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Sample records for cerebellar cortex

  1. An integrator circuit in cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Maex, Reinoud; Steuber, Volker

    2013-09-01

    The brain builds dynamic models of the body and the outside world to predict the consequences of actions and stimuli. A well-known example is the oculomotor integrator, which anticipates the position-dependent elasticity forces acting on the eye ball by mathematically integrating over time oculomotor velocity commands. Many models of neural integration have been proposed, based on feedback excitation, lateral inhibition or intrinsic neuronal nonlinearities. We report here that a computational model of the cerebellar cortex, a structure thought to implement dynamic models, reveals a hitherto unrecognized integrator circuit. In this model, comprising Purkinje cells, molecular layer interneurons and parallel fibres, Purkinje cells were able to generate responses lasting more than 10 s, to which both neuronal and network mechanisms contributed. Activation of the somatic fast sodium current by subthreshold voltage fluctuations was able to maintain pulse-evoked graded persistent activity, whereas lateral inhibition among Purkinje cells via recurrent axon collaterals further prolonged the responses to step and sine wave stimulation. The responses of Purkinje cells decayed with a time-constant whose value depended on their baseline spike rate, with integration vanishing at low (< 1 per s) and high rates (> 30 per s). The model predicts that the apparently fast circuit of the cerebellar cortex may control the timing of slow processes without having to rely on sensory feedback. Thus, the cerebellar cortex may contain an adaptive temporal integrator, with the sensitivity of integration to the baseline spike rate offering a potential mechanism of plasticity of the response time-constant. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Cerebellar dentate nuclei lesions alter prefrontal cortex dendritic spine morphology.

    PubMed

    Bauer, David J; Peterson, Todd C; Swain, Rodney A

    2014-01-28

    Anatomical tracing studies in primates have revealed neural tracts from the cerebellar dentate nuclei to prefrontal cortex, implicating a cerebellar role in nonmotor processes. Experiments in rats examining the functional role of this cerebellothalamocortical pathway have demonstrated the development of visuospatial and motivational deficits following lesions of the dentate nuclei, in the absence of motor impairment. These behavioral deficits possibly occur due to structural modifications of the cerebral cortex secondary to loss of cerebellar input. The current study characterized morphological alterations in prefrontal cortex important for visuospatial and motivational processes following bilateral cerebellar dentate nuclei lesions. Rats received either bilateral electrolytic cerebellar dentate nuclei lesions or sham surgery followed by a 30-day recovery. Randomly selected Golgi-impregnated neurons in prefrontal cortex were examined for analysis. Measures of branch length and spine density revealed no differences between lesioned and sham rats in either apical or basilar arbors; however, the proportion of immature to mature spines significantly decreased in lesioned rats as compared to sham controls, with reductions of 33% in the basilar arbor and 28% in the apical arbor. Although expected pruning of branches and spines did not occur, the results are consistent with the hypothesis that cerebellar lesions influence prefrontal morphology and support the possibility that functional deficits following cerebellar dentate nuclei lesions are related to prefrontal morphological alteration.

  3. Cerebellar Processing of Sensory Inputs Primes Motor Cortex Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Velayudhan, B.; Hubsch, C.; Pradeep, S.; Roze, E.; Vidailhet, M.; Meunier, S.; Kishore, A.

    2013-01-01

    Plasticity of the human primary motor cortex (M1) has a critical role in motor control and learning. The cerebellum facilitates these functions using sensory feedback. We investigated whether cerebellar processing of sensory afferent information influences the plasticity of the primary motor cortex (M1). Theta-burst stimulation protocols (TBS), both excitatory and inhibitory, were used to modulate the excitability of the posterior cerebellar cortex and to condition an ongoing M1 plasticity. M1 plasticity was subsequently induced in 2 different ways: by paired associative stimulation (PAS) involving sensory processing and TBS that exclusively involves intracortical circuits of M1. Cerebellar excitation attenuated the PAS-induced M1 plasticity, whereas cerebellar inhibition enhanced and prolonged it. Furthermore, cerebellar inhibition abolished the topography-specific response of PAS-induced M1 plasticity, with the effects spreading to adjacent motor maps. Conversely, cerebellar excitation had no effect on the TBS-induced M1 plasticity. This demonstrates the key role of the cerebellum in priming M1 plasticity, and we propose that it is likely to occur at the thalamic or olivo-dentate nuclear level by influencing the sensory processing. We suggest that such a cerebellar priming of M1 plasticity could shape the impending motor command by favoring or inhibiting the recruitment of several muscle representations. PMID:22351647

  4. Cerebellar atrophy without cerebellar cortex hyperintensity in infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy (INAD) due to PLA2G6 mutation.

    PubMed

    Biancheri, Roberta; Rossi, Andrea; Alpigiani, Giannina; Filocamo, Mirella; Gandolfo, Carlo; Lorini, Renata; Minetti, Carlo

    2007-05-01

    Infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy (INAD) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized by infantile onset and rapid progression of psychomotor regression and hypotonia evolving into spasticity. The neuroradiologic hallmark of the disease is represented by cerebellar atrophy and signal hyperintensity in the cerebellar cortex on MR T2-weighted images. We report a 2-year-old boy with psychomotor regression and hypotonia carrying a homozygous 5' splice site mutation in PLA2G6 gene, whose brain MRI revealed cerebellar atrophy with normal cerebellar cortex signal intensity. The absence of the signal hyperintensity of the cerebellar cortex does not rule out the diagnosis of INAD.

  5. Neocortical networks entrain neuronal circuits in cerebellar cortex

    PubMed Central

    Roš, Hana; Sachdev, Robert N. S.; Yu, Yuguo; Šestan, Nenad; McCormick, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Activity in neocortex is often characterized by synchronized oscillations of neurons and networks, resulting in the generation of a local field potential and electroencephalogram. Do the neuronal networks of the cerebellum also generate synchronized oscillations and are they under the influence of those in the neocortex? Here we show that in the absence of any overt external stimulus, the cerebellar cortex generates a slow oscillation that is correlated with that of the neocortex. Disruption of the neocortical slow oscillation abolishes the cerebellar slow oscillation, whereas blocking cerebellar activity has no overt effect on the neocortex. We provide evidence that the cerebellar slow oscillation results in part from the activation of granule, Golgi, and Purkinje neurons. In particular, we show that granule and Golgi cells discharge trains of single spikes, and Purkinje cells generate complex spikes, during the Up state of the slow oscillation. Purkinje cell simple spiking is weakly related to the cerebellar and neocortical slow oscillation in a minority of cells. Our results indicate that the cerebellum generates rhythmic network activity that can be recorded as an LFP in the anesthetized animal, which is driven by synchronized oscillations of the neocortex. Furthermore, we show that correlations between neocortical and cerebellar LFPs persist in the awake animal, indicating that neocortical circuits modulate cerebellar neurons in a similar fashion in natural behavioral states. Thus, the projection neurons of the neocortex collectively exert a driving and modulatory influence on cerebellar network activity. PMID:19692605

  6. Early degeneration of the cerebellar cortex, particularly the granular cells.

    PubMed

    Bugiani, O; Berio, A; Di Stefano, A; Mangiante, G; Mancardi, G L; Leonardi, A

    1978-12-07

    An 8 month old infant, who died of severe gastroenteritis, presented a degeneration of the cerebellar cortex involving cells arising from the outer granular layer as well as Purkinje and Golgi II cells. Residual Purkinje cells showed vacuolar change of the cell body and dendritic abnormalities. Related lesions were atrophy of the inferior olives and degeneration of the mossy fibers.

  7. Caytaxin Deficiency Disrupts Signaling Pathways in Cerebellar Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jianfeng; Gong, Suzhen; LeDoux, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    The genetically dystonic (dt) rat, an autosomal recessive model of generalized dystonia, harbors an insertional mutation in Atcay. As a result, dt rats are deficient in Atcay transcript and the neuronally-restricted protein caytaxin. Previous electrophysiological and biochemical studies have defined olivocerebellar pathways, particularly the climbing fiber projection to Purkinje cells, as a site of significant functional abnormality in dt rats. In normal rats, Atcay transcript is abundantly expressed in the granular and Purkinje cell layers of cerebellar cortex. To better understand the consequences of caytaxin deficiency in cerebellar cortex, differential gene expression was examined in dt rats and their normal littermates. Data from oligonucleotide microarrays and quantitative real-time RT-PCR (QRT-PCR) identified phosphatidylinositol signaling pathways, calcium homeostasis, and extracellular matrix interactions as domains of cellular dysfunction in dt rats. In dt rats, genes encoding the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRH-R1, Crhr1) and calcium-transporting plasma membrane ATPase 4 (PMCA4, Atp2b4) showed the greatest up-regulation with QRT-PCR. Immunocytochemical experiments demonstrated that CRH-R1, CRH, and PMCA4 were up-regulated in cerebellar cortex of mutant rats. Along with previous electrophysiological and pharmacological studies, our data indicate that caytaxin plays a critical role in the molecular response of Purkinje cells to climbing fiber input. Caytaxin may also contribute to maturational events in cerebellar cortex. PMID:17092653

  8. Caytaxin deficiency disrupts signaling pathways in cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Xiao, J; Gong, S; Ledoux, M S

    2007-01-19

    The genetically dystonic (dt) rat, an autosomal recessive model of generalized dystonia, harbors an insertional mutation in Atcay. As a result, dt rats are deficient in Atcay transcript and the neuronally-restricted protein caytaxin. Previous electrophysiological and biochemical studies have defined olivocerebellar pathways, particularly the climbing fiber projection to Purkinje cells, as sites of significant functional abnormality in dt rats. In normal rats, Atcay transcript is abundantly expressed in the granular and Purkinje cell layers of cerebellar cortex. To better understand the consequences of caytaxin deficiency in cerebellar cortex, differential gene expression was examined in dt rats and their normal littermates. Data from oligonucleotide microarrays and quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR (QRT-PCR) identified phosphatidylinositol signaling pathways, calcium homeostasis, and extracellular matrix interactions as domains of cellular dysfunction in dt rats. In dt rats, genes encoding the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRH-R1, Crhr1) and plasma membrane calcium-dependent ATPase 4 (PMCA4, Atp2b4) showed the greatest up-regulation with QRT-PCR. Immunocytochemical experiments demonstrated that CRH-R1, CRH, and PMCA4 were up-regulated in cerebellar cortex of mutant rats. Along with previous electrophysiological and pharmacological studies, our data indicate that caytaxin plays a critical role in the molecular response of Purkinje cells to climbing fiber input. Caytaxin may also contribute to maturational events in cerebellar cortex.

  9. Electrophysiological monitoring of injury progression in the rat cerebellar cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ordek, Gokhan; Proddutur, Archana; Santhakumar, Vijayalakshmi; Pfister, Bryan J.; Sahin, Mesut

    2014-01-01

    The changes of excitability in affected neural networks can be used as a marker to study the temporal course of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The cerebellum is an ideal platform to study brain injury mechanisms at the network level using the electrophysiological methods. Within its crystalline morphology, the cerebellar cortex contains highly organized topographical subunits that are defined by two main inputs, the climbing (CFs) and mossy fibers (MFs). Here we demonstrate the use of cerebellar evoked potentials (EPs) mediated through these afferent systems for monitoring the injury progression in a rat model of fluid percussion injury (FPI). A mechanical tap on the dorsal hand was used as a stimulus, and EPs were recorded from the paramedian lobule (PML) of the posterior cerebellum via multi-electrode arrays (MEAs). Post-injury evoked response amplitudes (EPAs) were analyzed on a daily basis for 1 week and compared with pre-injury values. We found a trend of consistently decreasing EPAs in all nine animals, losing as much as 72 ± 4% of baseline amplitudes measured before the injury. Notably, our results highlighted two particular time windows; the first 24 h of injury in the acute period and day-3 to day-7 in the delayed period where the largest drops (~50% and 24%) were observed in the EPAs. In addition, cross-correlations of spontaneous signals between electrode pairs declined (from 0.47 ± 0.1 to 0.35 ± 0.04, p < 0.001) along with the EPAs throughout the week of injury. In support of the electrophysiological findings, immunohistochemical analysis at day-7 post-injury showed detectable Purkinje cell loss at low FPI pressures and more with the largest pressures used. Our results suggest that sensory evoked potentials (SEPs) recorded from the cerebellar surface can be a useful technique to monitor the course of cerebellar injury and identify the phases of injury progression even at mild levels. PMID:25346664

  10. Microarchitectural changes during development of the cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Mecha, Miriam; Peña-Melián, Angel L; Blanco, Maria J

    2010-01-01

    The cerebellum is a highly conserved structure in the Central Nervous System (CNS) of vertebrates, and is involved in the coordination of voluntary motor behaviour. Supporting this function, the cerebellar cortex presents a layered structure which requires a precise spatial and temporal coordination of proliferation, migration and differentiation events. One of the characteristics of the developing cortex is the formation of the external granule cell layer (EGL) in the outermost part. The EGL is a highly proliferative transient layer which disappears when cells migrate inwards to form the inner granule cell layer. The balance between proliferation and migration leads to changes in EGL thickness, and might be related to "indentations" observed in the surface of the developing chick cerebellum. We have extended the observation of this feature to quail and mouse, supporting the idea that this phenomenon forms part of the mechanisms of cerebellar morphogenesis. Different factors involved in both mitotic activity and migration were analyzed in this study. Our results indicate that proliferation, more than formation of raphes for cell migration, is involved in the formation of indentations in the EGL. In addition, we show that vessels penetrating from the pial surface divide the EGL into regular regions at the time of the appearance of bulges and furrows. We conclude that indentations are the result of a coincidence in time of both the increase in thickness of the EGL and the establishment of the embryonic vascular pattern, which confers a characteristic transitory morphology to the surface of folia.

  11. Cerebellar cortex and cerebellar nuclei are concomitantly activated during eyeblink conditioning: a 7T fMRI study in humans.

    PubMed

    Thürling, Markus; Kahl, Fabian; Maderwald, Stefan; Stefanescu, Roxana M; Schlamann, Marc; Boele, Henk-Jan; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Diedrichsen, Jörn; Ladd, Mark E; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan K E; Timmann, Dagmar

    2015-01-21

    There are controversies whether learning of conditioned eyeblink responses primarily takes place within the cerebellar cortex, the interposed nuclei, or both. It has also been suggested that the cerebellar cortex may be important during early stages of learning, and that there is a shift to the cerebellar nuclei during later stages. As yet, human studies have provided little to resolve this question. In the present study, we established a setup that allows ultra-high-field 7T functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the cerebellar cortex and interposed cerebellar nuclei simultaneously during delay eyeblink conditioning in humans. Event-related fMRI signals increased concomitantly in the cerebellar cortex and nuclei during early acquisition of conditioned eyeblink responses in 20 healthy human subjects. ANOVAs with repeated-measures showed significant effects of time across five blocks of 20 conditioning trials in the cortex and nuclei (p < 0.05, permutation corrected). Activations were most pronounced in, but not limited to, lobules VI and interposed nuclei. Increased activations were most prominent at the first time the maximum number of conditioned responses was achieved. Our data are consistent with a simultaneous and synergistic two-site model of learning during acquisition of classically conditioned eyeblinks. Because increased MRI signal reflects synaptic activity, concomitantly increased signals in the cerebellar nuclei and cortex are consistent with findings of learning related potentiation at the mossy fiber to nuclear cell synapse and mossy fiber to granule cell synapse. Activity related to the expression of conditioned responses, however, cannot be excluded.

  12. Laterality Differences in Cerebellar-Motor Cortex Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Schlerf, John E; Galea, Joseph M; Spampinato, Danny; Celnik, Pablo A

    2015-07-01

    Lateralization of function is an important organizational feature of the motor system. Each effector is predominantly controlled by the contralateral cerebral cortex and the ipsilateral cerebellum. Transcranial magnetic stimulation studies have revealed hemispheric differences in the stimulation strength required to evoke a muscle response from the primary motor cortex (M1), with the dominant hemisphere typically requiring less stimulation than the nondominant. The current study assessed whether the strength of the connection between the cerebellum and M1 (CB-M1), known to change in association with motor learning, have hemispheric differences and whether these differences have any behavioral correlate. We observed, in right-handed individuals, that the connection between the right cerebellum and left M1 is typically stronger than the contralateral network. Behaviorally, we detected no lateralized learning processes, though we did find a significant effect on the amplitude of reaching movements across hands. Furthermore, we observed that the strength of the CB-M1 connection is correlated with the amplitude variability of reaching movements, a measure of movement precision, where stronger connectivity was associated with better precision. These findings indicate that lateralization in the motor system is present beyond the primary motor cortex, and points to an association between cerebellar M1 connectivity and movement execution. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Re-defining the cerebellar cortex as an assembly of non-uniform Purkinje cell microcircuits

    PubMed Central

    Cerminara, Nadia L; Lang, Eric J; Sillitoe, Roy V; Apps, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The adult mammalian cerebellar cortex is generally assumed to have a uniform cytoarchitecture. Differences in cerebellar function are thought to arise, in the main, through distinct patterns of input and output connectivity, rather than as a result of variations in cortical microcircuitry. However, evidence from anatomical, physiological and genetic studies is increasingly challenging this orthodoxy and there are now various lines of evidence that the cerebellar cortex is non uniform. Here we develop the hypothesis that regional differences in cerebellar cortical microcircuit properties lead to important differences in information processing. PMID:25601779

  14. Qualitative and quantitative aspects of the microanatomy of the African elephant cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Maseko, Busisiwe C; Jacobs, Bob; Spocter, Muhammad A; Sherwood, Chet C; Hof, Patrick R; Manger, Paul R

    2013-01-01

    The current study provides a number of novel observations on the organization and structure of the cerebellar cortex of the African elephant by using a combination of basic neuroanatomical and immunohistochemical stains with Golgi and stereologic analysis. While the majority of our observations indicate that the cerebellar cortex of the African elephant is comparable to other mammalian species, several features were unique to the elephant. The three-layered organization of the cerebellar cortex, the neuronal types and some aspects of the expression of calcium-binding proteins were common to a broad range of mammalian species. The Lugaro neurons observed in the elephant were greatly enlarged in comparison to those of other large-brained mammals, suggesting a possible alteration in the processing of neural information in the elephant cerebellar cortex. Analysis of Golgi impregnations indicated that the dendritic complexity of the different interneuron types was higher in elephants than other mammals. Expression of parvalbumin in the parallel fibers and calbindin expressed in the stellate and basket cells also suggested changes in the elephant cerebellar neuronal circuitry. The stereologic analysis confirmed and extended previous observations by demonstrating that neuronal density is low in the elephant cerebellar cortex, providing for a larger volume fraction of the neuropil. With previous results indicating that the elephants have the largest relative cerebellar size amongst mammals, and one of the absolutely largest mammalian cerebella, the current observations suggest that the elephants have a greater volume of a potentially more complexly organized cerebellar cortex compared to other mammals. This quantitatively larger and more complex cerebellar cortex likely represents part of the neural machinery required to control the complex motor patterns involved in movement of the trunk and the production of infrasonic vocalizations. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Diversity and complexity of roles of granule cells in the cerebellar cortex. Editorial.

    PubMed

    Manto, Mario; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2012-03-01

    The cerebellar granule cell, the most numerous neurons in the brain, forms the main excitatory neuron of the cerebellar cortical circuitry. Granule cells are synaptically connected with both mossy fibers and Golgi cells inside specialized structures called glomeruli, and thereby, they are subject to both feed-forward and feed-back inhibition. Their unique architecture with about four dendrites and a single axon ascending in the cerebellar cortex to bifurcate into two parallel fibers making synapses with Purkinje neurons has attracted numerous scientists. Recent advances show that they are much more than just relays of mossy fibers. They perform diverse and complex transformations in the spatiotemporal domain. This special issue highlights novel avenues in our understanding of the roles of this key neuronal population of the cerebellar cortex, ranging from developmental up to physiological and pathological points of view.

  16. Loss of connexin36 in rat hippocampus and cerebellar cortex in persistent Borna disease virus infection.

    PubMed

    Köster-Patzlaff, Christiane; Hosseini, Seyed Mehdi; Reuss, Bernhard

    2009-03-01

    Neonatal Borna disease virus (BDV) infection of the Lewis rat leads to progressive degeneration of dentate gyrus granule cells, and cerebellar Purkinje neurons. Our aim here was to clarify whether BDV interfered with the formation of electrical synapses, and we, therefore, analysed expression of the neuronal gap junction protein connexin36 (Cx36) in the Lewis rat hippocampal formation, and cerebellar cortex, 4 and 8 weeks after neonatal infection. Semiquantitative RT-PCR, revealed a BDV-dependent decrease in Cx36 mRNA in the hippocampal formation 4 and 8 weeks post-infection (p.i.), and in the cerebellar cortex 8 weeks p.i. Correspondingly, immunofluorescent staining revealed reduced Cx36 immunoreactivity in both dentate gyrus, and ammons horn CA3 region, 4 and 8 weeks post-infection. In the cerebellar cortex, Cx36 immunoreactivity was detected only 8 weeks post-infection in the molecular layer, where it was down regulated by BDV. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, distinct BDV-dependent reductions in Cx36 mRNA and protein in the rat hippocampal formation and cerebellar cortex, suggesting altered neuronal network properties to be an important feature of persistent viral brain infections.

  17. Comparative neuronal morphology of the cerebellar cortex in afrotherians, carnivores, cetartiodactyls, and primates.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Bob; Johnson, Nicholas L; Wahl, Devin; Schall, Matthew; Maseko, Busisiwe C; Lewandowski, Albert; Raghanti, Mary A; Wicinski, Bridget; Butti, Camilla; Hopkins, William D; Bertelsen, Mads F; Walsh, Timothy; Roberts, John R; Reep, Roger L; Hof, Patrick R; Sherwood, Chet C; Manger, Paul R

    2014-01-01

    Although the basic morphological characteristics of neurons in the cerebellar cortex have been documented in several species, virtually nothing is known about the quantitative morphological characteristics of these neurons across different taxa. To that end, the present study investigated cerebellar neuronal morphology among eight different, large-brained mammalian species comprising a broad phylogenetic range: afrotherians (African elephant, Florida manatee), carnivores (Siberian tiger, clouded leopard), cetartiodactyls (humpback whale, giraffe) and primates (human, common chimpanzee). Specifically, several neuron types (e.g., stellate, basket, Lugaro, Golgi, and granule neurons; N = 317) of the cerebellar cortex were stained with a modified rapid Golgi technique and quantified on a computer-assisted microscopy system. There was a 64-fold variation in brain mass across species in our sample (from clouded leopard to the elephant) and a 103-fold variation in cerebellar volume. Most dendritic measures tended to increase with cerebellar volume. The cerebellar cortex in these species exhibited the trilaminate pattern common to all mammals. Morphologically, neuron types in the cerebellar cortex were generally consistent with those described in primates (Fox et al., 1967) and rodents (Palay and Chan-Palay, 1974), although there was substantial quantitative variation across species. In particular, Lugaro neurons in the elephant appeared to be disproportionately larger than those in other species. To explore potential quantitative differences in dendritic measures across species, MARSplines analyses were used to evaluate whether species could be differentiated from each other based on dendritic characteristics alone. Results of these analyses indicated that there were significant differences among all species in dendritic measures.

  18. Comparative neuronal morphology of the cerebellar cortex in afrotherians, carnivores, cetartiodactyls, and primates

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Bob; Johnson, Nicholas L.; Wahl, Devin; Schall, Matthew; Maseko, Busisiwe C.; Lewandowski, Albert; Raghanti, Mary A.; Wicinski, Bridget; Butti, Camilla; Hopkins, William D.; Bertelsen, Mads F.; Walsh, Timothy; Roberts, John R.; Reep, Roger L.; Hof, Patrick R.; Sherwood, Chet C.; Manger, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Although the basic morphological characteristics of neurons in the cerebellar cortex have been documented in several species, virtually nothing is known about the quantitative morphological characteristics of these neurons across different taxa. To that end, the present study investigated cerebellar neuronal morphology among eight different, large-brained mammalian species comprising a broad phylogenetic range: afrotherians (African elephant, Florida manatee), carnivores (Siberian tiger, clouded leopard), cetartiodactyls (humpback whale, giraffe) and primates (human, common chimpanzee). Specifically, several neuron types (e.g., stellate, basket, Lugaro, Golgi, and granule neurons; N = 317) of the cerebellar cortex were stained with a modified rapid Golgi technique and quantified on a computer-assisted microscopy system. There was a 64-fold variation in brain mass across species in our sample (from clouded leopard to the elephant) and a 103-fold variation in cerebellar volume. Most dendritic measures tended to increase with cerebellar volume. The cerebellar cortex in these species exhibited the trilaminate pattern common to all mammals. Morphologically, neuron types in the cerebellar cortex were generally consistent with those described in primates (Fox et al., 1967) and rodents (Palay and Chan-Palay, 1974), although there was substantial quantitative variation across species. In particular, Lugaro neurons in the elephant appeared to be disproportionately larger than those in other species. To explore potential quantitative differences in dendritic measures across species, MARSplines analyses were used to evaluate whether species could be differentiated from each other based on dendritic characteristics alone. Results of these analyses indicated that there were significant differences among all species in dendritic measures. PMID:24795574

  19. Ultrastructural pathology of human peritumoural oedematous cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Castejón, O J

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar cortical biopsies of the peritumoural region of seven patients with cerebellar haemangioma, mesencephalic meningioma, cerebellopontine astrocytoma, cerebellopontine meningioma, and medulloblastoma of cerebellar vermis were examined by means of conventional transmission electron microscopy. Granule cells showed oedematous cytoplasm and mitochondria. Swollen Golgi cells exhibited lipofuscin granules and intranuclear inclusions. Both neuron cell types displayed swollen dendritic digits synapsing with afferent mossy fibre endings. Degenerated myelinated axons corresponding to afferent mossy and climbing fibres and efferent Purkinje cell axons were observed at the granular layer. Dense and clear ischaemic Purkinje cells established degenerated synapses with swollen parallel fibre synaptic varicosities. Degenerated Purkinje cell recurrent axonal collaterals were found at the molecular layer. Swollen and clear Bergmann glial cell cytoplasm was observed closely applied to the oedematous clear and dark Purkinje cell body, dendritic trunk, secondary and tertiary dendritic branches. Swollen climbing fibre endings featured by numerous microtubules and neurofilaments, and a decreased number of synaptic vesicles were observed making degenerated axo-spinodendritic synapses with clear and swollen dendritic spines from Purkinje, Golgi, basket and stellate cell dendrites. Swollen stellate neurons showed oedematous mitochondria. Lipofuscin-rich astrocytes and reactive phagocytic astrocytes were observed. The latter appeared engulfing haematogenous proteinaceous oedema fluid. All cerebellar neurons showed stress endoplasmic reticulum dysfunction featured by focal dilated cisterns and detachment of associated ribosomes. Myelin sheath degeneration was related with oligodendrocyte degenerating hydropic changes. The peritumoural ischaemic cerebellar nerve and glial cell abnormalities were related with neurobehavioral changes, tremor, nystagmus, dismetry and gait disturbance

  20. Analysis of protein pool of neuronal populations of cerebellar cortex in rodents of different species.

    PubMed

    Orlyanskaya, T Y; Lyutikova, T M

    2000-12-01

    The protein pool of neuronal population of the cerebellar cortex was studied by interference cytometry in rodents occupying different ecological niches and differing by life style, nutrition habits, and motor activity. In all cell populations protein concentrations in the cytoplasm were higher than in the nucleus in all studied rodents and did not depend on the functional characteristics of neurons. The extreme values of protein content were determined for populations of granular and ganglion cells. High protein concentrations per volume unit of cell structure were detected in functionally different cerebellar neurons of gray rats, characterized by high motor activity and a certain degree of synanthropy, while low values were detected in mole rats, slow-moving underground rodents. Therefore, the specific protein pool of neuronal populations of the cerebellar cortex of rodents can be regarded as adaptation to habitation conditions.

  1. Role of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor-2 in the Cerebellar Cortex in Cardiovascular Modulation in Anaesthetized Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changzheng; Sun, Tingzhe; Zhou, Peiling; Zhu, Qingfeng; Zhang, Liefeng

    2016-04-01

    Our previous investigations have demonstrated that microinjection of acetylcholine (ACh) or muscarinic ACh receptor activation in the cerebellar cortex induces a systemic blood pressure depressor response. This study aimed to determine the role of muscarinic ACh receptor-2 (M2 receptor) in the cerebellar cortex in cardiovascular function regulation in rats. A nonselective muscarinic receptor agonist (oxotremorine M, OXO; 30 mM), a selective M2 receptor agonist (arecaidine but-2-ynyl ester tosylate, ABET; 3, 10, and 30 mM), 30 mM OXO mixed with a selective M2 receptor antagonist (methoctramine hydrate, MCT; 0.3, 1, and 3 mM), and normal saline (0.9 % NaCl) were separately microinjected (0.5 µl/5 s) into the cerebellar cortex (lobule VI) of anaesthetized rats. We measured the mean arterial pressure (MAP), maximum change in MAP, and reactive time (RT; the duration required for the blood pressure to return to basal levels), heart rate (HR) and the maximum change in HR during the RT in response to drug activation. The results demonstrated that ABET dose-dependently decreased MAP and HR, increased the maximum change in MAP and the maximum change in HR, and prolonged the RT. Furthermore, MCT dose-dependently blocked the OXO-mediated cardiovascular depressor response. This study provides the first evidence that M2 receptors in the cerebellar cortex are involved in cardiovascular regulation, the activation of which evokes significant depressor and bradycardic responses.

  2. Stars and stripes in the cerebellar cortex: a voltage sensitive dye study.

    PubMed

    Rokni, Dan; Llinas, Rodolfo; Yarom, Yosef

    2007-01-01

    The lattice-like structure of the cerebellar cortex and its anatomical organization in two perpendicular axes provided the foundations for many theories of cerebellar function. However, the functional organization does not always match the anatomical organization. Thus direct measurement of the functional organization is central to our understanding of cerebellar processing. Here we use voltage sensitive dye imaging in the isolated cerebellar preparation to characterize the spatio-temporal organization of the climbing and mossy fiber (MF) inputs to the cerebellar cortex. Spatial and temporal parameters were used to develop reliable criteria to distinguish climbing fiber (CF) responses from MF responses. CF activation excited postsynaptic neurons along a parasagittal cortical band. These responses were composed of slow ( approximately 25 ms), monophasic depolarizing signals. Neither the duration nor the spatial distribution of CF responses were affected by inhibition. Activation of MF generated responses that were organized in radial patches, and were composed of a fast ( approximately 5 ms) depolarizing phase followed by a prolonged ( approximately 100 ms) negative wave. Application of a GABA(A) blocker eliminated the hyperpolarizing phase and prolonged the depolarizing phase, but did not affect the spatial distribution of the response, thus suggesting that it is not the inhibitory system that is responsible for the inability of the MF input to generate beams of activity that propagate along the parallel fiber system.

  3. Toluene decreases Purkinje cell output by enhancing inhibitory synaptic transmission in the cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Gmaz, Jimmie M; McKay, Bruce E

    2014-02-07

    Toluene belongs to a class of psychoactive drugs known as inhalants. Found in common household products such as adhesives, paint products, and aerosols, toluene is inhaled for its intoxicating and euphoric properties. Additionally, exposure to toluene disrupts motor behaviors in a manner consistent with impairments to cerebellar function. Previous work has suggested a role of GABA in mediating toluene's neurobehavioral effects, but how this manifests in the cerebellar cortex is not yet understood. In the present study, we examined the effects of toluene on cerebellar Purkinje cell action potential output and inhibitory synaptic transmission onto Purkinje cells using patch clamp electrophysiology in acute rat cerebellar slices. Toluene (1mM) reduced the frequency of Purkinje cell action potential output without affecting input resistance. Furthermore, toluene dose-dependently enhanced inhibitory synaptic transmission onto Purkinje cells, increasing the amplitude and frequency of inhibitory postsynaptic currents; no change in the frequency of action potentials from molecular layer interneurons was noted. The observed decreases in Purkinje cell action potential output could contribute to toluene-evoked impairments in cerebellar and motor functions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Structural and functional MRI abnormalities of cerebellar cortex and nuclei in SCA3, SCA6 and Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed

    Stefanescu, Maria R; Dohnalek, Moritz; Maderwald, Stefan; Thürling, Markus; Minnerop, Martina; Beck, Andreas; Schlamann, Marc; Diedrichsen, Joern; Ladd, Mark E; Timmann, Dagmar

    2015-05-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3, spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 and Friedreich's ataxia are common hereditary ataxias. Different patterns of atrophy of the cerebellar cortex are well known. Data on cerebellar nuclei are sparse. Whereas cerebellar nuclei have long been thought to be preserved in spinocerebellar ataxia type 6, histology shows marked atrophy of the nuclei in Friedreich's ataxia and spinocerebellar ataxia type 3. In the present study susceptibility weighted imaging was used to assess atrophy of the cerebellar nuclei in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (n = 12, age range 41-76 years, five female), Friedreich's ataxia (n = 12, age range 21-55 years, seven female), spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (n = 10, age range 34-67 years, three female), and age- and gender-matched controls (total n = 23, age range 22-75 years, 10 female). T1-weighted magnetic resonance images were used to calculate the volume of the cerebellum. In addition, ultra-high field functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed with optimized normalization methods to assess function of the cerebellar cortex and nuclei during simple hand movements. As expected, the volume of the cerebellum was markedly reduced in spinocerebellar ataxia type 6, preserved in Friedreich's ataxia, and mildy reduced in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3. The volume of the cerebellar nuclei was reduced in the three patient groups compared to matched controls (P-values < 0.05; two-sample t-tests). Atrophy of the cerebellar nuclei was most pronounced in spinocerebellar ataxia type 6. On a functional level, hand-movement-related cerebellar activation was altered in all three disorders. Within the cerebellar cortex, functional magnetic resonance imaging signal was significantly reduced in spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 and Friedreich's ataxia compared to matched controls (P-values < 0.001, bootstrap-corrected cluster-size threshold; two-sample t-tests). The difference missed significance in spinocerebellar ataxia

  5. Responses evoked in the cerebellar cortex by stimulation of the caudate nucleus in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Mary; Williams, T. D.

    1968-01-01

    1. Responses evoked in the cerebellar cortex following stimulation of caudate nucleus are described. 2. The evoked responses recorded from the surface of the cerebellar cortex were found to be of two types, one with a short (4-6 msec) latency and one with a longer (12-17 msec) latency. 3. The short latency response was maximal in the lobulus simplex, the longer latency response was maximal in paramedian lobule. 4. Following lesions in the inferior olive the longer latency response was absent. 5. Recordings from within the cerebellar cortex showed that the short latency response was uniformly distributed throughout the grey matter, the longer latency response was maximal in the region of the Purkinje cell bodies. 6. It was concluded that the short latency response was due to activation via the mossy fibres and the longer latency response to activation via the climbing fibres. 7. It was found that responses could be evoked in the cerebellum following stimulation of only the latero-ventral part of the caudate nucleus; stimulation of the rest of the nucleus caused no response in the cerebellum. This division of the caudate nucleus into two parts is similar to the subdivision of the caudate nucleus made by other workers using different criteria. PMID:5698279

  6. Eyeblink conditioning leads to fewer synapses in the rabbit cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Connor, S; Bloomfield, J; LeBoutillier, J C; Thompson, R F; Petit, T L; Weeks, A C W

    2009-08-01

    Eyeblink conditioning involves the pairing of a conditioned stimulus (tone) to an aversive unconditioned stimulus (air puff). Although the circuitry that underlies this form of learning is well defined, synaptic changes in these structures have not been fully investigated. This experiment examined synaptic structural plasticity in the cerebellar cortex, a structure that has been found to modulate the acquisition and timing of the conditioned response. Long-term depression of Purkinje cells (PCs) in the cerebellar cortex has been proposed as a mechanism for releasing inhibition of the interpositus nuclei, a structure critical for the formation of the CR. Adult albino rabbits were randomly allocated to either a paired, unpaired, or exposure-only condition. The results showed a significant decrease in the number of excitatory synapses in the outer layer of the cerebellar cortex in the conditioned rabbits compared with controls. This finding suggests that a reduction in the number of excitatory synapses may contribute to the lasting depression of PC activity that is associated with eyeblink conditioning. 2009 APA, all rights reserved

  7. Inhibition of classically conditioned eyeblink responses by stimulation of the cerebellar cortex in the decerebrate cat.

    PubMed

    Hesslow, G

    1994-04-15

    The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that neurones in the anterior interpositus nucleus, under the control of Purkinje cells in the c1 and c3 zones of the cerebellar cortex, exert some control over classically conditioned responses. In particular, the experiments were designed to determine whether the cerebellar control of conditioned and unconditioned responses is different. The experiments were performed on cats decerebrated rostral to the red nucleus under halothane anaesthesia. The cats were conditioned using either a 1000 Hz tone or trains of stimuli through the skin of the proximal forelimb as the conditioned stimulus, and periorbital electrical stimulation as the unconditioned stimulus. A large proportion of the animals acquired conditioned responses at normal rates. It could be shown that these were true conditioned responses and did not result from sensitization or pseudoconditioning. For instance, unpaired presentations of conditioned and unconditioned stimuli caused rapid extinction. Cerebellar areas controlling eyeblink were identified by recording climbing fibre responses in the cerebellar cortex and recording EMG activity in the eyelid evoked by stimulation of the cerebellar cortex. When single shocks of 40-70 microA were applied to these areas during the emission of conditioned eyeblink responses, the latter were strongly inhibited. The inhibition had a latency of about 10 ms and a duration of 25-75 ms. It was shown that this inhibition of the conditioned responses was topographically specific and could only be evoked from cortical sites identified as controlling eyeblink. Stimulation of the periphery of an eyeblink area caused little or no inhibition. The effect of cortical stimulation on unconditioned reflex responses in the orbicularis oculi muscle was also tested. Some inhibition of unconditioned responses was observed, but quantitative analysis showed that this inhibition was considerably weaker than the corresponding

  8. Inhibition of classically conditioned eyeblink responses by stimulation of the cerebellar cortex in the decerebrate cat.

    PubMed Central

    Hesslow, G

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that neurones in the anterior interpositus nucleus, under the control of Purkinje cells in the c1 and c3 zones of the cerebellar cortex, exert some control over classically conditioned responses. In particular, the experiments were designed to determine whether the cerebellar control of conditioned and unconditioned responses is different. The experiments were performed on cats decerebrated rostral to the red nucleus under halothane anaesthesia. The cats were conditioned using either a 1000 Hz tone or trains of stimuli through the skin of the proximal forelimb as the conditioned stimulus, and periorbital electrical stimulation as the unconditioned stimulus. A large proportion of the animals acquired conditioned responses at normal rates. It could be shown that these were true conditioned responses and did not result from sensitization or pseudoconditioning. For instance, unpaired presentations of conditioned and unconditioned stimuli caused rapid extinction. Cerebellar areas controlling eyeblink were identified by recording climbing fibre responses in the cerebellar cortex and recording EMG activity in the eyelid evoked by stimulation of the cerebellar cortex. When single shocks of 40-70 microA were applied to these areas during the emission of conditioned eyeblink responses, the latter were strongly inhibited. The inhibition had a latency of about 10 ms and a duration of 25-75 ms. It was shown that this inhibition of the conditioned responses was topographically specific and could only be evoked from cortical sites identified as controlling eyeblink. Stimulation of the periphery of an eyeblink area caused little or no inhibition. The effect of cortical stimulation on unconditioned reflex responses in the orbicularis oculi muscle was also tested. Some inhibition of unconditioned responses was observed, but quantitative analysis showed that this inhibition was considerably weaker than the corresponding

  9. Surface-based atlases of cerebellar cortex in the human, macaque, and mouse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Essen, David C.

    2002-01-01

    This study describes surface reconstructions and associated flat maps that represent the highly convoluted shape of cerebellar cortex in three species: human, macaque, and mouse. The reconstructions were based on high-resolution structural MRI data obtained from other laboratories. The surface areas determined for the fiducial reconstructions are about 600 cm(2) for the human, 60 cm(2) for the macaque, and 0.8 cm(2) for the mouse. As expected from the ribbon-like pattern of cerebellar folding, the cerebellar flat maps are elongated along the axis parallel to the midline. However, the degree of elongation varies markedly across species. The macaque flat map is many times longer than its mean width, whereas the mouse flat map is only slightly elongated and the human map is intermediate in its aspect ratio. These cerebellar atlases, along with associated software for visualization and for mapping experimental data onto the atlas, are freely available to the neuroscience community (see http:/brainmap.wustl.edu).

  10. Surface-based atlases of cerebellar cortex in the human, macaque, and mouse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Essen, David C.

    2002-01-01

    This study describes surface reconstructions and associated flat maps that represent the highly convoluted shape of cerebellar cortex in three species: human, macaque, and mouse. The reconstructions were based on high-resolution structural MRI data obtained from other laboratories. The surface areas determined for the fiducial reconstructions are about 600 cm(2) for the human, 60 cm(2) for the macaque, and 0.8 cm(2) for the mouse. As expected from the ribbon-like pattern of cerebellar folding, the cerebellar flat maps are elongated along the axis parallel to the midline. However, the degree of elongation varies markedly across species. The macaque flat map is many times longer than its mean width, whereas the mouse flat map is only slightly elongated and the human map is intermediate in its aspect ratio. These cerebellar atlases, along with associated software for visualization and for mapping experimental data onto the atlas, are freely available to the neuroscience community (see http:/brainmap.wustl.edu).

  11. Robustness effect of gap junctions between Golgi cells on cerebellar cortex oscillations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous one-dimensional network modeling of the cerebellar granular layer has been successfully linked with a range of cerebellar cortex oscillations observed in vivo. However, the recent discovery of gap junctions between Golgi cells (GoCs), which may cause oscillations by themselves, has raised the question of how gap-junction coupling affects GoC and granular-layer oscillations. To investigate this question, we developed a novel two-dimensional computational model of the GoC-granule cell (GC) circuit with and without gap junctions between GoCs. Results Isolated GoCs coupled by gap junctions had a strong tendency to generate spontaneous oscillations without affecting their mean firing frequencies in response to distributed mossy fiber input. Conversely, when GoCs were synaptically connected in the granular layer, gap junctions increased the power of the oscillations, but the oscillations were primarily driven by the synaptic feedback loop between GoCs and GCs, and the gap junctions did not change oscillation frequency or the mean firing rate of either GoCs or GCs. Conclusion Our modeling results suggest that gap junctions between GoCs increase the robustness of cerebellar cortex oscillations that are primarily driven by the feedback loop between GoCs and GCs. The robustness effect of gap junctions on synaptically driven oscillations observed in our model may be a general mechanism, also present in other regions of the brain. PMID:22330240

  12. Is essential tremor a Purkinjopathy? The role of the cerebellar cortex in its pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Giuliana; Manto, Mario

    2013-11-01

    Essential tremor (ET) encompasses a group of progressive neurological diseases in which the primary clinical feature is kinetic tremor of the arms. There is accumulating evidence to suggest that the cerebellum is involved in the pathogenesis of ET; the clinical presentation, neurophysiological data, and functional and metabolic abnormalities revealed by neuroimaging studies all point toward the dysregulation of cerebellar circuits. Recent neuropathological findings at postmortem demonstrate that Purkinje neurons, and some brainstem neurons, play an integral role in the pathogenesis of this common neurological disorder. The assessment of Purkinje cell linear density shows that Purkinje density is abnormal in ET brains. Specific efforts need be devoted to understanding the molecular and cellular events occurring in the Purkinje neurons of the cerebellar cortex, which are emerging as being of particular importance in the pathogenesis of ET in a subgroup of patients. © 2013 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  13. Traveling waves in developing cerebellar cortex mediated by asymmetrical Purkinje cell connectivity.

    PubMed

    Watt, Alanna J; Cuntz, Hermann; Mori, Masahiro; Nusser, Zoltan; Sjöström, P Jesper; Häusser, Michael

    2009-04-01

    Correlated network activity is important in the development of many neural circuits. Purkinje cells are among the first neurons to populate the cerebellar cortex, where they sprout exuberant axon collaterals. We used multiple patch-clamp recordings targeted with two-photon microscopy to characterize monosynaptic connections between the Purkinje cells of juvenile mice. We found that Purkinje cell axon collaterals projected asymmetrically in the sagittal plane, directed away from the lobule apex. On the basis of our anatomical and physiological characterization of this connection, we constructed a network model that robustly generated waves of activity that traveled along chains of connected Purkinje cells. Consistent with the model, we observed traveling waves of activity in Purkinje cells in sagittal slices from young mice that require GABA(A) receptor-mediated transmission and intact Purkinje cell axon collaterals. These traveling waves are absent in adult mice, suggesting they have a developmental role in wiring the cerebellar cortical microcircuit.

  14. Memory trace of motor learning shifts transsynaptically from cerebellar cortex to nuclei for consolidation.

    PubMed

    Shutoh, F; Ohki, M; Kitazawa, H; Itohara, S; Nagao, S

    2006-05-12

    Adaptation of ocular reflexes is a prototype of motor learning. While the cerebellum is acknowledged as the critical site for motor learning, the functional differences between the cerebellar cortex and nuclei in motor memory formation are not precisely known. Two different views are proposed: one that the memory is formed within the cerebellar flocculus, and the other that the memory is formed within vestibular nuclei. Here we developed a new paradigm of long-term adaptation of mouse horizontal optokinetic response eye movements and examined the location of its memory trace. We also tested the role of flocculus and inferior olive in long-term adaptation by chronic lesion experiments. Reversible bilateral flocculus shutdown with local application of 0.5 microl-5% lidocaine extinguished the memory trace of day-long adaptation, while it very little affected the memory trace of week-long adaptation. The responsiveness of vestibular nuclei after week-long adaptation was examined by measuring the extracellular field responses to the electrical stimulation of vestibular nerve under trichloroacetaldehyde anesthesia. The amplitudes and slopes of evoked monosynaptic field response (N1) of week-long adapted mice were enhanced around the medial vestibular nucleus compared with those of control mice. Chronic flocculus or inferior olive lesions abolished both day and week-long adaptations. These results suggest that the functional memory trace of short-term adaptation is formed initially within the cerebellar cortex, and later transferred to vestibular nuclei to be consolidated to a long-term memory. Both day and week-long adaptations were markedly depressed when neural nitric oxide was pharmacologically blocked locally and when neuronal nitric oxide synthase was ablated by gene knockout, suggesting that cerebellar long-term depression underlies both acquisition and consolidation of motor memory.

  15. Changes in the cerebellar cortex of hairless Rhino-J mice (hr-rh-j).

    PubMed

    García-Atares, N; San Jose, I; Cabo, R; Vega, J A; Represa, J

    1998-10-30

    A mutation in the hr gene is responsible for typical epithelium phenotype in hairless mice. As this gene is expressed at high levels not only in the skin but also in the brain, the aim of the study was to clarify its role in the central nervous system. We have analyzed by morphological and immunocytochemical methods (calbindin D-28k, phosphorylated and 200 kDa neurofilament protein) the cerebellum of a mutated mouse strain, the hairless (hr-rh-j) type carrying the homozygous hr gene rhino mutation. The cerebellar cortex was studied in young (3 months) and adult (9 months) wild type and mutated mice. No major structural change was found in any of the groups and neuronal density or neuronal arrangement were similar in mutated animals to their age-matched controls. Nevertheless there were changes in shape and size of the Purkinje neurons in the old mutated animals respect to their normal littermates, while the molecular and the granule cell layers were apparently invariable. Calbindin (CB) immunohistochemistry revealed a significant decrease in the expression of this protein in the Purkinje cells of the aged mutated mice. Immunohistochemistry for a neurofilament protein (NFP) showed a reduction of staining in all the cerebellar cortex layers in the older animals, which was much more evident in the (hr-rh-j) mutated mice. These results suggest that hr gene is involved in the structural maintenance of the mature cerebellar cortex, rather than in the development. Our findings may also be consistent with an accelerated aging of the central nervous system in rh-rh-j mice.

  16. Neurotoxicological effects of nicotine on the embryonic development of cerebellar cortex of chick embryo during various stages of incubation.

    PubMed

    El-Beltagy, Abd El-Fattah B M; Abou-El-Naga, Amoura M; Sabry, Dalia M

    2015-10-01

    Long-acting nicotine is known to exert pathological effects on almost all tissues including the cerebellar cortex. The present work was designed to elucidate the effect of nicotine on the development of cerebellar cortex of chick embryo during incubation period. The fertilized eggs of hen (Gallus gallus domesticus) were injected into the air space by a single dose of long acting nicotine (1.6 mg/kg/egg) at the 4th day of incubation. The embryos were taken out of the eggs on days 8, 12 and 16 of incubation. The cerebellum of the control and treated embryos at above ages were processed for histopathological examination. The TEM were examined at 16th day of incubation. The results of the present study revealed that, exposure to long-acting nicotine markedly influence the histogenesis of cerebellar cortex of chick embryo during the incubation period. At 8th day of incubation, nicotine delayed the differentiation of the cerebellar analge; especially the external granular layer (EGL) and inner cortical layer (ICL). Furthermore, at 12th day of incubation, the cerebellar foliation was irregular and the Purkinje cells not recognized. By 16th day of incubation, the cerebellar foliations were irregular with interrupted cerebellar cortex and irregular arrangement of Purkinje cells. Immunohistochemical analysis for antibody P53 protein revealed that the cerebellar cortex in all stages of nicotine treated groups possessed a moderate to weak reaction for P53 protein however; this reaction was markedly stronger in the cerebellar cortex of control groups. Moreover, the flow cytometric analysis confirmed that the percentage of apoptosis in control group was significantly higher compared with that of nicotine treated group. At the TEM level, the cerebellar Purkinje cells of 16th day of treated groups showed multiple subcellular alterations in compared with those of the corresponding control group. Such changes represented by appearing of vacuolated mitochondria, cisternal

  17. Back to front: cerebellar connections and interactions with the prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Thomas C.; Becker, Nadine; Apps, Richard; Jones, Matthew W.

    2014-01-01

    Although recent neuroanatomical evidence has demonstrated closed-loop connectivity between prefrontal cortex and the cerebellum, the physiology of cerebello-cerebral circuits and the extent to which cerebellar output modulates neuronal activity in neocortex during behavior remain relatively unexplored. We show that electrical stimulation of the contralateral cerebellar fastigial nucleus (FN) in awake, behaving rats evokes distinct local field potential (LFP) responses (onset latency ~13 ms) in the prelimbic (PrL) subdivision of the medial prefrontal cortex. Trains of FN stimulation evoke heterogeneous patterns of response in putative pyramidal cells in frontal and prefrontal regions in both urethane-anesthetized and awake, behaving rats. However, the majority of cells showed decreased firing rates during stimulation and subsequent rebound increases; more than 90% of cells showed significant changes in response. Simultaneous recording of on-going LFP activity from FN and PrL while rats were at rest or actively exploring an open field arena revealed significant network coherence restricted to the theta frequency range (5–10 Hz). Granger causality analysis indicated that this coherence was significantly directed from cerebellum to PrL during active locomotion. Our results demonstrate the presence of a cerebello-prefrontal pathway in rat and reveal behaviorally dependent coordinated network activity between the two structures, which could facilitate transfer of sensorimotor information into ongoing neocortical processing during goal directed behaviors. PMID:24550789

  18. Back to front: cerebellar connections and interactions with the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Watson, Thomas C; Becker, Nadine; Apps, Richard; Jones, Matthew W

    2014-01-01

    Although recent neuroanatomical evidence has demonstrated closed-loop connectivity between prefrontal cortex and the cerebellum, the physiology of cerebello-cerebral circuits and the extent to which cerebellar output modulates neuronal activity in neocortex during behavior remain relatively unexplored. We show that electrical stimulation of the contralateral cerebellar fastigial nucleus (FN) in awake, behaving rats evokes distinct local field potential (LFP) responses (onset latency ~13 ms) in the prelimbic (PrL) subdivision of the medial prefrontal cortex. Trains of FN stimulation evoke heterogeneous patterns of response in putative pyramidal cells in frontal and prefrontal regions in both urethane-anesthetized and awake, behaving rats. However, the majority of cells showed decreased firing rates during stimulation and subsequent rebound increases; more than 90% of cells showed significant changes in response. Simultaneous recording of on-going LFP activity from FN and PrL while rats were at rest or actively exploring an open field arena revealed significant network coherence restricted to the theta frequency range (5-10 Hz). Granger causality analysis indicated that this coherence was significantly directed from cerebellum to PrL during active locomotion. Our results demonstrate the presence of a cerebello-prefrontal pathway in rat and reveal behaviorally dependent coordinated network activity between the two structures, which could facilitate transfer of sensorimotor information into ongoing neocortical processing during goal directed behaviors.

  19. Reevaluation of the Beam and Radial Hypotheses of Parallel Fiber Action in the Cerebellar Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Samuel W.; Gao, Wangcai; Chen, Gang

    2013-01-01

    The role of parallel fibers (PFs) in cerebellar physiology remains controversial. Early studies inspired the “beam” hypothesis whereby granule cell (GC) activation results in PF-driven, postsynaptic excitation of beams of Purkinje cells (PCs). However, the “radial” hypothesis postulates that the ascending limb of the GC axon provides the dominant input to PCs and generates patch-like responses. Using optical imaging and single-cell recordings in the mouse cerebellar cortex in vivo, this study reexamines the beam versus radial controversy. Electrical stimulation of mossy fibers (MFs) as well as microinjection of NMDA in the granular layer generates beam-like responses with a centrally located patch-like response. Remarkably, ipsilateral forepaw stimulation evokes a beam-like response in Crus I. Discrete molecular layer lesions demonstrate that PFs contribute to the peripherally generated responses in Crus I. In contrast, vibrissal stimulation induces patch-like activation of Crus II and GABAA antagonists fail to convert this patch-like activity into a beam-like response, implying that molecular layer inhibition does not prevent beam-like responses. However, blocking excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) generates beam-like responses in Crus II. These beam-like responses are suppressed by focal inhibition of MF-GC synaptic transmission. Using EAAT4 reporter transgenic mice, we show that peripherally evoked patch-like responses in Crus II are aligned between parasagittal bands of EAAT4. This is the first study to demonstrate beam-like responses in the cerebellar cortex to peripheral, MF, and GC stimulation in vivo. Furthermore, the spatial pattern of the responses depends on extracellular glutamate and its local regulation by EAATs. PMID:23843513

  20. Age-related decline in the responsiveness of motor cortex to plastic forces reverses with levodopa or cerebellar stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kishore, Asha; Popa, Traian; James, Praveen; Yahia-Cherif, Lydia; Backer, Febina; Varughese Chacko, Lijo; Govind, Preetha; Pradeep, Salini; Meunier, Sabine

    2014-11-01

    The plasticity of motor cortex is integral for motor memory and skills acquisition but it declines with aging. Forty healthy volunteers, across 6 decades, were tested to examine the (a) age-dependency of motor cortex responsiveness to plasticity induction, as measured from the response to paired associative stimulation (PAS) and the (b) effect of aging on the cerebellar modulation of motor cortex response to PAS. We examined if reduced dopaminergic transmission was involved in the age-related decline of response to PAS by retesting 10 of the older subjects after a single dose of levodopa. There was a substantial decline in the motor cortex response to PAS with aging, which was restored by levodopa in the older subjects. The cerebellar modulation of motor cortex response to PAS was less vulnerable to aging and a single session of cerebellar inhibition reinstated the cortical responsiveness in older subjects. Both levodopa and cerebellar inhibition can be tested for their ability to enhance motor skills acquisition and motor performance in the elderly individuals.

  1. Stereotyped spatial patterns of functional synaptic connectivity in the cerebellar cortex

    PubMed Central

    Valera, Antoine M; Binda, Francesca; Pawlowski, Sophie A; Dupont, Jean-Luc; Casella, Jean-François; Rothstein, Jeffrey D; Poulain, Bernard; Isope, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Motor coordination is supported by an array of highly organized heterogeneous modules in the cerebellum. How incoming sensorimotor information is channeled and communicated between these anatomical modules is still poorly understood. In this study, we used transgenic mice expressing GFP in specific subsets of Purkinje cells that allowed us to target a given set of cerebellar modules. Combining in vitro recordings and photostimulation, we identified stereotyped patterns of functional synaptic organization between the granule cell layer and its main targets, the Purkinje cells, Golgi cells and molecular layer interneurons. Each type of connection displayed position-specific patterns of granule cell synaptic inputs that do not strictly match with anatomical boundaries but connect distant cortical modules. Although these patterns can be adjusted by activity-dependent processes, they were found to be consistent and predictable between animals. Our results highlight the operational rules underlying communication between modules in the cerebellar cortex. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09862.001 PMID:26982219

  2. Temporal dynamics of cerebellar and motor cortex physiological processes during motor skill learning.

    PubMed

    Spampinato, D; Celnik, P

    2017-01-16

    Learning motor tasks involves distinct physiological processes in the cerebellum (CB) and primary motor cortex (M1). Previous studies have shown that motor learning results in at least two important neurophysiological changes: modulation of cerebellar output mediated in-part by long-term depression of parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse and induction of long-term plasticity (LTP) in M1, leading to transient occlusion of additional LTP-like plasticity. However, little is known about the temporal dynamics of these two physiological mechanisms during motor skill learning. Here we use non-invasive brain stimulation to explore CB and M1 mechanisms during early and late motor skill learning in humans. We predicted that early skill acquisition would be proportional to cerebellar excitability (CBI) changes, whereas later stages of learning will result in M1 LTP-like plasticity modifications. We found that early, and not late into skill training, CBI changed. Whereas, occlusion of LTP-like plasticity over M1 occurred only during late, but not early training. These findings indicate a distinct temporal dissociation in the physiological role of the CB and M1 when learning a novel skill. Understanding the role and temporal dynamics of different brain regions during motor learning is critical to device optimal interventions to augment learning.

  3. Information processing in the hemisphere of the cerebellar cortex for control of wrist movement

    PubMed Central

    Tomatsu, Saeka; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Tsunoda, Yoshiaki; Lee, Jongho; Hoffman, Donna S.

    2015-01-01

    A region of cerebellar lobules V and VI makes strong loop connections with the primary motor (M1) and premotor (PM) cortical areas and is assumed to play essential roles in limb motor control. To examine its functional role, we compared the activities of its input, intermediate, and output elements, i.e., mossy fibers (MFs), Golgi cells (GoCs), and Purkinje cells (PCs), in three monkeys performing wrist movements in two different forearm postures. The results revealed distinct steps of information processing. First, MF activities displayed temporal and directional properties that were remarkably similar to those of M1/PM neurons, suggesting that MFs relay near copies of outputs from these motor areas. Second, all GoCs had a stereotyped pattern of activity independent of movement direction or forearm posture. Instead, GoC activity resembled an average of all MF activities. Therefore, inhibitory GoCs appear to provide a filtering function that passes only prominently modulated MF inputs to granule cells. Third, PCs displayed highly complex spatiotemporal patterns of activity, with coordinate frames distinct from those of MF inputs and directional tuning that changed abruptly before movement onset. The complexity of PC activities may reflect rapidly changing properties of the peripheral motor apparatus during movement. Overall, the cerebellar cortex appears to transform a representation of outputs from M1/PM into different movement representations in a posture-dependent manner and could work as part of a forward model that predicts the state of the peripheral motor apparatus. PMID:26467515

  4. Temporal dynamics of cerebellar and motor cortex physiological processes during motor skill learning

    PubMed Central

    Spampinato, D.; Celnik, P.

    2017-01-01

    Learning motor tasks involves distinct physiological processes in the cerebellum (CB) and primary motor cortex (M1). Previous studies have shown that motor learning results in at least two important neurophysiological changes: modulation of cerebellar output mediated in-part by long-term depression of parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse and induction of long-term plasticity (LTP) in M1, leading to transient occlusion of additional LTP-like plasticity. However, little is known about the temporal dynamics of these two physiological mechanisms during motor skill learning. Here we use non-invasive brain stimulation to explore CB and M1 mechanisms during early and late motor skill learning in humans. We predicted that early skill acquisition would be proportional to cerebellar excitability (CBI) changes, whereas later stages of learning will result in M1 LTP-like plasticity modifications. We found that early, and not late into skill training, CBI changed. Whereas, occlusion of LTP-like plasticity over M1 occurred only during late, but not early training. These findings indicate a distinct temporal dissociation in the physiological role of the CB and M1 when learning a novel skill. Understanding the role and temporal dynamics of different brain regions during motor learning is critical to device optimal interventions to augment learning. PMID:28091578

  5. Synapse-to-neuron ratios in rat cerebellar cortex following lengthy periods of undernutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, M A; Bedi, K S

    1990-01-01

    Black and white hooded Lister rats were undernourished for various times up to 150 days of age; some of them were nutritionally rehabilitated from 75 days. Undernourished rats weighed significantly less than well-fed controls at all ages studied. After embedding in resin, sections of cerebellar cortex were cut and examined at the light and electron microscopical levels using traditional morphometric methods. Undernourished rats showed significant deficits in synapse-to-neuron ratio, compared with controls, at 21 days of age. This deficit disappeared by 75 days despite continued undernutrition. Indeed, there was no alteration in this ratio even when undernutrition was extended up to 150 days even though the ratio for the controls decreased after that period. Rats undernourished from birth to 75 days and subsequently rehabilitated to 150 days had significantly more synapses per neuron than controls. The functional sequelae of these morphological changes remain unknown. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:2254161

  6. Circadian oscillators in the mouse brain: molecular clock components in the neocortex and cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Rath, Martin F; Rovsing, Louise; Møller, Morten

    2014-09-01

    The circadian timekeeper of the mammalian brain resides in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus (SCN), and is characterized by rhythmic expression of a set of clock genes with specific 24-h daily profiles. An increasing amount of data suggests that additional circadian oscillators residing outside the SCN have the capacity to generate peripheral circadian rhythms. We have recently shown the presence of SCN-controlled oscillators in the neocortex and cerebellum of the rat. The function of these peripheral brain clocks is unknown, and elucidating this could involve mice with conditional cell-specific clock gene deletions. This prompted us to analyze the molecular clockwork of the mouse neocortex and cerebellum in detail. Here, by use of in situ hybridization and quantitative RT-PCR, we show that clock genes are expressed in all six layers of the neocortex and the Purkinje and granular cell layers of the cerebellar cortex of the mouse brain. Among these, Per1, Per2, Cry1, Arntl, and Nr1d1 exhibit circadian rhythms suggesting that local running circadian oscillators reside within neurons of the mouse neocortex and cerebellar cortex. The temporal expression profiles of clock genes are similar in the neocortex and cerebellum, but they are delayed by 5 h as compared to the SCN, suggestively reflecting a master-slave relationship between the SCN and extra-hypothalamic oscillators. Furthermore, ARNTL protein products are detectable in neurons of the mouse neocortex and cerebellum, as revealed by immunohistochemistry. These findings give reason to further pursue the physiological significance of circadian oscillators in the mouse neocortex and cerebellum.

  7. An amplified promoter system for targeted expression of calcium indicator proteins in the cerebellar cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Bernd; Ozden, Ilker; Lampi, Yulia; Hasan, Mazahir T.; Wang, Samuel S.-H.

    2012-01-01

    Recording of identified neuronal network activity using genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) requires labeling that is cell type-specific and bright enough for the detection of functional signals. However, specificity and strong expression are often not achievable using the same promoter. Here we present a combinatorial approach for targeted expression and single-cell-level quantification in which a weak promoter is used to drive trans-amplification under a strong general promoter. We demonstrated this approach using recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAVs) to deliver the sequence of the GECI D3cpv in the mouse cerebellar cortex. Direct expression under the human synapsin promoter (hSYN) led to high levels of expression (50–100 μM) in five interneuron types of the cerebellar cortex but not in Purkinje cells (PCs) (≤10 μM), yielding sufficient contrast to allow functional signals to be recorded from somata and processes in awake animals using two-photon microscopy. When the hSYN promoter was used to drive expression of the tetracycline transactivator (tTA), a second rAAV containing the bidirectional TET promoter (Ptetbi) could drive strong D3cpv expression in PCs (10–300 μM), enough to allow reliable complex spike detection in the dendritic arbor. An amplified approach should be of use in monitoring neural processing in selected cell types and boosting expression of optogenetic probes. Additionally, we overcome cell toxicity associated with rAAV injection and/or local GECI overexpression by combining the virus injection with systemic pre-injection of hyperosmotic D-mannitol, and by this double the time window for functional imaging. PMID:22866030

  8. Cerebellar cortex development in the weaver condition presents regional and age-dependent abnormalities without differences in Purkinje cells neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Martí, Joaquín; Santa-Cruz, María C; Hervás, José P; Bayer, Shirley A; Villegas, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Ataxias are neurological disorders associated with the degeneration of Purkinje cells (PCs). Homozygous weaver mice (wv/wv) have been proposed as a model for hereditary cerebellar ataxia because they present motor abnormalities and PC loss. To ascertain the physiopathology of the weaver condition, the development of the cerebellar cortex lobes was examined at postnatal day (P): P8, P20 and P90. Three approaches were used: 1) quantitative determination of several cerebellar features; 2) qualitative evaluation of the developmental changes occurring in the cortical lobes; and 3) autoradiographic analyses of PC generation and placement. Our results revealed a reduction in the size of the wv/wv cerebellum as a whole, confirming previous results. However, as distinguished from these reports, we observed that quantified parameters contribute differently to the abnormal growth of the wv/wv cerebellar lobes. Qualitative analysis showed anomalies in wv/wv cerebellar cytoarchitecture, depending on the age and lobe analyzed. Such abnormalities included the presence of the external granular layer after P20 and, at P90, ectopic cells located in the molecular layer following several placement patterns. Finally, we obtained autoradiographic evidence that wild-type and wv/wv PCs presented similar neurogenetic timetables, as reported. However, the innovative character of this current work lies in the fact that the neurogenetic gradients of wv/wv PCs were not modified from P8 to P90. A tendency for the accumulation of late-formed PCs in the anterior and posterior lobes was found, whereas early-generated PCs were concentrated in the central and inferior lobes. These data suggested that wv/wv PCs may migrate properly to their final destinations. The extrapolation of our results to patients affected with cerebellar ataxias suggests that all cerebellar cortex lobes are affected with several age-dependent alterations in cytoarchitectonics. We also propose that PC loss may be regionally

  9. The primary vestibular projection to the cerebellar cortex in the pigeon (Columba livia)

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, I.E.; Schwarz, D.W.

    1983-06-01

    The cerebellar cortex of the pigeon receiving direct vestibular afferents was delineated by anterograde transport of (/sup 3/H)-amino acids injected into the vestibular nerve. Labelled mossy fiber rosettes in the granular layer were concentrated in lobule X (nodulus) and to a lesser extent, in the ventral portion of lobule IXd (uvula and paraflocculus). A few solitary labelled rosettes were also found in more dorsal portions of lobule IX, as well as in the anterior lobe between lobule II and IV. The lingula remained unlabelled. Discrete injections of (/sup 3/H)-leucine into the cristae of each of the three semicircular canals or the utricular macula yielded a similar distribution of fewer labelled rosettes. A few primary mossy fiber terminals labelled after cochlear injections are attributed to afferents from the lagenar macula. Since effective diffusion of label from the injection site was excluded by controls, it is concluded that projection of individual canal and macula nerves to the vestibulocerebellar cortex is not topographically separated. It is proposed that this extensive convergence of various afferents is required by the cerebellum to compute precise and directionally specific control signals during head rotation in all conceivable planes.

  10. [MORPHOFUNCTIONAL ADJUSTMENT VASCULAR AND CELLULAR COMPONENTS OF THE CEREBELLAR CORTEX IN EXPOSURE TO BODY SULFATES OF COPPER, ZINC AND IRON].

    PubMed

    Grintsova, N; Vasko, L; Kiptenko, L; Gortinsky, A; Murenets, N

    2015-09-01

    In order to analyze the morphological and morphometric reconstructions of the vascular bed, and Purkinje cells of the cerebellar cortex of rats in long-term action (for 90 days) on the body of sulphates of copper, zinc and iron, an experiment was conducted on 48 adult white male rats weighing 200-250 g in age 5-7 months. We used anatomical, morphometric, statistical and common methods of microanatomical research. It was found that the combined effect on the body of sulphates of copper and zinc, and iron in the cerebellum has enough expressive toxicity, which affects the condition of the vascular bed, and Purkinje cells. The degree of morphological transformations is in direct proportion to the duration of the experiment. In the pathogenesis of violations leading role played by hypoxia, develop signs of swelling of the cerebellar cortex with signs hemorrhagic infiltration, the severity of which is maximum on the 60th day of the experiment.

  11. Flavoprotein imaging in the cerebellar cortex in vivo: cellular and metabolic basis and insights into cerebellar function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wangcai; Chen, Gang; Ebner, Timothy J.

    2009-02-01

    Flavoprotein autofluorescence is an activity dependent intrinsic signal. Flavoproteins are involved in the electron transport chain and change their fluorescence according to the cellular redox state. We have been using flavoprotein autofluorescence in the cerebellum to examine properties of cerebellar circuits. Studies have also focused on understanding the cellular and metabolic origins of this intrinsic optical signal. Parallel fiber stimulation evokes a beamlike response intersected by bands of decreased fluorescence. The beam response is biphasic, with an early fluorescence increase (light phase) followed by a slower decrease (dark phase). We show this signal originates from flavoproteins as determined by its wavelength selectivity and sensitivity to blockers of the electron transport chain. Selectively blocking glutamate receptors abolished the on-beam light phase with the dark phase remaining intact. This demonstrates that the light phase is due to postsynaptic neuronal activation and suggests the dark phase is primarily due to glial activation. The bands of reduced fluorescence intersecting the beam are primarily neuronal in origin, mediated by GABAergic transmission, and due to the inhibitory action of molecular layer interneurons on Purkinje cells and the interneurons themselves. This parasagittally organized molecular layer inhibition differentially modulates the spatial pattern of cerebellar cortical activity. Flavoprotein imaging also reveals the functional architectures underlying the responses to inferior olive and peripheral whisker pad stimulation. Therefore, flavoprotein autofluorescence imaging is providing new insights into cerebellar cortical function and neurometabolic coupling.

  12. Ultrastructure of synaptic junctions in the cerebellar cortex in experimental valproate encephalopathy and after terminating chronic application of the antiepileptic.

    PubMed

    Sobaniec-Lotowska, Maria E

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse in TEM the evolution of changes in structural elements of synaptic junctions of the cerebellar cortex in rats in valproate encephalopathy induced by chronic 12-month administration of sodium valproate - VPA (once daily intragastrically, in a dose of 200 mg/kg b.w.) and after withdrawal of this antiepileptic for 1 and 3 months. After 9 and 12 months of the experiment, synaptic endings of both the symmetrical and asymmetrical synapses in the neuropil of the cerebellar cortex, especially in the molecular layer, showed signs of severe damage (mainly swelling) and even disintegration. They were mostly observed in axodendritic endings and axospinal endings on the dendritic spines of Purkinje cells, being manifested in the presence of large vacuolar structures, electron lucent areas and swollen mitochondria within the cytoplasm. A reduced number of axonal synaptic vesicles (with more type F vesicles preserved) could be seen. One and 3 months after the end of chronic application of VPA, the synaptic junctions did not show morphological exponents of the repair processes. The alterations observed in the synapticjunctions of the cerebellar cortex may suggest disorders in neurotransmission processes, such as exhaustion and damage caused by ischaemia due to damage to the blood-brain barrier induced by VPA and/or its toxic metabolites.

  13. Calbindin D28k distribution in neurons and reactive gliosis in cerebellar cortex of natural Rabies virus-infected cattle.

    PubMed

    Verdes, José Manuel; de Sant'Ana, Fabiano José Ferreira; Sabalsagaray, María Jesús; Okada, Kosuke; Calliari, Aldo; Moraña, José Antonio; de Barros, Claudio Severo Lombardo

    2016-07-01

    Rabies has been an enigmatic disease because microscopic findings in central nervous system tissues do not always correlate well with the severity of the clinical illness. Immunohistochemical staining of the calcium-binding protein calbindin (specifically CbD28k) seems to be the technique most used to identify Purkinje neurons under normal and pathological conditions. In the present work, we evaluated CbD28k immunoreactivity in the cerebellar cortex of normal and natural Rabies virus (RABV)-infected cattle. We examined brains from 3 normal cows and from 6 crossbreed cattle with a histologic diagnosis of rabies. Samples were taken from the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, and brainstem. Immunohistochemistry was carried out using the following primary antibodies: anti-RABV, anti-GFAP, and anti-CbD28k. In the cerebellar cortex, RABV infection caused the loss of CbD28k immunostaining in Purkinje cells; some large interneurons in the granular layer maintained their positive CbD28k immunoreaction. The identification of this loss of CbD28k reactivity in cerebellar Purkinje cells of RABV-infected cattle presents a potentially valuable tool to explore the impairment of Ca(2+) homeostasis. In addition, this may become a useful method to identify specific molecular alterations associated with the higher prevalence of Negri bodies in Purkinje cells of cattle. Furthermore, we detected the presence of rabies viral antigens in different regions of the central nervous system, accompanied by microglial proliferation and mild reactive astrogliosis.

  14. From Neurons to Neuron Neighborhoods: the Rewiring of the Cerebellar Cortex in Essential Tremor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Remarkably little has been written on the biology of essential tremor (ET), despite its high prevalence. The olivary model, first proposed in the 1970s, is the traditional disease model for ET; however, the model is problematic for a number of reasons. Recently, intensive tissue-based studies have identified a series of structural changes in the brains of most ET cases, and nearly all of the observed changes are located in the cerebellar cortex. These studies suggest that Purkinje cells are central to the pathogenesis of ET and may thus provide a focus for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. Arising from these studies, a new model of ET proposes that the population of Purkinje cells represents the site of the initial molecular/cellular events leading to ET. Furthermore, a number of secondary changes/remodeling observed in the molecular and granular layers (i.e., in the Purkinje cell “neighborhood”) are likely to be of additional mechanistic importance. On a physiological level, the presence of remodeling indicates the likely formation of aberrant synapses and the creation of new/abnormal cortical circuits in ET. Specific efforts need to be devoted to understanding the cascade of biochemical and cellular events occurring in the Purkinje cell layer in ET and its neuron neighborhood, as well as the physiological effects of secondary remodeling/rewiring that are likely to be occurring in this brain region in ET. PMID:24435423

  15. Anoctamin Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels May Modulate Inhibitory Transmission in the Cerebellar Cortex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiping; Schmelzeisen, Steffen; Parthier, Daniel; Frings, Stephan; Möhrlen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels of the anoctamin (alias TMEM16) protein family fulfill critical functions in epithelial fluid transport, smooth muscle contraction and sensory signal processing. Little is known, however, about their contribution to information processing in the central nervous system. Here we examined the recent finding that a calcium-dependent chloride conductance impacts on GABAergic synaptic inhibition in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. We asked whether anoctamin channels may underlie this chloride conductance. We identified two anoctamin channel proteins, ANO1 and ANO2, in the cerebellar cortex. ANO1 was expressed in inhibitory interneurons of the molecular layer and the granule cell layer. Both channels were expressed in Purkinje cells but, while ANO1 appeared to be retained in the cell body, ANO2 was targeted to the dendritic tree. Functional studies confirmed that ANO2 was involved in a calcium-dependent mode of ionic plasticity that reduces the efficacy of GABAergic synapses. ANO2 channels attenuated GABAergic transmission by increasing the postsynaptic chloride concentration, hence reducing the driving force for chloride influx. Our data suggest that ANO2 channels are involved in a Ca2+-dependent regulation of synaptic weight in GABAergic inhibition. Thus, in balance with the chloride extrusion mechanism via the co-transporter KCC2, ANO2 appears to regulate ionic plasticity in the cerebellum.

  16. Anoctamin Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels May Modulate Inhibitory Transmission in the Cerebellar Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Parthier, Daniel; Frings, Stephan; Möhrlen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels of the anoctamin (alias TMEM16) protein family fulfill critical functions in epithelial fluid transport, smooth muscle contraction and sensory signal processing. Little is known, however, about their contribution to information processing in the central nervous system. Here we examined the recent finding that a calcium-dependent chloride conductance impacts on GABAergic synaptic inhibition in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. We asked whether anoctamin channels may underlie this chloride conductance. We identified two anoctamin channel proteins, ANO1 and ANO2, in the cerebellar cortex. ANO1 was expressed in inhibitory interneurons of the molecular layer and the granule cell layer. Both channels were expressed in Purkinje cells but, while ANO1 appeared to be retained in the cell body, ANO2 was targeted to the dendritic tree. Functional studies confirmed that ANO2 was involved in a calcium-dependent mode of ionic plasticity that reduces the efficacy of GABAergic synapses. ANO2 channels attenuated GABAergic transmission by increasing the postsynaptic chloride concentration, hence reducing the driving force for chloride influx. Our data suggest that ANO2 channels are involved in a Ca2+-dependent regulation of synaptic weight in GABAergic inhibition. Thus, in balance with the chloride extrusion mechanism via the co-transporter KCC2, ANO2 appears to regulate ionic plasticity in the cerebellum. PMID:26558388

  17. Visuokinesthetic Perception of Hand Movement is Mediated by Cerebro–Cerebellar Interaction between the Left Cerebellum and Right Parietal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Hagura, Nobuhiro; Oouchida, Yutaka; Aramaki, Yu; Okada, Tomohisa; Matsumura, Michikazu; Sadato, Norihiro

    2009-01-01

    Combination of visual and kinesthetic information is essential to perceive bodily movements. We conducted behavioral and functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments to investigate the neuronal correlates of visuokinesthetic combination in perception of hand movement. Participants experienced illusory flexion movement of their hand elicited by tendon vibration while they viewed video-recorded flexion (congruent: CONG) or extension (incongruent: INCONG) motions of their hand. The amount of illusory experience was graded by the visual velocities only when visual information regarding hand motion was concordant with kinesthetic information (CONG). The left posterolateral cerebellum was specifically recruited under the CONG, and this left cerebellar activation was consistent for both left and right hands. The left cerebellar activity reflected the participants' intensity of illusory hand movement under the CONG, and we further showed that coupling of activity between the left cerebellum and the “right” parietal cortex emerges during this visuokinesthetic combination/perception. The “left” cerebellum, working with the anatomically connected high-order bodily region of the “right” parietal cortex, participates in online combination of exteroceptive (vision) and interoceptive (kinesthesia) information to perceive hand movement. The cerebro–cerebellar interaction may underlie updating of one's “body image,” when perceiving bodily movement from visual and kinesthetic information. PMID:18453537

  18. Quantitative analysis of granule cell axons and climbing fiber afferents in the turtle cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Tolbert, D L; Conoyer, B; Ariel, M

    2004-11-01

    The turtle cerebellar cortex is a single flat sheet of gray matter that greatly facilitates quantitative analysis of biotylinated dextran amine labeled granule cell and olivocerebellar axons and Nissl-stained granule and Purkinje neurons. On average, ascending granule cell axons are relatively thicker than their parallel fiber branches (mean +/- SD: 0.84 +/- 0.17 vs 0.64 +/- 0.12 microm, respectively). Numerous en passant swellings, the site of presynaptic contact, were present on both ascending and parallel fiber granule cell axons. The swellings on ascending axons (1.82 +/- 0.34 microm, n = 52) were slightly larger than on parallel fibers (1.43 +/- 0.24 microm, n = 430). In addition, per unit length (100 microm) there were more swellings on ascending axons (11.2 +/- 4.2) than on parallel fibers (9.7 +/- 4.2). Each parallel fiber branch from an ascending axon is approximately 1.5 mm long. Olivocerebellar climbing fiber axons followed the highly tortuous dendrites of Purkinje cells in the inner most 15-20% of the molecular layer. Climbing fibers displayed relatively fewer en passant swellings. The spatial perimeter of climbing fiber arbors (area) increased 72% from anteriorly (1797 microm2) to posteriorly (3090 microm2) and 104% from medially (1690 microm2) to laterally (3450 microm2). Differences in the size and spacing of en passant swellings on granule cell axons suggest that ascending axons may have a functionally more significant impact on the excitability of a limited number of radially overlying Purkinje cells than the single contacts by parallel fiber with multiple orthogonally aligned Purkinje cell dendrites. The spatially restricted distribution of climbing fibers to the inner most molecular layer, the paucity of en passant swellings, and different terminal arbor areas are enigmatic. Nevertheless, these finding provide important anatomical information for future optical imaging and electrophysiological experiments.

  19. Cellular and Metabolic Origins of Flavoprotein Autofluorescence in the Cerebellar Cortex in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Reinert, Kenneth C.; Gao, Wangcai; Chen, Gang; Wang, Xinming; Peng, Yu-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Flavoprotein autofluorescence imaging, an intrinsic mitochondrial signal, has proven useful for monitoring neuronal activity. In the cerebellar cortex, parallel fiber stimulation evokes a beam-like response consisting of an initial, short-duration increase in fluorescence (on-beam light phase) followed by a longer duration decrease (on-beam dark phase). Also evoked are parasagittal bands of decreased fluorescence due to molecular layer inhibition. Previous work suggests that the on-beam light phase is due to oxidative metabolism in neurons. The present study further investigated the metabolic and cellular origins of the flavoprotein signal in vivo, testing the hypotheses that the dark phase is mediated by glia activation and the inhibitory bands reflect decreased flavoprotein oxidation and increased glycolysis in neurons. Blocking postsynaptic ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors abolished the onbeam light phase and the parasagittal bands without altering the on-beam dark phase. Adding glutamate transporter blockers reduced the dark phase. Replacing glucose with lactate (or pyruvate) or adding lactate to the bathing media abolished the on-beam dark phase and reduced the inhibitory bands without affecting the light phase. Blocking monocarboxylate transporters eliminated the on-beam dark phase and increased the light phase. These results confirm that the on-beam light phase is due primarily to increased oxidative metabolism in neurons. They also show that the on-beam dark phase involves activation of glycolysis in glia resulting in the generation of lactate that is transferred to neurons. Oxidative savings in neurons contributes to the decrease in fluorescence characterizing the inhibitory bands. These findings provide strong in vivo support for the astrocyte–neuron lactate shuttle hypothesis. PMID:21503591

  20. Developmental Injury to the Cerebellar Cortex Following Hydroxyurea Treatment in Early Postnatal Life: An Immunohistochemical and Electron Microscopic Study.

    PubMed

    Martí, Joaquín; Molina, Vanesa; Santa-Cruz, M C; Hervás, José P

    2017-02-01

    Postnatal development of the cerebellar cortex was studied in rats administered with a single dose (2 mg/g) of the cytotoxic agent hydroxyurea (HU) on postnatal day (P) 9 and collected at appropriate times ranging from 6 h to 45 days. Quantification of several parameters such as the density of pyknotic, mitotic, BrdU-positive, and vimentin-stained cells revealed that HU compromises the survival of the external granular layer (EGL) cells. Moreover, vimentin immunocytochemistry revealed overexpression and thicker immunoreactive glial processes in HU-treated rats. On the other hand, we also show that HU leads to the activation of apoptotic cellular events, resulting in a substantial number of dying EGL cells, as revealed by TUNEL staining and at the electron microscope level. Additionally, we quantified several features of the cerebellar cortex of rats exposed to HU in early postnatal life and collected in adulthood. Data analysis indicated that the analyzed parameters were less pronounced in rats administered with this agent. Moreover, we observed several alterations in the cerebellar cortex cytoarchitecture of rats injected with HU. Anomalies included ectopic placement of Purkinje cells and abnormities in the dendritic arbor of these macroneurons. Ectopic granule cells were also found in the molecular layer. These findings provide a clue for investigating the mechanisms of HU-induced toxicity during the development of the central nervous system. Our results also suggest that it is essential to avoid underestimating the adverse effects of this hydroxylated analog of urea when administered during early postnatal life.

  1. Developmental expression of GABA transporter-1 and 3 during formation of the GABAergic synapses in the mouse cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Chitoshi; Inoue, Yoshiro

    2005-08-08

    In the brain, gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA), released extrasynaptically and synaptically from GABAergic neurons, plays important roles in morphogenesis, expression of higher functions and so on. In the GABAergic transmission system, plasma membrane GABA transporters (GATs) mediate GABA-uptake from the synaptic cleft in the mature brain and are thought to mediate diacrine of cytosolic GABA in the immature brain. In the present study, we focused on two GATs (GAT-1 and GAT-3) in the mouse cerebellar cortex, which are widely localized in neural and glial cells. Firstly, we examined the localization of GATs in the dendrites and cell bodies of developing GABAergic neurons, where GABA is extrasynaptically distributed, to clarify the GABA-diacrine before synaptogenesis. Secondly, we examined the developmental changes in the localization of GATs to reveal the development of the GABA-uptake system. Neither transporter was detected within the dendrites and cell bodies of GABAergic neurons, including Purkinje, stellate, basket and Golgi cells, in the immature cerebellar cortex. GAT-1 was observed within the Golgi cell axon terminals after postnatal day 5 (P5) and presynaptic axons of stellate and basket cells after P7. GAT-3 was localized within the astrocyte processes, sealing the GABAergic synapses in the Purkinje cell and granular layers after P10. These results indicated that GABA-diacrine did not work in the mouse cerebellar cortex. The onset of GAT-1-expression was prior to that of GAT-3. GAT-1 started to be localized within the GABAergic axon terminals during synapse formation. GAT-3 started to be localized within astrocyte processes when they sealed the synapses.

  2. Transcranial theta-burst stimulation alters GLT-1 and vGluT1 expression in rat cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Mancic, Bojana; Stevanovic, Ivana; Ilic, Tihomir V; Djuric, Ana; Stojanovic, Ivana; Milanovic, Sladjan; Ninkovic, Milica

    2016-11-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) induces changes in expression of proteins engaged in activity of excitatory and inhibitory systems as well as redox homeostasis. Our aim was to investigate the effect of single (SS) and repeated session (RS) of intermittent and continuous theta-burst stimulation (iTBS; cTBS) on the expression of vesicular and plasmatic glutamate transporters 1 (vGluT1 and GLT-1), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and influence on oxidative status in rats cerebellar tissue and plasma. Redox state parameters in cerebellar tissue and plasma were assessed 24 h after single and 48 h after the last TBS session. Molecular changes were examined by immunofluorescence. Stimulation significantly increased thiol groups (SH) in tissue of SS iTBS group, and decreased in iTBS RS. Activity of glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase (G6PD) was increased markedly in cTBS RS. Immunoreactivity of vGluT1 in cTBS RS decreased, while GLT-1 increased in cTBS SS and cTBS RS, compared to control. Present study gives insight in molecular and biochemical mechanisms by which iTBS and cTBS exerts its effects on rats cerebellar cortex.

  3. Topographical organization of pathways from somatosensory cortex through the pontine nuclei to tactile regions of the rat cerebellar hemispheres.

    PubMed

    Leergaard, Trygve B; Lillehaug, Sveinung; De Schutter, Erik; Bower, James M; Bjaalie, Jan G

    2006-11-01

    The granule cell layer of the cerebellar hemispheres contains a patchy and noncontinuous map of the body surface, consisting of a complex mosaic of multiple perioral tactile representations. Previous physiological studies have shown that cerebrocerebellar mossy fibre projections, conveyed through the pontine nuclei, are mapped in registration with peripheral tactile projections to the cerebellum. In contrast to the fractured cerebellar map, the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) is somatotopically organized. To understand better the map transformation occurring in cerebrocerebellar pathways, we injected axonal tracers in electrophysiologically defined locations in Sprague-Dawley rat folium crus IIa, and mapped the distribution of retrogradely labelled neurons within the pontine nuclei using three-dimensional (3-D) reconstructions. Tracer injections within the large central upper lip patch in crus IIa-labelled neurons located centrally in the pontine nuclei, primarily contralateral to the injected side. Larger injections (covering multiple crus IIa perioral representations) resulted in labelling extending only slightly beyond this region, with a higher density and more ipsilaterally labelled neurons. Combined axonal tracer injections in upper lip representations in SI and crus IIa, revealed a close spatial correspondence between the cerebropontine terminal fields and the crus IIa projecting neurons. Finally, comparisons with previously published three-dimensional distributions of pontine neurons labelled following tracer injections in face receiving regions in the paramedian lobule (downloaded from http://www.rbwb.org) revealed similar correspondence. The present data support the coherent topographical organization of cerebro-ponto-cerebellar networks previously suggested from physiological studies. We discuss the present findings in the context of transformations from cerebral somatotopic to cerebellar fractured tactile representations.

  4. Importance of Nitric Oxide for Local Increases of Blood Flow in Rat Cerebellar Cortex During Electrical Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akgoren, Nuran; Fabricius, Martin; Lauritzen, Martin

    1994-06-01

    The endothelium-derived relaxing factor, probably nitric oxide (NO), is a potent vasodilator that regulates the vascular tone in several vascular beds, including the brain. We explored the possibility that NO might be of importance for the increase of cerebral blood flow (CBF) associated with activity of the well-defined neuronal circuits of the rat cerebellar cortex. Laser-Doppler flowmetry was used to measure increases of cerebellar blood flow evoked by trains of electrical stimulations of the dorsal surface. The evoked increases of CBF were frequency-dependent, being larger on than off the parallel fiber tracts, suggesting that conduction along parallel fibers and synaptic activation of target cells were important for the increase of CBF. This was verified experimentally since the evoked CBF increases were abolished by tetrodotoxin and reduced by 10 mM Mg2+ and selective antagonists for non-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. The cerebellar cortex contains high levels of NO synthase. This raised the possibility that NO was involved in the increase of CBF associated with neuronal activation. NO synthase inhibition by topical application of N^G-nitro-L-arginine attenuated the evoked CBF increase by about 50%. This effect was partially reversed by pretreatment with L-arginine, the natural substrate for the enzyme, while N^G-nitro-D-arginine, the inactive enantiomer, had no effect on the evoked CBF increases. Simultaneous blockade of non-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and NO synthase had no further suppressing effect on the blood flow increase than either substance alone, suggesting that the NO-dependent flow rise was dependent on postsynaptic mechanisms. These findings are consistent with the idea that local synthesis of NO is involved in the transduction mechanism between neuronal activity and increased CBF.

  5. Importance of nitric oxide for local increases of blood flow in rat cerebellar cortex during electrical stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Akgören, N; Fabricius, M; Lauritzen, M

    1994-01-01

    The endothelium-derived relaxing factor, probably nitric oxide (NO), is a potent vasodilator that regulates the vascular tone in several vascular beds, including the brain. We explored the possibility that NO might be of importance for the increase of cerebral blood flow (CBF) associated with activity of the well-defined neuronal circuits of the rat cerebellar cortex. Laser-Doppler flowmetry was used to measure increases of cerebellar blood flow evoked by trains of electrical stimulations of the dorsal surface. The evoked increases of CBF were frequency-dependent, being larger on than off the parallel fiber tracts, suggesting that conduction along parallel fibers and synaptic activation of target cells were important for the increase of CBF. This was verified experimentally since the evoked CBF increases were abolished by tetrodotoxin and reduced by 10 mM Mg2+ and selective antagonists for non-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. The cerebellar cortex contains high levels of NO synthase. This raised the possibility that NO was involved in the increase of CBF associated with neuronal activation. NO synthase inhibition by topical application of NG-nitro-L-arginine attenuated the evoked CBF increase by about 50%. This effect was partially reversed by pretreatment with L-arginine, the natural substrate for the enzyme, while NG-nitro-D-arginine, the inactive enantiomer, had no effect on the evoked CBF increases. Simultaneous blockade of non-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and NO synthase had no further suppressing effect on the blood flow increase than either substance alone, suggesting that the NO-dependent flow rise was dependent on postsynaptic mechanisms. These findings are consistent with the idea that local synthesis of NO is involved in the transduction mechanism between neuronal activity and increased CBF. Images PMID:7517038

  6. The Morpho/Functional Discrepancy in the Cerebellar Cortex: Looks Alone are Deceptive

    PubMed Central

    Rokni, Dan; Llinas, Rodolfo; Yarom, Yosef

    2008-01-01

    In a recent report we demonstrated that stimulation of cerebellar mossy fibers synchronously activates Purkinje cells that are located directly above the site of stimulation. We found that the activated Purkinje cells are arranged in a radial patch on the cerebellar surface and that this organization is independent of the integrity of the inhibitory system. This arrangement of activity is counterintuitive. The anatomical structure with the extensive parallel fiber system implies that mossy fiber stimulation will activate Purkinje cells along a beam of parallel fibers. In this short review we highlight this discrepancy between anatomical structure and functional dynamics and suggest a plausible underlying mechanism. PMID:19225592

  7. Effects of cerebellar transcranial alternating current stimulation on motor cortex excitability and motor function.

    PubMed

    Naro, Antonino; Bramanti, Alessia; Leo, Antonino; Manuli, Alfredo; Sciarrone, Francesca; Russo, Margherita; Bramanti, Placido; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore

    2017-01-07

    The cerebellum regulates several motor functions through two main mechanisms, the cerebellum-brain inhibition (CBI) and the motor surround inhibition (MSI). Although the exact cerebellar structures and functions involved in such processes are partially known, Purkinje cells (PC) and their surrounding interneuronal networks may play a pivotal role concerning CBI and MSI. Cerebellar transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) has been proven to shape specific cerebellar components in a feasible, safe, effective, and non-invasive manner. The aim of our study was to characterize the cerebellar structures and functions subtending CBI and MSI using a tACS approach. Fifteen healthy individuals underwent a cerebellar tACS protocol at 10, 50, and 300 Hz, or a sham-tACS over the right cerebellar hemisphere. We measured the tACS aftereffects on motor-evoked potential (MEP) amplitude, CBI induced by tACS (tiCBI) at different frequencies, MSI, and hand motor task performance. None of the participants had any side effect related to tACS. After 50-Hz tACS, we observed a clear tiCBI-50Hz weakening (about +30%, p < 0.001) paralleled by a MEP amplitude increase (about +30%, p = 0.001) and a reduction of the time required to complete some motor task (about -20%, p = 0.01), lasting up to 30 min. The 300-Hz tACS induced a selective, specific tiCBI-300Hz and tiCBI-50Hz modulation in surrounding muscles (about -15%, p = 0.01) and MSI potentiation (about +40%, p < 0.001). The 10-Hz tACS and the sham-tACS were ineffective (p > 0.6). Our preliminary data suggest that PC may represent the last mediator of tiCBI and that the surrounding interneuronal network may have an important role in updating MSI, tiCBI, and M1 excitability during tonic muscle contraction, by acting onto the PC. The knowledge of these neurophysiological issues offers new cues to design innovative, non-invasive neuromodulation protocols to shape cerebellar-cerebral functions.

  8. Cellular and Subcellular Localization of the RGS7/Gβ5/R7BP Complex in the Cerebellar Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Carolina; Orlandi, Cesare; Fajardo-Serrano, Ana; Gil-Minguez, Mercedes; Martemyanov, Kirill A.; Luján, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    A member of regulator of G-protein signaling family, RGS7, is an essential modulator of signaling through GABAB receptors. RGS7 functions as a macromolecular complex with type 5 G protein β (Gβ5) and R7 binding protein (R7BP) to control the localization and function of the resultant heterotrimeric complexes. Here, we used co-immunoprecipitation, in situ hybridization, histoblot and immunohistochemical techniques at the light and electron microscopic level to advance understanding of RGS7-Gβ5-R7BP complexes in the central nervous system, focusing on distinct neuronal populations in the cerebellar cortex. Histoblot analysis showed that RGS7, Gβ5 and R7BP proteins were widely expressed in the brain, with mostly an overlapping pattern and showing a high expression level in the molecular layer of the cerebellar cortex. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments established that the RGS7/Gβ5 forms complexes with R7BP in the cerebellum. At the cellular level, RGS7 and R7BP mRNAs were expressed at the highest level in Purkinje cells (PCs) and Golgi cells, and at low levels in granule cells. Immunohistochemistry confirmed that labeling for RGS7, Gβ5 and R7BP were present in the three neuronal populations and concentrated in dendrites and spines. At the electron microscopic level, immunolabeling for RGS7, Gβ5 and R7BP proteins was found both at postsynaptic and presynaptic sites and showed similar distribution patterns. Immunoreactivity for the three proteins was mostly localized along the extrasynaptic plasma membrane of dendritic shafts and spines of PCs and to a lesser extent, in axon terminals (AT) establishing excitatory synapses. Quantitative analysis of immunogold particles for RGS7, Gβ5 and R7BP revealed that they are non-uniformly distributed along the surface of PCs, and show enrichment around excitatory synapses on dendritic spines. We further report that deletion of R7BP in mice reduced the targeting of both RGS7 and Gβ5 to the plasma membrane. Altogether, these

  9. [Cytochemical research on the matrix activity and status of the histone component of the neurocyte chromatin in the rat cerebellar cortex during postnatal differentiation].

    PubMed

    Grigor'eva, A V; Iarygin, V N

    1986-08-01

    Evident differences in the ammoniacal silver staining pattern of histones were demonstrated for neurones of different layers of adult rat cerebellar cortex. These differences were formed during postnatal differentiation. It has been also shown for Purkinje and granular cells that time-course of age-dependent changes in histone staining are not coincident with that for template activity of these cells.

  10. Developmental regulation of glucose transporters GLUT3, GLUT4 and GLUT8 in the mouse cerebellar cortex

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Olga; Ballester-Lurbe, Begoña; Poch, Enric; Mesonero, José E; Terrado, José

    2010-01-01

    Glucose uptake into the mammalian nervous system is mediated by the family of facilitative glucose transporter proteins (GLUT). In this work we investigate how the expression of the main neuronal glucose transporters (GLUT3, GLUT4 and GLUT8) is modified during cerebellar cortex maturation. Our results reveal that the levels of the three transporters increase during the postnatal development of the cerebellum. GLUT3 localizes in the growing molecular layer and in the internal granule cell layer. However, the external granule cell layer, Purkinje cell cytoplasm and cytoplasm of the other cerebellar cells lack GLUT3 expression. GLUT4 and GLUT8 have partially overlapping patterns, which are detected in the cytoplasm and dendrites of Purkinje cells, and also in the internal granule cell layer where GLUT8 displays a more diffuse pattern. The differential localization of the transporters suggests that they play different roles in the cerebellum, although GLUT4 and GLUT8 could also perform some compensatory or redundant functions. In addition, the increase in the levels and the area expressing the three transporters suggests that these roles become more important as development advances. Interestingly, the external granule cells, which have been shown to express the monocarboxylate transporter MCT2, express none of the three main neuronal GLUTs. However, when these cells migrate inwardly to differentiate in the internal granule cells, they begin to produce GLUT3, GLUT4 and GLUT8, suggesting that the maturation of the cerebellar granule cells involves a switch in their metabolism in such a way that they start using glucose as they mature. PMID:20819112

  11. Layer specific changes of astroglial gap junctions in the rat cerebellar cortex by persistent Borna Disease Virus infection.

    PubMed

    Köster-Patzlaff, Christiane; Hosseini, Seyed Mehdi; Reuss, Bernhard

    2008-07-11

    Neonatal Borna Disease Virus (BDV) infection of the Lewis rat brain, leads to Purkinje cell degeneration, in association with astroglial activation. Since astroglial gap junctions (GJ) are known to influence neuronal degeneration, we investigated BDV dependent changes in astroglial GJ connexins (Cx) Cx43, and Cx30 in the Lewis rat cerebellum, 4, and 8 weeks after neonatal infection. On the mRNA level, RT-PCR demonstrated a BDV dependent increase in cerebellar Cx43, and a decrease in Cx30, 8, but not 4 weeks p.i. On the protein level, Western blot analysis revealed no overall upregulation of Cx43, but an increase of its phosphorylated forms, 8 weeks p.i. Cx30 protein was downregulated. Immunohistochemistry revealed a BDV dependent reduction of Cx43 in the granular layer (GL), 4 weeks p.i. 8 weeks p.i., Cx43 immunoreactivity recovered in the GL, and was induced in the molecular layer (ML). Cx30 revealed a BDV dependent decrease in the GL, both 4, and 8 weeks p.i. Changes in astroglial Cxs correlated not with expression of the astrogliotic marker GFAP, which was upregulated in radial glia. With regard to functional coupling, primary cerebellar astroglial cultures, revealed a BDV dependent increase of Cx43, and Cx30 immunoreactivity and in spreading of the GJ permeant dye Lucifer Yellow. These results demonstrate a massive, BDV dependent reorganization of astroglial Cx expression, and of functional GJ coupling in the cerebellar cortex, which might be of importance for the BDV dependent neurodegeneration in this brain region.

  12. Consensus Paper: Towards a Systems-Level View of Cerebellar Function: the Interplay Between Cerebellum, Basal Ganglia, and Cortex.

    PubMed

    Caligiore, Daniele; Pezzulo, Giovanni; Baldassarre, Gianluca; Bostan, Andreea C; Strick, Peter L; Doya, Kenji; Helmich, Rick C; Dirkx, Michiel; Houk, James; Jörntell, Henrik; Lago-Rodriguez, Angel; Galea, Joseph M; Miall, R Chris; Popa, Traian; Kishore, Asha; Verschure, Paul F M J; Zucca, Riccardo; Herreros, Ivan

    2017-02-01

    Despite increasing evidence suggesting the cerebellum works in concert with the cortex and basal ganglia, the nature of the reciprocal interactions between these three brain regions remains unclear. This consensus paper gathers diverse recent views on a variety of important roles played by the cerebellum within the cerebello-basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical system across a range of motor and cognitive functions. The paper includes theoretical and empirical contributions, which cover the following topics: recent evidence supporting the dynamical interplay between cerebellum, basal ganglia, and cortical areas in humans and other animals; theoretical neuroscience perspectives and empirical evidence on the reciprocal influences between cerebellum, basal ganglia, and cortex in learning and control processes; and data suggesting possible roles of the cerebellum in basal ganglia movement disorders. Although starting from different backgrounds and dealing with different topics, all the contributors agree that viewing the cerebellum, basal ganglia, and cortex as an integrated system enables us to understand the function of these areas in radically different ways. In addition, there is unanimous consensus between the authors that future experimental and computational work is needed to understand the function of cerebellar-basal ganglia circuitry in both motor and non-motor functions. The paper reports the most advanced perspectives on the role of the cerebellum within the cerebello-basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical system and illustrates other elements of consensus as well as disagreements and open questions in the field.

  13. Time‐invariant feed‐forward inhibition of Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Blot, Antonin; de Solages, Camille; Ostojic, Srdjan; Szapiro, German; Hakim, Vincent; Léna, Clément

    2016-01-01

    Key points We performed extracellular recording of pairs of interneuron–Purkinje cells in vivo.A single interneuron produces a substantial, short‐lasting, inhibition of Purkinje cells.Feed‐forward inhibition is associated with characteristic asymmetric cross‐correlograms. In vivo, Purkinje cell spikes only depend on the most recent synaptic activity. Abstract Cerebellar molecular layer interneurons are considered to control the firing rate and spike timing of Purkinje cells. However, interactions between these cell types are largely unexplored in vivo. Using tetrodes, we performed simultaneous extracellular recordings of neighbouring Purkinje cells and molecular layer interneurons, presumably basket cells, in adult rats in vivo. The high levels of afferent synaptic activity encountered in vivo yield irregular spiking and reveal discharge patterns characteristic of feed‐forward inhibition, thus suggesting an overlap of the afferent excitatory inputs between Purkinje cells and basket cells. Under conditions of intense background synaptic inputs, interneuron spikes exert a short‐lasting inhibitory effect, delaying the following Purkinje cell spike by an amount remarkably independent of the Purkinje cell firing cycle. This effect can be explained by the short memory time of the Purkinje cell potential as a result of the intense incoming synaptic activity. Finally, we found little evidence for any involvement of the interneurons that we recorded with the cerebellar high‐frequency oscillations promoting Purkinje cell synchrony. The rapid interactions between interneurons and Purkinje cells might be of particular importance in fine motor control because the inhibitory action of interneurons on Purkinje cells leads to deep cerebellar nuclear disinhibition and hence increased cerebellar output. PMID:26918702

  14. Time-invariant feed-forward inhibition of Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex in vivo.

    PubMed

    Blot, Antonin; de Solages, Camille; Ostojic, Srdjan; Szapiro, German; Hakim, Vincent; Léna, Clément

    2016-05-15

    We performed extracellular recording of pairs of interneuron-Purkinje cells in vivo. A single interneuron produces a substantial, short-lasting, inhibition of Purkinje cells. Feed-forward inhibition is associated with characteristic asymmetric cross-correlograms. In vivo, Purkinje cell spikes only depend on the most recent synaptic activity. Cerebellar molecular layer interneurons are considered to control the firing rate and spike timing of Purkinje cells. However, interactions between these cell types are largely unexplored in vivo. Using tetrodes, we performed simultaneous extracellular recordings of neighbouring Purkinje cells and molecular layer interneurons, presumably basket cells, in adult rats in vivo. The high levels of afferent synaptic activity encountered in vivo yield irregular spiking and reveal discharge patterns characteristic of feed-forward inhibition, thus suggesting an overlap of the afferent excitatory inputs between Purkinje cells and basket cells. Under conditions of intense background synaptic inputs, interneuron spikes exert a short-lasting inhibitory effect, delaying the following Purkinje cell spike by an amount remarkably independent of the Purkinje cell firing cycle. This effect can be explained by the short memory time of the Purkinje cell potential as a result of the intense incoming synaptic activity. Finally, we found little evidence for any involvement of the interneurons that we recorded with the cerebellar high-frequency oscillations promoting Purkinje cell synchrony. The rapid interactions between interneurons and Purkinje cells might be of particular importance in fine motor control because the inhibitory action of interneurons on Purkinje cells leads to deep cerebellar nuclear disinhibition and hence increased cerebellar output. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  15. Neuroscience and Learning: Lessons from Studying the Involvement of a Region of Cerebellar Cortex in Eyeblink Classical Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Ronald P; Steinmetz, Joseph E

    2005-01-01

    How the nervous system encodes learning and memory processes has interested researchers for 100 years. Over this span of time, a number of basic neuroscience methods has been developed to explore the relationship between learning and the brain, including brain lesion, stimulation, pharmacology, anatomy, imaging, and recording techniques. In this paper, we summarize how different research approaches can be employed to generate converging data that speak to how structures and systems in the brain are involved in simple associative learning. To accomplish this, we review data regarding the involvement of a particular region of cerebellar cortex (Larsell's lobule HVI) in the widely used paradigm of classical eyeblink conditioning. We also present new data on the role of lobule HVI in eyeblink conditioning generated by combining temporary brain inactivation and single-cell recording methods, an approach that looks promising for further advancing our understanding of relationships between brain and behavior. PMID:16596983

  16. VAMP-2, SNAP-25A/B and syntaxin-1 in glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses of the rat cerebellar cortex

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the distribution of key SNARE proteins in glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses of the adult rat cerebellar cortex using light microscopy immunohistochemical techniques. Analysis was made of co-localizations of vGluT-1 and vGluT-2, vesicular transporters of glutamate and markers of glutamatergic synapses, or GAD, the GABA synthetic enzyme and marker of GABAergic synapses, with VAMP-2, SNAP-25A/B and syntaxin-1. Results The examined SNARE proteins were found to be diffusely expressed in glutamatergic synapses, whereas they were rarely observed in GABAergic synapses. However, among glutamatergic synapses, subpopulations which did not contain VAMP-2, SNAP-25A/B and syntaxin-1 were detected. They included virtually all the synapses established by terminals of climbing fibres (immunoreactive for vGluT-2) and some synapses established by terminals of parallel and mossy fibres (immunoreactive for vGluT-1, and for vGluT-1 and 2, respectively). The only GABA synapses expressing the SNARE proteins studied were the synapses established by axon terminals of basket neurons. Conclusion The present study supplies a detailed morphological description of VAMP-2, SNAP-25A/B and syntaxin-1 in the different types of glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses of the rat cerebellar cortex. The examined SNARE proteins characterize most of glutamatergic synapses and only one type of GABAergic synapses. In the subpopulations of glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses lacking the SNARE protein isoforms examined, alternative mechanisms for regulating trafficking of synaptic vesicles may be hypothesized, possibly mediated by different isoforms or homologous proteins. PMID:22094010

  17. Effects of prenatal paraquat and mancozeb exposure on amino acid synaptic transmission in developing mouse cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Contreras, Leticia; Dávila-Ovalles, Rosaura; Benítez-Díaz, Pedro; Peña-Contreras, Zulma; Palacios-Prü, Ernesto

    2005-11-07

    The goal of this study was to analyze the effects of prenatal exposure to the pesticides paraquat (PQ) and mancozeb (MZ) on the development of synaptic transmission in mouse cerebellar cortex. Pregnant NMRI mice were treated with either saline, 10 mg/kg PQ, 30 mg/kg MZ or the combination of PQ + MZ, between gestational days 12 (E12) and E20. Variation in the levels of amino acid neurotransmitters was determined by HPLC, between postnatal day 1 (P1) and P30. Motor coordination was assessed by locomotor activity evaluation of control and experimental pups at P14, P21 and P30. Significant reductions in the levels of excitatory neurotransmitters, aspartate and glutamate, were observed in PQ-, MZ- or combined PQ + MZ-exposed pups, with respect to control, during peak periods of excitatory innervation of Purkinje cells: between P2-P5 and P11-P15. However, at P30, lower aspartate contents, in contrast with increased glutamate levels, were detected in all experimental groups. During the first two postnatal weeks, delays in GABA and glycine ontogenesis were observed in PQ- and PQ + MZ-exposed pups, whereas notable decrements in GABA and glycine levels were seen in PQ + MZ-exposed animals. Decreased taurine contents were detected at P3 and P11 in PQ- and PQ + MZ-exposed mice. Pups in different experimental groups all showed hyperactivity at P14 and then exhibited reduced locomotor activity at P30. Taken together, our results indicate that prenatal exposure to either PQ or MZ or the combination of both could alter the chronology and magnitude of synaptic transmission in developing mouse cerebellar cortex.

  18. Distinct subsynaptic localization of type 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors at glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses in the rodent cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Mahnaz; Kasugai, Yu; Fukazawa, Yugo; Bertaso, Federica; Raynaud, Fabrice; Perroy, Julie; Fagni, Laurent; Kaufmann, Walter A; Watanabe, Masahiko; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Ferraguti, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu1) receptors play a pivotal role in different forms of synaptic plasticity in the cerebellar cortex, e.g. long-term depression at glutamatergic synapses and rebound potentiation at GABAergic synapses. These various forms of plasticity might depend on the subsynaptic arrangement of the receptor in Purkinje cells that can be regulated by protein-protein interactions. This study investigated, by means of the freeze-fracture replica immunogold labelling method, the subcellular localization of mGlu1 receptors in the rodent cerebellum and whether Homer proteins regulate their subsynaptic distribution. We observed a widespread extrasynaptic localization of mGlu1 receptors and confirmed their peri-synaptic enrichment at glutamatergic synapses. Conversely, we detected mGlu1 receptors within the main body of GABAergic synapses onto Purkinje cell dendrites. Although Homer proteins are known to interact with the mGlu1 receptor C-terminus, we could not detect Homer3, the most abundant Homer protein in the cerebellar cortex, at GABAergic synapses by pre-embedding and post-embedding immunoelectron microscopy. We then hypothesized a critical role for Homer proteins in the peri-junctional localization of mGlu1 receptors at glutamatergic synapses. To disrupt Homer-associated protein complexes, mice were tail-vein injected with the membrane-permeable dominant-negative TAT-Homer1a. Freeze-fracture replica immunogold labelling analysis showed no significant alteration in the mGlu1 receptor distribution pattern at parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses, suggesting that other scaffolding proteins are involved in the peri-synaptic confinement. The identification of interactors that regulate the subsynaptic localization of the mGlu1 receptor at neurochemically distinct synapses may offer new insight into its trafficking and intracellular signalling.

  19. The treasury of the commons: making use of public gene expression resources to better characterize the molecular diversity of inhibitory interneurons in the cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Karl; Oberdick, John

    2009-12-01

    We mined the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas for genes expressed in cerebellar cortical inhibitory interneurons that would allow identification and possibly distinction of these cells. We identified some 90 genes that are highly expressed in specific subsets of cerebellar cortical inhibitory interneurons or various combinations thereof. Four genes are exclusively expressed, within the cerebellar cortex, in molecular layer interneurons, and ten genes label exclusively inhibitory interneurons in the granule cell layer or subsets thereof. Differential expression of many of these genes in cells residing in the lower versus the upper molecular layer provides evidence that these cells, traditionally referred to as basket and stellate cells, are indeed molecularly distinct. Two genes could be identified as novel markers for unipolar brush cells. Intersection of these data with embryonic expression patterns as documented in the genepaint repository does not support a hierarchical model of cerebellar interneuron development, but may be more easily reconciled with the view that cerebellar inhibitory interneurons derive from a common precursor pool from which they are specified only late into their development. The novel markers identified here should prove useful for probing the timing and mechanisms supporting cerebellar cortical interneuron specification and diversification.

  20. Compartmentation of the cerebellar cortex: adaptation to lifestyle in the star-nosed mole Condylura cristata.

    PubMed

    Marzban, Hassan; Hoy, Nathan; Buchok, Matthew; Catania, Kenneth C; Hawkes, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The adult mammalian cerebellum is histologically uniform. However, concealed beneath the simple laminar architecture, it is organized rostrocaudally and mediolaterally into complex arrays of transverse zones and parasagittal stripes that is both highly reproducible between individuals and generally conserved across mammals and birds. Beyond this conservation, the general architecture appears to be adapted to the animal's way of life. To test this hypothesis, we have examined cerebellar compartmentation in the talpid star-nosed mole Condylura cristata. The star-nosed mole leads a subterranean life. It is largely blind and instead uses an array of fleshy appendages (the "star") to navigate and locate its prey. The hypothesis suggests that cerebellar architecture would be modified to reduce regions receiving visual input and expand those that receive trigeminal afferents from the star. Zebrin II and phospholipase Cß4 (PLCß4) immunocytochemistry was used to map the zone-and-stripe architecture of the cerebellum of the adult star-nosed mole. The general zone-and-stripe architecture characteristic of all mammals is present in the star-nosed mole. In the vermis, the four typical transverse zones are present, two with alternating zebrin II/PLCß4 stripes, two wholly zebrin II+/PLCß4-. However, the central and nodular zones (prominent visual receiving areas) are proportionally reduced in size and conversely, the trigeminal-receiving areas (the posterior zone of the vermis and crus I/II of the hemispheres) are uncharacteristically large. We therefore conclude that cerebellar architecture is generally conserved across the Mammalia but adapted to the specific lifestyle of the species.

  1. Age-Related Changes in Processing Speed: Unique Contributions of Cerebellar and Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Mark A.; Keren, Noam I.; Roberts, Donna R.; Calhoun, Vince D.; Harris, Kelly C.

    2010-01-01

    Age-related declines in processing speed are hypothesized to underlie the widespread changes in cognition experienced by older adults. We used a structural covariance approach to identify putative neural networks that underlie age-related structural changes associated with processing speed for 42 adults ranging in age from 19 to 79 years. To characterize a potential mechanism by which age-related gray matter changes lead to slower processing speed, we examined the extent to which cerebral small vessel disease influenced the association between age-related gray matter changes and processing speed. A frontal pattern of gray matter and white matter variation that was related to cerebral small vessel disease, as well as a cerebellar pattern of gray matter and white matter variation were uniquely related to age-related declines in processing speed. These results demonstrate that at least two distinct factors affect age-related changes in processing speed, which might be slowed by mitigating cerebral small vessel disease and factors affecting declines in cerebellar morphology. PMID:20300463

  2. Atypical neuropathological sCJD-MM phenotype with abundant white matter Kuru-type plaques sparing the cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Gelpi, Ellen; Soler Insa, Josep Ma; Parchi, Piero; Saverioni, Daniela; Yagüe, Jordi; Nos, Carlos; Martínez-Saez, Elena; Ribalta, Teresa; Ferrer, Isidre; Sanchez-Valle, Raquel

    2013-04-01

    We describe an atypical neuropatholgical phenotype of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) in a 64-year-old man presenting with a 5-month history of rapidly progressive dementia, comprising behavioral disturbances, memory complaints, disorientation and language alterations. MRI showed diffuse atrophy and hyperintensities in parietal, occipital, temporal and frontal cortices and left caudate nucleus on T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. No typical EEG alterations were observed. Repeated 14-3-3 assay was positive after a first negative test. Neuropathology showed classical CJD changes with small cortical foci of large confluent vacuoles and relatively well-preserved cerebellar cortex. The most striking feature was the presence of abundant Kuru-type plaques in both cerebral cortex and subcortical white matter. Sparse Kuru-type plaques were also seen in cerebellum, although only in white matter. Immunohistochemistry showed, in addition to unicentric plaques, diffuse synaptic and patchy perivacuolar, as well as plaque-like and periaxonal pathological prion protein deposits (PrP(res) ). Western blot studies demonstrated the co-occurrence of PrP(res) types 1 and 2 in frontal cortex and a relatively weak type 2 signal in cerebellum. PRNP genotyping revealed methionine homozygosity at codon 129 and excluded mutations. This case shows a previously undescribed combination of histopathological features which preclude its classification according to the current phenotypic and molecular sCJD classification. The observation demonstrates that Kuru-type amyloid plaques mainly involving the cerebral white matter may also occur in sCJD cases with short clinical course and the co-existence of PrP(res) types 1 and 2. This case further highlights the complexity of the correlations between histopathological phenotype and PrP(res) isotype in prion diseases. © 2012 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  3. Synaptic and cellular properties of the feed-forward inhibitory circuit within the input layer of the cerebellar cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kanichay, Roby T.; Silver, R. Angus

    2010-01-01

    Precise representation of the timing of sensory stimuli is essential for rapid motor coordination, a core function of the cerebellum. Feed-forward inhibition has been implicated in precise temporal signalling in several regions of the brain, but little is known about this type of inhibitory circuit within the input layer of the cerebellar cortex. We have investigated the synaptic properties of feed-forward inhibition at near physiological temperatures (35°C) in rat cerebellar slices. We establish that the previously uncharacterized mossy fibre–Golgi cell–granule cell pathway can act as a functional feed-forward inhibitory circuit. The synchronous activation of 4 mossy fibres, releasing a total of 6 quanta onto a Golgi cell, can reset spontaneous Golgi cell firing with high temporal precision (200μs). However, only modest increases in Golgi cell firing rate were observed during trains of high frequency mossy fibre stimulation. This decoupling of Golgi cell activity from mossy fibre firing rate was due to a strong after-hyperpolarization following each action potential, preventing mossy fibre–Golgi cell signalling for ~50 ms. Feed-forward excitation of Golgi cells induced a temporally precise inhibitory conductance in granule cells that curtailed the excitatory action of the mossy fibre EPSC. The synaptic and cellular properties of this feed-forward circuit appear tuned to trigger a fast inhibitory conductance in granule cells at the onset of stimuli that produce intense bursts of activity in multiple mossy fibres, thereby conserving the temporal precision of the initial granule cell response. PMID:18768689

  4. Cerebellar and prefrontal cortex contributions to adaptation, strategies, and reinforcement learning.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jordan A; Ivry, Richard B

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, motor learning has been studied as an implicit learning process, one in which movement errors are used to improve performance in a continuous, gradual manner. The cerebellum figures prominently in this literature given well-established ideas about the role of this system in error-based learning and the production of automatized skills. Recent developments have brought into focus the relevance of multiple learning mechanisms for sensorimotor learning. These include processes involving repetition, reinforcement learning, and strategy utilization. We examine these developments, considering their implications for understanding cerebellar function and how this structure interacts with other neural systems to support motor learning. Converging lines of evidence from behavioral, computational, and neuropsychological studies suggest a fundamental distinction between processes that use error information to improve action execution or action selection. While the cerebellum is clearly linked to the former, its role in the latter remains an open question.

  5. Cerebellar and Prefrontal Cortex Contributions to Adaptation, Strategies, and Reinforcement Learning

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jordan A.; Ivry, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, motor learning has been studied as an implicit learning process, one in which movement errors are used to improve performance in a continuous, gradual manner. The cerebellum figures prominently in this literature given well-established ideas about the role of this system in error-based learning and the production of automatized skills. Recent developments have brought into focus the relevance of multiple learning mechanisms for sensorimotor learning. These include processes involving repetition, reinforcement learning, and strategy utilization. We examine these developments, considering their implications for understanding cerebellar function and how this structure interacts with other neural systems to support motor learning. Converging lines of evidence from behavioral, computational, and neuropsychological studies suggest a fundamental distinction between processes that use error information to improve action execution or action selection. While the cerebellum is clearly linked to the former, its role in the latter remains an open question. PMID:24916295

  6. Sensory Stimulation-Dependent Plasticity in the Cerebellar Cortex of Alert Mice

    PubMed Central

    Márquez-Ruiz, Javier; Cheron, Guy

    2012-01-01

    In vitro studies have supported the occurrence of cerebellar long-term depression (LTD), an interaction between the parallel fibers and Purkinje cells (PCs) that requires the combined activation of the parallel and climbing fibers. To demonstrate the existence of LTD in alert animals, we investigated the plasticity of local field potentials (LFPs) evoked by electrical stimulation of the whisker pad. The recorded LFP showed two major negative waves corresponding to trigeminal (broken into the N2 and N3 components) and cortical responses. PC unitary extracellular recording showed that N2 and N3 occurred concurrently with PC evoked simple spikes, followed by an evoked complex spike. Polarity inversion of the N3 component at the PC level and N3 amplitude reduction after electrical stimulation of the parallel fiber volley applied on the surface of the cerebellum 2 ms earlier strongly suggest that N3 was related to the parallel fiber–PC synapse activity. LFP measurements elicited by single whisker pad stimulus were performed before and after trains of electrical stimuli given at a frequency of 8 Hz for 10 min. We demonstrated that during this later situation, the stimulation of the PC by parallel and climbing fibers was reinforced. After 8-Hz stimulation, we observed long-term modifications (lasting at least 30 min) characterized by a specific decrease of the N3 amplitude accompanied by an increase of the N2 and N3 latency peaks. These plastic modifications indicated the existence of cerebellar LTD in alert animals involving both timing and synaptic modulations. These results corroborate the idea that LTD may underlie basic physiological functions related to calcium-dependent synaptic plasticity in the cerebellum. PMID:22563448

  7. Twitch-related and rhythmic activation of the developing cerebellar cortex

    PubMed Central

    Plumeau, Alan M.; Mukherjee, Didhiti; Blumberg, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is a critical sensorimotor structure that exhibits protracted postnatal development in mammals. Many aspects of cerebellar circuit development are activity dependent, but little is known about the nature and sources of the activity. Based on previous findings in 6-day-old rats, we proposed that myoclonic twitches, the spontaneous movements that occur exclusively during active sleep (AS), provide generalized as well as topographically precise activity to the developing cerebellum. Taking advantage of known stages of cerebellar cortical development, we examined the relationship between Purkinje cell activity (including complex and simple spikes), nuchal and hindlimb EMG activity, and behavioral state in unanesthetized 4-, 8-, and 12-day-old rats. AS-dependent increases in complex and simple spike activity peaked at 8 days of age, with 60% of units exhibiting significantly more activity during AS than wakefulness. Also, at all three ages, approximately one-third of complex and simple spikes significantly increased their activity within 100 ms of twitches in one of the two muscles from which we recorded. Finally, we observed rhythmicity of complex and simple spikes that was especially prominent at 8 days of age and was greatly diminished by 12 days of age, likely due to developmental changes in climbing fiber and mossy fiber innervation patterns. All together, these results indicate that the neurophysiological activity of the developing cerebellum can be used to make inferences about changes in its microcircuitry. They also support the hypothesis that sleep-related twitches are a prominent source of discrete climbing and mossy fiber activity that could contribute to the activity-dependent development of this critical sensorimotor structure. PMID:26156383

  8. Morphometric analysis of the cerebellar cortex capillaries in the course of experimental valproate encephalopathy and after chronic exposure to sodium valproate using transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sobaniec-Lotowska, M; Sobaniec, W; Augustynowicz, A

    2001-01-01

    Morphometric analysis of the cerebellar cortex capillary cross-section area performed in experimental valproate encephalopathy using transmission electron microscopy showed that prolongation of VPA application resulted in more enhanced lumen narrowing manifested in gradual reduction in the mean value of the coefficient examined. After 6, 9 and 12 months of experiment this value was statistically different from that obtained in control subgroups, being respectively lower by approximately 22%, 48% and 65%. One month after terminating of chronic administration this value was close to the one found after 12 months of the study. Three months after the drug withdrawal the coefficient was higher by approximately 44% compared to the one after 12 months, which seemed to indicate an increase in capillary lumen patency. The morphometric analysis of the cerebellar cortex capillary cross-section area performed in the present study objectifies the results of qualitative ultrastructural investigations concerning the microcirculation of this CNS structure.

  9. Role of the cerebellar cortex in conditioned goal-directed behavior.

    PubMed

    Burguière, Eric; Arabo, Arnaud; Jarlier, Frederic; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Rondi-Reig, Laure

    2010-10-06

    Learning a new goal-directed behavioral task often requires the improvement of at least two processes, including an enhanced stimulus-response association and an optimization of the execution of the motor response. The cerebellum has recently been shown to play a role in acquiring goal-directed behavior, but it is unclear to what extent it contributes to a change in the stimulus-response association and/or the optimization of the execution of the motor response. We therefore designed the stimulus-dependent water Y-maze conditioning task, which allows discrimination between both processes, and we subsequently subjected Purkinje cell-specific mutant mice to this new task. The mouse mutants L7-PKCi, which suffer from impaired PKC-dependent processes such as parallel fiber to Purkinje cell long-term depression (PF-PC LTD), were able to acquire the stimulus-response association, but exhibited a reduced optimization of their motor performance. These data show that PF-PC LTD is not required for learning a stimulus-response association, but they do suggest that a PKC-dependent process in cerebellar Purkinje cells is required for optimization of motor responses.

  10. In vivo imaging of neural reactive plasticity after laser axotomy in cerebellar cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allegra Mascaro, A. L.; Sacconi, L.; Maco, B.; Knott, G. W.; Pavone, F. S.

    2014-03-01

    Multi-photon imaging provides valuable insights into the continuous reshaping of neuronal connectivity in live brain. We previously showed that single neuron or even single spine ablation can be achieved by laser-mediated dissection. Furthermore, single axonal branches can be dissected avoiding collateral damage to the adjacent dendrite and the formation of a persistent glial scar. Here, we describe the procedure to address the structural plasticity of cerebellar climbing fibers by combining two-photon in vivo imaging with laser axotomy in a mouse model. This method is a powerful tool to study the basic mechanisms of axonal rewiring after single branch axotomy in vivo. In fact, despite the denervated area being very small, the injured axons consistently reshape the connectivity with surrounding neurons, as indicated by the increase in the turnover of synaptic boutons. In addition, time-lapse imaging reveals the sprouting of new branches from the injured axon. Newly formed branches with varicosities suggest the possible formation of synaptic contacts. Correlative light and electron microscopy revealed that the sprouted branch contains large numbers of vesicles, with varicosities in the close vicinity of Purkinje dendrites.

  11. Differential effects of primary motor cortex and cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation on motor learning in healthy individuals: A randomized double-blind sham-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Ehsani, F; Bakhtiary, A H; Jaberzadeh, S; Talimkhani, A; Hajihasani, A

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of study was to compare the effect of primary motor cortex (M1) and cerebellar anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (a-tDCS) on online and offline motor learning in healthy individuals. Fifty-nine healthy volunteers were randomly divided into three groups (n=20 in two experimental groups and n=19 in sham-control group). One experimental group received M1a-tDCSand another received cerebellar a-tDCS. The main outcome measure were response time (RT) and number of errors during serial response time test (SRTT) which were assessed prior, 35min and 48h after the interventions. Reduction of response time (RT) and error numbers at last block of the test compared to the first block was considered online learning. Comparison of assessments during retention tests was considered as short-term and long-term offline learning. Online RT reduction was not different among groups (P>0.05), while online error reduction was significantly greater in cerebellar a-tDCS than sham-control group (P<0.017). Moreover, a-tDCS on both M1 and cerebellar regions produced more long-term offline learning as compared to sham tDCS (P<0.01), while short-term offline RT reduction was significantly greater in M1a-tDCS than sham-control group (P<0.05). The findings indicated that although cerebellar a-tDCS enhances online learning and M1a-tDCS has more effect on short-term offline learning, both M1 and cerebellar a-tDCS can be used as a boosting technique for improvement of offline motor learning in healthy individuals.

  12. Cerebellar cortex granular layer interneurons in the macaque monkey are functionally driven by mossy fiber pathways through net excitation or inhibition.

    PubMed

    Laurens, Jean; Heiney, Shane A; Kim, Gyutae; Blazquez, Pablo M

    2013-01-01

    The granular layer is the input layer of the cerebellar cortex. It receives information through mossy fibers, which contact local granular layer interneurons (GLIs) and granular layer output neurons (granule cells). GLIs provide one of the first signal processing stages in the cerebellar cortex by exciting or inhibiting granule cells. Despite the importance of this early processing stage for later cerebellar computations, the responses of GLIs and the functional connections of mossy fibers with GLIs in awake animals are poorly understood. Here, we recorded GLIs and mossy fibers in the macaque ventral-paraflocculus (VPFL) during oculomotor tasks, providing the first full inventory of GLI responses in the VPFL of awake primates. We found that while mossy fiber responses are characterized by a linear monotonic relationship between firing rate and eye position, GLIs show complex response profiles characterized by "eye position fields" and single or double directional tunings. For the majority of GLIs, prominent features of their responses can be explained by assuming that a single GLI receives inputs from mossy fibers with similar or opposite directional preferences, and that these mossy fiber inputs influence GLI discharge through net excitatory or inhibitory pathways. Importantly, GLIs receiving mossy fiber inputs through these putative excitatory and inhibitory pathways show different firing properties, suggesting that they indeed correspond to two distinct classes of interneurons. We propose a new interpretation of the information flow through the cerebellar cortex granular layer, in which mossy fiber input patterns drive the responses of GLIs not only through excitatory but also through net inhibitory pathways, and that excited and inhibited GLIs can be identified based on their responses and their intrinsic properties.

  13. Model-Founded Explorations of the Roles of Molecular Layer Inhibition in Regulating Purkinje Cell Responses in Cerebellar Cortex: More Trouble for the Beam Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Bower, James M.

    2010-01-01

    For most of the last 50 years, the functional interpretation for inhibition in cerebellar cortical circuitry has been dominated by the relatively simple notion that excitatory and inhibitory dendritic inputs sum, and if that sum crosses threshold at the soma the Purkinje cell generates an action potential. Thus, inhibition has traditionally been relegated to a role of sculpting, restricting, or blocking excitation. At the level of networks, this relatively simply notion is manifest in mechanisms like “surround inhibition” which is purported to “shape” or “tune” excitatory neuronal responses. In the cerebellum, where all cell types except one (the granule cell) are inhibitory, these assumptions regarding the role of inhibition continue to dominate. Based on our recent series of modeling and experimental studies, we now suspect that inhibition may play a much more complex, subtle, and central role in the physiological and functional organization of cerebellar cortex. This paper outlines how model-based studies are changing our thinking about the role of feed-forward molecular layer inhibition in the cerebellar cortex. The results not only have important implications for continuing efforts to understand what the cerebellum computes, but might also reveal important features of the evolution of this large and quintessentially vertebrate brain structure. PMID:20877427

  14. A novel site of synaptic relay for climbing fibre pathways relaying signals from the motor cortex to the cerebellar cortical C1 zone

    PubMed Central

    Ackerley, Rochelle; Pardoe, Joanne; Apps, Richard

    2006-01-01

    The climbing fibre projection from the motor cortex to the cerebellar cortical C1 zone in the posterior lobe of the rat cerebellum was investigated using a combination of physiological, anatomical and neuropharmacological techniques. Electrical stimulation of the ipsilateral fore- or hindimbs or somatotopically corresponding parts of the contralateral motor cortex evoked climbing fibre field potentials at the same cerebellar recording sites. Forelimb-related responses were located in the C1 zone in the paramedian lobule or lobulus simplex and hindlimb-related responses were located in the C1 zone in the copula pyramidis. Microinjections of anterograde axonal tracer (Fluoro-Ruby or Fluoro-Emerald) were made into the fore- or hindlimb parts of the motor cortex where stimulation evoked the largest cerebellar responses. After a survival period of 7–10 days, the neuraxis was examined for anterograde labelling. No terminal labelling was ever found in the inferior olive, but labelled terminals were consistently found in a well-localized site in the dorso-medial medulla, ventral to the gracile nucleus, termed the matrix region. Pharmacological inactivation of the matrix region (2 mm caudal to the obex) selectively reduced transmission in descending (cerebro-olivocerebellar) but not ascending (spino-olivocerebellar) paths targeting fore- or hindlimb-receiving parts of the C1 zone. Transmission in spino-olivocerebellar paths was either unaffected, or in some cases increased. The identification of a novel pre-olivary relay in cerebro-olivocerebellar paths originating from fore- and hindlimb motor cortex has implications for the regulation of transmission in climbing fibre pathways during voluntary movements and motor learning. PMID:16887878

  15. Dorsomedial prefrontal cortex and cerebellar contribution to in-group attitudes: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    PubMed

    Gamond, Lucile; Ferrari, Chiara; La Rocca, Stefania; Cattaneo, Zaira

    2017-04-01

    We tend to express more positive judgments and behaviors toward individuals belonging to our own group compared to other (out-) groups. In this study, we assessed the role of the cerebellum and of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) - two regions critically implicated in social cognition processes - in mediating implicit valenced attitudes toward in-group and out-group individuals. To this aim, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in combination with a standard attitude priming task, in which Caucasian participants had to categorize the valence of a series of adjectives primed by either an in-group or an out-group face. In two behavioral experiments, we found an in-group bias (i.e. faster categorization of positive adjectives when preceded by in-group faces) but no evidence of an out-group bias. Interestingly, TMS over both the dmPFC and over the (right) cerebellum significantly interfered with the modulation exerted by group membership on adjective valence classification, abolishing the in-group bias observed at baseline. Overall, our data suggest that both the dmPFC and the cerebellum play a causal role in mediating implicit social attitudes.

  16. Assessment of Anterior Cingulate Cortex (ACC) and Left Cerebellar Metabolism in Asperger's Syndrome with Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS).

    PubMed

    Goji, Aya; Ito, Hiromichi; Mori, Kenji; Harada, Masafumi; Hisaoka, Sonoka; Toda, Yoshihiro; Mori, Tatsuo; Abe, Yoko; Miyazaki, Masahito; Kagami, Shoji

    2017-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) is a noninvasive neuroimaging method to quantify biochemical metabolites in vivo and it can serve as a powerful tool to monitor neurobiochemical profiles in the brain. Asperger's syndrome (AS) is a type of autism spectrum disorder, which is characterized by impaired social skills and restrictive, repetitive patterns of interest and activities, while intellectual levels and language skills are relatively preserved. Despite clinical aspects have been well-characterized, neurometabolic profiling in the brain of AS remains to be clear. The present study used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) to investigate whether pediatric AS is associated with measurable neurometabolic abnormalities that can contribute new information on the neurobiological underpinnings of the disorder. Study participants consisted of 34 children with AS (2-12 years old; mean age 5.2 (±2.0); 28 boys) and 19 typically developed children (2-11 years old; mean age 5.6 (±2.6); 12 boys) who served as the normal control group. The 1H MRS data were obtained from two regions of interest: the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and left cerebellum. In the ACC, levels of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), total creatine (tCr), total choline-containing compounds (tCho) and myo-Inositol (mI) were significantly decreased in children with AS compared to controls. On the other hand, no significant group differences in any of the metabolites were found in the left cerebellum. Neither age nor sex accounted for the metabolic findings in the regions. The finding of decreased levels of NAA, tCr, tCho, and mI in the ACC but not in left cerebellar voxels in the AS, suggests a lower ACC neuronal density in the present AS cohort compared to controls.

  17. Assessment of Anterior Cingulate Cortex (ACC) and Left Cerebellar Metabolism in Asperger's Syndrome with Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS)

    PubMed Central

    Goji, Aya; Ito, Hiromichi; Mori, Kenji; Harada, Masafumi; Hisaoka, Sonoka; Toda, Yoshihiro; Mori, Tatsuo; Abe, Yoko; Miyazaki, Masahito; Kagami, Shoji

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) is a noninvasive neuroimaging method to quantify biochemical metabolites in vivo and it can serve as a powerful tool to monitor neurobiochemical profiles in the brain. Asperger’s syndrome (AS) is a type of autism spectrum disorder, which is characterized by impaired social skills and restrictive, repetitive patterns of interest and activities, while intellectual levels and language skills are relatively preserved. Despite clinical aspects have been well-characterized, neurometabolic profiling in the brain of AS remains to be clear. The present study used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) to investigate whether pediatric AS is associated with measurable neurometabolic abnormalities that can contribute new information on the neurobiological underpinnings of the disorder. Methods Study participants consisted of 34 children with AS (2–12 years old; mean age 5.2 (±2.0); 28 boys) and 19 typically developed children (2–11 years old; mean age 5.6 (±2.6); 12 boys) who served as the normal control group. The 1H MRS data were obtained from two regions of interest: the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and left cerebellum. Results In the ACC, levels of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), total creatine (tCr), total choline-containing compounds (tCho) and myo-Inositol (mI) were significantly decreased in children with AS compared to controls. On the other hand, no significant group differences in any of the metabolites were found in the left cerebellum. Neither age nor sex accounted for the metabolic findings in the regions. Conclusion The finding of decreased levels of NAA, tCr, tCho, and mI in the ACC but not in left cerebellar voxels in the AS, suggests a lower ACC neuronal density in the present AS cohort compared to controls. PMID:28060873

  18. FoxP2 expression in the cerebellum and inferior olive: development of the transverse stripe-shaped expression pattern in the mouse cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hirofumi; Sugihara, Izumi

    2012-02-15

    Many molecules are expressed heterogeneously in subpopulations of cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) and inferior olive (IO) neurons during development or in adulthood. These expression patterns are often organized in longitudinal stripes in the cerebellar cortex, which may be related to functional compartmentalization. FoxP2, a transcription factor, is expressed in PCs and IO neurons, but the details of its expression pattern remain unclear. Here we examined FoxP2 expression patterns systematically by immunostaining serial sections of the hindbrain from embryonic day 14.5 to adulthood in mice. FoxP2 was highly expressed in virtually all PCs at and before postnatal day 6 (P6), except for those in the flocculus and small parts of the nodulus (vermal lobule X), where FoxP2 expression was moderate or absent. After P6, FoxP2 expression gradually diminished in PCs in some areas. In adults, FoxP2 was expressed, less intensely than in earlier stages, in subsets of PCs that were mostly arranged transversely along the folial apices. In contrast, FoxP2 was expressed intensely in most IO neurons during development and in adulthood. FoxP2 was also expressed in a small population of neurons in the cerebellar nuclei. FoxP2 expression in adult rats and chicks was generally comparable to that in adult mice, suggesting evolutionary conservation of the expression pattern. Thus, the FoxP2 expression pattern reflects new transverse compartmentalization in the adult cerebellar cortex, although its functional significance remains unclear.

  19. Morphological features of encephalopathy after chronic administration of the antiepileptic drug valproate to rats. A transmission electron microscopic study of capillaries in the cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Sobaniec-Lotowska, M E; Sobaniec, W

    1996-01-01

    Long-term intragastric application of the antiepileptic drug sodium valproate (Vupral "Polfa") at the effective dose of 200 mg/kg b. w. once daily to rats for 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months revealed neurological disorders indicating cerebellum damage ("valproate encephalopathy"). The first ultrastructural changes in structural elements of the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) in the cerebellar cortex were detectable after 3 months of the experiment. They became more severe in the later months of the experiment, and were most severe after 12 months, located mainly in the molecular layer of the cerebellar cortex. Lesions of the capillary included necrosis of endothelial cells. Organelles of these cells, in particular the mitochondria (increased number and size, distinct degeneration of their matrix and cristae) and Golgi apparatus were altered. Reduced size of capillary lumen and occlusion were caused by swollen endothelial cells which had luminal protrusions and swollen microvilli. Pressure on the vessel wall was produced by enlarged perivascular astrocytic processes. Fragments of necrotic endothelial cells were in the vascular lumens and in these there was loosening and breaking of tight cellular junctions. Damage to the vascular basement lamina was also observed. Damage to the capillary was accompanied by marked damage to neuroglial cells, mainly to perivascular processes of astrocytes. The proliferation of astrocytes (Bergmann's in particular) and occasionally of oligodendrocytes was found. Alterations in the structural elements of the BBB coexisted with marked lesions of neurons of the cerebellum (Purkinje cells are earliest). In electron micrographs both luminal and antiluminal sides of the BBB of the cerebellar cortex had similar lesions. The possible influence of the hepatic damage, mainly hyperammonemia, upon the development of valproate encephalopathy is discussed.

  20. [Atrophy of the granular layer of the cerebellar cortex in patients with nonlymphoblastic leukemia treated with cytosine arabinoside].

    PubMed

    Nowacki, P; Dolińska, D; Honczarenko, K; Zyluk, B

    1992-01-01

    The reported analysis comprised 81 patients dying of acute non-lymphoblastic leukaemia type M1, M2, M4 and blastic crises in chronic myelocytic leukaemia. It was observed that the number of cases of cerebellar granular layer atrophy rose markedly in the years 1984-1990 as compared with 1976-1983 (45.4% vs 16.2%). It is suggested that this was due to the introduction of cytostatic treatment schedules with higher doses of cytosine arabinoside (ARAC), especially TAD (6-thioguanine, ARAC, daunorubicin). Cerebellar granular layer atrophy seems to be dependent rather on the cumulative dose of ARAC and not on a single high dose of that drug.

  1. Antenatal betamethasone produces protracted changes in anxiety-like behaviors and in the expression of microtubule-associated protein 2, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and the tyrosine kinase B receptor in the rat cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Rodrigo; Valencia, Martina; Bustamante, Carlos

    2015-06-01

    Using classic Golgi staining methods, we previously showed that the administration of synthetic glucocorticoid betamethasone in equivalent doses to those given in cases of human premature birth generates long-term alterations in Purkinje cell dendritic development in the cerebellar cortex. In the present study, we evaluated whether betamethasone alters the immunohistochemical expression of proteins that participate in cerebellar Purkinje cell dendritic development and maintenance, including microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and the tyrosine kinase B receptor (TrkB), which are located predominantly in the cerebellar molecular layer where Purkinje cell dendritogenesis occurs. Consistent with our previous Golgi stain studies, we observed that animals prenatally exposed to a single course of betamethasone showed long-term alterations in the expression of MAP2, BDNF and TrkB. Additionally, these protracted molecular changes were accompanied by anxiety-like behaviors in the elevated plus maze and marble burying tests.

  2. Thinking about Eating Food Activates Visual Cortex with Reduced Bilateral Cerebellar Activation in Females with Anorexia Nervosa: An fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Samantha J.; O'Daly, Owen; Uher, Rudolf; Friederich, Hans-Christoph; Giampietro, Vincent; Brammer, Michael; Williams, Steven C. R.; Schiöth, Helgi B.; Treasure, Janet; Campbell, Iain C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Women with anorexia nervosa (AN) have aberrant cognitions about food and altered activity in prefrontal cortical and somatosensory regions to food images. However, differential effects on the brain when thinking about eating food between healthy women and those with AN is unknown. Methods Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) examined neural activation when 42 women thought about eating the food shown in images: 18 with AN (11 RAN, 7 BPAN) and 24 age-matched controls (HC). Results Group contrasts between HC and AN revealed reduced activation in AN in the bilateral cerebellar vermis, and increased activation in the right visual cortex. Preliminary comparisons between AN subtypes and healthy controls suggest differences in cortical and limbic regions. Conclusions These preliminary data suggest that thinking about eating food shown in images increases visual and prefrontal cortical neural responses in females with AN, which may underlie cognitive biases towards food stimuli and ruminations about controlling food intake. Future studies are needed to explicitly test how thinking about eating activates restraint cognitions, specifically in those with restricting vs. binge-purging AN subtypes. PMID:22479499

  3. Altered expression and localization of synaptophysin in developing cerebellar cortex of neonatal rats due to maternal diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hami, Javad; Vafaei-Nezhad, Saeed; Ivar, Ghasem; Sadeghi, Akram; Ghaemi, Kazem; Mostafavizadeh, Mostafa; Hosseini, Mehran

    2016-12-01

    There is sufficient evidence that diabetes during pregnancy is associated with a higher risk of neurodevelopmental anomalies including learning deficits, behavioral problems and motor dysfunctions in the offspring. Synaptophysin (SYP) is an integral membrane protein of synaptic vesicles and is considered as a marker for synaptogenesis and synaptic density. This study aimed to examine the effects of maternal diabetes in pregnancy on the expression and localization of SYP in the developing rat cerebellum. Wistar female rats were maintained diabetic from a week before pregnancy through parturition and male offspring was euthanized at postnatal day (P) 0, 7, and 14. The results revealed a significant down-regulation in the mRNA expression of SYP in the offspring born to diabetic animals at both P7 and P14 (P < 0.05 each). One week after birth, there was a significant reduction in the localization of SYP expression in the external granular (EGL) and in the molecular (ML) layers of neonates born to diabetic animals (P < 0.05 each). We also found a marked decrease in the expression of SYP in all of the cerebellar cortical layers of STZ-D group pups at P14 (P < 0.05 each). Moreover, our results revealed no significant changes in either expression or localization of SYP in insulin-treated group pups when compared with the controls (P ≥ 0.05 each). The present study demonstrated that maternal diabetes has adverse effects on the synaptogenesis in the offspring's cerebellum. Furthermore, the rigid maternal blood glucose control in the most cases normalized these negative impacts.

  4. Cerebellar Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2008-01-01

    Recent Advances The molecular control of cell type specification within the developing cerebellum as well as the genetic causes of the most common human developmental cerebellar disorders have long remained mysterious. Recent genetic lineage and loss-of-function data from mice have revealed unique and non-overlapping anatomical origins for GABAergic neurons from ventricular zone precursors and glutamatergic cell from rhombic lip precursors, mirroring distinct origins for these neurotransmitter-specific cell types in the cerebral cortex. Mouse studies elucidating the role of Ptf1a as a cerebellar ventricular zone GABerigic fate switch were actually preceded by the recognition that PTF1A mutations in humans cause cerebellar agenesis, a birth defect of the human cerebellum. Indeed, several genes for congenital human cerebellar malformations have recently been identified, including genes causing Joubert syndrome, Dandy-Walker malformation and Ponto-cerebellar hypoplasia. These studies have pointed to surprisingly complex roles for transcriptional regulation, mitochondrial function and neuronal cilia in patterning, homeostasis and cell proliferation during cerebellar development. Together mouse and human studies are synergistically advancing our understanding of the developmental mechanisms that generate the uniquely complex mature cerebellum. PMID:18513948

  5. [Ultrastructure of the cortex of the cerebellar nodulus in rats after a flight on the biosatellite Kosmos-1514].

    PubMed

    Krasnov, I B; D'iachkova, L N

    1986-01-01

    The ultrastructure of moss fibers and granule cells of the cortex of the cerebellum nodulus of rats flown for 5 days onboard the biosatellite Cosmos-1514 and exposed to 1 g for 6-8 hours upon return to Earth is indicative of an excess excitation of terminals of moss fibers and excitation of granule cells. The excitation of moss fiber terminals reflect the excitatory state of hair cells of the otolith apparatus and neurons of the vestibular ganglion produced by the effect of 1 g after exposure to microgravity. This state can be viewed as evidence of a greater sensitivity of the hair cell of the otolith organ--neuron of the vestibular ganglion system during exposure to microgravity. It is hypothesized that the sensitivity of this system of other mammals may also increase in microgravity.

  6. Parasagittally aligned, mGluR1-dependent patches are evoked at long latencies by parallel fiber stimulation in the mouse cerebellar cortex in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinming; Chen, Gang; Gao, Wangcai; Ebner, Timothy J

    2011-04-01

    The parallel fibers (PFs) in the cerebellar cortex extend several millimeters along a folium in the mediolateral direction. The PFs are orthogonal to and cross several parasagittal zones defined by the olivocerebellar and corticonuclear pathways and the expression of molecular markers on Purkinje cells (PCs). The functions of these two organizations remain unclear, including whether the bands respond similarly or differentially to PF input. By using flavoprotein imaging in the anesthetized mouse in vivo, this study demonstrates that high-frequency PF stimulation, which activates a beamlike response at short latency, also evokes patches of activation at long latencies. These patches consist of increased fluorescence along the beam at latencies of 20-25 s with peak activation at 35 s. The long-latency patches are completely blocked by the type 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR(1)) antagonist LY367385. Conversely, the AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptor antagonists DNQX and APV have little effect. Organized in parasagittal bands, the long-latency patches align with zebrin II-positive PC stripes. Additional Ca(2+) imaging demonstrates that the patches reflect increases in intracellular Ca(2+). Both the PLCβ inhibitor U73122 and the ryanodine receptor inhibitor ryanodine completely block the long-latency patches, indicating that the patches are due to Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores. Robust, mGluR(1)-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP) of the patches is induced using a high-frequency PF stimulation conditioning paradigm that generates LTP of PF-PC synapses. Therefore, the parasagittal bands, as defined by the molecular compartmentalization of PCs, respond differentially to PF inputs via mGluR(1)-mediated release of internal Ca(2+).

  7. Parasagittally aligned, mGluR1-dependent patches are evoked at long latencies by parallel fiber stimulation in the mouse cerebellar cortex in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinming; Chen, Gang; Gao, Wangcai

    2011-01-01

    The parallel fibers (PFs) in the cerebellar cortex extend several millimeters along a folium in the mediolateral direction. The PFs are orthogonal to and cross several parasagittal zones defined by the olivocerebellar and corticonuclear pathways and the expression of molecular markers on Purkinje cells (PCs). The functions of these two organizations remain unclear, including whether the bands respond similarly or differentially to PF input. By using flavoprotein imaging in the anesthetized mouse in vivo, this study demonstrates that high-frequency PF stimulation, which activates a beamlike response at short latency, also evokes patches of activation at long latencies. These patches consist of increased fluorescence along the beam at latencies of 20–25 s with peak activation at 35 s. The long-latency patches are completely blocked by the type 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR1) antagonist LY367385. Conversely, the AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptor antagonists DNQX and APV have little effect. Organized in parasagittal bands, the long-latency patches align with zebrin II-positive PC stripes. Additional Ca2+ imaging demonstrates that the patches reflect increases in intracellular Ca2+. Both the PLCβ inhibitor U73122 and the ryanodine receptor inhibitor ryanodine completely block the long-latency patches, indicating that the patches are due to Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. Robust, mGluR1-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP) of the patches is induced using a high-frequency PF stimulation conditioning paradigm that generates LTP of PF-PC synapses. Therefore, the parasagittal bands, as defined by the molecular compartmentalization of PCs, respond differentially to PF inputs via mGluR1-mediated release of internal Ca2+. PMID:21289138

  8. A model of long-term memory storage in the cerebellar cortex: a possible role for plasticity at parallel fiber synapses onto stellate/basket interneurons.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, G T

    1997-12-09

    By evoking changes in climbing fiber activity, movement errors are thought to modify synapses from parallel fibers onto Purkinje cells (pf*Pkj) so as to improve subsequent motor performance. Theoretical arguments suggest there is an intrinsic tradeoff, however, between motor adaptation and long-term storage. Assuming a baseline rate of motor errors is always present, then repeated performance of any learned movement will generate a series of climbing fiber-mediated corrections. By reshuffling the synaptic weights responsible for any given movement, such corrections will degrade the memories for other learned movements stored in overlapping sets of synapses. The present paper shows that long-term storage can be accomplished by a second site of plasticity at synapses from parallel fibers onto stellate/basket interneurons (pf*St/Bk). Plasticity at pf*St/Bk synapses can be insulated from ongoing fluctuations in climbing fiber activity by assuming that changes in pf*St/Bk synapses occur only after changes in pf*Pkj synapses have built up to a threshold level. Although climbing fiber-dependent plasticity at pf*Pkj synapses allows for the exploration of novel motor strategies in response to changing environmental conditions, plasticity at pf*St/Bk synapses transfers successful strategies to stable long-term storage. To quantify this hypothesis, both sites of plasticity are incorporated into a dynamical model of the cerebellar cortex and its interactions with the inferior olive. When used to simulate idealized motor conditioning trials, the model predicts that plasticity develops first at pf*Pkj synapses, but with additional training is transferred to pf*St/Bk synapses for long-term storage.

  9. Toxic agents causing cerebellar ataxias.

    PubMed

    Manto, Mario

    2012-01-01

    The cerebellum is particularly vulnerable to intoxication and poisoning, especially so the cerebellar cortex and Purkinje neurons. In humans, the most common cause of a toxic lesion to the cerebellar circuitry is alcohol related, but the cerebellum is also a main target of drug exposure (such as anticonvulsants, antineoplastics, lithium salts, calcineurin inhibitors), drug abuse and addiction (such as cocaine, heroin, phencyclidine), and environmental toxins (such as mercury, lead, manganese, toluene/benzene derivatives). Although data for the prevalence and incidence of cerebellar lesions related to intoxication and poisoning are still unknown in many cases, clinicians should keep in mind the list of agents that may cause cerebellar deficits, since toxin-induced cerebellar ataxias are not rare in daily practice. Moreover, the patient's status may require immediate therapies when the intoxication is life-threatening. 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The compartmental restriction of cerebellar interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Consalez, G. Giacomo; Hawkes, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The Purkinje cells (PC's) of the cerebellar cortex are subdivided into multiple different molecular phenotypes that form an elaborate array of parasagittal stripes. This array serves as a scaffold around which afferent topography is organized. The ways in which cerebellar interneurons may be restricted by this scaffolding are less well-understood. This review begins with a brief survey of cerebellar topography. Next, it reviews the development of stripes in the cerebellum with a particular emphasis on the embryological origins of cerebellar interneurons. These data serve as a foundation to discuss the hypothesis that cerebellar compartment boundaries also restrict cerebellar interneurons, both excitatory [granule cells, unipolar brush cells (UBCs)] and inhibitory (e.g., Golgi cells, basket cells). Finally, it is proposed that the same PC scaffold that restricts afferent terminal fields to stripes may also act to organize cerebellar interneurons. PMID:23346049

  11. [Cerebellar hypoplasias].

    PubMed

    Safronova, Marta Maia; Barbot, Clara; Resende Pereira, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Cerebellar hypoplasias are cerebellar malformations with small but completely formed cerebellum. They can be divided in focal and in diffuse or generalized. It is sometimes difficult to make distinction between cerebellar atrophy (progressive condition) and hipoplasia (not progressive condition). Focal hypoplasias are restricted to one cerebellar hemisphere or to the vermis. Diffuse hypoplasias refer to both cerebellar hemispheres and vermis. If there is associated IVth ventricle enlargement, hypoplasias occur in the context of Dandy-Walker complex, a continuum of posterior fossa cystic anomalies. A revision of cerebellar hypoplasias and associated pathology is done, illustrated with 22 cases tha include focal and diffuse cerebellar hypoplasias, Dandy-Walker malformations and its variant, persistent Blake's pouch cyst, megacisterna magna, PEHO síndrome (progressive encephalopathy with oedema, hipsarrhythmia and optic atrophy), Joubert syndrome, congenital disorder of glycosylation type Ia, pontocerebellar hipoplasias Barth type I and II, diffuse subcortical heterotopia. The imaging finding of structural cerebellar anomalies frequently leads to diagnostic incertainty as the anomalies are mostly unspecific, implying an extenuating analytical and genetic workup. Their knowledge and classification may be useful to decide the patient adjusted laboratorial workup.

  12. Cerebellar ataxias.

    PubMed

    Manto, Mario; Marmolino, Daniele

    2009-08-01

    The term 'cerebellar ataxias' encompasses the various cerebellar disorders encountered during daily practice. Patients exhibit a cerebellar syndrome and can also present with pigmentary retinopathy, extrapyramidal movement disorders, pyramidal signs, cortical symptoms (seizures, cognitive impairment/behavioural symptoms), and peripheral neuropathy. The clinical diagnosis of subtypes of ataxias is complicated by the salient overlap of the phenotypes between genetic subtypes. The identification of the causative mutations of many hereditary ataxias and the development of relevant animal models bring hope for effective therapies in neurodegenerative ataxias. We describe the current classification of cerebellar ataxias and underline the recent discoveries in molecular pathogenesis. Cerebellar disorders can be divided into sporadic forms and inherited diseases. Inherited ataxias include autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias, autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias/spinocerebellar ataxia) and episodic ataxias, and X-linked ataxias. From a motor control point of view, the leading theories of ataxia are based on neural representations or 'internal models' to emulate fundamental natural processes such as body motion. Recent molecular advances have direct implications for research and daily practice. We provide a framework for the diagnosis of ataxias. For the first time, the therapeutic agents under investigation are targeted to deleterious pathways.

  13. Cerebellar Degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a process in which neurons in the cerebellum - the area of the brain that controls coordination ... body, can cause neurons to die in the cerebellum. Neurological diseases that feature cerebellar degeneration include: ischemic ...

  14. A novel approach for treating cerebellar ataxias.

    PubMed

    Manto, Mario; Ben Taib, Nordeyn Oulad

    2008-01-01

    The terminology of cerebellar ataxias encompasses a variety of sporadic and inherited debilitating diseases. Patients exhibit disabling deficits such as dysmetria, kinetic tremor and ataxia of stance/gait. We are currently lacking effective treatments in degenerative cerebellar ataxias. Animal models of cerebellar disorders and studies in ataxic patients have demonstrated that the excitability of the sensorimotor cortex is severely depressed in case of cerebellar lesion. These reduced levels of excitability are associated with learning deficits. Recent experimental data show that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the premotor cortex and low-frequency repetitive stimulation of the motor cortex (LFRSM1) restore the excitability of the motor cortex in hemicerebellectomized rats, reinstating the ability of the motor cortex to adapt to sustained peripheral stimulation. The hypothesis is based on the possibility that the combination of tDCS and contralateral LFRSM1 can improve human cerebellar ataxias. The proposed treatment consists of delivering trains of tDCS either in conjunction or in alternance with contralateral LFRSM1, in addition to application of peripheral nerve stimulation to sensitize the sensorimotor cortex. This hypothesis is to be tested in a procedure made of 3 steps in patients exhibiting a sporadic or inherited cerebellar disorder. First, patients are assessed clinically using validated scales of cerebellar ataxias and performing accepted quantified tests. Second, trains of tDCS and LFRSM1 are delivered, using a sham procedure in a cross-over design. Trains of peripheral stimulation are applied at peripheral nerves. Third, patients are re-assessed clinically and with quantified tests. Although grafting of stem cells and gene therapy are being developed, they will not be available soon. A successful treatment of combined neurostimulation would lead to a new and readily available approach in the management of cerebellar ataxias. This new

  15. [Memory transfer in cerebellar motor learning].

    PubMed

    Nagao, Soichi

    2012-01-01

    Most of our motor skills are acquired through learning. Experiments of gain adaptation of ocular reflexes have consistently suggested that the memory of adaptation is initially formed in the cerebellar cortex, and is transferred to the cerebellar (vestibular) nuclei for consolidation to long-term memory after repetitions of training. We have recently developed a new system to evaluate the motor learning in human subjects using prism adaptation of hand reaching movement, by referring to the prism adaptation of dart throwing of Martin et al. (1996). In our system, the subject views the small target presented in the touch-panel screen, and touches it with his/her finger without direct visual feedback. After 15-30 trials of touching wearing prisms, an adaptation occurs in healthy subjects: they became able to touch the target correctly. Meanwhile, such an adaptation was impaired in patients of cerebellar disease. We have proposed a model of human prism adaptation that the memory of adaptation is initially encoded in the cerebellar cortex, and is later transferred to the cerebellar nuclei after repetitions of training. The memory in the cerebellar cortex may be formed and extinguished independently of the memory maintained in the cerebellar nuclei, and these two memories work cooperatively.

  16. A dynamical system view of cerebellar function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeler, James D.

    1990-06-01

    First some previous theories of cerebellar function are reviewed, and deficiencies in how they map onto the neurophysiological structure are pointed out. I hypothesize that the cerebellar cortex builds an internal model, or prediction, of the dynamics of the animal. A class of algorithms for doing prediction based on local reconstruction of attractors are described, and it is shown how this class maps very well onto the structure of the cerebellar cortex. I hypothesize that the climbing fibers multiplex between different trajectories corresponding to different modes of operation. Then the vestibulo-ocular reflex is examined, and experiments to test the proposed model are suggested. The purpose of the presentation here is twofold: (1) To enlighten physiologists to the mathematics of a class of prediction algorithms that map well onto cerebellar architecture. (2) To enlighten dynamical system theorists to the physiological and anatomical details of the cerebellum.

  17. Cerebellar Ataxia.

    PubMed

    Perlman

    2000-05-01

    There is nothing more discouraging than for a patient to be given a specific diagnosis, then to be told that there is nothing that can be done. Physicians are equally disheartened to see exponential progress being made in the understanding of the pathophysiology of a complex disorder but few direct benefits resulting for their patients. Over the past 5 years, molecular genetic research has completely revolutionized the way in which the progressive cerebellar ataxias are classified and diagnosed, but it has yet to produce effective gene-based, neuroprotective, or neurorestorative therapies. The treatment of cerebellar ataxia remains primarily a neurorehabilitation challenge, employing physical, occupational, speech, and swallowing therapy; adaptive equipment; driver safety training; and nutritional counseling. Modest additional gains are seen with the use of medications that can improve imbalance, incoordination, or dysarthria (amantadine, buspirone, acetazolamide); cerebellar tremor (clonazepam, propranolol); and cerebellar or central vestibular nystagmus (gabapentin, baclofen, clonazepam). Many of the progressive cerebellar syndromes have associated features involving other neurologic systems (eg, spasticity, dystonia or rigidity, resting or rubral tremor, chorea, motor unit weakness or fatigue, autonomic dysfunction, peripheral or posterior column sensory loss, neuropathic pain or cramping, double vision, vision and hearing loss, dementia, and bowel, bladder, and sexual dysfunction), which can impede the treatment of the ataxic symptoms or can worsen with the use of certain drugs. Treatment of the associated features themselves may in turn worsen the ataxia either directly (as side effects of medication) or indirectly (eg, relaxation of lower limb spasticity that was acting as a stabilizer for an ataxic gait). Secondary complications of progressive ataxia can include deconditioning or immobility, weight loss or gain, skin breakdown, recurrent pulmonary and

  18. Cerebellar Stroke-manifesting as Mania

    PubMed Central

    Jagadesan, Venkatesan; Thiruvengadam, Kannapiran R.; Muralidharan, Rengarajalu

    2014-01-01

    Secondary mania resulting from cerebral Cortex are described commonly. But secondary mania produced by cerebellar lesions are relatively uncommon. This case report describes a patient who developed cerebellar stoke and manic features simultaneously. 28 years old male developed giddiness and projectile vomiting. Then he would lie down for about an hour only to find that he could not walk. He became quarrelsome. His Psycho motor activities and speech were increased. He was euphoric and was expressing grandiose ideas. Bender Gestalt Test showed signs of organicity. Score in Young mania relating scale was 32; productivity was low in Rorschach. Neurological examination revealed left cerebellar signs like ataxia and slurring of speech. Computed tomography of brain showed left cerebellar infarct. Relationship between Psychiatric manifestations and cerebellar lesion are discussed. PMID:25035567

  19. Linking oscillations in cerebellar circuits

    PubMed Central

    Courtemanche, Richard; Robinson, Jennifer C.; Aponte, Daniel I.

    2013-01-01

    In many neuroscience fields, the study of local and global rhythmicity has been receiving increasing attention. These network influences could directly impact on how neuronal groups interact together, organizing for different contexts. The cerebellar cortex harbors a variety of such local circuit rhythms, from the rhythms in the cerebellar cortex per se, or those dictated from important afferents. We present here certain cerebellar oscillatory phenomena that have been recorded in rodents and primates. Those take place in a range of frequencies: from the more known oscillations in the 4–25 Hz band, such as the olivocerebellar oscillatory activity and the granule cell layer oscillations, to the more recently reported slow (<1 Hz oscillations), and the fast (>150 Hz) activity in the Purkinje cell layer. Many of these oscillations appear spontaneously in the circuits, and are modulated by behavioral imperatives. We review here how those oscillations are recorded, some of their modulatory mechanisms, and also identify some of the cerebellar nodes where they could interact. A particular emphasis has been placed on how these oscillations could be modulated by movement and certain neuropathological manifestations. Many of those oscillations could have a definite impact on the way information is processed in the cerebellum and how it interacts with other structures in a variety of contexts. PMID:23908606

  20. Differential olivo-cerebellar cortical control of rebound activity in the cerebellar nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Hoebeek, Freek E.; Witter, Laurens; Ruigrok, Tom J. H.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.

    2010-01-01

    The output of the cerebellar cortex is controlled by two main inputs, (i.e., the climbing fiber and mossy fiber-parallel fiber pathway) and activations of these inputs elicit characteristic effects in its Purkinje cells: that is, the so-called complex spikes and simple spikes. Target neurons of the Purkinje cells in the cerebellar nuclei show rebound firing, which has been implicated in the processing and storage of motor coordination signals. Yet, it is not known to what extent these rebound phenomena depend on different modes of Purkinje cell activation. Using extracellular as well as patch-clamp recordings, we show here in both anesthetized and awake rodents that simple and complex spike-like train stimuli to the cerebellar cortex, as well as direct activation of the inferior olive, all result in rebound increases of the firing frequencies of cerebellar nuclei neurons for up to 250 ms, whereas single-pulse stimuli to the cerebellar cortex predominantly elicit well-timed spiking activity without changing the firing frequency of cerebellar nuclei neurons. We conclude that the rebound phenomenon offers a rich and powerful mechanism for cerebellar nuclei neurons, which should allow them to differentially process the climbing fiber and mossy fiber inputs in a physiologically operating cerebellum. PMID:20395550

  1. Altered cerebellar feedback projections in Asperger syndrome.

    PubMed

    Catani, Marco; Jones, Derek K; Daly, Eileen; Embiricos, Nitzia; Deeley, Quinton; Pugliese, Luca; Curran, Sarah; Robertson, Dene; Murphy, Declan G M

    2008-07-15

    It has been proposed that the biological basis of autism spectrum disorder includes cerebellar 'disconnection'. However, direct in vivo evidence in support of this is lacking. Here, the microstructural integrity of cerebellar white matter in adults with Asperger syndrome was studied using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance tractography. Fifteen adults with Asperger syndrome and 16 age-IQ-gender-matched healthy controls underwent diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging. For each subject, tract-specific measurements of mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy were made within the inferior, middle, superior cerebellar peduncles and short intracerebellar fibres. No group differences were observed in mean diffusivity. However, people with Asperger syndrome had significantly lower fractional anisotropy in the short intracerebellar fibres (p<0.001) and right superior cerebellar (output) peduncle (p<0.001) compared to controls; but no difference in the input tracts. Severity of social impairment, as measured by the Autistic Diagnostic Interview, was negatively correlated with diffusion anisotropy in the fibres of the left superior cerebellar peduncle. These findings suggest a vulnerability of specific cerebellar neural pathways in people with Asperger syndrome. The localised abnormalities in the main cerebellar outflow pathway may prevent the cerebral cortex from receiving those cerebellar feedback inputs necessary for a successful adaptive social behaviour.

  2. A probabilistic atlas of the cerebellar white matter.

    PubMed

    van Baarsen, K M; Kleinnijenhuis, M; Jbabdi, S; Sotiropoulos, S N; Grotenhuis, J A; van Cappellen van Walsum, A M

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of the cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei and their connectivity are gaining attraction, due to the important role the cerebellum plays in cognition and motor control. Atlases of the cerebellar cortex and nuclei are used to locate regions of interest in clinical and neuroscience studies. However, the white matter that connects these relay stations is of at least similar functional importance. Damage to these cerebellar white matter tracts may lead to serious language, cognitive and emotional disturbances, although the pathophysiological mechanism behind it is still debated. Differences in white matter integrity between patients and controls might shed light on structure-function correlations. A probabilistic parcellation atlas of the cerebellar white matter would help these studies by facilitating automatic segmentation of the cerebellar peduncles, the localization of lesions and the comparison of white matter integrity between patients and controls. In this work a digital three-dimensional probabilistic atlas of the cerebellar white matter is presented, based on high quality 3T, 1.25mm resolution diffusion MRI data from 90 subjects participating in the Human Connectome Project. The white matter tracts were estimated using probabilistic tractography. Results over 90 subjects were symmetrical and trajectories of superior, middle and inferior cerebellar peduncles resembled the anatomy as known from anatomical studies. This atlas will contribute to a better understanding of cerebellar white matter architecture. It may eventually aid in defining structure-function correlations in patients with cerebellar disorders.

  3. Changes in the cerebellar and cerebro-cerebellar circuit in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fang, Peng; An, Jie; Tan, Xin; Zeng, Ling-Li; Shen, Hui; Qiu, Shijun; Hu, Dewen

    2017-04-01

    Currently, 422 million adults suffer from diabetes worldwide, leading to tremendous disabilities and a great burden to families and society. Functional and structural MRIs have demonstrated that patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) exhibit abnormalities in brain regions in the cerebral cortex. However, the changes of cerebellar anatomical connections in diabetic patients remains unclear. In the current study, diffusion tensor imaging deterministic tractography and statistical analysis were employed to investigate abnormal cerebellar anatomical connections in diabetic patients. This is the first study to investigate the altered cerebellar anatomical connectivity in T2DM patients. Decreased anatomical connections were found in the cerebellar and cerebro-cerebellar circuits of T2DM patients, providing valuable new insights into the potential neuro-pathophysiology of diabetes-related motor and cognitive deficits. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. BDNF Polymorphisms Are Linked to Poorer Working Memory Performance, Reduced Cerebellar and Hippocampal Volumes and Differences in Prefrontal Cortex in a Swedish Elderly Population

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Samantha J.; Nilsson, Emil K.; Jacobsson, Josefin A.; Stein, Dan J.; Fredriksson, Robert; Lind, Lars; Schiöth, Helgi B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) links learning, memory and cognitive decline in elderly, but evidence linking BDNF allele variation, cognition and brain structural differences is lacking. Methods 367 elderly Swedish men (n = 181) and women (n = 186) from Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala seniors (PIVUS) were genotyped and the BDNF functional rs6265 SNP was further examined in subjects who completed the Trail Making Task (TMT), verbal fluency task, and had a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) examined brain structure, cognition and links with BDNF. Results The functional BDNF SNP (rs6265,) predicted better working memory performance on the TMT with positive association of the Met rs6265, and was linked with greater cerebellar, precuneus, left superior frontal gyrus and bilateral hippocampal volume, and reduced brainstem and bilateral posterior cingulate volumes. Conclusions The functional BDNF polymorphism influences brain volume in regions associated with memory and regulation of sensorimotor control, with the Met rs6265 allele potentially being more beneficial to these functions in the elderly. PMID:24465375

  5. Cerebellar contribution to feedforward control of locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Pisotta, Iolanda; Molinari, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is an important contributor to feedforward control mechanisms of the central nervous system, and sequencing—the process that allows spatial and temporal relationships between events to be recognized—has been implicated as the fundamental cerebellar mode of operation. By adopting such a mode and because cerebellar activity patterns are sensitive to a variety of sensorimotor-related tasks, the cerebellum is believed to support motor and cognitive functions that are encoded in the frontal and parietal lobes of the cerebral cortex. In this model, the cerebellum is hypothesized to make predictions about the consequences of a motor or cognitive command that originates from the cortex to prepare the entire system to cope with ongoing changes. In this framework, cerebellar predictive mechanisms for locomotion are addressed, focusing on sensorial and motoric sequencing. The hypothesis that sequence recognition is the mechanism by which the cerebellum functions in gait control is presented and discussed. PMID:25009490

  6. Cerebellar contribution to feedforward control of locomotion.

    PubMed

    Pisotta, Iolanda; Molinari, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is an important contributor to feedforward control mechanisms of the central nervous system, and sequencing-the process that allows spatial and temporal relationships between events to be recognized-has been implicated as the fundamental cerebellar mode of operation. By adopting such a mode and because cerebellar activity patterns are sensitive to a variety of sensorimotor-related tasks, the cerebellum is believed to support motor and cognitive functions that are encoded in the frontal and parietal lobes of the cerebral cortex. In this model, the cerebellum is hypothesized to make predictions about the consequences of a motor or cognitive command that originates from the cortex to prepare the entire system to cope with ongoing changes. In this framework, cerebellar predictive mechanisms for locomotion are addressed, focusing on sensorial and motoric sequencing. The hypothesis that sequence recognition is the mechanism by which the cerebellum functions in gait control is presented and discussed.

  7. Synchrony and neural coding in cerebellar circuits

    PubMed Central

    Person, Abigail L.; Raman, Indira M.

    2012-01-01

    The cerebellum regulates complex movements and is also implicated in cognitive tasks, and cerebellar dysfunction is consequently associated not only with movement disorders, but also with conditions like autism and dyslexia. How information is encoded by specific cerebellar firing patterns remains debated, however. A central question is how the cerebellar cortex transmits its integrated output to the cerebellar nuclei via GABAergic synapses from Purkinje neurons. Possible answers come from accumulating evidence that subsets of Purkinje cells synchronize their firing during behaviors that require the cerebellum. Consistent with models predicting that coherent activity of inhibitory networks has the capacity to dictate firing patterns of target neurons, recent experimental work supports the idea that inhibitory synchrony may regulate the response of cerebellar nuclear cells to Purkinje inputs, owing to the interplay between unusually fast inhibitory synaptic responses and high rates of intrinsic activity. Data from multiple laboratories lead to a working hypothesis that synchronous inhibitory input from Purkinje cells can set the timing and rate of action potentials produced by cerebellar nuclear cells, thereby relaying information out of the cerebellum. If so, then changing spatiotemporal patterns of Purkinje activity would allow different subsets of inhibitory neurons to control cerebellar output at different times. Here we explore the evidence for and against the idea that a synchrony code defines, at least in part, the input–output function between the cerebellar cortex and nuclei. We consider the literature on the existence of simple spike synchrony, convergence of Purkinje neurons onto nuclear neurons, and intrinsic properties of nuclear neurons that contribute to responses to inhibition. Finally, we discuss factors that may disrupt or modulate a synchrony code and describe the potential contributions of inhibitory synchrony to other motor circuits. PMID

  8. Ataxic hemiparesis: neurophysiological analysis by cerebellar transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Saeko; Mochizuki, Hitoshi; Moriya, Arata; Nakatani-Enomoto, Setsu; Nakamura, Koichiro; Hanajima, Ritsuko; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate physiological mechanisms underlying ataxia in patients with ataxic hemiparesis. Subjects were three patients with ataxic hemiparesis, whose responsible lesion was located at the posterior limb of internal capsule (case 1), thalamus (case 2), or pre- and post-central gyri (case 3). Paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) technique was used to evaluate connectivity between the cerebellum and contralateral motor cortex. The conditioning cerebellar stimulus was given over the cerebellum and the test stimulus over the primary motor cortex. We studied how the conditioning stimulus modulated motor evoked potentials (MEPs) to the cortical test stimulus. In non-ataxic limbs, the cerebellar stimulus normally suppressed cortical MEPs. In ataxic limbs, the cerebellar inhibition was not elicited in patients with a lesion at the posterior limb of internal capsule (case 1) or thalamus (case 2). In contrast, normal cerebellar inhibition was elicited in the ataxic limb in a patient with a lesion at sensori-motor cortex (case 3). Lesions at the internal capsule and thalamus involved the cerebello-thalamo-cortical pathways and reduced the cerebellar suppression effect. On the other hand, a lesion at the pre- and post-central gyri should affect cortico-pontine pathway but not involve the cerebello-thalamo-cortical pathways. This lack of cerebello-talamo-cortical pathway involvement may explain normal suppression in this patient. The cerebellar TMS method can differentiate cerebellar efferent ataxic hemiparesis from cerebellar afferent ataxic hemiparesis.

  9. Regionalization of the isthmic and cerebellar primordia.

    PubMed

    Narboux-Nême, Nicolas; Louvi, Angeliki; Alexandre, Paula; Wassef, Marion

    2005-01-01

    The complex migrations of neurons born in the dorsal neural tube of the isthmic and rhombomere l (rl) domains complicate the delineation of the cerebellar primordium. We show that Purkinje cells (P) are likely generated over a wide territory before gathering in the future cerebellar primordium under the developing external granular layer. Later expansion of the cerebellum over a restricted ependymal domain could rely on mutual interations between P cells and granule cell progenitors (GCP). P are attracted by GCP and in turn stimulate their proliferation, increasing the surface of the developing cortex. At later stages, regionalization of the developing and adult cerebellar cortex can be detected through regional variations in the distribution of several P cell markers. Whether and how the developmental and adult P subtypes are related is still unknown and it is unclear if they delineate the same sets of cerebellar subdivisions. We provide evidence that the early P regionalization is involved in intrinsic patterning of the cerebellar primordium, in particular it relate to the organization of the corticonuclear connection. We propose that the early P regionalization provides a scaffold to the mature P regionalization but that the development of functional afferent connections induces a period of P plasticity during which the early regional identity of P could be remodeled.

  10. Cerebellar modules operate at different frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haibo; Lin, Zhanmin; Voges, Kai; Ju, Chiheng; Gao, Zhenyu; Bosman, Laurens WJ; Ruigrok, Tom JH; Hoebeek, Freek E

    2014-01-01

    Due to the uniform cyto-architecture of the cerebellar cortex, its overall physiological characteristics have traditionally been considered to be homogeneous. In this study, we show in awake mice at rest that spiking activity of Purkinje cells, the sole output cells of the cerebellar cortex, differs between cerebellar modules and correlates with their expression of the glycolytic enzyme aldolase C or zebrin. Simple spike and complex spike frequencies were significantly higher in Purkinje cells located in zebrin-negative than zebrin-positive modules. The difference in simple spike frequency persisted when the synaptic input to, but not intrinsic activity of, Purkinje cells was manipulated. Blocking TRPC3, the effector channel of a cascade of proteins that have zebrin-like distribution patterns, attenuated the simple spike frequency difference. Our results indicate that zebrin-discriminated cerebellar modules operate at different frequencies, which depend on activation of TRPC3, and that this property is relevant for all cerebellar functions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02536.001 PMID:24843004

  11. Crossed Cerebellar Atrophy of the Lateral Cerebellar Nucleus in an Endothelin-1-Induced, Rodent Model of Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Hugh H.; Cooperrider, Jessica L.; Park, Hyun-Joo; Wathen, Connor A.; Gale, John T.; Baker, Kenneth B.; Machado, Andre G.

    2017-01-01

    Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) is a functional deficit of the cerebellar hemisphere resulting from loss of afferent input consequent to a lesion of the contralateral cerebral hemisphere. It is manifested as a reduction of metabolism and blood flow and, depending on severity and duration, it can result in atrophy, a phenomenon known as crossed cerebellar atrophy (CCA). While CCA has been well-demonstrated in humans, it remains poorly characterized in animal models of stroke. In this study we evaluated the effects of cerebral cortical ischemia on contralateral cerebellar anatomy using an established rodent model of chronic stroke. The effects of cortical ischemia on the cerebellar hemispheres, vermis and deep nuclei were characterized. Intracortical microinjections of endothelin-1 (ET-1) were delivered to the motor cortex of Long Evans rats to induce ischemic stroke, with animals sacrificed 6 weeks later. Naive animals served as controls. Cerebral sections and cerebellar sections including the deep nuclei were prepared for analysis with Nissl staining. Cortical ischemia was associated with significant thickness reduction of the molecular layer at the Crus 1 and parafloccular lobule (PFL), but not in fourth cerebellar lobule (4Cb), as compared to the ipsilesional cerebellar hemisphere. A significant reduction in volume and cell density of the lateral cerebellar nucleus (LCN), the rodent correlate of the dentate nucleus, was also noted. The results highlight the relevance of corticopontocerebellar (CPC) projections for cerebellar metabolism and function, including its direct projections to the LCN. PMID:28261086

  12. Optogenetics in the cerebellum: Purkinje cell-specific approaches for understanding local cerebellar functions.

    PubMed

    Tsubota, Tadashi; Ohashi, Yohei; Tamura, Keita

    2013-10-15

    The cerebellum consists of the cerebellar cortex and the cerebellar nuclei. Although the basic neuronal circuitry of the cerebellar cortex is uniform everywhere, anatomical data demonstrate that the input and output relationships of the cortex are spatially segregated between different cortical areas, which suggests that there are functional distinctions between these different areas. Perturbation of cerebellar cortical functions in a spatially restricted fashion is thus essential for investigating the distinctions among different cortical areas. In the cerebellar cortex, Purkinje cells are the sole output neurons that send information to downstream cerebellar and vestibular nuclei. Therefore, selective manipulation of Purkinje cell activities, without disturbing other neuronal types and passing fibers within the cortex, is a direct approach to spatially restrict the effects of perturbations. Although this type of approach has for many years been technically difficult, recent advances in optogenetics now enable selective activation or inhibition of Purkinje cell activities, with high temporal resolution. Here we discuss the effectiveness of using Purkinje cell-specific optogenetic approaches to elucidate the functions of local cerebellar cortex regions. We also discuss what improvements to current methods are necessary for future investigations of cerebellar functions to provide further advances. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Distributed Cerebellar Motor Learning: A Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity Model.

    PubMed

    Luque, Niceto R; Garrido, Jesús A; Naveros, Francisco; Carrillo, Richard R; D'Angelo, Egidio; Ros, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Deep cerebellar nuclei neurons receive both inhibitory (GABAergic) synaptic currents from Purkinje cells (within the cerebellar cortex) and excitatory (glutamatergic) synaptic currents from mossy fibers. Those two deep cerebellar nucleus inputs are thought to be also adaptive, embedding interesting properties in the framework of accurate movements. We show that distributed spike-timing-dependent plasticity mechanisms (STDP) located at different cerebellar sites (parallel fibers to Purkinje cells, mossy fibers to deep cerebellar nucleus cells, and Purkinje cells to deep cerebellar nucleus cells) in close-loop simulations provide an explanation for the complex learning properties of the cerebellum in motor learning. Concretely, we propose a new mechanistic cerebellar spiking model. In this new model, deep cerebellar nuclei embed a dual functionality: deep cerebellar nuclei acting as a gain adaptation mechanism and as a facilitator for the slow memory consolidation at mossy fibers to deep cerebellar nucleus synapses. Equipping the cerebellum with excitatory (e-STDP) and inhibitory (i-STDP) mechanisms at deep cerebellar nuclei afferents allows the accommodation of synaptic memories that were formed at parallel fibers to Purkinje cells synapses and then transferred to mossy fibers to deep cerebellar nucleus synapses. These adaptive mechanisms also contribute to modulate the deep-cerebellar-nucleus-output firing rate (output gain modulation toward optimizing its working range).

  14. Distributed Cerebellar Motor Learning: A Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity Model

    PubMed Central

    Luque, Niceto R.; Garrido, Jesús A.; Naveros, Francisco; Carrillo, Richard R.; D'Angelo, Egidio; Ros, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Deep cerebellar nuclei neurons receive both inhibitory (GABAergic) synaptic currents from Purkinje cells (within the cerebellar cortex) and excitatory (glutamatergic) synaptic currents from mossy fibers. Those two deep cerebellar nucleus inputs are thought to be also adaptive, embedding interesting properties in the framework of accurate movements. We show that distributed spike-timing-dependent plasticity mechanisms (STDP) located at different cerebellar sites (parallel fibers to Purkinje cells, mossy fibers to deep cerebellar nucleus cells, and Purkinje cells to deep cerebellar nucleus cells) in close-loop simulations provide an explanation for the complex learning properties of the cerebellum in motor learning. Concretely, we propose a new mechanistic cerebellar spiking model. In this new model, deep cerebellar nuclei embed a dual functionality: deep cerebellar nuclei acting as a gain adaptation mechanism and as a facilitator for the slow memory consolidation at mossy fibers to deep cerebellar nucleus synapses. Equipping the cerebellum with excitatory (e-STDP) and inhibitory (i-STDP) mechanisms at deep cerebellar nuclei afferents allows the accommodation of synaptic memories that were formed at parallel fibers to Purkinje cells synapses and then transferred to mossy fibers to deep cerebellar nucleus synapses. These adaptive mechanisms also contribute to modulate the deep-cerebellar-nucleus-output firing rate (output gain modulation toward optimizing its working range). PMID:26973504

  15. The physiological basis of therapies for cerebellar ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Mitoma, Hiroshi; Manto, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxias represent a group of heterogeneous disorders impacting on activities of daily living and quality of life. Various therapies have been proposed to improve symptoms in cerebellar ataxias. This review examines the physiological background of the various treatments currently administered worldwide. We analyze the mechanisms of action of drugs with a focus on aminopyridines and other antiataxic medications, of noninvasive cerebellar stimulation, and of motor rehabilitation. Considering the cerebellum as a controller, we propose the novel concept of ‘restorable stage’. Because of its unique anatomical architecture and its diffuse connectivity in particular with the cerebral cortex, keeping in mind the anatomophysiology of the cerebellar circuitry is a necessary step to understand the rationale of therapies of cerebellar ataxias and develop novel therapeutic tools. PMID:27582895

  16. Distinct critical cerebellar subregions for components of verbal working memory

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Freya E.; Grube, Manon; Von Kriegstein, Katharina; Kumar, Sukhbinder; English, Philip; Kelly, Thomas P.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Griffiths, Timothy D.

    2014-01-01

    A role for the cerebellum in cognition has been proposed based on studies suggesting a profile of cognitive deficits due to cerebellar stroke. Such studies are limited in the determination of the detailed organisation of cerebellar subregions that are critical for different aspects of cognition. In this study we examined the correlation between cognitive performance and cerebellar integrity in a specific degeneration of the cerebellar cortex: Spinocerebellar Ataxia type 6 (SCA6). The results demonstrate a critical relationship between verbal working memory and grey matter density in superior (bilateral lobules VI and crus I of lobule VII) and inferior (bilateral lobules VIIIa and VIIIb, and right lobule IX) parts of the cerebellum. We demonstrate that distinct cerebellar regions subserve different components of the prevalent psychological model for verbal working memory based on a phonological loop. The work confirms the involvement of the cerebellum in verbal working memory and defines specific subsystems for this within the cerebellum. PMID:22133495

  17. The physiological basis of therapies for cerebellar ataxias.

    PubMed

    Mitoma, Hiroshi; Manto, Mario

    2016-09-01

    Cerebellar ataxias represent a group of heterogeneous disorders impacting on activities of daily living and quality of life. Various therapies have been proposed to improve symptoms in cerebellar ataxias. This review examines the physiological background of the various treatments currently administered worldwide. We analyze the mechanisms of action of drugs with a focus on aminopyridines and other antiataxic medications, of noninvasive cerebellar stimulation, and of motor rehabilitation. Considering the cerebellum as a controller, we propose the novel concept of 'restorable stage'. Because of its unique anatomical architecture and its diffuse connectivity in particular with the cerebral cortex, keeping in mind the anatomophysiology of the cerebellar circuitry is a necessary step to understand the rationale of therapies of cerebellar ataxias and develop novel therapeutic tools.

  18. Cerebellar mass as a location of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Desideri, Ilaria; Canovetti, Silvia; Pesaresi, Ilaria; Caniglia, Michele; Ciancia, Eugenio; Bartolozzi, Carlo; Puglioli, Michele; Cosottini, Mirco

    2014-09-01

    A 22-year-old man with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia was referred to our observation for headache, cervical pain and sopor. A computed tomography study revealed triventricular obstructive hydrocephalus due to a left cerebellar hyperdense mass impinging on the fourth ventricle. A magnetic resonance study demonstrated an area of hyperintensity on T2-weighted images, hypointensity on T1, restricted diffusivity and contrast enhancement involving the left hemispherical cerebellar cortex and the vermis and causing cerebellar herniation. After surgical excision of the lesion, histological examination revealed an infiltrate of lymphoblastic leukaemia with B cells. Leukaemic intracranial masses are rare. Our report describes a case presenting a cerebellar mass of leukaemic tissue characterized by high cellularity and low apparent diffusion coefficient value comparable to acute ischaemia. Therefore leukaemic intracranial mass has to be considered in the differential diagnosis of cerebellar masses.

  19. Metabolic anatomy of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, N.E.; Posner, J.B.; Sidtis, J.J.; Moeller, J.R.; Strother, S.C.; Dhawan, V.; Rottenberg, D.A.

    1988-06-01

    Eleven patients with acquired cerebellar degeneration (10 of whom had paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD)) were evaluated using neuropsychological tests and /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose/positron emission tomography to (1) quantify motor, cognitive, and metabolic abnormalities; (2) determine if characteristic alterations in the regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRGlc) are associated with PCD; and (3) correlate behavioral and metabolic measures of disease severity. Eighteen volunteer subjects served as normal controls. Although some PCD neuropsychological test scores were abnormal, these results could not, in general, be dissociated from the effects of dysarthria and ataxia. rCMRGlc was reduced in patients with PCD (versus normal control subjects) in all regions except the brainstem. Analysis of patient and control rCMRGlc data using a mathematical model of regional metabolic interactions revealed two metabolic pattern descriptors, SSF1 and SSF2, which distinguished patients with PCD from normal control subjects; SSF2, which described a metabolic coupling between cerebellum, cuneus, and posterior temporal, lateral frontal, and paracentral cortex, correlated with quantitative indices of cerebellar dysfunction. Our inability to document substantial intellectual impairment in 7 of 10 patients with PCD contrasts with the 50% incidence of dementia in PCD reported by previous investigators. Widespread reductions in PCD rCMRGlc may result from the loss of cerebellar efferents to thalamus and forebrain structures, a reverse cerebellar diaschisis.

  20. Neurogenesis and Morphogenesis in the Cerebellar Cortex*

    PubMed Central

    Eccles, J. C.

    1970-01-01

    The cerebellum presents the best site in the central nervous system for defining fundamental problems concerning the origin and differentiation of neurones, and their growth and development. The many recent experimental investigations of these problems are reviewed, and hypotheses based upon them are developed in relation to neurogenesis, morphogenesis, and synaptogenesis. PMID:4915885

  1. Impairment of fragile X mental retardation protein-metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 signaling and its downstream cognates ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1, amyloid beta A4 precursor protein, striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase, and homer 1, in autism: a postmortem study in cerebellar vermis and superior frontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Candidate genes associated with idiopathic forms of autism overlap with other disorders including fragile X syndrome. Our laboratory has previously shown reduction in fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) and increase in metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) in cerebellar vermis and superior frontal cortex (BA9) of individuals with autism. Methods In the current study we have investigated expression of four targets of FMRP and mGluR5 signaling - homer 1, amyloid beta A4 precursor protein (APP), ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (RAC1), and striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) - in the cerebellar vermis and superior frontal cortex (BA9) via SDS-PAGE and western blotting. Data were analyzed based on stratification with respect to age (children and adolescents vs. adults), anatomic region of the brain (BA9 vs. cerebellar vermis), and impact of medications (children and adolescents on medications (n = 4) vs. total children and adolescents (n = 12); adults on medications (n = 6) vs. total adults (n = 12)). Results There were significant increases in RAC1, APP 120 kDa and APP 80 kDa proteins in BA9 of children with autism vs. healthy controls. None of the same proteins were significantly affected in cerebellar vermis of children with autism. In BA9 of adults with autism there were significant increases in RAC1 and STEP 46 kDa and a significant decrease in homer 1 vs. controls. In the vermis of adult subjects with autism, RAC1 was significantly increased while APP 120, STEP 66 kDa, STEP 27 kDa, and homer 1 were significantly decreased when compared with healthy controls. No changes were observed in vermis of children with autism. There was a significant effect of anticonvulsant use on STEP 46 kDa/β-actin and a potential effect on homer 1/NSE, in BA9 of adults with autism. However, no other significant confound effects were observed in this study. Conclusions Our findings provide further evidence of abnormalities in FMRP and

  2. In and out of the loop: external and internal modulation of the olivo-cerebellar loop.

    PubMed

    Libster, Avraham M; Yarom, Yosef

    2013-01-01

    Cerebellar anatomy is known for its crystal like structure, where neurons and connections are precisely and repeatedly organized with minor variations across the Cerebellar Cortex. The olivo-cerebellar loop, denoting the connections between the Cerebellar cortex, Inferior Olive and Cerebellar Nuclei (CN), is also modularly organized to form what is known as the cerebellar module. In contrast to the relatively organized and static anatomy, the cerebellum is innervated by a wide variety of neuromodulator carrying axons that are heterogeneously distributed along the olivo-cerebellar loop, providing heterogeneity to the static structure. In this manuscript we review modulatory processes in the olivo-cerebellar loop. We start by discussing the relationship between neuromodulators and the animal behavioral states. This is followed with an overview of the cerebellar neuromodulatory signals and a short discussion of why and when the cerebellar activity should be modulated. We then devote a section for three types of neurons where we briefly review its properties and propose possible neuromodulation scenarios.

  3. Cerebellar plasticity and the automation of first-order rules.

    PubMed

    Balsters, Joshua H; Ramnani, Narender

    2011-02-09

    Theories of corticocerebellar function propose roles for the cerebellum in automating motor control, a process thought to depend on plasticity in cerebellar circuits that exchange information with the motor cortex. Little is known, however, about automating behaviors beyond the motor domain. The present study tested the hypothesis that cerebellar plasticity also subserves the development of automaticity in behavior based on low-order rules. Human subjects were required to learn two sets of first-order rules in which visual stimuli of different shapes each arbitrarily instructed a particular finger movement. We used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging to scan subjects while these response rules became increasingly automatic with practice, as assessed with a dual-task procedure. We found that the amplitude of the blood oxygenation level-dependent signal gradually decreased as a function of practice, as responses became increasingly automatic, and that this effect was greater for a set of rules that became automatic rapidly compared with a second set, which became automatic more slowly. These trial-by-trial activity changes occurred in Crus I of cerebellar cortical lobule HVIIA, in which neurons exchange information with the prefrontal cortex rather than the motor cortex. Activity in Crus I was time locked specifically to the processing of these rules, rather than to subsequent actions. The results support the hypothesis that decreases in cerebellar cortical activity underlie the automation of behavior, whether related to motor control and motor cortex or to response rules and prefrontal cortex.

  4. Cerebellar secretin modulates eyeblink classical conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Jason R.; Robinson, Gain M.; Dean, Aaron M.; Schoenberg, Heidi E.; Williams, Michael R.; Morielli, Anthony D.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that intracerebellar infusion of the neuropeptide secretin enhances the acquisition phase of eyeblink conditioning (EBC). Here, we sought to test whether endogenous secretin also regulates EBC and to test whether the effect of exogenous and endogenous secretin is specific to acquisition. In Experiment 1, rats received intracerebellar infusions of the secretin receptor antagonist 5-27 secretin or vehicle into the lobulus simplex of cerebellar cortex immediately prior to sessions 1–3 of acquisition. Antagonist-infused rats showed a reduction in the percentage of eyeblink CRs compared with vehicle-infused rats. In Experiment 2, rats received intracerebellar infusions of secretin or vehicle immediately prior to sessions 1–2 of extinction. Secretin did not significantly affect extinction performance. In Experiment 3, rats received intracerebellar infusions of 5-27 secretin or vehicle immediately prior to sessions 1–2 of extinction. The secretin antagonist did not significantly affect extinction performance. Together, our current and previous results indicate that both exogenous and endogenous cerebellar secretin modulate acquisition, but not extinction, of EBC. We have previously shown that (1) secretin reduces surface expression of the voltage-gated potassium channel α-subunit Kv1.2 in cerebellar cortex and (2) intracerebellar infusions of a Kv1.2 blocker enhance EBC acquisition, much like secretin. Kv1.2 is almost exclusively expressed in cerebellar cortex at basket cell–Purkinje cell pinceaus and Purkinje cell dendrites; we propose that EBC-induced secretin release from PCs modulates EBC acquisition by reducing surface expression of Kv1.2 at one or both of these sites. PMID:25403455

  5. Clumsiness and disturbed cerebellar development: insights from animal experiments.

    PubMed

    Gramsbergen, Albert

    2003-01-01

    Cerebellar functioning has been implied in the fine adjustments of muscle tone, in the coordination and the feed-forward control of movements and posture, as well as in the establishment and performance of motor skills. The cerebellar cortex in mammals develops late in neuro-ontogeny and an extrapolation from experimental results indicates that in the human the proliferation of the granule cells and the development of circuitry in the cerebellar cortex starts only in the last trimester of pregnancy and lasts until beyond the first birthday. This late development makes the cerebellar development particularly vulnerable to situations like an insufficient supply of nutrients, which may follow placental dysfunction, or to side effects of pharmacological treatments like the administration of corticosteroids in the postnatal period. We studied whether such situations might also lead to motor impairments. In rats, the effects of undernutrition during the brain growth spurt were investigated as well as those of corticosteroids administered in a period that is analogous to the 7th to 8th month of pregnancy in the human. Both these interferences affect cerebellar development and our results in rats indicate that they also lead to retardations in the emergence of certain reflexes, as well as to longer lasting motor impairments during locomotion. Extrapolation of these results strongly suggests that a disturbed cerebellar development should be considered as an important etiological factor in clumsiness in human children.

  6. Iatrogenic postoperative cerebellar cyst.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Robin; Moscovici, Samuel; Wygoda, Marc; Eliahou, Ruth; Spektor, Sergey

    2016-12-01

    Cerebellar cyst is a known but uncommon entity. It is congenital in most cases, or may develop after brain parenchyma injuries or interventions. To our knowledge, de novo cerebellar cyst after extra-axial tumor excision, has not been described in the literature. We present the first reported case of a de novo cerebellar cyst developing in a 70-year-old woman following retrosigmoid craniotomy for vestibular schwannoma excision, and discuss the possible causes. Following cyst fenestration, there was no clinical or radiological evidence of a residual cyst. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Thalamic, brainstem, and cerebellar glucose metabolism in the hemiplegic monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoyama, I.; Dauth, G.W.; Gilman, S.; Frey, K.A.; Penney, J.B. Jr.

    1988-12-01

    Unilateral ablation of cerebral cortical areas 4 and 6 of Brodmann in the macaque monkey results in a contralateral hemiplegia that resolves partially with time. During the phase of dense hemiplegia, local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (1CMRG1c) is decreased significantly in most of the thalamic nuclei ipsilateral to the ablation, and there are slight contralateral decreases. The lCMRGlc is reduced bilaterally in most of the brainstem nuclei and bilaterally in the deep cerebellar nuclei, but only in the contralateral cerebellar cortex. During the phase of partial motor recovery, lCMRGlc is incompletely restored in many of the thalamic nuclei ipsilateral to the ablation and completely restored in the contralateral nuclei. In the brainstem and deep cerebellar nuclei, poor to moderate recovery occurs bilaterally. Moderate recovery occurs in the contralateral cerebellar cortex. The findings demonstrate that a unilateral cerebral cortical lesion strongly affects lCMRGlc in the thalamus ipsilaterally and in the cerebellar cortex contralaterally, but in the brainstem bilaterally. Partial recovery of lCMRGlc accompanies the progressive motor recovery. The structures affected include those with direct, and also those with indirect, connections to the areas ablated.

  8. A neural model of cerebellar learning for arm movement control: cortico-spino-cerebellar dynamics.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Vidal, J L; Grossberg, S; Bullock, D

    1997-01-01

    A neural network model of opponent cerebellar learning for arm movement control is proposed. The model illustrates how a central pattern generator in cortex and basal ganglia, a neuromuscular force controller in spinal cord, and an adaptive cerebellum cooperate to reduce motor variability during multijoint arm movements using mono- and bi-articular muscles. Cerebellar learning modifies velocity commands to produce phasic antagonist bursts at interpositus nucleus cells whose feed-forward action overcomes inherent limitations of spinal feedback control of tracking. Excitation of alpha motoneuron pools, combined with inhibition of their Renshaw cells by the cerebellum, facilitate movement initiation and optimal execution. Transcerebellar pathways are opened by learning through long-term depression (LTD) of parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses in response to conjunctive stimulation of parallel fibers and climbing fiber discharges that signal muscle stretch errors. The cerebellar circuitry also learns to control opponent muscles pairs, allowing cocontraction and reciprocal inhibition of muscles. Learning is stable, exhibits load compensation properties, and generalizes better across movement speeds if motoneuron pools obey the size principle. The intermittency of climbing fiber discharges maintains stable learning. Long-term potentiation (LTP) in response to uncorrelated parallel fiber signals enables previously weakened synapses to recover. Loss of climbing fibers, in the presence of LTP, can erode normal opponent signal processing. Simulated lesions of the cerebellar network reproduce symptoms of cerebellar disease, including sluggish movement onsets, poor execution of multijoint plans, and abnormally prolonged endpoint oscillations.

  9. Inverse Stochastic Resonance in Cerebellar Purkinje Cells

    PubMed Central

    Häusser, Michael; Gutkin, Boris S.; Roth, Arnd

    2016-01-01

    Purkinje neurons play an important role in cerebellar computation since their axons are the only projection from the cerebellar cortex to deeper cerebellar structures. They have complex internal dynamics, which allow them to fire spontaneously, display bistability, and also to be involved in network phenomena such as high frequency oscillations and travelling waves. Purkinje cells exhibit type II excitability, which can be revealed by a discontinuity in their f-I curves. We show that this excitability mechanism allows Purkinje cells to be efficiently inhibited by noise of a particular variance, a phenomenon known as inverse stochastic resonance (ISR). While ISR has been described in theoretical models of single neurons, here we provide the first experimental evidence for this effect. We find that an adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire model fitted to the basic Purkinje cell characteristics using a modified dynamic IV method displays ISR and bistability between the resting state and a repetitive activity limit cycle. ISR allows the Purkinje cell to operate in different functional regimes: the all-or-none toggle or the linear filter mode, depending on the variance of the synaptic input. We propose that synaptic noise allows Purkinje cells to quickly switch between these functional regimes. Using mutual information analysis, we demonstrate that ISR can lead to a locally optimal information transfer between the input and output spike train of the Purkinje cell. These results provide the first experimental evidence for ISR and suggest a functional role for ISR in cerebellar information processing. PMID:27541958

  10. Memory impairment following right cerebellar infarction: a case study.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Fumiko Kusunoki; Tsutsumiuchi, Michiko; Maeda, Meiko Hashimoto; Uesaka, Yoshikazu; Takeda, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    We reported a patient with a right cerebellar infarction who showed anterograde amnesia. Cognitive dysfunction caused by cerebellar lesions was called cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome, and deactivation of the contralateral prefrontal cortex function due to disconnections of cerebello-cerebral fiber tracts have been hypothesized as mechanism underlying the syndrome. The episodic memory impairment, however, could not be supported by the same mechanism because the prefrontal lesions cannot cause amnesia syndrome. The feature of the impairment of our patient was similar to that of diencephalic amnesia, and a single photon emission computed tomography study showed a relative hypoperfusion in the right cerebellar hemisphere and left anterior thalamus. We considered that the memory deficit was caused by the dysfunction of the thalamus, which is a relay center of the cerebello-cerebral connectivity network.

  11. Update on the pharmacotherapy of cerebellar and central vestibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Kalla, Roger; Teufel, Julian; Feil, Katharina; Muth, Caroline; Strupp, Michael

    2016-04-01

    An overview of the current pharmacotherapy of central vestibular syndromes and the most common forms of central nystagmus as well as cerebellar disorders is given. 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) is recommended for the treatment of downbeat nystagmus, a frequent form of acquired persisting fixation nystagmus, and upbeat nystagmus. Animal studies showed that this non-selective blocker of voltage-gated potassium channels increases Purkinje cell excitability and normalizes the irregular firing rate, so that the inhibitory influence of the cerebellar cortex on vestibular and deep cerebellar nuclei is restored. The efficacy of 4-AP in episodic ataxia type 2, which is most often caused by mutations of the PQ-calcium channel, was demonstrated in a randomized controlled trial. It was also shown in an animal model (the tottering mouse) of episodic ataxia type 2. In a case series, chlorzoxazone, a non-selective activator of small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels, was shown to reduce the DBN. The efficacy of acetyl-DL-leucine as a potential new symptomatic treatment for cerebellar diseases has been demonstrated in three case series. The ongoing randomized controlled trials on episodic ataxia type 2 (sustained-release form of 4-aminopyridine vs. acetazolamide vs. placebo; EAT2TREAT), vestibular migraine with metoprolol (PROVEMIG-trial), cerebellar gait disorders (sustained-release form of 4-aminopyridine vs. placebo; FACEG) and cerebellar ataxia (acetyl-DL-leucine vs. placebo; ALCAT) will provide new insights into the pharmacotherapy of cerebellar and central vestibular disorders.

  12. Acute cerebellar ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... movement due to disease or injury to the cerebellum in the brain. ... of acute cerebellar ataxia include: Abscess of the cerebellum Alcohol, medications, and insecticides Bleeding into the cerebellum ...

  13. Congenital cerebellar dysplasia in White Leghorn chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Sayuri; Ochiai, Kenji; Yabushita, Hiroki; Abe, Asumi

    2014-01-01

    Congenital cerebellar anomalies have been rarely reported in birds. We examined cerebellums with disorganized folia from seven specific-pathogen-free White Leghorn chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus). Islands of heterotopic cortex were distributed from the deeper cortices to the medulla in the cerebellum. The characteristic lesions were composed of randomly admixed components of the cerebellar cortex, including Purkinje cells, a molecular layer and granular cells. Immunofluorescent analysis revealed Purkinje cells with haphazardly extended dendrites and a lack of Bergmann's glial fibres in the foci. Chicken parvovirus, Aino virus and avian retrovirus were not detected in the affected birds by polymerase chain reaction. This is the first report of cerebellar dysplasia in chickens possibly caused by a genetic abnormality.

  14. Ontogeny of rapid estrogen-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling in the rat cerebellar cortex: potent nongenomic agonist and endocrine disrupting activity of the xenoestrogen bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Zsarnovszky, Attila; Le, Hoa H; Wang, Hong-Sheng; Belcher, Scott M

    2005-12-01

    In addition to regulating estrogen receptor-dependent gene expression, 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) can directly influence intracellular signaling. In primary cultured cerebellar neurons, E(2) was previously shown to regulate growth and oncotic cell death via rapid stimulation of ERK1/2 signaling. Here we show that ERK1/2 signaling in the cerebellum of neonatal and mature rats was rapidly responsive to E(2) and during development to the environmental estrogen bisphenol A (BPA). In vivo dose-response analysis for each estrogenic compound was performed by brief (6-min) intracerebellar injection, followed by rapid fixation and phosphorylation-state-specific immunohistochemistry to quantitatively characterize changes in activated ERK1/2 (pERK) immunopositive cell numbers. Beginning on postnatal d 8, E(2) significantly influenced the number of pERK-positive cells in a cell-specific manner that was dependent on concentration and age but not sex. In cerebellar granule cells on postnatal d 10, E(2) or BPA increased pERK-positive cell numbers at low doses (10(-12) to 10(-10) M) and at higher (10(-7) to 10(-6) M) concentrations. Intermediate concentrations of either estrogenic compound did not modify basal ERK signaling. Rapid E(2)-induced increases in pERK immunoreactivity were specific to the ERK1/2 pathway as demonstrated by coinjection of the mitogen-activated, ERK-activating kinase (MEK)1/2 inhibitor U0126. Coadministration of BPA (10(-12) to 10(-10) M) with 10(-10) M E(2) dose-dependently inhibited rapid E(2)-induced ERK1/2 activation in developing cerebellar neurons. The ability of BPA to act as a highly potent E(2) mimetic and to also disrupt the rapid actions of E(2) at very low concentrations during cerebellar development highlights the potential low-dose impact of xenoestrogens on the developing brain.

  15. [Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias].

    PubMed

    Tranchant, Christine; Anheim, Mathieu

    2009-12-01

    Friedreich ataxia is the most frequent recessive cerebral ataxia d should always be researched first. Ataxia with isolated vitamin E deficiency and abetalipoproteinemia have a specific treatment. Associated neurological signs such polyneuroapthy, ophtalmologic or oculomotor signs, pyramidal signs, and cerebellar MRI can lead to the etiological diagnosis. Biological tests should be: vitamin E, cholesterol, alpha-fetoprotein levels, acanthocytes, than phytanic acid, cholestanol, lysosomal enzymes. Numerous autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia remain without etiology.

  16. Linking novelty seeking and harm avoidance personality traits to cerebellar volumes.

    PubMed

    Laricchiuta, Daniela; Petrosini, Laura; Piras, Fabrizio; Macci, Enrica; Cutuli, Debora; Chiapponi, Chiara; Cerasa, Antonio; Picerni, Eleonora; Caltagirone, Carlo; Girardi, Paolo; Tamorri, Stefano Maria; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    Personality traits are multidimensional traits comprising cognitive, emotional, and behavioral characteristics, and a wide array of cerebral structures mediate individual variability. Differences in personality traits covary with brain morphometry in specific brain regions, and neuroimaging studies showed structural or functional abnormalities of cerebellum in subjects with personality disorders, suggesting a cerebellar role in affective processing and an effect on personality characteristics. To test the hypothesis that cerebellar [white matter (WM) and cortex] volumes are correlated with scores obtained in the four temperamental scales of the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) by Cloninger, a total of 125 healthy participants aged 18-67 years of both genders (males = 52) completed the TCI and underwent magnetic resonance imaging. The scores obtained in each temperamental scale were associated with the volumes of cerebellar WM and cortex of right and left hemispheres separately by using linear regression analyses. In line with our hypothesis, novelty seeking (NS) scores were positively associated with WM and cortex cerebellar volumes. Harm avoidance (HA) scores were negatively associated with WM and cortex cerebellar volumes. The range of individual differences in NS and HA scores reflects the range of variances of cerebellar volumes. The present data indicating a cerebellar substrate for some personality traits extend the relationship between personality and brain areas to a structure up to now thought to be involved mainly in motor and cognitive functions, much less in emotional processes and even less in personality individual differences. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Cerebellar Dysfunction in a Patient with HIV.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Ibarra, Fernando; Abdul, Waheed; Eivaz-Mohammadi, Sahar; Foscue, Christopher; Gongireddy, Srinivas; Syed, Amer

    2014-01-01

    A 50-year-old AIDS patient with a CD4 T-cell count of 114/mm(3) was admitted with cerebellar symptoms of left CN XI weakness, wide-based gait with left-sided dysmetria, abnormal heel-knee-shin test, and dysdiadochokinesia. MRI showed region of hyperintensity in the left inferior cerebellar hemisphere involving the cortex and underlying white matter. Serological tests for HSV1, HSV2, and syphilis were negative. Her CSF contained high protein content and a WBC of 71/mm(3), predominantly lymphocytes. The CSF was also negative for cryptococcal antigen and VDRL. CSF culture did not grow microbes. CSF PCR assay was negative for HSV1 and HSV2 but was positive for JC virus (1,276 copies). The most likely diagnosis is granule cell neuronopathy (GCN), which can only be definitively confirmed with biopsy and immunohistochemistry.

  18. Marijuana alters the human cerebellar clock.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Daniel S; Block, Robert I; Turner, Beth M; Koeppel, Julie; Magnotta, Vincent A; Ponto, Laura Boles; Watkins, G Leonard; Hichwa, Richard D; Andreasen, Nancy C

    2003-06-11

    The effects of marijuana on brain perfusion and internal timing were assessed using [15O] water PET in occasional and chronic users. Twelve volunteers who smoked marijuana recreationally about once weekly, and 12 volunteers who smoked daily for a number of years performed a self-paced counting task during PET imaging, before and after smoking marijuana and placebo cigarettes. Smoking marijuana increased rCBF in the ventral forebrain and cerebellar cortex in both groups, but resulted in significantly less frontal lobe activation in chronic users. Counting rate increased after smoking marijuana in both groups, as did a behavioral measure of self-paced tapping, and both increases correlated with rCBF in the cerebellum. Smoking marijuana appears to accelerate a cerebellar clock altering self-paced behaviors.

  19. Improved segmentation of cerebellar structures in children

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Priya Lakshmi; Boonazier, Natalie; Warton, Christopher; Molteno, Christopher D; Joseph, Jesuchristopher; Jacobson, Joseph L; Jacobson, Sandra W; Zöllei, Lilla; Meintjes, Ernesta M

    2016-01-01

    Background Consistent localization of cerebellar cortex in a standard coordinate system is important for functional studies and detection of anatomical alterations in studies of morphometry. To date, no pediatric cerebellar atlas is available. New method The probabilistic Cape Town Pediatric Cerebellar Atlas (CAPCA18) was constructed in the age-appropriate National Institute of Health Pediatric Database asymmetric template space using manual tracings of 16 cerebellar compartments in 18 healthy children (9–13 years) from Cape Town, South Africa. The individual atlases of the training subjects were also used to implement multi atlas label fusion using multi atlas majority voting (MAMV) and multi atlas generative model (MAGM) approaches. Segmentation accuracy in 14 test subjects was compared for each method to ‘gold standard’ manual tracings. Results Spatial overlap between manual tracings and CAPCA18 automated segmentation was 73% or higher for all lobules in both hemispheres, except VIIb and X. Automated segmentation using MAGM yielded the best segmentation accuracy over all lobules (mean Dice Similarity Coefficient 0.76; range 0.55–0.91). Comparison with existing methods In all lobules, spatial overlap of CAPCA18 segmentations with manual tracings was similar or higher than those obtained with SUIT (spatially unbiased infra-tentorial template), providing additional evidence of the benefits of an age appropriate atlas. MAGM segmentation accuracy was comparable to values reported recently by Park et al. (2014) in adults (across all lobules mean DSC = 0.73, range 0.40–0.89). Conclusions CAPCA18 and the associated multi atlases of the training subjects yield improved segmentation of cerebellar structures in children. PMID:26743973

  20. Improved segmentation of cerebellar structures in children.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Priya Lakshmi; Warton, Christopher; Rosella Boonzaier, Natalie; Molteno, Christopher D; Joseph, Jesuchristopher; Jacobson, Joseph L; Jacobson, Sandra W; Zöllei, Lilla; Meintjes, Ernesta M

    2016-03-15

    Consistent localization of cerebellar cortex in a standard coordinate system is important for functional studies and detection of anatomical alterations in studies of morphometry. To date, no pediatric cerebellar atlas is available. The probabilistic Cape Town Pediatric Cerebellar Atlas (CAPCA18) was constructed in the age-appropriate National Institute of Health Pediatric Database asymmetric template space using manual tracings of 16 cerebellar compartments in 18 healthy children (9-13 years) from Cape Town, South Africa. The individual atlases of the training subjects were also used to implement multi atlas label fusion using multi atlas majority voting (MAMV) and multi atlas generative model (MAGM) approaches. Segmentation accuracy in 14 test subjects was compared for each method to 'gold standard' manual tracings. Spatial overlap between manual tracings and CAPCA18 automated segmentation was 73% or higher for all lobules in both hemispheres, except VIIb and X. Automated segmentation using MAGM yielded the best segmentation accuracy over all lobules (mean Dice Similarity Coefficient 0.76; range 0.55-0.91; mean Hausdorff distance 0.9 mm; range 0.8-2.7 mm). In all lobules, spatial overlap of CAPCA18 segmentations with manual tracings was similar or higher than those obtained with SUIT (spatially unbiased infra-tentorial template), providing additional evidence of the benefits of an age appropriate atlas. MAGM segmentation accuracy was comparable to values reported recently by Park et al. (Neuroimage 2014;95(1):217) in adults (across all lobules mean DSC=0.73, range 0.40-0.89). CAPCA18 and the associated multi-subject atlases of the training subjects yield improved segmentation of cerebellar structures in children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A novel inhibitory nucleo-cortical circuit controls cerebellar Golgi cell activity

    PubMed Central

    Ankri, Lea; Husson, Zoé; Pietrajtis, Katarzyna; Proville, Rémi; Léna, Clément; Yarom, Yosef; Dieudonné, Stéphane; Uusisaari, Marylka Yoe

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum, a crucial center for motor coordination, is composed of a cortex and several nuclei. The main mode of interaction between these two parts is considered to be formed by the inhibitory control of the nuclei by cortical Purkinje neurons. We now amend this view by showing that inhibitory GABA-glycinergic neurons of the cerebellar nuclei (CN) project profusely into the cerebellar cortex, where they make synaptic contacts on a GABAergic subpopulation of cerebellar Golgi cells. These spontaneously firing Golgi cells are inhibited by optogenetic activation of the inhibitory nucleo-cortical fibers both in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggest that the CN may contribute to the functional recruitment of the cerebellar cortex by decreasing Golgi cell inhibition onto granule cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06262.001 PMID:25965178

  2. Distribution of cerebello-olivary degeneration in idiopathic late cortical cerebellar atrophy: clinicopathological study of four autopsy cases.

    PubMed

    Ota, Satoru; Tsuchiya, Kuniaki; Anno, Midori; Niizato, Kazuhiro; Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2008-02-01

    Late cortical cerebellar atrophy (LCCA) is a neurodegenerative disease which presents with slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia as a prominent symptom and is characterized neuropathologically by a limited main lesion to the cerebellar cortex and inferior olivary nucleus. To elucidate the features of lesions in the cerebellar cortex and inferior olivary nucleus, four autopsy cases suffering from idiopathic LCCA without other cortical cerebellar atrophies, such as alcoholic cerebellar degeneration, phenytoin intoxication, or hereditary cerebellar atrophy including spinocerebellar ataxia type 6, were examined. All affected patients had identical distinct features of cerebellar cortical lesions. In all four cases, the most obvious pathological finding throughout the cerebellum was loss of Purkinje cells, but the rarefaction of granular cell layers was observed only where loss of Purkinje cells was very severe, and thinning of the molecular layer was seen only where the rarefaction of granular cell layers was moderate to severe. Two patients presented with vermis dominant cerebellar cortical lesions, but the other two patients showed hemispheric dominant pathological changes. Neuronal loss of the inferior olivary nucleus was observed in the three autopsy cases. Two of the three cases had a prominent lesion in the dorsal part of the inferior olive and the cerebellar cortical lesion disclosed the vermis dominance, but the other patient, showing prominent neuronal loss in the ventral olivary nucleus, had a cerebellar hemisphere dominant lesion. The patient without neuronal loss in the inferior olivary nucleus had suffered from a shorter period of disease than the others and the rarefaction of granular cell layers and narrowing of the molecular layer of the cerebellar cortex were mild. Therefore, it is obvious that there are two types of cerebellar cortex lesions in idiopathic LCCA; one is vermis dominant and the other is cerebellar hemispheric dominant. The lesion of the

  3. Motor learning of mice lacking cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Porras-García, M Elena; Ruiz, Rocío; Pérez-Villegas, Eva M; Armengol, José Á

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellum plays a key role in the acquisition and execution of motor tasks whose physiological foundations were postulated on Purkinje cells' long-term depression (LTD). Numerous research efforts have been focused on understanding the cerebellum as a site of learning and/or memory storage. However, the controversy on which part of the cerebellum participates in motor learning, and how the process takes place, remains unsolved. In fact, it has been suggested that cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei, and/or their combination with some brain structures other than the cerebellum are responsible for motor learning. Different experimental approaches have been used to tackle this question (cerebellar lesions, pharmacological agonist and/or antagonist of cerebellar neurotransmitters, virus tract tracings, etc.). One of these approaches is the study of spontaneous mutations affecting the cerebellar cortex and depriving it of its main input-output organizer (i.e., the Purkinje cell). In this review, we discuss the results obtained in our laboratory in motor learning of both Lurcher (Lc/+) and tambaleante (tbl/tbl) mice as models of Purkinje-cell-devoid cerebellum.

  4. Motor learning of mice lacking cerebellar Purkinje cells

    PubMed Central

    Porras-García, M. Elena; Ruiz, Rocío; Pérez-Villegas, Eva M.; Armengol, José Á.

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellum plays a key role in the acquisition and execution of motor tasks whose physiological foundations were postulated on Purkinje cells' long-term depression (LTD). Numerous research efforts have been focused on understanding the cerebellum as a site of learning and/or memory storage. However, the controversy on which part of the cerebellum participates in motor learning, and how the process takes place, remains unsolved. In fact, it has been suggested that cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei, and/or their combination with some brain structures other than the cerebellum are responsible for motor learning. Different experimental approaches have been used to tackle this question (cerebellar lesions, pharmacological agonist and/or antagonist of cerebellar neurotransmitters, virus tract tracings, etc.). One of these approaches is the study of spontaneous mutations affecting the cerebellar cortex and depriving it of its main input–output organizer (i.e., the Purkinje cell). In this review, we discuss the results obtained in our laboratory in motor learning of both Lurcher (Lc/+) and tambaleante (tbl/tbl) mice as models of Purkinje-cell-devoid cerebellum. PMID:23630472

  5. Cerebellar network plasticity: from genes to fast oscillation.

    PubMed

    Cheron, G; Servais, L; Dan, B

    2008-04-22

    The role of the cerebellum has been increasingly recognized not only in motor control but in sensory, cognitive and emotional learning and regulation. Purkinje cells, being the sole output from the cerebellar cortex, occupy an integrative position in this network. Plasticity at this level is known to critically involve calcium signaling. In the last few years, electrophysiological study of genetically engineered mice has demonstrated the topical role of several genes encoding calcium-binding proteins (calretinin, calbindin, parvalbumin). Specific inactivation of these genes results in the emergence of a fast network oscillation (ca. 160 Hz) throughout the cerebellar cortex in alert animals, associated with ataxia. This oscillation is produced by synchronization of Purkinje cells along the parallel fiber beam. It behaves as an electrophysiological arrest rhythm, being blocked by sensorimotor stimulation. Pharmacological manipulations showed that the oscillation is blocked by GABA(A) and NMDA antagonists as well as gap junction blockers. This cerebellar network oscillation has also been documented in mouse models of human conditions with complex developmental cerebellar dysfunction, such as Angelman syndrome and fetal alcohol syndrome. Recent evidence suggests a relationship between fast oscillation and cerebellar long term depression (LTD). This may have major implications for future therapeutic targeting.

  6. Upregulation of cortico-cerebellar functional connectivity after motor learning.

    PubMed

    Mehrkanoon, Saeid; Boonstra, Tjeerd W; Breakspear, Michael; Hinder, Mark; Summers, Jeffery J

    2016-03-01

    Interactions between the cerebellum and primary motor cortex are crucial for the acquisition of new motor skills. Recent neuroimaging studies indicate that learning motor skills is associated with subsequent modulation of resting-state functional connectivity in the cerebellar and cerebral cortices. The neuronal processes underlying the motor-learning-induced plasticity are not well understood. Here, we investigate changes in functional connectivity in source-reconstructed electroencephalography (EEG) following the performance of a single session of a dynamic force task in twenty young adults. Source activity was reconstructed in 112 regions of interest (ROIs) and the functional connectivity between all ROIs was estimated using the imaginary part of coherence. Significant changes in resting-state connectivity were assessed using partial least squares (PLS). We found that subjects adapted their motor performance during the training session and showed improved accuracy but with slower movement times. A number of connections were significantly upregulated after motor training, principally involving connections within the cerebellum and between the cerebellum and motor cortex. Increased connectivity was confined to specific frequency ranges in the mu- and beta-bands. Post hoc analysis of the phase spectra of these cerebellar and cortico-cerebellar connections revealed an increased phase lag between motor cortical and cerebellar activity following motor practice. These findings show a reorganization of intrinsic cortico-cerebellar connectivity related to motor adaptation and demonstrate the potential of EEG connectivity analysis in source space to reveal the neuronal processes that underpin neural plasticity.

  7. Cerebellar learning mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, John H.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying cerebellar learning are reviewed with an emphasis on old arguments and new perspectives on eyeblink conditioning. Eyeblink conditioning has been used for decades a model system for elucidating cerebellar learning mechanisms. The standard model of the mechanisms underlying eyeblink conditioning is that there two synaptic plasticity processes within the cerebellum that are necessary for acquisition of the conditioned response: 1) long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses and 2) long-term potentiation (LTP) at mossy fiber-interpositus nucleus synapses. Additional Purkinje cell plasticity mechanisms may also contribute to eyeblink conditioning including LTP, excitability, and entrainment of deep nucleus activity. Recent analyses of the sensory input pathways necessary for eyeblink conditioning indicate that the cerebellum regulates its inputs to facilitate learning and maintain plasticity. Cerebellar learning during eyeblink conditioning is therefore a dynamic interactive process which maximizes responding to significant stimuli and suppresses responding to irrelevant or redundant stimuli. PMID:25289586

  8. Cerebellar infarct patterns: The SMART-Medea study

    PubMed Central

    De Cocker, Laurens J.L.; Geerlings, Mirjam I.; Hartkamp, Nolan S.; Grool, Anne M.; Mali, Willem P.; Van der Graaf, Yolanda; Kloppenborg, Raoul P.; Hendrikse, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Objective Previous studies on cerebellar infarcts have been largely restricted to acute infarcts in patients with clinical symptoms, and cerebellar infarcts have been evaluated with the almost exclusive use of transversal MR images. We aimed to document the occurrence and 3D-imaging patterns of cerebellar infarcts presenting as an incidental finding on MRI. Methods We analysed the 1.5 Tesla MRI, including 3D T1-weighted datasets, of 636 patients (mean age 62 ± 9 years, 81% male) from the SMART-Medea study. Cerebellar infarct analyses included an assessment of size, cavitation and gliosis, of grey and white matter involvement, and of infarct topography. Results One or more cerebellar infarcts (mean 1.97; range 1–11) were detected in 70 out of 636 patients (11%), with a total amount of 138 infarcts identified, 135 of which showed evidence of cavitation. The average mean axial diameter was 7 mm (range 2–54 mm), and 131 infarcts (95%) were smaller than 20 mm. Hundred-thirty-four infarcts (97%) involved the cortex, of which 12 in combination with subcortical white matter. No infarcts were restricted to subcortical branches of white matter. Small cortical infarcts involved the apex of a deep (pattern 1) or shallow fissure (pattern 2), or occurred alongside one (pattern 3) or opposite sides (pattern 4) of a fissure. Most (87%) cerebellar infarcts were situated in the posterior lobe. Conclusions Small cerebellar infarcts proved to be much more common than larger infarcts, and preferentially involved the cortex. Small cortical infarcts predominantly involved the posterior lobes, showed sparing of subcortical white matter and occurred in characteristic topographic patterns. PMID:26106556

  9. Cerebellar infarct patterns: The SMART-Medea study.

    PubMed

    De Cocker, Laurens J L; Geerlings, Mirjam I; Hartkamp, Nolan S; Grool, Anne M; Mali, Willem P; Van der Graaf, Yolanda; Kloppenborg, Raoul P; Hendrikse, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies on cerebellar infarcts have been largely restricted to acute infarcts in patients with clinical symptoms, and cerebellar infarcts have been evaluated with the almost exclusive use of transversal MR images. We aimed to document the occurrence and 3D-imaging patterns of cerebellar infarcts presenting as an incidental finding on MRI. We analysed the 1.5 Tesla MRI, including 3D T1-weighted datasets, of 636 patients (mean age 62 ± 9 years, 81% male) from the SMART-Medea study. Cerebellar infarct analyses included an assessment of size, cavitation and gliosis, of grey and white matter involvement, and of infarct topography. One or more cerebellar infarcts (mean 1.97; range 1-11) were detected in 70 out of 636 patients (11%), with a total amount of 138 infarcts identified, 135 of which showed evidence of cavitation. The average mean axial diameter was 7 mm (range 2-54 mm), and 131 infarcts (95%) were smaller than 20 mm. Hundred-thirty-four infarcts (97%) involved the cortex, of which 12 in combination with subcortical white matter. No infarcts were restricted to subcortical branches of white matter. Small cortical infarcts involved the apex of a deep (pattern 1) or shallow fissure (pattern 2), or occurred alongside one (pattern 3) or opposite sides (pattern 4) of a fissure. Most (87%) cerebellar infarcts were situated in the posterior lobe. Small cerebellar infarcts proved to be much more common than larger infarcts, and preferentially involved the cortex. Small cortical infarcts predominantly involved the posterior lobes, showed sparing of subcortical white matter and occurred in characteristic topographic patterns.

  10. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with cerebellar stroke.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Martínez, A; Arpa, J

    1997-01-01

    Conduction time of the central motor pathways (CMCT) by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was performed within the first two weeks in 7 patients with isolated hemicerebellar lesions after stroke. Cerebellar infarcts were small (< 2 cm in diameter) in 5 patients and no brainstem structure was involved in CT studies. The threshold (3 cases) and CMCT (4 cases) were abnormal or asymmetric by stimulation of the motor cortex contralateral to the impaired hemicerebellum. The follow-up study in 2 patients revealed electrophysiological improvement closely related to clinical cerebellar recovery rate. CMCT was significantly longer by cortex stimulation contralateral to the impaired hemicerebellum than by ipsilateral stimulation. Prolonged CMCT was significantly correlated with the rated severity of cerebellar signs. Increased threshold may be due to depressed facilitating action of the deep cerebellar nuclei on contralateral motor cortex. Abnormal CMCT might result in reduced size and increased dispersion of the efferent volleys. Recovery of electrophysiological results could represent in part true potentially reversible functional deficit. Whichever the pathophysiological mechanisms involved, our results demonstrate that the cerebellum dysfunction plays a role in the abnormalities of CMCT elicited by TMS.

  11. Differential Purkinje cell simple spike activity and pausing behavior related to cerebellar modules

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haibo; Voges, Kai; Lin, Zhanmin; Ju, Chiheng

    2015-01-01

    The massive computational capacity of the cerebellar cortex is conveyed by Purkinje cells onto cerebellar and vestibular nuclei neurons through their GABAergic, inhibitory output. This implies that pauses in Purkinje cell simple spike activity are potentially instrumental in cerebellar information processing, but their occurrence and extent are still heavily debated. The cerebellar cortex, although often treated as such, is not homogeneous. Cerebellar modules with distinct anatomical connectivity and gene expression have been described, and Purkinje cells in these modules also differ in firing rate of simple and complex spikes. In this study we systematically correlate, in awake mice, the pausing in simple spike activity of Purkinje cells recorded throughout the entire cerebellum, with their location in terms of lobule, transverse zone, and zebrin-identified cerebellar module. A subset of Purkinje cells displayed long (>500-ms) pauses, but we found that their occurrence correlated with tissue damage and lower temperature. In contrast to long pauses, short pauses (<500 ms) and the shape of the interspike interval (ISI) distributions can differ between Purkinje cells of different lobules and cerebellar modules. In fact, the ISI distributions can differ both between and within populations of Purkinje cells with the same zebrin identity, and these differences are at least in part caused by differential synaptic inputs. Our results suggest that long pauses are rare but that there are differences related to shorter intersimple spike intervals between and within specific subsets of Purkinje cells, indicating a potential further segregation in the activity of cerebellar Purkinje cells. PMID:25717166

  12. Restoring cognitive functions using non-invasive brain stimulation techniques in patients with cerebellar disorders.

    PubMed

    Pope, Paul A; Miall, R Chris

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have highlighted the possibility of modulating the excitability of cerebro-cerebellar circuits bi-directionally using transcranial electrical brain stimulation, in a manner akin to that observed using magnetic stimulation protocols. It has been proposed that cerebellar stimulation activates Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex, leading to inhibition of the dentate nucleus, which exerts a tonic facilitatory drive onto motor and cognitive regions of cortex through a synaptic relay in the ventral-lateral thalamus. Some cerebellar deficits present with cognitive impairments if damage to non-motor regions of the cerebellum disrupts the coupling with cerebral cortical areas for thinking and reasoning. Indeed, white matter changes in the dentato-rubral tract correlate with cognitive assessments in patients with Friedreich ataxia, suggesting that this pathway is one component of the anatomical substrate supporting a cerebellar contribution to cognition. An understanding of the physiology of the cerebro-cerebellar pathway previously helped us to constrain our interpretation of results from two recent studies in which we showed cognitive enhancements in healthy participants during tests of arithmetic after electrical stimulation of the cerebellum, but only when task demands were high. Others studies have also shown how excitation of the prefrontal cortex can enhance performance in a variety of working memory tasks. Thus, future efforts might be guided toward neuro-enhancement in certain patient populations, using what is commonly termed "non-invasive brain stimulation" as a cognitive rehabilitation tool to modulate cerebro-cerebellar circuits, or for stimulation over the cerebral cortex to compensate for decreased cerebellar drive to this region. This article will address these possibilities with a review of the relevant literature covering ataxias and cerebellar cognitive affective disorders, which are characterized by thalamo-cortical disturbances.

  13. Restoring Cognitive Functions Using Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation Techniques in Patients with Cerebellar Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Paul A.; Miall, R. Chris

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have highlighted the possibility of modulating the excitability of cerebro–cerebellar circuits bi-directionally using transcranial electrical brain stimulation, in a manner akin to that observed using magnetic stimulation protocols. It has been proposed that cerebellar stimulation activates Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex, leading to inhibition of the dentate nucleus, which exerts a tonic facilitatory drive onto motor and cognitive regions of cortex through a synaptic relay in the ventral–lateral thalamus. Some cerebellar deficits present with cognitive impairments if damage to non-motor regions of the cerebellum disrupts the coupling with cerebral cortical areas for thinking and reasoning. Indeed, white matter changes in the dentato–rubral tract correlate with cognitive assessments in patients with Friedreich ataxia, suggesting that this pathway is one component of the anatomical substrate supporting a cerebellar contribution to cognition. An understanding of the physiology of the cerebro–cerebellar pathway previously helped us to constrain our interpretation of results from two recent studies in which we showed cognitive enhancements in healthy participants during tests of arithmetic after electrical stimulation of the cerebellum, but only when task demands were high. Others studies have also shown how excitation of the prefrontal cortex can enhance performance in a variety of working memory tasks. Thus, future efforts might be guided toward neuro-enhancement in certain patient populations, using what is commonly termed “non-invasive brain stimulation” as a cognitive rehabilitation tool to modulate cerebro–cerebellar circuits, or for stimulation over the cerebral cortex to compensate for decreased cerebellar drive to this region. This article will address these possibilities with a review of the relevant literature covering ataxias and cerebellar cognitive affective disorders, which are characterized by thalamo

  14. Contralateral cortico-ponto-cerebellar pathways reconstruction in humans in vivo: implications for reciprocal cerebro-cerebellar structural connectivity in motor and non-motor areas.

    PubMed

    Palesi, Fulvia; De Rinaldis, Andrea; Castellazzi, Gloria; Calamante, Fernando; Muhlert, Nils; Chard, Declan; Tournier, J Donald; Magenes, Giovanni; D'Angelo, Egidio; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M

    2017-10-09

    Cerebellar involvement in cognition, as well as in sensorimotor control, is increasingly recognized and is thought to depend on connections with the cerebral cortex. Anatomical investigations in animals and post-mortem humans have established that cerebro-cerebellar connections are contralateral to each other and include the cerebello-thalamo-cortical (CTC) and cortico-ponto-cerebellar (CPC) pathways. CTC and CPC characterization in humans in vivo is still challenging. Here advanced tractography was combined with quantitative indices to compare CPC to CTC pathways in healthy subjects. Differently to previous studies, our findings reveal that cerebellar cognitive areas are reached by the largest proportion of the reconstructed CPC, supporting the hypothesis that a CTC-CPC loop provides a substrate for cerebro-cerebellar communication during cognitive processing. Amongst the cerebral areas identified using in vivo tractography, in addition to the cerebral motor cortex, major portions of CPC streamlines leave the prefrontal and temporal cortices. These findings are useful since provide MRI-based indications of possible subtending connectivity and, if confirmed, they are going to be a milestone for instructing computational models of brain function. These results, together with further multi-modal investigations, are warranted to provide important cues on how the cerebro-cerebellar loops operate and on how pathologies involving cerebro-cerebellar connectivity are generated.

  15. Precise localization of the voltage-gated potassium channel subunits Kv3.1b and Kv3.3 revealed in the molecular layer of the rat cerebellar cortex by a pre-embedding immunogold method.

    PubMed

    Puente, Nagore; Mendizabal-Zubiaga, Juan; Elezgarai, Izaskun; Reguero, Leire; Buceta, Ianire; Grandes, Pedro

    2010-10-01

    A proper motor activity relies on a correct cerebellar function. The Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 voltage-gated potassium channels are key proteins involved in cerebellar function and dysfunction, as the lack of these causes severe motor deficits. Both channel subunits are coexpressed in granule cells and are rapidly activated at relatively positive potentials to support the generation of fast action potentials. However, the contribution of each subunit to the molecular architecture of the parallel fibers, the granule cell axons, is so far unknown. The goal of this study was to elucidate the relative distribution of Kv3.1b and Kv3.3 in specific compartments of the rat parallel fibers by using a pre-embedding immunocytochemical method for electron microscopy. Numerous Kv3.1b and Kv3.3 silver-intensified gold particles were associated with membranes of parallel fiber synaptic terminals and their intervaricose segments. Kv3.1b was found in about 85% of parallel fiber synaptic terminals and in about 47% of their intervaricose portions. However, only 28% of intervaricosities and 23% of parallel fiber presynaptic boutons were Kv3.3 immunopositive. The analysis also revealed that 54% of Purkinje cell dendritic spines localized Kv3.3. Although both potassium channel subunits share localization in the same presynaptic parallel fiber compartments, the present results with the method used indicate that there are a higher percentage of parallel fibers labeled for Kv3.1b than for Kv3.3, and that the labeling intensity for each subunit is higher in specific subcompartments analyzed than in others.

  16. Cerebellar degeneration affects cortico-cortical connectivity in motor learning networks.

    PubMed

    Tzvi, Elinor; Zimmermann, Christoph; Bey, Richard; Münte, Thomas F; Nitschke, Matthias; Krämer, Ulrike M

    2017-01-01

    The cerebellum plays an important role in motor learning as part of a cortico-striato-cerebellar network. Patients with cerebellar degeneration typically show impairments in different aspects of motor learning, including implicit motor sequence learning. How cerebellar dysfunction affects interactions in this cortico-striato-cerebellar network is poorly understood. The present study investigated the effect of cerebellar degeneration on activity in causal interactions between cortical and subcortical regions involved in motor learning. We found that cerebellar patients showed learning-related increase in activity in two regions known to be involved in learning and memory, namely parahippocampal cortex and cerebellar Crus I. The cerebellar activity increase was observed in non-learners of the patient group whereas learners showed an activity decrease. Dynamic causal modeling analysis revealed that modulation of M1 to cerebellum and putamen to cerebellum connections were significantly more negative for sequence compared to random blocks in controls, replicating our previous results, and did not differ in patients. In addition, a separate analysis revealed a similar effect in connections from SMA and PMC to M1 bilaterally. Again, neural network changes were associated with learning performance in patients. Specifically, learners showed a negative modulation from right SMA to right M1 that was similar to controls, whereas this effect was close to zero in non-learners. These results highlight the role of cerebellum in motor learning and demonstrate the functional role cerebellum plays as part of the cortico-striato-cerebellar network.

  17. Non-invasive cerebellar stimulation--a consensus paper.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, G; Argyropoulos, G P; Boehringer, A; Celnik, P; Edwards, M J; Ferrucci, R; Galea, J M; Groiss, S J; Hiraoka, K; Kassavetis, P; Lesage, E; Manto, M; Miall, R C; Priori, A; Sadnicka, A; Ugawa, Y; Ziemann, U

    2014-02-01

    The field of neurostimulation of the cerebellum either with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS; single pulse or repetitive (rTMS)) or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS; anodal or cathodal) is gaining popularity in the scientific community, in particular because these stimulation techniques are non-invasive and provide novel information on cerebellar functions. There is a consensus amongst the panel of experts that both TMS and tDCS can effectively influence cerebellar functions, not only in the motor domain, with effects on visually guided tracking tasks, motor surround inhibition, motor adaptation and learning, but also for the cognitive and affective operations handled by the cerebro-cerebellar circuits. Verbal working memory, semantic associations and predictive language processing are amongst these operations. Both TMS and tDCS modulate the connectivity between the cerebellum and the primary motor cortex, tuning cerebellar excitability. Cerebellar TMS is an effective and valuable method to evaluate the cerebello-thalamo-cortical loop functions and for the study of the pathophysiology of ataxia. In most circumstances, DCS induces a polarity-dependent site-specific modulation of cerebellar activity. Paired associative stimulation of the cerebello-dentato-thalamo-M1 pathway can induce bidirectional long-term spike-timing-dependent plasticity-like changes of corticospinal excitability. However, the panel of experts considers that several important issues still remain unresolved and require further research. In particular, the role of TMS in promoting cerebellar plasticity is not established. Moreover, the exact positioning of electrode stimulation and the duration of the after effects of tDCS remain unclear. Future studies are required to better define how DCS over particular regions of the cerebellum affects individual cerebellar symptoms, given the topographical organization of cerebellar symptoms. The long-term neural consequences of non

  18. Excitatory Cerebellar Nucleocortical Circuit Provides Internal Amplification during Associative Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhenyu; Proietti-Onori, Martina; Lin, Zhanmin; ten Brinke, Michiel M.; Boele, Henk-Jan; Potters, Jan-Willem; Ruigrok, Tom J.H.; Hoebeek, Freek E.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Closed-loop circuitries between cortical and subcortical regions can facilitate precision of output patterns, but the role of such networks in the cerebellum remains to be elucidated. Here, we characterize the role of internal feedback from the cerebellar nuclei to the cerebellar cortex in classical eyeblink conditioning. We find that excitatory output neurons in the interposed nucleus provide efference-copy signals via mossy fibers to the cerebellar cortical zones that belong to the same module, triggering monosynaptic responses in granule and Golgi cells and indirectly inhibiting Purkinje cells. Upon conditioning, the local density of nucleocortical mossy fiber terminals significantly increases. Optogenetic activation and inhibition of nucleocortical fibers in conditioned animals increases and decreases the amplitude of learned eyeblink responses, respectively. Our data show that the excitatory nucleocortical closed-loop circuitry of the cerebellum relays a corollary discharge of premotor signals and suggests an amplifying role of this circuitry in controlling associative motor learning. PMID:26844836

  19. Consensus Paper: Neuroimmune Mechanisms of Cerebellar Ataxias.

    PubMed

    Mitoma, Hiroshi; Adhikari, Keya; Aeschlimann, Daniel; Chattopadhyay, Partha; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Hampe, Christiane S; Honnorat, Jérôme; Joubert, Bastien; Kakei, Shinji; Lee, Jongho; Manto, Mario; Matsunaga, Akiko; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Nanri, Kazunori; Shanmugarajah, Priya; Yoneda, Makoto; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2016-04-01

    In the last few years, a lot of publications suggested that disabling cerebellar ataxias may develop through immune-mediated mechanisms. In this consensus paper, we discuss the clinical features of the main described immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias and address their presumed pathogenesis. Immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias include cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-GAD antibodies, the cerebellar type of Hashimoto's encephalopathy, primary autoimmune cerebellar ataxia, gluten ataxia, Miller Fisher syndrome, ataxia associated with systemic lupus erythematosus, and paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Humoral mechanisms, cell-mediated immunity, inflammation, and vascular injuries contribute to the cerebellar deficits in immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias.

  20. Cerebellar and afferent ataxias.

    PubMed

    Pandolfo, Massimo; Manto, Mario

    2013-10-01

    Ataxia is the predominant manifestation of many acquired and inherited neurologic disorders affecting the cerebellum, its connections, and the afferent proprioceptive pathways. This article reviews the phenomenology and etiologies of cerebellar and afferent ataxias and provides indications for a rational approach to diagnosis and management. The pathophysiology of ataxia is being progressively understood and linked to the functional organization of the cerebellum. The impact of cerebellar diseases on different neurologic functions has been better defined and shown not to be limited to loss of motor coordination. The role of autoimmunity is increasingly recognized as a cause of sporadic cases of ataxia. Large collaborative studies of long duration are providing crucial information on the clinical spectrum and natural history of both sporadic ataxias (such as the cerebellar form of multiple system atrophy) and inherited ataxias. New dominant and recessive ataxia genes have been identified. On the therapeutic front, progress mostly concerns the development of treatments for Friedreich ataxia. Ataxia is the clinical manifestation of a wide range of disorders. In addition to accurate clinical assessment, MRI plays a major role in the diagnostic workup, allowing us to distinguish degenerative conditions from those due to other types of structural damage to the cerebellar or proprioceptive systems. Diagnostic algorithms based on clinical features, imaging, and neurophysiologic and biochemical parameters can be used to guide genetic testing for hereditary ataxias, the diagnosis of which is likely to be greatly improved by the introduction of new-generation DNA-sequencing approaches. Some rare forms of ataxia can be treated, so their diagnosis should not be missed. Proven symptomatic treatments for ataxia are still lacking, but intensive physical therapy appears to be helpful.

  1. Understanding and modulating motor learning with Cerebellar stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Celnik, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive brain stimulation techniques are a powerful approach to investigate the physiology and function of the central nervous system. Recent years have seen numerous investigations delivering transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to the cerebellum to determine its role in motor, cognitive and emotional behaviours. Early studies have shown that it is possible to assess cerebellar-motor cortex (CB-M1) connectivity using a paired-pulse TMS paradigm called cerebellar inhibition (CBI), and indirectly infer the state of cerebellar excitability. Thus, it has been shown that CBI changes proportionally to the magnitude of locomotor learning and in association with reaching adaption tasks. In addition, CBI has been used to demonstrate at a physiological level the effects of applying TMS or tDCS to modulate, up or down, the excitability of cerebellar-M1 connectivity. These studies became the fundamental substrate to newer investigations showing that we can affect motor, cognitive and emotional behaviour when TMS or tDCS targeting the cerebellum is delivered in the context of performance. Furthermore, newer investigations are starting to report the effects of cerebellar non-invasive stimulation to treat symptoms associated with neurological conditions such as stroke and dystonia. Altogether, non-invasive cerebellar stimulation can potentially become a game changer for the management of conditions that affect the cerebellum given the scarcity of current effective therapeutic options. In this brief manuscript, some of the current evidence demonstrating the effects of cerebellar stimulation to modulate motor behaviour and its use to assess physiological processes underlying motor learning are presented. PMID:25283180

  2. Modeling the Generation of Output by the Cerebellar Nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Steuber, Volker; Jaeger, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    Functional aspects of network integration in the cerebellar cortex have been studied experimentally and modeled in much detail ever since the early work by theoreticians such as Marr, Albus and Braitenberg more than 40 years ago. In contrast, much less is known about cerebellar processing at the output stage, namely in the cerebellar nuclei (CN). Here, input from Purkinje cells converges to control CN neuron spiking via GABAergic inhibition, before the output from the CN reaches cerebellar targets such as the brainstem and the motor thalamus. In this article we review modeling studies that address how the CN may integrate cerebellar cortical inputs, and what kind of signals may be transmitted. Specific hypotheses in the literature contrast rate coding and temporal coding of information in the spiking output from the CN. One popular hypothesis states that postinhibitory rebound spiking may be an important mechanism by which Purkinje cell inhibition is turned into CN output spiking, but this hypothesis remains controversial. Rate coding clearly does take place, but in what way it may be augmented by temporal codes remains to be more clearly established. Several candidate mechanisms distinct from rebound spiking are discussed, such as the significance of spike time correlations between Purkinje cell pools to determine CN spike timing, irregularity of Purkinje cell spiking as a determinant of CN firing rate, and shared brief pauses between Purkinje cell pools that may trigger individual CN spikes precisely. PMID:23200193

  3. Modelling the electric field and the current density generated by cerebellar transcranial DC stimulation in humans.

    PubMed

    Parazzini, Marta; Rossi, Elena; Ferrucci, Roberta; Liorni, Ilaria; Priori, Alberto; Ravazzani, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) over the cerebellum (or cerebellar tDCS) modulates working memory, changes cerebello-brain interaction, and affects locomotion in humans. Also, the use of tDCS has been proposed for the treatment of disorders characterized by cerebellar dysfunction. Nonetheless, the electric field (E) and current density (J) spatial distributions generated by cerebellar tDCS are unknown. This work aimed to estimate E and J distributions during cerebellar tDCS. Computational electromagnetics techniques were applied in three human realistic models of different ages and gender. The stronger E and J occurred mainly in the cerebellar cortex, with some spread (up to 4%) toward the occipital cortex. Also, changes by ±1cm in the position of the active electrode resulted in a small effect (up to 4%) in the E and J spatial distribution in the cerebellum. Finally, the E and J spreads to the brainstem and the heart were negligible, thus further supporting the safety of this technique. Despite inter-individual differences, our modeling study confirms that the cerebellum is the structure mainly involved by cerebellar tDCS. Modeling approach reveals that during cerebellar tDCS the current spread to other structures outside the cerebellum is unlike to produce functional effects. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Intra-cerebellar infusion of the protein kinase Mzeta (PKMζ) inhibitor ZIP disrupts eyeblink classical conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Chihabi, Kutibh; Morielli, Anthony D.; Green, John T.

    2016-01-01

    PKM-ζ, a constitutively active N-terminal truncated form of PKC-ζ, has long been implicated in a cellular correlate of learning, long-term potentiation (LTP). Inhibition of PKM-ζ with Zeta-inhibitory peptide (ZIP) has been shown in many brain structures to disrupt maintenance of AMPA receptors, irreversibly disrupting numerous forms of learning and memory that have been maintained for weeks. Delay eyeblink conditioning (EBC) is an established model for the assessment of cerebellar learning; here, we show that PKC-ζ and PKM-ζ are highly expressed in the cerebellar cortex, with highest expression found in Purkinje cell (PC) nuclei. Despite being highly expressed in the cerebellar cortex, no studies have examined how regulation of cerebellar PKM-ζ may affect cerebellar-dependent learning and memory. Given its disruption of learning in other brain structures, we hypothesized that ZIP would also disrupt delay EBC. We have shown that infusion of ZIP into the lobulus simplex of the rat cerebellar cortex can indeed significantly disrupt delay EBC. PMID:26949968

  5. Is the parvocellular red nucleus involved in cerebellar motor learning?

    PubMed

    Reid, E K; Norris, S A; Taylor, J A; Hathaway, E N; Smith, A J; Yttri, E A; Thach, W T

    2009-01-01

    The anatomical connections of the parvocellular red nucleus (RNp) have led to the suggestion that it might participate along with the cerebellum in modifying old and developing new programs for the control of complex, compound, coordinated movements of multiple body parts. RNp projects to and excites the inferior olivary nuclear neurons, which send climbing fibers to excite neurons in contralateral cerebellar cortex and nuclei. RNp receives excitatory inputs from ipsilateral cerebral cortex (onto distal dendrites) and from contralateral cerebellar nuclei (onto proximal dendrites). We here further develop a hypothesis as to mechanism, and offer preliminary evidence from RNp inactivation studies in awake, trained macaques during modification of their gaze-reach calibration while wearing wedge prism spectacles.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia (LCH) affects brain development, resulting in the brain ...

  7. Localization of the Cerebellar Cortical Zone Mediating Acquisition of Eyeblink Conditioning in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, Adam B.; Freeman, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Delay eyeblink conditioning is established by paired presentations of a conditioned stimulus (CS) such as a tone or light and an unconditioned stimulus (US) that elicits eyelid closure before training. The CS and US inputs converge on Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex. The cerebellar cortex plays a substantial role in acquisition of delay eyeblink conditioning in rabbits and rodents, but the specific area of the cortex that is necessary for acquisition in rodents has not been identified. A recent study identified an eyeblink microzone in the mouse cerebellar cortex at the base of the primary fissure (Heiney, Kim, Augustine, & Medina, 2014). There is no evidence that the cortex in this eyeblink microzone plays a role in rodent eyeblink conditioning but it is a good candidate region. Experiment 1 examined the effects of unilateral (ipsilateral to the US) lesions of lobule HVI, the lateral anterior lobe, or the base of the primary fissure on eyeblink conditioning in rats. Lesions of either the anterior lobe or lobule HVI impaired acquisition, but lesions of the base of the primary fissure produced the largest deficit. Experiment 2 used reversible inactivation with muscimol to demonstrate that inactivation of the putative eyeblink microzone severely impaired acquisition and had only a modest effect on retention of eyeblink conditioning. The findings indicate that the base of the primary fissure is the critical zone of the cerebellar cortex for acquisition of eyeblink conditioning in rats. PMID:24931828

  8. A Developmental Study of the Cerebellar Nucleus in the Catshark, a Basal Gnathostome.

    PubMed

    Pose-Méndez, Sol; Rodríguez-Moldes, Isabel; Candal, Eva; Mazan, Sylvie; Anadón, Ramón

    2017-01-01

    The output of the cerebellar cortex is mainly released via cerebellar nuclei which vary in number and complexity among gnathostomes, extant vertebrates with a cerebellum. Cartilaginous fishes, a basal gnathostome lineage, show a conspicuous, well-organized cerebellar nucleus, unlike ray-finned fishes. To gain insight into the evolution and development of the cerebellar nucleus, we analyzed in the shark Scyliorhinus canicula (a chondrichthyan model species) the developmental expression of several genes coding for transcription factors (ScLhx5,ScLhx9,ScTbr1, and ScEn2) and the distribution of the protein calbindin, since all appear to be involved in cerebellar nuclei patterning in other gnathostomes. Three regions (subventricular, medial or central, and lateral or superficial) became recognizable in the cerebellar nucleus of this shark during development. Present genoarchitectonic and neurochemical data in embryos provide insight into the origin of the cerebellar nucleus in chondrichthyans and support a tripartite mediolateral organization of the cerebellar nucleus, as previously described in adult sharks. Furthermore, the expression pattern of ScLhx5,ScLhx9, and ScTbr1 in this shark, together with that of markers of proliferation, migration, and early differentiation of neurons, is compatible with the hypothesis that, as in mammals, different subsets of cerebellar nucleus neurons are originated from progenitors of 2 different sources: the ventricular zone of the cerebellar plate and the rhombic lip. We also present suggestive evidence that Lhx9 expression is involved in cerebellar nuclei patterning early on in gnathostome evolution, rather than representing an evolutionary innovation of the dentate nucleus in mammals, as previously hypothesized.

  9. Coordinated scaling of cortical and cerebellar numbers of neurons.

    PubMed

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2010-01-01

    While larger brains possess concertedly larger cerebral cortices and cerebella, the relative size of the cerebral cortex increases with brain size, but relative cerebellar size does not. In the absence of data on numbers of neurons in these structures, this discrepancy has been used to dispute the hypothesis that the cerebral cortex and cerebellum function and have evolved in concert and to support a trend towards neocorticalization in evolution. However, the rationale for interpreting changes in absolute and relative size of the cerebral cortex and cerebellum relies on the assumption that they reflect absolute and relative numbers of neurons in these structures across all species - an assumption that our recent studies have shown to be flawed. Here I show for the first time that the numbers of neurons in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum are directly correlated across 19 mammalian species of four different orders, including humans, and increase concertedly in a similar fashion both within and across the orders Eulipotyphla (Insectivora), Rodentia, Scandentia and Primata, such that on average a ratio of 3.6 neurons in the cerebellum to every neuron in the cerebral cortex is maintained across species. This coordinated scaling of cortical and cerebellar numbers of neurons provides direct evidence in favor of concerted function, scaling and evolution of these brain structures, and suggests that the common notion that equates cognitive advancement with neocortical expansion should be revisited to consider in its stead the coordinated scaling of neocortex and cerebellum as a functional ensemble.

  10. Coordinated Scaling of Cortical and Cerebellar Numbers of Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2010-01-01

    While larger brains possess concertedly larger cerebral cortices and cerebella, the relative size of the cerebral cortex increases with brain size, but relative cerebellar size does not. In the absence of data on numbers of neurons in these structures, this discrepancy has been used to dispute the hypothesis that the cerebral cortex and cerebellum function and have evolved in concert and to support a trend towards neocorticalization in evolution. However, the rationale for interpreting changes in absolute and relative size of the cerebral cortex and cerebellum relies on the assumption that they reflect absolute and relative numbers of neurons in these structures across all species – an assumption that our recent studies have shown to be flawed. Here I show for the first time that the numbers of neurons in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum are directly correlated across 19 mammalian species of four different orders, including humans, and increase concertedly in a similar fashion both within and across the orders Eulipotyphla (Insectivora), Rodentia, Scandentia and Primata, such that on average a ratio of 3.6 neurons in the cerebellum to every neuron in the cerebral cortex is maintained across species. This coordinated scaling of cortical and cerebellar numbers of neurons provides direct evidence in favor of concerted function, scaling and evolution of these brain structures, and suggests that the common notion that equates cognitive advancement with neocortical expansion should be revisited to consider in its stead the coordinated scaling of neocortex and cerebellum as a functional ensemble. PMID:20300467

  11. Cerebellar agenesis revisited.

    PubMed

    Boyd, C A R

    2010-03-01

    New clinical and employment information, together with over-looked previously published information, on a patient (H.C.) is reviewed. H.C., who died at the age of 76 in 1939, was found, by chance during anatomical dissection, to lack a cerebellum. This synthesis challenges an unusual and interesting account of cerebellar agenesis published in Brain in 1994 by Glickstein (see also Glickstein, 2006), in which the allegedly 'bogus' oral history of this individual's motor skills was held to have led to 'medical myth making'. Part of the burden of the 1994 paper was to show that 'cerebellar agenesis is always associated with profound motor deficits'. Glickstein therefore focussed on an apparent 'exception' to this conclusion, concerning the brain of a single case, H.C., who died 70 years ago, who 'had given rise to an oral tradition alleging that normal movement is possible despite total cerebellar agenesis'. Glickstein (1994) concludes 'despite an oral tradition to the contrary there is absolutely no evidence about the motor capacities of this man during his life'. Rather remarkably, an extensive history of this individual has become available, its significance becoming noted only this year; this complements and adds to a previous brief history published on H.C. (and not mentioned in the 1994 paper; see below). The new evidence includes the death certificate stating the man's occupation to have been 'manual labourer' with all the implications relevant to his supposed incapacity. The written historical record thus confronts the alleged 'myth'. It is interesting to note how medical records on an undoubtedly very ordinary citizen were recorded in London in the 1930s (before the NHS was set up in 1949) and how they could be made accessible to clinical colleagues in east London in the middle of World War II blitz bombing of the capital.

  12. Neurotransplantation therapy and cerebellar reserve.

    PubMed

    Cendelin, Jan; Mitoma, Hiroshi; Manto, Mario

    2017-08-10

    Neurotransplantation has been recently the focus of interest as a promising therapy to substitute lost cerebellar neurons and improve cerebellar ataxias. However, since cell differentiation and synaptic formation are required to obtain a functional circuitry, highly integrated reproduction of cerebellar anatomy is not a simple process. Rather than a genuine replacement, recent studies have shown that grafted cells rescue surviving cells from neurodegeneration by exerting trophic effects, supporting mitochondrial function, modulating neuroinflammation, stimulating endogenous regenerative processes, and facilitating cerebellar compensatory properties thanks to neural plasticity. On the other hand, accumulating clinical evidence suggests that the self-recovery capacity is still preserved even if the cerebellum is affected by a diffuse and progressive pathology. We put forward the period with intact recovery capacity as "restorable stage" and the notion of reversal capacity as "cerebellar reserve". The concept of cerebellar reserve is particularly relevant, both theoretically and practically, to target recovery of cerebellar deficits by neurotransplantation. Reinforcing the cerebellar reserve and prolonging the restorable stage can be envisioned as future endpoints of neurotransplantation. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Childhood Cerebellar Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Brent L.

    2012-01-01

    Childhood presentations of ataxia, an impairment of balance and coordination caused by damage to or dysfunction of the cerebellum, can often be challenging to diagnose. Presentations tend to be clinically heterogeneous but key considerations may vary based on the child's age at onset, the course of illness, and subtle differences in phenotype. Systematic investigation is recommended for efficient diagnosis. In this review, we outline common etiologies and describe a comprehensive approach to the evaluation of both acquired and genetic cerebellar ataxia in children. PMID:22764177

  14. A case of cerebellar psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Rosinski, Amy; Goldman, Mona; Cameron, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Pathology of the cerebellum has traditionally been associated with motor symptoms, vertigo, and nystagmus. Patients with cerebellar disorders do not usually receive psychiatric evaluations. The authors seek to alert clinicians to the association between cerebellar disease and psychiatric symptoms. The authors describe a patient with uncommon psychiatric morbidity associated with cerebellar dysfunction, and provide a brief review of previous research on this phenomenon. Neurology consultants suggested that physical exam findings and behavioral changes could be accounted for by cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome. This syndrome involves dysfunction of the cerebellum, including classic cerebellar findings, in addition to cognitive difficulties and affective/personality changes. The suspected etiology was post-infectious cerebellitis from Epstein-Barr virus infection.

  15. Cerebellar Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: The Role of Coil Geometry and Tissue Depth☆

    PubMed Central

    Hardwick, Robert M.; Lesage, Elise; Miall, R. Chris

    2014-01-01

    Background While transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) coil geometry has important effects on the evoked magnetic field, no study has systematically examined how different coil designs affect the effectiveness of cerebellar stimulation. Hypothesis The depth of the cerebellar targets will limit efficiency. Angled coils designed to stimulate deeper tissue are more effective in eliciting cerebellar stimulation. Methods Experiment 1 examined basic input–output properties of the figure-of-eight, batwing and double-cone coils, assessed with stimulation of motor cortex. Experiment 2 assessed the ability of each coil to activate cerebellum, using cerebellar-brain inhibition (CBI). Experiment 3 mapped distances from the scalp to cerebellar and motor cortical targets in a sample of 100 subjects' structural magnetic resonance images. Results Experiment 1 showed batwing and double-cone coils have significantly lower resting motor thresholds, and recruitment curves with steeper slopes than the figure-of-eight coil. Experiment 2 showed the double-cone coil was the most efficient for eliciting CBI. The batwing coil induced CBI only at higher stimulus intensities. The figure-of-eight coil did not elicit reliable CBI. Experiment 3 confirmed that cerebellar tissue is significantly deeper than primary motor cortex tissue, and we provide a map of scalp-to-target distances. Conclusions The double-cone and batwing coils designed to stimulate deeper tissue can effectively stimulate cerebellar targets. The double-cone coil was found to be most effective. The depth map provides a guide to the accessible regions of the cerebellar volume. These results can guide coil selection and stimulation parameters when designing cerebellar TMS studies. PMID:24924734

  16. Cerebellar transcranial magnetic stimulation: the role of coil geometry and tissue depth.

    PubMed

    Hardwick, Robert M; Lesage, Elise; Miall, R Chris

    2014-01-01

    While transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) coil geometry has important effects on the evoked magnetic field, no study has systematically examined how different coil designs affect the effectiveness of cerebellar stimulation. The depth of the cerebellar targets will limit efficiency. Angled coils designed to stimulate deeper tissue are more effective in eliciting cerebellar stimulation. Experiment 1 examined basic input-output properties of the figure-of-eight, batwing and double-cone coils, assessed with stimulation of motor cortex. Experiment 2 assessed the ability of each coil to activate cerebellum, using cerebellar-brain inhibition (CBI). Experiment 3 mapped distances from the scalp to cerebellar and motor cortical targets in a sample of 100 subjects' structural magnetic resonance images. Experiment 1 showed batwing and double-cone coils have significantly lower resting motor thresholds, and recruitment curves with steeper slopes than the figure-of-eight coil. Experiment 2 showed the double-cone coil was the most efficient for eliciting CBI. The batwing coil induced CBI only at higher stimulus intensities. The figure-of-eight coil did not elicit reliable CBI. Experiment 3 confirmed that cerebellar tissue is significantly deeper than primary motor cortex tissue, and we provide a map of scalp-to-target distances. The double-cone and batwing coils designed to stimulate deeper tissue can effectively stimulate cerebellar targets. The double-cone coil was found to be most effective. The depth map provides a guide to the accessible regions of the cerebellar volume. These results can guide coil selection and stimulation parameters when designing cerebellar TMS studies. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Long lasting cerebellar alterations after perinatal asphyxia in rats.

    PubMed

    Campanille, Verónica; Saraceno, G Ezequiel; Rivière, Stéphanie; Logica, Tamara; Kölliker, Rodolfo; Capani, Francisco; Castilla, Rocío

    2015-07-01

    The developing brain may be particularly vulnerable to injury before, at and after birth. Among possible insults, hypoxia suffered as a consequence of perinatal asphyxia (PA) exhibits the highest incidence levels and the cerebellar circuitry appears to be particularly susceptible, as the cellular makeup and the quantity of inputs change quickly during days and weeks following birth. In this work, we have used a murine model to induce severe global PA in rats at the time of birth. Short-term cerebellar alterations within this PA model have been previously reported but whether such alterations remain in adulthood has not been conclusively determined yet. For this reason, and given the crucial cerebellar role in determining connectivity patterns in the brain, the aim of our work is to unveil long-term cerebellum histomorphology following a PA insult. Morphological and cytological neuronal changes and glial reaction in the cerebellar cortex were analyzed at postnatal 120 (P120) following injury performed at birth. As compared to control, PA animals exhibited: (1) an increase in molecular and granular thickness, both presenting lower cellular density; (2) a disarrayed Purkinje cell layer presenting a higher number of anomalous calbindin-stained cells. (3) focal swelling and marked fragmentation of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2) in Purkinje cell dendrites and, (4) an increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in Bergmann cells and the granular layer. In conclusion, we demonstrate that PA produces long-term damage in cellular histomorphology in rat cerebellar cortex which could be involved in the pathogenesis of cognitive deficits observed in both animals and humans.

  18. Crossed Cerebellar Diaschisis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shuguang; Wang, Xiaopeng; Xu, Kai; Hu, Chunfeng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) describes a depression of oxidative metabolism glucose and blood flow in the cerebellum secondary to a supratentorial lesion in the contralateral cerebral hemisphere. PET/MR has the potential to become a powerful tool for demonstrating and imaging intracranial lesions .We herein report 3 cases of CCD imaging using a tri-modality PET/CT–MR set-up for investigating the value of adding MRI rather than CT to PET in clinical routine. We describe 3 patients with CCD and neurological symptoms in conjunction with abnormal cerebral fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography-magnetic resonance imaging (PET/CT–MR) manifestations including arterial spin-labeling (ASL) and T2-weighted images. In all, 18FDG-PET/CT detected positive FDG uptake in supratentorial lesions, and hypometabolism with atrophy in the contralateral cerebellum. More than that, hybrid PET/MRI provided a more accurate anatomic localization and ASL indicated disruption of the cortico-ponto-cerebellar pathway. Using pathology or long-term clinical follow-up to confirm the PET and ASL findings, the supratentorial lesions of the 3 patients were respectively diagnosed with cerebral infarction, recurrent glioma, and metastasis. The reports emphasize the significance of multimodality radiological examinations. Multimodality imaging contributes to proper diagnosis, management, and follow-up of supratentorial lesions with CCD. PMID:26765477

  19. A Multiple-Plasticity Spiking Neural Network Embedded in a Closed-Loop Control System to Model Cerebellar Pathologies.

    PubMed

    Geminiani, Alice; Casellato, Claudia; Antonietti, Alberto; D'Angelo, Egidio; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2017-01-10

    The cerebellum plays a crucial role in sensorimotor control and cerebellar disorders compromise adaptation and learning of motor responses. However, the link between alterations at network level and cerebellar dysfunction is still unclear. In principle, this understanding would benefit of the development of an artificial system embedding the salient neuronal and plastic properties of the cerebellum and operating in closed-loop. To this aim, we have exploited a realistic spiking computational model of the cerebellum to analyze the network correlates of cerebellar impairment. The model was modified to reproduce three different damages of the cerebellar cortex: (i) a loss of the main output neurons (Purkinje Cells), (ii) a lesion to the main cerebellar afferents (Mossy Fibers), and (iii) a damage to a major mechanism of synaptic plasticity (Long Term Depression). The modified network models were challenged with an Eye-Blink Classical Conditioning test, a standard learning paradigm used to evaluate cerebellar impairment, in which the outcome was compared to reference results obtained in human or animal experiments. In all cases, the model reproduced the partial and delayed conditioning typical of the pathologies, indicating that an intact cerebellar cortex functionality is required to accelerate learning by transferring acquired information to the cerebellar nuclei. Interestingly, depending on the type of lesion, the redistribution of synaptic plasticity and response timing varied greatly generating specific adaptation patterns. Thus, not only the present work extends the generalization capabilities of the cerebellar spiking model to pathological cases, but also predicts how changes at the neuronal level are distributed across the network, making it usable to infer cerebellar circuit alterations occurring in cerebellar pathologies.

  20. Translational Approach to Behavioral Learning: Lessons from Cerebellar Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Cheron, Guy; Dan, Bernard; Márquez-Ruiz, Javier

    2013-01-01

    The role of cerebellar plasticity has been increasingly recognized in learning. The privileged relationship between the cerebellum and the inferior olive offers an ideal circuit for attempting to integrate the numerous evidences of neuronal plasticity into a translational perspective. The high learning capacity of the Purkinje cells specifically controlled by the climbing fiber represents a major element within the feed-forward and feedback loops of the cerebellar cortex. Reciprocally connected with the basal ganglia and multimodal cerebral domains, this cerebellar network may realize fundamental functions in a wide range of behaviors. This review will outline the current understanding of three main experimental paradigms largely used for revealing cerebellar functions in behavioral learning: (1) the vestibuloocular reflex and smooth pursuit control, (2) the eyeblink conditioning, and (3) the sensory envelope plasticity. For each of these experimental conditions, we have critically revisited the chain of causalities linking together neural circuits, neural signals, and plasticity mechanisms, giving preference to behaving or alert animal physiology. Namely, recent experimental approaches mixing neural units and local field potentials recordings have demonstrated a spike timing dependent plasticity by which the cerebellum remains at a strategic crossroad for deciphering fundamental and translational mechanisms from cellular to network levels. PMID:24319600

  1. Early Cerebellar Network Shifting in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6.

    PubMed

    Falcon, M I; Gomez, C M; Chen, E E; Shereen, A; Solodkin, A

    2016-07-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 6 (SCA6), an autosomal dominant degenerative disease, is characterized by diplopia, gait ataxia, and incoordination due to severe progressive degeneration of Purkinje cells in the vestibulo- and spinocerebellum. Ocular motor deficits are common, including difficulty fixating on moving objects, nystagmus and disruption of smooth pursuit movements. In presymptomatic SCA6, there are alterations in saccades and smooth-pursuit movements. We sought to assess functional and structural changes in cerebellar connectivity associated with a visual task, hypothesizing that gradual changes would parallel disease progression. We acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging data during a passive smooth-pursuit task in 14 SCA6 patients, representing a range of disease duration and severity, and performed a cross-sectional comparison of cerebellar networks compared with healthy controls. We identified a shift in activation from vermis in presymptomatic individuals to lateral cerebellum in moderate-to-severe cases. Concomitantly, effective connectivity between regions of cerebral cortex and cerebellum was at its highest in moderate cases, and disappeared in severe cases. Finally, we noted structural differences in the cerebral and cerebellar peduncles. These unique results, spanning both functional and structural domains, highlight widespread changes in SCA6 and compensatory mechanisms associated with cerebellar physiology that could be utilized in developing new therapies.

  2. Cerebellar rTMS disrupts predictive language processing

    PubMed Central

    Lesage, Elise; Morgan, Blaire E.; Olson, Andrew C.; Meyer, Antje S.; Miall, R. Chris

    2012-01-01

    Summary The human cerebellum plays an important role in language, amongst other cognitive and motor functions [1], but a unifying theoretical framework about cerebellar language function is lacking. In an established model of motor control, the cerebellum is seen as a predictive machine, making short-term estimations about the outcome of motor commands. This allows for flexible control, on-line correction, and coordination of movements [2]. The homogeneous cytoarchitecture of the cerebellar cortex suggests that similar computations occur throughout the structure, operating on different input signals and with different output targets [3]. Several authors have therefore argued that this ‘motor’ model may extend to cerebellar nonmotor functions [3–5], and that the cerebellum may support prediction in language processing [6]. However, this hypothesis has never been directly tested. Here, we used the ‘Visual World’ paradigm [7], where on-line processing of spoken sentence content can be assessed by recording the latencies of listeners' eye movements towards objects mentioned. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) was used to disrupt function in the right cerebellum, a region implicated in language [8]. After cerebellar rTMS, listeners showed delayed eye fixations to target objects predicted by sentence content, while there was no effect on eye fixations in sentences without predictable content. The prediction deficit was absent in two control groups. Our findings support the hypothesis that computational operations performed by the cerebellum may support prediction during both motor control and language processing. PMID:23017990

  3. Cortical networks of procedural learning: evidence from cerebellar damage.

    PubMed

    Torriero, Sara; Oliveri, Massimiliano; Koch, Giacomo; Lo Gerfo, Emanuele; Salerno, Silvia; Petrosini, Laura; Caltagirone, Carlo

    2007-03-25

    The lateral cerebellum plays a critical role in procedural learning that goes beyond the strict motor control functions attributed to it. Patients with cerebellar damage show marked impairment in the acquisition of procedures, as revealed by their performance on the serial reaction time task (SRTT). Here we present the case of a patient affected by ischemic damage involving the left cerebellum who showed a selective deficit in procedural learning while performing the SRTT with the left hand. The deficit recovered when the cortical excitability of an extensive network involving both cerebellar hemispheres and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) was decreased by low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). Although inhibition of the right DLPFC or a control fronto-parietal region did not modify the patient's performance, inhibition of the right (unaffected) cerebellum and the left DLPFC markedly improved task performance. These findings could be explained by the modulation of a set of inhibitory and excitatory connections between the lateral cerebellum and the contralateral prefrontal area induced by rTMS. The presence of left cerebellar damage is likely associated with a reduced excitatory drive from sub-cortical left cerebellar nuclei towards the right DLPFC, causing reduced excitability of the right DLPFC and, conversely, unbalanced activation of the left DLPFC. Inhibition of the left DLPFC would reduce the unbalancing of cortical activation, thus explaining the observed selective recovery of procedural memory.

  4. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Palau, Francesc; Espinós, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCA) are a heterogeneous group of rare neurological disorders involving both central and peripheral nervous system, and in some case other systems and organs, and characterized by degeneration or abnormal development of cerebellum and spinal cord, autosomal recessive inheritance and, in most cases, early onset occurring before the age of 20 years. This group encompasses a large number of rare diseases, the most frequent in Caucasian population being Friedreich ataxia (estimated prevalence 2–4/100,000), ataxia-telangiectasia (1–2.5/100,000) and early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes (1/100,000). Other forms ARCA are much less common. Based on clinicogenetic criteria, five main types ARCA can be distinguished: congenital ataxias (developmental disorder), ataxias associated with metabolic disorders, ataxias with a DNA repair defect, degenerative ataxias, and ataxia associated with other features. These diseases are due to mutations in specific genes, some of which have been identified, such as frataxin in Friedreich ataxia, α-tocopherol transfer protein in ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED), aprataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA1), and senataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA2). Clinical diagnosis is confirmed by ancillary tests such as neuroimaging (magnetic resonance imaging, scanning), electrophysiological examination, and mutation analysis when the causative gene is identified. Correct clinical and genetic diagnosis is important for appropriate genetic counseling and prognosis and, in some instances, pharmacological treatment. Due to autosomal recessive inheritance, previous familial history of affected individuals is unlikely. For most ARCA there is no specific drug treatment except for coenzyme Q10 deficiency and abetalipoproteinemia. PMID:17112370

  5. Homolateral ataxia and crural paresis: a crossed cerebral-cerebellar diaschisis.

    PubMed Central

    Giroud, M; Creisson, E; Fayolle, H; Gras, P; Vion, P; Brunotte, F; Dumas, R

    1994-01-01

    A patient developed weakness of the right leg and homolateral ataxia of the arm, caused by a subcortical infarct in the area supplied by the anterior cerebral artery in the left paracentral region, demonstrated by CT and MRI. Cerebral blood flow studied by technetium-labelled hexamethyl-propylene-amine oxime using single photon emission computed tomography showed decreased blood flow in the left lateral frontal cortex and in the right cerebellar hemisphere ("crossed cerebral-cerebellar diaschisis"). The homolateral ataxia of the arm may be caused by decreased function of the right cerebellar hemisphere, because of a lesion of the corticopontine-cerebellar tracts, whereas crural hemiparesis is caused by a lesion of the upper part of the corona radiata. Images PMID:8126511

  6. Changes in cerebro-cerebellar interaction during response inhibition after performance improvement.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Satoshi; Jimura, Koji; Kunimatsu, Akira; Abe, Osamu; Ohtomo, Kuni; Miyashita, Yasushi; Konishi, Seiki

    2014-10-01

    It has been demonstrated that motor learning is supported by the cerebellum and the cerebro-cerebellar interaction. Response inhibition involves motor responses and the higher-order inhibition that controls the motor responses. In this functional MRI study, we measured the cerebro-cerebellar interaction during response inhibition in two separate days of task performance, and detected the changes in the interaction following performance improvement. Behaviorally, performance improved in the second day, compared to the first day. The psycho-physiological interaction (PPI) analysis revealed the interaction decrease from the right inferior frontal cortex (rIFC) to the cerebellum (lobule VII or VI). It was also revealed that the interaction increased from the same cerebellar region to the primary motor area. These results suggest the involvement of the cerebellum in response inhibition, and raise the possibility that the performance improvement was supported by the changes in the cerebro-cerebellar interaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cadherins in cerebellar development: translation of embryonic patterning into mature functional compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Redies, Christoph; Neudert, Franziska; Lin, Juntang

    2011-09-01

    Cadherins are cell adhesion molecules with multiple morphogenic functions in brain development, for example, in neuroblast migration and aggregation, axon navigation, neural circuit formation, and synaptogenesis. More than 100 members of the cadherin superfamily are expressed in the developing and mature brain. Most of the cadherins investigated, in particular classic cadherins and δ-protocadherins, are expressed in the cerebellum. For several cadherin subtypes, expression begins at early embryonic stages and persists until mature stages of cerebellar development. At intermediate stages, distinct Purkinje cell clusters exhibit unique rostrocaudal and mediolateral expression profiles for each cadherin. In the chicken, mouse, and other species, the Purkinje cell clusters are separated by intervening raphes of migrating granule cells. This pattern of Purkinje cell clusters/raphes is, at least in part, continuous with the parasagittal striping pattern that is apparent in the mature cerebellar cortex, for example, for zebrin II/aldolase C. Moreover, subregions of the deep cerebellar nuclei, vestibular nuclei and the olivary complex also express cadherins differentially. Neuroanatomical evidence suggests that the nuclear subregions and cortical domains that express the same cadherin subtype are connected to each other, to form neural subcircuits of the cerebellar system. Cadherins thus provide a molecular code that specifies not only embryonic structures but also functional cerebellar compartmentalization. By following the implementation of this code, it can be revealed how mature functional architecture emerges from embryonic patterning during cerebellar development. Dysfunction of some cadherins is associated with psychiatric diseases and developmental impairments and may also affect cerebellar function.

  8. Dissociation of locomotor and cerebellar deficits in a murine Angelman syndrome model

    PubMed Central

    Bruinsma, Caroline F.; Schonewille, Martijn; Gao, Zhenyu; Aronica, Eleonora M.A.; Judson, Matthew C.; Philpot, Benjamin D.; Hoebeek, Freek E.; van Woerden, Geeske M.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Elgersma, Ype

    2015-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a severe neurological disorder that is associated with prominent movement and balance impairments that are widely considered to be due to defects of cerebellar origin. Here, using the cerebellar-specific vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) paradigm, we determined that cerebellar function is only mildly impaired in the Ube3am–/p+ mouse model of AS. VOR phase-reversal learning was singularly impaired in these animals and correlated with reduced tonic inhibition between Golgi cells and granule cells. Purkinje cell physiology, in contrast, was normal in AS mice as shown by synaptic plasticity and spontaneous firing properties that resembled those of controls. Accordingly, neither VOR phase-reversal learning nor locomotion was impaired following selective deletion of Ube3a in Purkinje cells. However, genetic normalization of αCaMKII inhibitory phosphorylation fully rescued locomotor deficits despite failing to improve cerebellar learning in AS mice, suggesting extracerebellar circuit involvement in locomotor learning. We confirmed this hypothesis through cerebellum-specific reinstatement of Ube3a, which ameliorated cerebellar learning deficits but did not rescue locomotor deficits. This double dissociation of locomotion and cerebellar phenotypes strongly suggests that the locomotor deficits of AS mice do not arise from impaired cerebellar cortex function. Our results provide important insights into the etiology of the motor deficits associated with AS. PMID:26485287

  9. Development of cerebellar connectivity in human fetal brains revealed by high angular resolution diffusion tractography.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Emi; Hayashi, Emiko; Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Grant, P Ellen

    2014-08-01

    High angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) tractography has provided insights into major white matter pathways and cortical development in the human fetal cerebrum. Our objective in this study was to further apply HARDI tracography to the developing human cerebellum ranging from fetal to adult stages, to outline in broad strokes the 3-dimensional development of white matter and local gray matter organization in the cerebellum. We imaged intact fixed fetal cerebellum specimens at 17 gestational weeks (W), 21W, 31W, 36W, and 38W along with an adult cerebellum for comparison. At the earliest gestational age studied (17W), coherent pathways that formed the superior, middle, and inferior cerebellar peduncles were already detected, but pathways between deep cerebellar nuclei and the cortex were not observed until after 38W. At 36-38W, we identified emerging regional specification of the middle cerebellar peduncle. In the cerebellar cortex, we observed disappearance of radial organization in the sagittal orientation during the studied developmental stages similar to our previous observations in developing cerebral cortex. In contrast, in the axial orientation, cerebellar cortical pathways emerged first sparsely (31W) and then with increased prominence at 36-38W with pathways detected both in the radial and tangential directions to the cortical surface. The cerebellar vermis first contained only pathways tangential to the long axes of folia (17-21W), but pathways parallel to the long axes of folia emerged between 21 and 31W. Our results show the potential for HARDI tractography to image developing human cerebellar connectivity.

  10. Cerebellar Contribution to Context Processing in Extinction Learning and Recall.

    PubMed

    Chang, D-I; Lissek, S; Ernst, T M; Thürling, M; Uengoer, M; Tegenthoff, M; Ladd, M E; Timmann, D

    2015-12-01

    Whereas acquisition of new associations is considered largely independent of the context, context dependency is a hallmark of extinction of the learned associations. The hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex are known to be involved in context processing during extinction learning and recall. Although the cerebellum has known functional and anatomic connections to the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex, cerebellar contributions to context processing of extinction have rarely been studied. In the present study, we reanalyzed functional brain imaging data (fMRI) of previous work investigating context effects during extinction in a cognitive associative learning paradigm in 28 young and healthy subjects (Lissek et al. Neuroimage. 81:131-3, 2013). In that study, event-related fMRI analysis did not include the cerebellum. The 3 T fMRI dataset was reanalyzed using a spatial normalization method optimized for the cerebellum. Data of seven participants had to be excluded because the cerebellum had not been scanned in full. Cerebellar activation related to context change during extinction learning was most prominent in lobule Crus II bilaterally (p < 0.01, t > 2.53; partially corrected by predetermined cluster size). No significant cerebellar activations were observed related to context change during extinction retrieval. The posterolateral cerebellum appears to contribute to context-related processes during extinction learning, but not (or less) during extinction retrieval. The cerebellum may support context learning during extinction via its connections to the hippocampus. Alternatively, the cerebellum may support the shifting of attention to the context via its known connections to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Because the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) is critically involved in context-related processes during extinction retrieval, and there are no known connections between the cerebellum and the vmPFC, the cerebellum may be less important

  11. Speech prosody in cerebellar ataxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, Maureen

    The present study sought an acoustic signature for the speech disturbance recognized in cerebellar degeneration. Magnetic resonance imaging was used for a radiological rating of cerebellar involvement in six cerebellar ataxic dysarthric speakers. Acoustic measures of the [pap] syllables in contrastive prosodic conditions and of normal vs. brain-damaged patients were used to further our understanding both of the speech degeneration that accompanies cerebellar pathology and of speech motor control and movement in general. Pair-wise comparisons of the prosodic conditions within the normal group showed statistically significant differences for four prosodic contrasts. For three of the four contrasts analyzed, the normal speakers showed both longer durations and higher formant and fundamental frequency values in the more prominent first condition of the contrast. The acoustic measures of the normal prosodic contrast values were then used as a model to measure the degree of speech deterioration for individual cerebellar subjects. This estimate of speech deterioration as determined by individual differences between cerebellar and normal subjects' acoustic values of the four prosodic contrasts was used in correlation analyses with MRI ratings. Moderate correlations between speech deterioration and cerebellar atrophy were found in the measures of syllable duration and f0. A strong negative correlation was found for F1. Moreover, the normal model presented by these acoustic data allows for a description of the flexibility of task- oriented behavior in normal speech motor control. These data challenge spatio-temporal theory which explains movement as an artifact of time wherein longer durations predict more extreme movements and give further evidence for gestural internal dynamics of movement in which time emerges from articulatory events rather than dictating those events. This model provides a sensitive index of cerebellar pathology with quantitative acoustic

  12. Redistribution of crossed cerebellar diaschisis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.M.; Park, C.H.; Intenzo, C.M.; Bell, R.

    1989-04-01

    Crossed cerebellar diaschisis refers to a functional decrease in blood flow to the cerebellar hemisphere contralateral to the infarcted or ischemic cerebral hemisphere. This phenomenon can be depicted using PET as well as using SPECT. This condition, seen on early I-123 IMP brain scans, can show redistribution on the three hour delayed scan, presumably due to normal non-specific amine receptor sites of the affected cerebellum. One such case is reported.

  13. Control of a simulated arm using a novel combination of Cerebellar learning mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assad, C.; Hartmann, M.; Paulin, M. G.

    2001-01-01

    We present a model of cerebellar cortex that combines two types of learning: feedforward predicitve association based on local Hebbian-type learning between granule cell ascending branch and parallel fiber inputs, and reinforcement learning with feedback error correction based on climbing fiber activity.

  14. Control of a simulated arm using a novel combination of Cerebellar learning mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assad, C.; Hartmann, M.; Paulin, M. G.

    2001-01-01

    We present a model of cerebellar cortex that combines two types of learning: feedforward predicitve association based on local Hebbian-type learning between granule cell ascending branch and parallel fiber inputs, and reinforcement learning with feedback error correction based on climbing fiber activity.

  15. Cerebellar lobules and dentate nuclei mirror cortical force‐related‐BOLD responses: Beyond all (linear) expectations

    PubMed Central

    Pardini, Matteo; Samson, Rebecca S.; Friston, Karl J.; Toosy, Ahmed T.; D'Angelo, Egidio; Gandini Wheeler‐Kingshott, Claudia A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The relationship between the BOLD response and an applied force was quantified in the cerebellum using a power grip task. To investigate whether the cerebellum responds in an on/off way to motor demands or contributes to motor responses in a parametric fashion, similarly to the cortex, five grip force levels were investigated under visual feedback. Functional MRI data were acquired in 13 healthy volunteers and their responses were analyzed using a cerebellum‐optimized pipeline. This allowed us to evaluate, within the cerebellum, voxelwise linear and non‐linear associations between cerebellar activations and forces. We showed extensive non‐linear activations (with a parametric design), covering the anterior and posterior lobes of the cerebellum with a BOLD‐force relationship that is region‐dependent. Linear responses were mainly located in the anterior lobe, similarly to the cortex, where linear responses are localized in M1. Complex responses were localized in the posterior lobe, reflecting its key role in attention and executive processing, required during visually guided movement. Given the highly organized responses in the cerebellar cortex, a key question is whether deep cerebellar nuclei show similar parametric effects. We found positive correlations with force in the ipsilateral dentate nucleus and negative correlations on the contralateral side, suggesting a somatotopic organization of the dentate nucleus in line with cerebellar and cortical areas. Our results confirm that there is cerebellar organization involving all grey matter structures that reflect functional segregation in the cortex, where cerebellar lobules and dentate nuclei contribute to complex motor tasks with different BOLD response profiles in relation to the forces. Hum Brain Mapp 38:2566–2579, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:28240422

  16. Cerebellar lobules and dentate nuclei mirror cortical force-related-BOLD responses: Beyond all (linear) expectations.

    PubMed

    Alahmadi, Adnan A S; Pardini, Matteo; Samson, Rebecca S; Friston, Karl J; Toosy, Ahmed T; D'Angelo, Egidio; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M

    2017-02-27

    The relationship between the BOLD response and an applied force was quantified in the cerebellum using a power grip task. To investigate whether the cerebellum responds in an on/off way to motor demands or contributes to motor responses in a parametric fashion, similarly to the cortex, five grip force levels were investigated under visual feedback. Functional MRI data were acquired in 13 healthy volunteers and their responses were analyzed using a cerebellum-optimized pipeline. This allowed us to evaluate, within the cerebellum, voxelwise linear and non-linear associations between cerebellar activations and forces. We showed extensive non-linear activations (with a parametric design), covering the anterior and posterior lobes of the cerebellum with a BOLD-force relationship that is region-dependent. Linear responses were mainly located in the anterior lobe, similarly to the cortex, where linear responses are localized in M1. Complex responses were localized in the posterior lobe, reflecting its key role in attention and executive processing, required during visually guided movement. Given the highly organized responses in the cerebellar cortex, a key question is whether deep cerebellar nuclei show similar parametric effects. We found positive correlations with force in the ipsilateral dentate nucleus and negative correlations on the contralateral side, suggesting a somatotopic organization of the dentate nucleus in line with cerebellar and cortical areas. Our results confirm that there is cerebellar organization involving all grey matter structures that reflect functional segregation in the cortex, where cerebellar lobules and dentate nuclei contribute to complex motor tasks with different BOLD response profiles in relation to the forces. Hum Brain Mapp, 2017. © 2017 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Short latency cerebellar modulation of the basal ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Christopher H.; Fremont, Rachel; Arteaga-Bracho, Eduardo E.; Khodakhah, Kamran

    2014-01-01

    The graceful, purposeful motion of our body is an engineering feat which remains unparalleled in robotic devices using advanced artificial intelligence. Much of the information required for complex movements is generated by the cerebellum and the basal ganglia in conjunction with the cortex. Cerebellum and basal ganglia have been thought to communicate with each other only through slow multi-synaptic cortical loops, begging the question as to how they coordinate their outputs in real time. Here we show in mice that the cerebellum rapidly modulates the activity of the striatum via a disynaptic pathway. Under physiological conditions this short latency pathway is capable of facilitating optimal motor control by allowing the basal ganglia to incorporate time-sensitive cerebellar information and by guiding the sign of cortico-striatal plasticity. Conversely, under pathological condition this pathway relays aberrant cerebellar activity to the basal ganglia to cause dystonia. PMID:25402853

  18. Short latency cerebellar modulation of the basal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Christopher H; Fremont, Rachel; Arteaga-Bracho, Eduardo E; Khodakhah, Kamran

    2014-12-01

    The graceful, purposeful motion of our body is an engineering feat that remains unparalleled in robotic devices using advanced artificial intelligence. Much of the information required for complex movements is generated by the cerebellum and the basal ganglia in conjunction with the cortex. Cerebellum and basal ganglia have been thought to communicate with each other only through slow, multi-synaptic cortical loops, begging the question as to how they coordinate their outputs in real time. We found that the cerebellum rapidly modulates the activity of the striatum via a disynaptic pathway in mice. Under physiological conditions, this short latency pathway was capable of facilitating optimal motor control by allowing the basal ganglia to incorporate time-sensitive cerebellar information and by guiding the sign of cortico-striatal plasticity. Conversely, under pathological condition, this pathway relayed aberrant cerebellar activity to the basal ganglia to cause dystonia.

  19. Motor training compensates for cerebellar dysfunctions caused by oligodendrocyte ablation

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Ludovic; Usiello, Alessandro; Erbs, Eric; Mathis, Carole; Borrelli, Emiliana

    2004-01-01

    The role played by oligodendrocytes (OLs), the myelinating cells of the CNS, during brain development has not been fully explored. We have addressed this question by inducing a temporal and reversible ablation of OLs on postnatal CNS development. OL ablation in newborn mice leads to a profound alteration in the structure of the cerebellar cortex, which can be progressively rescued by newly generated cells, leading to a delayed myelination. Nevertheless, the temporal shift of the OL proliferation and myelinating program cannot completely compensate for developmental defects, resulting in impaired motor functions in the adult. Strikingly, we show that, despite these abnormalities, epigenetic factors, such as motor training, are able to fully rescue cerebellar-directed motor skills. PMID:14694200

  20. Cerebellar-M1 Connectivity Changes Associated with Motor Learning Are Somatotopic Specific.

    PubMed

    Spampinato, Danny A; Block, Hannah J; Celnik, Pablo A

    2017-03-01

    One of the functions of the cerebellum in motor learning is to predict and account for systematic changes to the body or environment. This form of adaptive learning is mediated by plastic changes occurring within the cerebellar cortex. The strength of cerebellar-to-cerebral pathways for a given muscle may reflect aspects of cerebellum-dependent motor adaptation. These connections with motor cortex (M1) can be estimated as cerebellar inhibition (CBI): a conditioning pulse of transcranial magnetic stimulation delivered to the cerebellum before a test pulse over motor cortex. Previously, we have demonstrated that changes in CBI for a given muscle representation correlate with learning a motor adaptation task with the involved limb. However, the specificity of these effects is unknown. Here, we investigated whether CBI changes in humans are somatotopy specific and how they relate to motor adaptation. We found that learning a visuomotor rotation task with the right hand changed CBI, not only for the involved first dorsal interosseous of the right hand, but also for an uninvolved right leg muscle, the tibialis anterior, likely related to inter-effector transfer of learning. In two follow-up experiments, we investigated whether the preparation of a simple hand or leg movement would produce a somatotopy-specific modulation of CBI. We found that CBI changes only for the effector involved in the movement. These results indicate that learning-related changes in cerebellar-M1 connectivity reflect a somatotopy-specific interaction. Modulation of this pathway is also present in the context of interlimb transfer of learning.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Connectivity between the cerebellum and motor cortex is a critical pathway for the integrity of everyday movements and understanding the somatotopic specificity of this pathway in the context of motor learning is critical to advancing the efficacy of neurorehabilitation. We found that adaptive learning with the hand affects cerebellar

  1. Functional Evidence for a Cerebellar Node of the Dorsal Attention Network.

    PubMed

    Brissenden, James A; Levin, Emily J; Osher, David E; Halko, Mark A; Somers, David C

    2016-06-01

    The "dorsal attention network" or "frontoparietal network" refers to a network of cortical regions that support sustained attention and working memory. Recent work has demonstrated that cortical nodes of the dorsal attention network possess intrinsic functional connections with a region in ventral cerebellum, in the vicinity of lobules VII/VIII. Here, we performed a series of task-based and resting-state fMRI experiments to investigate cerebellar participation in the dorsal attention network in humans. We observed that visual working memory and visual attention tasks robustly recruit cerebellar lobules VIIb and VIIIa, in addition to canonical cortical dorsal attention network regions. Across the cerebellum, resting-state functional connectivity with the cortical dorsal attention network strongly predicted the level of activation produced by attention and working memory tasks. Critically, cerebellar voxels that were most strongly connected with the dorsal attention network selectively exhibited load-dependent activity, a hallmark of the neural structures that support visual working memory. Finally, we examined intrinsic functional connectivity between task-responsive portions of cerebellar lobules VIIb/VIIIa and cortex. Cerebellum-to-cortex functional connectivity strongly predicted the pattern of cortical activation during task performance. Moreover, resting-state connectivity patterns revealed that cerebellar lobules VIIb/VIIIa group with cortical nodes of the dorsal attention network. This evidence leads us to conclude that the conceptualization of the dorsal attention network should be expanded to include cerebellar lobules VIIb/VIIIa. The functional participation of cerebellar structures in nonmotor cortical networks remains poorly understood and is highly understudied, despite the fact that the cerebellum possesses many more neurons than the cerebral cortex. Although visual attention paradigms have been reported to activate cerebellum, many researchers have

  2. Functional Evidence for a Cerebellar Node of the Dorsal Attention Network

    PubMed Central

    Brissenden, James A.; Levin, Emily J.; Osher, David E.; Halko, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    The “dorsal attention network” or “frontoparietal network” refers to a network of cortical regions that support sustained attention and working memory. Recent work has demonstrated that cortical nodes of the dorsal attention network possess intrinsic functional connections with a region in ventral cerebellum, in the vicinity of lobules VII/VIII. Here, we performed a series of task-based and resting-state fMRI experiments to investigate cerebellar participation in the dorsal attention network in humans. We observed that visual working memory and visual attention tasks robustly recruit cerebellar lobules VIIb and VIIIa, in addition to canonical cortical dorsal attention network regions. Across the cerebellum, resting-state functional connectivity with the cortical dorsal attention network strongly predicted the level of activation produced by attention and working memory tasks. Critically, cerebellar voxels that were most strongly connected with the dorsal attention network selectively exhibited load-dependent activity, a hallmark of the neural structures that support visual working memory. Finally, we examined intrinsic functional connectivity between task-responsive portions of cerebellar lobules VIIb/VIIIa and cortex. Cerebellum-to-cortex functional connectivity strongly predicted the pattern of cortical activation during task performance. Moreover, resting-state connectivity patterns revealed that cerebellar lobules VIIb/VIIIa group with cortical nodes of the dorsal attention network. This evidence leads us to conclude that the conceptualization of the dorsal attention network should be expanded to include cerebellar lobules VIIb/VIIIa. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The functional participation of cerebellar structures in nonmotor cortical networks remains poorly understood and is highly understudied, despite the fact that the cerebellum possesses many more neurons than the cerebral cortex. Although visual attention paradigms have been reported to activate

  3. [Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome secondary to a cerebellar tumour].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Carral, J; Carreras-Sáez, I; García-Peñas, J J; Fournier-Del Castillo, C; Villalobos-Reales, J

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome is characterized by disturbances of executive function, impaired spatial cognition, linguistic difficulties, and personality change. The case of an 11 year old boy is presented, with behavior problems, learning difficulties and social interaction problems. In the physical examination he had poor visual contact, immature behavior, reduced expressive language and global motor disability with gait dyspraxia, with no defined cerebellar motor signs. In the neuropsychological evaluation he has a full scale overall intellectual quotient of 84, with signs of cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome. A tumour affecting inferior cerebellar vermis was observed in the magnetic resonance imaging, which had not significantly grown during 5 years of follow up. The cerebellum participates in controlling cognitive and affective functions. Cerebellar pathology must be considered in the differential diagnosis of children with cognitive or learning disorder with associated behavioral and emotional components. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Patterns of regional cerebellar atrophy in genetic frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Bocchetta, Martina; Cardoso, M. Jorge; Cash, David M.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Warren, Jason D.; Rohrer, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorder with a strong genetic component. The cerebellum has not traditionally been felt to be involved in FTD but recent research has suggested a potential role. Methods We investigated the volumetry of the cerebellum and its subregions in a cohort of 44 patients with genetic FTD (20 MAPT, 7 GRN, and 17 C9orf72 mutation carriers) compared with 18 cognitively normal controls. All groups were matched for age and gender. On volumetric T1-weighted magnetic resonance brain images we used an atlas propagation and label fusion strategy of the Diedrichsen cerebellar atlas to automatically extract subregions including the cerebellar lobules, the vermis and the deep nuclei. Results The global cerebellar volume was significantly smaller in C9orf72 carriers (mean (SD): 99989 (8939) mm3) compared with controls (108136 (7407) mm3). However, no significant differences were seen in the MAPT and GRN carriers compared with controls (104191 (6491) mm3 and 107883 (6205) mm3 respectively). Investigating the individual subregions, C9orf72 carriers had a significantly lower volume than controls in lobule VIIa-Crus I (15% smaller, p < 0.0005), whilst MAPT mutation carriers had a significantly lower vermal volume (10% smaller, p = 0.001) than controls. All cerebellar subregion volumes were preserved in GRN carriers compared with controls. Conclusion There appears to be a differential pattern of cerebellar atrophy in the major genetic forms of FTD, being relatively spared in GRN, localized to the lobule VIIa-Crus I in the superior-posterior region of the cerebellum in C9orf72, the area connected via the thalamus to the prefrontal cortex and involved in cognitive function, and localized to the vermis in MAPT, the ‘limbic cerebellum’ involved in emotional processing. PMID:26977398

  5. GDNF-induced cerebellar toxicity: A brief review.

    PubMed

    Luz, Matthias; Mohr, Erich; Fibiger, H Christian

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant-methionyl human glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is known for its neurorestorative and neuroprotective effects in rodent and primate models of Parkinson's disease (PD). When administered locally into the putamen of Parkinsonian subjects, early clinical studies showed its potential promise as a disease-modifying agent. However, the development of GDNF for the treatment of PD has been significantly clouded by findings of cerebellar toxicity after continuous intraputamenal high-dose administration in a 6-month treatment/3-month recovery toxicology study in rhesus monkeys. Specifically, multifocal cerebellar Purkinje cell loss affecting 1-21% of the cerebellar cortex was observed in 4 of 15 (26.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 10.5-52.4%) animals treated at the highest dose level tested (3000μg/month). No cerebellar toxicity was observed at lower doses (450 and 900μg/month) in the same study, or at similar or higher doses (up to 10,000μg/month) in subchronic or chronic toxicology studies testing intermittent intracerebroventricular administration. While seemingly associated with the use of GDNF, the pathogenesis of the cerebellar lesions has not been fully understood to date. This review integrates available information to evaluate potential pathogenic mechanisms and provide a consolidated assessment of the findings. While other explanations are considered, the existing evidence is most consistent with the hypothesis that leakage of GDNF into cerebrospinal fluid during chronic infusions into the putamen down-regulates GDNF receptors on Purkinje cells, and that subsequent acute withdrawal of GDNF generates the observed lesions. The implications of these findings for clinical studies with GDNF are discussed.

  6. Global dysrhythmia of cerebro-basal ganglia-cerebellar networks underlies motor tics following striatal disinhibition.

    PubMed

    McCairn, Kevin W; Iriki, Atsushi; Isoda, Masaki

    2013-01-09

    Motor tics, a cardinal symptom of Tourette syndrome (TS), are hypothesized to arise from abnormalities within cerebro-basal ganglia circuits. Yet noninvasive neuroimaging of TS has previously identified robust activation in the cerebellum. To date, electrophysiological properties of cerebellar activation and its role in basal ganglia-mediated tic expression remain unknown. We performed multisite, multielectrode recordings of single-unit activity and local field potentials from the cerebellum, basal ganglia, and primary motor cortex using a pharmacologic monkey model of motor tics/TS. Following microinjections of bicuculline into the sensorimotor putamen, periodic tics occurred predominantly in the orofacial region, and a sizable number of cerebellar neurons showed phasic changes in activity associated with tic episodes. Specifically, 64% of the recorded cerebellar cortex neurons exhibited increases in activity, and 85% of the dentate nucleus neurons displayed excitatory, inhibitory, or multiphasic responses. Critically, abnormal discharges of cerebellar cortex neurons and excitatory-type dentate neurons mostly preceded behavioral tic onset, indicating their central origins. Latencies of pathological activity in the cerebellum and primary motor cortex substantially overlapped, suggesting that aberrant signals may be traveling along divergent pathways to these structures from the basal ganglia. Furthermore, the occurrence of tic movement was most closely associated with local field potential spikes in the cerebellum and primary motor cortex, implying that these structures may function as a gate to release overt tic movements. These findings indicate that tic-generating networks in basal ganglia mediated tic disorders extend beyond classical cerebro-basal ganglia circuits, leading to global network dysrhythmia including cerebellar circuits.

  7. Storage of a naturally acquired conditioned response is impaired in patients with cerebellar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Thieme, Andreas; Thürling, Markus; Galuba, Julia; Burciu, Roxana G; Göricke, Sophia; Beck, Andreas; Aurich, Volker; Wondzinski, Elke; Siebler, Mario; Gerwig, Marcus; Bracha, Vlastislav; Timmann, Dagmar

    2013-07-01

    Previous findings suggested that the human cerebellum is involved in the acquisition but not the long-term storage of motor associations. The finding of preserved retention in cerebellar patients was fundamentally different from animal studies which show that both acquisition and retention depends on the integrity of the cerebellum. The present study investigated whether retention had been preserved because critical regions of the cerebellum were spared. Visual threat eye-blink responses, that is, the anticipatory closure of the eyes to visual threats, have previously been found to be naturally acquired conditioned responses. Because acquisition is known to take place in very early childhood, visual threat eye-blink responses can be used to test retention in patients with adult onset cerebellar disease. Visual threat eye-blink responses were tested in 19 adult patients with cerebellar degeneration, 27 adult patients with focal cerebellar lesions due to stroke, 24 age-matched control subjects, and 31 younger control subjects. High-resolution structural magnetic resonance images were acquired in patients to perform lesion-symptom mapping. Voxel-based morphometry was performed in patients with cerebellar degeneration, and voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping in patients with focal disease. Visual threat eye-blink responses were found to be significantly reduced in patients with cerebellar degeneration. Visual threat eye-blink responses were also reduced in patients with focal disease, but to a lesser extent. Visual threat eye-blink responses declined with age. In patients with cerebellar degeneration the degree of cerebellar atrophy was positively correlated with the reduction of conditioned responses. Voxel-based morphometry showed that two main regions within the superior and inferior parts of the posterior cerebellar cortex contributed to expression of visual threat eye-blink responses bilaterally. Involvement of the more inferior parts of the posterior lobe was

  8. Cerebellar Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (ctDCS): A Novel Approach to Understanding Cerebellar Function in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Giuliana; Argyropoulos, Georgios P; Bastian, Amy; Cortes, Mar; Davis, Nicholas J; Edwards, Dylan J; Ferrucci, Roberta; Fregni, Felipe; Galea, Joseph M; Hamada, Masahi; Manto, Mario; Miall, R Chris; Morales-Quezada, Leon; Pope, Paul A; Priori, Alberto; Rothwell, John; Tomlinson, S Paul; Celnik, Pablo

    2016-02-01

    The cerebellum is critical for both motor and cognitive control. Dysfunction of the cerebellum is a component of multiple neurological disorders. In recent years, interventions have been developed that aim to excite or inhibit the activity and function of the human cerebellum. Transcranial direct current stimulation of the cerebellum (ctDCS) promises to be a powerful tool for the modulation of cerebellar excitability. This technique has gained popularity in recent years as it can be used to investigate human cerebellar function, is easily delivered, is well tolerated, and has not shown serious adverse effects. Importantly, the ability of ctDCS to modify behavior makes it an interesting approach with a potential therapeutic role for neurological patients. Through both electrical and non-electrical effects (vascular, metabolic) ctDCS is thought to modify the activity of the cerebellum and alter the output from cerebellar nuclei. Physiological studies have shown a polarity-specific effect on the modulation of cerebellar-motor cortex connectivity, likely via cerebellar-thalamocortical pathways. Modeling studies that have assessed commonly used electrode montages have shown that the ctDCS-generated electric field reaches the human cerebellum with little diffusion to neighboring structures. The posterior and inferior parts of the cerebellum (i.e., lobules VI-VIII) seem particularly susceptible to modulation by ctDCS. Numerous studies have shown to date that ctDCS can modulate motor learning, and affect cognitive and emotional processes. Importantly, this intervention has a good safety profile; similar to when applied over cerebral areas. Thus, investigations have begun exploring ctDCS as a viable intervention for patients with neurological conditions.

  9. Whole-Cell Properties of Cerebellar Nuclei Neurons In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Canto, Cathrin B; Witter, Laurens; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2016-01-01

    . Instead, using whole-cell parameters in combination with morphological criteria revealed by intracellular labelling with Neurobiotin (N = 18) allowed for electrophysiological identification of larger (29.3-50 μm soma diameter) and smaller (< 21.2 μm) cerebellar nuclei neurons with significant differences in membrane properties. Larger cells had a lower membrane resistance and a shorter spike, with a tendency for higher capacitance. Thus, in general cerebellar nuclei neurons appear to offer a rich and wide continuum of physiological properties that stand in contrast to neurons in most cortical regions such as those of the cerebral and cerebellar cortex, in which different classes of neurons operate in a narrower territory of electrophysiological parameter space. The current dataset will help computational modelers of the cerebellar nuclei to update and improve their cerebellar motor learning and performance models by incorporating the large variation of the in vivo properties of cerebellar nuclei neurons. The cellular complexity of cerebellar nuclei neurons may endow the nuclei to perform the intricate computations required for sensorimotor coordination.

  10. Whole-Cell Properties of Cerebellar Nuclei Neurons In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    De Zeeuw, Chris I.

    2016-01-01

    . Instead, using whole-cell parameters in combination with morphological criteria revealed by intracellular labelling with Neurobiotin (N = 18) allowed for electrophysiological identification of larger (29.3–50 μm soma diameter) and smaller (< 21.2 μm) cerebellar nuclei neurons with significant differences in membrane properties. Larger cells had a lower membrane resistance and a shorter spike, with a tendency for higher capacitance. Thus, in general cerebellar nuclei neurons appear to offer a rich and wide continuum of physiological properties that stand in contrast to neurons in most cortical regions such as those of the cerebral and cerebellar cortex, in which different classes of neurons operate in a narrower territory of electrophysiological parameter space. The current dataset will help computational modelers of the cerebellar nuclei to update and improve their cerebellar motor learning and performance models by incorporating the large variation of the in vivo properties of cerebellar nuclei neurons. The cellular complexity of cerebellar nuclei neurons may endow the nuclei to perform the intricate computations required for sensorimotor coordination. PMID:27851801

  11. Cellular localization of cerebellar muscarinic receptors: an autoradiographic analysis of weaver, reeler, Purkinje cell degeneration and staggerer mice

    SciTech Connect

    Neustadt, A.; Frostholm, A.; Rotter, A.

    1988-02-01

    Light microscopic autoradiography of (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding sites was used to study the distribution of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in mouse mutants which have abnormalities affecting specific cerebellar cell types. In the normal C57BL/6J mouse, binding sites were distributed throughout the cerebellar cortex, with the highest levels in the granule cell layer and deep cerebellar nuclei. Normal binding site density was observed in the cerebellum of the weaver mutant in which the majority of granule cells had degenerated. The density of (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding sites was elevated in the cortex of the reeler, despite a reduction in the number of granule cells. The concentration of binding sites was also high over the Purkinje cell masses where granule cells were largely absent. No significant reduction in cortical (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding site density was detected in the Purkinje cell degeneration mutant, in which essentially all Purkinje cells had degenerated. In contrast, receptor binding in the deep cerebellar nuclei of this mutant was significantly increased. A substantial increase in labeling was observed in the cortex and deep nuclei of the staggerer cerebellum in which a large fraction of Golgi II cells, Purkinje cells, granule cells and mossy fibers have degenerated. We discuss the possibility that the persistence of (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding sites in all four mutants may imply a non-neuronal localization for a large proportion of muscarinic receptors in the mouse cerebellar cortex.

  12. Early Disruption of Extracellular Pleiotrophin Distribution Alters Cerebellar Neuronal Circuit Development and Function.

    PubMed

    Hamza, M M; Rey, S A; Hilber, P; Arabo, A; Collin, T; Vaudry, D; Burel, D

    2016-10-01

    The cerebellum is a structure of the central nervous system involved in balance, motor coordination, and voluntary movements. The elementary circuit implicated in the control of locomotion involves Purkinje cells, which receive excitatory inputs from parallel and climbing fibers, and are regulated by cerebellar interneurons. In mice as in human, the cerebellar cortex completes its development mainly after birth with the migration, differentiation, and synaptogenesis of granule cells. These cellular events are under the control of numerous extracellular matrix molecules including pleiotrophin (PTN). This cytokine has been shown to regulate the morphogenesis of Purkinje cells ex vivo and in vivo via its receptor PTPζ. Since Purkinje cells are the unique output of the cerebellar cortex, we explored the consequences of their PTN-induced atrophy on the function of the cerebellar neuronal circuit in mice. Behavioral experiments revealed that, despite a normal overall development, PTN-treated mice present a delay in the maturation of their flexion reflex. Moreover, patch clamp recording of Purkinje cells revealed a significant increase in the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents in PTN-treated mice, associated with a decrease of climbing fiber innervations and an abnormal perisomatic localization of the parallel fiber contacts. At adulthood, PTN-treated mice exhibit coordination impairment on the rotarod test associated with an alteration of the synchronization gait. Altogether these histological, electrophysiological, and behavior data reveal that an early ECM disruption of PTN composition induces short- and long-term defaults in the establishment of proper functional cerebellar circuit.

  13. Disruption in cerebellar and basal ganglia networks during a visuospatial task in cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Filip, Pavel; Gallea, Cécile; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Bertasi, Eric; Popa, Traian; Mareček, Radek; Lungu, Ovidiu V; Kašpárek, Tomáš; Vaníček, Jiří; Bareš, Martin

    2017-05-01

    Although dystonia is traditionally conceptualized as a basal ganglia disorder, increasing interest has been directed at a different neural network node, the cerebellum, which may play a significant role in the pathophysiology of dystonia. Abnormal sensorimotor processing and disturbed motor schemes, possibly attributable to cerebellar changes, remain unclear. We sought to characterize the extent of cerebellar dysfunction within the motor network using functional MRI activation analysis, connectivity analysis, and voxel-based morphometry in cervical dystonia patients (n = 25, 15 women, mean age 45.8 years) and healthy volunteers (n = 25, 15 women, mean age 44.7 years) in a visuospatial task requiring predictive motor timing. Cervical dystonia patients showed decreased activation in the posterior cerebellar lobules as well as in the premotor areas, the associative parietal cortex, and visual regions. Patients also had decreased cerebellar connectivity with bilateral basal ganglia structures and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. This promotes the view that dystonia results from miscommunication between the basal ganglia and cerebellar loops, thus providing new insights into the brain regions essential for the development of cervical dystonia. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  14. Cerebellar brain inhibition in the target and surround muscles during voluntary tonic activation

    PubMed Central

    Panyakaew, Pattamon; Cho, Hyun Joo; Srivanitchapoom, Prachaya; Popa, Traian; Wu, Tianxia; Hallett, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Motor surround inhibition is the neural mechanism that selectively favors the contraction of target muscles and inhibits nearby muscles to prevent unwanted movements. This inhibition was previously reported at the onset of a movement, but not during a tonic contraction. Cerebellar brain inhibition (CBI) is reduced in active muscles during tonic activation; however, it has not been studied in the surround muscles. CBI was evaluated in the first dorsal interosseus (FDI) as the target muscle, and the abductor digiti minimi (ADM), flexor carpi radialis (FCR), and extensor carpi radialis (ECR) as surround muscles during rest and tonic activation of FDI in fourteen subjects. Cerebellar stimulation was performed under MRI-guided neuronavigation targeting lobule VIII of the cerebellar hemisphere. Stimulus intensities for cerebellar stimulation were based on the resting motor cortex threshold (RMT) and adjusted for the depth difference between the cerebellar and motor cortices. We used 90% to 120% of adjusted RMT as the conditioning stimulus intensity during rest. The intensity that generated the best CBI at rest in the FDI was selected for use during tonic activation. During selective tonic activation of FDI, CBI was significantly reduced only for FDI but not for the surround muscles. Unconditioned MEP sizes were increased in all muscles during FDI tonic activation compared to rest, despite background EMG activity increasing only for the FDI. Our study suggests that the cerebellum may play an important role in selective tonic finger movement by reducing its inhibition in the motor cortex only for the relevant agonist muscle. PMID:26900871

  15. Autopsy study of cerebellar degeneration in siblings with ataxia-telangiectasia-like disorder.

    PubMed

    Oba, Daiju; Hayashi, Masaharu; Minamitani, Motoyuki; Hamano, Shinichiro; Uchisaka, Naoki; Kikuchi, Akira; Kishimoto, Hiroshi; Takagi, Masatoshi; Morio, Tomohiro; Mizutani, Shuki

    2010-04-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia-like disorder (ATLD) is caused by mutations of the MRE11 gene and is characterized by cerebellar ataxia, increased frequency of chromosomal translocations and hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation. ATLD is a rare genetic disease and the associated pathological changes in the brain are unclear. Here, we report the neuropathological findings in the first cases of genetically confirmed ATLD in a pair of Japanese male siblings. Magnetic resonance imaging studies performed during infancy revealed that both subjects had cerebellar atrophy. They died of pulmonary cancer at 9 and 16 years. The siblings had the same compound heterozygous mutations of the MRE11 gene. Brain autopsy demonstrated mild and severe cerebellar atrophy in the vermis and medial part of the hemispheres, oral to the horizontal fissure, respectively. Nuclear immunoreactivity for MRE11 was absent in neurons of cerebellar cortex, cerebral cortex, basal ganglia and midbrain, whereas being widespread in normal control brains. Immunoreactivity for the DNA oxidative stress marker, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, was identified in nuclei of granule cells and Bergmann glial cells. The combination of MRE11 deficiency and DNA oxidative injury might have led to selective cerebellar degeneration.

  16. IL1RAPL1 controls inhibitory networks during cerebellar development in mice.

    PubMed

    Gambino, Frédéric; Kneib, Marie; Pavlowsky, Alice; Skala, Henriette; Heitz, Stéphane; Vitale, Nicolas; Poulain, Bernard; Khelfaoui, Malik; Chelly, Jamel; Billuart, Pierre; Humeau, Yann

    2009-10-01

    Abnormalities in the formation and function of cerebellar circuitry potentially contribute to cognitive deficits in humans. In the adult, the activity of the sole output neurons of the cerebellar cortex - the Purkinje cells (PCs) - is shaped by the balance of activity between local excitatory and inhibitory circuits. However, how this balance is established during development remains poorly understood. Here, we investigate the role of interleukin-1 receptor accessory protein-like 1 (IL1RAPL1), a protein linked to cognitive function which interacts with neuronal calcium sensor 1 (NCS-1) in the development of mouse cerebellum. Using Il1rapl1-deficient mice, we found that absence of IL1RAPL1 causes a transient disinhibition of deep cerebellar nuclei neurons between postnatal days 10 and 14 (P10/P14). Upstream, in the cerebellar cortex, we found developmental perturbations in the activity level of molecular layer interneurons (MLIs), resulting in the premature appearance of giant GABAA-mediated inhibitory post-synaptic currents capable of silencing PCs. Examination of feed-forward recruitment of MLIs by parallel fibres shows that during this P10/P14 time window, MLIs were more responsive to incoming excitatory drive. Thus, we conclude that IL1RAPL1 exerts a key function during cerebellar development in establishing local excitation/inhibition balance.

  17. Cerebellar compartments for the processing of kinematic and kinetic information related to hindlimb stepping.

    PubMed

    Valle, M S; Bosco, G; Poppele, R E

    2017-08-23

    We previously showed that proprioceptive sensory input from the hindlimbs to the anterior cerebellar cortex of the cat may not be simply organized with respect to a body map, but it may also be distributed to multiple discrete functional areas extending beyond classical body map boundaries. With passive hindlimb stepping movements, cerebellar activity was shown to relate to whole limb kinematics as does the activity of dorsal spinocerebellar tract (DSCT) neurons. For DSCT activity, whole limb kinematics provides a solid functional framework within which information about limb forces, such as those generated during active stepping, may also be embedded. In this study, we investigated this idea for the spinocerebellar cortex activity by examining the activity of cerebellar cortical neurons during both passive bipedal hindlimb stepping and active stepping on a treadmill. Our results showed a functional compartmentalization of cerebellar responses to hindlimb stepping movements depending on the two types of stepping and strong relationships between neural activities and limb axis kinematics during both. In fact, responses to passive and active stepping were generally different, but in both cases their waveforms were related strongly to the limb axis kinematics. That is, the different stepping conditions modified the kinematics representation without producing different components in the response waveforms. In sum, cerebellar activity was consistent with a global kinematics framework serving as a basis upon which detailed information about limb mechanics and/or about individual limb segments might be imposed.

  18. Effects of two weeks of cerebellar theta burst stimulation in cervical dystonia patients.

    PubMed

    Koch, Giacomo; Porcacchia, Paolo; Ponzo, Viviana; Carrillo, Fatima; Cáceres-Redondo, María Teresa; Brusa, Livia; Desiato, Maria Teresa; Arciprete, Flavio; Di Lorenzo, Francesco; Pisani, Antonio; Caltagirone, Carlo; Palomar, Francisco J; Mir, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Dystonia is generally regarded as a disorder of the basal ganglia and their efferent connections to the thalamus and brainstem, but an important role of cerebellar-thalamo-cortical (CTC) circuits in the pathophysiology of dystonia has been invoked. Here in a sham controlled trial, we tested the effects of two-weeks of cerebellar continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) in a sample of cervical dystonia (CD) patients. Clinical evaluations were performed by administering the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS) and the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale (BFMDRS). We used TMS to measure the inhibitory connectivity between the cerebellum and the contralateral motor cortex (cerebellar brain inhibition [CBI]), and the excitability of the contralateral primary motor cortex assessing intracortical inhibition (SICI), intracortical facilitation (ICF) and cortical silent period (CSP). Paired associative stimulation (PAS) was tested to evaluate the level and the topographical specificity of cortical plasticity, which is abnormally enhanced and non-focal in CD patients. Two weeks of cerebellar stimulation resulted in a small but significant clinical improvement as measured by the TWSTRS of approximately 15%. Cerebellar stimulation modified the CBI circuits and reduced the heterotopic PAS potentiation, leading to a normal pattern of topographic specific induced plasticity. These data provide novel evidence CTC circuits could be a potential target to partially control some dystonic symptoms in patients with cervical dystonia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Structural and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Cerebellum: Considerations for Assessing Cerebellar Ataxias.

    PubMed

    Deistung, Andreas; Stefanescu, Maria R; Ernst, Thomas M; Schlamann, Marc; Ladd, Mark E; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Timmann, Dagmar

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain is of high interest for diagnosing and understanding degenerative ataxias. Here, we present state-of-the-art MRI methods to characterize structural alterations of the cerebellum and introduce initial experiments to show abnormalities in the cerebellar nuclei. Clinically, T1-weighted MR images are used to assess atrophy of the cerebellar cortex, the brainstem, and the spinal cord, whereas T2-weighted and PD-weighted images are typically employed to depict potential white matter lesions that may be associated with certain types of ataxias. More recently, attention has also focused on the characterization of the cerebellar nuclei, which are discernible on spatially highly resolved iron-sensitive MR images due to their relatively high iron content, including T2 (*)-weighted images, susceptibility-weighted images (SWI), effective transverse relaxation rate (R2 (*)) maps, and quantitative susceptibility maps (QSM). Among these iron-sensitive techniques, QSM reveals the best contrast between cerebellar nuclei and their surroundings. In particular, the gyrification of the dentate nuclei is prominently depicted, even at the clinically widely available field strength of 3 T. The linear relationship between magnetic susceptibility and local iron content allows for determination of iron deposition in cerebellar nuclei non-invasively. The increased signal-to-noise ratio of ultrahigh-field MRI (B0 ≥ 7 T) and advances in spatial normalization methods enable functional MRI (fMRI) at the level of the cerebellar cortex and cerebellar nuclei. Data from initial fMRI studies are presented in three common forms of hereditary ataxias (Friedreich's ataxia, spinocerebellar ataxia type 3, and spinocerebellar ataxia type 6). Characteristic changes in the fMRI signal are discussed in the light of histopathological data and current knowledge of the underlying physiology of the fMRI signal in the cerebellum.

  20. Cerebellar sensory processing alterations impact motor cortical plasticity in Parkinson's disease: clues from dyskinetic patients.

    PubMed

    Kishore, Asha; Popa, Traian; Balachandran, Ammu; Chandran, Shyambabu; Pradeep, Salini; Backer, Febina; Krishnan, Syam; Meunier, Sabine

    2014-08-01

    The plasticity of primary motor cortex (M1) in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LIDs) is severely impaired. We recently reported in young healthy subjects that inhibitory cerebellar stimulation enhanced the sensorimotor plasticity of M1 that was induced by paired associative stimulation (PAS). This study demonstrates that the deficient sensorimotor M1 plasticity in 16 patients with LIDs could be reinstated by a single session of real inhibitory cerebellar stimulation but not sham stimulation. This was evident only when a sensory component was involved in the induction of plasticity, indicating that cerebellar sensory processing function is involved in the resurgence of M1 plasticity. The benefit of inhibitory cerebellar stimulation on LIDs is known. To explore whether this benefit is linked to the restoration of sensorimotor plasticity of M1, we conducted an additional study looking at changes in LIDs and PAS-induced plasticity after 10 sessions of either bilateral, real inhibitory cerebellar stimulation or sham stimulation. Only real and not sham stimulation had an antidyskinetic effect and it was paralleled by a resurgence in the sensorimotor plasticity of M1. These results suggest that alterations in cerebellar sensory processing function, occurring secondary to abnormal basal ganglia signals reaching it, may be an important element contributing to the maladaptive sensorimotor plasticity of M1 and the emergence of abnormal involuntary movements.

  1. Neurogenin 2 regulates progenitor cell-cycle progression and Purkinje cell dendritogenesis in cerebellar development.

    PubMed

    Florio, Marta; Leto, Ketty; Muzio, Luca; Tinterri, Andrea; Badaloni, Aurora; Croci, Laura; Zordan, Paola; Barili, Valeria; Albieri, Ilaria; Guillemot, François; Rossi, Ferdinando; Consalez, G Giacomo

    2012-07-01

    By serving as the sole output of the cerebellar cortex, integrating a myriad of afferent stimuli, Purkinje cells (PCs) constitute the principal neuron in cerebellar circuits. Several neurodegenerative cerebellar ataxias feature a selective cell-autonomous loss of PCs, warranting the development of regenerative strategies. To date, very little is known as to the regulatory cascades controlling PC development. During central nervous system development, the proneural gene neurogenin 2 (Neurog2) contributes to many distinct neuronal types by specifying their fate and/or dictating development of their morphological features. By analyzing a mouse knock-in line expressing Cre recombinase under the control of Neurog2 cis-acting sequences we show that, in the cerebellar primordium, Neurog2 is expressed by cycling progenitors cell-autonomously fated to become PCs, even when transplanted heterochronically. During cerebellar development, Neurog2 is expressed in G1 phase by progenitors poised to exit the cell cycle. We demonstrate that, in the absence of Neurog2, both cell-cycle progression and neuronal output are significantly affected, leading to an overall reduction of the mature cerebellar volume. Although PC fate identity is correctly specified, the maturation of their dendritic arbor is severely affected in the absence of Neurog2, as null PCs develop stunted and poorly branched dendrites, a defect evident from the early stages of dendritogenesis. Thus, Neurog2 represents a key regulator of PC development and maturation.

  2. Cerebellar BOLD signal during the acquisition of a new lexicon predicts its early consolidation.

    PubMed

    Lesage, Elise; Nailer, Emma L; Miall, R Chris

    2016-10-01

    Cerebellar contributions to language are presently poorly understood, but it has been argued that the cerebellar role in motor learning can be extended to learning in cognitive and linguistic domains. Here, we used fMRI to investigate whether the cerebellum is recruited in mapping novel words onto existing semantic concepts. On separate days, participants performed a Basque vocabulary learning task and a control English synonym task in the MRI scanner. Learning-related BOLD activity was found in left inferior frontal gyrus, bilateral insula, pre-SMA, left superior parietal cortex, right caudate, the right cerebellar vermis and right cerebellar Crus II. The extent to which the cerebellar regions, but not the cerebral areas, were recruited during learning correlated positively with participants' off-line improvement in performance after the learning task. These data provide evidence for a cerebellar role in lexical learning, and suggest that the right cerebellum may contribute toward consolidation of lexico-semantic associations in the language network. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Alcohol Withdrawal and Cerebellar Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jung, Marianna E

    2015-08-01

    Cerebellar disorders trigger the symptoms of movement problems, imbalance, incoordination, and frequent fall. Cerebellar disorders are shown in various CNS illnesses including a drinking disorder called alcoholism. Alcoholism is manifested as an inability to control drinking in spite of adverse consequences. Human and animal studies have shown that cerebellar symptoms persist even after complete abstinence from drinking. In particular, the abrupt termination (ethanol withdrawal) of long-term excessive ethanol consumption has shown to provoke a variety of neuronal and mitochondrial damage to the cerebellum. Upon ethanol withdrawal, excitatory neurotransmitter molecules such as glutamate are overly released in brain areas including cerebellum. This is particularly relevant to the cerebellar neuronal network as glutamate signals are projected to Purkinje neurons through granular cells that are the most populated neuronal type in CNS. This excitatory neuronal signal may be elevated by ethanol withdrawal stress, which promotes an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) level and a decrease in a Ca(2+)-binding protein, both of which result in the excessive entry of Ca(2+) to the mitochondria. Subsequently, mitochondria undergo a prolonged opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore and the overproduction of harmful free radicals, impeding adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-generating function. This in turn provokes the leakage of mitochondrial molecule cytochrome c to the cytosol, which triggers a cascade of adverse cytosol reactions. Upstream to this pathway, cerebellum under the condition of ethanol withdrawal has shown aberrant gene modifications through altered DNA methylation, histone acetylation, or microRNA expression. Interplay between these events and molecules may result in functional damage to cerebellar mitochondria and consequent neuronal degeneration, thereby contributing to motoric deficit. Mitochondria-targeting research may help develop a powerful new

  4. An automatic-voluntary dissociation and mental imagery disturbance following a cerebellar lesion.

    PubMed

    Grealy, Madeleine A; Lee, David N

    2011-01-01

    The cerebellum receives signals from, and sends signals to, the parietal cortex and instances of cerebellocerebral diaschisis indicate that some behaviours are controlled through this circuitry. Not all aspects of action control associated with the parietal cortex have been reported in patients with cerebellar damage though. Presented here is a case study of a cerebellar patient whose action deficits appear to be associated with both cerebellar and parietal functions. AM was 27 years old and eight years previously he had an operation to remove a cystic cerebellar tumour. He was tested on his ability to carry out motor imagery, make instructed and spontaneous actions, and intrinsic and extrinsic movements. Similar to ideomotor apraxia patients AM showed an automatic-voluntary dissociation where his motor control was better on spontaneous actions than instructed ones. He also had poor motor imagery timing. However, unlike apraxia patients he was equally poor at controlling body-related and object-related actions and his performance improved without vision. The presence of problems more commonly associated with parietal cortex functions suggest that the cerebellum is involved in a broader spectrum of action abilities than previously thought. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cerebellar asymmetry and its relation to cerebral asymmetry estimated by intrinsic functional connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Danhong; Buckner, Randy L.

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetry of the human cerebellum was investigated using intrinsic functional connectivity. Regions of functional asymmetry within the cerebellum were identified during resting-state functional MRI (n = 500 subjects) and replicated in an independent cohort (n = 500 subjects). The most strongly right lateralized cerebellar regions fell within the posterior lobe, including crus I and crus II, in regions estimated to link to the cerebral association cortex. The most strongly left lateralized cerebellar regions were located in lobules VI and VIII in regions linked to distinct cerebral association networks. Comparison of cerebellar asymmetry with independently estimated cerebral asymmetry revealed that the lateralized regions of the cerebellum belong to the same networks that are strongly lateralized in the cerebrum. The degree of functional asymmetry of the cerebellum across individuals was significantly correlated with cerebral asymmetry and varied with handedness. In addition, cerebellar asymmetry estimated at rest predicted cerebral lateralization during an active language task. These results demonstrate that functional lateralization is likely a unitary feature of large-scale cerebrocerebellar networks, consistent with the hypothesis that the cerebellum possesses a roughly homotopic map of the cerebral cortex including the prominent asymmetries of the association cortex. PMID:23076113

  6. Effects of ethanol on sensory stimulus-evoked responses in the cerebellar molecular layer in vivo in mice.

    PubMed

    Cui, Song-Biao; Cui, Bai-Ri; Liu, Heng; Wu, Mao-Cheng; Xu, Yin-Hua; Bian, Jin-Hua; Chu, Chun-Ping; Qiu, De-Lai

    2014-08-08

    Overdose intake of ethanol can impair cerebellar cortical neurons to integrate and transfer external information, resulting in a dysfunction of cerebellar motor regulation or cerebellar ataxia. However, the mechanisms underlying ethanol-impaired transfer of sensory information from cerebellar cortical molecular layer neurons remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effects of ethanol on sensory stimulation-evoked responses in the cerebellar molecular layer of urethane-anesthetized mice, by electrophysiological and pharmacological methods. Our results demonstrated that air-puff stimulation (30 ms, 50-60 psi) of the ipsilateral whisker-pad evoked field potential responses in the molecular layer of the cerebellar cortex folium Crus II, which expressed a negative component (N1) followed by a gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor A (GABAA)-mediated positive component (P1). Cerebellar surface perfusion of ethanol between 2 and 5mM did not change the latency of the evoked responses and the amplitude of N1, but enhanced the amplitude and the area under the curve of P1. Interestingly, high concentrations (>20mM) of ethanol induced a significantly decrease in the amplitude and area under the curve of P1. Furthermore, high concentration ethanol (300 mM) significantly decreased the rise in tau and tau decay value of P1, whereas low concentration ethanol (2-5mM) significantly increased these values of P1. Inhibition of GABAA receptor activity reversed P1 and also abolished the effects of ethanol on sensory stimulation-evoked responses. These results indicated that ethanol induced a bidirectional effect on the sensory stimulation-evoked GABAergic responses in the cerebellar cortical molecular layer, suggesting that acute alcohol intake impacted the sensory information processing of cerebellar cortex.

  7. Decreased cerebellar blood flow in postinfectious acute cerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Nagamitsu, S.; Matsuishi, T.; Ishibashi, M.; Yamashita, Y.; Nishimi, T.; Ichikawa, K.; Yamanishi, K.; Kato, H.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—The aim of the present study was to evaluate the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with postinfectious acute cerebellar ataxia using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT).
METHODS—Five children with postinfectious acute cerebellar ataxia and five control subjects were examined. The distribution of rCBF was measured by SPECT imaging after intravenous administration of 123I-IMP (111 MBq). The rCBF ratio—defined as the ratio of rCBF in the region of interest (ROI) to that in the occipital cortex—was calculated for each cortical and subcortical ROI. The mean rCBF ratio of each region was then compared between the ataxic and control subjects. These patients and all control subjects were also evaluated using MRI.
RESULTS—The rCBF ratio was significantly lower in the cerebellum of the ataxic patients than in the cerebellum of the control subjects (p<0.05). No abnormal cerebellar morphology and no abnormal signal intensities were found on MRI.
CONCLUSION—123I-IMP SPECT clearly demonstrated the decreased rCBF in the cerebellum of all patients with postinfectious acute cerebellar ataxia.

 PMID:10369834

  8. Cerebellar gray matter volume correlates with duration of cocaine use in cocaine-dependent subjects.

    PubMed

    Sim, Minyoung E; Lyoo, In Kyoon; Streeter, Chris C; Covell, Julie; Sarid-Segal, Ofra; Ciraulo, Domenic A; Kim, Minue J; Kaufman, Marc J; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah A; Renshaw, Perry F

    2007-10-01

    This study was conducted to explore differences in gray and white matter volume between cocaine-dependent and healthy comparison subjects using optimized voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neuropsychological function tests were performed for 40 cocaine-dependent subjects (41.4+/-6.9 years, 27 men) and 41 healthy age- and sex-matched comparison subjects (38.7+/-8.8 years, 26 men). Optimally normalized whole brain MR images were segmented, modulated, smoothed, and compared between groups with statistical parametric mapping. The cocaine-dependent group had lower gray matter volumes in bilateral premotor cortex (Brodmann area (BA) 6, 8; 16.6%), right orbitofrontal cortex (BA 10, 15.1%), bilateral temporal cortex (BA 20, 38; 15.9%), left thalamus (12.6%), and bilateral cerebellum (13.4%) as well as lower right cerebellar white matter volume (10.0%) relative to the comparison group at a corrected p<0.05 for multiple comparisons. Duration of cocaine use negatively correlated with right and left cerebellar gray matter volumes (r=-0.37, r=-0.39, respectively). In cocaine-dependent subjects, lower cerebellar hemispheric gray and white matter volumes were correlated with deficits in executive function and decreased motor performance. This study reports that cocaine-dependent subjects have lower gray matter volumes in cerebellar hemispheres as well as in frontal, temporal cortex, and thalamus. These findings are the first to suggest that the cerebellum may be vulnerable to cocaine-associated brain volume changes, and that cerebellar deficits may contribute to neuropsychological deficits and motor dysfunction frequently observed in cocaine-dependent subjects.

  9. Dysfunctions of the basal ganglia-cerebellar-thalamo-cortical system produce motor tics in Tourette syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Arbib, Michael A.; Baldassarre, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    Motor tics are a cardinal feature of Tourette syndrome and are traditionally associated with an excess of striatal dopamine in the basal ganglia. Recent evidence increasingly supports a more articulated view where cerebellum and cortex, working closely in concert with basal ganglia, are also involved in tic production. Building on such evidence, this article proposes a computational model of the basal ganglia-cerebellar-thalamo-cortical system to study how motor tics are generated in Tourette syndrome. In particular, the model: (i) reproduces the main results of recent experiments about the involvement of the basal ganglia-cerebellar-thalamo-cortical system in tic generation; (ii) suggests an explanation of the system-level mechanisms underlying motor tic production: in this respect, the model predicts that the interplay between dopaminergic signal and cortical activity contributes to triggering the tic event and that the recently discovered basal ganglia-cerebellar anatomical pathway may support the involvement of the cerebellum in tic production; (iii) furnishes predictions on the amount of tics generated when striatal dopamine increases and when the cortex is externally stimulated. These predictions could be important in identifying new brain target areas for future therapies. Finally, the model represents the first computational attempt to study the role of the recently discovered basal ganglia-cerebellar anatomical links. Studying this non-cortex-mediated basal ganglia-cerebellar interaction could radically change our perspective about how these areas interact with each other and with the cortex. Overall, the model also shows the utility of casting Tourette syndrome within a system-level perspective rather than viewing it as related to the dysfunction of a single brain area. PMID:28358814

  10. Dysfunctions of the basal ganglia-cerebellar-thalamo-cortical system produce motor tics in Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Caligiore, Daniele; Mannella, Francesco; Arbib, Michael A; Baldassarre, Gianluca

    2017-03-01

    Motor tics are a cardinal feature of Tourette syndrome and are traditionally associated with an excess of striatal dopamine in the basal ganglia. Recent evidence increasingly supports a more articulated view where cerebellum and cortex, working closely in concert with basal ganglia, are also involved in tic production. Building on such evidence, this article proposes a computational model of the basal ganglia-cerebellar-thalamo-cortical system to study how motor tics are generated in Tourette syndrome. In particular, the model: (i) reproduces the main results of recent experiments about the involvement of the basal ganglia-cerebellar-thalamo-cortical system in tic generation; (ii) suggests an explanation of the system-level mechanisms underlying motor tic production: in this respect, the model predicts that the interplay between dopaminergic signal and cortical activity contributes to triggering the tic event and that the recently discovered basal ganglia-cerebellar anatomical pathway may support the involvement of the cerebellum in tic production; (iii) furnishes predictions on the amount of tics generated when striatal dopamine increases and when the cortex is externally stimulated. These predictions could be important in identifying new brain target areas for future therapies. Finally, the model represents the first computational attempt to study the role of the recently discovered basal ganglia-cerebellar anatomical links. Studying this non-cortex-mediated basal ganglia-cerebellar interaction could radically change our perspective about how these areas interact with each other and with the cortex. Overall, the model also shows the utility of casting Tourette syndrome within a system-level perspective rather than viewing it as related to the dysfunction of a single brain area.

  11. Evidence for Cerebellar Contributions to Adaptive Plasticity in Speech Perception.

    PubMed

    Guediche, Sara; Holt, Lori L; Laurent, Patryk; Lim, Sung-Joo; Fiez, Julie A

    2015-07-01

    Human speech perception rapidly adapts to maintain comprehension under adverse listening conditions. For example, with exposure listeners can adapt to heavily accented speech produced by a non-native speaker. Outside the domain of speech perception, adaptive changes in sensory and motor processing have been attributed to cerebellar functions. The present functional magnetic resonance imaging study investigates whether adaptation in speech perception also involves the cerebellum. Acoustic stimuli were distorted using a vocoding plus spectral-shift manipulation and presented in a word recognition task. Regions in the cerebellum that showed differences before versus after adaptation were identified, and the relationship between activity during adaptation and subsequent behavioral improvements was examined. These analyses implicated the right Crus I region of the cerebellum in adaptive changes in speech perception. A functional correlation analysis with the right Crus I as a seed region probed for cerebral cortical regions with covarying hemodynamic responses during the adaptation period. The results provided evidence of a functional network between the cerebellum and language-related regions in the temporal and parietal lobes of the cerebral cortex. Consistent with known cerebellar contributions to sensorimotor adaptation, cerebro-cerebellar interactions may support supervised learning mechanisms that rely on sensory prediction error signals in speech perception.

  12. The Changeable Nervous System: Studies On Neuroplasticity In Cerebellar Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Seil, Fredrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Circuit reorganization after injury was studied in a cerebellar culture model. When cerebellar cultures derived from newborn mice were exposed at explantation to a preparation of cytosine arabinoside that destroyed granule cells and oligodendrocytes and compromised astrocytes, Purkinje cells surviving in greater than usual numbers were unensheathed by astrocytic processes and received twice the control number of inhibitory axosomatic synapses. Purkinje cell axon collaterals sprouted and many of their terminals formed heterotypical synapses with other Purkinje cell dendritic spines. The resulting circuit reorganization preserved inhibition in the cerebellar cortex. Following this reorganization, replacement of the missing granule cells and glia was followed by a restitution of the normal circuitry. Most of these developmental and reconstructive changes were not dependent on neuronal activity, the major exception being inhibitory synaptogenesis. The full complement of inhibitory synapses did not develop in the absence of neuronal activity, which could be mitigated by application of exogenous TrkB receptor ligands. Inhibitory synaptogenesis could also be promoted by activity-induced release of endogenous TrkB receptor ligands or by antibody activation of the TrkB receptor. PMID:24933693

  13. Speech Prosody in Cerebellar Ataxia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casper, Maureen A.; Raphael, Lawrence J.; Harris, Katherine S.; Geibel, Jennifer M.

    2007-01-01

    Persons with cerebellar ataxia exhibit changes in physical coordination and speech and voice production. Previously, these alterations of speech and voice production were described primarily via perceptual coordinates. In this study, the spatial-temporal properties of syllable production were examined in 12 speakers, six of whom were healthy…

  14. Orthostatic tremor: a cerebellar pathology?

    PubMed

    Gallea, Cécile; Popa, Traian; García-Lorenzo, Daniel; Valabregue, Romain; Legrand, André-Pierre; Apartis, Emmanuelle; Marais, Lea; Degos, Bertrand; Hubsch, Cecile; Fernández-Vidal, Sara; Bardinet, Eric; Roze, Emmanuel; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Meunier, Sabine; Vidailhet, Marie

    2016-08-01

    SEE MUTHURAMAN ET AL DOI101093/AWW164 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: Primary orthostatic tremor is characterized by high frequency tremor affecting the legs and trunk during the standing position. Cerebellar defects were suggested in orthostatic tremor without direct evidence. We aimed to characterize the anatomo-functional defects of the cerebellar motor pathways in orthostatic tremor. We used multimodal neuroimaging to compare 17 patients with orthostatic tremor and 17 age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers. Nine of the patients with orthostatic tremor underwent repetitive transcranial stimulation applied over the cerebellum during five consecutive days. We quantified the duration of standing position and tremor severity through electromyographic recordings. Compared to healthy volunteers, grey matter volume in patients with orthostatic tremor was (i) increased in the cerebellar vermis and correlated positively with the duration of the standing position; and (ii) increased in the supplementary motor area and decreased in the lateral cerebellum, which both correlated with the disease duration. Functional connectivity between the lateral cerebellum and the supplementary motor area was abnormally increased in patients with orthostatic tremor, and correlated positively with tremor severity. After repetitive transcranial stimulation, tremor severity and functional connectivity between the lateral cerebellum and the supplementary motor area were reduced. We provide an explanation for orthostatic tremor pathophysiology, and demonstrate the functional relevance of cerebello-thalamo-cortical connections in tremor related to cerebellar defects.

  15. Speech Prosody in Cerebellar Ataxia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casper, Maureen A.; Raphael, Lawrence J.; Harris, Katherine S.; Geibel, Jennifer M.

    2007-01-01

    Persons with cerebellar ataxia exhibit changes in physical coordination and speech and voice production. Previously, these alterations of speech and voice production were described primarily via perceptual coordinates. In this study, the spatial-temporal properties of syllable production were examined in 12 speakers, six of whom were healthy…

  16. Cerebellar Contribution to Social Cognition.

    PubMed

    Hoche, Franziska; Guell, Xavier; Sherman, Janet C; Vangel, Mark G; Schmahmann, Jeremy D

    2016-12-01

    Emotion attribution (EA) from faces is key to social cognition, and deficits in perception of emotions from faces underlie neuropsychiatric disorders in which cerebellar pathology is reported. Here, we test the hypothesis that the cerebellum contributes to social cognition through EA from faces. We examined 57 patients with cerebellar disorders and 57 healthy controls. Thirty-one patients had complex cerebrocerebellar disease (complex cerebrocerebellar disease group (CD)); 26 had disease isolated to cerebellum (isolated cerebellar disease group (ID)). EA was measured with the Reading the Mind in the Eyes test (RMET), and informants were administered a novel questionnaire, the Cerebellar Neuropsychiatric Rating Scale (CNRS). EA was impaired in all patients (CD p < 0.001, ID p < 0.001). When analyzed for valence categories, both CD and ID missed more positive and negative stimuli. Positive targets produced the highest deficit (CD p < 0.001, ID p = 0.004). EA impairments correlated with CNRS measures of deficient social skills (p < 0.05) and autism spectrum behaviors (p < 0.005). Patients had difficulties with emotion regulation (CD p < 0.001, ID p < 0.001), autism spectrum behaviors (CD p < 0.049, ID p < 0.001), and psychosis spectrum symptoms (CD p < 0.021, ID p < 0.002). ID informants endorsed deficient social skills (CD p < 0.746, ID p < 0.003) and impaired attention regulation (CD p < 0.144, ID p < 0.001). Within the psychosis spectrum domain, CD patients were worse than controls for lack of empathy (CD p = 0.05; ID p = 0.49). Thus, patients with cerebellar damage were impaired on an EA task associated with deficient social skills and autism spectrum behaviors and experienced psychosocial difficulties on the CNRS. This has relevance for ataxias, the cerebellar cognitive affective/Schmahmann syndrome, and neuropsychiatric disorders with cerebellar pathology.

  17. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) decreases the amplitudes of long-latency stretch reflexes in cerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Giuliana; Manto, Mario

    2013-11-01

    Recent studies suggest that the neuromodulation of the cerebellum using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) could represent a new therapeutic strategy for the management of cerebellar disorders. Anodal tDCS of the cerebellum increases the excitability of the cerebellar cortex. We tested the effects of anodal tDCS applied over the cerebellum in ataxic patients. We studied (a) stretch reflexes (SR) in upper limb (SLSR: short-latency stretch reflexes; LLSR: long-latency stretch reflexes), (b) a coordination functional task in upper limbs based on mechanical counters (MCT: mechanical counter test), and (c) computerized posturography. tDCS did not change the amplitude of SLSR, but reduced significantly the amplitudes of LLSR. tDCS did not improve the MCT scores and did not modify posture. We suggest that anodal tDCS of the cerebellum reduces the amplitudes of LLSR by increasing the inhibitory effect exerted by the cerebellar cortex upon cerebellar nuclei. The absence of effect upon upper limb coordination and posture suggests that the cerebello-cerebral networks subserving these functions are less responsive to anodal tDCS of the cerebellum. Anodal tDCS of the cerebellum represents a novel experimental tool to investigate the effects of the cerebellar cortex on the modulation of the amplitudes of LLSR.

  18. Central regulation of cerebellar climbing fibre input during motor learning

    PubMed Central

    Apps, Richard; Lee, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    A forelimb-withdrawal classical conditioning paradigm was used in awake cats (n = 4) to investigate changes in transmission in climbing fibre (CF) pathways during motor learning. The conditioned stimulus was an auditory tone, while the unconditioned stimulus was a low-intensity, single or double (0.1 ms) electrical pulse applied to the ipsilateral superficial radial nerve. Microwires chronically implanted into the paravermal cerebellar cortex (lobule V) were used to record the CF field potentials evoked by nerve stimulation, and fields at 22 recording sites (9 C1, 7 C2 and 6 C3 zone sites) were monitored during the complete sequence of at least one training run (i.e. over a period of about 2-3 weeks of conditioning). At 19 sites (86 %) conditioning led to a significant reduction in mean size of field. Similar reductions occurred at four sites studied over two successive training runs. At 10 sites (45 %) there was a statistically significant increase prior to the reduction. The three sites that failed to exhibit a significant reduction were all located in the C1 zone. Controls showed that the changes in CF transmission were dependent on the animal being conditioned. The mean size of CF field for trials in which a conditioned EMG response was present (in either the cleidobrachialis or biceps muscle) was not significantly different from the mean size for trials in which a conditioned response was absent. Similarly, on a trial-by-trial basis, CF pathway excitability was not correlated with the conditioned EMG activity in the flexor muscles under study. Overall, the results demonstrate that (1) the capacity of spino-olivocerebellar pathways (SOCPs) to forward information to the cerebellar cortex can be altered by recent experience, (2) establishment of a conditioned forelimb flexor reflex to a tone reduces SOCP excitability at most but not all sites within a forelimb-related region of the cerebellar cortex, (3) the extent of reductions differ at different sites and some

  19. Cerebellar lesions and prism adaptation in macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Baizer, J S; Kralj-Hans, I; Glickstein, M

    1999-04-01

    If a laterally displacing prism is placed in front of one eye of a person or monkey with the other eye occluded, they initially will point to one side of a target that is located directly in front of them. Normally, people and monkeys adapt easily to the displaced vision and correct their aim after a few trials. If the prism then is removed, there is a postadaptation shift in which the subject misses the target and points in the opposite direction for a few trials. We tested five Macaque monkeys for their ability to adapt to a laterally displacing prism and to show the expected postadaptation shift. When tested as normals, all five animals showed the typical pattern of adaptation and postadaptation shift. Like human subjects, the monkeys also showed complete interocular transfer of the adaptation but no transfer of the adaptation between the two arms. When preoperative training and testing was complete, we made lesions of various target areas on the cerebellar cortex. A cerebellar lesion that included the dorsal paraflocculus and uvula abolished completely the normal prism adaptation for the arm ipsilateral to the lesion in one of the five monkeys. The other four animals retained the ability to prism-adapt normally and showed the expected postadaptation shift. In the one case in which the lesion abolished prism adaptation, the damage included Crus I and II, paramedian lobule and the dorsal paraflocculus of the cerebellar hemispheres as well as lobule IX, of the vermis. Thus in this case, the lesion included virtually all the cerebellar cortex that receives mossy-fiber visual information relayed via the pontine nuclei from the cerebral cortex. The other four animals had damage to lobule V, the classical anterior lobe arm area and/or vermian lobules VI/VII, the oculomotor region. When tested postoperatively, some of these animals showed a degree of ataxia equivalent to that of the case in which prism adaptation was affected, but prism adaptation and the

  20. Motor thalamus integration of cortical, cerebellar and basal ganglia information: implications for normal and parkinsonian conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bosch-Bouju, Clémentine; Hyland, Brian I.; Parr-Brownlie, Louise C.

    2013-01-01

    Motor thalamus (Mthal) is implicated in the control of movement because it is strategically located between motor areas of the cerebral cortex and motor-related subcortical structures, such as the cerebellum and basal ganglia (BG). The role of BG and cerebellum in motor control has been extensively studied but how Mthal processes inputs from these two networks is unclear. Specifically, there is considerable debate about the role of BG inputs on Mthal activity. This review summarizes anatomical and physiological knowledge of the Mthal and its afferents and reviews current theories of Mthal function by discussing the impact of cortical, BG and cerebellar inputs on Mthal activity. One view is that Mthal activity in BG and cerebellar-receiving territories is primarily “driven” by glutamatergic inputs from the cortex or cerebellum, respectively, whereas BG inputs are modulatory and do not strongly determine Mthal activity. This theory is steeped in the assumption that the Mthal processes information in the same way as sensory thalamus, through interactions of modulatory inputs with a single driver input. Another view, from BG models, is that BG exert primary control on the BG-receiving Mthal so it effectively relays information from BG to cortex. We propose a new “super-integrator” theory where each Mthal territory processes multiple driver or driver-like inputs (cortex and BG, cortex and cerebellum), which are the result of considerable integrative processing. Thus, BG and cerebellar Mthal territories assimilate motivational and proprioceptive motor information previously integrated in cortico-BG and cortico-cerebellar networks, respectively, to develop sophisticated motor signals that are transmitted in parallel pathways to cortical areas for optimal generation of motor programmes. Finally, we briefly review the pathophysiological changes that occur in the BG in parkinsonism and generate testable hypotheses about how these may affect processing of inputs in

  1. Imaging calcium waves in cerebellar Bergmann glia.

    PubMed

    Beierlein, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This protocol describes methods for recording synaptically evoked Ca(2+) waves from individual Bergmann glia (BG) in slices of cerebellar cortex. Unlike protoplasmic, star-shaped astrocytes, whose thin processes pose a serious challenge to stable Ca(2+) measurements, BG are large radial cells, with several main processes that run over distances of several hundred micrometers toward the pia and ensheathe thousands of parallel fiber (PF) synapses. Stimulation of PF synapses with brief bursts can trigger long-lasting Ca(2+) responses in BG processes, which can be reliably recorded using a cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. This protocol was developed to enable measurements of Ca(2+) waves in individual BG loaded with a high-affinity Ca(2+) indicator such as Fura-2 for up to 2 h. Because BG recorded in slices rarely display spontaneous (i.e., tetrodotoxin [TTX]-sensitive) or intrinsic Ca(2+) transients, Ca(2+) waves can be evoked repeatedly and reliably, which permits quantitative studies using pharmacological tools. Fluorescence measurements obtained using CCD technology offer a straightforward means of characterizing the mechanisms and potential functional consequences of widespread and long-lasting, store-mediated Ca(2+) increases in astrocytes.

  2. Optogenetic manipulation of cerebellar Purkinje cell activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tsubota, Tadashi; Ohashi, Yohei; Tamura, Keita; Sato, Ayana; Miyashita, Yasushi

    2011-01-01

    Purkinje cells (PCs) are the sole output neurons of the cerebellar cortex. Although their anatomical connections and physiological response properties have been extensively studied, the causal role of their activity in behavioral, cognitive and autonomic functions is still unclear because PC activity cannot be selectively controlled. Here we developed a novel technique using optogenetics for selective and rapidly reversible manipulation of PC activity in vivo. We injected into rat cerebellar cortex lentiviruses expressing either the light-activated cationic channel channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) or light-driven chloride pump halorhodopsin (eNpHR) under the control of the PC-specific L7 promoter. Transgene expression was observed in most PCs (ChR2, 92.6%; eNpHR, 95.3%), as determined by immunohistochemical analysis. In vivo electrophysiological recordings showed that all light-responsive PCs in ChR2-transduced rats increased frequency of simple spike in response to blue laser illumination. Similarly, most light-responsive PCs (93.8%) in eNpHR-transduced rats decreased frequency of simple spike in response to orange laser illumination. We then applied these techniques to characterize the roles of rat cerebellar uvula, one of the cardiovascular regulatory regions in the cerebellum, in resting blood pressure (BP) regulation in anesthetized rats. ChR2-mediated photostimulation and eNpHR-mediated photoinhibition of the uvula had opposite effects on resting BP, inducing depressor and pressor responses, respectively. In contrast, manipulation of PC activity within the neighboring lobule VIII had no effect on BP. Blue and orange laser illumination onto PBS-injected lobule IX didn't affect BP, indicating the observed effects on BP were actually due to PC activation and inhibition. These results clearly demonstrate that the optogenetic method we developed here will provide a powerful way to elucidate a causal relationship between local PC activity and functions of the cerebellum.

  3. Functional Cortical and Cerebellar Reorganization in a Case of Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    Calabrò, Rocco S.; Bramanti, Placido; Baglieri, Annalisa; Corallo, Francesco; De Luca, Rosaria; De Salvo, Simona

    2015-01-01

    Background: Functional studies have been previous reported in stroke patients, but no studies of functional magnetic resonance imaging have been performed in Moyamoya disease. Objective: To assess the cortical and cerebellar reorganization in a moyamoya patient. Methods: We reported a case of a patient suffering from moyamoya disease, undergoing a neuropsychological assessment, a neurocognitive rehabilitative treatment, an electroencephalogram evaluation, and a functional magnetic resonance imaging examination. Results: The subject showed a cognitive impairment, a slow electroencephalogram activity, and the ipsi- and controlateral motor cortex and cerebellar functional magnetic resonance imaging activation. Conclusions: This is the first functional magnetic resonance imaging case study reported in moyamoya disease. We showed a cortical reorganization, which could play an important role in clinical evaluation and motor recovery. The cerebellar activation, showed after cognitive and motor rehabilitation, could support the idea that the cerebellum contains several cognitive-related subregions involved in different functional networks in moyamoya disease. PMID:25852976

  4. Cerebellar granule cells acquire a widespread predictive feedback signal during motor learning.

    PubMed

    Giovannucci, Andrea; Badura, Aleksandra; Deverett, Ben; Najafi, Farzaneh; Pereira, Talmo D; Gao, Zhenyu; Ozden, Ilker; Kloth, Alexander D; Pnevmatikakis, Eftychios; Paninski, Liam; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Medina, Javier F; Wang, Samuel S-H

    2017-03-20

    Cerebellar granule cells, which constitute half the brain's neurons, supply Purkinje cells with contextual information necessary for motor learning, but how they encode this information is unknown. Here we show, using two-photon microscopy to track neural activity over multiple days of cerebellum-dependent eyeblink conditioning in mice, that granule cell populations acquire a dense representation of the anticipatory eyelid movement. Initially, granule cells responded to neutral visual and somatosensory stimuli as well as periorbital airpuffs used for training. As learning progressed, two-thirds of monitored granule cells acquired a conditional response whose timing matched or preceded the learned eyelid movements. Granule cell activity covaried trial by trial to form a redundant code. Many granule cells were also active during movements of nearby body structures. Thus, a predictive signal about the upcoming movement is widely available at the input stage of the cerebellar cortex, as required by forward models of cerebellar control.

  5. Cochlear implantation following cerebellar surgery.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Shahad; Mawman, Deborah; Green, Kevin

    2011-08-01

    Cochlear implantation in patients with known central nervous system conditions can result in wide-ranging outcomes. The aim of this study is to report two cases of cochlear implantation outcomes in patients with acquired cerebellar ataxia following cerebellar surgery. The first is a female implanted with the Nucleus 24 implant in September 2000 and the second is a male implanted with a MED-EL Sonata Flexsoft electro-acoustic stimulation in July 2009. Programming these patients resulted in significant non-auditory stimulation which resulted in less than optimum map fittings. The patients did not gain any open set speech perception benefit although both of them gained an awareness of sound with the device. However, patient 2 elected to become a non-user because of the limited benefit.

  6. Nonsurgical cerebellar mutism (anarthria) in two children.

    PubMed

    Mewasingh, Leena D; Kadhim, Hazim; Christophe, Catherine; Christiaens, Florence J; Dan, Bernard

    2003-01-01

    Cerebellar mutism (anarthria) is a well-described complication of posterior fossa tumor resection. It is accompanied by a characteristic behavior including irritability and autistic features. This syndrome is typically reversible within days to months. Underlying pathophysiology is unknown. We describe two children who presented with a similar clinical finding after nonsurgical cerebellar involvement, hemolytic-uremic syndrome in one and cerebellitis in the other. Postmortem pathologic findings in the first patient indicated cerebellar ischemic necrosis. Single-photon emission computed tomography in the second patient revealed diffuse cerebellar hypoperfusion with no supratentorial abnormalities, refuting a phenomenon of diaschisis between cerebellar and frontal connections. These findings confirm that this clinical syndrome may occur in a nonsurgical, nontraumatic context. They are consistent with recent integrative hypotheses explaining cerebellar anarthria.

  7. New supervised learning theory applied to cerebellar modeling for suppression of variability of saccade end points.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Masahiko

    2013-06-01

    A new supervised learning theory is proposed for a hierarchical neural network with a single hidden layer of threshold units, which can approximate any continuous transformation, and applied to a cerebellar function to suppress the end-point variability of saccades. In motor systems, feedback control can reduce noise effects if the noise is added in a pathway from a motor center to a peripheral effector; however, it cannot reduce noise effects if the noise is generated in the motor center itself: a new control scheme is necessary for such noise. The cerebellar cortex is well known as a supervised learning system, and a novel theory of cerebellar cortical function developed in this study can explain the capability of the cerebellum to feedforwardly reduce noise effects, such as end-point variability of saccades. This theory assumes that a Golgi-granule cell system can encode the strength of a mossy fiber input as the state of neuronal activity of parallel fibers. By combining these parallel fiber signals with appropriate connection weights to produce a Purkinje cell output, an arbitrary continuous input-output relationship can be obtained. By incorporating such flexible computation and learning ability in a process of saccadic gain adaptation, a new control scheme in which the cerebellar cortex feedforwardly suppresses the end-point variability when it detects a variation in saccadic commands can be devised. Computer simulation confirmed the efficiency of such learning and showed a reduction in the variability of saccadic end points, similar to results obtained from experimental data.

  8. Modeling possible effects of atypical cerebellar processing on eyeblink conditioning in autism.

    PubMed

    Radell, Milen L; Mercado, Eduardo

    2014-09-01

    Autism is unique among other disorders in that acquisition of conditioned eyeblink responses is enhanced in children, occurring in a fraction of the trials required for control participants. The timing of learned responses is, however, atypical. Two animal models of autism display a similar phenotype. Researchers have hypothesized that these differences in conditioning reflect cerebellar abnormalities. The present study used computer simulations of the cerebellar cortex, including inhibition by the molecular layer interneurons, to more closely examine whether atypical cerebellar processing can account for faster conditioning in individuals with autism. In particular, the effects of inhibitory levels on delay eyeblink conditioning were simulated, as were the effects of learning-related synaptic changes at either parallel fibers or ascending branch synapses from granule cells to Purkinje cells. Results from these simulations predict that whether molecular layer inhibition results in an enhancement or an impairment of acquisition, or changes in timing, may depend on (1) the sources of inhibition, (2) the levels of inhibition, and (3) the locations of learning-related changes (parallel vs. ascending branch synapses). Overall, the simulations predict that a disruption in the balance or an overall increase of inhibition within the cerebellar cortex may contribute to atypical eyeblink conditioning in children with autism and in animal models of autism.

  9. Postnatal Migration of Cerebellar Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Galas, Ludovic; Bénard, Magalie; Lebon, Alexis; Komuro, Yutaro; Schapman, Damien; Vaudry, Hubert; Vaudry, David; Komuro, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    Due to its continuing development after birth, the cerebellum represents a unique model for studying the postnatal orchestration of interneuron migration. The combination of fluorescent labeling and ex/in vivo imaging revealed a cellular highway network within cerebellar cortical layers (the external granular layer, the molecular layer, the Purkinje cell layer, and the internal granular layer). During the first two postnatal weeks, saltatory movements, transient stop phases, cell-cell interaction/contact, and degradation of the extracellular matrix mark out the route of cerebellar interneurons, notably granule cells and basket/stellate cells, to their final location. In addition, cortical-layer specific regulatory factors such as neuropeptides (pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP), somatostatin) or proteins (tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1)) have been shown to inhibit or stimulate the migratory process of interneurons. These factors show further complexity because somatostatin, PACAP, or tPA have opposite or no effect on interneuron migration depending on which layer or cell type they act upon. External factors originating from environmental conditions (light stimuli, pollutants), nutrients or drug of abuse (alcohol) also alter normal cell migration, leading to cerebellar disorders. PMID:28587295

  10. Cerebellar mutism syndrome and its relation to cerebellar cognitive and affective function: Review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz, Ozlem; Kabatas, Serdar; Yilmaz, Cem; Altinors, Nur; Agaoglu, Belma

    2010-01-01

    Tumors of the cerebellum and brainstem account for half of all brain tumors in children. The realization that cerebellar lesions produce clinically relevant intellectual disability makes it important to determine whether neuropsychological abnormalities occur in long-term survivors of pediatric cerebellar tumors. Little is known about the neurobehavioral sequale resulting specifically from the resection of these tumors in this population. We therefore reviewed neuropsychological findings associated with postoperative cerebellar mutism syndrome and discuss the further implications for cerebellar cognitive function. PMID:20436742

  11. Genetic effects on the cerebellar role in working memory: Same brain, different genes?

    PubMed Central

    Blokland, Gabriëlla A.M.; McMahon, Katie L.; Thompson, Paul M.; Hickie, Ian B.; Martin, Nicholas G.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Wright, Margaret J.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past several years, evidence has accumulated showing that the cerebellum plays a significant role in cognitive function. Here we show, in a large genetically informative twin sample (n = 430; aged 16–30 years), that the cerebellum is strongly, and reliably (n = 30 rescans), activated during an n-back working memory task, particularly lobules I–IV, VIIa Crus I and II, IX and the vermis. Monozygotic twin correlations for cerebellar activation were generally much larger than dizygotic twin correlations, consistent with genetic influences. Structural equation models showed that up to 65% of the variance in cerebellar activation during working memory is genetic (averaging 34% across significant voxels), most prominently in the lobules VI, and VIIa Crus I, with the remaining variance explained by unique/unshared environmental factors. Heritability estimates for brain activation in the cerebellum agree with those found for working memory activation in the cerebral cortex, even though cerebellar cyto-architecture differs substantially. Phenotypic correlations between BOLD percent signal change in cerebrum and cerebellum were low, and bivariate modeling indicated that genetic influences on the cerebellum are at least partly specific to the cerebellum. Activation on the voxel-level correlated very weakly with cerebellar gray matter volume, suggesting specific genetic influences on the BOLD signal. Heritable signals identified here should facilitate discovery of genetic polymorphisms influencing cerebellar function through genome-wide association studies, to elucidate the genetic liability to brain disorders affecting the cerebellum. PMID:24128737

  12. Cerebellar Dysfunction and Ataxia in Patients with Epilepsy: Coincidence, Consequence, or Cause?

    PubMed

    Marcián, Václav; Filip, Pavel; Bareš, Martin; Brázdil, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Basic epilepsy teachings assert that seizures arise from the cerebral cortex, glossing over infratentorial structures such as the cerebellum that are believed to modulate rather than generate seizures. Nonetheless, ataxia and other clinical findings in epileptic patients are slowly but inevitably drawing attention to this neural node. Tracing the evolution of this line of inquiry from the observed coincidence of cerebellar atrophy and cerebellar dysfunction (most apparently manifested as ataxia) in epilepsy to their close association, this review considers converging clinical, physiological, histological, and neuroimaging evidence that support incorporating the cerebellum into epilepsy pathology. We examine reports of still controversial cerebellar epilepsy, studies of cerebellar stimulation alleviating paroxysmal epileptic activity, studies and case reports of cerebellar lesions directly associated with seizures, and conditions in which ataxia is accompanied by epileptic seizures. Finally, the review substantiates the role of this complex brain structure in epilepsy whether by coincidence, as a consequence of deleterious cortical epileptic activity or antiepileptic drugs, or the very cause of the disease.

  13. Cerebellar Dysfunction and Ataxia in Patients with Epilepsy: Coincidence, Consequence, or Cause?

    PubMed Central

    Marcián, Václav; Filip, Pavel; Bareš, Martin; Brázdil, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Basic epilepsy teachings assert that seizures arise from the cerebral cortex, glossing over infratentorial structures such as the cerebellum that are believed to modulate rather than generate seizures. Nonetheless, ataxia and other clinical findings in epileptic patients are slowly but inevitably drawing attention to this neural node. Tracing the evolution of this line of inquiry from the observed coincidence of cerebellar atrophy and cerebellar dysfunction (most apparently manifested as ataxia) in epilepsy to their close association, this review considers converging clinical, physiological, histological, and neuroimaging evidence that support incorporating the cerebellum into epilepsy pathology. We examine reports of still controversial cerebellar epilepsy, studies of cerebellar stimulation alleviating paroxysmal epileptic activity, studies and case reports of cerebellar lesions directly associated with seizures, and conditions in which ataxia is accompanied by epileptic seizures. Finally, the review substantiates the role of this complex brain structure in epilepsy whether by coincidence, as a consequence of deleterious cortical epileptic activity or antiepileptic drugs, or the very cause of the disease. PMID:27375960

  14. Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration with a circulating antibody against neurons and non-neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Tomimoto, H; Brengman, J M; Yanagihara, T

    1993-01-01

    We describe a woman with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration associated with para-ovarian adenocarcinoma, who had a circulating antibody with a corresponding antigen not only in cerebellar Purkinje cells but also in neurons located in the molecular layer of the human and rat cerebellum. The antigen was also present in neurons in the cerebral cortex, brain stem, anterior horn cells, dorsal root ganglia, intestinal autonomic neurons, retinal ganglion cells, Schwann cells of the peripheral nerve and epithelial cells of the renal glomerulus in rats. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed immunoprecipitates in the smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum and polyribosomes in human and rat cerebellar Purkinje cells and other neuronal cell bodies as well as Schwann cells of the peripheral nerve. Even though patients with this disorder manifest primarily with cerebellar and some extracerebellar signs, the antigen also exists in many neurons other than cerebellar Purkinje cells and even in non-neuronal cells. The clinicopathologic significance of the observed immunologic reaction in diverse neurons remains to be determined.

  15. Integration of Purkinje cell inhibition by cerebellar nucleo-olivary neurons.

    PubMed

    Najac, Marion; Raman, Indira M

    2015-01-14

    Neurons in the cerebellar cortex, cerebellar nuclei, and inferior olive (IO) form a trisynaptic loop critical for motor learning. IO neurons excite Purkinje cells via climbing fibers and depress their parallel fiber inputs. Purkinje cells inhibit diverse cells in the cerebellar nuclei, including small GABAergic nucleo-olivary neurons that project to the IO. To investigate how these neurons integrate synaptic signals from Purkinje cells, we retrogradely labeled nucleo-olivary cells in the contralateral interpositus and lateral nuclei with cholera toxin subunit B-Alexa Fluor 488 and recorded their electrophysiological properties in cerebellar slices from weanling mice. Nucleo-olivary cells fired action potentials over a relatively narrow dynamic range (maximal rate, ∼ 70 spikes/s), unlike large cells that project to premotor areas (maximal rate, ∼ 400 spikes/s). GABA(A) receptor-mediated IPSCs evoked by electrical or optogenetic stimulation of Purkinje cells were more than 10-fold slower in nucleo-olivary cells (decay time, ∼ 25 ms) than in large cells (∼ 2 ms), and repetitive stimulation at 20-150 Hz evoked greatly summating IPSCs. Nucleo-olivary firing rates varied inversely with IPSP frequency, and the timing of Purkinje IPSPs and nucleo-olivary spikes was uncorrelated. These attributes contrast with large cells, whose brief IPSCs and rapid firing rates can permit well timed postinhibitory spiking. Thus, the intrinsic and synaptic properties of these two projection neurons from the cerebellar nuclei tailor them for differential integration and transmission of their Purkinje cell input.

  16. Modality specific cerebro-cerebellar activations in verbal working memory: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Kirschen, Matthew P; Chen, S H Annabel; Desmond, John E

    2010-01-01

    Verbal working memory (VWM) engages frontal and temporal/parietal circuits subserving the phonological loop, as well as, superior and inferior cerebellar regions which have projections from these neocortical areas. Different cerebro-cerebellar circuits may be engaged for integrating aurally- and visually-presented information for VWM. The present fMRI study investigated load (2, 4, or 6 letters) and modality (auditory and visual) dependent cerebro-cerebellar VWM activation using a Sternberg task. FMRI revealed modality-independent activations in left frontal (BA 6/9/44), insular, cingulate (BA 32), and bilateral inferior parietal/supramarginal (BA 40) regions, as well as in bilateral superior (HVI) and right inferior (HVIII) cerebellar regions. Visual presentation evoked prominent activations in right superior (HVI/CrusI) cerebellum, bilateral occipital (BA19) and left parietal (BA7/40) cortex while auditory presentation showed robust activations predominantly in bilateral temporal regions (BA21/22). In the cerebellum, we noted a visual to auditory emphasis of function progressing from superior to inferior and from lateral to medial regions. These results extend our previous findings of fMRI activation in cerebro-cerebellar networks during VWM, and demonstrate both modality dependent commonalities and differences in activations with increasing memory load.

  17. Modality Specific Cerebro-Cerebellar Activations in Verbal Working Memory: An fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Kirschen, Matthew P.; Chen, S. H. Annabel; Desmond, John E.

    2010-01-01

    Verbal working memory (VWM) engages frontal and temporal/parietal circuits subserving the phonological loop, as well as, superior and inferior cerebellar regions which have projections from these neocortical areas. Different cerebro-cerebellar circuits may be engaged for integrating aurally- and visually-presented information for VWM. The present fMRI study investigated load (2, 4, or 6 letters) and modality (auditory and visual) dependent cerebro-cerebellar VWM activation using a Sternberg task. FMRI revealed modality-independent activations in left frontal (BA 6/9/44), insular, cingulate (BA 32), and bilateral inferior parietal/supramarginal (BA 40) regions, as well as in bilateral superior (HVI) and right inferior (HVIII) cerebellar regions. Visual presentation evoked prominent activations in right superior (HVI/CrusI) cerebellum, bilateral occipital (BA19) and left parietal (BA7/40) cortex while auditory presentation showed robust activations predominately in bilateral temporal regions (BA21/22). In the cerebellum, we noted a visual to auditory emphasis of function progressing from superior to inferior and from lateral to medial regions. These results extend our previous findings of fMRI activation in cerebro-cerebellar networks during VWM, and demonstrate both modality dependent commonalities and differences in activations with increasing memory load. PMID:20714061

  18. Cerebellar cortical neuron responses evoked from the spinal border cell tract.

    PubMed

    Geborek, Pontus; Spanne, Anton; Bengtsson, Fredrik; Jörntell, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Spinocerebellar systems are likely to be crucial for cerebellar hallmark functions such as coordination. However, in terms of cerebellar functional analyses, these are perhaps among the least explored systems. The aim of the present study is to achieve activation of a single component of the spinocerebellar systems and to explore to what extent it can influence the spike output of granule cells, Golgi cells, molecular layer (ML) interneurons (stellate and basket cells) and Purkinje cells (PCs). For this purpose, we took advantage of a unique arrangement discovered in neuroanatomical studies, in which the spinal border cell (SBC) component of the ventral spinocerebellar system was found to be the only spinocerebellar tract which ascends in the contralateral lateral funiculus (coLF) and have terminations in sublobulus C1 of the paramedian lobule in the posterior cerebellum. Using electrical stimulation of this tract, we find a subset of the cerebellar cortical neurons in this region to be moderately or powerfully activated. For example, some of our granule cells displayed high intensity responses whereas the majority of the granule cells displayed no response at all. The finding that more than half of the PCs were activated by stimulation of the SBC tract indicated that this system is capable of directly influencing cerebellar cortical output. The implications of these findings for the view of the integrative functions of the cerebellar cortex are discussed.

  19. Neuroligins Are Selectively Essential for NMDAR Signaling in Cerebellar Stellate Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Südhof, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroligins are postsynaptic cell-adhesion molecules that contribute to synapse specification. However, many other postsynaptic cell-adhesion molecules are known and the relative contributions of neuroligins versus other such molecules in different types of synapses and neurons remains largely unknown. Here, we have studied the role of neuroligins in cerebellar stellate interneurons that participate in a well defined circuit that converges on Purkinje cells as the major output neurons of cerebellar cortex. By crossing triple conditional knock-out (cKO) mice targeting all three major neuroligins [neuroligin-1 to neuroligin-3 (NL123)] with parvalbumin-Cre (PV-Cre) transgenic mice, we deleted neuroligins from inhibitory cerebellar interneurons and Purkinje cells, allowing us to study the effects of neuroligin deletions on cerebellar stellate cell synapses by electrophysiology in acute slices. PV-Cre/NL123 cKO mice did not exhibit gross alterations of cerebellar structure or cerebellar interneuron morphology. Strikingly, electrophysiological recordings in stellate cells from these PV-Cre/NL123 cKO mice revealed a large decrease in NMDAR-mediated excitatory synaptic responses, which, in stellate cells, are largely extrasynaptic, without a change in AMPA-receptor-mediated responses. Parallel analyses in PV-Cre/NL1 mice that are single NL1 cKO mice uncovered the same phenotype, demonstrating that NL1 is responsible for recruiting extrasynaptic NMDARs. Moreover, we observed only a modest impairment in inhibitory synaptic responses in stellate cells lacking NL123 despite a nearly complete suppression of inhibitory synaptic transmission in Purkinje cells by the same genetic manipulation. Our results suggest that, unlike other types of neurons investigated, neuroligins are selectively essential in cerebellar stellate interneurons for enabling the function of extrasynaptic NMDARs. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neuroligins are postsynaptic cell-adhesion molecules genetically linked to

  20. Respective implications of glutamate decarboxylase antibodies in stiff person syndrome and cerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Manto, Mario U; Hampe, Christiane S; Rogemond, Véronique; Honnorat, Jérome

    2011-02-04

    To investigate whether Stiff-person syndrome (SPS) and cerebellar ataxia (CA) are associated with distinct GAD65-Ab epitope specificities and neuronal effects. Purified GAD65-Ab from neurological patients and monoclonal GAD65-Ab with distinct epitope specificities (b78 and b96.11) were administered in vivo to rat cerebellum. Effects of intra-cerebellar administration of GAD65-Ab were determined using neurophysiological and neurochemical methods. Intra-cerebellar administration of GAD65-Ab from a SPS patient (Ab SPS) impaired the NMDA-mediated turnover of glutamate, but had no effect on NMDA-mediated turnover of glycerol. By contrast, GAD65-Ab from a patient with cerebellar ataxia (Ab CA) markedly decreased the NMDA-mediated turnover of glycerol. Both GAD65-Ab increased the excitability of the spinal cord, as assessed by the F wave/M wave ratios. The administration of BFA, an inhibitor of the recycling of vesicles, followed by high-frequency stimulation of the cerebellum, severely impaired the cerebello-cortical inhibition only when Ab CA was used. Moreover, administration of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the motor cortex revealed a strong disinhibition of the motor cortex with Ab CA. Monoclonal antibodies b78 and b96.11 showed distinct effects, with greater effects of b78 in terms of increase of glutamate concentrations, impairment of the adaptation of the motor cortex to repetitive peripheral stimulation, disinhibition of the motor cortex following tDCS, and increase of the F/M ratios. Ab SPS shared antibody characteristics with b78, both in epitope recognition and ability to inhibit enzyme activity, while Ab CA had no effect on GAD65 enzyme activity. These results suggest that, in vivo, neurological impairments caused by GAD65-Ab could vary according to epitope specificities. These results could explain the different neurological syndromes observed in patients with GAD65-Ab.

  1. Respective implications of glutamate decarboxylase antibodies in stiff person syndrome and cerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To investigate whether Stiff-person syndrome (SPS) and cerebellar ataxia (CA) are associated with distinct GAD65-Ab epitope specificities and neuronal effects. Methods Purified GAD65-Ab from neurological patients and monoclonal GAD65-Ab with distinct epitope specificities (b78 and b96.11) were administered in vivo to rat cerebellum. Effects of intra-cerebellar administration of GAD65-Ab were determined using neurophysiological and neurochemical methods. Results Intra-cerebellar administration of GAD65-Ab from a SPS patient (Ab SPS) impaired the NMDA-mediated turnover of glutamate, but had no effect on NMDA-mediated turnover of glycerol. By contrast, GAD65-Ab from a patient with cerebellar ataxia (Ab CA) markedly decreased the NMDA-mediated turnover of glycerol. Both GAD65-Ab increased the excitability of the spinal cord, as assessed by the F wave/M wave ratios. The administration of BFA, an inhibitor of the recycling of vesicles, followed by high-frequency stimulation of the cerebellum, severely impaired the cerebello-cortical inhibition only when Ab CA was used. Moreover, administration of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the motor cortex revealed a strong disinhibition of the motor cortex with Ab CA. Monoclonal antibodies b78 and b96.11 showed distinct effects, with greater effects of b78 in terms of increase of glutamate concentrations, impairment of the adaptation of the motor cortex to repetitive peripheral stimulation, disinhibition of the motor cortex following tDCS, and increase of the F/M ratios. Ab SPS shared antibody characteristics with b78, both in epitope recognition and ability to inhibit enzyme activity, while Ab CA had no effect on GAD65 enzyme activity. Conclusions These results suggest that, in vivo, neurological impairments caused by GAD65-Ab could vary according to epitope specificities. These results could explain the different neurological syndromes observed in patients with GAD65-Ab. PMID:21294897

  2. Frontal lobe and posterior parietal contributions to the cortico-cerebellar system.

    PubMed

    Ramnani, Narender

    2012-06-01

    Our growing understanding of how cerebral cortical areas communicate with the cerebellum in primates has enriched our understanding of the data that cerebellar circuits can access, and the neocortical areas that cerebellar activity can influence. The cerebellum is part of some large-scale networks involving several parts of the neocortex including association areas in the frontal lobe and the posterior parietal cortex that are known for their contributions to higher cognitive function. Understanding their connections with the cerebellum informs the debates around the role of the cerebellum in higher cognitive functions because they provide mechanisms through which association areas and the cerebellum can influence each others' operations. In recent years, evidence from connectional anatomy and human neuroimaging have comprehensively overturned the view that the cerebellum contributes only to motor control. The aim of this review is to examine our changing perspectives on the nature of cortico-cerebellar anatomy and the ways in which it continues to shape our views on its contributions to function. The review considers the anatomical connectivity of the cerebellar cortex with frontal lobe areas and the posterior parietal cortex. It will first focus on the anatomical organisation of these circuits in non-human primates before discussing new findings about this system in the human brain. It has been suggested that in non-human primates "although there is a modest input from medial prefrontal cortex, there is very little or none from the more lateral prefrontal areas" [33]. This review discusses anatomical investigations that challenge this claim. It also attempts to dispel the misconception that prefrontal projections to the cerebellum are from areas concerned only with the kinematic control of eye movements. Finally, I argue that our revised understanding of anatomy compels us to reconsider conventional views of how these systems operate in the human brain.

  3. Hereditary lissencephaly and cerebellar hypoplasia in Churra lambs.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Valentín; Suárez-Vega, Aroa; Fuertes, Miguel; Benavides, Julio; Delgado, Laetitia; Ferreras, M Carmen; Arranz, Juan José

    2013-08-09

    Lissencephaly is a rare developmental brain disorder in veterinary and human medicine associated with defects in neuronal migration leading to a characteristic marked reduction or absence of the convolutional pattern of the cerebral hemispheres. In many human cases the disease has a genetic basis. In sheep, brain malformations, mainly cerebellar hypoplasia and forms of hydrocephalus, are frequently due to in utero viral infections. Although breed-related malformations of the brain have been described in sheep, breed-related lissencephaly has not been previously recorded in a peer reviewed publication. Here we report neuropathological findings in 42 newborn lambs from a pure Churra breed flock, with clinical signs of weakness, inability to walk, difficulty in sucking and muscular rigidity observed immediately after birth. All the lambs showed near-total agyria with only a rudimentary formation of few sulci and gyri, and a severe cerebellar hypoplasia. On coronal section, the cerebral grey matter was markedly thicker than that of age-matched unaffected lambs and the ventricular system was moderately dilated. Histologically, the normal layers of the cerebral cortex were disorganized and, using an immunohistochemical technique against neurofilaments, three layers were identified instead of the six present in normal brains. The hippocampus was also markedly disorganised and the number and size of lobules were reduced in the cerebellum. Heterotopic neurons were present in different areas of the white matter. The remainder of the brain structures appeared normal. The pathological features reported are consistent with the type LCH-b (lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia group b) defined in human medicine. No involvement of pestivirus or bluetongue virus was detected by immunohistochemistry. An analysis of pedigree data was consistent with a monogenic autosomal recessive pattern inheritance. The study describes the clinical and pathological findings of lissencephaly

  4. Hereditary lissencephaly and cerebellar hypoplasia in Churra lambs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lissencephaly is a rare developmental brain disorder in veterinary and human medicine associated with defects in neuronal migration leading to a characteristic marked reduction or absence of the convolutional pattern of the cerebral hemispheres. In many human cases the disease has a genetic basis. In sheep, brain malformations, mainly cerebellar hypoplasia and forms of hydrocephalus, are frequently due to in utero viral infections. Although breed-related malformations of the brain have been described in sheep, breed-related lissencephaly has not been previously recorded in a peer reviewed publication. Results Here we report neuropathological findings in 42 newborn lambs from a pure Churra breed flock, with clinical signs of weakness, inability to walk, difficulty in sucking and muscular rigidity observed immediately after birth. All the lambs showed near-total agyria with only a rudimentary formation of few sulci and gyri, and a severe cerebellar hypoplasia. On coronal section, the cerebral grey matter was markedly thicker than that of age-matched unaffected lambs and the ventricular system was moderately dilated. Histologically, the normal layers of the cerebral cortex were disorganized and, using an immunohistochemical technique against neurofilaments, three layers were identified instead of the six present in normal brains. The hippocampus was also markedly disorganised and the number and size of lobules were reduced in the cerebellum. Heterotopic neurons were present in different areas of the white matter. The remainder of the brain structures appeared normal. The pathological features reported are consistent with the type LCH-b (lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia group b) defined in human medicine. No involvement of pestivirus or bluetongue virus was detected by immunohistochemistry. An analysis of pedigree data was consistent with a monogenic autosomal recessive pattern inheritance. Conclusions The study describes the clinical and

  5. Comparative anatomical studies on the cerebellar nuclei of the pangolins.

    PubMed

    Ishimoto, Y

    1983-01-01

    The configurations and volumes of the cerebellar nuclei of left and right 10 sides of 5 cases of the pangolins (Manis pentadactyla) were examined with sagittal myelin sheath and toluidine blue stained serial sections and reconstruction models based upon these serial sections respectively. The cerebellar nuclei of the pangolins, same as in other mammals can be divided into four nuclei, nucleus medialis (M), nucleus interpositus posterior (P), nucleus interpositus anterior (A) and nucleus lateralis (L). In all cases from medially to laterally, M, P, A and L appear in order and disappear M, A, P and L in order respectively. The volume of each nucleus in the total volume of the cerebellar nuclei is: M; 5.3-7.9% P; 27.1-31.2% A; 17.6-22.9% L; 42.4-46.2% In right and left each cerebellar nuclei significant difference is not recognized as p is less than 0.05. The posterior protuberance of the nucleus medialis protrudes remarkably in 4 cases of No. 1, No. 2, No. 3 and No. 4 but in only 1 case of No. 5 it protrudes slightly. In nucleus interpositus posterior the ventrolateral protuberance protrudes slightly in 4 cases of No. 1, No. 3, No. 4 and No. 5 but in only 1 case of No. 2 it protrudes remarkably. The anterior protuberance protrudes remarkably in all cases and the superior protuberance protrudes remarkably in 3 cases of No. 2, No. 3 and No. 4 but in 2 cases of No. 1 and No. 5 it protrudes slightly. In sulci, sulcus b and sulcus a' are distinct in all cases and sulcus a, sulcus c, sulcus b' and sulcus c' are considerably remarkable. In the toluidine blue stained serial sections, the nucleus medialis is composed of close small nerve cells, nucleus interpositus posterior is composed of the diffuse medium-sized nerve cells, nucleus interpositus anterior is composed of the close medium-sized nerve cells and nucleus lateralis is composed of the diffuse large nerve cells. In projection pictures of each subnuclei to the cerebellar cortex in each directions in the dorsal view

  6. Cerebellar theta burst stimulation modulates the neural activity of interconnected parietal and motor areas

    PubMed Central

    Casula, Elias Paolo; Pellicciari, Maria Concetta; Ponzo, Viviana; Stampanoni Bassi, Mario; Veniero, Domenica; Caltagirone, Carlo; Koch, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    Voluntary movement control and execution are regulated by the influence of the cerebellar output over different interconnected cortical areas, through dentato-thalamo connections. In the present study we applied transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electroencephalography (EEG) to directly assess the effects of cerebellar theta-burst stimulation (TBS) over the controlateral primary motor cortex (M1) and posterior parietal cortex (PPC) in a group of healthy volunteers. We found a TBS-dependent bidirectional modulation over TMS-evoked activity; specifically, cTBS increased whereas iTBS decreased activity between 100 and 200 ms after TMS, in a similar manner over both M1 and PPC areas. On the oscillatory domain, TBS induced specific changes over M1 natural frequencies of oscillation: TMS-evoked alpha activity was decreased by cTBS whereas beta activity was enhanced by iTBS. No effects were observed after sham stimulation. Our data provide novel evidence showing that the cerebellum exerts its control on the cortex likely by impinging on specific set of interneurons dependent on GABA-ergic activity. We show that cerebellar TBS modulates cortical excitability of distant interconnected cortical areas by acting through common temporal, spatial and frequency domains. PMID:27796359

  7. The cerebellum, cerebellar disorders, and cerebellar research--two centuries of discoveries.

    PubMed

    Manto, Mario

    2008-01-01

    Research on the cerebellum is evolving rapidly. The exquisiteness of the cerebellar circuitry with a unique geometric arrangement has fascinated researchers from numerous disciplines. The painstaking works of pioneers of these last two centuries, such as Rolando, Flourens, Luciani, Babinski, Holmes, Cajal, Larsell, or Eccles, still exert a strong influence in the way we approach cerebellar functions. Advances in genetic studies, detailed molecular and cellular analyses, profusion of brain imaging techniques, emergence of behavioral assessments, and reshaping of models of cerebellar function are generating an immense amount of knowledge. Simultaneously, a better definition of cerebellar disorders encountered in the clinic is emerging. The essentials of a trans-disciplinary blending are expanding. The analysis of the literature published these last two decades indicates that the gaps between domains of research are vanishing. The launch of the society for research on the cerebellum (SRC) illustrates how cerebellar research is burgeoning. This special issue gathers the contributions of the inaugural conference of the SRC dedicated to the mechanisms of cerebellar function. Contributions were brought together around five themes: (1) cerebellar development, death, and regeneration; (2) cerebellar circuitry: processing and function; (3) mechanisms of cerebellar plasticity and learning; (4) cerebellar function: timing, prediction, and/or coordination?; (5) anatomical and disease perspectives on cerebellar function.

  8. Learning of Sensory Sequences in Cerebellar Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frings, Markus; Boenisch, Raoul; Gerwig, Marcus; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Timmann, Dagmar

    2004-01-01

    A possible role of the cerebellum in detecting and recognizing event sequences has been proposed. The present study sought to determine whether patients with cerebellar lesions are impaired in the acquisition and discrimination of sequences of sensory stimuli of different modalities. A group of 26 cerebellar patients and 26 controls matched for…

  9. Acute cerebellar ataxia and infectious mononucleosis.

    PubMed Central

    Wadhwa, N. K.; Ghose, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    A 28-year-old man, who presented with acute cerebellar ataxia, was found to have haematological features of infectious mononucleosis. There was serological evidence of recent infection with Epstein-Barr virus. It is speculated that cerebellar dysfunction results from virus-induced inflammatory changes within the central nervous system. PMID:6312442

  10. Familial cerebellar ataxia and diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, I C; O'Malley, B P; Young, I D

    1988-01-01

    Two sisters are reported who both developed partial cranial diabetes insipidus in their 4th decade, followed by progressive cerebellar ataxia. This appears to be the first report of cerebellar ataxia and diabetes insipidus occurring together as a genetic entity. PMID:3221226

  11. Learning of Sensory Sequences in Cerebellar Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frings, Markus; Boenisch, Raoul; Gerwig, Marcus; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Timmann, Dagmar

    2004-01-01

    A possible role of the cerebellum in detecting and recognizing event sequences has been proposed. The present study sought to determine whether patients with cerebellar lesions are impaired in the acquisition and discrimination of sequences of sensory stimuli of different modalities. A group of 26 cerebellar patients and 26 controls matched for…

  12. Consensus Paper: Management of Degenerative Cerebellar Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ilg, W.; Bastian, A. J.; Boesch, S.; Burciu, R. G.; Celnik, P.; Claaßen, J.; Feil, K.; Kalla, R.; Miyai, I.; Nachbauer, W.; Schöls, L.; Strupp, M.; Synofzik, M.; Teufel, J.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of motor symptoms of degenerative cerebellar ataxia remains difficult. Yet there are recent developments that are likely to lead to significant improvements in the future. Most desirable would be a causative treatment of the underlying cerebellar disease. This is currently available only for a very small subset of cerebellar ataxias with known metabolic dysfunction. However, increasing knowledge of the pathophysiology of hereditary ataxia should lead to an increasing number of medically sensible drug trials. In this paper, data from recent drug trials in patients with recessive and dominant cerebellar ataxias will be summarized. There is consensus that up to date, no medication has been proven effective. Aminopyridines and acetazolamide are the only exception, which are beneficial in patients with episodic ataxia type 2. Aminopyridines are also effective in a subset of patients presenting with downbeat nystagmus. As such, all authors agreed that the mainstays of treatment of degenerative cerebellar ataxia are currently physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy. For many years, well-controlled rehabilitation studies in patients with cerebellar ataxia were lacking. Data of recently published studies show that coordinative training improves motor function in both adult and juvenile patients with cerebellar degeneration. Given the well-known contribution of the cerebellum to motor learning, possible mechanisms underlying improvement will be outlined. There is consensus that evidence-based guidelines for the physiotherapy of degenerative cerebellar ataxia need to be developed. Future developments in physiotherapeutical interventions will be discussed including application of non-invasive brain stimulation. PMID:24222635

  13. Cerebellar Neural Circuits Involving Executive Control Network Predict Response to Group Cognitive Behavior Therapy in Social Anxiety Disorder.

    PubMed

    MinlanYuan; Meng, Yajing; Zhang, Yan; Nie, Xiaojing; Ren, Zhengjia; Zhu, Hongru; Li, Yuchen; Lui, Su; Gong, Qiyong; Qiu, Changjian; Zhang, Wei

    2017-06-01

    Some intrinsic connectivity networks including the default mode network (DMN) and executive control network (ECN) may underlie social anxiety disorder (SAD). Although the cerebellum has been implicated in the pathophysiology of SAD and several networks relevant to higher-order cognition, it remains unknown whether cerebellar areas involved in DMN and ECN exhibit altered resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) with cortical networks in SAD. Forty-six patients with SAD and 64 healthy controls (HC) were included and submitted to the baseline resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Seventeen SAD patients who completed post-treatment clinical assessments were included after group cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). RsFC of three cerebellar subregions in both groups was assessed respectively in a voxel-wise way, and these rsFC maps were compared by two-sample t tests between groups. Whole-brain voxel-wise regression was performed to examine whether cerebellar connectivity networks can predict response to CBT. Lower rsFC circuits of cerebellar subregions compared with HC at baseline (p < 0.05, corrected by false discovery rate) were revealed. The left Crus I rsFC with dorsal medial prefrontal cortex was negatively correlated with symptom severity. The clinical assessments in SAD patients were significantly decreased after CBT. Higher pretreatment cerebellar rsFC with angular gyrus and dorsal lateral frontal cortex corresponded with greater symptom improvement following CBT. Cerebellar rsFC circuits involving DMN and ECN are possible neuropathologic mechanisms of SAD. Stronger pretreatment cerebellar rsFC circuits involving ECN suggest potential neural markers to predict CBT response.

  14. Cortical Amyloid Beta in Cognitively Normal Elderly Adults is Associated with Decreased Network Efficiency within the Cerebro-Cerebellar System

    PubMed Central

    Steininger, Stefanie C.; Liu, Xinyang; Gietl, Anton; Wyss, Michael; Schreiner, Simon; Gruber, Esmeralda; Treyer, Valerie; Kälin, Andrea; Leh, Sandra; Buck, Alfred; Nitsch, Roger M.; Prüssmann, Klaas P.; Hock, Christoph; Unschuld, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Deposition of cortical amyloid beta (Aβ) is a correlate of aging and a risk factor for Alzheimer disease (AD). While several higher order cognitive processes involve functional interactions between cortex and cerebellum, this study aims to investigate effects of cortical Aβ deposition on coupling within the cerebro-cerebellar system. Methods: We included 15 healthy elderly subjects with normal cognitive performance as assessed by neuropsychological testing. Cortical Aβ was quantified using (11)carbon-labeled Pittsburgh compound B positron-emission-tomography late frame signals. Volumes of brain structures were assessed by applying an automated parcelation algorithm to three dimensional magnetization-prepared rapid gradient-echo T1-weighted images. Basal functional network activity within the cerebro-cerebellar system was assessed using blood-oxygen-level dependent resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging at the high field strength of 7 T for measuring coupling between cerebellar seeds and cerebral gray matter. A bivariate regression approach was applied for identification of brain regions with significant effects of individual cortical Aβ load on coupling. Results: Consistent with earlier reports, a significant degree of positive and negative coupling could be observed between cerebellar seeds and cerebral voxels. Significant positive effects of cortical Aβ load on cerebro-cerebellar coupling resulted for cerebral brain regions located in inferior temporal lobe, prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, and thalamus. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that brain amyloidosis in cognitively normal elderly subjects is associated with decreased network efficiency within the cerebro-cerebellar system. While the identified cerebral regions are consistent with established patterns of increased sensitivity for Aβ-associated neurodegeneration, additional studies are needed to elucidate the relationship between dysfunction of the

  15. Cortical Amyloid Beta in Cognitively Normal Elderly Adults is Associated with Decreased Network Efficiency within the Cerebro-Cerebellar System.

    PubMed

    Steininger, Stefanie C; Liu, Xinyang; Gietl, Anton; Wyss, Michael; Schreiner, Simon; Gruber, Esmeralda; Treyer, Valerie; Kälin, Andrea; Leh, Sandra; Buck, Alfred; Nitsch, Roger M; Prüssmann, Klaas P; Hock, Christoph; Unschuld, Paul G

    2014-01-01

    Deposition of cortical amyloid beta (Aβ) is a correlate of aging and a risk factor for Alzheimer disease (AD). While several higher order cognitive processes involve functional interactions between cortex and cerebellum, this study aims to investigate effects of cortical Aβ deposition on coupling within the cerebro-cerebellar system. We included 15 healthy elderly subjects with normal cognitive performance as assessed by neuropsychological testing. Cortical Aβ was quantified using (11)carbon-labeled Pittsburgh compound B positron-emission-tomography late frame signals. Volumes of brain structures were assessed by applying an automated parcelation algorithm to three dimensional magnetization-prepared rapid gradient-echo T1-weighted images. Basal functional network activity within the cerebro-cerebellar system was assessed using blood-oxygen-level dependent resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging at the high field strength of 7 T for measuring coupling between cerebellar seeds and cerebral gray matter. A bivariate regression approach was applied for identification of brain regions with significant effects of individual cortical Aβ load on coupling. Consistent with earlier reports, a significant degree of positive and negative coupling could be observed between cerebellar seeds and cerebral voxels. Significant positive effects of cortical Aβ load on cerebro-cerebellar coupling resulted for cerebral brain regions located in inferior temporal lobe, prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, and thalamus. Our findings indicate that brain amyloidosis in cognitively normal elderly subjects is associated with decreased network efficiency within the cerebro-cerebellar system. While the identified cerebral regions are consistent with established patterns of increased sensitivity for Aβ-associated neurodegeneration, additional studies are needed to elucidate the relationship between dysfunction of the cerebro-cerebellar system and risk for AD.

  16. Metronidazole-Induced Cerebellar Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Amit; Kanekar, Sangam; Sabat, Shyam; Thamburaj, Krishnamurthy

    2016-01-01

    Metronidazole is a very common antibacterial and antiprotozoal with wide usage across the globe, including the least developed countries. It is generally well-tolerated with a low incidence of serious side-effects. Neurological toxicity is fairly common with this drug, however majority of these are peripheral neuropathy with very few cases of central nervous toxicity reported. We report the imaging findings in two patients with cerebellar dysfunction after Metronidazole usage. Signal changes in the dentate and red nucleus were seen on magnetic resonance imaging in these patients. Most of the cases reported in literature reported similar findings, suggesting high predilection for the dentate nucleus in metronidazole induced encephalopathy. PMID:27127600

  17. Cellular and molecular basis of cerebellar development

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Salvador; Andreu, Abraham; Mecklenburg, Nora; Echevarria, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Historically, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of cerebellar development were investigated through structural descriptions and studying spontaneous mutations in animal models and humans. Advances in experimental embryology, genetic engineering, and neuroimaging techniques render today the possibility to approach the analysis of molecular mechanisms underlying histogenesis and morphogenesis of the cerebellum by experimental designs. Several genes and molecules were identified to be involved in the cerebellar plate regionalization, specification, and differentiation of cerebellar neurons, as well as the establishment of cellular migratory routes and the subsequent neuronal connectivity. Indeed, pattern formation of the cerebellum requires the adequate orchestration of both key morphogenetic signals, arising from distinct brain regions, and local expression of specific transcription factors. Thus, the present review wants to revisit and discuss these morphogenetic and molecular mechanisms taking place during cerebellar development in order to understand causal processes regulating cerebellar cytoarchitecture, its highly topographically ordered circuitry and its role in brain function. PMID:23805080

  18. Cerebellar and cerebral autoregulation in migraine.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, Matthias; Schork, Joscha; Allignol, Arthur; Weiller, Cornelius; Kaube, Holger

    2012-04-01

    Silent ischemic brain lesions frequently occur in migraine with aura and are most often located in cerebellar border zones. This may imply an impairment of cerebellar blood flow autoregulation. This study investigated the characteristics of interictal cerebellar autoregulation in migraine with and without aura. Thirty-four patients (n=17, migraine without aura; n=17, migraine with aura) and 35 age- and sex-matched controls were studied. Triple simultaneous transcranial Doppler monitoring of one posterior inferior cerebellar artery, right posterior cerebral artery, and left middle cerebral artery was performed. Autoregulation dynamics were assessed from spontaneous blood pressure fluctuations (correlation coefficient index Dx) and from respiratory-induced 0.1-Hz blood pressure oscillations (phase and gain). Compared with controls, the autoregulatory index Dx was higher (indicating less autoregulation) in the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (P=0.0062) and middle cerebral artery (P=0.0078) in migraine with aura, but not in migraine without aura. Phase and gain did not significantly differ between migraine patients and controls. No significant associations of autoregulation with clinical factors were found, including frequency of migraine attacks and orthostatic intolerance. This first-time analysis of cerebellar autoregulation in migraine did not show a specific cerebellar dysautoregulation in the interictal period. More static autoregulatory properties (index Dx) are, however, impaired in persons with migraine with aura both in the cerebellar and anterior circulation. The cerebellar predilection of ischemic lesions in migraine with aura might be a combination of altered autoregulation and additional factors, such as the end artery cerebellar angioarchitecture.

  19. Probabilistic Identification of Cerebellar Cortical Neurones across Species

    PubMed Central

    Van Dijck, Gert; Van Hulle, Marc M.; Heiney, Shane A.; Blazquez, Pablo M.; Meng, Hui; Angelaki, Dora E.; Arenz, Alexander; Margrie, Troy W.; Mostofi, Abteen; Edgley, Steve; Bengtsson, Fredrik; Ekerot, Carl-Fredrik; Jörntell, Henrik; Dalley, Jeffrey W.; Holtzman, Tahl

    2013-01-01

    Despite our fine-grain anatomical knowledge of the cerebellar cortex, electrophysiological studies of circuit information processing over the last fifty years have been hampered by the difficulty of reliably assigning signals to identified cell types. We approached this problem by assessing the spontaneous activity signatures of identified cerebellar cortical neurones. A range of statistics describing firing frequency and irregularity were then used, individually and in combination, to build Gaussian Process Classifiers (GPC) leading to a probabilistic classification of each neurone type and the computation of equi-probable decision boundaries between cell classes. Firing frequency statistics were useful for separating Purkinje cells from granular layer units, whilst firing irregularity measures proved most useful for distinguishing cells within granular layer cell classes. Considered as single statistics, we achieved classification accuracies of 72.5% and 92.7% for granular layer and molecular layer units respectively. Combining statistics to form twin-variate GPC models substantially improved classification accuracies with the combination of mean spike frequency and log-interval entropy offering classification accuracies of 92.7% and 99.2% for our molecular and granular layer models, respectively. A cross-species comparison was performed, using data drawn from anaesthetised mice and decerebrate cats, where our models offered 80% and 100% classification accuracy. We then used our models to assess non-identified data from awake monkeys and rabbits in order to highlight subsets of neurones with the greatest degree of similarity to identified cell classes. In this way, our GPC-based approach for tentatively identifying neurones from their spontaneous activity signatures, in the absence of an established ground-truth, nonetheless affords the experimenter a statistically robust means of grouping cells with properties matching known cell classes. Our approach therefore

  20. Cerebellar Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (ctDCS)

    PubMed Central

    Grimaldi, Giuliana; Argyropoulos, Georgios P.; Bastian, Amy; Cortes, Mar; Davis, Nicholas J.; Edwards, Dylan J.; Ferrucci, Roberta; Fregni, Felipe; Galea, Joseph M.; Hamada, Masahi; Manto, Mario; Miall, R. Chris; Morales-Quezada, Leon; Pope, Paul A.; Priori, Alberto; Rothwell, John; Tomlinson, S. Paul; Celnik, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellum is critical for both motor and cognitive control. Dysfunction of the cerebellum is a component of multiple neurological disorders. In recent years, interventions have been developed that aim to excite or inhibit the activity and function of the human cerebellum. Transcranial direct current stimulation of the cerebellum (ctDCS) promises to be a powerful tool for the modulation of cerebellar excitability. This technique has gained popularity in recent years as it can be used to investigate human cerebellar function, is easily delivered, is well tolerated, and has not shown serious adverse effects. Importantly, the ability of ctDCS to modify behavior makes it an interesting approach with a potential therapeutic role for neurological patients. Through both electrical and non-electrical effects (vascular, metabolic) ctDCS is thought to modify the activity of the cerebellum and alter the output from cerebellar nuclei. Physiological studies have shown a polarity-specific effect on the modulation of cerebellar–motor cortex connectivity, likely via cerebellar–thalamocortical pathways. Modeling studies that have assessed commonly used electrode montages have shown that the ctDCS-generated electric field reaches the human cerebellum with little diffusion to neighboring structures. The posterior and inferior parts of the cerebellum (i.e., lobules VI-VIII) seem particularly susceptible to modulation by ctDCS. Numerous studies have shown to date that ctDCS can modulate motor learning, and affect cognitive and emotional processes. Importantly, this intervention has a good safety profile; similar to when applied over cerebral areas. Thus, investigations have begun exploring ctDCS as a viable intervention for patients with neurological conditions. PMID:25406224

  1. Aberrant cerebellar connectivity in motor and association networks in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Shinn, Ann K.; Baker, Justin T.; Lewandowski, Kathryn E.; Öngür, Dost; Cohen, Bruce M.

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a devastating illness characterized by disturbances in multiple domains. The cerebellum is involved in both motor and non-motor functions, and the “cognitive dysmetria” and “dysmetria of thought” models propose that abnormalities of the cerebellum may contribute to schizophrenia signs and symptoms. The cerebellum and cerebral cortex are reciprocally connected via a modular, closed-loop network architecture, but few schizophrenia neuroimaging studies have taken into account the topographical and functional heterogeneity of the cerebellum. In this study, using a previously defined 17-network cerebral cortical parcellation system as the basis for our functional connectivity seeds, we systematically investigated connectivity abnormalities within the cerebellum of 44 schizophrenia patients and 28 healthy control participants. We found selective alterations in cerebro-cerebellar functional connectivity. Specifically, schizophrenia patients showed decreased cerebro-cerebellar functional connectivity in higher level association networks (ventral attention, salience, control, and default mode networks) relative to healthy control participants. Schizophrenia patients also showed increased cerebro-cerebellar connectivity in somatomotor and default mode networks, with the latter showing no overlap with the regions found to be hypoconnected within the same default mode network. Finally, we found evidence to suggest that somatomotor and default mode networks may be inappropriately linked in schizophrenia. The relationship of these dysconnectivities to schizophrenia symptoms, such as neurological soft signs and altered sense of agency, is discussed. We conclude that the cerebellum ought to be considered for analysis in all future studies of network abnormalities in SZ, and further suggest the cerebellum as a potential target for further elucidation, and possibly treatment, of the underlying mechanisms and network abnormalities producing symptoms of

  2. Abnormal Cerebellar Cytoarchitecture and Impaired Inhibitory Signaling in Adult Mice Lacking Testicular Orphan Nuclear Receptor 4

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yei-Tsung; Collins, Loretta L.; Uno, Hideo; Chou, Samuel M.; Meshul, Charles K.; Chang, Shu-Shi; Chang, Chawnshang

    2007-01-01

    Since Testicular orphan nuclear receptor 4 (TR4) was cloned, its physiological functions remain largely unknown. In this study, the TR4 knockout (TR4−/−) mouse model was used to investigate the role of TR4 in the adult cerebellum. Behaviorally, these null mice exhibit unsteady gait, as well as involuntary postural and kinetic movements, indicating a disturbance of cerebellar function. In the TR4−/− brain, cerebellar restricted hypoplasia is severe and cerebellar vermal lobules VI and VII are underdeveloped, while no structural alterations in the cerebral cortex are observed. Histological analysis of the TR4−/− cerebellar cortex reveals reductions in granule cell density, as well as a decreased number of parallel fiber boutons that are enlarged in size. Further analyses reveal that the levels of GABA and GAD are decreased in both Purkinje cells and interneurons of the TR4−/− cerebellum, suggesting that the inhibitory circuits signaling within and from the cerebellum may be perturbed. In addition, in the TR4−/− cerebellum, immunoreactivity of GluR2/3 was reduced in Purkinje cells, but increased in the deep cerebellar nuclei. Together, these results suggest that the behavioral phenotype of TR4−/− mice may result from disrupted inhibitory pathways in the cerebellum. No progressive atrophy was observed at various adult stages in the TR4−/− brain, therefore the disturbances most likely originate from a failure to establish proper connections between principal neurons in the cerebellum during development. PMID:17706948

  3. Cerebellar brain inhibition in the target and surround muscles during voluntary tonic activation.

    PubMed

    Panyakaew, Pattamon; Cho, Hyun Joo; Srivanitchapoom, Prachaya; Popa, Traian; Wu, Tianxia; Hallett, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Motor surround inhibition is the neural mechanism that selectively favours the contraction of target muscles and inhibits nearby muscles to prevent unwanted movements. This inhibition was previously reported at the onset of a movement, but not during a tonic contraction. Cerebellar brain inhibition (CBI) is reduced in active muscles during tonic activation; however, it has not been studied in the surround muscles. CBI was evaluated in the first dorsal interosseus (FDI) muscle as the target muscle, and the abductor digiti minimi, flexor carpi radialis and extensor carpi radialis muscles as surround muscles, during rest and tonic activation of the FDI muscle in 21 subjects. Cerebellar stimulation was performed under magnetic resonance imaging-guided neuronavigation targeting lobule VIII of the cerebellar hemisphere. Stimulus intensities for cerebellar stimulation were based on the resting motor cortex threshold (RMT) and adjusted for the depth difference between the cerebellar and motor cortices. We used 90-120% of the adjusted RMT as the conditioning stimulus intensity during rest. The intensity that generated the best CBI at rest in the FDI muscle was selected for use during tonic activation. During selective tonic activation of the FDI muscle, CBI was significantly reduced only for the FDI muscle, and not for the surround muscles. Unconditioned motor evoked potential sizes were increased in all muscles during FDI muscle tonic activation as compared with rest, despite background electromyography activity increasing only for the FDI muscle. Our study suggests that the cerebellum may play an important role in selective tonic finger movement by reducing its inhibition in the motor cortex only for the relevant agonist muscle.

  4. Electrophysiological Mapping of Novel Prefrontal – Cerebellar Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Thomas C.; Jones, Matthew W.; Apps, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Whilst the cerebellum is predominantly considered a sensorimotor control structure, accumulating evidence suggests that it may also subserve non-motor functions during cognition. However, this possibility is not universally accepted, not least because the nature and pattern of links between higher cortical structures and the cerebellum are poorly characterized. We have therefore used in vivo electrophysiological methods in anaesthetized rats to directly investigate connectivity between the medial prefrontal cortex (prelimbic subdivision, PrL) and the cerebellum. Stimulation of deep layers of PrL evoked distinct field potentials in the cerebellar cortex with a mean latency to peak of approximately 35 ms. These responses showed a well-defined topography, and were maximal in lobule VII of the contralateral vermis (a known oculomotor centre); they were not attenuated by local anaesthesia of the overlying M2 motor cortex, though M2 stimulation did evoke field potentials in lobule VII with a shorter latency (approximately 30 ms). Single unit recordings showed that prelimbic cortical stimulation elicits complex spikes in lobule VII Purkinje cells, indicating transmission via a previously undescribed cerebro-olivocerebellar pathway. Our results therefore establish a physiological basis for communication between PrL and the cerebellum. The role(s) of this pathway remain to be resolved, but presumably relate to control of eye movements and/or distributed networks associated with integrated prefrontal cortical functions. PMID:19738932

  5. Inhibition promotes long-term potentiation at cerebellar excitatory synapses

    PubMed Central

    Binda, F.; Dorgans, K.; Reibel, S.; Sakimura, K.; Kano, M.; Poulain, B.; Isope, P.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of the cerebellar cortex to learn from experience ensures the accuracy of movements and reflex adaptation, processes which require long-term plasticity at granule cell (GC) to Purkinje neuron (PN) excitatory synapses. PNs also receive GABAergic inhibitory inputs via GCs activation of interneurons; despite the involvement of inhibition in motor learning, its role in long-term plasticity is poorly characterized. Here we reveal a functional coupling between ionotropic GABAA receptors and low threshold CaV3 calcium channels in PNs that sustains calcium influx and promotes long-term potentiation (LTP) at GC to PN synapses. High frequency stimulation induces LTP at GC to PN synapses and CaV3-mediated calcium influx provided that inhibition is intact; LTP is mGluR1, intracellular calcium store and CaV3 dependent. LTP is impaired in CaV3.1 knockout mice but it is nevertheless recovered by strengthening inhibitory transmission onto PNs; promoting a stronger hyperpolarization via GABAA receptor activation leads to an enhanced availability of an alternative Purkinje-expressed CaV3 isoform compensating for the lack of CaV3.1 and restoring LTP. Accordingly, a stronger hyperpolarization also restores CaV3-mediated calcium influx in PNs from CaV3.1 knockout mice. We conclude that by favoring CaV3 channels availability inhibition promotes LTP at cerebellar excitatory synapses. PMID:27641070

  6. Cerebellar and Spinal Direct Current Stimulation in Children: Computational Modeling of the Induced Electric Field

    PubMed Central

    Fiocchi, Serena; Ravazzani, Paolo; Priori, Alberto; Parazzini, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the specific application of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the cerebellum can modulate cerebellar activity. In parallel, transcutaneous spinal DC stimulation (tsDCS) was found to be able to modulate conduction along the spinal cord and spinal cord functions. Of particular interest is the possible use of these techniques in pediatric age, since many pathologies and injuries, which affect the cerebellar cortex as well as spinal cord circuits, are diffuse in adults as well as in children. Up to now, experimental studies of cerebellar and spinal DC stimulation on children are completely missing and therefore there is a lack of information about the safety of this technique as well as the appropriate dose to be used during the treatment. Therefore, the knowledge of electric quantities induced into the cerebellum and over the spinal cord during cerebellar tDCS and tsDCS, respectively, is required. This work attempts to address this issue by estimating through computational techniques, the electric field distributions induced in the target tissues during the two stimulation techniques applied to different models of children of various ages and gender. In detail, we used four voxel child models, aged between 5- and 8-years. Results revealed that, despite inter-individual differences, the cerebellum is the structure mainly involved by cerebellar tDCS, whereas the electric field generated by tsDCS can reach the spinal cord also in children. Moreover, it was found that there is a considerable spread toward the anterior area of the cerebellum and the brainstem region for cerebellar tDCS and in the spinal nerve for spinal direct current stimulation. Our study therefore predicts that the electric field spreads in complex patterns that strongly depend on individual anatomy, thus giving further insight into safety issues and informing data for pediatric investigations of these stimulation techniques. PMID:27799905

  7. Purkinje cell activity in the cerebellar anterior lobe after rabbit eyeblink conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Green, John T.; Steinmetz, Joseph E.

    2005-01-01

    The cerebellar anterior lobe may play a critical role in the execution and proper timing of learned responses. The current study was designed to monitor Purkinje cell activity in the rabbit cerebellar anterior lobe after eyeblink conditioning, and to assess whether Purkinje cells in recording locations may project to the interpositus nucleus. Rabbits were trained in an interstimulus interval discrimination procedure in which one tone signaled a 250-msec conditioned stimulus-unconditioned stimulus (CS-US) interval and a second tone signaled a 750-msec CS-US interval. All rabbits showed conditioned responses to each CS with mean onset and peak latencies that coincided with the CS-US interval. Many anterior lobe Purkinje cells showed significant learning-related activity after eyeblink conditioning to one or both of the CSs. More Purkinje cells responded with inhibition than with excitation to CS presentation. In addition, when the firing patterns of all conditioning-related Purkinje cells were pooled, it appeared that the population showed a pattern of excitation followed by inhibition during the CS-US interval. Using cholera toxin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase, Purkinje cells in recording areas were found to project to the interpositus nucleus. These data support previous studies that have suggested a role for the anterior cerebellar cortex in eyeblink conditioning as well as models of cerebellar-mediated CR timing that postulate that Purkinje cell activity inhibits conditioned response (CR) generation during the early portion of a trial by inhibiting the deep cerebellar nuclei and permits CR generation during the later portion of a trial through disinhibition of the cerebellar nuclei. PMID:15897252

  8. Changes in cortical, cerebellar and basal ganglia representation after comprehensive long term unilateral hand motor training.

    PubMed

    Walz, A D; Doppl, K; Kaza, E; Roschka, S; Platz, T; Lotze, M

    2015-02-01

    We were interested in motor performance gain after unilateral hand motor training and associated changes of cerebral and cerebellar movement representation tested with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) before and after training. Therefore, we trained the left hand of strongly right-handed healthy participants with a comprehensive training (arm ability training, AAT) over two weeks. Motor performance was tested for the trained and non-trained hand before and after the training period. Functional imaging was performed for the trained and the non-trained hand separately and comprised force modulation with the fist, sequential finger movements and a fast writing task. After the training period the performance gain of tapping movements was comparable for both hand sides, whereas the motor performance for writing showed a higher training effect for the trained hand. fMRI showed a reduction of activation in supplementary motor, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, parietal cortical areas and lateral cerebellar areas during sequential finger movements over time. During left hand writing lateral cerebellar hemisphere also showed reduced activation, while activation of the anterior cerebellar hemisphere was increased. An initially high anterior cerebellar activation magnitude was a predictive value for high training outcome of finger tapping and visual guided movements. During the force modulation task we found increased activation in the striate. Overall, a comprehensive long-term training of the less skillful hand in healthy participants resulted in relevant motor performance improvements, as well as an intermanual learning transfer differently pronounced for the type of movement tested. Whereas cortical motor area activation decreased over time, cerebellar anterior hemisphere and striatum activity seem to represent increasing resources after long-term motor training.

  9. Cerebellar and Spinal Direct Current Stimulation in Children: Computational Modeling of the Induced Electric Field.

    PubMed

    Fiocchi, Serena; Ravazzani, Paolo; Priori, Alberto; Parazzini, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the specific application of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the cerebellum can modulate cerebellar activity. In parallel, transcutaneous spinal DC stimulation (tsDCS) was found to be able to modulate conduction along the spinal cord and spinal cord functions. Of particular interest is the possible use of these techniques in pediatric age, since many pathologies and injuries, which affect the cerebellar cortex as well as spinal cord circuits, are diffuse in adults as well as in children. Up to now, experimental studies of cerebellar and spinal DC stimulation on children are completely missing and therefore there is a lack of information about the safety of this technique as well as the appropriate dose to be used during the treatment. Therefore, the knowledge of electric quantities induced into the cerebellum and over the spinal cord during cerebellar tDCS and tsDCS, respectively, is required. This work attempts to address this issue by estimating through computational techniques, the electric field distributions induced in the target tissues during the two stimulation techniques applied to different models of children of various ages and gender. In detail, we used four voxel child models, aged between 5- and 8-years. Results revealed that, despite inter-individual differences, the cerebellum is the structure mainly involved by cerebellar tDCS, whereas the electric field generated by tsDCS can reach the spinal cord also in children. Moreover, it was found that there is a considerable spread toward the anterior area of the cerebellum and the brainstem region for cerebellar tDCS and in the spinal nerve for spinal direct current stimulation. Our study therefore predicts that the electric field spreads in complex patterns that strongly depend on individual anatomy, thus giving further insight into safety issues and informing data for pediatric investigations of these stimulation techniques.

  10. Cerebellar Motor Function in Spina Bifida Meningomyelocele

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Maureen; Salman, Michael S.; Juranek, Jenifer; Fletcher, Jack M.

    2010-01-01

    Spina bifida meningomyelocele (SBM), a congenital neurodevelopmental disorder, involves dysmorphology of the cerebellum, and its most obvious manifestations are motor deficits. This paper reviews cerebellar neuropathology and motor function across several motor systems well studied in SBM in relation to current models of cerebellar motor and timing function. Children and adults with SBM have widespread motor deficits in trunk, upper limbs, eyes, and speech articulators that are broadly congruent with those observed in adults with cerebellar lesions. The structure and function of the cerebellum are correlated with a range of motor functions. While motor learning is generally preserved in SBM, those motor functions requiring predictive signals and precise calibration of the temporal features of movement are impaired, resulting in deficits in smooth movement coordination as well as in the classical cerebellar triad of dysmetria, ataxia, and dysarthria. That motor function in individuals with SBM is disordered in a manner phenotypically similar to that in adult cerebellar lesions, and appears to involve similar deficits in predictive cerebellar motor control, suggests that age-based cerebellar motor plasticity is limited in individuals with this neurodevelopmental disorder. PMID:20652468

  11. Topography of cerebellar deficits in humans.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Giuliana; Manto, Mario

    2012-06-01

    The cerebellum is a key-piece for information processing and is involved in numerous motor and nonmotor activities, thanks to the anatomical characteristics of the circuitry, the enormous computational capabilities and the high connectivity to other brain areas. Despite its uniform cytoarchitecture, cerebellar circuitry is segregated into functional zones. This functional parcellation is driven by the connectivity and the anatomo-functional heterogeneity of the numerous extra-cerebellar structures linked to the cerebellum, principally brain cortices, precerebellar nuclei and spinal cord. Major insights into cerebellar functions have been gained with a detailed analysis of the cerebellar outputs, with the evidence that fundamental aspects of cerebrocerebellar operations are the closed-loop circuit and the predictions of future states. Cerebellar diseases result in disturbances of accuracy of movements and lack of coordination. The cerebellar syndrome includes combinations of oculomotor disturbances, dysarthria and other speech deficits, ataxia of limbs, ataxia of stance and gait, as well as often more subtle cognitive/behavioral impairments. Our understanding of the corresponding anatomo-functional maps for the human cerebellum is continuously improving. We summarize the topography of the clinical deficits observed in cerebellar patients and the growing evidence of a regional subdivision into motor, sensory, sensorimotor, cognitive and affective domains. The recently described topographic dichotomy motor versus nonmotor cerebellum based upon anatomical, functional and neuropsychological studies is also discussed.

  12. Sonic hedgehog patterning during cerebellar development.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Annarita; Cerrato, Valentina; Fucà, Elisa; Parmigiani, Elena; Buffo, Annalisa; Leto, Ketty

    2016-01-01

    The morphogenic factor sonic hedgehog (Shh) actively orchestrates many aspects of cerebellar development and maturation. During embryogenesis, Shh signaling is active in the ventricular germinal zone (VZ) and represents an essential signal for proliferation of VZ-derived progenitors. Later, Shh secreted by Purkinje cells sustains the amplification of postnatal neurogenic niches: the external granular layer and the prospective white matter, where excitatory granule cells and inhibitory interneurons are produced, respectively. Moreover, Shh signaling affects Bergmann glial differentiation and promotes cerebellar foliation during development. Here we review the most relevant functions of Shh during cerebellar ontogenesis, underlying its role in physiological and pathological conditions.

  13. Cystic cerebellar astrocytomas in childhood.

    PubMed

    Griffin, T W; Beaufait, D; Blasko, J C

    1979-07-01

    Thirty-nine patients with low grade cystic cerebellar astrocytomas were treated at the University of Washington and Children's Orthopedic Hospital in Seattle, Washington, between 1955 and 1977; 29 were treated with partial or complete resection alone, and 10 received radiation therapy after various types of surgical procedures. With a mean follow-up time of 7 years, the survival rate for patients who had complete resections of their primary disease was 100%. The relapse-free survival rate was 82%. The relapse-free survival rate for patients treated primarily with partial resection alone was 36%. Postoperative irradiation after partial resection for both primary and recurrent disease resulted in a relapse-free survival rate of 83%. If complete tumor excision is not possible, postoperative radiation therapy is recommended following partial resection.

  14. Does modulation of the endocannabinoid system have potential therapeutic utility in cerebellar ataxia?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cerebellar ataxias represent a spectrum of disorders which are, however, linked by common symptoms of motor incoordination and typically associated with deficiency in Purkinje cell firing activity and, often, degeneration. Cerebellar ataxias currently lack a curative agent. The endocannabinoid (eCB) system includes eCB compounds and their associated metabolic enzymes, together with cannabinoid receptors, predominantly the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) in the cerebellum; activation of this system in the cerebellar cortex is associated with deficits in motor coordination characteristic of ataxia, effects which can be prevented by CB1R antagonists. Of further interest are various findings that CB1R deficits may also induce a progressive ataxic phenotype. Together these studies suggest that motor coordination is reliant on maintaining the correct balance in eCB system signalling. Recent work also demonstrates deficient cannabinoid signalling in the mouse ‘ducky2J’ model of ataxia. In light of these points, the potential mechanisms whereby cannabinoids may modulate the eCB system to ameliorate dysfunction associated with cerebellar ataxias are considered. PMID:26970080

  15. Long-term supratentorial brain structure and cognitive function following cerebellar tumour resections in childhood.

    PubMed

    Moberget, T; Andersson, S; Lundar, T; Due-Tønnessen, B J; Heldal, A; Endestad, T; Westlye, L T

    2015-03-01

    The cerebellum is connected to extensive regions of the cerebrum, and cognitive deficits following cerebellar lesions may thus be related to disrupted cerebello-cerebral connectivity. Moreover, early cerebellar lesions could affect distal brain development, effectively inducing long-term changes in brain structure and cognitive function. Here, we characterize supratentorial brain structure and cognitive function in 20 adult patients treated for cerebellar tumours in childhood (mean age at surgery: 7.1 years) and 26 matched controls. Relative to controls, patients showed reduced cognitive function and increased grey matter density in bilateral cingulum, left orbitofrontal cortex and the left hippocampus. Within the patient group, increased grey matter density in these regions was associated with decreased performance on tests of processing speed and executive function. Further, diffusion tensor imaging revealed widespread alterations in white matter microstructure in patients. While current ventricle volume (an index of previous hydrocephalus severity it patients) was associated with grey matter density and white matter microstructure in patients, this could only partially account for the observed group differences in brain structure and cognitive function. In conclusion, our results show distal effects of cerebellar lesions on cerebral integrity and wiring, likely caused by a combination of neurodegenerative processes and perturbed neurodevelopment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Promoting Motor Cortical Plasticity with Acute Aerobic Exercise: A Role for Cerebellar Circuits.

    PubMed

    Mang, Cameron S; Brown, Katlyn E; Neva, Jason L; Snow, Nicholas J; Campbell, Kristin L; Boyd, Lara A

    2016-01-01

    Acute aerobic exercise facilitated long-term potentiation-like plasticity in the human primary motor cortex (M1). Here, we investigated the effect of acute aerobic exercise on cerebellar circuits, and their potential contribution to altered M1 plasticity in healthy individuals (age: 24.8 ± 4.1 years). In Experiment   1, acute aerobic exercise reduced cerebellar inhibition (CBI) (n = 10, p = 0.01), elicited by dual-coil paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation. In Experiment   2, we evaluated the facilitatory effects of aerobic exercise on responses to paired associative stimulation, delivered with a 25 ms (PAS25) or 21 ms (PAS21) interstimulus interval (n = 16 per group). Increased M1 excitability evoked by PAS25, but not PAS21, relies on trans-cerebellar sensory pathways. The magnitude of the aerobic exercise effect on PAS response was not significantly different between PAS protocols (interaction effect: p = 0.30); however, planned comparisons indicated that, relative to a period of rest, acute aerobic exercise enhanced the excitatory response to PAS25 (p = 0.02), but not PAS21 (p = 0.30). Thus, the results of these planned comparisons indirectly provide modest evidence that modulation of cerebellar circuits may contribute to exercise-induced increases in M1 plasticity. The findings have implications for developing aerobic exercise strategies to "prime" M1 plasticity for enhanced motor skill learning in applied settings.

  17. Diffusion Tensor Imaging Demonstrates Brainstem and Cerebellar Abnormalities in Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajesh; Macey, Paul M.; Woo, Mary A.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Harper, Ronald M.

    2008-01-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) patients show reduced breathing drive during sleep, decreased hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory responses, and autonomic and affective deficits, suggesting both brainstem and forebrain injuries. Forebrain damage was previously described in CCHS, but methodological limitations precluded detection of brainstem injury, a concern because genetic mutations in CCHS target brainstem autonomic nuclei. To assess brainstem and cerebellar areas, we used diffusion tensor imaging-based measures, namely axial diffusivity, reflecting water diffusion parallel to fibers, and sensitive to axonal injury, and radial diffusivity, measuring diffusion perpendicular to fibers, and indicative of myelin injury. Diffusion tensor imaging was performed in 12 CCHS and 26 controls, and axial and radial diffusivity maps were compared between groups using analysis of covariance (covariates; age and gender). Increased axial diffusivity in CCHS appeared within the lateral medulla and clusters with injury extended from the dorsal midbrain through the periaqueductal gray, raphé, and superior cerebellar decussation, ventrally to the basal-pons. Cerebellar cortex and deep nuclei, and the superior and inferior cerebellar peduncles showed increased radial diffusivity. Midbrain, pontine, and lateral medullary structures, and the cerebellum and its fiber systems are injured in CCHS, likely contributing to the characteristics found in the syndrome. PMID:18458651

  18. Interference of left and right cerebellar rTMS with procedural learning.

    PubMed

    Torriero, Sara; Oliveri, Massimiliano; Koch, Giacomo; Caltagirone, Carlo; Petrosini, Laura

    2004-11-01

    Increasing evidence suggests cerebellar involvement in procedural learning. To further analyze its role and to assess whether it has a lateralized influence, in the present study we used a repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation interference approach in a group of normal subjects performing a serial reaction time task. We studied 36 normal volunteers: 13 subjects underwent repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on the left cerebellum and performed the task with the right (6 subjects) or left (7 subjects) hand; 10 subjects underwent repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on the right cerebellum and performed the task with the hand ipsilateral (5 subjects) or contralateral (5 subjects) to the stimulation; another 13 subjects served as controls and were not submitted to repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation; 7 of them performed the task with the right hand and 6 with the left hand. The main results show that interference with the activity of the lateral cerebellum induces a significant decrease of procedural learning: Interference with the right cerebellar hemisphere activity induces a significant decrease in procedural learning regardless of the hand used to perform the serial reaction time task, whereas left cerebellar hemisphere activity seems more linked with procedural learning through the ipsilateral hand. In conclusion, the present study shows for the first time that a transient interference with the functions of the cerebellar cortex results in an impairment of procedural learning in normal subjects and it provides new evidences for interhemispheric differences in the lateral cerebellum.

  19. Postnatal dendritic morphogenesis of cerebellar basket and stellate cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Spatkowski, Gabriele; Schilling, Karl

    2003-05-01

    Inhibitory interneurons in the molecular layer of the cerebellar cortex play an essential role in cerebellar physiology by providing feed-forward inhibition to efferent Purkinje cells. Morphologic characteristics have been utilized to classify these cells as either basket cells or stellate cells. Conflicting evidence exists as to whether these cells are of distinct lineage and develop by employing discrete genetic programs, or whether their characteristic morphologic differences result from external cues that they encounter only after they have settled in their final territory in the molecular layer. We used primary dissociated cerebellar cultures established from early postnatal mice to study dendritogenesis of basket/stellate cells, identified by immunostaining for parvalbumin, under experimentally controlled conditions. We find that the radial axonal orientation of stem dendrites is non-random, suggesting a cell-intrinsic component defining this morphologic trait. In contrast, the expanse and complexity of basket/stellate cell dendrites is modulated by the granule cell derived neurotrophin, BDNF. BDNF-induced morphogenetic effects decline with ongoing development. Overall, our data do not provide evidence for a distinct lineage or genetic makeup of cerebellar molecular layer inhibitory interneurons.

  20. A cerebellar model for predictive motor control tested in a brain-based device.

    PubMed

    McKinstry, Jeffrey L; Edelman, Gerald M; Krichmar, Jeffrey L

    2006-02-28

    The cerebellum is known to be critical for accurate adaptive control and motor learning. We propose here a mechanism by which the cerebellum may replace reflex control with predictive control. This mechanism is embedded in a learning rule (the delayed eligibility trace rule) in which synapses onto a Purkinje cell or onto a cell in the deep cerebellar nuclei become eligible for plasticity only after a fixed delay from the onset of suprathreshold presynaptic activity. To investigate the proposal that the cerebellum is a general-purpose predictive controller guided by a delayed eligibility trace rule, a computer model based on the anatomy and dynamics of the cerebellum was constructed. It contained components simulating cerebellar cortex and deep cerebellar nuclei, and it received input from a middle temporal visual area and the inferior olive. The model was incorporated in a real-world brain-based device (BBD) built on a Segway robotic platform that learned to traverse curved paths. The BBD learned which visual motion cues predicted impending collisions and used this experience to avoid path boundaries. During learning, the BBD adapted its velocity and turning rate to successfully traverse various curved paths. By examining neuronal activity and synaptic changes during this behavior, we found that the cerebellar circuit selectively responded to motion cues in specific receptive fields of simulated middle temporal visual areas. The system described here prompts several hypotheses about the relationship between perception and motor control and may be useful in the development of general-purpose motor learning systems for machines.

  1. Compensatory striatal-cerebellar connectivity in mild-moderate Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Simioni, Alison C; Dagher, Alain; Fellows, Lesley K

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine depletion in the putamen is associated with altered motor network functional connectivity in people with Parkinson's disease (PD), but the functional significance of these changes remains unclear, attributed to either pathological or compensatory mechanisms in different studies. Here, we examined the effects of PD on dorsal caudal putamen functional connectivity, off and on dopamine replacement therapy (DRT), using resting state fMRI. Motor performance was assessed with the Purdue pegboard task. Twenty-one patients with mild-moderate Parkinson's disease were studied twice, once after an overnight DRT washout and once after the administration of a standard dose of levodopa (Sinemet), and compared to 20 demographically-matched healthy control participants. PD patients off DRT showed increased putamen functional connectivity with both the cerebellum (lobule V) and primary motor cortex (M1), relative to healthy controls. Greater putamen-cerebellar functional connectivity was significantly correlated with better motor performance, whereas greater putamen-M1 functional connectivity was predictive of poorer motor performance. The administration of levodopa improved motor performance in the PD group, as expected, and reduced putamen-cerebellar connectivity to levels comparable to the healthy control group. The strength of putamen-cerebellar functional connectivity continued to predict motor performance in the PD group while on levodopa. These findings argue that increased putamen-M1 functional connectivity reflects a pathological change, deleterious to motor performance. In contrast, increased putamen-cerebellar connectivity reflects a compensatory mechanism.

  2. Cerebellar contributions to episodic memory encoding as revealed by fMRI.

    PubMed

    Fliessbach, Klaus; Trautner, Peter; Quesada, Carlos M; Elger, Christian E; Weber, Bernd

    2007-04-15

    Event-related functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) allows for the comparison of hemodynamic responses evoked by items that are remembered in a subsequent memory task vs. items that are forgotten. In this way, brain regions that assumingly contribute to successful memory encoding have been identified, including the left inferior prefrontal cortex (LIPC) and the medial temporal lobe. Although a cerebellar involvement in verbal working memory is well-established, a contribution of the cerebellum to episodic long-term encoding has only sporadically been described, and mechanisms underlying cerebellar memory effects are unclear. We conducted a typical incidental verbal memory fMRI experiment with three different encoding tasks varying the depth of semantic processing. Slice positioning allowed for the coverage of the entire cerebellum. We observed a significant subsequent memory effect within the superior and posterior right cerebellar hemisphere that was task independent. Additionally, we found a different area within the superior right cerebellum displaying a memory effect specifically for semantically processed words and a bilateral cerebellar activation specifically associated with encoding success only for a non-semantic task. Our results suggest that besides its known role in verbal working memory, the cerebellum contributes to episodic long-term encoding and should therefore be considered in future fMRI studies dealing with episodic memory.

  3. Cerebellar dentate nuclei lesions reduce motivation in appetitive operant conditioning and open field exploration.

    PubMed

    Bauer, David J; Kerr, Abigail L; Swain, Rodney A

    2011-02-01

    Recently identified pathways from the dentate nuclei of the cerebellum to the rostral cerebral cortex via the thalamus suggest a cerebellar role in frontal and prefrontal non-motor functioning. Disturbance of cerebellar morphology and connectivity, particularly involving these cerebellothalamocortical (CTC) projections, has been implicated in motivational and cognitive deficits. The current study explored the effects of CTC disruption on motivation in male Long Evans rats. The results of two experiments demonstrate that electrolytic lesions of the cerebellar dentate nuclei lower breaking points on an operant conditioning progressive ratio schedule and decrease open field exploration compared to sham controls. Changes occurred in the absence of motor impairment, assessed via lever pressing frequency and rotarod performance. Similar elevated plus maze performances between lesioned and sham animals indicated that anxiety did not influence task performance. Our results demonstrate hedonic and purposive motivational reduction and suggest a CTC role in global motivational processes. These implications are discussed in terms of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and autism, in which cerebellar damage and motivational deficits often present concomitantly. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Promoting Motor Cortical Plasticity with Acute Aerobic Exercise: A Role for Cerebellar Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Mang, Cameron S.; Brown, Katlyn E.; Neva, Jason L.; Snow, Nicholas J.; Campbell, Kristin L.; Boyd, Lara A.

    2016-01-01

    Acute aerobic exercise facilitated long-term potentiation-like plasticity in the human primary motor cortex (M1). Here, we investigated the effect of acute aerobic exercise on cerebellar circuits, and their potential contribution to altered M1 plasticity in healthy individuals (age: 24.8 ± 4.1 years). In Experiment   1, acute aerobic exercise reduced cerebellar inhibition (CBI) (n = 10, p = 0.01), elicited by dual-coil paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation. In Experiment   2, we evaluated the facilitatory effects of aerobic exercise on responses to paired associative stimulation, delivered with a 25 ms (PAS25) or 21 ms (PAS21) interstimulus interval (n = 16 per group). Increased M1 excitability evoked by PAS25, but not PAS21, relies on trans-cerebellar sensory pathways. The magnitude of the aerobic exercise effect on PAS response was not significantly different between PAS protocols (interaction effect: p = 0.30); however, planned comparisons indicated that, relative to a period of rest, acute aerobic exercise enhanced the excitatory response to PAS25 (p = 0.02), but not PAS21 (p = 0.30). Thus, the results of these planned comparisons indirectly provide modest evidence that modulation of cerebellar circuits may contribute to exercise-induced increases in M1 plasticity. The findings have implications for developing aerobic exercise strategies to “prime” M1 plasticity for enhanced motor skill learning in applied settings. PMID:27127659

  5. Impact of cerebellar atrophy on cortical gray matter and cerebellar peduncles as assessed by voxel-based morphometry and high angular resolution diffusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, Michael; Olivito, Giusy; Molinari, Marco; Cercignani, Mara; Bozzali, Marco; Leggio, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Summary In recent years the cerebellum has been attributed a more important role in higher-level functions than previously believed. We examined a cohort of patients suffering from cerebellar atrophy resulting in ataxia, with two main objectives: first to investigate which regions of the cerebrum were affected by the cerebellar degeneration, and second to assess whether diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) metrics within the medial (MCP) and superior cerebellar peduncle (SCP) – namely fractional anisotropy (FA) and radial diffusivity (RD) – could be used as a biomarker in patients with this condition. Structural and dMRI data of seven patients with cerebellar atrophy (2 with spinocerebellar atrophy type 2, 1 with Friedreich’s ataxia, 4 with idiopathic cerebellar ataxia) and no visible cortical lesions or cortical atrophy were investigated with Freesurfer and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of gray matter (GM) as well as MCP and SCP FA maps. Correlations of MCP and SCP mean FA with ataxia scores and subscores were also evaluated. Freesurfer showed that patients had significantly reduced volume of the thalamus, ventral diencephalon and pallidum. VBM also demonstrated significantly lower local GM volumes in patients, notably in the head of the caudate nucleus, posterior cingulate gyrus and orbitofrontal cortex bilaterally, as well as in Broca’s area in the left hemisphere, and a significant increase in RD in the MCP and SCP of both hemispheres. A significant correlation was found between MCP mean FA and total ataxia score (R=−0.7, p=0.03), and subscores for kinetic functions (R=−0.74, p=0.03) and oculomotor disorders (R=−0.70, p=0.04). The regions of the cerebrum found to have significantly lower local GM volumes have been described to be involved in higher-level cerebellar functions such as initiation of voluntary movements, emotional control, memory retrieval and general cognition. Our findings corroborate recent research pointing to a more

  6. Increased facilitation of the primary motor cortex following 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the contralateral cerebellum in normal humans.

    PubMed

    Oliveri, Massimiliano; Koch, Giacomo; Torriero, Sara; Caltagirone, Carlo

    2005-03-16

    Connections between the cerebellum and the contralateral motor cortex are dense and important, but their physiological significance is difficult to measure in humans. We have studied a group of 10 healthy subjects to test whether a modulation of the excitability of the left cerebellum can affect the excitability of the contralateral motor cortex. We used repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) at 1 Hz frequency to transiently depress the excitability of the left cerebellar cortex and paired-pulse TMS testing of intracortical inhibition (ICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF) to probe the excitability of cortico-cortical connections in the right motor cortex. The cortical silent period was also measured before and after cerebellar rTMS. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were significantly larger after than before conditioning rTMS trains (p < 0.01). Moreover, left cerebellar rTMS increased the ICF of the right motor cortex as measured with paired-pulses separated by an interstimulus interval (ISI) of 15 ms. The effect lasted for up to 30 min afterward and was specific for the contralateral (right) motor cortex. The cortical silent period was unaffected by cerebellar rTMS. The implication is that rTMS of the cerebellar cortex can shape the flowing of inhibition from Purkinje cells toward deep nuclei, thereby increasing the excitability of interconnected brain areas.

  7. Genetic manipulation of cerebellar granule neurons in vitro and in vivo to study neuronal morphology and migration.

    PubMed

    Holubowska, Anna; Mukherjee, Chaitali; Vadhvani, Mayur; Stegmüller, Judith

    2014-03-17

    Developmental events in the brain including neuronal morphogenesis and migration are highly orchestrated processes. In vitro and in vivo analyses allow for an in-depth characterization to identify pathways involved in these events. Cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) that are derived from the developing cerebellum are an ideal model system that allows for morphological analyses. Here, we describe a method of how to genetically manipulate CGNs and how to study axono- and dendritogenesis of individual neurons. With this method the effects of RNA interference, overexpression or small molecules can be compared to control neurons. In addition, the rodent cerebellar cortex is an easily accessible in vivo system owing to its predominant postnatal development. We also present an in vivo electroporation technique to genetically manipulate the developing cerebella and describe subsequent cerebellar analyses to assess neuronal morphology and migration.

  8. On the Effect of Sex on Prefrontal and Cerebellar Neurometabolites in Healthy Adults: An MRS Study

    PubMed Central

    Endres, Dominique; Tebartz van Elst, Ludger; Feige, Bernd; Backenecker, Stephan; Nickel, Kathrin; Bubl, Anna; Lange, Thomas; Mader, Irina; Maier, Simon; Perlov, Evgeniy

    2016-01-01

    In neuropsychiatric research, the aspects of sex have received increasing attention over the past decade. With regard to the neurometabolic differences in the prefrontal cortex and the cerebellum of both men and women, we performed a magnetic resonance spectroscopic (MRS) study of a large group of healthy subjects. For neurometabolic measurements, we used single-voxel proton MRS. The voxels of interest (VOI) were placed in the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex (pACC) and the left cerebellar hemisphere. Absolute quantification of creatine (Cre), total choline (t-Cho), glutamate and glutamine (Glx), N-acetylaspartate, and myo-inositol (mI) was performed. Thirty-three automatically matched ACCs and 31 cerebellar male–female pairs were statistically analyzed. We found no significant neurometabolic differences in the pACC region (Wilks' lambda: p = 0.657). In the left cerebellar region, we detected significant variations between the male and female groups (p = 0.001). Specifically, we detected significantly higher Cre (p = 0.005) and t-Cho (p = 0.000) levels in men. Additionally, males tended to have higher Glx and mI concentrations. This is the first study to report neurometabolic sex differences in the cerebellum. The effects of sexual hormones might have influenced our findings. Our data indicates the importance of adjusting for the confounding effects of sex in MRS studies. PMID:27531975

  9. Evidence for a motor somatotopy in the cerebellar dentate nucleus--an FMRI study in humans.

    PubMed

    Küper, Michael; Thürling, Markus; Stefanescu, Roxana; Maderwald, Stefan; Roths, Johannes; Elles, Hans G; Ladd, Mark E; Diedrichsen, Jörn; Timmann, Dagmar

    2012-11-01

    Previous anatomical studies in monkeys have shown that forelimb motor representation is located caudal to hindlimb representation within the dorso-rostral dentate nucleus. Here we investigate human dentate nucleus motor somatotopy by means of ultra-highfield (7 T) functional magnetic brain imaging (fMRI). Twenty five young healthy males participated in the study. Simple finger and foot movement tasks were performed to identify dentate nucleus motor areas. Recently developed normalization procedures for group analyses were used for the cerebellar cortex and the cerebellar dentate nucleus. Cortical activations were in good accordance with the known somatotopy of the human cerebellar cortex. Dentate nucleus activations following motor tasks were found in particular in the ipsilateral dorso-rostral nucleus. Activations were also present in other parts of the nucleus including the contralateral side, and there was some overlap between the body part representations. Within the ipsilateral dorso-rostral dentate, finger activations were located caudally compared to foot movement-related activations in fMRI group analysis. Likewise, the centre of gravity (COG) for the finger activation was more caudal than the COG of the foot activation across participants. A multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) on the x, y, and z coordinates of the COG indicated that this difference was significant (P = 0.043). These results indicate that in humans, the lower and upper limbs are arranged rostro-caudally in the dorsal aspect of the dentate nucleus, which is consistent with studies in non-human primates.

  10. [Bilateral cerebellar hematoma after supratentorial glioma surgery].

    PubMed

    Czepko, Ryszard; Kwinta, Borys; Uhl, Henryka; Urbanik, Andrzej; Libionka, Witold; Pietraszko, Wojciech

    2004-01-01

    We present a case of bilateral hematoma in cerebellar hemispheres in a 30-year-old man after surgical treatment of extensive left frontal glioma. 16 hours after surgery the patient lost consciousness. An immediate CT revealed hematoma in both cerebellar hemispheres. The hematoma was subsequently removed via bilateral suboccipital craniectomy. After the operation the clinical status of the patient gradually improved - he was discharged in a good general condition. In the presented case the hematoma developed presumably as a consequence of extensive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) loss (670 ml) via postoperative wound drainage. The resulting cerebellar displacement caused strain of the draining veins, affecting blood outflow, and causing parenchymal hemorrhage. In order to prevent the complication, massive CSF loss during and after operation should be avoided. Careful monitoring of the patient's condition in the postoperative period, even if the general status is good, is important because only an immediate intervention may prevent the development of irreversible consequences of cerebellar hematoma formation.

  11. Consensus Paper: Radiological Biomarkers of Cerebellar Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Baldarçara, Leonardo; Currie, Stuart; Hadjivassiliou, M.; Hoggard, Nigel; Jack, Allison; Jackowski, Andrea P.; Mascalchi, Mario; Parazzini, Cecilia; Reetz, Kathrin; Righini, Andrea; Schulz, Jörg B.; Vella, Alessandra; Webb, Sara Jane; Habas, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary and sporadic cerebellar ataxias represent a vast and still growing group of diseases whose diagnosis and differentiation cannot only rely on clinical evaluation. Brain imaging including magnetic resonance (MR) and nuclear medicine techniques allows for characterization of structural and functional abnormalities underlying symptomatic ataxias. These methods thus constitute a potential source of radiological biomarkers, which could be used to identify these diseases and differentiate subgroups of them, and to assess their severity and their evolution. Such biomarkers mainly comprise qualitative and quantitative data obtained from MR including proton spectroscopy, diffusion imaging, tractography, voxel-based morphometry, functional imaging during task execution or in a resting state, and from SPETC and PET with several radiotracers. In the current article, we aim to illustrate briefly some applications of these neuroimaging tools to evaluation of cerebellar disorders such as inherited cerebellar ataxia, fetal developmental malformations, and immune-mediated cerebellar diseases and of neurodegenerative or early-developing diseases, such as dementia and autism in which cerebellar involvement is an emerging feature. Although these radiological biomarkers appear promising and helpful to better understand ataxia-related anatomical and physiological impairments, to date, very few of them have turned out to be specific for a given ataxia with atrophy of the cerebellar system being the main and the most usual alteration being observed. Consequently, much remains to be done to establish sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of available MR and nuclear medicine features as diagnostic, progression and surrogate biomarkers in clinical routine. PMID:25382714

  12. Cerebellar function and ischemic brain lesions in migraine patients from the general population.

    PubMed

    Koppen, Hille; Boele, Henk-Jan; Palm-Meinders, Inge H; Koutstaal, Bastiaan J; Horlings, Corinne Gc; Koekkoek, Bas K; van der Geest, Jos; Smit, Albertine E; van Buchem, Mark A; Launer, Lenore J; Terwindt, Gisela M; Bloem, Bas R; Kruit, Mark C; Ferrari, Michel D; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2017-02-01

    Objective The objective of this article is to obtain detailed quantitative assessment of cerebellar function and structure in unselected migraine patients and controls from the general population. Methods A total of 282 clinically well-defined participants (migraine with aura n = 111; migraine without aura n = 89; non-migraine controls n = 82; age range 43-72; 72% female) from a population-based study were subjected to a range of sensitive and validated cerebellar tests that cover functions of all main parts of the cerebellar cortex, including cerebrocerebellum, spinocerebellum, and vestibulocerebellum. In addition, all participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain to screen for cerebellar lesions. As a positive control, the same cerebellar tests were conducted in 13 patients with familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1; age range 19-64; 69% female) all carrying a CACNA1A mutation known to affect cerebellar function. Results MRI revealed cerebellar ischemic lesions in 17/196 (8.5%) migraine patients and 3/79 (4%) controls, which were always located in the posterior lobe except for one control. With regard to the cerebellar tests, there were no differences between migraine patients with aura, migraine patients without aura, and controls for the: (i) Purdue-pegboard test for fine motor skills (assembly scores p = 0.1); (ii) block-design test for visuospatial ability (mean scaled scores p = 0.2); (iii) prism-adaptation task for limb learning (shift scores p = 0.8); (iv) eyeblink-conditioning task for learning-dependent timing (peak-time p = 0.1); and (v) body-sway test for balance capabilities (pitch velocity score under two-legs stance condition p = 0.5). Among migraine patients, those with cerebellar ischaemic lesions performed worse than those without lesions on the assembly scores of the pegboard task ( p < 0.005), but not on the primary outcome measures of the other tasks. Compared with controls and non

  13. Identification of an inhibitory circuit that regulates cerebellar Golgi cell activity.

    PubMed

    Hull, Court; Regehr, Wade G

    2012-01-12

    Here we provide evidence that revises the inhibitory circuit diagram of the cerebellar cortex. It was previously thought that Golgi cells, interneurons that are the sole source of inhibition onto granule cells, were exclusively coupled via gap junctions. Moreover, Golgi cells were believed to receive GABAergic inhibition from molecular layer interneurons (MLIs). Here we challenge these views by optogenetically activating the cerebellar circuitry to determine the timing and pharmacology of inhibition onto Golgi cells and by performing paired recordings to directly assess synaptic connectivity. In contrast to current thought, we find that Golgi cells, not MLIs, make inhibitory GABAergic synapses onto other Golgi cells. As a result, MLI feedback does not regulate the Golgi cell network, and Golgi cells are inhibited approximately 2 ms before Purkinje cells, following a mossy fiber input. Hence, Golgi cells and Purkinje cells receive unique sources of inhibition and can differentially process shared granule cell inputs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Introducing treatment strategy for cerebellar ataxia in mutant med mice: combination of acetazolamide and 4-aminopyridine.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Samira; Abbasi, Ataollah; Sarbaz, Yashar

    2014-02-01

    Purkinje neurons are the sole output neuron of the cerebellar cortex, and they generate high-frequency action potentials. Electrophysiological dysfunction of Purkinje neurons causes cerebellar ataxia. Mutant med mice have the lack of expression of the Scn8a gene. This gene encodes the NaV1.6 protein. In med Purkinje neurons, regular high-frequency firing is slowed, and med mice are ataxic. The aim of this study was to propose the neuroprotective drugs which could be useful for ataxia treatment in med mice, and to investigate the neuroprotective effects of these drugs by simulation. Simulation results showed that Kv4 channel inhibitors and BK channel activators restored the normal electrophysiological properties of the med Purkinje neurons. 4-Aminopyridine (4-AP) and acetazolamide (ACTZ) were proposed as neuroprotective drugs for Kv4 channel inhibitor and BK channel activator, respectively.

  15. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Induction in Purkinje Neurons After Cerebellar Motor Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeds, Nicholas W.; Williams, Brian L.; Bickford, Paula C.

    1995-12-01

    The cerebellar cortex is implicated in the learning of complex motor skills. This learning may require synaptic remodeling of Purkinje cell inputs. An extracellular serine protease, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), is involved in remodeling various nonneural tissues and is associated with developing and regenerating neurons. In situ hybridization showed that expression of tPA messenger RNA was increased in the Purkinje neurons of rats within an hour of their being trained for a complex motor task. Antibody to tPA also showed the induction of tPA protein associated with cerebellar Purkinje cells. Thus, the induction of tPA during motor learning may play a role in activity-dependent synaptic plasticity.

  16. Model-Driven Analysis of Eyeblink Classical Conditioning Reveals the Underlying Structure of Cerebellar Plasticity and Neuronal Activity.

    PubMed

    Antonietti, Alberto; Casellato, Claudia; D'Angelo, Egidio; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2016-09-01

    The cerebellum plays a critical role in sensorimotor control. However, how the specific circuits and plastic mechanisms of the cerebellum are engaged in closed-loop processing is still unclear. We developed an artificial sensorimotor control system embedding a detailed spiking cerebellar microcircuit with three bidirectional plasticity sites. This proved able to reproduce a cerebellar-driven associative paradigm, the eyeblink classical conditioning (EBCC), in which a precise time relationship between an unconditioned stimulus (US) and a conditioned stimulus (CS) is established. We challenged the spiking model to fit an experimental data set from human subjects. Two subsequent sessions of EBCC acquisition and extinction were recorded and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was applied on the cerebellum to alter circuit function and plasticity. Evolutionary algorithms were used to find the near-optimal model parameters to reproduce the behaviors of subjects in the different sessions of the protocol. The main finding is that the optimized cerebellar model was able to learn to anticipate (predict) conditioned responses with accurate timing and success rate, demonstrating fast acquisition, memory stabilization, rapid extinction, and faster reacquisition as in EBCC in humans. The firing of Purkinje cells (PCs) and deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN) changed during learning under the control of synaptic plasticity, which evolved at different rates, with a faster acquisition in the cerebellar cortex than in DCN synapses. Eventually, a reduced PC activity released DCN discharge just after the CS, precisely anticipating the US and causing the eyeblink. Moreover, a specific alteration in cortical plasticity explained the EBCC changes induced by cerebellar TMS in humans. In this paper, for the first time, it is shown how closed-loop simulations, using detailed cerebellar microcircuit models, can be successfully used to fit real experimental data sets. Thus, the changes of the

  17. Human Cerebellar Sub-millimeter Diffusion Imaging Reveals the Motor and Non-motor Topography of the Dentate Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Steele, C J; Anwander, A; Bazin, P-L; Trampel, R; Schaefer, A; Turner, R; Ramnani, N; Villringer, A

    2017-09-01

    The reciprocal cortico-cerebellar loops that underlie cerebellar contributions to motor and cognitive behavior form one of the largest systems in the primate brain. Work with non-human primates has shown that the dentate nucleus, the major output nucleus of the cerebellum, contains topographically distinct connections to both motor and non-motor regions, yet there is no evidence for how the cerebellar cortex connects to the dentate nuclei in humans. Here we used in-vivo sub-millimeter diffusion imaging to characterize this fundamental component of the cortico-cerebellar loop, and identified a pattern of superior motor and infero-lateral non-motor connectivity strikingly similar to that proposed by animal work. Crucially, we also present first evidence that the dominance for motor connectivity observed in non-human primates may be significantly reduced in man - a finding that is in accordance with the proposed increase in cerebellar contributions to higher cognitive behavior over the course of primate evolution. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Cerebellar Exposure to Cell-Free Hemoglobin Following Preterm Intraventricular Hemorrhage: Causal in Cerebellar Damage?

    PubMed

    Agyemang, Alex Adusei; Sveinsdóttir, Kristbjörg; Vallius, Suvi; Sveinsdóttir, Snjolaug; Bruschettini, Matteo; Romantsik, Olga; Hellström, Ann; Smith, Lois E H; Ohlsson, Lennart; Holmqvist, Bo; Gram, Magnus; Ley, David

    2017-06-10

    Decreased cerebellar volume is associated with intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) in very preterm infants and may be a principal component in neurodevelopmental impairment. Cerebellar deposition of blood products from the subarachnoid space has been suggested as a causal mechanism in cerebellar underdevelopment following IVH. Using the preterm rabbit pup IVH model, we evaluated the effects of IVH induced at E29 (3 days prior to term) on cerebellar development at term-equivalent postnatal day 0 (P0), term-equivalent postnatal day 2 (P2), and term-equivalent postnatal day 5 (P5). Furthermore, the presence of cell-free hemoglobin (Hb) in cerebellar tissue was characterized, and cell-free Hb was evaluated as a causal factor in the development of cerebellar damage following preterm IVH. IVH was associated with a decreased proliferative (Ki67-positive) portion of the external granular layer (EGL), delayed Purkinje cell maturation, and activated microglia in the cerebellar white matter. In pups with IVH, immunolabeling of the cerebellum at P0 demonstrated a widespread presence of cell-free Hb, primarily distributed in the white matter and the molecular layer. Intraventricular injection of the Hb scavenger haptoglobin (Hp) resulted in a corresponding distribution of immunolabeled Hp in the cerebellum and a partial reversal of the damaging effects observed following IVH. The results suggest that cell-free Hb is causally involved in cerebellar damage following IVH and that blocking cell-free Hb may have protective effects.

  19. Investigating function and connectivity of morphometric findings — Exemplified on cerebellar atrophy in spinocerebellar ataxia 17 (SCA17)

    PubMed Central

    Reetz, Kathrin; Dogan, Imis; Rolfs, Arndt; Binkofski, Ferdinand; Schulz, Jörg B.; Laird, Angela R.; Fox, Peter T.; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 17 (SCA17) is a rare autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia but also a broad spectrum of other neuropsychiatric signs. As anatomical and structural studies have shown severe cerebellar atrophy in SCA17 and a differentiation of the human cerebellum into an anterior sensorimotor and posterior cognitive/emotional partition has been implicated, we aimed at investigating functional connectivity patterns of two cerebellar clusters of atrophy revealed by a morphometric analysis in SCA17 patients. In particular, voxel-based morphometry (VBM) revealed a large cluster of atrophy in SCA17 in the bilateral anterior cerebellum (lobule V) and another one in the left posterior cerebellum (lobules IX, VIIb, VIIIA, VIIIB). These two cerebellar clusters were used as seeds for functional connectivity analyses using task-based meta-analytic connectivity modeling (MACM) and task-free resting state connectivity analysis. Results demonstrated first consistent functional connectivity throughout the cerebellum itself; the anterior cerebellar seed showed stronger connectivity to lobules V, VI and to some extent I–IV, and the posterior cerebellar seed to the posterior lobules VI–IX. Importantly, the cerebellar anterior seed also showed consistently stronger functional connectivity than the posterior one with pre- and motor areas as well as the primary somatosensory cortex. In turn, task-based task-independent functional connectivity analyses revealed that the cerebellar posterior seed was linked with fronto-temporo-parietal areas as well as partly the insula and the thalamus, i.e., brain regions implicated in cognitive and affective processes. Functional characterization of experiments activating either cerebellar seed further corroborated this notion, revealing mainly motor-related functions for the anterior cluster and predominantly cognitive functions were associated for the posterior one. The

  20. Cerebellar and Motor Cortical Transcranial Stimulation Decrease Levodopa-Induced Dyskinesias in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ferrucci, Roberta; Cortese, Francesca; Bianchi, Marta; Pittera, Dario; Turrone, Rosanna; Bocci, Tommaso; Borroni, Barbara; Vergari, Maurizio; Cogiamanian, Filippo; Ardolino, Gianluca; Di Fonzo, Alessio; Padovani, Alessandro; Priori, Alberto

    2016-02-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive technique for inducing prolonged functional changes in the human cerebral cortex. This simple and safe neurostimulation technique for modulating motor functions in Parkinson's disease could extend treatment option for patients with movement disorders. We assessed whether tDCS applied daily over the cerebellum (cerebellar tDCS) and motor cortex (M1-tDCS) improves motor and cognitive symptoms and levodopa-induced dyskinesias in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Nine patients (aged 60-85 years; four women; Hoehn & Yahr scale score 2-3) diagnosed as having idiopathic PD were recruited. To evaluate how tDCS (cerebellar tDCS or M1-tDCS) affects motor and cognitive function in PD, we delivered bilateral anodal (2 mA, 20 min, five consecutive days) and sham tDCS, in random order, in three separate experimental sessions held at least 1 month apart. In each session, as outcome variables, patients underwent the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS III and IV) and cognitive testing before treatment (baseline), when treatment ended on day 5 (T1), 1 week later (T2), and then 4 weeks later (T3), at the same time each day. After patients received anodal cerebellar tDCS and M1-tDCS for five days, the UPDRS IV (dyskinesias section) improved (p < 0.001). Conversely, sham tDCS, cerebellar tDCS, and M1-tDCS left the other variables studied unchanged (p > 0.05). Despite the small sample size, our preliminary results show that anodal tDCS applied for five consecutive days over the motor cortical areas and cerebellum improves parkinsonian patients' levodopa-induced dyskinesias.

  1. Cerebellar contribution to higher and lower order rule learning and cognitive flexibility in mice.

    PubMed

    Dickson, P E; Cairns, J; Goldowitz, D; Mittleman, G

    2017-03-14

    Cognitive flexibility has traditionally been considered a frontal lobe function. However, converging evidence suggests involvement of a larger brain circuit which includes the cerebellum. Reciprocal pathways connecting the cerebellum to the prefrontal cortex provide a biological substrate through which the cerebellum may modulate higher cognitive functions, and it has been observed that cognitive inflexibility and cerebellar pathology co-occur in psychiatric disorders (e.g., autism, schizophrenia, addiction). However, the degree to which the cerebellum contributes to distinct forms of cognitive flexibility and rule learning is unknown. We tested lurcher↔wildtype aggregation chimeras which lose 0-100% of cerebellar Purkinje cells during development on a touchscreen-mediated attentional set-shifting task to assess the contribution of the cerebellum to higher and lower order rule learning and cognitive flexibility. Purkinje cells, the sole output of the cerebellar cortex, ranged from 0 to 108,390 in tested mice. Reversal learning and extradimensional set-shifting were impaired in mice with⩾95% Purkinje cell loss. Cognitive deficits were unrelated to motor deficits in ataxic mice. Acquisition of a simple visual discrimination and an attentional-set were unrelated to Purkinje cells. A positive relationship was observed between Purkinje cells and errors when exemplars from a novel, non-relevant dimension were introduced. Collectively, these data suggest that the cerebellum contributes to higher order cognitive flexibility, lower order cognitive flexibility, and attention to novel stimuli, but not the acquisition of higher and lower order rules. These data indicate that the cerebellar pathology observed in psychiatric disorders may underlie deficits involving cognitive flexibility and attention to novel stimuli.

  2. Cerebellar continuous theta-burst stimulation affects motor learning of voluntary arm movements in humans.

    PubMed

    Li Voti, Pietro; Conte, Antonella; Rocchi, Lorenzo; Bologna, Matteo; Khan, Nashaba; Leodori, Giorgio; Berardelli, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    In this study we investigated in healthy subjects whether continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) over the lateral cerebellum alters motor practice and retention phases during ipsilateral index finger and arm reaching movements. In 12 healthy subjects we delivered cTBS before repeated index finger abductions or arm reaching movements differing in complexity (reaching-to-grasp and reaching-to-point). We evaluated kinematic variables for index finger and arm reaching movements and changes in primary motor cortex (M1) activity tested with transcranial magnetic stimulation. Peak acceleration increased during motor practice for index finger abductions and reaching-to-grasp movements and persisted during motor retention. Peak acceleration decreased during motor practice for reaching-to-point movements and the decrease remained during motor retention. Cerebellar cTBS left the changes in peak acceleration during motor practice for index finger abductions and reaching-to-grasp arm movements unchanged but reduced peak acceleration at motor retention. Cerebellar cTBS prevented the decrease in peak acceleration for reaching-to-point movements during motor practice and at motor retention. Index finger abductions and arm reaching movements increased M1 excitability. Cerebellar cTBS decreased the motor evoked potential (MEP) facilitation induced by index finger movements, but increased the MEP facilitation after reaching-to-grasp and reaching-to-point movements. Cerebellar stimulation prevents motor retention for index finger abductions, reaching-to-grasp and reaching-to-point movements and degrades motor practice only for reaching-to-point movements. Cerebellar cTBS alters practice-related changes in M1 excitability depending on how intensely the cerebellum contributes to the task. Changes in M1 excitability reflect mechanisms of homeostatic plasticity elicited by the interaction of an 'exogenous' (cTBS-induced) and an 'endogenous' (motor practice-induced) plasticity

  3. Cell death and neurodegeneration in the postnatal development of cerebellar vermis in normal and Reeler mice.

    PubMed

    Castagna, Claudia; Merighi, Adalberto; Lossi, Laura

    2016-09-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) was demonstrated in neurons and glia in normal brain development, plasticity, and aging, but also in neurodegeneration. (Macro)autophagy, characterized by cytoplasmic vacuolization and activation of lysosomal hydrolases, and apoptosis, typically entailing cell shrinkage, chromatin and nuclear condensation, are the two more common forms of PCD. Their underlying intracellular pathways are partly shared and neurons can die following both modalities, according to the type of death-triggering stimulus. Reelin is an extracellular protein necessary for proper neuronal migration and brain lamination. In the mutant Reeler mouse, its absence causes neuronal mispositioning, with a notable degree of cerebellar hypoplasia that was tentatively related to an increase in PCD. We have carried out an ultrastructural analysis on the occurrence and type of postnatal PCD affecting the cerebellar neurons in normal and Reeler mice. In the forming cerebellar cortex, PCD took the form of apoptosis or autophagy and mainly affected the cerebellar granule cells (CGCs). Densities of apoptotic CGCs were comparable in both mouse strains at P0-P10, while, in mutants, they increased to become significantly higher at P15. In WT mice the density of autophagic neurons did not display statistically significant differences in the time interval examined in this study, whereas it was reduced in Reeler in the P0-P10 interval, but increased at P15. Besides CGCs, the Purkinje neurons also displayed autophagic features in both WT and Reeler mice. Therefore, cerebellar neurons undergo different types of PCD and a Reelin deficiency affects the type and degree of neuronal death during postnatal development of the cerebellum.

  4. Tubulin-related cerebellar dysplasia: definition of a distinct pattern of cerebellar malformation.

    PubMed

    Romaniello, Romina; Arrigoni, Filippo; Panzeri, Elena; Poretti, Andrea; Micalizzi, Alessia; Citterio, Andrea; Bedeschi, Maria Francesca; Berardinelli, Angela; Cusmai, Raffaella; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Ferraris, Alessandro; Hackenberg, Annette; Kuechler, Alma; Mancardi, Margherita; Nuovo, Sara; Oehl-Jaschkowitz, Barbara; Rossi, Andrea; Signorini, Sabrina; Tüttelmann, Frank; Wahl, Dagmar; Hehr, Ute; Boltshauser, Eugen; Bassi, Maria Teresa; Valente, Enza Maria; Borgatti, Renato

    2017-07-04

    To determine the neuroimaging pattern of cerebellar dysplasia (CD) and other posterior fossa morphological anomalies associated with mutations in tubulin genes and to perform clinical and genetic correlations. Twenty-eight patients harbouring 23 heterozygous pathogenic variants (ten novel) in tubulin genes TUBA1A (n = 10), TUBB2B (n = 8) or TUBB3 (n = 5) were studied by a brain MRI scan performed either on a 1.5 T (n = 10) or 3 T (n = 18) MR scanner with focus on the posterior fossa. Cerebellar anomalies were detected in 24/28 patients (86%). CD was recognised in 19/28 (68%) including cortical cerebellar dysplasia (CCD) in 18/28, either involving only the cerebellar hemispheres (12/28) or associated with vermis dysplasia (6/28). CCD was located only in the right hemisphere in 13/18 (72%), including four TUBB2B-, four TUBB3- and five TUBA1A-mutated patients, while in the other five TUBA1A cases it was located only in the left hemisphere or in both hemispheres. The postero-superior region of the cerebellar hemispheres was most frequently affected. The cerebellar involvement in tubulinopathies shows specific features that may be labelled as 'tubulin-related CD'. This pattern is unique and differs from other genetic causes of cerebellar dysplasia. • Cortical cerebellar dysplasia without cysts is suggestive of tubulin-related disorder. • Cerebellar dysplasia in tubulinopathies shows specific features labelled as 'tubulin-related CD'. • Focal and unilateral involvement of cerebellar hemispheres has important implications for counselling.

  5. The dynamic relationship between cerebellar Purkinje cell simple spikes and the spikelet number of complex spikes

    PubMed Central

    Burroughs, Amelia; Wise, Andrew K.; Xiao, Jianqiang; Houghton, Conor; Tang, Tianyu; Suh, Colleen Y.; Lang, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Purkinje cells are the sole output of the cerebellar cortex and fire two distinct types of action potential: simple spikes and complex spikes.Previous studies have mainly considered complex spikes as unitary events, even though the waveform is composed of varying numbers of spikelets.The extent to which differences in spikelet number affect simple spike activity (and vice versa) remains unclear.We found that complex spikes with greater numbers of spikelets are preceded by higher simple spike firing rates but, following the complex spike, simple spikes are reduced in a manner that is graded with spikelet number.This dynamic interaction has important implications for cerebellar information processing, and suggests that complex spike spikelet number may maintain Purkinje cells within their operational range. Abstract Purkinje cells are central to cerebellar function because they form the sole output of the cerebellar cortex. They exhibit two distinct types of action potential: simple spikes and complex spikes. It is widely accepted that interaction between these two types of impulse is central to cerebellar cortical information processing. Previous investigations of the interactions between simple spikes and complex spikes have mainly considered complex spikes as unitary events. However, complex spikes are composed of an initial large spike followed by a number of secondary components, termed spikelets. The number of spikelets within individual complex spikes is highly variable and the extent to which differences in complex spike spikelet number affects simple spike activity (and vice versa) remains poorly understood. In anaesthetized adult rats, we have found that Purkinje cells recorded from the posterior lobe vermis and hemisphere have high simple spike firing frequencies that precede complex spikes with greater numbers of spikelets. This finding was also evident in a small sample of Purkinje cells recorded from the posterior lobe hemisphere in awake

  6. Cerebellar Atrophy in Adult Survivors of Childhood Cerebellar Tumor.

    PubMed

    Ailion, Alyssa S; King, Tricia Z; Wang, Liya; Fox, Michelle E; Mao, Hui; Morris, Robin M; Crosson, Bruce

    2016-05-01

    The cerebellum (CB) is known for its role in supporting processing speed (PS) and cognitive efficiencies. The CB often sustains damage from treatment and resection in pediatric patients with posterior fossa tumors. Limited research suggests that CB atrophy may be associated with the radiation treatment experienced during childhood. The purpose of the study was to measure cerebellar atrophy to determine its neurobehavioral correlates. Brain magnetic resonance images were collected from 25 adult survivors of CB tumors and age- and gender-matched controls (M age= 24 years (SD=5), 52% female). Average age at diagnosis was 9 years (SD=5) and average time since diagnosis was 15 years (SD=5). PS was measured by the Symbol Digit Modality Test. To quantify atrophy, an objective formula was developed based on prior literature, in which Atrophy=[(CB White+CB Gray Volume)/Intracranial Vault (ICV)]controls-[(CB White+CB Gray+Lesion Size Volume)/ICV]survivors. Regression analyses found that the interaction term (age at diagnosis*radiation) predicts CB atrophy; regression equations included the Neurological Predictor Scale, lesion size, atrophy, and the interaction term and accounted for 33% of the variance in oral PS and 48% of the variance in written PS. Both interactions suggest that individuals with smaller CB lesion size but a greater degree of CB atrophy had slower PS, whereas individuals with a larger CB lesion size and less CB atrophy were less affected. The results of the current study suggest that young age at diagnosis and radiation is associated with CB atrophy, which interacts with lesion size to impact both written and oral PS.

  7. Trains of transcranial direct current stimulation antagonize motor cortex hypoexcitability induced by acute hemicerebellectomy.

    PubMed

    Ben Taib, Nordeyn Oulad; Manto, Mario

    2009-10-01

    The cerebellum is a key modulator of motor cortex activity, allowing both the maintenance and fine-tuning of motor cortex discharges. One elemental defect associated with acute cerebellar lesions is decreased excitability of the contralateral motor cortex, which is assumed to participate in deficits in skilled movements and considered a major defect in motor cortex properties. In the present study, the authors assessed the effect of trains of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), which elicits polarity-dependent shifts in resting membrane potentials. Transcranial DCS countered the defect in motor cortex excitability contralaterally to the hemicerebellar ablation. The depression of both the H-reflex and F wave remained unchanged with tDCS, and cutaneomuscular reflexes remained unaffected. Transcranial DCS antagonized motor cortex hypoexcitability induced by high-frequency stimulation of interpositus nucleus. The authors' results show that tDCS has the potential to modulate motor cortex excitability after acute cerebellar dysfunction. By putting the motor cortex at the appropriate level of excitability, tDCS might allow the motor cortex to become more reactive to the procedures of training or learning.

  8. A case-control proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study confirms cerebellar dysfunction in benign adult familial myoclonic epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Long, Lili; Song, Yanmin; Zhang, Linlin; Hu, Chongyu; Gong, Jian; Xu, Lin; Long, Hongyu; Zhou, Luo; Zhang, Yunci; Zhang, Yong; Xiao, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Background Benign adult familial myoclonic epilepsy (BAFME) is a rare form of epilepsy syndrome. The pathogenesis of BAFME remains unclear, though it seems to involve dysfunction of the cerebellum. Objectives The purpose of this study was to use proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) to investigate whether neurochemical changes underlie abnormal brain function in BAFME. Methods Twelve BAFME patients from one family and 12 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled in this study. The ratios of NAA/Cr, NAA/Cho, Cho/Cr, and NAA/(Cr+Cho) were analyzed. Results The BAFME patients exhibited a decreased N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/choline (Cho) ratio in the cerebellar cortex, whereas there were no significant differences in the NAA/creatine (Cr), Cho/Cr, and NAA/(Cr+Cho) ratios compared with healthy controls. There were no significant differences in 1H-MRS values in the frontal cortex or thalamus between the BAFME patients and controls. No correlation was detected between the NAA/Cho ratio in the cerebellar cortex and disease duration, myoclonus severity, or tremor severity. Conclusion Our results indicate clear cerebellar dysfunction in BAFME. 1H-MRS is a useful tool for the diagnosis of BAFME in combination with family history and electrophysiological examination. PMID:25750529

  9. The cerebellum and cognition: cerebellar lesions do not impair spatial working memory or visual associative learning in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Nixon, P D; Passingham, R E

    1999-11-01

    Anatomical studies in non-human primates have shown that the cerebellum has prominent connections with the dorsal, but not the ventral, visual pathways of the cerebral cortex. Recently, it has been shown that the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DPFC) and cerebellum are interconnected in monkeys. This has been cited in support of the view that the cerebellum may be involved in cognitive functions, e.g. working memory. Six monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) were therefore trained on a classic test of working memory, the spatial delayed alternation (SDA) task, and also on a visual concurrent discrimination (VCD) task. Excitotoxic lesions were made in the lateral cerebellar nuclei, bilaterally, in three of the animals. When retested after surgery the lesioned animals were as quick to relearn both tasks as the remaining unoperated animals. However, when the response times (RT) for each task were directly compared, on the SDA task the monkeys with cerebellar lesions were relatively slow to decide where to respond. We argue that on the SDA task animals can prepare their responses between trials whereas this is not possible on the VCD task, and that the cerebellar lesions may disrupt this response preparation. We subsequently made bilateral lesions in the DPFC of the control animals and retested them on the SDA task. These monkeys failed to relearn the task. The results show that, unlike the dorsal prefrontal cortex, the cerebellum is not essential for working memory or the executive processes that are necessary for correct performance, though it may contribute to the preparation of responses.

  10. Atypical Presentation of a Pediatric Cerebellar Ganglioglioma.

    PubMed

    Bram, Richard; Seidman, Roberta J; Chesler, David

    2017-09-20

    Gangliogliomas (GGs) are rare central nervous system tumors occurring primarily in the supratentorial compartment with infratentorial instances most often involving the brain stem. Infratentorial GGs typically present with signs and symptoms of increased intracranial pressure (ICP), cranial nerve deficits, or focal cerebellar findings; rarely, these tumors have been associated with focal seizures. In this report, we describe an atypical presentation of a cerebellar GG in a 20-month-old male who initially presented with syncope and emesis in the absence of electrographic evidence of seizures, radiographic evidence of hydrocephalus, or elevated ICP. The epidemiology, radiographic, and pathological findings as well as the treatment of these tumors are also discussed. After gross total resection, the patient experienced full resolution of all his preoperative symptoms without the development of new neurological deficits. Unlike their supratentorial counterparts, infratentorial GGs do not commonly present with seizures although rare reports exist in the literature of seizures attributed to cerebellar GG. Moreover, cerebellar GGs may produce nonspecific symptoms in the absence of concrete diagnostic findings. Such a presentation should prompt further neurological evaluation. Most cases of isolated cerebellar GG can be successfully treated with surgical resection and carry a favorable prognosis. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Epidemiology of Cerebellar Diseases and Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Salman, Michael S

    2017-09-22

    Diseases involving the cerebellum occur relatively commonly in children and adults around the globe. Many factors influence their epidemiology including geography, ethnicity, consanguinity, and the methodology used to ascertain patients. In addition, reliable epidemiological data rely heavily on accurate disease classification. Continuous advances in genetic research and neuroimaging modalities have resulted in improved understanding of cerebellar diseases and have led to several revisions in their classification. Recent global epidemiological studies on ataxia reported an estimated overall prevalence rate of 26/100,000 in children, a prevalence rate of dominant hereditary cerebellar ataxia of 2.7/100,000, and a prevalence rate of recessive hereditary cerebellar ataxia of 3.3/100,000. The management of cerebellar diseases is multidisciplinary and multimodal. General supportive and symptomatic therapies should be initiated. Genetic counseling should be offered, where appropriate. Few drugs, specific motor rehabilitation programs, and noninvasive cerebellar stimulation for the treatment of ataxia have been developed and seem to show early promise, but more studies are needed to replicate and fine-tune their benefits further. Some disease-specific treatments are available. For example, acetazolamide or 4-aminopyridine for patients with episodic ataxia type 2 and vitamin E for patients with ataxia caused by vitamin E deficiency.

  12. Cerebellar research: two centuries of discoveries.

    PubMed

    Manto, Mario; Haines, Duane

    2012-06-01

    Numerous laboratories currently focus their activities on cerebellar research. The cerebellum is attractive due to its sophisticated circuitry, high degree of modifiability combined with unique operational mechanisms, and the growing awareness of its multiple roles. Works of pioneers of these last two centuries, such as Rolando, Flourens, Magendie, Luciani, Lugaro, Babinski, Holmes, Cajal, Larsell, Eccles, Voogd, Llinas, or Ito, still exert a strong influence in the way we investigate cerebellar functions. The amount of knowledge is exploding, thanks to advances in genetics, molecular and cellular analyses, profusion of brain imaging techniques, novel behavioral assessments, and reshaping of models of cerebellar function. More than ever, strong and consistent intellectual efforts are required to generate homogeneous research outcomes that might exert a significant influence in the forthcoming domains of research. Because research is often based on the results of our predecessors, The Cerebellum has launched a section called Cerebellar Classics. Papers selected represent key steps for the discovery of some of the secrets of the cerebellar circuitry. These seminal contributions offer a portal to the past to modern scholars.

  13. Cerebellar grafts partially reverse amino acid receptor changes observed in the cerebellum of mice with hereditary ataxia: quantitative autoradiographic studies.

    PubMed

    Stasi, K; Mitsacos, A; Triarhou, L C; Kouvelas, E D

    1997-01-01

    We used quantitative autoradiography of [3H]CNQX (200 nM), [3H]muscimol (13 nM), and [3H]flunitrazepam (10 nM) binding to study the distribution of non-NMDA and GABA(A) receptors in the cerebellum of pcd mutant mice with unilateral cerebellar grafts. Nonspecific binding was determined by incubation with 1 mM Glu, 200 microM GABA, or 1 microM clonazepam, respectively. Saturation parameters were defined in wild-type and mutant cerebella. In mutants, non-NMDA receptors were reduced by 38% in the molecular layer and by 47% in the granule cell layer. The reduction of non-NMDA receptors in the pcd cerebellar cortex supports their localization on Purkinje cells. [3H]CNQX binding sites were visualized at higher density in grafts that had migrated to the cerebellar cortex of the hosts (4.1 and 11.0 pmol/mg protein, respectively, at 23 and 37 days after grafting) than in grafts arrested intraparenchymally (2.6 and 6.2 pmol/mg protein, respectively, at 23 and 37 days after grafting). The pattern of expression of non-NMDA receptors in cortical vs. parenchymal grafts suggests a possible regulation of their levels by transacting elements from host parallel fibers. GABA(A) binding levels in the grafts for both ligands used were similar to normal molecular layer. Binding was increased in the deep cerebellar nuclei of pcd mutants: the increase in [3H]muscimol binding over normal was 215% and the increase in [3H]flunitrazepam binding was 89%. Such increases in the pcd deep cerebellar nuclei may reflect a denervation-induced supersensitivity subsequent to the loss of Purkinje axon terminal innervation. In the deep nuclei of pcd mutants with unilateral cerebellar grafts, [3H]muscimol binding was 31% lower in the grafted side than in the contralateral nongrafted side at 37 days after transplantation; [3H]flunitrazepam binding was also lower in the grafted side by 15% compared to the nongrafted side. Such changes in GABA(A) receptors suggest a significant, albeit partial, normalizing

  14. Neurodevelopmental malformations of the cerebellar vermis in genetically engineered rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cerebellar vermis is particularly vulnerable to neurodevelopmental malformations in humans and rodents. Sprague-Dawley, and Long-Evans rats exhibit spontaneous cerebellar malformations consisting of heterotopic neurons and glia in the molecular layer of the vermis. Malformati...

  15. Secondary orthostatic tremor in the setting of cerebellar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Sarva, Harini; Severt, William Lawrence; Jacoby, Nuri; Pullman, Seth L; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel

    2016-05-01

    Orthostatic tremor (OT) and cerebellar ataxia are uncommon and difficult to treat. We present two patients with OT and cerebellar degeneration, one of whom had spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 and a good treatment response.

  16. Neurodevelopmental malformations of the cerebellar vermis in genetically engineered rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cerebellar vermis is particularly vulnerable to neurodevelopmental malformations in humans and rodents. Sprague-Dawley, and Long-Evans rats exhibit spontaneous cerebellar malformations consisting of heterotopic neurons and glia in the molecular layer of the vermis. Malformati...

  17. Clinical and neuroanatomical predictors of cerebellar mutism syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Law, Nicole; Greenberg, Mark; Bouffet, Eric; Taylor, Michael D.; Laughlin, Suzanne; Strother, Douglas; Fryer, Christopher; McConnell, Dina; Hukin, Juliette; Kaise, Caelyn; Wang, Frank; Mabbott, Donald J.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebellar mutism syndrome (CMS) is an important medical challenge in the management of pediatric posterior fossa brain tumors, because it occurs in a subset of children following tumor resection. A definitive clinical profile and neuroanatomical substrate associated with CMS remains unclear. We investigated the relationship between presurgical and clinical variables and the incidence of CMS, along with diffusion tensor imaging, to characterize the integrity of cerebello-thalamo-cerebral white matter pathways. Seventeen children with posterior fossa tumors and CMS, 34 children with posterior fossa tumors without CMS, and 28 healthy children were enrolled in this study. Bilateral cerebello-thalamo-cerebral pathways were delineated and segmented into anatomical regions. Mean integrity measures for each region were compared among children with CMS, children without CMS, and healthy children. Left-handedness, medulloblastoma histology, and larger tumor size distinguished between patients with CMS and patients without CMS (P < .04). Right cerebellar white matter within the cerebello-thalamo-cerebral pathway was compromised in children with CMS relative to children without CMS and healthy children (P < .02). We provide a potential schema for CMS risk among children treated for posterior fossa tumors. Left-handed children treated for medulloblastoma may be the most at risk for CMS, and unilateral, localized damage within the cerebello-thalamo-cerebral pathway at the level of the right cerebellum is implicated in the presentation of CMS. This disruption in communication between the right cerebellum and left frontal cortex may contribute to speech-language problems observed in children with CMS. Our findings may be relevant for surgical planning and speech-language therapy to mitigate symptoms of CMS. PMID:22952198

  18. Encoding of whisker input by cerebellar Purkinje cells

    PubMed Central

    Bosman, Laurens W J; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan K E; Shapiro, Joël; Rijken, Bianca F M; Zandstra, Froukje; van der Ende, Barry; Owens, Cullen B; Potters, Jan-Willem; de Gruijl, Jornt R; Ruigrok, Tom J H; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2010-01-01

    The cerebellar cortex is crucial for sensorimotor integration. Sensorimotor inputs converge on cerebellar Purkinje cells via two afferent pathways: the climbing fibre pathway triggering complex spikes, and the mossy fibre–parallel fibre pathway, modulating the simple spike activities of Purkinje cells. We used, for the first time, the mouse whisker system as a model system to study the encoding of somatosensory input by Purkinje cells. We show that most Purkinje cells in ipsilateral crus 1 and crus 2 of awake mice respond to whisker stimulation with complex spike and/or simple spike responses. Single-whisker stimulation in anaesthetised mice revealed that the receptive fields of complex spike and simple spike responses were strikingly different. Complex spike responses, which proved to be sensitive to the amplitude, speed and direction of whisker movement, were evoked by only one or a few whiskers. Simple spike responses, which were not affected by the direction of movement, could be evoked by many individual whiskers. The receptive fields of Purkinje cells were largely intermingled, and we suggest that this facilitates the rapid integration of sensory inputs from different sources. Furthermore, we describe that individual Purkinje cells, at least under anaesthesia, may be bound in two functional ensembles based on the receptive fields and the synchrony of the complex spike and simple spike responses. The ‘complex spike ensembles’ were oriented in the sagittal plane, following the anatomical organization of the climbing fibres, while the ‘simple spike ensembles’ were oriented in the transversal plane, as are the beams of parallel fibres. PMID:20724365

  19. Landmark based shape analysis for cerebellar ataxia classification and cerebellar atrophy pattern visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhen; Abulnaga, S. Mazdak; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Onyike, Chiadi; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction can lead to a wide range of movement disorders. Studying the cerebellar atrophy pattern associated with different cerebellar disease types can potentially help in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment planning. In this paper, we present a landmark based shape analysis pipeline to classify healthy control and different ataxia types and to visualize the characteristic cerebellar atrophy patterns associated with different types. A highly informative feature representation of the cerebellar structure is constructed by extracting dense homologous landmarks on the boundary surfaces of cerebellar sub-structures. A diagnosis group classifier based on this representation is built using partial least square dimension reduction and regularized linear discriminant analysis. The characteristic atrophy pattern for an ataxia type is visualized by sampling along the discriminant direction between healthy controls and the ataxia type. Experimental results show that the proposed method can successfully classify healthy controls and different ataxia types. The visualized cerebellar atrophy patterns were consistent with the regional volume decreases observed in previous studies, but the proposed method provides intuitive and detailed understanding about changes of overall size and shape of the cerebellum, as well as that of individual lobules.

  20. Landmark Based Shape Analysis for Cerebellar Ataxia Classification and Cerebellar Atrophy Pattern Visualization

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhen; Abulnaga, S. Mazdak; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Onyike, Chiadi; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction can lead to a wide range of movement disorders. Studying the cerebellar atrophy pattern associated with different cerebellar disease types can potentially help in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment planning. In this paper, we present a landmark based shape analysis pipeline to classify healthy control and different ataxia types and to visualize the characteristic cerebellar atrophy patterns associated with different types. A highly informative feature representation of the cerebellar structure is constructed by extracting dense homologous landmarks on the boundary surfaces of cerebellar sub-structures. A diagnosis group classifier based on this representation is built using partial least square dimension reduction and regularized linear discriminant analysis. The characteristic atrophy pattern for an ataxia type is visualized by sampling along the discriminant direction between healthy controls and the ataxia type. Experimental results show that the proposed method can successfully classify healthy controls and different ataxia types. The visualized cerebellar atrophy patterns were consistent with the regional volume decreases observed in previous studies, but the proposed method provides intuitive and detailed understanding about changes of overall size and shape of the cerebellum, as well as that of individual lobules. PMID:27303111

  1. The cerebellar serotoninergic system and its possible involvement in cerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Trouillas, P

    1993-05-01

    A review concerning the characteristics of the cerebellar serotoninergic system is presented. In rat, cat and oppossum, the perikarya of origin are located in the brain stem raphe nuclei and in other brainstem structures. The projections to the cerebellar layers and deep nuclei include synaptic connections, but also non synaptic terminals, especially in a diffuse cortical plexus. Serotoninergic receptors have been described: 5-HT1B in the molecular layer and 5-HT2 in the inferior olive. Serotonin exerts neurophysiological effects on several target cells, directly or indirectly, presynaptically or postsynaptically. A modulatory effect on Purkinje cells is well documented. In thiamine deprived animals, a specific serotoninergic cerebellar syndrome includes a selective degeneration of the serotoninergic cerebellar system, an increase of the 5-HIAA cerebellar values and an exaggerated serotoninergic turnover. In human heredoataxias (Friedreich's ataxia and cerebellar cortical atrophy), serotoninergic disturbances have been observed in the CSF, including low 5-HIAA values and an increased serotoninergic turnover. Therapeutic results have been obtained with L-5-HTP, a precursor of serotonin, in several conditions presenting cerebellar ataxia. L-5-HTP resistance of olivopontocerebellar atrophies may be explained by the destruction of serotonin-sensitive target cells, especially Purkinje cells.

  2. [Study of cerebellar infarction with isolated vertigo].

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Ai; Enomoto, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Kaoru; Kimura, Yu; Koizuka, Izumi; Tsukuda, Mamoru

    2010-07-01

    Isolated vertigo is generally attributed to labyrinthine disease, but may also signal otherwise asymptomatic cerebellar infarction. Of 309 subjects admitted between April 2004 and March 2009 for the single symptom of acute vertigo initially thought to be labyrinthine, four were found to have cerebellar infarction of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery area (PICA). All were over 60 years old and had risk factors including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, arrhythmia, and/or hyperlipidemia. Two had trunk ataxia, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showing infarction within a few days. The other two could walk without apparent trunk ataxia, however, it took 4 to 7 days to find the infarction, mainly through neurological, neurootological, and MRI findings. Neurologically, astasia, dysbasia or trunk ataxia were important signs. Neurootologically, nystagmus and electronystagmographic testing involving eye tracking, saccade, and optokinetic patttens were useful.

  3. 21 CFR 882.5820 - Implanted cerebellar stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implanted cerebellar stimulator. 882.5820 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5820 Implanted cerebellar stimulator. (a) Identification. An implanted cerebellar stimulator is a device used to stimulate...

  4. 21 CFR 882.5820 - Implanted cerebellar stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Implanted cerebellar stimulator. 882.5820 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5820 Implanted cerebellar stimulator. (a) Identification. An implanted cerebellar stimulator is a device used to stimulate...

  5. Unilateral cerebellar hypoplasia with different clinical features.

    PubMed

    Benbir, Gulcin; Kara, Simay; Yalcinkaya, Beyza Citci; Karhkaya, Geysu; Tuysuz, Beyhan; Kocer, Naci; Yalcinkaya, Cengiz

    2011-03-01

    Unilateral cerebellar hypoplasia (UCH) is a rare pathological condition characterized by the loss of volume in cerebellar hemispheres ranging from mild asymptomatic to severe symptomatic cases. As the designation of UCH remains problematic, the underlying etiopathogenesis also lacks explanation. We investigated the patients admitted to Departments of Child Neurology, Neurology, and Genetics between the years 1992 and 2010 and detected 12 patients with unilateral cerebellar volume loss, with the exclusion of all other cerebellar pathologies. The ages of patients ranged between 6 months to 55 years. Five patients had a delay in developmental milestones, and one of these was diagnosed with neurofibromatosis type 1. Two patients had epileptic seizures, one patient had peripheral facial paralysis as a component of Moebius syndrome, and four patients were incidentally diagnosed during etiological work-up for headache. The clinical outcomes of patients varied from healthy subjects to marked developmental impairment. Radiologically, five patients had severe disproportionate UCH, six had moderate disproportionate, and one had mild proportionate UCH. Cerebellar peduncles were affected in all, and vermis was partly hypoplastic in eight patients. Brainstem was involved in four patients, and seven patients showed involvement of white matter and/or corpus callosum. Imaging features supported that patients with severe disproportionate UCH also displayed additional cerebral and commissural changes, which were related to ischemic or vascular injuries, implying a prenatally acquired disruption. In the presence of such a wide spectrum of clinical and radiological features, a prenatally acquired lesion and, thus, a disruption seem to be more explanatory rather than a primary developmental process or malformation in the etiopathogenesis of unilateral cerebellar hypoplasia.

  6. Cerebellar hypoperfusion in infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kóbor, Jeno; Javaid, Ahmad; Omojola, Matthew F

    2005-02-01

    An identical abnormal pattern was detected by means of (99m)Tc-hexamethyl-propyleneamine-oxime single-photon emission computed tomography in two siblings with infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy. The markedly decreased cerebellar perfusion, along with the early motor symptoms, characteristic magnetic resonance imaging and pathologic findings, points to a preferential cerebellar involvement in this disease. A relative increase in the perfusion to the basal ganglia correlated with the magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities, highly resembling that of Hallervorden-Spatz disease in one of the males, at this site.

  7. The Cerebellar Mutism Syndrome and Its Relation to Cerebellar Cognitive Function and the Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Elizabeth M.; Walsh, Karin S.; Khademian, Zarir P.; Keating, Robert F.; Packer, Roger J.

    2008-01-01

    The postoperative cerebellar mutism syndrome (CMS), consisting of diminished speech output, hypotonia, ataxia, and emotional lability, occurs after surgery in up to 25% of patients with medulloblastoma and occasionally after removal of other posterior fossa tumors. Although the mutism is transient, speech rarely normalizes and the syndrome is…

  8. The Cerebellar Mutism Syndrome and Its Relation to Cerebellar Cognitive Function and the Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Elizabeth M.; Walsh, Karin S.; Khademian, Zarir P.; Keating, Robert F.; Packer, Roger J.

    2008-01-01

    The postoperative cerebellar mutism syndrome (CMS), consisting of diminished speech output, hypotonia, ataxia, and emotional lability, occurs after surgery in up to 25% of patients with medulloblastoma and occasionally after removal of other posterior fossa tumors. Although the mutism is transient, speech rarely normalizes and the syndrome is…

  9. Purkinje cell-specific ablation of Cav2.1 channels is sufficient to cause cerebellar ataxia in mice.

    PubMed

    Todorov, Boyan; Kros, Lieke; Shyti, Reinald; Plak, Petra; Haasdijk, Elize D; Raike, Robert S; Frants, Rune R; Hess, Ellen J; Hoebeek, Freek E; De Zeeuw, Chris I; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M

    2012-03-01

    The Cacna1a gene encodes the α(1A) subunit of voltage-gated Ca(V)2.1 Ca(2+) channels that are involved in neurotransmission at central synapses. Ca(V)2.1-α(1)-knockout (α1KO) mice, which lack Ca(V)2.1 channels in all neurons, have a very severe phenotype of cerebellar ataxia and dystonia, and usually die around postnatal day 20. This early lethality, combined with the wide expression of Ca(V)2.1 channels throughout the cerebellar cortex and nuclei, prohibited determination of the contribution of particular cerebellar cell types to the development of the severe neurobiological phenotype in Cacna1a mutant mice. Here, we crossed conditional Cacna1a mice with transgenic mice expressing Cre recombinase, driven by the Purkinje cell-specific Pcp2 promoter, to specifically ablate the Ca(V)2.1-α(1A) subunit and thereby Ca(V)2.1 channels in Purkinje cells. Purkinje cell Ca(V)2.1-α(1A)-knockout (PCα1KO) mice aged without difficulties, rescuing the lethal phenotype seen in α1KO mice. PCα1KO mice exhibited cerebellar ataxia starting around P12, much earlier than the first signs of progressive Purkinje cell loss, which appears in these mice between P30 and P45. Secondary cell loss was observed in the granular and molecular layers of the cerebellum and the volume of all individual cerebellar nuclei was reduced. In this mouse model with a cell type-specific ablation of Ca(V)2.1 channels, we show that ablation of Ca(V)2.1 channels restricted to Purkinje cells is sufficient to cause cerebellar ataxia. We demonstrate that spatial ablation of Ca(V)2.1 channels may help in unraveling mechanisms of human disease.

  10. Disruptive changes of cerebellar functional connectivity with the default mode network in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lubin; Zou, Feng; Shao, Yongcong; Ye, Enmao; Jin, Xiao; Tan, Shuwen; Hu, Dewen; Yang, Zheng

    2014-12-01

    The default mode network (DMN) plays an important role in the physiopathology of schizophrenia. Previous studies have suggested that the cerebellum participates in higher-order cognitive networks such as the DMN. However, the specific contribution of the cerebellum to the DMN abnormalities in schizophrenia has yet to be established. In this study, we investigated cerebellar functional connectivity differences between 60 patients with schizophrenia and 60 healthy controls from a public resting-state fMRI database. Seed-based correlation analysis was performed by using seeds from the left Crus I, right Crus I and Lobule IX, which have previously been identified as being involved in the DMN. Our results revealed that, compared with the healthy controls, the patients showed significantly reduced cerebellar functional connectivity with the thalamus and several frontal regions including the middle frontal gyrus, anterior cingulate cortex, and supplementary motor area. Moreover, the positive correlations between the strength of frontocerebellar and thalamocerebellar functional connectivity observed in the healthy subjects were diminished in the patients. Our findings implicate disruptive changes of the fronto-thalamo-cerebellar circuit in schizophrenia, which may provide further evidence for the "cognitive dysmetria" concept of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Ex Vivo Imaging of Postnatal Cerebellar Granule Cell Migration Using Confocal Macroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bénard, Magalie; Lebon, Alexis; Komuro, Hitoshi; Vaudry, David; Galas, Ludovic

    2015-01-01

    During postnatal development, immature granule cells (excitatory interneurons) exhibit tangential migration in the external granular layer, and then radial migration in the molecular layer and the Purkinje cell layer to reach the internal granular layer of the cerebellar cortex. Default in migratory processes induces either cell death or misplacement of the neurons, leading to deficits in diverse cerebellar functions. Centripetal granule cell migration involves several mechanisms, such as chemotaxis and extracellular matrix degradation, to guide the cells towards their final position, but the factors that regulate cell migration in each cortical layer are only partially known. In our method, acute cerebellar slices are prepared from P10 rats, granule cells are labeled with a fluorescent cytoplasmic marker and tissues are cultured on membrane inserts from 4 to 10 hr before starting real-time monitoring of cell migration by confocal macroscopy at 37 °C in the presence of CO2. During their migration in the different cortical layers of the cerebellum, granule cells can be exposed to neuropeptide agonists or antagonists, protease inhibitors, blockers of intracellular effectors or even toxic substances such as alcohol or methylmercury to investigate their possible role in the regulation of neuronal migration. PMID:25992599

  12. Cerebellar structure and function in male Wistar-Kyoto hyperactive rats.

    PubMed

    Thanellou, Alexandra; Green, John T

    2013-04-01

    Previous research has suggested that the Wistar-Kyoto Hyperactive (WKHA) rat strain may model some of the behavioral features associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We have shown that, in cerebellar-dependent eyeblink conditioning, male WKHAs emit eyeblink CRs with shortened onset latencies. To further characterize the shortened CR onset latencies seen in male WKHA rats, we examined 750-ms delay conditioning with either a tone conditional stimulus (CS) or a light CS, we extended acquisition training, and we included Wistar rats as an additional, outbred control strain. Our results indicated that WKHAs learned more quickly and showed a shortened CR onset latency to a tone CS compared to both Wistar-Kyoto Hypertensive (WKHT) and Wistars. WKHAs and Wistars show a lengthening of CR onset latency over conditioning with a tone CS and an increasing confinement of CRs to the later part of the tone CS (inhibition of delay). WKHAs learned more quickly to a light CS only in comparison to WKHTs, and showed a shortened CR onset latency only in comparison to Wistars. Wistars showed an increasing confinement of CRs to the late part of the light CS over conditioning. We used unbiased stereology to estimate the number of Purkinje and granule cells in the cerebellar cortex of the three strains. Our results indicated that WKHAs have more granule cells than Wistars and WKHTs and more Purkinje cells than Wistars. Results are discussed in terms of CS processing and cerebellar cortical contributions to EBC.

  13. Identification of CHIP as a Novel Causative Gene for Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yuting; Wang, Junling; Li, Jia-Da; Ren, Haigang; Guan, Wenjuan; He, Miao; Yan, Weiqian; Zhou, Ying; Hu, Zhengmao; Zhang, Jianguo; Xiao, Jingjing; Su, Zheng; Dai, Meizhi; Wang, Jun; Jiang, Hong; Guo, Jifeng; Zhou, Yafang; Zhang, Fufeng; Li, Nan; Du, Juan; Xu, Qian; Hu, Yacen; Pan, Qian; Shen, Lu; Wang, Guanghui; Xia, Kun; Zhang, Zhuohua; Tang, Beisha

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias are a group of neurodegenerative disorders that are characterized by complex clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Although more than 20 disease-causing genes have been identified, many patients are still currently without a molecular diagnosis. In a two-generation autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia family, we mapped a linkage to a minimal candidate region on chromosome 16p13.3 flanked by single-nucleotide polymorphism markers rs11248850 and rs1218762. By combining the defined linkage region with the whole-exome sequencing results, we identified a homozygous mutation (c.493CT) in CHIP (NM_005861) in this family. Using Sanger sequencing, we also identified two compound heterozygous mutations (c.389AT/c.441GT; c.621C>G/c.707GC) in CHIP gene in two additional kindreds. These mutations co-segregated exactly with the disease in these families and were not observed in 500 control subjects with matched ancestry. CHIP colocalized with NR2A, a subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, in the cerebellum, pons, medulla oblongata, hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Wild-type, but not disease-associated mutant CHIPs promoted the degradation of NR2A, which may underlie the pathogenesis of ataxia. In conclusion, using a combination of whole-exome sequencing and linkage analysis, we identified CHIP, encoding a U-box containing ubiquitin E3 ligase, as a novel causative gene for autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia. PMID:24312598

  14. Convergence of pontine and proprioceptive streams onto multimodal cerebellar granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cheng-Chiu; Sugino, Ken; Shima, Yasuyuki; Guo, Caiying; Bai, Suxia; Mensh, Brett D; Nelson, Sacha B; Hantman, Adam W

    2013-01-01

    Cerebellar granule cells constitute the majority of neurons in the brain and are the primary conveyors of sensory and motor-related mossy fiber information to Purkinje cells. The functional capability of the cerebellum hinges on whether individual granule cells receive mossy fiber inputs from multiple precerebellar nuclei or are instead unimodal; this distinction is unresolved. Using cell-type-specific projection mapping with synaptic resolution, we observed the convergence of separate sensory (upper body proprioceptive) and basilar pontine pathways onto individual granule cells and mapped this convergence across cerebellar cortex. These findings inform the long-standing debate about the multimodality of mammalian granule cells and substantiate their associative capacity predicted in the Marr-Albus theory of cerebellar function. We also provide evidence that the convergent basilar pontine pathways carry corollary discharges from upper body motor cortical areas. Such merging of related corollary and sensory streams is a critical component of circuit models of predictive motor control. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00400.001 PMID:23467508

  15. [A case of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration associated with small cell lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Nakashima, N; Takayama, K; Nakanishi, Y; Ishihara, S; Tanaka, T; Kaneko, Y; Takano, K; Inoue, K; Hara, N

    1999-02-01

    Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD) is a clinical syndrome and known to be occasionally associated with small cell carcinoma of the lung (SCLC). PCD usually affects patients before the cancer is evident. The disorder evolves subacutely, and causes severe pancerebellar dysfunction. In this paper, we report a case of PCD associated with SCLC. A 65-year-old man presenting with 2 weeks of progressive vertigo, gait ataxia, and speech disturbance, was readmitted to our hospital. He had earlier been given a diagnosis of SCLC, oat cell carcinoma, and had undergone high-dose chemotherapy with peripheral blood stem cell transplantation during his first admission. Following that treatment regimen, the tumor disappeared completely and the patient had been in remission. Based on neurological findings and the presence of anti-neuronal antibodies a diagnosis of PCD was made. Although cyclophosphamide (500 mg/m2) was administered, the patient experienced no relief of his cerebellar ataxia. Six months afer readmission, he died of cardiac tamponade due to malignant pericarditis. A histological examination at autopsy found few Purkinje cells and a proliferation of Bergmann's astrocytes in the cerebellar cortex. These findings were consistent with the diagnosis of PCD.

  16. Cerebellar Structure and Function in Male Wistar-Kyoto Hyperactive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Thanellou, Alexandra; Green, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that the Wistar-Kyoto Hyperactive (WKHA) rat strain may model some of the behavioral features associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We have shown that, in cerebellar-dependent eyeblink conditioning, WKHA emit eyeblink CRs with shortened onset latencies. To further characterize the shortened CR onset latencies seen in WKHA rats, we examined 750-ms delay conditioning with either a tone CS or a light CS, we extended acquisition training, and we included Wistar rats as an additional, outbred control strain. Our results indicated that WKHAs learned more quickly and showed a shortened CR onset latency to a tone CS compared to both Wistar-Kyoto Hypertensive (WKHT) and Wistars. WKHAs and Wistars show a lengthening of CR onset latency over conditioning with a tone CS and an increasing confinement of CRs to the later part of the tone CS (inhibition of delay). WKHAs learned more quickly to a light CS only in comparison to WKHTs and showed a shortened CR onset latency only in comparison to Wistars. Wistars showed an increasing confinement of CRs to the late part of the light CS over conditioning. We used unbiased stereology to estimate the number of Purkinje and granule cells in the cerebellar cortex of the three strains. Our results indicated that WKHAs have more granule cells than Wistars and WKHTs and more Purkinje cells than Wistars. Results are discussed in terms of CS processing and cerebellar cortical contributions to EBC. PMID:23398437

  17. Modeled changes of cerebellar activity in mutant mice are predictive of their learning impairments

    PubMed Central

    Badura, Aleksandra; Clopath, Claudia; Schonewille, Martijn; De Zeeuw, Chris I.

    2016-01-01

    Translating neuronal activity to measurable behavioral changes has been a long-standing goal of systems neuroscience. Recently, we have developed a model of phase-reversal learning of the vestibulo-ocular reflex, a well-established, cerebellar-dependent task. The model, comprising both the cerebellar cortex and vestibular nuclei, reproduces behavioral data and accounts for the changes in neural activity during learning in wild type mice. Here, we used our model to predict Purkinje cell spiking as well as behavior before and after learning of five different lines of mutant mice with distinct cell-specific alterations of the cerebellar cortical circuitry. We tested these predictions by obtaining electrophysiological data depicting changes in neuronal spiking. We show that our data is largely consistent with the model predictions for simple spike modulation of Purkinje cells and concomitant behavioral learning in four of the mutants. In addition, our model accurately predicts a shift in simple spike activity in a mutant mouse with a brainstem specific mutation. This combination of electrophysiological and computational techniques opens a possibility of predicting behavioral impairments from neural activity. PMID:27805050

  18. Abnormal GABA-mediated and cerebellar inhibition in women with the fragile X premutation.

    PubMed

    Conde, Virginia; Palomar, Francisco J; Lama, María José; Martínez, Raquel; Carrillo, Fátima; Pintado, Elizabeth; Mir, Pablo

    2013-03-01

    The fragile X syndrome is a mutation-driven developmental disorder caused by a repetition over 200 times of the CGG trinucleotide situated in the 5'-untranslated region of the fragile X mental retardation 1 gene (FMR1). The interval between 55 and 199 CGG repeats, which is over the normal range but below full mutation, is named fragile X premutation. Recent studies have focused on the asymptomatic state of fragile X premutation carriers and their potentially relevant preclinical features. However, the underlying neurological mechanisms leading to altered functions in fragile X premutation carriers are still poorly understood. In this study, we wanted to test the hypothesis that asymptomatic women who carry the fragile X premutation present GABAergic and cerebellar abnormalities compared with healthy women without the premutation. We performed noninvasive brain stimulation protocols on both asymptomatic fragile X premutation carriers and controls comprising of measures of GABAA- and GABAB-mediated intracortical inhibition, afferent inhibition, and cerebello-motor functional interactions. Premutation carriers presented an absence of cerebellar inhibition over primary motor cortex as well as a reduced GABAA-mediated intracortical and afferent inhibition compared with healthy nonpremutated controls. These alterations are most probably dependent on a dysfunctional GABAergic mechanism associated with the fragile X premutation condition as previously found in CGG-repeat animal models. Furthermore, the lack of cerebello-motor inhibition could be related to the cerebellar structural abnormalities previously found in carriers of the premutation.

  19. Modeled changes of cerebellar activity in mutant mice are predictive of their learning impairments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badura, Aleksandra; Clopath, Claudia; Schonewille, Martijn; de Zeeuw, Chris I.

    2016-11-01

    Translating neuronal activity to measurable behavioral changes has been a long-standing goal of systems neuroscience. Recently, we have developed a model of phase-reversal learning of the vestibulo-ocular reflex, a well-established, cerebellar-dependent task. The model, comprising both the cerebellar cortex and vestibular nuclei, reproduces behavioral data and accounts for the changes in neural activity during learning in wild type mice. Here, we used our model to predict Purkinje cell spiking as well as behavior before and after learning of five different lines of mutant mice with distinct cell-specific alterations of the cerebellar cortical circuitry. We tested these predictions by obtaining electrophysiological data depicting changes in neuronal spiking. We show that our data is largely consistent with the model predictions for simple spike modulation of Purkinje cells and concomitant behavioral learning in four of the mutants. In addition, our model accurately predicts a shift in simple spike activity in a mutant mouse with a brainstem specific mutation. This combination of electrophysiological and computational techniques opens a possibility of predicting behavioral impairments from neural activity.

  20. Cerebellar granule cells are predominantly generated by terminal symmetric divisions of granule cell precursors.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Kie; Umeshima, Hiroki; Kengaku, Mineko

    2015-06-01

    Neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) are generated by symmetric and asymmetric cell division of neural stem cells and their derivative progenitor cells. Cerebellar granule cells are the most abundant neurons in the CNS, and are generated by intensive cell division of granule cell precursors (GCPs) during postnatal development. Dysregulation of GCP cell cycle is causal for some subtypes of medulloblastoma. However, the details and mechanisms underlying neurogenesis from GCPs are not well understood. Using long-term live-cell imaging of proliferating GCPs transfected with a fluorescent newborn-granule cell marker, we found that GCPs underwent predominantly symmetric divisions, generating two GCPs or two neurons, while asymmetric divisions generating a GCP and a neuron were only occasionally observed, in both dissociated culture and within tissues of isolated cerebellar lobules. We found no significant difference in cell cycle length between proliferative and neurogenic divisions, or any consistent changes in cell cycle length during repeated proliferative division. Unlike neural stem cells in the cerebral cortex and spinal cord, which generate many neurons by repeated asymmetric division, cerebellar GCPs produce neurons predominantly by terminal symmetric division. These results indicate diverse mechanisms of neurogenesis in the mammalian brain. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Rabbit classical eyeblink conditioning is altered by brief cerebellar cortical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Katz, D B; Tracy, J A; Steinmetz, J E

    2001-03-01

    A pair of studies examined how cortical intracerebellar stimulation (ICS) affects eyeblink conditioning in the rabbit. Rabbits were implanted with chronic bipolar stimulating electrodes in the cell body layers of cerebellar lobule H-VI. Brief (40 ms) trains of intracranial stimulation (100 Hz, 250 microA) were delivered during training trials [forward pairings of a tone-conditioned stimulus (CS) with an air puff unconditioned stimulus (US)]. In Experiment 1, the onset of ICS varied randomly within sessions. US-onset-coincident ICS proved detrimental to the maintenance of conditioning [measured as the percentage of trials on which conditioned responses (CRs) were made] compared to ICS that ended 60 ms before US onset. Based on these findings, a second experiment compared a group trained with ICS consistently delivered at US onset to groups trained with ICS consistently delivered either at CS onset or between the two stimuli, as well as to unstimulated control subjects. Animals receiving CS- or US-coincident ICS learned slowest, whereas animals receiving middle stimulation learned more quickly than all other groups. In both Experiments 1 and 2, highly trained animals produced blinks in direct response to the stimulation. These data are discussed in terms of a new hypothesis concerning interactions between cerebellar cortex and the deep cerebellar nuclei during eyeblink conditioning--a rebound from inhibition hypothesis.

  2. HOXA1 A218G polymorphism is associated with smaller cerebellar volume in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Canu, Elisa; Boccardi, Marina; Ghidoni, Roberta; Benussi, Luisa; Duchesne, Simon; Testa, Cristina; Binetti, Giuliano; Frisoni, Giovanni B

    2009-10-01

    The Homeobox A1 (HOXA1) gene plays a critical role during development of the hindbrain in mice. Little is currently known about the relation between this gene and human brain development. The HOXA1 A218G polymorphism has been found to be associated with autism and larger head circumference in autistic patients. Similar effects were revealed also in healthy children but not in adult controls. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the A218G polymorphism on the hindbrain structure of healthy adults. Healthy persons from two independent groups underwent 3-dimensional high resolution magnetic resonance (MR) exam. Group A was made of 80 persons (27 G allele carriers and 53 non-carriers) and Group B of 72 (26 carriers and 46 non-carriers). Statistical parametric mapping 2 (SPM2) were used to perform voxel-based analysis of the gray matter (GM) of the hindbrain in carriers and non. Significance threshold was set at .05 with small volume correction using a cerebellar mask. In Group A, G carriers exhibited decreased GM volume in the superior posterior and anterior lobe of the cerebellum bilaterally. In Group B, decreased GM volume were found across the entire left cerebellar cortex. These data suggest that the HOXA1 A218G polymorphism may affect cerebellar development in humans.

  3. The 5-HT7 receptor triggers cerebellar long-term synaptic depression via PKC-MAPK.

    PubMed

    Lippiello, Pellegrino; Hoxha, Eriola; Speranza, Luisa; Volpicelli, Floriana; Ferraro, Angela; Leopoldo, Marcello; Lacivita, Enza; Perrone-Capano, Carla; Tempia, Filippo; Miniaci, Maria Concetta

    2016-02-01

    The 5-HT7 receptor (5-HT7R) mediates important physiological effects of serotonin, such as memory and emotion, and is emerging as a therapeutic target for the treatment of cognitive disorders and depression. Although previous studies have revealed an expression of 5-HT7R in cerebellum, particularly at Purkinje cells, its functional role and signaling mechanisms have never been described. Using patch-clamp recordings in cerebellar slices of adult mice, we investigated the effects of a selective 5-HT7R agonist, LP-211, on the main plastic site of the cerebellar cortex, the parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse. Here we show that 5-HT7R activation induces long-term depression of parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse via a postsynaptic mechanism that involves the PKC-MAPK signaling pathway. Moreover, a 5-HT7R antagonist abolished the expression of PF-LTD, produced by pairing parallel fiber stimulation with Purkinje cell depolarization; whereas, application of a 5-HT7R agonist impaired LTP induced by 1 Hz parallel fiber stimulation. Our results indicate for the first time that 5-HT7R exerts a fine regulation of cerebellar bidirectional synaptic plasticity that might be involved in cognitive processes and neuropsychiatric disorders involving the cerebellum.

  4. Cerebellar mutism syndrome: cause and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Catsman-Berrevoets, Coriene E

    2017-04-01

    Mutism of cerebellar origin may occur in the context of various causes but is most frequent in children after resection of a large midline cerebellar tumour. In this review, the endeavour to reach a consensus on name and definition of postoperative mutism of cerebellar origin and associated symptoms is highlighted. In addition, progress in understanding of cause and risk factors for the syndrome is discussed as well as the rehabilitation issues. Consensus on the term cerebellar mutism syndrome (CMS) has been reached. The exact pathogenesis of CMS remains unclear. Recently, attention was drawn to the hypothesis that thermal injury might be an important mechanism in the pathogenesis of CMS. Diffusion tensor imaging tractography was found to visualize the damage to relevant pathways that are associated with persistent impairments after recovery of CMS. There is still no established treatment for CMS to date. By reaching a consensus on terminology and description of CMS, a firm basis has been created for future research. The pathogenesis of CMS seems multifactorial and important risk factors have been found. However, CMS cannot be effectively prevented yet and no established or specific treatment is available, apart from very general rehabilitation and cognitive interventions.

  5. Improving Cerebellar Segmentation with Statistical Fusion.

    PubMed

    Plassard, Andrew J; Yang, Zhen; Prince, Jerry L; Claassen, Daniel O; Landman, Bennett A

    2016-02-27

    The cerebellum is a somatotopically organized central component of the central nervous system well known to be involved with motor coordination and increasingly recognized roles in cognition and planning. Recent work in multi-atlas labeling has created methods that offer the potential for fully automated 3-D parcellation of the cerebellar lobules and vermis (which are organizationally equivalent to cortical gray matter areas). This work explores the trade offs of using different statistical fusion techniques and post hoc optimizations in two datasets with distinct imaging protocols. We offer a novel fusion technique by extending the ideas of the Selective and Iterative Method for Performance Level Estimation (SIMPLE) to a patch-based performance model. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm, Non-Local SIMPLE, for segmentation of a mixed population of healthy subjects and patients with severe cerebellar anatomy. Under the first imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold-standard segmentation techniques. In the second imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold standard techniques but is outperformed by a non-locally weighted vote with the deeper population of atlases available. This work advances the state of the art in open source cerebellar segmentation algorithms and offers the opportunity for routinely including cerebellar segmentation in magnetic resonance imaging studies that acquire whole brain T1-weighted volumes with approximately 1 mm isotropic resolution.

  6. Myoclonus epilepsy with cerebellar Lafora bodies

    PubMed Central

    Scelsi, R.; Mazzella, G. L.; Lombardi, M.

    1976-01-01

    A case is reported of an 18 year old man with progressive myoclonus epilepsy. Histopathological examination revealed the presence of numerous Lafora bodies in the cerebellar granular layer, without other significant changes in the central nervous system or in other organs. Images PMID:932752

  7. Active force perception depends on cerebellar function.

    PubMed

    Bhanpuri, Nasir H; Okamura, Allison M; Bastian, Amy J

    2012-03-01

    Damage to the cerebellum causes characteristic movement abnormalities but is thought to have minimal impact on somatosensory perception. Traditional clinical assessments of patients with cerebellar lesions reveal no perceptual deficits despite the fact that the cerebellum receives substantial somatosensory information. Given that abnormalities have been reported in predicting the visual consequences of movement, we suspect that the cerebellum broadly participates in perception when motor output is required (i.e., active perception). Thus we hypothesize that cerebellar integrity is essential for somatosensory perception that requires motor activity, but not passive somatosensory perception. We compared the perceptual acuity of human cerebellar patients to that of healthy control subjects in several different somatosensory perception tasks with minimal visual information. We found that patients were worse at active force and stiffness discrimination but similar to control subjects with regard to passive cutaneous force detection, passive proprioceptive detection, and passive proprioceptive discrimination. Furthermore, the severity of movement symptoms as assessed by a clinical exam was positively correlated with impairment of active force perception. Notably, within the context of these perceptual tasks, control subjects and cerebellar patients displayed similar movement characteristics, and hence differing movement strategies are unlikely to underlie the differences in perception. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the cerebellum is vital to sensory prediction of self-generated movement and suggest a general role for the cerebellum in multiple forms of active perception.

  8. Improving cerebellar segmentation with statistical fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plassard, Andrew J.; Yang, Zhen; Prince, Jerry L.; Claassen, Daniel O.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-03-01

    The cerebellum is a somatotopically organized central component of the central nervous system well known to be involved with motor coordination and increasingly recognized roles in cognition and planning. Recent work in multiatlas labeling has created methods that offer the potential for fully automated 3-D parcellation of the cerebellar lobules and vermis (which are organizationally equivalent to cortical gray matter areas). This work explores the trade offs of using different statistical fusion techniques and post hoc optimizations in two datasets with distinct imaging protocols. We offer a novel fusion technique by extending the ideas of the Selective and Iterative Method for Performance Level Estimation (SIMPLE) to a patch-based performance model. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm, Non- Local SIMPLE, for segmentation of a mixed population of healthy subjects and patients with severe cerebellar anatomy. Under the first imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold-standard segmentation techniques. In the second imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold standard techniques but is outperformed by a non-locally weighted vote with the deeper population of atlases available. This work advances the state of the art in open source cerebellar segmentation algorithms and offers the opportunity for routinely including cerebellar segmentation in magnetic resonance imaging studies that acquire whole brain T1-weighted volumes with approximately 1 mm isotropic resolution.

  9. Improving Cerebellar Segmentation with Statistical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Plassard, Andrew J.; Yang, Zhen; Prince, Jerry L.; Claassen, Daniel O.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellum is a somatotopically organized central component of the central nervous system well known to be involved with motor coordination and increasingly recognized roles in cognition and planning. Recent work in multi-atlas labeling has created methods that offer the potential for fully automated 3-D parcellation of the cerebellar lobules and vermis (which are organizationally equivalent to cortical gray matter areas). This work explores the trade offs of using different statistical fusion techniques and post hoc optimizations in two datasets with distinct imaging protocols. We offer a novel fusion technique by extending the ideas of the Selective and Iterative Method for Performance Level Estimation (SIMPLE) to a patch-based performance model. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm, Non-Local SIMPLE, for segmentation of a mixed population of healthy subjects and patients with severe cerebellar anatomy. Under the first imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold-standard segmentation techniques. In the second imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold standard techniques but is outperformed by a non-locally weighted vote with the deeper population of atlases available. This work advances the state of the art in open source cerebellar segmentation algorithms and offers the opportunity for routinely including cerebellar segmentation in magnetic resonance imaging studies that acquire whole brain T1-weighted volumes with approximately 1 mm isotropic resolution. PMID:27127334

  10. Vergence Deficits in Patients with Cerebellar Lesions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, T.; Sprenger, A.; Neumann, G.; Machner, B.; Gottschalk, S.; Rambold, H.; Helmchen, C.

    2009-01-01

    The cerebellum is part of the cortico-ponto-cerebellar circuit for conjugate eye movements. Recent animal data suggest an additional role of the cerebellum for the control of binocular alignment and disconjugate, i.e. vergence eye movements. The latter is separated into two different components: fast vergence (to step targets) and slow vergence…

  11. Vergence Deficits in Patients with Cerebellar Lesions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, T.; Sprenger, A.; Neumann, G.; Machner, B.; Gottschalk, S.; Rambold, H.; Helmchen, C.

    2009-01-01

    The cerebellum is part of the cortico-ponto-cerebellar circuit for conjugate eye movements. Recent animal data suggest an additional role of the cerebellum for the control of binocular alignment and disconjugate, i.e. vergence eye movements. The latter is separated into two different components: fast vergence (to step targets) and slow vergence…

  12. Cerebellar Hypoplasia and Dysmorphia in Neurofibromatosis Type 1.

    PubMed

    Toelle, Sandra P; Poretti, Andrea; Weber, Peter; Seute, Tatjana; Bromberg, Jacoline E C; Scheer, Ianina; Boltshauser, Eugen

    2015-12-01

    Unidentified bright objects (UBO) and tumors are well-known cerebellar abnormalities in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Literature reports on malformative cerebellar anomalies in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), however, are scant. We retrospectively studied the clinical and neuroimaging findings of 5 patients with NF1 (4 females, age 6 to 29 years at last follow-up) and cerebellar anomalies. Cerebellar symptoms on neurological examination were mild or even not evident whereas learning disabilities were more or less pronounced in four patients. Two patients had cerebellar hypoplasia (diffusely enlarged cerebellar interfoliar spaces) and three cerebellar dysmorphias involving mainly one cerebellar hemisphere. In NF1, malformative cerebellar anomalies are rare (estimated prevalence of about 1%), but most likely underestimated and easily overlooked, because physicians tend to focus on more prevalent, obvious, and well-known findings such as optic pathway gliomas, other tumors, and UBO. This kind of cerebellar anomaly in NF1 has most likely a malformative origin, but the exact pathogenesis is unknown. The individual clinical significance is difficult to determine. We suggest that cerebellar anomalies should be systematically evaluated in neuroimaging studies of NF1 patients.

  13. A Novel and Multivalent Role of Pax6 in Cerebellar Development

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Joanna; Ha, Thomas J.; Swanson, Douglas J.

    2016-01-01

    Pax6 is a prominent gene in brain development. The deletion of Pax6 results in devastated development of eye, olfactory bulb, and cortex. However, it has been reported that the Pax6-null Sey cerebellum only has minor defects involving granule cells despite Pax6 being expressed throughout cerebellar development. The present work has uncovered a requirement of Pax6 in the development of all rhombic lip (RL) lineages. A significant downregulation of Tbr1 and Tbr2 expression is found in the Sey cerebellum, these are cell-specific markers of cerebellar nuclear (CN) neurons and unipolar brush cells (UBCs), respectively. The examination of Tbr1 and Lmx1a immunolabeling and Nissl staining confirmed the loss of CN neurons from the Sey cerebellum. CN neuron progenitors are produced in the mutant but there is an enhanced death of these neurons as shown by increased presence of caspase-3-positive cells. These data indicate that Pax6 regulates the survival of CN neuron progenitors. Furthermore, the analysis of experimental mouse chimeras suggests a cell-extrinsic role of Pax6 in CN neuron survival. For UBCs, using Tbr2 immunolabeling, these cells are significantly reduced in the Sey cerebellum. The loss of UBCs in the mutant is due partly to cell death in the RL and also to the reduced production of progenitors from the RL. These results demonstrate a critical role for Pax6 in regulating the generation and survival of UBCs. This and previous work from our laboratory demonstrate a seminal role of Pax6 in the development of all cerebellar glutamatergic neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Pax6 is a key molecule in development. Pax6 is best known as the master control gene in eye development with mutations causing aniridia in humans. Pax6 also plays important developmental roles in the cortex and olfactory bulb. During cerebellar development, Pax6 is robustly expressed in the germinal zone of all glutamatergic neurons [cerebellar nuclear (CN) neurons, granule cells, and unipolar brush

  14. Acute cerebellar ataxia, acute cerebellitis, and opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Desai, Jay; Mitchell, Wendy G

    2012-11-01

    Acute cerebellar ataxia and acute cerebellitis represent a process characterized by parainfectious, postinfectious, or postvaccination cerebellar inflammation. There is considerable overlap between these entities. The mildest cases of acute cerebellar ataxia represent a benign condition that is characterized by acute truncal and gait ataxia, variably with appendicular ataxia, nystagmus, dysarthria, and hypotonia. It occurs mostly in young children, presents abruptly, and recovers over weeks. Neuroimaging is normal. Severe cases of cerebellitis represent the other end of the spectrum, presenting with acute cerebellar signs often overshadowed by alteration of consciousness, focal neurological deficits, raised intracranial pressure, hydrocephalus, and even herniation. Neuroimaging is abnormal and the prognosis is less favorable than in acute cerebellar ataxia. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis may be confused with acute cerebellitis when the clinical findings are predominantly cerebellar, but lesions on neuroimaging are usually widespread. Paraneoplastic opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome is often initially misdiagnosed as acute cerebellar ataxia, but has very specific features, course, and etiopathogensis.

  15. Cerebellar contribution to mental rotation: a cTBS study.

    PubMed

    Picazio, Silvia; Oliveri, Massimiliano; Koch, Giacomo; Caltagirone, Carlo; Petrosini, Laura

    2013-12-01

    A cerebellar role in spatial information processing has been advanced even in the absence of physical manipulation, as occurring in mental rotation. The present study was aimed at investigating the specific involvement of left and right cerebellar hemispheres in two tasks of mental rotation. We used continuous theta burst stimulation to downregulate cerebellar hemisphere excitability in healthy adult subjects performing two mental rotation tasks: an Embodied Mental Rotation (EMR) task, entailing an egocentric strategy, and an Abstract Mental Rotation (AMR) task entailing an allocentric strategy. Following downregulation of left cerebellar hemisphere, reaction times were slower in comparison to sham stimulation in both EMR and AMR tasks. Conversely, identical reaction times were obtained in both tasks following right cerebellar hemisphere and sham stimulations. No effect of cerebellar stimulation side was found on response accuracy. The present findings document a specialization of the left cerebellar hemisphere in mental rotation regardless of the kind of stimulus to be rotated.

  16. Motor cortex rTMS improves dexterity in relapsing-remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Elzamarany, Eman; Afifi, Lamia; El-Fayoumy, Neveen M; Salah, Husam; Nada, Mona

    2016-06-01

    The motor cortex (MC) receives an excitatory input from the cerebellum which is reduced in patients with cerebellar lesions. High-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) induces cortical facilitation which can counteract the reduced cerebellar drive to the MC. Our study included 24 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) patients with dysmetria. The patients were divided into two groups: Group A received two sessions of real MC rTMS and Group B received one session of real rTMS and one session of sham rTMS. Ten healthy volunteers formed group C. Evaluation was carried out using the nine-hole pegboard task and the cerebellar functional system score (FSS) of the expanded disability status scale (EDSS). Group A patients showed a significant improvement in the time required to finish the pegboard task (P = 0.002) and in their cerebellar FSS (P = 0.000) directly after the second session and 1 month later. The RRMS patients showed more improvement than the SPMS patients. Group B patients did not show any improvement in the pegboard task or the cerebellar FSS. These results indicate that MC rTMS can be a promising option in treating both RRMS or SPMS patients with cerebellar impairment and that its effect can be long-lasting.

  17. Cerebellar perineuronal nets in cocaine-induced pavlovian memory: Site matters.

    PubMed

    Carbo-Gas, Maria; Moreno-Rius, Josep; Guarque-Chabrera, Julian; Vazquez-Sanroman, Dolores; Gil-Miravet, Isis; Carulli, Daniela; Hoebeek, Freek; De Zeeuw, Chris; Sanchis-Segura, Carla; Miquel, Marta

    2017-10-01

    One of the key mechanisms for the stabilization of synaptic changes near the end of critical periods for experience-dependent plasticity is the formation of specific lattice extracellular matrix structures called perineuronal nets (PNNs). The formation of drug memories depends on local circuits in the cerebellum, but it is unclear to what extent it may also relate to changes in their PNN. Here, we investigated changes in the PNNs of the cerebellum following cocaine-induced preference conditioning. The formation of cocaine-related preference memories increased expression of PNN-related proteins surrounding Golgi inhibitory interneurons as well as that of cFos in granule cells at the apex of the cerebellar cortex. In contrast, the expression of PNNs surrounding projection neurons in the medial deep cerebellar nucleus (DCN) was reduced in all cocaine-treated groups, independently of whether animals expressed a preference for cocaine-related cues. Discriminant function analysis confirmed that stronger PNNs in Golgi neurons and higher cFos levels in granule cells of the apex might be considered as the cerebellar hallmarks of cocaine-induced preference conditioning. Blocking the output of cerebellar granule cells in α6Cre-Cacna1a mutant mice prevented re-acquisition, but not acquisition, of cocaine-induced preference conditioning. Interestingly, this impairment in consolidation was selectively accompanied by a reduction in the expression of PNN proteins around Golgi cells. Our data suggest that PNNs surrounding Golgi interneurons play a role in consolidating drug-related memories. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A cerebellar model for predictive motor control tested in a brain-based device

    PubMed Central

    McKinstry, Jeffrey L.; Edelman, Gerald M.; Krichmar, Jeffrey L.

    2006-01-01

    The cerebellum is known to be critical for accurate adaptive control and motor learning. We propose here a mechanism by which the cerebellum may replace reflex control with predictive control. This mechanism is embedded in a learning rule (the delayed eligibility trace rule) in which synapses onto a Purkinje cell or onto a cell in the deep cerebellar nuclei become eligible for plasticity only after a fixed delay from the onset of suprathreshold presynaptic activity. To investigate the proposal that the cerebellum is a general-purpose predictive controller guided by a delayed eligibility trace rule, a computer model based on the anatomy and dynamics of the cerebellum was constructed. It contained components simulating cerebellar cortex and deep cerebellar nuclei, and it received input from a middle temporal visual area and the inferior olive. The model was incorporated in a real-world brain-based device (BBD) built on a Segway robotic platform that learned to traverse curved paths. The BBD learned which visual motion cues predicted impending collisions and used this experience to avoid path boundaries. During learning, the BBD adapted its velocity and turning rate to successfully traverse various curved paths. By examining neuronal activity and synaptic changes during this behavior, we found that the cerebellar circuit selectively responded to motion cues in specific receptive fields of simulated middle temporal visual areas. The system described here prompts several hypotheses about the relationship between perception and motor control and may be useful in the development of general-purpose motor learning systems for machines. PMID:16488974

  19. Responses of the red nucleus neurons to stimulation of the paw pads of forelimbs before and after cerebellar lesions.

    PubMed

    Tarnecki, R; Lupa, K; Niechaj, A

    2001-09-01

    Cerebellar cortex ablation releases deep cerebellar nuclei of monosynaptic inhibition from Purkinje cells. Therefore, it strengthens excitatory influence from Interpositus Nucleus (IN) upon Red Nucleus (RN), which results in much higher facilitation of the rubro-spinal neurons. This causes a big increase of spontaneous discharge rate, and eliminates brakes of discharges from responses generated by somatosensory stimuli. These two changes destroy content and timing of feedback information flowing through the spino-cerebello-rubro-spinal loop. This false bias of the feedback information, very important for fast postural adjustment and coordination of ongoing movements executed by central motor program, may at least in part be responsible for abnormal motor behavior evoked by cerebellar damage. Hemicerebellectomy resulted in dramatically reduced spontaneous activity and responses to limb stimulation because of severing a major input to the red nucleus from deep cerebellar nuclei. Due to direct somatosensory input to magnocellular Red Nucleus (mcRN) from the spinal cord that bypassed the cerebellum, the latency of response to limb stimulation was not changed and the narrower receptive fields were still present.

  20. Cerebello-thalamo-cortical projections to the posterior parietal cortex in the macaque monkey.

    PubMed

    Amino, Y; Kyuhou, S; Matsuzaki, R; Gemba, H

    2001-08-17

    The cerebello-thalamo-posterior parietal cortical projections were investigated electrophysiologically and morphologically in macaque monkeys. In anesthetized monkeys, electrical stimulation of every cerebellar nucleus evoked marked surface-positive, depth-negative (s-P, d-N) cortical field potentials in the superior parietal lobule and the cortical bank of the intraparietal sulcus, but no responses in the inferior parietal lobule. Tract-tracing experiments combining the anterograde method with the retrograde one indicated that the interposed and lateral cerebellar nuclei projected to the posterior parietal cortex mainly through the nucleus ventral lateralis caudalis of the thalamus. The significance of the projections is discussed in connection with cognitive functions.

  1. Primary cerebral and cerebellar astrocytes display differential sensitivity to extracellular sodium with significant effects on apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Tomohiko; Makinodan, Manabu; Fukami, Shin-ichi; Toritsuka, Michihiro; Ikawa, Daisuke; Yamashita, Yasunori; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2014-06-01

    Central pontine myelinolysis is one of the idiopathic or iatrogenic brain dysfunction, and the most common cause is excessively rapid correction of chronic hyponatraemia. While myelin disruption is the main pathology, as the diagnostic name indicates, a previous study has reported that astrocyte death precedes the destruction of the myelin sheath after the rapid correction of chronic low Na(+) levels, and interestingly, certain brain regions (cerebral cortex, hippocampus, etc.) are specifically damaged but not cerebellum. Here, using primary astrocyte cultures derived from rat cerebral cortex and cerebellum, we examined how extracellular Na(+) alterations affect astrocyte death and whether the response is different between the two populations of astrocytes. Twice the amount of extracellular [Na(+) ] and voltage-gated Na(+) channel opening induced substantial apoptosis in both populations of astrocytes, while, in contrast, one half [Na(+) ] prevented apoptosis in cerebellar astrocytes, in which the Na(+) -Ca(2+) exchanger, NCX2, was highly expressed but not in cerebral astrocytes. Strikingly, the rapid correction of chronic one half [Na(+) ] exposure significantly increased apoptosis in cerebellar astrocytes but not in cerebral astrocytes. These results indicate that extracellular [Na(+) ] affects astrocyte apoptosis, and the response to alterations in [Na(+) ] is dependent on the brain region from which the astrocyte is derived.

  2. Cerebellar Synaptic Plasticity and the Credit Assignment Problem.

    PubMed

    Jörntell, Henrik

    2016-04-01

    The mechanism by which a learnt synaptic weight change can contribute to learning or adaptation of brain function is a type of credit assignment problem, which is a key issue for many parts of the brain. In the cerebellum, detailed knowledge not only of the local circuitry connectivity but also of the topography of different sources of afferent/external information makes this problem particularly tractable. In addition, multiple forms of synaptic plasticity and their general rules of induction have been identified. In this review, we will discuss the possible roles of synaptic and cellular plasticity at specific locations in contributing to behavioral changes. Focus will be on the parts of the cerebellum that are devoted to limb control, which constitute a large proportion of the cortex and where the knowledge of the external connectivity is particularly well known. From this perspective, a number of sites of synaptic plasticity appear to primarily have the function of balancing the overall level of activity in the cerebellar circuitry, whereas the locations at which synaptic plasticity leads to functional changes in terms of limb control are more limited. Specifically, the postsynaptic forms of long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) at the parallel fiber synapses made on interneurons and Purkinje cells, respectively, are the types of plasticity that mediate the widest associative capacity and the tightest link between the synaptic change and the external functions that are to be controlled.

  3. Cerebro-cerebellar connectivity is increased in primary lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Meoded, Avner; Morrissette, Arthur E; Katipally, Rohan; Schanz, Olivia; Gotts, Stephen J; Floeter, Mary Kay

    2015-01-01

    Increased functional connectivity in resting state networks was found in several studies of patients with motor neuron disorders, although diffusion tensor imaging studies consistently show loss of white matter integrity. To understand the relationship between structural connectivity and functional connectivity, we examined the structural connections between regions with altered functional connectivity in patients with primary lateral sclerosis (PLS), a long-lived motor neuron disease. Connectivity matrices were constructed from resting state fMRI in 16 PLS patients to identify areas of differing connectivity between patients and healthy controls. Probabilistic fiber tracking was used to examine structural connections between regions of differing connectivity. PLS patients had 12 regions with increased functional connectivity compared to controls, with a predominance of cerebro-cerebellar connections. Increased functional connectivity was strongest between the cerebellum and cortical motor areas and between the cerebellum and frontal and temporal cortex. Fiber tracking detected no difference in connections between regions with increased functional connectivity. We conclude that functional connectivity changes are not strongly based in structural connectivity. Increased functional connectivity may be caused by common inputs, or by reduced selectivity of cortical activation, which could result from loss of intracortical inhibition when cortical afferents are intact.

  4. Plasticity of cerebellar Purkinje cells in behavioral training of body balance control

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ray X.; Huang, Jian-Jia; Huang, Chiming; Tsai, Meng-Li; Yen, Chen-Tung

    2015-01-01

    Neural responses to sensory inputs caused by self-generated movements (reafference) and external passive stimulation (exafference) differ in various brain regions. The ability to differentiate such sensory information can lead to movement execution with better accuracy. However, how sensory responses are adjusted in regard to this distinguishability during motor learning is still poorly understood. The cerebellum has been hypothesized to analyze the functional significance of sensory information during motor learning, and is thought to be a key region of reafference computation in the vestibular system. In this study, we investigated Purkinje cell (PC) spike trains as cerebellar cortical output when rats learned to balance on a suspended dowel. Rats progressively reduced the amplitude of body swing and made fewer foot slips during a 5-min balancing task. Both PC simple (SSs; 17 of 26) and complex spikes (CSs; 7 of 12) were found to code initially on the angle of the heads with respect to a fixed reference. Using periods with comparable degrees of movement, we found that such SS coding of information in most PCs (10 of 17) decreased rapidly during balance learning. In response to unexpected perturbations and under anesthesia, SS coding capability of these PCs recovered. By plotting SS and CS firing frequencies over 15-s time windows in double-logarithmic plots, a negative correlation between SS and CS was found in awake, but not anesthetized, rats. PCs with prominent SS coding attenuation during motor learning showed weaker SS-CS correlation. Hence, we demonstrate that neural plasticity for filtering out sensory reafference from active motion occurs in the cerebellar cortex in rats during balance learning. SS-CS interaction may contribute to this rapid plasticity as a form of receptive field plasticity in the cerebellar cortex between two receptive maps of sensory inputs from the external world and of efference copies from the will center for volitional movements

  5. Morphological development and neurochemical differentiation of cerebellar inhibitory interneurons in microexplant cultures.

    PubMed

    Koscheck, T; Weyer, A; Schilling, R L; Schilling, K

    2003-01-01

    The cerebellar cortex comprises a rather limited variety of interneurons, prominently among them inhibitory basket and stellate cells and Golgi neurons. To identify mechanisms subserving the positioning, morphogenesis, and neurochemical maturation of these inhibitory interneurons, we analyzed their development in primary microexplant cultures of the early postnatal cerebellar cortex. These provide a well-defined, patterned lattice within which the development of individual cells is readily accessible to experimental manipulation and observation. Pax-2-positive precursors of inhibitory interneurons were found to effectively segregate from granule cell perikarya. They emigrate from the core explant and avoid the vicinity of granule cells, which also emigrate and aggregate into small clusters around the explant proper. This contrasts with the behavior of Purkinje neurons, which remain within the explant proper. During migration, a subset of Pax-2-positive cells gradually acquires a GABAergic phenotype, and subsequently also expresses the type 2 metabotropic receptor for glutamate, or parvalbumin, markers for Golgi neurons and basket or stellate cells, respectively. The latter eventually orient their dendrites such that they take a preferentially perpendicular orientation relative to granule cell axons. Both the neurochemical maturation of basket/stellate cells and the specific orientation of their dendrites are independent of their continuous contact with radially oriented glia or Purkinje cell dendrites projecting from the core explant. Numbers of parvalbumin-positive basket/stellate cells and the prevalence of glutamate-positive neurites, which form a dense network preferentially within cell clusters containing granule cell perikarya and their dendrites, are subject to regulation by chronic depolarization. In contrast, brain-derived neurotrophic factor results in a drastic decrease of numbers of basket/stellate cells. These findings document that granule cell axons

  6. In vivo properties of cerebellar interneurons in the macaque caudal vestibular vermis

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Hui; Laurens, Jean; Blázquez, Pablo M; Angelaki, Dora E

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellar cortex is among the brain’s most well-studied circuits and includes distinct classes of excitatory and inhibitory interneurons. Several studies have attempted to characterize the in vivo properties of cerebellar interneurons, yet little is currently known about their stimulus-driven properties. Here we quantify both spontaneous and stimulus-driven responses of interneurons in lobules X (nodulus) and IXc,d (ventral uvula) of the macaque caudal vermis during vestibular stimulation. Interneurons were identified as cells located >100 μm from the Purkinje cell layer that did not exhibit complex spikes. Based on baseline firing, three types of interneurons could be distinguished. First, there was a group of very regular firing interneurons with high mean discharge rates, which consistently encoded tilt, rather than translational head movements. Second, there was a group of low firing interneurons with a range of discharge regularity. This group had more diverse vestibular properties, where most were translation-selective and a few tilt- or gravitoinertial acceleration-selective. Third, we also encountered interneurons that were similar to Purkinje cells in terms of discharge regularity and mean firing rate. This group also encoded mixtures of tilt and translation signals. A few mossy fibres showed unprocessed, otolith afferent-like properties, encoding the gravitoinertial acceleration. We conclude that tilt- and translation-selective signals, which reflect neural computations transforming vestibular afferent information, are not only encountered in Purkinje cell responses. Instead, upstream interneurons within the cerebellar cortex are also characterized by similar properties, thus implying a widespread network computation. PMID:25556803

  7. Anatomy and approaches along the cerebellar-brainstem fissures.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Ken; Yagmurlu, Kaan; Kohno, Michihiro; Rhoton, Albert L

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT Fissure dissection is routinely used in the supratentorial region to access deeply situated pathology while minimizing division of neural tissue. Use of fissure dissection is also practical in the posterior fossa. In this study, the microsurgical anatomy of the 3 cerebellar-brainstem fissures (cerebellomesencephalic, cerebellopontine, and cerebellomedullary) and the various procedures exposing these fissures in brainstem surgery were examined. METHODS Seven cadaveric heads were examined with a microsurgical technique and 3 with fiber dissection to clarify the anatomy of the cerebellar-brainstem and adjacent cerebellar fissures, in which the major vessels and neural structures are located. Several approaches directed along the cerebellar surfaces and fissures, including the supracerebellar infratentorial, occipital transtentorial, retrosigmoid, and midline suboccipital approaches, were examined. The 3 heads examined using fiber dissection defined the anatomy of the cerebellar peduncles coursing in the depths of these fissures. RESULTS Dissections directed along the cerebellar-brainstem and cerebellar fissures provided access to the posterior and posterolateral midbrain and upper pons, lateral pons, floor and lateral wall of the fourth ventricle, and dorsal and lateral medulla. CONCLUSIONS Opening the cerebellar-brainstem and adjacent cerebellar fissures provided access to the brainstem surface hidden by the cerebellum, while minimizing division of neural tissue. Most of the major cerebellar arteries, veins, and vital neural structures are located in or near these fissures and can be accessed through them.

  8. Cerebellar lobule atrophy and disability in progressive MS.

    PubMed

    Cocozza, Sirio; Petracca, Maria; Mormina, Enricomaria; Buyukturkoglu, Korhan; Podranski, Kornelius; Heinig, Monika M; Pontillo, Giuseppe; Russo, Camilla; Tedeschi, Enrico; Russo, Cinzia Valeria; Costabile, Teresa; Lanzillo, Roberta; Harel, Asaff; Klineova, Sylvia; Miller, Aaron; Brunetti, Arturo; Morra, Vincenzo Brescia; Lublin, Fred; Inglese, Matilde

    2017-08-26

    To investigate global and lobular cerebellar volumetries in patients with progressive multiple sclerosis (MS), testing the contribution of cerebellar lobular atrophy to both motor and cognitive performances. Eighty-two patients with progressive MS and 46 healthy controls (HC) were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Clinical evaluation included motor and cognitive testing: Expanded Disability Status Scale, cerebellar Functional System score, Timed 25-Foot Walk Test, 9-Hole Peg Test (9-HPT), Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT), Brief Visuospatial Memory Test-Revised (BVMT) and California Verbal Learning Test II (CVLT). Cerebellar volumes were automatically obtained using the Spatially Unbiased Infratentorial Toolbox. A hierarchical multiple linear regression analysis was performed to assess the relationship between MRI variables of supratentorial and cerebellar damage (grey matter fraction, T2 lesion volume, metrics of cerebellar atrophy and cerebellar lesion volume) and motor/cognitive scores. Patients with MS exhibited lower cerebellar volumes compared with HC. Regression analysis showed that cerebellar metrics accounted for extra variance in both motor and cognitive performances, with cerebellar lesion volume, cerebellar Lobules VI, Crus I and VIIIa atrophy being independent predictors of 9-HPT, SDMT, BVMT and CVLT performances. Atrophy of specific cerebellar lobules explains different aspects of motor and cognitive disability in patients with progressive MS. Investigation of cerebellar involvement provides further insight into the pathophysiological basis of clinical disability in progressive MS. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Hydroxyurea Treatment and Development of the Rat Cerebellum: Effects on the Neurogenetic Profiles and Settled Patterns of Purkinje Cells and Deep Cerebellar Nuclei Neurons.

    PubMed

    Martí, Joaquín; Santa-Cruz, M C; Serra, Roger; Hervás, José P

    2016-11-01

    The current paper analyzes the development of the male and female rat cerebellum exposed to hydroxyurea (HU) (300 or 600 mg/kg) as embryo and collected at postnatal day 90. Our study reveals that the administration of this drug compromises neither the cytoarchitecture of the cerebellar cortex nor deep nuclei (DCN). However, in comparison with the saline group, we observed that several cerebellar parameters were lower in the HU injected groups. These parameters included area of the cerebellum, cerebellar cortex length, molecular layer area, Purkinje cell number, granule cell counts, internal granular layer, white matter and cerebellar nuclei areas, and number of deep cerebellar nuclei neurons. These features were larger in the rats injected with saline, smaller in those exposed to 300 mg/kg of HU and smallest in the group receiving 600 mg/kg of this agent. No sex differences in the effect of the HU were observed. In addition, we infer the neurogenetic timetables and the neurogenetic gradients of PCs and DCN neurons in rats exposed to either saline or HU as embryos. For this purpose, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine was injected into pregnant rats previously administered with saline or HU. This thymidine analog was administered following a progressively delayed cumulative labeling method. The data presented here show that systematic differences exist in the pattern of neurogenesis and in the spatial location of cerebellar neurons between rats injected with saline or HU. No sex differences in the effect of the HU were observed. These findings have implications for the administration of this compound to women in gestation as the effects of HU on the development of the cerebellum might persist throughout their offsprings' life.

  10. Cooling of the cerebellar interpositus nucleus abolishes somatosensory cortical learning-related activity in eyeblink conditioned rabbits.

    PubMed

    Wikgren, Jan; Lavond, David G; Ruusuvirta, Timo; Korhonen, Tapani

    2006-06-03

    Nictitating membrane movement and multiple-unit activity in the somatosensory cortex were recorded from rabbits during paired (N=6) and unpaired (N=5) presentations of a tone conditioned stimulus (CS) and an airpuff unconditioned stimulus (US). A behavioural conditioned response (CR) to the CS and an accompanying neural response in the somatosensory cortex developed only in the paired group. Inactivation of the cerebellar interpositus nucleus abolished both the acquired CR and the accompanying neural response. However, the CS facilitated both behavioural and neural responses to the US during the inactivation. Thus, the absence of the CR could not be accounted for by the general inability of the CS to alter the behaviour constituting the CR or the activity of the somatosensory cortex. These findings suggest that the efferent copy of the signal related to the eyeblink CR is projected from the cerebellum to the cerebral cortical areas of the US modality.

  11. Structural cerebellar correlates of cognitive and motor dysfunctions in cerebellar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kansal, Kalyani; Yang, Zhen; Fishman, Ann M; Sair, Haris I; Ying, Sarah H; Jedynak, Bruno M; Prince, Jerry L; Onyike, Chiadi U

    2017-03-01

    See King et al. (doi:10.1093/aww348) for a scientific commentary on this article.Detailed mapping of clinical dysfunctions to the cerebellar lobules in disease populations is necessary to establish the functional significance of lobules implicated in cognitive and motor functions in normal subjects. This study constitutes the first quantitative examination of the lobular correlates of a broad range of cognitive and motor phenomena in cerebellar disease. We analysed cross-sectional data from 72 cases with cerebellar disease and 36 controls without cerebellar disease. Cerebellar lobule volumes were derived from a graph-cut based segmentation algorithm. Sparse partial least squares, a variable selection approach, was used to identify lobules associated with motor function, language, executive function, memory, verbal learning, perceptual organization and visuomotor coordination. Motor dysfunctions were chiefly associated with the anterior lobe and posterior lobule HVI. Confrontation naming, noun fluency, recognition, and perceptual organization did not have cerebellar associations. Verb and phonemic fluency, working memory, cognitive flexibility, immediate and delayed recall, verbal learning, and visuomotor coordination were variably associated with HVI, Crus I, Crus II, HVII B and/or HIX. Immediate and delayed recall also showed associations with the anterior lobe. These findings provide preliminary anatomical evidence for a functional topography of the cerebellum first defined in task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of normal subjects and support the hypotheses that (i) cerebellar efferents target frontal lobe neurons involved in forming action representations and new search strategies; (ii) there is greater involvement of the cerebellum when immediate recall tasks involve more complex verbal stimuli (e.g. longer words versus digits); and (iii) it is involved in spontaneous retrieval of long-term memory. More generally, they provide an anatomical

  12. A toolbox to visually explore cerebellar shape changes in cerebellar disease and dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abulnaga, S. Mazdak; Yang, Zhen; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Onyike, Chiadi U.; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    The cerebellum plays an important role in motor control and is also involved in cognitive processes. Cerebellar function is specialized by location, although the exact topographic functional relationship is not fully understood. The spinocerebellar ataxias are a group of neurodegenerative diseases that cause regional atrophy in the cerebellum, yielding distinct motor and cognitive problems. The ability to study the region-specific atrophy patterns can provide insight into the problem of relating cerebellar function to location. In an effort to study these structural change patterns, we developed a toolbox in MATLAB to provide researchers a unique way to visually explore the correlation between cerebellar lobule shape changes and function loss, with a rich set of visualization and analysis modules. In this paper, we outline the functions and highlight the utility of the toolbox. The toolbox takes as input landmark shape representations of subjects' cerebellar substructures. A principal component analysis is used for dimension reduction. Following this, a linear discriminant analysis and a regression analysis can be performed to find the discriminant direction associated with a specific disease type, or the regression line of a specific functional measure can be generated. The characteristic structural change pattern of a disease type or of a functional score is visualized by sampling points on the discriminant or regression line. The sampled points are used to reconstruct synthetic cerebellar lobule shapes. We showed a few case studies highlighting the utility of the toolbox and we compare the analysis results with the literature.

  13. Traumatic Hemorrhage within a Cerebellar Dermoid Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Yongxin; Wang, Haifeng; Zhong, Yanping; Bian, Xinchao; Luo, Yinan; Ge, Pengfei

    2012-01-01

    Intracranial dermoid cysts with hemorrhage are fairly rare. Herein, we reported a 28-year-old female patient with a cerebellar dermoid cyst, which was found accidently on neuro-imaging after head trauma. MR scanning revealed that the lesion was located within the cerebellar vermis and was measured 3.5cm×3.9cm×3.0cm, with hyper-intensity on T1WI and hypo-intensity on T2WI. However, on CT imaging, it showed hyper-dense signals. It was removed completely via midline sub-occipital approach under surgical microscope. Histological examination proved it was a dermoid cyst with internal hemorrhage. In combination with literature review, we discussed the factors that might be responsible for the hemorrhage within dermoid cysts. PMID:22211083

  14. Traumatic hemorrhage within a cerebellar dermoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Luan, Yongxin; Wang, Haifeng; Zhong, Yanping; Bian, Xinchao; Luo, Yinan; Ge, Pengfei

    2012-01-01

    Intracranial dermoid cysts with hemorrhage are fairly rare. Herein, we reported a 28-year-old female patient with a cerebellar dermoid cyst, which was found accidently on neuro-imaging after head trauma. MR scanning revealed that the lesion was located within the cerebellar vermis and was measured 3.5cm×3.9cm×3.0cm, with hyper-intensity on T1WI and hypo-intensity on T2WI. However, on CT imaging, it showed hyper-dense signals. It was removed completely via midline sub-occipital approach under surgical microscope. Histological examination proved it was a dermoid cyst with internal hemorrhage. In combination with literature review, we discussed the factors that might be responsible for the hemorrhage within dermoid cysts.

  15. Cerebellar degeneration following neuroleptic malignant syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Lal, V.; Sardana, V.; Thussu, A.; Sawhney, I. M.; Prabhakar, S.

    1997-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman with a history of bipolar affective disorder developed hyperpyrexia, rigidity and depressed consciousness (neuroleptic malignant syndrome) after commencing neuroleptic therapy. On regaining consciousness, she was mute and had signs suggesting pancerebellar involvement. Hyperpyrexia, which is a cardinal feature of neuroleptic malignant syndrome, may have caused cerebellar damage. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome needs both early recognition and prompt treatment to obviate devastating complications. PMID:9519191

  16. Homozygous Deletion of the Very Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Gene Causes Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Hypoplasia with Cerebral Gyral Simplification

    PubMed Central

    Boycott, Kym M.; Flavelle, Shauna; Bureau, Alexandre; Glass, Hannah C.; Fujiwara, T. Mary; Wirrell, Elaine; Davey, Krista; Chudley, Albert E.; Scott, James N.; McLeod, D. Ross; Parboosingh, Jillian S.

    2005-01-01

    An autosomal recessive syndrome of nonprogressive cerebellar ataxia and mental retardation is associated with inferior cerebellar hypoplasia and mild cerebral gyral simplification in the Hutterite population. An identity-by-descent mapping approach using eight patients from three interrelated Hutterite families localized the gene for this syndrome to chromosome region 9p24. Haplotype analysis identified familial and ancestral recombination events and refined the minimal region to a 2-Mb interval between markers D9S129 and D9S1871. A 199-kb homozygous deletion encompassing the entire very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) gene was present in all affected individuals. VLDLR is part of the reelin signaling pathway, which guides neuroblast migration in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum. To our knowledge, this syndrome represents the first human lipoprotein receptor malformation syndrome and the second human disease associated with a reelin pathway defect. PMID:16080122

  17. l-Serine and glycine serve as major astroglia-derived trophic factors for cerebellar Purkinje neurons

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Shigeki; Tabata, Toshihide; Mitoma, Junya; Yamada, Keiko; Yamasaki, Miwako; Makino, Asami; Yamamoto, Toshifumi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kano, Masanobu; Hirabayashi, Yoshio

    2000-01-01

    Glial cells support the survival and development of central neurons through the supply of trophic factors. Here we demonstrate that l-serine (l-Ser) and glycine (Gly) also are glia-derived trophic factors. These amino acids are released by astroglial cells and promote the survival, dendritogenesis, and electrophysiological development of cultured cerebellar Purkinje neurons. Although l-Ser and Gly are generally classified as nonessential amino acids, 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3PGDH), a key enzyme for their biosynthesis, is not expressed in Purkinje neurons. By contrast, the Bergman glia, a native astroglia in the cerebellar cortex, highly expresses 3PGDH. These data suggest that l-Ser and Gly mediate the trophic actions of glial cells on Purkinje neurons. PMID:11016963

  18. Phonemic vowel length contrasts in cerebellar disorders.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, H; Gräber, S; Hertrich, I; Daum, I

    1999-04-01

    Apraxia of speech and Broca's aphasia both affect voice onset time (VOT) whereas phonemic vowel length distinctions seem to be preserved. Assuming a close cooperation of anterior perisylvian language zones and the cerebellum with respect to speech timing, a similar profile of segment durations must be expected in ataxic dysarthria. In order to test this hypothesis, patients with cerebellar atrophy or cerebellar ischemia were asked to produce sentence utterances including either one of the German lexial items "Rate" (/ra:t(h)e/, 'installment'), "Ratte" (/rat(h)e/, 'rat'), "Gram" (/gra:m/, 'grief'), "Gramm" (/gram/, 'gramm'), "Taten" (/t(h)atn/, 'actions'), or "Daten" (/datn/, 'data'). At the acoustic signal, the duration of the target vowels /a/ and /a:/ as well as the VOT of the word-initial alveolar stops /d/ and /t/ were determined. In addition, a master tape comprising the target words from patients and controls in randomized order was played to three listeners for perceptual evaluation. In accordance with a previous study, first, the cerebellar subjects presented with a reduced categorical separation of the VOT of voiced and unvoiced stop consonants. Second, vowel length distinctions were only compromised in case of the minimal pair "Gram"/"Gramm." In contrast to "Rate"/"Ratte", production of the former lexical items requires coordination of several orofacial structures. Disruption of vowel length contrasts would, thus, depend upon the complexity of the underlying articulatory pattern. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  19. An in vivo 1H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study of the Deep Cerebellar Nuclei in Children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    du Plessis, Lindie; Jacobson, Joseph L.; Jacobson, Sandra W.; Hess, Aaron T.; van der Kouwe, Andre; Avison, Malcolm J.; Molteno, Christopher D.; Stanton, Mark E.; Stanley, Jeffrey A.; Peterson, Bradley S.; Meintjes, Ernesta M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Prenatal alcohol exposure has been linked to impairment in cerebellar structure and function, including eyeblink conditioning. The deep cerebellar nuclei, which play a critical role in cerebellar-mediated learning, receive extensive inputs from brain stem and cerebellar cortex and provide the point of origin for most of the output fibers to other regions of the brain. We used in vivo 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to examine effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on neurochemistry in this important cerebellar region. Methods MRS data from the deep cerebellar nuclei were acquired from 37 children with heavy prenatal alcohol exposure and 17 non- or minimally exposed controls from the Cape Coloured (mixed ancestry) community in Cape Town, South Africa. Results Increased maternal alcohol consumption around time of conception was associated with lower N-acetylaspartate (NAA) levels in the deep nuclei (r=−0.33, p<0.05). Higher levels of alcohol consumption during pregnancy were related to lower levels of the choline-containing metabolites (r=−0.37, p<0.01), glycerophosphocholine plus phosphocholine (Cho). Alcohol consumption levels both at conception (r=0.35, p<0.01) and during pregnancy (r=0.38, p<0.01) were related to higher levels of glutamate plus glutamine (Glx). All these effects continued to be significant after controlling for potential confounders. Conclusions The lower NAA levels seen in relation to prenatal alcohol exposure may reflect impaired neuronal integrity in the deep cerebellar nuclei. Our finding of lower Cho points to disrupted Cho metabolism of membrane phospholipids, reflecting altered neuropil development with potentially reduced content of dendrites and synapses. The alcohol-related alterations in Glx may suggest a disruption of the glutamate–glutamine cycling involved in glutamatergic excitatory neurotransmission. PMID:24655149

  20. The brain-specific RasGEF very-KIND is required for normal dendritic growth in cerebellar granule cells and proper motor coordination

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Kanehiro; Furuya, Asako; Sakamaki, Yuriko; Akagi, Takumi; Shinoda, Yo; Sadakata, Tetsushi; Hashikawa, Tsutomu; Shimizu, Kazuki; Minami, Haruka; Sano, Yoshitake; Nakayama, Manabu

    2017-01-01

    Very-KIND/Kndc1/KIAA1768 (v-KIND) is a brain-specific Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factor carrying two sets of the kinase non-catalytic C-lobe domain (KIND), and is predominantly expressed in cerebellar granule cells. Here, we report the impact of v-KIND deficiency on dendritic and synaptic growth in cerebellar granule cells in v-KIND knockout (KO) mice. Furthermore, we evaluate motor function in these animals. The gross anatomy of the cerebellum, including the cerebellar lobules, layered cerebellar cortex and densely-packed granule cell layer, in KO mice appeared normal, and was similar to wild-type (WT) mice. However, KO mice displayed an overgrowth of cerebellar granule cell dendrites, compared with WT mice, resulting in an increased number of dendrites, dendritic branches and terminals. Immunoreactivity for vGluT2 (a marker for excitatory presynapses of mossy fiber terminals) was increased in the cerebellar glomeruli of KO mice, compared with WT mice. The postsynaptic density around the terminals of mossy fibers was also increased in KO mice. Although there were no significant differences in locomotor ability between KO and WT animals in their home cages or in the open field, young adult KO mice had an increased grip strength and a tendency to exhibit better motor performance in balance-related tests compared with WT animals. Taken together, our results suggest that v-KIND is required for compact dendritic growth and proper excitatory synaptic connections in cerebellar granule cells, which are necessary for normal motor coordination and balance. PMID:28264072

  1. Roles of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors during the sensory stimulation-evoked field potential responses in mouse cerebellar cortical molecular layer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yin-Hua; Zhang, Guang-Jian; Zhao, Jing-Tong; Chu, Chun-Ping; Li, Yu-Zi; Qiu, De-Lai

    2017-09-14

    The functions of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) in cerebellar cortex have been widely studied under in vitro condition, but their roles during the sensory stimulation-evoked responses in the cerebellar cortical molecular layer in living animals are currently unclear. We here investigated the roles of NMDARs during the air-puff stimulation on ipsilateral whisker pad-evoked field potential responses in cerebellar cortical molecular layer in urethane-anesthetized mice by electrophysiological recording and pharmacological methods. Our results showed that cerebellar surface administration of NMDA induced a dose-dependent decrease in amplitude of the facial stimulation-evoked inhibitory responses (P1) in the molecular layer, accompanied with decreases in decay time, half-width and area under curve (AUC) of P1. The IC50 of NMDA induced inhibition in amplitude of P1 was 46.5μM. In addition, application of NMDA induced significant increases in the decay time, half-width and AUC values of the facial stimulation-evoked excitatory responses (N1) in the molecular layer. Application of an NMDAR blocker, D-APV (250μM) abolished the facial stimulation-evoked P1 in the molecular layer. These results suggested that NMDARs play a critical role during the sensory information processing in cerebellar cortical molecular layer in vivo in mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Anodal Direct Current Stimulation of the Cerebellum Reduces Cerebellar Brain Inhibition but Does Not Influence Afferent Input from the Hand or Face in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Doeltgen, Sebastian H; Young, Jessica; Bradnam, Lynley V

    2016-08-01

    The cerebellum controls descending motor commands by outputs to primary motor cortex (M1) and the brainstem in response to sensory feedback. The cerebellum may also modulate afferent input en route to M1 and the brainstem. The objective of this study is to determine if anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to the cerebellum influences cerebellar brain inhibition (CBI), short afferent inhibition (SAI) and trigeminal reflexes (TRs) in healthy adults. Data from two studies evaluating effects of cerebellar anodal and sham tDCS are presented. The first study used a twin coil transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) protocol to investigate CBI and combined TMS and cutaneous stimulation of the digit to assess SAI. The second study evaluated effects on trigemino-cervical and trigemino-masseter reflexes using peripheral nerve stimulation of the face. Fourteen right-handed healthy adults participated in experiment 1. CBI was observed at baseline and was reduced by anodal cerebellar DCS only (P < 0.01). There was SAI at interstimulus intervals of 25 and 30 ms at baseline (both P < 0.0001), but cerebellar tDCS had no effect. Thirteen right-handed healthy adults participated in experiment 2. Inhibitory reflexes were evoked in the ipsilateral masseter and sternocleidomastoid muscles. There was no effect of cerebellar DCS on either reflex. Anodal DCS reduced CBI but did not change SAI or TRs in healthy adults. These results require confirmation in individuals with neurological impairment.

  3. Cerebro-cerebellar circuits in autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    D'Mello, Anila M.; Stoodley, Catherine J.

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is one of the most consistent sites of abnormality in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and cerebellar damage is associated with an increased risk of ASD symptoms, suggesting that cerebellar dysfunction may play a crucial role in the etiology of ASD. The cerebellum forms multiple closed-loop circuits with cerebral cortical regions that underpin movement, language, and social processing. Through these circuits, cerebellar dysfunction could impact the core ASD symptoms of social and communication deficits and repetitive and stereotyped behaviors. The emerging topography of sensorimotor, cognitive, and affective subregions in the cerebellum provides a new framework for interpreting the significance of regional cerebellar findings in ASD and their relationship to broader cerebro-cerebellar circuits. Further, recent research supports the idea that the integrity of cerebro-cerebellar loops might be important for early cortical development; disruptions in specific cerebro-cerebellar loops in ASD might impede the specialization of cortical regions involved in motor control, language, and social interaction, leading to impairments in these domains. Consistent with this concept, structural, and functional differences in sensorimotor regions of the cerebellum and sensorimotor cerebro-cerebellar circuits are associated with deficits in motor control and increased repetitive and stereotyped behaviors in ASD. Further, communication and social impairments are associated with atypical activation and structure in cerebro-cerebellar loops underpinning language and social cognition. Finally, there is converging evidence from structural, functional, and connectivity neuroimaging studies that cerebellar right Crus I/II abnormalities are related to more severe ASD impairments in all domains. We propose that cerebellar abnormalities may disrupt optimization of both structure and function in specific cerebro-cerebellar circuits in ASD. PMID:26594140

  4. Autism and cerebellar dysfunction: Evidence from animal models.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Peter T

    2016-10-01

    Autism is a prevalent neurodevelopmental disorder whose origins are not well understood. Cerebellar involvement has been implicated in the pathogenesis of autism spectrum disorders with increasing evidence from both clinical studies and animal models supporting an important role for cerebellar dysfunction in autism spectrum disorders. This article discusses the various cerebellar contributions to autism spectrum disorders. Both clinical and preclinical studies are discussed and future research directions highlighted.

  5. Cerebro-cerebellar circuits in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    D'Mello, Anila M; Stoodley, Catherine J

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is one of the most consistent sites of abnormality in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and cerebellar damage is associated with an increased risk of ASD symptoms, suggesting that cerebellar dysfunction may play a crucial role in the etiology of ASD. The cerebellum forms multiple closed-loop circuits with cerebral cortical regions that underpin movement, language, and social processing. Through these circuits, cerebellar dysfunction could impact the core ASD symptoms of social and communication deficits and repetitive and stereotyped behaviors. The emerging topography of sensorimotor, cognitive, and affective subregions in the cerebellum provides a new framework for interpreting the significance of regional cerebellar findings in ASD and their relationship to broader cerebro-cerebellar circuits. Further, recent research supports the idea that the integrity of cerebro-cerebellar loops might be important for early cortical development; disruptions in specific cerebro-cerebellar loops in ASD might impede the specialization of cortical regions involved in motor control, language, and social interaction, leading to impairments in these domains. Consistent with this concept, structural, and functional differences in sensorimotor regions of the cerebellum and sensorimotor cerebro-cerebellar circuits are associated with deficits in motor control and increased repetitive and stereotyped behaviors in ASD. Further, communication and social impairments are associated with atypical activation and structure in cerebro-cerebellar loops underpinning language and social cognition. Finally, there is converging evidence from structural, functional, and connectivity neuroimaging studies that cerebellar right Crus I/II abnormalities are related to more severe ASD impairments in all domains. We propose that cerebellar abnormalities may disrupt optimization of both structure and function in specific cerebro-cerebellar circuits in ASD.

  6. Cerebellar vascular hamartoma in a British Shorthair cat.

    PubMed

    Stalin, Catherine E; Granger, Nicolas; Jeffery, Nick D

    2008-04-01

    Cerebellar vascular hamartoma was diagnosed in a 16-month-old cat following magnetic resonance imaging and incisional biopsy. The clinical features were consistent with the cerebellar site of the lesion accompanied by signs attributable to cerebellar herniation through the foramen magnum and increased intra-cranial pressure. A lesion of this type represents a previously unreported differential diagnosis for central nervous system lesions in young cats.

  7. Remote Cerebellar Hemorrhage Presenting with Cerebellar Mutism after Spinal Surgery: An Unusual Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sen, Halil Murat; Guven, Mustafa; Aras, Adem Bozkurt; Cosar, Murat

    2017-05-01

    Dural injury during spinal surgery can subsequently give rise to a remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH). Although the incidence of such injury is low, the resulting hemorrhage can be life threatening. The mechanism underlying the formation of the hemorrhage is not known, but it is mostly thought to develop after venous infarction. Cerebellar mutism (CM) is a frequent complication of posterior fossa operations in children, but it is rarely seen in adults. The development of CM after an RCH has not been described. We describe the case of a 65-year old female who lost cerebrospinal fluid after inadvertent opening of the dura during surgery. Computerized tomography performed when the patient became unable to speak revealed a bilateral cerebellar hemorrhage.

  8. Acute bilateral cerebellar infarction in the territory of the medial branches of posterior inferior cerebellar arteries.

    PubMed

    Gurer, G; Sahin, G; Cekirge, S; Tan, E; Saribas, O

    2001-10-01

    The most frequent type of cerebellar infarcts involved the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) and superior cerebellar artery territories but bilateral involvement of lateral or medial branches of PICA is extremely rare. In this report, we present a 55-year-old male who admitted to hospital with vomiting, nausea and dizziness. On examination left-sided hemiparesia and ataxic gait were detected. Infarct on bilateral medial branch of PICA artery territories was found out with cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique and 99% stenosis of the left vertebral artery was found out with digital subtraction arteriography. The patient was put on heparin treatment. After 3 weeks, his complaints and symptoms had disappeared except for mild gait ataxia.

  9. Pronounced reduction of acquisition of conditioned eyeblink responses in young adults with focal cerebellar lesions impedes conclusions on the role of the cerebellum in extinction and savings.

    PubMed

    Ernst, T M; Beyer, L; Mueller, O M; Göricke, S; Ladd, M E; Gerwig, M; Timmann, D

    2016-05-01

    . In addition, the present data suggest that if the critical regions of the cerebellar cortex are lesioned, the ability to acquire CRs is not only reduced but abolished. Subjects with lesions outside these critical areas, on the other hand show preserved acquisition, extinction and saving effects. As a consequence, studies in human subjects with cerebellar lesions do not allow drawing conclusions on CR extinction and savings. In light of the present findings, previous reports of reduced extinction in humans with circumscribed cerebellar disease need to be critically reevaluated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Pitch discrimination in cerebellar patients: evidence for a sensory deficit.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Lawrence M; Petacchi, Augusto; Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Bower, James M

    2009-12-15

    In the last two decades, a growing body of research showing cerebellar involvement in an increasing number of nonmotor tasks and systems has prompted an expansion of speculations concerning the function of the cerebellum. Here, we tested the predictions of a hypothesis positing cerebellar involvement in sensory data acquisition. Specifically, we examined the effect of global cerebellar degeneration on primary auditory sensory function by means of a pitch discrimination task. The just noticeable difference in pitch between two tones was measured in 15 healthy controls and in 15 high functioning patients afflicted with varying degrees of global cerebellar degeneration caused by hereditary, idiopathic, paraneoplastic, or postinfectious pancerebellitis. Participants also performed an auditory detection task assessing sustained attention, a test of verbal auditory working memory, and an audiometric test. Patient pitch discrimination thresholds were on average five and a half times those of controls and were proportional to the degree of cerebellar ataxia assessed independently. Patients and controls showed normal hearing thresholds and similar performance in control tasks in sustained attention and verbal auditory working memory. These results suggest there is an effect of cerebellar degeneration on primary auditory function. The findings are consistent with other recent demonstrations of cerebellar-related sensory impairments, and with robust cerebellar auditorily evoked activity, confirmed by quantitative meta-analysis, across a range of functional neuroimaging studies dissociated from attention, motor, affective, and cognitive variables. The data are interpreted in the context of a sensory hypothesis of cerebellar function.

  11. Immune activation during cerebellar dysfunction following Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    de Silva, H J; Hoang, P; Dalton, H; de Silva, N R; Jewell, D P; Peiris, J B

    1992-01-01

    Evidence for immune activation was investigated in 12 patients with a rare syndrome of self-limiting, delayed onset cerebellar dysfunction following an attack of falciparum malaria which occurred 18-26 d previously. Concentrations of tumour necrosis factor, interleukin 6 and interleukin 2 were all significantly higher in serum samples of patients during cerebellar ataxia than in recovery sera and in the sera of 8 patients who did not develop delayed cerebellar dysfunction following an attack of falciparum malaria. Cytokine concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid were also significantly higher in ataxic patients than in controls. These findings suggest that immunological mechanisms may play a role in delayed cerebellar dysfunction following falciparum malaria.

  12. Decreased cerebellar-cerebral connectivity contributes to complex task performance

    PubMed Central

    Knops, André

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellum's role in nonmotor processes is now well accepted, but cerebellar interaction with cerebral targets is not well understood. Complex cognitive tasks activate cerebellar, parietal, and frontal regions, but the effective connectivity between these regions has never been tested. To this end, we used psycho-physiological interactions (PPI) analysis to test connectivity changes of cerebellar and parietal seed regions in complex (2-digit by 1-digit multiplication, e.g., 12 × 3) vs. simple (1-digit by 1-digit multiplication, e.g., 4 × 3) task conditions (“complex − simple”). For cerebellar seed regions (lobule VI, hemisphere and vermis), we found significantly decreased cerebellar-parietal, cerebellar-cingulate, and cerebellar-frontal connectivity in complex multiplication. For parietal seed regions (PFcm, PFop, PFm) we found significantly increased parietal-parietal and parietal-frontal connectivity in complex multiplication. These results suggest that decreased cerebellar-cerebral connectivity contributes to complex task performance. Interestingly, BOLD activity contrasts revealed partially overlapping parietal areas of increased BOLD activity but decreased cerebellar-parietal PPI connectivity. PMID:27334957

  13. The enigmatic linguistic cerebellum: clinical relevance and unanswered questions on nonmotor speech and language deficits in cerebellar disorders.

    PubMed

    Mariën, Peter; Beaton, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Clinical case descriptions and experimental evidence dating back to the early part of the 19th century from time to time documented a range of nonmotor cognitive and affective impairments following cerebellar pathology. However, a causal relationship between disruption of nonmotor cognitive and affective skills and cerebellar disease was dismissed for several decades and the classical view of the cerebellum as a mere coordinator of autonomic and somatic sensorimotor function prevailed for more than two centuries in behavioural neuroscience. The ignorance of early clinical evidence suggesting a much richer and complex role for the cerebellum than a pure sensorimotor one is remarkable given that in addition: 1) the cerebellum contains more neurons than the rest of the combined cerebral cortex and 2) no other structure has as many connections with other parts of the brain as the cerebellum. During the past decades, the long-standing view of the cerebellum as pure coordinator of sensorimotor function has been substantially modified. From the late 1970s onwards, major advances were made in elucidating the many functional neuroanatomical connections of the cerebellum with the supratentorial association cortices that subserve nonmotor language, cognition and affect. Combined with evidence derived from experimental functional neuroimaging studies in healthy subjects and neurophysiological and neuropsychological research in patients, the role of the cerebellum has been substantially extended to include that of a crucial modulator of cognitive and affective processes. In addition to its long-established role in coordinating motor aspects of speech production, clinical and experimental studies with patients suffering from etiologically different cerebellar disorders have identified involvement of the cerebellum in a variety of nonmotor language functions, including motor speech planning, language dynamics and verbal fluency, phonological and semantic word retrieval

  14. Cerebellar on-beam and lateral inhibition: two functionally distinct circuits.

    PubMed

    Cohen, D; Yarom, Y

    2000-04-01

    Optical imaging of voltage-sensitive dyes in an isolated cerebellum preparation was used to study the spatiotemporal functional organization of the inhibitory systems in the cerebellar cortex. Responses to surface stimulation of the cortex reveal two physiologically distinct inhibitory systems, which we refer to as lateral and on-beam inhibition following classical terminology. Lateral inhibition occurs throughout the area responding to a stimulus, whereas on-beam inhibition is confined to the area directly excited by parallel fibers. The time course of the lateral inhibition is twice as long as that of the on-beam inhibition. Both inhibitory responses increase with stimulus intensity, but the lateral inhibition has a lower threshold, and it saturates at lower stimulus intensity. The amplitude of the on-beam inhibition is linearly related to the excitation at the same location, whereas that of the lateral inhibition is linearly related to the excitation at the center of the beam. Repetitive stimulation is required to activate on-beam inhibition, whereas the same stimulus paradigm reveals prolonged depression of the lateral inhibition. We conclude that lateral inhibition reflects the activation of molecular layer interneurons, and its major role is to increase the excitability of the activated area by disinhibition. The on-beam inhibition most likely reflects Golgi cell inhibition of granule cells. However, Purkinje cell collateral inhibition of Golgi cells cannot be excluded. Both possibilities suggest that the role of the on-beam inhibition is to efficiently modulate, in time and space, the mossy fiber input to the cerebellar cortex.

  15. Cerebellar cortical efferent fibers of the paraflocculus of tree shrew (Tupaia glis).

    PubMed

    Haines, D E; Whitworth, R H

    1978-11-01

    Efferent projections from the paraflocculus of the tree shrew (Tupaia glis) were studied utilizing the Fink and Heimer ('67) method. Cerebellar corticonuclear fibers of both dorsal (Dpf) and ventral (Vpf) divisions of the paraflocculus terminate in the lateral cerebellar nucelus (NL) and in the posterior interposed nucleus (NIP). These fibers are ipsilateral, topographically organized and arranged into at least two zones. Following injury to either the Dpf or Vpf, degenerated axons are found in lateral and caudal regions of the NIP respectively. Consequently, these two portions of the paraflocculus have relatively exclusive terminal fields with overlap only at the periphery. Preterminal debris is seen in basically similar areas of the NL (caudolateral, caudal, ventral) after damage to either the Dpf or Vpf. This observation leads to the conclusion that the terminal fields for these areas of parafloccular cortex are largely coextensive in the NL. In addition to the topographical representation of the Dpf and Vpf in both the NL and NIP, there is evidence that these corticonuclear fibers are also organized into the general zonal pattern hypothesized by Voogd ('69). Persistent and numerous degenerated axons from both the Dpf and Vpf end in lateral and caudal NIP, respectively, corroborating the presence of a relatively wide zone C2 in both divisions of the paraflocculus. The Dpf and Vpf also project into the NL to a terminal field that appears to consist of two portions. One part located in caudal, ventral and/or caudoventral areas of the NL and a second at slightly more rostral and rostrolateral areas. The presence of a cortical region which is affiliated with two areas of the NL substantiates not only the existence of zone D in the paraflocculus, but gives experimental evidence that it may consist of two parts as previously suggested (Voogd, '69). From the Dpf many fibers enter the NL while few are seen in this nucleus after damage to the Vpf. This suggests that zone

  16. Cerebellar vermis proteome of chronic alcoholic individuals.

    PubMed

    Alexander-Kaufman, Kimberley; Harper, Clive; Wilce, Peter; Matsumoto, Izuru

    2007-08-01

    Cerebellar changes are commonly associated with alcoholism and chronic alcohol consumption can produce profound impairments in motor functioning and various aspects of cognition. Although the mechanisms underlying alcohol-induced changes in the cerebellar vermis are poorly understood, observations in the alcoholic vermis are thought to be consequential to common alcohol-related factors, particularly thiamine deficiency. In the present study, we used a proteomics-based approach to compare protein expression profiles of the cerebellar vermis from human alcoholic individuals (both neurologically uncomplicated and alcoholic individuals complicated with liver cirrhosis) and healthy control brains. This article complements our recent studies performed on alcoholic prefrontal gray and white matter and splenium of the corpus callosum (CC). Like the CC study, several liver cirrhosis-specific proteins were identified in the vermis, perhaps indicating the effects of liver dysfunction in this brain region. Among other protein expression changes observed are disturbances in the levels of thiamine-dependent enzymes. A derangement in energy metabolism perhaps related to thiamine deficiency seems to be important in both alcoholic groups, even where there are no clinical or pathological findings of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. These results suggest that clinically and pathologically uncomplicated alcoholic cases may not in fact be "uncomplicated," as at the proteome level we seem to be isolating the confounding effects of nutritional deficiencies and liver dysfunction and perhaps their role in alcohol-related vermis damage. Together, these results indicate that the alcohol-related pathology of the vermis is more multifactorial than other brain regions examined previously (prefrontal region and CC splenium).

  17. Pre- and Postnatal Neuroimaging of Congenital Cerebellar Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Poretti, Andrea; Boltshauser, Eugen; Huisman, Thierry A G M

    2016-02-01

    The human cerebellum has a protracted development that makes it vulnerable to a broad spectrum of developmental disorders including malformations and disruptions. Starting from 19 to 20 weeks of gestation, prenatal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can reliably study the developing cerebellum. Pre- and postnatal neuroimaging plays a key role in the diagnostic work-up of congenital cerebellar abnormalities. Diagnostic criteria for cerebellar malformations and disruptions are based mostly on neuroimaging findings. The diagnosis of a Dandy-Walker malformation is based on the presence of hypoplasia, elevation, and counterclockwise upward rotation of the cerebellar vermis and cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle, which extends posteriorly filling out the posterior fossa. For the diagnosis of Joubert syndrome, the presence of the molar tooth sign (thickened, elongated, and horizontally orientated superior cerebellar pedunc