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Sample records for centrifugal blood pump

  1. [Hemodynamic analysis of a centrifugal blood pump].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Yang, Ming; Xu, Zihao; Zhuang, Xiaoqi; Li, Qilei; Xu, Liang

    2015-01-01

    This paper built the mathematical model of a centrifugal blood pump, which was designed by ourselves, combined it with that of the human cardiovascular system and simulated the coupling system using Matlab. Then we set up the experiment platform, linked the blood pump to mock human cardiovascular system in case of three-stage heart failure, and measured aortic pressure and flow under different speed. The comparison between experiment results and simulation results not only indicates the coupling model is correct and the blood pump works well, but also shows that with the increase of blood pump speed, the pulsation of aortic pressure and flow will be reduced, this situation will affect the structure and function of blood vessels.

  2. Design of a centrifugal blood pump: Heart Turcica Centrifugal.

    PubMed

    Demir, Onur; Biyikli, Emre; Lazoglu, Ismail; Kucukaksu, Suha

    2011-07-01

    A prototype of a new implantable centrifugal blood pump system named Heart Turcica Centrifugal (HTC) was developed as a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) for the treatment of end-stage cardiac failure. In the development of HTC, effects of blade height and volute tongue profiles on the hydraulic and hemolytic performances of the pump were investigated. As a result, the prototype was manufactured using the best blade height and volute tongue profiles. Performance of the prototype model was experimentally evaluated in a closed-loop flow system using water as the medium. The hydraulic performance requirement of an LVAD (5 L/min flow rate against a pressure difference of 100 mm Hg) was attained at 2800 rpm rotational speed.

  3. A straight path centrifugal blood pump concept in the Capiox centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Kijima, T; Oshiyama, H; Horiuchi, K; Nogawa, A; Hamasaki, H; Amano, N; Nojiri, C; Fukasawa, H; Akutsu, T

    1993-07-01

    This article describes comparative studies of a newly developed "straight path" centrifugal pump (Capiox centrifugal pump) targeted for open-heart surgery and circulatory support. A unique straight path design of the rotor was very effective in reducing the pump's rotational speed and prime volume. This pump was evaluated for hydraulics, hemolysis, depriming characteristics, cavitation, and heat generation. Two commercially available centrifugal pumps, the Biomedicus cone-type pump and the Sarns 3M impeller-type pump, were used as controls. The new pump required the lowest pump speed to produce the same flow rates under the same pressure loads and demonstrated the lowest hemolysis and the lowest temperature rise with the outlet clamped. The air volume required to deprime the new pump was one-third to one-half that for the other pumps, and no sign of cavitation was observed even if a small amount of air was introduced to the pump inlet under a negative pressure of 200 mm Hg.

  4. Magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with a radial magnetic driver.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Hideo; Katakoa, Kiroyuki; Ohuchi, Katsuhiro; Asama, Jun-ichi; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Shimokohbe, Akira; Takatani, Setsuo

    2005-01-01

    A new magnetic bearing has been designed to achieve a low electronic power requirement and high stiffness. The magnetic bearing consists of 1) radial passive forces between the permanent magnet ring mounted inside the impeller rotor and the electromagnet core materials in the pump casing and 2) radial active forces generated by the electromagnets using the two gap sensor signals. The magnetic bearing was assembled into a centrifugal rotary blood pump (CRBP) driven with a radial, magnetic coupled driver. The impeller vane shape was designed based upon the computational fluid dynamic simulation. The diameter and height of the CRBP were 75 mm and 50 mm, respectively. The magnetic bearing system required the power of 1.0-1.4 W. The radial impeller movement was controlled to within +/- 10 microm. High stiffness in the noncontrolled axes, Z, phi, and theta, was obtained by the passive magnetic forces. The pump flow of 5 L/min against 100 mm Hg head pressure was obtained at 1,800 rpm with the electrical to hydraulic efficiency being greater than 15%. The Normalized Index of Hemolysis (NIH) of the magnetic bearing CRBP was one fifth of the BioPump BP-80 and one half of the NIKKISO HPM-15 after 4 hours. The newly designed magnetic bearing with two degrees of freedom control in combination with optimized impeller vane was successful in achieving an excellent hemolytic performance in comparison with the clinical centrifugal blood pumps. PMID:15745136

  5. In vivo evaluation of centrifugal blood pump for cardiopulmonary bypass-Spiral Pump.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Cibele; da Silva, Bruno Utiyama; Leme, Juliana; Uebelhart, Beatriz; Dinkhuysen, Jarbas; Biscegli, José F; Andrade, Aron; Zavaglia, Cecília

    2013-11-01

    The Spiral Pump (SP), a centrifugal blood pump for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), has been developed at the Dante Pazzanese Institute of Cardiology/Adib Jatene Foundation laboratories, with support from Sintegra Company (Pompeia, Brazil). The SP is a disposable pump with an internal rotor-a conically shaped fuse with double entrance threads. This rotor is supported by two ball bearings, attached to a stainless steel shaft fixed to the housing base. Worm gears provide axial motion to the blood column, and the rotational motion of the conically shaped impeller generates a centrifugal pumping effect, improving pump efficiency without increasing hemolysis. In vitro tests were performed to evaluate the SP's hydrodynamic performance, and in vivo experiments were performed to evaluate hemodynamic impact during usual CPB. A commercially available centrifugal blood pump was used as reference. In vivo experiments were conducted in six male pigs weighing between 60 and 90 kg, placed on CPB for 6 h each. Blood samples were collected just before CPB (T0) and after every hour of CPB (T1-T6) for hemolysis determination and laboratory tests (hematological and biochemical). Values of blood pressure, mean flow, pump rotational speed, and corporeal temperature were recorded. Also, ergonomic conditions were recorded: presence of noise, difficulty in removing air bubbles, trouble in installing the pump in the drive module (console), and difficulties in mounting the CPB circuit. Comparing the laboratory and hemolysis results for the SP with those of the reference pump, we can conclude that there is no significant difference between the two devices. In addition, reports made by medical staff and perfusionists described a close similarity between the two devices. During in vivo experiments, the SP maintained blood flow and pressure at physiological levels, consistent with those applied in cardiac surgery with CPB, without presenting any malfunction. Also, the SP needed lower rotational

  6. The margin of safety in the use of a straight path centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kijima, T; Nojiri, C; Oshiyama, H; Horiuchi, K; Nogawa, A; Hamasaki, H; Ogihara, M; Katsuda, H S; Amano, N; Fukasawa, H

    1994-09-01

    A new centrifugal blood pump with a rotor that arranges 6 straight paths radially was developed for open heart surgery and temporary circulatory support. We describe comparative studies of the margin of safety in the practical use of the new pump. This pump was evaluated for temperature increase, cavitation, and pressure sensitivity. Two commercially available centrifugal pumps, the Biomedicus cone type and the Sarns 3M impeller type, were used as control pumps. The temperature increase in the new pump was four times slower than in the impeller pump when the outlet and the inlet of the pump was clamped. No sign of cavitation was observed when 0.1 ml air was introduced to the pump inlet under a negative pressure of 200 mm Hg in fresh bovine blood. As for pressure sensitivity of centrifugal pumps in practical applications, circuit resistance was a more essential factor than flow-pressure curves of the pump.

  7. Concept designs of nonrotating-type centrifugal blood pump and basic study on output characteristics of the oscillating disk-type centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Kabei, N; Tuichiya, K; Sakurai, Y

    1994-09-01

    When designing a turbo-type blood pump as an artificial heart, the gap between a rotating shaft and a pump housing should be perfectly sealed to prevent any leakage or contamination through a seal. In addition, blood coagulation in a blood chamber must be avoided. To overcome these problems, we proposed five different nonrotating-type turbo pumps: a caudal-fin-type axial-flow pump, a caudal-fin-type centrifugal pump, a nutating-column-type centrifugal pump, a nutating-collapsible-tube-type centrifugal pump, and an oscillating-disk-type centrifugal pump. We selected and developed the oscillating-disk-type centrifugal pump that consists of a disk, a driving rod, a seal, an oscillation mechanism, and a pump housing. The disk is mounted on the end of the rod, which is connected to a high-speed DC motor through an oscillation mechanism. The rod and the disk do not rotate, but they oscillate in the pump housing. This movement of the disk generates forward fluid flow around the axis (i.e., the rotational fluid flow). Centrifugal force due to fluid rotation supports the pressure difference between the outlet and the inlet. The diameter of the disk is 39 mm, the maximum inner diameter of the pump housing is 40 mm, and the volume of the blood chamber for 25 degrees' oscillation is 16.9 ml. The performance of the pump was tested in a mock circulatory system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7998882

  8. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of the pediatric tiny centrifugal blood pump (TinyPump).

    PubMed

    Kido, Kazuyuki; Hoshi, Hideo; Watanabe, Nobuo; Kataoka, Hiroyuki; Ohuchi, Katsuhiro; Asama, Junichi; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Yoshikawa, Masaharu; Takatani, Setsuo

    2006-05-01

    We have developed a tiny rotary centrifugal blood pump for the purpose of supporting circulation of children and infants. The pump is designed to provide a flow of 0.1-4.0 L/min against a head pressure of 50-120 mm Hg. The diameter of the impeller is 30 mm with six straight vanes. The impeller is supported by a hydrodynamic bearing at its center and rotated with a radial coupled magnetic driver. The bearing that supports rotation of the impeller of the tiny centrifugal blood pump is very critical to achieve durability, and clot-free and antihemolytic performance. In this study, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed to quantify the secondary flow through the hydrodynamic bearing at the center of the impeller and investigated the effects of bearing clearance on shear stress to optimize hemolytic performance of the pump. Two types of bearing clearance (0.1 and 0.2 mm) were studied. The wall shear stress of the 0.1-mm bearing clearance was lower than that of 0.2-mm bearing clearance at 2 L/min and 3000 rpm. This was because the axial component of the shear rate significantly decreased due to the narrower clearance even though the circumferential component of the shear rate increased. Hemolysis tests showed that the normalized index of hemolysis was reduced to 0.0076 g/100 L when the bearing clearance was reduced to 0.1 mm. It was found that the CFD prediction supported the experimental trend. The CFD is a useful tool for optimization of the hydrodynamic bearing design of the centrifugal rotary blood pump to optimize the performance of the pump in terms of mechanical effect on blood cell elements, durability of the bearing, and antithrombogenic performance.

  9. Magnetic drive system for a new centrifugal rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Andrew; Tansley, Geoff

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to design a novel magnetic drive and bearing system for a new centrifugal rotary blood pump (CRBP). The drive system consists of two components: (i) permanent magnets within the impeller of the CRBP; and (ii) the driving electromagnets. Orientation of the magnets varies from axial through to 60 degrees included out-lean (conical configuration). Permanent magnets replace the electromagnet drive to allow easier characterization. The performance characteristics tested were the axial force of attraction between the stator and rotor at angles of rotational alignment, Ø, and the corresponding torque at those angles. The drive components were tested for various magnetic cone angles, theta. The test was repeated for three backing conditions: (i) non-backed; (ii) steel-cupped; and (iii) steel plate back-iron, performed on an Instron tensile testing machine. Experimental results were expanded upon through finite element and boundary element analysis (BEM). The force/torque characteristics were maximal for a 12-magnet configuration at 0 degree cone angle with steel-back iron (axial force = 60 N, torque = 0.375 Nm). BEM showed how introducing a cone angle increases the radial restoring force threefold while not compromising axial bearing force. Magnets in the drive system may be orientated not only to provide adequate coupling to drive the CRBP, but to provide significant axial and radial bearing forces capable of withstanding over 100 m/s(2) shock excitation on the impeller. Although the 12 magnet 0 degree (theta) configuration yielded the greatest force/torque characteristic, this was seen as potentially unattractive as this magnetic cone angle yielded poor radial restoring force characteristics. PMID:18959665

  10. [Numerical assessment of impeller features of centrifugal blood pump based on fast hemolysis approximation model].

    PubMed

    Shou, Chen; Guo, Yongjun; Su, Lei; Li, Yongqian

    2014-12-01

    The impeller profile, which is one of the most important factors, determines the creation of shear stress which leads to blood hemolysis in the internal flow of centrifugal blood pump. The investigation of the internal flow field in centrifugal blood pump and the estimation of the hemolysis within different impeller profiles will provide information to improve the performance of centrifugal blood pump. The SST kappa-omega with low Reynolds correction was used in our laboratory to study the internal flow fields for four kinds of impellers of centrifugal blood pump. The flow fields included distributions of pressure field, velocity field and shear stress field. In addition, a fast numerical hemolysis approximation was adopted to calculate the normalized index of hemolysis (NIH). The results indicated that the pressure field distribution in all kinds of blood pump were reasonable, but for the log spiral impeller pump, the vortex and backflow were much lower than those of the other pumps, and the high shear stress zone was just about 0.004%, and the NIH was 0.0089.

  11. A magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a simple-structured disposable pump head.

    PubMed

    Hijikata, Wataru; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Asama, Junichi; Li, Lichuan; Hoshi, Hideo; Takatani, Setsuo; Shimokohbe, Akira

    2008-07-01

    A magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump (MedTech Dispo) has been developed for use in a disposable extracorporeal system. The design of the pump is intended to eliminate mechanical contact with the impeller, to facilitate a simple disposable mechanism, and to reduce the blood-heating effects that are caused by motors and magnetic bearings. The bearing rotor attached to the impeller is suspended by a two degrees-of-freedom controlled radial magnetic bearing stator, which is situated outside the rotor. In the space inside the ringlike rotor, a magnetic coupling disk is placed to rotate the rotor and to ensure that the pump head is thermally isolated from the motor. In this system, the rotor can exhibit high passive stiffness due to the novel design of the closed magnetic circuits. The disposable pump head, which has a priming volume of 23 mL, consists of top and bottom housings, an impeller, and a rotor with a diameter of 50 mm. The pump can provide a head pressure of more than 300 mm Hg against a flow of 5 L/min. The normalized index of hemolysis of the MedTech Dispo is 0.0025 +/- 0.0005 g/100 L at 5 L/min against 250 mm Hg. This is one-seventh of the equivalent figure for a Bio Pump BPX-80 (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA), which has a value of 0.0170 +/- 0.0096 g/100 L. These results show that the MedTech Dispo offers high pumping performance and low blood trauma.

  12. Design optimization of flow channel and performance analysis for a new-type centrifugal blood pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, J. J.; Luo, X. W.; Y Wu, Q.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a new-type centrifugal blood pump, whose impeller is suspended inside a pump chamber with hydraulic bearings, is presented. In order to improve the hydraulic performance of the pump, an internal flow simulation is conducted to compare the effects of different geometrical parameters of pump flow passage. Based on the numerical results, the pumps can satisfy the operation parameters and be free of hemolysis. It is noted that for the pump with a column-type supporter at its inlet, the pump head and hydraulic efficiency decreases compared to the pump with a step-type support structure. The performance drop is caused by the disturbed flow upstream impeller inlet. Further, the unfavorable flow features such as reverse flow and low velocity in the pump may increases the possibility of thrombus. It is also confirmed that the casing shape can little influence pump performance. Those results are helpful for design optimization in blood pump development.

  13. Numerical analysis of the internal flow field in screw centrifugal blood pump based on CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, W.; Han, B. X.; Y Wang, H.; Shen, Z. J.

    2013-12-01

    As to the impeller blood pump, the high speed of the impeller, the local high shear force of the flow field and the flow dead region are the main reasons for blood damage. The screw centrifugal pump can effectively alleviate the problems of the high speed and the high shear stress for the impeller. The softness and non-destructiveness during the transfer process can effectively reduce the extent of the damage. By using CFD software, the characteristics of internal flow are analyzed in the screw centrifugal pump by exploring the distribution rules of the velocity, pressure and shear deformation rate of the blood when it flows through the impeller and the destructive effects of spiral blades on blood. The results show that: the design of magnetic levitation solves the sealing problems; the design of regurgitation holes solves the problem of the flow dead zone; the magnetic levitated microcirculation screw centrifugal pump can effectively avoid the vortex, turbulence and high shear forces generated while the blood is flowing through the pump. Since the distribution rules in the velocity field, pressure field and shear deformation rate of the blood in the blood pump are comparatively uniform and the gradient change is comparatively small, the blood damage is effectively reduced.

  14. Pediatric ECMO outcomes: comparison of centrifugal versus roller blood pumps using propensity score matching.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Cindy S; Jaggers, James J; Cook, E Francis; Graham, Dionne A; Yarlagadda, Vasmi V; Teele, Sarah A; Almond, Christopher S; Bratton, Susan L; Seeger, John D; Dalton, Heidi J; Rycus, Peter T; Laussen, Peter C; Thiagarajan, Ravi R

    2013-01-01

    Centrifugal blood pumps are being increasingly utilized in children supported with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Our aim was to determine if survival and ECMO-related morbidities in children supported with venoarterial (VA) ECMO differed by blood pump type.Children aged less than 18 years who underwent VA ECMO support from 2007 to 2009 and reported to the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization registry were propensity score matched (Greedy 1:1 matching) using pre-ECMO characteristics.A total of 2,656 (centrifugal = 2,231, roller = 425) patients were identified and 548 patients (274 per pump type) were included in the propensity score-matched cohort. Children supported with centrifugal pumps had increased odds of hemolysis (odds ratio [OR], 4.03 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.37-6.87), hyperbilirubinemia (OR, 5.48; 95% CI, 2.62-11.49), need for inotropic support during ECMO (OR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.09-2.17), metabolic alkalosis (blood pH > 7.6) during ECMO (OR, 3.13; 95% CI, 1.49-6.54), and acute renal failure (OR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.10-2.39). Survival to hospital discharge did not differ by pump type.In a propensity score-matched cohort of pediatric ECMO patients, children supported with centrifugal pumps had increased odds of ECMO-related complications. There was no difference in survival between groups.

  15. [Study on optimal selection of structure of vaneless centrifugal blood pump with constraints on blood perfusion and on blood damage indexes].

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhaoyan; Pan, Youlian; Chen, Zhenglong; Zhang, Tianyi; Lu, Lijun

    2012-12-01

    This paper is aimed to study the optimal selection of structure of vaneless centrifugal blood pump. The optimal objective is determined according to requirements of clinical use. Possible schemes are generally worked out based on structural feature of vaneless centrifugal blood pump. The optimal structure is selected from possible schemes with constraints on blood perfusion and blood damage indexes. Using an optimal selection method one can find the optimum structure scheme from possible schemes effectively. The results of numerical simulation of optimal blood pump showed that the method of constraints of blood perfusion and blood damage is competent for the requirements of selection of the optimal blood pumps.

  16. [Research on flow characteristics in a non-blade centrifugal blood pump based on CFD technology].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yunzhang; Luo, Binhai; Wu, Wenquan; Jiang, Lei

    2010-10-01

    The problem of thrombus and hemolysis in blood pump has always been an important topic to study in the development of the blood pump. Numbers of research results show that it is the complicated flow and the high shear stress of the mechanical movement that result in the thrombus and hemolysis. In this study, with the cooperation of Shanghai Children's Medical Center, we have used computational fluid dynamics (CFD) commercial software FLUENT to compute and analyze the flow characteristics in a non-blade centrifugal blood pump. The results figure out that this pump has a reasonable flow distribution and the shear stress distribution is under the critical broken state of red blood cell; meanwhile, there is less thrombus and hemolysis in this pump. So it is in the foreground for clinical use.

  17. Evaluation of erythrocyte flow at a bearing gap in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Murashige, Tomotaka; Kosaka, Ryo; Sakota, Daisuke; Nishida, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi; Maruyama, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump for extracorporeal circulatory support. In the blood pump, a spiral groove bearing was adopted for a thrust bearing. In the spiral groove bearing, separation of erythrocytes and plasma by plasma skimming has been postulated to occur. However, it is not clarified that plasma skimming occurs in a spiral groove bearing. The purpose of this study is to verify whether plasma skimming occurs in the spiral groove bearing of a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. For evaluation of plasma skimming in the spiral groove bearing, an impeller levitation performance test using a laser focus displacement meter and a microscopic visualization test of erythrocyte flow using a high-speed microscope were conducted. Bovine blood diluted with autologous plasma to adjust hematocrit to 1.0% was used as a working fluid. Hematocrit on the ridge region in the spiral groove bearing was estimated using image analysis. As a result, hematocrits on the ridge region with gaps of 45 μm, 31 μm, and 25 μm were calculated as 1.0%, 0.6%, and 0.3%, respectively. Maximum skimming efficiency in this study was calculated as 70% with a gap of 25 μm. We confirmed that separation of erythrocyte and plasma occurred in the spiral groove bearing with decrease in bearing gap in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. PMID:26736252

  18. Evaluation of erythrocyte flow at a bearing gap in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Murashige, Tomotaka; Kosaka, Ryo; Sakota, Daisuke; Nishida, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi; Maruyama, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump for extracorporeal circulatory support. In the blood pump, a spiral groove bearing was adopted for a thrust bearing. In the spiral groove bearing, separation of erythrocytes and plasma by plasma skimming has been postulated to occur. However, it is not clarified that plasma skimming occurs in a spiral groove bearing. The purpose of this study is to verify whether plasma skimming occurs in the spiral groove bearing of a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. For evaluation of plasma skimming in the spiral groove bearing, an impeller levitation performance test using a laser focus displacement meter and a microscopic visualization test of erythrocyte flow using a high-speed microscope were conducted. Bovine blood diluted with autologous plasma to adjust hematocrit to 1.0% was used as a working fluid. Hematocrit on the ridge region in the spiral groove bearing was estimated using image analysis. As a result, hematocrits on the ridge region with gaps of 45 μm, 31 μm, and 25 μm were calculated as 1.0%, 0.6%, and 0.3%, respectively. Maximum skimming efficiency in this study was calculated as 70% with a gap of 25 μm. We confirmed that separation of erythrocyte and plasma occurred in the spiral groove bearing with decrease in bearing gap in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

  19. Numerical study of a centrifugal blood pump with different impeller profiles.

    PubMed

    Song, Guoliang; Chua, Leok Poh; Lim, Tau Meng

    2010-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic simulations of the Kyoto-NTN magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with 16 forward-bending blades (16FB), 16 straight blades (16SB), and eight backward-bending blades (8BB) impellers were performed in this study. Commercial CFD software package FLUENT were used as the solver. The purpose of this study is to find out how the impeller blade profiles affect the inner flow and the performance of the centrifugal blood pump. The simulations were carried out with the same impeller rotating speed of 2,000 rpm and pump flow rate of 5 L/min to compare the three pump models. It was found that the 16SB impeller can produce higher pressure head than the 16FB and 8BB impellers under the same impeller rotating speed and pump flow rate. The flow particle tracing was carried out to estimate the blood damage level caused by the three different impeller profiles. It was found that the 16FB and 8BB models have caused the highest and lowest blood damage, respectively. The 16SB is recommended among the three pumps because it can generate the highest pressure head and induce mild blood damage index, although it was higher than that of the 8BB model.

  20. Study of a centrifugal blood pump in a mock loop system.

    PubMed

    Uebelhart, Beatriz; da Silva, Bruno Utiyama; Fonseca, Jeison; Bock, Eduardo; Leme, Juliana; da Silva, Cibele; Leão, Tarcísio; Andrade, Aron

    2013-11-01

    An implantable centrifugal blood pump (ICBP) is being developed to be used as a ventricular assist device (VAD) in patients with severe cardiovascular diseases. The ICBP system is composed of a centrifugal pump, a motor, a controller, and a power supply. The electricity source provides power to the controller and to a motor that moves the pump's rotor through magnetic coupling. The centrifugal pump is composed of four parts: external conical house, external base, impeller, and impeller base. The rotor is supported by a pivot bearing system, and its impeller base is responsible for sheltering four permanent magnets. A hybrid cardiovascular simulator (HCS) was used to evaluate the ICBP's performance. A heart failure (HF) (when the heart increases beat frequency to compensate for decrease in blood flow) was simulated in the HCS. The main objective of this work is to analyze changes in physiological parameters such as cardiac output, blood pressure, and heart rate in three situations: healthy heart, HF, and HF with left circulatory assistance by ICBP. The results showed that parameters such as aortic pressure and cardiac output affected by the HF situation returned to normal values when the ICBP was connected to the HCS. In conclusion, the test results showed satisfactory performance for the ICBP as a VAD. PMID:24237361

  1. Study of a centrifugal blood pump in a mock loop system.

    PubMed

    Uebelhart, Beatriz; da Silva, Bruno Utiyama; Fonseca, Jeison; Bock, Eduardo; Leme, Juliana; da Silva, Cibele; Leão, Tarcísio; Andrade, Aron

    2013-11-01

    An implantable centrifugal blood pump (ICBP) is being developed to be used as a ventricular assist device (VAD) in patients with severe cardiovascular diseases. The ICBP system is composed of a centrifugal pump, a motor, a controller, and a power supply. The electricity source provides power to the controller and to a motor that moves the pump's rotor through magnetic coupling. The centrifugal pump is composed of four parts: external conical house, external base, impeller, and impeller base. The rotor is supported by a pivot bearing system, and its impeller base is responsible for sheltering four permanent magnets. A hybrid cardiovascular simulator (HCS) was used to evaluate the ICBP's performance. A heart failure (HF) (when the heart increases beat frequency to compensate for decrease in blood flow) was simulated in the HCS. The main objective of this work is to analyze changes in physiological parameters such as cardiac output, blood pressure, and heart rate in three situations: healthy heart, HF, and HF with left circulatory assistance by ICBP. The results showed that parameters such as aortic pressure and cardiac output affected by the HF situation returned to normal values when the ICBP was connected to the HCS. In conclusion, the test results showed satisfactory performance for the ICBP as a VAD.

  2. A new design for a compact centrifugal blood pump with a magnetically levitated rotor.

    PubMed

    Asama, Junichi; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Hoshi, Hideo; Takatani, Setsuo; Shimokohbe, Akira

    2004-01-01

    A compact centrifugal blood pump has been developed using a radial magnetic bearing with a two-degree of freedom active control. The proposed magnetic bearing exhibits high stiffness, even in passively controlled directions, and low power consumption because a permanent magnet, incorporated with the rotor, suspends its weight. The rotor is driven by a Lorentz force type of built-in motor, avoiding mechanical friction and material wear. The built-in motor is designed to generate only rotational torque, without radial and axial attractive forces on the rotor, leading to low power consumption by the magnetic bearing. The fabricated centrifugal pump measured 65 mm in diameter and 45 mm in height and weighed 0.36 kg. In the closed loop circuit filled with water, the pump provided a flow rate of 4.5 L/min at 2,400 rpm against a pressure head of 100 mm Hg. Total power consumption at that point was 18 W, including 2 W required for magnetic levitation, with a total efficiency of 5.7%. The experimental results showed that the design of the compact magnetic bearing was feasible and effective for use in a centrifugal blood pump. PMID:15672787

  3. Numerical study of a bio-centrifugal blood pump with straight impeller blade profiles.

    PubMed

    Song, Guoliang; Chua, Leok Poh; Lim, Tau Meng

    2010-02-01

    Computational fluid dynamic simulations of the flow in the Kyoto-NTN (Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan) magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with a 16-straight-bladed impeller were performed in the present study. The flow in the pump was assumed as unsteady and turbulent, and blood was treated as a Newtonian fluid. At the impeller rotating speed of 2000 rpm and flow rate of 5 L/min, the pump produces a pressure head of 113.5 mm Hg according to the simulation. It was found that the double volute of the pump has caused symmetrical pressure distribution in the volute passages and subsequently caused symmetrical flow patterns in the blade channels. Due to the tangentially increasing pressure in the volute passages, the flow through the blade channels initially increases at the low-pressure region and then decreases due to the increased pressure. The reverse flow and vortices have been identified in the impeller blade channels. The high shear stress of the flow in the pump mainly occurred at the inlet and outlet of the blade channels, the beginning of the volute passages and the regions around the tips of the cutwater and splitter plate. Higher shear stress is obtained when the tips of the cutwater and splitter plate are located at the impeller blade trailing edges than when they are located at the middle of the impeller blade channel. It was found that the blood damage index assessed based on the blood corpuscle path tracing of the present pump was about 0.94%, which has the same order of magnitude as those of the clinical centrifugal pumps reported in the literature.

  4. Plasma Skimming in a Spiral Groove Bearing of a Centrifugal Blood Pump.

    PubMed

    Murashige, Tomotaka; Sakota, Daisuke; Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi; Maruyama, Osamu

    2016-09-01

    Plasma skimming is a phenomenon in which discharge hematocrit is lower than feed hematocrit in microvessels. Plasma skimming has been investigated at a bearing gap in a spiral groove bearing (SGB), as this has the potential to prevent hemolysis in the SGB of a blood pump. However, it is not clear whether plasma skimming occurs in a blood pump with the SGB, because the hematocrit has not been obtained. The purpose of this study is to verify plasma skimming in an SGB of a centrifugal blood pump by developing a hematocrit measurement method in an SGB. Erythrocyte observation using a high-speed microscope and a bearing gap measurement using a laser confocal displacement meter was performed five times. In these tests, bovine blood as a working fluid was diluted with autologous plasma to adjust the hematocrit to 1.0%. A resistor was adjusted to achieve a pressure head of 100 mm Hg and a flow rate of 5.0 L/min at a rotational speed of 2800 rpm. Hematocrit on the ridge region in the SGB was measured using an image analysis based on motion image of erythrocytes, mean corpuscular volume, the measured bearing gap, and a cross-sectional area of erythrocyte. Mean hematocrit on the ridge region in the SGB was linearly reduced from 0.97 to 0.07% with the decreasing mean bearing gap from 38 to 21 μm when the rotational speed was changed from 2250 to 3000 rpm. A maximum plasma skimming efficiency of 93% was obtained with a gap of 21 μm. In conclusion, we succeeded in measuring the hematocrit on the ridge region in the SGB of the blood pump. Hematocrit decreased on the ridge region in the SGB and plasma skimming occurred with a bearing gap of less than 30 μm in the hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. PMID:27645396

  5. Plasma Skimming in a Spiral Groove Bearing of a Centrifugal Blood Pump.

    PubMed

    Murashige, Tomotaka; Sakota, Daisuke; Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi; Maruyama, Osamu

    2016-09-01

    Plasma skimming is a phenomenon in which discharge hematocrit is lower than feed hematocrit in microvessels. Plasma skimming has been investigated at a bearing gap in a spiral groove bearing (SGB), as this has the potential to prevent hemolysis in the SGB of a blood pump. However, it is not clear whether plasma skimming occurs in a blood pump with the SGB, because the hematocrit has not been obtained. The purpose of this study is to verify plasma skimming in an SGB of a centrifugal blood pump by developing a hematocrit measurement method in an SGB. Erythrocyte observation using a high-speed microscope and a bearing gap measurement using a laser confocal displacement meter was performed five times. In these tests, bovine blood as a working fluid was diluted with autologous plasma to adjust the hematocrit to 1.0%. A resistor was adjusted to achieve a pressure head of 100 mm Hg and a flow rate of 5.0 L/min at a rotational speed of 2800 rpm. Hematocrit on the ridge region in the SGB was measured using an image analysis based on motion image of erythrocytes, mean corpuscular volume, the measured bearing gap, and a cross-sectional area of erythrocyte. Mean hematocrit on the ridge region in the SGB was linearly reduced from 0.97 to 0.07% with the decreasing mean bearing gap from 38 to 21 μm when the rotational speed was changed from 2250 to 3000 rpm. A maximum plasma skimming efficiency of 93% was obtained with a gap of 21 μm. In conclusion, we succeeded in measuring the hematocrit on the ridge region in the SGB of the blood pump. Hematocrit decreased on the ridge region in the SGB and plasma skimming occurred with a bearing gap of less than 30 μm in the hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

  6. Centrifugal blood pump for temporary ventricular assist devices with low priming and ceramic bearings.

    PubMed

    Leme, Juliana; da Silva, Cibele; Fonseca, Jeison; da Silva, Bruno Utiyama; Uebelhart, Beatriz; Biscegli, José F; Andrade, Aron

    2013-11-01

    A new model of centrifugal blood pump for temporary ventricular assist devices has been developed and evaluated. The design of the device is based on centrifugal pumping principles and the usage of ceramic bearings, resulting in a pump with reduced priming (35 ± 2 mL) that can be applied for up to 30 days. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis is an efficient tool to optimize flow path geometry, maximize hydraulic performance, and minimize shear stress, consequently decreasing hemolysis. Initial studies were conducted by analyzing flow behavior with different impellers, aiming to determine the best impeller design. After CFD studies, rapid prototyping technology was used for production of pump prototypes with three different impellers. In vitro experiments were performed with those prototypes, using a mock loop system composed of Tygon tubes, oxygenator, digital flow meter, pressure monitor, electronic driver, and adjustable clamp for flow control, filled with a solution (1/3 water, 1/3 glycerin, 1/3 alcohol) simulating blood viscosity and density. Flow-versus-pressure curves were obtained for rotational speeds of 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500, and 3000 rpm. As the next step, the CFD analysis and hydrodynamic performance results will be compared with the results of flow visualization studies and hemolysis tests.

  7. A new model of centrifugal blood pump for cardiopulmonary bypass: design improvement, performance, and hemolysis tests.

    PubMed

    Leme, Juliana; Fonseca, Jeison; Bock, Eduardo; da Silva, Cibele; da Silva, Bruno Utiyama; Dos Santos, Alex Eugênio; Dinkhuysen, Jarbas; Andrade, Aron; Biscegli, José F

    2011-05-01

    A new model of blood pump for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) application has been developed and evaluated in our laboratories. Inside the pump housing is a spiral impeller that is conically shaped and has threads on its surface. Worm gears provide an axial motion of the blood column. Rotational motion of the conical shape generates a centrifugal pumping effect and improves pumping performance. One annular magnet with six poles is inside the impeller, providing magnetic coupling to a brushless direct current motor. In order to study the pumping performance, a mock loop system was assembled. Mock loop was composed of Tygon tubes (Saint-Gobain Corporation, Courbevoie, France), oxygenator, digital flowmeter, pressure monitor, electronic driver, and adjustable clamp for flow control. Experiments were performed on six prototypes with small differences in their design. Each prototype was tested and flow and pressure data were obtained for rotational speed of 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500, and 3000 rpm. Hemolysis was studied using pumps with different internal gap sizes (1.35, 1.45, 1.55, and 1.7 mm). Hemolysis tests simulated CPB application with flow rate of 5 L/min against total pressure head of 350 mm Hg. The results from six prototypes were satisfactory, compared to the results from the literature. However, prototype #6 showed the best results. Best hemolysis results were observed with a gap of 1.45 mm, and showed a normalized index of hemolysis of 0.013 g/100 L. When combined, axial and centrifugal pumping principles produce better hydrodynamic performance without increasing hemolysis.

  8. Fault-tolerant strategies for an implantable centrifugal blood pump using a radially controlled magnetic bearing.

    PubMed

    Pai, Chi Nan; Shinshi, Tadahiko

    2011-10-01

    In our laboratory, an implantable centrifugal blood pump (CBP) with a two degrees-of-freedom radially controlled magnetic bearing (MB) to support the impeller without contact has been developed to assist the pumping function of the weakened heart ventricle. In order to maintain the function of the CBP after damage to the electromagnets (EMs) of the MB, fault-tolerant strategies for the CBP are proposed in this study. Using a redundant MB design, magnetic levitation of the impeller was maintained with damage to up to two out of a total of four EMs of the MB; with damage to three EMs, contact-free support of the impeller was achieved using hydrodynamic and electromagnetic forces; and with damage to all four EMs, the pump operating point, of 5 l/min against 100 mmHg, was achieved using the motor for rotation of the impeller, with contact between the impeller and the stator. PMID:21382738

  9. Fault-tolerant strategies for an implantable centrifugal blood pump using a radially controlled magnetic bearing.

    PubMed

    Pai, Chi Nan; Shinshi, Tadahiko

    2011-10-01

    In our laboratory, an implantable centrifugal blood pump (CBP) with a two degrees-of-freedom radially controlled magnetic bearing (MB) to support the impeller without contact has been developed to assist the pumping function of the weakened heart ventricle. In order to maintain the function of the CBP after damage to the electromagnets (EMs) of the MB, fault-tolerant strategies for the CBP are proposed in this study. Using a redundant MB design, magnetic levitation of the impeller was maintained with damage to up to two out of a total of four EMs of the MB; with damage to three EMs, contact-free support of the impeller was achieved using hydrodynamic and electromagnetic forces; and with damage to all four EMs, the pump operating point, of 5 l/min against 100 mmHg, was achieved using the motor for rotation of the impeller, with contact between the impeller and the stator.

  10. Current status of the gyro centrifugal blood pump--development of the permanently implantable centrifugal blood pump as a biventricular assist device (NEDO project).

    PubMed

    Nosé, Yukihiko; Furukawa, Kojiro

    2004-10-01

    The New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) project was started in 1995. The goal is the development of a multipurpose, totally implantable biventricular assist device (BVAD) that can be used for any patient who suffers from severe heart failure. Our C1E3 (two-week pump) centrifugal pump, called the Gyro pump, has three design characteristics: a magnetic coupling and double pivot bearing system, an eccentric inlet port, and secondary vanes on the bottom of the impeller. The pump was miniaturized. The C1E3 evolved into the NEDO PI-601, a totally implantable centrifugal pump for BVAD. The current NEDO PI-710 pump (five-year pump) system includes a centrifugal pump with pivot bearings, a hydraulically-levitated impeller, an rpm-controlled miniaturized actuator (all-in-one actuator plus controller), an emergency clamp on the left outflow, and a Frank-Starling-type flow control. The final mass production model is now finalized, and the final animal study and two-year endurance studies are ongoing.

  11. Fluid dynamic design for low hemolysis in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Murashige, Tomotaka; Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yamane, Takashi; Kuwana, Katsuyuki; Kawaguchi, Yasuo

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump for extracorporeal circulatory support as a bridge to decision pump. The impeller is levitated using hydrodynamic bearings without any complicated control circuit or displacement sensor. However, the effect of the outer circumferential velocity and the bearing area on the hemolytic property has not been clarified, even if the bearing gap is same size. The purpose of this study is to experimentally evaluate the effect of the outer circumferential velocity and the bearing area in the bearing gaps on the hemolytic property in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. We prepared three models for testing. These models have the same bearing gap size by adjusting the impeller levitation position. However, the outer circumferential velocity of the impeller and the bearing area in the minimum bearing gaps are different. The outer circumferential velocity of the impeller and the bearing area were assumed to be related to the maximum shear rate and the exposure time. For the evaluation, we conducted an impeller levitation performance test and an in vitro hemolysis test. As a result, the normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) was reduced from 0.084 g/100 L to 0.040 g/100 L corresponding to a reduction in the outer circumferential velocity and a reduction in the bearing area, even if the minimum bearing gaps were same size. We confirmed that, even if the bearing gap was same size under the stably levitated condition, the outer circumferential velocity and the bearing area should be decreased in order to improve the hemolytic property.

  12. A compact highly efficient and low hemolytic centrifugal blood pump with a magnetically levitated impeller.

    PubMed

    Asama, Junichi; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Hoshi, Hideo; Takatani, Setsuo; Shimokohbe, Akira

    2006-03-01

    A magnetically levitated (maglev) centrifugal blood pump (CBP), intended for use as a ventricular assist device, needs to be highly durable and reliable for long-term use without any mechanical failure. Furthermore, maglev CBPs should be small enough to be implanted into patients of various size and weight. We have developed a compact maglev CBP employing a two-degree-of-freedom controlled magnetic bearing, with a magnetically suspended impeller directly driven by an internal brushless direct current (DC) motor. The magnetic bearing actively controls the radial motion of the impeller and passively supports axial and angular motions using a permanent magnet embedded in the impeller. The overall dimensions of the maglev CBP are 65 mm in diameter and 40 mm in height. The total power consumption and pump efficiency for pumping 6 L/min against a head pressure of 105 mm Hg were 6.5 W and 21%, respectively. To evaluate the characteristics of the maglev CBP when subjected to a disturbance, excitation of the base, simulating the movement of the patient in various directions, and the sudden interception of the outlet tube connected with the pump in a mock circulatory loop, simulating an unexpected kink and emergent clamp during a heart surgery, were tested by monitoring the five-degree-of-freedom motion of the impeller. Furthermore, the hemolytic characteristics of the maglev CBP were compared with those of the Medtronic Biomedicus BPX-80, which demonstrated the superiority of the maglev CBP. PMID:16480390

  13. Seal-less centrifugal blood pump with magnetically suspended rotor: rot-a-flot.

    PubMed

    Mendler, N; Podechtl, F; Feil, G; Hiltmann, P; Sebening, F

    1995-07-01

    Limitations of current centrifugal blood pumps are related to heat generation of bearings and leakage of seals, to dead water zones, and to poor efficiency. A new concept is proposed in this paper to ameliorate these problems based on a miniaturized magnetic drive, and a prototype is introduced. The pump rotor is suspended and driven by a radial permanent magnetic field that stabilizes the impeller in 4 of the 6 spatial degrees of freedom and allows it to be top-spun on a single blood-flushed pivot bearing with minimal load and friction. A shrouded impeller with an open center and 4 logarithmically curved channels is run inside a cone-and-plate-type housing with a spiral volute chamber. In vitro testing was performed comparing this design with the BioMedicus, St. Jude, and Sarns pumps. The prototype is demonstrated to have the smallest internal volume (35 ml), surface (190 qcm), and passage time (0.5 s at 4 L/min), as well as the highest hydraulic efficiency (up to 0.4) of all devices studied.

  14. Seal-less centrifugal blood pump with magnetically suspended rotor: rot-a-flot.

    PubMed

    Mendler, N; Podechtl, F; Feil, G; Hiltmann, P; Sebening, F

    1995-07-01

    Limitations of current centrifugal blood pumps are related to heat generation of bearings and leakage of seals, to dead water zones, and to poor efficiency. A new concept is proposed in this paper to ameliorate these problems based on a miniaturized magnetic drive, and a prototype is introduced. The pump rotor is suspended and driven by a radial permanent magnetic field that stabilizes the impeller in 4 of the 6 spatial degrees of freedom and allows it to be top-spun on a single blood-flushed pivot bearing with minimal load and friction. A shrouded impeller with an open center and 4 logarithmically curved channels is run inside a cone-and-plate-type housing with a spiral volute chamber. In vitro testing was performed comparing this design with the BioMedicus, St. Jude, and Sarns pumps. The prototype is demonstrated to have the smallest internal volume (35 ml), surface (190 qcm), and passage time (0.5 s at 4 L/min), as well as the highest hydraulic efficiency (up to 0.4) of all devices studied. PMID:8572962

  15. An investigational study of minimum rotational pump speed to avoid retrograde flow in three centrifugal blood pumps in a pediatric extracorporeal life support model.

    PubMed

    Clark, Joseph B; Guan, Yulong; McCoach, Robert; Kunselman, Allen R; Myers, John L; Undar, Akif

    2011-05-01

    During extracorporeal life support with centrifugal blood pumps, retrograde pump flow may occur when the pump revolutions decrease below a critical value determined by the circuit resistance and the characteristics of the pump. We created a laboratory model to evaluate the occurrence of retrograde flow in each of three centrifugal blood pumps: the Rotaflow, the CentriMag, and the Bio-Medicus BP-50. At simulated patient pressures of 60, 80, and 100 mmHg, each pump was evaluated at speeds from 1000 to 2200 rpm and flow rates were measured. Retrograde flow occurred at low revolution speeds in all three centrifugal pumps. The Bio-Medicus pump was the least likely to demonstrate retrograde flow at low speeds, followed by the Rotaflow pump. The CentriMag pump showed the earliest transition to retrograde flow, as well as the highest degree of retrograde flow. At every pump speed evaluated, the Bio-Medicus pump delivered the highest antegrade flow and the CentriMag pump delivered the least.

  16. [Magnetic field numerical calculation and analysis for magnetic coupling of centrifugal blood pump for extracorporeal circulation].

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhaoyan; Lu, Lijun; Zhang, Tianyi; Chen, Zhenglong; Zhang, Tao

    2013-12-01

    This paper mainly studies the driving system of centrifugal blood pump for extracorporeal circulation, with the core being disc magnetic coupling. Structure parameters of disc magnetic coupling are related to the ability of transferring magnetic torque. Therefore, it is necessary to carry out disc magnetic coupling permanent magnet pole number (n), air gap length (L(g)), permanent magnet thickness (L(m)), permanent magnet body inside diameter (R(i)) and outside diameter (R(o)), etc. thoroughly. This paper adopts the three-dimensional static magnetic field edge element method of Ansys for numerical calculation, and analyses the relations of magnetic coupling each parameter to transmission magnetic torque. It provides a good theory basis and calculation method for further optimization of the disc magnetic coupling.

  17. Quantification of the secondary flow in a radial coupled centrifugal blood pump based on particle tracking velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Nobuo; Masuda, Takaya; Iida, Tomoya; Kataoka, Hiroyuki; Fujimoto, Tetsuo; Takatani, Setsuo

    2005-01-01

    Secondary flow in the centrifugal blood pump helps to enhance the washout effect and to minimize thrombus formation. On the other hand, it has an adverse effect on pump efficiency. Excessive secondary flow may induce hemolytic effects. Understanding the secondary flow is thus important to the design of a compact, efficient, biocompatible blood pump. This study examined the secondary flow in a radial coupled centrifugal blood pump based on a simple particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) technique. A radial magnetically coupled centrifugal blood pump has a bell-shaped narrow clearance between the impeller inner radius and the pump casing. In order to vary the flow levels through the clearance area, clearance widths of 0.25 mm and 0.50 mm and impeller washout holes with diameters of 0 mm, 2.5 mm, and 4 mm were prepared. A high-speed video camera (2000 frames per second) was used to capture the particle images from which radial flow components were derived. The flow in the space behind the impeller was assumed to be laminar and Couette type. The larger the inner clearance or diameter of washout hole, the greater was the secondary flow rate. Without washout holes, the flow behind the impeller resulted in convection. The radial flow through the washout holes of the impeller was conserved in the radial as well as in the axial direction behind the impeller. The increase in the secondary flow reduced the net pump efficiency. Simple PTV was successful in quantifying the flow in the space behind the impeller. The results verified the hypothesis that the flow behind the impeller was theoretically Couette along the circumferential direction. The convection flow observed behind the impeller agreed with the reports of other researchers. Simple PTV was effective in understanding the fluid dynamics to help improve the compact, efficient, and biocompatible centrifugal blood pump for safe clinical applications.

  18. Evaluation of hydraulic radial forces on the impeller by the volute in a centrifugal rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Boehning, Fiete; Timms, Daniel L; Amaral, Felipe; Oliveira, Leonardo; Graefe, Roland; Hsu, Po-Lin; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2011-08-01

    In many state-of-the-art rotary blood pumps for long-term ventricular assistance, the impeller is suspended within the casing by magnetic or hydrodynamic means. For the design of such suspension systems, profound knowledge of the acting forces on the impeller is crucial. Hydrodynamic bearings running at low clearance gaps can yield increased blood damage and magnetic bearings counteracting high forces consume excessive power. Most current rotary blood pump devices with contactless bearings are centrifugal pumps that incorporate a radial diffuser volute where hydraulic forces on the impeller develop. The yielding radial forces are highly dependent on impeller design, operating point and volute design. There are three basic types of volute design--singular, circular, and double volute. In this study, the hydraulic radial forces on the impeller created by the volute in an investigational centrifugal blood pump are evaluated and discussed with regard to the choice of contactless suspension systems. Each volute type was tested experimentally in a centrifugal pump test setup at various rotational speeds and flow rates. For the pump's design point at 5 L/min and 2500 rpm, the single volute had the lowest radial force (∼0 N), the circular volute yielded the highest force (∼2 N), and the double volute possessed a force of approx. 0.5 N. Results of radial force magnitude and direction were obtained and compared with a previously performed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study.

  19. A novel design of spiral groove bearing in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Han, Qing; Zou, Jun; Ruan, Xiaodong; Fu, Xin; Yang, Huayong

    2012-08-01

    Good washout is very important in spiral groove bearing (SGB) designs when applied to blood pumps due to the micrometer scales of lubrication films and groove depths. To improve washout, flow rate or leakage through SGBs should be as large as possible. However, this special goal violates conventional SGB designs in which no leakage is desired as the leakage would decrease load-carrying capacity significantly. So, a design concept is formed fulfilling the two goals of high load-carrying capacity and large flow rate: let groove width decrease along flow path and the mating surface of the rotor rotate with a direction facilitating the flow through the grooves. Under this concept, a novel SGB is designed, contrary to conventional ones, with groove width decreasing with increasing spiral radius. This SGB is mounted on the motionless upper plate of our designed centrifugal blood pump, with the mating surface of rotor rotating with a direction facilitating the outward flow. To assess SGB designs, a characteristic plane is originally presented relating to pressure-normalized load-carrying capacity and flow rate. Comparisons between various kinds of SGB designs are made, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results are plotted in this characteristic plane from which load/flow performances can be directly read out. CFD and comparison results show that the new designs have superior load/flow characteristics. However, the impact of SGB designs upon hemolysis/thrombus formation is still to be verified according to the concept presented.

  20. In vitro study to estimate particle release from a centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Takami, Yoshiyuki

    2006-05-01

    Centrifugal pumps have been increasingly used in clinical settings. Like roller pumps, centrifugal pumps can cause debris release due to mechanical stress. The objectives of this study were to evaluate in vitro the particle release from a centrifugal pump, Gyro Pump (Japan Medical Materials Co., Osaka, Japan), which is a pivot-bearing supported pump clinically used in Japan, and to identify the released particles. In the clean room Class 10,000, the pump was operated for 24 h at 4000 rpm and 6 L/min in a mock loop filled with lactated Ringer's solution. After 24 h, the sample fluid and a blank were filtered with a 0.45-microm membrane filter for microscopic counting, followed by observation with a scanning electron microscope and element analysis with an X-ray spectrometer. Microscopic countings were 128 +/- 42 in the test samples (n = 10) of the Gyro Pump and 98 +/- 42 in the blank samples (n = 10) (P = 0.12). The oxygen/carbon atomic ratio of the particles in the test samples was 0.32 +/- 0.06, which was similar to the ratio of the particles in the blank sample (0.34 +/- 0.06). The profiles of elements with an X-ray spectrometer showed that the released particles from the Gyro Pump were not derived from the pump materials. In conclusion, an in vitro test system has been established for estimation of particle release from a centrifugal pump. Based upon the results with the system, the Gyro Pump with a pivot-bearing system has little risk to release debris particles even in a severe condition.

  1. Bearing gap adjustment for improvement of levitation performance in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Yoshida, Fumihiko; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate a bearing gap adjustment for improvement of levitation performance in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump to realize a blood pump with a low hemolysis level. The impeller levitates axially by balancing a gravitational force, buoyancy, a magnetic force, and hydrodynamic forces on the top and bottom sides of the impeller. To adjust the levitation position of the impeller, the balance of acting forces on the impeller was adjusted by changing the shroud area on the bottom impeller. Three pumps having various shroud area were prepared as tested models: 817 mm(2) (HH-S), 875 mm(2) (HH-M) and 931 mm(2) (HH-L). First, for evaluating the bearing gap adjustment, the bearing gap was estimated by calculating a balancing position of the acting forces on the impeller. We actually measured the gravitational force, buoyancy and the magnetic force, and numerically analyzed hydrodynamic forces on the top and bottom sides of the impeller. Second, to verify accuracy of the estimated bearing gap, the measurement test of the bearing gap was performed. Finally, an in-vitro hemolysis test was performed to evaluate a hemolysis level of the pump. As a result, bottom bearing gaps were estimated as 40 μm (HH-S), 60 μm (HH-M) and 238 μm (HH-L). In the measurement test, bottom bearing gaps were measured as 63 μm (HH-S), 219 μm (HH-M), and 231 μm (HH-L). The estimated bearing gaps had positively correlated with the measured bearing gaps in relation to the shroud area on the impeller. In the hemolysis test, hemolysis level in every model was almost equivalent to that of BPX-80, when the bearing gap was adjusted greater than 60 μm. We could adjust the bearing gap by changing the shroud area on the impeller for improvement of levitation performance to realize a blood pump with a low hemolysis level. PMID:26736996

  2. Bearing gap adjustment for improvement of levitation performance in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Yoshida, Fumihiko; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate a bearing gap adjustment for improvement of levitation performance in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump to realize a blood pump with a low hemolysis level. The impeller levitates axially by balancing a gravitational force, buoyancy, a magnetic force, and hydrodynamic forces on the top and bottom sides of the impeller. To adjust the levitation position of the impeller, the balance of acting forces on the impeller was adjusted by changing the shroud area on the bottom impeller. Three pumps having various shroud area were prepared as tested models: 817 mm(2) (HH-S), 875 mm(2) (HH-M) and 931 mm(2) (HH-L). First, for evaluating the bearing gap adjustment, the bearing gap was estimated by calculating a balancing position of the acting forces on the impeller. We actually measured the gravitational force, buoyancy and the magnetic force, and numerically analyzed hydrodynamic forces on the top and bottom sides of the impeller. Second, to verify accuracy of the estimated bearing gap, the measurement test of the bearing gap was performed. Finally, an in-vitro hemolysis test was performed to evaluate a hemolysis level of the pump. As a result, bottom bearing gaps were estimated as 40 μm (HH-S), 60 μm (HH-M) and 238 μm (HH-L). In the measurement test, bottom bearing gaps were measured as 63 μm (HH-S), 219 μm (HH-M), and 231 μm (HH-L). The estimated bearing gaps had positively correlated with the measured bearing gaps in relation to the shroud area on the impeller. In the hemolysis test, hemolysis level in every model was almost equivalent to that of BPX-80, when the bearing gap was adjusted greater than 60 μm. We could adjust the bearing gap by changing the shroud area on the impeller for improvement of levitation performance to realize a blood pump with a low hemolysis level.

  3. [Research on magnetic coupling centrifugal blood pump control based on a self-tuning fuzzy PI algorithm].

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Yang, Ming; Xu, Zihao; Zhuang, Xiaoqi; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Haibo; Han, Lu; Xu, Liang

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the research and design of control system of magnetic coupling centrifugal blood pump in our laboratory, and to briefly describe the structure of the magnetic coupling centrifugal blood pump and principles of the body circulation model. The performance of blood pump is not only related to materials and structure, but also depends on the control algorithm. We studied the algorithm about motor current double-loop control for brushless DC motor. In order to make the algorithm adjust parameter change in different situations, we used the self-tuning fuzzy PI control algorithm and gave the details about how to design fuzzy rules. We mainly used Matlab Simulink to simulate the motor control system to test the performance of algorithm, and briefly introduced how to implement these algorithms in hardware system. Finally, by building the platform and conducting experiments, we proved that self-tuning fuzzy PI control algorithm could greatly improve both dynamic and static performance of blood pump and make the motor speed and the blood pump flow stable and adjustable. PMID:25764720

  4. [Research on magnetic coupling centrifugal blood pump control based on a self-tuning fuzzy PI algorithm].

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Yang, Ming; Xu, Zihao; Zhuang, Xiaoqi; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Haibo; Han, Lu; Xu, Liang

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the research and design of control system of magnetic coupling centrifugal blood pump in our laboratory, and to briefly describe the structure of the magnetic coupling centrifugal blood pump and principles of the body circulation model. The performance of blood pump is not only related to materials and structure, but also depends on the control algorithm. We studied the algorithm about motor current double-loop control for brushless DC motor. In order to make the algorithm adjust parameter change in different situations, we used the self-tuning fuzzy PI control algorithm and gave the details about how to design fuzzy rules. We mainly used Matlab Simulink to simulate the motor control system to test the performance of algorithm, and briefly introduced how to implement these algorithms in hardware system. Finally, by building the platform and conducting experiments, we proved that self-tuning fuzzy PI control algorithm could greatly improve both dynamic and static performance of blood pump and make the motor speed and the blood pump flow stable and adjustable.

  5. Design analysis and performance assessment of hybrid magnetic bearings for a rotary centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhaohui; Jahanmir, Said; Heshmat, Hooshang; Hunsberger, Andrew Z; Walton, James F

    2009-01-01

    A hybrid magnetic bearing system was designed for a rotary centrifugal blood pump being developed to provide long-term circulatory support for heart failure patients. This design consists of two compact bearings to suspend the rotor in five degrees-of-freedom with single axis active control. Permanent magnets are used to provide passive radial support and electromagnets to maintain axial stability of the rotor. Characteristics of the passive radial and active thrust magnetic bearing system were evaluated by the electromagnetic finite element analysis. A proportional-integral-derivative controller with force balance algorithm was implemented for closed loop control of the magnetic thrust bearing. The control position is continuously adjusted based on the electrical energy in the bearing coils, and thus passive magnetic forces carry static thrust loads to minimize the bearing current. Performance of the magnetic bearing system with associated control algorithm was evaluated at different operating conditions. The bearing current was significantly reduced with the force balance control method and the power consumption was below 0.5 W under various thrust loads. The bearing parameters predicted by the analysis were validated by the experimental data. PMID:19381082

  6. Application of indirect flow rate measurement using motor driving signals to a centrifugal blood pump with an integrated motor.

    PubMed

    Tsukiya, T; Taenaka, Y; Nishinaka, T; Oshikawa, M; Ohnishi, H; Tatsumi, E; Takano, H; Konishi, Y; Ito, K; Shimada, M

    2001-09-01

    The method of measuring the flow rate of a centrifugal blood pump from the input electric power, which will be indispensable for the long-term use of such devices, was developed and was applied to the direct-driven centrifugal blood pump that has been developed by our research group. The accuracy was evaluated in a chronic animal experiment using an adult goat. The results demonstrated that this method carries the sufficient potential of the instantaneous monitoring method, but errors due to electromagnetic and mechanical losses were not determined always precisely. The detection of adverse phenomena such as the obstruction of the inlet cannula was also possible from the estimated value of the flow rate and its waveform pattern.

  7. A cost-effective extracorporeal magnetically-levitated centrifugal blood pump employing a disposable magnet-free impeller.

    PubMed

    Hijikata, W; Mamiya, T; Shinshi, T; Takatani, S

    2011-12-01

    In the field of rotary blood pumps, contactless support of the impeller by a magnetic bearing has been identified as a promising method to reduce blood damage and enhance durability. The authors developed a two-degrees-of-freedom radial controlled magnetic bearing system without a permanent magnet in the impeller in order that a low-cost disposable pump-head for an extracorporeal centrifugal blood pump could be manufactured more easily. Stable levitation and contactless rotation of the 'magnet-free' impeller were realized for a prototype blood-pump that made use of this magnetic bearing. The run-out of the impeller position at between 1000 r/min and 3000 r/min was less than 40 microm in the radial-controlled directions. The total power consumption of the magnetic bearing was less than 1 W at the same rotational speeds. When the pump was operated, a flow rate of 5 l/min against a head pressure of 78.66 kPa was achieved at a rotational speed of 4000 r/min, which is sufficient for extracorporeal circulation support. The proposed technology offers the advantage of low-cost mass production of disposable pump heads. PMID:22320054

  8. A cost-effective extracorporeal magnetically-levitated centrifugal blood pump employing a disposable magnet-free impeller.

    PubMed

    Hijikata, W; Mamiya, T; Shinshi, T; Takatani, S

    2011-12-01

    In the field of rotary blood pumps, contactless support of the impeller by a magnetic bearing has been identified as a promising method to reduce blood damage and enhance durability. The authors developed a two-degrees-of-freedom radial controlled magnetic bearing system without a permanent magnet in the impeller in order that a low-cost disposable pump-head for an extracorporeal centrifugal blood pump could be manufactured more easily. Stable levitation and contactless rotation of the 'magnet-free' impeller were realized for a prototype blood-pump that made use of this magnetic bearing. The run-out of the impeller position at between 1000 r/min and 3000 r/min was less than 40 microm in the radial-controlled directions. The total power consumption of the magnetic bearing was less than 1 W at the same rotational speeds. When the pump was operated, a flow rate of 5 l/min against a head pressure of 78.66 kPa was achieved at a rotational speed of 4000 r/min, which is sufficient for extracorporeal circulation support. The proposed technology offers the advantage of low-cost mass production of disposable pump heads.

  9. Geometric optimization of a step bearing for a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump for the reduction of hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Yada, Toru; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yamane, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    A hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a semi-open impeller has been developed for mechanical circulatory assistance. However, a narrow bearing gap has the potential to cause hemolysis. The purpose of the present study is to optimize the geometric configuration of the hydrodynamic step bearing in order to reduce hemolysis by expansion of the bearing gap. First, a numerical analysis of the step bearing, based on lubrication theory, was performed to determine the optimal design. Second, in order to assess the accuracy of the numerical analysis, the hydrodynamic forces calculated in the numerical analysis were compared with those obtained in an actual measurement test using impellers having step lengths of 0%, 33%, and 67% of the vane length. Finally, a bearing gap measurement test and a hemolysis test were performed. As a result, the numerical analysis revealed that the hydrodynamic force was the largest when the step length was approximately 70%. The hydrodynamic force calculated in the numerical analysis was approximately equivalent to that obtained in the measurement test. In the measurement test and the hemolysis test, the blood pump having a step length of 67% achieved the maximum bearing gap and reduced hemolysis, as compared with the pumps having step lengths of 0% and 33%. It was confirmed that the numerical analysis of the step bearing was effective, and the developed blood pump having a step length of approximately 70% was found to be a suitable configuration for the reduction of hemolysis.

  10. Estimation of the radial force using a disturbance force observer for a magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Pai, C N; Shinshi, T; Shimokohbe, A

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of the hydraulic forces in a magnetically levitated (maglev) centrifugal blood pump is important from the point of view of the magnetic bearing design. Direct measurement is difficult due to the absence of a rotor shaft, and computational fluid dynamic analysis demands considerable computational resource and time. To solve this problem, disturbance force observers were developed, using the radial controlled magnetic bearing of a centrifugal blood pump, to estimate the radial forces on the maglev impeller. In order to design the disturbance observer, the radial dynamic characteristics of a maglev impeller were evaluated under different working conditions. It was observed that the working fluid affects the additional mass and damping, while the rotational speed affects the damping and stiffness of the maglev system. Based on these results, disturbance force observers were designed and implemented. The designed disturbance force observers present a bandwidth of 45 Hz. In non-pulsatile conditions, the magnitude of the estimated radial thrust increases in proportion to the flowrate, and the rotational speed has little effect on the force direction. At 5 l/min against 100 mmHg, the estimated radial thrust is 0.95 N. In pulsatile conditions, this method was capable of estimating the pulsatile radial thrust with good response.

  11. The spiral groove bearing as a mechanism for enhancing the secondary flow in a centrifugal rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Felipe; Gross-Hardt, Sascha; Timms, Daniel; Egger, Christina; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    The rapid evolution of rotary blood pump (RBP) technology in the last few decades was shaped by devices with increased durability, frequently employing magnetic or hydrodynamic suspension techniques. However, the potential for low flow in small gaps between the rotor and pump casing is still a problem for hemocompatibility. In this study, a spiral groove hydrodynamic bearing (SGB) is applied with two distinct objectives: first, as a mechanism to enhance the washout in the secondary flow path of a centrifugal RBP, lowering the exposure to high shear stresses and avoiding thrombus formation; and second, as a way to allow smaller gaps without compromising the washout, enhancing the overall pump efficiency. Computational fluid dynamics was applied and verified via bench-top experiments. An optimization of selected geometric parameters (groove angle, width and depth) focusing on the washout in the gap rather than generating suspension force was conducted. An optimized SGB geometry reduced the residence time of the cells in the gap from 31 to 27 ms, an improvement of 14% compared with the baseline geometry of 200 μm without grooves. When optimizing for pump performance, a 15% smaller gap yielded a slightly better rate of fluid exchange compared with the baseline, followed by a 22% reduction in the volumetric loss from the primary pathway. Finally, an improved washout can be achieved in a pulsatile environment due to the SGB ability to pump inwardly, even in the absence of a pressure head.

  12. Improvement of hemocompatibility in centrifugal blood pump with hydrodynamic bearings and semi-open impeller: in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Maruyama, Osamu; Nishida, Masahiro; Yada, Toru; Saito, Sakae; Hirai, Shusaku; Yamane, Takashi

    2009-10-01

    We have developed a noncontact-type centrifugal blood pump with hydrodynamic bearings and a semi-open impeller for mechanical circulatory assist. The impeller is levitated by an original spiral-groove thrust bearing and a herringbone-groove journal bearing, without any additional displacement-sensing module or additional complex control circuits. The pump was improved by optimizing the groove direction of the spiral-groove thrust bearing and the pull-up magnetic force between the rotor magnet and the stator coil against the impeller. To evaluate hemocompatibility, we conducted a levitation performance test and in vitro hemocompatibility tests by means of a mock-up circulation loop. In the hemolysis test, the normalized index of hemolysis was reduced from 0.721 to 0.0335 g/100 L corresponding to an expansion of the bearing gap from 1.1 to 56.1 microm. In the in vitro antithrombogenic test, blood pumps with a wide thrust bearing gap were effective in preventing thrombus formation. Through in vitro evaluation tests, we confirmed that hemocompatibility was improved by balancing the hydrodynamic fluid dynamics and magnetic forces. PMID:19681836

  13. Disposable MagLev centrifugal blood pump utilizing a cone-shaped impeller.

    PubMed

    Hijikata, Wataru; Sobajima, Hideo; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Nagamine, Yasuyuki; Wada, Suguru; Takatani, Setsuo; Shimokohbe, Akira

    2010-08-01

    To enhance the durability and reduce the blood trauma of a conventional blood pump with a cone-shaped impeller, a magnetically levitated (MagLev) technology has been applied to the BioPump BPX-80 (Medtronic Biomedicus, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA), whose impeller is supported by a mechanical bearing. The MagLev BioPump (MagLev BP), which we have developed, has a cone-shaped impeller, the same as that used in the BPX-80. The suspension and driving system, which is comprised of two degrees of freedom, radial-controlled magnetic bearing, and a simply structured magnetic coupling, eliminates any physical contact between the impeller and the housing. To reduce both oscillation of the impeller and current in the coils, the magnetic bearing system utilizes repetitive and zero-power compensators. In this article, we present the design of the MagLev mechanism, measure the levitational accuracy of the impeller and pressure-flow curves (head-quantity [HQ] characteristics), and describe in vitro experiments designed to measure hemolysis. For the flow-induced hemolysis of the initial design to be reduced, the blood damage index was estimated by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Stable rotation of the impeller in a prototype MagLev BP from 0 to 2750 rpm was obtained, yielding a flow rate of 5 L/min against a head pressure in excess of 250 mm Hg. Because the impeller of the prototype MagLev BP is levitated without contact, the normalized index of hemolysis was 10% less than the equivalent value with the BPX-80. The results of the CFD analysis showed that the shape of the outlet and the width of the fluid clearances have a large effect on blood damage. The prototype MagLev BP satisfied the required HQ characteristics (5 L/min, 250 mm Hg) for extracorporeal circulation support with stable levitation of the impeller and showed an acceptable level of hemolysis. The simulation results of the CFD analysis indicated the possibility of further reducing the blood damage of

  14. Evaluation of a Spiral Groove Geometry for Improvement of Hemolysis Level in a Hydrodynamically Levitated Centrifugal Blood Pump.

    PubMed

    Murashige, Tomotaka; Kosaka, Ryo; Sakota, Daisuke; Nishida, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi; Maruyama, Osamu

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a spiral groove geometry for a thrust bearing to improve the hemolysis level in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. We compared three geometric models: (i) the groove width is the same as the ridge width at any given polar coordinate (conventional model); (ii) the groove width contracts inward from 9.7 to 0.5 mm (contraction model); and (iii) the groove width expands inward from 0.5 to 4.2 mm (expansion model). To evaluate the hemolysis level, an impeller levitation performance test and in vitro hemolysis test were conducted using a mock circulation loop. In these tests, the driving conditions were set at a pressure head of 200 mm Hg and a flow rate of 4.0 L/min. As a result of the impeller levitation performance test, the bottom bearing gaps of the contraction and conventional models were 88 and 25 μm, respectively. The impeller of the expansion model touched the bottom housing. In the hemolysis test, the relative normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) ratios of the contraction model in comparison with BPX-80 and HPM-15 were 0.6 and 0.9, respectively. In contrast, the relative NIH ratios of the conventional model in comparison with BPX-80 and HPM-15 were 9.6 and 13.7, respectively. We confirmed that the contraction model achieved a large bearing gap and improved the hemolysis level in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. PMID:26146791

  15. Evaluation of a Spiral Groove Geometry for Improvement of Hemolysis Level in a Hydrodynamically Levitated Centrifugal Blood Pump.

    PubMed

    Murashige, Tomotaka; Kosaka, Ryo; Sakota, Daisuke; Nishida, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi; Maruyama, Osamu

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a spiral groove geometry for a thrust bearing to improve the hemolysis level in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. We compared three geometric models: (i) the groove width is the same as the ridge width at any given polar coordinate (conventional model); (ii) the groove width contracts inward from 9.7 to 0.5 mm (contraction model); and (iii) the groove width expands inward from 0.5 to 4.2 mm (expansion model). To evaluate the hemolysis level, an impeller levitation performance test and in vitro hemolysis test were conducted using a mock circulation loop. In these tests, the driving conditions were set at a pressure head of 200 mm Hg and a flow rate of 4.0 L/min. As a result of the impeller levitation performance test, the bottom bearing gaps of the contraction and conventional models were 88 and 25 μm, respectively. The impeller of the expansion model touched the bottom housing. In the hemolysis test, the relative normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) ratios of the contraction model in comparison with BPX-80 and HPM-15 were 0.6 and 0.9, respectively. In contrast, the relative NIH ratios of the conventional model in comparison with BPX-80 and HPM-15 were 9.6 and 13.7, respectively. We confirmed that the contraction model achieved a large bearing gap and improved the hemolysis level in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

  16. Optimal bearing gap of a multiarc radial bearing in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump for the reduction of hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Yasui, Kazuya; Nishida, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Maruyama, Osamu; Yamane, Takashi

    2014-09-01

    We have developed a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal pump as a bridge-to-decision device. The purpose of the present study is to determine the optimal bearing gap of a multiarc radial bearing in the developed blood pump for the reduction of hemolysis. We prepared eight pump models having bearing gaps of 20, 30, 40, 80, 90, 100, 180, and 250 μm. The driving conditions were set to a pressure head of 200 mm Hg and a flow rate of 4 L/min. First, the orbital radius of the impeller was measured for the evaluation of the impeller stability. Second, the hemolytic property was evaluated in an in vitro hemolysis test. As a result, the orbital radius was not greater than 15 μm when the bearing gap was between 20 and 100 μm. The relative normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) ratios in comparison with BPX-80 were 37.67 (gap: 20 μm), 0.95 (gap: 30 μm), 0.96 (gap: 40 μm), 0.82 (gap: 80 μm), 0.77 (gap: 90 μm), 0.92 (gap: 100 μm), 2.76 (gap: 180 μm), and 2.78 (gap: 250 μm). The hemolysis tended to increase at bearing gaps of greater than 100 μm due to impeller instability. When the bearing gap decreased from 30 to 20 μm, the relative NIH ratios increased significantly from 0.95 to 37.67 times (P < 0.01) due to high shear stress. We confirmed that the optimal bearing gap was determined between 30 and 100 μm in the developed blood pump for the reduction of hemolysis.

  17. Five-week use of a monopivot centrifugal blood pump as a right ventricular assist device in severe dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takamichi; Kitamura, Tadashi; Torii, Shinzo; Hanayama, Naoji; Oka, Norihiko; Itatani, Keiichi; Tomoyasu, Takahiro; Irisawa, Yusuke; Shibata, Miyuki; Hayashi, Hidenori; Ono, Minoru; Miyaji, Kagami

    2014-03-01

    Right heart failure is a critical complication in patients requiring mechanical ventricular support. However, it is often difficult to provide adequate right ventricular support in the acute phase. A 41-year-old woman diagnosed with dilated cardiomyopathy with severe right heart failure underwent implantation of a paracorporeal pulsatile left ventricular assist device (LVAD, Nipro Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) and a MERA monopivot centrifugal pump (Senko Medical Instrument Manufacturing Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan) as a right ventricular assist device (RVAD). The patient developed ischemic enteritis 3 weeks after surgery, necessitating fasting and reversal of anticoagulation therapy. A target international normalized ratio of 1.5 was selected, and aspirin administration was discontinued. Following recovery without thromboembolic events, the patient failed the RVAD discontinuation test. Five weeks after surgery, the monopivot centrifugal pump was exchanged for a pulsatile pump. No thrombus was evident on the centrifugal pump. The patient was undergoing cardiac rehabilitation at the time of this writing and awaiting heart transplantation.

  18. Implantable centrifugal blood pump with dual impeller and double pivot bearing system: electromechanical actuator, prototyping, and anatomical studies.

    PubMed

    Bock, Eduardo; Antunes, Pedro; Leao, Tarcisio; Uebelhart, Beatriz; Fonseca, Jeison; Leme, Juliana; Utiyama, Bruno; da Silva, Cibele; Cavalheiro, Andre; Filho, Diolino Santos; Dinkhuysen, Jarbas; Biscegli, Jose; Andrade, Aron; Arruda, Celso

    2011-05-01

    An implantable centrifugal blood pump has been developed with original features for a left ventricular assist device. This pump is part of a multicenter and international study with the objective to offer simple, affordable, and reliable devices to developing countries. Previous computational fluid dynamics investigations and wear evaluation in bearing system were performed followed by prototyping and in vitro tests. In addition, previous blood tests for assessment of normalized index of hemolysis show results of 0.0054±2.46 × 10⁻³ mg/100 L. An electromechanical actuator was tested in order to define the best motor topology and controller configuration. Three different topologies of brushless direct current motor (BLDCM) were analyzed. An electronic driver was tested in different situations, and the BLDCM had its mechanical properties tested in a dynamometer. Prior to evaluation of performance during in vivo animal studies, anatomical studies were necessary to achieve the best configuration and cannulation for left ventricular assistance. The results were considered satisfactory, and the next step is to test the performance of the device in vivo.

  19. Estimation of changes in dynamic hydraulic force in a magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with transient computational fluid dynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Masuzawa, Toru; Ohta, Akiko; Tanaka, Nobuatu; Qian, Yi; Tsukiya, Tomonori

    2009-01-01

    The effect of the hydraulic force on magnetically levitated (maglev) pumps should be studied carefully to improve the suspension performance and the reliability of the pumps. A maglev centrifugal pump, developed at Ibaraki University, was modeled with 926 376 hexahedral elements for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses. The pump has a fully open six-vane impeller with a diameter of 72.5 mm. A self-bearing motor suspends the impeller in the radial direction. The maximum pressure head and flow rate were 250 mmHg and 14 l/min, respectively. First, a steady-state analysis was performed using commercial code STAR-CD to confirm the model's suitability by comparing the results with the real pump performance. Second, transient analysis was performed to estimate the hydraulic force on the levitated impeller. The impeller was rotated in steps of 1 degrees using a sliding mesh. The force around the impeller was integrated at every step. The transient analysis revealed that the direction of the radial force changed dynamically as the vane's position changed relative to the outlet port during one circulation, and the magnitude of this force was about 1 N. The current maglev pump has sufficient performance to counteract this hydraulic force. Transient CFD analysis is not only useful for observing dynamic flow conditions in a centrifugal pump but is also effective for obtaining information about the levitation dynamics of a maglev pump. PMID:19894088

  20. Estimation of changes in dynamic hydraulic force in a magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with transient computational fluid dynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Masuzawa, Toru; Ohta, Akiko; Tanaka, Nobuatu; Qian, Yi; Tsukiya, Tomonori

    2009-01-01

    The effect of the hydraulic force on magnetically levitated (maglev) pumps should be studied carefully to improve the suspension performance and the reliability of the pumps. A maglev centrifugal pump, developed at Ibaraki University, was modeled with 926 376 hexahedral elements for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses. The pump has a fully open six-vane impeller with a diameter of 72.5 mm. A self-bearing motor suspends the impeller in the radial direction. The maximum pressure head and flow rate were 250 mmHg and 14 l/min, respectively. First, a steady-state analysis was performed using commercial code STAR-CD to confirm the model's suitability by comparing the results with the real pump performance. Second, transient analysis was performed to estimate the hydraulic force on the levitated impeller. The impeller was rotated in steps of 1 degrees using a sliding mesh. The force around the impeller was integrated at every step. The transient analysis revealed that the direction of the radial force changed dynamically as the vane's position changed relative to the outlet port during one circulation, and the magnitude of this force was about 1 N. The current maglev pump has sufficient performance to counteract this hydraulic force. Transient CFD analysis is not only useful for observing dynamic flow conditions in a centrifugal pump but is also effective for obtaining information about the levitation dynamics of a maglev pump.

  1. Effect of a bearing gap on hemolytic property in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a semi-open impeller.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Imachi, Kou; Yamane, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a semi-open impeller for long-term circulatory assist. The pump uses hydrodynamic bearings to enhance durability and reliability without additional displacement-sensors or control circuits. However, a narrow bearing gap of the pump has a potential for hemolysis. The purpose of this study is to develop the hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a semi-open impeller, and to evaluate the effect of a bearing gap on hemolytic property. The impeller levitates using a spiral-groove type thrust bearing, and a herringbone-groove type radial bearing. The pump design was improved by adopting a step type thrust bearing and optimizing the pull-up magnetic force. The pump performance was evaluated by a levitation performance test, a hemolysis test and an animal experiment. In these tests, the bearing gap increased from 1 to 63 μm. In addition, the normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) improved from 0.415 to 0.005 g/100 l, corresponding to the expansion of the bearing gap. In the animal experiment for 24 h, the plasma-free hemoglobin remained within normal ranges (<4.0 mg/dl). We confirmed that the hemolytic property of the pump was improved to the acceptable level by expanding the bearing gap greater than 60 μm. PMID:23442235

  2. Effect of a bearing gap on hemolytic property in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a semi-open impeller.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Imachi, Kou; Yamane, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a semi-open impeller for long-term circulatory assist. The pump uses hydrodynamic bearings to enhance durability and reliability without additional displacement-sensors or control circuits. However, a narrow bearing gap of the pump has a potential for hemolysis. The purpose of this study is to develop the hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a semi-open impeller, and to evaluate the effect of a bearing gap on hemolytic property. The impeller levitates using a spiral-groove type thrust bearing, and a herringbone-groove type radial bearing. The pump design was improved by adopting a step type thrust bearing and optimizing the pull-up magnetic force. The pump performance was evaluated by a levitation performance test, a hemolysis test and an animal experiment. In these tests, the bearing gap increased from 1 to 63 μm. In addition, the normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) improved from 0.415 to 0.005 g/100 l, corresponding to the expansion of the bearing gap. In the animal experiment for 24 h, the plasma-free hemoglobin remained within normal ranges (<4.0 mg/dl). We confirmed that the hemolytic property of the pump was improved to the acceptable level by expanding the bearing gap greater than 60 μm.

  3. Engineering Aspects in Blood Pump Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golding, Leonard; Veres, Joseph P.

    1997-01-01

    NASA turbomachinery computer codes assisted in the design of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation's centrifugal bladed blood pump. The codes were originally developed for the aerospace industry, but are applicable to the blood pump because of a high degree of synergy with this application. Traditional turbomachinery design criteria were used in the design of the blood pump centrifugal impeller and volute casing. The fluid dynamic performance of the blood pump is meeting the engineering design goals of flow rate and pressure rise.

  4. Effect of Impeller Geometry on Lift-Off Characteristics and Rotational Attitude in a Monopivot Centrifugal Blood Pump.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Masahiro; Nakayama, Kento; Sakota, Daisuke; Kosaka, Ryo; Maruyama, Osamu; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Kuwana, Katsuyuki; Yamane, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    The effect of the flow path geometry of the impeller on the lift-off and tilt of the rotational axis of the impeller against the hydrodynamic force was investigated in a centrifugal blood pump with an impeller supported by a single-contact pivot bearing. Four types of impeller were compared: the FR model with the flow path having both front and rear cutouts on the tip, the F model with the flow path having only a front cutout, the R model with only a rear cutout, and the N model with a straight flow path. First, the axial thrust and the movement about the pivot point, which was loaded on the surface of the impeller, were calculated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Next, the lift-off point and the tilt of the rotational axis of the impeller were measured experimentally. The CFD analysis showed that the axial thrust increased gently in the FR and R models as the flow rate increased, whereas it increased drastically in the F and N models. This difference in axial thrust was likely from the higher pressure caused by the smaller circumferential velocity in the gap between the top surface of the impeller and the casing in the FR and R models than in the F and N models, which was caused by the rear cutout. These results corresponded with the experimental results showing that the impellers lifted off in the F and N models as the flow rate increased, whereas it did not in the FR and R models. Conversely, the movement about the pivot point increased in the direction opposite the side with the pump outlet as the flow rate increased. However, the tilt of the rotational axis of the impeller, which oriented away from the pump outlet, was less than 0.8° in any model under any conditions, and was considered to negligibly affect the rotational attitude of the impeller. These results confirm that a rear cutout prevents lift-off of the impeller caused by a decrease in the axial thrust.

  5. Real-Time Observation of Thrombus Growth Process in an Impeller of a Hydrodynamically Levitated Centrifugal Blood Pump by Near-Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging.

    PubMed

    Sakota, Daisuke; Murashige, Tomotaka; Kosaka, Ryo; Fujiwara, Tatsuki; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu

    2015-08-01

    Understanding the thrombus formation in cardiovascular devices such as rotary blood pumps is the most important issue in developing more hemocompatible devices. The objective of this study was to develop a hyperspectral imaging (HSI) method to visualize the thrombus growth process within a rotary blood pump and investigate the optical properties of the thrombus. An in vitro thrombogenic test was conducted using fresh porcine blood and a specially designed hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a transparent bottom. The pump rotating at 3000 rpm circulated the blood at 1.0 L/min. The bottom surface of the pump was illuminated with white light pulsed at the same frequency as the pump rotation, and the backward-scattered light was imaged using the HSI system. Using stroboscopic HSI and an image construction algorithm, dynamic spectral imaging at wavelengths ranging from 608 to 752 nm within the rotating pump was achieved. After completing the experiment, we collected the red thrombus formed in the pump impeller and quantified the thrombus hemoglobin concentration (Hbthrombus ). The spectrum changed around the center of the impeller, and the area of change expanded toward the impeller flow path. The shape corresponded approximately to the shape of the thrombus. The spectrum change indicated that the light scattering derived from red blood cells decreased. The Hbthrombus was 4.7 ± 1.3 g/dL versus a total hemoglobin of 13 ± 0.87 g/dL. The study revealed that Hbthrombus was reduced by the surrounding blood flow.

  6. Avoid self-priming centrifugal pump

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, G.G.

    1987-01-01

    The self-priming horizontal centrifugal pump becomes known to its operator either as a good pump or a bad pump. The latter is usually replaced by another type of pump, even though a properly specified self-priming centrifugal pump might have been a good choice. Use of the guidelines described in this article are intended to help in the purchase and installation of a good pump. Self-priming centrifugal pumps are used for removing liquids from below grade sumps or pits that may also contain solids, fibers and/or muck. Alternate pumps for this service include submersible pumps, vertical turbine pumps and positive displacement pumps. These alternate pumps do not pass solid particles as large as self-priming pumps do without damage. Positive displacement pumps are not normally cost-effective when pumping liquid at rates in excess of 500 gallons per minute in low-head applications. Vertical and submersible pumps must be removed when cleaning of the pump is required. Self-priming pumps are easily cleaned by opening the access plates without moving the pump; and they cost less than the other types.

  7. Development of a disposable maglev centrifugal blood pump intended for one-month support in bridge-to-bridge applications: in vitro and initial in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Someya, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Mariko; Waguri, Satoshi; Ushiyama, Tomohiro; Nagaoka, Eiki; Hijikata, Wataru; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Arai, Hirokuni; Takatani, Setsuo

    2009-09-01

    MedTech Dispo, a disposable maglev centrifugal blood pump with two degrees of freedom magnetic suspension and radial magnetic coupling rotation, has been developed for 1-month extracorporeal circulatory support. As the first stage of a two-stage in vivo evaluation, 2-week evaluation of a prototype MedTech Dispo was conducted. In in vitro study, the pump could produce 5 L/min against 800 mm Hg and the normalized index of hemolysis was 0.0054 +/- 0.0008 g/100 L. In in vivo study, the pump, with its blood-contacting surface coated with biocompatible 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine polymer, was implanted in seven calves in left heart bypass. Pump performance was stable with a mean flow of 4.49 +/- 0.38 L/min at a mean speed of 2072.1 +/- 64.5 rpm. The maglev control revealed its stability in rotor position during normal activity by the calves. During 2 weeks of operation in two calves which survived the intended study period, no thrombus formation was seen inside the pump and levels of plasma free hemoglobin were maintained below 4 mg/dL. Although further experiments are required, the pump demonstrated the potential for sufficient and reliable performance and biocompatibility in meeting the requirements for cardiopulmonary bypass and 1-week circulatory support. PMID:19775262

  8. Development of a disposable maglev centrifugal blood pump intended for one-month support in bridge-to-bridge applications: in vitro and initial in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Someya, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Mariko; Waguri, Satoshi; Ushiyama, Tomohiro; Nagaoka, Eiki; Hijikata, Wataru; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Arai, Hirokuni; Takatani, Setsuo

    2009-09-01

    MedTech Dispo, a disposable maglev centrifugal blood pump with two degrees of freedom magnetic suspension and radial magnetic coupling rotation, has been developed for 1-month extracorporeal circulatory support. As the first stage of a two-stage in vivo evaluation, 2-week evaluation of a prototype MedTech Dispo was conducted. In in vitro study, the pump could produce 5 L/min against 800 mm Hg and the normalized index of hemolysis was 0.0054 +/- 0.0008 g/100 L. In in vivo study, the pump, with its blood-contacting surface coated with biocompatible 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine polymer, was implanted in seven calves in left heart bypass. Pump performance was stable with a mean flow of 4.49 +/- 0.38 L/min at a mean speed of 2072.1 +/- 64.5 rpm. The maglev control revealed its stability in rotor position during normal activity by the calves. During 2 weeks of operation in two calves which survived the intended study period, no thrombus formation was seen inside the pump and levels of plasma free hemoglobin were maintained below 4 mg/dL. Although further experiments are required, the pump demonstrated the potential for sufficient and reliable performance and biocompatibility in meeting the requirements for cardiopulmonary bypass and 1-week circulatory support.

  9. Comparative hemolysis study of clinically available centrifugal pumps.

    PubMed

    Naito, K; Suenaga, E; Cao, Z L; Suda, H; Ueno, T; Natsuaki, M; Itoh, T

    1996-06-01

    Centrifugal pumps have become important devices for cardiopulmonary bypass and circulatory assistance. Five types of centrifugal pumps are clinically available in Japan. To evaluate the blood trauma caused by centrifugal pumps, a comparative hemolysis study was performed under identical conditions. In vitro hemolysis test circuits were constructed to operate the BioMedicus BP-80 (Medtronic, BioMedicus), Sarns Delphin (Sarns/3M Healthcare), Isoflow (St. Jude Medical [SJM]), HPM-15 (Nikkiso), and Capiox CX-SP45 (Terumo). The hemolysis test loop consisted of two 1.5 m lengths of polyvinyl chloride tubing with a 3/8-inch internal diameter, a reservoir with a sampling port, and a pump head. All pumps were set to flow at 6 L/min against the total pressure head of 120 mm Hg. Experiments were conducted simultaneously for 6 h at room temperature (21 degrees C) with fresh bovine blood. Blood samples for plasma-free hemoglobin testing were taken, and the change in temperature at the pump outlet port was measured during the experiment. The mean pump rotational speeds were 1,570, 1,374, 1,438, 1,944, and 1,296 rpm, and the normalized indexes of hemolysis were 0.00070, 0.00745, 0.00096, 0.00066, 0.00090 g/100 L for the BP-80, Sarns, SJM, Nikkiso, and Terumo pumps, respectively. The change in temperature at the pump outlet port was the least for the Nikkiso pump (1.8 degrees C) and the most with the SJM pump (3.8 degrees C). This study showed that there is no relationship between the pump rotational speed (rpm) and the normalized index of hemolysis in 5 types of centrifugal pumps. The pump design and number of impellers could be more notable factors in blood damage.

  10. Development of a disposable magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump (MedTech Dispo) intended for bridge-to-bridge applications--two-week in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Eiki; Someya, Takeshi; Kitao, Takashi; Kimura, Taro; Ushiyama, Tomohiro; Hijikata, Wataru; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Arai, Hirokuni; Takatani, Setsuo

    2010-09-01

    Last year, we reported in vitro pump performance, low hemolytic characteristics, and initial in vivo evaluation of a disposable, magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump, MedTech Dispo. As the first phase of the two-stage in vivo studies, in this study we have carried out a 2-week in vivo evaluation in calves. Male Holstein calves with body weight of 62.4–92.2 kg were used. Under general anesthesia, a left heart bypass with a MedTech Dispo pump was instituted between the left atrium and the descending aorta via left thoracotomy. Blood-contacting surface of the pump was coated with a 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine polymer. Post-operatively, with activated clotting time controlled at 180–220 s using heparin and bypass flow rate maintained at 50 mL/kg/min, plasma-free hemoglobin (Hb), coagulation, and major organ functions were analyzed for evaluation of biocompatibility. The animals were electively sacrificed at the completion of the 2-week study to evaluate presence of thrombus inside the pump,together with an examination of major organs. To date, we have done 13 MedTech Dispo implantations, of which three went successfully for a 2-week duration. In these three cases, the pump produced a fairly constant flow of 50 mL/Kg/min. Neurological disorders and any symptoms of thromboembolism were not seen. Levels of plasma-free Hb were maintained very low. Major organ functions remained within normal ranges. Autopsy results revealed no thrombus formation inside the pump. In the last six cases, calves suffered from severe pneumonia and they were excluded from the analysis. The MedTech Dispo pump demonstrated sufficient pump performance and biocompatibility to meet requirements for 1-week circulatory support. The second phase (2-month in vivo study) is under way to prove the safety and efficacy of MedTech Dispo for 1-month applications.

  11. Development of a novel centrifugal pump: magnetic rotary pump.

    PubMed

    Naganuma, S; Yambe, T; Sonobe, T; Kobayashi, S; Nitta, S

    1997-07-01

    The rotational axis of the centrifugal pump has some associated problems such as blood destruction and sealing between the axis and pump housing. To improve upon these deficits we have developed a new type of blood pump, the magnetic rotary pump (MRP). The MRP has an original design with no rotational axis and no impellers. We made a prototype MRP and examined its hemodynamics in mock circulation. The prototype MRP flow rate is only 1.0 L/min with an afterload of 30 mm Hg, and we have made some modifications in the size and drive mechanisms from these results. The modified MRP can achieve high flow rates and rotational speeds (6.0 L/min with an afterload of 100 mm Hg, 2,000 rpm) in a mock circuit, and the modified MRP was used for left heart assistance in an acute animal experiment. The MRP could maintain the hemodynamics of an anesthetized adult goat. These results suggest that the MRP needs to be improved in several areas, but the MRP may be useful as a blood pump. PMID:9212950

  12. New generation extracorporeal membrane oxygenation with MedTech Mag-Lev, a single-use, magnetically levitated, centrifugal blood pump: preclinical evaluation in calves.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Tatsuki; Nagaoka, Eiki; Watanabe, Taiju; Miyagi, Naoto; Kitao, Takashi; Sakota, Daisuke; Mamiya, Taichi; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Arai, Hirokuni; Takatani, Setsuo

    2013-05-01

    We have evaluated the feasibility of a newly developed single-use, magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump, MedTech Mag-Lev, in a 3-week extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) study in calves against a Medtronic Bio-Pump BPX-80. A heparin- and silicone-coated polypropylene membrane oxygenator MERA NHP Excelung NSH-R was employed as an oxygenator. Six healthy male Holstein calves with body weights of about 100 kg were divided into two groups, four in the MedTech group and two in the Bio-Pump group. Under general anesthesia, the blood pump and oxygenator were inserted extracorporeally between the main pulmonary artery and the descending aorta via a fifth left thoracotomy. Postoperatively, both the pump and oxygen flow rates were controlled at 3 L/min. Heparin was continuously infused to maintain the activated clotting time at 200-240 s. All the MedTech ECMO calves completed the study duration. However, the Bio-Pump ECMO calves were terminated on postoperative days 7 and 10 because of severe hemolysis and thrombus formation. At the start of the MedTech ECMO, the pressure drop across the oxygenator was about 25 mm Hg with the pump operated at 2800 rpm and delivering 3 L/min flow. The PO2 of the oxygenator outlet was higher than 400 mm Hg with the PCO2 below 45 mm Hg. Hemolysis and thrombus were not seen in the MedTech ECMO circuits (plasma-free hemoglobin [PFH] < 5 mg/dL), while severe hemolysis (PFH > 20 mg/dL) and large thrombus were observed in the Bio-Pump ECMO circuits. Plasma leakage from the oxygenator did not occur in any ECMO circuits. Three-week cardiopulmonary support was performed successfully with the MedTech ECMO without circuit exchanges. The MedTech Mag-Lev could help extend the durability of ECMO circuits by the improved biocompatible performances.

  13. Clinical experience with the Sarns centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Curtis, J J; Walls, J T; Demmy, T L; Boley, T M; Schmaltz, R A; Goss, C F; Wagner-Mann, C C

    1993-07-01

    Since October 1986, we have had experience with 96 Sarns centrifugal pumps in 72 patients (pts). Heparinless left atrial to femoral artery or aorta bypass was used in 14 pts undergoing surgery on the thoracic aorta with 13 survivors (93%). No paraplegia or device-related complications were observed. In 57 patients, the Sarns centrifugal pump was used as a univentricular (27 pts) or biventricular (30 pts) cardiac assist device for postcardiotomy cardiogenic shock. In these patients, cardiac assist duration ranged from 2 to 434 h with a hospital survival rate of 29% in those requiring left ventricular assist and 13% in those requiring biventricular assist. Although complications were ubiquitous in this mortally ill patient population, in 5,235 pump-hours, no pump thrombosis was observed. Hospital survivors followed for 4 months to 6 years have enjoyed an improved functional class. We conclude that the Sarns centrifugal pump is an effective cardiac assist device when used to salvage patients otherwise unweanable from cardiopulmonary bypass. Partial left ventricular bypass using a centrifugal pump has become our procedure of choice for unloading the left ventricle and for maintenance of distal aortic perfusion pressure when performing surgery on the thoracic aorta. This clinical experience with the Sarns centrifugal pump appears to be similar to that reported with other centrifugal assist devices.

  14. Clinical use of centrifugal pumps and the roller pump in open heart surgery: a comparative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yoshikai, M; Hamada, M; Takarabe, K; Okazaki, Y; Ito, T

    1996-06-01

    Centrifugal pumps have been used widely as the main pump in open heart surgery to reduce damage to blood elements and to reduce the activation of the coagulation system. The purpose of this study was the evaluation and comparison of the effects of two types of centrifugal pumps and of one type of roller pump on blood elements, the coagulation system, complements, and immunoglobulins. Two types of centrifugal pumps (Lifestream; St. Jude Medical, Chelmsford, Massachusetts; and BP-80: Medtronic, BioMedicus, Inc., Eden Prairie, Minnesota, U.S.A.) and one roller pump (Mera Co.) were used separately as the main pump for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in 29 patients. Platelet counts, lactate dehydrogenase, antithrombin III, thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT), complements (C3, C4, and CH50) and immunoglobulins G, A, and M values were measured before and after CPB and compared. Values, except those for TAT, showed no significant difference among the three groups. The TAT values increased less in each of the centrifugal pump groups than in the roller pump group. This finding suggests that thrombin synthesis might be suppressed by the use of a centrifugal pump.

  15. Centrifugal Force Based Magnetic Micro-Pump Driven by Rotating Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Hashi, S.; Ishiyama, K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a centrifugal force based magnetic micro-pump for the pumping of blood. Most blood pumps are driven by an electrical motor with wired control. To develop a wireless and battery-free blood pump, the proposed pump is controlled by external rotating magnetic fields with a synchronized impeller. Synchronization occurs because the rotor is divided into multi-stage impeller parts and NdFeB permanent magnet. Finally, liquid is discharged by the centrifugal force of multi-stage impeller. The proposed pump length is 30 mm long and19 mm in diameter which much smaller than currently pumps; however, its pumping ability satisfies the requirement for a blood pump. The maximum pressure is 120 mmHg and the maximum flow rate is 5000ml/min at 100 Hz. The advantage of the proposed pump is that the general mechanical problems of a normal blood pump are eliminated by the proposed driving mechanism.

  16. Optimal design of the hydrodynamic multi-arc bearing in a centrifugal blood pump for the improvement of bearing stiffness and hemolysis level.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Kazuya; Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of the present study is to establish an optimal design of the multi-arc hydrodynamic bearing in a centrifugal blood pump for the improvement of bearing stiffness and hemolysis level. The multi-arc bearing was designed to fulfill the required specifications: (i) ensuring the uniform bearing stiffness for various bearing angles; (ii) ensuring a higher bearing stiffness than the centrifugal force to prevent impeller whirl; and (iii) adjusting the bearing clearance as much as possible to reduce hemolysis. First, a numerical analysis was performed to optimize three design parameters of the multi-arc bearing: number of arcs N, bearing clearance C, and groove depth H. To validate the accuracy of the numerical analysis, the impeller trajectories for six pump models were measured. Finally, an in vitro hemolysis test was conducted to evaluate the hemolytic property of the multi-arc bearing. As a result of the numerical analysis, the optimal parameter combination was determined as follows: N=4, C=100 μm, and H ≥ 100 μm. In the measurements of the impeller trajectory, the optimal parameter combination was found to be as follows: N=4, C=90 μm, and H=100 μm. This result demonstrated the high reliability of the numerical analysis. In the hemolysis test, the parameter combination that achieved the smallest hemolysis was obtained as follows: N=4, C=90 μm, and H=100 μm. In conclusion, the multi-arc bearing could be optimized for the improvement of bearing stiffness and hemolysis level.

  17. At 1050 Gallery, Block 12, two centrifugal pumps, Buffalo Pumps, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    At 1050 Gallery, Block 12, two centrifugal pumps, Buffalo Pumps, Buffalo, NY, driven by Allis Chalmers motors (size 3 HSO, head 230, 120 cpm, 1750, rpm, Impulse dia. 15) installed in the 1960s and used for water-cooling system for 230-kv cable; the cables have been removed and the pumps are not currently used. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  18. Centrifugal Pump Experiment for Chemical Engineering Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderslice, Nicholas; Oberto, Richard; Marrero, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a Centrifugal Pump Experiment that provided an experiential learning experience to chemical engineering undergraduates at the University of Missouri in the spring of 2010 in the Unit Operations Laboratory course. Lab equipment was used by senior students with computer-based data and control technology. In…

  19. Clinical evaluation of the centrifugal pump in open heart surgery: a comparative study of different pumps.

    PubMed

    Takarabe, K; Yoshikai, M; Murayama, J; Hamada, M; Ito, T

    1997-07-01

    The centrifugal pump is now widely used in open heart surgery for its clinical benefits related to the blood elements and the coagulation system. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical performances of and the outcomes offered by 4 types of centrifugal pumps. For each pump, we investigated the effects on the blood elements, coagulation system, complements, and immunoglobulins during open heart surgery. Four types of centrifugal pumps were used: the HPM-15 (Nikkiso Co.), the Capiox (Terumo Co.), the Lifestream (St. Jude Medical Co.), and the BP-80 (Medtronic, BioMedicus Co.). The platelet count, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), antithrombin III (AT III), thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT), complements (C3, C4, and CH50), and immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA, and IgM) were measured before and after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). The platelet count was decreased more significantly by the HPM-15 than by any of the other pumps. The other parameters showed no difference among the 4 pumps. In clinical use, each of the 4 types of centrifugal pumps was safe.

  20. In-vitro assessment of centrifugal pumps for ventricular assist.

    PubMed

    Jakob, H; Kutschera, Y; Palzer, B; Prellwitz, W; Oelert, H

    1990-08-01

    Currently two major types of centrifugal pumps are commercially available for ventricular assist: the Biomedicus-cone (Group I) and the Centrimed-impeller pump (now Sarns 3M) (Group II). To compare them for blood trauma and hemolysis, an in-vitro experiment was designed with a Stöckert roller pump as a standard control (Group III). The in-vitro circuit was constructed consisting of a pump head, electromagnetic flow probe, polyvinyl chloride tubing and a reservoir, identical for all groups. Human ACD blood was used for priming and was circulated with a flow rate of 2 L/min for 24 h. Blood samples were taken at 0, 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 h and zero control values were subtracted from the resulting data per time interval. Among the 16 parameters studied, a highly significant difference in favor of Group I was found for glutamate oxalacetate transaminase (GOT) and lactate dehydrogenase (p less than 0.0001) and for the free plasma hemoglobin (p less than 0.0001) after 12 and 24 h, respectively. The hemolytic index (Allen) again was lowest for group I in contrast to Groups II and III (0.012 versus 0.060 and 1.70) after 24 h. All other parameters studied did not render significant differences between the systems tested. The authors conclude that the Biomedicus pump currently is the least traumatic centrifugal pump for ventricular assist.

  1. Centrifugal pump inlet pressure site affects measurement.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Simon; Horton, Alison; Butt, Warwick; Bennett, Martin; Horton, Stephen

    2010-09-01

    During extracorporeal life support (ECLS), blood is exposed to a myriad of unphysiological factors that can affect outcome. One aspect of this is the sub-atmospheric pressure generated by the ECLS pump and imparted to blood elements along the pump inlet line. This pressure can be measured on the inlet line close to the pump head by adding a connector, or at the venous cannula connection site. We compared the two measurement sites located at both points; between the venous cannula-inlet tubing and inlet tubing-pump, with a range of cannulae and flows. We also investigated the effects on inlet pressure from pump afterload and increasing inlet tubing length.

  2. Hydrodynamic performance and heat generation by centrifugal pumps.

    PubMed

    Ganushchak, Y; van Marken Lichtenbelt, W; van der Nagel, T; de Jong, D S

    2006-11-01

    For over a century, centrifugal pumps (CP) have been used in various applications, from large industrial pumps to flow pumps for aquariums. However, the use of CP as blood pumps has a rather short history. Consequently, the hydraulic performance data for a blood CP are limited. The aim of our investigation was to study the hydraulic performance and the heat generation of three commercially available CP: Bio-Medicus Bio-Pump BP80 (Medtronic), Rotaflow (Jostra Medizintechnik), and DeltaStream DP2 (MEDOS Medizintechnik AQ). The study was performed using a circuit primed with a water-glycerin mixture with a dynamic viscosity of 0.00272 pa/s. Pressure-flow curves were obtained by a stepwise stagnation of the pump outlet or inlet. The temperature changes were observed using ThermaCAM SC2000 (Flir Systems). The pumps' performance in close to clinical conditions ('operating region') was analysed in this report. The 'operating region' in the case of the BP80 is positioned around the pressure-flow curve at a pump speed of 3000 rpm. In the case of the Rotaflow, the 'operating region' was between the pump pressure-flow curves at a speed of 3000 and 4000 rpm, and the DP2 was found between 7000 and 8000 rpm. The standard deviation of mean pressure through the pump was used to characterise the stability of the pump. In experiments with outlet stagnation, the BP80 demonstrated high negative association between flow and pressure variability (r = -0.68, p < 0.001). In experiments with the DP2, this association was positive (r = 0.68, p < 0.001). All pumps demonstrated significantly higher variability of pressure in experiments with inlet stagnation in comparison to the experiments with outlet stagnation. The rise of relative temperature in the inlet of a pump was closely related to the flow rate. The heating of fluid was more pronounced in the 'zero-flow' mode, especially in experiments with inlet stagnation. In summary, (1) the 'zero-flow' regime, which is described in the manuals

  3. 23. TEMPORARY CENTRIFUGAL PUMP. NOTE CHAPMAN HYDRAULICOPERATED VALVE FOR LATER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. TEMPORARY CENTRIFUGAL PUMP. NOTE CHAPMAN HYDRAULIC-OPERATED VALVE FOR LATER CONNECTION OF ENGINE PUMP ENG TO DISCHARGE HEADER. - Lakeview Pumping Station, Clarendon & Montrose Avenues, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  4. Development and initial testing of a permanently implantable centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, T; Takami, Y; Benkowski, R; Ohtsubo, S; Yukio, O; Tayama, E; Ohtsuka, G; Niimi, Y; Glueck, J; Sueoka, A; Schmallegger, H; Schima, H; Wolner, E; Nosé, Y

    1997-07-01

    To be able to salvage heart failure patients, the need for an economical permanent ventricular assist device is increasing. To meet this increasing demand, a miniaturized centrifugal blood pump has been developed as a permanently implantable device. The Gyro permanently implantable model (PI-601) incorporates a sealless design with a blood stagnation free structure. The pump impeller is magnetically coupled to the driver magnet in a sealless manner. This pump is atraumatic and antithrombogenic and incorporates a double pivot bearing system. A miniaturized actuator was utilized in this system in collaboration with the University of Vienna. The priming volume of this pump is 20 ml. The overall size of the pump actuator package is 53 mm in height and 65 mm in diameter, 145 ml of displacement volume, and 305 g in weight. Testing to date has included in vitro hydraulic performance and hemolysis. This pump can provide 5 L/min against a 110 mm Hg total pressure head at 2,000 rpm and 8 L/min against 150 mm Hg at 2,500 rpm. The normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) value of this pump was 0.0028 g/100 L at 5 L/min against 100 mm Hg. A preliminary anatomical study revealed the possibility of the implantability of 2 such systems in biventricular bypass at a preperitoneal location. This system is feasible for use as a permanently implantable biventricular assist device. PMID:9212924

  5. [Design and optimization of a centrifugal pump for CPCR].

    PubMed

    Pei, J; Tan, X; Chen, K; Li, X

    2000-06-01

    Requirements for an optimal centrifugal pump, the vital component in the equipment for cardiopulmonary cerebral resuscitation(CPCR), have been presented. The performance of the Sarns centrifugal pump (Sarns, Inc./3M, Ann arbor, MI, U.S.A) was tested. The preliminarily optimized model for CPCR was designed according to the requirements of CPCR and to the comparison and analysis of several clinically available centrifugal pumps. The preliminary tests using the centrifugal pump made in our laboratory(Type CPCR-I) have confirmed the design and the optimization.

  6. Platelet function and hemolysis in centrifugal pumps: in vitro investigations.

    PubMed

    Steines, D; Westphal, D; Göbel, C; Reul, H; Rau, G

    1999-08-01

    The effects of centrifugal pumps on blood components other than erythrocytes, namely platelets and their interaction with the coagulation system, are not very well known. In a comparative study with three centrifugal pumps (BioMedicus BP-80, St. Jude Isoflow, and Sarns Delphin) and the Stockert roller pump hemolysis, platelet counts, thromboplastin and partial thromboplastin times, as well as resonance thrombography (RTG) parameters for the assessment of platelet and coagulation function were evaluated in vitro. Normalized indices of hemolysis (NIH) with ACD anticoagulation after 360 minutes were 0.008+/-0.004 (Isoflow), 0.018+/-0.017 (BP-80), 0.085+/-0.051 (Delphin), and 0.049+/-0.010 g/1001 (roller pump). Plasmatic coagulation was activated in all circuits. Platelet function was severely inhibited by the BP-80, indicated by increase in RTG platelet time to 358%+/-150% of initial values compared to 42%+/-29% (Isoflow), 40%+/-20% (Delphin), and 12%+/-10% (roller pump). Fibrin polymerization was affected similarly. The large surface area of the BP-80 leads to an extensive activation of platelets and plasminogen.

  7. Rotary blood pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Greg S. (Inventor); Vandamm, George A. (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Paul A. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A rotary blood pump is presented. The pump includes a pump housing for receiving a flow straightener, a rotor mounted on rotor bearings and having an inducer portion and an impeller portion, and a diffuser. The entrance angle, outlet angle, axial, and radial clearances of the blades associated with the flow straightener, inducer portion, impeller portion, and diffuser are optimized to minimize hemolysis while maintaining pump efficiency. The rotor bearing includes a bearing chamber that is filled with crosslinked blood or other bio-compatible material. A back emf integrated circuit regulates rotor operation and a microcomputer may be used to control one or more back emf integrated circuits. A plurality of magnets are disposed in each of a plurality of impeller blades with a small air gap. A stator may be axially adjusted on the pump housing to absorb bearing load and maximize pump efficiency.

  8. Prediction of performance of centrifugal pumps during starts under pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostafinski, W.

    1969-01-01

    Method which calculates start-up characteristics of centrifugal pumps reveals a capacity to predict pressure drop characteristics of pumps with vaned diffusers. Calculations are based on pump geometry, design-point flow, speed, and pressure rise, and the pump characteristic within range of approximately ten percent of the design-point flow.

  9. A seal-less centrifugal pump (Baylor Gyro Pump) for application to long-term circulatory support.

    PubMed

    Minato, N; Sakuma, I; Sasaki, T; Shiono, M; Ohara, Y; Takatani, S; Noon, G P; Nosé, Y

    1993-01-01

    We are developing a new centrifugal pump, the Baylor Gyro Centrifugal Pump (Gyro Pump), which can function for more than 2 weeks. The concept of the Gyro Pump is that a one-piece rotor-impeller with embedded permanent magnets, driven directly by a brushless direct current motor stator placed outside, rotates like a "gyroscope," and the rotor-impeller is supported by one pivot bearing at the bottom in accordance with the gyroscopic principle. This concept enables us to eliminate a driving shaft and a seal between the driving shaft and the blood chamber, which results in extending the life of the centrifugal pump. The blood passes through the space between the motor stator and the rotor to the impeller portion. In this preliminary phase, two pivot bearings were applied to support the rotor-impeller at the top and the bottom inside the blood chamber. Both pivot bearings showed less blood trauma and less thrombogenicity in in vitro and in vivo studies. The Gyro Pump is a promising second-generation centrifugal pump for long-term circulatory support in the near future. PMID:8422233

  10. Rotary Blood Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor); VanDamm, George A. (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Paul A. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A rotary blood pump includes a pump housing for receiving a flow straightener, a rotor mounted on rotor bearings and having an inducer portion and an impeller portion, and a diffuser. The entrance angle, outlet angle, axial and radial clearances of blades associated with the flow straightener, inducer portion, impeller portion and diffuser are optimized to minimize hemolysis while maintaining pump efficiency. The rotor bearing includes a bearing chamber that is filled with cross-linked blood or other bio-compatible material. A back emf integrated circuit regulates rotor operation and a microcomputer may be used to control one or more back emf integrated circuits. A plurality of magnets are disposed in each of a plurality of impeller blades with a small air gap. A stator may be axially adjusted on the pump housing to absorb bearing load and maximize pump efficiency.

  11. Rotary blood pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor); Kiris, Cetin (Inventor); Kwak, Dochan (Inventor); Rosenbaum, Bernard J. (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); DeBakey, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A blood pump that comprises a pump housing having a blood flow path therethrough, a blood inlet, and a blood outlet; a stator mounted to the pump housing, the stator having a stator field winding for producing a stator magnetic field; a flow straightener located within the pump housing, and comprising a flow straightener hub and at least one flow straightener blade attached to the flow straightener hub; a rotor mounted within the pump housing for rotation in response to the stator magnetic field, the rotor comprising an inducer and an impeller; the inducer being located downstream of the flow straightener, and comprising an inducer hub and at least one inducer blade attached to the inducer hub; the impeller being located downstream of the inducer, and comprising an impeller hub and at least one impeller blade attached to the impeller hub; and preferably also comprising a diffuser downstream of the impeller, the diffuser comprising a diffuser hub and at least one diffuser blade. Blood flow stagnation and clot formation within the pump are minimized by, among other things, providing the inducer hub with a diameter greater than the diameter of the flow straightener hub; by optimizing the axial spacing between the flow straightener hub and the inducer hub, and between the impeller hub and the diffuser hub; by optimizing the inlet angle of the diffuser blades; and by providing fillets or curved transitions between the upstream end of the inducer hub and the shaft mounted therein, and between the impeller hub and the shaft mounted therein.

  12. The CentriMag centrifugal blood pump as a benchmark for in vitro testing of hemocompatibility in implantable ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chris H H; Pieper, Ina Laura; Hambly, Rebecca; Radley, Gemma; Jones, Alyssa; Friedmann, Yasmin; Hawkins, Karl M; Westaby, Stephen; Foster, Graham; Thornton, Catherine A

    2015-02-01

    Implantable ventricular assist devices (VADs) have proven efficient in advanced heart failure patients as a bridge-to-transplant or destination therapy. However, VAD usage often leads to infection, bleeding, and thrombosis, side effects attributable to the damage to blood cells and plasma proteins. Measuring hemolysis alone does not provide sufficient information to understand total blood damage, and research exploring the impact of currently available pumps on a wider range of blood cell types and plasma proteins such as von Willebrand factor (vWF) is required to further our understanding of safer pump design. The extracorporeal CentriMag (Thoratec Corporation, Pleasanton, CA, USA) has a hemolysis profile within published standards of normalized index of hemolysis levels of less than 0.01 g/100 L at 100 mm Hg but the effect on leukocytes, vWF multimers, and platelets is unknown. Here, the CentriMag was tested using bovine blood (n = 15) under constant hemodynamic conditions in comparison with a static control for total blood cell counts, hemolysis, leukocyte death, vWF multimers, microparticles, platelet activation, and apoptosis. The CentriMag decreased the levels of healthy leukocytes (P < 0.006), induced leukocyte microparticles (P < 10(-5) ), and the level of high molecular weight of vWF multimers was significantly reduced in the CentriMag (P < 10(-5) ) all compared with the static treatment after 6 h in vitro testing. Despite the leukocyte damage, microparticle formation, and cleavage of vWF multimers, these results show that the CentriMag is a hemocompatible pump which could be used as a standard in blood damage assays to inform the design of new implantable blood pumps.

  13. Design of a Bearingless Blood Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barletta, Natale; Schoeb, Reto

    1996-01-01

    In the field of open heart surgery, centrifugal blood pumps have major advantages over roller pumps. The main drawbacks to centrifugal pumps are however problems with the bearings and with the sealing of the rotor shaft. In this paper we present a concept for a simple, compact and cost effective solution for a blood pump with a totally magnetically suspended impeller. It is based on the new technology of the 'Bearingless Motor' and is therefore called the 'Bearingless Blood Pump.' A single bearingless slice motor is at the same time a motor and a bearing system and is able to stabilize the six degrees of freedom of the pump impeller in a very simple way. Three degrees of freedom are stabilized actively (the rotation and the radial displacement of the motor slice). The axial and the angular displacement are stabilized passively. The pump itself (without the motor-stator and the control electronics) is built very simply. It consists of two parts only: the impeller with the integrated machine rotor and the housing. So the part which gets in contact with blood and has therefore to be disposable, is cheap. Fabricated in quantities, it will cost less than $10 and will therefore be affordable for the use in a heart-lung-machine.

  14. Latex micro-balloon pumping in centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

    PubMed

    Aeinehvand, Mohammad Mahdi; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Harun, Sulaiman Wadi; Al-Faqheri, Wisam; Thio, Tzer Hwai Gilbert; Kazemzadeh, Amin; Madou, Marc

    2014-03-01

    Centrifugal microfluidic platforms have emerged as point-of-care diagnostic tools. However, the unidirectional nature of the centrifugal force limits the available space for multi-step processes on a single microfluidic disc. To overcome this limitation, a passive pneumatic pumping method actuated at high rotational speeds has been previously proposed to pump liquid against the centrifugal force. In this paper, a novel micro-balloon pumping method that relies on elastic energy stored in a latex membrane is introduced. It operates at low rotational speeds and pumps a larger volume of liquid towards the centre of the disc. Two different micro-balloon pumping mechanisms have been designed to study the pump performance at a range of rotational frequencies from 0 to 1500 rpm. The behaviour of the micro-balloon pump on the centrifugal microfluidic platforms has been theoretically analysed and compared with the experimental data. The experimental data show that the developed pumping method dramatically decreases the required rotational speed to pump liquid compared to the previously developed pneumatic pumping methods. It also shows that within a range of rotational speed, a desirable volume of liquid can be stored and pumped by adjusting the size of the micro-balloon.

  15. Development of an atraumatic small centrifugal pump for second-generation cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Jikuya, T; Sasaki, T; Aizawa, T; Shiono, M; Glueck, J A; Smith, C P; Feldman, L; Sakuma, I; Sekela, M E; Noda, T

    1992-12-01

    A small and light direct-drive centrifugal pump has been developed for cardiopulmonary bypass. In the development process, blood compatibility studies including a hemolysis study, an in vitro fluid dynamic performance study, and in vivo durability and feasibility studies were performed. The centrifugal pump with a 50 mm diameter impeller resulted in almost the same index of hemolysis value as did a Bio-Medicus centrifugal pump. Heat dissipation from the motor was prevented by using a flexible drive cable. Forty-eight-hour sealing durability around the driving axis was accomplished by using a fluoro-rubber V-ring that connected to the hard chrome-plated stainless steel. In vitro and in vivo performances of the pump were satisfactory. Thrombus formation behind the impeller was prevented by using a holed impeller that generated blood flow from the back to the surface of the impeller. Elimination of air during priming procedures was also easier with this modification. This centrifugal pump has one-quarter of the priming volume, size, and weight of magnetically coupled centrifugal pump systems.

  16. Investigation of Flow in a Centrifugal Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Karl

    1946-01-01

    The investigation of the flow in a centrifugal pump indicated that the flow patterns in frictional fluid are fundamentally different from those in frictionless fluid. In particular, the dead air space adhering to the section side undoubtedly causes a reduction of the theoretically possible delivery head. The velocity distribution over a parallel circle is also subjected to a noticeable change as a result of the incomplete filling of the passages. The relative velocity on the pressure side of the vane, which for passages completely filled with active flow would differ little from zero even at comparatively lower than normal delivery volume, is increased, so that no rapid reverse flow occurs on the pressure side of the vane even for smaller delivery volume. It was established, further, that the flow ceases to be stationary for very small quantities of water. The inflow to the impeller can be regarded as radial for the operating range an question. The velocity triangles at the exit are subjected to a significant alteration in shape ae a result of the increased peripheral velocity, which may be of particular importance in the determination of the guide vane entrance angle.

  17. Evaluation of HL-20 roller pump and Rotaflow centrifugal pump on perfusion quality and gaseous microemboli delivery.

    PubMed

    Yee, Stella; Qiu, Feng; Su, Xiaowei; Rider, Alan; Kunselman, Allen R; Guan, Yulong; Undar, Akif

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the HL-20 roller pump (Jostra USA, Austin, TX, USA) and Rotaflow centrifugal pump (Jostra USA) on hemodynamic energy production and gaseous microemboli (GME) delivery in a simulated neonatal cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) circuit under nonpulsatile perfusion. This study employed a simulated model of the pediatric CPB including a Jostra HL-20 heart-lung machine (or a Rotaflow centrifugal pump), a Capiox BabyRX05 oxygenator (Terumo Corporation, Tokyo, Japan), a Capiox pediatric arterial filter (Terumo Corporation), and ¼-inch tubing. The total volume of the experimental system was 700mL (500mL for the circuit and 200mL for the pseudo neonatal patient). The hematocrit was maintained at 30% using human blood. At the beginning of each trial, a 5mL bolus of air was injected into the venous line. Both GME data and pressure values were recorded at postpump and postoxygenator sites. All the experiments were conducted under nonpulsatile perfusion at three flow rates (500, 750, and 1000mL/min) and three blood temperatures (35, 30, and 25°C). As n=6 for each setup, a total of 108 trials were done. The total number of GME increased as temperature decreased from 35°C to 25°C in the trials using the HL-20 roller pump while the opposite effect occurred when using the Rotaflow centrifugal pump. At a given temperature, total GME counts increased with increasing flow rates for both pumps. Results indicated the Rotaflow centrifugal pump delivered significantly fewer microemboli compared to the HL-20 roller pump, especially under high flow rates. Less than 10% of total microemboli were larger than 40µm in size and the majority of GME were in the 0-20µm class in all trials. Postpump total hemodynamic energy (THE) increased with increasing flow rates and decreasing temperatures in both circuits using these two pumps. The HL-20 roller pump delivered more THE than the Rotaflow centrifugal pump at all tested flow rates and temperature conditions

  18. Operation effectiveness of wells by enhancing the electric- centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyatikov, P. N.; Kozyrev, I. N.; Deeva, V. S.

    2016-09-01

    We present the method to improve the operation effectiveness of wells by enhancing the electric-centrifugal pump. Some of the best ways to extend the electric-centrifugal pumps operating lifetime is using today's techniques as well as additional protective equipment as a part of the electric-centrifugal pump. In paper it is shown that high corrosiveness of formation fluid (a multi-component medium composed of oil, produced water, free and dissolved gases) is a major cause of failures of downhole equipment. Coil tubing is the most efficient technology to deal with this problem. The experience of coil tubing operations has proved that high-quality bottom hole cleaning saving the cost of operation due to a decreased failure rate of pumps associated with ejection of mechanical impurity.

  19. Blood Pump Bearing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for a blood pump bearing system within a pump housing to support long-term highspeed rotation of a rotor with an impeller blade having a plurality of individual magnets disposed thereon to provide a small radial air gap between the magnets and a stator of less than 0.025 inches. The bearing system may be mounted within a flow straightener, diffuser, or other pump element to support the shaft of a pump rotor. The bearing system includes a zirconia shaft having a radiused end. The radiused end has a first radius selected to be about three times greater than the radius of the zirconia shaft. The radiused end of the zirconia shaft engages a flat sapphire endstone. Due to the relative hardness of these materials a flat is quickly produced during break-in on the zirconia radiused end of precisely the size necessary to support thrust loads whereupon wear substantially ceases. Due to the selection of the first radius, the change in shaft end-play during pump break-in is limited to a total desired end-play of less than about 0.010 inches. Radial loads are supported by an olive hole ring jewel that makes near line contact around the circumference of the Ir shaft to support big speed rotation with little friction. The width of olive hole ring jewel is small to allow heat to conduct through to thereby prevent heat build-up in the bearing. A void defined by the bearing elements may fill with blood that then coagulates within the void. The coagulated blood is then conformed to the shape of the bearing surfaces.

  20. Blood Pump Bearing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for a blood pump bearing system within a pump housing to support long-term high-speed rotation of a rotor with an impeller blade having a plurality of individual magnets disposed thereon to provide a small radial air gap between the magnets and a stator of less than 0.025 inches. The bearing system may be mounted within a flow straightener, diffuser, or other pump element to support the shaft of a pump rotor. The bearing system includes a zirconia shaft having a radiused end. The radiused end has a first radius selected to be about three times greater than the radius of the zirconia shaft. The radiused end of the zirconia shaft engages a flat sapphire endstone. Due to the relative hardness of these materials a flat is quickly produced during break-in on the zirconia radiused end of precisely the size necessary to support thrust loads whereupon wear substantially ceases. Due to the selection of the first radius, the change in shaft end-play during pump break-in is limited to a total desired end-play of less than about 0.010 inches. Radial loads are supported by an olive hole ring jewel that makes near line contact around the circumference of the shaft to support high speed rotation with little friction. The width of olive hole ring jewel is small to allow heat to conduct through to thereby prevent heat build-up in the bearing. A void defined by the bearing elements may fill with blood that then coagulates within the void. The coagulated blood is then conformed to the shape of the bearing surfaces.

  1. [Temporary use of centrifugal pump for pump thrombosis in patients with paracorporeal ventricular assist device].

    PubMed

    Kimura, Mitsutoshi; Kinoshita, Osamu; Nawata, Kan; Yamauchi, Haruo; Itoda, Yoshifumi; Hoshino, Yasuhiro; Kashiwa, Koichi; Kubo, Hitoshi; Kurosawa, Hideo; Takahashi, Mai; Koga, Sayaka; Ono, Minoru

    2015-05-01

    Nipro paracorporeal ventricular assist device( VAD) is often associated with pump thrombosis which causes severe complications such as brain infarction, often requiring pump change. However, Nipro VAD pump is an expensive device and it is difficult to change pumps frequently at a short interval. We have temporarily used Rotaflow centrifugal pump for recurrent pump thrombosis in patients with Nipro VADs. From January 2012 through December 2013, 19 patients underwent Nipro VADs implantation at our institution, and 9 of them underwent pump change from Nipro pumps to Rotaflow centrifugal pumps. A total of 25 Rotaflow centrifugal pumps were used in these 9 patients, with the total circulatory support duration of 526 days. The median support period was 15 days (range;2-128 days). There were 2 cerebrovascular accidents and 1 Rotaflow pump circuit thrombosis during this period. Change from Rotaflow to Nipro VAD pump resulted in decrease in hematocrit by about 3 point. There was no difference in liver or renal function between before and after the pump change. Our results suggest that temporary use of Rotaflow centrifugal pump for recurrent pump thrombosis in patients with Nipro VADs may be a promising alternative.

  2. Experience with the Sarns centrifugal pump in postcardiotomy ventricular failure.

    PubMed

    Curtis, J J; Walls, J T; Schmaltz, R; Boley, T M; Nawarawong, W; Landreneau, R J

    1992-09-01

    The reported clinical use of the Sarns centrifugal pump (Sarns, Inc./3M, Ann Arbor, Mich.) as a cardiac assist device for postcardiotomy ventricular failure is limited. During a 25-month period ending November 1988, we used 40 Sarns centrifugal pumps as univentricular or biventricular cardiac assist devices in 27 patients who could not be weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass despite maximal pharmacologic and intraaortic balloon support. Eighteen men and nine women with a mean age of 60.4 years (28 to 83) required assistance. Left ventricular assist alone was used in 12 patients, right ventricular assist in 2, and biventricular assist in 13. The duration of assist ranged from 2 to 434 hours (median 45). Centrifugal assist was successful in weaning 100% of the patients. Ten of 27 patients (37%) improved hemodynamically, allowing removal of the device(s), and 5 of 27 (18.5%) survived hospitalization. Survival of patients requiring left ventricular assist only was 33.3% (4/12). Complications were common and included renal failure, hemorrhage, coagulopathy, ventricular arrhythmias, sepsis, cerebrovascular accident, and wound infection. During 3560 centrifugal pump hours, no pump thrombosis was observed. The Sarns centrifugal pump is an effective assist device when used to salvage patients who otherwise cannot be weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass. Statistical analysis of preoperative patient characteristics, operative risk factors, and postoperative complications failed to predict which patients would be weaned from cardiac assist or which would survive.

  3. Small centrifugal pumps for low thrust rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulbrandsen, N. C.; Furst, R. B.; Burgess, R. M.; Scheer, D. D.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a combined analytical and experimental investigation of low specific speed pumps for potential use as components of propellant feed systems for low thrust rocket engines. Shrouded impellers and open face impellers were tested in volute type and vaned diffuser type pumps. Full- and partial-emission diffusers and full- and partial-admission impellers were tested. Axial and radial loads, head and efficiency versus flow, and cavitation tests were conducted. Predicted performance of two pumps are compared when pumping water and liquid hydrogen. Detailed pressure loss and parasitic power values are presented for two pump configurations. Partial-emission diffusers were found to permit use of larger impeller and diffuser passages with a minimal performance penalty. Normal manufacturing tolerances were found to result in substantial power requirement variation with only a small pressure rise change. Impeller wear ring leakage was found to reduce pump pressure rise to an increasing degree as the pump flowrate was decreased.

  4. In vitro evaluation of the TandemHeart pediatric centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Svitek, Robert G; Smith, Douglas E; Magovern, James A

    2007-01-01

    The pediatric TandemHeart pump is being developed for short-term circulatory support of patients varying in size from 2 to 40 kg. The pump withdraws blood from the left atrium via cannula inserted percutaneously, either through the right internal jugular vein or transhepatically, and pumps the blood back into the arterial system via the carotid or femoral artery. High resolution stereolithography (SLA) was used to create an upper housing and impeller design, which were assembled into a functional pump prototype. Pressure-flow characteristics of the pump were determined in a blood analogue solution and compared with the pressure-flow requirements of the intended cannulation. At 5,500 rpm, the pump was able to generate 0.4 L/min of flow with a pressure rise of 325 mm Hg and 2.0 L/min with a pressure rise of 250 mm Hg. The hydraulic performance of the pump will enable at least 50% of cardiac output when the arterial cannula is placed in the carotid artery. The hemolysis of the TandemHeart pediatric pump at 5,500 rpm was compared with the BP-50 pediatric centrifugal pump in vitro using bovine blood flowing at 0.4 L/min against 250 mm Hg. The TandemHeart pump produced a similar increase in plasma free hemoglobin levels during the duration of the 6 hour test.

  5. Measurements of the rotordynamic shroud forces for centrifugal pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinzburg, A.; Brennen, C. E.; Acosta, A. J.; Caughey, T. K.

    1990-01-01

    An experiment was designed to measure the rotordynamic shroud forces on a centrifugal pump impeller. The measurements were done for various whirl/impeller speed ratios and for different flow rates. A destabilizing tangential force was measured for small positive whirl ratios and this force decreased with increasing flow rate.

  6. Less platelet damage in the curved vane centrifugal pump: a comparative study with the roller pump in open heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Nishinaka, T; Nishida, H; Endo, M; Koyanagi, H

    1994-09-01

    The centrifugal pump with the curved vane (Lifestream Centrifugal Pump [LCP]) was applied to cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in 10 patients who underwent elective coronary artery bypass grafting. Serum hemoglobin levels, platelet counts, and serum beta-thromboglogulin (beta-TG) levels were measured during CPB. The results were compared with those for a comparative roller pump (RP) group (n = 10). There was no difference in CPB time between LCP (112 +/- 22 min) and RP (121 +/- 22 min) groups. Serum beta-TG levels (ng/ml) were lower in the LCP group than in the RP group (34 +/- 9 vs. 101 +/- 80, 5 min; 81 +/- 33 vs. 236 +/- 112, 30 min; 120 +/- 53 vs. 314 +/- 100, 60 min after initiation of CPB; p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in hemolysis and platelet depletion. The LCP showed excellent hemodynamic performance with less blood trauma in clinical application to open heart surgery.

  7. Comparison of the standard roller pump and a pulsatile centrifugal pump for extracorporeal circulation during routine coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Driessen, J J; Fransen, G; Rondelez, L; Schelstraete, E; Gevaert, L

    1991-01-01

    The present prospective study compared the standard nonpulsatile twin roller pump with the Sarns centrifugal pump, in the pulsatile mode, as arterial pumps for extracorporeal circulation during coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). The study was conducted in two consecutive groups of 25 patients receiving a standard anaesthetic and surgical protocol. The investigated parameters included haemodynamic profiles, oxygen exchange, blood gas and acid-base homeostasis, haematology, coagulation and complement consumption. With comparable settings for pump flow, gas flow and delivered oxygen concentrations, there was no difference between the groups in the main haemodynamic parameters during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). However, a tenfold lower dose of sodium nitroprusside was required to keep systemic vascular resistance within physiologic limits during CPB in the centrifugal group (C group) compared with the roller group (R group). During rewarming oxygen extraction was higher in the C group than in the R group. During the first eight hours after CPB no differences in haemodynamics, oxygenation parameters and pulmonary shunt between the groups were observed. During, as well as after, CPB there was no significant difference in blood gas and acid-base homeostasis between either group. Average postoperative blood loss via chest tubes, total transfusions of blood products, haemoglobin and coagulation did not differ between the two groups. However, the white blood cell count, corrected for changes in haematocrit, decreased during the early phase of CPB in the R group, but not in the C group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. MedTech Mag-Lev, single-use, extracorporeal magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump for mid-term circulatory support.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Eiki; Fujiwara, Tatsuki; Kitao, Takashi; Sakota, Daisuke; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Arai, Hirokuni; Takatani, Setsuo

    2013-01-01

    Short- to mid-term extracorporeal ventricular assist devices (VADs) are recommended for critical cardiogenic shock patients. We have designed a preclinical, single-use MedTech Mag-Lev VAD for one-month extracorporeal use. The impeller-rotor of the pump was suspended by a two degree-of-freedom active magnetic bearing in a 300 μm fluid gap, where the computational fluid dynamics analysis predicted a secondary flow of about 400-500 ml/min at a pump speed of 1800-2200 rpm. Three eddy current sensors were employed to implement noise- and drift-free magnetic levitation. The pump components were injection molded using polycarbonate for smooth surfaces as well as improved reproducibility, followed by coating with a biocompatible 2-methacryloyl-oxyethyl phosphorylcholine polymer. Chronic animal experiments were performed in nine calves. Three of the nine calves were excluded from analysis for problems with the circuit. Five of the six (83.3%) completed the 60 day duration of the study, while one prematurely died of massive bleeding due to inflow port detachment. The pump did not stop due to magnetic-levitation malfunction. Neither pump thrombosis nor major organ infarction was observed at autopsy. In comparison to machined surfaces, the injection-molded pump surfaces were thrombus-free after 60 day implantation. This study demonstrates the feasibility of MedTech Mag-Lev VAD for 60 day circulatory support. PMID:23644611

  9. MedTech Mag-Lev, single-use, extracorporeal magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump for mid-term circulatory support.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Eiki; Fujiwara, Tatsuki; Kitao, Takashi; Sakota, Daisuke; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Arai, Hirokuni; Takatani, Setsuo

    2013-01-01

    Short- to mid-term extracorporeal ventricular assist devices (VADs) are recommended for critical cardiogenic shock patients. We have designed a preclinical, single-use MedTech Mag-Lev VAD for one-month extracorporeal use. The impeller-rotor of the pump was suspended by a two degree-of-freedom active magnetic bearing in a 300 μm fluid gap, where the computational fluid dynamics analysis predicted a secondary flow of about 400-500 ml/min at a pump speed of 1800-2200 rpm. Three eddy current sensors were employed to implement noise- and drift-free magnetic levitation. The pump components were injection molded using polycarbonate for smooth surfaces as well as improved reproducibility, followed by coating with a biocompatible 2-methacryloyl-oxyethyl phosphorylcholine polymer. Chronic animal experiments were performed in nine calves. Three of the nine calves were excluded from analysis for problems with the circuit. Five of the six (83.3%) completed the 60 day duration of the study, while one prematurely died of massive bleeding due to inflow port detachment. The pump did not stop due to magnetic-levitation malfunction. Neither pump thrombosis nor major organ infarction was observed at autopsy. In comparison to machined surfaces, the injection-molded pump surfaces were thrombus-free after 60 day implantation. This study demonstrates the feasibility of MedTech Mag-Lev VAD for 60 day circulatory support.

  10. Rotating and positive-displacement pumps for low-thrust rocket engines. Volume 1: Pump Evaluation and design. [of centrifugal pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macgregor, C.; Csomor, A.

    1974-01-01

    Rotating and positive displacement pumps of various types were studied for pumping liquid fluorine for low-thrust, high-performance rocket engines. Included in the analysis were: centrifugal, pitot, Barske, Tesla, drag, gear, vane, axial piston, radial piston, diaphragm, and helirotor pump concepts. The centrifugal pump and the gear pump were selected and these were carried through detailed design and fabrication. Mechanical difficulties were encountered with the gear pump during the preliminary tests in Freon-12. Further testing and development was therefore limited to the centrifugal pump. Tests on the centrifugal pump were conducted in Freon-12 to determine the hydrodynamic performance and in liquid fluorine to demonstrate chemical compatibility.

  11. Evaluation of floating impeller phenomena in a Gyro centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Ikuya; Ichikawa, S; Mikami, M; Ishitoya, H; Motomura, T; Kawamura, M; Linneweber, J; Glueck, J; Shinohara, T; Nosé, Y

    2013-01-01

    The Gyro centrifugal pump developed as a totally implantable artificial heart was designed with a free impeller, in which the rotational shaft (male bearing) of the impeller was completely separated from the female bearing. For this type of pump, it is very important to keep the proper magnet balance (impeller-magnet and actuator-magnet) in order to prevent thrombus formation and/or bearing wear. When the magnet balance is not proper, the impeller is jerked down into the bottom bearing. On the other hand, if magnet balance is proper, the impeller lifted off the bottom of the pump housing within a certain range of pumping conditions. In this study, this floating phenomenon was investigated in detail. The floating phenomenon was proved by observation of the impeller behavior using a transparent acrylic pump. The impeller floating phenomenon was mapped on a pump performance curve. The impeller floating phenomenon is affected by the magnet-magnet coupling distance and rotational speed of the impeller. In order to keep the proper magnet balance and to maintain the impeller floating phenomenon at the driving condition of right and left pump, the magnet-magnet coupling distance was altered by a spacer which was installed between the pump and actuator. It became clear that the same pump could handle different conditions (right and left ventricular assist), by just changing the thickness of the spacer. When magnet balance is proper, the floating impeller phenomenon occurs automatically in response to the impeller rev. It is called "the dynamic RPM suspension".

  12. Development of an autoflow cruise control system for a centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Nishida, H; Beppu, T; Nakajima, M; Nishinaka, T; Nakatani, H; Ihashi, K; Katsumata, T; Kitamura, M; Aomi, S; Endo, M

    1995-07-01

    To improve the ease of driving a centrifugal pump that is afterload dependent, we have developed an automatic flow control system for the Terumo Capiox centrifugal pump system. This system consists of an autoflow cruise control system with a safety cutoff. The Capiox Pump Console 3000 was controlled by a personal computer through a serial communication line. In the usual manual mode, the motor speed knob works as a pump speed control, and in the autoflow mode, the same knob works as a blood flow rate control. After selecting and obtaining the desired flow rate, the mode was changed from manual to autoflow mode. In the autoflow mode, the computer compares the desired flow rate with the actual flow measured by an ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter and adjusts the motor rotational speed accordingly. During both in vivo and in vitro testing, this autoflow mode was able to return the changed flow that was disrupted by either clamping and declamping of the tubing or by the bolus injection of a vasomotor drug to the selected flow rate within 10 s without any significant fluctuation. In conclusion, the newly developed computer controlled autoflow system was able to produce a reliable and effective flow regulation for a centrifugal pump.

  13. Analysis of the reliability of submersible centrifugal electric pumping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shilyaev, V.A.; Solodovnikov, G.G.; Vikhman, R.G.; Koshelev, V.A.; Zhitina, G.S.; Chirkova, N.I.

    1987-01-01

    A modern submersible centrifugal electric pumping system (SCEPS) for oil production consists of a submersible part which includes a centrifugal pump, an electric motor, a hydroprotection arrangement, a cable line, and an aboveground part that includes a control station and a transformer. The author discusses the mean service life of the submersible part of the SCEPS as the most important parameter of reliability of the SCEPS. The effect of the operating factors is assessed by calculating the mean service life of the submersible part of the typical SCEPS, making allowance for failures resulting from all causes. The mean operating time until failure of the submersible part of the new SCEPS due to design and technological error was determined.

  14. Modelling of flow with cavitation in centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homa, D.; Wróblewski, W.

    2014-08-01

    The paper concerns flow modelling in centrifugal pump with special consideration of cavitation phenomena. Cavitation occurs when local pressure drops below the saturation pressure according to the temperature of the flow. Vapour bubbles are created and then they flow through the areas with higher pressure. The bubbles collapse rapidly generating pressure wave, noise and vibration. Working under cavitation condition is very dangerous to a pump and can significantly shorten its lifetime. The investigated centrifugal pump consists of three two-flow rotors and stators working on a single shaft. The modelling process started with grid independence study. When the grid was chosen, the pump performance curve was obtained using the single phase fluid model. Next, using the results from pump performance curve calculations, the cavitation characteristic was obtained. The constant capacity was held when the pressure at the inlet was reduced. The two - phase model was used with Zwart cavitation model. The results indicate that the pump work in safe range of parameters. The analysis also provides wide range of information about the areas of vapour appearance. The most endangered regions are leading edges of rotor. When pressure at the inlet drops to about one third of pressure that calculations started from the cavitation cloud appears in whole rotor. The intense of vapour bubbles creation is greater near the shroud of the pump, rather than near the hub. As cavitation is strongly unsteady phenomena, the transient calculations were performed to check if the results are close to those obtained using the steady state type. The differences are not significant.

  15. Mechanical drive for blood pump

    DOEpatents

    Bifano, N.J.; Pouchot, W.D.

    1975-07-29

    This patent relates to a highly efficient blood pump to be used as a replacement for a ventricle of the human heart to restore people disabled by heart disease. The mechanical drive of the present invention is designed to operate in conjunction with a thermoelectric converter power source. The mechanical drive system essentially converts the output of a rotary power into pulsatile motion so that the power demand from the thermoelectric converter remains essentially constant while the blood pump output is pulsed. (auth)

  16. Active magnetic bearings: As applied to centrifugal pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelik, Lev; Cooper, Paul; Jones, Graham; Galecki, Dennis; Pinckney, Frank; Kirk, Gordon

    1992-01-01

    Application of magnetic bearings to boiler feed pumps presents various attractive features, such as longer bearing life, lower maintenance costs, and improved operability through control of the rotordynamics. Magnetic bearings were fitted to an eight-stage, 600 hp boiler feed pump, which generates 2600 ft of heat at 680 gpm and 3560 rpm. In addition to the varied and severe operating environment in steady state operation of this pump in a power plant, it is also subjected to transient loads during frequent starts and stops. These loads can now be measured by the in-built instrumentation of the magnetic bearings. Following site installation, a follow-up bearing tune-up was performed, and pump transient response testing was conducted. The bearing response was completely satisfactory, ensuring trouble-free pump operation even in the range of reduced load. The experience gained so far through design and testing proves feasibility of magnetic bearings for boiler feed pumps, which sets the stage for application of even higher energy centrifugal pumps equipped with magnetic bearings.

  17. Active magnetic bearings: As applied to centrifugal pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelik, Lev; Cooper, Paul; Jones, Graham; Galecki, Dennis; Pinckney, Frank; Kirk, Gordon

    1992-05-01

    Application of magnetic bearings to boiler feed pumps presents various attractive features, such as longer bearing life, lower maintenance costs, and improved operability through control of the rotordynamics. Magnetic bearings were fitted to an eight-stage, 600 hp boiler feed pump, which generates 2600 ft of heat at 680 gpm and 3560 rpm. In addition to the varied and severe operating environment in steady state operation of this pump in a power plant, it is also subjected to transient loads during frequent starts and stops. These loads can now be measured by the in-built instrumentation of the magnetic bearings. Following site installation, a follow-up bearing tune-up was performed, and pump transient response testing was conducted. The bearing response was completely satisfactory, ensuring trouble-free pump operation even in the range of reduced load. The experience gained so far through design and testing proves feasibility of magnetic bearings for boiler feed pumps, which sets the stage for application of even higher energy centrifugal pumps equipped with magnetic bearings.

  18. [Hematologic and endocrinologic effects of pulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass using a centrifugal pump].

    PubMed

    Komoda, T; Maeta, H; Imawaki, S; Shiraishi, Y; Tanaka, S

    1992-06-01

    The effects of pulsatile and nonpulsatile flow during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) with of centrifugal pump (Sarns) and membrane oxygenator, on blood cells, hemodynamics, and hormonal response were studied. In the pulsatile group (group P) in which pulsatile flow was generated by centrifugal pump and a 20 Fr arterial cannula was used, hemolysis and reduction of platelet count during CPB were more marked than in the nonpulsatile group (group NP), in which the same type of circuit was used. When the 20 Fr arterial cannula was replaced with a 24 Fr cannula (group Pc), the rate of hemolysis during CPB was significantly reduced compared with that in group P (p less than 0.05). The rate of rise in plasma free hemoglobin from 10 to 70 minutes CPB in group Pc was 15.0 mg/dl/hr, this value did not exceed that in either group NP or in group Pr, in which a roller pump rather than centrifugal pump was used to generate pulsatile flow. These findings show that pulsatile CPB with a centrifugal pump produces no deleterious hematologic effect in clinical use. The rise in the level of angiotensin II in group P was significantly smaller than that in group NP (p less than 0.05), and the rise in plasma renin activity and levels of angiotensin I, adrenalin and noradrenaline were smaller than those in group NP, although these differences were no significance. These findings indicate that the centrifugal pump generates pulsatile flow effectively, although not so effectively as to prevent the rise in peripheral vascular resistance. During CPB, there was no change in levels of thyroid hormones, including free T3, free T4 and reverse T3, in either pulsatile groups P and Pc or nonpulsatile group. TSH level in group Pc was significantly elevated in contrast with that in the nonpulsatile group (p less than 0.05), in which no change in TSH level was seen. It is suggested that pulsatile perfusion using a centrifugal pump might maintain sufficient hypothalamic-pituitary function to permit

  19. Study of blade clearance effects on centrifugal pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoshide, R. K.; Nielson, C. E.

    1972-01-01

    A program of analysis, design, fabrication, and testing has been conducted to develop and experimentally verify analytical models to predict the effects of impeller blade clearance on centrifugal pumps. The effect of tip clearance on pump efficiency, and the relationship between the head coefficient and torque loss with tip clearance was established. Analysis were performed to determine the cost variation in design, manufacture, and test that would occur between unshrouded and shrouded impellers. An impeller, representative of typical rocket engine impellers, was modified by removing its front shroud to permit variation of its blade clearances. It was tested in water with special instrumentation to provide measurements of blade surface pressures during operation. Pump performance data were obtained from tests at various impeller tip clearances. Blade pressure data were obtained at the nominal tip clearance. Comparisons of predicted and measured data are given.

  20. Cavitation Performance of a Centrifugal Pump with Water and Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammitt, F. G.; Barton, R. K.; Cramer, V. F.; Robinson, M. J.

    1961-01-01

    The cavitation performance of a given centrifugal pump with water (hot and cold) and mercury is compared. It is found that there are significant scale effects with all fluids tested, with the Thoma cavitation parameter decreasing in all cases for increased pump speed or fluid Reynolds' number. The data for a fixed flow coefficient fall into a single curve when plotted against pump speed (or fluid velocity), rather than against Reynolds' number. Conversely, the Thoma parameter for a given Reynolds' number is approximately twice as large for mercury as for water. The direction of this variation is as predicted from consideration of the cavitation thermodynamic parameters which vary by a factor of 10(exp 7) between these fluids. No difference in cavitation performance between hot and cold water (approximately 160 F and 80 F) was observed, However, the thermodynamic parameters vary only by a factor of 5.

  1. Antithrombogenic properties of a monopivot magnetic suspension centrifugal pump for circulatory assist.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Takashi; Maruyama, Osamu; Nishida, Masahiro; Kosaka, Ryo; Chida, Takahiro; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Kuwana, Katsuyuki; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Sankai, Yoshiyuki; Matsuzaki, Mio; Shigeta, Osamu; Enomoto, Yoshiharu; Tsutsui, Tatsuo

    2008-06-01

    The National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) monopivot magnetic suspension centrifugal pump (MC105) was developed for open-heart surgery and several weeks of circulatory assist. The monopivot centrifugal pump has a closed impeller of 50 mm in diameter, supported by a single pivot bearing, and is driven through a magnetic coupling to widen the fluid gap. Design parameters such as pivot length and tongue radius were determined through flow visualization experiments, and the effectiveness was verified in preliminary animal experiments. The maximum overall pump efficiency reached 18%, and the normalized index of hemolysis tested with bovine blood was as low as 0.0013 g/100 L. Animal experiments with MC105 were conducted in sheep for 3, 15, 29, and 35 days in a configuration of left ventricle bypass. No thrombus was formed around the pivot bearing except when the pump speed was reduced by 20% of normal operational speed, which reduced the pump flow by 40% to avoid inlet suction. Subsequently, the antithrombogenic design was verified in animal experiments for 5 weeks at a minimum rotational speed of greater than 1500 rpm and a minimum pump flow greater than 1.0 L/min; no thrombus formation was observed under these conditions.

  2. Axial and centrifugal continuous-flow rotary pumps: a translation from pump mechanics to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Moazami, Nader; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Kobayashi, Mariko; Smedira, Nicholas G; Hoercher, Katherine J; Massiello, Alex; Lee, Sangjin; Horvath, David J; Starling, Randall C

    2013-01-01

    The recent success of continuous-flow circulatory support devices has led to the growing acceptance of these devices as a viable therapeutic option for end-stage heart failure patients who are not responsive to current pharmacologic and electrophysiologic therapies. This article defines and clarifies the major classification of these pumps as axial or centrifugal continuous-flow devices by discussing the difference in their inherent mechanics and describing how these features translate clinically to pump selection and patient management issues. Axial vs centrifugal pump and bearing design, theory of operation, hydrodynamic performance, and current vs flow relationships are discussed. A review of axial vs centrifugal physiology, pre-load and after-load sensitivity, flow pulsatility, and issues related to automatic physiologic control and suction prevention algorithms is offered. Reliability and biocompatibility of the two types of pumps are reviewed from the perspectives of mechanical wear, implant life, hemolysis, and pump deposition. Finally, a glimpse into the future of continuous-flow technologies is presented.

  3. Sound generation by a centrifugal pump at blade passing frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Morgenroth, M.; Weaver, D.S.

    1996-12-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental study of the pressure pulsations produced by a centrifugal volute pump at its blade passing frequency and their amplification by acoustic resonance in a connected piping system. Detailed measurements were made of the pressure fluctuations in the piping as a function of pump speed and flow rate. A semi-empirical model was used to separate acoustic standing waves from hydraulic pressure fluctuations. The effects of modifying the cut-water geometry were also studied, including the use of flow visualization to observe the flow behavior at the cut-water. The results suggest that the pump may act as an acoustic pressure or velocity source, depending on the flow rate. At conditions of acoustic resonance, the pump acted as an open termination of the piping, i.e., as a node in the acoustic pressure standing waves. Rounding the cut-water had the effect of reducing the amplitude of acoustic resonance, apparently because of the ability of the stagnation point to move and thereby reduce the vorticity generated. A notable example of this acoustic resonance in the Primary Heat Transport (PHT) system at Ontario Hydro`s Darlington nuclear power station.

  4. Influence of clearance model on numerical simulation of centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Gao, B.; Yang, L.; Du, W. Q.

    2016-05-01

    Computing models are always simplified to save the computing resources and time. Particularly, the clearance that between impeller and pump casing is always ignored. But the completer model is, the more precise result of numerical simulation is in theory. This paper study the influence of clearance model on numerical simulation of centrifugal pump. We present such influence via comparing performance, flow characteristic and pressure pulsation of two cases that the one of two cases is the model pump with clearance and the other is not. And the results show that the head decreases and power increases so that efficiency decreases after computing with front and back cavities. Then no-leakage model would improve absolute velocity magnitude in order to reach the rated flow rate. Finally, more disturbance induced by front cavity flow and wear-ring flow would change the pressure pulsation of impeller and volute. The performance of clearance flow is important for the whole pump in performance, flow characteristic, pressure pulsation and other respects.

  5. Improvement of hemocompatibility for hydrodynamic levitation centrifugal pump by optimizing step bearings.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Yada, Toru; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yamane, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a hydrodynamic levitation centrifugal blood pump with a semi-open impeller for a mechanically circulatory assist. The impeller levitated with original hydrodynamic bearings without any complicated control and sensors. However, narrow bearing gap has the potential for causing hemolysis. The purpose of the study is to investigate the geometric configuration of the hydrodynamic step bearing to minimize hemolysis by expansion of the bearing gap. Firstly, we performed the numerical analysis of the step bearing based on Reynolds equation, and measured the actual hydrodynamic force of the step bearing. Secondly, the bearing gap measurement test and the hemolysis test were performed to the blood pumps, whose step length were 0 %, 33 % and 67 % of the vane length respectively. As a result, in the numerical analysis, the hydrodynamic force was the largest, when the step bearing was around 70 %. In the actual evaluation tests, the blood pump having step 67 % obtained the maximum bearing gap, and was able to improve the hemolysis, compared to those having step 0% and 33%. We confirmed that the numerical analysis of the step bearing worked effectively, and the blood pump having step 67 % was suitable configuration to minimize hemolysis, because it realized the largest bearing gap. PMID:22254562

  6. Improvement of hemocompatibility for hydrodynamic levitation centrifugal pump by optimizing step bearings.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Yada, Toru; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yamane, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a hydrodynamic levitation centrifugal blood pump with a semi-open impeller for a mechanically circulatory assist. The impeller levitated with original hydrodynamic bearings without any complicated control and sensors. However, narrow bearing gap has the potential for causing hemolysis. The purpose of the study is to investigate the geometric configuration of the hydrodynamic step bearing to minimize hemolysis by expansion of the bearing gap. Firstly, we performed the numerical analysis of the step bearing based on Reynolds equation, and measured the actual hydrodynamic force of the step bearing. Secondly, the bearing gap measurement test and the hemolysis test were performed to the blood pumps, whose step length were 0 %, 33 % and 67 % of the vane length respectively. As a result, in the numerical analysis, the hydrodynamic force was the largest, when the step bearing was around 70 %. In the actual evaluation tests, the blood pump having step 67 % obtained the maximum bearing gap, and was able to improve the hemolysis, compared to those having step 0% and 33%. We confirmed that the numerical analysis of the step bearing worked effectively, and the blood pump having step 67 % was suitable configuration to minimize hemolysis, because it realized the largest bearing gap.

  7. 77 FR 65360 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status (Centrifugal and Submersible Pumps); Auburn, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ..., filed 10-21-2011); Whereas, notice inviting public comment has been given in the Federal Register (76 FR... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Grant of Authority for Subzone Status (Centrifugal and Submersible Pumps... subzone at the centrifugal and submersible pump manufacturing and warehousing facilities of Xylem...

  8. Small centrifugal pumps for low-thrust rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furst, R. B.

    1986-01-01

    Six small, low specific speed centrifugal pump configurations were designed, fabricated, and tested. The configurations included shrouded, and 25 and 100% admission open face impellers with 2 inch tip diameters; 25, 50, and 100% emission vaned diffusers; and volutes with conical exits. Impeller tip widths varied from 0.030 inch to 0.052 inch. Design specific speeds (N sub s = RPM*GPM**0.5.FT**0.75) were 430 (four configurations) and 215 (two configurations). The six configurations were tested with water as the pumped fluid. Noncavitating performance results are presented for the design speed of 24,500 rpm over a flowrate range from 1 to 6 gpm for the N sub s = 430 configurations and test speeds up to 29,000 rpm over a flowrate range from 0.3 to 1.2 gpm for the N sub s = 215 configurations. Cavitating performance results are presented over a flowrate range from 60 to 120% of design flow. Fabrication of the small pump conponents is also discussed.

  9. 21 CFR 864.9275 - Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use... Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9275 Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use. (a) Identification. A blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use is a device used only to separate blood...

  10. 21 CFR 864.9275 - Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use... Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9275 Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use. (a) Identification. A blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use is a device used only to separate blood...

  11. 21 CFR 864.9275 - Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use... Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9275 Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use. (a) Identification. A blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use is a device used only to separate blood...

  12. 21 CFR 864.9275 - Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use... Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9275 Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use. (a) Identification. A blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use is a device used only to separate blood...

  13. 21 CFR 864.9275 - Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use... Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9275 Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use. (a) Identification. A blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use is a device used only to separate blood...

  14. Research on energy conversion mechanism of rotodynamic pump and design of non-overload centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. L.; Hu, S. B.; Shen, Z. Z.; Wu, S. P.; Li, K.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, an attempt has been made for the calculation of an expression for the intrinsic law of input power which has not yet been given by current theory of Rotodynamic pump. By adequate recognition of the characteristics of non-inertial system within the rotating impeller, it is concluded that the input power consists of two power components, the first power component, whose magnitude increases with the increase of the flow rate, corresponds to radial velocity component, and the second power component, whose magnitude decreases with the increase of the flow rate, corresponds to tangential velocity component, therefore, the law of rise, basic levelness and drop of input power curves of centrifugal pump, mixed-flow pump and axial-flow pump can be explained reasonably. Through further analysis, the main ways for realizing non-overload of centrifugal pump are obtained, and its equivalent design factor is found out, the factor correlates with the outlet angle of leading face and back face of the blade, wrap angle, number of blades, outlet width, area ratio, and the ratio of operating flow rate to specified flow rate and so on. These are verified with actual example.

  15. Method for Reducing Pumping Damage to Blood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor); VanDamm, George Arthur (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Robert J. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Methods are provided for minimizing damage to blood in a blood pump wherein the blood pump comprises a plurality of pump components that may affect blood damage such as clearance between pump blades and housing, number of impeller blades, rounded or flat blade edges, variations in entrance angles of blades, impeller length, and the like. The process comprises selecting a plurality of pump components believed to affect blood damage such as those listed herein before. Construction variations for each of the plurality of pump components are then selected. The pump components and variations are preferably listed in a matrix for easy visual comparison of test results. Blood is circulated through a pump configuration to test each variation of each pump component. After each test, total blood damage is determined for the blood pump. Preferably each pump component variation is tested at least three times to provide statistical results and check consistency of results. The least hemolytic variation for each pump component is preferably selected as an optimized component. If no statistical difference as to blood damage is produced for a variation of a pump component, then the variation that provides preferred hydrodynamic performance is selected. To compare the variation of pump components such as impeller and stator blade geometries, the preferred embodiment of the invention uses a stereolithography technique for realizing complex shapes within a short time period.

  16. Blood culture technique based on centrifugation: clinical evaluation.

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, G L; Burson, G G; Haynes, J R

    1976-01-01

    A total of 1,000 blood samples from patients suspected of having a bacteremia were analyzed concurrently, where possible, by three methods: (i) Trypticase soy broth with sodium polyanethol sulfonate and a CO2 atmosphere: (ii) pour plates with either brain heart infusion agar or Sabouraud dextrose agar; and (iii) centrifugation of the suspected organism in a hypertonic solution. There were 176 positive cultures. The centrifugation technique recovered 73% of the positive cultures. The broth and pour plate techniques recovered 38 and 49%, respectively. The centrifugation technique showed an increased isolation rate for Pseudomonas, fungi, and gram-positive cocci. In general, for each organism the time required for the detection of a positive culture was shortest for the centrifugation technique. PMID:1270591

  17. Optimization and Analysis of Centrifugal Pump considering Fluid-Structure Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sanbao

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the optimization of vibrations of centrifugal pump considering fluid-structure interaction (FSI). A set of centrifugal pumps with various blade shapes were studied using FSI method, in order to investigate the transient vibration performance. The Kriging model, based on the results of the FSI simulations, was established to approximate the relationship between the geometrical parameters of pump impeller and the root mean square (RMS) values of the displacement response at the pump bearing block. Hence, multi-island genetic algorithm (MIGA) has been implemented to minimize the RMS value of the impeller displacement. A prototype of centrifugal pump has been manufactured and an experimental validation of the optimization results has been carried out. The comparison among results of Kriging surrogate model, FSI simulation, and experimental test showed a good consistency of the three approaches. Finally, the transient mechanical behavior of pump impeller has been investigated using FSI method based on the optimized geometry parameters of pump impeller. PMID:25197690

  18. Optimization and analysis of centrifugal pump considering fluid-structure interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Hu, Sanbao; Zhang, Yunqing; Chen, Liping

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the optimization of vibrations of centrifugal pump considering fluid-structure interaction (FSI). A set of centrifugal pumps with various blade shapes were studied using FSI method, in order to investigate the transient vibration performance. The Kriging model, based on the results of the FSI simulations, was established to approximate the relationship between the geometrical parameters of pump impeller and the root mean square (RMS) values of the displacement response at the pump bearing block. Hence, multi-island genetic algorithm (MIGA) has been implemented to minimize the RMS value of the impeller displacement. A prototype of centrifugal pump has been manufactured and an experimental validation of the optimization results has been carried out. The comparison among results of Kriging surrogate model, FSI simulation, and experimental test showed a good consistency of the three approaches. Finally, the transient mechanical behavior of pump impeller has been investigated using FSI method based on the optimized geometry parameters of pump impeller.

  19. Roller and Centrifugal Pumps: A Retrospective Comparison of Bleeding Complications in Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Halaweish, Ihab; Cole, Adam; Cooley, Elaine; Lynch, William R; Haft, Jonathan W

    2015-01-01

    Centrifugal pumps are increasingly used for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) rather than roller pumps. However, shear forces induced by these types of continuousflow pumps are associated with acquired von Willebrand factor deficiency and bleeding complications. This study was undertaken to compare adverse bleeding complications with the use of centrifugal and roller pumps in patients on prolonged ECMO support. The records of all adult ECMO patients from June 2002 to 2013 were retrospectively reviewed using the University of Michigan Health System database and the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization registry, focusing on patients supported for at least 5 days. Ninety-five ECMO patients met criteria for inclusion (48 roller vs. 47 centrifugal pump). Indications included pulmonary (79%), cardiac (15%), and extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (6%), without significant difference between the two groups. Despite lower heparin anticoagulation (10.9 vs. 13.7 IU/kg/hr) with centrifugal pumps, there was a higher incidence of nonsurgical bleeding (gastrointestinal, pulmonary, and neurological) in centrifugal pump patients (26.1 vs. 9.0 events/1,000 patient-days, p = 0.024). In conclusion, in our historical comparison, despite reduced anticoagulation, ECMO support using centrifugal pumps was associated with a higher incidence of nonsurgical bleeding. The mechanisms behind this are multifactorial and require further investigation.

  20. Research on the effect of wear-ring clearances to the performance of centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, W. G.; Li, Y. B.; Wang, X. Y.; Sun, J. P.; Wu, G. X.

    2012-11-01

    In order to study the effect of wear-ring clearance on the performance of centrifugal pump, based on the Reynolds Time-Averaged N-S equations and RNG k-ε turbulence model, a centrifugal pump was simulated with three variable styles of the wear-rings: Only the clearance of the front wear-ring was changed, only the clearance of the back wear-ring was changed and both were changed. Numerical results agree well with the experimental results. In the three changing styles of the clearance, the variable of the clearance of front wear-ring has the most influence on the performance of centrifugal pump. The existence of wear-ring not only has an effect on the volumetric loss of the centrifugal pump, but also on the performance of the centrifugal pump. Relative to the experimental studies, numerical simulation methods have some advantages, such as low cost, fast and efficient, and easy to get the detailed structure of the internal flow characteristics, so it has been widely used in the fluid machinery study. In order to study the effect of wear-ring clearance on the performance of centrifugal pump, based on the Reynolds Time-Averaged N-S equations and RNG k-ε turbulence model, a centrifugal pump was simulated with three variable styles of the wear-rings: Only the clearance of the front wear-ring was changed, only the clearance of the back wear-ring was changed and both were changed. Numerical results agree well with the experimental results. In the three changing styles of the clearance, the variable of the clearance of front wear-ring has the most influence on the performance of centrifugal pump.

  1. Centrifugal pump and roller pump in adult cardiac surgery: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Saczkowski, Richard; Maklin, Michelle; Mesana, Thierry; Boodhwani, Munir; Ruel, Marc

    2012-08-01

    Centrifugal pump (CP) and roller pump (RP) designs are the dominant main arterial pumps used in cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Trials reporting clinical outcome measures comparing CP and RP are controversial. Therefore, a meta-analysis was undertaken to evaluate clinical variables from randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Keyword searches were performed on Medline (1966-2011), EmBase (1980-2011), and CINAHL (1981-2011) for studies comparing RP and CP as the main arterial pump in adult CPB. Pooled fixed-effects estimates for dichotomous and continuous data were calculated as an odds ratio and weighted-mean difference, respectively. The P value was utilized to assess statistical significance (P < 0.05) between CP and RP groups. Eighteen RCTs met inclusion criteria, which represented 1868 patients (CP = 961, RP = 907). The prevailing operation was isolated coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CP = 88%, RP = 87%). Fixed-effects pooled estimates were performed for end-of-CPB (ECP) and postoperative day one (PDO) for platelet count (ECP: P = 0.51, PDO: P = 0.16), plasma free hemoglobin (ECP: P = 0.36, PDO: P = 0.24), white blood cell count (ECP: P = 0.21, PDO: P = 0.66), and hematocrit (ECP: P = 0.06, PDO: P = 0.51). No difference was demonstrated for postoperative blood loss (P = 0.65) or red blood cell transfusion (P = 0.71). Intensive care unit length of stay (P = 0.30), hospital length of stay (P = 0.33), and mortality (P = 0.91) were similar between the CP and RP groups. Neurologic outcomes were not amenable to pooled analysis; nevertheless, the results were inconclusive. There was no reported pump-related malfunction or mishap. The meta-analysis of RCTs comparing CP and RP in adult cardiac surgery suggests no significant difference for hematological variables, postoperative blood loss, transfusions, neurological outcomes, or mortality.

  2. Hemocompatibility of Axial Versus Centrifugal Pump Technology in Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices.

    PubMed

    Schibilsky, David; Lenglinger, Matthias; Avci-Adali, Meltem; Haller, Christoph; Walker, Tobias; Wendel, Hans Peter; Schlensak, Christian

    2015-08-01

    The hemocompatible properties of rotary blood pumps commonly used in mechanical circulatory support (MCS) are widely unknown regarding specific biocompatibility profiles of different pump technologies. Therefore, we analyzed the hemocompatibility indicating markers of an axial flow and a magnetically levitated centrifugal device within an in vitro mock loop. The HeartMate II (HM II; n = 3) device and a CentriMag (CM; n = 3) adult pump were investigated in a human whole blood mock loop for 360 min using the MCS devices as a driving component. Blood samples were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for markers of coagulation, complement system, and inflammatory response. There was a time-dependent activation of the coagulation (thrombin-antithrombin complexes [TAT]), complement (SC5b-9), and inflammation system (polymorphonuclear [PMN] elastase) in both groups. The mean value of TAT (CM: 4.0 μg/L vs. 29.4 μg/L, P < 0.001; HM II: 4.5 μg/L vs. 232.2 μg/L, P < 0.05) and PMN elastase (CM: 53.4 ng/mL vs. 253.8 ng/mL, P < 0.05; HM II: 28.0 ng/mL vs. 738.8 ng/mL, P < 0.001) significantly increased from baseline until the end of the experiments (360 min). After 360 min, TAT and PMN values were significantly higher in the HM II group compared with the values in the CM adult group. The values of SC5b-9 increased from baseline to 360 min in the CM group (CM: 141.8 ng/mL vs. 967.9 ng/mL, P < 0.05) and the HM II group. However, the increase within the HM II group (97.3 vs. 2462.0, P = 0.06) and the comparison of the 360-min values between CM group and HM II group did not reach significance (P = 0.18). The activation of complement, coagulation, and inflammation system showed a time-dependent manner in both devices. The centrifugal CM device showed significantly lower activation of coagulation and inflammation than that of the HM II axial flow pump. Both HM II and CM have demonstrated an acceptable

  3. Optimization of Centrifugal Pump Characteristic Dimensions for Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices.

    PubMed

    Korakianitis, Theodosios; Rezaienia, Mohammad A; Paul, Gordon M; Rahideh, Akbar; Rothman, Martin T; Mozafari, Sahand

    2016-01-01

    The application of artificial mechanical pumps as heart assist devices impose power and size limitations on the pumping mechanism, and therefore requires careful optimization of pump characteristics. Typically new pumps are designed by relying on the performance of other previously designed pumps of known performance using concepts of fluid dynamic similarity. Such data are readily available for industrial pumps, which operate in Reynolds numbers region of 10. Heart assist pumps operate in Reynolds numbers of 10. There are few data available for the design of centrifugal pumps in this characteristic range. This article develops specific speed versus specific diameter graphs suitable for the design and optimization of these smaller centrifugal pumps concentrating in dimensions suitable for ventricular assist devices (VADs) and mechanical circulatory support (MCS) devices. A combination of experimental and numerical techniques was used to measure and analyze the performance of 100 optimized pumps designed for this application. The data are presented in the traditional Cordier diagram of nondimensional specific speed versus specific diameter. Using these data, nine efficient designs were selected to be manufactured and tested in different operating conditions of flow, pressure, and rotational speed. The nondimensional results presented in this article enable preliminary design of centrifugal pumps for VADs and MCS devices. PMID:27258221

  4. Optimization of Centrifugal Pump Characteristic Dimensions for Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices.

    PubMed

    Korakianitis, Theodosios; Rezaienia, Mohammad A; Paul, Gordon M; Rahideh, Akbar; Rothman, Martin T; Mozafari, Sahand

    2016-01-01

    The application of artificial mechanical pumps as heart assist devices impose power and size limitations on the pumping mechanism, and therefore requires careful optimization of pump characteristics. Typically new pumps are designed by relying on the performance of other previously designed pumps of known performance using concepts of fluid dynamic similarity. Such data are readily available for industrial pumps, which operate in Reynolds numbers region of 10. Heart assist pumps operate in Reynolds numbers of 10. There are few data available for the design of centrifugal pumps in this characteristic range. This article develops specific speed versus specific diameter graphs suitable for the design and optimization of these smaller centrifugal pumps concentrating in dimensions suitable for ventricular assist devices (VADs) and mechanical circulatory support (MCS) devices. A combination of experimental and numerical techniques was used to measure and analyze the performance of 100 optimized pumps designed for this application. The data are presented in the traditional Cordier diagram of nondimensional specific speed versus specific diameter. Using these data, nine efficient designs were selected to be manufactured and tested in different operating conditions of flow, pressure, and rotational speed. The nondimensional results presented in this article enable preliminary design of centrifugal pumps for VADs and MCS devices.

  5. Sarns centrifugal pump for repair of thoracic aortic injury: case reports.

    PubMed

    Walls, J T; Curtis, J J; Boley, T

    1989-09-01

    A new centrifugal pump (Sarns), originally designed for ventricular assist, was successfully used in two patients during repair of traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta. The distal thoracic aorta was perfused without heparinization to avoid spinal cord and visceral ischemia, reduce afterload on the heart, and avoid clamp injury to the aorta. Distal mean aortic pressure was maintained above 50 mm Hg with a mean pump flow of 1.75 liter/minute. Proposed structural advantages of the Sarns centrifugal pump for perfusion of the distal thoracic aorta without heparin are resistance to thrombus formation, air embolus, and hemolysis.

  6. Performance analysis on solid-liquid mixed flow in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, C.; Wang, Y.

    2016-05-01

    In order to study the solid-liquid mixed flow hydraulic characteristics of centrifugal pump, the Pro/E software was used for three-dimensional modeling of centrifugal pump chamber. By using the computational fluid dynamics software CFX, the numerical simulation calculation of solid-liquid two-phase flow within whole flow passage of centrifugal pump was conducted. Aim at different particle diameters, the Reynolds-averaged N-S equations with the RNG k-Ɛ turbulence model and SIMPLEC algorithm were used to simulate the two-phase flow respectively on the condition of different volume fraction. The influence of internal flow characteristic on pump performance was analyzed. On the conditions of different particle diameter and different volume fraction, the turbulence kinetic energy and particle concentration are analyzed. It can be found that the erosion velocity ratio on the flow channel wall increases along with the increasing of the volume fraction

  7. Critical cavitation coefficient analysis of a space low specific centrifugal pump with micro gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. T.; Li, Y.; Gao, Y.; Hu, Q.; Zhou, C.; Wu, Y. L.

    2016-05-01

    Centrifugal pump was used in the loop as a baselined unit. The flow rate of the pump was very small, while the head was high. This space pump must work stable for a long time (more than a year), so the performance of the pump attracted public attention. The rotational speed of the impeller was limited for stability, so the pump belonged to low specific centrifugal pump. In this paper, a single-phase centrifugal pump, which was designed for single-phase fluid loops in satellites, was modeled for numerical simulation. The hydraulic region of the pump was discretized by structured mesh. Three dimensional (3-D) flow in the pump was studied by the use of computational fluid dynamics. Partially-Averaged Navier- Stokes (PANS) model based on RNG k-ε turbulence model was developed for the simulation of the unsteady flow. Velocity inlet and pressure outlet was used as the boundary conditions. Interface was used between the impeller and the casing, as well as the impeller and inlet pipe. Performances and pressure fluctuation of the pump were investigated. The dominant frequency of the pressure fluctuation is blade passing frequency at the region close to the tongue of the casing, while it is twice of blade passing frequency at the other region.

  8. A hemodynamic evaluation of the Levitronix Pedivas centrifugal pump and Jostra Hl-20 roller pump under pulsatile and nonpulsatile perfusion in an infant CPB model.

    PubMed

    Ressler, Noel; Rider, Alan R; Kunselman, Allen R; Richardson, J Scott; Dasse, Kurt A; Wang, Shigang; Undar, Akif

    2009-01-01

    The hemodynamic comparison of the Jostra HL-20 and the Levitronix PediVAS blood pumps is the focus this study, where pressure-flow waveforms and hemodynamic energy values are analyzed in the confines of a pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass circuit.The pseudo pediatric patient was perfused with flow rates between 500 and 900 ml/min (100 ml/min increments) under pulsatile and nonpulsatile mode. The Levitronix continuous flow pump utilized a customized controller to engage in pulsatile perfusion with equivalent pulse settings to the Jostra HL-20 roller pump. Hemodynamic measurements and waveforms were recorded at the precannula location, while the mean arterial pressure was maintained at 40 mm Hg for each test. Glycerin water was used as the blood analog circuit perfusate. At each flow rate 24 trials were conducted yielding a total of 120 experiments (n=60 pulsatile and n=60 nonpulsatile).Under nonpulsatile perfusion the Jostra roller pump produced small values for surplus hemodynamic energy (SHE) due to its inherent pulsatility, while the Levitronix produced values of essentially zero for SHE. When switching to pulsatile perfusion, the SHE levels for both the Jostra and Levitronix pump made considerable increases. In comparing the two pumps under pulsatile perfusion, the Levitronix PediVAS produced significantly more surplus and total hemodynamic energy than did the Jostra roller pump each pump flow rate.The study suggests that the Levitronix PediVAS centrifugal pump has the capability of achieving quality pulsatile waveforms and delivering more SHE to the pseudo patient than the Jostra HL-20 roller pump. Further studies are warranted to investigate the Levitronix under bovine blood studies and with various pulsatile settings.

  9. Hydrogen test of a small, low specific speed centrifugal pump stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A small, low specific speed centrifugal pump stage with a 2 inch tip diameter, .030 inch tip width shrouded impeller and volute collector was tested with liquid hydrogen as the pumped fluid. The hydrodynamic design of the pump stage is summarized and the noncavitating and cavitating performance results are presented. Test speeds were 60 and 80 percent of the 77,000 rpm design speed. Liquid hydrogen test results are compared with data from previous tests of the stage in water.

  10. Preclinical study of a novel hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal pump for long-term cardiopulmonary support : In vivo performance during percutaneous cardiopulmonary support.

    PubMed

    Tsukiya, Tomonori; Mizuno, Toshihide; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki

    2015-12-01

    An extracorporeal centrifugal blood pump with a hydrodynamically levitated impeller was developed for use in a durable extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) system. The present study examined the biocompatibility of the blood pump during long-term use by conducting a series of 30-day chronic animal experiments. The ECMO system was used to produce a percutaneous venoarterial bypass between the venae cavae and carotid artery in adult goats. No anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy was administered during the experiments. Three out of four animals survived for the scheduled 30-day period, and the blood pumps and membrane oxygenators both exhibited sufficient hydrodynamic performance and good antithrombogenicity, while one animal died of massive bleeding from the outflow cannulation site. The animals' plasma free hemoglobin had returned to within the normal range by 1 week after the surgical intervention, and their hemodynamic and biochemistry parameters remained within their normal ranges throughout the experiment. The explanted centrifugal blood pumps did not display any trace of thrombus formation. Based on the biocompatibility demonstrated in this study, the examined centrifugal blood pump, which includes a hydrodynamically levitated impeller, is suitable for use in durable ECMO systems. PMID:25975380

  11. Preclinical study of a novel hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal pump for long-term cardiopulmonary support : In vivo performance during percutaneous cardiopulmonary support.

    PubMed

    Tsukiya, Tomonori; Mizuno, Toshihide; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki

    2015-12-01

    An extracorporeal centrifugal blood pump with a hydrodynamically levitated impeller was developed for use in a durable extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) system. The present study examined the biocompatibility of the blood pump during long-term use by conducting a series of 30-day chronic animal experiments. The ECMO system was used to produce a percutaneous venoarterial bypass between the venae cavae and carotid artery in adult goats. No anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy was administered during the experiments. Three out of four animals survived for the scheduled 30-day period, and the blood pumps and membrane oxygenators both exhibited sufficient hydrodynamic performance and good antithrombogenicity, while one animal died of massive bleeding from the outflow cannulation site. The animals' plasma free hemoglobin had returned to within the normal range by 1 week after the surgical intervention, and their hemodynamic and biochemistry parameters remained within their normal ranges throughout the experiment. The explanted centrifugal blood pumps did not display any trace of thrombus formation. Based on the biocompatibility demonstrated in this study, the examined centrifugal blood pump, which includes a hydrodynamically levitated impeller, is suitable for use in durable ECMO systems.

  12. An Experimental Study of Cavitation Detection in a Centrifugal Pump Using Envelope Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chek Zin; Leong, M. Salman

    Cavitation represents one of the most common faults in pumps and could potentially lead to a series of failure in mechanical seal, impeller, bearing, shaft, motor, etc. In this work, an experimental rig was setup to investigate cavitation detection using vibration envelope analysis method, and measured parameters included sound, pressure and flow rate for feasibility of cavitation detection. The experiment testing included 3 operating points of the centrifugal pump (B.E.P, 90% of B.E.P and 80% of B.E.P). Suction pressure of the centrifugal pump was decreased gradually until the inception point of cavitation. Vibration measurements were undertaken at various locations including casing, bearing, suction and discharge flange of the centrifugal pump. Comparisons of envelope spectrums under cavitating and non-cavitating conditions were presented. Envelope analysis was proven useful in detecting cavitation over the 3 testing conditions. During the normal operating condition, vibration peak synchronous to rotational speed was more pronounced. It was however during cavitation condition, the half order sub-harmonic vibration component was clearly evident in the envelope spectrums undertaken at all measurement locations except at the pump bearing. The possible explanation of the strong sub-harmonic (½ of BPF) during cavitation existence in the centrifugal pump was due to insufficient time for the bubbles to collapse completely before the end of the single cycle.

  13. 2011 IEEE Visualization Contest winner: Visualizing unsteady vortical behavior of a centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Otto, Mathias; Kuhn, Alexander; Engelke, Wito; Theisel, Holger

    2012-01-01

    In the 2011 IEEE Visualization Contest, the dataset represented a high-resolution simulation of a centrifugal pump operating below optimal speed. The goal was to find suitable visualization techniques to identify regions of rotating stall that impede the pump's effectiveness. The winning entry split analysis of the pump into three parts based on the pump's functional behavior. It then applied local and integration-based methods to communicate the unsteady flow behavior in different regions of the dataset. This research formed the basis for a comparison of common vortex extractors and more recent methods. In particular, integration-based methods (separation measures, accumulated scalar fields, particle path lines, and advection textures) are well suited to capture the complex time-dependent flow behavior. This video (http://youtu.be/oD7QuabY0oU) shows simulations of unsteady flow in a centrifugal pump.

  14. In vivo assessment of a new method of pulsatile perfusion based on a centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Herreros, Jesús; Ubilla, Matías; Berjano, Enrique J; Vila-Nuñez, Juan E; Páramo, José A; Sola, Josu; Mercé, Salvador

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess platelet dysfunction and damage to organs after extracorporeal circulation using a pump based on a new method that adds a pulsatile flow to the continuous flow provided by a centrifugal pump. The continuous component of the total flow (2-3 L/min) is created by a Bio-Pump centrifugal pump, while the pulsatile component is created by the pulsating of an inner membrane pneumatically controlled by an intra-aortic counterpulsation balloon console (systolic volume of 37.5 mL in an asynchronous way with a frequency of 60 bpm). Six pigs were subjected to a partial cardiopulmonary bypass lasting 180 min and were sacrificed 60 min after extracorporeal circulation was suspended. The hematological study included the measurement of hematocrit, hemoglobin, leukocytes, and platelet function. The new pump did not significantly alter either platelet count or platelet function. In contrast, hematocrit and hemoglobin were significantly reduced during extracorporeal circulation (approximately 5% P = 0.011, and 2 g/dL P = 0.01, respectively). The leukocyte count during extracorporeal circulation showed a tendency to decrease, but this was not significant. In general, the short-term use of the new pump (4 h) did not cause any serious morphological damage to the heart, lung, kidney, or liver. The results suggest that the hemodynamic performance of the new pump is similar to a conventional centrifugal pump and could therefore be appropriate for use in extracorporeal circulation.

  15. Cavitation performance and flow characteristic in a centrifugal pump with inlet guide vanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L.; Zha, L.; Cao, S. L.; Wang, Y. C.; Gui, S. B.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of prewhirl regulation by inlet guide vanes (IGVs) on cavitation performance and flow characteristic in a centrifugal pump is investigated. At the impeller inlet, the streamlines are regulated by the IGVs, and the axial velocity distribution is also influenced by the IGVs. Due to the total pressure loss on the IGVs, the cavitation performance of the centrifugal pump degrades. The cavitation area in impeller with IGVs is larger than one without IGVs. The specify values of total pressure loss between the suction pipe inlet and impeller inlet for three cavitation conditions show that the IGVs will generate additional pressure loss, which is related to the IGVs angles and cavitation conditions.

  16. Centrifugal pump or pneumatic ventricle for short-term mechanical circulatory support?

    PubMed

    Deleuze, P H; Liu, Y; Tixier, D; Okude, J; Leandri, J; Gouault, M; Galacteros, F; Cachera, J P; Loisance, D

    1989-05-01

    Two comparable groups of four Holstein calves were implanted with different left ventricle assist devices: the Centrimed centrifugal pump (CP) (Sarns Inc.) or the UTAH 85 VAD pneumatic ventricle (University of Utah). Operative procedure, inflow and outflow cannulae, monitoring, heparinization, were identical in both groups. No transfusion was ever required. The study was terminated after three days and autopsy was performed on the calves. Left ventricular unloading provided by both devices was complete (LVEDP less than 1 mmHg) and identical. LV bypassed flow rate was higher in CP (0.045 L/min/kg) than in UTAH 85 VAD (0.035 L/min/kg) but with no statistical difference. Blood trauma was comparable in the two groups. Daily blood samples did not show any significant changes from baseline values in creatinine, hematocrit, fibrinogen. Platelet loss from initial level was 30%; serum lactate dehydrogenase rose 150% with no significant difference in the two groups; plasma free hemoglobin never reached significant values. At autopsy, thrombotic deposits on cannuale and renal infarction rate were similar. CP housing had to be changed every day, whereas no technical failure was ever observed with the UTAH 85 VAD. Clinical response and blood damage of the two pumps used as LVAD were the same. Considering the CP has to be replaced every 24 h, the cost of three CP's would be comparable to one Utah UVAD-85 if polyurethane tricusp semi-lunar valves are used in the latter. Until the UTAH-85 VAD becomes commercially available, simple valveless low-cost CP are very attractive for short-term mechanical support.

  17. Subchronic use of the St. Jude centrifugal pump as a mechanical assist device in calves.

    PubMed

    Curtis, J; Wagner-Mann, C; Mann, F; Demmy, T; Walls, J; Turk, J

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to study the effects of the St. Jude Lifestream centrifugal pump on hemodynamic and hematologic parameters and the incidence of postmortem findings in a subchronic ex vivo left ventricular assist animal model. Five calves were implanted with the pump as a left ventricular assist device (left atrial to thoracic aorta bypass) and studied for 96 h of continuous pumping under identical conditions. Heparin (100 IU/kg) was administered only in the initial saline pump prime. Throughout the protocol, mean arterial and central venous pressures averaged 102.1 +/- 4.6 and 3.4 +/- 2.2 mm Hg, respectively. Pump flow was 47.8 +/- 8.4 ml/kg/min at a mean pump speed of 1,676.3 +/- 106.1 rpm. No clinical abnormalities or mechanical malfunctions attributable to the pump were detected during the 96 h of continuous pumping for each calf. Mean plasma-free hemoglobin after 96 h was 3.9 +/- 3.7 mumol/L (p = 0.337 compared to baseline). At post mortem, renal infarctions were detected in 1 calf. No other pump-associated lesions were detected in any of the other calves. We have concluded that the St. Jude Lifestream centrifugal pump functions reliably during 96 h of continuous left heart bypass in a calf model.

  18. Numerical simulation and analysis of cavitation flows in a double suction centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, G.; Tan, L.; Cao, S. L.; Jian, W.; Liu, W. W.; Jiang, D. J.

    2015-01-01

    Cavitation is an unsteady phenomenon, which is nearly inevitable in pumps. It would degrade the pump performance, generate vibrations and noises, and even erode pump flow passage components. The double suction centrifugal pump at design flow rate and large flow rate is numerically simulated using the k-ω turbulence model and the mass transport cavitation model. As a result, the calculated variation of pump head with pump inlet pressure agreed well with the experimental data. The results demonstrate that the numerical model and method can accurately predict the cavitation flows in a double suction centrifugal pump. The cavitation characteristics are analysed in great details. In addition, based on the calculation results, the reason that the plunge of pump head curve is revealed. It is found that the steep fall of pump head happens when the cavity reaches the blade to blade throat and the micro-vortex group appears at the back of the blade suction side. At the same time, this practice can provide guidance for the optimal design of double suction pumps.

  19. Experimental testing of centrifugal pump: small and medium sized enterprise product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, R.; Paddiyatu, F.; Khafidh, M.; Nugroho, S.; Sugiyanto, S.; Jamari, J.

    2014-06-01

    This paper reports the experimental testing for centrifugal pump for fisherman ship, manufactured by small and medium sized enterprises in Central Java Province, Indonesia. The research covers material analysis, component observation, endurance and vibration test. Six centrifugal pumps are tested and three main pump components are discussed: shaft, bearings and seals. The results show that the material of the shaft is predicted to support and transmit the load from the engine to impeller. The problem found in the tolerance and geometry accuracy of the shaft which causes difficulties during assembling process, excessive wear and leakage during testing. From the endurance and vibration test, the ball bearings fail and lock the shaft due to the fatigue on the rolling elements and raceways. The oil seal and water seal also fail in maintaining the oil and water in the chamber and induce the unlubricated system for the ball bearings. Some suggestions are delivered to improve the product quality of the centrifugal pump. A good quality of the centrifugal pump for fishermen ship and long life span is expected to be produced by local SMEs to win the free trade competition in the Indonesian market.

  20. Direct detection of red blood cell fragments: a new flow cytometric method to evaluate hemolysis in blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Linneweber, J; Chow, T W; Takano, T; Maeda, T; Nonaka, K; Schulte-Eistrup, S; Kawahito, S; Elert, O; Moake, J L; Nosé, Y

    2001-01-01

    Pump induced hemolysis is presently evaluated by measuring plasma free hemoglobin (fHb). However, this method has disadvantages because quantification of fHb depends on hematocrit (HCT) and hemoglobin (Hb) levels. The aim of this work was to devise a hemoglobin independent method, capable of quantifying cell trauma directly by measuring the number of red blood cell (RBC) fragments. Whole blood flow cytometry was used to quantify circulating RBC fragments derived from a roller pump (Sarns, Inc. Model 2 M 6,002) and a centrifugal pump (Gyro C1E3, Kyocera Corp.). The pumps were tested in a mock circuit for 2 hr (5 L/min flow against 100 mm Hg pressure head). Red blood cell fragments were quantified by a phycoerythrin (PE) labeled glycophorin A antibody specific for erythrocytes. Red blood cell fragments were smaller than the intact RBC population and overlapped in size with the platelet population (based on forward- and side-light scattering measurements). For the roller pump, the values for RBC fragments increased from 1,090 +/- 260/microl at 0 min to 14,880 +/- 5,900/microl after 120 min. In contrast, using the centrifugal pump, there was little increase in RBC fragments (from 730 +/- 270/microl at 0 min to 1,400 +/- 840/microl after 120 min). Flow cytometry can be used for the rapid, sensitive, hemoglobin independent evaluation of pump induced RBC trauma.

  1. CENTRIFUGE APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.; Urey, H.C.; Cohen, K.

    1960-08-01

    A high-speed centrifuge for the separation of gaseous isotopes is designed comprising a centrifugal pump mounted on the outlet of a centrifuge bowl and arranged to pump the heavy and light fractions out of the centrifuge bowl in two separate streams.

  2. Influence of the empirical coefficients of cavitation model on predicting cavitating flow in the centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hou-lin; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Hua; Huang, Haoqin

    2014-03-01

    The phenomenon of cavitation is an unsteady flow, which is nearly inevitable in pump. It would degrade the pump performance, produce vibration and noise and even damage the pump. Hence, to improve accuracy of the nu¬merical prediction of the pump cavitation performance is much desirable. In the present work, a homogenous model, the Zwart-Gerber-Belamri cavitation model, is considered to investigate the influence of the empirical coefficients on predicting the pump cavitation performance, concerning a centrifugal pump. Three coefficients are analyzed, namely the nucleation site radius, evaporation and condensation coefficients. Also, the experiments are carried out to validate the numerical simulations. The results indicate that, to get a precise prediction, the approaches of declining the initial bubble radius, the condensation coefficient or increasing the evaporation coefficient are all feasible, especially for de¬clining the condensation coefficient, which is the most effective way.

  3. A survey of instabilities within centrifugal pumps and concepts for improving the flow range of pumps in rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.

    1992-01-01

    Design features and concepts that have primary influence on the stable operating flow range of propellant-feed centrifugal turbopumps in a rocket engine are discussed. One of the throttling limitations of a pump-fed rocket engine is the stable operating range of the pump. Several varieties of pump hydraulic instabilities are mentioned. Some pump design criteria are summarized and a qualitative correlation of key parameters to pump stall and surge are referenced. Some of the design criteria were taken from the literature on high pressure ratio centrifugal compressors. Therefore, these have yet to be validated for extending the stable operating flow range of high-head pumps. Casing treatment devices, dynamic fluid-damping plenums, backflow-stabilizing vanes and flow-reinjection techniques are summarized. A planned program was undertaken at LeRC to validate these concepts. Technologies developed by this program will be available for the design of turbopumps for advanced space rocket engines for use by NASA in future space missions where throttling is essential.

  4. Performance of a small centrifugal pump in He I and He II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludtke, P. R.; Daney, D. E.; Steward, W. G.

    1988-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a small centrifugal pump in He I and He II are determined over the temperature range of 1.6 to 4.2 K. The single-stage pump is powered by a close-coupled cryogenic induction motor. In the absence of cavitation, pump performance (head and capacity) was found to be identical for He I and He II. Developed heads up to 16 m and capacities of up to 900 liters/hr are obtained at 7000 rpm. A three-blade screw inducer was shown to require much less suction head than a six-blade propeller inducer.

  5. Frequency of seal disruption with the sarns centrifugal pump in postcardiotomy circulatory assist.

    PubMed

    Curtis, J J; Boley, T M; Walls, J T; Demmy, T L; Schmaltz, R A

    1994-03-01

    We have used the Sarns centrifugal pump for uni- or biventricular assist in 58 patients with postcardiotomy cardiogenic shock. This device utilizes a spinning impeller pump that is magnetically coupled to a motor imparting rotary motion to incoming perfusate. Nine patients (16%) experienced 22 device failures, which consisted of a nonvisible disruption of the seal within the pumphead. This allowed fluid to accumulate between the pumphead and the motor necessitating change of the pumphead. The time to seal disruption was 10-149 h (median 48). Of the 22 seal disruptions, 18 occurred in 73 left ventricular pumps (25%), and 4 occurred in 38 right ventricular pumps (11%) p = 0.015. Left ventricular pumps failed at 10-144 h (median 48), and right ventricular pumps failed at 48-149 h (median 83) p = 0.02. The Sarns centrifugal pump is dependable for its intended use of cardiopulmonary perfusion. However, when used for postcardiotomy assist, seal disruption should be expected. It occurs sooner and is more common during left ventricular assist. We recommend inspection of the magnet chamber for evidence of seal disruption every 12 h with left ventricular assist and every 24 h with right ventricular assist.

  6. CENTRIFUGE

    DOEpatents

    Rushing, F.C.

    1960-09-01

    A vibration damping mechanism for damping vibration forces occurring during the operation of a centrifuge is described. The vibration damping mechanism comprises a plurality of nested spaced cylindrical elements surrounding the rotating shaft of the centrifuge. Some of the elements are held substantially stationary while the others are held with respect to a pair of hearings spaced along the rotating shaft. A fluid is retained about the cylindrical elements.

  7. Successful application of horizontal multistage centrifugal pumps in lean amine service

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, M.; Goodwin, B.

    1998-12-31

    Installation of horizontal multistage centrifugal pumps in lean amine service has proven to be extremely successful and economical at Union Pacific Resources (UPR) East Texas Gas Plant (ETGP) located in Carthage, Texas. In the past, UPR used either vertical can pumps or positive displacement (PD) pumps for amine circulation in their gas treating operations. When the need to replace a PD pump in the No. 4 Amine Plant arose, UPR solicited bids from both traditional pump suppliers. Additionally, UPR solicited a bid from REDA for their Horizontal Pumping System (HPS) based on previous success of this type of pump at ETGP in salt water disposal service. Pump system cost comparisons revealed that REDA`s HPS had a cost savings of approximately 35% over the PD or vertical can pump options. In addition, the installation cost of the REDA pump showed a significant savings versus a vertical can pump. Thus UPR opted to install and evaluate the performance of the HPS in amine service. This was the first installation of a horizontal multistage pump for amine service in UPR`s gas treating plants and was also REDA`s first use of its HPS in this type of application. The first pump was installed in May 1996 and designed to circulate a maximum of 80 gpm. Since installation of the pump in No. 4 Amine Treating Unit, UPR has not experienced any downtime and has realized a significant cost savings on maintenance labor and parts over the previous positive displacement installation. The success of this HPS in amine service has led UPR to invest in five additional HPS pumps for the ETGP in amine service.

  8. Cavitation improvement of double suction centrifugal pump HPP Fuhren

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škerlavaj, A.; Titzschkau, M.; Pavlin, R.; Vehar, F.; Mežnar, P.; Lipej, A.

    2012-11-01

    A double suction storage pump has been refurbished because of the strong cavitation which resulted in cavitation damage on blade and consequently in frequent repairs of the impeller. The analyses of the old and the new impeller were done by the computational fluid dynamics (CFD), performing transient simulations with the commercial solver Ansys CFX. In the simulations, the scale-adaptive-simulation with the curvature correction (SAS-CC) turbulence model was used. No model tests were carried out. Additionally, observations with the digital camera were made through the specially designed plexi-glass window, mounted at the lid at the suction side. The predicted pump head at the operating point agrees well with the pump characteristics measurements, performed with the direct thermodynamic method. The extent of the cavitation predicted by CFD is smaller than the observed one because the cloud cavitation was not predicted. The observations of the cavitation extent show that the impeller design is better than the old one, which was also possible to anticipate based on the CFD results.

  9. A new method of providing pulsatile flow in a centrifugal pump: assessment of pulsatility using a mock circulatory system.

    PubMed

    Herreros, Jesús; Berjano, Enrique J; Sales-Nebot, Laura; Más, Pedro; Calvo, Irene; Mastrobuoni, Stefano; Mercé, Salvador

    2008-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the potential advantages of pulsatile flow as compared with continuous flow. However, to date, physiologic pumps have been technically complex and their application has therefore remained in the experimental field. We have developed a new type of centrifugal pump, which can provide pulsatile as well as continuous flow. The inner wall of a centrifugal pump is pulsed by means of a flexible membrane, which can be accurately controlled by means of either a hydraulic or pneumatic driver. The aim of this study was to assess the hydraulic behavior of the new pump in terms of surplus hemodynamic energy (SHE). We conducted experiments using a mock circulatory system including a membrane oxygenator. No differences were found in the pressure-flow characteristics between the new pump and a conventional centrifugal pump, suggesting that the inclusion of the flexible membrane does not alter hydraulic performance. The value of SHE rose when systolic volume was increased. However, SHE dropped when the percentage of ejection time was reduced and also when the continuous flow (programmed by the centrifugal console) increased. Mean flow matched well with the continuous flow set by the centrifugal console, that is, the pulsatile component of the flow was exclusively controlled by the pulsatile console, and was therefore independent of the continuous flow programmed by the centrifugal console. The pulsatility of the new pump was approximately 25% of that created with a truly pulsatile pump.

  10. Experimental investigation on the flow-induced noise under variable conditions for centrifugal pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Shouqi; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Jianping; Luo, Yin; Pei, Ji

    2012-05-01

    With extensively using of centrifugal pumps, noise generation in these pumps is increasingly receiving research attention in recent years. The noise sources in centrifugal pumps are mainly composed of mechanical noise and flow-induced noise. And the study of flow-induced noise has become a hotspot and important domain in the field. The flow-induced noise closely related to the inner pressure pulses and vibration of volute in pumps, therefore, it is necessary to research the interaction and mechanism among them. To investigate the relationships, a test system is designed which includes a test loop and a measurement system. The hydrophones and pressure sensors are installed on the outlet of the pump and vibration acceleration sensors are disposed on the pump body. Via these instruments, the signals of noise, pressure pulses and vibration are collected and analyzed. The results show that the level of flow-induced noise becomes smaller as the flow increment during low flow rate operations, and it is steadily close to the design point, then it increases with the growing of flow rate in high flow rate conditions. Furthermore, there are some similar peak points in the power spectrum charts of noise, pressure pulses and vibration. The broadband noise at low flow rate is mostly focused on the region of 0-40 times shaft frequency, which is mostly made by rotating stall and vortex; while the noise at high flow rate conditions is focused on the region of 60-100 times shaft frequency, which may be mostly made by cavitations. The proposed research is of practical and academic significance to the study of noise reduction for centrifugal pumps.

  11. Mechanical damage of red blood cells by rotary blood pumps: selective destruction of aged red blood cells and subhemolytic trauma.

    PubMed

    Sakota, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Ryuki; Sobajima, Hideo; Yokoyama, Naoyuki; Waguri, Satoshi; Ohuchi, Katsuhiro; Takatani, Setsuo

    2008-10-01

    In this study, mean cell volume (MCV), mean cell hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), and mean cell hemoglobin (MCH) were measured to quantify RBC damage by rotary blood pumps. Six-hour hemolysis tests were conducted with a Bio-pump BPX-80, a Sarns 15200 roller pump, and a prototype mag-lev centrifugal pump (MedTech Heart) using fresh porcine blood circulated at 5 L/min against a 100 mm Hg head pressure. The temperature of the test and noncirculated control blood was maintained at 37 degrees C. The normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) of each pump was determined by measuring the plasma-free hemoglobin level. The MCV was measured with a Coulter counter, and MCHC was derived from total hemoglobin and hematocrit. MCH was derived from MCV and MCHC. A multivariance statistical analysis (ANOVA) revealed statistically significant differences (n = 15, P < 0.05) in MCV, MCHC, and MCH between the blood sheared by the rotary blood pumps and the nonsheared control blood. Normalized to the control blood, the Bio-pump BPX-80 showed an MCV of 1.04 +/- 0.03, an MCHC of 0.95 +/- 0.04, and an MCH of 0.98 +/- 0.02; the mag-lev MedTech Heart had an MCV of 1.02 +/- 0.02, an MCHC of 0.97 +/- 0.02, and an MCH of 0.99 +/- 0.01; and the roller pump exhibited an MCV of 1.03 +/- 0.03, an MCHC of 0.96 +/- 0.03, and an MCH of 0.99 +/- 0.01. Per 0.01 increase in NIH, the BPX-80 showed a normalized MCV change of +10.1% and a normalized MCHC change of -14.0%; the MedTech Heart demonstrated a +6.9% MCV and -9.5% MCHC change; and the roller pump had a +0.5% MCV and -0.6% MCHC change. Due to shear in the pump circuits, the RBC increased while the MCHC decreased. The likely mechanism is that older RBCs with smaller size and higher hemoglobin concentration were destroyed fast by the shear, leaving younger RBCs with larger size and lower hemoglobin concentration. Subhemolytic trauma caused the intracellular hemoglobin to decrease due to gradual hemoglobin leakage through the micropores formed in the thinned

  12. Centrifugal and Axial Pump Design and Off-Design Performance Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.

    1995-01-01

    A meanline pump-flow modeling method has been developed to provide a fast capability for modeling pumps of cryogenic rocket engines. Based on this method, a meanline pump-flow code PUMPA was written that can predict the performance of pumps at off-design operating conditions, given the loss of the diffusion system at the design point. The design-point rotor efficiency and slip factors are obtained from empirical correlations to rotor-specific speed and geometry. The pump code can model axial, inducer, mixed-flow, and centrifugal pumps and can model multistage pumps in series. The rapid input setup and computer run time for this meanline pump flow code make it an effective analysis and conceptual design tool. The map-generation capabilities of the code provide the information needed for interfacing with a rocket engine system modeling code. The off-design and multistage modeling capabilities of PUMPA permit the user to do parametric design space exploration of candidate pump configurations and to provide head-flow maps for engine system evaluation.

  13. A theoretical relationship between NPSH and erosion rate for a centrifugal pump

    SciTech Connect

    Kale, R.D.; Sreedhar, B.K.

    1994-12-31

    Cavitation in turbomachines adversely affects not only the performance of the machine but is also detrimental to equipment life. The practice of ensuring NPSH{sub av} > NPSH{sub 3%} does not eliminate cavitation erosion as cavitation inception is found to occur at much higher values of the available NPSH. This paper attempts to develop a theoretical relationship between the erosion rate and NPSH for a centrifugal pump as this can be of immense value in correlating the maximum erosion rate NPSH with NPSH{sub 3%}. This is pertinent for liquid metal fast breeder reactor pumping systems.

  14. Cavitation characteristics of a small centrifugal pump in He I and He II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludtke, P. R.; Daney, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    The cavitation characteristics of a small preinduced centrifugal pump operating in He I and He II over the temperature range 1.8-4.2 K are presented. The pump and close-coupled induction motor operate immersed in liquid helium. A six-blade propeller inducer and a three-blade screw inducer were both tested. With this pump configuration using either inducer, there is a tremendous difference between the cavitation characteristics of He I and He II. The net positive suction head requirements for this pump with the screw inducer could not be determined for He I, but it is less than -100 mm and, depending on flow rate, ranges between 35 and 165 mm for He II.

  15. Generation and control of pressure pulsations emitted from centrifugal pumps: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Rzentkowski, G.

    1996-12-01

    Pressure pulsations emitted by centrifugal pumps may strongly interact with a piping system, leading to excessive vibration and alternating stresses beyond endurance limits. Several cases of this nature were reported, especially in chemical, petro-chemical and power generation industries, causing costly repairs and loss of power. In the past, research attention was primary focused on corrective actions involving the design and installation of piping elements to absorb acoustic energy emitted by pumps. Currently, more emphasis is placed on developing analytical tools to predict piping system acoustics and avoid undesirable resonance effects. Little attention has been directed towards preventive actions, leading to a better understanding of pumps as an acoustic source. This paper provides an overview of the underlying excitation mechanisms and modelling techniques, and explores the role of pump design parameters in controlling pressure pulsations. The application here is to primary heat transport system of CANDU reactor.

  16. Enhancement of hemocompatibility of the MERA monopivot centrifugal pump: toward medium-term use.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Takashi; Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Kuwana, Katsuyuki; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Sankai, Yoshiyuki; Tsutsui, Tatsuo

    2013-02-01

    The MERA monopivot centrifugal pump has been developed for use in open-heart surgery, circulatory support, and bridge-to-decision for up to 4 weeks. The pump has a closed-type, 50-mm diameter impeller with four straight paths. The impeller is supported by a monopivot bearing and is driven by a radial-flux magnet-coupling motor. Because flow visualization experiments have clarified sufficient pivot wash and stagnation at the sharp corner of the pivot support was suggested, sharp corners were removed in the design stage. The index of hemolysis of the pump operating at more than 200 mm Hg was found to be lower than that of a commercial pump. Four-week animal tests were then conducted two times; improvement of thrombus formation was seen in the female pivot through modification of female pivot geometry. Overall antithrombogenicity was also recorded. Finally, to assure mid-term use, an additional 4-week durability test revealed that the rate of the axial pivot wear was as small as 1.1 µm/day. The present in vitro and in vivo studies revealed that the MERA monopivot centrifugal pump has sufficient hemocompatibility and durability for up to 4 weeks.

  17. Fluid dynamic characteristics of monopivot magnetic suspension blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Yamane, T; Nishida, M; Asztalos, B; Tsutsui, T; Jikuya, T

    1997-01-01

    A monopivot magnetic suspension blood pump is a centrifugal pump under development with a magnetic suspension and a ceramic pivot to support the impeller with minimum contact. The pump size has been reduced by implementing a direct impeller drive mechanism in place of a magnetic coupling and motor. Flow visualization studies revealed that high shear, which seems to be closely related to hemolysis, concentrates in boundary layers near the walls. This implies that fluid dynamic shear can be reduced not by widening the gap, but by reducing the impeller velocity. Therefore, compared with the results of the previous semi-open curved vane impeller model, impeller velocity was reduced by 30% with a closed impeller having radial straight vanes, and smaller impeller/housing gaps. The volute shape around the impeller tip was also changed such that the outflow from the impeller enters along the center plane of the volute. To examine the effect of the improvements, hemolysis testing was conducted and found that the newly developed closed impeller model generated a lower level of hemolysis than the previous semi-open impeller model. PMID:9360122

  18. Dynamic stress analysis of sewage centrifugal pump impeller based on two-way coupling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Ji; Yuan, Shouqi; Yuan, Jianping

    2014-03-01

    Current research on the operational reliability of centrifugal pumps has mainly focused on hydrodynamic instability. However, the interaction between the fluid and structure has not been sufficiently considered; this interaction can cause vibration and dynamic stress, which can affect the reliability. In this study, the dynamic stresses in a single-blade centrifugal pump impeller are analysed under different operating conditions; the two-way coupling method is used to calculate the fluid-structure interaction. Three-dimensional unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved with the SST k-ω turbulence model for the fluid in the whole flow passage, while transient structure dynamic analysis is used with the finite element method for the structure side. The dynamic stresses in the rotor system are computed according to the fourth strength theory. The stress results show that the highest stress is near the loose bearing and that the equivalent stress increases with the flow rate because the dynamic stresses are closely related to the pressure load. The stress distributions on the blade pressure side, suction side, leading edge, and trailing edge are each analysed for different flow rates; the highest stress distribution is found on the pressure side. On the blade pressure side, a relatively large stress is found near the trailing edge and hub side. Based on these results, a stress distribution prediction method is proposed for centrifugal pumps, which considers the interaction between the fluid and structure. The method can be used to check the dynamic stress at different flow rates when optimising the pump design to increase the pump reliability.

  19. Quality evaluation of energy consumed in flow regulation method by speed variation in centrifugal pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, S.; Culman, M.; Acevedo, C.; Rey, C.

    2014-06-01

    Nowadays, energy efficiency and the Electric Power Quality are two inseparable issues in the evaluation of three-phase induction motors, framed within the program of Rational and Efficient Use of Energy (RUE).The use of efficient energy saving devices has been increasing significantly in RUE programs, for example the use of variable frequency drives (VFD) in pumping systems.The overall objective of the project was to evaluate the impact on power quality and energy efficiency in a centrifugal pump driven by an induction three-phase motor, using the flow control method of speed variation by VFD. The fundamental purpose was to test the opinions continuously heard about the use of flow control methods in centrifugal pumps, analyzing the advantages and disadvantages that have been formulated deliberately in order to offer support to the industry in taking correct decisions. The VFD changes the speed of the motor-pump system increasing efficiency compared to the classical methods of regulation. However, the VFD originates conditions that degrade the quality of the electric power supplied to the system and therefore its efficiency, due to the nonlinearity and presence of harmonic currents. It was possible to analyze the power quality, ensuring that the information that comes to the industry is generally biased.

  20. Improved Outcome of Cardiac Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Infants and Children Using Magnetic Levitation Centrifugal Pumps.

    PubMed

    Luciani, Giovanni Battista; Hoxha, Stiljan; Torre, Salvatore; Rungatscher, Alessio; Menon, Tiziano; Barozzi, Luca; Faggian, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has traditionally been and, for the most part, still is being performed using roller pumps. Use of first-generation centrifugal pumps has yielded controversial outcomes, perhaps due to mechanical properties of the same and the ensuing risk of hemolysis and renal morbidity. Latest-generation centrifugal pumps, using magnetic levitation (ML), exhibit mechanical properties which may have overcome limitations of first-generation devices. This retrospective study aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of veno-arterial (V-A) ECMO for cardiac indications in neonates, infants, and children, using standard (SP) and latest-generation ML centrifugal pumps. Between 2002 and 2014, 33 consecutive neonates, infants, and young children were supported using V-A ECMO for cardiac indications. There were 21 males and 12 females, with median age of 29 days (4 days-5 years) and a median body weight of 3.2 kg (1.9-18 kg). Indication for V-A ECMO were acute circulatory collapse in ICU or ward after cardiac repair in 16 (49%) patients, failure to wean after repair of complex congenital heart disease in 9 (27%), fulminant myocarditis in 4 (12%), preoperative sepsis in 2 (6%), and refractory tachy-arrhythmias in 2 (6%). Central cannulation was used in 27 (81%) patients and peripheral in 6. Seven (21%) patients were supported with SP and 26 (79%) with ML centrifugal pumps. Median duration of support was 82 h (range 24-672 h), with 26 (79%) patients weaned from support. Three patients required a second ECMO run but died on support. Seventeen (51%) patients required peritoneal dialysis for acute renal failure. Overall survival to discharge was 39% (13/33 patients). All patients with fulminant myocarditis and with refractory arrhythmias were weaned, and five (83%) survived, whereas no patient supported for sepsis survived. Risk factors for hospital mortality included lower (<2.5 kg) body weight (P = 0.02) and rescue ECMO after cardiac

  1. Improved Outcome of Cardiac Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Infants and Children Using Magnetic Levitation Centrifugal Pumps.

    PubMed

    Luciani, Giovanni Battista; Hoxha, Stiljan; Torre, Salvatore; Rungatscher, Alessio; Menon, Tiziano; Barozzi, Luca; Faggian, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has traditionally been and, for the most part, still is being performed using roller pumps. Use of first-generation centrifugal pumps has yielded controversial outcomes, perhaps due to mechanical properties of the same and the ensuing risk of hemolysis and renal morbidity. Latest-generation centrifugal pumps, using magnetic levitation (ML), exhibit mechanical properties which may have overcome limitations of first-generation devices. This retrospective study aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of veno-arterial (V-A) ECMO for cardiac indications in neonates, infants, and children, using standard (SP) and latest-generation ML centrifugal pumps. Between 2002 and 2014, 33 consecutive neonates, infants, and young children were supported using V-A ECMO for cardiac indications. There were 21 males and 12 females, with median age of 29 days (4 days-5 years) and a median body weight of 3.2 kg (1.9-18 kg). Indication for V-A ECMO were acute circulatory collapse in ICU or ward after cardiac repair in 16 (49%) patients, failure to wean after repair of complex congenital heart disease in 9 (27%), fulminant myocarditis in 4 (12%), preoperative sepsis in 2 (6%), and refractory tachy-arrhythmias in 2 (6%). Central cannulation was used in 27 (81%) patients and peripheral in 6. Seven (21%) patients were supported with SP and 26 (79%) with ML centrifugal pumps. Median duration of support was 82 h (range 24-672 h), with 26 (79%) patients weaned from support. Three patients required a second ECMO run but died on support. Seventeen (51%) patients required peritoneal dialysis for acute renal failure. Overall survival to discharge was 39% (13/33 patients). All patients with fulminant myocarditis and with refractory arrhythmias were weaned, and five (83%) survived, whereas no patient supported for sepsis survived. Risk factors for hospital mortality included lower (<2.5 kg) body weight (P = 0.02) and rescue ECMO after cardiac

  2. Fluid dynamic characterization of operating conditions for continuous flow blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Wu, Z J; Antaki, J F; Burgreen, G W; Butler, K C; Thomas, D C; Griffith, B P

    1999-01-01

    As continuous flow pumps become more prominent as long-term ventricular assist devices, the wide range of conditions under which they must be operated has become evident. Designed to operate at a single, best-efficiency, operating point, continuous flow pumps are required to perform at off-design conditions quite frequently. The present study investigated the internal fluid dynamics within two representative rotary fluid pumps to characterize the quality of the flow field over a full range of operating conditions. A Nimbus/UoP axial flow blood pump and a small centrifugal pump were used as the study models. Full field visualization of flow features in the two pumps was conducted using a laser based fluorescent particle imaging technique. Experiments were performed under steady flow conditions. Flow patterns at inlet and outlet sections were visualized over a series of operating points. Flow features specific to each pump design were observed to exist under all operating conditions. At off-design conditions, an annular region of reverse flow was commonly observed within the inlet of the axial pump, while a small annulus of backflow in the inlet duct and a strong disturbed flow at the outlet tongue were observed for the centrifugal pump. These observations were correlated to a critical nondimensional flow coefficient. The creation of a "map" of flow behavior provides an additional, important criterion for determining favorable operating speed for rotary blood pumps. Many unfavorable flow features may be avoided by maintaining the flow coefficient above a characteristic critical coefficient for a particular pump, whereas the intrinsic deleterious flow features can only be minimized by design improvement. Broadening the operating range by raising the band between the critical flow coefficient and the designed flow coefficient, is also a worthy goal for design improvement.

  3. Preliminary results of left heart bypass in pigs using a heparin-coated centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Campanella, C; Cameron, E; Sinclair, C; Feilberg, V L; Hider, C; Prasad, S; Boulton, F; Lamb, D

    1991-08-01

    To assess the feasibility of left ventricular assist without systemic heparinization, we used a commercially available (Sarns 3M) centrifugal pump with tubing set and cannulas, all internally precoated for the purpose of this study with heparin, to bypass the left ventricle in 12 pigs for periods of either 1 or 3 hours. There was no significant activation of clotting and there was no sign of generalized embolization. However, on postmortem studies, 5 kidneys out of 22 examined showed signs of minimal thromboembolism. This experiment shows that artificial left ventricular assist, free of systemic heparinization but using heparin precoating, is feasible and safe, at least for a short period of time.

  4. The rotordynamic forces on a centrifugal pump impeller in the presence of cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franz, R.; Acosta, A. J.; Brennen, C. E.; Caughey, T. K.

    1990-01-01

    Fluid-induced rotordynamic forces on a centrifugal pump impeller whirling along a trajectory eccentric to its undeflected position in the presence of cavitation were measured using the experimental facility described by Jery (1987). The force measured is a combination of a steady radial force due to the volute asymmetries and an unsteady force due to the eccentric motion of the rotor. It was found that, compared to the noncavitation condition, a cavitation corresponding to a head loss of 3 percent had little effect upon the unsteady force. However, a lesser degree of cavitation at the design point, was found to increase the destabilizing force for a particular set of whirl ratios.

  5. Numerical performance evaluation of design modifications on a centrifugal pump impeller running in reverse mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassanos, Ioannis; Chrysovergis, Marios; Anagnostopoulos, John; Papantonis, Dimitris; Charalampopoulos, George

    2016-06-01

    In this paper the effect of impeller design variations on the performance of a centrifugal pump running as turbine is presented. Numerical simulations were performed after introducing various modifications in the design for various operating conditions. Specifically, the effects of the inlet edge shape, the meridional channel width, the number of blades and the addition of splitter blades on impeller performance was investigated. The results showed that, an increase in efficiency can be achieved by increasing the number of blades and by introducing splitter blades.

  6. New mechanism to reduce the size of the monopivot magnetic suspension blood pump: direct drive mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yamane, T; Nishida, M; Kijima, T; Maekawa, J

    1997-07-01

    Size reduction of the monopivot magnetic suspension blood pump has been achieved by reducing the size of the magnetic suspension and employing a direct drive mechanism in place of a brushless DC motor and a magnetic coupling. The flow has also been improved using a closed hollow impeller to remove flow obstruction at the inlet and using radial straight vanes to reduce the impeller speed by 30%. Hemolysis testing was conducted for the new models. Results showed that model DD1 presented only a slightly higher level of hemolysis than a regular extracorporeal centrifugal pump. PMID:9212927

  7. Research on the effect of wear-ring clearances to the axial and radial force of a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, W. G.; Y He, M.; Qi, C. X.; Li, Y. B.

    2013-12-01

    Varying of the wear-ring clearance not only has a distinct effect on the volumetric loss of the centrifugal pump, but also on the performance of the centrifugal pump including the axial and radial forces. Comparing with the experimental studies, numerical simulation methods have some special advantages, such as the low cost, fast and high efficiency, and convenient to get the detailed structure of the internal flow characteristics, so it has been widely used in the fluid machinery study in recent years. In order to study the effect of wear-ring clearance on the force performance of the centrifugal pump, based on the Reynolds Time-Averaged N-S equations and RNG k-ε turbulence model, a centrifugal pump with three variable styles of the wear-rings was simulated: Only the clearance of the front wear-ring was changed, only the clearance of the back wear-ring was changed and both were changed. Comparing with the experiment, numerical results show a good agreement. In the three changing styles of the clearance, the variable of the clearance of front wear-ring has the most influence on the axial force of the centrifugal pump, while has tiny effect on the radial force for all the conditions.

  8. Clinical evaluation of pulsatile flow mode of Terumo Capiox centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Nishida, H; Uesugi, H; Nishinaka, T; Uwabe, K; Aomi, S; Endo, M; Koyanagi, H; Oshiyama, H; Nogawa, A; Akutsu, T

    1997-07-01

    The Terumo Capiox centrifugal pump system possesses an automatic priming function in which the motor repeatedly stops and runs intermittently to eliminate air bubbles in the circuit through the micropores of the hollow-fiber membrane oxygenator. By modifying this mechanism, we have developed a pulsatile flow mode. In this mode, maximum and minimum pump rotational speeds can be independently set every 20 rpm in the range of 0 to 3,000 rpm. The duration of the pump run at maximum and minimum speeds can also be independently set every 0.1 s in the range of 0.2 to 15 s. In a clinical trial, after obtaining the desired flow rate, 2.4 L/min/m2 in nonpulsatile flow mode, a pulsatile flow mode of 60 cycles/min (with 1 cycle being maximum speed for 0.4 s and minimum speed for 0.6 s) was obtained by adding and subtracting 500 rpm to and from the rotational speed in nonpulsatile flow mode. Pulse pressures in the femoral artery and in the circuit just proximal to the perfusion cannula (6.5 mm Sarns high flow cannula with metal tip) were measured in 5 patients who underwent pulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) for a coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), and compared to pulse pressures obtained by intraaortic balloon pumping (IABP) in 3 patients and by the pulsatile mode of the 3M Delphin pump in 3 patients. The platelet count, free hemoglobin, and beta-thromboglobulin (beta-TG) were measured and compared with measurements from another 5 patients who underwent nonpulsatile CPB. Although the pulse pressure measured in the circuit was 180 mm Hg on average, the pressure in the femoral artery was only 15 to 40 mm Hg with a mean of 20 mm Hg. In the same patients, 60 to 80 mm Hg pulse pressure was obtained with IABP. The pulse pressure obtained with the Delphin pump was not more than that obtained with the Terumo pump. There were no significant differences in percents of preoperative levels of platelet counts (pulsatile, 87.6 +/- 15.8% and nonpulsatile, 72.4 +/- 40.6%), free

  9. Clinical evaluation of pulsatile flow mode of Terumo Capiox centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Nishida, H; Uesugi, H; Nishinaka, T; Uwabe, K; Aomi, S; Endo, M; Koyanagi, H; Oshiyama, H; Nogawa, A; Akutsu, T

    1997-07-01

    The Terumo Capiox centrifugal pump system possesses an automatic priming function in which the motor repeatedly stops and runs intermittently to eliminate air bubbles in the circuit through the micropores of the hollow-fiber membrane oxygenator. By modifying this mechanism, we have developed a pulsatile flow mode. In this mode, maximum and minimum pump rotational speeds can be independently set every 20 rpm in the range of 0 to 3,000 rpm. The duration of the pump run at maximum and minimum speeds can also be independently set every 0.1 s in the range of 0.2 to 15 s. In a clinical trial, after obtaining the desired flow rate, 2.4 L/min/m2 in nonpulsatile flow mode, a pulsatile flow mode of 60 cycles/min (with 1 cycle being maximum speed for 0.4 s and minimum speed for 0.6 s) was obtained by adding and subtracting 500 rpm to and from the rotational speed in nonpulsatile flow mode. Pulse pressures in the femoral artery and in the circuit just proximal to the perfusion cannula (6.5 mm Sarns high flow cannula with metal tip) were measured in 5 patients who underwent pulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) for a coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), and compared to pulse pressures obtained by intraaortic balloon pumping (IABP) in 3 patients and by the pulsatile mode of the 3M Delphin pump in 3 patients. The platelet count, free hemoglobin, and beta-thromboglobulin (beta-TG) were measured and compared with measurements from another 5 patients who underwent nonpulsatile CPB. Although the pulse pressure measured in the circuit was 180 mm Hg on average, the pressure in the femoral artery was only 15 to 40 mm Hg with a mean of 20 mm Hg. In the same patients, 60 to 80 mm Hg pulse pressure was obtained with IABP. The pulse pressure obtained with the Delphin pump was not more than that obtained with the Terumo pump. There were no significant differences in percents of preoperative levels of platelet counts (pulsatile, 87.6 +/- 15.8% and nonpulsatile, 72.4 +/- 40.6%), free

  10. The effect of inlet swirl on the dynamics of long annular seals in centrifugal pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ismail, M.; Brown, R. D.; France, D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes additional results from a continuing research program which aims to identify the dynamics of long annular seals in centrifugal pumps. A seal test rig designed at Heriot-Watt University and commissioned at Weir Pumps Research Laboratory in Alloa permits the identification of mass, stiffness, and damping coefficients using a least-squares technique based on the singular value decomposition method. The analysis is carried out in the time domain using a multi-fiequency forcing function. The experimental method relies on the forced excitation of a flexibly supported stator by two hydraulic shakers. Running through the stator embodying two symmetrical balance drum seals is a rigid rotor supported in rolling element bearings. The only physical connection between shaft and stator is the pair of annular gaps filled with pressurized water discharged axially. The experimental coefficients obtained from the tests are compared with theoretical values.

  11. Aortic arch surgery with a single centrifugal pump for selective cerebral perfusion and systemic circulation.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Keiji; Shimazaki, Yasuhisa; Sakamoto, Tomohiko; Ueda, Hideki; Nakagawa, Masashi; Yamada, Hideto; Doi, Teruo; Ooue, Takuya

    2010-01-01

    In aortic arch surgery, two pumps are required for systemic perfusion and selective cerebral perfusion (SCP). A new technique with a single centrifugal pump for systemic perfusion and SCP was developed and its efficacy and safety evaluated. This technique was adopted for total arch replacement in 22 consecutive patients with true aneurysms (13) and aortic dissection (nine) from January 2005 to January 2008. Cerebral perfusion lines branched from the main perfusion line. During SCP, right radial arterial pressure was maintained at 50 mm Hg and left common carotid arterial pressure at 60 mm Hg, and the regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rSO(2)) values were maintained at approximately >80% of the baseline value. Two operative deaths (9%) occurred due to pneumonia and hemorrhage in the left lung, respectively. Stroke occurred in one patient (5%). This simple circuit system can thus be easily and safely applied for aortic arch surgery.

  12. The effect of inlet swirl on the rotordynamic shroud forces in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ginzburg, A.; Brennen, C. E.; Acosta, A. J.; Caughey, T. K.

    1992-01-01

    The role played by fluid forces in determining the rotordynamic stability of a centrifugal pump is gaining increasing attention. The present research investigates the contributions to the rotordynamic forces from the discharge-to-suction leakage flows between the front shroud of the rotating impeller and the stationary pump casing. In particular, the dependency of the rotordynamic characteristics of leakage flows on the swirl at the inlet to the leakage path was examined. An inlet guide vane was designed for the experiment so that swirl could be introduced at the leakage flow inlet. The data demonstrates substantial rotordynamic effects and a destabilizing tangential force for small positive whirl ratios; this force decreased with increasing flow rate. The effect of swirl on the rotordynamic forces was found to be destabilizing.

  13. Centrifugal pump support for distal aortic perfusion during repair of traumatic thoracic aortic injury.

    PubMed

    Walls, Joseph T; Curtis, Jack J; McKenney-Knox, Charlotte A; Schmaltz, Richard A

    2002-11-01

    Paraplegia from ischemic injury of the spinal cord and renal failure from inadequate perfusion of the kidneys may occur from aortic cross-clamping during repair of traumatic thoracic aortic injuries. After Institutional Review Board approval, we retrospectively reviewed the charts of 26 patients surgically treated for traumatic transection of the descending thoracic aorta during a 14 year period (1987-2001), using centrifugal pump (Sarns) support for distal aortic perfusion. The study group comprised 19 males and 7 females, whose ages ranged from 15 to 69 years. For all but 1 patient, who fell from a flagpole, the injuries were incurred in motor vehicle accidents. Aortic cross-clamp time lasted between 5 to 78 min (median = 40 min). Mean arterial pressure ranged from 50 to 80 mm Hg (median = 70 mm Hg). All patients survived operation without developing paraplegia or renal failure. Distal centrifugal pump perfusion during repair of traumatic injury of the descending thoracic aorta is a valuable adjunct during surgical treatment and aids in preservation of spinal cord and renal function.

  14. Effects of computational grids and turbulence models on numerical simulation of centrifugal pump with CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. L.; Liu, M. M.; Dong, L.; Ren, Y.; Du, H.

    2012-11-01

    In order to verify accurately the effects of computational grids and turbulence models on CFD numerical simulation of centrifugal pump, the calculation results of the different mesh numbers coupling with five kinds of turbulence models are compared. These parts of models (e.g. wear ring and tongue) are meshed with the local refinement technology. At design condition, with CFX software on the Dawning TC3600 parallel computer cluster, the calculation results of phase coupling six different mesh numbers from 1 million to 25 million with five different turbulence models (K-Epsilon, SSG Reynolds Stress, K epsilon EARSM, RNG K-Epsilon, K-Omega) are used to make performance prediction and to analyze the internal flow field. And the comparison between performance prediction results and experimental results are analyzed. It is confirmed that the calculation results are quite different with different turbulence models, and the result under K epsilon EARSM model is better than the others. And it shows that the internal flow in centrifugal pump is depicted more perfect with the increase of mesh numbers.

  15. [Clinical experience of mechanical ventricular support with centrifugal pump for severe ventricular failure after open heart surgery].

    PubMed

    Matsuwaka, R; Matsuda, H; Kaneko, M; Masai, T; Fudemoto, Y; Kobayashi, T; Imagawa, H; Miyamoto, K; Morisaki, H; Kawashima, Y

    1990-09-01

    Five adult patients (pts) with age 15-67 (mean 43) received mechanical circulatory support with centrifugal pump (Biomedicus, BP-80, Sarns centrifugal pump) for postcardiotomy profound shock. Three pts underwent left ventricular support (LVS) alone, and the other 2 required biventricular support (BVS). Duration of the LVS ranged from 33 to 240 hours (mean 126 hours) and the right ventricular support 92, 120 hrs. Pump flow rate was 1.1 to 2.5 (mean 1.9) L/min/m2. Sixteen pumps were used and the pump exchange was performed 9 times in five pts and an average perfusion time per pump was 57 hrs. Two of 3 pts with LVS alone survived and one died of multiorgan failure associated with right heart dysfunction. In two pts with BVS, one survived and the other died of persistent low cardiac output early after pump removal. As the complication during mechanical support, bleeding was seen in 3 pts and cerebral infarction in one. Although centrifugal pump has potential limitation in antithrombogenicity and durability, this device provides a simple and effective mechanical circulatory support.

  16. Clinical effectiveness of centrifugal pump to produce pulsatile flow during cardiopulmonary bypass in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Gu, Y John; van Oeveren, Willem; Mungroop, Hubert E; Epema, Anne H; den Hamer, Inez J; Keizer, Jorrit J; Leuvenink, Ron P; Mariani, Massimo A; Rakhorst, Gerhard

    2011-02-01

    Although the centrifugal pump has been widely used as a nonpulsatile pump for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), little is known about its performance as a pulsatile pump for CPB, especially on its efficacy in producing hemodynamic energy and its clinical effectiveness. We performed a study to evaluate whether the Rotaflow centrifugal pump produces effective pulsatile flow during CPB and whether the pulsatile flow in this setting is clinically effective in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Thirty-two patients undergoing CPB for elective coronary artery bypass grafting were randomly allocated to a pulsatile perfusion group (n = 16) or a nonpulsatile perfusion group (n = 16). All patients were perfused with the Rotaflow centrifugal pump. In the pulsatile group, the centrifugal pump was adjusted to the pulsatile mode (60 cycles/min) during aortic cross-clamping, whereas in the nonpulsatile group, the pump was kept in its nonpulsatile mode during the same period of time. Compared with the nonpulsatile group, the pulsatile group had a higher pulse pressure (P < 0.01) and a fraction higher energy equivalent pressure (EEP, P = 0.058). The net gain of pulsatile flow, represented by the surplus hemodynamic energy (SHE), was found much higher in the CPB circuit than in patients (P < 0.01). Clinically, there was no difference between the pulsatile and nonpulsatile groups with regard to postoperative acute kidney injury, endothelial activation, or inflammatory response. Postoperative organ function and the duration of hospital stay were similar in the two patient groups. In conclusion, pulsatile CPB with the Rotaflow centrifugal pump is associated with a small gain of EEP and SHE, which does not seem to be clinically effective in adult cardiac surgical patients.

  17. Analysis of silt abrasion of the impeller ring in a centrifugal pump with J-grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Z. D.; Wang, Z. Y.; Guo, Z. W.; Dong, J.; Lu, J.

    2016-05-01

    The water flow and movement of silt in a prototype double-suction centrifugal pump was simulated using an Euler-Lagrange multiphase flow model. J-Grooves were adopted to protect the impeller ring from silt abrasion. The influence of J-grooves on the silt concentration and pump efficiency was analyzed. The results show that the radial component of the relative velocity around the impeller ring is too low to move the silt out of the spacing between the impeller plate and the casing. The high silt concentration around the impeller ring is the major contributor to silt abrasion of the impeller ring. The J-grooves induce two strong vortices, which increase the radial component of the relative velocity of water and reduce the silt concentration around the impeller ring, but additional friction losses are introduced and the pump efficiency is decreased. Optimization of the number and shape of J-grooves decreases losses in the efficiency of the pump, and effectively protects the impeller ring. Case 4 was found the most effective configuration in this study.

  18. Optimization on the impeller of a low-specific-speed centrifugal pump for hydraulic performance improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Ji; Wang, Wenjie; Yuan, Shouqi; Zhang, Jinfeng

    2016-08-01

    In order to widen the high-efficiency operating range of a low-specific-speed centrifugal pump, an optimization process for considering efficiencies under 1.0Q d and 1.4Q d is proposed. Three parameters, namely, the blade outlet width b 2, blade outlet angle β 2, and blade wrap angle φ, are selected as design variables. Impellers are generated using the optimal Latin hypercube sampling method. The pump efficiencies are calculated using the software CFX 14.5 at two operating points selected as objectives. Surrogate models are also constructed to analyze the relationship between the objectives and the design variables. Finally, the particle swarm optimization algorithm is applied to calculate the surrogate model to determine the best combination of the impeller parameters. The results show that the performance curve predicted by numerical simulation has a good agreement with the experimental results. Compared with the efficiencies of the original impeller, the hydraulic efficiencies of the optimized impeller are increased by 4.18% and 0.62% under 1.0Q d and 1.4Q d, respectively. The comparison of inner flow between the original pump and optimized one illustrates the improvement of performance. The optimization process can provide a useful reference on performance improvement of other pumps, even on reduction of pressure fluctuations.

  19. Blood Pump Having a Magnetically Suspended Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antaki, James F. (Inventor); Paden, Bradley (Inventor); Burgreen, Gregory (Inventor); Groom, Nelson J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A blood pump preferably has a magnetically suspended rotor that rotates within a housing. The rotor may rotate about a stator disposed within the housing. Radial magnetic bearings may be defined within the stator and the rotor in order to suspend the rotor. The radial magnetic bearings may be passive magnetic bearings that include permanent magnets disposed within the stator and the rotor or active magnetic bearings. The pump may further include an axial magnetic bearing that may be either a passive or an active magnetic bearing. A motor that drives the rotor may be disposed within the housing in order to more easily dissipate heat generated by the motor. A primary flow path is defined between the rotor and the stator, and a secondary flow path is defined between the stator and the rotor. Preferably, a substantial majority of blood passes through the primary flow path. The secondary flow path is large enough so that it provides adequate flushing of the secondary flow path while being small enough to permit efficient operation of the radial magnet bearings across the secondary flow path.

  20. Blood Pump Having a Magnetically Suspended Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antaki, James F. (Inventor); Paden, Bradley (Inventor); Burgreen, Gregory (Inventor); Groom, Nelson J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A blood pump preferably has a magnetically suspended rotor that rotates within a housing. The rotor may rotate about a stator disposed within the housing. Radial magnetic bearings may be defined within the stator and the rotor in order to suspend the rotor. The radial magnetic bearings may be passive magnetic bearings that include permanent magnets disposed within the stator and the rotor or active magnetic bearings. The pump may further include an axial magnetic bearing that may be either a passive or an active magnetic bearing. A motor that drives the rotor may be disposed within the housing in order to more easily dissipate heat generated by the motor. A primary flow path is defined between the rotor and the stator, and a secondary flow path is defined between the stator and the rotor. Preferably, a substantial majority of blood passes through the primary flow path. The secondary flow path is large enough so that it provides adequate flushing of the secondary flow path while being small enough to permit efficient operation of the radial magnet bearings across the secondary flow path.

  1. Multi-level 3D implementation of thermo-pneumatic pumping on centrifugal microfluidic CD platforms.

    PubMed

    Thio, Tzer Hwai Gilbert; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Al-Faqheri, Wisam; Soin, Norhayati; Abdul Kahar, Maria Kahar Bador; Madou, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Thermo-pneumatic (TP) pumping is a method employing the principle of expanding heated air to transfer fluids back towards the CD center on the centrifugal microfluidic CD platform. While the TP features are easy to fabricate as no moving parts are involved, it consumes extra real estate on the CD, and because heating is involved, it introduces unnecessary heating to the fluids on the CD. To overcome these limitations, we introduce a multi-level 3D approach and implement forced convection heating. In a multi-level 3D CD, the TP features are relocated to a separate top level, while the microfluidic process remains on a lower bottom level. This allows for heat shielding of the fluids in the microfluidic process level, and also improve usage of space on the CD. To aid in future implementations of TP pumping on a multi-level 3D CD, studies on the effect of heat source setting, and the effect of positioning the TP feature (it distance from the CD center) on CD surface heating are also presented. In this work, we successfully demonstrate a multi-level 3D approach to implement TP pumping on the microfluidic CD platform.

  2. Multi-objective optimization of a low specific speed centrifugal pump using an evolutionary algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Zhao; Zhounian, Lai; Peng, Wu; Linlin, Cao; Dazhuan, Wu

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the shape optimization of a low specific speed centrifugal pump at the design point. The target pump has already been manually modified on the basis of empirical knowledge. A genetic algorithm (NSGA-II) with certain enhancements is adopted to improve its performance further with respect to two goals. In order to limit the number of design variables without losing geometric information, the impeller is parametrized using the Bézier curve and a B-spline. Numerical simulation based on a Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulent model is done in parallel to evaluate the flow field. A back-propagating neural network is constructed as a surrogate for performance prediction to save computing time, while initial samples are selected according to an orthogonal array. Then global Pareto-optimal solutions are obtained and analysed. The results manifest that unexpected flow structures, such as the secondary flow on the meridian plane, have diminished or vanished in the optimized pump.

  3. Numerical and experimental study on flow-induced noise at blade-passing frequency in centrifugal pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Yuan, Shouqi; Yuan, Jianping; Si, Qiaorui; Pei, Ji

    2014-05-01

    With the increasing noise pollution, low noise optimization of centrifugal pimps has become a hot topic. However, experimental study on this problem is unacceptable for industrial applications due to unsustainable cost. A hybrid method that couples computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with computational aeroacoustic software is used to predict the flow-induced noise of pumps in order to minimize the noise of centrifugal pumps in actual projects. Under Langthjem's assumption that the blade surface pressure is the main flow-induced acoustic source in centrifugal pumps, the blade surface pressure pulsation is considered in terms of the acoustical sources and simulated using CFX software. The pressure pulsation and noise distribution in the near-cutoff region are examined for the blade-passing frequency (BPF) noise, and the sound pressure level (SPL) reached peaks near the cutoff that corresponded with the pressure pulsation in this region. An experiment is performed to validate this prediction. Four hydrophones are fixed to the inlet and outlet ports of the test pump to measure the flow-induced noise from the four-port model. The simulation results for the noise are analyzed and compared with the experimental results. The variation in the calculated noise with changes in the flow agreed well with the experimental results. When the flow rate was increased, the SPL first decreased and reached the minimum near the best efficient point (BEP); it then increased when the flow rate was further increased. The numerical and experimental results confirmed that the BPF noise generated by a blade-rotating dipole roughly reflects the acoustic features of centrifugal pumps. The noise simulation method in current study has a good feasibility and suitability, which could be adopted in engineering design to predict and optimize the hydroacoustic behavior of centrifugal pumps.

  4. Permanent magnetic-levitation of rotating impeller: a decisive breakthrough in the centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Qian, K X; Zeng, P; Ru, W M; Yuan, H Y; Feng, Z G; Li, L

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic bearings have no mechanical contact between the rotor and stator, and a rotary pump with magnetic bearings therefore has no mechanical wear and thrombosis. The magnetic bearings available, however, contain electromagnets, are complicated to control and have high energy consumption. Therefore, it is difficult to apply an electromagnetic bearing to a rotary pump without disturbing its simplicity, reliability and ability to be implanted. The authors have developed a levitated impeller pump using only permanent magnets. The rotor is supported by permanent radial magnetic forces. The impeller is fixed on one side of the rotor; on the other side the rotor magnets are mounted. Opposite these rotor magents, a driving magnet is fastened to the motor axis. Thereafter, the motor drives the rotor via magnetic coupling. In laboratory tests with saline, where the rotor is still or rotates at under 4,000 rpm, the rotor magnets have one point in contact axially with a spacer between the rotor magnets and the driving magnets. The contacting point is located in the center of the rotor. As the rotating speed increases gradually to more than 4000 rpm, the rotor will disaffiliate from the stator axially, and become fully levitated. Since the axial levitation is produced by hydraulic force and the rotor magnets have a giro-effect, the rotor rotates very stably during levitation. As a left ventricular assist device, the pump works in a rotating speed range of 5,000-8,000 rpm, and the levitation of the impeller is assured by use of the pump. The permanent maglev impeller pump retains the advantages of the rotary pump but overcomes the disadvantages of the leviated pump with electromagnetic-bearing, and has met with most requirements of artificial heart blood pumps, thus promising to have more applications than previously. PMID:11924845

  5. Annular Seals of High Energy Centrifugal Pumps: Presentation of Full Scale Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florjancic, S.; Stuerchler, R.; Mccloskey, T.

    1991-01-01

    Prediction of rotordynamic behavior for high energy concentration centrifugal pumps is a challenging task which still imposes considerable difficulties. While the mechanical modeling of the rotor is solved most satisfactorily by finite element techniques, accurate boundary conditions for arbitrary operating conditions are known for journal bearings only. Little information is available on the reactive forces of annular seals, such as neck ring and interstage seals and balance pistons, and on the impeller interaction forces. The present focus is to establish reliable boundary conditions at annular seals. For this purpose, a full scale test machine was set up and smooth and serrated seal configurations measured. Dimensionless coefficients are presented and compared with a state of the art theory.

  6. Experimental research on internal flow in impeller of a low specific speed centrifugal pump by PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. F.; Wang, Y. F.; Yuan, S. Q.

    2016-05-01

    For the purpose of investigating the influence of two different impellers, one is with splitter blades and the other one is without splitter blades, on a low-specific centrifugal pump. The experimental investigation in impellers was conducted at different conditions and phases by means of PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) to study the internal flow. Meanwhile, the absolute and relative velocity distributions in impellers were obtained. Experimental results show that the head value is higher in the impeller with splitter blades and both two head curves appear hump phenomena at small flow rate. The absolute velocity value increases with radius and from pressure side to suction side at the same radius gradually. The splitter blades can scour the wake, making outlet velocity distribution more uniform and improving the internal flow. The velocity distribution becomes less even in the process of closing to tongue due to reinforced interference of tongue on internal flow.

  7. Hydrodynamic impeller stiffness, damping, and inertia in the rotordynamics of centrifugal flow pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jery, S.; Acosta, A. J.; Brennen, C. E.; Caughey, T. K.

    1984-01-01

    The lateral hydrodynamic forces experienced by a centrifugal pump impeller performing circular whirl motions within several volute geometries were measured. The lateral forces were decomposed into: (1) time averaged lateral forces and (2) hydrodynamic force matrices representing the variation of the lateral forces with position of the impeller center. It is found that these force matrices essentially consist of equal diagonal terms and skew symmetric off diagonal terms. One consequence of this is that during its whirl motion the impeller experiences forces acting normal and tangential to the locus of whirl. Data on these normal and tangential forces are presented; it is shown that there exists a region of positive reduced whirl frequencies, within which the hydrodynamic forces can be destablizing with respect to whirl.

  8. Underwater plasma-MIG arc welding: Shielding technique and pressure reduction by a centrifugal pump

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.; Mewes, D.; Bartzsch, J.; Draugelates, U.

    1995-12-31

    In comparison to hyperbaric underwater welding in diving chambers, wet welding techniques promise higher flexibility and lower costs. One technique for creating a local dry and pressure reduced welding zone is the use of a centrifugal pump. Results of experimental investigations in combination with a plasma-MIG arc welding system are presented in this paper. Special importance is attached to the local pressure reduction in view of the fact that low pressure, i.e. a high pressure difference between surrounding water and dry welding area, is a good condition for welding but is difficult to be obtained with other shielding systems than pressure chambers. Plasma-MIG welding has been done under water with a good result on the weld quality. Values of the hardness of the joint and the appearance of the weld structure are nearly comparable to atmospheric welds.

  9. Study on the influence of back blade shape on the wear characteristics of centrifugal slurry pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, X.; Zhou, S. P.; Li, S.

    2016-05-01

    CFX particle inhomogeneous model was introduced for the mechanism analysis of a centrifugal slurry pump which is equipped with back blades on impeller shrouds. Combining with the total efficiency correction, the simulation showed good prediction accuracy of external characteristics results compared with the experimental values. Vorticity and Q-Criterion were chosen as the variables to illustrate the abrasion morphology and wear mechanism by contrasting simulation result with worn impeller in engineering. The analysis showed that the large vorticity intensity areas are distributed at the edge of impeller shroud and intensively behind the back blades. Moreover, the vorticity scattered on suction surface of back blade shows the largest intensity. The contour of Q-Criterion demonstrated that the swirl scale in front cavity is obviously larger than that in back cavity. The distribution of vorticity on both front and back shrouds can reasonably explain the impeller wear characteristics. Finally, the forward curved back blade proved to be excellence performance in vorticity distribution.

  10. Experience with the Sarns centrifugal pump as a ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Joyce, L D; Kiser, J C; Eales, F; King, R M; Toninato, C J; Hansen, J

    1990-01-01

    The authors used the Sarns centrifugal pump (Sarns 3M, Ann Arbor, MI) as a ventricular assist device (VAD) in 30 patients between May 1985 and February 1990. Sixteen patients were unweanable from cardiopulmonary bypass at the time of surgery; nine were patients who developed cardiogenic shock postoperatively in the intensive care unit. One was a donor organ failure; one had a failed PTCA; and one an acute myocardial infarction with cardiogenic shock preoperatively. Two patients were bridged to cardiac transplantation. Of the 28 nontransplant candidates, 20 (71.4%) were weaned successfully, 14 (50%) were discharged from the hospital, and 13 (46%) are alive from 1 to 46 months postoperatively (mean, 21.1 months). Three patients received right ventricular support alone; all three were weaned, and two (66.7%) were discharged. Ten patients received left ventricular assistance alone. Six (60%) were weaned, and four (40%) were discharged. Two patients received left ventricular support initially but were taken back for right VAD insertion because of right-sided heart failure; one (50%) is alive. Fifteen patients received biventricular support. Eleven (77.3%) were weaned, and eight (53.3%) were discharged. Patient ages ranged from 19 to 73 years, with a mean age for men of 59 years and 50.5 years for women. There were no thromboembolic events. Various clinical parameters were evaluated to determine effect on weanability and survival. These results show survival equivalent to any other VAD at this time. The centrifugal pump is a convenient and effective means of maintaining ventricular support in individuals who are believed to have salvageable myocardium.

  11. A fluid dynamic analysis of a rotary blood pump for design improvement.

    PubMed

    Treichler, J; Rosenow, S E; Damm, G; Naito, K; Ohara, Y; Mizuguchi, K; Makinouchi, K; Takatani, S; Nosé, Y

    1993-09-01

    The proper design of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) requires an understanding of the pump's fluid dynamic and biocompatible properties. A hydraulically efficient system minimizes the power required for pumping. Biocompatibility refers to the ability to pump blood with minimal hemolysis and thrombus formation. Typically, shear stresses below a threshold level will not damage blood significantly. A fluid dynamic analysis of a prototype centrifugal pump designed for use as an LVAD was performed to establish flow characteristics. A flow visualization technique using Amberlite particles suspended in a glycerin/water blood analogue was used. The system was illuminated with a 1 mm planar beam strobed helium-neon laser, and the results were recorded photographically. An analysis of photographs revealed laminar and turbulent flows with vortices within an illuminated plane in both the inlet and outlet port areas. From these data, velocity and shear stress profiles were generated that showed possible areas of improvement. It was concluded that the outlet port design could be improved by changing its angle and the continuity of its expansion. The inlet port could also be improved by smoothing the transition area between the inlet tube and the pump body to allow for gradual acceleration of the entering fluid. PMID:8240074

  12. Left ventricular assist device support with a centrifugal pump for 2 months in a 5-kg child.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takafumi; Nishimura, Takashi; Murakami, Arata; Itatani, Keiichi; Takaoka, Tetsuhiro; Kitahori, Kazuo; Umeki, Akihide; Takezoe, Toshiko; Kashiwa, Koichi; Kyo, Shunei; Ono, Minoru

    2011-09-01

    The mid-term and long-term results of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation for small children are still unsatisfactory. There have been few reports of LVAD implantation for more than a month in children weighing under 5 kg. We report the case of a 4-month-old female infant who survived for 2 months after being diagnosed with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) with extracorporeal centrifugal pump support. In recent years, although pumps designed for small children have been introduced and are used as a bridge to transplantation or recovery, mid-term or long-term mechanical support for small children with heart failure is still difficult. We managed to successfully provide support for a low-body-weight child with a centrifugal pump over a mid-term period. We achieved acceptable control of thrombosis, but eventually the infant died of sepsis. Autopsy revealed no prominent thrombosis in the perfusion cannula, drainage cannula, the pump, or the left ventricle. This is the first case report of LVAD support with the centrifugal pump, ROTAFLOW(®) (Maquet, Rastatt, Germany), for 2 months in a child weighing under 5 kg. Our method may potentially save severe heart failure children who need mid-term LVAD support.

  13. Left ventricular assist for pediatric patients with dilated cardiomyopathy using the Medos VAD cannula and a centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shu-Chien; Chi, Nai-Hsin; Chen, Chun-An; Chen, Yih-Sharng; Chou, Nai-Kuan; Ko, Wen-Je; Wang, Shoei-Shen

    2009-11-01

    Ventricular assist devices for small pediatric patients are expensive and commercially unavailable in Taiwan. We used the Medos ventricular assist device cannula (Medos, Aachen, Germany) and a centrifugal pump to support pediatric patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and decompensated heart failure. From January 2007 to December 2008, three pediatric patients with dilated cardiomyopathy were supported using a centrifugal pump as the left ventricular assist device. The Medos arterial cannula was sutured to the ascending aorta, and the Apex cannula was fixed into the left ventricular apex. When the patient was weaned off of cardiopulmonary bypass, the left ventricular assist device pump was started. The pump flow was gradually titrated according to the filling status of the left ventricle. All the left ventricular assist devices were successfully implanted and functioned well. Two patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation had severe lung edema before left ventricular assist device implantation. Both patients required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for the postoperative period until the pulmonary edema was resolved. Among the three patients, two successfully bridged to heart transplantation after support for 6 and 11 days, respectively. The first patient (10 kg) expired due to systemic emboli 30 days after left ventricular assist device support. In summary, these results suggest that the Medos ventricular assist device cannula and a centrifugal pump is an option for temporary left ventricular assist device support in patients with intractable heart failure and as a bridge to heart transplantation.

  14. Axial reciprocation of rotating impeller: a new concept of antithrombogenecity in centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Qian, K X; Zeng, P; Ru, W M; Yuan, H Y; Feng, Z G; Li, L

    2001-01-01

    For long-term application, rotary pumps have to solve the problems of bearing wear and thrombosis along the bearing. Most investigators choose the magnetic bearing to realize zero-friction and no contact between the rotor and stator; the former avoids the mechanical wear and the latter eliminates the possibility of thrombus formation. The authors have tried and found, however, that it is difficult to apply a magnetic bearing to the rotary pump without disturbing its simplicity, reliability and implantability, and have therefor developed a much simpler and much more creative approach to achieve the same results. Instead of using a sliding bearing, a rolling bearing has been devised for the pump, and its friction is about 1/15 of the sliding bearing. Furthermore, a wear-proof material of ultra-high-molecular weight polythene has been adopted to make the rollers, and its anti-wear property is 8 times better than metal. Thereby, the service life of the bearing has been prolonged to ten years according to the documents provided by the producer. In order to prevent the thrombus formation along the bearing, the impeller reciprocates axiallly as the impeller changes its rotating speed periodically to produce a pulsatile flow. The reciprocation is the result of the effects of a magnetic force between the motor rotor and stator, and a hydraulic force between the blood flow and the impeller. Similar to a piston pump, the oscillating impeller can make the blood flow in and out of the bearing, resulting in wash-out once a circle. This obviously helps to prevent thombosis along the bearing and in the pump. The endurance tests with saline of this novel pump demonstrated the durabililty of the device. It promises to be able to assist the circulation of patients permanently, and to be able to replace heart transplantation in the future. PMID:11345097

  15. Axial reciprocation of rotating impeller: a novel approach to preventing thrombosis in centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Qian, K X; Zeng, P; Ru, W M; Yuan, H Y

    2002-01-01

    For long-term application, rotary pumps have to solve the problems of bearing wear and thrombosis along the bearing. Some investigators choose the magnetic bearing for zero friction and to provide no contact between the rotor and stator; the former avoids the mechanical wear and the latter eliminates the possibility of thrombus formation. The authors have tried and have found, however, that it is difficult to apply a magnetic bearing to the rotary pump without disturbing its simplicity, reliability, and implantability, and have therefore developed a much simpler approach to achieve the same results. Instead of using a sliding bearing, a rolling bearing has been devised, and its friction is about 1/15 that of the sliding bearing. Furthermore, a wearproof material of ultra high molecular weight polythene has been adopted to make the rollers, and its antiwear property is eight times better than metal. The service life of the bearing has thus been prolonged. To prevent thrombus formation along the bearing, the impeller reciprocates axially as the impeller changes its rotating speed periodically to produce a pulsatile flow. The reciprocation is the result of the effects of a magnetic force between the motor rotor and stator and a hydraulic force between the blood flow and the impeller. Similar to a piston pump, the oscillating impeller can make the blood flow in and out of the bearing, resulting in washout with fresh blood once a cycle. This obviously helps to prevent thrombosis along the bearing and in the pump. Endurance tests with saline of this novel pump demonstrated device durability, promising long-term assisted circulation. PMID:12296579

  16. Development of a miniature intraventricular axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, K; Umezu, M; Koyanagi, H; Outa, E; Ogino, S; Otake, Y; Shiozaki, H; Fujimoto, T; Tagusari, O; Kitamura, M

    1993-01-01

    A new intraventricular axial flow blood pump has been designed and developed as a totally implantable left ventricular assist device (LVAD). This pump consists of an impeller combined with a guide-vane, a tube housing, and a DC motor. The pump is introduced into the LV cavity through the LV apex, and the outlet cannula is passed antegrade across the aortic valve. Blood is withdrawn from the LV through the inlet ports at the pump base, and discharged to the ascending aorta. Our newly developed axial flow pump system has the following advantages: 1) it is a simple and compact system, 2) minimal blood stasis both in the device and the LV cavity, 3) minimal blood contacting surface of the pump, 4) easy accessibility with a less invasive surgical procedure, and 5) low cost. A pump flow > 5 L/min was obtained against 100 mmHg differential pressure in the mock circulatory system. The pump could produce a passive pulsatile flow effect with a beating heart more efficiently than other non-pulsatile pumps because of minimal pressure drop and inertia along the bypass tract. Anatomic fit studies using dissected hearts of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) cadavers showed that this pump could smoothly pass through the aortic valve without any interference with mitral valve function. Recently, a dynamic pressure groove bearing and a miniature lip seal have been developed. The dynamic pressure groove bearing has a simple structure and acts as a pressure resistant sealing mechanism.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Left heart bypass support with the Rotaflow Centrifugal Pump® as a bridge to decision and recovery in an adult.

    PubMed

    Kashiwa, Koichi; Nishimura, Takashi; Saito, Aya; Kubo, Hitoshi; Fukaya, Aoi; Tamai, Hisayoshi; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Kyo, Shunei; Ono, Minoru

    2012-06-01

    Since left heart bypass or biventricular circulatory assist with an extracorporeal centrifugal pump as a bridge to decision or recovery sometimes requires long-time support, the long-term durability of extracorporeal centrifugal pumps is crucial. The Rotaflow Centrifugal Pump(®) (MAQUET Cardiopulmonary AG, Hirrlingen, Germany) is one of the centrifugal pumps available for long-term use in Japan. However, there have been few reports of left heart bypass or biventricular circulatory support over the mid-term. This is a case report of left heart bypass support with the Rotaflow Centrifugal Pump(®) as a bridge to decision and recovery for an adult patient who could not be weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass and percutaneous cardiopulmonary support after cardiac surgery. We could confirm that the patient's consciousness level was normal; however, the patient could not be weaned from the left heart bypass support lasting 1 month. Therefore, the circulatory assist device was switched to the extracorporeal Nipro ventricular assist device (VAD). This time, left heart bypass support could be maintained for 30 days using a single Rotaflow Centrifugal Pump(®). There were no signs of hemolysis during left heart bypass support. The Rotaflow Centrifugal Pump(®) itself may be used as a device for a bridge to decision or recovery before using a VAD in cardiogenic shock patients.

  18. Magnetically suspended rotary blood pump with radial type combined motor-bearing.

    PubMed

    Masuzawa, T; Kita, T; Matsuda, K; Okada, Y

    2000-06-01

    A magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump is being developed with a combined motor-bearing for long-term ventricular assist systems. The combined motor-bearing actively suspends a rotor in a radial direction to deal with radial force unbalance in the pump and rotates the rotor by using the electric magnetic field. Therefore, the pump has no mechanical parts such as bearings of the motor and has a long lifetime. The developed pump consists of a thin rotor with a semi open-type 6 vane impeller and a stator to suspend and rotate the rotor. The rotor has 4-pole permanent magnets on the circumferential surface. The outer diameter and the thickness of the rotor are 60 mm and 8 mm, respectively. Axial movement and tilt of the rotor are restricted by passive stability based on the thin rotor structure. Radial movements of the rotor, such as levitation in radial direction and rotation, are controlled actively by using electric magnets of the stator. The electric magnet coils to produce levitation and rotation forces are constructed on the periphery stator. The p +/- 2-pole algorithm and the synchronous motor mechanism are adopted to levitate and rotate the rotor. The radial gap between the rotor and the stator is 1 mm. A closed-loop circuit filled with water was connected to the developed pump to examine the basic performance of the pump and the magnetic suspension system. Maximum rotational speed, flow rate, and head were 2,800 rpm, 11 L/min, and 270 mm Hg, respectively. The rotor with the impeller could be suspended completely during the entire pumping process. We conclude the pump with the combined motor-bearing has sufficient performance for the blood pump. PMID:10886067

  19. Assessment of Hydraulic Performance and Biocompatibility of a MagLev Centrifugal Pump System Designed for Pediatric Cardiac or Cardiopulmonary Support

    PubMed Central

    Dasse, Kurt A.; Gellman, Barry; Kameneva, Marina V.; Woolley, Joshua R.; Johnson, Carl A.; Gempp, Thomas; Marks, John D.; Kent, Stella; Koert, Andrew; Richardson, J. Scott; Franklin, Steve; Snyder, Trevor A.; Wearden, Peter; Wagner, William R.; Gilbert, Richard J.; Borovetz, Harvey S.

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of children with life-threatening cardiac and cardiopulmonary failure is a large and underappreciated public health concern. We have previously shown that the CentriMag is a magnetically levitated centrifugal pump system, having the utility for treating adults and large children (1,500 utilized worldwide). We present here the Pedi-VAS, a pump system whose design was modified from the CentriMag to meet the physiological requirements of young pediatric and neonatal patients. The PediVAS is comprised of a single-use centrifugal blood pump, reusable motor, and console, and is suitable for right ventricular assist device (RVAD), left ventricular assist device (LVAD), biventricular assist device (BVAD), or extracorporeal membrane oxygenator (ECMO) applications. It is designed to operate without bearings, seals and valves, and without regions of blood stasis, friction, or wear. The PediVAS pump is compatible with the CentriMag hardware, although the priming volume was reduced from 31 to 14 ml, and the port size reduced from 3/8 to ¼ in. For the expected range of pediatric flow (0.3–3.0 L/min), the PediVAS exhibited superior hydraulic efficiency compared with the CentriMag. The PediVAS was evaluated in 14 pediatric animals for up to 30 days, demonstrating acceptable hydraulic function and hemocompatibility. The current results substantiate the performance and biocompatibility of the PediVAS cardiac assist system and are likely to support initiation of a US clinical trial in the future. PMID:18043164

  20. Pulsatile flow and simple flow control method during weaning period in centrifugal pump: toward more expanded usage in open heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Nishida, H; Koyanagi, H; Endo, M; Suzuki, S; Oshiyama, H; Nojiri, C; Fukasawa, H; Akutsu, T

    1994-09-01

    To expand the usage of the centrifugal pump (CP) in open heart surgery, we performed two studies. In the first, we evaluated pulsatile flow in the CP. In vitro pump performance of the Terumo Capiox pump (TCP) and the Sarns Delphin pump (SDP) and increase of free hemoglobin (mg/dl) after driving 6 h were investigated using bovine blood. A roller pump (RP) was used as a comparison. Equally effective pulsatile flow was obtained in both CPs. Hemolysis was less severe in TCP (120 mg/dl) than SDP (210 mg/dl) and RP (320 mg/dl). In the second study, we evaluated a simple flow control method. Flow rate was easily controlled with step-wise clamping of 3-pronged tubing (Triple-flow) without changing rotational speed, regardless of afterload. Fluctuation of flow was much less with this method than with the rotational speed change method. The use of pulsatile flow of TCP, with its minimum increase of hemolysis and the easier flow control method during the weaning process, may expand the usage of CP in open heart surgery.

  1. Effects of radial diffuser hydraulic design on a double-suction centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, H. C.; Zhang, Y. X.; Xu, C.; Zhang, J. Y.; Li, Z. L.

    2016-05-01

    device and is good to transform the dynamic energy to pressure energy. Then through the hydraulic loss analysis of each pump component for all diffusers, it shows that the impeller takes up the biggest part of the whole loss about 8.19% averagely, the radial diffuser about 3.70% and the volute about 1.65%. The hydraulic loss of impeller is dominant at the large flow rate while the radial diffuser is at the small flow rate. Among all diffusers, the ES profile diffuser generates the least loss and combined to the distribution of velocity vector and turbulent kinetic energy for two kinds of diffusers it also shows that ES profile is fit to apply in radial diffuser. This research can offer a significant reference for the radial diffuser hydraulic design of such centrifugal pumps.

  2. Evaluation of conventional castaneda and lysis centrifugation blood culture techniques for diagnosis of human brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Mantur, Basappa G; Mangalgi, Smita S

    2004-09-01

    We investigated the role of the lysis centrifugation blood culture technique over the conventional Castaneda technique for the diagnosis of human brucellosis. The lysis centrifugation technique has been found to be more sensitive in both acute (20% higher sensitivity; P < 0.00001) and chronic (40% higher sensitivity; P = 0.087) forms of brucellosis. The major advantage of lysis centrifugation was in the mean detection time, which was only 2.4 days in acute and 2.7 days in chronic cases, with 103 out of 110 (93.6%) and 17 out of 20 (85%) cultures from acute and chronic brucellosis, respectively, detected before the conventional culture was positive. Our results confirmed the potential usefulness of the lysis technique in diagnosis and institution of appropriate antibiotic therapy.

  3. Evaluation of Conventional Castaneda and Lysis Centrifugation Blood Culture Techniques for Diagnosis of Human Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Mantur, Basappa G.; Mangalgi, Smita S.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the role of the lysis centrifugation blood culture technique over the conventional Castaneda technique for the diagnosis of human brucellosis. The lysis centrifugation technique has been found to be more sensitive in both acute (20% higher sensitivity; P < 0.00001) and chronic (40% higher sensitivity; P = 0.087) forms of brucellosis. The major advantage of lysis centrifugation was in the mean detection time, which was only 2.4 days in acute and 2.7 days in chronic cases, with 103 out of 110 (93.6%) and 17 out of 20 (85%) cultures from acute and chronic brucellosis, respectively, detected before the conventional culture was positive. Our results confirmed the potential usefulness of the lysis technique in diagnosis and institution of appropriate antibiotic therapy. PMID:15365036

  4. Pulsatile compared with nonpulsatile perfusion using a centrifugal pump for cardiopulmonary bypass during coronary artery bypass grafting. Effects on systemic haemodynamics, oxygenation, and inflammatory response parameters.

    PubMed

    Driessen, J J; Dhaese, H; Fransen, G; Verrelst, P; Rondelez, L; Gevaert, L; van Becelaere, M; Schelstraete, E

    1995-01-01

    The present study investigated the influence of pulsatile or nonpulsatile flow delivery with a centrifugal pump for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) during coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in two randomized groups of 19 patients each. All patients received a standard anaesthetic and surgical protocol. Pulsatile perfusion during CPB was created by accelerating the baseline pump speed of the Sarns centrifugal pump at a rate of 50 cycles per minute. Measurements included perioperative systemic haemodynamics and oxygen exchange, total haemolytic complement (CH50), polymorphonuclear (neutrophil) granulocyte (PMN) count and plasma granulocyte elastase bound to alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (E-alpha 1-PI). Laboratory measurements were corrected for haemodilution. During and after CPB there were only a few significant differences between the groups in systemic haemodynamics and oxygenation, i.e. a lower mean arterial blood pressure after the end of CPB in the nonpulsatile group (65 mmHg, SD = 11 vs 76 mmHg, SD = 11) and a lower SvO2 during rewarming on CPB in the nonpulsatile group (62%, SD = 8 vs 67%, SD = 8). The decrease in percentage of PMNs in the total white blood cell count during CPB was greater in the nonpulsatile group than in the pulsatile group (from 61 to 46% vs 63 to 53% of prebypass value). The steep increase of PMN count at the end of CPB and postoperatively was comparable in both groups. The maximal decrease of CH50 levels, occurring after surgery, was significantly higher in the nonpulsatile group (70% SD = 15 vs 79%, SD = 16, of baseline value), suggesting a greater complement activation. E-alpha 1-PI levels increased significantly in both groups during and after CPB with higher peak levels, obtained at one hour after admission to an intensive care unit, in the nonpulsatile group (316 micrograms/l, SD = 102) than in the pulsatile group (247 micrograms/l, SD = 106). There was a partly inverse correlation between the peak postoperative elastase levels and

  5. Analysis of the effect of hydrophobic properties of surfaces in the flow part of centrifugal pumps on their operational performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, A. V.; Parygin, A. G.; Lukin, M. V.; Ryzhenkov, A. V.; Khovanov, G. P.; Naumov, A. V.; Soukal, J.; Pochyly, F.; Fialova, S.

    2015-11-01

    The results of experimental studies focused on evaluating the effect of different conditions of wetting of functional surfaces in flow parts of centrifugal pumps (specifically, impellers) used in heat- and watersupply systems on their operational performance are presented. The conditions of interaction of the pumped medium with the impeller surfaces were altered through hydrophobization of functional surfaces that was implemented using the techniques developed at the Moscow Power Engineering Institute and the Brno University of Technology. It is demonstrated that this hydrophobization produced a considerable positive effect and raised the efficiency of pump units based on centrifugal KM pumps of three different form factors produced by ZAO Pompa (Shchelkovo) and a K centrifugal pump produced by Sigma. The efficiency was increased by 2-6% depending on the pump model. The results of experimental studies of the effect of hydrophobization of the surface of a canonical plate-type domain with a working medium flowing longitudinally along it in a hydrodynamic bed (Moscow Power Engineering Institute) are detailed. Two flat plates with a length of 250 mm and a width of 252 mm were studied. The surfaces of these plates had different roughness values, since one of the plates was polished prior to hydrophobization. Different wetting conditions, which were monitored by measuring the contact angle with a KRUSS MobileDrop goniometer, were established after hydrophobization. The obtained experimental data showed that the surface friction of the modified plate with a higher initial roughness (unpolished plate) was reduced by as much as 23%. This result agrees completely with the Cassie hypothesis.

  6. Development of miniaturized mass flow meter for an axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Maruyama, Osamu; Nishida, Masahiro; Yamane, Takashi

    2007-05-01

    To grasp the conditions of patients and implantable artificial hearts, it is essential to monitor the blood flow rate continuously and noninvasively. However, it is difficult to monitor the pump flow rate in an implantable artificial heart, because the conventional flow meter is too large to implant into the human body, and the flow estimation method is influenced by changes in the blood characteristics and the pump performance. In particular, the power consumption has neither linearity nor uniqueness with respect to the pump flow rate in an axial flow blood pump. In this research, we develop a prototype miniaturized mass flow meter that uses centrifugal force F(c) for discharged patients with an axial flow blood pump. This flow meter measures the F(c) corresponding to the mass flow rate, and implements compensation for static pressure. Because the strain gauges are attached outside of the curved tube, this mass flow meter has no blood contact point, resulting in a compact design. To evaluate the measurement accuracy and the tracking performance, the mass flow meter was compared with the conventional ultrasonic flow meter in a mock-up circulation study. As a result, the measurement error ranging from 0.5 to 5.0 L/min was less than +/-10% with respect to the maximum flow rate. The tracking performance of pulsation flow was approximately equivalent to that of the conventional flow meter. These experiments demonstrated that the prototype miniaturized mass flow meter using F(c) could accurately measure the mass flow rate continuously and noninvasively. PMID:17470214

  7. A new pulsatile total artificial heart using a single centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Imachi, K; Chinzei, T; Abe, Y; Mabuchi, K; Imanishi, K; Yonezawa, T; Kouno, A; Ono, T; Atsumi, K; Isoyama, T

    1991-01-01

    A new pulsatile total artificial heart (TAH) system, combining a single centrifugal pump (CFP) with two three-way valves, was developed. One port of each three-way valve was connected to the inlet and outlet of a CFP, respectively. The other two ports of each valve ware connected to the right and left atrium, pulmonary artery, and aorta. The CFP can perfuse the pulmonary and systemic circulation alternately with pulsatile flow. A prototype system composed of a Sarns' CFP and solenoid valves was connected to a mock circulatory system resulting in 1) a pulsatile TAH that could be produced with a single CFP, 2) 5 L/min of pulsatile output with a normal flow wave form that can be obtained alternately on the right and left side by switching the solenoid valves, and 3) flow balance between the left and the right that could be controlled easily by the length of switching duration. This new system could be miniaturized and is feasible for a totally implantable TAH.

  8. A microfluidic timer for timed valving and pumping in centrifugal microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Schwemmer, F; Zehnle, S; Mark, D; von Stetten, F; Zengerle, R; Paust, N

    2015-03-21

    Accurate timing of microfluidic operations is essential for the automation of complex laboratory workflows, in particular for the supply of sample and reagents. Here we present a new unit operation for timed valving and pumping in centrifugal microfluidics. It is based on temporary storage of pneumatic energy and time delayed sudden release of said energy. The timer is loaded at a relatively higher spinning frequency. The countdown is started by reducing to a relatively lower release frequency, at which the timer is released after a pre-defined delay time. We demonstrate timing for 1) the sequential release of 4 liquids at times of 2.7 s ± 0.2 s, 14.0 s ± 0.5 s, 43.4 s ± 1.0 s and 133.8 s ± 2.3 s, 2) timed valving of typical assay reagents (contact angles 36-78°, viscosities 0.9-5.6 mPa s) and 3) on demand valving of liquids from 4 inlet chambers in any user defined sequence controlled by the spinning protocol. The microfluidic timer is compatible to all wetting properties and viscosities of common assay reagents and does neither require assistive equipment, nor coatings. It can be monolithically integrated into a microfluidic test carrier and is compatible to scalable fabrication technologies such as thermoforming or injection molding. PMID:25648105

  9. Multicondition Optimization and Experimental Measurements of a Double-Blade Centrifugal Pump Impeller.

    PubMed

    Liu, Houlin; Wang, Kai; Yuan, Shouqi; Tan, Minggao; Wang, Yong; Dong, Liang

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve internal unsteady flow in a double-blade centrifugal pump (DBCP), this study used major geometric parameters of the original design as the initial values, heads at three conditions (i.e., 80% design flow rate, 100% design flow rate, and 120% design flow rate) as the constraints conditions, and the maximum of weighted average efficiency at the three conditions as the objective function. An adaptive simulated annealing algorithm was selected to solve the energy performance calculation model and the supertransitive approximation method was applied to fix optimal weight factors of individual objectives. On the basis of hydraulic performance optimization, three-condition automatic computational fluid dynamics (CFD) optimization of impeller meridional plane for the DBCP was realized by means of Isight software integrated Pro/E, Gambit, and Fluent software. The shroud arc radii R0 and R1, shroud angle T1, hub arc radius R2, and hub angle T2 on the meridional plane were selected as the design variables and the maximum of weighted average hydraulic efficiency at the three conditions was chosen as the objective function. Performance characteristic test and particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements of internal flow in the DBCP were conducted. Performance characteristic test results show that the weighted average efficiency of the impeller after the three-condition optimization has increased by 1.46% than that of original design. PIV measurements results show that vortex or recirculation phenomena in the impeller are distinctly improved under the three conditions.

  10. Hemolytic performance of a MagLev disposable rotary blood pump (MedTech Dispo): effects of MagLev gap clearance and surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Hideo; Asama, Junichi; Hijikata, Wataru; Hara, Chikara; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Yasuda, Toshitaka; Ohuchi, Katsuhiro; Shimokohbe, Akira; Takatani, Setsuo

    2006-12-01

    Mechanical shaft seal bearing incorporated in the centrifugal blood pumps contributes to hemolysis and thrombus formation. In addition, the problem of durability and corrosion of mechanical shaft seal bearing has been recently reported from the safety point of view. To amend the shortcomings of the blood-immersed mechanical bearings, a magnetic levitated centrifugal rotary blood pump (MedTech Dispo Model 1; Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan) has been developed for extracorporeal disposable application. In this study, the hemolytic performance of the MedTech Dispo Model 1 centrifugal blood pump system was evaluated, with special focus on the narrow blood path clearance at the magnetic bearing between rotor and stator, and on the pump housing surface roughness. A pump flow of 5 L/min against the head pressure of 100 mm Hg for 4 h was included in the hemolytic test conditions. Anticoagulated fresh porcine blood was used as a working fluid. The clearance of blood path at the magnetic bearing was in the range of 100-250 micro m. Pump housing surface roughness was controlled to be around Ra = 0.1-1.5 micro m. The lowest hemolytic results were obtained at the clearance of 250 micro m and with the polished surface (Ra = 0.1 micro m) yielding the normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) of less than 0.001 g/100 L, which was 1/5 of the Biopump BP-80 (Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA, and 1/4 of the BPX-80. In spite of rough surface and narrow blood path, NIH levels were less than clinically acceptable level of 0.005 g/100 L. The noncontact, levitated impeller system is useful to improve pump performance in blood environment.

  11. Comparison of the centrifugal and roller pump in elective coronary artery bypass surgery--a prospective, randomized study with special emphasis upon platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Knut S; Nygreen, Else L; Grong, Ketil; Leirvaag, Beryl; Holmsen, Holm

    2003-12-01

    Objective--Evaluation of the centrifugal pump vs roller pump concerning effects upon platelet function, hemolysis and clinical outcome in elective coronary artery bypass surgery. Design--Thirty-four patients were randomized to centrifugal or roller pump. Platelet activation was studied by flow cytometry before, during and up to 3 days after bypass. Results--Duration of bypass, ischemic period, peripheral anastomoses, hospital stay and mortality did not differ. In roller pump patients, platelet aggregates increased by 250% between end of bypass and 3 h postoperatively (p < 0.001). A secondary, fivefold increase in number of platelet aggregates was found on the 3rd postoperative day (p < 0.001). In the centrifugal pump group, these changes were not significant. Hemolysis increased (20%) at end of bypass and 3 h postoperatively (p < 0.005), and decreased to preoperative levels the next day without group difference. Conclusion--Platelet aggregation was significantly increased in roller compared with centrifugal pump patients, indicating higher susceptibility to postoperative thrombotic complications with the roller pump. Otherwise, there was no clinical evidence for superiority of the centrifugal pump.

  12. Effects of the pulsatile flow settings on pulsatile waveforms and hemodynamic energy in a PediVAS centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shigang; Rider, Alan R; Kunselman, Allen R; Richardson, J Scott; Dasse, Kurt A; Undar, Akif

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test different pulsatile flow settings of the PediVAS centrifugal pump to seek an optimum setting for pulsatile flow to achieve better pulsatile energy and minimal backflow. The PediVAS centrifugal pump and the conventional pediatric clinical circuit, including a pediatric membrane oxygenator, arterial filter, arterial cannula, and 1/4 in circuit tubing were used. The circuit was primed with 40% glycerin water mixture. Postcannula pressure was maintained at 40 mm Hg by a Hoffman clamp. The experiment was conducted at 800 ml/min of pump flow with a modified pulsatile flow setting at room temperature. Pump flow and pressure readings at preoxygenator and precannula sites were simultaneously recorded by a data acquisition system. The results showed that backflows appeared at flow rates of 200-800 ml/min (200 ml/min increments) with the default pulsatile flow setting and only at 200 ml/min with the modified pulsatile flow setting. With an increased rotational speed difference ratio and a decreased pulsatile width, the pulsatility increased in terms of surplus hemodynamic energy and total hemodynamic energy at preoxygenator and precannula sites. Backflows seemed at preoxygenator and precannula sites at a 70% of rotational speed difference ratio. The modified pulsatile flow setting was better than the default pulsatile flow setting in respect to pulsatile energy and backflow. The pulsatile width and the rotational speed difference ratio significantly affected pulsatility. The parameter of the rotational speed difference ratio can automatically increase pulsatility with increased rotational speeds. Further studies will be conducted to optimize the pulsatile flow setting of the centrifugal pump.

  13. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  14. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through...

  15. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through...

  16. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  17. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through...

  18. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  19. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  20. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through...

  1. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  2. Evaluating the role of low-speed centrifugation towards transfecting human peripheral blood mononuclear cell culture.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, M; Ratho, R; Chawla, Y; Singh, M P

    2014-01-01

    The conventional method of transfection of suspension cells by chemical has proven to be very difficult. We present a new transfection protocol, wherein, low-speed centrifugation of cell culture plates immediately after adding the lipid: DNA complex significantly enhances the transfection efficiency. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were transfected with BLOCK-iT™ Fluorescent Oligo (scrambled siRNA) and lipofectamine complex using conventional and low-speed centrifugation modified transfection protocols. The efficiency of transfection was determined using flowcytometer and cell viability was checked using MTT assay. Incorporation of low-speed centrifugation significantly enhances the transfection efficiency of BLOCK-iT™ in the suspension culture of PBMCs as compared to conventional transfection method (99.8% vs 28.3%; P < 0.0001), even at a low concentration of 40 picomoles without affecting the cell viability. Centrifugation enhanced transfection (CET) technique is simple, time-saving and novel application without compromising the cell viability in the context of recently popular RNA interference in suspension cultures of PBMCs. This undemanding modification might be applicable to a wide variety of cell lines and solve crucial problem of researchers working with RNA interference in suspension cultures. PMID:24713904

  3. [Artificial heart--turbo type blood pump for long-term use].

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Teruaki

    2003-05-01

    Shortage of donor heart for transplantation necessitates long-term artificial assist heart. Turbo-pump is smaller, simpler and cheaper than the pulsatile displacement type pump, but the turbo-pump has defect of thrombus formation at the shaft seal. Our centrifugal pump with magnetically suspended impellers overcomes this defect and is ready for clinical trials now. The structures and functions are described and are compared with the other newly-developed pump of the same kinds with us. And also the pumps of centrifugal type and axial-type, of which impellers are supported by pivots, are reviewed briefly from the stand point for long-term use. Other pumps are referred too: pumps with hydrodynamic bearing and a pump with the shaft seal which is washed and cooled by saline solution.

  4. Preliminary validation of a new magnetic wireless blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Ishiyama, Kazushi; Hashi, Shuichiro; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Hayatsu, Yukihiro; Akiyama, Masatoshi; Saiki, Yoshikatsu; Yambe, Tomoyuki

    2013-10-01

    In general, a blood pump must be small, have a simple configuration, and have sufficient hydrodynamic performance. Herein, we introduce new mechanisms for a wireless blood pump that is small and simple and provides wireless and battery-free operation. To achieve wireless and battery-free operation, we implement magnetic torque and force control methods that use two external drivers: an external coil and a permanent magnet with a DC-motor, respectively. Power harvesting can be used to drive an electronic circuit for wireless monitoring (the observation of the pump conditions and temperature) without the use of an internal battery. The power harvesting will be used as a power source to drive other electronic devices, such as various biosensors with their driving circuits. To have both a compact size and sufficient pumping capability, the fully magnetic impeller has five stages and each stage includes four backward-curved blades. The pump has total and inner volumes of 20 and 9.8 cc, respectively, and weighs 52 g. The pump produces a flow rate of approximately 8 L/min at 80 mm Hg and the power generator produces 0.3 W of electrical power at 120 Ω. The pump also produces a minimum flow rate of 1.5 L/min and a pressure of 30 mm Hg for circulation at a maximum distance of 7.5 cm.

  5. Preliminary validation of a new magnetic wireless blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Ishiyama, Kazushi; Hashi, Shuichiro; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Hayatsu, Yukihiro; Akiyama, Masatoshi; Saiki, Yoshikatsu; Yambe, Tomoyuki

    2013-10-01

    In general, a blood pump must be small, have a simple configuration, and have sufficient hydrodynamic performance. Herein, we introduce new mechanisms for a wireless blood pump that is small and simple and provides wireless and battery-free operation. To achieve wireless and battery-free operation, we implement magnetic torque and force control methods that use two external drivers: an external coil and a permanent magnet with a DC-motor, respectively. Power harvesting can be used to drive an electronic circuit for wireless monitoring (the observation of the pump conditions and temperature) without the use of an internal battery. The power harvesting will be used as a power source to drive other electronic devices, such as various biosensors with their driving circuits. To have both a compact size and sufficient pumping capability, the fully magnetic impeller has five stages and each stage includes four backward-curved blades. The pump has total and inner volumes of 20 and 9.8 cc, respectively, and weighs 52 g. The pump produces a flow rate of approximately 8 L/min at 80 mm Hg and the power generator produces 0.3 W of electrical power at 120 Ω. The pump also produces a minimum flow rate of 1.5 L/min and a pressure of 30 mm Hg for circulation at a maximum distance of 7.5 cm. PMID:23634711

  6. Method and apparatus for automated processing and aliquoting of whole blood samples for analysis in a centrifugal fast analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Burtis, C.A.; Johnson, W.F.; Walker, W.A.

    1985-08-05

    A rotor and disc assembly for use in a centrifugal fast analyzer. The assembly is designed to process multiple samples of whole blood followed by aliquoting of the resultant serum into precisely measured samples for subsequent chemical analysis. The assembly requires minimal operator involvement with no mechanical pipetting. The system comprises: (1) a whole blood sample disc; (2) a serum sample disc; (3) a sample preparation rotor; and (4) an analytical rotor. The blood sample disc and serum sample disc are designed with a plurality of precision bore capillary tubes arranged in a spoked array. Samples of blood are loaded into the blood sample disc by capillary action and centrifugally discharged into cavities of the sample preparation rotor where separation of serum and solids is accomplished. The serum is loaded into the capillaries of the serum sample disc by capillary action and subsequently centrifugally expelled into cuvettes of the analyticaly rotor for conventional methods. 5 figs.

  7. Method and apparatus for automated processing and aliquoting of whole blood samples for analysis in a centrifugal fast analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Burtis, Carl A.; Johnson, Wayne F.; Walker, William A.

    1988-01-01

    A rotor and disc assembly for use in a centrifugal fast analyzer. The assembly is designed to process multiple samples of whole blood followed by aliquoting of the resultant serum into precisely measured samples for subsequent chemical analysis. The assembly requires minimal operator involvement with no mechanical pipetting. The system comprises (1) a whole blood sample disc, (2) a serum sample disc, (3) a sample preparation rotor, and (4) an analytical rotor. The blood sample disc and serum sample disc are designed with a plurality of precision bore capillary tubes arranged in a spoked array. Samples of blood are loaded into the blood sample disc in capillary tubes filled by capillary action and centrifugally discharged into cavities of the sample preparation rotor where separation of serum and solids is accomplished. The serum is loaded into the capillaries of the serum sample disc by capillary action and subsequently centrifugally expelled into cuvettes of the analytical rotor for analysis by conventional methods.

  8. Coronary vascular resistance increases under full bypass support of centrifugal pumps--relation between myocardial perfusion and ventricular workload during pump support.

    PubMed

    Ando, Masahiko; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Nishimura, Takashi; Yamazaki, Kenji; Kyo, Shunei; Ono, Minoru; Tsukiya, Tomonori; Mizuno, Toshihide; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki; Tatsumi, Eisuke

    2012-01-01

    Coronary circulation is closely linked to myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO(2)), and previous reports have suggested decreased coronary flow (CoF) under left ventricular assist device support. Decreased CoF itself under support is not unfavorable because the native heart can be well unloaded and myocardial oxygen demand is also decreased. There should be an autoregulatory system that would maintain optimal CoF according to oxygen demand; however, the detailed mechanism is still unclear. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the effect of centrifugal pumps on CoF under varied bypass rates in relation to left ventricle workload. A centrifugal pump, EVAHEART (Sun Medical Technology Research Corporation, Nagano, Japan), was installed in an adult goat (n = 10, 61.3 ± 6.5 kg). We set up the following conditions, including Circuit-Clamp (i.e., no pump support), 50% bypass, and 100% bypass. In these settings, CoF, MVO(2), pressure-volume area (PVA), and coronary vascular resistance (CVR) were measured. In 100% bypass, CoF, MVO(2), and PVA were all decreased significantly from clamp. While in 50% bypass, CoF and MVO(2) decreased from clamp, but not PVA. There was a significant 40% increase in CVR in 100% bypass from clamp. This CVR increase in 100% bypass was possibly due to mechanical collapse of coronary vascular bed itself by pump support or increased vascular tone through autoregulatory system. In clinical settings, we should adjust optimal pump speed so as not to cause this vascular collapse. However, to clarify autoregulatory system of the coronary perfusion, further investigation is ongoing in ischemic and heart failure models.

  9. Impact of the postpump resistance on pressure-flow waveform and hemodynamic energy level in a neonatal pulsatile centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shigang; Haines, Nikkole; Richardson, J Scott; Dasse, Kurt A; Undar, Akif

    2009-01-01

    This study tested the impact of different postpump resistances on pulsatile pressure-flow waveforms and hemodynamic energy output in a mock extracorporeal system. The circuit was primed with a 40% glycerin-water mixture, and a PediVAS centrifugal pump was used. The pre- and postpump pressures and flow rates were monitored via a data acquisition system. The postpump resistance was adjusted using a Hoffman clamp at the outlet of the pump. Five different postpump resistances and rotational speeds were tested with nonpulsatile (NP: 5000 RPM) and pulsatile (P: 4000 RPM) modes. No backflow was found when using pulsatile flow. With isoresistance, increased arterial resistances decreased pump flow rates (NP: from 1,912 ml/min to 373 ml/min; P: from 1,485 ml/min to 288 ml/min), increased postpump pressures (NP: from 333 mm Hg to 402 mm Hg; P: from 223 mm Hg to 274 mm Hg), and increased hemodynamic energy output with pulsatile mode. Pump flow rate correlated linearly with rotational speed (RPMs) of the pump, whereas postpump pressures and hemodynamic energy outputs showed curvilinear relationships with RPMs. The maximal pump flow rate also increased from 618 ml/min to 4,293 ml/min with pulsatile mode and from 581 ml/min to 5,665 ml/min with nonpulsatile mode. Results showed that higher postpump resistance reduced the pump flow range, and increased postpump pressure and surplus hemodynamic energy output with pulsatile mode. Higher rotational speeds also generated higher pump flow rates, postpump pressures, and increased pulsatility.

  10. Parameter estimation and actuator characteristics of hybrid magnetic bearings for axial flow blood pump applications.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tau Meng; Cheng, Shanbao; Chua, Leok Poh

    2009-07-01

    Axial flow blood pumps are generally smaller as compared to centrifugal pumps. This is very beneficial because they can provide better anatomical fit in the chest cavity, as well as lower the risk of infection. This article discusses the design, levitated responses, and parameter estimation of the dynamic characteristics of a compact hybrid magnetic bearing (HMB) system for axial flow blood pump applications. The rotor/impeller of the pump is driven by a three-phase permanent magnet brushless and sensorless motor. It is levitated by two HMBs at both ends in five degree of freedom with proportional-integral-derivative controllers, among which four radial directions are actively controlled and one axial direction is passively controlled. The frequency domain parameter estimation technique with statistical analysis is adopted to validate the stiffness and damping coefficients of the HMB system. A specially designed test rig facilitated the estimation of the bearing's coefficients in air-in both the radial and axial directions. Experimental estimation showed that the dynamic characteristics of the HMB system are dominated by the frequency-dependent stiffness coefficients. By injecting a multifrequency excitation force signal onto the rotor through the HMBs, it is noticed in the experimental results the maximum displacement linear operating range is 20% of the static eccentricity with respect to the rotor and stator gap clearance. The actuator gain was also successfully calibrated and may potentially extend the parameter estimation technique developed in the study of identification and monitoring of the pump's dynamic properties under normal operating conditions with fluid. PMID:19566728

  11. Parameter estimation and actuator characteristics of hybrid magnetic bearings for axial flow blood pump applications.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tau Meng; Cheng, Shanbao; Chua, Leok Poh

    2009-07-01

    Axial flow blood pumps are generally smaller as compared to centrifugal pumps. This is very beneficial because they can provide better anatomical fit in the chest cavity, as well as lower the risk of infection. This article discusses the design, levitated responses, and parameter estimation of the dynamic characteristics of a compact hybrid magnetic bearing (HMB) system for axial flow blood pump applications. The rotor/impeller of the pump is driven by a three-phase permanent magnet brushless and sensorless motor. It is levitated by two HMBs at both ends in five degree of freedom with proportional-integral-derivative controllers, among which four radial directions are actively controlled and one axial direction is passively controlled. The frequency domain parameter estimation technique with statistical analysis is adopted to validate the stiffness and damping coefficients of the HMB system. A specially designed test rig facilitated the estimation of the bearing's coefficients in air-in both the radial and axial directions. Experimental estimation showed that the dynamic characteristics of the HMB system are dominated by the frequency-dependent stiffness coefficients. By injecting a multifrequency excitation force signal onto the rotor through the HMBs, it is noticed in the experimental results the maximum displacement linear operating range is 20% of the static eccentricity with respect to the rotor and stator gap clearance. The actuator gain was also successfully calibrated and may potentially extend the parameter estimation technique developed in the study of identification and monitoring of the pump's dynamic properties under normal operating conditions with fluid.

  12. Centrifugal extraction of plasma from whole blood on a rotating disk.

    PubMed

    Haeberle, Stefan; Brenner, Thilo; Zengerle, Roland; Ducrée, Jens

    2006-06-01

    We present a centrifugal process for the extraction of plasma from sediment by a decanting structure, terminating with metered plasma which is readily available for subsequent on-disk processing. Our technique supplies 2 microl plasma from 5 microl of whole blood at moderate spinning frequencies of 40 Hz within 20 s, only. The residual cell concentration in the purified plasma amounts to less than 0.11%, independent of the frequency of rotation. A capillary duct connects the extracted plasma to subsequent on-disk processing units.

  13. An electromagnetic pneumatic blood pump driver.

    PubMed

    Whalen, R L; Briskman, R N

    1988-01-01

    An electromagnetic pneumatic pump driver has been developed with the goals of enhanced mechanical reliability and simplicity of operation. The new driver eliminates failure prone components such as solenoid valves or pressure regulators common to conventional pneumatic drive systems, has only a single moving part, and provides for closed-loop operation in which stroke volume and dP/dT are controlled on each beat in real time. Power is provided by a high force (178 N) electromagnetic linear actuator. This assembly uses a high energy density neodymium-iron-boron permanent magnet, low loss vanadium alloy pole pieces, and an energized moving coil. The nominal stroke length of the actuator is 1.7 cm. During operation, the moving coil always remains within a fixed annular air gap, resulting in a measured force output versus applied power linearity of better than 92% over its stroke range. The coil is directly attached to the free end of a 10 cm diameter, 21 convolution, welded titanium metal bellows that forms the gas containing element of the system. The comparatively low pressure gradients across the bellows in this application result in a predicted life for the bellows in excess of 10(9) cycles. Bellows position and internal pressure are monitored continuously to control the pneumatic output. The linear actuator total excursion and velocity are adjusted on each beat using a closed-loop servo system. This results in a pump driver with no operator required adjustment of drive pressure. Instead, there are user selected settings of stroke volume, operating mode, and fill sensitivity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Centrifuge apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Sartory, Walter K.; Eveleigh, John W.

    1976-01-01

    A method and apparatus for operating a continuous flow blood separation centrifuge are provided. The hematocrit of the entrant whole blood is continuously maintained at an optimum constant value by the addition of plasma to the entrant blood. The hematocrit of the separated red cells is monitored to indicate the degree of separation taking place, thereby providing a basis for regulating the flow through the centrifuge.

  15. Two-Dimensional Computational Flow Analysis and Frictional Characteristics Model for Red Blood Cell under Inclined Centrifuge Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funamoto, Kenichi; Hayase, Toshiyuki; Shirai, Atsushi

    Simplified two-dimensional flow analysis is performed in order to simulate frictional characteristics measurement of red blood cells moving on a glass plate in a medium with an inclined centrifuge microscope. Computation under various conditions reveals the influences of parameters on lift, drag, and moment acting on a red blood cell. Among these forces, lift appears only when the cell is longitudinally asymmetric. By considering the balance of forces, the frictional characteristics of the red blood cell are modeled as the sum of Coulomb friction and viscous drag. The model describes the possibility that the red blood cell deforms to expand in the front side in response to the inclined centrifugal force. When velocity exceeds some critical value, the lift overcomes the normal centrifugal force component, and the thickness of the plasma layer between the cell and the glass plate increases from the initial value of the plasma protein thickness.

  16. Blood Pump Development Using Rocket Engine Flow Simulation Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the progress made towards developing complete blood flow simulation capability in humans, especially in the presence of artificial devices such as valves and ventricular assist devices. Devices modeling poses unique challenges different from computing the blood flow in natural hearts and arteries. There are many elements needed to quantify the flow in these devices such as flow solvers, geometry modeling including flexible walls, moving boundary procedures and physiological characterization of blood. As a first step, computational technology developed for aerospace applications was extended to the analysis and development of a ventricular assist device (VAD), i.e., a blood pump. The blood flow in a VAD is practically incompressible and Newtonian, and thus an incompressible Navier-Stokes solution procedure can be applied. A primitive variable formulation is used in conjunction with the overset grid approach to handle complex moving geometry. The primary purpose of developing the incompressible flow analysis capability was to quantify the flow in advanced turbopump for space propulsion system. The same procedure has been extended to the development of NASA-DeBakey VAD that is based on an axial blood pump. Due to massive computing requirements, high-end computing is necessary for simulating three-dimensional flow in these pumps. Computational, experimental, and clinical results are presented.

  17. Centrifugal Pumps for Swimming Pools. National Sanitation Foundation Standard Number 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, MI. Committee for Swimming Pool Equipment Standards.

    The pumps discussed herein are intended to be used for recirculating water in swimming pools, both public and private. Included are the basic components which may be a part of a pump such as the housing, strainer, impeller, valves, and such other parts as are attached or a part of the pump as supplied by the manufacturer. This standard is intended…

  18. Blood culture bottles are superior to lysis-centrifugation tubes for bacteriological diagnosis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis.

    PubMed Central

    Siersema, P D; de Marie, S; van Zeijl, J H; Bac, D J; Wilson, J H

    1992-01-01

    The conventional method of ascitic fluid culturing was compared with the bedside inoculation of ascites into blood culture bottles and into lysis-centrifugation tubes. The conventional culture method was compared with the blood culture bottle method in 31 episodes of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP). Cultures were positive with the conventional culture method in 11 (35%) episodes and with the blood culture bottle method in 26 (84%) episodes (P less than 0.001). The lysis-centrifugation tube method was compared with the blood culture bottle method in 24 episodes of SBP. Cultures were positive with the lysis-centrifugation tube method in 11 (46%) episodes and with the blood culture bottle method in 19 (79%) episodes (P less than 0.05). Moreover, the blood culture bottle method also shortened the time needed for the detection of bacterial growth. In conclusion, bedside inoculation of ascites into blood culture bottles should be used routinely for patients with suspected SBP. Culturing of ascites in lysis-centrifugation tubes is more laborious than and inferior to that in blood culture bottles. PMID:1551984

  19. Study on Internal Flow and External Performance of a Semi-open Impeller Centrifugal Pump with Different Tip Clearances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xiao-Qi; Cui, Bao-Ling; Zhang, Yu-Liang; Zhu, Zu-Chao

    2015-04-01

    To study the influence of tip clearance on internal flow characteristics and external performance of a prototype centrifugal pump with a semi-open impeller, the unsteady numerical simulation and performance experiments are carried out in this paper. The evolution process of leakage vortex with time t, the flow characteristics and the magnitude of leakage rate in tip clearance are obtained in details. The results indicate that the H-Q curve hump of centrifugal pump shows a weakened trend with the increasing of tip clearance Δc. Meanwhile, the leakage rate ΔQ and the ratio of leakage rate to discharge flow rate (ψ) gradually increase. At the same tip clearance, the leakage rate ΔQ increases, while the ratio of leakage rate to discharge flow rate (ψ) decreases with the increasing of discharge flow rate Q. It is found that higher volumetric loss account for a higher percentage of the total loss at small flow rate condition. There easily exist strong leakage vortexes in the impeller inlet, impeller passage and impeller outlet. The pressure difference between suction side and pressure side makes the fluid pass through the tip clearance layer to form a lower pressure region and leakage vortex.

  20. Designing and modeling a centrifugal microfluidic device to separate target blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamloo, Amir; Selahi, AmirAli; Madadelahi, Masoud

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study is to design a novel and efficient portable lab-on-a-CD (LOCD) microfluidic device for separation of specific cells (target cells) using magnetic beads. In this study the results are shown for neutrophils as target cells. However, other kinds of target cells can be separated in a similar approach. The designed microfluidics can be utilized as a point of care system for neutrophil detection. This microfluidic system employs centrifugal and magnetic forces for separation. After model validation by the experimental data in the literature (that may be used as a design tool for developing centrifugo-magnetophoretic devices), two models are presented for separation of target cells using magnetic beads. The first model consists of one container in the inlet section and two containers in the outlets. Initially, the inlet container is filled with diluted blood sample which is a mixture of red blood cells (RBCs) plus neutrophils which are attached to Magnetic beads. It is shown that by using centrifugal and magnetic forces, this model can separate all neutrophils with recovery factor of ~100%. In the second model, due to excess of magnetic beads in usual experimental analysis (to ensure that all target cells are attached to them) the geometry is improved by adding a third outlet for these free magnetic beads. It is shown that at angular velocity of 45 rad s-1, recovery factor of 100% is achievable for RBCs, free magnetic beads and neutrophils as target cells.

  1. Classification of Unsteady Flow Patterns in a Rotodynamic Blood Pump: Introduction of Non-Dimensional Regime Map.

    PubMed

    Shu, Fangjun; Vandenberghe, Stijn; Brackett, Jaclyn; Antaki, James F

    2015-09-01

    Rotodynamic blood pumps (also known as rotary or continuous flow blood pumps) are commonly evaluated in vitro under steady flow conditions. However, when these devices are used clinically as ventricular assist devices (VADs), the flow is pulsatile due to the contribution of the native heart. This study investigated the influence of this unsteady flow upon the internal hemodynamics of a centrifugal blood pump. The flow field within the median axial plane of the flow path was visualized with particle image velocimetry (PIV) using a transparent replica of the Levacor VAD. The replica was inserted in a dynamic cardiovascular simulator that synchronized the image acquisition to the cardiac cycle. As compared to steady flow, pulsatile conditions produced periodic, transient recirculation regions within the impeller and separation in the outlet diffuser. Dimensional analysis revealed that the flow characteristics could be uniquely described by the non-dimensional flow coefficient (Φ) and its time derivative ([Formula: see text]), thereby eliminating impeller speed from the experimental matrix. Four regimes within the Φ-[Formula: see text] plane were found to classify the flow patterns, well-attached or disturbed. These results and methods can be generalized to provide insights for both design and operation of rotodynamic blood pumps for safety and efficacy. PMID:26577357

  2. A passive magnetically and hydrodynamically suspended rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Stoiber, Martin; Grasl, Christian; Pirker, Stefan; Raderer, Franz; Schistek, Roland; Huber, Leopold; Gittler, Philipp; Schima, Heinrich

    2009-03-01

    A combined hydrodynamic-magnetic bearing allows the design of rotary blood pumps that are not encumbered with mechanical bearings and magnets requiring sensors or electrical power. However, such pumps have so far needed very small and accurately manufactured gaps between rotor and housing to assure effective hydromagnetic bearing behavior. In order to use this concept in disposable pump heads, a design that allows larger rotor-housing gaps, and thus larger manufacturing tolerances, is needed. A pump with passive magnetic bearings and a gap between rotor and housing in the range of 0.5 mm was designed. Numerical simulations were performed to optimize the rotor geometry at low levels of shear stress. An experimental test stand was used to find a range of speeds and gap settings that resulted in low levels of vibration and useful pressure-flow relationships. Three different rotor geometries were tested using a viscosity-adjusted test fluid. Blood damage tests were conducted within the desirable range of speeds and gap settings. In this study stable pump performance was demonstrated at total gap widths between 0.3 and 0.7 mm at flows of 0-10 L/min, with afterloads up to 230 mm Hg. Best performance was achieved with rotors sliding on a fluid pillow between the rotor and the outer housing at a gap distance of 50 to 250 microm. The inner gap distance, between the rotor and the inner housing, could be as great as 500 microm. Hemolysis tests on the prototype within the chosen operating range showed lower values (NIH = 0.0029 +/- 0.0012 g/100 L) than the Biomedicus BP-80 pump (NIH = 0.0033 +/- 0.0011 g/100 L). In conclusion, it is possible to build rotary blood pumps with passive hydromagnetic bearings that have large gaps between their rotors and housings. Rotor behavior is sensitive to the position of the permanent magnetic drive unit. To minimize vibration and blood damage, the fluid gaps and the rotational speed have to be adjusted according to the desired operating

  3. Development of a mercury electromagnetic centrifugal pump for the SNAP-8 refractory boiler development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, R. A.; Schnacke, A. W.

    1974-01-01

    An electromagnetic pump, in which pressure is developed in mercury because of the interaction of the magnetic field and current which flows as a result of the voltage induced in the mercury contained in the pump duct, was developed for the SNAP-8 refractory boiler test facility. Pump performance results are presented for ten duct configurations and two stator sizes. These test results were used to design and fabricate a pump which met the SNAP-8 criteria of 530 psi developed pressure at 12,500 lb/hr. The pump operated continuously for over 13,000 hours without failure or performance degradation. Included in this report are descriptions of the experimental equipment, measurement techniques, all experimental data, and an analysis of the electrical losses in the pump.

  4. Directly observed reversible shape changes and hemoglobin stratification during centrifugation of human and Amphiuma red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Joseph F; Inoué, Shinya

    2006-02-21

    This paper describes changes that occur in human and Amphiuma red blood cells observed during centrifugation with a special microscope. Dilute suspensions of cells were layered, in a centrifuge chamber, above an osmotically matched dense solution, containing Nycodenz, Ficoll, or Percoll (Pharmacia) that formed a density gradient that allowed the cells to slowly settle to an equilibrium position. Biconcave human red blood cells moved downward at low forces with minimum wobble. The cells oriented vertically when the force field was increased and Hb sedimented as the lower part of each cell became bulged and assumed a "bag-like" shape. The upper centripetal portion of the cell became thinner and remained biconcave. These changes occurred rapidly and were completely reversible upon lowering the centrifugal force. Bag-shaped cells, upon touching red cells in rouleau, immediately reverted to biconcave disks as they flipped onto a stack. Amphiuma red cells displayed a different type of reversible stratification and deformation at high force fields. Here the cells became stretched, with the nucleus now moving centrifugally, the Hb moving centripetally, and the bottom of the cells becoming thinner and clear. Nevertheless, the distribution of the marginal bands at the cells' rim was unchanged. We conclude that centrifugation, per se, while changing a red cell's shape and the distribution of its intracellular constituents, does so in a completely reversible manner. Centrifugation of red cells harboring altered or missing structural elements could provide information on shape determinants that are still unexplained. PMID:16477016

  5. Rotary blood pump control strategy for preventing left ventricular suction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Koenig, Steven C; Slaughter, Mark S; Giridharan, Guruprasad A

    2015-01-01

    The risk for left ventricular (LV) suction while maintaining adequate perfusion over a range of physiologic conditions during continuous flow LV assist device (LVAD) support is a significant clinical concern. To address this challenge, we developed a suction prevention and physiologic control (SPPC) algorithm for use with axial and centrifugal LVADs. The SPPC algorithm uses two gain-scheduled, proportional-integral controllers that maintain a differential pump speed (ΔRPM) above a user-defined threshold to prevent LV suction, while maintaining an average reference differential pressure (ΔP) between the LV and aorta to provide physiologic perfusion. Efficacy and robustness of the proposed algorithm were evaluated in silico during simulated rest and exercise test conditions for (1) ΔP/ΔRPM excessive setpoint (ES); (2) rapid eightfold increase in pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR); and (3) ES and PVR. Hemodynamic waveforms (LV pressure and volume; aortic pressure and flow) were simulated and analyzed to identify suction event(s), quantify total flow output (pump + cardiac output), and characterize the performance of the SPPC algorithm. The results demonstrated that the proposed SPPC algorithm prevented LV suction while maintaining physiologic perfusion for all simulated test conditions, and warrants further investigation in vivo. PMID:25248043

  6. Large-scale clinical comparison of the lysis-centrifugation and radiometric systems for blood culture

    SciTech Connect

    Brannon, P.; Kiehn, T.E.

    1985-12-01

    The Isolator 10 lysis-centrifugation blood culture system (E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Co., Inc., Wilmington, Del.) was compared with the BACTEC radiometric method (Johnston Laboratories, Inc., Towson, Md.) with 6B and 7D broth media for the recovery of bacteria and yeasts. From 11,000 blood cultures, 1,174 clinically significant organisms were isolated. The Isolator system recovered significantly more total organisms, members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, Staphylococcus spp., and yeasts. The BACTEC system recovered significantly more Pseudomonas spp., Streptococcus spp., and anaerobes. Of the Isolator colony counts, 87% measured less than 11 CFU/ml of blood. Organisms, on an average, were detected the same day from each of the two culture systems. Only 13 of the 975 BACTEC isolates (0.01%) were recovered by subculture of growth-index-negative bottles, and 12 of the 13 were detected in another broth blood culture taken within 24 h. Contaminants were recovered from 4.8% of the Isolator 10 and 2.3% of the BACTEC cultures.

  7. Application of computational fluid dynamics techniques to blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Sukumar, R; Athavale, M M; Makhijani, V B; Przekwas, A J

    1996-06-01

    Present-day computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques can be used to analyze the behavior of fluid flow in a variety of pumps. CFD can be a powerful tool during the design stage for rapid virtual prototyping of different designs, analyzing performance parameters, and making design improvements. Computational flow solutions provide information such as the location and size of stagnation zones and the local shear rate. These parameters can be correlated to the extent of hemolysis and thrombus formation and are critical to the success of a blood pump. CFD-ACE, an advanced commercial CFD code developed by CFD Research Corporation, has been applied to fluid flows in rotary machines, such as axial flow pumps and inducers. Preprocessing and postprocessing tools for efficient grid generation and advanced graphical flow visualization are integrated seamlessly with CFD-ACE. The code has structured multiblock grid capability, non-Newtonian fluid treatment, a variety of turbulence models, and an Eulerian-Langrangian particle tracking model. CFD-ACE has been used successfully to study the flow characteristics in an axial flow blood pump. An unstructured flow solver that greatly automates the process of grid generation and speeds up the flow simulation is under development. PMID:8817950

  8. Blood Pump Development Using Rocket Engine Flow Simulation Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin C.; Kwak, Dochan

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the transfer of rocket engine flow simulation technology to work involving the development of blood pumps. Details are offered regarding the design and requirements of mechanical heart assist devices, or VADs (ventricular assist device). There are various computational fluid dynamics issues involved in the visualization of flow in such devices, and these are highlighted and compared to those of rocket turbopumps.

  9. Development of a miniaturized mass-flow meter for an axial flow blood pump based on computational analysis.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yamane, Takashi

    2011-09-01

    In order to monitor the condition of patients with implantable left ventricular assist systems (LVAS), it is important to measure pump flow rate continuously and noninvasively. However, it is difficult to measure the pump flow rate, especially in an implantable axial flow blood pump, because the power consumption has neither linearity nor uniqueness with regard to the pump flow rate. In this study, a miniaturized mass-flow meter for discharged patients with an implantable axial blood pump was developed on the basis of computational analysis, and was evaluated in in-vitro tests. The mass-flow meter makes use of centrifugal force produced by the mass-flow rate around a curved cannula. An optimized design was investigated by use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. On the basis of the computational analysis, a miniaturized mass-flow meter made of titanium alloy was developed. A strain gauge was adopted as a sensor element. The first strain gauge, attached to the curved area, measured both static pressure and centrifugal force. The second strain gauge, attached to the straight area, measured static pressure. By subtracting the output of the second strain gauge from the output of the first strain gauge, the mass-flow rate was determined. In in-vitro tests using a model circulation loop, the mass-flow meter was compared with a conventional flow meter. Measurement error was less than ±0.5 L/min and average time delay was 0.14 s. We confirmed that the miniaturized mass-flow meter could accurately measure the mass-flow rate continuously and noninvasively. PMID:21537972

  10. Implantable axialflow blood pump for left ventricular support.

    PubMed

    Untaroiu, Alexandrina; Wood, Houston G; Allaire, Paul E

    2008-01-01

    Artificial blood pumps, either ventricular assist devices (VADs) or total artificial hearts, are currently employed for bridge to recovery, bridge to transplant, and destination therapy situations. The clinical effectiveness of VADs has been demonstrated; however, all of the currently available pumps have a limited life because of either the damage they cause to blood or their limited mechanical design life. A magnetically suspended rotary blood pump offers the potential to meet the requirements of both extending design life and causing negligible blood damage due to superior hemodynamics. Therefore, over the last few years, efforts of an interdisciplinary research team at University of Virginia have been concentrated on the design and development of a fully implantable axial flow VAD with a magnetically levitated impeller (LEV-VAD). This paper details the second generation developmental prototype (LEV-VAD2 design configuration) and includes a complete CFD analysis of device performance. Based on encouraging results of the first design stage, including a good agreement between the CFD performance estimations and the experimental measurements, a second design phase was initiated in an attempt to enhance device flow performance and suspension system capabilities. Using iterative design optimization stages, the design of the impeller and the geometry of the stationary and rotating blades have been reevaluated. A thorough CFD analysis allowed for optimization of the blood flow path such that an optimal trade-off among the hydraulic performance, specific requirements of a blood pump, and manufacturing requirements has been achieved. Per the CFD results, the LEV-VAD2 produces 6 lpm and 100 mmHg at a rotational speed of 7,000 rpm. The pressure-flow performance predictions indicate the LEV-VAD2's ability to deliver adequate flow over physiologic pressures for rotational speeds varying from 5,000 to 8,000 rpm. The blood damage numerical predictions also demonstrate

  11. Internal hydraulic analysis of impeller rounding in centrifugal pumps as turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Punit; Nestmann, Franz

    2011-01-15

    The use of pumps as turbines in different applications has been gaining importance in the recent years, but the subject of hydraulic optimization still remains an open research problem. One of these optimization techniques that include rounding of the sharp edges at the impeller periphery (or turbine inlet) has shown tendencies of performance enhancement. In order to understand the effect of this hydraulic optimization, the paper introduces an analytical model in the pump as turbine control volume and brings out the functionalities of the internal variables classified under control variables consisting of the system loss coefficient and exit relative flow direction and under dependent variables consisting of net tangential flow velocity, net head and efficiency. The paper studies the effects of impeller rounding on a combination of radial flow and mixed flow pumps as turbines using experimental data. The impeller rounding is seen to have positive impact on the overall efficiency in different operating regions with an improvement in the range of 1-3%. The behaviour of the two control variables have been elaborately studied in which it is found that the system loss coefficient has reduced drastically due to rounding effects, while the extent of changes to the exit relative flow direction seems to be limited in comparison. The reasons for changes to these control variables have been physically interpreted and attributed to the behaviour of the wake zone at the turbine inlet and circulation within the impeller control volume. The larger picture of impeller rounding has been discussed in comparison with performance prediction models in pumps as turbines. The possible limitations of the analytical model as well as the test setup are also presented. The paper concludes that the impeller rounding technique is very important for performance optimization and recommends its application on all pump as turbine projects. It also recommends the standardization of the rounding

  12. Induction of ventricular collapse by an axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Amin, D V; Antaki, J F; Litwak, P; Thomas, D; Wu, Z J; Watach, M

    1998-01-01

    An important consideration for clinical application of rotary blood pump based ventricular assist is the avoidance of ventricular collapse due to excessive operating speed. Because healthy animals do not typically demonstrate this phenomenon, it is difficult to evaluate control algorithms for avoiding suction in vivo. An acute hemodynamic study was thus conducted to determine the conditions under which suction could be induced. A 70 kg calf was implanted with an axial flow assist device (Nimbus/UoP IVAS; Nimbus Inc., Rancho Cordova, CA) cannulated from the left ventricular apex to ascending aorta. On initiation of pump operation, several vasoactive interventions were performed to alter preload, afterload, and contractility of the left ventricle. Initially, dobutamine increased contractility and heart rate ([HR] = 139; baseline = 70), but ventricular collapse was not achievable, even at the maximal pump speed of 15,000 rpm. Norepinephrine decreased HR (HR = 60), increased contractility, and increased systemic vascular resistance ([SVR] = 24; baseline = 15), resulting in ventricular collapse at a pump speed of 14,000 rpm. Isoproterenol (beta agonist) increased HR (HR = 103) and decreased SVR (SVR = 12), but ventricular collapse was not achieved. Inferior vena cava occlusion reduced preload, and ventricular collapse was achieved at speeds as low as 11,000 rpm. Esmolol (beta1 antagonist) decreased HR (HR = 55) and contractility, and ventricular collapse was achieved at 11,500 rpm. Episodes of ventricular collapse were characterized initially by the pump output exceeding the venous return and the aortic valve remaining closed throughout the cardiac cycle. If continued, the mitral valve would remain open throughout the cardiac cycle. Using these unique states of the mitral and aortic valves, the onset of ventricular collapse could reliably be identified. It is hoped that the ability to detect the onset of ventricular collapse, rather than the event itself, will assist in

  13. Analysis of Forced Spatial Vibrations of a Centrifugal Pump Impeller with Axial Forces Balancing Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhulyov, A.; Martsinkovsky, V.; Kundera, C.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a model of a pump impeller with annular seals and a balancing device, used as a combined support-seal assembly, is considered. The forced coupled radial, angular and axial vibrations of the rotor are determined with consideration of linearized inertial, damping, gyroscopic, positional and circulating forces and moments acting on the impeller from the side of the fluid flow in annular seals. The theoretical analysis is supplemented with a numerical example, the amplitude frequency characteristics are shown.

  14. Experimental investigation of the hydrodynamic forces on the shroud of a centrifugal pump impeller. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhuang, Fei

    1989-01-01

    Fluid-induced forces acting on a rotating impeller are known to cause rotor-dynamic problems in turbomachines. The forces generated by leakage flow along the front shroud surface of a centrifugal turbomachine impeller play an important role among these fluid-induced forces. The present research was aimed to gain a better understanding of these shroud forces. An experimental apparatus was designed and constructed to simulate the impeller shroud leakage flow. Hydrodynamic forces and steady and unsteady pressure distributions on the rotating shroud were measured as functions of eccentricity, width of shroud clearance, face seal clearance and shaft rotating speed. The forces measured from the dynamometer and manometers agreed well. The hydrodynamic force matrices were found skew-symmetric and statically unstable. This is qualitatively similar to the result of previous hydrodynamic volute force measurements. Nondimensionalized normal and tangential forces decrease slightly as Reynolds number increases. As the width of the shroud clearance decreases and/or the eccentricity increases, the hydrodynamic forces increase nonlinearly. There was some evidence found that increased front seal clearance could reduce the radial shroud forces and the relative magnitude of the destabilizing tangential force. Subharmonic pressure fluctuations were also observed which may adversely affect the behavior of the rotor system.

  15. Theory and practice of centrifugal elutriation (CE). Factors influencing the separation of human blood cells.

    PubMed

    Figdor, C G; Leemans, J M; Bont, W S; de Vries, J E

    1983-06-01

    Centrifugal elutriation (CE) is currently a widely used preparative cell separation technique. In order to optimize the separation of cells that show only small differences in sedimentation velocity, several conditions that might influence the resolution capacity, such as rotor speed, counterflow, jetstream, cell load, density, and viscosity of the elutriation medium, were analyzed. Experiments carried out with human red blood cells (rbc) indicated that selective losses of rbc from the rotor caused by the jetstream, could be prevented if the separations were carried out at high rotor speeds, as predicted by the theory. In addition, high cell loads (5 X 10(8) rbc) resulted in better separations than low cell loads (5 X 10(7) rbc). Human monocytes were separated into subpopulations that differed only about 0.003 g/mL in density, but have virtually the same size. The separation was carried out either by increasing the density or viscosity of the elutriation medium or by decreasing the rotor speed. In all cases similar results were obtained. These results indicated that under optimal conditions CE can be applied for the separation of cells that differ only slightly in sedimentation velocity. PMID:6197173

  16. Histoplasma capsulatum fungemia in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: detection by lysis-centrifugation blood-culturing technique.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Flávio de Mattos; Fernandes, Sérgio Sônego; Severo, Cecília Bittencourt; Guazzelli, Luciana Silva; Severo, Luiz Carlos

    2007-01-01

    Progressive disseminated histoplasmosis (PDH) is an increasingly common cause of infection in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). We report 21 cases of PDH associated with AIDS diagnosed by lysis-centrifugation blood culture method. The most prevalent clinical findings were fever, weight loss, respiratory symptoms, and mucocutaneous lesions. Chest roentgenogram showed diffuse pulmonary infiltrates in 13 of 21 patients (62%). Bronchoalveolar fluid has yielded positive culture in four patients only in medium with cycloheximide. PMID:17625688

  17. The research on particle trajectory of solid-liquid two-phase flow and erosion predicting in screw centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Z. J.; Li, R. N.; Han, W.; Zhao, W. G.; Wang, X. H.

    2016-05-01

    Use the Discrete Phase Model (DPM) based on Euler-Lagrange method, the internal flow field of screw centrifugal pump was simulated by computational fluid dynamics(CFD) code when transmission medium is solid-liquid two phase flow with large-size particles. The research of liquid phase is under the Euler coordinate system while the solid phase is under the Lagrange coordinate system. The energy change, trajectory characteristic of solid phase particle and its erosion damage rule of solid-phase particle in whole computational domain is analyzed with different density, partical size(d=0.05mm, d=0.2mm, d=2mm) and solid volume fraction(Cv=3%, Cv=5%, Cv=7%).The result shows that within a given diameter range, the low density fine particles trajectory are longer, more collision times with flow passage components, more energy loss and the erosion parts are relatively uniform, but particles which are large-size diameter and high density has a big collision angle with the surface of impeller and volute, even the area of impact and abrasion are quite focus, and easy to be transported. particles will impact with the head of impeller when it enter into impeller domain, the erosion mainly occurs on the work side of impeller.

  18. Effect of modification to tongue and impeller geometry on unsteady flow, pressure fluctuations, and noise in a centrifugal pump

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, R.; Chu, S.; Katz, J.

    1997-07-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), pressure, and noise measurements are used to study the effect of modifications to tongue and impeller geometries on the flow structure and resulting noise in a centrifugal pump. It is demonstrated that the primary sources of noise are associated with interactions of the nonuniform outflux from the impeller (jet/wake phenomenon) with the tongue. Consequently, significant reduction of noise is achieved by increasing the gap between the tongue and the impeller up to about 20% of the impeller radius. Further increase in the gap affects the performance adversely with minimal impact on the noise level. When the gap is narrow, the primary sources of noise are impingement of the wake on the tip of the tongue, and tongue oscillations when the pressure difference across it is high. At about 20% gap, the entire wake and its associated vorticity trains miss the tongue, and the only (quite weak) effect of nonuniform outflux is the impingement of the jet on the tongue. An attempt is also made to reduce the nonuniformity in outflux from the impeller by inserting short vanes between the blades. They cause reduction in the size of the original wakes, but generate an additional jet/wake phenomenon of their own. Both wakes are weak to a level that their impacts on local pressure fluctuations and noise are insignificant. The only remaining major contributor to noise is tongue oscillations. This effect is shown to be dependent on the stiffness of the tongue.

  19. Proposal of Unique Process Pump with Floating Type Centrifugal Impeller (Preliminarily Report : Axial Thrust of Impeller with Driving Shaft)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Ryunosuke; Kanemoto, Toshiaki; Sakamoto, Kengo; Uno, Mitsuo

    2010-06-01

    The authors have proposed the unique centrifugal pump, in which the impeller dose not have the driving shaft but is driven by the magnetic induction, namely Lorentz force, without the stay. Then, the rotating posture of the impeller is not stable, just like UFO. To make the rotating posture of the impeller stable irrespective of the operating condition, the pressure in the impeller casing was investigated experimentally while the impeller rotates at the steady state, as the preliminarily stage. The pressure, as well known, fluctuates periodically in response to the blade number. Besides, the pressure on the impeller shrouds decreases with the increase of the gap between the front shroud and the suction cover where the water leaks to the suction pipe, and is distorted in the peripheral direction. Such pressure conditions contribute directly to the hydraulic force acting on the impeller. The unstable behaviors of the impeller are induced from the above hydraulic forces, which change unsteadily in the radial and the peripheral directions in the impeller casing. The forces are affected by not only the operating condition but also the rotating posture of the impeller.

  20. The effect of centrifugation at various g force levels on rheological properties of rat, dog, pig and human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Ferenc; Toth, Eniko; Miszti-Blasius, Kornel; Nemeth, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory investigations often require centrifugation of blood samples for various erythrocyte tests. Although there is a lack of data about the effect of centrifugation at various g force levels on erythrocyte rheological properties. We aimed to investigate the effect of a 10-minute centrifugation at 500, 1000 or 1500 g at 15°C of rat, dog, pig and human venous (K3-EDTA, 1.5 mg/ml) blood samples. Hematological parameters, erythrocyte deformability, cell membrane stability, osmotic gradient ektacytometry (osmoscan) and erythrocyte aggregation were determined. Hematological and erythrocyte deformability parameters showed interspecies differences, centrifugation caused no significant alterations. Cell membrane stability for human erythrocytes centrifuged at higher g level showed less decrease in deformability. Osmoscan O min parameter showed slight elevation in dog centrifuged aliquots. Erythrocyte aggregation parameters changed unexpectedly. Rat and dog erythrocyte aggregation indices significantly dropped in centrifuged aliquots. Pig erythrocyte aggregation indices increased significantly after centrifugation. Human erythrocyte aggregation was the most stable one among the investigated species. The used centrifugation protocols caused the largest alterations in erythrocyte aggregation in a controversial way among the investigated species. On the other hand, erythrocyte deformability parameters were stable, cell membrane stability and osmoscan data show minor shifts.

  1. Mathematical model of the two-phase flow in a vertical well with an electric centrifugal pump located in the permafrost region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musakaev, N. G.; Borodin, S. L.

    2016-05-01

    The mathematical model of the two-phase flow in a vertical well with an electric centrifugal pump located in the permafrost region is presented. The comparison of the calculation's results with experimental data, the results of numerical experiments by determining the flow structure, the temperature distribution in a well, influence of the temperature distribution on paraffin deposition and change in time of the radius of thawing in the frozen ground are presented.

  2. Comparison of decision tree-fuzzy and rough set-fuzzy methods for fault categorization of mono-block centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakthivel, N. R.; Sugumaran, V.; Nair, Binoy. B.

    2010-08-01

    Mono-block centrifugal pumps are widely used in a variety of applications. In many applications the role of mono-block centrifugal pump is critical and condition monitoring is essential. Vibration based continuous monitoring and analysis using machine learning approach is gaining momentum. Particularly, artificial neural networks, fuzzy logic have been employed for continuous monitoring and fault diagnosis. This paper presents the use of decision tree and rough sets to generate the rules from statistical features extracted from vibration signals under good and faulty conditions of a mono-block centrifugal pump. A fuzzy classifier is built using decision tree and rough set rules and tested using test data. The results obtained using decision tree rules and those obtained using rough set rules are compared. Finally, the accuracy of a principle component analysis based decision tree-fuzzy system is also evaluated. The study reveals that overall classification accuracy obtained by the decision tree-fuzzy hybrid system is to some extent better than the rough set-fuzzy hybrid system.

  3. Development of the pulsation device for rotary blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Yambe, Tomoyuki; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Sekine, Kazumitsu; Shibata, Mune-ichi; Yamaguchi, Tasuku; Jian, Liu Hong; Yoshizawa, Makoto; Tanaka, Akira; Matsuki, Hidetoshi; Sato, Fumihiro; Haga, You-ichi; Esashi, Masayoshi; Tabayashi, Kouichi; Mitamura, Yoshinori; Sasada, Hiroshi; Nitta, Shin-ichi

    2005-11-01

    A rotary blood pump (RP) is desirable as a small ventricular assist device (VAD). However, an RP is nonpulsatile. We tried to develop a device that attaches a pulse to the RP. We also tried to develop a pulse-generating equipment that was not air-pressure driven. The ball screw motor was considered a candidate. The application of a small-sized shape memory alloy was also attempted. An electrohydraulic system was adopted, and actuator power was connected to the diaphragm. The diaphragm was placed on the outer side of the ventricle. Most RPs that have been developed all over the world drain blood from the ventricle. The wave of a pulse should be generated if a pulse is added by the drawn part. The output assistance from the outer side of the ventricle was attempted in animal experiments, and the device operated effectively. This device can be used during implantable operation of RP. This may serve as an effective device in patients experiencing problems in peripheral circulation and in the function of internal organs.

  4. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass... cardiopulmonary bypass circuit during bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  5. Biochemical assessment of growth factors and circulation of blood components contained in the different fractions obtained by centrifugation of venous blood.

    PubMed

    Corigiano, M; Ciobanu, G; Baldoni, E; Pompa, G

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a biochemical marker with different elements of a normal blood serum and centrifuged blood serum after a different rotation system. For this technique, we used five fractions of a blood Concentrated Growth Factors system (bCGF) and a particular device for the different rotation program. Blood samples were collected from 10 volunteers aged between 35 and 55 in the Operative Unit of the “Sapienza” University of Rome with only a fraction of different biochemical elements. Through an individual blood phase separator tube of venous blood, active factions of serum and 4 fractions of red buffy coat were taken. The biochemical markers with 14 elements were examined at times: P1-11 minutes, P2-12minutes, P3-15 minutes. Exclusively biological materials which are normally applied in the regeneration techniques for different defects and lesions were used with this technique. After specific rotation programs, a different result was obtained for each cycle: P1, P2, P3. In test tubes obtained by separated blood, we observed a higher concentration of proteins, ions, and other antigens compared to normal blood plasma. Examining the biochemical results of different elements, we observed an increase (P≤0,01). Since each person’s DNA is different, we could not have the same results in 5 fractions of blood concentration, we did, however, find a good increase in only a fraction of proteins, immunoglobulin and different ions. We obtained five fractions after centrifugation, and we had an increase in different biochemical elements compared to normal blood (P≤0,01) which is significant at different times. These biochemical elements were stimulated by different growth factors, which are used by the immune system, and they induced the formation of hard and soft tissues and good regeneration.

  6. The effects of residual pump blood on patient plasma free haemoglobin levels post cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    H, Schotola; Aj, Wetz; Af, Popov; I, Bergmann; Bc, Danner; Fa, Schöndube; M, Bauer; A, Bräuer

    2016-09-01

    At the end of cardiopulmonary bypass, there are invariably several hundred millilitres of residual pump blood in the reservoir, which can either be re-transfused or discarded. The objective of this prospective observational study was to investigate the quality of the residual pump blood, focusing on plasma free haemoglobin (pfHb) and blood cell counts. Fifty-one consecutive patients were included in the study. Forty-nine units of residual pump blood and 58 units of transfused red blood cell (RBC) concentrates were analysed. The mean preoperative pfHb of the patients was 0.057 ± 0.062 g/l, which increased gradually to 0.55 ± 0.36 g/l on arrival in the intensive care unit postoperatively. On the first postoperative day, the mean pfHb had returned to within the normal range. Our data showed that haemoglobin, haematocrit, and erythrocyte counts of residual pump blood were approximately 40% of the values in standardised RBC concentrates. Plasma free haemoglobin was significantly higher in residual pump blood compared to RBC concentrates, and nearly twice as high as the pfHb in patient blood samples taken contemporaneously. Our findings indicate that residual pump blood pfHb levels are markedly higher compared to patients' blood and RBC concentrates, but that its administration does not significantly increase patients' pfHb levels. PMID:27608341

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamics-Based Design Optimization Method for Archimedes Screw Blood Pumps.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai; Janiga, Gábor; Thévenin, Dominique

    2016-04-01

    An optimization method suitable for improving the performance of Archimedes screw axial rotary blood pumps is described in the present article. In order to achieve a more robust design and to save computational resources, this method combines the advantages of the established pump design theory with modern computer-aided, computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based design optimization (CFD-O) relying on evolutionary algorithms and computational fluid dynamics. The main purposes of this project are to: (i) integrate pump design theory within the already existing CFD-based optimization; (ii) demonstrate that the resulting procedure is suitable for optimizing an Archimedes screw blood pump in terms of efficiency. Results obtained in this study demonstrate that the developed tool is able to meet both objectives. Finally, the resulting level of hemolysis can be numerically assessed for the optimal design, as hemolysis is an issue of overwhelming importance for blood pumps. PMID:26526039

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics-Based Design Optimization Method for Archimedes Screw Blood Pumps.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai; Janiga, Gábor; Thévenin, Dominique

    2016-04-01

    An optimization method suitable for improving the performance of Archimedes screw axial rotary blood pumps is described in the present article. In order to achieve a more robust design and to save computational resources, this method combines the advantages of the established pump design theory with modern computer-aided, computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based design optimization (CFD-O) relying on evolutionary algorithms and computational fluid dynamics. The main purposes of this project are to: (i) integrate pump design theory within the already existing CFD-based optimization; (ii) demonstrate that the resulting procedure is suitable for optimizing an Archimedes screw blood pump in terms of efficiency. Results obtained in this study demonstrate that the developed tool is able to meet both objectives. Finally, the resulting level of hemolysis can be numerically assessed for the optimal design, as hemolysis is an issue of overwhelming importance for blood pumps.

  9. Circular pump support of blood circulation in the human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, A. E.; Fomin, V. M.; Prikhodko, Yu. M.; Cherniavskiy, A. M.; Fomichev, V. P.; Fomichev, A. V.; Chekhov, V. P.; Ruzmatov, T. M.

    2016-10-01

    The need of circulatory support systems in the treatment of chronic heart failure is increasing constantly, as 20% of patients in the waiting list die every year. Despite the great need for mechanical heart support systems, using of available systems is limited by the expensiveness. In addition, there is no one system that is 100% responsible to all medical and technical requirements, and would be completely safe for patient. Therefore, further research in the field of circu-latory support systems, considering health and technical requirements is relevant. One of the new directions in the study are disc pumps of viscous friction for liquid transporting, based on the Tesla pump principle. The operation principle of pumps based on the phenomenon of the boundary layer which is formed on the disk rotating in a fluid. There are experimental studies results of models with different variants of the rotor suspension, the various forms and the number of disks, forms the pump housing. However, none of the above samples was not brought to clinical trials. Furthermore, despite the promise of this model is still used today in some circulatory support systems are no similar type pump. Published data provide a basis for further development and testing of the pump model and allow to hope for leveling a number of significant shortcomings of modern left ventricular bypass systems.

  10. Experimental determination of dynamic characteristics of the VentrAssist implantable rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Chung, Michael K H; Zhang, Nong; Tansley, Geoff D; Qian, Yi

    2004-12-01

    The VentrAssist implantable rotary blood pump, intended for long-term ventricular assist, is under development and is currently being tested for its rotor-dynamic stability. The pump consists of a shaftless impeller, which also acts as the rotor of the brushless DC motor. The impeller remains passively suspended in the pump cavity by hydrodynamic forces, which result from the small clearances between the outside surfaces of the impeller and the pump cavity. These small clearances range from approximately 50 microm to 230 microm in size in the version of pump reported here. This article presents experimental investigation into the dynamic characteristics of the impeller-bearing-pump housing system of the rotary blood pump for increasing pump speeds at different flow rates. The pump was mounted on a suspension system consisting of a platform and springs, where the natural frequency and damping ratio for the suspension system were determined. Real-time measurements of the impeller's displacement were performed using Hall effect sensors. A vertical disturbance force was exerted onto the pump housing, causing the impeller to be displaced in vertical direction from its dynamic equilibrium position within the pump cavity. The impeller displacement was represented by a decaying sine wave, which indicated the impeller restoring to its equilibrium position. From the decaying sine wave the natural frequency and stiffness coefficient of the system were determined. Furthermore, the logarithmic decrement method was used to determine the damping ratio and eventually the damping coefficient of the system. Results indicate that stiffness and damping coefficients increased as flow rate and pump speed increased, representing an increase in stability with these changing conditions. However, pump speed had a greater influence on the stiffness and damping coefficients than flow rate did, which was evident through dynamic analysis. Overall the experimental method presented in this

  11. A miniature intraventricular axial flow blood pump that is introduced through the left ventricular apex.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, K; Umezu, M; Koyanagi, H; Kitamura, M; Eishi, K; Kawai, A; Tagusari, O; Niinami, H; Akimoto, T; Nojiri, C

    1992-01-01

    A new intraventricular axial flow blood pump has been designed and developed as an implantable left ventricular assist device (LVAD). The pump consists of a tube housing (10 cm in length and 14 mm in diameter), a three-vane impeller combined with a guide vane, and a DC motor. This pump is introduced into the LV cavity through the LV apex, and the outlet cannula is passed antegrade across the aortic valve. Blood is withdrawn from the LV through the inlet ports at the pump base, and discharged into the ascending aorta. A pump flow of > 8 L/min was obtained against 90 mmHg differential pressure in the mock circulatory system. In an acute dog model, this pump could produce a sufficient output of 200 ml/kg/min. In addition, the pump flow profile demonstrated a pulsatile pattern, although the rotation speed was fixed. This is mainly due to the changes in flow rate during a cardiac cycle--that is, during systole, the flow rate increases to the maximum, while the differential pressure between the LV and the aorta decreases to the minimum. Thus, this simple and compact axial flow blood pump can be a potential LVAD, with prompt accessibility and need for less invasive surgical procedures.

  12. A sliding mode-based starling-like controller for implantable rotary blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Bakouri, Mohsen A; Salamonsen, Robert F; Savkin, Andrey V; AlOmari, Abdul-Hakeem H; Lim, Einly; Lovell, Nigel H

    2014-07-01

    Clinically adequate implementation of physiological control of a rotary left ventricular assist device requires a sophisticated technique such as the recently proposed method based on the Frank-Starling mechanism. In this mechanism, the stroke volume of the heart increases in response to an increase in the volume of blood filling the left ventricle at the end of diastole. To emulate this process, changes in pump speed need to automatically regulate pump flow to ensure that the combined output of the left ventricle and pump match the output of the right ventricle across changing cardiovascular states. In this approach, we exploit the linear relationship between estimated mean pump flow (Q ̅ est) and pump flow pulsatility (PIQp) in a tracking control algorithm based on sliding mode control. The immediate response of the controller was assessed using a lumped parameter model of the cardiovascular system (CVS) and pump from which could be extracted both Q ̅ est and PIQp. Two different perturbations from the resting state in the presence of left ventricular failure were tested. The first was blood loss requiring a reduction in pump flow to match the reduced output from the right ventricle and to avoid the complication of ventricular suction. The second was exercise, requiring an increase in pump flow. The sliding mode controller induced the required changes in Qp within approximately five heart beats in the blood loss simulation and eight heart beats in the exercise simulation without clinically significant transients or steady-state errors.

  13. Power consumption of rotary blood pumps: pulsatile versus constant-speed mode.

    PubMed

    Pirbodaghi, Tohid; Cotter, Chris; Bourque, Kevin

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the power consumption of a HeartMate III rotary blood pump based on in vitro experiments performed in a cardiovascular simulator. To create artificial-pulse mode, we modulated the pump speed by decreasing the mean speed by 2000 rpm for 200 ms and then increasing speed by 4000 rpm (mean speeds plus 2000 rpm) for another 200 ms, creating a square waveform shape. The HeartMate III was connected to a cardiovascular simulator consisting of a hydraulic pump system to simulate left ventricle pumping action, arterial and venous compliance chambers, and an adjustable valve for peripheral resistance to facilitate the desired aortic pressure. The simulator operated based on Suga's elastance model to mimic the Starling response of the heart, thereby reproducing physiological blood flow and pressure conditions. We measured the instantaneous total electrical current and voltage of the pump to evaluate its power consumption. The aim was to answer these fundamental questions: (i) How does pump speed modulation affect pump power consumption? (ii) How does the power consumption vary in relation to external pulsatile flow? The results indicate that speed modulation and external pulsatile flow both moderately increase the power consumption. Increasing the pump speed reduces the impact of external pulsatile flow.

  14. Reversed intracranial blood flow in patients with an intra-aortic balloon pump.

    PubMed

    Brass, L M

    1990-03-01

    As a preliminary investigation into the cerebral effects of mechanical cardiac assist devices, using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography I examined the basal cerebral arteries in three patients placed on an intra-aortic balloon pump. Unassisted systoles had normal blood velocities and waveforms. When the pump was in use, diastolic blood velocity during balloon inflation increased. As the balloon was deflated and intra-aortic pressure was dramatically lowered, diastolic blood velocity within the intracranial vessels decreased sharply. In two patients there was a reversal of blood flow in the middle cerebral, anterior cerebral, basilar, and vertebral arteries during late diastole. Although the clinical effects of cessation and reversal of blood flow in the cerebral circulation while on an intra-aortic balloon pump remain to be determined, transcranial Doppler ultrasonography appears to be a useful tool for measuring these hemodynamic effects. It may also be helpful in quantifying the effects of such pumps on cerebral blood flow and devising inflation/deflation timing sequences that maximize forward blood flow.

  15. Axial type self-bearing motor for axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yohji; Masuzawa, Toru; Matsuda, Ken-Ichi; Ohmori, Kunihiro; Yamane, Takashi; Konishi, Yoshiaki; Fukahori, Shinya; Ueno, Satoshi; Kim, Seung-Jong

    2003-10-01

    An axial self-bearing motor is proposed which can drive an axial blood pump without physical contact. It is a functional combination of the bi-directional disc motor and the axial active magnetic bearing, where it actively controls single degree-of-freedom motion, while other motions such as lateral vibration are passively stable. For application to a blood pump, the proposed self-bearing motor has the advantages of simple structure and small size. Through the finite element method (FEM) analysis and the experimental test, its good feasibility is verified. Finally, the axial flow pump is fabricated using the developed magnetically suspended motor. The pump test is carried out and the results are discussed in detail. PMID:14616531

  16. Development of a portable bridge-to-decision blood pump.

    PubMed

    Yamane, T; Kitamura, K

    2013-01-01

    We are developing an axial-flow pump with a cylindrical-impeller without airfoils. In the mock experiments of HA02 model a pressure of 13.3 kPa was obtained at a rotational speed of 12500 rpm and flow of 5L/min. The obtained pressure with HA02 was almost double than an airfoil-type impeller. The 2D analysis of hydrodynamic bearings for the pump revealed that a section with 3 or more arcs is stable with respect to angular position, and a minimum bearing gap of 100 µm can be attained at a design bearing gap of 150 µm and at a groove depth of 100 µm. PMID:24110291

  17. Development of a portable bridge-to-decision blood pump.

    PubMed

    Yamane, T; Kitamura, K

    2013-01-01

    We are developing an axial-flow pump with a cylindrical-impeller without airfoils. In the mock experiments of HA02 model a pressure of 13.3 kPa was obtained at a rotational speed of 12500 rpm and flow of 5L/min. The obtained pressure with HA02 was almost double than an airfoil-type impeller. The 2D analysis of hydrodynamic bearings for the pump revealed that a section with 3 or more arcs is stable with respect to angular position, and a minimum bearing gap of 100 µm can be attained at a design bearing gap of 150 µm and at a groove depth of 100 µm.

  18. Hazard Evaluation for the Saltwell Chempump and a Saltwell Centrifugal Pump Design using Service Water for Lubrication and Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    GRAMS, W.H.

    2000-11-16

    This report documents results of a preliminary hazard analysis (PHA) covering the existing Crane Chempump and the new salt well pumping design. Three hazardous conditions were identified for the Chempump and ten hazardous conditions were identified for the new salt well pump design. This report also presents the results of the control decision/allocation process. A backflow preventer and associated limiting condition for operation were assigned to one hazardous condition with the new design.

  19. Validation of an axial flow blood pump: computational fluid dynamics results using particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Su, Boyang; Chua, Leok Poh; Wang, Xikun

    2012-04-01

    A magnetically suspended axial flow blood pump is studied experimentally in this article. The pump casing enclosed a three-blade straightener, a two-blade impeller shrouded by a permanent magnet-embedded cylinder, and a three-blade diffuser. The internal flow fields were simulated earlier using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and the pump characteristic curves were determined. The simulation results showed that the internal flow field was basically streamlined, except the diffuser region. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement of the 1:1 pump model was conducted to validate the CFD result. In order to ensure the optical access, an acrylic prototype was fabricated with the impeller driven by a servomotor instead, as the magnet is opaque. In addition to the transparent model, the blood analog fluid with the refractive index close to that of acrylic was used to avoid refraction. According to the CFD results, the axial flow blood pump could generate adequate pressure head at the rotating speed of 9500rpm and flow rate of 5L/min, and the same flow condition was applied during the PIV measurement. Through the comparisons, it was found that the experimental results were close to those obtained by CFD and had thus validated the CFD model, which could complement the limitation of the measurement in assessing the more detailed flow fields of the axial flow pump.

  20. A technique for automatic tubing occlusion in response to air bubble detection when using a centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, A W; Hargadine, W L; Lambert, G S; Long, A C

    1990-01-01

    A double acting pneumatically powered cylinder, energized by an electrically activated solenoid valve, is used to occlude the outflow line from a Bio-Medicus (a) constrained vortex pump. The cylinder is mounted on a tubing guide that is fastened to a pole clamp. A Sarns (b) air bubble detector, placed on the pump inflow line is used to provide the signal to activate the solenoid valve. The outflow occluder is capable of 100% occlusion of 3/8 x 3/32 inch Tygon tubing up to pressures of 2586 mmHg. The occluder system is able to work with many types of bubble detectors and is applicable to any form of non-occlusive pump.

  1. Feasibility of Pump Speed Modulation for Restoring Vascular Pulsatility with Rotary Blood Pumps.

    PubMed

    Ising, Mickey S; Sobieski, Michael A; Slaughter, Mark S; Koenig, Steven C; Giridharan, Guruprasad A

    2015-01-01

    Continuous flow (CF) left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) diminish vascular pressure pulsatility, which may be associated with clinically reported adverse events including gastrointestinal bleeding, aortic valve insufficiency, and hemorrhagic stroke. Three candidate CF LVAD pump speed modulation algorithms designed to augment aortic pulsatility were evaluated in mock flow loop and ischemic heart failure (IHF) bovine models by quantifying hemodynamic performance as a function of mean pump speed, modulation amplitude, and timing. Asynchronous and synchronous copulsation (high revolutions per minute [RPM] during systole, low RPM during diastole) and counterpulsation (low RPM during systole, high RPM during diastole) algorithms were tested for defined modulation amplitudes (±300, ±500, ±800, and ±1,100 RPM) and frequencies (18.75, 37.5, and 60 cycles/minute) at low (2,900 RPM) and high (3,200 RPM) mean LVAD speeds. In the mock flow loop model, asynchronous, synchronous copulsation, and synchronous counterpulsation algorithms each increased pulse pressure (ΔP = 931%, 210%, and 98% and reduced left ventricular external work (LVEW = 20%, 22%, 16%). Similar improvements in vascular pulsatility (1,142%) and LVEW (40%) were observed in the IHF bovine model. Asynchronous modulation produces the largest vascular pulsatility with the advantage of not requiring sensor(s) for timing pump speed modulation, facilitating potential clinical implementation. PMID:26102173

  2. Density-Gradient Mediated Band Extraction of Leukocytes from Whole Blood Using Centrifugo-Pneumatic Siphon Valving on Centrifugal Microfluidic Discs.

    PubMed

    Kinahan, David J; Kearney, Sinéad M; Kilcawley, Niamh A; Early, Philip L; Glynn, Macdara T; Ducrée, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Here we present retrieval of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by density-gradient medium based centrifugation for subsequent analysis of the leukocytes on an integrated microfluidic "Lab-on-a-Disc" cartridge. Isolation of white blood cells constitutes a critical sample preparation step for many bioassays. Centrifugo-pneumatic siphon valves are particularly suited for blood processing as they function without need of surface treatment and are 'low-pass', i.e., holding at high centrifugation speeds and opening upon reduction of the spin rate. Both 'hydrostatically' and 'hydrodynamically' triggered centrifugo-pneumatic siphon valving schemes are presented. Firstly, the geometry of the pneumatic chamber of hydrostatically primed centrifugo-pneumatic siphon valves is optimised to enable smooth and uniform layering of blood on top of the density-gradient medium; this feature proves to be key for efficient Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell extraction. A theoretical analysis of hydrostatically primed valves is also presented which determines the optimum priming pressure for the individual valves. Next, 'dual siphon' configurations for both hydrostatically and hydrodynamically primed centrifugo-pneumatic siphon valves are introduced; here plasma and Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells are extracted through a distinct siphon valve. This work represents a first step towards enabling on disc multi-parameter analysis. Finally, the efficiency of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells extraction in these structures is characterised using a simplified design. A microfluidic mechanism, which we termed phase switching, is identified which affects the efficiency of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell extraction.

  3. The activation of the sodium pump in pig red blood cells by internal and external cations.

    PubMed

    Brand, S C; Whittam, R

    1985-05-30

    A study has been made with pig red blood cells of the activation of the sodium pump by internal and external cations. Cell Na and K concentrations were altered using a PCMBS cation loading procedure. The procedure was characterised for resultant ionic conditions, maintenance of ATP levels and fragility. The activation of the sodium pump by external K was measured in cells suspended in choline (Na-free) solutions. External Cs was used as a substitute for K and elicited lower rates of pump activity. Both the Vmax and apparent Km for 42K influx and 134Cs influx increased as internal Na concentration was raised (within the non-saturating range). Vmax/apparent Km ratios for cation influx were constant. Raising external Cs concentration exerted a similar influence on pump activation by internal Na: both the maximum pump velocity and the apparent Na-site dissociation constant (K'Na) increased. The results provide evidence for a transmembrane connection between cation binding sites on opposite faces of the membrane and are consistent with a consecutive model for the sodium pump in pig red blood cells. PMID:2581622

  4. Fully Automated Centrifugal Microfluidic Device for Ultrasensitive Protein Detection from Whole Blood.

    PubMed

    Park, Yang-Seok; Sunkara, Vijaya; Kim, Yubin; Lee, Won Seok; Han, Ja-Ryoung; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is a promising method to detect small amount of proteins in biological samples. The devices providing a platform for reduced sample volume and assay time as well as full automation are required for potential use in point-of-care-diagnostics. Recently, we have demonstrated ultrasensitive detection of serum proteins, C-reactive protein (CRP) and cardiac troponin I (cTnI), utilizing a lab-on-a-disc composed of TiO2 nanofibrous (NF) mats. It showed a large dynamic range with femto molar (fM) detection sensitivity, from a small volume of whole blood in 30 min. The device consists of several components for blood separation, metering, mixing, and washing that are automated for improved sensitivity from low sample volumes. Here, in the video demonstration, we show the experimental protocols and know-how for the fabrication of NFs as well as the disc, their integration and the operation in the following order: processes for preparing TiO2 NF mat; transfer-printing of TiO2 NF mat onto the disc; surface modification for immune-reactions, disc assembly and operation; on-disc detection and representative results for immunoassay. Use of this device enables multiplexed analysis with minimal consumption of samples and reagents. Given the advantages, the device should find use in a wide variety of applications, and prove beneficial in facilitating the analysis of low abundant proteins. PMID:27167836

  5. Analysis of a new PM motor design for a rotary dynamic blood Pump.

    PubMed

    Xu, L; Wang, F; Fu, M; Medvedev, A; Smith, W A; Golding, L A

    1997-01-01

    The permanent magnet (PM) motor for a rotary dynamic blood pump requires high power density to coordinate the motor size with the limited pump space and high efficiency to reduce the size and weight of the associated batteries. The motor also serves as a passive axial magnetic thrust bearing, a reacting hydraulic force, and provides a stabilizing force for the radial journal bearing. This article presents analysis of a new PM motor for the blood pump application. High power density is achieved by using the Halbach magnetic array, and high efficiency is accomplished by optimizing the rotor magnet assembly and the stator slots/windings. While both radial and axial forces are greatly enhanced, pulsating components of the torque and force are also significantly reduced. PMID:9360106

  6. Centrifugal acceleration modes for incompressible fluid in the leakage annulus between a shrouded pump impeller and its housing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, D. W.

    1991-01-01

    An algorithm is developed for calculating complex eigenvalues and eigenvectors associated with the fluid resonances and is used to analyze the perturbed flow in the leakage path between a shrouded-pump impeller and its housing. The eigenvalues obtained are consistent with the forced-response curves. First- and second-natural-frequency eigensolutions are presented for mode shapes corresponding to lateral excitations, and first-natural-frequency eigensolutions are presented for mode shapes corresponding to axial excitation.

  7. A Centrifugal Microfluidic Platform That Separates Whole Blood Samples into Multiple Removable Fractions Due to Several Discrete but Continuous Density Gradient Sections

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Moen, Scott T.; Hatcher, Christopher L.; Singh, Anup K.

    2016-04-07

    We present a miniaturized centrifugal platform that uses density centrifugation for separation and analysis of biological components in small volume samples (~5 μL). We demonstrate the ability to enrich leukocytes for on-disk visualization via microscopy, as well as recovery of viable cells from each of the gradient partitions. In addition, we simplified the traditional Modified Wright-Giemsa staining by decreasing the time, volume, and expertise involved in the procedure. From a whole blood sample, we were able to extract 95.15% of leukocytes while excluding 99.8% of red blood cells. Ultimately, this platform has great potential in both medical diagnostics and researchmore » applications as it offers a simpler, automated, and inexpensive method for biological sample separation, analysis, and downstream culturing.« less

  8. A Centrifugal Microfluidic Platform That Separates Whole Blood Samples into Multiple Removable Fractions Due to Several Discrete but Continuous Density Gradient Sections

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Scott T.; Hatcher, Christopher L.; Singh, Anup K.

    2016-01-01

    We present a miniaturized centrifugal platform that uses density centrifugation for separation and analysis of biological components in small volume samples (~5 μL). We demonstrate the ability to enrich leukocytes for on-disk visualization via microscopy, as well as recovery of viable cells from each of the gradient partitions. In addition, we simplified the traditional Modified Wright-Giemsa staining by decreasing the time, volume, and expertise involved in the procedure. From a whole blood sample, we were able to extract 95.15% of leukocytes while excluding 99.8% of red blood cells. This platform has great potential in both medical diagnostics and research applications as it offers a simpler, automated, and inexpensive method for biological sample separation, analysis, and downstream culturing. PMID:27054764

  9. A Centrifugal Microfluidic Platform That Separates Whole Blood Samples into Multiple Removable Fractions Due to Several Discrete but Continuous Density Gradient Sections.

    PubMed

    Moen, Scott T; Hatcher, Christopher L; Singh, Anup K

    2016-01-01

    We present a miniaturized centrifugal platform that uses density centrifugation for separation and analysis of biological components in small volume samples (~5 μL). We demonstrate the ability to enrich leukocytes for on-disk visualization via microscopy, as well as recovery of viable cells from each of the gradient partitions. In addition, we simplified the traditional Modified Wright-Giemsa staining by decreasing the time, volume, and expertise involved in the procedure. From a whole blood sample, we were able to extract 95.15% of leukocytes while excluding 99.8% of red blood cells. This platform has great potential in both medical diagnostics and research applications as it offers a simpler, automated, and inexpensive method for biological sample separation, analysis, and downstream culturing. PMID:27054764

  10. Modeling of a dielectric elastomer diaphragm for a prosthetic blood pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulbourne, Nakhiah; Frecker, Mary I.; Mockensturm, Eric M.; Snyder, Alan J.

    2003-07-01

    The electromechanical behavior of dielectric elastomers is to be exploited for medical application in artificial blood pumps. It is required that the pump diaphragm achieves a swept volume increase of 70 cc into a systolic pressure of 120 mmHg with the main design objective being volumetric efficiency. As such, a model that accommodates large deformation behavior is used. In order to design prosthetic blood pumps that closely mimic the natural pumping chambers of the heart, a dielectric elastomer diaphragm design is proposed. The elastomer's change in shape in response to the applied electric field will permit it to be the active element of the pump just as the ventricular walls are in the natural heart. A comprehensive analytical model that accounts for the combined elastic and dielectric behavior of the membrane is used to compute the stresses and deformations of the inflated membrane. Dielectric elastomers are often pre-strained in order to obtain optimal electromechanical performance. The resulting model incorporates pre-strain and shows how system parameters such as pre-strain, pressure, electric field, and edge constraints affect membrane deformation. The model predicts more than adequate volume displacement for moderate pre-strain of the elastomer.

  11. PIV Investigations of the Flow Field in the Volute of a Rotary Blood Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankovic, John M.; Kadambi, Jaikrishnan R.; Smith, William A.; Wernet, Mark P.

    2004-01-01

    A full-size acrylic model of a rotary blood pump was developed in order to utilize Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to make measurements of the fluid velocities and turbulent stresses throughout the device. The development of an understanding of the hemodynamics within the blood pump is critical to the development and validation of computational models. A blood analog solution, consisting of sodium iodide solution and glycerin, was developed to match physiological kinematic viscosity. The refractive indices of the fluid, the pump casing, and the impeller were matched to facilitate the use of PIV to make velocity measurements. Velocity measurements made in the volute exit/diffuser region are presented for pumps speeds of 3000-3850 rpm. At each speed data were obtained at a physiological pressure of 12 kPa and at a maximum flow condition. Four hundred data pairs were used for each resultant mean velocity vector value, representing greater than an order of magnitude more data pairs than reported previously in the literature on similar devices and resulting in velocity uncertainty levels of approximately 22.9%.

  12. PIV Investigations of the Flow Field in the Volute of a Rotary Blood Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankovic, John M.; Kadambi, Jaikrishnan R.; Mehta, Mehul; Smith, William A.; Wernet, Mark P.

    2004-01-01

    A full-size acrylic model of a rotary blood pump was developed in order to utilize Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to make measurements of the fluid velocities and turbulent stresses throughout the device. The development of an understanding of the hemodynamics within the blood pump is critical to the development and validation of computational models. A blood analog solution, consisting of sodium iodide solution and glycerin, was developed to match physiological kinematic viscosity. The refractive indecies of the fluid, the pump casing and the impeller were matched to facilitate the use of PIV to make velocity measurements. Velocity measurements made in the volute exit/diffuser region are presented for pumps speeds of 3000-3850 rpm. At each speed data were obtained at a physiological pressure of 90 mmHg and at a maximum flow condition. Four hundred data pairs were used for each resultant mean velocity vector value, representing greater than an order of magnitude more data pairs than reported previously in the literature on similar devices and resulting in velocity uncertainty levels of approximately 2.9%.

  13. Sodium pump alpha2 subunits control myogenic tone and blood pressure in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Lee, Moo Yeol; Cavalli, Maurizio; Chen, Ling; Berra-Romani, Roberto; Balke, C William; Bianchi, Giuseppe; Ferrari, Patrizia; Hamlyn, John M; Iwamoto, Takahiro; Lingrel, Jerry B; Matteson, Donald R; Wier, W Gil; Blaustein, Mordecai P

    2005-11-15

    A key question in hypertension is: How is long-term blood pressure controlled? A clue is that chronic salt retention elevates an endogenous ouabain-like compound (EOLC) and induces salt-dependent hypertension mediated by Na(+)/Ca(2)(+) exchange (NCX). The precise mechanism, however, is unresolved. Here we study blood pressure and isolated small arteries of mice with reduced expression of Na(+) pump alpha1 (alpha1(+/-)) or alpha2 (alpha2(+/-)) catalytic subunits. Both low-dose ouabain (1-100 nm; inhibits only alpha2) and high-dose ouabain (> or =1 microm; inhibits alpha1) elevate myocyte Ca(2)(+) and constrict arteries from alpha1(+/-), as well as alpha2(+/-) and wild-type mice. Nevertheless, only mice with reduced alpha2 Na(+) pump activity (alpha2(+/-)), and not alpha1 (alpha1(+/-)), have elevated blood pressure. Also, isolated, pressurized arteries from alpha2(+/-), but not alpha1(+/-), have increased myogenic tone. Ouabain antagonists (PST 2238 and canrenone) and NCX blockers (SEA0400 and KB-R7943) normalize myogenic tone in ouabain-treated arteries. Only the NCX blockers normalize the elevated myogenic tone in alpha2(+/-) arteries because this tone is ouabain independent. All four agents are known to lower blood pressure in salt-dependent and ouabain-induced hypertension. Thus, chronically reduced alpha2 activity (alpha2(+/-) or chronic ouabain) apparently regulates myogenic tone and long-term blood pressure whereas reduced alpha1 activity (alpha1(+/-)) plays no persistent role: the in vivo changes in blood pressure reflect the in vitro changes in myogenic tone. Accordingly, in salt-dependent hypertension, EOLC probably increases vascular resistance and blood pressure by reducing alpha2 Na(+) pump activity and promoting Ca(2)(+) entry via NCX in myocytes. PMID:16166162

  14. Flow modulation algorithms for intra-aortic rotary blood pumps to minimize coronary steal.

    PubMed

    Ising, Mickey S; Koenig, Steven C; Sobieski, Michael A; Slaughter, Mark S; Giridharan, Guruprasad A

    2013-01-01

    Intra-aortic rotary blood pumps (IARBPs) have been used for partial cardiac support during cardiogenic shock, myocardial infarction, percutaneous coronary intervention, and potentially viable for long-term circulatory support. Intra-aortic rotary blood pump support continuously removes volume from the aortic root, which lowers left ventricular preload, external work (LVEW), and improves end-organ perfusion. However, IARBP support diminishes aortic root pressure and coronary artery. It may also create "coronary steal," which may produce a myocardial hypoxic state adversely affecting patient outcomes. Our objective was to develop IARBP flow modulation algorithms to eliminate coronary steal and improve the myocardial supply-demand ratio without compromising the clinical benefits of restored end-organ perfusion and reduced LVEW. The hemodynamic responses of the native ventricle, coronary, and systemic vasculature to timing and synchronization of IARBP flow modulation (cyclic variation of pump flow) were investigated using a clinical heart failure (HF) computer simulation model. A total of more than 150 combinations of varying pulse widths and time-shifts to modulate IARBP flow were tested at mean IARBP flow rates of 2, 3, and 4 L/min, and compared with HF baseline values (no IARBP support). Increasing IARBP support augmented cardiac output and diminished LVEW. Nonmodulated IARBP support significantly diminished mean diastolic coronary flow (-49%) and myocardial supply-demand ratio (-12%) compared with HF baseline. Intra-aortic rotary blood pump flow modulation increased mean diastolic coronary flow (+17%) and myocardial supply-demand ratio (+24%) compared with nonmodulated IARBP (constant flow). Modulation and synchronization of IARBP support augmented coronary artery perfusion and myocardial supply-demand ratio in simulated clinical HF while also restoring end-organ perfusion and reducing LVEW. Implementation of IARBP support with flow modulation may prevent

  15. The Generation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Blood Cells: An Efficient Protocol Using Serial Plating of Reprogrammed Cells by Centrifugation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngkyun; Yi, Hyoju; Park, Sung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have demonstrated great potential for differentiation into diverse tissues. We report a straightforward and highly efficient method for the generation of iPSCs from PBMCs. By plating the cells serially to a newly coated plate by centrifugation, this protocol provides multiple healthy iPSC colonies even from a small number of PBMCs. The generated iPSCs expressed pluripotent markers and differentiated into all three germ layer lineages. The protocol can also be used with umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs). In this study, we present a simple and efficient protocol that improved the yield of iPSCs from floating cells such as PBMCs and CBMCs by serial plating and centrifugation. PMID:27579041

  16. The Generation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Blood Cells: An Efficient Protocol Using Serial Plating of Reprogrammed Cells by Centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngkyun; Rim, Yeri Alice; Yi, Hyoju; Park, Narae; Park, Sung-Hwan; Ju, Ji Hyeon

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have demonstrated great potential for differentiation into diverse tissues. We report a straightforward and highly efficient method for the generation of iPSCs from PBMCs. By plating the cells serially to a newly coated plate by centrifugation, this protocol provides multiple healthy iPSC colonies even from a small number of PBMCs. The generated iPSCs expressed pluripotent markers and differentiated into all three germ layer lineages. The protocol can also be used with umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs). In this study, we present a simple and efficient protocol that improved the yield of iPSCs from floating cells such as PBMCs and CBMCs by serial plating and centrifugation. PMID:27579041

  17. A hydrodynamically suspended, magnetically sealed mechanically noncontact axial flow blood pump: design of a hydrodynamic bearing.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Yoshinori; Kido, Kazuyuki; Yano, Tetsuya; Sakota, Daisuke; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Sekine, Kazumitsu; OKamoto, Eiji

    2007-03-01

    To overcome the drive shaft seal and bearing problem in rotary blood pumps, a hydrodynamic bearing, a magnetic fluid seal, and a brushless direct current (DC) motor were employed in an axial flow pump. This enabled contact-free rotation of the impeller without material wear. The axial flow pump consisted of a brushless DC motor, an impeller, and a guide vane. The motor rotor was directly connected to the impeller by a motor shaft. A hydrodynamic bearing was installed on the motor shaft. The motor and the hydrodynamic bearing were housed in a cylindrical casing and were waterproofed by a magnetic fluid seal, a mechanically noncontact seal. Impeller shaft displacement was measured using a laser sensor. Axial and radial displacements of the shaft were only a few micrometers for motor speed up to 8500 rpm. The shaft did not make contact with the bearing housing. A flow of 5 L/min was obtained at 8000 rpm at a pressure difference of 100 mm Hg. In conclusion, the axial flow blood pump consisting of a hydrodynamic bearing, a magnetic fluid seal, and a brushless DC motor provided contact-free rotation of the impeller without material wear.

  18. A hydrodynamically suspended, magnetically sealed mechanically noncontact axial flow blood pump: design of a hydrodynamic bearing.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Yoshinori; Kido, Kazuyuki; Yano, Tetsuya; Sakota, Daisuke; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Sekine, Kazumitsu; OKamoto, Eiji

    2007-03-01

    To overcome the drive shaft seal and bearing problem in rotary blood pumps, a hydrodynamic bearing, a magnetic fluid seal, and a brushless direct current (DC) motor were employed in an axial flow pump. This enabled contact-free rotation of the impeller without material wear. The axial flow pump consisted of a brushless DC motor, an impeller, and a guide vane. The motor rotor was directly connected to the impeller by a motor shaft. A hydrodynamic bearing was installed on the motor shaft. The motor and the hydrodynamic bearing were housed in a cylindrical casing and were waterproofed by a magnetic fluid seal, a mechanically noncontact seal. Impeller shaft displacement was measured using a laser sensor. Axial and radial displacements of the shaft were only a few micrometers for motor speed up to 8500 rpm. The shaft did not make contact with the bearing housing. A flow of 5 L/min was obtained at 8000 rpm at a pressure difference of 100 mm Hg. In conclusion, the axial flow blood pump consisting of a hydrodynamic bearing, a magnetic fluid seal, and a brushless DC motor provided contact-free rotation of the impeller without material wear. PMID:17343698

  19. Electro-elastic modeling of a dielectric elastomer diaphragm for a prosthetic blood pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulbourne, Nakhiah C.; Frecker, Mary I.; Mockensturm, Eric

    2004-07-01

    A dielectric elastomer diaphragm is to be designed for potential use in a prosthetic blood pump. Application of an electric field deforms the membrane such that it moves from an initially flat configuration to an inflated state. This motion creates positive displacement of blood from the cardiac chambers thus mimicking the pump-like behavior of the natural heart. A comprehensive large deformation model accounting for the combined dielectric and elastic effect has been formulated. This paper presents recent developments in the model to further incorporate the entire nonlinear range of material elastic behavior and to more accurately represent the applied electric field by keeping the voltage constant as the membrane thickness decreases. The updated model is used to calculate the effects of varying system parameters such as pressure, voltage, prestretch, material constants, and membrane geometry. Analytical results are obtained for biaxially stretched 3M VHB 4905 polyacrylate films.

  20. Density-Gradient Mediated Band Extraction of Leukocytes from Whole Blood Using Centrifugo-Pneumatic Siphon Valving on Centrifugal Microfluidic Discs

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, Sinéad M.; Kilcawley, Niamh A.; Early, Philip L.; Glynn, Macdara T.; Ducrée, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Here we present retrieval of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by density-gradient medium based centrifugation for subsequent analysis of the leukocytes on an integrated microfluidic “Lab-on-a-Disc” cartridge. Isolation of white blood cells constitutes a critical sample preparation step for many bioassays. Centrifugo-pneumatic siphon valves are particularly suited for blood processing as they function without need of surface treatment and are ‘low-pass’, i.e., holding at high centrifugation speeds and opening upon reduction of the spin rate. Both ‘hydrostatically’ and ‘hydrodynamically’ triggered centrifugo-pneumatic siphon valving schemes are presented. Firstly, the geometry of the pneumatic chamber of hydrostatically primed centrifugo-pneumatic siphon valves is optimised to enable smooth and uniform layering of blood on top of the density-gradient medium; this feature proves to be key for efficient Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell extraction. A theoretical analysis of hydrostatically primed valves is also presented which determines the optimum priming pressure for the individual valves. Next, ‘dual siphon’ configurations for both hydrostatically and hydrodynamically primed centrifugo-pneumatic siphon valves are introduced; here plasma and Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells are extracted through a distinct siphon valve. This work represents a first step towards enabling on disc multi-parameter analysis. Finally, the efficiency of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells extraction in these structures is characterised using a simplified design. A microfluidic mechanism, which we termed phase switching, is identified which affects the efficiency of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell extraction. PMID:27167376

  1. The Influence of Swirl Brakes and a Tip Discharge Orifice on the Rotordynamic Forces Generated by Discharge-to-Suction Leakage Flows in Shrouded Centrifugal Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivo, Joseph M.; Acosta, A. J.; Brennen, C. E.; Caughey, T. K.

    1993-01-01

    Recent experiments conducted in the Rotor Force Test Facility at the California Institute of Technology have examined the effects of a tip leakage restriction and swirl brakes on the rotordynamic forces due to leakage flows on an impeller undergoing a prescribed circular whirl. The experiments simulate the leakage flow conditions and geometry of the Alternate Turbopump Design (ATD) of the Space Shuttle High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump and are critical to evaluating the pump's rotordynamic instability problems. Previous experimental and analytical results have shown that discharge-to-suction leakage flows in the annulus of a shrouded centrifugal pump contribute substantially to the fluid induced rotordynamic forces. Also, previous experiments have shown that leakage inlet (pump discharge) swirl can increase the cross-coupled stiffness coefficient and hence increase the range of positive whirl for which the tangential force is destabilizing. In recent experimental work, the present authors demonstrated that when the swirl velocity within the leakage path is reduced by the introduction of ribs or swirl brakes, then a substantial decrease in both the destabilizing normal and tangential forces could be achieved. Motivation for the present research is that previous experiments have shown that restrictions such as wear rings or orifices at pump inlets affect the leakage forces. Recent pump designs such as the Space Shuttle Alternate Turbopump Design (ATD) utilize tip orifices at discharge for the purpose of establishing axial thrust balance. The ATD has experienced rotordynamic instability problems and one may surmise that these tip discharge orifices may also have an important effect on the normal and tangential forces in the plane of impeller rotation. The present study determines if such tip leakage restrictions contribute to undesirable rotordynamic forces. Additional motivation for the present study is that the widening of the leakage path annular clearance and the

  2. Hemodynamics during Rotary Blood Pump support with speed synchronization in heart failure condition: A modelling study.

    PubMed

    Htet, Zwe Lin; Aye, Thin Pa Pa; Singhavilai, Thamvarit; Naiyanetr, Phornphop

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the hemodynamic changes in the cardiovascular system under different modes of Rotary Blood Pump (RBP) support. Continuous mode (constant pump speed) and co-pulse mode (increased pump speed in systole) are studied. Computer simulation studies have been conducted to evaluate the performances of these two modes under normal and pathological conditions. The pathological heart condition is simulated by reducing the maximum systolic elestance (Emax) in the cardiovascular system model. The model is implemented by using MATLAB Simulink. The pressure-volume loop of different heart conditions (normal heart: 100% of normal contractility, pathological heart: 30% of normal contractility) and the different modes of RBP support (8 krpm and 11 krpm in continuous mode, between 8 krpm and 11 krpm in co-pulse mode) are simulated. The results of this study show the slope of end systolic pressure volume relationship (ESPVR) changes in pathological condition. The reduction of area inside pressure volume loops depend on the increasing level of pump speed. The results indicated systolic aortic pressures in co-pulse mode are higher than in the continuous mode. In normal condition, the value of systolic aortic pressure in co-pulse mode is 113 mmHg and the values of systolic aortic pressures in continuous modes are 109 mmHg (8 k) and 95 mmHg (11 k). In pathological condition, the value of systolic aortic pressure in co pulse mode is 100 mmHg and the values of systolic aortic pressures in continuous modes are 90 mmHg (8 k) and 95 mmHg (11 k). The hemodynamics results of this study are comparable in vivo data, clinical data and other simulation studies. Therefore, this simulation enables hemodynamic studies in patients with end-stage heart failure, and patients under different modes of rotary blood pump support. PMID:26736999

  3. Comparison of a pulsatile blood pump and a peristaltic roller pump during hemoperfusion treatment in a canine model of paraquat poisoning.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Chan; Park, Chan Young; Choi, Seong Wook; Kim, Jeong Chul; Lim, Ki Moo; Kim, Kyuseok; Jung, Sung Koo; Kwak, Young Ho; Shin, Sang Do; Jo, Ik Joon; Suh, Gil Joon; Min, Byoung Goo

    2008-07-01

    This study examined the treatment efficacy and the damage to the blood during hemoperfusion for treating paraquat poisoning using two blood pump mechanisms. Paraquat-poisoned animal models were prepared. A conventional hemodialysis machine, AK90, with a peristaltic roller pump and a cardiopulmonary support system, T-PLS, with a pulsatile blood pump were used during the animal experiments. A total of 12 dogs were treated with hemoperfusion using a charcoal column. Six dogs were treated with hemoperfusion and T-PLS, and the other six were treated with AK90. A paraquat dose of 30 mg/kg was administrated by an intravenous injection. Both pumps maintained blood flow rates of 125 mL/min measured by an ultrasonic flowmeter. For anticoagulation, heparin was administrated by an initial bolus (250 IU/kg) and a continuous injection (100 IU/kg/h). During the experiments, T-PLS and AK90 showed a similar toxin removal efficacy. Both devices decreased the plasma paraquat concentration to 10% of the initial dose within 4-h hemoperfusion. The two pumps showed similar hemolysis properties with acceptable levels. Although T-PLS was developed as a cardiopulmonary bypass system, it can also be used as a hemoperfusion treatment device. PMID:18638308

  4. PUMPS

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, J.D.

    1959-03-24

    A pump is described for conveving liquids, particure it is not advisable he apparatus. The to be submerged in the liquid to be pumped, a conduit extending from the high-velocity nozzle of the injector,and means for applying a pulsating prcesure to the surface of the liquid in the conduit, whereby the surface oscillates between positions in the conduit. During the positive half- cycle of an applied pulse liquid is forced through the high velocity nozzle or jet of the injector and operates in the manner of the well known water injector and pumps liquid from the main intake to the outlet of the injector. During the negative half-cycle of the pulse liquid flows in reverse through the jet but no reverse pumping action takes place.

  5. CENTRIFUGAL SEPARATORS

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.

    1959-03-10

    A centrifugal separator is described for separating gaseous mixtures where the temperature gradients both longitudinally and radially of the centrifuge may be controlled effectively to produce a maximum separation of the process gases flowing through. Tbe invention provides for the balancing of increases and decreases in temperature in various zones of the centrifuge chamber as the result of compression and expansions respectively, of process gases and may be employed effectively both to neutralize harmful temperature gradients and to utilize beneficial temperaturc gradients within the centrifuge.

  6. Automatic system for noninvasive blood pressure determination in rotary pump recipients.

    PubMed

    Schima, Heinrich; Boehm, Herbert; Huber, Leopold; Schmallegger, Helmut; Vollkron, Michael; Hiesmayr, Michael; Noisser, Robert; Wieselthaler, Georg

    2004-05-01

    In patients with implanted rotary pumps, the arterial pressure pulsatility is usually far lower than in normal individuals. Depending on the remaining degree of pulsatility, cuff-based systems such as the classical Riva-Rocci-determination of arterial blood pressure and correlated sounds or pressure measurements based on cuffpressure oscillations become inaccurate or even impossible. Therefore, a system was developed which evaluates the flow in the radial artery using an ultrasound wristwatch sensor, and this additional information is used for pressure determination. A computerized data acquisition and cuff-control system based on a PC using Matlab software, a wristwatch ultrasound device, and a compressor-driven pressure cuff was set up. The cuff was controlled for automatic inflation and deflation cycles. Cuff pressure and arterial flow was recorded. Several algorithm strategies were developed, which gave data for systolic blood pressure and heart rate together with a reliability index for data quality. Finally, the new algorithms were implemented in a microcontroller system. Comparisons with invasive measurements showed excellent correlation with systolic blood pressure (mean deltaP -0.3 mm Hg, n = 28). During exercise of rotary pump patients and therefore enhanced pulsatility the difference from manual evaluation was -2.1 mm Hg (n = 18). In conclusion, adaptation of the classical cuff-pressure method with ultrasound evaluation of peripheral flow allows reliable determination of blood pressure in patients with low pulsatility resulting from implanted rotary cardiac assist pumps. By development of a wristwatch sensor and an automatic control system a robust method for daily use could be developed.

  7. Optimization of a Hybrid Magnetic Bearing for a Magnetically Levitated Blood Pump via 3-D FEA

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shanbao; Olles, Mark W.; Burger, Aaron F.; Day, Steven W.

    2011-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of a magnetically levitated (maglev) axial flow blood pump, three-dimensional (3-D) finite element analysis (FEA) was used to optimize the design of a hybrid magnetic bearing (HMB). Radial, axial, and current stiffness of multiple design variations of the HMB were calculated using a 3-D FEA package and verified by experimental results. As compared with the original design, the optimized HMB had twice the axial stiffness with the resulting increase of negative radial stiffness partially compensated for by increased current stiffness. Accordingly, the performance of the maglev axial flow blood pump with the optimized HMBs was improved: the maximum pump speed was increased from 6000 rpm to 9000 rpm (50%). The radial, axial and current stiffness of the HMB was found to be linear at nominal operational position from both 3-D FEA and empirical measurements. Stiffness values determined by FEA and empirical measurements agreed well with one another. The magnetic flux density distribution and flux loop of the HMB were also visualized via 3-D FEA which confirms the designers’ initial assumption about the function of this HMB. PMID:22065892

  8. Estimation of maximum ventricular elastance under assistance with a rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Sugai, Telma K; Tanaka, Akira; Yoshizawa, Makoto; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Nitta, Shin-ichi; Baba, Atsushi

    2010-05-01

    The maximum ventricular elastance is a reliable index for assessing the cardiac function from changes in its pressure-volume relationship. The advantage of this index is that it can represent the contractility of either unassisted hearts or native hearts assisted with rotary blood pumps. However, there are situations in which changes in the ventricular load required for the conventional estimation method might be risky. For example, in a bridge-to-recovery the cardiac function should also be continuously observed after the implantation of a rotary blood pump. In this article, we present the results of the estimation of the maximum elastance with in vivo data using the parameter optimization method, which is a single-beat estimation method. The estimated values for the normal cardiac function (6.8 +/- 0.6, 4.5 +/- 0.9, 4.2 +/- 1.8 mm Hg/mL) were significantly different from those for the low cardiac function (3.2 +/- 1.5, 1.9 +/- 1.0, 1.9 +/- 1.2 mm Hg/mL) from the data of the three animals that were analyzed. Besides, the maximum elastance values were independent of the pump rotational speed. These results indicate that this index might be useful for the detection of the myocardial recovery.

  9. Sensorless Viscosity Measurement in a Magnetically-Levitated Rotary Blood Pump.

    PubMed

    Hijikata, Wataru; Rao, Jun; Abe, Shodai; Takatani, Setsuo; Shinshi, Tadahiko

    2015-07-01

    Controlling the flow rate in an implantable rotary blood pump based on the physiological demand made by the body is important. Even though various methods to estimate the flow rate without using a flow meter have been proposed, no adequate method for measuring the blood viscosity, which is necessary for an accurate estimate of the flow rate, without using additional sensors or mechanisms in a noninvasive way, has yet been realized. We have developed a sensorless method for measuring viscosity in magnetically levitated rotary blood pumps, which requires no additional sensors or mechanisms. By applying vibrational excitation to the impeller using a magnetic bearing, we measured the viscosity of the working fluid by measuring the phase difference between the current in the magnetic bearing and the displacement of the impeller. The measured viscosity showed a high correlation (R(2)  > 0.992) with respect to a reference viscosity. The mean absolute deviation of the measured viscosity was 0.12 mPa·s for several working fluids with viscosities ranging from 1.18 to 5.12 mPa·s. The proposed sensorless measurement method has the possibility of being utilized for estimating flow rate. PMID:25920684

  10. Gas centrifuge purge method

    DOEpatents

    Theurich, Gordon R.

    1976-01-01

    1. In a method of separating isotopes in a high speed gas centrifuge wherein a vertically oriented cylindrical rotor bowl is adapted to rotate about its axis within an evacuated chamber, and wherein an annular molecular pump having an intake end and a discharge end encircles the uppermost portion of said rotor bowl, said molecular pump being attached along its periphery in a leak-tight manner to said evacuated chamber, and wherein end cap closure means are affixed to the upper end of said rotor bowl, and a process gas withdrawal and insertion system enters said bowl through said end cap closure means, said evacuated chamber, molecular pump and end cap defining an upper zone at the discharge end of said molecular pump, said evacuated chamber, molecular pump and rotor bowl defining a lower annular zone at the intake end of said molecular pump, a method for removing gases from said upper and lower zones during centrifuge operation with a minimum loss of process gas from said rotor bowl, comprising, in combination: continuously measuring the pressure in said upper zone, pumping gas from said lower zone from the time the pressure in said upper zone equals a first preselected value until the pressure in said upper zone is equal to a second preselected value, said first preselected value being greater than said second preselected value, and continuously pumping gas from said upper zone from the time the pressure in said upper zone equals a third preselected value until the pressure in said upper zone is equal to a fourth preselected value, said third preselected value being greater than said first, second and fourth preselected values.

  11. Prospective randomized clinical study of arterial pumps used for routine on pump coronary bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Keyser, Andreas; Hilker, Michael K; Diez, Claudius; Philipp, Alois; Foltan, Maik; Schmid, Christof

    2011-05-01

    In a number of studies, centrifugal blood pumps--in comparison with roller pumps--have been shown to attenuate trauma to blood components. Nevertheless, the impact of these results on the postoperative course needs to be discussed controversially. In a prospective randomized study, 240 consecutive adult patients underwent elective myocardial revascularization with cardiopulmonary bypass employing five different pumps (Roller, Avecor, Sarns, Rotaflow, Bio-Medicus). We analyzed clinical course, blood loss, damage of blood components, and impairment of the hemostatic system. The study population was homogenous with respect to age, gender, myocardial function, and operative data. No differences were found with respect to time of ventilation, duration of intensive care stay, hospitalization, and laboratory data. The choice of arterial pump during standard extracorporeal bypass for elective coronary artery bypass grafting is no matter of concern.

  12. Hematocrit analysis through the use of an inexpensive centrifugal polyester-toner device with finger-to-chip blood loading capability.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Brandon L; Gilbert, Rachel J; Mejia, Maximo; Shukla, Nishant; Haverstick, Doris M; Garner, Gavin T; Landers, James P

    2016-06-14

    Hematocrit (HCT) measurements are important clinical diagnostic variables that help physicians diagnose and treat various medical conditions, ailments, and diseases. In this work, we present the HCT Disc, a centrifugal microdevice fabricated by a Print, Cut and Laminate (PCL) method to generate a 12-sample HCT device from materials costing <0.5 USD (polyester and toner or PeT). Following introduction from a drop of blood (finger stick), whole blood metering and cell sedimentation are controlled by centrifugal force, only requiring a CD player motor as external hardware and, ultimately, a cell phone for detection. The sedimented volume from patient blood in the HCT Disc was analyzed using a conventional scanner/custom algorithm for analysis of the image to determine a hematocrit value, and these were compared to values generated in a clinical laboratory, which correlated well. To enhance portability and assure simplicity of the HCT measurement, values from image analysis by a cell phone using a custom application was compared to the scanner. Fifteen samples were analyzed with cell phone image analysis system and were found to be within 4% of the HCT values determined in the clinical lab. We demonstrate the feasibility of the PeT device for HCT measurement, and highlight its uniquely low cost (<0.5 USD), speed (sample-to-answer <8 min), multiplexability (12 samples), low volume whole blood requirement (<3 μL), rotation speeds (<4000 rpm) needed for effective measurement as well as the direct finger-to-chip sample loading capability. PMID:27181638

  13. Hematocrit analysis through the use of an inexpensive centrifugal polyester-toner device with finger-to-chip blood loading capability.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Brandon L; Gilbert, Rachel J; Mejia, Maximo; Shukla, Nishant; Haverstick, Doris M; Garner, Gavin T; Landers, James P

    2016-06-14

    Hematocrit (HCT) measurements are important clinical diagnostic variables that help physicians diagnose and treat various medical conditions, ailments, and diseases. In this work, we present the HCT Disc, a centrifugal microdevice fabricated by a Print, Cut and Laminate (PCL) method to generate a 12-sample HCT device from materials costing <0.5 USD (polyester and toner or PeT). Following introduction from a drop of blood (finger stick), whole blood metering and cell sedimentation are controlled by centrifugal force, only requiring a CD player motor as external hardware and, ultimately, a cell phone for detection. The sedimented volume from patient blood in the HCT Disc was analyzed using a conventional scanner/custom algorithm for analysis of the image to determine a hematocrit value, and these were compared to values generated in a clinical laboratory, which correlated well. To enhance portability and assure simplicity of the HCT measurement, values from image analysis by a cell phone using a custom application was compared to the scanner. Fifteen samples were analyzed with cell phone image analysis system and were found to be within 4% of the HCT values determined in the clinical lab. We demonstrate the feasibility of the PeT device for HCT measurement, and highlight its uniquely low cost (<0.5 USD), speed (sample-to-answer <8 min), multiplexability (12 samples), low volume whole blood requirement (<3 μL), rotation speeds (<4000 rpm) needed for effective measurement as well as the direct finger-to-chip sample loading capability.

  14. Design and parameter estimation of hybrid magnetic bearings for blood pump applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Tau Meng; Zhang, Dongsheng; Yang, Juanjuan; Cheng, Shanbao; Low, Sze Hsien; Chua, Leok Poh; Wu, Xiaowei

    2009-10-01

    This paper discusses the design and parameter estimation of the dynamics characteristics of a high-speed hybrid magnetic bearings (HMBs) system for axial flow blood pump applications. The rotor/impeller of the pump is driven by a three-phase permanent magnet (PM) brushless and sensorless DC motor. It is levitated by two HMBs at both ends in five-degree-of-freedom with proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllers; among which four radial directions are actively controlled and one axial direction is passively controlled. Test results show that the rotor can be stably supported to speeds of 14,000 rpm. The frequency domain parameter estimation technique with statistical analysis is adopted to validate the stiffness and damping coefficients of the HMBs system. A specially designed test rig facilitated the estimation of the bearing's coefficients in air—in both the radial and axial directions. The radial stiffness of the HMBs is compared to the Ansoft's Maxwell 2D/3D finite element magnetostatic results. Experimental estimation showed that the dynamics characteristics of the HMBs system are dominated by the frequency-dependent stiffness coefficients. The actuator gain was also successfully calibrated and may potentially extend the parameter estimation technique developed in the study of identification and monitoring of the pump's dynamics properties under normal operating conditions with fluid.

  15. MALDI-TOF identification of Gram-negative bacteria directly from blood culture bottles containing charcoal: Sepsityper® kits versus centrifugation-filtration method.

    PubMed

    Riederer, Kathleen; Cruz, Kristian; Shemes, Stephen; Szpunar, Susan; Fishbain, Joel T

    2015-06-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry has dramatically altered the way microbiology laboratories identify clinical isolates. Direct blood culture (BC) detection may be hampered, however, by the presence of charcoal in BC bottles currently in clinical use. This study evaluates an in-house process for extraction and MALDI-TOF identification of Gram-negative bacteria directly from BC bottles containing charcoal. Three hundred BC aliquots were extracted by a centrifugation-filtration method developed in our research laboratory with the first 96 samples processed in parallel using Sepsityper® kits. Controls were colonies from solid media with standard phenotypic and MALDI-TOF identification. The identification of Gram-negative bacteria was successful more often via the in-house method compared to Sepsityper® kits (94.7% versus 78.1%, P≤0.0001). Our in-house centrifugation-filtration method was further validated for isolation and identification of Gram-negative bacteria (95%; n=300) directly from BC bottles containing charcoal.

  16. Development of magnetic bearing system for a new third-generation blood pump.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Joo; Ahn, Chi Bum; Choi, Jaesoon; Park, Jun Woo; Song, Seung-Joon; Sun, Kyung

    2011-11-01

    A magnetic bearing system is a crucial component in a third-generation blood pump, particularly when we consider aspects such as system durability and blood compatibility. Many factors such as efficiency, occupying volume, hemodynamic stability in the flow path, mechanical stability, and stiffness need to be considered for the use of a magnetic bearing system in a third-generation blood pump, and a number of studies have been conducted to develop novel magnetic bearing design for better handling of these factors. In this study, we developed and evaluated a new magnetic bearing system having a motor for a new third-generation blood pump. This magnetic bearing system consists of a magnetic levitation compartment and a brushless direct current (BLDC) motor compartment. The active-control degree of freedom is one; this control is used for controlling the levitation in the axial direction. The levitation in the radial direction has a passive magnetic levitation structure. In order to improve the system efficiency, we separated the magnetic circuit for axial levitation by using a magnetic circuit for motor drive. Each magnetic circuit in the bearing system was designed to have a minimum gap by placing mechanical parts, such as the impeller blades, outside the circuit. A custom-designed noncontact gap sensor was used for minimizing the system volume. We fabricated an experimental prototype of the proposed magnetic bearing system and evaluated its performance by a control system using the Matlab xPC Target system. The noncontact gap sensor was an eddy current gap sensor with an outer diameter of 2.38 mm, thickness of 0.88 mm, and resolution of 5 µm. The BLDC motor compartment was designed to have an outer diameter of 20 mm, length of 28.75 mm, and power of 4.5 W. It exhibited a torque of 8.6 mNm at 5000 rpm. The entire bearing system, including the motor and the sensor, had an outer diameter of 22 mm and a length of 97 mm. The prototype exhibited sufficient levitation

  17. Development of magnetic bearing system for a new third-generation blood pump.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Joo; Ahn, Chi Bum; Choi, Jaesoon; Park, Jun Woo; Song, Seung-Joon; Sun, Kyung

    2011-11-01

    A magnetic bearing system is a crucial component in a third-generation blood pump, particularly when we consider aspects such as system durability and blood compatibility. Many factors such as efficiency, occupying volume, hemodynamic stability in the flow path, mechanical stability, and stiffness need to be considered for the use of a magnetic bearing system in a third-generation blood pump, and a number of studies have been conducted to develop novel magnetic bearing design for better handling of these factors. In this study, we developed and evaluated a new magnetic bearing system having a motor for a new third-generation blood pump. This magnetic bearing system consists of a magnetic levitation compartment and a brushless direct current (BLDC) motor compartment. The active-control degree of freedom is one; this control is used for controlling the levitation in the axial direction. The levitation in the radial direction has a passive magnetic levitation structure. In order to improve the system efficiency, we separated the magnetic circuit for axial levitation by using a magnetic circuit for motor drive. Each magnetic circuit in the bearing system was designed to have a minimum gap by placing mechanical parts, such as the impeller blades, outside the circuit. A custom-designed noncontact gap sensor was used for minimizing the system volume. We fabricated an experimental prototype of the proposed magnetic bearing system and evaluated its performance by a control system using the Matlab xPC Target system. The noncontact gap sensor was an eddy current gap sensor with an outer diameter of 2.38 mm, thickness of 0.88 mm, and resolution of 5 µm. The BLDC motor compartment was designed to have an outer diameter of 20 mm, length of 28.75 mm, and power of 4.5 W. It exhibited a torque of 8.6 mNm at 5000 rpm. The entire bearing system, including the motor and the sensor, had an outer diameter of 22 mm and a length of 97 mm. The prototype exhibited sufficient levitation

  18. Development of a polymer bileaflet valve to realize a low-cost pulsatile blood pump.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Kiyotaka; Umezu, Mitsuo; Iijima, Kazuo; Inoue, Akira; Imachi, Kou; Ye, Chun Xiu

    2003-01-01

    The final goal of this study is to realize a low-cost pulsatile blood pump especially for patients with acute heart failure or postoperative low cardiac output syndrome. In support of the pump, two types of polymer bileaflet valves with different configuration of the valve seats were developed. Influence of the leaflet thickness on the hydrodynamics of the prototype was preliminarily investigated among 70 microm, 100 microm, and 150 microm. As to the valves with the thinner leaflets, buckling of the leaflets was observed, which induced a large amount of regurgitation at valve closure. However, by thickening the leaflet to 150 microm, the mean flow of the prototype and the second model could be successfully comparable to the Medtronic-Hall valve. Moreover, accelerated fatigue tests showed that reinforcement of the valve seat with the additional spokes in the second model extended the durability by four times as compared with the prototype, equivalent to an in vivo duration of over one month. PMID:12534717

  19. Liquid pump for astronaut cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo portable life support system water-recirculation pump used for astronaut cooling is described. The problems associated with an early centrifugal pump and how these problems were overcome by the use of a new diaphragm pump are discussed. Performance comparisons of the two pump designs are given. Developmental problems and flight results with the diaphragm pump are discussed.

  20. Development of Lorentz force-type self-bearing motor for an alternative axial flow blood pump design.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tau Meng; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2006-05-01

    A Lorentz force-type self-bearing motor was developed to provide delivery of both motoring torque and levitation force for an alternative axial flow blood pump design with an enclosed impeller. The axial flow pumps currently available introduce electromagnetic coupling from the motor's stator to the impeller by means of permanent magnets (PMs) embedded in the tips of the pump's blades. This design has distinct disadvantages, for example, pumping efficiency and electromagnetic coupling transmission are compromised by the constrained or poor geometry of the blades and limited pole width of the PMs, respectively. In this research, a Lorentz force-type self-bearing motor was developed. It is composed of (i) an eight-pole PM hollow-cylindrical rotor assembly supposedly to house and enclose the impeller of an axial flow blood pump, and (ii) a six-pole stator with two sets of copper wire and different winding configurations to provide the motoring torque and levitating force for the rotor assembly. MATLAB's xPC Target interface hardware was used as the rapid prototyping tool for the development of the controller for the self-bearing motor. Experimental results on a free/simply supported rotor assembly validated the design feasibility and control algorithm effectiveness in providing both the motoring torque and levitation force for the rotor. When levitated, a maximum orbital displacement of 0.3 mm corresponding to 1050 rpm of the rotor was measured by two eddy current probes placed in the orthogonal direction. This design has the advantage of eliminating the trade-off between motoring torques, levitating force, and pumping efficiency of previous studies. It also indicated the benefits of enclosed-impeller design as having good dynamic response, linearity, and better reliability. The nonmechanical contact feature between rotating and stationary parts will further reduce hemolysis and thromboembolitic tendencies in a typical blood pump application. PMID:16683951

  1. Infusion pumps and red blood cell damage in transfusion therapy: an integrative revision of the academic literature 1

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Ana Maria Miranda Martins; Peterlini, Maria Angélica Sorgini; Pedreira, Mavilde da Luz Gonçalves

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: to obtain information from scientific literature concerning infusion pumps used in administering erythrocyte (red blood cells) and to evaluate the implications in the practical use of this equipment by nurses when conducting transfusions. Method: an integrative revision of the following scientific databases: Pubmed/Medline, Scopus, the Virtual Library for Health, SciELO, Web of Science and Cochrane. The following descriptors were used: "infusion pumps", "blood transfusion", "transfused erythrocyte" and "hemolyis". There were no restrictions on the scope of the initial data and it was finalized in December 2014. 17 articles were identified in accordance with the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results: all of the publications included in the studies were experimental in vitro and covered the use of infusion pumps in transfusion therapy. A summary of the data was presented in a synoptic chart and an analysis of it generated the following categories: cellular damage and the infusion mechanism. Conclusion: infusion pumps can be harmful to erythrocytes based on the infusion mechanism that is used, as the linear peristaltic pump is more likely to cause hemolysis. Cellular damage is related to the plasmatic liberation of markers that largely dominate free hemoglobin and potassium. We reiterate the need for further research and technological investments to guide the development of protocols that promote safe practices and that can contribute to future clinical studies. PMID:27533272

  2. Cardiovascular devices; reclassification of nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pumps for cardiopulmonary and circulatory bypass; effective date of requirement for premarket approval for nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pumps for temporary ventricular support. Final order.

    PubMed

    2015-06-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final order to reclassify nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump (NRP) devices for cardiopulmonary and circulatory bypass, a preamendments class III device, into class II (special controls), and to require the filing of a premarket approval application (PMA) for NRP devices for temporary ventricular support. FDA is also revising the title and identification of the regulation for NRP devices in this order. PMID:26054096

  3. Viscosity-adjusted estimation of pressure head and pump flow with quasi-pulsatile modulation of rotary blood pump for a total artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Yurimoto, Terumi; Hara, Shintaro; Isoyama, Takashi; Saito, Itsuro; Ono, Toshiya; Abe, Yusuke

    2016-09-01

    Estimation of pressure and flow has been an important subject for developing implantable artificial hearts. To realize real-time viscosity-adjusted estimation of pressure head and pump flow for a total artificial heart, we propose the table estimation method with quasi-pulsatile modulation of rotary blood pump in which systolic high flow and diastolic low flow phased are generated. The table estimation method utilizes three kinds of tables: viscosity, pressure and flow tables. Viscosity is estimated from the characteristic that differential value in motor speed between systolic and diastolic phases varies depending on viscosity. Potential of this estimation method was investigated using mock circulation system. Glycerin solution diluted with salty water was used to adjust viscosity of fluid. In verification of this method using continuous flow data, fairly good estimation could be possible when differential pulse width modulation (PWM) value of the motor between systolic and diastolic phases was high. In estimation under quasi-pulsatile condition, inertia correction was provided and fairly good estimation was possible when the differential PWM value was high, which was not different from the verification results using continuous flow data. In the experiment of real-time estimation applying moving average method to the estimated viscosity, fair estimation could be possible when the differential PWM value was high, showing that real-time viscosity-adjusted estimation of pressure head and pump flow would be possible with this novel estimation method when the differential PWM value would be set high.

  4. Viscosity-adjusted estimation of pressure head and pump flow with quasi-pulsatile modulation of rotary blood pump for a total artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Yurimoto, Terumi; Hara, Shintaro; Isoyama, Takashi; Saito, Itsuro; Ono, Toshiya; Abe, Yusuke

    2016-09-01

    Estimation of pressure and flow has been an important subject for developing implantable artificial hearts. To realize real-time viscosity-adjusted estimation of pressure head and pump flow for a total artificial heart, we propose the table estimation method with quasi-pulsatile modulation of rotary blood pump in which systolic high flow and diastolic low flow phased are generated. The table estimation method utilizes three kinds of tables: viscosity, pressure and flow tables. Viscosity is estimated from the characteristic that differential value in motor speed between systolic and diastolic phases varies depending on viscosity. Potential of this estimation method was investigated using mock circulation system. Glycerin solution diluted with salty water was used to adjust viscosity of fluid. In verification of this method using continuous flow data, fairly good estimation could be possible when differential pulse width modulation (PWM) value of the motor between systolic and diastolic phases was high. In estimation under quasi-pulsatile condition, inertia correction was provided and fairly good estimation was possible when the differential PWM value was high, which was not different from the verification results using continuous flow data. In the experiment of real-time estimation applying moving average method to the estimated viscosity, fair estimation could be possible when the differential PWM value was high, showing that real-time viscosity-adjusted estimation of pressure head and pump flow would be possible with this novel estimation method when the differential PWM value would be set high. PMID:27022734

  5. Evaluation of the method of collecting suspended sediment from large rivers by discharge-weighted pumping and separation by continuous- flow centrifugation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moody, J.A.; Meade, R.H.

    1994-01-01

    The efficacy of the method is evaluated by comparing the particle size distributions of sediment collected by the discharge-weighted pumping method with the particle size distributions of sediment collected by depth integration and separated by gravitational settling. The pumping method was found to undersample the suspended sand sized particles (>63 ??m) but to collect a representative sample of the suspended silt and clay sized particles (<63??m). The success of the discharge-weighted pumping method depends on how homogeneously the silt and clay sized particles (<63 ??m) are distributed in the vertical direction in the river. The degree of homogeneity depends on the composition and degree of aggregation of the suspended sediment particles. -from Authors

  6. Centrifugal pyrocontactor

    DOEpatents

    Chow, L.S.; Leonard, R.A.

    1993-10-19

    A method is described for mixing and separating immiscible liquid salts and liquid metals in a centrifugal contractor. The method includes introducing the liquids into an annular mixing zone and intensely mixing the liquids using vertical vanes attached to a rotor cooperating with vertical baffles, a horizontal baffle, and bottom vanes attached to the contactor housing. The liquids enter the contactor in the range of 700-800 degrees Celsius. The liquids are separated in the rotor into a dense phase and a light phase which are discharged from the contactor. 6 figures.

  7. Centrifugal pyrocontactor

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Lorac S.; Leonard, Ralph A.

    1993-01-01

    A method for mixing and separating immiscible liquid salts and liquid metals in a centrifugal contractor. The method includes introducing the liquids into an annular mixing zone and intensely mixing the liquids using vertical vanes attached to a rotor cooperating with vertical baffles, a horizontal baffle, and bottom vanes attached to the contactor housing. The liquids enter the contactor in the range of 700-800 degrees Celsius. The liquids are separated in the rotor into a dense phase and a light phase which are discharged from the contactor.

  8. The ABCs of pump selection for mine dewatering

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, S.E.

    2008-10-15

    Choosing the right type of pump for removing water from mine operations can provide significant benefits in overall performance and cost of operation. The article describes the types of pump most commonly used: vertical turbine pumps, electric and hydraulic submersible pumps, horizontal multistage centrifugal pumps and horizontal single-stage centrifugal pumps. It gives points to consider when selecting a suitable pump, including solids handling capacity and acid content, portability, automatic operation, easy maintenance and parts availability. 1 photo.

  9. Effect of intra-aortic balloon pump on coronary blood flow during different balloon cycles support: A computer study.

    PubMed

    Aye, Thin Pa Pa; Htet, Zwe Lin; Singhavilai, Thamvarit; Naiyanetr, Phornphop

    2015-01-01

    Intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) has been used in clinical treatment as a mechanical circulatory support device for patients with heart failure. A computer model is used to study the effect on coronary blood flow (CBF) with different balloon cycles under both normal and pathological conditions. The model of cardiovascular and IABP is developed by using MATLAB SIMULINK. The effect on coronary blood flow has been studied under both normal and pathological conditions using different balloon cycles (balloon off; 1:4; 1:2; 1:1). A pathological heart is implemented by reducing the left ventricular contractility. The result of this study shows that the rate of balloon cycles is related to the level of coronary blood flow.

  10. Effect of intra-aortic balloon pump on coronary blood flow during different balloon cycles support: A computer study.

    PubMed

    Aye, Thin Pa Pa; Htet, Zwe Lin; Singhavilai, Thamvarit; Naiyanetr, Phornphop

    2015-01-01

    Intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) has been used in clinical treatment as a mechanical circulatory support device for patients with heart failure. A computer model is used to study the effect on coronary blood flow (CBF) with different balloon cycles under both normal and pathological conditions. The model of cardiovascular and IABP is developed by using MATLAB SIMULINK. The effect on coronary blood flow has been studied under both normal and pathological conditions using different balloon cycles (balloon off; 1:4; 1:2; 1:1). A pathological heart is implemented by reducing the left ventricular contractility. The result of this study shows that the rate of balloon cycles is related to the level of coronary blood flow. PMID:26736998

  11. A magnetic fluid seal for rotary blood pumps: effects of seal structure on long-term performance in liquid.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Yoshinori; Takahashi, Sayaka; Amari, Shuichi; Okamoto, Eiji; Murabayashi, Shun; Nishimura, Ikuya

    2011-03-01

    A magnetic fluid (MF) seal enables mechanical contact-free rotation of the shaft and hence has excellent durability. The performance of an MF seal, however, has been reported to decrease in liquids. We developed an MF seal that has a "shield" mechanism, and a new MF with a higher magnetization of 47.9 kA/m. The sealing performance of the MF seal installed in a rotary blood pump was studied. Three types of MF seals were used. Seal A was a conventional seal without a shield. Seal B had the same structure as that of Seal A, but the seal was installed at 1 mm below liquid level. Seal C was a seal with a shield and the MF was set at 1 mm below liquid level. Seal A failed after 6 and 11 days. Seal B showed better results (20 and 73 days). Seal C showed long-term durability (217 and 275 days). The reason for different results in different seal structures was considered to be different flow conditions near the magnetic fluid. Fluid dynamics near the MF in the pump were analyzed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. We have developed an MF seal with a shield that works in liquid for >275 days. The MF seal is promising as a shaft seal for rotary blood pumps.

  12. Blood flow measurements within optic nerve head during on-pump cardiovascular operations. A window to the brain?

    PubMed

    Nenekidis, Ioannis; Geiser, Martial; Riva, Charles; Pournaras, Constantin; Tsironi, Evangelia; Vretzakis, Georgios; Mitilis, Vasilios; Tsilimingas, Nikolaos

    2011-05-01

    This observational study is conducted to demonstrate optic nerve head (ONH) blood flow alterations during extracorporeal circulation (ECC) in routine on-pump cardiovascular operations in order to evaluate the perfusion status of important autoregulatory tissue vascular beds during moderate hypothermia. Twenty-one patients free from eye disease were prospectively enrolled in our database. Perioperative ONH blood flow measurements were performed using a hand-held portable ocular laser Doppler flowmeter just after administration of general anesthesia and during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) upon the lowest temperature point of moderate hypothermia. Important operative flow variables were correlated to optic nerve blood flow during surgical phases. Statistical analysis showed significant reduction of 32.1 ± 14.5% of mean ONH blood flow in phase 2 (P < 0.0001) compared to the reference flow values of phase 1. A negative univariate association between ECC time and ONH blood flow in phase 2 (P = 0.031) is noted. This angiokinetic approach can detect changes of flow within autoregulatory vascular tissue beds like ONH, thus creating a 'window' on cerebral microvasculature. ONH blood flow is reduced during CPB. Our data suggest that it is of paramount importance to avoid extracorporeal prolongation even in moderate hypothermic cardiovascular operations. PMID:21297131

  13. Successful bridge to recovery using a microaxial blood pump in a patient with electrical storm and cardiogenic shock.

    PubMed

    Henning, A; Schreieck, J; Riessen, R; Gawaz, M; May, A E

    2011-10-01

    A 59-year-old patient with dilated cardiomyopathy and incessant ventricular tachycardia leading to progressive cardiogenic shock is presented. Due to hemodynamic instability, high dose catecholamines were required in addition to the implantation of an intraaortic balloon pump (IABP), which, however, appeared to further augment the frequency and duration of ventricular tachycardias. The implantation of a microaxial blood pump allowed catecholamine administration to be terminated, thereby, ending this vicious circle of catecholamine-driven electrical storm. Within 5 days, the patient was hemodynamically stabilized and kidney and liver function recovered with the support of intensive antiarrhythmic therapy (amiodarone, mexiletine, sotalol). During a 24-month follow-up, the patient had no further ICD shocks and no rehospitalization was required for treatment of congestive heart failure. PMID:22038638

  14. A magnetic fluid seal for rotary blood pumps: image and computational analyses of behaviors of magnetic fluids.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Yoshinori; Yano, Tetsuya; Okamoto, Eiji

    2013-01-01

    A magnetic fluid (MF) seal has excellent durability. The performance of an MF seal, however, has been reported to decrease in liquids (several days). We have developed an MF seal that has a shield mechanism. The seal was perfect for 275 days in water. To investigate the effect of a shield, behaviors of MFs in a seal in water were studied both experimentally and computationally. (a) Two kinds of MF seals, one with a shield and one without a shield, were installed in a centrifugal pump. Behaviors of MFs in the seals in water were observed with a video camera and high-speed microscope. In the seal without a shield, the surface of the water in the seal waved and the turbulent flow affected behaviors of the MFs. In contrast, MFs rotated stably in the seal with a shield in water even at high rotational speeds. (b) Computational fluid dynamics analysis revealed that a stationary secondary flow pattern in the seal and small velocity difference between magnetic fluid and water at the interface. These MF behaviors prolonged the life of an MF seal in water. PMID:24109774

  15. A magnetic fluid seal for rotary blood pumps: Behaviors of magnetic fluids in a magnetic fluid seal.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Yoshinori; Yano, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Wataru; Okamoto, Eiji

    2013-01-01

    A magnetic fluid (MF) seal has excellent durability. The performance of an MF seal, however, has been reported to decrease in liquids (several days). We have developed an MF seal that has a shield mechanism. The seal was perfect for 275 days in water. To investigate the effect of a shield, behaviors of MFs in a seal in water were studied both experimentally and computationally. (a) Two kinds of MF seals, one with a shield and one without a shield, were installed in a centrifugal pump. Behaviors of MFs in the seals in water were observed with a video camera and high-speed microscope. In the seal without a shield, the surface of the water in the seal waved and the turbulent flow affected behaviors of the MFs. In contrast, MFs rotated stably in the seal with a shield in water even at high rotational speeds. (b) Computational fluid dynamics analysis revealed that a stationary secondary flow pattern in the seal and small velocity difference between magnetic fluid and water at the interface. These MF behaviors prolonged the life of an MF seal in water. PMID:23442238

  16. Clinical results and pump analysis of the Gyro pump for long-term extracorporeal life support.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Takamitsu; Takano, Tamaki; Michinaga, Yuuki; Yokokawa, Michihiro; Wada, Yuko; Seto, Tatsuichirou; Fukui, Daisuke; Amano, Jun

    2013-09-01

    Rescuing patients in severe cardiac failure with extracorporeal support remains challenging. The Gyro pump is a centrifugal blood pump and was now used for cardiopulmonary bypass, although it was originally developed for long-term cardiac assist. Little is known about clinical experiences using this pump. Here, we report on the clinical results of long-term extracorporeal life support for over 4 days using the Gyro pump with Excelung, a hollow fiber oxygenator coated with silicone and heparin. Seven patients underwent extracorporeal life support with 15 pump and oxygenator combinations. Gyro and Excelung were used for venoarterial extracorporeal support in six patients and for right ventricular support in one patient. Patient characteristics, pump driving conditions, and blood chemistry were obtained retrospectively. All pumps were subsequently disassembled and examined macroscopically, with 6 of 15 pumps also examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The patient mortality rate was 57.1%. Mean duration of support was 10.5 ± 7.2 days per pump and oxygenator combination. Lactate dehydrogenase and aspartate aminotransferase were generally maintained below 1000 and 100 IU/L, respectively, after the first 4 days of pump driving. Thrombi were found in two pumps, one used without anticoagulation and the other driven at a very slow rotational speed. SEM revealed no wear in the male bearings and very low wear and deformation (0.02 ± 0.03 mm) in the female bearings. The combination of Gyro and Excelung may be applicable for long-term biventricular and right ventricular support, although proper anticoagulation should be administrated to avoid thrombus formation inside the pump.

  17. The Aachen MiniHLM--a miniaturized heart-lung machine for neonates with an integrated rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Arens, Jutta; Schnoering, Heike; Pfennig, Michael; Mager, Ilona; Vázquez-Jiménez, Jaime F; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2010-09-01

    The operation of congenital heart defects in neonates often requires the use of heart-lung machines (HLMs) to provide perfusion and oxygenation. This is prevalently followed by serious complications inter alia caused by hemodilution and extrinsic blood contact surfaces. Thus, one goal of developing a HLM for neonates is the reduction of priming volume and contact surface. The currently available systems offer reasonable priming volumes for oxygenators, reservoirs, etc. However, the necessary tubing system contains the highest volumes within the whole system. This is due to the use of roller pumps; hence, the resulting placement of the complete HLM is between 1 and 2 m away from the operating table due to connective tubing between the components. Therefore, we pursued a novel approach for a miniaturized HLM (MiniHLM) by integrating all major system components in one single device. In particular, the MiniHLM is a HLM with the rotary blood pump centrically integrated into the oxygenator and a heat exchanger integrated into the cardiotomy reservoir which is directly connected to the pump inlet. Thus, tubing is only necessary between the patient and MiniHLM. A total priming volume of 102 mL (including arterial filter and a/v line) could be achieved. To validate the overall concept and the specific design we conducted several in vitro and in vivo test series. All tests confirm the novel concept of the MiniHLM. Its low priming volume and blood contact surface may significantly reduce known complications related to cardiopulmonary bypass in neonates (e.g., inflammatory reaction and capillary leak syndrome).

  18. Development of an Optical Detector of Thrombus Formation on the Pivot Bearing of a Rotary Blood Pump.

    PubMed

    Sakota, Daisuke; Fujiwara, Tatsuki; Ouchi, Katsuhiro; Kuwana, Katsuyuki; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Maruyama, Osamu

    2016-09-01

    Continuous optical monitoring of thrombus formation in extracorporeal mechanical circulatory support (EMCS) devices will contribute to safe, long-term EMCS. A clinically applicable optical detector must be able to distinguish among the optical characteristics of oxygen saturation (SaO2 ), hematocrit (Hct), and thrombus formation. In vitro studies of spectral changes at wavelengths from 400 to 900 nm associated with SaO2 , Hct, and thrombus formed around the top pivot bearing of a Gyro C1E3 pump were conducted. Fresh porcine blood anticoagulated with sodium citrate was circulated in a mock circuit using the pump. The SaO2 , Hct, and anticoagulation activity were altered using an oxygenator, autologous plasma, and calcium chlorite injection, respectively. Light from a xenon lamp was guided by an incident fiber perpendicularly fixed on the top bearing. This light was scattered by blood pooled between the male and female pivots. The detection fiber was perpendicularly fixed against the incident fiber, and the side-scattered light was detected and guided to a spectrophotometer. As a result, light at two different wavelengths, 420 and 810 nm, was identified as suitable for thrombus detection because it was negligibly influenced by SaO2 and was able to detect the optical characteristics of fibrin. The light at these two wavelengths responded more quickly to thrombus formation than the inlet or outlet pressure, and flow rate change. The optical changes showed the changes in Hct around the top pivot bearing, which is caused by the reduction in density of fibrin-trapped red blood cells (RBCs) due to the RBCs being swept away by the surrounding blood flow. The proposed method was also able to detect fibrin production by extracting subtle differences in the optical characteristics between the Hct and thrombus formation. PMID:27645394

  19. Vibration Control for an Implantable Blood Pump on a Bearingless Slice Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huettner, Christian

    Implantable left ventricular assist devices are powered by batteries. Their limited capacity has to be used as efficiently as possible. At the example of a MAGLEV centrifugal LVAD it was demonstrated that a drastic reduction of power consumption (50% in the bearing) could be achieved by vibration control. A vibration controller design for the non-linear plant is discussed, simplified and extended to four harmonics. A new phase shift strategy is presented to eliminate time-consuming matrix operations. Based on this simplification the implemented algorithm applied on the bearingless slice motor allocates little memory and requires short computation time. Additionally, the decreased control currents lead to higher control margins of the power amplifiers and therefore to improved robustness.

  20. The Effects of Ambulatory Accelerations on the Stability of a Magnetically Suspended Impeller for an Implantable Blood Pump.

    PubMed

    Paul, Gordon; Rezaienia, Mohammed Amin; Rahideh, Akbar; Munjiza, Ante; Korakianitis, Theodosios

    2016-09-01

    This article describes the effects of ambulatory accelerations on the stability of a magnetically suspended impeller for use in implantable blood pumps. A magnetic suspension system is developed to control the radial position of a magnetic impeller using coils in the pump casing. The magnitude and periodicity of ambulatory accelerations at the torso are measured. A test rig is then designed to apply appropriate accelerations to the suspension system. Accelerations from 0 to 1 g are applied to the suspended impeller with ambulatory periodicity while the radial position of the impeller and power consumption of the suspension system are monitored. The test is carried out with the impeller suspended in air, water, and a glycerol solution to simulate the viscosity of blood. A model is developed to investigate the effects of the radial magnetic suspension system and fluid damping during ambulatory accelerations. The suspension system reduces the average displacement of the impeller suspended in aqueous solutions within its casing to 100 µm with a power consumption of below 2 W during higher magnitude ambulatory accelerations (RMS magnitude 0.3 g). The damping effect of the fluid is also examined and it is shown that buoyancy, rather than drag, is the primary cause of the damping at the low displacement oscillations that occur during the application of ambulatory accelerations to such a suspension system. PMID:27401117

  1. Rotary Blood Pumps as Long-Term Mechanical Circulatory Support: A Review of a 15-Year Berlin Experience.

    PubMed

    Hetzer, Roland; Kaufmann MEng, Friedrich; Potapov, Evgenij; Krabatsch, Thomas; Delmo Walter, Eva Maria

    2016-01-01

    This article reports our 15-year single-center experience with rotary blood pumps (RBPs) as long-term mechanical circulatory support (MCS) with emphasis on outcomes. For more than 15-year period, we have used various RBPs as bridge to transplantation or to myocardial recovery. Our group performed the first human implantation worldwide of RBCs, the MicroMed DeBakey ventricular assist device in November 1998 in a patient with end-stage heart failure who was supported for 47 days until his death. Based on this initial experience, we recognized the feasibility of providing long-term support and since then it has been our primary armamentarium in treating patients with heart failure. Between 1987 and September 2013, we have implanted 2208 ventricular assist devices ranging from pulsatile to continuous-flow systems, as short-term, long-term, or permanent support in patients with end-stage heart failure. In total, 1009 RBPs were implanted on 908 patients, and their outcomes are reported here. We have shared some milestones in MCS including the first implantation of Jarvik 2000 on the oldest patient (81-year old) in 2008 and the first worldwide implantation of a biventricular HeartWare. Over time, implantation techniques, anticoagulation, and postoperative care have been modified and individualized. A relevant aspect of our experience has been the incidence of pump thrombosis. This is particularly frustrating because the problem has occurred in the setting of full anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy, guided by strict anticoagulation monitoring. It has become clear to us that the devices are still not perfect. Technical pump failures such as cable breaks also occur, prompting urgent pump exchange, and infection. A 15-year cumulative mortality rate is 46.9%. This report emphasizes that MCS with RBPs has evolved into a routine treatment in heart failure and is a highly feasible option for permanent therapy particularly for elderly patients. PMID:27568128

  2. Rotary Blood Pumps as Long-Term Mechanical Circulatory Support: A Review of a 15-Year Berlin Experience.

    PubMed

    Hetzer, Roland; Kaufmann MEng, Friedrich; Potapov, Evgenij; Krabatsch, Thomas; Delmo Walter, Eva Maria

    2016-01-01

    This article reports our 15-year single-center experience with rotary blood pumps (RBPs) as long-term mechanical circulatory support (MCS) with emphasis on outcomes. For more than 15-year period, we have used various RBPs as bridge to transplantation or to myocardial recovery. Our group performed the first human implantation worldwide of RBCs, the MicroMed DeBakey ventricular assist device in November 1998 in a patient with end-stage heart failure who was supported for 47 days until his death. Based on this initial experience, we recognized the feasibility of providing long-term support and since then it has been our primary armamentarium in treating patients with heart failure. Between 1987 and September 2013, we have implanted 2208 ventricular assist devices ranging from pulsatile to continuous-flow systems, as short-term, long-term, or permanent support in patients with end-stage heart failure. In total, 1009 RBPs were implanted on 908 patients, and their outcomes are reported here. We have shared some milestones in MCS including the first implantation of Jarvik 2000 on the oldest patient (81-year old) in 2008 and the first worldwide implantation of a biventricular HeartWare. Over time, implantation techniques, anticoagulation, and postoperative care have been modified and individualized. A relevant aspect of our experience has been the incidence of pump thrombosis. This is particularly frustrating because the problem has occurred in the setting of full anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy, guided by strict anticoagulation monitoring. It has become clear to us that the devices are still not perfect. Technical pump failures such as cable breaks also occur, prompting urgent pump exchange, and infection. A 15-year cumulative mortality rate is 46.9%. This report emphasizes that MCS with RBPs has evolved into a routine treatment in heart failure and is a highly feasible option for permanent therapy particularly for elderly patients.

  3. Blood pressure regulation X: What happens when the muscle pump is lost? Post-exercise hypotension and syncope

    PubMed Central

    Halliwill, John R.; Sieck, Dylan C.; Romero, Steven A.; Buck, Tahisha M.; Ely, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    Syncope which occurs suddenly in the setting of recovery from exercise, known as post-exercise syncope, represents a failure of integrative physiology during recovery from exercise. We estimate that between 50 and 80% of healthy individuals will develop pre-syncopal signs and symptoms if subjected to a 15-min head-up tilt following exercise. Post-exercise syncope is most often neurally mediated syncope during recovery from exercise, with a combination of factors associated with post-exercise hypotension and loss of the muscle pump contributing to the onset of the event. One can consider the initiating reduction in blood pressure as the tip of the proverbial iceberg. What is needed is a clear model of what lies under the surface; a model that puts the observational variations in context and provides a rational framework for developing strategic physical or pharmacological countermeasures to ultimately protect cerebral perfusion and avert loss of consciousness. This review summarizes the current mechanistic understanding of post-exercise syncope and attempts to categorize the variation of the physiological processes that arise in multiple exercise settings. Newer investigations into the basic integrative physiology of recovery from exercise provide insight into the mechanisms and potential interventions that could be developed as countermeasures against post-exercise syncope. While physical counter maneuvers designed to engage the muscle pump and augment venous return are often found to be beneficial in preventing a significant drop in blood pressure after exercise, countermeasures that target the respiratory pump and pharmacological countermeasures based on the involvement of histamine receptors show promise. PMID:24197081

  4. 75 FR 15679 - Foreign-Trade Zone 272-Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania Application for Subzone Grundfos Pumps...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... Grundfos Pumps Manufacturing Corporation (Multi-Stage Centrifugal Pumps); Allentown, PA An application has... Corporation, grantee of FTZ 272, requesting special-purpose subzone status for the multi-stage centrifugal... manufacture and assembly of multi-stage centrifugal pumps used in commercial, residential,...

  5. Transfusion of blood products in off-pump coronary artery bypass and conventional coronary artery revascularization. A prospective randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Walczak, Maciej; Tomczyk, Jadwiga; Camacho, Estillita; Ligowski, Marcin; Stefaniak, Sebastian; Jemielity, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Introduction There has been a growing interest in off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) grafting in recent years. Beating-heart surgery is believed to be less invasive as it allows the side effects of extracorporeal circulation to be avoided. The aim of the study The aim of the study was to compare blood product transfusion rates between two groups of patients undergoing surgery for ischemic heart disease with either the off-pump technique or using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Material and methods There were 152 patients enrolled in the prospective randomized study. All procedures were elective. There were 84 patients (62 men and 20 women) at the mean age of 63.74 ± 7 years who underwent OPCAB (group I), and 68 patients (54 men and 14 women) at the mean age of 63.51 ± 6 years who underwent cardiopulmonary bypass (group II). Results There were no perioperative deaths. The mean number of grafts was 2.27 ± 0.3 (OPCAB group) and 2.63 ± 0.6 (CPB group) (p < 0.05). The mean number of packed red blood cells transfused in the OPCAB group was 2.31 ± 0.18 units/patient and 3.94 ± 0.30 units/patient in the CPB group (p < 0.05). The mean number of fresh frozen plasma units transfused was 1.13 ± 0.13 in the OPCAB group vs. 1.57 ± 0.15 in the CPB group (p < 0.05). There were 12 patients (14%) in the OPCAB group who had no transfusion. Conclusions One of the most important advantages of the OPCAB technique is that it makes it possible to reduce the rate of blood product transfusions. PMID:26336410

  6. Subchronic centrifugal mechanical assist in an unheparinized calf model.

    PubMed

    Wagner-Mann, C; Curtis, J; Mann, F A; Turk, J; Demmy, T; Turpin, T

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the major centrifugal pumps currently in use in the United States (Medtronic, BioMedicus BioPump and Carmeda-coated BioPump, Sarns 3M centrifugal pump, and St. Jude Medical Lifestream) could function as left mechanical assist devices in the subchronic (72 h) unheparinized calf model. Calves were instrumented for left atrial to aorta ex vivo assist, and the pump flow was set at 3.5 +/- 0.4 L/min. Two calves (Sarns 3M and St. Jude) survived 72 h of pumping without clinical complications. The other 2 calves died at 62 and 66 h (Medtronic BioPump and Carmeda-coated BioPump, respectively); both had pelvic limb paralysis. The seal of the Sarns 3M pump head ruptured after approximately 36 h of pumping and required replacement. On postmortem examination, pump-associated thromboembolic lesions were detected in 3 of the 4 calves in one or more of the following organs: kidneys, pancreas, abomasum, duodenum, ileum, spleen, and lumbar spinal cord. The calf with the Sarns 3M pump had no discernable lesions. Because of the clinical abnormalities and postmortem lesions in the unheparinized calf model, it was suggested that anticoagulation is necessary for conducting centrifugal mechanical assist studies in calves using presently available technology.

  7. CENTRIFUGE END CAP

    DOEpatents

    Beams, J.W.; Snoddy, L.B.

    1960-08-01

    An end cap for ultra-gas centrifuges is designed to impart or remove angular momentum to or from the gas and to bring the entering gas to the temperature of the gas inside the centrifuge. The end cap is provided with slots or fins for adjusting the temperature and the angular momentum of the entering gas to the temperature and momentum of the gas in the centrifuge and is constructed to introduce both the inner and the peripheral stream into the centrifuge.

  8. Differential white cell count by centrifugal microfluidics.

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, Gregory Jon; Tentori, Augusto M.; Schaff, Ulrich Y.

    2010-07-01

    We present a method for counting white blood cells that is uniquely compatible with centrifugation based microfluidics. Blood is deposited on top of one or more layers of density media within a microfluidic disk. Spinning the disk causes the cell populations within whole blood to settle through the media, reaching an equilibrium based on the density of each cell type. Separation and fluorescence measurement of cell types stained with a DNA dye is demonstrated using this technique. The integrated signal from bands of fluorescent microspheres is shown to be proportional to their initial concentration in suspension. Among the current generation of medical diagnostics are devices based on the principle of centrifuging a CD sized disk functionalized with microfluidics. These portable 'lab on a disk' devices are capable of conducting multiple assays directly from a blood sample, embodied by platforms developed by Gyros, Samsung, and Abaxis. [1,2] However, no centrifugal platform to date includes a differential white blood cell count, which is an important metric complimentary to diagnostic assays. Measuring the differential white blood cell count (the relative fraction of granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes) is a standard medical diagnostic technique useful for identifying sepsis, leukemia, AIDS, radiation exposure, and a host of other conditions that affect the immune system. Several methods exist for measuring the relative white blood cell count including flow cytometry, electrical impedance, and visual identification from a stained drop of blood under a microscope. However, none of these methods is easily incorporated into a centrifugal microfluidic diagnostic platform.

  9. Axial Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor); VanDamm, George Arthur (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Paul A. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A rotary blood pump includes a pump housing for receiving a flow straightener, a rotor mounted on rotor bearings and having an inducer portion and an impeller portion, and a diffuser. The entrance angle, outlet angle, axial and radial clearances of blades associated with the flow straightener, inducer portion, impeller portion and diffuser are optimized to minimize hemolysis while maintaining pump efficiency. The rotor bearing includes a bearing chamber that is filled with cross-linked blood or other bio-compatible material. A back emf integrated circuit regulates rotor operation and a microcomputer may be used to control one or more back emf integrated circuits. A plurality of magnets are disposed in each of a plurality of impeller blades with a small air gap. A stator may be axially adjusted on the pump housing to absorb bearing load and maximize pump efficiency.

  10. 21 CFR 864.9285 - Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9285 Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology. (a) Identification. An automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology is a device...

  11. 21 CFR 864.9285 - Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9285 Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology. (a) Identification. An automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology is a device...

  12. 21 CFR 864.9285 - Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9285 Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology. (a) Identification. An automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology is a device...

  13. 21 CFR 864.9285 - Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9285 Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology. (a) Identification. An automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology is a device...

  14. 21 CFR 864.9285 - Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9285 Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology. (a) Identification. An automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology is a device...

  15. Preliminary study on the estimation of Emax using single-beat methods during assistance with rotary blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Sugai, Telma Keiko; Tanaka, Akira; Yoshizawa, Makoto; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Baba, Atsushi; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Nitta, Shin-ichi

    2008-01-01

    Recently, rotary blood pumps (RBPs) have been used as bridge to recovery. In such application the RBP might be weaned once the cardiac function has been recovered. In such cases, the detection of the cardiac function is fundamental for the treatment efficiency. However, most of the widely used cardiac function indices (CFIs) were proposed for unassisted hearts and have not been completely evaluated under assistance. In contrast, Emax, which is known as a reliable CFI, has already been validated under assistance with RBP. However, since the conventional method for the estimation of Emax has some limitations for the clinical application, the objective of this study was to evaluate different single-beat estimation methods qualitatively and also quantitatively using in vivo data. The preliminary results showed that although single-beat estimation have more clinical applicability, not all those estimation methods are suitable for the RBP assistance.

  16. Rotating-Pump Design Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James F.; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Scheer, Dean D.

    2006-01-01

    Pump Design (PUMPDES) is a computer program for designing a rotating pump for liquid hydrogen, liquid oxygen, liquid nitrogen, water, methane, or ethane. Using realistic properties of these fluids provided by another program called GASPAK, this code performs a station-by-station, mean-line analysis along the pump flow path, obtaining thermodynamic properties of the pumped fluid at each station and evaluating hydraulic losses along the flow path. The variables at each station are obtained under constraints that are consistent with the underlying physical principles. The code evaluates the performance of each stage and the overall pump. In addition, by judiciously choosing the givens and the unknowns, the code can perform a geometric inverse design function: that is, it can compute a pump geometry that yields a closest approximation of given design point. The code contains two major parts: one for an axial-rotor/inducer and one for a multistage centrifugal pump. The inducer and the centrifugal pump are functionally integrated. The code can be used in designing and/or evaluating the inducer/centrifugal-pump combination or the centrifugal pump alone. The code is written in standard Fortran 77.

  17. Using Daily Plasma-Free Hemoglobin Levels for Diagnosis of Critical Pump Thrombus in Patients Undergoing ECMO or VAD Support

    PubMed Central

    Neal, James R.; Quintana, Eduard; Pike, Roxann B.; Hoyer, James D.; Joyce, Lyle D.; Schears, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Patients supported with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) or short-term centrifugal ventricular assist devices (VADs) are at risk for potential elevation of plasma-free hemoglobin (pfHb) during treatment. The use of pfHb testing allows detection of subclinical events with avoidance of propagating injury. Among 146 patients undergoing ECMO and VAD from 2009 to 2014, five patients experienced rapid increases in pfHb levels over 100 mg/dL. These patients were supported with CardioHelp, Centrimag, or Pedimag centrifugal pumps. Revolutions per minute of the pump head and flow in the circuit in three of the patients did not change, to maintain patient flow during the period that pfHb level spiked. Two patients had unusual vibrations originating from the pump head during the pfHb spike. Four patients had pump head replacement. Following intervention, trending pfHb levels demonstrated a rapid decline over the next 12 hours, returning to baseline within 48 hours. Two of the three patients who survived to discharge also experienced acute kidney injury, which was attributed to pfHb elevations. The kidney injury resolved over time. The architecture of centrifugal pumps may have indirectly contributed to red blood cell damage due to thrombus, originally from the venous line or venous cannula, being snared in the pump fins or pump head. PMID:26405358

  18. Spallation and migration of silicone from blood-pump tubing in patients on hemodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, A.S.; Disney, A.P.; Gove, D.W.

    1982-01-21

    Spalled particles of silicone were observed in the livers of patients with chronic renal failure treated by hemodialysis. The refractile particles of silicone were associated with various degrees of hepatic inflammation and fibrosis, and granulomatous hepatitis was evident in nine cases. Retrospective examination revealed the material in 18 of 38 liver-biopsy samples from patients on hemodialysis who had clinical hepatic dysfunction. Of 31 autopsies of patients who had undergone hemodialysis, 22 revealed silicone in the liver, and silicone was also present in the spleen in all cases and in the marrow, lungs, and nodes in some. Giant cells containing silicone were also observed in these organs. Silicone was present in patients who had undergone hemodialysis for six weeks to 84 months (mean, 24 months). The identity of the material was confirmed by atomic absorption and by electron microprobe analysis. The silicone was traced to a segment of silicone tubing located in the roller pump of the dialysis machine.

  19. System-level network simulation for robust centrifugal-microfluidic lab-on-a-chip systems.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, I; Zehnle, S; Hutzenlaub, T; Zengerle, R; Paust, N

    2016-05-10

    Centrifugal microfluidics shows a clear trend towards a higher degree of integration and parallelization. This trend leads to an increase in the number and density of integrated microfluidic unit operations. The fact that all unit operations are processed by the same common spin protocol turns higher integration into higher complexity. To allow for efficient development anyhow, we introduce advanced lumped models for network simulations in centrifugal microfluidics. These models consider the interplay of centrifugal and Euler pressures, viscous dissipation, capillary pressures and pneumatic pressures. The simulations are fast and simple to set up and allow for the precise prediction of flow rates as well as switching and valving events. During development, channel and chamber geometry variations due to manufacturing tolerances can be taken into account as well as pipetting errors, variations of contact angles, compliant chamber walls and temperature variations in the processing device. As an example of considering these parameters during development, we demonstrate simulation based robustness analysis for pneumatic siphon valving in centrifugal microfluidics. Subsequently, the influence of liquid properties on pumping and valving is studied for four liquids relevant for biochemical analysis, namely, water (large surface tension), blood plasma (large contact angle hysteresis), ethanol/water (highly wetting) and glycerine/water (highly viscous). In a second example, we derive a spin protocol to attain a constant flow rate under varying pressure conditions. Both examples show excellent agreement with experimental validations.

  20. Pump/Control System Minimum Operating Cost Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A preliminary evaluation of pump performance was initiated to determine the efficiencies of an arbitrary group of small pumps. Trends in factors affecting energy usage in typical prime movers which might be used in liquid transport solar systems were assessed. Comparisons of centrifugal pump efficiencies were made from one manufacturer to another. Tests were also made on two positive-displacement pumps and comparisons with centrifugal pumps were observed.

  1. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    Blood pressure is the force of your blood pushing against the walls of your arteries. Each time your heart ... it pumps blood into the arteries. Your blood pressure is highest when your heart beats, pumping the ...

  2. Is the Air Handling Capability of the Quadrox D Pump Dependent within an ECMO Circuit? An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Martin C.; Dando, Hayden; Dittmer, John

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: The occurrence of gaseous microemboli (GME) within the extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuit is largely overlooked, as are methods to ameliorate this occurrence. We aimed to determine if the air handling capability of the Quadrox D oxygenator was dependent upon whether it was used in conjunction with a centrifugal or roller pump; and if application of a Pall air eliminating filter (AEF) would prevent circuit air introduction from intravenous infusions. Using a blood primed circuit 1 mL of air was infused pre pump. GME were quantified post pump and post oxygenator using the EDAC® Quantifier. Trials were conducted at 1 and 2 L/min flow. To prevent GME recirculation a Capiox SX18 was used in circuit with negative pressure applied to its oxygenator; an EDAC® cuvette distal to this device quantified GME recirculation. Following air infusion, 3–5 minute data recordings were carried out for each trial. Separate trials were carried out for centrifugal and roller pumps, and for each flow rate. The process was then repeated following the application of the AEF to the air infusion line. More GME were detected post Quadrox D when the centrifugal pump was used in comparison to the roller pump at 1 L/min (p ≤ .05), and 2 L/min (p = .05). A greater volume of air was detected post Quadrox D when used in conjunction with the centrifugal device at 1 L/min (p ≤ .05), and 2 L/min (p ≤ .05). Application of the AEF resulted in zero GME detected at any circuit location. The results of this study confirm that a greater total count and volume of GME are detected distal to the Quadrox D when used in conjunction with a Rotaflow centrifugal pump. Application of a Pall AEF to infusion and drug lines can prevent air introduction from this source. PMID:21114223

  3. Is the air handling capability of the quadrox D pump dependent within an ECMO circuit? An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Gill, Martin C; Dando, Hayden; John, Dittmer

    2010-09-01

    The occurrence of gaseous microemboli (GME) within the extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuit is largely overlooked, as are methods to ameliorate this occurrence. We aimed to determine if the air handling capability of the Quadrox D oxygenator was dependent upon whether it was used in conjunction with a centrifugal or roller pump; and if application of a Pall air eliminating filter (AEF) would prevent circuit air introduction from intravenous infusions. Using a blood primed circuit 1 mL of air was infused pre pump. GME were quantified post pump and post oxygenator using the EDAC Quantifier. Trials were conducted at 1 and 2 L/min flow. To prevent GME recirculation a Capiox SX18 was used in circuit with negative pressure applied to its oxygenator; an EDAC cuvette distal to this device quantified GME recirculation. Following air infusion, 3-5 minute data recordings were carried out for each trial. Separate trials were carried out for centrifugal and roller pumps, and for each flow rate. The process was then repeated following the application of the AEF to the air infusion line. More GME were detected post Quadrox D when the centrifugal pump was used in comparison to the roller pump at 1 L/min (p < .05), and 2 L/min (p = .05). A greater volume of air was detected post Quadrox D when used in conjunction with the centrifugal device at 1 L/min (p < or = .05), and 2 L/min (p < or = .05). Application of the AEF resulted in zero GME detected at any circuit location. The results of this study confirm that a greater total count and volume of GME are detected distal to the Quadrox D when used in conjunction with a Rotaflow centrifugal pump. Application of a Pall AEF to infusion and drug lines can prevent air introduction from this source.

  4. CENTRIFUGAL PUMP AND SHAFT SEALING MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Rushing, F.C.

    1960-09-01

    A description is given of sealing means between a hollow rotatable shaft and a stationary member surrounding the shaft which defines therewith a sealing space of annular cross-section, comprising a plurality of axially spaced rings held against seats by ring springs which serve to subdivide the sealing space- into a plurality of zones. Process gas introduced into the hollow shaft through a port communicating with a centrally located zone which iu turn communicates with a bore in the sleeve, is removed from the shaft through a second port communicating with an adjacent central zone and discharged through a second bore. A sealant gas is supplied to an end zone under a pressure sufficient to cause it to flow axially into adjacent zones and then maintained at a lower pressure than either the sealant gas source or the process gas inlet zone, preventing the sealant gas from entering the shaft and allowing gases leaking into the sealant gas to be withdrawn and led to a separator.

  5. Single stage high pressure centrifugal slurry pump

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, John W.; Bonin, John H.; Daniel, Arnold D.

    1984-03-27

    Apparatus is shown for feeding a slurry to a pressurized housing. An impeller that includes radial passages is mounted in the loose fitting housing. The impeller hub is connected to a drive means and a slurry supply means which extends through the housing. Pressured gas is fed into the housing for substantially enveloping the impeller in a bubble of gas.

  6. Development of a 3D circular microfluidic centrifuge for the separation of mixed particles by using their different centrifuge times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, H. J.; Kim, D. I.; Kim, M. J.; Nguyen, X. D.; Park, D. H.; Go, J. S.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a circular microfluidic centrifuge with two inlets and two outlets to separate mixed microparticles with a specially designed sample injection hole. To separate the mixed particles, it uses a rotational flow, generated in a chamber by counter primary flows in the microchannels. The shape and sizes of the circular microfluidic centrifuge have been designed through numerical evaluation to have a large relative centrifugal force. The difference of centrifuge times of the mixed particles of 1 μm and 6 μm was determined to be 8.2 s at an inlet Reynolds number of 500 and a sample Reynolds number of 20. In the experiment, this was measured to be about 10 s. From the separation of the two polymer particles analogous to the representative sizes of platelets and red blood cells, the circular microfluidic centrifuge shows a potential to separate human blood cells size-selectively by using the difference of centrifuge times.

  7. Detection of pump degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Casada, D.

    1995-04-01

    There are a variety of stressors that can affect the operation of centrifugal pumps. Although these general stressors are active in essentially all centrifugal pumps, the stressor level and the extent of wear and degradation can vary greatly. Parameters that affect the extent of stressor activity are manifold. In order to assure the long-term operational readiness of a pump, it is important to both understand the nature and magnitude of the specific degradation mechanisms and to monitor the performance of the pump. The most commonly applied method of monitoring the condition of not only pumps, but rotating machinery in general, is vibration analysis. Periodic or continuous special vibration analysis is a cornerstone of most pump monitoring programs. In the nuclear industry, non-spectral vibration monitoring of safety-related pumps is performed in accordance with the ASME code. Pump head and flow rate are also monitored, per code requirements. Although vibration analysis has dominated the condition monitoring field for many years, there are other measures that have been historically used to help understand pump condition; advances in historically applied technologies and developing technologies offer improved monitoring capabilities. The capabilities of several technologies (including vibration analysis, dynamic pressure analysis, and motor power analysis) to detect the presence and magnitude of both stressors and resultant degradation are discussed.

  8. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Red blood cells (RBC) deliver oxygen from your lungs to your tissues and organs. White blood cells (WBC) fight infection and are part of your ...

  9. Design and Evaluation of a Fully Implantable Control Unit for Blood Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Unthan, Kristin; Gräf, Felix; Laumen, Marco; Finocchiaro, Thomas; Sommer, Christoph; Lanmüller, Hermann; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    As the number of donor hearts is limited while more and more patients suffer from end stage biventricular heart failure, Total Artificial Hearts become a promising alternative to conventional treatment. While pneumatic devices sufficiently supply the patients with blood flow, the patient's quality of life is limited by the percutaneous pressure lines and the size of the external control unit. This paper describes the development of the control unit of the ReinHeart, a fully implantable Total Artificial Heart. General requirements for any implantable control unit are defined from a technical and medical point of view: necessity of a Transcutaneous Energy Transmission, autonomous operation, safety, geometry, and efficiency. Based on the requirements, a prototype is designed; it incorporates a LiFePo4 battery pack with charger, a rectifier for transcutaneous energy transmission, the motor's driver electronics, and a microcontroller which monitors and controls all functions. In validation tests, the control unit demonstrated a stable operation on TET and battery supply and a safe switching from one supply to the other. The overall mean efficiency is 14% on TET and 22% on battery supply. The control unit is suitable for chronic animal trials of the ReinHeart. PMID:26583095

  10. Design and Evaluation of a Fully Implantable Control Unit for Blood Pumps.

    PubMed

    Unthan, Kristin; Gräf, Felix; Laumen, Marco; Finocchiaro, Thomas; Sommer, Christoph; Lanmüller, Hermann; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    As the number of donor hearts is limited while more and more patients suffer from end stage biventricular heart failure, Total Artificial Hearts become a promising alternative to conventional treatment. While pneumatic devices sufficiently supply the patients with blood flow, the patient's quality of life is limited by the percutaneous pressure lines and the size of the external control unit. This paper describes the development of the control unit of the ReinHeart, a fully implantable Total Artificial Heart. General requirements for any implantable control unit are defined from a technical and medical point of view: necessity of a Transcutaneous Energy Transmission, autonomous operation, safety, geometry, and efficiency. Based on the requirements, a prototype is designed; it incorporates a LiFePo4 battery pack with charger, a rectifier for transcutaneous energy transmission, the motor's driver electronics, and a microcontroller which monitors and controls all functions. In validation tests, the control unit demonstrated a stable operation on TET and battery supply and a safe switching from one supply to the other. The overall mean efficiency is 14% on TET and 22% on battery supply. The control unit is suitable for chronic animal trials of the ReinHeart. PMID:26583095

  11. The effects on blood flows of coronary artery by-pass grafts during intra-aortic balloon pumping.

    PubMed

    Tedoriya, T; Akemoto, K; Imai, T; Ueyama, T; Kawasuji, M; Watanabe, Y

    1994-12-01

    The internal thoracic artery (ITA), as well as aorto-coronary by-pass grafts, has been used for widely coronary artery by-pass grafting. Intra-aortic balloon pumping (IABP) is the first choice for left ventricular support when low output syndrome occurs during coronary artery by-pass surgery. However, the effect of diastolic augmentation by IABP may vary to the type of grafts. Graft flow with and without IABP support were measured in six patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass surgery requiring IABP at Kanazawa National Hospital. The patients ranged in age from 59 to 67 years, with a mean age of 63 years, and included one woman and five men. In all cases, the left ITA was dissected from the thoracic wall as pedicle, and anastomosed in situ to the left anterior descending artery. Saphenous vein grafts (SVGs) were used for aortocoronary by-pass to the obtuse marginal branches, the first diagonal branches, the left circumflex branches, and/or the right coronary artery. Blood flow in 6 ITAs, 11 SVGs to the left coronary artery systems, and three SVGs to the right coronary artery was measured by ultrasound transit-time flowmeter simultaneously with the electrocardiogram. Blood flows in ITA grafts and SVGs were measured during IABP assist and unassisting under hemodynamically stable conditions after discontinuing cardiopulmonary by-pass. The systolic and diastolic flows of each graft were measured using the peak of the R wave and the end of T wave on the electrocardiogram as the references for systole. Systolic flow during IABP were similar to unassisted flow in both ITA and SVGs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. METHOD OF CENTRIFUGE OPERATION

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, K.

    1960-05-10

    A method of isotope separation is described in which two streams are flowed axially of, and countercurrently through, a cylindrical centrifuge bowl. Under the influence of a centrifugal field, the light fraction is concentrated in a stream flowing through the central portion of the bowl, whereas the heavy fraction is concentrated in a stream at the periphery thereof.

  13. Valve for gas centrifuges

    DOEpatents

    Hahs, C.A.; Rurbage, C.H.

    1982-03-17

    The invention is pneumatically operated valve assembly for simulatenously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two on the lines so closed. The value assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

  14. The helical flow pump with a hydrodynamic levitation impeller.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yusuke; Ishii, Kohei; Isoyama, Takashi; Saito, Itsuro; Inoue, Yusuke; Ono, Toshiya; Nakagawa, Hidemoto; Nakano, Emiko; Fukazawa, Kyoko; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Fukunaga, Kazuyoshi; Ono, Minoru; Imachi, Kou

    2012-12-01

    The helical flow pump (HFP) is a novel rotary blood pump invented for developing a total artificial heart (TAH). The HFP with a hydrodynamic levitation impeller, which consists of a multi-vane impeller involving rotor magnets, stator coils at the core position, and double helical-volute pump housing, was developed. Between the stator and impeller, a hydrodynamic bearing is formed. Since the helical volutes are formed at both sides of the impeller, blood flows with a helical flow pattern inside the pump. The developed HFP showed maximum output of 19 l/min against 100 mmHg of pressure head and 11 % maximum efficiency. The profile of the H-Q (pressure head vs. flow) curve was similar to that of the undulation pump. Hydrodynamic levitation of the impeller was possible with higher than 1,000 rpm rotation speed. The normalized index of the hemolysis ratio of the HFP to centrifugal pump (BPX-80) was from 2.61 to 8.07 depending on the design of the bearing. The HFP was implanted in two goats with a left ventricular bypass method. After surgery, hemolysis occurred in both goats. The hemolysis ceased on postoperative days 14 and 9, respectively. In the first experiment, no thrombus was found in the pump after 203 days of pumping. In the second experiment, a white thrombus was found in the pump after 23 days of pumping. While further research and development are necessary, we are expecting to develop an excellent TAH with the HFP. PMID:22926404

  15. Pressure pulsation in roller pumps: a validated lumped parameter model.

    PubMed

    Moscato, Francesco; Colacino, Francesco M; Arabia, Maurizio; Danieli, Guido A

    2008-11-01

    During open-heart surgery roller pumps are often used to keep the circulation of blood through the patient body. They present numerous key features, but they suffer from several limitations: (a) they normally deliver uncontrolled pulsatile inlet and outlet pressure; (b) blood damage appears to be more than that encountered with centrifugal pumps. A lumped parameter mathematical model of a roller pump (Sarns 7000, Terumo CVS, Ann Arbor, MI, USA) was developed to dynamically simulate pressures at the pump inlet and outlet in order to clarify the uncontrolled pulsation mechanism. Inlet and outlet pressures obtained by the mathematical model have been compared with those measured in various operating conditions: different rollers' rotating speed, different tube occlusion rates, and different clamping degree at the pump inlet and outlet. Model results agree with measured pressure waveforms, whose oscillations are generated by the tube compression/release mechanism during the rollers' engaging and disengaging phases. Average Euclidean Error (AEE) was 20mmHg and 33mmHg for inlet and outlet pressure estimates, respectively. The normalized AEE never exceeded 0.16. The developed model can be exploited for designing roller pumps with improved performances aimed at reducing the undesired pressure pulsation.

  16. Detection of pump degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Casada, D.

    1994-12-31

    There are a variety of stressors that can affect the operation of centrifugal pumps. Although these general stressors are active in essentially all centrifugal pumps, the stressor level and the extent of wear and degradation can vary greatly. Parameters that affect the extent of stressor activity are manifold. In order to assure the long-term operational readiness of a pump, it is important to both understand the nature and magnitude of the specific degradation mechanisms and to monitor the performance of the pump. The most commonly applied method of monitoring the condition of not only pumps, but rotating machinery in general, is vibration analysis. Periodic or continuous spectral vibration analysis is a cornerstone of most pump monitoring programs. In the nuclear industry, non-spectral vibration monitoring of safety-related pumps is performed in accordance with the ASME code. Although vibration analysis has dominated the condition monitoring field for many years, there are other measures that have been historically used to help understand pump condition: advances in historically applied technologies and developing technologies offer improved monitoring capabilities. The capabilities of several technologies (including vibration analysis, dynamic pressure analysis, and motor power analysis) to detect the presence and magnitude of both stressors and resultant degradation are discussed.

  17. DuraHeart magnetically levitated centrifugal left ventricular assist system for advanced heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Morshuis, Michiel; Schoenbrodt, Michael; Nojiri, Chisato; Roefe, Daniela; Schulte-Eistrup, Sebastian; Boergermann, Jochen; Gummert, Jan F; Arusoglu, Latif

    2010-03-01

    The implantable left ventricular assist system (LVAS) using pulsatile pump technology has become an established therapeutic option for advanced heart failure patients. However, there have been technological limitations in some older designs, including a high incidence of infection and mechanical failures associated with moving parts, and the large size of both implantable pump and percutaneous cable. A smaller rotary blood pump emerged as a possible alternative to a large pulsatile pump to overcome some of these limitations. The technological advancement that defines the third-generation LVAS was the elimination of all mechanical contacts between the impeller and the drive mechanism. The DuraHeart LVAS is the world's first third-generation implantable LVAS to obtain market approval (CE-mark), which combines a centrifugal pump and active magnetic levitation. The initial clinical experience with the DuraHeart LVAS in Europe demonstrated that it provided significantly improved survival (85% at 6 months and 79% at 1 year), reduced adverse event rates and long-term device reliability (freedom from device replacement at 2 years: 96 +/- 3%) over pulsatile LVAS. PMID:20214423

  18. ORNL centrifuge pellet fueling system

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, C.A.; Houlberg, W.A.; Gouge, M.J.; Grapperhaus, M.J.; Milora, S.L. ); Drawin, H.; Geraud, A.; Chatelier, M.; Gros, G. )

    1992-01-01

    A centrifuge pellet injecter designed and built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is in operation on Tore Supra. This injector has the capability of injecting up to 100 pellets at speeds up to 800 M/s. The solid deuterium pellets can be formed with a variable mass from 3 to 10 torr-L and are fired at a rate of up to 10 pellets per second. The experimental program that is under way combines repetitive pellet fueling with the ergodic divertor and pump limiters to establish and understand long-pulse plasmas in which the pellet fuel source is in balance with the particle exhaust. With lower hybrid current drive, pulse lengths of up to 2 min might be achieved. To prepare for these extended pulse lengths, the pellet source on the centrifuge will be extended to provide a 300- to 500-pellet capability. A similar system extended to steady-state pellet fabrication technology and designed for a radiation and tritium environment would be a candidate for a fueling system for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Analysis of pellet-fueled ITER discharges using the WHIST code shows the potential for controlling the radial fuel deposition point to achieve the desired core density while maintaining the edge density and temperatures so as to minimize the diverter plate erosion. A centrifuge fueling system would have the capability of taking the D-T exhaust directly from the cryopumping systems, recondensing and purifying the fuel, and injecting the reconstituted pellets into the plasma, thereby minimizing the tritium inventory.

  19. ORNL centrifuge pellet fueling system

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, C.A.; Houlberg, W.A.; Gouge, M.J.; Grapperhaus, M.J.; Milora, S.L.; Drawin, H.; Geraud, A.; Chatelier, M.; Gros, G.

    1992-11-01

    A centrifuge pellet injecter designed and built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is in operation on Tore Supra. This injector has the capability of injecting up to 100 pellets at speeds up to 800 M/s. The solid deuterium pellets can be formed with a variable mass from 3 to 10 torr-L and are fired at a rate of up to 10 pellets per second. The experimental program that is under way combines repetitive pellet fueling with the ergodic divertor and pump limiters to establish and understand long-pulse plasmas in which the pellet fuel source is in balance with the particle exhaust. With lower hybrid current drive, pulse lengths of up to 2 min might be achieved. To prepare for these extended pulse lengths, the pellet source on the centrifuge will be extended to provide a 300- to 500-pellet capability. A similar system extended to steady-state pellet fabrication technology and designed for a radiation and tritium environment would be a candidate for a fueling system for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Analysis of pellet-fueled ITER discharges using the WHIST code shows the potential for controlling the radial fuel deposition point to achieve the desired core density while maintaining the edge density and temperatures so as to minimize the diverter plate erosion. A centrifuge fueling system would have the capability of taking the D-T exhaust directly from the cryopumping systems, recondensing and purifying the fuel, and injecting the reconstituted pellets into the plasma, thereby minimizing the tritium inventory.

  20. Low Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... the walls of your arteries. Each time your heart beats, it pumps out blood into the arteries. Your blood pressure is highest when your heart beats, pumping the blood. This is called systolic pressure. ...

  1. Calmodulin activation of the Ca2+ pump revealed by fluorescent chelator dyes in human red blood cell ghosts

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Ca2+ transport in red blood cell ghosts was monitored with fura2 or quin2 incorporated as the free acid during resealing. This is the first report of active transport monitored by the fluorescent intensity of the chelator dyes fura2 (5-50 microM) or quin2 (250 microM) in hemoglobin-depleted ghosts. Since there are no intracellular compartments in ghosts and the intracellular concentrations of all assay chelator substances including calmodulin (CaM), the dyes, and ATP could be set, the intracellular concentrations of free and total Ca [( Cafree]i and [Catotal]i) could be calculated during the transport. Ghosts prepared with or without CaM rapidly extruded Ca2+ to a steady- state concentration of 60-100 nM. A 10(4)-fold gradient for Ca2+ was routinely produced in medium containing 1 mM Ca2+. During active Ca2+ extrusion, d[Cafree]i/dt was a second order function of [Cafree]i and was independent of the dye concentration, whereas d[Catotal]i/dt increased as a first order function of both the [Cafree]i and the concentration of the Ca:dye complex. CaM (5 microM) increased d[Catotal]i/dt by 400% at 1 microM [Cafree]i, while d[Cafree]i/dt increased by only 25%. From a series of experiments we conclude that chelated forms of Ca2+ serve as substrates for the pump under permissive control of the [Cafree]i, and this dual effect may explain cooperativity. Free Ca2+ is extruded, and probably also Ca2+ bound to CaM or other chelators, while CaM and the chelators are retained in the cell. PMID:1371307

  2. Valve for gas centrifuges

    DOEpatents

    Hahs, Charles A.; Burbage, Charles H.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a pneumatically operated valve assembly for simultaneously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two of the lines so closed. The valve assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

  3. Heart Pump Design for Cleveland Clinic Foundation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Through a Lewis CommTech Program project with the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, the NASA Lewis Research Center is playing a key role in the design and development of a permanently implantable, artificial heart pump assist device. Known as the Innovative Ventricular Assist System (IVAS), this device will take on the pumping role of the damaged left ventricle of the heart. The key part of the IVAS is a nonpulsatile (continuous flow) artificial heart pump with centrifugal impeller blades, driven by an electric motor. Lewis is part of an industry and academia team, led by the Ohio Aerospace Institute (OAI), that is working with the Cleveland Clinic Foundation to make IVAS a reality. This device has the potential to save tens of thousands of lives each year, since 80 percent of heart attack victims suffer irreversible damage to the left ventricle, the part of the heart that does most of the pumping. Impeller blade design codes and flow-modeling analytical codes will be used in the project. These codes were developed at Lewis for the aerospace industry but will be applicable to the IVAS design project. The analytical codes, which currently simulate the flow through the compressor and pump systems, will be used to simulate the flow within the blood pump in the artificial heart assist device. The Interdisciplinary Technology Office heads up Lewis' efforts in the IVAS project. With the aid of numerical modeling, the blood pump will address many design issues, including some fluid-dynamic design considerations that are unique to the properties of blood. Some of the issues that will be addressed in the design process include hemolysis, deposition, recirculation, pump efficiency, rotor thrust balance, and bearing lubrication. Optimum pumping system performance will be achieved by modeling all the interactions between the pump components. The interactions can be multidisciplinary and, therefore, are influenced not only by the fluid dynamics of adjacent components but also by

  4. Innovative Design to Prevent Reversal of Roller Blood Pump Rotation in the Event of Electromechanical Failure: An Easy Solution to a Devastating Problem

    PubMed Central

    Skoletsky, Jennifer S.; White, Brian T.; Austin, Jon W.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract: Despite the advanced technologies of battery back-up for heart-lung consoles and the availability of system-wide generators, electromechanical failure is still occurring. Several heartlung machine manufacturers still provide unsafe handcranking devices to use in the case of an emergency while using a roller blood pump. A new design has been engineered to eliminate safety and quality issues for the perfusionist and the patient when the need for handcranking presents itself. A ratchet-style handcranking device was fabricated by means of a steel plate with adjustable pins. The adjustable pins allow for use with different models of the Cobe, Stockert, and Jostra heart-lung consoles, which contain roller pumps with 180° roller heads. Additional modifications such as a 1:2 transmission and fluorescent markers are also used in the design. This innovative design is an improvement in safety compared with the current handcrank provided by Cobe, Stockert, and Jostra. With this modified handcranking device, accidental reverse rotation of the roller pump head cannot occur. Fluorescent markers will improve visualization of the pump head in low-light situations. The ergonomic design improves efficiency by reducing fatigue. Most importantly, a “safe” safety device will replace the current design provided by these manufacturers, thus improving the quality of care by health care providers. PMID:17672191

  5. Innovative design to prevent reversal of roller blood pump rotation in the event of electromechanical failure: an easy solution to a devastating problem.

    PubMed

    Skoletsky, Jennifer S; White, Brian T; Austin, Jon W

    2007-06-01

    Despite the advanced technologies of battery back-up for heart-lung consoles and the availability of system-wide generators, electromechanical failure is still occurring. Several heart-lung machine manufacturers still provide unsafe handcranking devices to use in the case of an emergency while using a roller blood pump. A new design has been engineered to eliminate safety and quality issues for the perfusionist and the patient when the need for handcranking presents itself. A ratchet-style handcranking device was fabricated by means of a steel plate with adjustable pins. The adjustable pins allow for use with different models of the Cobe, Stockert, and Jostra heart-lung consoles, which contain roller pumps with 1800 roller heads. Additional modifications such as a 1:2 transmission and fluorescent markers are also used in the design. This innovative design is an improvement in safety compared with the current handcrank provided by Cobe, Stockert, and Jostra. With this modified handcranking device, accidental reverse rotation of the roller pump head cannot occur. Fluorescent markers will improve visualization of the pump head in low-light situations. The ergonomic design improves efficiency by reducing fatigue. Most importantly, a "safe" safety device will replace the current design provided by these manufacturers, thus improving the quality of care by health care providers.

  6. Condensate and feedwater systems, pumps, and water chemistry. Volume seven

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Subject matter includes condensate and feedwater systems (general features of condensate and feedwater systems, condenser hotwell level control, condensate flow, feedwater flow), pumps (principles of fluid flow, types of pumps, centrifugal pumps, positive displacement pumps, jet pumps, pump operating characteristics) and water chemistry (water chemistry fundamentals, corrosion, scaling, radiochemistry, water chemistry control processes, water pretreatment, PWR water chemistry, BWR water chemistry, condenser circulating water chemistry.

  7. SEAL FOR HIGH SPEED CENTRIFUGE

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.W.

    1957-12-17

    A seal is described for a high speed centrifuge wherein the centrifugal force of rotation acts on the gasket to form a tight seal. The cylindrical rotating bowl of the centrifuge contains a closure member resting on a shoulder in the bowl wall having a lower surface containing bands of gasket material, parallel and adjacent to the cylinder wall. As the centrifuge speed increases, centrifugal force acts on the bands of gasket material forcing them in to a sealing contact against the cylinder wall. This arrangememt forms a simple and effective seal for high speed centrifuges, replacing more costly methods such as welding a closure in place.

  8. Attack on centrifugal costs

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, P.F.

    1986-03-01

    The Monsanto Chocolate Bayou plant has had an aggressive and successful energy conservation program. The combined efforts have resulted in a 80% reduction in unit energy consumption compared to 1972. The approach of using system audits to optimize fluid systems was developed. Since most of the fluid movers are centrifugal, the name Centrifugal Savings Task Force was adopted. There are three tools that are particularly valuable in optimizing fluid systems. First, a working level understanding of the Affinity Laws seems a must. In addition, the performance curves for the fluid movers is needed. The last need is accurate system field data. Systems effectively managed at the Chocolate Bayou plant were process air improvement, feed-water pressure reduction, combustion air blower turbine speed control, and cooling tower pressure reduction. Optimization of centrifugal systems is an often-overlooked opportunity for energy savings. The basic guidelines are to move only the fluid needed, and move it at as low a pressure as possible.

  9. Centrifugal microfluidic platforms: advanced unit operations and applications.

    PubMed

    Strohmeier, O; Keller, M; Schwemmer, F; Zehnle, S; Mark, D; von Stetten, F; Zengerle, R; Paust, N

    2015-10-01

    Centrifugal microfluidics has evolved into a mature technology. Several major diagnostic companies either have products on the market or are currently evaluating centrifugal microfluidics for product development. The fields of application are widespread and include clinical chemistry, immunodiagnostics and protein analysis, cell handling, molecular diagnostics, as well as food, water, and soil analysis. Nevertheless, new fluidic functions and applications that expand the possibilities of centrifugal microfluidics are being introduced at a high pace. In this review, we first present an up-to-date comprehensive overview of centrifugal microfluidic unit operations. Then, we introduce the term "process chain" to review how these unit operations can be combined for the automation of laboratory workflows. Such aggregation of basic functionalities enables efficient fluidic design at a higher level of integration. Furthermore, we analyze how novel, ground-breaking unit operations may foster the integration of more complex applications. Among these are the storage of pneumatic energy to realize complex switching sequences or to pump liquids radially inward, as well as the complete pre-storage and release of reagents. In this context, centrifugal microfluidics provides major advantages over other microfluidic actuation principles: the pulse-free inertial liquid propulsion provided by centrifugal microfluidics allows for closed fluidic systems that are free of any interfaces to external pumps. Processed volumes are easily scalable from nanoliters to milliliters. Volume forces can be adjusted by rotation and thus, even for very small volumes, surface forces may easily be overcome in the centrifugal gravity field which enables the efficient separation of nanoliter volumes from channels, chambers or sensor matrixes as well as the removal of any disturbing bubbles. In summary, centrifugal microfluidics takes advantage of a comprehensive set of fluidic unit operations such as

  10. Centrifugal microfluidic platforms: advanced unit operations and applications.

    PubMed

    Strohmeier, O; Keller, M; Schwemmer, F; Zehnle, S; Mark, D; von Stetten, F; Zengerle, R; Paust, N

    2015-10-01

    Centrifugal microfluidics has evolved into a mature technology. Several major diagnostic companies either have products on the market or are currently evaluating centrifugal microfluidics for product development. The fields of application are widespread and include clinical chemistry, immunodiagnostics and protein analysis, cell handling, molecular diagnostics, as well as food, water, and soil analysis. Nevertheless, new fluidic functions and applications that expand the possibilities of centrifugal microfluidics are being introduced at a high pace. In this review, we first present an up-to-date comprehensive overview of centrifugal microfluidic unit operations. Then, we introduce the term "process chain" to review how these unit operations can be combined for the automation of laboratory workflows. Such aggregation of basic functionalities enables efficient fluidic design at a higher level of integration. Furthermore, we analyze how novel, ground-breaking unit operations may foster the integration of more complex applications. Among these are the storage of pneumatic energy to realize complex switching sequences or to pump liquids radially inward, as well as the complete pre-storage and release of reagents. In this context, centrifugal microfluidics provides major advantages over other microfluidic actuation principles: the pulse-free inertial liquid propulsion provided by centrifugal microfluidics allows for closed fluidic systems that are free of any interfaces to external pumps. Processed volumes are easily scalable from nanoliters to milliliters. Volume forces can be adjusted by rotation and thus, even for very small volumes, surface forces may easily be overcome in the centrifugal gravity field which enables the efficient separation of nanoliter volumes from channels, chambers or sensor matrixes as well as the removal of any disturbing bubbles. In summary, centrifugal microfluidics takes advantage of a comprehensive set of fluidic unit operations such as

  11. Cardio-postural interactions and short-arm centrifugation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaber, Andrew; Goswami, Nandu; Xu, Da; Laurin, Alexendre

    INTRODUCTION: We are interested in mechanisms associated with orthostatic tolerance. In previous studies we have shown that postural muscles in the calf contribute to both posture and blood pressure regulation during orthostatic stress. In this study we investigated the relationship between cardiovascular and postural muscle control before, during and after short arm human centrifuge (SAHC) up to 2.2 G. METHODS: Eleven healthy young subjects (6 m, 5 f), with no history of cardiovascular disease, falls or orthostatic hypotension, participated. All were familiarized with the SAHC with 10 minutes at 1-G at the feet. Each subject was instrumented in the supine position on the SAHC for beat-to-beat ECG and blood pressure (Portapres derived SBP). Bilateral lower leg EMG was collected from four leg postural muscles: tibialis anterior, medial gastrocnemius, lateral gastrocnemius, and medial soleus. Transdermal differential recording of signals was performed using an 8-channel EMG system, (Myosystem 1200, Noraxon Inc., Arizona, USA). Postural sway data of the body COP was computed from the force and moment data collected with a force platform (Accusway, AMTI, MA, USA). Before and after SAHC, the subject stood on a force platform with their gaze fixed on a point at eye level, closed their eyes and stood quietly for 5 min. A final stand was conducted 30 min after centrifugation with supine rest in between. During clockwise centrifugation (10-min 1g and 10-min 2.2g at the foot) the subjects’ head was hooded and in the dark. The subject’s body was restrained into the rotation arm with a parachute harness and given additional body support with a foot-plate. ECG, EMG and BP data were collected throughout and centre of pressure trajectory (COP) collected during the stand test. Subjects were requested to relax and not to voluntarily contract the leg muscles; however, they were not to suppress contractions as they occurred involuntarily or by reflex. A Continuous Wavelet

  12. Enhancing Centrifugal Separation With Electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, F. T.

    1986-01-01

    Separation of biological cells by coil-planet centrifuge enhanced by electrophoresis. By itself, coil-planet centrifuge offers relatively gentle method of separating cells under low centrifugal force in physiological medium that keeps cells alive. With addition of voltage gradient to separation column of centrifuge, separation still gentle but faster and more complete. Since separation apparatus contains no rotary seal, probability of leakage, contamination, corrosion, and short circuits reduced.

  13. The Heartmate III: design and in vivo studies of a maglev centrifugal left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Loree, H M; Bourque, K; Gernes, D B; Richardson, J S; Poirier, V L; Barletta, N; Fleischli, A; Foiera, G; Gempp, T M; Schoeb, R; Litwak, K N; Akimoto, T; Kameneva, M; Watach, M J; Litwak, P

    2001-05-01

    A compact implantable centrifugal left ventricular assist device (LVAD) (HeartMate III) featuring a magnetically levitated impeller is under development. The goal of our ongoing work is to demonstrate feasibility, low hemolysis, and low thrombogenicity of the titanium pump in chronic bovine in vivo studies. The LVAD is based on so-called bearingless motor technology and combines pump rotor, drive, and magnetic bearing functions in a single unit. The impeller is rotated (theta z) and levitated with both active (X, Y) and passive (Z, theta x, theta y) suspension. Six prototype systems have been built featuring an implantable titanium pump (69 mm diameter, 30 mm height) with textured blood contacting surfaces and extracorporeal electronics. The pumps were implanted in 9 calves (< or = 100 kg at implant) that were anticoagulated with Coumadin (2.5 < or = INR < or = 4.0) throughout the studies. Six studies were electively terminated (at 27-61 days), 1 study was terminated after the development of severe pneumonia and lung atelectasis (at 27 days) another study was terminated after cardiac arrest (at 2 days) while a final study is ongoing (at approximately 100 days). Mean pump flows ranged from 2 to 7 L/min, except for brief periods of exercise at 6 to 9 L/min. Plasma free hemoglobin ranged from 4 to 10 mg/dl. All measured biochemical indicators of end organ function remained within normal range. The pumps have met performance requirements in all 9 implants with acceptable hemolysis and no mechanical failures. PMID:11403669

  14. Lightweight Shield for Centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luper, C.

    1982-01-01

    Centrifuge bowl composed of laminated aluminum offers required combination of high strength at reduced weight. Around outside wall of bowl core of 1/16 inch thick spun aluminum are wrapped two layers of aluminum, each also one-sixteenth inch thick. Layered structure prevents cracks from propagating through wall.

  15. Human Powered Centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, Gerald M. (Inventor); Vernikos, Joan (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A human powered centrifuge has independently established turntable angular velocity and human power input. A control system allows excess input power to be stored as electric energy in a battery or dissipated as heat through a resistors. In a mechanical embodiment, the excess power is dissipated in a friction brake.

  16. Potential Danger of Pre-Pump Clamping on Negative Pressure-Associated Gaseous Microemboli Generation During Extracorporeal Life Support--An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shigang; Chin, Brian J; Gentile, Frank; Kunselman, Allen R; Palanzo, David; Ündar, Akif

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the relationship between revolution speed of a conventional centrifugal pump and negative pressure at the inlet of the pump by clamping the tubing upstream of the pump, and to verify whether negative pressure leads to gaseous microemboli (GME) production in a simulated adult extracorporeal life support (ECLS) system. The experimental circuit, including a Maquet Rotaflow centrifugal pump and a Medos Hilite 7000 LT polymethyl-pentene membrane oxygenator, was primed with packed red blood cells (hematocrit 35%). Negative pressure was created in the circuit by clamping the tubing upstream of the pump for 10 s, and then releasing the clamp. An emboli detection and classification quantifier was used to record GME volume and count at pre-oxygenator and post-oxygenator sites, and pressure and flow rate data were collected using a custom-based data acquisition system. All trials were conducted at 36°C at revolution speeds of 2000-4000 rpm (500 rpm increment). The flow rates were 1092.5-4708.4 mL/min at the revolution speeds of 2000-4000 rpm. Higher revolution speed generated higher negative pressure at the pre-pump site when clamping the tubing upstream of the pump (-108.3 ± 0.1 to -462.0 ± 0.5 mm Hg at 2000-4000 rpm). Moreover, higher negative pressure was associated with a larger number and volume of GME at pre-oxygenator site after de-clamp (GME count 10,573 ± 271 at pre-oxygenator site at 4000 rpm). The results showed that there was a potential danger of delivering GME to the patient when clamping pre-pump tubing during ECLS using a centrifugal pump. Our results warrant further clinical studies to investigate this phenomenon.

  17. Portable engine-pump assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhardt, H.A.

    1987-02-17

    This patent describes a portable engine-pump assembly that is compact and light in weight comprising: an internal combustion engine mounted with its crankshaft extending vertically, a centrifugal pump having an impeller mounted for rotation on a pump shaft within a volute chamber, means mounting the pump on and immediately beneath the engine with the pump shaft extending vertically in accurate alignment and concentricity with the engine crankshaft, means coupling the engine crankshaft and the pump shaft together so that the engine crankshaft drives the pump shaft, the pump comprising a pump body defining the volute chamber and providing a pump inlet passage and a pump discharge passage oriented in generally horizontal directions, the pump body defining an inlet chamber providing passages for the flow of liquid from the pump inlet passage into the impeller from both above and below same and including an upper body portion and a lower body portion, and an exhaust system for the engine including an exhaust passage contained in the upper body portion, a muffler having an inlet, and means providing flow communication between the exhaust passage and the inlet of the muffler.

  18. Closed continuous-flow centrifuge rotor

    DOEpatents

    Breillatt, Jr., Julian P.; Remenyik, Carl J.; Sartory, Walter K.; Thacker, Louis H.; Penland, William Z.

    1976-01-01

    A blood separation centrifuge rotor having a generally parabolic core disposed concentrically and spaced apart within a housing having a similarly shaped cavity. Blood is introduced through a central inlet and into a central passageway enlarged downwardly to decrease the velocity of the entrant blood. Septa are disposed inside the central passageway to induce rotation of the entrant blood. A separation chamber is defined between the core and the housing wherein the whole blood is separated into red cell, white cell, and plasma zones. The zones are separated by annular splitter blades disposed within the separation chamber. The separated components are continuously removed through conduits communicating through a face seal to the outside of the rotor.

  19. A novel all-in-one magnetic pump and power harvester design for bio-medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Shin, Jaewon; Hashi, Shuichiro; Ishiyama, Kazushi

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a magnetic centrifugal pump with a magnetic power harvester (all-in-one system) for medical applications. The proposed pump is driven by an external rotating magnetic field. To produce pressure and electrical power, an all-in-one device consisting of a pump and a power harvester was designed. It consists of a multi-stage impeller, a disc type NdFeB permanent magnet, and a fixed wound coil on the pump case. The rotation of the rotor creates a continuous flow of liquid through the pump, with a pressure head, and an electrical power is generated in the wound coil because of the rotating magnetic field. The maximum flow rate and pressure are 5000 ml min-1 and 16 kPa, respectively, at 100 Hz. These results meet the requirements of an artificial heart assistance blood pump. Under these operating conditions, the harvested voltage can reach a maximum of 8.2 Vp-p. With this configuration and control method, wireless and battery-free operation is possible, which is required in the medical field. Moreover, the power harvester can monitor the pump conditions without additional electrical power and can provide electrical power to other implanted electrical devices. The performances of the pump and power harvester were verified in a laboratory experiment. Overall, the proposed system acts as a pump and a power harvester that is fully wireless and battery-free.

  20. In-vitro investigation of cerebral-perfusion effects of a rotary blood pump installed in the descending aorta.

    PubMed

    Rezaienia, Mohammad Amin; Paul, Gordon; Avital, Eldad; Rahideh, Akbar; Rothman, Martin Terry; Korakianitis, Theodosios

    2016-06-14

    This study describes use of a cardiovascular simulator to replicate the hemodynamic responses of the cerebrovascular system with a mechanical circulatory support device operating in the descending aorta. To do so, a cerebral autoregulation unit was developed which replicates the dilation and constriction of the native cerebrovascular resistance system and thereby regulates the cerebral flow rate within defined limits. The efficacy of the replicated autoregulation mechanism was investigated by introducing a number of step alterations in mean aortic pressure and monitoring the cerebral flow. The steady responses of the cerebral flow to changes in mean aortic pressure were in good agreement with clinical data. Next, a rotary pump, modeling a mechanical circulatory support device, was installed in the descending aorta and the hemodynamic responses of the cerebral system were investigated over a wide range of pump operating conditions. Insertion of a mechanical circulatory support device in the descending aorta presented an improved cardiac output as a result of afterload reduction. It was observed that the primary drop in cerebral flow, caused by the pump in the descending aorta, was compensated over the course of five seconds due to a gradual decrease in cerebrovascular resistance. The experimental results suggest that the implantation of a mechanical circulatory support device in the descending aorta, a less invasive procedure than typical mechanical circulatory support implantation, will not have an adverse effect on the cognitive function, provided that the cerebral autoregulation is largely unimpaired. PMID:27155746

  1. Centrifugally decoupling touchdown bearings

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F

    2014-06-24

    Centrifugally decoupling mechanical bearing systems provide thin tensioned metallic ribbons contained in a support structure. This assembly rotates around a stationary shaft being centered at low speeds by the action of the metal ribbons. Tension springs are connected on one end to the ribbons and on the other end to the support structure. The ribbons pass through slots in the inner ring of the support structure. The spring preloading thus insures contact (or near-contact) between the ribbons and the shaft at rotation speeds below the transition speed. Above this speed, however, the centrifugal force on the ribbons produces a tensile force on them that exceeds the spring tensile force so that the ribbons curve outward, effectively decoupling them from mechanical contact with the shaft. They still remain, however, in position to act as a touchdown bearing in case of abnormally high transverse accelerations.

  2. Centrifugal unbalance detection system

    DOEpatents

    Cordaro, Joseph V.; Reeves, George; Mets, Michael

    2002-01-01

    A system consisting of an accelerometer sensor attached to a centrifuge enclosure for sensing vibrations and outputting a signal in the form of a sine wave with an amplitude and frequency that is passed through a pre-amp to convert it to a voltage signal, a low pass filter for removing extraneous noise, an A/D converter and a processor and algorithm for operating on the signal, whereby the algorithm interprets the amplitude and frequency associated with the signal and once an amplitude threshold has been exceeded the algorithm begins to count cycles during a predetermined time period and if a given number of complete cycles exceeds the frequency threshold during the predetermined time period, the system shuts down the centrifuge.

  3. Centrifugal adsorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor); Tsao, Yow-Min D. (Inventor); Lee, Wenshan (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A gas-liquid separator uses a helical passageway to impart a spiral motion to a fluid passing therethrough. The centrifugal force generated by the spiraling motion urges the liquid component of the fluid radially outward which forces the gas component radially inward. The gas component is then separated through a gas-permeable, liquid-impervious membrane and discharged through a central passageway. A filter material captures target substances contained in the fluid.

  4. Arterial α2-Na+ pump expression influences blood pressure: lessons from novel, genetically engineered smooth muscle-specific α2 mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ling; Song, Hong; Wang, Youhua; Lee, Jane C.; Kotlikoff, Michael I.; Pritchard, Tracy J.; Paul, Richard J.; Zhang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Arterial myocytes express α1-catalytic subunit isoform Na+ pumps (75–80% of total), which are ouabain resistant in rodents, and high ouabain affinity α2-Na+ pumps. Mice with globally reduced α2-pumps (but not α1-pumps), mice with mutant ouabain-resistant α2-pumps, and mice with a smooth muscle (SM)-specific α2-transgene (α2SM-Tg) that induces overexpression all have altered blood pressure (BP) phenotypes. We generated α2SM-DN mice with SM-specific α2 (not α1) reduction (>50%) using nonfunctional dominant negative (DN) α2. We compared α2SM-DN and α2SM-Tg mice to controls to determine how arterial SM α2-pumps affect vasoconstriction and BP. α2SM-DN mice had elevated basal mean BP (mean BP by telemetry: 117 ± 4 vs. 106 ± 1 mmHg, n = 7/7, P < 0.01) and enhanced BP responses to chronic ANG II infusion (240 ng·kg−1·min−1) and high (6%) NaCl. Several arterial Ca2+ transporters, including Na+/Ca2+ exchanger 1 (NCX1) and sarcoplasmic reticulum and plasma membrane Ca2+ pumps [sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase 2 (SERCA2) and plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase 1 (PMCA1)], were also reduced (>50%). α2SM-DN mouse isolated small arteries had reduced myogenic reactivity, perhaps because of reduced Ca2+ transporter expression. In contrast, α2SM-Tg mouse aortas overexpressed α2 (>2-fold), NCX1, SERCA2, and PMCA1 (43). α2SM-Tg mice had reduced basal mean BP (104 ± 1 vs. 109 ± 2 mmHg, n = 15/9, P < 0.02) and attenuated BP responses to chronic ANG II (300–400 ng·kg−1·min−1) with or without 2% NaCl but normal myogenic reactivity. NCX1 expression was inversely related to basal BP in SM-α2 engineered mice but was directly related in SM-NCX1 engineered mice. NCX1, which usually mediates arterial Ca2+ entry, and α2-Na+ pumps colocalize at plasma membrane-sarcoplasmic reticulum junctions and functionally couple via the local Na+ gradient to help regulate cell Ca2+. Altered Ca2+ transporter expression in SM-α2 engineered mice apparently compensates to

  5. Arterial α2-Na+ pump expression influences blood pressure: lessons from novel, genetically engineered smooth muscle-specific α2 mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; Song, Hong; Wang, Youhua; Lee, Jane C; Kotlikoff, Michael I; Pritchard, Tracy J; Paul, Richard J; Zhang, Jin; Blaustein, Mordecai P

    2015-09-01

    Arterial myocytes express α1-catalytic subunit isoform Na(+) pumps (75-80% of total), which are ouabain resistant in rodents, and high ouabain affinity α2-Na(+) pumps. Mice with globally reduced α2-pumps (but not α1-pumps), mice with mutant ouabain-resistant α2-pumps, and mice with a smooth muscle (SM)-specific α2-transgene (α2 (SM-Tg)) that induces overexpression all have altered blood pressure (BP) phenotypes. We generated α2 (SM-DN) mice with SM-specific α2 (not α1) reduction (>50%) using nonfunctional dominant negative (DN) α2. We compared α2 (SM-DN) and α2 (SM-Tg) mice to controls to determine how arterial SM α2-pumps affect vasoconstriction and BP. α2 (SM-DN) mice had elevated basal mean BP (mean BP by telemetry: 117 ± 4 vs. 106 ± 1 mmHg, n = 7/7, P < 0.01) and enhanced BP responses to chronic ANG II infusion (240 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1)) and high (6%) NaCl. Several arterial Ca(2+) transporters, including Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger 1 (NCX1) and sarcoplasmic reticulum and plasma membrane Ca(2+) pumps [sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase 2 (SERCA2) and plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase 1 (PMCA1)], were also reduced (>50%). α2 (SM-DN) mouse isolated small arteries had reduced myogenic reactivity, perhaps because of reduced Ca(2+) transporter expression. In contrast, α2 (SM-Tg) mouse aortas overexpressed α2 (>2-fold), NCX1, SERCA2, and PMCA1 (43). α2 (SM-Tg) mice had reduced basal mean BP (104 ± 1 vs. 109 ± 2 mmHg, n = 15/9, P < 0.02) and attenuated BP responses to chronic ANG II (300-400 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1)) with or without 2% NaCl but normal myogenic reactivity. NCX1 expression was inversely related to basal BP in SM-α2 engineered mice but was directly related in SM-NCX1 engineered mice. NCX1, which usually mediates arterial Ca(2+) entry, and α2-Na(+) pumps colocalize at plasma membrane-sarcoplasmic reticulum junctions and functionally couple via the local Na(+) gradient to help regulate cell Ca(2+). Altered Ca(2+) transporter expression in

  6. 40 CFR 65.116 - Quality improvement program for pumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (for example, piston, horizontal or vertical centrifugal, gear, bellows); pump manufacturer; seal type... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Quality improvement program for pumps... pumps. (a) Criteria. If, on a 6-month rolling average, at least the greater of either 10 percent of...

  7. Oscillatory counter-centrifugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shujing; Nadim, Ali

    2016-02-01

    In ordinary centrifugation, a suspended particle that is heavier than the displaced fluid migrates away from the rotation axis when the fluid-filled container rotates steadily about that axis. In contrast a particle that is lighter than the displaced fluid (e.g., a bubble) migrates toward the rotation axis in a centrifuge. In this paper, we show theoretically that if a fluid-filled container rotates in an oscillatory manner as a rigid body about an axis, at high enough oscillation frequencies, the sense of migration of suspended particles is reversed. That is, in that case particles denser than the fluid migrate inward, while those that are lighter than the fluid move outward. We term this unusual phenomenon "Oscillatory Counter-Centrifugation" or OCC, for short. Through application of the method of averaging to the equations of motion, we derive a simple criterion to predict the occurrence of OCC. The analysis also reveals that the time-average of the Coriolis force in the radial direction is the term that is responsible for this effect. In addition, we analyze the effects of the Basset history force and the Rubinow-Keller lift force on particle trajectories and find that OCC persists even when these forces are active. The phenomenon awaits experimental verification.

  8. Postcardiotomy centrifugal assist: a single surgeon's experience.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Jack J; McKenney-Knox, Charlotte A; Wagner-Mann, Colette C

    2002-11-01

    Because of the infrequent application of cardiac assist devices for postcardiotomy heart failure, most published reports include the results of learning curves from multiple surgeons. Between October 1986 and June 2001, a single surgeon used 35 Sarns Centrifugal Pumps as ventricular assist devices in 21 patients with severe hemodynamic compromise after open heart surgery (0.88% incidence). Patients' ages ranged from 39 to 77 (mean, 59.6 years). Three patients required right ventricular assist devices, 4 left ventricular assist devices, and 14 had biventricular assist devices. For all, the indication for application was inability to wean from cardiopulmonary bypass despite multiple inotropes and intraaortic balloon pumping. All were expected to be intraoperative deaths without further mechanical assistance. Patients were assisted from 2 to 434 h (median, 48 h). Fifteen patients (71.4%) were weaned from device(s), and 11 patients (52.4%) were hospital survivors. Actuarial survival in those dismissed from the hospital was 78% at 5 years and 39% at 10 years. Patients facing certain demise after cardiac surgery can be salvaged with temporary centrifugal mechanical assist. Results are competitive with that achieved with more sophisticated devices. Hospital survivors enjoy reasonable longevity.

  9. LH2 pump component development testing in the electric pump room at test cell C inducer no. 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, F. X.; Brunner, J. J.; Kirk, K. G.; Mathews, J. P.; Nishioka, T.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics of a turbine pump for use with the nuclear engine for rocket vehicles are discussed. It was determined that the pump will be a two stage centrifugal pump with both stages having backswept impellers and an inducer upstream of the first stage impeller. The test program provided demonstration of the ability of the selected design to meet the imposed requirements.

  10. Gas Centrifuges and Nuclear Proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, David

    2004-09-15

    Gas centrifuges have been an ideal enrichment method for a wide variety of countries. Many countries have built gas centrifuges to make enriched uranium for peaceful nuclear purposes. Other countries have secretly sought centrifuges to make highly enriched uranium for nuclear weapons. In more recent times, several countries have secretly sought or built gas centrifuges in regions of tension. The main countries that have been of interest in the last two decades have been Pakistan, Iraq, Iran, and North Korea. Currently, most attention is focused on Iran, Pakistan, and North Korea. These states did not have the indigenous abilities to make gas centrifuges, focusing instead on illicit and questionable foreign procurement. The presentation covered the following main sections: Spread of centrifuges through illicit procurement; Role of export controls in stopping proliferation; Increasing the transparency of gas centrifuge programs in non-nuclear weapon states; and, Verified dismantlement of gas centrifuge programs. Gas centrifuges are important providers of low enriched uranium for civil nuclear power reactors. They also pose special nuclear proliferation risks. We all have special responsibilities to prevent the spread of gas centrifuges into regions of tension and to mitigate the consequences of their spread into the Middle East, South Asia, and North Asia.

  11. Supernatant decanting on a centrifugal platform.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chih-Hsin; Lu, Chien-Hsing; Yuan, Wei-Li; Chiang, Wei-Ling; Lin, Chia-Hui

    2011-03-30

    This study presents a novel approach to decant supernatant on a centrifugal platform. By manipulating the centrifugally induced pressure and the elastic deformation of the plastic lids in the decanting chamber, fixed amounts of the supernatant can be decanted into the detection chamber at lower rotational speeds. The experimental results showed that decanted volume is affected by the volume of deformation and the operating parameters. Factors that influence the decanting ratio are also discussed. This approach has the advantages of simple design and low manufacturing cost; further, it has no need of surface modification. It has been applied to on-disk separation of plasma from whole blood, and the results showed good stability and repeatability.

  12. The Magnetic Centrifugal Mass Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2011-08-04

    Mass filters using rotating plasmas have been considered for separating nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel. We propose a new mass filter that utilizes centrifugal and magnetic confinement of ions in a way similar to the asymmetric centrifugal trap. This magnetic centrifugal mass filter is shown to be more proliferation resistant than present technology. This filter is collisional and produces well confined output streams, among other advantages. __________________________________________________

  13. Enhanced ventricular pump function and decreased reservoir backflow sustain rise in pulmonary blood flow after reduction of lung liquid volume in fetal lambs.

    PubMed

    Smolich, Joseph J

    2014-02-15

    Although a reduction in lung liquid volume increases fetal pulmonary blood flow, the changes in central flow patterns that sustain this increased pulmonary perfusion are unknown. To address this issue, eight anesthetized late-gestation fetal sheep were instrumented with pulmonary trunk (PT), ductus arteriosus (DA), and left pulmonary artery (PA) micromanometer catheters and transit-time flow probes, with blood flow profile and wave intensity analyses performed at baseline and after withdrawal of lung liquid via an endotracheal tube. Reducing lung liquid volume by 19 ± 6 ml/kg (mean ± SD) augmented right ventricular power by 34% (P < 0.001), with distribution of an accompanying increase in mean PT blood flow (245 ± 63 ml/min, P < 0.001) to the lungs (169 ± 91 ml/min, P = 0.001) and across the DA (77 ± 92 ml/min, P = 0.04). However, although PT and DA flow increments were confined to systole and were related to an increased magnitude of flow-increasing, forward-running compression waves, the rise in PA flow spanned both systole (108 ± 66 ml/min) and diastole (61 ± 32 ml/min). Flow profile analysis showed that the step-up in PA diastolic flow was associated with diminished PA diastolic backflow and accompanied by a lesser degree of diastolic right-to-left DA shunting. These data suggest that an increased pulmonary blood flow after reduction of lung liquid volume is associated with substantial changes in PT-DA-PA interactions and underpinned by two main factors: 1) enhanced right ventricular pump function that increases PA systolic inflow and 2) decreased PA diastolic backflow that arises from a fundamental change in PA reservoir function, thereby resulting in greater passage of systolic inflow through the lungs.

  14. In Vitro Mean Red Blood Cell Volume Change Induced by Diode Pump Solid State Low-Level Laser of 405 nm

    PubMed Central

    Jafar, Mohamad Suhaimi; Al-Gailani, Bassam T.; Ahmed, Naser Mahmoud; Suhaimi, Fatanah Mohamad; Suardi, Nursakinah

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This study was conducted to investigate the effects of low-level laser (LLL) doses on human red blood cell volume. The effects of exposure to a diode pump solid state (DPSS) (λ = 405 nm) laser were observed. Background data: The response of human blood to LLL irradiation gives important information about the mechanism of interaction of laser light with living organisms. Materials and methods Blood samples were collected into ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-containing tubes, and each sample was divided into two equal aliquots, one to serve as control and the other for irradiation. The aliquot was subjected to laser irradiation for 20, 30, 40, or 50 min at a fixed power density of 0.03 W/cm2. Mean cell volume (MCV) and red blood cell (RBC) counts were measured immediately after irradiation using a computerized hemtoanalyzer. Results: Significant decrease in RBC volume (p < 0.05, p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001, and p < 0.05, respectively) was induced with variation in laser doses.The highest response was observed with an exposure time of 40 min. This result was reproduced in RBCs suspended in a buffered NaCl solution. In contrast to this finding, laser-induced RBC volume change was completely abolished by suspending RBCs in a solution containing a higher concentration of EDTA. Conclusions: It was suggested that LLL can reduce RBC volume possibly because of the increased free intracellular Ca+2 concentrations, which activate Ca+2-dependent K+ channels with consequent K+ ion efflux and cell shrinkage. PMID:26966989

  15. Centrifuge Techniques and Apparatus for Transport Experiments in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Earl D. Mattson; Carl D. Paler; Robert W. Smith; Markus Flury

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes experimental approaches and apparatus that we have developed to study solute and colloid transport in porous media using Idaho National Laboratory's 2-m radius centrifuge. The ex-perimental techniques include water flux scaling with applied acceleration at the top of the column and sub-atmospheric pressure control at the column base, automation of data collection, and remote experimental con-trol over the internet. These apparatus include a constant displacement piston pump, a custom designed liquid fraction collector based on switching valve technology, and modified moisture monitoring equipment. Suc-cessful development of these experimental techniques and equipment is illustrated through application to transport of a conservative tracer through unsaturated sand column, with centrifugal acceleration up to 40 gs. Development of such experimental equipment that can withstand high accelerations enhances the centrifuge technique to conduct highly controlled unsaturated solute/colloid transport experiments and allows in-flight liquid sample collection of the effluent.

  16. Centrifuge impact cratering experiment 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Transient crates motions, cratering flow fields, crates dynamics, determining impact conditions from total crater welt, centrifuge quarter-space cratering, and impact cratering mechanics research is documented.

  17. CENTRIFUGAL MEMBRANE FILTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel J. Stepan; Bradley G. Stevens; Melanie D. Hetland

    1999-10-01

    The overall project consists of several integrated research phases related to the applicability, continued development, demonstration, and commercialization of the SpinTek centrifugal membrane filtration process. Work performed during this reporting period consisted of Phase 2 evaluation of the SpinTek centrifugal membrane filtration technology and Phase 3, Technology Partnering. During Phase 1 testing conducted at the EERC using the SpinTek ST-IIL unit operating on a surrogate tank waste, a solids cake developed on the membrane surface. The solids cake was observed where linear membrane velocities were less than 17.5 ft/s and reduced the unobstructed membrane surface area up to 25%, reducing overall filtration performance. The primary goal of the Phase 2 research effort was to enhance filtration performance through the development and testing of alternative turbulence promoter designs. The turbulence promoters were designed to generate a shear force across the entire membrane surface sufficient to maintain a self-cleaning membrane capability and improve filtration efficiency and long-term performance. Specific Phase 2 research activities included the following: System modifications to accommodate an 11-in.-diameter, two-disk rotating membrane assembly; Development and fabrication of alternative turbulence promoter designs; Testing and evaluation of the existing and alternative turbulence promoters under selected operating conditions using a statistically designed test matrix; and Data reduction and analysis; The objective of Phase 3 research was to demonstrate the effectiveness of SpinTek's centrifugal membrane filtration as a pretreatment to remove suspended solids from a liquid waste upstream of 3M's WWL cartridge technology for the selective removal of technetium (Tc).

  18. National geotechnical centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallam, J. A.; Kunz, N.; Vallotton, W. C.

    1982-01-01

    A high G-ton centrifuge, able to take a 2700 kg (6000 lb) payload up to 300 G, is described. The stability of dams and embankments, the bearing capacity of soil foundations, and the dynamic behavior of foundations due to vibration of machinery are examples of applications. A power rating of 6,000 kW (9,000 hp) was established for the motor. An acceptable maximum speed of 70 rpm was determined. A speed increase with a ratio of 1:3 is discussed. The isolated tension straps, the anti-spreader bar and the flexwall bucket, and safety precautions are also discussed.

  19. Centrifugal Adsorption Cartridge System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Tsao, Yow-Min D.; Lee, Wenshan

    2004-01-01

    The centrifugal adsorption cartridge system (CACS) is an apparatus that recovers one or more bioproduct(s) from a dilute aqueous solution or suspension flowing from a bioreactor. The CACS can be used both on Earth in unit gravity and in space in low gravity. The CACS can be connected downstream from the bioreactor; alternatively, it can be connected into a flow loop that includes the bioreactor so that the liquid can be recycled. A centrifugal adsorption cartridge in the CACS (see figure) includes two concentric cylinders with a spiral ramp between them. The volume between the inner and outer cylinders, and between the turns of the spiral ramp is packed with an adsorbent material. The inner cylinder is a sieve tube covered with a gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane. During operation, the liquid effluent from the bioreactor is introduced at one end of the spiral ramp, which then constrains the liquid to flow along the spiral path through the adsorbent material. The spiral ramp also makes the flow more nearly uniform than it would otherwise be, and it minimizes any channeling other than that of the spiral flow itself. The adsorbent material is formulated to selectively capture the bioproduct(s) of interest. The bioproduct(s) can then be stored in bound form in the cartridge or else eluted from the cartridge. The centrifugal effect of the spiral flow is utilized to remove gas bubbles from the liquid. The centrifugal effect forces the bubbles radially inward, toward and through the membrane of the inner cylinder. The gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane allows the bubbles to enter the inner cylinder while keeping the liquid out. The bubbles that thus enter the cylinder are vented to the atmosphere. The spacing between the ramps determines rate of flow along the spiral, and thereby affects the air-bubble-removal efficiency. The spacing between the ramps also determines the length of the fluid path through the cartridge adsorbent, and thus affects the bioproduct

  20. Blood Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    In the 1970's, NASA provided funding for development of an automatic blood analyzer for Skylab at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL devised "dynamic loading," which employed a spinning rotor to load, transfer, and analyze blood samples by centrifugal processing. A refined, commercial version of the system was produced by ABAXIS and is marketed as portable ABAXIS MiniLab MCA. Used in a doctor's office, the equipment can perform 80 to 100 chemical blood tests on a single drop of blood and report results in five minutes. Further development is anticipated.

  1. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  2. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  3. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  4. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  5. Advanced centrifugal contactor development

    SciTech Connect

    DeMuth, S.F.; Jubin, R.T.; Ladd, L.D.

    1988-01-01

    As part of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), compact centrifugal contactors were designed and prototypes were built for the Breeder Reprocessing Engineering Test (BRET) facility. These contactors were designed for a nominal throughput of 0.1 metric tons of heavy metal per day. While construction of BRET has been put on indefinite hold, development of the 5.5-cm-diam rotor centrifugal contactors has advanced due to their broad applicability in other areas of reprocessing. Development has been concentrated in three areas: (1) mass transfers, (2) hydraulics, and (3) fabrication. Mass transfer development has involved determining how the stage efficiency is affected by the rotor speed, phase ratio, and feed flow rate. Hydraulic efforts have focused on the cascade operation with individual stage failures. Fabrication development has resulted in reducing the number of rotor components from seven to four. This paper discusses the results of these development efforts. 20 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Centrifugal shot blast system

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This report describes a demonstration of Concrete cleaning, Inc., modified centrifugal shot blast technology to remove the paint coating from concrete flooring. This demonstration is part of the Chicago Pile-5 (CP-5) Large-Scale Demonstration Project (LSDP) sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), office of Science and Technology (OST), Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA). The objective of the LSDP is to select and demonstrate potentially beneficial technologies at the Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL) CP-5 Research Reactor. The purpose of the LSDP is to demonstrate that using innovative and improved decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) technologies from various sources can result in significant benefits, such as decreased cost and increased health and safety, as compared with baseline D and D technologies. Potential markets exist for the innovative centrifugal shot blast system at the following sites: Fernald Environmental Management Project, Los Alamos, Nevada, Oak Ridge Y-12 and K-25, Paducah, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion site, and the Savannah River Site. This information is based on a revision to the OST Linkage Tables dated August 4, 1997.

  7. Physics-driven impeller designs for a novel intravascular blood pump for patients with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Chopski, Steven G; Fox, Carson S; McKenna, Kelli L; Riddle, Michelle L; Kafagy, Dhyaa H; Stevens, Randy M; Throckmorton, Amy L

    2016-07-01

    Mechanical circulatory support offers an alternative therapeutic treatment for patients with dysfunctional single ventricle physiology. An intravascular axial flow pump is being developed as a cavopulmonary assist device for these patients. This study details the development of a new rotating impeller geometry. We examined the performance of 8 impeller geometries with blade stagger or twist angles varying from 100° to 800° using computational methods. A refined range of blade twist angles between 300° and 400° was then identified, and 4 additional geometries were evaluated. Generally, the impeller designs produced 4-26mmHg for flow rates of 1-4L/min for 6000-8000 RPM. A data regression analysis was completed and found the impeller with 400° of blade twist to be the superior performer. A hydraulic test was conducted on a prototype of the 400° impeller, which generated measurable pressure rises of 7-28mmHg for flow rates of 1-4L/min at 6000-8000 RPM. The findings of the numerical model and experiment were in reasonable agreement within approximately 20%. These results support the continued development of an axial-flow, mechanical cavopulmonary assist device as a new clinical therapeutic option for Fontan patients. PMID:27129783

  8. Physics-driven impeller designs for a novel intravascular blood pump for patients with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Chopski, Steven G; Fox, Carson S; McKenna, Kelli L; Riddle, Michelle L; Kafagy, Dhyaa H; Stevens, Randy M; Throckmorton, Amy L

    2016-07-01

    Mechanical circulatory support offers an alternative therapeutic treatment for patients with dysfunctional single ventricle physiology. An intravascular axial flow pump is being developed as a cavopulmonary assist device for these patients. This study details the development of a new rotating impeller geometry. We examined the performance of 8 impeller geometries with blade stagger or twist angles varying from 100° to 800° using computational methods. A refined range of blade twist angles between 300° and 400° was then identified, and 4 additional geometries were evaluated. Generally, the impeller designs produced 4-26mmHg for flow rates of 1-4L/min for 6000-8000 RPM. A data regression analysis was completed and found the impeller with 400° of blade twist to be the superior performer. A hydraulic test was conducted on a prototype of the 400° impeller, which generated measurable pressure rises of 7-28mmHg for flow rates of 1-4L/min at 6000-8000 RPM. The findings of the numerical model and experiment were in reasonable agreement within approximately 20%. These results support the continued development of an axial-flow, mechanical cavopulmonary assist device as a new clinical therapeutic option for Fontan patients.

  9. Centrifuge treatment of coal tar

    SciTech Connect

    L.A. Kazak; V.Z. Kaidalov; L.F. Syrova; O.S. Miroshnichenko; A.S. Minakov

    2009-07-15

    New technology is required for the removal of water and heavy fractions from regular coal tar. Centrifuges offer the best option. Purification of coal tar by means of centrifuges at OAO NLMK permits the production of pitch coke or electrode pitch that complies with current standards.

  10. Centrifugal microfluidics for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Gorkin, Robert; Park, Jiwoon; Siegrist, Jonathan; Amasia, Mary; Lee, Beom Seok; Park, Jong-Myeon; Kim, Jintae; Kim, Hanshin; Madou, Marc; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung

    2010-07-21

    The centrifugal microfluidic platform has been a focus of academic and industrial research efforts for almost 40 years. Primarily targeting biomedical applications, a range of assays have been adapted on the system; however, the platform has found limited commercial success as a research or clinical tool. Nonetheless, new developments in centrifugal microfluidic technologies have the potential to establish wide-spread utilization of the platform. This paper presents an in-depth review of the centrifugal microfluidic platform, while highlighting recent progress in the field and outlining the potential for future applications. An overview of centrifugal microfluidic technologies is presented, including descriptions of advantages of the platform as a microfluidic handling system and the principles behind centrifugal fluidic manipulation. The paper also discusses a history of significant centrifugal microfluidic platform developments with an explanation of the evolution of the platform as it pertains to academia and industry. Lastly, we review the few centrifugal microfluidic-based sample-to-answer analysis systems shown to date and examine the challenges to be tackled before the centrifugal platform can be more broadly accepted as a new diagnostic platform. In particular, fully integrated, easy to operate, inexpensive and accurate microfluidic tools in the area of in vitro nucleic acid diagnostics are discussed.

  11. Compact, Automated Centrifugal Slide-Staining System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeback, Daniel L.; Clarke, Mark S. F.

    2004-01-01

    The Directional Acceleration Vector-Driven Displacement of Fluids (DAVD-DOF) system, under development at the time of reporting the information for this article, would be a relatively compact, automated, centrifugally actuated system for staining blood smears and other microbiological samples on glass microscope slides in either a microgravitational or a normal Earth gravitational environment. The DAVD-DOF concept is a successor to the centrifuge-operated slide stainer (COSS) concept, which was reported in Slide-Staining System for Microgravity or Gravity (MSC-22949), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 1 (January, 2001), page 64. The COSS includes reservoirs and a staining chamber that contains a microscope slide to which a biological sample is affixed. The staining chamber is sequentially filled with and drained of staining and related liquids from the reservoirs by use of a weighted plunger to force liquid from one reservoir to another at a constant level of hypergravity maintained in a standard swing-bucket centrifuge. In the DAVD-DOF system, a staining chamber containing a sample would also be sequentially filled and emptied, but with important differences. Instead of a simple microscope slide, one would use a special microscope slide on which would be fabricated a network of very small reservoirs and narrow channels connected to a staining chamber (see figure). Unlike in the COSS, displacement of liquid would be effected by use of the weight of the liquid itself, rather than the weight of a plunger.

  12. Nuclear power plant safety related pump issues

    SciTech Connect

    Colaccino, J.

    1996-12-01

    This paper summarizes of a number of pump issues raised since the Third NRC/ASME Symposium on Valve and Pump Testing in 1994. General issues discussed include revision of NRC Inspection Procedure 73756, issuance of NRC Information Notice 95-08 on ultrasonic flow meter uncertainties, relief requests for tests that are determined by the licensee to be impractical, and items in the ASME OM-1995 Code, Subsection ISTB, for pumps. The paper also discusses current pump vibration issues encountered in relief requests and plant inspections - which include smooth running pumps, absolute vibration limits, and vertical centrifugal pump vibration measurement requirements. Two pump scope issues involving boiling water reactor waterlog and reactor core isolation cooling pumps are also discussed. Where appropriate, NRC guidance is discussed.

  13. Rat growth during chronic centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, G. C.; Oyama, J.

    1978-01-01

    Female weanling rats were chronically centrifuged at 4.15 G with controls at terrestrial gravity. Samples were sacrificed for body composition studies at 0, 28, 63, 105 and 308 days of centrifugation. The centrifuged group approached a significantly lower mature body mass than the controls (251 and 318g) but the rate of approach was the same in both groups. Retirement to 1G on the 60th day resulted in complete recovery. Among individual components muscle, bone, skin, CNS, heart, kidneys, body water and body fat were changed in the centrifuged group. However, an analysis of the growth of individual components relative to growth of the total fat-free compartment revealed that only skin (which increased in mass) was responding to centrifugation per se.

  14. 11. PUMP ROOM FLOOR OF GENE PLANT FROM NORTH END, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. PUMP ROOM FLOOR OF GENE PLANT FROM NORTH END, CENTRIFUGAL PUMPS DESIGNED BY BYRON JACKSON CO., MANUFACTURED BY PELTON WATER WHEEL CO. OF SAN FRANCISCO. POWERED BY G.E. SYNCHRONOUS MOTOR 9000 HP, 6900 VOLTS, 612 AMPS, 7320 KVA, 3 PHASE, 60 CYCLES, 400 RPM, EXCITATION AT 125 VOLTS, 540 AMPS. - Gene Pump Plant, South of Gene Wash Reservoir, 2 miles west of Whitsett Pump Plant, Parker Dam, San Bernardino County, CA

  15. Rotating and positive-displacement pumps for low-thrust rocket engines. Volume 2: Fabrication and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csomor, A.

    1974-01-01

    Rotating and positive displacement pumps of various types were studied for pumping liquid fluorine for low thrust high performance rocket engines. Included in the analysis were: centrifugal, pitot, Barske, Tesla, drag, gear, vane, axial piston, radial piston, diaphragm and helirotor pump concepts. The centrifugal and gear pumps were carried through detail design and fabrication. After preliminary testing in Freon 12, the centrifugal pump was selected for further testing and development. It was tested in Freon 12 to obtain the hydrodynamic performance. Tests were also conducted in liquid fluorine to demonstrate chemical compatibility.

  16. Allogeneic Blood Product Usage in Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting (CABG) with minimalized Extracorporeal Circulation System (MECC) Versus Standard On-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Lisy, M.; Schmid, E.; Kozok, J.; Rosenberger, P.; Stock, U.A.; Kalender, G.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Intraoperative allogeneic blood product transfusion (ABPT) in cardiac surgery is associated with worse overall outcome, including mortality. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ABPTs in minimalized extracorporeal cardiopulmonary (MECCTM) compared with standard open system on-pump coronary revascularization. Methods: Data of 156 patients undergoing myocardial revascularization between September 2008 and September 2010 were reviewed. 83 patients were operated by the MECC technique and 73 were treated by standard extracorporeal circulation (sECC). ABPT and overall early postoperative complications were analyzed. Results: Operative mortality and morbidity were similar in both groups. ABPT in the MECC group was significantly lower than in the sECC group both intraoperatively (7.2 vs. 60.3% of patients p<0.001) and during the first five postoperative days (19.3 vs. 57.5%; p<0.001). “Skin to skin”- (214 ± 45 vs. 232 ± 45 min; p=0.012), cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) - (82 ± 25 vs. 95 ± 26 min; p=0.014), and X-clamp- times (50 ± 16 vs. 56 ± 17 min; p=0.024) were significantly lower in the MECC group than in the sECC group. Length of ICU (intensive care unit) - and hospital stay were also significantly lower in the MECC group vs. the sECC group (26.7 ± 20.2 vs. 54.5 ± 68.9 h; p<0.001, and 12.0 ± 4.1 vs. 14.5 ± 4.6 days; p<0.001). Conclusion: Application of MECC as on-pump coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) results in significantly lower ABPT as well as shorter ICU and in-hospital stay. In order to achieve these benefits of MECC autologous retrograde priming, Bispectral index (BIS) monitoring, intraoperative cell salvage, meticulous hemostasis and strict peri- and postoperative volume management are crucial. PMID:27499818

  17. In vitro pulsatility analysis of axial-flow and centrifugal-flow left ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Stanfield, J Ryan; Selzman, Craig H

    2013-03-01

    Recently, continuous-flow ventricular assist devices (CF-VADs) have supplanted older, pulsatile-flow pumps, for treating patients with advanced heart failure. Despite the excellent results of the newer generation devices, the effects of long-term loss of pulsatility remain unknown. The aim of this study is to compare the ability of both axial and centrifugal continuous-flow pumps to intrinsically modify pulsatility when placed under physiologically diverse conditions. Four VADs, two axial- and two centrifugal-flow, were evaluated on a mock circulatory flow system. Each VAD was operated at a constant impeller speed over three hypothetical cardiac conditions: normo-tensive, hypertensive, and hypotensive. Pulsatility index (PI) was compared for each device under each condition. Centrifugal-flow devices had a higher PI than that of axial-flow pumps. Under normo-tension, flow PI was 0.98 ± 0.03 and 1.50 ± 0.02 for the axial and centrifugal groups, respectively (p < 0.01). Under hypertension, flow PI was 1.90 ± 0.16 and 4.21 ± 0.29 for the axial and centrifugal pumps, respectively (p = 0.01). Under hypotension, PI was 0.73 ± 0.02 and 0.78 ± 0.02 for the axial and centrifugal groups, respectively (p = 0.13). All tested CF-VADs were capable of maintaining some pulsatile-flow when connected in parallel with our mock ventricle. We conclude that centrifugal-flow devices outperform the axial pumps from the basis of PI under tested conditions.

  18. [Galileo and centrifugal force].

    PubMed

    Vilain, Christiane

    This work intends to focus on Galileo's study of what is now called "centrifugal force," within the framework of the Second Day of his Dialogo written in 1632, rather than on the previously published commentaries on the topic. Galileo proposes three geometrical demonstrations in order to prove that gravity will always overcome centrifugalforce, and that the potential rotation of the Earth, whatever its speed, cannot in any case project objects beyond it. Each of these demonstrations must consequently contain an error and it has seemed to us that the first one had not been understood up until now. Our analysis offers an opportunity to return to Galileo's geometrical representation of dynamical questions; actually, we get an insight into the sophistication of Galileo's practices more than into his mistakes. Our second point, concerning the historiography of the problem, shows an evolution from anachronic critics to more contextual considerations, in the course of the second half of the twentieth century. PMID:25029818

  19. [Galileo and centrifugal force].

    PubMed

    Vilain, Christiane

    This work intends to focus on Galileo's study of what is now called "centrifugal force," within the framework of the Second Day of his Dialogo written in 1632, rather than on the previously published commentaries on the topic. Galileo proposes three geometrical demonstrations in order to prove that gravity will always overcome centrifugalforce, and that the potential rotation of the Earth, whatever its speed, cannot in any case project objects beyond it. Each of these demonstrations must consequently contain an error and it has seemed to us that the first one had not been understood up until now. Our analysis offers an opportunity to return to Galileo's geometrical representation of dynamical questions; actually, we get an insight into the sophistication of Galileo's practices more than into his mistakes. Our second point, concerning the historiography of the problem, shows an evolution from anachronic critics to more contextual considerations, in the course of the second half of the twentieth century.

  20. Active pneumatic control of centrifugal microfluidic flows for lab-on-a-chip applications.

    PubMed

    Clime, Liviu; Brassard, Daniel; Geissler, Matthias; Veres, Teodor

    2015-06-01

    This paper reports a novel method of controlling liquid motion on a centrifugal microfluidic platform based on the integration of a regulated pressure pump and a programmable electromechanical valving system. We demonstrate accurate control over the displacement of liquids within the system by pressurizing simultaneously multiple ports of the microfluidic device while the platform is rotating at high speed. Compared to classical centrifugal microfluidic platforms where liquids are solely driven by centrifugal and capillary forces, the method presented herein adds a new degree of freedom for fluidic manipulation, which represents a paradigm change in centrifugal microfluidics. We first demonstrate how various core microfluidic functions such as valving, switching, and reverse pumping (i.e., against the centrifugal field) can be easily achieved by programming the pressures applied at dedicated access ports of the microfluidic device. We then show, for the first time, that the combination of centrifugal force and active pneumatic pumping offers the possibility of mixing fluids rapidly (~0.1 s) and efficiently based on the creation of air bubbles at the bottom of a microfluidic reservoir. Finally, the suitability of the developed platform for performing complex bioanalytical assays in an automated fashion is demonstrated in a DNA harvesting experiment where recovery rates of about 70% were systematically achieved. The proposed concept offers the interesting prospect to decouple basic microfluidic functions from specific material properties, channel dimensions and fabrication tolerances, surface treatments, or on-chip active components, thus promoting integration of complex assays on simple and low-cost microfluidic cartridges.

  1. Effects of altering the ATP/ADP ratio on pump-mediated Na/K and Na/Na exchanges in resealed human red blood cell ghosts

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Resealed human red blood cell ghosts were prepared to contain a range of ADP concentrations at fixed ATP concentrations and vice versa. ATP/ADP ratios ranging from approximately 0.2 to 50 were set and maintained (for up to 45 min) in this system. ATP and ADP concentrations were controlled by the addition of either a phosphoarginine- or phosphocreatine-based regenerating system. Ouabain- sensitive unidirectional Na efflux was determined in the presence and absence of 15 mM external K as a function of the nucleotide composition. Na/K exchange was found to increase to saturation with ATP (K 1/2 approximately equal to 250 microM), whereas Na/Na exchange (measured in K-free solutions) was a saturating function of ADP (K 1/2 approximately equal to 350 microM). The elevation of ATP from approximately 100 to 1,800 microM did not appreciably affect Na/Na exchange. In the presence of external Na and a saturating concentration of external K, increasing the ADP concentration at constant ATP was found to decrease ouabain-sensitive Na/K exchange. The decreased Na/K exchange that still remained when the ADP/ATP ratio was high was stimulated by removal of external Na. Assuming that under normal substrate conditions the reaction cycle of the Na/K pump is rate- limited by the conformational change associated with the release of occluded K [E2 X (K) X ATP----E1 X ATP + K], increasing ADP inhibits the rate of these transformations by competition with ATP for the E2(K) form. A less likely alternative is that inhibition is due to competition with ATP at the high-affinity site (E1). The acceleration of the Na/K pump that occurs upon removing external Na at high levels of ADP evidently results from a shift in the forward direction of the transformation of the intermediates involved with the release of occluded Na from E1P X (Na). Thus, the nucleotide composition and the Na gradient can modulate the rate at which the Na/K pump operates. PMID:3950576

  2. Quantification of platelets obtained by different centrifugation protocols in SHR rats☆

    PubMed Central

    Yazigi Junior, João Alberto; dos Santos, João Baptista Gomes; Xavier, Bruno Rodrigues; Fernandes, Marcela; Valente, Sandra Gomes; Leite, Vilnei Mattiolli

    2015-01-01

    Objective To quantify the platelet concentration in the blood of SHR rats, by means of different centrifugation protocols, and to evaluate what the most effective method for obtaining platelets is. Methods We used 40 male rats of the isogenic SHR lineage. The animals were divided into three groups: control, using whole blood without centrifugation; single centrifugation, using whole blood subjected to a single centrifugation at 200 × g and 400 × g; and double centrifugation, using whole blood subjected one centrifugation at different rotations, followed by collection of whole plasma subjected to another centrifugation at different rotations: 200 × g + 200 × g; 200 × g + 400 × g; 200 × g + 800 × g; 400 × g + 400 × g; 400 × g + 800 × g. Samples of 3 ml of blood were drawn from each animal by means of cardiac puncture. The blood was stored in Vacutainer collection tubes containing 3.2% sodium citrate. The blood from the control group animals was analyzed without being subjected to centrifugation. After the blood from the other groups of animals had been subjected to centrifugation, the whole plasma was collected and subjected to platelet counting in the lower third of the sample. Results We obtained greatest platelet enrichment in the subgroup with two centrifugations comprising 400 × g for 10 min + 400 × g for 10 min, in which the mean platelet concentration was 11.30 times higher than that of the control group. Conclusion It was possible to obtain a high platelet concentration using viable simple techniques, by means of centrifugation of whole blood and use of commonly used materials. The most effective method for obtaining platelet concentrate was found in samples subjected to two centrifugations. PMID:27218087

  3. Performance of mosquito's pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Kenji

    2005-11-01

    The flow of human blood in Mosquito's proboscis on Hagen-Poiseuille flow is investigated by using micro PIV system to apply mosquito's sucking system for micro-TAS devises. We want to know how high the power of Mosquito's pump is and how small the resistance in a proboscis is, a structure of Mosquito's sucking pump, and its characteristics as mechanical pump. We made the mosquito suck blood of our arm to obtain the average value, made many slices of a mosquito with 2μm thickness after fixed by wax. We anatomized the mosquito's head and picked up the sucking pump under the microscope to know its volume. Mosquito's pump shows high performance compared with the artificial pumps. The surfaces of proboscis were taken by using SEM, AFM because it is important factor for interaction between flow and its wall. Visualization of the blood flows near the tip of and inside proboscis are taken by micro PIV system to know the flow rate. We estimate the power of pump and the friction drag of proboscis by using these data.

  4. Phosphate from the phosphointermediate (EP) of the human red blood cell Na/K pump is coeffluxed with Na, in the absence of external K

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    This study is concerned with Na/K pump-mediated phosphate efflux that occurs during uncoupled Na efflux in human red blood cells. Uncoupled Na efflux is known to be a ouabain-sensitive mode of the Na/K pump that occurs in the absence of external Nao and Ko. Because this efflux (measured with 22Na) is also inhibited by 5 mM Nao, the efflux can be separated into a Nao-sensitive and a Nao-insensitive component. Previous work established that the Nao-sensitive efflux is actually comprised of an electroneutral coefflux of Na with cellular anions, such as SO4 (as 35SO4). The present work focuses on the Nao-insensitive component in which the principal finding is that orthophosphate (P(i)) is coeffluxed with Na in a ouabain-sensitive manner. This P(i) efflux can be seen to occur, in the absence of Ko, in both DIDS-treated intact cells and resealed red cell ghosts. This efflux of P(i) was shown to be derived directly from the pump's substrate, ATP, by the use of resealed ghosts made to contain both ATP and P(i) in which either the ATP or the P(i) were labeled with, respectively, [gamma-32P]ATP or [32P]H3PO4. (These resealed ghosts also contained Na, Mg, P(i), SO4, Ap5A, as well as an arginine kinase/creatine kinase nucleotide regenerating system for the control of ATP and ADP concentrations, and were suspended usually in (NMG)2SO4 at pH 7.4.) It was found that 32P was only coeffluxed with Na when the 32P was contained in [gamma-32P]ATP and not in [32P]H3PO4. This result implies that the 32P that is released comes from ATP via the pump's phosphointermediate (EP) without commingling with the cellular pool of P(i). Ko (as K2SO4) inhibits this 32P efflux as well as the Nao-sensitive 35SO4 efflux, with a K0.5 of 0.3-0.4 mM. The K0.5 for inhibition of P(i) efflux by Ko is not influenced by Nao, nor can Nao act as a congenor for Ko in any of the flux reactions involving Ko. The stoichiometry of Na to SO4 and Na to P(i) efflux is approximately 2:1 under circumstances where the

  5. The alpha 1 Na(+)-K+ pump of the Dahl salt-sensitive rat exhibits altered Na+ modulation of K+ transport in red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Canessa, M; Romero, J R; Ruiz-Opazo, N; Herrera, V L

    1993-06-01

    The properties of the alpha 1 Na(+)-K+ pump were compared in Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) and salt-resistant (DR) strains by measuring ouabain-sensitive fluxes (mmol/liter cell x hr = FU, Mean +/- SE) in red blood cells (RBCs) and varying internal (i) and external (o) Na+ and K+ concentrations. Kinetic parameters of several modes of operation, i.e., Na+/K+, K+/K+, Na+/Na+ exchanges, were characterized and analyzed for curve-fitting using the Enzfitter computer program. In unidirectional flux studies (n = 12 rats of each strain) into fresh cells incubated in 140 mM Na(+) + 5 mM K+, ouabain-sensitive K+ influx was substantially lower in the DS than in DR RBCs, while ouabain-sensitive Na+ efflux and Nai were similar in both strains. Thus, the coupling ratio between unidirectional Na+:K+ fluxes was significantly higher in DS than in DR cells at similar RBC Na+ content. In the presence of 140 mM Nao, activation of ouabain-sensitive K+ influx by Ko had a lower Km and Vmax in DS as estimated by the Garay equation (N = 2.70 +/- 0.33, Km 0.74 +/- 0.09 mM; Vmax 2.87 +/- 0.09 FU) than in DR rats (N = 1.23 +/- 0.36, Km 2.31 +/- 0.16 mM; Vmax 5.70 +/- 0.52 FU). However, the two kinetic parameters were similar following Nao removal. The activation of ouabain-sensitive K+ influx by Nai had significantly lower Vmax in DS (9.3 +/- 0.4 FU) than in DR (14.5 +/- 0.6 FU) RBCs but similar Km. These data suggest that the low K+ influx in DS cells is caused by a defect in modulation by Nao and Nai. Na+ efflux showed no differences in Nai activation or trans effects by Nao and Ko, thus accounting for the different Na+:K+ coupling ratio in the Dahl strains. Further evidence for the differences in the coupling of ouabain-sensitive fluxes was found in studies of net Na+ and K+ fluxes, where the net ouabain-sensitive Na+ losses showed similar magnitudes in the two Dahl strains while the net ouabain-sensitive K+ gains were significantly greater in the DR than the DS RBCs. Ouabain-sensitive Na

  6. Centrifugal dryers keep pace with the market

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2008-03-15

    New plant design and upgrades create a shift in dewatering strategies. The article describes recent developments. Three major manufacturers supply centrifugal dryers - TEMA, Centrifugal & Mechanical Industries (CMI) and Ludowici. CMI introduced a line of vertical centrifugal dryers. TEMA improved the techniques by developing a horizontal vibratory centrifuge (HVC) which simplified maintenance. 3 figs., 1 photo.

  7. Microwave assisted centrifuge and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Meikrantz, David H [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-08-17

    Centrifuge samples may be exposed to microwave energy to heat the samples during centrifugation and to promote separation of the different components or constituents of the samples using a centrifuge device configured for generating microwave energy and directing the microwave energy at a sample located in the centrifuge.

  8. HOUSINGS AND MOUNTINGS FOR CENTRIFUGES

    DOEpatents

    Rushing, F.C.

    1960-08-16

    A protective housing for a gas centrifuge comprises a slidable connection between flanges and framework portions for absorbing rotational energy in case of bursting of the rotor and a sealing means for sealing the rotor chamber.

  9. Low-thrust chemical propulsion system pump technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabiers, R. L.; Siebenhaar, A.

    1981-01-01

    Candidate pump and driver systems for low thrust cargo orbit transfer vehicle engines which deliver large space structures to geosynchronous equatorial orbit and beyond are evaluated. The pumps operate to 68 atmospheres (1000 psi) discharge pressure and flowrates suited to cryogenic engines using either LOX/methane or LOX/hydrogen propellants in thrust ranges from 445 to 8900 N (100 to 2000 lb F). Analysis of the various pumps and drivers indicate that the low specific speed requirement will make high fluid efficiencies difficult to achieve. As such, multiple stages are required. In addition, all pumps require inducer stages. The most attractive main pumps are the multistage centrifugal pumps.

  10. Extreme high-head portables provide more pumping options

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2006-10-15

    Three years ago, Godwin Pumps, one of the largest manufacturers of portable pumps, introduced its Extreme Duty High Lift (HL) series of pumps and more mines are finding unique applications for these pumps. The Extreme HL series is a range single-stage Dri-Prime pumps with heads up to 600 feet and flows up to 5,000 gallons per minute. The American Coal Co.'s Galatia mine, an underground longwall mine in southern Illinois, used an HL 160 to replace a multiple-staged centrifugal pump. It provided Galatia with 1,500 gpm at 465 ft. 3 photos.

  11. Design method of supercavitating pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulagin, V.; Likhachev, D.; Li, F. C.

    2016-05-01

    The problem of effective supercavitating (SC) pump is solved, and optimum load distribution along the radius of the blade is found taking into account clearance, degree of cavitation development, influence of finite number of blades, and centrifugal forces. Sufficient accuracy can be obtained using the equivalent flat SC-grid for design of any SC-mechanisms, applying the “grid effect” coefficient and substituting the skewed flow calculated for grids of flat plates with the infinite attached cavitation caverns. This article gives the universal design method and provides an example of SC-pump design.

  12. Variable-Speed Instrumented Centrifuges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, David K.; Brown, Allan H.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes conceptual pair of centrifuges, speed of which varied to produce range of artificial gravities in zero-gravity environment. Image and data recording and controlled temperature and gravity provided for 12 experiments. Microprocessor-controlled centrifuges include video cameras to record stop-motion images of experiments. Potential applications include studies of effect of gravity on growth and on production of hormones in corn seedlings, experiments with magnetic flotation to separate cells, and electrophoresis to separate large fragments of deoxyribonucleic acid.

  13. Centrifugal Compressor Aeroelastic Analysis Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Srivastava, Rakesh

    2002-01-01

    Centrifugal compressors are very widely used in the turbomachine industry where low mass flow rates are required. Gas turbine engines for tanks, rotorcraft and small jets rely extensively on centrifugal compressors for rugged and compact design. These compressors experience problems related with unsteadiness of flowfields, such as stall flutter, separation at the trailing edge over diffuser guide vanes, tip vortex unsteadiness, etc., leading to rotating stall and surge. Considerable interest exists in small gas turbine engine manufacturers to understand and eventually eliminate the problems related to centrifugal compressors. The geometric complexity of centrifugal compressor blades and the twisting of the blade passages makes the linear methods inapplicable. Advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods are needed for accurate unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analysis of centrifugal compressors. Most of the current day industrial turbomachines and small aircraft engines are designed with a centrifugal compressor. With such a large customer base and NASA Glenn Research Center being, the lead center for turbomachines, it is important that adequate emphasis be placed on this area as well. Currently, this activity is not supported under any project at NASA Glenn.

  14. Liquid density effect on burst frequency in centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

    PubMed

    Al-Faqheri, Wisam; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Thio, Tzer Hwai Gilbert; Joseph, Karunan; Mohktar, Mas S; Madou, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Centrifugal microfluidic platforms are widely used in various advanced processes such as biomedical diagnostics, chemical analysis and drug screening. This paper investigates the effect of liquid density on the burst frequency of the centrifugal microfluidic platform. This effect is experimentally investigated and compared to theoretical values. It is found that increasing the liquid density results in lower burst frequency and it is in agreement with theoretical calculations. Moreover, in this study we proposed the use of the microfluidic CD platform as an inexpensive and simple sensor for liquid density measurements. The proposed liquid sensor requires much less liquid volume (in the range of microliters) compared to conventional density meters. This study presents fundamental work which allows for future advance studies with the aim of designing and fabricating centrifugal microfluidic platforms for more complex tasks such as blood analysis.

  15. Microfluidic size separation of cells and particles using a swinging bucket centrifuge.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Joo Chuan; Wang, Zhiping; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2015-09-01

    Biomolecular separation is crucial for downstream analysis. Separation technique mainly relies on centrifugal sedimentation. However, minuscule sample volume separation and extraction is difficult with conventional centrifuge. Furthermore, conventional centrifuge requires density gradient centrifugation which is laborious and time-consuming. To overcome this challenge, we present a novel size-selective bioparticles separation microfluidic chip on a swinging bucket minifuge. Size separation is achieved using passive pressure driven centrifugal fluid flows coupled with centrifugal force acting on the particles within the microfluidic chip. By adopting centrifugal microfluidics on a swinging bucket rotor, we achieved over 95% efficiency in separating mixed 20 μm and 2 μm colloidal dispersions from its liquid medium. Furthermore, by manipulating the hydrodynamic resistance, we performed size separation of mixed microbeads, achieving size efficiency of up to 90%. To further validate our device utility, we loaded spiked whole blood with MCF-7 cells into our microfluidic device and subjected it to centrifugal force for a mere duration of 10 s, thereby achieving a separation efficiency of over 75%. Overall, our centrifugal microfluidic device enables extremely rapid and label-free enrichment of different sized cells and particles with high efficiency. PMID:26487900

  16. Nuclear Waste Cross Site Transfer Pump Operational Resonance Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    HAUCK, F.M.

    1999-12-01

    Two single-volute, multi-stage centrifugal pumps are installed at a nuclear waste transfer station operated by the Department of Energy in Hanford, WA. The two parallel 100% pumps are Variable Frequency Drive operated and designed to transport waste etc.

  17. PUMP CONSTRUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Strickland, G.; Horn, F.L.; White, H.T.

    1960-09-27

    A pump which utilizes the fluid being pumped through it as its lubricating fluid is described. This is achieved by means of an improved bearing construction in a pump of the enclosed or canned rotor type. At the outlet end of the pump, adjacent to an impeller mechanism, there is a bypass which conveys some of the pumped fluid to a chamber at the inlet end of the pump. After this chamber becomes full, the pumped fluid passes through fixed orifices in the top of the chamber and exerts a thrust on the inlet end of the pump rotor. Lubrication of the rotor shaft is accomplished by passing the pumped fluid through a bypass at the outlet end of the rotor shaft. This bypass conveys Pumped fluid to a cooling means and then to grooves on the surface of the rotor shait, thus lubricating the shaft.

  18. Design Guidelines for Quiet Fans and Pumps for Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, John S.; Magliozzi, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    This document presents guidelines for the design of quiet fans and pumps of the class used on space vehicles. A simple procedure is presented for the prediction of fan noise over the meaningful frequency spectrum. A section also presents general design criteria for axial flow fans, squirrel cage fans, centrifugal fans, and centrifugal pumps. The basis for this report is an experimental program conducted by Hamilton Standard under NASA Contract NAS 9-12457. The derivations of the noise predicting methods used in this document are explained in Hamilton Standard Report SVHSER 6183, "Fan and Pump Noise Control," dated May 1973 (6).

  19. Meteor Crater: Energy of formation - Implications of centrifuge scaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    Recent work on explosive cratering has demonstrated the utility of performing subscale experiments on a geotechnic centrifuge to develop scaling rules for very large energy events. The present investigation is concerned with an extension of this technique to impact cratering. Experiments have been performed using a projectile gun mounted directly on the centrifuge rotor to launch projectiles into a suitable soil container undergoing centripetal accelerations in excess of 500 G. The pump tube of a two-stage light-gas gun was used to attain impact velocities of approximately 2 km/sec. The results of the experiments indicate that the energy of formation of any large impact crater depends upon the impact velocity. This dependence, shown for the case of Meteor Crater, is consistent with analogous results for the specific energy dependence of explosives and is expected to persist to impact velocities in excess of 25 km/sec.

  20. SEDIMENTATION IN THE ANGLE CENTRIFUGE.

    PubMed

    Pickels, E G

    1943-01-20

    1. Using hemocyanin from Limulus polyphemus as a test material, the process of sedimentation in the angle centrifuge, operating both in vacuum and in the open air, has been investigated. 2. Sedimentation in a given field of force was found less efficient when centrifugation was conducted in the open air, because of thermal convection. 3. Correlations have been made with results obtained in the analytical ultracentrifuge, and a theory of sedimentation in inclined tubes has been presented to explain the experimental results. 4. It has been shown that under proper conditions the angle centrifuge may be used for approximate determinations of particle size. 5. Recommendations, based mostly on experimental evidence, have been made for improving sedimentation and interpreting results. 6. To counteract convective disturbances of either thermal or inertial origin, a satisfactory method has been developed which consists of furnishing the fluid under study with a synthetic density gradient, formed with sucrose or some other non-sedimentable material.

  1. Centrifugal trapping in the magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delcourt, D. C.; Martin, R. F., Jr.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Moore, T. E.

    1995-01-01

    Particles leving the neutral sheet in the distant magnetotail at times display adiabatic trajectory sequences characterized by an inflection toward the equator and subsequent mirroring in its vicinity. We demonstrate that this low-latitude mirroring results primarily from a centrifugal deceleration due to the fast direction-changing E x B drift. This effect which we refer to as 'centrifugal trapping' appears both in guiding centre and full particle treatments. It thus does not directly relate to nonadiabatic motion. However, pitch angle scattering due to nonadiabatic neutral sheet interaction does play a role in reducing the parallel speed of the particles. We show that centrifugal trapping is an important mechanism for the confinement of the slowest (typically below the equatorial E x B drift speed) plasma sheet populations to the midplane vicinity.

  2. MEANS FOR DETERMINING CENTRIFUGE ALIGNMENT

    DOEpatents

    Smith, W.Q.

    1958-08-26

    An apparatus is presented for remotely determining the alignment of a centrifuge. The centrifage shaft is provided with a shoulder, upon which two followers ride, one for detecting radial movements, and one upon the shoulder face for determining the axial motion. The followers are attached to separate liquid filled bellows, and a tube connects each bellows to its respective indicating gage at a remote location. Vibrations produced by misalignment of the centrifuge shaft are transmitted to the bellows, and tbence through the tubing to the indicator gage. This apparatus is particularly useful for operation in a hot cell where the materials handled are dangerous to the operating personnel.

  3. Centrifugation and the Manhattan Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Cameron

    2009-05-01

    A study of U. S. Army Manhattan Engineer District documents reveals that consideration of centrifugation as a means of uranium enrichment during World War II was considerably more extensive than is commonly appreciated. By the time the centrifuge project was abandoned in early 1944 a full-scale prototype unit had been fabricated and tested at near-production speeds, enrichments of close to theoretically-expected levels had been demonstrated with pilot-plant units, and plans for production plants had been developed. This paper will review the history of this little-known aspect of the Project and examine the circumstances of how it came to be discontinued.

  4. Centrifugation and the Manhattan Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Cameron

    2009-04-01

    A study of U. S. Army Manhattan Engineer District documents reveals that consideration of centrifugation as a means of uranium enrichment during World War II was considerably more extensive than is commonly appreciated. By the time the centrifuge project was abandoned in early 1944 a full-scale prototype unit had been fabricated and tested at near-production speeds, enrichments of close to theoretically-expected levels had been demonstrated with pilot-plant units, and plans for production plants had been developed. This paper will review the history of this little-known aspect of the Project and examine the circumstances of how it came to be discontinued.

  5. Hydraulic forces caused by annular pressure seals in centrifugal pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iino, T.; Kaneko, H.

    1980-01-01

    The hydraulic forces caused by annular pressure seals were investigated. The measured inlet and exit loss coefficients of the flow through the seals were much smaller than the conventional values. The results indicate that the damping coefficient and the inertia coefficient of the fluid film in the seal are not affected much by the rotational speed or the eccentricity of the rotor, though the stiffness coefficient seemed to be influenced by the eccentricity.

  6. Superconducting AC motor for centrifugal liquid helium pump

    SciTech Connect

    Rivetti, A.; Goria, R.; Martini, G.

    1982-01-01

    The behavior of flowmeters in liquid and supercritical helium is studied. A description is given of the motor and experimental apparatus. The initial results (torque vs. efficiency and power vs. slip) are chartered. The results obtained with an external rotating shield (torque vs. efficiency and power vs. slip) are also charted. One rotor provided a higher power particularly at the highest frequencies, provided that the critical point is not exceeded. Another rotor gives a better efficiency, particularly at the lowest frequencies. Recommendations for adopting a rotor design are given.

  7. Long stroke pumping unit. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The Long Stroke Pumping unit (LSP) is designed to replace the current beam pumping unit being used widely in the oil fields. The LSP unit uses fixed top and bottom reservoirs and a moving shuttle dump bucket. a continuously running centrifugal pump transfers hydraulic fluids from the bottom reservior to the top. The static head between the two reservoirs provides the necessary potential energy for sucker rod force and stroke. Details of the LSP unit and its operation are provided, as well as test procedures. (LEW)

  8. Pump station for radioactive waste water

    DOEpatents

    Whitton, John P.; Klos, Dean M.; Carrara, Danny T.; Minno, John J.

    2003-11-18

    A pump station for transferring radioactive particle containing waste water, includes: (a.) an enclosed sump having a vertically elongated right frusto conical wall surface and a bottom surface and (b.) a submersible volute centrifugal pump having a horizontally rotating impeller and a volute exterior surface. The sump interior surface, the bottom surface and the volute exterior surface are made of stainless steel having a 30 Ra or finer surface finish. A 15 Ra finish has been found to be most cost effective. The pump station is used for transferring waste water, without accumulation of radioactive fines.

  9. Offshore installation and maintenance of submersible pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Verdina, G.G.

    1983-01-01

    Pertamina/IIAPCO operates a large offshore production complex in the Southeast Sumatra Contract Area of Indonesia. The use of submersible centrifugal electric pumps both for artificial lift and for pipeline transfer of produced fluids has played an important role in the success enjoyed by this contract area during its 10-year producing life. This paper describes the conditions and considerations contributing to the initial selection and eventual standardized use of these pumps by the company. Also included are a discussion of operational experience gained and a summary of the submersible pumps' performance record.

  10. Bubble Eliminator Based on Centrifugal Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Tsao, Yow-Min D.; Lee, Wenshan

    2004-01-01

    The fluid bubble eliminator (FBE) is a device that removes gas bubbles from a flowing liquid. The FBE contains no moving parts and does not require any power input beyond that needed to pump the liquid. In the FBE, the buoyant force for separating the gas from the liquid is provided by a radial pressure gradient associated with a centrifugal flow of the liquid and any entrained bubbles. A device based on a similar principle is described in Centrifugal Adsorption Cartridge System (MSC- 22863), which appears on page 48 of this issue. The FBE was originally intended for use in filtering bubbles out of a liquid flowing relatively slowly in a bioreactor system in microgravity. Versions that operate in normal Earth gravitation at greater flow speeds may also be feasible. The FBE (see figure) is constructed as a cartridge that includes two concentric cylinders with flanges at the ends. The outer cylinder is an impermeable housing; the inner cylinder comprises a gas-permeable, liquid-impermeable membrane covering a perforated inner tube. Multiple spiral disks that collectively constitute a spiral ramp are mounted in the space between the inner and outer cylinders. The liquid enters the FBE through an end flange, flows in the annular space between the cylinders, and leaves through the opposite end flange. The spiral disks channel the liquid into a spiral flow, the circumferential component of which gives rise to the desired centrifugal effect. The resulting radial pressure gradient forces the bubbles radially inward; that is, toward the inner cylinder. At the inner cylinder, the gas-permeable, liquid-impermeable membrane allows the bubbles to enter the perforated inner tube while keeping the liquid in the space between the inner and outer cylinders. The gas thus collected can be vented via an endflange connection to the inner tube. The centripetal acceleration (and thus the radial pressure gradient) is approximately proportional to the square of the flow speed and

  11. Magnetocaloric pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.

    1973-01-01

    Very cold liquids and gases such as helium, neon, and nitrogen can be pumped by using magnetocaloric effect. Adiabatic magnetization and demagnetization are used to alternately heat and cool slug of pumped fluid contained in closed chamber.

  12. Casing pump

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, H.E.; Bass, R.E.

    1987-09-29

    A natural gas operated pump is described for use in the casing of an oil well, comprising: a tubular pump body having an open lower end for admitting well fluids to the interior of the pump body and an open upper end, wherein a downwardly facing seating surface is formed on the inner periphery of the pump body adjacent the upper end thereof; means for forming a seal between the pump body and the casing of the well; a rod extending longitudinally through the seating surface formed in the pump body and protruding from the upper end of the pump body; a valve member mounted on the rod below the seating surface and shaped to mate with the seating surface; and means for vertically positioning the rod in proportion to fluid pressure within the pump body.

  13. Keeping Hearts Pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A collaboration between NASA, Dr. Michael DeBakey, Dr. George Noon, and MicroMed Technology, Inc., resulted in a life-saving heart pump for patients awaiting heart transplants. The MicroMed DeBakey VAD functions as a "bridge to heart transplant" by pumping blood throughout the body to keep critically ill patients alive until a donor heart is available. Weighing less than 4 ounces and measuring 1 inch by 3 inches, the pump is approximately one-tenth the size of other currently marketed pulsatile VADs. This makes it less invasive and ideal for smaller adults and children. Because of the pump's small size, less than 5 percent of the patients implanted developed device-related infections. It can operate up to 8 hours on batteries, giving patients the mobility to do normal, everyday activities.The MicroMed DeBakey VAD is a registered trademark of MicroMed Technology, Inc.

  14. ELECTROMAGNETIC PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Pulley, O.O.

    1954-08-17

    This patent reiates to electromagnetic pumps for electricity-conducting fluids and, in particular, describes several modifications for a linear conduction type electromagnetic interaction pump. The invention resides in passing the return conductor for the current traversing the fiuid in the duct back through the gap in the iron circuit of the pump. Both the maximum allowable pressure and the efficiency of a linear conduction electromagnetic pump are increased by incorporation of the present invention.

  15. Evaluation of isolator system and large-volume centrifugation method for culturing body fluids.

    PubMed Central

    Elston, H R; Wang, M; Philip, A

    1990-01-01

    The Isolator system was compared with the large-volume centrifugation method for processing and recovering organisms from body fluids other than blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and urine. A total of 155 body fluid samples were processed for the recovery of clinically significant organisms. Of the 55 positive cultures, Isolator detected 94% and the large-volume centrifugation method detected 64%. The time necessary to indicate positivity was not significantly different in the two methods; however, in five cases, the Isolator system yielded clinically significant organisms 24 h sooner than the conventional method. The Isolator system was found to be a more sensitive alternative than the conventional large-volume centrifugation method. PMID:2405006

  16. 77 FR 9273 - USEC Inc. (American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and American Centrifuge Plant); Direct...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-16

    ... COMMISSION USEC Inc. (American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and American Centrifuge Plant); Direct Transfer of Licenses In the Matter of USEC INC. (American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and American... holder of materials licenses SNM-7003 and SNM-2011 for the American Centrifuge Lead Cascade...

  17. Life Sciences Centrifuge Facility assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Robert H.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of the status of the Centrifuge Facility being developed by ARC for flight on the International Space Station Alpha. The assessment includes technical status, schedules, budgets, project management, performance of facility relative to science requirements, and identifies risks and issues that need to be considered in future development activities.

  18. Life Sciences Centrifuge Facility review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Laurence R.

    1994-01-01

    The Centrifuge Facility Project at ARC was reviewed by a code U team to determine appropriateness adequacy for the ISSA. This report represents the findings of one consultant to this team and concentrates on scientific and technical risks. This report supports continuation of the project to the next phase of development.

  19. Laser and gas centrifuge enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinonen, Olli

    2014-05-01

    Principles of uranium isotope enrichment using various laser and gas centrifuge techniques are briefly discussed. Examples on production of high enriched uranium are given. Concerns regarding the possibility of using low end technologies to produce weapons grade uranium are explained. Based on current assessments commercial enrichment services are able to cover the global needs of enriched uranium in the foreseeable future.

  20. Laser and gas centrifuge enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Heinonen, Olli

    2014-05-09

    Principles of uranium isotope enrichment using various laser and gas centrifuge techniques are briefly discussed. Examples on production of high enriched uranium are given. Concerns regarding the possibility of using low end technologies to produce weapons grade uranium are explained. Based on current assessments commercial enrichment services are able to cover the global needs of enriched uranium in the foreseeable future.