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Sample records for ceratopogonidae

  1. Laboratory Infection of Culicoides Sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) with Weldona Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weldona virus was originally isolated in 1990, from a pool of unidentified Ceratopogonidae collected near Weldona, Colorado. The ceratopogonids were probably Culicoides spp. but the natural insect vector of this virus remains unknown. We fed Weldona virus to Culicoides sonorensis Wirth and Jones in...

  2. Blood Meal Analysis of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Central Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    Slama, Darine; Haouas, Najoua; Mezhoud, Habib; Babba, Hamouda; Chaker, Emna

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the host preferences of Culicoides species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Central Tunisia, we identified the source of blood meals of field collected specimens by sequencing of the cytochrome b (cyt b) mitochondrial locus and Prepronociceptine single copy nuclear gene. The study includes the most common and abundant livestock associated species of biting midges in Tunisia: C. imicola, C. jumineri, C. newsteadi, C. paolae, C. cataneii, C. circumscriptus, C. kingi, C. pseudojumineri, C. submaritimus, C. langeroni, C. jumineri var and some unidentified C. species. Analysis of cyt b PCR products from 182 field collected blood-engorged females’ midges revealed that 92% of them fed solely on mammalian species, 1.6% on birds, 2.4% on insects and 0.8% on reptiles. The blast results identified the blood origin of biting midges to the species level with exact or nearly exact matches (≥98%). The results confirm the presence of several Culicoides species, including proven vectors in Central Tunisia. Blood meal analyses show that these species will indeed feed on bigger mammals, thereby highlighting the risk that these viruses will be able to spread in Tunisia. PMID:25793285

  3. Effects of Viral Infection on Blood-Feeding Behavior in Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) is the primary vector of bluetongue virus (BTV) in North America and a competent vector of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Little is known about how viral infection of this midge affects its blood feeding behavior. Midges were intrathoracically inoc...

  4. Effects of Viral Infection on Blood Feeding Behavior and Fecundity in Culicoides Sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) is the primary vector of bluetongue virus (BTV) in North America and a competent vector of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Little is known about how viral infection of this midge affects its blood feeding behavior and fecundity. Blood feeding succes...

  5. Blood Feeding Behavior of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Infected Culicoides Sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) is the primary vector of Bluetongue virus in North America and a competent vector of Vesicular Stomatitis virus (VSV). Little is known about how viral infection of this midge affects blood feeding behavior and how this might affect virus transmission....

  6. Gene discovery and differential expression analysis of humoral immune response elements in female Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Female Culicoides sonorensis midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are vectors of pathogens that impact livestock and wildlife in the United States. Little is known about their molecular functioning, including components of their immune system. Because the insect immune response is involved ...

  7. Nematocera (Ceratopogonidae, Psychodidae, Simuliidae and Culicidae) and control methods.

    PubMed

    Braverman, Y

    1994-12-01

    The biology, veterinary importance and control of certain Nematocera are described and discussed. Culicoides spp. (family Ceratopogonidae) transmit the arboviruses of bluetongue (BT), African horse sickness (AHS), bovine ephemeral fever (BEF) and Akabane. Some other arboviruses have been isolated from these species, while fowl pox has been transmitted experimentally by Culicoides. These insects are vectors of the parasitic protozoans Leucocytozoon caulleryi and Haemoproteus nettionis, and the parasitic nematodes Onchocerca gutturosa, O. gibsoni and O. cervicalis. They also cause recurrent summer hypersensitivity in horses, ponies, donkeys, cattle and sheep. Farm animals can die as a result of mass attack by Simulium spp., which are also vectors of Leucocytozoon simondi, L. smithi and the filariae O. gutturosa, O. linealis and O. ochengi. Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis (VEE) and Rift Valley fever (RVF) have been isolated from simuliids, and vesicular stomatitis virus New Jersey strain has been replicated in Simulium vittatum. Simuliids are well known as vectors of O. volvulus, the cause of human onchocercosis (river blindness). The family Psychodidae includes the genera Phlebotomus and Lutzomyia (subfamily Phlebotominae), vectors of Leishmania spp. in humans, dogs and other mammals. Vesicular stomatitis virus Indiana strain has been regularly isolated from phlebotomine sandflies. Mass attack by mosquitoes can also prove fatal to farm animals. Mosquitoes are vectors of the viruses of Akabane, BEF, RVF, Japanese encephalitis, VEE, western equine encephalomyelitis, eastern equine encephalomyelitis and west Nile meningoencephalitis, secondary vectors of AHS and suspected vectors of Israel turkey meningoencephalitis. The viruses of hog cholera, fowl pox and reticuloendotheliosis, the rickettsiae Eperythrozoon ovis and E. suis, and the bacterium Borrelia anserina are mechanically transmitted by mosquitoes. These insects also induce allergic dermatitis in horses. They

  8. Morphological description of the fourth instar larva: Culicoides cataneii and Culicoides sahariensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Slama, Darine; Khedher, Asma; Bdira, Sassi; Khayech, Fethi; Delecolle, Jean-claude; Mezhoud, Habib; Babba, Hamouda; Emna, Chaker

    2013-01-01

    This study was carried out of the region of Monastir in Central Tunisia, between July and August 2010. Larvae were collected using a floatation technique with magnesium sulfate in mud samples. The fourth instar larva of Culicoides cataneii Clastrier, 1957 and Culicoides sahariensis Callot, Kremer, Bailly-Choumara, 1970 are described, illustrated and drawn. Measurements of instars IV are also presented. This is the first record of Culicoides cataneii and Culicoides sahariensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) to Tunisia.

  9. A fossil biting midge (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) from early Eocene Indian amber with a complex pheromone evaporator

    PubMed Central

    Stebner, Frauke; Szadziewski, Ryszard; Rühr, Peter T.; Singh, Hukam; Hammel, Jörg U.; Kvifte, Gunnar Mikalsen; Rust, Jes

    2016-01-01

    The life-like fidelity of organisms captured in amber is unique among all kinds of fossilization and represents an invaluable source for different fields of palaeontological and biological research. One of the most challenging aspects in amber research is the study of traits related to behaviour. Here, indirect evidence for pheromone-mediated mating behaviour is recorded from a biting midge (Ceratopogonidae) in 54 million-year-old Indian amber. Camptopterohelea odora n. sp. exhibits a complex, pocket shaped structure on the wings, which resembles the wing folds of certain moth flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) and scent organs that are only known from butterflies and moths (Lepidoptera) so far. Our studies suggests that pheromone releasing structures on the wings have evolved independently in biting midges and might be much more widespread in fossil as well as modern insects than known so far. PMID:27698490

  10. A fossil biting midge (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) from early Eocene Indian amber with a complex pheromone evaporator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebner, Frauke; Szadziewski, Ryszard; Rühr, Peter T.; Singh, Hukam; Hammel, Jörg U.; Kvifte, Gunnar Mikalsen; Rust, Jes

    2016-10-01

    The life-like fidelity of organisms captured in amber is unique among all kinds of fossilization and represents an invaluable source for different fields of palaeontological and biological research. One of the most challenging aspects in amber research is the study of traits related to behaviour. Here, indirect evidence for pheromone-mediated mating behaviour is recorded from a biting midge (Ceratopogonidae) in 54 million-year-old Indian amber. Camptopterohelea odora n. sp. exhibits a complex, pocket shaped structure on the wings, which resembles the wing folds of certain moth flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) and scent organs that are only known from butterflies and moths (Lepidoptera) so far. Our studies suggests that pheromone releasing structures on the wings have evolved independently in biting midges and might be much more widespread in fossil as well as modern insects than known so far.

  11. Differential emergence of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) from on-farm breeding substrates in Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Geoffrey M; Jess, Stephen; Murchie, Archie K

    2013-05-01

    Biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are vectors of a number of viral diseases worldwide. Following the unforeseen outbreak of bluetongue in northern Europe (2006–2009) there was a need to clarify on-farm breeding substrates utilized by temperate Culicoides spp. Six substrates (cow dung, cow slurry, horse dung, sheep dung, maize silage and soil) were investigated for Culicoides spp. emergence over a 31-week period. Overall, most Obsoletus group Culicoides emerged from the cow dung and the most Pulicaris group Culicoides emerged from the sheep dung. Furthermore, Culicoides of the Obsoletus group were found to be abundant in cow slurry and sheep dung. Temperature played a significant role in the emergence times of adult Culicoides. The Obsoletus group appear to have undergone 3 generations during the experimental period. The sex ratio of emergent Obsoletus group Culicoides was affected by substrate type, with a greater proportion of males emerging from cow dung and slurry compared with the other substrates.

  12. Ceratopogonidae (Diptera: Nematocera) of the piedmont of the Yungas forests of Tucumán: ecology and distribution

    PubMed Central

    Veggiani-Aybar, Cecilia Adriana; Fuenzalida, Ana Denise; Quintana, María Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Within the Ceratopogonidae family, many genera transmit numerous diseases to humans and animals, while others are important pollinators of tropical crops. In the Yungas ecoregion of Argentina, previous systematic and ecological research on Ceratopogonidae focused on Culicoides, since they are the main transmitters of mansonelliasis in northwestern Argentina; however, few studies included the genera Forcipomyia, Dasyhelea, Atrichopogon, Alluaudomyia, Echinohelea, and Bezzia. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the presence and abundance of Ceratopogonidae in this region, their association with meteorological variables, and their variation in areas disturbed by human activity. Monthly collection of specimens was performed from July 2008 to July 2009 using CDC miniature light traps deployed for two consecutive days. A total of 360 specimens were collected, being the most abundant Dasyhelea genus (48.06%) followed by Forcipomyia (26.94%) and Atrichopogon (13.61%). Bivariate analyses showed significant differences in the abundance of the genera at different sampling sites and climatic conditions, with the summer season and El Corralito site showing the greatest abundance of specimens. Accumulated rainfall was the variable that related the most to the abundance of Culicoides (10.56%), while temperature was the most closely related variable to the abundance of Forcipomyia, Dasyhelea, and Atrichopogon. PMID:27896023

  13. Ceratopogonidae (Diptera: Nematocera) of the piedmont of the Yungas forests of Tucumán: ecology and distribution.

    PubMed

    Direni Mancini, José Manuel; Veggiani-Aybar, Cecilia Adriana; Fuenzalida, Ana Denise; Lizarralde de Grosso, Mercedes Sara; Quintana, María Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Within the Ceratopogonidae family, many genera transmit numerous diseases to humans and animals, while others are important pollinators of tropical crops. In the Yungas ecoregion of Argentina, previous systematic and ecological research on Ceratopogonidae focused on Culicoides, since they are the main transmitters of mansonelliasis in northwestern Argentina; however, few studies included the genera Forcipomyia, Dasyhelea, Atrichopogon, Alluaudomyia, Echinohelea, and Bezzia. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the presence and abundance of Ceratopogonidae in this region, their association with meteorological variables, and their variation in areas disturbed by human activity. Monthly collection of specimens was performed from July 2008 to July 2009 using CDC miniature light traps deployed for two consecutive days. A total of 360 specimens were collected, being the most abundant Dasyhelea genus (48.06%) followed by Forcipomyia (26.94%) and Atrichopogon (13.61%). Bivariate analyses showed significant differences in the abundance of the genera at different sampling sites and climatic conditions, with the summer season and El Corralito site showing the greatest abundance of specimens. Accumulated rainfall was the variable that related the most to the abundance of Culicoides (10.56%), while temperature was the most closely related variable to the abundance of Forcipomyia, Dasyhelea, and Atrichopogon.

  14. First Records of Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), a Known Vector of Bluetongue Virus, in Southern Ontario.

    PubMed

    Jewiss-Gaines, A; Barelli, L; Hunter, F F

    2016-12-27

    Ceratopogonidae (Diptera) were collected on sheep farms in southern Ontario to establish whether Culicoides spp pose a threat to the livestock industry. Specimens were collected in modified CO2-baited Centers for Disease Control and Prevention light traps, returned to the laboratory, freeze-killed, and identified to species under a microscope. In addition to Culicoides variipennis (Coquillet), we found that Culicoides sonorensis Wirth & Jones occurred on a number of farms over a 2-yr period. These records represent a significant departure from C. sonorensis' previously known geographical distribution. We present spatial and temporal distribution data for both species, with an emphasis on C. sonorensis DNA sequence information is presented so that researchers lacking the necessary taxonomic skills can determine whether C. sonorensis is present in their collections. To differentiate C. sonorensis from C. variipennis, taxonomically reliable and informative traits were found in EF1α and, to a lesser extent, in ITS1, whereas the universal barcode region of cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) was unsuitable.

  15. Biting rates and developmental substrates for biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Iquitos, Peru.

    PubMed

    Mercer, David R; Spinelli, Gustavo R; Watts, Douglas M; Tesh, Robert B

    2003-11-01

    Biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) were collected at 16 periurban and rural sites around Iquitos, Peru, between 17 October 1996 and 26 May 1997. Culicoides paraensis (Goeldi), the principal vector of Oropouche virus, was the most commonly collected species (9,086 flies) with Culicoides insinuatus Wirth & Blanton second (7,229 flies). Although both species were collected at all sampling sites (linear (distance surveyed approximately 25 km), C. paraensis dominated at northern collection sites (> 90%), whereas C. insinuatus prevailed at southern collection sites (> 60%). C. paraensis were collected from human sentinels at a constant rate throughout daylight hours, at similar rates during wet and dry months, and regardless of rainfall. Larval developmental substrates for C. paraensis included decaying platano (Musa x paradisiaca L. [Musaceae]) stems, stumps, flowers, fruits, and debris beneath platano trees as well as from soil beneath a fruiting mamay (Syzygium malaccense Merr. & Perry [Myrtaceae] ) tree and organic-rich mud along a lake shoreline. C. insinuatus adults likewise emerged from decaying platano and organic-rich mud along a lake shoreline, but also from debris accumulated in the axils of aguaje (Mauritia flexuosa L. [Palmae]) fronds and decaying citrus fruit. Despite high numbers of biting adults near putative substrates, adults of neither species emerged from other decomposing plant material, soil, phytotelmata, or artificial containers. Because both species of biting midges emerged in high numbers from all parts of platano (ubiquitous in Iquitos), it will be challenging to control them through sanitation.

  16. First overview of the Culicoides Latreille (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) livestock associated species of Reunion Island, Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Desvars, A; Grimaud, Y; Guis, H; Esnault, O; Allène, X; Gardès, L; Balenghien, T; Baldet, T; Delécolle, J C; Garros, C

    2015-02-01

    This study establishes the first faunistic inventory of livestock associated Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) species of Reunion Island (Indian Ocean), where bluetongue and epizootic hemorrhagic disease are regularly recorded. Single night-catches were performed at 41 sites using light suction traps at altitudes ranging from 0 to 1525 m, from March to April 2005. Five species were recorded: Culicoides imicola, Culicoides bolitinos, Culicoides enderleini, Culicoides grahamii, and Culicoides kibatiensis, among which at least the first three species are known to be involved in virus transmission to ruminants and equids. This is the first record of C. bolitinos, C. kibatiensis, and C. enderleini on the island. C. imicola was the most abundant species along the sea coast. C. bolitinos was more abundant inland and on two sites on the east coast. C. kibatiensis and C. grahamii were less abundant than the other three species and limited to two foci. Spatial distribution analysis of the different species showed that C. bolitinos, C. enderleini and C. imicola were collected at low altitudes, while the other two species were found at higher altitude. A morphological identification key for adult females and males is given, as well as cytochrome oxydase subunit I sequences. Phylogenetic reconstructions showed a clear divergence between C. bolitinos from Reunion Island and mainland Africa. This monograph will help to identify the Culicoides species in the poorly known entomological fauna of the south-western Indian Ocean region.

  17. [List of the type species of Ceratopogonidae (Diptera, Nematocera) deposited in the Entomological Collection of Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Felippe-Bauer, M; Oliveira Sd, S

    2001-11-01

    A list of all type specimens of the Family Ceratopogonidae, present in the Entomological Collection of Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil is presented. This list includes the genera Bahiahelea, Culicoides, Dasyhelea, Downeshelea, Forcipomyia, Leptoconops, Mallochohelea, Monohelea, Neobezzia, Palpomyia and Sphaerohelea.

  18. Haemoproteus tartakovskyi (Haemoproteidae): Complete sporogony in Culicoides nubeculosus (Ceratopogonidae), with implications for avian haemoproteid experimental research.

    PubMed

    Žiegytė, Rita; Bernotienė, Rasa; Palinauskas, Vaidas; Valkiūnas, Gediminas

    2016-01-01

    Numerous recent studies have addressed the molecular characterization, distribution and genetic diversity of Haemoproteus spp. (Haemoproteidae). Some species of these blood parasites cause severe disease in birds, and heavy infections are often lethal in biting midges (Ceratopogonidae) and other blood-sucking insects. However, information about the vectors of haemoproteids is scarce. This presents an obstacle for better understanding the mechanisms of host-parasite interactions and the epidemiology of haemoproteosis. Here we investigated the sporogonic development of Haemoproteus tartakovskyi, a widespread bird parasite, in experimentally infected biting midges, Culicoides nubeculosus. These biting midges are widespread in the Europe. The insects were cultivated under laboratory conditions. Unfed females were allowed to take blood meals on wild caught siskins Carduelis spinus naturally infected with H. tartakovskyi (lineage hSISKIN1). Engorged females were maintained at 22-23 °C, dissected at intervals, and examined for sporogonic stages. Mature ookinetes of H. tartakovskyi were seen in the midgut content between 6 and 48 h post infection, oocysts were observed in the midgut wall 3-4 days post infection (dpi). Sporozoites were first reported in the salivary gland preparations 7 dpi. In accordance with microscopy data, polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing confirmed presence of the corresponding parasite lineage in experimentally infected biting midges. This study indicates that C. nubeculosus willingly takes blood meals on birds and is a vector of H. tartakovskyi. These biting midges are readily amenable to cultivation under laboratory conditions. Culicoides nubeculosus transmits Haemoproteus parasites infecting parrots, owls and siskins, birds belonging to different families and orders. Thus, this vector provides a convenient model for experimental research with avian haemoproteids.

  19. Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) as vectors of bluetongue virus in South Africa - a review.

    PubMed

    Venter, Gert Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to consolidate vector competence studies on Culicoides midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) as vectors of bluetongue virus (BTV) done over a period 25 years at the ARC‑Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute in South Africa. In 1944, it was demonstrated for the first time in South Africa that Culicoides midges transmit BTV. In 1991, field‑collected Culicoides imicola were fed on blood containing BTV‑3 or ‑6 and the infection rates were established as being 31% and 24%, respectively. In 1998, Culicoides bolitinos was shown to have a higher infection prevalence and virus titre/midge than C. imicola. This species was then shown to have a higher transmission potential for BTV‑1 over a range of incubation temperatures wider than the one showed by C. imicola. Attenuation of BTV also does not reduce its ability to infect competent Culicoides species. Oral susceptibility studies, involving 29 BTV isolates of various serotypes, indicated differences between various geographic virus isolates and Culicoides populations evaluated. While low recovery rates of European BTV strains from South African Culicoides species suggest co‑adaptation between orbiviruses and vectors in a given locality, co‑adaption was shown not to be essential for virus transmission. Cumulative results since 1991 provide evidence that at least 13 livestock‑associated Culicoides species are susceptible to BTV. Susceptibility results are supported by field isolations from 5 of these species. This implies that multi‑vector potential for the transmission of BTV will complicate the epidemiology of BT. It must be emphasised that neither oral susceptibility nor virus isolation/detection from field‑collected specimens is proof that a species is a confirmed field vector.

  20. Collection and analysis of salivary proteins from the biting midge Culicoides nubeculosus (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Langner, Kathrin F A; Darpel, Karin E; Denison, Eric; Drolet, Barbara S; Leibold, Wolfgang; Mellor, Philip S; Mertens, Peter P C; Nimtz, Manfred; Greiser-Wilke, Irene

    2007-03-01

    Salivary proteins of hematophagous Culicoides spp. are thought to play an important role in pathogen transmission and skin hypersensitivity. Analysis of these proteins, however, has been problematic due to the difficulty in obtaining adequate amounts of secreted Culicoides saliva. In the current study, a collection method for midge saliva was developed. Over a 3-d period, 3- to 5-d-old male and female Culicoides nubeculosus Meigen (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) were repeatedly placed onto the collection system and allowed to deposit saliva into a filter. Salivary products were eluted from the filters and evaluated by gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry as well as by intradermal testing and determination of clotting time. Gel electrophoresis revealed approximately 55 protein spots displaying relative molecular masses from 5 to 67 kDa and isoelectric points ranging from 4.5 to 9.8. The majority of molecular species analyzed by mass spectrometry showed high convergence with salivary proteins recently obtained from a cDNA library of Culicoides sonorensis Wirth & Jones, including proteins involved in sugarmeal digestion, defense, and coagulation inhibition as well as members of the D7 family and unclassified salivary proteins. In addition, the proteome analysis revealed a number of peptides that were related to proteins from insect species other than Culicoides. Intradermal injection of the saliva in human skin produced edema, vasodilatation, and pruritus. The anticoagulant activity of the saliva was demonstrated by significantly prolonged clotting times for human platelets. The potential role of the identified salivary proteins in the transmission of pathogens and the induction of allergies is discussed.

  1. Modelling the Northward Expansion of Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) under Future Climate Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Lysyk, Timothy; Johnson, Gregory; Marshall, Shawn; Berger, Kathryn; Cork, Susan Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is affecting the distribution of pathogens and their arthropod vectors worldwide, particularly at northern latitudes. The distribution of Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) plays a key role in affecting the emergence and spread of significant vector borne diseases such as Bluetongue (BT) and Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease (EHD) at the border between USA and Canada. We used 50 presence points for C. sonorensis collected in Montana (USA) and south-central Alberta (Canada) between 2002 and 2012, together with monthly climatic and environmental predictors to develop a series of alternative maximum entropy distribution models. The best distribution model under current climatic conditions was selected through the Akaike Information Criterion, and included four predictors: Vapour Pressure Deficit of July, standard deviation of Elevation, Land Cover and mean Precipitation of May. This model was then projected into three climate change scenarios adopted by the IPCC in its 5th assessment report and defined as Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP) 2.6, 4.5 and 8.5. Climate change data for each predictor and each RCP were calculated for two time points pooling decadal data around each one of them: 2030 (2021–2040) and 2050 (2041–2060). Our projections showed that the areas predicted to be at moderate-high probability of C. sonorensis occurrence would increase from the baseline scenario to 2030 and from 2030 to 2050 for each RCP. The projection also indicated that the current northern limit of C. sonorensis distribution is expected to move northwards to above 53°N. This may indicate an increased risk of Culicoides-borne diseases occurrence over the next decades, particularly at the USA-Canada border, as a result of changes which favor C. sonorensis presence when associated to other factors (i.e. host and pathogen factors). Recent observations of EHD outbreaks in northern Montana and southern Alberta supported our projections and

  2. An annotated checklist of Culicoides Latreille, 1809 (Insecta: Ceratopogonidae: Diptera) with incorporation of a vector species list from India.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Emon; Mazumdar, Abhijit; Joardar, S N; Saha, Goutam K; Banerjee, Dhriti

    2016-12-01

    Culicoides Latreille, 1809 (Insecta : Diptera : Ceratopogonidae) are small nematocerous biological vectors of a wide range of pathogens of veterinary and medical importance. They are distributed worldwide but prefer warm, damp, and muddy areas. Female midges require blood for egg maturation. Studies on taxonomy, proper identification keys, and distribution patterns of these flies across different geographical regions of India of these flies are limited. This article provides an updated checklist of Culicoides spp. from India collected from various scattered publications, along with their synonyms and details on their subgenera, geographical distribution, and type locality. A compiled list of different Culicoides vectors from India has also been included separately in this article, along with the type of the diseases spread.

  3. Species Diversity and Seasonal Distribution of Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Jeju-do, Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heung Chul; Bellis, Glenn A; Kim, Myung-Soon; Klein, Terry A; Gopurenko, David; Cai, Du-Cheng; Seo, Hyun-Ji; Cho, In-Soo; Park, Jee-Yong

    2015-08-01

    Biting midges belonging to the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) were collected by Mosquito Magnet(®) and black light traps at 5 sites on Jeju-do, Republic of Korea (Korea), from May-November 2013 to determine species diversity and seasonal distribution. A total of 4,267 specimens were collected, of which 99.9% were female. The most common species was Culicoides tainanus (91.8%), followed by C. lungchiensis (7.2%) and C. punctatus (0.6%), while the remaining 4 species accounted for <0.5% of all Culicoides spp. that were collected. High numbers of C. tainanus were collected in May, followed by decreasing numbers through August, and then increasing numbers through November when surveillance was terminated. Peak numbers of C. lungchiensis were collected during September, with low numbers collected from May-August and October-November. The presence of C. lungchiensis in Korea was confirmed by morphological and molecular analyses.

  4. Species Diversity and Seasonal Distribution of Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Jeju-do, Republic of Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heung Chul; Bellis, Glenn A.; Kim, Myung-Soon; Klein, Terry A.; Gopurenko, David; Cai, Du-Cheng; Seo, Hyun-Ji; Cho, In-Soo; Park, Jee-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Biting midges belonging to the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) were collected by Mosquito Magnet® and black light traps at 5 sites on Jeju-do, Republic of Korea (Korea), from May-November 2013 to determine species diversity and seasonal distribution. A total of 4,267 specimens were collected, of which 99.9% were female. The most common species was Culicoides tainanus (91.8%), followed by C. lungchiensis (7.2%) and C. punctatus (0.6%), while the remaining 4 species accounted for <0.5% of all Culicoides spp. that were collected. High numbers of C. tainanus were collected in May, followed by decreasing numbers through August, and then increasing numbers through November when surveillance was terminated. Peak numbers of C. lungchiensis were collected during September, with low numbers collected from May-August and October-November. The presence of C. lungchiensis in Korea was confirmed by morphological and molecular analyses. PMID:26323852

  5. Seasonal abundance of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) collected by mosquito Magnet® in Northern Gyeonggi-do (Province), Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heung Chul; Bellis, Glenn A; Kim, Myung-Soon; Klein, Terry A; Chong, Sung-Tae; Park, Jee-Yong

    2014-02-01

    Biting midges (Culicoides: Ceratopogonidae) were collected by Mosquito Magnet® traps at the Neutral Nations Supervisory Commission (NNSC) camp and Daeseongdong village inside the demilitarized zone (DMZ) and near the military demarcation line (MDL) separating North and South Korea and at Warrior Base (US Army training site) and Tongilchon 3 km south of the DMZ in northern Gyeonggi Province, Republic of Korea (ROK), from May-October 2010-2012, to determine their seasonal distributions. A total of 18,647 Culicoides females (18,399; 98.7%) and males (248; 1.3%) comprising 16 species were collected. Overall, the most commonly collected species was Culicoides nipponensis (42.9%), followed by C. erairai (29.2%), C. punctatus (20.3%), C. arakawae (3.3%), C. pallidulus (1.8%), and C. circumscriptus (1.4%), while the remaining 10 species accounted for only 1.1% of all Culicoides spp. collected. The seasonal distribution of C. nipponensis was bimodal, with high numbers collected during May-June and again during September. C. erairai was more frequently collected during June-July, followed by sharply decreased populations from August-October. C. punctatus was collected in low numbers from May-September with high numbers collected during October. C. erairai was predominantly collected from the NNSC camp (85.1% of all C. erairai collected) located adjacent to the MDL at Panmunjeom in the northernmost part of Gyeonggi-do (Province), while other sites yielded low numbers of specimens.

  6. Biting Midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) from Cambay Amber Indicate that the Eocene Fauna of the Indian Subcontinent Was Not Isolated

    PubMed Central

    Stebner, Frauke; Szadziewski, Ryszard; Singh, Hukam; Gunkel, Simon; Rust, Jes

    2017-01-01

    India’s unique and highly diverse biota combined with its unique geodynamical history has generated significant interest in the patterns and processes that have shaped the current distribution of India’s flora and fauna and their biogeographical relationships. Fifty four million year old Cambay amber from northwestern India provides the opportunity to address questions relating to endemism and biogeographic history by studying fossil insects. Within the present study seven extant and three fossil genera of biting midges are recorded from Cambay amber and five new species are described: Eohelea indica Stebner & Szadziewski n. sp., Gedanohelea gerdesorum Stebner & Szadziewski n. sp., Meunierohelea cambayana Stebner & Szadziewski n. sp., Meunierohelea borkenti Stebner & Szadziewski n. sp., and Meunierohelea orientalis Stebner & Szadziewski n. sp. Fossils of species in the genera Leptoconops Skuse, 1889, Forcipomyia Meigen, 1818, Brachypogon Kieffer, 1899, Stilobezzia Kieffer, 1911, Serromyia Meigen, 1818, and Mantohelea Szadziewski, 1988 are recorded without formal description. Furthermore, one fossil belonging to the genus Camptopterohelea Wirth & Hubert, 1960 is included in the present study. Our study reveals faunal links among Ceratopogonidae from Cambay amber and contemporaneous amber from Fushun, China, Eocene Baltic amber from Europe, as well as the modern Australasian and the Oriental regions. These findings imply that faunal exchange between Europe, Asia and India took place before the formation of Cambay amber in the early Eocene. PMID:28076427

  7. Biting Midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) from Cambay Amber Indicate that the Eocene Fauna of the Indian Subcontinent Was Not Isolated.

    PubMed

    Stebner, Frauke; Szadziewski, Ryszard; Singh, Hukam; Gunkel, Simon; Rust, Jes

    2017-01-01

    India's unique and highly diverse biota combined with its unique geodynamical history has generated significant interest in the patterns and processes that have shaped the current distribution of India's flora and fauna and their biogeographical relationships. Fifty four million year old Cambay amber from northwestern India provides the opportunity to address questions relating to endemism and biogeographic history by studying fossil insects. Within the present study seven extant and three fossil genera of biting midges are recorded from Cambay amber and five new species are described: Eohelea indica Stebner & Szadziewski n. sp., Gedanohelea gerdesorum Stebner & Szadziewski n. sp., Meunierohelea cambayana Stebner & Szadziewski n. sp., Meunierohelea borkenti Stebner & Szadziewski n. sp., and Meunierohelea orientalis Stebner & Szadziewski n. sp. Fossils of species in the genera Leptoconops Skuse, 1889, Forcipomyia Meigen, 1818, Brachypogon Kieffer, 1899, Stilobezzia Kieffer, 1911, Serromyia Meigen, 1818, and Mantohelea Szadziewski, 1988 are recorded without formal description. Furthermore, one fossil belonging to the genus Camptopterohelea Wirth & Hubert, 1960 is included in the present study. Our study reveals faunal links among Ceratopogonidae from Cambay amber and contemporaneous amber from Fushun, China, Eocene Baltic amber from Europe, as well as the modern Australasian and the Oriental regions. These findings imply that faunal exchange between Europe, Asia and India took place before the formation of Cambay amber in the early Eocene.

  8. Collection of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) using CO2 and enantiomers of 1-octen-3-ol in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Harrup, L E; Logan, J G; Cook, J I; Golding, N; Birkett, M A; Pickett, J A; Sanders, C; Barber, J; Rogers, D J; Mellor, P S; Purse, B V; Carpenter, S

    2012-01-01

    The host kairomones carbon dioxide (CO2) and 1-octen-3-ol elicit a host seeking response in a wide range of haematophagous Diptera. This study investigates the response of Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) to these cues using field-based experiments at two sites in the United Kingdom with very different species complements. Traps used for surveillance (miniature CDC model 512) and control (Mosquito Magnet Pro) were modified to release ratios of (R)- and (S)-1-octen-3-ol enantiomers in combination with CO2 and, in the case of the latter trap type, a thermal cue. Abundance and species diversity were then compared between these treatments and against collections made using a trap with a CO2 lure only, in a Latin square design. In both habitats, results demonstrated that semiochemical lures containing a high proportion of the (R)-enantiomer consistently attracted a greater abundance of host-seeking Culicoides females than any other treatment. Culicoides collected using an optimal stimulus of 500 ml/min CO2 combined with 4.1 mg/h (R)-1-octen-3-ol were then compared with those collected on sheep through the use of a drop trap. While preliminary in nature, this trial indicated Culicoides species complements are similar between collections made using the drop trap in comparison to the semiochemical-baited CDC trap, and that there are advantages in using (R)-1-octen-3-ol.

  9. Molecular characterization of Swiss Ceratopogonidae (Diptera) and evaluation of real-time PCR assays for the identification of Culicoides biting midges.

    PubMed

    Wenk, Claudia E; Kaufmann, Christian; Schaffner, Francis; Mathis, Alexander

    2012-03-23

    Biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera, Ceratopogonidae) are vectors of several viruses of veterinary relevance, and they can cause insect bite hypersensitivity. As the morphological identification of these tiny insects is a difficult task in many cases, alternative approaches are expedient. With the aim to develop real-time PCRs, we determined partial mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene (mt COI) sequences from 380 Culicoides midges representing three regions of Switzerland, namely the Alps, Midland north of the Alps (Atlantic climate), and South of the Alps (Mediterranean climate). The same region was also sequenced from non-biting midges of the genera Atrichopogon, Brachypogon, Dasyhelea, Forcipomyia and Serromyia. A total of 21 Culicoides species were identified by morphology. Sequence variability (haplotypes) was observed in all species. For each of C. grisescens and C. obsoletus, a novel cryptic species was identified. Whereas all individuals of C. grisescens and of the cryptic C. obsoletus species (O2) originated only from Alpine sites, the known C. obsoletus (O1) species was found in all three regions. Further, a sister taxon to C. pulicaris was identified based on the mt COI sequences and named Culicoides sp. Alignments of available mtCOI sequences from Ceratopogonidae (GenBank, this study) were used to design real-time PCR primers and probes to distinguish C. chiopterus, C. deltus, C. dewulfi, C. grisescens (including the cryptic species), C. imicola, C. lupicaris, C. obsoletus O1, C. obsoletus O2, C. pulicaris, C. scoticus and Culicoides sp. Specificities of primers and probes was tested with cloned targets representing 1 to 4 haplotypes of 18 Culicoides spp. and 1 haplotype each from 4 other Ceratopogonidae. No cross-reactivity was observed when plasmid template representing 5 × 10(6) gene copies was tested, but it was evident (Ct values ≤ 30) in few instances when plasmid template representing 5 × 10(9) gene copies was utilized, the

  10. Towards the PCR-based identification of Palaearctic Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae): results from an international ring trial targeting four species of the subgenus Avaritia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are biological vectors of internationally important arboviruses. To understand the role of Culicoides in the transmission of these viruses, it is essential to correctly identify the species involved. Within the western Palaearctic region, the main suspected vector species, C. obsoletus, C. scoticus, C. dewulfi and C. chiopterus, have similar wing patterns, which makes it difficult to separate and identify them correctly. Methods In this study, designed as an inter-laboratory ring trial with twelve partners from Europe and North Africa, we assess four PCR-based assays which are used routinely to differentiate the four species of Culicoides listed above. The assays based on mitochondrial or ribosomal DNA or microarray hybridisation were tested using aliquots of Culicoides DNA (extracted using commercial kits), crude lysates of ground specimens and whole Culicoides (265 individuals), and non-Culicoides Ceratopogonidae (13 individuals) collected from across Europe. Results A total of 800 molecular assays were implemented. The in-house assays functioned effectively, although specificity and sensitivity varied according to the molecular marker and DNA extraction method used. The Obsoletus group specificity was overall high (95-99%) while the sensitivity varied greatly (59.6-100%). DNA extraction methods impacted the sensitivity of the assays as well as the type of sample used as template for the DNA extraction. Conclusions The results are discussed in terms of current use of species diagnostic assays and the future development of molecular tools for the rapid differentiation of cryptic Culicoides species. PMID:24884950

  11. Characterization of internal transcribed spacer (ITS1)-ITS2 region of ribosomal RNA gene from 25 species of Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Japan.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Y; Yanase, T; Tsuda, T; Noda, H

    2009-09-01

    We determined nucleotide sequences of the nuclear rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1-5.8S-ITS2a-2S-ITS2 region in 103 individuals of 25 Culicoides species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) from 11 locations in Japan. Ribosomal RNA genes, 5.8S and 2S rDNA, were highly conserved among the species with few variations. The ITS2a region showed length variation among species. Both ITS1 and ITS2 showed highly varied sequences among species. The noticeable indel regions among ITS1 sequences are present in some Culicoides species, separating species into two types having long or short ITS1 region. However, Culicoides cylindratus Kitaoka possesses both types of ITS1 in each individual; these results seem to indicate that the ITS1-long type was the prototype and the short type was produced through deletion in many Culicoides species. One species, belonging to subgenus Avaritia, possessed an Avaritia-specific sequence in ITS1 and phylogenetically formed a monophyletic group. Geographical genotypes in a species were not clear. Species-specific sequence features were observed, enabling molecular identification of Culicoides species.

  12. Seasonal Dynamics, Parity Rate, and Composition of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) Occurring in the Vicinity of Wild and Domestic Ruminants in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Rádrová, Jana; Mračková, Marie; Galková, Zdenka; Lamka, Jírí; Račka, Karol; Barták, Pavel; Votýpka, Jan

    2016-03-01

    In the light of the emergence of bluetongue and Schmallenberg viruses in northern and central Europe, an extensive entomological survey within the framework of a bluetongue control program was undertaken from 2008 to 2013 in the Czech Republic to investigate Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) collected in close proximity of domestic livestock and semiwild ruminants. Insects were sampled using CDC black-light suction traps placed overnight near ruminants in farms or in forest game preserves to provide data on Culicoides fauna collected near these two groups of hosts inhabiting different environments. From almost a half million biting midge specimens collected at 41 sampling sites, 34 species were identified including three species newly recorded for the Czech Republic: Culicoides (Oecacta) clastrieri Callot, Kremer & Deduit, Culicoides (Oecacta) odiatus Austen, and Culicoides (Pontoculicoides) saevus Kieffer. The Culicoides obsoletus species group, incriminated as a bluetongue virus vector, was predominant in both domestic livestock (91%) and semiwild game (52%). A relatively high proportion (around 30%) of C. obsoletus Meigen females with pigmented abdomen (= more likely parous) was observed from spring till autumn. In contrast, adult biting midges were found to be largely absent during at least three winter months, approximately December till March, which could be considered as the biting midge vector-free period.

  13. Circadian activity of Culicoides oxystoma (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), potential vector of bluetongue and African horse sickness viruses in the Niayes area, Senegal.

    PubMed

    Fall, Moussa; Fall, Assane G; Seck, Momar T; Bouyer, Jérémy; Diarra, Maryam; Balenghien, Thomas; Garros, Claire; Bakhoum, Mame T; Faye, Ousmane; Baldet, Thierry; Gimonneau, Geoffrey

    2015-08-01

    Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are important vectors of arboviruses in Africa. Culicoides oxystoma has been recently recorded in the Niayes region of Senegal (West Africa) and its high abundance on horses suggests a potential implication in the transmission of the African horse sickness virus in this region. This species is also suspected to transmit bluetongue virus to imported breeds of sheep. Little information is available on the biology and ecology of Culicoides in Africa. Therefore, understanding the circadian host-seeking activity of this putative vector is of primary importance to assess the risk of the transmission of Culicoides-borne pathogens. To achieve this objective, midges were collected using a sheep-baited trap over two consecutive 24-h periods during four seasons in 2012. A total of 441 Culicoides, belonging to nine species including 418 (94.8%) specimens of C. oxystoma, were collected. C. oxystoma presented a bimodal circadian host-seeking activity at sunrise and sunset in July and was active 3 h after sunrise in April. Daily activity appeared mainly related to time periods. Morning activity increased with the increasing temperature up to about 27 °C and then decreased with the decreasing humidity, suggesting thermal limits for C. oxystoma activity. Evening activity increased with the increasing humidity and the decreasing temperature, comprised between 20 and 27 °C according to seasons. Interestingly, males were more abundant in our sampling sessions, with similar activity periods than females, suggesting potential animal host implication in the facilitation of reproduction. Finally, the low number of C. oxystoma collected render practical vector-control recommendations difficult to provide and highlight the lack of knowledge on the bio-ecology of this species of veterinary interest.

  14. Assessment of vector/host contact: comparison of animal-baited traps and UV-light/suction trap for collecting Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), vectors of Orbiviruses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The emergence and massive spread of bluetongue in Western Europe during 2006-2008 had disastrous consequences for sheep and cattle production and confirmed the ability of Palaearctic Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) to transmit the virus. Some aspects of Culicoides ecology, especially host-seeking and feeding behaviors, remain insufficiently described due to the difficulty of collecting them directly on a bait animal, the most reliable method to evaluate biting rates. Our aim was to compare typical animal-baited traps (drop trap and direct aspiration) to both a new sticky cover trap and a UV-light/suction trap (the most commonly used method to collect Culicoides). Methods/results Collections were made from 1.45 hours before sunset to 1.45 hours after sunset in June/July 2009 at an experimental sheep farm (INRA, Nouzilly, Western France), with 3 replicates of a 4 sites × 4 traps randomized Latin square using one sheep per site. Collected Culicoides individuals were sorted morphologically to species, sex and physiological stages for females. Sibling species were identified using a molecular assay. A total of 534 Culicoides belonging to 17 species was collected. Abundance was maximal in the drop trap (232 females and 4 males from 10 species) whereas the diversity was the highest in the UV-light/suction trap (136 females and 5 males from 15 species). Significant between-trap differences abundance and parity rates were observed. Conclusions Only the direct aspiration collected exclusively host-seeking females, despite a concern that human manipulation may influence estimation of the biting rate. The sticky cover trap assessed accurately the biting rate of abundant species even if it might act as an interception trap. The drop trap collected the highest abundance of Culicoides and may have caught individuals not attracted by sheep but by its structure. Finally, abundances obtained using the UV-light/suction trap did not estimate accurately Culicoides

  15. [The small halophilic zygopteric odonate, Mortonagrion hirosei, of central Japan, a predator utilizable against tiny stinging diptera of coastal salt marshes, especially Ceratopogonidae of the genera Culicoides and Oecacta, pests of sea shores in southwestern U.S.A. and Caribbean area].

    PubMed

    Vasserot, J

    1986-01-01

    Among stinging diptera pullulating in coastal salt marshes Ceratopogonidae gnats (mainly of genus Culicoides and Oecacta) are especially troublesome, particularly in Southeastern U. S. A. and Caribbean area, escaping attacks of most predators by their tiny size. But the zygopteric odonate insect Mortonagrion hirosei is well fitted for hunting those minute diptera, by its tiny size and its behaviour, seeking shelter between halophilic plants (2 facts explaining that it was not discovered in central Japan before 1971...). Its larvae, living in brackish waters of coastal lagoons, can devour those of Ceratopogonidae and at least young stages of those of Mosquitoes whose some halophilic species are dangerous vectors of diseases. According to similarity of climates M. hirosei can certainly thrive in Southeastern U. S. A., and probably in Southern Europe. At lower latitudes problems for completion of annual cycle could perhaps arise from lack of hivernal cooling. It is necessary to make at the world scale methodical researches for other species of zygopteric odonates of similar ecology which could exist in other countries, both for avoiding harmful competition of introduced M. hirosei with native species still unknown and for fulfilling the same ecological function in areas of climate no suitable for this Japanese insect. Introduction of M. hirosei in new geographic areas would be very useful, too, for protection of this interesting species threatened by human activities in its natural biotopes, made of discontinuous and rather little areas.

  16. Culicoides Biting Midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) of Kenya

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    53 (male, femalej. Holotype: 0, Zika Forest, Uganda, C. Khamala, light trap, 17-V-66 (BMNH). Paratypes: 1 0, 1 6, Kakamega Forest, Kenya, C...types: 3 &?, same data as holotype (1 6, BMNH; 1 6, MRAC; 1 8, NMK); 8 QQ, 2 86, Zika Forest, Uganda, C. Khamala, light trap, 5-V-66 (1 Q, 1 8, BMNH; 1...collected several adults in East Africa, in- cluding one from a savanna in Kenya and three from the Zika Forest in Uganda. In Nigeria, Di- peolu (197613

  17. The Culicoides of Southeast Asia (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    21 Climate .... .. .. .... ...... .............. 21 Vegetation. . .... .. .. .................... 25...their area and causes the build-up of estuaries where they empty into the sea. CUMATE The climate of Southeast Asia is characterized by regional...region. A striking exception is the drý zone of central Burma, parts of which receive less than 630 mm of rain. The climate of Sumatra, Borneo, and

  18. Some New Records of Culicoides Species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) from Iran

    PubMed Central

    Abdigoudarzi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Biting midges of the genus Culicoides act as vectors for important diseases affecting humans and both wild and domestic animals. Collection of adult Culicoides specimens in the near vicinity of vertebrate hosts is the major part of any bluetongue surveillance plan. There are old records of Culicoides species dated from 1963, 1968 and 1975. Therefore, it was decided to collect different ceratopogonids members using a light trap. Methods: One night catching using light traps with a suction fan was performed at representative sites (25 places) located in North Western Provinces (Ardebil, Eastern Azerbaijan, Western Azerbaijan and Zanjan) of Iran (suspected farms for clinical records of Bluetongue virus or serodiagnosis of the Bluetongue virus). Samples were detected and identified primarily and were sent to a reference center for final verification. Results: Seven Culicoides species including (Culicoides circumscriptus, C. flavidus, C. longipennis, C. pulicaris, C. puncatatus, C. nubeculosus, and three species from Culicoides (Oecacta) are under study in reference laboratory in Poland and C. puncticollis were confirmed from Iran. Conclusion: Morphological and explanation of each species was regarded in this study. In comparison to old record, there are four new records of Culicoides species from Iran and one species is regarded suspected for viral transmission. PMID:28032099

  19. Osmoregulatory Organs of Immature Culicodes Sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The water saturated soils and wet feces in livestock feed lots support a variety of Diptera including Musca spp. and Culicoides spp. Aquatic insects that must regulate the ion concentrations of their haemolymph; and fresh water insects tend to loose ions to their aquatic environment. The larvae of C...

  20. Description of the Pupa of Culicoides crucifer Clastrier (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Ronderos, M M; Spinelli, G R; Keppler, R L F

    2013-10-01

    The pupa of Culicoides crucifer Clastrier is described, illustrated and photomicrographed by using binocular microscope and phase-contrast microscopy from material collected in an artificial container in Manaus, Brazil. The pupa shows features typical of pupae occurring in calm and clean waters, and it is compared with its similar congeners of the subgenus Haematomyiidium, Culicoides annuliductus Wirth and Culicoides debilipalpis Lutz.

  1. Effect of temperature on replication of epizootic hemorrhagic disease viruses in Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Replication of many arboviruses, including some orbiviruses, within the vector has been shown to be temperature-dependent. In general, cooler ambient temperatures slow virus replication in arthropod vectors, whereas viruses replicate faster and to higher titers at warmer ambient temperatures. Prev...

  2. A new species of predaceous midge of the genus Monohelea Kieffer from Mexico (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Felippe-Bauer, M L; Huerta, H; Bernal, S I

    2000-01-01

    A description and illustrations of Monohelea maya, new species, based on male and female characteristics are provided. The specimens were collected in the special biosphere Reserves of Ria Lagartos and Ria Celestun, Yucatan State, Mexico.

  3. A morphological investigation of Culicoides spp. biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) from the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Blackwell, Alison

    2004-06-01

    Features of the antennae, maxillary palps, and mouthparts of the females of seven species of Culicoides spp. biting midges collected from a montane rainforest site in Trinidad, West Indies, were studied by light and scanning electron microscopy. Comparisons were made with two British species, Culicoides impunctatus and Culicoides nubeculosus. Species-specific differences were demonstrated in the camber and pitch of mandibular teeth, the size and shape of the subapical labral sensilla, the size and depth of the palpal sensory pit, and the number and shape of heads of the palpal sensilla. Counts of sensilla coeloconica and palpal sensilla were suggested as being contributory features for the prediction of host preference, indicating that Culicoides darlingtonae, Culicoides glabellus, Culicoides insinuatus, Culicoides paraensis, and Culicoides pseudodiabolicus were probably mammalophilic species. The host preferences of Culicoides heliconiae and Culicoides flavivenula could not be determined accurately.

  4. Revision of the Neotropical species of the subgenus Atrichopogon (Psilokempia) (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Gustavo R; Marino, Pablo I; Huerta, Herón

    2015-08-20

    This revision of the midges in the subgenus Psilokempia Enderlein of Atrichopogon Kieffer provides a brief description of the subgenus, diagnoses, descriptions, illustrations and a key to adult males and females of the 17 species from the Neotropical region, as well as distributional records of both new and previously described species. Six new species are described and illustrated: A. arti, A. javieri, A. longirostris, A. nahuelbutensis, A. sergioi and A. woodruffi (n. spp.). The type materials of all previously known Neotropical species except A. penicillatus Delècolle & Rieb were examined. Atrichopogon altivolans Macfie, A. aridus Spinelli & Marino, A. domizii Spinelli, A. glaber Macfie, A. gordoni Macfie, A. insigniventris Macfie, A. pectinatus Macfie and A. penicillatus are redescribed and illustrated, and notes on the types of A. echinodes Macfie, A. harrisi Macfie and A. sanctaeclarae Macfie are provided. Lectotypes are designated for A. glaber, A. insigniventris and A. pectinatus. The previously unknown males of A. altivolans, A. pectinatus and A. penicillatus are described and illustrated, and A. fimbriatus Macfie is recognized as a junior synonym of A. gordoni.

  5. Occurrence of Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Tunisia, with emphasis on the bluetongue vector Culicoides imicola.

    PubMed

    Hammami, S; Bouzid, M; Hammou, F; Fakhfakh, E; Delecolle, J C

    2008-06-01

    Following the bluetongue (BT) outbreaks in Tunisia from 1999 to 2002, BTV (bluetongue virus) serotype 2 was isolated; however, no entomological investigation was performed. In the study presented here, we assessed the Culicoides species populations (particularly C. imicola) in proximity to the BT outbreaks locations, both as a retrospective analysis and to update the list of Culicoides species present in Tunisia. The insects were caught using light traps and the species identification was performed according to the standard entomological methods. This study reveaaled the presence of significant numbers of C. imicola in all the tested locations. In addition, we reported a new Culicoides species for the Tunisian fauna C. punctatus.

  6. Newly emerged nulliparous Culicoides imicola Kieffer (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) with pigmented abdomen.

    PubMed

    Braverman, Yehuda; Mumcuoglu, Kosta

    2009-03-23

    The method of segregating nulliparous and parous females of Culicoides spp. based on the presence of burgundy-red pigment inside the abdominal wall of parous Culicoides midges, is used worldwide. Out of 320 females of Culicoides imicola trapped by emergence traps, set over an artificial breeding site for 10 and 24 days, 73 (22.8%) showed a red-pigmentation despite the fact that they were nulliparous. This finding indicated that 23% of the "parous" females that are examined for the presence of arboviruses and other pathogens or for age-grading purposes, are actually old nulliparous females, which had no chance of acquiring pathogens. This bias in parous rate distorts upward the calculation of vectorial capacity.

  7. Potential Distribution Map of Culicoides insignis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), Vector of Bluetongue Virus, in Northwestern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Veggiani Aybar, Cecilia A; Díaz Gomez, Romina A; Dantur Juri, María J; Lizarralde de Grosso, Mercedes S; Spinelli, Gustavo R

    2016-01-01

    Culicoides insignis Lutz is incriminated as a vector of bluetongue virus (BTV) to ruminants in America. In South America, almost all countries have serological evidence of BTV infections, but only four outbreaks of the disease have been reported. Although clinical diseases have never been cited in Argentina, viral activity has been detected in cattle. In this study, we developed a potential distribution map of Culicoides insignis populations in northwestern Argentina using Maximum Entropy Modeling (Maxent). For the analyses, information regarding both data of specimen collections between 2003 and 2013, and climatic and environmental variables was used. Variables selection was based on the ecological relevance in relation to Culicoides spp. biology and distribution in the area. The best Maxent model according to the Jackknife test included 53 C. insignis presence records and precipitation of the warmest quarter, altitude, and precipitation of the wettest month. Accuracy was evaluated by the area under the curve (AUC = 0.97). These results provide an important analytical resource of high potential for both the development of suitable control strategies and the assessment of disease transmission risk in the region.

  8. Collection and analysis of salivary proteins from the biting midge Culicoides nubeculosus (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salivary proteins of hematophagous Culicoides spp. are thought to play an important role in pathogen transmission and skin hypersensitivity. Analysis of these proteins, however, has been problematic due to the difficulty in obtaining adequate amounts of secreted Culicoides saliva. In the current stu...

  9. Midgut and salivary gland transcriptomes of the arbovirus vector Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Campbell, C L; Vandyke, K A; Letchworth, G J; Drolet, B S; Hanekamp, T; Wilson, W C

    2005-04-01

    Numerous Culicoides spp. are important vectors of livestock or human disease pathogens. Transcriptome information from midguts and salivary glands of adult female Culicoides sonorensis provides new insight into vector biology. Of 1719 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from adult serum-fed female midguts harvested within 5 h of feeding, twenty-eight clusters of serine proteases were derived. Four clusters encode putative iron binding proteins (FER1, FERL, PXDL1, PXDL2), and two clusters encode metalloendopeptidases (MDP6C, MDP6D) that probably function in bloodmeal catabolism. In addition, a diverse variety of housekeeping cDNAs were identified. Selected midgut protease transcripts were analysed by quantitative real-time PCR (q-PCR): TRY1_115 and MDP6C mRNAs were induced in adult female midguts upon feeding, whereas TRY1_156 and CHYM1 were abundant in midguts both before and immediately after feeding. Of 708 salivary gland ESTs analysed, clusters representing two new classes of protein families were identified: a new class of D7 proteins and a new class of Kunitz-type protease inhibitors. Additional cDNAs representing putative immunomodulatory proteins were also identified: 5' nucleotidases, antigen 5-related proteins, a hyaluronidase, a platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, mucins and several immune response cDNAs. Analysis by q-PCR showed that all D7 and Kunitz domain transcripts tested were highly enriched in female heads compared with other tissues and were generally absent from males. The mRNAs of two additional protease inhibitors, TFPI1 and TFPI2, were detected in salivary glands of paraffin-embedded females by in situ hybridization.

  10. PCR identification of Culicoides dewulfi midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), potential vectors of bluetongue in Germany.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Anja; Clausen, Peter-Henning; Bauer, Burkhard; Steuber, Stephan

    2009-08-01

    Due to the severe outbreaks of bluetongue disease (BTD) in the years 2006/2007 in Germany in the absence of the main African vector Culicoides imicola, a rapid and easy applicable method for identification of autochthonous Culicoides spp. had to be developed. Morphological identification is time-consuming, rendering impossible the identification of large numbers of midges in a short period of time. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based procedure in connection with a species-specific primer greatly simplifies the identification process. The region of internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS-1) of the ribosomal DNA has shown great potential for developing a reliable PCR-based procedure. Culicoides midges were caught with ultraviolet-light traps installed on different farms in Germany during 2007 and 2008. The midges were mounted on slides and morphologically characterised. Midge DNA was extracted and the ITS-1 region amplified using conservative primers. Potential primer regions within ITS-1 were determined and a species-specific Culicoides dewulfi primer was developed to correctly identify autochthonous C. dewulfi, one of the suspected BTV vectors in northwestern Europe. The developed primer was used to identify C. dewulfi in a pool of Culicoides midges from a farm in the state of Brandenburg.

  11. The transmission of Haemoproteus belopolskyi (Haemosporida: Haemoproteidae) of blackcap by Culicoides impunctatus (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Valkiunas, Gediminas; Iezhova, Tatjana A

    2004-02-01

    Haemoproteus belopolskyi of blackcap, Sylvia atricapilla, underwent sporogony in wild-caught female biting midges, Culicoides impunctatus, which were experimentally infected by feeding them on naturally infected birds. The engorged flies were held for 8-12 days to allow development of sporozoites and then aspirated and triturated in 0.85% saline. Seven uninfected nestlings of blackcap at the age of 20-21 days were inoculated into the pectoral muscle with 0.3 ml of the slurry containing approximately 45 sporozoites. Parasitemia of H. belopolskyi developed in 6 nestlings, with a prepatent period of 11-12 days. The maximum parasitemia varied between 0.9 and 16% of erythrocytes in different experimental hosts. Culicoides impunctatus is an experimental vector of H. belopolskyi. It is likely to be the important natural vector of Haemoproteus spp. of passerine birds in Europe.

  12. Additional notes on biting midges from the subtropical forest of northeastern Argentina (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Ayala, Mahia M; Spinelli, Gustavo R; Funes, Amparo; Ronderos, María M

    2015-03-30

    Adult males and pupae of Culicoides guarani Ronderos & Spinelli and Parabezzia brasiliensis Spinelli & Grogan are fully described and illustrated with a modern criterium from material recently collected in the vicinities of the city of Posadas in Misiones province, Argentina. Both species are compared with their most similar congeners. Besides, Bezzia blantoni Spinelli & Wirth and B. brevicornis (Kieffer) are firstly recorded from Misiones province.

  13. All stages of the Palaearctic predaceous midge Palpomyia schmidti Goetghebuer, 1934 (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Szadziewski, Ryszard; Golovatyuk, Larisa V; Sontag, Elżbieta; Urbanek, Aleksandra; Zinchenko, Tatiana D

    2016-07-08

    All stages and the ecology of the Southern Palaearctic Palpomyia schmidti collected from the vicinity of the saline Lake Elton in Russia are described and illustrated. The morphology of larvae and pupae as well as the detailed ecology of the larvae are described for the first time. P. schmidti is a halobiontic biting midge, widely distributed in the steppes and deserts of the Palaearctic region. It is proposed that the Palpomyia schmidti group should include five Holarctic species. P. downesi Grogan & Wirth, 1979 from north-western North America is recognized as a new junior synonym of the Eastern Palaearctic P. tuvae Remm, 1972. New synonymy.

  14. Forcipomyia (Pterobosca) paludis (Macfie, 1936) (Diptera, Ceratopogonidae) on adult dragonflies (Odonata) in Sardinia, Italy.

    PubMed

    Dell'Anna, L; Utzeri, C; Sabatini, A; Coluzzi, M

    1995-04-01

    Ceratopogonid midges, referred to Forcipomyia paludis, were recorded from five dragonfly species in Sardinia, Italy. All ceratopogonids were females and almost all were in the last phase of the gonotrophic cycle (gravid females). Although a parasitic association cannot be excluded, no evidence was obtained of the midge biting activity, neither by direct observation nor indirectly, by detecting the expected lesions on the host cuticle. The attachment to dragonflies of F. paludis (perhaps an autogenous species) might fit well with the hypothesis of a phoretic association which would favour the long range dispersal of the gravid females.

  15. Modelling the Abundances of Two Major Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) Species in the Niayes Area of Senegal.

    PubMed

    Diarra, Maryam; Fall, Moussa; Lancelot, Renaud; Diop, Aliou; Fall, Assane G; Dicko, Ahmadou; Seck, Momar Talla; Garros, Claire; Allène, Xavier; Rakotoarivony, Ignace; Bakhoum, Mame Thierno; Bouyer, Jérémy; Guis, Hélène

    2015-01-01

    In Senegal, considerable mortality in the equine population and hence major economic losses were caused by the African horse sickness (AHS) epizootic in 2007. Culicoides oxystoma and Culicoides imicola, known or suspected of being vectors of bluetongue and AHS viruses are two predominant species in the vicinity of horses and are present all year-round in Niayes area, Senegal. The aim of this study was to better understand the environmental and climatic drivers of the dynamics of these two species. Culicoides collections were obtained using OVI (Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute) light traps at each of the 5 sites for three nights of consecutive collection per month over one year. Cross Correlation Map analysis was performed to determine the time-lags for which environmental variables and abundance data were the most correlated. C. oxystoma and C. imicola count data were highly variable and overdispersed. Despite modelling large Culicoides counts (over 220,000 Culicoides captured in 354 night-traps), using on-site climate measures, overdispersion persisted in Poisson, negative binomial, Poisson regression mixed-effect with random effect at the site of capture models. The only model able to take into account overdispersion was the Poisson regression mixed-effect model with nested random effects at the site and date of capture levels. According to this model, meteorological variables that contribute to explaining the dynamics of C. oxystoma and C. imicola abundances were: mean temperature and relative humidity of the capture day, mean humidity between 21 and 19 days prior a capture event, density of ruminants, percentage cover of water bodies within a 2 km radius and interaction between temperature and humidity for C. oxystoma; mean rainfall and NDVI of the capture day and percentage cover of water bodies for C. imicola. Other variables such as soil moisture, wind speed, degree days, land cover or landscape metrics could be tested to improve the models. Further work should also assess whether other trapping methods such as host-baited traps help reduce overdispersion.

  16. Blood Feeding Behavior of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Infected Culicoides Sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine whether vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection of Culicoides sonorensis affects subsequent blood feeding behavior, midges injected with either virus-infected or virus-free cell lysates were allowed to blood feed for short (10 min) or long (60 min) periods of time on days 2, 3, and 4...

  17. Metamorphic changes in abdominal spines of Forcipomyia nigra pupae (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Urbanek, Aleksandra; Richert, Malwina; Kapusta, Małgorzata

    2015-11-01

    Pupae of Forcipomyia nigra biting midges bear double rows of dorsal and lateral spines. Their arrangement corresponds to the distribution of larval mechanosensory setae. They are serrated simple cuticular structures with tubercles but, in contrast to larval secretory mechanoreceptors, they are not innervated and do not exhibit any pores. The ultrastructure of abdominal spines varies among different pupal stages. They are produced by epidermal cells which fill the interior of the spine. In the youngest pupae epidermal cells are tightly packed and adhere to the cuticle. Then, the cells withdraw from the spinal cavity and the beginning of autophagy is observed. The last stage represents abdominal spines without any cellular material and then apoptosis probably proceeds in the withdrawn epidermal cells. Since the pupal spines occupied the same region of the segment as the larval setae, we consider that the same genes are responsible for their formation as for the formation of epidermal cells but that their mechanosensory and secretory function is no longer needed.

  18. Abundance of biting midge species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae, Culicoides spp.) on cattle farms in Korea.

    PubMed

    Oem, Jae-Ku; Chung, Joon-Yee; Kwon, Mee-Soon; Kim, Toh-Kyung; Lee, Tae-Uk; Bae, You-Chan

    2013-01-01

    Culicoides biting midges were collected on three cattle farms weekly using light traps overnight from May to October between 2010 and 2011 in the southern part of Korea. The seasonal and geographical abundance of Culicodes spp. were measured. A total of 16,538 biting midges were collected from 2010 to 2011, including seven species of Culicoides, four of which represented 98.42% of the collected specimens. These four species were Culicodes (C.) punctatus (n = 14,413), C. arakawae (n = 1,120), C. oxystoma (n = 427), and C. maculatus (n = 318). C. punctatus was the predominant species (87.15%).

  19. Effects of Melezitose and Stachyose on Adult Longevity and Virus Persistence in Culicoides Sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A wide variety of blood feeding Diptera feed on extrafloral sugar sources such as homopteran honeydew. he significance of these sugar sources to insect survival and disease transmission are poorly known. Culicoides sonorensis can survive on plant sugars but might feed on homopteran honeydew. The su...

  20. Vector competence of Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) for vesicular stomatitis virus.

    PubMed

    Drolet, Barbara S; Campbell, Corey L; Stuart, Melissa A; Wilson, William C

    2005-05-01

    To determine the vector competence of Culicoides sonorensis Wirth & Jones midges for vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-New Jersey, insects were experimentally infected per os and sampled over time. Viral replication, as determined by in situ hybridization, was seen in epithelial, neural, and hemolymph cell types throughout the insect. Spatial and temporal distribution of virus was determined by immunohistochemical examination of sequentially sampled insects. Tissues of the alimentary canal were infected in a temporal pattern that paralleled the route of digestion/absorption: foregut and midgut by day 1, surrounding hemolymph and Malpighian tubules by day 3, and finally the midgut/ hindgut junction, hindgut, and rectal region by day 5. The circulation of virus in the hemolymph by day 3 coincided with infection of the dermis and fat bodies, the salivary glands, eyes, cerebral and subthoracic ganglia, and the ovaries. Oviduct epithelium and ovarial sheaths were infected by day 3, followed by infection of the developing oocytes by day 5. Interestingly, neural infections were seen in the subabdominal ganglia innervating the midgut in 33% of insects by 1 d postfeeding in the absence of positive staining in the hemolymph or surrounding tissues. A retrograde axonal transport infection route for these ganglia is discussed. The disseminated, productive, noncytolytic infection in Culicoides is consistent with that of an efficient biological vector for VSV. Virus readily replicated throughout the insect, passing both midgut and salivary gland infection barriers and reaching transmission-related organs in 3 d. Establishing the competence of this insect vector for VSV provides the foundation for animal transmission studies in the future. The possibility of horizontal, transovarial, and mechanical transmission is discussed.

  1. Papular dermatitis induced in guinea pigs by the biting midge Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Histological, ultrastructural, and virological examinations were performed on abdominal skin from guinea pigs after a blood meal by colony-bred biting midges, Culicoides sonorensis. Small, superficial, cutaneous, crateriform ulcers with necrosis of superficial dermis developed at feeding sites and ...

  2. Control of Culicoides Sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)blood feeding on sheep with long lasting repellent pesticides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Culicoides sonorensis is the primary vector of bluetongue and epizootic hemorrhagic disease viruses in North America. Bluetongue disease is considered one of the most economically important arthropod-borne diseases of sheep in North America because it causes significant morbidity and mortality and ...

  3. [Biology of biting midge species (Ceratopogonidae) in the southern Krasnoyarsk Territory].

    PubMed

    Gornostaeva, R M

    1978-01-01

    In the valley of the Enisei (140 km from the town of Abakan up to the river) C. sinanoensis and C. sanguisuga are mass bloodsuckers while C. chiopterus and C. filicinus occur in small number. Data on the age composition of attacking females confirm the autogeny of C. filicinus and suggest the presence of autogeny in C. chiopterus. C. sinanoensis and C. sanguisuga can have two generations during the period of their activity. The emergence of the 1st generation takes place in the IInd--IIIrd decade of June, the emergence of the 2nd generation--at the beginning of August. The 2nd generation is so small, as a rule, that its appearance does not practically affect the abundance of attacking females. C. sanguisuga is less sensitive to light and attacks at a somewhat higher temperature as compared to C. sinanoensis. As a result, a morning peak of abundance of C. sanguisuga takes place in 1--2 hours after the peak of abundance of C. sinanoensis while the evening peak is 1--2 hours prior to it. The daily period of activity of C. sanguisuga is usually longer than that of C. sinanoensis.

  4. The Biting Midge Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) Is Capable of Developing Late Stage Infections of Leishmania enriettii

    PubMed Central

    Seblova, Veronika; Sadlova, Jovana; Vojtkova, Barbora; Votypka, Jan; Carpenter, Simon; Bates, Paul Andrew; Volf, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite their importance in animal and human health, the epidemiology of species of the Leishmania enriettii complex remains poorly understood, including the identity of their biological vectors. Biting midges of the genus Forcipomyia (Lasiohelea) have been implicated in the transmission of a member of the L. enriettii complex in Australia, but the far larger and more widespread genus Culicoides has not been investigated for the potential to include vectors to date. Methodology/Principal Findings Females from colonies of the midges Culicoides nubeculosus Meigen and C. sonorensis Wirth & Jones and the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis Lutz & Nevia (Diptera: Psychodidae) were experimentally infected with two different species of Leishmania, originating from Australia (Leishmania sp. AM-2004) and Brazil (Leishmania enriettii). In addition, the infectivity of L. enriettii infections generated in guinea pigs and golden hamsters for Lu. longipalpis and C. sonorensis was tested by xenodiagnosis. Development of L. enriettii in Lu. longipalpis was relatively poor compared to other Leishmania species in this permissive vector. Culicoides nubeculosus was not susceptible to infection by parasites from the L. enriettii complex. In contrast, C. sonorensis developed late stage infections with colonization of the thoracic midgut and the stomodeal valve. In hamsters, experimental infection with L. enriettii led only to mild symptoms, while in guinea pigs L. enriettii grew aggressively, producing large, ulcerated, tumour-like lesions. A high proportion of C. sonorensis (up to 80%) feeding on the ears and nose of these guinea pigs became infected. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrate that L. enriettii can develop late stage infections in the biting midge Culicoides sonorensis. This midge was found to be susceptible to L. enriettii to a similar degree as Lutzomyia longipalpis, the vector of Leishmania infantum in South America. Our results support the hypothesis that some biting midges could be natural vectors of the L. enriettii complex because of their vector competence, although not Culicoides sonorensis itself, which is not sympatric, and midges should be assessed in the field while searching for vectors of related Leishmania species including L. martiniquensis and "L. siamensis". PMID:26367424

  5. Effects of Ivermectin on the Susceptibility of Culicoides Sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) to Bluetongue and Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease Viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ivermectin is one of the most frequently used antiparasitic drugs in the livestock industry. It is toxic to insects, because it can hyperpolarize their nerve and muscle cells and increases cellular membrane permeability to chloride ions, which leads to muscular paralysis. The mortality of Culicoides...

  6. Behavior of larval Culicoides Sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in response to an invertebrate predator, Hydra Littoralis (Anthomedusae: Hydridae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Larvae of Culicoides sonorensis a blood feeding ceratopogonid are aquatic. In their natural habitat they are exposed to numerous predators. Predator avoidance behavior has not been studied in most Culicoides spp. Based on laboratory data the larvae of Culicoides sonorensis behave differently when cn...

  7. Simuliid blackflies (Diptera: Simuliidae) and ceratopogonid midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) as vectors of Mansonella ozzardi (Nematoda: Onchocercidae) in northern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Shelley, A J; Coscarón, S

    2001-05-01

    Mansonella ozzardi, a relatively nonpathogenic filarial parasite of man in Latin America, is transmitted by either ceratopogonid midges or simuliid blackflies. In the only known focus of the disease in north-western Argentina the vectors have never been incriminated. This study investigated the potential vectors of M. ozzardi in this area. The only anthropophilic species of these Diptera families biting man at the time of the investigation were Simulium exiguum, S. dinellii, Culicoides lahillei and C. paraensis. Using experimentally infected flies S. exiguum and both species of Culicoides allowed full development of microfilariae to the infective stage, with C. lahillei being a more competent host than S. exiguum. Based on these data, biting rates and natural infectivity rates it is probable that at the begininning of the wet season C. lahillei is the main vector of M. ozzardi and both C. paraensis and S. exiguum secondary vectors. Additionally, it was found that a single dose of ivermectin was ineffectual in eradicating M. ozzardi from infected individuals in this area.

  8. New Agar Technique Compared with Sand Flotation for Obtaining Salt Marsh Culicoides mississippiensis Hoffman (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) Larvae,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-26

    compared with 1% and 2% (wt/v) agar formulations for extracting Culicoides ndisaiooippiensis Hoffman larvae from marsh soil samples. The 1% agar formula...been used to recover larvae of biting midges (CuZ.,o;1aa spp .) from salt marsh substrate (soil) samples. They are: (1) sieve-flotation (Kettle and Lawson...Kettle et al., (1975) in which tabanid and culicoid larvae were successfully reared in agar media, we decided that one possibility was to replace the

  9. Complete development of three species of Haemoproteus (Haemosporida, Haemoproteidae) in the biting midge Culicoides impunctatus (Diptera, Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Valkiūnas, Gediminas; Liutkevicius, Gediminas; Iezhova, Tatjana A

    2002-10-01

    Development of Haemoproteus balmorali, H. dolniki, and H. tartakovskyi was followed in experimentally infected biting midges Culicoides impunctatus on the Curonian Spit in the Baltic Sea. Wild-caught flies were allowed to take blood meals on naturally infected spotted flycatchers Muscicapa striata, chaffinches Fringilla coelebs, or crossbills Loxia curvirostra harboring mature gametocytes of these parasites. The engorged biting midges were collected, held at 14-18 C, and dissected daily. Mature ookinetes of H. balmorali, H. dolniki, and H. tartakovskyi were numerous in the midgut content 36 hr postinfection (PI). Oocysts were first seen in the midgut wall 3 days PI. They were numerous in the midgut on the fourth day PI. Sporozoites were seen in salivary glands 5 days PI. The percentage of experimentally infected biting midges with sporozoites of H. balmorali was 36.1%: 8.8% with H. dolniki and 31.2% with H. tartakovskyi. Culicoides impunctatus is likely to be an important vector of Haemoproteus spp. in Europe. All investigated species of parasites can be distinguished on the basis of morphology or size (or both) of their vector stages. Morphological features of the ookinetes, oocysts, and sporozoites should be given more prominence in the description of new species of hemoproteids.

  10. Ecology of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in southcentral Florida and experimental Culicoides vectors of the avian hematozoan Haemoproteus danilewskyi Kruse.

    PubMed

    Garvin, Mary C; Greiner, Ellis C

    2003-01-01

    To determine the vectors of Haemoproteus danilewskyi in blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) in southcentral Florida (USA), we conducted a 2 yr study from January 1993 to December 1995 of the presence and seasonal abundance of Culicoides spp. Of the 14 species of Culicoides captured in Centers for Disease Control light traps, 10 were ornithophilic. Of these, C. edeni, C. knowltoni, C. stellifer, C. beckae, and C. arboricola were most abundant, representing 46% of the total collection and 99% of the ornithophilic collection. The presence of C. stellifer in Bennett trap collections represents a new biting record for this species on passerine birds. We experimentally challenged the most abundant ornithophilic species to determine which were capable of supporting sporogonic development of H. danilewskyi. Culicoides edeni, C. knowltoni, and C. arboricola supported sporogonic development of H. danilewskyi.

  11. Activity of Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) inside and outside of livestock stables in late winter and spring.

    PubMed

    Kameke, Daniela; Kampen, Helge; Walther, Doreen

    2017-03-01

    Culicoides Latreille, 1809 midge species are the putative vectors of Bluetongue virus (BTV) and Schmallenberg virus (SBV) in Europe. To gain a better understanding of the epidemiology of the diseases, basic knowledge about the overwintering of the vectors is needed. Therefore, we investigated culicoid activity in relation to air temperature at livestock stables during late winter and spring season. Ceratopogonids were captured weekly indoors and outdoors on three cattle farms, three horse farms and one sheep farm in the federal state of Brandenburg, Germany between January and May, 2015 by BG-Sentinel UV-light suction traps. First seasonal activity was measured inside a sheep barn and cattle stables in mid-March, suggesting the existence of a preceding vector-free period. The first species at all trapping sites were members of the Obsoletus Complex followed by Culicoides punctatus (Meigen), 1804 and Culicoides pulicaris (Linnaeus), 1758 simultaneously. In total, 160 collections were made, including 3465 Culicoides specimens with 2790 (80.6%) of them being members of the Obsoletus Complex. The remaining 675 individuals belonged to six other culicoid species. 59.8% of all Culicoides were collected indoors, and almost five times as many midges were sampled on cattle farms as on horse farms. Cattle farms harboured seven species while only two species were found on the horse and the sheep farms, respectively. Temperatures, husbandry practises and the presence/quality of potential breeding sites might be responsible for the difference in species and numbers of caught specimens between livestock holdings.

  12. Five new species and new records of biting midges of the genus Dasyhelea Kieffer from the Near East (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Dominiak, Patrycja; Alwin, Alicja

    2013-01-01

    As a result of the entomological surveys in the Near East, seventeen species of biting midges of the genus Dasyhelea Kieffer are reported. Five new species are described and illustrated from adult males: D. (Dicryptoscena) antonii sp. nov., D. (Pseudoculicoides) avia sp. nov., D. (Ps.) libanensis sp. nov., D. (Ps.) nauta sp. nov. and D. (Ps.) sandrageorgei sp. nov. Among the remaining species, four are recorded for the first time from this region. Furthermore, new country records for Iran (1 sp.), Israel (2 spp.), Lebanon (9 spp.) and Yemen (1 sp.) are given. Four species described by Kieffer in 1918, namely D. distalis, D. flaviscapula, D. scutellaris and D. trifasciata, are treated as doubtful names (nomina dubia) and excluded from the Turkish fauna. In addition, an updated checklist of Dasyhelea of the Near East is presented. Dasyhelea labinoda Mazumdar & Chaudhuri, 2009 is proposed as a new junior synonym of D. deemingi Boorman & Harten, 2002. New synonymy.

  13. Field studies on Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) activity and response to deltamethrin applications to sheep in northeastern Spain.

    PubMed

    Mullens, Bradley A; Gerry, Alec C; Monteys, Victor Sarto I; Pinna, M; González, A

    2010-01-01

    An enclosure trapping experiment compared numbers and engorgement of Culicoides spp. taken from treated sheep (7.5% deltamethrin) to Culicoides from untreated sheep. Attack rates were low (0.2/min), but 58% of Culicoides obsoletus s.l. and 67% of Culicoides parroti Kieffer engorged on untreated sheep, and no engorgement occurred on treated sheep on 0 and 4 d posttreatment. A UV light trap in a livestock barn collected eight Culicoides spp. (510 individuals), dominated by C. obsoletus (Meigen) (68%), Culicoides imicola Kieffer (19%), Culicoides circumscriptus Kieffer (8%), and Culicoides alazanicus Dzhafarov (4%). A more powerful but nonattractive fan trap collected five species (121 individuals) dominated by C. obsoletus (48%), C. imicola (36%), C. alazanicus (8%), and C. circumscriptus (7%). Parity of C. obsoletus and C. imicola did not vary between the light and fan traps. Engorged Culicoides in the barn (33 C. obsoletus and three C. imicola) had fed on sheep or goats (precipitin test).

  14. Cuticular and internal chemical composition of biting midges Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), potential vectors of viral diseases.

    PubMed

    González, Mikel; López, Sergio; Rosell, Gloria; Goldarazen, Arturo; Guerrero, Angel

    2014-08-01

    The chemical profile of the cuticle and internal tissues of four species of Culicoides have been studied for the first time by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The chemical composition of females of C. obsoletus s.l. and C. lupicaris, vectors of diverse viral diseases, have been compared with that of other biting midges, such as C. kibunensis and C. fascipennis, and the non-biting midge Forcipomyia bipunctata. A total of 61 compounds belonging to 8 major chemical classes were identified in cuticular and internal tissues in n-hexane extracts. The compounds include carboxylic acids (CAs) (C6-C20), with C16:0, C16:1 and C18:1 being dominant, branched hydrocarbons (C29 to C38 mono/di/trimethylalkanes), linear hydrocarbons (C15 to C33, mainly odd chain carbons), terpenes (geranylacetone, geranylgeraniol acetate, squalene, terpenic alcohol), steroids (cholesterol), aldehydes (C9-C10 and even chain C20 to C30), and esters. The chemical profile depends on the species and whether the extracts are external (cuticle) or internal. The contents of linear and branched hydrocarbons and aldehydes was high in cuticular extracts but practically absent in internal tissues, which were, in contrast, rich in CAs, terpenes and steroids. The results are discussed and compared with other Culicoides midges and mosquito-related species.

  15. Seasonal abundance of four Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) at Al-Ahsa oasis, Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Abu, Elzein E M E; Hilali, M A; Al-Afaleq, A I; Mellor, P S; Boorman, J; Al-Atiya, S; Al, Naiem A

    2002-06-01

    This report constitutes the first study of Culicoides spp. and their seasonal abundance at Al-Ahsa, the largest oasis in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. New Jersey light traps were used to collect the midges at Mastock farm and Al-Mansura village. The mean monthly abundance was determined from October 1993 to October 1994. The mean monthly number per trap reached its minimum value during January 1994, increasing gradually from February to reach its maximum value during September 1994. During the study period, the following species were collected: Culicoides schultzei group (September), non-spotted group of Culicoides (September), Culicoides imicola (May) and Culicoides newstaedi (March). The potential importance of the Culicoides spp. in relation to arboviral activity in Saudi Arabia is discussed.

  16. Assessment of population genetic structure in the arbovirus vector midge, Culicoides brevitarsis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), using multi-locus DNA microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Onyango, Maria G; Beebe, Nigel W; Gopurenko, David; Bellis, Glenn; Nicholas, Adrian; Ogugo, Moses; Djikeng, Appolinaire; Kemp, Steve; Walker, Peter J; Duchemin, Jean-Bernard

    2015-09-25

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is a major pathogen of ruminants that is transmitted by biting midges (Culicoides spp.). Australian BTV serotypes have origins in Asia and are distributed across the continent into two distinct episystems, one in the north and another in the east. Culicoides brevitarsis is the major vector of BTV in Australia and is distributed across the entire geographic range of the virus. Here, we describe the isolation and use of DNA microsatellites and gauge their ability to determine population genetic connectivity of C. brevitarsis within Australia and with countries to the north. Eleven DNA microsatellite markers were isolated using a novel genomic enrichment method and identified as useful for genetic analyses of sampled populations in Australia, northern Papua New Guinea (PNG) and Timor-Leste. Significant (P < 0.05) population genetic subdivision was observed between all paired regions, though the highest levels of genetic sub-division involved pair-wise tests with PNG (PNG vs. Australia (FST = 0.120) and PNG vs. Timor-Leste (FST = 0.095)). Analysis of multi-locus allelic distributions using STRUCTURE identified a most probable two-cluster population model, which separated PNG specimens from a cluster containing specimens from Timor-Leste and Australia. The source of incursions of this species in Australia is more likely to be Timor-Leste than PNG. Future incursions of BTV positive C. brevitarsis into Australia may be genetically identified to their source populations using these microsatellite loci. The vector's panmictic genetic structure within Australia cannot explain the differential geographic distribution of BTV serotypes.

  17. Host feeding patterns of Culicoides species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) within the Picos de Europa National Park in northern Spain.

    PubMed

    Calvo, J H; Berzal, B; Calvete, C; Miranda, M A; Estrada, R; Lucientes, J

    2012-12-01

    Blood meal identification can provide information about the natural host-feeding patterns or preferences of Culicoides species. Such information could indirectly provide data indicating which reservoirs are significant in associated vector-borne diseases. We positively identified the host species through DNA sequencing of the cytochrome b gene in 144 of the 170 (84.7%) blood meal specimens tested. In the remaining samples, identification of the blood-meal source was unsuccessful, possibly due to the post-ingestion time prior to sampling or the availability of the species-specific cytochrome b gene sequences in the database. The majority of identified blood meals were derived from mammalian blood (95.8%), and only six contained chicken blood. We identified five species as mammalian hosts for Culicoides spp.: sheep (87.7%), human (6.5%), cattle (3.7%) and Savi's Pine Vole (Micrototus savii) (2.1%). The results suggested that large mammals, specifically ruminants, were most frequently fed upon by biting midges (Culicoides spp.), but evidence of opportunistic feeding behaviour was also found. Host feeding behaviour of Culicoides species may also be influenced by the relative abundance of a particular host species in the area being studied. In this sense, Savi's Pine Vole, a wild species, was found to be a locally relevant host and a putative reservoir for viruses transmitted by species of biting midges belonging to the Culicoides genus. Finally, feeding on multiple potential host species was observed. One midge acquired blood meals from human and chicken hosts, while four other midges fed on two different sheep.

  18. Population Genetic Structure and Potential Incursion Pathways of the Bluetongue Virus Vector Culicoides brevitarsis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Australia.

    PubMed

    Tay, W T; Kerr, P J; Jermiin, L S

    2016-01-01

    Culicoides brevitarsis is a vector of the bluetongue virus (BTV), which infects sheep and cattle. It is an invasive species in Australia with an assumed Asian/South East Asian origin. Using one mitochondrial marker (i.e., part of the cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene) and six nuclear markers, we inferred population genetic structure and possible incursion pathways for Australian C. brevitarsis. Nine mitochondrial haplotypes, with low nucleotide sequence diversity (0.0-0.7%) among these, were identified in a sample of 70 individuals from seven sites. Both sets of markers revealed a homogeneous population structure, albeit with evidence of isolation by distance and two genetically distinct clusters distributed along a north-to-south cline. No evidence of a cryptic species complex was found. The geographical distribution of the mitochondrial haplotypes is consistent with at least two incursion pathways into Australia since the arrival of suitable livestock hosts. By contrast, 15 mitochondrial haplotypes, with up to four times greater nucleotide sequence diversity (0.0-2.9%) among these, were identified in a sample of 16 individuals of the endemic C. marksi (sampled from a site in South Australia and another in New South Wales). A phylogenetic tree inferred using the mitochondrial marker revealed that the Australian and Japanese samples of C. brevitarsis are as evolutionarily different from one another as some of the other Australian species (e.g., C. marksi, C. henryi, C. pallidothorax) are. The phylogenetic tree placed four of the species endemic to Australia (C. pallidothorax, C. bundyensis, C. marksi, C. henryi) in a clade, with a fifth such species (C. bunrooensis) sharing a common ancestor with that clade and a clade comprising two Japanese species (C. verbosus, C. kibunensis).

  19. Population Genetic Structure and Potential Incursion Pathways of the Bluetongue Virus Vector Culicoides brevitarsis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Tay, W. T.; Kerr, P. J.; Jermiin, L. S.

    2016-01-01

    Culicoides brevitarsis is a vector of the bluetongue virus (BTV), which infects sheep and cattle. It is an invasive species in Australia with an assumed Asian/South East Asian origin. Using one mitochondrial marker (i.e., part of the cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene) and six nuclear markers, we inferred population genetic structure and possible incursion pathways for Australian C. brevitarsis. Nine mitochondrial haplotypes, with low nucleotide sequence diversity (0.0–0.7%) among these, were identified in a sample of 70 individuals from seven sites. Both sets of markers revealed a homogeneous population structure, albeit with evidence of isolation by distance and two genetically distinct clusters distributed along a north-to-south cline. No evidence of a cryptic species complex was found. The geographical distribution of the mitochondrial haplotypes is consistent with at least two incursion pathways into Australia since the arrival of suitable livestock hosts. By contrast, 15 mitochondrial haplotypes, with up to four times greater nucleotide sequence diversity (0.0–2.9%) among these, were identified in a sample of 16 individuals of the endemic C. marksi (sampled from a site in South Australia and another in New South Wales). A phylogenetic tree inferred using the mitochondrial marker revealed that the Australian and Japanese samples of C. brevitarsis are as evolutionarily different from one another as some of the other Australian species (e.g., C. marksi, C. henryi, C. pallidothorax) are. The phylogenetic tree placed four of the species endemic to Australia (C. pallidothorax, C. bundyensis, C. marksi, C. henryi) in a clade, with a fifth such species (C. bunrooensis) sharing a common ancestor with that clade and a clade comprising two Japanese species (C. verbosus, C. kibunensis). PMID:26771743

  20. Culicoides Latreille biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) of the Dongzhaigang mangrove forest, Hainan Province, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia-Hui; Gopurenko, David; Cai, DU-Cheng; Yang, Ye-Meng; Hu, Rong; Thepparat, Arunrat; Wardhana, April H; Kim, Heung-Chul; Klein, Terry A; Kim, Myung-Soon; Bellis, Glenn A

    2017-01-31

    The biting midge fauna of Dongzhaigang Mangrove Forest, Hainan Province, China was sampled on 14 October 2015 using three methods: a pan light trap operated from dusk until dawn the following morning and sweep net and human landing collections performed between 16:15-17:15 hr. Eight species, including two new records for China, Culicoides palawanensis and C. niphanae, and one new record for Hainan, C. circumbasalis, were collected. A key to assist with identification of specimens of these species is provided. DNA barcodes supported the morphological identification of some of these species and identified the potential presence of cryptic species and/or deep population structure in others. The newly recorded species were morphologically similar to species previously reported from Hainan, highlighting the need for further investigation into the taxonomy of biting midges in this region. Species composition and abundance varied considerably between the three collection techniques suggesting that multiple techniques likely provide a more comprehensive sample of biting midge fauna.

  1. Prevalence of the symbiont Cardinium in Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) vector species is associated with land surface temperature.

    PubMed

    Morag, Neta; Klement, Eyal; Saroya, Yonatan; Lensky, Itamar; Gottlieb, Yuval

    2012-10-01

    Prevalence of infection by bacterial symbionts may reflect their interactions with the host and has been shown to be correlated with environmental factors. Yet, it is still unclear whether infection by symbionts is determined by environmental factors affecting the early or imago stage of the host. Here, we identified and localized the symbiont Candidatus Cardinium hertigii (Bacteroidetes) in sympatric Culicoides biting midge species, examined its abundance, and studied its association with environmental factors. The prevalence of adult infection differed, with 50.7% from C. imicola, 31.4% from C. oxystoma, and 0% from C. schultzei gp., although phylogenetic analyses showed that Cardinium in these species is almost identical. In addition, prevalence of infection differed between climate regions, with lowest prevalence in the arid region and highest prevalence in the Mediterranean region. Multivariate linear regression analysis of Cardinium prevalence together with climatic and satellite imagery data-derived environmental variables revealed that infection prevalence is significantly associated with land surface temperature and explained up to 89.7% of infection prevalence variability. These findings suggest that the observed variation of Cardinium infection of the imago stage of Culicoides may be influenced by environmental conditions during the latter's early developmental stages.

  2. Two new species and new records of biting midges of the genus Culicoides from northwestern Argentina (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    PubMed Central

    Spinelli, Gustavo Ricardo; Aybar, Cecilia Veggiani; Juri, María Julia Dantur; de Grosso, Mercedes Lizarralde; Marino, Pablo Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    The following two new species of Culicoides from the Argentinean Yungas are described, illustrated and placed to subgenus or species group and compared with related congeners: Culicoides calchaqui Spinelli & Veggiani Aybar and Culicoides willinki Spinelli & Veggiani Aybar. Culicoides daedaloides Wirth & Blanton is recorded for the first time for Argentina and Culicoides pseudoheliconiae Felippe-Bauer is firstly mentioned from the northwestern region of the country. PMID:23903973

  3. Morphology and histology of secretory setae in terrestrial larvae of biting midges of the genus Forcipomyia (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Urbanek, Aleksandra; Richert, Malwina; Giłka, Wojciech; Szadziewski, Ryszard

    2011-11-01

    Apneustic larvae of the genus Forcipomyia possess unique secretory setae located on the dorsal surface along the body in two rows, one pair on each thoracic and abdominal segment and two pairs on the head. Morphological and histological studies of secretory setae in fourth instar larvae of Forcipomyia nigra (Winnertz) and Forcipomyia nigrans Remm indicate they are modified mechanoreceptors (sensilla trichodea) in which the trichogen cell is a glandular cell producing a hygroscopic secretion. The cytoplasm of the glandular trichogen cell fills the lumen of a secretory seta, which shows one or more pores on the apex. The cytoplasm contains numerous microtubules responsible for transportation of proteinaceous vesicles, and an extremely large polyploid nucleus typical of gland cells. The main role of the hygroscopic secretion is to moist the body and thus facilitate cuticular respiration.

  4. Foraging range of arthropods with veterinary interest: New insights for Afrotropical Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) using the ring method.

    PubMed

    Bakhoum, M T; Fall, M; Seck, M T; Gardès, L; Fall, A G; Diop, M; Mall, I; Balenghien, T; Baldet, T; Gimonneau, G; Garros, C; Bouyer, J

    2016-05-01

    The identification of blood meal source of arthropod vector species contributes to the understanding of host-vector-pathogen interactions. The aim of the current work was to identify blood meal source in Culicoides biting midge species, biological vectors of internationally important arboviruses of livestock and equids, using a new ecological approach. We examined the correlation between blood meal source identified in engorged Culicoides females collected in a suction light trap and the available vertebrate hosts along four rings (200, 500, 1000 and 2000 m) centered at the trap site and described the foraging range of the three main vector species of veterinary interest present in the study area, Culicoides imicola, Culicoides kingi and Culicoides oxystoma. The study was performed in four sites localized in the Niayes region of Senegal (West Africa) where recent outbreaks of African horse sickness occurred. Blood meal source identification was carried out by species-specific multiplex PCRs with genomic DNA extracted from the abdomen of engorged females collected during nine night collections for twenty-six collections. The four most abundant hosts present in the studied area (horse, cattle, goat and sheep) were surveyed in each ring zone. The blood meal source varied according to Culicoides species and host availability in each site. C. oxystoma and C. imicola females mainly fed on horses readily available at 200 m maximum from the trap location whereas females of C. kingi fed mainly on cattle, at variable distances from the traps (200 to 2000 m). C. oxystoma may also feed on other vertebrates. We discuss the results in relation with the transmission of Culicoides-borne arboviruses and the species dispersion capacities.

  5. Quantifying Dispersal of European Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) Vectors between Farms Using a Novel Mark-Release-Recapture Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kirkeby, Carsten; Bødker, René; Stockmarr, Anders; Lind, Peter; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2013-01-01

    Studying the dispersal of small flying insects such as Culicoides constitutes a great challenge due to huge population sizes and lack of a method to efficiently mark and objectively detect many specimens at a time. We here describe a novel mark-release-recapture method for Culicoides in the field using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) as marking agent without anaesthesia. Using a plate scanner, this detection technique can be used to analyse thousands of individual Culicoides specimens per day at a reasonable cost. We marked and released an estimated 853 specimens of the Pulicaris group and 607 specimens of the Obsoletus group on a cattle farm in Denmark. An estimated 9,090 (8,918–9,260) Obsoletus group specimens and 14,272 (14,194–14,448) Pulicaris group specimens were captured in the surroundings and subsequently analysed. Two (0.3%) Obsoletus group specimens and 28 (4.6%) Pulicaris group specimens were recaptured. The two recaptured Obsoletus group specimens were caught at the release point on the night following release. Eight (29%) of the recaptured Pulicaris group specimens were caught at a pig farm 1,750 m upwind from the release point. Five of these were recaptured on the night following release and the three other were recaptured on the second night after release. This is the first time that movement of Culicoides vectors between farms in Europe has been directly quantified. The findings suggest an extensive and rapid exchange of disease vectors between farms. Rapid movement of vectors between neighboring farms may explain the the high rate of spatial spread of Schmallenberg and bluetongue virus (BTV) in northern Europe. PMID:23630582

  6. Effects of altitude, distance and waves of movement on the dispersal in Australia of the arbovirus vector, Culicoides brevitarsis Kieffer (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Bishop, Alan L; Spohr, Lorraine J; Barchia, Idris M

    2004-10-14

    The dispersal of the biting midge and arbovirus vector Culicoides brevitarsis in the Bellinger, Macleay and Hastings river valleys and up the escarpment of the great dividing range (GDR) of mid-northern coastal New South Wales, Australia, from 1995 to 2003 was studied. The midge moved up these valleys from the endemic coastal plain in at least two waves between October and May, and both waves were modelled. Dispersal time can be explained by direct distance from the coast and the altitude of the sites. Dispersal times due to distance were similar at 18.2 +/- 2.2 (S.D.) and 15.9 +/- 2.6 weeks per 100 km for first- and second-occurrences at fixed altitude. Time of the first wave was extended 0.48 +/- 0.22 weeks for every 100-m rise in altitude and the second by 1.14 +/- 0.24 weeks for every 100-m rise for a set distance. Although C. brevitarsis can move up the escarpment of the GDR (and possibly transmit virus), vector dispersal, survival and establishment at and beyond the top of the range are limited. A third model showed that previously described slower movement of C. brevitarsis up the more-southerly Hunter valley relative to movements down the coastal plain also was related to increasing altitude.

  7. Comparison of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry and molecular biology techniques for identification of Culicoides (Diptera: ceratopogonidae) biting midges in senegal.

    PubMed

    Sambou, Masse; Aubadie-Ladrix, Maxence; Fenollar, Florence; Fall, Becaye; Bassene, Hubert; Almeras, Lionel; Sambe-Ba, Bissoume; Perrot, Nadine; Chatellier, Sonia; Faye, Ngor; Parola, Philippe; Wade, Boubacar; Raoult, Didier; Mediannikov, Oleg

    2015-02-01

    Biting midges of the genus Culicoides are implicated as vectors for a wide variety of pathogens. The morphological identification of these arthropods may be difficult because of a lack of detailed investigation of taxonomy for this species in Africa. However, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) profiling is efficient for arthropod identification at the species level. This study established a spectrum database of Culicoides spp. from Senegal using MALDI-TOF. Identification of Culicoides insects to the species level before mass spectrometry was performed on the basis of morphological characters. MALDI-TOF MS reference spectra were determined for 437 field-caught Culicoides of 10 species. The protein profiles of all tested Culicoides revealed several peaks with mass ranges of 2 to 20 kDa. In a validation study, 72 Culicoides specimens in the target species were correctly identified at the species level with a similarity of 95 to 99.9%. Four Culicoides protein profiles were misidentified. Nevertheless, six SuperSpectra (C. imicola, C. enderleini, C. oxystoma, C. kingi, C. magnus, and C. fulvithorax) were created. Abdomens of midges were used to amplify and sequence a portion of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene (COI). The results obtained using the MALDI-TOF MS method were consistent with the morphological identification and similar to the genetic identification. Protein profiling using MALDI-TOF is an efficient approach for the identification of Culicoides spp., and it is economically advantageous for approaches that require detailed and quantitative information of vector species that are collected in field. The database of African Culicoides MS spectra created is the first database in Africa. The COI sequences of five Culicoides species that were previously noncharacterized using molecular methods were deposited in GenBank.

  8. A survey of biting midges of the genus Culicoides Latreille, 1809 (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in NE Bulgaria, with respect to transmission of avian haemosporidians.

    PubMed

    Bobeva, Aneliya; Zehtindjiev, Pavel; Bensch, Staffan; Radrova, Jana

    2013-12-01

    This study presents data from a molecular survey of the species of the genus Culicoides from the region of Kalimok Field Station (NE Bulgaria) and haemosporidian parasites occurring in them in order to investigate the host-parasite specificity of haemosporidians to their dipteran vectors. The identification of Culicoides spp. was carried out by morphological and molecular-genetic methods. We collected and analysed 230 individuals of the genus Culicoides. Nine species were found. Eight species were identified morphologically; Culicoides obsoletus, C. riethi, C. newsteadi, C. circumscriptus, C. festivipennis, C. punctatus, C. pictipennis and C. puncticollis. The ninth species might be classified as either of C. nubeculosus or C. riethi and its identification needs additional investigations. The total prevalence of Haemoproteus in the examined biting midges was 2.17%. Three individuals of C. pictipennis were infected with the Haemoproteus lineage TURDUS2 (prevalence 16.67%), a common parasite of thrushes (Turdidae). Two individuals of C. circumscriptus contained Haemoproteus lineages (prevalence 2.78%); these were the lineage HAWF2 (previously reported from Coccothraustes coccothraustes) and a new lineage CULCIR1 not previously reported in the literature.

  9. Seasonal dynamics of biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae, Culicoides spp.) on dairy farms of Central Germany during the 2007/2008 epidemic of bluetongue.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Peter-Henning; Stephan, Anja; Bartsch, Stefanie; Jandowsky, Anabell; Hoffmann-Köhler, Peggy; Schein, Eberhard; Mehlitz, Dieter; Bauer, Burkhard

    2009-08-01

    The unforeseen outbreak of bluetongue in north-western Europe in August 2006 raised the question, which Culicoides spp. were involved in the transmission of bluetongue virus (BTV). Based on the decision 2007/20/EU of December 2006, a large-scale entomological surveillance programme was initiated in the five affected EU member states including Germany. This paper reports on the entomological findings obtained from March/April 2007 to May 2008 at 15 sampling sites in the federal states of Lower Saxony (eastern region), Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Brandenburg and Saxony-Anhalt: The number of captured biting midges in one trap varied from none or few Culicoides during winter (December 2007 to April 2008) to up to more than 12,500 individuals during summer and autumn. Catches of the C. obsoletus group were consistently higher than those of the C. pulicaris group. C. imicola, the principal afro-asiatic vector of BTV, was not detected. High numbers of midges were caught inside the cattle sheds. Eleven pools of biting midges were RT-PCR-positive to BTV-8 including pools of non-engorged midges of the C. obsoletus and of the C. pulicaris groups. The first BTV-genome positive pool of midges was detected in August 2007; the remaining genome-positive pools were detected during October and November 2007.

  10. The geographical distribution and first molecular analysis of Culicoides Latreille (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) species in the Southern and Southeastern Turkey during the 2012 outbreak of bovine ephemeral fever.

    PubMed

    Dik, B; Muz, D; Muz, M N; Uslu, U

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated the geographical distribution and molecular analysis of Culicoides species in the Southern and Southeastern Turkey during the 2012 outbreak of bovine ephemeral fever (BEF). The midge specimens caught by Onderstepoort-type light traps from livestock farms were tested for molecular evidence of existence of viral genome. Blood specimens were collected from clinically BEF-suspected acute febrile cattle. Total nucleic acid samples obtained from field specimens were checked against the BEF virus G gene and Culicoides internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS-1) gene. A total of 20,845 Culicoides specimens (20,569 ♀♀, 276 ♂♂) comprising 11 species (Culicoides badooshensis, Culicoides circumscriptus, Culicoides gejgelensis, Culicoides imicola, Culicoides kibunensis, Culicoides longipennis, Culicoides newsteadi, Culicoides nubeculosus, Culicoides odiatus, Culicoides punctatus, Culicoides schultzei, Culicoides spp.) were collected. C. schultzei (18,032) was found as the dominant species and followed by C. imicola (1,857), C. nubeculosus complex (545), and C. circumscriptus (259), respectively. C. kibunensis was identified as new species for this region. PCR positivity of BEF was found 37.14% (13/35) in blood samples whereas no viral genome was obtained from Culicoides specimens. Culicoides spp. ITS-1 gene sequences were analyzed phylogenetically with GenBank ITS-1 sequences. Molecular homology of Culicoides ITS-1 gene was ranged between 62.74 and 71.39%. The results described first molecular detection and phylogenetic analysis of Culicoides ITS-1 gene with reference to the 2012 BEF outbreak in Turkey.

  11. Seasonal abundance of biting midges, Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), collected at cowsheds in the southern part of the Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heung Chul; Bellis, Glenn A; Kim, Myung-Soon; Chong, Sung-Tae; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Park, Jee-Yong; Yeh, Jung-Yong; Klein, Terry A

    2012-06-01

    Black light traps were used to measure the seasonal and geographical distribution of Culicoides spp. (biting midges or no-see-ums) at 9 cowsheds in the southern half of the Republic of Korea (ROK) from June through October 2010. A total of 25,242 Culicoides females (24,852; 98.5%) and males (390; 1.5%) comprising of 9 species were collected. The most commonly collected species was Culicoides punctatus (73.0%) followed by C. arakawae (25.7%), while the remaining 7 species accounted for <1.0% of all Culicoides spp. collected. The mean number of Culicoides spp. collected per trap night (Trap Index [TI]) was highest for C. punctatus (409.3), followed by C. arakawae (144.2), C. tainanus (4.1), C. oxystoma (1.2), C. circumscriptus (0.7), C. homotomus (0.6), C. erairai (0.4), C. kibunensis (0.3), and C. nipponensis (0.04). Peak TIs were observed for C. punctatus (1,188.7) and C. arakawae (539.0) during July and August, respectively. C. punctatus and C. arakawae have been implicated in the transmission of arboviruses and other pathogens of veterinary importance that adversely impact on animal and bird husbandry.

  12. Detection of Leishmania amazonensis and Leishmania braziliensis in Culicoides (Diptera, Ceratopogonidae) in an endemic area of cutaneous leishmaniasis in the Brazilian Amazonia.

    PubMed

    Rebêlo, José Manuel Macário; Rodrigues, Bruno Leite; Bandeira, Maria da Conceição Abreu; Moraes, Jorge Luiz Pinto; Fonteles, Raquel Silva; Pereira, Silma Regina Ferreira

    2016-12-01

    Biting midges in the genus Culicoides act as vectors of arboviruses throughout the world and as vectors of filariasis in Latin America, the Caribbean, and parts of Africa. Although Culicoides spp. are currently not considered to be vectors of Leishmania protozoa, the high abundance of biting midges in areas with active cutaneous leishmaniasis transmission points to the possibility of Culicoides infection by these pathogens. We used PCR to test captured Culicoides species for natural infection with Leishmania spp. We tested 450 Culicoides females, divided into 30 pools of 15 individuals each, as follows: nine pools of C. foxi (135 specimens), seven pools of C. filariferus (105), seven pools of C. insignis (105), five pools of C. ignacioi (75), and two pools of C. flavivenula (30). PCR confirmed the presence of Leishmania braziliensis DNA in C. ignacioi (0.14%), C. insignis (0.14%), and C. foxi (0.11); and Le. amazonensis DNA in C. filariferus (0.14%) and C. flavivenula (0.50%). We conclude that these Culicoides species can be naturally infected, but vector competence and transmission capability must be confirmed in future studies. Our results warrant further investigation into the role of these biting midge species in the leishmaniasis epidemiological cycle.

  13. Is the morphology of Culicoides intersexes parasitized by mermithid nematodes a parasite adaptation? A morphometric approach to Culicoides circumscriptus (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Muñoz, Francesc; Ramoneda, Josep; Pagès, Nonito; Pujol, Nuria; Talavera, Sandra

    2016-03-01

    Mermithidae is a family of endoparasitic nematodes known to cause intersexuality in arthropods. Intersexes of the genus Culicoides parasitized by mermithids have been the object of several studies aiming to describe their particular morphology. Culicoides intersexes are specimens with male genitalia and feminized sexually dimorphic structures, i.e. antennae, mouthparts and wings. To date, these specimens have only been described qualitatively and a quantitative approach supported by statistical analysis is lacking. Here we conduct morphometric analyses of sexually dimorphic structures in a sample of Culicoides circumscriptus that includes 34 intersexes with the aim of describing precisely the intersexual morphology. The morphology of antennae and the mouthparts was studied by multivariate statistical analysis of linear measures, and wing form by implementing geometric morphometrics techniques. While intersex wings proved to have a similar size to male wings, their shape was intermediate between males and females. However, when allometric shape variation was removed, the wing shape of intersexes was almost identical to that of females. The intersex antennae were morphometrically of the female type, especially when size variation was considered. In contrast, the measured mouthparts (the labrum and the third palpal segment) were halfway between males and females, even when body size was considered. Overall, the antennae and the wings showed a higher degree of feminization than the mouthparts. These findings indicate that the degree of feminization depends both on the morphological structure and on body size. Moreover, we propose that the feminization of the wings and antennae has an adaptive meaning for the parasite, which would favor female-like traits in order to access more easily its breeding sites, where the parasite has plenty of new hosts to infect. Female-like antennae would be beneficial to detect these sites, while having female-like wings would favor the host's capacity of dispersal to these sites.

  14. Biting midges of the subfamily Forcipomyiinae (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) from the Middle East, with keys and descriptions of new species.

    PubMed

    Alwin-Kownacka, Alicja; Szadziewski, Ryszard; Szwedo, Jacek

    2016-10-05

    Middle East biting midges of the genera Atrichopogon Kieffer and Forcipomyia Meigen, subfamily Forcipomyiinae Lenz, covering 41 species are reviewed. Two new species are described and illustrated: Forcipomyia (F.) siverekensis Alwin & Szadziewski sp. nov. and Forcipomyia (Microhelea) borkenti Alwin & Szadziewski sp. nov. The list includes 16 species of Atrichopogon and 25 of Forcipomyia. Nine species previously described by Vimmer and Kieffer from the Middle East are treated as nomina dubia and not included in the list.        Keys to identification of Atrichopogon and Forcipomyia species of the Middle East are also provided.

  15. Biting midges of the tribe Ceratopogonini (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) from the Middle East, with keys and descriptions of new species.

    PubMed

    Alwin-Kownacka, Alicja; Szadziewski, Ryszard; Szwedo, Jacek

    2016-02-16

    Middle East predatory biting midges of the tribe Ceratopogonini, covering 22 species of 7 genera are reviewed. Three new species are described and illustrated: Allohelea israelensis Szadziewski & Alwin sp. nov., Kolenohelea levantica Szadziewski & Alwin sp. nov. and Serromyia galilaeae Szadziewski & Alwin sp. nov. The genus Boreohelea Clastrier & Delécolle, 1990 syn. nov. is recognized as a junior synonym of Allohelea Kieffer, 1917. Thysanognathus nilogenes Kieffer, 1925 syn. nov. from Egypt is a junior synonym of Alluaudomyia melanosticta (Ingram & Macfie, 1922). Keys to identification of subfamilies, tribes, genera and species of Ceratopogonini of the Middle East are also provided.

  16. Description of the last instar larva and new contributions to the knowledge of the pupa of Dasyhelea mediomunda Minaya (Diptera, Culicomorpha, Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Díaz, Florentina; Anjos-Santos, Danielle; Funes, Amparo; Ronderos, María M

    2016-01-01

    The fourth instar larva of Dasyhelea mediomunda Minaya is described for the first time and a complete description of the pupa is provided, through use of phase-contrast microscope and scanning electron microscope. Studied specimens were collected in a pond connected to a small wetland "mallin" on the Patagonian steppe, Chubut province, Argentina.

  17. Composition and antimicrobial activity of fatty acids detected in the hygroscopic secretion collected from the secretory setae of larvae of the biting midge Forcipomyia nigra (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Urbanek, Aleksandra; Szadziewski, Ryszard; Stepnowski, Piotr; Boros-Majewska, Joanna; Gabriel, Iwona; Dawgul, Małgorzata; Kamysz, Wojciech; Sosnowska, Danuta; Gołębiowski, Marek

    2012-09-01

    The hygroscopic secretion produced by the secretory setae of terrestrial larvae of the biting midge Forcipomyia nigra (Winnertz) was analysed using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The viscous secretion is stored at the top of each seta and absorbs water from moist air. GC-MS analyses (four independent tests) showed that the secretion contained 12 free fatty acids, the most abundant of which were oleic (18:1), palmitic (16:0), palmitoleic (16:1) and linoleic (18:2). Other acids identified were valeric (5:0), enanthic (7:0), caprylic (8:0), pelargonic (9:0), capric (10:0), lauric (12:0), myristic (14:0) and stearic (18:0). Two other compounds, glycerol and pyroglutamic acid, were also found. The antibacterial activity of the fatty acids and pyroglutamic acid was tested using the agar disc diffusion method and targeted Gram positive (Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Enterococcus faecalis) and Gram negative bacterial strains (Citrobacter freundii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens). The antifungal activity was tested by determining minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of examined compounds. Fatty acids were tested against enthomopathogenic fungi (Paecilomyces lilacinus, Paecilomyces fumosoroseus, Lecanicillium lecanii, Metarhizium anisopliae, Beauveria bassiana (Tve-N39), Beauveria bassiana (Dv-1/07)). The most effective acids against bacterial and fungal growth were C(9:0), C(10:0) and C(16:1), whereas C(14:0), C(16:0,) C(18:0) and C(18:1) demonstrated rather poor antifungal activity and did not inhibit the growth of bacteria. The antimicrobial assay investigated mixtures of fatty and pyroglutamic acids (corresponding to the results of each GC-MS test): they were found to be active against almost all the bacteria except P. fluorescens and also demonstrated certain fungistatic activity against enthomopathogenic fungi. The hygroscopic secretion facilitates cuticular respiration and plays an important role in the antimicrobial protection of F. nigra larvae living in moist terrestrial habitats.

  18. A comparison of a new centrifuge sugar flotation technique with the agar method for the extraction of immature Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) life stages from salt marsh soils.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two sampling techniques, agar extraction (AE) and centrifuge sugar flotation extraction (CSFE) were compared to determine their relative efficacy to recover immature stages of Culicoides spp from salt marsh substrates. Three types of samples (seeded with known numbers of larvae, homogenized field s...

  19. Distribution (presence / absence) of Culicoides Sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Nebraska, South Dakota, and North Dakota: Clarifying the Epidemiology of Bluetongue Disease in the North-Central United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presence or absence of the biting midge, Culicoides sonorensis, a primary vector of bluetongue viruses (BTV) in North America, was assessed on ranches and farms across the north-central region of the United States (U.S.), specifically the states of Nebraska, South Dakota, and North Dakota, as pa...

  20. Record of two species of Culicoides (Diptera, Ceratopogonidae) new for Madagascar and molecular study showing the paraphylies of the subgenus Oecacta and the Schultzei group.

    PubMed

    Augot, D; Randrianambinintsoa, F J; Gasser, A; Depaquit, J

    2013-08-01

    Culicoides are vectors of diseases of Veterinary Medicine importance (bluetongue, African horse sickness, Schmallenberg virus) all over the world. In the present study, we report two species new for Madagascar: C. nevilli and C. enderleini. They belong to the Schultzei group which is sometimes classified in the subgenus Oecacta and sometimes in the subgenus Remmia, depending on authors. Consequently, we carried out a molecular cladistics of these groups based on cytochrome C oxidase subunit I mtDNA sequences. We processed the Malagasy specimens and some C. furens (the Oecacta type-species) caught in Florida and we analyzed their sequences and those available in Genbank: C. schultzei, C. oxystoma, C. festivipennis, C. brunnicans, C. kibunensis, C. truncorum and C. vexans. C. (Avaritia) imicola have been selected as an outgroup. The maximum parsimony analysis showed the paraphylies of the Schultzei group (=Remmia) and of the subgenus Oecacta if the first group is excluded from the latter. Our results underline the doubtful current classification and need to be validated by other molecular markers in the future.

  1. Detection of bluetongue virus RNA in field-collected Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) following the discovery of bluetongue virus serotype 1 in white-tailed deer and cattle in Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Becker, M E; Reeves, W K; Dejean, S K; Emery, M P; Ostlund, E N; Foil, L D

    2010-03-01

    In November 2004, bluetongue virus (family Reoviridae, genus Orbivirus, BTV) serotype 1 (BTV-1) was detected for the first time in the United States from a hunter-killed deer in St. Mary Parish, LA. In 2005, sera surveys were conducted on three cattle farms near the area where the deer was found, and BTV-1-seropositive cattle were found on two of the three farms; in 2006, sera surveys from the cattle on the three farms did not detect any BTV-1-positive animals. The purpose of this study was to survey ceratopogonid populations at the three farms and test field-collected specimens for the presence of BTV and epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (family Reoviridae, genus Orbivirus, EHDV). Miniature CDC light traps and New Jersey traps were used to capture ceratopogonids on the three farms from January 2006 through November 2007. In total, 3,319 ceratopogonids were captured, including 1,790 specimens of 10 different species of Culicoides. IR-RT-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed to screen for BTV and EHDV in 264 pools representing 2,309 specimens collected at the farms. All positive samples were sequenced for serotype determination. Five pools of 275 (1.8%) were positive for BTV. Pools of four species of Culicoides were found to be positive: Culicoides crepuscularis (Malloch), Culicoides debilipalpis Lutz (two pools), Culicoides haematopotus Malloch, and Gulicoidesfurens (Poey). The amplicons of the positive specimens were sequenced and found to be identical to both BTV-17 and BTV-13. During our study, no BTV-1 transmission was detected in cattle, and no BTV-1 was detected in specimens of ceratopogonids.

  2. Detection of bluetongue virus RNA in field-collected Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) following the discovery of bluetongue virus serotype 1 in white-tailed deer and cattle in Louisiana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In November 2004, bluetongue virus (family Reoviridae, genus Orbivirus, BTV) serotype 1 (BTV-1) was detected for the first time in the United States from a hunter-killed deer in St. Mary Parish, LA. In 2005, sera surveys were conducted on three cattle farms near the area where the deer was found, an...

  3. The salivary secretome of the biting midge, Culicoides sonorensis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are hematophagous insects with over 1400 species distributed throughout the world. Many of these species are of particular agricultural importance as primary vectors of bluetongue, epizootic hemorrhagic disease and Schmallenberg viruses. Detailed s...

  4. Evaluation of Propane Combustion Traps for the Collection of Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) in Southern Israel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    Ceratopogonidae) biting midges (Cilek and Hallmon 2005, Cilek et al. 2003) in the U.S.; some Lutzomyia have been collaterally collected. To our...Ashbel 1951). Average daily temperature is 20° C from the end of September to Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public

  5. Understanding and exploiting olfaction for the surveillance and control of Culicoides biting midges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Culicoides midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are found worldwide with the exception of only a few countries including New Zealand, Patagonia, the Hawaiian Isles and Antarctica. They are a nuisance pest to human beings, but transmit a number of diseases that mainly affect livestock. Like many haema...

  6. Studying Culicoides vectors of BTV in the post-genomic era: resources, bottlenecks to progress and future directions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are a major vector group responsible for the biological transmission of a wide variety of globally significant arboviruses, including bluetongue virus (BTV). In this review we examine current biological resources for the study of this genus, with a...

  7. Management of North American Culicoides biting midges: Current knowledge and research needs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are biological vectors of two important viruses infecting North American ruminants: bluetongue (BTV) and epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHDV). While these viruses have been identified for over 60 years, we still lack an adequate understanding of t...

  8. Biosystematics of Larval Movement of Central American Mosquitoes and its Use for Field Identification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    head, resulting in lateral pro- = semisymmetric; A = anopheline. gression of the larva. Linley’s (1986) excellent analysis of movement in Culicoides ...1986. Swimming behavior of the larva of of their patterns of movement should provide Culicoides variipennis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) experience...i[ | I i 218 JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MOSQUITO CONTROL ASSOCIATION VOL. 5, No. 2 ing host selection and successful parasitism of Aedes 90:484-494. spp

  9. The influence of host number on the attraction of biting midges, Culicoides spp., to light traps.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Saenz, A; McCarter, P; Baylis, M

    2011-03-01

    A preliminary study was undertaken to investigate how the number of sheep below a light-suction trap affects the number of female Culicoides obsoletus Meigen (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) caught. As the number of sheep increased from zero to three, the number of midges caught increased, but there appeared to be no further increase when six sheep were used. The lack of increase between three and six sheep is attributable to different activity rates on certain nights, perhaps in response to weather, and suggests, therefore, that catches in light traps increase linearly with sheep numbers, at least for small host numbers.

  10. Species diversity and seasonal abundance of Culicoides biting midges in northwestern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Aybar, C A Veggiani; Juri, M J Dantur; De Grosso, M S Lizarralde; Spinelli, G R

    2010-03-01

    The species diversity and seasonal abundance of biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) were studied in northwestern Argentina during the period 2003-2005. A total of 5437 Culicoides specimens were collected using CDC light traps in three areas of the mountainous rainforest area. The most common species were Culicoides paraensis (Goeldi) and C. insignis Lutz, Culicoides lahillei (Iches), C. venezuelensis Ortiz & Mirsa, C. debilipalpis Lutz and C. crescentis Wirth & Blanton were also collected. Culicoides paraensis was abundant during the summer, and C. insignis and C. lahillei during late summer and early fall. Accumulated rainfall was the climatic variable most related to fluctuation in abundance of C. paraensis.

  11. Impact of freezing on the emergence of Culicoides chiopterus and Culicoides dewulfi from bovine dung.

    PubMed

    Steinke, S; Lühken, R; Kiel, E

    2015-04-15

    The emergence of Culicoides chiopterus (Meigen), 1830 and C. dewulfi Goetghebuer, 1936 (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) from cowpats in northwestern Germany was investigated. In order to investigate the survival of both species at low temperatures, cowpat subsamples were frozen for 48h at -18 and -21°C. Emergence from frozen and non-frozen samples was compared. The number of emerging adults of C. chiopterus from samples frozen at -18°C was greatly reduced and no emergence was observed from samples frozen at -21°C. No adult C. dewulfi emerged from frozen samples, suggesting this species is less resistant to these temperatures, compared to C. chiopterus.

  12. Spatial feeding preferences of ornithophilic mosquitoes, blackflies and biting midges.

    PubMed

    Cerný, O; Votýpka, J; Svobodová, M

    2011-03-01

    The section of habitat used by particular bloodsucking insects when seeking bloodmeals may influence the spectrum of hosts to which they have access and consequently the diseases they transmit. The vertical distribution of ornithophilic bloodsucking Diptera (Culicidae, Simuliidae and Ceratopogonidae) was studied using bird-baited traps set at both ground and tree canopy levels. In total, 1240 mosquito females of eight species, 1201 biting midge females of 11 species, and 218 blackfly females of two species were captured during 2003-2005. Culex pipiens (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae) was found to prefer ground-level habitats, whereas Anopheles plumbeus (Stephens) (Diptera: Culicidae), biting midges [Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)] and Eusimulium angustipes (Edwards) (Diptera: Simuliidae) preferred the canopy. The results of this study with regard to Cx. pipiens behaviour differ from those of most previous studies and may indicate different spatial feeding preferences in geographically separate populations. The occurrence of E. angustipes in the canopy is concordant with its role in the transmission of avian trypanosomes. These findings may be important for surveillance programmes focusing on ornithophilic Diptera which transmit various pathogenic agents.

  13. Insects as vectors: systematics and biology.

    PubMed

    Rodhain, F

    2015-04-01

    Among the many complex relationships between insects and microorganisms such as viruses, bacteria and parasites, some have resulted in the establishment of biological systems within which the insects act as a biological vector for infectious agents. It is therefore advisable to understand the identity and biology of these vectors in depth, in order to define procedures for epidemiological surveillance and anti-vector control. The following are successively reviewed in this article: Anoplura (lice), Siphonaptera (fleas), Heteroptera (bugs: Cimicidae, Triatoma, Belostomatidae), Psychodidae (sandflies), Simuliidae (black flies), Ceratopogonidae (biting midges), Culicidae (mosquitoes), Tabanidae (horseflies) and Muscidae (tsetse flies, stable flies and pupipara). The authors provide a rapid overview of the morphology, systematics, development cycle and bio-ecology of each of these groups of vectors. Finally, their medical and veterinary importance is briefly reviewed.

  14. Evaluation of in vitro methods for assessment of infection of Australian Culicoides spp. with bluetongue viruses.

    PubMed

    Van der Saag, Matthew; Nicholas, Adrian; Ward, Michael; Kirkland, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Biting midges from the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are the vectors of several globally important arboviruses that affect livestock. These include orbiviruses from the bluetongue virus (BTV) and African horse sickness virus (AHSV) groups and members of the Simbu serogroup of orthobunyaviruses, such as the recently emerged Schmallenberg virus. In this article, the authors evaluate several methods for feeding wild‑caught Australian Culicoides on BTV infected preparations of blood and sucrose. Feeding Culicoides on the membrane of embryonated chicken eggs was identified as the preferred feeding method. Although, cotton wool pads soaked in either virus‑infected blood or virus‑sucrose mixtures were also successful. A non‑destructive nucleic acid extraction technique for the detection of viral RNA in Culicoides was also evaluated as it allows for readily differentiating infected from non‑infected Culicoides.

  15. Biting Midges of the Genus Culicoides in South Carolina Zoos

    PubMed Central

    Nelder, Mark P.; Swanson, Dustin A.; Adler, Peter H.; Grogan, William L.

    2010-01-01

    Biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) were collected during the summer of 2007 at the Greenville and Riverbanks Zoos in South Carolina with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) traps equipped with ultraviolet or incandescent lights and baited with carbon dioxide. Sixteen species of Culicoides were collected, four of which represented more than 80%. They were Culicoides guttipennis (Coquillett), Culicoides mulrenanni Beck, Culicoides obsoletus (Meigen), and Culicoides sanguisuga (Coquillett). C. guttipennis was found on a dead colobus monkey and a dead golden-headed lion tamarin; Culicoides husseyi Wirth & Blanton was collected from an unidentified, abandoned bird's nest. Ultraviolet light-equipped traps captured significantly more Culicoides specimens than traps with incandescent light. Half of the collected species previously have been associated with vertebrate pathogens, indicating a potential risk to captive animals. PMID:20569132

  16. The spatio-temporal distribution patterns of biting midges of the genus Culicoides in Salta province, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Aybar, Cecilia A Veggiani; Juri, María J Dantur; Santana, Mirta; de Grosso, Mercedes S Lizarralde; Spinelli, Gustavo R

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this survey was to analyze the spatio-temporal distribution patterns of Culicoides Latreille species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) and their relationship with environmental variables in Salta, northwestern Argentina. Culicoides were collected monthly from January 2003 through December 2005. The influence of the climatic variables on population abundance was analyzed with a multilevel Poisson regression. A total of 918 specimens belonging to five species were collected. The most abundant species was Culicoides paraensis Goeldi (65.5%), followed by Culicoides lahillei Iches (14.6%) and Culicoides debilipalpis Lutz (7.6%). The highest seasonal abundance for C. paraensis, C. debilipalpis and C. lahillei occurred during the spring and summer. A Poisson regression analysis showed that the mean maximum and minimum temperature and the mean maximum and minimum humidity were the variables with the greatest influence on the population abundance of Culicoides species.

  17. Behavioral and catastrophic drift of invertebrates in two streams in northeastern Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wangsness, David J.; Peterson, David A.

    1980-01-01

    Invertebrate drift samples were collected in August 1977 from two streams in the Powder River structural basin in northeastern Wyoming. The streams are Clear Creek, a mountain stream, and the Little Powder River, a plains stream. Two major patterns of drift were recognized. Clear Creek was sampled during a period of normal seasonal conditions. High drift rates occurred during the night indicating a behavioral drift pattern that is related to the benthic invertebrate density and carrying capacity of the stream substrates. The mayfly genes Baetis, a common drift organism, dominated the peak periods of drift in Clear Creek. The Little Powder River has a high discharge during the study period. Midge larvae of the families Chironomidae and Ceratopogonidae, ususally not common in drift, dominated the drift community. The dominance of midge larvae, the presence of several other organisms not common in drift, and the high discharge during the study period caused a catastrophic drift pattern. (USGS)

  18. Phylogenetic relationships of the Culicomorpha inferred from 18S and 5.8S ribosomal DNA sequences. (Diptera:Nematocera).

    PubMed

    Miller, B R; Crabtree, M B; Savage, H M

    1997-05-01

    We investigated the evolutionary origins of the mosquito family Culicidae by examination of 18S and 5.8S ribosomal gene sequence divergence. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that within the infraorder Culicomorpha, taxa in the families Corethrellidae, Chaoboridae and Culicidae formed a monophyletic group; there was support for a sister relationship between this lineage and a representative of the Chironomidae. A chaoborid midge was the closest relative of the mosquitoes. Taxa from four genera of mosquitoes formed a monophyletic group; lack of a spacer in the 5.8S gene was unique to members of the Culicidae. A member of the genus Anopheles formed the most basal lineage among the mosquitoes analysed. Phylogenetic relationships were unresolved for representatives in the families Dixidae, Simuliidae and Ceratopogonidae.

  19. Attempted mechanical transmission of lumpy skin disease virus by biting insects.

    PubMed

    Chihota, C M; Rennie, L F; Kitching, R P; Mellor, P S

    2003-09-01

    The mosquitoes Anopheles stephensi Liston and Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae), the stable fly Stomoxys calcitrans Linnaeus (Diptera: Muscidae) and the biting midge Culicoides nubeculosus Meigen (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) were allowed to feed on either lumpy skin disease (LSD) infected animals or through a membrane on a bloodmeal containing lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV). These arthropods were then allowed to refeed on susceptible cattle at various intervals after the infective feed. Virus was detected in the insects by polymerase chain reaction immediately after feeding and at sufficiently high titre to enable transmission to occur. However, no transmission of virus from infected to susceptible animals by An. stephensi, S. calcitrans, C. nubeculosus and Cx. quinquefasciatus was observed.

  20. The Spatio-Temporal Distribution Patterns of Biting Midges of the Genus Culicoides in Salta Province, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Aybar, Cecilia A. Veggiani; Juri, María J. Dantur; Santana, Mirta; de Grosso, Mercedes S. Lizarralde; Spinelli, Gustavo R.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this survey was to analyze the spatio-temporal distribution patterns of Culicoides Latreille species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) and their relationship with environmental variables in Salta, northwestern Argentina. Culicoides were collected monthly from January 2003 through December 2005. The influence of the climatic variables on population abundance was analyzed with a multilevel Poisson regression. A total of 918 specimens belonging to five species were collected. The most abundant species was Culicoides paraensis Goeldi (65.5%), followed by Culicoides lahillei Iches (14.6%) and Culicoides debilipalpis Lutz (7.6%). The highest seasonal abundance for C. paraensis, C. debilipalpis and C. lahillei occurred during the spring and summer. A Poisson regression analysis showed that the mean maximum and minimum temperature and the mean maximum and minimum humidity were the variables with the greatest influence on the population abundance of Culicoides species. PMID:23461794

  1. The Aquatic Communities Inhabiting Internodes of Two Sympatric Bamboos in Argentinean Subtropical Forest

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Raúl E.

    2013-01-01

    In order to determine if phytotelmata in sympatric bamboos of the genus Guadua might be colonized by different types of arthropods and contain communities of different complexities, the following objectives were formulated: (1) to analyze the structure and species richness of the aquatic macroinvertebrate communities, (2) to comparatively analyze co-occurrences; and (3) to identify the main predators. Field studies were conducted in a subtropical forest in Argentina, where 80 water-filled bamboo internodes of Guadua chacoensis (Rojas Acosta) Londoño and Peterson (Poales: Poaceae) and G. trinii (Nees) Nees and Rupr. were sampled. Morphological measurements indicated that G. chacoensis held more fluid than G. trinii. The communities differed between Guadua species, but many macroinvertebrate species used both bamboo species. The phytotelmata were mainly colonized by Diptera of the families Culicidae and Ceratopogonidae. PMID:24224775

  2. Toward development of neem-based repellents against the Scottish Highland biting midge Culicoides impunctatus.

    PubMed

    Blackwell, A; Evans, K A; Strang, R H C; Cole, M

    2004-12-01

    Oil of neem, from the tree Azadirachta indica A. Juss (Meliaceae), was evaluated for repellent and antifeedant activity against Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), by three complementary methods with serial dilutions. Electroantennograms revealed the sensitivity of Culicoides nubeculosus (Meigen) females to neem > or = 0.10%. Culicoides impunctatus Goetghebuer females were repelled by > or = 1% in a Y-tube olfactometer, Using a membrane feeder for wild-caught parous females of C. impunctatus, the proportion blood-feeding was significantly reduced by topical applications of neem oil > or = 0.10% concentrations, with blood-feeding completely prevented by > or =1%. On the basis of these response data, we developed 2% neem-based formulations for personal protection against biting midges.

  3. Trichomycetes living in the guts of aquatic insects of Misiones and Tierra del Fuego, Argentina.

    PubMed

    López Lastra, Claudia C; Scorsetti, Ana C; Marti, Gerardo A; Coscarón, Sixto

    2005-01-01

    Fourteen species of Trichomycetes living in the guts of aquatic insects are reported from two provinces of Argentina, Misiones and Tierra del Fuego. Twelve of the species belong to the Harpellales and two are Amoebidiales. Five harpellid species are reported from Misiones in the extreme northeast of the country (Genistellospora homothallica, Harpella tica, Smittium culisetae, Smittium sp., Stachylina sp.) and seven are from Tierra del Fuego, the southern tip of South America (H. meridianalis, Glotzia sp., S. culicis, S. cellaspora, S. imitatum, Stachylina minima, Penella simulii). Insect hosts all were immature stages of Culicidae, Simuliidae, Chironomidae, Ceratopogonidae (Insecta: Diptera), and Ephemeroptera and Plecoptera. The lower diversity of Trichomycetes found at Misiones, which has a subtropical climate and rainforest vegetation, was due possibly to the warmer temperatures of the water (15-24 C), compared to the colder streams of Tierra del Fuego (9-15 C), with forests and steppes as typical vegetation.

  4. Pulmonary localization of Mansonella perstans in a 16 months-old male patient in a tertiary care hospital in Bukavu, Democratic Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    Kabego, Landry; Kasengi, Joe Bwija; Mirindi, Patrick; Ruhanya, Vurayai; Lupande, David; Bulabula, André; Ngoma, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Mansonella perstans is a human filarial parasite transmitted by biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) belonging to the genus Culicoides and it is widely spread in sub-Saharan Africa. While most cases are asymptomatic, mansonelliasis can be associated with angioedema, arthralgia, swellings, pain in the scrotum or in serous cavities such as the pleura, the peritoneum, the pericardium, etc. Mansonelliasis can be really hard to treat, but it has been shown that an intensive treatment using albendazole can clear the parasite. Case report Here we describe a case of a 16 months-old malnourished child with pneumonia due to M. perstans in the east of the Democratic Republic of Congo. Conclusion Although our investigations confirmed M. perstans infection, this case shows that it is very difficult to come to a conclusive diagnosis. PMID:28053918

  5. The salivary secretome of the biting midge, Culicoides sonorensis

    PubMed Central

    Lehiy, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are hematophagous insects with over 1400 species distributed throughout the world. Many of these species are of particular agricultural importance as primary vectors of bluetongue and Schmallenberg viruses, yet little is known about Culicoides genomics and proteomics. Detailed studies of members from other blood-feeding Dipteran families, including those of mosquito (Culicidae) and black fly (Simuliidae), have shown that protein components within the insect’s saliva facilitate the blood feeding process. To determine the protein components in Culicoides sonorensis midges, secreted saliva was collected for peptide sequencing by tandem mass spectrometry. Forty-five secreted proteins were identified, including members of the D7 odorant binding protein family, Kunitz-like serine protease inhibitors, maltase, trypsin, and six novel proteins unique to C. sonorensis. Identifying the complex myriad of proteins in saliva from blood-feeding Dipteran species is critical for understanding their role in blood feeding, arbovirus transmission, and possibly the resulting disease pathogenesis. PMID:24949243

  6. Impact of experimental flooding on larvae and pupae of dung-breeding Culicoides.

    PubMed

    Steinke, S; Lühken, R; Kiel, E

    2016-10-01

    Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) spend the greatest part of their life in the larval stage. However, knowledge on the immature stages and the impact of abiotic factors on their development is still poor. Therefore, we investigated the effect of flooding on the larvae and pupae of Culicoides chiopterus (Meigen, 1830) and C. dewulfi Goetghebuer, 1936. In water, the larvae of both species showed head-to-tail flexions and sinuous flexions, at slow rates, but were not able to swim. Flooding of larvae for 24 h did not affect the number of emerging adults; flooding of pupae significantly reduced the emergence rate of C. chiopterus, compared to the control group, while C. dewulfi was not affected. Pupae were not able to float and no pupae survived flooding for 10 days. After flooding of larvae for 10 days, 50 % of C. chiopterus and 4 % of C. dewulfi completed the pre-adult development. During this treatment, 84 % of C. chiopterus and 48 % of C. dewulfi larvae pupated in water.

  7. Collection of Culicoides spp. with four light trap models during different seasons in the Balearic Islands.

    PubMed

    del Río, R; Monerris, M; Miquel, M; Borràs, D; Calvete, C; Estrada, R; Lucientes, J; Miranda, M A

    2013-07-01

    Bluetongue (BT) is a viral disease that affects ruminants, being especially pathogenic in certain breeds of sheep. Its viral agent (bluetongue virus; BTV) is transmitted by several species of Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). Different models of suction light traps are being used in a number of countries for the collection of BTV vector species. To determine the relative effectiveness of different light traps under field conditions, four traps (Onderstepoort, Mini-CDC, Rieb and Pirbright) were compared. These traps were rotated between four sites on a cattle farm in Mallorca (Balearic Islands, Spain) for several non-consecutive nights. Results showed remarkable disparities in the efficacy of the traps for the collection of Culicoides midges. The highest number of midges collected in the Onderstepoort trap (x¯±SD=62±94.2) was not significantly different from that collected in the Mini-CDC (x¯±SD=58±139.2). The Rieb trap collected the lowest number of midges (x¯±SD=3±4.0). Significantly higher mean numbers of midges were collected in the Onderstepoort than in either the Pirbright (P=0.002) or Rieb traps (P=0.008). There were also differences in the Culicoides species composition as determine with the various traps. These results indicate that the Onderstepoort or Mini-CDC traps will be more effective than either the Rieb or Pirbright traps for the collection of large numbers of Culicoides midges.

  8. First detection of endosymbiotic bacteria in biting midges Culicoides pulicaris and Culicoides punctatus, important Palaearctic vectors of bluetongue virus.

    PubMed

    Lewis, S E; Rice, A; Hurst, G D D; Baylis, M

    2014-12-01

    Heritable bacteria have been highlighted as important components of vector biology, acting as required symbionts with an anabolic role, altering competence for disease transmission, and affecting patterns of gene flow by altering cross compatibility. In this paper, we tested eight U.K. species of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) midge for the presence of five genera of endosymbiotic bacteria: Cardinium (Bacteroidales: Bacteroidaceae); Wolbachia (Rickettsiales: Rickettsiaceae); Spiroplasma (Entomoplasmatales: Spiroplasmataceae); Arsenophonus (Enterobacteriales: Enterobacteriaceae), and Rickettsia (Rickettsiales: Rickettsiaceae). Cardinium spp. were detected in both sexes of Culicoides pulicaris and Culicoides punctatus, two known vectors of bluetongue virus. Cardinium spp. were not detected in any other species, including the Culicoides obsoletus group, the main vector of bluetongue and Schmallenberg viruses in northern Europe. The other endosymbionts were not detected in any Culicoides species. The Cardinium strain detected in U.K. Culicoides species is very closely related to the Candidatus Cardinium hertigii group C, previously identified in Culicoides species in Asia. Further, we infer that the symbiont is not a sex ratio distorter and shows geographic variation in prevalence within a species. Despite its detection in several species of Culicoides that vector arboviruses worldwide, the absence of Cardinium in the C. obsoletus group suggests that infections of these symbionts may not be necessary to the arboviral vector competence of biting midges.

  9. Estimating Culicoides sonorensis biting midge abundance using digital image analysis.

    PubMed

    Osborne, C J; Mayo, C E; Mullens, B A; Maclachlan, N J

    2014-12-01

    ImageJ is an open-source software tool used for a variety of scientific objectives including cell counting, shape analysis and image correction. This technology has previously been used to estimate mosquito abundance in surveillance efforts. However, the utility of this application for estimating abundance or parity in the surveillance of Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) has not yet been tested. Culicoides sonorensis (Wirth and Jones), a biting midge often measuring 2.0-2.5 mm in length, is an economically important vector of ruminant arboviruses in California. Current surveillance methods use visual sorting for the characteristics of midges and are very time-intensive for large studies. This project tested the utility of ImageJ as a tool to assist in gross trap enumeration as well as in parity analysis of C. sonorensis in comparison with traditional visual methods of enumeration using a dissecting microscope. Results confirmed that automated counting of midges is a reliable means of approximating midge numbers under certain conditions. Further evaluation confirmed accurate and time-efficient parity analysis in comparison with hand sorting. The ImageJ software shows promise as a tool that can assist and expedite C. sonorensis surveillance. Further, these methods may be useful in other insect surveillance activities.

  10. Sticky-trapping biting midges (Culicoides spp.) alighting on cattle and sheep: effects of trap colour and evidence for host preference.

    PubMed

    Thompson, G M; Jess, S; Gordon, A W; Murchie, A K

    2014-08-01

    Sticky traps were mounted on heifers and sheep to assess Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) host preference. Initially, four coloured 200-cm(2) sticky traps (white, clear, yellow and blue) were attached to the backs of each of ten Friesian heifers that were released into open pasture for 24 h, repeated on six occasions. More Obsoletus group Culicoides were caught on the white and clear traps than on the yellow and blue. Trap position on the right or left flank also affected midge catch, probably due to heifer orientation in the field. Next, six Friesian heifers and six Charollais hoggets each had one clear and one white sticky strap attached to their backs for one 24-h period per week, repeated for 24 weeks. Overall, Obsoletus group Culicoides comprised 91.8% (n = 5, 955) of the midge catch but there was no evidence of host preference, either discounting or including host live weight in the analyses. However, Pulicaris group Culicoides did demonstrate a significant host preference for sheep, providing that the analysis was adjusted for live weight. On heifers, the Pulicaris group comprised 7.5% of biting midges caught, whereas on hoggets, it comprised 12.7%.

  11. Phenotypic differentiation and phylogenetic signal of wing shape in western European biting midges, Culicoides spp., of the subgenus Avaritia.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Muñoz, F; Talavera, S; Carpenter, S; Nielsen, S A; Werner, D; Pagès, N

    2014-09-01

    In the past decade biting midges of the subgenus Avaritia (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) have been popular subjects of applied entomological studies in Europe owing to their implication as biological vectors in outbreaks of bluetongue and Schmallenberg viruses. This study uses a combination of cytochrome oxidase subunit I barcode sequencing and geometric morphometric analyses to investigate wing shape as a means to infer species identification within this subgenus. In addition the congruence of morphological data with different phylogenetic hypotheses is tested. Five different species of the subgenus Avaritia were considered in the study (C. obsoletus (Meigen); C. scoticus Kettle and Lawson; C. chiopterus (Meigen); C. dewulfi Goetghebuer and C. imicola (Kieffer)). The study demonstrated that over 90% of individuals could be separated correctly into species by their wing shape and that patterns of morphological differentiation derived from the geometric morphometric analyses were congruent with phylogenies generated from sequencing data. Morphological data produced are congruent with monophyly of the subgenus Avaritia and the exclusion of C. dewulfi from the group containing C. obsoletus, C. scoticus and C. chiopterus. The implications of these results and their importance in a wider context of integrating multiple data types to interpret both phylogeny and species characterization is discussed.

  12. The oral susceptibility of South African field populations of Culicoides to African horse sickness virus.

    PubMed

    Venter, G J; Wright, I M; Van Der Linde, T C; Paweska, J T

    2009-12-01

    Twenty-two isolates of African horse sickness virus (AHSV), representing its distinct serotypes, geographical and historical origins, were fed to three populations of South African livestock-associated Culicoides spp. (Diptera, Ceratopogonidae). Infective blood meals included 12 recent isolates, nine historical reference strains and one live attenuated vaccine strain serotype 7 (AHSV-7) of the virus. Field-collected midges were fed through a chicken-skin membrane on sheep blood spiked with one of the viruses, which concentrations ranged from 5.4 to 8.8 log(10)TCID(50)/mL of blood. After 10 days incubation at 23.5 degrees C, AHSV was isolated from 11 Culicoides species. Standard in vitro passaging of AHSV-7, used for the preparation of live attenuated vaccine, did not reduce its ability to infect Culicoides species. Virus recovery rates in orally infected Culicoides midges differed significantly between species and populations, serotypes, isolates and seasons. Significant variations in oral susceptibility recorded in this study emphasize a complex inter-relationship between virus and vector, which is further influenced by multiple intrinsic and extrinsic factors. As it is not possible to standardize all these factors under laboratory conditions, conclusive assessment of the role of field-collected Culicoides midges in the transmission of orbiviruses remains problematic. Nevertheless, results of this study suggest the potential for multi-vector transmission of AHSV virus in South Africa.

  13. Meteorological conditions and land cover as predictors for the prevalence of Bluetongue virus in the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region of Mainland China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Qin, Hongyu; Xiao, Jianhua; Wang, Hongbin

    2017-03-01

    Bluetongue is a major disease of economic importance that affects ruminants worldwide. It is transmitted by species of Culicoides midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). The Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region is one of the main pastoral areas for farmed sheep in Mainland China and, because of its large area, represents an ideal candidate region for the study of Bluetongue virus (BTV) distribution and prevalence characteristics. The present study conducted a detailed investigation into the spatial patterns of BTV transmission in sheep in the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, and assessed the inter-relationships between meteorological factors, land cover and the transmission of the virus was conducted. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used for the determination of BTV infection in the surveyed animals. Between June 2013 and February 2015, 6199 sheep were subjected to virus detection and 2199 sheep (35.47%) were determined to be positive for BTV. Subsequently, a maximum entropy model (MaxEnt) was used to investigate the relationship between land cover, meteorological factors and the prevalence of BTV infection. Jackknife analysis revealed that the mean monthly temperature, rainfall and average wind speed were associated with the occurrence of BTV infection and that BTV infection positivity was significantly higher among animals from districts with a high percentage of grassland and forest area. Our findings indicate that meteorological factors and land cover may be important variables affecting transmission of BTV and should be taken into account in the development of future surveillance programmes for BTV.

  14. In situ effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on community structure of freshwater benthic macroinvertebrates.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Boris; Milošević, Djuradj; Piperac, Milica Stojković; Savić, Ana

    2016-06-01

    For the first time in the current literature, the effect of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles on the community structure of macroinvertebrates has been investigated in situ. Macroinvertebrates were exposed for 100 days to an environmentally relevant concentration of TiO2 nanoparticles, 25 mg kg(-1) in sediment. Czekanowski's index was 0.61, meaning 39% of the macroinvertebrate community structure was affected by the TiO2 treatment. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) visualized the qualitative and quantitative variability of macroinvertebrates at the community level among all samples. A distance-based permutational multivariate analysis of variance (PERMANOVA) revealed the significant effect of TiO2 on the macroinvertebrate community structure. The indicator value analysis showed that the relative frequency and abundance of Planorbarius corneus and Radix labiata were significantly lower in the TiO2 treatment than in the control. Meanwhile, Ceratopogonidae, showed a significantly higher relative frequency and abundance in the TiO2 treatment than in the control.

  15. Aquatic macroinvertebrates associated with Eichhornia azurea (Swartz) Kunth and relationships with abiotic factors in marginal lentic ecosystems (São Paulo, Brazil).

    PubMed

    Silva, C V; Henry, R

    2013-02-01

    Marginal lakes are characterised by their having high biological diversity due to the presence of aquatic macrophytes in their coastal zones, providing habitats for refuge and food for animal community members. Among the fauna components associated with macrophytes, aquatic macroinvertebrates are important because they are an energy source for predators and fish. In six lakes and two different seasons (March and August 2009), the ecological attributes of aquatic macroinvertebrate community associated with Eichhornia azurea were compared and the controlling environmental factors were identified. Since the attributes of macroinvertebrate community are strictly associated with abiotic variables of each distinct habitat, our hypothesis was that each site associated with the same floating aquatic macrophyte (E. azurea) should have a typical composition and density of organisms. We identified 50 taxa of macroinvertebrates, with greater taxa richness for aquatic insects (37 taxa) divided into eight orders; the order Diptera being the most abundant in the two study periods. On the other hand, higher values of total taxa richness were recorded in August. Dissolved oxygen and pH presented the greatest number of significant positive correlations with the different taxa. The animals most frequently collected in the six lakes in March and August 2009 were Hirudinea, Oligochaeta, Hydrachnidae, Conchostraca, Ostracoda, Noteridae, Ceratopogonidae, Chironomidae, Culicidae, Caenidae, Pleidae, Aeshnidae, Libellulidae, Coenagrionidae and Nematoda. Only densities of Trichoptera, Ostracoda and Conchostraca presented the highest significant differences between lakes in both study periods and considering the composition of macroinvertebrates no significant differences were registered for macroinvertebrate composition.

  16. Impacts of climate, host and landscape factors on Culicoides species in Scotland.

    PubMed

    Purse, B V; Falconer, D; Sullivan, M J; Carpenter, S; Mellor, P S; Piertney, S B; Mordue Luntz, A J; Albon, S; Gunn, G J; Blackwell, A

    2012-06-01

    Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) vector a wide variety of internationally important arboviral pathogens of livestock and represent a widespread biting nuisance. This study investigated the influence of landscape, host and remotely-sensed climate factors on local abundance of livestock-associated species in Scotland, within a hierarchical generalized linear model framework. The Culicoides obsoletus group and the Culicoides pulicaris group accounted for 56% and 41%, respectively, of adult females trapped. Culicoides impunctatus Goetghebuer and C. pulicaris s.s. Linnaeus were the most abundant and widespread species in the C. pulicaris group (accounting for 29% and 10%, respectively, of females trapped). Abundance models performed well for C. impunctatus, Culicoides deltus Edwards and Culicoides punctatus Meigen (adjusted R(2) : 0.59-0.70), but not for C. pulicaris s.s. (adjusted R(2) : 0.36) and the C. obsoletus group (adjusted R(2) : 0.08). Local-scale abundance patterns were best explained by models combining host, landscape and climate factors. The abundance of C. impunctatus was negatively associated with cattle density, but positively associated with pasture cover, consistent with this species' preference in the larval stage for lightly grazed, wet rush pasture. Predicted abundances of this species varied widely among farms even over short distances (less than a few km). Modelling approaches that may facilitate the more accurate prediction of local abundance patterns for a wider range of Culicoides species are discussed.

  17. Incursion and range expansion in the bluetongue vector Culicoides imicola in the Mediterranean basin: a phylogeographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Nolan, D V; Dallas, J F; Piertney, S B; Mordue Luntz, A J

    2008-12-01

    The bluetongue (BT) vector Culicoides imicola Kieffer (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) has undergone widespread range expansion across most of the Mediterranean basin, concomitant with the largest BT epizootic outbreaks on record. Knowledge of the substructure of this vector expansion would be useful for identifying specific source-expansion systems. To this end we analysed the haplotype diversity of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene in 273 C. imicola from 88 Mediterranean sites and outgroups. All the C. imicola haplotypes (n = 26) formed a single, distinct clade in comparison with haplotypes of four other species of the Imicola group from southern Africa, confirming C. imicola as a single phylospecies. Haplotype distribution showed extreme differentiation across the Mediterranean basin, with four common haplotypes each predominating in different areas. Eastern and western areas characterized by distinct BT incursions accounted for most of the molecular variance in haplotype composition. Shared common haplotypes identified one area of incursion and expansion encompassing the western half of the Mediterranean basin, with evidence of population growth, and another system encompassing Anatolian Turkey, the Aegean Islands and mainland Greece. A third area of range expansion was identified in the central Mediterranean, with a possible source in Algeria and unsampled parts of central North Africa. We conclude that the expansion of C. imicola in the Mediterranean basin consists of at least three incursions followed by expansions and that the western system experiences conditions promoting high population growth.

  18. Does covering of farm-associated Culicoides larval habitat reduce adult populations in the United Kingdom?☆

    PubMed Central

    Harrup, L.E.; Gubbins, S.; Barber, J.; Denison, E.; Mellor, P.S.; Purse, B.V.; Carpenter, S.

    2014-01-01

    Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are the biological vectors of a range of internationally important arboviruses of livestock, including bluetongue virus (BTV) and the recently emerging Schmallenberg virus (SBV). Culicoides species in the subgenus Avaritia (in the UK: Culicoides obsoletus Meigen, Culicoides scoticus Downes & Kettle, Culicoides dewulfi Goetghebuer and Culicoides chiopterus Meigen) have been implicated in BTV transmission in northern Europe and to a varying degree utilise cattle dung as a larval development substrate. The collection of cattle dung into heaps on farms provides a localised source of Culicoides emergence in close proximity to livestock. This study assesses the impact of covering dung heaps prior to the onset of adult Culicoides activity with the aim of reducing recruitment to the local adult populations at four livestock farms in England. Light suction trap catches of adult Culicoides from these farms were compared with those from four untreated control farms from a wide geographic range across the UK. It was demonstrated that implementing control of emergence from dung heaps did not have a significant impact upon the local adult subgenus Avaritia abundance at the treated farm holdings and that the onset of Culicoides activity was similarly unaffected. Use of this method in isolation is unlikely to have an effect in reducing the risk of BTV and SBV transmission. The implications of these results for control of farm-associated Culicoides in Europe are discussed. PMID:24472769

  19. Insecticidal sugar baits for adult biting midges.

    PubMed

    Snyder, D; Cernicchiaro, N; Allan, S A; Cohnstaedt, L W

    2016-06-01

    The mixing of an insecticide with sugar solution creates an oral toxin or insecticidal sugar bait (ISB) useful for reducing adult insect populations. The ability of ISBs to kill the biting midge Culicoides sonorensis Wirth and Jones (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), a vector of bluetongue virus, epizootic hemorrhagic disease and vesicular stomatitis viruses, was tested. The commercial insecticide formulations (percentage active ingredient) tested included bifenthrin, cyfluthrin, deltamethrin, permethrin, dinotefuran, imidacloprid, thiamethoxam and spinosad. Mortality rates were determined for various concentrations of commercial formulations (0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 1, 2 and 3%) and observed at 1, 4, 10 and 24 h post-exposure to the ISB. In the first set of assays, laboratory-reared midges were fed sugar ad libitum and then exposed to insecticide-treated sugar solutions to measure mortality. The second assay assessed competitive feeding: midges were provided with a control sugar solution (10% sucrose) in one vial, and a sugar and insecticide solution in another. Pyrethroid treatments resulted in the greatest mortality in the first hour at the lowest concentrations and spinosad consumption resulted in the least mortality. Biting midges were not deterred from feeding on the 1% ISB solutions despite the presence of an insecticide-free alternative source of sugar.

  20. Farms, pastures and woodlands: the fine-scale distribution of Palearctic Culicoides spp. biting midges along an agro-ecological gradient.

    PubMed

    Rigot, T; Drubbel, M Vercauteren; Delécolle, J-C; Gilbert, M

    2013-03-01

    The spatial epidemiology of Bluetongue virus (BTV) at the landscape level relates to the fine-scale distribution and dispersal capacities of its vectors, midges belonging to the genus Culicoides Latreille (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). Although many previous researches have carried out Culicoides sampling on farms, little is known of the fine-scale distribution of Culicoides in the landscape immediately surrounding farms. The aim of this study was to gain a better understanding of Culicoides populations at increasing distances from typical dairy farms in north-west Europe, through the use of eight Onderstepoort-type black-light traps positioned along linear transects departing from farms, going through pastures and entering woodlands. A total of 16 902 Culicoides were collected in autumn 2008 and spring 2009. The majority were females, of which more than 97% were recognized as potential vectors. In pastures, we found decreasing numbers of female Culicoides as a function of the distance to the farm. This pattern was modelled by leptokurtic models, with parameters depending on season and species. By contrast, the low number of male Culicoides caught were homogeneously distributed along the transects. When transects entered woodlands, we found a higher abundance of Culicoides than expected considering the distance of the sampling sites to the farm, although this varied according to species.

  1. Trap placement and attractant choice affect capture and create sex and parity biases in collections of the biting midge, Culicoides sonorensis.

    PubMed

    McDermott, E G; Mayo, C E; Gerry, A C; Mullens, B A

    2016-09-01

    Culicoides sonorensis Wirth & Jones (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) is the primary North American vector of bluetongue virus (BTV), which can cause high morbidity and mortality in ruminant livestock or wildlife. Worldwide, most Culicoides surveillance relies on light (usually UV) traps typically placed near animals or larval development sites. However, the trapping method can cause sex, species and parity biases in collections. We collected C. sonorensis from three dairies in California using suction traps baited with CO2 , UV light or CO2  + UV placed near animals, wastewater ponds, or in fields. Higher numbers of parous females were collected using CO2  + UV traps, although this difference was only significant on one dairy. UV traps were poor at collecting nulliparous females, but the addition of UV to a trap increased the abundance of males in a collection. Traps set in open fields collected significantly higher numbers of males and females than in either of the other two locations. In some cases, there was a significant interaction between the trap type and site. We discuss the limitations of traditional trapping methodologies for C. sonorensis and make suggestions for vector surveillance.

  2. Arthropod Surveillance Programs: Basic Components, Strategies, and Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cohnstaedt, Lee W; Rochon, Kateryn; Duehl, Adrian J; Anderson, John F; Barrera, Roberto; Su, Nan-Yao; Gerry, Alec C; Obenauer, Peter J; Campbell, James F; Lysyk, Tim J; Allan, Sandra A

    2012-03-01

    Effective entomological surveillance planning stresses a careful consideration of methodology, trapping technologies, and analysis techniques. Herein, the basic principles and technological components of arthropod surveillance plans are described, as promoted in the symposium "Advancements in arthropod monitoring technology, techniques, and analysis" presented at the 58th annual meeting of the Entomological Society of America in San Diego, CA. Interdisciplinary examples of arthropod monitoring for urban, medical, and veterinary applications are reviewed. Arthropod surveillance consists of the three components: 1) sampling method, 2) trap technology, and 3) analysis technique. A sampling method consists of selecting the best device or collection technique for a specific location and sampling at the proper spatial distribution, optimal duration, and frequency to achieve the surveillance objective. Optimized sampling methods are discussed for several mosquito species (Diptera: Culicidae) and ticks (Acari: Ixodidae). The advantages and limitations of novel terrestrial and aerial insect traps, artificial pheromones and kairomones are presented for the capture of red flour beetle (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), small hive beetle (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae), bed bugs (Hemiptera: Cimicidae), and Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) respectively. After sampling, extrapolating real world population numbers from trap capture data are possible with the appropriate analysis techniques. Examples of this extrapolation and action thresholds are given for termites (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) and red flour beetles.

  3. Late Quaternary paleoclimate of western Alaska inferred from fossil chironomids and its relation to vegetation histories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurek, Joshua; Cwynar, Les C.; Ager, Thomas A.; Abbott, Mark B.; Edwards, Mary E.

    2009-01-01

    Fossil Chironomidae assemblages (with a few Chaoboridae and Ceratopogonidae) from Zagoskin and Burial Lakes in western Alaska provide quantitative reconstructions of mean July air temperatures for periods of the late-middle Wisconsin (~39,000-34,000 cal yr B.P.) to the present. Inferred temperatures are compared with previously analyzed pollen data from each site summarized here by indirect ordination. Paleotemperature trends reveal substantial differences in the timing of climatic warming following the late Wisconsin at each site, although chronological uncertainty exists. Zagoskin Lake shows early warming beginning at about 21,000 cal yr B.P., whereas warming at Burial Lake begins ~4000 years later. Summer climates during the last glacial maximum (LGM) were on average ~3.5C° below the modern temperatures at each site. Major shifts in vegetation occurred from ~19,000 to 10,000 cal yr B.P. at Zagoskin Lake and from ~17,000 to 10,000 cal yr B.P. at Burial Lake. Vegetation shifts followed climatic warming, when temperatures neared modern values. Both sites provide evidence of an early postglacial thermal maximum at ~12,300 cal yr B.P. These chironomid records, combined with other insect-based climatic reconstructions from Beringia, indicate that during the LGM: (1) greater continentality likely influenced regions adjacent to the Bering Land Bridge and (2) summer climates were, at times, not dominated by severe cold.

  4. Culicoides species abundance and potential over-wintering of African horse sickness virus in the Onderstepoort area, Gauteng, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Venter, Gert J; Labuschagne, Karien; Majatladi, Daphney; Boikanyo, Solomon N B; Lourens, Carina; Ebersohn, Karen; Venter, Estelle H

    2014-11-14

    In South Africa, outbreaks of African horse sickness (AHS) occur in summer; no cases are reported in winter, from July to September. The AHS virus (AHSV) is transmitted almost exclusively by Culicoides midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), of which Culicoides imicola is considered to be the most important vector. The over-wintering mechanism of AHSV is unknown. In this study, more than 500 000 Culicoides midges belonging to at least 26 species were collected in 88 light traps at weekly intervals between July 2010 and September 2011 near horses in the Onderstepoort area of South Africa. The dominant species was C. imicola. Despite relatively low temperatures and frost, at least 17 species, including C. imicola, were collected throughout winter (June-August). Although the mean number of midges per night fell from > 50 000 (March) to < 100 (July and August), no midge-free periods were found. This study, using virus isolation on cell cultures and a reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay, confirmed low infection prevalence in field midges and that the detection of virus correlated to high numbers. Although no virus was detected during this winter period, continuous adult activity indicated that transmission can potentially occur. The absence of AHSV in the midges during winter can be ascribed to the relatively low numbers collected coupled to low infection prevalence, low virus replication rates and low virus titres in the potentially infected midges. Cases of AHS in susceptible animals are likely to start as soon as Culicoides populations reach a critical level.

  5. Composition and Longitudinal Patterns of Aquatic Insect Emergence in Small Rivers of Palawan Island, the Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitag, Hendrik

    2004-09-01

    This study presents the first emergence trap samples from streams in the Philippines and Greater Sunda. Aquatic insect emergence from two small rivers and longitudinal patterns including estuaries are compared. A decline of total emergence towards estuaries was observed, affecting all major orders. Diptera, namely Chironomidae, dominated all sites. High abundances in Ceratopogonidae, Odonata, and Coleoptera were found, compared to other emergence studies from tropical and temperate latitudes. Ephemeroptera displayed a highly variable contribution to the emergence from Palawan as well as in other comparative studies either supported by the appropriate conditions for certain functional groups or limited by environmental variables such as pH. Trichoptera are likely to tolerate a wider range of environmental conditions and they are consequently able to fill further niches where Ephemeroptera are under-represented. Except for scarce abundances of Plecoptera observed in this and other studies from the tropics, no substantial differences in emergence composition at order level existed between temperate and tropical rivers, however, with a remarkable local variation. Components of riparian and non-aquatic insects and non-emergent fauna contributing to the collections are discussed based on trap features. (

  6. Spatio-temporal patterns in pollination of deceptive Aristolochia rotunda L. (Aristolochiaceae).

    PubMed

    Oelschlägel, B; von Tschirnhaus, M; Nuss, M; Nikolić, T; Wanke, S; Dötterl, S; Neinhuis, C

    2016-11-01

    Pollination success of highly specialised flowers is susceptible to fluctuations of the pollinator fauna. Mediterranean Aristolochia rotunda has deceptive trap flowers exhibiting a highly specialised pollination system. The sole pollinators are kleptoparasitic flies in search of food. This study investigates these pollinators on a spatio-temporal scale and the impact of weather conditions on their availability. Two potential strategies of the plants to cope with pollinator limitation, i.e. autonomous selfing and an increased floral life span, were tested. A total of 6156 flowers were investigated for entrapped pollinators in 10 Croatian populations. Availability of the main pollinator was correlated to meteorological data. Artificial pollination experiments were conducted and the floral life span was recorded in two populations according to pollinator availability. Trachysiphonella ruficeps (Chloropidae) was identified as dominant pollinator, along with less abundant species of Chloropidae, Ceratopogonidae and Milichiidae. Pollinator compositions varied among populations. Weather conditions 15-30 days before pollination had a significant effect on availability of the main pollinator. Flowers were not autonomously selfing, and the floral life span exhibited considerable plasticity depending on pollinator availability. A. rotunda flowers rely on insect pollen vectors. Plants are specialised on a guild of kleptoparasitic flies, rather than on a single species. Pollinator variability may result in differing selection pressures among populations. The availability/abundance of pollinators depends on weather conditions during their larval development. Flowers show a prolonged trapping flower stage that likely increases outcrossing success during periods of pollinator limitation.

  7. A study of Culicoides in Rondônia, in the Brazilian Amazon: species composition, relative abundance and potential vectors.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, L P C; Pereira Júnior, A M; Farias, E S; Almeida, J F; Rodrigues, M S; Resadore, F; Pessoa, F A C; Medeiros, J F

    2017-03-01

    There is very little information available about Culicoides species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in the western Brazilian Amazon. However, studies of the fauna of this region are essential to knowledge of the species and potential vectors within it. Thus, the present study aims to evaluate the abundance, richness and composition of Culicoides species in rural areas in the state of Rondônia, Brazil. Culicoides specimens were collected in forest and pasture environments in the municipality of Porto Velho, using light traps. A total of 1708 individuals (1136 females and 572 males) belonging to 33 species were collected; 28 of these samples represent new records for the state of Rondônia and include the first record of Culicoides contubernalis in Brazil. Culicoides insignis was the most abundant species (86.1%). Species richness was greater in forest areas (32 species, 96.96%), whereas pastures presented the greatest number of Culicoides captured (n = 1540, 90.1%). This study shows that Culicoides populations differ between forest and pasture environments and indicates that the abundance of C. insignis is an important factor in epidemiological vigilance studies in the region.

  8. Management of North American Culicoides Biting Midges: Current Knowledge and Research Needs.

    PubMed

    Pfannenstiel, Robert S; Mullens, Bradley A; Ruder, Mark G; Zurek, Ludek; Cohnstaedt, Lee W; Nayduch, Dana

    2015-06-01

    Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are biological vectors of two important viruses impacting North American ruminants--bluetongue virus (BTV) and epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV). These viruses have been identified for over 60 years in North America, but we still lack an adequate understanding of the basic biology and ecology of the confirmed vector, Culicoides sonorensis, and know even less about other putative Culicoides vector species. The major gaps in our knowledge of the biology of Culicoides midges are broad and include an understanding of the ecology of juveniles, the identity of potential alternate vector species, interactions of midges with both pathogens and vertebrates, and the effectiveness of potential control measures. Due to these broad and numerous fundamental knowledge gaps, vector biologists and livestock producers are left with few options to respond to or understand outbreaks of EHD or BT in North America, or respond to emerging or exotic Culicoides-transmitted pathogens. Here we outline current knowledge of vector ecology and control tactics for North American Culicoides species, and delineate research recommendations aimed to fill knowledge gaps.

  9. Scathophagid fly Larvae as Predators of Neophylax rickeri (Trichoptera: Uenoidae) egg Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purcell, A. H.; Hoffman, A.; Resh, V. H.

    2005-05-01

    We examined the predator-prey interaction of an undescribed predator (Diptera: Scathophagidae) on egg masses of Neophylax rickeri (Trichoptera: Uenoidae). Over a two-year period, we regularly surveyed 14 riffles within a 200-m reach of Redwood Creek and Webb Creek (Marin County, California). In Webb Creek, scathophagid predators were absent despite the abundance of N. rickeri egg masses. However, in Redwood Creek scathophagid predators were found within 11% (n=1594 egg masses) of the N. rickeri egg masses collected. N. rickeri egg masses were more frequently found clustered in aggregations (86%) than singly (14%), and scathophagid predators were more frequently found within N. rickeri egg mass aggregations (23% infestation rate) than in singly deposited egg masses (5%). Scathophagid predators exhibited a bivoltine life cycle with an increase in abundance after the first winter rains (November/December) and again in late spring (May/June). The abundance of predator larvae in the winter coincided with the peak oviposition period of N. rickeri, but in the late spring when N. rickeri egg masses were absent, the predator fed on egg masses of several other trichopteran (Brachycentridae) and dipteran (Ceratopogonidae, Chironomidae) species.

  10. An insight into the sialome of blood-feeding Nematocera.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, José M C; Mans, Ben J; Arcà, Bruno

    2010-11-01

    Within the Diptera and outside the suborder Brachycera, the blood-feeding habit occurred at least twice, producing the present day sand flies, and the Culicomorpha, including the mosquitoes (Culicidae), black flies (Simulidae), biting midges (Ceratopogonidae) and frog feeding flies (Corethrellidae). Alternatives to this scenario are also discussed. Successful blood-feeding requires adaptations to antagonize the vertebrate's mechanisms of blood clotting, platelet aggregation, vasoconstriction, pain and itching, which are triggered by tissue destruction and immune reactions to insect products. Saliva of these insects provides a complex pharmacological armamentarium to block these vertebrate reactions. With the advent of transcriptomics, the sialomes (from the Greek word sialo = saliva) of at least two species of each of these families have been studied (except for the frog feeders), allowing an insight into the diverse pathways leading to today's salivary composition within the Culicomorpha, having the sand flies as an outgroup. This review catalogs 1288 salivary proteins in 10 generic classes comprising over 150 different protein families, most of which we have no functional knowledge. These proteins and many sequence comparisons are displayed in a hyperlinked spreadsheet that hopefully will stimulate and facilitate the task of functional characterization of these proteins, and their possible use as novel pharmacological agents and epidemiological markers of insect vector exposure.

  11. Bluetongue virus in Oryx antelope (Oryx leucoryx) during the quarantine period in 2010 in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Bosnić, Sanja; Beck, Relja; Listeš, Eddy; Lojkić, Ivana; Savini, Giovanni; Roić, Besi

    2015-01-01

    Bluetongue (BT) is a viral infectious non‑contagious disease of domestic and wild ruminants. Insect species of the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) serve as biological vectors that transmit bluetongue virus (BTV) to susceptible hosts. The infection is present in the Mediterranean region. Recently, it has also been reported in Central, Western, and Northern Europe where BTV‑8 was recognised as the causative serotype. In the meantime, BTV‑14 has appeared in the North‑Eastern part of Europe. In the present study, BTV serotype 16 (BTV‑16) was detected by virus neutralisation (VNT)‑assay and real‑time reverse transcription‑PCR (rRT‑PCR) in 1 antelope and BTV‑1 in 3 of 10 Oryx antelopes (Oryx leucoryx) imported in Croatia from the Sultanate of Oman. No BTV vectors were collected during the antelope quarantine on the Veliki Brijun Island. Also, no BTV antibodies were detected in sheep, cattle, and deer on the Island. Entomological studies did not reveal any new vector species that may have been introduced with the infected antelopes on their transportation. It was the first time that BTV was demonstrated in animals imported in Croatia. It involved BTV‑1, which had never been demonstrated before and BTV‑16, which had been previously recorded in domestic ruminants.

  12. Vector species of Culicoides midges implicated in the 2012‑2014 Bluetongue epidemics in Italy.

    PubMed

    Goffredo, Maria; Catalani, Monica; Federici, Valentina; Portanti, Ottavio; Marini, Valeria; Mancini, Giuseppe; Quaglia, Michela; Santilli, Adriana; Teodori, Liana; Savini, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, serotypes 1 and 4 of bluetongue virus (BTV) entered and co‑circulated in Sardinia. The following year, BTV‑1 spread all over Sardinia and invaded Sicily and the Italian Tyrrenian coast. In 2014, this strain spread extensively in mainland Italy, causing severe outbreaks. In late 2014, BTV‑4 was detected in Southern Italy (Apulia region). This study reports the detection of BTV in species of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) collected in Italy during the epidemics between 2012 and 2014. A total of 2,925 pools (83,102 midges), sorted from 651 collections made on 339 affected farms of 12 Italian regions, were tested for the presence of BTV by real time polymerase chain reaction (RT‑PCR). The study clearly shows that Culicoides imicola and Obsoletus complex have played a crucial role in the bluetongue (BT) epidemics in Italy in 2012‑2014. Nevertheless, it also shows that other species may have played a role in transmitting BTV during these outbreaks. Culicoides dewulfi and at least 3 species of the Pulicaris complex, namely Culicoides pulicaris, Culicoides newsteadi and Culicoides punctatus, were found positive to BTV. Serotype 1 was detected in all species tested, whereas the BTV‑4 was detected in the Obsoletus complex, C. imicola, and C. newsteadi.

  13. The dying of the light: crepuscular activity in Culicoides and impact on light trap efficacy at temperate latitudes.

    PubMed

    Meiswinkel, R; Elbers, A R W

    2016-03-01

    The light trap is the tool of choice for conducting large-scale Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) vector surveillance programmes. Its efficacy is in doubt, however. To assess this, hourly changes in Culicoides activity over the 24-h diel were determined comparatively by way of light trapping and aerial sweeping, and correlated against light intensity. In the Netherlands, sweeping around cattle at pasture revealed that, in early summer, Culicoides are active throughout the diel, and that their abundance peaks during the crepuscular period and falls to a low during the brightest hours of the day. By contrast, the light trap was able to accumulate Culicoides only at night (i.e. after illuminance levels had dropped to 0 lux and midge activity had begun to decline). Although Culicoides chiopterus and species of the Culicoides obsoletus complex were similarly abundant around livestock, they differed critically in their hours of peak activity, being largely diurnal and nocturnal, respectively. This polarity helps to explain why, routinely, the C. obsoletus complex dominates light trap collections and C. chiopterus does not. Inability to accumulate Culicoides at light intensity levels above 0 lux means that, at ever-higher latitudes, particularly beyond 45° N, the progressive northward lengthening of the twilight period will have an increasingly adverse impact upon the efficacy of the light trap as a vector surveillance tool.

  14. A new tool for the molecular identification of Culicoides species of the Obsoletus group: the glass slide microarray approach.

    PubMed

    Deblauwe, I; de Witte, J C; de Deken, G; de Deken, R; Madder, M; van Erk, S; Hoza, F A; Lathouwers, D; Geysen, D

    2012-03-01

    Culicoides species of the Obsoletus group (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are potential vectors of bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV 8), which was introduced into central Western Europe in 2006. Correct morphological species identification of Obsoletus group females is especially difficult and molecular identification is the method of choice. In this study we present a new molecular tool based on probe hybridization using a DNA microarray format to identify Culicoides species of the Obsoletus group. The internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) gene sequences of 55 Culicoides belonging to 13 different species were determined and used, together with 19 Culicoides ITS1 sequences sourced from GenBank, to design species-specific probes for the microarray test. This test was evaluated using the amplified ITS1 sequences of another 85 Culicoides specimens, belonging to 11 species. The microarray test successfully identified all samples (100%) of the Obsoletus group, identifying each specimen to species level within the group. This test has several advantages over existing polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based molecular tools, including possible capability for parallel analysis of many species, high sensitivity and specificity, and low background signal noise. Hand-spotting of the microarray slide and the use of detection chemistry make this alternative technique affordable and feasible for any diagnostic laboratory with PCR facilities.

  15. The effect of high frequency sound on Culicoides numbers collected with suction light traps.

    PubMed

    Venter, Gert J; Labuschagne, Karien; Boikanyo, Solomon N B; Morey, Liesl

    2012-11-07

    Culicoides midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), are involved in the transmission of various pathogens that cause important diseases of livestock worldwide. The use of insect repellents to reduce the attack rate of these insects on livestock could play an important role as part of an integrated control programme against diseases transmitted by these midges. The objective of this study was to determine whether high frequency sound has any repellent effect on Culicoides midges. The number of midges collected with 220 V Onderstepoort white light traps fitted with electronic mosquito repellents (EMRs), emitting 5-20 KHz multi-frequency sound waves, was compared with that of two untreated traps. Treatments were rotated in two replicates of a 4 x 4 randomised Latin square design. Although fewer midges were collected in the two traps fitted with EMRs, the average number collected over eight consecutive nights was not significantly different. The EMRs also had no influence on any of the physiological groups of Culicoides imicola Kieffer or the species composition of the Culicoides population as determined with light traps. The results indicate that high frequency sound has no repellent effect on Culicoides midges. There is therefore no evidence to support their promotion or use in the protection of animals against pathogens transmitted by Culicoides midges.

  16. Phylogenetic analysis of Culicoides species from France based on nuclear ITS1-rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Perrin, A; Cetre-Sossah, C; Mathieu, B; Baldet, T; Delecolle, J-C; Albina, E

    2006-06-01

    Biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) play important roles in the transmission of viral diseases affecting wild and domestic ruminants and horses, including Bluetongue (BT) and African horse sickness (AHS) respectively. In southern Europe, BT has been largely transmitted by the classical Afro-Asian vector Culicoides imicola Kieffer. However, other species such as C. obsoletus Meigen, C. scoticus Downs & Kettle and C. pulicaris Linné may also be involved in BTV transmission. As a consequence of the discovery of C. imicola followed by BTV-2 outbreaks on the island of Corsica in October 2000, further studies on these biting midges have been carried out. To better characterize the evolution and phylogenetic relations of Culicoides, molecular analysis in parallel with a morphology-based taxonomic approach were performed. Phylogenetic analyses of French Culicoides species were undertaken using the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) as a molecular target. This region was shown to be useful in understanding evolutionary and genetic relationships between species. Construction of several trees showed that molecular phylogeny within the genus Culicoides correlates not only with morphological-based taxonomy but also with ecological patterns.

  17. Comparing the effect of modeled climatic variables on the distribution of African horse sickness in South Africa and Namibia.

    PubMed

    Liebenberg, Danica; van Hamburg, Huib; Piketh, Stuart; Burger, Roelof

    2015-12-01

    Africa horse sickness (AHS) is a lethal disease of horses with a seasonal occurrence that is influenced by environmental conditions that favor the development of Culicoides midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). This study compared and evaluated the relationship of various modeled climatic variables with the distribution and abundance of AHS in South Africa and Namibia. A comprehensive literature review of the historical AHS reported data collected from the Windhoek archives as well as annual reports from the Directorate of Veterinary services in Namibia were conducted. South African AHS reported data were collected from the South African Department of Agriculture, Forestry, and Fisheries. Daily climatic data were extracted for the time period 1993-2011 from the ERA-interim re-analysis dataset. The principal component analysis of the complete dataset indicated a significant statistical difference between Namibia and South Africa for the various climate variables and the outbreaks of AHS. The most influential parameters in the distribution of AHS included humidity, precipitation, evaporation, and minimum temperature. In South Africa, temperature had the most significant effect on the outbreaks of AHS, whereas in Namibia, humidity and precipitation were the main drivers. The maximum AHS cases in South Africa occurred at temperatures of 20-22° C and relative humidity between 50-70%. Furthermore, anthropogenic effects must be taken into account when trying to understand the distribution of AHS.

  18. Characterization of Viral Communities of Biting Midges and Identification of Novel Thogotovirus Species and Rhabdovirus Genus

    PubMed Central

    Temmam, Sarah; Monteil-Bouchard, Sonia; Robert, Catherine; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Sambou, Masse; Aubadie-Ladrix, Maxence; Labas, Noémie; Raoult, Didier; Mediannikov, Oleg; Desnues, Christelle

    2016-01-01

    More than two thirds of emerging viruses are of zoonotic origin, and among them RNA viruses represent the majority. Ceratopogonidae (genus Culicoides) are well-known vectors of several viruses responsible for epizooties (bluetongue, epizootic haemorrhagic disease, etc.). They are also vectors of the only known virus infecting humans: the Oropouche virus. Female midges usually feed on a variety of hosts, leading to possible transmission of emerging viruses from animals to humans. In this context, we report here the analysis of RNA viral communities of Senegalese biting midges using next-generation sequencing techniques as a preliminary step toward the identification of potential viral biohazards. Sequencing of the RNA virome of three pools of Culicoides revealed the presence of a significant diversity of viruses infecting plants, insects and mammals. Several novel viruses were detected, including a novel Thogotovirus species, related but genetically distant from previously described tick-borne thogotoviruses. Novel rhabdoviruses were also detected, possibly constituting a novel Rhabdoviridae genus, and putatively restricted to insects. Sequences related to the major viruses transmitted by Culicoides, i.e., African horse sickness, bluetongue and epizootic haemorrhagic disease viruses were also detected. This study highlights the interest in monitoring the emergence and circulation of zoonoses and epizooties using their arthropod vectors. PMID:26978389

  19. Detection of Low-Level Cardinium and Wolbachia Infections in Culicoides.

    PubMed

    Mee, Peter T; Weeks, Andrew R; Walker, Peter J; Hoffmann, Ary A; Duchemin, Jean-Bernard

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial endosymbionts have been identified as potentially useful biological control agents for a range of invertebrate vectors of disease. Previous studies of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) species using conventional PCR assays have provided evidence of Wolbachia (1/33) and Cardinium (8/33) infections. Here, we screened 20 species of Culicoides for Wolbachia and Cardinium, utilizing a combination of conventional PCR and more sensitive quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays. Low levels of Cardinium DNA were detected in females of all but one of the Culicoides species screened, and low levels of Wolbachia were detected in females of 9 of the 20 Culicoides species. Sequence analysis based on partial 16S rRNA gene and gyrB sequences identified "Candidatus Cardinium hertigii" from group C, which has previously been identified in Culicoides from Japan, Israel, and the United Kingdom. Wolbachia strains detected in this study showed 98 to 99% sequence identity to Wolbachia previously detected from Culicoides based on the 16S rRNA gene, whereas a strain with a novel wsp sequence was identified in Culicoides narrabeenensis. Cardinium isolates grouped to geographical regions independent of the host Culicoides species, suggesting possible geographical barriers to Cardinium movement. Screening also identified Asaia bacteria in Culicoides. These findings point to a diversity of low-level endosymbiont infections in Culicoides, providing candidates for further characterization and highlighting the widespread occurrence of these endosymbionts in this insect group.

  20. Arthropod Surveillance Programs: Basic Components, Strategies, and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rochon, Kateryn; Duehl, Adrian J.; Anderson, John F.; Barrera, Roberto; Su, Nan-Yao; Gerry, Alec C.; Obenauer, Peter J.; Campbell, James F.; Lysyk, Tim J.; Allan, Sandra A.

    2015-01-01

    Effective entomological surveillance planning stresses a careful consideration of methodology, trapping technologies, and analysis techniques. Herein, the basic principles and technological components of arthropod surveillance plans are described, as promoted in the symposium “Advancements in arthropod monitoring technology, techniques, and analysis” presented at the 58th annual meeting of the Entomological Society of America in San Diego, CA. Interdisciplinary examples of arthropod monitoring for urban, medical, and veterinary applications are reviewed. Arthropod surveillance consists of the three components: 1) sampling method, 2) trap technology, and 3) analysis technique. A sampling method consists of selecting the best device or collection technique for a specific location and sampling at the proper spatial distribution, optimal duration, and frequency to achieve the surveillance objective. Optimized sampling methods are discussed for several mosquito species (Diptera: Culicidae) and ticks (Acari: Ixodidae). The advantages and limitations of novel terrestrial and aerial insect traps, artificial pheromones and kairomones are presented for the capture of red flour beetle (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), small hive beetle (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae), bed bugs (Hemiptera: Cimicidae), and Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) respectively. After sampling, extrapolating real world population numbers from trap capture data are possible with the appropriate analysis techniques. Examples of this extrapolation and action thresholds are given for termites (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) and red flour beetles. PMID:26543242

  1. Does covering of farm-associated Culicoides larval habitat reduce adult populations in the United Kingdom?

    PubMed

    Harrup, L E; Gubbins, S; Barber, J; Denison, E; Mellor, P S; Purse, B V; Carpenter, S

    2014-03-17

    Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are the biological vectors of a range of internationally important arboviruses of livestock, including bluetongue virus (BTV) and the recently emerging Schmallenberg virus (SBV). Culicoides species in the subgenus Avaritia (in the UK: Culicoides obsoletus Meigen, Culicoides scoticus Downes & Kettle, Culicoides dewulfi Goetghebuer and Culicoides chiopterus Meigen) have been implicated in BTV transmission in northern Europe and to a varying degree utilise cattle dung as a larval development substrate. The collection of cattle dung into heaps on farms provides a localised source of Culicoides emergence in close proximity to livestock. This study assesses the impact of covering dung heaps prior to the onset of adult Culicoides activity with the aim of reducing recruitment to the local adult populations at four livestock farms in England. Light suction trap catches of adult Culicoides from these farms were compared with those from four untreated control farms from a wide geographic range across the UK. It was demonstrated that implementing control of emergence from dung heaps did not have a significant impact upon the local adult subgenus Avaritia abundance at the treated farm holdings and that the onset of Culicoides activity was similarly unaffected. Use of this method in isolation is unlikely to have an effect in reducing the risk of BTV and SBV transmission. The implications of these results for control of farm-associated Culicoides in Europe are discussed.

  2. Larval development and emergence sites of farm-associated Culicoides in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Harrup, L E; Purse, B V; Golding, N; Mellor, P S; Carpenter, S

    2013-12-01

    Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are the biological vectors of internationally important arboviruses of livestock including bluetongue virus (BTV). Information on the habitats used by Culicoides for larval development is valuable for establishing targeted vector control strategies and for improving local scale models of vector abundance. This study combines emergence trap collections of adult Culicoides identified using molecular markers and physiochemical measurements of habitats to investigate larval development sites of Palaearctic Culicoides in South East England. The known range of larval habitats for several Culicoides species is extended and the potential BTV vector species C. obsoletus and C. scoticus are confirmed to co-occur in many larval habitats. The presence of emerging C. obsoletus was favoured by increasing substrate moisture level [odds ratio (OR) 6.94 (2.30; 20.90)] and substrate pH [OR 4.80 (1.66; 13.90)] [bias-corrected Dxy : 0.68; area under the curve (AUC): 0.86] rather than any particular larval habitat type, as expected for a species with relatively wide larval habitat preference. Of the newly emerged sub-genus Avaritia individuals collected, 23% were observed to have a degree of abdominal pigmentation commonly inferred to indicate parity. If consistent across species and locations, this observation represents a potential source of error for age structure analyses of Culicoides populations.

  3. An Insight into the Sialome of the Black Fly, Simulium vittatum

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, John F.; Pham, Van M.; Meng, Zhaojing; Champagne, Donald E.; Ribeiro, José M. C.

    2009-01-01

    Adaptation to vertebrate blood feeding includes development of a salivary ‘magic potion’ that can disarm host hemostasis and inflammatory reactions. Within the lower Diptera, a vertebrate blood-sucking mode evolved in the Psychodidae (sand flies), Culicidae (mosquitoes), Ceratopogonidae (biting midges), Simuliidae (black flies), and in the frog-feeding Corethrellidae. Sialotranscriptome analyses from several species of mosquitoes and sand flies and from one biting midge indicate divergence in the evolution of the blood-sucking salivary potion, manifested in the finding of many unique proteins within each insect family, and even genus. Gene duplication and divergence events are highly prevalent, possibly driven by vertebrate host immune pressure. Within this framework, we describe the sialome (from Greek sialo, saliva) of the black fly Simulium vittatum and discuss the findings within the context of the protein families found in other blood-sucking Diptera. Sequences and results of Blast searches against several protein family databases are given in Supplemental Tables S1 and S2, which can be obtained from http://exon.niaid.nih.gov/transcriptome/S_vittatum/T1/SV-tb1.zip and http://exon.niaid.nih.gov/transcriptome/S_vittatum/T2/SV-tb2.zip. PMID:19166301

  4. Detection of Low-Level Cardinium and Wolbachia Infections in Culicoides

    PubMed Central

    Mee, Peter T.; Weeks, Andrew R.; Walker, Peter J.; Hoffmann, Ary A.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial endosymbionts have been identified as potentially useful biological control agents for a range of invertebrate vectors of disease. Previous studies of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) species using conventional PCR assays have provided evidence of Wolbachia (1/33) and Cardinium (8/33) infections. Here, we screened 20 species of Culicoides for Wolbachia and Cardinium, utilizing a combination of conventional PCR and more sensitive quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays. Low levels of Cardinium DNA were detected in females of all but one of the Culicoides species screened, and low levels of Wolbachia were detected in females of 9 of the 20 Culicoides species. Sequence analysis based on partial 16S rRNA gene and gyrB sequences identified “Candidatus Cardinium hertigii” from group C, which has previously been identified in Culicoides from Japan, Israel, and the United Kingdom. Wolbachia strains detected in this study showed 98 to 99% sequence identity to Wolbachia previously detected from Culicoides based on the 16S rRNA gene, whereas a strain with a novel wsp sequence was identified in Culicoides narrabeenensis. Cardinium isolates grouped to geographical regions independent of the host Culicoides species, suggesting possible geographical barriers to Cardinium movement. Screening also identified Asaia bacteria in Culicoides. These findings point to a diversity of low-level endosymbiont infections in Culicoides, providing candidates for further characterization and highlighting the widespread occurrence of these endosymbionts in this insect group. PMID:26150447

  5. Are Bogs Reservoirs for Emerging Disease Vectors? Evaluation of Culicoides Populations in the Hautes Fagnes Nature Reserve (Belgium)

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Jean-Yves; Smeets, François; Simonon, Grégory; Fagot, Jean; Haubruge, Eric; Francis, Frédéric; Losson, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    Several species of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) biting midges serve as biological vectors for the bluetongue virus (BTV) and the recently described Schmallenberg virus (SBV) in northern Europe. Since their recent emergence in this part of the continent, these diseases have caused considerable economic losses to the sheep and cattle industries. Much data is now available that describe the distribution, population dynamics, and feeding habits of these insects. However, little is known regarding the presence of Culicoides in unusual habitats such as peaty marshes, nor their potential vector capacity. This study evaluated Culicoides biting midges present in the bogs of a Belgian nature reserve compared to those residing at a nearby cattle farm. Culicoides were trapped in 2011 at four different sites (broadleaved and coniferous forested areas, open environments, and at a scientific station) located in the Hautes Fagnes Nature Reserve (Belgium). An additional light trap was operated on a nearby cattle farm. Very high numbers of biting midges were captured in the marshy area and most of them (70 to 95%) were Culicoides impunctatus, a potential vector of BTV and other pathogens. In addition, fewer numbers of C. obsoletus/C. scoticus species, C. chiopterus, and C. dewulfi were observed in the bogs compared to the farm. The wet environment and oligotrophic nature of the soil were probably responsible for these changes in the respective populations. A total of 297,808 Culicoides midges belonging to 27 species were identified during this study and 3 of these species (C. sphagnumensis, C. clintoni and C. comosioculatus) were described in Belgium for the first time. PMID:23799137

  6. Virus recovery rates for wild-type and live-attenuated vaccine strains of African horse sickness virus serotype 7 in orally infected South African Culicoides species.

    PubMed

    Venter, G J; Paweska, J T

    2007-12-01

    Previously reported virus recovery rates from Culicoides (Avaritia) imicola Kieffer and Culicoides (Avaritia) bolitinos Meiswinkel (Diptera, Ceratopogonidae) orally infected with vaccine strain of African horse sickness virus serotype 7 (AHSV-7) were compared with results obtained from concurrently conducted oral infections with five recent AHSV-7 isolates from naturally infected horses from various localities in South Africa. Culicoides were fed sheep bloods spiked with 10(7.6) TCID(50)/mL of a live-attenuated vaccine strain AHSV-7, and with five field isolates in which virus titre in the bloodmeals ranged from 10(7.1) to 10(8.2) TCID(50)/mL). After an extrinsic incubation of 10 days at 23.5 degrees C, virus recovery rates were significantly higher in C. imicola (13.3%) and C. bolitinos (4.2%) infected with the live-attenuated virus than in midges infected with any of the field isolates. The virus recovery rates for the latter groups ranged from 0% to 9.5% for C. imicola and from 0% to 1.5% for C. bolitinos. The C. imicola population at Onderstepoort was significantly more susceptible to infection with AHSV-7 isolated at Onderstepoort than to the virus strains isolated from other localities. Results of this study suggest that tissue culture attenuation of AHSV-7 does not reduce its ability to orally infect competent Culicoides species and may even lead to enhanced replication in the vector. Furthermore, oral susceptibility in a midge population appears to vary for geographically distinct isolates of AHSV-7.

  7. Aquatic insects of New York salt marsh associated with mosquito larval habitat and their potential utility as bioindicators.

    PubMed

    Rochlin, Ilia; Dempsey, Mary E; Iwanejko, Tom; Ninivaggi, Dominick V

    2011-01-01

    The aquatic insect fauna of salt marshes is poorly characterized, with the possible exception of biting Diptera. Aquatic insects play a vital role in salt marsh ecology, and have great potential importance as biological indicators for assessing marsh health. In addition, they may be impacted by measures to control mosquitoes such as changes to the marsh habitat, altered hydrology, or the application of pesticides. Given these concerns, the goals of this study were to conduct the first taxonomic survey of salt marsh aquatic insects on Long Island, New York, USA and to evaluate their utility for non-target pesticide impacts and environmental biomonitoring. A total of 18 species from 11 families and five orders were collected repeatedly during the five month study period. Diptera was the most diverse order with nine species from four families, followed by Coleoptera with four species from two families, Heteroptera with three species from three families, then Odonata and the hexapod Collembola with one species each. Water boatmen, Trichocorixa verticalis Fieber (Heteroptera: Corixidae) and a shore fly, Ephydra subopaca Loew (Diptera: Ephydridae), were the two most commonly encountered species. An additional six species; Anurida maritima Guérin-Méneville (Collembola: Neanuridae), Mesovelia mulsanti White (Heteroptera: Mesovelidae), Enochrus hamiltoni Horn (Coleoptera: Hydrophilidae), Tropisternus quadristriatus Horn (Coleoptera: Hydrophilidae), Dasyhelea pseudocincta Waugh and Wirth (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), and Brachydeutera argentata Walker (Diptera: Ephydridae), were found regularly. Together with the less common Erythrodiplax berenice Drury (Odonata: Libellulidae), these nine species were identified as the most suitable candidates for pesticide and environmental impact monitoring due to abundance, position in the food chain, and extended seasonal occurrence. This study represents a first step towards developing an insect-based index of biological integrity for

  8. Testing of UK Populations of Culex pipiens L. for Schmallenberg Virus Vector Competence and Their Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Manley, Robyn; Harrup, Lara E.; Veronesi, Eva; Stubbins, Francesca; Stoner, Jo; Gubbins, Simon; Wilson, Anthony; Batten, Carrie; Koenraadt, Constantianus J. M.; Henstock, Mark; Barber, James; Carpenter, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Background Schmallenberg virus (SBV), an arboviral pathogen of ruminants, emerged in northern Europe during 2011 and has subsequently spread across a vast geographic area. While Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) have been identified as a biological transmission agent of SBV, the role of mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) as potential vectors has not been defined beyond small-scale field collections in affected areas. Culex pipiens L. are one of the most widespread mosquitoes in northern Europe; they are present on farms across the region and have previously been implicated as vectors of several other arboviruses. We assessed the ability of three colony lines of Cx. pipiens, originating from geographically diverse field populations, to become fully infected by SBV using semi-quantitative real-time RT-PCR (sqPCR). Findings Two colony lines of Cx. pipiens were created in the UK (‘Brookwood’ and ‘Caldbeck’) from field collections of larvae and pupae and characterised using genetic markers. A third strain of Cx. pipiens from CVI Wageningen, The Netherlands, was also screened during experiments. Intrathoracic inoculation of the Brookwood line resulted in infections after 14 days that were characterised by high levels of RNA throughout individuals, but which demonstrated indirect evidence of salivary gland barriers. Feeding of 322 individuals across the three colony lines on a membrane based infection system resulted in no evidence of full dissemination of SBV, although infections did occur in a small proportion of Cx. pipiens from each line. Conclusions/Significance This study established two novel lines of Cx. pipiens mosquitoes of UK origin in the laboratory and subsequently tested their competence for SBV. Schmallenberg virus replication and dissemination was restricted, demonstrating that Cx. pipiens is unlikely to be an epidemiologically important vector of the virus in northern Europe. PMID:26291533

  9. Diet of first-feeding larval and young-of-the-year white sturgeon in the lower Columbia River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muir, W.D.; McCabe, G.T.; Parsley, M.J.; Hinton, S.A.

    2000-01-01

    In some Snake and Columbia River reservoirs, adult white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) are common but few juvenile fish are found, indicating a lack of spawning success or poor survival of larvae. In contrast, recruitment of young-of-the-year white sturgeon to juvenile and adult stages is successful in the unimpounded Columbia River downstream of Bonneville Dam. The availability and size of preferred prey during the period when white sturgeon larvae begin exogenous feeding could be an important determinant of year-class strength. To explore this issue, we examined the diet composition of 352 larval and young-of-the year white sturgeon collected from 1989 through 1991 in the lower Columbia River. Samples were collected downstream from Bonneville Dam and upstream from the dam in Bonneville and The Dalles Reservoirs. Fish that ranged in size from 15 to 290 mm in total length fed primarily on gammarid amphipods (Corophium spp.) during all months. This diet item became increasingly important to all sizes of white sturgeon examined as they grew. The length of Corophium spp. eaten by larval and young-of-the-year white sturgeon increased with increasing fish length (r2 = 45.6%, P < 0.0001). Copepods (Cyclopoida), Ceratopogonidae larvae, and Diptera pupae and larvae (primarily chironomids) were also consumed, especially at the onset of exogenous feeding. A small percentage of white sturgeon were found with empty stomachs during June (1.6% downstream from Bonneville Dam) and July (4.5% downstream and 2.6% in the reservoirs). Diets of larval and young-of-the year white sturgeon from both impounded and free-flowing sections of the Columbia River were similar and we found no evidence of larval starvation in the areas investigated, areas currently supporting healthy white sturgeon populations.

  10. Protection of livestock against bluetongue virus vector Culicoides imicola using insecticide-treated netting in open areas.

    PubMed

    Calvete, C; Estrada, R; Miranda, M A; Del Rio, R; Borrás, D; Beldron, F J; Martínez, A; Calvo, A J; Lucientes, J

    2010-06-01

    The protection of livestock against Culicoides species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) using physical barriers or chemically treated barriers is difficult owing to the small size of these biting midges and animal welfare concerns associated with the reduction of air flow. Culicoides imicola Kieffer is the main bluetongue virus vector in the Mediterranean basin, including the southern Iberian peninsula, where livestock is mainly housed in open pens or sheds which offer no physical protection against C. imicola. In this study we assessed the efficacy of surrounding yearling ewe pens with a canvas barrier or a cypermethrin-treated canvas barrier in reducing the entry of Culicoides spp. and C. imicola. Analyses were based on comparisons of Culicoides catches in traps in pens with and without barriers, and in traps located outside pens. Although there was no clear reduction in the abundance of Culicoides other than C. imicola in pens with either barrier, the C. imicola presence was markedly reduced by the insecticide-treated barrier compared with the untreated barrier; the latter did not reduce the abundance of this species in pens. Estimates of the protection conferred against C. imicola by the treated barrier differed depending on whether catch comparisons were based on outside traps or on traps located inside no-barrier pens. The results suggest that the use of insecticide-treated barriers may reduce contact between livestock and C. imicola in open areas or sheds. More research is necessary to assess the degree of protection as a function of barrier height, C. imicola abundance, and the size of the area to be protected.

  11. Culicoides midge trap enhancement with animal odour baits in Scotland.

    PubMed

    Mands, V; Kline, D L; Blackwell, A

    2004-12-01

    Examples of the commercial trap Mosquito Magnet Pro (MMP emitting attractant 1-octen-3-ol in carbon dioxide 500 mL/min generated from propane fuel), were run 24 h/day on the Isle of Skye, Scotland, during June-August 2001 and evaluated for catching Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). From 30 days trapping, the catch averaged 2626 +/- 1358 Culicoides females/trap/day (mean +/- SE, range 558 +/- 139 to 6088 +/- 3597, for five sets of six consecutive nights), predominantly the pest Culicoides impunctatus Goetghebuer (68% overall), plus C. vexans (Staeger) > C. delta Edwards > C. pulicaris (L.) > C. lupicaris Downs & Kettle > C. albicans (Winnertz) > other Culicoides spp. Attempts were made to enhance the odour baiting system by adding hexane-extracts (2.1 mg/day) of hair samples from large host animals, resulting in the following effects on Culicoides collections: sheep - 53 %, red deer - 26 %, calf + 20%, pony + 40%, water buffalo + 262%, with greatest increases for C. impunctatus and C. pulicaris. Serial concentrations of these animal extracts (10(-1) - 10(-3) x 2.2 g/mL) were assayed on parous female C. impunctatus response in a Y-tube olfactometer (air-flow 150 mL/min), and by electroantennogram (EAG) on Culicoides nubeculosus Meigen laboratory-reared parous females. Positive behavioural responses to host odours were dose-dependent: the water buffalo extract being most active (threshold 0.22 g/mL), similar to deer, whereas other host extracts were > or = 10-fold less active. Correspondingly, the EAG threshold was lowest for water buffalo, 10-fold greater for deer, calf and pony, but not detected for sheep. If the active component(s) of these host extracts can be identified and synthesized, they might be employed to improve the capture of Culicoides midges for local control by removal trapping.

  12. Rapid diagnostic PCR assays for members of the Culicoides obsoletus and Culicoides pulicaris species complexes, implicated vectors of bluetongue virus in Europe.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Damien V; Carpenter, Simon; Barber, James; Mellor, Philip S; Dallas, John F; Mordue Luntz, A Jennifer; Piertney, Stuart B

    2007-09-20

    Biting midges of the Culicoides obsoletus Meigen and Culicoides pulicaris L. species complexes (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are increasingly implicated as vectors of bluetongue virus in Palearctic regions. However, predicting epidemiological risk and the spread of disease is hampered because whilst vector competence of Culicoides is expressed only in adult females, morphological identification of constituent species is only readily applicable to adult males and some species distinguishing traits have overlapping character states. Furthermore, adult males are typically rare in field collections, making characterisation of Culicoides communities impossible. Here we highlight the utility of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) DNA sequences for taxonomic resolution and species identification of all species within C. obsoletus and C. pulicarus complexes. Culicoides were collected from 18 sites in the UK and Continental Europe, and identified to species level, or species complex level, based on morphological characters. The sample comprised four species from the C. obsoletus complex (n = 88) and five species from the C. pulicaris complex (n = 39). The DNA sequence of the 5' end of the COI gene was obtained from all individuals. Each member species formed a well-supported reciprocally monophyletic clade in a maximum likelihood phylogeny. Levels of DNA sequence divergence were sufficiently high between species to allow the design of species-specific PCR primers that can be used in PCR for identification of members of the C. pulicaris complex or in a multiplex PCR to identify members of the C. obsoletus complex. This approach provides a valuable diagnostic tool for monitoring species composition in mixed field collections of Culicoides.

  13. Efficacy of aerial spray applications using fuselage booms on Air Force C-130H aircraft against mosquitoes and biting midges.

    PubMed

    Breidenbaugh, Mark S; Haagsma, Karl A; Wojcik, George M; De Szalay, Ferenc A

    2009-12-01

    The effectiveness of a novel fuselage boom configuration was tested with flat-fan nozzles on U.S. Air Force C-130H aircraft to create ultra-low volume sprays to control mosquitoes (Culicidae) and biting midges (Ceratopogonidae). The mortality of mosquitoes and biting midges in bioassay cages and natural populations, using the organophosphate adulticide, naled, was measured. Mosquitoes in bioassay cages had 100% mortality at 639 m downwind in all single-pass spray trials, and most trials had >90% mortality up to 1491 m downwind. Mosquito mortality was negatively correlated with distance from the spray release point (r2 = 0.38, P < 0.001). The volume median diam of droplets collected was 44 tm at 213 m and decreased to 11 microm at 2130 m downwind of the release point. Droplet density decreased from an average of 18.4 drops/cm2 at 213 m to 2 drops/cm2 at 2130 m. Droplet densities of 10-18 droplets/cm2 were recorded at sampling stations with high mosquito mortality rates (>90%). In wide-area operational applications, numbers of mosquitoes from natural populations 1 wk postspray were 83% (range 55%-95%), lower than prespray numbers (P < 0.05). Biting midge numbers were reduced by 86% (range 53%-97%) on average (P = 0.051) after 7 days. The results of these field trials indicate that the fuselage boom configuration on C-130H aircraft are an effective method to conduct large-scale aerial sprays during military operations and public health emergencies.

  14. The emergence of Schmallenberg virus across Culicoides communities and ecosystems in Europe.

    PubMed

    Balenghien, Thomas; Pagès, Nonito; Goffredo, Maria; Carpenter, Simon; Augot, Denis; Jacquier, Elisabeth; Talavera, Sandra; Monaco, Federica; Depaquit, Jérôme; Grillet, Colette; Pujols, Joan; Satta, Giuseppe; Kasbari, Mohamed; Setier-Rio, Marie-Laure; Izzo, Francesca; Alkan, Cigdem; Delécolle, Jean-Claude; Quaglia, Michela; Charrel, Rémi; Polci, Andrea; Bréard, Emmanuel; Federici, Valentina; Cêtre-Sossah, Catherine; Garros, Claire

    2014-10-15

    Schmallenberg virus (SBV), a novel arboviral pathogen, has emerged and spread across Europe since 2011 inflicting congenital deformities in the offspring of infected adult ruminants. Several species of Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) have been implicated in the transmission of SBV through studies conducted in northern Europe. In this study Culicoides from SBV outbreak areas of mainland France and Italy (Sardinia) were screened for viral RNA. The role of both C. obsoletus and the Obsoletus complex (C. obsoletus and C. scoticus) in transmission of SBV were confirmed in France and SBV was also discovered in a pool of C. nubeculosus for the first time, implicating this species as a potential vector. While collections in Sardinia were dominated by C. imicola, only relatively small quantities of SBV RNA were detected in pools of this species and conclusive evidence of its potential role in transmission is required. In addition to these field-based studies, infection rates in colony-derived individuals of C. nubeculosus and field-collected C. scoticus are also examined in the laboratory. Rates of infection in C. nubeculosus were low, confirming previous studies, while preliminary examination of C. scoticus demonstrated that while this species can replicate SBV to a potentially transmissible level, further work is required to fully define comparative competence between species in the region. Finally, the oral competence for SBV of two abundant and widespread mosquito vector species in the laboratory is assessed. Neither Aedes albopictus nor Culex pipiens were demonstrated to replicate SBV to transmissible levels and appear unlikely to play a major role in transmission. Other vector competence data produced from studies across Europe to date is then comprehensively reviewed and compared with that generated previously for bluetongue virus.

  15. [Agricultural land use impacts on aquatic macroinvertebrates in small streams from La Vieja river (Valle del Cauca, Colombia].

    PubMed

    Giraldo, Lina Paola; Chará, Julián; Zúñiga, Maria del Carmen; Chará-Serna, Ana Marcela; Pedraza, Gloria

    2014-04-01

    The expansion of the agricultural frontier in Colombia has exerted significant pressure on its aquatic ecosystems during the last few decades. In order to determine the impacts of different agricultural land uses on the biotic and abiotic characteristics of first and second order streams of La Vieja river watershed, we evaluated 21 streams located between 1,060 and 1,534 m asl in the municipalities of Alcalá, Ulloa, and Cartago (Valle del Cauca, Colombia). Seven streams were protected by native vegetation buffers, eight had influence of coffee and plantain crops, and six were influenced by cattle ranching. Habitat conditions, channel dimensions, water quality, and aquatic macroinvertebrates were studied in each stream. Streams draining cattle ranching areas had significantly higher dissolved solids, higher phosphorus, higher alkalinity, higher conductivity, and lower dissolved oxygen than those covered by cropland and forests. Coarse substrates and diversity of flow regimes were significantly higher in cropland and protected streams when compared to streams affected by cattle ranching, whereas the percent of silt and slow currents was significantly higher in the latter. A total of 26,777 macroinvertebrates belonging to 17 orders, 72 families and 95 genera were collected. The most abundant groups were Diptera 62.8%, (Chironomidae 49.6%, Ceratopogonidae 6.7%), Mollusca 18.8% (Hydrobiidae 7.2%, Sphaeriidae 9.6%) and Trichoptera 5.7% (Hydropsychidae 3.7%). The Ephemeroptera, Trichoptera, and Plecoptera orders, known for their low tolerance to habitat perturbation, had high abundance in cropland and forested streams, whereas Diptera and Mollusca were more abundant in those impacted by cattle ranching. Results indicate that streams draining forests and croplands have better physical and biological conditions than those draining pastures, and highlight the need to implement protective measures to restore the latter.

  16. Environmental Drivers of Culicoides Phenology: How Important Is Species-Specific Variation When Determining Disease Policy?

    PubMed Central

    Searle, Kate R.; Barber, James; Stubbins, Francesca; Labuschagne, Karien; Carpenter, Simon; Butler, Adam; Denison, Eric; Sanders, Christopher; Mellor, Philip S.; Wilson, Anthony; Nelson, Noel; Gubbins, Simon; Purse, Bethan V.

    2014-01-01

    Since 2006, arboviruses transmitted by Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) have caused significant disruption to ruminant production in northern Europe. The most serious incursions involved strains of bluetongue virus (BTV), which cause bluetongue (BT) disease. To control spread of BTV, movement of susceptible livestock is restricted with economic and animal welfare impacts. The timing of BTV transmission in temperate regions is partly determined by the seasonal presence of adult Culicoides females. Legislative measures therefore allow for the relaxation of ruminant movement restrictions during winter, when nightly light-suction trap catches of Culicoides fall below a threshold (the ‘seasonally vector free period’: SVFP). We analysed five years of time-series surveillance data from light-suction trapping in the UK to investigate whether significant inter-specific and yearly variation in adult phenology exists, and whether the SVFP is predictable from environmental factors. Because female vector Culicoides are not easily morphologically separated, inter-specific comparisons in phenology were drawn from male populations. We demonstrate significant inter-specific differences in Culicoides adult phenology with the season of Culicoides scoticus approximately eight weeks shorter than Culicoides obsoletus. Species-specific differences in the length of the SVFP were related to host density and local variation in landscape habitat. When the Avaritia Culicoides females were modelled as a group (as utilised in the SFVP), we were unable to detect links between environmental drivers and phenological metrics. We conclude that the current treatment of Avaritia Culicoides as a single group inhibits understanding of environmentally-driven spatial variation in species phenology and hinders the development of models for predicting the SVFP from environmental factors. Culicoides surveillance methods should be adapted to focus on concentrated assessments of species

  17. A six-year study of insect emergence from temporary flooded wetlands in central Sweden, with and without Bti-based mosquito control.

    PubMed

    Persson Vinnersten, T Z; Lundström, J O; Schäfer, M L; Petersson, E; Landin, J

    2010-12-01

    In temporary wetlands in the River Dalälven floodplains, recurrent but irregular floods induce massive hatching of the flood-water mosquito Aedes sticticus, which causes enormous nuisance. Flood-water mosquito control using the biological larvicide Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (Bti) was commenced in parts of the floodplains during 2002, and here we report the first six years of full-season monitoring of general insect emergence from temporary wetlands with and without treatment. Emergence traps, which were emptied weekly, were used from May to September each year. A total of 137,153 insects of 13 taxonomic orders were collected. Diptera was highly dominating and especially the sub-order Nematocera with 18 families was a very prominent taxon. Bti-treatment effects were analysed by taxonomic order, by sub-order in Diptera and Hemiptera, and by family for Nematocera and Coleoptera for the whole study period. We found no significant negative effects of Bti treatments on the production of insects by taxonomic order, with the exception of Coleoptera in the long term. However, no significant negative effects were found for the Coleoptera families, neither in the short term nor in the long term. There was no significant negative treatment effect on Nematocera production, neither when analyzed for the whole sub-order nor when analyzed by family. However, abundance of Ceratopogonidae was significantly higher in experimental than in reference wetlands. We conclude that Bti-treatment effects on insect production may be minute in comparison to other environmental factors structuring the insect fauna of the temporary wetlands studied.

  18. Hematophagous Flies Attracted to Frog Calls in a Preserved Seasonal Forest of the Austral Neotropics, with a Description of a New Species of Corethrella (Diptera: Corethrellidae).

    PubMed

    Caldart, Vinícius Matheus; Santos, Maurício Beux Dos; Iop, Samanta; Pinho, Luiz Carlos; Cechin, Sonia Zanini

    2016-10-01

    The signaler-eavesdropper interaction has been investigated for a wide range of organisms, and although many flies feed on calling frogs, this dynamic has been addressed only poorly in the austral Neotropics. We investigated this interaction in southern Brazil using pairs of suction traps (acoustic + silent) broadcasting frog calls or an artificial white noise in ponds and streams. From 139 sessions, flies of the genera Corethrella (Corethrellidae), Forcipomyia (Ceratopogonidae) and Uranotaenia (Culicidae) were collected, including five Corethrella species, the most abundant of which was previously unknown and is formally described here. Additionally, we present the southernmost records of Corethrella lopesi, C. alticola and C. atricornis. Numbers of Forcipomyia midges and Uranotaenia mosquitoes did not differ between silent traps and traps broadcasting frog calls, and did not differ between white noise traps and adjacent silent traps. However, the number of female Corethrella was significantly higher in traps broadcasting calls of the pond-breeding frog P. aff. gracilis compared to adjacent silent traps; calls of this frog attracted the five Corethrella species and also collected significantly more female Corethrella than the white noise. By evaluating different taxa of flies and broadcasting different sounds, we demonstrated that Corethrella midges were attracted only to the acoustic cue of P. aff. gracilis calls, while Forcipomyia and Uranotaenia were captured in traps by chance. Our results suggest that female Corethrella feed on males of the common pond-breeding frog P. aff. gracilis in southern Brazil, and highlight the utility of frog call traps in revealing the diversity of Corethrella in the austral Neotropics.

  19. Are bogs reservoirs for emerging disease vectors? Evaluation of culicoides populations in the Hautes Fagnes Nature Reserve (Belgium).

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Jean-Yves; Smeets, François; Simonon, Grégory; Fagot, Jean; Haubruge, Eric; Francis, Frédéric; Losson, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    Several species of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) biting midges serve as biological vectors for the bluetongue virus (BTV) and the recently described Schmallenberg virus (SBV) in northern Europe. Since their recent emergence in this part of the continent, these diseases have caused considerable economic losses to the sheep and cattle industries. Much data is now available that describe the distribution, population dynamics, and feeding habits of these insects. However, little is known regarding the presence of Culicoides in unusual habitats such as peaty marshes, nor their potential vector capacity. This study evaluated Culicoides biting midges present in the bogs of a Belgian nature reserve compared to those residing at a nearby cattle farm. Culicoides were trapped in 2011 at four different sites (broadleaved and coniferous forested areas, open environments, and at a scientific station) located in the Hautes Fagnes Nature Reserve (Belgium). An additional light trap was operated on a nearby cattle farm. Very high numbers of biting midges were captured in the marshy area and most of them (70 to 95%) were Culicoides impunctatus, a potential vector of BTV and other pathogens. In addition, fewer numbers of C. obsoletus/C. scoticus species, C. chiopterus, and C. dewulfi were observed in the bogs compared to the farm. The wet environment and oligotrophic nature of the soil were probably responsible for these changes in the respective populations. A total of 297,808 Culicoides midges belonging to 27 species were identified during this study and 3 of these species (C. sphagnumensis, C. clintoni and C. comosioculatus) were described in Belgium for the first time.

  20. Mining pollution and the diet of the purple-striped Gudgeon Mogurnda Mogurnda Richardson (Eleotridae) in the Finniss River, Northern Territory, Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffree, R.A.; Williams, N.J.

    1980-01-01

    During the dry season of 1974, collections of the purple-striped Gudgeon Mogurnda Mogurnda were taken from the Finniss River of the Northern Territory; during the wet season, this river receives acidic and metallic pollutants from the formerly mined area of Rum Jungle. The fish consumed a great variety of foods, with high abundances of dytiscidae, chironomidae, ceratopogonidae, trichoptera, odonata, copepoda, decapoda, and pisces. For no food was there a significant regression against habitat descriptors in both of the zones; this emphasizes that pollution effects are more complex than simply depressing or raising the abundances of the dietary species. Five foods were more abundant in the diets of the polluted zone, and three in those of the unpolluted zone. The dietary abundances of two foods, both crustacean, increased in the polluted zone, compared to the unpolluted zone, through the dry season. Two categories of foods: (1) those obtaining oxygen directly from the atmosphere or via a film or bubble of air; and (2) the converse set (aquatic respirers), were contrasted for their usefulness in distinguishing between the zones, by both hierarchical agglomerative and discriminant function analyses. One collection from the polluted zone was reclassified as unpolluted on the basis of its grouping behaviour. The relevance for pollution studies of dietary analysis of euryphagous fish, rather than sampling aquatic fauna directly, is discussed in terms of food substitution, switching, strategies for abundance and recovery by the fauna, and possible effects of the pollutants on the fish as an intervening collector. Downstream patterns of abundance of the invertebrate fauna in this study are broadly similar to those of other studies in which such chemically diverse metals as Pb, Zn, and Cu are the pollutants, but there are differences for some faunal components.

  1. The Influence of Host Plant Extrafloral Nectaries on Multitrophic Interactions: An Experimental Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Koptur, Suzanne; Jones, Ian M.; Peña, Jorge E.

    2015-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted with outplantings of the native perennial shrub Senna mexicana var. chapmanii in a semi-natural area adjacent to native pine rockland habitat in southern Florida. The presence of ants and the availability of extrafloral nectar were manipulated in a stratified random design. Insect communities were monitored and recorded over a period of six months with a view to addressing three main questions. Do ants provide biotic defense against key herbivores on S. chapmanii? Is the presence of ants on S. chapmanii mediated by EFN? Finally, are there ecological costs associated with the presence of ants on S. chapmanii, such as a reduction in alternative predator or parasitoid numbers? Herbivores on S. chapmanii included immature stages of three pierid butterflies, and adult weevils. Eight species of ants were associated with the plants, and other predators included spiders, ladybugs, wasps, and hemipterans. Parasitic, haemolymph-sucking midges (Ceratopogonidae) and parasitoid flies were also associated with the caterpillar herbivores, and possibly the extrafloral nectaries of the plants. The presence of ants did not appear to influence oviposition by butterflies, as numbers of lepidopterans of all developmental stages did not differ among treatments. Significantly more late instar caterpillars, however, were observed on plants with ants excluded, indicating that ants remove small caterpillars from plants. Substantially more alternative predators (spiders, ladybugs, and wasps) were observed on plants with ants excluded. Rates of parasitization did not differ among the treatments, but there were substantially fewer caterpillars succumbing to virus among those collected from control plants. We provide a rare look at facultative ant-plant mutualisms in the context of the many other interactions with which they overlap. We conclude that ants provide some biotic defense against herbivores on S. chapmanii, and plants benefit overall from the presence

  2. Sugar-feeding behaviour and longevity of European Culicoides biting midges.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, C; Mathis, A; Vorburger, C

    2015-03-01

    Most haematophagous insect vectors can also use sugar as an energy source; thus their sugar-feeding behaviour influences their longevity and blood-feeding rate and hence their vectorial capacity. Scant information is available on the sugar-feeding behaviour of Culicoides Latreille biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), which are vectors of bluetongue and Schmallenberg viruses. The longevity of laboratory-reared Culicoides nubeculosus (Meigen) under fluctuating temperatures (16 and 28 °C) and with access to water or water and blood was on average 6.4 days and 8.9 days, respectively, which was around one third of the lifespan of siblings with access to sugar or sugar and blood (22.2 days and 27.1 days, respectively). Access to honeydew significantly increased the midge's longevity, whereas the provision of extrafloral nectaries had no impact. Females with access to sugar produced a significantly higher number of eggs (65.5 ± 5.2) than their starved sisters (45.4 ± 8.4). More than 80% of field-caught female Culicoides from the two most abundant European groups, Obsoletus (n = 2243) and Pulicaris (n = 805), were fructose-positive. Fructose-positivity was high in all physiological stages and no seasonal variability was noted. The high rate of natural sugar feeding of Culicoides offers opportunities for the development of novel control strategies using toxic sugar baits and for the monitoring of vector-borne diseases using sugar-treated FTA (nucleic acid preservation) cards in the field.

  3. The Influence of Host Plant Extrafloral Nectaries on Multitrophic Interactions: An Experimental Investigation.

    PubMed

    Koptur, Suzanne; Jones, Ian M; Peña, Jorge E

    2015-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted with outplantings of the native perennial shrub Senna mexicana var. chapmanii in a semi-natural area adjacent to native pine rockland habitat in southern Florida. The presence of ants and the availability of extrafloral nectar were manipulated in a stratified random design. Insect communities were monitored and recorded over a period of six months with a view to addressing three main questions. Do ants provide biotic defense against key herbivores on S. chapmanii? Is the presence of ants on S. chapmanii mediated by EFN? Finally, are there ecological costs associated with the presence of ants on S. chapmanii, such as a reduction in alternative predator or parasitoid numbers? Herbivores on S. chapmanii included immature stages of three pierid butterflies, and adult weevils. Eight species of ants were associated with the plants, and other predators included spiders, ladybugs, wasps, and hemipterans. Parasitic, haemolymph-sucking midges (Ceratopogonidae) and parasitoid flies were also associated with the caterpillar herbivores, and possibly the extrafloral nectaries of the plants. The presence of ants did not appear to influence oviposition by butterflies, as numbers of lepidopterans of all developmental stages did not differ among treatments. Significantly more late instar caterpillars, however, were observed on plants with ants excluded, indicating that ants remove small caterpillars from plants. Substantially more alternative predators (spiders, ladybugs, and wasps) were observed on plants with ants excluded. Rates of parasitization did not differ among the treatments, but there were substantially fewer caterpillars succumbing to virus among those collected from control plants. We provide a rare look at facultative ant-plant mutualisms in the context of the many other interactions with which they overlap. We conclude that ants provide some biotic defense against herbivores on S. chapmanii, and plants benefit overall from the presence

  4. Environmental drivers of Culicoides phenology: how important is species-specific variation when determining disease policy?

    PubMed

    Searle, Kate R; Barber, James; Stubbins, Francesca; Labuschagne, Karien; Carpenter, Simon; Butler, Adam; Denison, Eric; Sanders, Christopher; Mellor, Philip S; Wilson, Anthony; Nelson, Noel; Gubbins, Simon; Purse, Bethan V

    2014-01-01

    Since 2006, arboviruses transmitted by Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) have caused significant disruption to ruminant production in northern Europe. The most serious incursions involved strains of bluetongue virus (BTV), which cause bluetongue (BT) disease. To control spread of BTV, movement of susceptible livestock is restricted with economic and animal welfare impacts. The timing of BTV transmission in temperate regions is partly determined by the seasonal presence of adult Culicoides females. Legislative measures therefore allow for the relaxation of ruminant movement restrictions during winter, when nightly light-suction trap catches of Culicoides fall below a threshold (the 'seasonally vector free period': SVFP). We analysed five years of time-series surveillance data from light-suction trapping in the UK to investigate whether significant inter-specific and yearly variation in adult phenology exists, and whether the SVFP is predictable from environmental factors. Because female vector Culicoides are not easily morphologically separated, inter-specific comparisons in phenology were drawn from male populations. We demonstrate significant inter-specific differences in Culicoides adult phenology with the season of Culicoides scoticus approximately eight weeks shorter than Culicoides obsoletus. Species-specific differences in the length of the SVFP were related to host density and local variation in landscape habitat. When the Avaritia Culicoides females were modelled as a group (as utilised in the SFVP), we were unable to detect links between environmental drivers and phenological metrics. We conclude that the current treatment of Avaritia Culicoides as a single group inhibits understanding of environmentally-driven spatial variation in species phenology and hinders the development of models for predicting the SVFP from environmental factors. Culicoides surveillance methods should be adapted to focus on concentrated assessments of species

  5. Comparison of two trapping methods for Culicoides biting midges and determination of African horse sickness virus prevalence in midge populations at Onderstepoort, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Scheffer, Elisabeth G; Venter, Gert J; Labuschagne, Karien; Page, Patrick C; Mullens, Bradley A; MacLachlan, N James; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Guthrie, Alan J

    2012-04-30

    Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are vectors of a variety of pathogens including African horse sickness virus (AHSV), a member of the family Reoviridae, genus Orbivirus. AHSV causes African horse sickness (AHS), an endemic disease of equids with an extremely high mortality rate in horses in sub-Saharan Africa. Culicoides (Avaritia) imicola Kieffer is considered to be the principal vector of AHSV and is the dominant Culicoides species in South Africa. Due to the global distribution of Culicoides vectors, there is a potential risk of AHS spreading from endemic areas to areas traditionally free of the disease, which could have a severe economical impact on the affected equine industry. As part of any risk assessment it is essential to monitor known vectors as well as potential vector species. In the present study, sampling of Culicoides insects was compared using overnight collections in the conventional Onderstepoort light trap and mechanical aspiration of midges at sunset from bait horses. Culicoides imicola was confirmed as the predominant species using both trapping methods. Other species, mainly Culicoides (Avaritia) bolitinos Meiswinkel and Culicoides (Avaritia) gulbenkiani Caeiro, were highly underrepresented in the light trap collections, but made a significant contribution to the mechanical aspiration catches. The time for optimal collection differed between the trapping methods, leading to the conclusion that mechanical aspiration is a useful addition to conventional light trap collection and possibly the better choice when investigating insect vectors. An infection rate of 1.14% was calculated for the midge population based on real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assays of collected Culicoides midges, which exceeds previous estimates. This is probably due to the increased sensitivity of the RT-qPCR assay used in this study as compared to the virus isolation assays used in previous studies. RT

  6. Control techniques for Culicoides biting midges and their application in the U.K. and northwestern Palaearctic.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, S; Mellor, P S; Torr, S J

    2008-09-01

    The recent emergence of bluetongue virus (Reoviridae: Orbivirus) (BTV) in northern Europe, for the first time in recorded history, has led to an urgent need for methods to control the disease caused by this virus and the midges that spread it. This paper reviews various methods of vector control that have been employed elsewhere and assesses their likely efficacy for controlling vectors of BTV in northern Europe. Methods of controlling Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) have included: (a) application of insecticides and pathogens to habitats where larvae develop; (b) environmental interventions to remove larval breeding sites; (c) controlling adult midges by treating either resting sites, such as animal housing, or host animals with insecticides; (d) housing livestock in screened buildings, and (e) using repellents or host kairomones to lure and kill adult midges. The major vectors of BTV in northern Europe are species from the Culicoides obsoletus (Meigen) and Culicoides pulicaris (L.) groups, for which there are scant data on breeding habits, resting behaviour and host-oriented responses. Consequently, there is little information on which to base a rational strategy for controlling midges or for predicting the likely impact of interventions. However, data extrapolated from the results of vector control operations conducted elsewhere, combined with some assessment of how acceptable or not different methods may be within northern Europe, indicate that the treatment of livestock and animal housing with pyrethroids, the use of midge-proofed stabling for viraemic or high-value animals and the promotion of good farm practice to at least partially eliminate local breeding sites are the best options currently available. Research to assess and improve the efficacy of these methods is required and, in the longer term, efforts should be made to develop better bait systems for monitoring and, possibly, controlling midges. All these studies will need better methods of

  7. A survey of Culicoides developmental sites on a farm in northern Spain, with a brief review of immature habitats of European species.

    PubMed

    González, Mikel; López, Sergio; Mullens, Bradley A; Baldet, Thierry; Goldarazena, Arturo

    2013-01-16

    Culicoides species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) belonging to the Obsoletus and Pulicaris groups are considered to be the main vectors of bluetongue virus (BTV) in non Mediterranean Europe. Selected terrestrial microhabitats (n=17) on a farm in northern Spain were sampled repeatedly over a year-long period and characterized for use by Culicoides species for immature development. Concurrent use of CDC light traps showed the presence of 37 species and 66,575 specimens of adult Culicoides. A total of 28 species and 11,396 individuals emerged from laboratory-maintained soil samples. Culicoides obsoletus and Culicoides scoticus (pooled as Obsoletus complex) were particularly abundant (comprising 58.6% and 74.5% of the total collections in light traps and emergence traps respectively). Potential key vectors of animal viruses (such as BTV) were found in two main terrestrial types of microhabitats. In the case of C. obsoletus, different types of manure (old and composted manure, manure mixed with organic matter, and fresh manure) produced most of the specimens. In contrast, larvae of C. scoticus and Culicoides lupicaris were associated with soil substantially comprised of rotting leaf litter that included the parasitic plant Lathraea clandestina. Several species, Culicoides festivipennis, Culicoides punctatus and Culicoides brunnicans, were very common in mud at pond margins. Indeed, pond microhabitats and runoff below barn rooflines supported the greatest species richness. In the pond habitat, 49.4% of Culicoides specimens emerged from mud at the water edge, as opposed to 50 cm above (32.4%) and 1 meter above waterline (18%). Similar species richness, but statistically significant differences in abundance, were observed among the four pond microhabitats. Overall, the majority of the specimens were found in the upper layer (0-3 cm), except in manure, where they preferred deeper layers (>6 cm). Maximum peaks of abundance occurred in both light traps and soil samples in summer

  8. A preliminary account of the fly fauna in Jabal Shada al-A’la Nature Reserve, Saudi Arabia, with new records and biogeographical remarks (Diptera, Insecta)

    PubMed Central

    El-Hawagry, Magdi S.; Abdel-Dayem, Mahmoud S.; Elgharbawy, Ali A.; Dhafer, Hathal M. Al

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The first list of insects of Al-Baha Province, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) was published in 2013 and contained a total of 582 species; an addendum to this list was published in 2015 adding 142 species and bringing the total number recorded from the province to 724 insect species representing 17 orders. The previous two studies excluded Jabal Shada al-A’la Nature Reserve (SANR), so the present study in SANR, as belonging to Al-Baha Province, are complementary to the previous two. The present study presents a preliminary list of Diptera (Insecta) in SANR, with remarks on their zoogeography, and is the first of a series of planned ecological and systematic studies on different insect orders as one of the outputs of a project proposed to study the entire insect fauna of SANR. A total number of 119 Diptera species belonging to 87 genera, 31 tribes, 42 subfamilies, and representing 30 families has been recorded from SANR in the present study. Some species have been identified only to the genus level and listed herein only because this is the first time to record their genera in KSA. Fourteen of the species are recorded for the first time for KSA, namely: Forcipomyia sahariensis Kieffer, 1923 [Ceratopogonidae]; Chaetosciara sp. [Sciaridae]; Neolophonotus sp.1; Neolophonotus sp.2; Promachus sinaiticus Efflatoun, 1934; Saropogon longicornis (Macquart, 1838); Saropogon sp. [Asilidae]; Spogostylum tripunctatum (Pallas in Wiedemann, 1818) [Bombyliidae]; Phycus sp. [Therevidae]; Hemeromyia sp.; Meoneura palaestinensis Hennig, 1937 [Carnidae]; Desmometopa inaurata Lamb, 1914 [Milichiidae]; Stomoxys niger Macquart, 1851 [Muscidae]; and Sarcophaga palestinensis (Lehrer, 1998) [Sarcophagidae]. Zoogeographic affinities of recorded fly species suggest a closer affiliation to the Afrotropical region (46%) than to the Palearctic region (23.5%) or the Oriental region (2.5%). This supports the previous studies’ conclusions and emphasizes the fact that parts of the Arabian

  9. Protection of horses against Culicoides biting midges in different housing systems in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Lincoln, V J; Page, P C; Kopp, C; Mathis, A; von Niederhäusern, R; Burger, D; Herholz, C

    2015-06-15

    Species belonging to the Culicoides complexes (Diptera, Ceratopogonidae), obsoletus and pulicaris, in Switzerland, are potential vectors of both bluetongue virus (BTV) and African horse sickness virus (AHSV). The epidemic of BTV in 2006 and 2007 in Europe has highlighted the risk of introduction and spread of vector-borne diseases in previously non-endemic areas. As a measure of prevention, as part of an integrated control programme in the event of an outbreak of African horse sickness (AHS), it is of utmost importance to prevent, or substantially reduce, contact between horses and Culicoides. The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of three protection systems, net, fan, repellent, or combinations thereof, with regard to their potential to reduce contact between horses and Culicoides. Three different equine housing systems, including individual boxes (BX), group housing systems (GR), and individual boxes with permanently accessible paddock (BP) were used. The efficacy of the protection systems were evaluated by comparing the total number counts of collected female Culicoides, of non-blood-fed and blood-fed Culicoides, respectively, with UV black light traps. The study was conducted over 3 summer months during 2012 and 2013 each and focused on the efficacy and practicality of the protection systems. The repellent was tested in 2012 only and not further investigated in 2013, as it showed no significant effect in reducing Culicoides collected in the light traps. Net protection system provided the best overall protection for the total number of female Culicoides, non-blood-fed and blood-fed Culicoides in all tested housing systems. The net, with a pore size of 0.1825 mm(2), reduced the total number of Culicoides collected in the housing systems BP, GR and BX by 98%, 85% and 67%, respectively. However, in the GR housing system, no significant difference between the effectiveness of the fan and the net were determined for any of the three Culicoides

  10. Culicoides vector species on three South American camelid farms seropositive for bluetongue virus serotype 8 in Germany 2008/2009.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Claudia; Ziller, Mario; Kampen, Helge; Gauly, Matthias; Beer, Martin; Grevelding, Christoph G; Hoffmann, Bernd; Bauer, Christian; Werner, Doreen

    2015-12-15

    Palearctic species of Culicoides (Diptera, Ceratopogonidae), in particular of the Obsoletus and Pulicaris complexes, were identified as putative vectors of bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV-8) on ruminant farms during the epizootic in Germany from 2006 to 2009. BTV may cause severe morbidity and mortality in ruminants and sporadically in South American camelids (SAC). However, the fauna of Culicoides spp. on SAC farms has not been investigated. Therefore, the ceratopogonid fauna was monitored on three farms with BTV-seropositive SAC in Germany. Black-light traps were set up on pastures and in stables from summer 2008 to autumn 2009. Additionally, ceratopogonids were caught in emergence traps mounted on llama dung and dung-free pasture from spring to autumn 2009. After morphological identification, selected Culicoides samples were analysed for BTV-RNA by real-time RT-PCR. The effects of the variables 'location', 'temperature' and 'humidity' on the number of Culicoides caught in black-light traps were modelled using multivariable Poisson regression. In total, 26 species of Culicoides and six other genera of biting midges were identified. The most abundant Culicoides spp. collected both outdoors and indoors with black-light traps belonged to the Obsoletus (77.4%) and Pulicaris (16.0%) complexes. The number of Culicoides peaked in summer, while no biting midges were caught during the winter months. Daily collections of Culicoides were mainly influenced by the location and depended on the interaction of temperature and humidity. In the emergence traps, species of the Obsoletus complex predominated the collections. In summary, the absence of BTV-RNA in any of the analysed Culicoides midges and in the BTV-seropositive SAC on the three farms together with the differences in the pathogenesis of BTV-8 in SAC compared to ruminants suggests a negligible role of SAC in the spread of the virus. Although SAC farms may provide similar suitable habitats for putative Culicoides

  11. Response of biotic communities to salinity changes in a Mediterranean hypersaline stream

    PubMed Central

    Velasco, Josefa; Millán, Andrés; Hernández, Juan; Gutiérrez, Cayetano; Abellán, Pedro; Sánchez, David; Ruiz, Mar

    2006-01-01

    Background This study investigates the relationship between salinity and biotic communities (primary producers and macroinvertebrates) in Rambla Salada, a Mediterranean hypersaline stream in SE Spain. Since the 1980's, the mean salinity of the stream has fallen from about 100 g L-1 to 35.5 g L-1, due to intensive irrigated agriculture in the watershed. Furthermore, large dilutions occur occasionally when the water irrigation channel suffers cracks. Results Along the salinity gradient studied (3.5 – 76.4 g L-1) Cladophora glomerata and Ruppia maritima biomass decreased with increasing salinity, while the biomass of epipelic algae increased. Diptera and Coleoptera species dominated the community both in disturbed as in re-established conditions. Most macroinvertebrates species found in Rambla Salada stream are euryhaline species with a broad range of salinity tolerance. Eight of them were recorded in natural hypersaline conditions (~100 g L-1) prior to important change in land use of the watershed: Ephydra flavipes, Stratyomis longicornis, Nebrioporus ceresyi, N. baeticus, Berosus hispanicus, Enochrus falcarius, Ochthebius cuprescens and Sigara selecta. However, other species recorded in the past, such as Ochthebius glaber, O. notabilis and Enochrus politus, were restricted to a hypersaline source or absent from Rambla Salada. The dilution of salinity to 3.5 – 6.8 gL-1 allowed the colonization of species with low salininty tolerance, such as Melanopsis praemorsa, Anax sp., Simulidae, Ceratopogonidae and Tanypodinae. The abundance of Ephydra flavipes and Ochthebius corrugatus showed a positive significant response to salinity, while Anax sp., Simulidae, S. selecta, N. ceresyi, N. baeticus, and B. hispanicus showed significant negative correlations. The number of total macroinvertebrate taxa, Diptera and Coleoptera species, number of families, Margalef's index and Shannon's diversity index decreased with increasing salinity. However, the rest of community

  12. Genetic characterization and molecular identification of the bloodmeal sources of the potential bluetongue vector Culicoides obsoletus in the Canary Islands, Spain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) biting midges are vectors for a diversity of pathogens including bluetongue virus (BTV) that generate important economic losses. BTV has expanded its range in recent decades, probably due to the expansion of its main vector and the presence of other autochthonous competent vectors. Although the Canary Islands are still free of bluetongue disease (BTD), Spain and Europe have had to face up to a spread of bluetongue with disastrous consequences. Therefore, it is essential to identify the distribution of biting midges and understand their feeding patterns in areas susceptible to BTD. To that end, we captured biting midges on two farms in the Canary Islands (i) to identify the midge species in question and characterize their COI barcoding region and (ii) to ascertain the source of their bloodmeals using molecular tools. Methods Biting midges were captured using CDC traps baited with a 4-W blacklight (UV) bulb on Gran Canaria and on Tenerife. Biting midges were quantified and identified according to their wing patterns. A 688 bp segment of the mitochondrial COI gene of 20 biting midges (11 from Gran Canaria and 9 from Tenerife) were PCR amplified using the primers LCO1490 and HCO2198. Moreover, after selected all available females showing any rest of blood in their abdomen, a nested-PCR approach was used to amplify a fragment of the COI gene from vertebrate DNA contained in bloodmeals. The origin of bloodmeals was identified by comparison with the nucleotide-nucleotide basic alignment search tool (BLAST). Results The morphological identification of 491 female biting midges revealed the presence of a single morphospecies belonging to the Obsoletus group. When sequencing the barcoding region of the 20 females used to check genetic variability, we identified two haplotypes differing in a single base. Comparison analysis using the nucleotide-nucleotide basic alignment search tool (BLAST) showed that both haplotypes belong to

  13. Arboviruses pathogenic for domestic and wild animals.

    PubMed

    Hubálek, Zdenek; Rudolf, Ivo; Nowotny, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this chapter is to provide an updated and concise systematic review on taxonomy, history, arthropod vectors, vertebrate hosts, animal disease, and geographic distribution of all arboviruses known to date to cause disease in homeotherm (endotherm) vertebrates, except those affecting exclusively man. Fifty arboviruses pathogenic for animals have been documented worldwide, belonging to seven families: Togaviridae (mosquito-borne Eastern, Western, and Venezuelan equine encephalilitis viruses; Sindbis, Middelburg, Getah, and Semliki Forest viruses), Flaviviridae (mosquito-borne yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, Murray Valley encephalitis, West Nile, Usutu, Israel turkey meningoencephalitis, Tembusu and Wesselsbron viruses; tick-borne encephalitis, louping ill, Omsk hemorrhagic fever, Kyasanur Forest disease, and Tyuleniy viruses), Bunyaviridae (tick-borne Nairobi sheep disease, Soldado, and Bhanja viruses; mosquito-borne Rift Valley fever, La Crosse, Snowshoe hare, and Cache Valley viruses; biting midges-borne Main Drain, Akabane, Aino, Shuni, and Schmallenberg viruses), Reoviridae (biting midges-borne African horse sickness, Kasba, bluetongue, epizootic hemorrhagic disease of deer, Ibaraki, equine encephalosis, Peruvian horse sickness, and Yunnan viruses), Rhabdoviridae (sandfly/mosquito-borne bovine ephemeral fever, vesicular stomatitis-Indiana, vesicular stomatitis-New Jersey, vesicular stomatitis-Alagoas, and Coccal viruses), Orthomyxoviridae (tick-borne Thogoto virus), and Asfarviridae (tick-borne African swine fever virus). They are transmitted to animals by five groups of hematophagous arthropods of the subphyllum Chelicerata (order Acarina, families Ixodidae and Argasidae-ticks) or members of the class Insecta: mosquitoes (family Culicidae); biting midges (family Ceratopogonidae); sandflies (subfamily Phlebotominae); and cimicid bugs (family Cimicidae). Arboviral diseases in endotherm animals may therefore be classified as: tick

  14. Genetic structure and population dynamics of the biting midges Culicoides obsoletus and Culicoides scoticus: implications for the transmission and maintenance of bluetongue.

    PubMed

    Pili, E; Carcangiu, L; Oppo, M; Marchi, A

    2010-12-01

    Culicoides species belonging to the Obsoletus complex (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) have been indicated as primary bluetongue (BT) vectors in many European countries and their possible involvement in the maintenance and overwintering of BT viruses has been suggested, even in regions where Culicoides imicola Keiffer is the main vector. The Obsoletus complex includes two predominant taxa, Culicoides obsoletus (Meigen) and Culicoides scoticus Downes & Kettle. However, the role played by each species in the epidemiology of BT is still unknown. Taxonomic identification is mainly based on the morphology of male genitalia and the lack of other reliable diagnostic features makes the screening of trap-collected vector populations, mainly females, particularly difficult. Although molecular markers have facilitated species identification, little information is yet available on the biology, abundance and population dynamics of the two taxa. The aim of this work was to investigate the genetic profile and temporal distribution of C. obsoletus and C. scoticus by using isozyme electrophoresis applied to adult midges, collected weekly at two selected farms in southern Sardinia. A total of nine enzyme loci were analysed and five of them provided diagnostic allozyme markers (Hk, Mdh, Pgi, Idh-1 and Idh-2). Nei's genetic distance between the two taxa was in the range of other well-separated taxa (D = 1.792), supporting their status as true species. Culicoides scoticus represented almost 61% of the 562 specimens analysed; its genetic structure was characterized by a very low level of intra-population variation (mean heterozygosity H(e) = 0.019) and higher genetic divergence between populations (F(ST) = 0.0016) than in C. obsoletus. The latter species had significantly more heterozygotes (H(e) = 0.123), a higher percentage of polymorphic loci, and no inter-population differentiation (F(ST) ≅ 0). We suggest that different biological and ecological constraints, such as breeding habitat