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Sample records for centre-to-limb variation nlte

  1. Effect of the stellar absorption line centre-to-limb variation on exoplanet transmission spectrum observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, F.; Pallé, E.; Fosbury, R. A. E.; Petr-Gotzens, M. G.; Henning, Th.

    2017-07-01

    Transit spectroscopy is one of the most commonly used techniques for exoplanet atmosphere characterisation. This technique has been used to detect ionised and neutral species in exoplanet atmospheres by comparing the observed stellar lines in and out of transit. The centre-to-limb variation (CLV) of the stellar lines across the stellar disk is an important effect for transmission spectroscopy, since it results in a change of stellar line depth when the planet transits different parts of the stellar disk. We reanalysed the transit data of HD 189733b taken with the HARPS spectrograph to study the CLV effect during transit. The transmission light curve of the Na i D line so obtained shows a clear imprint of the CLV effect. We used a one-dimensional non-LTE stellar spectral model to simulate the CLV effect. After applying the correction, the measurement of the Na i absorption in the atmosphere of HD 189733b becomes better determined. We compared the CLV effect of HD 189733b to that of HD 209458b. The CLV effects are different for these two benchmark planetary systems and this is attributed to their different stellar effective temperatures and transit impact parameters. We then explored the general CLV effect that occurs during exoplanet transits. Normally, a star with a lower effective temperature exhibits a stronger CLV effect and its CLV feature extends over a relatively broad wavelength range. The transit impact parameter (b) describes the transit trajectory on the stellar disk and thus determines the actual manifestation of the CLV effect. We introduced a b-diagram which describes the behaviour of the CLV effect as the function of different impact parameters. With improving observational precision, a careful modelling and correction of the CLV effect is necessary for exoplanet atmosphere characterisation using transit spectroscopy.

  2. Non-LTE line formation of Fe in late-type stars - IV. Modelling of the solar centre-to-limb variation in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, K.; Amarsi, A. M.; Asplund, M.; Barklem, P. S.; Bautista, M.; Bergemann, M.; Collet, R.; Kiselman, D.; Leenaarts, J.; Pereira, T. M. D.

    2017-07-01

    Our ability to model the shapes and strengths of iron lines in the solar spectrum is a critical test of the accuracy of the solar iron abundance, which sets the absolute zero-point of all stellar metallicities. We use an extensive 463-level Fe atom with new photoionization cross-sections for Fe I and quantum mechanical calculations of collisional excitation and charge transfer with neutral hydrogen; the latter effectively remove a free parameter that has hampered all previous line formation studies of Fe in non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE). For the first time, we use realistic 3D NLTE calculations of Fe for a quantitative comparison to solar observations. We confront our theoretical line profiles with observations taken at different viewing angles across the solar disc with the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope. We find that 3D modelling well reproduces the observed centre-to-limb behaviour of spectral lines overall, but highlight aspects that may require further work, especially cross-sections for inelastic collisions with electrons. Our inferred solar iron abundance is log (ɛFe) = 7.48 ± 0.04 dex.

  3. The photospheric solar oxygen project. III. Investigation of the centre-to-limb variation of the 630 nm [O I]-Ni I blend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffau, E.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Steffen, M.; Livingston, W.; Bonifacio, P.; Malherbe, J.-M.; Doerr, H.-P.; Schmidt, W.

    2015-07-01

    Context. The solar photospheric abundance of oxygen is still a matter of debate. For about ten years some determinations have favoured a low oxygen abundance which is at variance with the value inferred by helioseismology. Among the oxygen abundance indicators, the forbidden line at 630 nm has often been considered the most reliable even though it is blended with a Ni i line. In Papers I and II of this series we reported a discrepancy in the oxygen abundance derived from the 630 nm and the subordinate [O I] line at 636 nm in dwarf stars, including the Sun. Aims: Here we analyse several, in part new, solar observations of the centre-to-limb variation of the spectral region including the blend at 630 nm in order to separate the individual contributions of oxygen and nickel. Methods: We analyse intensity spectra observed at different limb angles in comparison with line formation computations performed on a CO5BOLD 3D hydrodynamical simulation of the solar atmosphere. Results: The oxygen abundances obtained from the forbidden line at different limb angles are inconsistent if the commonly adopted nickel abundance of 6.25 is assumed in our local thermodynamic equilibrium computations. With a slightly lower nickel abundance, A(Ni) ≈ 6.1, we obtain consistent fits indicating an oxygen abundance of A(O) = 8.73 ± 0.05. At this value the discrepancy with the subordinate oxygen line remains. Conclusions: The derived value of the oxygen abundance supports the notion of a rather low oxygen abundance in the solar photosphere. However, it is disconcerting that the forbidden oxygen lines at 630 and 636 nm give noticeably different results, and that the nickel abundance derived here from the 630 nm blend is lower than expected from other nickel lines.

  4. Three-dimensional simulations of near-surface convection in main-sequence stars. IV. Effect of small-scale magnetic flux concentrations on centre-to-limb variation and spectral lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeck, B.; Schüssler, M.; Cameron, R. H.; Reiners, A.

    2015-09-01

    Context. Magnetic fields affect the local structure of the photosphere of stars. They can considerably influence the radiative properties near the optical surface, flow velocities, and the temperature and pressure profiles. This has an impact on observables such as limb darkening and spectral line profiles. Aims: We aim at understanding qualitatively the influence of small magnetic flux concentrations in unipolar plage regions on the centre-to-limb variation of the intensity and its contrast and on the shape of spectral line profiles in cool main-sequence stars. Methods: We analyse the bolometric and continuum intensity and its angular dependence of 24 radiative magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the near-surface layers of main-sequence stars with six different sets of stellar parameters (spectral types F to early M) and four different average magnetic field strengths (including the non-magnetic case). We also calculated disc-integrated profiles of three spectral lines. Results: The small magnetic flux concentrations formed in the magnetic runs of simulations have a considerable impact on the intensity and its centre-to-limb variation. In some cases, the difference in limb darkening between magnetic and non-magnetic runs is larger than the difference between the spectral types. Spectral lines are not only broadened owing to the Zeeman effect, but are also strongly affected by the modified thermodynamical structure and flow patterns. This indirect magnetic impact on the line profiles is often bigger than that of the Zeeman effect. Conclusions: The effects of the magnetic field on the radiation leaving the star can be considerable and is not restricted to spectral line broadening and polarisation by the Zeeman effect. The inhomogeneous structure of the magnetic field on small length scales and its impact on (and spatial correlation with) the local thermodynamical structure and the flow field near the surface influence the measurement of the global field properties

  5. Comparing 3D Solar Model Atmospheres with Observations: Hydrogen Lines and Centre-to-limb Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Tiago M. D.; Asplund, Martin; Trampedach, Regner

    Three dimensional hydrodynamical stellar model atmospheres represent a major step forward in stellar spectroscopy. Making use of radiative-hydrodynamical convection simulations that contain no adjustable free parameters, the model atmospheres provide a robust and realistic treatment of convection. These models have been applied to several lines in the Sun and other stars, yielding an excellent agreement with observations (e.g., Asplund et al. (2000) [1]).

  6. Centre-to-limb properties of small, photospheric quiet-Sun jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio da Costa, F.; Solanki, S. K.; Danilovic, S.; Hizberger, J.; Martínez-Pillet, V.

    2015-02-01

    Context. Strongly Doppler-shifted Stokes V profiles have been detected in the quiet Sun with the IMaX instrument on-board the SUNRISE stratospheric balloon-borne telescope. High velocities are required to produce such signals, hence these events have been interpreted as jets, although other sources are also possible. Aims: We aim to characterize the variation of the main properties of these events (occurrence rate, lifetime, size, and velocities) with their position on the solar disk between disk centre and the solar limb. Methods: These events were identified in SUNRISE/IMaX data according to the same objective criteria at all available positions on the solar disk. Their properties were determined using standard techniques. Results: Our study yielded a number of new insights into this phenomenon. Most importantly, the number density of these events is independent of the heliocentric angle, meaning that the investigated supersonic flows are nearly isotropically distributed. Size and lifetime are also nearly independent of the heliocentric angle, while their intensity contrast increases towards the solar limb. The Stokes V jets are associated with upflow velocities deduced from Stokes I, which are stronger towards the limb. Their intensity decreases with time, while their line-of-sight velocity does not display a clear temporal evolution. Their association with linear polarization signals decreases towards the limb. Conclusions: The density of events appears to be independent of heliocentric angle, establishing that they are directed nearly randomly. If these events are jets triggered by magnetic reconnection between emerging magnetic flux and the ambient field, then our results suggest that there is no preferred geometry for the reconnection process.

  7. Advances in NLTE Modeling for Integrated Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, H A; Hansen, S B

    2009-07-08

    The last few years have seen significant progress in constructing the atomic models required for non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) simulations. Along with this has come an increased understanding of the requirements for accurately modeling the ionization balance, energy content and radiative properties of different elements for a wide range of densities and temperatures. Much of this progress is the result of a series of workshops dedicated to comparing the results from different codes and computational approaches applied to a series of test problems. The results of these workshops emphasized the importance of atomic model completeness, especially in doubly excited states and autoionization transitions, to calculating ionization balance, and the importance of accurate, detailed atomic data to producing reliable spectra. We describe a simple screened-hydrogenic model that calculates NLTE ionization balance with surprising accuracy, at a low enough computational cost for routine use in radiation-hydrodynamics codes. The model incorporates term splitting, {Delta}n = 0 transitions, and approximate UTA widths for spectral calculations, with results comparable to those of much more detailed codes. Simulations done with this model have been increasingly successful at matching experimental data for laser-driven systems and hohlraums. Accurate and efficient atomic models are just one requirement for integrated NLTE simulations. Coupling the atomic kinetics to hydrodynamics and radiation transport constrains both discretizations and algorithms to retain energy conservation, accuracy and stability. In particular, the strong coupling between radiation and populations can require either very short timesteps or significantly modified radiation transport algorithms to account for NLTE material response. Considerations such as these continue to provide challenges for NLTE simulations.

  8. NLTE4 Plasma Population Kinetics Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 159 NLTE4 Plasma Population Kinetics Database (Web database for purchase)   This database contains benchmark results for simulation of plasma population kinetics and emission spectra. The data were contributed by the participants of the 4th Non-LTE Code Comparison Workshop who have unrestricted access to the database. The only limitation for other users is in hidden labeling of the output results. Guest users can proceed to the database entry page without entering userid and password.

  9. NLTE opacities of mid- and high-Z cocktails

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrill, Manolo E; Abdallah, Joseph; Fontes, Christopher J; Kilcrease, David P; Zhang, Honglin

    2009-01-01

    In this work we report on the development of a new method for computing mi- and high-Z NLTE opacities. A study has been performed using this method to assess the EOS and opacity sensitivities to the radiation field for both single species Au and multi-species SnNb and U{sub 3}Au plasma cocktails with an emphasis on moderately to highly ionized systems. Developed as a benchmark tool, this capability will be used to assess both current and future in-line NLTE opacity capabilities.

  10. Review of the 9th NLTE code comparison workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piron, R.; Gilleron, F.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Chung, H.-K.; Fontes, C. J.; Hansen, S. B.; Marchuk, O.; Scott, H. A.; Stambulchik, E.; Ralchenko, Yu.

    2017-06-01

    We review the 9th NLTE code comparison workshop, which was held in the Jussieu campus, Paris, from November 30th to December 4th, 2015. This time, the workshop was mainly focused on a systematic investigation of iron NLTE steady-state kinetics and emissivity, over a broad range of temperature and density. Through these comparisons, topics such as modeling of the dielectronic processes, density effects or the effect of an external radiation field were addressed. The K-shell spectroscopy of iron plasmas was also addressed, notably through the interpretation of tokamak and laser experimental spectra.

  11. Review of the 9th NLTE code comparison workshop

    DOE PAGES

    Piron, Robin; Gilleron, Franck; Aglitskiy, Yefim; ...

    2017-02-24

    Here, we review the 9th NLTE code comparison workshop, which was held in the Jussieu campus, Paris, from November 30th to December 4th, 2015. This time, the workshop was mainly focused on a systematic investigation of iron NLTE steady-state kinetics and emissivity, over a broad range of temperature and density. Through these comparisons, topics such as modeling of the dielectronic processes, density effects or the effect of an external radiation field were addressed. The K-shell spectroscopy of iron plasmas was also addressed, notably through the interpretation of tokamak and laser experimental spectra.

  12. Observations and NLTE modeling of Ellerman bombs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlicki, A.; Heinzel, P.

    2014-07-01

    Context. Ellerman bombs (EBs) are short-lived, compact, and spatially well localized emission structures that are observed well in the wings of the hydrogen Hα line. EBs are also observed in the chromospheric CaII lines and in UV continua as bright points located within active regions. Hα line profiles of EBs show a deep absorption at the line center and enhanced emission in the line wings with maxima around ±1 Å from the line center. Similar shapes of the line profiles are observed for the CaII IR line at 8542 Å. In CaII H and K lines the emission peaks are much stronger, and EBs emission is also enhanced in the line center. Aims: It is generally accepted that EBs may be considered as compact microflares located in lower solar atmosphere that contribute to the heating of these low-lying regions, close to the temperature minimum of the atmosphere. However, it is still not clear where exactly the emission of EBs is formed in the solar atmosphere. High-resolution spectrophotometric observations of EBs were used for determining of their physical parameters and construction of semi-empirical models. Obtained models allow us to determine the position of EBs in the solar atmosphere, as well as the vertical structure of the activated EB atmosphere Methods: In our analysis we used observations of EBs obtained in the Hα and CaII H lines with the Dutch Open Telescope (DOT). These one-hour long simultaneous sequences obtained with high temporal and spatial resolution were used to determine the line emissions. To analyze them, we used NLTE numerical codes for the construction of grids of 243 semi-empirical models simulating EBs structures. In this way, the observed emission could be compared with the synthetic line spectra calculated for all such models. Results: For a specific model we found reasonable agreement between the observed and theoretical emission and thus we consider such model as a good approximation to EBs atmospheres. This model is characterized by an

  13. RED SUPERGIANT STARS AS COSMIC ABUNDANCE PROBES. II. NLTE EFFECTS IN J-BAND SILICON LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Bergemann, Maria; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Wuerl, Matthias; Plez, Bertrand; Davies, Ben; Gazak, Zach E-mail: Matthias.Wuerl@physik.uni-muenchen.de E-mail: zgazak@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: bdavies@ast.cam.ac.uk

    2013-02-20

    Medium-resolution J-band spectroscopy of individual red supergiant stars is a promising tool to investigate the chemical composition of the young stellar population in star-forming galaxies. As a continuation of recent work on iron and titanium, detailed non-LTE (NLTE) calculations are presented to investigate the influence of NLTE on the formation of silicon lines in the J-band spectra of red supergiants. Substantial effects are found resulting in significantly stronger absorption lines of neutral silicon in NLTE. As a consequence, silicon abundances determined in NLTE are significantly smaller than in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) with the NLTE abundance corrections varying smoothly between -0.4 dex and -0.1 dex for effective temperatures between 3400 K and 4400 K. The effects are largest at low metallicity. The physical reasons behind the NLTE effects and the consequences for extragalactic J-band abundance studies are discussed.

  14. Lithium spectral line formation in stellar atmospheres. The impact of convection and NLTE effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klevas, J.; Kučinskas, A.; Steffen, M.; Caffau, E.; Ludwig, H.-G.

    2016-02-01

    Aims: Because of the complexities involved in treating spectral line formation in full 3D and non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE), different simplified approaches are sometimes used to account for the NLTE effects with 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres. In certain cases, chemical abundances are derived in 1D NLTE and then corrected for the 3D effects by adding 3D-1D LTE (Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium, LTE) abundance corrections (3D+NLTE approach). Alternatively, average ⟨3D⟩ model atmospheres are sometimes used to substitute for the full 3D hydrodynamical models. Methods: In this work we tested whether the results obtained using these simplified schemes (3D+NLTE, ⟨3D⟩ NLTE) may reproduce those derived using the full 3D NLTE computations. The tests were made using 3D hydrodynamical CO5BOLD model atmospheres of the main sequence (MS), main sequence turn-off (TO), subgiant (SGB), and red giant branch (RGB) stars, all at two metallicities, [ M / H ] = 0.0 and -2.0. Our goal was to investigate the role of 3D and NLTE effects on the formation of the 670.8 nm lithium resonance line. This was done by assessing differences in the strengths of synthetic 670.8 nm line profiles, which were computed using 3D/1D NLTE/LTE approaches. Results: Our results show that Li 670.8 nm line strengths obtained using different methodologies differ only slightly in most of the models at solar metallicity studied here. However, the line strengths predicted with the 3D NLTE and 3D+NLTE approaches become significantly different at subsolar metallicities. At [ M / H ] = -2.0, this may lead to (3D NLTE) - (3D+NLTE) differences in the predicted lithium abundance of ~0.46 and ~0.31 dex in the TO and RGB stars respectively. On the other hand, NLTE line strengths computed with the average ⟨3D⟩ and 1D model atmospheres are similar to those obtained with the full 3D NLTE approach for MS, TO, SGB, and RGB stars, at all metallicities; 3D - ⟨3D⟩ and 3D - 1D differences in the

  15. Sulphur in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Including NLTE corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skúladóttir, Á.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Tolstoy, E.; Hill, V.; Salvadori, S.; Korotin, S. A.; Pettini, M.

    2015-08-01

    In Galactic halo stars, sulphur has been shown to behave like other α-elements, but until now, no comprehensive studies have been done on this element in stars of other galaxies. Here, we use high-resolution ESO VLT/FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectra to determine sulphur abundances for 85 stars in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy, covering the metallicity range -2.5 ≤ [ Fe / H ] ≤ -0.8. The abundances are derived from the S I triplet at 9213, 9228, and 9238 Å. These lines have been shown to be sensitive to departure from local thermodynamic equilibrium, i.e. NLTE effects. Therefore, we present new NLTE corrections for a grid of stellar parameters covering those of the target stars. The NLTE-corrected sulphur abundances in Sculptor show the same behaviour as other α-elements in that galaxy (such as Mg, Si, and Ca). At lower metallicities ([ Fe / H ] ≲ -2) the abundances are consistent with a plateau at [ S / Fe ] ≈ + 0.16, similar to what is observed in the Galactic halo, [ S / Fe ] ≈ + 0.2. With increasing [Fe/H], the [S/Fe] ratio declines, reaching negative values at [ Fe / H ] ≳ -1.5. The sample also shows an increase in [S/Mg] with [Fe/H], most probably because of enrichment from Type Ia supernovae. Based on observations made with ESO/VLT/FLAMES at the La Silla Paranal observatory under program ID 089.B-0304(B).Appendix is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. NLTE solar flare models with stationary velocity fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejezchleba, T.

    1998-02-01

    A method of calculating NLTE models of a plan-parallel solar flare atmosphere with stationary plasma flows is presented. To solve the radiative transfer equation, equations of statistical equilibrium (ESE) and the stationary momentum equation, we use the multilevel approximate lambda iteration (MALI) approach. The numerical code is based on the method recently developed by \\cite[Rybicky & Hummer (1991, 1992)]{ri91} and allows to take into account macroscopic velocity fields in observer's frame formulation. The preconditioned ESE, constructed by this method, are finally linearized with respect to level populations and electron densities to treat the the hydrogen ionization balance. The numerical code based on this method is used to compute a grid of NLTE flare models with various velocity fields in order to show the influence of the velocity fields on the Hα -line asymmetries. The analysis of the results lead to conclusions that would improve interpretations of flare line asymmetries: 1) The velocities affect the level populations, 2) The type of asymmetry depends on the changes in the optical depth scales and on the run of the source function in the atmosphere. 3) A monotonous velocity affects only one wing of the line profile. 4) To get the velocity field from an observed profile the bisector method should be modified.

  17. EFFICIENT THREE-DIMENSIONAL NLTE DUST RADIATIVE TRANSFER WITH SKIRT

    SciTech Connect

    Baes, Maarten; Verstappen, Joris; De Looze, Ilse; Fritz, Jacopo; Saftly, Waad; Vidal Perez, Edgardo; Stalevski, Marko; Valcke, Sander

    2011-10-01

    We present an updated version of SKIRT, a three-dimensional (3D) Monte Carlo radiative transfer code developed to simulate dusty galaxies. The main novel characteristics of the SKIRT code are the use of a stellar foam to generate random positions, an efficient combination of eternal forced scattering and continuous absorption, and a new library approach that links the radiative transfer code to the DustEM dust emission library. This approach enables a fast, accurate, and self-consistent calculation of the dust emission of arbitrary mixtures of transiently heated dust grains and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, even for full 3D models containing millions of dust cells. We have demonstrated the accuracy of the SKIRT code through a set of simulations based on the edge-on spiral galaxy UGC 4754. The models we ran were gradually refined from a smooth, two-dimensional, local thermal equilibrium (LTE) model to a fully 3D model that includes non-LTE (NLTE) dust emission and a clumpy structure of the dusty interstellar medium. We find that clumpy models absorb UV and optical radiation less efficiently than smooth models with the same amount of dust, and that the dust in clumpy models is on average both cooler and less luminous. Our simulations demonstrate that, given the appropriate use of optimization techniques, it is possible to efficiently and accurately run Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations of arbitrary 3D structures of several million dust cells, including a full calculation of the NLTE emission by arbitrary dust mixtures.

  18. Empirical NLTE analyses of solar spectral lines. III - Iron lines versus LTE models of the photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutten, R. J.; Kostik, R. I.

    1982-11-01

    We compare observational indications of departures from LTE in solar Fe I lines with published NLTE computations in the context of discrepancies between empirical LTE and NLTE models of the solar atmosphere. We find that the importance of departures from LTE in Fe I and similar spectra is often underestimated through neglect of opacity departures. We demonstrate with numerical experiments that the peculiarities of the LTE models are artifacts due to the neglect of NLTE departures; in particular, we so explain the Holweger-Müller LTE model quantitatively. However, we show also that the NLTE formation of most optical metal lines is fortuitously well-mimicked by LTE computation when using LTE models. Thus, LTE-derived metal abundances and empirical oscillator strengths happen to be fairly precise. The same may hold for the use of theoretical radiative- equilibrium models in stellar abundance determinations.

  19. Improvement of atomic models for NLTE radiative transfer in atmospheres of late type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merle, T.; Thévenin, F.; Pichon, B.; Bigot, L.

    2010-12-01

    We present our first results on NLTE line transfer for Mg I, Ca I and Ca II in atmospheres of late type stars. This work prepares for the analysis of future spectroscopic data of the Gaia mission. To do this, we have updated atomic models of magnesium and calcium. This work on NLTE effects will also be applied to correct the determination of LTE chemical abundances for late type stars.

  20. RED SUPERGIANT STARS AS COSMIC ABUNDANCE PROBES. III. NLTE EFFECTS IN J-BAND MAGNESIUM LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Bergemann, Maria; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Gazak, Zach; Davies, Ben; Plez, Bertrand E-mail: kud@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: bdavies@ast.cam.ac.uk

    2015-05-10

    Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) calculations for Mg i in red supergiant stellar atmospheres are presented to investigate the importance of NLTE for the formation of Mg i lines in the NIR J-band. Recent work using medium resolution spectroscopy of atomic lines in the J-band of individual red supergiant stars has demonstrated this technique is a very promising tool for investigating the chemical composition of the young stellar population in star forming galaxies. As in previous work, where NLTE effects were studied for iron, titanium, and silicon, substantial effects are found resulting in significantly stronger Mg i absorption lines. For the quantitative spectral analysis the NLTE effects lead to magnesium abundances significantly smaller than in local thermodynamic equilibrium with the NLTE abundance corrections varying smoothly between −0.4 dex and −0.1 dex for effective temperatures between 3400 and 4400 K. We discuss the physical reasons of the NLTE effects and the consequences for extragalactic J-band abundance studies using individual red supergiants in the young massive galactic double cluster h and χ Persei.

  1. A Grid of NLTE Corrections for Sulphur Lines in Atmospheres of Cool Stars for the Gaia-ESO Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotin, S.; Andrievsky, S.; Caffau, E.; Bonifacio, P.

    2017-06-01

    To derive sulfur abundance in a large amount of the stars from Gaia-ESO survey we calculated grid of theoretical line equivalent widths of 8th multiplet. We show that NLTE effects increase equivalent widths of the sulfur lines. NLTE corrections for this multiplet are not too large (about 0.15 dex) in contrast with corrections for other sulfur multiplets.

  2. Effect of NLTE Emissivity Models on NIF Ignition Hohlraum Power Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, L.; Rosen, M.; Springer, P.; Haan, S.; Hansen, S.

    2009-09-10

    NLTE atomic physics model can significantly affect the power requirements and plasma conditions in ignition hohlraums. This is because the emissivity is a significant factor in determining the time dependent coronal temperature of the hot blow-off plasma filling ignition hohlraums, which, in turn, determines the total energy stored in that coronal plasma at any instant. Here we present best estimates of NLTE emissivity using the SCRAM model, including the range of uncertainty, and compare them with the emissivity of the model used to design NIF ignition hohlraums and set the NIF pulse shape, XSN NLTE. We then present pulse shapes derived from hohlraum simulations using an atomic physics model that approximates the SCRAM emissivities. We discuss the differences in coronal energetics and show how this affects the pulse shape and, in particular, the peak power requirement.

  3. NLTE Analysis of High-Resolution H-band Spectra. I. Neutral Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junbo; Shi, Jianrong; Pan, Kaike; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Liu, Chao

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the reliability of our silicon atomic model and the influence of non-local thermodynamical equilibrium (NLTE) on the formation of neutral silicon (Si i) lines in the near-infrared (near-IR) H-band. We derived the differential Si abundances for 13 sample stars with high-resolution H-band spectra from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), as well as from optical spectra, both under local thermodynamical equilibrium (LTE) and NLTE conditions. We found that the differences between the Si abundances derived from the H-band and from optical lines for the same stars are less than 0.1 dex when the NLTE effects are included, and that NLTE reduces the line-to-line scatter in the H-band spectra for most sample stars. These results suggest that our Si atomic model is appropriate for studying the formation of H-band Si lines. Our calculations show that the NLTE corrections of the Si i H-band lines are negative, i.e., the final Si abundances will be overestimated in LTE. The corrections for strong lines depend on surface gravity, and tend to be larger for giants, reaching ˜-0.2 dex in our sample, and up to ˜-0.4 dex in extreme cases of APOGEE targets. Thus, the NLTE effects should be included in deriving silicon abundances from H-band Si i lines, especially for the cases where only strong lines are available. Based on observations collected with the 2.16 m telescope at Xinglong station, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, the 2.2 m telescope at the Calar Alto Observatory, the 1.88 m reflector at the Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, the Kitt Peak coudé feed telescope, and the McMath-Pierce solar telescope and the coudé focus of the Mayall 4 m reflector at Kitt Peak.

  4. NLTE Analysis of High-resolution H-band Spectra. II. Neutral Magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junbo; Shi, Jianrong; Pan, Kaike; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Liu, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Aiming at testing the validity of our magnesium atomic model and investigating the effects of non-local thermodynamical equilibrium (NLTE) on the formation of the H-band neutral magnesium lines, we derive the differential Mg abundances from selected transitions for 13 stars either adopting or relaxing the assumption of local thermodynamical equilibrium (LTE). Our analysis is based on high-resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio H-band spectra from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) and optical spectra from several instruments. The absolute differences between the Mg abundances derived from the two wavelength bands are always less than 0.1 dex in the NLTE analysis, while they are slightly larger for the LTE case. This suggests that our Mg atomic model is appropriate for investigating the NLTE formation of the H-band Mg lines. The NLTE corrections for the Mg i H-band lines are sensitive to the surface gravity, becoming larger for smaller log g values, and strong lines are more susceptible to departures from LTE. For cool giants, NLTE corrections tend to be negative, and for the strong line at 15765 Å they reach -0.14 dex in our sample, and up to -0.22 dex for other APOGEE stars. Our results suggest that it is important to include NLTE corrections in determining Mg abundances from the H-band Mg i transitions, especially when strong lines are used. Based on observations collected on the 2.16 m telescope at Xinglong station, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, the 2.2 m telescope at the Calar Alto Observatory, the 1.88 m reflector on the Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, the Kitt Peak coudé feed telescope, and the McMath-Pierce solar telescope and the coudé focus of the Mayall 4 m reflector at Kitt Peak.

  5. A Si I atomic model for NLTE spectropolarimetric diagnostics of the 10 827 Å line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchukina, N. G.; Sukhorukov, A. V.; Trujillo Bueno, J.

    2017-07-01

    Aims: The Si i 10 827 Å line is commonly used for spectropolarimetric diagnostics of the solar atmosphere. First, we aim at quantifying the sensitivity of the Stokes profiles of this line to non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects. Second, we aim at facilitating NLTE diagnostics of the Si i 10 827 Å line. To this end, we propose the use of a relatively simple silicon model atom, which allows a fast and accurate computation of Stokes profiles. The NLTE Stokes profiles calculated using this simple model atom are very similar to those obtained via the use of a very comprehensive silicon model atom. Methods: We investigate the impact of the NLTE effects on the Si i 10 827 Å line by means of multilevel radiative transfer calculations in a three-dimensional (3D) model atmosphere taken from a state-of-the-art magneto-convection simulation with small-scale dynamo action. We calculate the emergent Stokes profiles for this line at the solar disk center and for every vertical column of the 3D snapshot model, neglecting the effects of horizontal radiative transfer. Results: We find significant departures from LTE in the Si i 10 827 Å line, not only in the intensity but also in the linearly and circularly polarized profiles. At wavelengths around 0.1 Å, where most of the Stokes Q, U, and V peaks of the Si i 10 827 Å line occur, the differences between the NLTE and LTE profiles are comparable with the Stokes amplitudes themselves. The deviations from LTE increase with increasing Stokes Q, U, and V signals. Concerning the Stokes V profiles, the NLTE effects correlate with the magnetic field strength in the layers where such circular polarization signals are formed. Conclusions: The NLTE effects should be taken into account when diagnosing the emergent Stokes I profiles as well as the Stokes Q, U, and V profiles of the Si i 10 827 Å line. The sixteen-level silicon model atom proposed here, with six radiative bound-bound transitions, is suitable to account for the

  6. RED SUPERGIANT STARS AS COSMIC ABUNDANCE PROBES: NLTE EFFECTS IN J-BAND IRON AND TITANIUM LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Bergemann, Maria; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Lind, Karin; Plez, Bertrand; Davies, Ben; Gazak, Zach E-mail: klind@mpa-garching.mpg.de E-mail: zgazak@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: bdavies@ast.cam.ac.uk

    2012-06-01

    Detailed non-LTE (NLTE) calculations for red supergiant (RSG) stars are presented to investigate the influence of NLTE on the formation of atomic iron and titanium lines in the J band. With their enormous brightness at J band RSG stars are ideal probes of cosmic abundances. Recent LTE studies have found that metallicities accurate to 0.15 dex can be determined from medium-resolution spectroscopy of individual RSGs in galaxies as distant as 10 Mpc. The NLTE results obtained in this investigation support these findings. NLTE abundance corrections for iron are smaller than 0.05 dex for effective temperatures between 3400 K and 4200 K and 0.1 dex at 4400 K. For titanium the NLTE abundance corrections vary smoothly between -0.4 dex and +0.2 dex as a function of effective temperature. For both elements, the corrections also depend on stellar gravity and metallicity. The physical reasons behind the NLTE corrections and the consequences for extragalactic J-band abundance studies are discussed.

  7. NLTE Effects in Globular Cluster Integrated Light Spectra and Photometric Colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Mitchell; Short, C. Ian

    2017-01-01

    Our overall goal is to investigate the effect that modelling the atmospheres and spectra of Galactic globular cluster (GGCs) members in non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) has on the integrated light (IL) spectrum, and the derivation of GGC ages and metallicities ([Fe/H] values) from IL photometric color and spectrum fitting. We create synthetic GGC populations and associated colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) using the Kroupa initial mass function (Kroupa, P., 2001, MNRAS, 322, 231-246) and the Teramo isochrones (Pietrinferni, A. et al, 2004, ApJ, 612, 168-190) with ages ranging from 9 to 15 Gyr, and [Fe/H] = -1.49 to -0.66 with α = +0.4. We investigate the dependence of predicted LTE and NLTE colors on the method and resolution of CMD discretization, and on the definition of representative stellar parameters in a discretized CMD.

  8. A Computer Code for the Calculation of NLTE Model Atmospheres Using ALI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubát, J.

    2003-01-01

    A code for calculation of NLTE model atmospheres in hydrostatic and radiative equilibrium in either spherically symmetric or plane parallel geometry is described. The method of accelerated lambda iteration is used for the treatment of radiative transfer. Other equations (hydrostatic equilibrium, radiative equilibrium, statistical equilibrium, optical depth) are solved using the Newton-Raphson method (linearization). In addition to the standard output of the model atmosphere (dependence of temperature, density, radius, and population numbers on column mass depth) the code enables optional additional outputs for better understanding of processes in the atmosphere. The code is able to calculate model atmospheres of plane-parallel and spherically symmetric semi-infinite atmospheres as well as models of plane parallel and spherical shells. There is also an option for solution of a restricted problem of a NLTE line formation (solution of radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium for a given model atmosphere). The overall scheme of the code is presented.

  9. Multilevel NLTE radiative transfer in isolated atmospheric structures: implementation of the MALI-technique.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzel, P.

    1995-07-01

    We have developed and extensively tested a new multilevel NLTE transfer code for isolated solar atmospheric structures (loops, prominences, spicules etc.). The code is based on the MALI approach of Rybicki & Hummer (1991, 1992) to multilevel accelerated lambda iterations. It is demonstrated that this method is fully capable of treating a difficult problem of NLTE hydrogen excitation and ionization equilibrium, provided that we linearize the preconditioned statistical equilibrium equations with respect to atomic level populations and the electron density. With this generalization of the original MALI approach, the numerical code is robust and stable. As compared to the standard linearization method of Auer & Mihalas (1969), the new MALI code designed for 1D slabs is more than one order of magnitude faster and its accuracy is quite satisfactory. We discuss several details of our implementation of the MALI technique to isolated, externally irradiated, 1D structures and finally draw some future prospects.

  10. Impact of NLTE on research of early chemical enrichment of the dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashonkina, Lyudmila

    2015-08-01

    The individual stars observed in the dwarf galaxies orbiting the Milky Way are presumably red giants. Their chemical abundances are commonly determined under the classical LTE assumption, despite its validity is questionable for atmospheres of giant, in particular, metal-poor stars. Exactly metal-poor objects are important for understanding the early chemical enrichment processes of the host galaxy and the onset of star formation. We selected a sample of the -4 < [Fe/H] < -2 stars in the dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies Sculptor, Sextans, and Fornax and the ultra-faint galaxies Bootes I and Segue I, with the high-resolution observational data available, and revised abundances of up to 12 chemical species based on the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) line formation. Stellar parameters taken from the literature were checked through the NLTE analysis of lines of iron observed in the two ionisation stages, Fe I and Fe II. For the Scl, Sex, and Fnx stars, with effective temperatures and surface gravities derived from the photometry and known distance (Jablonka et al. 2015; Tafelmeyer et al. 2010), the Fe I/Fe II ionisation equilibrium was found to be fulfilled, when applying a scaling factor of SH = 0.5 to the Drawinian rates of Fe+H collisions. Pronounced NLTE effects were calculated for lines of Na I and Al I resulting in up to 0.5 dex lower [Na/Fe] ratios and up to 0.65 dex higher [Al/Fe] ratios compared with the corresponding LTE values. For the six Scl stars, the scatter of data on Mg/Na is much smaller in NLTE, with the mean [Mg/Na] = 0.61 +- 0.11, than LTE, where [Mg/Na] = 0.42 +- 0.21. We computed a grid of the NLTE abundance corrections for an extensive list of the Ca I, Ti I-Ti II, and Fe I lines in the MARCS models of cool giants, 4000 K <= Teff <= 4750 K, 0.5 <= log g <= 2.5, -4 <= [M/H] <= 0.

  11. 3D NLTE analysis of the most iron-deficient star, SMSS0313-6708

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordlander, T.; Amarsi, A. M.; Lind, K.; Asplund, M.; Barklem, P. S.; Casey, A. R.; Collet, R.; Leenaarts, J.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Models of star formation in the early universe require a detailed understanding of accretion, fragmentation and radiative feedback in metal-free molecular clouds. Different simulations predict different initial mass functions of the first stars, ranging from predominantly low-mass (0.1-10 M⊙), to massive (10-100 M⊙), or even supermassive (100-1000 M⊙). The mass distribution of the first stars should lead to unique chemical imprints on the low-mass second and later generation metal-poor stars still in existence. The chemical composition of SMSS0313-6708, which has the lowest abundances of Ca and Fe of any star known, indicates it was enriched by a single massive supernova. Aims: The photospheres of metal-poor stars are relatively transparent in the UV, which may lead to large three-dimensional (3D) effects as well as departures from local thermodynamical equilibrium (LTE), even for weak spectral lines. If 3D effects and departures from LTE (NLTE) are ignored or treated incorrectly, errors in the inferred abundances may significantly bias the inferred properties of the polluting supernovae. We redetermine the chemical composition of SMSS0313-6708by means of the most realistic methods available, and compare the results to predicted supernova yields. Methods: A 3D hydrodynamical Staggermodel atmosphere and 3D NLTE radiative transfer were applied to obtain accurate abundances for Li, Na, Mg, Al, Ca and Fe. The model atoms employ realistic collisional rates, with no calibrated free parameters. Results: We find significantly higher abundances in 3D NLTE than 1D LTE by 0.8 dex for Fe, and 0.5 dex for Mg, Al and Ca, while Li and Na are unaffected to within 0.03 dex. In particular, our upper limit for [Fe/H] is now a factor ten larger, at [Fe/H] < -6.53 (3σ), than previous estimates based on ⟨ 3D ⟩NLTE (i.e., using averaged 3D models). This higher estimate is due to a conservative upper limit estimation, updated NLTE data, and 3D-⟨ 3D ⟩NLTE

  12. Chemical abundances in early B-type stars. 5: Metal abundances and LTE/NLTE comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilian, J.

    1994-02-01

    Chemical abundances of neon, magnesium, aluminum, sulfur, and iron are derived for a sample of 21 unevolved B-stars in the local field and nearby associations. While aluminum, sulfur, and iron are underabundant in nearly all stars, near solar abundances are found for magnesium and neon. In agreement with earlier results for carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and silicon (Kilian 1992), the present results show no correlation with surface gravities or evolutionary states, which indicates that the metal abundances reflect the original composition of the interstellar medium. The results are supplemented by a comparison of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE (NLTE) abundances for C, N, O, Si, Mg, and Al. In most cases the differences amount to +/- (0.1-0.2) dex, which slightly exceeds the estimated accuracy of the NLTE abundance determination. However, a clear temperature gradient is evident for most elements, which indicates systematic LTE abundance errors with a maximum amplitude of 0.4 dex between 21 000 K and 31 000 K.

  13. A Grid of NLTE Line-blanketed Model Atmospheres of Early B-Type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanz, Thierry; Hubeny, Ivan

    2007-03-01

    We have constructed a comprehensive grid of 1540 metal line-blanketed, NLTE, plane-parallel, hydrostatic model atmospheres for the basic parameters appropriate to early B-type stars. The BSTAR2006 grid considers 16 values of effective temperatures, 15,000 K<=Teff<=30,000 K with 1000 K steps, 13 surface gravities, 1.75<=logg<=4.75 with 0.25 dex steps, six chemical compositions, and a microturbulent velocity of 2 km s-1. The lower limit of logg for a given effective temperature is set by an approximate location of the Eddington limit. The selected chemical compositions range from twice to one-tenth of the solar metallicity and metal-free. Additional model atmospheres for B supergiants (logg<=3.0) have been calculated with a higher microturbulent velocity (10 km s-1) and a surface composition that is enriched in helium and nitrogen and depleted in carbon. This new grid complements our earlier OSTAR2002 grid of O-type stars (our Paper I). The paper contains a description of the BSTAR2006 grid and some illustrative examples and comparisons. NLTE ionization fractions, bolometric corrections, radiative accelerations, and effective gravities are obtained over the parameter range covered by the grid. By extrapolating radiative accelerations, we have determined an improved estimate of the Eddington limit in absence of rotation between 55,000 and 15,000 K. The complete BSTAR2006 grid is available at the TLUSTY Web site.

  14. Accelerated complete-linearization method for calculating NLTE model stellar atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubeny, I.; Lanz, T.

    1992-01-01

    Two approaches to accelerating the method of complete linearization for calculating NLTE model stellar atmospheres are suggested. The first one, the so-called Kantorovich variant of the Newton-Raphson method, consists of keeping the Jacobi matrix of the system fixed, which allows us to calculate the costly matrix inversions only a few times and then keep them fixed during the subsequent computations. The second method is an application of the Ng acceleration. Both methods are extremely easy to implement with any model atmosphere code based on complete linearization. It is demonstrated that both methods, and especially their combination, yield a rapidly and globally convergent algorithm, which takes 2 to 5 times less computer time, depending on the model at hand and the required accuracy, than the ordinary complete linearization. Generally, the time gain is more significant for more complicated models. The methods were tested for a broad range of atmospheric parameters, and in all cases they exhibited similar behavior. Ng acceleration applied on the Kantorovich variant thus offers a significant improvement of the standard complete-linearization method, and may now be used for calculating relatively involved NLTE model stellar atmospheres.

  15. NLTE modeling of a small active region filament observed with the VTT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, P.; Balthasar, H.; Kuckein, C.; Koza, J.; Gömöry, P.; Rybák, J.; Heinzel, P.; Kučera, A.

    2016-11-01

    An active region mini-discretionary-filament was observed with the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) in Tenerife simultaneously in the He I infrared triplet using the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter 1 (TIP 1), in Hα with the TESOS Fabry-Pérot interferometer, and in Ca II 8542 Å with the VTT spectrograph. The spectropolarimetric data were inverted using the HAZEL code and Hα profiles were modelled by solving a NLTE radiative transfer in a simple isobaric and isothermal 2D slab irradiated both from its bottom and sides from the solar surface. It was found that the mini-discretionary-filament is composed of horizontal fluxtubes, along which the cool plasma of T˜10 000 K can flow with very large, even supersonic, velocities.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: NLTE corrections for Mg and Ca lines (Merle+ 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merle, T.; Thevenin, F.; Pichon, B.; Bigot, L.

    2012-05-01

    Non-LTE corrections for Mg and Ca lines in the stellar parameter range Teff=[3500,5250]K, log(g)=[0.5, 2.0], [Fe/H]=[-4.0,0.5] and [α/Fe]=[0.0,0.4]. The W/W* ratio can be applied to the measured equivalent widths to determine NLTE abundance with classical LTE radiative transfer codes. 45 files for 45 lines of MgI, CaI and CaII are given. In each file, 453 rows at max for a grid of 453 model atmospheres. Only models with W>=1mÅ are given. Only models with 0.0

  17. NLTE carbon abundance determination in selected A- and B-type stars and the interpretation of C I emission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeeva, S. A.; Ryabchikova, T. A.; Mashonkina, L. I.

    2016-10-01

    We constructed a comprehensive model atom for C I-C II using the most up-to-date atomic data available and evaluated the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) line formation for C I and C II in classical 1D models representing the atmospheres of A- and late B-type stars. Our NLTE calculations predict the emission that appears at effective temperature of 9250 to 10 500 K depending on log g in the C I 8335, 9405 Å singlet lines and at Teff> 15 000 K (log g = 4) in the C I 9061-9111 Å, 9603-9658 Å triplet lines. A pre-requisite of the emission phenomenon is the overionization-recombination mechanism resulting in a depopulation of the lower levels of C I to a greater extent than the upper levels. Extra depopulation of the lower levels of the transitions corresponding to the near-infrared lines, is caused by photon loss in the UV lines C I 2479, 1930, and 1657 Å. We analysed the lines of C I and C II in Vega, HD 73666, Sirius, 21 Peg, π Cet, HD 22136, and ι Her taking advantage of their observed high-resolution spectra. The C I emission lines were detected in the four hottest stars, and they were well reproduced in our NLTE calculations. For each star, the mean NLTE abundances from lines of the two ionization stages, C I and C II, including the C I emission lines, were found to be consistent. We show that the predicted C I emission phenomenon depends strongly on whether accurate or approximate electron-impact excitation rates are applied.

  18. A Reduced-order NLTE Kinetic Model for Radiating Plasmas of Outer Envelopes of Stellar Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munafò, Alessandro; Mansour, Nagi N.; Panesi, Marco

    2017-04-01

    The present work proposes a self-consistent reduced-order NLTE kinetic model for radiating plasmas found in the outer layers of stellar atmospheres. A detailed collisional-radiative kinetic mechanism is constructed by leveraging the most up-to-date set of ab initio and experimental data available in the literature. This constitutes the starting point for the derivation of a reduced-order model, obtained by lumping the bound energy states into groups. In order to determine the needed thermo-physical group properties, uniform and Maxwell–Boltzmann energy distributions are used to reconstruct the energy population of each group. Finally, the reduced set of governing equations for the material gas and the radiation field is obtained based on the moment method. Applications consider the steady flow across a shock wave in partially ionized hydrogen. The results clearly demonstrate that adopting a Maxwell–Boltzmann grouping allows, on the one hand, for a substantial reduction of the number of unknowns and, on the other, to maintain accuracy for both gas and radiation quantities. Also, it is observed that, when neglecting line radiation, the use of two groups already leads to a very accurate resolution of the photo-ionization precursor, internal relaxation, and radiative cooling regions. The inclusion of line radiation requires adopting just one additional group to account for optically thin losses in the α, β, and γ lines of the Balmer and Paschen series. This trend has been observed for a wide range of shock wave velocities.

  19. NLTE models for synthetic spectra of type IA supernovae. The influence of line blocking.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauldrach, A. W. A.; Duschinger, M.; Mazzali, P. A.; Puls, J.; Lennon, M.; Miller, D. L.

    1996-08-01

    A method to compute a NLTE model of the atmosphere of a type Ia supernova (SN Ia) near maximum light is presented. The determination of the level populations is carried out using detailed atomic models, and including all important contributions to the rate equations: Thomson scattering, bound-free (from ground and excited levels) and free-free opacities, line absorption and emission processes. Dielectronic recombination is included. The spherical radiation transfer is solved at up to 400 frequency points and 41 depth points. Finally, a synthetic spectrum is computed using a formal integral solution of the transfer equation based on a spatial microgrid. It is found that the SN atmosphere is electron scattering-dominated, and that the high velocity of the apparent photosphere (~8000km/s) is due to the pseudo-continuum opacity created by the thick line forest which blocks the flux in the UV and optical part of the spectrum. Increasingly more sophisticated treatments of the process of flux blocking in the UV (line blocking) are discussed. The necessity of treating the far-UV flux correctly is demonstrated. Line blocking in the region 800-1300A reduces the photoionization from the excited levels of several important ions (e.g. Fe II, Co II, Si II, Ca II), thus decreasing the overall degree of ionization. This effect is clearly seen in the synthetic emergent spectra. Synthetic spectra obtained with the various methods adopted for line blocking are shown, and compared to one another. When line blocking is properly treated, the synthetic spectrum reproduces well the spectrum of the `normal' SN Ia 1992A from the UV to the near-IR.

  20. NLTE models of line-driven stellar winds - II. O stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krtička, Jiří

    2006-04-01

    We calculate non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) line-driven wind models of selected O stars in the spectral range of O4 to O9 in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We compare predicted basic wind properties, i.e. the terminal velocity and the mass-loss rate with values derived from observation. We found relatively good agreement between theoretical and observed terminal velocities. On the other hand, predicted mass-loss rates and mass-loss rates derived from observation are in a good agreement only for higher mass-loss rates. Theoretical mass-loss rates lower than approximately 10-7Msolaryr-1 are significantly higher than those derived from observation. These results confirm the previously reported problem of weak winds, since our calculated mass-loss rates are in fair agreement with predictions of Vink et al. We study multicomponent models for these winds. For this purpose we develop a more detailed description of wind decoupling. We show that the instability connected with the decoupling of individual wind elements may occur for low-density winds. In the case of winds with very low observed mass-loss rates the multicomponent effects are important for the wind structure, however this is not able to explain consistently the difference between the predicted mass-loss rate and the mass-loss rate derived from observation for these stars. Similar to previous studies, we found the level of dependence of the wind parameters on the metallicity. We conclude that the wind mass-loss rate significantly increases with metallicity as , whereas the terminal velocity of wind on average depends on metallicity only slightly, namely v∞~Z0.06 (for studied stars).

  1. Variation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton City Board of Education (Ontario).

    Suggestions for studying the topic of variation of individuals and objects (balls) to help develop elementary school students' measurement, comparison, classification, evaluation, and data collection and recording skills are made. General suggestions of variables that can be investigated are made for the study of human variation. Twelve specific…

  2. Comparison of various NLTE codes in computing the charge-state populations of an argon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, S.R.; Weisheit, J.C.

    1984-11-01

    A comparison among nine computer codes shows surprisingly large differences where it had been believed that the theroy was well understood. Each code treats an argon plasma, optically thin and with no external photon flux; temperatures vary around 1 keV and ion densities vary from 6 x 10/sup 17/ cm/sup -3/ to 6 x 10/sup 21/ cm/sup -3/. At these conditions most ions have three or fewer bound electrons. The calculated populations of 0-, 1-, 2-, and 3-electron ions differ from code to code by typical factors of 2, in some cases by factors greater than 300. These differences depend as sensitively on how may Rydberg states a code allows as they do on variations among computed collision rates. 29 refs., 23 figs.

  3. The formation of the Milky Way halo and its dwarf satellites; a NLTE-1D abundance analysis. I. Homogeneous set of atmospheric parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashonkina, L.; Jablonka, P.; Pakhomov, Yu.; Sitnova, T.; North, P.

    2017-08-01

    We present a homogeneous set of accurate atmospheric parameters for a complete sample of very and extremely metal-poor stars in the dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) Sculptor, Ursa Minor, Sextans, Fornax, Boötes I, Ursa Major II, and Leo IV. We also deliver a Milky Way (MW) comparison sample of giant stars covering the - 4 < [Fe/H] < - 1.7 metallicity range. We show that, in the [Fe/H] ≿ - 3.7 regime, the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) calculations with non-spectroscopic effective temperature (Teff) and surface gravity (log g) based on the photometric methods and known distance provide consistent abundances of the Fe i and Fe ii lines. This justifies the Fe i/Fe ii ionisation equilibrium method to determine log g for the MW halo giants with unknown distance. The atmospheric parameters of the dSphs and MW stars were checked with independent methods. In the [Fe/H] > - 3.5 regime, the Ti i/Ti ii ionisation equilibrium is fulfilled in the NLTE calculations. In the log g - Teff plane, all the stars sit on the giant branch of the evolutionary tracks corresponding to [Fe/H] = - 2 to - 4, in line with their metallicities. For some of the most metal-poor stars of our sample, we achieve relatively inconsistent NLTE abundances from the two ionisation stages for both iron and titanium. We suggest that this is a consequence of the uncertainty in the Teff-colour relation at those metallicities. The results of this work provide the basis for a detailed abundance analysis presented in a companion paper. Tables A.1 and A.2 are also available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/604/A129

  4. Analysis of helium-rich subdwarf O stars. 1: NLTE models, methods, and fits for 21 Palomar Green survey sdOs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thejll, P.; Bauer, F.; Saffer, R.; Liebert, J.; Kunze, D.; Shipman, H. L.

    1994-01-01

    Atmospheric parameters for 21 helium-rich hot subdwarf O stars from the Palomar Green survey are found from fits of non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) models to optical spectra. About 250 new NLTE models in the parameter range T(sub eff) from 35,000 to 65,000 K, log (g) from 4.0 to 6.5, and epsilon(He) from 50% He to 99% He have been calculated. A fit for each object is presented. Estimated distances and luminosities are calculated, assuming a mass of 0.5 solar masses. Large distances above the Galactic plane are found, and this implies that the majority of the sdO stars belong to a different stellar population than the sdB, planetary nebulae and white dwarf stars. Possibilities may include the halo and a 'thick disk.' Kinematical data from the literature are also discussed in view of the found distances. Five of the stars have been observed, modeled, and analyzed by Dreizler et al., and significant differences exist between their results and ours for these stars. The reason for these differences is not yet known, but the problem does not alter the conclusions about population membership that we present.

  5. Accelerating NLTE radiative transfer by means of the Forth-and-Back Implicit Lambda Iteration: A two-level atom line formation in 2D Cartesian coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milić, Ivan; Atanacković, Olga

    2014-10-01

    State-of-the-art methods in multidimensional NLTE radiative transfer are based on the use of local approximate lambda operator within either Jacobi or Gauss-Seidel iterative schemes. Here we propose another approach to the solution of 2D NLTE RT problems, Forth-and-Back Implicit Lambda Iteration (FBILI), developed earlier for 1D geometry. In order to present the method and examine its convergence properties we use the well-known instance of the two-level atom line formation with complete frequency redistribution. In the formal solution of the RT equation we employ short characteristics with two-point algorithm. Using an implicit representation of the source function in the computation of the specific intensities, we compute and store the coefficients of the linear relations J=a+bS between the mean intensity J and the corresponding source function S. The use of iteration factors in the ‘local’ coefficients of these implicit relations in two ‘inward’ sweeps of 2D grid, along with the update of the source function in other two ‘outward’ sweeps leads to four times faster solution than the Jacobi’s one. Moreover, the update made in all four consecutive sweeps of the grid leads to an acceleration by a factor of 6-7 compared to the Jacobi iterative scheme.

  6. Atmospheric NLTE-models for the spectroscopic analysis of blue stars with winds. II. Line-blanketed models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puls, J.; Urbaneja, M. A.; Venero, R.; Repolust, T.; Springmann, U.; Jokuthy, A.; Mokiem, M. R.

    2005-05-01

    We present new or improved methods for calculating NLTE, line-blanketed model atmospheres for hot stars with winds (spectral types A to O), with particular emphasis on fast performance. These methods have been implemented into a previous, more simple version of the model atmosphere code Fastwind (Santolaya-Rey et al. 1997) and allow us to spectroscopically analyze large samples of massive stars in a reasonable time-scale, using state-of-the-art physics. Although this updated version of the code has already been used in a number of recent investigations, the corresponding methods have not been explained in detail so far, and no rigorous comparison with results from alternative codes has been performed. This paper intends to address both topics. In particular, we describe our (partly approximate) approach to solve the equations of statistical equilibrium for those elements that are primarily responsible for line-blocking and blanketing, as well as an approximate treatment of the line-blocking itself, which is based on a simple statistical approach using suitable means of line opacities and emissivities. Both methods are validated by specific tests. Furthermore, we comment on our implementation of a consistent temperature structure. In the second part, we concentrate on a detailed comparison with results from two codes used in alternative spectroscopical investigations, namely cmfgen (Hillier & Miller 1998) and wm-Basic (Pauldrach et al. 2001). All three codes predict almost identical temperature structures and fluxes for λ > 400 Å, whereas at lower wavelengths a number of discrepancies are found. Particularly in the Heii continua, where fluxes and corresponding numbers of ionizing photons react extremely sensitively to subtle differences in the models, we consider any uncritical use of these quantities (e.g., in the context of nebula diagnostics) as unreliable. Optical H/He lines as synthesized by fastwind are compared with results from cmfgen, obtaining a

  7. Atmospheric NLTE models for the spectroscopic analysis of blue stars with winds. III. X-ray emission from wind-embedded shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carneiro, L. P.; Puls, J.; Sundqvist, J. O.; Hoffmann, T. L.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and X-ray radiation emitted from wind-embedded shocks in hot, massive stars can affect the ionization balance in their outer atmospheres and can be the mechanism responsible for producing highly ionized atomic species detected in stellar wind UV spectra. Aims: To allow for these processes in the context of spectral analysis, we have implemented the emission from wind-embedded shocks and related physics into our unified, NLTE model atmosphere/spectrum synthesis code FASTWIND. Methods: The shock structure and corresponding emission is calculated as a function of user-supplied parameters (volume filling factor, radial stratification of shock strength, and radial onset of emission). We account for a temperature and density stratification inside the postshock cooling zones, calculated for radiative and adiabatic cooling in the inner and outer wind, respectively. The high-energy absorption of the cool wind is considered by adding important K-shell opacities, and corresponding Auger ionization rates have been included in the NLTE network. To test our implementation and to check the resulting effects, we calculated a comprehensive model grid with a variety of X-ray emission parameters. Results: We tested and verified our implementation carefully against corresponding results from various alternative model atmosphere codes, and studied the effects from shock emission for important ions from He, C, N, O, Si, and P. Surprisingly, dielectronic recombination turned out to play an essential role for the ionization balance of O iv/O v (particularly in dwarfs with Teff~ 45 000 K). Finally, we investigated the frequency dependence and radial behavior of the mass absorption coefficient, κν(r), which is important in the context of X-ray line formation in massive star winds. Conclusions: In almost all of the cases considered, direct ionization is of major influence because of the enhanced EUV radiation field, and Auger ionization only affects N vi

  8. Radiation-driven winds of hot luminous stars. XIII. A description of NLTE line blocking and blanketing towards realistic models for expanding atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauldrach, A. W. A.; Hoffmann, T. L.; Lennon, M.

    2001-08-01

    Spectral analysis of hot luminous stars requires adequate model atmospheres which take into account the effects of NLTE and radiation driven winds properly. Here we present significant improvements of our approach in constructing detailed atmospheric models and synthetic spectra for hot luminous stars. Moreover, as we regard our solution method in its present stage already as a standard procedure, we make our program package WM-basic available to the community (download is possible from the URL given below). The most important model improvements towards a realistic description of stationary wind models concern: [(i)] A sophisticated and consistent description of line blocking and blanketing. Our solution concept to this problem renders the line blocking influence on the ionizing fluxes emerging from the atmospheres of hot stars - mainly the spectral ranges of the EUV and the UV are affected - in identical quality as the synthetic high resolution spectra representing the observable region. In addition, the line blanketing effect is properly accounted for in the energy balance. [(ii)] The atomic data archive which has been improved and enhanced considerably, providing the basis for a detailed multilevel NLTE treatment of the metal ions (from C to Zn) and an adequate representation of line blocking and the radiative line acceleration. [(iii)] A revised inclusion of EUV and X-ray radiation produced by cooling zones which originate from the simulation of shock heated matter. This new tool not only provides an easy-to-use method for O-star diagnostics, whereby physical constraints on the properties of stellar winds, stellar parameters, and abundances can be obtained via a comparison of observed and synthetic spectra, but also allows the astrophysically important information about the ionizing fluxes of hot stars to be determined automatically. Results illustrating this are discussed by means of a basic model grid calculated for O-stars with solar metallicity. To further

  9. Extended NLTE model for the IR CO2 bands in the atmosphere of Mars. Vibrational state populations and heating rates for daytime.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogibalov, V.

    Heating and cooling in the IR ro-vibrational bands of CO2 have dominant value in establishing the global heat balance, structure, and dynamic properties throughout the entire atmosphere of Mars. An extended model for solving the problem of radiative transfer in the CO2 bands under non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) was applied for daytime conditions in the Martian atmosphere. The model includes 321 excited vibrational states belonging to 7 isotopes of CO2 and 779 radiative vibrational transitions (about 100000 lines). The most upper state is 2003 of the principal isotope with energy of about 9500 cm-1. Another new point consists in that the radiative transfer in the ro-vibrational transitions forming the IR CO2 bands with taking into account the overlapping over frequency of lines within a given ro-vibrational band as well as lines belonging to different bands was considered using the accelerated lambda-iteration technique. Both for a number of profiles representing various conditions in the middle and upper atmosphere of Mars and for different solar zenith angles, the non-equilibrium populations of the CO2 vibrational states were obtained with high accuracy (not worse than 0.001 per cent) followed by calculating radiative flux divergencies in all the CO2 bands included into the model. For the first time, the contribution into the heating rate from some vibrational transitions were estimated for daytime conditions on Mars. In particular, a visible contribution of vibrational transitions belonging to the spectral region of the 4.3μ m CO2 band, which rise from high excited CO2 vibrational states, was found for the altitude range of 80-120 km. The author acknowledge Dr. López-Valverde (IAA, Granada, Spain) who compiled some of Martian atmosphere models used for the calculations presented.

  10. Spectral solar variations during the eclipse of March 20th, 2015 at two European sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröbner, Julian; Kazadzis, Stelios; Kouremeti, Natalia; Doppler, Lionel; Tagirov, Rinat; Shapiro, Alexander I.

    2017-02-01

    A total solar eclipse occurred on March 20th, 2015. The longest duration of totality was 2 minutes and 47 seconds off the coast of the Faroe Islands. It was visible in Europe and the only populated places from which the totality could be seen were the Faroe Islands and Svalbard. We report here on solar radiation measurements with various filter and spectral radiometers performed at Davos, Switzerland (46.8N, 9.8E) where the eclipse obscuration and magnitude were 66.9% and 0.729 respectively and Lindenberg, Germany (52.2N, 14.1E), (73% and 0.778). For the case of the 73% obscuration, spectral differences (between 380 nm to 865 nm) of 8% have been calculated from direct irradiance measurements and model calculations. In this work, using spectral measurements from different sensors, we also investigated possible factors that could cause spectral variations on the measured solar irradiance, such as the centre-to-limb variations (CLV) of the solar brightness that strongly depend on wavelengths. Finally, the observed decrease in total column ozone measured with Brewer spectrophotometrers during the eclipse could be partially explained by the spectral changes of the solar spectrum due to the CLV.

  11. An improved model of radiative transfer for the NLTE problem in the NIR bands of CO2 and CO molecules in the daytime atmosphere of Mars. 2. Population of vibrational states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogibalov, V. P.; Shved, G. M.

    2017-09-01

    The near-infrared (NIR) emission of the Martian atmosphere in the CO2 bands at 4.3, 2.7, 2.0, 1.6, 1.4, 1.3, 1.2, and 1.05 µm and in the CO bands at 4.7, 2.3, 1.6, and 1.2 µm is mainly generated under nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) conditions for vibrational states, the transitions from which form the specified bands. The paper presents the results of simulations of the population of these states under NLTE for daytime conditions. In the cold high-latitude troposphere, the NLTE takes place much lower than in the troposphere under typical temperature conditions. If the NIR-radiation reflection from the surface is ignored, the population of high vibrational states substantially decreases, at least, in some layer of the lower atmosphere. However, inelastic collisions of CO2 and CO molecules with O atoms produce no considerable influence on the values of populations. The population of vibrational states, the transitions from which form NIR bands, is also almost insensitive to possible large values of the quenching-in-collision rate constants of vibrational states higher than CO2(0001). However, very large errors in the estimates of the population of vibrational states of the CO2 molecule (rather than the CO molecule!) can be caused by the uncertainty in the values of the rate constant of exchange between CO2 molecules by the energy quantum of the asymmetric stretching vibrational mode. For this intermolecular exchange, we recommend a possible way to restrict the vibrational excitation degree of the molecule that is a collision partner and to maintain simultaneously a sufficiently high accuracy in the population estimate.

  12. An improved model of radiative transfer for the NLTE problem in the NIR bands of CO2 and CO molecules in the daytime atmosphere of Mars. 1. Input data and calculation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogibalov, V. P.; Shved, G. M.

    2016-09-01

    Advances in attacking the problem of radiative transfer in the near infrared (NIR) bands of CO2 and CO under nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) conditions depend on the accuracy of taking into account the radiation processes and inelastic collisions of CO2 and CO molecules. The focus of the paper is to substantially improve the physical model of the problem and update the calculation method. It is the first time the surface albedo is introduced into the problem of the molecular emission under NLTE conditions. The values of the rate constants for inelastic molecular collisions and their temperature dependences have been radically updated. In some cases, since laboratory measurements of these constants are lacking, different versions are provided for them. The relative abundance of CO2 and CO isotopologues is based on the ratios of isotope abundances for the elements C and O obtained from the measurements in the atmosphere of Mars. The intensity of extraterrestrial solar NIR radiation is specified on the base of the high-accuracy ground-based measurements. In the method for calculating the populations of vibrational states, we pioneer in completely taking into account the overlapping of spectral lines in the NIR bands of CO2 and CO.

  13. The NLTE problem of radiative transfer in the near-infrared CO2 and CO bands in the Martian atmosphere taking account for scattering and absorption of radiation by aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogibalov, Vladimir

    Heating of the Martian atmosphere due to the radiative transfer in the nearinfrared (NIR) ro-vibrational CO2 bands is one of the most important mechanisms which control the structural and dynamical properties throughout the entire atmosphere of Mars. Also, the emissions in some of these bands are used for remote sensing of the atmosphere of Mars. So, a development of more sophisticated models for estimating the values of the Martian atmosphere emissions in the NIR bands of CO2 molecules is required. A high rate of absorption of solar NIR radiation by CO2 molecules and a low density of the Martian atmosphere result in that the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) takes place in large altitude intervals for populations of the excited CO2 vibrational states. On other hand, dust and water ice aerosols permanently exist in the atmosphere of Mars. The aerosol optical depth of the Martian atmosphere varies from less than 0.1 for the condition of transparent atmosphere up to about 5 during global dust storms. Thus, the values of aerosol optical depth are comparable to the ones of some NIR bands of CO2 . The extinction of the NIR radiation by the aerosol particles makes an important influence on the radiative heating and, thus, on the dynamics of the Martian atmosphere. In the paper [1] the model used for solving the NLTE problem of radiative transfer in the CO2 bands in the Martian atmosphere included the 321 excited vibrational states belonging to 7 isotopologues of CO2 and 779 radiative vibrational transitions (about 100000 lines). The most upper state is 200 3 of the principal isotopologue with energy of about 9500 cm-1 . In the present study, this model has been further developed. The main improvements are following. 1) The 10 bands rising between 8 vibrational states of 2 isotopologues of the CO molecules have been included. 2) The radiative transfer in all the bands of CO2 and CO within the 15-1.02 µm spectral interval is taken into account with an exact

  14. Lithium abundance and 6Li/7Li ratio in the active giant HD 123351. I. A comparative analysis of 3D and 1D NLTE line-profile fits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mott, A.; Steffen, M.; Caffau, E.; Spada, F.; Strassmeier, K. G.

    2017-08-01

    Context. Current three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamical model atmospheres together with detailed spectrum synthesis, accounting for departures from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), permit to derive reliable atomic and isotopic chemical abundances from high-resolution stellar spectra. Not much is known about the presence of the fragile 6Li isotope in evolved solar-metallicity red giant branch (RGB) stars, not to mention its production in magnetically active targets like HD 123351. Aims: A detailed spectroscopic investigation of the lithium resonance doublet in HD 123351 in terms of both abundance and isotopic ratio is presented. From fits of the observed spectrum, taken at the Canada-France-Hawaii telescope, with synthetic line profiles based on 1D and 3D model atmospheres, we seek to estimate the abundance of the 6Li isotope and to place constraints on its origin. Methods: We derive the lithium abundance A(Li) and the 6Li/7Li isotopic ratio by fitting different synthetic spectra to the Li-line region of a high-resolution CFHT spectrum (R = 120 000, S/N = 400). The synthetic spectra are computed with four different line lists, using in parallel 3D hydrodynamical CO5BOLD and 1D LHD model atmospheres and treating the line formation of the lithium components in non-LTE (NLTE). The fitting procedure is repeated with different assumptions and wavelength ranges to obtain a reasonable estimate of the involved uncertainties. Results: We find A(Li) = 1.69 ± 0.11 dex and 6Li/7Li = 8.0 ± 4.4% in 3D-NLTE, using the line list of Meléndez et al. (2012, A&A, 543, A29), updated with new atomic data for V i, which results in the best fit of the lithium line profile of HD 123351. Two other line lists lead to similar results but with inferior fit qualities. Conclusions: Our 2σ detection of the 6Li isotope is the result of a careful statistical analysis and the visual inspection of each achieved fit. Since the presence of a significant amount of 6Li in the atmosphere of a cool

  15. Model studies of the solar limb shape variation with wavelenght within the PICARD project.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo, Stella M. L.; Thuillier, Gerard; Claudel, Jennyfer; Haberreiter, Margit; Mein, Nicole; Schmutz, Werner; Shapiro, Alexander; Sofia, Sabatino; Short, Christopher I.

    Solar images in the visible wavelength range show that the disk centre is brighter than the limb region. This phenomenon, which is both known as "centre to limb variation (CLV)", or "limb darkening function", is know to depend on wavelength. Since the CLV is determined by the density and temperature stratification, as well as the chemical composition of the so-lar photosphere, its measurement is important to validate theoretical assumption made when building numerical models of the solar atmosphere. The definition of the solar diameter is nor-mally adopted as the separation between two inflection points at opposite ends of a line passing through the center of the solar disk. Therefore, in order to understand long term variability on the solar diameter, it is important to understand what drives the dependence of the position of the inflection point on wavelength. In this paper we use different available solar atmosphere models to study this dependence. The results presented here refer to quiet Sun conditions and encompass the visible and near infra-red spectral regions, which are the regions of interest for the PICARD Satellite Mission. In a first step we utilize the solar atmosphere parameters with a radiative transfer code. This allows for the study of the impact of different factors such as opacities, electron density and temperature from different models on the results. Then, we compare results obtained using each solar atmosphere model. Our results are compared with existent ground based measurements performed by the Pic du Midi telescope, the balloon board measurements with the Solar Disk Sextant experiment, and with the measurements by the Michelson Doppler Imager on board SoHO satellite. The model simulations show that the position of the inflection point is sensitive to the different parameters and model assumptions. Furthermore, our study shows, for the first time, that the position of the inflection point changes dramatically with and outside of

  16. Spatial and Temporal distribution of CO_{2} 4.3-mu m NLTE Emission from nadir VIRTIS-H/Venus Express observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, Javier; Ángel López-Valverde, Miguel; Gilli, Gabriella; Drossart, Pierre; Piccioni, Giuseppe

    2010-05-01

    Non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (non-LTE) emissions are known to play a key role in the radiative heating and cooling of the Venus mesosphere and lower thermosphere (Dickinson, JAS, 1973; Roldan et al., Icarus, 2000). In the case of the Venusian atmosphere, CO2 vibrational-rotational emissions at 4.3 μm and 2.7 μm were predicted to give intense emissions, and since they are originated between 80 and 150 km, their observation might give information on the atmospheric parameters at those altitudes, depending on sensitivity and spectral resolution. The VIRTIS spectrometer on board Venus Express allows for the first time the systematic sounding of these bands in the Venus atmosphere, both in nadir and limb observing geometries. The limb data by VIRTIS has been recently studied by our team (Gilli et al., JGR, 2009; López-Valverde et al., 2010 submitted; Gilli et al., 2010 submitted), focusing on its vertical distribution and the validation of non-LTE models, but an exhaustive study of nadir observations has not been presented so far, except for the detection of gravity waves by García et al. (2008; 2009). In this work, we have used the nadir observations to study the horizontal distribution of the CO2 non-LTE emissions at 4.3 μm, mainly originated at altitudes about ~110 km. The analyzed dataset comprises the whole nadir measurements with VIRTIS-H (the highest spectral resolution channel) obtained up to September 2009, covering nearly 900 days of observations and more than 140,000 spectra. Similarly to the case of limb data, it was found that the nadir radiance depends not only on the Solar Zenith Angle, but also on the Emission Angle, as predicted by our non-LTE model. After careful radiance averages, the small dispersion found in the mean emission of this band suggests that the Venus lower thermosphere is more stable than expected, with scarce episodes of significant variation during the studied period. Since the spectral resolution of VIRTIS-H allows

  17. The Virtual Observatory Service TheoSSA: Establishing a Database of Synthetic Stellar Flux Standards I. NLTE Spectral Analysis of the DA-Type White Dwarf G191-B2B *,**,***,****

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauch, T.; Werner, K.; Bohlin, R.; Kruk, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen-rich, DA-type white dwarfs are particularly suited as primary standard stars for flux calibration. State-of-the-art NLTE models consider opacities of species up to trans-iron elements and provide reliable synthetic stellar-atmosphere spectra to compare with observations. Aims. We will establish a database of theoretical spectra of stellar flux standards that are easily accessible via a web interface. Methods. In the framework of the Virtual Observatory, the German Astrophysical Virtual Observatory developed the registered service TheoSSA. It provides easy access to stellar spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and is intended to ingest SEDs calculated by any model-atmosphere code. In case of the DA white dwarf G191-B2B, we demonstrate that the model reproduces not only its overall continuum shape but also the numerous metal lines exhibited in its ultraviolet spectrum. Results. TheoSSA is in operation and contains presently a variety of SEDs for DA-type white dwarfs. It will be extended in the near future and can host SEDs of all primary and secondary flux standards. The spectral analysis of G191-B2B has shown that our hydrostatic models reproduce the observations best at Teff =60 000 +/- 2000K and log g=7.60 +/- 0.05.We newly identified Fe vi, Ni vi, and Zn iv lines. For the first time, we determined the photospheric zinc abundance with a logarithmic mass fraction of -4.89 (7.5 × solar). The abundances of He (upper limit), C, N, O, Al, Si, O, P, S, Fe, Ni, Ge, and Sn were precisely determined. Upper abundance limits of about 10% solar were derived for Ti, Cr, Mn, and Co. Conclusions. The TheoSSA database of theoretical SEDs of stellar flux standards guarantees that the flux calibration of all astronomical data and cross-calibration between different instruments can be based on the same models and SEDs calculated with different model-atmosphere codes and are easy to compare.

  18. Review of the NLTE-5 kinetics workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Fontes, Christopher J; Abdallah, Jr., Joseph; Bowen, Christopher; Lee, Richard W; Ralchenko, Yuri

    2008-01-01

    We review the 5th non-LTE (non local thermodynamic equilibrium) kinetics code comparison workshop, held in November 2007. Both steady-state and time-dependent cases for elements ranging from carbon to gold were examined in detail. Calculations of radiative power losses and specific spectra were requested in addition to typical plasma quantities such as the ionization balance. Non-Maxwellian electrons, external Planckian radiation and opacity effects in spectra were also included in the comparisons. We discuss the organization of the workshop and present a set of representative results. The particular case of a tungsten plasma at tokamak operating densities was considered for the first time. Due to its importance to the ITER project, more detailed results of these comparisons will be published elsewhere.

  19. NICOLE: NLTE Stokes Synthesis/Inversion Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socas-Navarro, H.

    2015-08-01

    NICOLE, written in Fortran 90, seeks the model atmosphere that provides the best fit to the Stokes profiles (in a least-squares sense) of an arbitrary number of simultaneously-observes spectral lines from solar/stellar atmospheres. The inversion core used for the development of NICOLE is the LORIEN engine (the Lovely Reusable Inversion ENgine), which combines the SVD technique with the Levenberg-Marquardt minimization method to solve the inverse problem.

  20. The virtual observatory service TheoSSA: Establishing a database of synthetic stellar flux standards. I. NLTE spectral analysis of the DA-type white dwarf G191-B2B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, T.; Werner, K.; Bohlin, R.; Kruk, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    Context. Hydrogen-rich, DA-type white dwarfs are particularly suited as primary standard stars for flux calibration. State-of-the-art NLTE models consider opacities of species up to trans-iron elements and provide reliable synthetic stellar-atmosphere spectra to compare with observations. Aims: We will establish a database of theoretical spectra of stellar flux standards that are easily accessible via a web interface. Methods: In the framework of the Virtual Observatory, the German Astrophysical Virtual Observatory developed the registered service TheoSSA. It provides easy access to stellar spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and is intended to ingest SEDs calculated by any model-atmosphere code. In case of the DA white dwarf G191-B2B, we demonstrate that the model reproduces not only its overall continuum shape but also the numerous metal lines exhibited in its ultraviolet spectrum. Results: TheoSSA is in operation and contains presently a variety of SEDs for DA-type white dwarfs. It will be extended in the near future and can host SEDs of all primary and secondary flux standards. The spectral analysis of G191-B2B has shown that our hydrostatic models reproduce the observations best at and log g = 7.60 ± 0.05. We newly identified Fe vi, Ni vi, and Zn iv lines. For the first time, we determined the photospheric zinc abundance with a logarithmic mass fraction of -4.89 (7.5 × solar). The abundances of He (upper limit), C, N, O, Al, Si, O, P, S, Fe, Ni, Ge, and Sn were precisely determined. Upper abundance limits of about 10% solar were derived for Ti, Cr, Mn, and Co. Conclusions: The TheoSSA database of theoretical SEDs of stellar flux standards guarantees that the flux calibration of all astronomical data and cross-calibration between different instruments can be based on the same models and SEDs calculated with different model-atmosphere codes and are easy to compare. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope

  1. Variational filtering.

    PubMed

    Friston, K J

    2008-07-01

    This note presents a simple Bayesian filtering scheme, using variational calculus, for inference on the hidden states of dynamic systems. Variational filtering is a stochastic scheme that propagates particles over a changing variational energy landscape, such that their sample density approximates the conditional density of hidden and states and inputs. The key innovation, on which variational filtering rests, is a formulation in generalised coordinates of motion. This renders the scheme much simpler and more versatile than existing approaches, such as those based on particle filtering. We demonstrate variational filtering using simulated and real data from hemodynamic systems studied in neuroimaging and provide comparative evaluations using particle filtering and the fixed-form homologue of variational filtering, namely dynamic expectation maximisation.

  2. The SPARC water vapour assessment II: comparison of annual, semi-annual and quasi-biennial variations in stratospheric and lower mesospheric water vapour observed from satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lossow, Stefan; Khosrawi, Farahnaz; Nedoluha, Gerald E.; Azam, Faiza; Bramstedt, Klaus; Burrows, John. P.; Dinelli, Bianca M.; Eriksson, Patrick; Espy, Patrick J.; García-Comas, Maya; Gille, John C.; Kiefer, Michael; Noël, Stefan; Raspollini, Piera; Read, William G.; Rosenlof, Karen H.; Rozanov, Alexei; Sioris, Christopher E.; Stiller, Gabriele P.; Walker, Kaley A.; Weigel, Katja

    2017-03-01

    In the framework of the second SPARC (Stratosphere-troposphere Processes And their Role in Climate) water vapour assessment (WAVAS-II), the amplitudes and phases of the annual, semi-annual and quasi-biennial variation in stratospheric and lower mesospheric water were compared using 30 data sets from 13 different satellite instruments. These comparisons aimed to provide a comprehensive overview of the typical uncertainties in the observational database which can be considered in subsequent observational and modelling studies. For the amplitudes, a good agreement of their latitude and altitude distribution was found. Quantitatively there were differences in particular at high latitudes, close to the tropopause and in the lower mesosphere. In these regions, the standard deviation over all data sets typically exceeded 0.2 ppmv for the annual variation and 0.1 ppmv for the semi-annual and quasi-biennial variation. For the phase, larger differences between the data sets were found in the lower mesosphere. Generally the smallest phase uncertainties can be observed in regions where the amplitude of the variability is large. The standard deviations of the phases for all data sets were typically smaller than a month for the annual and semi-annual variation and smaller than 5 months for the quasi-biennial variation. The amplitude and phase differences among the data sets are caused by a combination of factors. In general, differences in the temporal variation of systematic errors and in the observational sampling play a dominant role. In addition, differences in the vertical resolution of the data, the considered time periods and influences of clouds, aerosols as well as non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects cause differences between the individual data sets.

  3. Variation and Mathematics Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Allen

    2012-01-01

    This discussion paper put forwards variation as a theme to structure mathematical experience and mathematics pedagogy. Patterns of variation from Marton's Theory of Variation are understood and developed as types of variation interaction that enhance mathematical understanding. An idea of a discernment unit comprising mutually supporting variation…

  4. Computing NLTE Opacities -- Node Level Parallel Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Holladay, Daniel

    2015-09-11

    Presentation. The goal: to produce a robust library capable of computing reasonably accurate opacities inline with the assumption of LTE relaxed (non-LTE). Near term: demonstrate acceleration of non-LTE opacity computation. Far term (if funded): connect to application codes with in-line capability and compute opacities. Study science problems. Use efficient algorithms that expose many levels of parallelism and utilize good memory access patterns for use on advanced architectures. Portability to multiple types of hardware including multicore processors, manycore processors such as KNL, GPUs, etc. Easily coupled to radiation hydrodynamics and thermal radiative transfer codes.

  5. Realistic NLTE Radiative Transfer for Modeling Stellar Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Philip D.

    1999-01-01

    This NASA grant supported the development of codes to solve the non-LTE multi-level spherical radiative transfer problem in the presence of velocity fields. Much of this work was done in collaboration with Graham Harper (CASA, University of Colorado). These codes were developed for application to the cool, low-velocity winds of evolved late-type stars. Particular emphasis was placed on modeling the wind of lambda Velorum (K4 lb), the brightest K supergiant in the sky, based on extensive observations of the ultraviolet spectrum with the HST/GHRS from GO program 5307. Several solution techniques were examined, including the Eddington factor Approach described in detail by Bennett & Harper (1997). An Eddington factor variant of Harper's S-MULTI code (Harper 1994) for stationary atmospheres was developed and implemented, although full convergence was not realized. The ratio of wind terminal velocity to turbulent velocity is large (approx. 0.3-0.5) in these cool star winds so this assumption of stationarity provides reasonable starting models. Final models, incorporating specified wind laws, were converged using the comoving CRD S-MULTI code. Details of the solution procedure were published by Bennett & Harper (1997). Our analysis of the wind of lambda Vel, based on wind absorption superimposed on chromospheric emission lines in the ultraviolet, can be found in Carpenter et al. (1999). In this paper, we compare observed wind absorption features to an exact CRD calculation in the comoving frame, and also to a much quicker, but approximate, method using the SEI (Sobolev with Exact Integration) code of Lamers, Cerruti-Sola, & Perinotto (1987). Carpenter et al. (1999) provide detailed comparisons of the exact CRD and approximate SEI results and discuss when SEI is adequate to use for computing wind line profiles. Unfortunately, the observational material is insufficient to unambiguously determine the wind acceleration law for lambda Vel. Relatively few unblended Fe II lines of optical depth sensitive to the wind acceleration region are present in the existing HST/GHRS data set. Most of the Fe II lines are either too optically thick (resulting in a board, black wind absorption profile) or too optically thin (resulting in no wind absorption feature present). Also, most of the ultraviolet spectra obtained from HST GO-5307 was at medium resolution (R approx. 40,000, corresponding to a velocity resolution of 7.5 km/s). This is simply inadequate to resolve the turbulence in the outer wind; a key parameter in theoretical wind models. We can now say that an unambiguous determination of the wind velocity law in lambda Vel will require complete coverage of the ultraviolet spectrum at high dispersion (R approx. 10(exp 5), or 3 km/s). This is now feasible usin, the STIS echelle spectrograph on-board HST.

  6. Realistic NLTE Radiative Transfer for Modeling Stellar Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Philip D.

    1999-01-01

    This NASA grant supported the development of codes to solve the non-LTE multi-level spherical radiative transfer problem in the presence of velocity fields. Much of this work was done in collaboration with Graham Harper (CASA, University of Colorado). These codes were developed for application to the cool, low-velocity winds of evolved late-type stars. Particular emphasis was placed on modeling the wind of lambda Velorum (K4 lb), the brightest K supergiant in the sky, based on extensive observations of the ultraviolet spectrum with the HST/GHRS from GO program 5307. Several solution techniques were examined, including the Eddington factor Approach described in detail by Bennett & Harper (1997). An Eddington factor variant of Harper's S-MULTI code (Harper 1994) for stationary atmospheres was developed and implemented, although full convergence was not realized. The ratio of wind terminal velocity to turbulent velocity is large (approx. 0.3-0.5) in these cool star winds so this assumption of stationarity provides reasonable starting models. Final models, incorporating specified wind laws, were converged using the comoving CRD S-MULTI code. Details of the solution procedure were published by Bennett & Harper (1997). Our analysis of the wind of lambda Vel, based on wind absorption superimposed on chromospheric emission lines in the ultraviolet, can be found in Carpenter et al. (1999). In this paper, we compare observed wind absorption features to an exact CRD calculation in the comoving frame, and also to a much quicker, but approximate, method using the SEI (Sobolev with Exact Integration) code of Lamers, Cerruti-Sola, & Perinotto (1987). Carpenter et al. (1999) provide detailed comparisons of the exact CRD and approximate SEI results and discuss when SEI is adequate to use for computing wind line profiles. Unfortunately, the observational material is insufficient to unambiguously determine the wind acceleration law for lambda Vel. Relatively few unblended Fe II lines of optical depth sensitive to the wind acceleration region are present in the existing HST/GHRS data set. Most of the Fe II lines are either too optically thick (resulting in a board, black wind absorption profile) or too optically thin (resulting in no wind absorption feature present). Also, most of the ultraviolet spectra obtained from HST GO-5307 was at medium resolution (R approx. 40,000, corresponding to a velocity resolution of 7.5 km/s). This is simply inadequate to resolve the turbulence in the outer wind; a key parameter in theoretical wind models. We can now say that an unambiguous determination of the wind velocity law in lambda Vel will require complete coverage of the ultraviolet spectrum at high dispersion (R approx. 10(exp 5), or 3 km/s). This is now feasible usin, the STIS echelle spectrograph on-board HST.

  7. Genetics and variation

    Treesearch

    John R. Jones; Norbert V. DeByle

    1985-01-01

    The broad genotypic variability in quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.), that results in equally broad phenotypic variability among clones is important to the ecology and management of this species. This chapter considers principles of aspen genetics and variation, variation in aspen over its range, and local variation among clones. For a more...

  8. Variations in Sexual Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juhasz, Anne McCreary

    1983-01-01

    Questions are raised about the difficulty of defining normal and atypical sexual behavior. Variations from normalcy that students, parents, and educators are most likely to encounter are discussed. The importance of dealing with variations in ways that are best for the individual and the group is emphasized. (PP)

  9. Total variation regularization with bounded linear variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makovetskii, Artyom; Voronin, Sergei; Kober, Vitaly

    2016-09-01

    One of the most known techniques for signal denoising is based on total variation regularization (TV regularization). A better understanding of TV regularization is necessary to provide a stronger mathematical justification for using TV minimization in signal processing. In this work, we deal with an intermediate case between one- and two-dimensional cases; that is, a discrete function to be processed is two-dimensional radially symmetric piecewise constant. For this case, the exact solution to the problem can be obtained as follows: first, calculate the average values over rings of the noisy function; second, calculate the shift values and their directions using closed formulae depending on a regularization parameter and structure of rings. Despite the TV regularization is effective for noise removal; it often destroys fine details and thin structures of images. In order to overcome this drawback, we use the TV regularization for signal denoising subject to linear signal variations are bounded.

  10. Variational Transition State Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Truhlar, Donald G.

    2016-09-29

    This is the final report on a project involving the development and applications of variational transition state theory. This project involved the development of variational transition state theory for gas-phase reactions, including optimized multidimensional tunneling contributions and the application of this theory to gas-phase reactions with a special emphasis on developing reaction rate theory in directions that are important for applications to combustion. The development of variational transition state theory with optimized multidimensional tunneling as a useful computational tool for combustion kinetics involved eight objectives.

  11. Human genomic variation

    PubMed Central

    Disotell, Todd R

    2000-01-01

    The recent completion and assembly of the first draft of the human genome, which combines samples from several ethnically diverse males and females, provides preliminary data on the extent of human genetic variation. PMID:11178257

  12. Masks: Interpretations and Variations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basso, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Presents a high school art teacher's views of and experiences with masks. Outlines a maskmaking activity in which students were required to create variations on existing masks. Emphasizes use of experimental materials. Displays examples of student-created masks. (DB)

  13. Multiclass Total Variation Clustering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Multiclass Total Variation Clustering Xavier Bresson University of Lausanne Lausanne, Switzerland xavier.bresson@unil.ch Thomas Laurent Loyola...recently motivated a new set of clustering algorithms that rely on the concept of total variation. While these al- gorithms perform well for bi-partitioning...tasks, their recursive extensions yield unimpressive results for multiclass clustering tasks. This paper presents a general framework for multiclass

  14. Generalized quasi variational inequalities

    SciTech Connect

    Noor, M.A.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, we establish the equivalence between the generalized quasi variational inequalities and the generalized implicit Wiener-Hopf equations using essentially the projection technique. This equivalence is used to suggest and analyze a number of new iterative algorithms for solving generalized quasi variational inequalities and the related complementarity problems. The convergence criteria is also considered. The results proved in this paper represent a significant improvement and refinement of the previously known results.

  15. The Schwinger Variational Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.

    1995-01-01

    Variational methods have proven invaluable in theoretical physics and chemistry, both for bound state problems and for the study of collision phenomena. For collisional problems they can be grouped into two types: those based on the Schroedinger equation and those based on the Lippmann-Schwinger equation. The application of the Schwinger variational (SV) method to e-molecule collisions and photoionization has been reviewed previously. The present chapter discusses the implementation of the SV method as applied to e-molecule collisions.

  16. Discrete Variational Optimal Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Fernando; Kobilarov, Marin; Martín de Diego, David

    2013-06-01

    This paper develops numerical methods for optimal control of mechanical systems in the Lagrangian setting. It extends the theory of discrete mechanics to enable the solutions of optimal control problems through the discretization of variational principles. The key point is to solve the optimal control problem as a variational integrator of a specially constructed higher dimensional system. The developed framework applies to systems on tangent bundles, Lie groups, and underactuated and nonholonomic systems with symmetries, and can approximate either smooth or discontinuous control inputs. The resulting methods inherit the preservation properties of variational integrators and result in numerically robust and easily implementable algorithms. Several theoretical examples and a practical one, the control of an underwater vehicle, illustrate the application of the proposed approach.

  17. Genomic variation in maize

    SciTech Connect

    Rivin, C.J.

    1990-01-01

    We have endeavored to learn to learn how different DNA sequences and sequence arrangements contribute to genome plasticity in maize. We describe quantitative variation among maize inbred lines for tandemly arrayed and dispersed repeated DNA sequences and gene families, and qualitative variation for sequences homologous to the Mutator family of transposons. The potential of these sequences to undergo unequal crossing over, non-allelic (ectopic) recombination and transposition makes them a source of genome instability. We have found examples of rapid genomic change involving these sequences in F1 hybrids, tissue culture cells and regenerated plants.

  18. Sociolinguistic Variation and Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trudgill, Peter

    This book examines linguistic variation and change. Section 1, "Sociohistorical Linguistics," includes: (1) "British Vernacular Dialects in the Formation of American English: The Case of East Anglian 'Do'"; (2) "'Short o' in East Anglia and New England"; and (3) "Sociohistorical Linguistics and Dialect Survival:…

  19. Variational transition state theory

    SciTech Connect

    Truhlar, D.G.

    1993-12-01

    This research program involves the development of variational transition state theory (VTST) and semiclassical tunneling methods for the calculation of gas-phase reaction rates and selected applications. The applications are selected for their fundamental interest and/or their relevance to combustion.

  20. Seasonal Variation in Epidemiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marrero, Osvaldo

    2013-01-01

    Seasonality analyses are important in medical research. If the incidence of a disease shows a seasonal pattern, then an environmental factor must be considered in its etiology. We discuss a method for the simultaneous analysis of seasonal variation in multiple groups. The nuts and bolts are explained using simple trigonometry, an elementary…

  1. Sociolinguistic Variation and Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trudgill, Peter

    This book examines linguistic variation and change. Section 1, "Sociohistorical Linguistics," includes: (1) "British Vernacular Dialects in the Formation of American English: The Case of East Anglian 'Do'"; (2) "'Short o' in East Anglia and New England"; and (3) "Sociohistorical Linguistics and Dialect Survival:…

  2. (Genomic variation in maize)

    SciTech Connect

    Rivin, C.J.

    1991-01-01

    These studies have sought to learn how different DNA sequences and sequence arrangements contribute to genome plasticity in maize. We describe quantitative variation among maize inbred lines for tandemly arrayed and dispersed repeated DNA sequences and gene families, and qualitative variation for sequences homologous to the Mutator family of transposons. The potential of these sequences to undergo unequal crossing over, non-allelic (ectopic) recombination and transposition makes them a source of genome instability. We have found examples of rapid genomic change involving these sequences in Fl hybrids, tissue culture cells and regenerated plants. We describe the repetitive portion of the maize genome as composed primarily of sequences that vary markedly in copy number among different genetic stocks. The most highly variable is the 185 bp repeat associated with the heterochromatic chromosome knobs. Even in lines without visible knobs, there is a considerable quantity of tandemly arrayed repeats. We also found a high degree of variability for the tandemly arrayed 5S and ribosomal DNA repeats. While such variation might be expected as the result of unequal cross-over, we were surprised to find considerable variation among lower copy number, dispersed repeats as well. One highly repeated sequence that showed a complex tandem and dispersed arrangement stood out as showing no detectable variability among the maize lines. In striking contrast to the variability seen between the inbred stocks, individuals within a stock were indistinguishable with regard to their repeated sequence multiplicities.

  3. Seasonal Variation in Epidemiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marrero, Osvaldo

    2013-01-01

    Seasonality analyses are important in medical research. If the incidence of a disease shows a seasonal pattern, then an environmental factor must be considered in its etiology. We discuss a method for the simultaneous analysis of seasonal variation in multiple groups. The nuts and bolts are explained using simple trigonometry, an elementary…

  4. Situational Variation in English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlewood, William T.

    1981-01-01

    Presents data which shows, in a systematic and objective way, how the same speaker can express the same meaning in a variety of ways depending upon the social situation. Such data offer the teacher of English a basis for discussing some of the linguistic features involved in this variation. (Author/PJM)

  5. Fluency Variation in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Andrade, Claudia Regina Furquim; Martins, Vanessa De Oliveira

    2007-01-01

    The Speech Fluency Profile of fluent adolescent speakers of Brazilian Portuguese, were examined with respect to gender and neurolinguistic variations. Speech samples of 130 male and female adolescents, aged between 12;0 and 17;11 years were gathered. They were analysed according to type of speech disruption; speech rate; and frequency of speech…

  6. The Schwinger Variational Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.

    1995-01-01

    Variational methods have proven invaluable in theoretical physics and chemistry, both for bound state problems and for the study of collision phenomena. The application of the Schwinger variational (SV) method to e-molecule collisions and molecular photoionization has been reviewed previously. The present chapter discusses the implementation of the SV method as applied to e-molecule collisions. Since this is not a review of cross section data, cross sections are presented only to server as illustrative examples. In the SV method, the correct boundary condition is automatically incorporated through the use of Green's function. Thus SV calculations can employ basis functions with arbitrary boundary conditions. The iterative Schwinger method has been used extensively to study molecular photoionization. For e-molecule collisions, it is used at the static exchange level to study elastic scattering and coupled with the distorted wave approximation to study electronically inelastic scattering.

  7. Human immune system variation

    PubMed Central

    Brodin, Petter; Davis, Mark M.

    2017-01-01

    The human immune system is highly variable between individuals but relatively stable over time within a given person. Recent conceptual and technological advances have enabled systems immunology analyses, which reveal the composition of immune cells and proteins in populations of healthy individuals. The range of variation and some specific influences that shape an individual’s immune system is now becoming clearer. Human immune systems vary as a consequence of heritable and non-heritable influences, but symbiotic and pathogenic microbes and other non-heritable influences explain most of this variation. Understanding when and how such influences shape the human immune system is key for defining metrics of immunological health and understanding the risk of immune-mediated and infectious diseases. PMID:27916977

  8. Variation, Repetition, And Choice

    PubMed Central

    Abreu-Rodrigues, Josele; Lattal, Kennon A; dos Santos, Cristiano V; Matos, Ricardo A

    2005-01-01

    Experiment 1 investigated the controlling properties of variability contingencies on choice between repeated and variable responding. Pigeons were exposed to concurrent-chains schedules with two alternatives. In the REPEAT alternative, reinforcers in the terminal link depended on a single sequence of four responses. In the VARY alternative, a response sequence in the terminal link was reinforced only if it differed from the n previous sequences (lag criterion). The REPEAT contingency generated low, constant levels of sequence variation whereas the VARY contingency produced levels of sequence variation that increased with the lag criterion. Preference for the REPEAT alternative tended to increase directly with the degree of variation required for reinforcement. Experiment 2 examined the potential confounding effects in Experiment 1 of immediacy of reinforcement by yoking the interreinforcer intervals in the REPEAT alternative to those in the VARY alternative. Again, preference for REPEAT was a function of the lag criterion. Choice between varying and repeating behavior is discussed with respect to obtained behavioral variability, probability of reinforcement, delay of reinforcement, and switching within a sequence. PMID:15828592

  9. Taking Stock of Regulatory Variation.

    PubMed

    Maurano, Matthew T; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A

    2015-07-29

    Three recent studies measure individual variation in regulatory DNA accessibility. What do they tell us about the prospects of assessing variation in single cells and across populations? Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Harmonically excited orbital variations

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, T.

    1985-08-06

    Rephrasing the equations of motion for orbital maneuvers in terms of Lagrangian generalized coordinates instead of Newtonian rectangular cartesian coordinates can make certain harmonic terms in the orbital angular momentum vector more readily apparent. In this formulation the equations of motion adopt the form of a damped harmonic oscillator when torques are applied to the orbit in a variationally prescribed manner. The frequencies of the oscillator equation are in some ways unexpected but can nonetheless be exploited through resonant forcing functions to achieve large secular variations in the orbital elements. Two cases are discussed using a circular orbit as the control case: (1) large changes in orbital inclination achieved by harmonic excitation rather than one impulsive velocity change, and (2) periodic and secular changes to the longitude of the ascending node using both stable and unstable excitation strategies. The implications of these equations are also discussed for both artificial satellites and natural satellites. For the former, two utilitarian orbits are suggested, each exploiting a form of harmonic excitation. 5 refs.

  11. Multifunctions of bounded variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinter, R. B.

    2016-02-01

    Consider control systems described by a differential equation with a control term or, more generally, by a differential inclusion with velocity set F (t , x). Certain properties of state trajectories can be derived when it is assumed that F (t , x) is merely measurable w.r.t. the time variable t. But sometimes a refined analysis requires the imposition of stronger hypotheses regarding the time dependence. Stronger forms of necessary conditions for minimizing state trajectories can be derived, for example, when F (t , x) is Lipschitz continuous w.r.t. time. It has recently become apparent that significant addition properties of state trajectories can still be derived, when the Lipschitz continuity hypothesis is replaced by the weaker requirement that F (t , x) has bounded variation w.r.t. time. This paper introduces a new concept of multifunctions F (t , x) that have bounded variation w.r.t. time near a given state trajectory, of special relevance to control. We provide an application to sensitivity analysis.

  12. Variations in brain DNA

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Jesús; Gómez-Ramos, Alberto; Soriano, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    It is assumed that DNA sequences are conserved in the diverse cell types present in a multicellular organism like the human being. Thus, in order to compare the sequences in the genome of DNA from different individuals, nucleic acid is commonly isolated from a single tissue. In this regard, blood cells are widely used for this purpose because of their availability. Thus blood DNA has been used to study genetic familiar diseases that affect other tissues and organs, such as the liver, heart, and brain. While this approach is valid for the identification of familial diseases in which mutations are present in parental germinal cells and, therefore, in all the cells of a given organism, it is not suitable to identify sporadic diseases in which mutations might occur in specific somatic cells. This review addresses somatic DNA variations in different tissues or cells (mainly in the brain) of single individuals and discusses whether the dogma of DNA invariance between cell types is indeed correct. We will also discuss how single nucleotide somatic variations arise, focusing on the presence of specific DNA mutations in the brain. PMID:25505410

  13. Anisotropic Total Variation Filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Grasmair, Markus; Lenzen, Frank

    2010-12-15

    Total variation regularization and anisotropic filtering have been established as standard methods for image denoising because of their ability to detect and keep prominent edges in the data. Both methods, however, introduce artifacts: In the case of anisotropic filtering, the preservation of edges comes at the cost of the creation of additional structures out of noise; total variation regularization, on the other hand, suffers from the stair-casing effect, which leads to gradual contrast changes in homogeneous objects, especially near curved edges and corners. In order to circumvent these drawbacks, we propose to combine the two regularization techniques. To that end we replace the isotropic TV semi-norm by an anisotropic term that mirrors the directional structure of either the noisy original data or the smoothed image. We provide a detailed existence theory for our regularization method by using the concept of relaxation. The numerical examples concluding the paper show that the proposed introduction of an anisotropy to TV regularization indeed leads to improved denoising: the stair-casing effect is reduced while at the same time the creation of artifacts is suppressed.

  14. Variations of hybrid damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Margaretha J.; Inman, Daniel J.; Saunders, William R.

    1998-06-01

    Damping is important to structures and can be achieved through the addition of viscoelastic materials (VEM). The damping of the VEM is enhanced if a constraining layer is attached to the VEM. If this constraining layer is active, the treatment is called active constrained layer damping (ACLD). In the last few years, ACLD has proven to be superior in vibration control to active or passive damping. The active element makes ACLD more effective than passive constrained layer damping. It also provides a fail-safe in case of breakdown of the active element that is not present for purely active control. It is shown that the control effort needed to damp vibration using ACLD can be significantly higher than purely active control. In order to combine the inherent damping of passive control with the effectiveness of the active element, this paper will explore different variations of active, passive and hybrid damping. Some of the variations include: passive constrained layer damping (PCLD) separate from active element but on the same side of beam, PCLD separate from active on the opposite side of the beam, and active element underneath PCLD. The discretized system equations will be obtained using assumed modes method and Lagrange's equation. The damping will be modeled using the Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) method. The optimal placement and size of the active, passive, ACLD and hybrid treatments will be found using different schemes. The issue of overshoot and settling time of the output and control force using LQR will be addressed, as well as the control effort, passive and active vibration suppression, and LQR cost function. It will be shown that the hybrid treatments are capable of greater vibration control for lower control effort for different optimization schemes. 31

  15. Geometric constrained variational calculus. II: The second variation (Part I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, Enrico; Bruno, Danilo; Luria, Gianvittorio; Pagani, Enrico

    2016-10-01

    Within the geometrical framework developed in [Geometric constrained variational calculus. I: Piecewise smooth extremals, Int. J. Geom. Methods Mod. Phys. 12 (2015) 1550061], the problem of minimality for constrained calculus of variations is analyzed among the class of differentiable curves. A fully covariant representation of the second variation of the action functional, based on a suitable gauge transformation of the Lagrangian, is explicitly worked out. Both necessary and sufficient conditions for minimality are proved, and reinterpreted in terms of Jacobi fields.

  16. FROG - Fingerprinting Genomic Variation Ontology.

    PubMed

    Abinaya, E; Narang, Pankaj; Bhardwaj, Anshu

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variations play a crucial role in differential phenotypic outcomes. Given the complexity in establishing this correlation and the enormous data available today, it is imperative to design machine-readable, efficient methods to store, label, search and analyze this data. A semantic approach, FROG: "FingeRprinting Ontology of Genomic variations" is implemented to label variation data, based on its location, function and interactions. FROG has six levels to describe the variation annotation, namely, chromosome, DNA, RNA, protein, variations and interactions. Each level is a conceptual aggregation of logically connected attributes each of which comprises of various properties for the variant. For example, in chromosome level, one of the attributes is location of variation and which has two properties, allosomes or autosomes. Another attribute is variation kind which has four properties, namely, indel, deletion, insertion, substitution. Likewise, there are 48 attributes and 278 properties to capture the variation annotation across six levels. Each property is then assigned a bit score which in turn leads to generation of a binary fingerprint based on the combination of these properties (mostly taken from existing variation ontologies). FROG is a novel and unique method designed for the purpose of labeling the entire variation data generated till date for efficient storage, search and analysis. A web-based platform is designed as a test case for users to navigate sample datasets and generate fingerprints. The platform is available at http://ab-openlab.csir.res.in/frog.

  17. Spectral-collocation variational integrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yiqun; Wu, Boying; Leok, Melvin

    2017-03-01

    Spectral methods are a popular choice for constructing numerical approximations for smooth problems, as they can achieve geometric rates of convergence and have a relatively small memory footprint. In this paper, we introduce a general framework to convert a spectral-collocation method into a shooting-based variational integrator for Hamiltonian systems. We also compare the proposed spectral-collocation variational integrators to spectral-collocation methods and Galerkin spectral variational integrators in terms of their ability to reproduce accurate trajectories in configuration and phase space, their ability to conserve momentum and energy, as well as the relative computational efficiency of these methods when applied to some classical Hamiltonian systems. In particular, we note that spectrally-accurate variational integrators, such as the Galerkin spectral variational integrators and the spectral-collocation variational integrators, combine the computational efficiency of spectral methods together with the geometric structure-preserving and long-time structural stability properties of symplectic integrators.

  18. FROG - Fingerprinting Genomic Variation Ontology

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Anshu

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variations play a crucial role in differential phenotypic outcomes. Given the complexity in establishing this correlation and the enormous data available today, it is imperative to design machine-readable, efficient methods to store, label, search and analyze this data. A semantic approach, FROG: “FingeRprinting Ontology of Genomic variations” is implemented to label variation data, based on its location, function and interactions. FROG has six levels to describe the variation annotation, namely, chromosome, DNA, RNA, protein, variations and interactions. Each level is a conceptual aggregation of logically connected attributes each of which comprises of various properties for the variant. For example, in chromosome level, one of the attributes is location of variation and which has two properties, allosomes or autosomes. Another attribute is variation kind which has four properties, namely, indel, deletion, insertion, substitution. Likewise, there are 48 attributes and 278 properties to capture the variation annotation across six levels. Each property is then assigned a bit score which in turn leads to generation of a binary fingerprint based on the combination of these properties (mostly taken from existing variation ontologies). FROG is a novel and unique method designed for the purpose of labeling the entire variation data generated till date for efficient storage, search and analysis. A web-based platform is designed as a test case for users to navigate sample datasets and generate fingerprints. The platform is available at http://ab-openlab.csir.res.in/frog. PMID:26244889

  19. Seasonal variations in Soudan 2.

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, M. C.; Soudan 2 Collaboration

    1999-06-23

    Seasonal Variations in an underground detector may be a signature for Dark Matter. The Soudan 2 detector searches for nucleon decay and atmospheric neutrinos. The trigger rate is about 0.5 Hertz. It is dominated by approximately equal numbers of atmospheric muons and low level radioactivityy. The muon rate has a seasonal variation of {+-}2%, which is consistent with a similar effect at MACRO. The MACRO effect has been correlated with temperature in the upper atmosphere. Our trigger rate has a seasonal variation of {+-}15% which we believe is due to radon in the mine, and variations in air flow with outside temperature.

  20. Periodic insolation variations on Mars.

    PubMed

    Murray, B C; Ward, W R; Yeung, S C

    1973-05-11

    Previously unrecognized insolation variations on Mars are a consequence of periodic variations in eccentricity, first established by the theory of Brouwer and Van Woerkom (1950). Such annual insolation variations, characterized by both 95,000-year and 2,000,000-year periodicities, may actually be recorded in newly discovered layered deposits in the polar regions of Mars. An additional north-south variation in seasonal insolation, but not average annual insolation, exists with 51,000-year and 2,000,000-year periodicities.

  1. Explorations in Regional Variation: A Variational Pragmatic Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The present article introduces the Special Issue entitled "A Variational Pragmatic Approach to Regional Variation in Language," a collection of papers which celebrates the work of Klaus P. Schneider (Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn, Germany) on the occasion of his 60th birthday.

  2. Explorations in Regional Variation: A Variational Pragmatic Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The present article introduces the Special Issue entitled "A Variational Pragmatic Approach to Regional Variation in Language," a collection of papers which celebrates the work of Klaus P. Schneider (Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn, Germany) on the occasion of his 60th birthday.

  3. Flagellar variation in Serratia marcescens is associated with color variation.

    PubMed Central

    Paruchuri, D K; Harshey, R M

    1987-01-01

    The pigmented enterobacterium Serratia marcescens, an opportunistic pathogen, shows a striking variation of its red color. Different strains differ greatly both in color and in the frequency with which they produce color variants. Within a strain, the variations occur at constant rates and are reversible. During an investigation of this phenomenon we observed that variation of a 39-kilodalton protein in S. marcescens 274 is closely associated with color variation. Using antibodies to this protein we identified it as being a component of the bacterial flagella. Variation of surface proteins often provides an organism with alternate offense-defense strategies for survival in a challenging environment. The pigment, in association with flagella, may provide such a function for S. marcescens. Images PMID:3539927

  4. Sea level variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Bruce C.

    1992-01-01

    Published values for the long-term, global mean sea level rise determined from tide gauge records range from about one to three mm per year. The scatter of the estimates appears to arise largely from the use of data from gauges located at convergent tectonic plate boundaries where changes of land elevation give fictitious sea level trends, and the effects of large interdecadal and longer sea level variations on short (less than 50+ years) or sappy records. In addition, virtually all gauges undergo subsidence or uplift due to isostatic rebound from the last deglaciation at a rate comparable to or greater than the secular rise of sea level. Modeling rebound by the ICE-3G model of Tushingham and Peltier (1990) and avoiding tide gauge records in areas of converging tectonic plates produces a highly consistent set of long sea level records. A global set of 21 such stations in nine oceanic regions with an average record length of 76 years during the period 1880-1980 yields the global sea level rise value 1.8 mm/year +/- 0.1. Greenhouse warming scenarios commonly forecast an additional acceleration of global sea level in the next 5 or 6+ decades in the range 0.1-0.2 mm/yr2. Because of the large power at low frequencies in the sea level spectrum, very long tide gauge records (75 years minimum) have been examined for past apparent sea level acceleration. For the 80-year period 1905-1985, 23 essentially complete tide gauge records in 10 geographic groups are available for analysis. These yielded the apparent global acceleration -0.011 (+/- 0.012) mm/yr2. A larger, less uniform set of 37 records in the same 10 groups with 92 years average length covering the 141 years from 1850-1991 gave 0.001 (+/- 0.008) mm/yr2. Thus there is no evidence for an apparent acceleration in the past 100+ years that is significant either statistically, or in comparison to values associated with global warming. Unfortunately, the large interdecadal fluctuations of sea level severely affect

  5. Sea level variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Bruce C.

    1992-01-01

    Published values for the long-term, global mean sea level rise determined from tide gauge records range from about one to three mm per year. The scatter of the estimates appears to arise largely from the use of data from gauges located at convergent tectonic plate boundaries where changes of land elevation give fictitious sea level trends, and the effects of large interdecadal and longer sea level variations on short (less than 50+ years) or sappy records. In addition, virtually all gauges undergo subsidence or uplift due to isostatic rebound from the last deglaciation at a rate comparable to or greater than the secular rise of sea level. Modeling rebound by the ICE-3G model of Tushingham and Peltier (1990) and avoiding tide gauge records in areas of converging tectonic plates produces a highly consistent set of long sea level records. A global set of 21 such stations in nine oceanic regions with an average record length of 76 years during the period 1880-1980 yields the global sea level rise value 1.8 mm/year +/- 0.1. Greenhouse warming scenarios commonly forecast an additional acceleration of global sea level in the next 5 or 6+ decades in the range 0.1-0.2 mm/yr2. Because of the large power at low frequencies in the sea level spectrum, very long tide gauge records (75 years minimum) have been examined for past apparent sea level acceleration. For the 80-year period 1905-1985, 23 essentially complete tide gauge records in 10 geographic groups are available for analysis. These yielded the apparent global acceleration -0.011 (+/- 0.012) mm/yr2. A larger, less uniform set of 37 records in the same 10 groups with 92 years average length covering the 141 years from 1850-1991 gave 0.001 (+/- 0.008) mm/yr2. Thus there is no evidence for an apparent acceleration in the past 100+ years that is significant either statistically, or in comparison to values associated with global warming. Unfortunately, the large interdecadal fluctuations of sea level severely affect

  6. Robust Understanding of Statistical Variation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Susan A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a framework that captures the complexity of reasoning about variation in ways that are indicative of robust understanding and describes reasoning as a blend of design, data-centric, and modeling perspectives. Robust understanding is indicated by integrated reasoning about variation within each perspective and across…

  7. Variational Derivation of Dissipative Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sogo, Kiyoshi

    2017-03-01

    A new variational principle is formulated to derive various dissipative equations. Model equations considered are the damping equation, Bloch equation, diffusion equation, Fokker-Planck equation, Kramers equation and Smoluchowski equation. Each equation and its time reversal equation are simultaneously obtained in our variational principle.

  8. Variational Bounds for Creeping Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procházka, Petr

    2010-05-01

    In the paper time dependent variational bounds are derived based on Extended Hashin-Shtrikman variational principles. Direct calculation leads to explicit formulas to be presented in the text. For various mechanical properties easy coding in Excel, say, can be used and verification of accuracy for numerical procedures is available using the derived formulas.

  9. Robust Understanding of Statistical Variation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Susan A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a framework that captures the complexity of reasoning about variation in ways that are indicative of robust understanding and describes reasoning as a blend of design, data-centric, and modeling perspectives. Robust understanding is indicated by integrated reasoning about variation within each perspective and across…

  10. Variational formulation of high performance finite elements: Parametrized variational principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felippa, Carlos A.; Militello, Carmello

    1991-01-01

    High performance elements are simple finite elements constructed to deliver engineering accuracy with coarse arbitrary grids. This is part of a series on the variational basis of high-performance elements, with emphasis on those constructed with the free formulation (FF) and assumed natural strain (ANS) methods. Parametrized variational principles that provide a foundation for the FF and ANS methods, as well as for a combination of both are presented.

  11. Chemical Variations Affect Seismic Velocities Less Than Grain Size Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, B. H.; Jacobs, M. H.

    2001-12-01

    It is well known that mantle velocities depend on the ``Magnesium number'' of constituent minerals. According to our recently developed equation of state (Jacobs & Oonk, Calphad 24, 133--147, 2000) this speed varies almost linearly between 6.7422 (Mg2SiO4) and 6.0113 (Fe2SiO4) km/sec at 10 GPa and 1500 K, i.e. a velocity contrast of 730 m/sec, the canonical mantle composition at 400 km depth being 52% Mg2SiO4 in accordance with the estimates by Lee et al. (1998). We have shown experimentally elsewhere that grain size variations of isochemical, equal density, holocrystalline alkali disilicates affect acoustic velocities. These vary at room temperature and ambient pressure between 6.6 km/sec (coarse grained) and 7.7 km/sec (fine grained), a difference of 1100 m/sec, i.e. substantially larger than the above mentioned 730 m/sec for chemical variations. Such differences in grain size occur because of variations in time, temperature, transformation (TTT) conditions to which a material is subjected. Thus velocity variations as observed in the mantle do not necessarily reflect current hottter or colder localities or compositional variations. They more likely reflect different TTT conditions with concomitant fabric variation during subduction.

  12. Statistics, Uncertainty, and Transmitted Variation

    SciTech Connect

    Wendelberger, Joanne Roth

    2014-11-05

    The field of Statistics provides methods for modeling and understanding data and making decisions in the presence of uncertainty. When examining response functions, variation present in the input variables will be transmitted via the response function to the output variables. This phenomenon can potentially have significant impacts on the uncertainty associated with results from subsequent analysis. This presentation will examine the concept of transmitted variation, its impact on designed experiments, and a method for identifying and estimating sources of transmitted variation in certain settings.

  13. Variation in pediatric surgical care.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Danielle B; Rangel, Shawn J

    2015-12-01

    Variation in care and outcomes are common in the management of children with surgical diseases. Differences in the availability of resources, patient and family preferences, ever-increasing fiscal pressure, and lack of high-quality data to guide clinical decision making are just a few factors that contribute to both the over and under-utilization of healthcare resources. Identification of data-driven, value-based "best practices" that are sensitive to differences in resource availability and patient preferences may be an important first step in establishing a practical framework for reducing unwarranted practice variation. The goal of this article is to explore the causes and influence of practice variation using appendicitis as a common condition to illustrate key concepts, and to propose solutions to mitigate unwarranted practice variation while preserving the spirit of innovation necessary to advance the field. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Variational Approach to Molecular Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Nüske, Feliks; Keller, Bettina G; Pérez-Hernández, Guillermo; Mey, Antonia S J S; Noé, Frank

    2014-04-08

    The eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the molecular dynamics propagator (or transfer operator) contain the essential information about the molecular thermodynamics and kinetics. This includes the stationary distribution, the metastable states, and state-to-state transition rates. Here, we present a variational approach for computing these dominant eigenvalues and eigenvectors. This approach is analogous to the variational approach used for computing stationary states in quantum mechanics. A corresponding method of linear variation is formulated. It is shown that the matrices needed for the linear variation method are correlation matrices that can be estimated from simple MD simulations for a given basis set. The method proposed here is thus to first define a basis set able to capture the relevant conformational transitions, then compute the respective correlation matrices, and then to compute their dominant eigenvalues and eigenvectors, thus obtaining the key ingredients of the slow kinetics.

  15. Extensions to total variation denoising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomgren, Peter; Chan, Tony F.; Mulet, Pep

    1997-10-01

    The total variation denoising method, proposed by Rudin, Osher and Fatermi, 92, is a PDE-based algorithm for edge-preserving noise removal. The images resulting from its application are usually piecewise constant, possibly with a staircase effect at smooth transitions and may contain significantly less fine details than the original non-degraded image. In this paper we present some extensions to this technique that aim to improve the above drawbacks, through redefining the total variation functional or the noise constraints.

  16. Variational integrators for electric circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ober-Blöbaum, Sina; Tao, Molei; Cheng, Mulin; Owhadi, Houman; Marsden, Jerrold E.

    2013-06-01

    In this contribution, we develop a variational integrator for the simulation of (stochastic and multiscale) electric circuits. When considering the dynamics of an electric circuit, one is faced with three special situations: 1. The system involves external (control) forcing through external (controlled) voltage sources and resistors. 2. The system is constrained via the Kirchhoff current (KCL) and voltage laws (KVL). 3. The Lagrangian is degenerate. Based on a geometric setting, an appropriate variational formulation is presented to model the circuit from which the equations of motion are derived. A time-discrete variational formulation provides an iteration scheme for the simulation of the electric circuit. Dependent on the discretization, the intrinsic degeneracy of the system can be canceled for the discrete variational scheme. In this way, a variational integrator is constructed that gains several advantages compared to standard integration tools for circuits; in particular, a comparison to BDF methods (which are usually the method of choice for the simulation of electric circuits) shows that even for simple LCR circuits, a better energy behavior and frequency spectrum preservation can be observed using the developed variational integrator.

  17. Variational integrators for electric circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Ober-Blöbaum, Sina; Tao, Molei; Cheng, Mulin; Owhadi, Houman; Marsden, Jerrold E.

    2013-06-01

    In this contribution, we develop a variational integrator for the simulation of (stochastic and multiscale) electric circuits. When considering the dynamics of an electric circuit, one is faced with three special situations: 1. The system involves external (control) forcing through external (controlled) voltage sources and resistors. 2. The system is constrained via the Kirchhoff current (KCL) and voltage laws (KVL). 3. The Lagrangian is degenerate. Based on a geometric setting, an appropriate variational formulation is presented to model the circuit from which the equations of motion are derived. A time-discrete variational formulation provides an iteration scheme for the simulation of the electric circuit. Dependent on the discretization, the intrinsic degeneracy of the system can be canceled for the discrete variational scheme. In this way, a variational integrator is constructed that gains several advantages compared to standard integration tools for circuits; in particular, a comparison to BDF methods (which are usually the method of choice for the simulation of electric circuits) shows that even for simple LCR circuits, a better energy behavior and frequency spectrum preservation can be observed using the developed variational integrator.

  18. Is there much variation in variation? Revisiting statistics of small area variation in health services research

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez, Berta; Librero, Julián; Bernal-Delgado, Enrique; Peiró, Salvador; López-Valcarcel, Beatriz González; Martínez, Natalia; Aizpuru, Felipe

    2009-01-01

    Background The importance of Small Area Variation Analysis for policy-making contrasts with the scarcity of work on the validity of the statistics used in these studies. Our study aims at 1) determining whether variation in utilization rates between health areas is higher than would be expected by chance, 2) estimating the statistical power of the variation statistics; and 3) evaluating the ability of different statistics to compare the variability among different procedures regardless of their rates. Methods Parametric bootstrap techniques were used to derive the empirical distribution for each statistic under the hypothesis of homogeneity across areas. Non-parametric procedures were used to analyze the empirical distribution for the observed statistics and compare the results in six situations (low/medium/high utilization rates and low/high variability). A small scale simulation study was conducted to assess the capacity of each statistic to discriminate between different scenarios with different degrees of variation. Results Bootstrap techniques proved to be good at quantifying the difference between the null hypothesis and the variation observed in each situation, and to construct reliable tests and confidence intervals for each of the variation statistics analyzed. Although the good performance of Systematic Component of Variation (SCV), Empirical Bayes (EB) statistic shows better behaviour under the null hypothesis, it is able to detect variability if present, it is not influenced by the procedure rate and it is best able to discriminate between different degrees of heterogeneity. Conclusion The EB statistics seems to be a good alternative to more conventional statistics used in small-area variation analysis in health service research because of its robustness. PMID:19341469

  19. Theoretical principles for biology: Variation.

    PubMed

    Montévil, Maël; Mossio, Matteo; Pocheville, Arnaud; Longo, Giuseppe

    2016-10-01

    Darwin introduced the concept that random variation generates new living forms. In this paper, we elaborate on Darwin's notion of random variation to propose that biological variation should be given the status of a fundamental theoretical principle in biology. We state that biological objects such as organisms are specific objects. Specific objects are special in that they are qualitatively different from each other. They can undergo unpredictable qualitative changes, some of which are not defined before they happen. We express the principle of variation in terms of symmetry changes, where symmetries underlie the theoretical determination of the object. We contrast the biological situation with the physical situation, where objects are generic (that is, different objects can be assumed to be identical) and evolve in well-defined state spaces. We derive several implications of the principle of variation, in particular, biological objects show randomness, historicity and contextuality. We elaborate on the articulation between this principle and the two other principles proposed in this special issue: the principle of default state and the principle of organization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Seasonal variation in sports participation.

    PubMed

    Schüttoff, Ute; Pawlowski, Tim

    2017-04-20

    This study explores indicators describing socio-demographics, sports participation characteristics and motives which are associated with variation in sports participation across seasons. Data were drawn from the German Socio-Economic Panel which contains detailed information on the sports behaviour of adults in Germany. Overall, two different measures of seasonal variation are developed and used as dependent variables in our regression models. The first variable measures the coefficient of (seasonal) variation in sport-related energy expenditure per week. The second variable measures whether activity drops below the threshold as defined by the World Health Organization (WHO). Results suggest that the organisational setting, the intensity and number of sports practised, and the motive for participation are strongly correlated with the variation measures used. For example, both, participation in a sports club and a commercial facility, are associated with reduced seasonal variation and a significantly higher probability of participating at a volume above the WHO threshold across all seasons. These findings give some impetus for policymaking and the planning of sports programmes as well as future research directions.

  1. Solar flux and its variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. V. P.; Gottlieb, D. M.

    1975-01-01

    Data are presented on the solar irradiance as derived from a number of sources. An attempt was made to bring these data onto a uniform scale. Summation of fluxes at all wavelengths yields a figure of 1357.826 for the solar constant. Estimates are made of the solar flux variations due to flares, active regions (slowly varying component), 27-day period, and the 11-yr cycle. Solar activity does not produce a significant variation in the value of the solar constant. Variations in the X-ray and EUV portions of the solar flux may be several orders of magnitude during solar activity, especially at times of major flares. It is established that these short wavelength flux enhancements cause significant changes in the terrestrial ionosphere.

  2. Craniometric variation in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Ross, Ann H; Ubelaker, Douglas H; Falsetti, Anthony B

    2002-12-01

    Craniofacial variation is investigated in Latin America and the Caribbean. The samples included in this study are two historic and one prehistoric sample from Ecuador; prehistoric and modern Cuban samples; a prehistoric Peruvian sample; two prehistoric Mexican samples and one contemporary admixed Mexican sample; a 16th/17th-century Spanish sample; and Terry blacks. Biological distance is investigated using traditional craniometrics by computing size and shape variables according to Mosimann and colleagues. This study shows that there is much biological variation within the Americas.

  3. Diurnal variation of mesospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, G.

    1982-03-01

    Four Petrel rockets were flown from South Uist on October 2, 1979, to investigate the ozone concentration variation predicted by photochemical models between day and night in the mesosphere by means of interference filters that defined an approximately 10 nm bandwidth. The first two rockets contained photometers with wavebands centered at 265 and 290 nm, while the last two employed a single waveband at 265 nm. Results show significant diurnal variation above 54 km, which exceeds a factor of 2 above 65 km and reaches a factor of 10 between night and sunrise at 90 km.

  4. Head Start Planned Variation Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Jenny

    There is little agreement concerning which methods of preschool intervention are most effective. In order to evaluate several approaches to early childhood education, Project Head Start, in conjunction with Project Follow Through, has initiated the Planned Variation program. This year only a pilot project is underway with eight schools…

  5. Sociocultural Variation in Literacy Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verhoeven, Ludo

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the variations in literacy achievement among native and non-native upper primary school children (grades three to six) in the Netherlands. Various measures of word decoding, reading literacy and writing skill were collected from 1091 native Dutch children, 753 children with a former Dutch colonial…

  6. Variations of the solar constant

    SciTech Connect

    Sofia, S.

    1981-12-01

    The variations in data received from rocket-borne and balloon-borne instruments are discussed. Indirect techniques to measure and monitor the solar constant are presented. Emphasis is placed on the correlation of data from the Solar Maximum Mission and the Nimbus 7 satellites. Abstracts of individual items from the workshop were prepared separately for the data base.

  7. The Dimensionality of Grammatical Variation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sankoff, David; Cedergren, Henrietta J.

    1976-01-01

    Computer-based multidimensional scaling techniques are used to determine the dimensionality of grammatical variation in three large sets of data: Ross' (1973) Noun Phrase and fake Noun Phrase data; Sankoff's (1974) complementizer "que"-deletion (Montreal French) data; and Cedergren's (1973) syllable-final S-reduction (Panamanian Spanish) data. (DB)

  8. ACS PSF Variations with Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash C.; Lallo, Matt; Makidon, Russ

    2007-09-01

    We have used the HST ACS/WFC observations of a Galactic bulge field taken over a continuous interval of 7 days (Prop 9750) to investigate the possible dependence of the ACS focus with the external temperatures. This dataset allows us to investigate possible focus variations over timescales of a few hours to a few days. The engineering data related to the external temperatures for this duration show that the maximum temperature change occurred over the first 1.5 days. Among all the different temperatures recorded, the truss diametric differential and the truss axial temperatures are the only two temperatures which have the same timescale of variation as the PSFwidth variations. The PSF-widths also strongly correlate with these two temperatures during this time interval. We empirically fit the PSF-width variations with these 2 temperature sensor values. This suggests that the focus has a similar dependence, and we recommend that this finding be followed up with the determination of actual focus values to check if the focus values indeed have the same correlation. If so, the temperature data can be useful in estimating the focus values, which can then be used to predict the PSFs to a first order.

  9. Geographical variation in camper expenditures

    Treesearch

    Wilbur F. LaPage; Edward G. Fisher

    1971-01-01

    Daily expenditures by families camping in New Hampshire State parks in 1967 averaged $11.81. Considerable variation was found between the northern, central, and southern regions of the State in both the average amount of money spent and the way in which the money was spent. Daily expenditures in the north were higher, but average visit lengths were shorter, resulting...

  10. Tense Variation in Indirect Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pufahl, Ingrid

    A study of the extent to which the sequence-of-tenses rule (STR) is used in television news reporting in the United States is presented. The study examines which tenses are shifted most frequently and explains the uses and functions of tense variation. It is argued that STR is not always a semantically and pragmatically unmarked form as proposed…

  11. Modeling Natural Variation through Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehrer, Richard; Schauble, Leona

    2004-01-01

    This design study tracks the development of student thinking about natural variation as late elementary grade students learned about distribution in the context of modeling plant growth at the population level. The data-modeling approach assisted children in coordinating their understanding of particular cases with an evolving notion of data as an…

  12. Energy conservation and constants variation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraiselburd, L.; Miller Bertolami, M. M.; Sisterna, P.; Vucetich, H.

    If fundamental constants vary, the internal energy of macroscopic bodies should change. This should produce observable effects. It is shown that those effects can produce upper bounds on the variation of much lower than those coming from Eötvös experiments.

  13. Creativity, depression, and circannual variation.

    PubMed

    Sitton, S C; Hughes, R B

    1995-12-01

    Verbal creativity has been linked to personal and family histories of bipolar depression. The present studies investigated the relationship between creativity and atypical symptoms of bipolar depression such as seasonal mood variations. Although more creative individuals, as measured by scores on the Remote Associates Test and a writing sample, perceived seasonal fluctuations in their creativity, no significant differences in performance were found.

  14. Modeling Natural Variation through Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehrer, Richard; Schauble, Leona

    2004-01-01

    This design study tracks the development of student thinking about natural variation as late elementary grade students learned about distribution in the context of modeling plant growth at the population level. The data-modeling approach assisted children in coordinating their understanding of particular cases with an evolving notion of data as an…

  15. Relating Human Genetic Variation to Variation in Drug Responses

    PubMed Central

    Madian, Ashraf G.; Wheeler, Heather E.; Jones, Richard Baker; Dolan, M. Eileen

    2012-01-01

    Although sequencing a single human genome was a monumental effort a decade ago, more than one thousand genomes have now been sequenced. The task ahead lies in transforming this information into personalized treatment strategies that are tailored to the unique genetics of each individual. One important aspect of personalized medicine is patient-to-patient variation in drug response. Pharmacogenomics addresses this issue by seeking to identify genetic contributors to human variation in drug efficacy and toxicity. Here, we present a summary of the current status of this field, which has evolved from studies of single candidate genes to comprehensive genome-wide analyses. Additionally, we discuss the major challenges in translating this knowledge into a systems-level understanding of drug physiology with the ultimate goal of developing more effective personalized clinical treatment strategies. PMID:22840197

  16. Geometric constrained variational calculus. III: The second variation (Part II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, Enrico; Luria, Gianvittorio; Pagani, Enrico

    2016-03-01

    The problem of minimality for constrained variational calculus is analyzed within the class of piecewise differentiable extremaloids. A fully covariant representation of the second variation of the action functional based on a family of local gauge transformations of the original Lagrangian is proposed. The necessity of pursuing a local adaptation process, rather than the global one described in [1] is seen to depend on the value of certain scalar attributes of the extremaloid, here called the corners’ strengths. On this basis, both the necessary and the sufficient conditions for minimality are worked out. In the discussion, a crucial role is played by an analysis of the prolongability of the Jacobi fields across the corners. Eventually, in the appendix, an alternative approach to the concept of strength of a corner, more closely related to Pontryagin’s maximum principle, is presented.

  17. NLTE opacity calculations: C-Si and C-Ge mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrah, W.; Benredjem, D.; Pain, J.-C.; Dubau, J.

    2017-09-01

    The opacity is an important issue in the knowledge of the radiative properties of ICF and astrophysical plasmas. We present the opacity of dopants (silicon, germanium) embedded in the ablator of some ICF capsules. In recent works, Hill and Rose calculated the opacity of silicon in LTE and non-LTE plasmas, while Minguez and co-workers focused on the opacity of carbon. We have used the Cowan code to calculate the atomic structure of carbon, silicon and germanium in various ionic stages. The cross-sections of atomic processes (collisional excitation, collisional ionization) are obtained by fitting the values given by the code FAC to the Van Regemorter-like formulas of Sampson and Zhang. A corrected Gaunt factor is then obtained. A collisional-radiative code was developed in order to obtain the ionic populations, the level populations and the opacity. Line broadening and line shift are taken into account. The ionization potential depression is included in our calculations. The effect of a radiation field on the opacity is examined.

  18. NLTE Models of Vertical structure of Accretion Disks around Stellar Mass Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubeny, I.; Blaes, O.; Krolik, J. H.; Agol, E.; Lanz, T.

    2001-12-01

    Recent upgrades of our computer program TLUSDISK are briefly described. These include a self-consistent treatment of Compton scattering, and the effects of X-ray continuum opacities of the most important metal species (C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, Fe, Ni). In the case the central degenerate object is a neutron star or a black hole, we allow for a full general relativistic treatment. We show the effects of Comptonization and metal opacities on the structure of disk under various conditions. We also present a simple analytic prescription for the vertical temperature structure of the disk in the presence of Comptonization, and show under what conditions a hot outer layer (a corona) is formed.

  19. The stochastic radiative transfer equation: quantum damping, Kirchoff's law and NLTE

    SciTech Connect

    Graziani, F R

    2005-01-24

    A method is presented based on the theory of quantum damping, for deriving a self consistent but approximate form of the quantum transport for photons interacting with fully ionized electron plasma. Specifically, we propose in this paper a technique of approximately including the effects of background plasma on a photon distribution function without directly solving any kinetic equations for the plasma itself. The result is a quantum Langevin equation for the photon number operator; the quantum radiative transfer equation. A dissipation term appears which is the imaginary part of the dielectric function for an electron gas with photon mediated electron-electron interactions due to absorption and re-emission. It depends only on the initial state of the plasma. A quantum noise operator also appears as a result of spontaneous emission of photons from the electron plasma. The thermal expectation value of this noise operator yields the emissivity which is exactly of the form of the Kirchoff-Planck relation. This non-zero thermal expectation value is a direct consequence of a fluctuation-dissipation relation (FDR).

  20. Mg/Si Mineralogical Ratio of Low-Mass Planet Hosts. Correction for the NLTE Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adibekyan, V.; Gonçalves da Silva, H. M.; Sousa, S. G.; Santos, N. C.; Delgado Mena, E.; Hakobyan, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    Mg/Si and Fe/Si ratios are important parameters that control the composition of rocky planets. In this work we applied non-LTE correction to the Mg and Si abundances of stars with and without planets to confirm/reject our previous findings that [Mg/Si] atmospheric abundance is systematically higher for Super-Earth/Neptune-mass planet hosts than stars without planets. Our results show that the small differences of stellar parameters observed in these two groups of stars are not responsible for the already reported difference in the [Mg/Si] ratio. Thus, the high [Mg/Si] ratio of Neptunian hosts is probably related to the formation efficiency of these planets in such environments.

  1. Estimating the chromospheric magnetic field from a revised NLTE modeling: the case of HR 7428

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busá, Innocenza

    2017-10-01

    Semi-empirical atmospheric modeling is here used to obtain the chromospheric magnetic field distribution versus height in the K2 primary component of the RS CVn binary system HR 7428. The chromospheric magnetic field estimation versus height comes from considering the possibility of not imposing hydrostatic equilibrium in the atmospheric modeling. The stability of the best Non-hydrostatic equilibrium model, implies the presence of and additive (toward the center of the star) pressure, that decrease in strength from the base of the chromosphere toward the outer layers. Interpreting the additive pressure as magnetic pressure and I derive a magnetic field intensity of about 500 Gauss at the base of the chromosphere.

  2. Estimating the chromospheric magnetic field from a revised NLTE modelling: the case of HR 7428

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busá, I.; Catanzaro, G.; Frasca, A.; Gangi, M.; Giarrusso, M.; Leone, F.; Munari, M.; Scalia, C.; Scuderi, S.

    2017-07-01

    In this work, we use the semi-empirical atmospheric modelling method to obtain the chromospheric temperature, pressure, density and magnetic field distribution versus height in the K2 primary component of the RS CVn binary system HR 7428. While temperature, pressure and density are the standard output of the semi-empirical modelling technique, the chromospheric magnetic field estimation versus height comes from considering the possibility of not imposing hydrostatic equilibrium in the semi-empirical computation. The stability of the best non-hydrostatic equilibrium model implies the presence of an additive (towards the centre of the star) pressure that decreases in strength from the base of the chromosphere towards the outer layers. Interpreting the additive pressure as magnetic pressure, we estimated a magnetic field intensity of about 500 G at the base of the chromosphere.

  3. NLTE model stellar atmospheres with line blanketing near the series limits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubeny, I.; Hummer, D. G.; Lanz, T.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we study the influence of line-merging regions at the intermediate long-wavelength side of a continuum threshold on the computed model atmosphere structure and predicted spectrum. In order to model these regions sufficiently accurately, we have developed two concepts. First, we have extended the occupation probability formalism of Hummer and Mihalas to non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) plasmas. Second, in order to treat the very complicated opacity in the line merging region, we have generalized the concept of opacity distribution functions to treat non-LTE situations. All Rydberg states are consistently included within this framework, so that no arbitrary cutoff of high (LTE) levels is made. We have calculated several pure hydrogen models atmospheres for two effective temperatures, T(sub eff) = 20000 and 35000 K, and discussed the differences between models calculated with various treatments of the line merging. In particular, we have shown that the error in the predicted profiles of Balmer lines resulting from the neglect of line merging is typically of the order of 3-4%, while the errors in the far-UV portion of the Balmer continuum reaches 15-35%. The errors generally decrease with increasing effective temperature. At the same time, the internal accuracy of the models is shown to be about or below 0.5% for all predicted spectral features. We conclude that for interpreting current high-accuracy spectrophotometric observations models including the line merging are necessary, and that the formalism developed in this paper is capable of providing a sufficiently accurate and robust modeling technique.

  4. Variation of Parameters in Differential Equations (A Variation in Making Sense of Variation of Parameters)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Terry; Rai, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    The method of variation of parameters can be found in most undergraduate textbooks on differential equations. The method leads to solutions of the non-homogeneous equation of the form y = u[subscript 1]y[subscript 1] + u[subscript 2]y[subscript 2], a sum of function products using solutions to the homogeneous equation y[subscript 1] and…

  5. Variation of Parameters in Differential Equations (A Variation in Making Sense of Variation of Parameters)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Terry; Rai, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    The method of variation of parameters can be found in most undergraduate textbooks on differential equations. The method leads to solutions of the non-homogeneous equation of the form y = u[subscript 1]y[subscript 1] + u[subscript 2]y[subscript 2], a sum of function products using solutions to the homogeneous equation y[subscript 1] and…

  6. Variational Principle for Planetary Interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Li; Jacobsen, Stein B.

    2016-09-01

    In the past few years, the number of confirmed planets has grown above 2000. It is clear that they represent a diversity of structures not seen in our own solar system. In addition to very detailed interior modeling, it is valuable to have a simple analytical framework for describing planetary structures. The variational principle is a fundamental principle in physics, entailing that a physical system follows the trajectory, which minimizes its action. It is alternative to the differential equation formulation of a physical system. Applying the variational principle to the planetary interior can beautifully summarize the set of differential equations into one, which provides us some insight into the problem. From this principle, a universal mass-radius relation, an estimate of the error propagation from the equation of state to the mass-radius relation, and a form of the virial theorem applicable to planetary interiors are derived.

  7. Numerical integration of variational equations.

    PubMed

    Skokos, Ch; Gerlach, E

    2010-09-01

    We present and compare different numerical schemes for the integration of the variational equations of autonomous Hamiltonian systems whose kinetic energy is quadratic in the generalized momenta and whose potential is a function of the generalized positions. We apply these techniques to Hamiltonian systems of various degrees of freedom and investigate their efficiency in accurately reproducing well-known properties of chaos indicators such as the Lyapunov characteristic exponents and the generalized alignment indices. We find that the best numerical performance is exhibited by the "tangent map method," a scheme based on symplectic integration techniques which proves to be optimal in speed and accuracy. According to this method, a symplectic integrator is used to approximate the solution of the Hamilton equations of motion by the repeated action of a symplectic map S , while the corresponding tangent map TS is used for the integration of the variational equations. A simple and systematic technique to construct TS is also presented.

  8. Variational principles for dissipative waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodin, I. Y.; Ruiz, D. E.

    2016-10-01

    Variational methods are a powerful tool in plasma theory. However, their applications are typically restricted to conservative systems or require doubling of variables, which often contradicts the purpose of the variational approach altogether. We show that these restrictions can be relaxed for some classes of dynamical systems that are of practical interest in plasma physics, particularly including dissipative plasma waves. Applications will be discussed to calculating dispersion relations and modulational dynamics of individual plasma waves and wave ensembles. The work was supported by the NNSA SSAA Program through DOE Research Grant No. DE-NA0002948, by the U.S. DOE through Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466, and by the U.S. DOD NDSEG Fellowship through Contract No. 32-CFR-168a.

  9. Clinical Interpretation of Genomic Variations

    PubMed Central

    Sayitoğlu, Müge

    2016-01-01

    Novel high-throughput sequencing technologies generate large-scale genomic data and are used extensively for disease mapping of monogenic and/or complex disorders, personalized treatment, and pharmacogenomics. Next-generation sequencing is rapidly becoming routine tool for diagnosis and molecular monitoring of patients to evaluate therapeutic efficiency. The next-generation sequencing platforms generate huge amounts of genetic variation data and it remains a challenge to interpret the variations that are identified. Such data interpretation needs close collaboration among bioinformaticians, clinicians, and geneticists. There are several problems that must be addressed, such as the generation of new algorithms for mapping and annotation, harmonization of the terminology, correct use of nomenclature, reference genomes for different populations, rare disease variant databases, and clinical reports. PMID:27507302

  10. Coastal eutrophication and temperature variation

    SciTech Connect

    Ganoulis, J.; Rafailidis, S.; Bogardi, I.; Duckstein, L.; Matyasovszky, I.

    1994-12-31

    A 3-D hydroecological model has been developed to simulate the impact of climate-change-induced daily temperature variation on coastal water quality and eutrophication. Historical daily temperature time series over a thirty-year period have been used to link local meteorological variables to large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns (CPs). Then, CPs generated under a 2{times}CO{sub 2} scenario have been used to simulate climate-change-induced local daily temperature variations. Both historical and climate-change-induced temperature time series have been introduced as inputs into the hydroecological model to simulate coastal water quality and eutrophication. Subject to model validation with available data, a case study in the bay of Thessaloniki (N. Greece) indicates a risk of increasing eutrophication and oxygen depletion in coastal areas due to possible climate change.

  11. Clinical Interpretation of Genomic Variations.

    PubMed

    Sayitoğlu, Müge

    2016-09-05

    Novel high-throughput sequencing technologies generate large-scale genomic data and are used extensively for disease mapping of monogenic and/or complex disorders, personalized treatment, and pharmacogenomics. Next-generation sequencing is rapidly becoming routine tool for diagnosis and molecular monitoring of patients to evaluate therapeutic efficiency. The next-generation sequencing platforms generate huge amounts of genetic variation data and it remains a challenge to interpret the variations that are identified. Such data interpretation needs close collaboration among bioinformaticians, clinicians, and geneticists. There are several problems that must be addressed, such as the generation of new algorithms for mapping and annotation, harmonization of the terminology, correct use of nomenclature, reference genomes for different populations, rare disease variant databases, and clinical reports.

  12. Tidal variations of earth rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoder, C. F.; Williams, J. G.; Parke, M. E.

    1981-01-01

    The periodic variations of the earths' rotation resulting from the tidal deformation of the earth by the sun and moon were rederived including terms with amplitudes of 0.002 millisec and greater. The series applies to the mantle, crust, and oceans which rotate together for characteristic tidal periods; the scaling parameter is the ratio of the fraction of the Love number producing tidal variations in the moment of inertia of the coupled mantle and oceans (k) to the dimensionless polar moment of inertia of the coupled moments (C). The lunar laser ranging data shows that k/C at monthly and fortnightly frequencies equals 0.99 + or - 0.15 and 0.99 + or - 0.20 as compared to the theoretical value of 0.94 + or - 0.04.

  13. Compositional variations in lunar spinels.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggerty, S. E.

    1971-01-01

    Electron probe data for spinels from Apollo 11, 12, and 14 are presented and analyzed. A modified Johnstone spinel prism showing the data distribution is given. Three projections of this prism are then presented which illustrate the variations of simple ratios that are present in the prism and permit three different perspectives of the data. The results are summarized as fO2 isobars on the spinel prism.

  14. Communication variations and aircrew performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanki, Barbara G.; Greaud, Valerie A.; Irwin, Cheryl M.

    1989-01-01

    Crew-related communication variations and their effects on performance are examined. The communication analysis involves evaluating the performance of 18 pilots to a high-fidelity full-mission simulation. Initiating speech consists of four categories: commands, questions, observations, and dysfluencies. Response speech is coded as: reply, acknowledgements, and zero response. A standard form of communication has been adopted which should aid in the coordination process and enhance crew performance.

  15. Secular variations of tropospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrgian, A. Kh.

    1988-02-01

    The dependence of secular variations of tropospheric ozone on decreases of temperature and cloud growth in Central Europe is assessed on the basis of Vienna, Paris, and Athens data for 1853-1920. Decreases in ozone content occurring with a certain time lag after major volcanic eruptions (e.g., Krakatoa) are examined. The effect of the Tungusk-meteorite fall on ozone content is also discussed.

  16. Compositional variations in lunar spinels.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggerty, S. E.

    1971-01-01

    Electron probe data for spinels from Apollo 11, 12, and 14 are presented and analyzed. A modified Johnstone spinel prism showing the data distribution is given. Three projections of this prism are then presented which illustrate the variations of simple ratios that are present in the prism and permit three different perspectives of the data. The results are summarized as fO2 isobars on the spinel prism.

  17. Global Stress Variation over Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, H.; Lu, Z.; Wen, L.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding how stress changes over time is important as it is related to studies of earthquake triggering and mantle rheology. We calculate stress variation at the Earth's surface on the global scale from 2003 to 2014, resultant from several major physical forces acting on the Earth. The physical forces we considered include the surface loading due to terrestrial water storage (TWS), force associated with post-glacial rebound (PGR) and tidal loading (including solid tide and ocean tide). The stress change associated with TWS is calculated in this way: we infer TWS from monthly gravity field of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), in which gravity variation associated with PGR has been removed; we then estimate stress change at the Earth's surface as the elastic response of the GRACE-inferred TWS change. The stress change associated with PGR is calculated as the rate of viscoelastic stress change responding to ice loading from ICE-5G model. And, tidal stress is calculated as the elastic response of the Earth to the traction forces of the Sun and the Moon (solid tide) and to the loading of ocean tide. The total stress change is the sum of the stress changes associated with these three types of forces. As first result, in the study period from 2003 to 2014, the radial normal stress variation exhibits a prominent decreasing trend in southern Africa and Queen Maud Land of Antarctica, an increasing trend in Alaska of the US (United States), Greenland and Marie Byrd Land of Antarctica, and strong annual cycles in southern Africa and Alaska of the US. We will present the geographical distribution of global stress variation from 2003 to 2014 and discuss its possible implications.

  18. Longitudinal Variations in Jupiter's Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Gierasch, P. J.; Tierney, G.

    2010-01-01

    Long-term studies of Jupiter's zonal wind field revealed temporal variations on the order of 20 to 40 m/s at many latitudes, greater than the typical data uncertainties of 1 to 10 m/s. No definitive periodicities were evident, however, though some latitudinally-confined signals did appear at periods relevant to the Quasi- Quadrennial Oscillation (Simon-Miller & Gierasch, Icarus, in press). As the QQO appears, from vertical temperature profiles, to propagate downward, it is unclear why a signal is not more obvious, unless other processes dominate over possibly weaker forcing from the QQO. An additional complication is that zonal wind profiles represent an average over some particular set of longitudes for an image pair and most data sets do not offer global wind coverage. Lien avoiding known features, such as the large anticyclonic vortices especially prevalent in the south, there can be distinct variations in longitude. We present results on the full wind field from Voyager and Cassini data, showing apparent longitudinal variations of up to 60 m/s or more. These are particularly obvious near disruptions such as the South Equatorial Disturbance, even when the feature itself is not clearly visible. These two dates represent very different states of the planet for comparison: Voyagers 1 & 2 flew by Jupiter shortly after a global upheaval, while many regions were in a disturbed state, while the Cassini view is typical of a more quiescent period present during much of the 1990s and early 2000s.

  19. Variational integrators for reduced magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, Michael; Tassi, Emanuele; Grasso, Daniela

    2016-09-15

    Reduced magnetohydrodynamics is a simplified set of magnetohydrodynamics equations with applications to both fusion and astrophysical plasmas, possessing a noncanonical Hamiltonian structure and consequently a number of conserved functionals. We propose a new discretisation strategy for these equations based on a discrete variational principle applied to a formal Lagrangian. The resulting integrator preserves important quantities like the total energy, magnetic helicity and cross helicity exactly (up to machine precision). As the integrator is free of numerical resistivity, spurious reconnection along current sheets is absent in the ideal case. If effects of electron inertia are added, reconnection of magnetic field lines is allowed, although the resulting model still possesses a noncanonical Hamiltonian structure. After reviewing the conservation laws of the model equations, the adopted variational principle with the related conservation laws is described both at the continuous and discrete level. We verify the favourable properties of the variational integrator in particular with respect to the preservation of the invariants of the models under consideration and compare with results from the literature and those of a pseudo-spectral code.

  20. Amplitude variations in coarticulated vowels

    PubMed Central

    Jacewicz, Ewa; Fox, Robert Allen

    2008-01-01

    This paper seeks to characterize the nature, size, and range of acoustic amplitude variation in naturally produced coarticulated vowels in order to determine its potential contribution and relevance to vowel perception. The study is a partial replication and extension of the pioneering work by House and Fairbanks [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 22, 105–113 (1953)], who reported large variation in vowel amplitude as a function of consonantal context. Eight American English vowels spoken by men and women were recorded in ten symmetrical CVC consonantal contexts. Acoustic amplitude measures included overall rms amplitude, amplitude of the rms peak along with its relative location in the CVC-word, and the amplitudes of individual formants F1–F4 along with their frequencies. House and Fairbanks’ amplitude results were not replicated: Neither the overall rms nor the rms peak varied appreciably as a function of consonantal context. However, consonantal context was shown to affect significantly and systematically the amplitudes of individual formants at the vowel nucleus. These effects persisted in the auditory representation of the vowel signal. Auditory spectra showed that the pattern of spectral amplitude variation as a function of contextual effects may still be encoded and represented at early stages of processing by the peripheral auditory system. PMID:18529192

  1. Intraspecific variation and species coexistence.

    PubMed

    Lichstein, Jeremy W; Dushoff, Jonathan; Levin, Simon A; Pacala, Stephen W

    2007-12-01

    We use a two-species model of plant competition to explore the effect of intraspecific variation on community dynamics. The competitive ability ("performance") of each individual is assigned by an independent random draw from a species-specific probability distribution. If the density of individuals competing for open space is high (e.g., because fecundity is high), species with high maximum (or large variance in) performance are favored, while if density is low, species with high typical (e.g., mean) performance are favored. If there is an interspecific mean-variance performance trade-off, stable coexistence can occur across a limited range of intermediate densities, but the stabilizing effect of this trade-off appears to be weak. In the absence of this trade-off, one species is superior. In this case, intraspecific variation can blur interspecific differences (i.e., shift the dynamics toward what would be expected in the neutral case), but the strength of this effect diminishes as competitor density increases. If density is sufficiently high, the inferior species is driven to extinction just as rapidly as in the case where there is no overlap in performance between species. Intraspecific variation can facilitate coexistence, but this may be relatively unimportant in maintaining diversity in most real communities.

  2. Variational integrators for reduced magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Michael; Tassi, Emanuele; Grasso, Daniela

    2016-09-01

    Reduced magnetohydrodynamics is a simplified set of magnetohydrodynamics equations with applications to both fusion and astrophysical plasmas, possessing a noncanonical Hamiltonian structure and consequently a number of conserved functionals. We propose a new discretisation strategy for these equations based on a discrete variational principle applied to a formal Lagrangian. The resulting integrator preserves important quantities like the total energy, magnetic helicity and cross helicity exactly (up to machine precision). As the integrator is free of numerical resistivity, spurious reconnection along current sheets is absent in the ideal case. If effects of electron inertia are added, reconnection of magnetic field lines is allowed, although the resulting model still possesses a noncanonical Hamiltonian structure. After reviewing the conservation laws of the model equations, the adopted variational principle with the related conservation laws is described both at the continuous and discrete level. We verify the favourable properties of the variational integrator in particular with respect to the preservation of the invariants of the models under consideration and compare with results from the literature and those of a pseudo-spectral code.

  3. Antigenic variation in Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Prucca, Cesar G; Lujan, Hugo D

    2009-12-01

    Giardia lamblia undergoes antigenic variation, both in vitro and within the intestines of infected individuals. Variant-specific surface proteins (VSPs) cover the entire surface of the trophozoites and are the main antigens recognized by the host. Only 1 of about 200 VSP genes encoded by the Giardia genome is expressed on the surface of individual Giardia cells at any time; however, VSP antigen switching occurs spontaneously. In the recent year, significant advances in the knowledge of the antigen switching process have been achieved, which strongly suggests that antigenic variation in Giardia is regulated at the post-transcriptional level by a mechanism similar to RNA interference (RNAi). Several enzymes of the RNAi pathway are directly involved in VSP mRNA silencing and/or translational repression. Although several questions remain regarding how individual VSP antigens are selected for expression on the parasite surface, it is clear that an epigenetic mechanism is involved. In this review, we summarize the characteristics of this fascinating mechanism, analyse conflicting information regarding the structure of VSPs as it relates to the host's immune response, and highlight the major issues that need to be resolved to fully understand antigenic variation in this important pathogen.

  4. Diurnal variations in myocardial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bray, Molly S; Young, Martin E

    2008-07-15

    The heart is challenged by a plethora of extracellular stimuli over the course of a normal day, each of which distinctly influences myocardial contractile function. It is therefore not surprising that myocardial metabolism also oscillates in a time-of-day dependent manner. What is becoming increasingly apparent is that the heart exhibits diurnal variations in its intrinsic properties, including responsiveness to extracellular stimuli. This article summarizes our current knowledge regarding the mechanism(s) mediating diurnal variations in myocardial metabolism. Particular attention is focused towards the intramyocardial circadian clock, a cell autonomous molecular mechanism that appears to regulate myocardial metabolism both directly (e.g. triglyceride and glycogen metabolism) and indirectly (through modulation of the responsiveness of the myocardium to workload, insulin, and fatty acids). In doing so, the circadian clock within the cardiomyocyte allows the heart to anticipate environmental stimuli (such as changes in workload, feeding status) prior to their onset. This synchronization between the myocardium and its environment is enhanced by regular feeding schedules. Conversely, loss of synchronization may occur through disruption of the circadian clock and/or diurnal variations in neurohumoral factors (as observed during diabetes mellitus). Here, we discuss the possibility that loss of synchronization between the heart and its environment predisposes the heart to metabolic maladaptation and subsequent myocardial contractile dysfunction.

  5. Seasonal variation in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Partonen, T; Lönnqvist, J

    1996-11-01

    In patients with bipolar disorder, admissions for manic and depressive episodes frequently display a seasonal pattern. We examined this variation and compared the patterns with the seasonal admission rates for schizophrenia. Patients with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia were identified from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register of in-patient admissions to all psychiatric hospitals during the years 1969-91. They were included in the analysis if the first admission had occurred before 30 years of age. A total of 295 bipolar patients were found, and a sample of 295 schizophrenic patients was randomly selected for comparison. There was no seasonal variation among all hospital admissions for bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. However, the first admission for a depressive compared with a manic episode of bipolar disorder occurred significantly more often in the autumn (33% v. 21% respectively). The peak difference occurred during the week after the autumnal equinox in September. Our findings suggest that there is no seasonal variation in bipolar disorder, although in some patients the clinical course might be influenced by the autumn, as far as the likelihood of a first admission for depression is concerned.

  6. Embryological variation during nematode development.

    PubMed

    Schierenberg, Einhard

    2006-01-02

    Early cell lineages and arrangement of blastomeres in C. elegans are similar to the pattern found in Ascaris and other studied nematodes leading to the assumption that embryonic development shows little variation within the phylum Nematoda. However, analysis of a larger variety of species from various branches of the phylogenetic tree demonstrate that prominent variations in crucial steps of early embryogenesis exist among representatives of this taxon. So far, most of these variations have only been studied on a descriptive level and thus essentially nothing is known about their molecular or genetic basis. Nevertheless, it is obvious that the limited morphological diversity of the freshly hatched juvenile and the uniformity of the basic body plan contrast with the many modifications in the way a worm is generated from the egg cell. This chapter focuses on the initial phase between egg activation and gastrulation and deals with the following aspects: reproduction and diploidy, polarity, cleavage and germ line, cell lineages; cell cycles and maternal contribution, cell-cell communication and cell specification, gastrulation.

  7. Morphogenetic origin of natural variation.

    PubMed

    Cherdantsev, Vladimir G; Scobeyeva, Victoria A

    2012-09-01

    We studied individual pathways of gastrulation in two related amphibian species making an emphasis on the developmental dynamics of normal variation in the geometry of gastrulation movements. Analyzing the variation dynamics, we show that the linear succession of developmental stages is a secondary phenomenon disguising self-oscillations that lie at the heart of the dorsal blastopore lip morphogenesis. Characteristic features of the equations derived to describe the oscillations are, first, their dependence only on the movement geometry and, second, including of the dynamics of spatial variance directly into the movement equations, making it clear that the reasons for variability of morphogenesis are the same that for morphogenesis itself. The equations describing morphogenetic oscillations are mathematically similar to those describing natural selection in that the system tends to minimize its variance, individual or within-individual one, but the spatially uniform state turns to be unstable. Comparing of the dynamics of natural developmental variation in gastrulation in two frog species shows that, depending on the mechanics and geometry mass cell movements, different types of gastrulation movements have different proportions of the between- to within-individual differences, which strongly influences the choice of characters subject to evolution. Instead of being a source of constraints imposed on externally guided evolutionary trends, morphogenesis becomes a driving force of the adaptively silent, but directional evolution of the developing systems, which seems to be the only possible way of originating of the evolutionary novelties, both in evolution and ontogeny of the biological structures.

  8. Phase variation of hadronic amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Dedonder, J.-P.; Gibbs, W. R.; Nuseirat, Mutazz

    2008-04-15

    The phase variation with angle of hadronic amplitudes is studied with a view to understanding the underlying physical quantities that control it and how well it can be determined in free space. We find that unitarity forces a moderately accurate determination of the phase in standard amplitude analyses but that the nucleon-nucleon analyses done to date do not give the phase variation needed to achieve a good representation of the data in multiple scattering calculations. Models are examined that suggest its behavior near forward angles is related to the radii of the real and absorptive parts of the interaction. The dependence of this phase on model parameters is such that if these radii are modified in the nuclear medium (in combination with the change due to the shift in energy of the effective amplitude in the medium) then the larger magnitudes of the phase needed to fit the data might be attainable but only for negative values of the phase variation parameter.

  9. International Variation in Drug Usage

    PubMed Central

    Nolte, Ellen; Corbett, Jennie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This article explores the range of possible causes that might explain observed international variations in the usage of medicines for selected disease areas: dementia, osteoporosis, cancer, diabetes and hepatitis C. Commissioned by the UK Department of Health, through its Policy Research Programme, it complements a quantitative analysis of medicines uptake carried out by the Office for Health Economics (OHE) of medicines uptake across 16 classes of medicines in 13 high-income countries in 2012/13. Both studies build on an earlier study led by Professor Sir Mike Richards (UK) into the extent and causes of international variations in drug usage, published in 2010. Drawing on a rapid evidence assessment, we explore, for each of the five disease areas, epidemiological factors such as the disease burden and aspects of health system and service organisation that were shown to have a direct or indirect impact on drug usage, such as reimbursement mechanisms, access to diagnosis and treatment more broadly. We also provide a summary overview of key features of the health systems and of the principles of drug assessment or approval processes across the countries included in the OHE analysis. We find that a range of factors are likely to play a role in explaining international variation in medicines use, but their relative importance will vary depending on the disease area in question and the system context. Any given level of use of a given medicine in one country is likely determined by a set of factors the combination and the relative weight of which will be different in another country. PMID:28083348

  10. Cleft palate repair and variations

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Karoon

    2009-01-01

    Cleft palate affects almost every function of the face except vision. Today a child born with cleft palate with or without cleft lip should not be considered as unfortunate, because surgical repair of cleft palate has reached a highly satisfactory level. However for an average cleft surgeon palatoplasty remains an enigma. The surgery differs from centre to centre and surgeon to surgeon. However there is general agreement that palatoplasty (soft palate at least) should be performed between 6-12 months of age. Basically there are three groups of palatoplasty techniques. One is for hard palate repair, second for soft palate repair and the third based on the surgical schedule. Hard palate repair techniques are Veau-Wardill-Kilner V-Y, von Langenbeck, two-flap, Aleveolar extension palatoplasty, vomer flap, raw area free palatoplasty etc. The soft palate techniques are intravelar veloplasty, double opposing Z-plasty, radical muscle dissection, primary pharyngeal flap etc. And the protocol based techniques are Schweckendiek's, Malek's, whole in one, modified schedule with palatoplasty before lip repair etc. One should also know the effect of each technique on maxillofacial growth and speech. The ideal technique of palatoplasty is the one which gives perfect speech without affecting the maxillofacial growth and hearing. The techniques are still evolving because we are yet to design an ideal one. It is always good to know all the techniques and variations so that one can choose whichever gives the best result in one's hands. A large number of techniques are available in literature, and also every surgeon incorporates his own modification to make it a variation. However there are some basic techniques, which are described in details which are used in various centres. Some of the important variations are also described. PMID:19884664

  11. Variations in the thermospheirc compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Paxton, L. J.

    2015-12-01

    Satellite based far-ultraviolet (FUV) observations provide an important and unique way to determine the thermospheric compositions, such as O/N2 column density ratio and NO column density. We will use the data from TIMED/GUVI, DMSP/SSUSI and IMAGE/FUV and other measurements to discuss the composition variations caused by different drivers (solar EUV, magnetospheric energy input, wind and ion-neutral coupling). Applications of the thermospheric composition measurements for satellite drag estimation and ionospheric nowcast and forecast will be briefly discussed.

  12. Neodymium isotopic variations in seawater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piepgras, D. J.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1980-01-01

    Direct measurement of the isotopic composition of Nd in the Atlantic agree with the Nd content in ferromanganese sediments and differ from the observed amounts in the Pacific samples. These data indicate the existence of distinctive differences in the isotopic composition of Nd in the waters of major oceans; the average values determined from seawater and ferromanganese sediments are considerably lower than in sources with oceanic mantle affinities showing that the REE in the oceans is dominated by continental sources. The Nd isotopic variations in seawater are applied to relate the residence time of Nd and mixing rates between the oceans.

  13. Identification of structural variation in mouse genomes

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Thomas M.; Wong, Kim; Adams, David J.; Flint, Jonathan; Reymond, Alexandre; Yalcin, Binnaz

    2014-01-01

    Structural variation is variation in structure of DNA regions affecting DNA sequence length and/or orientation. It generally includes deletions, insertions, copy-number gains, inversions, and transposable elements. Traditionally, the identification of structural variation in genomes has been challenging. However, with the recent advances in high-throughput DNA sequencing and paired-end mapping (PEM) methods, the ability to identify structural variation and their respective association to human diseases has improved considerably. In this review, we describe our current knowledge of structural variation in the mouse, one of the prime model systems for studying human diseases and mammalian biology. We further present the evolutionary implications of structural variation on transposable elements. We conclude with future directions on the study of structural variation in mouse genomes that will increase our understanding of molecular architecture and functional consequences of structural variation. PMID:25071822

  14. World Climates and Food Supply Variations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, James E.; Pickett, Robert C.

    1974-01-01

    This article contains an outline of the major variations in the world's climates and suggestions for taking these variations into account in any plans made to improve world food production and supply. (PEB)

  15. Variational methods for field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Menahem, Shahar

    1986-09-01

    The thesis is presented in four parts dealing with field theory models: Periodic Quantum Electrodynamics (PQED) in (2+1) dimensions, free scalar field theory in (1+1) dimensions, the Quantum XY model in (1+1) dimensions, and the (1+1) dimensional Ising model in a transverse magnetic field. The last three parts deal exclusively with variational methods; the PQED part involves mainly the path integral approach. The PQED calculation results in a better understanding of the connection between electric confinement through monopole screening, and confinement through tunneling between degenerate vacua. Free field theory is used as a laboratory for a new variational blocking truncation approximation, in which the high frequency modes in a block are truncated to wave functions that depend on the slower background model (Born Oppenheimer approximation). For the XY model, several trial wave functions for the ground state are explored, with an emphasis on the periodic Gaussian. In the 4th part, the transfer matrix method is used to find a good (non blocking) trial ground state for the Ising model in a transverse magnetic field in (1+1) dimensions.

  16. Talker variation and word learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollich, George; Jusczyk, Peter; Brent, Michael

    2002-05-01

    While infants must go beyond talker-specific information in recognizing a given word, regardless of the talker, they must also process talker-specific information in order to extract meaning from a particular sound source. Otherwise, for example, they could never recognize whether [hct] referred to a talker's pronunciation of hot, hut, or even hat. This poster suggests that not only do infants process talker-specific information, but they also make use of it both to extract invariant properties in learning a new word and in recognizing talker-specific tokens faster. Using the splitscreen preferential looking paradigm, two studies were conducted that examined how talker-specific properties and variation among talkers could facilitate word learning. Results of study 1 indicated that word learning was facilitated in the case where infants heard different talkers. Thus, talker variation is critical for the extraction of invariant properties of a word. However, the results of study 2 indicated that talker-specific properties were encoded and used to help these infants recognize and learn the referents of these words. Given this evidence, it is suggested that infants appear to be using talker-specific information to form abstract representations of the invariant properties of words.

  17. Pharmacogenetic variation and metformin response.

    PubMed

    Chen, Suning; Zhou, Jie; Xi, Miaomiao; Jia, Yanyan; Wong, Yan; Zhao, Jinyi; Ding, Likun; Zhang, Jian; Wen, Aidong

    2013-12-01

    Diabetes is a major health problem worldwide, and metformin, a traditional oral anti-hyperglycemic drug, is now believed to be the most widely prescribed antidiabetic drug. Metformin acts primarily by inhibiting hepatic glucose production and improving insulin sensitivity. Metformin is absorbed predominately by the small intestine and excreted in an unaltered form in the urine. The pharmacokinetics of metformin is primarily determined by membrane transporters, including the plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT), the organic cation transporters (OCTs), the multidrug and toxin extrusion (MATE) transporters, and the critical protein kinase AMPactivated protein kinase (AMPK). PMAT may play a role in the uptake of metformin from the gastrointestinal tract, while OCTs mediate the intestinal absorption, hepatic uptake, and renal excretion of metformin. MATEs are believed to contribute to the hepatic and renal excretion of the drug. The pharmacologic effects of metformin are primarily exerted in the liver, at least partly via the activation of AMPK and the subsequent inhibition of gluconeogenesis. A considerable amount of pharmacogenetic research has demonstrated that genetic variation is one of the major factors affecting metformin response. Moreover, it has become increasingly clear that membrane transporters are important determinants of the pharmacokinetics of metformin. In this review, we will discuss the genetic variants of major transporters that purportedly determine the pharmacokinetics of metformin in terms of drug bioavailability, distribution, and excretion, such as PMAT, OCTs, and MATEs. Understanding how genetic variation affects metformin response will help promote more effective use of the drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D).

  18. Antigenic variation in African trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Horn, David

    2014-01-01

    Studies on Variant Surface Glycoproteins (VSGs) and antigenic variation in the African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, have yielded a remarkable range of novel and important insights. The features first identified in T. brucei extend from unique to conserved-among-trypanosomatids to conserved-among-eukaryotes. Consequently, much of what we now know about trypanosomatid biology and much of the technology available has its origin in studies related to VSGs. T. brucei is now probably the most advanced early branched eukaryote in terms of experimental tractability and can be approached as a pathogen, as a model for studies on fundamental processes, as a model for studies on eukaryotic evolution or often all of the above. In terms of antigenic variation itself, substantial progress has been made in understanding the expression and switching of the VSG coat, while outstanding questions continue to stimulate innovative new approaches. There are large numbers of VSG genes in the genome but only one is expressed at a time, always immediately adjacent to a telomere. DNA repair processes allow a new VSG to be copied into the single transcribed locus. A coordinated transcriptional switch can also allow a new VSG gene to be activated without any detectable change in the DNA sequence, thereby maintaining singular expression, also known as allelic exclusion. I review the story behind VSGs; the genes, their expression and switching, their central role in T. brucei virulence, the discoveries that emerged along the way and the persistent questions relating to allelic exclusion in particular. PMID:24859277

  19. 45 CFR 156.420 - Plan variations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-Sharing Reductions § 156.420 Plan variations. (a) Submission of silver plan variations. For each of its silver health plans that an issuer offers, or intends to offer in the individual market on an Exchange... standard silver plan and three variations of the standard silver plan, as follows— (1) For...

  20. Pre-vector variational inequality

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Lai-Jiu

    1994-12-31

    Let X be a Hausdorff topological vector space, (Y, D) be an ordered Hausdorff topological vector space ordered by convex cone D. Let L(X, Y) be the space of all bounded linear operator, E {improper_subset} X be a nonempty set, T : E {yields} L(X, Y), {eta} : E {times} E {yields} E be functions. For x, y {element_of} Y, we denote x {not_lt} y if y - x intD, where intD is the interior of D. We consider the following two problems: Find x {element_of} E such that < T(x), {eta}(y, x) > {not_lt} 0 for all y {element_of} E and find x {element_of} E, < T(x), {eta}(y, x) > {not_gt} 0 for all y {element_of} E and < T(x), {eta}(y, x) >{element_of} C{sub p}{sup w+} = {l_brace} {element_of} L(X, Y) {vert_bar}< l, {eta}(x, 0) >{not_lt} 0 for all x {element_of} E{r_brace} where < T(x), y > denotes linear operator T(x) at y, that is T(x), (y). We called Pre-VVIP the Pre-vector variational inequality problem and Pre-VCP complementary problem. If X = R{sup n}, Y = R, D = R{sub +} {eta}(y, x) = y - x, then our problem is the well-known variational inequality first studies by Hartman and Stampacchia. If Y = R, D = R{sub +}, {eta}(y, x) = y - x, our problem is the variational problem in infinite dimensional space. In this research, we impose different condition on T(x), {eta}, X, and < T(x), {eta}(y, x) > and investigate the existences theorem of these problems. As an application of one of our results, we establish the existence theorem of weak minimum of the problem. (P) V - min f(x) subject to x {element_of} E where f : X {yields} Y si a Frechet differentiable invex function.

  1. Non-differentiable variational principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresson, Jacky

    2005-07-01

    We develop a calculus of variations for functionals which are defined on a set of non-differentiable curves. We first extend the classical differential calculus in a quantum calculus, which allows us to define a complex operator, called the scale derivative, which is the non-differentiable analogue of the classical derivative. We then define the notion of extremals for our functionals and obtain a characterization in term of a generalized Euler-Lagrange equation. We finally prove that solutions of the Schrödinger equation can be obtained as extremals of a non-differentiable variational principle, leading to an extended Hamilton's principle of least action for quantum mechanics. We compare this approach with the scale relativity theory of Nottale, which assumes a fractal structure of space-time.Résumé (Principes variationnels non différentiable). Nous développons un calcul des variations pour des fonctionnelles définies sur un ensemble de courbes non différentiables. Pour cela, nous étendons le calcul différentiel classique, en calcul appelé calcul quantique, qui nous permet de définir un opérateur à valeur complexes, appelé dérivée d'échelle, qui est l'analogue non différentiable de la dérivée usuelle. On définit alors la notion d'extremale pour ces fonctionnelles pour lesquelles nous obtenons une caractérisation via une équation d'Euler-Lagrange généralisée. On prouve enfin que les solutions de l'équation de Schrödinger peuvent s'obtenir comme solution d'un problème variationnel non différentiable, étendant ainsi le principe de moindre action de Hamilton au cadre de la mécanique quantique. On discute enfin la connexion entre ce travail et la théorie de la relativité d'échelle développée par Nottale, et qui suppose une structure fractale de l'espace-temps.

  2. MDCT evaluation of sternal variations: Pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Duraikannu, Chary; Noronha, Olma V; Sundarrajan, Pushparajan

    2016-01-01

    Sternal variations and anomalies have been identified in the past during autopsy or cadaveric studies. Recently, an increasing number of minor sternal variations have been reported with the advent of multidetector computed tomography (CT). Although there are many sternal variations that occur with varying appearance and prevalence, most of them are not recognized or are underreported during routine imaging of thorax. Identification of sternal variations is important to differentiate from pathological conditions and to prevent fatal complications prior to sternal interventions like marrow aspiration or acupuncture. This article aims to describe the minor and asymptomatic sternal variations by multidetector CT and their clinical significance. PMID:27413263

  3. Secular Variation in Slip (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowgill, E.; Gold, R. D.

    2010-12-01

    Faults show temporal variations in slip rate at time scales ranging from the hours following a major rupture to the millions of years over which plate boundaries reorganize. One such behavior is secular variation in slip (SVS), which we define as a pulse of accelerated strain release along a single fault that occurs at a frequency that is > 1 order of magnitude longer than the recurrence interval of earthquakes within the pulse. Although numerous mechanical models have been proposed to explain SVS, it has proven much harder to measure long (5-500 kyr) records of fault displacement as a function of time. Such fault-slip histories may be obtained from morphochronologic data, which are measurements of offset and age obtained from faulted landforms. Here we describe slip-history modeling of morphochronologic data and show how this method holds promise for obtaining long records of fault slip. In detail we place SVS in the context of other types of time-varying fault-slip phenomena, explain the importance of measuring fault-slip histories, summarize models proposed to explain SVS, review current approaches for measuring SVS in the geologic record, and illustrate the slip-history modeling approach we advocate here using data from the active, left-slip Altyn Tagh fault in NW Tibet. In addition to SVS, other types of temporal variation in fault slip include post-seismic transients, discrepancies between geologic slip rates and those derived from geodetic and/or paleoseismic data, and single changes in slip rate resulting from plate reorganization. Investigating secular variation in slip is important for advancing understanding of long-term continental deformation, fault mechanics, and seismic risk. Mechanical models producing such behavior include self-driven mode switching, changes in pore-fluid pressure, viscoelasticity, postseismic reloading, and changes in local surface loads (e.g., ice sheets, large lakes, etc.) among others. However, a key problem in testing these

  4. Emerging patterns of epigenomic variation

    PubMed Central

    Milosavljevic, Aleksandar

    2011-01-01

    Fuelled by new sequencing technologies, epigenome mapping projects are revealing epigenomic variation at all levels of biological complexity, from species to cells. Comparisons of methylation profiles among species reveal evolutionary conservation of gene body methylation patterns, pointing to the fundamental role of epigenomes in gene regulation. At the human population level, epigenomic changes provide footprints of the effects of genomic variants within the vast non-protein coding fraction of the genome while comparisons of the epigenomes of parents and their offspring point to quantitative epigenomic parent-of-origin effects confounding classical Mendelian genetics. At the organismal level, comparisons of epigenomes from diverse cell types provide insights into cellular differentiation. Finally, comparisons of epigenomes from monozygotic twins help dissect genetic and environmental influences on human phenotypes and longitudinal comparisons reveal aging-associated epigenomic drift. The development of new bioinformatic frameworks for comparative epigenome analysis is putting epigenome maps within reach of researchers across a wide spectrum of biological disciplines. PMID:21507501

  5. Isotopic variations in primitive meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, R. N.

    1981-12-01

    Oxygen isotopic variations in carbonaceous chondrites and ordinary chondrites can each be interpreted as mixtures of two isotopically different reservoirs, one consisting of solids, enriched in O-16, the other of a gas, depleted in O-16 relative to terrestrial abundances. The data indicate a common source of the solids for each of the two classes of meteorites, but a different gas reservoir for each. These conditions might obtain in gaseous protoplanets. It is noted that radiogenic Mg-26 is variable in abundance among some classes of Allende inclusions, implying either nebular heterogeneity with respect to Al-26/Al-27 ratios or time differences of crystal formation. The presence of excess Ag-107 from decay of extinct Pd-107 corroborates the evidence from Mg-26 for a time interval of at most a few million years between the last nucleosynthetic event and the accretion of substantial bodies in the solar system.

  6. Variational approach and deformed derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weberszpil, J.; Helayël-Neto, J. A.

    2016-05-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that there exists a possible relationship between q-deformed algebras in two different contexts of Statistical Mechanics, namely, the Tsallis' framework and the Kaniadakis' scenario, with a local form of fractional-derivative operators for fractal media, the so-called Hausdorff derivatives, mapped into a continuous medium with a fractal measure. Here, in this paper, we present an extension of the traditional calculus of variations for systems containing deformed-derivatives embedded into the Lagrangian and the Lagrangian densities for classical and field systems. The results extend the classical Euler-Lagrange equations and the Hamiltonian formalism. The resulting dynamical equations seem to be compatible with those found in the literature, specially with mass-dependent and with nonlinear equations for systems in classical and quantum mechanics. Examples are presented to illustrate applications of the formulation. Also, the conserved ​Noether current is worked out.

  7. Variational identities and Hamiltonian structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Wenxiu

    2010-03-08

    This report is concerned with Hamiltonian structures of classical and super soliton hierarchies. In the classical case, basic tools are variational identities associated with continuous and discrete matrix spectral problems, targeted to soliton equations derived from zero curvature equations over general Lie algebras, both semisimple and non-semisimple. In the super case, a supertrace identity is presented for constructing Hamiltonian structures of super soliton equations associated with Lie superalgebras. We illustrate the general theories by the KdV hierarchy, the Volterra lattice hierarchy, the super AKNS hierarchy, and two hierarchies of dark KdV equations and dark Volterra lattices. The resulting Hamiltonian structures show the commutativity of each hierarchy discussed and thus the existence of infinitely many commuting symmetries and conservation laws.

  8. Communication variations and aircrew performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanki, Barbara G.; Folk, Valerie G.; Irwin, Cheryl M.

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between communication variations and aircrew performance (high-error vs low-error performances) was investigated by analyzing the coded verbal transcripts derived from the videotape records of 18 two-person air transport crews who participated in a high-fidelity, full-mission flight simulation. The flight scenario included a task which involved abnormal operations and required the coordinated efforts of all crew members. It was found that the best-performing crews were characterized by nearly identical patterns of communication, whereas the midrange and poorer performing crews showed a great deal of heterogeneity in their speech patterns. Although some specific speech sequences can be interpreted as being more or less facilitative to the crew-coordination process, predictability appears to be the key ingredient for enhancing crew performance. Crews communicating in highly standard (hence predictable) ways were better able to coordinate their task, whereas crews characterized by multiple, nonstandard communication profiles were less effective in their performance.

  9. Communication variations and aircrew performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanki, Barbara G.; Folk, Valerie G.; Irwin, Cheryl M.

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between communication variations and aircrew performance (high-error vs low-error performances) was investigated by analyzing the coded verbal transcripts derived from the videotape records of 18 two-person air transport crews who participated in a high-fidelity, full-mission flight simulation. The flight scenario included a task which involved abnormal operations and required the coordinated efforts of all crew members. It was found that the best-performing crews were characterized by nearly identical patterns of communication, whereas the midrange and poorer performing crews showed a great deal of heterogeneity in their speech patterns. Although some specific speech sequences can be interpreted as being more or less facilitative to the crew-coordination process, predictability appears to be the key ingredient for enhancing crew performance. Crews communicating in highly standard (hence predictable) ways were better able to coordinate their task, whereas crews characterized by multiple, nonstandard communication profiles were less effective in their performance.

  10. Detecting variation in chaotic attractors.

    PubMed

    Carroll, T L

    2011-06-01

    If the output of an experiment is a chaotic signal, it may be useful to detect small changes in the signal, but there are a limited number of ways to compare signals from chaotic systems, and most known methods are not robust in the presence of noise. One may calculate dimension or Lyapunov exponents from the signal, or construct a synchronizing model, but all of these are only useful in low noise situations. I introduce a method for detecting small variations in a chaotic attractor based on directly calculating the difference between vector fields in phase space. The differences are found by comparing close strands in phase space, rather than close neighbors. The use of strands makes the method more robust to noise and more sensitive to small attractor differences.

  11. Secular obliquity variations for Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bills, Bruce; Scott, Bryan R.; Nimmo, Francis

    2016-10-01

    We have constructed secular variation models for the orbit and spin poles of the asteroid (1) Ceres, and used them to examine how the obliquity, or angular separation between spin and orbit poles, varies over a time span of several million years. The current obliquity is 4.3 degrees, which means that there are some regions near the poles which do not receive any direct Sunlight. The Dawn mission has provided an improved estimate of the spin pole orientation, and of the low degree gravity field. That allows us to estimate the rate at which the spin pole precesses about the instantaneous orbit pole.The orbit of Ceres is secularly perturbed by the planets, with Jupiter's influence dominating. The current inclination of the orbit plane, relative to the ecliptic, is 10.6 degrees. However, it varies between 7.27 and 11.78 degrees, with dominant periods of 22.1 and 39.6 kyr. The spin pole precession rate parameter has a period of 205 kyr, with current uncertainty of 3%, dominated by uncertainty in the mean moment of inertia of Ceres.The obliquity varies, with a dominant period of 24.5 kyr, with maximum values near 26 degrees, and minimum values somewhat less than the present value. Ceres is currently near to a minimum of its secular obliquity variations.The near-surface thermal environment thus has at least 3 important time scales: diurnal (9.07 hours), annual (4.60 years), and obliquity cycle (24.5 kyr). The annual thermal wave likely only penetrates a few meters, but the much long thermal wave associated with the obliquity cycle has a skin depth larger by a factor of 70 or so, depending upon thermal properties in the subsurface.

  12. Nested biological variation and speciation

    PubMed Central

    Foster, S. A.

    1998-01-01

    The modes of speciation that are thought to have contributed most to the generation of biodiversity require population differentiation as the initial stage in the speciation process. Consequently, a complete understanding of the mechanisms of speciation requires that the process be examined not just after speciation is complete, or nearly so, but also much earlier. Because reproductive isolation defines biological species, and it evolves slowly, study of the process may require a prohibitive span of time. Even if speciation could be observed directly, selection of populations in the process of speciation is typically difficult or impossible, because those that will ultimately undergo speciation cannot be distinguished from those that will differentiate but never assume the status of new biological species. One means of circumventing this problem is to study speciation in taxa comprising several sibling species, at least one of which exhibits extensive population differentiation. We illustrate this approach by exploring patterns of population variation in the post-glacial radiation of the threespine stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus. We focus on lacustrine populations and species within this complex, demonstrating parallel axes of divergence within populations, among populations and among species. The pattern that emerges is one of parallel relationships between phenotype and fitness at all three hierarchical levels, a pattern that facilitates exploration of the causes and consequences of speciation and secondary contact. A second outcome of this exploration is the observation that speciation can be the consequence of a cascade of effects, beginning with selection on trophic or other characteristics that in turn force the evolution of other population characteristics that precipitate speciation. Neither of these conclusions could have been reached without comparative studies of wild populations at several hierarchical levels, a conclusion reinforced by a brief

  13. Solar Response to Luminosity Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arendt, S.

    1990-01-01

    The connection between solar luminosity and magnetic fields is now well-established. Magnetic fields under the guise of sunspots and faculae enhance or suppress heat transfer through the solar surface, leading to changes in the total solar luminosity. This raises the question of the effect that such surface heat transfer perturbations have on the internal structure of the sun. The problem has been considered previously by Foukal and Spruit. Here, researchers generalize the calculation of Spruit, removing the assumption of a constant heat diffusivity coefficient by treating the full mixing length heat transfer expression. Further, they treat the surface conditions in a simpler manner, and show that the previous conclusions of Foukal and Spruit are unaffected by these modifications. The model shows that following the application of a step function emissivity change: a fraction 1 - D(sub 0) of the luminosity change relaxes away after approx. 50 days. This corresponds to the thermal diffusion time across the convection zone, adjusting to a value in correspondence with the surface change. In other words, the whole convection zone feels the perturbation on this timescale. The remaining fraction relaxes away on a timescale of 10 to the 5th power years, corresponding to the convective layer radiating away enough energy so that it can adjust to its new adiabat. These are the same results arrived at by Spruit and Foukal. For variations of sigma on timescales of 10 to 200 years, then, the only important relaxation is the 50 day one. If the amplitude of this relaxation is small, the luminosity follows the sigma variation.

  14. Variational methods for field theories

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Menahem, S.

    1986-09-01

    Four field theory models are studied: Periodic Quantum Electrodynamics (PQED) in (2 + 1) dimensions, free scalar field theory in (1 + 1) dimensions, the Quantum XY model in (1 + 1) dimensions, and the (1 + 1) dimensional Ising model in a transverse magnetic field. The last three parts deal exclusively with variational methods; the PQED part involves mainly the path-integral approach. The PQED calculation results in a better understanding of the connection between electric confinement through monopole screening, and confinement through tunneling between degenerate vacua. This includes a better quantitative agreement for the string tensions in the two approaches. Free field theory is used as a laboratory for a new variational blocking-truncation approximation, in which the high-frequency modes in a block are truncated to wave functions that depend on the slower background modes (Boron-Oppenheimer approximation). This ''adiabatic truncation'' method gives very accurate results for ground-state energy density and correlation functions. Various adiabatic schemes, with one variable kept per site and then two variables per site, are used. For the XY model, several trial wave functions for the ground state are explored, with an emphasis on the periodic Gaussian. A connection is established with the vortex Coulomb gas of the Euclidean path integral approach. The approximations used are taken from the realms of statistical mechanics (mean field approximation, transfer-matrix methods) and of quantum mechanics (iterative blocking schemes). In developing blocking schemes based on continuous variables, problems due to the periodicity of the model were solved. Our results exhibit an order-disorder phase transition. The transfer-matrix method is used to find a good (non-blocking) trial ground state for the Ising model in a transverse magnetic field in (1 + 1) dimensions.

  15. Variation in Recombination Rate: Adaptive or Not?

    PubMed

    Ritz, Kathryn R; Noor, Mohamed A F; Singh, Nadia D

    2017-03-27

    Rates of meiotic recombination are widely variable both within and among species. However, the functional significance of this variation remains largely unknown. Is the observed within-species variation in recombination rate adaptive? Recent work has revealed new insight into the scale and scope of population-level variation in recombination rate. These data indicate that the magnitude of within-population variation in recombination is similar among taxa. The apparent similarity of the variance in recombination rate among individuals between distantly related species suggests that the relative costs and benefits of recombination that establish the upper and lower bounds may be similar across species. Here we review the current data on intraspecific variation in recombination rate and discuss the molecular and evolutionary costs and benefits of recombination frequency. We place this variation in the context of adaptation and highlight the need for more empirical studies focused on the adaptive value of variation in recombination rate.

  16. Accommodating Variation: Dialects, Idiolects, and Speech Processing

    PubMed Central

    Kraljic, Tanya; Brennan, Susan E.; Samuel, Arthur G.

    2008-01-01

    Listeners are faced with enormous variation in pronunciation, yet they rarely have difficulty understanding speech. Although much research has been devoted to figuring out how listeners deal with variability, virtually none (outside of sociolinguistics) has focused on the source of the variation itself. The current experiments explore whether different kinds of variation lead to different cognitive and behavioral adjustments. Specifically, we compare adjustments to the same acoustic consequence when it is due to context-independent variation (resulting from articulatory properties unique to a speaker) versus context-conditioned variation (resulting from common articulatory properties of speakers who share a dialect). The contrasting results for these two cases show that the source of a particular acoustic-phonetic variation affects how that variation is handled by the perceptual system. We also show that changes in perceptual representations do not necessarily lead to changes in production. PMID:17803986

  17. Regulation of antigenic variation in Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Prucca, César G; Rivero, Fernando D; Luján, Hugo D

    2011-01-01

    Antigenic variation, a clonal phenotypic variation developed by microorganisms, involves the permanent switching of homologous, antigenically different cell surface molecules. In pathogenic microorganisms, antigenic variation is often described as a mechanism to evade the host immune system and therefore is responsible for the generation of chronic and/or recurrent infections. However, antigenic variation has also been involved in expanding host diversity and differential courses of the diseases. The intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia undergoes antigenic variation through the continuous exchange of approximately 200 variant-specific surface proteins. Here we review the principal issues regarding the significance of antigenic variation during Giardia infections, the particular features of the variant-specific surface proteins, and the current knowledge on the mechanisms that regulate this process, as well as the relevance of disrupting antigenic variation as a novel approach to design effective antiparasitic vaccines.

  18. Accommodating variation: dialects, idiolects, and speech processing.

    PubMed

    Kraljic, Tanya; Brennan, Susan E; Samuel, Arthur G

    2008-04-01

    Listeners are faced with enormous variation in pronunciation, yet they rarely have difficulty understanding speech. Although much research has been devoted to figuring out how listeners deal with variability, virtually none (outside of sociolinguistics) has focused on the source of the variation itself. The current experiments explore whether different kinds of variation lead to different cognitive and behavioral adjustments. Specifically, we compare adjustments to the same acoustic consequence when it is due to context-independent variation (resulting from articulatory properties unique to a speaker) versus context-conditioned variation (resulting from common articulatory properties of speakers who share a dialect). The contrasting results for these two cases show that the source of a particular acoustic-phonetic variation affects how that variation is handled by the perceptual system. We also show that changes in perceptual representations do not necessarily lead to changes in production.

  19. Pervasive gene content variation and copy number variation in maize and its undomesticated progenitor

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Different individuals of the same species are generally thought to have very similar genomes. However, there is growing evidence that structural variation in the form of copy number variation (CNV) and presence-absence variation (PAV) can lead to variation in the genome content of individuals withi...

  20. How variation between individuals affects species coexistence.

    PubMed

    Hart, Simon P; Schreiber, Sebastian J; Levine, Jonathan M

    2016-08-01

    Although the effects of variation between individuals within species are traditionally ignored in studies of species coexistence, the magnitude of intraspecific variation in nature is forcing ecologists to reconsider. Compelling intuitive arguments suggest that individual variation may provide a previously unrecognised route to diversity maintenance by blurring species-level competitive differences or substituting for species-level niche differences. These arguments, which are motivating a large body of empirical work, have rarely been evaluated with quantitative theory. Here we incorporate intraspecific variation into a common model of competition and identify three pathways by which this variation affects coexistence: (1) changes in competitive dynamics because of nonlinear averaging, (2) changes in species' mean interaction strengths because of variation in underlying traits (also via nonlinear averaging) and (3) effects on stochastic demography. As a consequence of the first two mechanisms, we find that intraspecific variation in competitive ability increases the dominance of superior competitors, and intraspecific niche variation reduces species-level niche differentiation, both of which make coexistence more difficult. In addition, individual variation can exacerbate the effects of demographic stochasticity, and this further destabilises coexistence. Our work provides a theoretical foundation for emerging empirical interests in the effects of intraspecific variation on species diversity.

  1. Hollow glass waveguides: New variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Daniel Joseph

    This study is an effort to develop new variations on the infrared silver-silver iodide hollow glass waveguide (HGW) with application specific properties. Four variations are presented: a HGW with a long, gradual taper, a HGW with a rectangular cross-section, curved HGW tips and a new all-dielectric hollow waveguide based on photonic bandgap guidance principles. A hollow glass waveguide tapered over its entire length offers ease of coupling at the proximal end and excellent flexibility at the distal end. Waveguides tapered from 1000 to 500 mum and 700 to 500 mum over 1.5 m were fabricated in this study. Compared to similarly sized non-tapered waveguides, laser losses for the tapered guides were high but decreased when bent. This behavior is contrary to that of non-tapered guides and an iterative ray tracing model was also developed to explain the observed loss characteristics of tapered hollow waveguides. Hollow glass waveguides with round profiles do not maintain the polarization state of the delivered radiation to any appreciable degree. HGWs with large- and small-aspect ratio rectangular cross sections were developed and shown to preserve polarization up to 96%, even when bent. The large aspect ratio guide was able to effectively rotate the transmitted polarization when twisted along its axis. Curved distal tips for medical and dental laser applications were developed by removing the low-OH silica fiber from commercially available stainless steel dental tips, and inserting HGWs of various sizes. The optical performances and heating profiles of the various configurations indicate the tips are suitable for certain medical applications, but the minimum bending radius is limited by the mechanical properties of the glass substrate. A small radii bending loss study confirms that propagating modes periodically couple as the radius of curvature is reduced. Through the application of the photonic bandgap (PBG) guidance, hollow waveguides can be made entirely from

  2. Variational Methods for Field Theories.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Menahem, Shahar

    The thesis has four parts, dealing with four field theory models: Periodic Quantum Electrodynamics (PQED) in (2 + 1) dimensions, free scalar field theory in (1 + 1) dimensions, the Quantum XY model in (1 + 1) dimensions, and the (1 + 1) dimensional Ising model in a transverse magnetic field. The last three parts deal exclusively with variational methods; the PQED part involves mainly the path-integral approach. The PQED calculation results in a better understanding of the connection between electric confinement through monopole screening, and confinement through tunneling between degenerate vacua. This includes a better quantitative agreement for the string tensions in the two approaches. In the second part, we use free field theory as a loboratory for a new variational blocking-tuncation approximation, in which the high-frequency modes in a block are truncated to wave functions that depend on the slower background modes(Born-Oppenheimer approximation). This "adiabatic truncation" method gives very accurate results for ground -state energy density and correlation functions. Without the adiabatic method, a much larger number of state per block must be kept to get comparable results. Various adiabatic schemes, with one variable kept per site and then two variables per site, are used. For the XY model, several trial wave functions for the ground state are explored, with an emphasis on the periodic Gaussian. A connection is established with the vortex Coulomb gas of the Eclidean path integral approach. The approximations used are taken from the realms of statistical mechanics (mean field approximation, transfer-matrix methods) and of quantum mechanics (iterative blocking schemes). In developing blocking schemes based on continuous variables, problems due to the periodicity of the model were solved. Our results exhibit an order-disorder phase transition. This transition is a rudimentary version of the actual transition known to occur in the XY model, and is

  3. Global Color Variations on Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Jupiter's icy moon Callisto is shown in approximate natural color (left) and in false color to enhance subtle color variations (right). This image of Callisto's Jupiter-facing hemisphere shows the ancient, multi-ring impact structure Valhalla just above the center of the image. Valhalla, possibly created by a large asteroid or comet which impacted Callisto, is the largest surface feature on this icy moon. Valhalla consists of a bright inner region, about 600 kilometers (360 miles) in diameter surrounded by concentric rings 3000 to 4000 kilometers (1800-2500 miles) in diameter. The bright central plains were possibly created by the excavation and ejection of 'cleaner' ice from beneath the surface, with a fluid-like mass (impact melt) filling the crater bowl after impact. The concentric rings are fractures in the crust resulting from the impact.

    The false color in the right image shows new information, including ejecta from relatively recent craters, which are often not apparent in the natural color image. The color also reveals a gradual variation across the moon's hemisphere, perhaps due to implantation of materials onto the surface from space.

    These color images were obtained with the 1 micrometer (infrared), green, and violet filters of the Solid State Imaging (SSI) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The false color is created from ratios of infrared/violet and its inverse (violet/infrared) which are then combined so the infrared/violet, green, and violet/infrared are assigned to red, green, and blue in a composite product.

    North is to the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from near the center, in the same way a full moon is seen from Earth when illuminated by the sun. The image, centered at 0.5 degrees south latitude and 56.3 degrees longitude, covers an area about 4800 by 4800 kilometers. The resolution is 14 kilometers per picture element. The images were taken on November 5, 1997 at a range of 68,400 kilometers (41,000 miles

  4. Statistical variation in progressive scrambling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Robert D.; Fox, Peter C.

    2004-07-01

    The two methods most often used to evaluate the robustness and predictivity of partial least squares (PLS) models are cross-validation and response randomization. Both methods may be overly optimistic for data sets that contain redundant observations, however. The kinds of perturbation analysis widely used for evaluating model stability in the context of ordinary least squares regression are only applicable when the descriptors are independent of each other and errors are independent and normally distributed; neither assumption holds for QSAR in general and for PLS in particular. Progressive scrambling is a novel, non-parametric approach to perturbing models in the response space in a way that does not disturb the underlying covariance structure of the data. Here, we introduce adjustments for two of the characteristic values produced by a progressive scrambling analysis - the deprecated predictivity (Q_s^{ast^2}) and standard error of prediction (SDEP s * ) - that correct for the effect of introduced perturbation. We also explore the statistical behavior of the adjusted values (Q_0^{ast^2} and SDEP 0 * ) and the sensitivity to perturbation (d q 2/d r yy ' 2). It is shown that the three statistics are all robust for stable PLS models, in terms of the stochastic component of their determination and of their variation due to sampling effects involved in training set selection.

  5. Similarity, invariance, and musical variation.

    PubMed

    McAdams, S; Matzkin, D

    2001-06-01

    Perceptual similarity underlies a number of important psychological properties of musical materials, including perceptual invariance under transformation, categorization, recognition, and the sense of familiarity. Mental processes involved in the perception of musical similarity may be an integral part of the functional logic of music composition and thus underly important aspects of musical experience. How much and in what ways can musical materials be varied and still be considered as perceptually related or as belonging to the same category? The notions of musical material, musical variation, perceptual similarity and invariance, and form-bearing dimensions are considered in this light. Recent work on similarity perception has demonstrated that the transformation space for a given musical material is limited by several factors ranging from degree of match of the values of auditory attributes of the events composing the sequences to their relations of various levels of abstraction and to the degree that the transformation respects the grammar of the musical system within which the material was composed. These notions and results are considered in the light of future directions of research, particularly concerning the role of similarity and invariance in the understanding of musical form during listening.

  6. Temporal Variations in Jupiter's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Chanover, N. J.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.; Hammel, H. B.; dePater, I.; Noll, K.; Wong, M.; Clarke, J.; Sanchez-Levega, A.; Orton, G. S.; Gonzaga, S.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, Jupiter has undergone many atmospheric changes from storms turning red to global. cloud upheavals, and most recently, a cornet or asteroid impact. Yet, on top of these seemingly random changes events there are also periodic phenomena, analogous to observed Earth and Saturn atmospheric oscillations. We will present 15 years of Hubble data, from 1994 to 2009, to show how the equatorial tropospheric cloud deck and winds have varied over that time, focusing on the F953N, F41 ON and F255W filters. These filters give leverage on wind speeds plus cloud opacity, cloud height and tropospheric haze thickness, and stratospheric haze, respectively. The wind data consistently show a periodic oscillation near 7-8 S latitude. We will discuss the potential for variations with longitude and cloud height, within the calibration limits of those filters. Finally, we will discuss the role that large atmospheric events, such as the impacts in 1994 and 2009, and the global upheaval of 2007, have on temporal studies, This work was supported by a grant from the NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program. HST observational support was provided by NASA through grants from Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under contract NAS5-26555.

  7. Recent glacier variations in Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutomu, Kadota; Gombo, Davaa

    2007-10-01

    Glacier monitoring enables us to detect influences of global warming in high mountain regions. To initiate the establishment of a glacier-monitoring network in northern Eurasia, we studied recent glacier variations in Mongolia using topographical maps, aerial photographs and satellite images (Corona and Landsat). Glaciers in Mongolia exist in the Altai mountains which span approximately 1400 km within Russia, China and Mongolia. Four regions were selected to form the study area: Tavan Bogd region, Turgen massif, Kharkhiraa massif and Tsambagarav massif. During the period from the 1940s to 2000 or from 1968 to 2000, the glaciers in these regions lost 10.2%, 19.3%, 28.0% and 28.8% of their area respectively. The glaciers in the Tavan Bogd, Kharkhiraa and Turgen regions were found to have been almost stationary since 1987/88, while those in Tsambagarav massif showed no significant change in area since 1963. Shrinkage of the glaciers occurred between 1945/68 and 1987/88 in the former regions and between 1948 and 1963 in the latter. Mongolian glaciers seem to behave differently from other glaciers which have been experiencing steady shrinkage recently.

  8. Temporal Variations in Jupiter's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Chanover, N. J.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.; Hammel, H. B.; dePater, I.; Noll, K.; Wong, M.; Clarke, J.; Sanchez-Levega, A.; Orton, G. S.; hide

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, Jupiter has undergone many atmospheric changes from storms turning red to global. cloud upheavals, and most recently, a cornet or asteroid impact. Yet, on top of these seemingly random changes events there are also periodic phenomena, analogous to observed Earth and Saturn atmospheric oscillations. We will present 15 years of Hubble data, from 1994 to 2009, to show how the equatorial tropospheric cloud deck and winds have varied over that time, focusing on the F953N, F41 ON and F255W filters. These filters give leverage on wind speeds plus cloud opacity, cloud height and tropospheric haze thickness, and stratospheric haze, respectively. The wind data consistently show a periodic oscillation near 7-8 S latitude. We will discuss the potential for variations with longitude and cloud height, within the calibration limits of those filters. Finally, we will discuss the role that large atmospheric events, such as the impacts in 1994 and 2009, and the global upheaval of 2007, have on temporal studies, This work was supported by a grant from the NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program. HST observational support was provided by NASA through grants from Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under contract NAS5-26555.

  9. Variations on the Zilch Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, P.-M.; Tanoue, C. K. S.

    2013-10-01

    Thermo dynamic cycles in introductory physics courses are usually made up from a small number of permutations of isothermal, adiabatic, and constant-pressure and volume quasistatic strokes, with the working fluid usually being an ideal gas. Among them we find the Carnot, Stirling, Otto, Diesel, and Joule-Brayton cycles; in more advanced courses, steam cycles and refrigerators based on real working fluids are often introduced. Any additional cycles made up from the same simple strokes, and any extended analysis of known cycles, are welcome additions to the teaching repertory, as they provide more opportunities for practice and discussion. Our purpose in this note is to extend the analysis of the zilch cycle, introduced in Ref. 1, by presenting its TS diagram and by proposing several variations that do not contain adiabatic strokes, thus allowing a simpler mathematical treatment. As a bonus, we also provide results that make it possible to represent practically any elementary ideal-gas cycle in a TS diagram.

  10. Worldwide variations in artificial skyglow.

    PubMed

    Kyba, Christopher C M; Tong, Kai Pong; Bennie, Jonathan; Birriel, Ignacio; Birriel, Jennifer J; Cool, Andrew; Danielsen, Arne; Davies, Thomas W; Outer, Peter N den; Edwards, William; Ehlert, Rainer; Falchi, Fabio; Fischer, Jürgen; Giacomelli, Andrea; Giubbilini, Francesco; Haaima, Marty; Hesse, Claudia; Heygster, Georg; Hölker, Franz; Inger, Richard; Jensen, Linsey J; Kuechly, Helga U; Kuehn, John; Langill, Phil; Lolkema, Dorien E; Nagy, Matthew; Nievas, Miguel; Ochi, Nobuaki; Popow, Emil; Posch, Thomas; Puschnig, Johannes; Ruhtz, Thomas; Schmidt, Wim; Schwarz, Robert; Schwope, Axel; Spoelstra, Henk; Tekatch, Anthony; Trueblood, Mark; Walker, Constance E; Weber, Michael; Welch, Douglas L; Zamorano, Jaime; Gaston, Kevin J

    2015-02-12

    Despite constituting a widespread and significant environmental change, understanding of artificial nighttime skyglow is extremely limited. Until now, published monitoring studies have been local or regional in scope, and typically of short duration. In this first major international compilation of monitoring data we answer several key questions about skyglow properties. Skyglow is observed to vary over four orders of magnitude, a range hundreds of times larger than was the case before artificial light. Nearly all of the study sites were polluted by artificial light. A non-linear relationship is observed between the sky brightness on clear and overcast nights, with a change in behavior near the rural to urban landuse transition. Overcast skies ranged from a third darker to almost 18 times brighter than clear. Clear sky radiances estimated by the World Atlas of Artificial Night Sky Brightness were found to be overestimated by ~25%; our dataset will play an important role in the calibration and ground truthing of future skyglow models. Most of the brightly lit sites darkened as the night progressed, typically by ~5% per hour. The great variation in skyglow radiance observed from site-to-site and with changing meteorological conditions underlines the need for a long-term international monitoring program.

  11. Genome size variation in Begonia.

    PubMed

    Dewitte, Angelo; Leus, Leen; Eeckhaut, Tom; Vanstechelman, Ives; Van Huylenbroeck, Johan; Van Bockstaele, Erik

    2009-10-01

    The genome sizes of a Begonia collection comprising 37 species and 23 hybrids of African, Asiatic, Middle American, and South American origin were screened using flow cytometry. Within the collection, 1C values varied between 0.23 and 1.46 pg DNA. Genome sizes were, in most cases, not positively correlated with chromosome number, but with pollen size. A 12-fold difference in mean chromosome size was found between the genotypes with the largest and smallest chromosomes. In general, chromosomes from South American genotypes were smaller than chromosomes of African, Asian, or Middle American genotypes, except for B. boliviensis and B. pearcei. Cytological chromosome studies in different genotypes showed variable chromosome numbers, length, width, and total chromosome volume, which confirmed the diversity in genome size. Large secondary constrictions were present in several investigated genotypes. These data show that chromosome number and structure exhibit a great deal of variation within the genus Begonia, and likely help to explain the large number of taxa found within the genus.

  12. Variations in hospital administrative costs.

    PubMed

    McKay, Niccie L; Lemak, Christy Harris; Lovett, Annesha

    2008-01-01

    Administrative costs in hospitals are substantial and can have a major effect on performance. Despite this fact, not much research has been done to better understand such costs. This study examined variations in hospital administrative costs using a data set of acute care hospitals in Florida over the period 2000 through 2004. Results indicated that inflation-adjusted total administrative costs increased from about $22 million to $28 million on average over this time period. However, the percentage of total operating costs devoted to administrative costs was quite stable over the period, averaging approximately 23 percent in each of the five years. Compared with those in rural areas, urban hospitals on average had higher administrative costs per adjusted admission but lower administrative costs as a percentage of total operating costs. Hospital administrative costs also differed by ownership: For-profit hospitals on average had higher administrative costs per adjusted admission than not-for-profit and government hospitals, but administrative costs as a percentage of total operating costs were highest for for-profit hospitals and lowest for not-for-profit hospitals, with government hospitals falling in the middle. For bed size, administrative costs as a percentage of total operating costs were highest for the smallest hospitals. Results of this study will be useful to healthcare managers searching for ways to reduce unnecessary administrative costs while continuing to maintain the level of administrative activities required for the provision of safe, effective, high-quality care.

  13. Variations in Weight Stigma Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Teter, Cambridge; K.Thaw, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 40 years, obesity rates in the United States have grown significantly; these rates have not grown uniformly across the United States (18 of the 20 counties with the highest obesity rates are located in the South). Obesity increases cardiovascular disease risk factors and new research has highlighted the negative psychological effects of obesity, known as weight stigma, including decreased selfcontrol resources, over eating, and exercise avoidance. The primary objective of this study was to determine if weight stigma concerns varied regionally and if social behaviors influenced this variation. In two studies, we collected cross-sectional data from participants in the United States including height and weight, weight stigma concerns, and perception of friends’ preoccupation with weight and dieting. We also collected each participant’s home zip code which was used to locate local obesity rate. We established differences in the relationship between body mass index and weight stigma concerns by local county obesity rate and showed that perceived friend preoccupation with weight and dieting mediated this relationship for individuals in low and medium obesity rate counties. For individuals living in United States counties with lower levels of obesity, increases in personal body mass index leads to increased weight stigma concerns due to an increase in perceived friend preoccupation with weight and dieting. These results indicate that relationships between body mass index, weight stigma concerns, and social networks vary significantly for subpopulations throughout the United States. PMID:28058288

  14. Worldwide variations in artificial skyglow

    PubMed Central

    Kyba, Christopher C. M.; Tong, Kai Pong; Bennie, Jonathan; Birriel, Ignacio; Birriel, Jennifer J.; Cool, Andrew; Danielsen, Arne; Davies, Thomas W.; Outer, Peter N. den; Edwards, William; Ehlert, Rainer; Falchi, Fabio; Fischer, Jürgen; Giacomelli, Andrea; Giubbilini, Francesco; Haaima, Marty; Hesse, Claudia; Heygster, Georg; Hölker, Franz; Inger, Richard; Jensen, Linsey J.; Kuechly, Helga U.; Kuehn, John; Langill, Phil; Lolkema, Dorien E.; Nagy, Matthew; Nievas, Miguel; Ochi, Nobuaki; Popow, Emil; Posch, Thomas; Puschnig, Johannes; Ruhtz, Thomas; Schmidt, Wim; Schwarz, Robert; Schwope, Axel; Spoelstra, Henk; Tekatch, Anthony; Trueblood, Mark; Walker, Constance E.; Weber, Michael; Welch, Douglas L.; Zamorano, Jaime; Gaston, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite constituting a widespread and significant environmental change, understanding of artificial nighttime skyglow is extremely limited. Until now, published monitoring studies have been local or regional in scope, and typically of short duration. In this first major international compilation of monitoring data we answer several key questions about skyglow properties. Skyglow is observed to vary over four orders of magnitude, a range hundreds of times larger than was the case before artificial light. Nearly all of the study sites were polluted by artificial light. A non-linear relationship is observed between the sky brightness on clear and overcast nights, with a change in behavior near the rural to urban landuse transition. Overcast skies ranged from a third darker to almost 18 times brighter than clear. Clear sky radiances estimated by the World Atlas of Artificial Night Sky Brightness were found to be overestimated by ~25%; our dataset will play an important role in the calibration and ground truthing of future skyglow models. Most of the brightly lit sites darkened as the night progressed, typically by ~5% per hour. The great variation in skyglow radiance observed from site-to-site and with changing meteorological conditions underlines the need for a long-term international monitoring program. PMID:25673335

  15. Sex reduces genetic variation: a multidisciplinary review.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, Root; Heng, Henry H Q

    2011-04-01

    For over a century, the paradigm has been that sex invariably increases genetic variation, despite many renowned biologists asserting that sex decreases most genetic variation. Sex is usually perceived as the source of additive genetic variance that drives eukaryotic evolution vis-à-vis adaptation and Fisher's fundamental theorem. However, evidence for sex decreasing genetic variation appears in ecology, paleontology, population genetics, and cancer biology. The common thread among many of these disciplines is that sex acts like a coarse filter, weeding out major changes, such as chromosomal rearrangements (that are almost always deleterious), but letting minor variation, such as changes at the nucleotide or gene level (that are often neutral), flow through the sexual sieve. Sex acts as a constraint on genomic and epigenetic variation, thereby limiting adaptive evolution. The diverse reasons for sex reducing genetic variation (especially at the genome level) and slowing down evolution may provide a sufficient benefit to offset the famed costs of sex.

  16. Tooth Size Variation in Pinniped Dentitions

    PubMed Central

    Wolsan, Mieczyslaw; Suzuki, Satoshi; Asahara, Masakazu; Motokawa, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    It is contentious whether size variation among mammalian teeth is heterogeneous or homogeneous, whether the coefficient of variation is reliable, and whether the standard deviation of log-transformed data and the residual of standard deviation on mean variable size are useful replacements for the coefficient of variation. Most studies of tooth size variation have been on mammals with complex-crowned teeth, with relatively little attention paid to taxa with simple-crowned teeth, such as Pinnipedia. To fill this gap in knowledge and to resolve the existing controversies, we explored the variation of linear size variables (length and width) for all teeth from complete permanent dentitions of four pinniped species, two phocids (Histriophoca fasciata, Phoca largha) and two otariids (Callorhinus ursinus, Eumetopias jubatus). Size variation among these teeth was mostly heterogeneous both along the toothrow and among species. The incisors, canines, and mesial and distal postcanines were often relatively highly variable. The levels of overall dental size variation ranged from relatively low as in land carnivorans (Phoca largha and both otariids) to high (Histriophoca fasciata). Sexual size dimorphism varied among teeth and among species, with teeth being, on average, larger in males than in females. This dimorphism was more pronounced, and the canines were larger and more dimorphic relative to other teeth in the otariids than in the phocids. The coefficient of variation quantified variation reliably in most cases. The standard deviation of log-transformed data was redundant with the coefficient of variation. The residual of standard deviation on mean variable size was inaccurate when size variation was considerably heterogeneous among the compared variables, and was incomparable between species and between sexes. The existing hypotheses invoking developmental fields, occlusal complexity, and the relative timing of tooth formation and sexually dimorphic hormonal activity do

  17. Anatomic Variations in Head and Neck Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Bien-Keem; Wong, Chin-Ho; Chen, Hung-Chi

    2010-01-01

    Head and neck reconstruction is a technically challenging procedure. Variations encountered in the recipient vessels and commonly used flaps add to the complexity of surgery. This article reviews the commonly encountered variations in the recipient vessels in the neck with emphasis on alternatives and techniques to circumvent these variations. Flaps commonly used in head and neck reconstruction are also reviewed in detail. Furthermore, safety, potential pitfalls, and technical pearls are highlighted. PMID:22550436

  18. Tooth Size Variation in Pinniped Dentitions.

    PubMed

    Wolsan, Mieczyslaw; Suzuki, Satoshi; Asahara, Masakazu; Motokawa, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    It is contentious whether size variation among mammalian teeth is heterogeneous or homogeneous, whether the coefficient of variation is reliable, and whether the standard deviation of log-transformed data and the residual of standard deviation on mean variable size are useful replacements for the coefficient of variation. Most studies of tooth size variation have been on mammals with complex-crowned teeth, with relatively little attention paid to taxa with simple-crowned teeth, such as Pinnipedia. To fill this gap in knowledge and to resolve the existing controversies, we explored the variation of linear size variables (length and width) for all teeth from complete permanent dentitions of four pinniped species, two phocids (Histriophoca fasciata, Phoca largha) and two otariids (Callorhinus ursinus, Eumetopias jubatus). Size variation among these teeth was mostly heterogeneous both along the toothrow and among species. The incisors, canines, and mesial and distal postcanines were often relatively highly variable. The levels of overall dental size variation ranged from relatively low as in land carnivorans (Phoca largha and both otariids) to high (Histriophoca fasciata). Sexual size dimorphism varied among teeth and among species, with teeth being, on average, larger in males than in females. This dimorphism was more pronounced, and the canines were larger and more dimorphic relative to other teeth in the otariids than in the phocids. The coefficient of variation quantified variation reliably in most cases. The standard deviation of log-transformed data was redundant with the coefficient of variation. The residual of standard deviation on mean variable size was inaccurate when size variation was considerably heterogeneous among the compared variables, and was incomparable between species and between sexes. The existing hypotheses invoking developmental fields, occlusal complexity, and the relative timing of tooth formation and sexually dimorphic hormonal activity do

  19. Flextensional Transducer Modeling Using Variational Principles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-30

    AD-A284 740Oi NUWC-NPT Technical Document 10,479 30 September 1993 Flextensional Transducer Modeling Using Variational Principles Presented at the...3 REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED r 30 September 1993 Final 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Flextensional Transducer Modeling Using Variational...This document contains the presentation entitled " Flextensional Transducer Modeling Using Variational Principles" given at the 124th meeting of the

  20. Influence of Design Variations on Systems Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, Irem Y.; Stone, Robert B.; Huff, Edward M.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    High-risk aerospace components have to meet very stringent quality, performance, and safety requirements. Any source of variation is a concern, as it may result in scrap or rework. poor performance, and potentially unsafe flying conditions. The sources of variation during product development, including design, manufacturing, and assembly, and during operation are shown. Sources of static and dynamic variation during development need to be detected accurately in order to prevent failure when the components are placed in operation. The Systems' Health and Safety (SHAS) research at the NASA Ames Research Center addresses the problem of detecting and evaluating the statistical variation in helicopter transmissions. In this work, we focus on the variations caused by design, manufacturing, and assembly of these components, prior to being placed in operation (DMV). In particular, we aim to understand and represent the failure and variation information, and their correlation to performance and safety and feed this information back into the development cycle at an early stage. The feedback of such critical information will assure the development of more reliable components with less rework and scrap. Variations during design and manufacturing are a common source of concern in the development and production of such components. Accounting for these variations, especially those that have the potential to affect performance, is accomplished in a variety ways, including Taguchi methods, FMEA, quality control, statistical process control, and variation risk management. In this work, we start with the assumption that any of these variations can be represented mathematically, and accounted for by using analytical tools incorporating these mathematical representations. In this paper, we concentrate on variations that are introduced during design. Variations introduced during manufacturing are investigated in parallel work.

  1. Influence of Design Variations on Systems Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, Irem Y.; Stone, Robert B.; Huff, Edward M.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    High-risk aerospace components have to meet very stringent quality, performance, and safety requirements. Any source of variation is a concern, as it may result in scrap or rework. poor performance, and potentially unsafe flying conditions. The sources of variation during product development, including design, manufacturing, and assembly, and during operation are shown. Sources of static and dynamic variation during development need to be detected accurately in order to prevent failure when the components are placed in operation. The Systems' Health and Safety (SHAS) research at the NASA Ames Research Center addresses the problem of detecting and evaluating the statistical variation in helicopter transmissions. In this work, we focus on the variations caused by design, manufacturing, and assembly of these components, prior to being placed in operation (DMV). In particular, we aim to understand and represent the failure and variation information, and their correlation to performance and safety and feed this information back into the development cycle at an early stage. The feedback of such critical information will assure the development of more reliable components with less rework and scrap. Variations during design and manufacturing are a common source of concern in the development and production of such components. Accounting for these variations, especially those that have the potential to affect performance, is accomplished in a variety ways, including Taguchi methods, FMEA, quality control, statistical process control, and variation risk management. In this work, we start with the assumption that any of these variations can be represented mathematically, and accounted for by using analytical tools incorporating these mathematical representations. In this paper, we concentrate on variations that are introduced during design. Variations introduced during manufacturing are investigated in parallel work.

  2. Modulation Cycles of GCR Diurnal Anisotropy Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Y.; Oh, S. Y.

    The diurnal variations of GCR intensity observed by the ground NM stations represent the anisotropic GCR flow at 1 AU. It is generally believed that the variation of the local time of the GCR maximum intensity (phase) has 22-year period of two sunspot cycles. However, there even exists doubt on such anisotropy variation cycle. Those different interpretations come from the lack of enough data since determining the cycle of variation in precision requires data archived over long time of at least two cycles. In order to determine the cycle of GCR anisotropy variation, we carried out the statistical study on the diurnal variation of phase. We examined the 52 years data of Huancayo (Haleakala), 38-year data from Rome, 42-year data from Oulu NM stations. We used new method in determining the yearly mean phase. We applied the F-test to determine the statistically meaningful period of anisotropy phase variation. We found that the coupling coefficients indicating the differences in phase between the NM stations are not constant but dependent on the solar cycle. The phase variation has two components of 22-year and 11-year cycles. The NM station in the high latitude (low cut-off rigidity) shows mainly the 22-year cycle in phase controlled by the diffusion effect with the solar polar magnetic field reversal. However, the lower the latitude of NM station is, the higher contribution from 11-year cycle associated with the solar sunspot cycle. This additional phase variation might be regulated by the drift effect.

  3. The Genetic Contribution to Phenological Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, J. M.; Roelle, J. E.; Cade, B. S.

    2009-12-01

    Variation in phenology is often attributed to a changing climate. However, in wild populations some of the variation in phenology over space and time is a consequence of genetic variation. We used a common garden consisting of paired collections of native and introduced riparian trees sampled along a latitudinal gradient to explore the genetic component of latitudinal phenological variation. The garden in Fort Collins, Colorado (latitude 40.6°N), included 681 native plains cottonwood (Populus deltoides subsp. monilifera) and introduced saltcedar (Tamarix ramosissima, T. chinensis and hybrids) collected from 15 sites at 29.2-47.6°N in the central United States. In the common garden both species showed latitudinal variation in fall, but not spring, leaf phenology, demonstrating that the latitudinal gradient in fall phenology observed in the field reflects both genetic and climatic variation, while the latitudinal gradient in spring phenology observed in the field reflects climatic variation alone. In contrast, cold hardiness showed strong genetic variation in both fall and spring for both species. The latitudinal variation in fall phenology and cold hardiness of saltcedar appears to have evolved through hybridization and natural selection in the 150 years since introduction. We suggest that phenological networks observing wild populations include marked trees replicated in common gardens to distinguish genetic and environmental influences on phenology.

  4. On the variational principles in linear elastodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    En, Luo; Cheung, Y. K.

    1988-11-01

    A new approach is proposed for the systematic derivation of varïous variational principles in linear elastodynamics. Based on an important integral relation in terms of convolutions given by the authors, the new approach can be used to derive the complementary functionals for the five-field, four-field, three-field, two-field and one-field variational principles more simply and directly. Furthermore, with this approach, it is possible not only to derive the variational principles given by Herrera and Bielak, Oden and Reddy, but also to develop new more general variational principles. And the intrinsic relationship among various principles can be explained clearly.

  5. Equations of motion for variational electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, Jayme

    2016-04-01

    We extend the variational problem of Wheeler-Feynman electrodynamics by generalizing the electromagnetic functional to a local space of absolutely continuous trajectories possessing a derivative (velocities) of bounded variation. We show here that the Gateaux derivative of the generalized functional defines two partial Lagrangians for variations in our generalized local space, one for each particle. We prove that the critical-point conditions of the generalized variational problem are: (i) the Euler-Lagrange equations must hold Lebesgue-almost-everywhere and (ii) the momentum of each partial Lagrangian and the Legendre transform of each partial Lagrangian must be absolutely continuous functions, generalizing the Weierstrass-Erdmann conditions.

  6. Predictability of seasonal atmospheric variations

    SciTech Connect

    Brankovic, C. ); Palmer, T.N.; Ferranti, L. )

    1994-02-01

    Results from a set of 120-day ensemble integrations of a T63L19 version of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model are described. The integrations used observed global sea surface temperature (SST) as a lower boundary condition. The ensembles were analyzed over the last 90 days of the integration period, corresponding to conventional calendar seasons. Interannual variations in the atmosphere for the period 1986 to 1990 were studied. the sign and magnitude of tropical Pacific SST anomalies were chosen to define an El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) index. In general, the skill of the ensemble difference fields was higher for the strong ENSO-index years than for the weak ones, both in the tropics and the extratropics. In the northern extratropics, the skill of the ensemble mean tended to be highest in the spring season and the internal spread of the ensemble tended to be smallest in spring. Differences in zonally averaged zonal mean wind revealed that in the tropical and subtropical troposphere, the model simulations were quite accurate. For both strong and weak ENSO-index years, the model correctly simulated differences in the tropical stratosphere associated with the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO). From wind differences and analysis of changes to regime residence frequencies, it was concluded that while the SST anomalies associated with strong ENSO-index years had a significant influence on the extratropical circulation (including both North America and Europe), there was considerable intra-ensemble variability affecting tropical Pacific area. Intraensemble variability was also shown to be substantial in parts of the tropics associated with the summer monsoons over India and Southeast Asia. By contrast, rainfall over sub-Saharan Africa was more stable. 23 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Climate-tectonic coupling: Variations in the mean, variations about the mean, and variations in mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenardic, A.; Jellinek, A. M.; Foley, B.; O'Neill, C.; Moore, W. B.

    2016-10-01

    Interactions among tectonics, volcanism, and surface weathering are critical to the long-term climatic state of a terrestrial planet. Volcanism cycles greenhouse gasses into the atmosphere. Tectonics creates weatherable topography, and weathering reactions draw greenhouse gasses out of the atmosphere. Weathering depends on physical processes governed partly by surface temperature, which allows for the potential that climate-tectonic coupling can buffer the surface conditions of a planet in a manner that allows liquid water to exist over extended timescales (a condition that allows a planet to be habitable by life as we know it). We discuss modeling efforts to explore the level to which climate-tectonic coupling can or cannot regulate the surface temperature of a planet over geologic time. Thematically, we focus on how coupled climate-tectonic systems respond to the following: (1) changes in the mean pace of tectonics and associated variations in mantle melting and volcanism, (2) large-amplitude fluctuations about mean properties such as mantle temperature and surface plate velocities, and (3) changes in tectonic mode. We consider models that map the conditions under which plate tectonics can or cannot provide climate buffering as well as models that explore the potential that alternate tectonic modes can provide a level of climate buffering that allows liquid water to be present at a planet's surface over geological timescales. We also discuss the possibility that changes in the long-term climate state of a planet can feedback into the coupled system and initiate changes in tectonic mode.

  8. A Language Variation Model for the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nugent, Harold E.; Burgess, Carol

    This paper focuses on a language variation model that incorporates a number of concepts from linguistic and rhetorical studies. The model views language variation as a product of two correlating causes: one, the user and his or her personal, regional, and social dialect; and the other, the user's use of the language in terms of such discourse…

  9. Genetic Variation in Cardiomyopathy and Cardiovascular Disorders.

    PubMed

    McNally, Elizabeth M; Puckelwartz, Megan J

    2015-01-01

    With the wider deployment of massively-parallel, next-generation sequencing, it is now possible to survey human genome data for research and clinical purposes. The reduced cost of producing short-read sequencing has now shifted the burden to data analysis. Analysis of genome sequencing remains challenged by the complexity of the human genome, including redundancy and the repetitive nature of genome elements and the large amount of variation in individual genomes. Public databases of human genome sequences greatly facilitate interpretation of common and rare genetic variation, although linking database sequence information to detailed clinical information is limited by privacy and practical issues. Genetic variation is a rich source of knowledge for cardiovascular disease because many, if not all, cardiovascular disorders are highly heritable. The role of rare genetic variation in predicting risk and complications of cardiovascular diseases has been well established for hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy, where the number of genes that are linked to these disorders is growing. Bolstered by family data, where genetic variants segregate with disease, rare variation can be linked to specific genetic variation that offers profound diagnostic information. Understanding genetic variation in cardiomyopathy is likely to help stratify forms of heart failure and guide therapy. Ultimately, genetic variation may be amenable to gene correction and gene editing strategies.

  10. Anatomy, Medical Education, and Human Ancestral Variation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strkalj, Goran; Spocter, Muhammad A.; Wilkinson, A. Tracey

    2011-01-01

    It is argued in this article that the human body both in health and disease cannot be fully understood without adequately accounting for the different levels of human variation. The article focuses on variation due to ancestry, arguing that the inclusion of information pertaining to ancestry in human anatomy teaching materials and courses should…

  11. Variation in animal response to different toxicants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    The variation in response of different lots of male Swiss albino mice to pyrolysis effluents from surgical cotton and from bisphenol A polycarbonate, and to pure carbon monoxide, is discussed. The variation appeared to be less with the pyrolysis gases from polycarbonate than with pure carbon monoxide.

  12. Exploring Duopoly Markets with Conjectural Variations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Julien, Ludovic A.; Musy, Olivier; Saïdi, Aurélien W.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors investigate competitive firm behaviors in a two-firm environment assuming linear cost and demand functions. By introducing conjectural variations, they capture the different market structures as specific configurations of a more general model. Conjectural variations are based on the assumption that each firm believes…

  13. Variational Theory of Hot Dense Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukherjee, Abhishek

    2009-01-01

    We develop a variational theory of hot nuclear matter in neutron stars and supernovae. It can also be used to study charged, hot nuclear matter which may be produced in heavy-ion collisions. This theory is a generalization of the variational theory of cold nuclear and neutron star matter based on realistic models of nuclear forces and pair…

  14. Variational Theory of Hot Dense Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukherjee, Abhishek

    2009-01-01

    We develop a variational theory of hot nuclear matter in neutron stars and supernovae. It can also be used to study charged, hot nuclear matter which may be produced in heavy-ion collisions. This theory is a generalization of the variational theory of cold nuclear and neutron star matter based on realistic models of nuclear forces and pair…

  15. Size variation in Middle Pleistocene humans.

    PubMed

    Arsuaga, J L; Carretero, J M; Lorenzo, C; Gracia, A; Martínez, I; Bermúdez de Castro, J M; Carbonell, E

    1997-08-22

    It has been suggested that European Middle Pleistocene humans, Neandertals, and prehistoric modern humans had a greater sexual dimorphism than modern humans. Analysis of body size variation and cranial capacity variation in the large sample from the Sima de los Huesos site in Spain showed instead that the sexual dimorphism is comparable in Middle Pleistocene and modern populations.

  16. Variation for canopy morphology in little bluestem

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Little bluestem, Schizachyrium scoparium (Michx.) Nash, is a native grass that has been shown to have high level of genetic variation for traits such as; biomass yield, disease resistance, plant height, leafiness, maturity, seed yield, and seed yield components. If high levels of genetic variation ...

  17. The Needs of Students with Intersex Variations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    To date, people with intersex variations have been mainly studied via small-scale clinical research, with only a small amount of reflective commentary contributed by sociocultural scholars. This paper reports on findings from a 2015 online Australian survey of 272 people with intersex variations, which aimed to redress the gap in research on this…

  18. Isozyme variation in wild and cultivated pineapple

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Isozyme variation was studied in 161 accessions of pineapple including four species of Ananas and one of Pseudananas. Six enzyme systems (ADH, GPI, PGM, SKDH, TPI, UGPP) involving seven putative loci revealed 35 electromorphs . Considerable variation exists within and between species of Ananas. Sixt...

  19. Collecting genetic variation on a small island

    Treesearch

    S. Kallow; C. Trivedi

    2017-01-01

    Genetic variation is the most powerful factor in ensuring the long term success of trees and forests in times of change. In order to protect against loss of genetic variation from threats, including pests and diseases and climate change, the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, is developing a national tree seed collection for the United Kingdom. This paper...

  20. Anatomy, Medical Education, and Human Ancestral Variation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strkalj, Goran; Spocter, Muhammad A.; Wilkinson, A. Tracey

    2011-01-01

    It is argued in this article that the human body both in health and disease cannot be fully understood without adequately accounting for the different levels of human variation. The article focuses on variation due to ancestry, arguing that the inclusion of information pertaining to ancestry in human anatomy teaching materials and courses should…

  1. A Language Variation Model for the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nugent, Harold E.; Burgess, Carol

    This paper focuses on a language variation model that incorporates a number of concepts from linguistic and rhetorical studies. The model views language variation as a product of two correlating causes: one, the user and his or her personal, regional, and social dialect; and the other, the user's use of the language in terms of such discourse…

  2. Exploring Duopoly Markets with Conjectural Variations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Julien, Ludovic A.; Musy, Olivier; Saïdi, Aurélien W.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors investigate competitive firm behaviors in a two-firm environment assuming linear cost and demand functions. By introducing conjectural variations, they capture the different market structures as specific configurations of a more general model. Conjectural variations are based on the assumption that each firm believes…

  3. Variations in Developmental Patterns across Pragmatic Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on the findings of longitudinal studies in uninstructed contexts over the last two decades, this synthesis explores variations in developmental patterns across second language (L2) pragmatic features. Two synthesis questions were addressed: (a) What are the variations in developmental patterns across pragmatic features?, and (b) What are…

  4. Multipartition generalizations of the Schwinger variational principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldflam, R.; Thaler, R. M.; Tobocman, W.

    1981-04-01

    Generalizations of the Schwinger variational principle are proposed which include rearrangement scattering. Functionals are given for the transition amplitude. The requirement that a functional be stationary with respect to variation of the scattering wave function leads to a set of simultaneous equations for the scattering wave function rather than a single equation. This is consistent with recent formalisms for many-body scattering.

  5. Accommodating Variation: Dialects, Idiolects, and Speech Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraljic, Tanya; Brennan, Susan E.; Samuel, Arthur G.

    2008-01-01

    Listeners are faced with enormous variation in pronunciation, yet they rarely have difficulty understanding speech. Although much research has been devoted to figuring out how listeners deal with variability, virtually none (outside of sociolinguistics) has focused on the source of the variation itself. The current experiments explore whether…

  6. Closed orbit response to quadrupole strength variation

    SciTech Connect

    Wolski, Andrzej; Zimmermann, Frank

    2004-01-20

    We derive two formulae relating the variation in closed orbit in a storage ring to variations in quadrupole strength, neglecting nonlinear and dispersive effects. These formulae correct results previously reported [1,2,3]. We compare the results of the formulae applied to the ATF with simulations using MAD, and consider their application to beam-based alignment.

  7. The Needs of Students with Intersex Variations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    To date, people with intersex variations have been mainly studied via small-scale clinical research, with only a small amount of reflective commentary contributed by sociocultural scholars. This paper reports on findings from a 2015 online Australian survey of 272 people with intersex variations, which aimed to redress the gap in research on this…

  8. Variational Pragmatics in the Foreign Language Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Anne

    2005-01-01

    Situational variation has long been an accepted form of intra-lingual variation in speech act realisations. The effect of macro-social factors, such as region, ethnic background, age, social status and gender, on intra-lingual pragmatic conventions has, however, received comparatively little attention in the study of pragmatics to date [Kasper,…

  9. Variation in Hawaiian English: Underlying R.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odo, Carol

    The underlying assumptions of the study described in this report are that language change in process is revealed through language variation and that variation is rarely random. With these two ideas in mind, the author studies the presence of "r" in Hawaiian English and considers its appearance in various environments. The study also…

  10. Note on Methodology: The Coefficient of Variation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheret, Michael

    1984-01-01

    Addresses applications of the coefficient of variation as a measure of educational inequality or as a means of measuring changes of inequality status. Suggests the Gini coefficient has many advantages over the coefficient of variation since it can be used with the Lorenz curve (Lorenz provides detail Gini omits). (BRR)

  11. Variational bayesian method of estimating variance components.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Aisaku; Taniguchi, Masaaki; Hayashi, Takeshi; Mikawa, Satoshi

    2016-07-01

    We developed a Bayesian analysis approach by using a variational inference method, a so-called variational Bayesian method, to determine the posterior distributions of variance components. This variational Bayesian method and an alternative Bayesian method using Gibbs sampling were compared in estimating genetic and residual variance components from both simulated data and publically available real pig data. In the simulated data set, we observed strong bias toward overestimation of genetic variance for the variational Bayesian method in the case of low heritability and low population size, and less bias was detected with larger population sizes in both methods examined. The differences in the estimates of variance components between the variational Bayesian and the Gibbs sampling were not found in the real pig data. However, the posterior distributions of the variance components obtained with the variational Bayesian method had shorter tails than those obtained with the Gibbs sampling. Consequently, the posterior standard deviations of the genetic and residual variances of the variational Bayesian method were lower than those of the method using Gibbs sampling. The computing time required was much shorter with the variational Bayesian method than with the method using Gibbs sampling. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  12. Variation in animal response to different toxicants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    The variation in response of different lots of male Swiss albino mice to pyrolysis effluents from surgical cotton and from bisphenol A polycarbonate, and to pure carbon monoxide, is discussed. The variation appeared to be less with the pyrolysis gases from polycarbonate than with pure carbon monoxide.

  13. Modeling Density Variation in the Thermosphere

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-29

    region has a strong seasonal variation, with eddy diffusion larger during solstices than equinoxes, and stronger turbulence in summer than in winter...contribute to seasonal variation in the thermosphere, particularly the asymmetry between solstices that cannot be explained by other mechanisms. 2

  14. Understanding Statistical Variation: A Response to Sharma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Jim

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author responds to the paper "Exploring pre-service teachers' understanding of statistical variation: Implications for teaching and research" by Sashi Sharma (see EJ779107). In that paper, Sharma described a study "designed to investigate pre-service teachers' acknowledgment of variation in sampling and distribution…

  15. Correcting solar quiet variations for tidal signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzavina, Martina; Grayver, Alexander; Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2017-04-01

    Solar quiet (Sq) variations of geomagnetic field are originated from electric current system which is flowing at 110 km altitude in a thin ionospheric E-layer. This current system is driven by atmospheric tides in the ambient magnetic field of the Earth. These tides are generated from solar heating of the atmosphere on the sunlit side of Earth. Sq variations are periodic phenomenon and thus can be represented as a superposition of time harmonics with periods of 24, 12, 8, 6, 4.8 and 4 hours. These variations can be used for electromagnetic induction sounding to study electrical conductivity of the Earth's upper mantle down to approximately 600 km. However, Sq variations are potentially distorted by several factors. Among them are motionally-induced (tidal) magnetic signals which have periods close to 12 and 24 hours. This study is aimed at evaluating and correcting for the effect of tidal magnetic signals in observed Sq variations.

  16. Investigating seasonal variations in rock glacier dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicoira, Alessandro; Vieli, Andreas; Faillettaz, Jerome; Wirz, Vanessa

    2017-04-01

    Periglacial monitoring has highlighted seasonal and inter-annual variations in rock glacier dynamics. Temperature forcing, through heat conduction, has been proposed as one of the key processes to explain these kinematics variations. But this mechanism has not yet been quantitatively assessed against real-world data. We present a numerical model that couples heat conduction and an empirical creep model for ice-rich frozen soils (Arenson, 2005). We use this model to investigate the dynamic response of alpine permafrost to external temperature variations. We compare the modeling with the PERMOS monitoring network data, which include several years of borehole temperature data and variations in surface velocity. These data allow us to conduct a direct comparison and test our model. We are able to model velocity variations from temperature forcing in the right order of magnitude but, in general, these are underestimated, in particular for thicker rock-glaciers.

  17. Variation tolerant SoC design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhikkottu, Vivek J.

    The scaling of integrated circuits into the nanometer regime has led to variations emerging as a primary concern for designers of integrated circuits. Variations are an inevitable consequence of the semiconductor manufacturing process, and also arise due to the side-effects of operation of integrated circuits (voltage, temperature, and aging). Conventional design approaches, which are based on design corners or worst-case scenarios, leave designers with an undesirable choice between the considerable overheads associated with over-design and significantly reduced manufacturing yield. Techniques for variation-tolerant design at the logic, circuit and layout levels of the design process have been developed and are in commercial use. However, with the incessant increase in variations due to technology scaling and design trends such as near-threshold computing, these techniques are no longer sufficient to contain the effects of variations, and there is a need to address variations at all stages of design. This thesis addresses the problem of variation-tolerant design at the earliest stages of the design process, where the system-level design decisions that are made can have a very significant impact. There are two key aspects to making system-level design variation-aware. First, analysis techniques must be developed to project the impact of variations on system-level metrics such as application performance and energy. Second, variation-tolerant design techniques need to be developed to absorb the residual impact of variations (that cannot be contained through lower-level techniques). In this thesis, we address both these facets by developing robust and scalable variation-aware analysis and variation mitigation techniques at the system level. The first contribution of this thesis is a variation-aware system-level performance analysis framework. We address the key challenge of translating the per-component clock frequency distributions into a system-level application

  18. Language Variation and Score Variation in the Testing of English Language Learners, Native Spanish Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solano-Flores, Guillermo; Li, Min

    2009-01-01

    We investigated language variation and score variation in the testing of English language learners, native Spanish speakers. We gave students the same set of National Assessment of Educational Progress mathematics items in both their first language and their second language. We examined the amount of score variation due to the main and interaction…

  19. Micro-scale environmental variation amplifies physiological variation among individual mussels

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Ana Gabriela; Jayawardene, Sarah; Alves, Shaina; Dallmer, Jeremiah; Dowd, W. Wesley

    2015-01-01

    The contributions of temporal and spatial environmental variation to physiological variation remain poorly resolved. Rocky intertidal zone populations are subjected to thermal variation over the tidal cycle, superimposed with micro-scale variation in individuals' body temperatures. Using the sea mussel (Mytilus californianus), we assessed the consequences of this micro-scale environmental variation for physiological variation among individuals, first by examining the latter in field-acclimatized animals, second by abolishing micro-scale environmental variation via common garden acclimation, and third by restoring this variation using a reciprocal outplant approach. Common garden acclimation reduced the magnitude of variation in tissue-level antioxidant capacities by approximately 30% among mussels from a wave-protected (warm) site, but it had no effect on antioxidant variation among mussels from a wave-exposed (cool) site. The field-acclimatized level of antioxidant variation was restored only when protected-site mussels were outplanted to a high, thermally stressful site. Variation in organismal oxygen consumption rates reflected antioxidant patterns, decreasing dramatically among protected-site mussels after common gardening. These results suggest a highly plastic relationship between individuals' genotypes and their physiological phenotypes that depends on recent environmental experience. Corresponding context-dependent changes in the physiological mean–variance relationships within populations complicate prediction of responses to shifts in environmental variability that are anticipated with global change. PMID:26645201

  20. Micro-scale environmental variation amplifies physiological variation among individual mussels.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Ana Gabriela; Jayawardene, Sarah; Alves, Shaina; Dallmer, Jeremiah; Dowd, W Wesley

    2015-12-07

    The contributions of temporal and spatial environmental variation to physiological variation remain poorly resolved. Rocky intertidal zone populations are subjected to thermal variation over the tidal cycle, superimposed with micro-scale variation in individuals' body temperatures. Using the sea mussel (Mytilus californianus), we assessed the consequences of this micro-scale environmental variation for physiological variation among individuals, first by examining the latter in field-acclimatized animals, second by abolishing micro-scale environmental variation via common garden acclimation, and third by restoring this variation using a reciprocal outplant approach. Common garden acclimation reduced the magnitude of variation in tissue-level antioxidant capacities by approximately 30% among mussels from a wave-protected (warm) site, but it had no effect on antioxidant variation among mussels from a wave-exposed (cool) site. The field-acclimatized level of antioxidant variation was restored only when protected-site mussels were outplanted to a high, thermally stressful site. Variation in organismal oxygen consumption rates reflected antioxidant patterns, decreasing dramatically among protected-site mussels after common gardening. These results suggest a highly plastic relationship between individuals' genotypes and their physiological phenotypes that depends on recent environmental experience. Corresponding context-dependent changes in the physiological mean-variance relationships within populations complicate prediction of responses to shifts in environmental variability that are anticipated with global change. © 2015 The Author(s).

  1. Non-LTE Stellar Population Synthesis of Globular Clusters Using Synthetic Integrated Light Spectra. I. Constructing the IL Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Mitchell. E.; Short, C. Ian

    2017-02-01

    We present an investigation of the globular cluster population synthesis method of McWilliam & Bernstein, focusing on the impact of non-LTE (NLTE) modeling effects and color-magnitude diagram (CMD) discretization. Johnson-Cousins-Bessel U - B, B-V, V-I, and J-K colors are produced for 96 synthetic integrated light (IL) spectra with two different discretization prescriptions and three degrees of NLTE treatment. These color values are used to compare NLTE- and LTE-derived population ages. Relative contributions of different spectral types to the IL spectra for different wavebands are measured. IL NLTE spectra are shown to be more luminous in the UV and optical than LTE spectra, but show stronger absorption features in the IR. The main features showing discrepancies between NLTE and LTE IL spectra may be attributed to light metals, primarily Fe i, Ca i, and Ti i, as well as TiO molecular bands. Main-sequence stars are shown to have negligible NLTE effects at IR wavelengths compared to more evolved stars. Photometric color values are shown to vary at the millimagnitude level as a function of CMD discretization. Finer CMD sampling for the upper main sequence and turnoff, base of the red giant branch, and the horizontal branch minimizes this variation. Differences in ages derived from LTE and NLTE IL spectra are found to range from 0.55 to 2.54 Gyr, comparable to the uncertainty in GC ages derived from color indices with observational uncertainties of 0.01 mag, the limiting precision of the Harris catalog.

  2. Variation in EMG activity: a hierarchical approach

    PubMed Central

    German, Rebecca Z.; Crompton, A. W.; Thexton, A. J.

    2008-01-01

    Recordings of naturally occurring Electromyographic (EMG) signals are variable. One of the first formal and successful attempts to quantify variation in EMG signals was Shaffer and Lauder's (1985) study examining several levels of variation but not within muscle. The goal of the current study was to quantify the variation that exists at different levels, using more detailed measures of EMG activity than did Shaffer and Lauder (1985). The importance of accounting for different levels of variation in an EMG study is both biological and statistical. Signal variation within the same muscle for a stereotyped action suggests that each recording represents a sample drawn from a pool of a large number of motor units that, while biologically functioning in an integrated fashion, showed statistical variation. Different levels of variation for different muscles could be related to different functions or different tasks of those muscles. The statistical impact of unaccounted or inappropriately analyzed variation can lead to false rejection (type I error) or false acceptance (type II error) of the null hypothesis. Type II errors occur because such variation will accrue to the error, reducing power, and producing an artificially low F-value. Type I errors are associated with pseudoreplication, in which the replicated units are not truly independent, thereby leading to inflated degrees of freedom, and an underestimate of the error mean square. To address these problems, we used a repeated measures, nested multifactor model to measure the relative contribution of different hierarchical levels of variation to the total variation in EMG signals during swallowing. We found that variation at all levels, among electrodes in the same muscle, in sequences of the same animal, and among individuals and between differently named muscles, was significant. These findings suggest that a single intramuscular electrode, recording from a limited sample of the motor units, cannot be relied upon to

  3. Environmental Variation Generates Environmental Opportunist Pathogen Outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Anttila, Jani; Kaitala, Veijo; Laakso, Jouni; Ruokolainen, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    Many socio-economically important pathogens persist and grow in the outside host environment and opportunistically invade host individuals. The environmental growth and opportunistic nature of these pathogens has received only little attention in epidemiology. Environmental reservoirs are, however, an important source of novel diseases. Thus, attempts to control these diseases require different approaches than in traditional epidemiology focusing on obligatory parasites. Conditions in the outside-host environment are prone to fluctuate over time. This variation is a potentially important driver of epidemiological dynamics and affect the evolution of novel diseases. Using a modelling approach combining the traditional SIRS models to environmental opportunist pathogens and environmental variability, we show that epidemiological dynamics of opportunist diseases are profoundly driven by the quality of environmental variability, such as the long-term predictability and magnitude of fluctuations. When comparing periodic and stochastic environmental factors, for a given variance, stochastic variation is more likely to cause outbreaks than periodic variation. This is due to the extreme values being further away from the mean. Moreover, the effects of variability depend on the underlying biology of the epidemiological system, and which part of the system is being affected. Variation in host susceptibility leads to more severe pathogen outbreaks than variation in pathogen growth rate in the environment. Positive correlation in variation on both targets can cancel the effect of variation altogether. Moreover, the severity of outbreaks is significantly reduced by increase in the duration of immunity. Uncovering these issues helps in understanding and controlling diseases caused by environmental pathogens.

  4. Multi-objective optimization shapes ecological variation.

    PubMed

    Kaitaniemi, Pekka; Scheiner, Annette; Klemola, Tero; Ruohomäki, Kai

    2012-02-22

    Ecological systems contain a huge amount of quantitative variation between and within species and locations, which makes it difficult to obtain unambiguous verification of theoretical predictions. Ordinary experiments consider just a few explanatory factors and are prone to providing oversimplified answers because they ignore the complexity of the factors that underlie variation. We used multi-objective optimization (MO) for a mechanistic analysis of the potential ecological and evolutionary causes and consequences of variation in the life-history traits of a species of moth. Optimal life-history solutions were sought for environmental conditions where different life stages of the moth were subject to predation and other known fitness-reducing factors in a manner that was dependent on the duration of these life stages and on variable mortality rates. We found that multi-objective optimal solutions to these conditions that the moths regularly experience explained most of the life-history variation within this species. Our results demonstrate that variation can have a causal interpretation even for organisms under steady conditions. The results suggest that weather and species interactions can act as underlying causes of variation, and MO acts as a corresponding adaptive mechanism that maintains variation in the traits of organisms.

  5. Seasonal variations of cancer incidence and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Moan, Johan; Lagunova, Zoya; Bruland, Oyvind; Juzeniene, Asta

    2010-04-01

    The overall death rates are highest in the winter season in many countries at high latitudes. In some but not all countries, this is also true for more specific diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases and influenza. For internal cancers we find no consistent, significant seasonal variation, neither of incidence nor of death rates. On the other hand, we find a significant seasonal variation of cancer prognosis with season of diagnosis in Norway. Best prognosis is found for summer and autumn diagnosis; i.e., for the seasons of the best status of vitamin D in the population. There were no corresponding seasonal variations, neither of the rates of diagnosis, nor of the rates of death which could explain the variations of prognosis. The most likely reason for this variation is that the vitamin D status in Norway is significantly better in summer and autumn than in winter and spring. Earlier, seasonal variations have been explained by circannual variations of certain hormones, but the data are not consistent.

  6. Variations in pectoral girdle muscles in dogs.

    PubMed

    Alić, I; Trbojević Vukičević, T; Đuras, M; Kužir, S; Fazarinc, G; Gjurčević Kantura, V

    2014-02-01

    Muscle variations take the form of additional muscle bundle or belly, unusual muscle origin or termination, as well as complete muscle absence. Knowledge of such variations not only has clinical importance for guiding surgery, but also can help reveal phylogenetic relationships. To improve our understanding of muscle variations in dogs, 57 medium-sized, cross-breed male and female adult animals were dissected as part of a gross anatomy course between 2005 and 2011. Variations in pectoral girdle muscles were observed in 7 (12.3%) dogs and took the form of an additional muscle bundle in the brachiocephalicus muscle (n = 2), in the omotransversarius muscle (n = 2), in the cervical part of the rhomboideus muscle (n = 2) and in the cervical part of the serratus ventralis muscle (n = 1). Muscle variation was bilateral in only one dog; it involved the omotransversarius muscle. The variations did not seem to be sex dependent. Such variations can appear regularly in dogs and should be taken into consideration during anatomical dissection. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. Seasonal variations of cancer incidence and prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Moan, Johan; Bruland, Øyvind; Juzeniene, Asta

    2010-01-01

    The overall death rates are highest in the winter season in many countries at high latitudes. In some but not all countries, this is also true for more specific diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases and influenza. For internal cancers we find no consistent, significant seasonal variation, neither of incidence nor of death rates. On the other hand, we find a significant seasonal variation of cancer prognosis with season of diagnosis in Norway. Best prognosis is found for summer and autumn diagnosis; i.e., for the seasons of the best status of vitamin D in the population. There were no corresponding seasonal variations, neither of the rates of diagnosis, nor of the rates of death which could explain the variations of prognosis. The most likely reason for this variation is that the vitamin D status in Norway is significantly better in summer and autumn than in winter and spring. Earlier, seasonal variations have been explained by circannual variations of certain hormones, but the data are not consistent. PMID:21547098

  8. Noncoding chloroplast DNA variation in Mexican pines.

    PubMed

    Perez de la Rosa, J; Harris, S A; Farjon, A

    1995-11-01

    Universal primers were used for PCR amplification of three noncoding regions of chloroplast DNA in order to study restriction site variation in 12 Mexican pine species. Two length mutations were identified that are of diagnostic value for two subgenera or sections of the genus. Phylogenetic analysis of the restriction site and length variation showed patterns of variation largely consistent with previous arrangements of these pines, except for the position of Pinus nelsonii, indicating that Pinus section Parraya Mayr, as circumscribed by Little and Critchfield (1969) and later authors, is not a monophyletic group.

  9. NO TRANSIT TIMING VARIATIONS IN WASP-4

    SciTech Connect

    Petrucci, R.; Schwartz, M.; Buccino, A. P.; Mauas, P. J. D.; Jofré, E.; Cúneo, V.; Gómez, M.; Martínez, C.

    2013-12-20

    We present six new transits of the system WASP-4. Together with 28 light curves published in the literature, we perform a homogeneous study of its parameters and search for variations in the transits' central times. The final values agree with those previously reported, except for a slightly lower inclination. We find no significant long-term variations in i or R{sub P} /R {sub *}. The O-C mid-transit times do not show signs of transit timing variations greater than 54 s.

  10. Accounting for population variation in targeted proteomics.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Grant M; Monroe, Matthew E; Rodriguez, Larissa; Wu, Chaochao; MacLean, Brendan; Smith, Richard D; MacCoss, Michael J; Payne, Samuel H

    2014-01-03

    Individual proteomes typically differ from the reference human proteome at ∼10,000 single amino acid variants. When viewed on the population scale, this individual variation results in a wide variety of protein sequences. In targeted proteomics experiments, such variability can confound accurate protein quantification. To assist researchers in identifying target peptides with high variability within the human population, we have created the Population Variation plug-in for Skyline, which provides easy access to the polymorphisms stored in dbSNP. Given a set of peptides, the tool reports minor allele frequency for common polymorphisms. We highlight the importance of considering genetic variation by applying the tool to public data sets.

  11. Variations of mesopause temperatures in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offermann, D.; Gerndt, R.; Lange, G.; Trinks, H.

    Mesopause temperatures were derived from ground measurements of the near infrared OH(asterisk) spectrum. Preliminary data are presented. Seasonal variations at Wuppertal (51 deg N, 7 deg E) are well represented if the Cole and Kantor (1978) model is raised by 10 K and shifted by about 18 days. Latitudinal variations from 68 deg N to 51 deg N are found much smaller than the model variations. During a stratospheric warming, mesopause and stratosphere temperatures were found to be in anticorrelation only if a substantial longitudinal shift is introduced.

  12. Variational calculus with constraints on general algebroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowska, Katarzyna; Grabowski, Janusz

    2008-05-01

    Variational calculus on a vector bundle E equipped with a structure of a general algebroid is developed, together with the corresponding analogs of Euler-Lagrange equations. Constrained systems are introduced in the variational and geometrical settings. The constrained Euler-Lagrange equations are derived for analogs of holonomic, vakonomic and nonholonomic constraints. This general model covers the majority of first-order Lagrangian systems which are present in the literature and reduces to the standard variational calculus and the Euler-Lagrange equations in classical mechanics for E = TM.

  13. Accounting for Population Variation in Targeted Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Grant M.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Rodriguez, Larissa; Wu, Chaochao; MacLean, Brendan; Smith, Richard D.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Payne, Samuel H.

    2014-01-03

    Individual proteomes typically differ from the reference human proteome at ~10,000 single amino acid variants. When viewed at the population scale, this individual variation results in a wide variety of protein sequences. In targeted proteomics experiments, such variability would confound accurate protein quantification. To facilitate researchers in identifying target peptides with high variability within the human population we have created the Population Variation plug-in for Skyline, which provides easy access to the polymorphisms stored in dbSNP. Given a set of peptides, the tool reports minor allele frequency for common polymorphisms. We highlight the importance of considering genetic variation by applying the tool to public datasets.

  14. Precipitation drives global variation in natural selection.

    PubMed

    Siepielski, Adam M; Morrissey, Michael B; Buoro, Mathieu; Carlson, Stephanie M; Caruso, Christina M; Clegg, Sonya M; Coulson, Tim; DiBattista, Joseph; Gotanda, Kiyoko M; Francis, Clinton D; Hereford, Joe; Kingsolver, Joel G; Augustine, Kate E; Kruuk, Loeske E B; Martin, Ryan A; Sheldon, Ben C; Sletvold, Nina; Svensson, Erik I; Wade, Michael J; MacColl, Andrew D C

    2017-03-03

    Climate change has the potential to affect the ecology and evolution of every species on Earth. Although the ecological consequences of climate change are increasingly well documented, the effects of climate on the key evolutionary process driving adaptation-natural selection-are largely unknown. We report that aspects of precipitation and potential evapotranspiration, along with the North Atlantic Oscillation, predicted variation in selection across plant and animal populations throughout many terrestrial biomes, whereas temperature explained little variation. By showing that selection was influenced by climate variation, our results indicate that climate change may cause widespread alterations in selection regimes, potentially shifting evolutionary trajectories at a global scale.

  15. Ethnopsychologies: cultural variations in theories of mind.

    PubMed

    Lillard, A

    1998-01-01

    A set of basic beliefs about others' minds and behavior, referred to as folk psychology or theory of mind, is often discussed as if it were the same the world over. Yet, certainly variation in folk psychology exists. This article compares several aspects of European American theory of mind with other cultural models, as suggested by experiments and ethnographies, with the purpose of illuminating the degree to which there is variation. After summarizing 4 types of variation, the author explores possible sources of variability, implications for the mindreading process, potential universals, and directions for future research.

  16. Digital item adaptation for color vision variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jaeil; Yang, Seungji; Kim, Cheonseog; Nam, Jaeho; Hong, Jin-Woo; Ro, Yong Man

    2003-06-01

    As color is more widely used to carry visual information in the multimedia content, ability to perceive color plays a crucial role in getting visual information. Regardless of color vision variations, one should have visual information equally. This paper proposes the adaptation technique for color vision variations in the MPEG-21 Digital Item Adaptation (DIA). DIA is performed respectively for severe color vision deficiency (dichromats) and for mild color vision deficiency (anomalous trichromats), according to the description of user characteristics about color vision variations. Adapted images are tested by simulation program for color vision variations so as to recognize the appearance of the adapted images in the color deficient vision. Experimental result shows that proposed adaptation technique works well in the MPEG-21 framework.

  17. Variational Method for Two-Electron Atoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srivastava, M. K.; Bhaduri, R. K.

    1977-01-01

    Proposes a simple two-parameter trial wave function for the helium atom and helium-like ions. Shows that a variational calculation for the ground-state energy yields better results than the usual one-parameter example. (MLH)

  18. Ultrasonic detection of atmospheric humidity variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, R. Giles

    2001-03-01

    The small variation of the speed of sound in air with water vapor concentration is evaluated as a method of measuring atmospheric humidity. Laboratory acoustic phase measurements were made, using inexpensive piezoelectric transducers and electret microphones with dew point temperature independently monitored in the same enclosure. Phase variations from an acoustic path gave fair agreement with the measured humidity variations, when temperature and cross-wind variations were removed. Thermal stabilization and filtering were necessary to reduce the random phase noise contributions from the detectors, leading to errors in mean vapor pressure of ˜5 mbar at 20 °C. The approach is therefore more suited to determine turbulent humidity fluctuations, for meteorological latent heat flux measurements.

  19. McLean's second variation formula revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lê, Hông Vân; Vanžura, Jiří

    2017-03-01

    We revisit McLean's second variation formulas for calibrated submanifolds in exceptional geometries, and correct his formulas concerning associative submanifolds and Cayley submanifolds, using a unified treatment based on the (relative) calibration method and Harvey-Lawson's identities.

  20. Variational Method for Two-Electron Atoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srivastava, M. K.; Bhaduri, R. K.

    1977-01-01

    Proposes a simple two-parameter trial wave function for the helium atom and helium-like ions. Shows that a variational calculation for the ground-state energy yields better results than the usual one-parameter example. (MLH)

  1. Explaining mutualism variation: a new evolutionary paradox?

    PubMed

    Heath, Katy D; Stinchcombe, John R

    2014-02-01

    The paradox of mutualism is typically framed as the persistence of interspecific cooperation, despite the potential advantages of cheating. Thus, mutualism research has tended to focus on stabilizing mechanisms that prevent the invasion of low-quality partners. These mechanisms alone cannot explain the persistence of variation for partner quality observed in nature, leaving a large gap in our understanding of how mutualisms evolve. Studying partner quality variation is necessary for applying genetically explicit models to predict evolution in natural populations, a necessary step for understanding the origins of mutualisms as well as their ongoing dynamics. An evolutionary genetic approach, which is focused on naturally occurring mutualist variation, can potentially synthesize the currently disconnected fields of mutualism evolution and coevolutionary genetics. We outline explanations for the maintenance of genetic variation for mutualism and suggest approaches necessary to address them.

  2. Secular obliquity variations of Ceres and Pallas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bills, Bruce G.; Scott, Bryan R.

    2017-03-01

    We examine variations in the orientations of the orbit poles and spin poles of Ceres and Pallas, on time scales of a few million years. We consider these two bodies together because they have similar orbits, but very different present states of knowledge concerning internal mass distribution and spin pole orientation. For Ceres, the Dawn mission has recently provided accurate estimates of the current spin pole orientation, and the degree 2 spherical harmonics of the gravitational potential. The polar moment of inertia is not as well constrained, but plausible bounds are known. For Pallas, we have estimates of the shape of the body, and spin pole orientation and angular rate, all derived from optical light curves. Using those input parameters, and the readily computed secular variations in the orbit pole, we can compute long term variations in the spin pole orientation. This provides information concerning long term variations in insolation, which controls stability of surface volatiles.

  3. Fluctuations in tides and geomagnetic variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohsiek, A.; Kiefer, M.; Meek, C. E.; Manson, A. H.

    Middle atmosphere tidal winds and the daily geomagnetic Sq-variation show a day-to-day variability, both with a local behaviour. Due to the main cause of the Sq-variation, the ionospheric dynamo effect, day-to-day fluctuation of Sq could be raised by fluctuations in tides. This coupling of fluctuations is investigated with radar wind data measured at Saskatoon at around 100 km height and with magnetic data from four observatories in the vicinity of the radar. We show that our definition of fluctuations exhibits properties of atmospheric tides in the winds and that the magnetic data can be assumed to represent a local behaviour. We find that there are some significant correlations between fluctuations in winds and magnetic variations. Apparently the local fluctuation of geomagnetic variations is weakly coupled not only to the fluctuations of the semidiurnal tides but also to those of the mean winds.

  4. Seasonal variations in menarche in Oslo.

    PubMed

    Brundtland, G H; Liestøl, K

    1982-01-01

    Data from about 11,000 girls aged 10-18 years were used to study seasonal variations in menarche in Oslo, Norway. A statistical method which takes into account the changes over time in the age-structure of the sample is used to show that throughout the period 1965-1970, the menarche incidence varied according to a stable bimodal seasonal pattern with peaks in December-January and July-August. This pattern corresponds to those observed in Sweden and Finland, but deviates from other reported patterns, i.e. from the variations found in Copenhagen. It is argued that a possible cause of general lack of well supported hypotheses for seasonal variations is that an environmental factor may cause marked cyclic variations, without having a marked effect on the process determining maturation.

  5. Genetic sources of population epigenomic variation.

    PubMed

    Taudt, Aaron; Colomé-Tatché, Maria; Johannes, Frank

    2016-06-01

    The field of epigenomics has rapidly progressed from the study of individual reference epigenomes to surveying epigenomic variation in populations. Recent studies in a number of species, from yeast to humans, have begun to dissect the cis- and trans-regulatory genetic mechanisms that shape patterns of population epigenomic variation at the level of single epigenetic marks, as well as at the level of integrated chromatin state maps. We show that this information is paving the way towards a more complete understanding of the heritable basis underlying population epigenomic variation. We also highlight important conceptual challenges when interpreting results from these genetic studies, particularly in plants, in which epigenomic variation can be determined both by genetic and epigenetic inheritance.

  6. Solution of two-level variational inequality

    SciTech Connect

    Kalashnikov, V.V.; Kalashnikova, N.I.

    1995-03-01

    The mathematical programming problem with variational inequality constraints, or the complementary problem, often arises in the analysis of physical and socio-economic systems. At present, such problems are mostly solved by heuristic methods. In a recent paper, Harker and Choi described an approach based on external penalty functions, which is applied after restating the variational inequality constraint in optimization form. An alternative approach to the solution of the problem conversely involves restating its optimization part in the form of an appropriate variational inequality, whose solution is then sought on the set of feasible vectors that satisfy the original inequality constraint. In this paper, we propose a penalty technique for solving the resulting problem, which is accordingly reduced to a one-level variational inequality dependent on a penalty parameter.

  7. Solar cycle variations in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, John W.; Lopez, Ramon E.

    1986-01-01

    The solar cycle variations of various solar wind parameters are reviewed. It is shown that there is a gradual decrease in the duration of high-speed streams from the declining phase of solar cycle 20 through the ascending phase of cycle 21 and a corresponding decrease in the annual average of the proton speed toward solar maximum. Beta, the ratio of the proton thermal pressure to magnetic pressure, undergoes a significant solar cycle variation, as expected from the variation in the IMF. Individual hourly averages of beta often exceed unity with 20 cases exceeding 10 and one case as high as 25. The Alfven Mach number shows a solar cycle variation similar to beta, lower aboard solar maximum. High-speed streams can be seen clearly in epsilon and the y component of the interplanetary magnetic field.

  8. Temporal variation of Mercury's sodium density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusegawa, Ayaka; Dairoku, Hayato; Kameda, Shingo; Kagitani, Masato; Okano, Shoichi

    2013-04-01

    Mercury has a thin atmosphere. In the past, Mercury has been observed by Mariner 10 and MESSENGER, and ground-based observations have also been carried out. H, He, O, Na, Mg, K, and Ca were detected in its atmosphere. Solar-photon-stimulated desorption, sputtering by impacting solar particles, and meteoroid vaporization are considered to be the source processes of Mercury's exosphere. However, the primary process among these three processes is unknown as yet. The resonance scattering constitutes exospheric emission. The NaD emission is well suited for study by ground-based observations because of its high intensity. Past observations have shown that the temporal variation and north-south asymmetry of intensity of sodium emission. We have observed Mercury's sodium exosphere at the Haleakala Observatory in Hawaii since April 2011. The observations were performed using a 40 cm Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope, a high-dispersion spectrograph, and a CCD camera. We determined the temporal variation of the sodium density using the observational data. It is possible that the temporal variation of the sodium density is caused by variation of solar wind magnetic field if solar wind ion sputtering is the primary source process of Mercury's exosphere. To verify this assumption, we checked the temporal variation of solar wind magnetic field observed by MESSENGER, and then we compared these variations with our observational result. CMEs toward Mercury probably cause the increase of the sodium density. Potter et al. (1999) suggested that the total amount of sodium on Mercury increased monotonically during several days of observation after CMEs occurred on the same side of the Sun as Mercury. We observed Mercury's sodium exosphere on November 23, 2011 when MESSENGER observed variation of solar wind magnetic field, which indicated CMEs arrived at Mercury. However, our results have not shown large variation of the sodium density like that of Potter et al. (1999). From these results, we

  9. A study of microclad thickness variation (1987)

    SciTech Connect

    Ramachandran, R.S.; Armstrong, K.P.

    1989-06-22

    A study was conducted to investigate the thickness variation of microclad material used in fabricating 1E38 bridges. For the role sampled (nine reels), standard deviations within reels ranged from 6.11 to 12.07 {mu}in. Thickness variations within reels ranged from 16.2 to 40.9 {mu}in., with the average thickness between 142.90 and 161.28 {mu}in.

  10. Stochastic variation in Cardamine hirsuta petal number.

    PubMed

    Monniaux, Marie; Pieper, Bjorn; Hay, Angela

    2016-04-01

    Floral development is remarkably robust in terms of the identity and number of floral organs in each whorl, whereas vegetative development can be quite plastic. This canalization of flower development prevents the phenotypic expression of cryptic genetic variation, even in fluctuating environments. A cruciform perianth with four petals is a hallmark of the Brassicaceae family, typified in the model species Arabidopsis thaliana However, variable petal loss is found in Cardamine hirsuta, a genetically tractable relative of A. thaliana Cardamine hirsuta petal number varies in response to stochastic, genetic and environmental perturbations, which makes it an interesting model to study mechanisms of decanalization and the expression of cryptic variation. Multitrait quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis in recombinant inbred lines (RILs) was used to identify whether the stochastic variation found in C. hirsuta petal number had a genetic basis. Stochastic variation (standard error of the average petal number) was found to be a heritable phenotype, and four QTL that influenced this trait were identified. The sensitivity to detect these QTL effects was increased by accounting for the effect of ageing on petal number variation. All QTL had significant effects on both average petal number and its standard error, indicating that these two traits share a common genetic basis. However, for some QTL, a degree of independence was found between the age of the flowers where allelic effects were significant for each trait. Stochastic variation in C. hirsuta petal number has a genetic basis, and common QTL influence both average petal number and its standard error. Allelic variation at these QTL can, therefore, modify petal number in an age-specific manner via effects on the phenotypic mean and stochastic variation. These results are discussed in the context of trait evolution via a loss of robustness. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals

  11. Genetic Variations in Vesicoureteral Reflux Sequelae

    PubMed Central

    Hains, David S.; Schwaderer, Andrew L.

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are a common condition in children. Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) represents a common associated condition with childhood UTI. UTI susceptibility appears to have a genetic component based on family and UTI cohort studies. Targeted analysis of innate immune system genetic variations indicate that these variations are important in UTI susceptibility. In this overview, we discuss how current cohorts and genetic strategies can be implemented to discover new susceptibility loci in patients with UTI. PMID:26848692

  12. Stochastic variation in Cardamine hirsuta petal number

    PubMed Central

    Monniaux, Marie; Pieper, Bjorn; Hay, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Floral development is remarkably robust in terms of the identity and number of floral organs in each whorl, whereas vegetative development can be quite plastic. This canalization of flower development prevents the phenotypic expression of cryptic genetic variation, even in fluctuating environments. A cruciform perianth with four petals is a hallmark of the Brassicaceae family, typified in the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. However, variable petal loss is found in Cardamine hirsuta, a genetically tractable relative of A. thaliana. Cardamine hirsuta petal number varies in response to stochastic, genetic and environmental perturbations, which makes it an interesting model to study mechanisms of decanalization and the expression of cryptic variation. Methods Multitrait quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis in recombinant inbred lines (RILs) was used to identify whether the stochastic variation found in C. hirsuta petal number had a genetic basis. Key Results Stochastic variation (standard error of the average petal number) was found to be a heritable phenotype, and four QTL that influenced this trait were identified. The sensitivity to detect these QTL effects was increased by accounting for the effect of ageing on petal number variation. All QTL had significant effects on both average petal number and its standard error, indicating that these two traits share a common genetic basis. However, for some QTL, a degree of independence was found between the age of the flowers where allelic effects were significant for each trait. Conclusions Stochastic variation in C. hirsuta petal number has a genetic basis, and common QTL influence both average petal number and its standard error. Allelic variation at these QTL can, therefore, modify petal number in an age-specific manner via effects on the phenotypic mean and stochastic variation. These results are discussed in the context of trait evolution via a loss of robustness. PMID:26346720

  13. Cultural Variation in Vigilance and Precaution Themes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2012-0050 Cultural Variation in Vigilance and Precaution Themes Dr. Ernest T. Lawson Queen’s University...Belfast Institute of Cognition and Culture University Road Belfast, United Kingdom BT7 1NN EOARD Grant 09-3105 Report Date...REPORT TYPE Final Report 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) 21 July 2009 – 30 July 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Cultural Variation in Vigilance and

  14. Phase and Antigenic Variation in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    van der Woude, Marjan W.; Bäumler, Andreas J.

    2004-01-01

    Phase and antigenic variation result in a heterogenic phenotype of a clonal bacterial population, in which individual cells either express the phase-variable protein(s) or not, or express one of multiple antigenic forms of the protein, respectively. This form of regulation has been identified mainly, but by no means exclusively, for a wide variety of surface structures in animal pathogens and is implicated as a virulence strategy. This review provides an overview of the many bacterial proteins and structures that are under the control of phase or antigenic variation. The context is mainly within the role of the proteins and variation for pathogenesis, which reflects the main body of literature. The occurrence of phase variation in expression of genes not readily recognizable as virulence factors is highlighted as well, to illustrate that our current knowledge is incomplete. From recent genome sequence analysis, it has become clear that phase variation may be more widespread than is currently recognized, and a brief discussion is included to show how genome sequence analysis can provide novel information, as well as its limitations. The current state of knowledge of the molecular mechanisms leading to phase variation and antigenic variation are reviewed, and the way in which these mechanisms form part of the general regulatory network of the cell is addressed. Arguments both for and against a role of phase and antigenic variation in immune evasion are presented and put into new perspective by distinguishing between a role in bacterial persistence in a host and a role in facilitating evasion of cross-immunity. Finally, examples are presented to illustrate that phase-variable gene expression should be taken into account in the development of diagnostic assays and in the interpretation of experimental results and epidemiological studies. PMID:15258095

  15. Varying alpha: New constraints from seasonal variations

    SciTech Connect

    Barrow, John D.; Shaw, Douglas J.

    2008-09-15

    We analyze the constraints obtained from new atomic clock data on the possible time variation of the fine structure 'constant' and the electron-proton mass ratio, and show how they are strengthened when the seasonal variation of the Sun's gravitational field at the Earth's surface is taken into account. We compare these bounds with those obtainable from tests of the weak equivalence principle and high redshift observations of quasar absorption spectra.

  16. Developmental and environmental variation in genomes.

    PubMed

    Li, X-Q

    2009-04-01

    The genetic make-up of an organism, established at fertilization, is not conventionally expected to change during development unless mutation occurs. However, there is actually evidence that considerable variation can arise. Some of these changes may occur in response to the environment. This article reviews such variations in genome size or DNA content (excluding ploidy-level changes). The variation can be generated by processes, including high-frequency chromosomal recombination, transposition, cis-element-enhanced gene amplification and repetitive-sequence-based changes in nuclear DNA content. Environmentally induced and developmentally regulated genomic variation (ED-genomic variation or ED-genetic variation) can be found in both coding and non-coding sequences, and is often non-Mendelian in its inheritance pattern. Changes can depend on development (for example, propagation method, seed/fruit position on plants, embryo stage, etc.) and occur in response to the environment (for example, light, temperature, herbicide, salinity, fertilizer, land slope direction, pathogen infection, etc.). Some plants have meiotic (or rejuvenation) corrections, which restore their genome sizes to a certain degree. However, Mendelian inheritance and acquired inheritance of the variants occur, and both inheritance types may be different expressions evolved for the same adaptive responses. With this perspective, the terms 'pure-breeding line' or 'stable cultivar' may only be appropriate for a given mode of reproduction or propagation, and for a given environment. ED-genomic variation appears to be an essential component of differentiation, development and adaptation. Consequently, modern molecular biology tools, such as microarray hybridization and new sequencing technology, should be directed towards a more comprehensive evaluation of ED-genomic variation.

  17. A rare variation of the digastric muscle

    PubMed Central

    KALNIEV, MANOL; KRASTEV, DIMO; KRASTEV, NIKOLAY; VIDINOV, KALIN; VELTCHEV, LUDMIL; APOSTOLOV, ALEXANDER; MILEVA, MILKA

    2013-01-01

    The digastric muscle is composed by two muscle bellies: an anterior and a posterior, joined by an intermediate tendon. This muscle is situated in the anterior region of the neck. The region between the hyoid bone and the mandible is divided by an anterior belly into two triangles: the submandibular situated laterally and the submental triangle which is located medially. We found that the anatomical variations described in the literature relate mainly to the anterior belly and consist of differences in shape and attachment of the muscle. During routine dissection in February 2013 in the section hall of the Department of Anatomy and Histology in Medical University – Sofia we came across a very interesting variation of the digastric muscle. The digastric muscles that presented anatomical variations were photographed using a Sony Cyber-shot DSC-T1 camera, with a Carl Zeiss Vario-Tessar lens. We found out bilateral variation of the digastric muscle in one cadaver. The anterior bellies were very thin and insert to the hyoid bone. Two anterior bellies connect each other and thus they formed a loop. The anatomical variations observed of our study related only to the anterior belly, as previously described by other authors. It is very important to consider the occurrence of the above mentioned variations in the digastric muscle when surgical procedures are performed on the anterior region of the neck. PMID:26527971

  18. Phenotypic variation explains food web structural patterns.

    PubMed

    Gibert, Jean P; DeLong, John P

    2017-10-02

    Food webs (i.e., networks of species and their feeding interactions) share multiple structural features across ecosystems. The factors explaining such similarities are still debated, and the role played by most organismal traits and their intraspecific variation is unknown. Here, we assess how variation in traits controlling predator-prey interactions (e.g., body size) affects food web structure. We show that larger phenotypic variation increases connectivity among predators and their prey as well as total food intake rate. For predators able to eat only a few species (i.e., specialists), low phenotypic variation maximizes intake rates, while the opposite is true for consumers with broader diets (i.e., generalists). We also show that variation sets predator trophic level by determining interaction strengths with prey at different trophic levels. Merging these results, we make two general predictions about the structure of food webs: (i) trophic level should increase with predator connectivity, and (ii) interaction strengths should decrease with prey trophic level. We confirm these predictions empirically using a global dataset of well-resolved food webs. Our results provide understanding of the processes structuring food webs that include functional traits and their naturally occurring variation. Published under the PNAS license.

  19. Beach profile variation on Hawaiian carbonate beaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gibbs, A.E.; Richmond, B.M.; Fletcher, C.H.; ,

    2000-01-01

    Beach profiles from selected Oahu and Maui beaches quantitatively document beach volume variation and change between 1994 and 1999. Along exposed, high-energy beaches, large fluctuations in beach volume, characterized primarily by the formation and erosion of extensive berms, dominate the seasonal changes. Beaches along more protected stretches of coastline show much less variation in profile morphology. Beaches on the west (leeward) coast of Oahu experienced the most seasonal variation in profile volume, followed by the north shore, east (windward) shore, and south shore. Similar to Oahu, beaches along the west coast of Maui showed the greatest overall profile variation. However, the mean variation for profiles along a single coastal reach showed little difference compared to other coastal segments. Although some beaches showed net gain or loss during the study period, most beaches remained relatively stable with change limited to a finite envelope. No island-wide trends in beach erosion or accretion were observed during the study period. However, no extreme events, such as tropical storms or hurricanes, directly influenced the Hawaiian Islands during the study period. This data set should therefore be considered as representative of typical annual beach activity. Greater variation and possible long-term change would be expected during extreme events.

  20. Exploring subdomain variation in biomedical language

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Applications of Natural Language Processing (NLP) technology to biomedical texts have generated significant interest in recent years. In this paper we identify and investigate the phenomenon of linguistic subdomain variation within the biomedical domain, i.e., the extent to which different subject areas of biomedicine are characterised by different linguistic behaviour. While variation at a coarser domain level such as between newswire and biomedical text is well-studied and known to affect the portability of NLP systems, we are the first to conduct an extensive investigation into more fine-grained levels of variation. Results Using the large OpenPMC text corpus, which spans the many subdomains of biomedicine, we investigate variation across a number of lexical, syntactic, semantic and discourse-related dimensions. These dimensions are chosen for their relevance to the performance of NLP systems. We use clustering techniques to analyse commonalities and distinctions among the subdomains. Conclusions We find that while patterns of inter-subdomain variation differ somewhat from one feature set to another, robust clusters can be identified that correspond to intuitive distinctions such as that between clinical and laboratory subjects. In particular, subdomains relating to genetics and molecular biology, which are the most common sources of material for training and evaluating biomedical NLP tools, are not representative of all biomedical subdomains. We conclude that an awareness of subdomain variation is important when considering the practical use of language processing applications by biomedical researchers. PMID:21619603

  1. The epidemiological relevance of trypanosome strain variation.

    PubMed

    Tait, A

    1989-01-01

    The study of strain variation in T.b. rhodesiense has yielded a lot of information which suggests that these trypanosomes are a sub-set of the stocks circulating in tsetse and non human hosts and that each focus constitutes a separate set of human infective stocks. These conclusions remain to be fully established by extensive studies in specific foci. Whether the maintenance of these foci or the expansion of them into epidemics is dependent on variation in the trypanosoma stocks generated by mutation or genetic exchange is unanswered. In order to examine such questions, detailed long-term studies using large numbers of isolates are needed. The analysis of strain variation using existing methods requires considerable manpower and equipment and suffers from the need for growth of trypanosomes in laboratory animals with resultant selection of the stocks under study. The question of whether strain variation in T.b. rhodesiense is epidemiologically relevant remains unanswered, variation certainly occurs but the existing studies are not able to answer this question. It is possible that this question could be answered by detailed studies in two or more foci over a long period using new reagents for the detection of variation (e.g. monoclonal antibodies), large trypanosome stock collections and the measurement of parameters such as virulence, tsetse transmissibility etc.

  2. Variational integrators for nonvariational partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Michael; Maj, Omar

    2015-08-01

    Variational integrators for Lagrangian dynamical systems provide a systematic way to derive geometric numerical methods. These methods preserve a discrete multisymplectic form as well as momenta associated to symmetries of the Lagrangian via Noether's theorem. An inevitable prerequisite for the derivation of variational integrators is the existence of a variational formulation for the considered problem. Even though for a large class of systems this requirement is fulfilled, there are many interesting examples which do not belong to this class, e.g., equations of advection-diffusion type frequently encountered in fluid dynamics or plasma physics. On the other hand, it is always possible to embed an arbitrary dynamical system into a larger Lagrangian system using the method of formal (or adjoint) Lagrangians. We investigate the application of the variational integrator method to formal Lagrangians, and thereby extend the application domain of variational integrators to include potentially all dynamical systems. The theory is supported by physically relevant examples, such as the advection equation and the vorticity equation, and numerically verified. Remarkably, the integrator for the vorticity equation combines Arakawa's discretisation of the Poisson brackets with a symplectic time stepping scheme in a fully covariant way such that the discrete energy is exactly preserved. In the presentation of the results, we try to make the geometric framework of variational integrators accessible to non specialists.

  3. Curvature Filters Efficiently Reduce Certain Variational Energies.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yuanhao; Sbalzarini, Ivo F

    2017-04-01

    In image processing, the rapid approximate solution of variational problems involving generic data-fitting terms is often of practical relevance, for example in real-time applications. Variational solvers based on diffusion schemes or the Euler-Lagrange equations are too slow and restricted in the types of data-fitting terms. Here, we present a filter-based approach to reduce variational energies that contain generic data-fitting terms, but are restricted to specific regularizations. Our approach is based on reducing the regularization part of the variational energy, while guaranteeing non-increasing total energy. This is applicable to regularization-dominated models, where the data-fitting energy initially increases, while the regularization energy initially decreases. We present fast discrete filters for regularizers based on Gaussian curvature, mean curvature, and total variation. These pixel-local filters can be used to rapidly reduce the energy of the full model. We prove the convergence of the resulting iterative scheme in a greedy sense, and we show several experiments to demonstrate applications in image-processing problems involving regularization-dominated variational models.

  4. Normal variation of radionuclide esophageal transit

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, H.A.; Wald, A.

    1985-05-01

    The authors have extended their investigation of normal esophageal transit of aqueous Tc-99m sulfur colloid to determine range and reproducibility using previously described methods. They studied 5 males and 11 females, ages 21 to 67 (mean 35), with no symptoms of esophageal disease. Eight had repeat studies after a 48 day mean interval. The rapid component mean transit time through the esophagus in the 1st swallow (MTT), residual fraction after the 1st and 4th swallows (RF(1), RF(4)), and retrograde index quantifying retrograde motion in the 1st swallow (RI) are presented for the 16 initial studies. CV/sub i/ = intersubject coefficient of variation. CV/sub r/=mean intrasubject coefficient of variation of the 8 repeat pairs. Marked skewness of the distribution to the right, as well as high inter- and intrasubject variation, are noted for RF(1) and RI. Condensed images having a spatial and a temporal dimension show related variable qualitative features. In contrast, MTT distribution is somewhat symmetrical with lower variation, and RF(4) is intermediate. The authors conclude that the normal 1st swallow is subject to sporadic variation. Though all the measured indices may have diagnostic utility, certain of those having a lesser degree of normal variation, notably the residual fractions of swallows beyond the 1st, may discriminate better between normal and abnormal than do RF(1) and RI.

  5. Population effects of increased climate variation.

    PubMed

    Drake, John M

    2005-09-07

    Global circulation models predict and numerous observations confirm that anthropogenic climate change has altered high-frequency climate variability. However, it is not yet well understood how changing patterns of environmental variation will affect wildlife population dynamics and other ecological processes. Theory predicts that a population's long-run growth rate is diminished and the chance of population extinction is increased as environmental variation increases. This results from the fact that population growth is a multiplicative process and that long-run population growth rate is the geometric mean of growth rates over time, which is always less than the arithmetic mean. However, when population growth rates for unstructured populations are related nonlinearly to environmental drivers, increasing environmental variation can increase a population's long-run growth rate. This suggests that patterns of environmental variation associated with different aspects of climate change may affect population dynamics in different ways. Specifically, increasing variation in rainfall might result in diminished long-run growth rates for many animal species while increasing variation in temperature might result in increased long-run growth rates. While the effect of rainfall is theoretically well understood and supported by data, the hypothesized effect of temperature is not. Here, I analyse two datasets to study the effect of fluctuating temperatures on growth rates of zooplankton. Results are consistent with the prediction that fluctuating temperatures should increase long-run growth rates and the frequency of extreme demographic events.

  6. Variational time integrators in computational solid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lew, Adrian Jose

    This thesis develops the theory and implementation of variational integrators for computational solid mechanics problems, and to some extent, for fluid mechanics problems as well. Variational integrators for finite dimensional mechanical systems are succinctly reviewed, and used as the foundations for the extension to continuum systems. The latter is accomplished by way of a space-tune formulation for Lagrangian continuum mechanics that unifies the derivation of tyre balance of linear momentum, energy and configurational forces, all of there as Euler-Lagrange equations of an extended Hamilton's principle. In this formulation, energy conservation and the path independence of the J- and L-integrals are conserved quantities emanating from Noether's theorem. Variational integrators for continuum mechanics are constructed by mimicking this variational structure, and a discrete Noether's theorem for rather general space-tune discretizations is presented. Additionally, the algorithms are automatically (multi)symplectic, and the (multi)symplectic form is uniquely defined by the theory. For instance, in nonlinear elastodynamics the algorithms exactly preserve linear and angular momenta, whenever the continuous system does. A class of variational algorithms is constructed, termed asynchronous variational integrators (AVI), which permit: the selection of independent time steps in each element of a finite element mesh, and the local time steps need riot bear an integral relation to each other. The conservation properties of both synchronous and asynchronous variational integrators are discussed in detail. In particular, AVI are found to nearly conserve energy both locally and globally, a distinguishing feature of variational integrators. The possibility of adapting the elemental time step to exactly satisfy the local energy balance equation, obtained from the extended variational principle, is analyzed. The AVI are also extended to include dissipative systems. The excellent

  7. Surface Photometric Variation of Comet Borrelly's Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; A'Hearn, M. F.; McFadden, L. A.

    2004-11-01

    Comet Borrelly was visited by Deep Space 1 in Sept. 2001 (Soderblom et al. 2004) The images of comet Borrelly's nucleus show large brightness variation over the surface even after the effect of shape is taken into account (Oberst et al. 2004, Kirk et al. 2004). It is not yet known whether this variation is caused by albedo variation (Oberst et al. 2004, Buratti et al. 2004) or the variation of other physical properties such as surface roughness (Kirk et al. 2004) or solar phase function. In our analysis, the disk-resolved images from the DS1 spacecraft (Soderblom et al. 2004) were used, coupled with the shape model of Borrelly's nucleus developed from stereo imaging (Oberst et al. 2004, Kirk et al. 2004), to fit the bidirectional reflectance as a function of local illumination and viewing geometry for individual terrains as defined by Britt et al. (2004). Results show that the surface reflectance variation is, contrary to previous interpretations, most likely due to the combination of albedo variation (a factor of 1.5) and the variation of the asymmetry factor (g) of the single-particle phase function. We find the roughness parameter (theta_bar) is <25o over the surface. The surface on Borrelly's nucleus can be highly back-scattering (g <= -0.7) for mottled terrain, and close to isotropic scattering (g -0.15) for smooth terrain, with single scattering albedo ranging from 0.05 to 0.07. This work is supported by NASA grant NNG04GA92G.

  8. Intrapopulation Genome Size Variation in D. melanogaster Reflects Life History Variation and Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Lisa L.; Huang, Wen; Quinn, Andrew M.; Ahuja, Astha; Alfrejd, Ben; Gomez, Francisco E.; Hjelmen, Carl E.; Moore, Kristi L.; Mackay, Trudy F. C.; Johnston, J. Spencer; Tarone, Aaron M.

    2014-01-01

    We determined female genome sizes using flow cytometry for 211 Drosophila melanogaster sequenced inbred strains from the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel, and found significant conspecific and intrapopulation variation in genome size. We also compared several life history traits for 25 lines with large and 25 lines with small genomes in three thermal environments, and found that genome size as well as genome size by temperature interactions significantly correlated with survival to pupation and adulthood, time to pupation, female pupal mass, and female eclosion rates. Genome size accounted for up to 23% of the variation in developmental phenotypes, but the contribution of genome size to variation in life history traits was plastic and varied according to the thermal environment. Expression data implicate differences in metabolism that correspond to genome size variation. These results indicate that significant genome size variation exists within D. melanogaster and this variation may impact the evolutionary ecology of the species. Genome size variation accounts for a significant portion of life history variation in an environmentally dependent manner, suggesting that potential fitness effects associated with genome size variation also depend on environmental conditions. PMID:25057905

  9. Cycle-to-Cycle Variations in the Diurnal Variation of Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Simon; Owen, Chris; Owens, Matt; Lockwood, Mike

    2016-04-01

    We examine mean profiles of the diurnal variations in galactic cosmic ray flux using a number of neutron monitors at different magnetic latitudes and longitudes. By splitting all of the hourly neutron monitor data by the solar magnetic polarity and analysing the mean normalised neutron monitor count rates between these, we see that the diurnal variation changes phase by 1-2 hours between the two polarity states for the majority of non-polar neutron monitors. The intensity and variability of a heliospheric magnetic field is analysed for every day and found not to be the cause of the phase change. Some polar neutron monitors, however, show different, smaller amplitude variations in phase between polarity cycles. Time series of the time of the maximum in the diurnal variation are presented between 1965 and 2013. Our results agree with previous work by confirming the presence of a 22-year variation in the peak time of the diurnal variation and a 11-year variation in the amplitude, but also show that not all neutron monitors show the same trend. An analysis of the magnetic latitude dependence of the diurnal variation shows that the time-of-day of the peak and trough of this variation gives opposing changes to the amplitude of the 22-year change. We suggest that this could be due to changes in the configeration of the heliospheric magnetic field for consecutive cycles.

  10. Genomic Sequence Variation Markup Language (GSVML).

    PubMed

    Nakaya, Jun; Kimura, Michio; Hiroi, Kaei; Ido, Keisuke; Yang, Woosung; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2010-02-01

    With the aim of making good use of internationally accumulated genomic sequence variation data, which is increasing rapidly due to the explosive amount of genomic research at present, the development of an interoperable data exchange format and its international standardization are necessary. Genomic Sequence Variation Markup Language (GSVML) will focus on genomic sequence variation data and human health applications, such as gene based medicine or pharmacogenomics. We developed GSVML through eight steps, based on case analysis and domain investigations. By focusing on the design scope to human health applications and genomic sequence variation, we attempted to eliminate ambiguity and to ensure practicability. We intended to satisfy the requirements derived from the use case analysis of human-based clinical genomic applications. Based on database investigations, we attempted to minimize the redundancy of the data format, while maximizing the data covering range. We also attempted to ensure communication and interface ability with other Markup Languages, for exchange of omics data among various omics researchers or facilities. The interface ability with developing clinical standards, such as the Health Level Seven Genotype Information model, was analyzed. We developed the human health-oriented GSVML comprising variation data, direct annotation, and indirect annotation categories; the variation data category is required, while the direct and indirect annotation categories are optional. The annotation categories contain omics and clinical information, and have internal relationships. For designing, we examined 6 cases for three criteria as human health application and 15 data elements for three criteria as data formats for genomic sequence variation data exchange. The data format of five international SNP databases and six Markup Languages and the interface ability to the Health Level Seven Genotype Model in terms of 317 items were investigated. GSVML was developed as

  11. Intraseasonal variation of visibility in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wen; Li, Richard C. Y.; Chow, Eric C. H.

    2017-01-01

    Visibility is one of the parameters for indicating air pollution. In this study, visibility variation in Hong Kong during summer and winter is investigated. Visibility in Hong Kong has clear intraseasonal variation. Examination of different environmental parameters suggests that the intraseasonal component dominates the overall circulation anomalies in both summer and winter. Associated with the intraseasonal variation of environmental parameters, obvious variation in visibility impairment is found in both summer and winter. In summer, local visibility and air quality are found to be significantly affected by the (MJO) and the 10-30-day intraseasonal oscillation (ISO) through modulation of associated atmospheric circulations. In winter, the modulation effects appear to be weaker due to the southward shift of the associated convection. The results in this study highlight the importance of the ISO in contributing to the overall variation in visibility in Hong Kong, and provide useful implications for the development of possible mitigation strategies associated with visibility impairment and air pollution in Hong Kong.

  12. Variation in care in pediatric Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Colletti, Richard B; Baldassano, Robert N; Milov, David E; Margolis, Peter A; Bousvaros, Athos; Crandall, Wallace V; Crissinger, Karen D; D'Amico, Michael A; Day, Andrew S; Denson, Lee A; Dubinsky, Marla; Ebach, Dawn R; Hoffenberg, Edward J; Kader, Howard A; Keljo, David J; Leibowitz, Ian H; Mamula, Petar; Pfefferkorn, Marian D; Qureshi, M Azim

    2009-09-01

    Variation in medical care can be a barrier to improving clinical outcomes. We aim to describe the variation in care of Crohn disease as provided by a broad sample of pediatric gastroenterologists. Two hundred forty-six Crohn disease patients of 93 pediatric gastroenterologists from 48 practice sites starting treatment with either thiopurine or infliximab were studied. We assessed variation in diagnostic testing that had been performed to establish the diagnosis of Crohn disease and to assess the phenotype, extent, and severity of disease. We also assessed variation in initial thiopurine and infliximab dosage and in nutritional therapy. Diagnostic studies in which care was uniform included complete blood count, performed in 100% of patients, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and colonoscopy in 96%, and upper endoscopy in 89%. However, imaging of the small bowel had not been performed in 19%, and a stool test for pathogens had not been performed in 29%. Thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) had been measured in 61% of patients before treatment with a thiopurine; in 85%, TPMT was normal. Nonetheless, even when TPMT was normal, 40% of patients received an initial dose of thiopurine that was lower than recommended. Testing for tuberculosis before initiating treatment with infliximab was not performed in 30%. In addition, 36% of severely underweight patients were not receiving a multivitamin supplement, supplemental formula, or tube feeding. There is variation in diagnostic and therapeutic interventions in the management of pediatric Crohn disease, and gaps exist between recommended and actual care.

  13. Culture and geographic variation in orangutan behavior.

    PubMed

    Krützen, Michael; Willems, Erik P; van Schaik, Carel P

    2011-11-08

    Although geographic variation in an organism's traits is often seen as a consequence of selection on locally adaptive genotypes accompanied by canalized development [1], developmental plasticity may also play a role [2, 3], especially in behavior [4]. Behavioral plasticity includes both individual learning and social learning of local innovations ("culture"). Cultural plasticity is the undisputed and dominant explanation for geographic variation in human behavior. It has recently also been suggested to hold for various primates and birds [5], but this proposition has been met with widespread skepticism [6-8]. Here, we analyze parallel long-term studies documenting extensive geographic variation in behavioral ecology, social organization, and putative culture of orangutans [9] (genus Pongo). We show that genetic differences among orangutan populations explain only very little of the geographic variation in behavior, whereas environmental differences explain much more, highlighting the importance of developmental plasticity. Moreover, variation in putative cultural variants is explained by neither genetic nor environmental differences, corroborating the cultural interpretation. Thus, individual and cultural plasticity provide a plausible pathway toward local adaptation in long-lived organisms such as great apes and formed the evolutionary foundation upon which human culture was built.

  14. Prostate Contouring Variation: Can It Be Fixed?

    SciTech Connect

    Khoo, Eric L.H.; Schick, Karlissa; Plank, Ashley W.; Poulsen, Michael; Wong, Winnie W.G.; Middleton, Mark; Martin, Jarad M.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To assess whether an education program on CT and MRI prostate anatomy would reduce inter- and intraobserver prostate contouring variation among experienced radiation oncologists. Methods and Materials: Three patient CT and MRI datasets were selected. Five radiation oncologists contoured the prostate for each patient on CT first, then MRI, and again between 2 and 4 weeks later. Three education sessions were then conducted. The same contouring process was then repeated with the same datasets and oncologists. The observer variation was assessed according to changes in the ratio of the encompassing volume to intersecting volume (volume ratio [VR]), across sets of target volumes. Results: For interobserver variation, there was a 15% reduction in mean VR with CT, from 2.74 to 2.33, and a 40% reduction in mean VR with MRI, from 2.38 to 1.41 after education. A similar trend was found for intraobserver variation, with a mean VR reduction for CT and MRI of 9% (from 1.51 to 1.38) and 16% (from 1.37 to 1.15), respectively. Conclusion: A well-structured education program has reduced both inter- and intraobserver prostate contouring variations. The impact was greater on MRI than on CT. With the ongoing incorporation of new technologies into routine practice, education programs for target contouring should be incorporated as part of the continuing medical education of radiation oncologists.

  15. Geomagnetic secular variation in the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heirtzler, J. R.; Nazarova, K.

    2003-02-01

    Annual repeat stations in Australia and in South Africa show that secular variation may change rapidly and over short geographical distances in the Indian Ocean area. Satellite models show large secular variations in the center of the Indian Ocean where there are few island geomagnetic observatories. This paper investigates marine geomagnetic measurements to see if they give more information about secular variations in this area. Between 1960 and 1988 there were more than 70 port-to-port cruises with ships towing proton precession magnetometers in the Indian Ocean. Change in field intensity from one cruise to another provides new information about the secular variation in this part of the world. Several methods were investigated to determine this change from the ship's data. Observing the change on closely parallel or crossing tracks provides an estimate of this change. These results indicate that there are short time and distance scales of secular variation in the Indian Ocean which have not been accounted for in geomagnetic field models.

  16. Fast Variations of Spectra of Comet Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borysenko, Sergiy; Nazarchuk, Halyna; Shulman, Leonid

    2002-03-01

    Results of the analysis of the Comet Halley spectrophotometry, which has been carried out by H.K. Nazarchuk in 1985 with the TV scanner of the 6-meter telescope (SAO, Russia) are presented. Time variations in the intensities of the CN, CH, C2 and NH2 bands were investigated using the series of spectra obtained in the spectral region λλ=410÷ 510 nm. The auto-correlation functions for all the bands, the cross-correlation functions for C2 lines and their Fourier transformations are calculated to determine the frequencies and periods of the variations. A possibility is considered that high-amplitude fast variations of spectral lines in Comet Halley are caused by solar flares. The daily numbers of solar spots and proton fluxes with energies of more then 1 MeV are compared with the spectral variations of these lines. It is shown that in the observation periods the comet was projected onto an active region of the Sun, but, among all the kinds of solar activity, mainly the solar proton flux with energies less than 4 MeV coincides in time with fast intensity variations in the spectral lines. An algorithm of cross-correlation analysis of discrete sampling series with gaps is built, and average cross-correlation coefficients are calculated.

  17. Variations in pesticide tolerance: Chapter 16

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bridges, Christine M.; Semlitsch, Raymond D.; Lannoo, Michael

    2005-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that a number of amphibian populations have declined in recent years. The cause of these population declines has been difficult to establish because in some instances only a single species is declining while sympatric species are thriving. This chapter discusses the results of research that has been conducted to determine the degree of variation present in amphibians with respect to their response to insecticide exposure. The study assessed the degree of variation in response to an anthropogenic stressor among and within species of frogs in the family Ranidae, focusing on the variation in tolerance of tadpoles to the insecticide carbaryl. Carbaryl acts by inhibiting nervous system acetylcholinesterase, which is a common mode of action among insecticides; thus, carbaryl can serve as a model chemical with which to examine amphibian responses. The study also analyzed variation in a hierarchical fashion to identify where variation was the greatest: among nine ranid species, among populations within a single species, and within populations of southern leopard frogs.

  18. Genetic Variations Involved in Vitamin E Status

    PubMed Central

    Borel, Patrick; Desmarchelier, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin E (VE) is the generic term for four tocopherols and four tocotrienols that exhibit the biological activity of α-tocopherol. VE status, which is usually estimated by measuring fasting blood VE concentration, is affected by numerous factors, such as dietary VE intake, VE absorption efficiency, and VE catabolism. Several of these factors are in turn modulated by genetic variations in genes encoding proteins involved in these factors. To identify these genetic variations, two strategies have been used: genome-wide association studies and candidate gene association studies. Each of these strategies has its advantages and its drawbacks, nevertheless they have allowed us to identify a list of single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with fasting blood VE concentration and α-tocopherol bioavailability. However, much work remains to be done to identify, and to replicate in different populations, all the single nucleotide polymorphisms involved, to assess the possible involvement of other kind of genetic variations, e.g., copy number variants and epigenetic modifications, in order to establish a reliable list of genetic variations that will allow us to predict the VE status of an individual by knowing their genotype in these genetic variations. Yet, the potential usefulness of this area of research is exciting with regard to personalized nutrition and for future clinical trials dedicated to assessing the biological effects of the various isoforms of VE. PMID:27983595

  19. Unusual variation in musculocutaneous nerves in Nepalese.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, C; Poudel, P P

    2009-01-01

    Variations in origin, course, branching pattern, termination and connections of the musculocutaneous nerve in the arm are not as uncommon as was once thought. Variational study of nerve in Nepalese is very less and can be of surgical-clinical importance. This opinion led us to performing this study. The aim of this study was to a study in Nepalese which could be important for clinical investigation and the surgical treatment of peripheral nerve injury. This study was carried out in Manipal College of medical sciences (MCOMS). Dissection of formalised 16 cadavers (n=32 upper limbs) were carried out using normal dissection kit with the help of standard dissection manual in two and half years. The study revealed the variation in course, branching pattern and termination of musculocutaneous nerve in 6.25% of cases unilaterally on the right side. No statistically significant differences by gender and side were observed. This present study provides the evidence of variation of musculocutaneous nerve in Nepalese. The knowledge of the anatomical variations of the peripheral nerve system can help explain an incomprehensible clinical sign.

  20. Boas and beyond: migration and craniometric variation.

    PubMed

    Relethford, John H

    2004-01-01

    Migration is expected to affect craniometric variation in three ways: 1) movement into a different environment leading to developmental plasticity; 2) movement into a different environment followed by in situ adaptation through natural selection; and 3) changes in among-group differentiation and genetic distance through the action of gene flow. The relative influence of these three factors has been argued in the literature, most recently in a series of articles debating the statistical and biological significance of Boas's immigration studies as they relate to cranial plasticity. The Boas debate is discussed within the broader context of debate over genetic and environmental influences on craniometric variation. Additional examples are provided from an ongoing study of global craniometric variation. Although developmental plasticity and climatic adaptation have had an impact on craniometric variation, these factors tend not to erase, or even obscure greatly, underlying patterns of population structure and history that fit a neutral model of quantitative variation. Thus, craniometric data can be used to explore questions of gene flow and genetic affinity. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Antigenic variation: Molecular and genetic mechanisms of relapsing disease

    SciTech Connect

    Cruse, J.M.; Lewis, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. They are: Contemporary Concepts of Antigenic Variation; Antigenic Variation in the Influenza Viruses; Mechanisms of Escape of Visna Lentiviruses from Immunological Control; A Review of Antigenic Variation by the Equine Infectious Anemia Virus; Biologic and Molecular Variations in AIDS Retrovirus Isolates; Rabies Virus Infection: Genetic Mutations and the Impact on Viral Pathogenicity and Immunity; Immunobiology of Relapsing Fever; Antigenic Variation in African Trypanosomes; Antigenic Variation and Antigenic Diversity in Malaria; and Mechanisms of Immune Evasion in Schistosomiasis.

  2. Mass variation tests for coating tablets and hard capsules: rational application of mass variation tests.

    PubMed

    Katori, Noriko; Aoyagi, Nobuo; Kojima, Shigeo

    2002-09-01

    The mass variation test is a simplified alternative test version of the content uniformity test. In the case of coating tablets and capsules, the mass variation test is principally applied to test the inner cores or fillings containing the active ingredient. However, some exceptions exist in pharmacopoeias. The effects of tablet coating and capsule shell on the results of the mass variation test were studied. The mass variation of outer crusts (coatings, capsule shells) and inner cores (core tablets, fillings) was measured separately in several products. The effects of coating on weight variability were very large for sugar-coated tablets. Relative standard deviation (RSD) of the formulation weight (RSD(W)) of sugar-coated tablets (2.73%) was larger than that of plain tablets (0.77%). The cause of the large RSD(W) is the large variation the weight of sugar-coating accounting for 44% of formulation weight. In the case of film-coated tablets, the effect of coating weight on the mass variation test was very small because the rate of coating in comparison to the whole weight was small. In the case of hard capsules, the usage of whole formulation weight resulted in underestimation of variations of filling weight. The differences between dosage forms in the applicability of the mass variation test are caused by differing weight proportions and variability of the outer coatings or shells. To avoid the underestimation of mass variation for hard capsules, a corrected acceptance value is useful. For all the dosage units, the mass variation test can principally be applied to determine which mass is expected to be proportional to the content of the active ingredient. However, some modification of acceptance values enables application of the mass variation tests to inapplicable cases, such as when the RSD of drug concentration (RSD(C)) is larger than 2%.

  3. A global reference for human genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Auton, Adam; Brooks, Lisa D; Durbin, Richard M; Garrison, Erik P; Kang, Hyun Min; Korbel, Jan O; Marchini, Jonathan L; McCarthy, Shane; McVean, Gil A; Abecasis, Gonçalo R

    2015-10-01

    The 1000 Genomes Project set out to provide a comprehensive description of common human genetic variation by applying whole-genome sequencing to a diverse set of individuals from multiple populations. Here we report completion of the project, having reconstructed the genomes of 2,504 individuals from 26 populations using a combination of low-coverage whole-genome sequencing, deep exome sequencing, and dense microarray genotyping. We characterized a broad spectrum of genetic variation, in total over 88 million variants (84.7 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 3.6 million short insertions/deletions (indels), and 60,000 structural variants), all phased onto high-quality haplotypes. This resource includes >99% of SNP variants with a frequency of >1% for a variety of ancestries. We describe the distribution of genetic variation across the global sample, and discuss the implications for common disease studies.

  4. Variations and heredity in bacterial colonies

    PubMed Central

    Čepl, Jaroslav; Blahůšková, Anna; Neubauer, Zdeněk; Markoš, Anton

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Spontaneous variation in appearance was studied in bacterial colonies of Serratia marcescens F morphotype1: (i) A defined array of non-heritable phenotype variations does appear repeatedly; (ii) The presence of colonies of different bacterial species will narrow the variability toward the typical F appearance, as if such an added environmental factor curtailed the capacity of colony morphospace; (iii) Similarly the morphospace becomes reduced by random mutations leading to new, heritable morphotypes—at the same time opening a new array of variations typical for the mutant but not accessible directly from the original F morphospace. Results are discussed in context with biphasic model of early morphogenesis applicable to all multicellular bodies. PMID:28042382

  5. A Climatological Analysis of Geoelectric Field Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balch, C. C.; Cilliers, P. J.; Viljanen, A.; Thomson, A. W. P.; Gaunt, T.; Lotz, S.

    2015-12-01

    Geomagnetic variations induce currents that flow along natural and artificial conducting pathways including critical infrastructure such as the electrical power grid. The level of induction is controlled by the geoelectric field at the Earth's surface, which may be calculated by convolving the geomagnetic variations with an earth-conductivity model. We carry out a long-term statistical analysis of calculated geoelectric field variations using about 30 years of geomagnetic observations from selected locations. We find two dominant classes of geoelectric field events: those that are driven by shock arrival at the Earth which produces a sudden impulse or sudden storm commencement, and those that are associated with geomagnetic storm activity. We provide a historical perspective on the distribution of the geoelectric field for these types of events and compare the geoelectric field with other measures of geomagnetic activity. We also demonstrate the sensitivity of these results to different conductivity models and to geomagnetic latitude.

  6. Lunar nitrogen: Secular variation or mixing?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, S. J.; Wright, I. P.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1986-01-01

    The two current models to explain the nearly 40% variation of the lunar nitrogen isotopic composition are: (1) secular variation of solar wind nitrogen; and (2) a two component mixing model having a constant, heavy solar wind admixed with varying amounts of indigenous light lunar N (LLN). Both models are needed to explain the step pyrolysis extraction profile. The secular variation model proposes that the low temperature release is modern day solar wind implanted into grain surfaces, the 900 C to 1100 C release is from grain surfaces which were once exposed to the ancient solar wind but which are now trapped inside agglutinates, and the >1100 C release as spallogenic N produced by cosmic rays. The mixing model ascribes the components to solar wind, indigenous lunar N and spallogenic N respectively. An extension of either interpretation is that the light N seen in lunar breccias or deep drill cores represent conditions when more N-14 was available to the lunar surface.

  7. Variations in magmatic processes among igneous asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffey, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    Six asteroid classes (types V, E, A, R, M, S) are composed primarily of differentiated assemblages produced by igneous processes within their parent planetesimals. These are identified by surface materials which deviate from a chondritic composition to a degree that require igneous chemical fractionation processes. There are large variations among these igneous asteroids in the peak temperatures attained, in the efficiency of magmatic phase separation, and in the depth within the original parent body exposed at the present surface. These variations provide important constraints on the nature of asteroidal heating events, on the differentiation processes within small planetary bodies, and on the disruption of those parent bodies. Variations due to depth within the parent body and due to degree of magmatic differentiation are detailed.

  8. Variations in K/Th on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. Jeffrey; Stopar, J. D.; Boynton, W. V.; Karunatillake, S.; Keller, J. M.; Brückner, J.; Wänke, H.; Dreibus, G.; Kerry, K. E.; Reedy, R. C.; Evans, L. G.; Starr, R. D.; Martel, L. M. V.; Squyres, S. W.; Gasnault, O.; Maurice, S.; d'Uston, C.; Englert, P.; Dohm, J. M.; Baker, V. R.; Hamara, D.; Janes, D.; Sprague, A. L.; Kim, K. J.; Drake, D. M.; McLennan, S. M.; Hahn, B. C.

    2006-12-01

    K/Th determined by the Mars Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer varies by a factor of 3 on Mars (3000 to 9000), but over 95% of the surface area has K/Th between 4000 and 7000. K/Th is distinctly lower than average in some areas, including west of Olympus Mons in the Amazonis Planitia, the region around Memnonia Fossae, Chryse Planitia, southeastern Arabia Terra, Syrtis Major Planum, and northwest of Apollinaris Patera. On the other hand, K/Th is distinctly higher than average in other areas, including the central part of Valles Marineris and the surrounding highlands, and in the northern part of Hellas. The generally modest variation in K/Th may be explained by inherent variations in igneous rocks and by variations in the extent of aqueous alteration.

  9. Mastering variation: variance components and personalised medicine

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Various sources of variation in observed response in clinical trials and clinical practice are considered, and ways in which the corresponding components of variation might be estimated are discussed. Although the issues have been generally well‐covered in the statistical literature, they seem to be poorly understood in the medical literature and even the statistical literature occasionally shows some confusion. To increase understanding and communication, some simple graphical approaches to illustrating issues are proposed. It is also suggested that reducing variation in medical practice might make as big a contribution to improving health outcome as personalising its delivery according to the patient. It is concluded that the common belief that there is a strong personal element in response to treatment is not based on sound statistical evidence. © 2015 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26415869

  10. [Clinical practice variation in cataract surgery].

    PubMed

    García-Martín, M J; Giménez-Gómez, R; García-Catalán, R; Herrador, M A; Gallardo, J M

    2015-05-01

    Cataract surgery rates have dramatically increased in the last two decades. However, clinical practice variation in cataract surgery has not been thoroughly studied. The aim of this review is to analyze clinical practice variation, including the causes and consequences of this phenomenon. Then, its role in health care planning and health care quality is focused, emphasizing the importance of reducing it and providing several practical strategies to accomplish it. The latest researches are presented in this article. They identify the development and implementation of clinical practice guidelines as the best tool to standardize care processes. Managing unwarranted or unwanted variation would improve quality of care and may lead to a significant saving in health care spending. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Heterogeneous treatment in the variational nodal method

    SciTech Connect

    Fanning, T.H.; Palmiotti, G.

    1995-06-01

    The variational nodal transport method is reduced to its diffusion form and generalized for the treatment of heterogeneous nodes while maintaining nodal balances. Adapting variational methods to heterogeneous nodes requires the ability to integrate over a node with discontinuous cross sections. In this work, integrals are evaluated using composite gaussian quadrature rules, which permit accurate integration while minimizing computing time. Allowing structure within a nodal solution scheme avoids some of the necessity of cross section homogenization, and more accurately defines the intra-nodal flux shape. Ideally, any desired heterogeneity can be constructed within the node; but in reality, the finite set of basis functions limits the practical resolution to which fine detail can be defined within the node. Preliminary comparison tests show that the heterogeneous variational nodal method provides satisfactory results even if some improvements are needed for very difficult, configurations.

  12. A global reference for human genetic variation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The 1000 Genomes Project set out to provide a comprehensive description of common human genetic variation by applying whole-genome sequencing to a diverse set of individuals from multiple populations. Here we report completion of the project, having reconstructed the genomes of 2,504 individuals from 26 populations using a combination of low-coverage whole-genome sequencing, deep exome sequencing, and dense microarray genotyping. We characterized a broad spectrum of genetic variation, in total over 88 million variants (84.7 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 3.6 million short insertions/deletions (indels), and 60,000 structural variants), all phased onto high-quality haplotypes. This resource includes >99% of SNP variants with a frequency of >1% for a variety of ancestries. We describe the distribution of genetic variation across the global sample, and discuss the implications for common disease studies. PMID:26432245

  13. Clinical Significance of an Unusual Variation

    PubMed Central

    Murugan, M. Senthil; Sudha, R.; Bhargavan, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    The infrahyoid muscles are involved in vocalisation and swallowing; among these, the sternothyroid muscle is derived from the common primitive sheet. The improper differentiation of this muscle may therefore result in morphological variations. We report an unusual variation found during the dissection of a 65-year-old male cadaver at the Sri Manakula Vinayagar Medical College, Madagadipet, Pondicherry, India, in 2015. An anomalous belly of the right sternothyroid muscle was observed between the internal jugular (IJ) vein and the internal carotid artery with an additional insertion into the tympanic plate and petrous part of the temporal bone and the presence of a levator glandulae thyroideae muscle. The anomalous muscle may compress the IJ vein if it is related to the neurovascular structures of neck; hence, knowledge of variations of the infrahyoid muscles can aid in the evaluation of IJ vein compression among patients with idiopathic symptoms resulting from venous congestion. PMID:28003898

  14. Textual Stylistic Variation: Choices, Genres and Individuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlgren, Jussi

    This chapter argues for more informed target metrics for the statistical processing of stylistic variation in text collections. Much as operationalized relevance proved a useful goal to strive for in information retrieval, research in textual stylistics, whether application oriented or philologically inclined, needs goals formulated in terms of pertinence, relevance, and utility—notions that agree with reader experience of text. Differences readers are aware of are mostly based on utility—not on textual characteristics per se. Mostly, readers report stylistic differences in terms of genres. Genres, while vague and undefined, are well-established and talked about: very early on, readers learn to distinguish genres. This chapter discusses variation given by genre, and contrasts it to variation occasioned by individual choice.

  15. Establishing epigenetic variation during genome reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Transgenerational reprogramming of DNA methylation is important for transposon silencing and epigenetic inheritance. A stochastic regulation of methylation states in the germline may lead to epigenetic variation and the formation of epialleles that contribute to phenotypic variation. In Arabidopsis thaliana inbred lines, the frequency of single base variation of DNA methylation is much higher than genetic mutation and, interestingly, variable epialleles are pre-methylated in the male germline. However, these same alleles are targeted for demethylation in the pollen vegetative nucleus, by a mechanism that seems to contribute to the accumulation of small RNAs that reinforce transcriptional gene silencing in the gametes. These observations are paving the way toward understanding the extent of epigenetic reprogramming in higher plants, and the mechanisms regulating the stability of acquired epigenetic states across generations. PMID:23774895

  16. Ecological release exposes genetically based niche variation.

    PubMed

    Emery, Nancy C; Ackerly, D D

    2014-09-01

    The evolutionary trajectories of ecological niches have profound impacts on community, population and speciation dynamics, yet the underlying causes of niche lability vs. stasis are poorly understood. Here, we conducted a field experiment to quantify the effects of competition and, conversely, competitive release on the microevolutionary processes driving microhabitat niche evolution in an annual plant population restricted to California vernal pool wetlands. Removing competitors generated a strong increase in mean fitness, the exposure of genetically based niche variation and directional selection for niche evolution in the experimental population. In contrast, genetic variation in the microhabitat niche and directional selection for niche evolution were not detected in individuals growing with competitors. These results indicate that ecological opportunity (here, the removal of competitors) can trigger the immediate expression of latent, heritable niche variation that is necessary for rapid evolutionary responses; conversely, competitors may restrict niche evolution, contributing to niche conservatism in saturated communities. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  17. Return current in encephalography. Variational principles.

    PubMed Central

    Heller, L

    1990-01-01

    The encephalographic problem of finding the electric potential V and the return current associated with any assumed primary current, Jp, is put in the form of a variational principle. With Jp and the conductivity specified, the correct V is one which makes an integral quantity P[V] a maximum. The terms in P[V] are related to the rates at which work is done by the electric field on the primary and return currents. It is shown that there is a unique solution for the electric field, and it satisfies the conservation of energy; this condition can serve as a check on any numerical solution. With the conductivity a different constant in different regions, the variational principle is recast in terms of the charge density on the surfaces of discontinuity. An iteration-variation method for finding the solution is outlined, and possible computational advantages over other approaches are discussed. PMID:2306503

  18. Sources of variation in waterfowl survival rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krementz, D.G.; Barker, R.J.; Nichols, J.D.

    1997-01-01

    Because of the need to manage hunted populations of waterfowl (Anatidae), biologists have studied many demographic traits of waterfowl by analyzing band recoveries. These analyses have produced the most extensive and best estimates of survival available for any group of birds. Using these data, we examined several factors that might explain variation among annual survival rates to explore large-scale patterns that might be useful in understanding waterfowl population dynamics. We found that geography, body mass, and tribe (i.e. phylogeny) were important in explaining variation in average waterfowl survival rates.

  19. The variational subspace valence bond method

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, Graham D.

    2015-04-07

    The variational subspace valence bond (VSVB) method based on overlapping orbitals is introduced. VSVB provides variational support against collapse for the optimization of overlapping linear combinations of atomic orbitals (OLCAOs) using modified orbital expansions, without recourse to orthogonalization. OLCAO have the advantage of being naturally localized, chemically intuitive (to individually model bonds and lone pairs, for example), and transferrable between different molecular systems. Such features are exploited to avoid key computational bottlenecks. Since the OLCAO can be doubly occupied, VSVB can access very large problems, and calculations on systems with several hundred atoms are presented.

  20. Piecewise Integration of Differential Variational Inequality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhengyu; Wu, Xinyuan

    2009-09-01

    Differential variational inequality (DVI) is a new mathematical paradigm consisting of a system of ordinary differential equations and a parametric variational inequality problem as the constraints. The solution of DVI was shown at best piecewise differentiable, for which the existing integrators possess only convergence of order one. In this paper we present an algorithm of finding the pieces where the solution is differentiable, and propose applying the methods in the pieces for a moderate stepsize, while for smaller stepsize around the boundary of the pieces for achieving high accuracy. Numerical example of bridge collapse is given to illustrate the efficiency of our algorithms.

  1. The variational subspace valence bond method.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Graham D

    2015-04-07

    The variational subspace valence bond (VSVB) method based on overlapping orbitals is introduced. VSVB provides variational support against collapse for the optimization of overlapping linear combinations of atomic orbitals (OLCAOs) using modified orbital expansions, without recourse to orthogonalization. OLCAO have the advantage of being naturally localized, chemically intuitive (to individually model bonds and lone pairs, for example), and transferrable between different molecular systems. Such features are exploited to avoid key computational bottlenecks. Since the OLCAO can be doubly occupied, VSVB can access very large problems, and calculations on systems with several hundred atoms are presented.

  2. A brief history of genetic variation analysis.

    PubMed

    Ahmadian, Afshin; Lundeberg, Joakim

    2002-05-01

    As the human genome sequence is determined, there is an emerging need for the analysis of human sequence variations as genetic markers in diagnosis, linkage and association studies, cancer research, and pharmacogenomics. There are several different techniques and approaches for detecting these genetic variations, and here we review some of these techniques and their application fields. However, all the techniques have advantages and disadvantages, andfactors such as laboratory instrumentation, personnel experience, required accuracy, required throughput, and cost often have to be taken into account before selecting a method.

  3. Onsager's variational principle in soft matter.

    PubMed

    Doi, Masao

    2011-07-20

    In the celebrated paper on the reciprocal relation for the kinetic coefficients in irreversible processes, Onsager (1931 Phys. Rev. 37 405) extended Rayleigh's principle of the least energy dissipation to general irreversible processes. In this paper, I shall show that this variational principle gives us a very convenient framework for deriving many established equations which describe the nonlinear and non-equilibrium phenomena in soft matter, such as phase separation kinetics in solutions, gel dynamics, molecular modeling for viscoelasticity nemato-hydrodynamics, etc. Onsager's variational principle can therefore be regarded as a solid general basis for soft matter physics.

  4. Lateral variations in lower mantle seismic velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Thomas S.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1992-01-01

    To obtain a theoretical model which provides a rationale for the observed high values of velocity variations, the effect of a 0.1 to 0.2 percent partially molten volatile-rich material in various geometries which are heterogeneously dispersed in the lower mantle is examined. Data obtained indicate that, depending on aspect ratio and geometry, 0.1-0.2 percent partial melting in conjunction with about 100 K thermal anomalies can explain the seismic variations provided the compressibility of the melt differs by less than about 20 percent from the surrounding solid.

  5. Mammalian odorant receptors: functional evolution and variation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yue; Matsunami, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, the perception of smell starts with the activation of odorant receptors (ORs) by volatile molecules in the environment. The mammalian OR repertoire has been subject to rapid evolution, and is highly diverse within the human population. Recent advances in the functional expression and ligand identification of ORs allow for functional analysis of OR evolution, and reveal that changes in OR protein sequences translate into high degrees of functional variations. Moreover, in several cases the functional variation of a single OR affects the perception of its cognate odor ligand, providing clues as to how an odor is coded at the receptor level. PMID:25660959

  6. Genomic variation in maize. Progress report, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Rivin, C.J.

    1990-12-31

    We have endeavored to learn to learn how different DNA sequences and sequence arrangements contribute to genome plasticity in maize. We describe quantitative variation among maize inbred lines for tandemly arrayed and dispersed repeated DNA sequences and gene families, and qualitative variation for sequences homologous to the Mutator family of transposons. The potential of these sequences to undergo unequal crossing over, non-allelic (ectopic) recombination and transposition makes them a source of genome instability. We have found examples of rapid genomic change involving these sequences in F1 hybrids, tissue culture cells and regenerated plants.

  7. Sources of variation in waterfowl survival rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krementz, D.G.; Barker, R.J.; Nichols, J.D.

    1997-01-01

    Because of the need to manage hunted populations of waterfowl (Anatidae), biologists have studied many demographic traits of waterfowl by analyzing band recoveries. These analyses have produced the most extensive and best estimates of survival available for any group of birds. Using these data, we examined several factors that might explain variation among annual survival rates to explore large-scale patterns that might be useful in understanding waterfowl population dynamics. We found that geography, body mass, and tribe (i.e. phylogeny) were important in explaining variation in average waterfowl survival rates.

  8. Lateral variations in lower mantle seismic velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Thomas S.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1992-01-01

    To obtain a theoretical model which provides a rationale for the observed high values of velocity variations, the effect of a 0.1 to 0.2 percent partially molten volatile-rich material in various geometries which are heterogeneously dispersed in the lower mantle is examined. Data obtained indicate that, depending on aspect ratio and geometry, 0.1-0.2 percent partial melting in conjunction with about 100 K thermal anomalies can explain the seismic variations provided the compressibility of the melt differs by less than about 20 percent from the surrounding solid.

  9. On the total variation dictionary model.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Tieyong; Ng, Michael K

    2010-03-01

    The goal of this paper is to provide a theoretical study of a total variation (TV) dictionary model. Based on the properties of convex analysis and bounded variation functions, the existence of solutions of the TV dictionary model is proved. We then show that the dual form of the model can be given by the minimization of the sum of the l(1) -norm of the dual solution and the Bregman distance between the curvature of the primal solution and the subdifferential of TV norm of the dual solution. This theoretical result suggests that the dictionary must represent sparsely the curvatures of solution image in order to obtain a better denoising performance.

  10. Fractional variational calculus and the transversality conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, O. P.

    2006-08-01

    This paper presents the Euler-Lagrange equations and the transversality conditions for fractional variational problems. The fractional derivatives are defined in the sense of Riemann-Liouville and Caputo. The connection between the transversality conditions and the natural boundary conditions necessary to solve a fractional differential equation is examined. It is demonstrated that fractional boundary conditions may be necessary even when the problem is defined in terms of the Caputo derivative. Furthermore, both fractional derivatives (the Riemann-Liouville and the Caputo) arise in the formulations, even when the fractional variational problem is defined in terms of one fractional derivative only. Examples are presented to demonstrate the applications of the formulations.

  11. Copernicus observations of Iota Herculis velocity variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogerson, J. B., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of Iota Her at 109.61-109.67 nm obtained with the U1 channel of the Copernicus spectrophotometer at resolution 5 pm during 3.6 days in May, 1979, are reported. Radial-velocity variations are detected and analyzed as the sum of two sinusoids with frequencies 0.660 and 0.618 cycles/day and amplitudes 9.18 and 8.11 km/s, respectively. Weak evidence supporting the 13.9-h periodicity seen in line-profile variations by Smith (1978) is found.

  12. A probabilistic Hu-Washizu variational principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. K.; Belytschko, T.; Besterfield, G. H.

    1987-01-01

    A Probabilistic Hu-Washizu Variational Principle (PHWVP) for the Probabilistic Finite Element Method (PFEM) is presented. This formulation is developed for both linear and nonlinear elasticity. The PHWVP allows incorporation of the probabilistic distributions for the constitutive law, compatibility condition, equilibrium, domain and boundary conditions into the PFEM. Thus, a complete probabilistic analysis can be performed where all aspects of the problem are treated as random variables and/or fields. The Hu-Washizu variational formulation is available in many conventional finite element codes thereby enabling the straightforward inclusion of the probabilistic features into present codes.

  13. A variational principle for turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, M. E.

    1980-11-01

    A general control theory is proposed to select the realized stationary state whenever the equations of motion are densely nonunique (degenerate). For the turbulent flow in a pipe with given pressure gradient, the theory implies that the discharge is an extremum. Quantitative results, such as von Karman's constant, emerge when this variational principle is combined with inequalities pertaining to the mean field. The control theory is also applied to fully turbulent thermal convection, and a variational principle for this problem is obtained which is also consistent with measurements.

  14. The contribution of additive genetic variation to personality variation: heritability of personality.

    PubMed

    Dochtermann, Ned A; Schwab, Tori; Sih, Andrew

    2015-01-07

    Individual animals frequently exhibit repeatable differences from other members of their population, differences now commonly referred to as 'animal personality'. Personality differences can arise, for example, from differences in permanent environmental effects--including parental and epigenetic contributors--and the effect of additive genetic variation. Although several studies have evaluated the heritability of behaviour, less is known about general patterns of heritability and additive genetic variation in animal personality. As overall variation in behaviour includes both the among-individual differences that reflect different personalities and temporary environmental effects, it is possible for personality to be largely genetically influenced even when heritability of behaviour per se is quite low. The relative contribution of additive genetic variation to personality variation can be estimated whenever both repeatability and heritability are estimated for the same data. Using published estimates to address this issue, we found that approximately 52% of animal personality variation was attributable to additive genetic variation. Thus, while the heritability of behaviour is often moderate or low, the heritability of personality is much higher. Our results therefore (i) demonstrate that genetic differences are likely to be a major contributor to variation in animal personality and (ii) support the phenotypic gambit: that evolutionary inferences drawn from repeatability estimates may often be justified.

  15. The contribution of additive genetic variation to personality variation: heritability of personality

    PubMed Central

    Dochtermann, Ned A.; Schwab, Tori; Sih, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Individual animals frequently exhibit repeatable differences from other members of their population, differences now commonly referred to as ‘animal personality’. Personality differences can arise, for example, from differences in permanent environmental effects―including parental and epigenetic contributors―and the effect of additive genetic variation. Although several studies have evaluated the heritability of behaviour, less is known about general patterns of heritability and additive genetic variation in animal personality. As overall variation in behaviour includes both the among-individual differences that reflect different personalities and temporary environmental effects, it is possible for personality to be largely genetically influenced even when heritability of behaviour per se is quite low. The relative contribution of additive genetic variation to personality variation can be estimated whenever both repeatability and heritability are estimated for the same data. Using published estimates to address this issue, we found that approximately 52% of animal personality variation was attributable to additive genetic variation. Thus, while the heritability of behaviour is often moderate or low, the heritability of personality is much higher. Our results therefore (i) demonstrate that genetic differences are likely to be a major contributor to variation in animal personality and (ii) support the phenotypic gambit: that evolutionary inferences drawn from repeatability estimates may often be justified. PMID:25392476

  16. Tensor-based AAM with continuous variation estimation: application to variation-robust face recognition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyung-Soo; Kim, Daijin

    2009-06-01

    The Active appearance model (AAM) is a well-known model that can represent a non-rigid object effectively. However, the fitting result is often unsatisfactory when an input image deviates from the training images due to its fixed shape and appearance model. To obtain more robust AAM fitting, we propose a tensor-based AAM that can handle a variety of subjects, poses, expressions, and illuminations in the tensor algebra framework, which consists of an image tensor and a model tensor. The image tensor estimates image variations such as pose, expression, and illumination of the input image using two different variation estimation techniques: discrete and continuous variation estimation. The model tensor generates variation-specific AAM basis vectors from the estimated image variations, which leads to more accurate fitting results. To validate the usefulness of the tensor-based AAM, we performed variation-robust face recognition using the tensor-based AAM fitting results. To do, we propose indirect AAM feature transformation. Experimental results show that tensor-based AAM with continuous variation estimation outperforms that with discrete variation estimation and conventional AAM in terms of the average fitting error and the face recognition rate.

  17. Do key dimensions of seed and seedling functional trait variation capture variation in recruitment probability?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    1. Plant functional traits provide a mechanistic basis for understanding ecological variation among plant species and the implications of this variation for species distribution, community assembly and restoration. 2. The bulk of our functional trait understanding, however, is centered on traits rel...

  18. Connection between variations of the atmosphere temperature profile and variations of the meson component intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blokh, Y. L.; Rogovaya, S. I.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of temperature effects on intensity variations of the cosmic ray meson component were studied. The connection between the temperature variation delta T and the intensity variation delta I was established by using the temperature coefficient density technique. To realize how many devices are needed on the Earth for predicting the temperature variation of the atmosphere profile with a reasonable accuracy, IO isobaric levels and IO were calculated. The set of initial elements of the cosmic ray mesons are varied and it is shown that the matrix of the coefficients B sub ij is rather sensitive to their choice. It is found that if for the calculations of the atmospheric temperature variations the model is used, the number of meson components, essentially exceeding 3, should be considered.

  19. Eliminating Unpredictable Variation through Iterated Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kenny; Wonnacott, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Human languages may be shaped not only by the (individual psychological) processes of language acquisition, but also by population-level processes arising from repeated language learning and use. One prevalent feature of natural languages is that they avoid unpredictable variation. The current work explores whether linguistic predictability might…

  20. Allophonic Variation in the Spanish Sibilant Fricative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Alison

    2013-01-01

    In Spanish, the phoneme /s/ has two variants: [z] occurs in the coda when preceding a voiced consonant, and [s] occurs elsewhere. However, recent research has revealed irregular voicing patterns with regards to this phone. This dissertation examines two of these allophonic variations. It first investigates how speech rate and speech formality…

  1. Community Engagement about Genetic Variation Research

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Kurt D.; Metosky, Susan; Rudofsky, Gayle; Deignan, Kathleen P.; Martinez, Hulda; Johnson-Moore, Penelope; Citrin, Toby

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this article is to describe the methods and effectiveness of the Public Engagement in Genetic Variation and Haplotype Mapping Issues (PEGV) Project, which engaged a community in policy discussion about genetic variation research. The project implemented a 6-stage community engagement model in New Rochelle, New York. First, researchers recruited community partners. Second, the project team created community oversight. Third, focus groups discussed concerns generated by genetic variation research. Fourth, community dialogue sessions addressed focus group findings and developed policy recommendations. Fifth, a conference was held to present these policy recommendations and to provide a forum for HapMap (haplotype mapping) researchers to dialogue directly with residents. Finally, findings were disseminated via presentations and papers to the participants and to the wider community beyond. The project generated a list of proposed guidelines for genetic variation research that addressed the concerns of New Rochelle residents. Project team members expressed satisfaction with the engagement model overall but expressed concerns about how well community groups were utilized and what segment of the community actually engaged in the project. The PEGV Project represents a model for researchers to engage the general public in policy development about genetic research. There are benefits of such a process beyond the desired genetic research. (Population Health Management 2012;15:78–89) PMID:21815821

  2. Diurnal Variations in Maximal Oxygen Uptake.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClellan, Powell D.

    A study attempted to determine if diurnal (daily cyclical) variations were present during maximal exercise. The subjects' (30 female undergraduate physical education majors) oxygen consumption and heart rates were monitored while they walked on a treadmill on which the grade was raised every minute. Each subject was tested for maximal oxygen…

  3. Genetic Variation Sampled in Three California Oaks

    Treesearch

    Lawrence A. Riggs; Constance I. Millar; Diane L. Delany

    1991-01-01

    As a first step in acquiring genetic information about oak species indigenous to California's hardwood rangelands we drew on experience from both forest regeneration and species conservation and applied biochemical techniques for rapidly assaying patterns of genetic variation. In a study sponsored by the California Integrated Hardwood Range Management Program we...

  4. Solar generated quasi-biennial geomagnetic variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugiura, M.; Poros, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    The existence of highly correlated quasi-biennial variations in the geomagnetic field and in solar activity is demonstrated. The analysis uses a numerical filter technique applied to monthly averages of the geomagnetic horizontal component and of the Zurich relative sunspot number. Striking correlations are found between the quasi-biennial geomagnetic variations determined from several magnetic observatories located at widely different longitudes, indicating a worldwide nature of the obtained variation. The correlation coefficient between the filtered Dst index and the filtered relative sunspot number is found to be -0.79 at confidence level greater than 99% with a time-lag of 4 months, with solar activity preceding the Dst variation. The correlation between the unfiltered data of Dst and of the sunspot number is also high with a similar time-lag. Such a timelag has not been discussed in the literature, and a further study is required to establish the mode of sun-earth relationship that gives this time delay.

  5. Interlanguage Variation and Transfer of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Mark Andrew

    2007-01-01

    One branch of research in second language acquisition has investigated the ways a learner's interlanguage (IL) varies between tasks. IL variation research has examined linguistic, psycholinguistic, and sociolinguistic constraints, and has revealed much about this phenomenon. An additional potentially-useful perspective that has, to this point,…

  6. Geographic variation in ponderosa pine leader growth

    Treesearch

    James W. Hanover

    1963-01-01

    Growth of the shoot apices of 91 trees in a 45-year-old Pinus ponderosa Laws. provenance test was measured periodically with a transit. Analysis of the measurements led to the following conclusions: (1) 19 races of ponderosa pine planted near Priest River, Idaho, showed phenological, morphological, or physiological variation in six characters: date of beginning growth...

  7. Earth orbital variations and vertebrate bioevolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclean, Dewey M.

    1988-01-01

    Cause of the Pleistocene-Holocene transition mammalian extinctions at the end of the last age is the subject of debate between those advocating human predation and climate change. Identification of an ambient air temperature (AAT)-uterine blood flow (UBF) coupling phenomenon supports climate change as a factor in the extinctions, and couples the extinctions to earth orbital variations that drive ice age climatology. The AAT-UBF phenomenon couples mammalian bioevolution directly to climate change via effects of environmental heat upon blood flow to the female uterus and damage to developing embryos. Extinctions were in progress during climatic warming before the Younger Dryas event, and after, at times when the AAT-UBF couple would have been operative; however, impact of a sudden short-term cooling on mammals in the process of adapting to smaller size and relatively larger S/V would have been severe. Variations in earth's orbit, and orbital forcing of atmospheric CO2 concentrations, were causes of the succession of Pleistocene ice ages. Coincidence of mammalian extinctions with terminations of the more intense cold stages links mammalian bioevolution to variations in earth's orbit. Earth orbital variations are a driving source of vertebrate bioevolution.

  8. Pathogenic variation of Phakopsora pachyrhizi in Nigeria

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi) is endemic to soybean growing areas in Nigeria. To determine the pathogenic variation, infected leaves were collected from 85 locations in the Derived Savanna, Southern Guinea Savanna, Northern Guinea Savanna and Mid-Altitude agroecological zones. A total of 116 ...

  9. Dialectal Variation in the Lexical Tone System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remijsen, Bert

    2001-01-01

    Discusses dialectal variation in the lexical tone system of Ma'ya, an Austronesian language featuring three lexically contrastive tonemes. Representative acoustic data were collected from the Missol, Slawati, and Laganyan dialects, and on the basis of these data, an account is given of their tone systems and of how these tone systems compare to…

  10. On the regularity in some variational problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragusa, Maria Alessandra; Tachikawa, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    Our main goal is the study some regularity results where are considered estimates in Morrey spaces for the derivatives of local minimizers of variational integrals of the form 𝒜 (u ,Ω )= ∫Ω F (x ,u ,D u ) dx where Ω is a bounded domain in ℝm and the integrand F have some different forms.

  11. Intraocular pressure variations: causes and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Sit, Arthur J

    2014-12-01

    Reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP) is the only known effective treatment for glaucoma. However, IOP is a highly variable and dynamic parameter, undergoing virtually constant changes from numerous factors, including body position and circadian rhythms. Despite this variability, evidence for the efficacy of IOP reduction in glaucoma is based on studies designed to assess mean IOP and not IOP variations. Post hoc analysis of data from major clinical trials has suggested that IOP variations may be an independent risk factor for the development of glaucoma or glaucomatous progression, at least in some patients, but the evidence is incomplete and further studies are required. In the interim, judicious selection of existing therapies can help to minimize IOP variations. In general, therapies that improve outflow instead of suppressing aqueous humor production result in more stable IOP. However, new technology to allow better monitoring of IOP, ideally in a continuous 24-hour manner, is required to fully understand the role of IOP variations in glaucoma. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Spatial and temporal variation in evapotranspiration

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Spatial and temporal variation in evapotranspiration occurs at multiple scales as the result of several different spatial and temporal patterns in precipitation, soil water holding capacity, cloudiness (available energy), types of crops, and residue and tillage management practices. We have often as...

  13. Variational fitting methods for electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlap, Brett I.; Rösch, Notker; Trickey, S. B.

    2010-11-01

    We review the basics and the evolution of a powerful and widely applicable general approach to the systematic reduction of computational burden in many-electron calculations. Variational fitting of electron densities (either total or partial) has the great advantage, for quantum mechanical calculations, that it respects the stationarity property, which is at the heart of the success of the basis set expansion methods ubiquitous in computational chemistry and materials physics. The key point is easy. In a finite system, independent of whether the fitted charge distribution is constrained to contain the proper amount of charge, variational fitting guarantees that the quantum mechanical total energy retains the stationarity property. Thus, many-electron quantum mechanics with variational fitting of an electronic density in an incomplete density-fitting basis set behaves similarly as the exact quantum mechanical energy does when evaluated with an incomplete basis set to fit wavefunctions or spin-orbitals. Periodically bounded systems are a bit more subtle but the essential stationarity is preserved. This preservation of an exact property is quite distinct from truncation of the resolution of the identity in a basis. Variational fitting has proven to have benefits far beyond the original objective of making a Gaussian-orbital basis calculation of an early density functional computationally feasible. We survey many of those developments briefly, with guidance to the pertinent literature and a few remarks about the connections with Quantum Theory Project.

  14. Neighborhood Disadvantage and Variations in Blood Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cathorall, Michelle L.; Xin, Huaibo; Peachey, Andrew; Bibeau, Daniel L.; Schulz, Mark; Aronson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the extent to which neighborhood disadvantage accounts for variation in blood pressure. Methods: Demographic, biometric, and self-reported data from 19,261 health screenings were used. Addresses of participants were geocoded and located within census block groups (n = 14,510, 75.3%). Three hierarchical linear models were…

  15. The Known Mix: A Taste of Variation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canada, Daniel L.

    2008-01-01

    To create an environment in which all students have opportunities to notice, describe, and wonder about variability, this article takes a context familiar to many teacher--sampling colored chips from a jar--and shows how this context was used to explicitly focus on variation in the classroom. The sampling activity includes physical as well as…

  16. Variation in height growth and growth

    Treesearch

    Knud E. Clausen

    1968-01-01

    Yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis Britt.) is an important hardwood species in the Lake States, northeastern United States, and eastern Canada. Since it produces valuable timber, the species is a logical candidate for genetic improvement. An understanding of the variation pattern in a species is, however, basic to any improvement program. In 1963...

  17. Genomic characteristics of cattle copy number variations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We performed a systematic analysis of cattle copy number variations (CNVs) using the Bovine HapMap SNP genotyping data, including 539 animals of 21 modern cattle breeds and 6 outgroups. After correcting genomic waves and considering the trio information, we identified 682 candidate CNV regions (CNVR...

  18. Student Images of Sociology: Variations and Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordova, Terri L.; And Others

    To explore the impact of an introductory sociology course on concepts held by college students, a study was executed on the images of sociology and sociologists, the variation of this image with other variables, the degree and direction of change of these images on completing an introductory course, and variability among students' changes in…

  19. Neisserial surface variation: how and why?

    PubMed

    Swanson, J; Belland, R J; Hill, S A

    1992-10-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae exhibits striking variability in several of its surface components (pili, Opa proteins and lipooligosaccharide) in vivo and in vitro. Such flagrant variation of this mucosal pathogen's surface components contrasts sharply with changes in single surface components of blood-borne trypanosomes and borreliae. Despite these differences, similar molecular events are sometimes involved.

  20. Seasonal variations in the rotation of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Maistre, Sebastien; Karatekin, Özgür; Rosenblatt, Pascal; Dehant, Veronique

    2010-05-01

    Seasonal variations in the rotation of Mars are primarily driven by its atmosphere and involve an exchange of mass and/or momentum between the atmosphere and the solid body. In this study, we investigate the determination of seasonal variations of the Length-of-Day (LOD) and of the polar motion (PM). PM corresponds to the motion of the rotation axis in a reference frame tied to the planet. Mars' polar motion contains seasonal effects of the atmosphere as well as a resonance with a rotational normal mode of the planet, the Chandler Wobble (CW), which is the natural wobbling of an oblate planet that does not rotate around its principal moment of inertia. The period and damping of this mode are very interesting since they are linked to the interior structure of the planet. LOD variations are deviations from the uniform rotation speed of the planet. They are mostly related to the dynamics of the geophysical fluids of the system such as the core and atmosphere of Mars. The amplitudes of the PM and LOD variations calculated from the outputs of the General Circulation Models will be compared with the observed amplitudes from the tracking of Martian landers and orbiters. The improvements with the future missions and their implications for the Martian atmospheric dynamics and interior structure will be discussed.

  1. Language Variation, Language Change and Perceptual Dialectology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gessinger, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Subjective and objective language data collected in a research project on language variation in north Germany not only reveal information on current linguistic trends in north Germany; they also show how language change in this region is represented in the consciousness of the speakers themselves and described in comments by them. This diachronic…

  2. Variations of the Solar Constant. [conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofia, S. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The variations in data received from rocket-borne and balloon-borne instruments are discussed. Indirect techniques to measure and monitor the solar constant are presented. Emphasis is placed on the correlation of data from the Solar Maximum Mission and the Nimbus 7 satellites.

  3. Seasonal variations of selected cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Gregory S

    2005-12-01

    This article reviews research on selected biomarkers of cardiovascular risk - cholesterol and other lipids, C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, homocysteine - in the attempt to determine the existence of a predictable seasonal chronobiological pattern of variation. Studies dating as far back as the 1930s have reported seasonal variations in cholesterol levels. Statistically significant seasonal changes in lipid levels have been found in individuals irrespective of the country where the research has been conducted, and irrespective of the age, sex, ethnicity, and baseline lipid levels of the study subjects. While not all studies have been in complete agreement on either the amplitude (degree of seasonal change) or month/s of highest lipid levels, a strong winter/summer difference has been found in most studies. Existing evidence for an independent effect of season in variation of CRP is weak. Studies have consistently reported significant seasonal variations in fibrinogen levels. While other biological factors clearly interact to affect fibrinogen variability, seasonality appears to be an independent source of variability. Evidence from several studies points to a lack of seasonal variability in homocysteine levels. Although seasonal variability is just one source of periodicity influencing biological function and assessments in clinical practice, for some biomarkers, including lipids and fibrinogen, it is a source of variability that warrants consideration prior to a decision to treat and in assessing response to interventions.

  4. On variational features of vortex flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdichevsky, V. L.

    2008-09-01

    Ideal incompressible fluid is a Hamiltonian system which possesses an infinite number of integrals, the circulations of velocity over closed fluid contours. This allows one to split all the degrees of freedom into the driving ones and the “slave” ones, the latter to be determined by the integrals of motions. The “slave” degrees of freedom correspond to “potential part” of motion, which is driven by vorticity. Elimination of the “slave” degrees of freedom from equations of ideal incompressible fluid yields a closed system of equations for dynamics of vortex lines. This system is also Hamiltonian. The variational principle for this system was found recently (Berdichevsky in Thermodynamics of chaos and order, Addison-Wesly-Longman, Reading, 1997; Kuznetsov and Ruban in JETP Lett 67, 1076 1081, 1998). It looks striking, however. In particular, the fluid motion is set to be compressible, while in the least action principle of fluid mechanics the incompressibility of motion is a built-in property. This striking feature is explained in the paper, and a link between the variational principle of vortex line dynamics and the least action principle is established. Other points made in this paper are concerned with steady motions. Two new variational principles are proposed for steady vortex flows. Their relation to Arnold’s variational principle of steady vortex motion is discussed.

  5. Variations of scalp, pubic and axillary hair.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Sanchita; Chatterjee, Madhumati; Ghosh, Jyoti Ratan; Chakrabarti, Nirmal Kanti; Bandyopadhyay, Arup Ratan

    2012-01-01

    Hair examinations and comparisons conducted by forensic scientists often provide investigative and associative information. Apart from its length and its natural color, hair displays a morphologic diversity both macroscopically and microscopically. Pseudogenization of variations in the hair follicles are all taken into account when classifying hair types. However, the classification of differential types of hair quantitative traits in human is yet to be undertaken. An attempt has been made in the present study to understand the variation by using the histomorphological and quantitative variables of 540 hair strands (180 each scalp, axillary and pubic hair) of 18 adult Bengalee Hindu caste females. Apart from variation in histomorphological variables, quantitative variables regarding shaft and medulla diameter demonstrated variation in terms of being significantly higher (p < 0.05) in pubic hair compared to that of axillary and scalp hair. Therefore, the present study envisaged that variability in histomorphological and quantitative traits in different areas of human could be one of the important criteria for personal identification in forensic research.

  6. Analysis of Performance Variation Using Query Expansion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alemayehu, Nega

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of information retrieval performance evaluation focuses on a case study using a statistical repeated measures analysis of variance for testing the significance of factors, such as retrieval method and topic in retrieval performance variation. Analyses of the effect of query expansion on document ranking confirm that expansion affects…

  7. Chloroplast DNA variation of northern red oak

    Treesearch

    Jeanne Romero-Severson; Preston Aldrich; Yi Feng; Weilin Sun; Charles Michler

    2003-01-01

    Chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) variation was examined in 48 northern red oaks at 14 sites representing contrasting glacial histories and age structures within the state of Indiana in the United States. PCR-RFLP of three intergenic regions revealed five haplotypes. Haplotype I was common to seven sites and was the most frequent (17 trees). Haplotype II was common to five sites...

  8. Introductions in Research Articles: Variation across Disciplines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samraj, B.

    2002-01-01

    Reports on an analysis of research article introductions from two related fields, Wildlife Behavior and Conservation Biology, using Swales' (1990), "Genre Analysis. English in Academic and Research Settings." Results of the analysis reveal disciplinary variation in the structure of this genre, which has important pedagogical implications.…

  9. Introductions in Research Articles: Variation across Disciplines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samraj, B.

    2002-01-01

    Reports on an analysis of research article introductions from two related fields, Wildlife Behavior and Conservation Biology, using Swales' (1990), "Genre Analysis. English in Academic and Research Settings." Results of the analysis reveal disciplinary variation in the structure of this genre, which has important pedagogical implications.…

  10. Analysis of Performance Variation Using Query Expansion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alemayehu, Nega

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of information retrieval performance evaluation focuses on a case study using a statistical repeated measures analysis of variance for testing the significance of factors, such as retrieval method and topic in retrieval performance variation. Analyses of the effect of query expansion on document ranking confirm that expansion affects…

  11. Seasonal variations of haematological parameters in athletes.

    PubMed

    Banfi, Giuseppe; Lundby, Carsten; Robach, Paul; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    The influence of training and competition workloads is crucial for evaluation of longitudinal haematological data in athletes. There are only a few papers on the variation of haematological parameters during long-lasting periods and, especially, during an entire competitive season. We summarized that some haematological parameters can be influenced by long-term training and competition periods. Haemoglobin (Hb) and haematocrit (Ht) are decreased during the more intense periods of training, throughout the season. In different sport disciplines, the decline of Hb ranges from 3 to 8% during the competition season, while the range of reticulocytes (Ret%) varies from 5 to 21%. Reticulocytes are also decreased after long periods of training and competitions, but their variation is not necessarily associated with that of Hb. The qualitative variations (trend of modifications) of haematological parameters are roughly independent of the sport discipline, but quantitatively (amount of modifications) dependent on sport discipline. The modifications are more evident in cycling, running, swimming than they are in football and rugby. The variations of haematological parameters within the same sport discipline are qualitatively concordant and quantitatively different among separate but consecutive competitive seasons. These findings are described in aerobic and team sports sportsmen. The definition of reliable reference ranges in sportsmen would only be possible by following the best laboratory practices. For antidoping purposes more studies investigating haematological modifications during the season are advisable.

  12. Geographic variation within the military health system.

    PubMed

    Kimsey, Linda; Olaiya, Samuel; Smith, Chad; Hoburg, Andrew; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Koehlmoos, Tracey; Nguyen, Louis L; Weissman, Joel S

    2017-04-13

    This study seeks to quantify variation in healthcare utilization and per capita costs using system-defined geographic regions based on enrollee residence within the Military Health System (MHS). Data for fiscal years 2007 - 2010 were obtained from the Military Health System under a data sharing agreement with the Defense Health Agency (DHA). DHA manages all aspects of the Department of Defense Military Health System, including TRICARE. Adjusted rates were calculated for per capita costs and for two procedures with high interest to the MHS- back surgery and Cesarean sections for TRICARE Prime and Plus enrollees. Coefficients of variation (CoV) and interquartile ranges (IQR) were calculated and analyzed using residence catchment area as the geographic unit. Catchment areas anchored by a Military Treatment Facility (MTF) were compared to catchment areas not anchored by a MTF. Variation, as measured by CoV, was 0.37 for back surgery and 0.13 for C-sections in FY 2010- comparable to rates documented in other healthcare systems. The 2010 CoV (and average cost) for per capita costs was 0.26 ($3,479.51). Procedure rates were generally lower and CoVs higher in regions anchored by a MTF compared with regions not anchored by a MTF, based on both system-wide comparisons and comparisons of neighboring areas. In spite of its centrally managed system and relatively healthy beneficiaries with very robust health benefits, the MHS is not immune to unexplained variation in utilization and cost of healthcare.

  13. Numeral Variation in New Zealand Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, David; McKee, Rachel; Major, George

    2011-01-01

    Lexical variation abounds in New Zealand Sign Language (NZSL) and is commonly associated with the introduction of the Australasian Signed English lexicon into Deaf education in 1979, before NZSL was acknowledged as a language. Evidence from dictionaries of NZSL collated between 1986 and 1997 reveal many coexisting variants for the numbers from one…

  14. Variational Algorithms for Test Particle Trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, C. Leland; Finn, John M.; Qin, Hong; Tang, William M.

    2015-11-01

    The theory of variational integration provides a novel framework for constructing conservative numerical methods for magnetized test particle dynamics. The retention of conservation laws in the numerical time advance captures the correct qualitative behavior of the long time dynamics. For modeling the Lorentz force system, new variational integrators have been developed that are both symplectic and electromagnetically gauge invariant. For guiding center test particle dynamics, discretization of the phase-space action principle yields multistep variational algorithms, in general. Obtaining the desired long-term numerical fidelity requires mitigation of the multistep method's parasitic modes or applying a discretization scheme that possesses a discrete degeneracy to yield a one-step method. Dissipative effects may be modeled using Lagrange-D'Alembert variational principles. Numerical results will be presented using a new numerical platform that interfaces with popular equilibrium codes and utilizes parallel hardware to achieve reduced times to solution. This work was supported by DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  15. Variation and Commonality in Phenomenographic Research Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akerlind, Gerlese S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the data analysis stage of phenomenographic research, elucidating what is involved in terms of both commonality and variation in accepted practice. The analysis stage of phenomenographic research is often not well understood. This paper helps to clarify the process, initially by collecting together in one location the more…

  16. On distance variation effects on graphene bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naji, S.; Bhihi, M.; Labrim, H.; Belhaj, A.; Benyoussef, A.; El Kenz, A.; Loulidi, M.

    2014-06-01

    The opening of the energy gap and the total energy of the graphene-like bilayers are investigated using ab initio calculations. The studied model consists of a static single layer of graphene interacting with an extra dynamic one placed at a varying vertical distance d in the (AB) stacking arrangement. The effects of the vertical distance variation on the energy gap and the total energy of the system are discussed first. Starting from a distance around the van der Waals length, the energy gap does not depend on the vertical distance variation and the system exhibits graphene-like properties with minor deformations in the lattice size parameter and the energy dispersion behaviour around K points. However, it has been shown that the diagonal distance variation of the graphene-like bilayer modifies the electronic structure properties. This modification depends on an intermediate stacking arrangement between the (AA) and the (AB) configurations. It has been shown that the diagonal distance variation has an influence on the states of pz electrons in the (AB) arrangement and it can be explored to open the energy gap.

  17. Asymmetries and Variations in Jupiter's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khurana, Krishan K.

    2003-01-01

    The investigation was carried out to infer the influence of solar wind on Jupiter's magnetosphere through studies of asymmetries and variations in the magnetosphere. We used the magnetic field observations from all of the pre-Galileo spacecraft and from the Galileo Prime and extended missions to understand asymmetries in magnetic field and various current systems in the magnetosphere.

  18. Cultural Variations in Sex-Typing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basow, Susan A.

    1984-01-01

    Results of Personal Attributes Questionnaire administered to Fijian secondary and university students showed: (1) no sex differences in sex-typing patterns; (2) same-sex-typing as much less marked than in the United States; (3) minor variations among Fijian ethnic groups; and (4) university students as more similar than secondary students to U.S.…

  19. [Genomic variation in maize]. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Rivin, C.J.

    1991-12-31

    These studies have sought to learn how different DNA sequences and sequence arrangements contribute to genome plasticity in maize. We describe quantitative variation among maize inbred lines for tandemly arrayed and dispersed repeated DNA sequences and gene families, and qualitative variation for sequences homologous to the Mutator family of transposons. The potential of these sequences to undergo unequal crossing over, non-allelic (ectopic) recombination and transposition makes them a source of genome instability. We have found examples of rapid genomic change involving these sequences in Fl hybrids, tissue culture cells and regenerated plants. We describe the repetitive portion of the maize genome as composed primarily of sequences that vary markedly in copy number among different genetic stocks. The most highly variable is the 185 bp repeat associated with the heterochromatic chromosome knobs. Even in lines without visible knobs, there is a considerable quantity of tandemly arrayed repeats. We also found a high degree of variability for the tandemly arrayed 5S and ribosomal DNA repeats. While such variation might be expected as the result of unequal cross-over, we were surprised to find considerable variation among lower copy number, dispersed repeats as well. One highly repeated sequence that showed a complex tandem and dispersed arrangement stood out as showing no detectable variability among the maize lines. In striking contrast to the variability seen between the inbred stocks, individuals within a stock were indistinguishable with regard to their repeated sequence multiplicities.

  20. Seasonal variations of cardiac output in rats.

    PubMed

    Back, G; Strubelt, O

    1975-11-15

    Cardiac output of rats shows seasonal variations with low values in spring and summer and high ones in autumn and winter. The stroke volume was much more implicated in these changes than the heart rate. The seasonal changes of cardiac output are probably due to changes of thyroid function.

  1. Neighborhood Disadvantage and Variations in Blood Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cathorall, Michelle L.; Xin, Huaibo; Peachey, Andrew; Bibeau, Daniel L.; Schulz, Mark; Aronson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the extent to which neighborhood disadvantage accounts for variation in blood pressure. Methods: Demographic, biometric, and self-reported data from 19,261 health screenings were used. Addresses of participants were geocoded and located within census block groups (n = 14,510, 75.3%). Three hierarchical linear models were…

  2. Syntactic Variation in West African English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bamiro, Edmund O.

    1995-01-01

    Describes syntactic variation in West African English with examples from West African English literature and identifies and describes subjectless sentences, deletion of the -ly morpheme in manner adjuncts, omission of function words, reduplication, tag questions, substitution of prepositions in idiomatic usage, and focus constructions. (53…

  3. Variation and Commonality in Phenomenographic Research Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akerlind, Gerlese S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the data analysis stage of phenomenographic research, elucidating what is involved in terms of both commonality and variation in accepted practice. The analysis stage of phenomenographic research is often not well understood. This paper helps to clarify the process, initially by collecting together in one location the more…

  4. [Circadian variations of performances and basic rhythms].

    PubMed

    Querrioux-Coulombier, G; Rossi, J P

    1995-12-01

    Difficulties with chronopsychology studies include a masking effect of variables, the combination of different rhythms and variations of strategies. An experiment is conducted to analyze the role of circadian variations of elementary processes in the variations of performance for a complex task. Twenty-four subjects solved anagrams and tried to find the rule of anagram construction, during two sessions, at 10 am and 5 pm. Responses were classified in three groups: (a) discovery of the anagram construction rule (R2 responses); (b) resolution of anagram without discovery of rule (R1 responses); (c) failure, no resolution of anagram (R0 responses). During the second session, R2 performances were better at 10 am than at 5 pm. In contrast, R1 performances were better at 5 pm than at 10 am. Rule application was faster at 10 am than at 5 pm. Results are discussed in terms of variations of short-term memory capacity (Folkard and Monk, 1980). Using chronopsychology to analyze the role of elementary processes in a complex task is discussed.

  5. Socially Determined Variation in Ancient Rome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Brian D.; Wallace, Rex E.

    1992-01-01

    Social implications of phonological and morphological variation in Classical Latin is examined. Arguments for the social factor are instances of hypercorrection, private and domestic instances of certain datives and Augustus' use of rural "domos" for "domus." It is understood in terms of the model of urbanization. (35…

  6. The landscape of human STR variation.

    PubMed

    Willems, Thomas; Gymrek, Melissa; Highnam, Gareth; Mittelman, David; Erlich, Yaniv

    2014-11-01

    Short tandem repeats are among the most polymorphic loci in the human genome. These loci play a role in the etiology of a range of genetic diseases and have been frequently utilized in forensics, population genetics, and genetic genealogy. Despite this plethora of applications, little is known about the variation of most STRs in the human population. Here, we report the largest-scale analysis of human STR variation to date. We collected information for nearly 700,000 STR loci across more than 1000 individuals in Phase 1 of the 1000 Genomes Project. Extensive quality controls show that reliable allelic spectra can be obtained for close to 90% of the STR loci in the genome. We utilize this call set to analyze determinants of STR variation, assess the human reference genome's representation of STR alleles, find STR loci with common loss-of-function alleles, and obtain initial estimates of the linkage disequilibrium between STRs and common SNPs. Overall, these analyses further elucidate the scale of genetic variation beyond classical point mutations.

  7. Language Variation, Language Change and Perceptual Dialectology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gessinger, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Subjective and objective language data collected in a research project on language variation in north Germany not only reveal information on current linguistic trends in north Germany; they also show how language change in this region is represented in the consciousness of the speakers themselves and described in comments by them. This diachronic…

  8. TAUBERIAN THEOREMS FOR MATRIX REGULAR VARIATION

    PubMed Central

    MEERSCHAERT, M. M.; SCHEFFLER, H.-P.

    2013-01-01

    Karamata’s Tauberian theorem relates the asymptotics of a nondecreasing right-continuous function to that of its Laplace-Stieltjes transform, using regular variation. This paper establishes the analogous Tauberian theorem for matrix-valued functions. Some applications to time series analysis are indicated. PMID:24644367

  9. Diurnal Variations in Human Pulmonary Function

    PubMed Central

    Medarov, Boris I.; Pavlov, Valentin A.; Rossoff, Leonard

    2008-01-01

    Pulmonary function has circadian modulations. Variations in human pulmonary function during the daytime hours (diurnal variations) remain to be well characterized. Discerning these variations will contribute to better understanding the relationship between biorhythms and lung physiology and to improving clinical management of pulmonary diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the magnitude of pulmonary function variability during the usual daytime hours in a population of patients referred for pulmonary function testing. Diurnal fluctuations of human pulmonary function were examined by studying retrospectively a study population of 4,756 individuals with performed pulmonary function tests. We found the lowest and highest spirometric values in the 12:00–12:59 pm and 3:00–4:59 pm time intervals respectively. The difference in the forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) between the noon (12:00–12:59 pm) and afternoon (4:00–4:59 pm) intervals was 17.6% (P<0.01). Furthermore, the highest values of diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide [DLCO] and alveolar volume [Va] were identified in the 8:00–8:59 am time interval. These findings, identifying a model of diurnal variations of pulmonary function in individuals referred for pulmonary function testing, are of interest for better understanding lung physiology and human circadian rhythms and may have clinical value in managing lung disorders. PMID:19079662

  10. Norms And Completeness In Variational Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storch, Joel A.

    1991-01-01

    Paper discusses significance of norms and completeness in analyses based on variational principle of mechanics. Such analyses conducted to determine static deflections and/or vibrations of structures, including complicated ones like spacecraft. Illustrates by example that such casual approaches lead to erroneous results.

  11. Equivariance, Variational Principles, and the Feynman Integral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetlichny, George

    2008-03-01

    We argue that the variational calculus leading to Euler's equations and Noether's theorem can be replaced by equivariance and invariance conditions avoiding the action integral. We also speculate about the origin of Lagrangian theories in physics and their connection to Feynman's integral.

  12. Variations on Black Themes: English, Black Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randolph, Gloria D.

    Variations on Black Themes, an introductory course in the study of black literature, permits students to make cursory examination of representative works of many black writers for the purpose of identifying major writers and recurring themes. The course content includes: introduction to some works of major Black American authors; identification of…

  13. Numeral Variation in New Zealand Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, David; McKee, Rachel; Major, George

    2011-01-01

    Lexical variation abounds in New Zealand Sign Language (NZSL) and is commonly associated with the introduction of the Australasian Signed English lexicon into Deaf education in 1979, before NZSL was acknowledged as a language. Evidence from dictionaries of NZSL collated between 1986 and 1997 reveal many coexisting variants for the numbers from one…

  14. Phonological Variation: Educational Taxonomy for Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melendez, Mildred C.

    The influence of educational background upon the variety of English as a second language speech was examined. Adults in a rural New Mexico community were interviewed in order to elicit data on phonological variation. Data were collected through free speech, controlled speech which required the informants to translate Spanish questions to English,…

  15. A Variation Plan for Indian Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wax, Murray L.

    Since American Indians are extremely diverse in their social and cultural situations and are widely scattered geographically, any set of educational prescriptions must be flexible, allowing for variations among individuals, tribes, and regions, as well as among occupational and social class positions. Local representation and control coupled with…

  16. Individual variation behind the evolution of cooperation.

    PubMed

    Barta, Zoltán

    2016-02-05

    Life on Earth has two remarkable properties. The first is variation: even apart from the vast number of extant species, there are considerable differences between individuals within a single species. The second property is cooperation. It is surprising that until recently the interactions between these two properties have rarely been addressed from an evolutionary point of view. Here, I concentrate on how inter-individual differences influence the evolution of cooperation. First, I deal with cases where individuality is maintained by random processes like mutation or phenotypic noise. Second, I examine when differences in state cause differences in behaviour. Finally, I investigate the effects of individual role specialization. Variation can be important in several ways. Increased random variation can change the expectation about cooperativeness of future partners, altering behaviour in a current relationship. Differences in state may serve as a book-keeping mechanism that is necessary for the evolution of reciprocity. If the cost of cooperation can depend on state then strategic regulation of state makes it possible to coerce partners to cooperate. If conditions force individuals to specialize, cooperation becomes more valuable. My review of theoretical models suggests that variation plays an important role in the evolution of cooperation. © 2016 The Author(s).

  17. Copy number variation in the bovine genome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Copy number variations (CNVs), which represent a significant source of genetic diversity in mammals, have been shown to be associated with phenotypes of clinical relevance and to be causative of disease. Notwithstanding, little is known about the extent to which CNV contributes to genetic variation in cattle. Results We designed and used a set of NimbleGen CGH arrays that tile across the assayable portion of the cattle genome with approximately 6.3 million probes, at a median probe spacing of 301 bp. This study reports the highest resolution map of copy number variation in the cattle genome, with 304 CNV regions (CNVRs) being identified among the genomes of 20 bovine samples from 4 dairy and beef breeds. The CNVRs identified covered 0.68% (22 Mb) of the genome, and ranged in size from 1.7 to 2,031 kb (median size 16.7 kb). About 20% of the CNVs co-localized with segmental duplications, while 30% encompass genes, of which the majority is involved in environmental response. About 10% of the human orthologous of these genes are associated with human disease susceptibility and, hence, may have important phenotypic consequences. Conclusions Together, this analysis provides a useful resource for assessment of the impact of CNVs regarding variation in bovine health and production traits. PMID:20459598

  18. The Tagmemic Model and Language Variation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornstein, Jacob

    This paper proposes a tentative notational or marking system which attempts to provide more information on the sociolinguistic constraints upon the use of linguistic features than has been the case in other systems. A review of other studies in language variation, particularly those of William Labov, suggests that much can be done toward…

  19. Variational method for lattice spectroscopy with ghosts

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, Tommy; Hagen, Christian; Gattringer, Christof; Glozman, Leonid Ya.; Lang, C.B.

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the variational method used in lattice spectroscopy calculations. In particular we address the role of ghost contributions which appear in quenched or partially quenched simulations and have a nonstandard euclidean time dependence. We show that the ghosts can be separated from the physical states. Our result is illustrated with numerical data for the scalar meson.

  20. Sources of Variation in Creep Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, William S.; Ellis, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Creep rupture is an important material characteristic for the design of rocket engines. It was observed during the characterization of GRCop-84 that the complete data set had nearly 4 orders of magnitude of scatter. This scatter likely confounded attempts to determine how creep performance was influenced by manufacturing. It was unclear if this variation was from the testing, the material, or both. Sources of variation were examined by conducting tests on identically processed specimens at the same specified stresses and temperatures. Significant differences existed between the five constant-load creep frames. The specimen temperature was higher than the desired temperature by as much as 43 C. It was also observed that the temperature gradient was up to 44 C. Improved specimen temperature control minimized temperature variations. The data from additional tests demonstrated that the results from all five frames were comparable. The variation decreased to 1/2 order of magnitude from 2 orders of magnitude for the baseline data set. Independent determination of creep rates in a reference load frame closely matched the creep rates determined after the modifications. Testing in helium tended to decrease the sample temperature gradient, but helium was not a significant improvement over vacuum.

  1. Implicit variational principle for contact Hamiltonian systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kaizhi; Wang, Lin; Yan, Jun

    2017-02-01

    We establish an implicit variational principle for the contact Hamiltonian systems generated by the Hamiltonian H(x, u, p) with respect to the contact 1-form α =\\text{d}u-p\\text{d}x under Tonelli and Lipschitz continuity conditions.

  2. 45 CFR 156.255 - Rating variations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS HEALTH INSURANCE ISSUER STANDARDS UNDER THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT, INCLUDING STANDARDS RELATED TO EXCHANGES Qualified Health Plan Minimum Certification Standards § 156.255 Rating variations. (a) Rating areas. A QHP...

  3. Variation in the ovine PRKAG3 gene.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guo; Zhou, Huitong; Wang, Ruoyu; Hickford, Jon

    2015-08-10

    The 5'AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a heterotrimeric enzyme that controls cellular energy homeostasis in response to environmental or nutritional stress. The PRKAG3 gene (PRKAG3) encodes the γ3 subunit of the AMPK. Variation in this gene has been found to be associated with meat quality traits in pigs. In this study, we used polymerase chain reaction-single stranded conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) to investigate variation in exon 3 and exons 4-6 of ovine PRKAG3. In 160 New Zealand Suffolk sheep, two variant sequences (named a and b) were identified in the exon 3 region of the gene and three variant sequences (named A, B and C) were identified in the exon 4-6 region of the gene, respectively. A total of three nucleotide substitutions were revealed and these were located in intron 4, exon 4 and intron 5, respectively. The nucleotide substitution identified in the exon 4 (g.2656 C>T) could nominally lead to an amino acid substitution of tryptophan to arginine at position 230 (R230W) in ovine PRKAG3. In comparison with the PRKAG3 amino acid sequences in other species, this R230W substitution appeared to occur only in sheep. This is the first report of genetic variation in ovine PRKAG3, and the variation found in this study could be functionally important for AMPK activity, which in turn may affect meat quality traits in sheep. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Dialectal Variation in the Lexical Tone System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remijsen, Bert

    2001-01-01

    Discusses dialectal variation in the lexical tone system of Ma'ya, an Austronesian language featuring three lexically contrastive tonemes. Representative acoustic data were collected from the Missol, Slawati, and Laganyan dialects, and on the basis of these data, an account is given of their tone systems and of how these tone systems compare to…

  5. Individual variation behind the evolution of cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Barta, Zoltán

    2016-01-01

    Life on Earth has two remarkable properties. The first is variation: even apart from the vast number of extant species, there are considerable differences between individuals within a single species. The second property is cooperation. It is surprising that until recently the interactions between these two properties have rarely been addressed from an evolutionary point of view. Here, I concentrate on how inter-individual differences influence the evolution of cooperation. First, I deal with cases where individuality is maintained by random processes like mutation or phenotypic noise. Second, I examine when differences in state cause differences in behaviour. Finally, I investigate the effects of individual role specialization. Variation can be important in several ways. Increased random variation can change the expectation about cooperativeness of future partners, altering behaviour in a current relationship. Differences in state may serve as a book-keeping mechanism that is necessary for the evolution of reciprocity. If the cost of cooperation can depend on state then strategic regulation of state makes it possible to coerce partners to cooperate. If conditions force individuals to specialize, cooperation becomes more valuable. My review of theoretical models suggests that variation plays an important role in the evolution of cooperation. PMID:26729927

  6. The landscape of human STR variation

    PubMed Central

    Willems, Thomas; Gymrek, Melissa; Highnam, Gareth; Mittelman, David

    2014-01-01

    Short tandem repeats are among the most polymorphic loci in the human genome. These loci play a role in the etiology of a range of genetic diseases and have been frequently utilized in forensics, population genetics, and genetic genealogy. Despite this plethora of applications, little is known about the variation of most STRs in the human population. Here, we report the largest-scale analysis of human STR variation to date. We collected information for nearly 700,000 STR loci across more than 1000 individuals in Phase 1 of the 1000 Genomes Project. Extensive quality controls show that reliable allelic spectra can be obtained for close to 90% of the STR loci in the genome. We utilize this call set to analyze determinants of STR variation, assess the human reference genome’s representation of STR alleles, find STR loci with common loss-of-function alleles, and obtain initial estimates of the linkage disequilibrium between STRs and common SNPs. Overall, these analyses further elucidate the scale of genetic variation beyond classical point mutations. PMID:25135957

  7. Determinants of variations in coronary revascularization practices.

    PubMed

    Tu, Jack V; Ko, Dennis T; Guo, Helen; Richards, Janice A; Walton, Nancy; Natarajan, Madhu K; Wijeysundera, Harindra C; So, Derek; Latter, David A; Feindel, Christopher M; Kingsbury, Kori; Cohen, Eric A

    2012-02-07

    The ratio of percutaneous coronary interventions to coronary artery bypass graft surgeries (PCI:CABG ratio) varies considerably across hospitals. We conducted a comprehensive study to identify clinical and nonclinical factors associated with variations in the ratio across 17 cardiac centres in the province of Ontario. In this retrospective cohort study, we selected a population-based sample of 8972 patients who underwent an index cardiac catheterization between April 2006 and March 2007 at any of 17 hospitals that perform invasive cardiac procedures in the province. We classified the hospitals into four groups by PCI:CABG ratio (low [< 2.0], low-medium [2.0-2.7], medium-high [2.8-3.2] and high [> 3.2]). We explored the relative contribution of patient, physician and hospital factors to variations in the likelihood of patients receiving PCI or CABG surgery within 90 days after the index catheterization. The mean PCI:CABG ratio was 2.7 overall. We observed a threefold variation in the ratios across the four hospital ratio groups, from a mean of 1.6 in the lowest ratio group to a mean of 4.6 in the highest ratio group. Patients with single-vessel disease usually received PCI (88.4%-99.0%) and those with left main artery disease usually underwent CABG (80.8%-94.2%), regardless of the hospital's procedure ratio. Variation in the management of patients with non-emergent multivessel disease accounted for most of the variation in the ratios across hospitals. The mode of revascularization largely reflected the recommendation of the physician performing the diagnostic catheterization and was also influenced by the revascularization "culture" at the treating hospital. The physician performing the diagnostic catheterization and the treating hospital were strong independent predictors of the mode of revascularization. Opportunities exist to improve transparency and consistency around the decision-making process for coronary revascularization, most notably among patients with

  8. Perception testing of apparel ease variation.

    PubMed

    Ashdown, S P; Delong, M

    1995-02-01

    The development of new computer technologies designed to custom-fit apparel has created a need for quantification of apparel fit characteristics. Fit perception and preference data are needed to improve sizing for ready-to-wear and custom-fitted apparel. Tactile responses of subjects to the fit of pants were investigated using an adaptation of an American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) sensory perception test. The test was designed to establish thresholds in apparel fit: that is, the smallest difference in garment dimensions that can be consistently perceived and identified. The test samples for the study were a set of 15 pants, which varied in size, made for each participant from precise computer-generated patterns. Four female experts in apparel fit, who comprised the subject panel, each recorded their responses to these pants compared to a control. Control pants were custom-fitted to each panel member; the remaining pants in each set varied from the control by 0.5 to 1.5 cm at a single location (waist, hips, or crotch length). When the pants were presented in a blind test, the panel perceived differences as small as 0.5 cm in pants waist size from the control. Differences of 1.5 cm were perceptible at the hip and crotch. The subject's level of acceptance of the fit variations in the pants was then judged using a preference test. This test revealed differences among individual subjects in the acceptability of fit variations in waist and crotch dimensions; judgements of the acceptability of hip variations were more consistent among the subjects. Judging from the results of this testing, it is concluded that threshold levels at which fit differences can be perceived can be established for different areas of the body, and that perceptible fit variations can be quite small. This testing also showed that individuals vary in their tolerance for fit variations at different locations on the body.

  9. VariOtator, a Software Tool for Variation Annotation with the Variation Ontology.

    PubMed

    Schaafsma, Gerard C P; Vihinen, Mauno

    2016-04-01

    The Variation Ontology (VariO) is used for describing and annotating types, effects, consequences, and mechanisms of variations. To facilitate easy and consistent annotations, the online application VariOtator was developed. For variation type annotations, VariOtator is fully automated, accepting variant descriptions in Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS) format, and generating VariO terms, either with or without full lineage, that is, all parent terms. When a coding DNA variant description with a reference sequence is provided, VariOtator checks the description first with Mutalyzer and then generates the predicted RNA and protein descriptions with their respective VariO annotations. For the other sublevels, function, structure, and property, annotations cannot be automated, and VariOtator generates annotation based on provided details. For VariO terms relating to structure and property, one can use attribute terms as modifiers and evidence code terms for annotating experimental evidence. There is an online batch version, and stand-alone batch versions to be used with a Leiden Open Variation Database (LOVD) download file. A SOAP Web service allows client programs to access VariOtator programmatically. Thus, systematic variation effect and type annotations can be efficiently generated to allow easy use and integration of variations and their consequences.

  10. Anatomic variation and orgasm: Could variations in anatomy explain differences in orgasmic success?

    PubMed

    Emhardt, E; Siegel, J; Hoffman, L

    2016-07-01

    Though the public consciousness is typically focused on factors such as psychology, penis size, and the presence of the "G-spot," there are other anatomical and neuro-anatomic differences that could play an equal, or more important, role in the frequency and intensity of orgasms. Discovering these variations could direct further medical or procedural management to improve sexual satisfaction. The aim of this study is to review the available literature of anatomical sexual variation and to explain why this variation may predispose some patients toward a particular sexual experience. In this review, we explored the available literature on sexual anatomy and neuro-anatomy. We used PubMed and OVID Medline for search terms, including orgasm, penile size variation, clitoral variation, Grafenberg spot, and benefits of orgasm. First we review the basic anatomy and innervation of the reproductive organs. Then we describe several anatomical variations that likely play a superior role to popular known variation (penis size, presence of g-spot, etc). For males, the delicate play between the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems is vital to achieve orgasm. For females, the autonomic component is more complex. The clitoris is the primary anatomical feature for female orgasm, including its migration toward the anterior vaginal wall. In conclusions, orgasms are complex phenomena involving psychological, physiological, and anatomic variation. While these variations predispose people to certain sexual function, future research should explore how to surgically or medically alter these. Clin. Anat. 29:665-672, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Geographic Variation of Endoscopic Sinus Surgery in Canada: An Alberta-Based Small Area Variation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Rudmik, Luke; Bird, Ceris; Dean, Stafford; Dort, Joseph C; Schorn, Richard; Kukec, Edward

    2015-11-01

    With an estimated 10,000 to 15,000 endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) cases performed in Canada each year, identifying potential unwarranted practice patterns is important. The objective of this study is to examine the rates and geographic variation of ESS in the province of Alberta, Canada. Small area variation analysis. Province of Alberta, Canada. The National Ambulatory Care Reporting System database was searched to identify all patients who received ESS between April 1, 2010, and March 31, 2013, in Alberta, Canada. The annual adjusted rates of ESS per 1000 people were calculated for each Alberta health zone and health status area. Geographic variations were evaluated with the extremal quotient, weighted coefficient of variation, and systematic component of variance. Chi-squared-test was used to quantify the significance of variation of the adjusted ESS rates across regions. The annual adjusted rate of ESS was 0.33 per 1000 people in Alberta, Canada. The mean extremal quotient for health status areas was 6.9, indicating a 7-fold difference between the highest and lowest regions. The mean coefficient of variation was 41.0, and the mean systematic component of variance was 10.5, which demonstrates "very high" variation. This study observed very high geographic variation in the rates of ESS across the province of Alberta. Given the negative impact of unwarranted surgical variation on quality of care, outcomes from this study indicate a need to further evaluate the delivery of care for ESS in Canada to improve overall health system performance. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  12. 48 CFR 52.211-16 - Variation in Quantity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Variation in Quantity. 52....211-16 Variation in Quantity. As prescribed in 11.703(a), insert the following clause: Variation in Quantity (APR 1984) (a) A variation in the quantity of any item called for by this contract will not be...

  13. 48 CFR 52.211-16 - Variation in Quantity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Variation in Quantity. 52....211-16 Variation in Quantity. As prescribed in 11.703(a), insert the following clause: Variation in Quantity (APR 1984) (a) A variation in the quantity of any item called for by this contract will not...

  14. Update of an Efficient Computer Code (NLTE) to Calculate Emission and Transmission of Radiation through Non-Equilibrium Atmospheres.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-20

    SQUARE OF ZERO FIXED BY 2-PT GAUSS-HERMITE QUADRATURE C U-U3 = SQUARES OF ZEROES FIXED BY 6-PT GAUSS-HERMITE QUADRATURE C PISQ = 2/SQRT(PI); SL = SQRT...3974252722665E-73, .7095717391818E-75, .1244665977389E-76/ C DATA SLP /.4697186393498/ DATA PISQ ,SL /1.128379167096, .8325546111577/ DATA Wl,W2,W3...FPR*T SER = SER + FNR*AN(N+1) SEI = SEI + FNI*AN(N+l) FPR = FNR 100 FPI = FNI VGT(K) = SLP*EXP(-S)*(COS(T)*(1.0- PISQ *SER) .SIN(T)* PISQ *Sz:) C C C

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: NLTE spectral analysis of white dwarf G191-B2B (Rauch+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, T.; Werner, K.; Bohlin, R.; Kruk, J. W.

    2013-08-01

    In the framework of the Virtual Observatory, the German Astrophysical Virtual Observatory developed the registered service TheoSSA. It provides easy access to stellar spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and is intended to ingest SEDs calculated by any model-atmosphere code. In case of the DA white dwarf G191-B2B, we demonstrate that the model reproduces not only its overall continuum shape but also the numerous metal lines exhibited in its ultraviolet spectrum. (3 data files).

  16. The coefficient of cyclic variation: a novel statistic to measure the magnitude of cyclic variation.

    PubMed

    Fulford, Anthony Jc

    2014-01-01

    PERIODIC OR CYCLIC DATA OF KNOWN PERIODICITY ARE FREQUENTLY ENCOUNTERED IN EPIDEMIOLOGICAL AND BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH: for instance, seasonality provides a useful experiment of nature while diurnal rhythms play an important role in endocrine secretion. There is, however, little consensus on how to analysis these data and less still on how to measure association or effect size for the often complex patterns seen. A simple statistic, readily derived from Fourier regression models, provides a readily-understood measure cyclic variation in a wide variety of situations. The coefficient of cyclic variation or similar statistics derived from the variance of a Fourier series could provide a universal means of summarising the magnitude of periodic variation.

  17. Polarization and position measurements of Type III bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, S.; Sheridan, K. V.; Dulk, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    The positional and polarization characteristics of Type III bursts in the range 24-220 MHz as measured by the Culgoora radioheliograph, spectrograph and spectropolarimeter are reported. The study includes 997 bursts which are of two classes: fundamental-harmonic (F-H) pairs and 'structureless' bursts with no visible F-H structure, and concentrates on the polarization of the bursts and the variation of polarization from centre to limb. The observed centre-to-limb decrease in polarization approximately follows a cosine law. This decrease is not as predicted by simple theory but is consistent with other observations which imply that open field lines from an active region diverge strongly. The observed o-mode polarization of harmonic radiation implies that the wave vectors of Langmuir waves are always parallel, within about 20 deg, to the magnetic field, while the constancy of H polarization with frequency implies that the ratio of gyromagnetic to plasma frequency, the Alfven speed and the plasma beta are constant with height on the open field lines above an active region. Finally, it is inferred that some factor, in addition to the magnetic field strength, controls the polarization of F radiation.

  18. Plant responses to climatic extremes: within-species variation equals among-species variation.

    PubMed

    Malyshev, Andrey V; Arfin Khan, Mohammed A S; Beierkuhnlein, Carl; Steinbauer, Manuel J; Henry, Hugh A L; Jentsch, Anke; Dengler, Jürgen; Willner, Evelin; Kreyling, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    Within-species and among-species differences in growth responses to a changing climate have been well documented, yet the relative magnitude of within-species vs. among-species variation has remained largely unexplored. This missing comparison impedes our ability to make general predictions of biodiversity change and to project future species distributions using models. We present a direct comparison of among- versus within-species variation in response to three of the main stresses anticipated with climate change: drought, warming, and frost. Two earlier experiments had experimentally induced (i) summer drought and (ii) spring frost for four common European grass species and their ecotypes from across Europe. To supplement existing data, a third experiment was carried out, to compare variation among species from different functional groups to within-species variation. Here, we simulated (iii) winter warming plus frost for four grasses, two nonleguminous, and two leguminous forbs, in addition to eleven European ecotypes of the widespread grass Arrhenatherum elatius. For each experiment, we measured: (i) C/N ratio and biomass, (ii) chlorophyll content and biomass, and (iii) plant greenness, root (15) N uptake, and live and dead tissue mass. Using coefficients of variation (CVs) for each experiment and response parameter, a total of 156 within- vs. among-species comparisons were conducted, comparing within-species variation in each of four species with among-species variation for each seed origin (five countries). Of the six significant differences, within-species CVs were higher than among-species CVs in four cases. Partitioning of variance within each treatment in two of the three experiments showed that within-species variability (ecotypes) could explain an additional 9% of response variation after accounting for the among-species variation. Our observation that within-species variation was generally as high as among-species variation emphasizes the importance of

  19. Do Coinfections Maintain Genetic Variation in Parasites?

    PubMed

    Seppälä, Otto; Jokela, Jukka

    2016-12-01

    Host individuals are often infected with multiple, potentially interacting parasite species and genotypes. Such coinfections have consequences for epidemiology, disease severity, and evolution of parasite virulence. As fitness effects of coinfection can be specific to interacting parasite genotypes, coinfections may induce high fitness variation among parasite genotypes. We argue that such interactions can be an important mechanism maintaining genetic variation in parasite traits such as infectivity and virulence. We also argue that such interactions may slow coevolutionary dynamics between hosts and parasites. This is because, instead of depending only on host genotype, parasite fitness may be determined by average infection success across all coinfection scenarios. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Earth Rotational Variations Excited by Geophysical Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.

    2004-01-01

    Modern space geodetic measurement of Earth rotation variations, particularly by means of the VLBI technique, has over the years allowed studies of Earth rotation dynamics to advance in ever-increasing precision, accuracy, and temporal resolution. A review will be presented on our understanding of the geophysical and climatic causes, or "excitations". for length-of-day change, polar motion, and nutations. These excitations sources come from mass transports that constantly take place in the Earth system comprised of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, lithosphere, mantle, and the cores. In this sense, together with other space geodetic measurements of time-variable gravity and geocenter motion, Earth rotation variations become a remote-sensing tool for the integral of all mass transports, providing valuable information about the latter on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Future prospects with respect to geophysical studies with even higher accuracy and resolution will be discussed.

  1. Geographic variation in marine turtle fibropapillomatosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenblatt, R.J.; Work, Thierry M.; Dutton, P.; Sutton, C.A.; Spraker, T.R.; Casey, R.N.; Diez, C.E.; Parker, Dana C.; St. Ledger, J.; Balazs, G.H.; Casey, J.W.

    2005-01-01

    We document three examples of fibropapillomatosis by histology, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and sequence analysis from three different geographic areas. Tumors compatible in morphology with fibropapillomatosis were seen in green turtles from Puerto Rico and San Diego (California) and in a hybrid loggerhead/ hawksbill turtle from Florida Bay (Florida). Tumors were confirmed as fibropapillomas on histology, although severity of disease varied between cases. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses revealed infection with the fibropapilloma-associated turtle herpesvirus (FPTHV) in all cases, albeit at highly variable copy numbers per cell. Alignment of a portion of the polymerase gene from each fibropapilloma-associated turtle herpesvirus isolate demonstrated geographic variation in sequence. These cases illustrate geographic variation in both the pathology and the virology of fibropapillomatosis.

  2. 222Rn variations in Mystery Cave, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lively, R.S.; Krafthefer, B.C.

    1995-01-01

    222Rn concentrations and meteorological parameters were measured at 4- h intervals over a 2-y period in Mystery Cave, southeastern Minnesota. Continuous radon monitors and meteorological sensors connected to data loggers were installed at several locations along commercial tour routes. 222Rn concentrations ranged as high as 25 kBq m-3 in summer and 20 kBq m-3 in winter. Average winter concentrations were lower than summer by at least a factor of two. Seasonal radon variations were correlative with outside air temperatures. During the winter, radon concentrations were observed to fluctuate periodically by factors of 20 or more in under 24 h. Both the long- and short-term variations are correlative with temperature- induced mixing of cave air with surface air.

  3. Climatic changes and variations: a geophysical problem

    SciTech Connect

    Newell, R. E.; Chiu, L. S.

    1980-01-01

    The morphology of, and the physical factors that control, the seasonal changes in global free air temperature and sea surface temperature are discussed. Non-seasonal tropical free air temperature changes are related to preceeding changes in tropical sea surface temperature and to volcanic aerosol while the tropical sea surface temperature itself is related to changes in surface pressure which characterize the Southern Oscillation. Zonal wind variations at low latitudes accompany the latter variations. The main variability in tropospheric temperature at high latitudes is characterized by the Greenland seesaw. The injection of volcanic aerosol by the eruption of Mt. Agung in March 1963 into the stratosphere gives rise to temperature increases of up to 5/sup 0/C in the stratosphere and cooling of 1/sup 0/C in the troposphere. The third major climatic signal in the recent record - the so called Biennial oscillation - is also briefly reviewed.

  4. Geographic variation in marine turtle fibropapillomatosis.

    PubMed

    Greenblatt, Rebecca J; Work, Thierry M; Dutton, Peter; Sutton, Claudia A; Spraker, Terry R; Casey, Rufina N; Diez, Carlos E; Parker, Denise; St Leger, Judy; Balazs, George H; Casey, James W

    2005-09-01

    We document three examples of fibropapillomatosis by histology, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and sequence analysis from three different geographic areas. Tumors compatible in morphology with fibropapillomatosis were seen in green turtles from Puerto Rico and San Diego (California) and in a hybrid loggerhead/ hawksbill turtle from Florida Bay (Florida). Tumors were confirmed as fibropapillomas on histology, although severity of disease varied between cases. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses revealed infection with the fibropapilloma-associated turtle herpesvirus (FPTHV) in all cases, albeit at highly variable copy numbers per cell. Alignment of a portion of the polymerase gene from each fibropapilloma-associated turtle herpesvirus isolate demonstrated geographic variation in sequence. These cases illustrate geographic variation in both the pathology and the virology of fibropapillomatosis.

  5. Geographic variation in marine turtle fibropapillomatosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenblatt, R.J.; Work, T.M.; Dutton, P.; Sutton, C.A.; Spraker, T.R.; Casey, R.N.; Diez, C.E.; Parker, Dana C.; St. Ledger, J.; Balazs, G.H.; Casey, J.W.

    2005-01-01

    We document three examples of fibropapillomatosis by histology, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and sequence analysis from three different geographic areas. Tumors compatible in morphology with fibropapillomatosis were seen in green turtles from Puerto Rico and San Diego (California) and in a hybrid loggerhead/ hawksbill turtle from Florida Bay (Florida). Tumors were confirmed as fibropapillomas on histology, although severity of disease varied between cases. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses revealed infection with the fibropapilloma-associated turtle herpesvirus (FPTHV) in all cases, albeit at highly variable copy numbers per cell. Alignment of a portion of the polymerase gene from each fibropapilloma-associated turtle herpesvirus isolate demonstrated geographic variation in sequence. These cases illustrate geographic variation in both the pathology and the virology of fibropapillomatosis.

  6. IDR muon capture front end and variations

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, David; Prior, Gersende; Rogers, Christopher; Snopok, Pavel; Yoshikawa, Cary; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2010-12-01

    The (International Design Report) IDR neutrino factory scenario for capture, bunching, phase-energy rotation and initial cooling of {mu}'s produced from a proton source target is explored. It requires a drift section from the target, a bunching section and a {phi}-{delta}E rotation section leading into the cooling channel. The rf frequency changes along the bunching and rotation transport in order to form the {mu}'s into a train of equal-energy bunches suitable for cooling and acceleration. Optimization and variations are discussed. An important concern is rf limitations within the focusing magnetic fields; mitigation procedures are described. The method can be extended to provide muons for a {mu}{sup +}-{mu}{sup -} Collider; variations toward optimizing that extension are discussed.

  7. Total variation projection with first order schemes.

    PubMed

    Fadili, Jalal M; Peyre, Gabriel

    2011-03-01

    This article proposes a new algorithm to compute the projection on the set of images whose total variation is bounded by a constant. The projection is computed through a dual formulation that is solved by first order non-smooth optimization methods. This yields an iterative algorithm that applies iterative soft thresholding to the dual vector field, and for which we establish convergence rate on the primal iterates. This projection algorithm can then be used as a building block in a variety of applications such as solving inverse problems under a total variation constraint, or for texture synthesis. Numerical results are reported to illustrate the usefulness and potential applicability of our TV projection algorithm on various examples including denoising, texture synthesis, inpainting, deconvolution and tomography problems. We also show that our projection algorithm competes favorably with state-of-the-art TV projection methods in terms of convergence speed.

  8. Diurnal variations of vegetation canopy structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.; Kirchner, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    The significance and magnitude of diurnal variations of vegetation canopy structure are reviewed. Diurnal leaf inclination-azimuth angle distributions of a soybean and cotton canopy were documented using a simple measurement technique. The precision of the measurements was on the order of + or -5 deg for the inclination and + or -14 deg for the azimuth. The experimental results and a review of the literature showed that this distribution can vary significantly on a diurnal basis due to vegetation type, heliotropic leaf movement, environmental conditions, and vegetation stress. The study also showed that it is erroneous to treat two separate distributions of azimuth and inclination angles rather than one three-dimensional distribution of leaf orientation. The latter distribution needs to be routinely collected in studies which document variations of diurnal spectral reflectance with changes in solar zenith angle.

  9. Variational approach for nonpolar solvation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhan; Zhao, Shan; Chun, Jaehun; Thomas, Dennis G.; Baker, Nathan A.; Bates, Peter W.; Wei, G. W.

    2012-01-01

    Solvation analysis is one of the most important tasks in chemical and biological modeling. Implicit solvent models are some of the most popular approaches. However, commonly used implicit solvent models rely on unphysical definitions of solvent-solute boundaries. Based on differential geometry, the present work defines the solvent-solute boundary via the variation of the nonpolar solvation free energy. The solvation free energy functional of the system is constructed based on a continuum description of the solvent and the discrete description of the solute, which are dynamically coupled by the solvent-solute boundaries via van der Waals interactions. The first variation of the energy functional gives rise to the governing Laplace-Beltrami equation. The present model predictions of the nonpolar solvation energies are in an excellent agreement with experimental data, which supports the validity of the proposed nonpolar solvation model. PMID:22938212

  10. Epstein-Barr Virus Strain Variation.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    What is wild-type Epstein-Barr virus and are there genetic differences in EBV strains that contribute to some of the EBV-associated diseases? Recent progress in DNA sequencing has resulted in many new Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome sequences becoming available. EBV isolates worldwide can be grouped into type 1 and type 2, a classification based on the EBNA2 gene sequence. Type 1 transforms human B cells into lymphoblastoid cell lines much more efficiently than type 2 EBV and molecular mechanisms that may account for this difference in cell transformation are now becoming understood. Study of geographic variation of EBV strains independent of the type 1/type 2 classification and systematic investigation of the relationship between viral strains, infection and disease are now becoming possible. So we should consider more directly whether viral sequence variation might play a role in the incidence of some EBV-associated diseases.

  11. Longitudinal variations of the equatorial electojet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shume, Esayas

    We have utilized a three dimensional electrostatic potential model to explain the longitudinal variations of the equatorial electrojet. The model runs were constrained by net H component magnetic field measurements from three equatorial stations, namely, Huancayo (Peru) 12.05 S, 284.67 E; Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) 9.8 N, 38.8 E; Tirunelveli (India) 8.42 N, 77.48 E. The model runs were done in an iterative fashion until the computed and measured H component magnetic field values come into a close agreement. The physical mechanisms for the longitudinal variations of the equatorial electrojet were inferred by comparing and contrasting the resulting computed vertical polarization electric field (which drives the equatorial electrojet), and zonal current density profiles for the three stations mentioned above.

  12. Modeling the climatic response to orbital variations.

    PubMed

    Imbrie, J; Imbrie, J Z

    1980-02-29

    According to the astronomical theory of climate, variations in the earth's orbit are the fundamental cause of the succession of Pleistocene ice ages. This article summarizes how the theory has evolved since the pioneer studies of James Croll and Milutin Milankovitch, reviews recent evidence that supports the theory, and argues that a major opportunity is at hand to investigate the physical mechanisms by which the climate system responds to orbital forcing. After a survey of the kinds of models that have been applied to this problem, a strategy is suggested for building simple, physically motivated models, and a time-dependent model is developed that simulates the history of planetary glaciation for the past 500,000 years. Ignoring anthropogenic and other possible sources of variation acting at frequencies higher than one cycle per 19,000 years, this model predicts that the long-term cooling trend which began some 6000 years ago will continue for the next 23,000 years.

  13. Anatomical variations in human carotid bodies.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Q; Heath, D; Smith, P

    1988-01-01

    The variations in anatomical structure and position of both carotid bodies were noted in 100 consecutive subjects who came to necropsy. Considerable variations in form were found. Although most carotid bodies (83% on the right and 86% on the left) were of the classic ovoid type, an appreciable minority was bilobed (9% on the right and 7% on the left) or double (7% on the right and 6% on the left); 1% were leaf shaped. All these anatomical variants have to be distinguished from the pathologically enlarged carotid body that may have a smooth or finely nodular surface. Anatomical variants (such as the bilobed) may themselves enlarge as a consequence of carotid body hyperplasia. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 5 Fig 6 Fig 7 Fig 8 PMID:3209707

  14. Seasonal variations of volcanic eruption frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    1989-05-01

    Do volcanic eruptions have a tendency to occur more frequently in the months of May and June? Some past evidence suggests that they do. The present study, based on the new eruption catalog of Simkin et al.(1981), investigates the monthly statistics of the largest eruptions, grouped according to explosive magnitude, geographical latitude, and year. At the 2-delta level, no month-to-month variations in eruption frequency are found to be statistically significant. Examination of previously published month-to-month variations suggests that they, too, are not statistically significant. It is concluded that volcanism, at least averaged over large portions of the globe, is probably not periodic on a seasonal or annual time scale.

  15. Origin and variation of tunicate secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Eric W; Donia, Mohamed S; McIntosh, John A; Fricke, W Florian; Ravel, Jacques

    2012-02-24

    Ascidians (tunicates) are rich sources of structurally elegant, pharmaceutically potent secondary metabolites and, more recently, potential biofuels. It has been demonstrated that some of these compounds are made by symbiotic bacteria and not by the animals themselves, and for a few other compounds evidence exists supporting a symbiotic origin. In didemnid ascidians, compounds are highly variable even in apparently identical animals. Recently, we have explained this variation at the genomic and metagenomic levels and have applied the basic scientific findings to drug discovery and development. This review discusses what is currently known about the origin and variation of symbiotically derived metabolites in ascidians, focusing on the family Didemnidae, where most research has occurred. Applications of our basic studies are also described.

  16. Our Gods: Variation in Supernatural Minds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purzycki, Benjamin G.; Sosis, Richard

    In this chapter we examine variation in the contents of supernatural minds across cultures and the social correlates of this variation. We first provide a sketch of how humans are capable of representing supernatural minds and emphasize the significance of the types of knowledge attributed to supernatural agents. We then argue that the contents of supernatural minds as represented cross-culturally will primarily rest on or between two poles: knowledge of people's moral behavior and knowledge of people's ritualized costly behavior. Communities which endorse omniscient supernatural agents that are highly concerned with moral behavior will emphasize the importance of shared beliefs (cultural consensus), whereas communities which possess supernatural agents with limited social knowledge who are concerned with ritual actions will emphasize shared behavioral patterns (social consensus).We conclude with a brief discussion about the contexts in which these patterns occur.

  17. 222Rn variations in Mystery Cave, Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Lively, R S; Krafthefer, B C

    1995-04-01

    222Rn concentrations and meteorological parameters were measured at 4-h intervals over a 2-y period in Mystery Cave, southeastern Minnesota. Continuous radon monitors and meteorological sensors connected to data loggers were installed at several locations along commercial tour routes. 222Rn concentrations ranged as high as 25 kBq m-3 in summer and 20 kBq m-3 in winter. Average winter concentrations were lower than summer by at least a factor of two. Seasonal radon variations were correlative with outside air temperatures. During the winter, radon concentrations were observed to fluctuate periodically by factors of 20 or more in under 24 h. Both the long- and short-term variations are correlative with temperature-induced mixing of cave air with surface air.

  18. Seasonal variations of volcanic eruption frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    1989-01-01

    Do volcanic eruptions have a tendency to occur more frequently in the months of May and June? Some past evidence suggests that they do. The present study, based on the new eruption catalog of Simkin et al.(1981), investigates the monthly statistics of the largest eruptions, grouped according to explosive magnitude, geographical latitude, and year. At the 2-delta level, no month-to-month variations in eruption frequency are found to be statistically significant. Examination of previously published month-to-month variations suggests that they, too, are not statistically significant. It is concluded that volcanism, at least averaged over large portions of the globe, is probably not periodic on a seasonal or annual time scale.

  19. Epigenetic variation in Arabidopsis disease resistance

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Trevor L.; Kunkel, Barbara N.; Richards, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    Plant pathogen resistance is mediated by a large repertoire of resistance (R) genes, which are often clustered in the genome and show a high degree of genetic variation. Here, we show that an Arabidopsis thaliana R-gene cluster is also subject to epigenetic variation. We describe a heritable but metastable epigenetic variant bal that overexpresses the R-like gene At4g16890 from a gene cluster on Chromosome 4. The bal variant and Arabidopsis transgenics overexpressing the At4g16890 gene are dwarfed and constitutively activate the salicylic acid (SA)-dependent defense response pathway. Overexpression of a related R-like gene also occurs in the ssi1 (suppressor of SA insensitivity 1) background, suggesting that ssi1 is mechanistically related to bal. PMID:11799061

  20. Magnetic Variations Associated With Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, Vahe

    2005-01-01

    A report summarizes an investigation of helioseismic waves and magnetic variations associated with solar flares, involving analysis of data acquired by the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) aboard the Solar and Heliocentric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft, the Yohkoh spacecraft, and the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) spacecraft. Reconstruction of x-ray flare images from RHESSI data and comparison of them with MDI magnetic maps were performed in an attempt to infer the changes in the geometry of the magnetic field. It was established that in most flares observed with MDI, downward propagating shocks were much weaker than was one observed in the July 9, 1996 flare, which caused a strong helioseismic response. It was concluded that most of the observed impulsive variations result from direct impact of high-energy particles. Computer codes were developed for further study of these phenomena.

  1. Molecular variation of hop mosaic virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Poke, Fiona S; Crowle, Damian R; Whittock, Simon P; Wilson, Calum R

    2010-10-01

    Hop mosaic virus (HpMV), a member of the genus Carlavirus, is importance to hop production worldwide. We identified variation in nucleic and amino acid sequences among 23 HpMV isolates from Australia, the USA, the Czech Republic, South Africa and Japan using a 1,455-bp fragment covering the 3' end of the virus genome including ORFs 4, 5 and 6. Three clusters of two or more isolates were identified in phylogenies of the total nucleotide sequence and the coat protein (ORF5) amino acid sequence. Two of these clusters combined in analyses of ORF4 and ORF6 amino acid sequences. Isolates from within and outside of Australia were found in each cluster, indicating that sequence variation was not associated with geographic source. Monitoring of HpMV variants in the field and evaluation of the impact of variants on vector association, rate of spread, and hop yield and quality can now be undertaken.

  2. Mitochondrial DNA variation among Anopheles albimanus populations.

    PubMed

    De Merida, A M; Palmieri, M; Yurrita, M; Molina, A; Molina, E; Black, W C

    1999-08-01

    Barriers to gene flow between Pacific and Atlantic coast populations of Anopheles albimanus were reported in an earlier study of variation in the intergenic spacer of the nuclear ribosomal DNA. We examined the distribution of mitochondrial DNA haplotypes among A. albimanus populations to test for gene flow barriers with an independent genetic marker. A region of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 gene was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 1,105 mosquitoes collected from 16 locations in Guatemala and in single collections from Mexico, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, Colombia, and Venezuela. The PCR products were tested for variation using single strand conformation polymorphism analysis and 45 haplotypes were detected. Haplotype frequencies did not vary between coasts in Guatemala. Populations within approximately 200 km of one another were panmictic. However, at distances > 200 km, FST and geographic distances were correlated suggesting that populations are isolated by distance.

  3. Selectivity in neurotrophin signaling: theme and variations.

    PubMed

    Segal, Rosalind A

    2003-01-01

    Neurotrophins are a family of growth factors critical for the development and functioning of the nervous system. Although originally identified as neuronal survival factors, neurotrophins elicit many biological effects, ranging from proliferation to synaptic modulation to axonal pathfinding. Recent data indicate that the nature of the signaling cascades activated by neurotrophins, and the biological responses that ensue, are specified not only by the ligand itself but also by the temporal pattern and spatial location of stimulation. Studies on neurotrophin signaling have revealed variations in the Ras/MAP kinase, PI3 kinase, and phospholipase C pathways, which transmit spatial and temporal information. The anatomy of neurons makes them particularly appropriate for studying how the location and tempo of stimulation determine the signal cascades that are activated by receptor tyrosine kinases such as the Trk receptors. These signaling variations may represent a general mechanism eliciting specificity in growth factor responses.

  4. Epigenetic variation: origin and transgenerational inheritance.

    PubMed

    Becker, Claude; Weigel, Detlef

    2012-11-01

    Recent studies have revealed that epigenetic variation in plant populations exceeds genetic diversity and that it is influenced by the environment. Nevertheless, epigenetic differences are not entirely independent of shared ancestry. Epigenetic modifications have gained increasing attention, because one can now study their patterns across the entire genome and in many different individuals. Not only do epigenetic phenomena modulate the activity of the genome in response to environmental stimuli, but they also constitute a potential source of natural variation. Understanding the emergence and heritability of epigenetic variants is critical for understanding how they might become subject to natural selection and thus affect genetic diversity. Here we review progress in characterizing natural epigenetic variants in model and nonmodel plant species and how this work is helping to delineate the role of epigenetic changes in evolution.

  5. Adjoint variational methods in nonconservative stability problems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, S. N.; Herrmann, G.

    1972-01-01

    A general nonself-adjoint eigenvalue problem is examined and it is shown that the commonly employed approximate methods, such as the Galerkin procedure, the method of weighted residuals and the least square technique lack variational descriptions. When used in their previously known forms they do not yield stationary eigenvalues and eigenfunctions. With the help of an adjoint system, however, several analogous variational descriptions may be developed and it is shown in the present study that by properly restating the method of least squares, stationary eigenvalues may be obtained. Several properties of the adjoint eigenvalue problem, known only for a restricted group, are shown to exist for the more general class selected for study.

  6. Observed and theoretical variations of atmospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    London, J.

    1976-01-01

    Results are summarized from three areas of ozone research: (1) continued analysis of the global distribution of total ozone to extend the global ozone atlas to summarize 15 years (1957-72) of ground based observations; (2) analysis of balloon borne ozonesonde observations for Arosa, Switzerland, and Hohenpeissenberg, Germany (GFR); (3) contined processing of the (Orbiting Geophysical Observatory-4) satellite data to complete the analysis of the stratospheric ozone distribution from the available OGO-4 data. Results of the analysis of the total ozone observations indicated that the long term ozone variation have marked regional patterns and tend to alternate with season and hemisphere. It is becoming increasingly clear that these long period changes are associated with large scale variations in the general upper atmosphere circulation patterns.

  7. Stellar luminosity variations and global warming.

    PubMed

    Foukal, P

    1994-04-08

    Recent studies indicate that variation in the sun's luminosity is less than that observed in many other stars of similar magnetic activity. Current findings also indicate that in more active stars, the attenuation by faculae of sunspot luminosity modulation is less effective than in the sun at present. The sun could thus become photometrically more variable (and dimmer) if its magnetic activity exceeded present levels. But the levels of solar activity required for this to occur are not observed in carbon-14 and beryllium-10 records over the past several millennia, which indicates that such an increase in amplitude of surface magnetism-driven variations in solar luminosity is unlikely in the present epoch.

  8. Variational learning for Gaussian mixture models.

    PubMed

    Nasios, Nikolaos; Bors, Adrian G

    2006-08-01

    This paper proposes a joint maximum likelihood and Bayesian methodology for estimating Gaussian mixture models. In Bayesian inference, the distributions of parameters are modeled, characterized by hyperparameters. In the case of Gaussian mixtures, the distributions of parameters are considered as Gaussian for the mean, Wishart for the covariance, and Dirichlet for the mixing probability. The learning task consists of estimating the hyperparameters characterizing these distributions. The integration in the parameter space is decoupled using an unsupervised variational methodology entitled variational expectation-maximization (VEM). This paper introduces a hyperparameter initialization procedure for the training algorithm. In the first stage, distributions of parameters resulting from successive runs of the expectation-maximization algorithm are formed. Afterward, maximum-likelihood estimators are applied to find appropriate initial values for the hyperparameters. The proposed initialization provides faster convergence, more accurate hyperparameter estimates, and better generalization for the VEM training algorithm. The proposed methodology is applied in blind signal detection and in color image segmentation.

  9. Modal decomposition of Hamiltonian variational equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiesel, William E.

    1994-01-01

    Over any finite arc of trajectory, the variational equations of a Hamiltonian system can be separated into 'normal' modes. This transformation is canonical, and the Lyapunov exponents over the trajectory arc occur as positive/negative pairs for conjugate modes, while the modal vectors remain unit vectors. This decomposition effectively solves the variational equations for any canonical, linear-dependent system. As an example, we study the Voyager I trajectory. In an interplanetary flyby, some of the modal variables increase by very large multiplicative factors, but this means that their conjugate modal variables decrease by those same very large multiplicative vectors. Maneuver strategies for this case are explored, and the minimum delta upsilon maneuver is found.

  10. Cultural variation--nutritional and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Freimer, N; Echenberg, D; Kretchmer, N

    1983-12-01

    Cultural variation may play an important role in human nutrition and must be considered in either clinical or public health intervention particularly in areas with large immigrant populations. Acculturative and environmental change influence the food habits and health of transitional groups. Nutritional assessment may be complicated by cultural variation. The relationship between ethnicity and nutrition may be of evolutionary significance. Food beliefs may have beneficial or detrimental effects on health status. The study of acculturating populations may elucidate the pathogenesis of nutrition-related chronic diseases. Appreciation of the interaction of culture and nutrition may be of benefit to physicians and nutritionists in clinical practice and to those concerned with the prevention of nutrition-related chronic diseases.

  11. Variational theory for disordered vortex lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchaud, J.; Mezard, M.; Yedidia, J.S. Laboratoire de Physique Theorique de l'Ecole Normale Superieure et de l'Universite de Paris-Sud, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris CEDEX 05 )

    1991-12-30

    We derive a variational replica-symmetry-breaking theory for the effect of random impurities on two- and three-dimensional vortex lattices. We find that the translational correlation functions decay as stretched exponentials with exponents which seem to be in good agreement with experiments. We predict, in the absence of dislocations, long-range orientational order in three {ital and} {ital and} {ital two} dimensions.

  12. Intraspecific variation of recombination rate in maize

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In sexually reproducing organisms, meiotic crossovers ensure the proper segregation of chromosomes and contribute to genetic diversity by shuffling allelic combinations. Such genetic reassortment is exploited in breeding to combine favorable alleles, and in genetic research to identify genetic factors underlying traits of interest via linkage or association-based approaches. Crossover numbers and distributions along chromosomes vary between species, but little is known about their intraspecies variation. Results Here, we report on the variation of recombination rates between 22 European maize inbred lines that belong to the Dent and Flint gene pools. We genotype 23 doubled-haploid populations derived from crosses between these lines with a 50 k-SNP array and construct high-density genetic maps, showing good correspondence with the maize B73 genome sequence assembly. By aligning each genetic map to the B73 sequence, we obtain the recombination rates along chromosomes specific to each population. We identify significant differences in recombination rates at the genome-wide, chromosome, and intrachromosomal levels between populations, as well as significant variation for genome-wide recombination rates among maize lines. Crossover interference analysis using a two-pathway modeling framework reveals a negative association between recombination rate and interference strength. Conclusions To our knowledge, the present work provides the most comprehensive study on intraspecific variation of recombination rates and crossover interference strength in eukaryotes. Differences found in recombination rates will allow for selection of high or low recombining lines in crossing programs. Our methodology should pave the way for precise identification of genes controlling recombination rates in maize and other organisms. PMID:24050704

  13. The nature of solar brightness variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, A. I.; Solanki, S. K.; Krivova, N. A.; Cameron, R. H.; Yeo, K. L.; Schmutz, W. K.

    2017-09-01

    Determining the sources of solar brightness variations1,2, often referred to as solar noise3, is important because solar noise limits the detection of solar oscillations3, is one of the drivers of the Earth's climate system4,5 and is a prototype of stellar variability6,7—an important limiting factor for the detection of extrasolar planets. Here, we model the magnetic contribution to solar brightness variability using high-cadence8,9 observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction (SATIRE)10,11 model. The brightness variations caused by the constantly evolving cellular granulation pattern on the solar surface were computed with the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS)/University of Chicago Radiative Magnetohydrodynamics (MURaM)12 code. We found that the surface magnetic field and granulation can together precisely explain solar noise (that is, solar variability excluding oscillations) on timescales from minutes to decades, accounting for all timescales that have so far been resolved or covered by irradiance measurements. We demonstrate that no other sources of variability are required to explain the data. Recent measurements of Sun-like stars by the COnvection ROtation and planetary Transits (CoRoT)13 and Kepler14 missions uncovered brightness variations similar to that of the Sun, but with a much wider variety of patterns15. Our finding that solar brightness variations can be replicated in detail with just two well-known sources will greatly simplify future modelling of existing CoRoT and Kepler as well as anticipated Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite16 and PLAnetary Transits and Oscillations of stars (PLATO)17 data.

  14. Variational theory of hot dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Abhishek

    We develop a variational theory of hot nuclear matter in neutron stars and supernovae. It can also be used to study charged, hot nuclear matter which may be produced in heavy-ion collisions. This theory is a generalization of the variational theory of cold nuclear and neutron star matter based on realistic models of nuclear forces and pair correlation operators. The present approach uses microcanonical ensembles and the variational principle obeyed by the free energy. We show that the correlated states of the microcanonical ensemble at a given temperature T and density r can be orthonormalized preserving their diagonal matrix elements of the Hamiltonian. This allows for the minimization of the free energy without corrections from the nonorthogonality of the correlated basis states, similar to that of the ground state energy. Samples of the microcanonical ensemble can be used to study the response, and the neutrino luminosities and opacities of hot matter. We present methods to orthonormalize the correlated states that contribute to the response of hot matter. We apply this variational theory to symmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter. This extension generalizes to finite temperatures, the many body technique used in the construction of the zero temperature Akmal-Pandharipande-Ravenhall equation of state. We discuss how the formalism can be used for practical calculations of hot dense matter. Our calculations are a significant improvement over the previous calculation due to Friedman and Pandharipande. The Hamiltonian contains modern realistic two nucleon and three nucleon interactions along with relativistic boost corrections. Expectation values of various operators, including the Hamiltonian, are calculated using cluster expansion and chain summation techniques. The pair correlation operator is now calculated at every density and temperature. Neutral pion condensation along with the associated isovector spin longitudinal sum rule is analyzed. The equation

  15. Variational methods in steady state diffusion problems

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.E.; Fan, W.C.P.; Bratton, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    Classical variational techniques are used to obtain accurate solutions to the multigroup multiregion one dimensional steady state neutron diffusion equation. Analytic solutions are constructed for benchmark verification. Functionals with cubic trial functions and conservational lagrangian constraints are exhibited and compared with nonconservational functionals with respect to neutron balance and to relative flux and current at interfaces. Excellent agreement of the conservational functionals using cubic trial functions is obtained in comparison with analytic solutions.

  16. Ethnic variation in inflammatory profile in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Coussens, Anna K; Wilkinson, Robert J; Nikolayevskyy, Vladyslav; Elkington, Paul T; Hanifa, Yasmeen; Islam, Kamrul; Timms, Peter M; Bothamley, Graham H; Claxton, Alleyna P; Packe, Geoffrey E; Darmalingam, Mathina; Davidson, Robert N; Milburn, Heather J; Baker, Lucy V; Barker, Richard D; Drobniewski, Francis A; Mein, Charles A; Bhaw-Rosun, Leena; Nuamah, Rosamond A; Griffiths, Christopher J; Martineau, Adrian R

    2013-01-01

    Distinct phylogenetic lineages of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) cause disease in patients of particular genetic ancestry, and elicit different patterns of cytokine and chemokine secretion when cultured with human macrophages in vitro. Circulating and antigen-stimulated concentrations of these inflammatory mediators might therefore be expected to vary significantly between tuberculosis patients of different ethnic origin. Studies to characterise such variation, and to determine whether it relates to host or bacillary factors, have not been conducted. We therefore compared circulating and antigen-stimulated concentrations of 43 inflammatory mediators and 14 haematological parameters (inflammatory profile) in 45 pulmonary tuberculosis patients of African ancestry vs. 83 patients of Eurasian ancestry in London, UK, and investigated the influence of bacillary and host genotype on these profiles. Despite having similar demographic and clinical characteristics, patients of differing ancestry exhibited distinct inflammatory profiles at presentation: those of African ancestry had lower neutrophil counts, lower serum concentrations of CCL2, CCL11 and vitamin D binding protein (DBP) but higher serum CCL5 concentrations and higher antigen-stimulated IL-1 receptor antagonist and IL-12 secretion. These differences associated with ethnic variation in host DBP genotype, but not with ethnic variation in MTB strain. Ethnic differences in inflammatory profile became more marked following initiation of antimicrobial therapy, and immunological correlates of speed of elimination of MTB from the sputum differed between patients of African vs. Eurasian ancestry. Our study demonstrates a hitherto unappreciated degree of ethnic heterogeneity in inflammatory profile in tuberculosis patients that associates primarily with ethnic variation in host, rather than bacillary, genotype. Candidate immunodiagnostics and immunological biomarkers of response to antimicrobial therapy should be derived

  17. Variational thermodynamics of relativistic thin disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-Piñeres, Antonio C.; Lopez-Monsalvo, Cesar S.; Quevedo, Hernando

    2015-12-01

    We present a relativistic model describing a thin disk system composed of two fluids. The system is surrounded by a halo in the presence of a non-trivial electromagnetic field. We show that the model is compatible with the variational multifluid thermodynamics formalism, allowing us to determine all the thermodynamic variables associated with the matter content of the disk. The asymptotic behavior of these quantities indicates that the single fluid interpretation should be abandoned in favor of a two-fluid model.

  18. Variational global analysis of satellite temperature soundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halem, M.; Kalnay, E.

    1983-01-01

    A variational spherical harmonic analysis is developed for the production of global geopotential height and geostropic wind fields from the TIROS-N spacecraft's temperature sounding profiles. This scheme is based on Tykhonov's (1964) regularization method, and the smoothing parameter is determined by cross validation. The scheme is noted to be stable and computationally efficient, and it does not depend on a priori information. Its applications to three-dimensional temperature retrievals and to four-dimensional spectral analyses are illustrated.

  19. Epigenetic variations in heredity and evolution.

    PubMed

    Jablonka, E

    2012-12-01

    The biological and medical importance of epigenetics is nowtaken for granted, but the significance of one aspect of it—epigenetic inheritance—is less widely recognized. New datasuggest that not only is it ubiquitous, but both the generationand the transmission of epigenetic variations may be affectedby developmental conditions. Population studies, formalmodels, and research on genomic and ecological stressesall suggest that epigenetic inheritance is important in bothmicro-and macroevolutionary change.

  20. Hot Wall Thickness Variation Measurement System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    Subtltia) HOT WALL THICKNESS VARIATION MEASUREMENT SYSTEM 7. AUTHORfa; 3. J. KRUPSKI 9 . PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS PRODUCT...THE FORGING 3. ULTRASONICS ON A HOT TUBE 4. SYSTEt-l DESCRIPTION 5. TESTING RESULTS 6. CONCLUSIONS 7. HffLEMENTATION PAGE i ii 1 2 4 6 9 ...printed out. The grip procedure was repeated toward the breech end of the forging with good results. The third and 9 breech end prints were at about

  1. Historical Variations in Solar UV Irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLand, M. T.

    2011-12-01

    Satellite measurements of solar UV variability have been made by at least fifteen different instruments since 1978. While it is difficult to keep a single UV irradiance instrument operating throughout a complete solar cycle, many of these instruments (Nimbus-7 SBUV, SME, NOAA-9 SBUV/2, NOAA-11 SBUV/2, UARS SUSIM, UARS SOLSTICE) were able to observe both maximum and minimum irradiance levels during either rising or declining phases of solar activity. Comparisons of these published results for solar cycles 21, 22, and 23 show consistent solar cycle irradiance changes at key wavelengths for terrestrial effects (e.g. 205 nm, 240 nm) within instrumental uncertainties. All historical data sets also show the same relative spectral dependence in the ultraviolet for both short-term (rotational) and long-term (solar cycle) variations. Empirical solar irradiance models that employ multiple proxy data sets to represent spectral irradiance produce long-term solar UV variations that are in good agreement with merged observational data through 2005. Recent UV irradiance data from the SORCE mission covering the declining phase of Cycle 23 present a different picture of long-term solar variations, with significantly larger temporal changes and different spectral dependence. We present comparisons of the SORCE irradiance data with previous solar UV observations and current model predictions. Scaling factors for use with solar UV proxy indexes have been derived from SORCE SIM and SORCE SOLSTICE data during 2004-2005. These scale factors, based on short-term irradiance variations, agree very well with results derived from concurrent NOAA-17 SBUV/2 and UARS SUSIM measurements. The 2004-2005 scale factors are consistent with previously derived scale factors that produce calculated long-term irradiance changes in good agreement with observations. The SORCE long-term solar UV irradiance results, corresponding to the early part of the mission, are consistent with undercorrection of

  2. Geographic variation in gorilla limb bones.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Rebecca S; Pearman, Tessa L

    2016-06-01

    Gorilla systematics has received increased attention over recent decades from primatologists, conservationists, and paleontologists. Studies of geographic variation in DNA, skulls, and teeth have led to new taxonomic proposals, such as recognition of two gorilla species, Gorilla gorilla (western gorilla) and Gorilla beringei (eastern gorilla). Postcranial differences between mountain gorillas (G. beringei beringei) and western lowland gorillas (G. g. gorilla) have a long history of study, but differences between the limb bones of the eastern and western species have not yet been examined with an emphasis on geographic variation within each species. In addition, proposals for recognition of the Cross River gorilla as Gorilla gorilla diehli and gorillas from Tshiaberimu and Kahuzi as G. b. rex-pymaeorum have not been evaluated in the context of geographic variation in the forelimb and hindlimb skeletons. Forty-three linear measurements were collected from limb bones of 266 adult gorillas representing populations of G. b. beringei, Gorilla beringei graueri, G. g. gorilla, and G. g. diehli in order to investigate geographic diversity. Skeletal elements included the humerus, radius, third metacarpal, third proximal hand phalanx, femur, tibia, calcaneus, first metatarsal, third metatarsal, and third proximal foot phalanx. Comparisons of means and principal components analyses clearly differentiate eastern and western gorillas, indicating that eastern gorillas have absolutely and relatively smaller hands and feet, among other differences. Gorilla subspecies and populations cluster consistently by species, although G. g. diehli may be similar to the eastern gorillas in having small hands and feet. The subspecies of G. beringei are distinguished less strongly and by different variables than the two gorilla species. Populations of G. b. graueri are variable, and Kahuzi and Tshiaberimu specimens do not cluster together. Results support the possible influence of

  3. Variations of somatotype in elderly Sardinians.

    PubMed

    Buffa, R; Succa, V; Garau, D; Marini, E; Floris, G

    2005-01-01

    Somatotyping is an effective technique for the study of anthropometric variations and body composition in elderly subjects, even though it has not often been used in this field. The present study was conducted on a sample of 280 healthy Sardinians (134 men and 146 women) of age 60-89 years, subdivided into three age classes (60-69 years; 70-79 years; and 80-89 years). Somatotypes were computed according to Carter and Heath (Somatotyping-Development and Applications. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press; 1990). The results show a dominance of the endo- and mesomorphic components in the elderly subjects, with less development of ectomorphy than in younger individuals. In a comparison with other populations, our sample shows strong development of endomorphy and especially of mesomorphy, while ectomorphy values are generally low. Age-related variations are significant in both sexes and consist in a progressive reduction of the endomorphic component, particularly in the 80-89-year class (endomorphy in the three age classes: 6.4, 6.1, and 5.3 in men; 8.1, 7.8, and 6.8 in women). The mesomorphic component is characterized by stability (age variations: 6.4, 6.4, and 5.9 in men; 6.3, 6.4, and 6.3 in women) and the ectomorphic component by a slight increase (age variations: 0.5, 0.6, and 0.8 in men; 0.4, 0.3, and 0.5 in women). Sex differences are significant and especially large for the endomorphic component, with generally higher values in women. The sexual dimorphism tends to decrease with age. The results are discussed with regard to the biology of aging, with emphasis on the potential application of somatotype to studies of the elderly population.

  4. Circadian variation of acute aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Seguchi, Masaru; Wada, Hiroshi; Sakakura, Kenichi; Nakagawa, Tom; Ibe, Tatsuro; Ikeda, Nahoko; Sugawara, Yoshitaka; Ako, Junya; Momomura, Shin-ichi

    2015-05-13

    Acute aortic dissection (AAD) is a life-threatening cardiovascular disease with high mortality. Hypertension is a well known risk factor of AAD. There have been previous reports about the association between circadian variation of blood pressure (BP) and cardiovascular events. However, little is known about the association between the onset-time of AAD and circadian variation of BP. The purpose of this study was to clarify the characteristics of circadian variation of BP in AAD and its relation to the onset-time of this disease. This study included type B spontaneous AAD patients who were referred to our institution and treated conservatively between January 2008 and June 2013. Patients with type A AAD, secondary to trauma, and type B AAD which preceded surgical intervention were excluded. Data were retrospectively collected from the hospital medical records. Sixty-eight patients with type B AAD were enrolled. The distribution of the circadian pattern in the study patients was as follows: extreme-dipper, 0% (none); dipper, 20.6% (n = 14); nondipper, 50% (n = 34); riser, 29.4% (n = 20). Non-dipper and riser patterns were more frequently observed compared with other population studies reported previously. Moreover, no patient in the dipper group had night-time onset while 31.5% of the patients in the absence of nocturnal BP fall group (non-dipper and riser) did (P = 0.01). Absence of a nocturnal BP fall was frequently seen in AAD patients. Absence of a nocturnal BP fall may be a risk factor of AAD. Circadian variation of BP may also affect the onset-time of type B AAD.

  5. Relative Perturbation Theory: (I) Eigenvalue Variations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-25

    observaciones sobre el algebra lineal . Universidad Nacional de Tucuman Revista, Serie A, 5:147{151, 1946. [6] P. Deift, J. Demmel, L.-C. Li, and C. Tomei...Gragg. On computing accurate singular values and eigenvalues of matrices with acyclic graphs. Linear Algebra and its Application, 185:203{217, 1993. [8...21] R.-C. Li. Norms of certain matrices with applications to variations of the spectra of matrices and matrix pencils. Linear Algebra and its

  6. IDR Neutrino Factory Front End and Variations

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.; Alekou, A.; Rogers, C.; Snopok, P.; Yoshikawa, C.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2012-05-01

    The International Design Report (IDR) neutrino factory scenario for capture, bunching, phase-energy rotation and initial cooling of {mu}'s produced from a proton source target is explored. It requires a drift section from the target, a bunching section and a {phi}-{delta}E rotation section leading into the cooling channel. Optimization and variations are discussed. Important concerns are rf limitations within the focusing magnetic fields and large losses in the transport.

  7. Ethnic Variation in Inflammatory Profile in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Coussens, Anna K.; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Nikolayevskyy, Vladyslav; Elkington, Paul T.; Hanifa, Yasmeen; Islam, Kamrul; Timms, Peter M.; Bothamley, Graham H.; Claxton, Alleyna P.; Packe, Geoffrey E.; Darmalingam, Mathina; Davidson, Robert N.; Milburn, Heather J.; Baker, Lucy V.; Barker, Richard D.; Drobniewski, Francis A.; Mein, Charles A.; Bhaw-Rosun, Leena; Nuamah, Rosamond A.; Griffiths, Christopher J.; Martineau, Adrian R.

    2013-01-01

    Distinct phylogenetic lineages of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) cause disease in patients of particular genetic ancestry, and elicit different patterns of cytokine and chemokine secretion when cultured with human macrophages in vitro. Circulating and antigen-stimulated concentrations of these inflammatory mediators might therefore be expected to vary significantly between tuberculosis patients of different ethnic origin. Studies to characterise such variation, and to determine whether it relates to host or bacillary factors, have not been conducted. We therefore compared circulating and antigen-stimulated concentrations of 43 inflammatory mediators and 14 haematological parameters (inflammatory profile) in 45 pulmonary tuberculosis patients of African ancestry vs. 83 patients of Eurasian ancestry in London, UK, and investigated the influence of bacillary and host genotype on these profiles. Despite having similar demographic and clinical characteristics, patients of differing ancestry exhibited distinct inflammatory profiles at presentation: those of African ancestry had lower neutrophil counts, lower serum concentrations of CCL2, CCL11 and vitamin D binding protein (DBP) but higher serum CCL5 concentrations and higher antigen-stimulated IL-1 receptor antagonist and IL-12 secretion. These differences associated with ethnic variation in host DBP genotype, but not with ethnic variation in MTB strain. Ethnic differences in inflammatory profile became more marked following initiation of antimicrobial therapy, and immunological correlates of speed of elimination of MTB from the sputum differed between patients of African vs. Eurasian ancestry. Our study demonstrates a hitherto unappreciated degree of ethnic heterogeneity in inflammatory profile in tuberculosis patients that associates primarily with ethnic variation in host, rather than bacillary, genotype. Candidate immunodiagnostics and immunological biomarkers of response to antimicrobial therapy should be derived

  8. Modeling Behavior and Variation for Crowd Animation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    Modeling Behavior and Variation for Crowd Animation Manfred Chung Man Lau CMU-CS-09-148 August 2009 School of Computer Science Carnegie Mellon...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Carnegie Mellon University , School of Computer Science,Pittsburgh,PA,15213 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...fast crowds on ps3. In sandbox ’06: Proceedings of the 2006 ACM SIGGRAPH symposium on Videogames , pages 113–121, 2006. 2.1 [87] Craig W. Reynolds

  9. Optimal Control of Evolution Mixed Variational Inclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Alduncin, Gonzalo

    2013-12-15

    Optimal control problems of primal and dual evolution mixed variational inclusions, in reflexive Banach spaces, are studied. The solvability analysis of the mixed state systems is established via duality principles. The optimality analysis is performed in terms of perturbation conjugate duality methods, and proximation penalty-duality algorithms to mixed optimality conditions are further presented. Applications to nonlinear diffusion constrained problems as well as quasistatic elastoviscoplastic bilateral contact problems exemplify the theory.

  10. Genetic Variation in an Individual Human Exome

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Pauline C.; Levy, Samuel; Huang, Jiaqi; Stockwell, Timothy B.; Walenz, Brian P.; Li, Kelvin; Axelrod, Nelson; Busam, Dana A.; Strausberg, Robert L.; Venter, J. Craig

    2008-01-01

    There is much interest in characterizing the variation in a human individual, because this may elucidate what contributes significantly to a person's phenotype, thereby enabling personalized genomics. We focus here on the variants in a person's ‘exome,’ which is the set of exons in a genome, because the exome is believed to harbor much of the functional variation. We provide an analysis of the ∼12,500 variants that affect the protein coding portion of an individual's genome. We identified ∼10,400 nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) in this individual, of which ∼15–20% are rare in the human population. We predict ∼1,500 nsSNPs affect protein function and these tend be heterozygous, rare, or novel. Of the ∼700 coding indels, approximately half tend to have lengths that are a multiple of three, which causes insertions/deletions of amino acids in the corresponding protein, rather than introducing frameshifts. Coding indels also occur frequently at the termini of genes, so even if an indel causes a frameshift, an alternative start or stop site in the gene can still be used to make a functional protein. In summary, we reduced the set of ∼12,500 nonsilent coding variants by ∼8-fold to a set of variants that are most likely to have major effects on their proteins' functions. This is our first glimpse of an individual's exome and a snapshot of the current state of personalized genomics. The majority of coding variants in this individual are common and appear to be functionally neutral. Our results also indicate that some variants can be used to improve the current NCBI human reference genome. As more genomes are sequenced, many rare variants and non-SNP variants will be discovered. We present an approach to analyze the coding variation in humans by proposing multiple bioinformatic methods to hone in on possible functional variation. PMID:18704161

  11. Genetic variation in an individual human exome.

    PubMed

    Ng, Pauline C; Levy, Samuel; Huang, Jiaqi; Stockwell, Timothy B; Walenz, Brian P; Li, Kelvin; Axelrod, Nelson; Busam, Dana A; Strausberg, Robert L; Venter, J Craig

    2008-08-15

    There is much interest in characterizing the variation in a human individual, because this may elucidate what contributes significantly to a person's phenotype, thereby enabling personalized genomics. We focus here on the variants in a person's 'exome,' which is the set of exons in a genome, because the exome is believed to harbor much of the functional variation. We provide an analysis of the approximately 12,500 variants that affect the protein coding portion of an individual's genome. We identified approximately 10,400 nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) in this individual, of which approximately 15-20% are rare in the human population. We predict approximately 1,500 nsSNPs affect protein function and these tend be heterozygous, rare, or novel. Of the approximately 700 coding indels, approximately half tend to have lengths that are a multiple of three, which causes insertions/deletions of amino acids in the corresponding protein, rather than introducing frameshifts. Coding indels also occur frequently at the termini of genes, so even if an indel causes a frameshift, an alternative start or stop site in the gene can still be used to make a functional protein. In summary, we reduced the set of approximately 12,500 nonsilent coding variants by approximately 8-fold to a set of variants that are most likely to have major effects on their proteins' functions. This is our first glimpse of an individual's exome and a snapshot of the current state of personalized genomics. The majority of coding variants in this individual are common and appear to be functionally neutral. Our results also indicate that some variants can be used to improve the current NCBI human reference genome. As more genomes are sequenced, many rare variants and non-SNP variants will be discovered. We present an approach to analyze the coding variation in humans by proposing multiple bioinformatic methods to hone in on possible functional variation.

  12. Variational algorithms for nonlinear smoothing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bach, R. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A variational approach is presented for solving a nonlinear, fixed-interval smoothing problem with application to offline processing of noisy data for trajectory reconstruction and parameter estimation. The nonlinear problem is solved as a sequence of linear two-point boundary value problems. Second-order convergence properties are demonstrated. Algorithms for both continuous and discrete versions of the problem are given, and example solutions are provided.

  13. A four dimensional variational analysis experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, R.

    1981-01-01

    A demonstration that the four dimensional variational analysis method using the governing equations as exact constraints can be successfully employed for a perfect model and for a simple, but nonlinear, system is presented. The method is stable in an assimilation cycle. The method reconstructs the unobservable variables; in the case demonstrated, no velocity data was observed. The analysis errors are much smaller than the observing system errors.

  14. Variational Bayesian Approximation methods for inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad-Djafari, Ali

    2012-09-01

    Variational Bayesian Approximation (VBA) methods are recent tools for effective Bayesian computations. In this paper, these tools are used for inverse problems where the prior models include hidden variables and where where the estimation of the hyper parameters has also to be addressed. In particular two specific prior models (Student-t and mixture of Gaussian models) are considered and details of the algorithms are given.

  15. A Variational Approach to Mass Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, P. D.; Broomfield, J. M. A.

    2009-08-01

    The variational method of Balian and Vénéroni is applied to dynamic simulations of giant resonances using the effective Skyrme interaction. Fluctuations in the mass following the resonance decay are compared in the time-dependent Hartree-Fock and Balian-Vénéroni approaches. The Balian-Vénéroni results are consistly higher than the Time-Dependent Hartree-Fock results.

  16. Variational Convergence Of Bifunctions: Motivating Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Research Office (ARO) W911NS1010246 and Fondap- Matematicas Aplicadas, Universidad de Chile 1 Variational convergence of bifunctions The analysis of...The public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing...problems. 1 . REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those

  17. Monitoring Continental Water Mass Variations by GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercan, H.; Akyılmaz, O.

    2015-12-01

    The low-low satellite-to-satellite tracking mission GRACE (Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment), launched in March 2002, aims to determine Earth's static gravity field and its temporal variations. Geophysical mass changes at regional and global scale, which are related with terrestrial water bodies, ocean and atmosphere masses, melting and displacements of ice sheets and tectonic movements can be determined from time-dependent changes of the Earth's gravity field. In this study, it is aimed to determine total water storage (TWS) (soil moisture, groundwater, snow and glaciers, lake and river waters, herbal waters) variations at different temporal and spatial resolution, monitoring the hydrologic effect causing time-dependent changes in the Earth's gravity field by two different methods. The region between 30°-40° northern latitudes and 36°-48° eastern longitudes has been selected as a study area covering the Euphrates - Tigris basin. TWS maps were produced with (i) monthly temporal and 400 km spatial resolution, based on monthly mean global spherical harmonic gravity field models of GRACE satellite mission (L2), and with (ii) monthly and semi-monthly temporal and spatial resolution as fine as 200 km based on GRACE in-situ observations (L1B). Decreasing trend of water mass anomalies from the year 2003 to 2013 is proved by aforesaid approaches. Monthly TWS variations are calculated using two different methods for the same region and time period. Time series of both solutions are generated and compared.

  18. Genetic engineering compared to natural genetic variations.

    PubMed

    Arber, Werner

    2010-11-30

    By comparing strategies of genetic alterations introduced in genetic engineering with spontaneously occurring genetic variation, we have come to conclude that both processes depend on several distinct and specific molecular mechanisms. These mechanisms can be attributed, with regard to their evolutionary impact, to three different strategies of genetic variation. These are local nucleotide sequence changes, intragenomic rearrangement of DNA segments and the acquisition of a foreign DNA segment by horizontal gene transfer. Both the strategies followed in genetic engineering and the amounts of DNA sequences thereby involved are identical to, or at least very comparable with, those involved in natural genetic variation. Therefore, conjectural risks of genetic engineering must be of the same order as those for natural biological evolution and for conventional breeding methods. These risks are known to be quite low. There is no scientific reason to assume special long-term risks for GM crops. For future agricultural developments, a road map is designed that can be expected to lead, by a combination of genetic engineering and conventional plant breeding, to crops that can insure food security and eliminate malnutrition and hunger for the entire human population on our planet. Public-private partnerships should be formed with the mission to reach the set goals in the coming decades.

  19. Temporal variation in major trauma admissions

    PubMed Central

    Kieffer, WKM; Michalik, DV; Gallagher, K; McFadyen, I; Bernard, J; Rogers, BA

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Trauma is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the UK. Since the inception of the trauma networks, little is known of the temporal pattern of trauma admissions. Methods Trauma Audit and Research Network data for 1 April 2011 to 31 March 2013 were collated from two large major trauma centres (MTCs) in the South East of England: Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust (BSUH) and St George's University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (SGU). The number of admissions and the injury severity score by time of admission, by weekdays versus weekend and by month/season were analysed. Results There were 1,223 admissions at BSUH and 1,241 at SGU. There was significant variation by time of admission; there were more admissions in the afternoons (BSUH p<0.001) and evenings (SGU p<0.001). There were proportionally more admissions at the weekends than on weekdays (BSUH p<0.001, SGU p=0.028). There was significant seasonal variation in admissions at BSUH (p<0.001) with more admissions in summer and autumn. No significant seasonal variation was observed at SGU (p=0.543). Conclusions The temporal patterns observed were different for each MTC with important implications for resource planning of trauma care. This study identified differing needs for different MTCs and resource planning should be individualised to the network. PMID:26741676

  20. Variational theory for thermodynamics of thermal waves.

    PubMed

    Sieniutycz, Stanislaw; Berry, R Stephen

    2002-04-01

    We discuss description of macroscopic representations of thermal fields with finite signal speed by composite variational principles involving suitably constructed potentials along with original physical variables. A variational formulation for a given vector field treats all field equations as constraints that are linked by Lagrange multipliers to the given kinetic potential. We focus on the example of simple hyperbolic heat transfer, but also stress that the approach can be easily extended to the coupled transfer of heat, mass, and electric charge. With our approach, various representations may be obtained for physical fields in terms of potentials (gradient or non-gradient representations). Corresponding Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalism can be developed. Symmetry principles yield components of the energy-momentum tensor for the given kinetic potential. The limiting reversible case appears as a special yet suitable reference frame to describe irreversible phenomena. With the conservation laws resulting from the least action principle and the Gibbs equation, the variational scheme of nonequilibrium thermodynamics follows. Its main property is abandoning the assumption of local thermal equilibrium.