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Sample records for centrifugal compressor stage

  1. Understand Centrifugal Compressor stage curves

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, E.L.

    1986-08-01

    Multistage Centrifugal Compressor Performance is generally presented in the form of a composite curve showing discharge pressure and bhp plotted as a function of capacity. This composite curve represents the cumulative performance of each stage performance curve. A simple yet quite accurate means of measuring compressor total performance is to test each stage as a single-stage compressor, usually on air with atmospheric inlets. Stage curves are then generated from the test data and three important variables are plotted: head coefficient, work coefficient and adiabatic efficiency. These variables are plotted against a normalized flow coefficient, Q/N, which is inlet volume flowmore » (cfm) divided by impeller speed (rpm). The nomenclature used to define these stage variables changes from manufacturer to manufacturer; however, the parameters presented are the same. An understanding of each parameter's theoretical derivation and determination from test data will help the engineer reviewing test curves to be more cognizant of the interrelationships between these variables; specifically, how they affect overall machine pressure rise and power consumption.« less

  2. Unsteady flow phenomena in industrial centrifugal compressor stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonciani, L.; Terrinoni, L.; Tesei, A.

    1982-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation on a typical centrifugal compressor stage running on an atmospheric pressure test rig are shown. Unsteady flow was invariably observed at low flow well before surge. In order to determine the influence of the statoric components, the same impeller was repeatedly tested with the same vaneless diffuser, but varying return channel geometry. Experimental results show the strong effect exerted by the return channel, both on onset and on the behavior of unsteady flow. Observed phenomena have been found to confirm well the observed dynamic behavior of full load tested machines when gas density is high enough to cause appreciable mechanical vibrations. Therefore, testing of single stages at atmospheric pressure may provide a fairly accurate prediction of this kind of aerodynamic excitation.

  3. Deterministic blade row interactions in a centrifugal compressor stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirtley, K. R.; Beach, T. A.

    1991-01-01

    The three-dimensional viscous flow in a low speed centrifugal compressor stage is simulated using an average passage Navier-Stokes analysis. The impeller discharge flow is of the jet/wake type with low momentum fluid in the shroud-pressure side corner coincident with the tip leakage vortex. This nonuniformity introduces periodic unsteadiness in the vane frame of reference. The effect of such deterministic unsteadiness on the time-mean is included in the analysis through the average passage stress, which allows the analysis of blade row interactions. The magnitude of the divergence of the deterministic unsteady stress is of the order of the divergence of the Reynolds stress over most of the span, from the impeller trailing edge to the vane throat. Although the potential effects on the blade trailing edge from the diffuser vane are small, strong secondary flows generated by the impeller degrade the performance of the diffuser vanes.

  4. Sample of CFD optimization of a centrifugal compressor stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galerkin, Y.; Drozdov, A.

    2015-08-01

    Industrial centrifugal compressor stage is a complicated object for gas dynamic design when the goal is to achieve maximum efficiency. The Authors analyzed results of CFD performance modeling (NUMECA Fine Turbo calculations). Performance prediction in a whole was modest or poor in all known cases. Maximum efficiency prediction was quite satisfactory to the contrary. Flow structure in stator elements was in a good agreement with known data. The intermediate type stage “3D impeller + vaneless diffuser+ return channel” was designed with principles well proven for stages with 2D impellers. CFD calculations of vaneless diffuser candidates demonstrated flow separation in VLD with constant width. The candidate with symmetrically tampered inlet part b3 / b2 = 0,73 appeared to be the best. Flow separation takes place in the crossover with standard configuration. The alternative variant was developed and numerically tested. The obtained experience was formulated as corrected design recommendations. Several candidates of the impeller were compared by maximum efficiency of the stage. The variant with gas dynamic standard principles of blade cascade design appeared to be the best. Quasi - 3D non-viscid calculations were applied to optimize blade velocity diagrams - non-incidence inlet, control of the diffusion factor and of average blade load. “Geometric” principle of blade formation with linear change of blade angles along its length appeared to be less effective. Candidates’ with different geometry parameters were designed by 6th math model version and compared. The candidate with optimal parameters - number of blades, inlet diameter and leading edge meridian position - is 1% more effective than the stage of the initial design.

  5. Centrifugal reciprocating compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    High, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    Efficient compressor uses centrifugal force to compress gas. System incorporates two coupled dc motors, each driving separate centrifugal reciprocating-compressor assembly. Motors are synchronized to accelerate and decelerate alternately.

  6. Discussion on back-to-back two-stage centrifugal compressor compact design techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Lei; Liu, Huoxing

    2013-12-01

    Design a small flow back-to-back two-stage centrifugal compressor in the aviation turbocharger, the compressor is compact structure, small axial length, light weighted. Stationary parts have a great influence on their overall performance decline. Therefore, the stationary part of the back-to-back two-stage centrifugal compressor should pay full attention to the diffuser, bend, return vane and volute design. Volute also impact downstream return vane, making the flow in circumferential direction is not uniformed, and several blade angle of attack is drastically changed in downstream of the volute with the airflow can not be rotated to required angle. Loading of high-pressure rotor blades change due to non-uniformed of flow in circumferential direction, which makes individual blade load distribution changed, and affected blade passage load decreased to reduce the capability of work, the tip low speed range increases.

  7. Dynamic Modeling of Starting Aerodynamics and Stage Matching in an Axi-Centrifugal Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Kevin; OBrien, Walter F.; Owen, A. Karl

    1996-01-01

    A DYNamic Turbine Engine Compressor Code (DYNTECC) has been modified to model speed transients from 0-100% of compressor design speed. The impetus for this enhancement was to investigate stage matching and stalling behavior during a start sequence as compared to rotating stall events above ground idle. The model can simulate speed and throttle excursions simultaneously as well as time varying bleed flow schedules. Results of a start simulation are presented and compared to experimental data obtained from an axi-centrifugal turboshaft engine and companion compressor rig. Stage by stage comparisons reveal the front stages to be operating in or near rotating stall through most of the start sequence. The model matches the starting operating line quite well in the forward stages with deviations appearing in the rearward stages near the start bleed. Overall, the performance of the model is very promising and adds significantly to the dynamic simulation capabilities of DYNTECC.

  8. Magnetic bearing design and control optimization for a four-stage centrifugal compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Pinckney, F.D.; Keesee, J.M.

    1992-07-01

    A four-stage centrifugal pipeline compressor with a flexible rotor was equipped with magnetic bearings. Magnetic bearing sizing, shaft rotor dynamics, and controller/bearing design are discussed. Controller changes during shop and field tuning and the resulting rotor dynamic effects are also presented. Results of the field operation of this compressor indicate no vibration-related problems, despite the shaft second and third undamped modes being within the operating speed range. During the first 14 months after field commissioning, 9900 operating hours had been accumulated, indicating a 97 percent unit availability. 6 refs.

  9. Numerical investigation & comparison of a tandem-bladed turbocharger centrifugal compressor stage with conventional design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danish, Syed Noman; Qureshi, Shafiq Rehman; EL-Leathy, Abdelrahman; Khan, Salah Ud-Din; Umer, Usama; Ma, Chaochen

    2014-12-01

    Extensive numerical investigations of the performance and flow structure in an unshrouded tandem-bladed centrifugal compressor are presented in comparison to a conventional compressor. Stage characteristics are explored for various tip clearance levels, axial spacings and circumferential clockings. Conventional impeller was modified to tandem-bladed design with no modifications in backsweep angle, meridional gas passage and camber distributions in order to have a true comparison with conventional design. Performance degradation is observed for both the conventional and tandem designs with increase in tip clearance. Linear-equation models for correlating stage characteristics with tip clearance are proposed. Comparing two designs, it is clearly evident that the conventional design shows better performance at moderate flow rates. However; near choke flow, tandem design gives better results primarily because of the increase in throat area. Surge point flow rate also seems to drop for tandem compressor resulting in increased range of operation.

  10. Performance improvement of a centrifugal compressor stage by using different vaned diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. C.; Kong, X. Z.; Li, F.; Sun, W.; Chen, Q. G.

    2013-12-01

    The vaneless diffuser (VLD) is usually adopted in the traditional design of the multi-stage centrifugal compressor because of the stage's match problem. The drawback of the stage with vaneless diffusers is low efficiency. In order to increase the efficiency and at the same time, induce no significant decline in the operating range of the stage, three different types of vaned diffusers are designed and numerically investigated: the traditional vaned diffuser (TVD), the low-solidity cascade diffuser (LSD) and the partial-height vane diffuser (PVD). These three types of vaned diffusers have different influences on the performance of the centrifugal compressor. In the present investigation, the first part investigates the performance of a centrifugal compressor stage with three different vaned diffusers. The second part studies the influences of the height and the position of partial height vanes on the stage performance, and discusses the matching problem between the PVD and the downstream return channel. The stage investigated in this paper includes the impeller, the diffuser, the bend and the return channel. In the process of numerical investigation, the flow is assumed to be steady, and this process includes calculation and simulation. The calculation of 3-D turbulent flow in the stage uses the commercial CFD code NUMECA together with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. The simulation of the computational region includes the impeller passages, the diffuser passages and return channel passages. The structure and surrounding region are assumed to have a perfect cyclic symmetry, so the single channel model and periodic boundary condition are applied at the middle of the passage, that is to reduce the calculation region to only one region. The investigation showed that the low-solidity cascade diffuser would be a better choice as a middle course for the first stage of the multistage centrifugal compressor. Besides, the influences of the height and the position of

  11. Scaled Centrifugal Compressor Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-31

    small compressors in turbo - shaft, turbofan , and turboprop engines used in rotorcraft; fixed-wing general aviation, and cruise missile aircraft . Included...AD-A±74 "I SCALED CENTRIFUGAL COMPRESSOR PEOGRAN(U) GARRETT13 TURBINE ENGINE CO PHOENIX AZ G CRGILL ET AL. 31 OCT 86 21-5464 MASA-CR-i?4912 NAS3...REPORT 6’ FOR SCALED CENTRIFUGAL COMPRESSOR PROGRAM GARRETT TURBINE ENGINE COMPANY A DIVISION OF THE GARRETT CORPORATION I111 SOUTH 34TH STREET - P.O

  12. Simplified mathematical model of losses in a centrifugal compressor stage

    SciTech Connect

    Seleznev, K.P.; Galerkin, Yu.B.; Popova, E.Yu.

    1988-05-01

    A mathematical model was developed for optimizing the parameters of the stage which does not require calculation of the flow around grids. The loss coefficients of the stage elements were considered as functions of the flow-through section, the angle of incidence, the compressibility criterion, and the Reynolds number. The relationships were used to calculate losses in all blade components, including blade diffusers, deflectors, and rotors. The model is implemented in a microcomputer and will compute the efficiency of one variant of the flow-through section of a stage in 60 minutes.

  13. Centrifugal compressor surge detecting method based on wavelet analysis of unsteady pressure fluctuations in typical stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izmaylov, R.; Lebedev, A.

    2015-08-01

    Centrifugal compressors are complex energy equipment. Automotive control and protection system should meet the requirements: of operation reliability and durability. In turbocompressors there are at least two dangerous areas: surge and rotating stall. Antisurge protecting systems usually use parametric or feature methods. As a rule industrial system are parametric. The main disadvantages of anti-surge parametric systems are difficulties in mass flow measurements in natural gas pipeline compressor. The principal idea of feature method is based on the experimental fact: as a rule just before the onset of surge rotating or precursor stall established in compressor. In this case the problem consists in detecting of unsteady pressure or velocity fluctuations characteristic signals. Wavelet analysis is the best method for detecting onset of rotating stall in spite of high level of spurious signals (rotating wakes, turbulence, etc.). This method is compatible with state of the art DSP systems of industrial control. Examples of wavelet analysis application for detecting onset of rotating stall in typical stages centrifugal compressor are presented. Experimental investigations include unsteady pressure measurement and sophisticated data acquisition system. Wavelet transforms used biorthogonal wavelets in Mathlab systems.

  14. Design and optimization of a single stage centrifugal compressor for a solar dish-Brayton system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongsheng; Wang, Kai; Tong, Zhiting; Lin, Feng; Nie, Chaoqun; Engeda, Abraham

    2013-10-01

    According to the requirements of a solar dish-Brayton system, a centrifugal compressor stage with a minimum total pressure ratio of 5, an adiabatic efficiency above 75% and a surge margin more than 12% needs to be designed. A single stage, which consists of impeller, radial vaned diffuser, 90° crossover and two rows of axial stators, was chosen to satisfy this system. To achieve the stage performance, an impeller with a 6:1 total pressure ratio and an adiabatic efficiency of 90% was designed and its preliminary geometry came from an in-house one-dimensional program. Radial vaned diffuser was applied downstream of the impeller. Two rows of axial stators after 90° crossover were added to guide the flow into axial direction. Since jet-wake flow, shockwave and boundary layer separation coexisted in the impeller-diffuser region, optimization on the radius ratio of radial diffuser vane inlet to impeller exit, diffuser vane inlet blade angle and number of diffuser vanes was carried out at design point. Finally, an optimized centrifugal compressor stage fulfilled the high expectations and presented proper performance. Numerical simulation showed that at design point the stage adiabatic efficiency was 79.93% and the total pressure ratio was 5.6. The surge margin was 15%. The performance map including 80%, 90% and 100% design speed was also presented.

  15. Mathematical models for optimization of the centrifugal stage of a refrigerating compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Nuzhdin, A.S.

    1987-09-01

    The authors describe a general approach to the creating of mathematical models of energy and head losses in the flow part of the centrifugal compressor. The mathematical model of the pressure head and efficiency of a two-section stage proposed in this paper is meant for determining its characteristics for the assigned geometric dimensions and for optimizing by variance calculations. Characteristic points on the plot of velocity distribution over the margin of the vanes of the impeller and the diffuser of the centrifugal stage with a combined diffuser are presented. To assess the reliability of the mathematical model the authors comparedmore » some calculated data with the experimental ones.« less

  16. Design and development of an advanced two-stage centrifugal compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.L.; Waterman, W.F.

    1995-04-01

    Small turboshaft engines require high-pressure-ratio, high-efficiency compressors to provide low engine fuel consumption. This paper describes the aeromechanical design and development of a 3.3 kg/s (7.3 lb/sec), 14:1 pressure ratio two-stage centrifugal compressor, which is used in the T800-LHT-800 helicopter engine. The design employs highly nonradial, splitter bladed impellers with swept leading edges and compact vaned diffusers to achieve high performance in a small and robust configuration. The development effort quantified the effects of impeller diffusion and passive inducer shroud bleed on surge margin as well as the effects of impeller loading on tip clearance sensitivity and the impact ofmore » sand erosion and shroud roughness on performance. The developed compressor exceeded its performance objectives with a minimum of 23% surge margin without variable geometry. The compressor provides a high-performance, rugged, low-cost configuration ideally suited for helicopter applications.« less

  17. An aerodynamic design and numerical investigation of transonic centrifugal compressor stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Weilin; Ji, Lucheng; Tian, Yong; Shao, Weiwei; Li, Weiwei; Xiao, Yunhan

    2011-09-01

    In the present paper, the design of a transonic centrifugal compressor stage with the inlet relative Mach number about 1.3 and detailed flow field investigation by three-dimensional CFD are described. Firstly the CFD program was validated by an experimental case. Then the preliminary aerodynamic design of stage completed through in-house one-dimensional code. Three types of impellers and two sets of stages were computed and analyzed. It can be found that the swept shape of leading edge has prominent influence on the performance and can enlarge the flow range. Similarly, the performance of the stage with swept impeller is better than others. The total pressure ratio and adiabatic efficiency of final geometry achieve 7:1 and 80% respectively. The vane diffuser with same airfoils along span increases attack angle at higher span, and the local flow structure and performance is deteriorated.

  18. Experimental investigation and performance analysis of six low flow coefficient centrifugal compressor stages

    SciTech Connect

    Paroubek, J.; Cyrus, V.; Kyncl, J.

    1995-10-01

    Some results of a research and development program for centrifugal compressors are presented. Six-stage configurations with low flow coefficient were tested. The stages had channel width parameter b{sub 2}/D{sub 2} = 0.01 and 0.03. For each value of the width parameter, three different impellers with inlet hub to outlet diameter ratio d{sub 0}/D{sub 2} = 0.3, 0.4, and 0.5 were designed. Test rig, instrumentation, and data analysis are described. Special attention was devoted to probe calibrations and to evaluation of the leakage, bearing, and disk friction losses. Aerodynamic performance of all tested stages is presented. Slip factors of impellers obtainedmore » experimentally and theoretically are compared. Losses in both vaneless diffuser and return channel with deswirl vanes are discussed. Rotating stall was also investigated. Criteria for stall limit were tested.« less

  19. The change of the inlet geometry of a centrifugal compressor stage and its influence on the compressor performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Leilei; Yang, Ce; Zhao, Ben; Lao, Dazhong; Ma, Chaochen; Li, Du

    2013-06-01

    The impact on the compressor performance is important for designing the inlet pipe of the centrifugal compressor of a vehicle turbocharger with different inlet pipes. First, an experiment was performed to determine the compressor performance from three cases: a straight inlet pipe, a long bent inlet pipe and a short bent inlet pipe. Next, dynamic sensors were installed in key positions to collect the sign of the unsteady pressure of the centrifugal compressor. Combined with the results of numerical simulations, the total pressure distortion in the pipes, the pressure distributions on the blades and the pressure variability in the diffuser are studied in detail. The results can be summarized as follows: a bent pipe results in an inlet distortion to the compressor, which leads to performance degradation, and the effect is more apparent as the mass flow rate increases. The distortion induced by the bent inlet is not only influenced by the distance between the outlet of the bent section and the leading edge of the impeller but also by the impeller rotation. The flow fields in the centrifugal impeller and the diffuser are influenced by a coupling effect produced by the upstream inlet distortion and the downstream blocking effect from the volute tongue. If the inlet geometry is changed, the distributions and the fluctuation intensities of the static pressure on the main blade surface of the centrifugal impeller and in the diffuser are changed accordingly.

  20. Centrifugal-reciprocating compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higa, W. H. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A centrifugal compressor is described which includes at least one pair of cylinders arranged in coaxial alignment and supported for angular displacement about a common axis of rotation normally disecting a common longitudinal axis of symmetry for the cylinders. The cylinders are characterized by ported closures located at the mutually remote ends thereof through which the cylinders are charged and discharged, and a pair of piston heads seated within the cylinders and supported for floating displacement in compressive strokes in response to unidirectional angular displacement imparted to the cylinders.

  1. Effect of diffuser vane shape on the performance of a centrifugal compressor stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, T. Ch Siva; Ramana Murty, G. V.; Prasad, M. V. S. S. S. M.

    2014-04-01

    The present paper reports the results of experimental investigations on the effect of diffuser vane shape on the performance of a centrifugal compressor stage. These studies were conducted on the chosen stage having a backward curved impeller of 500 mm tip diameter and 24.5 mm width and its design flow coefficient is ϕd=0.0535. Three different low solidity diffuser vane shapes namely uncambered aerofoil, constant thickness flat plate and circular arc cambered constant thickness plate were chosen as the variants for diffuser vane shape and all the three shapes have the same thickness to chord ratio (t/c=0.1). Flow coefficient, polytropic efficiency, total head coefficient, power coefficient and static pressure recovery coefficient were chosen as the parameters for evaluating the effect of diffuser vane shape on the stage performance. The results show that there is reasonable improvement in stage efficiency and total head coefficient with the use of the chosen diffuser vane shapes as compared to conventional vaneless diffuser. It is also noticed that the aero foil shaped LSD has shown better performance when compared to flat plate and circular arc profiles. The aerofoil vane shape of the diffuser blade is seen to be tolerant over a considerable range of incidence.

  2. NASA low speed centrifugal compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, Michael D.

    1990-01-01

    The flow characteristics of a low speed centrifugal compressor were examined at NASA Lewis Research Center to improve understanding of the flow in centrifugal compressors, to provide models of various flow phenomena, and to acquire benchmark data for three dimensional viscous flow code validation. The paper describes the objectives, test facilities' instrumentation, and experiment preliminary comparisons.

  3. The analysis of the flow with water injection in a centrifugal compressor stage using CFD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michal, Tomášek; Richard, Matas; Tomáš, Syka

    2017-09-01

    This text deals with the principle of direct cooling of the pressure gas in a centrifugal compressor based on evaporation of the additional fluid phase in a control domain. A decrease of the gas temperature is reached by taking the heat, which is required for evaporation of the fluid phase. The influence of additional fluid phase on the parameters of the multiphase flow is compared with the ideal gas simulation in the defined domain and with the same boundary conditions.

  4. High Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor for Rotorcraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medic, Gorazd; Sharma, Om P.; Jongwook, Joo; Hardin, Larry W.; McCormick, Duane C.; Cousins, William T.; Lurie, Elizabeth A.; Shabbir, Aamir; Holley, Brian M.; Van Slooten, Paul R.

    2017-01-01

    A centrifugal compressor research effort conducted by United Technologies Research Center under NASA Research Announcement NNC08CB03C is documented. The objectives were to identify key technical barriers to advancing the aerodynamic performance of high-efficiency, high work factor, compact centrifugal compressor aft-stages for turboshaft engines; to acquire measurements needed to overcome the technical barriers and inform future designs; to design, fabricate, and test a new research compressor in which to acquire the requisite flow field data. A new High-Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor stage -- splittered impeller, splittered diffuser, 90 degree bend, and exit guide vanes -- with aerodynamically aggressive performance and configuration (compactness) goals were designed, fabricated, and subquently tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center.

  5. Centrifugal Compressor Aeroelastic Analysis Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Srivastava, Rakesh

    2002-01-01

    Centrifugal compressors are very widely used in the turbomachine industry where low mass flow rates are required. Gas turbine engines for tanks, rotorcraft and small jets rely extensively on centrifugal compressors for rugged and compact design. These compressors experience problems related with unsteadiness of flowfields, such as stall flutter, separation at the trailing edge over diffuser guide vanes, tip vortex unsteadiness, etc., leading to rotating stall and surge. Considerable interest exists in small gas turbine engine manufacturers to understand and eventually eliminate the problems related to centrifugal compressors. The geometric complexity of centrifugal compressor blades and the twisting of the blade passages makes the linear methods inapplicable. Advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods are needed for accurate unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analysis of centrifugal compressors. Most of the current day industrial turbomachines and small aircraft engines are designed with a centrifugal compressor. With such a large customer base and NASA Glenn Research Center being, the lead center for turbomachines, it is important that adequate emphasis be placed on this area as well. Currently, this activity is not supported under any project at NASA Glenn.

  6. Centrifugal Compressor Surge Controlled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoch, Gary J.

    2003-01-01

    It shows the variation in compressor mass flow with time as the mass flow is throttled to drive the compressor into surge. Surge begins where wide variations in mass flow occur. Air injection is then turned on to bring about a recovery from the initial surge condition and stabilize the compressor. The throttle is closed further until surge is again initiated. Air injection is increased to again recover from the surge condition and stabilize the compressor.

  7. Miniature Centrifugal Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sixsmith, Herbert

    1989-01-01

    Miniature turbocompressor designed for reliability and long life. Cryogenic system includes compressor, turboexpander, and heat exchanger provides 5 W of refrigeration at 70 K from 150 W input power. Design speed of machine 510,000 rpm. Compressor has gas-lubricated journal bearings and magnetic thrust bearing. When compressor runs no bearing contact and no wear.

  8. Constraints complicate centrifugal compressor depressurization

    SciTech Connect

    Key, B.; Colbert, F.L.

    1993-05-10

    Blowdown of a centrifugal compressor is complicated by process constraints that might require slowing the depressurization rate and by mechanical constraints for which a faster rate might be preferred. The paper describes design constraints such as gas leaks; thrust-bearing overload; system constraints; flare extinguishing; heat levels; and pressure drop.

  9. Aerodynamic Performance of a Compact, High Work-Factor Centrifugal Compressor at the Stage and Subcomponent Level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braunscheidel, Edward P.; Welch, Gerard E.; Skoch, Gary J.; Medic, Gorazd; Sharma, Om P.

    2015-01-01

    The measured aerodynamic performance of a compact, high work-factor, single-stage centrifugal compressor, comprising an impeller, diffuser, 90deg-bend, and exit guide vane is reported. Performance levels are based on steady-state total-pressure and total-temperature rake and angularity-probe data acquired at key machine rating planes during recent testing at NASA Glenn Research Center. Aerodynamic performance at the stage level is reported for operation between 70 to 105 percent of design corrected speed, with subcomponent (impeller, diffuser, and exit-guide-vane) flow field measurements presented and discussed at the 100 percent design-speed condition. Individual component losses from measurements are compared with pre-test CFD predictions on a limited basis.

  10. Aerodynamic Performance of a Compact, High Work-Factor Centrifugal Compressor at the Stage and Subcomponent Level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braunscheidel, Edward P.; Welch, Gerard E.; Skoch, Gary J.; Medic, Gorazd; Sharma, Om P.

    2014-01-01

    The measured aerodynamic performance of a compact, high work factor, single-stage centrifugal compressor, comprising an impeller, diffuser, 90-bend, and exit guide vane (EGV), is reported. Performance levels are based on steady-state total-pressure and total-temperature rake and angularity-probe data acquired at key machine rating planes during recent testing at NASA Glenn Research Center. Aerodynamic performance at the stage level are reported for operation between 70 to 105 of design corrected speed, with subcomponent (impeller, diffuser, and exitguide-vane) detailed flow field measurements presented and discussed at the 100 design-speed condition. Individual component losses from measurements are compared with pre-test predictions on a limited basis.

  11. Aerodynamic Performance of a Compact, High Work-Factor Centrifugal Compressor at the Stage and Subcomponent Level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braunscheidel, Edward P.; Welch, Gerard E.; Skoch, Gary J.; Medic, Gorazd; Sharma, Om P.

    2014-01-01

    The measured aerodynamic performance of a compact, high work-factor, single-stage centrifugal compressor, comprising an impeller, diffuser, 90º-bend, and exit guide vane is reported. Performance levels are based on steady-state total-pressure and total-temperature rake and angularity-probe data acquired at key machine rating planes during recent testing at NASA Glenn Research Center. Aerodynamic performance at the stage level is reported for operation between 70 to 105% of design corrected speed, with subcomponent (impeller, diffuser, and exit-guide-vane) flow field measurements presented and discussed at the 100% design-speed condition. Individual component losses from measurements are compared with pre-test CFD predictions on a limited basis.

  12. Development of the virtual experimental bench on the basis of modernized research centrifugal compressor stage test unit with the 3D impeller.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, A. A.; Danilishin, A. M.; Dubenko, A. M.; Kozhukov, Y. V.

    2017-08-01

    Design modernization of the centrifugal compressor stage test bench with three dimensional impeller blades was carried out for the possibility of holding a series of experimental studies of different 3D impeller models. The studies relates to the problem of joint work of the impeller and the stationary channels of the housing when carrying out works on modernization with the aim of improving the parameters of the volumetric capacity or pressure in the presence of design constraints. The object of study is the experimental single end centrifugal compressor stage with the 3D impeller. Compressor stage consists of the 3D impeller, vaneless diffuser (VLD), outlet collector - folded side scroll and downstream pipe. The drive is a DC motor 75 kW. The increase gear (multiplier) was set between the compressor and DC motor, gear ratio is i = 9.8. To obtain the characteristics of the compressor and the flow area the following values were measured: total pressure, static pressure, direction (angles) of the stream in different cross sections. Additional pneumometric probes on the front wall of the VLD of the test bench have been installed. Total pressure probes and foster holes for the measurement of total and static pressure by the new drainage scheme. This allowed carrying out full experimental studies for two elements of centrifugal compressor stage. After the experimental tests the comprehensive information about the performance of model stage were obtained. Was measured geometric parameters and the constructed virtual model of the experimental bench flow part with the help of Creo Parametric 3.0 and ANSYS v. 16.2. Conducted CFD calculations and verification with experimental data. Identifies the steps for further experimental and virtual works.

  13. Comparison of CFD-calculations of centrifugal compressor stages by NUMECA Fine Turbo and ANSYS CFX programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galerkin, Y. B.; Voinov, I. B.; Drozdov, A. A.

    2017-08-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods are widely used for centrifugal compressors design and flow analysis. The calculation results are dependent on the chosen software, turbulence models and solver settings. Two of the most widely applicable programs are NUMECA Fine Turbo and ANSYS CFX. The objects of the study were two different stages. CFD-calculations were made for a single blade channel and for full 360-degree flow paths. Stage 1 with 3D impeller and vaneless diffuser was tested experimentally. Its flow coefficient is 0.08 and loading factor is 0.74. For stage 1 calculations were performed with different grid quality, a different number of cells and different models of turbulence. The best results have demonstrated the Spalart-Allmaras model and mesh with 1.854 million cells. Stage 2 with return channel, vaneless diffuser and 3D impeller with flow coefficient 0.15 and loading factor 0.5 was designed by the known Universal Modeling Method. Its performances were calculated by the well identified Math model. Stage 2 performances by CFD calculations shift to higher flow rate in comparison with design performances. The same result was obtained for stage 1 in comparison with measured performances. Calculated loading factor is higher in both cases for a single blade channel. Loading factor performance calculated for full flow path (“360 degrees”) by ANSYS CFX is in satisfactory agreement with the stage 2 design performance. Maximum efficiency is predicted accurately by the ANSYS CFX “360 degrees” calculation. “Sector” calculation is less accurate. Further research is needed to solve the problem of performances mismatch.

  14. Numerical and experimental modelling of the centrifugal compressor stage - setting the model of impellers with 2D blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matas, Richard; Syka, Tomáš; Luňáček, Ondřej

    The article deals with a description of results from research and development of a radial compressor stage. The experimental compressor and used numerical models are briefly described. In the first part, the comparisons of characteristics obtained experimentally and by numerical simulations for stage with vaneless diffuser are described. In the second part, the results for stage with vanned diffuser are presented. The results are relevant for next studies in research and development process.

  15. Lubrication free centrifugal compressor. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Gottschlich, J.M.; Scaringe, R.P.; Gui, F.

    1994-04-22

    This paper describes an effort to demonstrate the benefits of an innovative, lightweight, lubrication free centrifugal compressor that allows the use of environmentally sale alternate refrigerants with improved system efficiencies over current state-of-the-art technology. This effort couples the recently developed 3-D high efficiency centrifugal compressor and fabrication technologies with magnetic bearing technology and will then prove the performance, life and reliability of the compressor.

  16. Asynchronous vibration problem of centrifugal compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujikawa, T.; Ishiguro, N.; Ito, M.

    1980-01-01

    An unstable asynchronous vibration problem in a high pressure centrifugal compressor and the remedial actions against it are described. Asynchronous vibration of the compressor took place when the discharge pressure (Pd) was increased, after the rotor was already at full speed. The typical spectral data of the shaft vibration indicate that as the pressure Pd increases, pre-unstable vibration appears and becomes larger, and large unstable asynchronous vibration occurs suddenly (Pd = 5.49MPa). A computer program was used which calculated the logarithmic decrement and the damped natural frequency of the rotor bearing systems. The analysis of the log-decrement is concluded to be effective in preventing unstable vibration in both the design stage and remedial actions.

  17. Centrifugal compressor design for electrically assisted boost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y Yang, M.; Martinez-Botas, R. F.; Zhuge, W. L.; Qureshi, U.; Richards, B.

    2013-12-01

    Electrically assisted boost is a prominent method to solve the issues of transient lag in turbocharger and remains an optimized operation condition for a compressor due to decoupling from turbine. Usually a centrifugal compressor for gasoline engine boosting is operated at high rotational speed which is beyond the ability of an electric motor in market. In this paper a centrifugal compressor with rotational speed as 120k RPM and pressure ratio as 2.0 is specially developed for electrically assisted boost. A centrifugal compressor including the impeller, vaneless diffuser and the volute is designed by meanline method followed by 3D detailed design. Then CFD method is employed to predict as well as analyse the performance of the design compressor. The results show that the pressure ratio and efficiency at design point is 2.07 and 78% specifically.

  18. A modeling study of a centrifugal compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, P.; Shapiro, H.N.

    1998-12-31

    A centrifugal compressor, which is part of a chlorofluorocarbon R-114 chiller installation, was investigated, operating with a new refrigerant, hydrofluorocarbon R-236ea, a proposed alternative to R-114. A large set of R-236ea operating data, as well as a limited amount of R-114 data, were available for this study. A relatively simple analytical compressor model was developed to describe compressor performance. The model was built upon a thorough literature search, experimental data, and some compressor design parameters. Two original empirical relations were developed, providing a new approach to the compressor modeling. The model was developed in a format that would permit itmore » to be easily incorporated into a complete chiller simulation. The model was found to improve somewhat on the quantitative and physical aspects of a compressor model of the same format found in the literature. It was found that the compressor model is specific to the particular refrigerant.« less

  19. High Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor for Rotorcraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medic, Gorazd; Sharma, Om P.; Jongwook, Joo; Hardin, Larry W.; McCormick, Duane C.; Cousins, William T.; Lurie, Elizabeth A.; Shabbir, Aamir; Holley, Brian M.; Van Slooten, Paul R.

    2017-01-01

    The report "High Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor for Rotorcraft Applications" documents the work conducted at UTRC under the NRA Contract NNC08CB03C, with cost share 2/3 NASA, and 1/3 UTRC, that has been extended to 4.5 years. The purpose of this effort was to identify key technical barriers to advancing the state-of-the-art of small centrifugal compressor stages; to delineate the measurements required to provide insight into the flow physics of the technical barriers; to design, fabricate, install, and test a state-of-the-art research compressor that is representative of the rear stage of an axial-centrifugal aero-engine; and to acquire detailed aerodynamic performance and research quality data to clarify flow physics and to establish detailed data sets for future application. The design activity centered on meeting the goal set outlined in the NASA solicitation-the design target was to increase efficiency at higher work factor, while also reducing the maximum diameter of the stage. To fit within the existing Small Engine Components Test Facility at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and to facilitate component re-use, certain key design parameters were fixed by UTRC, including impeller tip diameter, impeller rotational speed, and impeller inlet hub and shroud radii. This report describes the design effort of the High Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor stage (HECC) and delineation of measurements, fabrication of the compressor, and the initial tests that were performed. A new High-Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor stage with a very challenging reduction in radius ratio was successfully designed, fabricated and installed at GRC. The testing was successful, with no mechanical problems and the running clearances were achieved without impeller rubs. Overall, measured pressure ratio of 4.68, work factor of 0.81, and at design exit corrected flow rate of 3 lbm/s met the target requirements. Polytropic efficiency of 85.5 percent and stall margin of 7.5 percent were

  20. High Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor for Rotorcraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medic, Gorazd; Sharma, Om P.; Jongwook, Joo; Hardin, Larry W.; McCormick, Duane C.; Cousins, William T.; Lurie, Elizabeth A.; Shabbir, Aamir; Holley, Brian M.; Van Slooten, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    The report "High Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor for Rotorcraft Applications" documents the work conducted at UTRC under the NRA Contract NNC08CB03C, with cost share 2/3 NASA, and 1/3 UTRC, that has been extended to 4.5 years. The purpose of this effort was to identify key technical barriers to advancing the state-of-the-art of small centrifugal compressor stages; to delineate the measurements required to provide insight into the flow physics of the technical barriers; to design, fabricate, install, and test a state-of-the-art research compressor that is representative of the rear stage of an axial-centrifugal aero-engine; and to acquire detailed aerodynamic performance and research quality data to clarify flow physics and to establish detailed data sets for future application. The design activity centered on meeting the goal set outlined in the NASA solicitation-the design target was to increase efficiency at higher work factor, while also reducing the maximum diameter of the stage. To fit within the existing Small Engine Components Test Facility at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and to facilitate component re-use, certain key design parameters were fixed by UTRC, including impeller tip diameter, impeller rotational speed, and impeller inlet hub and shroud radii. This report describes the design effort of the High Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor stage (HECC) and delineation of measurements, fabrication of the compressor, and the initial tests that were performed. A new High-Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor stage with a very challenging reduction in radius ratio was successfully designed, fabricated and installed at GRC. The testing was successful, with no mechanical problems and the running clearances were achieved without impeller rubs. Overall, measured pressure ratio of 4.68, work factor of 0.81, and at design exit corrected flow rate of 3 lbm/s met the target requirements. Polytropic efficiency of 85.5 percent and stall margin of 7.5 percent were

  1. Algorithm for Controlling a Centrifugal Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedict, Scott M.

    2004-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed for controlling a centrifugal compressor that serves as the prime mover in a heatpump system. Experimental studies have shown that the operating conditions for maximum compressor efficiency are close to the boundary beyond which surge occurs. Compressor surge is a destructive condition in which there are instantaneous reversals of flow associated with a high outlet-to-inlet pressure differential. For a given cooling load, the algorithm sets the compressor speed at the lowest possible value while adjusting the inlet guide vane angle and diffuser vane angle to maximize efficiency, subject to an overriding requirement to prevent surge. The onset of surge is detected via the onset of oscillations of the electric current supplied to the compressor motor, associated with surge-induced oscillations of the torque exerted by and on the compressor rotor. The algorithm can be implemented in any of several computer languages.

  2. Development of a high-specific-speed centrifugal compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, C.

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the development of a subscale single-stage centrifugal compressor with a dimensionless specific speed (Ns) of 1.8, originally designed for full-size application as a high volume flow, low pressure ratio, gas booster compressor. The specific stage is noteworthy in that it provides a benchmark representing the performance potential of very high-specific-speed compressors, of which limited information is found in the open literature. Stage and component test performance characteristics are presented together with traverse results at the impeller exit. Traverse test results were compared with recent CFD computational predictions for an exploratory analytical calibration of a very high-specific-speed impellermore » geometry. The tested subscale (0.583) compressor essentially satisfied design performance expectations with an overall stage efficiency of 74% including, excessive exit casing losses. It was estimated that stage efficiency could be increased to 81% with exit casing losses halved.« less

  3. Advanced two-stage compressor program design of inlet stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryce, C. A.; Paine, C. J.; Mccutcheon, A. R. S.; Tu, R. K.; Perrone, G. L.

    1973-01-01

    The aerodynamic design of an inlet stage for a two-stage, 10/1 pressure ratio, 2 lb/sec flow rate compressor is discussed. Initially a performance comparison was conducted for an axial, mixed flow and centrifugal second stage. A modified mixed flow configuration with tandem rotors and tandem stators was selected for the inlet stage. The term conical flow compressor was coined to describe a particular type of mixed flow compressor configuration which utilizes axial flow type blading and an increase in radius to increase the work input potential. Design details of the conical flow compressor are described.

  4. Flow Range of Centrifugal Compressor Being Extended

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoch, Gary J.

    2001-01-01

    General Aviation will benefit from turbine engines that are both fuel-efficient and reliable. Current engines fall short of their potential to achieve these attributes. The reason is compressor surge, which is a flow stability problem that develops when the compressor is subjected to conditions that are outside of its operating range. Compressor surge can occur when fuel flow to the engine is increased, temporarily back pressuring the compressor and pushing it past its stability limit, or when the compressor is subjected to inlet flow-field distortions that may occur during takeoff and landing. Compressor surge can result in the loss of an aircraft. As a result, engine designers include a margin of safety between the operating line of the engine and the stability limit line of the compressor. Unfortunately, the most efficient operating line for the compressor is usually closer to its stability limit line than it is to the line that provides an adequate margin of safety. A wider stable flow range will permit operation along the most efficient operating line of the compressor, improving the specific fuel consumption of the engine and reducing emissions. The NASA Glenn Research Center is working to extend the stable flow range of the compressor. Significant extension has been achieved in axial compressors by injecting air upstream of the compressor blade rows. Recently, the technique was successfully applied to a 4:1 pressure ratio centrifugal compressor by injecting streams of air into the diffuser. Both steady and controlled unsteady injection were used to inject air through the diffuser shroud surface and extend the range. Future work will evaluate the effect of air injection through the diffuser hub surface and diffuser vanes with the goal of maximizing the range extension while minimizing the amount of injected air that is required.

  5. Axial and Centrifugal Compressor Mean Line Flow Analysis Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a method to estimate key aerodynamic parameters of single and multistage axial and centrifugal compressors. This mean-line compressor code COMDES provides the capability of sizing single and multistage compressors quickly during the conceptual design process. Based on the compressible fluid flow equations and the Euler equation, the code can estimate rotor inlet and exit blade angles when run in the design mode. The design point rotor efficiency and stator losses are inputs to the code, and are modeled at off design. When run in the off-design analysis mode, it can be used to generate performance maps based on simple models for losses due to rotor incidence and inlet guide vane reset angle. The code can provide an improved understanding of basic aerodynamic parameters such as diffusion factor, loading levels and incidence, when matching multistage compressor blade rows at design and at part-speed operation. Rotor loading levels and relative velocity ratio are correlated to the onset of compressor surge. NASA Stage 37 and the three-stage NASA 74-A axial compressors were analyzed and the results compared to test data. The code has been used to generate the performance map for the NASA 76-B three-stage axial compressor featuring variable geometry. The compressor stages were aerodynamically matched at off-design speeds by adjusting the variable inlet guide vane and variable stator geometry angles to control the rotor diffusion factor and incidence angles.

  6. Experimental Investigation of Centrifugal Compressor Stabilization Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoch, Gary J.

    2003-01-01

    Results from a series of experiments to investigate techniques for extending the stable flow range of a centrifugal compressor are reported. The research was conducted in a high-speed centrifugal compressor at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The stabilizing effect of steadily flowing air-streams injected into the vaneless region of a vane-island diffuser through the shroud surface is described. Parametric variations of injection angle, injection flow rate, number of injectors, injector spacing, and injection versus bleed were investigated for a range of impeller speeds and tip clearances. Both the compressor discharge and an external source were used for the injection air supply. The stabilizing effect of flow obstructions created by tubes that were inserted into the diffuser vaneless space through the shroud was also investigated. Tube immersion into the vaneless space was varied in the flow obstruction experiments. Results from testing done at impeller design speed and tip clearance are presented. Surge margin improved by 1.7 points using injection air that was supplied from within the compressor. Externally supplied injection air was used to return the compressor to stable operation after being throttled into surge. The tubes, which were capped to prevent mass flux, provided 9.3 points of additional surge margin over the baseline surge margin of 11.7 points.

  7. Prediction of active control of subsonic centrifugal compressor rotating stall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, Patrick B.; Fleeter, Sanford

    1993-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to predict the suppression of rotating stall in a centrifugal compressor with a vaned diffuser. This model is based on the employment of a control vortical waveform generated upstream of the impeller inlet to damp weak potential disturbances that are the early stages of rotating stall. The control system is analyzed by matching the perturbation pressure in the compressor inlet and exit flow fields with a model for the unsteady behavior of the compressor. The model was effective at predicting the stalling behavior of the Purdue Low Speed Centrifugal Compressor for two distinctly different stall patterns. Predictions made for the effect of a controlled inlet vorticity wave on the stability of the compressor show that for minimum control wave magnitudes, on the order of the total inlet disturbance magnitude, significant damping of the instability can be achieved. For control waves of sufficient amplitude, the control phase angle appears to be the most important factor in maintaining a stable condition in the compressor.

  8. High stability design for new centrifugal compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanki, H.; Katayama, K.; Morii, S.; Mouri, Y.; Umemura, S.; Ozawa, U.; Oda, T.

    1989-01-01

    It is essential that high-performance centrifugal compressors be free of subsynchronous vibrations. A new high-performance centrifugal compressor has been developed by applying the latest rotordynamics knowledge and design techniques: (1) To improve the system damping, a specially designed oil film seal was developed. This seal attained a damping ratio three times that of the conventional design. The oil film seal contains a special damper ring in the seal cartridge. (2) To reduce the destabilizing effect of the labyrinth seal, a special swirl canceler (anti-swirl nozzle) was applied to the balance piston seal. (3) To confirm the system damping margin, the dynamic simulation rotor model test and the full load test applied the vibration exciting test in actual load conditions.

  9. Axial forces in centrifugal compressor couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. N.; Ivanov, N. M.; Yun, V. K.

    2017-08-01

    The article presents the results of the theoretical and experimental investigation of axial forces arising in the toothed and plate couplings of centrifugal compressor shaft lines. Additional loads on the thrust bearing are considered that can develop in the toothed couplings as a result of coupled rotors misalignment. Design relationships to evaluate the level of axial forces and recommendations for their reduction in the operating conditions are given.

  10. Program finds centrifugal compressor operating point

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, M.C.M.M.; Rodrigues, P.S.B.

    1990-09-01

    This article presents the Scop program, a computational procedure developed using Fortran 77 language to find the operating point of centrifugal compressors starting from performance curves. Characteristics or performance curves traditionally are employed by manufacturers to inform users about turbocompressor behavior. Usually, these curves have polytropic head, H, and corresponding polytropic efficiency, {eta} plus rotation speed, N, and inlet volumetric flowrate, Q, as parameters. Two families of curves can be identified in this figure. One provides head-flow relationships for several speeds and the other refers to isoefficiency curves.

  11. The method of the gas-dynamic centrifugal compressor stage characteristics recalculation for variable rotor rotational speeds and the rotation angle of inlet guide vanes blades if the kinematic and dynamic similitude conditions are not met

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanyashov, A. D.; Karabanova, V. V.

    2017-08-01

    A mathematical description of the method for obtaining gas-dynamic characteristics of a centrifugal compressor stage is proposed, taking into account the control action by varying the rotor speed and the angle of rotation of the guide vanes relative to the "basic" characteristic, if the kinematic and dynamic similitude conditions are not met. The formulas of the correction terms for the non-dimensional coefficients of specific work, consumption and efficiency are obtained. A comparative analysis of the calculated gas-dynamic characteristics of a high-pressure centrifugal stage with experimental data is performed.

  12. NASA low-speed centrifugal compressor for fundamental research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, J. R.; Adam, P. W.; Buggele, A. E.

    1983-01-01

    A new centrifugal compressor facility being built by the NASA Lewis Research Center is described; its purpose is to obtain 'benchmark' experimental data for internal flow code verification and modeling. The facility will be heavily instrumented with standard pressure and temperature probes and have provisions for flow visualization and laser Doppler velocimetry. The facility will accommodate rotational speeds to 2400 rpm and will be rated at pressures to 1.25 atm. The initial compressor stage for testing is geometrically and dynamically representative of modern high-performance stages with the exception of Mach number levels. Design exit tip speed for the initial stage is 500 ft/sec with a pressure ratio of 1.17. The rotor exit backsweep is 55 deg from radial. The facility is expected to be operational in the first half of 1985.

  13. NASA Low-Speed Centrifugal Compressor for Fundamental Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, J. R.; Adam, P. W.; Buggele, A. E.

    1983-01-01

    A centrifugal compressor facility being built by the NASA Lewis Research Center is described; its purpose is to obtain benchmark experimental data for internal flow code verification and modeling. The facility will be heavily instrumented with standard pressure and temperature probes and have provisions for flow visualization and laser Doppler velocimetry. The facility will accommodate rotational speeds to 2400 rpm and will be rated at pressures to 1.25 atm. The initial compressor stage for testing is geometrically and dynamically representative of modern high-performance stages with the exception of Mach number levels. Design exit tip speed for the initial stage is 500 ft/sec with a pressure ratio of 1.17. The rotor exit backsweep is 55 deg from radial.

  14. Rotating stall simulation for axial and centrifugal compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halawa, Taher; Gadala, Mohamed S.

    2017-05-01

    This study presents a numerical simulation of the rotating stall phenomenon in axial and centrifugal compressors with detailed descriptions of stall precursors and its development with time. Results showed that the vaneless region of the centrifugal compressor is the most critical location affected by stall. It was found that the tip leakage flow and the back flow impingement are the main cause of the stall development at the impeller exit area for centrifugal compressors. The results of the axial compressor simulations indicated that the early separated flow combined with the tip leakage flow can block the impeller passages during stall.

  15. Coordinates for a High Performance 4:1 Pressure Ratio Centrifugal Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKain, Ted F.; Holbrook, Greg J.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this program was to define the aerodynamic design and manufacturing coordinates for an advanced 4:1 pressure ratio, single stage centrifugal compressor at a 10 lbm/sec flow size. The approach taken was to perform an exact scale of an existing DDA compressor originally designed at a flow size of 3.655 lbm/sec.

  16. A network application for modeling a centrifugal compressor performance map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforov, A.; Popova, D.; Soldatova, K.

    2017-08-01

    The approximation of aerodynamic performance of a centrifugal compressor stage and vaneless diffuser by neural networks is presented. Advantages, difficulties and specific features of the method are described. An example of a neural network and its structure is shown. The performances in terms of efficiency, pressure ratio and work coefficient of 39 model stages within the range of flow coefficient from 0.01 to 0.08 were modeled with mean squared error 1.5 %. In addition, the loss and friction coefficients of vaneless diffusers of relative widths 0.014-0.10 are modeled with mean squared error 2.45 %.

  17. Effect of high negative incidence on the performance of a centrifugal compressor stage with conventional vaned diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaatinen, Ahti; Grönman, Aki; Turunen-Saaresti, Teemu; Backman, Jari

    2011-06-01

    Three vaned diffusers, designed to have high negative incidence (-8°) at the design operating point, are studied experimentally. The overall performance (efficiency and pressure ratio) are measured at three rotational speeds, and flow angles before and after the diffuser are measured at the design rotational speed and with three mass flow rates. The results are compared to corresponding results of the original vaneless diffuser design. Attention is paid to the performance at lower mass flows than the design mass flow. The results show that it is possible to improve the performance at mass flows lower than the design mass flow with a vaned diffuser designed with high negative incidence. However, with the vaned diffusers, the compressor still stalls at higher mass flow rates than with the vaneless one. The flow angle distributions after the diffuser are more uniform with the vaned diffusers.

  18. High Technology Centrifugal Compressor for Commercial Air Conditioning Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ruckes, John

    2006-04-15

    R&D Dynamics, Bloomfield, CT in partnership with the State of Connecticut has been developing a high technology, oil-free, energy-efficient centrifugal compressor called CENVA for commercial air conditioning systems under a program funded by the US Department of Energy. The CENVA compressor applies the foil bearing technology used in all modern aircraft, civil and military, air conditioning systems. The CENVA compressor will enhance the efficiency of water and air cooled chillers, packaged roof top units, and other air conditioning systems by providing an 18% reduction in energy consumption in the unit capacity range of 25 to 350 tons of refrigeration Themore » technical approach for CENVA involved the design and development of a high-speed, oil-free foil gas bearing-supported two-stage centrifugal compressor, CENVA encompassed the following high technologies, which are not currently utilized in commercial air conditioning systems: Foil gas bearings operating in HFC-134a; Efficient centrifugal impellers and diffusers; High speed motors and drives; and System integration of above technologies. Extensive design, development and testing efforts were carried out. Significant accomplishments achieved under this program are: (1) A total of 26 builds and over 200 tests were successfully completed with successively improved designs; (2) Use of foil gas bearings in refrigerant R134a was successfully proven; (3) A high speed, high power permanent magnet motor was developed; (4) An encoder was used for signal feedback between motor and controller. Due to temperature limitations of the encoder, the compressor could not operate at higher speed and in turn at higher pressure. In order to alleviate this problem a unique sensorless controller was developed; (5) This controller has successfully been tested as stand alone; however, it has not yet been integrated and tested as a system; (6) The compressor successfully operated at water cooled condensing temperatures Due to

  19. Wave Augmented Diffusers for Centrifugal Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Skoch, Gary J.

    1998-01-01

    A conceptual device is introduced which would utilize unsteady wave motion to slow and turn flows in the diffuser section of a centrifugal compressor. The envisioned device would substantially reduce the size of conventional centrifugal diffusers by eliminating the relatively large ninety degree bend needed to turn the flow from the radial/tangential to the axial direction. The bend would be replaced by a wall and the flow would instead exit through a series of rotating ports located on a disk, adjacent to the diffuser hub, and fixed to the impeller shaft. The ports would generate both expansion and compression waves which would rapidly transition from the hub/shroud (axial) direction to the radial/tangential direction. The waves would in turn induce radial/tangential and axial flow. This paper presents a detailed description of the device. Simplified cycle analysis and performance results are presented which were obtained using a time accurate, quasi-one-dimensional CFD code with models for turning, port flow conditions, and losses due to wall shear stress. The results indicate that a periodic wave system can be established which yields diffuser performance comparable to a conventional diffuser. Discussion concerning feasibility, accuracy, and integration follow.

  20. Boundary layers in centrifugal compressors. [application of boundary layer theory to compressor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, R. C., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The utility of boundary-layer theory in the design of centrifugal compressors is demonstrated. Boundary-layer development in the diffuser entry region is shown to be important to stage efficiency. The result of an earnest attempt to analyze this boundary layer with the best tools available is displayed. Acceptable prediction accuracy was not achieved. The inaccuracy of boundary-layer analysis in this case would result in stage efficiency prediction as much as four points low. Fluid dynamic reasons for analysis failure are discussed with support from flow data. Empirical correlations used today to circumnavigate the weakness of the theory are illustrated.

  1. 16. View northwest of Arctic Chamber Worthington centrifugal compressor and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. View northwest of Arctic Chamber Worthington centrifugal compressor and control panel, in machine area. - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  2. 18. View north of Tropic Chamber Worthington centrifugal compressor and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. View north of Tropic Chamber Worthington centrifugal compressor and control panel, in machine area. - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  3. Experimental on-stream elimination of resonant whirl in a large centrifugal compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, G. I.; Eierman, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    Resonant whirl condition during operation of a multi-stage centrifugal compressor at higher than anticipated speeds and loads was reported. The condition was diagnosed by a large scale computerized Machinery Condition Monitoring System (MACMOS). This computerized system verified that the predominant subsynchronous whirl frequency locked in on the first resonant frequency of the compressor rotor and did not vary with compressor speed. Compressor stability calculations showed the rotor system had excessive hearing stiffness and inadequate effective damping. An optimum bearing design which was developed to minimize the unbalance response and to maximize the stability threshold is presented.

  4. Wave Augmented Diffuser for Centrifugal Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoch, Gary J. (Inventor); Paxson, Daniel E. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A wave augmented diffuser for a centrifugal compressor surrounds the outlet of an impeller that rotates on a drive shaft having an axis of rotation. The impeller brings flow in in an axial direction and imparts kinetic energy to the flow discharging it in radial and tangential directions. The flow is discharged into a plurality of circumferentially disposed wave chambers. The wave chambers are periodically opened and closed by a rotary valve such that the flow through the diffuser is unsteady. The valve includes a plurality of valve openings that are periodically brought into and out of fluid communication with the wave chambers. When the wave chambers are closed, a reflected compression wave moves upstream towards the diffuser bringing the flow into the wave chamber to rest. This action recovers the kinetic energy from the flow and limits any boundary layer growth. The flow is then discharged in an axial direction through an opening in the valve plate when the valve plate is rotated to an open position. The diffuser thus efficiently raises the static pressure of the fluid and discharges an axially directed flow at a radius that is predominantly below the maximum radius of the diffuser.

  5. An Investigation of Backflow Phenomenon in Centrifugal Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benser, William A; Moses, Jason J

    1945-01-01

    Report presents the results of an investigation conducted to determine the nature and the extent of the reversal of flow, which occurs at the inlet of centrifugal compressors over a considerable portion of the operating range. Qualitative studies of this flow reversal were made by lampblack patterns taken on a mixed-flow-type impeller and by tuft studies made on a conventional centrifugal compressor. Quantitative studies were made on a compressor specially designed to enable survey of angularity of flow, static and total pressures, and temperatures to be taken very close to the impeller front housing.

  6. Numerical Investigations of Slip Phenomena in Centrifugal Compressor Impellers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jeng-Min; Luo, Kai-Wei; Chen, Ching-Fu; Chiang, Chung-Ping; Wu, Teng-Yuan; Chen, Chun-Han

    2013-03-01

    This study systematically investigates the slip phenomena in the centrifugal air compressor impellers by CFD. Eight impeller blades for different specific speeds, wrap angles and exit blade angles are designed by compressor design software to analyze their flow fields. Except for the above three variables, flow rate and number of blades are the other two. Results show that the deviation angle decreases as the flow rate increases. The specific speed is not an important parameter regarding deviation angle or slip factor for general centrifugal compressor impellers. The slip onset position is closely related to the position of the peak value in the blade loading factor distribution. When no recirculation flow is present at the shroud, the variations of slip factor under various flow rates are mainly determined by difference between maximum blade angle and exit blade angle, Δβmax-2. The solidity should be of little importance to slip factor correlations in centrifugal compressor impellers.

  7. Effects of Impeller-Diffuser Interaction on Centrifugal Compressor Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Choon S.

    2003-01-01

    This research program focuses on characterizing the effect of impeller-diffuser interactions in a centrifugal compressor stage on its performance using unsteady threedimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulations. The computed results show that the interaction between the downstream diffuser pressure field and the impeller tip clearance flow can account for performance changes in the impeller. The magnitude of performance change due to this interaction was examined for an impeller with varying tip clearance followed by a vaned or vaneless diffuser. The impact of unsteady impeller-diffuser interaction, primarily through the impeller tip clearance flow, is reflected through a time-averaged change in impeller loss, blockage and slip. The results show that there exists a tip clearance where the beneficial effect of the impeller-diffuser interaction on the impeller performance is at a maximum. A flow feature that consists of tip flow back leakage was shown to occur at design speed for the centrifugal compressor stage. This flow phenomenon is described as tip flow that originates in one passage, flows downstream of the impeller trailing edge and then returns to upstream of the impeller trailing edge of a neighboring passage. Such a flow feature is a source of loss in the impeller. A hypothesis is put forth to show that changing the diffuser vane count and changing impeller-diffuser gap has an analogous effect on the impeller performance. The centrifugal compressor stage was analyzed using diffusers of different vane counts, producing an impeller performance trend similar to that when the impeller-diffuser gap was varied, thus supporting the hypothesis made. This has the implication that the effect impeller performance associated with changing the impeller-diffuser gap and changing diffuser vane count can be described by the non-dimensional ratio of impeller-diffuser gap to diffuser vane pitch. A procedure is proposed and developed for isolating impeller passage

  8. Performance characteristics of the Cooper PC-9 centrifugal compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, R.E.; Neely, R.F.

    1988-06-30

    Mathematical performance modeling of the PC-9 centrifugal compressor has been completed. Performance characteristics curves have never been obtained for them in test loops with the same degree of accuracy as for the uprated axial compressors and, consequently, computer modeling of the top cascade and purge cascades has been very difficult and of limited value. This compressor modeling work has been carried out in an attempt to generate data which would more accurately define the compressor's performance and would permit more accurate cascade modeling. A computer code, COMPAL, was used to mathematically model the PC-9 performance with variations in gas composition,more » flow ratios, pressure ratios, speed and temperature. The results of this effort, in the form of graphs, with information about the compressor and the code, are the subject of this report. Compressor characteristic curves are featured. 13 figs.« less

  9. Investigation on centrifugal impeller in an axial-radial combined compressor with inlet distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Du; Yang, Ce; Zhao, Ben; Zhou, Mi; Qi, Mingxu; Zhang, Jizhong

    2011-12-01

    Assembling an axial rotor and a stator at centrifugal compressor upstream to build an axial-radial combined compressor could achieve high pressure ratio and efficiency by appropriate size augment. Then upstream potential flow and wake effect appear at centrifugal impeller inlet. In this paper, the axial-radial compressor is unsteadily simulated by three-dimensional Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations with uniform and circumferential distorted total pressure inlet condition to investigate upstream effect on radial rotor. The results show that span-wise nonuniform total pressure distribution is generated and radial and circumferential combined distortion is formed at centrifugal rotor inlet. The upstream stator wake deflects to rotor rotation direction and decreases with blade span increases. Circumferential distortion causes different separated flow formations at different pitch positions. The tip leakage vortex is suppressed in centrifugal blade passages. Under distorted inlet condition, flow direction of centrifugal impeller leading edge upstream varies evidently near hub and shroud but varies slightly at mid-span. In addition, compressor stage inlet distortion produces remarkable effect on blade loading of centrifugal blade both along chordwise and pitchwise.

  10. Numerical Investigation of Flow in a Centrifugal Compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishin, Yu. A.; Bakulin, V. N.

    2015-09-01

    With the use of the domestic software suite of computational hydrodynamics Flow Vision based on application of the method of control volumes, numerical simulation of air composition and delivery by a centrifugal compressor employed for supercharging a piston engine has been carried out. The head-flow characteristics of the compressor, as well as the 3D fields of flow velocity and pressure distributions in the elements of the compressor flow passage, including the interblade channels of the impeller, have been obtained for various regimes. In the regimes of diminished air flow rate, surging phenomena are identified, characterized by a return flow. The application of the technique of numerical experiment will make it possible from here on to carry out design optimization of the compressor flow passage profile and thus to improve its basic characteristics — the degree of pressure increase, compressed air flow rate, and the efficiency — as well as to reduce the costs of the development and production of compressors.

  11. The experimental study of matching between centrifugal compressor impeller and diffuser

    SciTech Connect

    Tamaki, H.; Nakao, H.; Saito, M.

    1999-01-01

    the centrifugal compressor for a marine use turbocharger with its design pressure ratio of 3.2 was tested with a vaneless diffuser and various vaned diffusers. Vaned diffusers were chosen to cover impeller operating range as broad as possible. The analysis of the static pressure ratio in the impeller and the diffusing system, consisting of the diffuser and scroll, showed that there were four possible combinations of characteristics of impeller pressure ratio and diffusing system pressure ratio. The flow rate, Q{sub P}, where the impeller achieved maximum static pressure ratio, was surge flow rate of the centrifugal compressor determined by themore » critical flow rate. In order to operate the compressor at a rate lower than Q{sub P}, the diffusing system, whose pressure recovery factor was steep negative slope near Q{sub P}, was needed. When the diffuser throat area was less than a certain value, the compressor efficiency deteriorated; however, the compressor stage pressure ratio was almost constant. In this study, by reducing the diffuser throat area, the compressor could be operated at a flow rate less than 40% of its design flow rate. Analysis of the pressure ratio in the impeller and diffusing systems at design and off-design speeds showed that the irregularities in surge line occurred when the component that controlled the negative slope on the compressor stage pressure ratio changed.« less

  12. Numerical and experimental modelling of the radial compressor stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syka, Tomáš; Matas, Richard; LuÅáček, Ondřej

    2016-06-01

    This article deals with the description of the numerical and experimental model of the new compressor stage designed for process centrifugal compressors. It's the first member of the new stages family developed to achieve the state of the art thermodynamic parameters. This stage (named RTK01) is designed for high flow coefficient with 3D shaped impeller blades. Some interesting findings were gained during its development. The article is focused mainly on some interesting aspects of the development methodology and numerical simulations improvement, not on the specific stage properties. Conditions and experimental equipment, measured results and their comparison with ANSYS CFX and NUMECA FINE/Turbo CFD simulations are described.

  13. Numerical analysis on centrifugal compressor with membrane type dryer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razali, M. A.; Zulkafli, M. F.; Mat Isa, N.; Subari, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Moisture content is a common phenomenon in industrial processes especially in oil and gas industries. This contaminant has a lot of disadvantages which can lead to mechanical failure DEC (Deposition, Erosion & Corrosion) problems. To overcome DEC problem, this study proposed to design a centrifugal compressor with a membrane type dryer to reduce moisture content of a gas. The effectiveness of such design has been analyzed in this study using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approach. Numerical scheme based on multiphase flow technique is used in ANSYS Fluent software to evaluate the moisture content of the gas. Through this technique, two kind of centrifugal compressor, with and without membrane type dryer has been tested. The results show that the effects of pressure on dew point temperature of the gas change the composition of its moisture content, where high value lead more condensation to occur. However, with the injection of cool dry gas through membrane type dryer in the centrifugal compressor, the pressure and temperature of moisture content as well as mass fraction of H2O in centrifugal compressor show significant reduction.

  14. The influence of wedge diffuser blade number and divergence angle on the performance of a high pressure ratio centrifugal compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Han, Ge; Lu, Xingen; Zhu, Junqiang

    2018-02-01

    Wedge diffuser is widely used in centrifugal compressors due to its high performance and compact size. This paper is aimed to research the influence of wedge diffuser blade number and divergence angle on centrifugal compressor performance. The impact of wedge diffuser blade number on compressor stage performance is investigated, and then the wedge diffusers with different divergence angle are studied by varying diffuser wedge angle and blade number simultaneously. It is found that wedge diffuser with 27 blades could have about 0.8% higher adiabatic efficiency and 0.14 higher total pressure ratio than the wedge diffuser with 19 blades and the best compressor performance is achieved when diffuser divergence angle is 8.3°.These results could give some advices on centrifugal compressor design.

  15. Active control of surge in centrifugal compressors using magnetic thrust bearing actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanadgol, Dorsa

    This research presents a new method for active surge control in centrifugal compressors with unshrouded impellers using a magnetic thrust bearing to modulate the impeller tip clearance. Magnetic bearings offer the potential for active control of flow instabilities. This capability is highly dependent on the sensitivity of the compressor characteristics to blade tip clearance. If the position of the shaft can be actuated with sufficient authority and speed, the induced pressure modulation makes control of surge promising. The active nature of the magnetic bearing system makes the real-time static and dynamic positioning of the rotor and therefore modulation of the impeller tip clearance possible. A theoretical model is first established that describes the sensitivity of the centrifugal compressor characteristic curve to tip clearance variations induced by axial motion of the rotor. Results from simulation of the nonlinear model for a single stage high-speed centrifugal compressor show that using the proposed control method, mass flow and pressure oscillations associated with compressor surge are quickly suppressed with acceptable tip clearance excursions, typically less than 20% of the available clearance. It is shown that it is possible to produce adequate axial excursions in the clearance between the impeller blades and the adjacent stationary shroud using a magnetic thrust bearing with practical levels of drive voltage. This surge control method would allow centrifugal compressors to reliably and safely operate with a wider range than is currently done in the field. The principal advantage of the proposed approach over conventional surge control methods lies in that, in machines already equipped with magnetic bearing, the method can potentially be implemented by simply modifying controller software. This dispenses with the need to introduce additional hardware, permitting adaptation of existing machinery at virtually no cost. In addition, since the controller is

  16. Progress of High Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor Simulations Using TURBO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Sameer; Beach, Timothy A.

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional, time-accurate, and phase-lagged computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of the High Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor (HECC) stage were generated using the TURBO solver. Changes to the TURBO Parallel Version 4 source code were made in order to properly model the no-slip boundary condition along the spinning hub region for centrifugal impellers. A startup procedure was developed to generate a converged flow field in TURBO. This procedure initialized computations on a coarsened mesh generated by the Turbomachinery Gridding System (TGS) and relied on a method of systematically increasing wheel speed and backpressure. Baseline design-speed TURBO results generally overpredicted total pressure ratio, adiabatic efficiency, and the choking flow rate of the HECC stage as compared with the design-intent CFD results of Code Leo. Including diffuser fillet geometry in the TURBO computation resulted in a 0.6 percent reduction in the choking flow rate and led to a better match with design-intent CFD. Diffuser fillets reduced annulus cross-sectional area but also reduced corner separation, and thus blockage, in the diffuser passage. It was found that the TURBO computations are somewhat insensitive to inlet total pressure changing from the TURBO default inlet pressure of 14.7 pounds per square inch (101.35 kilopascals) down to 11.0 pounds per square inch (75.83 kilopascals), the inlet pressure of the component test. Off-design tip clearance was modeled in TURBO in two computations: one in which the blade tip geometry was trimmed by 12 mils (0.3048 millimeters), and another in which the hub flow path was moved to reflect a 12-mil axial shift in the impeller hub, creating a step at the hub. The one-dimensional results of these two computations indicate non-negligible differences between the two modeling approaches.

  17. Axial inlet conversion to a centrifugal compressor with magnetic bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Novecosky, T.

    1994-01-01

    NOVA's Alberta Gas Transmission Division transports natural gas via pipeline throughout the province of Alberta, Canada, exporting it to eastern Canada, US, and British Columbia. There is a continuing effort to operate the facilities and pipeline at the highest possible efficiency. One area being addressed to improve efficiency is compression of the gas. By improving compressor efficiency, fuel consumption and hence operating costs can be reduced. One method of improving compressor efficiency is by converting the compressor to an axial inlet configuration, a conversion that has been carried out more frequently in the past years. Concurrently, conventional hydrodynamic bearings havemore » been replaced with magnetic bearings on many centrifugal compressors. This paper discusses the design and installation for converting a radial overhung unit to an axial inlet configuration, having both magnetic bearings and a thrust reducer. The thrust reducer is required to reduce axial compressor shaft loads, to a level that allows the practical installation of magnetic bearings within the space limitations of the compressor (Bear and Gibson, 1992).« less

  18. Reverse-Tangent Injection in a Centrifugal Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoch, Gary J.

    2007-01-01

    Injection of working fluid into a centrifugal compressor in the reverse tangent direction has been invented as a way of preventing flow instabilities (stall and surge) or restoring stability when stall or surge has already commenced. The invention applies, in particular, to a centrifugal compressor, the diffuser of which contains vanes that divide the flow into channels oriented partly radially and partly tangentially. In reverse-tangent injection, a stream or jet of the working fluid (the fluid that is compressed) is injected into the vaneless annular region between the blades of the impeller and the vanes of the diffuser. As used here, "reverse" signifies that the injected flow opposes (and thereby reduces) the tangential component of the velocity of the impeller discharge. At the same time, the injected jet acts to increase the radial component of the velocity of the impeller discharge.

  19. Aerodynamic and mechanical design of an 8:1 pressure ratio centrifugal compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, C.; Runstadler, P. W., Jr.; Stacy, W. D.

    1974-01-01

    A high-pressure-ratio, low-mass-flow centrifugal compressor stage was designed, fabricated, and tested. The design followed specifications that the stage be representative of state-of-the-art performance and that the stage is to be used as a workhorse compressor for planned experiments using laser Doppler velocimeter equipment. The final design is a 75,000-RPM, 19-blade impeller with an axial inducer and 30 degrees of backward leaning at the impeller tip. The compressor design was tested for two- and/or quasi-three-dimensional aerodynamic and stress characteristics. Critical speed analyses were performed for the high speed rotating impeller assembly. An optimally matched, 17-channel vane island diffuser was also designed and built.

  20. Study on rotational frequency noise in a centrifugal compressor for automobile turbochargers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakaki, Daichi; Sakuka, Yuta; Yamasaki, Nobuhiko; Yamagata, Akihiro

    2014-02-01

    The rotational frequency noise (also known as the pulsation noise) due to the mistuning of impeller blade rows introduced at the manufacturing stage of the impellers is observed in the small-sized centrifugal compressor for automobile turbochargers. The present paper addresses the elucidation of the generating mechanism and parameter dependency such as the kind and degree of mistuning. In order to analyze numerically the rotational frequency noise due to mistuning, the unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) of the whole compressor including volute is executed, and the resultant time history of the pressure is fed into the spectral analysis.

  1. Numerical Study of Unsteady Flow in Centrifugal Cold Compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Peng; Wu, Jihao; Li, Qing

    In helium refrigeration system, high-speed centrifugal cold compressor is utilized to pumped gaseous helium from saturated liquid helium tank at low temperature and low pressure for producing superfluid helium or sub-cooled helium. Stall and surge are common unsteady flow phenomena in centrifugal cold compressors which severely limit operation range and impact efficiency reliability. In order to obtain the installed range of cold compressor, unsteady flow in the case of low mass flow or high pressure ratio is investigated by the CFD. From the results of the numerical analysis, it can be deduced that the pressure ratio increases with the decrease in reduced mass flow. With the decrease of the reduced mass flow, backflow and vortex are intensified near the shroud of impeller. The unsteady flow will not only increase the flow loss, but also damage the compressor. It provided a numerical foundation of analyzing the effect of unsteady flow field and reducing the flow loss, and it is helpful for the further study and able to instruct the designing.

  2. Unsteady behavior and control of vortices in centrifugal compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Yutaka; Fujisawa, Nobumichi

    2014-10-01

    Two examples of the use of vortex control to reduce noise and enhance the stable operating range of a centrifugal compressor are presented in this paper. In the case of high-flow operation of a centrifugal compressor with a vaned diffuser, a discrete frequency noise induced by interaction between the impeller-discharge flow and the diffuser vane, which appears most notably in the power spectra of the radiated noise, can be reduced using a tapered diffuser vane (TDV) without affecting the performance of the compressor. Twin longitudinal vortices produced by leakage flow passing through the tapered portion of the diffuser vane induce secondary flow in the direction of the blade surface and prevent flow separation from the leading edge of the diffuser. The use of a TDV can effectively reduce both the discrete frequency noise generated by the interaction between the impeller-discharge flow and the diffuser surface and the broadband turbulent noise component. In the case of low-flow operation, a leading-edge vortex (LEV) that forms on the shroud side of the suction surface near the leading edge of the diffuser increases significantly in size and blocks flow in the diffuser passage. The formation of an LEV may adversely affect the performance of the compressor and may cause the diffuser to stall. Using a one-side tapered diffuser vane to suppress the evolution of an LEV, the stable operating range of the compressor can be increased by more than 12 percent, and the pressure-rise characteristics of the compressor can be improved. The results of a supplementary examination of the structure and unsteady behavior of LEVs, conducted by means of detailed numerical simulations, are also presented.

  3. Centrifugal compressor controller for minimizing power consumption while avoiding surge

    SciTech Connect

    Haley, P.F.; Junk, B.S.; Renaud, M.A.

    1987-08-18

    For use with a variable capacity centrifugal compressor driven by an electric motor, a controller is described for adjusting the capacity of the compressor to satisfy a demand, minimize electric power consumption and avoid a surge condition. The controller consists of: a. means for sensing an operating parameter that is indicative of the capacity of the compressor; b. means for setting a selected setpoint that represents a desired value of the operating parameter; c. surge sensing means for detecting an impending surge by sensing fluctuation in the electric current supplied to the compressor motor, wherein an impending surge is detectedmore » whenever fluctuations in excess of a predetermined amplitude occur in excess of a predetermined frequency; and d. control means, responsive to the operating parameter sensing means, the setpoint setting means, and the surge sensing means, for controlling the compressor, such that its capacity is minimally above a level that would cause a surge condition yet is sufficient to maintain the operating parameter at the setpoint.« less

  4. Computational analysis of stall and separation control in centrifugal compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Alexander

    2000-10-01

    A numerical technique for simulating unsteady viscous fluid flow in turbomachinery components has been developed. In this technique, the three-dimensional form of the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations is solved in a time-accurate manner. The flow solver is used to study fluid dynamic phenomena that lead to instabilities in centrifugal compressors. The results indicate that large flow incidence angles, at reduced flow rates, can cause boundary layer separation near the blade leading edge. This mechanism is identified as the primary factor in the stall inception process. High-pressure jets upstream of the compressor face are studied as a means of controlling compressor instabilities. Steady jets are found to alter the leading edge flow pattern and effectively suppress compressor instabilities. Yawed jets are more effective than parallel jets and an optimum yaw angle exists for each compression system. Numerical simulations utilizing pulsed jets have also been done. Pulsed jets are found to yield additional performance enhancements and lead to a reduction in external air requirements for operating the jets. Jets pulsed at higher frequencies perform better than low-frequency jets. These findings suggest that air injection is a viable means of alleviating compressor instabilities and could impact gas turbine technology. Results concerning the optimization of practical air injection systems and implications for future research are discussed. The flow solver developed in this work, along with the postprocessing tools developed to interpret the results, provide a rational framework for analyzing and controlling current and next generation compression systems.

  5. Radiated BPF sound measurement of centrifugal compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohuchida, S.; Tanaka, K.

    2013-12-01

    A technique to measure radiated BPF sound from an automotive turbocharger compressor impeller is proposed in this paper. Where there are high-level background noises in the measurement environment, it is difficult to discriminate the target component from the background. Since the effort of measuring BPF sound was taken in a room with such condition in this study, no discrete BPF peak was initially found on the sound spectrum. Taking its directionality into consideration, a microphone covered with a parabolic cone was selected and using this technique, the discrete peak of BPF was clearly observed. Since the level of measured sound was amplified due to the area-integration effect, correction was needed to obtain the real level. To do so, sound measurements with and without a parabolic cone were conducted for the fixed source and their level differences were used as correction factors. Consideration is given to the sound propagation mechanism utilizing measured BPF as well as the result of a simple model experiment. The present method is generally applicable to sound measurements conducted with a high level of background noise.

  6. Review on stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue failure of centrifugal compressor impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiao; Chen, Songying; Qu, Yanpeng; Li, Jianfeng

    2015-03-01

    Corrosion failure, especially stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue, is the main cause of centrifugal compressor impeller failure. And it is concealed and destructive. This paper summarizes the main theories of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue and its latest developments, and it also points out that existing stress corrosion cracking theories can be reduced to the anodic dissolution (AD), the hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC), and the combined AD and HIC mechanisms. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of corrosion fatigue in the crack propagation stage are similar to stress corrosion cracking. The effects of stress ratio, loading frequency, and corrosive medium on the corrosion fatigue crack propagation rate are analyzed and summarized. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in corrosive environments, which contain sulfide, chlorides, and carbonate, are analyzed. The working environments of the centrifugal compressor impeller show the behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in different corrosive environments. The current research methods for centrifugal compressor impeller corrosion failure are analyzed. Physical analysis, numerical simulation, and the fluid-structure interaction method play an increasingly important role in the research on impeller deformation and stress distribution caused by the joint action of aerodynamic load and centrifugal load.

  7. Numerical study of a high-speed miniature centrifugal compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoyi

    A miniature centrifugal compressor is a key component of reverse Brayton cycle cryogenic cooling system. The system is commonly used to generate a low cryogenic temperature environment for electronics to increase their efficiency, or generate, store and transport cryogenic liquids, such as liquid hydrogen and oxygen, where space limit is also an issue. Because of space limitation, the compressor is composed of a radial IGV, a radial impeller and an axial-direction diffuser (which reduces the radial size because of smaller diameter). As a result of reduction in size, rotating speed of the impeller is as high as 313,000 rpm, and Helium is used as the working fluid, in order to obtain the required static pressure ratio/rise. Two main characteristics of the compressor---miniature and high-speed, make it distinct from conventional compressors. Higher compressor efficiency is required to obtain a higher COP (coefficient of performance) system. Even though miniature centrifugal compressors start to draw researchers' attention in recent years, understanding of the performance and loss mechanism is still lacking. Since current experimental techniques are not advanced enough to capture details of flow at miniature scale, numerical methods dominate miniature turbomachinery study. This work numerically studied a high speed miniature centrifugal compressor with commercial CFD code. The overall performance of the compressor was predicted with consideration of interaction between blade rows by using sliding mesh model. The law of similarity of turbomachinery was validated for small scale machines. It was found that the specific ratio effect needs to be considered when similarity law is applied. But Reynolds number effect can be neglected. The loss mechanism of each component was analyzed. Loss due to turning bend was significant in each component. Tip leakage loss of small scale turbomachines has more impact on the impeller performance than that of large scale ones. Because the

  8. The performance of a centrifugal compressor with high inlet prewhirl

    SciTech Connect

    Whitfield, A.; Abdullah, A.H.

    1998-07-01

    The performance requirements of centrifugal compressors usually include a broad operating range between surge and choke. This becomes increasingly difficult to achieve as increased pressure ratio is demanded. In order to suppress the tendency to surge and extend the operating range at low flow rates, inlet swirl is often considered through the application of inlet guide vanes. To generate high inlet swirl angles efficiently, an inlet volute has been applied as the swirl generator, and a variable geometry design developed in order to provide zero swirl. The variable geometry approach can be applied to increase the swirl progressively or tomore » switch rapidly from zero swirl to maximum swirl. The variable geometry volute and the swirl conditions generated are described. The performance of a small centrifugal compressor is presented for a wide range of inlet swirl angles. In addition to the basic performance characteristics of the compressor, the onsets of flow reversals at impeller inlet are presented, together with the development of pressure pulsations, in the inlet and discharge ducts, through to full surge. The flow rate at which surge occurred was shown, by the shift of the peak pressure condition and by the measurement of the pressure pulsations, to be reduced by over 40%.« less

  9. Calculating High Speed Centrifugal Compressor Performance from Averaged Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Fangyuan; Fleming, Ryan; Key, Nicole L.

    2012-12-01

    To improve the understanding of high performance centrifugal compressors found in modern aircraft engines, the aerodynamics through these machines must be experimentally studied. To accurately capture the complex flow phenomena through these devices, research facilities that can accurately simulate these flows are necessary. One such facility has been recently developed, and it is used in this paper to explore the effects of averaging total pressure and total temperature measurements to calculate compressor performance. Different averaging techniques (including area averaging, mass averaging, and work averaging) have been applied to the data. Results show that there is a negligible difference in both the calculated total pressure ratio and efficiency for the different techniques employed. However, the uncertainty in the performance parameters calculated with the different averaging techniques is significantly different, with area averaging providing the least uncertainty.

  10. Subsychronous vibration of multistage centrifugal compressors forced by rotating stall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulton, J. W.

    1987-01-01

    A multistage centrifugal compressor, in natural gas re-injection service on an offshore petroleum production platform, experienced subsynchronous vibrations which caused excessive bearing wear. Field performance testing correlated the subsynchronous amplitude with the discharge flow coefficient, demonstrating the excitation to be aerodynamic. Adding two impellers allowed an increase in the diffuser flow angle (with respect to tangential) to meet the diffuser stability criteria based on factory and field tests correlated using the theory of Senoo (for rotating stall in a vaneless diffuser). This modification eliminated all significant subsynchronous vibrations in field service, thus confirming the correctness of the solution. Other possible sources of aerodynamically induced vibrations were considered, but the judgment that those are unlikely has been confirmed by subsequent experience with other similar compressors.

  11. Rotor-to-stator rub vibration in centrifugal compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, J. J.; Qi, Q. M.

    1985-01-01

    One example of excessive vibration encountered during loading of a centrifugal compressor train (H type compressor with HP casing) is discussed. An investigation was made of the effects of the dynamic load on the bearing stiffness and the rotor-bearing system critical speed. The high vibration occurred at a "threshold load," but the machine didn't run smoothly due to rubs even when it had passed through the threshold load. The acquisition and discussion of the data taken in the field as well as a description of the case history which utilizes background information to identify the malfunction conditions is presented. The analysis shows that the failures, including full reverse precession rub and exact one half subharmonic vibration, were caused by the oversize bearings and displacement of the rotor center due to foundation deformation and misalignment between gear shafts, etc. The corrective actions taken to alleviate excessive vibration and the problems which remain to be solved are also presented.

  12. Failure analysis of fractured capscrews in centrifugal coolant compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Witherell, C.E.

    1985-03-25

    This study was made to determine the cause of failure of capscrews that retain a baffle plate in a Freon 11 centrifugal compressor manufactured by the Trane Company. The affected unit is installed in Building 490 at LLNL. The capscrews failed through hydrogen embrittlement. The source for hydrogen appears to have been corrosion. In a dissimilar metal couple of aluminum and uncoated high strength, highly-stressed steel, corrosive environments would generate hydrogen at the the steel side of the couple and embrittle it. There is no evidence that the manufacturer took precautions to prevent such an occurrence.

  13. Non-axisymmetric flow characteristics in centrifugal compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Leilei; Lao, Dazhong; Liu, Yixiong; Yang, Ce

    2015-06-01

    The flow field distribution in centrifugal compressor is significantly affected by the non-axisymmetric geometry structure of the volute. The experimental and numerical simulation methods were adopted in this work to study the compressor flow field distribution with different flow conditions. The results show that the pressure distributionin volute is characterized by the circumferential non-uniform phenomenon and the pressure fluctuation on the high static pressure zone propagates reversely to upstream, which results in the non-axisymmetric flow inside the compressor. The non-uniform level of pressure distribution in large flow condition is higher than that in small flow condition, its effect on the upstream flow field is also stronger. Additionally, the non-uniform circumferential pressure distribution in volute brings the non-axisymmetric flow at impeller outlet. In different flow conditions,the circumferential variation of the absolute flow angle at impeller outlet is also different. Meanwhile, the non-axisymmetric flow characteristics in internal impeller can be also reflected by the distribution of the mass flow. The high static pressure region of the volute corresponds to the decrease of mass flow in upstream blade channel, while the low static pressure zone of the volute corresponds to the increase of the mass flow. In small flow condition, the mass flow difference in the blade channel is bigger than that in the large flow condition.

  14. Scaled centrifugal compressor, collector and running gear program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenehan, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    The Scaled Centrifugal Compressor, Collector and Running gear Program was conducted in support of an overall NASA strategy to improve small-compressor performance, durability, and reliability while reducing initial and life-cycle costs. Accordingly, Garrett designed and provided a test rig, gearbox coupling, and facility collector for a new NASA facility, and provided a scaled model of an existing, high-performance impeller for evaluation scaling effects on aerodynamic performance and for obtaining other performance data. Test-rig shafting was designed to operate smoothly throughout a speed range up to 60,000 rpm. Pressurized components were designed to operate at pressures up to 300 psia and at temperatures to 1000 F. Nonrotating components were designed to provide a margin-of-safety of 0.05 or greater; rotating components, for a margin-of-safety based on allowable yield and ultimate strengths. Design activities were supported by complete design analysis, and the finished hardware was subjected to check-runs to confirm proper operation. The test rig will support a wide range of compressor tests and evaluations.

  15. Internally-cooled centrifugal compressor with cooling jacket formed in the diaphragm

    DOEpatents

    Moore, James J.; Lerche, Andrew H.; Moreland, Brian S.

    2014-08-26

    An internally-cooled centrifugal compressor having a shaped casing and a diaphragm disposed within the shaped casing having a gas side and a coolant side so that heat from a gas flowing though the gas side is extracted via the coolant side. An impeller disposed within the diaphragm has a stage inlet on one side and a stage outlet for delivering a pressurized gas to a downstream connection. The coolant side of the diaphragm includes at least one passageway for directing a coolant in a substantially counter-flow direction from the flow of gas through the gas side.

  16. An experimental description of the flow in a centrifugal compressor from alternate stall to surge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moënne-Loccoz, V.; Trébinjac, I.; Benichou, E.; Goguey, S.; Paoletti, B.; Laucher, P.

    2017-08-01

    The present paper gives the experimental results obtained in a centrifugal compressor stage designed and built by SAFRAN Helicopter Engines. The compressor is composed of inlet guide vanes, a backswept splittered unshrouded impeller, a splittered vaned radial diffuser and axial outlet guide vanes. Previous numerical simulations revealed a particular S-shape pressure rise characteristic at partial rotation speed and predicted an alternate flow pattern in the vaned radial diffuser at low mass flow rate. This alternate flow pattern involves two adjacent vane passages. One passage exhibits very low momentum and a low pressure recovery, whereas the adjacent passage has very high momentum in the passage inlet and diffuses efficiently. Experimental measurements confirm the S-shape of the pressure rise characteristic even if the stability limit experimentally occurs at higher mass flow than numerically predicted. At low mass flow the alternate stall pattern is confirmed thanks to the data obtained by high-frequency pressure sensors. As the compressor is throttled the path to instability has been registered and a first scenario of the surge inception is given. The compressor first experiences a steady alternate stall in the diffuser. As the mass flow decreases, the alternate stall amplifies and triggers the mild surge in the vaned diffuser. An unsteady behavior results from the interaction of the alternate stall and the mild surge. Finally, when the pressure gradient becomes too strong, the alternate stall blows away and the compressor enters into deep surge.

  17. Establishing repeatable operation of a centrifugal compressor research facility for aerodynamic investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, Matthew Philip

    The objective of this research has been to analyze the steady state performance of a new centrifugal compressor research facility. The CSTAR (Centrifugal STage for Aerodynamic Research) compressor has been designed to be placed as the last stage in an axial compressor and its performance in this flow regime was measured. Because the compressor was designed as a research vehicle, unique instrumentation throughout the flow path provides a detailed look at its steady state performance. Rakes at the inlet and deswirl section quantify the overall performance but other instrumentation is used to understand the component performance. Static pressure taps along the shroud, within the diffuser, and through the turn-to-axial show the static pressure rise. Additionally, rakes at the inlet and exit of diffuser also characterize the performance of the wedge diffuser and the impeller. Additionally, capacitance probes located at the knee and exducer of the impeller non-intrusively measure the size of the tip clearance during facility operation. An investigation into these measurements resulted in a standard procedure for in-situ calibration and installation to produce repeatable and accurate clearance measurements. Finally, the feasibility of future Laser Doppler Velocimetry measurements acquired through the shroud window was tested and was found to be achievable with the use of beam translators to ensure that measurement volumes are created after beam refraction through the windows. Inlet conditions of the facility have been investigated and fluctuations of the ambient conditions have been mitigated with a large settling chamber to ensure repeatable and stable operation. The current instrumentation was utilized to determine the compressor performance. Measurements of the steady performance parameters along with those of the internal flowfield are documented.

  18. Effect of a curved duct upstream on performance of small centrifugal compressors for automobile turbochargers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Shigeta; Yamasaki, Nobuhiko; Yamagata, Akihiro

    2013-02-01

    Since the automobile turbochargers are installed in an engine compartment with limited space, the ducts upstream of the turbocharger compressor may be curved in a complex manner. In the present paper, the effect of a curved duct upstream on performance of small centrifugal compressors for automobile turbochargers is discussed. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of a turbocharger compressor validated for the compressor model with the straight pipe applied to the compressor with the curved pipe are executed, and the deterioration of the performance for the curved pipe is confirmed. It is also found that the deterioration of compressor performance is caused by the interaction of the secondary flow and the impeller.

  19. New generation of universal modeling for centrifugal compressors calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galerkin, Y.; Drozdov, A.

    2015-08-01

    The Universal Modeling method is in constant use from mid - 1990th. Below is presented the newest 6th version of the Method. The flow path configuration of 3D impellers is presented in details. It is possible to optimize meridian configuration including hub/shroud curvatures, axial length, leading edge position, etc. The new model of vaned diffuser includes flow non-uniformity coefficient based on CFD calculations. The loss model was built from the results of 37 experiments with compressors stages of different flow rates and loading factors. One common set of empirical coefficients in the loss model guarantees the efficiency definition within an accuracy of 0.86% at the design point and 1.22% along the performance curve. The model verification was made. Four multistage compressors performances with vane and vaneless diffusers were calculated. As the model verification was made, four multistage compressors performances with vane and vaneless diffusers were calculated. Two of these compressors have quite unusual flow paths. The modeling results were quite satisfactory in spite of these peculiarities. One sample of the verification calculations is presented in the text. This 6th version of the developed computer program is being already applied successfully in the design practice.

  20. Detailed stress tensor measurements in a centrifugal compressor vaneless diffuser

    SciTech Connect

    Pinarbasi, A.; Johnson, M.W.

    1996-04-01

    Detailed flow measurements have been made in the vaneless diffuser of a large low-speed centrifugal compressor using hot-wire anemometry. The three time mean velocity components and full stress tensor distributions have been determined on eight measurement plans within the diffuser. High levels of Reynolds stress result in the rapid mixing out of the blade wake. Although high levels of turbulent kinetic energy are found in the passage wake, they are not associated with strong Reynolds stresses and hence the passage wake mixes out only slowly. Low-frequency meandering of the wake position is therefore likely to be responsible for the highmore » kinetic energy levels. The anisotropic nature of the turbulence suggests that Reynolds stress turbulence models are required for CFD modeling of diffuser flows.« less

  1. Detailed flow measurements in a centrifugal compressor vaneless diffuser

    SciTech Connect

    Pinarbasi, A.; Johnson, M.W.

    1994-07-01

    Hot-wire anemometer measurements have been made in the vaneless diffuser of a 1-m-dia low-speed backswept centrifugal compressor using a phase lock loop technique. Radial, tangential, and axial velocity measurements have been made on eight measurement planes through the diffuser. The flow field at the diffuser entry clearly shows the impeller jet-wake flow pattern and the blade wakes. The passage wake is located on the shroud side of the diffuser and mixes out slowly as the flow moves through the diffuser. The blade wakes, on the other hand, distort and mix out rapidly in the diffuser. Contours of turbulent kinetic energymore » are also presented on each of the measurement stations, from which the regions of turbulent mixing can be deduced.« less

  2. Core compressor exit stage study, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behlke, R. F.; Burdsall, E. A.; Canal, E., Jr.; Korn, N. D.

    1979-01-01

    A total of two three-stage compressors were designed and tested to determine the effects of aspect ratio on compressor performance. The first compressor was designed with an aspect ratio of 0.81; the other, with an aspect ratio of 1.22. Both compressors had a hub-tip ratio of 0.915, representative of the rear stages of a core compressor, and both were designed to achieve a 15.0% surge margin at design pressure ratios of 1.357 and 1.324, respectively, at a mean wheel speed of 167 m/sec. At design speed the 0.81 aspect ratio compressor achieved a pressure ratio of 1.346 at a corrected flow of 4.28 kg/sec and an adiabatic efficiency of 86.1%. The 1.22 aspect ratio design achieved a pressure ratio of 1.314 at 4.35 kg/sec flow and 87.0% adiabatic efficiency. Surge margin to peak efficiency was 24.0% with the lower aspect ratio blading, compared with 12.4% with the higher aspect ratio blading.

  3. Performance Improvement of a Return Channel in a Multistage Centrifugal Compressor Using Multiobjective Optimization.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Yoshifumi; Kobayashi, Hiromi; Nishida, Hideo; Sugimura, Kazuyuki

    2013-05-01

    The effect of the design parameters of a return channel on the performance of a multistage centrifugal compressor was numerically investigated, and the shape of the return channel was optimized using a multiobjective optimization method based on a genetic algorithm to improve the performance of the centrifugal compressor. The results of sensitivity analysis using Latin hypercube sampling suggested that the inlet-to-outlet area ratio of the return vane affected the total pressure loss in the return channel, and that the inlet-to-outlet radius ratio of the return vane affected the outlet flow angle from the return vane. Moreover, this analysis suggested that the number of return vanes affected both the loss and the flow angle at the outlet. As a result of optimization, the number of return vane was increased from 14 to 22 and the area ratio was decreased from 0.71 to 0.66. The radius ratio was also decreased from 2.1 to 2.0. Performance tests on a centrifugal compressor with two return channels (the original design and optimized design) were carried out using two-stage test apparatus. The measured flow distribution exhibited a swirl flow in the center region and a reversed swirl flow near the hub and shroud sides. The exit flow of the optimized design was more uniform than that of the original design. For the optimized design, the overall two-stage efficiency and pressure coefficient were increased by 0.7% and 1.5%, respectively. Moreover, the second-stage efficiency and pressure coefficient were respectively increased by 1.0% and 3.2%. It is considered that the increase in the second-stage efficiency was caused by the increased uniformity of the flow, and the rise in the pressure coefficient was caused by a decrease in the residual swirl flow. It was thus concluded from the numerical and experimental results that the optimized return channel improved the performance of the multistage centrifugal compressor.

  4. Developments in a centrifugal compressor surge control -- a technology assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Botros, K.K.; Henderson, J.F.

    1994-04-01

    There are a number of surge control schemes in current use for centrifugal compressors employed in natural gas transmission systems. Basically, these schemes consist of a set of detection devices that either anticipate surge or detect it at its inception, and a set of control devices that act to prevent surge from occurring. A patent search was conducted in an attempt to assess the level and direction of technology development over the last 20 years and to define the focus for future R D activities. In addition, the paper presents the current state of technology in three areas: surge control,more » surge detection, and surge suppression. Patent data obtained from on-line databases showed that most of the emphasis has been on surge control rather than on detection and control and that the current trend in surge control will likely continue toward incremental improvement of a basic or conventional surge control strategy. Various surge suppression techniques can be grouped in two categories: (1) those that are focused on better compressor interior design, and (2) others that attempt to suppress surge by external and operational means.« less

  5. Two-Stage Centrifugal Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Converse, David

    2011-01-01

    Fan designs are often constrained by envelope, rotational speed, weight, and power. Aerodynamic performance and motor electrical performance are heavily influenced by rotational speed. The fan used in this work is at a practical limit for rotational speed due to motor performance characteristics, and there is no more space available in the packaging for a larger fan. The pressure rise requirements keep growing. The way to ordinarily accommodate a higher DP is to spin faster or grow the fan rotor diameter. The invention is to put two radially oriented stages on a single disk. Flow enters the first stage from the center; energy is imparted to the flow in the first stage blades, the flow is redirected some amount opposite to the direction of rotation in the fixed stators, and more energy is imparted to the flow in the second- stage blades. Without increasing either rotational speed or disk diameter, it is believed that as much as 50 percent more DP can be achieved with this design than with an ordinary, single-stage centrifugal design. This invention is useful primarily for fans having relatively low flow rates with relatively high pressure rise requirements.

  6. A Stability Enhancement Method for Centrifugal Compressors using Active Control Casing Treatment System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuanyang; Xiao, Jun; Li, Liansheng; Yang, Qichao; Liu, Guangbin; Wang, Le

    2015-08-01

    The centrifugal compressors are widely used in many fields. When the centrifugal compressors operate at the edge of the surge line, the compressor will be unstable. In addition, if the centrifugal compressor runs at this situation long time, the damage will be occurred on compressor. There are some kinds of method to improve and enlarge the range of the centrifugal compressors, such as inlet guide vane, and casing treatment. For casing treatment method, some structures have been researched, such as holed recirculation, basic slot casing treatment and groove casing treatment. All these researches are the passive methods. This paper present a new stability enhancement method based Active Control Casing Treatment (ACCT). All parts of this new method are introduced in detail. The control strategy of the system is mentioned in the paper. As a research sample, a centrifugal compressor having this system is researched using CFD method. The study focuses on the effect of the active control system on the impeller flow. The vortex in impeller is changed by the active control system. And this leads to the suppression of the extension of vortex blockage in impeller and to contribute to the enhancement of the compressor operating range.

  7. Centrifugal compressor modifications and their effect on high-frequency pipe wall vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Motriuk, R.W.; Harvey, D.P.

    1998-08-01

    High-frequency pulsation generated by centrifugal compressors, with pressure wave-lengths much smaller than the attached pipe diameter, can cause fatigue failures of the compressor internals, impair compressor performance, and damage the attached compressor piping. There are numerous sources producing pulsation in centrifugal compressors. Some of them are discussed in literature at large (Japikse, 1995; Niese, 1976). NGTL has experienced extreme high-frequency discharge pulsation and pipe wall vibration on many of its radial inlet high-flow centrifugal gas compressor facilities. These pulsations led to several piping attachment failures and compressor internal component failures while the compressor operated within the design envelope. This papermore » considers several pulsation conditions at an NGTL compression facility which resulted in unacceptable piping vibration. Significant vibration attenuation was achieved by modifying the compressor (pulsation source) through removal of the diffuser vanes and partial removal of the inlet guide vanes (IGV). Direct comparison of the changes in vibration, pulsation, and performance are made for each of the modifications. The vibration problem, probable causes, options available to address the problem, and the results of implementation are reviewed. The effects of diffuser vane removal on discharge pipe wall vibration as well as changes in compressor performance are described.« less

  8. Fluid-structure interaction analysis and lifetime estimation of a natural gas pipeline centrifugal compressor under near-choke and near-surge conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Yaping; Liu, Hui; Yao, Ziyun; Xing, Peng; Zhang, Chuhua

    2015-11-01

    Up to present, there have been no studies concerning the application of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) analysis to the lifetime estimation of multi-stage centrifugal compressors under dangerous unsteady aerodynamic excitations. In this paper, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of a three-stage natural gas pipeline centrifugal compressor are performed under near-choke and near-surge conditions, and the unsteady aerodynamic pressure acting on impeller blades are obtained. Then computational structural dynamics (CSD) analysis is conducted through a one-way coupling FSI model to predict alternating stresses in impeller blades. Finally, the compressor lifetime is estimated using the nominal stress approach. The FSI results show that the impellers of latter stages suffer larger fluctuation stresses but smaller mean stresses than those at preceding stages under near-choke and near-surge conditions. The most dangerous position in the compressor is found to be located near the leading edge of the last-stage impeller blade. Compressor lifetime estimation shows that the investigated compressor can run up to 102.7 h under the near-choke condition and 200.2 h under the near-surge condition. This study is expected to provide a scientific guidance for the operation safety of natural gas pipeline centrifugal compressors.

  9. Study Improving Performance of Centrifugal Compressor In Paiton Coal Fired Power Plant Unit 1 And 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusuma, Yuriadi; Permana, Dadang S.

    2018-03-01

    The compressed air system becomes part of a very important utility system in a Plant, including the Steam Power Plant. In PLN’S coal fired power plant, Paiton units 1 and 2, there are four Centrifugal air compressor types, which produce compressed air as much as 5.652 cfm and with electric power capacity of 1200 kW. Electricity consumption to operate centrifugal compressor is 7.104.117 kWh per year. This study aims to measure the performance of Centrifugal Compressors operating in Paiton’s coal fired power plant units 1 and 2. Performance Compressor is expressed by Specific Power Consumption (SPC) in kW/100 cfm. For this purpose, we measure the compressed air flow rate generated by each compressor and the power consumed by each compressor. The result is as follows Air Compressor SAC 2B : 15.1 kW/100 cfm, Air Compressor SAC 1B : 15.31 kW/100 cfm,Air Compressor SAC 1A : 16.3 kW/100 cfm and air Compressor SAC 2C : 18.19 kW/100 cfm. From the measurement result, air compressor SAC 2B has the best performance that is 15.1 kW / 100 cfm. In this study we analyze efforts to improve the performance of other compressors to at least match the performance of the SAC 2B air compressor. By increasing the Specific Power Consumption from others Compressor, it will get energy saving up to 284,165 kWh per year.

  10. Devices and methods of operation thereof for providing stable flow for centrifugal compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoch, Gary J. (Inventor); Stevens, Mark A. (Inventor); Jett, Thomas A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Centrifugal compressor flow stabilizing devices and methods of operation thereof are disclosed that act upon the flow field discharging from the impeller of a centrifugal compressor and modify the flow field ahead of the diffuser vanes such that flow conditions contributing to rotating stall and surge are reduced or even eliminated. In some embodiments, shaped rods and methods of operation thereof are disclosed, whereas in other embodiments reverse-tangent air injection devices and methods are disclosed.

  11. NASA low-speed centrifugal compressor for 3-D viscous code assessment and fundamental flow physics research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, M. D.; Wood, J. R.; Wasserbauer, C. A.

    1991-01-01

    A low speed centrifugal compressor facility recently built by the NASA Lewis Research Center is described. The purpose of this facility is to obtain detailed flow field measurements for computational fluid dynamic code assessment and flow physics modeling in support of Army and NASA efforts to advance small gas turbine engine technology. The facility is heavily instrumented with pressure and temperature probes, both in the stationary and rotating frames of reference, and has provisions for flow visualization and laser velocimetry. The facility will accommodate rotational speeds to 2400 rpm and is rated at pressures to 1.25 atm. The initial compressor stage being tested is geometrically and dynamically representative of modern high-performance centrifugal compressor stages with the exception of Mach number levels. Preliminary experimental investigations of inlet and exit flow uniformly and measurement repeatability are presented. These results demonstrate the high quality of the data which may be expected from this facility. The significance of synergism between computational fluid dynamic analysis and experimentation throughout the development of the low speed centrifugal compressor facility is demonstrated.

  12. Subsynchronous instability of a geared centrifugal compressor of overhung design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, J. H.; Wittman, L. J.

    1980-01-01

    The original design analysis and shop test data are presented for a three stage (poster) air compressor with impellers mounted on the extensions of a twin pinion gear, and driven by an 8000 hp synchronous motor. Also included are field test data, subsequent rotor dynamics analysis, modifications, and final rotor behavior. A subsynchronous instability existed on a geared, overhung rotor. State-of-the-art rotor dynamics analysis techniques provided a reasonable analytical model of the rotor. A bearing modification arrived at analytically eliminated the instability.

  13. FORTRAN program for calculating total efficiency - specific speed characteristics of centrifugal compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvas, M. R.

    1972-01-01

    A computer program for predicting design point specific speed - efficiency characteristics of centrifugal compressors is presented with instructions for its use. The method permits rapid selection of compressor geometry that yields maximum total efficiency for a particular application. A numerical example is included to demonstrate the selection procedure.

  14. Numerical analysis of flow in a centrifugal compressor with circumferential grooves: influence of groove location and number on flow instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Qin, G.; Ai, Z.; Ji, Y.

    2017-08-01

    As an effective and economic method for flow range enhancement, circumferential groove casing treatment (CGCT) is widely used to increase the stall margin of compressors. Different from traditional grooved casing treatments, in which the grooves are always located over the rotor in both axial and radial compressors, one or several circumferential grooves are located along the shroud side of the diffuser passage in this paper. Numerical investigations were conducted to predict the performance of a low flow rate centrifugal compressor with CGCT in diffuser. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis is performed under stage environment in order to find the optimum location of the circumferential casing groove in consideration of stall margin enhancement and efficiency gain at design point, and the impact of groove number to the effect of this grooved casing treatment configuration in enhancing the stall margin of the compressor stage is studied. The results indicate that the centrifugal compressor with circumferential groove in vaned diffuser can obtain obvious improvement in the stall margin with sacrificing design efficiency a little. Efforts were made to study blade level flow mechanisms to determine how the CGCT impacts the compressor’s stall margin (SM) and performance. The flow structures in the passage, the tip gap, and the grooves as well as their mutual interactions were plotted and analysed.

  15. Performance Investigations of a Large Centrifugal Compressor from an Experimental Turbojet Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ginsburg, Ambrose; Creagh, John W. R.; Ritter, William K.

    1948-01-01

    An investigation was conducted on a large centrifugal compressor from an experimental turbojet engine to determine the performance of the compressor and to obtain fundamental information on the aerodynamic problems associated with large centrifugal-type compressors. The results of the research conducted on the compressor indicated that the compressor would not meet the desired engine-design air-flow requirements (78 lb/sec) because of an air-flow restriction in the vaned collector (diffuser). Revision of the vaned collector resulted in an increased air-flow capacity over the speed range and showed improved matching of the impeller and diffuser components. At maximum flow, the original compressor utilized approximately 90 percent of the available geometric throat area at the vaned-collector inlet and the revised compressor utilized approximately 94 percent, regardless of impeller speed. The ratio of the maximum weight flows of the revised and original compressors were less than the ratio of effective critical throat areas of the two compressors because of the large pressure losses in the impeller near the impeller inelt and the difference increased with an increase in impeller speed. In order to further increase the pressure ratio and maximum weight flow of the compressor, the impeller must be modified to eliminate the pressure losses therein.

  16. Active unsteady aerodynamic suppression of rotating stall in an incompressible flow centrifugal compressor with vaned diffuser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, Patrick B.; Fleeter, Sanford

    1991-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to analyze the suppression of rotating stall in an incompressible flow centrifugal compressor with a vaned diffuser, thereby addressing the important need for centrifugal compressor rotating stall and surge control. In this model, the precursor to to instability is a weak rotating potential velocity perturbation in the inlet flow field that eventually develops into a finite disturbance. To suppress the growth of this potential disturbance, a rotating control vortical velocity disturbance is introduced into the impeller inlet flow. The effectiveness of this control is analyzed by matching the perturbation pressure in the compressor inlet and exit flow fields with a model for the unsteady behavior of the compressor. To demonstrate instability control, this model is then used to predict the control effectiveness for centrifugal compressor geometries based on a low speed research centrifugal compressor. These results indicate that reductions of 10 to 15 percent in the mean inlet flow coefficient at instability are possible with control waveforms of half the magnitude of the total disturbance at the inlet.

  17. Numerical analysis of flow in ultra micro centrifugal compressor -influence of meridional configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Masanao; Tsujita, Hoshio; Hirano, Toshiyuki

    2013-04-01

    A single stage ultra micro centrifugal compressor constituting ultra micro gas turbine is required to operate at high rotational speed in order to achieve the pressure ratio which establishes the gas turbine cycle. As a consequence, the aerodynamic losses can be increased by the interaction of a shock wave with the boundary layer on the blade surface. Moreover, the centrifugal force which exceeds the allowable stress of the impeller material can act on the root of blades. On the other hand, the restrictions of processing technology for the downsizing of impeller not only relatively enlarge the size of tip clearance but also make it difficult to shape the impeller with the three-dimensional blade. Therefore, it is important to establish the design technology for the impeller with the two-dimensional blade which possesses the sufficient aerodynamic performance and enough strength to bear the centrifugal force caused by the high rotational speed. In this study, the flow in two types of impeller with the two-dimensional blade which have different meridional configuration was analyzed numerically. The computed results clarified the influence of the meridional configuration on the loss generations in the impeller passage.

  18. Experimental Investigation of Diffuser Hub Injection to Improve Centrifugal Compressor Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoch, Gary J.

    2004-01-01

    Results from a series of experiments to investigate whether centrifugal compressor stability could be improved by injecting air through the diffuser hub surface are reported. The research was conducted in a 4:1 pressure ratio centrifugal compressor configured with a vane-island diffuser. Injector nozzles were located just upstream of the leading edge of the diffuser vanes. Nozzle orientations were set to produce injected streams angled at 8, 0 and +8 degrees relative to the vane mean camber line. Several injection flow rates were tested using both an external air supply and recirculation from the diffuser exit. Compressor flow range did not improve at any injection flow rate that was tested. Compressor flow range did improve slightly at zero injection due to the flow resistance created by injector openings on the hub surface. Leading edge loading and semi-vaneless space diffusion showed trends similar to those reported earlier from shroud surface experiments that did improve compressor flow range. Opposite trends are seen for hub injection cases where compressor flow range decreased. The hub injection data further explain the range improvement provided by shroud-side injection and suggest that different hub-side techniques may produce range improvement in centrifugal compressors.

  19. Detailed analysis of the flow in the inducer of a transonic centrifugal compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffaz, Nicolas; Trébinjac, Isabelle

    2012-02-01

    Numerical and experimental investigations were conducted in a transonic centrifugal compressor stage composed of a backswept splittered unshrouded impeller and a vaned diffuser. A detailed analysis of the flow in the inducer (i.e. the entry zone of the impeller between the main blade leading edge and the splitter blade leading edge) is proposed from choke to surge. Steady and unsteady simulations were performed using the code elsA, which uses a multi-domain approach on structured meshes and solves the compressible RANS equations, associated with a two-equation turbulence model k-l in the rotating frame of reference. The 1MW LMFA-ECL test rig was used for carrying out the tests in the compressor stage. Unsteady pressure measurements up to 150 kHz and Laser Doppler Anemometry measurements were performed in the inducer. A good agreement is obtained between the experimental and numerical data even if an over dissipation is noticed in the numerical results. The change in flow pattern from choke to surge is mainly due to a change in the tip leakage flow trajectory which straightens, leading to a flow blockage of an individual passage near shroud. A spectral analysis shows that only the blade passing frequency and its harmonics compose the various spectra obtained from choke to surge.

  20. The operational stability of a centrifugal compressor and its dependence on the characteristics of the subcomponents

    SciTech Connect

    Hunziker, R.; Gyarmathy, G.

    1994-04-01

    A centrifugal compressor was tested with three different diffusers with circular-arc vanes. The vane inlet angle was varied from 15 to 30 deg. Detailed static wall pressure measurements show that the pressure field in the diffuser inlet is very sensitive to flow rate. The stability limit regularly occurred at the flow rate giving the maximum pressure rise for the overall stage. Mild surge arises as a dynamic instability of the compression system. The analysis of the pressure rise characteristic of each individual subcomponent (impeller, diffuser inlet, diffuser channel,...) reveals their contribution to the overall pressure rise. The diffuser channels playmore » an inherently destabilizing role while the impeller and the diffuser inlet are typically stabilizing. The stability limit was mainly determined by a change in the characteristic of the diffuser inlet. Further, the stability limit was found to be independent of the development of inducer-tip recirculation.« less

  1. An alternative method for centrifugal compressor loading factor modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galerkin, Y.; Drozdov, A.; Rekstin, A.; Soldatova, K.

    2017-08-01

    The loading factor at design point is calculated by one or other empirical formula in classical design methods. Performance modelling as a whole is out of consideration. Test data of compressor stages demonstrates that loading factor versus flow coefficient at the impeller exit has a linear character independent of compressibility. Known Universal Modelling Method exploits this fact. Two points define the function - loading factor at design point and at zero flow rate. The proper formulae include empirical coefficients. A good modelling result is possible if the choice of coefficients is based on experience and close analogs. Earlier Y. Galerkin and K. Soldatova had proposed to define loading factor performance by the angle of its inclination to the ordinate axis and by the loading factor at zero flow rate. Simple and definite equations with four geometry parameters were proposed for loading factor performance calculated for inviscid flow. The authors of this publication have studied the test performance of thirteen stages of different types. The equations are proposed with universal empirical coefficients. The calculation error lies in the range of plus to minus 1,5%. The alternative model of a loading factor performance modelling is included in new versions of the Universal Modelling Method.

  2. Effect of double air injection on performance characteristics of centrifugal compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Toshiyuki; Takano, Mizuki; Tsujita, Hoshio

    2015-02-01

    In the operation of a centrifugal compressor of turbocharger, instability phenomena such as rotating stall and surge are induced at a lower flow rate close to the maximum pressure ratio. In this study, for the suppression of surge phenomenon resulting in the extension of the stable operating range of centrifugal compressor to lower flow rate, the compressed air at the compressor exit was re-circulated and injected into the impeller inlet by using the double injection nozzle system. The experiments were performed to find out the optimum circumferential position of the second nozzle relative to the fixed first one and the optimum inner diameter of the injection nozzles, which are able to most effectively reduce the flow rate of surge inception. Moreover, in order to examine the universality of these optimum values, the experiments were carried out for two types of compressors.

  3. Research for the Fluid Field of the Centrifugal Compressor Impeller in Accelerating Startup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaozhu; Chen, Gang; Zhu, Changyun; Qin, Guoliang

    2013-03-01

    In order to study the flow field in the impeller in the accelerating start-up process of centrifugal compressor, the 3-D and 1-D transient accelerated flow governing equations along streamline in the impeller of the centrifugal compressor are derived in detail, the assumption of pressure gradient distribution is presented, and the solving method for 1-D transient accelerating flow field is given based on the assumption. The solving method is achieved by programming and the computing result is obtained. It is obtained by comparison that the computing method is met with the test result. So the feasibility and effectiveness for solving accelerating start-up problem of centrifugal compressor by the solving method in this paper is proven.

  4. Enlarging the operation range of a centrifugal compressor by cutting vanes based on CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, J. T.; Gu, C. H.; Pan, X. H.; Y Zheng, S.

    2013-12-01

    Many centrifugal compressors are liable to insufficient operation range. The purpose of this paper is to enlarge the operation range of a centrifugal compressor used in turbocharger by cutting vanes. Some numerical works have been done based on CFD. The comparison of the calculated and measured results shows good agreement. The overall performance characteristics of the centrifugal compressor with different cutted vanes are observed and analyzed. The performance characteristic curves show that cutting vanes can increase the operation range by more than 50% with the loss of the highest efficiency limited in 1%. The flow fields are also shown in this paper and related explanations about the change of the performance characteristics curves are given. Shock wave is also detected in the simulation, and some related characteristics are summed up.

  5. Experimental investigation on centrifugal compressor blade crack classification using the squared envelope spectrum.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongkun; Zhang, Xuefeng; Xu, Fujian

    2013-09-18

    Centrifugal compressors are a key piece of equipment for modern production. Among the components of the centrifugal compressor, the impeller is a pivotal part as it is used to transform kinetic energy into pressure energy. Blade crack condition monitoring and classification has been broadly investigated in the industrial and academic area. In this research, a pressure pulsation (PP) sensor arranged in close vicinity to the crack area and the corresponding casing vibration signals are used to monitor blade crack information. As these signals cannot directly demonstrate the blade crack, the method employed in this research is based on the extraction of weak signal characteristics that are induced by blade cracking. A method for blade crack classification based on the signals monitored by using a squared envelope spectrum (SES) is presented. Experimental investigations on blade crack classification are carried out to verify the effectiveness of this method. The results show that it is an effective tool for blade crack classification in centrifugal compressors.

  6. Some field experience with subsynchronous vibration of centrifugal compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xi-Xuan; Gu, Jin-Chu; Shen, Qin-Gen; Hua, Yong-Li; Zhu, Lan-Sheng; Du, Yun-Tian

    1989-01-01

    A lot of large chemical fertilizer plants producing 1000 ton NH3/day and 1700 ton urea/day were constructed in the 1970's in China. During operation, subsynchronous vibration takes place occasionally in some of the large turbine-compressor sets and has resulted in heavy economic losses. Two cases of subsynchronous vibration are described: Self-excited vibration of the low-pressure (LP) cylinder of one kind of N2-H2 multistage compressor; and Forced subsynchronous vibration of the high-pressure (HP) cylinder of the CO2 compressor.

  7. Pressure oscillations occurring in a centrifugal compressor system with and without passive and active surge control

    SciTech Connect

    Jungowski, W.M.; Weiss, M.H.; Price, G.R.

    1996-01-01

    A study of pressure oscillations occurring in small centrifugal compressor systems without a plenum is presented. Active and passive surge control were investigated theoretically and experimentally for systems with various inlet and discharge piping configurations. The determination of static and dynamic stability criteria was based on Greitzer`s (1981) lumped parameter model modified to accommodate capacitance of the piping. Experimentally, passive control using globe valves closely coupled to the compressor prevented the occurrence of surge even with the flow reduced to zero. Active control with a sleeve valve located at the compressor was effective but involved a significant component of passivemore » throttling which reduced the compressor efficiency. With an oscillator connected to a short side branch at the compressor, effective active control was achieved without throttling. Both methods of active control reduced the flow rate at surge onset by about 30%. In general, the experiments qualitatively confirmed the derived stability criteria.« less

  8. Experiments and modelling of surge in small centrifugal compressor for automotive engines

    SciTech Connect

    Galindo, J.; Serrano, J.R.; Climent, H.

    2008-01-15

    In this paper the surge phenomenon in small centrifugal compressors used for turbocharging internal combustion engines is analyzed. The experimental work was focused on the measurement of compressor behaviour within the surge zone by means of a specifically designed facility. The presented model is based on the introduction of a fluid inertia term that accounts for the non quasi steady effects and the use of a compressor map extended to the surge and negative flows zone obtained from experimental tests. The compressor model was implemented in a one-dimensional gas-dynamic model. The comparison of the modelled and measured evolution of instantaneousmore » pressure during deep surge operation shows good agreement. Furthermore, the model is also able to predict the amplitude and frequency of pressure pulses when the compressor operates in surge with different outlet duct lengths. (author)« less

  9. Development Of A Centrifugal Hydrogen Pipeline Gas Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Di Bella, Francis A.

    2015-04-16

    Concepts NREC (CN) has completed a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored project to analyze, design, and fabricate a pipeline capacity hydrogen compressor. The pipeline compressor is a critical component in the DOE strategy to provide sufficient quantities of hydrogen to support the expected shift in transportation fuels from liquid and natural gas to hydrogen. The hydrogen would be generated by renewable energy (solar, wind, and perhaps even tidal or ocean), and would be electrolyzed from water. The hydrogen would then be transported to the population centers in the U.S., where fuel-cell vehicles are expected to become popular and necessary tomore » relieve dependency on fossil fuels. The specifications for the required pipeline hydrogen compressor indicates a need for a small package that is efficient, less costly, and more reliable than what is available in the form of a multi-cylinder, reciprocating (positive displacement) compressor for compressing hydrogen in the gas industry.« less

  10. Active identification and control of aerodynamic instabilities in axial and centrifugal compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krichene, Assad

    In this thesis, it is experimentally shown that dynamic cursors to stall and surge exist in both axial and centrifugal compressors using the experimental axial and centrifugal compressor rigs located in the School of Aerospace Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Further, it is shown that the dynamic cursors to stall and surge can be identified in real-time and they can be used in a simple control scheme to avoid the occurrence of stall and surge instabilities altogether. For the centrifugal compressor, a previously developed real-time observer is used in order to detect dynamic cursors to surge in real-time. An off-line analysis using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of the open loop experimental data from the centrifugal compressor rig is carried out to establish the influence of compressor speed on the dynamic cursor frequency. The variation of the amplitude of dynamic cursors with compressor operating condition from experimental data is qualitatively compared with simulation results obtained using a generic compression system model subjected to white noise excitation. Using off-line analysis results, a simple control scheme based on fuzzy logic is synthesized for surge avoidance and recovery. The control scheme is implemented in the centrifugal compressor rig using compressor bleed as well as fuel flow to the combustor. Closed loop experimental results are obtained to demonstrate the effectiveness of the controller for both surge avoidance and surge recovery. The existence of stall cursors in an axial compression system is established using the observer scheme from off-line analysis of an existing database of a commercial gas turbine engine. However, the observer scheme is found to be ineffective in detecting stall cursors in the experimental axial compressor rig in the School of Aerospace Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. An alternate scheme based on the amplitude of pressure data content at the blade passage frequency obtained

  11. Core compressor exit stage study, volume 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisler, D. C.

    1981-01-01

    Rear stage blading designs that have lower losses in their endwall boundary layer regions were studied. A baseline Stage A was designed as a low-speed model of stage 7 of a 10-stage compressor. Candidate rotors and stators were designed which have the potential of reducing endwall losses relative to the baseline. Rotor B uses a type of meanline in the tip region that unloads the leading edge and loads the trailing edge relative to the baseline rotor A designs. Rotor C incorporates a more skewed (hub strong) radial distribution of total pressure and smoother distribution of static pressure on the rotor tip than those of rotor B. Candidate stator B embodies twist gradients in the endwall region. Stator C embodies airfoil sections near the endwalls that have reduced trailing edge loading relative to stator A. The baseline and candidate bladings were tested using four identical stages to produce a true multistage environment. Single-stage tests were also conducted. The test data were analyzed and performances were compared. Several of the candidate configurations showed a performance improvement relative to the baseline.

  12. 40 CFR 60.5380 - What standards apply to centrifugal compressor affected facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What standards apply to centrifugal compressor affected facilities? 60.5380 Section 60.5380 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for Crude Oil and Natura...

  13. 40 CFR 60.5380 - What standards apply to centrifugal compressor affected facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What standards apply to centrifugal compressor affected facilities? 60.5380 Section 60.5380 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for Crude Oil and Natura...

  14. Calculation characteristics of centrifugal compressor operates on a mixture of gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novitskiy, B. B.; Arbekov, A. N.

    2016-10-01

    The creation of Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) unit is impossible without developing the basic knots. This work is devoted to determining the characteristics of a centrifugal compressor when operating at various working bodies with the help of experimental and numerical studies.

  15. MODELING AND DESIGN STUDY USING HFC-236EA AS AN ALTERNATIVE REFRIGERANT IN A CENTRIFUGAL COMPRESSOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an investigation of the operation of a centrifugal compressor--part of a chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-114 chiller installation--with the new refrigerant hydrofluorocarbon (HFC)-236ea, a proposed alternative to CFC-114. A large set of CFC-236ea operating da...

  16. Centrifugal compressor fault diagnosis based on qualitative simulation and thermal parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yunsong; Wang, Fuli; Jia, Mingxing; Qi, Yuanchen

    2016-12-01

    This paper concerns fault diagnosis of centrifugal compressor based on thermal parameters. An improved qualitative simulation (QSIM) based fault diagnosis method is proposed to diagnose the faults of centrifugal compressor in a gas-steam combined-cycle power plant (CCPP). The qualitative models under normal and two faulty conditions have been built through the analysis of the principle of centrifugal compressor. To solve the problem of qualitative description of the observations of system variables, a qualitative trend extraction algorithm is applied to extract the trends of the observations. For qualitative states matching, a sliding window based matching strategy which consists of variables operating ranges constraints and qualitative constraints is proposed. The matching results are used to determine which QSIM model is more consistent with the running state of system. The correct diagnosis of two typical faults: seal leakage and valve stuck in the centrifugal compressor has validated the targeted performance of the proposed method, showing the advantages of fault roots containing in thermal parameters.

  17. Determination of Pressure Fluctuations in Rotor Bundle of Centrifugal Compressor at Critical Conditions of Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levashov, V. A.; Lyubchenko, K. Yu

    2017-08-01

    This article describes the physical processes that occur in the stage flow part of the compressor while it is operating and can create conditions for the occurrence of forced vibrations, which in turn can lead to the destruction of the impellers. Critical conditions of compressor operation are determined. To understand that critical condition of operation is cause of the destruction of the impellers, transient CFD analysis was carried for test stage of compressor. The obtained pressure fluctuation amplitudes allow to evaluate the critical conditions of compressor operation.

  18. CFD comparison with centrifugal compressor measurements on a wide operating range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Sausse, P.; Fabrie, P.; Arnou, D.; Clunet, F.

    2013-04-01

    Centrifugal compressors are widely used in industrial applications thanks to their high efficiency. They are able to provide a wide operating range before reaching the flow barrier or surge limits. Performances and range are described by compressor maps obtained experimentally. After a description of performance test rig, this article compares measured centrifugal compressor performances with computational fluid dynamics results. These computations are performed at steady conditions with R134a refrigerant as fluid. Navier-Stokes equations, coupled with k-ɛ turbulence model, are solved by the commercial software ANSYS-CFX by means of volume finite method. Input conditions are varied in order to calculate several speed lines. Theoretical isentropic efficiency and theoretical surge line are finally compared to experimental data.

  19. Effect of double air injection on performance characteristics of centrifugal compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Toshiyuki; Ogawa, Tatsuya; Yasui, Ryutaro; Tsujita, Hoshio

    2017-02-01

    In the operation of a centrifugal compressor of turbocharger, instability phenomena such as rotating stall and surge are induced at a lower flow rate close to the maximum pressure ratio. In this study, the compressed air at the exit of centrifugal compressor was re-circulated and injected to the impeller inlet by using two injection nozzles in order to suppress the surge phenomenon. The most effective circumferential position was examined to reduce the flow rate at the surge inception. Moreover, the influences of the injection on the fluctuating property of the flow field before and after the surge inception were investigated by examining the frequency of static pressure fluctuation on the wall surface and visualizing the compressor wall surface by oil-film visualization technique.

  20. Experimental and computational investigation of the NASA Low-Speed Centrifugal Compressor flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, M. D.; Chriss, R. M.; Wood, J. R.; Strazisar, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental and computational investigation of the NASA Low-Speed Centrifugal Compressor (LSCC) flow field has been conducted using laser anemometry and Dawes' 3D viscous code. The experimental configuration consists of a backswept impeller followed by a vaneless diffuser. Measurements of the three-dimensional velocity field were acquired at several measurement planes through the compressor. The measurements describe both the throughflow and secondary velocity field along each measurement plane. In several cases the measurements provide details of the flow within the blade boundary layers. Insight into the complex flow physics within centrifugal compressors is provided by the computational analysis, and assessment of the CFD predictions is provided by comparison with the measurements. Five-hole probe and hot-wire surveys at the inlet and exit to the rotor as well as surface flow visualization along the impeller blade surfaces provide independent confirmation of the laser measurement technique.

  1. Evaluation of centrifugal compressor performance with water injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beede, William L; Hamrick, Joseph T; Withee, Joseph R , Jr

    1951-01-01

    The effects of water injection on a compressor are presented. To determine the effects of varying water-air ratio, the compressor was operated at a constant equivalent impeller speed over a range of water-air ratios and weight flows. Operation over a range of weight flows at one water-air ratio and two inlet air temperatures was carried out to obtain an indication of the effects of varying inlet air temperature. Beyond a water-air ratio of 0.03 there was no increase in maximum air-weight flow, a negligible rise in peak total-pressure ratio, and a decrease in peak adiabatic efficiency. An increase in inlet air temperature resulted in an increase in the magnitude of evaporation. An analysis of data indicated that the magnitude of evaporation within the compressor impeller was small.

  2. Prototyping of ultra micro centrifugal compressor-influence of meridional configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Toshiyuki; Muto, Tadataka; Tsujita, Hoshio

    2011-08-01

    In order to investigate the design method for a micro centrifugal compressor, which is the most important component of an ultra micro gas turbine, two types of centrifugal impeller with 2-dimensional blade were designed, manufactured and tested. These impellers have different shapes of hub on the meridional plane with each other. Moreover, these types of impeller were made for the 5 times and the 6 times size of the final target centrifugal impeller with the outer diameter of 4mm in order to assess the similitude for the impellers. The comparison among the performance characteristics of the impellers revealed the influence of the meridional configuration on the performance and the similitude of the compressors.

  3. Aerodynamically induced radial forces in a centrifugal gas compressor: Part 2 -- Computational investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Flathers, M.B.; Bache, G.E.

    1999-10-01

    Radial loads and direction of a centrifugal gas compressor containing a high specific speed mixed flow impeller and a single tongue volute were determined both experimentally and computationally at both design and off-design conditions. The experimental methodology was developed in conjunction with a traditional ASME PTC-10 closed-loop test to determine radial load and direction. The experimental study is detailed in Part 1 of this paper (Moore and Flathers, 1998). The computational method employs a commercially available, fully three-dimensional viscous code to analyze the impeller and the volute interaction. An uncoupled scheme was initially used where the impeller and volute weremore » analyzed as separate models using a common vaneless diffuser geometry. The two calculations were then repeated until the boundary conditions at a chosen location in the common vaneless diffuser were nearly the same. Subsequently, a coupled scheme was used where the entire stage geometry was analyzed in one calculation, thus eliminating the need for manual iteration of the two independent calculations. In addition to radial load and direction information, this computational procedure also provided aerodynamic stage performance. The effect of impeller front face and rear face cavities was also quantified. The paper will discuss computational procedures, including grid generation and boundary conditions, as well as comparisons of the various computational schemes to experiment. The results of this study will show the limitations and benefits of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for determination of radial load, direction, and aerodynamic stage performance.« less

  4. Stability Improvement of High-Pressure-Ratio Turbocharger Centrifugal Compressor by Asymmetric Flow Control-Part I: Non-Axisymmetrical Flow in Centrifugal Compressor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingyang; Zheng, Xinqian; Zhang, Yangjun; Bamba, Takahiro; Tamaki, Hideaki; Huenteler, Joern; Li, Zhigang

    2013-03-01

    This is Part I of a two-part paper documenting the development of a novel asymmetric flow control method to improve the stability of a high-pressure-ratio turbocharger centrifugal compressor. Part I focuses on the nonaxisymmetrical flow in a centrifugal compressor induced by the nonaxisymmetrical geometry of the volute while Part II describes the development of an asymmetric flow control method to avoid the stall on the basis of the characteristic of nonaxisymmetrical flow. To understand the asymmetries, experimental measurements and corresponding numerical simulation were carried out. The static pressure was measured by probes at different circumferential and stream-wise positions to gain insights about the asymmetries. The experimental results show that there is an evident nonaxisymmetrical flow pattern throughout the compressor due to the asymmetric geometry of the overhung volute. The static pressure field in the diffuser is distorted at approximately 90 deg in the rotational direction of the volute tongue throughout the diffuser. The magnitude of this distortion slightly varies with the rotational speed. The magnitude of the static pressure distortion in the impeller is a function of the rotational speed. There is a significant phase shift between the static pressure distributions at the leading edge of the splitter blades and the impeller outlet. The numerical steady state simulation neglects the aforementioned unsteady effects found in the experiments and cannot predict the phase shift, however, a detailed asymmetric flow field structure is obviously obtained.

  5. Experimental and computational investigation of the NASA low-speed centrifugal compressor flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, Michael D.; Chriss, Randall M.; Wood, Jerry R.; Strazisar, Anthony J.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental and computational investigation of the NASA Lewis Research Center's low-speed centrifugal compressor (LSCC) flow field was conducted using laser anemometry and Dawes' three-dimensional viscous code. The experimental configuration consisted of a backswept impeller followed by a vaneless diffuser. Measurements of the three-dimensional velocity field were acquired at several measurement planes through the compressor. The measurements describe both the throughflow and secondary velocity field along each measurement plane. In several cases the measurements provide details of the flow within the blade boundary layers. Insight into the complex flow physics within centrifugal compressors is provided by the computational fluid dynamics analysis (CFD), and assessment of the CFD predictions is provided by comparison with the measurements. Five-hole probe and hot-wire surveys at the inlet and exit to the impeller as well as surface flow visualization along the impeller blade surfaces provided independent confirmation of the laser measurement technique. The results clearly document the development of the throughflow velocity wake that is characteristic of unshrouded centrifugal compressors.

  6. Structure design and simulation research of active magnetic bearing for helium centrifugal cold compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y Zhang, S.; Pan, W.; Wei, C. B.; Wu, J. H.

    2017-12-01

    Helium centrifugal cold compressors are utilized to pump gaseous helium from saturated liquid helium tank to obtain super-fluid helium in cryogenic refrigeration system, which is now being developed at TIPC, CAS. Active magnetic bearing (AMB) is replacing traditional oil-fed bearing as the optimal supporting assembly for cold compressor because of its many advantages: free of contact, high rotation speed, no lubrication and so on. In this paper, five degrees of freedom for AMB are developed for the helium centrifugal cold compressor application. The structure parameters of the axial and radial magnetic bearings as well as hardware and software of the electronic control system is discussed in detail. Based on modal analysis and critical speeds calculation, a control strategy combining PID arithmetic with other phase compensators is proposed. Simulation results demonstrate that the control method not only stables AMB system but also guarantees good performance of closed-loop behaviour. The prior research work offers important base and experience for test and application of AMB experimental platform for system centrifugal cold compressor.

  7. Noise Reduction Design of the Volute for a Centrifugal Compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhen; Wen, Huabing; Hong, Liangxing; Jin, Yudong

    2017-08-01

    In order to effectively control the aerodynamic noise of a compressor, this paper takes into consideration a marine exhaust turbocharger compressor as a research object. According to the different design concept of volute section, tongue and exit cone, six different volute models were established. The finite volume method is used to calculate the flow field, whiles the finite element method is used for the acoustic calculation. Comparison and analysis of different structure designs from three aspects: noise level, isentropic efficiency and Static pressure recovery coefficient. The results showed that under the concept of volute section model 1 yielded the best result, under the concept of tongue analysis model 3 yielded the best result and finally under exit cone analysis model 6 yielded the best results.

  8. Uncertainty analysis of thermal quantities measurement in a centrifugal compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurda, Lukáš; Matas, Richard

    2017-09-01

    Compressor performance characteristics evaluation process based on the measurement of pressure, temperature and other quantities is examined to find uncertainties for directly measured and derived quantities. CFD is used as a tool to quantify the influences of different sources of uncertainty of measurements for single- and multi-thermocouple total temperature probes. The heat conduction through the body of the thermocouple probe and the heat-up of the air in the intake piping are the main phenomena of interest.

  9. An Investigation of Surge in a High-Speed Centrifugal Compressor Using Digital PIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Bright, Michelle M.; Skoch, Gary J.

    2002-01-01

    Compressor stall is a catastrophic breakdown of the flow in a compressor, which can lead to a loss of engine power, large pressure transients in the inlet/nacelle and engine flameout. The implementation of active or passive strategies for controlling rotating stall and surge can significantly extend the stable operating range of a compressor without substantially sacrificing performance. It is crucial to identify the dynamic changes occurring in the flow field prior to rotating stall and surge in order to successfully control these events. Generally, pressure transducer measurements are made to capture the transient response of a compressor prior to rotating stall. In this investigation, Digital Particle Imaging Velocimetry (DPIV) is used in conjunction with dynamic pressure transducers to simultaneously capture transient velocity and pressure measurements in the non-stationary flow field during compressor surge. DPIV is an instantaneous, planar measurement technique which is ideally suited for studying transient flow phenomena in high speed turbomachinery and has been used previously to successfully map the stable operating point flow field in the diffuser of a high speed centrifugal compressor. Through the acquisition of both DPIV images and transient pressure data, the time evolution of the unsteady flow during surge is revealed.

  10. An Investigation of Surge in a High-Speed Centrifugal Compressor Using Digital PIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Bright, Michelle M.; Skoch, Gary J.

    2001-01-01

    Compressor stall is a catastrophic breakdown of the flow in a compressor, which con lead to a loss of engine power, large pressure transients in the inlet/nacelle, and engine flameout. The implementation of active or passive strategies for controlling rotating stall and surge can significantly extend the stable operating range of a compressor without substantially sacrificing performance. It is crucial to identify the dynamic changes occurring in the flow field prior to rotating stall and surge in order to control these events successfully. Generally, pressure transducer measurements are made to capture the transient response of a compressor prior to rotating stall. In this investigation, Digital Particle Imaging Velocimetry (DPIV) is used in conjunction with dynamic pressure transducers to capture transient velocity and pressure measurements simultaneously in the nonstationary flow field during compressor surge. DPIV is an instantaneous, planar measurement technique that is ideally suited for studying transient flow phenomena in highspeed turbomachinery and has been used previously to map the stable operating point flow field in the diffuser of a high-speed centrifugal compressor. Through the acquisition of both DPIV images and transient pressure data, the time evolution of the unsteady flow during surge is revealed.

  11. Measurement and numerical simulation of a small centrifugal compressor characteristics at small or negative flow rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukamoto, Kaname; Okada, Mizuki; Inokuchi, Yuzo; Yamasaki, Nobuhiko; Yamagata, Akihiro

    2017-04-01

    For centrifugal compressors used in automotive turbochargers, the extension of the surge margin is demanded because of lower engine speed. In order to estimate the surge line exactly, it is required to acquire the compressor characteristics at small or negative flow rate. In this paper, measurement and numerical simulation of the characteristics at small or negative flow rate are carried out. In the measurement, an experimental facility with a valve immediately downstream of the compressor is used to suppress the surge. In the numerical work, a new boundary condition that specifies mass flow rate at the outlet boundary is used to simulate the characteristics around the zero flow rate region. Furthermore, flow field analyses at small or negative flow rate are performed with the numerical results. The separated and re-circulated flow fields are investigated by visualization to identify the origin of losses.

  12. Subsynchronous vibrations in a high pressure centrifugal compressor: A case history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, B. F.; Smalley, A. J.

    1984-01-01

    Two distinct aerodynamically excited vibrations in a high pressure low flow centrifugal compressor are documented. A measured vibration near 21% of running speed was identified as a nonresonant forced vibration which results from rotating stall in the diffuser; a measured vibration near 50% of running speed was identified as a self excited vibration sustained by cross coupling forces acting at the compressor wheels. The dependence of these characteristics on speed, discharge pressure, and changes in bearing design are shown. The exciting mechanisms of diffuser stall and aerodynamic cross coupling are evidenced. It is shown how the rotor characteristics are expected to change as a result of modifications. The operation of the compressor after the modifications is described.

  13. Investigation of deformation at a centrifugal compressor rotor in process of interference on shaft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamim, M. R.; Berezhnoi, D. V.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, according to the finite element method, we had implemented “master- slave” method of contact interaction in elastic deformable bodies, with consider of the friction in the contact zone. We had compiled the orientation of solving extremum problems with inequality restrictions, projection algorithm, which called “the closest point projection algorithm”. Finally, an example, had brought to show the calculation of the rotor nozzle centrifugal compressor on the shaft with interference.

  14. Numerical calculation of the internal flow field in a centrifugal compressor impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walitt, L.; Harp, J. L., Jr.; Liu, C. Y.

    1975-01-01

    An iterative numerical method has been developed for the calculation of steady, three-dimensional, viscous, compressible flow fields in centrifugal compressor impellers. The computer code, which embodies the method, solves the steady three dimensional, compressible Navier-Stokes equations in rotating, curvilinear coordinates. The solution takes place on blade-to-blade surfaces of revolution which move from the hub to the shroud during each iteration.

  15. Use of CFD Analyses to Predict Disk Friction Loss of Centrifugal Compressor Impellers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Leesang; Lee, Seawook; Cho, Jinsoo

    To improve the total efficiency of centrifugal compressors, it is necessary to reduce disk friction loss, which is expressed as the power loss. In this study, to reduce the disk friction loss due to the effect of axial clearance and surface roughness is analyzed and methods to reduce disk friction loss are proposed. The rotating reference frame technique using a commercial CFD tool (FLUENT) is used for steady-state analysis of the centrifugal compressor. Numerical results of the CFD analysis are compared with theoretical results using established experimental empirical equations. The disk friction loss of the impeller is decreased in line with increments in axial clearance until the axial clearance between the impeller disk and the casing is smaller than the boundary layer thickness. In addition, the disk friction loss of the impeller is increased in line with the increments in surface roughness in a similar pattern as that of existing experimental empirical formulas. The disk friction loss of the impeller is more affected by the surface roughness than the change of the axial clearance. To minimize disk friction loss on the centrifugal compressor impeller, the axial clearance and the theoretical boundary layer thickness should be designed to be the same. The design of the impeller requires careful consideration in order to optimize axial clearance and minimize surface roughness.

  16. Experimental Investigation on Centrifugal Compressor Blade Crack Classification Using the Squared Envelope Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongkun; Zhang, Xuefeng; Xu, Fujian

    2013-01-01

    Centrifugal compressors are a key piece of equipment for modern production. Among the components of the centrifugal compressor, the impeller is a pivotal part as it is used to transform kinetic energy into pressure energy. Blade crack condition monitoring and classification has been broadly investigated in the industrial and academic area. In this research, a pressure pulsation (PP) sensor arranged in close vicinity to the crack area and the corresponding casing vibration signals are used to monitor blade crack information. As these signals cannot directly demonstrate the blade crack, the method employed in this research is based on the extraction of weak signal characteristics that are induced by blade cracking. A method for blade crack classification based on the signals monitored by using a squared envelope spectrum (SES) is presented. Experimental investigations on blade crack classification are carried out to verify the effectiveness of this method. The results show that it is an effective tool for blade crack classification in centrifugal compressors. PMID:24051521

  17. Core compressor exit stage study. 1: Aerodynamic and mechanical design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdsall, E. A.; Canal, E., Jr.; Lyons, K. A.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of aspect ratio on the performance of core compressor exit stages was demonstrated using two three stage, highly loaded, core compressors. Aspect ratio was identified as having a strong influence on compressors endwall loss. Both compressors simulated the last three stages of an advanced eight stage core compressor and were designed with the same 0.915 hub/tip ratio, 4.30 kg/sec (9.47 1bm/sec) inlet corrected flow, and 167 m/sec (547 ft/sec) corrected mean wheel speed. The first compressor had an aspect ratio of 0.81 and an overall pressure ratio of 1.357 at a design adiabatic efficiency of 88.3% with an average diffusion factor or 0.529. The aspect ratio of the second compressor was 1.22 with an overall pressure ratio of 1.324 at a design adiabatic efficiency of 88.7% with an average diffusion factor of 0.491.

  18. Performance test results of 80 K centrifugal compressor for helium refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Asakura, H.; Kato, D.; Saji, N.

    1994-12-31

    The authors have developed a completely oil-free compressor used for the highly reliable helium refrigeration system for a superconducting generator and carried out performance tests under actual condition. The compressor is designed to achieve a pressure ratio of 8 with only 4 stages by cooling the compressor inlet at 80 K with liquid nitrogen, thus acquiring high reliability of long-term maintenance-free operation together with the use of magnetic bearings for oil-free operation. The compressor at each stage is independently driven by a 25 kW built-in motor at the speed of 100,000 rpm, with the power supplied by a variable frequencymore » inverter. The performance test was carried out at each stage, by incorporating the compressor in the closed loop test equipment using helium gas. It was recognized from the test results that the specified pressure ratio of each stage was achieved at the speed below the rated one of 100,000 rpm. It was found that each stage of the compressor has a flat characteristics of adiabatic efficiency over the wide flow range. The mechanical rotation characteristics at low temperatures was also confirmed to be sufficiently stable.« less

  19. Stage-by-Stage and Parallel Flow Path Compressor Modeling for a Variable Cycle Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George; Connolly, Joseph W.; Cheng, Larry

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers the development of stage-by-stage and parallel flow path compressor modeling approaches for a Variable Cycle Engine. The stage-by-stage compressor modeling approach is an extension of a technique for lumped volume dynamics and performance characteristic modeling. It was developed to improve the accuracy of axial compressor dynamics over lumped volume dynamics modeling. The stage-by-stage compressor model presented here is formulated into a parallel flow path model that includes both axial and rotational dynamics. This is done to enable the study of compressor and propulsion system dynamic performance under flow distortion conditions. The approaches utilized here are generic and should be applicable for the modeling of any axial flow compressor design.

  20. Recycle dynamics during centrifugal compressor ESD, start-up and surge control

    SciTech Connect

    Botros, K.K.; Jones, B.J.; Richards, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    Recycle systems are important components in the operation of centrifugal compressor stations. They are essential during a start-up operation, for surge protection and for emergency shutdown (ESD). These operations are inherently dynamic where interactions between equipment, control and gas flow occur in a complex manner with the associated risk of compressor surge. Of particular importance are the effects or recycle system capacity, the recycle valve characteristics, check valve dynamic behavior, piping geometry and capacitance around the compressor unit, and the performance characteristics of the centrifugal compressor itself. This paper presents numerical results of the effects of some of these parametersmore » on surge control, ESD and unit startup. These parameters are: (1) The effects of damping the surge control flow signal in an attempt to suppress the signal noise, on the integrity of the surge control system; (2) The effects of recycle valve characteristics, stroke time and valve capacity on ESD; (3) The effects of recycle line size on ESD; and (4) The effects of the recycle valve closing time (or rate) on the startup operation, with the intent of shortening this time to minimum for environmental reasons. Results were obtained from the solution of the pertinent dynamic equations describing the gas and equipment dynamics which has been verified against field and laboratory measurements. The samples presented in this paper were applied to a 24 MW natural gas compressor station on the NOVA Gas Transmission system, and to a scale-down laboratory model. Influence of other parameters from this investigation were published elsewhere and are cited in the reference section.« less

  1. Study of blade aspect ratio on a compressor front stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behlke, R. F.; Brooky, J. D.; Canal, E., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A single stage, low aspect ratio, compressor with a 442.0 m/sec (1450 ft/sec) tip speed and a 0.597 hub/tip ratio typical of an advanced core compressor front stage was tested. The test stage incorporated an inlet duct which was representative of an engine transition duct between fan and high pressure compressors. At design speed, the rotor stator stage achieved a peak adiabatic efficiency of 86.6 percent at a flow of 44.35 kg/sec (97.8 lbm/sec) and a pressure ratio of 1.8. Surge margin was 12.5 percent from the peak stage efficiency point.

  2. Numerical investigation of a centrifugal compressor with circumferential grooves in vane diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. F.; Qin, G. L.; Ai, Z. J.

    2015-08-01

    Enhancing stall and surge margin has a great importance for the development of turbo compressors. The application of casing treatment is an effective measure to expand the stall margin and stable operation range. Numerical investigations were conducted to predict the performance of a low flow rate centrifugal compressor with circumferential groove casing treatment in vane diffuser. Numerical cases with different radial location, radial width and axial depth of a circumferential single groove and different numbers of circumferential grooves were carried out to compare the results. The CFD analyses results show that the centrifugal compressor with circumferential grooves in diffuser can extend stable range by about 9% while the efficiency over the whole operating range decreases by 0.2 to 1.7%. The evaluation based on stall margin improvement showed the optimal position for the groove to be located was indicated to exist near the leading edge of the diffuser, and a combination of position, width, depth and numbers of circumferential grooves that will maximize both surge margin range and efficiency.

  3. A study on flow development in an APU-style inlet and its effect on centrifugal compressor performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Fangyuan

    The objectives of this research were to investigate the flow development inside an APU-style inlet and its effect on centrifugal compressor performance. The motivation arises from the increased applications of gas turbine engines installed with APU-style inlets such as unmanned aerial vehicles, auxiliary power units, and helicopters. The inlet swirl distortion created from these complicated inlet systems has become a major performance and operability concern. To improve the integration between the APU-style inlet and gas turbine engines, better understanding of the flow field in the APU-style inlet and its effect on gas turbine is necessary. A research facility for the purpose of performing an experimental investigation of the flow field inside an APU-style inlet was developed. A subcritical air ejector is used to continuously flow the inlet at desired corrected mass flow rates. The facility is capable of flowing the APU inlet over a wide range of corrected mass flow rate that matches the same Mach numbers as engine operating conditions. Additionally, improvement in the system operational steadiness was achieved by tuning the pressure controller using a PID control method and utilizing multi-layer screens downstream of the APU inlet. Less than 1% relative unsteadiness was achieved for full range operation. The flow field inside the rectangular-sectioned 90? bend of the APU-style inlet was measured using a 3-Component LDV system. The structures for both primary flow and the secondary flow inside the bend were resolved. Additionally, the effect of upstream geometry on the flow development in the downstream bend was also investigated. Furthermore, a Single Stage Centrifugal Compressor research facility was developed at Purdue University in collaboration with Honeywell to operate the APU-style inlet at engine conditions with a compressor. To operate the facility, extensive infrastructure for facility health monitoring and performance control (including lubrication

  4. Centrifugal Compressor Surge Margin Improved With Diffuser Hub Surface Air Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoch, Gary J.

    2002-01-01

    Aerodynamic stability is an important parameter in the design of compressors for aircraft gas turbine engines. Compression system instabilities can cause compressor surge, which may lead to the loss of an aircraft. As a result, engine designers include a margin of safety between the operating line of the engine and the stability limit line of the compressor. The margin of safety is typically referred to as "surge margin." Achieving the highest possible level of surge margin while meeting design point performance objectives is the goal of the compressor designer. However, performance goals often must be compromised in order to achieve adequate levels of surge margin. Techniques to improve surge margin will permit more aggressive compressor designs. Centrifugal compressor surge margin improvement was demonstrated at the NASA Glenn Research Center by injecting air into the vaned diffuser of a 4:1-pressure-ratio centrifugal compressor. Tests were performed using injector nozzles located on the diffuser hub surface of a vane-island diffuser in the vaneless region between the impeller trailing edge and the diffuser-vane leading edge. The nozzle flow path and discharge shape were designed to produce an air stream that remained tangent to the hub surface as it traveled into the diffuser passage. Injector nozzles were located near the leading edge of 23 of the 24 diffuser vanes. One passage did not contain an injector so that instrumentation located in that passage would be preserved. Several orientations of the injected stream relative to the diffuser vane leading edge were tested over a range of injected flow rates. Only steady flow (nonpulsed) air injection was tested. At 100 percent of the design speed, a 15-percent improvement in the baseline surge margin was achieved with a nozzle orientation that produced a jet that was bisected by the diffuser vane leading edge. Other orientations also improved the baseline surge margin. Tests were conducted at speeds below the

  5. Two-dimensional compressible flow in centrifugal compressors with straight blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanitz, John D; Ellis, Gaylord O

    1950-01-01

    Six numerical examples are presented for steady, two-dimensional, compressible, nonviscous flow in centrifugal compressors with thin straight blades, the center lines of which generate the surface of a right circular cone when rotated about the axis of the compressor. A seventh example is presented for incompressible flow. The solutions were obtained in a region of the compressors, including the impeller tip, that was considered to be unaffected by the diffuser vanes or by the impeller-inlet configuration. Each solution applies to radial and mixed flow compressors with various cone angles but with the same angle between blades on the conic flow surface. The solution also apply to radial and mixed flow turbines with the rotation and the flow direction reversed. The effects of variations in the following parameters were investigated: (1) flow rate, (2) impeller-tip speed, (3) variation of passage height with radius, and (4) angle between blades on conic flow surface. The numerical results are presented in plots of the streamlines and constant Mach number lines. Correlation equations are developed whereby the flow conditions in any impeller with straight blades can be determined (in the region investigated by this analysis) for all operating conditions.

  6. Experiences with nonsynchronous forced vibration in centrifugal compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. R.; Wachel, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    The high subsynchronous vibrations which are often forced vibrations caused by flow instabilities, such as stage stall were examined. Modifications to improve the rotor stability by changing the bearings or seals have little effects on the subsynchronous vibrations. Understanding of the differences between forced vibrations and self excited vibrations to properly diagnose the problem and to correct it, is recommended. A list of characteristics of the two types of subsynchronous vibration is presented.

  7. Analytical correlation of centrifugal compressor design geometry for maximum efficiency with specific speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvas, M. R.

    1972-01-01

    Centrifugal compressor performance was examined analytically to determine optimum geometry for various applications as characterized by specific speed. Seven specific losses were calculated for various combinations of inlet tip-exit diameter ratio, inlet hub-tip diameter ratio, blade exit backsweep, and inlet-tip absolute tangential velocity for solid body prewhirl. The losses considered were inlet guide vane loss, blade loading loss, skin friction loss, recirculation loss, disk friction loss, vaneless diffuser loss, and vaned diffuser loss. Maximum total efficiencies ranged from 0.497 to 0.868 for a specific speed range of 0.257 to 1.346. Curves of rotor exit absolute flow angle, inlet tip-exit diameter ratio, inlet hub-tip diameter ratio, head coefficient and blade exit backsweep are presented over a range of specific speeds for various inducer tip speeds to permit rapid selection of optimum compressor size and shape for a variety of applications.

  8. Performance of a low-pressure-ratio centrifugal compressor with four diffuser designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klassen, H. A.

    1973-01-01

    A low-pressure-ratio centrifugal compressor was tested with four different diffuser configurations. One diffuser had airfoil vanes. Two were pipe diffusers. One pipe diffuser had 7.5 deg cone diffusing passages. The other had trumpet-shaped passages designed for linear static-pressure rise from throat to exit. The fourth configuration had flat vanes with elliptical leading edges similar to those of pipe diffusers. The side walls were contoured to produce a linear pressure rise. Peak compressor efficiencies were 0.82 with the airfoil vane and conical pipe diffusers, 0.80 with the trumpet, and 0.74 with the flat-vane design. Surge margin and useful range were greater for the airfoil-vane diffuser than for the other three.

  9. Digital PIV Measurements in the Diffuser of a High Speed Centrifugal Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    1998-01-01

    Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) is a powerful measurement technique which can be used as an alternative or complementary approach to Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) in a wide range of research applications. PIV data are measured simultaneously at multiple points in space, which enables the investigation of the non-stationary spatial structures typically encountered in turbomachinery. Obtaining ample optical access, sufficiently high seed particle concentrations and accurate synchronization of image acquisition relative to impeller position are the most formidable tasks in the successful implementation of PIV in turbomachinery. Preliminary results from the successful application of the standard 2-D digital PIV technique in the diffuser of a high speed centrifugal compressor are presented. Instantaneous flow. measurements were also obtained during compressor surge.

  10. The task of validation of gas-dynamic characteristics of a multistage centrifugal compressor for a natural gas booster compressor station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilishin, A. M.; Kozhukhov, Y. V.; Neverov, V. V.; Malev, K. G.; Mironov, Y. R.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this work is the validation study for the numerical modeling of characteristics of a multistage centrifugal compressor for natural gas. In the research process was the analysis used grid interfaces and software systems. The result revealed discrepancies between the simulated and experimental characteristics and outlined the future work plan.

  11. A 4-spot time-of-flight anemometer for small centrifugal compressor velocity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wernet, M.P.; Skoch, G.J.

    1992-07-01

    The application of laser anemometry techniques in turbomachinery facilities is a challenging dilemma requiring an anemometer system with special qualities. Here, we describe the use of a novel laser anemometry technique applied to a small 4.5 kg/s, 4:1 pressure ratio centrifugal compressor. Sample velocity profiles across the blade pitch are presented for a single location along the rotor. The results of the intra-blade passage velocity measurements will ultimately be used to verify CFD 3-D viscous code predictions.

  12. A 4-spot time-of-flight anemometer for small centrifugal compressor velocity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Skoch, Gary J.

    1992-01-01

    The application of laser anemometry techniques in turbomachinery facilities is a challenging dilemma requiring an anemometer system with special qualities. Here, we describe the use of a novel laser anemometry technique applied to a small 4.5 kg/s, 4:1 pressure ratio centrifugal compressor. Sample velocity profiles across the blade pitch are presented for a single location along the rotor. The results of the intra-blade passage velocity measurements will ultimately be used to verify CFD 3-D viscous code predictions.

  13. Investigation of the jet-wake flow of a highly loaded centrifugal compressor impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckardt, D.

    1978-01-01

    Investigations, aimed at developing a better understanding of the complex flow field in high performance centrifugal compressors were performed. Newly developed measuring techniques for unsteady static and total pressures as well as flow directions, and a digital data analysis system for fluctuating signals were thoroughly tested. The loss-affected mixing process of the distorted impeller discharge flow was investigated in detail, in the absolute and relative system, at impeller tip speeds up to 380 m/s. A theoretical analysis proved good coincidence of the test results with the DEAN-SENOO theory, which was extended to compressible flows.

  14. Effect of self recirculation casing treatment on the performance of a turbocharger centrifugal compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gancedo, Matthieu

    Increase in emission regulations in the transport industry brings the need to have more efficient engines. A path followed by the automobile industry is to downsize the size of the internal combustion engine and increase the air density at the intake to keep the engine power when needed. Typically a centrifugal compressor is used to force the air into the engine, it can be powered from the engine shaft (superchargers) or extracting energy contained into the hot exhaust gases with a turbine (turbochargers). The flow range of the compressor needs to match the one of the engine. However compressors mass flow operating range is limited by choke on the high end and surge on the low end. In order to extend the operation at low mass flow rates, the use of passive devices for turbocharger centrifugal compressors was explored since the late 80's. Hence, casing treatments including flow recirculation from the inducer part of the compressor have been shown to move the surge limit to lower flows. Yet, the working mechanisms are still not well understood and thus, to optimize the design of this by-pass system, it is necessary to determine the nature of the changes induced by the device both on the dynamic stability of the pressure delivery and on the flow at the inlet. The compressor studied here features a self-recirculating casing treatment at the inlet. The recirculation passage could be blocked to carry a direct comparison between the cases with and without the flow feature. To grasp the effect on compressor stability, pressure measurements were taken in the different constituting elements of the compressor. The study of the mean pressure variations across the operating map showed that the tongue region is a limiting element. Dynamic pressure measurements revealed that the instabilities generated near the inducer when the recirculation is blocked increase the overall instability levels at the compressor outlet and propagating pressure waves starting at the tongue occurred

  15. The Impeller Exit Flow Coefficient As a Performance Map Variable for Predicting Centrifugal Compressor Off-Design Operation Applied to a Supercritical CO 2 Working Fluid

    DOE PAGES

    Liese, Eric; Zitney, Stephen E.

    2017-06-26

    A multi-stage centrifugal compressor model is presented with emphasis on analyzing use of an exit flow coefficient vs. an inlet flow coefficient performance parameter to predict off-design conditions in the critical region of a supercritical carbon dioxide (CO 2) power cycle. A description of the performance parameters is given along with their implementation in a design model (number of stages, basic sizing, etc.) and a dynamic model (for use in transient studies). A design case is shown for two compressors, a bypass compressor and a main compressor, as defined in a process simulation of a 10 megawatt (MW) supercritical COmore » 2 recompression Brayton cycle. Simulation results are presented for a simple open cycle and closed cycle process with changes to the inlet temperature of the main compressor which operates near the CO 2 critical point. Results showed some difference in results using the exit vs. inlet flow coefficient correction, however, it was not significant for the range of conditions examined. Here, this paper also serves as a reference for future works, including a full process simulation of the 10 MW recompression Brayton cycle.« less

  16. The Impeller Exit Flow Coefficient As a Performance Map Variable for Predicting Centrifugal Compressor Off-Design Operation Applied to a Supercritical CO 2 Working Fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Liese, Eric; Zitney, Stephen E.

    A multi-stage centrifugal compressor model is presented with emphasis on analyzing use of an exit flow coefficient vs. an inlet flow coefficient performance parameter to predict off-design conditions in the critical region of a supercritical carbon dioxide (CO 2) power cycle. A description of the performance parameters is given along with their implementation in a design model (number of stages, basic sizing, etc.) and a dynamic model (for use in transient studies). A design case is shown for two compressors, a bypass compressor and a main compressor, as defined in a process simulation of a 10 megawatt (MW) supercritical COmore » 2 recompression Brayton cycle. Simulation results are presented for a simple open cycle and closed cycle process with changes to the inlet temperature of the main compressor which operates near the CO 2 critical point. Results showed some difference in results using the exit vs. inlet flow coefficient correction, however, it was not significant for the range of conditions examined. Here, this paper also serves as a reference for future works, including a full process simulation of the 10 MW recompression Brayton cycle.« less

  17. Development of the seeding system used for laser velocimeter surveys of the NASA Low-Speed Centrifugal Compressor flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserbauer, Charles A.; Hathaway, Michael D.

    1993-01-01

    An atomizer-based system for distributing high-volume rates of seed material was developed to support laser velocimeter investigations of the NASA Low-Speed Centrifugal Compressor flow field. The seeding system and the major concerns that were addressed during its development are described. Of primary importance were that the seed material be dispersed as single particles and that the liquid carrier used be completely evaporated before entering the compressor.

  18. A model for the selective amplification of spatially coherent waves in a centrifugal compressor on the verge of rotating stall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, Patrick B.; Fleeter, Sanford

    1993-01-01

    A simple model for the stability zones of a low speed centrifugal compressor is developed, with the goal of understanding the driving mechanism for the changes in stalling behavior predicted for, and observed in, the Purdue Low Speed Centrifugal Research Compressor Facility. To this end, earlier analyses of rotating stall suppression in centrifugal compressors are presented in a reduced form that preserves the essential parameters of the model that affect the stalling behavior of the compressor. The model is then used to illuminate the relationship between compressor geometry, expected mode shape, and regions of amplification for weak waves which are indicative of the susceptibility of the system to rotating stall. The results demonstrate that increasing the stagger angle of the diffuser vanes, and consequently the diffusion path length, results in the compressor moving towards a condition where higher-order spatial modes are excited during stall initiation. Similarly, flow acceleration in the diffuser section caused by an increase in the number of diffuser vanes also results in the excitation of higher modes.

  19. Effects of inlet flow field conditions on the performance of centrifugal compressor diffusers: Part 1 -- Discrete-passage diffuser

    SciTech Connect

    Filipenco, V.G.; Deniz, S.; Johnston, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    This is Part 1 of a two-part paper considering the performance of radial diffusers for use in a high-performance centrifugal compressor. Part 1 reports on discrete-passage diffusers, while Part 2 describes a test of a straight-channel diffuser designed for equivalent duty. Two builds of discrete-passage diffuser were tested, with 30 and 38 separate passages. Both the 30 and 38 passage diffusers investigated showed comparable range of unstalled operation and similar level of overall diffuser pressure recovery. The paper concentrates on the influence of inlet flow conditions on the pressure recovery and operating range of radial diffusers for centrifugal compressor stages.more » The flow conditions examined include diffuser inlet Mach number, flow angle, blockage, and axial flow nonuniformity. The investigation was carried out in a specially built test facility, designed to provide a controlled inlet flow field to the test diffusers. The facility can provide a wide range of diffuser inlet velocity profile distortion and skew with Mach numbers up to unity and flow angles of 63 to 75 deg from the radical direction. The consequences of different averaging methods for the inlet total pressure distributions, which are needed in the definition of diffuser pressure recovery coefficient for nonuniform diffuser inlet conditions, were also assessed. The overall diffuser pressure recovery coefficient, based on suitably averaged inlet total pressure, was found to correlate well with the momentum-averaged flow angle into the diffuser. It is shown that the generally accepted sensitivity of diffuser pressure recovery performance to inlet flow distortion and boundary layer blockage can be largely attributed to inappropriate quantification of the average dynamic pressure at diffuser inlet. Use of an inlet dynamic pressure based on availability or mass-averaging in combination with definition of inlet flow angle based on mass average of the radial and tangential velocity at diffuser

  20. Numerical investigation of rotating stall in centrifugal compressor with vaned and vaneless diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halawa, Taher; Alqaradawi, Mohamed; Gadala, Mohamed S.; Shahin, Ibrahim; Badr, Osama

    2015-06-01

    This study presents a numerical simulation of the stall and surge in a centrifugal compressor and presents a descriptionof the stall development in two different cases. The first case is for a compressor with vaneless diffuser and the second is for a compressor with vaned diffuser of the vane island shape. The main aim of this study is to compare the flow characteristics and behavior for the two compressors near the surge operating condition and provide further understanding of the diffuser role when back flow occurs at surge. Results showed that for a locationnear the diffuser entrance, the amplitude of the static pressure fluctuations for the vaneless diffuser case is higher than that for the vaned diffuser case near surge condition. These pressure fluctuations in the case of the vaneless diffuser appear with a gradual decrease of the mean pressure value as a part of the surge cycle. While for the case of the vaned diffuser, the pressure drop during surge occurs faster than the case of the vaneless diffuser. Also, results indicated that during surge in the case of vaneless diffuser, there is a region with low velocity and back flow that appears as a layer connecting all impeller passages near shroud surface and this layer develops in size with time. On the other hand, for the case of vaned diffuser during surge, the low velocity regions appear in random locations in some passages and these regions expand with time towards the shroud surface. Results showed that during stall, the impeller passages are exposed to identical impact from stall cells in the case of vaneless diffuser while the stall effect varies from passage to another in the case of the vaned diffuser.

  1. Aerodynamically induced radial forces in a centrifugal gas compressor. Part 1: Experimental measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.J.; Flathers, M.B.

    1998-04-01

    Net radial loading arising from asymmetric pressure fields in the volutes of centrifugal pumps during off-design operation is well known and has been studied extensively. In order to achieve a marked improvement in overall efficiency in centrifugal gas compressors, vaneless volute diffusers are matched to specific impellers to yield improved performance over a wide application envelope. As observed in centrifugal pumps, nonuniform pressure distributions that develop during operation above and below the design flow create static radial loads on the rotor. In order to characterize these radial forces, a novel experimental measurement and post-processing technique is employed that yields bothmore » the magnitude and direction of the load by measuring the shaft centerline locus in the tilt-pad bearings. The method is applicable to any turbomachinery operating on fluid film radial bearings equipped with proximity probes. The forces are found to be a maximum near surge and increase with higher pressures and speeds. The results are nondimensionalized, allowing the radial loading for different operating conditions to be predicted.« less

  2. Numerical investigation of influence of tip leakage flow on secondary flow in transonic centrifugal compressor at design condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Masanao; Tsujita, Hoshio

    2015-04-01

    In a centrifugal compressor, the leakage flow through the tip clearance generates the tip leakage vortex by the interaction with the main flow, and consequently makes the flow in the impeller passage more complex by the interaction with the passage vortex. In addition, the tip leakage vortex interacts with the shock wave on the suction surface near the blade tip in the transonic centrifugal compressor impeller. Therefore, the detailed examination for the influence of the tip leakage vortex becomes seriously important to improve the aerodynamic performance especially for the transonic centrifugal compressor. In this study, the flows in the transonic centrifugal compressor with and without the tip clearance at the design condition were analyzed numerically by using the commercial CFD code. The computed results revealed that the tip leakage vortex induced by the high loading at the blade tip around the leading edge affected the loss generation by the reduction or the suppression of the shock wave on the suction surface of the blade.

  3. Weak Defect Identification for Centrifugal Compressor Blade Crack Based on Pressure Sensors and Genetic Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongkun; He, Changbo

    2018-01-01

    The Centrifugal compressor is a piece of key equipment for petrochemical factories. As the core component of a compressor, the blades suffer periodic vibration and flow induced excitation mechanism, which will lead to the occurrence of crack defect. Moreover, the induced blade defect usually has a serious impact on the normal operation of compressors and the safety of operators. Therefore, an effective blade crack identification method is particularly important for the reliable operation of compressors. Conventional non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E) methods can detect the blade defect effectively, however, the compressors should shut down during the testing process which is time-consuming and costly. In addition, it can be known these methods are not suitable for the long-term on-line condition monitoring and cannot identify the blade defect in time. Therefore, the effective on-line condition monitoring and weak defect identification method should be further studied and proposed. Considering the blade vibration information is difficult to measure directly, pressure sensors mounted on the casing are used to sample airflow pressure pulsation signal on-line near the rotating impeller for the purpose of monitoring the blade condition indirectly in this paper. A big problem is that the blade abnormal vibration amplitude induced by the crack is always small and this feature information will be much weaker in the pressure signal. Therefore, it is usually difficult to identify blade defect characteristic frequency embedded in pressure pulsation signal by general signal processing methods due to the weakness of the feature information and the interference of strong noise. In this paper, continuous wavelet transform (CWT) is used to pre-process the sampled signal first. Then, the method of bistable stochastic resonance (SR) based on Woods-Saxon and Gaussian (WSG) potential is applied to enhance the weak characteristic frequency contained in the pressure

  4. Weak Defect Identification for Centrifugal Compressor Blade Crack Based on Pressure Sensors and Genetic Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongkun; He, Changbo; Malekian, Reza; Li, Zhixiong

    2018-04-19

    The Centrifugal compressor is a piece of key equipment for petrochemical factories. As the core component of a compressor, the blades suffer periodic vibration and flow induced excitation mechanism, which will lead to the occurrence of crack defect. Moreover, the induced blade defect usually has a serious impact on the normal operation of compressors and the safety of operators. Therefore, an effective blade crack identification method is particularly important for the reliable operation of compressors. Conventional non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E) methods can detect the blade defect effectively, however, the compressors should shut down during the testing process which is time-consuming and costly. In addition, it can be known these methods are not suitable for the long-term on-line condition monitoring and cannot identify the blade defect in time. Therefore, the effective on-line condition monitoring and weak defect identification method should be further studied and proposed. Considering the blade vibration information is difficult to measure directly, pressure sensors mounted on the casing are used to sample airflow pressure pulsation signal on-line near the rotating impeller for the purpose of monitoring the blade condition indirectly in this paper. A big problem is that the blade abnormal vibration amplitude induced by the crack is always small and this feature information will be much weaker in the pressure signal. Therefore, it is usually difficult to identify blade defect characteristic frequency embedded in pressure pulsation signal by general signal processing methods due to the weakness of the feature information and the interference of strong noise. In this paper, continuous wavelet transform (CWT) is used to pre-process the sampled signal first. Then, the method of bistable stochastic resonance (SR) based on Woods-Saxon and Gaussian (WSG) potential is applied to enhance the weak characteristic frequency contained in the pressure

  5. Improved model for the design and analysis of centrifugal compressor volutes

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Braembussche, R.A.; Ayder, E.; Hagelstein, D.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes a new model for the analysis of the flow in volutes of centrifugal compressors. It explicitly takes into account the vortical structure of the flow that has been observed during detailed three-dimensional flow measurements. It makes use of an impeller and diffuser response model to predict the nonuniformity of the volute inlet flow due, to the circumferential variation of the pressure at the volute inlet, and is therefore applicable also at off-design operation of the volute. Predicted total pressure loss and static pressure rise coefficients at design and off-design operation have been compared with experimental data formore » different volute geometries but only one test case is presented here. Good agreement in terms of losses and pressure rise is observed at most operating points and confirms the validity of the impeller and diffuser response model.« less

  6. Off-design flow measurements in a centrifugal compressor vaneless diffuser

    SciTech Connect

    Pinarbasi, A.; Johnson, M.W.

    1995-10-01

    Detailed measurements have been taken of the three-dimensional velocity field within the vaneless diffuser of a backswept low speed centrifugal compressor using hot-wire anemometry. A 16% below and an 11% above design flow rate were used in the present study. Results at both flow rates show how the blade wake mixes out more rapidly than the passage wake. Strong secondary flows inherited from the impeller at the higher flow rate delay the mixing out of the circumferential velocity variations, but at both flow rates these circumferential variations are negligible at the last measurement station. The measured tangential/radial flow angle ismore » used to recommend optimum values for the vaneless space and vane angle for design of a vaned diffuser.« less

  7. Weak rotating flow disturbances in a centrifugal compressor with a vaneless diffuser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, F. K.

    1988-01-01

    A theory is presented to predict the occurrence of weak rotating waves in a centrifugal compression system with a vaneless diffuser. As in a previous study of axial systems, an undisturbed performance characteristic is assumed known. Following an inviscid analysis of the diffuser flow, conditions for a neutral rotating disturbance are found. The solution is shown to have two branches; one with fast rotation, the other with very slow rotation. The slow branch includes a dense set of resonant solutions. The resonance is a feature of the diffuser flow, and therefore such disturbances must be expected at the various resonant flow coefficients regardless of the compressor characteristic. Slow solutions seem limited to flow coefficients less than about 0.3, where third and fourth harmonics appear. Fast waves seem limited to a first harmonic. These fast and slow waves are described, and effects of diffuser-wall convergence, backward blade angles, and partial recovery of exit velocity head are assessed.

  8. The effect of prewhirl on the internal aerodynamics and performance of a mixed flow research centrifugal compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, William B.; Fleeter, Sanford

    1987-01-01

    The internal three-dimensional steady and time-varying flow through the diffusing elements of a centrifugal impeller were investigated using a moderate scale, subsonic, mixed flow research compressor facility. The characteristics of the test facility which permit the measurement of internal flow conditions throughout the entire research compressor and radial diffuser for various operating conditions are described. Results are presented in the form of graphs and charts to cover a range of mass flow rates with inlet guide vane settings varying from minus 15 degrees to plus 45 degrees. The static pressure distributions in the compressor inlet section and on the impeller and exit diffuser vanes, as well as the overall pressure and temperature rise and mass flow rate, were measured and analyzed at each operating point to determine the overall performance as well as the detailed aerodynamics throughout the compressor.

  9. Regulating Effect of Asymmetrical Impeller on the Flow Distributions of Double-sided Centrifugal Compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ce; Liu, Yixiong; Yang, Dengfeng; Wang, Benjiang

    2017-11-01

    To achieve the rebalance of flow distributions of double-sided impellers, a method of improving the radius of rear impeller is presented in this paper. It is found that the flow distributions of front and rear impeller can be adjusted effectively by increasing the radius of rear impeller, thus improves the balance of flow distributions of front and rear impeller. Meanwhile, the working conversion mode process of double-sided centrifugal compressor is also changed. Further analysis shows that the flowrates of blade channels in front impeller are mainly influenced by the circumferential distributions of static pressure in the volute. But the flowrates of rear impeller blade channels are influenced by the outlet flow field of bent duct besides the effects of static pressure distributions in the volute. In the airflow interaction area downstream, the flowrate of blade channel is obviously smaller. By increasing the radius of rear impeller, the work capacity of rear impeller is enhanced, the working mode conversion process from parallel working mode of double-sided impeller to the single impeller working mode is delayed, and the stable working range of double-sided compressor is broadened.

  10. Core compressor exit stage study. Volume 4: Data and performance report for the best stage configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisler, D. C.

    1981-01-01

    The core compressor exit stage study program develops rear stage blading designs that have lower losses in their endwall boundary layer regions. The test data and performance results for the best stage configuration consisting of Rotor-B running with Stator-B are described. The technical approach in this efficiency improvement program utilizes a low speed research compressor. Tests were conducted in two ways: (1) to use four identical stages of blading to obtain test data in a true multistage environment and (2) to use a single stage of blading to compare with the multistage test results. The effects of increased rotor tip clearances and circumferential groove casing treatment are evaluated.

  11. Optical Flow-Field Techniques Used for Measurements in High-Speed Centrifugal Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoch, Gary J.

    1999-01-01

    The overall performance of a centrifugal compressor depends on the performance of the impeller and diffuser as well as on the interactions occurring between these components. Accurate measurements of the flow fields in each component are needed to develop computational models that can be used in compressor design codes. These measurements must be made simultaneously over an area that covers both components so that researchers can understand the interactions occurring between the two components. Optical measurement techniques are being used at the NASA Lewis Research Center to measure the velocity fields present in both the impeller and diffuser of a 4:1 pressure ratio centrifugal compressor operating at several conditions ranging from design flow to surge. Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) was used to measure the intrablade flows present in the impeller, and the results were compared with analyses obtained from two three-dimensional viscous codes. The development of a region of low throughflow velocity fluid within this high-speed impeller was examined and compared with a similar region first observed in a large low-speed centrifugal impeller at Lewis. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is a relatively new technique that has been applied to measuring the diffuser flow fields. PIV can collect data rapidly in the diffuser while avoiding the light-reflection problems that are often encountered when LDV is used. The Particle Image Velocimeter employs a sheet of pulsed laser light that is introduced into the diffuser in a quasi-radial direction through an optical probe inserted near the diffuser discharge. The light sheet is positioned such that its centerline is parallel to the hub and shroud surfaces and such that it is parallel to the diffuser vane, thereby avoiding reflections from the solid surfaces. Seed particles small enough to follow the diffuser flow are introduced into the compressor at an upstream location. A high-speed charge-coupled discharge (CCD) camera is

  12. Effect of inducer inlet and diffuser throat areas on performance of a low pressure ratio sweptback centrifugal compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klassen, H. A.

    1975-01-01

    A low-pressure-ratio centrifugal compressor was tested with nine combinations of three diffuser throat areas and three impeller inducer inlet areas which were 75, 100, and 125 percent of design values. For a given inducer inlet area, increases in diffuser area within the range investigated resulted in increased mass flow and higher peak efficiency. Changes in both diffuser and inducer areas indicated that efficiencies within one point of the maximum efficiency were obtained over a compressor specific speed range of 27 percent. The performance was analyzed of an assumed two-spool open-cycle engine using the 75 percent area inducer with a variable area diffuser.

  13. Design and analysis of axial aspirated compressor stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merchant, Ali A.

    The pressure ratio of axial compressor stages can be significantly increased by controlling the development of blade and endwall boundary layers in regions of adverse pressure gradient by means of boundary layer suction. This concept is validated and demonstrated through the design and analysis of two unique aspirated compressor stages: a low-speed stage with a design pressure ratio of 1.6 at a tip speed of 750 ft/s, and a high-speed stage with a design pressure ratio of 3.5 at a tip speed of 1500 ft/s. The aspirated compressor stages were designed using a new procedure which is a synthesis of low speed and high speed blade design techniques combined with a flexible inverse design method which enabled precise independent control over the shape of the blade suction and pressure surfaces. Integration of the boundary layer suction calculation into the overall design process is an essential ingredient of the new procedure. The blade design system consists of two axisymmetric through-flow codes coupled with a quasi three-dimensional viscous cascade plane code with inverse design capability. Validation of the completed designs were carried out with three-dimensional Euler and Navier-Stokes calculations. A single spanwise slot on the blade suction surface is used to bleed the boundary layer. The suction mass flow requirement for the low-speed and high-speed stages are 1% and 4% of the inlet mass flow, respectively. Additional suction between 1-2% is also required on the compressor endwalls near shock impingement locations. The rotor is modeled with a tip shroud to eliminate tip clearance effects and to discharge the suction flow radially from the flowpath. Three-dimensional viscous evaluation of the designs showed good agreement with the quasi three-dimensional design intent, except in the endwall regions. The suction requirements predicted by the quasi three-dimensional calculation were confirmed by the three-dimensional viscous calculations. The three

  14. Numerical study of centrifugal compressor stage vaneless diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galerkin, Y.; Soldatova, K.; Solovieva, O.

    2015-08-01

    The authors analyzed CFD calculations of flow in vaneless diffusers with relative width in range from 0.014 to 0.100 at inlet flow angles in range from 100 to 450 with different inlet velocity coefficients, Reynolds numbers and surface roughness. The aim is to simulate calculated performances by simple algebraic equations. The friction coefficient that represents head losses as friction losses is proposed for simulation. The friction coefficient and loss coefficient are directly connected by simple equation. The advantage is that friction coefficient changes comparatively little in range of studied parameters. Simple equations for this coefficient are proposed by the authors. The simulation accuracy is sufficient for practical calculations. To create the complete algebraic model of the vaneless diffuser the authors plan to widen this method of modeling to diffusers with different relative length and for wider range of Reynolds numbers.

  15. Full load shop testing of 18,000-hp gas turbine driven centrifugal compressor for offshore platform service: Evaluation of rotor dynamics performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, R. G.; Simpson, M.

    1985-01-01

    The results for in-plant full load testing of a 13.4 MW (18000 HP) gas turbine driven centrifugal compressor are presented and compared to analytical predictions of compressor rotor stability. Unique problems from both oil seals and labyrinth gas seals were encountered during the testing. The successful resolution of these problems are summarized.

  16. Stage effects on stalling and recovery of a high-speed 10-stage axial-flow compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Copenhaver, W.W.

    1988-01-01

    Results of a high-speed 10-stage axial-flow compressor test involving overall compressor and individual stage performance while stalling and operating in quasi-steady rotating stall are described. Test procedures and data-acquisition methods used to obtain the dynamic stalling and quasi-steady in-stall data are explained. Unstalled and in-stall time-averaged data obtained from the compressor operating at five different shaft speeds and one off-schedule variable vane condition are presented. Effects of compressor speed and variable geometry on overall compressor in-stall pressure rise and hysteresis extent are illustrated through the use of quasi-steady-stage temperature rise and pressure-rise characteristics. Results indicate that individual stage performance duringmore » overall compressor rotating stall operation varies considerably throughout the length of the compressor. The measured high-speed 10-stage test compressor individual stage pressure and temperature characteristics were input into a stage-by-stage dynamic compressor performance model. Comparison of the model results and measured pressures provided the additional validation necessary to demonstrate the model's ability to predict high-speed multistage compressor stalling and in-stall performance.« less

  17. Dimension Determination of Precursive Stall Events in a Single Stage High Speed Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bright, Michelle M.; Qammar, Helen K.; Hartley, Tom T.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the dynamics for a single-stage, axial-flow, high speed compressor core, specifically, the NASA Lewis rotor stage 37. Due to the overall blading design for this advanced core compressor, each stage has considerable tip loading and higher speed than most compressor designs, thus, the compressor operates closer to the stall margin. The onset of rotating stall is explained as bifurcations in the dynamics of axial compressors. Data taken from the compressor during a rotating stall event is analyzed. Through the use of a box-assisted correlation dimension methodology, the attractor dimension is determined during the bifurcations leading to rotating stall. The intent of this study is to examine the behavior of precursive stall events so as to predict the entrance into rotating stall. This information may provide a better means to identify, avoid or control the undesirable event of rotating stall formation in high speed compressor cores.

  18. Numerical analysis of the three-dimensional swirling flow in centrifugal compressor volutes

    SciTech Connect

    Ayder, E.; Van den Braembussche, R.

    1994-07-01

    The improvement of centrifugal compressor performance and the control of the radial forces acting on the impeller due to the circumferential variation of the static pressure caused by the volute require a good understanding of the flow mechanisms and an accurate prediction of the flow pattern inside the volute. A three-dimensional volute calculation method has been developed for this purpose. The volute is discretized by means of hexahedral elements. A cell vertex finite volume approach is used in combination with a time-marching procedure. The numerical procedure makes use of a central space discretization and a four-step Runge-Kutta time-stepping scheme. Themore » artificial dissipation used in the solver is based on the fourth-order differences of the conservative variables. Implicit residual smoothing improves the convergence rate. The loss model implemented in the code accounts for the losses due to internal shear and friction losses on the walls. A comparison of the calculated and measured results inside a volute with elliptical cross section reveals that the modified Euler solver accurately predicts the velocity and pressure distribution inside and upstream of the volute.« less

  19. Inverse design of centrifugal compressor vaned diffusers in inlet shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Zangeneh, M.

    1996-04-01

    A three-dimensional inverse design method in which the blade (or vane) geometry is designed for specified distributions of circulation and blade thickness is applied to the design of centrifugal compressor vaned diffusers. Two generic diffusers are designed, one with uniform inlet flow (equivalent to a conventional design) and the other with a sheared inlet flow. The inlet shear flow effects are modeled in the design method by using the so-called ``Secondary Flow Approximation`` in which the Bernoulli surfaces are convected by the tangentially mean inviscid flow field. The difference between the vane geometry of the uniform inlet flow and nonuniformmore » inlet flow diffusers is found to be most significant from 50 percent chord to the trailing edge region. The flows through both diffusers are computed by using Denton`s three-dimensional inviscid Euler solver and Dawes` three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver under sheared in-flow conditions. The predictions indicate improved pressure recovery and internal flow field for the diffuser designed for shear inlet flow conditions.« less

  20. Multi-point optimization of recirculation flow type casing treatment in centrifugal compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tun, Min Thaw; Sakaguchi, Daisaku

    2016-06-01

    High-pressure ratio and wide operating range are highly required for a turbocharger in diesel engines. A recirculation flow type casing treatment is effective for flow range enhancement of centrifugal compressors. Two ring grooves on a suction pipe and a shroud casing wall are connected by means of an annular passage and stable recirculation flow is formed at small flow rates from the downstream groove toward the upstream groove through the annular bypass. The shape of baseline recirculation flow type casing is modified and optimized by using a multi-point optimization code with a metamodel assisted evolutionary algorithm embedding a commercial CFD code CFX from ANSYS. The numerical optimization results give the optimized design of casing with improving adiabatic efficiency in wide operating flow rate range. Sensitivity analysis of design parameters as a function of efficiency has been performed. It is found that the optimized casing design provides optimized recirculation flow rate, in which an increment of entropy rise is minimized at grooves and passages of the rotating impeller.

  1. Optimization of a centrifugal compressor impeller using CFD: the choice of simulation model parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neverov, V. V.; Kozhukhov, Y. V.; Yablokov, A. M.; Lebedev, A. A.

    2017-08-01

    Nowadays the optimization using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) plays an important role in the design process of turbomachines. However, for the successful and productive optimization it is necessary to define a simulation model correctly and rationally. The article deals with the choice of a grid and computational domain parameters for optimization of centrifugal compressor impellers using computational fluid dynamics. Searching and applying optimal parameters of the grid model, the computational domain and solver settings allows engineers to carry out a high-accuracy modelling and to use computational capability effectively. The presented research was conducted using Numeca Fine/Turbo package with Spalart-Allmaras and Shear Stress Transport turbulence models. Two radial impellers was investigated: the high-pressure at ψT=0.71 and the low-pressure at ψT=0.43. The following parameters of the computational model were considered: the location of inlet and outlet boundaries, type of mesh topology, size of mesh and mesh parameter y+. Results of the investigation demonstrate that the choice of optimal parameters leads to the significant reduction of the computational time. Optimal parameters in comparison with non-optimal but visually similar parameters can reduce the calculation time up to 4 times. Besides, it is established that some parameters have a major impact on the result of modelling.

  2. Performance of 15-Stage Experimental J71 Axial-Flow Compressor: II - Individual Stage Performance Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, James G.; Filippi, Richard E.

    1954-01-01

    The first four stages were found to cause a major part of the poor low-speed efficiency of this compressor. The low design-speed over-all pressure ratio at surge was caused by the first and the twelfth to fifteenth stages. The multiple over-all performance curves in the intermediate-speed range were at least partly the result of double-branched characteristic curves for the third and seventh stages.

  3. Analysis of rig test data for an axial/centrifugal compressor in the 12 kg/sec

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, A. K.

    1994-01-01

    Extensive testing was done on a T55-L-712 turboshaft engine compressor in a compressor test rig at TEXTRON/Lycoming. These rig tests will be followed by a series of engine tests to occur at the NASA Lewis Research Center beginning in the last quarter of 1993. The goals of the rig testing were: (1) map the steady state compressor operation from 20 percent to 100 percent design speed, (2) quantify the effects of compressor bleed on the operation of the compressor, and (3) explore and measure the operation of the compressor in the flow ranges 'beyond' the normal compressor stall line. Instrumentation consisted of 497 steady state pressure sensors, 153 temperature sensors and 34 high response transducers for transient analysis in the pre- and post-stall operating regime. These measurements allow for generation of detailed stage characteristics as well as overall mapping. Transient data is being analyzed for the existence of modal disturbances at the front face of the compression system ('stall precursors'). This paper presents some preliminary results of the ongoing analysis and a description of the current and future program plans. It will primarily address the unsteady events at the front face of the compression system that occur as the system transitions from steady state to unsteady (stall/surge) operation.

  4. PIV measurements of the flow at the inlet of a turbocharger centrifugal compressor with recirculation casing treatment near the inducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gancedo, Matthieu; Gutmark, Ephraim; Guillou, Erwann

    2016-02-01

    Turbocharging reciprocating engines is a viable solution in order to meet the new regulations for emissions and fuel efficiency in part because turbochargers allow to use smaller, more efficient engines (downsizing) while maintaining power. A major challenge is to match the flow range of a dynamic turbomachine (the centrifugal compressor in the turbocharger) with a positive displacement pump (the engine) as the flow range of the latter is typically higher. The operating range of the compressor is thus of prime interest. At low mass flow rate (MFR), the compressor range is limited by the occurrence of surge. To control and improve it, numerous and varied methods have been used. Yet, an automotive application requires that the solution remains relatively simple and preferably passive. A common feature that has been demonstrated to improve the surge line is the use of flow recirculation in the inducer region through a circumferential bleed slot around the shroud, also called "ported shroud", similar to what has been developed for axial compressors in the past. The compressor studied here features such a device. In order to better understand the effect of the recirculation slot on the compressor functioning, flow measurements were performed at the inlet using particle image velocimetry and the results were correlated with pressure measurements nearby. Measurements were taken on a compressor with and without recirculation and across the full range of normal operation and during surge using a phase-locking method to obtain average flow fields throughout the entire surge cycle. When the recirculation is blocked, it was found that strong backflow develops at low MFR perturbing the incoming flow and inducing significant preswirl. The slot eliminated most of the backflow in front of the inducer making the compressor operation more stable. The measurements performed during surge showed strong backflow occurring periodically during the outlet pressure drop and when the

  5. Investigation on inlet recirculation characteristics of double suction centrifugal compressor with unsymmetrical inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ce; Wang, Yingjun; Lao, Dazhong; Tong, Ding; Wei, Longyu; Liu, Yixiong

    2016-08-01

    The inlet recirculation characteristics of double suction centrifugal compressor with unsymmetrical inlet structures were studied in numerical method, mainly focused on three issues including the amounts and differences of the inlet recirculation in different working conditions, the circumferential non-uniform distributions of the inlet recirculation, the recirculation velocity distributions of the upstream slot of the rear impeller. The results show that there are some differences between the recirculation of the front impeller and that of the rear impeller in whole working conditions. In design speed, the recirculation flow rate of the rear impeller is larger than that of the front impeller in the large flow range, but in the small flow range, the recirculation flow rate of the rear impeller is smaller than that of the front impeller. In different working conditions, the recirculation velocity distributions of the front and rear impeller are non-uniform along the circumferential direction and their non-uniform extents are quite different. The circumferential non-uniform extent of the recirculation velocity varies with the working conditions change. The circumferential non-uniform extent of the recirculation velocity of front impeller and its distribution are determined by the static pressure distribution of the front impeller, but that of the rear impeller is decided by the coupling effects of the inlet flow distortion of the rear impeller, the circumferential unsymmetrical distribution of the upstream slot and the asymmetric structure of the volute. In the design flow and small flow conditions, the recirculation velocities at different circumferential positions of the mean line of the upstream slot cross-section of the rear impeller are quite different, and the recirculation velocities distribution forms at both sides of the mean line are different. The recirculation velocity distributions in the cross-section of the upstream slot depend on the static pressure

  6. Numerical investigation on pressure fluctuations in centrifugal compressor with different inlet guide vanes pre-whirl angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. C.; Shi, M.; Cao, S. L.; Li, Z. H.

    2013-12-01

    The pressure fluctuations in a centrifugal compressor with different inlet guide vanes (IGV) pre-whirl angles were investigated numerically, as well as the pre-stress model and static structural of blade. The natural frequency was evaluated by pre-stress model analysis. The results show that, the aero-dynamic pressure acting on blade surface is smaller than rotation pre-stress, which wouldn't result in large deformation of blade. The natural frequencies with rotation pre-stress are slightly higher than without rotation pre-stress. The leading mechanism of pressure fluctuations for normal conditions is the rotor-stator (IGVs) interaction, while is serious flow separations for conditions that are close to surge line. A few frequency components in spectra are close to natural frequency, which possibly result in resonant vibration if amplitude is large enough, which is dangerous for compressor working, and should be avoided.

  7. A prediction of 3-D viscous flow and performance of the NASA Low-Speed Centrifugal Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, John; Moore, Joan G.

    1990-01-01

    A prediction of the three-dimensional turbulent flow in the NASA Low-Speed Centrifugal Compressor Impeller has been made. The calculation was made for the compressor design conditions with the specified uniform tip clearance gap. The predicted performance is significantly worse than that predicted in the NASA design study. This is explained by the high tip leakage flow in the present calculation and by the different model adopted for tip leakage flow mixing. The calculation gives an accumulation of high losses in the shroud/pressure-side quadrant near the exit of the impeller. It also predicts a region of meridional backflow near the shroud wall. Both of these flow features should be extensive enough in the NASA impeller to allow detailed flow measurements, leading to improved flow modeling. Recommendations are made for future flow studies in the NASA impeller.

  8. L2F and LDV velocimetry measurement and analysis of the 3-D flow field in a centrifugal compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fagan, John R., Jr.; Fleeter, Sanford

    1989-01-01

    The flow field in the Purdue Research Centrifugal Compressor is studied using a laser two-focus (L2F) velocimeter. L2F data are obtained which quantify: (1) the compressor inlet flow field; (2) the steady-state velocity field in the impeller blade passages; and (3) the flow field in the radial diffuser. The L2F data are compared with both laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) data and predictions from three-dimensional inviscid and viscous flow models. In addition, a model is developed to calculate the effect on the measurement volume geometry of refraction by curved windows. Finally, the advantages and disadvantages of using the L2F for turbomachinery measurements is discussed in terms of measurement accuracy, ease of use, including sample time per correlated event and the ability to make measurements in regions of high noise due to stray radiation from wall reflections.

  9. A prediction of 3-D viscous flow and performance of the NASA low-speed centrifugal compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, John; Moore, Joan G.

    1989-01-01

    A prediction of the 3-D turbulent flow in the NASA Low-Speed Centrifugal Compressor Impeller has been made. The calculation was made for the compressor design conditions with the specified uniform tip clearance gap. The predicted performance is significantly worse than that predicted in the NASA design study. This is explained by the high tip leakage flow in the present calculation and by the different model adopted for tip leakage flow mixing. The calculation gives an accumulation for high losses in the shroud/pressure-side quadrant near the exit of the impeller. It also predicts a region of meridional backflow near the shroud wall. Both of these flow features should be extensive enough in the NASA impeller to allow detailed flow measurements, leading to improved flow modelling. Recommendations are made for future flow studies in the NASA impeller.

  10. Vane clocking effects in an embedded compressor stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, Nicole Leanne

    The objective of this research was to experimentally investigate the effects of vane clocking, the circumferential indexing of adjacent vane rows with similar vane counts, in an embedded compressor stage. Experiments were performed in the Purdue 3-Stage Compressor, which consists of an IGV followed by three stages. The IGV, Stator 1, and Stator 2 have identical vane counts of 44, and the effects of clocking were studied on Stage 2. The clocking configuration that located the upstream vane wake on the Stator 2 leading edge was identified with total pressure measurements at the inlet to Stator 2 and confirmed with measurements at the exit of Stator 2. For both loading conditions, the total temperature results showed that there was no measurable change associated with vane clocking in the amount of work done on the flow. At design loading, the change in stage efficiency with vane clocking was 0.27 points between the maximum and minimum efficiency clocking configurations. The maximum efficiency configuration was the case where the Stator 1 wake impinged on the Stator 2 leading edge. This condition produced a shallower and thinner Stator 2 wake compared to the clocking configuration that located the wake in the middle of the Stator 2 passage. By locating the Stator 1 wake at the leading edge, it dampened the Stator 2 boundary layer response to inlet fluctuations associated with the Rotor 2 wakes. At high loading, the change in Stage 2 efficiency increased to 1.07 points; however, the maximum efficiency clocking configuration was the case where the Stator 1 wake passed through the middle of the downstream vane passage. At high loading, the flow physics associated with vane clocking were different than at design loading because the location of the Stator 1 wake fluid on the Stator 2 leading edge triggered a boundary layer separation on the suction side of Stator 2 producing a wider and deeper wake. Vane clocking essentially affects the amount of interaction between the

  11. 2D and 3D impellers of centrifugal compressors - advantages, shortcomings and fields of application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galerkin, Y.; Reksrin, A.; Drozdov, A.

    2017-08-01

    The simplified equations are presented for calculation of inlet dimensions and velocity values for impellers with three-dimensional blades located in axial and radial part of an impeller (3D impeller) and with two-dimensional blades in radial part (2D). Considerations concerning loss coefficients of 3D and 2D impellers at different design flow rate coefficients are given. The tendency of reduction of potential advantages of 3D impellers at medium and small design flow rate coefficients is shown. The data on high-efficiency compressors and stages with 2D impellers coefficients designed by the authors are presented. The reached efficiency level of 88 - 90% makes further increase of efficiency by the application of 3D impellers doubtful. CFD-analysis of stage candidates with medium flow rate coefficient with 3D and 2D impellers revealed specific problems. In some cases the constructive advantage of a 2D impeller is smaller hub ratio. It makes possible the reaching of higher efficiency. From other side, there is a positive tendency of gas turbine drive RPM increase. 3D impellers have no alternative for stages with high flow rate coefficients matching high-speed drive.

  12. Extended range heat pump system and centrifugal compressor for use therewith

    SciTech Connect

    Shoemaker, J.F.

    1988-04-26

    Improvements in heat pump systems having indoor and outdoor heat exchangers and at least two compressors for supplying a refrigerant medium under pressure thereto, and means for circulating the medium through the heat exchangers, the improvement is described comprising a selector valve associated with each of the compressors. The selector valves provide that any combination and any one or more of the compressors can be selected for operation, each of the selector valves having a first operating condition placing the associated compressor in series with the heat exchangers and a second operating condition whereby the associated compressor is bypassed, whenmore » the selector valves for at least two of the compressors are simultaneously in their first positions a flow path is established through the associated compressors and through the heat exchangers all in series, a two position changeover valve and associated conduit means. The changeover valve has a first position wherein at least one of the compressors is connected in series with the first and second heat exchangers to produce flow of the medium in one direction therethrough and a second position whereby at least one compressor is connected to produce flow of the medium in the opposite direction through the heat exchangers.« less

  13. Rotating stall investigation of 0.72 hub-tip ratio single-stage compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, Robert W; Prian, Vasily D

    1954-01-01

    The rotating stall characteristics of a 0.72 hub-tip ratio, single-stage compressor were investigated. The stage was a 14-inch-diameter replica of the fourth stage of an experimental multistage compressor. No similarity existed between the frequency and propagation rate of the stall patterns observed in the single-stage replica and those observed in the multistage compressor after the fourth stage. A fatigue failure of the rotor blades occurred during the testing which was attributed to a resonance between the stall frequency and the natural bending frequency of the blades.

  14. Aerodynamic Design of a Four-Stage Low-Speed Axial Compressor for Cantilevered Stator Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, James N.

    This research is focused on the baseline aerodynamic design of a four-stage low-speed axial compressor with the intent to achieve similarity of cantilevered stator hub leakage flows with those in the rear stages of Siemens large gas turbine compressors. The baseline airfoil design is to act as a comparison for all future research completed in the low speed compressor and, therefore, will not include possible future research topics such as 3-D airfoil geometry or end-wall contouring. Following the design of the airfoils is the aerodynamic design of the facility including the inlet and exhaust. These components were designed to eliminate interactions of the compressor with the facility and to accommodate instrumentation. A baseline set of aerodynamic instrumentation is then suggested to characterize compressor performance. Fully 3-D steady CFD was used extensively during the design of both the facility and the compressor, as well as determining the locations and types of instrumentation.

  15. Splitter-bladed centrifugal compressor impeller designed for automotive gas turbine application. [at the Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pampreen, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Mechanical design and fabrication of two splitter-bladed centrifugal compressor impellers were completed for rig testing at NASA Lewis Research Center. These impellers were designed for automotive gas turbine application. The mechanical design was based on NASA specifications for blade-shape and flowpath configurations. The contractor made engineering drawings and performed calculations for mass and center-of-gravity, for stress and vibration analyses, and for shaft critical speed analysis. One impeller was machined to print; the other had a blade height and exit radius of 2.54 mm larger than print dimensions.

  16. Three-dimensional Aerodynamic Instability in Multi-stage Axial Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suder, Kenneth (Technical Monitor); Tan, Choon-Sooi

    2003-01-01

    Four separate tasks are reported. The first task: A Computational Model for Short Wavelength Stall Inception and Development In Multi-Stage Compressors; the second task: Three-dimensional Rotating Stall Inception and Effects of Rotating Tip Clearance Asymmetry in Axial Compressors; the third task:Development of an Effective Computational Methodology for Body Force Representation of High-speed Rotor 37; and the fourth task:Development of Circumferential Inlet Distortion through a Representative Eleven Stage High-speed axial compressor. The common theme that threaded throughout these four tasks is the conceptual framework that consists of quantifying flow processes at the fadcompressor blade passage level to define the compressor performance characteristics needed for addressing physical phenomena such compressor aerodynamic instability and compressor response to flow distoriton with length scales larger than compressor blade-to-blade spacing at the system level. The results from these two levels can be synthesized to: (1) simulate compressor aerodynamic instability inception local to a blade rotor tip and its development from a local flow event into the nonlinear limit cycle instability that involves the entire compressor as was demonstrated in the first task; (2) determine the conditions under which compressor stability assessment based on two-dimensional model may not be adequate and the effects of self-induced flow distortion on compressor stability limit as in the second task; (3) quantify multistage compressor response to inlet distortion in stagnation pressure as illustrated in the fourth task; and (4) elucidate its potential applicability for compressor map generation under uniform as well as non-uniform inlet flow given three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solution for each individual blade row as was demonstrated in the third task.

  17. Unsteady behavior of leading-edge vortex and diffuser stall in a centrifugal compressor with vaned diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisawa, Nobumichi; Hara, Shotaro; Ohta, Yutaka

    2016-02-01

    The characteristics of a rotating stall of an impeller and diffuser and the evolution of a vortex generated at the diffuser leading-edge (i.e., the leading-edge vortex (LEV)) in a centrifugal compressor were investigated by experiments and numerical analysis. The results of the experiments revealed that both the impeller and diffuser rotating stalls occurred at 55 and 25 Hz during off-design flow operation. For both, stall cells existed only on the shroud side of the flow passages, which is very close to the source location of the LEV. According to the CFD results, the LEV is made up of multiple vortices. The LEV is a combination of a separated vortex near the leading- edge and a longitudinal vortex generated by the extended tip-leakage flow from the impeller. Therefore, the LEV is generated by the accumulation of vorticity caused by the velocity gradient of the impeller discharge flow. In partial-flow operation, the spanwise extent and the position of the LEV origin are temporarily transmuted. The LEV develops with a drop in the velocity in the diffuser passage and forms a significant blockage within the diffuser passage. Therefore, the LEV may be regarded as being one of the causes of a diffuser stall in a centrifugal compressor.

  18. Analysis and identification of subsynchronous vibration for a high pressure parallel flow centrifugal compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, R. G.; Nicholas, J. C.; Donald, G. H.; Murphy, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    The summary of a complete analytical design evaluation of an existing parallel flow compressor is presented and a field vibration problem that manifested itself as a subsynchronous vibration that tracked at approximately 2/3 of compressor speed is reviewed. The comparison of predicted and observed peak response speeds, frequency spectrum content, and the performance of the bearing-seal systems are presented as the events of the field problem are reviewed. Conclusions and recommendations are made as to the degree of accuracy of the analytical techniques used to evaluate the compressor design.

  19. Modeling and design study using HFC-236ea as an alternative refrigerant in a centrifugal compressor. Final report, January 1994-September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, P.; Shapiro, H.N.

    1997-04-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in cooperation with the Navy has been seeking a CFC-114 drop-in placement. One alternative HFC refrigerant which appears to satisfy all physical and chemical characteristics for the Navy fleet was found to be HFC-236ea refrigerant. The project represents a part of the investigation directed to evaluate this CFC-114 alternative refrigerant as a possible drop-in replacement in Navy chillers. The objective of the study was to conduct a thorough literature review regarding centrifugal compressors and the, on the basis of the information gathered, build an accurate but simple compressor model utilizing the available compressor experimental data.more » Further, the developed compressor model would be used to suggest eventual design adjustments to enhance compressor performance with the alternative HFC-236ea refrigerant.« less

  20. Three-Dimensional Aerodynamic Instabilities In Multi-Stage Axial Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Choon S.; Gong, Yifang; Suder, Kenneth L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This thesis presents the conceptualization and development of a computational model for describing three-dimensional non-linear disturbances associated with instability and inlet distortion in multistage compressors. Specifically, the model is aimed at simulating the non-linear aspects of short wavelength stall inception, part span stall cells, and compressor response to three-dimensional inlet distortions. The computed results demonstrated the first-of-a-kind capability for simulating short wavelength stall inception in multistage compressors. The adequacy of the model is demonstrated by its application to reproduce the following phenomena: (1) response of a compressor to a square-wave total pressure inlet distortion; (2) behavior of long wavelength small amplitude disturbances in compressors; (3) short wavelength stall inception in a multistage compressor and the occurrence of rotating stall inception on the negatively sloped portion of the compressor characteristic; (4) progressive stalling behavior in the first stage in a mismatched multistage compressor; (5) change of stall inception type (from modal to spike and vice versa) due to IGV stagger angle variation, and "unique rotor tip incidence" at these points where the compressor stalls through short wavelength disturbances. The model has been applied to determine the parametric dependence of instability inception behavior in terms of amplitude and spatial distribution of initial disturbance, and intra-blade-row gaps. It is found that reducing the inter-blade row gaps suppresses the growth of short wavelength disturbances. It is also concluded from these parametric investigations that each local component group (rotor and its two adjacent stators) has its own instability point (i.e. conditions at which disturbances are sustained) for short wavelength disturbances, with the instability point for the compressor set by the most unstable component group. For completeness, the methodology has been extended to

  1. Study of blade aspect ratio on a compressor front stage aerodynamic and mechanical design report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, G. D.; Lee, D.; Snow, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    A single stage compressor was designed with the intent of demonstrating that, for a tip speed and hub-tip ratio typical of an advanced core compressor front stage, the use of low aspect ratio can permit high levels of blade loading to be achieved at an acceptable level of efficiency. The design pressure ratio is 1.8 at an adiabatic efficiency of 88.5 percent. Both rotor and stator have multiple-circular-arc airfoil sections. Variable IGV and stator vanes permit low speed matching adjustments. The design incorporates an inlet duct representative of an engine transition duct between fan and high pressure compressor.

  2. Core compressor exit stage study. Volume 1: Blading design. [turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisler, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    A baseline compressor test stage was designed as well as a candidate rotor and two candidate stators that have the potential of reducing endwall losses relative to the baseline stage. These test stages are typical of those required in the rear stages of advanced, highly-loaded core compressors. The baseline Stage A is a low-speed model of Stage 7 of the 10 stage AMAC compressor. Candidate Rotor B uses a type of meanline in the tip region that unloads the leading edge and loads the trailing edge relative to the baseline Rotor A design. Candidate Stator B embodies twist gradients in the endwall region. Candidate Stator C embodies airfoil sections near the endwalls that have reduced trailing edge loading relative to Stator A. Tests will be conducted using four identical stages of blading so that the designs described will operate in a true multistage environment.

  3. Experimental studies of two-stage centrifugal dust concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vechkanova, M. V.; Fadin, Yu M.; Ovsyannikov, Yu G.

    2018-03-01

    The article presents data of experimental results of two-stage centrifugal dust concentrator, describes its design, and shows the development of a method of engineering calculation and laboratory investigations. For the experiments, the authors used quartz, ceramic dust and slag. Experimental dispersion analysis of dust particles was obtained by sedimentation method. To build a mathematical model of the process, dust collection was built using central composite rotatable design of the four factorial experiment. A sequence of experiments was conducted in accordance with the table of random numbers. Conclusion were made.

  4. Stability Improvement of High-Pressure-Ratio Turbocharger Centrifugal Compressor by Asymmetrical Flow Control-Part II: Nonaxisymmetrical Self-Recirculation Casing Treatment.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xinqian; Zhang, Yangjun; Yang, Mingyang; Bamba, Takahiro; Tamaki, Hideaki

    2013-03-01

    This is part II of a two-part paper involving the development of an asymmetrical flow control method to widen the operating range of a turbocharger centrifugal compressor with high-pressure ratio. A nonaxisymmetrical self-recirculation casing treatment (SRCT) as an instance of asymmetrical flow control method is presented. Experimental and numerical methods were used to investigate the impact of nonaxisymmetrical SRCT on the surge point of the centrifugal compressor. First, the influence of the geometry of a symmetric SRCT on the compressor performance was studied by means of numerical simulation. The key parameter of the SRCT was found to be the distance from the main blade leading edge to the rear groove (S r ). Next, several arrangements of a nonaxisymmetrical SRCT were designed, based on flow analysis presented in part I. Then, a series of experiments were carried out to analyze the influence of nonaxisymmetrical SRCT on the compressor performance. Results show that the nonaxisymmetrical SRCT has a certain influence on the performance and has a larger potential for stability improvement than the traditional symmetric SRCT. For the investigated SRCT, the surge flow rate of the compressor with the nonaxisymmetrical SRCTs is about 10% lower than that of the compressor with symmetric SRCT. The largest surge margin (smallest surge flow rate) can be obtained when the phase of the largest S r is coincident with the phase of the minimum static pressure in the vicinity of the leading edge of the splitter blades.

  5. Exprimental Results of the First Two Stages of an Advanced Transonic Core Compressor Under Isolated and Multi-Stage Conditions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahst, Patricia S.; Kulkarni, Sameer; Sohn, Ki H.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program calls for investigation of the technology barriers associated with improved fuel efficiency for large gas turbine engines. Under ERA, the highly loaded core compressor technology program attempts to realize the fuel burn reduction goal by increasing overall pressure ratio of the compressor to increase thermal efficiency of the engine. Study engines with overall pressure ratio of 60 to 70 are now being investigated. This means that the high pressure compressor would have to almost double in pressure ratio while keeping a high level of efficiency. NASA and GE teamed to address this challenge by testing the first two stages of an advanced GE compressor designed to meet the requirements of a very high pressure ratio core compressor. Previous test experience of a compressor which included these front two stages indicated a performance deficit relative to design intent. Therefore, the current rig was designed to run in 1-stage and 2-stage configurations in two separate tests to assess whether the bow shock of the second rotor interacting with the upstream stage contributed to the unpredicted performance deficit, or if the culprit was due to interaction of rotor 1 and stator 1. Thus, the goal was to fully understand the stage 1 performance under isolated and multi-stage conditions, and additionally to provide a detailed aerodynamic data set for CFD validation. Full use was made of steady and unsteady measurement methods to understand fluid dynamics loss source mechanisms due to rotor shock interaction and endwall losses. This paper will present the description of the compressor test article and its measured performance and operability, for both the single stage and two stage configurations. We focus the paper on measurements at 97% corrected speed with design intent vane setting angles.

  6. Thirty Stage Annular Centrifugal Contactor Thermal Profile Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    David H. Meikrantz; Troy G. Garn; Jack D. Law

    2010-02-01

    A thirty stage 5 cm annular centrifugal contactor cascade has been assembled and tested to obtain thermal profiles during both ambient and heated input conditions of operation. Thermocouples were installed on every stage as well as feed inputs and Real-time data was taken during experiments lasting from two to eight hours at total flow rates of 0.5 to 1.4 liters per minute. Ambient temperature profile results show that only a small amount of heat is generated by the mechanical energy of the contactors. Steady state temperature profiles mimic the ambient temperature of the lab but are higher toward the middlemore » of the cascade. Heated inlet solutions gave temperature profiles with smaller temperature gradients, more driven by the temperature of the inlet solutions than ambient lab temperature. Temperature effects of solution mixing, even at rotor speeds of 4000 rpm, were not measurable.« less

  7. Analysis of casing treatment’s impact on the axial compressor model stage characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tribunskaia, K.; Kozhukhov, Y. V.

    2017-08-01

    There are special requirements for the compressors of aircraft engines. They must ensure maximum efficiency in a maximally large stable work zone Due to a high pressure ratio these stages are more susceptible to the losses from radial clearance. One of the approaches to reduce such losses is the application of above-rotor devices. In the following study there is considered the impact of such treatments on the compressor stage performance. Despite the fact that there is a sufficient amount of research about this issue, their results are contradictory. The use of these devices can affect the characteristics of compressor stage performance both positively and negatively. This study was conducted using the methods of computational fluid dynamics and was based on the NASA Rotor-37 geometry model stage. Results were obtained through the comparison of the characteristics of stages with and without above-rotor devices.

  8. CFD simulation of pulsation noise in a small centrifugal compressor with volute and resonance tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakaki, Daich; Sakuka, Yuta; Inokuchi, Yuzo; Ueda, Kosuke; Yamasaki, Nobuhiko; Yamagata, Akihiro

    2015-02-01

    The rotational frequency tone noise emitted from the automobile turbocharger is called the pulsation noise. The cause of the pulsation noise is not fully understood, but is considered to be due to some manufacturing errors, which is called the mistuning. The effects of the mistuning of the impeller blade on the noise field inside the flow passage of the compressor are numerically investigated. Here, the flow passage includes the volute and duct located downstream of the compressor impeller. Our numerical approach is found to successfully capture the wavelength of the pulsation noise at given rotational speeds by the comparison with the experiments. One of the significant findings is that the noise field of the pulsation noise in the duct is highly one-dimensional although the flow fields are highly three-dimensional.

  9. Practical exergy analysis of centrifugal compressor performance using ASME-PTC-10 data

    SciTech Connect

    Carranti, F.J.

    1997-07-01

    It has been shown that measures of performance currently in use for industrial and process compressors do not give a true measure of energy utilization, and that the required assumptions of isentropic or adiabatic behavior are now always valid. A better indication of machine or process performance can be achieved using exergetic (second law) efficiencies and by employing the second law of thermodynamics to indicate the nature of irreversibilities and entropy generation in the compression process. In this type of analysis, performance is related to an environmental equilibrium condition, or dead state. Often, the differences between avoidable and unavoidable irreversibilitiesmore » ca be interpreted from these results. A general overview of the techniques involved in exergy analysis as applied to compressors and blowers is presented. A practical method to allow the calculation of exergetic efficiencies by manufacturers and end users is demonstrated using data from ASME Power Test Code input. These data are often readily available from compressor manufacturers for both design and off-design conditions, or can sometimes be obtained from field measurements. The calculations involved are simple and straightforward, and can demonstrate the energy usage situation for a variety of conditions. Here off-design is taken to mean at different rates of flow, as well as at different environmental states. The techniques presented are also applicable to many other equipment and process types.« less

  10. Comparison of measurement data at the impeller exit of a centrifugal compressor measured with both pneumatic and fast-response probes

    SciTech Connect

    Roduner, C.; Koeppel, P.; Kupferschmied, P.

    1999-07-01

    The main goal of these investigations was the refined measurement of unsteady high speed flow in a centrifugal compressor using the advanced FRAP{reg_sign} fast-response aerodynamic probe system. The present contribution focuses on the impeller exit region and shows critical comparisons between fast-response (time-resolving) and conventional pneumatic probe measurement results. Three probes of identical geometry (one fast and two pneumatic) were used to perform wall-to-wall traverses close to impeller exit. The data shown refer to a single running condition near the best point of the stage. The mass flow obtained from different probe measurements and from the standard orifice measurement weremore » compared. Stage work obtained from temperature rise measured with a FRAP{reg_sign} probe and from impeller outlet velocity vectors fields by using Euler`s turbine equation are presented. The comparison in terms of velocity magnitude and angle distribution is quite satisfactory, indicating the superior DC measurement capabilities of the fast-response probe system.« less

  11. Simulated dynamic response of a multi-stage compressor with variable molecular weight flow medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babcock, Dale A.

    1995-01-01

    A mathematical model of a multi-stage compressor with variable molecular weight flow medium is derived. The modeled system consists of a five stage, six cylinder, double acting, piston type compressor. Each stage is followed by a water cooled heat exchanger which serves to transfer the heat of compression from the gas. A high molecular weight gas (CFC-12) mixed with air in varying proportions is introduced to the suction of the compressor. Condensation of the heavy gas may occur in the upper stage heat exchangers. The state equations for the system are integrated using the Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL) for determining the system's dynamic and steady state characteristics under varying operating conditions.

  12. Surge Flow in a Centrifugal Compressor Measured by Digital Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    2000-01-01

    A planar optical velocity measurement technique known as Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is being used to study transient events in compressors. In PIV, a pulsed laser light sheet is used to record the positions of particles entrained in a fluid at two instances in time across a planar region of the flow. Determining the recorded particle displacement between exposures yields an instantaneous velocity vector map across the illuminated plane. Detailed flow mappings obtained using PIV in high-speed rotating turbomachinery components are used to improve the accuracy of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations, which in turn, are used to guide advances in state-of-the-art aircraft engine hardware designs.

  13. Study of the potential for improving the economics of hydrogen liquefaction through the use of centrifugal compressors and the addition of a heavy water plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, C. R.

    1977-01-01

    An approach to the liquefaction of hydrogen was developed which permits the application of standard centrifugal compressors in place of reciprocating machines. A second fluid, such as propane, is added to the hydrogen prior to compression to form a mixture having a molecular weight much greater than that of hydrogen alone, so that a standard centrifugal compressor can be used. After compression, the mixture is cooled to cryogenic temperature levels where the propane condenses out of the mixture and is separated as a liquid. Since a small amount of deuterium is produced during hydrogen liquefaction, the potential of recovering deuterium and selling it as a co-product was investigated. Deuterium, in the form of heavy water, can be used in certain nuclear reactors as a neutron moderator to reduce the neutron velocity and enhance the probability of neutron collision with uranium nucleii.

  14. Design, development, and test of a laser velocimeter for a small 8:1 pressure ratio centrifugal compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, F. X.; Runstadler, P. W., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The instrument was designed as a diagnostic tool for the basic fluid dynamics of the inducer, impeller, and diffuser regions of this type compressor. The LV instrumentation was optimized to measure instantaneous velocities up to approximately 500 m/s, measured in absolute coordinates, within the rotating compressor impeller and in the two dimensional radial plane of the diffuser. Some measurements were made within the diffuser and the impeller inlet flows; however, attempts to make detailed measurements of the velocity field were not successful. Difficulties in maintaining high seed particle rates within the probe volume and the improper operation of the blade gating optics may explain the lack of success. Recommendations are made to further pursue these problems. At 100% speed the stage attained a total static pressure ratio of 7.5:1 at 75% total-static efficiency. Flow range from choke-to-surge was 6.8% of choking mass flow rate. Performance was lower than the design intent of 8:1 pressure ratio at 77% efficiency and 12% flow range. Detailed measurements of the stage components are presented which show the reasons for the stage performance deficiencies.

  15. Verification of a three-dimensional viscous flow analysis for a single stage compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Akinori; Hashimoto, Keisuke; Nozaki, Osamu; Kikuchi, Kazuo; Fukuda, Masahiro; Tamura, Atsuhiro

    1992-12-01

    A transonic flowfield around rotor blades of a highly loaded single stage axial compressor was numerically analyzed by a three dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equation code using Chakravarthy and Osher type total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme. A stage analysis which calculates both flowfields around inlet guide vane (IGV) and rotor blades simultaneously was carried out. Comparing with design values and experimental data, computed results show slight difference quantitatively. But the numerical calculation simulates well the pressure rise characteristics of the compressor and its flow pattern including strong shock surface.

  16. CENTRIFUGE

    DOEpatents

    Rushing, F.C.

    1960-09-01

    A vibration damping mechanism for damping vibration forces occurring during the operation of a centrifuge is described. The vibration damping mechanism comprises a plurality of nested spaced cylindrical elements surrounding the rotating shaft of the centrifuge. Some of the elements are held substantially stationary while the others are held with respect to a pair of hearings spaced along the rotating shaft. A fluid is retained about the cylindrical elements.

  17. Stage Effects on Stalling and Recovery of a High-Speed 10-Stage Axial- Flow Compressor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    facility C Specific heat of air at constant pressureP Cx Axial velocity DC Direct current DAC Data acquisition computer DCS Design corrected compressor ...was designed to inve3tigate the component performance of an axial -flow compressor while stalling and operating in rotating stall. No attempt was made...Temperatures were measured from a probe configuration similar to the to - pressure design . 68 Table 4.2 Compressor instrumentation RADIAL PROPERTY AXIAL

  18. Active magnetic bearings applied to industrial compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, R. G.; Hustak, J. F.; Schoeneck, K. A.

    1993-01-01

    The design and shop test results are given for a high-speed eight-stage centrifugal compressor supported by active magnetic bearings. A brief summary of the basic operation of active magnetic bearings and the required rotor dynamics analysis are presented with specific attention given to design considerations for optimum rotor stability. The concerns for retrofits of magnetic bearings in existing machinery are discussed with supporting analysis of a four-stage centrifugal compressor. The current status of industrial machinery in North America using this new support system is presented and recommendations are given on design and analysis requirements for successful machinery operation of either retrofit or new design turbomachinery.

  19. An experimental and computational investigation of flow in a radial inlet of an industrial pipeline centrifugal compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Flathers, M.B.; Bache, G.E.; Rainsberger, R.

    1996-04-01

    The flow field of a complex three-dimensional radial inlet for an industrial pipeline centrifugal compressor has been experimentally determined on a half-scale model. Based on the experimental results, inlet guide vanes have been designed to correct pressure and swirl angle distribution deficiencies. The unvaned and vaned inlets are analyzed with a commercially available fully three-dimensional viscous Navier-Stokes code. Since experimental results were available prior to the numerical study, the unvaned analysis is considered a postdiction while the vaned analysis is considered a prediction. The computational results of the unvaned inlet have been compared to the previously obtained experimental results. Themore » experimental method utilized for the unvaned inlet is repeated for the vaned inlet and the data have been used to verify the computational results. The paper will discuss experimental, design, and computational procedures, grid generation, boundary conditions, and experimental versus computational methods. Agreement between experimental and computational results is very good, both in prediction and postdiction modes. The results of this investigation indicate that CFD offers a measurable advantage in design, schedule, and cost and can be applied to complex, three-dimensional radial inlets.« less

  20. Feedforward compensation control of rotor imbalance for high-speed magnetically suspended centrifugal compressors using a novel adaptive notch filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Shiqiang; Feng, Rui

    2016-03-01

    This paper introduces a feedforward control strategy combined with a novel adaptive notch filter to solve the problem of rotor imbalance in high-speed Magnetically Suspended Centrifugal Compressors (MSCCs). Unbalance vibration force of rotor in MSCC is mainly composed of current stiffness force and displacement stiffness force. In this paper, the mathematical model of the unbalance vibration with the proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control laws is presented. In order to reduce the unbalance vibration, a novel adaptive notch filter is proposed to identify the synchronous frequency displacement of the rotor as a compensation signal to eliminate the current stiffness force. In addition, a feedforward channel from position component to control output is introduced to compensate displacement stiffness force to achieve a better performance. A simplified inverse model of power amplifier is included in the feedforward channel to reject the degrade performance caused by its low-pass characteristic. Simulation and experimental results on a MSCC demonstrate a significant effect on the synchronous vibration suppression of the magnetically suspended rotor at a high speed.

  1. Numerical simulation of MEMS-based blade load distribution control in centrifugal compressor surge suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beneda, Károly

    2012-11-01

    The utilization of turbomachines requires up-to-date technologies to ensure safe operation throughout the widest possible range that makes novel ideas necessary to cope with classic problems. One of the most dangerous instability in compression systems is surge that has to be suppressed before its onset to avoid structural damages as well as other adverse consequences in the system. As surge occurs at low delivered mass flow rates the conventional widely spread surge control is based on bypassing the unnecessary airflow back to the atmosphere. This method has been implemented on a large number of aircraft and provides a robust control on suppressing compressor surge while creating a significant efficiency loss. This paper deals with an idea that has been originally designed as a fixed geometry that could be realized using up-to-date MEMS technology resulting in moderate losses but comparable stability enhancement. Previously the author has established the one-dimensional mathematical model of the concept, but it is indispensable - before the real instrument can be developed - to carry out detailed numerical simulation of the device. The aim of the paper is to acquaint the efforts of this CFD simulation.

  2. Experimental analysis of the flow in a two stage axial compressor at off-design conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massardo, Aristide; Satta, Antonio

    1987-05-01

    The experimental analysis of the flow that develops in a two-stage axial flow compressor at off-design conditions is presented. The measurements are performed upstream, between, and downstream of the four blade rows of the compressor. The analysis shows the off-design effects on the local conditions of the flow field. Low-energy flow zones are identified, and the development of annulus-boundary-layer, secondary, and tip-clearance flows is shown. The tip-clearance flows are also present in the stator rows with various outlying conditions (stationary or rotating hub).

  3. Application of a multi-block CFD code to investigate the impact of geometry modeling on centrifugal compressor flow field predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Hathaway, M.D.; Wood, J.R.

    1997-10-01

    CFD codes capable of utilizing multi-block grids provide the capability to analyze the complete geometry of centrifugal compressors. Attendant with this increased capability is potentially increased grid setup time and more computational overhead with the resultant increase in wall clock time to obtain a solution. If the increase in difficulty of obtaining a solution significantly improves the solution from that obtained by modeling the features of the tip clearance flow or the typical bluntness of a centrifugal compressor`s trailing edge, then the additional burden is worthwhile. However, if the additional information obtained is of marginal use, then modeling of certainmore » features of the geometry may provide reasonable solutions for designers to make comparative choices when pursuing a new design. In this spirit a sequence of grids were generated to study the relative importance of modeling versus detailed gridding of the tip gap and blunt trailing edge regions of the NASA large low-speed centrifugal compressor for which there is considerable detailed internal laser anemometry data available for comparison. The results indicate: (1) There is no significant difference in predicted tip clearance mass flow rate whether the tip gap is gridded or modeled. (2) Gridding rather than modeling the trailing edge results in better predictions of some flow details downstream of the impeller, but otherwise appears to offer no great benefits. (3) The pitchwise variation of absolute flow angle decreases rapidly up to 8% impeller radius ratio and much more slowly thereafter. Although some improvements in prediction of flow field details are realized as a result of analyzing the actual geometry there is no clear consensus that any of the grids investigated produced superior results in every case when compared to the measurements. However, if a multi-block code is available, it should be used, as it has the propensity for enabling better predictions than a single block code.« less

  4. Evaluation of a low aspect ratio small axial compressor stage, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, C. W., III

    1977-01-01

    A program was conducted to evaluate the effects of scaling, tip clearance, and IGV reset on the performance of a low aspect ratio compressor stage. Stage design was obtained by scaling an existing single stage compressor by a linear factor of 0.304. The design objective was to maintain the meanline velocity field of the base machine in the smaller size. Adjustments were made to account for predicted blockage differences and to chord lengths and airfoil edge radii to obtain reasonable blade geometries. Meanline velocity diagrams of the base stage were not maintained at the scaled size. At design speed and flowrate the scaled stage achieved a pressure ratio of 1.423, adiabatic efficiency of 0.822, and surge margin of 18.5%. The corresponding performance parameters for the base stage were 1.480, 0.872, and 25.2%, respectively. The base stage demonstrated a peak efficiency at design speed of 0.872; the scaled stage achieved a level of 0.838. When the scaled stage rotor and stator tip clearances were doubled, the stage achieved a pressure ratio of 1.413, efficiency of 0.799, and surge margin of 16.0% at the design flowrate. The peak stage efficiency at design speed was 0.825 with the increased clearance. Increased prewhirl lowered the stage pressure ratio as expected. Stage efficiency was maintained with ten degrees of increased prewhirl and then decreased substantially with ten additional degrees of reset.

  5. Core compressor exit stage study. Volume 3: Data and performance report for screening test configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisler, D. C.

    1980-01-01

    Rear stage blading designs that have lower losses in their endwall boundary layer regions were developed. Test data and performance results for rotor B, stator B, and stator C - blading designs that offer promise of reducing endwall losses relative to the baseline are given. A low speed research compressor was the principal investigative tool. The tests were conducted using four identical stages of blading so that the test data would be obtained in a true multistage environment.

  6. Effects of inlet flow field conditions on the performance of centrifugal compressor diffusers: Part 2 -- Straight-channel diffuser

    SciTech Connect

    Deniz, S.; Greitzer, E.M.; Cumpsty, N.A.

    2000-01-01

    This is Part 2 of an examination of the influence of inlet flow conditions on the performance and operating range of centrifugal compressor vaned diffusers. The paper describes tests of a straight-channel type diffuser, sometimes called a wedge-vane diffuser, and compares the results with those from the discrete-passage diffusers described in Part 1. Effects of diffuser inlet Mach number, flow angle, blockage, and axial flow nonuniformity on diffuser pressure recovery and operating range are addressed. The straight-channel diffuser investigated has 30 vanes and was designed for the same aerodynamic duty as the discrete-passage diffuser described in Part 1. The rangesmore » of the overall pressure recovery coefficients were 0.50--0.78 for the straight-channel diffuser and 0.50--0.70 for the discrete-passage diffuser, except when the diffuser was choked. In other words, the maximum pressure recovery of the straight-channel diffuser was found to be roughly 10% higher than that of the discrete-passage diffuser investigated. The two types of diffuser showed similar behavior regarding the dependence of pressure recovery on diffuser inlet flow angle and the insensitivity of the performance to inlet flow field axial distortion and Mach number. The operating range of the straight-channel diffuser, as for the discrete-passage diffusers, was limited by the onset of rotating stall at a fixed momentum-averaged flow angle into the diffuser, which was for the straight-channel diffuser, {alpha}{sub crit} = 70 {+-} 0.5 deg. The background, nomenclature, and description of the facility and method are all given in Part 1.« less

  7. STGSTK- PREDICTING MULTISTAGE AXIAL-FLOW COMPRESSOR PERFORMANCE BY A MEANLINE STAGE-STACKING METHOD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinke, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    The STGSTK computer program was developed for predicting the off-design performance of multistage axial-flow compressors. The axial-flow compressor is widely used in aircraft engines. In addition to its inherent advantage of high mass flow per frontal area, it can exhibit very good aerodynamic performance. However, good aerodynamic performance over an acceptable range of operating conditions is not easily attained. STGSTK provides an analytical tool for the development of new compressor designs. The simplicity of a one-dimensional compressible flow model enables the stage-stacking method used in STGSTK to have excellent convergence properties and short computer run times. Also, the simplicity of the model makes STGSTK a manageable code that eases the incorporation, or modification, of empirical correlations directly linked to test data. Thus, the user can adapt the code to meet varying design needs. STGSTK uses a meanline stage-stacking method to predict off-design performance. Stage and cumulative compressor performance is calculated from representative meanline velocity diagrams located at rotor inlet and outlet meanline radii. STGSTK includes options for the following: 1) non-dimensional stage characteristics may be input directly or calculated from stage design performance input, 2) stage characteristics may be modified for off-design speed and blade reset, and 3) rotor design deviation angle may be modified for off-design flow, speed, and blade setting angle. Many of the code's options use correlations that are normally obtained from experimental data. The STGSTK user may modify these correlations as needed. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM 370 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 85K of 8 bit bytes. STGSTK was developed in 1982.

  8. The construction, testing, and installation of a 6500 r/min 15 000-hp adjustable-speed electric drive for a centrifugal gas compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, R.G.; Finney, D.; Davidson, D.F.

    1988-07-01

    The construction, testing, and installation of a 6500 r/min 15 000-hp adjustable-speed electric drive for a centrifugal gas compressor is presented. A power electronic converter is applied to control the speed of a 5-kV motor. The motor is directly coupled to a 6500 r/min compressor and replaced a steam turbine. Dual converters are used in a twelve-pulse arrangement at both the utility and the motor. The motor is of solid rotor construction, with dual 30/sup 0/ displaced stator windings. Finite-element analysis is used to optimize the motor designs for use with a variable-frequency static converter. Full-power tests are completed whichmore » confirm theoretical predictions on losses, performance, and operation. The electrical drive takes up considerably less space and is much more efficient than the steam turbine it replaced.« less

  9. The numerical study of the rake angle of impeller blade in centrifugal compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, A.; Galerkin, Y.

    2017-08-01

    Investigated impellers have blade surfaces formed by straight generatrix. Blade profiles on shroud and disc surfaces are optimized by velocity diagram control (inviscid, quasi-three dimensional calculations). The blade profiles at hub and shroud blade-to-blade surfaces must be coordinated. A designer can choose the generatrix position at a trailing edge for it. The position is defined by the rake angle that is the angle between a trailing edge generatrix and a meridional plane. Two stages with 3D impellers, vaneless diffusers and return channels were investigated. Seven candidates of impellers of these stages with rake angles in range plus-minus 30 degrees were designed and investigated by quasi-three-dimensional inviscid calculation. CFD-calculations were made for the stages with these impellers. The optimal rake angle is minus 20 degrees for the high flow rate impeller due to lesser blade surface area and favorable meridian velocity field. Zero rake angle is optimal for the medium flow rate impeller where blade surface area is not so important. The combination of inviscid and viscid calculations is the informative instrument for further studies.

  10. Study of a Wake Recovery Mechanism in a High-Speed Axial Compressor Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale E.

    1998-01-01

    This work addresses the significant differences in compressor rotor wake mixing loss which exist in a stage environment relative to a rotor in isolation. The wake decay for a rotor in isolation is due solely to viscous dissipation which is an irreversible process and thus leads to a loss in both total pressure and efficiency. Rotor wake decay in the stage environment is due to both viscous mixing and the inviscid strain imposed on the wake fluid particles by the stator velocity field. This straining process, referred to by Smith (1993) as recovery, is reversible and for a 2D rotor wake leads to an inviscid reduction of the velocity deficit of the wake. A model for the rotor wake decay process is developed and used to quantify the viscous dissipation effects relative to those of inviscid wake stretching. The model is verified using laser anemometer measurements acquired in the wake of a transonic rotor operated in isolation and in a stage configuration at near peak efficiency and near stall operating conditions. Additional insight is provided by a time-accurate 3D Navier-Stokes simulation of the compressor stator flow field at the corresponding stage loading levels. Results from the wake decay model exhibit good agreement with the experimental data. Data from the model, laser anemometer measurements, and numerical simulations indicate that for the rotor/stator spacing used in this work, which is typical of core compressors, rotor wake straining (stretching) is the primary decay process in the stator passage with viscous mixing playing only a minor role. The implications of these results on compressor stage design are discussed.

  11. Influence of stationary components on unsteady flow in industrial centrifugal compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonciani, L.; Terrinoni, L.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to determine the characteristics of the onset and the growth of rotating nonuniform flow in a standard low specific speed stage, normally utilized in high pressure applications, in relation to change of stationary component geometry. Four configurations, differing only in the return channel and crossover geometry were tested on an atmospheric pressure open loop test rig. Experimental results make conspicious the effect of return channel geometry and give the possibility of shifting the unstable zone onset varying such geometry. An attempt was made to interpret the experimental results in the Emmons - Stenning's rotating stall theory.

  12. Secondary flow spanwise deviation model for the stators of NASA middle compressor stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. B.; Sandercock, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    A model of the spanwise variation of deviation for stator blades is presented. Deviation is defined as the difference between the passage mean flow angle and the metal angle at the outlet of a blade element of an axial compressor stage. The variation of deviation is taken as the difference above or below that predicted by blade element, (i.e., two-dimensional) theory at any spanwise location. The variation of deviation is dependent upon the blade camber, solidity and inlet boundary layer thickness at the hub or tip end-wall, and the blade channel aspect ratio. If these parameters are known or can be calculated, the model provides a reasonable approximation of the spanwise variation of deviation for most compressor middle stage stators operating at subsonic inlet Mach numbers.

  13. Experimental and numerical investigation of the flow in a centrifugal compressor volute

    SciTech Connect

    Hagelstein, D.; Hillewaert, K.; Van Den Braembussche, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental and numerical investigation of an outward volute of rectangular cross section. The investigation is carried out at the level of stage performance, volute performance, and detailed flow field study at selected peripheral positions for various operating points. The objective of the investigation was to gain further knowledge about the flow structure and loss mechanism in the volute. Simultaneously with the experimental investigation, a numerical simulation of the flow in the volute was carried out. A three-dimensional Euler code was used in which a wall friction term and a tuned artificial dissipation term account for viscousmore » effects. A reasonable agreement between the experimental and numerical results is observed. As a result a good and detailed knowledge about the pressure recovery and loss mechanism in the volute is obtained.« less

  14. Single-stage experimental evaluation of compressor blading with slots and vortex generators, part 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brent, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the extent that slots and vortex generators can increase the efficiency and stable operating range of highly loaded compressor stages. With slots in the rotor and stator, the stage performance both with and without vortex generators was inferior to that achieved with the unslotted blading. However, with vortex generators, stator slots, and an unslotted rotor, the stable operating range increased 25% and the stage peak efficiency increased 2.1% over the values achieved with the unslotted rotor and stator without vortex generators, at design equivalent rotor speed.

  15. Core compressor exit stage study. Volume 2: Data and performance report for the baseline configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisler, D. C.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of the program is to develop rear stage blading designs that have lower losses in their endwall boundary layer regions. The overall technical approach in this efficiency improvement program utilized General Electric's Low Speed Research Compressor as the principal investigative tool. Tests were conducted in two ways: using four identical stages of blading so that test data would be obtained in a true multistage environment and using a single stage of blading so that comparison with the multistage test results could be made.

  16. The Onset of Aerodynamic Instability in a 3-Stage Transonic Compressor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    frequency corresponds to nearly half of the shaft speed. The stall cell spreads at once over all three stages of the compressor and, after an oscillation...interacting wakes, (intermittent classic surge and deep surge, pressure waves or stall cells can be traced in phase space bottom). with their...circumferential positions tp. on the casing wall showing the 200 axial distribution under the influence of a stall 0 cell . A S2 computation by ZORBA2 (Novak, -200

  17. Analysis of Three-dimension Viscous Flow in the Model Axial Compressor Stage K1002L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tribunskaia, K.; Kozhukhov, Y. V.

    2017-08-01

    The main investigation subject considered in this paper is axial compressor model stage K1002L. Three simulation models were designed: Scheme 1 - inlet stage model consisting of IGV (Inlet Guide Vane), rotor and diffuser; Scheme 2 - two-stage model: IGV, first-stage rotor, first-stage diffuser, second-stage rotor, EGV (Exit Guide Vane); Scheme 3 - full-round model: IGV, rotor, diffuser. Numerical investigation of the model stage was held for four circumferential velocities at the outer diameter (Uout=125,160,180,210 m/s) within the range of flow coefficient: ϕ = 0.4 - 0.6. The computational domain was created with ANSYS CFX Workbench. According to simulation results, there were constructed aerodynamic characteristic curves of adiabatic efficiency and the adiabatic head coefficient calculated for total parameters were compared with data from the full-scale test received at the Central Boiler and Turbine Institution (CBTI), thus, verification of the calculated data was carried out. Moreover, there were conducted the following studies: comparison of aerodynamic characteristics of the schemes 1, 2; comparison of the sector and full-round models. The analysis and conclusions are supplemented by gas-dynamic method calculation for axial compressor stages.

  18. Experimental Results of the First Two Stages of an Advanced Transonic Core Compressor Under Isolated and Multi-Stage Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahst, Patricia S.; Kulkarni, Sameer; Sohn, Ki H.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program calls for investigation of the technology barriers associated with improved fuel efficiency of large gas turbine engines. Under ERA the task for a High Pressure Ratio Core Technology program calls for a higher overall pressure ratio of 60 to 70. This mean that the HPC would have to almost double in pressure ratio and keep its high level of efficiency. The challenge is how to match the corrected mass flow rate of the front two supersonic high reaction and high corrected tip speed stages with a total pressure ratio of 3.5. NASA and GE teamed to address this challenge by using the initial geometry of an advanced GE compressor design to meet the requirements of the first 2 stages of the very high pressure ratio core compressor. The rig was configured to run as a 2 stage machine, with Strut and IGV, Rotor 1 and Stator 1 run as independent tests which were then followed by adding the second stage. The goal is to fully understand the stage performances under isolated and multi-stage conditions and fully understand any differences and provide a detailed aerodynamic data set for CFD validation. Full use was made of steady and unsteady measurement methods to isolate fluid dynamics loss source mechanisms due to interaction and endwalls. The paper will present the description of the compressor test article, its predicted performance and operability, and the experimental results for both the single stage and two stage configurations. We focus the detailed measurements on 97 and 100 of design speed at 3 vane setting angles.

  19. Blade Row Interaction Effects on the Performance of a Moderately Loaded NASA Transonic Compressor Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale E.; To, Wai-Ming; Chen, Jen-Ping

    2003-01-01

    Blade row interaction effects on loss generation in compressors have received increased attention as compressor work-per-stage and blade loading have increased. Two dimensional Laser Doppler Velocimeter measurements of the velocity field in a NASA transonic compressor stage show the magnitude of interactions in the velocity field at the peak efficiency and near stall operating conditions. The experimental data are presented along with an assessment of the velocity field interactions. In the present study the experimental data are used to confirm the fidelity of a three-dimensional, time-accurate, Navier Stokes calculation of the stage using the MSU-TURBO code at the peak efficiency and near stall operating conditions. The simulations are used to quantify the loss generation associated with interaction phenomena. At the design point the stator pressure field has minimal effect on the rotor performance. The rotor wakes do have an impact on loss production in the stator passage at both operating conditions. A method for determining the potential importance of blade row interactions on performance is presented.

  20. Tip-Clearance Measurement in the First Stage of the Compressor of an Aircraft Engine.

    PubMed

    García, Iker; Przysowa, Radosław; Amorebieta, Josu; Zubia, Joseba

    2016-11-11

    In this article, we report the design of a reflective intensity-modulated optical fiber sensor for blade tip-clearance measurement, and the experimental results for the first stage of a compressor of an aircraft engine operating in real conditions. The tests were performed in a ground test cell, where the engine completed four cycles from idling state to takeoff and back to idling state. During these tests, the rotational speed of the compressor ranged between 7000 and 15,600 rpm. The main component of the sensor is a tetrafurcated bundle of optical fibers, with which the resulting precision of the experimental measurements was 12 µm for a measurement range from 2 to 4 mm. To get this precision the effect of temperature on the optoelectronic components of the sensor was compensated by calibrating the sensor in a climate chamber. A custom-designed MATLAB program was employed to simulate the behavior of the sensor prior to its manufacture.

  1. Tip-Clearance Measurement in the First Stage of the Compressor of an Aircraft Engine

    PubMed Central

    García, Iker; Przysowa, Radosław; Amorebieta, Josu; Zubia, Joseba

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we report the design of a reflective intensity-modulated optical fiber sensor for blade tip-clearance measurement, and the experimental results for the first stage of a compressor of an aircraft engine operating in real conditions. The tests were performed in a ground test cell, where the engine completed four cycles from idling state to takeoff and back to idling state. During these tests, the rotational speed of the compressor ranged between 7000 and 15,600 rpm. The main component of the sensor is a tetrafurcated bundle of optical fibers, with which the resulting precision of the experimental measurements was 12 µm for a measurement range from 2 to 4 mm. To get this precision the effect of temperature on the optoelectronic components of the sensor was compensated by calibrating the sensor in a climate chamber. A custom-designed MATLAB program was employed to simulate the behavior of the sensor prior to its manufacture. PMID:27845709

  2. Effect of Blade-surface Finish on Performance of a Single-stage Axial-flow Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Jason J; Serovy, George, K

    1951-01-01

    A set of modified NACA 5509-34 rotor and stator blades was investigated with rough-machine, hand-filed, and highly polished surface finishes over a range of weight flows at six equivalent tip speeds from 672 to 1092 feet per second to determine the effect of blade-surface finish on the performance of a single-stage axial-flow compressor. Surface-finish effects decreased with increasing compressor speed and with decreasing flow at a given speed. In general, finishing blade surfaces below the roughness that may be considered aerodynamically smooth on the basis of an admissible-roughness formula will have no effect on compressor performance.

  3. Off-design Performance Analysis of Multi-Stage Transonic Axial Compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, W. H.; Wu, H.; Zhang, L.

    Because of the complex flow fields and component interaction in modern gas turbine engines, they require extensive experiment to validate performance and stability. The experiment process can become expensive and complex. Modeling and simulation of gas turbine engines are way to reduce experiment costs, provide fidelity and enhance the quality of essential experiment. The flow field of a transonic compressor contains all the flow aspects, which are difficult to present-boundary layer transition and separation, shock-boundary layer interactions, and large flow unsteadiness. Accurate transonic axial compressor off-design performance prediction is especially difficult, due in large part to three-dimensional blade design and the resulting flow field. Although recent advancements in computer capacity have brought computational fluid dynamics to forefront of turbomachinery design and analysis, the grid and turbulence model still limit Reynolds-average Navier-Stokes (RANS) approximations in the multi-stage transonic axial compressor flow field. Streamline curvature methods are still the dominant numerical approach as an important tool for turbomachinery to analyze and design, and it is generally accepted that streamline curvature solution techniques will provide satisfactory flow prediction as long as the losses, deviation and blockage are accurately predicted.

  4. Stage-by-Stage and Parallel Flow Path Compressor Modeling for a Variable Cycle Engine, NASA Advanced Air Vehicles Program - Commercial Supersonic Technology Project - AeroServoElasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George; Connolly, Joseph W.; Cheng, Larry

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers the development of stage-by-stage and parallel flow path compressor modeling approaches for a Variable Cycle Engine. The stage-by-stage compressor modeling approach is an extension of a technique for lumped volume dynamics and performance characteristic modeling. It was developed to improve the accuracy of axial compressor dynamics over lumped volume dynamics modeling. The stage-by-stage compressor model presented here is formulated into a parallel flow path model that includes both axial and rotational dynamics. This is done to enable the study of compressor and propulsion system dynamic performance under flow distortion conditions. The approaches utilized here are generic and should be applicable for the modeling of any axial flow compressor design accurate time domain simulations. The objective of this work is as follows. Given the parameters describing the conditions of atmospheric disturbances, and utilizing the derived formulations, directly compute the transfer function poles and zeros describing these disturbances for acoustic velocity, temperature, pressure, and density. Time domain simulations of representative atmospheric turbulence can then be developed by utilizing these computed transfer functions together with the disturbance frequencies of interest.

  5. Design of a Low Aspect Ratio Transonic Compressor Stage Using CFD Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanger, Nelson L.

    1994-01-01

    A transonic compressor stage has been designed for the Naval Postgraduate School Turbopropulsion Laboratory. The design relied heavily on CFD techniques while minimizing conventional empirical design methods. The low aspect ratio (1.2) rotor has been designed for a specific head ratio of .25 and a tip relative inlet Mach number of 1.3. Overall stage pressure ratio is 1.56. The rotor was designed using an Euler code augmented by a distributed body force model to account for viscous effects. This provided a relatively quick-running design tool, and was used for both rotor and stator calculations. The initial stator sections were sized using a compressible, cascade panel code. In addition to being used as a case study for teaching purposes, the compressor stage will be used as a research stage. Detailed measurements, including non-intrusive LDV, will be compared with the design computations, and with the results of other CFD codes, as a means of assessing and improving the computational codes as design tools.

  6. STGSTK: A computer code for predicting multistage axial flow compressor performance by a meanline stage stacking method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinke, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer code is presented for off-design performance prediction of axial-flow compressors. Stage and compressor performance is obtained by a stage-stacking method that uses representative velocity diagrams at rotor inlet and outlet meanline radii. The code has options for: (1) direct user input or calculation of nondimensional stage characteristics; (2) adjustment of stage characteristics for off-design speed and blade setting angle; (3) adjustment of rotor deviation angle for off-design conditions; and (4) SI or U.S. customary units. Correlations from experimental data are used to model real flow conditions. Calculations are compared with experimental data.

  7. Hydrogen test of a small, low specific speed centrifugal pump stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A small, low specific speed centrifugal pump stage with a 2 inch tip diameter, .030 inch tip width shrouded impeller and volute collector was tested with liquid hydrogen as the pumped fluid. The hydrodynamic design of the pump stage is summarized and the noncavitating and cavitating performance results are presented. Test speeds were 60 and 80 percent of the 77,000 rpm design speed. Liquid hydrogen test results are compared with data from previous tests of the stage in water.

  8. Effects of bending-torsional duct-induced swirl distortion on aerodynamic performance of a centrifugal compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Hongjuan; Wang, Leilei; Wang, Rui; Yang, Yanzhao

    2017-04-01

    A turbocharger compressor working in commercial vehicles, especially in some passenger cars, often works together with some pipes with complicated geometry as an air intake system, due to limit of available space in internal combustion engine compartments. These pipes may generate various distortions of physical parameters of the air at the inlet of the compressor and therefore the compressor aerodynamic performance deteriorates. Sometimes, the turbocharging engine fails to work at some operation points. This paper investigates the effects of various swirl distortions induced by different bending-torsional intake ducts on the aerodynamic performance of a turbocharger compressor by both 3D numerical simulations and experimental measurements. It was found that at the outlet of the pipes the different inlet ducts can generate different swirl distortions, twin vortices and bulk-like vortices with different rotating directions. Among them, the bulk-like vortices not only affect seriously the pressure distribution in the impeller domain, but also significantly deteriorate the compressor performance, especially at high flow rate region. And the rotating direction of the bulk-like vortices is also closely associated with the efficiency penalty. Besides the efficiency, the transient flow rate through a single impeller channel, or the asymmetric mass flow crossing the whole impeller, can be influenced by two disturbances. One is from the upstream bending-torsional ducts; other one is from the downstream volute.

  9. Aeroelastic Computations of a Compressor Stage Using the Harmonic Balance Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.

    2010-01-01

    The aeroelastic characteristics of a compressor stage were analyzed using a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) solver that uses the harmonic balance method to solve the governing equations. The three dimensional solver models the unsteady flow field due to blade vibration using the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The formulation enables the study of the effect of blade row interaction through the inclusion of coupling modes between blade rows. It also enables the study of nonlinear effects of high amplitude blade vibration by the inclusion of higher harmonics of the fundamental blade vibration frequency. In the present work, the solver is applied to study in detail the aeroelastic characteristics of a transonic compressor stage. Various parameters were included in the study: number of coupling modes, blade row axial spacing, and operating speeds. Only the first vibration mode is considered with amplitude of oscillation in the linear range. Both aeroelastic stability (flutter) of rotor blade and unsteady loading on the stator are calculated. The study showed that for the stage considered, the rotor aerodynamic damping is not influenced by the presence of the stator even when the axial spacing is reduced by nearly 25 percent. However, the study showed that blade row interaction effects become important for the unsteady loading on the stator when the axial spacing is reduced by the same amount.

  10. Experimental vibration damping characteristics of the third-stage rotor of a three-stage transonic axial-flow compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Frederick A.

    1988-01-01

    Rotor blade aerodynamic damping is experimentally determined in a three-stage transonic axial flow compressor having design aerodynamic performance goals of 4.5:1 pressure ratio and 65.5 lbm/sec weight flow. The combined damping associated with each mode is determined by a least squares fit of a single degree of freedom system transfer function to the nonsynchronous portion of the rotor blade strain gage output power spectra. The combined damping consists of the aerodynanmic damping and the structural and mechanical damping. The aerodynamic damping varies linearly with the inlet total pressure for a given corrected speed, weight flow, and pressure ratio while the structural and mechanical damping is assumed to remain constant. The combined damping is determined at three inlet total pressure levels to obtain the aerodynamic damping. The third-stage rotor blade aerodynamic damping is presented and discussed for the design equivalent speed with the stator blades reset for maximum efficiency. The compressor overall performance and experimental Campbell diagrams for the third-stage rotor blade row are also presented.

  11. Experimental Vibration Damping Characteristics of the Third-stage Rotor of a Three-stage Transonic Axial-flow Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Frederick A.

    1988-01-01

    Rotor blade aerodynamic damping is experimentally determined in a three-stage transonic axial flow compressor having design aerodynamic performance goals of 4.5:1 pressure ratio and 65.5 lbm/sec weight flow. The combined damping associated with each mode is determined by a least squares fit of a single degree of freedom system transfer function to the nonsynchronous portion of the rotor blade strain gage output power spectra. The combined damping consists of the aerodynamic damping and the structural and mechanical damping. The aerodynamic damping varies linearly with the inlet total pressure for a given corrected speed, weight flow, and pressure ratio while the structural and mechanical damping is assumed to remain constant. The combined damping is determined at three inlet total pressure levels to obtain the aerodynamic damping. The third-stage rotor blade aerodynamic damping is presented and discussed for the design equivalent speed with the stator blades reset for maximum efficiency. The compressor overall preformance and experimental Campbell diagrams for the third-stage rotor blade row are also presented.

  12. High loading, 1800 ft/sec tip speed, transonic compressor fan stage. 2: Final report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, A. L.; Sulam, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    Tests were conducted on a 0.5 hub/tip ratio, single-stage fan-compressor designed to produce a pressure ratio of 2.285 an efficiency of 84 percent with a rotor tip speed of 1800 feet per second. A peak efficiency of 82 percent was achieved by the stage at a stall margin of 6.5 percent. Tests showed that stall-limit line was slightly sensitive to tip-radial distortion, but stall-line improvements were noted when the stage was subjected to circumferential and hub-radial flow distortions. Rotor blade passage and trailing edge shock positions were inferred from static pressure contours over the rotor tips.

  13. Investigation of modification design of the fan stage in axial compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xun; Yan, Peigang; Han, Wanjin

    2010-04-01

    The S2 flow path design method of the transonic compressor is used to design the one stage fan in order to replace the original designed blade cascade which has two-stage transonic fan rotors. In the modification design, the camber line is parameterized by a quartic polynomial curve and the thickness distribution of the blade profile is controlled by the double-thrice polynomial. Therefore, the inlet flow has been pre-compressed and the location and intensity of the shock wave at supersonic area have been controlled in order to let the new blade profiles have better aerodynamic performance. The computational results show that the new single stage fan rotor increases the efficiency by two percent at the design condition and the total pressure ratio is slightly higher than that of the original design. At the same time, it also meets the mass flow rate and the geometrical size requirements for the modification design.

  14. Performance of NACA Eight-stage Axial-flow Compressor Designed on the Basis of Airfoil Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinnette, John T; Schey, Oscar W; King, J Austin

    1943-01-01

    The NACA has conducted an investigation to determine the performance that can be obtained from a multistage axial-flow compressor based on airfoil research. A theory was developed; an eight-stage axial-flow compressor was designed, constructed, and tested. The performance of the compressor was determined for speeds from 5000 to 14,000 r.p.m with varying air flow at each speed. Most of the tests were made with air at room temperature. The performance was determined in accordance with the Committee's recommended procedure for testing superchargers. The expected performance was obtained, showing that a multistage compressor of high efficiency can be designed by the application of airfoil theory.

  15. Pre-Stall Behavior of a Transonic Axial Compressor Stage via Time-Accurate Numerical Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jen-Ping; Hathaway, Michael D.; Herrick, Gregory P.

    2008-01-01

    CFD calculations using high-performance parallel computing were conducted to simulate the pre-stall flow of a transonic compressor stage, NASA compressor Stage 35. The simulations were run with a full-annulus grid that models the 3D, viscous, unsteady blade row interaction without the need for an artificial inlet distortion to induce stall. The simulation demonstrates the development of the rotating stall from the growth of instabilities. Pressure-rise performance and pressure traces are compared with published experimental data before the study of flow evolution prior to the rotating stall. Spatial FFT analysis of the flow indicates a rotating long-length disturbance of one rotor circumference, which is followed by a spike-type breakdown. The analysis also links the long-length wave disturbance with the initiation of the spike inception. The spike instabilities occur when the trajectory of the tip clearance flow becomes perpendicular to the axial direction. When approaching stall, the passage shock changes from a single oblique shock to a dual-shock, which distorts the perpendicular trajectory of the tip clearance vortex but shows no evidence of flow separation that may contribute to stall.

  16. Compressor Study to Meet Large Civil Tilt Rotor Engine Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.

    2009-01-01

    A vehicle concept study has been made to meet the requirements of the Large Civil Tilt Rotorcraft vehicle mission. A vehicle concept was determined, and a notional turboshaft engine system study was conducted. The engine study defined requirements for the major engine components, including the compressor. The compressor design-point goal was to deliver a pressure ratio of 31:1 at an inlet weight flow of 28.4 lbm/sec. To perform a conceptual design of two potential compressor configurations to meet the design requirement, a mean-line compressor flow analysis and design code were used. The first configuration is an eight-stage axial compressor. Some challenges of the all-axial compressor are the small blade spans of the rear-block stages being 0.28 in., resulting in the last-stage blade tip clearance-to-span ratio of 2.4%. The second configuration is a seven-stage axial compressor, with a centrifugal stage having a 0.28-in. impeller-exit blade span. The compressors conceptual designs helped estimate the flow path dimensions, rotor leading and trailing edge blade angles, flow conditions, and velocity triangles for each stage.

  17. Compressor Study to Meet Large Civil Tilt Rotor Engine Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.

    2009-01-01

    A vehicle concept study has been made to meet the requirements of the Large Civil Tilt Rotorcraft vehicle mission. A vehicle concept was determined, and a notional turboshaft engine system study was conducted. The engine study defined requirements for the major engine components, including the compressor. The compressor design-point goal was to deliver a pressure ratio of 31:1 at an inlet weight flow of 28.4 lbm/sec. To perform a conceptual design of two potential compressor configurations to meet the design requirement, a mean-line compressor flow analysis and design code were used. The first configuration is an eight-stage axial compressor. Some challenges of the all-axial compressor are the small blade spans of the rear-block stages being 0.28 in., resulting in the last-stage blade tip clearance-to-span ratio of 2.4 percent. The second configuration is a seven-stage axial compressor, with a centrifugal stage having a 0.28-in. impeller-exit blade span. The compressors conceptual designs helped estimate the flow path dimensions, rotor leading and trailing edge blade angles, flow conditions, and velocity triangles for each stage.

  18. Comparisons of Rig and Engine Dynamic Events in the Compressor of an Axi-Centrifugal Turboshaft Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, A. Karl; Mattern, Duane L.; Le, Dzu K.

    1996-01-01

    Steady state and dynamic data were acquired in a T55-L-712 compressor rig. In addition, a T55-L-12 engine was instrumented and similar data were acquired. Rig and engine stall/surge data were analyzed using modal techniques. This paper compares rig and engine preliminary results for the ground idle (approximately 60% of design speed) point. The results of these analyses indicate both rig and engine dynamic event are preceded by indications of traveling wave energy in front of the compressor face. For both rig and engine, the traveling wave energy contains broad band energy with some prominent narrow peaks and, while the events are similar in many ways, some noticeable differences exist between the results of the analyses of rig data and engine data.

  19. Development of the Seeding System Used for Laser Velocimeter Surveys of the NASA Low-Speed Centrifugal Compressor Flow Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserbauer, C. A.; Hathaway, M. D.

    1994-01-01

    Consideration is given to an atomizer-based system for distributing high-volume rates of polystyrene latex (PSL) seed material developed to support laser velocimeter investigations of the NASA Low-Speed Compressor flow field. Complete evaporation of the liquid carrier before the flow entering the compressor was of primary concern for the seeder system design. It is argued that the seed nozzle should incorporate a needle valve that can mechanically dislodge accumulated PSL seed material when the nozzle is turned off. Water is less expensive as the liquid carrier and should be used whenever adequate residence times are available to ensure complete evaporation. PSL agglomerates over time and needs to be mixed or blended before use. Arrangement of the spray nozzles needs to be adjustable to provide maximum seeding at the laser probe volume.

  20. Task I: A Computational Model for Short Wavelength Stall Inception and Development In Multi-Stage Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suder, Kenneth (Technical Monitor); Tan, Choon-Sooi

    2003-01-01

    A computational model is presented for simulating axial compressor stall inception and development via disturbances with length scales on the order of several (typically about three) blade pitches. The model was designed for multi-stage compressors in which stall is initiated by these short wavelength disturbances, also referred to as spikes. The inception process described is fundamentally nonlinear, in contrast to the essentially linear behavior seen in so-called modal stall inception . The model was able to capture the following experimentally observed phenomena: (1) development of rotating stall via short wavelength disturbances, (2) formation and evolution of localized short wavelength stall cells in the first stage of a mismatched compressor, (3) the switch from long to short wavelength stall inception resulting from the re-staggering of the inlet guide vane, (4) the occurrence of rotating stall inception on the negatively sloped portion of the compressor characteristic. Parametric investigations indicated that (1) short wavelength disturbances were supported by the rotor blade row, (2) the disturbance strength was attenuated within the stators, and (3) the reduction of inter-blade row gaps can suppress the growth of short wavelength disturbances. It is argued that each local component group (rotor plus neighboring stators) has its own instability point (i.e. conditions at which disturbances are sustained) for short wavelength disturbances, with the instability point for the compressor set by the most unstable component group.

  1. Centrifugal contactor modified for end stage operation in a multistage system

    DOEpatents

    Jubin, Robert T.

    1990-01-01

    A cascade formed of a plurality of centrifugal contactors useful for countercurrent solvent extraction processes such as utilizable for the reprocessing of nuclear reactor fuels is modified to permit operation in the event one or both end stages of the cascade become inoperative. Weir assemblies are connected to each of the two end stages by suitable conduits for separating liquids discharged from an inoperative end stage based upon the weight of the liquid phases uses in the solvent extraction process. The weir assembly at one end stage is constructed to separate and discharge the heaviest liquid phase while the weir assembly at the other end stage is constructed to separate and discharge the lightest liquid phase. These weir assemblies function to keep the liquid discharge from an inoperative end stages on the same weight phase a would occur from an operating end stage.

  2. Chaotic Time Series Analysis Method Developed for Stall Precursor Identification in High-Speed Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A new technique for rotating stall precursor identification in high-speed compressors has been developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center. This pseudo correlation integral method uses a mathematical algorithm based on chaos theory to identify nonlinear dynamic changes in the compressor. Through a study of four various configurations of a high-speed compressor stage, a multistage compressor rig, and an axi-centrifugal engine test, this algorithm, using only a single pressure sensor, has consistently predicted the onset of rotating stall.

  3. Design of 9.271-pressure-ratio 5-stage core compressor and overall performance for first 3 stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinke, Ronald J.

    1986-01-01

    Overall aerodynamic design information is given for all five stages of an axial flow core compressor (74A) having a 9.271 pressure ratio and 29.710 kg/sec flow. For the inlet stage group (first three stages), detailed blade element design information and experimental overall performance are given. At rotor 1 inlet tip speed was 430.291 m/sec, and hub to tip radius ratio was 0.488. A low number of blades per row was achieved by the use of low-aspect-ratio blading of moderate solidity. The high reaction stages have about equal energy addition. Radial energy varied to give constant total pressure at the rotor exit. The blade element profile and shock losses and the incidence and deviation angles were based on relevant experimental data. Blade shapes are mostly double circular arc. Analysis by a three-dimensional Euler code verified the experimentally measured high flow at design speed and IGV-stator setting angles. An optimization code gave an optimal IGV-stator reset schedule for higher measured efficiency at all speeds.

  4. Stall/surge dynamics of a multi-stage air compressor in response to a load transient of a hybrid solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, Mohammad Ali; Brouwer, Jacob

    2017-10-01

    A better understanding of turbulent unsteady flows in gas turbine systems is necessary to design and control compressors for hybrid fuel cell-gas turbine systems. Compressor stall/surge analysis for a 4 MW hybrid solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine system for locomotive applications is performed based upon a 1.7 MW multi-stage air compressor. Control strategies are applied to prevent operation of the hybrid SOFC-GT beyond the stall/surge lines of the compressor. Computational fluid dynamics tools are used to simulate the flow distribution and instabilities near the stall/surge line. The results show that a 1.7 MW system compressor like that of a Kawasaki gas turbine is an appropriate choice among the industrial compressors to be used in a 4 MW locomotive SOFC-GT with topping cycle design. The multi-stage radial design of the compressor enhances the ability of the compressor to maintain air flow rate during transient step-load changes. These transient step-load changes are exhibited in many potential applications for SOFC/GT systems. The compressor provides sustained air flow rate during the mild stall/surge event that occurs due to the transient step-load change that is applied, indicating that this type of compressor is well-suited for this hybrid application.

  5. Opposed piston linear compressor driven two-stage Stirling Cryocooler for cooling of IR sensors in space application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhojwani, Virendra; Inamdar, Asif; Lele, Mandar; Tendolkar, Mandar; Atrey, Milind; Bapat, Shridhar; Narayankhedkar, Kisan

    2017-04-01

    A two-stage Stirling Cryocooler has been developed and tested for cooling IR sensors in space application. The concept uses an opposed piston linear compressor to drive the two-stage Stirling expander. The configuration used a moving coil linear motor for the compressor as well as for the expander unit. Electrical phase difference of 80 degrees was maintained between the voltage waveforms supplied to the compressor motor and expander motor. The piston and displacer surface were coated with Rulon an anti-friction material to ensure oil less operation of the unit. The present article discusses analysis results, features of the cryocooler and experimental tests conducted on the developed unit. The two-stages of Cryo-cylinder and the expander units were manufactured from a single piece to ensure precise alignment between the two-stages. Flexure bearings were used to suspend the piston and displacer about its mean position. The objective of the work was to develop a two-stage Stirling cryocooler with 2 W at 120 K and 0.5 W at 60 K cooling capacity for the two-stages and input power of less than 120 W. The Cryocooler achieved a minimum temperature of 40.7 K at stage 2.

  6. Experimental performance of a 13.65-centimeter-tip-diameter tandem-bladed sweptback centrifugal compressor designed for a pressure ratio of 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klassen, H. A.; Wood, J. R.; Schumann, L. F.

    1977-01-01

    A 13.65 cm tip diameter backswept centrifugal impeller having a tandem inducer and a design mass flow rate of 0.907 kg/sec was experimentally investigated to establish stage and impeller characteristics. Tests were conducted with both a cascade diffuser and a vaneless diffuser. A pressure ratio of 5.9 was obtained near surge for the smallest clearance tested. Flow range at design speed was 6.3 percent for the smallest clearance test. Impeller exit to shroud axial clearance at design speed was varied to determine the effect on stage and impeller performance.

  7. Numerical Investigation of Different Radial Inlet Forms for Centrifugal Compressor and Influence of the Deflectors Number by Means of Computational Fluid Dynamics Methods with Computational Model Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhukhov, Y. V.; Yun, V. K.; Reshetnikova, L. V.; Prokopovich, M. V.

    2015-08-01

    The goal of this work is numerical experiments for five different types of the centrifugal compressor's inlet chambers with the help of CFD-methods and comparison of the computational results with the results of the real experiment which was held in the Nevskiy Lenin Plant in Saint-Petersburg. In the context of one of the chambers the influence of deflectors on its characteristics was investigated. The objects of investigation are 5 inlet chambers of different types which differ from each other by deflectors’ existence and by its number. The comparative analyze of the results of numerical and real experiments was held by means of comparison of relative velocity and static pressure coefficient distribution on hub and shroud region, and also by means of loss coefficient values change for all five chambers. As a result of the numerical calculation the quantitative and qualitative departure of CFD- calculations results and real experiment were found out. The investigation of the influence of the number of deflectors on flow parameters was carried out. The results of the study prove that the presence of the deflectors on flow path significantly increases the probability of the flow separations and reversed flows appearance on them. At the same time, the complete absence of the deflectors in the chamber significantly increases circumferential distortion of the flow; however the loss coefficient decreases anyway, the high values of which are caused by the shock flow existence. Thus, the profiling of the deflectors of the inlet chamber should be given a special attention.

  8. Single-stage experimental evaluation of tandem-airfoil rotor and stator blading for compressors, part 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brent, J. A.; Clemmons, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted with an 0.8 hub/tip ratio, single-stage, axial flow compressor to determine the potential of tandem-airfoil blading for improving the efficiency and stable operating range of compressor stages. The investigation included testing of a baseline stage with single-airfoil blading and two tandem-blade stages. The overall performance of the baseline stage and the tandem-blade stage with a 20-80% loading split was considerably below the design prediction. The other tandem-blade stage, which had a rotor with a 50-50% loading split, came within 4.5% of the design pressure rise (delta P(bar)/P(bar) sub 1) and matched the design stage efficiency. The baseline stage with single-airfoil blading, which was designed to account for the actual rotor inlet velocity profile and the effects of axial velocity ratio and secondary flow, achieved the design predicted performance. The corresponding tandem-blade stage (50-50% loading split in both blade rows) slightly exceeded the design pressure rise but was 1.5 percentage points low in efficiency. The tandem rotors tested during both phases demonstrated higher pressure rise and efficiency than the corresponding single-airfoil rotor, with identical inlet and exit airfoil angles.

  9. Laser Anemometer Measurements of the Three-Dimensional Rotor Flow Field in the NASA Low-Speed Centrifugal Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, Michael D.; Chriss, Randall M.; Strazisar, Anthony J.; Wood, Jerry R.

    1995-01-01

    A laser anemometer system was used to provide detailed surveys of the three-dimensional velocity field within the NASA low-speed centrifugal impeller operating with a vaneless diffuser. Both laser anemometer and aerodynamic performance data were acquired at the design flow rate and at a lower flow rate. Floor path coordinates, detailed blade geometry, and pneumatic probe survey results are presented in tabular form. The laser anemometer data are presented in the form of pitchwise distributions of axial, radial, and relative tangential velocity on blade-to-blade stream surfaces at 5-percent-of-span increments, starting at 95-percent-of-span from the hub. The laser anemometer data are also presented as contour and wire-frame plots of throughflow velocity and vector plots of secondary velocities at all measurement stations through the impeller.

  10. A Navier-Stokes solution of the three-dimensional viscous compressible flow in a centrifugal compressor impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harp, J. L., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A two-dimensional time-dependent computer code was utilized to calculate the three-dimensional steady flow within the impeller blading. The numerical method is an explicit time marching scheme in two spatial dimensions. Initially, an inviscid solution is generated on the hub blade-to-blade surface by the method of Katsanis and McNally (1973). Starting with the known inviscid solution, the viscous effects are calculated through iteration. The approach makes it possible to take into account principal impeller fluid-mechanical effects. It is pointed out that the second iterate provides a complete solution to the three-dimensional, compressible, Navier-Stokes equations for flow in a centrifugal impeller. The problems investigated are related to the study of a radial impeller and a backswept impeller.

  11. Annulus wall boundary layer development in a compressor stage, including the effects of tip clearance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Murthy, K. N. S.; Pouagare, M.; Govindan, T. R.

    1983-01-01

    The end-wall boundary layer development in a compressor stage, including the inlet guide vane (IGV) passage and the rotor passage, was measured. The measurement upstream of the rotor and inside the IGV passage were carried out with a five-hole probe. The data (blade-to-blade) inside the IGV passage were carried out with a five-hole probe. The data (blade-to-blade) inside the rotor passage were measured using a three-sensor rotating hot-wire below the tip clearance region and "V' configuration probe inside the clearance region. The rotor exit measurements (blade-to-blade) were acquired with a laser Doppler velocimeter. The velocity profiles and the integral properties are presented and interpreted. The boundary layer is comparatively well behaved up to the leading edge of the rotor, beyond which complex interactions result in very unconventional profiles. The momentum thicknesses decrease in the leakage flow region of the rotor. The momentum thicknesses and the limiting streamline angles predicted from a momentum integral technique agree well with the data up to the leading edge of the rotor.

  12. Orifice Mass Flow Calculation in NASA's W-8 Single Stage Axial Compressor Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Richard F.

    2018-01-01

    Updates to the orifice mass flow calculation for the W-8 Single Stage Axial Compressor Facility at NASA Glenn Research Center are provided to include the effect of humidity and incorporate ISO 5167. A methodology for including the effect of humidity into the inlet orifice mass flow calculation is provided. Orifice mass flow calculations provided by ASME PTC-19.5-2004, ASME MFC-3M-2004, ASME Fluid Meters, and ISO 5167 are compared for W-8's atmospheric inlet orifice plate. Differences in expansion factor and discharge coefficient given by these standards give a variation of about +/- 75% mass flow except for a few cases. A comparison of the calculations with an inlet static pressure mass flow correlation and a fan exit mass flow integration using test data from a 2017 turbofan rotor test in W-8 show good agreement between the inlet static pressure mass flow correlation, ISO 5167, and ASME Fluid Meters. While W-8's atmospheric inlet orifice plate violates the pipe diameter limit defined by each of the standards, the ISO 5167 is chosen to be the primary orifice mass flow calculation to use in the W-8 facility.

  13. Temperature control in a 30 stage, 5-cm Centrifugal Contactor Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Jack D. Law; Troy G. Garn; David H. Meikrantz

    2009-09-01

    Temperature profile testing was performed using a 30 stage 5-cm centrifugal contactor pilot plant. These tests were performed to evaluate the ability to control process temperature by adjusting feed solution temperatures. This would eliminate the need for complex jacketed heat exchanger installation on the centrifugal contactors. Thermocouples were installed on the inlet and outlets of each stage, as well as directly in the mixing zone of several of the contactor stages. Lamp oil, a commercially available alkane mixture of C14 to C18 chains, and tap water adjusted to pH 2 with nitric acid were the solution feeds for the temperaturemore » profile testing. Temperature data profiles for an array of total throughputs and contactor rpm values for both single-phase and two-phase systems were collected with selected profiles. The total throughput ranged from 0.5-1.4 L/min with rotor speeds from 3500-4000 rpm. Inlet solution temperatures ranging from ambient up to 50 °C were tested. Results of the two-phase temperature profile testing are detailed« less

  14. Parametric optimization of the MVC desalination plant with thermomechanical compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagin, E. V.; Biryuk, V. V.; Anisimov, M. Y.; Shimanov, A. A.; Gorshkalev, A. A.

    2018-03-01

    This article deals with parametric optimization of the Mechanical Vapour Compression (MVC) desalination plant with thermomechanical compressor. In this plants thermocompressor is used instead of commonly used centrifugal compressor. Influence of two main parameters was studied. These parameters are: inlet pressure and number of stages. Analysis shows that it is possible to achieve better plant performance in comparison with traditional MVC plant. But is required reducing the number of stages and utilization of low or high initial pressure with power consumption maximum at approximately 20-30 kPa.

  15. Experimental investigation and numerical modelling of 3D radial compressor stage and influence of the technological holes on the working characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matas, Richard; Syka, Tomáš; Hurda, Lukáš

    2018-06-01

    The article deals with a description of results from research and development of a radial compressor stage with 3D rotor blades. The experimental facility and the measurement and evaluation process is described briefly in the first part. The comparison of measured and computed characteristics can be found in the second part. The last part of this contribution is the evaluation of the rotor blades technological holes influence on the compressor stage characteristics.

  16. Single-stage experimental evaluation of tandem-airfoil rotor and stator blading for compressors. Part 5: Analysis and design of stages D and E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brent, J. A.; Cheatham, J. G.; Clemmons, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    A conventional and a tandem bladed stage were designed for a comparative experimental evaluation in a 0.8 hub/tip ratio single-stage compressor. Based on a preliminary design study, a radially constant work input distribution was selected for the rotor designs. Velocity diagrams and blade leading and trailing edge angles selected for the conventional rotor and stator were used in the design of the tandem blading. The effects of axial velocity ratio and secondary flow on turning were included in the selection of blade leading and trailing edge angles. Design values of rotor tip velocity and stage pressure ratio were 757 ft/sec and 1.26, respectively.

  17. Temperature Profile Measurements in a Newly Constructed 30-Stage 5 cm Centrifugal Contactor pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Troy G. Garn; Dave H. Meikrantz; Mitchell R. Greenhalgh

    2008-09-01

    An annular centrifugal contactor pilot plant incorporating 30 stages of commercial 5 cm CINC V-02 units has been built and operated at INL during the past year. The pilot plant includes an automated process control and data acquisitioning system. The primary purpose of the pilot plant is to evaluate the performance of a large number of inter-connected centrifugal contactors and obtain temperature profile measurements within a 30-stage cascade. Additional solvent extraction flowsheet testing using stable surrogates is also being considered. Preliminary hydraulic testing was conducted with all 30 contactors interconnected for continuous counter-current flow. Hydraulic performance and system operational testsmore » were conducted successfully but with higher single-stage rotor speeds found necessary to maintain steady interstage flow at flowrates of 1 L/min and higher. Initial temperature profile measurements were also completed in this configuration studying the performance during single aqueous and two-phase counter-current flow at ambient and elevated inlet solution temperatures. Temperature profile testing of two discreet sections of the cascade required additional feed and discharge connections. Lamp oil, a commercially available alkane mixture of C14 to C18 chains, and tap water adjusted to pH 2 were the solution feeds for all the testing described in this report. Numerous temperature profiles were completed using a newly constructed 30-stage centrifugal contactor pilot plant. The automated process control and data acquisition system worked very well throughout testing. Temperature data profiles for an array of total flowrates (FT) and contactor rpm values for both single-phase and two-phase systems have been collected with selected profiles and comparisons reported. Total flowrates (FT) ranged from 0.5-1.4 L/min with rotor speeds from 3500-4000 rpm. Solution inlet temperatures ranging from ambient up to 50° C were tested. Ambient temperature testing shows

  18. Research on Aero-Thermodynamic Distortion Induced Structural Dynamic Response of Multi-Stage Compressor Blading.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-15

    However. only very engineering limited experimental data exists to assess the Director, Thermal Sciences and range of validity and to direct the... experimental results of Goldstein et. al. "A 1111 and also the Navier Stokes numerical solutions of Morihara 1121. Diffuser The predicted stream function...Unsteady Aerodynamic Interactions in a Multistage Compressor............................................................ 53 I APPENDIX VI. Experimental

  19. Conceptual Design of a Two Spool Compressor for the NASA Large Civil Tilt Rotor Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.; Thurman, Douglas R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the conceptual design of a two spool compressor for the NASA Large Civil Tilt Rotor engine, which has a design-point pressure ratio goal of 30:1 and an inlet weight flow of 30.0 lbm/sec. The compressor notional design requirements of pressure ratio and low-pressure compressor (LPC) and high pressure ratio compressor (HPC) work split were based on a previous engine system study to meet the mission requirements of the NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing Projects Large Civil Tilt Rotor vehicle concept. Three mean line compressor design and flow analysis codes were utilized for the conceptual design of a two-spool compressor configuration. This study assesses the technical challenges of design for various compressor configuration options to meet the given engine cycle results. In the process of sizing, the technical challenges of the compressor became apparent as the aerodynamics were taken into consideration. Mechanical constraints were considered in the study such as maximum rotor tip speeds and conceptual sizing of rotor disks and shafts. The rotor clearance-to-span ratio in the last stage of the LPC is 1.5% and in the last stage of the HPC is 2.8%. Four different configurations to meet the HPC requirements were studied, ranging from a single stage centrifugal, two axi-centrifugals, and all axial stages. Challenges of the HPC design include the high temperature (1,560deg R) at the exit which could limit the maximum allowable peripheral tip speed for centrifugals, and is dependent on material selection. The mean line design also resulted in the definition of the flow path geometry of the axial and centrifugal compressor stages, rotor and stator vane angles, velocity components, and flow conditions at the leading and trailing edges of each blade row at the hub, mean and tip. A mean line compressor analysis code was used to estimate the compressor performance maps at off-design speeds and to determine the required variable geometry reset schedules of the

  20. Robust design optimization method for centrifugal impellers under surface roughness uncertainties due to blade fouling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Yaping; Zhang, Chuhua

    2016-03-01

    Blade fouling has been proved to be a great threat to compressor performance in operating stage. The current researches on fouling-induced performance degradations of centrifugal compressors are based mainly on simplified roughness models without taking into account the realistic factors such as spatial non-uniformity and randomness of the fouling-induced surface roughness. Moreover, little attention has been paid to the robust design optimization of centrifugal compressor impellers with considerations of blade fouling. In this paper, a multi-objective robust design optimization method is developed for centrifugal impellers under surface roughness uncertainties due to blade fouling. A three-dimensional surface roughness map is proposed to describe the nonuniformity and randomness of realistic fouling accumulations on blades. To lower computational cost in robust design optimization, the support vector regression (SVR) metamodel is combined with the Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) method to conduct the uncertainty analysis of fouled impeller performance. The analyzed results show that the critical fouled region associated with impeller performance degradations lies at the leading edge of blade tip. The SVR metamodel has been proved to be an efficient and accurate means in the detection of impeller performance variations caused by roughness uncertainties. After design optimization, the robust optimal design is found to be more efficient and less sensitive to fouling uncertainties while maintaining good impeller performance in the clean condition. This research proposes a systematic design optimization method for centrifugal compressors with considerations of blade fouling, providing a practical guidance to the design of advanced centrifugal compressors.

  1. 33 CFR 154.826 - Vapor compressors and blowers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Excessive shaft bearing temperature. (d) If a centrifugal compressor, fan, or lobe blower handles vapor in... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vapor compressors and blowers....826 Vapor compressors and blowers. (a) Each inlet and outlet to a compressor or blower which handles...

  2. A microprocessor-based automation test system for the experiment of the multi-stage compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huisheng; Lin, Chongping

    1991-08-01

    An automation test system that is controlled by the microprocessor and used in the multistage compressor experiment is described. Based on the analysis of the compressor experiment performances, a complete hardware system structure is set up. It is composed of a IBM PC/XT computer, a large scale sampled data system, the moving machine with three directions, the scanners, the digital instrumentation and some output devices. A program structure of real-time software system is described. The testing results show that this test system can take the measure of many parameter magnitudes in the blade row places and on a boundary layer in different states. The automatic extent and the accuracy of experiment is increased and the experimental cost is reduced.

  3. Single-stage experimental evaluation of tandem-airfoil rotor and stator blading for compressors. Part 7: Data and performance for stage E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheatham, J. G.

    1974-01-01

    An axial flow compressor stage, having tandem airfoil blading, was designed for zero rotor prewhirl, constant rotor work across the span, and axial discharge flow. The stage was designed to produce a pressure ratio of 1.265 at a rotor tip velocity of 757 ft/sec. The rotor has an inlet hub/tip ratio of 0.8. The design procedure accounted for the rotor inlet boundary layer and included the effects of axial velocity ratio and secondary flow on blade row performance. The objectives of this experimental program were (1) to obtain performance with uniform and distorted inlet flow for comparison with the performance of a stage consisting of single-airfoil blading designed for the same vector diagrams and (2) to evaluate the effectiveness of accounting for the inlet boundary layer, axial velocity ratio, and secondary flows in the stage design.

  4. Rotor-generated unsteady aerodynamic interactions in a 1½ stage compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papalia, John J.

    Because High Cycle Fatigue (HCF) remains the predominant surprise failure mode in gas turbine engines, HCF avoidance design systems are utilized to identify possible failures early in the engine development process. A key requirement of these analyses is accurate determination of the aerodynamic forcing function and corresponding airfoil unsteady response. The current study expands the limited experimental database of blade row interactions necessary for calibration of predictive HCF analyses, with transonic axial-flow compressors of particular interest due to the presence of rotor leading edge shocks. The majority of HCF failures in aircraft engines occur at off-design operating conditions. Therefore, experiments focused on rotor-IGV interactions at off-design are conducted in the Purdue Transonic Research Compressor. The rotor-generated IGV unsteady aerodynamics are quantified when the IGV reset angle causes the vane trailing edge to be nearly aligned with the rotor leading edge shocks. A significant vane response to the impulsive static pressure perturbation associated with a shock is evident in the point measurements at 90% span, with details of this complex interaction revealed in the corresponding time-variant vane-to-vane flow field data. Industry wide implementation of Controlled Diffusion Airfoils (CDA) in modern compressors motivated an investigation of upstream propagating CDA rotor-generated forcing functions. Whole field velocity measurements in the reconfigured Purdue Transonic Research Compressor along the design speedline reveal steady loading had a considerable effect on the rotor shock structure. A detached rotor leading edge shock exists at low loading, with an attached leading edge and mid-chord suction surface normal shock present at nominal loading. These CDA forcing functions are 3--4 times smaller than those generated by the baseline NACA 65 rotor at their respective operating points. However, the IGV unsteady aerodynamic response to the CDA

  5. Axial-Centrifugal Compressor Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-01

    chip detector, but they were not large enough to trigger the alarm circuit. These chips we-e analyzed as M50 bearing material, which was a positive...but an analysis of these particles indicated M50 bearing material and positively identified a thrust bearing problem. 50 ’ ! i VI Figure 18. Load Cel...load cell readout became erratic and the vehicle was shut down. An inspection showed that the aft bearing sump chip detector contained M50 bearing

  6. End wall flow characteristics and overall performance of an axial flow compressor stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitaram, N.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1983-01-01

    This review indicates the possible future directions for research on endwall flows in axial flow compressors. Theoretical investigations on the rotor blade endwall flows in axial flow compressors reported here include the secondary flow calculation and the development of the momentum integral equations for the prediction of the annulus wall boundary layer. The equations for secondary vorticity at the rotor exit are solved analytically. The solution includes the effects of rotation and the viscosity. The momentum integral equations derived include the effect of the blade boundary layers. The axial flow compressor facility of the Department of Aerospace Engineering at The Pennsylvania State University, which is used for the experimental investigations of the endwall flows, is described in some detail. The overall performance and other preliminary experimental results are presented. Extensive radial flow surveys are carried out at the design and various off design conditions. These are presented and interpreted in this report. The following experimental investigations of the blade endwall flows are carried out. (1) Rotor blade endwall flows: The following measurements are carried out at four flow coefficients. (a) The rotor blade static pressures at various axial and radial stations (with special emphasis near the blade tips). (b) The hub wall static pressures inside the rotor blade passage at various axial and tangential stations. (2) IGV endwall flows: The following measurements are carried out at the design flow coefficient. (a) The boundary layer profiles at various axial and tangential stations inside the blade passage and at the blade exit. (b) Casing static pressures and limiting streamline angles inside the blade passage.

  7. Stator Indexing in Multistage Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barankiewicz, Wendy S.

    1997-01-01

    The relative circumferential location of stator rows (stator indexing) is an aspect of multistage compressor design that has not yet been explored for its potential impact on compressor aerodynamic performance. Although the inlet stages of multistage compressors usually have differing stator blade counts, the aft stages of core compressors can often have stage blocks with equal stator blade counts in successive stages. The potential impact of stator indexing is likely greatest in these stages. To assess the performance impact of stator indexing, researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center used the 4 ft diameter, four-stage NASA Low Speed Axial Compressor for detailed experiments. This compressor has geometrically identical stages that can circumferentially index stator rows relative to each other in a controlled manner; thus it is an ideal test rig for such investigations.

  8. Single stage experimental evaluation of tandem-airfoil rotor and stator blading for compressors. Part 4: Data and performance for stage B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brent, J. A.; Cheatham, J. G.

    1973-01-01

    Stage B, composed of tandem-airfoil rotor B and stator B, was tested with uniform inlet flow and with hub radial, tip radial and 90 degree one-per-revolution circumferential distortion of the inlet flow as part of an overall program to evaluate the effectiveness of tandem airfoils for increasing the design point loading capability and stable operating range of rotor and stator blading. The results of this series of tests provide overall performance and blade element data for evaluating: (1) the potential of tandem blading for extending the loading limit and stable operating range of a stage representative of a middle stage of an advanced high pressure compressor, (2) the effect of loading split between the two airfoils in tandem on the performance of tandem blading, and (3) the effects of inlet flow distortion on the stage performance. The rotor had an inlet hub/tip ratio of 0.8 and a design tip velocity of 757 ft/sec. With uniform inlet flow, rotor B achieved a maximum adiabatic efficiency of 88.4% at design equivalent rotor speed and a pressure ratio of 1.31. The stage maximum adiabatic efficiency at design equivalent rotor speed with uniform inlet flow was 82.5% at a pressure ratio of 1.28. Tip radial and circumferential distortion of the inlet flow caused substantial reductions in surge margin.

  9. Single-stage experimental evaluation of tandem-airfoil rotor stator blading for compressors. Part 6: Data and performance for stage D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemmons, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    An axial flow compressor stage, having single-airfoil blading, was designed for zero rotor prewhirl, constant rotor work across the span, and axial discharge flow. The stage was designed to produce a pressure ratio of 1.265 at a rotor tip velocity of 757 ft/sec. The rotor had an inlet hub/tip ratio of 0.8. The design procedure accounted for the rotor inlet boundary layer and included the effects of axial velocity ratio and secondary flow on blade row performance. The objectives of this experimental program were: (1) to obtain performance with uniform and distorted inlet flow for comparison with the performance of a stage consisting of tandem-airfoil blading designed for the same vector diagrams; and (2) to evaluate the effectiveness of accounting for the inlet boundary layer, axial velocity ratio, and secondary flows in the stage design. With uniform inlet flow, the rotor achieved a maximum adiabatic efficiency of 90.1% at design equivalent rotor speed and a pressure ratio of 1.281. The stage maximum adiabatic efficiency at design equivalent rotor speed with uniform inlet flow was 86.1% at a pressure ratio of 1.266. Hub radial, tip radial, and circumferential distortion of the inlet flow caused reductions in surge pressure ratio of approximately 2, 10 and 5%, respectively, at design rotor speed.

  10. Experimental investigation of a forced response condition in a multistage compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, William Louis, III

    The objective of this research is twofold. Firstly, the design, development, and construction of a test facility for a Honeywell APU-style centrifugal compressor was implemented, as well as the design and construction of an inlet flow experiment. Secondly, the aeromechanical response of an embedded stage in the Purdue 3-Stage axial research compressor was analyzed through a suite of different measurement techniques in the fulfillment of the end of the GUIde IV Consortium contract. The purpose of the first phase of Honeywell work was to comprehensively measure the flow field of an APU-style centrifugal compressor inlet through the use of Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). A portion of a Honeywell supplied inlet was modified to provide optical access to the elbow, and a gas ejector system was designed and constructed to provide the same suction to the inlet that it would see during operation with the compressor. A performance and health monitoring electronics system was designed and purchased to support the testing of the Honeywell inlet ejector system and eventually it will be used for testing with a centrifugal compressor. Additionally, a secondary air and oil system has been designed and is currently being constructed in the test cell in preparation for the arrival of the Honeywell compressor this summer. An embedded rotor stage in the Purdue 3-stage compressor, with a Campbell diagram crossing of the 1T vibratory mode was analyzed with a suite of measurement systems. In addition to steady state compressor performance measurements, other types of measurements were used to characterize the aerodynamic forcing function for this forced response condition including: NSMS, high-frequency pressure transducers mounted in the casing and in a downstream stator, and cross-film thermal anemometry. Rotor geometry was measured by Aerodyne using an in-situ laser scanning technique. Vibrometry testing was performed at WPAFB to characterize safe operating speeds for stator

  11. Experimental Studies on a Single Stage Stirling Type Pulse Tube Cryocooler Driven by Oil-Lubricated Compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Ren; Jianying, Hu; Ercang, Luo; Xiaotao, Wang

    2010-04-01

    Because lubricating oil for moving parts is not allowed to go into the pulse tube cryocooler, Stirling type pulse tube cryocoolers are generally driven by oil-free compressors although oil-lubricated compressors are much cheaper and facile. Recently, it was proposed that an acoustic transparent and oil blocking diaphragm could be employed to separate the compressor and the cryocooler. Thus, the cryocooler can be driven by oil-lubricated compressors. In this paper, a pulse tube cryocooler is designed to match a crankcase compressor. Although the efficiency of the crankcase compressor is lower compared with the oil-free linear compressor, the crankcase compressor can easily work at lower frequency which results in higher efficiency for the cryocooler. So the relative high performance of the whole system can be maintained. In this system, the cryocooler delivers 28.5 W of cooling at 80 K with 680 W of electrical input power and operates at 15 Hz. The corresponding Carnot efficiency is 11.52%.

  12. Possibility of Thermomechanical Compressor Application in Desalination Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagin, E. V.; Shimanov, A. A.; Uglanov, D. A.; Korneev, S. S.

    2018-01-01

    This article deals with estimation of thermocompressor operating possibility in desalination plant with mechanical vapour compressor. In this plant thermocompressor is used instead of commonly used centrifugal compressor. Preliminary analysis shows that such plant is able to operate, however, power consumption is 3.5-6.5 higher in comparison with traditional MVC plant. In turn, utilization of thermocompressor allows avoiding usual high-frequency drive of centrifugal compressor. Drives with frequency of 50 Hz are enough for thermocompressor when centrifugal compressor requires drives with frequency up to 500 Hz and higher. Approximate thermocompressor dimensions are estimated.

  13. Design features of fans, blowers, and compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremisinoff, N. P.; Cheremisinoff, P. N.

    Fan engineering and compression machines are discussed. Basic aspects of fan performance and design are reviewed, and the design and performance characteristics of radial-flow fans, axial-flow fans, and controllable pitch fans are examined in detail. Air-conditioning systems are discussed, and noise, vibration, and mechanical considerations in fans are extensively examined. The thermodynamic principles governing compression machines are reviewed, and piston compressors, rotary compressors, blowers, and centrifugal compressors are discussed.

  14. An analysis of thermal stress and gas bending effects on vibrations of compressor rotor stages. [blade torsional rigidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, L.-T.; Dugundji, J.

    1979-01-01

    A preliminary study conducted by Kerrebrock et al. (1976) has shown that the torsional rigidity of untwisted thin blades of a transonic compressor can be reduced significantly by transient thermal stresses. The aerodynamic loads have various effects on blade vibration. One effect is that gas bending loads may result in a bending-torsion coupling which may change the characteristics of the torsion and bending vibration of the blade. For a general study of transient-temperature distribution within a rotor stage, a finite-element heat-conduction analysis was developed. The blade and shroud are divided into annular elements. With a temperature distribution obtained from the heat-conduction analysis and a prescribed gas bending load distribution along the blade span, the static deformation and moment distributions of the blade can be solved iteratively using the finite-element method. The reduction of the torsional rigidity of pretwisted blades caused by the thermal stress effect is then computed. The dynamic behavior of the blade is studied by a modified Galerkin's method.

  15. Compressor Modeling for Engine Control and Maintenance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    four compressor stages, while the high pressure compressor (HPC) consists of a set of variable pitch inlet guide vanes ( IGVs ) and 12 compressor...bleed valves at stages 5, 14 and 17, along with the variable IGVs and stators within the engine, are used to relieve the pressure and prevent

  16. Cold-air performance of compressor-drive turbine of Department of Energy upgraded automobile gas turbine engine. 2: Stage performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelke, R. J.; Haas, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of the compressor-drive turbine of the DOE upgraded gas turbine engine was determined in low temperature air. The as-received cast rotor blading had a significantly thicker profile than design and a fairly rough surface finish. Because of these blading imperfections a series of stage tests with modified rotors were made. These included the as-cast rotor, a reduced-roughness rotor, and a rotor with blades thinned to near design. Significant performance changes were measured. Tests were also made to determine the effect of Reynolds number on the turbine performance. Comparisons are made between this turbine and the compressor-drive turbine of the DOE baseline gas turbine engine.

  17. Design and overall performance of four highly loaded, high speed inlet stages for an advanced high-pressure-ratio core compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, L.; Moore, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    The detailed design and overall performances of four inlet stages for an advanced core compressor are presented. These four stages represent two levels of design total pressure ratio (1.82 and 2.05), two levels of rotor aspect ratio (1.19 and 1.63), and two levels of stator aspect ratio (1.26 and 1.78). The individual stages were tested over the stable operating flow range at 70, 90, and 100 percent of design speeds. The performances of the low aspect ratio configurations were substantially better than those of the high aspect ratio configurations. The two low aspect ratio configurations achieved peak efficiencies of 0.876 and 0.872 and corresponding stage efficiencies of 0.845 and 0.840. The high aspect ratio configurations achieved peak ratio efficiencies of 0.851 and 0.849 and corresponding stage efficiencies of 0.821 and 0.831.

  18. A Comprehensive Solution of the Problems of Ensuring the Strength of Gas Turbine Engine Compressor at the Design Stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedeneev, V. V.; Kolotnikov, M. E.; Mossakovskii, P. A.; Kostyreva, L. A.; Abdukhakimov, F. A.; Makarov, P. V.; Pyhalov, A. A.; Dudaev, M. A.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we present a complex numerical workflow for analysis of blade flutter and high-amplitude resonant oscillations, impenetrability of casing if the blade is broken off, and the rotor reaction to the blade detachment and following misbalance, with the assessment of a safe flight possibility at the auto-rotation regime. All the methods used are carefully verified by numerical convergence study and correlations with experiments. The use of the workflow developed significantly improves the efficiency of the design process of modern jet engine compressors. It ensures a significant reduction of time and cost of the compressor design with the required level of strength and durability.

  19. Effects of Double-Leakage Tip Clearance Flow on the Performance of a Compressor Stage with a Large Rotor Tip Gap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hah, Chunill

    2016-01-01

    Effects of a large rotor tip gap on the performance of a one and half stage axial compressor are investigated in detail with a numerical simulation based on LES and available PIV data. The current paper studies the main flow physics, including why and how the loss generation is increased with the large rotor tip gap. The present study reveals that when the tip gap becomes large, tip clearance fluid goes over the tip clearance core vortex and enters into the next blade's tip gap, which is called double-leakage tip clearance flow. As the tip clearance flow enters into the adjacent blade's tip gap, a vortex rope with a lower pressure core is generated. This vortex rope breaks up the tip clearance core vortex of the adjacent blade, resulting in a large additional mixing. This double-leakage tip clearance flow occurs at all operating conditions, from design flow to near stall condition, with the large tip gap for the current compressor stage. The double-leakage tip clearance flow, its interaction with the tip clearance core vortex of the adjacent blade, and the resulting large mixing loss are the main flow mechanism of the large rotor tip gap in the compressor. When the tip clearance is smaller, flow near the end wall follows more closely with the main passage flow and this double-leakage tip clearance flow does not happen near the design flow condition for the current compressor stage. When the compressor with a large tip gap operates at near stall operation, a strong vortex rope is generated near the leading edge due to the double-leakage flow. Part of this vortex separates from the path of the tip clearance core vortex and travels from the suction side of the blade toward the pressure side of the blade. This vortex is generated periodically at near stall operation with a large tip gap. As the vortex travels from the suction side to the pressure side of the blade, a large fluctuation of local pressure forces blade vibration. Nonsynchronous blade vibration occurs due

  20. Computational Assessment of a 3-Stage Axial Compressor Which Provides Airflow to the NASA 11- by 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel, Including Design Changes for Increased Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Sameer; Beach, Timothy A.; Jorgenson, Philip C.; Veres, Joseph P.

    2017-01-01

    A 24 foot diameter 3-stage axial compressor powered by variable-speed induction motors provides the airflow in the closed-return 11- by 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel (11-Foot TWT) Facility at NASA Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, California. The facility is part of the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel, which was completed in 1955. Since then, upgrades made to the 11-Foot TWT such as flow conditioning devices and instrumentation have increased blockage and pressure loss in the tunnel, somewhat reducing the peak Mach number capability of the test section. Due to erosion effects on the existing aluminum alloy rotor blades, fabrication of new steel rotor blades is planned. This presents an opportunity to increase the Mach number capability of the tunnel by redesigning the compressor for increased pressure ratio. Challenging design constraints exist for any proposed design, demanding the use of the existing driveline, rotor disks, stator vanes, and hub and casing flow paths, so as to minimize cost and installation time. The current effort was undertaken to characterize the performance of the existing compressor design using available design tools and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes and subsequently recommend a new compressor design to achieve higher pressure ratio, which directly correlates with increased test section Mach number. The constant cross-sectional area of the compressor leads to highly diffusion factors, which presents a challenge in simulating the existing design. The CFD code APNASA was used to simulate the aerodynamic performance of the existing compressor. The simulations were compared to performance predictions from the HT0300 turbomachinery design and analysis code, and to compressor performance data taken during a 1997 facility test. It was found that the CFD simulations were sensitive to endwall leakages associated with stator buttons, and to a lesser degree, under-stator-platform flow recirculation at the hub. When stator button leakages were

  1. Experimental performance of a 16.10-centimeter-tip-diameter sweptback centrifugal compressor designed for a 6:1 pressure ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klassen, H. A.; Wood, J. R.; Schumann, L. F.

    1977-01-01

    A backswept impeller with design mass flow rate of 1.033 kg/sec was tested with both a vaned diffuser and a vaneless diffuser to establish stage and impeller characteristics. Design stage pressure ratio of 5.9:1 was attained at a flow slightly lower than the design value. Flow range at design speed was 6 percent of choking flow. Impeller axial tip clearance at design speed was varied to determine effect on stage and impeller performance.

  2. Shape memory alloy adaptive control of gas turbine engine compressor blade tip clearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schetky, Lawrence M.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    1998-06-01

    The ambient air ingested through the inlet of a gas turbine is first compressed by an axial compressor followed by further compression in a centrifugal compressor and then fed into the combustion chamber where ignition and expansion take place to produce the engine thrust. The axial compressor typically has five or more stages which consist of revolving blades and stators and the overall performance of the turbine is strongly affected by the compressor efficiency. When the turbine is turned on, to accommodate the rapid initial increase in the compressor blade length due to centrifugal force, the cold turbine has a built in clearance between the turbine blade tip and the casing. As the turbine reached its operating temperature there is a further increase in the blade length due to thermal expansion and, at the same time, the diameter of the casing increases. The net result is that when these various components have reached their equilibrium temperatures, the initial cold build clearance is reduced, but there remains a residual clearance. The magnitude of this clearance has a direct effect on the compressor efficiency and can be stated as: Δη/Δ CLR equals 0.5 where η is efficiency and CLR is the tip clearance. The concept of adaptive tip clearance control is based on the ability of a shape memory alloy ring to shrink to a predetermined diameter when heated to the temperature of a particular stage, and thus reducing the tip clearance. The ring is fabricated from a CuAlNi shape memory alloy and is mounted in the casing so as to be coaxial with the rotating blades of the particular stage. When cold, the ring dimensions are such as to provide the required cold build clearance, but when at operating temperature the reduced diameter creates a very small tip clearance. The clearance provided by this concept is much smaller than the clearance normally obtained for a turbine of the size being studied.

  3. Small, high pressure ratio compressor: Aerodynamic and mechanical design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryce, C. A.; Erwin, J. R.; Perrone, G. L.; Nelson, E. L.; Tu, R. K.; Bosco, A.

    1973-01-01

    The Small, High-Pressure-Ratio Compressor Program was directed toward the analysis, design, and fabrication of a centrifugal compressor providing a 6:1 pressure ratio and an airflow rate of 2.0 pounds per second. The program consists of preliminary design, detailed areodynamic design, mechanical design, and mechanical acceptance tests. The preliminary design evaluate radial- and backward-curved blades, tandem bladed impellers, impeller-and diffuser-passage boundary-layer control, and vane, pipe, and multiple-stage diffusers. Based on this evaluation, a configuration was selected for detailed aerodynamic and mechanical design. Mechanical acceptance test was performed to demonstrate that mechanical design objectives of the research package were met.

  4. Rotary-Wing Relevant Compressor Aero Research and Technology Development Activities at Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.; Hathaway, Michael D.; Skoch, Gary J.; Snyder, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Technical challenges of compressors for future rotorcraft engines are driven by engine-level and component-level requirements. Cycle analyses are used to highlight the engine-level challenges for 3000, 7500, and 12000 SHP-class engines, which include retention of performance and stability margin at low corrected flows, and matching compressor type, axial-flow or centrifugal, to the low corrected flows and high temperatures in the aft stages. At the component level: power-to-weight and efficiency requirements impel designs with lower inherent aerodynamic stability margin; and, optimum engine overall pressure ratios lead to small blade heights and the associated challenges of scale, particularly increased clearance-to-span ratios. The technical challenges associated with the aerodynamics of low corrected flows and stability management impel the compressor aero research and development efforts reviewed herein. These activities include development of simple models for clearance sensitivities to improve cycle calculations, full-annulus, unsteady Navier-Stokes simulations used to elucidate stall, its inception, and the physics of stall control by discrete tip-injection, development of an actuator-duct-based model for rapid simulation of nonaxisymmetric flow fields (e.g., due inlet circumferential distortion), advanced centrifugal compressor stage development and experimentation, and application of stall control in a T700 engine.

  5. A comparison of a new centrifuge sugar flotation technique with the agar method for the extraction of immature Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) life stages from salt marsh soils.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two sampling techniques, agar extraction (AE) and centrifuge sugar flotation extraction (CSFE) were compared to determine their relative efficacy to recover immature stages of Culicoides spp from salt marsh substrates. Three types of samples (seeded with known numbers of larvae, homogenized field s...

  6. Investigation of X24C-2 10-Stage Axial-Flow Compressor. 2; Effect of Inlet-Air Pressure and Temperature of Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finger, Harold B.; Schum, Harold J.; Buckner, Howard Jr.

    1947-01-01

    Effect of inlet-air pressure and temperature on the performance of the X24-2 10-Stage Axial-Flow Compressor from the X24C-2 turbojet engine was evaluated. Speeds of 80, 89, and 100 percent of equivalent design speed with inlet-air pressures of 6 and 12 inches of mercury absolute and inlet-air temperaures of approximately 538 degrees, 459 degrees,and 419 degrees R ( 79 degrees, 0 degrees, and minus 40 degrees F). Results were compared with prior investigations.

  7. Experimental Determination of Aerodynamic Damping in a Three-Stage Transonic Axial-Flow Compressor. Degree awarded by Case Western Reserve Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Frederick A.

    1988-01-01

    Rotor blade aerodynamic damping is experimentally determined in a three-stage transonic axial flow compressor having design aerodynamic performance goals of 4.5:1 pressure ratio and 65.5 lbm/sec weight flow. The combined damping associated with each mode is determined by a least squares fit of a single degree of freedom system transfer function to the nonsynchronous portion of the rotor blade strain gauge output power spectra. The combined damping consists of aerodynamic and structural and mechanical damping. The aerodynamic damping varies linearly with the inlet total pressure for a given equivalent speed, equivalent mass flow, and pressure ratio while structural and mechanical damping are assumed to be constant. The combined damping is determined at three inlet total pressure levels to obtain the aerodynamic damping. The third stage rotor blade aerodynamic damping is presented and discussed for 70, 80, 90, and 100 percent design equivalent speed. The compressor overall performance and experimental Campbell diagrams for the third stage rotor blade row are also presented.

  8. An Experimental Investigation of the Flow Physics Associated With End Wall Losses and Large Rotor Tip Clearances as Found in the Rear Stages of a High Pressure Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdanier, Reid A.; Key, Nicole L.

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this work was to characterize the fundamental flow physics and the overall performance effects due to increased rotor tip clearance heights in axial compressors. Data have been collected in the three-stage axial research compressor at Purdue University with a specific focus on analyzing the multistage effects resulting from the tip leakage flow. Three separate rotor tip clearance heights were studied with nominal tip clearance heights of 1.5%, 3.0%, and 4.0% based on a constant annulus height. Overall compressor performance was investigated at four corrected speedlines (100%, 90%, 80%, and 68%) for each of the three tip clearance configurations using total pressure and total temperature rakes distributed throughout the compressor. The results have confirmed results from previous authors showing a decrease of total pressure rise, isentropic efficiency, and stall margin which is approximately linear with increasing tip clearance height. The stall inception mechanisms have also been evaluated at the same corrected speeds for each of the tip clearance configurations. Detailed flow field measurements have been collected at two loading conditions, nominal loading (NL) and high loading (HL), on the 100% corrected speedline for the smallest and largest tip clearance heights (1.5% and 4.0%). Steady detailed radial traverses of total pressure at the exit of each stator row have been supported by flow visualization techniques to identify regions of flow recirculation and separation. Furthermore, detailed radial traverses of time-resolved total pressures at the exit of each rotor row have been measured with a fast-response pressure probe. These data have helped to quantify the size of the leakage flow at the exit of each rotor. Thermal anemometry has also been implemented to evaluate the time-resolved three-dimensional components of velocity throughout the compressor and calculate blockage due to the rotor tip leakage flow throughout the compressor. These

  9. Limits of Single-stage Compression in Centrifugal Superchargers for Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kollmann, K

    1940-01-01

    The limits of the single-stage compression in superchargers at the present state of development are determined by five factors. 1) by the rotor material; 2) by the formation of the flow; 3) by the manufacture of double shrouded rotors; 4) by the bearing problem; 5) by the drive method.

  10. The WISGSK: A computer code for the prediction of a multistage axial compressor performance with water ingestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuchiya, T.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1982-01-01

    A computer code is presented for the prediction of off-design axial flow compressor performance with water ingestion. Four processes were considered to account for the aero-thermo-mechanical interactions during operation with air-water droplet mixture flow: (1) blade performance change, (2) centrifuging of water droplets, (3) heat and mass transfer process between the gaseous and the liquid phases and (4) droplet size redistribution due to break-up. Stage and compressor performance are obtained by a stage stacking procedure using representative veocity diagrams at a rotor inlet and outlet mean radii. The Code has options for performance estimation with (1) mixtures of gas and (2) gas-water droplet mixtures, and therefore can take into account the humidity present in ambient conditions. A test case illustrates the method of using the Code. The Code follows closely the methodology and architecture of the NASA-STGSTK Code for the estimation of axial-flow compressor performance with air flow.

  11. Compressor stability management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhingra, Manuj

    threshold level to successful stability management. The compressor stability management concepts have also been experimentally demonstrated on a laboratory axial compressor rig. The fundamental nature of correlation measure has opened avenues for its application besides limit detection. The applications presented include stage load matching in a multi-stage compressor and monitoring the aerodynamic health of rotor blades.

  12. Effect of Rotor- and Stator-Blade Modifications on Surge Performance of an 11-Stage Axial-Flow Compressor. I - Original Production Compressor of XJ40-WE-6 Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finger, Harold B.; Essig, Robert H.; Conrad, E. William

    1952-01-01

    An investigation to increase the compressor surge-limit pressure ratio of the XJ40-WE-6 turbojet engine at high equivalent speeds was conducted at the NACA Lewis altitude wind tunnel. This report evaluates the compressor modifications which were restricted to (1) twisting rotor blades (in place) to change blade section angles and (2) inserting new stator diaphragms with different blade angles. Such configuration changes could be incorporated quickly and easily in existing engines at overhaul depots. It was found that slight improvements in the compressor surge limit were possible by compressor blade adjustment. However, some of the modifications also reduced the engine air flow and hence penalized the thrust. The use of a mixer assembly at the compressor outlet improved the surge limit with no appreciable thrust penalty.

  13. Oil-free centrifugal hydrogen compression technology demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Heshmat, Hooshang

    2014-05-31

    One of the key elements in realizing a mature market for hydrogen vehicles is the deployment of a safe and efficient hydrogen production and delivery infrastructure on a scale that can compete economically with current fuels. The challenge, however, is that hydrogen, being the lightest and smallest of gases with a lower viscosity and density than natural gas, readily migrates through small spaces and is difficult to compresses efficiently. While efficient and cost effective compression technology is crucial to effective pipeline delivery of hydrogen, the compression methods used currently rely on oil lubricated positive displacement (PD) machines. PD compression technologymore » is very costly, has poor reliability and durability, especially for components subjected to wear (e.g., valves, rider bands and piston rings) and contaminates hydrogen with lubricating fluid. Even so called “oil-free” machines use oil lubricants that migrate into and contaminate the gas path. Due to the poor reliability of PD compressors, current hydrogen producers often install duplicate units in order to maintain on-line times of 98-99%. Such machine redundancy adds substantially to system capital costs. As such, DOE deemed that low capital cost, reliable, efficient and oil-free advanced compressor technologies are needed. MiTi’s solution is a completely oil-free, multi-stage, high-speed, centrifugal compressor designed for flow capacity of 500,000 kg/day with a discharge pressure of 1200 psig. The design employs oil-free compliant foil bearings and seals to allow for very high operating speeds, totally contamination free operation, long life and reliability. This design meets the DOE’s performance targets and achieves an extremely aggressive, specific power metric of 0.48 kW-hr/kg and provides significant improvements in reliability/durability, energy efficiency, sealing and freedom from contamination. The multi-stage compressor system concept has been validated through full

  14. CENTRIFUGE APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.; Urey, H.C.; Cohen, K.

    1960-08-01

    A high-speed centrifuge for the separation of gaseous isotopes is designed comprising a centrifugal pump mounted on the outlet of a centrifuge bowl and arranged to pump the heavy and light fractions out of the centrifuge bowl in two separate streams.

  15. Preliminary compressor design study for an advanced multistage axial flow compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marman, H. V.; Marchant, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    An optimum, axial flow, high pressure ratio compressor for a turbofan engine was defined for commercial subsonic transport service starting in the late 1980's. Projected 1985 technologies were used and applied to compressors with an 18:1 pressure ratio having 6 to 12 stages. A matrix of 49 compressors was developed by statistical techniques. The compressors were evaluated by means of computer programs in terms of various airline economic figures of merit such as return on investment and direct-operating cost. The optimum configuration was determined to be a high speed, 8-stage compressor with an average blading aspect ratio of 1.15.

  16. Performance of single-stage axial-flow transonic compressor with rotor and stator aspect ratios of 1.19 and 1.26 respectively, and with design pressure ratio of 2.05

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. D.; Reid, L.

    1980-01-01

    The overall and blade-element performances of a low-aspect-ratio transonic compressor stage are presented over the stable operating flow range for speeds from 50 to 100 percent of design. At design speed the rotor and stage achieved peak efficiencies of 0.876 and 0.840 at pressure ratios of 2.056 and 2.000, respectively. The stage stall margin at design speed was 10 percent.

  17. Investigation of Blade-row Flow Distributions in Axial-flow-compressor Stage Consisting of Guide Vanes and Rotor-blade Row

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahoney, John J; Dugan, Paul D; Budinger, Raymond E; Goelzer, H Fred

    1950-01-01

    A 30-inch tip-diameter axial-flow compressor stage was investigated with and without rotor to determine individual blade-row performance, interblade-row effects, and outer-wall boundary-layer conditions. Velocity gradients at guide-vane outlet without rotor approximated design assumptions, when the measured variation of leaving angle was considered. With rotor in operation, Mach number and rotor-blade effects changed flow distribution leaving guide vanes and invalidated design assumption of radial equilibrium. Rotor-blade performance correlated interpolated two-dimensional results within 2 degrees, although tip stall was indicated in experimental and not two-dimensional results. Boundary-displacement thickness was less than 1.0 and 1.5 percent of passage height after guide vanes and after rotor, respectively, but increased rapidly after rotor when tip stall occurred.

  18. The effects of compressor seventh-stage bleed air extraction on performance of the F100-PW-220 afterburning turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Alison B.

    1991-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of seventh-stage compressor bleed on the performance of the F100 afterburning turbofan engine. The effects of bleed on thrust, specific fuel consumption, fan turbine inlet temperature, bleed total pressure, and bleed total temperature were obtained from the engine manufacturer's status deck computer simulation. These effects were determined for power settings of intermediate, partial afterburning, and maximum afterburning for Mach numbers between 0.6 and 2.2 and for altitudes of 30,000, 40,000, and 50,000 ft. It was found that thrust loss and specific fuel consumption increase were approximately linear functions of bleed flow and, based on a percent-thrust change basis, were approximately independent of power setting.

  19. Single-stage evaluation of highly-loaded high-Mach-number compressor stages 5. Data and performance of baseline, corner-blow wall suction and combined corner blow wall suction stator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikkanen, J. P.; Brooky, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    A single-stage compressor with a rotor tip speed of 1600 ft/sec and a 0.5 hub tip ratio was used to investigate the effects of several stator endwall treatment methods on stage range and performance. These endwall treatment methods consisted of stator corner-blow, annular wall suction upstream of stator leading edge, and combined corner-blow and annular wall suction. The overall stage performance with corner blow was essentially the same as the baseline performance. The performance for the annular wall suction and the combined corner-blow and wall suction showed a reduction in peak efficiency of 2.5 percentage points compared to the baseline data.

  20. Centrifugal Compressors, Flow Phenomena and Performance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    of the diffuser indicate that rotating nonuniformities (rotating stall) may be observed at certain operating conditions. The last paper in this...utilis6 en 6tage isol6, sans canal de retour, ce compresseur peut fournir un taux de compression TT = 5,3 au r~frig~rant 12 (clest-A-dire T = 5,6 A lair

  1. Investigation of Unsteady Flow Field in a Low-Speed One and a Half Stage Axial Compressor. Part 2; Effects of Tip Gap Size On the Tip Clearance Flow Structure at Near Stall Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hah, Chunill; Hathaway, Michael; Katz, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The primary focus of this paper is to investigate the effect of rotor tip gap size on how the rotor unsteady tip clearance flow structure changes in a low speed one and half stage axial compressor at near stall operation (for example, where maximum pressure rise is obtained). A Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is applied to calculate the unsteady flow field at this flow condition with both a small and a large tip gaps. The numerically obtained flow fields at the small clearance matches fairly well with the available initial measurements obtained at the Johns Hopkins University with 3-D unsteady PIV in an index-matched test facility which renders the compressor blades and casing optically transparent. With this setup, the unsteady velocity field in the entire flow domain, including the flow inside the tip gap, can be measured. The numerical results are also compared with previously published measurements in a low speed single stage compressor (Maerz et al. [2002]). The current study shows that, with the smaller rotor tip gap, the tip clearance vortex moves to the leading edge plane at near stall operating condition, creating a nearly circumferentially aligned vortex that persists around the entire rotor. On the other hand, with a large tip gap, the clearance vortex stays inside the blade passage at near stall operation. With the large tip gap, flow instability and related large pressure fluctuation at the leading edge are observed in this one and a half stage compressor. Detailed examination of the unsteady flow structure in this compressor stage reveals that the flow instability is due to shed vortices near the leading edge, and not due to a three-dimensional separation vortex originating from the suction side of the blade, which is commonly referred to during a spike-type stall inception. The entire tip clearance flow is highly unsteady. Many vortex structures in the tip clearance flow, including the sheet vortex system near the casing, interact with each other. The

  2. The measurement of U(VI) and Np(IV) mass transfer in a single stage centrifugal contactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, I.; Birkett, E. J.; Denniss, I. S.; Gaubert, E. T.; Jobson, M.

    2000-07-01

    BNFL currently operates two reprocessing plants for the conversion of spent nuclear fuel into uranium and plutonium products for fabrication into uranium oxide and mixed uranium and plutonium oxide (MOX) fuels. To safeguard the future commercial viability of this process, BNFL is developing novel single cycle flowsheets that can be operated in conjunction with intensified centrifugal contactors.

  3. Supersonic compressor

    DOEpatents

    Lawlor, Shawn P [Bellevue, WA; Novaresi, Mark A [San Diego, CA; Cornelius, Charles C [Kirkland, WA

    2008-02-26

    A gas compressor based on the use of a driven rotor having an axially oriented compression ramp traveling at a local supersonic inlet velocity (based on the combination of inlet gas velocity and tangential speed of the ramp) which forms a supersonic shockwave axially, between adjacent strakes. In using this method to compress inlet gas, the supersonic compressor efficiently achieves high compression ratios while utilizing a compact, stabilized gasdynamic flow path. Operated at supersonic speeds, the inlet stabilizes an oblique/normal shock system in the gasdyanamic flow path formed between the gas compression ramp on a strake, the shock capture lip on the adjacent strake, and captures the resultant pressure within the stationary external housing while providing a diffuser downstream of the compression ramp.

  4. Hydride compressor

    DOEpatents

    Powell, James R.; Salzano, Francis J.

    1978-01-01

    Method of producing high energy pressurized gas working fluid power from a low energy, low temperature heat source, wherein the compression energy is gained by using the low energy heat source to desorb hydrogen gas from a metal hydride bed and the desorbed hydrogen for producing power is recycled to the bed, where it is re-adsorbed, with the recycling being powered by the low energy heat source. In one embodiment, the adsorption-desorption cycle provides a chemical compressor that is powered by the low energy heat source, and the compressor is connected to a regenerative gas turbine having a high energy, high temperature heat source with the recycling being powered by the low energy heat source.

  5. CENTRIFUGAL SEPARATORS

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.

    1959-03-10

    A centrifugal separator is described for separating gaseous mixtures where the temperature gradients both longitudinally and radially of the centrifuge may be controlled effectively to produce a maximum separation of the process gases flowing through. Tbe invention provides for the balancing of increases and decreases in temperature in various zones of the centrifuge chamber as the result of compression and expansions respectively, of process gases and may be employed effectively both to neutralize harmful temperature gradients and to utilize beneficial temperaturc gradients within the centrifuge.

  6. Single-stage experimental evaluation of tandem-airfoil rotor and stator blading for compressors. Part 2: Data and performance for stage A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brent, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    Stage A, comprised of a conventional rotor and stator, was designed and tested to establish a performance baseline for comparison with the results of subsequent tests planned for two tandem-blade stages. The rotor had an inlet hub/tip ratio of 0.8 and a design tip velocity of 757 ft/sec. At design equivalent rotor speed, rotor A achieved a maximum adiabatic efficiency of 85.1 percent at a pressure ratio of 1.29. The stage maximum adiabatic efficiency was 78.6 percent at a pressure ratio of 1.27.

  7. High-loading, 1800 ft/sec tip speed transonic compressor fan stage. 1: Aerodynamic and mechanical design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, A. L.; Halle, J. E.; Kennedy, E. E.

    1972-01-01

    A single stage fan with a tip speed of 1800 ft/sec (548.6m/sec) and hub/tip ratio of 0.5 was designed to produce a pressure ratio of 2.285:1 with an adiabatic efficiency of 84.0%. The design flow per inlet annulus area is 38.7 lbm/sq ft-sec (188.9KG/sqm-sec). Rotor blades have modified multiple-circular-arc and precompression airfoil sections. The stator vanes have multiple-circular-arc airfoil sections.

  8. A packet data compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunes, Mitchell R.; Choi, Junho

    1995-01-01

    We are in the preliminary stages of creating an operational system for losslessly compressing packet data streams. The end goal is to reduce costs. Real world constraints include transmission in the presence of error, tradeoffs between the costs of compression and the costs of transmission and storage, and imperfect knowledge of the data streams to be transmitted. The overall method is to bring together packets of similar type, split the data into bit fields, and test a large number of compression algorithms. Preliminary results are very encouraging, typically offering compression factors substantially higher than those obtained with simpler generic byte stream compressors, such as Unix Compress and HA 0.98.

  9. Supersonic compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, II, William Byron; Lawlor, Shawn P.; Breidenthal, Robert E.

    A supersonic compressor including a rotor to deliver a gas at supersonic conditions to a diffuser. The diffuser includes a plurality of aerodynamic ducts that have converging and diverging portions, for deceleration of gas to subsonic conditions and then for expansion of subsonic gas, to change kinetic energy of the gas to static pressure. The aerodynamic ducts include vortex generating structures for controlling boundary layer, and structures for changing the effective contraction ratio to enable starting even when the aerodynamic ducts are designed for high pressure ratios, and structures for boundary layer control. In an embodiment, aerodynamic ducts are providedmore » having an aspect ratio of in excess of two to one, when viewed in cross-section orthogonal to flow direction at an entrance to the aerodynamic duct.« less

  10. Single-stage experimental evaluation of tandem-airfoil rotor and stator blading for compressors. Part 3: Data and performance for stage C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brent, J. A.; Clemmons, D.

    1972-01-01

    Stage C, comprised of tandem-airfoil rotor C and tandem-airfoil stator B, was designed and tested to establish performance data for comparison with the performance of conventional single-airfoil blading. Velocity diagrams and blade leading and trailing edge metal angles selected for the conventional rotor and stator blading were used in the design of the tandem blading. The rotor had an inlet hub/tip ratio of 0.8 and a design tip velocity of 757 ft/sec. At design equivalent rotor speed, rotor C achieved a maximum adiabatic efficiency of 91.8% at a pressure ratio of 1.31. The stage maximum adiabatic efficiency was 86.5% at a pressure ratio of 1.31.

  11. Predicting the Performance of an Axial-Flow Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinke, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Stage-stacking computer code (STGSTK) developed for predicting off-design performance of multi-stage axial-flow compressors. Code uses meanline stagestacking method. Stage and cumulative compressor performance calculated from representative meanline velocity diagrams located at rotor inlet and outlet meanline radii. Numerous options available within code. Code developed so user modify correlations to suit their needs.

  12. Performance of Compressor of XJ-41-V Turbojet Engine. 4; Performance Analysis Over Range of Compressor Speeds from 5000 to 10,000 RPM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creagh, John W. R.; Ginsburg, Ambrose

    1948-01-01

    An investigation of the XJ-41-V turbojet-engine compressor was conducted to determine the performance of the compressor and to obtain fundamental information on the aerodynamic problems associated with large centrifugal-type compressors. The results of the research conducted on the original compressor indicated the compressor would not meet the desired engine-design air-flow requirements because of an air-flow restriction in the vaned collector. The compressor air-flow choking point occurred near the entrance to the vaned-collector passage and was instigated by a poor mass-flow distribution at the vane entrance and from relatively large negative angles of attack of the air stream along the entrance edges of the vanes at the outer passage wall and large positive angles of attack at the inner passage wall. As a result of the analysis, a design change of the vaned collector entrance is recommended for improving the maximum flow capacity of the compressor.

  13. Internal hysteresis experienced on a high pressure syn gas compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeidan, F. Y.

    1984-01-01

    A vibration instability phenomenon experienced in operating high pressure syn gas centrifugal compressors in two ammonia plants is described. The compressors were monitored by orbit and spectrum analysis for changes from baseline readings. It is found that internal hysteresis was the major destabilizing force; however, the problem was further complicated by seal lockup at the suction end of the compressor. A coupling lockup problem and a coupling fit problem, which frettage of the shaft, are also considered as contributors to the self excited vibrations.

  14. Single-stage experimental evaluation of tandem-airfoil rotor and stator blading for compressors. Part 1: Analysis and design of stages A, B, and C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brent, J. A.; Cheatham, J. G.; Nilsen, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    A conventional rotor and stator, two dual-airfoil tandem rotors, and one dual-airfoil tandem stator were designed. The two tandem rotors were each designed with different percentages of the overall lift produced by the front airfoil. Velocity diagrams and blade leading and trailing edge metal angles selected for the conventional rotor and stator blading were used in the design of the tandem blading. Rotor inlet hub/tip ratio was 0.8. Design values of rotor tip velocity and stage pressure ratio were 757 ft/sec and 1.30, respectively.

  15. Centrifuge apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Sartory, Walter K.; Eveleigh, John W.

    1976-01-01

    A method and apparatus for operating a continuous flow blood separation centrifuge are provided. The hematocrit of the entrant whole blood is continuously maintained at an optimum constant value by the addition of plasma to the entrant blood. The hematocrit of the separated red cells is monitored to indicate the degree of separation taking place, thereby providing a basis for regulating the flow through the centrifuge.

  16. A compressor designed for the energy research and development agency automotive gas turbine program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvas, M. R.

    1975-01-01

    A centrifugal compressor was designed for a gas turbine powered automobile as part of the Energy Research and Development Agency program to demonstrate emissions characteristics that meet 1978 standards with fuel economy and acceleration which are competitive with conventionally powered vehicles. A backswept impeller was designed for the compressor in order to attain the efficiency goal range required for the objectives of this program. Details of the design and method of flow analysis of the compressor are presented.

  17. Investigation of Unsteady Tip Clearance Flow in a Low-Speed One and Half Stage Axial Compressor with LES And PIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hah, Chunill; Hathaway, Michael; Katz, Joseph; Tan, David

    2015-01-01

    The primary focus of this paper is to investigate how a rotor's unsteady tip clearance flow structure changes in a low speed one and half stage axial compressor when the rotor tip gap size is increased from 0.5 mm (0.49% of rotor tip blade chord, 2% of blade span) to 2.4 mm (2.34% chord, 4% span) at the design condition are investigated. The changes in unsteady tip clearance flow with the 0.62 % tip gap as the flow rate is reduced to near stall condition are also investigated. A Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is applied to calculate the unsteady flow field at these three flow conditions. Detailed Stereoscopic PIV (SPIV) measurements of the current flow fields were also performed at the Johns Hopkins University in a refractive index-matched test facility which renders the compressor blades and casing optically transparent. With this setup, the unsteady velocity field in the entire flow domain, including the flow inside the tip gap, can be measured. Unsteady tip clearance flow fields from LES are compared with the PIV measurements and both LES and PIV results are used to study changes in tip clearance flow structures. The current study shows that the tip clearance vortex is not a single structure as traditionally perceived. The tip clearance vortex is formed by multiple interlaced vorticities. Therefore, the tip clearance vortex is inherently unsteady. The multiple interlaced vortices never roll up to form a single structure. When phased-averaged, the tip clearance vortex appears as a single structure. When flow rate is reduced with the same tip gap, the tip clearance vortex rolls further upstream and the tip clearance vortex moves further radially inward and away from the suction side of the blade. When the tip gap size is increased at the design flow condition, the overall tip clearance vortex becomes stronger and it stays closer to the blade suction side and the vortex core extends all the way to the exit of the blade passage. Measured and calculated unsteady flow

  18. Mean velocity and decay characteristics of the guidevane and stator blade wake of an axial flow compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Davino, R.

    1979-01-01

    Pure tone noise, blade row vibrations, and aerodynamic losses are phenomena which are influenced by stator and IGV (inlet guide vane) blade wake production, decay, and interaction in an axial-flow compressor. The objective of this investigation is to develop a better understanding of the nature of stator and IGV blade wakes that are influenced by the presence of centrifugal forces due to flow curvature. A single sensor hot wire probe was employed to determine the three mean velocity components of stator and IGV wakes of a single stage compressor. These wake profiles indicated a varying decay rate of the tangential and axial wake velocity components and a wake profile similarity. An analysis, which predicts this trend, has been developed. The radial velocities are found to be appreciable in both IGV and the stator wakes.

  19. Stage design

    DOEpatents

    Shacter, J.

    1975-12-01

    A method is described of cycling gases through a plurality of diffusion stages comprising the steps of admitting the diffused gases from a first diffusion stage into an axial compressor, simultaneously admitting the undiffused gases from a second diffusion stage into an intermediate pressure zone of said compressor corresponding in pressure to the pressure of said undiffused gases, and then admitting the resulting compressed mixture of diffused and undiffused gases into a third diffusion stage.

  20. High pressure compressor component performance report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, S. J.; Fesler, W.; Liu, H. S.; Lovell, R. C.; Shaffer, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    A compressor optimization study defined a 10 stage configuration with a 22.6:1 pressure ratio, an adiabatic efficiency goal of 86.1%, and a polytropic efficiency of 90.6%; the corrected airflow is 53.5 kg/s. Subsequent component testing included three full scale tests: a six stage rig test, a 10 stage rig test, and another 10 stage rig test completed in the second quarter of 1982. Information from these tests is used to select the configuration for a core engine test and an integrated core/low spool test. The test results will also provide data base for the flight propulsion system. The results of the test series with both aerodynamic and mechanical performance of each compressor build are presented. The second 10 stage compressor adiabatic efficiency was 0.848 at a cruise operating point versus a test goal of 0.846.

  1. Increase of Gas-Turbine Plant Efficiency by Optimizing Operation of Compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveev, V.; Goriachkin, E.; Volkov, A.

    2018-01-01

    The article presents optimization method for improving of the working process of axial compressors of gas turbine engines. Developed method allows to perform search for the best geometry of compressor blades automatically by using optimization software IOSO and CFD software NUMECA Fine/Turbo. The calculation of the compressor parameters was performed for work and stall point of its performance map on each optimization step. Study was carried out for seven-stage high-pressure compressor and three-stage low-pressure compressors. As a result of optimization, improvement of efficiency was achieved for all investigated compressors.

  2. Performance of single-stage compressor designed on basis of constant total enthalpy with symmetrical velocity diagram at all radii and velocity ratio of 0.7 at rotor hub / Jack R. Burtt and Robert J. Jackson

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burtt, Jack R; Jackson, Robert J

    1951-01-01

    A typical inlet axial-flow compressor inlet stage, which was designed on the basis of constant total enthalpy with symmetrical velocity diagram at all radii, was investigated. At a tip speed of 1126 feet per second, a peak pressure ratio of 1.28 was obtained at an efficiency of 0.76. At a tip speed, the highest practical flow was 28 pounds per second per square foot frontal area with an efficiency of 0.78. Data for a rotor relative inlet Mach number range of from 0.5 to 0.875 indicates that the critical value for any stage radial element is approximately 0.80 for the stage investigated.

  3. The Supersonic Axial-Flow Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantrowitz, Arthur

    1950-01-01

    An investigation has been made to explore the possibilities of axial-flow compressors operating with supersonic velocities into the blade rows. Preliminary calculations showed that very high pressure ratios across a stage, together with somewhat increased mass flows, were apparently possible with compressors which decelerated air through the speed of sound in their blading. The first phase of the investigation was the development of efficient supersonic diffusers to decelerate air through the speed of sound. The present report is largely a general discussion of some of the essential aerodynamics of single-stage supersonic axial-flow compressors. As an approach to the study of supersonic compressors, three possible velocity diagrams are discussed briefly. Because of the encouraging results of this study, an experimental single-stage supersonic compressor has been constructed and tested in Freon-12. In this compressor, air decelerates through the speed of sound in the rotor blading and enters the stators at subsonic speeds. A pressure ratio of about 1.8 at an efficiency of about 80 percent has been obtained.

  4. Design of a 1500 Ft/Sec, Transonic, High-through-Flow, Single-Stage Axial-Flow Compressor with Low Hub/Tip Ratio

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-10-01

    aerodynamic flow field pertaining to the design point is defined on twenty-one stream surfaces, and radial and meridional distributions of significant...full radial equilibrium analysis of the compressor flow field using the streamline curvature solution technique. Through a series of iterations, it...one can assume the blade geometry, solving for the equilibriwn flow field using specified relative flow aigles as input to the aerodynamic program. In

  5. Magnetic power piston fluid compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasser, Max G. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A compressor with no moving parts in the traditional sense having a housing having an inlet end allowing a low pressure fluid to enter and an outlet end allowing a high pressure fluid to exit is described. Within the compressor housing is at least one compression stage to increase the pressure of the fluid within the housing. The compression stage has a quantity of magnetic powder within the housing, is supported by a screen that allows passage of the fluid, and a coil for selectively providing a magnetic field across the magnetic powder such that when the magnetic field is not present the individual particles of the powder are separated allowing the fluid to flow through the powder and when the magnetic field is present the individual particles of the powder pack together causing the powder mass to expand preventing the fluid from flowing through the powder and causing a pressure pulse to compress the fluid.

  6. Compressor-fan unitary structure for air conditioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreiman, N.

    2015-08-01

    An extremely compact, therefore space saving unitary structure of short axial length is produced by radial integration of a revolving piston rotary compressor and an impeller of a centrifugal fan. The unitary structure employs single motor to run as the compressor so the airflow fan and eliminates duality of motors, related power supply and control elements. Novel revolving piston rotary compressor which provides possibility for such integration comprises the following: a suction gas delivery system which provides cooling of the motor and supplies refrigerant into the suction chamber under higher pressure (supercharged); a modified discharge system and lubricating oil supply system. Axial passages formed in the stationary crankshaft are used to supply discharge gas to a condenser, to return vaporized cooling agent from the evaporator to the suction cavity of the compressor, to pass a lubricant and to accommodate wiring supplying power to the unitary structure driver -external rotor electric motor.

  7. Development of Carbon Dioxide Hermitic Compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Satoshi; Oda, Atsushi; Ebara, Toshiyuki

    Because of global environmental problems, the existing refrigerants are to be replaced with natural refrigerants. CO2 is one of the natural refrigerants and environmentally safe, inflammable and non-toxic refrigerant. Therefore high efficiency compressor that can operate with natural refrigerants, especially CO2, needs to be developed. We developed a prototype CO2 hermetic compressor, which is able to use in carbon dioxide refrigerating systems for practical use. The compressor has two rolling pistons, and it leads to low vibrations, low noise. In additions, two-stage compression with two cylinders is adopted, because pressure difference is too large to compress in one stage. And inner pressure of the shell case is intermediate pressure to minimize gas leakage between compressing rooms and inner space of shell case. Intermediate pressure design enabled to make the compressor smaller in size and lighter in weight. As a result, the compressor achieved high efficiency and high reliability by these technology. We plan to study heat pump water heater, cup vending machine and various applications with CO2 compressor.

  8. An evaluation of 1D loss model collections for the off-design performance prediction of automotive turbocharger compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harley, P.; Spence, S.; Early, J.; Filsinger, D.; Dietrich, M.

    2013-12-01

    Single-zone modelling is used to assess different collections of impeller 1D loss models. Three collections of loss models have been identified in literature, and the background to each of these collections is discussed. Each collection is evaluated using three modern automotive turbocharger style centrifugal compressors; comparisons of performance for each of the collections are made. An empirical data set taken from standard hot gas stand tests for each turbocharger is used as a baseline for comparison. Compressor range is predicted in this study; impeller diffusion ratio is shown to be a useful method of predicting compressor surge in 1D, and choke is predicted using basic compressible flow theory. The compressor designer can use this as a guide to identify the most compatible collection of losses for turbocharger compressor design applications. The analysis indicates the most appropriate collection for the design of automotive turbocharger centrifugal compressors.

  9. Recirculating rotary gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Weinbrecht, J.F.

    1992-02-25

    A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

  10. Recirculating rotary gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Weinbrecht, John F.

    1992-01-01

    A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

  11. Computer programs for axial flow compressor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmody, R. H.; Creveling, H. F.

    1969-01-01

    Four computer programs examine effects of design parameters and indicate areas for research of multistage axial flow compressors. The programs provide information on velocity diagrams and stage-by-stage performance calculation, radial equilibrium of flow, radial distribution of total pressure, and off-design performance calculation.

  12. The Multistage Compressor Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flegel, Ashlie

    2004-01-01

    Research and developments of new aerospace technologies is one of Glenn Research Center's specialties. One facility that deals with the research of aerospace technologies is the High-speed Multistage Compressor Facility. This facility will be testing the performance and efficiency of an Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) two-stage compressor. There is a lot of preparation involved with testing something of this caliber. Before the test article can be installed into the test rig, the facility must be fully operational and ready to run. Meaning all the necessary instrumentation must be calibrated and installed in the facility. The test rig should also be in safe operating condition, and the proper safety permits obtained. In preparation for the test, the Multistage Compressor Facility went through a few changes. For instance the facility will now be utilizing slip rings, the gearbox went through some maintenance, new lubrications systems replaced the old ones, and special instrumentation needs to be fine tuned to achieve the maximum amount of accurate data. Slips rings help gather information off of a rotating device - in this case from a shaft - onto stationary contacts. The contacts (or brushes) need to be cooled to reduce the amount of frictional heat produced between the slip ring and brushes. The coolant being run through the slip ring is AK-225, a material hazardous to the ozone. To abide by the safety regulations the coolant must be run through a closed chiller system. A new chiller system was purchased but the reservoir that holds the coolant was ventilated which doesn t make the system truly closed and sealed. My task was to design and have a new reservoir built for the chiller system that complies with the safety guidelines. The gearbox had some safety issues also. Located in the back of the gearbox an inching drive was set up. When the inching drive is in use the gears and chain are bare and someone can easily get caught up in it. So to prevent

  13. Experimental and computational results from a large low-speed centrifugal impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, M. D.; Chriss, R. M.; Wood, J. R.; Strazisar, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental and computational investigation of the NASA Low-Speed Centrifugal Compressor (LSCC) flow field has been conducted using laser anemometry and Dawes' 3D viscous code. The experimental configuration consists of a backswept impeller followed by a vaneless diffuser. Measurements of the three-dimensional velocity field were acquired at several measurement planes through the compressor. The measurements describe both the throughflow and secondary velocity field along each measurement plane and in several cases provide details of the flow within the blade boundary layers. The experimental and computational results provide a clear understanding of the development of the throughflow momentum wake which is characteristic of centrifugal compressors.

  14. Design of a CO2 Twin Rotary Compressor for a Heat Pump Water Heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Jong Min; Kim, Woo Young; Kim, Hyun Jin; Cho, Sung Oug; Seo, Jong Cheun

    2010-06-01

    For a CO2 heat pump water heater, one-stage twin rotary compressor has been designed. As a design tool, computer simulation program for the compressor performance has been made. Validation of the simulation program has been carried out for a bench model compressor in a compressor calorimeter. Cooling capacity and the compressor input power were reasonably well compared between the simulation and the calorimeter test. Good agreement on P-V diagram between the simulation and the test was also obtained. With this validated compressor simulation program, parametric study has been performed to arrive at optimum dimensions for the compression chamber.

  15. High ratio recirculating gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Weinbrecht, J.F.

    1989-08-22

    A high ratio positive displacement recirculating rotary compressor is disclosed. The compressor includes an integral heat exchanger and recirculation conduits for returning cooled, high pressure discharge gas to the compressor housing to reducing heating of the compressor and enable higher pressure ratios to be sustained. The compressor features a recirculation system which results in continuous and uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas to the compressor with no direct leakage to either the discharge port or the intake port of the compressor, resulting in a capability of higher sustained pressure ratios without overheating of the compressor. 10 figs.

  16. Centrifugal pyrocontactor

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Lorac S.; Leonard, Ralph A.

    1993-01-01

    A method for mixing and separating immiscible liquid salts and liquid metals in a centrifugal contractor. The method includes introducing the liquids into an annular mixing zone and intensely mixing the liquids using vertical vanes attached to a rotor cooperating with vertical baffles, a horizontal baffle, and bottom vanes attached to the contactor housing. The liquids enter the contactor in the range of 700-800 degrees Celsius. The liquids are separated in the rotor into a dense phase and a light phase which are discharged from the contactor.

  17. Centrifugal pyrocontactor

    DOEpatents

    Chow, L.S.; Leonard, R.A.

    1993-10-19

    A method is described for mixing and separating immiscible liquid salts and liquid metals in a centrifugal contractor. The method includes introducing the liquids into an annular mixing zone and intensely mixing the liquids using vertical vanes attached to a rotor cooperating with vertical baffles, a horizontal baffle, and bottom vanes attached to the contactor housing. The liquids enter the contactor in the range of 700-800 degrees Celsius. The liquids are separated in the rotor into a dense phase and a light phase which are discharged from the contactor. 6 figures.

  18. Experimental study of low aspect ratio compressor blading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, L.; Moore, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of low aspect ratio blading on aerodynamic performance were examined. Four individual transonic compressor stages, representative of the inlet stage of an advanced high pressure ratio core compressor, are discussed. The flow phenomena for the four stages are investigated. Comparisons of blade element parameters are presented for the two different aspect ratio configurations. Blade loading levels are compared for the near stall conditions and comparisons are made of loss and diffusion factors over the operating range of incidence angles.

  19. Influence of definition of impeller-vaneless diffuser boundary on physical validity of numerical simulations of viscid flow in the vaneless diffuser of a centrifugal compressor: A short review of case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabalyk, K.; Kryllowicz, W.

    2017-09-01

    The study aims to work out a set of recommendations for setting a proper distance between the trailing edge of impeller and the interface boundary, which on the one hand would not be too large to overpredict the impeller efficiency and not too short to introduce artificial wake-like flow structures at diffuser inlet on the other. Three individual two-element stages belonging to three different types known as medium- and low-flow coefficient stages are studied. Besides of the design flow coefficient, the focus is on the influence of impeller tip Mach number on the optimal location of the boundary.

  20. Analytical study of effect of casing treatment on performance of a multistage compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, R. W.; Blade, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    The simulation was based on individual stage pressure and efficiency maps. These maps were modified to account for casing treatment effects on the individual stage characteristics. The individual stage maps effects on overall compressor performance were observed. The results show that to improve the performance of the compressor in its normal operating range, casing treatment of the rear stages is required.

  1. An examination of gas compressor stability and rotating stall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fozi, Aziz A.

    1987-01-01

    The principal sources of vibration related reliability problems in high pressure centrifugal gas compressors are the re-excitation of the first critical speed or Resonant Subsynchronous Vibration (RSSV), and the forced vibration due to rotating stall in the vaneless diffusers downstream of the impellers. An example of such field problems is given elsewhere. This paper describes the results of a test program at the author's company, initiated in 1983 and completed during 1985, which studied the RSSV threshold and the rotating stall phenomenon in a high pressure gas compressor.

  2. CFD study of leakage flows in shroud cavities of a compressor impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatova, K.

    2017-08-01

    The flow character in a gap between shroud disc of an impeller and a stator surface (shroud cavity) influences disc friction loss, labyrinth seal loss (parasitic losses) and thrust force. Flow calculations inside the shroud cavity of a model of centrifugal compressor stage and its labyrinth seal in a range of flow rates and axial width and radial gap are presented. The results are presented in terms of non-dimensional coefficients of flow, disc friction and seal leakage losses coefficients and pressure coefficient. The distributions meridional and tangential flow velocities correspond to the continuity and equilibrium equations - flow radial circulation exists in wide cavity and is absent in narrow cavities. The radial pressure distributions as measured and calculated are not fully comparable. The possible reason is that CFD-calculated leakage coefficient is less than calculated by A.Stodola formula. The influence of a cavity width on the losses and the thrust force requires a balanced design.

  3. Economics of water injected air screw compressor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venu Madhav, K.; Kovačević, A.

    2015-08-01

    There is a growing need for compressed air free of entrained oil to be used in industry. In many cases it can be supplied by oil flooded screw compressors with multi stage filtration systems, or by oil free screw compressors. However, if water injected screw compressors can be made to operate reliably, they could be more efficient and therefore cheaper to operate. Unfortunately, to date, such machines have proved to be insufficiently reliable and not cost effective. This paper describes an investigation carried out to determine the current limitations of water injected screw compressor systems and how these could be overcome in the 15-315 kW power range and delivery pressures of 6-10 bar. Modern rotor profiles and approach to sealing and cooling allow reasonably inexpensive air end design. The prototype of the water injected screw compressor air system was built and tested for performance and reliability. The water injected compressor system was compared with the oil injected and oil free compressor systems of the equivalent size including the economic analysis based on the lifecycle costs. Based on the obtained results, it was concluded that water injected screw compressor systems could be designed to deliver clean air free of oil contamination with a better user value proposition than the oil injected or oil free screw compressor systems over the considered range of operations.

  4. The New Performance Calculation Method of Fouled Axial Flow Compressor

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Fouling is the most important performance degradation factor, so it is necessary to accurately predict the effect of fouling on engine performance. In the previous research, it is very difficult to accurately model the fouled axial flow compressor. This paper develops a new performance calculation method of fouled multistage axial flow compressor based on experiment result and operating data. For multistage compressor, the whole compressor is decomposed into two sections. The first section includes the first 50% stages which reflect the fouling level, and the second section includes the last 50% stages which are viewed as the clean stage because of less deposits. In this model, the performance of the first section is obtained by combining scaling law method and linear progression model with traditional stage stacking method; simultaneously ambient conditions and engine configurations are considered. On the other hand, the performance of the second section is calculated by averaged infinitesimal stage method which is based on Reynolds' law of similarity. Finally, the model is successfully applied to predict the 8-stage axial flow compressor and 16-stage LM2500-30 compressor. The change of thermodynamic parameters such as pressure ratio, efficiency with the operating time, and stage number is analyzed in detail. PMID:25197717

  5. Sound reduction of air compressors using a systematic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moylan, Justin Tharp

    The noise emitted by portable electric air compressors can often be a nuisance or potentially hazardous to the operator or others nearby. Therefore, reducing the noise of these air compressors is desired. This research focuses on compressors with a reciprocating piston design as this is the most common type of pump design for portable compressors. An experimental setup was developed to measure the sound and vibration of the air compressors, including testing inside a semi-anechoic chamber. The design of a quiet air compressor was performed in four stages: 1) Teardown and benchmarking of air compressors, 2) Identification and isolation of noise sources, 3) Development of individual means to quiet noise sources, 4) Selection and testing of integrated solutions. The systematic approach and results for each of these stages will be discussed. Two redesigned solutions were developed and measured to be approximately 65% quieter than the previous unmodified compressor. An additional analysis was performed on the solutions selected by the participants involved in the selection process. This analysis involved determining which of the design criteria each participant considered most important when selecting solutions. The results from each participant were then compared to their educational background and experience and correlations were identified. The correlations discovered suggest that educational background and experience may be key determinants for the preference models developed.

  6. Evaluation of the Hydraulic Performance and Mass Transfer Efficiency of the CSSX Process with the Optimized Solvent in a Single Stage of 5.5-Cm Diameter Centrifugal Contactor

    SciTech Connect

    Law, J.D.; Tillotson, R.D.; Todd, T.A.

    2002-09-19

    The Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process has been selected for the separation of cesium from Savannah River Site high-level waste. The solvent composition used in the CSSX process was recently optimized so that the solvent is no longer supersaturated with respect to the calixarene crown ether extractant. Hydraulic performance and mass transfer efficiency testing of a single stage of 5.5-cm ORNL-designed centrifugal contactor has been performed for the CSSX process with the optimized solvent. Maximum throughputs of the 5.5-cm centrifugal contactor, as a function of contactor rotor speed, have been measured for the extraction, scrub, strip, and wash sections ofmore » the CSSX flowsheet at the baseline organic/aqueous flow ratios (O/A) of the process, as well as at O/A's 20% higher and 20% lower than the baseline. Maximum throughputs are comparable to the design throughput of the contactor, as well as with throughputs obtained previously in a 5-cm centrifugal contactor with the non-optimized CSSX solvent formulation. The 20% variation in O/A had minimal effect on contactor throughput. Additionally, mass transfer efficiencies have been determined for the extraction and strip sections of the flowsheet. Efficiencies were lower than the process goal of greater than or equal to 80%, ranging from 72 to 75% for the extraction section and from 36 to 60% in the strip section. Increasing the mixing intensity and/or the solution level in the mixing zone of the centrifugal contactor (residence time) could potentially increase efficiencies. Several methods are available to accomplish this including (1) increasing the size of the opening in the bottom of the rotor, resulting in a contactor which is partially pumping instead of fully pumping, (2) decreasing the number of vanes in the contactor, (3) increasing the vane height, or (4) adding vanes on the rotor and baffles on the housing of the contactor. The low efficiency results obtained stress the importance of proper

  7. Evaluation of the Hydraulic Capacity and Mass Transfer Efficiency of the CSSX Process with the Optimized Solvent in a Single Stage of 5.5-cm-Diameter Centrifugal Contactor

    SciTech Connect

    Law, Jack Douglas; Tillotson, Richard Dean; Todd, Terry Allen

    2002-09-01

    The Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process has been selected for the separation of cesium from Savannah River Site high-level waste. The solvent composition used in the CSSX process was recently optimized so that the solvent is no longer supersaturated with respect to the calixarene crown ether extractant. Hydraulic performance and mass transfer efficiency testing of a single stage of 5.5-cm ORNL-designed centrifugal contactor has been performed for the CSSX process with the optimized solvent. Maximum throughputs of the 5.5-cm centrifugal contactor, as a function of contactor rotor speed, have been measured for the extraction, scrub, strip, and wash sections ofmore » the CSSX flowsheet at the baseline organic/aqueous flow ratios (O/A) of the process, as well as at O/A’s 20% higher and 20% lower than the baseline. Maximum throughputs are comparable to the design throughput of the contactor, as well as with throughputs obtained previously in a 5-cm centrifugal contactor with the non-optimized CSSX solvent formulation. The 20% variation in O/A had minimal effect on contactor throughput. Additionally, mass transfer efficiencies have been determined for the extraction and strip sections of the flowsheet. Efficiencies were lower than the process goal of greater than or equal to 80%, ranging from 72 to 75% for the extraction section and from 36 to 60% in the strip section. Increasing the mixing intensity and/or the solution level in the mixing zone of the centrifugal contactor (residence time) could potentially increase efficiencies. Several methods are available to accomplish this including (1) increasing the size of the opening in the bottom of the rotor, resulting in a contactor which is partially pumping instead of fully pumping, (2) decreasing the number of vanes in the contactor, (3) increasing the vane height, or (4) adding vanes on the rotor and baffles on the housing of the contactor. The low efficiency results obtained stress the importance of proper

  8. Cooled spool piston compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Brian G. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A hydraulically powered gas compressor receives low pressure gas and outputs a high pressure gas. The housing of the compressor defines a cylinder with a center chamber having a cross-sectional area less than the cross-sectional area of a left end chamber and a right end chamber, and a spool-type piston assembly is movable within the cylinder and includes a left end closure, a right end closure, and a center body that are in sealing engagement with the respective cylinder walls as the piston reciprocates. First and second annual compression chambers are provided between the piston enclosures and center housing portion of the compressor, thereby minimizing the spacing between the core gas and a cooled surface of the compressor. Restricted flow passageways are provided in the piston closure members and a path is provided in the central body of the piston assembly, such that hydraulic fluid flows through the piston assembly to cool the piston assembly during its operation. The compressor of the present invention may be easily adapted for a particular application, and is capable of generating high gas pressures while maintaining both the compressed gas and the compressor components within acceptable temperature limits.

  9. Sorption compressor/mechanical expander hybrid refrigeration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. A.; Britcliffe, M.

    1987-01-01

    Experience with Deep Space Network (DSN) ground-based cryogenic refrigerators has proved the reliability of the basic two-stage Gifford-McMahon helium refrigerator. A very long life cryogenic refrigeration system appears possible by combining this expansion system or a turbo expansion system with a hydride sorption compressor in place of the usual motor driven piston compressor. To test the feasibility of this system, a commercial Gifford-McMahon refrigerator was tested using hydrogen gas as the working fluid. Although no attempt was made to optimize the system for hydrogen operation, the refrigerator developed 1.3 W at 30 K and 6.6 W at 60 K. The results of the test and of theoretical performances of the hybrid compressor coupled to these expansion systems are presented.

  10. NACA Engineer Examines Wind Tunnel Compressor Blades

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1955-09-21

    An engineer examines the main compressor for the 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory. The engineers were preparing the new wind tunnel for its initial runs in early 1956. The 10- by 10 was the most powerful propulsion wind tunnel in the nation. The facility was part of Congress’ Unitary Plan Act which coordinated wind tunnel construction at the NACA, Air Force, industry, and universities. The 10- by 10 was the largest of the three NACA tunnels built under the act. The 20-foot diameter eight-stage axial flow compressor, seen in this photograph, could generate air flows up to Mach 2.5 through the test section. The stainless steel compressor had 584 blades ranging from 1.8 to 3.25 feet in length. This main compressor was complemented by a secondary axial flow compressor. Working in tandem the two could generate wind streams up to Mach 3.5. The Cleveland Chamber of Commerce presented NACA Lewis photographer Bill Bowles with a second place award for this photograph in their Business and Professional category. The photograph was published in October 1955 edition of its periodical, The Clevelander, which highlighted local professional photographers. Fellow Lewis photographer Gene Giczy won second place in another category for a photograph of Cleveland Municipal Airport.

  11. Computational analysis of a multistage axial compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamidoju, Chaithanya

    Turbomachines are used extensively in Aerospace, Power Generation, and Oil & Gas Industries. Efficiency of these machines is often an important factor and has led to the continuous effort to improve the design to achieve better efficiency. The axial flow compressor is a major component in a gas turbine with the turbine's overall performance depending strongly on compressor performance. Traditional analysis of axial compressors involves throughflow calculations, isolated blade passage analysis, Quasi-3D blade-to-blade analysis, single-stage (rotor-stator) analysis, and multi-stage analysis involving larger design cycles. In the current study, the detailed flow through a 15 stage axial compressor is analyzed using a 3-D Navier Stokes CFD solver in a parallel computing environment. Methodology is described for steady state (frozen rotor stator) analysis of one blade passage per component. Various effects such as mesh type and density, boundary conditions, tip clearance and numerical issues such as turbulence model choice, advection model choice, and parallel processing performance are analyzed. A high sensitivity of the predictions to the above was found. Physical explanation to the flow features observed in the computational study are given. The total pressure rise verses mass flow rate was computed.

  12. Compressor Stall Recovery Through Tip Injection Assessed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suder, Ken L.

    2001-01-01

    Aerodynamic stability is a fundamental limit in the compressor design process. The development of robust techniques for increasing stability has several benefits: enabling higher loading and fewer blades, increasing safety throughout a mission, increasing tolerance to stage mismatch during part-speed operation and speed transients, and providing an opportunity to match stages at the compressor maximum efficiency point, thus reducing fuel burn. Mass injection upstream of the tip of a high-speed axial compressor rotor is a stability enhancement approach known to be effective in suppressing stall in tip-critical rotors if the injection is activated before stall occurs. This approach to stall suppression requires that a reliable stall warning system be available. Tests have recently been performed to assess whether steady injection can also be used to recover from fully developed stall. If mass injection is effective in recovering from stall quickly enough to avoid structural damage or loss of engine power, then a stall warning system may not be required. The stall recovery tests were performed on a transonic compressor rotor at its design tip speed of 1475 ft/sec using four injectors evenly spaced around the compressor case upstream of the rotor. The injectors were connected to an external air source. In an actual engine application, the injected air would be supplied with compressor bleed air. The injectors were isolated from the air source by a fast-acting butterfly valve. With the injectors turned off, the compressor was throttled into stall. Air injection was then activated with no change in throttle setting by opening the butterfly valve. The compressor recovered from stall at a fixed throttle setting with the aid of tip injection. The unsteady operating characteristic of the rotor was measured during these tests using high-response pressure sensors located upstream and downstream of the rotor. The figure shows the results, where the unsteady pressure and mass

  13. CF6 Jet Engine Diagnostics Program: High pressure compressor clearance investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radomski, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of high pressure compressor clearance changes on engine performance were experimentally determined on a CF6 core engine. The results indicate that a one percent reduction in normalized average clearance, expressed as a fraction of airfoil length, improves compressor efficiency by one percent. Compressor clearances are reduced by the application of rotor bore cooling, insulation of the stator casing, and use of a low coefficient of expansion material in the aft stages. This improvement amounts to a reduction of normalized average clearance of 0.78 percent, relative to CF6-60 compressor, which is equivalent to an improvement in compressor efficiency of 0.78 percent.

  14. Effects of reset stators and a rotating, grooved stator hub on performance of a 1.92-pressure-ratio compressor stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, G. W., Jr.; Urasek, D. C.; Reid, L.

    1977-01-01

    The overall performance and blade-element performance of a transonic fan stage are presented for two modified test configurations and are compared with the unmodified stage. Tests were conducted with reset stators 2 deg open and reset stators with a rotating grooved stator hub. Detailed radial and circumferential (behind stator) surveys of the flow conditions were made over the stable operating range at rotative speeds of 70, 90, and 100 percent of design speed. Reset stator blade tests indicated a small increase in stage efficiency, pressure ratio, and maximum weight flow at each speed. Performance with reset stators and a rotating, grooved stator hub resulted in an additional increase in stage efficiency and pressure ratio at all speeds. The rotating grooved stator hub reduced hub losses considerably.

  15. Standing wave compressor

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Timothy S.

    1991-01-01

    A compressor for compression-evaporation cooling systems, which requires no moving parts. A gaseous refrigerant inside a chamber is acoustically compressed and conveyed by means of a standing acoustic wave which is set up in the gaseous refrigerant. This standing acoustic wave can be driven either by a transducer, or by direct exposure of the gas to microwave and infrared sources, including solar energy. Input and output ports arranged along the chamber provide for the intake and discharge of the gaseous refrigerant. These ports can be provided with optional valve arrangements, so as to increase the compressor's pressure differential. The performance of the compressor in either of its transducer or electromagnetically driven configurations, can be optimized by a controlling circuit. This controlling circuit holds the wavelength of the standing acoustical wave constant, by changing the driving frequency in response to varying operating conditions.

  16. Performance of a 13-Stage Development Compressor for the J40-WE-24 Engine at Equivalent Speeds from 30 to 112 Percent of Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatch, James E.; Lucas, James G.; Finger, Harold B.

    1953-01-01

    The performance of a 13-stage development comressor for the J40-WE-24 engine has been determined at equivalent speeds from 30 to 112 percent of design. The design total-pressure ratio of 6.0 and the design weight flow of 164 pounds per second were not attained, An analysis was conducted to determine the reasons for the poor performance at the design and over-design speed. The analysis indicated that most of the difficulty could be attributed to the fact that the first stage was overcompromised to favor part-speed performance,

  17. Compressor surge counter

    DOEpatents

    Castleberry, Kimberly N.

    1983-01-01

    A surge counter for a rotating compressor is provided which detects surging by monitoring the vibration signal from an accelerometer mounted on the shaft bearing of the compressor. The circuit detects a rapid increase in the amplitude envelope of the vibration signal, e.g., 4 dB or greater in less than one second, which is associated with a surge onset and increments a counter. The circuit is rendered non-responsive for a period of about 5 seconds following the detection which corresponds to the duration of the surge condition. This prevents multiple registration of counts during the surge period due to rapid swings in vibration amplitude during the period.

  18. CENTRIFUGE END CAP

    DOEpatents

    Beams, J.W.; Snoddy, L.B.

    1960-08-01

    An end cap for ultra-gas centrifuges is designed to impart or remove angular momentum to or from the gas and to bring the entering gas to the temperature of the gas inside the centrifuge. The end cap is provided with slots or fins for adjusting the temperature and the angular momentum of the entering gas to the temperature and momentum of the gas in the centrifuge and is constructed to introduce both the inner and the peripheral stream into the centrifuge.

  19. Technology’s present situation and the development prospects of energy efficiency monitoring as well as performance testing & analysis for process flow compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Zhao, Y.; Wang, L.; Yang, Q.; Liu, G.; Tang, B.; Xiao, J.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, the background of performance testing of in-service process flow compressors set in user field are introduced, the main technique barriers faced in the field test are summarized, and the factors that result in real efficiencies of most process flow compressors being lower than the guaranteed by manufacturer are analysed. The authors investigated the present operational situation of process flow compressors in China and found that low efficiency operation of flow compressors is because the compressed gas is generally forced to flow back into the inlet pipe for adapting to the process parameters variety. For example, the anti-surge valve is always opened for centrifugal compressor. To improve the operation efficiency of process compressors the energy efficiency monitoring technology was overviewed and some suggestions are proposed in the paper, which is the basis of research on energy efficiency evaluation and/or labelling of process compressors.

  20. Investigation of turbocharger compressor surge inception by means of an acoustic two-port model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabral, R.; Åbom, M.

    2018-01-01

    The use of centrifugal compressors have increased tremendously in the last decade being implemented in the modern IC engine design as a key component. However, an efficient implementation is restricted by the compression system surge phenomenon. The focus in the investigation of surge inception have mainly been on the aerodynamic field while neglecting the acoustic field. In the present work a new method based on the full acoustic 2-port model is proposed for investigation of centrifugal compressor stall and surge inception. Essentially, the compressor is acoustically decoupled from the compression system, hence enabling the determination of sound generation and the quantification of internal aero-acoustic coupling effects, both independently of the connected pipe system. These frequency dependent quantities are indicating if the compressor is prone to self-sustained oscillations in case of positive feedback when installed in a system. The method is demonstrated on experimentally determined 2-port data of an automotive turbocharger centrifugal compressor under a variety of realistic operating conditions.

  1. On the characteristics of centrifugal-reciprocating machines. [cryogenic coolers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higa, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    A method of compressing helium gas for cryogenic coolers is presented which uses centrifugal force to reduce the forces on the connecting rod and crankshaft in the usual reciprocating compressor. This is achieved by rotating the piston-cylinder assembly at a speed sufficient for the centrifugal force on the piston to overcome the compressional force due to the working fluid. The rotating assembly is dynamically braked in order to recharge the working space with fluid. The intake stroke consists of decelerating the rotating piston-cylinder assembly and the exhaust stroke consists of accelerating the assembly.

  2. Investigation of Performance of Axial-Flow Compressor of XT-46 Turbine-Propeller Engine. II - Performance of Revised Compressor at Design Equivalent Speed. II; Performance of Revised Compressor at Design Equivalent Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creagh, John W. R.

    1950-01-01

    The compressor from the XT-46 turbine-propeller engine was revised by removing the last two rows of stator blades and by eliminating the interstage leakage paths described in a previous report. With the revised compressor, the flow choking point shifted upstream into the last rotor-blade row but the maximum weight flow was not increased over that of the original compressor. The flow range of the revised compressor was reduced to about two-thirds that obtained with the original compressor. The later stages of the compressor did not produce the design static-pressure increase probably because of excessive boundary-layer build-up in this region. Measurements obtained in the ninth-stage stator showed that the performance up to this station was promising but that the last three stages of the compressor were limiting the useful operating range of the preceding stages. Some modifications in flow-passage geometry and blade settings are believed to be necessary, however, before any major improvements in over-all compressor performance can be obtained.

  3. Towards Large Eddy Simulation of gas turbine compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullan, W. A.; Page, G. J.

    2012-07-01

    With increasing computing power, Large Eddy Simulation could be a useful simulation tool for gas turbine axial compressor design. This paper outlines a series of simulations performed on compressor geometries, ranging from a Controlled Diffusion Cascade stator blade to the periodic sector of a stage in a 3.5 stage axial compressor. The simulation results show that LES may offer advantages over traditional RANS methods when off-design conditions are considered - flow regimes where RANS models often fail to converge. The time-dependent nature of LES permits the resolution of transient flow structures, and can elucidate new mechanisms of vorticity generation on blade surfaces. It is shown that accurate LES is heavily reliant on both the near-wall mesh fidelity and the ability of the imposed inflow condition to recreate the conditions found in the reference experiment. For components embedded in a compressor this requires the generation of turbulence fluctuations at the inlet plane. A recycling method is developed that improves the quality of the flow in a single stage calculation of an axial compressor, and indicates that future developments in both the recycling technique and computing power will bring simulations of axial compressors within reach of industry in the coming years.

  4. Combined cold compressor/ejector helium refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Brown, D.P.

    1984-06-05

    A refrigeration apparatus having an ejector operatively connected with a cold compressor to form a two-stage pumping system. This pumping system is used to lower the pressure, and thereby the temperature of a bath of boiling refrigerant (helium). The apparatus as thus arranged and operated has substantially improved operating efficiency when compared to other processes or arrangements for achieving a similar low pressure.

  5. Combined cold compressor/ejector helium refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Donald P.

    1985-01-01

    A refrigeration apparatus having an ejector operatively connected with a cold compressor to form a two-stage pumping system. This pumping system is used to lower the pressure, and thereby the temperature of a bath of boiling refrigerant (helium). The apparatus as thus arranged and operated has substantially improved operating efficiency when compared to other processes or arrangements for achieving a similar low pressure.

  6. Combination Of Investment And Centrifugal Casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creeger, Gordon A.

    1994-01-01

    Modifications, including incorporation of centrifugal casting, made in investment-casting process reducing scrap rate. Used to make first- and second-stage high-pressure-fuel-turbopump nozzles, containing vanes with thin trailing edges and other thin sections. Investment mold spun for short time while being filled, and stopped before solidification occurs. Centrifugal force drives molten metal into thin trailing edges, ensuring they are filled. With improved filling, preheat and pour temperatures reduced and solidification hastened so less hot tearing.

  7. 23. Station Compressor Room 1 with Air Compressors and Accumulator ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Station Compressor Room 1 with Air Compressors and Accumulator Tanks, view to the south. One of the two large station air compressor units used for depressing the draft tube water level is visible atop a concrete pedestal on the left side of photograph (the second identical compressor is located in an adjacent room). Two of the six station air accumulator tanks are visible in the background. The smaller station service air compressor is visible in right foreground of the photograph was installed in the early 1980s, and replaced the original station service air compressor. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Noxon Rapids Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, South bank of Clark Fork River at Noxon Rapids, Noxon, Sanders County, MT

  8. Evaluation of Bauer K-20 Diesel Drive High Pressure Breathing Air Compressor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    was to: A. Determine if the compressor and Purification System provides compressed air at the required pressures, flow rates, quality and cleanliness... compressed air return from the air storage flasks to the compressor during unit shut down. All four stages of the compressor are protected by safety...1993. 6. Naval Ships Technical Manual, S9086-SY-STM-0O0, Chapeter 551 1st Rev. I November 1987. Compressed Air Plants and Systems, para 551-4.2.21. 7

  9. Process compressor technology. Volume 2: TI-59 manual for estimating centrifugal compressor performance

    SciTech Connect

    Lapina, R.P.

    1983-01-01

    This volume provides the performance-estimating procedures of Volume 1 in the from of calculator programs. Each chapter contains one program and is divided into five parts: the background (which develops the technology and equations); the program description; user instructions; sample problems; and the program listing. More than 25 programs are included.

  10. Compensating effect of the coherent synchrotron radiation in bunch compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Yichao; Hao, Yue; Litvinenko, Vladimir N.

    2013-06-01

    Typical bunch compression for a high-gain free-electron laser (FEL) requires a large compression ratio. Frequently, this compression is distributed in multiple stages along the beam transport line. However, for a high-gain FEL driven by an energy recovery linac (ERL), compression must be accomplished in a single strong compressor located at the beam line’s end; otherwise the electron beam would be affected severely by coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the ERL’s arcs. In such a scheme, the CSR originating from the strong compressors could greatly degrade the quality of the electron beam. In this paper, we present our design for a bunch compressor that will limit the effect of CSR on the e-beam’s quality. We discuss our findings from a study of such a compressor, and detail its potential for an FEL driven by a multipass ERL developed for the electron-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

  11. Vorticity Dynamics in Axial Compressor Flow Diagnosis and Design.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jie-Zhi; Yang, Yan-Tao; Wu, Hong; Li, Qiu-Shi; Mao, Feng; Zhou, Sheng

    2007-11-01

    It is well recognized that vorticity and vortical structures appear inevitably in viscous compressor flows and have strong influence on the compressor performance. But conventional analysis and design procedure cannot pinpoint the quantitative contribution of each individual vortical structure to the integrated performance of a compressor, such as the stagnation-pressure ratio and efficiency. We fill this gap by using the so-called derivative-moment transformation which has been successfully applied to external aerodynamics. We show that the compressor performance is mainly controlled by the radial distribution of azimuthal vorticity, of which an optimization in the through-flow design stage leads to a simple Abel equation of the second kind. Solving the equation yields desired circulation distribution that optimizes the blade geometry. The advantage of this new procedure is demonstrated by numerical examples, including the posterior performance check by 3-D Navier-Stokes simulation.

  12. Solid State Compressor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-20

    Air Products and Chemicals , Inc . CONTRACT NO.: N00014-83-C-0394...performed by Air Products and Chemicals , Inc . 2.0 TASK 2. MECHANICAL SIMULATOR: SUBTASK 2.1, ONE CELL SIMULATOR 2.1 Purpose The overall goal of this...refrigerant 12 (Freon 12) • 4.5 Test final system, ten cell compressor, and cryostat APCI ., ’ APCI - Air Products and Chemicals , Inc . CPI -

  13. Temperature Swing Adsorption Compressor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, John E.; Mulloth, Lila M.; Affleck, Dave L.

    2001-01-01

    Closing the oxygen loop in an air revitalization system based on four-bed molecular sieve and Sabatier reactor technology requires a vacuum pump-compressor that can take the low-pressure CO, from the 4BMS and compress and store for use by a Sabatier reactor. NASA Ames Research Center proposed a solid-state temperature-swing adsorption (TSA) compressor that appears to meet performance requirements, be quiet and reliable, and consume less power than a comparable mechanical compressor/accumulator combination. Under this task, TSA compressor technology is being advanced through development of a complete prototype system. A liquid-cooled TSA compressor has been partially tested, and the rest of the system is being fabricated. An air-cooled TSA compressor is also being designed.

  14. Light intensity compressor

    DOEpatents

    Rushford, Michael C.

    1990-02-06

    In a system for recording images having vastly differing light intensities over the face of the image, a light intensity compressor is provided that utilizes the properties of twisted nematic liquid crystals to compress the image intensity. A photoconductor or photodiode material that is responsive to the wavelength of radiation being recorded is placed adjacent a layer of twisted nematic liquid crystal material. An electric potential applied to a pair of electrodes that are disposed outside of the liquid crystal/photoconductor arrangement to provide an electric field in the vicinity of the liquid crystal material. The electrodes are substantially transparent to the form of radiation being recorded. A pair of crossed polarizers are provided on opposite sides of the liquid crystal. The front polarizer linearly polarizes the light, while the back polarizer cooperates with the front polarizer and the liquid crystal material to compress the intensity of a viewed scene. Light incident upon the intensity compressor activates the photoconductor in proportion to the intensity of the light, thereby varying the field applied to the liquid crystal. The increased field causes the liquid crystal to have less of a twisting effect on the incident linearly polarized light, which will cause an increased percentage of the light to be absorbed by the back polarizer. The intensity of an image may be compressed by forming an image on the light intensity compressor.

  15. Light intensity compressor

    DOEpatents

    Rushford, Michael C.

    1990-01-01

    In a system for recording images having vastly differing light intensities over the face of the image, a light intensity compressor is provided that utilizes the properties of twisted nematic liquid crystals to compress the image intensity. A photoconductor or photodiode material that is responsive to the wavelength of radiation being recorded is placed adjacent a layer of twisted nematic liquid crystal material. An electric potential applied to a pair of electrodes that are disposed outside of the liquid crystal/photoconductor arrangement to provide an electric field in the vicinity of the liquid crystal material. The electrodes are substantially transparent to the form of radiation being recorded. A pair of crossed polarizers are provided on opposite sides of the liquid crystal. The front polarizer linearly polarizes the light, while the back polarizer cooperates with the front polarizer and the liquid crystal material to compress the intensity of a viewed scene. Light incident upon the intensity compressor activates the photoconductor in proportion to the intensity of the light, thereby varying the field applied to the liquid crystal. The increased field causes the liquid crystal to have less of a twisting effect on the incident linearly polarized light, which will cause an increased percentage of the light to be absorbed by the back polarizer. The intensity of an image may be compressed by forming an image on the light intensity compressor.

  16. Physics based modeling of axial compressor stall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaki, Mina Adel

    2009-12-01

    Axial compressors are used in a wide variety of aerodynamic applications and are one of the most important components in aero-engines. However, the operability of compressors is limited at low-mass flow rates by fluid dynamic instabilities such as stall and surge. These instabilities can lead to engine failure and loss of engine power which can compromise the aircraft safety and reliability. Thus, a better understanding of how stall occurs and the causes behind its inception is extremely important. In the vicinity of the stall line, the flow field is inherently unsteady due to the interactions between adjacent rows of blades, formation of separation cells, and the viscous effects including shock-boundary layer interactions. Accurate modeling of these phenomena requires a proper set of stable and accurate boundary conditions at the rotor-stator interface that conserve mass, momentum, and energy, while eliminating false reflections. As a part of this research effort, an existing 3-D Navier-Stokes analysis for modeling single stage compressors has been modified to model multi-stage axial compressors and turbines. Several rotor-stator interface boundary conditions have been implemented. These conditions have been evaluated for the first stage (a stator and a rotor) of the two-stage fuel turbine on the space shuttle main engine (SSME). Their effectiveness in conserving global properties such as mass, momentum, and energy across the interface while yielding good performance predictions has been evaluated. While all the methods gave satisfactory results, a characteristic based approach and an unsteady sliding mesh approach are found to work best. Accurate modeling of the formation of stall cells requires the use of advanced turbulence models. As a part of this effort, a new advanced turbulence model called the Hybrid RANS/KES (HRKES) model has been developed and implemented. This model solves the Menter's k-o-SST model near walls and switches to the Kinetic Eddy

  17. NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation High Overall Pressure Ratio Compressor Research Pre-Test CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celestina, Mark L.; Fabian, John C.; Kulkarni, Sameer

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a collaborative and cost-shared approach to reducing fuel burn under the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation project. NASA and General Electric (GE) Aviation are working together aa an integrated team to obtain compressor aerodynamic data that is mutually beneficial to both NASA and GE Aviation. The objective of the High OPR Compressor Task is to test a single stage then two stages of an advanced GE core compressor using state-of-the-art research instrumentation to investigate the loss mechanisms and interaction effects of embedded transonic highly-loaded compressor stages. This paper presents preliminary results from NASA's in-house multistage computational code, APNASA, in preparation for this advanced transonic compressor rig test.

  18. VIEW OF COMPRESSOR ROOM AT GROUND LEVEL SHOWING COMPRESSOR EQUIPMENT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF COMPRESSOR ROOM AT GROUND LEVEL SHOWING COMPRESSOR EQUIPMENT. VIEW FACING SOUTH - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  19. Endwall flows and blading design for axial flow compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Christopher J.

    Literature relevant to blading design in the endwall region is reviewed, and important three dimensional flow phenomena occurring in embedded stages of axial compressors are described. A low speed axial flow four stage compressor rig is described and bladings studied are detailed: two conventional and two with end bends. The application of a three dimensional Navier-Stokes solver to the bladings' stators, to assess the effectiveness of the code, is reported. Calculation results of exit whirl angles, losses, and surface static pressures are compared with experiment.

  20. Valve for gas centrifuges

    DOEpatents

    Hahs, C.A.; Rurbage, C.H.

    1982-03-17

    The invention is pneumatically operated valve assembly for simulatenously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two on the lines so closed. The value assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

  1. METHOD OF CENTRIFUGE OPERATION

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, K.

    1960-05-10

    A method of isotope separation is described in which two streams are flowed axially of, and countercurrently through, a cylindrical centrifuge bowl. Under the influence of a centrifugal field, the light fraction is concentrated in a stream flowing through the central portion of the bowl, whereas the heavy fraction is concentrated in a stream at the periphery thereof.

  2. Two Stage Sibling Cycle Compressor/Expander.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    documents, follow the procedures in DoD 5200.22-M, Industrial Security Manual, Section 11-19 or DoD 5200.1 -R, Information Security Program Regulation...procedures in DoD 5200.22-M, Industrial Security Manual, Section 11-19 or DoD 5200.1-R, Information Security Program Regulation, Chapter IX. For...Spae Piston rotation periodically connects channels from expansion/ compresion ces to ports P1Port B2 Heat Exchangers B Piston moves Ports Process Al

  3. Miniature high speed compressor having embedded permanent magnet motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Lei (Inventor); Zheng, Liping (Inventor); Chow, Louis (Inventor); Kapat, Jayanta S. (Inventor); Wu, Thomas X. (Inventor); Kota, Krishna M. (Inventor); Li, Xiaoyi (Inventor); Acharya, Dipjyoti (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A high speed centrifugal compressor for compressing fluids includes a permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) having a hollow shaft, the being supported on its ends by ball bearing supports. A permanent magnet core is embedded inside the shaft. A stator with a winding is located radially outward of the shaft. The PMSM includes a rotor including at least one impeller secured to the shaft or integrated with the shaft as a single piece. The rotor is a high rigidity rotor providing a bending mode speed of at least 100,000 RPM which advantageously permits implementation of relatively low-cost ball bearing supports.

  4. OMC Compressor Case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, W. Donald

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes efforts expended in the development of an all-composite compressor case. Two pre-production units have been built, one utilizing V-CAP and one utilizing AFR-700B resin systems. Both units have been rig tested at elevated temperatures well above design limit loads. This report discusses the manufacturing processes, test results, and Finite Element Analysis performed. The V-CAP unit was funded by NASA-Lewis Research Center in 1994 under contract number NAS3- 27442 for Development of an All-Composite OMC Compressor Case. This contract was followed by an Air Force study in 1996 to build and identical unit using the AFR-700B resin system in place of the V-CAP system. The second compressor case was funded under U.S. Air Force contract F33615-93-D-5326, Advanced Materials for Aerospace Structures Special Studies (AMAS3), Delivery Order 0021 entitled "Advanced Polymeric Composite Materials and Structures Technology for Advanced High Temperature Gas Turbine Engines.' Initial studies using the V-CAP resin system were undertaken in 1993 under a NASA Lewis contract (NAS3-26829). A first prototype unit was developed in a joint program between Textron-Lycoming (now Allied Signal) and Brunswick (now Lincoln Composites). This unit included composite end closures using low density, high temperature molded end closures. The units was similar in size and shape to a titanium case currently used on the PT-21 0 engine and was funded as part of the integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology (EHPTET) initiative of DOD and NASA.

  5. Cooled-Spool Piston Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Brian G.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed cooled-spool piston compressor driven by hydraulic power and features internal cooling of piston by flowing hydraulic fluid to limit temperature of compressed gas. Provides sufficient cooling for higher compression ratios or reactive gases. Unlike conventional piston compressors, all parts of compressed gas lie at all times within relatively short distance of cooled surface so that gas cooled more effectively.

  6. Development of a turbine-compressor for 10 kW class neon turbo-Brayton refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Hirokazu; Hirokawa, Masaki; Yoshida, Shigeru; Sano, Tomonobu; Ozaki, Shinsuke

    2014-01-01

    We are developing 10 kW class turbo-Brayton refrigerator whose working fluid is neon gas. Its high pressure value is 1 MPa and its low pressure value is 0.5 MPa. The refrigerator consists of two turbine-compressors and a heat exchanger. The turbine-compressor has a turbo-expander on one side of its shaft and a turbo-compressor on the other side of the shaft. Two turbo-compressors are connected in series and two turbo-expanders are set in parallel. So, all amount of neon gas is compressed by two stages and each half a mount of neon gas is expanded by one stage. Two turbinecompressors are the same machines and development cost and time are minimized. In this stage, we made one prototype turbine-compressor and installed it in a performance test facility. This paper shows details of the turbine-compressor and refrigerator cooling power simulation results.

  7. QRFXFreeze: Queryable Compressor for RFX.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumar, Radha; Nandagopal, Gomathi; Ronald, Daphne

    2015-01-01

    The verbose nature of XML has been mulled over again and again and many compression techniques for XML data have been excogitated over the years. Some of the techniques incorporate support for querying the XML database in its compressed format while others have to be decompressed before they can be queried. XML compression in which querying is directly supported instantaneously with no compromise over time is forced to compromise over space. In this paper, we propose the compressor, QRFXFreeze, which not only reduces the space of storage but also supports efficient querying. The compressor does this without decompressing the compressed XML file. The compressor supports all kinds of XML documents along with insert, update, and delete operations. The forte of QRFXFreeze is that the textual data are semantically compressed and are indexed to reduce the querying time. Experimental results show that the proposed compressor performs much better than other well-known compressors.

  8. Practical experience with unstable compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malanoski, S. B.

    1980-01-01

    Using analytical mathematical modeling techniques for the system components, an attempt is made to gauge the destabilizing effects in a number of compressor designs. In particular the overhung (or cantilevered) compressor designs and the straddle-mounted (or simply supported) compressor designs are examined. Recommendations are made, based on experiences with stable and unstable compressors, which can be used as guides in future designs. High and low pressure compressors which operate well above their fundamental rotor-bearing lateral natural frequencies can suffer from destructive subsynchronous vibration. Usually the elements in the system design which contribute to this vibration, other than the shafting and the bearings, are the seals (both gas labyrinth and oil breakdown bushings) and the aerodynamic components.

  9. Preliminary Results of Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of X24C-4B Turbojet Engine. IV - Performance of Modified Compressor. Part 4; Performance of Modified Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorman, H. Carl; Dupree, David T.

    1947-01-01

    The performance of the 11-stage axial-flow compressor, modified to improve the compressor-outlet velocity, in a revised X24C-4B turbojet engine is presented and compared with the performance of the compressor in the original engine. Performance data were obtained from an investigation of the revised engine in the MACA Cleveland altitude wind tunnel. Compressor performance data were obtained for engine operation with four exhaust nozzles of different outlet area at simulated altitudes from 15,OOO to 45,000 feet, simulated flight Mach numbers from 0.24 to 1.07, and engine speeds from 4000 to 12,500 rpm. The data cover a range of corrected engine speeds from 4100 to 13,500 rpm, which correspond to compressor Mach numbers from 0.30 to 1.00.

  10. Aerodynamic Design of Axial Flow Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullock, R. O. (Editor); Johnsen, I. A.

    1965-01-01

    An overview of 'Aerodynamic systems design of axial flow compressors' is presented. Numerous chapters cover topics such as compressor design, ptotential and viscous flow in two dimensional cascades, compressor stall and blade vibration, and compressor flow theory. Theoretical aspects of flow are also covered.

  11. Miniature Piezoelectric Compressor for Joule-Thomson Cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobol, Sergey; Tzabar, Nir; Grossman, Gershon

    Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocoolers operate with a continuous flow of the working fluid that enters the cooler at a high pressure and leaves it at a lower pressure. Ideally, the temperature of the outgoing fluid equals the temperature of the entering fluid. JT cryocoolers that operate with pure refrigerants require high pressure of a few tens of MPa where the low pressure is usually around 0.1 MPa. Circulation of the working fluid in such cases requires high pressure ratio compressors that evidently have large dimensions. JT cryocoolers can operate with much lower pressure ratios by using mixed-refrigerants. Cooling from 300 K to about 80 K in a single stage cryocooler normally requires a pressure ratio of about 1:25. In the present research a miniature compressor driven by piezoelectric elements is developed in collaboration between Rafael and the Technion. This type of compressor has the advantage of improved long life compared to other mechanical compressors, very low vibrations, and silent operation. In the current case, the design goal of the intake and discharge pressures has been 0.1 and 2.5 MPa, respectively, with a flow rate of 0.06 g/s. The compressor has two compression stages; 1:5 and 5:25. Several configurations have been considered, fabricated, and tested. The performance of the last configuration approaches the desired specification and is presented in the current paper together with the design concept.

  12. Centrifuge for SLS-1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1981-01-16

    S81-25565 (Feb 1981) --- Expected to be a busy item of flight hardware on the Spacelab Life Sciences (SLS-1) mission is this low-gravity centrifuge. To be flown onboard Columbia for STS-40, the centrifuge is able to simulate several gravity levels (0.5 g, 1.0 g, 1.5 g. and 2.0 g). Blood samples, taken during the flight, will be placed in the centrifuge, fixed for post flight analysis and transferred to a freezer.

  13. Active stabilization to prevent surge in centrifugal compression systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, Alan H.; Greitzer, Edward M.; Simon, Jon S.; Valavani, Lena

    1993-01-01

    This report documents an experimental and analytical study of the active stabilization of surge in a centrifugal engine. The aims of the research were to extend the operating range of a compressor as far as possible and to establish the theoretical framework for the active stabilization of surge from both an aerodynamic stability and a control theoretic perspective. In particular, much attention was paid to understanding the physical limitations of active stabilization and how they are influenced by control system design parameters. Previously developed linear models of actively stabilized compressors were extended to include such nonlinear phenomena as bounded actuation, bandwidth limits, and robustness criteria. This model was then used to systematically quantify the influence of sensor-actuator selection on system performance. Five different actuation schemes were considered along with four different sensors. Sensor-actuator choice was shown to have a profound effect on the performance of the stabilized compressor. The optimum choice was not unique, but rather shown to be a strong function of some of the non-dimensional parameters which characterize the compression system dynamics. Specifically, the utility of the concepts were shown to depend on the system compliance to inertia ratio ('B' parameter) and the local slope of the compressor speedline. In general, the most effective arrangements are ones in which the actuator is most closely coupled to the compressor, such as a close-coupled bleed valve inlet jet, rather than elsewhere in the flow train, such as a fuel flow modulator. The analytical model was used to explore the influence of control system bandwidth on control effectiveness. The relevant reference frequency was shown to be the compression system's Helmholtz frequency rather than the surge frequency. The analysis shows that control bandwidths of three to ten times the Helmholtz frequency are required for larger increases in the compressor flow range

  14. Compressor and Turbine Models of Brayton Units for Space Nuclear Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, Bruno M.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel

    2007-01-01

    Closed Brayton Cycles with centrifugal flow, single-shaft turbo-machines are being considered, with gas cooled nuclear reactors, to provide 10's to 100's of electrical power to support future space exploration missions and Lunar and Mars outposts. Such power system analysis is typically based on the cycle thermodynamics, for given operating pressures and temperatures and assumed polytropic efficiencies of the compressor and turbine of the Brayton energy conversion units. Thus the analysis results not suitable for modeling operation transients such as startup and changes in the electric load. To simulate these transients, accurate models of the turbine and compressor in the Brayton rotating unit, which calculate the changes in the compressor and turbine efficiencies with system operation are needed. This paper presents flow models that account for the design and dimensions of the compressor impeller and diffuser, and the turbine stator and rotor blades. These models calculate the various enthalpy losses and the polytropic efficiencies along with the pressure ratios of the turbine and compressor. The predictions of these models compare well with reported performance data of actual hardware. In addition, the results of a parametric analysis to map the operations of the compressor and turbine, as functions of the rotating shaft speed and inlet Mach number of the gas working fluid, are presented and discussed. The analysis used a binary mixture of He-Xe with a molecular weight of 40 g/mole as the working fluid.

  15. Free piston inertia compressor

    DOEpatents

    Richards, W.D.C.; Bilodeau, D.; Marusak, T.; Dutram, L. Jr.; Brady, J.

    A free piston inertia compressor comprises a piston assembly including a connecting rod having pistons on both ends, the cylinder being split into two substantially identical portions by a seal through which the connecting rod passes. Vents in the cylinder wall are provided near the seal to permit gas to escape the cylinder until the piston covers the vent whereupon the remaining gas in the cylinder functions as a gas spring and cushions the piston against impact on the seal. The connecting rod has a central portion of relatively small diameter providing free play of the connecting rod through the seal and end portions of relatively large diameter providing a limited tolerance between the connecting rod and the seal. Finally, the seal comprises a seal ring assembly consisting of a dampener plate, a free floating seal at the center of the dampener plate and a seal retainer plate in one face of the dampener plate.

  16. Free piston inertia compressor

    DOEpatents

    Richards, William D. C.; Bilodeau, Denis; Marusak, Thomas; Dutram, Jr., Leonard; Brady, Joseph

    1981-01-01

    A free piston inertia compressor comprises a piston assembly including a connecting rod having pistons on both ends, the cylinder being split into two substantially identical portions by a seal through which the connecting rod passes. Vents in the cylinder wall are provided near the seal to permit gas to excape the cylinder until the piston covers the vent whereupon the remaining gas in the cylinder functions as a gas spring and cushions the piston against impact on the seal. The connecting rod has a central portion of relatively small diameter providing free play of the connecting rod through the seal and end portions of relatively large diameter providing a limited tolerance between the connecting rod and the seal. Finally, the seal comprises a seal ring assembly consisting of a dampener plate, a free floating seal at the center of the dampener plate and a seal retainer plate in one face of the dampener plate.

  17. Dual capacity reciprocating compressor

    DOEpatents

    Wolfe, Robert W.

    1984-01-01

    A multi-cylinder compressor 10 particularly useful in connection with northern climate heat pumps and in which different capacities are available in accordance with reversing motor 16 rotation is provided with an eccentric cam 38 on a crank pin 34 under a fraction of the connecting rods, and arranged for rotation upon the crank pin between opposite positions 180.degree. apart so that with cam rotation on the crank pin such that the crank throw is at its normal maximum value all pistons pump at full capacity, and with rotation of the crank shaft in the opposite direction the cam moves to a circumferential position on the crank pin such that the overall crank throw is zero. Pistons 24 whose connecting rods 30 ride on a crank pin 36 without a cam pump their normal rate with either crank rotational direction. Thus a small clearance volume is provided for any piston that moves when in either capacity mode of operation.

  18. Dual capacity reciprocating compressor

    DOEpatents

    Wolfe, R.W.

    1984-10-30

    A multi-cylinder compressor particularly useful in connection with northern climate heat pumps and in which different capacities are available in accordance with reversing motor rotation is provided with an eccentric cam on a crank pin under a fraction of the connecting rods, and arranged for rotation upon the crank pin between opposite positions 180[degree] apart so that with cam rotation on the crank pin such that the crank throw is at its normal maximum value all pistons pump at full capacity, and with rotation of the crank shaft in the opposite direction the cam moves to a circumferential position on the crank pin such that the overall crank throw is zero. Pistons whose connecting rods ride on a crank pin without a cam pump their normal rate with either crank rotational direction. Thus a small clearance volume is provided for any piston that moves when in either capacity mode of operation. 6 figs.

  19. Valve for gas centrifuges

    DOEpatents

    Hahs, Charles A.; Burbage, Charles H.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a pneumatically operated valve assembly for simultaneously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two of the lines so closed. The valve assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

  20. Improving of the working process of axial compressors of gas turbine engines by using an optimization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchukov, E.; Egorov, I.; Popov, G.; Baturin, O.; Goriachkin, E.; Novikova, Y.; Kolmakova, D.

    2017-08-01

    The article presents one optimization method for improving of the working process of an axial compressor of gas turbine engine. Developed method allows to perform search for the best geometry of compressor blades automatically by using optimization software IOSO and CFD software NUMECA Fine/Turbo. Optimization was performed by changing the form of the middle line in the three sections of each blade and shifts of three sections of the guide vanes in the circumferential and axial directions. The calculation of the compressor parameters was performed for work and stall point of its performance map on each optimization step. Study was carried out for seven-stage high-pressure compressor and three-stage low-pressure compressors. As a result of optimization, improvement of efficiency was achieved for all investigated compressors.

  1. Hermetic compressor and block expansion valve in refrigeration performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoso, Budi; Susilo, Didik Djoko; Tjahjana, D. D. D. P.

    2016-03-01

    Vehicle cabin in tropical countries requires the cooling during the day for comfort of passengers. Air conditioning machine is commonly driven by an internal combustion engine having a great power, which the conventional compressor is connected to crank shaft. The stage of research done is driving the hermetic compressor with an electric motor, and using block expansion valve. The HFC-134a was used as refrigerant working. The primary parameters observed during the experiment are pressure, temperature, and power consumption for different cooling capacities. The results show that the highest coefficient of performance (COP) and the electric power of system are 6.3 and 638 Watt, respectively.

  2. Suction muffler for refrigeration compressor

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, R.T.; Middleton, M.G.

    1983-01-25

    A hermetic refrigeration compressor includes a suction muffler formed from two pieces of plastic material mounted on the cylinder housing. One piece is cylindrical in shape with an end wall having an aperture for receiving a suction tube connected to the cylinder head. The other piece fits over and covers the other end of the cylindrical piece, and includes a flaring entrance horn which extends toward the return line on the sidewall of the compressor shell. 5 figs.

  3. Suction muffler for refrigeration compressor

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Richard T.; Middleton, Marc G.

    1983-01-01

    A hermetic refrigeration compressor includes a suction muffler formed from two pieces of plastic material mounted on the cylinder housing. One piece is cylindrical in shape with an end wall having an aperture for receiving a suction tube connected to the cylinder head. The other piece fits over and covers the other end of the cylindrical piece, and includes a flaring entrance horn which extends toward the return line on the sidewall of the compressor shell.

  4. Semi-active compressor valve

    DOEpatents

    Brun, Klaus; Gernentz, Ryan S.

    2010-07-27

    A method and system for fine-tuning the motion of suction or discharge valves associated with cylinders of a reciprocating gas compressor, such as the large compressors used for natural gas transmission. The valve's primary driving force is conventional, but the valve also uses an electromagnetic coil to sense position of the plate (or other plugging element) and to provide an opposing force prior to impact.

  5. Flow Characterization and Dynamic Analysis of a Radial Compressor with Passive Method of Surge Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillou, Erwann

    Due to recent emission regulations, the use of turbochargers for force induction of internal combustion engines has increased. Actually, the trend in diesel engines is to downsize the engine by use of turbochargers that operate at higher pressure ratio. Unfortunately, increasing the rotational speed tends to reduce the turbocharger radial compressor range of operation which is limited at low mass flow rate by the occurrence of surge. In order to extent the operability of turbochargers, compressor housings can be equipped with a passive surge control device also known as ported shroud. This specific casing treatment has been demonstrated to enhance surge margin with minor negative impact on the compressor efficiency. However, the actual working mechanisms of the bypass system remain not well understood. In order to optimize the design of the ported shroud, it is then crucial to identify the dynamic flow changes induced by the implementation of the device to control instabilities. Experimental methods were used to assess the development of instabilities from stable, stall and eventually surge regimes of a ported shroud centrifugal compressor. Systematic comparison was conducted with the same compressor design without ported shroud. Hence, the full pressure dynamic survey of both compressors' performance characteristics converged toward two different and probably interrelated driving mechanisms to the development and/or propagation of unsteadiness within each compressor. One related the pressure disturbances at the compressor inlet, and notably the more apparent development of perturbations in the non-ported compressor impeller, whereas the other was attributed to the pressure distortions induced by the presence of the tongue in the asymmetric design of the compressor volute. Specific points of operation were selected to carry out planar flow measurements. At normal working, both standard and stereoscopic particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) measurements were performed

  6. JT8D high pressure compressor performance improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffin, W. O.

    1981-01-01

    An improved performance high pressure compressor with potential application to all models of the JT8D engine was designed. The concept consisted of a trenched abradable rubstrip which mates with the blade tips for each of the even rotor stages. This feature allows tip clearances to be set so blade tips run at or near the optimum radius relative to the flowpath wall, without the danger of damaging the blades during transients and maneuvers. The improved compressor demonstrated thrust specific fuel consumption and exhaust gas temperature improvements of 1.0 percent and at least 10 C over the takeoff and climb power range at sea level static conditions, compared to a bill-of-material high pressure compressor. Surge margin also improved 4 percentage points over the high power operating range. A thrust specific fuel consumption improvement of 0.7 percent at typical cruise conditions was calculated based on the sea level test results.

  7. Downhole steam generator having a downhole oxidant compressor

    DOEpatents

    Fox, Ronald L.

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus and method for generation of steam in a borehole for penetration into an earth formation wherein a downhole oxidant compressor is used to compress relatively low pressure (atmospheric) oxidant, such as air, to a relatively high pressure prior to mixing with fuel for combustion. The multi-stage compressor receives motive power through a shaft driven by a gas turbine powered by the hot expanding combustion gases. The main flow of compressed oxidant passes through a velocity increasing nozzle formed by a reduced central section of the compressor housing. An oxidant bypass feedpipe leading to peripheral oxidant injection nozzles of the combustion chamber are also provided. The downhole compressor allows effective steam generation in deep wells without need for high pressure surface compressors. Feedback preheater means are provided for preheating fuel in a preheat chamber. Preheating of the water occurs in both a water feed line running from aboveground and in a countercurrent water flow channel surrounding the combustor assembly. The countercurrent water flow channels advantageously serve to cool the combustion chamber wall. The water is injected through slotted inlets along the combustion chamber wall to provide an unstable boundary layer and stripping of the water from the wall for efficient steam generation. Pressure responsive doors are provided at the steam outlet for closing and sealing the combustion chamber from entry of reservoir fluids in the event of a flameout.

  8. Dynamic model including piping acoustics of a centrifugal compression system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Helvoirt, Jan; de Jager, Bram

    2007-04-01

    This paper deals with low-frequency pulsation phenomena in full-scale centrifugal compression systems associated with compressor surge. The Greitzer lumped parameter model is applied to describe the dynamic behavior of an industrial compressor test rig and experimental evidence is provided for the presence of acoustic pulsations in the compression system under study. It is argued that these acoustic phenomena are common for full-scale compression systems where pipe system dynamics have a significant influence on the overall system behavior. The main objective of this paper is to extend the basic compressor model in order to include the relevant pipe system dynamics. For this purpose a pipeline model is proposed, based on previous developments for fluid transmission lines. The connection of this model to the lumped parameter model is accomplished via the selection of appropriate boundary conditions. Validation results will be presented, showing a good agreement between simulation and measurement data. The results indicate that the damping of piping transients depends on the nominal, time-varying pressure and flow velocity. Therefore, model parameters are made dependent on the momentary pressure and a switching nonlinearity is introduced into the model to vary the acoustic damping as a function of flow velocity. These modifications have limited success and the results indicate that a more sophisticated model is required to fully describe all (nonlinear) acoustic effects. However, the very good qualitative results show that the model adequately combines compressor and pipe system dynamics. Therefore, the proposed model forms a step forward in the analysis and modeling of surge in full-scale centrifugal compression systems and opens the path for further developments in this field.

  9. Staged regenerative sorption heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A regenerative adsorbent heat pump process and system for cooling and heating a space. A sorbent is confined in a plurality of compressors of which at least four are first stage and at least four are second stage. The first stage operates over a first pressure region and the second stage over a second pressure region which is higher than the first. Sorbate from the first stage enters the second stage. The sorbate loop includes a condenser, expansion valve, evaporator and the compressors. A single sorbate loop can be employed for single-temperature-control such as air conditioning and heating. Two sorbate loops can be used for two-temperature-control as in a refrigerator and freezer. The evaporator temperatures control the freezer and refrigerator temperatures. Alternatively the refrigerator temperature can be cooled by the freezer with one sorbate loop. A heat transfer fluid is circulated in a closed loop which includes a radiator and the compressors. Low temperature heat is exhausted by the radiator. High temperature heat is added to the heat transfer fluid entering the compressors which are desorbing vapor. Heat is transferred from compressors which are sorbing vapor to the heat transfer fluid, and from the heat transfer fluid to the compressors which are desorbing vapor. Each compressor is subjected to the following phases, heating to its highest temperature, cooling down from its highest temperature, cooling to its lowest temperature, and warming up from its lowest temperature. The phases are repeated to complete a cycle and regenerate heat.

  10. Development of a linear compressor for compact 2 K Gifford- McMahon cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiratsuka, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, a new, compact Gifford-McMahon (GM) cryocooler for cooling superconducting single photon detectors (SSPD) has been developed at Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) [1, 2]. The objective is to reduce the total height of the expander by 33% relative to the existing RDK-101 GM expander and to reduce the total volume of the compressor unit by 50% relative to the existing CNA-11 compressor. In addition, considering the targeted cooling application, we set the design temperature targets of the first and the second stages to 1 W and 20 mW of heat load at 60 K and 2.3 K, respectively. Although optimization of the internal components is one way to miniaturize the volume of the compressor unit, major design changes are required because the volume of the adsorber and the oil separator is almost the same as the volume of the compressor capsule. Thus, one approach is to develop a non-lubricated compressor, such as a valved linear compressor. An experimental unit of a valved linear compressor was designed and built, and preliminary experiments were conducted. Under no-load condition, a low temperature of 2.19 K has been achieved. With 1 W and 14 mW heat load, the temperature is 48 K at the first stage and 2.3 K at the second stage, with an input power of about 1.2 KW. The detailed experimental results will be discussed in this paper.

  11. Compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system

    DOEpatents

    Donahoo, Eric E; Ross, Christopher W

    2014-11-25

    A compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids from a compressor to a turbine airfoil cooling system to supply cooling fluids to one or more airfoils of a rotor assembly is disclosed. The compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system may enable cooling fluids to be exhausted from a compressor exhaust plenum through a downstream compressor bleed collection chamber and into the turbine airfoil cooling system. As such, the suction created in the compressor exhaust plenum mitigates boundary layer growth along the inner surface while providing flow of cooling fluids to the turbine airfoils.

  12. SEAL FOR HIGH SPEED CENTRIFUGE

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.W.

    1957-12-17

    A seal is described for a high speed centrifuge wherein the centrifugal force of rotation acts on the gasket to form a tight seal. The cylindrical rotating bowl of the centrifuge contains a closure member resting on a shoulder in the bowl wall having a lower surface containing bands of gasket material, parallel and adjacent to the cylinder wall. As the centrifuge speed increases, centrifugal force acts on the bands of gasket material forcing them in to a sealing contact against the cylinder wall. This arrangememt forms a simple and effective seal for high speed centrifuges, replacing more costly methods such as welding a closure in place.

  13. Geotechnical centrifuge under construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Modifications are underway at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center in California to transform a centrifuge used in the Apollo space program to the largest geotechnical centrifuge in the free world. The centrifuge, to be finished in August and opened next January, following check out and tuning, will enable geoscientists to model stratigraphic features down to 275 m below the earth's surface. Scientists will be able to model processes that are coupled with body force loading, including earthquake response of earth structures and soil structure interaction; rubbled-bed behavior during in situ coal gasification or in oil shale in situ retorts; behavior of frozen soil; frost heave; behavior of offshore structures; wave-seabed interactions; explosive cratering; and blast-induced liquefaction.The centrifuge will have a load capacity of 900-g-tons (short); that is, it will be able to carry a net soil load of 3 short tons to a centripetal acceleration of 300 times the acceleration caused by gravity. Modified for a total cost of $2.4 million, the centrifuge will have an arm with a 7.6-m radius and a swinging platform or bucket at its end that will be able to carry a payload container measuring 2.1×2.1 m. An additional future input of $500,000 would enable the purchase of a larger bucket that could accommodate a load of up to 20 tons, according to Charles Babendreier, program director for geotechnical engineering at the National Science Foundation. Additional cooling for the motor would also be required. The centrifuge has the capability of accelerating the 20-ton load to 100 g.

  14. Design and Development of a Novel Knudsen Compressor as a Part of a Joule-Thomson Cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthuvijayan, Indra; Antelius, Mikael; Björneklett, Are; Nilsson, Peter; Thorslund, Robert

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents the design and development of a novel Knudsen compressor, with no moving parts, as a part of a Joule-Thomson cryocooler. The compressor works by using the Knudsen diffusion principle and includes a combination of graphene-based layers and Knudsen membranes in a particular fashion to pressurize the fluid. The Knudsen membrane for this application was selected by testing several commercially available materials. Prototypes of single stage and a multistage compressors are presented together with experimental evaluations. Insights on a Tube-in-Tube heat exchanger, as another part a the Joule-Thomson cryocooler, intended to integrate with the Knudsen compressor, are also presented.

  15. Single stage high pressure centrifugal slurry pump

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, John W.; Bonin, John H.; Daniel, Arnold D.

    1984-03-27

    Apparatus is shown for feeding a slurry to a pressurized housing. An impeller that includes radial passages is mounted in the loose fitting housing. The impeller hub is connected to a drive means and a slurry supply means which extends through the housing. Pressured gas is fed into the housing for substantially enveloping the impeller in a bubble of gas.

  16. Engineering report: Oxygen boost compressor study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tera, L. S.

    1974-01-01

    An oxygen boost compressor is described which supports a self-contained life support system. A preliminary analysis of the compressor is presented along with performance test results, and recommendations for follow-on efforts.

  17. Enhancing Centrifugal Separation With Electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, F. T.

    1986-01-01

    Separation of biological cells by coil-planet centrifuge enhanced by electrophoresis. By itself, coil-planet centrifuge offers relatively gentle method of separating cells under low centrifugal force in physiological medium that keeps cells alive. With addition of voltage gradient to separation column of centrifuge, separation still gentle but faster and more complete. Since separation apparatus contains no rotary seal, probability of leakage, contamination, corrosion, and short circuits reduced.

  18. Pressure pulsations in piping system excited by a centrifugal turbomachinery taking the damping characteristics into consideration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, I.; Kaneko, S.

    2014-02-01

    Pressure pulsations excited by a centrifugal turbomachinery such as compressor, fan or pump at the blade passing frequency may cause severe noise and vibrations in piping system. Therefore, the practical evaluation method of pressure pulsations is strongly recommended. In particular, the maximum pressure amplitude under the resonant conditions should be appropriately evaluated. In this study, a one-dimensional excitation source model for a compressor or pump is introduced based on the equation of motion, so as to incorporate the non-linear damping proportional to velocity squared in the total piping system including the compressor or pump. The damping characteristics of the compressor or pump are investigated by using the semi-empirical model. It is shown that the resistance coefficient of the compressor or pump depends on the Reynolds number that is defined using the equivalent velocity of the pulsating flow. The frequency response of the pressure amplitude and the pressure distribution in the piping system can be evaluated by introducing the equivalent resistance of the compressor or pump and that of piping system. In particular, the relation of the maximum pressure amplitude in piping system to the location of the excitation source under resonant conditions can be evaluated. Finally, the reduction of the pressure pulsations by use of an orifice plate is discussed in terms of the pulsation energy loss.

  19. Water injected fuel cell system compressor

    DOEpatents

    Siepierski, James S.; Moore, Barbara S.; Hoch, Martin Monroe

    2001-01-01

    A fuel cell system including a dry compressor for pressurizing air supplied to the cathode side of the fuel cell. An injector sprays a controlled amount of water on to the compressor's rotor(s) to improve the energy efficiency of the compressor. The amount of water sprayed out the rotor(s) is controlled relative to the mass flow rate of air inputted to the compressor.

  20. Multifunctional centrifugal grinding unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevostyanov, V. S.; Uralskij, V. I.; Uralskij, A. V.; Sinitsa, E. V.

    2018-03-01

    The article presents scientific and engineering developments of multifunctional centrifugal grinding unit in which the selective effect of grinding bodies on the crushing material is realized, depending on its physical and mechanical characteristics and various schemes for organizing the technological process

  1. Centrifugal Gas Compression Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fultun, Roy

    2002-11-01

    A centrifuged gas of kinetic, elastic hard spheres compresses isothermally and without flow of heat in a process that reverses free expansion. This theorem follows from stated assumptions via a collection of thought experiments, theorems and other supporting results, and it excludes application of the reversible mechanical adiabatic power law in this context. The existence of an isothermal adiabatic centrifugal compression process makes a three-process cycle possible using a fixed sample of the working gas. The three processes are: adiabatic mechanical expansion and cooling against a piston, isothermal adiabatic centrifugal compression back to the original volume, and isochoric temperature rise back to the original temperature due to an influx of heat. This cycle forms the basis for a Thomson perpetuum mobile that induces a loop of energy flow in an isolated system consisting of a heat bath connectable by a thermal path to the working gas, a mechanical extractor of the gas's internal energy, and a device that uses that mechanical energy and dissipates it as heat back into the heat bath. We present a simple experimental procedure to test the assertion that adiabatic centrifugal compression is isothermal. An energy budget for the cycle provides a criterion for breakeven in the conversion of heat to mechanical energy.

  2. Human Powered Centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, Gerald M. (Inventor); Vernikos, Joan (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A human powered centrifuge has independently established turntable angular velocity and human power input. A control system allows excess input power to be stored as electric energy in a battery or dissipated as heat through a resistors. In a mechanical embodiment, the excess power is dissipated in a friction brake.

  3. Lightweight Shield for Centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luper, C.

    1982-01-01

    Centrifuge bowl composed of laminated aluminum offers required combination of high strength at reduced weight. Around outside wall of bowl core of 1/16 inch thick spun aluminum are wrapped two layers of aluminum, each also one-sixteenth inch thick. Layered structure prevents cracks from propagating through wall.

  4. 46 CFR 154.1415 - Air compressor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Air compressor. 154.1415 Section 154.1415 Shipping COAST... Equipment § 154.1415 Air compressor. Each vessel must have an air compressor to recharge the bottles for the air-breathing apparatus. ...

  5. 46 CFR 154.1415 - Air compressor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Air compressor. 154.1415 Section 154.1415 Shipping COAST... Equipment § 154.1415 Air compressor. Each vessel must have an air compressor to recharge the bottles for the air-breathing apparatus. ...

  6. 46 CFR 154.1415 - Air compressor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Air compressor. 154.1415 Section 154.1415 Shipping COAST... Equipment § 154.1415 Air compressor. Each vessel must have an air compressor to recharge the bottles for the air-breathing apparatus. ...

  7. 46 CFR 154.1415 - Air compressor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Air compressor. 154.1415 Section 154.1415 Shipping COAST... Equipment § 154.1415 Air compressor. Each vessel must have an air compressor to recharge the bottles for the air-breathing apparatus. ...

  8. 46 CFR 154.1415 - Air compressor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Air compressor. 154.1415 Section 154.1415 Shipping COAST... Equipment § 154.1415 Air compressor. Each vessel must have an air compressor to recharge the bottles for the air-breathing apparatus. ...

  9. The Human Centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loon, Jack J. W. A.

    2009-01-01

    Life on Earth has developed at unit gravity, 9.81 m/s2, which was a major factor especially when vertebrates emerged from water onto land in the late Devonian, some 375 million years ago. But how would nature have evolved on a larger planet? We are able to address this question simply in experiments using centrifuges. Based on these studies we have gained valuable insights in the physiological process in plants and animals. They adapt to a new steady state suitable for the high-g environments applied. Information on mammalian adaptations to hyper-g is interesting or may be even vital for human space exploration programs. It has been shown in long duration animal hypergravity studies, ranging from snails, rats to primates, that various structures like muscles, bones, neuro-vestibular, or the cardio-vascular system are affected. However, humans have never been exposed to a hyper-g environment for long durations. Centrifuge studies involving humans are mostly in the order of hours. The current work on human centrifuges are all focused on short arm systems to apply short periods of artificial gravity in support of long duration space missions in ISS or to Mars. In this paper we will address the possible usefulness of a large human centrifuge on Earth. In such a centrifuge a group of humans can be exposed to hypergravity for, in principle, an unlimited period of time like living on a larger planet. The input from a survey under scientists working in the field of gravitational physiology, but also other disciplines, will be discussed.

  10. Experimental Investigation of Inlet Distortion in a Multistage Axial Compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusu, Razvan

    The primary objective of this research is to present results and methodologies used to study total pressure inlet distortion in a multi-stage axial compressor environment. The study was performed at the Purdue 3-Stage Axial Compressor Facility (P3S) which models the final three stages of a production turbofan engine's high-pressure compressor (HPC). The goal of this study was twofold; first, to design, implement, and validate a circumferentially traversable total pressure inlet distortion generation system, and second, to demonstrate data acquisition methods to characterize the inter-stage total pressure flow fields to study the propagation and attenuation of a one-per-rev total pressure distortion. The datasets acquired for this study are intended to support the development and validation of novel computational tools and flow physics models for turbomachinery flow analysis. Total pressure inlet distortion was generated using a series of low-porosity wire gauze screens placed upstream of the compressor in the inlet duct. The screens are mounted to a rotatable duct section that can be precisely controlled. The P3S compressor features fixed instrumentation stations located at the aerodynamic interface plane (AIP) and downstream and upstream of each vane row. Furthermore, the compressor features individually indexable stator vanes which can be traverse by up to two vane passages. Using a series of coordinated distortion and vane traverses, the total pressure flow field at the AIP and subsequent inter-stage stations was characterized with a high circumferential resolution. The uniformity of the honeycomb carrier was demonstrated by characterizing the flow field at the AIP while no distortion screens where installed. Next, the distortion screen used for this study was selected following three iterations of porosity reduction. The selected screen consisted of a series of layered screens with a 100% radial extent and a 120° circumferential extent. A detailed total

  11. Experimental/analytical approach to understanding mistuning in a transonic wind tunnel compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Teri; Hansen, Reed S.; Nguyen, Nhan; Hampton, Roy W.; Muzzio, Doug; Chargin, Mladen K.; Guist, Roy; Hamm, Ken; Walker, Len

    1994-01-01

    This paper will briefly set forth some of the basic tenets of mistuned rotating bladed-disk assemblies. The experience with an existing three stage compressor in a transonic wind tunnel will be documented. The manner in which the theoretical properties manifest themselves in this non-ideal compressor will be described. A description of mistuning behaviors that can and cannot be accurately substantiated will be discussed.

  12. Multiple volume compressor for hot gas engine

    DOEpatents

    Stotts, Robert E.

    1986-01-01

    A multiple volume compressor for use in a hot gas (Stirling) engine having a plurality of different volume chambers arranged to pump down the engine when decreased power is called for and return the working gas to a storage tank or reservoir. A valve actuated bypass loop is placed over each chamber which can be opened to return gas discharged from the chamber back to the inlet thereto. By selectively actuating the bypass valves, a number of different compressor capacities can be attained without changing compressor speed whereby the capacity of the compressor can be matched to the power available from the engine which is used to drive the compressor.

  13. Unsteady Loss in the Stator Due to the Incoming Rotor Wake in a Highly-Loaded Transonic Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hah, Chunill

    2015-01-01

    The present paper reports an investigation of unsteady loss generation in the stator due to the incoming rotor wake in an advanced GE transonic compressor design with a high-fidelity numerical method. This advanced compressor with high reaction and high stage loading has been investigated both experimentally and analytically in the past. The measured efficiency in this advanced compressor is significantly lower than the design intention goal. The general understanding is that the current generation of compressor design analysis tools miss some important flow physics in this modern compressor design. To pinpoint the source of the efficiency miss, an advanced test with a detailed flow traverse was performed for the front one and a half stage at the NASA Glenn Research Center.

  14. Comprehensive model of a hermetic reciprocating compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, B.; Ziviani, D.; Groll, E. A.

    2017-08-01

    A comprehensive simulation model is presented to predict the performance of a hermetic reciprocating compressor and to reveal the underlying mechanisms when the compressor is running. The presented model is composed of sub-models simulating the in-cylinder compression process, piston ring/journal bearing frictional power loss, single phase induction motor and the overall compressor energy balance among different compressor components. The valve model, leakage through piston ring model and in-cylinder heat transfer model are also incorporated into the in-cylinder compression process model. A numerical algorithm solving the model is introduced. The predicted results of the compressor mass flow rate and input power consumption are compared to the published compressor map values. Future work will focus on detailed experimental validation of the model and parametric studies investigating the effects of structural parameters, including the stroke-to-bore ratio, on the compressor performance.

  15. Pulse compressor with aberration correction

    SciTech Connect

    Mankos, Marian

    In this SBIR project, Electron Optica, Inc. (EOI) is developing an electron mirror-based pulse compressor attachment to new and retrofitted dynamic transmission electron microscopes (DTEMs) and ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) cameras for improving the temporal resolution of these instruments from the characteristic range of a few picoseconds to a few nanoseconds and beyond, into the sub-100 femtosecond range. The improvement will enable electron microscopes and diffraction cameras to better resolve the dynamics of reactions in the areas of solid state physics, chemistry, and biology. EOI’s pulse compressor technology utilizes the combination of electron mirror optics and a magnetic beam separatormore » to compress the electron pulse. The design exploits the symmetry inherent in reversing the electron trajectory in the mirror in order to compress the temporally broadened beam. This system also simultaneously corrects the chromatic and spherical aberration of the objective lens for improved spatial resolution. This correction will be found valuable as the source size is reduced with laser-triggered point source emitters. With such emitters, it might be possible to significantly reduce the illuminated area and carry out ultrafast diffraction experiments from small regions of the sample, e.g. from individual grains or nanoparticles. During phase I, EOI drafted a set of candidate pulse compressor architectures and evaluated the trade-offs between temporal resolution and electron bunch size to achieve the optimum design for two particular applications with market potential: increasing the temporal and spatial resolution of UEDs, and increasing the temporal and spatial resolution of DTEMs. Specialized software packages that have been developed by MEBS, Ltd. were used to calculate the electron optical properties of the key pulse compressor components: namely, the magnetic prism, the electron mirror, and the electron lenses. In the final step, these results were

  16. Centrifugal unbalance detection system

    DOEpatents

    Cordaro, Joseph V.; Reeves, George; Mets, Michael

    2002-01-01

    A system consisting of an accelerometer sensor attached to a centrifuge enclosure for sensing vibrations and outputting a signal in the form of a sine wave with an amplitude and frequency that is passed through a pre-amp to convert it to a voltage signal, a low pass filter for removing extraneous noise, an A/D converter and a processor and algorithm for operating on the signal, whereby the algorithm interprets the amplitude and frequency associated with the signal and once an amplitude threshold has been exceeded the algorithm begins to count cycles during a predetermined time period and if a given number of complete cycles exceeds the frequency threshold during the predetermined time period, the system shuts down the centrifuge.

  17. Centrifugally decoupling touchdown bearings

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F

    2014-06-24

    Centrifugally decoupling mechanical bearing systems provide thin tensioned metallic ribbons contained in a support structure. This assembly rotates around a stationary shaft being centered at low speeds by the action of the metal ribbons. Tension springs are connected on one end to the ribbons and on the other end to the support structure. The ribbons pass through slots in the inner ring of the support structure. The spring preloading thus insures contact (or near-contact) between the ribbons and the shaft at rotation speeds below the transition speed. Above this speed, however, the centrifugal force on the ribbons produces a tensile force on them that exceeds the spring tensile force so that the ribbons curve outward, effectively decoupling them from mechanical contact with the shaft. They still remain, however, in position to act as a touchdown bearing in case of abnormally high transverse accelerations.

  18. Centrifugal adsorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor); Tsao, Yow-Min D. (Inventor); Lee, Wenshan (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A gas-liquid separator uses a helical passageway to impart a spiral motion to a fluid passing therethrough. The centrifugal force generated by the spiraling motion urges the liquid component of the fluid radially outward which forces the gas component radially inward. The gas component is then separated through a gas-permeable, liquid-impervious membrane and discharged through a central passageway. A filter material captures target substances contained in the fluid.

  19. Centrifugal Contactor Efficiency Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mincher, Bruce Jay; Tillotson, Richard Dean; Grimes, Travis Shane

    2017-01-01

    The contactor efficiency of a 2-cm acrylic centrifugal contactor, fabricated by ANL using 3D printer technology was measured by comparing a contactor test run to 5-min batch contacts. The aqueous phase was ~ 3 ppm depleted uranium in 3 M HNO3, and the organic phase was 1 M DAAP/dodecane. Sampling during the contactor run showed that equilibrium was achieved within < 3 minutes. The contactor efficiency at equilibrium was 95% to 100 %, depending on flowrate.

  20. The design and development of transonic multistage compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, C. L.; Steinke, R. J.; Newman, F. A.

    1988-01-01

    The development of the transonic multistage compressor is reviewed. Changing trends in design and performance parameters are noted. These changes are related to advances in compressor aerodynamics, computational fluid mechanics and other enabling technologies. The parameters normally given to the designer and those that need to be established during the design process are identified. Criteria and procedures used in the selection of these parameters are presented. The selection of tip speed, aerodynamic loading, flowpath geometry, incidence and deviation angles, blade/vane geometry, blade/vane solidity, stage reaction, aerodynamic blockage, inlet flow per unit annulus area, stage/overall velocity ratio, and aerodynamic losses are considered. Trends in these parameters both spanwise and axially through the machine are highlighted. The effects of flow mixing and methods for accounting for the mixing in the design process are discussed.

  1. Attack on centrifugal costs

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, P.F.

    1986-03-01

    The Monsanto Chocolate Bayou plant has had an aggressive and successful energy conservation program. The combined efforts have resulted in a 80% reduction in unit energy consumption compared to 1972. The approach of using system audits to optimize fluid systems was developed. Since most of the fluid movers are centrifugal, the name Centrifugal Savings Task Force was adopted. There are three tools that are particularly valuable in optimizing fluid systems. First, a working level understanding of the Affinity Laws seems a must. In addition, the performance curves for the fluid movers is needed. The last need is accurate system fieldmore » data. Systems effectively managed at the Chocolate Bayou plant were process air improvement, feed-water pressure reduction, combustion air blower turbine speed control, and cooling tower pressure reduction. Optimization of centrifugal systems is an often-overlooked opportunity for energy savings. The basic guidelines are to move only the fluid needed, and move it at as low a pressure as possible.« less

  2. A viscous-inviscid interactive compressor calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, W.; Sockol, P. M.

    1978-01-01

    A viscous-inviscid interactive procedure for subsonic flow is developed and applied to an axial compressor stage. Calculations are carried out on a two-dimensional blade-to-blade region of constant radius assumed to occupy a mid-span location. Hub and tip effects are neglected. The Euler equations are solved by MacCormack's method, a viscous marching procedure is used in the boundary layers and wake, and an iterative interaction scheme is constructed that matches them in a way that incorporates information related to momentum and enthalpy thicknesses as well as the displacement thickness. The calculations are quasi-three-dimensional in the sense that the boundary layer and wake solutions allow for the presence of spanwise (radial) velocities.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF COLD CLIMATE HEAT PUMP USING TWO-STAGE COMPRESSION

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Bo; Rice, C Keith; Abdelaziz, Omar

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses a well-regarded, hardware based heat pump system model to investigate a two-stage economizing cycle for cold climate heat pump applications. The two-stage compression cycle has two variable-speed compressors. The high stage compressor was modelled using a compressor map, and the low stage compressor was experimentally studied using calorimeter testing. A single-stage heat pump system was modelled as the baseline. The system performance predictions are compared between the two-stage and single-stage systems. Special considerations for designing a cold climate heat pump are addressed at both the system and component levels.

  4. Aero-Mechanical Coupling in a High-Speed Compressor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    compressor for which this facility is being designed is a scale model of a single stage of a civil jet engine . A strong non-synchronous blade vibration was...Flutter and resonant vibration characteristics of engine blades . Journal of engineering for gas turbines and power, 119. Thermann, H. and Niehuis, R...changes in airfoil lift associated with the unsteady flow. The blade aerodynamics are approximated by a flat plate, however more complex shapes can be

  5. [Kinematics and ultrastructure of plasmic factor regions in the egg of Wachtliella persicariae L. (Diptera) : II. The behaviour of ooplasmic partial systems after centrifugation of eggs in the stage of four cleavage nuclei].

    PubMed

    Wolf, Rainer

    1969-03-01

    Kinematics and ultrastructure of centrifuged and untreated eggs fromWachtliella persicariae were investigated for the micromorphological properties of ooplasmic factor regions and their role in early developmental processes by means of time-lapse motion pictures and electron microscopic analysis (see part I).After centrifugation the eggs show up to five different layers, among them a pole of fatty yolk with lipid droplets, a region of clear plasm (rich in ground plasm) which itself may become subdivided into a centripetal region with nuclei and endoplasmic reticulum, followed by a centrifugal part with mitochondria and ribosomes, another region containing orange clods of proteid yolk and finally a cup of glycogen. Displacement of pole plasm from the posterior pole always is accompanied by dislocation of the basophilic oosome material contained therein. At sufficient r.p.m. both of them enter the centripetal area of clear plasm. Structures of "di-polar density" type are orientated by centrifugation. The initial phase till the centrifuge reaches its final r.p.m. may act decicively upon the site of certain egg components after centrifugation as upon the nuclei, and thus may essentially influence the experimental results. In case centrifugation coincides with certain dividing phases of energides, the nuclear envelope becomes fragmented. The fragments then may appear piled up to form annulated membranes which have been recognized as pathological structures in centrifuged eggs. Besides lamellar cytosomes are often found. In centrifuged as well as in untreated eggs the nuclear envelope either consists of two layers as usual or may be of the complex multi-layered type (see part I). As for the movement of nuclei, the possible role of the complex nuclear envelope is not yet clear. The pigment halo of cleavage nuclei does not play an active part in nuclear migration. In centrifuged eggs yolk nuclei are of the usual type i.e. either roundish, horse-shoe-shaped or multi

  6. Analysis of Limitations Imposed on One-spool Turboprop-engine Designs by Compressors and Turbines at Flight Mach Numbers of 0, 0.6, and 0.8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavicchi, Richard H

    1956-01-01

    Turbine centrifugal stress is a limiting factor for all flight conditions studied. This stress is more severe for sea-level operations than for subsonic flight at the tropopause. Turbines designed for a stress of 30,000 psi are capable of driving a light, compact, high-spedd compressor but only at high values of specific fuel consumption. An increase in turbine-inlet temperature is accompanied by an increase in turbine centrifugal stress. If stresses in excess of 50,000 psi can be tolerated, compressor aerodynamics may become a primary limitation.

  7. Method of Matching Performance of Compressor Systems with that of Aircraft Power Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullock, Robert O.; Keetch, Robert C.; Moses, Jason J.

    1945-01-01

    A method is developed of easily determining the performance of a compressor system relative to that of the power section for a given altitude. Because compressors, reciprocating engines, and turbines are essentially flow devices, the performance of each of these power-plant components is presented in terms of similar dimensionless ratios. The pressure and temperature changes resulting from restrictions of the charge-air flow and from heat transfer in the ducts connecting the components of the power plant are also expressed by the same dimensionless ratios and the losses are included in the performance of the compressor. The performance of a mechanically driven, single-stage compressor in relation to the performance of a conventional air-cooled engine operating at sea-level conditions is presented as an example of the application of the method.

  8. Preliminary Design and Investigation of Integrated Compressor with Composite Material Wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jifeng; Müller, Norbert

    2012-06-01

    An integrated water vapor compressor with composite material wheel is developed and strength analysis using FEM is presented. The design of wound composite material allows for integrating all rotating parts of the drive that may simply reduce to only the rotor of the electrical motor, since no drive shaft is required anymore. This design can reduce the number of parts and mass, which is convenient for engineers to maintain the compressor. The electrical motors are brushless DC motors operating through a frequency drive and apply a torque on the wheels through the materials bonded in the wheel shrouds. This system allows a large amount of compression to be produced in a multi-stage compression setup. To determine the stress and vibration characteristics of this integrated compressor, numerical analysis is carried out using FEM. The simulation result shows that the integrated compressor with composite material wheel can be used in a chiller system where water as a refrigerant.

  9. WINCLR: a Computer Code for Heat Transfer and Clearance Calculation in a Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, T. K.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1994-01-01

    One of the concerns during inclement weather operation of aircraft in rain and hail storm conditions is the nature and extent of changes in compressor casing clearance. An increase in clearance affects efficiency while a decrease may cause blade rubbing with the casing. The change in clearance is the result of geometrical dimensional changes in the blades, the casing and the rotor due to heat transfer between those parts and the two-phase working fluid. The heat transfer interacts nonlinearly with the performance of the compressor, and, therefore, the determination of clearance changes necessitates a simultaneous determination of change in performance of the compressor. A computer code the WINCLR has been designed for the determination of casing clearance, that is operated interactively with the PURDU-WINCOF I code designed previously for determining the performance of a compressor. A detailed description of the WINCLR code is provided in a companion report. The current report provides details of the code with an illustrative example of application to the case of a multistage compressor. It is found in the example case that under given ingestion and operational conditions, it is possible for a compressor to undergo changes in performance in the front stages and rubbing in the back stages.

  10. Centrifuge impact cratering experiment 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Transient crates motions, cratering flow fields, crates dynamics, determining impact conditions from total crater welt, centrifuge quarter-space cratering, and impact cratering mechanics research is documented.

  11. Centrifugal Adsorption Cartridge System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Tsao, Yow-Min D.; Lee, Wenshan

    2004-01-01

    The centrifugal adsorption cartridge system (CACS) is an apparatus that recovers one or more bioproduct(s) from a dilute aqueous solution or suspension flowing from a bioreactor. The CACS can be used both on Earth in unit gravity and in space in low gravity. The CACS can be connected downstream from the bioreactor; alternatively, it can be connected into a flow loop that includes the bioreactor so that the liquid can be recycled. A centrifugal adsorption cartridge in the CACS (see figure) includes two concentric cylinders with a spiral ramp between them. The volume between the inner and outer cylinders, and between the turns of the spiral ramp is packed with an adsorbent material. The inner cylinder is a sieve tube covered with a gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane. During operation, the liquid effluent from the bioreactor is introduced at one end of the spiral ramp, which then constrains the liquid to flow along the spiral path through the adsorbent material. The spiral ramp also makes the flow more nearly uniform than it would otherwise be, and it minimizes any channeling other than that of the spiral flow itself. The adsorbent material is formulated to selectively capture the bioproduct(s) of interest. The bioproduct(s) can then be stored in bound form in the cartridge or else eluted from the cartridge. The centrifugal effect of the spiral flow is utilized to remove gas bubbles from the liquid. The centrifugal effect forces the bubbles radially inward, toward and through the membrane of the inner cylinder. The gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane allows the bubbles to enter the inner cylinder while keeping the liquid out. The bubbles that thus enter the cylinder are vented to the atmosphere. The spacing between the ramps determines rate of flow along the spiral, and thereby affects the air-bubble-removal efficiency. The spacing between the ramps also determines the length of the fluid path through the cartridge adsorbent, and thus affects the bioproduct

  12. Pea Chaperones under Centrifugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talalaiev, Oleksandr

    2008-06-01

    Etiolated Pisum sativum seedlings were subjected to altered g-forces by centrifugation (3-14g). By using semiquantitative RT-PCR, we studied transcripts of pea genes coding for chaperones that are representatives of small heat shock proteins (sHsps) family. Four members from the different classes of sHsps: cytosolic Hsp17.7 and Hsp18.1 (class I and class II accordingly), chloroplast Hsp21 (class III) and endoplasmic reticulum Hsp22.7 (class IV) were investigated. We conclude that exposure to 3, 7, 10 and 14g for 1h did not affect the level of sHsp transcripts.

  13. National geotechnical centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallam, J. A.; Kunz, N.; Vallotton, W. C.

    1982-01-01

    A high G-ton centrifuge, able to take a 2700 kg (6000 lb) payload up to 300 G, is described. The stability of dams and embankments, the bearing capacity of soil foundations, and the dynamic behavior of foundations due to vibration of machinery are examples of applications. A power rating of 6,000 kW (9,000 hp) was established for the motor. An acceptable maximum speed of 70 rpm was determined. A speed increase with a ratio of 1:3 is discussed. The isolated tension straps, the anti-spreader bar and the flexwall bucket, and safety precautions are also discussed.

  14. Centrifugal lyophobic separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, F. W.; Bruce, R. A. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A centrifugal separator is described using a lyophobic filter for removing liquid particles from a mixed stream of gas and liquid under various negative or positive external acceleration conditions as well as zero g or weightless conditions. Rotating the lyophobic filter and inclining the filter to the entering flow improves the lyophobic properties of the filter, provides gross separation of larger liquid particles, and prevents prolonged contact of liquid droplets with the spinning filter which might change the filter properties or block the filter.

  15. Axial Compressor Reversed Flow Performance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    5.3.2. Axial Tempature Profils TIme-verage axial temperature profiles were acquired through the use of exposed...on the above questions, or any additional details concerning the current application, future potential, or other value of this research. Please use the...were heavily dependent upon the model used for defining compressor post-stall performance, both steady state end transient, especially In the reve a

  16. Oil cooled, hermetic refrigerant compressor

    DOEpatents

    English, William A.; Young, Robert R.

    1985-01-01

    A hermetic refrigerant compressor having an electric motor and compressor assembly in a hermetic shell is cooled by oil which is first cooled in an external cooler 18 and is then delivered through the shell to the top of the motor rotor 24 where most of it is flung radially outwardly within the confined space provided by the cap 50 which channels the flow of most of the oil around the top of the stator 26 and then out to a multiplicity of holes 52 to flow down to the sump and provide further cooling of the motor and compressor. Part of the oil descends internally of the motor to the annular chamber 58 to provide oil cooling of the lower part of the motor, with this oil exiting through vent hole 62 also to the sump. Suction gas with entrained oil and liquid refrigerant therein is delivered to an oil separator 68 from which the suction gas passes by a confined path in pipe 66 to the suction plenum 64 and the separated oil drops from the separator to the sump. By providing the oil cooling of the parts, the suction gas is not used for cooling purposes and accordingly increase in superheat is substantially avoided in the passage of the suction gas through the shell to the suction plenum 64.

  17. Oil cooled, hermetic refrigerant compressor

    DOEpatents

    English, W.A.; Young, R.R.

    1985-05-14

    A hermetic refrigerant compressor having an electric motor and compressor assembly in a hermetic shell is cooled by oil which is first cooled in an external cooler and is then delivered through the shell to the top of the motor rotor where most of it is flung radially outwardly within the confined space provided by the cap which channels the flow of most of the oil around the top of the stator and then out to a multiplicity of holes to flow down to the sump and provide further cooling of the motor and compressor. Part of the oil descends internally of the motor to the annular chamber to provide oil cooling of the lower part of the motor, with this oil exiting through vent hole also to the sump. Suction gas with entrained oil and liquid refrigerant therein is delivered to an oil separator from which the suction gas passes by a confined path in pipe to the suction plenum and the separated oil drops from the separator to the sump. By providing the oil cooling of the parts, the suction gas is not used for cooling purposes and accordingly increase in superheat is substantially avoided in the passage of the suction gas through the shell to the suction plenum. 3 figs.

  18. Supercharging an internal combustion engine by aid of a dual-rotor bi-flux axial compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grǎdinariu, Andrei Cristian; Mihai, Ioan

    2016-12-01

    Internal combustion engines can be supercharged in order to enhance their performances [1-3]. Engine power is proportional to the quantity of fresh fluid introduced into the cylinder. At present, the general tendency is to try to obtain actual specific powers as high as possible, for as small as possible cylinder capacity, without increasing the generated pollution hazards. The present paper investigates the impact of replacing a centrifugal turbo-compressor with an axial double-rotor bi-flux one [4]. The proposed method allows that for the same number of cylinders, an increase in discharged airflow, accompanied by a decrease in fuel consumption. Using a program developed under the MathCad environment, the present work was aimed at studying the way temperature modifies at the end of isentropic compression under supercharging conditions. Taking into account a variation between extreme limits of the ambient temperature, its influence upon the evolution of thermal load coefficient was analyzed considering the air pressure at the compressor cooling system outlet. This analysis was completed by an exergetical study of the heat evacuated through cylinder walls in supercharged engine conditions. The conducted investigation allows verification of whether significant differences can be observed between an axial, dual-rotor, bi-flux compressor and centrifugal compressors.

  19. Relativistic centrifugal instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourgouliatos, Konstantinos N.; Komissarov, Serguei S.

    2018-03-01

    Near the central engine, many astrophysical jets are expected to rotate about their axis. Further out they are expected to go through the processes of reconfinement and recollimation. In both these cases, the flow streams along a concave surface and hence, it is subject to the centrifugal force. It is well known that such flows may experience the centrifugal instability (CFI), to which there are many laboratory examples. The recent computer simulations of relativistic jets from active galactic nuclei undergoing the process of reconfinement show that in such jets CFI may dominate over the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability associated with velocity shear (Gourgouliatos & Komissarov). In this letter, we generalize the Rayleigh criterion for CFI in rotating fluids to relativistic flows using a heuristic analysis. We also present the results of computer simulations which support our analytic criterion for the case of an interface separating two uniformly rotating cylindrical flows. We discuss the difference between CFI and the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in flows with curved streamlines.

  20. Centrifugal precipitation chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yoichiro; Lin, Qi

    2009-01-01

    Centrifugal precipitation chromatography separates analytes according their solubility in ammonium sulfate (AS) solution and other precipitants. The separation column is made from a pair of long spiral channels partitioned with a semipermeable membrane. In a typical separation, concentrated ammonium sulfate is eluted through one channel while water is eluted through the other channel in the opposite direction. The countercurrent process forms an exponential AS concentration gradient through the water channel. Consequently, protein samples injected into the water channel is subjected to a steadily increasing AS concentration and at the critical AS concentration they are precipitated and deposited in the channel bed by the centrifugal force. Then the chromatographic separation is started by gradually reducing the AS concentration in the AS channel which lowers the AS gradient concentration in the water channel. This results in dissolution of deposited proteins which are again precipitated at an advanced critical point as they move through the channel. Consequently, proteins repeat precipitation and dissolution through a long channel and finally eluted out from the column in the order of their solubility in the AS solution. The present method has been successfully applied to a number of analytes including human serum proteins, recombinant ketosteroid isomerase, carotenoid cleavage enzymes, plasmid DNA, polysaccharide, polymerized pigments, PEG-protein conjugates, etc. The method is capable to single out the target species of proteins by affinity ligand or immunoaffinity separation. PMID:19541553