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Sample records for centred local structures

  1. Investigations of the EPR Parameters and Local Lattice Structure for the Rhombic Cu2+ Centre in TZSH Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao-Ying; Liu, Shi-Fei; Fu, Jin-Xian

    2016-03-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) parameters [i.e. g factors gi (i=x, y, z) and hyperfine structure constants Ai] and the local lattice structure for the Cu2+ centre in Tl2Zn(SO4)2·6H2O (TZSH) crystal were theoretically investigated by utilising the perturbation formulae of these parameters for a 3d9 ion under rhombically elongated octahedra. In the calculations, the admixture of d orbitals in the ground state and the ligand orbital and spin-orbit coupling interactions are taken into account based on the cluster approach. The theoretical EPR parameters show good agreement with the observed values, and the Cu2+-H2O bond lengths are obtained as follows: Rx≈1.98 Å, Ry≈2.09 Å, Rz≈2.32 Å. The results are discussed.

  2. Constructing Learning Spaces? Videoconferencing at Local Learning Centres in Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logdlund, Ulrik

    2010-01-01

    This article explores videoconferencing in the context of local learning centres in Sweden. The practice is described as a "learning space" in which adult learners construct socio-spatial relations. The study goes beyond a sociological apprehension of actors and opposes the idea of the material as neutral, passive and conformed by…

  3. Constructing Learning Spaces? Videoconferencing at Local Learning Centres in Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logdlund, Ulrik

    2010-01-01

    This article explores videoconferencing in the context of local learning centres in Sweden. The practice is described as a "learning space" in which adult learners construct socio-spatial relations. The study goes beyond a sociological apprehension of actors and opposes the idea of the material as neutral, passive and conformed by…

  4. South Cheshire Local Multi-disciplinary Evidence Centre: an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Howard, John C

    2002-07-01

    The South Cheshire Local Multidisciplinary Evidence Centre (LMEC) was a two-year project commenced in March 1998 and completed in April 2000. The project aimed to develop an information service to enable all primary and community care staff in South Cheshire to access high-quality evidence and thus to improve patient care. The LMEC gave access from the workplace to both physical and electronic resources to support clinical governance and lifelong learning, with a strong emphasis on evidence-based material. Automation of the library catalogue enabled its inclusion on the website. The project developed enquiry and document delivery services and provided training on using the LMEC and on critical appraisal. An evaluation carried out at the end of the project showed that over 120 primary and community care staff had used the LMEC and were positive about the service. As Clinical Governance, the NHSnet, and plans for continuing professional development are implemented, the LMEC is one model for a Local Health Information Service outlined in the NHS IT strategy.

  5. Reaction centres: the structure and evolution of biological solar power.

    PubMed

    Heathcote, Peter; Fyfe, Paul K; Jones, Michael R

    2002-02-01

    Reaction centres are complexes of pigment and protein that convert the electromagnetic energy of sunlight into chemical potential energy. They are found in plants, algae and a variety of bacterial species, and vary greatly in their composition and complexity. New structural information has highlighted features that are common to the different types of reaction centre and has provided insights into some of the key differences between reaction centres from different sources. New ideas have also emerged on how contemporary reaction centres might have evolved and on the possible origin of the first chlorophyll-protein complexes to harness the power of sunlight.

  6. Type I photosynthetic reaction centres: structure and function.

    PubMed Central

    Heathcote, Peter; Jones, Michael R; Fyfe, Paul K

    2003-01-01

    We review recent advances in the study of the photosystem I reaction centre, following the determination of a spectacular 2.5 A resolution crystal structure for this complex of Synechococcus elongatus. Photosystem I is proving different to type II reaction centres in structure and organization, and the mechanism of transmembrane electron transfer, and is providing insights into the control of function in reaction centres that operate at very low redox potentials. The photosystem I complex of oxygenic organisms has a counterpart in non-oxygenic bacteria, the strictly anaerobic phototrophic green sulphur bacteria and heliobacteria. The most distinctive feature of these type I reaction centres is that they contain two copies of a large core polypeptide (i.e. a homodimer), rather than a heterodimeric arrangement of two related, but different, polypeptides as in the photosystem I complex. To compare the structural organization of the two forms of type I reaction centre, we have modelled the structure of the central region of the reaction centre from green sulphur bacteria, using sequence alignments and the structural coordinates of the S. elongatus Photosystem I complex. The outcome of these modelling studies is described, concentrating on regions of the type I reaction centre where important structure-function relationships have been demonstrated or inferred. PMID:12594931

  7. Lipids in photosynthetic reaction centres: structural roles and functional holes.

    PubMed

    Jones, Michael R

    2007-01-01

    Photosynthetic proteins power the biosphere. Reaction centres, light harvesting antenna proteins and cytochrome b(6)f (or bc(1)) complexes are expressed at high levels, have been subjected to an intensive spectroscopic, biochemical and mutagenic analysis, and several have been characterised to an informatively high resolution by X-ray crystallography. In addition to revealing the structural basis for the transduction of light energy, X-ray crystallography has brought molecular insights into the relationships between these multicomponent membrane proteins and their lipid environment. Lipids resolved in the X-ray crystal structures of photosynthetic proteins bind light harvesting cofactors, fill intra-protein cavities through which quinones can diffuse, form an important part of the monomer-monomer interface in multimeric structures and may facilitate structural flexibility in complexes that undergo partial disassembly and repair. It has been proposed that individual lipids influence the biophysical properties of reaction centre cofactors, and so affect the rate of electron transfer through the complex. Lipids have also been shown to be important for successful crystallisation of photosynthetic proteins. Comparison of the three types of reaction centre that have been structurally characterised reveals interesting similarities in the position of bound lipids that may point towards a generic requirement to reinforce the structure of the core electron transfer domain. The crystallographic data are also providing new opportunities to find molecular explanations for observed effects of different types of lipid on the structure, mechanism and organisation of reaction centres and other photosynthetic proteins.

  8. Theoretical studies of the dependence of EPR g-factors on local structure for the trigonal Er3+-VK centres in KMgF3 and KZnF3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Rui-Peng; Kuang, Xiao-Yu; Liang, Liang; Yu, Geng-Hua

    2015-05-01

    The dependence of the EPR g-factors on the local structural parameter for a 4f11 configuration ion Er3+ in a trigonal crystal-field has been studied by diagonalizing the 364×364 complete energy matrices. Our studies indicate that the EPR spectra of the trigonal Er3+-VK centers in KMgF3 and KZnF3 may be attributed to the translation of the cubic Kramers doublet Γ7. Furthermore, the EPR g-factors of the trigonal Er3+-VK centers may be interpreted reasonably by the shifts ΔZ≈0.340 Å and ΔZ≈0.303 Å of the Er3+ ions toward the charge compensator VK along the C3 axis for the KMgF3:Er3+ and the KZnF3:Er3+ systems respectively.

  9. Localized structures in convective experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burguete, J.; Mancini, H.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we review localized structures appearing in thermo-convective experiments performed in extended (large "aspect ratio") fluid layers. After a brief general review (not exhaustive), we focus on some results obtained in pure fluids in a Bénard-Marangoni system with non-homogeneous heating where some structures of this kind appear. The experimental results are compared in reference to the most classical observed in binary mixtures experiments or simulations. In the Bénard-Marangoni experiment we present the stability diagram where localized structures appear and the typical situations where these local mechanisms have been studied experimentally. Some new experimental results are also included. The authors want to honor Prof. H. Brand in his 60th. birthday and to thank him for helpful discussions.

  10. Magmatic Plumbing at an Incipient Oceanic Spreading Centre: Evidence From Local Earthquake Data in Northern Afar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illsley-Kemp, F.; Keir, D.; Bull, J. M.; Ayele, A.; Hammond, J. O. S.; Kendal, M. J.; Gallacher, R. J.; Gernon, T.; Goitom, B.

    2015-12-01

    The transition from continental breakup to seafloor spreading is characterised by voluminous intrusive and extrusive magmatic activity, focused along narrow rift segments. The manner in which this magma is stored and transported within the crust is poorly constrained. It is difficult to answer these questions by studying previously rifted continental margins, as the area of transition is buried deep beneath volcanic and sedimentary sequences. Northern Afar presents a unique opportunity to resolve this problem, as it exposes subaerially the magma-rich transition from continental rifting to an oceanic spreading centre. The region therefore acts as a laboratory in which the geological signatures of continental breakup can be investigated unambiguously. For two years, between 2011 and 2013, a seismic network of 20 seismic stations was deployed in the area. Presented here are the hypocentral locations and local magnitudes of over 4500 earthquakes. Seismicity is focused along the western border fault and at active volcanic centres. Magma pathways beneath active volcanoes are clearly defined by seismicity spanning the entire crust. The data allows for the development of a calibrated local magnitude scale for northern Afar and provides an insight into the nature of seismic attenuation in the uppermost mantle. I discuss the implications that these results have on our understanding of the distribution of extension, melt storage and migration and upper mantle processes during the last stages of continental rifting.

  11. Deformation-induced structural transition in body-centred cubic molybdenum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, S. J.; Wang, H.; Du, K.; Zhang, W.; Sui, M. L.; Mao, S. X.

    2014-01-01

    Molybdenum is a refractory metal that is stable in a body-centred cubic structure at all temperatures before melting. Plastic deformation via structural transitions has never been reported for pure molybdenum, while transformation coupled with plasticity is well known for many alloys and ceramics. Here we demonstrate a structural transformation accompanied by shear deformation from an original <001>-oriented body-centred cubic structure to a <110>-oriented face-centred cubic lattice, captured at crack tips during the straining of molybdenum inside a transmission electron microscope at room temperature. The face-centred cubic domains then revert into <111>-oriented body-centred cubic domains, equivalent to a lattice rotation of 54.7°, and ~15.4% tensile strain is reached. The face-centred cubic structure appears to be a well-defined metastable state, as evidenced by scanning transmission electron microscopy and nanodiffraction, the Nishiyama–Wassermann and Kurdjumov–Sachs relationships between the face-centred cubic and body-centred cubic structures and molecular dynamics simulations. Our findings reveal a deformation mechanism for elemental metals under high-stress deformation conditions. PMID:24603655

  12. Deformation-induced structural transition in body-centred cubic molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. J.; Wang, H.; Du, K.; Zhang, W.; Sui, M. L.; Mao, S. X.

    2014-03-01

    Molybdenum is a refractory metal that is stable in a body-centred cubic structure at all temperatures before melting. Plastic deformation via structural transitions has never been reported for pure molybdenum, while transformation coupled with plasticity is well known for many alloys and ceramics. Here we demonstrate a structural transformation accompanied by shear deformation from an original <001>-oriented body-centred cubic structure to a <110>-oriented face-centred cubic lattice, captured at crack tips during the straining of molybdenum inside a transmission electron microscope at room temperature. The face-centred cubic domains then revert into <111>-oriented body-centred cubic domains, equivalent to a lattice rotation of 54.7°, and ~15.4% tensile strain is reached. The face-centred cubic structure appears to be a well-defined metastable state, as evidenced by scanning transmission electron microscopy and nanodiffraction, the Nishiyama-Wassermann and Kurdjumov-Sachs relationships between the face-centred cubic and body-centred cubic structures and molecular dynamics simulations. Our findings reveal a deformation mechanism for elemental metals under high-stress deformation conditions.

  13. Deformation-induced structural transition in body-centred cubic molybdenum.

    PubMed

    Wang, S J; Wang, H; Du, K; Zhang, W; Sui, M L; Mao, S X

    2014-03-07

    Molybdenum is a refractory metal that is stable in a body-centred cubic structure at all temperatures before melting. Plastic deformation via structural transitions has never been reported for pure molybdenum, while transformation coupled with plasticity is well known for many alloys and ceramics. Here we demonstrate a structural transformation accompanied by shear deformation from an original <001>-oriented body-centred cubic structure to a <110>-oriented face-centred cubic lattice, captured at crack tips during the straining of molybdenum inside a transmission electron microscope at room temperature. The face-centred cubic domains then revert into <111>-oriented body-centred cubic domains, equivalent to a lattice rotation of 54.7°, and ~15.4% tensile strain is reached. The face-centred cubic structure appears to be a well-defined metastable state, as evidenced by scanning transmission electron microscopy and nanodiffraction, the Nishiyama-Wassermann and Kurdjumov-Sachs relationships between the face-centred cubic and body-centred cubic structures and molecular dynamics simulations. Our findings reveal a deformation mechanism for elemental metals under high-stress deformation conditions.

  14. Locally centred Mahalanobis distance: a new distance measure with salient features towards outlier detection.

    PubMed

    Todeschini, Roberto; Ballabio, Davide; Consonni, Viviana; Sahigara, Faizan; Filzmoser, Peter

    2013-07-17

    Outlier detection is a prerequisite to identify the presence of aberrant samples in a given set of data. The identification of such diverse data samples is significant particularly for multivariate data analysis where increasing data dimensionality can easily hinder the data exploration and such outliers often go undetected. This paper is aimed to introduce a novel Mahalanobis distance measure (namely, a pseudo-distance) termed as locally centred Mahalanobis distance, derived by centering the covariance matrix at each data sample rather than at the data centroid as in the classical covariance matrix. Two parameters, called as Remoteness and Isolation degree, were derived from the resulting pairwise distance matrix and their salient features facilitated a better identification of atypical samples isolated from the rest of the data, thus reflecting their potential application towards outlier detection. The Isolation degree demonstrated to be able to detect a new kind of outliers, that is, isolated samples within the data domain, thus resulting in a useful diagnostic tool to evaluate the reliability of predictions obtained by local models (e.g. k-NN models). To better understand the role of Remoteness and Isolation degree in identification of such aberrant data samples, some simulated and published data sets from literature were considered as case studies and the results were compared with those obtained by using Euclidean distance and classical Mahalanobis distance.

  15. Residential proximity to urban centres, local-area walkability and change in waist circumference among Australian adults.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Takemi; Niyonsenga, Theo; Howard, Natasha J; Coffee, Neil T; Paquet, Catherine; Taylor, Anne W; Daniel, Mark

    2016-12-01

    Consistent associations have been observed between macro-level urban sprawl and overweight/obesity, but whether residential proximity to urban centres predicts adiposity change over time has not been established. Further, studies of local-area walkability and overweight/obesity have generated mixed results. This study examined 4-year change in adults' waist circumference in relation to proximity to city centre, proximity to closest suburban centre, and local-area walkability. Data were from adult participants (n=2080) of a cohort study on chronic conditions and health risk factors in Adelaide, Australia. Baseline data were collected in 2000-03 with a follow-up in 2005-06. Multilevel regression models examined in 2015 the independent and joint associations of the three environmental measures with change in waist circumference, accounting for socio-demographic covariates. On average, waist circumference rose by 1.8cm over approximately 4years. Greater distance to city centre was associated with a greater increase in waist circumference. Participants living in distal areas (20km or further from city centre) had a greater increase in waist circumference (mean increase: 2.4cm) compared to those in proximal areas (9km or less, mean increase: 1.2cm). Counterintuitively, living in the vicinity of a suburban centre was associated with a greater increase in adiposity. Local-area walkability was not significantly associated with the outcome. Residential proximity to city centre appears to be protective against excessive increases in waist circumference. Controlled development and targeted interventions in the urban fringe may be needed to tackle obesity. Additional research needs to assess behaviours that mediate relationships between sprawl and obesity.

  16. A Study of Self and Task Performance in Childcare Centres as Perceived by Caregivers under Local Administrative Organisations in Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhulpat, Cheerapan

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the opinions toward self and task performance in childcare centres as perceived by caregivers under the jurisdiction of the Local Administrative Organization. The four areas evaluated were caregiver characteristics, task performance, objectives of caregiving and educating young children and problems and…

  17. A Study of Self and Task Performance in Childcare Centres as Perceived by Caregivers under Local Administrative Organisations in Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhulpat, Cheerapan

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the opinions toward self and task performance in childcare centres as perceived by caregivers under the jurisdiction of the Local Administrative Organization. The four areas evaluated were caregiver characteristics, task performance, objectives of caregiving and educating young children and problems and…

  18. Quasi-local gravitational angular momentum and centre of mass from generalised Witten equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieland, Wolfgang

    2017-03-01

    Witten's proof for the positivity of the ADM mass gives a definition of energy in terms of three-surface spinors. In this paper, we give a generalisation for the remaining six Poincaré charges at spacelike infinity, which are the angular momentum and centre of mass. The construction improves on certain three-surface spinor equations introduced by Shaw. We solve these equations asymptotically obtaining the ten Poincaré charges as integrals over the Nester-Witten two-form. We point out that the defining differential equations can be extended to three-surfaces of arbitrary signature and we study them on the entire boundary of a compact four-dimensional region of spacetime. The resulting quasi-local expressions for energy and angular momentum are integrals over a two-dimensional cross-section of the boundary. For any two consecutive such cross-sections, conservation laws are derived that determine the influx (outflow) of matter and gravitational radiation.

  19. Does a biomedical research centre affect patient care in local hospitals?

    PubMed

    Lichten, Catherine A; Marsden, Grace; Pollitt, Alexandra; Kiparoglou, Vasiliki; Channon, Keith M; Sussex, Jon

    2017-01-21

    Biomedical research can have impacts on patient care at research-active hospitals. We qualitatively evaluated the impact of the Oxford Biomedical Research Centre (Oxford BRC), a university-hospital partnership, on the effectiveness and efficiency of healthcare in local hospitals. Effectiveness and efficiency are conceptualised in terms of impacts perceived by clinicians on the quality, quantity and costs of patient care they deliver. First, we reviewed documentation from Oxford BRC and literature on the impact of research activity on patient care. Second, we interviewed leaders of the Oxford BRC's research to identify the direct and indirect impacts they expected their activity would have on local hospitals. Third, this information was used to inform interviews with senior clinicians responsible for patient care at Oxford's acute hospitals to discover what impacts they observed from research generally and from Oxford BRC's research work specifically. We compared and contrasted the results from the two sets of interviews using a qualitative approach. Finally, we identified themes emerging from the senior clinicians' responses, and compared them with an existing taxonomy of mechanisms through which quality of healthcare may be affected in research-active settings. We were able to interview 17 research leaders at the Oxford BRC and 19 senior clinicians at Oxford's acute hospitals. The research leaders identified a wide range of beneficial impacts that they expected might be felt at local hospitals as a result of their research activity. They expected the impact of their research activity on patient care to be generally positive. The senior clinicians responsible for patient care at those hospitals presented a more mixed picture, identifying many positive impacts, but also a smaller number of negative impacts, from research activity, including that of the Oxford BRC. We found the existing taxonomy of benefit types to be helpful in organising the findings, and propose

  20. Localized structure of Euglena bioconvection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iima, Makoto; Shoji, Erika; Awazu, Akinori; Nishimori, Hiraku; Izumi, Shunsuke; Hiroshima University Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    Bioconvection of a suspension of Euglena gracilis, a photosensitive flagellate whose body length is approximately 50 micrometers, was experimentally studied. Under strong light intensity, Euglena has a negative phototaxis; they tend to go away from the light source. When the bright illumination is given from the bottom, a large scale spatio-temporal pattern is generated as a result of interaction between Euglena and surrounding flow. Recently, localized convection pattern had been reported, however, the generation process and interaction of the localized convection cells has not been analyzed. We performed experimental study to understand the localization mechanism, in particular, the onset of bioconvection and lateral localization behavior due to phototaxis. Experiments started from different initial condition suggests a bistability near the onset of the convection as binary fluid convection that also shows localized convection cells. Dynamics of localized convections cells, which is similar to the binary fluid convection case although the basic equations are not the same, is also reported.

  1. The model of local mode analysis for structural acoustics of box structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngai, King-Wah

    Structure-borne noise is a new noise pollution problem emerging from railway concrete box structures in Hong Kong. Its low frequency noise with intermittent effect can cause considerable nuisance to neighborhoods. The tonal noise peaks in this low frequency range should be one of the important factors in structure-borne noise analysis. In the acoustic field, the deterministic analysis of all the resonant modes of vibration is generally considered as not practical. Many acoustic experts use the statistical energy analysis as the main tool for the noise investigation whereas the application of the experimental modal analysis in the structural acoustic problem is comparatively rare. In the past, most studies mainly focused on the structure-borne noise measurement and analysis. The detail study of the cause of structure-borne noise is lack, especially for the rectangular concrete box structure. In this dissertation, an experimental and analytical approach is adopted to study a typical concrete box model. This thesis aims at confirming the importance of modal analysis in the structure-borne noise study and then at identifying the local vibration modes along the cross-section of box structure. These local modes are responsible for the structure-borne noise radiation. The findings of this study suggest that the web of viaduct cross-section is not as rigid as assumed in the conventional viaduct design and the web face is likely to be more flexible in the vertical displacement of the concrete viaduct. Two types of local vibration modes along the cross-section are identified: the centre mode and the web mode. At the top panel of the viaduct, the centre mode has movement in the middle but not at the edges. The web mode has movement at the edges with the middle fixed. The combined centre and web mode has been found to be important in the structural acoustics of the concrete box structure. In the actual concrete viaduct, the coincidence frequency is especially low (often around

  2. "Bringing Learning Closer to Home": The Value and Impact of the Lisbon Strategy for Strengthening the Role of Local Learning Centres and Partnerships in South-Eastern Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarifis, George K.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative examination of four local learning centres that provide learning opportunities throughout life in Bulgaria, Cyprus, Greece and Turkey. The paper aims to assess some of the strengths and weaknesses of different types of local learning centres and partnerships in South-Eastern Europe--in line with the value and…

  3. Densest Local Structures of Uniaxial Ellipsoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, Fabian M.; Weigel, Robert F. B.; Kapfer, Sebastian C.

    2016-10-01

    Connecting the collective behavior of disordered systems with local structure on the particle scale is an important challenge, for example, in granular and glassy systems. Compounding complexity, in many scientific and industrial applications, particles are polydisperse, aspherical, or even of varying shape. Here, we investigate a generalization of the classical kissing problem in order to understand the local building blocks of packings of aspherical grains. We numerically determine the densest local structures of uniaxial ellipsoids by minimizing the Set Voronoi cell volume around a given particle. Depending on the particle aspect ratio, different local structures are observed and classified by symmetry and Voronoi coordination number. In extended disordered packings of frictionless particles, knowledge of the densest structures allows us to rescale the Voronoi volume distributions onto the single-parameter family of k -Gamma distributions. Moreover, we find that approximate icosahedral clusters are found in random packings, while the optimal local structures for more aspherical particles are not formed.

  4. Combinatorics of locally optimal RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Fusy, Eric; Clote, Peter

    2014-01-01

    It is a classical result of Stein and Waterman that the asymptotic number of RNA secondary structures is 1.104366∙n-3/2∙2.618034n. Motivated by the kinetics of RNA secondary structure formation, we are interested in determining the asymptotic number of secondary structures that are locally optimal, with respect to a particular energy model. In the Nussinov energy model, where each base pair contributes -1 towards the energy of the structure, locally optimal structures are exactly the saturated structures, for which we have previously shown that asymptotically, there are 1.07427∙n-3/2∙2.35467n many saturated structures for a sequence of length n. In this paper, we consider the base stacking energy model, a mild variant of the Nussinov model, where each stacked base pair contributes -1 toward the energy of the structure. Locally optimal structures with respect to the base stacking energy model are exactly those secondary structures, whose stems cannot be extended. Such structures were first considered by Evers and Giegerich, who described a dynamic programming algorithm to enumerate all locally optimal structures. In this paper, we apply methods from enumerative combinatorics to compute the asymptotic number of such structures. Additionally, we consider analogous combinatorial problems for secondary structures with annotated single-stranded, stacking nucleotides (dangles).

  5. A Foreign Model of Teacher Education and Its Local Appropriation: The English Teachers' Centres in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groves, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the implementation of the English model of teachers' centres in the context of 1980s Spain. Originally it was a top-down plan initiated by a national government. However, from the very beginning its fate was dependent on a bottom-up educational project carried out by pedagogical social movements. The first part of the article…

  6. Teaching Reading and Writing in Local Language Using the Child-Centred Pedagogy in Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akello, Dora Lucy; Timmerman, Greetje; Namusisi, Speranza

    2016-01-01

    Uganda introduced the use of mother tongue as medium of instruction in primary schools in 2007. This was meant to promote interaction and participation in the learning process and improve children's proficiency in reading and writing. Drawing elements of interaction and participation from the socio-cultural theory, the child-centred pedagogy was…

  7. Teaching Reading and Writing in Local Language Using the Child-Centred Pedagogy in Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akello, Dora Lucy; Timmerman, Greetje; Namusisi, Speranza

    2016-01-01

    Uganda introduced the use of mother tongue as medium of instruction in primary schools in 2007. This was meant to promote interaction and participation in the learning process and improve children's proficiency in reading and writing. Drawing elements of interaction and participation from the socio-cultural theory, the child-centred pedagogy was…

  8. A Foreign Model of Teacher Education and Its Local Appropriation: The English Teachers' Centres in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groves, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the implementation of the English model of teachers' centres in the context of 1980s Spain. Originally it was a top-down plan initiated by a national government. However, from the very beginning its fate was dependent on a bottom-up educational project carried out by pedagogical social movements. The first part of the article…

  9. Local statistical interpretation for water structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiang

    2013-05-01

    In this Letter, Raman spectroscopy is employed to study supercooled water down to a temperature of 248 K at ambient pressure. Based on our interpretation of the Raman OH stretching band, decreasing temperature mainly leads to a structural transition from the single donor-single acceptor (DA) to the double donor-double acceptor (DDAA) hydrogen bonding motif. Additionally, a local statistical interpretation of the water structure is proposed, which reveals that a water molecule interacts with molecules in the first shell through various local hydrogen-bonded networks. From this, a local structure order parameter is proposed to explain the short-range order and long-range disorder.

  10. OPTICAL RECORDING AND COMMUNICATION: Optical recording of transient spatial structures in saturable three-level centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucherenko, M. G.; Rusinov, A. P.

    2004-08-01

    Optical recording and decay of transient spatial structures is analysed in a system with a nonlinear response caused by incoherent saturation of three-level centres. The main attention is devoted to the thermal mechanism of phase recording in media with the temperature-independent heat conductivity. The relaxation of an inhomogeneous temperature field and the diffraction of a probe beam from the transient structure are studied.

  11. Deterministic weak localization in periodic structures.

    PubMed

    Tian, C; Larkin, A

    2005-12-09

    In some perfect periodic structures classical motion exhibits deterministic diffusion. For such systems we present the weak localization theory. As a manifestation for the velocity autocorrelation function a universal power law decay is predicted to appear at four Ehrenfest times. This deterministic weak localization is robust against weak quenched disorders, which may be confirmed by coherent backscattering measurements of periodic photonic crystals.

  12. Introduction: Dissipative localized structures in extended systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tlidi, Mustapha; Taki, Majid; Kolokolnikov, Theodore

    2007-09-01

    Localized structures belong to the class of dissipative structures found far from equilibrium. Contributions from the most representative groups working on a various fields of natural science such as biology, chemistry, plant ecology, mathematics, optics, and laser physics are presented. The aim of this issue is to gather specialists from these fields towards a cross-fertilization among these active areas of research and thereby to present an overview of the state of art in the formation and the characterization of dissipative localized structures. Nonlinear optics and laser physics have an important part in this issue because of potential applications in information technology. In particular, localized structures could be used as "bits" for parallel information storage and processing.

  13. Surgical education at Weill Bugando Medical Centre: supplementing surgical training and investing in local health care providers.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Katrina B; Giiti, Geofrey; Kotecha, Vihar; Chandika, Alphonce; Pryor, Kane O; Härtl, Roger; Gilyoma, Japhet

    2013-06-01

    Global surgery initiatives increasingly are focused on strengthening education and local health care systems to build surgical capacity. The goal of this education project was to support local health care providers in augmenting the surgical curriculum at a new medical school, thus promoting long-term local goals and involvement. Working with local surgeons, residents, and medical and assistant medical officer students, we identified the most common surgical conditions presenting to Weill Bugando Medical Centre in Mwanza, Tanzania, and the areas of greatest need in surgical education. We developed an 8-week teaching schedule for undergraduate students and an electronic database of clinical surgery topics. In addition, we started teaching basic surgical skills in the operating theatre, bridging to an official and recurring workshop through a supporting international surgery organization. The medical and assistant medical officer students reported increased satisfaction with their clinical surgery rotations and mastery of key educational subjects. The initiation of an Essential Surgical Skills workshop through the Canadian Network for International Surgery showed students had improved comfort with basic surgical techniques. Short-term surgical missions may appear to fill a void in the shortage of health care in the developing world. However, we conclude that global health resources are more appropriately used through projects giving ownership to local providers and promoting education as a foundation of development. This results in better coordination among local and visiting providers and greater impact on education and long-term growth of health care capacity.

  14. Polarization properties of localized structures in VCSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averlant, Etienne; Tlidi, Mustapha; Ackemann, Thorsten; Thienpont, Hugo; Panajotov, Krassimir

    2016-04-01

    Broad area Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers (VCSELs) have peculiar polarization properties which are a field of study by itself.1-3 These properties have already been used for localized structure generation, in a simple configuration, where only one polarization component was used.4 Here, we present new experimental and theoretical results on the complex polarization behavior of localized structures generated in an optically-injected broad area VCSEL. A linear stability analysis of the spin-flip VCSEL model is performed for the case of broad area devices, in a restrained and experimentally relevant parameter set. Numerical simulations are performed, in one and two dimensions. They reveal existence of vector localized structures. These structures have a complex polarization state, which is not simply a linear polarization following the one of the optical injection. Experimental results confirm theoretical predictions. Applications of this work can lead to the encoding of small color images in the polarization state of an ensemble of localized structures at the surface of a broad area VCSEL.

  15. Detecting structure of haplotypes and local ancestry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We present a two-layer hidden Markov model to detect the structure of haplotypes for unrelated individuals. This allows us to model two scales of linkage disequilibrium (one within a group of haplotypes and one between groups), thereby taking advantage of rich haplotype information to infer local an...

  16. Investigating the CT localizer radiograph: acquisition parameters, patient centring and their combined influence on radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Lambert, J W; Kumar, S; Chen, J S; Wang, Z J; Gould, R G; Yeh, B M

    2015-04-01

    To systematically investigate the effect of CT localizer radiograph acquisition on the tube current modulation and thus radiation dose of the subsequent diagnostic scan. Localizer radiographs of an abdominal section CT phantom were taken, and the resulting volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) for the diagnostic scan was recorded. Variables included tube potential, the phantom's alignment within the CT scanner gantry in both the vertical and horizontal directions and the X-ray source angle at which the localizer was acquired. Diagnostic scan CTDIvol decreased with increasing tube potential. Vertical (table height) movement was found to affect radiation dose more than horizontal movement, with ±50 mm table movement resulting in a standard deviation in the diagnostic scan CTDIvol of 4.4 mGy, compared with 2.5 mGy with ±50 mm horizontal movement. Correspondingly, localizer angles of 90° or 270° (3 o'clock and 9 o'clock X-ray source positions) were less sensitive overall to alignment errors, with a standard deviation of 2.5 mGy, compared with a 0° or 180° angle, which had a standard deviation of 3.8 mGy. To achieve a consistently optimized radiation dose, the localizer protocol should be paired with the diagnostic acquisition protocol. A final acquisition angle of 90° should be used when possible to minimize dose variation resulting from alignment errors. Localizer parameters that affect radiation output were identified for this scanner system. The importance of tube potential and acquisition angle was highlighted.

  17. Structures of two superoxide dismutases from Bacillus anthracis reveal a novel active centre

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher, Ian W.; Kalliomaa, Anne K.; Levdikov, Vladimir M.; Blagova, Elena V.; Fogg, Mark J.; Brannigan, James A. Wilson, Keith S.; Wilkinson, Anthony J.

    2005-07-01

    The crystal structures of two manganese superoxide dismutases from B. anthracis were solved by X-ray crystallography using molecular replacement. The BA4499 and BA5696 genes of Bacillus anthracis encode proteins homologous to manganese superoxide dismutase, suggesting that this organism has an expanded repertoire of antioxidant proteins. Differences in metal specificity and quaternary structure between the dismutases of prokaryotes and higher eukaryotes may be exploited in the development of therapeutic antibacterial compounds. Here, the crystal structure of two Mn superoxide dismutases from B. anthracis solved to high resolution are reported. Comparison of their structures reveals that a highly conserved residue near the active centre is substituted in one of the proteins and that this is a characteristic feature of superoxide dismutases from the B. cereus/B. anthracis/B. thuringiensis group of organisms.

  18. An observationally centred method to quantify local climate change as a distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stainforth, David; Chapman, Sandra; Watkins, Nicholas

    2013-04-01

    For planning and adaptation, guidance on trends in local climate is needed at the specific thresholds relevant to particular impact or policy endeavours. This requires quantifying trends at specific quantiles in distributions of variables such as daily temperature or precipitation. These non-normal distributions vary both geographically and in time. The trends in the relevant quantiles may not simply follow the trend in the distribution mean. We present a method[1] for analysing local climatic timeseries data to assess which quantiles of the local climatic distribution show the greatest and most robust trends. We demonstrate this approach using E-OBS gridded data[2] timeseries of local daily temperature from specific locations across Europe over the last 60 years. Our method extracts the changing cumulative distribution function over time and uses a simple mathematical deconstruction of how the difference between two observations from two different time periods can be assigned to the combination of natural statistical variability and/or the consequences of secular climate change. This deconstruction facilitates an assessment of the sensitivity of different quantiles of the distributions to changing climate. Geographical location and temperature are treated as independent variables, we thus obtain as outputs how the trend or sensitivity varies with temperature (or occurrence likelihood), and with geographical location. These sensitivities are found to be geographically varying across Europe; as one would expect given the different influences on local climate between, say, Western Scotland and central Italy. We find as an output many regionally consistent patterns of response of potential value in adaptation planning. We discuss methods to quantify the robustness of these observed sensitivities and their statistical likelihood. This also quantifies the level of detail needed from climate models if they are to be used as tools to assess climate change impact. [1] S C

  19. An Observationally-Centred Method to Quantify the Changing Shape of Local Temperature Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, S. C.; Stainforth, D. A.; Watkins, N. W.

    2014-12-01

    For climate sensitive decisions and adaptation planning, guidance on how local climate is changing is needed at the specific thresholds relevant to particular impacts or policy endeavours. This requires the quantification of how the distributions of variables, such as daily temperature, are changing at specific quantiles. These temperature distributions are non-normal and vary both geographically and in time. We present a method[1,2] for analysing local climatic time series data to assess which quantiles of the local climatic distribution show the greatest and most robust changes. We have demonstrated this approach using the E-OBS gridded dataset[3] which consists of time series of local daily temperature across Europe over the last 60 years. Our method extracts the changing cumulative distribution function over time and uses a simple mathematical deconstruction of how the difference between two observations from two different time periods can be assigned to the combination of natural statistical variability and/or the consequences of secular climate change. The change in temperature can be tracked at a temperature threshold, at a likelihood, or at a given return time, independently for each geographical location. Geographical correlations are thus an output of our method and reflect both climatic properties (local and synoptic), and spatial correlations inherent in the observation methodology. We find as an output many regionally consistent patterns of response of potential value in adaptation planning. For instance, in a band from Northern France to Denmark the hottest days in the summer temperature distribution have seen changes of at least 2°C over a 43 year period; over four times the global mean change over the same period. We discuss methods to quantify the robustness of these observed sensitivities and their statistical likelihood. This approach also quantifies the level of detail at which one might wish to see agreement between climate models and

  20. Quantum structure based infrared detector research and development within Acreo’s centre of excellence IMAGIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, J. Y.; Höglund, L.; Noharet, B.; Wang, Q.; Ericsson, P.; Wissmar, S.; Asplund, C.; Malm, H.; Martijn, H.; Hammar, M.; Gustafsson, O.; Hellström, S.; Radamson, H.; Holtz, P. O.

    2010-07-01

    Acreo has a long tradition of working with quantum structure based infrared (IR) detectors and arrays. This includes QWIP (quantum well infrared photodetector), QDIP (quantum dot infrared photodetector), and InAs/GaInSb based photon detectors of different structure and composition. It also covers R&D on uncooled microbolometers. The integrated thermistor material of such detectors is advantageously based on quantum structures that are optimised for high temperature coefficient and low noise. Especially the SiGe material system is preferred due to the compatibility with silicon technology. The R&D work on IR detectors is a prominent part of Acreo's centre of excellence "IMAGIC" on imaging detectors and systems for non-visible wavelengths. IMAGIC is a collaboration between Acreo, several industry partners and universities like the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) and Linköping University.

  1. Drifting localized structures in doubly diffusive convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobloch, Edgar; Lo Jacono, David; Bergeon, Alain

    2016-11-01

    We use numerical continuation to compute a multiplicity of spatially localized states in doubly diffusive convection in a vertical slot driven by imposed horizontal temperature and concentration differences. The calculations focus on the so-called opposing case, in which the resulting gradients are in balance. No-slip boundary conditions are used at the sides and periodic boundary conditions with large spatial period are used in the vertical direction. This system exhibits homoclinic snaking of stationary spatially localized structures with point symmetry. In this talk we demonstrate the existence, near threshold, of drifting pulses of spatially localized convection that appear when mixed concentration boundary conditions are used, and use homotopic continuation to identify similar states in the case of fixed concentration boundary conditions. We show that these states persist to large values of the Grasshof number and provide a detailed study of their properties.

  2. Automatic Tool for Local Assembly Structures

    SciTech Connect

    2016-10-11

    Whole community shotgun sequencing of total DNA (i.e. metagenomics) and total RNA (i.e. metatranscriptomics) has provided a wealth of information in the microbial community structure, predicted functions, metabolic networks, and is even able to reconstruct complete genomes directly. Here we present ATLAS (Automatic Tool for Local Assembly Structures) a comprehensive pipeline for assembly, annotation, genomic binning of metagenomic and metatranscriptomic data with an integrated framework for Multi-Omics. This will provide an open source tool for the Multi-Omic community at large.

  3. Event-horizon-scale structure in the supermassive black hole candidate at the Galactic Centre.

    PubMed

    Doeleman, Sheperd S; Weintroub, Jonathan; Rogers, Alan E E; Plambeck, Richard; Freund, Robert; Tilanus, Remo P J; Friberg, Per; Ziurys, Lucy M; Moran, James M; Corey, Brian; Young, Ken H; Smythe, Daniel L; Titus, Michael; Marrone, Daniel P; Cappallo, Roger J; Bock, Douglas C-J; Bower, Geoffrey C; Chamberlin, Richard; Davis, Gary R; Krichbaum, Thomas P; Lamb, James; Maness, Holly; Niell, Arthur E; Roy, Alan; Strittmatter, Peter; Werthimer, Daniel; Whitney, Alan R; Woody, David

    2008-09-04

    The cores of most galaxies are thought to harbour supermassive black holes, which power galactic nuclei by converting the gravitational energy of accreting matter into radiation. Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), the compact source of radio, infrared and X-ray emission at the centre of the Milky Way, is the closest example of this phenomenon, with an estimated black hole mass that is 4,000,000 times that of the Sun. A long-standing astronomical goal is to resolve structures in the innermost accretion flow surrounding Sgr A*, where strong gravitational fields will distort the appearance of radiation emitted near the black hole. Radio observations at wavelengths of 3.5 mm and 7 mm have detected intrinsic structure in Sgr A*, but the spatial resolution of observations at these wavelengths is limited by interstellar scattering. Here we report observations at a wavelength of 1.3 mm that set a size of 37(+16)(-10) microarcseconds on the intrinsic diameter of Sgr A*. This is less than the expected apparent size of the event horizon of the presumed black hole, suggesting that the bulk of Sgr A* emission may not be centred on the black hole, but arises in the surrounding accretion flow.

  4. On the influence of the local vibration on spectral and laser characteristics of F{sub 2}{sup -} colour centres in LiF crystals at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Papashvili, A G; Smetanin, S N; Doroshenko, M E

    2015-12-31

    A study of spectral and laser properties of the LiF : F{sub 2}{sup -} crystal at low temperatures has revealed an electronic – vibrational interaction of electrons of the F{sub 2}{sup -} centre with the local vibration of the centre, which occurs against the background of coupling between electrons of F{sub 2}{sup -} centres and lattice phonons. The interaction of electrons with the local vibration manifests itself in spectra in the form of narrow lines superimposed on wide electron – phonon lines that are due to the electron – lattice interaction. An anomalous behaviour of spectral LiF : F{sub 2}{sup -} laser lines is also found at liquid nitrogen temperature upon selective excitation; this behaviour is explained by the difference in the probabilities of the lattice and local interactions. (active media)

  5. Frequency based localization of structural discrepancies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, G. D.; Milani, J.

    1988-01-01

    The intent of modal analysis is to develop a reliable model of a structure by working with the analytical and experimental modal properties of frequency, damping and mode shape. In addition to identifying these modal properties, it would be desirable to determine spatially which parts of the structure are modelled poorly or well. It is shown how the pattern of discrepancies in the analytical and experimental test values for the pole and the driving point zero frequencies of a structure can be linked to discrepancies in the mass or stiffness of the structural elements. The success of the procedure depends on the numerical conditioning of a modal reference matrix. Strategies to insure adequate numerical conditioning require a formulation which avoids geometric and energy storage symmetries of the structure, and ignores structural elements which contribute negligibly small potential or kinetic energy to the excited modes. Physical insight into the numerical conditioning problem is provided by a numerical example and by localization of a mass discrepancy in a real structure based on lab tests.

  6. Anharmonic pair potential study in face-centred-cubic structure metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirog, I. V.; Nedoseikina, T. I.; Zarubin, I. A.; Shuvaev, A. T.

    2002-03-01

    Temperature dependencies of Ni, Cu and Mo metals EXAFS spectra were studied in order to determine the anharmonic pair potential. The potential parameters for metals with cubic structure - Ni, Cu, Mo as well as for Pb (Stern E A et al 1991 Phys. Rev. B 43 8850), Au, Ag (Newville M and Stern E A http://krazy.phys.washington.edu/paper/ag-au.html) - obtained earlier, were analysed to find correlations with other physical characteristics. It was found that a, b potential parameter values correlate with cohesive energy and interatomic distance for face-centred-cubic structure metals. Obtained potential parameter values were used to determine thermodynamics parameters, including the linear coefficient of thermal expansion, the Debye temperature, the bulk modulus and the Grunesien parameter.

  7. Survival and failure outcomes in locally advanced esthesioneuroblastoma: a single centre experience of 15 patients.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ritesh; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Khosla, Divya; Bharti, Shreekant; Das, Ashim; Kumar, Narendra; Kapoor, Rakesh; Sharma, Suresh Chander

    2013-05-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma (ENB) constitutes 3 % of all malignant intranasal tumors. As the tumor is very rare, the number of patients of ENB treated in individual departments is small. We present our institute's experience in combined modality management of 15 successive patients of ENB treated from 2006 to 2010. Clinical characteristics and treatment modality in form of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy were noted. Kadish stage C was the most common stage (12 patients) followed by stage B (3 patients). Fourteen patients underwent primary surgery, of which nine had total excision and five had subtotal excision. One patient was treated with combination of chemotherapy (CT) and radiotherapy (RT). Median RT dose delivered was 54 Gy. Twelve patients received CT with cisplatin and etoposide. Overall, eight patients had complete response, five had partial response, while one had static disease and progressive disease each. Two patients had distant metastases. Four-year loco-regional control (LRC) was 25 % and 4-year overall survival (OS) was 45 %. Most common presentation in our series was locally advanced tumors. Most of these patients require adjuvant RT, which helps in significant LRC. Systemic CT benefits in inoperable, advanced and high risk tumors. Risk-adapted and multimodality approach is the need of hour to achieve good control rates while minimizing treatment related toxicity.

  8. The crystal structure of an oxygen-tolerant hydrogenase uncovers a novel iron-sulphur centre.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Johannes; Scheerer, Patrick; Frielingsdorf, Stefan; Kroschinsky, Sebastian; Friedrich, Bärbel; Lenz, Oliver; Spahn, Christian M T

    2011-10-16

    Hydrogenases are abundant enzymes that catalyse the reversible interconversion of H(2) into protons and electrons at high rates. Those hydrogenases maintaining their activity in the presence of O(2) are considered to be central to H(2)-based technologies, such as enzymatic fuel cells and for light-driven H(2) production. Despite comprehensive genetic, biochemical, electrochemical and spectroscopic investigations, the molecular background allowing a structural interpretation of how the catalytic centre is protected from irreversible inactivation by O(2) has remained unclear. Here we present the crystal structure of an O(2)-tolerant [NiFe]-hydrogenase from the aerobic H(2) oxidizer Ralstonia eutropha H16 at 1.5 Å resolution. The heterodimeric enzyme consists of a large subunit harbouring the catalytic centre in the H(2)-reduced state and a small subunit containing an electron relay consisting of three different iron-sulphur clusters. The cluster proximal to the active site displays an unprecedented [4Fe-3S] structure and is coordinated by six cysteines. According to the current model, this cofactor operates as an electronic switch depending on the nature of the gas molecule approaching the active site. It serves as an electron acceptor in the course of H(2) oxidation and as an electron-delivering device upon O(2) attack at the active site. This dual function is supported by the capability of the novel iron-sulphur cluster to adopt three redox states at physiological redox potentials. The second structural feature is a network of extended water cavities that may act as a channel facilitating the removal of water produced at the [NiFe] active site. These discoveries will have an impact on the design of biological and chemical H(2)-converting catalysts that are capable of cycling H(2) in air.

  9. The Structure of the Local Hot Bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W.; Chiao, M.; Collier, M. R.; Cravens, T.; Galeazzi, M.; Koutroumpa, D.; Kuntz, K. D.; Lallement, R.; Lepri, S. T.; McCammon, Dan; hide

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse X-rays from the Local Galaxy (DXL) is a sounding rocket mission designed to quantify and characterize the contribution of Solar Wind Charge eXchange (SWCX) to the Diffuse X-ray Background and study the properties of the Local Hot Bubble (LHB). Based on the results from the DXL mission, we quantified and removed the contribution of SWCX to the diffuse X-ray background measured by the ROSAT All Sky Survey. The cleaned maps were used to investigate the physical properties of the LHB. Assuming thermal ionization equilibrium, we measured a highly uniform temperature distributed around kT = 0.097 keV +/- 0.013 keV (FWHM) +/- 0.006 keV(systematic). We also generated a thermal emission measure map and used it to characterize the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the LHB, which we found to be in good agreement with the structure of the local cavity measured from dust and gas.

  10. The Structure of the Local Hot Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Chiao, M.; Collier, M. R.; Cravens, T.; Galeazzi, M.; Koutroumpa, D.; Kuntz, K. D.; Lallement, R.; Lepri, S. T.; McCammon, D.; Morgan, K.; Porter, F. S.; Snowden, S. L.; Thomas, N. E.; Uprety, Y.; Ursino, E.; Walsh, B. M.

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse X-rays from the Local Galaxy (DXL) is a sounding rocket mission designed to quantify and characterize the contribution of Solar Wind Charge eXchange (SWCX) to the Diffuse X-ray Background and study the properties of the Local Hot Bubble (LHB). Based on the results from the DXL mission, we quantified and removed the contribution of SWCX to the diffuse X-ray background measured by the ROSAT All Sky Survey. The “cleaned” maps were used to investigate the physical properties of the LHB. Assuming thermal ionization equilibrium, we measured a highly uniform temperature distributed around kT = 0.097 keV ± 0.013 keV (FWHM) ± 0.006 keV (systematic). We also generated a thermal emission measure map and used it to characterize the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the LHB, which we found to be in good agreement with the structure of the local cavity measured from dust and gas.

  11. Indoor footstep localization from structural dynamics instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poston, Jeffrey D.; Buehrer, R. Michael; Tarazaga, Pablo A.

    2017-05-01

    Measurements from accelerometers originally deployed to measure a building's structural dynamics can serve a new role: locating individuals moving within a building. Specifically, this paper proposes measurements of footstep-generated vibrations as a novel source of information for localization. The complexity of wave propagation in a building (e.g., dispersion and reflection) limits the utility of existing algorithms designed to locate, for example, the source of sound in a room or radio waves in free space. This paper develops enhancements for arrival time determination and time difference of arrival localization in order to address the complexities posed by wave propagation within a building's structure. Experiments with actual measurements from an instrumented public building demonstrate the potential of locating footsteps to sub-meter accuracy. Furthermore, this paper explains how to forecast performance in other buildings with different sensor configurations. This localization capability holds the potential to assist public safety agencies in building evacuation and incidence response, to facilitate occupancy-based optimization of heating or cooling and to inform facility security.

  12. Localizing Target Structures in Ultrasound Video

    PubMed Central

    Kwitt, R.; Vasconcelos, N.; Razzaque, S.; Aylward, S.

    2013-01-01

    The problem of localizing specific anatomic structures using ultrasound (US) video is considered. This involves automatically determining when an US probe is acquiring images of a previously defined object of interest, during the course of an US examination. Localization using US is motivated by the increased availability of portable, low-cost US probes, which inspire applications where inexperienced personnel and even first-time users acquire US data that is then sent to experts for further assessment. This process is of particular interest for routine examinations in underserved populations as well as for patient triage after natural disasters and large-scale accidents, where experts may be in short supply. The proposed localization approach is motivated by research in the area of dynamic texture analysis and leverages several recent advances in the field of activity recognition. For evaluation, we introduce an annotated and publicly available database of US video, acquired on three phantoms. Several experiments reveal the challenges of applying video analysis approaches to US images and demonstrate that good localization performance is possible with the proposed solution. PMID:23746488

  13. Treatment of dysplastic Barrett’s Oesophagus in lower volume centres after structured training

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Georgina; Faulkner, Jack; Ley-Greaves, Robert; Vlavianos, Panagiotis; Goldin, Rob; Hoare, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether dysplastic Barrett’s Oesophagus can be safely and effectively treated endoscopically in low volume centres after structured training. METHODS: After attending a structured training program in Amsterdam on the endoscopic treatment of dysplastic Barrett’s Oesophagus, treatment of these patients was initiated at St Marys Hospital. This is a retrospective case series conducted at a United Kingdom teaching Hospital, of patients referred for endoscopic treatment of Barrett’s oesophagus with high grade dysplasia or early cancer, who were diagnosed between January 2008 and February 2012. Data was collected on treatment provided (radiofrequency ablation and endoscopic resection), and success of treatment both at the end of treatment and at follow up. Rates of immediate and long term complications were assessed. RESULTS: Thirty-two patients were referred to St Marys with high grade dysplasia or intramucosal cancer within a segment of Barrett’s Oesophagus. Twenty-seven met the study inclusion criteria, 16 of these had a visible nodule at initial endoscopy. Treatment was given over a median of 5 mo, and patients received a median of 3 treatment sessions over this time. At the end of treatment dysplasia was successfully eradicated in 96% and intestinal metaplasia in 88%, on per protocol analysis. Patients were followed up for a median of 18 mo. At which time complete eradication of dysplasia was maintained in 86%. Complications were rare: 2 patients suffered from post-procedural bleeding, 4 cases were complicated by oesophageal stenosis. Recurrence of cancer was seen in 1 case. CONCLUSION: With structured training good outcomes can be achieved in low volume centres treating dysplastic Barrett’s Oesophagus. PMID:25610536

  14. Single centre outcomes from definitive chemo-radiotherapy and single modality radiotherapy for locally advanced oesophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Joanna; McDonald, Alexander; McIntosh, David; MacLaren, Vivienne; Hennessy, Aisling; Grose, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Background Definitive chemo-radiotherapy (dCRT) has been advocated as an alternative to surgical resection for the treatment of locally advanced oesophageal cancer (OC). We have retrospectively reviewed 4 years’ experience of patients (pts) who underwent contemporary staging and were treated with concurrent chemo-radiotherapy (dCRT) or single modality radical radiotherapy (RT) with curative intent. Methods Retrospective analysis permitted identification of consecutive patients who underwent contemporary staging prior to non-surgical treatment for locally advanced oesophageal carcinoma. The primary outcomes were overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS), adjusted for baseline differences in age, tumour staging and histological cell type. All patients were treated with either dCRT or single modality RT within a single centre between 2009 and 2012. Results We identified 235 patients in total [median age 69.8 years, male =130 pts, female =105 pts, adenocarcinoma (ACA) =85 pts, squamous =150 pts]. A total of 190 pts received dCRT and 45 patients were treated with RT. All patients were staged with CT of chest, abdomen and pelvis, 226 patients underwent endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), and 183 patients had PET-CT. Patients treated with dCRT demonstrated longer OS (27 vs. 25 months respectively, P=0.02) and DFS (31 vs. 16 months respectively, P=0.01) compared to those treated with RT. More advanced tumour stage (stage 3 vs. stage 1/2) at presentation conferred poorer OS (32 vs. 38.2 months, P=0.02) and DFS (11 vs. 28 months, P=0.013). We demonstrated an acceptable toxicity profile with only 77 patients (32.8%) suffering grade 3 toxicity and 9 patients (4.2%) experiencing grade 4 toxicity by CTC criteria. The NG/PEG feeding rates were 4% across all treated patients. Conclusions This retrospective analysis is in keeping with current treatment paradigms emphasising the importance and safety of concurrent CRT in maximising curative potential for patients undergoing

  15. A structured methodology to calculate traffic emissions inventories for city centres.

    PubMed

    Ariztegui, Javier; Casanova, Jesus; Valdes, Manuel

    2004-12-01

    This study presents a methodology to estimate traffic emissions inventories for the case of city centres. It deals with the problem in a structured manner, identifying the sources and the formats of the input data as well as labelling the steps needed to perform the calculation. It describes a method to calculate the total mileage driven around the city using the concept of mileage per zone. Although the methodology employs a classical approach through the use of emission factors developed for mean speeds, it also discusses the possibility of applying these factors to instantaneous speeds. Finally, the study focuses on the influence of two critical factors: time resolution and the estimate of the total mileage. In both cases, the results indicate that the assumptions made are adequate and yield accurate results. The methodology has been applied to the city of Madrid as an example.

  16. A lattice-gas model for alkali-metal fullerides: face-centred-cubic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udvardi, László; Szabó, György

    1996-12-01

    A lattice-gas model is suggested for describing the ordering phenomena in alkali-metal fullerides of face-centred-cubic structure assuming that the electric charge of alkali ions residing in either octahedral or tetrahedral sites is completely screened by the first-neighbour 0953-8984/8/50/022/img5 molecules. This approximation allows us to derive an effective ion - ion interaction. The van der Waals interaction between the ion and 0953-8984/8/50/022/img5 molecule is characterized by introducing an additional site energy at the tetrahedral sites. This model is investigated by using a three-sublattice mean-field approximation and a simple cluster-variation method. The analysis shows a large variety of phase diagrams as the site energy parameter is changed.

  17. A lattice-gas model for alkali-metal fullerides: body-centred-cubic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, György; Udvardi, László

    1998-05-01

    A Coulomb lattice-gas model with a host-lattice screening mechanism is adapted to describe the ordering phenomena in alkali-metal fullerides of body-centred-cubic structure. It is assumed that the electric charge of an alkali ion residing at a tetrahedral interstitial site is completely screened by its first-neighbour 0953-8984/10/19/009/img5 molecules. The electronic energy of the 0953-8984/10/19/009/img6 ion is also taken into consideration as a charged spherical shell. By means of these assumptions an effective (short-range) pair interaction between two alkali ions is obtained. The resultant lattice-gas model is analysed by using two- and six-sublattice mean-field approximations. The thermodynamic properties are summarized in phase diagrams for different shell radii.

  18. Structure and binding efficiency relations of QB site inhibitors of photosynthetic reaction centres.

    PubMed

    Husu, Ivan; Magyar, Melinda; Szabó, Tibor; Fiser, Béla; Gómez-Bengoa, Enrique; Nagy, László

    2015-04-01

    Many herbicides employed in agriculture and also some antibiotics bind to a specific site of the reaction centre protein (RC) blocking the photosynthetic electron transport. Crystal structures showed that all these compounds bind at the secondary ubiquinone (QB) site albeit to slightly different places. Different herbicide molecules have different binding affinities (evaluated as inhibition constants, KI, and binding enthalpy values, ΔHbind). The action of inhibitors depends on the following parameters: (i) herbicide molecular structure; (ii) interactions between herbicide and quinone binding site; (iii) protein environment. In our investigations KI and ΔHbind were determined for several inhibitors. Bound herbicide structures were optimized and their intramolecular charge distributions were calculated. Experimental and calculated data were compared to those available from databank crystal structures. We can state that the herbicide inhibition efficiency depends on steric and electronic, i.e. geometry of binding with the protein and molecular charge distribution, respectively. Apolar bulky groups on N-7 atom of the inhibitor molecule (like t-buthyl in terbutryn) are preferable for establishing stronger interactions with QB site, while such substituents are not recommended on N-8. The N-4,7,8 nitrogen atoms maintain a larger electron density so that more effective H-bonds are formed between the inhibitor and the surrounding amino acids of the protein.

  19. Vortical structures generated by a localized forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korabel, Vasily N.

    Vortex structures (monopoles, dipoles, quadrupoles) as well as more complex structures (vortex streets) are fundamental elements of geophysical turbulence. Because they can effectively transport momentum, heat, salt and biochemical products, they play an essential role in ocean dynamics. Organized vortex structures are a well known feature of quasi-two-dimensional flows where motion in one direction is suppressed due to one of the following physical mechanisms: background rotation of the system, density stratification or geometrical restrictions such as for the flows in thin layers or soap films. Vortex dipoles are formed in a viscous fluid when a force is applied locally to some volume of fluid. If the force acts impulsively, a translating vortex dipole is generated. If the force starts at t = 0 and then acts continuously a starting jet with a dipole at its front is generated. Solutions for unsteady viscous flows generated by the action of continuous or impulsive localized forces are obtained in Oseen approximation. The solutions are compared with direct numerical simulations of vortex dipoles as well as with laboratory experiments. The comparison shows good quantitative agreement in both cases. A physical problem where the localized force acting continuously on fluid is placed in a uniform stream is equivalent to a problem of a fixed body in a uniform stream, while the couple of forces acting in opposite direction are equivalent to the problem of self-propelled body moving at constant velocity through a fluid. The solutions for the two-dimensional far-field wake are obtained in both cases. At a certain Reynolds number, wakes become unstable and form vortex streets. New series of high-resolution 2D numerical simulations is performed to study the characteristics of the wakes including the shedding frequency for a wide range of control parameters such as translational velocity, magnitude and spatial extent of a localized force. The results of numerical experiments

  20. Science Learning Centres Roundup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Science, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The national network of Science Learning Centres aims to raise the quality of science teaching from Key Stage 1 through post-16 (ages 5-19). Short courses are provided locally through the regional Science Learning Centres and longer, more intensive programmes are available at the National Science Learning Centre in York. There are a growing number…

  1. A survey of German centres performing invasive electrophysiology: structure, procedures, and training positions.

    PubMed

    Neuberger, Hans-Ruprecht; Tilz, Roland Richard; Bonnemeier, Hendrik; Deneke, Thomas; Estner, Heidi L; Kriatselis, Charalampos; Kuniss, Malte; Luik, Armin; Sommer, Philipp; Steven, Daniel; von Bary, Christian; Voss, Frederik; Eckardt, Lars

    2013-12-01

    To provide a nationwide survey (and reference for the future) on cardiac electrophysiologists, types and numbers of invasive electrophysiological procedures, and training opportunities in 2010. German cardiology centres performing invasive electrophysiology were identified from quality reports and contacted to fill a questionnaire. A majority of 122 centres (65%) responded. Electrophysiology (ablation procedures and device therapy) was mainly part of a cardiology department (82%), and only in 9% independent (own budget). In only 58% of the centres, (at least) two physicians were present during catheter ablations. Although in 2010, women represented 59.4% of physicians <35 years old, only 26% of physicians in electrophysiology training were female. In total, 33 420 catheter ablations were performed with a median number of 180 per centre. Atrial fibrillation (AF) was the most common arrhythmia invasively treated (35%). At least 50 AF ablations were performed in 53% of the centres. Of the centres performing AF ablations, consecutive left atrial arrhythmias were treated by catheter ablation only in 75%, and only 44% had in-house surgical backup. Only one-fourth of the 122 centres fulfilled all requirements for training centre accreditation according to the European Heart Rhythm Association and the German Cardiac Society. The results indicate a high number of electrophysiology centres and procedures in Germany. Atrial fibrillation was the most common arrhythmia invasively treated. An increasing demand for catheter ablation is likely, but training opportunities are limited. Women are clearly underrepresented. A co-operation of higher and lower volume electrophysiology centres may be necessary for training purposes.

  2. Gakkel Ridge at 85°E/85°N: Seismicity and Structure of an Ultraslow Spreading Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korger, Edith; Schlindwein, Vera

    2014-05-01

    Ultraslow spreading ridges are divergent plate boundaries, which spread apart with less than 20 mm/yr. Their appearance is very rugged, with steep rift flanks, numerous normal faults and discontinuous volcanic activity at discrete volcanic centres - drastically different from ridges which spread faster. Due to the inaccessible area where these ridges are found, much less is know about lithospheric structure than at faster spreading ridges. Gakkel Ridge spans between Greenland and Siberia, crossing through the Arctic Ocean. There, a perennial ice cover inhibits seismic surveys. At 85°E/85°N where the spreading rate is only about 10.2 mm/yr, a volcanic spreading centre is located. It was spectacularly active in 1999, spawning over 250 teleseismically registered earthquakes with body wave magnitudes up to 5.2 and lasting 9 months. At this site, volcanic cones and fresh lava were captured by seafloor imagery in 2007. Making use of the ice cover, three arrays of four seismometers each were deployed in 2007 on ice floes, drifting 16 days over the area and recording more than 300 local events. Due to the drift of the ice floes, the location of the arrays changed with time, resulting in sufficient ray coverage suitable for a local earthquake tomography. We present here the results of this tomography, the first ever done at an ultraslow spreading centre. We compiled a 1D local velocity model from confidently located hypocentres. While incorporating the varying 3D bathymetry and the water layer, we used 124 microearthquakes which had been recorded by at least two arrays for generating a local 3D earthquake tomographic model. At spreading rates below 20 mm/yr it has been proposed that conductive heat loss should increase, leading to a thinner crust. Yet, our results infer a deep Moho at about 7 km beneath seafloor and hypocentres as deep as 16 km (bsf.) which implies an exceptionally thick crust and cold lithosphere. Theoretical thermal models for the axial lithospheric

  3. The ionized gas at the centre of IC 10: a possible localized chemical pollution by Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Mesa-Delgado, A.; López-Martín, L.; Esteban, C.

    2011-03-01

    We present results from integral field spectroscopy with the Potsdam Multi-Aperture Spectrograph at the 3.5-m telescope at Calar Alto Observatory of the intense star-forming region [HL90] 111 at the centre of the starburst galaxy IC 10. We have obtained maps with a spatial sampling of 1 × 1 arcsec2= 3.9× 3.9 pc2 of different emission lines and analysed the extinction, physical conditions, nature of the ionization and chemical abundances of the ionized gas, as well determined locally the age of the most recent star formation event. By defining several apertures, we study the main integrated properties of some regions within [HL90] 111. Two contiguous spaxels show an unambiguous detection of the broad He IIλ4686 emission line, this feature seems to be produced by a single late-type WN star. We also report a probable N and He enrichment in the precise spaxels where the Wolf-Rayet (WR) features are detected. The enrichment pattern is roughly consistent with that expected for the pollution of the ejecta of a single or a very small number of WR stars. Furthermore, this chemical pollution is very localized (˜2 arcsec ˜7.8 pc) and it should be difficult to detect in star-forming galaxies beyond the Local Volume. We also discuss the use of the most common empirical calibrations to estimate the oxygen abundances of the ionized gas in nearby galaxies from 2D spectroscopic data. The ionization degree of the gas plays an important role when applying these empirical methods, as they tend to give lower oxygen abundances with increasing ionization degree. Based on observations collected at the Centro Astrónomico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Plank Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC).Visiting Astronomer at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.

  4. Geometrical optimization for strictly localized structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Yirong

    2003-07-01

    Recently we proposed the block localized wavefunction (BLW) approach which takes the advantages of valence bond theory and molecular orbital theory and defines the wavefunctions for resonance structures based on the assumption that all electrons and orbitals are partitioned into a few subgroups. In this work, we implement the geometrical optimization of the BLW method based on the algorithm proposed by Gianinetti and coworkers. Thus, we can study the conjugation effect on not only the molecular stability, but also the molecular geometry. With this capability, the π conjugation effect in trans-polyenes C2nH2n+2 (n=2-5) as well as in formamide and its analogs are studied by optimizing their delocalized and strictly localized forms with the 6-31G(d) and 6-311+G(d,p) basis sets. Although it has been well presumed that the π resonance shortens the single bonds and lengthens the double bonds with the delocalization of π electrons across the whole line in polyenes, our optimization of the strictly localized structures quantitatively shows that when the conjugation effect is "turned off," the double bond lengths will be identical to the CC bond length in ethylene and the single Csp2-Csp2 bond length will be about 1.513-1.517 Å. In agreement with the classical Hückel theory, the resonance energies in polyenes are approximately in proportion to the number of double bonds. Similarly, resonance is responsible not only for the planarity of formamide, thioformamide, and selenoformamide, but also for the lengthening of the CX (X=O,S,Se) double bond and the shortening of the CN bonds. Although it is assumed that the CX bond polarization decreases in the order of O>S>Se, the π electronic delocalization increases in the opposite order, i.e., formamide

  5. Governance structure reform and antibiotics prescription in community health centres in Shenzhen, China.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaoyun; Xia, Tingsong; Zhang, Xiulan; Jin, Chenggang

    2014-06-01

    It is unclear whether changing the governance structure of community health centres (CHCs) could affect antibiotic prescribing behaviour. To explore how changes in governance structure affect antibiotic prescription for children younger than 5 years of age with acute upper respiratory tract infections (AURI) in CHCs in Shenzhen, China. This study used an interrupted time series design with a comparison series. On 1 June 2009, the Health Bureau of Shenzhen's Baoan District transferred CHCs from a hospital-affiliated model to a self-managed independent model regarding finance, personnel and employee compensation. We collected 23481 electronic medical records of children younger than 5 years of age who were treated for AURI on an outpatient basis 1 year before and 1 year after governance structure reform. We used segmented regression analysis to evaluate the effect of reform on antibiotic prescription. After the reform, the proportion of patients receiving an antibiotic injection per month and the proportion of patients receiving two or more antibiotics conditional on receiving an antibiotic per month decreased 9.17% and 7.34%, respectively (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05). In the intervention series, the proportion of patients receiving an antibiotic injection per month and the monthly average cost of the antibiotics prescribed per patient continued to decrease over time compared with the control series (P < 0.001 or P < 0.05). This study suggests that governance structure reform can have positive effects on behaviour for antibiotic prescribing. Moreover, this short-term effect might have important implications for further community health reforms in China. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Multi-centre diagnostic classification of individual structural neuroimaging scans from patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Mwangi, Benson; Ebmeier, Klaus P; Matthews, Keith; Steele, J Douglas

    2012-05-01

    Quantitative abnormalities of brain structure in patients with major depressive disorder have been reported at a group level for decades. However, these structural differences appear subtle in comparison with conventional radiologically defined abnormalities, with considerable inter-subject variability. Consequently, it has not been possible to readily identify scans from patients with major depressive disorder at an individual level. Recently, machine learning techniques such as relevance vector machines and support vector machines have been applied to predictive classification of individual scans with variable success. Here we describe a novel hybrid method, which combines machine learning with feature selection and characterization, with the latter aimed at maximizing the accuracy of machine learning prediction. The method was tested using a multi-centre dataset of T(1)-weighted 'structural' scans. A total of 62 patients with major depressive disorder and matched controls were recruited from referred secondary care clinical populations in Aberdeen and Edinburgh, UK. The generalization ability and predictive accuracy of the classifiers was tested using data left out of the training process. High prediction accuracy was achieved (~90%). While feature selection was important for maximizing high predictive accuracy with machine learning, feature characterization contributed only a modest improvement to relevance vector machine-based prediction (~5%). Notably, while the only information provided for training the classifiers was T(1)-weighted scans plus a categorical label (major depressive disorder versus controls), both relevance vector machine and support vector machine 'weighting factors' (used for making predictions) correlated strongly with subjective ratings of illness severity. These results indicate that machine learning techniques have the potential to inform clinical practice and research, as they can make accurate predictions about brain scan data from

  7. PMD2HD--a web tool aligning a PubMed search results page with the local German Cancer Research Centre library collection.

    PubMed

    Bohne-Lang, Andreas; Lang, Elke; Taube, Anke

    2005-06-27

    Web-based searching is the accepted contemporary mode of retrieving relevant literature, and retrieving as many full text articles as possible is a typical prerequisite for research success. In most cases only a proportion of references will be directly accessible as digital reprints through displayed links. A large number of references, however, have to be verified in library catalogues and, depending on their availability, are accessible as print holdings or by interlibrary loan request. The problem of verifying local print holdings from an initial retrieval set of citations can be solved using Z39.50, an ANSI protocol for interactively querying library information systems. Numerous systems include Z39.50 interfaces and therefore can process Z39.50 interactive requests. However, the programmed query interaction command structure is non-intuitive and inaccessible to the average biomedical researcher. For the typical user, it is necessary to implement the protocol within a tool that hides and handles Z39.50 syntax, presenting a comfortable user interface. PMD2HD is a web tool implementing Z39.50 to provide an appropriately functional and usable interface to integrate into the typical workflow that follows an initial PubMed literature search, providing users with an immediate asset to assist in the most tedious step in literature retrieval, checking for subscription holdings against a local online catalogue. PMD2HD can facilitate literature access considerably with respect to the time and cost of manual comparisons of search results with local catalogue holdings. The example presented in this article is related to the library system and collections of the German Cancer Research Centre. However, the PMD2HD software architecture and use of common Z39.50 protocol commands allow for transfer to a broad range of scientific libraries using Z39.50-compatible library information systems.

  8. The structure of locally bounded finite-dimensional representations of connected locally compact groups

    SciTech Connect

    Shtern, A. I.

    2014-04-30

    An analogue of a Lie theorem is obtained for (not necessarily continuous) finite-dimensional representations of soluble finite-dimensional locally compact groups with connected quotient group by the centre. As a corollary, the following automatic continuity proposition is obtained for locally bounded finite-dimensional representations of connected locally compact groups: if G is a connected locally compact group, N is a compact normal subgroup of G such that the quotient group G/N is a Lie group, N{sub 0} is the connected identity component in N, H is the family of elements of G commuting with every element of N{sub 0}, and π is a (not necessarily continuous) locally bounded finite-dimensional representation of G, then π is continuous on the commutator subgroup of H (in the intrinsic topology of the smallest analytic subgroup of G containing this commutator subgroup). Bibliography: 23 titles. (paper)

  9. Luminescence and ESR studies of relationships between O(-)-centres and structural iron in natural and synthetically hydrated kaolinites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.; Costanzo, P. M.; Theng, B. K.

    1989-01-01

    Luminescence, induced by dehydration and by wetting with hydrazine and unsymmetrically substituted hydrazine, and related ESR spectra have been observed from several kaolinites, synthetically hydrated kaolinites, and metahalloysites. The amine-wetting luminescence results suggest that intercalation, not a chemiluminescence reaction, is the luminescence trigger. Correlation between hydration-induced luminescence and g = 2 ESR signals associated with O(-)-centres in several natural halloysites, and concurrent diminution of the intensity of both these signal types as a function of aging in two 8.4 angstroms synthetically hydrated, kaolinites, confirm a previously-reported relationship between the luminescence induced by dehydration and in the presence of O(-)-centres (holes, i.e., electron vacancies) in the tetrahedral sheet. Furthermore, the ESR spectra of the 8.4 angstroms hydrate showed a concurrent change in the line shape of the g = 4 signal from a shape usually associated with structural Fe in an ordered kaolinite, to a simpler one typically observed in more disordered kaolinite, halloysite, and montmorillonite. Either structural Fe centres and the O(-)-centres interact, or both are subject to factors previously associated with degree of order. The results question the long-term stability of the 8.4 angstroms hydrate, although XRD does not indicate interlayer collapse over this period. Complex inter-relationships are shown between intercalation, stored energy, structural Fe, and the degree of hydration which may be reflected in catalytic as well as spectroscopic properties of the clays.

  10. Luminescence and ESR studies of relationships between O(-)-centres and structural iron in natural and synthetically hydrated kaolinites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.; Costanzo, P. M.; Theng, B. K.

    1989-01-01

    Luminescence, induced by dehydration and by wetting with hydrazine and unsymmetrically substituted hydrazine, and related ESR spectra have been observed from several kaolinites, synthetically hydrated kaolinites, and metahalloysites. The amine-wetting luminescence results suggest that intercalation, not a chemiluminescence reaction, is the luminescence trigger. Correlation between hydration-induced luminescence and g = 2 ESR signals associated with O(-)-centres in several natural halloysites, and concurrent diminution of the intensity of both these signal types as a function of aging in two 8.4 angstroms synthetically hydrated, kaolinites, confirm a previously-reported relationship between the luminescence induced by dehydration and in the presence of O(-)-centres (holes, i.e., electron vacancies) in the tetrahedral sheet. Furthermore, the ESR spectra of the 8.4 angstroms hydrate showed a concurrent change in the line shape of the g = 4 signal from a shape usually associated with structural Fe in an ordered kaolinite, to a simpler one typically observed in more disordered kaolinite, halloysite, and montmorillonite. Either structural Fe centres and the O(-)-centres interact, or both are subject to factors previously associated with degree of order. The results question the long-term stability of the 8.4 angstroms hydrate, although XRD does not indicate interlayer collapse over this period. Complex inter-relationships are shown between intercalation, stored energy, structural Fe, and the degree of hydration which may be reflected in catalytic as well as spectroscopic properties of the clays.

  11. Local conservation laws and the structure of the many-body localized states.

    PubMed

    Serbyn, Maksym; Papić, Z; Abanin, Dmitry A

    2013-09-20

    We construct a complete set of local integrals of motion that characterize the many-body localized (MBL) phase. Our approach relies on the assumption that local perturbations act locally on the eigenstates in the MBL phase, which is supported by numerical simulations of the random-field XXZ spin chain. We describe the structure of the eigenstates in the MBL phase and discuss the implications of local conservation laws for its nonequilibrium quantum dynamics. We argue that the many-body localization can be used to protect coherence in the system by suppressing relaxation between eigenstates with different local integrals of motion.

  12. Local hydrophobicity stabilizes secondary structures in proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kanehisa, M.I.; Tsong, T.Y.

    1980-01-01

    The probability of occurrence of helix and ..beta..-sheet residues in 47 globular proteins was determined as a function of local hydrophobicity, which was defined by the sum of the Nozaki-Tanford transfer free energies at two nearest-neighbors on both sides of the amino acid sequence. In general, hydrophilic amino acids favor neither helix nor ..beta..-sheet formations when neighbor residues are also hydrophilic but favor helix formation at higher local hydrophobicity. On the other hand, some hydrophobic amino acids such as Met, Leu, and Ile favor helix formation when neighbor residues are hydrophilic. None of the hydrophobic amino acids favor ..beta..-sheet formation with hydrophilic neighbors, but most of them strongly favor ..beta..-sheet formation at high local hydrophobicity. When the average of 20 amino acids is taken, both helix and ..beta..-sheet residue probabilities are higher at higher local hydrophobicity, although the increase is steeper for ..beta..-sheets. Therefore, ..beta..-sheet formation is more influenced by local hydrophobicity than helix formation. Generally, helices are nearer the surface and tend to have hydrophilic and hydrophobic faces at opposite sides. The tendency of alternating regions of hydrophilic and hydrophobic residues in a helical sequence was revealed by calculating the correlation of the Nozaki-Tanford values. Such amphipathic helices may be important in protein-protein-lipid interactions and in forming hydrophilic channels in the membrane. The choice of 30 nonhomologous proteins as the data set did not alter the above results.

  13. Applied Research Centres at South African Universities. The Relationship between 'Base' Internal Structures and Network 'Superstructures'

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, David

    2005-01-01

    This article considers the way in which applied research centres and units at South African higher education institutions enhance their networks with industry, government and community organizations. The findings from 12 case studies of research groupings at higher education institutions in Cape Town support the author's argument for a more…

  14. Effects of closure of an urban level I trauma centre on adjacent hospitals and local injury mortality: a retrospective, observational study.

    PubMed

    Crandall, Marie; Sharp, Douglas; Wei, Xiong; Nathens, Avery; Hsia, Renee Y

    2016-05-10

    To determine the association of the Martin Luther King Jr Hospital (MLK) closure on the distribution of admissions on adjacent trauma centres, and injury mortality rates in these centres and within the county. Observational, retrospective study. Non-public patient-level data from the state of California were obtained for all trauma patients from 1999 to 2009. Geospatial analysis was used to visualise the redistribution of trauma patients to other hospitals after MLK closed. Variance of observed to expected injury mortality using multivariate logistic regression was estimated for the study period. A total of 37 131 trauma patients were admitted to the five major south Los Angeles trauma centres from the MLK service area between 1999 and 2009. (1) Number and type of trauma admissions to trauma centres in closest proximity to MLK; (2) inhospital injury mortality of trauma patients after the trauma centre closure. During and after the MLK closure, trauma admissions increased at three of the four nearby hospitals, particularly admissions for gunshot wounds (GSWs). This redistribution of patient load was accompanied by a dramatic change in the payer mix for surrounding hospitals; one hospital's share of uninsured more than tripled from 12.9% in 1999 to 44.6% by 2009. Overall trauma mortality did not significantly change, but GSW mortality steadily and significantly increased after the closure from 5.0% in 2007 to 7.5% in 2009. Though local hospitals experienced a dramatic increase in trauma patient volume, overall mortality for trauma patients did not significantly change after MLK closed. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. Effects of closure of an urban level I trauma centre on adjacent hospitals and local injury mortality: a retrospective, observational study

    PubMed Central

    Crandall, Marie; Sharp, Douglas; Wei, Xiong; Nathens, Avery; Hsia, Renee Y

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the association of the Martin Luther King Jr Hospital (MLK) closure on the distribution of admissions on adjacent trauma centres, and injury mortality rates in these centres and within the county. Design Observational, retrospective study. Setting Non-public patient-level data from the state of California were obtained for all trauma patients from 1999 to 2009. Geospatial analysis was used to visualise the redistribution of trauma patients to other hospitals after MLK closed. Variance of observed to expected injury mortality using multivariate logistic regression was estimated for the study period. Participants A total of 37 131 trauma patients were admitted to the five major south Los Angeles trauma centres from the MLK service area between 1999 and 2009. Main outcome measures (1) Number and type of trauma admissions to trauma centres in closest proximity to MLK; (2) inhospital injury mortality of trauma patients after the trauma centre closure. Results During and after the MLK closure, trauma admissions increased at three of the four nearby hospitals, particularly admissions for gunshot wounds (GSWs). This redistribution of patient load was accompanied by a dramatic change in the payer mix for surrounding hospitals; one hospital's share of uninsured more than tripled from 12.9% in 1999 to 44.6% by 2009. Overall trauma mortality did not significantly change, but GSW mortality steadily and significantly increased after the closure from 5.0% in 2007 to 7.5% in 2009. Conclusions Though local hospitals experienced a dramatic increase in trauma patient volume, overall mortality for trauma patients did not significantly change after MLK closed. PMID:27165650

  16. Structures of Local Rearrangements in Soft Colloidal Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiunan; Liu, Rui; Yang, Mingcheng; Wang, Wei-Hua; Chen, Ke

    2016-06-01

    We image local structural rearrangements in soft colloidal glasses under small periodic perturbations induced by thermal cycling. Local structural entropy S2 positively correlates with observed rearrangements in colloidal glasses. The high S2 values of the rearranging clusters in glasses indicate that fragile regions in glasses are structurally less correlated, similar to structural defects in crystalline solids. Slow-evolving high S2 spots are capable of predicting local rearrangements long before the relaxations occur, while fluctuation-created high S2 spots best correlate with local deformations right before the rearrangement events. Local free volumes are also found to correlate with particle rearrangements at extreme values, although the ability to identify relaxation sites is substantially lower than S2. Our experiments provide an efficient structural identifier for the fragile regions in glasses and highlight the important role of structural correlations in the physics of glasses.

  17. Rodlike localized structure in isotropic pattern-forming systems.

    PubMed

    Bordeu, Ignacio; Clerc, Marcel G

    2015-10-01

    Stationary two-dimensional localized structures have been observed in a wide variety of dissipative systems. The existence, stability properties, dynamical evolution, and bifurcation diagram of an azimuthal symmetry breaking, rodlike localized structure in the isotropic prototype model of pattern formation, the Swift-Hohenberg model, is studied. These rodlike structures persist under the presence of nongradient perturbations. Interaction properties of the rodlike structures are studied. This allows us to envisage the possibility of different crystal-like configurations.

  18. Local Surface Structure From Disparity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkin, Michael R. M.; Jepson, Allan D.; Tsotsos, John K.

    1988-02-01

    Current theories of stereopsis involve three distinct stages: First, the two images of a stereo pair are processed separately to extract monocular features. One common choice of feature is the presence of a zero-crossing in a bandpassed versions of the image. Second, the monocular features in one image are matched with corresponding features found in the other image. In practice this second stage cannot be expected to produce only the correct matches, and a third stage must be considered in order to remove the incorrect matches ("false targets"). There are therefore three main issues the design of such a traditional algorithm for stereopsis, namely i) the choice of image features; the choice of matching criteria; and iii) the way false targets are avoided or eliminated. In this paper we introduce a different approach. We propose that symbolic features should not be extracted from the monocular images in the first stage of processing. Rather we examine a technique for measuring the local phase difference between the two images. We show how local phase difference in a bandpassed version of the image can be interpreted as disparity. This essentially combines the first two stages of the traditional approach. These disparity measurements may contain "false targets" which must be eliminated. Building upon the results of these disparty detectors, we show that a simple surface model based on object cohesiveness and local surface planarity across a range of spatial-frequency tuned channels can be used to reduce false matches. The resulting local planar surface support can be used to segment the image into planar regions in depth. Due to the independent nature of both the disparity detection and local planar support mechanism, this method is capable of dealing with both opaque and transparent stimuli.

  19. Geometry motivated alternative view on local protein backbone structures.

    PubMed

    Zacharias, Jan; Knapp, Ernst Walter

    2013-11-01

    We present an alternative to the classical Ramachandran plot (R-plot) to display local protein backbone structure. Instead of the (φ, ψ)-backbone angles relating to the chemical architecture of polypeptides generic helical parameters are used. These are the rotation or twist angle ϑ and the helical rise parameter d. Plots with these parameters provide a different view on the nature of local protein backbone structures. It allows to display the local structures in polar (d, ϑ)-coordinates, which is not possible for an R-plot, where structural regimes connected by periodicity appear disconnected. But there are other advantages, like a clear discrimination of the handedness of a local structure, a larger spread of the different local structure domains--the latter can yield a better separation of different local secondary structure motives--and many more. Compared to the R-plot we are not aware of any major disadvantage to classify local polypeptide structures with the (d, ϑ)-plot, except that it requires some elementary computations. To facilitate usage of the new (d, ϑ)-plot for protein structures we provide a web application (http://agknapp.chemie.fu-berlin.de/secsass), which shows the (d, ϑ)-plot side-by-side with the R-plot.

  20. The categorical structure of knowledge for famous people (and a novel application of Centre-Surround theory).

    PubMed

    Stone, Anna; Valentine, Tim

    2007-09-01

    Knowledge of familiar people is essential to guide social interaction, yet there is uncertainty about whether semantic knowledge for people is stored in a categorical structure as for objects. Four priming experiments using hard-to-perceive primes investigated whether occupation forms a category connecting famous persons in semantic memory. Primes were famous faces exposed for 17ms with masking, resulting in severely restricted awareness and thus precluding expectancy-based priming effects. Targets were consciously perceptible famous faces (Experiments 1-3), famous names (Experiment 3), or occupations (Experiment 4) representing either the same or different occupation to the prime. Significant priming demonstrated the operation of automatic processes, including spreading activation, among persons sharing a common occupation; this supports the categorical view. The direction of priming (faster/slower responses to same-occupation than different-occupation targets) was dependent on prime-target stimulus onset asynchrony (Experiments 1-3) and type of target (Experiment 4). This pattern of results is attributed to the Centre-Surround mechanism proposed by Carr and Dagenbach [Carr, T. H., & Dagenbach, D. (1990). Semantic priming and repetition priming from masked words: evidence for a centre-surround attentional mechanism in perceptual recognition. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition, 16, 341-350]. These results support (a) the categorical structure of semantic knowledge for famous people and (b) the application of the Centre-Surround mechanism to the domain of person recognition.

  1. Localization of defects using checkerboard test structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellenberg, Sven-Olaf

    2001-04-01

    Defects in semiconductor industry become more important by shrinking structures and increasing complexity of process. Therefore the size of a killer defect becomes smaller and it is not easy to find them with optical inspection tools. In addition Inspection tools are not able to say something about electrical effects from defects which are found. With Checkerboard Test Structures it is possible to locate electrical defects. In fact these special test structures will be tested at the end of the process, like an usual function test. A special developed algorithm allows low quantity of pads. This gives a high spatial resolution and on the other hand we have good ratio between active and passive area. A reduction of a statistical failure could be reached, because it is not necessary to calculate the defect density from a small region. In particular special defect distribution like cluster can be considered. With this structures different layers can be examined for disconnections and short-circuits. Therefore it is possible to locate defects in one layer or between two layers. So the defect density for the sensitive dielectrica between two layers, like any kind of oxide can be calculated. The karree test structures can be used very good as an inline-defectmonitoring, because there is no difference from the original technology of proces. There are also no differences in time for processing and for testing, so Karreeteststructures is an optimal representation for your process.

  2. Population structure with localized haplotype clusters.

    PubMed

    Browning, Sharon R; Weir, Bruce S

    2010-08-01

    We propose a multilocus version of F(ST) and a measure of haplotype diversity using localized haplotype clusters. Specifically, we use haplotype clusters identified with BEAGLE, which is a program implementing a hidden Markov model for localized haplotype clustering and performing several functions including inference of haplotype phase. We apply this methodology to HapMap phase 3 data. With this haplotype-cluster approach, African populations have highest diversity and lowest divergence from the ancestral population, East Asian populations have lowest diversity and highest divergence, and other populations (European, Indian, and Mexican) have intermediate levels of diversity and divergence. These relationships accord with expectation based on other studies and accepted models of human history. In contrast, the population-specific F(ST) estimates obtained directly from single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) do not reflect such expected relationships. We show that ascertainment bias of SNPs has less impact on the proposed haplotype-cluster-based F(ST) than on the SNP-based version, which provides a potential explanation for these results. Thus, these new measures of F(ST) and haplotype-cluster diversity provide an important new tool for population genetic analysis of high-density SNP data.

  3. Enhancing community detection by using local structural information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Ju; Hu, Ke; Zhang, Yan; Bao, Mei-Hua; Tang, Liang; Tang, Yan-Ni; Gao, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Jian-Ming; Chen, Benyan; Hu, Jing-Bo

    2016-03-01

    Many real-world networks, such as gene networks, protein-protein interaction networks and metabolic networks, exhibit community structures, meaning the existence of groups of densely connected vertices in the networks. Many local similarity measures in the networks are closely related to the concept of the community structures, and may have a positive effect on community detection in the networks. Here, various local similarity measures are used to extract local structural information, which is then applied to community detection in the networks by using the edge-reweighting strategy. The effect of the local similarity measures on community detection is carefully investigated and compared in various networks. The experimental results show that the local similarity measures are crucial for the improvement of community detection methods, while the positive effect of the local similarity measures is closely related to the networks under study and applied community detection methods.

  4. Local and bulk 13C hyperpolarization in nitrogen-vacancy-centred diamonds at variable fields and orientations

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez, Gonzalo A.; Bretschneider, Christian O.; Fischer, Ran; London, Paz; Kanda, Hisao; Onoda, Shinobu; Isoya, Junichi; Gershoni, David; Frydman, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    Polarizing nuclear spins is of fundamental importance in biology, chemistry and physics. Methods for hyperpolarizing 13C nuclei from free electrons in bulk usually demand operation at cryogenic temperatures. Room temperature approaches targeting diamonds with nitrogen-vacancy centres could alleviate this need; however, hitherto proposed strategies lack generality as they demand stringent conditions on the strength and/or alignment of the magnetic field. We report here an approach for achieving efficient electron-13C spin-alignment transfers, compatible with a broad range of magnetic field strengths and field orientations with respect to the diamond crystal. This versatility results from combining coherent microwave- and incoherent laser-induced transitions between selected energy states of the coupled electron–nuclear spin manifold. 13C-detected nuclear magnetic resonance experiments demonstrate that this hyperpolarization can be transferred via first-shell or via distant 13Cs throughout the nuclear bulk ensemble. This method opens new perspectives for applications of diamond nitrogen-vacancy centres in nuclear magnetic resonance, and in quantum information processing. PMID:26404169

  5. Non-Local currents and the structure of eigenstates in planar discrete systems with local symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röntgen, M.; Morfonios, C. V.; Diakonos, F. K.; Schmelcher, P.

    2017-05-01

    Local symmetries are spatial symmetries present in a subdomain of a complex system. By using and extending a framework of so-called non-local currents that has been established recently, we show that one can gain knowledge about the structure of eigenstates in locally symmetric setups through a Kirchhoff-type law for the non-local currents. The framework is applicable to all discrete planar Schrödinger setups, including those with non-uniform connectivity. Conditions for spatially constant non-local currents are derived and we explore two types of locally symmetric subsystems in detail, closed-loops and one-dimensional open ended chains. We find these systems to support locally similar or even locally symmetric eigenstates.

  6. The nearby structure of the Local Arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cersosimo, J. C.; Muller, R. J.; Santiago Figueroa, N.; Figueroa Vélez, S.; Báez, P.; Testori, J. C.

    The continuum emission of the galactic region located at G85-0.5 is well defined by the weak 11 cm wavelength emission. The region catalogued as W80 is extended 3° in diameter and the optical images show the North America and the Pelican Nebulae (NPN) complex. In this paper we derive new distances wich were obtained from the radiorecombination line observations made at a frequency near 1.4 GHz. The results suggest that the ionized hydrogen is spread along the line of sight instead of being clumped at one specific distance. We identified three structures located at distances of about 0.7 kpc, 1.7 kpc, and 2.7 kpc, respectively. Using a simple model where we assume homogeneity and a constant electron temperature the electron densities of each structure are obtained. We conclude that W80 is composed of different regions located along the line of sight.

  7. Resonance ultrasonic actuation and local structural rejuvenation in metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D. P.; Yang, Y.; Niu, X. R.; Lu, J.; Yang, G. N.; Wang, W. H.; Liu, C. T.

    2017-06-01

    Using the method of contact resonance ultrasonic actuation (CRUA), we observed evidence of local structural rejuvenation at the surface of metallic glasses (MGs), arising from the increase of the vibration amplitude of the atoms after the resonance actuation. By adjusting the CRUA parameters, the size, pattern, and extent of the rejuvenated zones could be tailored. Nanoindentation tests revealed suppressed nucleation of shear bands after CRUA, originating from the homogenization of the local structure induced by the ultrasonic vibration. Compared with the structural homogenization from annealing, this method will not sacrifice the concentration of the free volume for the local structural constraint. These results are useful to understand the evolution of the microstructure and local structural rejuvenation of MGs, as well as the design of MGs with improved plasticity from the nanoscale to the microscale.

  8. Local structural study of doped-ceria by EXAFS spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shirbhate, S. C.; Acharya, S. A.; Yadav, A. K.; Sagdeo, A. P.; Jha, S. N.

    2016-05-23

    In the present work, Structural and Local structural study of Sm, Gd doped and Sm-Gd co-doped ceria system has been studied by Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy (EXAFS). These ceria based systems are synthesized by hydrothermal synthesis route. Fluorite structure is confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and data is well fitted using Rietveld refinement by Full-Prof suite. Local structural changes in terms of coordination with surrounding, inter atomic distances and Debye Waller factor of nearest neighbor and next nearest neighbor has been discussed.

  9. Local structural study of doped-ceria by EXAFS spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirbhate, S. C.; Yadav, A. K.; Acharya, S. A.; Sagdeo, A. P.; Jha, S. N.

    2016-05-01

    In the present work, Structural and Local structural study of Sm, Gd doped and Sm-Gd co-doped ceria system has been studied by Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy (EXAFS). These ceria based systems are synthesized by hydrothermal synthesis route. Fluorite structure is confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and data is well fitted using Rietveld refinement by Full-Prof suite. Local structural changes in terms of coordination with surrounding, inter atomic distances and Debye Waller factor of nearest neighbor and next nearest neighbor has been discussed.

  10. Band structures and localization properties of aperiodic layered phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhi-Zhong; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2012-03-01

    The band structures and localization properties of in-plane elastic waves with coupling of longitudinal and transverse modes oblique propagating in aperiodic phononic crystals based on Thue-Morse and Rudin-Shapiro sequences are studied. Using transfer matrix method, the concept of the localization factor is introduced and the correctness is testified through the Rytov dispersion relation. For comparison, the perfect periodic structure and the quasi-periodic Fibonacci system are also considered. In addition, the influences of the random disorder, local resonance, translational and/or mirror symmetries on the band structures of the aperiodic phononic crystals are analyzed in this paper.

  11. Local gravity and large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juszkiewicz, Roman; Vittorio, Nicola; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1990-01-01

    The magnitude and direction of the observed dipole anisotropy of the galaxy distribution can in principle constrain the amount of large-scale power present in the spectrum of primordial density fluctuations. This paper confronts the data, provided by a recent redshift survey of galaxies detected by the IRAS satellite, with the predictions of two cosmological models with very different levels of large-scale power: the biased Cold Dark Matter dominated model (CDM) and a baryon-dominated model (BDM) with isocurvature initial conditions. Model predictions are investigated for the Local Group peculiar velocity, v(R), induced by mass inhomogeneities distributed out to a given radius, R, for R less than about 10,000 km/s. Several convergence measures for v(R) are developed, which can become powerful cosmological tests when deep enough samples become available. For the present data sets, the CDM and BDM predictions are indistinguishable at the 2 sigma level and both are consistent with observations. A promising discriminant between cosmological models is the misalignment angle between v(R) and the apex of the dipole anisotropy of the microwave background.

  12. Local gravity and large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juszkiewicz, Roman; Vittorio, Nicola; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1990-01-01

    The magnitude and direction of the observed dipole anisotropy of the galaxy distribution can in principle constrain the amount of large-scale power present in the spectrum of primordial density fluctuations. This paper confronts the data, provided by a recent redshift survey of galaxies detected by the IRAS satellite, with the predictions of two cosmological models with very different levels of large-scale power: the biased Cold Dark Matter dominated model (CDM) and a baryon-dominated model (BDM) with isocurvature initial conditions. Model predictions are investigated for the Local Group peculiar velocity, v(R), induced by mass inhomogeneities distributed out to a given radius, R, for R less than about 10,000 km/s. Several convergence measures for v(R) are developed, which can become powerful cosmological tests when deep enough samples become available. For the present data sets, the CDM and BDM predictions are indistinguishable at the 2 sigma level and both are consistent with observations. A promising discriminant between cosmological models is the misalignment angle between v(R) and the apex of the dipole anisotropy of the microwave background.

  13. Structural characterization of the melano-macrophage centres (MMC) of goldfish Carassius auratus.

    PubMed

    Herráez, M P; Zapata, A G

    1991-01-01

    In the present work we have studied the organization of melano-macrophage centres (MMCs) in the peripheral lymphoid organs, including spleen, pro- and mesonephros, of the goldfish, Carassius auratus, in an attempt to clarify their cellular composition, origins and functional relationships. Histological analysis demonstrated a similar organization in the three organs on the basis of closely packed phagocytic cells containing abundant pigment. The MMCs of Carassius auratus are found throughout the parenchyma of spleen and kidney and show a close association with the vascular system, i.e. splenic ellipsoids, sinusoids of red pulp and renal blood sinuses. They exhibit distinct degree of development from small groups of actively phagocytic macrophages to large, totally or partially encapsulated centres, where effete phagocytic cells are filled by cell debris. Ultrastructural and histochemical data suggest that the main inclusion observed in the MMCs of Carassius auratus is lipofuscin. Haemosiderin occurs in lesser amounts and melanin is almost restricted to kidney MMCs,--mainly mesonephros--. Our results suggest various non-specific physiological roles for the teleost MMCs, including tissue breakdown and erythrocyte catabolism.

  14. Optimisation of the usage of LHC and local computing resources in a multidisciplinary physics department hosting a WLCG Tier-2 centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberis, Stefano; Carminati, Leonardo; Leveraro, Franco; Mazza, Simone Michele; Perini, Laura; Perlz, Francesco; Rebatto, David; Tura, Ruggero; Vaccarossa, Luca; Villaplana, Miguel

    2015-12-01

    We present the approach of the University of Milan Physics Department and the local unit of INFN to allow and encourage the sharing among different research areas of computing, storage and networking resources (the largest ones being those composing the Milan WLCG Tier-2 centre and tailored to the needs of the ATLAS experiment). Computing resources are organised as independent HTCondor pools, with a global master in charge of monitoring them and optimising their usage. The configuration has to provide satisfactory throughput for both serial and parallel (multicore, MPI) jobs. A combination of local, remote and cloud storage options are available. The experience of users from different research areas operating on this shared infrastructure is discussed. The promising direction of improving scientific computing throughput by federating access to distributed computing and storage also seems to fit very well with the objectives listed in the European Horizon 2020 framework for research and development.

  15. Identifying local structural states in atomic imaging by computer vision

    DOE PAGES

    Laanait, Nouamane; Ziatdinov, Maxim; He, Qian; ...

    2016-11-02

    The availability of atomically resolved imaging modalities enables an unprecedented view into the local structural states of materials, which manifest themselves by deviations from the fundamental assumptions of periodicity and symmetry. Consequently, approaches that aim to extract these local structural states from atomic imaging data with minimal assumptions regarding the average crystallographic configuration of a material are indispensable to advances in structural and chemical investigations of materials. Here, we present an approach to identify and classify local structural states that is rooted in computer vision. This approach introduces a definition of a structural state that is composed of both localmore » and non-local information extracted from atomically resolved images, and is wholly untethered from the familiar concepts of symmetry and periodicity. Instead, this approach relies on computer vision techniques such as feature detection, and concepts such as scale-invariance. We present the fundamental aspects of local structural state extraction and classification by application to simulated scanning transmission electron microscopy images, and analyze the robustness of this approach in the presence of common instrumental factors such as noise, limited spatial resolution, and weak contrast. Finally, we apply this computer vision-based approach for the unsupervised detection and classification of local structural states in an experimental electron micrograph of a complex oxides interface, and a scanning tunneling micrograph of a defect engineered multilayer graphene surface.« less

  16. Investigation of fine-structure dips in fission-fragment mass distribution: An asymmetric two centre shell model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Sham S.

    2017-04-01

    The fission fragment mass distribution followed by neutron emission is studied for the 208Pb (18O , f) reaction using the asymmetric two centre shell model. The measured mass distribution spectrum reveals new kind of systematics on shell structure and leads to an improved understanding of structure effects in nuclear fission. A detailed investigation of shell effects both in potential and cranking mass parameter has been carried out for explaining the observed fine structure dips (i.e., less probable distributions) corresponding to shell closure (Z = 50 and/or N = 82) of fission fragments and their complementary partners. The available energy states for the decay process are obtained by solving the Schrödinger equation and found that first-five eigenstates are sufficient in reproducing the observed mass distribution spectrum. An outcome of the asymmetric two centre shell model also completely favours the observed claim that ;the total number of emitted neutrons between correlated pairs of fission fragments should not exceed 6;. A complete observed spectrum is obtained by adding the mass distribution yields of all 6-neutron emission channels. This suggests a possible importance of extending these calculations to get new insight into an understanding of the dynamical behaviour of fragment formation in the fission process.

  17. High levels of diversity and population structure in the potato late blight pathogen at the Mexico centre of origin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianan; Fernández-Pavía, Sylvia P; Larsen, Meredith M; Garay-Serrano, Edith; Gregorio-Cipriano, Rosario; Rodríguez-Alvarado, Gerardo; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Goss, Erica M

    2017-02-01

    Globally destructive crop pathogens often emerge by migrating out of their native ranges. These pathogens are often diverse at their centre of origin and may exhibit adaptive variation in the invaded range via multiple introductions from different source populations. However, source populations are generally unidentified or poorly studied compared to invasive populations. Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of late blight, is one of the most costly pathogens of potato and tomato worldwide. Mexico is the centre of origin and diversity of P. infestans and migration events out of Mexico have enormously impacted disease dynamics in North America and Europe. The debate over the origin of the pathogen, and population studies of P. infestans in Mexico, has focused on the Toluca Valley, whereas neighbouring regions have been little studied. We examined the population structure of P. infestans across central Mexico, including samples from Michoacán, Tlaxcala and Toluca. We found high levels of diversity consistent with sexual reproduction in Michoacán and Tlaxcala and population subdivision that was strongly associated with geographic region. We determined that population structure in central Mexico has contributed to diversity in introduced populations based on relatedness of U.S. clonal lineages to Mexican isolates from different regions. Our results suggest that P. infestans exists as a metapopulation in central Mexico, and this population structure could be contributing to the repeated re-emergence of P. infestans in the United States and elsewhere.

  18. Local structural modeling for implementation of optimal active damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaurock, Carl A.; Miller, David W.

    1993-09-01

    Local controllers are good candidates for active control of flexible structures. Local control generally consists of low order, frequency benign compensators using collocated hardware. Positive real compensators and plant transfer functions ensure that stability margins and performance robustness are high. The typical design consists of an experimentally chosen gain on a fixed form controller such as rate feedback. The resulting compensator performs some combination of damping (dissipating energy) and structural modification (changing the energy flow paths). Recent research into structural impedance matching has shown how to optimize dissipation based on the local behavior of the structure. This paper investigates the possibility of improving performance by influencing global energy flow, using local controllers designed using a global performance metric.

  19. Automated Localization of Multiple Pelvic Bone Structures on MRI.

    PubMed

    Onal, Sinan; Lai-Yuen, Susana; Bao, Paul; Weitzenfeld, Alfredo; Hart, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fully automated localization method for multiple pelvic bone structures on magnetic resonance images (MRI). Pelvic bone structures are at present identified manually on MRI to locate reference points for measurement and evaluation of pelvic organ prolapse (POP). Given that this is a time-consuming and subjective procedure, there is a need to localize pelvic bone structures automatically. However, bone structures are not easily differentiable from soft tissue on MRI as their pixel intensities tend to be very similar. In this paper, we present a model that combines support vector machines and nonlinear regression capturing global and local information to automatically identify the bounding boxes of bone structures on MRI. The model identifies the location of the pelvic bone structures by establishing the association between their relative locations and using local information such as texture features. Results show that the proposed method is able to locate the bone structures of interest accurately (dice similarity index >0.75) in 87-91% of the images. This research aims to enable accurate, consistent, and fully automated localization of bone structures on MRI to facilitate and improve the diagnosis of health conditions such as female POP.

  20. Proteins comparison through probabilistic optimal structure local alignment.

    PubMed

    Micale, Giovanni; Pulvirenti, Alfredo; Giugno, Rosalba; Ferro, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Multiple local structure comparison helps to identify common structural motifs or conserved binding sites in 3D structures in distantly related proteins. Since there is no best way to compare structures and evaluate the alignment, a wide variety of techniques and different similarity scoring schemes have been proposed. Existing algorithms usually compute the best superposition of two structures or attempt to solve it as an optimization problem in a simpler setting (e.g., considering contact maps or distance matrices). Here, we present PROPOSAL (PROteins comparison through Probabilistic Optimal Structure local ALignment), a stochastic algorithm based on iterative sampling for multiple local alignment of protein structures. Our method can efficiently find conserved motifs across a set of protein structures. Only the distances between all pairs of residues in the structures are computed. To show the accuracy and the effectiveness of PROPOSAL we tested it on a few families of protein structures. We also compared PROPOSAL with two state-of-the-art tools for pairwise local alignment on a dataset of manually annotated motifs. PROPOSAL is available as a Java 2D standalone application or a command line program at http://ferrolab.dmi.unict.it/proposal/proposal.html.

  1. Local Structure Around Te in Heavily Doped GaAs:Te using X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Pietnoczka, A.; Bacewicz, R.; Slupinski, T.; Antonowicz, J.; Wei, Su-Huai

    2012-04-01

    The annealing of heavily doped GaAs:Te can significantly change the free electron concentration in a reversible manner. These changes of electrical properties are accompanied by the structural changes of GaAs:Te solid solution. We used X-ray Absorption Fine Structure at K-edge of tellurium to determine local changes around Te atoms for different states of the GaAs:Te crystals caused by the annealing corresponding to different electron concentrations. The best EXAFS fit for the samples with high electron concentration was obtained for the substitutional Te{sub As} model with elongated Te-Ga bonds (as compared to the As-Ga distance). For the samples in the low concentration state the best fit was for the pairs of Te atoms forming a rhombohedral symmetry double-DX centre, with the proportional admixture of the substitutional tellurium.

  2. Local structure preserving sparse coding for infrared target recognition

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jing; Yue, Jiang; Zhang, Yi; Bai, Lianfa

    2017-01-01

    Sparse coding performs well in image classification. However, robust target recognition requires a lot of comprehensive template images and the sparse learning process is complex. We incorporate sparsity into a template matching concept to construct a local sparse structure matching (LSSM) model for general infrared target recognition. A local structure preserving sparse coding (LSPSc) formulation is proposed to simultaneously preserve the local sparse and structural information of objects. By adding a spatial local structure constraint into the classical sparse coding algorithm, LSPSc can improve the stability of sparse representation for targets and inhibit background interference in infrared images. Furthermore, a kernel LSPSc (K-LSPSc) formulation is proposed, which extends LSPSc to the kernel space to weaken the influence of the linear structure constraint in nonlinear natural data. Because of the anti-interference and fault-tolerant capabilities, both LSPSc- and K-LSPSc-based LSSM can implement target identification based on a simple template set, which just needs several images containing enough local sparse structures to learn a sufficient sparse structure dictionary of a target class. Specifically, this LSSM approach has stable performance in the target detection with scene, shape and occlusions variations. High performance is demonstrated on several datasets, indicating robust infrared target recognition in diverse environments and imaging conditions. PMID:28323824

  3. Local Sparse Structure Denoising for Low-Light-Level Image.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Yue, Jiang; Zhang, Yi; Bai, Lianfa

    2015-12-01

    Sparse and redundant representations perform well in image denoising. However, sparsity-based methods fail to denoise low-light-level (LLL) images because of heavy and complex noise. They consider sparsity on image patches independently and tend to lose the texture structures. To suppress noises and maintain textures simultaneously, it is necessary to embed noise invariant features into the sparse decomposition process. We, therefore, used a local structure preserving sparse coding (LSPSc) formulation to explore the local sparse structures (both the sparsity and local structure) in image. It was found that, with the introduction of spatial local structure constraint into the general sparse coding algorithm, LSPSc could improve the robustness of sparse representation for patches in serious noise. We further used a kernel LSPSc (K-LSPSc) formulation, which extends LSPSc into the kernel space to weaken the influence of linear structure constraint in nonlinear data. Based on the robust LSPSc and K-LSPSc algorithms, we constructed a local sparse structure denoising (LSSD) model for LLL images, which was demonstrated to give high performance in the natural LLL images denoising, indicating that both the LSPSc- and K-LSPSc-based LSSD models have the stable property of noise inhibition and texture details preservation.

  4. Local structure preserving sparse coding for infrared target recognition.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Yue, Jiang; Zhang, Yi; Bai, Lianfa

    2017-01-01

    Sparse coding performs well in image classification. However, robust target recognition requires a lot of comprehensive template images and the sparse learning process is complex. We incorporate sparsity into a template matching concept to construct a local sparse structure matching (LSSM) model for general infrared target recognition. A local structure preserving sparse coding (LSPSc) formulation is proposed to simultaneously preserve the local sparse and structural information of objects. By adding a spatial local structure constraint into the classical sparse coding algorithm, LSPSc can improve the stability of sparse representation for targets and inhibit background interference in infrared images. Furthermore, a kernel LSPSc (K-LSPSc) formulation is proposed, which extends LSPSc to the kernel space to weaken the influence of the linear structure constraint in nonlinear natural data. Because of the anti-interference and fault-tolerant capabilities, both LSPSc- and K-LSPSc-based LSSM can implement target identification based on a simple template set, which just needs several images containing enough local sparse structures to learn a sufficient sparse structure dictionary of a target class. Specifically, this LSSM approach has stable performance in the target detection with scene, shape and occlusions variations. High performance is demonstrated on several datasets, indicating robust infrared target recognition in diverse environments and imaging conditions.

  5. Aluminum alloy material structure impact localization by using FBG sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiubin

    2014-12-01

    The aluminum alloy structure impact localization system by using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors and impact localization algorithm was investigated. A four-FBG sensing network was established. And the power intensity demodulation method was initialized employing the narrow-band tunable laser. The wavelet transform was used to weaken the impact signal noise. And the impact signal time difference was extracted to build the time difference localization algorithm. At last, a fiber Bragg grating impact localization system was established and experimentally verified. The experimental results showed that in the aluminum alloy plate with the 500 mm*500 mm*2 mm test area, the maximum and average impact abscissa localization errors were 11 mm and 6.25 mm, and the maximum and average impact ordinate localization errors were 9 mm and 4.25 mm, respectively. The fiber Bragg grating sensors and demodulation system are feasible to realize the aviation aluminum alloy material structure impact localization. The research results provide a reliable method for the aluminum alloy material structure impact localization.

  6. Local structures around the substituted elements in mixed layered oxides

    PubMed Central

    Akama, Shota; Kobayashi, Wataru; Amaha, Kaoru; Niwa, Hideharu; Nitani, Hiroaki; Moritomo, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    The chemical substitution of a transition metal (M) is an effective method to improve the functionality of a material, such as its electrochemical, magnetic, and dielectric properties. The substitution, however, causes local lattice distortion because the difference in the ionic radius (r) modifies the local interatomic distances. Here, we systematically investigated the local structures in the pure (x = 0.0) and mixed (x = 0.05 or 0.1) layered oxides, Na(M1−xM′x)O2 (M and M′ are the majority and minority transition metals, respectively), by means of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis. We found that the local interatomic distance (dM-O) around the minority element approaches that around the majority element to reduces the local lattice distortion. We further found that the valence of the minority Mn changes so that its ionic radius approaches that of the majority M. PMID:28252008

  7. Local structures around the substituted elements in mixed layered oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akama, Shota; Kobayashi, Wataru; Amaha, Kaoru; Niwa, Hideharu; Nitani, Hiroaki; Moritomo, Yutaka

    2017-03-01

    The chemical substitution of a transition metal (M) is an effective method to improve the functionality of a material, such as its electrochemical, magnetic, and dielectric properties. The substitution, however, causes local lattice distortion because the difference in the ionic radius (r) modifies the local interatomic distances. Here, we systematically investigated the local structures in the pure (x = 0.0) and mixed (x = 0.05 or 0.1) layered oxides, Na(M1-xM‧x)O2 (M and M‧ are the majority and minority transition metals, respectively), by means of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis. We found that the local interatomic distance (dM-O) around the minority element approaches that around the majority element to reduces the local lattice distortion. We further found that the valence of the minority Mn changes so that its ionic radius approaches that of the majority M.

  8. Two-dimensional localized structures in harmonically forced oscillatory systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y.-P.; Knobloch, E.

    2016-12-01

    Two-dimensional spatially localized structures in the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation with 1:1 resonance are studied near the simultaneous presence of a steady front between two spatially homogeneous equilibria and a supercritical Turing bifurcation on one of them. The bifurcation structures of steady circular fronts and localized target patterns are computed in the Turing-stable and Turing-unstable regimes. In particular, localized target patterns grow along the solution branch via ring insertion at the core in a process reminiscent of defect-mediated snaking in one spatial dimension. Stability of axisymmetric solutions on these branches with respect to axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric perturbations is determined, and parameter regimes with stable axisymmetric oscillons are identified. Direct numerical simulations reveal novel depinning dynamics of localized target patterns in the radial direction, and of circular and planar localized hexagonal patterns in the fully two-dimensional system.

  9. Local Factors Determine Plant Community Structure on Closely Neighbored Islands

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jianbo; Jiang, Lin; Yu, Lin; Sun, Que

    2011-01-01

    Despite the recent popularity of the metacommunity concept, ecologists have not evaluated the applicability of different metacommunity frameworks to insular organisms. We surveyed 50 closely spaced islands in the Thousand-Island Lake of China to examine the role of local (environmental) and regional (dispersal) factors in structuring woody plant assemblages (tree and shrub species) on these islands. By partitioning the variation in plant community structure into local and regional causes, we showed that local environmental conditions, specifically island morphometric characteristics, accounted for the majority of the variation in plant community structure among the studied islands. Spatial variables, representing the potential importance of species dispersal, explained little variation. We conclude that one metacommunity framework–species sorting–best characterizes these plant communities. This result reinforces the idea that the traditional approach of emphasizing the local perspective when studying ecological communities continues to hold its value. PMID:21572960

  10. Locally refined block-centred finite-difference groundwater models: Evaluation of parameter sensitivity and the consequences for inverse modelling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehl, S.; Hill, M.C.

    2002-01-01

    Models with local grid refinement, as often required in groundwater models, pose special problems for model calibration. This work investigates the calculation of sensitivities and the performance of regression methods using two existing and one new method of grid refinement. The existing local grid refinement methods considered are: (a) a variably spaced grid in which the grid spacing becomes smaller near the area of interest and larger where such detail is not needed, and (b) telescopic mesh refinement (TMR), which uses the hydraulic heads or fluxes of a regional model to provide the boundary conditions for a locally refined model. The new method has a feedback between the regional and local grids using shared nodes, and thereby, unlike the TMR methods, balances heads and fluxes at the interfacing boundary. Results for sensitivities are compared for the three methods and the effect of the accuracy of sensitivity calculations are evaluated by comparing inverse modelling results. For the cases tested, results indicate that the inaccuracies of the sensitivities calculated using the TMR approach can cause the inverse model to converge to an incorrect solution.

  11. Fully automated localization of multiple pelvic bone structures on MRI.

    PubMed

    Onal, Sinan; Lai-Yuen, Susana; Bao, Paul; Weitzenfeld, Alfredo; Hart, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fully automated localization method for multiple pelvic bone structures on magnetic resonance images (MRI). Pelvic bone structures are currently identified manually on MRI to identify reference points for measurement and evaluation of pelvic organ prolapse (POP). Given that this is a time-consuming and subjective procedure, there is a need to localize pelvic bone structures without any user interaction. However, bone structures are not easily differentiable from soft tissue on MRI as their pixel intensities tend to be very similar. In this research, we present a model that automatically identifies the bounding boxes of the bone structures on MRI using support vector machines (SVM) based classification and non-linear regression model that captures global and local information. Based on the relative locations of pelvic bones and organs, and local information such as texture features, the model identifies the location of the pelvic bone structures by establishing the association between their locations. Results show that the proposed method is able to locate the bone structures of interest accurately. The pubic bone, sacral promontory, and coccyx were correctly detected (DSI > 0.75) in 92%, 90%, and 88% of the testing images. This research aims to enable accurate, consistent and fully automated identification of pelvic bone structures on MRI to facilitate and improve the diagnosis of female pelvic organ prolapse.

  12. Vortex emission accompanies the advection of optical localized structures.

    PubMed

    Haudin, F; Rojas, R G; Bortolozzo, U; Clerc, M G; Residori, S

    2011-02-11

    We show that the advection of optical localized structures is accompanied by the emission of vortices, with phase singularities appearing in the wake of the drifting structure. Localized structures are obtained in a light-valve experiment and made to drift by a mirror tilt in the feedback loop. Pairs of oppositely charged vortices are detected for small drifts, whereas for large drifts a vortex array develops. Observations are supported by numerical simulations and linear stability analysis of the system equations and are expected to be generic for a large class of translated optical patterns.

  13. Deriving quantum theory from its local structure and reversibility.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Gonzalo; Masanes, Lluís; Short, Anthony J; Müller, Markus P

    2012-08-31

    We investigate the class of physical theories with the same local structure as quantum theory but potentially different global structure. It has previously been shown that any bipartite correlations generated by such a theory can be simulated in quantum theory but that this does not hold for tripartite correlations. Here we explore whether imposing an additional constraint on this space of theories-that of dynamical reversibility-will allow us to recover the global quantum structure. In the particular case in which the local systems are identical qubits, we show that any theory admitting at least one continuous reversible interaction must be identical to quantum theory.

  14. Structure of local interactions in complex financial dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, X. F.; Chen, T. T.; Zheng, B.

    2014-01-01

    With the network methods and random matrix theory, we investigate the interaction structure of communities in financial markets. In particular, based on the random matrix decomposition, we clarify that the local interactions between the business sectors (subsectors) are mainly contained in the sector mode. In the sector mode, the average correlation inside the sectors is positive, while that between the sectors is negative. Further, we explore the time evolution of the interaction structure of the business sectors, and observe that the local interaction structure changes dramatically during a financial bubble or crisis. PMID:24936906

  15. Alignment-free local structural search by writhe decomposition.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Degui; Shatsky, Maxim; Brenner, Steven E

    2010-05-01

    Rapid methods for protein structure search enable biological discoveries based on flexibly defined structural similarity, unleashing the power of the ever greater number of solved protein structures. Projection methods show promise for the development of fast structural database search solutions. Projection methods map a structure to a point in a high-dimensional space and compare two structures by measuring distance between their projected points. These methods offer a tremendous increase in speed over residue-level structural alignment methods. However, current projection methods are not practical, partly because they are unable to identify local similarities. We propose a new projection-based approach that can rapidly detect global as well as local structural similarities. Local structural search is enabled by a topology-inspired writhe decomposition protocol that produces a small number of fragments while ensuring that similar structures are cut in a similar manner. In benchmark tests, we show that our method, writher, improves accuracy over existing projection methods in terms of recognizing scop domains out of multi-domain proteins, while maintaining accuracy comparable with existing projection methods in a standard single-domain benchmark test. The source code is available at the following website: http://compbio.berkeley.edu/proj/writher/.

  16. Sampling Realistic Protein Conformations Using Local Structural Bias

    PubMed Central

    Hamelryck, Thomas; Kent, John T; Krogh, Anders

    2006-01-01

    The prediction of protein structure from sequence remains a major unsolved problem in biology. The most successful protein structure prediction methods make use of a divide-and-conquer strategy to attack the problem: a conformational sampling method generates plausible candidate structures, which are subsequently accepted or rejected using an energy function. Conceptually, this often corresponds to separating local structural bias from the long-range interactions that stabilize the compact, native state. However, sampling protein conformations that are compatible with the local structural bias encoded in a given protein sequence is a long-standing open problem, especially in continuous space. We describe an elegant and mathematically rigorous method to do this, and show that it readily generates native-like protein conformations simply by enforcing compactness. Our results have far-reaching implications for protein structure prediction, determination, simulation, and design. PMID:17002495

  17. Reconstruction of biofilm images: combining local and global structural parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Resat, Haluk; Renslow, Ryan S.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-10-20

    Digitized images can be used for quantitative comparison of biofilms grown under different conditions. Using biofilm image reconstruction, it was previously found that biofilms with a completely different look can have nearly identical structural parameters and that the most commonly utilized global structural parameters were not sufficient to uniquely define these biofilms. Here, additional local and global parameters are introduced to show that these parameters considerably increase the reliability of the image reconstruction process. Assessment using human evaluators indicated that the correct identification rate of the reconstructed images increased from 50% to 72% with the introduction of the new parameters into the reconstruction procedure. An expanded set of parameters especially improved the identification of biofilm structures with internal orientational features and of structures in which colony sizes and spatial locations varied. Hence, the newly introduced structural parameter sets helped to better classify the biofilms by incorporating finer local structural details into the reconstruction process.

  18. Local thermal energy as a structural indicator in glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zylberg, Jacques; Lerner, Edan; Bar-Sinai, Yohai; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2017-07-01

    Identifying heterogeneous structures in glasses—such as localized soft spots—and understanding structure-dynamics relations in these systems remain major scientific challenges. Here, we derive an exact expression for the local thermal energy of interacting particles (the mean local potential energy change caused by thermal fluctuations) in glassy systems by a systematic low-temperature expansion. We show that the local thermal energy can attain anomalously large values, inversely related to the degree of softness of localized structures in a glass, determined by a coupling between internal stresses—an intrinsic signature of glassy frustration—anharmonicity and low-frequency vibrational modes. These anomalously large values follow a fat-tailed distribution, with a universal exponent related to the recently observed universal ω4ω4 density of states of quasilocalized low-frequency vibrational modes. When the spatial thermal energy field—a “softness field”—is considered, this power law tail manifests itself by highly localized spots, which are significantly softer than their surroundings. These soft spots are shown to be susceptible to plastic rearrangements under external driving forces, having predictive powers that surpass those of the normal modes-based approach. These results offer a general, system/model-independent, physical/observable-based approach to identify structural properties of quiescent glasses and relate them to glassy dynamics.

  19. Local thermal energy as a structural indicator in glasses.

    PubMed

    Zylberg, Jacques; Lerner, Edan; Bar-Sinai, Yohai; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2017-07-11

    Identifying heterogeneous structures in glasses-such as localized soft spots-and understanding structure-dynamics relations in these systems remain major scientific challenges. Here, we derive an exact expression for the local thermal energy of interacting particles (the mean local potential energy change caused by thermal fluctuations) in glassy systems by a systematic low-temperature expansion. We show that the local thermal energy can attain anomalously large values, inversely related to the degree of softness of localized structures in a glass, determined by a coupling between internal stresses-an intrinsic signature of glassy frustration-anharmonicity and low-frequency vibrational modes. These anomalously large values follow a fat-tailed distribution, with a universal exponent related to the recently observed universal [Formula: see text] density of states of quasilocalized low-frequency vibrational modes. When the spatial thermal energy field-a "softness field"-is considered, this power law tail manifests itself by highly localized spots, which are significantly softer than their surroundings. These soft spots are shown to be susceptible to plastic rearrangements under external driving forces, having predictive powers that surpass those of the normal modes-based approach. These results offer a general, system/model-independent, physical/observable-based approach to identify structural properties of quiescent glasses and relate them to glassy dynamics.

  20. Protein domain assignment from the recurrence of locally similar structures

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Chin-Hsien; Sam, Vichetra; Gibrat, Jean-Francois; Garnier, Jean; Munson, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Domains are basic units of protein structure and essential for exploring protein fold space and structure evolution. With the structural genomics initiative, the number of protein structures in the Protein Databank (PDB) is increasing dramatically and domain assignments need to be done automatically. Most existing structural domain assignment programs define domains using the compactness of the domains and/or the number and strength of intra-domain versus inter-domain contacts. Here we present a different approach based on the recurrence of locally similar structural pieces (LSSPs) found by one-against-all structure comparisons with a dataset of 6,373 protein chains from the PDB. Residues of the query protein are clustered using LSSPs via three different procedures to define domains. This approach gives results that are comparable to several existing programs that use geometrical and other structural information explicitly. Remarkably, most of the proteins that contribute the LSSPs defining a domain do not themselves contain the domain of interest. This study shows that domains can be defined by a collection of relatively small locally similar structural pieces containing, on average, four secondary structure elements. In addition, it indicates that domains are indeed made of recurrent small structural pieces that are used to build protein structures of many different folds as suggested by recent studies. PMID:21287617

  1. Local structure and polarization in Pb containing ferroelectric oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egami, T.; Dmowski, W.; Akbas, M.; Davies, P. K.

    1998-06-01

    While the Pb containing ferroelectric and antiferroelectric oxides show a large variety in crystal structure, the pulsed neutron atomic pair-distribution function (PDF) studies indicate that their local atomic structures are surprisingly similar to each other. In particular the environment of Pb is nearly independent of composition, with Pb being strongly off-centered in the PbO12 cluster, resulting in a large local polarization. A new model is proposed to describe the interplay between the Pb polarization and the random local structural fluctuation. This model explains the relaxor ferroelectricity from a general point of view, while other models such as nano-domain space charge model and the random field model were introduced specifically for hetero-valent systems such as Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3 (PMN).

  2. Results of a pooled analysis of IOERT containing multimodality treatment for locally recurrent rectal cancer: Results of 565 patients of two major treatment centres.

    PubMed

    Holman, F A; Bosman, S J; Haddock, M G; Gunderson, L L; Kusters, M; Nieuwenhuijzen, G A P; van den Berg, H; Nelson, H; Rutten, H J

    2017-01-01

    Aim of this study is analysing the pooled results of Intra-Operative Electron beam Radiotherapy (IOERT) containing multimodality treatment of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC) of two major treatment centres. Five hundred sixty five patients with LRRC who underwent multimodality-treatment up to 2010 were studied. The preferred treatment was preoperative chemo-radiotherapy, surgery and IOERT. In uni- and multivariate analyses risk factors for local re-recurrence, distant metastasis free survival, relapse free survival, cancer-specific survival and overall survival were studied. Two hundred fifty one patients (44%) underwent a radical (R0) resection. In patients who had no preoperative treatment the R0 resection rate was 26%, and this was 43% and 50% for patients who respectively received preoperative re-(chemo)-irradiation or full-course radiotherapy (p < 0.0001). After uni- and multivariate analysis it was found that all oncologic parameters were influenced by preoperative treatment and radicality of the resection. Patients who were re-irradiated had a similar outcome compared to patients, who were radiotherapy naive and could undergo full-course treatment, except the chance of local re-recurrence was higher for re-irradiated patients. Waiting-time between preoperative radiotherapy and IOERT was inversely correlated with the chance of local re-recurrence, and positively correlated with the chance of a R0 resection. R0 resection is the most important factor influencing oncologic parameters in treatment of LRRC. Preoperative (chemo)-radiotherapy increases the chance of achieving radical resections and improves oncologic outcomes. Short waiting-times between preoperative treatment and IOERT improves the effectiveness of IOERT to reduce the chance of a local re-recurrence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  3. Strain localization and percolation of stable structure in amorphous solids.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yunfeng; Falk, Michael L

    2005-08-26

    Spontaneous strain localization occurs during mechanical tests of a model amorphous solid simulated using molecular dynamics. The degree of localization depends upon the extent of structural relaxation prior to mechanical testing. In the most rapidly quenched samples higher strain rates lead to increased localization, while the more gradually quenched samples exhibit the opposite strain rate dependence. This transition coincides with the k-core percolation of atoms with quasi-crystal-like short range order. The authors infer the existence of a related microstructural length scale.

  4. Local function conservation in sequence and structure space.

    PubMed

    Weinhold, Nils; Sander, Oliver; Domingues, Francisco S; Lengauer, Thomas; Sommer, Ingolf

    2008-07-04

    We assess the variability of protein function in protein sequence and structure space. Various regions in this space exhibit considerable difference in the local conservation of molecular function. We analyze and capture local function conservation by means of logistic curves. Based on this analysis, we propose a method for predicting molecular function of a query protein with known structure but unknown function. The prediction method is rigorously assessed and compared with a previously published function predictor. Furthermore, we apply the method to 500 functionally unannotated PDB structures and discuss selected examples. The proposed approach provides a simple yet consistent statistical model for the complex relations between protein sequence, structure, and function. The GOdot method is available online (http://godot.bioinf.mpi-inf.mpg.de).

  5. Stabilizing hierarchical compensation for locally controlled large flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, B.; Balas, M.

    1989-01-01

    A two-level hierarchical control strategy is proposed for large flexible space structures. The lower level consists of a set of local controllers. The higher level is a stabilizing compensator to account for any instabilities caused by controller-structure interaction with unmodeled dynamics. The advantage of this hierarchical strategy is that the lower level can be designed to meet the performance requirements, and the higher level can be designed independently to produce overall stability.

  6. Local structure analysis in ab initio liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santra, Biswajit; DiStasio, Robert A., Jr.; Martelli, Fausto; Car, Roberto

    2015-09-01

    Within the framework of density functional theory, the inclusion of exact exchange and non-local van der Waals/dispersion (vdW) interactions is crucial for predicting a microscopic structure of ambient liquid water that quantitatively agrees with experiment. In this work, we have used the local structure index (LSI) order parameter to analyse the local structure in such highly accurate ab initio liquid water. At ambient conditions, the LSI probability distribution, P(I ), was unimodal with most water molecules characterised by more disordered high-density-like local environments. With thermal excitations removed, the resultant bimodal P(I ) in the inherent potential energy surface (IPES) exhibited a 3:1 ratio between high-density- and low-density-like molecules, with the latter forming small connected clusters amid the predominant population. By considering the spatial correlations and hydrogen bond network topologies among water molecules with the same LSI identities, we demonstrate that the signatures of the experimentally observed low- and high-density amorphous phases of ice are present in the IPES of ambient liquid water. Analysis of the LSI autocorrelation function uncovered a persistence time of ∼ 4 ps - a finding consistent with the fact that natural thermal fluctuations are responsible for transitions between these distinct yet transient local aqueous environments in ambient liquid water.

  7. How lasing localized structures evolve out of passive mode locking.

    PubMed

    Marconi, M; Javaloyes, J; Balle, S; Giudici, M

    2014-06-06

    We investigate the relationship between passive mode locking and the formation of time-localized structures in the output intensity of a laser. We show how the mode-locked pulses transform into lasing localized structures, allowing for individual addressing and arbitrary low repetition rates. Our analysis reveals that this occurs when (i) the cavity round-trip is much larger than the slowest medium time scale, namely the gain recovery time, and (ii) the mode-locked solution coexists with the zero intensity (off) solution. These conditions enable the coexistence of a large quantity of stable solutions, each of them being characterized by a different number of pulses per round-trip and with different arrangements. Then, each mode-locked pulse becomes localized, i.e., individually addressable.

  8. One Single Static Measurement Predicts Wave Localization in Complex Structures.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Gautier; Gondel, Alexane; Dubois, Marc; Atlan, Michael; Feppon, Florian; Labbé, Aimé; Gillot, Camille; Garelli, Alix; Ernoult, Maxence; Mayboroda, Svitlana; Filoche, Marcel; Sebbah, Patrick

    2016-08-12

    A recent theoretical breakthrough has brought a new tool, called the localization landscape, for predicting the localization regions of vibration modes in complex or disordered systems. Here, we report on the first experiment which measures the localization landscape and demonstrates its predictive power. Holographic measurement of the static deformation under uniform load of a thin plate with complex geometry provides direct access to the landscape function. When put in vibration, this system shows modes precisely confined within the subregions delineated by the landscape function. Also the maxima of this function match the measured eigenfrequencies, while the minima of the valley network gives the frequencies at which modes become extended. This approach fully characterizes the low frequency spectrum of a complex structure from a single static measurement. It paves the way for controlling and engineering eigenmodes in any vibratory system, especially where a structural or microscopic description is not accessible.

  9. Local Structure of CuIn3Se5

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C. H.; Wei, S. H.; Leyarovska, N.; Johnson, J. W.; Zhang, S. B.; Stanbery, B. J.; Anderson, T. J.

    2000-01-01

    The results of a detailed EXAFS study of the Cu-K, In-K, and Se-K edges CuIn3Se5 are reported. The Cu and In first nearest neighbor local structures were found to be almost identical to those in CuInSe2.

  10. The Changing Market Structure of Local Television News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Angela

    The growth in competition for revenues, along with the advent of cable, independent television and video cassette recorders (VCR), may signify a change in the market structure of local television news. To explain if and how this change may be occurring, an explanation of economic theory as well as evidence from "Broadcast and Cable…

  11. Constrained spectral clustering under a local proximity structure assumption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagstaff, Kiri; Xu, Qianjun; des Jardins, Marie

    2005-01-01

    This work focuses on incorporating pairwise constraints into a spectral clustering algorithm. A new constrained spectral clustering method is proposed, as well as an active constraint acquisition technique and a heuristic for parameter selection. We demonstrate that our constrained spectral clustering method, CSC, works well when the data exhibits what we term local proximity structure.

  12. Local structure of numerically generated worm hole spacetime.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siino, M.

    The author investigates the evolution of the apparent horizons in a numerically gererated worm hole spacetime. The behavior of the apparent horizons is affected by the dynamics of the matter field. By using the local mass of the system, he interprets the evolution of the worm hole structure.

  13. Structures of Participation in the "University of Local Knowledge"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Penny; Irish, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    "Structures of Participation" concerns a recent media arts project, the University of Local Knowledge (ULK). ULK is simultaneously a critique of established academic institutions and disciplines and a system for self-organized learning among the residents of Knowle West, an area of south Bristol (UK). Beginning in 2009, the Knowle West…

  14. Effects of Temperature on Structure and Mobility of the <100> Edge Dislocation in Body-Centred Cubic Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Terentyev, Dmitry; Osetskiy, Yury N; Bacon, David J

    2010-01-01

    Dislocation segments with Burgers vector b = <1 0 0> are formed during deformation of body-centred-cubic (bcc) metals by the interaction between dislocations with b = 1/2<1 1 1>. Such segments are also created by reactions between dislocations and dislocation loops in irradiated bcc metals. The obstacle resistance produced by these segments on gliding dislocations is controlled by their mobility, which is determined in turn by the atomic structure of their cores. The core structure of a straight <1 0 0> edge dislocation is investigated here by atomic-scale computer simulation for {alpha}-iron using three different interatomic potentials. At low temperature the dislocation has a non-planar core consisting of two 1/2<1 1 1> fractional dislocations with atomic disregistry spread on planes inclined to the main glide plane. Increasing temperature modifies this core structure and so reduces the critical applied shear stress for glide of the <1 0 0> dislocation. It is concluded that the response of the <1 0 0> edge dislocation to temperature or applied stress determines specific reaction pathways occurring between a moving dislocation and 1/2<1 1 1> dislocation loops. The implications of this for plastic flow in unirradiated and irradiated ferritic materials are discussed and demonstrated by examples.

  15. Localization of acoustic modes in periodic porous silicon structures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The propagation of longitudinal acoustic waves in multilayer structures based on porous silicon and the experimental measurement of acoustic transmission for the structures in the gigahertz range are reported and studied theoretically. The considered structures exhibit band gaps in the transmission spectrum and these are localized modes inside the band gap, coming from defect layers introduced in periodic systems. The frequency at which the acoustic resonances appear can be tuned by changing the porosity and/or thickness of the defect layer. PMID:25206317

  16. OPEN PROBLEM: Spatially localized structures in dissipative systems: open problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobloch, E.

    2008-04-01

    Stationary spatially localized structures, sometimes called dissipative solitons, arise in many interesting and important applications, including buckling of slender structures under compression, nonlinear optics, fluid flow, surface catalysis, neurobiology and many more. The recent resurgence in interest in these structures has led to significant advances in our understanding of the origin and properties of these states, and these in turn suggest new questions, both general and system-specific. This paper surveys these results focusing on open problems, both mathematical and computational, as well as on new applications.

  17. Local magnetic structure determination using polarized neutron holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szakál, Alex; Markó, Márton; Cser, László

    2015-05-01

    A unique and important property of the neutron is that it possesses magnetic moment. This property is widely used for determination of magnetic structure of crystalline samples observing the magnetic components of the diffraction peaks. Investigations of diffraction patterns give information only about the averaged structure of a crystal but for discovering of local spin arrangement around a specific (e.g., impurity) nucleus remains still a challenging problem. Neutron holography is a useful tool to investigate the local structure around a specific nucleus embedded in a crystal lattice. The method has been successfully applied experimentally in several cases using non-magnetic short range interaction of the neutron and the nucleus. A mathematical model of the hologram using interaction between magnetic moment of the atom and the neutron spin for polarized neutron holography is provided. Validity of a polarized neutron holographic experiment is demonstrated by applying the proposed method on model systems.

  18. Local magnetic structure determination using polarized neutron holography

    SciTech Connect

    Szakál, Alex Markó, Márton Cser, László

    2015-05-07

    A unique and important property of the neutron is that it possesses magnetic moment. This property is widely used for determination of magnetic structure of crystalline samples observing the magnetic components of the diffraction peaks. Investigations of diffraction patterns give information only about the averaged structure of a crystal but for discovering of local spin arrangement around a specific (e.g., impurity) nucleus remains still a challenging problem. Neutron holography is a useful tool to investigate the local structure around a specific nucleus embedded in a crystal lattice. The method has been successfully applied experimentally in several cases using non-magnetic short range interaction of the neutron and the nucleus. A mathematical model of the hologram using interaction between magnetic moment of the atom and the neutron spin for polarized neutron holography is provided. Validity of a polarized neutron holographic experiment is demonstrated by applying the proposed method on model systems.

  19. Topological framework for local structure analysis in condensed matter

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Emanuel A.; Han, Jian; Srolovitz, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Physical systems are frequently modeled as sets of points in space, each representing the position of an atom, molecule, or mesoscale particle. As many properties of such systems depend on the underlying ordering of their constituent particles, understanding that structure is a primary objective of condensed matter research. Although perfect crystals are fully described by a set of translation and basis vectors, real-world materials are never perfect, as thermal vibrations and defects introduce significant deviation from ideal order. Meanwhile, liquids and glasses present yet more complexity. A complete understanding of structure thus remains a central, open problem. Here we propose a unified mathematical framework, based on the topology of the Voronoi cell of a particle, for classifying local structure in ordered and disordered systems that is powerful and practical. We explain the underlying reason why this topological description of local structure is better suited for structural analysis than continuous descriptions. We demonstrate the connection of this approach to the behavior of physical systems and explore how crystalline structure is compromised at elevated temperatures. We also illustrate potential applications to identifying defects in plastically deformed polycrystals at high temperatures, automating analysis of complex structures, and characterizing general disordered systems. PMID:26460045

  20. Mapping local deformation behavior in single cell metal lattice structures

    DOE PAGES

    Carlton, Holly D.; Lind, Jonathan; Messner, Mark C.; ...

    2017-02-08

    The deformation behavior of metal lattice structures is extremely complex and challenging to predict, especially since strain is not uniformly distributed throughout the structure. Understanding and predicting the failure behavior for these types of light-weighting structures is of great interest due to the excellent scaling of stiffness- and strength-to weight ratios they display. Therefore, there is a need to perform simplified experiments that probe unit cell mechanisms. This study reports on high resolution mapping of the heterogeneous structural response of single unit cells to the macro-scale loading condition. Two types of structures, known to show different stress-strain responses, were evaluatedmore » using synchrotron radiation micro-tomography while performing in-situ uniaxial compression tests to capture the local micro-strain deformation. These structures included the octet-truss, a stretch-dominated lattice, and the rhombic-dodecahedron, a bend-dominated lattice. The tomographic analysis showed that the stretch- and bend-dominated lattices exhibit different failure mechanisms and that the defects built into the structure cause a heterogeneous localized deformation response. Also shown here is a change in failure mode for stretch-dominated lattices, where there appears to be a transition from buckling to plastic yielding for samples with a relative density between 10 and 20%. In conclusion, the experimental results were also used to inform computational studies designed to predict the mesoscale deformation behavior of lattice structures. Here an equivalent continuum model and a finite element model were used to predict both local strain fields and mechanical behavior of lattices with different topologies.« less

  1. Tracking Coherent Structures and Source Localization in Geophysical Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgoston, Eric; Hsieh, Ani; Schwartz, Ira; Yecko, Philip

    There has been a steady increase in the deployment of autonomous underwater and surface vehicles for applications such as ocean monitoring, tracking of marine processes, and forecasting contaminant transport. The underwater environment poses unique challenges since robots must operate in a communication and localization-limited environment where their dynamics are tightly coupled with the environmental dynamics. This work presents current efforts in understanding the impact of geophysical fluid dynamics on underwater vehicle control and autonomy. The focus of the talk is on the use of collaborative vehicles to track Lagrangian coherent structures and to localize contaminant spills. Research supported by the National Science Foundation and the Office of Naval Research.

  2. Functional implications of local DNA structures in regulatory motifs.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Qian

    2013-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of DNA has been proposed to be a major determinant for functional transcription factors (TFs) and DNA interaction. Here, we use hydroxyl radical cleavage pattern as a measure of local DNA structure. We compared the conservation between DNA sequence and structure in terms of information content and attempted to assess the functional implications of DNA structures in regulatory motifs. We used statistical methods to evaluate the structural divergence of substituting a single position within a binding site and applied them to a collection of putative regulatory motifs. The following are our major observations: (i) we observed more information in structural alignment than in the corresponding sequence alignment for most of the transcriptional factors; (ii) for each TF, majority of positions have more information in the structural alignment as compared to the sequence alignment; (iii) we further defined a DNA structural divergence score (SD score) for each wild-type and mutant pair that is distinguished by single-base mutation. The SD score for benign mutations is significantly lower than that of switch mutations. This indicates structural conservation is also important for TFBS to be functional and DNA structures will provide previously unappreciated information for TF to realize the binding specificity.

  3. Gamma-tubulin is required for the structure and function of the microtubule organizing centre in Drosophila neuroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Sunkel, C E; Gomes, R; Sampaio, P; Perdigão, J; González, C

    1995-01-01

    We report that in Drosophila, gamma-tubulin is required for the structure as well as the function of microtubule organizing centres (MTOCs). This conclusion is based on the identification and phenotypic characterization of a mutant allele of the gamma-tubulin gene located at region 23C of the polytene chromosome map. This mutation, which we have called gamma-tub23CPl, is caused by the insertion of a P-element within the 5' untranslated leader of the gamma-tubulin transcript. Northern and Western analysis show that gamma-tub23CPl is either a null or a very severe hypomorph as no gamma-tubulin mRNA or protein can be detected in mutant individuals. Visualization of DNA, MTOCs and microtubules by confocal laser scanning microscopy of cells from individuals homozygous for gamma-tub23CPl reveals a series of phenotypic abnormalities. Some of these are similar to those observed after disruption of gamma-tubulin function in other organisms, including mitotic arrest and a dramatic decrease in the number of microtubules, but, in addition, we have observed that mutation in this gene also results in highly abnormal MTOCs which show a variety of shapes and sizes which we never observed in wild type cells. These results show that gamma-tubulin is required for both structural and functional roles in the MTOCs. Images PMID:7828594

  4. Nucleic acid structure analysis: Local, mathematically rigorous, comparable

    SciTech Connect

    Babcock, M.S.

    1993-01-01

    A more sophisticated mathematical treatments for analyzing nucleic acid coordinate data is presented. The methodology is both rigorous and comparable for parameterizing nucleic acids in terms of the local structural morphology of complementary and neighboring base pairs. Chapter 1 clearly defines the problems of nucleic acid structure parameterization by examining the consequences of the EMBO workshop guidelines published in 1989. Chapter 2 defines mathematics to rigorously and comparably calculate all of the parameters for nucleic acid structure from a local viewpoint. The mathematics satisfies all EMBO guidelines for local structural parameters. One of the main features making this program flexible is that any base pair relationship can be rigorously analyzed. This is because the meaning of zero for the complementary base parameters is clearly definable for any base pairing relationship. Chapter 3 analyses and explains why certain pairwise parameter correlations were observed between rotational and translational parameters. It was observed that the method of calculating the rotational parameters greatly affected the calculated translational parameters. As a result of our analysis, we determined the optimum location about which rotations should be performed in order to reduce and/or eliminate the correlations which are artifacts of the mathematics employed and do not reflect true structural properties of nucleic acids. Chapter 4 presents an analysis of the available nucleic acid X-ray crystallographic structural data, showing that the experimental base pairs do not generally have the ideal Watson-Crick structure. By utilizing a hybrid between helical and Cartesian parameterization methods, the relative distribution of the complementary base parameters was examined as a function of the nearest neighboring base pairs. The final chapter includes a review article explaining each of the available methods in plain English as well as giving the mathematics.

  5. Fluctuations and local ice structure in model supercooled water.

    PubMed

    Overduin, S D; Patey, G N

    2015-09-07

    Large-scale simulations (up to 32,000 molecules) are used to analyze local structures and fluctuations for the TIP4P/2005 and TIP5P water models, under deeply supercooled conditions, near previously proposed liquid-liquid critical points. Bulk freezing does not occur in our simulations, but correlations between molecules with local ice-like structure (ice-like molecules) are strong and long ranged (∼4 nm), exceeding the shortest dimension of smaller simulation cells at the lowest temperatures considered. Correlations between ice-like molecules decay slowly at low temperature, on the order of a hundred nanoseconds. Local ice-like structure is strongly correlated with highly tetrahedral liquid structure at all times, both structures contribute to density fluctuations, and to the associated anomalous scattering. For the TIP4P/2005 and TIP5P models, we show that the apparent spontaneous liquid-liquid phase separations, recently reported [T. Yagasaki, M. Matsumoto, and H. Tanaka, Phys. Rev. E 89, 020301 (2014)] for small rectangular simulation cells below the proposed critical points, exhibit strong system size dependence and do not occur at all in the largest systems we consider. Furthermore, in the smaller rectangular systems where layers of different densities do occur, we find that the appearance of a region of low density is always accompanied simultaneously by an excess of local ice density, with no separation in time. Our results suggest that the density differences observed in direct simulations for the two models considered here are likely due to long-range correlations between ice-like molecules and do not provide strong evidence of liquid-liquid phase separation.

  6. Exploiting orientation-selective DEER: determining molecular structure in systems containing Cu(ii) centres.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Alice M; Jones, Michael W; Lovett, Janet E; Gaule, Thembanikosi G; McPherson, Michael J; Dilworth, Jonathan R; Timmel, Christiane R; Harmer, Jeffrey R

    2016-02-17

    Orientation-selective DEER (Double Electron-Electron Resonance) measurements were conducted on a series of rigid and flexible molecules containing Cu(ii) ions. A system with two rigidly held Cu(ii) ions was afforded by the protein homo-dimer of copper amine oxidase from Arthrobacter globiformis. This system provided experimental DEER data between two Cu(ii) ions with a well-defined distance and relative orientation to assess the accuracy of the methodology. Evaluation of orientation-selective DEER (os DEER) on systems with limited flexibility was probed using a series of porphyrin-based Cu(ii)-nitroxide and Cu(ii)-Cu(ii) model systems of well-defined lengths synthesized for this project. Density functional theory was employed to generate molecular models of the conformers for each porphyrin-based Cu(ii) dimer studied. Excellent agreement was found between DEER traces simulated using these computed conformers and the experimental data. The performance of different parameterised structural models in simulating the experimental DEER data was also investigated. The results of this analysis demonstrate the degree to which the DEER data define the relative orientation of the two Cu(ii) ions and highlight the need to choose a parameterised model that captures the essential features of the flexibility (rotational freedom) of the system being studied.

  7. Recognition of Local DNA Structures by p53 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Brázda, Václav; Coufal, Jan

    2017-01-01

    p53 plays critical roles in regulating cell cycle, apoptosis, senescence and metabolism and is commonly mutated in human cancer. These roles are achieved by interaction with other proteins, but particularly by interaction with DNA. As a transcription factor, p53 is well known to bind consensus target sequences in linear B-DNA. Recent findings indicate that p53 binds with higher affinity to target sequences that form cruciform DNA structure. Moreover, p53 binds very tightly to non-B DNA structures and local DNA structures are increasingly recognized to influence the activity of wild-type and mutant p53. Apart from cruciform structures, p53 binds to quadruplex DNA, triplex DNA, DNA loops, bulged DNA and hemicatenane DNA. In this review, we describe local DNA structures and summarize information about interactions of p53 with these structural DNA motifs. These recent data provide important insights into the complexity of the p53 pathway and the functional consequences of wild-type and mutant p53 activation in normal and tumor cells. PMID:28208646

  8. Recognition of Local DNA Structures by p53 Protein.

    PubMed

    Brázda, Václav; Coufal, Jan

    2017-02-10

    p53 plays critical roles in regulating cell cycle, apoptosis, senescence and metabolism and is commonly mutated in human cancer. These roles are achieved by interaction with other proteins, but particularly by interaction with DNA. As a transcription factor, p53 is well known to bind consensus target sequences in linear B-DNA. Recent findings indicate that p53 binds with higher affinity to target sequences that form cruciform DNA structure. Moreover, p53 binds very tightly to non-B DNA structures and local DNA structures are increasingly recognized to influence the activity of wild-type and mutant p53. Apart from cruciform structures, p53 binds to quadruplex DNA, triplex DNA, DNA loops, bulged DNA and hemicatenane DNA. In this review, we describe local DNA structures and summarize information about interactions of p53 with these structural DNA motifs. These recent data provide important insights into the complexity of the p53 pathway and the functional consequences of wild-type and mutant p53 activation in normal and tumor cells.

  9. Toward structurally integrated locally resonant metamaterials for vibration attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmied, Jascha U.; Sugino, Christopher; Bergamini, Andrea; Ermanni, Paolo; Ruzzene, Massimo; Erturk, Alper

    2017-04-01

    In this contribution, we explore the use of locally resonant metamaterials for multi-functional structural load- bearing concepts using analytical, numerical, and experimental techniques. Locally resonant metamaterials exhibit bandgaps at wavelengths much larger than the lattice dimension. This is a promising feature for low- frequency vibration attenuation. The presented work aims to investigate highly integrated structural concepts and experimentally validated prototypes for vibration reduction in load-bearing applications. The goal is to explore and extend the design space of lightweight structural systems, by designing multi-functional periodic structural elements, preserving structural stiffness while concurrently enabling sufficiently wideband damping performance over a target frequency range of interest. Following a generalized theoretical modeling framework for bandgap design and analysis in finite structures, the focus is placed on the design, fabrication, and analysis of a load-carrying frame development with internally resonant components. Finite-element modeling is employed to design and analyze the frequency response of the frame and simplified analytical solution is compared with this numerical solution. Experimental validations are presented for a 3D-printed prototype. The effects of various parameters are reported both based on numerical and experimental findings.

  10. Monaural sound localization based on structure-induced acoustic resonance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Keonwook; Kim, Youngwoong

    2015-02-06

    A physical structure such as a cylindrical pipe controls the propagated sound spectrum in a predictable way that can be used to localize the sound source. This paper designs a monaural sound localization system based on multiple pyramidal horns around a single microphone. The acoustic resonance within the horn provides a periodicity in the spectral domain known as the fundamental frequency which is inversely proportional to the radial horn length. Once the system accurately estimates the fundamental frequency, the horn length and corresponding angle can be derived by the relationship. The modified Cepstrum algorithm is employed to evaluate the fundamental frequency. In an anechoic chamber, localization experiments over azimuthal configuration show that up to 61% of the proper signal is recognized correctly with 30% misfire. With a speculated detection threshold, the system estimates direction 52% in positive-to-positive and 34% in negative-to-positive decision rate, on average.

  11. A local average distance descriptor for flexible protein structure comparison

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Protein structures are flexible and often show conformational changes upon binding to other molecules to exert biological functions. As protein structures correlate with characteristic functions, structure comparison allows classification and prediction of proteins of undefined functions. However, most comparison methods treat proteins as rigid bodies and cannot retrieve similarities of proteins with large conformational changes effectively. Results In this paper, we propose a novel descriptor, local average distance (LAD), based on either the geodesic distances (GDs) or Euclidean distances (EDs) for pairwise flexible protein structure comparison. The proposed method was compared with 7 structural alignment methods and 7 shape descriptors on two datasets comprising hinge bending motions from the MolMovDB, and the results have shown that our method outperformed all other methods regarding retrieving similar structures in terms of precision-recall curve, retrieval success rate, R-precision, mean average precision and F1-measure. Conclusions Both ED- and GD-based LAD descriptors are effective to search deformed structures and overcome the problems of self-connection caused by a large bending motion. We have also demonstrated that the ED-based LAD is more robust than the GD-based descriptor. The proposed algorithm provides an alternative approach for blasting structure database, discovering previously unknown conformational relationships, and reorganizing protein structure classification. PMID:24694083

  12. Earth Structure, Ice Mass Changes, and the Local Dynamic Geoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harig, C.; Simons, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    Spherical Slepian localization functions are a useful method for studying regional mass changes observed by satellite gravimetry. By projecting data onto a sparse basis set, the local field can be estimated more easily than with the full spherical harmonic basis. We have used this method previously to estimate the ice mass change in Greenland from GRACE data, and it can also be applied to other planetary problems such as global magnetic fields. Earth's static geoid, in contrast to the time-variable field, is in large part related to the internal density and rheological structure of the Earth. Past studies have used dynamic geoid kernels to relate this density structure and the internal deformation it induces to the surface geopotential at large scales. These now classical studies of the eighties and nineties were able to estimate the mantle's radial rheological profile, placing constraints on the ratio between upper and lower mantle viscosity. By combining these two methods, spherical Slepian localization and dynamic geoid kernels, we have created local dynamic geoid kernels which are sensitive only to density variations within an area of interest. With these kernels we can estimate the approximate local radial rheological structure that best explains the locally observed geoid on a regional basis. First-order differences of the regional mantle viscosity structure are accessible to this technique. In this contribution we present our latest, as yet unpublished results on the geographical and temporal pattern of ice mass changes in Antarctica over the past decade, and we introduce a new approach to extract regional information about the internal structure of the Earth from the static global gravity field. Both sets of results are linked in terms of the relevant physics, but also in being developed from the marriage of Slepian functions and geoid kernels. We make predictions on the utility of our approach to derive fully three-dimensional rheological Earth models, to

  13. Local density corrected three-body distribution functions for probing local structure reorganization in liquids.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Anirban; Hofer, Thomas S; Rode, Bernd M

    2008-11-28

    Three-body distribution functions are calculated for metal ions in an aqueous medium in order to investigate and characterise solvent structure reorganization. Based on the existing formulation of three body correlation function, a local density correction is introduced to enable a comparison of different sub-regions within a solvate as well as different systems, thus taking into account the varying density arising from the influence of the solute.

  14. Dynamics of Localized Structures in Systems with Broken Parity Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javaloyes, J.; Camelin, P.; Marconi, M.; Giudici, M.

    2016-04-01

    A great variety of nonlinear dissipative systems are known to host structures having a correlation range much shorter than the size of the system. The dynamics of these localized structures (LSs) has been investigated so far in situations featuring parity symmetry. In this Letter we extend this analysis to systems lacking this property. We show that the LS drifting speed in a parameter varying landscape is not simply proportional to the parameter gradient, as found in parity preserving situations. The symmetry breaking implies a new contribution to the velocity field which is a function of the parameter value, thus leading to a new paradigm for LSs manipulation. We illustrate this general concept by studying the trajectories of the LSs found in a passively mode-locked laser operated in the localization regime. Moreover, the lack of parity affects significantly LSs interactions which are governed by asymmetrical repulsive forces.

  15. Alfvénic localized structures in partially ionized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borhanian, Jafar; Rezaei, Arash

    2017-02-01

    The existence and dynamics of Alfvénic localized structures are investigated in partially ionized plasmas. We have employed the Hall magnetohydrodynamics model for partially ionized plasmas and shown that the evolution of a weakly nonlinear and weakly dispersive Alfvén wave is governed by a derivative nonlinear Schrödinger (DNLS) type equation. In the Hall effect domination limit, this equation reduces to a standard DNLS equation that possesses localized solutions in the form of solitons and rogue waves. The dependence of the profile of these structures on the Hall parameter is addressed. When the ohmic and ambipolar effects are small but finite in comparison to the Hall effect, the evolution equation takes the form of a perturbed DNLS equation. In this limit, the dynamics of envelope soliton solution is examined by means of the soliton perturbation method, the moment method, to be precise.

  16. Neuronal selectivity and local map structure in visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Nauhaus, I.; Benucci, A.; Carandini, M.; Ringach, D. L.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The organization of primary visual cortex into functional maps makes individual cells operate in a variety of contexts. For instance, some neurons lie in regions of fairly homogeneous orientation preference (iso-orientation domains), while others lie in regions with a variety of preferences (e.g., pinwheel centers). We asked whether this diversity in local map structure correlates with the degree of selectivity of spike responses. We used a novel combination of imaging and electrophysiology to reveal that neurons in regions of homogeneous orientation preference have much sharper tuning. Moreover, in both monkeys and cats, a common principle links the structure of the orientation map, on the spatial scale of dendritic integration, to the degree of selectivity of individual cells. We conclude that neural computation is not invariant across the cortical surface: its relationship to local context must be considered by theories of receptive field wiring and map development. PMID:18341988

  17. Local structure co-occurrence pattern for image retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ke; Zhang, Fan; Lu, Jia; Lu, Yinghua; Kong, Jun; Zhang, Ming

    2016-03-01

    Image description and annotation is an active research topic in content-based image retrieval. How to utilize human visual perception is a key approach to intelligent image feature extraction and representation. This paper has proposed an image feature descriptor called the local structure co-occurrence pattern (LSCP). LSCP extracts the whole visual perception for an image by building a local binary structure, and it is represented by a color-shape co-occurrence matrix which explores the relationship of multivisual feature spaces according to visual attention mechanism. As a result, LSCP not only describes low-level visual features integrated with texture feature, color feature, and shape feature but also bridges high-level semantic comprehension. Extensive experimental results on an image retrieval task on the benchmark datasets, corel-10,000, MIT VisTex, and INRIA Holidays, have demonstrated the usefulness, effectiveness, and robustness of the proposed LSCP.

  18. Electronic structure and localized states in a model amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, G.; Delerue, C.; Lannoo, M.

    1998-03-01

    The electronic structure of a model amorphous silicon (a-Si) represented by a supercell of 4096 silicon atoms [B.R. Djordjevic, M.F. Thorpe, and F. Wooten, Phys. Rev. B 52, 5685 (1995)] and of a model hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) that we have built from the a-Si model are calculated in the tight-binding approximation. The band edges near the gap are characterized by exponential tails of localized states induced mainly by the variations in bond angles. The spatial localization of the states is compared between a-Si and a-Si:H. Comparison with experiments suggests that the structural models give good descriptions of the amorphous materials.

  19. The local spiral structure of the Milky Way

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ye; Reid, Mark; Dame, Thomas; Menten, Karl; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Li, Jingjing; Brunthaler, Andreas; Moscadelli, Luca; Zhang, Bo; Zheng, Xingwu

    2016-01-01

    The nature of the spiral structure of the Milky Way has long been debated. Only in the last decade have astronomers been able to accurately measure distances to a substantial number of high-mass star-forming regions, the classic tracers of spiral structure in galaxies. We report distance measurements at radio wavelengths using the Very Long Baseline Array for eight regions of massive star formation near the Local spiral arm of the Milky Way. Combined with previous measurements, these observations reveal that the Local Arm is larger than previously thought, and both its pitch angle and star formation rate are comparable to those of the Galaxy’s major spiral arms, such as Sagittarius and Perseus. Toward the constellation Cygnus, sources in the Local Arm extend for a great distance along our line of sight and roughly along the solar orbit. Because of this orientation, these sources cluster both on the sky and in velocity to form the complex and long enigmatic Cygnus X region. We also identify a spur that branches between the Local and Sagittarius spiral arms. PMID:27704048

  20. The local spiral structure of the Milky Way.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ye; Reid, Mark; Dame, Thomas; Menten, Karl; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Li, Jingjing; Brunthaler, Andreas; Moscadelli, Luca; Zhang, Bo; Zheng, Xingwu

    2016-09-01

    The nature of the spiral structure of the Milky Way has long been debated. Only in the last decade have astronomers been able to accurately measure distances to a substantial number of high-mass star-forming regions, the classic tracers of spiral structure in galaxies. We report distance measurements at radio wavelengths using the Very Long Baseline Array for eight regions of massive star formation near the Local spiral arm of the Milky Way. Combined with previous measurements, these observations reveal that the Local Arm is larger than previously thought, and both its pitch angle and star formation rate are comparable to those of the Galaxy's major spiral arms, such as Sagittarius and Perseus. Toward the constellation Cygnus, sources in the Local Arm extend for a great distance along our line of sight and roughly along the solar orbit. Because of this orientation, these sources cluster both on the sky and in velocity to form the complex and long enigmatic Cygnus X region. We also identify a spur that branches between the Local and Sagittarius spiral arms.

  1. Implementing Responsibility Centre Budgeting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vonasek, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Recently, institutes of higher education (universities) have shown a renewed interest in organisational structures and operating methodologies that generate productivity and innovation; responsibility centre budgeting (RCB) is one such process. This paper describes the underlying principles constituting RCB, its origin and structural elements, and…

  2. Implementing Responsibility Centre Budgeting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vonasek, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Recently, institutes of higher education (universities) have shown a renewed interest in organisational structures and operating methodologies that generate productivity and innovation; responsibility centre budgeting (RCB) is one such process. This paper describes the underlying principles constituting RCB, its origin and structural elements, and…

  3. Viscosity of aqueous solutions and local microscopic structure.

    PubMed

    Corridoni, T; Mancinelli, R; Ricci, M A; Bruni, F

    2011-12-08

    The effect of solutes on the structure of water has been debated intensively over the past years. Typical scenarios label different ions as water structure "makers" or "breakers": this is a quite elusive definition, which has been first introduced in the description of the effect of solutes on the viscosity of water and, although criticized, is still used in the current literature. Here, using a combination of neutron diffraction and computer modeling, we present a possible relation between the viscosity B coefficient and a local structural property of the solution. In particular, B appears in the Jones-Dole relation and its sign is traditionally used to characterize a solute as "structure maker" or "breaker". We find that B is linearly correlated to the difference between the average solute-water distance and the water-water distance in the pure liquid, in the case of monovalent electrolyte solutions.

  4. Localized structural frustration for evaluating the impact of sequence variants

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sushant; Clarke, Declan; Gerstein, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Population-scale sequencing is increasingly uncovering large numbers of rare single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) in coding regions of the genome. The rarity of these variants makes it challenging to evaluate their deleteriousness with conventional phenotype–genotype associations. Protein structures provide a way of addressing this challenge. Previous efforts have focused on globally quantifying the impact of SNVs on protein stability. However, local perturbations may severely impact protein functionality without strongly disrupting global stability (e.g. in relation to catalysis or allostery). Here, we describe a workflow in which localized frustration, quantifying unfavorable local interactions, is employed as a metric to investigate such effects. Using this workflow on the Protein Databank, we find that frustration produces many immediately intuitive results: for instance, disease-related SNVs create stronger changes in localized frustration than non-disease related variants, and rare SNVs tend to disrupt local interactions to a larger extent than common variants. Less obviously, we observe that somatic SNVs associated with oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) induce very different changes in frustration. In particular, those associated with TSGs change the frustration more in the core than the surface (by introducing loss-of-function events), whereas those associated with oncogenes manifest the opposite pattern, creating gain-of-function events. PMID:27915290

  5. Distal chromatin structure influences local nucleosome positions and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Jansen, An; van der Zande, Elisa; Meert, Wim; Fink, Gerald R; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2012-05-01

    The positions of nucleosomes across the genome influence several cellular processes, including gene transcription. However, our understanding of the factors dictating where nucleosomes are located and how this affects gene regulation is still limited. Here, we perform an extensive in vivo study to investigate the influence of the neighboring chromatin structure on local nucleosome positioning and gene expression. Using truncated versions of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae URA3 gene, we show that nucleosome positions in the URA3 promoter are at least partly determined by the local DNA sequence, with so-called 'anti-nucleosomal elements' like poly(dA:dT) tracts being key determinants of nucleosome positions. In addition, we show that changes in the nucleosome positions in the URA3 promoter strongly affect the promoter activity. Most interestingly, in addition to demonstrating the effect of the local DNA sequence, our study provides novel in vivo evidence that nucleosome positions are also affected by the position of neighboring nucleosomes. Nucleosome structure may therefore be an important selective force for conservation of gene order on a chromosome, because relocating a gene to another genomic position (where the positions of neighboring nucleosomes are different from the original locus) can have dramatic consequences for the gene's nucleosome structure and thus its expression.

  6. Visualization of structures and cosmic flows in the local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomarède, Daniel; Courtois, Hélène; Tully, R. Brent

    2013-02-01

    A visualization of 3D structures and cosmic flows is presented using information from the Extragalactic Distance Database V8k redshift catalog and peculiar velocities from the Cosmicflows-1 survey. Structures within a volume bounded at 8000 km s-1 on the cardinal Supergalactic axes are explored in terms of both displaying the positions of the 30,124 galaxies of the catalog and its reconstructed luminosity density field, corrected to account for growing incompleteness with increasing distance. Cosmography of the local Universe is discussed with the intent to identify the most prominent structures, including voids, galaxy clusters, filaments, and walls. The mapping also benefits from precise distance measures provided through the Cosmicflows-1 observational program. Three-dimensional visualizations of the coherent flows of galaxies in the nearby Universe are presented, using recent results based on reconstruction of cosmic flows with the Wiener filter approach. The three major components of the Milky Way's motion, namely expulsion from the Local Void, infall toward the Virgo Cluster, and the bulk flow of the historic Local Supercluster toward the Great Attractor are illustrated using different visualization techniques and analyzed in light of the cosmography derived from the V8k redshift and Cosmicflows-1 distance catalogs.

  7. Cosmic structure and dynamics of the local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Erdoǧdu, Pirin; Nuza, Sebastián. E.; Khalatyan, Arman; Angulo, Raul E.; Hoffman, Yehuda; Gottlöber, Stefan

    2012-11-01

    We present a cosmography analysis of the local Universe based on the recently released Two-Micron All-Sky Redshift Survey catalogue. Our method is based on a Bayesian Networks Machine Learning algorithm (the KIGEN-code) which self-consistently samples the initial density fluctuations compatible with the observed galaxy distribution and a structure formation model given by second-order Lagrangian perturbation theory (2LPT). From the initial conditions we obtain an ensemble of reconstructed density and peculiar velocity fields which characterize the local cosmic structure with high accuracy unveiling non-linear structures like filaments and voids in detail. Coherent redshift-space distortions are consistently corrected within 2LPT. From the ensemble of cross-correlations between the reconstructions and the galaxy field and the variance of the recovered density fields, we find that our method is extremely accurate up to k˜ 1 h Mpc-1 and still yields reliable results down to scales of about 3-4 h-1 Mpc. The motion of the Local Group we obtain within ˜80 h-1 Mpc (vLG = 522 ± 86 km s-1, lLG = 291° ± 16°, bLG = 34° ± 8°) is in good agreement with measurements derived from the cosmic microwave background and from direct observations of peculiar motions and is consistent with the predictions of ΛCDM.

  8. Antibiotic resistance and population structure of cystic fibrosis Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from a Spanish multi-centre study.

    PubMed

    López-Causapé, Carla; de Dios-Caballero, Juan; Cobo, Marta; Escribano, Amparo; Asensio, Óscar; Oliver, Antonio; Del Campo, Rosa; Cantón, Rafael; Solé, Amparó; Cortell, Isidoro; Asensio, Oscar; García, Gloria; Martínez, María Teresa; Cols, María; Salcedo, Antonio; Vázquez, Carlos; Baranda, Félix; Girón, Rosa; Quintana, Esther; Delgado, Isabel; de Miguel, María Ángeles; García, Marta; Oliva, Concepción; Prados, María Concepción; Barrio, María Isabel; Pastor, María Dolores; Olveira, Casilda; de Gracia, Javier; Álvarez, Antonio; Escribano, Amparo; Castillo, Silvia; Figuerola, Joan; Togores, Bernat; Oliver, Antonio; López, Carla; de Dios Caballero, Juan; Tato, Marta; Máiz, Luis; Suárez, Lucrecia; Cantón, Rafael

    2017-09-01

    The first Spanish multi-centre study on the microbiology of cystic fibrosis (CF) was conducted from 2013 to 2014. The study involved 24 CF units from 17 hospitals, and recruited 341 patients. The aim of this study was to characterise Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, 79 of which were recovered from 75 (22%) patients. The study determined the population structure, antibiotic susceptibility profile and genetic background of the strains. Fifty-five percent of the isolates were multi-drug-resistant, and 16% were extensively-drug-resistant. Defective mutS and mutL genes were observed in mutator isolates (15.2%). Considerable genetic diversity was observed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (70 patterns) and multi-locus sequence typing (72 sequence types). International epidemic clones were not detected. Fifty-one new and 14 previously described array tube (AT) genotypes were detected by AT technology. This study found a genetically unrelated and highly diverse CF P. aeruginosa population in Spain, not represented by the epidemic clones widely distributed across Europe, with multiple combinations of virulence factors and high antimicrobial resistance rates (except for colistin). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  9. The Mn4Ca-cluster of the photosynthetic oxygen evolving centre: its structure, function and evolution.

    PubMed

    Barber, James

    2016-10-05

    Photosystem II is the chlorophyll containing enzyme in which the very first chemical energy storing reaction of photosynthesis occurs. It does so by splitting water into molecular oxygen and hydrogen equivalents at a catalytic centre composed of four Mn ions and one Ca2+. All the oxygen in the atmosphere is derived from this reaction and without it the biosphere, as we know it, would not exist. Indeed its appearance about 3 billion years ago gave rise to the "big bang of evolution". Thus understanding the structure and functioning of this metal cluster is a major topic in science and here I discuss it in terms of research over of the last twelve years dating back to when it was first proposed to be a Mn3CaO4 cubane with the fourth Mn attached to cubane by one of its oxo bridging bonds. In so doing a number of novel properties emerge for this metallo-protein with implications for its mechanism and evolutionary origin.

  10. Thyroïdectomies pratiquées sous anesthésie locale au Centre Hospitalier Universitaire d'Antananarivo

    PubMed Central

    Razafindrakoto, Rex Mario; Razafindranaivo, Mananjara Nandrianina; Valisoa, Herimalalaniaina Angelo; Schammirah, Mahamad Rojovolaarivony; Randriamboavonjy, Rado

    2015-01-01

    Menée le plus souvent sous anesthésie générale, la chirurgie thyroïdienne peut aussi être pratiquée sous anesthésie régionale ou sous anesthésie locale. Notre objectif a été de rapporter l'expérience du Centre Hospitalier Universitaire d'Antananarivo sur l'anesthésie locale dans les thyroïdectomies. La drogue employée dans notre protocole anesthésique a été le fentanyl, administré en intraveineuse directe, associé à une infiltration sous-cutanée de lidocaïne suivant la ligne d'incision. Le/la patient(e) n'a pas été intubé(e), l'oxygène étant délivré au niveau des cavités nasales. Ont été étudiés le type de chirurgie thyroïdienne, la durée de l'intervention, la satisfaction des patient(e)s vis-à-vis de la qualité de l'anesthésie, et le coût de l'intervention. Sur 567 thyroïdectomies effectuées, 51,68% (n= 293) ont été des lobo-isthmectomies gauches, 44,44% (n= 252) des lobo-isthmectomies droites, 2,82% (n= 16) des thyroïdectomies subtotales ou totales, 1,06% (n= six) des totalisations pour carcinomes thyroïdiens. La durée des interventions a varié de 30 à 90 minutes. Un total de 83,95% (n= 476) des patient(e)s a été très satisfait de la qualité de l'anesthésie et 15,87% autres (n= 90) satisfait. Les suites opératoires ont été bonnes dans la majorité des cas. Le coût d'une thyroïdectomie a été évalué à 100- 150 dollars américains. L'anesthésie locale utilisée dans les thyroïdectomies effectuées au Centre Hospitalier Universitaire d'Antananarivo est simple, rapide, d'un coût moyen, et permet d'alarmer précocement le chirurgien en cas de lésion d'un nerf laryngé inférieur. PMID:26587128

  11. Electronic Structure, Localization and 5f Occupancy in Pu Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, John J.; Beaux, Miles F.; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Graham, Kevin S.; Bauer, Eric D.; Mitchell, Jeremy N.; Tobash, Paul H.; Richmond, Scott

    2012-05-03

    The electronic structure of delta plutonium ({delta}-Pu) and plutonium compounds is investigated using photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). Results for {delta}-Pu show a small component of the valence electronic structure which might reasonably be associated with a 5f{sup 6} configuration. PES results for PuTe are used as an indication for the 5f{sup 6} configuration due to the presence of atomic multiplet structure. Temperature dependent PES data on {delta}-Pu indicate a narrow peak centered 20 meV below the Fermi energy and 100 meV wide. The first PES data for PuCoIn5 indicate a 5f electronic structure more localized than the 5fs in the closely related PuCoGa{sub 5}. There is support from the PES data for a description of Pu materials with an electronic configuration of 5f{sup 5} with some admixture of 5f{sup 6} as well as a localized/delocalized 5f{sup 5} description.

  12. Structural damage localization using wavelet-based silhouette statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Uk; Koh, Bong-Hwan

    2009-04-01

    This paper introduces a new methodology for classifying and localizing structural damage in a truss structure. The application of wavelet analysis along with signal classification techniques in engineering problems allows us to discover novel characteristics that can be used for the diagnosis and classification of structural defects. This study exploits the data discriminating capability of silhouette statistics, which is eventually combined with the wavelet-based vertical energy threshold technique for the purpose of extracting damage-sensitive features and clustering signals of the same class. This threshold technique allows us to first obtain a suitable subset of the extracted or modified features of our data, i.e. good predictor sets should contain features that are strongly correlated to the characteristics of the data without considering the classification method used, although each of these features should be as uncorrelated with each other as possible. The silhouette statistics have been used to assess the quality of clustering by measuring how well an object is assigned to its corresponding cluster. We use this concept for the discriminant power function used in this paper. The simulation results of damage detection in a truss structure show that the approach proposed in this study can be successfully applied for locating both open- and breathing-type damage even in the presence of a considerable amount of process and measurement noise. Finally, a typical data mining tool such as classification and regression tree (CART) quantitatively evaluates the performance of the damage localization results in terms of the misclassification error.

  13. Probing local structure in glass by the application of shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weingartner, Nicholas B.; Nussinov, Zohar

    2016-09-01

    The glass transition remains one of the great unsolved mysteries of contemporary condensed matter physics. When crystallization is bypassed by rapid cooling, a supercooled liquid, retaining amorphous particle arrangement, results. The physical phenomenology of supercooled liquids is as vast as it is interesting. Most significant, the viscosity of the supercooled liquid displays an incredible increase over a narrow temperature range. Eventually, the supercooled liquid ceases to flow, becomes a glass, and gains rigidity and solid-like behaviors. Understanding what underpins the monumental growth of viscosity, and how rigidity results without long range order is a long-sought goal. Furthermore, discerning what role local structure plays in the kinetics of supercooled liquids remains an open question. Many theories of the glassy slowdown require the growth of static lengthscale related to structure with lowering of the temperature and provide a link between slowdown and propagation of ‘amorphous order’. In light of this, we examine the recently proposed shear penetration depth in the context of other length scales and its relation to local structure. We provide numerical data, based on the simulations of NiZr2, illustrating that this length scale exhibits dramatic growth upon approach to the glass transition and further discuss this in relation to percolating structural connectivity in similar glassforming systems.

  14. Local Structure of Cerium in Aluminophosphate and Silicophosphate Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    J Rygel; Y Chen; C Pantano; T Shibata; J Du; L Kokou; R Woodman; J Belcher

    2011-12-31

    The local structure of cerium in two systematic compositional series of glasses, nominally CeP{sub 3}O{sub 9}-AlP{sub 3}O{sub 9} and CeP{sub 3}O{sub 9}-SiP{sub 2}O{sub 7}, was interrogated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. XPS revealed that, for glasses melted in air, {>=}95% of cerium ions are Ce{sup 3+}. This was independently confirmed using X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES). Ce K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) has been used to determine the local structure of Ce{sup 3+}. Near the metaphosphate composition, cerium was found to have an average cerium coordination number of {approx}7.0 and an average cerium-oxygen bond length of 2.41 {angstrom}. The average cerium coordination number and average cerium-oxygen bond distance were found to increase with decreasing cerium concentration in both compositional series. Rare-earth clustering is suggested based on numerical calculations for glasses containing {>=}14 and {>=}15 mol% Ce{sub 2}O{sub 3} for the aluminophosphate and silicophosphate series, respectively.

  15. Local Structure of Cerium in Aluminophosphate and Silicophosphate Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Rygel, Jennifer L.; Chen, Yongsheng; Pantano, Carlo G.; Shibata, Tomohiro; Du, Jincheng; Kokou, Leopold; Woodman, Robert; Belcher, James

    2011-09-20

    The local structure of cerium in two systematic compositional series of glasses, nominally CeP{sub 3}O{sub 9}-AlP{sub 3}O{sub 9} and CeP{sub 3}O{sub 9}-SiP{sub 2}O{sub 7}, was interrogated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. XPS revealed that, for glasses melted in air, {>=}95% of cerium ions are Ce{sup 3+}. This was independently confirmed using X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES). Ce K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) has been used to determine the local structure of Ce{sup 3+}. Near the metaphosphate composition, cerium was found to have an average cerium coordination number of {approx}7.0 and an average cerium-oxygen bond length of 2.41 {angstrom}. The average cerium coordination number and average cerium-oxygen bond distance were found to increase with decreasing cerium concentration in both compositional series. Rare-earth clustering is suggested based on numerical calculations for glasses containing {>=}14 and {>=}15 mol% Ce{sub 2}O{sub 3} for the aluminophosphate and silicophosphate series, respectively.

  16. Localization and structure of carbonaceous deposits on reforming catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Espinat, D.; Freund, E.; Martino, G. ); Dexpert, H. , Orsay )

    1990-12-01

    The aging of alumina-supported Pt-containing reforming catalysts by coke deposition has previously been extensively investigated. In the present work, a large number of techniques including optical and electron microscopy have been used to determine both the localization and the structure of the so-called coke (carbonaceous deposits) formed during the normal operation of these catalysts. The coke is not uniformly deposited on the surface of the catalysts. Its structure is not uniform for a given catalyst, and depends on the operating condition (especially the H{sub 2}/hydrocarbon ratio) as well as the composition of the metallic phase (pure platinum or multimetallic alloy). The structure is always rather well organized (pregraphitic) even at the onset of coke deposition.

  17. Electronic-structure calculation for metals by local optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, C.; Min, B. I.; Benedek, R.; Garner, J.

    1989-03-01

    Recent work by Car and Parrinello has generated considerable interest in the calculation of electronic structure by nonlinear optimization. The technique introduced by these authors, dynamical simulated annealing, is designed for problems that involve energy barriers. When local optimization suffices to determine the energy minimum, more direct methods are available. In this paper we apply the algorithm suggested by Williams and Soler to calculate the electronic structure of metals, using a plane-wave expansion for the electronic orbitals and an electron-ion pseudopotential of the Kleinman-Bylander form. Radial pseudopotentials were taken from the compilation of Bachelet, Hamann, and Schlüter. Calculations are performed to optimize the electronic structure (i) with fixed atomic configuration, or (ii) with the atomic volume being optimized simultaneously. It is found that the dual optimization (ii) converges in essentially the same number of steps as the static lattice optimization (i). Numerical results are presented for Li, K, Al, and simple-cubic P.

  18. Role of nonlinear localized structures and turbulence in magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Neha; Yadav, Nitin; Uma, R.; Sharma, R. P.

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, we have analyzed the field localization of kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW) due to the presence of background density perturbation, which are assumed to be originated by the three dimensionally propagating low frequency KAW. These localized structures play an important role for energy transportation at smaller scales in the dispersion range of magnetic power spectrum. For the present model, governing dynamic equations of high frequency pump KAW and low frequency KAW has been derived by considering ponderomotive nonlinearity. Further, these coupled equations have been numerically solved to analyze the resulting localized structures of pump KAW and magnetic power spectrum in the magnetopause regime. Numerically calculated spectrum exhibits inertial range having spectral index of -3/2 followed by steeper scaling; this steepening in the turbulent spectrum is a signature of energy transportation from larger to smaller scales. In this way, the proposed mechanism, which is based on nonlinear wave-wave interaction, may be useful for understanding the particle acceleration and turbulence in magnetopause.

  19. The local electronic structure of alpha-Li3N.

    PubMed

    Fister, T T; Seidler, G T; Shirley, E L; Vila, F D; Rehr, J J; Nagle, K P; Linehan, J C; Cross, J O

    2008-07-28

    New theoretical and experimental investigations of the occupied and unoccupied local electronic densities of states (DOS) are reported for alpha-Li(3)N. Band-structure and density-functional theory calculations confirm the absence of covalent bonding character. However, real-space full-multiple-scattering (RSFMS) calculations of the occupied local DOS find less extreme nominal valences than have previously been proposed. Nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering, RSFMS calculations, and calculations based on the Bethe-Salpeter equation are used to characterize the unoccupied electronic final states local to both the Li and N sites. There is a good agreement between experiment and theory. Throughout the Li 1s near-edge region, both experiment and theory find strong similarities in the s-and p-type components of the unoccupied local final DOS projected onto an orbital angular momentum basis (l-DOS). An unexpected, significant correspondence exists between the near-edge spectra for the Li 1s and N 1s initial states. We argue that both spectra are sampling essentially the same final DOS due to the combination of long core-hole lifetimes, long photoelectron lifetimes, and the fact that orbital angular momentum is the same for all relevant initial states. Such considerations may be generally applicable for low atomic number compounds.

  20. Localizing target structures in ultrasound video - a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Kwitt, R; Vasconcelos, N; Razzaque, S; Aylward, S

    2013-10-01

    The problem of localizing specific anatomic structures using ultrasound (US) video is considered. This involves automatically determining when an US probe is acquiring images of a previously defined object of interest, during the course of an US examination. Localization using US is motivated by the increased availability of portable, low-cost US probes, which inspire applications where inexperienced personnel and even first-time users acquire US data that is then sent to experts for further assessment. This process is of particular interest for routine examinations in underserved populations as well as for patient triage after natural disasters and large-scale accidents, where experts may be in short supply. The proposed localization approach is motivated by research in the area of dynamic texture analysis and leverages several recent advances in the field of activity recognition. For evaluation, we introduce an annotated and publicly available database of US video, acquired on three phantoms. Several experiments reveal the challenges of applying video analysis approaches to US images and demonstrate that good localization performance is possible with the proposed solution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Protein structure prediction with local adjust tabu search algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Protein folding structure prediction is one of the most challenging problems in the bioinformatics domain. Because of the complexity of the realistic protein structure, the simplified structure model and the computational method should be adopted in the research. The AB off-lattice model is one of the simplification models, which only considers two classes of amino acids, hydrophobic (A) residues and hydrophilic (B) residues. Results The main work of this paper is to discuss how to optimize the lowest energy configurations in 2D off-lattice model and 3D off-lattice model by using Fibonacci sequences and real protein sequences. In order to avoid falling into local minimum and faster convergence to the global minimum, we introduce a novel method (SATS) to the protein structure problem, which combines simulated annealing algorithm and tabu search algorithm. Various strategies, such as the new encoding strategy, the adaptive neighborhood generation strategy and the local adjustment strategy, are adopted successfully for high-speed searching the optimal conformation corresponds to the lowest energy of the protein sequences. Experimental results show that some of the results obtained by the improved SATS are better than those reported in previous literatures, and we can sure that the lowest energy folding state for short Fibonacci sequences have been found. Conclusions Although the off-lattice models is not very realistic, they can reflect some important characteristics of the realistic protein. It can be found that 3D off-lattice model is more like native folding structure of the realistic protein than 2D off-lattice model. In addition, compared with some previous researches, the proposed hybrid algorithm can more effectively and more quickly search the spatial folding structure of a protein chain. PMID:25474708

  2. Synonymous codon usage influences the local protein structure observed

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Rhodri; Deane, Charlotte M.

    2010-01-01

    Translation of mRNA into protein is a unidirectional information flow process. Analysing the input (mRNA) and output (protein) of translation, we find that local protein structure information is encoded in the mRNA nucleotide sequence. The Coding Sequence and Structure (CSandS) database developed in this work provides a detailed mapping between over 4000 solved protein structures and their mRNA. CSandS facilitates a comprehensive analysis of codon usage over many organisms. In assigning translation speed, we find that relative codon usage is less informative than tRNA concentration. For all speed measures, no evidence was found that domain boundaries are enriched with slow codons. In fact, genes seemingly avoid slow codons around structurally defined domain boundaries. Translation speed, however, does decrease at the transition into secondary structure. Codons are identified that have structural preferences significantly different from the amino acid they encode. However, each organism has its own set of ‘significant codons’. Our results support the premise that codons encode more information than merely amino acids and give insight into the role of translation in protein folding. PMID:20530529

  3. Change of Electronic Structures by Dopant-Induced Local Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyeong Kim, Gyu; Jeong, Sukmin

    2015-06-01

    Ag-induced Si(111)- surfaces (-Ag) exhibit unusual electronic structures that cannot be explained by the conventional rigid band model and charge transfer model. The (-Ag surfaces feature a free-electron-like parabolic band, the S1 band, that selectively shifts downward upon the adsorption of noble metal or alkali metal adatoms. Furthermore, the downward shift of S1 is independent of the type of dopants, Au, Ag, and Na. According to charge transfer analysis, Au adatoms accumulate electrons from the substrate and become negatively charged, whereas Na adatoms become positively charged, which indicates that S1 should shift in the opposite direction for both the adatoms. Investigation of calculated structures, calculation of model structures, and tight-binding analysis disclose that the changes in the electronic structure are closely related to the average Ag-Ag distance in the substrate and have their origin in the local strain induced by dopants (adatoms). This explanation implies that the electronic structure is irrespective of the dopant characters itself and paves a new way for understanding the electronic structures associated with the presence of dopants.

  4. Measuring capital market efficiency: Global and local correlations structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristoufek, Ladislav; Vosvrda, Miloslav

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new measure for capital market efficiency. The measure takes into consideration the correlation structure of the returns (long-term and short-term memory) and local herding behavior (fractal dimension). The efficiency measure is taken as a distance from an ideal efficient market situation. The proposed methodology is applied to a portfolio of 41 stock indices. We find that the Japanese NIKKEI is the most efficient market. From a geographical point of view, the more efficient markets are dominated by the European stock indices and the less efficient markets cover mainly Latin America, Asia and Oceania. The inefficiency is mainly driven by a local herding, i.e. a low fractal dimension.

  5. Correlation Between Local Structure and Boson Peak in Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Azkar Saeed; Zhao, Xiangnan; Xu, Mingxiang; Zhang, Dongxian; Hu, Junwen; Fecht, Hans J.; Wang, Xiaodong; Cao, Qingping; Jiang, J. Z.

    2017-01-01

    We made a systematic study of the boson peak for six different Zr-based metallic glasses and found a universal correlation between average local atomic structure and boson peak. It is found that the boson peak can be decomposed into six characteristic vibratory modes, i.e., Debye's vibratory mode and five Einstein's vibratory modes. By using the Ioffe-Regel condition over all studied Zr-based metallic glasses, we reveal that atomic pair correlation function exactly maps on the low-temperature dynamics and the origin of the boson peak, which is the sum of vibrations of local density fluctuation domains in the glasses. In addition, it is found that the Debye's type oscillators are the major contributors to the low-temperature specific heat capacities. This study opens a new way of understanding the relationship of the physical properties with the atomic arrangements in glasses.

  6. A Phenomenological Theory of Spatially Structured Local Synaptic Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Amirikian, Bagrat

    2005-01-01

    The structure of local synaptic circuits is the key to understanding cortical function and how neuronal functional modules such as cortical columns are formed. The central problem in deciphering cortical microcircuits is the quantification of synaptic connectivity between neuron pairs. I present a theoretical model that accounts for the axon and dendrite morphologies of pre- and postsynaptic cells and provides the average number of synaptic contacts formed between them as a function of their relative locations in three-dimensional space. An important aspect of the current approach is the representation of a complex structure of an axonal/dendritic arbor as a superposition of basic structures—synaptic clouds. Each cloud has three structural parameters that can be directly estimated from two-dimensional drawings of the underlying arbor. Using empirical data available in literature, I applied this theory to three morphologically different types of cell pairs. I found that, within a wide range of cell separations, the theory is in very good agreement with empirical data on (i) axonal–dendritic contacts of pyramidal cells and (ii) somatic synapses formed by the axons of inhibitory interneurons. Since for many types of neurons plane arborization drawings are available from literature, this theory can provide a practical means for quantitatively deriving local synaptic circuits based on the actual observed densities of specific types of neurons and their morphologies. It can also have significant implications for computational models of cortical networks by making it possible to wire up simulated neural networks in a realistic fashion. PMID:16103900

  7. Local structure in hard-sphere chain-molecule fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasti, Sambid; Taylor, Mark

    2012-04-01

    The conformation of a polymer chain in solvent is coupled to the local structure of the solvent environment. For hard-sphere systems, a monomeric solvent acts to compress a flexible hard-sphere-solute chain and, for a dense system, the local solvent structure is imprinted onto the chain. Here we use Monte Carlo simulation, including bond-rebridging moves, to study the size and conformation of a hard sphere chain in a hard-sphere solvent as a function of both solvent density and solvent diameter. We also study the structure of a hard-sphere-chain solute in a hard-sphere-chain solvent. In the case of a 5-mer chain in 5-mer solvent we show that the effects of solvent can be mapped to a set of two-body solvation potentials. Following our previous work on hard-sphere chains in monomeric solvent [1], we explore the application of these short chain potentials to the study of longer chain-molecule fluids. [4pt] [1] M.P. Taylor and S. Ichida, J. Polym. Sci. B: Polym. Phys. 45, 3319 (2007).

  8. Local structure in hard-sphere chain-molecule fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasti, Sambid; Taylor, Mark

    2011-10-01

    The conformation of a polymer chain in solvent is coupled to the local structure of the solvent environment. For hard-sphere systems, a monomeric solvent acts to compress a flexible hard-sphere-solute chain and, for a dense system, the local solvent structure is imprinted onto the chain. Here we use Monte Carlo simulation, including bond-rebridging moves, to study the size and conformation of a hard sphere chain in a hard-sphere solvent as a function of both solvent density and solvent diameter. We also study the structure of a hard-sphere-chain solute in a hard-sphere-chain solvent. In the case of a 5-mer chain in 5-mer solvent we show that the effects of solvent can be mapped to a set of two-body solvation potentials. Following our previous work on hard-sphere chains in monomeric solvent [1], we explore the application of these short chain potentials to the study of longer chain-molecule fluids. [4pt] [1] M.P. Taylor and S. Ichida, J. Polym. Sci. B: Polym. Phys. 45, 3319 (2007).

  9. Local pulmonary structure classification for computer-aided nodule detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahlmann, Claus; Li, Xianlin; Okada, Kazunori

    2006-03-01

    We propose a new method of classifying the local structure types, such as nodules, vessels, and junctions, in thoracic CT scans. This classification is important in the context of computer aided detection (CAD) of lung nodules. The proposed method can be used as a post-process component of any lung CAD system. In such a scenario, the classification results provide an effective means of removing false positives caused by vessels and junctions thus improving overall performance. As main advantage, the proposed solution transforms the complex problem of classifying various 3D topological structures into much simpler 2D data clustering problem, to which more generic and flexible solutions are available in literature, and which is better suited for visualization. Given a nodule candidate, first, our solution robustly fits an anisotropic Gaussian to the data. The resulting Gaussian center and spread parameters are used to affine-normalize the data domain so as to warp the fitted anisotropic ellipsoid into a fixed-size isotropic sphere. We propose an automatic method to extract a 3D spherical manifold, containing the appropriate bounding surface of the target structure. Scale selection is performed by a data driven entropy minimization approach. The manifold is analyzed for high intensity clusters, corresponding to protruding structures. Techniques involve EMclustering with automatic mode number estimation, directional statistics, and hierarchical clustering with a modified Bhattacharyya distance. The estimated number of high intensity clusters explicitly determines the type of pulmonary structures: nodule (0), attached nodule (1), vessel (2), junction (>3). We show accurate classification results for selected examples in thoracic CT scans. This local procedure is more flexible and efficient than current state of the art and will help to improve the accuracy of general lung CAD systems.

  10. Characterizing structural transitions using localized free energy landscape analysis.

    PubMed

    Banavali, Nilesh K; Mackerell, Alexander D

    2009-01-01

    Structural changes in molecules are frequently observed during biological processes like replication, transcription and translation. These structural changes can usually be traced to specific distortions in the backbones of the macromolecules involved. Quantitative energetic characterization of such distortions can greatly advance the atomic-level understanding of the dynamic character of these biological processes. Molecular dynamics simulations combined with a variation of the Weighted Histogram Analysis Method for potential of mean force determination are applied to characterize localized structural changes for the test case of cytosine (underlined) base flipping in a GTCAGCGCATGG DNA duplex. Free energy landscapes for backbone torsion and sugar pucker degrees of freedom in the DNA are used to understand their behavior in response to the base flipping perturbation. By simplifying the base flipping structural change into a two-state model, a free energy difference of upto 14 kcal/mol can be attributed to the flipped state relative to the stacked Watson-Crick base paired state. This two-state classification allows precise evaluation of the effect of base flipping on local backbone degrees of freedom. The calculated free energy landscapes of individual backbone and sugar degrees of freedom expectedly show the greatest change in the vicinity of the flipping base itself, but specific delocalized effects can be discerned upto four nucleotide positions away in both 5' and 3' directions. Free energy landscape analysis thus provides a quantitative method to pinpoint the determinants of structural change on the atomic scale and also delineate the extent of propagation of the perturbation along the molecule. In addition to nucleic acids, this methodology is anticipated to be useful for studying conformational changes in all macromolecules, including carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins.

  11. Local and Average Structures in Ferroelectrics under Perturbing Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usher, Tedi-Marie

    Ferroelectric and dielectric ceramics are used in a multitude of applications including sonar, micro-positioning, actuators, transducers, and capacitors. The most widely used compositions are lead (Pb)-based, however there is an ongoing effort to reduce lead-based materials in consumer applications. Many lead-free compositions are under investigation; some are already in production and others have been identified as suitable for certain applications. For any such material system, there is a need to thoroughly characterize the structure in order to develop robust structure-property relationships, particularly during in situ application of different stimuli (e.g. electric field and mechanical stress). This work investigates two lead-free material systems of interest, (1-x)Na1/2Bi1/2TiO3 - (x)BaTiO3 (NBT-xBT) and (1-x)BaTiO3 - (x)Bi(Zn1/2Ti1/2)O3 (BT-xBZT), as well as the constituent compounds Na1/2Bi1/2TiO3 and BaTiO3. Both systems exhibit compositional boundaries between unique phases exhibiting different functional properties. Advanced scattering techniques are used to characterize the atomic structures and how they change during in situ application of different stimuli. The long-range, average structures are probed using high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) and neutron diffraction (ND) and local scale structures are probed using X-ray or neutron total scattering, which are converted to pair distribution functions (PDFs). First, two in situ ND experiments which investigate structural changes to NBT-xBT in response to uniaxial stresses and electric fields are presented. In response to stresses, different crystallographic directions strain differently. The elastic anisotropy, (i.e., the orientation-dependence of elastic stiffness) for the studied compositions is characterized. A general inverse relationship between elastic anisotropy and piezoelectric anisotropy is demonstrated for three common ferroelectric point groups. In response to electric fields

  12. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human thrombospondin gene.

    PubMed

    Wolf, F W; Eddy, R L; Shows, T B; Dixit, V M

    1990-04-01

    Thrombospondin (THBS1) is a large modular glycoprotein component of the extracellular matrix and contains a variety of distinct domains, including three repeating subunits (types I, II, and III) that share homology to an assortment of other proteins. Determination of THBS1 gene structure has revealed that the type I repeat modules are encoded by symmetrical exons and that the heparin-binding domain is encoded by a single exon. To further elucidate the higher level organization of THBS1, the gene was localized to the q11-qter region of chromosome 15.

  13. Localization-Based Super-Resolution Imaging of Cellular Structures

    PubMed Central

    Kanchanawong, Pakorn; Waterman, Clare M.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy allows direct visualization of fluorescently tagged proteins within cells. However, the spatial resolution of conventional fluorescence microscopes is limited by diffraction to ~250 nm, prompting the development of super-resolution microscopy which offers resolution approaching the scale of single proteins, i.e., ~20 nm. Here, we describe protocols for single molecule localization-based super-resolution imaging, using focal adhesion proteins as an example and employing either photoswitchable fluorophores or photoactivatable fluorescent proteins. These protocols should also be easily adaptable to imaging a broad array of macromolecular assemblies in cells whose components can be fluorescently tagged and assemble into high density structures. PMID:23868582

  14. Local structure probes of nanoscale heterogeneity in crystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Conradson, S; Espinosa, F; Villella, P

    2001-03-01

    In the conventional model of condensed matter increasing numbers of defects break down the order and ultimately convert perfect periodic crystals into aperiodic glasses. Local structure probes of a variety of materials with non-stoichiometric compositions, multiple degenerate ordering modes, or other symmetry breaking factors identify multiple ordered arrangements of atoms that render the materials heterogeneous on the nanometer scale. While exerting apparently negligible effects on bulk properties, this heterogeneity or phase separation does influence correlated or collective properties such as magnetism and phase stability.

  15. Localized structures in dissipative media: from optics to plant ecology

    PubMed Central

    Tlidi, M.; Staliunas, K.; Panajotov, K.; Vladimirov, A. G.; Clerc, M. G.

    2014-01-01

    Localized structures (LSs) in dissipative media appear in various fields of natural science such as biology, chemistry, plant ecology, optics and laser physics. The proposal for this Theme Issue was to gather specialists from various fields of nonlinear science towards a cross-fertilization among active areas of research. This is a cross-disciplinary area of research dominated by nonlinear optics due to potential applications for all-optical control of light, optical storage and information processing. This Theme Issue contains contributions from 18 active groups involved in the LS field and have all made significant contributions in recent years. PMID:25246688

  16. Investigation of nanogap localized field enhancement in gold plasmonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debu, Desalegn Tadesse; Bauman, Stephen; Saylor, Cameron; Novak, Eric; French, David; Herzog, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    Nanogaps between plasmonic structures allow confining the localized electric field with moreenhancements. Based on previously implemented two-step lithography process, we introducea nano-masking technique to fabricate nanostructrues and nanogaps for various geometrical patterns. This new method can fabricate gold nanostructures as well as nanogaps that are less than 10nm, below the limiting scale of lithography. Simulation from finite element method (FEM) shows strong gap dependence of optical properties and peak enhancement of these devices. The fabricated plasmonic nanostructure provides wide range of potential future application including highly sensitive optical antenna, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and biosensing.

  17. Local structure and structural signature underlying properties in metallic glasses and supercooled liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jun

    Metallic glasses (MGs), discovered five decades ago as a newcomer in the family of glasses, are of current interest because of their unique structures and properties. There are also many fundamental materials science issues that remain unresolved for metallic glasses, as well as their predecessor above glass transition temperature, the supercooled liquids. In particular, it is a major challenge to characterize the local structure and unveil the structure-property relationship for these amorphous materials. This thesis presents a systematic study of the local structure of metallic glasses as well as supercooled liquids via classical and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Three typical MG models are chosen as representative candidate, Cu64 Zr36, Pd82Si18 and Mg65Cu 25Y10 systems, while the former is dominant with full icosahedra short-range order and the prism-type short-range order dominate for latter two. Furthermore, we move to unravel the underlying structural signature among several properties in metallic glasses. Firstly, the temperature dependence of specific heat and liquid fragility between Cu-Zr and Mg-Cu-Y (also Pd-Si) in supercooled liquids are quite distinct: gradual versus fast evolution of specific heat and viscosity/relaxation time with undercooling. Their local structural ordering are found to relate with the temperature dependence of specific heat and relaxation time. Then elastic heterogeneity has been studied to correlate with local structure in Cu-Zr MGs. Specifically, this part covers how the degree of elastic deformation correlates with the internal structure at the atomic level, how to quantitatively evaluate the local solidity/liquidity in MGs and how the network of interpenetrating connection of icosahedra determine the corresponding shear modulus. Finally, we have illustrated the structure signature of quasi-localized low-frequency vibrational normal modes, which resides the intriguing vibrational properties in MGs. Specifically, the

  18. Seismic structure of ultra-slow spreading crust formed at the Mid-Cayman Spreading Centre, Caribbean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevemeyer, I.; Merz, M.; Dannowski, A.; Papenberg, C. A.; Hayman, N. W.; Van Avendonk, H. J.; Peirce, C.

    2015-12-01

    About 57% of the Earth's surface is covered by oceanic crust and new ocean floor is continuously created along the ~60.000 km long mid-ocean ridge (MOR) system. About 25% of the MOR spread at an ultra-slow spreading rate of <20 mm/yr. At ultra-slow spreading rates the melt supply to the ridge is thought to dramatically decrease and crustal thickness decreases to a thickness of <6 km. However, we know little about the processes shaping crust at reduced spreading rates. A formation of crust from a magma chamber would suggest the creation of a well stratified crust, with an extrusive upper crust (layer 2) and a lower gabbroic crust (lower 3) and a well-defined crust-mantle boundary and hence a seismic Moho. In contrast, decompressional melting without formation of a magma chamber would support a crustal structure where seismic velocities change gradually from values typical of crustal rocks to mantle rocks. Here, we report initial results from a survey from the ultra-slow spreading Cayman Spreading Centre in the Caribbean Sea, sampling mature crust along a flowline from both conjugated ridge flanks. The seismic refraction and wide-angle survey was conducted using ocean-bottom-seismometers from Germany, the UK, and Texas and a 5500 cubic-inch airgun-array source towed by the German research vessel METEOR in April 2015. Typical crustal velocities support a thin crust of 3 to 5 km thickness. However, a well-defined Moho boundary was not observed. Thus, velocities change gradually from crustal-type velocities (<7.2 km/s) to values of 7.6-7.8 km/s, supporting mantle rocks. We suggest that reduced mantle velocities indicate gabbroic intrusions within the mantle rather than indicating serpentinization.

  19. Local Tomography and the Jordan Structure of Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, Howard; Wilce, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    Using a result of H. Hanche-Olsen, we show that (subject to fairly natural constraints on what constitutes a system, and on what constitutes a composite system), orthodox finite-dimensional complex quantum mechanics with superselection rules is the only non-signaling probabilistic theory in which (i) individual systems are Jordan algebras (equivalently, their cones of unnormalized states are homogeneous and self-dual), (ii) composites are locally tomographic (meaning that states are determined by the joint probabilities they assign to measurement outcomes on the component systems) and (iii) at least one system has the structure of a qubit. Using this result, we also characterize finite dimensional quantum theory among probabilistic theories having the structure of a dagger-monoidal category.

  20. Imaging biological structures with fluorescence photoactivation localization microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Travis J; Verkhusha, Vladislav V; Hess, Samuel T

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence photoactivation localization microscopy (FPALM) images biological structures with subdiffraction-limited resolution. With repeated cycles of activation, readout and bleaching, large numbers of photoactivatable probes can be precisely localized to obtain a map (image) of labeled molecules with an effective resolution of tens of nanometers. FPALM has been applied to a variety of biological imaging applications, including membrane, cytoskeletal and cytosolic proteins in fixed and living cells. Molecular motions can be quantified. FPALM can also be applied to nonbiological samples, which can be labeled with photoactivatable probes. With emphasis on cellular imaging, we describe here the adaptation of a conventional widefield fluorescence microscope for FPALM and present step-by-step procedures to successfully obtain and analyze FPALM images. The fundamentals of this protocol may also be applicable to users of similar imaging techniques that apply localization of photoactivatable probes to achieve super-resolution. Once alignment of the setup has been completed, data acquisitions can be obtained in approximately 1–30 min and analyzed in approximately 0.5–4 h. PMID:19214181

  1. Imaging biological structures with fluorescence photoactivation localization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gould, Travis J; Verkhusha, Vladislav V; Hess, Samuel T

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence photoactivation localization microscopy (FPALM) images biological structures with subdiffraction-limited resolution. With repeated cycles of activation, readout and bleaching, large numbers of photoactivatable probes can be precisely localized to obtain a map (image) of labeled molecules with an effective resolution of tens of nanometers. FPALM has been applied to a variety of biological imaging applications, including membrane, cytoskeletal and cytosolic proteins in fixed and living cells. Molecular motions can be quantified. FPALM can also be applied to nonbiological samples, which can be labeled with photoactivatable probes. With emphasis on cellular imaging, we describe here the adaptation of a conventional widefield fluorescence microscope for FPALM and present step-by-step procedures to successfully obtain and analyze FPALM images. The fundamentals of this protocol may also be applicable to users of similar imaging techniques that apply localization of photoactivatable probes to achieve super-resolution. Once alignment of the setup has been completed, data acquisitions can be obtained in approximately 1-30 min and analyzed in approximately 0.5-4 h.

  2. The local structure of topological charge fluctuations in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    I. Horvath; S.J. Dong; T. Draper; Frank Lee; K.F. Liu; J.B. Zhang; H.B. Thacker

    2002-06-01

    We introduce the Dirac eigenmode filtering of topological charge density associated with Ginsparg-Wilson fermions as a tool to investigate the local structure of topological charge fluctuations in QCD. The resulting framework is used to demonstrate that the bulk of topological charge in QCD does not appear in the form of unit quantized lumps. This means that the mixing of ''would-be'' zeromodes associated with such lumps is probably not the prevalent microscopic mechanism for spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in QCD. To characterize the coherent local behavior in topological charge density at low energy, we compute the charges contained in maximal coherent spheres enclosing non-overlapping peaks. We find a continuous distribution essentially ending at {approx}0.5. Finally, we study, for the first time, the overlap-operator topological-charge-density correlators and find consistency with non-positivity at nonzero physical distance. This represents a non-trivial check on the locality (in gauge paths) of the overlap Dirac operator for realistic gauge backgrounds.

  3. Global functions in global-local finite-element analysis of localized stresses in prismatic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dong, Stanley B.

    1989-01-01

    An important consideration in the global local finite-element method (GLFEM) is the availability of global functions for the given problem. The role and mathematical requirements of these global functions in a GLFEM analysis of localized stress states in prismatic structures are discussed. A method is described for determining these global functions. Underlying this method are theorems due to Toupin and Knowles on strain energy decay rates, which are related to a quantitative expression of Saint-Venant's principle. It is mentioned that a mathematically complete set of global functions can be generated, so that any arbitrary interface condition between the finite element and global subregions can be represented. Convergence to the true behavior can be achieved with increasing global functions and finite-element degrees of freedom. Specific attention is devoted to mathematically two-dimensional and three-dimensional prismatic structures. Comments are offered on the GLFEM analysis of NASA flat panel with a discontinuous stiffener. Methods for determining global functions for other effects are also indicated, such as steady-state dynamics and bodies under initial stress.

  4. Towards accurate structural characterization of metal centres in protein crystals: the structures of Ni and Cu T{sub 6} bovine insulin derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Frankaer, Christian Grundahl; Mossin, Susanne; Ståhl, Kenny; Harris, Pernille

    2014-01-01

    The level of structural detail around the metal sites in Ni{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+} T{sub 6} insulin derivatives was significantly improved by using a combination of single-crystal X-ray crystallography and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Photoreduction and subsequent radiation damage of the Cu{sup 2+} sites in Cu insulin was followed by XANES spectroscopy. Using synchrotron radiation (SR), the crystal structures of T{sub 6} bovine insulin complexed with Ni{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+} were solved to 1.50 and 1.45 Å resolution, respectively. The level of detail around the metal centres in these structures was highly limited, and the coordination of water in Cu site II of the copper insulin derivative was deteriorated as a consequence of radiation damage. To provide more detail, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to improve the information level about metal coordination in each derivative. The nickel derivative contains hexacoordinated Ni{sup 2+} with trigonal symmetry, whereas the copper derivative contains tetragonally distorted hexacoordinated Cu{sup 2+} as a result of the Jahn–Teller effect, with a significantly longer coordination distance for one of the three water molecules in the coordination sphere. That the copper centre is of type II was further confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The coordination distances were refined from EXAFS with standard deviations within 0.01 Å. The insulin derivative containing Cu{sup 2+} is sensitive towards photoreduction when exposed to SR. During the reduction of Cu{sup 2+} to Cu{sup +}, the coordination geometry of copper changes towards lower coordination numbers. Primary damage, i.e. photoreduction, was followed directly by XANES as a function of radiation dose, while secondary damage in the form of structural changes around the Cu atoms after exposure to different radiation doses was studied by crystallography using a laboratory diffractometer. Protection against photoreduction and subsequent

  5. Local structures surrounding Zr in nanostructurally stabilized cubic zirconia: Structural origin of phase stability

    SciTech Connect

    Soo, Y. L.; Chen, P. J.; Huang, S. H.; Shiu, T. J.; Tsai, T. Y.; Chow, Y. H.; Lin, Y. C.; Weng, S. C.; Chang, S. L.; Wang, G.; Cheung, C. L.; Sabirianov, R. F.; Mei, W. N.; Namavar, F.; Haider, H.; Garvin, K. L.; Lee, J. F.; Lee, H. Y.; Chu, P. P.

    2008-12-01

    Local environment surrounding Zr atoms in the thin films of nanocrystalline zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}) has been investigated by using the extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) technique. These films prepared by the ion beam assisted deposition exhibit long-range structural order of cubic phase and high hardness at room temperature without chemical stabilizers. The local structure around Zr probed by EXAFS indicates a cubic Zr sublattice with O atoms located on the nearest tetragonal sites with respect to the Zr central atoms, as well as highly disordered locations. Similar Zr local structure was also found in a ZrO{sub 2} nanocrystal sample prepared by a sol-gel method. Variations in local structures due to thermal annealing were observed and analyzed. Most importantly, our x-ray results provide direct experimental evidence for the existence of oxygen vacancies arising from local disorder and distortion of the oxygen sublattice in nanocrystalline ZrO{sub 2}. These oxygen vacancies are regarded as the essential stabilizing factor for the nanostructurally stabilized cubic zirconia.

  6. Wycheproof Education Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweetnam and Godfrey, Melbourne (Australia).

    The Wycheproof township in New South Wales (Australia) is the regional center for a grain farming community. The Wycheproof Education Centre was formed by the merger of a separate primary and secondary school (on one site with existing buildings), into a single governing body that is educationally structured into junior, middle, and senior…

  7. Wycheproof Education Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweetnam and Godfrey, Melbourne (Australia).

    The Wycheproof township in New South Wales (Australia) is the regional center for a grain farming community. The Wycheproof Education Centre was formed by the merger of a separate primary and secondary school (on one site with existing buildings), into a single governing body that is educationally structured into junior, middle, and senior…

  8. A local immunization strategy for networks with overlapping community structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghavian, Fatemeh; Salehi, Mostafa; Teimouri, Mehdi

    2017-02-01

    Since full coverage treatment is not feasible due to limited resources, we need to utilize an immunization strategy to effectively distribute the available vaccines. On the other hand, the structure of contact network among people has a significant impact on epidemics of infectious diseases (such as SARS and influenza) in a population. Therefore, network-based immunization strategies aim to reduce the spreading rate by removing the vaccinated nodes from contact network. Such strategies try to identify more important nodes in epidemics spreading over a network. In this paper, we address the effect of overlapping nodes among communities on epidemics spreading. The proposed strategy is an optimized random-walk based selection of these nodes. The whole process is local, i.e. it requires contact network information in the level of nodes. Thus, it is applicable to large-scale and unknown networks in which the global methods usually are unrealizable. Our simulation results on different synthetic and real networks show that the proposed method outperforms the existing local methods in most cases. In particular, for networks with strong community structures, high overlapping membership of nodes or small size communities, the proposed method shows better performance.

  9. Embrittlement and Flow Localization in Reactor Structural Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Xianglin Wu; Xiao Pan; James Stubbins

    2006-10-06

    Many reactor components and structural members are made from metal alloys due, in large part, to their strength and ability to resist brittle fracture by plastic deformation. However, brittle fracture can occur when structural material cannot undergo extensive, or even limited, plastic deformation due to irradiation exposure. Certain irradiation conditions lead to the development of a damage microstructure where plastic flow is limited to very small volumes or regions of material, as opposed to the general plastic flow in unexposed materials. This process is referred to as flow localization or plastic instability. The true stress at the onset of necking is a constant regardless of the irradiation level. It is called 'critical stress' and this critical stress has strong temperature dependence. Interrupted tensile testes of 316L SS have been performed to investigate the microstructure evolution and competing mechanism between mechanic twinning and planar slip which are believed to be the controlling mechanism for flow localization. Deformation twinning is the major contribution of strain hardening and good ductility for low temperatures, and the activation of twinning system is determined by the critical twinning stress. Phases transform and texture analyses are also discussed in this study. Finite element analysis is carried out to complement the microstructural analysis and for the prediction of materaials performance with and without stress concentration and irradiation.

  10. Mapping Milky Way and Local Volume Structure With LSST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willman, Beth; Bochanski, J. J.; Bullock, J. S.; de Jong, R.; Debattista, V. P.; Finkbeiner, D.; Grillmair, C. J.; Henry, T. J.; Ivezić, Ž.; Johnston, K. V.; Jurić, M.; Kalirai, J.; McGehee, P. M.; Minniti, D.; Roškar, R.; Sarajedini, A.; Simon, J. D.; Strader, J.; Strauss, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    The last decade has seen a renaissance in the study of our own and other galaxies in the Local Volume, based in large part on the multi-dimensional maps provided by the vast numbers of stars cataloged by surveys such as 2MASS and SDSS. This renaissance has revolutionized our view of the Milky Way (MW) by facilitating tomographic studies of its global structure and by revealing a vast menagerie of substructures, including a new population of satellite galaxies with a millionth the luminosity of the MW and a halo replete with lumps and streams that betray the formation history of the MW. With LSST's 6 bands, 1000 epochs, and a final a limiting magnitude of r=27.6 (AB mag; 5-sigma), it will provide an excellent resource for mapping the structure and accretion history of the MW and beyond in a way that the present generation of surveys has only hinted at. LSST is anticipated to catalog 10 billion stars, including photometric abundances for the 200 million F/G stars within 100 kpc and proper motion/parallax measurements for stars brighter than r = 24 mag. Specific MW and Local Volume science to be enabled by LSST includes: mapping the 3D distribution of dust throughout the MW's disk, including variations in R_V; understanding the smooth distribution of stars in the MW and other nearby galaxies; understanding large-scale chemical gradients in the MW; discovering lumps and streams in metallicity and phase-space; inferring the mass distribution in the MW; discovering ultra-faint galaxies throughout the Local Volume as overdensities of resolved stars.

  11. Local structural ordering in surface-confined liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Śliwa, I.; Jeżewski, W.; Zakharov, A. V.

    2017-06-01

    The effect of the interplay between attractive nonlocal surface interactions and attractive pair long-range intermolecular couplings on molecular structures of liquid crystals confined in thin cells with flat solid surfaces has been studied. Extending the McMillan mean field theory to include finite systems, it has been shown that confining surfaces can induce complex orientational and translational ordering of molecules. Typically, local smectic A, nematic, and isotropic phases have been shown to coexist in certain temperature ranges, provided that confining cells are sufficiently thick, albeit finite. Due to the nonlocality of surface interactions, the spatial arrangement of these local phases can display, in general, an unexpected complexity along the surface normal direction. In particular, molecules located in the vicinity of surfaces can still be organized in smectic layers, even though nematic and/or isotropic order can simultaneously appear in the interior of cells. The resulting surface freezing of smectic layers has been confirmed to occur even for rather weak surface interactions. The surface interactions cannot, however, prevent smectic layers from melting relatively close to system boundaries, even when molecules are still arranged in layers within the central region of the system. The internal interfaces, separating individual liquid-crystal phases, are demonstrated here to form fronts of local finite-size transitions that move across cells under temperature changes. Although the complex molecular ordering in surface confined liquid-crystal systems can essentially be controlled by temperature variations, specific thermal properties of these systems, especially the nature of the local transitions, are argued to be strongly conditioned to the degree of molecular packing.

  12. GaAs quantum well structures investigation by local cathodoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakhmin, A. A.; Zamoryanskaya, M. V.; Arsentyev, I. N.; Konnikov, S. G.; Vinokurov, D. A.; Stankevich, A. L.; Tarasov, I. S.

    2009-04-01

    The article shows the cathodoluminescence technique application to a quality analysis of a semiconductor multilayer heterostructures. Two structures with a GaAs quantum well embedded between the AlGaAs and GaInP barriers were investigated. The AlGaAs/GaAs/GaInP and GaInP/GaAs/AlGaAs structures were grown by MOCVD on a GaAs substrate. In this work we study the interface quality of quantum-dimensional GaAs layer by means of the local cathodoluminescence. Degradation and broadening of GaAs/GaInP interface occurring during the growth process of GaAs on GaInP layer was assumed to result in the formation of a layer with mixed composition at the interface. In addition, the presence of the layer prevented the formation of a quantum well in the GaAs layer. The transition layer was clearly observed by the cathodoluminescence. In the other case it was found that the growth of a structure with GaAs layer on top of AlGaAs produced a quantum well with a 10 nm thickness. The interface quality and layer thicknesses were also confirmed by the X-ray diffraction investigation of these structures.

  13. To recommend the local primary health-care centre or not: what importance do patients attach to initial contact quality, staff continuity and responsive staff encounters?

    PubMed

    Abrahamsson, Birgitta; Berg, Marie-Louise U; Jutengren, Gӧran; Jonsson, Annikki

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to examine the circumstances associated with patients' tendencies to recommend a primary care centre, based on four hypotheses, the initial contact's quality, care relationship continuity, treatment encounter responsiveness and whether the significance of encounter responsiveness differs depending on whether the patient has been seeing a nurse or physician. The study is based on the patient' self-reported responses, retrieved from the Swedish National Patient Survey. The design is cross-sectional, and data were analysed using a binary logistic regression. Data were collected from three primary healthcare centres in the region of Västra Götaland, Sweden. A total of 362 patients (62% females) having visited any of three publicly run healthcare centres in September 2010 constitute the analytical sample. Participants were fairly evenly distributed across all age groups. Recommendation was captured by patients' binary responses to the question: Would you recommend the visited primary healthcare centre? The hypotheses involving initial contact quality, care relationship continuity and treatment encounter responsiveness were supported by the analyses. The latter was strongly associated with patient tendency to recommend the primary healthcare centre. However, the profession (nurse or physician) involved in the treatment encounter made no difference for the predictive significance of encounter responsiveness for a patient's tendency to recommend the healthcare centre. Striving for stable and responsive patient/staff relationships and an open approach towards patients are potentially successful strategies for primary healthcare centres seeking to attract new patients and maintain current ones. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  14. Structure and local charging of electromigrated Au nanocontacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, D.; Marz, M.; Schneider, S.; Hoffmann-Vogel, R.

    2017-02-01

    We study the structure and the electronic properties of Au nanocontacts created by controlled electromigration of thin film devices, a method frequently used to contact molecules. In contrast to electromigration testing, a current is applied in a cyclic fashion and during each cycle the resistance increase of the metal upon heating is used to avoid thermal runaway. In this way, nanometer sized-gaps are obtained. The thin film devices with an optimized structure at the origin of the electromigration process are made by shadow evaporation without contamination by organic materials. Defining rounded edges and a thinner area in the center of the device allow to pre-determine the location where the electromigration takes place. Scanning force microscopy images of the pristine Au film and electromigrated contact show its grainy structure. Through electromigration, a 1.5 μm-wide slit is formed, with extensions only on the anode side that had previously not been observed in narrower structures. It is discussed whether this could be explained by asymmetric heating of both electrodes. New grains are formed in the slit and on the extensions on both, the anode and the cathode side. The smaller structures inside the slit lead to an electrode distance below 150 nm. Kelvin probe force microscopy images show a local work function difference with fluctuations of 70 mV on the metal before electromigration. Between the electrodes, disconnected through electromigration, a work function difference of 3.2 V is observed due to charging. Some of the grains newly formed by electromigration are electrically disconnected from the electrodes.

  15. Structure and local charging of electromigrated Au nanocontacts.

    PubMed

    Arnold, D; Marz, M; Schneider, S; Hoffmann-Vogel, R

    2017-02-03

    We study the structure and the electronic properties of Au nanocontacts created by controlled electromigration of thin film devices, a method frequently used to contact molecules. In contrast to electromigration testing, a current is applied in a cyclic fashion and during each cycle the resistance increase of the metal upon heating is used to avoid thermal runaway. In this way, nanometer sized-gaps are obtained. The thin film devices with an optimized structure at the origin of the electromigration process are made by shadow evaporation without contamination by organic materials. Defining rounded edges and a thinner area in the center of the device allow to pre-determine the location where the electromigration takes place. Scanning force microscopy images of the pristine Au film and electromigrated contact show its grainy structure. Through electromigration, a 1.5 μm-wide slit is formed, with extensions only on the anode side that had previously not been observed in narrower structures. It is discussed whether this could be explained by asymmetric heating of both electrodes. New grains are formed in the slit and on the extensions on both, the anode and the cathode side. The smaller structures inside the slit lead to an electrode distance below 150 nm. Kelvin probe force microscopy images show a local work function difference with fluctuations of 70 mV on the metal before electromigration. Between the electrodes, disconnected through electromigration, a work function difference of 3.2 V is observed due to charging. Some of the grains newly formed by electromigration are electrically disconnected from the electrodes.

  16. Flexible structural protein alignment by a sequence of local transformations

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Jairo; Segura, Joan; Wilson, Richard C.; Dasgupta, Swagata

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Throughout evolution, homologous proteins have common regions that stay semi-rigid relative to each other and other parts that vary in a more noticeable way. In order to compare the increasing number of structures in the PDB, flexible geometrical alignments are needed, that are reliable and easy to use. Results: We present a protein structure alignment method whose main feature is the ability to consider different rigid transformations at different sites, allowing for deformations beyond a global rigid transformation. The performance of the method is comparable with that of the best ones from 10 aligners tested, regarding both the quality of the alignments with respect to hand curated ones, and the classification ability. An analysis of some structure pairs from the literature that need to be matched in a flexible fashion are shown. The use of a series of local transformations can be exported to other classifiers, and a future golden protein similarity measure could benefit from it. Availability: A public server for the program is available at http://dmi.uib.es/ProtDeform/. Contact: jairo@uib.es Supplementary information: All data used, results and examples are available at http://dmi.uib.es/people/jairo/bio/ProtDeform.Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19417057

  17. Segmentation of knee MRI using structure enhanced local phase filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Mikhiel; Hacihaliloglu, Ilker

    2016-03-01

    The segmentation of bone surfaces from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data has applications in the quanti- tative measurement of knee osteoarthritis, surgery planning for patient specific total knee arthroplasty and its subsequent fabrication of artificial implants. However, due to the problems associated with MRI imaging such as low contrast between bone and surrounding tissues, noise, bias fields, and the partial volume effect, segmentation of bone surfaces continues to be a challenging operation. In this paper, a new framework is presented for the enhancement of knee MRI scans prior to segmentation in order to obtain high contrast bone images. During the first stage, a new contrast enhanced relative total variation (RTV) regularization method is used in order to remove textural noise from the bone structures and surrounding soft tissue interface. This salient bone edge information is further enhanced using a sparse gradient counting method based on L0 gradient minimization, which globally controls how many non-zero gradients are resulted in order to approximate prominent bone structures in a structure-sparsity-management manner. The last stage of the framework involves incorporation of local phase bone boundary information in order to provide an intensity invariant enhancement of contrast between the bone and surrounding soft tissue. The enhanced images are segmented using a fast random walker algorithm. Validation against expert segmentation was performed on 10 clinical knee MRI images, and achieved a mean dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of 0.975.

  18. Structuring Lecture Videos by Automatic Projection Screen Localization and Analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Wang, Jue; Wang, Haoqian; Dai, Qionghai

    2015-06-01

    We present a fully automatic system for extracting the semantic structure of a typical academic presentation video, which captures the whole presentation stage with abundant camera motions such as panning, tilting, and zooming. Our system automatically detects and tracks both the projection screen and the presenter whenever they are visible in the video. By analyzing the image content of the tracked screen region, our system is able to detect slide progressions and extract a high-quality, non-occluded, geometrically-compensated image for each slide, resulting in a list of representative images that reconstruct the main presentation structure. Afterwards, our system recognizes text content and extracts keywords from the slides, which can be used for keyword-based video retrieval and browsing. Experimental results show that our system is able to generate more stable and accurate screen localization results than commonly-used object tracking methods. Our system also extracts more accurate presentation structures than general video summarization methods, for this specific type of video.

  19. Strain localization driven by structural relaxation in sheared amorphous solids.

    PubMed

    Jagla, E A

    2007-10-01

    A two dimensional amorphous material is modeled as an assembly of mesoscopic elemental pieces coupled together to form an elastically coherent structure. Plasticity is introduced as the existence of different minima in the energy landscape of the elemental constituents. Upon the application of an external strain rate, the material shears through the appearance of elemental slip events with quadrupolar symmetry. When the energy landscape of the elemental constituents is kept fixed, the slip events distribute uniformly throughout the sample, producing on average a uniform deformation. However, when the energy landscape at different spatial positions can be rearranged dynamically to account for structural relaxation, the system develops inhomogeneous deformation in the form of shear bands at low shear rates, and stick-slip-like motion at the shear bands for the lowest shear rates. The origin of strain localization is traced back to a region of negative correlation between strain rate and stress, which appears only if structural relaxation is present. The model also reproduces other well known effects in the rheology of amorphous materials, as a stress peak in a strain rate controlled experiment staring from rest, and the increase of the maximum of this peak with sample age.

  20. Local structure of solid Rb at megabar pressures

    SciTech Connect

    De Panfilis, S.; Gorelli, F.; Santoro, M.; Ulivi, L.; Gregoryanz, E.; Irifune, T.; Shinmei, T.; Kantor, I.; Mathon, O.; Pascarelli, S.

    2015-06-07

    We have investigated the local and electronic structure of solid rubidium by means of x-ray absorption spectroscopy up to 101.0 GPa, thus doubling the maximum investigated experimental pressure. This study confirms the predicted stability of phase VI and was completed by the combination of two pivotal instrumental solutions. On one side, we made use of nanocrystalline diamond anvils, which, contrary to the more commonly used single crystal diamond anvils, do not generate sharp Bragg peaks (glitches) at specific energies that spoil the weak fine structure oscillations in the x-ray absorption cross section. Second, we exploited the performance of a state-of-the-art x-ray focussing device yielding a beam spot size of 5 × 5 μm{sup 2}, spatially stable over the entire energy scan. An advanced data analysis protocol was implemented to extract the pressure dependence of the structural parameters in phase VI of solid Rb from 51.2 GPa up to the highest pressure. A continuous reduction of the nearest neighbour distances was observed, reaching about 6% over the probed pressure range. We also discuss a phenomenological model based on the Einstein approximation to describe the pressure behaviour of the mean-square relative displacement. Within this simplified scheme, we estimate the Grüneisen parameter for this high pressure Rb phase to be in the 1.3–1.5 interval.

  1. Local atomic structures of single-component metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trady, Salma; Hasnaoui, Abdellatif; Mazroui, M.'hammed; Saadouni, Khalid

    2016-10-01

    In this study we examine the structural properties of single-component metallic glasses of aluminum. We use a molecular dynamics simulation based on semi-empirical many-body potential, derived from the embedded atom method (EAM). The radial distribution function (RDF), common neighbors analysis method (CNA), coordination number analysis (CN) and Voronoi tessellation are used to characterize the metal's local structure during the heating and cooling (quenching). The simulation results reveal that the melting temperature depends on the heating rate. In addition, atomic visualization shows that the structure of aluminum after fast quenching is in a glassy state, confirmed quantitatively by the splitting of the second peak of the radial distribution function, and by the appearance of icosahedral clusters observed via CNA technique. On the other hand, the Wendt-Abraham parameters are calculated to determine the glass transition temperature (Tg), which depends strongly on the cooling rate; it increases while the cooling rate increases. On the basis of CN analysis and Voronoi tessellation, we demonstrate that the transition from the Al liquid to glassy state is mainly due to the formation of distorted and perfect icosahedral clusters.

  2. Efficient reanalysis of structures by a direct modification method. [local stiffness modifications of large structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raibstein, A. I.; Kalev, I.; Pipano, A.

    1976-01-01

    A procedure for the local stiffness modifications of large structures is described. It enables structural modifications without an a priori definition of the changes in the original structure and without loss of efficiency due to multiple loading conditions. The solution procedure, implemented in NASTRAN, involved the decomposed stiffness matrix and the displacement vectors of the original structure. It solves the modified structure exactly, irrespective of the magnitude of the stiffness changes. In order to investigate the efficiency of the present procedure and to test its applicability within a design environment, several real and large structures were solved. The results of the efficiency studies indicate that the break-even point of the procedure varies between 8% and 60% stiffness modifications, depending upon the structure's characteristics and the options employed.

  3. Using Local Born and Local Rytov Fourier Modeling and Migration Methods for Investigation of Heterogeneous Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Fehler, M.C.; Huang, L.-J.

    1998-12-10

    During the past few years, there has been interest in developing migration and forward modeling approaches that are both fast and reliable particularly in regions that have rapid spatial variations in structure. The authors have been investigating a suite of modeling and migration methods that are implemented in the wavenumber-space domains and operate on data in the frequency domain. The best known example of these methods is the split-step Fourier method (SSF). Two of the methods that the authors have developed are the extended local Born Fourier (ELBF) approach and the extended local Rytov Fourier (ELRF) approach. Both methods are based on solutions of the scalar (constant density) wave equation, are computationally fast and can reliably model effects of both deterministic and random structures. The authors have investigated their reliability for migrating both 2D synthetic data and real 2D field data. The authors have found that the methods give images that are better than those that can be obtained using other methods like the SSF and Kirchhoff migration approaches. More recently, the authors have developed an approach for solving the acoustic (variable density) wave equation and have begun to investigate its applicability for modeling one-way wave propagation. The methods will be introduced and their ability to model seismic wave propagation and migrate seismic data will be investigated. The authors will also investigate their capability to model forward wave propagation through random media and to image zones of small scale heterogeneity such as those associated with zones of high permeability.

  4. Optical fingerprint recognition based on local minutiae structure coding.

    PubMed

    Yi, Yao; Cao, Liangcai; Guo, Wei; Luo, Yaping; Feng, Jianjiang; He, Qingsheng; Jin, Guofan

    2013-07-15

    A parallel volume holographic optical fingerprint recognition system robust to fingerprint translation, rotation and nonlinear distortion is proposed. The optical fingerprint recognition measures the similarity by using the optical filters of multiplexed holograms recorded in the holographic media. A fingerprint is encoded into multiple template data pages based on the local minutiae structure coding method after it is adapted for the optical data channel. An improved filter recording time schedule and a post-filtering calibration technology are combined to suppress the calculating error from the large variations in data page filling ratio. Experimental results tested on FVC2002 DB1 and a forensic database comprising 270,216 fingerprints demonstrate the robustness and feasibility of the system.

  5. Balancing Newtonian gravity and spin to create localized structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Michael; Lindner, John

    2015-03-01

    Using geometry and Newtonian physics, we design localized structures that do not require electromagnetic or other forces to resist implosion or explosion. In two-dimensional Euclidean space, we find an equilibrium configuration of a rotating ring of massive dust whose inward gravity is the centripetal force that spins it. We find similar solutions in three-dimensional Euclidean and hyperbolic spaces, but only in the limit of vanishing mass. Finally, in three-dimensional Euclidean space, we generalize the two-dimensional result by finding an equilibrium configuration of a spherical shell of massive dust that supports itself against gravitational collapse by spinning isoclinically in four dimensions so its three-dimensional acceleration is everywhere inward. These Newtonian ``atoms'' illuminate classical physics and geometry.

  6. Characterization of localized transverse structures in wide-aperture lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosanov, N. N.; Fedorov, A. V.; Fedorov, S. V.; Khodova, G. V.

    The problem of characterization of spatio-temporal patterns is discussed for the case of wide-aperture lasers with nonlinear losses where variety of such patterns is especially rich. Laser autosolitons (LASs)-localized transverse structures representing “islands of lasing” on a background of the nonlasing mode on the laser aperture-are studied. Existence of stable single LASs which are motionless or moving in the transverse direction with constant linear velocity is shown. Described are also LASs with regular wavefronts, those with screw dislocations (defects) of wavefronts with different topological indices, and those with axially symmetric and asymmetric intensity distributions rotating with constant angular velocity around the LAS center. An approach is given for qualitative and quantitative characterization of a single LAS by its linear and angular velocities and frequency shift, based on a combination of analytical methods and computer simulations. Results of investigations of weak and strong interactions among the LASs are presented.

  7. Localized structures in dissipative media: from optics to plant ecology.

    PubMed

    Tlidi, M; Staliunas, K; Panajotov, K; Vladimirov, A G; Clerc, M G

    2014-10-28

    Localized structures (LSs) in dissipative media appear in various fields of natural science such as biology, chemistry, plant ecology, optics and laser physics. The proposal for this Theme Issue was to gather specialists from various fields of nonlinear science towards a cross-fertilization among active areas of research. This is a cross-disciplinary area of research dominated by nonlinear optics due to potential applications for all-optical control of light, optical storage and information processing. This Theme Issue contains contributions from 18 active groups involved in the LS field and have all made significant contributions in recent years. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  8. Polariton Local States in Periodic Bragg Multiple Quantum Well Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deych, Lev; Yamilov, Alexey; Lisyansky, Alexander

    2000-11-01

    We analytically study defect polariton states in Bragg MQW structures, and defect induced changes in transmission and reflection spectra. Defect layers can differ from the host layers in three different ways: in the exciton-light coupling strength, in the exciton resonance frequency, and in interwell spacing. We show that a single defect leads to two local polariton modes in the photonic band gap. These modes lead to peculiarities in reflection and transmission spectra. Each type of defect can be reproduced experimentally, and we show that each of them play distinctly different roles in the optical properties of the system. We obtain closed analytical expressions for respective local frequencies, as well as for reflection and transmission coefficients. On the basis of the results obtained, we give practical recommendation for experimental observation of the studied effects in samples used in Refs. [1,2]. [1] M.Hübner, J. Kuhl, T. Stroucken, A. Knorr, S.W. Koch, R. Hey, K. Ploog, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 4199 (1996). [2] M.Hübner, J.P. Prineas, C. Ell, P. Brick, E.S. Lee, G. Khitrova, H.M. Gibbs, S.W. Koch, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 2841 (1999).

  9. The local electronic structure of α-Li3N

    SciTech Connect

    Fister, Timothy T.; Siedler, Gerald T.; Shirley, E. L.; Vila, Fernando D.; Nagle, Kenneth P.; Rehr, John J.; Linehan, John C.; Cross, Julie O.

    2008-07-28

    We investigate the local electronic structure of α-Li3N by the combination of nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering measurements and three independent ab initio theoretical treatments. Experimental determination of the local final density of states projected onto an orbital angular momentum basis (l-DOS) for Li 1s initial states finds strong similarities in the s- and p-DOS throughout the near-edge region, which we attribute to the 3-fold rotational symmetry about Li sites in the Li2N sheets of α-Li3N. We also find a significant correspondence between the near-edge spectra for the Li 1s and N 1s contributions to the NRIXS signal. This is unexpected, as such behavior is typically associated with covalent materials whereas α-Li3N is strongly ionic. We explain that such similarity in the DOS at different sites in either ionic or covalent systems may occur when the core-hole lifetimes are very long, so that the lifetime of the photoelectron is the dominant factor in cutting off high-order multiple scattering in the near-edge regime. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for DOE.

  10. Studies of local magnetism and local structure in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budnick, J. I.; Tan, Z.; Filipkowski, M.

    1991-01-01

    The muon spin rotation (MUSR) study of local magnetism of Sr-doped La2CrO4 is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on magnetic order as detected by local and bulk probes with local atomic environments studies by x ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). Correlations between the MUSR study of local magnetic ordering and the bulk magnetization study are presented along with a discussion of the dependence upon oxygen stoichiometry. Results are presented for both superconducting phases and magnetic phases. Recent data which reveals the existence of local magnetic ordering in the hydrogen-doped YBa2Cu3O7 system are also discussed.

  11. Pressure dependence of the local structure of iridium ditelluride across the structural phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, E.; Joseph, B.; Iadecola, A.; Marini, C.; Ishii, H.; Kudo, K.; Pascarelli, S.; Nohara, M.; Mizokawa, T.; Saini, N. L.

    2016-04-01

    The local structure of IrTe2 has been studied by iridium L3-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements as a function of pressure, performed at two temperatures (100 and 295 K) across the structural phase transition at ˜270 K. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra show pressure-dependent anomalies, suggesting phase transitions that are characterized by different local atomic displacements. The high-temperature phase of IrTe2 (trigonal at 295 K) reveals a clear anomaly in the Ir-Te correlations at ˜4 GPa, while the low-temperature phase (at 100 K) shows a smaller change at ˜6 GPa, likely to be associated with transitions in lower-symmetry phases. XANES spectra, measuring higher-order atomic correlations, also show nonlinear pressure dependence in the local geometry at the anomalous pressures. These nonlinear changes suggest that IrTe2 goes through lower local symmetry phases with increasing pressure.

  12. Local field enhancement and thermoplasmonics in multimodal aluminum structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiecha, Peter R.; Mennemanteuil, Marie-Maxime; Khlopin, Dmitry; Martin, Jérôme; Arbouet, Arnaud; Gérard, Davy; Bouhelier, Alexandre; Plain, Jérôme; Cuche, Aurélien

    2017-07-01

    Aluminum nanostructures have recently been at the focus of numerous studies due to their properties including oxidation stability and surface plasmon resonances covering the ultraviolet and visible spectral windows. In this article, we reveal a facet of this metal relevant for both plasmonic purposes and photothermal conversion. The field distribution of high-order plasmonic resonances existing in two-dimensional Al structures is studied by nonlinear photoluminescence microscopy in a spectral region where electronic interband transitions occur. The polarization sensitivity of the field intensity maps shows that the electric field concentration can be addressed and controlled on demand. We use a numerical tool based on the Green dyadic method to analyze our results and to simulate the absorbed energy that is locally converted into heat. The polarization-dependent temperature increase of the Al structures is experimentally quantitatively measured, and is in an excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. Our work highlights Al as a promising candidate for designing thermal nanosources integrated in coplanar geometries for thermally assisted nanomanipulation or biophysical applications.

  13. Band gaps in grid structure with periodic local resonator subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoqin; Wang, Jun; Wang, Rongqi; Lin, Jieqiong

    2017-09-01

    The grid structure is widely used in architectural and mechanical field for its high strength and saving material. This paper will present a study on an acoustic metamaterial beam (AMB) based on the normal square grid structure with local resonators owning both flexible band gaps and high static stiffness, which have high application potential in vibration control. Firstly, the AMB with variable cross-section frame is analytically modeled by the beam-spring-mass model that is provided by using the extended Hamilton’s principle and Bloch’s theorem. The above model is used for computing the dispersion relation of the designed AMB in terms of the design parameters, and the influences of relevant parameters on band gaps are discussed. Then a two-dimensional finite element model of the AMB is built and analyzed in COMSOL Multiphysics, both the dispersion properties of unit cell and the wave attenuation in a finite AMB have fine agreement with the derived model. The effects of design parameters of the two-dimensional model in band gaps are further examined, and the obtained results can well verify the analytical model. Finally, the wave attenuation performances in three-dimensional AMBs with equal and unequal thickness are presented and discussed.

  14. Identification of ligand templates using local structure alignment for structure-based drug design.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hui Sun; Im, Wonpil

    2012-10-22

    With a rapid increase in the number of high-resolution protein-ligand structures, the known protein-ligand structures can be used to gain insight into ligand-binding modes in a target protein. On the basis of the fact that the structurally similar binding sites share information about their ligands, we have developed a local structure alignment tool, G-LoSA (graph-based local structure alignment). The known protein-ligand binding-site structure library is searched by G-LoSA to detect binding-site structures with similar geometry and physicochemical properties to a query binding-site structure regardless of sequence continuity and protein fold. Then, the ligands in the identified complexes are used as templates (i.e., template ligands) to predict/design a ligand for the target protein. The performance of G-LoSA is validated against 76 benchmark targets from the Astex diverse set. Using the currently available protein-ligand structure library, G-LoSA is able to identify a single template ligand (from a nonhomologous protein complex) that is highly similar to the target ligand in more than half of the benchmark targets. In addition, our benchmark analyses show that an assembly of structural fragments from multiple template ligands with partial similarity to the target ligand can be used to design novel ligand structures specific to the target protein. This study clearly indicates that a template-based ligand modeling has potential for de novo ligand design and can be a complementary approach to the receptor structure based methods.

  15. Identification of Ligand Templates using Local Structure Alignment for Structure-based Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hui Sun; Im, Wonpil

    2012-01-01

    With a rapid increase in the number of high-resolution protein-ligand structures, the known protein-ligand structures can be used to gain insight into ligand-binding modes in a target protein. Based on the fact that the structurally similar binding sites share information about their ligands, we have developed a local structure alignment tool, G-LoSA (Graph-based Local Structure Alignment). In G-LoSA, the known protein-ligand binding-site structure library is searched to detect binding-site structures with similar geometry and physicochemical properties to a query binding-site structure regardless of sequence continuity and protein fold. Then, the ligands in the identified complexes are used as templates (i.e., template ligands) to predict/design a ligand for the target protein. The performance of G-LoSA is validated against 76 benchmark targets from the Astex diverse set. Using the currently available protein-ligand structure library, G-LoSA is able to identify a single template ligand (from a non-homologous protein complex) that is highly similar to the target ligand in more than half of the benchmark targets. In addition, our benchmark analyses show that an assembly of structural fragments from multiple template ligands with partial similarity to the target ligand can be used to design novel ligand structures specific to the target protein. This study clearly indicates that a template-based ligand modeling has potential for de novo ligand design and can be a complementary approach to the receptor structure based methods. PMID:22978550

  16. Hydroxyl radicals in ice: insights into local structure and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Codorniu-Hernández, Edelsys; Kusalik, Peter G

    2012-09-07

    The hydroxyl radical and its reactivity within ice environments are crucial to many important atmospheric reactions. The associated molecular mechanisms are largely unknown due to challenges posed by direct experimental measurements and computational studies of this transient species. Here we report insights into the local structure and behaviour of the hydroxyl radical in bulk ice through an extensive study utilizing Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. Interstitial and in-lattice hydroxyl radicals in hexagonal ice were investigated at primarily 190 K. Our findings, utilizing both HCTH/120 and BLYP functionals, show that OH* can exhibit greater mobility than other ice defects (the trapping energy estimated to be only 0.09 eV). We observe the formation of a two-center three-electron hemibond structure between the hydroxyl radical and an in-lattice water molecule; while controversial, such a structure in ice may be amenable to experimental detection due to its relative stability. Our results show that interstitial water molecules can strongly influence the mobility of the hydroxyl radical in bulk ice through the displacement of the radical to an interstitial location. We also demonstrate that the H-transfer reaction from an interstitial water to the radical is a rare event in ice. Together, these results predict that the radical can be a reactive species in bulk ice, as both interstitial and in-lattice OH* can be available for reactions with other species. These microscopic insights should contribute to our understanding of the reactivity of OH* in ice and its implications to atmospheric reactions.

  17. Single Posterior Approach for En-Bloc Resection and Stabilization for Locally Advanced Pancoast Tumors Involving the Spine: Single Centre Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sunna, Tarek; Liberman, Moishe; Boubez, Ghassan; Wang, Zhi; Shedid, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Monocentric prospective study. Purpose To assess the safety and effectiveness of the posterior approach for resection of advanced Pancoast tumors. Overview of Literature In patients with advanced Pancoast tumors invading the spine, most surgical teams consider the combined approach to be necessary for “en-bloc” resection to control visceral, vascular, and neurological structures. We report our preliminary experience with a single-stage posterior approach. Methods We included all patients who underwent posterior en-bloc resection of advanced Pancoast tumors invading the spine in our institution between January 2014 and May 2015. All patients had locally advanced tumors without N2 nodes or distant metastases. All patients, except 1, benefited from induction treatment consisting of a combination of concomitant chemotherapy (cisplatin-VP16) and radiation. Results Five patients were included in this study. There were 2 men and 3 women with a mean age of 55 years (range, 46–61 years). The tumor involved 2 adjacent levels in 1 patient, 3 levels in 1 patient, and 4 levels in 3 patients. There were no intraoperative complications. The mean operative time was 9 hours (range, 8–12 hours), and the mean estimated blood loss was 3.2 L (range, 1.5–7 L). No patient had a worsened neurological condition at discharge. Four complications occurred in 4 patients. Three complications required reoperation and none was lethal. The mean follow-up was 15.5 months (range, 9–24 months). Four patients harbored microscopically negative margins (R0 resection) and remained disease free. One patient harbored a microscopically positive margin (R1 resection) and exhibited local recurrence at 8 months following radiation treatment. Conclusions The posterior approach was a valuable option that avoided the need for a second-stage operation. Induction chemoradiation is highly suitable for limiting the risk of local recurrence. PMID:27994780

  18. Predicting continuous local structure and the effect of its substitution for secondary structure in fragment-free protein structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Faraggi, Eshel; Yang, Yuedong; Zhang, Shesheng; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2009-11-11

    Local structures predicted from protein sequences are used extensively in every aspect of modeling and prediction of protein structure and function. For more than 50 years, they have been predicted at a low-resolution coarse-grained level (e.g., three-state secondary structure). Here, we combine a two-state classifier with real-value predictor to predict local structure in continuous representation by backbone torsion angles. The accuracy of the angles predicted by this approach is close to that derived from NMR chemical shifts. Their substitution for predicted secondary structure as restraints for ab initio structure prediction doubles the success rate. This result demonstrates the potential of predicted local structure for fragment-free tertiary-structure prediction. It further implies potentially significant benefits from using predicted real-valued torsion angles as a replacement for or supplement to the secondary-structure prediction tools used almost exclusively in many computational methods ranging from sequence alignment to function prediction.

  19. Localized and chaotic folding: the role of axial plane structures.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Bruce E; Ord, Alison

    2012-04-28

    Most natural fold systems are not sinusoidal in profile. A widely held view is that such irregularity derives solely from inherited initial geometrical perturbations. Although, undoubtedly, initial perturbations can contribute to irregularity, we explore a different (but complementary) view in which the irregular geometry results from some material or system softening process. This arises because the buckling response of a layer (or layers) embedded in a weaker matrix is controlled in a sensitive manner by the nature of the reaction forces exerted by the deforming matrix on the layer. In many theoretical treatments of the folding problem, this reaction force is assumed to be a linear function of some measure of the deformation or deformation rate. This paper is concerned with the influence of nonlinear reaction forces such as arise from nonlinear elasticity or viscosity. Localized folds arising from nonlinearity form in a fundamentally different way than the Biot wavelength selection process. As a particular example of nonlinear behaviour, we examine the influence of axial plane structures made up of layers of different mineralogy formed by chemical differentiation processes accompanying the deformation; they are referred to as metamorphic layering. The alternating mineralogical composition in the metamorphic layers means that the embedding matrix exerts a reaction force on the folded layers that varies not only with the deflection or the velocity of deflection of the layer, but also in a periodic manner along the length of the folded layers. The influence of this spatially periodic reaction force on the development of localized and chaotic folding is explored numerically.

  20. Probing the band structure and local electronic properties of low-dimensional semiconductor structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walrath, Jenna Cherie

    Low-dimensional semiconductor structures are important for a wide variety of applications, and recent advances in nanoscale fabrication are paving the way for increasingly precise nano-engineering of a wide range of materials. It is therefore essential that the physics of materials at the nanoscale are thoroughly understood to unleash the full potential of nanotechnology, requiring the development of increasingly sophisticated instrumentation and modeling. Of particular interest is the relationship between the local density of states (LDOS) of low-dimensional structures and the band structure and local electronic properties. This dissertation presents the investigation of the band structure, LDOS, and local electronic properties of nanostructures ranging from zero-dimensional (0D) quantum dots (QDs) to two-dimensional (2D) thin films, synthesizing computational and experimental approaches including Poisson-Schrodinger band structure calculations, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), and scanning thermoelectric microscopy (SThEM). A method is presented for quantifying the local Seebeck coefficient (S) with SThEM, using a quasi-3D conversion matrix approach to directly convert temperature gradient-induced voltages S. For a GaAs p-n junction, the resulting S-profile is consistent with that computed using the free carrier concentration profile. This combined computational-experimental approach is expected to enable nanoscale measurements of S across a wide variety of heterostructure interfaces. The local carrier concentration, n, is profiled across epitaxial InAs/GaAs QDs, where SThEM is used to profile the temperature gradient-induced voltage, which is converted to a profile of the local S and finally to an n profile. The S profile is converted to a conduction band-edge profile and compared with Poisson-Schrodinger band-edge simulations. The combined computational-experimental approach suggests a reduced n in the QD center in

  1. Superoxide reductase from Giardia intestinalis: structural characterization of the first SOR from a eukaryotic organism shows an iron centre that is highly sensitive to photoreduction.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cristiana M; Carpentier, Philippe; Matias, Pedro M; Testa, Fabrizio; Pinho, Filipa; Sarti, Paolo; Giuffrè, Alessandro; Bandeiras, Tiago M; Romão, Célia V

    2015-11-01

    Superoxide reductase (SOR), which is commonly found in prokaryotic organisms, affords protection from oxidative stress by reducing the superoxide anion to hydrogen peroxide. The reaction is catalyzed at the iron centre, which is highly conserved among the prokaryotic SORs structurally characterized to date. Reported here is the first structure of an SOR from a eukaryotic organism, the protozoan parasite Giardia intestinalis (GiSOR), which was solved at 2.0 Å resolution. By collecting several diffraction data sets at 100 K from the same flash-cooled protein crystal using synchrotron X-ray radiation, photoreduction of the iron centre was observed. Reduction was monitored using an online UV-visible microspectrophotometer, following the decay of the 647 nm absorption band characteristic of the iron site in the glutamate-bound, oxidized state. Similarly to other 1Fe-SORs structurally characterized to date, the enzyme displays a tetrameric quaternary-structure arrangement. As a distinctive feature, the N-terminal loop of the protein, containing the characteristic EKHxP motif, revealed an unusually high flexibility regardless of the iron redox state. At variance with previous evidence collected by X-ray crystallography and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of prokaryotic SORs, iron reduction did not lead to dissociation of glutamate from the catalytic metal or other structural changes; however, the glutamate ligand underwent X-ray-induced chemical changes, revealing high sensitivity of the GiSOR active site to X-ray radiation damage.

  2. Shear-wave velocity structure of the Tongariro Volcanic Centre, New Zealand: Fast Rayleigh and slow Love waves indicate strong shallow anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrey, Holly J.; Fry, Bill; Savage, Martha K.

    2017-04-01

    Models of the velocity structure of volcanoes can help define possible magma pathways and contribute to calculating more accurate earthquake locations, which can help with monitoring volcanic activity. However, shear-wave velocity of volcanoes is difficult to determine from traditional seismic techniques, such as local earthquake tomography (LET) or refraction/reflection surveys. Here we use the recently developed technique of noise cross correlation of continuous seismic data to investigate the subsurface shear-wave velocity structure of the Tongariro Volcanic Centre (TgVC) of New Zealand, focusing on the active Ruapehu and Tongariro Volcanoes. We observe both the fundamental and first higher-order modes of Rayleigh and Love waves within our noise dataset, made from stacks of 15 min cross-correlation functions. We manually pick group velocity dispersion curves from over 1900 correlation functions, of which we consider 1373 to be high quality. We subsequently invert a subset of the fundamental mode Rayleigh- and Love-wave dispersion curves both independently and jointly for one dimensional shear-wave velocity (Vs) profiles at Ruapehu and Tongariro Volcanoes. Vs increases very slowly at a rate of approximately 0.2 km/s per km depth beneath Ruapehu, suggesting that progressive hydrothermal alteration mitigates the effects of compaction driven velocity increases. At Tongariro, we observe larger Vs increases with depth, which we interpret as different layers within Tongariro's volcanic system above altered basement greywacke. Slow Vs, on the order of 1-2 km/s, are compatible with P-wave velocities (using a Vp/Vs ratio of 1.7) from existing velocity profiles of areas within the TgVC, and the observations of worldwide studies of shallow volcanic systems that used ambient noise cross-correlation methods. Most of the measured group velocities of fundamental mode Love-waves across the TgVC are 0.1-0.4 km/s slower than those of fundamental mode Rayleigh-waves in the

  3. Local Structural Distortion Induced Uniaxial Negative Thermal Expansion in Nanosized Semimetal Bismuth.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Zhu, He; Zheng, Lirong; Fan, Longlong; Ren, Yang; Chen, Jun; Deng, Jinxia; Xing, Xianran

    2016-11-01

    The corrugated layer structure bismuth has been successfully tailored into negative thermal expansion along c axis by size effect. Pair distribution function and extended X-ray absorption fine structure are combined to reveal the local structural distortion for nanosized bismuth. The comprehensive method to identify the local structure of nanomaterials can benefit the regulating and controlling of thermal expansion in nanodivices.

  4. Local structure in anisotropic systems determined by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komolkin, Andrei V.; Maliniak, Arnold

    In the present communication we describe the investigation of local structure using a new visualization technique. The approach is based on two-dimensional pair correlation functions derived from a molecular dynamics computer simulation. We have used this method to analyse a trajectory produced in a simulation of a nematic liquid crystal of 4-n-pentyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (5CB) (Komolkin et al., 1994, J. chem. Phys., 101, 4103). The molecule is assumed to have cylindrical symmetry, and the liquid crystalline phase is treated as uniaxial. The pair correlation functions or cylindrical distribution functions (CDFs) are calculated in the molecular (m) and laboratory (l) frames, gm2(z1 2, d1 2) and g12(Z1 2, D1 2). Anisotropic molecular organization in the liquid crystal is reflected in laboratory frame CDFs. The molecular excluded volume is determined and the effect of the fast motion in the alkyl chain is observed. The intramolecular distributions are included in the CDFs and indicate the size of the motional amplitude in the chain. Absence of long range order was confirmed, a feature typical for a nematic liquid crystal.

  5. Historic timber skeleton structures and the local seismic culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostenaru, M.

    2009-04-01

    This presentation deals with the employment of timber skeleton structure and the local seismic culture. After the 1755 earthquake in the reconstruction of Lisbon a type of building with timber skeleton and masonry infill called "gaiola pombalina" was promoted, since this was designed to better resists earthquakes. "Gaiola" means cage, and it was also named after the Marques de Pombal who introduced it in the reconstruction following the earthquake. The „gaiola pombalina" presents a timber skeleton with Saint Andrew crosses in the interior walls with masonry infill and thick masonry load bearing walls loosing in thickness to the upper floors in the exterior walls. The masonry can fall out during earthquakes but the building remains staying given the interior timber skeleton. The type of buildings with timber structure and (masonry) infill behaved well in earthquakes in various parts of the earth, like Nepal (the dhaji dewary type), Pakistan, Turkey (the himiş type after the 1999 earthquake) [both latter types were researched by Langenbach, www.conservationtech.com and www.traditional-is-modern.net] and also in Germany after the 1356 earthquake (the Southern German subtype of Fachwerk). Also in Italy a subtype called "casa baraccata" was promoted in a construction code to a similar time (following the 1783 earthquake in Southern Italy, see Tobriner 1983) as that of the "gaiola pombalina", the time of the Baroque, when town planning acquired another status. Unlike at the "gaiola pombalina" the "casa baraccata" the timber skeleton is at the exterior walls. For this reason this type of buildings is considered to be an expression of the local seismic culture. However, this type of buildings is common also for areas where seismic risk is not an issue, like half-timbered in England and the northern subtype of Fachwerk in Northern Germany, and in some high seismic risk regions with mountains and timber resources like Romania is not spread. Given these premises the author

  6. Crustal structure beneath the southern Korean Peninsula from local earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwang-Hee; Park, Jung-Ho; Park, Yongcheol; Hao, Tian-Yao; Kim, Han-Joon

    2017-02-01

    The three-dimensional subsurface structure beneath the southern Korean Peninsula is poorly known, even though such information could be key in verifying or rejecting several competing models of the tectonic evolution of East Asia. We constructed a three-dimensional velocity model of the upper crust beneath the southern Korean Peninsula using 19,935 P-wave arrivals from 747 earthquakes recorded by high-density local seismic networks. Results show significant lateral and vertical variations: velocity increases from northwest to southeast at shallow depths, and significant velocity variations are observed across the South Korea Tectonic Line between the Okcheon Fold Belt and the Youngnam Massif. Collision between the North China and South China blocks during the Early Cretaceous might have caused extensive deformation and the observed negative velocity anomalies in the region. The results of the tomographic inversion, combined with the findings of previous studies of Bouguer and isostatic gravity anomalies, indicate the presence of high-density material in the upper and middle crust beneath the Gyeongsang Basin in the southeastern Korean Peninsula. Although our results partially support the indentation tectonic model, it is still premature to discard other tectonic evolution models because our study only covers the southern half of the peninsula.

  7. Local genetic structure in a white-bearded manakin population.

    PubMed

    Höglund, Jacob; Shorey, Lisa

    2003-09-01

    Local genetic structure was studied in lekking white-bearded manakins in a study area on northern Trinidad, West Indies. The study population consisted of nine leks, at which a total of 238 birds were caught. By genotyping the individuals at eight polymorphic microsatellite loci we inferred some males on leks to be related (r = 0.25) as we found an average number of 14.8 half-sib relationships and two full-sib relationships per lek. We found that the sampled birds belonged to one genetic population that was slightly inbred (FIS and FIT = 0.02). Kinship coefficients decreased with increasing geographical distance, indicating that related birds displayed at the same or nearby leks. However, leks did not consist of only one family group because the average genetic distance (aij) between males within leks was higher than when comparing males on leks within close proximity. These patterns suggest limited male dispersal, that some type of kin recognition process between individuals may exist in this species and that males on leks may be more likely to establish themselves as territory-holding birds if a relative is already present.

  8. Crustal structure beneath the southern Korean Peninsula from local earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwang-Hee; Park, Jung-Ho; Park, Yongcheol; Hao, Tian-Yao; Kim, Han-Joon

    2017-05-01

    The 3-D subsurface structure beneath the southern Korean Peninsula is poorly known, even though such information could be key in verifying or rejecting several competing models of the tectonic evolution of East Asia. We constructed a 3-D velocity model of the upper crust beneath the southern Korean Peninsula using 19 935 P-wave arrivals from 747 earthquakes recorded by high-density local seismic networks. Results show significant lateral and vertical variations: velocity increases from northwest to southeast at shallow depths, and significant velocity variations are observed across the South Korea Tectonic Line between the Okcheon Fold Belt and the Youngnam Massif. Collision between the North and South China blocks during the Early Cretaceous might have caused extensive deformation and the observed negative velocity anomalies in the region. The results of the tomographic inversion, combined with the findings of previous studies of Bouguer and isostatic gravity anomalies, indicate the presence of high-density material in the upper and middle crust beneath the Gyeongsang Basin in the southeastern Korean Peninsula. Although our results partially support the indentation tectonic model, it is still premature to discard other tectonic evolution models because our study only covers the southern half of the peninsula.

  9. Local structure analysis of materials for increased energy efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medling, Scott

    In this dissertation, a wide range of materials which exhibit interesting properties with potential for energy efficiency applications are investigated. The bulk of the research was conducted using the Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) technique. EXAFS is a powerful tool for elucidating the local structure of novel materials, and it's advantages are presented in Chapter 2. In Chapter 3, I present details on two new techniques which are used in studies later in this dissertation, but are also promising for other, unrelated studies and, therefore, warrant being discussed generally. I explain the presence of and present a method for subtracting the X-ray Raman background in the fluorescence window when collecting fluorescence EXAFS data of a dilute dopant Z in a Z+1 host. I introduce X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and discuss the process to reduce XMCD data, including the self-absorption corrections for low energy K-edges. In Chapter 4, I present a series of investigations on ZnS:Cu electroluminescent phosphors. Optical microscopy indicates that the emission centers do not degrade uniformly or monotonically, but rather, most of the emission centers blink on and off during degradation. The effect of this on various proposed degradation mechanisms is discussed. EXAFS data of ZnS:Cu phosphors ground to enable thinner, lower-voltage devices indicate that grinding preferentially causes damage to the CuS nanoprecipitates, quenching electroluminescence (EL) and concluding that smaller particles must be built up from nanoparticles instead. EXAFS data of nanoparticles show that adding a ZnS shell outside a ZnS:Cu core provides significant additional encapsulation of the Cu, increasing photoluminescence and indicating that this may increase EL if devices can be fabricated. Data from extremely dilute (0.02% Cu) ZnS:Cu nanoparticles is presented in order to specifically study the non-precipitate and suggests that the Cu dopant substitutes for Zn and is

  10. Strength through structure: visualization and local assessment of the trabecular bone structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Räth, C.; Monetti, R.; Bauer, J.; Sidorenko, I.; Müller, D.; Matsuura, M.; Lochmüller, E.-M.; Zysset, P.; Eckstein, F.

    2008-12-01

    The visualization and subsequent assessment of the inner human bone structures play an important role for better understanding the disease- or drug-induced changes of bone in the context of osteoporosis giving prospect for better predictions of bone strength and thus of the fracture risk of osteoporotic patients. In this work, we show how the complex trabecular bone structure can be visualized using μCT imaging techniques at an isotropic resolution of 26 μm. We quantify these structures by calculating global and local topological and morphological measures, namely Minkowski functionals (MFs) and utilizing the (an-)isotropic scaling index method (SIM) and by deriving suitable texture measures based on MF and SIM. Using a sample of 151 specimens taken from human vertebrae in vitro, we correlate the texture measures with the mechanically measured maximum compressive strength (MCS), which quantifies the strength of the bone probe, by using Pearson's correlation coefficient. The structure parameters derived from the local measures yield good correlations with the bone strength as measured in mechanical tests. We investigate whether the performance of the texture measures depends on the MCS value by selecting different subsamples according to MCS. Considering the whole sample the results for the newly defined parameters are better than those obtained for the standard global histomorphometric parameters except for bone volume/total volume (BV/TV). If a subsample consisting only of weak bones is analysed, the local structural analysis leads to similar and even better correlations with MCS as compared to BV/TV. Thus, the MF and SIM yield additional information about the stability of the bone especially in the case of weak bones, which corroborates the hypothesis that the bone structure (and not only its mineral mass) constitutes an important component of bone stability.

  11. Expectation and Locality Effects in German Verb-final Structures.

    PubMed

    Levy, Roger P; Keller, Frank

    2013-02-01

    Probabilistic expectations and memory limitations are central factors governing the real-time comprehension of natural language, but how the two factors interact remains poorly understood. One respect in which the two factors have come into theoretical conflict is the documentation of both locality effects, in which more dependents preceding a governing verb increase processing difficulty at the verb, and anti-locality effects, in which more preceding dependents facilitate processing at the verb. However, no controlled study has previously demonstrated both locality and anti-locality effects in the same type of dependency relation within the same language. Additionally, many previous demonstrations of anti-locality effects have been potentially confounded with lexical identity, plausibility, and sentence position. Here, we provide new evidence of both locality and anti-locality effects in the same type of dependency relation in a single language-verb-final constructions in German-while controlling for lexical identity, plausibility, and sentence position. In main clauses, we find clear anti-locality effects, with the presence of a preceding dative argument facilitating processing at the final verb; in subject-extracted relative clauses with identical linear ordering of verbal dependents, we find both anti-locality and locality effects, with processing facilitated when the verb is preceded by a dative argument alone, but hindered when the verb is preceded by both the dative argument and an adjunct. These results indicate that both expectations and memory limitations need to be accounted for in any complete theory of online syntactic comprehension.

  12. Superpose3D: A Local Structural Comparison Program That Allows for User-Defined Structure Representations

    PubMed Central

    Gherardini, Pier Federico; Ausiello, Gabriele; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela

    2010-01-01

    Local structural comparison methods can be used to find structural similarities involving functional protein patches such as enzyme active sites and ligand binding sites. The outcome of such analyses is critically dependent on the representation used to describe the structure. Indeed different categories of functional sites may require the comparison program to focus on different characteristics of the protein residues. We have therefore developed superpose3D, a novel structural comparison software that lets users specify, with a powerful and flexible syntax, the structure description most suited to the requirements of their analysis. Input proteins are processed according to the user's directives and the program identifies sets of residues (or groups of atoms) that have a similar 3D position in the two structures. The advantages of using such a general purpose program are demonstrated with several examples. These test cases show that no single representation is appropriate for every analysis, hence the usefulness of having a flexible program that can be tailored to different needs. Moreover we also discuss how to interpret the results of a database screening where a known structural motif is searched against a large ensemble of structures. The software is written in C++ and is released under the open source GPL license. Superpose3D does not require any external library, runs on Linux, Mac OSX, Windows and is available at http://cbm.bio.uniroma2.it/superpose3D. PMID:20700534

  13. Structure of the Ni(II) complex of Escherichia coli peptide deformylase and suggestions on deformylase activities depending on different metal(II) centres.

    PubMed

    Yen, Ngo Thi Hai; Bogdanović, Xenia; Palm, Gottfried J; Kühl, Olaf; Hinrichs, Winfried

    2010-02-01

    Crystal structures of polypeptide deformylase (PDF) of Escherichia coli with nickel(II) replacing the native iron(II) have been solved with chloride and formate as metal ligands. The chloro complex is a model for the correct protonation state of the hydrolytic hydroxo ligand and the protonated status of the Glu133 side chain as part of the hydrolytic mechanism. The ambiguity that recently some PDFs have been identified with Zn(2+) ion as the active-site centre whereas others are only active with Fe(2+) (or Co(2+), Ni(2+) is discussed with respect to Lewis acid criteria of the metal ion and substrate activation by the CD loop.

  14. Local structure and dynamics of hemeproteins by X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Arcovito, Alessandro; della Longa, Stefano

    2012-07-01

    X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy is a synchrotron radiation technique sensitive to the local structure and dynamics around the metal site of a heme containing protein. Advances in detection techniques and theoretical/computational platforms in the last 15 years allowed the use of XANES as a quantitative probe of the key structural determinants driving functional changes, both in a concerted way with protein crystallography and EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure), or as a stand-alone method to apply in the crystal state as well as in solution. Moreover, the local dynamics of the heme site has been deeply investigated, on one hand, coupling XANES to classical photolysis experiments at cryogenic temperatures; on the other hand, the intrinsic property of the synchrotron radiation to induce radiolysis events, has been exploited to investigate specific cryotrapped intermediates, using X-rays both as a pump and a probe. Insights on the XANES method and some specific examples are presented to illustrate these topics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A special kind of local structure in the CMB intensity maps: duel peak structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao; Li, Ti-Pei

    2009-03-01

    We study the local structure of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature maps released by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) team, and find a new kind of structure, which can be described as follows: a peak (or valley) of average temperature is often followed by a peak of temperature fluctuation that is 4° away. This structure is important for the following reasons: both the well known cold spot detected by Cruz et al. and the hot spot detected by Vielva et al. with the same technology (the third spot in their article) have such structure; more spots that are similar to them can be found on CMB maps and they also tend to be significant cold/hot spots; if we change the 4° characteristic into an artificial one, such as 3° or 5°, there will be less 'similar spots', and the temperature peaks or valleys will be less significant. The presented 'similar spots' have passed a strict consistency test which requires them to be significant on at least three different CMB temperature maps. We hope that this article could arouse some interest in the relationship of average temperature with temperature fluctuation in local areas; meanwhile, we are also trying to find an explanation for it which might be important to CMB observation and theory.

  16. Local Large-Scale Structure and the Assumption of Homogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, Ryan C.; Barger, Amy J.; Cowie, Lennox L.

    2016-10-01

    Our recent estimates of galaxy counts and the luminosity density in the near-infrared (Keenan et al. 2010, 2012) indicated that the local universe may be under-dense on radial scales of several hundred megaparsecs. Such a large-scale local under-density could introduce significant biases in the measurement and interpretation of cosmological observables, such as the inferred effects of dark energy on the rate of expansion. In Keenan et al. (2013), we measured the K-band luminosity density as a function of distance from us to test for such a local under-density. We made this measurement over the redshift range 0.01 < z < 0.2 (radial distances D ~ 50 - 800 h 70 -1 Mpc). We found that the shape of the K-band luminosity function is relatively constant as a function of distance and environment. We derive a local (z < 0.07, D < 300 h 70 -1 Mpc) K-band luminosity density that agrees well with previously published studies. At z > 0.07, we measure an increasing luminosity density that by z ~ 0.1 rises to a value of ~ 1.5 times higher than that measured locally. This implies that the stellar mass density follows a similar trend. Assuming that the underlying dark matter distribution is traced by this luminous matter, this suggests that the local mass density may be lower than the global mass density of the universe at an amplitude and on a scale that is sufficient to introduce significant biases into the measurement of basic cosmological observables. At least one study has shown that an under-density of roughly this amplitude and scale could resolve the apparent tension between direct local measurements of the Hubble constant and those inferred by Planck team. Other theoretical studies have concluded that such an under-density could account for what looks like an accelerating expansion, even when no dark energy is present.

  17. Effect of local structures on structural evolution during crystallization in undercooled metallic glass-forming liquids.

    PubMed

    Wu, Z W; Li, M Z; Wang, W H; Song, W J; Liu, K X

    2013-02-21

    The effect of local structures on structural evolution during the crystallization of undercooled ZrCu metallic glass-forming liquid was studied via molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that body-centered-cubic (bcc)-like clusters play a key role in structural evolution during crystallization. In contrast to previous speculations, the number of bcc-like crystal nuclei does not change much before the onset of crystallization. Instead, the development of a bcc-like critical nucleus during annealing leads to a strong spatial correlation with other nuclei in its surroundings, forming a crystalline structure template. It is also found that the size distribution of bcc-like nuclei follows a power-law form with an exponential cutoff in the early stage of annealing, but changes to a pure power-law behavior just before the onset of crystallization. This implies that the crystalline structure template has fractal feature and the undercooled liquids evolve to a self-organized critical state before the onset of crystallization, which might trigger the subsequent rapid crystallization. According to the graph theory analysis, it is also found that the observed large scatter of the onset time of crystallization in different liquid samples results from the connectivity of the bcc-like clusters.

  18. Centre-embedded structures are a by-product of associative learning and working memory constraints: evidence from baboons (Papio Papio).

    PubMed

    Rey, Arnaud; Perruchet, Pierre; Fagot, Joël

    2012-04-01

    Influential theories have claimed that the ability for recursion forms the computational core of human language faculty distinguishing our communication system from that of other animals (Hauser, Chomsky, & Fitch, 2002). In the present study, we consider an alternative view on recursion by studying the contribution of associative and working memory processes. After an intensive paired-associate training with visual shapes, we observed that baboons spontaneously ordered their responses in keeping with a recursive, centre-embedded structure. This result suggests that the human ability for recursion might partly if not entirely originate from fundamental processing constraints already present in nonhuman primates and that the critical distinction between animal communication and human language should more likely be found in working memory capacities than in an ability to produce recursive structures per se.

  19. Analysis of pan-African Centres of excellence in health innovation highlights opportunities and challenges for local innovation and financing in the continent

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A pool of 38 pan-African Centres of Excellence (CoEs) in health innovation has been selected and recognized by the African Network for Drugs and Diagnostics Innovation (ANDI), through a competitive criteria based process. The process identified a number of opportunities and challenges for health R&D and innovation in the continent: i) it provides a direct evidence for the existence of innovation capability that can be leveraged to fill specific gaps in the continent; ii) it revealed a research and financing pattern that is largely fragmented and uncoordinated, and iii) it highlights the most frequent funders of health research in the continent. The CoEs are envisioned as an innovative network of public and private institutions with a critical mass of expertise and resources to support projects and a variety of activities for capacity building and scientific exchange, including hosting fellows, trainees, scientists on sabbaticals and exchange with other African and non-African institutions. PMID:22838941

  20. Analysis of pan-African Centres of excellence in health innovation highlights opportunities and challenges for local innovation and financing in the continent.

    PubMed

    Nwaka, Solomon; Ochem, Alexander; Besson, Dominique; Ramirez, Bernadette; Fakorede, Foluke; Botros, Sanaa; Inyang, Uford; Mgone, Charles; Adae-Mensah, Ivan; Konde, Victor; Nyasse, Barthelemy; Okole, Blessed; Guantai, Anastasia; Loots, Glaudina; Atadja, Peter; Ndumbe, Peter; Sanou, Issa; Olesen, Ole; Ridley, Robert; Ilunga, Tshinko

    2012-07-27

    A pool of 38 pan-African Centres of Excellence (CoEs) in health innovation has been selected and recognized by the African Network for Drugs and Diagnostics Innovation (ANDI), through a competitive criteria based process. The process identified a number of opportunities and challenges for health R&D and innovation in the continent: i) it provides a direct evidence for the existence of innovation capability that can be leveraged to fill specific gaps in the continent; ii) it revealed a research and financing pattern that is largely fragmented and uncoordinated, and iii) it highlights the most frequent funders of health research in the continent. The CoEs are envisioned as an innovative network of public and private institutions with a critical mass of expertise and resources to support projects and a variety of activities for capacity building and scientific exchange, including hosting fellows, trainees, scientists on sabbaticals and exchange with other African and non-African institutions.

  1. Local structure studies of some cobalt (II) complexes using extended X-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Ashutosh; Ninama, Samrath; Trivedi, Apurva

    2014-09-01

    Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) analysis of Cobalt (II) complex as a ligand of 2 -methyl-3-[(bis-aniline(R) phenyl]-3H-l,5 benzodiazepine for finding local structure using conventional method .The Co(II) complexes were prepared by chemical root method. The EXAFS spectra were recorded at Cobalt K-edge i.e.; 7709 eV using Dispersive EXFAS beam line at 2.5GeV Indus-2 Synchrotron Radiation Source(SRS) at RRCAT, Indore, India. The recorded EXAFS data were analysed using the computer software Athena for determine the nearest neighbouring distances (bond lengths) of these complexes with conventional methods and it compared with Fourier transform(FT) analysis. The Fourier Transform convert EXAFS data signal into r-space or k-space. This is useful for visualizing the major contributions to the EXAFS spectrum.

  2. Multiscale tomography of buried magnetic structures: its use in the localization and characterization of archaeological structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saracco, Ginette; Moreau, Frédérique; Mathé, Pierre-Etienne; Hermitte, Daniel; Michel, Jean-Marie

    2007-10-01

    We have previously developed a method for characterizing and localizing `homogeneous' buried sources, from the measure of potential anomalies at a fixed height above ground (magnetic, electric and gravity). This method is based on potential theory and uses the properties of the Poisson kernel (real by definition) and the continuous wavelet theory. Here, we relax the assumption on sources and introduce a method that we call the `multiscale tomography'. Our approach is based on the harmonic extension of the observed magnetic field to produce a complex source by use of a complex Poisson kernel solution of the Laplace equation for complex potential field. A phase and modulus are defined. We show that the phase provides additional information on the total magnetic inclination and the structure of sources, while the modulus allows us to characterize its spatial location, depth and `effective degree'. This method is compared to the `complex dipolar tomography', extension of the Patella method that we previously developed. We applied both methods and a classical electrical resistivity tomography to detect and localize buried archaeological structures like antique ovens from magnetic measurements on the Fox-Amphoux site (France). The estimates are then compared with the results of excavations.

  3. Expectation and Locality Effects in German Verb-Final Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Roger P.; Keller, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Probabilistic expectations and memory limitations are central factors governing the real-time comprehension of natural language, but how the two factors interact remains poorly understood. One respect in which the two factors have come into theoretical conflict is the documentation of both "locality" effects, in which having more dependents…

  4. Localized surface plasmon enhanced cellular imaging using random metallic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Taehwang; Lee, Wonju; Kim, Donghyun

    2017-02-01

    We have studied fluorescence cellular imaging with randomly distributed localized near-field induced by silver nano-islands. For the fabrication of nano-islands, a 10-nm silver thin film evaporated on a BK7 glass substrate with an adhesion layer of 2-nm thick chromium. Micrometer sized silver square pattern was defined using e-beam lithography and then the film was annealed at 200°C. Raw images were restored using electric field distribution produced on the surface of random nano-islands. Nano-islands were modeled from SEM images. 488-nm p-polarized light source was set to be incident at 60°. Simulation results show that localized electric fields were created among nano-islands and that their average size was found to be 135 nm. The feasibility was tested using conventional total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy while the angle of incidence was adjusted to maximize field enhancement. Mouse microphage cells were cultured on nano-islands, and actin filaments were selectively stained with FITC-conjugated phalloidin. Acquired images were deconvolved based on linear imaging theory, in which molecular distribution was sampled by randomly distributed localized near-field and blurred by point spread function of far-field optics. The optimum fluorophore distribution was probabilistically estimated by repetitively matching a raw image. The deconvolved images are estimated to have a resolution in the range of 100-150 nm largely determined by the size of localized near-fields. We also discuss and compare the results with images acquired with periodic nano-aperture arrays in various optical configurations to excite localized plasmonic fields and to produce super-resolved molecular images.

  5. Global/local methods research using a common structural analysis framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Ransom, Jonathan B.; Griffin, O. H., Jr.; Thompson, Danniella M.

    1991-01-01

    Methodologies for global/local stress analysis are described including both two- and three-dimensional analysis methods. These methods are being developed within a common structural analysis framework. Representative structural analysis problems are presented to demonstrate the global/local methodologies being developed.

  6. Global/local methods research using a common structural analysis framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Ransom, Jonathan B.; Griffin, O. H., Jr.; Thompson, Danniella M.

    1991-01-01

    Methodologies for global/local stress analysis are described including both two- and three-dimensional analysis methods. These methods are being developed within a common structural analysis framework. Representative structural analysis problems are presented to demonstrate the global/local methodologies being developed.

  7. Oscillation structure of localized perturbations in modulationally unstable media.

    PubMed

    Biondini, Gino; Li, Sitai; Mantzavinos, Dionyssios

    2016-12-01

    We characterize the properties of the asymptotic stage of modulational instability arising from localized perturbations of a constant background, including the number and location of the individual peaks in the oscillation region. We show that, for long times, the solution tends to an ensemble of classical (i.e., sech-shaped) solitons of the focusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation (as opposed to the various breatherlike solutions of the same equation with a nonzero background). We also confirm the robustness of the theoretical results by comparing the analytical predictions with careful numerical simulations with a variety of initial conditions, which confirm that the evolution of modulationally unstable media in the presence of localized initial perturbations is indeed described by the same asymptotic state.

  8. Oscillation structure of localized perturbations in modulationally unstable media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondini, Gino; Li, Sitai; Mantzavinos, Dionyssios

    2016-12-01

    We characterize the properties of the asymptotic stage of modulational instability arising from localized perturbations of a constant background, including the number and location of the individual peaks in the oscillation region. We show that, for long times, the solution tends to an ensemble of classical (i.e., sech-shaped) solitons of the focusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation (as opposed to the various breatherlike solutions of the same equation with a nonzero background). We also confirm the robustness of the theoretical results by comparing the analytical predictions with careful numerical simulations with a variety of initial conditions, which confirm that the evolution of modulationally unstable media in the presence of localized initial perturbations is indeed described by the same asymptotic state.

  9. Structural biomechanics modulate intramuscular distribution of locally delivered drugs.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peter I-Kung; Edelman, Elazer R

    2008-09-18

    As local drug delivery continues to emerge as a clinical force, so does understanding of its potentially narrow therapeutic window. Classic molecular transport studies are of value but do not typically account for the local nature of drug transport or the effects of regional dynamic function in target tissues like muscle that may undergo cyclical and variable mechanical motion and loading. We examined the impact of dynamic architecture on intramuscular drug distribution. We designed a tissue mounting technique and mechanical loading system that uniquely enables pharmacokinetics investigations in association with control of muscle biomechanics while preserving physiologic tissue architecture. The system was validated and used to elucidate the influence of architecture and controlled cyclic strain on intramuscular drug distribution. Rat soleus muscles underwent controlled deformations within a drug delivery chamber that preserved in vivo physiology. Penetration of 1mM 20 kDa FITC-dextran at planar surfaces of the soleus axial cross-section increased significantly from 0.52+/-0.09 mm under 80 min of static (0%) strain to 0.81+/-0.09 mm under cyclic (3 Hz, 0-20% peak-to-peak) strain, demonstrating the driving effect of cyclic loading on transport. Penetration at curved margins was 1.57- and 2.53-fold greater than at planar surfaces under static and cyclic strain, respectively, and was enhanced 1.6-fold more by cyclic strain, revealing architecturally dictated spatial heterogeneity in transport and modulation of motion dynamics. Architectural geometry and dynamics modulate the impact of mechanical loading on local drug penetration and intramuscular distribution. Future work will use the biomechanical test system to investigate mechanisms underlying transport effects of specific loading regimens. It is hoped that this work will initiate a broader understanding of intramuscular pharmacokinetics and guide local drug delivery strategies.

  10. The role of local structure in dynamical arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royall, C. Patrick; Williams, Stephen R.

    2015-02-01

    Amorphous solids, or glasses, are distinguished from crystalline solids by their lack of long-range structural order. At the level of two-body structural correlations, glassformers show no qualitative change upon vitrifying from a supercooled liquid. Nonetheless the dynamical properties of a glass are so much slower that it appears to take on the properties of a solid. While many theories of the glass transition focus on dynamical quantities, a solid's resistance to flow is often viewed as a consequence of its structure. Here we address the viewpoint that this remains the case for a glass. Recent developments using higher-order measures show a clear emergence of structure upon dynamical arrest in a variety of glass formers and offer the tantalising hope of a structural mechanism for arrest. However a rigorous fundamental identification of such a causal link between structure and arrest remains elusive. We undertake a critical survey of this work in experiments, computer simulation and theory and discuss what might strengthen the link between structure and dynamical arrest. We move on to highlight the relationship between crystallisation and glass-forming ability made possible by this deeper understanding of the structure of the liquid state, and emphasise the potential to design materials with optimal glassforming and crystallisation ability, for applications such as phase-change memory. We then consider aspects of the phenomenology of glassy systems where structural measures have yet to make a large impact, such as polyamorphism (the existence of multiple liquid states), ageing (the time-evolution of non-equilibrium materials below their glass transition) and the response of glassy materials to external fields such as shear.

  11. Perceptual centres in speech - an acoustic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Sophie Kerttu

    Perceptual centres, or P-centres, represent the perceptual moments of occurrence of acoustic signals - the 'beat' of a sound. P-centres underlie the perception and production of rhythm in perceptually regular speech sequences. P-centres have been modelled both in speech and non speech (music) domains. The three aims of this thesis were toatest out current P-centre models to determine which best accounted for the experimental data bto identify a candidate parameter to map P-centres onto (a local approach) as opposed to the previous global models which rely upon the whole signal to determine the P-centre the final aim was to develop a model of P-centre location which could be applied to speech and non speech signals. The first aim was investigated by a series of experiments in which a) speech from different speakers was investigated to determine whether different models could account for variation between speakers b) whether rendering the amplitude time plot of a speech signal affects the P-centre of the signal c) whether increasing the amplitude at the offset of a speech signal alters P-centres in the production and perception of speech. The second aim was carried out by a) manipulating the rise time of different speech signals to determine whether the P-centre was affected, and whether the type of speech sound ramped affected the P-centre shift b) manipulating the rise time and decay time of a synthetic vowel to determine whether the onset alteration was had more affect on P-centre than the offset manipulation c) and whether the duration of a vowel affected the P-centre, if other attributes (amplitude, spectral contents) were held constant. The third aim - modelling P-centres - was based on these results. The Frequency dependent Amplitude Increase Model of P-centre location (FAIM) was developed using a modelling protocol, the APU GammaTone Filterbank and the speech from different speakers. The P-centres of the stimuli corpus were highly predicted by attributes of

  12. Comparison of perceived quality amongst migrant and local patients using primary health care delivered by community health centres in Shenzhen, China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Providing good quality primary health care to all inhabitants is one of the Chinese Government’s health care objectives. However, information is scarce regarding the difference in quality of primary health care delivered to migrants and local residents respectively. This study aimed to compare patients’ perceptions of quality of primary health care between migrants and local patients, and their willingness to use and recommend primary health care to others. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted. 787 patients in total were chosen from four randomly drawn Community Health Centers (CHCs) for interviews. Results Local residents scored higher than migrants in terms of their satisfaction with types of drugs available (3.62 vs. 3.45, p = 0.035), attitude of health workers (4.41 vs. 4.14, p = 0.042) and waiting time (4.30 vs. 3.86, p < 0.001). Even though there was no significant difference in overall satisfaction between local residents and migrants (4.16 vs. 3.91, p = 0.159), migrants were more likely to utilize primary health care as the first choice for their usual health problems (94.1% vs. 87.1%, p = 0.032), while local residents were more inclined to recommend Traditional Chinese Medicine to others (65.6% vs. 56.6%, p = 0.026). Conclusions Quality of primary health care given to migrants is less satisfactory than to local residents in terms of attitude of health workers and waiting time. Our study suggests quality of care could be improved through extending opening hours of CHCs and strengthening professional ethics education. Considering CHCs as the first choice by migrants might be due to their health insurance scheme, while locals’ recommendations for traditional Chinese medicine were possibly because of cultural differences. PMID:24779564

  13. Remote sensing image segmentation using local sparse structure constrained latent low rank representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Shu; Zhang, Ye; Yan, Yimin; Su, Nan; Zhang, Junping

    2016-09-01

    Latent low-rank representation (LatLRR) has been attached considerable attention in the field of remote sensing image segmentation, due to its effectiveness in exploring the multiple subspace structures of data. However, the increasingly heterogeneous texture information in the high spatial resolution remote sensing images, leads to more severe interference of pixels in local neighborhood, and the LatLRR fails to capture the local complex structure information. Therefore, we present a local sparse structure constrainted latent low-rank representation (LSSLatLRR) segmentation method, which explicitly imposes the local sparse structure constraint on LatLRR to capture the intrinsic local structure in manifold structure feature subspaces. The whole segmentation framework can be viewed as two stages in cascade. In the first stage, we use the local histogram transform to extract the texture local histogram features (LHOG) at each pixel, which can efficiently capture the complex and micro-texture pattern. In the second stage, a local sparse structure (LSS) formulation is established on LHOG, which aims to preserve the local intrinsic structure and enhance the relationship between pixels having similar local characteristics. Meanwhile, by integrating the LSS and the LatLRR, we can efficiently capture the local sparse and low-rank structure in the mixture of feature subspace, and we adopt the subspace segmentation method to improve the segmentation accuracy. Experimental results on the remote sensing images with different spatial resolution show that, compared with three state-of-the-art image segmentation methods, the proposed method achieves more accurate segmentation results.

  14. Information content of the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) family structures for linkage studies.

    PubMed

    Chakravarti, A

    1991-10-01

    This paper derives theoretical values for joint polymorphism information content for two markers from a family structure consisting of four grandparents, two parents, and many offspring. These data determine the efficiency of linkage map construction.

  15. Optical Activity Governed by Local Chiral Structures in Two-Dimensional Curved Metallic Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Narushima, Tetsuya; Hashiyada, Shun; Okamoto, Hiromi

    2016-07-01

    Chiral nanostructures show macroscopic optical activity. Local optical activity and its handedness are not uniform in the nanostructure, and are spatially distributed depending on the shape of the nanostructure. In this study we fabricated curved chain nanostructures made of gold by connecting linearly two or more arc structures in a two-dimensional plane. Spatial features of local optical activity in the chain structures were evaluated with near-field circular dichroism (CD) imaging, and analyzed with the aid of classical electromagnetic simulation. The electromagnetic simulation predicted that local optical activity appears at inflection points where arc structures are connected. The handedness of the local optical activity was dependent on the handedness of the local chirality at the inflection point. Chiral chain structures have odd inflection points and the local optical activity distributed symmetrically with respect to structural centers. In contrast, achiral chain structures have even inflection points and showed antisymmetric distribution. In the near-field CD images of fabricated chain nanostructures, the symmetric and antisymmetric distributions of local CD were observed for chiral and achiral chain structures, respectively, consistent with the simulated results. The handedness of the local optical activity was found to be determined by the handedness of the inflection point, for the fabricated chain structures having two or more inflection points. The local optical activity was thus governed primarily by the local chirality of the inflection points for the gold chain structures. The total effect of all the inflection points in the chain structure is considered to be a predominant factor that determines the macroscopic optical activity. Chirality 28:540-544, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Nuclear spin relaxation due to motion on inequivalent sites: H diffusion on O and T sites in the face-centred cubic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xinjun; Sholl, C. A.

    2003-02-01

    Magnetization recoveries for nuclear spin relaxation of like spins due to magnetic dipolar coupling and diffusion on inequivalent sites involve a sum of exponentials. The theory is applied to diffusion on octahedral and tetrahedral interstitial sites in the face-centred cubic structure. Monte Carlo simulations have been used to generate relaxation data for parameters typical for H in metals. It is found that only a single exponential would be observable in the high- and low-temperature limits, but that two-exponential recoveries could be observable in the vicinity of the maximum in the relaxation rate as a function of temperature. The Monte Carlo relaxation data has been fitted using a Bloembergen-Pound-Purcell (BPP) model to assess the accuracy of the BPP model.

  17. Local Crystalline Structure in an Amorphous Protein Dense Phase.

    PubMed

    Greene, Daniel G; Modla, Shannon; Wagner, Norman J; Sandler, Stanley I; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2015-10-20

    Proteins exhibit a variety of dense phases ranging from gels, aggregates, and precipitates to crystalline phases and dense liquids. Although the structure of the crystalline phase is known in atomistic detail, little attention has been paid to noncrystalline protein dense phases, and in many cases the structures of these phases are assumed to be fully amorphous. In this work, we used small-angle neutron scattering, electron microscopy, and electron tomography to measure the structure of ovalbumin precipitate particles salted out with ammonium sulfate. We found that the ovalbumin phase-separates into core-shell particles with a core radius of ∼2 μm and shell thickness of ∼0.5 μm. Within this shell region, nanostructures comprised of crystallites of ovalbumin self-assemble into a well-defined bicontinuous network with branches ∼12 nm thick. These results demonstrate that the protein gel is comprised in part of nanocrystalline protein.

  18. Local Crystalline Structure in an Amorphous Protein Dense Phase

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Daniel G.; Modla, Shannon; Wagner, Norman J.; Sandler, Stanley I.; Lenhoff, Abraham M.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins exhibit a variety of dense phases ranging from gels, aggregates, and precipitates to crystalline phases and dense liquids. Although the structure of the crystalline phase is known in atomistic detail, little attention has been paid to noncrystalline protein dense phases, and in many cases the structures of these phases are assumed to be fully amorphous. In this work, we used small-angle neutron scattering, electron microscopy, and electron tomography to measure the structure of ovalbumin precipitate particles salted out with ammonium sulfate. We found that the ovalbumin phase-separates into core-shell particles with a core radius of ∼2 μm and shell thickness of ∼0.5 μm. Within this shell region, nanostructures comprised of crystallites of ovalbumin self-assemble into a well-defined bicontinuous network with branches ∼12 nm thick. These results demonstrate that the protein gel is comprised in part of nanocrystalline protein. PMID:26488663

  19. Identification of local variations within secondary structures of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prasun; Bansal, Manju

    2015-05-01

    Secondary-structure elements (SSEs) play an important role in the folding of proteins. Identification of SSEs in proteins is a common problem in structural biology. A new method, ASSP (Assignment of Secondary Structure in Proteins), using only the path traversed by the C(α) atoms has been developed. The algorithm is based on the premise that the protein structure can be divided into continuous or uniform stretches, which can be defined in terms of helical parameters, and depending on their values the stretches can be classified into different SSEs, namely α-helices, 310-helices, π-helices, extended β-strands and polyproline II (PPII) and other left-handed helices. The methodology was validated using an unbiased clustering of these parameters for a protein data set consisting of 1008 protein chains, which suggested that there are seven well defined clusters associated with different SSEs. Apart from α-helices and extended β-strands, 310-helices and π-helices were also found to occur in substantial numbers. ASSP was able to discriminate non-α-helical segments from flanking α-helices, which were often identified as part of α-helices by other algorithms. ASSP can also lead to the identification of novel SSEs. It is believed that ASSP could provide a better understanding of the finer nuances of protein secondary structure and could make an important contribution to the better understanding of comparatively less frequently occurring structural motifs. At the same time, it can contribute to the identification of novel SSEs. A standalone version of the program for the Linux as well as the Windows operating systems is freely downloadable and a web-server version is also available at http://nucleix.mbu.iisc.ernet.in/assp/index.php.

  20. Consequences of local Allee effects in spatially structured populations.

    PubMed

    Cassini, Marcelo H

    2011-03-01

    The ideal free distribution model incorporating the Allee effect was published by Fretwell and Lucas (1970), but went almost unnoticed within the ecological literature. The model is relevant to populations distributed among patchy habitats. It predicts a sporadic but substantial decline in populations at high densities, which in turn induces the rapid growth of new populations. In this paper, I show that the simple process explained by this model can be used to change our view of several phenomena within the field of population ecology, behavioural ecology and conservation. The ecological consequences of the model are well known. A key feature of Fretwell and Lucas's model is what I call the "Allee paradox:" there is a range of local population densities at which local individual fitness is less than the potential mean gain that could be obtained in the environment; however, individuals cannot disperse. This paradox can be used to explain why helping appears before suitable breeding areas are fully occupied, and why breeding females aggregate when male coercion is a reproductive cost. The model also predicts high clustering between related populations, and, in conservation biology, it can identify unfounded concerns about the dangers of extinction, delays in recolonisation processes after human-induced population decline, and latency periods in the initial phases of expansion of invasive species.

  1. Locally resonant periodic structures with low-frequency band gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhibao; Shi, Zhifei; Mo, Y. L.; Xiang, Hongjun

    2013-07-01

    Presented in this paper are study results of dispersion relationships of periodic structures composited of concrete and rubber, from which the frequency band gap can be found. Two models with fixed or free boundary conditions are proposed to approximate the bound frequencies of the first band gap. Studies are conducted to investigate the low-frequency and directional frequency band gaps for their application to engineering. The study finds that civil engineering structures can be designed to block harmful waves, such as earthquake disturbance.

  2. Defect Structure of Localized Excitons in a WSe2 Monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuai; Wang, Chen-Guang; Li, Ming-Yang; Huang, Di; Li, Lain-Jong; Ji, Wei; Wu, Shiwei

    2017-07-01

    The atomic and electronic structure of intrinsic defects in a WSe2 monolayer grown on graphite was revealed by low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. Instead of chalcogen vacancies that prevail in other transition metal dichalcogenide materials, intrinsic defects in WSe2 arise surprisingly from single tungsten vacancies, leading to the hole (p -type) doping. Furthermore, we found these defects to dominate the excitonic emission of the WSe2 monolayer at low temperature. Our work provided the first atomic-scale understanding of defect excitons and paved the way toward deciphering the defect structure of single quantum emitters previously discovered in the WSe2 monolayer.

  3. The Local Job Bank Program: Performance, Structure, and Direction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ullman, Joseph C.; Huber, George P.

    The book represents an effort to assess the performance, structure, and direction of the Job Bank Program of the Public Employment Service, a program meant to improve the functioning of the labor market information system in the United States. The research had three goals: to assess the relative goal achievement of job banks; to determine its…

  4. Judicial Structuring of Collective Bargaining in Local School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colton, David L.; Graber, Edith E.

    Collective bargaining relationships in school districts are affected by court actions in a variety of ways. Courts have acted as a "surrogate legislature" by providing legal structures where legislation is absent and by modifying legislation through the process of statutory construction. This paper examines the courts' role in structuring…

  5. The Local Job Bank Program: Performance, Structure, and Direction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ullman, Joseph C.; Huber, George P.

    The book represents an effort to assess the performance, structure, and direction of the Job Bank Program of the Public Employment Service, a program meant to improve the functioning of the labor market information system in the United States. The research had three goals: to assess the relative goal achievement of job banks; to determine its…

  6. The Categorical Structure of Knowledge for Famous People (And a Novel Application of Centre-Surround Theory)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Anna; Valentine, Tim

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge of familiar people is essential to guide social interaction, yet there is uncertainty about whether semantic knowledge for people is stored in a categorical structure as for objects. Four priming experiments using hard-to-perceive primes investigated whether occupation forms a category connecting famous persons in semantic memory. Primes…

  7. Hen Egg-White Lysozyme Crystallisation: Protein Stacking and Structure Stability Enhanced by a Tellurium(VI)-Centred Polyoxotungstate

    PubMed Central

    Bijelic, Aleksandar; Molitor, Christian; Mauracher, Stephan G; Al-Oweini, Rami; Kortz, Ulrich; Rompel, Annette

    2015-01-01

    As synchrotron radiation becomes more intense, detectors become faster and structure-solving software becomes more elaborate, obtaining single crystals suitable for data collection is now the bottleneck in macromolecular crystallography. Hence, there is a need for novel and advanced crystallisation agents with the ability to crystallise proteins that are otherwise challenging. Here, an Anderson–Evans-type polyoxometalate (POM), specifically Na6[TeW6O24]⋅22 H2O (TEW), is employed as a crystallisation additive. Its effects on protein crystallisation are demonstrated with hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL), which co-crystallises with TEW in the vicinity (or within) the liquid–liquid phase separation (LLPS) region. The X-ray structure (PDB ID: 4PHI) determination revealed that TEW molecules are part of the crystal lattice, thus demonstrating specific binding to HEWL with electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonds. The negatively charged TEW polyoxotungstate binds to sites with a positive electrostatic potential located between two (or more) symmetry-related protein chains. Thus, TEW facilitates the formation of protein–protein interfaces of otherwise repulsive surfaces, and thereby the realisation of a stable crystal lattice. In addition to retaining the isomorphicity of the protein structure, the anomalous scattering of the POMs was used for macromolecular phasing. The results suggest that hexatungstotellurate(VI) has great potential as a crystallisation additive to promote both protein crystallisation and structure elucidation. PMID:25521080

  8. Hen egg-white lysozyme crystallisation: protein stacking and structure stability enhanced by a Tellurium(VI)-centred polyoxotungstate.

    PubMed

    Bijelic, Aleksandar; Molitor, Christian; Mauracher, Stephan G; Al-Oweini, Rami; Kortz, Ulrich; Rompel, Annette

    2015-01-19

    As synchrotron radiation becomes more intense, detectors become faster and structure-solving software becomes more elaborate, obtaining single crystals suitable for data collection is now the bottleneck in macromolecular crystallography. Hence, there is a need for novel and advanced crystallisation agents with the ability to crystallise proteins that are otherwise challenging. Here, an Anderson-Evans-type polyoxometalate (POM), specifically Na6 [TeW6 O24 ]⋅22 H2 O (TEW), is employed as a crystallisation additive. Its effects on protein crystallisation are demonstrated with hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL), which co-crystallises with TEW in the vicinity (or within) the liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) region. The X-ray structure (PDB ID: 4PHI) determination revealed that TEW molecules are part of the crystal lattice, thus demonstrating specific binding to HEWL with electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonds. The negatively charged TEW polyoxotungstate binds to sites with a positive electrostatic potential located between two (or more) symmetry-related protein chains. Thus, TEW facilitates the formation of protein-protein interfaces of otherwise repulsive surfaces, and thereby the realisation of a stable crystal lattice. In addition to retaining the isomorphicity of the protein structure, the anomalous scattering of the POMs was used for macromolecular phasing. The results suggest that hexatungstotellurate(VI) has great potential as a crystallisation additive to promote both protein crystallisation and structure elucidation.

  9. Structural alteration of the metal-organic pyrogallol[4]arene nano-capsule motif by incorporation of large metal centres.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ping; Kumari, Harshita; Kennedy, Stuart; Barnes, Charles L; Teat, Simon J; Dalgarno, Scott J; Atwood, Jerry L

    2014-05-04

    Addition of cadmium(II) nitrate to gallium-coordinated metal-organic C-alkylpyrogallol[4]arene nano-capsules affords a variation of the near spherical hexamer motif, structural changes in which are induced by the markedly different nature of the secondary incorporated metal.

  10. Novel method to detect a motif of local structures in different protein conformations.

    PubMed

    Wako, H; Yamato, T

    1998-11-01

    In order to detect a motif of local structures in different protein conformations, the Delaunay tessellation is applied to protein structures represented by C(alpha) atoms only. By the Delaunay tessellation the interior space of the protein is uniquely divided up into Delaunay tetrahedra whose vertices are the C(alpha) atom positions. Some edges of the tetrahedra are virtual bonds connecting adjacent residues' C(alpha) atoms along the polypeptide chain and others indicate interactions between residues nearest neighbouring in space. The rules are proposed to assign a code, i.e., a string of digits, to each tetrahedron to characterize the local structure constructed by the vertex residues of one relevant tetrahedron and four surrounding it. Many sets comprised of the local structures with the same code are obtained from 293 proteins, each of which has relatively low sequence similarity with the others. The local structures in each set are similar enough to each other to represent a motif. Some of them are parts of secondary or supersecondary structures, and others are irregular, but definite structures. The method proposed here can find motifs of local structures in the Protein Data Bank much more easily and rapidly than other conventional methods, because they are represented by codes. The motifs detected in this method can provide more detailed information about specific interactions between residues in the local structures, because the edges of the Delaunay tetrahedra are regarded to express interactions between residues nearest neighbouring in space.

  11. Molecular modeling of phosphorylation sites in proteins using a database of local structure segments.

    PubMed

    Plewczynski, Dariusz; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Godzik, Adam; Kloczkowski, Andrzej; Rychlewski, Leszek

    2005-11-01

    A new bioinformatics tool for molecular modeling of the local structure around phosphorylation sites in proteins has been developed. Our method is based on a library of short sequence and structure motifs. The basic structural elements to be predicted are local structure segments (LSSs). This enables us to avoid the problem of non-exact local description of structures, caused by either diversity in the structural context, or uncertainties in prediction methods. We have developed a library of LSSs and a profile--profile-matching algorithm that predicts local structures of proteins from their sequence information. Our fragment library prediction method is publicly available on a server (FRAGlib), at http://ffas.ljcrf.edu/Servers/frag.html . The algorithm has been applied successfully to the characterization of local structure around phosphorylation sites in proteins. Our computational predictions of sequence and structure preferences around phosphorylated residues have been confirmed by phosphorylation experiments for PKA and PKC kinases. The quality of predictions has been evaluated with several independent statistical tests. We have observed a significant improvement in the accuracy of predictions by incorporating structural information into the description of the neighborhood of the phosphorylated site. Our results strongly suggest that sequence information ought to be supplemented with additional structural context information (predicted with our segment similarity method) for more successful predictions of phosphorylation sites in proteins.

  12. Local structure of liquid carbon controls diamond nucleation.

    PubMed

    Ghiringhelli, L M; Valeriani, C; Meijer, E J; Frenkel, D

    2007-08-03

    Diamonds melt at temperatures above 4000 K. There are no measurements of the steady-state rate of the reverse process, i.e., diamond nucleation from the melt, because experiments are difficult at these extreme temperatures and pressures. Using numerical simulations, we estimate the diamond nucleation rate and find that it increases by many orders of magnitude when the pressure is increased at constant supersaturation. The reason is that by increasing the pressure the local coordination of the liquid changes from threefold to fourfold, and we show that the free-energy cost to create a diamond-liquid interface is lower in the fourfold than in the threefold liquid. We speculate that this mechanism for nucleation control is relevant for crystallization in many network-forming liquids. We conclude that homogeneous diamond nucleation is likely in carbon-rich stars and unlikely in gaseous planets.

  13. Deformed relativity symmetries and the local structure of spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letizia, Marco; Liberati, Stefano

    2017-02-01

    A spacetime interpretation of deformed relativity symmetry groups was recently proposed by resorting to Finslerian geometries, seen as the outcome of a continuous limit endowed with first-order corrections from the quantum gravity regime. In this work, we further investigate such connections between deformed algebras and Finslerian geometries by showing that the Finsler geometries associated with the generalization of the Poincaré group (the so-called κ -Poincaré Hopf algebra) are maximally symmetric spacetimes which are also of the Berwald type: Finslerian spacetimes for which the connections are substantially Riemannian, belonging to the unique class for which the weak equivalence principle still holds. We also extend this analysis by considering a generalization of the de Sitter group (the so-called q -de Sitter group) and showing that its associated Finslerian geometry reproduces locally the one from the κ -Poincaré group, and that it itself can be recast in a Berwald form in an appropriate limit.

  14. Light Localization by Defects in Optically Induced Photonic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianke; Wang, Xiaosheng; Wang, Jiandong; Chen, Zhigang

    In the past ten years, there has blossomed an interest in the study of collective behavior of wave propagation in periodic waveguide arrays and photonic lattices [1-3]. The unique bandgap structures of these periodic media, coupled with nonlinear effects, give rise to many types of novel soliton structures [1- 26]. On the other hand, it is well known that one of the unique and most interesting features of photonic band-gap structures is a fundamentally different way of waveguiding by defects in otherwise uniformly periodic structures. Such waveguiding has been demonstrated with an "air-hole" in photonic crystal fibers (PCF) for optical waves [27, 28], in an isolated defect in two-dimensional arrays of dielectric cylinders for microwaves [29-31], and recently in all-solid PCF with a lower-index core [32, 33]. In addition, laser emission based on photonic defect modes has been realized in a number of experiments [34-38]. In one-dimensional (1D) fabricated semiconductor waveguide arrays, previous experiments have investigated nonlinearity-induced escape from a defect state [39] and interactions of discrete solitons with structural defects [40] (see also [41]). Despite the above efforts, theoretical understanding on defect guiding was still limited, and experimental demonstrations of defect guiding was still scarce. In addition, when nonlinear effects are significant, how defect guiding is affected by nonlinearity is largely an open issue. Recently, in a series of theoretical and experimental studies, we optically induced 1D, 2D and ringlike photonic lattices with single-site negative defects in photorefractive crystals, and investigated their linear and nonlinear light guiding properties [42-48]. This work will be reviewed in this Chapter. In addition, we present the first experimental demonstration of nonlinear defect modes which undergoes nonlinear propagation through the defects. Our work not only has a direct link to technologically important systems of periodic

  15. Transcription inactivation through local refolding of the RNA polymerase structure

    SciTech Connect

    Belogurov, Georgiy A.; Vassylyeva, Marina N.; Sevostyanova, Anastasiya; Appleman, James R.; Xiang, Alan X.; Lira, Ricardo; Webber, Stephen E.; Klyuyev, Sergiy; Nudler, Evgeny; Artsimovitch, Irina; Vassylyev, Dmitry G.

    2009-02-12

    Structural studies of antibiotics not only provide a shortcut to medicine allowing for rational structure-based drug design, but may also capture snapshots of dynamic intermediates that become 'frozen' after inhibitor binding. Myxopyronin inhibits bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) by an unknown mechanism. Here we report the structure of dMyx - a desmethyl derivative of myxopyronin B - complexed with a Thermus thermophilus RNAP holoenzyme. The antibiotic binds to a pocket deep inside the RNAP clamp head domain, which interacts with the DNA template in the transcription bubble. Notably, binding of dMyx stabilizes refolding of the {beta}'-subunit switch-2 segment, resulting in a configuration that might indirectly compromise binding to, or directly clash with, the melted template DNA strand. Consistently, footprinting data show that the antibiotic binding does not prevent nucleation of the promoter DNA melting but instead blocks its propagation towards the active site. Myxopyronins are thus, to our knowledge, a first structurally characterized class of antibiotics that target formation of the pre-catalytic transcription initiation complex - the decisive step in gene expression control. Notably, mutations designed in switch-2 mimic the dMyx effects on promoter complexes in the absence of antibiotic. Overall, our results indicate a plausible mechanism of the dMyx action and a stepwise pathway of open complex formation in which core enzyme mediates the final stage of DNA melting near the transcription start site, and that switch-2 might act as a molecular checkpoint for DNA loading in response to regulatory signals or antibiotics. The universally conserved switch-2 may have the same role in all multisubunit RNAPs.

  16. Local identification of scalar hybrid models with tree structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, Bernold; Schuppert, Andreas

    2008-06-01

    Standard modelling approaches, e.g. in chemical engineering, suffer from two principal difficulties: the curse of dimension and a lack of extrapolability. We propose an approach via structured hybrid models (SHMs) to resolve both issues. For simplicity, we consider reactor models which can be written as a tree-like composition of scalar input-output (i/o) functions uj. The vertices j of the finite tree structure represent known or unknown subprocesses of the overall process. Known processes are modelled by white-box functions uj; unknown processes are represented by black boxes uj. Oriented edges of the tree indicate composition of the i/o relations uj in a feedforward structure. The tree structure of a mixture of black and white boxes constitutes what we call an SHM. Under certain assumptions on differentiability, genericity and monotonicity, we provide an inductive algorithm which uniquely identifies all black boxes in the SHM up to a trivial scaling calibration between adjacent black boxes. Our result does not require any extra measurements interior to the SHM. Instead, we only require global, overall i/o data clustered along a d-dimensional database of inputs. More precisely, information on partial derivatives of order up to 5 is required, in all directions, but only at base points within the d-dimensional database. The dimension d need not exceed the maximal input dimension of any individual black box in the SHM. Compared to the total input dimension n of the reactor, which may be much larger than d, this dimension reduction effectively avoids the curse of dimension: the complexity of our approach is polynomial in n and exponential in d, only, rather than exponential in n. Moreover, our unique identification of all black boxes accommodates a reliable global extrapolation, far beyond the original database, to input regions of full dimension. We illustrate our results with a model of an industrial continuous polymerization plant.

  17. The Cambridge Centre for Ageing and Neuroscience (Cam-CAN) data repository: Structural and functional MRI, MEG, and cognitive data from a cross-sectional adult lifespan sample.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jason R; Williams, Nitin; Cusack, Rhodri; Auer, Tibor; Shafto, Meredith A; Dixon, Marie; Tyler, Lorraine K; Cam-Can; Henson, Richard N

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the data repository for the Cambridge Centre for Ageing and Neuroscience (Cam-CAN) initial study cohort. The Cam-CAN Stage 2 repository contains multi-modal (MRI, MEG, and cognitive-behavioural) data from a large (approximately N=700), cross-sectional adult lifespan (18-87years old) population-based sample. The study is designed to characterise age-related changes in cognition and brain structure and function, and to uncover the neurocognitive mechanisms that support healthy cognitive ageing. The database contains raw and preprocessed structural MRI, functional MRI (active tasks and resting state), and MEG data (active tasks and resting state), as well as derived scores from cognitive behavioural experiments spanning five broad domains (attention, emotion, action, language, and memory), and demographic and neuropsychological data. The dataset thus provides a depth of neurocognitive phenotyping that is currently unparalleled, enabling integrative analyses of age-related changes in brain structure, brain function, and cognition, and providing a testbed for novel analyses of multi-modal neuroimaging data. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Solving local structure around dopants in metal nanoparticles with ab initio modeling of X-ray absorption near edge structure

    DOE PAGES

    Timoshenko, J.; Shivhare, A.; Scott, R. W.; ...

    2016-06-30

    We adopted ab-initio X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) modelling for structural refinement of local environments around metal impurities in a large variety of materials. Our method enables both direct modelling, where the candidate structures are known, and the inverse modelling, where the unknown structural motifs are deciphered from the experimental spectra. We present also estimates of systematic errors, and their influence on the stability and accuracy of the obtained results. We illustrate our approach by following the evolution of local environment of palladium atoms in palladium-doped gold thiolate clusters upon chemical and thermal treatments.

  19. Solving local structure around dopants in metal nanoparticles with ab initio modeling of X-ray absorption near edge structure.

    PubMed

    Timoshenko, Janis; Shivhare, Atal; Scott, Robert W J; Lu, Deyu; Frenkel, Anatoly I

    2016-07-20

    We adopted ab initio X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) modeling for structural refinement of local environments around metal impurities in a large variety of materials. Our method enables both direct modeling, where the candidate structures are known, and the inverse modeling, where the unknown structural motifs are deciphered from the experimental spectra. We present also estimates of systematic errors, and their influence on the stability and accuracy of the obtained results. We illustrate our approach by revealing the evolution of local environment of palladium atoms in palladium-doped gold thiolate clusters upon chemical and thermal treatments.

  20. Local structures in computer-generated liquids and glasses: Classification of three-dimensional patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gades, Heinrich; Mitus, Antoni C.

    1991-08-01

    Using probabilistic methods we work out mathematical tools for an identification of local close-packed structures (fcc, hcp, icosahedron) in a configuration of atoms undergoing (thermal) fluctuations. A structure is described by invariants constructed from standard and generalized local bond-order parameters and by laws of their fluctuations. We provide a detailed analysis of fluctuations of 13-atom close-packed clusters, find the most informative invariants for each of them and calculate the metric which quantifies a concept of similarity of fluctuating structures. A simple algorithm for an identification of close-packed clusters is proposed. As an example, we analyze local structures in hot fcc solid. We discuss the origin of the difficulties encountered by a classification of local structures in liquids and glasses (Voronoi-like or standard bond-order analysis) and suggest how they can be avoided.

  1. Study of local structure and magnetism in high-T(sub c) copper oxide superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budnick, J. I.; Tan, Z.; Filipkowski, M.; Niedermayer, CH.; Glueckler, H.; Simon, R.; Golnik, A.; Rauer, M.; Recknagel, E.; Weidinger, A.

    1990-01-01

    The muon spin rotation (MUSR) study of local magnetism of Sr-doped La2CuO4 is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on magnetic order as detected by local and bulk probes with local atomic environments studied by x ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). Correlations between the MUSR study of local magnetic ordering and the bulk magnetization study are presented along with a discussion of the dependence upon oxygen stoichiometry. Results are presented for both superconducting phases and magnetic phases. Recent data which reveals the existence of local magnetic ordering in the hydrogen-doped YBa2Cu3O7 system are also discussed.

  2. SPLASH: structural pattern localization analysis by sequential histograms.

    PubMed

    Califano, A

    2000-04-01

    The discovery of sparse amino acid patterns that match repeatedly in a set of protein sequences is an important problem in computational biology. Statistically significant patterns, that is patterns that occur more frequently than expected, may identify regions that have been preserved by evolution and which may therefore play a key functional or structural role. Sparseness can be important because a handful of non-contiguous residues may play a key role, while others, in between, may be changed without significant loss of function or structure. Similar arguments may be applied to conserved DNA patterns. Available sparse pattern discovery algorithms are either inefficient or impose limitations on the type of patterns that can be discovered. This paper introduces a deterministic pattern discovery algorithm, called Splash, which can find sparse amino or nucleic acid patterns matching identically or similarly in a set of protein or DNA sequences. Sparse patterns of any length, up to the size of the input sequence, can be discovered without significant loss in performances. Splash is extremely efficient and embarrassingly parallel by nature. Large databases, such as a complete genome or the non-redundant SWISS-PROT database can be processed in a few hours on a typical workstation. Alternatively, a protein family or superfamily, with low overall homology, can be analyzed to discover common functional or structural signatures. Some examples of biologically interesting motifs discovered by Splash are reported for the histone I and for the G-Protein Coupled Receptor families. Due to its efficiency, Splash can be used to systematically and exhaustively identify conserved regions in protein family sets. These can then be used to build accurate and sensitive PSSM or HMM models for sequence analysis. Splash is available to non-commercial research centers upon request, conditional on the signing of a test field agreement. acal@us.ibm.com, Splash main page http://www.research.ibm.com/splash

  3. Dynamics of galaxy structures in the Local Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachentsev, I. D.

    2016-10-01

    I consider a sample of `Updated Nearby Galaxy Catalog' that contains eight hundred objects within 11 Mpc. Environment of each galaxy is characterized by a tidal index Θ1 depending on separation and mass of the galaxy Main Disturber (=MD). The UNGC galaxies with a common MD are ascribed to its `suite' and ranked according to their Θ1. Fifteen the most populated suites contain more than half of the UNGC sample. The fraction of MDs among the brightest galaxies is almost 100% and drops to 50% at M_B = -18 mag. The observational properties of galaxies accumulated in UNGC are used to derive orbital masses of giant galaxies via motions of their satellites. The average orbital-to-stellar mass ratio for them is M orb M* ~= 30, corresponding to the mean local density of matter Ωm ~= 0.09, i.e 1/3 of the global cosmic one. The dark-to-stellar mass ratio for the Milky Way and M31 is typical for other neighboring giant galaxies.

  4. Local structure analysis of some Cu(II) theophylline complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, L.; Cozar, O.; Forizs, E.; Cr ăciun, C.; Ristoiu, D.; B ălan, C.

    1999-10-01

    The CuT 2L 2·2H 2O complexes [T=Theophylline (1,3-dimethylxanthine); L=NH 3, n-propylamine (npa), 2-aminoethanol (ae)] were prepared and investigated by ESR spectroscopy. Powder ESR spectrum of CuT 2(NH 3) 2·2H 2O is axial ( g||=2.255, g⊥=2.059). ESR spectrum of CuT 2(npa) 2·2H 2O with ( g||=2.299, g⊥=2.081) is a superposition of one axial ( g||=2.299, g⊥=2.073) and one isotropic component ( g0≈2.089), in the same amount. The axial spectra of the former complexes are due to a static Jahn-Teller effect ( EJT≈2880 cm -1). ESR spectrum of CuT 2(ae) 2·2H 2O is orthorhombic ( g1c=2.199, g2c=2.095, g3c=2.037). The local symmetries around the Cu(II) ions remain unchanged by DMF solvating, by adsorbing these solutions on NaY zeolite or by lowering the temperature.

  5. Structural Damage Detection Using Frequency Domain Error Localization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    113 rn ~l-,I T X ~oy Ul C 114 APPENDIX D. FE MODEL / COMPUTER CODES The following is a brief description of MATLAB routines employed in this thesis...R.R., Structural Dynamics, An Introduction to Computer Methods , pp. 383-387, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., 1981. 8. Guyan , R.J., "Reduction of Stiffness...official policy or position of the Department of Defense or the U.S. Government. 12a. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE

  6. Input clustering and the microscale structure of local circuits

    PubMed Central

    DeBello, William M.; McBride, Thomas J.; Nichols, Grant S.; Pannoni, Katy E.; Sanculi, Daniel; Totten, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    The recent development of powerful tools for high-throughput mapping of synaptic networks promises major advances in understanding brain function. One open question is how circuits integrate and store information. Competing models based on random vs. structured connectivity make distinct predictions regarding the dendritic addressing of synaptic inputs. In this article we review recent experimental tests of one of these models, the input clustering hypothesis. Across circuits, brain regions and species, there is growing evidence of a link between synaptic co-activation and dendritic location, although this finding is not universal. The functional implications of input clustering and future challenges are discussed. PMID:25309336

  7. Electronic and local structures of BiFeO₃ films.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Y; Sakamoto, W

    2011-01-12

    The electronic structure of BiFeO₃ (BFO), BiFeO₃-PbTiO(3) solid solution (BFO-PT), and Mn-doped BFO-PT (BFM-PT) films fabricated by chemical solution deposition was investigated by x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). The BiFeO₃ shows a large leakage current owing to the mixed valance state of Fe(2 +) and Fe(3 +). The BFO film has a blunt absorption edge jump indicating the charge fluctuated state of the iron ions. The BFO-PT and BFM-PT films have sharp absorption edges, and the absorption energy of these films shifted to opposite energy. The valence fluctuation of the iron ions was closely connected with the leakage current properties. The charge fluctuated BFO film showed a leaky feature, and the charge unfluctuated BFO-PT and BFM-PT films had improved leakage current properties. The valence fluctuation of the iron ions can be controlled by Mn substitution and by making solid solutions.

  8. Global/local stress analysis of composite structures. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, Jonathan B.

    1989-01-01

    A method for performing a global/local stress analysis is described and its capabilities are demonstrated. The method employs spline interpolation functions which satisfy the linear plate bending equation to determine displacements and rotations from a global model which are used as boundary conditions for the local model. Then, the local model is analyzed independent of the global model of the structure. This approach can be used to determine local, detailed stress states for specific structural regions using independent, refined local models which exploit information from less-refined global models. The method presented is not restricted to having a priori knowledge of the location of the regions requiring local detailed stress analysis. This approach also reduces the computational effort necessary to obtain the detailed stress state. Criteria for applying the method are developed. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated using a classical stress concentration problem and a graphite-epoxy blade-stiffened panel with a discontinuous stiffener.

  9. Laser-induced periodic surface structures: Fingerprints of light localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skolski, J. Z. P.; Römer, G. R. B. E.; Obona, J. V.; Ocelik, V.; Huis in't Veld, A. J.; de Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2012-02-01

    The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is used to study the inhomogeneous absorption of linearly polarized laser radiation below a rough surface. The results are first analyzed in the frequency domain and compared to the efficacy factor theory of Sipe and coworkers. Both approaches show that the absorbed energy shows a periodic nature, not only in the direction orthogonal to the laser polarization, but also in the direction parallel to it. It is shown that the periodicity is not always close to the laser wavelength for the perpendicular direction. In the parallel direction, the periodicity is about λ/Re(ñ), with ñ being the complex refractive index of the medium. The space-domain FDTD results show a periodicity in the inhomogeneous energy absorption similar to the periodicity of the low- and high-spatial-frequency laser-induced periodic surface structures depending on the material's excitation.

  10. The Manitoba Centre for Health Policy: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Marchessault, Gail

    2011-01-01

    Context: The Manitoba Centre for Health Policy (MCHP) is a university research centre with a long-standing contractual arrangement with government. Objective: The purpose of this project was to examine the facilitators and challenges in the development, establishment and continuation of MCHP. Methods: In-depth, semi-structured interviews with 28 participants selected purposefully and a document review were conducted and analyzed using qualitative methods. Results: Although a unique confluence of factors facilitated MCHP's establishment, participants viewed safeguards to credibility (arm's-length from government; guaranteed academic freedom) along with powerful advocates as key to longevity. Other factors that participants discussed as important to sustainability included excellence in scholarship; thorough protection of privacy; stable funding; incremental growth; teamwork; leadership; nurturing of relationships; and authentic partnerships. Conclusions: MCHP has demonstrated that using local administrative data to address policy-related research questions is of enduring value to local and provincial communities, and also has national and international relevance. PMID:24933371

  11. Seismic data filtering using non-local means algorithm based on structure tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuai; Chen, Anqing; Chen, Hongde

    2017-05-01

    Non-Local means algorithm is a new and effective filtering method. It calculates weights of all similar neighborhoods' center points relative to filtering point within searching range by Gaussian weighted Euclidean distance between neighborhoods, then gets filtering point's value by weighted average to complete the filtering operation. In this paper, geometric distance of neighborhood's center point is taken into account in the distance measure calculation, making the non-local means algorithm more reasonable. Furthermore, in order to better protect the geometry structure information of seismic data, we introduce structure tensor that can depict the local geometrical features of seismic data. The coherence measure, which reflects image local contrast, is extracted from the structure tensor, is integrated into the non-local means algorithm to participate in the weight calculation, the control factor of geometry structure similarity is added to form a non-local means filtering algorithm based on structure tensor. The experimental results prove that the algorithm can effectively restrain noise, with strong anti-noise and amplitude preservation effect, improving PSNR and protecting structure information of seismic image. The method has been successfully applied in seismic data processing, indicating that it is a new and effective technique to conduct the structure-preserved filtering of seismic data.

  12. Local and average structure of Mn- and La-substituted BiFeO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bo; Selbach, Sverre M.

    2017-06-01

    The local and average structure of solid solutions of the multiferroic perovskite BiFeO3 is investigated by synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The average experimental structure is determined by Rietveld refinement and the local structure by total scattering data analyzed in real space with the pair distribution function (PDF) method. With equal concentrations of La on the Bi site or Mn on the Fe site, La causes larger structural distortions than Mn. Structural models based on DFT relaxed geometry give an improved fit to experimental PDFs compared to models constrained by the space group symmetry. Berry phase calculations predict a higher ferroelectric polarization than the experimental literature values, reflecting that structural disorder is not captured in either average structure space group models or DFT calculations with artificial long range order imposed by periodic boundary conditions. Only by including point defects in a supercell, here Bi vacancies, can DFT calculations reproduce the literature results on the structure and ferroelectric polarization of Mn-substituted BiFeO3. The combination of local and average structure sensitive experimental methods with DFT calculations is useful for illuminating the structure-property-composition relationships in complex functional oxides with local structural distortions.

  13. Local atomic structure modulations activate metal oxide as electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu Hang; Liu, Peng Fei; Pan, Lin Feng; Wang, Hai Feng; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Zheng, Li Rong; Hu, P; Zhao, Hui Jun; Gu, Lin; Yang, Hua Gui

    2015-08-19

    Modifications of local structure at atomic level could precisely and effectively tune the capacity of materials, enabling enhancement in the catalytic activity. Here we modulate the local atomic structure of a classical but inert transition metal oxide, tungsten trioxide, to be an efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water, which has shown promise as an alternative to platinum. Structural analyses and theoretical calculations together indicate that the origin of the enhanced activity could be attributed to the tailored electronic structure by means of the local atomic structure modulations. We anticipate that suitable structure modulations might be applied on other transition metal oxides to meet the optimal thermodynamic and kinetic requirements, which may pave the way to unlock the potential of other promising candidates as cost-effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution in industry.

  14. Local atomic structure modulations activate metal oxide as electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu Hang; Liu, Peng Fei; Pan, Lin Feng; Wang, Hai Feng; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Zheng, Li Rong; Hu, P.; Zhao, Hui Jun; Gu, Lin; Yang, Hua Gui

    2015-01-01

    Modifications of local structure at atomic level could precisely and effectively tune the capacity of materials, enabling enhancement in the catalytic activity. Here we modulate the local atomic structure of a classical but inert transition metal oxide, tungsten trioxide, to be an efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water, which has shown promise as an alternative to platinum. Structural analyses and theoretical calculations together indicate that the origin of the enhanced activity could be attributed to the tailored electronic structure by means of the local atomic structure modulations. We anticipate that suitable structure modulations might be applied on other transition metal oxides to meet the optimal thermodynamic and kinetic requirements, which may pave the way to unlock the potential of other promising candidates as cost-effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution in industry. PMID:26286479

  15. Local atomic structure modulations activate metal oxide as electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu Hang; Liu, Peng Fei; Pan, Lin Feng; Wang, Hai Feng; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Zheng, Li Rong; Hu, P.; Zhao, Hui Jun; Gu, Lin; Yang, Hua Gui

    2015-08-01

    Modifications of local structure at atomic level could precisely and effectively tune the capacity of materials, enabling enhancement in the catalytic activity. Here we modulate the local atomic structure of a classical but inert transition metal oxide, tungsten trioxide, to be an efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water, which has shown promise as an alternative to platinum. Structural analyses and theoretical calculations together indicate that the origin of the enhanced activity could be attributed to the tailored electronic structure by means of the local atomic structure modulations. We anticipate that suitable structure modulations might be applied on other transition metal oxides to meet the optimal thermodynamic and kinetic requirements, which may pave the way to unlock the potential of other promising candidates as cost-effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution in industry.

  16. The influence of the local sequence environment on RNA loop structures.

    PubMed

    Schudoma, Christian; Larhlimi, Abdelhalim; Walther, Dirk

    2011-07-01

    RNA folding is assumed to be a hierarchical process. The secondary structure of an RNA molecule, signified by base-pairing and stacking interactions between the paired bases, is formed first. Subsequently, the RNA molecule adopts an energetically favorable three-dimensional conformation in the structural space determined mainly by the rotational degrees of freedom associated with the backbone of regions of unpaired nucleotides (loops). To what extent the backbone conformation of RNA loops also results from interactions within the local sequence context or rather follows global optimization constraints alone has not been addressed yet. Because the majority of base stacking interactions are exerted locally, a critical influence of local sequence on local structure appears plausible. Thus, local loop structure ought to be predictable, at least in part, from the local sequence context alone. To test this hypothesis, we used Random Forests on a nonredundant data set of unpaired nucleotides extracted from 97 X-ray structures from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) to predict discrete backbone angle conformations given by the discretized η/θ-pseudo-torsional space. Predictions on balanced sets with four to six conformational classes using local sequence information yielded average accuracies of up to 55%, thus significantly better than expected by chance (17%-25%). Bases close to the central nucleotide appear to be most tightly linked to its conformation. Our results suggest that RNA loop structure does not only depend on long-range base-pairing interactions; instead, it appears that local sequence context exerts a significant influence on the formation of the local loop structure.

  17. From local structure to a global framework: recognition of protein folds

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Agnel Praveen; de Brevern, Alexandre G.

    2014-01-01

    Protein folding has been a major area of research for many years. Nonetheless, the mechanisms leading to the formation of an active biological fold are still not fully apprehended. The huge amount of available sequence and structural information provides hints to identify the putative fold for a given sequence. Indeed, protein structures prefer a limited number of local backbone conformations, some being characterized by preferences for certain amino acids. These preferences largely depend on the local structural environment. The prediction of local backbone conformations has become an important factor to correctly identifying the global protein fold. Here, we review the developments in the field of local structure prediction and especially their implication in protein fold recognition. PMID:24740960

  18. Spatial Variation in the Population Structure and Reproductive Biology of Rimicaris hybisae (Caridea: Alvinocarididae) at Hydrothermal Vents on the Mid-Cayman Spreading Centre

    PubMed Central

    Nye, Verity; Copley, Jonathan T.; Tyler, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics and microdistribution of faunal assemblages at hydrothermal vents often reflect the fine-scale spatial and temporal heterogeneity of the vent environment. This study examined the reproductive development and population structure of the caridean shrimp Rimicaris hybisae at the Beebe and Von Damm Vent Fields (Mid-Cayman Spreading Centre, Caribbean) using spatially discrete samples collected in January 2012. Rimicaris hybisae is gonochoric and exhibits iteroparous reproduction. Oocyte size-frequency distributions (21-823 µm feret diameters) varied significantly among samples. Embryo development was asynchronous among females, which may result in asynchronous larval release for the populations. Specimens of R. hybisae from the Von Damm Vent Field (2294 m) were significantly larger than specimens from the Beebe Vent Field. Brooding females at Von Damm exhibited greater size-specific fecundity, possibly as a consequence of a non-linear relationship between fecundity and body size that was consistent across both vent fields. Samples collected from several locations at the Beebe Vent Field (4944–4972 m) revealed spatial variability in the sex ratios, population structure, size, and development of oocytes and embryos of this mobile species. Samples from the Von Damm Vent Field and sample J2-613-24 from Beebe Woods exhibited the highest frequencies of ovigerous females and significantly female-biased sex ratios. Environmental variables within shrimp aggregations may influence the distribution of ovigerous females, resulting in a spatially heterogeneous pattern of reproductive development in R. hybisae, as found in other vent taxa. PMID:23555955

  19. Spatial variation in the population structure and reproductive biology of Rimicaris hybisae (Caridea: Alvinocarididae) at hydrothermal vents on the Mid-Cayman Spreading Centre.

    PubMed

    Nye, Verity; Copley, Jonathan T; Tyler, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics and microdistribution of faunal assemblages at hydrothermal vents often reflect the fine-scale spatial and temporal heterogeneity of the vent environment. This study examined the reproductive development and population structure of the caridean shrimp Rimicaris hybisae at the Beebe and Von Damm Vent Fields (Mid-Cayman Spreading Centre, Caribbean) using spatially discrete samples collected in January 2012. Rimicaris hybisae is gonochoric and exhibits iteroparous reproduction. Oocyte size-frequency distributions (21-823 µm feret diameters) varied significantly among samples. Embryo development was asynchronous among females, which may result in asynchronous larval release for the populations. Specimens of R. hybisae from the Von Damm Vent Field (2294 m) were significantly larger than specimens from the Beebe Vent Field. Brooding females at Von Damm exhibited greater size-specific fecundity, possibly as a consequence of a non-linear relationship between fecundity and body size that was consistent across both vent fields. Samples collected from several locations at the Beebe Vent Field (4944-4972 m) revealed spatial variability in the sex ratios, population structure, size, and development of oocytes and embryos of this mobile species. Samples from the Von Damm Vent Field and sample J2-613-24 from Beebe Woods exhibited the highest frequencies of ovigerous females and significantly female-biased sex ratios. Environmental variables within shrimp aggregations may influence the distribution of ovigerous females, resulting in a spatially heterogeneous pattern of reproductive development in R. hybisae, as found in other vent taxa.

  20. Complex haplotype structure of the human GNAS gene identifies a recombination hotspot centred on a single nucleotide polymorphism widely used in association studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wanling; White, Brook; Spicer, Eleanor K; Weinstein, Benjamin L; Hildebrandt, John D

    2004-11-01

    The alpha subunit of the heterotrimeric G protein Gs (Gsalpha) is involved in numerous physiological processes and is a primary determinant of cellular responses to extracellular signals. Genetic variations in the Gsalpha gene may play an important role in complex diseases and drug responses. To characterize the genetic diversity in this locus, we resequenced exons and flanking introns of the gene in 44 genomic samples and analysed the haplotype structure of the gene in an additional 50 African-Americans and 50 Caucasians. Significant differences in allele frequency for nearly all the genotyped single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) were detected between the two ethnic groups. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis of this locus revealed two haplotype blocks characterized by strong LD and reduced haplotype diversity, especially in Caucasians. Between the two blocks is a narrow (approximately 3 kb) recombination hotspot centred on exons 4 and 5, and a widely used genetic marker in association studies in this region (rs7121) was in linkage equilibrium with the rest of the gene. The haplotype structure of the GNAS locus warrants reevaluation of previous association studies that used marker rs7121 and affects choice of SNP markers to be used in future studies of this locus.

  1. 33 CFR 208.10 - Local flood protection works; maintenance and operation of structures and facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Local flood protection works... CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE FLOOD CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.10 Local flood protection works; maintenance and operation of structures and facilities. (a) General. (1...

  2. Application of Local Linear Embedding to Nonlinear Exploratory Latent Structure Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Haonan; Iyer, Hari

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the use of a recent dimension reduction technique called Locally Linear Embedding, introduced by Roweis and Saul, for performing an exploratory latent structure analysis. The coordinate variables from the locally linear embedding describing the manifold on which the data reside serve as the latent variable scores. We…

  3. High-density localization of active molecules using Structured Sparse Model and Bayesian Information Criterion.

    PubMed

    Quan, Tingwei; Zhu, Hongyu; Liu, Xiaomao; Liu, Yongfeng; Ding, Jiuping; Zeng, Shaoqun; Huang, Zhen-Li

    2011-08-29

    Localization-based super-resolution microscopy (or called localization microscopy) rely on repeated imaging and localization of active molecules, and the spatial resolution enhancement of localization microscopy is built upon the sacrifice of its temporal resolution. Developing algorithms for high-density localization of active molecules is a promising approach to increase the speed of localization microscopy. Here we present a new algorithm called SSM_BIC for such purpose. The SSM_BIC combines the advantages of the Structured Sparse Model (SSM) and the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC). Through simulation and experimental studies, we evaluate systematically the performance between the SSM_BIC and the conventional Sparse algorithm in high-density localization of active molecules. We show that the SSM_BIC is superior in processing single molecule images with weak signal embedded in strong background.

  4. Origin of heterogeneous dynamics in local molecular structures of ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Sha, Maolin; Liu, Yusheng; Dong, Huaze; Luo, Fabao; Jiang, Fangling; Tang, Zhongfeng; Zhu, Guanglai; Wu, Guozhong

    2016-11-04

    Room-temperature ionic liquids (ILs) are generally considered as structurally heterogeneous with inherent polar/apolar phase separation. However, even after a decade of research, local dynamics in the heterogeneous structures of ILs remain neglected. Such local dynamics may influence the ion transport of electrolytes, as well as the reaction rate of solvents. In this study, we performed molecular dynamics simulation to analyze the local dynamics for the structural heterogeneity of ILs. Calculations of the diffusion, reorientation, and association dynamics showed a distinct heterogeneous dynamics between the polar and apolar regions of ILs. Further studies demonstrated that such local dynamic differences originate from local structural heterogeneity. Different energy barriers determine a predominant fast reorientation dynamics in apolar regions and a locally vibrating behavior in polar regions. Additionally, we suggested a new jumping mechanism to clarify the dynamic heterogeneity of ions in the polar regions. The results will help determine the origin of the heterogeneous dynamics in IL local structures and provide a theoretical basis for tuning the dynamic properties of ILs used as electrolytes or reaction solvents.

  5. Local structures of high-entropy alloys (HEAs) on atomic scales: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Diao, Haoyan; Santodonato, Louis J.; Tang, Zhi; Egami, Takeshi; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    The high-entropy alloys (HEAs), containing several elements mixed in equimolar or near-equimolar ratios, have shown exceptional engineering properties. Local structures on atomic level are essential to understand the mechanical behaviors and related mechanisms. In this paper, the local structure and stress on the atomic level are reviewed by the pair-distribution function (PDF) of neutron-diffraction data, ab-initio-molecular-dynamics (AIMD) simulations, and atomic-probe microscopy (APT).

  6. Local Structure of BiFeO3-BaTiO3 Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Yasuhiro; Yoshii, Kenji; Kohara, Shinji; Kitagawa, Shuji; Mori, Shigeo

    2008-09-01

    Local structure analysis of (1-x)BiFeO3-xBaTiO3 mixture was carried out by a synchrotron radiation X-ray pair-distribution function (PDF) method. The PDF peak is resolved as a doublet owing to the presence of two phases with distinct local structures. The randomness of the off-center displacement of Bi atoms was different in these two phases, one was an average structure and the other a disordered rhombohedral structure. The volume fraction of each phase changed with BaTiO3 composition.

  7. ConvNet-Based Localization of Anatomical Structures in 3D Medical Images.

    PubMed

    de Vos, Bob; Wolterink, Jelmer; de Jong, Pim; Leiner, Tim; Viergever, Max; Isgum, Ivana

    2017-02-23

    Localization of anatomical structures is a prerequisite for many tasks in medical image analysis. We propose a method for automatic localization of one or more anatomical structures in 3D medical images through detection of their presence in 2D image slices using a convolutional neural network (ConvNet). A single ConvNet is trained to detect presence of the anatomical structure of interest in axial, coronal, and sagittal slices extracted from a 3D image. To allow the ConvNet to analyze slices of different sizes, spatial pyramid pooling is applied. After detection, 3D bounding boxes are created by combining the output of the ConvNet in all slices. In the experiments 200 chest CT, 100 cardiac CT angiography (CTA), and 100 abdomen CT scans were used. The heart, ascending aorta, aortic arch, and descending aorta were localized in chest CT scans, the left cardiac ventricle in cardiac CTA scans, and the liver in abdomen CT scans. Localization was evaluated using the distances between automatically and manually defined reference bounding box centroids and walls. The best results were achieved in localization of structures with clearly defined boundaries (e.g. aortic arch) and the worst when the structure boundary was not clearly visible (e.g. liver). The method was more robust and accurate in localization multiple structures.

  8. Acoustic wave localization in one-dimensional Fibonacci phononic structures with mirror symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hladky-Hennion, A. C.; Vasseur, J. O.; Degraeve, S.; Granger, C.; de Billy, M.

    2013-04-01

    This paper reports on numerical and experimental results of acoustic transmission spectra of bead chains with symmetric and asymmetric Fibonacci-like structures. As a matter of comparison, perfect periodic acoustic waveguide structures are also examined. This study shows that Fibonacci structures with mirror symmetry can exhibit localized modes with higher amplitude, due to resonant transmission induced by the presence of dimers inside the 1D structure. A good agreement is observed between the theoretical predictions and the experimental power spectra.

  9. Parameters Affecting Loads on Buried Structures Subjected to Localized Blast Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-01

    Structures Laboratory DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY Waterways Experiment Station, Corps of Engineers 3909 Halls Ferry Road, Vicksburg, Mississippi 39180-6199...ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Structures Laboratory, Technical Report SL-92-9...Loads on Buried Structures Subjected to Localized Blast Effects." These analyses were performed in the Structures Laboratory (SL), U.S. Army Engineer

  10. Local Structure and Short-Range Order in a NiCoCr Solid Solution Alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, F. X.; Zhao, Shijun; Jin, Ke; ...

    2017-05-19

    Multi-element solid solution alloys are intrinsically disordered on the atomic scale, and many of their advanced properties originate from the unique local structural characteristics. We measured the local structure of a NiCoCr solid solution alloy with X-ray/neutron total scattering and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) techniques. The atomic pair distribution function analysis (PDF) did not exhibit distinct structural distortion. But, EXAFS analysis suggested that the Cr atoms are favorably bonded with Ni and Co in the solid solution alloys. This short-range order (SRO) plays a role in the distinct low values of electrical and thermal conductivities in Ni-based solidmore » solution alloys when Cr is incorporated. Both the long-range and local structures of the NiCoCr alloy upon Ni ion irradiation were studied and an irradiation-induced enhancement of SRO was found.« less

  11. The Effects of a Locally Developed mHealth Intervention on Delivery and Postnatal Care Utilization; A Prospective Controlled Evaluation among Health Centres in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Shiferaw, Solomon; Spigt, Mark; Tekie, Michael; Abdullah, Muna; Fantahun, Mesganaw; Dinant, Geert-Jan

    2016-01-01

    Although there are studies showing that mobile phone solutions can improve health service delivery outcomes in the developed world, there is little empirical evidence that demonstrates the impact of mHealth interventions on key maternal health outcomes in low income settings. A non-randomized controlled study was conducted in the Amhara region, Ethiopia in 10 health facilities (5 intervention, 5 control) together serving around 250,000 people. Health workers in the intervention group received an android phone (3 phones per facility) loaded with an application that sends reminders for scheduled visits during antenatal care (ANC), delivery and postnatal care (PNC), and educational messages on dangers signs and common complaints during pregnancy. The intervention was developed at Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia. Primary outcomes were the percentage of women who had at least 4 ANC visits, institutional delivery and PNC visits at the health center after 12 months of implementation of the intervention. Overall 933 and 1037 women were included in the cross-sectional surveys at baseline and at follow-up respectively. In addition, the medical records of 1224 women who had at least one antenatal care visit were followed in the longitudinal study. Women who had their ANC visit in the intervention health centers were significantly more likely to deliver their baby in the same health center compared to the control group (43.1% versus 28.4%; Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR): 1.98 (95%CI 1.53-2.55)). A significantly higher percentage of women who had ANC in the intervention group had PNC in the same health center compared to the control health centers (41.2% versus 21.1%: AOR: 2.77 (95%CI 2.12-3.61)). Our findings demonstrated that a locally customized mHealth application during ANC can significantly improve delivery and postnatal care service utilization possibly through positively influencing the behavior of health workers and their clients.

  12. Strong influence of regional species pools on continent-wide structuring of local communities.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Jean-Philippe; Borregaard, Michael K; Fordyce, James A; Rahbek, Carsten; Weiser, Michael D; Dunn, Robert R; Sanders, Nathan J

    2012-01-22

    There is a long tradition in ecology of evaluating the relative contribution of the regional species pool and local interactions on the structure of local communities. Similarly, a growing number of studies assess the phylogenetic structure of communities, relative to that in the regional species pool, to examine the interplay between broad-scale evolutionary and fine-scale ecological processes. Finally, a renewed interest in the influence of species source pools on communities has shown that the definition of the source pool influences interpretations of patterns of community structure. We use a continent-wide dataset of local ant communities and implement ecologically explicit source pool definitions to examine the relative importance of regional species pools and local interactions for shaping community structure. Then we assess which factors underlie systematic variation in the structure of communities along climatic gradients. We find that the average phylogenetic relatedness of species in ant communities decreases from tropical to temperate regions, but the strength of this relationship depends on the level of ecological realism in the definition of source pools. We conclude that the evolution of climatic niches influences the phylogenetic structure of regional source pools and that the influence of regional source pools on local community structure is strong.

  13. Local anesthetics structure-dependently interact with anionic phospholipid membranes to modify the fluidity.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Hironori; Ueno, Takahiro; Mizogami, Maki; Takakura, Ko

    2010-01-05

    While bupivacaine is more cardiotoxic than other local anesthetics, the mechanistic background for different toxic effects remains unclear. Several cardiotoxic compounds act on lipid bilayers to change the physicochemical properties of membranes. We comparatively studied the interaction of local anesthetics with lipid membranous systems which might be related to their structure-selective cardiotoxicity. Amide local anesthetics (10-300 microM) were reacted with unilamellar vesicles which were prepared with different phospholipids and cholesterol of varying lipid compositions. They were compared on the potencies to modify membrane fluidity by measuring fluorescence polarization. Local anesthetics interacted with liposomal membranes to increase the fluidity. Increasing anionic phospholipids in membranes enhanced the membrane-fluidizing effects of local anesthetics with the potency being cardiolipin>phosphatidic acid>phosphatidylglycerol>phosphatidylserine. Cardiolipin was most effective on bupivacaine, followed by ropivacaine. Local anesthetics interacted differently with biomimetic membranes consisting of 10mol% cardiolipin, 50mol% other phospholipids and 40mol% cholesterol with the potency being bupivacaine>ropivacaine>lidocaine>prilocaine, which agreed with the rank order of cardiotoxicity. Bupivacaine significantly fluidized 2.5-12.5mol% cardiolipin-containing membranes at cardiotoxicologically relevant concentrations. Bupivacaine is considered to affect lipid bilayers by interacting electrostatically with negatively charged cardiolipin head groups and hydrophobically with phospholipid acyl chains. The structure-dependent interaction with lipid membranes containing cardiolipin, which is preferentially localized in cardiomyocyte mitochondrial membranes, may be a mechanistic clue to explain the structure-selective cardiotoxicity of local anesthetics.

  14. Local structure study of the orbital order/disorder transition in LaMnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thygesen, Peter M. M.; Young, Callum A.; Beake, Edward O. R.; Romero, Fabio Denis; Connor, Leigh D.; Proffen, Thomas E.; Phillips, Anthony E.; Tucker, Matthew G.; Hayward, Michael A.; Keen, David A.; Goodwin, Andrew L.

    2017-05-01

    We use a combination of neutron and x-ray total scattering measurements together with pair distribution function (PDF) analysis to characterize the variation in local structure across the orbital order/disorder transition in LaMnO3. Our experimental data are inconsistent with a conventional order/disorder description of the transition, and reflect instead the existence of a discontinuous change in local structure between ordered and disordered states. Within the orbital ordered regime, the neutron and x-ray PDFs are best described by a local structure model with the same local orbital arrangements as those observed in the average (long-range) crystal structure. We show that a variety of meaningfully different local orbital arrangement models can give fits of comparable quality to the experimental PDFs collected within the disordered regime; nevertheless, our data show a subtle but consistent preference for the anisotropic Potts model proposed previously [M. R. Ahmed and G. A. Gehring, Phys. Rev. B 79, 174106 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevB.79.174106]. The key implications of this model are electronic and magnetic isotropy together with the loss of local inversion symmetry at the Mn site. We conclude with a critical assessment of the interpretation of PDF measurements when characterizing local symmetry breaking in functional materials.

  15. Resolving the Sedimentary Basin Structure from Oklahoma with Local Receiver Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, D.; Ni, S.

    2015-12-01

    The teleseismic receiver function is defined as the radial component of P wave being deconvoluted from the vertical component of the earthquakes with magnitude larger than 5.5 at teleseismic distances. It has successfully been applied in resolving the structure of the crust and upper mantle in many regions. The receiver function can also be used to determine the thickness of sedimentary basin. However the corner frequency of the P waves from the teleseismic events (M>5.5) is relatively low and the high frequency content in the teleseismic P waves is attenuated, thus, the teleseismic receiver function is usually not sufficient to reveal details of sedimentary basin structure. Instead, local small earthquake (~ M3) generates P waves of short duration waveforms with high frequency content, which can be used to calculate receiver functions (called local receiver function). As a case study, we study waveform data from local earthquakes in Oklahoma. We first explore feasibility of local receiver function for different magnitude, focal depth, epicentral distance, filtering band and time window length. After local receiver functions are computed, we search the best velocity model to fit the local receiver function waveforms with the Differential Evolution (DE) algorithm which is a global optimization method. We invert the sedimentary basin structure in Oklahoma and find that this method is suitable for other area for the sedimentary basin structure where local seismic waveforms are available.

  16. Temperature Dependence of the Local Structure in Pb Containing Relaxor Ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egami, T.; Mamontov, E.; Dmowski, W.; Vakhrushev, S. B.

    2003-08-01

    Temperature dependence of the local structure of relaxor and related ferroelectric oxide systems, such as PMN, PST and PZT, are discussed based upon the results of the pulsed neutron atomic pair-density function (PDF) analysis. Optical data have shown various changes in the local structure taking place much above the relaxor freezing temperature. However, the origins of such changes have long been controversial. We show that the Burns temperature is the local Curie temperature at which the polar nano-regions are formed, and the transition is of the order/disorder type for Pb polarization. Local Pb polarization persists up to temperatures several hundreds of degrees above the Burns temperature where the Raman scattering suggests disappearance of the local distortion in the oxygen environment.

  17. Data-driven high-throughput prediction of the 3-D structure of small molecules: review and progress. A response to the letter by the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre.

    PubMed

    Baldi, Pierre

    2011-12-27

    A response is presented to sentiments expressed in "Data-Driven High-Throughput Prediction of the 3-D Structure of Small Molecules: Review and Progress. A Response from The Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre", recently published in the Journal of Chemical Information and Modeling, (1) which may give readers a misleading impression regarding significant impediments to scientific research posed by the CCDC.

  18. The Effects of a Locally Developed mHealth Intervention on Delivery and Postnatal Care Utilization; A Prospective Controlled Evaluation among Health Centres in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Shiferaw, Solomon; Spigt, Mark; Tekie, Michael; Abdullah, Muna; Fantahun, Mesganaw; Dinant, Geert-Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background Although there are studies showing that mobile phone solutions can improve health service delivery outcomes in the developed world, there is little empirical evidence that demonstrates the impact of mHealth interventions on key maternal health outcomes in low income settings. Methods A non-randomized controlled study was conducted in the Amhara region, Ethiopia in 10 health facilities (5 intervention, 5 control) together serving around 250,000 people. Health workers in the intervention group received an android phone (3 phones per facility) loaded with an application that sends reminders for scheduled visits during antenatal care (ANC), delivery and postnatal care (PNC), and educational messages on dangers signs and common complaints during pregnancy. The intervention was developed at Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia. Primary outcomes were the percentage of women who had at least 4 ANC visits, institutional delivery and PNC visits at the health center after 12 months of implementation of the intervention. Findings Overall 933 and 1037 women were included in the cross-sectional surveys at baseline and at follow-up respectively. In addition, the medical records of 1224 women who had at least one antenatal care visit were followed in the longitudinal study. Women who had their ANC visit in the intervention health centers were significantly more likely to deliver their baby in the same health center compared to the control group (43.1% versus 28.4%; Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR): 1.98 (95%CI 1.53–2.55)). A significantly higher percentage of women who had ANC in the intervention group had PNC in the same health center compared to the control health centers (41.2% versus 21.1%: AOR: 2.77 (95%CI 2.12–3.61)). Conclusions Our findings demonstrated that a locally customized mHealth application during ANC can significantly improve delivery and postnatal care service utilization possibly through positively influencing the behavior of health workers and their

  19. How localized is ``local?'' Efficiency vs. accuracy of O(N) domain decomposition in local orbital based all-electron electronic structure theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havu, Vile; Blum, Volker; Scheffler, Matthias

    2007-03-01

    Numeric atom-centered local orbitals (NAO) are efficient basis sets for all-electron electronic structure theory. The locality of NAO's can be exploited to render (in principle) all operations of the self-consistency cycle O(N). This is straightforward for 3D integrals using domain decomposition into spatially close subsets of integration points, enabling critical computational savings that are effective from ˜tens of atoms (no significant overhead for smaller systems) and make large systems (100s of atoms) computationally feasible. Using a new all-electron NAO-based code,^1 we investigate the quantitative impact of exploiting this locality on two distinct classes of systems: Large light-element molecules [Alanine-based polypeptide chains (Ala)n], and compact transition metal clusters. Strict NAO locality is achieved by imposing a cutoff potential with an onset radius rc, and exploited by appropriately shaped integration domains (subsets of integration points). Conventional tight rc<= 3å have no measurable accuracy impact in (Ala)n, but introduce inaccuracies of 20-30 meV/atom in Cun. The domain shape impacts the computational effort by only 10-20 % for reasonable rc. ^1 V. Blum, R. Gehrke, P. Havu, V. Havu, M. Scheffler, The FHI Ab Initio Molecular Simulations (aims) Project, Fritz-Haber-Institut, Berlin (2006).

  20. Origin of the phase transition in IrTe2: structural modulation and local bonding instability

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Huibo; Chakoumakos, Bryan C; Yan, Jiaqiang; Zhou, Haidong; Custelcean, Radu; Mandrus, D.; McGuire, Michael A; Singh, David J; Chen, Xin; Yang, Hui

    2013-01-01

    We used X-ray/neutron diffraction to determine the low temperature (LT) structure of IrTe2. A structural modulation was observed with a wavevector of k =(1/5, 0, 1/5) below Ts285 K, accompanied by a structural transition from a trigonal to a triclinic lattice. We also performed the first principles calculations for high temperature (HT) and LT structures, which elucidate the nature of the phase transition and the LT structure. A local bonding instability associated with the Te 5p states is likely the origin of the structural phase transition in IrTe2.

  1. Adjoint-tomography for a Local Surface Structure: Methodology and a Blind Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubina, Filip; Michlik, Filip; Moczo, Peter; Kristek, Jozef; Stripajova, Svetlana

    2017-04-01

    We have developed a multiscale full-waveform adjoint-tomography method for local surface sedimentary structures with complicated interference wavefields. The local surface sedimentary basins and valleys are often responsible for anomalous earthquake ground motions and corresponding damage in earthquakes. In many cases only relatively small number of records of a few local earthquakes is available for a site of interest. Consequently, prediction of earthquake ground motion at the site has to include numerical modeling for a realistic model of the local structure. Though limited, the information about the local structure encoded in the records is important and irreplaceable. It is therefore reasonable to have a method capable of using the limited information in records for improving a model of the local structure. A local surface structure and its interference wavefield require a specific multiscale approach. In order to verify our inversion method, we performed a blind test. We obtained synthetic seismograms at 8 receivers for 2 local sources, complete description of the sources, positions of the receivers and material parameters of the bedrock. We considered the simplest possible starting model - a homogeneous halfspace made of the bedrock. Using our inversion method we obtained an inverted model. Given the starting model, synthetic seismograms simulated for the inverted model are surprisingly close to the synthetic seismograms simulated for the true structure in the target frequency range up to 4.5 Hz. We quantify the level of agreement between the true and inverted seismograms using the L2 and time-frequency misfits, and, more importantly for earthquake-engineering applications, also using the goodness-of-fit criteria based on the earthquake-engineering characteristics of earthquake ground motion. We also verified the inverted model for other source-receiver configurations not used in the inversion.

  2. Workshop on Measurement Needs for Local-Structure Determination in Inorganic Materials

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Igor; Vanderah, Terrell

    2008-01-01

    The functional responses (e.g., dielectric, magnetic, catalytic, etc.) of many industrially-relevant materials are controlled by their local structure—a term that refers to the atomic arrangements on a scale ranging from atomic (sub-nanometer) to several nanometers. Thus, accurate knowledge of local structure is central to understanding the properties of nanostructured materials, thereby placing the problem of determining atomic positions on the nanoscale—the so-called “nanostructure problem”—at the center of modern materials development. Today, multiple experimental techniques exist for probing local atomic arrangements; nonetheless, finding accurate comprehensive, and robust structural solutions for the nanostructured materials still remains a formidable challenge because any one of these methods yields only a partial view of the local structure. The primary goal of this 2-day NIST-sponsored workshop was to bring together experts in the key experimental and theoretical areas relevant to local-structure determination to devise a strategy for the collaborative effort required to develop a comprehensive measurement solution on the local scale. The participants unanimously agreed that solving the nanostructure problem—an ultimate frontier in materials characterization—necessitates a coordinated interdisciplinary effort that transcends the existing capabilities of any single institution, including national laboratories, centers, and user facilities. The discussions converged on an institute dedicated to local structure determination as the most viable organizational platform for successfully addressing the nanostructure problem. The proposed “institute” would provide an intellectual infrastructure for local structure determination by (1) developing and maintaining relevant computer software integrated in an open-source global optimization framework (Fig. 2), (2) connecting industrial and academic users with experts in measurement techniques, (3

  3. Local reversibility and entanglement structure of many-body ground states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Tomotaka; Arad, Itai; Amico, Luigi; Vedral, Vlatko

    2017-03-01

    The low-temperature physics of quantum many-body systems is largely governed by the structure of their ground states. Minimizing the energy of local interactions, ground states often reflect strong properties of locality such as the area law for entanglement entropy and the exponential decay of correlations between spatially separated observables. Here, we present a novel characterization of quantum states, which we call ‘local reversibility’. It characterizes the type of operations that are needed to reverse the action of a general disturbance on the state. We prove that unique ground states of gapped local Hamiltonian are locally reversible. This way, we identify new universal features of many-body ground states, which cannot be derived from the aforementioned properties. We use local reversibility to distinguish between states enjoying microscopic and macroscopic quantum phenomena. To demonstrate the potential of our approach, we prove specific properties of ground states, which are relevant both to critical and non-critical theories.

  4. Phase Diagram of Catalytic Oxidation of CO on the Surface Subsurface of a Body-Centred Cubic Structure with Eley Rideal Process: A Monte Carlo Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qaisrani, A. U.; Khalid, M.; Musa Kaleem, Baloch

    2004-09-01

    Monte Carlo simulation is used to explore the effects of the Eley-Rideal (ER) process on the phase diagram of the Langmuir Hinshelwood (LH) type monomer dimer (CO O2) catalytic reaction on the surface and subsurface of a body-centred cubic structure, which extends to only two layers in the z-direction. The dimer (O2) is adsorbed in such a way that it takes one surface site whereas the second site is from the subsurface. For this mechanism, an interesting situation develops. The production rate of CO2 is found to be consistent with experiment. The qualitative trend of the surface oxygen coverage is not consistent with the experimental situation in one model while it is found to be consistent with that in another model, i.e. the coverage of surface oxygen decreases slowly with increase of concentration of CO (yCO). Moreover, the production of CO2 can be predicted in the form of a mathematical relation.

  5. Localized optical states in a liquid-crystal structure adjacent to a metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyatnov, M. V.; Vetrov, S. Ya.; Timofeev, I. V.

    2017-08-01

    The spectrum of light transmission through a structure consisting of a metallic layer and a cholesteric liquid crystal with an induced planar defect is calculated. The possibility of existence of localized states at the metal-dielectric interface of this system is demonstrated. The transmission spectra at different positions of the defect in the structure are studied.

  6. Ultrahigh resolution imaging of local structural distortions in intergrowth tungsten bronzes.

    PubMed

    Kirkland, A I; Sloan, J; Haigh, S

    2007-01-01

    Details of the local structure of a complex tungsten bronze, K(x)WO(3) have been determined using focal series exit wave reconstruction. Octahedral rotations in different structural regions of the same crystal have been directly measured from the exit wave phase and correlated with variations in cation occupancy determined from the exit wave modulus.

  7. Local field enhancement on metallic periodic surface structures produced by femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ionin, Andrei A; Kudryashov, Sergei I; Ligachev, A E; Makarov, Sergei V; Mel'nik, N N; Rudenko, A A; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V; Khmelnitskii, R A

    2013-04-30

    Periodic surface structures on aluminium are produced by femtosecond laser pulses for efficient excitation of surface electromagnetic waves using a strong objective (NA = 0.5). The local electromagnetic field enhancement on the structures is measured using the technique of surface-enhanced Raman scattering from pyridine molecules. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  8. Simulation of NMR data reveals that proteins' local structures are stabilized by electronic polarization.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yan; Ji, Chang G; Mei, Ye; Zhang, John Z H

    2009-06-24

    Molecular dynamics simulations of NMR backbone relaxation order parameters have been carried out to investigate the polarization effect on the protein's local structure and dynamics for five benchmark proteins (bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, immunoglobulin-binding domain (B1) of streptococcal protein G, bovine apo-calbindin D9K, human interleukin-4 R88Q mutant, and hen egg white lysozyme). In order to isolate the polarization effect from other interaction effects, our study employed both the standard AMBER force field (AMBER03) and polarized protein-specific charges (PPCs) in the MD simulations. The simulated order parameters, employing both the standard nonpolarizable and polarized force fields, are directly compared with experimental data. Our results show that residue-specific order parameters at some specific loop and turn regions are significantly underestimated by the MD simulations using the standard AMBER force field, indicating hyperflexibility of these local structures. Detailed analysis of the structures and dynamic motions of individual residues reveals that the hyperflexibility of these local structures is largely related to the breaking or weakening of relevant hydrogen bonds. In contrast, the agreement with the experimental results is significantly improved and more stable local structures are observed in the MD simulations using the polarized force field. The comparison between theory and experiment provides convincing evidence that intraprotein hydrogen bonds in these regions are stabilized by electronic polarization, which is critical to the dynamical stability of these local structures in proteins.

  9. Defect-mediated snaking: A new growth mechanism for localized structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y.-P.; Burke, J.; Knobloch, E.

    2010-10-01

    Stationary spatially localized patterns in parametrically driven systems are studied, focusing on the 2:1 and 1:1 resonance tongues as described by the forced complex Ginzburg-Landau equation. Homoclinic snaking is identified in both cases and the nature of the growth of the localized structures along the snaking branches is described. The structures grow from a central defect that inserts new rolls on either side, while pushing existing rolls outwards. This growth mechanism differs fundamentally from that found in other systems exhibiting homoclinic snaking in which new rolls are added at the fronts that connect the structure to the background homogeneous state.

  10. Synthesis, crystal structure analysis, molecular docking studies and density functional theory predictions of the local reactive properties and degradation properties of a novel halochalcone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshad, Suhana; Pillai, Renjith Raveendran; Zainuri, Dian Alwani; Khalib, Nuridayanti Che; Razak, Ibrahim Abdul; Armaković, Stevan; Armaković, Sanja J.

    2017-09-01

    In the present study, single crystals of E)-3-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-1-(4-fluorophenyl)prop-2-en-1-one, were prepared and structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The molecular structure crystallized in monoclinic crystal system with P21/c space group. Sensitivity of the title molecule towards electrophilic attacks has been examined by calculations of average localized ionization energies (ALIE) and their mapping to electron density surface. Further determination of atoms that could be important reactive centres has been performed by calculations of Fukui functions. Sensitivity of title molecule towards autoxidation and hydrolysis mechanisms has been assessed by calculations of bond dissociation energies and radial distribution functions (RDF), respectively. Also, in order to explore possible binding mode of the title compound towards Dihydrofolate reductase enzyme, we have utilized in silico molecular docking to explore possible binding modes of the title compound with the DHFR enzyme.

  11. Heterogeneous FDG-guided dose-escalation for locally advanced NSCLC (the NARLAL2 trial): Design and early dosimetric results of a randomized, multi-centre phase-III study.

    PubMed

    Møller, Ditte Sloth; Nielsen, Tine Bjørn; Brink, Carsten; Hoffmann, Lone; Lutz, Christina Maria; Drøgemüller Lund, Mikkel; Hansen, Olfred; Schytte, Tine; Khalil, Azza Ahmed; Knap, Marianne Marquard; Nyhus, Christa Haugaard; Ottosson, Wiviann; Sibolt, Patrik; Borissova, Svetlana; Josipovic, Mirjana; Persson, Gitte; Appelt, Ane Lindegaard

    2017-08-01

    Local recurrence is frequent in locally advanced NSCLC and is primarily located in FDG-avid parts of tumour and lymph nodes. Aiming at improving local control without increasing toxicity, we designed a multi-centre phase-III trial delivering inhomogeneous dose-escalation driven by FDG-avid volumes, while respecting normal tissue constraints and requiring no increase in mean lung dose. Dose-escalation driven by FDG-avid volumes, delivering mean doses of 95Gy (tumour) and 74Gy (lymph nodes), was pursued and compared to standard 66Gy/33F plans. Dose plans for the first thirty patients enroled were analysed. Standard and escalated plans were created for all patients, blinded to randomization, and compared for each patient in terms of the ability to escalate while protecting normal tissue. The median dose-escalation in FDG-avid areas was 93.9Gy (tumour) and 73.0Gy (lymph nodes). Escalation drove the GTV and CTV to mean doses for the tumour of 87.5Gy (GTV-T) and 81.3Gy (CTV-T) in median. No significant differences in mean dose to lung and heart between standard and escalated were found, but small volumes of e.g. the bronchi received doses between 66 and 74Gy due to escalation. FDG-driven inhomogeneous dose-escalation achieves large increment in tumour and lymph node dose, while delivering similar doses to normal tissue as homogenous standard plans. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Incorporation of local structure into kriging models for the prediction of atomistic properties in the water decamer

    PubMed Central

    Davie, Stuart J; Di Pasquale, Nicodemo

    2016-01-01

    Machine learning algorithms have been demonstrated to predict atomistic properties approaching the accuracy of quantum chemical calculations at significantly less computational cost. Difficulties arise, however, when attempting to apply these techniques to large systems, or systems possessing excessive conformational freedom. In this article, the machine learning method kriging is applied to predict both the intra‐atomic and interatomic energies, as well as the electrostatic multipole moments, of the atoms of a water molecule at the center of a 10 water molecule (decamer) cluster. Unlike previous work, where the properties of small water clusters were predicted using a molecular local frame, and where training set inputs (features) were based on atomic index, a variety of feature definitions and coordinate frames are considered here to increase prediction accuracy. It is shown that, for a water molecule at the center of a decamer, no single method of defining features or coordinate schemes is optimal for every property. However, explicitly accounting for the structure of the first solvation shell in the definition of the features of the kriging training set, and centring the coordinate frame on the atom‐of‐interest will, in general, return better predictions than models that apply the standard methods of feature definition, or a molecular coordinate frame. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27535711

  13. Incorporation of local structure into kriging models for the prediction of atomistic properties in the water decamer.

    PubMed

    Davie, Stuart J; Di Pasquale, Nicodemo; Popelier, Paul L A

    2016-10-15

    Machine learning algorithms have been demonstrated to predict atomistic properties approaching the accuracy of quantum chemical calculations at significantly less computational cost. Difficulties arise, however, when attempting to apply these techniques to large systems, or systems possessing excessive conformational freedom. In this article, the machine learning method kriging is applied to predict both the intra-atomic and interatomic energies, as well as the electrostatic multipole moments, of the atoms of a water molecule at the center of a 10 water molecule (decamer) cluster. Unlike previous work, where the properties of small water clusters were predicted using a molecular local frame, and where training set inputs (features) were based on atomic index, a variety of feature definitions and coordinate frames are considered here to increase prediction accuracy. It is shown that, for a water molecule at the center of a decamer, no single method of defining features or coordinate schemes is optimal for every property. However, explicitly accounting for the structure of the first solvation shell in the definition of the features of the kriging training set, and centring the coordinate frame on the atom-of-interest will, in general, return better predictions than models that apply the standard methods of feature definition, or a molecular coordinate frame. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Quantitative Characterization of Local Protein Solvation To Predict Solvent Effects on Protein Structure

    PubMed Central

    Vagenende, Vincent; Trout, Bernhardt L.

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of solvent preferences of proteins is essential to the understanding of solvent effects on protein structure and stability. Although it is generally believed that solvent preferences at distinct loci of a protein surface may differ, quantitative characterization of local protein solvation has remained elusive. In this study, we show that local solvation preferences can be quantified over the entire protein surface from extended molecular dynamics simulations. By subjecting microsecond trajectories of two proteins (lysozyme and antibody fragment D1.3) in 4 M glycerol to rigorous statistical analyses, solvent preferences of individual protein residues are quantified by local preferential interaction coefficients. Local solvent preferences for glycerol vary widely from residue to residue and may change as a result of protein side-chain motions that are slower than the longest intrinsic solvation timescale of ∼10 ns. Differences of local solvent preferences between distinct protein side-chain conformations predict solvent effects on local protein structure in good agreement with experiment. This study extends the application scope of preferential interaction theory and enables molecular understanding of solvent effects on protein structure through comprehensive characterization of local protein solvation. PMID:22995508

  15. Enhanced damage localization for complex structures through statistical modeling and sensor fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, Colin; Todd, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves represent a promising technique for detecting and localizing structural damage, but their application to realistic structures has been hampered by the complicated interference patterns produced by scattering from geometric features. This work presents a new damage localization paradigm based on a statistical approach to dealing with uncertainty in the guided wave signals. A bolted frame and a section of a fuselage rib are tested with different simulated damage conditions and used to conduct a detailed comparison between the proposed solution and other sparse-array localization approaches. After establishing the superiority of the statistical approach, two novel innovations to the localization procedure are proposed: an approach to sensor fusion based on the Neyman-Pearson criterion, and a method of constructing simple models of geometrical features. Including the sensor fusion and geometrical models produces a substantial improvement in the system's localization accuracy. The final result is a robust and accurate framework for single-site damage localization that moves structural health monitoring towards practical implementation on a much broader range of structures.

  16. Protein Classification Based on Analysis of Local Sequence-Structure Correspondence

    SciTech Connect

    Zemla, A T

    2006-02-13

    The goal of this project was to develop an algorithm to detect and calculate common structural motifs in compared structures, and define a set of numerical criteria to be used for fully automated motif based protein structure classification. The Protein Data Bank (PDB) contains more than 33,000 experimentally solved protein structures, and the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database, a manual classification of these structures, cannot keep pace with the rapid growth of the PDB. In our approach called STRALCP (STRucture Alignment based Clustering of Proteins), we generate detailed information about global and local similarities between given set of structures, identify similar fragments that are conserved within analyzed proteins, and use these conserved regions (detected structural motifs) to classify proteins.

  17. Myanmar: The Community Learning Centre Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middelborg, Jorn; Duvieusart, Baudouin, Ed.

    A community learning centre (CLC) is a local educational institution outside the formal education system, usually set up and managed by local people. CLCs were first introduced in Myanmar in 1994, and by 2001 there were 71 CLCs in 11 townships. The townships are characterized by remoteness, landlessness, unemployment, dependency on one cash crop,…

  18. Why reread? Evidence from garden-path and local coherence structures.

    PubMed

    Christianson, Kiel; Luke, Steven G; Hussey, Erika K; Wochna, Kacey L

    2017-07-01

    Two eye-tracking experiments were conducted to compare the online reading and offline comprehension of main verb/reduced relative garden-path sentences and local coherence sentences. Rereading of early material in garden-path reduced relatives should be revisionary, aimed at reanalysing an earlier misparse; however, rereading of early material in a local coherence reduced relative need only be confirmatory, as the original parse of the earlier portion of these sentences is ultimately correct. Results of online and offline measures showed that local coherence structures elicited signals of reading disruption that arose earlier and lasted longer, and local coherence comprehension was also better than garden path comprehension. Few rereading measures in either sentence type were predicted by structural features of these sentences, nor was rereading related to comprehension accuracy, which was extremely low overall. Results are discussed with respect to selective reanalysis and good-enough processing.

  19. The European standards of Haemophilia Centres

    PubMed Central

    Giangrande, Paul; Calizzani, Gabriele; Menichini, Ivana; Candura, Fabio; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio; Makris, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The European haemophilia community of professionals and patients has agreed on the principles of haemophilia care to address comprehensive optimal delivery of care which is nowadays scattered throughout Europe. Many of the health facilities call themselves Haemophilia Centres despite their variation in size, expertise and services provided. Only a small number of countries have Haemophilia Centre accreditation systems in place. Methods In the framework of the European Haemophilia Network project, following an inclusive process of stakeholder involvement, the European Guidelines for the certification of haemophilia centres have been developed in order to set quality standards for European Haemophilia Centres and criteria for their certification. Results The Guidelines define the standards and criteria for the designation of two levels of care delivery: European Haemophilia Treatment Centres, providing local routine care, and European Haemophilia Comprehensive Care Centres, providing specialised and multi-disciplinary care and functioning as tertiary referral centres. Additionally, they define standards about general requirements, patient care, provision of an advisory service and establishment of network of clinical and specialised services. Conclusions The implementation of the European Guidelines for the certification of Haemophilia Centres will contribute to the reduction of health inequalities through the standardisation of quality of care in European Union Member States and could represent a model to be taken into consideration for other rare disease groups. PMID:24922293

  20. Cryogenic optical localization provides 3D protein structure data with Angstrom resolution.

    PubMed

    Weisenburger, Siegfried; Boening, Daniel; Schomburg, Benjamin; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Griesinger, Christian; Sandoghdar, Vahid

    2017-02-01

    We introduce Cryogenic Optical Localization in 3D (COLD), a method to localize multiple fluorescent sites within a single small protein with Angstrom resolution. We demonstrate COLD by determining the conformational state of the cytosolic Per-ARNT-Sim domain from the histidine kinase CitA of Geobacillus thermodenitrificans and resolving the four biotin sites of streptavidin. COLD provides quantitative 3D information about small- to medium-sized biomolecules on the Angstrom scale and complements other techniques in structural biology.

  1. Local and global structural drivers for the photoactivation of the orange carotenoid protein

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Sayan; Guttman, Miklos; Leverenz, Ryan L.; Zhumadilova, Kulyash; Pawlowski, Emily G.; Petzold, Christopher J.; Lee, Kelly K.; Ralston, Corie Y.; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.

    2015-09-18

    Here, photoprotective mechanisms are of fundamental importance for the survival of photosynthetic organisms. In cyanobacteria, the orange carotenoid protein (OCP), when activated by intense blue light, binds to the light-harvesting antenna and triggers the dissipation of excess captured light energy. Using a combination of small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), X-ray hydroxyl radical footprinting, circular dichroism, and H/D exchange mass spectrometry, we identified both the local and global structural changes in the OCP upon photoactivation. SAXS and H/D exchange data showed that global tertiary structural changes, including complete domain dissociation, occur upon photoactivation, but with alteration of secondary structure confined to only the N terminus of the OCP. Microsecond radiolytic labeling identified rearrangement of the H-bonding network associated with conserved residues and structural water molecules. Collectively, these data provide experimental evidence for an ensemble of local and global structural changes, upon activation of the OCP, that are essential for photoprotection.

  2. Effect of eddy current damping on phononic band gaps generated by locally resonant periodic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozkaya, Efe; Yilmaz, Cetin

    2017-02-01

    The effect of eddy current damping on a novel locally resonant periodic structure is investigated. The frequency response characteristics are obtained by using a lumped parameter and a finite element model. In order to obtain wide band gaps at low frequencies, the periodic structure is optimized according to certain constraints, such as mass distribution in the unit cell, lower limit of the band gap, stiffness between the components in the unit cell, the size of magnets used for eddy current damping, and the number of unit cells in the periodic structure. Then, the locally resonant periodic structure with eddy current damping is manufactured and its experimental frequency response is obtained. The frequency response results obtained analytically, numerically and experimentally match quite well. The inclusion of eddy current damping to the periodic structure decreases amplitudes of resonance peaks without disturbing stop band width.

  3. Local and global structural drivers for the photoactivation of the orange carotenoid protein

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sayan; Guttman, Miklos; Leverenz, Ryan L.; Zhumadilova, Kulyash; Pawlowski, Emily G.; Petzold, Christopher J.; Lee, Kelly K.; Ralston, Corie Y.; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.

    2015-01-01

    Photoprotective mechanisms are of fundamental importance for the survival of photosynthetic organisms. In cyanobacteria, the orange carotenoid protein (OCP), when activated by intense blue light, binds to the light-harvesting antenna and triggers the dissipation of excess captured light energy. Using a combination of small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), X-ray hydroxyl radical footprinting, circular dichroism, and H/D exchange mass spectrometry, we identified both the local and global structural changes in the OCP upon photoactivation. SAXS and H/D exchange data showed that global tertiary structural changes, including complete domain dissociation, occur upon photoactivation, but with alteration of secondary structure confined to only the N terminus of the OCP. Microsecond radiolytic labeling identified rearrangement of the H-bonding network associated with conserved residues and structural water molecules. Collectively, these data provide experimental evidence for an ensemble of local and global structural changes, upon activation of the OCP, that are essential for photoprotection. PMID:26385969

  4. Local structure of NaNbO3: A neutron scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lu; Mitchell, D. C.; Dmowski, W.; Egami, T.

    2013-07-01

    We report the results of a neutron diffraction study of structural evolution in sodium niobate, NaNbO3, which is the parent compound for lead-free ferroelectric materials, as a function of temperature from 15 to 930 K over six phases. The Rietveld analysis of the high-resolution powder neutron diffraction data shows the variation in the structure from cubic to rhombohedral ferroelectric structures. However, the refinements on local structure by the pair distribution function (PDF) method indicates that there are only three basic patterns of the local structure, and the ground states of NaNbO3 in the low-temperature antiferroelectric and ferroelectric phases have the R3c symmetry, even though in the long range the system shows the Pbcm symmetry or the coexistence of two phases. The origin of the complex phase behavior and its implications on the performance as lead-free ferroelectrics are discussed.

  5. Effect of structural distortion and polarization in localization of electronic excitations in organic semiconductor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayyar, Iffat; Batista, Enrique; Tretiak, Sergei; Saxena, Avadh; Smith, Darryl; Martin, Richard

    2012-02-01

    Organic polymers find varied applications in optoelectronic devices such as solar cells, light emitting diodes and lasers. Detailed understanding of charge carrier transport by polarons and excitonic energy transfer producing singlet and triplet excitations is critical to improve their efficiency. We benchmarked the ability of current functional models to describe the spatial extent of self-trapped neutral and charged excitations for MEH-PPV owing to its superior luminescence and experimental evidence. Now we are interested in distinguishing between two distinct origins leading to localization; spatial localization of the wavefunction by itself on the undistorted geometry and localization of the wavefunction assured by distortion of the structure during its relaxation. We suggest localization is produced by electronic rearrangements and character of the functional. We also observe that different functionals place the highest occupied and lowest virtual orbitals at different positions in the energy band diagram based on their ability to predict the extent of localization of these states.

  6. Prediction of Local Quality of Protein Structure Models Considering Spatial Neighbors in Graphical Models

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Woong-Hee; Kang, Xuejiao; Zhang, Jian; Kihara, Daisuke

    2017-01-01

    Protein tertiary structure prediction methods have matured in recent years. However, some proteins defy accurate prediction due to factors such as inadequate template structures. While existing model quality assessment methods predict global model quality relatively well, there is substantial room for improvement in local quality assessment, i.e. assessment of the error at each residue position in a model. Local quality is a very important information for practical applications of structure models such as interpreting/designing site-directed mutagenesis of proteins. We have developed a novel local quality assessment method for protein tertiary structure models. The method, named Graph-based Model Quality assessment method (GMQ), explicitly considers the predicted quality of spatially neighboring residues using a graph representation of a query protein structure model. GMQ uses conditional random field as its core of the algorithm, and performs a binary prediction of the quality of each residue in a model, indicating if a residue position is likely to be within an error cutoff or not. The accuracy of GMQ was improved by considering larger graphs to include quality information of more surrounding residues. Moreover, we found that using different edge weights in graphs reflecting different secondary structures further improves the accuracy. GMQ showed competitive performance on a benchmark for quality assessment of structure models from the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP). PMID:28074879

  7. Brain networks, structural realism, and local approaches to the scientific realism debate.

    PubMed

    Yan, Karen; Hricko, Jonathon

    2017-08-01

    We examine recent work in cognitive neuroscience that investigates brain networks. Brain networks are characterized by the ways in which brain regions are functionally and anatomically connected to one another. Cognitive neuroscientists use various noninvasive techniques (e.g., fMRI) to investigate these networks. They represent them formally as graphs. And they use various graph theoretic techniques to analyze them further. We distinguish between knowledge of the graph theoretic structure of such networks (structural knowledge) and knowledge of what instantiates that structure (nonstructural knowledge). And we argue that this work provides structural knowledge of brain networks. We explore the significance of this conclusion for the scientific realism debate. We argue that our conclusion should not be understood as an instance of a global structural realist claim regarding the structure of the unobservable part of the world, but instead, as a local structural realist attitude towards brain networks in particular. And we argue that various local approaches to the realism debate, i.e., approaches that restrict realist commitments to particular theories and/or entities, are problematic insofar as they don't allow for the possibility of such a local structural realist attitude. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Prediction of Local Quality of Protein Structure Models Considering Spatial Neighbors in Graphical Models.

    PubMed

    Shin, Woong-Hee; Kang, Xuejiao; Zhang, Jian; Kihara, Daisuke

    2017-01-11

    Protein tertiary structure prediction methods have matured in recent years. However, some proteins defy accurate prediction due to factors such as inadequate template structures. While existing model quality assessment methods predict global model quality relatively well, there is substantial room for improvement in local quality assessment, i.e. assessment of the error at each residue position in a model. Local quality is a very important information for practical applications of structure models such as interpreting/designing site-directed mutagenesis of proteins. We have developed a novel local quality assessment method for protein tertiary structure models. The method, named Graph-based Model Quality assessment method (GMQ), explicitly considers the predicted quality of spatially neighboring residues using a graph representation of a query protein structure model. GMQ uses conditional random field as its core of the algorithm, and performs a binary prediction of the quality of each residue in a model, indicating if a residue position is likely to be within an error cutoff or not. The accuracy of GMQ was improved by considering larger graphs to include quality information of more surrounding residues. Moreover, we found that using different edge weights in graphs reflecting different secondary structures further improves the accuracy. GMQ showed competitive performance on a benchmark for quality assessment of structure models from the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP).

  9. Robust extraction of local structures by the minimum beta-divergence method.

    PubMed

    Mollah, Md Nurul Haque; Sultana, Nayeema; Minami, Mihoko; Eguchi, Shinto

    2010-03-01

    This paper discusses a new highly robust learning algorithm for exploring local principal component analysis (PCA) structures in which an observed data follow one of several heterogeneous PCA models. The proposed method is formulated by minimizing beta-divergence. It searches a local PCA structure based on an initial location of the shifting parameter and a value for the tuning parameter beta. If the initial choice of the shifting parameter belongs to a data cluster, then the proposed method detects the local PCA structure of that data cluster, ignoring data in other clusters as outliers. We discuss the selection procedures for the tuning parameter beta and the initial value of the shifting parameter mu in this article. We demonstrate the performance of the proposed method by simulation. Finally, we compare the proposed method with a method based on a finite mixture model.

  10. Correlation between locally deformed structure and oxide film properties in austenitic stainless steel irradiated with neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chimi, Yasuhiro; Kitsunai, Yuji; Kasahara, Shigeki; Chatani, Kazuhiro; Koshiishi, Masato; Nishiyama, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in high-temperature water for neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels (SSs), the locally deformed structures, the oxide films formed on the deformed areas, and their correlation were investigated. Tensile specimens made of irradiated 316L SSs were strained 0.1%-2% at room temperature or at 563 K, and the surface structures and crystal misorientation among grains were evaluated. The strained specimens were immersed in high-temperature water, and the microstructures of the oxide films on the locally deformed areas were observed. The appearance of visible step structures on the specimens' surface depended on the neutron dose and the applied strain. The surface oxides were observed to be prone to increase in thickness around grain boundaries (GBs) with increasing neutron dose and increasing local strain at the GBs. No penetrative oxidation was observed along GBs or along surface steps.

  11. Structure of hexapod 3D packings: understanding the global stability from the local organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barés, Jonathan; Zhao, Yuchen; Renouf, Mathieu; Dierichs, Karola; Behringer, Robert

    2017-06-01

    Aggregates of non-convex particles have shown to be particularly stable which makes them good candidates to design new lightweight and reversible structures. However, few is known about the fundamental reason of their stability. In this paper we presents a novel experimental method to investigate the local structure of piles made of hexapod particles. This method is based on X-ray scanning and on an accurate homemade particle detection code. It permits to get the position and orientation of each particle as well as to detect their contact points. Measurement of the coordination numbers, statistics of the contact positions and local density evaluation for different packing configurations show a good agreement with the previous studies carried out at the global scale and permits to explain the main local mechanisms leading to stable structures.

  12. Distinct local electronic structure and magnetism for Mn in amorphous Si and Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Li; Cao, J. X.; Helgren, E.; Karel, J.; Arenholz, E.; Ouyang, Lu; Smith, David J.; Wu, R. Q.; Hellman, F.

    2010-06-01

    Transition metals such as Mn generally have large local moments in covalent semiconductors due to their partially filled d shells. However, Mn magnetization in group-IV semiconductors is more complicated than often recognized. Here we report a striking crossover from a quenched Mn moment (<0.1 {mu}{sub B}) in amorphous Si (a-Si) to a large distinct local Mn moment ({ge}3{mu}{sub B}) in amorphous Ge (a-Ge) over a wide range of Mn concentrations (0.005-0.20). Corresponding differences are observed in d-shell electronic structure and the sign of the Hall effect. Density-functional-theory calculations show distinct local structures, consistent with different atomic density measured for a-Si and a-Ge, respectively, and the Mn coordination number N{sub c} is found to be the key factor. Despite the amorphous structure, Mn in a-Si is in a relatively well-defined high coordination interstitial type site with broadened d bands, low moment, and electron (n-type) carriers, while Mn in a-Ge is in a low coordination substitutional type site with large local moment and holes (p-type) carriers. Moreover, the correlation between N{sub c} and the magnitude of the local moment is essentially independent of the matrix; the local Mn moments approach zero when N{sub c} > 7 for both a-Si and a-Ge.

  13. Doubly periodic structure for the study of inhomogeneous bulk fermion matter with spatial localizations

    SciTech Connect

    Vantournhout, Klaas; Jachowicz, Natalie; Ryckebusch, Jan

    2011-09-15

    We present a method that offers perspectives to perform fully antisymmetrized simulations for inhomogeneous bulk fermion matter. The technique bears resemblance to classical periodic boundary conditions, using localized single-particle states. Such localized states are an ideal tool to discuss phenomena where spatial localization plays an important role. The antisymmetrization is obtained introducing a doubly periodic structure in the many-body fermion wave functions. This results in circulant matrices for the evaluation of expectation values, leading to a computationally tractable formalism to study fully antisymmetrized bulk fermion matter. We show that the proposed technique is able to reproduce essential fermion features in an elegant and computationally advantageous manner.

  14. Prediction of compounds in different local structure-activity relationship environments using emerging chemical patterns.

    PubMed

    Namasivayam, Vigneshwaran; Gupta-Ostermann, Disha; Balfer, Jenny; Heikamp, Kathrin; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2014-05-27

    Active compounds can participate in different local structure-activity relationship (SAR) environments and introduce different degrees of local SAR discontinuity, depending on their structural and potency relationships in data sets. Such SAR features have thus far mostly been analyzed using descriptive approaches, in particular, on the basis of activity landscape modeling. However, compounds in different local SAR environments have not yet been predicted. Herein, we adapt the emerging chemical patterns (ECP) method, a machine learning approach for compound classification, to systematically predict compounds with different local SAR characteristics. ECP analysis is shown to accurately assign many compounds to different local SAR environments across a variety of activity classes covering the entire range of observed local SARs. Control calculations using random forests and multiclass support vector machines were carried out and a variety of statistical performance measures were applied. In all instances, ECP calculations yielded comparable or better performance than controls. The approach presented herein can be applied to predict compounds that complement local SARs or prioritize compounds with different SAR characteristics.

  15. Local structure in BaTiO3-BiScO3 dipole glasses

    DOE PAGES

    Levin, I.; Krayzman, V.; Woicik, J. C.; ...

    2016-03-01

    Local structures in cubic perovskite-type (Ba0.6Bi0.4)(Ti0.6Sc0.4)O-3 solid solutions that exhibit reentrant dipole glass behavior have been studied with variable-temperature x-ray/neutron total scattering, extended x-ray absorption fine structure, and electron diffraction methods. Simultaneous fitting of these data using a reverse Monte Carlo algorithm provided instantaneous atomic configurations, which have been used to extract local displacements of the constituent species. The smaller Bi and Ti atoms exhibit probability density distributions that consist of 14 and 8 split sites, respectively. In contrast, Ba and Sc feature single-site distributions. The multisite distributions arise from large and strongly anisotropic off-center displacements of Bi and Ti.more » The cation displacements are correlated over a short range, with a correlation length limited by chemical disorder. The magnitudes of these displacements and their anisotropy, which are largely determined by local chemistry, change relatively insignificantly on cooling from room temperature. The structure features a nonrandom distribution of local polarization with low-dimensional polar clusters that are several unit cells in size. In situ measurements of atomic pair-distribution function under applied electric field were used to study field-induced changes in the local structure; however, no significant effects besides lattice expansion in the direction of the field could be observed up to electric-field values of 4 kVmm(-1).« less

  16. EXAFS Analysis of the Local Structure of GexSi1-x Thin Film Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Narkeon; Yoo, Yong-Goo; Yang, Dong-Seok

    2007-02-02

    In this work we analyzed the local structure of GexSi1-x (x = 0.5 and 0.8) ultra thin film alloys deposited on silicon substrate. The local structural parameters for the thin films were compared to the values for a bulk sample. The coordination numbers for the thin films were similar to the value of a bulk sample but the interatomic distances were different. Also, the use of a germanium solid state detector was important for EXAFS analysis of ultra thin film alloys.

  17. Local Atomic Structure of Semiconductor Alloys Using Pair Distribution Function Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Billinge, S.J.L.; Thorpe, M.F.

    2002-06-24

    We have been taking advantage of recent experimental developments, which involve utilizing diffraction data from x-rays or neutrons out to very large wave-vectors, to obtain a detailed structural characterization of semiconductor alloys. This approach allows an accurate Pair Distribution Function (PDF) to be obtained to 20A and beyond and reveals the local structure of the alloy directly. These data can be modeled explicitly to learn about local correlations and short-range order in materials. We are combining theory, modeling and experiments to study a range of materials from semiconductors to thermoelectrics and proton conductors.

  18. Seismicity and structure of the 85°E volcanic complex at the ultraslow spreading Gakkel Ridge from local earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korger, E. I. M.; Schlindwein, V.

    2014-01-01

    Accretion mechanisms at ultraslow spreading ridges are still only poorly understood due to difficult survey conditions for seismic experiments at these ridges. Melts gets focused in distinct magmatic centres, with thin crust in between. At the 85°E/85°N volcanic complex at Gakkel Ridge, Arctic Ocean, where a recent spreading episode has been observed, perennial sea ice cover challenges traditional investigations of seismic structure and microseismicity. We used an unusual survey set-up to gather seismological data during 16 d in 2007 July, using seismometer arrays mounted on ice floes. Despite only 12 stations, the drift of the ice floes over the survey area resulted in a multitude of crossing rays in the rift valley. The data included 303 microearthquakes of which 248 events could be confidently located. We compiled a 1-D velocity model by localizing a subset of these earthquakes with a suite of randomly created velocity models. In this model, the Moho is placed at 7 km depth below seafloor, inferring a thick, basaltic crust. Using 124 events which were recorded by at least two arrays, we inverted for P-wave velocity structure in a local earthquake tomography. Resolution tests indicate reliable results in the central rift valley, illuminating the thermal structure underneath the Asgard volcanic chain in the aftermath of its most recent spreading episode. Our results show microearthquake activity down to 16 km beneath seafloor, inferring a cold lithosphere. Most hypocentres cluster at the centre of the rift valley at the site of the Asgard volcanic chain. This may mean that existing thermal models for this class of ridges have to be refined. An area of decreased seismic velocities crosses the rift valley at this location and microearthquake activity is located at its eastern fringe where the velocity gradient is highest. We therefore speculate that the reduced velocities may be caused by warm intruded material and that the observed seismicity predominatly

  19. Functional classification of protein 3D structures from predicted local interaction sites.

    PubMed

    Parasuram, Ramya; Lee, Joslynn S; Yin, Pengcheng; Somarowthu, Srinivas; Ondrechen, Mary Jo

    2010-12-01

    A new approach to the functional classification of protein 3D structures is described with application to some examples from structural genomics. This approach is based on functional site prediction with THEMATICS and POOL. THEMATICS employs calculated electrostatic potentials of the query structure. POOL is a machine learning method that utilizes THEMATICS features and has been shown to predict accurate, precise, highly localized interaction sites. Extension to the functional classification of structural genomics proteins is now described. Predicted functionally important residues are structurally aligned with those of proteins with previously characterized biochemical functions. A 3D structure match at the predicted local functional site then serves as a more reliable predictor of biochemical function than an overall structure match. Annotation is confirmed for a structural genomics protein with the ribulose phosphate binding barrel (RPBB) fold. A putative glucoamylase from Bacteroides fragilis (PDB ID 3eu8) is shown to be in fact probably not a glucoamylase. Finally a structural genomics protein from Streptomyces coelicolor annotated as an enoyl-CoA hydratase (PDB ID 3g64) is shown to be misannotated. Its predicted active site does not match the well-characterized enoyl-CoA hydratases of similar structure but rather bears closer resemblance to those of a dehalogenase with similar fold.

  20. Structural controls on localized intraplate deformation and seismicity in Southern Australia: Insights from local earthquake tomography of the Flinders Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilia, S.; Rawlinson, N.; Direen, N. G.; Cummins, P. R.; Balfour, N.

    2013-05-01

    Data from an array of 24 seismometers are used to image the crust beneath the Flinders Ranges, southeast Australia, with the goal of improving our understanding of crustal structure, rheology, and the mechanism responsible for the localized intraplate deformation that characterizes this region. A subset of P- and S-wave traveltimes is inverted to jointly recover earthquake hypocenters, P-wave velocity structure and vp/vs anomalies. The P-wave velocity model reveals a spatial correlation between major negative velocity perturbations and concentrations of seismicity. In particular, a cluster of seismicity is observed within a distinct low velocity region between the Archean-Mesoproterozoic Gawler Craton and the Palaeo-Mesoproterozoic Curnamona Province, from 7 to 20 km depth. We postulate that this may be associated with a pre-existing structural weakness in the crust that arises primarily from rifting between the Curnamona Province and the Gawler Craton. Another area characterized by a high level of seismicity overlies a major sequence of N-S trending Ross-Delamerian thrust faults, which correspond to a band of low vp and particularly vp/vs. The lack of evidence for elevated heat flows in both of these seismogenic regions suggests that thermally induced weakness is unlikely to play a dominant role. Instead, the dynamic behavior of this intraplate region appears to be caused by a serendipitously oriented regional stress field, provided by far field forces that originate from the boundary between the Pacific and Australian plates, which acts upon preexisting structural weaknesses in the lithosphere.

  1. Coordination Analysis Using Global Structural Constraints and Alignment-based Local Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Kazuo; Shimbo, Masashi; Matsumoto, Yuji

    We propose a hybrid approach to coordinate structure analysis that combines a simple grammar to ensure consistent global structure of coordinations in a sentence, and features based on sequence alignment to capture local symmetry of conjuncts. The weight of the alignment-based features, which in turn determines the score of coordinate structures, is optimized by perceptron training on a given corpus. A bottom-up chart parsing algorithm efficiently finds the best scoring structure, taking both nested or non-overlapping flat coordinations into account. We demonstrate that our approach outperforms existing parsers in coordination scope detection on the Genia corpus.

  2. Local structures in a computer-generated liquid. Two-dimensional Lennard-Jones liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitus, Antoni C.; Patashinskii, Alexander Z.; Sokolowski, Stefan

    1991-06-01

    We study the local structures in a 2D Lennard-Jones liquid of 2500 atoms near the melting line ( ϱ ∗ = 0.76 , T ∗ = 0.47 ) with the help of methods of mathematical statistics based on an earlier proposed probabilistic approach. We analyze the local structures in individual configurations and study the time evolution of patterns of matter which is close to the solid hexagonal structure. We conclude that the model liquid displays two types of local structure: hexagonal and “chaotic”. The first one corresponds to the fluctuations of the hexagon with root-mean-square fluctuations ξ of atoms equal to ξ = 0.14-0.16 while the second one can be represented by a strongly fluctuating (ξ = 0.25-0.30) “defect” pattern. We discuss the consequences of the physical picture of the liquid as a locally ordered two-structure system for the methodology of computer simulations and for theories of the 2D liquid phase.

  3. RNAsnp: Efficient Detection of Local RNA Secondary Structure Changes Induced by SNPs

    PubMed Central

    Sabarinathan, Radhakrishnan; Tafer, Hakim; Seemann, Stefan E; Hofacker, Ivo L; Stadler, Peter F; Gorodkin, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Structural characteristics are essential for the functioning of many noncoding RNAs and cis-regulatory elements of mRNAs. SNPs may disrupt these structures, interfere with their molecular function, and hence cause a phenotypic effect. RNA folding algorithms can provide detailed insights into structural effects of SNPs. The global measures employed so far suffer from limited accuracy of folding programs on large RNAs and are computationally too demanding for genome-wide applications. Here, we present a strategy that focuses on the local regions of maximal structural change between mutant and wild-type. These local regions are approximated in a “screening mode” that is intended for genome-wide applications. Furthermore, localized regions are identified as those with maximal discrepancy. The mutation effects are quantified in terms of empirical P values. To this end, the RNAsnp software uses extensive precomputed tables of the distribution of SNP effects as function of length and GC content. RNAsnp thus achieves both a noise reduction and speed-up of several orders of magnitude over shuffling-based approaches. On a data set comprising 501 SNPs associated with human-inherited diseases, we predict 54 to have significant local structural effect in the untranslated region of mRNAs. RNAsnp is available at http://rth.dk/resources/rnasnp. PMID:23315997

  4. Multi-spacecraft analysis of local structure of Heliospheric Current Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrazola, D.; Blanco, Juan Jose; Rodriguez-Pacheco, Javier; Hidalgo, Miguel Angel; Medina, Jose

    Local variability of the Heliospheric Current Sheet (HCS) has been studied. Its local magnetic structure is observed as a boundary through which the magnetic field inverts its direction toward or away from Sun. In this work, we have used data from ACE, WIND, STEREO A and B spacecrafts. Solar wind features and magnetic field variations obtained from each spacecraft and for each event analyzed have been used to estimate temporal and spatial dependences in the local HCS structure. Their connection with the neutral line at the corona has been also determined. We have grouped the selected events according to their magnetic connection, with the aim of analyzing possible variations on the local orientation. Events studied cover from the ascending phase of solar cycle 23 to the next minimum around 2007. It has been observed that when spacecrafts are close to each other and/or magnetically well connected, clear variations on the local orientation are not observed. In these cases, the elapsed time was less than 2 hours. This fact could be interpreted as if there were not temporal variations on the local structure of the HCS in the range of 2 hours. On the other hand, the analysis shows that angular variation has a growing trend with elapsed time between different spacecraft. This can be related to the fact that spacecrafts are magnetically bad connected. In these cases, variations in local HCS orientation are observed. To evaluate changes of the HCS local orientations it has been used MVA, CVA and HYTARO methods. Results and future goals are summarized in this work.

  5. Pressure-Induced Local Structural Changes in Heavy Fermion β-YbAlB4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Yui; Ikeda, Shugo; Kuga, Kentaro; Suzuki, Shintaro; Nakatsuji, Satoru; Hirao, Naohisa; Ohishi, Yasuo; Kobayashi, Hisao

    2016-02-01

    The structural properties of β-YbAlB4 with an orthorhombic Cmmm symmetry have been investigated by powder X-ray diffraction analysis using synchrotron radiation under high pressure (up to ˜20 GPa) at 7 K. Although the refined lattice parameters exhibit no discontinuity and the pressure dependence of the volume was well reproduced by the Murnaghan's equation of state up to ˜20 GPa, detailed analyses of the observed X-ray diffraction patterns reveal local structure changes in B layers at 3.5(2) and 5.8(1) GPa. The changes in the local structure strongly affect the bonding structures in the B layers among the conduction electrons of β-YbAlB4 under pressure at 7 K.

  6. Local Structure and Short-Range Order in a NiCoCr Solid Solution Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, F. X.; Zhao, Shijun; Jin, Ke; Xue, H.; Velisa, G.; Bei, H.; Huang, R.; Ko, J. Y. P.; Pagan, D. C.; Neuefeind, J. C.; Weber, W. J.; Zhang, Yanwen

    2017-05-01

    Multielement solid solution alloys are intrinsically disordered on the atomic scale, and many of their advanced properties originate from the local structural characteristics. The local structure of a NiCoCr solid solution alloy is measured with x-ray or neutron total scattering and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) techniques. The atomic pair distribution function analysis does not exhibit an observable structural distortion. However, an EXAFS analysis suggests that the Cr atoms are favorably bonded with Ni and Co in the solid solution alloys. This short-range order (SRO) may make an important contribution to the low values of the electrical and thermal conductivities of the Cr-alloyed solid solutions. In addition, an EXAFS analysis of Ni ion irradiated samples reveals that the degree of SRO in NiCoCr alloys is enhanced after irradiation.

  7. Evolution of local atomic structure during solidification of Al2Au liquid: An ab initio study

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, L H; Lou, H B; Wang, X D; Debela, T T; Cao, Q P; Zhang, D X; Wang, S Y; Wang, C Z; Jiang, J Z

    2014-04-01

    The local atomic structure evolution in Al2Au alloy during solidification from 2000 K to 400 K was studied by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and analyzed using the structure factor, pair correlation functions, bond angle distributions, the Honeycutt-Anderson (HA) index and Voronoi tessellation methods. It was found that the icosahedral-like clusters are negligible in the Al2Au stable liquid and supercooled liquid states, and the most abundant clusters are those having HA indices of 131 and 120 or Voronoi indices of < 0,4,4,0 >, < 0,3, 6,0 > and < 0,4,4,2 > with coordination numbers of 8, 9 and 10, respectively. These clusters are similar to the local atomic structures in the CaF2-type Al2Au crystal, revealing the existence of structure heredity between liquid and crystalline phase in Al2Au alloy. (C) 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations on local structure and diffusion in liquid Ti x Al 1- x alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, J. H.; Liu, C. S.; Cheng, Z. F.; Shi, D. P.

    2011-10-01

    The microscopic structure and dynamics of liquid Ti xAl 1- x alloys together with pure liquid Ti and Al metals were investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations. This work gives the structural properties, including pair-correlation function, bond-angle distribution function, HA and Voronoi indices, and their composition dependence. The dynamical properties have also been studied. The calculated pair-correlation function, bond-angle distribution function, and HA and Voronoi indices suggest that the stoichiometric composition Ti 0.75Al 0.25 exhibits a different local structure order compared with other concentrations, which help us understand the appearance of the minimum diffusion coefficient at this composition. These results indicate that the mobility of atoms strongly depends on their atomic local structure.

  9. Local modulation and trapping of energetic particles by coherent magnetic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessein, Jeffrey A.; Ruffolo, David; Matthaeus, William H.; Wan, Minping

    2016-04-01

    Recent observational studies show strong statistical associations between features of interplanetary suprathermal energetic particle (EP) data and rapid changes in the interplanetary vector magnetic field. The latter are connected to intermittency and coherent magnetic structures, including classical discontinuities. Here we discuss these observations in the context of two appealing theoretical ideas: First, magnetic structures bounding flux tubes can cause local or temporary topological trapping, thus influencing EP transport. Second, charged particles may be accelerated by interacting with dynamic flux tubes, either through reconnection, trapping in secondary islands, or a betatron mechanism. We present observations that support interpretation in terms of trapping boundaries associated with changes in EP flux and also find a case in which an EP peak lies near a coherent magnetic structure that is not a shock, with changing particle anisotropy consistent with outflow from the structure, suggestive of local particle acceleration.

  10. Hidden Markov models that use predicted local structure for fold recognition: alphabets of backbone geometry.

    PubMed

    Karchin, Rachel; Cline, Melissa; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael; Karplus, Kevin

    2003-06-01

    An important problem in computational biology is predicting the structure of the large number of putative proteins discovered by genome sequencing projects. Fold-recognition methods attempt to solve the problem by relating the target proteins to known structures, searching for template proteins homologous to the target. Remote homologs that may have significant structural similarity are often not detectable by sequence similarities alone. To address this, we incorporated predicted local structure, a generalization of secondary structure, into two-track profile hidden Markov models (HMMs). We did not rely on a simple helix-strand-coil definition of secondary structure, but experimented with a variety of local structure descriptions, following a principled protocol to establish which descriptions are most useful for improving fold recognition and alignment quality. On a test set of 1298 nonhomologous proteins, HMMs incorporating a 3-letter STRIDE alphabet improved fold recognition accuracy by 15% over amino-acid-only HMMs and 23% over PSI-BLAST, measured by ROC-65 numbers. We compared two-track HMMs to amino-acid-only HMMs on a difficult alignment test set of 200 protein pairs (structurally similar with 3-24% sequence identity). HMMs with a 6-letter STRIDE secondary track improved alignment quality by 62%, relative to DALI structural alignments, while HMMs with an STR track (an expanded DSSP alphabet that subdivides strands into six states) improved by 40% relative to CE.

  11. Structural characteristics and crystal polymorphism of three local anaesthetic bases crystal polymorphism of local anaesthetic drugs: part VII.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, A C

    2005-07-14

    Benzocaine (BZC), butambene (BTN) and isobutambene (BTI) are basic local anaesthetic agents of the ester type, preferentially used for surgery and dental procedures. The compounds, official in the USP (BZC and BTN) and Ph. Eur. (BZC), were each found to exist in two polymorphic crystal forms and their solid state characteristics have been determined by thermomicroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), FTIR-, FT-Raman-spectroscopy as well as X-ray powder diffractometry. This work further emphasizes the comparison of solid state characteristics of three compounds with closely related structural features on molecular level, leading to opportunities for the investigation of structure-property relationships. Mod. I0 is the particular thermodynamically stable form at room temperature in all of the three systems. This form is present in commercial products and can be crystallized from solvents at room conditions. Mod. II can be obtained by annealing the supercooled melt or fast cooling of a saturated solution, respectively. The endothermic transformation of mod. II to mod. I0 upon heating confirms that mod. I0 is thermodynamically stable at ambient conditions (heat of transition rule) whereas mod. II is enantiotropically related to mod. I0, i.e. is metastable at temperatures above the transition temperature. The metastable forms show different kinetic stabilities at room temperature.

  12. Genetic Structure and Potential Environmental Determinants of Local Genetic Diversity in Japanese Honeybees (Apis cerana japonica)

    PubMed Central

    Nagamitsu, Teruyoshi; Yasuda, Mika; Saito-Morooka, Fuki; Inoue, Maki N.; Nishiyama, Mio; Goka, Koichi; Sugiura, Shinji; Maeto, Kaoru; Okabe, Kimiko; Taki, Hisatomo

    2016-01-01

    Declines in honeybee populations have been a recent concern. Although causes of the declines remain unclear, environmental factors may be responsible. We focused on the potential environmental determinants of local populations of wild honeybees, Apis cerana japonica, in Japan. This subspecies has little genetic variation in terms of its mitochondrial DNA sequences, and genetic variations at nuclear loci are as yet unknown. We estimated the genetic structure and environmental determinants of local genetic diversity in nuclear microsatellite genotypes of fathers and mothers, inferred from workers collected at 139 sites. The genotypes of fathers and mothers showed weak isolation by distance and negligible genetic structure. The local genetic diversity was high in central Japan, decreasing toward the peripheries, and depended on the climate and land use characteristics of the sites. The local genetic diversity decreased as the annual precipitation increased, and increased as the proportion of urban and paddy field areas increased. Positive effects of natural forest area, which have also been observed in terms of forager abundance in farms, were not detected with respect to the local genetic diversity. The findings suggest that A. cerana japonica forms a single population connected by gene flow in its main distributional range, and that climate and landscape properties potentially affect its local genetic diversity. PMID:27898704

  13. Time series-based damage detection and localization algorithm with application to the ASCE benchmark structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, K. Krishnan; Kiremidjian, Anne S.; Law, Kincho H.

    2006-03-01

    In this paper, a time series algorithm is presented for damage identification and localization. The vibration signals obtained from sensors are modeled as autoregressive moving average (ARMA) time series. A new damage-sensitive feature, DSF, is defined as a function of the first three auto regressive (AR) components. It is found that the mean values of the DSF for the damaged and undamaged signals are different. Thus, a hypothesis test involving the t-test is used to obtain a damage decision. Two damage localization indices LI 1 and LI 2, are introduced based on the AR coefficients. At the sensor locations where damage is introduced, the values of LI 1 and LI 2 appear to increase from their values obtained at the undamaged baseline state. The damage detection and localization algorithms are valid for stationary signals obtained from linear systems. To test the efficacy of the damage detection and localization methodologies, the algorithm has been tested on the analytical and experimental results of the ASCE benchmark structure. In contrast to prior pattern classification and statistical signal processing algorithms that have been able to identify primarily severe damage and have not been able to localize the damage effectively, the proposed algorithm is able to identify and localize minor to severe damage as defined for the benchmark structure.

  14. Variability of the Heliospheric Current Sheet local structure at 1 AU. Observations from WIND and ACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrazola Pérez, D.; Blanco Ávalos, J. J.; Rodríguez-Pacheco, J.

    2009-04-01

    The Heliospheric Current Sheet divides the Heliosphere in regions of opposite magnetic polarity. Its local magnetic structure is observed as a boundary through which the magnetic field inverts its direction toward or away from Sun. This boundary shows a wide range of local inclinations, which can reflect a local waviness, complex structures, oscillations or propagating waves. In this work, we study the local variability of the HCS at 1 AU inferred from magnetometer measurements on board of WIND and ACE spacecrafts. They were at different but close locations: ACE always stayed at L1 point and WIND was orbiting around Earth but out of the magnetosphere. When a HCS crossing is detected by both spacecrafts, the solar wind features are studied in its neighbourhood, its solar connection is determined and its local orientation is estimated using three methods, the Minimum Variance Analysis (MVA), the Coplanarity Variance Analysis (CVA) and the Hyperbolic Tangent Rotation method (HYTARO). After analyzing each HCS crossing for each individual spacecraft, results are compared in terms of the HCS local orientation, taking into account the solar wind conditions and the spacecraft locations. In this study data from several HCS crossings detected since 1998 have been used. The preliminary results and future goals are summarized in this work.

  15. Introducing anisotropic Minkowski functionals and quantitative anisotropy measures for local structure analysis in biomedical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wismüller, Axel; De, Titas; Lochmüller, Eva; Eckstein, Felix; Nagarajan, Mahesh B.

    2013-03-01

    The ability of Minkowski Functionals to characterize local structure in different biological tissue types has been demonstrated in a variety of medical image processing tasks. We introduce anisotropic Minkowski Functionals (AMFs) as a novel variant that captures the inherent anisotropy of the underlying gray-level structures. To quantify the anisotropy characterized by our approach, we further introduce a method to compute a quantitative measure motivated by a technique utilized in MR diffusion tensor imaging, namely fractional anisotropy. We showcase the applicability of our method in the research context of characterizing the local structure properties of trabecular bone micro-architecture in the proximal femur as visualized on multi-detector CT. To this end, AMFs were computed locally for each pixel of ROIs extracted from the head, neck and trochanter regions. Fractional anisotropy was then used to quantify the local anisotropy of the trabecular structures found in these ROIs and to compare its distribution in different anatomical regions. Our results suggest a significantly greater concentration of anisotropic trabecular structures in the head and neck regions when compared to the trochanter region (p < 10-4). We also evaluated the ability of such AMFs to predict bone strength in the femoral head of proximal femur specimens obtained from 50 donors. Our results suggest that such AMFs, when used in conjunction with multi-regression models, can outperform more conventional features such as BMD in predicting failure load. We conclude that such anisotropic Minkowski Functionals can capture valuable information regarding directional attributes of local structure, which may be useful in a wide scope of biomedical imaging applications.

  16. Structure and luminescence of intrinsic localized states in sodium silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinou, Konstantinos; Duffy, Dorothy M.; Shluger, Alexander L.

    2016-11-01

    Sodium silicate glasses exhibit a characteristic luminescence with a maximum at about 3.4 eV, which is thought to be determined by optical excitation of local glass structures, called L centers. To investigate the atomic and electronic structures of these centers, we calculated the electronic properties of the ground and excited states of a sodium silicate glass using classical and ab initio methods. Classical molecular dynamics was used to generate glass models of Na2O -3 SiO2 molar composition, and the density functional theory (DFT), with hybrid functionals, was used to identify and characterize the geometric and electronic structures of L centers. The ground and excited L* center states are studied, and their calculated excitation and luminescence transition energies are in good agreement with experimental data. The results confirm that the lowest triplet excited states in sodium silicate glass are associated with small clusters of Na ions and nonbridging oxygen atoms. These clusters serve as structural precursors for the localization of the excited states, and the broad distribution of the luminescence energies is correlated with the short-range order of the Na cations. The atomic and electronic structures of the electron E1- and hole H1+ centers are also studied. These results provide a more detailed insight into the atomistic structure of localized states in these important glasses.

  17. Local structure and spin transition in Fe2O3 hematite at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanson, Andrea; Kantor, Innokenty; Cerantola, Valerio; Irifune, Tetsuo; Carnera, Alberto; Pascarelli, Sakura

    2016-07-01

    The pressure evolution of the local structure of Fe2O3 hematite has been determined by extended x-ray absorption fine structure up to ˜79 GPa. Below the phase-transition pressure at ˜50 GPa, no increasing of FeO6 octahedra distortion is observed as pressure is applied. Above the phase transition, an abrupt decrease of the nearest-neighbor Fe-O distance is observed concomitantly with a strong reduction in the FeO6 distortion. This information on the local structure, used as a test-bench for the different high-pressure forms proposed in the literature, suggests that the orthorhombic structure with space group A b a 2 , recently proposed by Bykova et al. [Nat. Commun. 7, 10661 (2016), 10.1038/ncomms10661], is the most probable, but puts into question the presence of the P 21 /n form in the pressure range 54-67 GPa. Finally, the crossover from Fe high-spin to low-spin states with pressure increase has been monitored from the pre-edge region of the Fe K -edge absorption spectra. Its "simultaneous" comparison with the local structural changes allows us to conclude that it is the electronic transition that drives the structural transition and not vice versa.

  18. Hybrid local FEM/global LISA modeling of damped guided wave propagation in complex composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Cesnik, Carlos E. S.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a new hybrid modeling technique for the efficient simulation of guided wave generation, propagation, and interaction with damage in complex composite structures. A local finite element model is deployed to capture the piezoelectric effects and actuation dynamics of the transmitter, while the global domain wave propagation and interaction with structural complexity (structure features and damage) are solved utilizing a local interaction simulation approach (LISA). This hybrid approach allows the accurate modeling of the local dynamics of the transducers and keeping the LISA formulation in an explicit format, which facilitates its readiness for parallel computing. The global LISA framework was extended through the 3D Kelvin-Voigt viscoelasticity theory to include anisotropic damping effects for composite structures, as an improvement over the existing LISA formulation. The global LISA framework was implemented using the compute unified device architecture running on graphic processing units. A commercial preprocessor is integrated seamlessly with the computational framework for grid generation and material property allocation to handle complex structures. The excitability and damping effects are successfully captured by this hybrid model, with experimental validation using the scanning laser doppler vibrometry. To demonstrate the capability of our hybrid approach for complex structures, guided wave propagation and interaction with a delamination in a composite panel with stiffeners is presented.

  19. Local structure of the convective boundary layer measured by a volume-imaging radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Brian David

    For over 30 years, radars have examined the structure of the convective boundary layer (CBL). Those studies have consisted either of the three dimensional structure of km-scale features, or of the vertical structure of local, 1 to 100 m-scale features. A new instrument, the Turbulent Eddy Profiler (TEP), images the local, three dimensional character of the CBL with the 10 m-scale resolution of current vertically profiling systems. This thesis presents TEP CBL measurements, including /tilde Cn2, the local refractive index structure-function parameter, and w, the vertical velocity. Qualitative horizontal and vertical images are shown. The scales of the measured structures are then quantified through calculation of the correlation distance. To examine larger scale features, effective volumes are constructed from TEP time series data through Taylor's hypothesis. Within those volumes, the statistical properties of /tilde Cn2 and w and calculated. These measurements highlight some of the capabilities of the TEP system, and give a unique picture of the morphology and evolution of /tilde Cn2 and w in the CBL. Many of the TEP measurements are compared to appropriately scaled large-eddy simulation (LES) predictions. The LES qualitative CBL structure agrees well with the measurements, while the statistical values of /tilde Cn2 agree well for only some of the measured data. Those /tilde Cn2 comparisons are the first of their kind, however, and suggest that LES may become a useful tool in CBL propagation studies.

  20. Pressure Induced Local Structure Distortions in Cu(pyz)F2(H2O)2

    SciTech Connect

    Musfeldt, J.L.; Carr, G.; Liu, Z.; Li, S.; Kang, C.L., Jena, P.; Manson, J.L.; Schlueter, J.A. Whangbo, M.H.

    2011-06-06

    We employed infrared spectroscopy along with complementary lattice dynamics and spin density calculations to investigate pressure-driven local structure distortions in the copper coordination polymer Cu(pyz)F{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}. Here, pyz is pyrazine. Our study reveals rich and fully reversible local lattice distortions that buckle the pyrazine ring, disrupt the bc-plane O-H {hor_ellipsis} F hydrogen-bonding network, and reinforce magnetic property switching. The resiliency of the soft organic ring is a major factor in the stability of this material. Interestingly, the collective character of the lattice vibrations masks direct information on the Cu-N and Cu-O linkages through the series of pressure-induced Jahn-Teller axis switching transitions, although Cu-F bond softening is clearly identified above 3 GPa. These findings illustrate the importance of combined bulk and local probe techniques for microscopic structure determination in complex materials.

  1. Pressure-Induced Local Structure Distortions in Cu(pyz)F(2)(H(2)O)(2)

    SciTech Connect

    J Musfeldt; Z Liu; S Li; J Kang; C Lee; P Jena; J Manson; J Schlueter; G Carr; M Whangbo

    2011-12-31

    We employed infrared spectroscopy along with complementary lattice dynamics and spin density calculations to investigate pressure-driven local structure distortions in the copper coordination polymer Cu(pyz)F{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}. Here, pyz is pyrazine. Our study reveals rich and fully reversible local lattice distortions that buckle the pyrazine ring, disrupt the bc-plane O-H {hor_ellipsis} F hydrogen-bonding network, and reinforce magnetic property switching. The resiliency of the soft organic ring is a major factor in the stability of this material. Interestingly, the collective character of the lattice vibrations masks direct information on the Cu-N and Cu-O linkages through the series of pressure-induced Jahn-Teller axis switching transitions, although Cu-F bond softening is clearly identified above 3 GPa. These findings illustrate the importance of combined bulk and local probe techniques for microscopic structure determination in complex materials.

  2. Strong nonlocal coupling stabilizes localized structures: an analysis based on front dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Oto, C; Clerc, M G; Escaff, D; Tlidi, M

    2013-04-26

    We investigate the effect of strong nonlocal coupling in bistable spatially extended systems by using a Lorentzian-like kernel. This effect through front interaction drastically alters the space-time dynamics of bistable systems by stabilizing localized structures in one and two dimensions, and by affecting the kinetics law governing their behavior with respect to weak nonlocal and local coupling. We derive an analytical formula for the front interaction law and show that the kinetics governing the formation of localized structures obeys a law inversely proportional to their size to some power. To illustrate this mechanism, we consider two systems, the Nagumo model describing population dynamics and nonlinear optics model describing a ring cavity filled with a left-handed material. Numerical solutions of the governing equations are in close agreement with analytical predictions.

  3. Limits of slow sound propagation and transparency in lossy, locally resonant periodic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theocharis, G.; Richoux, O.; Romero García, V.; Merkel, A.; Tournat, V.

    2014-09-01

    We investigate sound propagation in lossy, locally resonant periodic structures by studying an air-filled tube periodically loaded with Helmholtz resonators and taking into account the intrinsic viscothermal losses. In particular, by tuning the resonator with the Bragg gap in this prototypical locally resonant structure, we study the limits and various characteristics of slow sound propagation. While in the lossless case the overlapping of the gaps results in slow-sound-induced transparency of a narrow frequency band surrounded by a strong and broadband gap, the inclusion of the unavoidable losses imposes limits to the slowdown factor and the maximum transmission. Experiments, theory, and finite element simulations have been used for the characterization of acoustic wave propagation by tuning the Helmholtz/Bragg frequencies and the total amount of loss both for infinite and finite lattices. This study contributes to the field of locally resonant acoustic metamaterials and slow sound applications.

  4. Testing the relationship between local cue-response patterns and the global structure of communication behaviour.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Paul J; Donald, Ian

    2007-06-01

    A central assumption of negotiation research is that organized sequences of cues and responses underlie the dimensions and constructs found to structure interaction. We empirically tested this assumption using a new 'proximity' coefficient, which measures the global interrelationships among behaviours based on their intrinsic local organization within an interaction sequence. An analysis of sequences from 21 hostage negotiations showed that local cue-response dependencies are organized in a way that corresponds with an established structural model of communication. Further analysis of case-specific coefficients showed that criminal, political and domestic incidents involve very different cue-response dynamics, with criminal incidents dividing into two distinct types of interaction. The importance of the proximity concept for unifying local and global accounts of negotiation behaviour, and the avenues of research made possible by the proximity coefficient, are discussed.

  5. Local Laser Strengthening of Steel Sheets for Load Adapted Component Design in Car Body Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahn, Axel; Heitmanek, Marco; Standfuss, Jens; Brenner, Berndt; Wunderlich, Gerd; Donat, Bernd

    The current trend in car body construction concerning light weight design and car safety improvement increasingly requires an adaption of the local material properties on the component load. Martensitic hardenable steels, which are typically used in car body components, show a significant hardening effect, for instance in laser welded seams. This effect can be purposefully used as a local strengthening method. For several steel grades the local strengthening, resulting from a laser remelting process was investigated. The strength in the treated zone was determined at crash relevant strain rates. A load adapted design of complex reinforcement structures was developed for compression and bending loaded tube samples, using numerical simulation of the deformation behavior. Especially for bending loaded parts, the crash energy absorption can be increased significantly by local laser strengthening.

  6. Multistage structural evolution in simple monatomic supercritical fluids: superstable tetrahedral local order.

    PubMed

    Ryltsev, R E; Chtchelkatchev, N M

    2013-11-01

    The local order units of dense simple liquid are typically three-dimensional (close packed) clusters: hcp, fcc, and icosahedrons. We show that the fluid demonstrates the superstable tetrahedral local order up to temperatures several orders of magnitude higher than the melting temperature and down to critical density. While the solid-like local order (hcp, fcc) disappears in the fluid at much lower temperatures and far above critical density. We conclude that the supercritical fluid shows the temperature (density)-driven two-stage "melting" of the three-dimensional local order. We also find that the structure relaxation times in the supercritical fluid are much larger than ones estimated for weakly interactive gas even far above the melting line.

  7. Role of zinc finger structure in nuclear localization of transcription factor Sp1

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Tatsuo; Azumano, Makiko; Uwatoko, Chisana; Itoh, Kohji Kuwahara, Jun

    2009-02-27

    Transcription factor Sp1 is localized in the nucleus and regulates gene expression. Our previous study demonstrated that the carboxyl terminal region of Sp1 containing 3-zinc finger region as DNA binding domain can also serve as nuclear localization signal (NLS). However, the nuclear transport mechanism of Sp1 has not been well understood. In this study, we performed a gene expression study on mutant Sp1 genes causing a set of amino acid substitutions in zinc finger domains to elucidate nuclear import activity. Nuclear localization of the GFP-fused mutant Sp1 proteins bearing concomitant substitutions in the first and third zinc fingers was highly inhibited. These mutant Sp1 proteins had also lost the binding ability as to the GC box sequence. The results suggest that the overall tertiary structure formed by the three zinc fingers is essential for nuclear localization of Sp1 as well as dispersed basic amino acids within the zinc fingers region.

  8. Influence of static habitat attributes on local and regional Rocky intertidal community structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konar, B.; Iken, K.; Coletti, H.; Monson, Daniel H.; Weitzman, Ben P.

    2016-01-01

    Rocky intertidal communities are structured by local environmental drivers, which can be dynamic, fluctuating on various temporal scales, or static and not greatly varying across years. We examined the role of six static drivers (distance to freshwater, tidewater glacial presence, wave exposure, fetch, beach slope, and substrate composition) on intertidal community structure across the northern Gulf of Alaska. We hypothesized that community structure is less similar at the local scale compared with the regional scale, coinciding with static drivers being less similar on smaller than larger scales. We also hypothesized that static attributes mainly drive local biological community structure. For this, we surveyed five to six sites in each of the six regions in the mid and low intertidal strata. Across regions, static attributes were not consistently different and only small clusters of sites had similar attributes. Additionally, intertidal communities were less similar on the site compared with the region level. These results suggest that these biological communities are not strongly influenced by the local static attributes measured in this study. An alternative explanation is that static attributes among our regions are not different enough to influence the biological communities. This lack of evidence for a strong static driver may be a result of our site selection, which targeted rocky sheltered communities. This suggests that this habitat may be ideal to examine the influence of dynamic drivers. We recommend that future analyses of dynamic attributes may best be performed after analyses have demonstrated that sites do not differ in static attributes.

  9. An Integrated Program Structure and System of Account Codes for PPBS in Local School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Donald R.

    This monograph presents a comprehensive but tentative matrix program structure and system of account codes that have been integrated to facilitate the implementation of PPB systems in local school districts. It is based on the results of an extensive analysis of K-12 public school district programs and management practices. In its entirety, the…

  10. Types and concentrations of metal ions affect local structure and dynamics of RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Xiao, Yi

    2016-10-01

    The roles that metal ions play in the structure and dynamics of RNA molecules are long-standing problems that have been studied extensively but are still not well understood. Here we show that metal ions have distributions around RNA molecules that strongly depend on the types and concentrations of the metal ions and also the electrostatic surface of the molecule. In particular, the ion distributions may not balance all the local electronegativity of the molecule. These ion distributions do not only greatly affect local structures but also lead to different local dynamics of RNA. We studied the effects of different ion solutions on the structure and dynamics of RNA by taking the pre Q1 riboswitch aptamer domain as an illustrative example and using molecular dynamics simulations. Since the local structures and dynamics of RNAs are important to their functions, our results also indicate that the selection of proper ion conditions is necessary to model them correctly, in contrast to the use of diverse ion solutions in current molecular dynamics simulations.

  11. Effect of local atomic and electronic structures on thermoelectric properties of chemically substituted CoSi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, C. C.; Pao, C. W.; Chen, J. L.; Chen, C. L.; Dong, C. L.; Liu, Y. S.; Lee, J. F.; Chan, T. S.; Chang, C. L.; Kuo, Y. K.; Lue, C. S.

    2014-05-01

    We report the effects of Ge partial substitution for Si on local atomic and electronic structures of thermoelectric materials in binary compound cobalt monosilicides (\\text{CoSi}_{1-x}\\text{Ge}_{x}\\text{:}\\ 0 \\le x \\le 0.15 ). Correlations between local atomic/electronic structure and thermoelectric properties are investigated by means of X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The spectroscopic results indicate that as Ge is partially substituted onto Si sites at x \\le 0.05 , Co in CoSi1-xGex gains a certain amount of charge in its 3d orbitals. Contrarily, upon further replacing Si with Ge at x \\ge 0.05 , the Co 3d orbitals start to lose some of their charge. Notably, thermopower is strongly correlated with charge redistribution in the Co 3d orbital, and the observed charge transfer between Ge and Co is responsible for the variation of Co 3d occupancy number. In addition to Seebeck coefficient, which can be modified by tailoring the Co 3d states, local lattice disorder may also be beneficial in enhancing the thermoelectric properties. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectrum results further demonstrate that the lattice phonons can be enhanced by Ge doping, which results in the formation of the disordered Co-Co pair. Improvements in the thermoelectric properties are interpreted based on the variation of local atomic and electronic structure induced by lattice distortion through chemical substitution.

  12. Local atomic arrangements and lattice distortions in layered Ge-Sb-Te crystal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotnyk, Andriy; Ross, Ulrich; Bernütz, Sabine; Thelander, Erik; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    Insights into the local atomic arrangements of layered Ge-Sb-Te compounds are of particular importance from a fundamental point of view and for data storage applications. In this view, a detailed knowledge of the atomic structure in such alloys is central to understanding the functional properties both in the more commonly utilized amorphous–crystalline transition and in recently proposed interfacial phase change memory based on the transition between two crystalline structures. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy allows direct imaging of local arrangement in the crystalline lattice with atomic resolution. However, due to the non-trivial influence of thermal diffuse scattering on the high-angle scattering signal, a detailed examination of the image contrast requires comparison with theoretical image simulations. This work reveals the local atomic structure of trigonal Ge-Sb-Te thin films by using a combination of direct imaging of the atomic columns and theoretical image simulation approaches. The results show that the thin films are prone to the formation of stacking disorder with individual building blocks of the Ge2Sb2Te5, Ge1Sb2Te4 and Ge3Sb2Te6 crystal structures intercalated within randomly oriented grains. The comparison with image simulations based on various theoretical models reveals intermixed cation layers with pronounced local lattice distortions, exceeding those reported in literature.

  13. Spaghetti Politics: Local Electoral Systems and Alliance Structure in Italy, 1984-2001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parigi, Paolo; Bearman, Peter S.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the impact of the Italian electoral reforms of 1993 on the structure of local political alliances. The reform, which moved Italy from a purely proportional representation system to a mixed, largely majoritarian system, was designed to increase transparency, reduce corruption, limit the number of political parties, and create…

  14. Accelerating simulation of ensembles of locally differing optical structures via a Schur complement domain decomposition.

    PubMed

    Verweij, Sacha; Liu, Victor; Fan, Shanhui

    2014-11-15

    We present a Schur complement domain decomposition method that can significantly accelerate simulation of ensembles of locally differing optical structures. We apply the method to design a multi-spatial-mode photonic crystal waveguide splitter that exhibits high transmission and preservation of modal content, showing design acceleration by more than a factor of 20.

  15. Local structures of Ca, Ti and Fe in meteorite fusion crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobase, T.; Yoshiasa, A.; Hiratoko, T.; Hongu, H.; Isobe, H.; Nakatsuka, A.; Arima, H.; Sugiyama, K.

    2016-05-01

    The local structures of meteorite fusion crusts were studied by Ca, Ti and Fe K-edge XANES and EXAFS spectroscopy. The surface of meteorites were melted and volatilized with extreme high temperature and large temperature gradient when meteorites were rushed into atmosphere. This study indicated that meteorite fusion crusts have unique local structures. The local structures of fusion crusts differ from tektites especially in intensity of the shoulder in the rising flank of the edge in Ca XANES spectra. It is consistent with chemical composition change by the volatilization of Si at fusion during atmospheric entry. The high estimated Fe3+/ (Fe2++Fe3+) ratio in meteorite fusion crusts indicates that meteorite fusion crusts are formed into atmospheric oxidation condition. The Ca-O distances in meteorite fusion crusts are 2.612.66 A and are extremely longer than in other natural glasses. The fusion crusts have unique local structure since they experienced extremely high temperature and short quenching time. The XAFS method is effective in distinction of meteorite fusion crusts and classification of natural glass.

  16. Impacts of Information Subsidies and Community Structure on Local Press Coverage of Environmental Contamination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Robert J.; Dunwoody, Sharon

    1995-01-01

    Finds that a press kit sent by an environmental group to midwestern newspapers influenced them to delegate local staff to cover the story. Indicates that the press's function to report or raise issues concerning industrial toxic releases and related health risks is tempered by community structure and particularly by community reliance on…

  17. Spaghetti Politics: Local Electoral Systems and Alliance Structure in Italy, 1984-2001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parigi, Paolo; Bearman, Peter S.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the impact of the Italian electoral reforms of 1993 on the structure of local political alliances. The reform, which moved Italy from a purely proportional representation system to a mixed, largely majoritarian system, was designed to increase transparency, reduce corruption, limit the number of political parties, and create…

  18. Local temperature redistribution and structural transition during joule-heating-driven conductance switching in VO2.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Suhas; Pickett, Matthew D; Strachan, John Paul; Gibson, Gary; Nishi, Yoshio; Williams, R Stanley

    2013-11-13

    Joule-heating induced conductance-switching is studied in VO2 , a Mott insulator. Complementary in situ techniques including optical characterization, blackbody microscopy, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and numerical simulations are used. Abrupt redistribution in local temperature is shown to occur upon conductance-switching along with a structural phase transition, at the same current.

  19. Local atomic arrangements and lattice distortions in layered Ge-Sb-Te crystal structures

    PubMed Central

    Lotnyk, Andriy; Ross, Ulrich; Bernütz, Sabine; Thelander, Erik; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Insights into the local atomic arrangements of layered Ge-Sb-Te compounds are of particular importance from a fundamental point of view and for data storage applications. In this view, a detailed knowledge of the atomic structure in such alloys is central to understanding the functional properties both in the more commonly utilized amorphous–crystalline transition and in recently proposed interfacial phase change memory based on the transition between two crystalline structures. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy allows direct imaging of local arrangement in the crystalline lattice with atomic resolution. However, due to the non-trivial influence of thermal diffuse scattering on the high-angle scattering signal, a detailed examination of the image contrast requires comparison with theoretical image simulations. This work reveals the local atomic structure of trigonal Ge-Sb-Te thin films by using a combination of direct imaging of the atomic columns and theoretical image simulation approaches. The results show that the thin films are prone to the formation of stacking disorder with individual building blocks of the Ge2Sb2Te5, Ge1Sb2Te4 and Ge3Sb2Te6 crystal structures intercalated within randomly oriented grains. The comparison with image simulations based on various theoretical models reveals intermixed cation layers with pronounced local lattice distortions, exceeding those reported in literature. PMID:27220411

  20. Local Structure of Li-Substituted (Bi0.5Na0.5)TiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Yasuhiro; Hiruma, Yuji; Nagata, Hajime; Takenaka, Tadashi

    2010-09-01

    The local structure analysis of Li-substituted (Bi0.5Na0.5)TiO3 was carried out by a synchrotron radiation X-ray pair-distribution function (PDF) method. The PDF peak is resolved as a doublet owing to the presence of two phases with distinct local structures, namely, the rhombohedral and tetragonal phases. The coexisting local structure is very similar to the orthorhombic structure. A martensitic phase transformation occurred at the deporalization temperature (Td) because of the similarity of the local structures.

  1. Local structural investigation of SmFeAsO₁₋xF(x) high temperature superconductors.

    PubMed

    Malavasi, Lorenzo; Artioli, Gianluca A; Kim, Hyunjeong; Maroni, Beatrice; Joseph, Boby; Ren, Yang; Proffen, Thomas; Billinge, Simon J L

    2011-07-13

    A strong revitalization of the field of high temperature superconductivity (HTSC) has been induced recently by the discovery of T(C) around 26 K in F-doped LaFeAsO iron pnictides. Starting from this discovery, a huge amount of experimental data have been accumulated. This important corpus of results will allow the development of suitable theoretical models aimed at describing the basic electronic structure properties and nature of superconducting states in these fascinating new systems. A close correlation between structural features and physical properties of the normal and superconducting states has already been demonstrated in the current literature. Advanced theoretical models are also based on the close correlation with structural properties and in particular with the Fe-As tetrahedral array. As for other complex materials, a deeper understanding of their structure-properties correlation requires a full knowledge of the atomic arrangement within the structure. Here we report an investigation of the local structure in the SmFeAsO₁₋ xF(x) system carried out by means of x-ray total scattering measurements and pair distribution function analysis. The results presented indicate that the local structure of these HTSC significantly differs from the average structure determined by means of traditional diffraction techniques, in particular the distribution of Fe-As bond lengths. In addition, a model for describing the observed discrepancies is presented.

  2. Local structural investigation of SmFeAsO1 - xFx high temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malavasi, Lorenzo; Artioli, Gianluca A.; Kim, Hyunjeong; Maroni, Beatrice; Joseph, Boby; Ren, Yang; Proffen, Thomas; Billinge, Simon J. L.

    2011-07-01

    A strong revitalization of the field of high temperature superconductivity (HTSC) has been induced recently by the discovery of TC around 26 K in F-doped LaFeAsO iron pnictides. Starting from this discovery, a huge amount of experimental data have been accumulated. This important corpus of results will allow the development of suitable theoretical models aimed at describing the basic electronic structure properties and nature of superconducting states in these fascinating new systems. A close correlation between structural features and physical properties of the normal and superconducting states has already been demonstrated in the current literature. Advanced theoretical models are also based on the close correlation with structural properties and in particular with the Fe-As tetrahedral array. As for other complex materials, a deeper understanding of their structure-properties correlation requires a full knowledge of the atomic arrangement within the structure. Here we report an investigation of the local structure in the SmFeAsO1 - xFx system carried out by means of x-ray total scattering measurements and pair distribution function analysis. The results presented indicate that the local structure of these HTSC significantly differs from the average structure determined by means of traditional diffraction techniques, in particular the distribution of Fe-As bond lengths. In addition, a model for describing the observed discrepancies is presented.

  3. Decoupling local mechanics from large-scale structure in modular metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Nan; Silverberg, Jesse L.

    2017-04-01

    A defining feature of mechanical metamaterials is that their properties are determined by the organization of internal structure instead of the raw fabrication materials. This shift of attention to engineering internal degrees of freedom has coaxed relatively simple materials into exhibiting a wide range of remarkable mechanical properties. For practical applications to be realized, however, this nascent understanding of metamaterial design must be translated into a capacity for engineering large-scale structures with prescribed mechanical functionality. Thus, the challenge is to systematically map desired functionality of large-scale structures backward into a design scheme while using finite parameter domains. Such “inverse design” is often complicated by the deep coupling between large-scale structure and local mechanical function, which limits the available design space. Here, we introduce a design strategy for constructing 1D, 2D, and 3D mechanical metamaterials inspired by modular origami and kirigami. Our approach is to assemble a number of modules into a voxelized large-scale structure, where the module’s design has a greater number of mechanical design parameters than the number of constraints imposed by bulk assembly. This inequality allows each voxel in the bulk structure to be uniquely assigned mechanical properties independent from its ability to connect and deform with its neighbors. In studying specific examples of large-scale metamaterial structures we show that a decoupling of global structure from local mechanical function allows for a variety of mechanically and topologically complex designs.

  4. Characterization of local complex structures in a recurrence plot to improve nonlinear dynamic discriminant analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hang

    2014-01-01

    Structures in recurrence plots (RPs), preserving the rich information of nonlinear invariants and trajectory characteristics, have been increasingly analyzed in dynamic discrimination studies. The conventional analysis of RPs is mainly focused on quantifying the overall diagonal and vertical line structures through a method, called recurrence quantification analysis (RQA). This study extensively explores the information in RPs by quantifying local complex RP structures. To do this, an approach was developed to analyze the combination of three major RQA variables: determinism, laminarity, and recurrence rate (DLR) in a metawindow moving over a RP. It was then evaluated in two experiments discriminating (1) ideal nonlinear dynamic series emulated from the Lorenz system with different control parameters and (2) data sets of human heart rate regulations with normal sinus rhythms (n = 18) and congestive heart failure (n = 29). Finally, the DLR was compared with seven major RQA variables in terms of discriminatory power, measured by standardized mean difference (DSMD). In the two experiments, DLR resulted in the highest discriminatory power with DSMD = 2.53 and 0.98, respectively, which were 7.41 and 2.09 times the best performance from RQA. The study also revealed that the optimal RP structures for the discriminations were neither typical diagonal structures nor vertical structures. These findings indicate that local complex RP structures contain some rich information unexploited by RQA. Therefore, future research to extensively analyze complex RP structures would potentially improve the effectiveness of the RP analysis in dynamic discrimination studies.

  5. Decoupling local mechanics from large-scale structure in modular metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nan; Silverberg, Jesse L

    2017-04-04

    A defining feature of mechanical metamaterials is that their properties are determined by the organization of internal structure instead of the raw fabrication materials. This shift of attention to engineering internal degrees of freedom has coaxed relatively simple materials into exhibiting a wide range of remarkable mechanical properties. For practical applications to be realized, however, this nascent understanding of metamaterial design must be translated into a capacity for engineering large-scale structures with prescribed mechanical functionality. Thus, the challenge is to systematically map desired functionality of large-scale structures backward into a design scheme while using finite parameter domains. Such "inverse design" is often complicated by the deep coupling between large-scale structure and local mechanical function, which limits the available design space. Here, we introduce a design strategy for constructing 1D, 2D, and 3D mechanical metamaterials inspired by modular origami and kirigami. Our approach is to assemble a number of modules into a voxelized large-scale structure, where the module's design has a greater number of mechanical design parameters than the number of constraints imposed by bulk assembly. This inequality allows each voxel in the bulk structure to be uniquely assigned mechanical properties independent from its ability to connect and deform with its neighbors. In studying specific examples of large-scale metamaterial structures we show that a decoupling of global structure from local mechanical function allows for a variety of mechanically and topologically complex designs.

  6. Simulating different manufactured antireflective sub-wavelength structures considering the influence of local topographic variations.

    PubMed

    Lehr, Dennis; Helgert, Michael; Sundermann, Michael; Morhard, Christoph; Pacholski, Claudia; Spatz, Joachim P; Brunner, Robert

    2010-11-08

    Laterally structured antireflective sub-wavelength structures show unique properties with respect to broadband performance, damage threshold and thermal stability. Thus they are superior to classical layer based antireflective coatings for a number of applications. Dependent on the selected fabrication technology the local topography of the periodic structure may deviate from the perfect repetition of a sub-wavelength unit cell. We used rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) to simulate the efficiency losses due to scattering effects based on height and displacement variations between the individual protuberances. In these simulations we chose conical and Super-Gaussian shapes to approximate the real profile of fabricated structures. The simulation results are in accordance with the experimentally determined optical properties of sub-wavelength structures over a broad wavelength range. Especially the transmittance reduction in the deep-UV could be ascribed to these variations in the sub-wavelength structures.

  7. Advances in Structural Integrity Analysis Methods for Aging Metallic Airframe Structures with Local Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Newman, James C., Jr.; Harris, Charles E.; Piascik, Robert S.; Young, Richard D.; Rose, Cheryl A.

    2003-01-01

    Analysis methodologies for predicting fatigue-crack growth from rivet holes in panels subjected to cyclic loads and for predicting the residual strength of aluminum fuselage structures with cracks and subjected to combined internal pressure and mechanical loads are described. The fatigue-crack growth analysis methodology is based on small-crack theory and a plasticity induced crack-closure model, and the effect of a corrosive environment on crack-growth rate is included. The residual strength analysis methodology is based on the critical crack-tip-opening-angle fracture criterion that characterizes the fracture behavior of a material of interest, and a geometric and material nonlinear finite element shell analysis code that performs the structural analysis of the fuselage structure of interest. The methodologies have been verified experimentally for structures ranging from laboratory coupons to full-scale structural components. Analytical and experimental results based on these methodologies are described and compared for laboratory coupons and flat panels, small-scale pressurized shells, and full-scale curved stiffened panels. The residual strength analysis methodology is sufficiently general to include the effects of multiple-site damage on structural behavior.

  8. Propagation and localization of electromagnetic waves in quasiperiodic serial loop structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aynaou, H.; El Boudouti, E. H.; El Hassouani, Y.; Akjouj, A.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.; Vasseur, J.; Benomar, A.; Velasco, V. R.

    2005-11-01

    We study the propagation of electromagnetic waves in one-dimensional quasiperiodic photonic band gap structures made of serial loop structures separated by segments. Different quasiperiodic structures such as Fibonacci, Thue-Morse, Rudin-Shapiro, and double period are investigated with special focus on the Fibonacci structure. Depending on the lengths of the two arms constituting the loops, one can distinguish two particular cases. (i) There are symmetric loop structures, which are shown to be equivalent to impedance-modulated mediums. In this case, it is found that besides the existence of extended and forbidden modes, some narrow frequency bands appear as defect modes in the transmission spectrum inside the gaps. These modes are shown to be localized within only one of the two types of blocks constituting the structure. An analysis of the transmission phase time enables us to derive the group velocity as well as the density of states in these structures. In particular, the stop bands (localized modes) may give rise to unusual (strong normal) dispersion in the gaps, yielding fast (slow) group velocities above (below) the velocity of light. (ii) There are also asymmetric loop structures, where the loops play the role of resonators that may introduce transmission zeros and hence additional gaps unnoticed in the case of simple impedance-modulated mediums. A comparison of the transmission amplitude and phase time of Fibonacci systems with those of other quasiperiodic systems is also outlined. In particular, it was shown that these structures present similar behaviors in the transmission spectra inside the regions of extended modes, whereas they present different localized modes inside the gaps. Experiments and numerical calculations are in very good agreement.

  9. Local structural order and relaxation effects in metal-chalcogenide glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Saleh, Z.M.

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) have been employed to study the local structural order and the relaxation mechanisms in metal-arsenic-chalcogenide glasses for metal concentrations within the glass forming region. The glass forming region in the Cu-As-S and Cu-As-se glassy systems extends approximately to 6 and 25 at. % copper, respectively. In the composition Cu[sub x](As[sub 2/5]Ch[sub 3/5])[sub 1[minus]x], where Ch = S or Se, there is evidence of dramatic changes in the local structure as copper is added to the system. One important change is the formation of As-As bonds which are absent in As[sub 2]Ch[sub 3]. The [sup 75]As NQR measurements indicate that the density of these bonds increases with copper concentration x. These results are consistent with the predictions of a model proposed recently to explain the local structural order in glassy metal chalcogenides. While NQR data show that arsenic atoms are threefold coordinated, EXAFs measurements have shown that copper is fourfold coordinated within the glass forming ranges in both systems. The NMR measurements confirm this result and quantitatively determine the local environment around the copper nuclei. For the naturally occurring mineral luzonite (Cu[sub 3]AsS[sub 4]) copper is fourfold coordinated. The known structure of this mineral has been used as a guide to understanding the local structure in the glasses. Copper and arsenic nuclear relaxation measurements were used to study the dynamics of these systems. The temperature and frequency dependence of the spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times have been carefully measured to determine the relaxation mechanisms.

  10. Ytterbium monopnictides under high pressure and high temperature: Structural and electronic properties studied using local spin density approximation and Hubbard corrections approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. K.; Verma, U. P.

    2014-06-01

    The structural and electronic properties of ytterbium monopnictides YbX (X = N, P) compounds have been investigated using full potential linear augmented plane wave plus local orbitals approach within the framework of density functional theory. The local spin-density approximation along with Hubbard- U corrections and spin-orbit coupling have been used for correct prediction of electronic properties. At ambient conditions ytterbium monopnictides stabilize in NaCl ( B1) structure. Also, the equilibrium properties, viz., lattice constants ( a), bulk modulus ( B 0) and its pressure derivative ( B 0 ') and total energy ( E 0) have been calculated in three other phases namely CsCl ( B2), zinc blende ( B3) and body centred tetragonal. Under compression, both YbN and YbP undergo first-order structural transition from B1 to B2 phase at 164.0 and 33.7 GPa of pressure, respectively. Obtained results show that YbX is semi-metallic in B1 phase and metallic in B2 phase. Thermal parameters such as Gruneisen parameter, Debye temperature, specific heat, thermal expansion coefficient and entropy have been determined as a function of pressure and temperature. The calculated lattice and other parameters are in good agreement with experimental and other theoretical values reported earlier.

  11. Machine-learning approach for local classification of crystalline structures in multiphase systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietz, C.; Kretz, T.; Thoma, M. H.

    2017-07-01

    Machine learning is one of the most popular fields in computer science and has a vast number of applications. In this work we will propose a method that will use a neural network to locally identify crystal structures in a mixed phase Yukawa system consisting of fcc, hcp, and bcc clusters and disordered particles similar to plasma crystals. We compare our approach to already used methods and show that the quality of identification increases significantly. The technique works very well for highly disturbed lattices and shows a flexible and robust way to classify crystalline structures that can be used by only providing particle positions. This leads to insights into highly disturbed crystalline structures.

  12. The green emission and local structure of the scintillator PbWO 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zeming; Shi, Chaoshu; Zhou, Dongfang; Tang, Honggao; Liu, Tao; Hu, Tiandou

    2001-12-01

    The green emission of lead tungstate (PbWO 4 ) is closely related to structure defects. For studying the mechanism of the green emission, the local structure of PbWO 4 has been first investigated by extended X-ray absorption fine structure using synchrotron radiation. The results indicate that the excess oxygen in air-annealed PbWO 4 exists and forms “WO 4+O i” centers. The green emission of PbWO 4 is not caused by (WO 3+F) centers, but probably originates from the centers of “WO 4+O i”.

  13. Local orderings in long-range-disordered bismuth-layered intergrowth structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Faqiang; Li, Yongxiang; Gu, Hui; Gao, Xiang

    2014-04-01

    A series of intergrowth bismuth-layered (Bi{sub 3}TiNbO{sub 9}){sub 2}(Bi{sub 4}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 12}) (2{sub 2}3) ceramics were prepared by conventional solid-state reaction to study the characteristics of the local orderings in long-range-disordered intergrowth structures. High-resolution high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) imaging reveals the intergrowth structure composed of mixtures of -23-, -223-, -2223- and -22- sequences, while the -223- structure is the thermodynamic stable state of this intergrowth system. It was confirmed by the crystals of recurrent -223- structure prepared by self-flux method and the nature of the local ordering was discussed from their differences in repeating units. The statistics show that when repeating units reach 4 or higher, the independent -223- intergrowth ordering emerges clearly among the competing associated orderings. We infer it is the kinetic factor that induces local compositional variance to result in long-range disordered intergrowth structures. - Graphical abstract: The long-range-disordered intergrowth structure in a (Bi{sub 3}TiNbO{sub 9}){sub 2}(Bi{sub 4}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 12}) (2{sub 2}3) grain, which is composed of various types of local orderings, such as -22-, -23- and -223-. - Highlights: • The characteristic of the long-range-disordered (Bi{sub 3}TiNbO{sub 9}){sub 2}(Bi{sub 4}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 12}) (2{sub 2}3) structure was statistically analyzed, and the ordered -223- structure was speculated to be the thermodynamic stable state of the system. • The crystals of the -223- structure were successfully prepared for the first time by self-melt method. • The lower limit of the repeating units (L) to uniquely determine an independent intergrowth structure was speculated to be L=4. • The analysis inferred that the kinetic process is the controlling factor to limit the structural continuity and induce the long-range-disordered intergrowth structure.

  14. Local structure analysis of Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Yasuhiro; Nagata, Hajime; Takenaka, Tadashi

    2015-05-01

    The potential lead-free piezoelectric material bismuth sodium titanate, Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3 (BNT), was investigated by means of high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction. BNT has been assumed thus far to exhibit the rhombohedral space group R3 c at room temperature. Recently, the average structure of BNT was described by the monoclinic space group C c. We performed a local structure analysis of BNT using atomic pair-distribution function method. The ground state of BNT was found to have a rhombohedral structure in which bismuth and sodium atoms were chemically ordered in the perovskite A-site.

  15. Local atomic structure of Pb(Zr-Ti)O3 near the morphotropic phase boundary.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmowski, Wojciech; Egami, Takeshi; Farber, Leon; Davies, Peter K.

    2001-03-01

    We have studied the local atomic structure of PbZrO_3-PbTiO3 solid solution (PZT) near the morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) using pulsed neutron scattering. The PZT phase diagram is characterized by the almost vertical MPB at 48-52rich rhombohedral phase from the tetragonal Ti rich phase. In our study, in addition to Rietveld analysis, we used the pair distribution function (PDF) method. Since the PDF is obtained by the Fourier transformation of both the Bragg peaks and diffuse scattering the inter-atomic distances are obtained without the assumption of the unit cell symmetry. While the crystal structure changes substantially through the MPB, we found that the local atomic structure does not show dramatic changes. The actual change is more of a statistical nature in the population of Pb displacements. Crystallographically the Pb displacement is in [100] in the tetragonal phase and [111] in the rhombohedral phase, with the rotation from one to the other in the intermediate monoclinic phase. Locally, however, pure [111] Pb displacements are not observed even in the Zr-rich rhombohedral phase. The [100] displacements are majority in the tetragonal phase, while they are gradually replaced by the [110] displacements through the MPB. These observations suggest that the "polarization rotation" is driven by the gradual change in the partition of the Pb displacement patterns, and the crystal structure reflects the change in the average structure.

  16. Connecting the dots: how local structure affects global integration in infants

    PubMed Central

    Palomares, Melanie; Pettet, Mark; Vildavski, Vladimir; Hou, Chuan; Norcia, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Glass patterns are moirés created from a sparse random dot field paired with its spatially-shifted copy. Because discrimination of these patterns is not based on local features, they have been used extensively to study global integration processes. Here, we investigated whether 4–5.5 month old infants are sensitive to the global structure of Glass patterns by measuring Visual Evoked Potentials (VEPs). Although we found strong responses to the appearance of the constituent dots, we found sensitivity to the global structure of the Glass patterns in the infants only over a very limited range of spatial separation. In contrast, we observed robust responses in the infants when we connected the dot pairs of the Glass pattern with lines. Moreover, both infants and adults showed differential responses to exchanges between line patterns portraying different global structures. A control study varying luminance contrast in adults suggests that infant sensitivity to global structure is not primarily limited by reduced element visibility. Together our results suggest that the insensitivity to structure in conventional Glass patterns is due to inefficiencies in extracting the local orientation cues generated by the dot pairs. Once the local orientations are made unambiguous or when the interpolation span is small, infants can integrate these signals over the image. PMID:19642888

  17. Local structural investigation of buried InAs(x)P(1-x)/InP interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberti, C.; Bordiga, S.; Boscherini, F.; Pascarelli, S.; Schiavini, G. M.; Ferari, C.; Lazzarini, L.; Salviati, G.

    1994-10-01

    A local structural investigation has been carried out on the 10 A InAs(x)P(1-x) layer in ad hoc grown InAs(x)P(1-x)/InP epitaxal multistructures deposited by low pressure metallorganic chemical vapor deposition by means of extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, and high resolution x-ray diffraction analyses. The goal was to characterize the local structure of the unwanted, strained, interface layers of InAs(x)P(1-x) produced by the exposure of the InP surface to AsH3 as occurs during the growth of InP/In(0.53)Ga(0.47)As heterostructures optimized for photonics. High resolution x-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy confirm the high crystalline perfection of the investigated interfaces. As K-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure analysis shows, the first shell environment of As at these interfaces is similar to that found in bulk InAs(x)P(1-X) alloys of similar composition, as determined experimentally and by comparison with recent theories of bond lengths in semiconductor alloys. In particular we measure an As-In bond length which varies at most 0.02 A with As concentration at the interface; this implies that epitaxy with InP is accompanied by local structural distortions, such as bond angle variations, which accommodate the nearly constant As-In bond length.

  18. Ligand Binding Site Detection by Local Structure Alignment and Its Performance Complementarity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hui Sun; Im, Wonpil

    2013-01-01

    Accurate determination of potential ligand binding sites (BS) is a key step for protein function characterization and structure-based drug design. Despite promising results of template-based BS prediction methods using global structure alignment (GSA), there is a room to improve the performance by properly incorporating local structure alignment (LSA) because BS are local structures and often similar for proteins with dissimilar global folds. We present a template-based ligand BS prediction method using G-LoSA, our LSA tool. A large benchmark set validation shows that G-LoSA predicts drug-like ligands’ positions in single-chain protein targets more precisely than TM-align, a GSA-based method, while the overall success rate of TM-align is better. G-LoSA is particularly efficient for accurate detection of local structures conserved across proteins with diverse global topologies. Recognizing the performance complementarity of G-LoSA to TM-align and a non-template geometry-based method, fpocket, a robust consensus scoring method, CMCS-BSP (Complementary Methods and Consensus Scoring for ligand Binding Site Prediction), is developed and shows improvement on prediction accuracy. The G-LoSA source code is freely available at http://im.bioinformatics.ku.edu/GLoSA. PMID:23957286

  19. Connecting the dots: how local structure affects global integration in infants.

    PubMed

    Palomares, Melanie; Pettet, Mark; Vildavski, Vladimir; Hou, Chuan; Norcia, Anthony

    2010-07-01

    Glass patterns are moirés created from a sparse random-dot field paired with its spatially shifted copy. Because discrimination of these patterns is not based on local features, they have been used extensively to study global integration processes. Here, we investigated whether 4- to 5.5-month-old infants are sensitive to the global structure of Glass patterns by measuring visual-evoked potentials. Although we found strong responses to the appearance of the constituent dots, we found sensitivity to the global structure of the Glass patterns in the infants only over a very limited range of spatial separation. In contrast, we observed robust responses in the infants when we connected the dot pairs of the Glass pattern with lines. Moreover, both infants and adults showed differential responses to exchanges between line patterns portraying different global structures. A control study varying luminance contrast in adults suggests that infant sensitivity to global structure is not primarily limited by reduced element visibility. Together our results suggest that the insensitivity to structure in conventional Glass patterns is due to inefficiencies in extracting the local orientation cues generated by the dot pairs. Once the local orientations are made unambiguous or when the interpolation span is small, infants can integrate these signals over the image.

  20. Quantitative characterizations of phasic structure developments by local measurement methods in two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, C.S.; Leung, W.H.; Wu, Q.; Ueno, T.; Ishii, M.

    1995-06-01

    An experimental study on the internal structure an a out in a 25.4 mm ID pipe. The local void fraction and interfacial area concentration were measured by a double-sensor probe. The flow structure development was visualized by measuring the radial distribution of these two parameters at three axial, locations (L/D = 12, 62, and 112). A more detailed study on the fully developed flow structure was conducted at L/D = 120. The interfacial structure were measured by the double- and four-sensor probes. A bubbly to-=slug transition region was defined according to the local data.The area-averaged void fraction measurements were given by a gamma densitometer. Other parameters such as the Taylor bubble film thickness, bubble length and slug unit length in slug flow were measured by a film robe. The redundant measurements were made to calibrate the local probe measurements. The quantitative representation of the phasic structure can then be used for modeling.

  1. A multilevel approach for minimum weight structural design including local and system buckling constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmit, L. A., Jr.; Ramanathan, R. K.

    1977-01-01

    A rational multilevel approach for minimum weight structural design of truss and wing structures including local and system buckling constraints is presented. Overall proportioning of the structure is achieved at the system level subject to strength, displacement and system buckling constraints, while the detailed component designs are carried out separately at the component level satisfying local buckling constraints. Total structural weight is taken to be the objective function at the system level while employing the change in the equivalent system stiffness of the component as the component level objective function. Finite element analysis is used to predict static response while system buckling behavior is handled by incorporating a geometric stiffness matrix capability. Buckling load factors and the corresponding mode shapes are obtained by solving the eigenvalue problem associated with the assembled elastic stiffness and geometric stiffness matrices for the structural system. At the component level various local buckling failure modes are guarded against using semi-empirical formulas. Mathematical programming techniques are employed at both the system and component level.

  2. Localization and fractal spectra of optical phonon modes in quasiperiodic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmo, D. H. A. L.; Dantas, A. L.; Medeiros, S. K.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Freire, V. N.

    2005-04-01

    The dispersion relation and localization profile of confined optical phonon modes in quasiperiodic structures, made up of nitride semiconductor materials, are analyzed through a transfer-matrix approach. The quasiperiodic structures are characterized by the nature of their Fourier spectrum, which can be dense pure point (Fibonacci sequences) or singular continuous (Thue-Morse and Double-period sequences). These substitutional sequences are described in terms of a series of generations that obey peculiar recursion relations and/or inflation rules. We present a quantitative analysis of the localization and magnitude of the allowed band widths in the optical phonons spectra of these quasiperiodic structures, as well as how they scale as a function of the number of generations of the sequences.

  3. Polydisperse hard spheres: crystallization kinetics in small systems and role of local structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, Matteo; Speck, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    We study numerically the crystallization of a hard-sphere mixture with 8% polydispersity. Although often used as a model glass former, for small system sizes we observe crystallization in molecular dynamics simulations. This opens the possibility to study the competition between crystallization and structural relaxation of the melt, which typically is out of reach due to the disparate timescales. We quantify the dependence of relaxation and crystallization times on density and system size. For one density and system size we perform a detailed committor analysis to investigate the suitability of local structures as order parameters to describe the crystallization process. We find that local structures are strongly correlated with generic bond order and add little information to the reaction coordinate.

  4. On the influence of ion exchange on the local structure of the titanosilicate ETS-10.

    PubMed

    Pavel, Claudiu C; Zibrowius, Bodo; Löffler, Elke; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2007-07-14

    The effect of ion exchange with different monovalent cations (NH(4)(+), K(+), Na(+) and Cs(+)) on the local structure of the titanosilicate ETS-10 has been studied by (29)Si MAS NMR and Raman spectroscopy. Although X-ray diffraction shows no significant influence of ion exchange on the long range order, ammonium exchange is found to result in substantial damage to the local structure. Ion exchange experiments with alkali cations under significantly more acidic conditions clearly show that the structural damage brought about by ammonium exchange is not caused by the low pH of the exchange solution. The exchange with potassium and caesium ions also leads to significant changes in the (29)Si NMR and Raman spectra. However, these changes can largely be reversed by sodium back-exchange.

  5. Damage localization in linear-form structures based on sensitivity investigation for principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viet Ha, Nguyen; Golinval, Jean-Claude

    2010-10-01

    This paper addresses the problem of damage detection and localization in linear-form structures. Principal component analysis (PCA) is a popular technique for dynamic system investigation. The aim of the paper is to present a damage diagnosis method based on sensitivities of PCA results in the frequency domain. Starting from frequency response functions (FRFs) measured at different locations on the structure; PCA is performed to determine the main features of the signals. Sensitivities of principal directions obtained from PCA to structural parameters are then computed and inspected according to the location of sensors; their variation from the healthy state to the damaged state indicates damage locations. It is worth noting that damage localization is performed without the need of modal identification. Influences of some features as noise, choice of parameter and number of sensors are discussed. The efficiency and limitations of the proposed method are illustrated using numerical and real-world examples.

  6. Local Protein Structure Refinement via Molecular Dynamics Simulations with locPREFMD

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A method for the local refinement of protein structures that targets improvements in local stereochemistry while preserving the overall fold is presented. The method uses force field-based minimization and sampling via molecular dynamics simulations with a modified force field to bring bonds, angles, and torsion angles into an acceptable range for high-resolution protein structures. The method is implemented in the locPREFMD web server and was tested on computational models submitted to CASP11. Using MolProbity scores as the main assessment criterion, the locPREFMD method significantly improves the stereochemical quality of given input models close to the quality expected for experimental structures while maintaining the Cα coordinates of the initial model. PMID:27380201

  7. Self-organization of amphiphilic macromolecules with local helix structure in concentrated solutions.

    PubMed

    Glagolev, M K; Vasilevskaya, V V; Khokhlov, A R

    2012-08-28

    Concentrated solutions of amphiphilic macromolecules with local helical structure were studied by means of molecular dynamic simulations. It is shown that in poor solvent the macromolecules are assembled into wire-like aggregates having complex core-shell structure. The core consists of a hydrophobic backbone of the chains which intertwine around each other. It is protected by the shell of hydrophilic side groups. In racemic mixture of right-hand and left-hand helix macromolecules the wire-like complex is a chain of braid bundles of macromolecules with the same chirality stacking at their ends. The average number of macromolecules in the wire cross-section is close to that of separate bundles observed in dilute solutions of such macromolecules. The effects described here could serve as a simple model of self-organization in solutions of macromolecules with local helical structure.

  8. Effective 3D protein structure prediction with local adjustment genetic-annealing algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Long; Lin, Xiao-Li

    2010-09-01

    The protein folding problem consists of predicting protein tertiary structure from a given amino acid sequence by minimizing the energy function. The protein folding structure prediction is computationally challenging and has been shown to be NP-hard problem when the 3D off-lattice AB model is employed. In this paper, the local adjustment genetic-annealing (LAGA) algorithm was used to search the ground state of 3D offlattice AB model for protein folding structure. The algorithm included an improved crossover strategy and an improved mutation strategy, where a local adjustment strategy was also used to enhance the searching ability. The experiments were carried out with the Fibonacci sequences. The experimental results demonstrate that the LAGA algorithm appears to have better performance and accuracy compared to the previous methods.

  9. Local kernel nonparametric discriminant analysis for adaptive extraction of complex structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Quanbao; Wei, Fajie; Zhou, Shenghan

    2017-05-01

    The linear discriminant analysis (LDA) is one of popular means for linear feature extraction. It usually performs well when the global data structure is consistent with the local data structure. Other frequently-used approaches of feature extraction usually require linear, independence, or large sample condition. However, in real world applications, these assumptions are not always satisfied or cannot be tested. In this paper, we introduce an adaptive method, local kernel nonparametric discriminant analysis (LKNDA), which integrates conventional discriminant analysis with nonparametric statistics. LKNDA is adept in identifying both complex nonlinear structures and the ad hoc rule. Six simulation cases demonstrate that LKNDA have both parametric and nonparametric algorithm advantages and higher classification accuracy. Quartic unilateral kernel function may provide better robustness of prediction than other functions. LKNDA gives an alternative solution for discriminant cases of complex nonlinear feature extraction or unknown feature extraction. At last, the application of LKNDA in the complex feature extraction of financial market activities is proposed.

  10. Strain properties analysis and wireless collection system of PVDF for structural local health monitoring of civil engineering structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yan; Wang, Yang; Dong, Weijie; Jin, Yajing; Ou, Jinping

    2009-07-01

    For large civil engineering structures and base establishments, for example, bridges, super-high buildings, long-span space structures, offshore platforms and pipe systems of water & gas supply, their lives are up to a few decades or centuries. Damaged by environmental loads, fatigue effects, corrosion effects and material aging, these structures experience inevitably such side effects as damage accumulation, resistance reduction and even accidents. The traditional civil structure is a kind of passive one, whose performance and status are unpredictable to a great extent, but the informatics' introduction breaks a new path to obtain the status of the structure, thus it is an important research direction to evaluate and improve reliability of civil structures by the use of monitoring and health diagnosis technique, and this also assures the security of service for civil engineering structures. Smart material structure, originated from the aerospace sector, has been a research hotspot in civil engineering, medicine, shipping, and so on. For structural health monitoring of civil engineering, the research about high-performance sensing unit of smart material structure is very important, and this will possibly push further the development and application of monitoring and health diagnosis techniques. At present, piezoelectric materials are one of the most widely used sensing materials among the research of smart material structures. As one of the piezoelectric materials, PVDF(Polyvinylidene Fluoride)film is widely considered for the advantages of low cost, good mechanical ability, high sensibility, the ability of being easily placed and resistance of corrosion. However, only a few studies exit about building a mature monitoring system using PVDF. In this paper, for the sake of using PVDF for sensing unit for structural local monitoring of civil engineering, the strain sensing properties of PVDF are studied in detail. Firstly, the operating mechanism of PVDF is analyzed

  11. Local structure and La L1 and L3-edge XANES spectra of lanthanum complex oxides.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Hiroyuki; Shishido, Tetsuya; Teramura, Kentaro; Tanaka, Tsunehiro

    2014-06-16

    La L1 and L3-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) of various La oxides were classified according to the local configuration of La. We found a correlation between both of the areas of the pre-edge peaks of the La L1-edge XANES spectra and the full width at half-maximum of white line of La L3-edge XANES spectra and the local configuration of La. Theoretical calculation of the XANES spectra and local density of states reveals the difference of La L1 and L3-edge XANES spectra of various La compounds is related to the p-d hybridization of the unoccupied band and broadening of the d band of La induced by the difference of local configuration. In addition, simplified bond angle analysis parameters defined by the angles of the La atom and the two adjacent oxygen atoms are correlated to the pre-edge peak intensity of the La L1-edge XANES spectra. These results indicate that quantitative analysis of La L1 and L3-edge XANES spectra could be an indicator of the local structure of La materials.

  12. Emergence of Coherent Localized Structures in Shear Deformations of Temperature Dependent Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsaounis, Theodoros; Olivier, Julien; Tzavaras, Athanasios E.

    2017-04-01

    Shear localization occurs in various instances of material instability in solid mechanics and is typically associated with Hadamard-instability for an underlying model. While Hadamard instability indicates the catastrophic growth of oscillations around a mean state, it does not by itself explain the formation of coherent structures typically observed in localization. The latter is a nonlinear effect and its analysis is the main objective of this article. We consider a model that captures the main mechanisms observed in high strain-rate deformation of metals, and describes shear motions of temperature dependent non-Newtonian fluids. For a special dependence of the viscosity on the temperature, we carry out a linearized stability analysis around a base state of uniform shearing solutions, and quantitatively assess the effects of the various mechanisms affecting the problem: thermal softening, momentum diffusion and thermal diffusion. Then, we turn to the nonlinear model, and construct localized states—in the form of similarity solutions—that emerge as coherent structures in the localization process. This justifies a scenario for localization that is proposed on the basis of asymptotic analysis in Katsaounis and Tzavaras (SIAM J Appl Math 69:1618-1643, 2009).

  13. Emergence of Coherent Localized Structures in Shear Deformations of Temperature Dependent Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsaounis, Theodoros; Olivier, Julien; Tzavaras, Athanasios E.

    2016-12-01

    Shear localization occurs in various instances of material instability in solid mechanics and is typically associated with Hadamard-instability for an underlying model. While Hadamard instability indicates the catastrophic growth of oscillations around a mean state, it does not by itself explain the formation of coherent structures typically observed in localization. The latter is a nonlinear effect and its analysis is the main objective of this article. We consider a model that captures the main mechanisms observed in high strain-rate deformation of metals, and describes shear motions of temperature dependent non-Newtonian fluids. For a special dependence of the viscosity on the temperature, we carry out a linearized stability analysis around a base state of uniform shearing solutions, and quantitatively assess the effects of the various mechanisms affecting the problem: thermal softening, momentum diffusion and thermal diffusion. Then, we turn to the nonlinear model, and construct localized states—in the form of similarity solutions—that emerge as coherent structures in the localization process. This justifies a scenario for localization that is proposed on the basis of asymptotic analysis in uc(Katsaounis) and uc(Tzavaras) (SIAM J Appl Math 69:1618-1643, 2009).

  14. Forced snaking: Localized structures in the real Ginzburg-Landau equation with spatially periodic parametric forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponedel, Benjamin C.; Knobloch, Edgar

    2016-11-01

    We study spatial localization in the real subcritical Ginzburg-Landau equation ut = m0u + Q(x)u + uxx + d|u|2u -|u|4u with spatially periodic forcing Q(x). When d>0 and Q ≡ 0 this equation exhibits bistability between the trivial state u = 0 and a homogeneous nontrivial state u = u0 with stationary localized structures which accumulate at the Maxwell point m0 = -3d2/16. When spatial forcing is included its wavelength is imprinted on u0 creating conditions favorable to front pinning and hence spatial localization. We use numerical continuation to show that under appropriate conditions such forcing generates a sequence of localized states organized within a snakes-and-ladders structure centered on the Maxwell point, and refer to this phenomenon as forced snaking. We determine the stability properties of these states and show that longer lengthscale forcing leads to stationary trains consisting of a finite number of strongly localized, weakly interacting pulses exhibiting foliated snaking.

  15. Structural and contextual dimensions of Iranian primary health care system at local level.

    PubMed

    Zanganeh Baygi, Mehdi; Seyedin, Hesam; Salehi, Masoud; Jafari Sirizi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, family physician plan was established as the main strategy of health system in Iran, while organizational structure of the primary health care system has remained the same as thirty years ago. This study was performed to illustrate structural and contextual dimensions of organizational structure and relationship between them in Iranian primary health care system at local level. A cross-sectional quantitative study was conducted from January to June 2013, during which 121 questionnaires were distributed among senior and junior managers of city health centers at Medical Sciences universities in Iran. Validity of the questionnaire was confirmed by experts (CVI = 0.089 and CVR more than 0.85) and Cronbach α was utilized for reliability (α = 0.904). We used multistage sampling method in this study and analysis of the data was performed by SPSS software using different tests. Local level of primary health care system in Iran had mechanical structure, but in contextual dimensions the results showed different types. There was a significant relationship between structural and contextual dimensions (r = 0.642, P value < 0.001). Goals and culture dimensions had strongest effects on structural dimensions. Because of the changes in goals and strategies of Iranian health system in recent years, it is urgently recommended to reform the current structure to increase efficiency and effectiveness of the system.

  16. Structural and Contextual Dimensions of Iranian Primary Health Care System at Local Level

    PubMed Central

    Zanganeh Baygi, Mehdi; Seyedin, Hesam; Salehi, Masoud; Jafari Sirizi, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Background: In recent years, family physician plan was established as the main strategy of health system in Iran, while organizational structure of the primary health care system has remained the same as thirty years ago. Objectives: This study was performed to illustrate structural and contextual dimensions of organizational structure and relationship between them in Iranian primary health care system at local level. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional quantitative study was conducted from January to June 2013, during which 121 questionnaires were distributed among senior and junior managers of city health centers at Medical Sciences universities in Iran. Validity of the questionnaire was confirmed by experts (CVI = 0.089 and CVR more than 0.85) and Cronbach α was utilized for reliability (α = 0.904). We used multistage sampling method in this study and analysis of the data was performed by SPSS software using different tests. Results: Local level of primary health care system in Iran had mechanical structure, but in contextual dimensions the results showed different types. There was a significant relationship between structural and contextual dimensions (r = 0.642, P value < 0.001). Goals and culture dimensions had strongest effects on structural dimensions. Conclusions: Because of the changes in goals and strategies of Iranian health system in recent years, it is urgently recommended to reform the current structure to increase efficiency and effectiveness of the system. PMID:25763257

  17. Electric-field-induced local and mesoscale structural changes in polycrystalline dielectrics and ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usher, Tedi-Marie; Levin, Igor; Daniels, John E.; Jones, Jacob L.

    2015-10-01

    The atomic-scale response of dielectrics/ferroelectrics to electric fields is central to their functionality. Here we introduce an in situ characterization method that reveals changes in the local atomic structure in polycrystalline materials under fields. The method employs atomic pair distribution functions (PDFs), determined from X-ray total scattering that depends on orientation relative to the applied field, to probe structural changes over length scales from sub-Ångstrom to several nanometres. The PDF is sensitive to local ionic displacements and their short-range order, a key uniqueness relative to other techniques. The method is applied to representative ferroelectrics, BaTiO3 and Na½Bi½TiO3, and dielectric SrTiO3. For Na½Bi½TiO3, the results reveal an abrupt field-induced monoclinic to rhombohedral phase transition, accompanied by ordering of the local Bi displacements and reorientation of the nanoscale ferroelectric domains. For BaTiO3 and SrTiO3, the local/nanoscale structural changes observed in the PDFs are dominated by piezoelectric lattice strain and ionic polarizability, respectively.

  18. Electric-field-induced local and mesoscale structural changes in polycrystalline dielectrics and ferroelectrics.

    PubMed

    Usher, Tedi-Marie; Levin, Igor; Daniels, John E; Jones, Jacob L

    2015-10-01

    The atomic-scale response of dielectrics/ferroelectrics to electric fields is central to their functionality. Here we introduce an in situ characterization method that reveals changes in the local atomic structure in polycrystalline materials under fields. The method employs atomic pair distribution functions (PDFs), determined from X-ray total scattering that depends on orientation relative to the applied field, to probe structural changes over length scales from sub-Ångstrom to several nanometres. The PDF is sensitive to local ionic displacements and their short-range order, a key uniqueness relative to other techniques. The method is applied to representative ferroelectrics, BaTiO3 and Na½Bi½TiO3, and dielectric SrTiO3. For Na½Bi½TiO3, the results reveal an abrupt field-induced monoclinic to rhombohedral phase transition, accompanied by ordering of the local Bi displacements and reorientation of the nanoscale ferroelectric domains. For BaTiO3 and SrTiO3, the local/nanoscale structural changes observed in the PDFs are dominated by piezoelectric lattice strain and ionic polarizability, respectively.

  19. Electric-field-induced local and mesoscale structural changes in polycrystalline dielectrics and ferroelectrics

    PubMed Central

    Usher, Tedi-Marie; Levin, Igor; Daniels, John E.; Jones, Jacob L.

    2015-01-01

    The atomic-scale response of dielectrics/ferroelectrics to electric fields is central to their functionality. Here we introduce an in situ characterization method that reveals changes in the local atomic structure in polycrystalline materials under fields. The method employs atomic pair distribution functions (PDFs), determined from X-ray total scattering that depends on orientation relative to the applied field, to probe structural changes over length scales from sub-Ångstrom to several nanometres. The PDF is sensitive to local ionic displacements and their short-range order, a key uniqueness relative to other techniques. The method is applied to representative ferroelectrics, BaTiO3 and Na½Bi½TiO3, and dielectric SrTiO3. For Na½Bi½TiO3, the results reveal an abrupt field-induced monoclinic to rhombohedral phase transition, accompanied by ordering of the local Bi displacements and reorientation of the nanoscale ferroelectric domains. For BaTiO3 and SrTiO3, the local/nanoscale structural changes observed in the PDFs are dominated by piezoelectric lattice strain and ionic polarizability, respectively. PMID:26424360

  20. Local Structure in Ab Initio Liquid Water: Signatures of Amorphous Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santra, Biswajit; Distasio, Robert A., Jr.; Martelli, Fausto; Car, Roberto

    Within the framework of density functional theory, the inclusion of exact exchange and non-local van der Waals/dispersion interactions is crucial for predicting a microscopic structure of ambient liquid water that quantitatively agrees with experiment. In this work, we have used the local structure index (LSI) order parameter to analyze the local structure in such highly accurate ab initio liquid water. At ambient conditions, the LSI probability distribution, P(I), was unimodal with most water molecules characterized by more disordered high-density-like local environments. With thermal excitations removed, the resultant bimodal P(I) in the inherent potential energy surface (IPES) exhibited a 3:1 ratio between high- and low-density-like molecules, with the latter forming small connected clusters amid the predominant population. By considering the spatial correlations and hydrogen bond network topologies among water molecules with the same LSI identities, we demonstrate that the signatures of the experimentally observed low- and high-density amorphous phases of ice are present in the IPES of ambient liquid water This work was supported by the DOE: DE-SC0008626, DE-SC0005180.

  1. Electric-field-induced local and mesoscale structural changes in polycrystalline dielectrics and ferroelectrics

    DOE PAGES

    Usher, Tedi -Marie; Levin, Igor; Daniels, John E.; ...

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the atomic-scale response of dielectrics/ferroelectrics to electric fields is central to their functionality. Here we introduce an in situ characterization method that reveals changes in the local atomic structure in polycrystalline materials under fields. The method employs atomic pair distribution functions (PDFs), determined from X-ray total scattering that depends on orientation relative to the applied field, to probe structural changes over length scales from sub-Ångstrom to several nanometres. The PDF is sensitive to local ionic displacements and their short-range order, a key uniqueness relative to other techniques. The method is applied to representative ferroelectrics, BaTiO3 and Na½Bi½TiO3,more » and dielectric SrTiO3. For Na½Bi½TiO3, the results reveal an abrupt field-induced monoclinic to rhombohedral phase transition, accompanied by ordering of the local Bi displacements and reorientation of the nanoscale ferroelectric domains. For BaTiO3 and SrTiO3, the local/nanoscale structural changes observed in the PDFs are dominated by piezoelectric lattice strain and ionic polarizability, respectively.« less

  2. Electric-field-induced local and mesoscale structural changes in polycrystalline dielectrics and ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Usher, Tedi -Marie; Levin, Igor; Daniels, John E.; Jones, Jacob L.

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the atomic-scale response of dielectrics/ferroelectrics to electric fields is central to their functionality. Here we introduce an in situ characterization method that reveals changes in the local atomic structure in polycrystalline materials under fields. The method employs atomic pair distribution functions (PDFs), determined from X-ray total scattering that depends on orientation relative to the applied field, to probe structural changes over length scales from sub-Ångstrom to several nanometres. The PDF is sensitive to local ionic displacements and their short-range order, a key uniqueness relative to other techniques. The method is applied to representative ferroelectrics, BaTiO3 and Na½Bi½TiO3, and dielectric SrTiO3. For Na½Bi½TiO3, the results reveal an abrupt field-induced monoclinic to rhombohedral phase transition, accompanied by ordering of the local Bi displacements and reorientation of the nanoscale ferroelectric domains. For BaTiO3 and SrTiO3, the local/nanoscale structural changes observed in the PDFs are dominated by piezoelectric lattice strain and ionic polarizability, respectively.

  3. Structural and functional characterization of human telomerase RNA processing and cajal body localization signals.

    PubMed

    Theimer, Carla A; Jády, Beáta E; Chim, Nicholas; Richard, Patricia; Breece, Katherine E; Kiss, Tamás; Feigon, Juli

    2007-09-21

    The RNA component of human telomerase (hTR) includes H/ACA and CR7 domains required for 3' end processing, localization, and accumulation. The terminal loop of the CR7 domain contains the CAB box (ugAG) required for targeting of scaRNAs to Cajal bodies (CB) and an uncharacterized sequence required for accumulation and processing. To dissect out the contributions of the CR7 stem loop to hTR processing and localization, we solved the solution structures of the 3' terminal stem loops of hTR CR7 and U64 H/ACA snoRNA, and the 5' terminal stem loop of U85 C/D-H/ACA scaRNA. These structures, together with analysis of localization, processing, and accumulation of hTRs containing nucleotide substitutions in the CR7 domain, identified the sequence and structural requirements of the hTR processing and CB localization signals and showed that these signals are functionally independent. Further, 3' end processing was found to be a prerequisite for translocation of hTR to CBs.

  4. Functional and structural basis of the nuclear localization signal in the ZIC3 zinc finger domain

    PubMed Central

    Hatayama, Minoru; Tomizawa, Tadashi; Sakai-Kato, Kumiko; Bouvagnet, Patrice; Kose, Shingo; Imamoto, Naoko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Utsunomiya-Tate, Naoko; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Kigawa, Takanori; Aruga, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Disruptions in ZIC3 cause heterotaxy, a congenital anomaly of the left–right axis. ZIC3 encodes a nuclear protein with a zinc finger (ZF) domain that contains five tandem C2H2 ZF motifs. Missense mutations in the first ZF motif (ZF1) result in defective nuclear localization, which may underlie the pathogenesis of heterotaxy. Here we revealed the structural and functional basis of the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of ZIC3 and investigated its relationship to the defect caused by ZF1 mutation. The ZIC3 NLS was located in the ZF2 and ZF3 regions, rather than ZF1. Several basic residues interspersed throughout these regions were responsible for the nuclear localization, but R320, K337 and R350 were particularly important. NMR structure analysis revealed that ZF1–4 had a similar structure to GLI ZF, and the basic side chains of the NLS clustered together in two regions on the protein surface, similar to classical bipartite NLSs. Among the residues for the ZF1 mutations, C253 and H286 were positioned for the metal chelation, whereas W255 was positioned in the hydrophobic core formed by ZF1 and ZF2. Tryptophan 255 was a highly conserved inter-finger connector and formed part of a structural motif (tandem CXW-C-H-H) that is shared with GLI, Glis and some fungal ZF proteins. Furthermore, we found that knockdown of Karyopherin α1/α6 impaired ZIC3 nuclear localization, and physical interactions between the NLS and the nuclear import adapter proteins were disturbed by mutations in the NLS but not by W255G. These results indicate that ZIC3 is imported into the cell nucleus by the Karyopherin (Importin) system and that the impaired nuclear localization by the ZF1 mutation is not due to a direct influence on the NLS. PMID:18716025

  5. Visualizing cell structure and function with point-localization superresolution imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Prabuddha; Van Engelenburg, Schuyler; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Fundamental to the success of cell and developmental biology is the ability to tease apart molecular organization in cells and tissues by localizing specific proteins with respect to one another in a native cellular context. However, many key cellular structures (from mitochondrial cristae to nuclear pores) lie below the diffraction limit of visible light, precluding analysis of their organization by conventional approaches. Point-localization superresolution microscopy techniques, such as PALM and STORM, are poised to resolve, with unprecedented clarity, the organizational principles of macromolecular complexes within cells, thus leading to deeper insights into cellular function in both health and disease. PMID:23237943

  6. Probing Local Structures in ZrO2 Nanocrystals Using EXAFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soo, Y. L.; Chen, P. J.; Huang, S. H.; Shiu, T. J.; Tsai, T. Y.; Chow, Y. H.; Lin, Y. C.; Weng, S. C.; Chang, S. L.; Lee, J. F.; Cheung, C. L.; Sabirianov, R. F.; Namavar, F.; Mei, W. N.

    2008-03-01

    Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) has been employed to investigate the local structures surrounding Zr in cubic zirconia thin films prepared by an ion beam assisted deposition technique. These materials have demonstrated promising mechanical properties such as improved hardness and lubricant wettability compared to yttria-stabilized zirconia. To verify the cubic structure of zirconia in films prepared under different growth conditions and to fully understand the mechanism leading to their unique physical properties, the structural information is a required prerequisite. Since zirconia is in the form of nanosized crystallets, conventional x-ray diffraction method is not useful for this purpose. Our x-ray results reveal cubic-like structure with O vacancies around Zr in several nanocrystal samples. Powders of cubic zirconia prepared using chemical methods were also measured for comparison.

  7. The Comparative Structural Study of Vitreous Matrices P{sub 2}O{sub 5}centre dotMeO [MeO ident to Li{sub 2}O (M{sub 1}) or CaO (M{sub 2})] Systems and {sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}(100-x)[P{sub 2}O{sub 5}centre dotMeO] Glasses by Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Andronache, C.

    2010-01-21

    For getting information about the way in which the structural units presented in glass matrices P{sub 2}O{sub 5}centre dotLi{sub 2}O (M{sub 1}) and P{sub 2}O{sub 5}centre dotCaO (M{sub 2}) are modifying with the substitutions Li{sub 2}O with CaO, these glasses where investigated by Raman spectroscopies. The absorption bands obtained and their assignments for each those two matrices are summarized. The influence of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} content on the structure of M1 and M2 matrices was followed.

  8. Local structure of temperature and pH-sensitive colloidal microgels

    SciTech Connect

    Nigro, Valentina Bruni, Fabio; Ricci, Maria Antonietta; Angelini, Roberta; Ruzicka, Barbara; Bertoldo, Monica; Castelvetro, Valter; Rogers, Sarah

    2015-09-21

    The temperature dependence of the local intra-particle structure of colloidal microgel particles, composed of interpenetrated polymer networks, has been investigated by small-angle neutron scattering at different pH and concentrations, in the range (299÷315) K, where a volume phase transition from a swollen to a shrunken state takes place. Data are well described by a theoretical model that takes into account the presence of both interpenetrated polymer networks and cross-linkers. Two different behaviors are found across the volume phase transition. At neutral pH and T ≈ 307 K, a sharp change of the local structure from a water rich open inhomogeneous interpenetrated polymer network to a homogeneous porous solid-like structure after expelling water is observed. Differently, at acidic pH, the local structure changes almost continuously. These findings demonstrate that a fine control of the pH of the system allows to tune the sharpness of the volume-phase transition.

  9. FBG and FOPS for local and global structural health monitoring on a single fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheshwari, Muneesh; Tjin, Swee Chuan; Ching, Wei Wen; Asundi, A.

    2015-04-01

    Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors and fiber optic polarimetric sensors (FOPS) have been widely researched and implemented for structural health monitoring (SHM). FBG essentially provides localized strain information, while FOPS gives a global indication of the structural health of materials. An FBG written on the polarization maintaining (PM) fiber can thus be used for both global structural monitoring and local strain sensing. However each sensor has to be used with its own hardware and processing. For gratings written on PM fibers two Bragg reflections, corresponding to two modes of polarization, are observed. While both Bragg wavelengths shift under longitudinal strain in unison, their relative peak amplitude does not change. In this paper, a novel concept is proposed which makes the peak amplitudes responsive to the longitudinal strain. This relative amplitude of both the peaks is used for the first time to determine the state of polarization (SOP) with no additional optical systems. With this additional information on SOP, PM-FBGs can be used for both, local and global SHM simultaneously. Further, a new design has been proposed which gives improved information on the damaged location in beam structures. This can be further extended to other complex geometries.

  10. Rearrangement dynamics in colloidal particle packings identified through local structure and machine-learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Zoey S.; Still, Tim; Gratale, Matthew D.; Ma, Xiaoguang; Schoenholz, Samuel S.; Sussman, Daniel M.; Liu, A. J.; Yodh, A. G.

    We explore the connection between measures of local structure and particle rearrangements in soft thermal quasi-two-dimensional colloidal systems employing a machine learning approach. Local structure is characterized by two and three point structure functions that measure radial and angular distributions of particles, and rearrangements are identified by a measure of change in average colloidal particle position. By generating labeled training data, we can extract the features of these functions that contribute to the likelihood of a rearrangement. In particular, we use a machine-learning algorithm to construct a decision function in the form of a scalar field we call softness that with high accuracy labels regions of particles more likely to rearrange. Thus, we can predict dynamic rearrangements from the instantaneous local structure. The softness field remains a good predictor when we vary the packing fraction between training and test data sets. In glassy samples, the softness field can identify aging as particles become less likely to undergo cage rearrangements. We gratefully acknowledge financial support through NSF DMR12-05463, MRSEC DMR11-20901, NASA NNX08AO0G, and DE-FG02-05ER46199.

  11. Protein subcellular localization prediction based on compartment-specific features and structure conservation

    PubMed Central

    Su, Emily Chia-Yu; Chiu, Hua-Sheng; Lo, Allan; Hwang, Jenn-Kang; Sung, Ting-Yi; Hsu, Wen-Lian

    2007-01-01

    Background Protein subcellular localization is crucial for genome annotation, protein function prediction, and drug discovery. Determination of subcellular localization using experimental approaches is time-consuming; thus, computational approaches become highly desirable. Extensive studies of localization prediction have led to the development of several methods including composition-based and homology-based methods. However, their performance might be significantly degraded if homologous sequences are not detected. Moreover, methods that integrate various features could suffer from the problem of low coverage in high-throughput proteomic analyses due to the lack of information to characterize unknown proteins. Results We propose a hybrid prediction method for Gram-negative bacteria that combines a one-versus-one support vector machines (SVM) model and a structural homology approach. The SVM model comprises a number of binary classifiers, in which biological features derived from Gram-negative bacteria translocation pathways are incorporated. In the structural homology approach, we employ secondary structure alignment for structural similarity comparison and assign the known localization of the top-ranked protein as the predicted localization of a query protein. The hybrid method achieves overall accuracy of 93.7% and 93.2% using ten-fold cross-validation on the benchmark data sets. In the assessment of the evaluation data sets, our method also attains accurate prediction accuracy of 84.0%, especially when testing on sequences with a low level of homology to the training data. A three-way data split procedure is also incorporated to prevent overestimation of the predictive performance. In addition, we show that the prediction accuracy should be approximately 85% for non-redundant data sets of sequence identity less than 30%. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that biological features derived from Gram-negative bacteria translocation pathways yield a significant

  12. Local structure, composition, and crystallization mechanism of a model two-phase “composite nanoglass”

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, Soma; Shibata, Tomohiro; Kelly, S. D.; Balasubramanian, M.; Srinivasan, S. G.; Du, Jincheng; Banerjee, Rajarshi; Ayyub, Pushan

    2016-02-14

    We report a detailed study of the local composition and structure of a model, bi-phasic nanoglass with nominal stoichiometry Cu{sub 55}Nb{sub 45}. Three dimensional atom probe data suggest a nanoscale-phase-separated glassy structure having well defined Cu-rich and Nb-rich regions with a characteristic length scale of ≈3 nm. However, extended x-ray absorption fine structure analysis indicates subtle differences in the local environments of Cu and Nb. While the Cu atoms displayed a strong tendency to cluster and negligible structural order beyond the first coordination shell, the Nb atoms had a larger fraction of unlike neighbors (higher chemical order) and a distinctly better-ordered structural environment (higher topological order). This provides the first experimental indication that metallic glass formation may occur due to frustration arising from the competition between chemical ordering and clustering. These observations are complemented by classical as well as ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Our study indicates that these nanoscale phase-separated glasses are quite distinct from the single phase nanoglasses (studied by Gleiter and others) in the following three respects: (i) they contain at least two structurally and compositionally distinct, nanodispersed, glassy phases, (ii) these phases are separated by comparatively sharp inter-phase boundaries, and (iii) thermally induced crystallization occurs via a complex, multi-step mechanism. Such materials, therefore, appear to constitute a new class of disordered systems that may be called a composite nanoglass.

  13. Local structure in the disordered solid solution of cis- and trans-perinones.

    PubMed

    Teteruk, Jaroslav L; Glinnemann, Jürgen; Heyse, Winfried; Johansson, Kristoffer E; van de Streek, Jacco; Schmidt, Martin U

    2016-06-01

    The cis- and trans-isomers of the polycyclic aromatic compound perinone, C26H12N4O2, form a solid solution (Vat Red 14). This solid solution is isotypic to the crystal structures of cis-perinone (Pigment Red 194) and trans-perinone (Pigment Orange 34) and exhibits a combined positional and orientational disorder: In the crystal, each molecular position is occupied by either a cis- or trans-perinone molecule, both of which have two possible molecular orientations. The structure of cis-perinone exhibits a twofold orientational disorder, whereas the structure of trans-perinone is ordered. The crystal structure of the solid solution was determined by single-crystal X-ray analysis. Extensive lattice-energy minimizations with force-field and DFT-D methods were carried out on combinatorially complete sets of ordered models. For the disordered systems, local structures were calculated, including preferred local arrangements, ordering lengths, and probabilities for the arrangement of neighbouring molecules. The superposition of the atomic positions of all energetically favourable calculated models corresponds well with the experimentally determined crystal structures, explaining not only the atomic positions, but also the site occupancies and anisotropic displacement parameters.

  14. Local structure, composition, and crystallization mechanism of a model two-phase “composite nanoglass”

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, Soma; Kelly, S. D.; Shibata, Tomohiro; Balasubramanian, M.; Srinivasan, S. G.; Du, Jincheng; Banerjee, Rajarshi; Ayyub, Pushan

    2016-02-14

    We report a detailed study of the local composition and structure of a model, bi-phasic nanoglass with nominal stoichiometry Cu55Nb45. Three dimensional atom probe data suggest a nanoscale-phase-separated glassy structure having well defined Cu-rich and Nb-rich regions with a characteristic length scale of ≈3 nm. However, extended x-ray absorption fine structure analysis indicates subtle differences in the local environments of Cu and Nb. While the Cu atoms displayed a strong tendency to cluster and negligible structural order beyond the first coordination shell, the Nb atoms had a larger fraction of unlike neighbors (higher chemical order) and a distinctly better-ordered structural environment (higher topological order). This provides the first experimental indication that metallic glass formation may occur due to frustration arising from the competition between chemical ordering and clustering. These observations are complemented by classical as well as ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Our study indicates that these nanoscale phase-separated glasses are quite distinct from the single phase nanoglasses (studied by Gleiter and others) in the following three respects: (i) they contain at least two structurally and compositionally distinct, nanodispersed, glassy phases, (ii) these phases are separated by comparatively sharp inter-phase boundaries, and (iii) thermally induced crystallization occurs via a complex, multi-step mechanism. Such materials, therefore, appear to constitute a new class of disordered systems that may be called a composite nanoglass.

  15. Protein function annotation with Structurally Aligned Local Sites of Activity (SALSAs).

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhouxi; Yin, Pengcheng; Lee, Joslynn S; Parasuram, Ramya; Somarowthu, Srinivas; Ondrechen, Mary Jo

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of biochemical function from the 3D structure of a protein has proved to be much more difficult than was originally foreseen. A reliable method to test the likelihood of putative annotations and to predict function from structure would add tremendous value to structural genomics data. We report on a new method, Structurally Aligned Local Sites of Activity (SALSA), for the prediction of biochemical function based on a local structural match at the predicted catalytic or binding site. Implementation of the SALSA method is described. For the structural genomics protein PY01515 (PDB ID 2aqw) from Plasmodium yoelii, it is shown that the putative annotation, Orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC), is most likely correct. SALSA analysis of YP_001304206.1 (PDB ID 3h3l), a putative sugar hydrolase from Parabacteroides distasonis, shows that its active site does not bear close resemblance to any previously characterized member of its superfamily, the Concanavalin A-like lectins/glucanases. It is noted that three residues in the active site of the thermophilic beta-1,4-xylanase from Nonomuraea flexuosa (PDB ID 1m4w), Y78, E87, and E176, overlap with POOL-predicted residues of similar type, Y168, D153, and E232, in YP_001304206.1. The substrate recognition regions of the two proteins are rather different, suggesting that YP_001304206.1 is a new functional type within the superfamily. A structural genomics protein from Mycobacterium avium (PDB ID 3q1t) has been reported to be an enoyl-CoA hydratase (ECH), but SALSA analysis shows a poor match between the predicted residues for the SG protein and those of known ECHs. A better local structural match is obtained with Anabaena beta-diketone hydrolase (ABDH), a known β-diketone hydrolase from Cyanobacterium anabaena (PDB ID 2j5s). This suggests that the reported ECH function of the SG protein is incorrect and that it is more likely a β-diketone hydrolase. A local site match provides a more compelling

  16. Protein function annotation with Structurally Aligned Local Sites of Activity (SALSAs)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The prediction of biochemical function from the 3D structure of a protein has proved to be much more difficult than was originally foreseen. A reliable method to test the likelihood of putative annotations and to predict function from structure would add tremendous value to structural genomics data. We report on a new method, Structurally Aligned Local Sites of Activity (SALSA), for the prediction of biochemical function based on a local structural match at the predicted catalytic or binding site. Results Implementation of the SALSA method is described. For the structural genomics protein PY01515 (PDB ID 2aqw) from Plasmodium yoelii, it is shown that the putative annotation, Orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC), is most likely correct. SALSA analysis of YP_001304206.1 (PDB ID 3h3l), a putative sugar hydrolase from Parabacteroides distasonis, shows that its active site does not bear close resemblance to any previously characterized member of its superfamily, the Concanavalin A-like lectins/glucanases. It is noted that three residues in the active site of the thermophilic beta-1,4-xylanase from Nonomuraea flexuosa (PDB ID 1m4w), Y78, E87, and E176, overlap with POOL-predicted residues of similar type, Y168, D153, and E232, in YP_001304206.1. The substrate recognition regions of the two proteins are rather different, suggesting that YP_001304206.1 is a new functional type within the superfamily. A structural genomics protein from Mycobacterium avium (PDB ID 3q1t) has been reported to be an enoyl-CoA hydratase (ECH), but SALSA analysis shows a poor match between the predicted residues for the SG protein and those of known ECHs. A better local structural match is obtained with Anabaena beta-diketone hydrolase (ABDH), a known β-diketone hydrolase from Cyanobacterium anabaena (PDB ID 2j5s). This suggests that the reported ECH function of the SG protein is incorrect and that it is more likely a β-diketone hydrolase. Conclusions A local site match

  17. Local Adaptation and Vector-Mediated Population Structure in Plasmodium vivax Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Ceron, Lilia; Carlton, Jane M.; Gueye, Amy; Fay, Michael; McCutchan, Thomas F.; Su, Xin-zhuan

    2008-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax in southern Mexico exhibits different infectivities to 2 local mosquito vectors, Anopheles pseudopunctipennis and Anopheles albimanus. Previous work has tied these differences in mosquito infectivity to variation in the central repeat motif of the malaria parasite's circumsporozoite (csp) gene, but subsequent studies have questioned this view. Here we present evidence that P. vivax in southern Mexico comprised 3 genetic populations whose distributions largely mirror those of the 2 mosquito vectors. Additionally, laboratory colony feeding experiments indicate that parasite populations are most compatible with sympatric mosquito species. Our results suggest that reciprocal selection between malaria parasites and mosquito vectors has led to local adaptation of the parasite. Adaptation to local vectors may play an important role in generating population structure in Plasmodium. A better understanding of coevolutionary dynamics between sympatric mosquitoes and parasites will facilitate the identification of molecular mechanisms relevant to disease transmission in nature and provide crucial information for malaria control. PMID:18385220

  18. Numerical modeling of local scour around hydraulic structure in sandy beds by dynamic mesh method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Fei; Liang, Bingchen; Bai, Yuchuan; Zhu, Zhixia; Zhu, Yanjun

    2017-10-01

    Local scour, a non-negligible factor in hydraulic engineering, endangers the safety of hydraulic structures. In this work, a numerical model for simulating local scour was constructed, based on the open source code computational fluid dynamics model OpenFOAM. We consider both the bedload and suspended load sediment transport in the scour model and adopt the dynamic mesh method to simulate the evolution of the bed elevation. We use the finite area method to project data between the three-dimensional flow model and the two-dimensional (2D) scour model. We also improved the 2D sand slide method and added it to the scour model to correct the bed bathymetry when the bed slope angle exceeds the angle of repose. Moreover, to validate our scour model, we conducted and compared the results of three experiments with those of the developed model. The validation results show that our developed model can reliably simulate local scour.

  19. Chromosomal localization and structure of the human type II IMP dehydrogenase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Glesne, D.; Huberman, E. |; Collart, F.; Varkony, T.; Drabkin, H.

    1994-05-01

    We determined the chromosomal localization and structure of the gene encoding human type II inosine 5{prime}-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH, EC 1.1.1.205), an enzyme associated with cellular proliferation, malignant transformation, and differentiation. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers specific for type II IMPDH, we screened a panel of human-Chinese hamster cell somatic hybrids and a separate deletion panel of chromosome 3 hybrids and localized the gene to 3p21.1{yields}p24.2. Two overlapping yeast artificial chromosome clones containing the full gene for type II IMPDH were isolated and a physical map of 117 kb of human genomic DNA in this region of chromosome 3 was constructed. The gene for type II IMPDH was localized and oriented on this map and found to span no more than 12.5 kb.

  20. Multi-cavity locally resonant structure with the low frequency and broad band-gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jiulong; Yao, Hong; Du, Jun; Zhao, Jinbo

    2016-11-01

    A multi-cavity periodic structure with the characteristic of local resonance was proposed in the paper. The low frequency band-gap structure was comparatively analyzed by the finite element method (FEM) and electric circuit analogy (ECA). Low frequency band-gap can be opened through the dual influence of the coupling's resonance in the cavity and the interaction among the couplings between structures. Finally, the influence of the structural factors on the band-gap was analyzed. The results show that the structure, which is divided into three parts equally, has a broader effective band-gap below the frequency of 200 Hz. It is also proved that reducing the interval between unit structures can increase the intensity of the couplings among the structures. And in this way, the width of band-gap would be expanded significantly. Through the parameters adjustment, the structure enjoys a satisfied sound insulation effect below the frequency of 500Hz. In the area of low frequency noise reduction, the structure has a lot of potential applications.

  1. TAP score: torsion angle propensity normalization applied to local protein structure evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Tosatto, Silvio CE; Battistutta, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    Background Experimentally determined protein structures may contain errors and require validation. Conformational criteria based on the Ramachandran plot are mainly used to distinguish between distorted and adequately refined models. While the readily available criteria are sufficient to detect totally wrong structures, establishing the more subtle differences between plausible structures remains more challenging. Results A new criterion, called TAP score, measuring local sequence to structure fitness based on torsion angle propensities normalized against the global minimum and maximum is introduced. It is shown to be more accurate than previous methods at estimating the validity of a protein model in terms of commonly used experimental quality parameters on two test sets representing the full PDB database and a subset of obsolete PDB structures. Highly selective TAP thresholds are derived to recognize over 90% of the top experimental structures in the absence of experimental information. Both a web server and an executable version of the TAP score are available at . Conclusion A novel procedure for energy normalization (TAP) has significantly improved the possibility to recognize the best experimental structures. It will allow the user to more reliably isolate problematic structures in the context of automated experimental structure determination. PMID:17504537

  2. Delay-induced depinning of localized structures in a spatially inhomogeneous Swift-Hohenberg model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabbert, Felix; Schelte, Christian; Tlidi, Mustapha; Gurevich, Svetlana V.

    2017-03-01

    We report on the dynamics of localized structures in an inhomogeneous Swift-Hohenberg model describing pattern formation in the transverse plane of an optical cavity. This real order parameter equation is valid close to the second-order critical point associated with bistability. The optical cavity is illuminated by an inhomogeneous spatial Gaussian pumping beam and subjected to time-delayed feedback. The Gaussian injection beam breaks the translational symmetry of the system by exerting an attracting force on the localized structure. We show that the localized structure can be pinned to the center of the inhomogeneity, suppressing the delay-induced drift bifurcation that has been reported in the particular case where the injection is homogeneous, assuming a continuous wave operation. Under an inhomogeneous spatial pumping beam, we perform the stability analysis of localized solutions to identify different instability regimes induced by time-delayed feedback. In particular, we predict the formation of two-arm spirals, as well as oscillating and depinning dynamics caused by the interplay of an attracting inhomogeneity and destabilizing time-delayed feedback. The transition from oscillating to depinning solutions is investigated by means of numerical continuation techniques. Analytically, we use an order parameter approach to derive a normal form of the delay-induced Hopf bifurcation leading to an oscillating solution. Additionally we model the interplay of an attracting inhomogeneity and destabilizing time delay by describing the localized solution as an overdamped particle in a potential well generated by the inhomogeneity. In this case, the time-delayed feedback acts as a driving force. Comparing results from the later approach with the full Swift-Hohenberg model, we show that the approach not only provides an instructive description of the depinning dynamics, but also is numerically accurate throughout most of the parameter regime.

  3. The positional, structural, and sequence requirements of the Drosophila TLS RNA localization element

    PubMed Central

    COHEN, ROBERT S.; ZHANG, SUI; DOLLAR, GRETCHEN L.

    2005-01-01

    The subcellular localization of mRNAs is a key step in the polarization of cells in organisms from yeast to man. Here, we use a transgenic fly/in situ hybridization assay system to define the positional, structural, and sequence requirements of the TLS, a stem loop RNA sequence element that mediates the subcellular localization of K10 and Orb transcripts in Drosophila oocytes. We find that the TLS is a highly robust and modular element. It mediates efficient RNA localization regardless of sequence context or position within the transcript. Site-specific mutagenesis experiments indicate that the size and shape of the stem and loop regions are critical determinants of TLS activity. Such experiments also identify specific base residues that are important for TLS activity. All such residues map to the stem portion of the structure. Significantly, mutations at these residues interfere with TLS activity only when they alter the stereochemistry of the stem’s minor groove. For example, mutation of the A:U base pair at position 3 of the TLS stem to G:C severely reduces TLS activity, while mutation of the same base pair to U:A has no effect. Extensive searches for TLS-like elements in other Drosophila mRNAs using sequence and structural parameters defined by our experiments indicate that the TLS is unique to K10 and Orb mRNAs. This unexpected finding raises important questions as to how the many hundreds of other mRNAs that are known or thought to exhibit K10 and Orb-like localization are localized. PMID:15987813

  4. Direct probe of interplay between local structure and superconductivity in FeTe₀.₅₅Se₀.₄₅.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wenzhi; Li, Qing; Sales, Brian C; Jesse, Stephen; Sefat, Athena S; Kalinin, Sergei V; Pan, Minghu

    2013-03-26

    The relationship between atomically defined structures and physical properties in functional materials remains a subject of constant interest. We explore the interplay between local crystallographic structure, composition, and local superconductive properties in iron chalcogenide superconductors. Direct structural analysis of scanning tunneling microscopy data allows local lattice distortions and structural defects across an FeTe0.55Se0.45 surface to be explored on a single unit-cell level. Concurrent superconducting gap (SG) mapping reveals suppression of the SG at well-defined structural defects, identified as a local structural distortion. The strong structural distortion causes the vanishing of the superconducting state. This study provides insight into the origins of superconductivity in iron chalcogenides by providing an example of atomic-level studies of the structure-property relationship.

  5. Local structure in diatom biosilica probed by synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dibiccari, Michael; Kwak, Seo-Young; Hind, Geoffrey; Dimasi, Elaine

    2006-03-01

    Diatoms are single-celled algae that form intricate outer shells, or frustrules, composed of biosilica. They have attracted attention in the context of nanotechnology, since the submicron architectures are genetically determined and thus potentially could be reproduced synthetically, by using organic additives that mimic the proteins responsible for controlling biological silicification. We have compared the local atomic structure of diatom biosilica to that of inorganic silica with synchrotron x-ray diffraction, analyzed as the Pair Distribution Function (PDF). Specimens of Thalassiosira weissflogii (Tw) were cleaned of organic matter using either hydrogen peroxide, commercial bleach, or sodium dodecyl sulfate treatments. Low resolution PDF measurements (qmax 13.6 å-1) were made of wet and dry Tw, pure silica microspheres, and diatomaceous earth containing 15% mineral impurities. All samples have similar PDFs, demonstrating that local structure in diatoms and synthetic silica are equivalent, and that the PDF method is insensitive to biological impurites.

  6. Local Electronic Structure of a Single Magnetic Impurity in a Superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Flatte, M.E.; Byers, J.M.

    1997-05-01

    We present the first three-dimensional, self-consistent calculation of the electronic structure near a strong classical magnetic impurity in a superconductor. Localized excited states are found within the energy gap which are half electron and half hole. The spatial structure of the positive-frequency (electronlike) spectral weight (or local density of states) can differ strongly from that of the negative frequency (holelike) spectral weight. The effect of the impurity on the continuum states above the energy gap is calculated with good spectral resolution for the first time. For sufficiently strong impurity potentials, the order parameter may change sign at the impurity site. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. A Numerical Analysis on the Local Deformation of a Spacer Grid Structure for Nuclear Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Myung-Geun; Na, Geum Ju; Shin, Hyunho; Kim, Jong-Bong

    2016-08-01

    The result of a preliminary numerical investigation on local deformation characteristics of a multi-layered spacer-grid structure with five guide tubes is reported based on implicit finite element analysis. For the numerical analysis, displacements of top and bottom cross sections of each guide tube in a single-layer model were constrained while a lateral displacement was imposed on the single layer. Unlike the impact hammer test that is generally employed to characterize the deformation characteristics of the space-grid structure, the buckling phenomenon occurs locally in this study; it takes place at the inner grids around each tube and the degree of bucking is more apparent for tubes near the lateral surface where the lateral displacement was imposed.

  8. The phase diagram of molybdenum at extreme conditions and the role of local liquid structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M

    2008-08-15

    Recent DAC measurements made of the Mo melting curve by the x-ray diffraction studies confirms that, up to at least 110 GPa (3300K) melting is directly from bcc to liquid, evidence that there is no basis for a speculated bcc-hcp or fcc transition. An examination of the Poisson Ratio, obtained from shock sound speed measurements, provides evidence that the 210 GPa (4100K) transition detected from shock experiments is a continuation of the bcc-liquid melting, but is from a bcc-to a solid-like mixed phase rather than to liquid. Calculations, modeled to include the free energy of liquid local structures, predict that the transition from the liquid to the mixed phase is near 150 GPa(3500K). The presence of local structures provides the simplest and most direct explanation for the Mo phase diagram, and the low melting slopes.

  9. Fluctuations and Local Structure in Two-Dimensional Lennard--Jones Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitus, A. C.; Orlik, R.; Patashinski, A. Z.; Patrykiejew, A.; Sokolowski, S.; Riefert, O.

    2003-07-01

    We quantify the concept of ensembles of atoms' fluctuations for 2D liquids close to and in the two-phase coexistence region, using a probabilistic method of local structure analysis. Two ensembles are studied: gas-like independent gaussian fluctuations (IGF) A.C. Mitu�, A.Z. Patashinski, A. Patrykiejew, S. Sokolowski, Phys. Rev. B66, 184202 (2002) and a truly solid-like fluctuations (SF) characteristic for a two-dimensional (2D) triangular solid. For a 2D Lennard--Jones (LJ) system simulated using Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics methods those ensembles yield a statistically reliable description of local solid-like structures in the two-phase region. Both ensembles undergo a spectacular breakdown as the density changes. A hypothetical relation of this breakdown to the behaviour of the heat capacity in the two-phase region is proposed.

  10. Bio-medical imaging: Localization of main structures in retinal fundus images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basit, A.; Egerton, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    Retinal fundus images have three main structures, the optic disk, fovea and blood vessels. By examining fundus images, an ophthalmologist can diagnose various clinical disorders of the eye and the body, typically indicated by changes in the diameter, area, branching angles and tortuosity of the three ma in retinal structures. Knowledge of the optic disk position is an important diagnostic index fo r many diseases related to the retina. In this paper, localization of optic disc is discussed. Optic disk detection is based on morphological operationsand smoothing filters. Blood vessels are extracted using the green component of a colour retinal image with the help of a median filter. Maximum intensity values are validated with blood vessels to localize the optic disk location. The proposed method has shown significant improvements in results.

  11. Local structure of germanium-sulfur, germanium-selenium, and germanium-tellurium vitreous alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bordovsky, G. A.; Terukov, E. I.; Anisimova, N. I.; Marchenko, A. V.; Seregin, P. P.

    2009-09-15

    {sup 119}Sn and {sup 129}Te ({sup 129}I) Moessbauer spectroscopy showed that chalcogen-enriched Ge{sub 100-y}X{sub y} (X = S, Se, Te) glasses are constructed of structural units including two-coordinated chalcogen atoms in chains such as Ge-X-Ge- and Ge-X-X-Ge-. Germanium in these glasses is only tetravalent and four-coordinated, and only chalcogen atoms are in the local environment of germanium atoms. Chalcogen-depleted glasses are constructed of structural units including two-coordinated (in Ge-X-Ge- chains) and three-coordinated chalcogen atoms (in -Ge-X-Ge- chains). Germanium in these glasses stabilizes in both the tetravalent four-coordinated and divalent three-coordinated states, and only chalcogen atoms are in the local environment of germanium atoms.

  12. Effects of Local Structure on Seafloor Ambient Noise at the Hawaii-2 Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromirski, P. D.; Stephen, R.; Duennebier, F. K.

    2006-12-01

    Long time series of broadband (0.001-60Hz) seismometer and hydrophone data collected at the Hawaii-2 Observatory reveal many time independent characteristics in power spectral density and coherence that persist regardless of the type or location of the noise sources. These characteristics can be attributed to the water depth, sediment thickness, igneous crustal structure, and other geological features local to the observatory. It is important to recognize that these characteristics are due to local structure so that they do not confuse the interpretation of noise generated by storms and earthquakes in terms of other physical processes such as infra-gravity wave excitation and propagation, wave-wave interaction, breaking waves, Rayleigh/Stoneley/Scholte wave effects, and propagation and leakage from the ocean wave guide. Locally controlled signal characteristics include: 1) shear wave resonances (modes) in sediments (Godin and Chapman, 1999), 2) water multiples (organ pipe modes) in the ocean (Bradner et al, BSSA, 1970), and 3) secondary scattering of Scholte waves from local seafloor heterogeneities (Dorman et al, in Natural Physical Sources of Underwater Sound, Kerman et al (ed.), Kluwer, 1993). Sediment resonances particularly can act as an amplifier for excitation by natural and controlled sources.

  13. Impact localization on composite structures using time difference and MUSIC approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yongteng; Xiang, Jiawei

    2017-05-01

    1-D uniform linear array (ULA) has the shortcoming of the half-plane mirror effect, which does not allow discriminating between a target placed above the array and a target placed below the array. This paper presents time difference (TD) and multiple signal classification (MUSIC) based omni-directional impact localization on a large stiffened composite structure using improved linear array, which is able to perform omni-directional 360° localization. This array contains 2M+3 PZT sensors, where 2M+1 PZT sensors are arranged as a uniform linear array, and the other two PZT sensors are placed above and below the array. Firstly, the arrival times of impact signals observed by the other two sensors are determined using the wavelet transform. Compared with each other, the direction range of impact source can be decided in general, 0°to 180° or 180°to 360°. And then, two dimensional multiple signal classification (2D-MUSIC) based spatial spectrum formula using the uniform linear array is applied for impact localization by the general direction range. When the arrival times of impact signals observed by upper PZT is equal to that of lower PZT, the direction can be located in x axis (0°or 180°). And time difference based MUSIC method is present to locate impact position. To verify the proposed approach, the proposed approach is applied to a composite structure. The localization results are in good agreement with the actual impact occurring positions.

  14. Local and Regional Environmental Variables Important in Structuring Caddisfly (Trichoptera) Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galbraith, H. S.; Vaughn, C. C.

    2005-05-01

    Complex biotic and abiotic interactions coupled with the significance of scale have confounded the interpretation of community data. The use of multivariate statistical techniques has improved the way in which we are able to analyze this type of ecological data. We evaluated stream and riparian habitat features in southeastern Oklahoma at a range of spatial scales from local, in-stream variables to large-scale, regional characteristics to address the following questions: (1) How much variation in trichopteran community composition can be attributed to local, regional, and spatial variables? and (2) What environmental variables are most important in determining trichopteran community structure? Ten local and regional variables were identified as important to community structure using canonical correspondence analysis (CCA). In addition, straight-line distance between sampling sites and interconnectedness of the rivers are important in regulating caddisfly assemblages. We explained 71% of the variation in community composition with local habitat characteristics explaining the most variation (27.0%) followed by regional (8.9%) and spatial variables (2.5%). There was, however, considerable overlap in variation explained by these three suites of variables. Conservation efforts should minimize changes to river depth, substrate, and riparian conditions to preserve caddisfly communities.

  15. Scale-adaptive tensor algebra for local many-body methods of electronic structure theory

    SciTech Connect

    Liakh, Dmitry I

    2014-01-01

    While the formalism of multiresolution analysis (MRA), based on wavelets and adaptive integral representations of operators, is actively progressing in electronic structure theory (mostly on the independent-particle level and, recently, second-order perturbation theory), the concepts of multiresolution and adaptivity can also be utilized within the traditional formulation of correlated (many-particle) theory which is based on second quantization and the corresponding (generally nonorthogonal) tensor algebra. In this paper, we present a formalism called scale-adaptive tensor algebra (SATA) which exploits an adaptive representation of tensors of many-body operators via the local adjustment of the basis set quality. Given a series of locally supported fragment bases of a progressively lower quality, we formulate the explicit rules for tensor algebra operations dealing with adaptively resolved tensor operands. The formalism suggested is expected to enhance the applicability and reliability of local correlated many-body methods of electronic structure theory, especially those directly based on atomic orbitals (or any other localized basis functions).

  16. Nonlinear Localized Dissipative Structures for Long-Time Solution of Wave Equation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    Fatemi, E., Engquist, B., and Osher, S., " Numerical Solution of the High Frequency Asymptotic Expansion for the Scalar Wave Equation ", Journal of...FINAL REPORT Grant Title: Nonlinear Localized Dissipative Structures for Long-Time Solution of Wave Equation By Dr. John Steinhoff Grant number... numerical method, "Wave Confinement" (WC), is developed to efficiently solve the linear wave equation . This is similar to the originally developed

  17. Cavity light bullets: three-dimensional localized structures in a nonlinear optical resonator.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, Massimo; Maggipinto, Tommaso; Patera, Giuseppe; Columbo, Lorenzo

    2004-11-12

    We consider the paraxial model for a nonlinear resonator with a saturable absorber beyond the mean-field limit. For accessible parametric domains we observe total radiation confinement and the formation of 3D localized bright structures. Different from freely propagating light bullets, here the self-organization proceeds from the resonator feedback, combined with diffraction and nonlinearity. Such "cavity" light bullets can be independently excited and erased by appropriate pulses, and once created, they endlessly travel the cavity round-trip.

  18. Local atomic order, electronic structure and electron transport properties of Cu-Zr metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Antonowicz, J. Pietnoczka, A.; Pękała, K.; Latuch, J.; Evangelakis, G. A.

    2014-05-28

    We studied atomic and electronic structures of binary Cu-Zr metallic glasses (MGs) using combined experimental and computa