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Sample records for cerebellar cortex

  1. An integrator circuit in cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Maex, Reinoud; Steuber, Volker

    2013-09-01

    The brain builds dynamic models of the body and the outside world to predict the consequences of actions and stimuli. A well-known example is the oculomotor integrator, which anticipates the position-dependent elasticity forces acting on the eye ball by mathematically integrating over time oculomotor velocity commands. Many models of neural integration have been proposed, based on feedback excitation, lateral inhibition or intrinsic neuronal nonlinearities. We report here that a computational model of the cerebellar cortex, a structure thought to implement dynamic models, reveals a hitherto unrecognized integrator circuit. In this model, comprising Purkinje cells, molecular layer interneurons and parallel fibres, Purkinje cells were able to generate responses lasting more than 10 s, to which both neuronal and network mechanisms contributed. Activation of the somatic fast sodium current by subthreshold voltage fluctuations was able to maintain pulse-evoked graded persistent activity, whereas lateral inhibition among Purkinje cells via recurrent axon collaterals further prolonged the responses to step and sine wave stimulation. The responses of Purkinje cells decayed with a time-constant whose value depended on their baseline spike rate, with integration vanishing at low (< 1 per s) and high rates (> 30 per s). The model predicts that the apparently fast circuit of the cerebellar cortex may control the timing of slow processes without having to rely on sensory feedback. Thus, the cerebellar cortex may contain an adaptive temporal integrator, with the sensitivity of integration to the baseline spike rate offering a potential mechanism of plasticity of the response time-constant.

  2. Cerebellar dentate nuclei lesions alter prefrontal cortex dendritic spine morphology.

    PubMed

    Bauer, David J; Peterson, Todd C; Swain, Rodney A

    2014-01-28

    Anatomical tracing studies in primates have revealed neural tracts from the cerebellar dentate nuclei to prefrontal cortex, implicating a cerebellar role in nonmotor processes. Experiments in rats examining the functional role of this cerebellothalamocortical pathway have demonstrated the development of visuospatial and motivational deficits following lesions of the dentate nuclei, in the absence of motor impairment. These behavioral deficits possibly occur due to structural modifications of the cerebral cortex secondary to loss of cerebellar input. The current study characterized morphological alterations in prefrontal cortex important for visuospatial and motivational processes following bilateral cerebellar dentate nuclei lesions. Rats received either bilateral electrolytic cerebellar dentate nuclei lesions or sham surgery followed by a 30-day recovery. Randomly selected Golgi-impregnated neurons in prefrontal cortex were examined for analysis. Measures of branch length and spine density revealed no differences between lesioned and sham rats in either apical or basilar arbors; however, the proportion of immature to mature spines significantly decreased in lesioned rats as compared to sham controls, with reductions of 33% in the basilar arbor and 28% in the apical arbor. Although expected pruning of branches and spines did not occur, the results are consistent with the hypothesis that cerebellar lesions influence prefrontal morphology and support the possibility that functional deficits following cerebellar dentate nuclei lesions are related to prefrontal morphological alteration.

  3. Neocortical networks entrain neuronal circuits in cerebellar cortex

    PubMed Central

    Roš, Hana; Sachdev, Robert N. S.; Yu, Yuguo; Šestan, Nenad; McCormick, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Activity in neocortex is often characterized by synchronized oscillations of neurons and networks, resulting in the generation of a local field potential and electroencephalogram. Do the neuronal networks of the cerebellum also generate synchronized oscillations and are they under the influence of those in the neocortex? Here we show that in the absence of any overt external stimulus, the cerebellar cortex generates a slow oscillation that is correlated with that of the neocortex. Disruption of the neocortical slow oscillation abolishes the cerebellar slow oscillation, whereas blocking cerebellar activity has no overt effect on the neocortex. We provide evidence that the cerebellar slow oscillation results in part from the activation of granule, Golgi, and Purkinje neurons. In particular, we show that granule and Golgi cells discharge trains of single spikes, and Purkinje cells generate complex spikes, during the Up state of the slow oscillation. Purkinje cell simple spiking is weakly related to the cerebellar and neocortical slow oscillation in a minority of cells. Our results indicate that the cerebellum generates rhythmic network activity that can be recorded as an LFP in the anesthetized animal, which is driven by synchronized oscillations of the neocortex. Furthermore, we show that correlations between neocortical and cerebellar LFPs persist in the awake animal, indicating that neocortical circuits modulate cerebellar neurons in a similar fashion in natural behavioral states. Thus, the projection neurons of the neocortex collectively exert a driving and modulatory influence on cerebellar network activity. PMID:19692605

  4. Early degeneration of the cerebellar cortex, particularly the granular cells.

    PubMed

    Bugiani, O; Berio, A; Di Stefano, A; Mangiante, G; Mancardi, G L; Leonardi, A

    1978-12-07

    An 8 month old infant, who died of severe gastroenteritis, presented a degeneration of the cerebellar cortex involving cells arising from the outer granular layer as well as Purkinje and Golgi II cells. Residual Purkinje cells showed vacuolar change of the cell body and dendritic abnormalities. Related lesions were atrophy of the inferior olives and degeneration of the mossy fibers.

  5. Caytaxin Deficiency Disrupts Signaling Pathways in Cerebellar Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jianfeng; Gong, Suzhen; LeDoux, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    The genetically dystonic (dt) rat, an autosomal recessive model of generalized dystonia, harbors an insertional mutation in Atcay. As a result, dt rats are deficient in Atcay transcript and the neuronally-restricted protein caytaxin. Previous electrophysiological and biochemical studies have defined olivocerebellar pathways, particularly the climbing fiber projection to Purkinje cells, as a site of significant functional abnormality in dt rats. In normal rats, Atcay transcript is abundantly expressed in the granular and Purkinje cell layers of cerebellar cortex. To better understand the consequences of caytaxin deficiency in cerebellar cortex, differential gene expression was examined in dt rats and their normal littermates. Data from oligonucleotide microarrays and quantitative real-time RT-PCR (QRT-PCR) identified phosphatidylinositol signaling pathways, calcium homeostasis, and extracellular matrix interactions as domains of cellular dysfunction in dt rats. In dt rats, genes encoding the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRH-R1, Crhr1) and calcium-transporting plasma membrane ATPase 4 (PMCA4, Atp2b4) showed the greatest up-regulation with QRT-PCR. Immunocytochemical experiments demonstrated that CRH-R1, CRH, and PMCA4 were up-regulated in cerebellar cortex of mutant rats. Along with previous electrophysiological and pharmacological studies, our data indicate that caytaxin plays a critical role in the molecular response of Purkinje cells to climbing fiber input. Caytaxin may also contribute to maturational events in cerebellar cortex. PMID:17092653

  6. Caytaxin deficiency disrupts signaling pathways in cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Xiao, J; Gong, S; Ledoux, M S

    2007-01-19

    The genetically dystonic (dt) rat, an autosomal recessive model of generalized dystonia, harbors an insertional mutation in Atcay. As a result, dt rats are deficient in Atcay transcript and the neuronally-restricted protein caytaxin. Previous electrophysiological and biochemical studies have defined olivocerebellar pathways, particularly the climbing fiber projection to Purkinje cells, as sites of significant functional abnormality in dt rats. In normal rats, Atcay transcript is abundantly expressed in the granular and Purkinje cell layers of cerebellar cortex. To better understand the consequences of caytaxin deficiency in cerebellar cortex, differential gene expression was examined in dt rats and their normal littermates. Data from oligonucleotide microarrays and quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR (QRT-PCR) identified phosphatidylinositol signaling pathways, calcium homeostasis, and extracellular matrix interactions as domains of cellular dysfunction in dt rats. In dt rats, genes encoding the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRH-R1, Crhr1) and plasma membrane calcium-dependent ATPase 4 (PMCA4, Atp2b4) showed the greatest up-regulation with QRT-PCR. Immunocytochemical experiments demonstrated that CRH-R1, CRH, and PMCA4 were up-regulated in cerebellar cortex of mutant rats. Along with previous electrophysiological and pharmacological studies, our data indicate that caytaxin plays a critical role in the molecular response of Purkinje cells to climbing fiber input. Caytaxin may also contribute to maturational events in cerebellar cortex.

  7. Microarchitectural changes during development of the cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Mecha, Miriam; Peña-Melián, Angel L; Blanco, Maria J

    2010-01-01

    The cerebellum is a highly conserved structure in the Central Nervous System (CNS) of vertebrates, and is involved in the coordination of voluntary motor behaviour. Supporting this function, the cerebellar cortex presents a layered structure which requires a precise spatial and temporal coordination of proliferation, migration and differentiation events. One of the characteristics of the developing cortex is the formation of the external granule cell layer (EGL) in the outermost part. The EGL is a highly proliferative transient layer which disappears when cells migrate inwards to form the inner granule cell layer. The balance between proliferation and migration leads to changes in EGL thickness, and might be related to "indentations" observed in the surface of the developing chick cerebellum. We have extended the observation of this feature to quail and mouse, supporting the idea that this phenomenon forms part of the mechanisms of cerebellar morphogenesis. Different factors involved in both mitotic activity and migration were analyzed in this study. Our results indicate that proliferation, more than formation of raphes for cell migration, is involved in the formation of indentations in the EGL. In addition, we show that vessels penetrating from the pial surface divide the EGL into regular regions at the time of the appearance of bulges and furrows. We conclude that indentations are the result of a coincidence in time of both the increase in thickness of the EGL and the establishment of the embryonic vascular pattern, which confers a characteristic transitory morphology to the surface of folia.

  8. Cerebellar cortex and cerebellar nuclei are concomitantly activated during eyeblink conditioning: a 7T fMRI study in humans.

    PubMed

    Thürling, Markus; Kahl, Fabian; Maderwald, Stefan; Stefanescu, Roxana M; Schlamann, Marc; Boele, Henk-Jan; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Diedrichsen, Jörn; Ladd, Mark E; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan K E; Timmann, Dagmar

    2015-01-21

    There are controversies whether learning of conditioned eyeblink responses primarily takes place within the cerebellar cortex, the interposed nuclei, or both. It has also been suggested that the cerebellar cortex may be important during early stages of learning, and that there is a shift to the cerebellar nuclei during later stages. As yet, human studies have provided little to resolve this question. In the present study, we established a setup that allows ultra-high-field 7T functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the cerebellar cortex and interposed cerebellar nuclei simultaneously during delay eyeblink conditioning in humans. Event-related fMRI signals increased concomitantly in the cerebellar cortex and nuclei during early acquisition of conditioned eyeblink responses in 20 healthy human subjects. ANOVAs with repeated-measures showed significant effects of time across five blocks of 20 conditioning trials in the cortex and nuclei (p < 0.05, permutation corrected). Activations were most pronounced in, but not limited to, lobules VI and interposed nuclei. Increased activations were most prominent at the first time the maximum number of conditioned responses was achieved. Our data are consistent with a simultaneous and synergistic two-site model of learning during acquisition of classically conditioned eyeblinks. Because increased MRI signal reflects synaptic activity, concomitantly increased signals in the cerebellar nuclei and cortex are consistent with findings of learning related potentiation at the mossy fiber to nuclear cell synapse and mossy fiber to granule cell synapse. Activity related to the expression of conditioned responses, however, cannot be excluded.

  9. Comparative neuronal morphology of the cerebellar cortex in afrotherians, carnivores, cetartiodactyls, and primates

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Bob; Johnson, Nicholas L.; Wahl, Devin; Schall, Matthew; Maseko, Busisiwe C.; Lewandowski, Albert; Raghanti, Mary A.; Wicinski, Bridget; Butti, Camilla; Hopkins, William D.; Bertelsen, Mads F.; Walsh, Timothy; Roberts, John R.; Reep, Roger L.; Hof, Patrick R.; Sherwood, Chet C.; Manger, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Although the basic morphological characteristics of neurons in the cerebellar cortex have been documented in several species, virtually nothing is known about the quantitative morphological characteristics of these neurons across different taxa. To that end, the present study investigated cerebellar neuronal morphology among eight different, large-brained mammalian species comprising a broad phylogenetic range: afrotherians (African elephant, Florida manatee), carnivores (Siberian tiger, clouded leopard), cetartiodactyls (humpback whale, giraffe) and primates (human, common chimpanzee). Specifically, several neuron types (e.g., stellate, basket, Lugaro, Golgi, and granule neurons; N = 317) of the cerebellar cortex were stained with a modified rapid Golgi technique and quantified on a computer-assisted microscopy system. There was a 64-fold variation in brain mass across species in our sample (from clouded leopard to the elephant) and a 103-fold variation in cerebellar volume. Most dendritic measures tended to increase with cerebellar volume. The cerebellar cortex in these species exhibited the trilaminate pattern common to all mammals. Morphologically, neuron types in the cerebellar cortex were generally consistent with those described in primates (Fox et al., 1967) and rodents (Palay and Chan-Palay, 1974), although there was substantial quantitative variation across species. In particular, Lugaro neurons in the elephant appeared to be disproportionately larger than those in other species. To explore potential quantitative differences in dendritic measures across species, MARSplines analyses were used to evaluate whether species could be differentiated from each other based on dendritic characteristics alone. Results of these analyses indicated that there were significant differences among all species in dendritic measures. PMID:24795574

  10. Ultrastructural pathology of human peritumoural oedematous cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Castejón, O J

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar cortical biopsies of the peritumoural region of seven patients with cerebellar haemangioma, mesencephalic meningioma, cerebellopontine astrocytoma, cerebellopontine meningioma, and medulloblastoma of cerebellar vermis were examined by means of conventional transmission electron microscopy. Granule cells showed oedematous cytoplasm and mitochondria. Swollen Golgi cells exhibited lipofuscin granules and intranuclear inclusions. Both neuron cell types displayed swollen dendritic digits synapsing with afferent mossy fibre endings. Degenerated myelinated axons corresponding to afferent mossy and climbing fibres and efferent Purkinje cell axons were observed at the granular layer. Dense and clear ischaemic Purkinje cells established degenerated synapses with swollen parallel fibre synaptic varicosities. Degenerated Purkinje cell recurrent axonal collaterals were found at the molecular layer. Swollen and clear Bergmann glial cell cytoplasm was observed closely applied to the oedematous clear and dark Purkinje cell body, dendritic trunk, secondary and tertiary dendritic branches. Swollen climbing fibre endings featured by numerous microtubules and neurofilaments, and a decreased number of synaptic vesicles were observed making degenerated axo-spinodendritic synapses with clear and swollen dendritic spines from Purkinje, Golgi, basket and stellate cell dendrites. Swollen stellate neurons showed oedematous mitochondria. Lipofuscin-rich astrocytes and reactive phagocytic astrocytes were observed. The latter appeared engulfing haematogenous proteinaceous oedema fluid. All cerebellar neurons showed stress endoplasmic reticulum dysfunction featured by focal dilated cisterns and detachment of associated ribosomes. Myelin sheath degeneration was related with oligodendrocyte degenerating hydropic changes. The peritumoural ischaemic cerebellar nerve and glial cell abnormalities were related with neurobehavioral changes, tremor, nystagmus, dismetry and gait disturbance

  11. Role of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor-2 in the Cerebellar Cortex in Cardiovascular Modulation in Anaesthetized Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changzheng; Sun, Tingzhe; Zhou, Peiling; Zhu, Qingfeng; Zhang, Liefeng

    2016-04-01

    Our previous investigations have demonstrated that microinjection of acetylcholine (ACh) or muscarinic ACh receptor activation in the cerebellar cortex induces a systemic blood pressure depressor response. This study aimed to determine the role of muscarinic ACh receptor-2 (M2 receptor) in the cerebellar cortex in cardiovascular function regulation in rats. A nonselective muscarinic receptor agonist (oxotremorine M, OXO; 30 mM), a selective M2 receptor agonist (arecaidine but-2-ynyl ester tosylate, ABET; 3, 10, and 30 mM), 30 mM OXO mixed with a selective M2 receptor antagonist (methoctramine hydrate, MCT; 0.3, 1, and 3 mM), and normal saline (0.9 % NaCl) were separately microinjected (0.5 µl/5 s) into the cerebellar cortex (lobule VI) of anaesthetized rats. We measured the mean arterial pressure (MAP), maximum change in MAP, and reactive time (RT; the duration required for the blood pressure to return to basal levels), heart rate (HR) and the maximum change in HR during the RT in response to drug activation. The results demonstrated that ABET dose-dependently decreased MAP and HR, increased the maximum change in MAP and the maximum change in HR, and prolonged the RT. Furthermore, MCT dose-dependently blocked the OXO-mediated cardiovascular depressor response. This study provides the first evidence that M2 receptors in the cerebellar cortex are involved in cardiovascular regulation, the activation of which evokes significant depressor and bradycardic responses.

  12. Structural and functional MRI abnormalities of cerebellar cortex and nuclei in SCA3, SCA6 and Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed

    Stefanescu, Maria R; Dohnalek, Moritz; Maderwald, Stefan; Thürling, Markus; Minnerop, Martina; Beck, Andreas; Schlamann, Marc; Diedrichsen, Joern; Ladd, Mark E; Timmann, Dagmar

    2015-05-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3, spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 and Friedreich's ataxia are common hereditary ataxias. Different patterns of atrophy of the cerebellar cortex are well known. Data on cerebellar nuclei are sparse. Whereas cerebellar nuclei have long been thought to be preserved in spinocerebellar ataxia type 6, histology shows marked atrophy of the nuclei in Friedreich's ataxia and spinocerebellar ataxia type 3. In the present study susceptibility weighted imaging was used to assess atrophy of the cerebellar nuclei in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (n = 12, age range 41-76 years, five female), Friedreich's ataxia (n = 12, age range 21-55 years, seven female), spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (n = 10, age range 34-67 years, three female), and age- and gender-matched controls (total n = 23, age range 22-75 years, 10 female). T1-weighted magnetic resonance images were used to calculate the volume of the cerebellum. In addition, ultra-high field functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed with optimized normalization methods to assess function of the cerebellar cortex and nuclei during simple hand movements. As expected, the volume of the cerebellum was markedly reduced in spinocerebellar ataxia type 6, preserved in Friedreich's ataxia, and mildy reduced in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3. The volume of the cerebellar nuclei was reduced in the three patient groups compared to matched controls (P-values < 0.05; two-sample t-tests). Atrophy of the cerebellar nuclei was most pronounced in spinocerebellar ataxia type 6. On a functional level, hand-movement-related cerebellar activation was altered in all three disorders. Within the cerebellar cortex, functional magnetic resonance imaging signal was significantly reduced in spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 and Friedreich's ataxia compared to matched controls (P-values < 0.001, bootstrap-corrected cluster-size threshold; two-sample t-tests). The difference missed significance in spinocerebellar ataxia

  13. Responses evoked in the cerebellar cortex by stimulation of the caudate nucleus in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Mary; Williams, T. D.

    1968-01-01

    1. Responses evoked in the cerebellar cortex following stimulation of caudate nucleus are described. 2. The evoked responses recorded from the surface of the cerebellar cortex were found to be of two types, one with a short (4-6 msec) latency and one with a longer (12-17 msec) latency. 3. The short latency response was maximal in the lobulus simplex, the longer latency response was maximal in paramedian lobule. 4. Following lesions in the inferior olive the longer latency response was absent. 5. Recordings from within the cerebellar cortex showed that the short latency response was uniformly distributed throughout the grey matter, the longer latency response was maximal in the region of the Purkinje cell bodies. 6. It was concluded that the short latency response was due to activation via the mossy fibres and the longer latency response to activation via the climbing fibres. 7. It was found that responses could be evoked in the cerebellum following stimulation of only the latero-ventral part of the caudate nucleus; stimulation of the rest of the nucleus caused no response in the cerebellum. This division of the caudate nucleus into two parts is similar to the subdivision of the caudate nucleus made by other workers using different criteria. PMID:5698279

  14. Inhibition of classically conditioned eyeblink responses by stimulation of the cerebellar cortex in the decerebrate cat.

    PubMed

    Hesslow, G

    1994-04-15

    The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that neurones in the anterior interpositus nucleus, under the control of Purkinje cells in the c1 and c3 zones of the cerebellar cortex, exert some control over classically conditioned responses. In particular, the experiments were designed to determine whether the cerebellar control of conditioned and unconditioned responses is different. The experiments were performed on cats decerebrated rostral to the red nucleus under halothane anaesthesia. The cats were conditioned using either a 1000 Hz tone or trains of stimuli through the skin of the proximal forelimb as the conditioned stimulus, and periorbital electrical stimulation as the unconditioned stimulus. A large proportion of the animals acquired conditioned responses at normal rates. It could be shown that these were true conditioned responses and did not result from sensitization or pseudoconditioning. For instance, unpaired presentations of conditioned and unconditioned stimuli caused rapid extinction. Cerebellar areas controlling eyeblink were identified by recording climbing fibre responses in the cerebellar cortex and recording EMG activity in the eyelid evoked by stimulation of the cerebellar cortex. When single shocks of 40-70 microA were applied to these areas during the emission of conditioned eyeblink responses, the latter were strongly inhibited. The inhibition had a latency of about 10 ms and a duration of 25-75 ms. It was shown that this inhibition of the conditioned responses was topographically specific and could only be evoked from cortical sites identified as controlling eyeblink. Stimulation of the periphery of an eyeblink area caused little or no inhibition. The effect of cortical stimulation on unconditioned reflex responses in the orbicularis oculi muscle was also tested. Some inhibition of unconditioned responses was observed, but quantitative analysis showed that this inhibition was considerably weaker than the corresponding

  15. Inhibition of classically conditioned eyeblink responses by stimulation of the cerebellar cortex in the decerebrate cat.

    PubMed Central

    Hesslow, G

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that neurones in the anterior interpositus nucleus, under the control of Purkinje cells in the c1 and c3 zones of the cerebellar cortex, exert some control over classically conditioned responses. In particular, the experiments were designed to determine whether the cerebellar control of conditioned and unconditioned responses is different. The experiments were performed on cats decerebrated rostral to the red nucleus under halothane anaesthesia. The cats were conditioned using either a 1000 Hz tone or trains of stimuli through the skin of the proximal forelimb as the conditioned stimulus, and periorbital electrical stimulation as the unconditioned stimulus. A large proportion of the animals acquired conditioned responses at normal rates. It could be shown that these were true conditioned responses and did not result from sensitization or pseudoconditioning. For instance, unpaired presentations of conditioned and unconditioned stimuli caused rapid extinction. Cerebellar areas controlling eyeblink were identified by recording climbing fibre responses in the cerebellar cortex and recording EMG activity in the eyelid evoked by stimulation of the cerebellar cortex. When single shocks of 40-70 microA were applied to these areas during the emission of conditioned eyeblink responses, the latter were strongly inhibited. The inhibition had a latency of about 10 ms and a duration of 25-75 ms. It was shown that this inhibition of the conditioned responses was topographically specific and could only be evoked from cortical sites identified as controlling eyeblink. Stimulation of the periphery of an eyeblink area caused little or no inhibition. The effect of cortical stimulation on unconditioned reflex responses in the orbicularis oculi muscle was also tested. Some inhibition of unconditioned responses was observed, but quantitative analysis showed that this inhibition was considerably weaker than the corresponding

  16. Surface-based atlases of cerebellar cortex in the human, macaque, and mouse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Essen, David C.

    2002-01-01

    This study describes surface reconstructions and associated flat maps that represent the highly convoluted shape of cerebellar cortex in three species: human, macaque, and mouse. The reconstructions were based on high-resolution structural MRI data obtained from other laboratories. The surface areas determined for the fiducial reconstructions are about 600 cm(2) for the human, 60 cm(2) for the macaque, and 0.8 cm(2) for the mouse. As expected from the ribbon-like pattern of cerebellar folding, the cerebellar flat maps are elongated along the axis parallel to the midline. However, the degree of elongation varies markedly across species. The macaque flat map is many times longer than its mean width, whereas the mouse flat map is only slightly elongated and the human map is intermediate in its aspect ratio. These cerebellar atlases, along with associated software for visualization and for mapping experimental data onto the atlas, are freely available to the neuroscience community (see http:/brainmap.wustl.edu).

  17. Robustness effect of gap junctions between Golgi cells on cerebellar cortex oscillations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous one-dimensional network modeling of the cerebellar granular layer has been successfully linked with a range of cerebellar cortex oscillations observed in vivo. However, the recent discovery of gap junctions between Golgi cells (GoCs), which may cause oscillations by themselves, has raised the question of how gap-junction coupling affects GoC and granular-layer oscillations. To investigate this question, we developed a novel two-dimensional computational model of the GoC-granule cell (GC) circuit with and without gap junctions between GoCs. Results Isolated GoCs coupled by gap junctions had a strong tendency to generate spontaneous oscillations without affecting their mean firing frequencies in response to distributed mossy fiber input. Conversely, when GoCs were synaptically connected in the granular layer, gap junctions increased the power of the oscillations, but the oscillations were primarily driven by the synaptic feedback loop between GoCs and GCs, and the gap junctions did not change oscillation frequency or the mean firing rate of either GoCs or GCs. Conclusion Our modeling results suggest that gap junctions between GoCs increase the robustness of cerebellar cortex oscillations that are primarily driven by the feedback loop between GoCs and GCs. The robustness effect of gap junctions on synaptically driven oscillations observed in our model may be a general mechanism, also present in other regions of the brain. PMID:22330240

  18. Neurotoxicological effects of nicotine on the embryonic development of cerebellar cortex of chick embryo during various stages of incubation.

    PubMed

    El-Beltagy, Abd El-Fattah B M; Abou-El-Naga, Amoura M; Sabry, Dalia M

    2015-10-01

    Long-acting nicotine is known to exert pathological effects on almost all tissues including the cerebellar cortex. The present work was designed to elucidate the effect of nicotine on the development of cerebellar cortex of chick embryo during incubation period. The fertilized eggs of hen (Gallus gallus domesticus) were injected into the air space by a single dose of long acting nicotine (1.6 mg/kg/egg) at the 4th day of incubation. The embryos were taken out of the eggs on days 8, 12 and 16 of incubation. The cerebellum of the control and treated embryos at above ages were processed for histopathological examination. The TEM were examined at 16th day of incubation. The results of the present study revealed that, exposure to long-acting nicotine markedly influence the histogenesis of cerebellar cortex of chick embryo during the incubation period. At 8th day of incubation, nicotine delayed the differentiation of the cerebellar analge; especially the external granular layer (EGL) and inner cortical layer (ICL). Furthermore, at 12th day of incubation, the cerebellar foliation was irregular and the Purkinje cells not recognized. By 16th day of incubation, the cerebellar foliations were irregular with interrupted cerebellar cortex and irregular arrangement of Purkinje cells. Immunohistochemical analysis for antibody P53 protein revealed that the cerebellar cortex in all stages of nicotine treated groups possessed a moderate to weak reaction for P53 protein however; this reaction was markedly stronger in the cerebellar cortex of control groups. Moreover, the flow cytometric analysis confirmed that the percentage of apoptosis in control group was significantly higher compared with that of nicotine treated group. At the TEM level, the cerebellar Purkinje cells of 16th day of treated groups showed multiple subcellular alterations in compared with those of the corresponding control group. Such changes represented by appearing of vacuolated mitochondria, cisternal

  19. Back to front: cerebellar connections and interactions with the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Watson, Thomas C; Becker, Nadine; Apps, Richard; Jones, Matthew W

    2014-01-01

    Although recent neuroanatomical evidence has demonstrated closed-loop connectivity between prefrontal cortex and the cerebellum, the physiology of cerebello-cerebral circuits and the extent to which cerebellar output modulates neuronal activity in neocortex during behavior remain relatively unexplored. We show that electrical stimulation of the contralateral cerebellar fastigial nucleus (FN) in awake, behaving rats evokes distinct local field potential (LFP) responses (onset latency ~13 ms) in the prelimbic (PrL) subdivision of the medial prefrontal cortex. Trains of FN stimulation evoke heterogeneous patterns of response in putative pyramidal cells in frontal and prefrontal regions in both urethane-anesthetized and awake, behaving rats. However, the majority of cells showed decreased firing rates during stimulation and subsequent rebound increases; more than 90% of cells showed significant changes in response. Simultaneous recording of on-going LFP activity from FN and PrL while rats were at rest or actively exploring an open field arena revealed significant network coherence restricted to the theta frequency range (5-10 Hz). Granger causality analysis indicated that this coherence was significantly directed from cerebellum to PrL during active locomotion. Our results demonstrate the presence of a cerebello-prefrontal pathway in rat and reveal behaviorally dependent coordinated network activity between the two structures, which could facilitate transfer of sensorimotor information into ongoing neocortical processing during goal directed behaviors.

  20. Reevaluation of the Beam and Radial Hypotheses of Parallel Fiber Action in the Cerebellar Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Samuel W.; Gao, Wangcai; Chen, Gang

    2013-01-01

    The role of parallel fibers (PFs) in cerebellar physiology remains controversial. Early studies inspired the “beam” hypothesis whereby granule cell (GC) activation results in PF-driven, postsynaptic excitation of beams of Purkinje cells (PCs). However, the “radial” hypothesis postulates that the ascending limb of the GC axon provides the dominant input to PCs and generates patch-like responses. Using optical imaging and single-cell recordings in the mouse cerebellar cortex in vivo, this study reexamines the beam versus radial controversy. Electrical stimulation of mossy fibers (MFs) as well as microinjection of NMDA in the granular layer generates beam-like responses with a centrally located patch-like response. Remarkably, ipsilateral forepaw stimulation evokes a beam-like response in Crus I. Discrete molecular layer lesions demonstrate that PFs contribute to the peripherally generated responses in Crus I. In contrast, vibrissal stimulation induces patch-like activation of Crus II and GABAA antagonists fail to convert this patch-like activity into a beam-like response, implying that molecular layer inhibition does not prevent beam-like responses. However, blocking excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) generates beam-like responses in Crus II. These beam-like responses are suppressed by focal inhibition of MF-GC synaptic transmission. Using EAAT4 reporter transgenic mice, we show that peripherally evoked patch-like responses in Crus II are aligned between parasagittal bands of EAAT4. This is the first study to demonstrate beam-like responses in the cerebellar cortex to peripheral, MF, and GC stimulation in vivo. Furthermore, the spatial pattern of the responses depends on extracellular glutamate and its local regulation by EAATs. PMID:23843513

  1. Age-related decline in the responsiveness of motor cortex to plastic forces reverses with levodopa or cerebellar stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kishore, Asha; Popa, Traian; James, Praveen; Yahia-Cherif, Lydia; Backer, Febina; Varughese Chacko, Lijo; Govind, Preetha; Pradeep, Salini; Meunier, Sabine

    2014-11-01

    The plasticity of motor cortex is integral for motor memory and skills acquisition but it declines with aging. Forty healthy volunteers, across 6 decades, were tested to examine the (a) age-dependency of motor cortex responsiveness to plasticity induction, as measured from the response to paired associative stimulation (PAS) and the (b) effect of aging on the cerebellar modulation of motor cortex response to PAS. We examined if reduced dopaminergic transmission was involved in the age-related decline of response to PAS by retesting 10 of the older subjects after a single dose of levodopa. There was a substantial decline in the motor cortex response to PAS with aging, which was restored by levodopa in the older subjects. The cerebellar modulation of motor cortex response to PAS was less vulnerable to aging and a single session of cerebellar inhibition reinstated the cortical responsiveness in older subjects. Both levodopa and cerebellar inhibition can be tested for their ability to enhance motor skills acquisition and motor performance in the elderly individuals.

  2. Temporal dynamics of cerebellar and motor cortex physiological processes during motor skill learning

    PubMed Central

    Spampinato, D.; Celnik, P.

    2017-01-01

    Learning motor tasks involves distinct physiological processes in the cerebellum (CB) and primary motor cortex (M1). Previous studies have shown that motor learning results in at least two important neurophysiological changes: modulation of cerebellar output mediated in-part by long-term depression of parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse and induction of long-term plasticity (LTP) in M1, leading to transient occlusion of additional LTP-like plasticity. However, little is known about the temporal dynamics of these two physiological mechanisms during motor skill learning. Here we use non-invasive brain stimulation to explore CB and M1 mechanisms during early and late motor skill learning in humans. We predicted that early skill acquisition would be proportional to cerebellar excitability (CBI) changes, whereas later stages of learning will result in M1 LTP-like plasticity modifications. We found that early, and not late into skill training, CBI changed. Whereas, occlusion of LTP-like plasticity over M1 occurred only during late, but not early training. These findings indicate a distinct temporal dissociation in the physiological role of the CB and M1 when learning a novel skill. Understanding the role and temporal dynamics of different brain regions during motor learning is critical to device optimal interventions to augment learning. PMID:28091578

  3. Stereotyped spatial patterns of functional synaptic connectivity in the cerebellar cortex

    PubMed Central

    Valera, Antoine M; Binda, Francesca; Pawlowski, Sophie A; Dupont, Jean-Luc; Casella, Jean-François; Rothstein, Jeffrey D; Poulain, Bernard; Isope, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Motor coordination is supported by an array of highly organized heterogeneous modules in the cerebellum. How incoming sensorimotor information is channeled and communicated between these anatomical modules is still poorly understood. In this study, we used transgenic mice expressing GFP in specific subsets of Purkinje cells that allowed us to target a given set of cerebellar modules. Combining in vitro recordings and photostimulation, we identified stereotyped patterns of functional synaptic organization between the granule cell layer and its main targets, the Purkinje cells, Golgi cells and molecular layer interneurons. Each type of connection displayed position-specific patterns of granule cell synaptic inputs that do not strictly match with anatomical boundaries but connect distant cortical modules. Although these patterns can be adjusted by activity-dependent processes, they were found to be consistent and predictable between animals. Our results highlight the operational rules underlying communication between modules in the cerebellar cortex. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09862.001 PMID:26982219

  4. Synapse-to-neuron ratios in rat cerebellar cortex following lengthy periods of undernutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, M A; Bedi, K S

    1990-01-01

    Black and white hooded Lister rats were undernourished for various times up to 150 days of age; some of them were nutritionally rehabilitated from 75 days. Undernourished rats weighed significantly less than well-fed controls at all ages studied. After embedding in resin, sections of cerebellar cortex were cut and examined at the light and electron microscopical levels using traditional morphometric methods. Undernourished rats showed significant deficits in synapse-to-neuron ratio, compared with controls, at 21 days of age. This deficit disappeared by 75 days despite continued undernutrition. Indeed, there was no alteration in this ratio even when undernutrition was extended up to 150 days even though the ratio for the controls decreased after that period. Rats undernourished from birth to 75 days and subsequently rehabilitated to 150 days had significantly more synapses per neuron than controls. The functional sequelae of these morphological changes remain unknown. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:2254161

  5. An amplified promoter system for targeted expression of calcium indicator proteins in the cerebellar cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Bernd; Ozden, Ilker; Lampi, Yulia; Hasan, Mazahir T.; Wang, Samuel S.-H.

    2012-01-01

    Recording of identified neuronal network activity using genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) requires labeling that is cell type-specific and bright enough for the detection of functional signals. However, specificity and strong expression are often not achievable using the same promoter. Here we present a combinatorial approach for targeted expression and single-cell-level quantification in which a weak promoter is used to drive trans-amplification under a strong general promoter. We demonstrated this approach using recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAVs) to deliver the sequence of the GECI D3cpv in the mouse cerebellar cortex. Direct expression under the human synapsin promoter (hSYN) led to high levels of expression (50–100 μM) in five interneuron types of the cerebellar cortex but not in Purkinje cells (PCs) (≤10 μM), yielding sufficient contrast to allow functional signals to be recorded from somata and processes in awake animals using two-photon microscopy. When the hSYN promoter was used to drive expression of the tetracycline transactivator (tTA), a second rAAV containing the bidirectional TET promoter (Ptetbi) could drive strong D3cpv expression in PCs (10–300 μM), enough to allow reliable complex spike detection in the dendritic arbor. An amplified approach should be of use in monitoring neural processing in selected cell types and boosting expression of optogenetic probes. Additionally, we overcome cell toxicity associated with rAAV injection and/or local GECI overexpression by combining the virus injection with systemic pre-injection of hyperosmotic D-mannitol, and by this double the time window for functional imaging. PMID:22866030

  6. Circadian oscillators in the mouse brain: molecular clock components in the neocortex and cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Rath, Martin F; Rovsing, Louise; Møller, Morten

    2014-09-01

    The circadian timekeeper of the mammalian brain resides in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus (SCN), and is characterized by rhythmic expression of a set of clock genes with specific 24-h daily profiles. An increasing amount of data suggests that additional circadian oscillators residing outside the SCN have the capacity to generate peripheral circadian rhythms. We have recently shown the presence of SCN-controlled oscillators in the neocortex and cerebellum of the rat. The function of these peripheral brain clocks is unknown, and elucidating this could involve mice with conditional cell-specific clock gene deletions. This prompted us to analyze the molecular clockwork of the mouse neocortex and cerebellum in detail. Here, by use of in situ hybridization and quantitative RT-PCR, we show that clock genes are expressed in all six layers of the neocortex and the Purkinje and granular cell layers of the cerebellar cortex of the mouse brain. Among these, Per1, Per2, Cry1, Arntl, and Nr1d1 exhibit circadian rhythms suggesting that local running circadian oscillators reside within neurons of the mouse neocortex and cerebellar cortex. The temporal expression profiles of clock genes are similar in the neocortex and cerebellum, but they are delayed by 5 h as compared to the SCN, suggestively reflecting a master-slave relationship between the SCN and extra-hypothalamic oscillators. Furthermore, ARNTL protein products are detectable in neurons of the mouse neocortex and cerebellum, as revealed by immunohistochemistry. These findings give reason to further pursue the physiological significance of circadian oscillators in the mouse neocortex and cerebellum.

  7. Cerebellar cortex development in the weaver condition presents regional and age-dependent abnormalities without differences in Purkinje cells neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Martí, Joaquín; Santa-Cruz, María C; Hervás, José P; Bayer, Shirley A; Villegas, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Ataxias are neurological disorders associated with the degeneration of Purkinje cells (PCs). Homozygous weaver mice (wv/wv) have been proposed as a model for hereditary cerebellar ataxia because they present motor abnormalities and PC loss. To ascertain the physiopathology of the weaver condition, the development of the cerebellar cortex lobes was examined at postnatal day (P): P8, P20 and P90. Three approaches were used: 1) quantitative determination of several cerebellar features; 2) qualitative evaluation of the developmental changes occurring in the cortical lobes; and 3) autoradiographic analyses of PC generation and placement. Our results revealed a reduction in the size of the wv/wv cerebellum as a whole, confirming previous results. However, as distinguished from these reports, we observed that quantified parameters contribute differently to the abnormal growth of the wv/wv cerebellar lobes. Qualitative analysis showed anomalies in wv/wv cerebellar cytoarchitecture, depending on the age and lobe analyzed. Such abnormalities included the presence of the external granular layer after P20 and, at P90, ectopic cells located in the molecular layer following several placement patterns. Finally, we obtained autoradiographic evidence that wild-type and wv/wv PCs presented similar neurogenetic timetables, as reported. However, the innovative character of this current work lies in the fact that the neurogenetic gradients of wv/wv PCs were not modified from P8 to P90. A tendency for the accumulation of late-formed PCs in the anterior and posterior lobes was found, whereas early-generated PCs were concentrated in the central and inferior lobes. These data suggested that wv/wv PCs may migrate properly to their final destinations. The extrapolation of our results to patients affected with cerebellar ataxias suggests that all cerebellar cortex lobes are affected with several age-dependent alterations in cytoarchitectonics. We also propose that PC loss may be regionally

  8. The primary vestibular projection to the cerebellar cortex in the pigeon (Columba livia)

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, I.E.; Schwarz, D.W.

    1983-06-01

    The cerebellar cortex of the pigeon receiving direct vestibular afferents was delineated by anterograde transport of (/sup 3/H)-amino acids injected into the vestibular nerve. Labelled mossy fiber rosettes in the granular layer were concentrated in lobule X (nodulus) and to a lesser extent, in the ventral portion of lobule IXd (uvula and paraflocculus). A few solitary labelled rosettes were also found in more dorsal portions of lobule IX, as well as in the anterior lobe between lobule II and IV. The lingula remained unlabelled. Discrete injections of (/sup 3/H)-leucine into the cristae of each of the three semicircular canals or the utricular macula yielded a similar distribution of fewer labelled rosettes. A few primary mossy fiber terminals labelled after cochlear injections are attributed to afferents from the lagenar macula. Since effective diffusion of label from the injection site was excluded by controls, it is concluded that projection of individual canal and macula nerves to the vestibulocerebellar cortex is not topographically separated. It is proposed that this extensive convergence of various afferents is required by the cerebellum to compute precise and directionally specific control signals during head rotation in all conceivable planes.

  9. [MORPHOFUNCTIONAL ADJUSTMENT VASCULAR AND CELLULAR COMPONENTS OF THE CEREBELLAR CORTEX IN EXPOSURE TO BODY SULFATES OF COPPER, ZINC AND IRON].

    PubMed

    Grintsova, N; Vasko, L; Kiptenko, L; Gortinsky, A; Murenets, N

    2015-09-01

    In order to analyze the morphological and morphometric reconstructions of the vascular bed, and Purkinje cells of the cerebellar cortex of rats in long-term action (for 90 days) on the body of sulphates of copper, zinc and iron, an experiment was conducted on 48 adult white male rats weighing 200-250 g in age 5-7 months. We used anatomical, morphometric, statistical and common methods of microanatomical research. It was found that the combined effect on the body of sulphates of copper and zinc, and iron in the cerebellum has enough expressive toxicity, which affects the condition of the vascular bed, and Purkinje cells. The degree of morphological transformations is in direct proportion to the duration of the experiment. In the pathogenesis of violations leading role played by hypoxia, develop signs of swelling of the cerebellar cortex with signs hemorrhagic infiltration, the severity of which is maximum on the 60th day of the experiment.

  10. Flavoprotein imaging in the cerebellar cortex in vivo: cellular and metabolic basis and insights into cerebellar function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wangcai; Chen, Gang; Ebner, Timothy J.

    2009-02-01

    Flavoprotein autofluorescence is an activity dependent intrinsic signal. Flavoproteins are involved in the electron transport chain and change their fluorescence according to the cellular redox state. We have been using flavoprotein autofluorescence in the cerebellum to examine properties of cerebellar circuits. Studies have also focused on understanding the cellular and metabolic origins of this intrinsic optical signal. Parallel fiber stimulation evokes a beamlike response intersected by bands of decreased fluorescence. The beam response is biphasic, with an early fluorescence increase (light phase) followed by a slower decrease (dark phase). We show this signal originates from flavoproteins as determined by its wavelength selectivity and sensitivity to blockers of the electron transport chain. Selectively blocking glutamate receptors abolished the on-beam light phase with the dark phase remaining intact. This demonstrates that the light phase is due to postsynaptic neuronal activation and suggests the dark phase is primarily due to glial activation. The bands of reduced fluorescence intersecting the beam are primarily neuronal in origin, mediated by GABAergic transmission, and due to the inhibitory action of molecular layer interneurons on Purkinje cells and the interneurons themselves. This parasagittally organized molecular layer inhibition differentially modulates the spatial pattern of cerebellar cortical activity. Flavoprotein imaging also reveals the functional architectures underlying the responses to inferior olive and peripheral whisker pad stimulation. Therefore, flavoprotein autofluorescence imaging is providing new insights into cerebellar cortical function and neurometabolic coupling.

  11. Anoctamin Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels May Modulate Inhibitory Transmission in the Cerebellar Cortex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiping; Schmelzeisen, Steffen; Parthier, Daniel; Frings, Stephan; Möhrlen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels of the anoctamin (alias TMEM16) protein family fulfill critical functions in epithelial fluid transport, smooth muscle contraction and sensory signal processing. Little is known, however, about their contribution to information processing in the central nervous system. Here we examined the recent finding that a calcium-dependent chloride conductance impacts on GABAergic synaptic inhibition in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. We asked whether anoctamin channels may underlie this chloride conductance. We identified two anoctamin channel proteins, ANO1 and ANO2, in the cerebellar cortex. ANO1 was expressed in inhibitory interneurons of the molecular layer and the granule cell layer. Both channels were expressed in Purkinje cells but, while ANO1 appeared to be retained in the cell body, ANO2 was targeted to the dendritic tree. Functional studies confirmed that ANO2 was involved in a calcium-dependent mode of ionic plasticity that reduces the efficacy of GABAergic synapses. ANO2 channels attenuated GABAergic transmission by increasing the postsynaptic chloride concentration, hence reducing the driving force for chloride influx. Our data suggest that ANO2 channels are involved in a Ca2+-dependent regulation of synaptic weight in GABAergic inhibition. Thus, in balance with the chloride extrusion mechanism via the co-transporter KCC2, ANO2 appears to regulate ionic plasticity in the cerebellum.

  12. Anoctamin Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels May Modulate Inhibitory Transmission in the Cerebellar Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Parthier, Daniel; Frings, Stephan; Möhrlen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels of the anoctamin (alias TMEM16) protein family fulfill critical functions in epithelial fluid transport, smooth muscle contraction and sensory signal processing. Little is known, however, about their contribution to information processing in the central nervous system. Here we examined the recent finding that a calcium-dependent chloride conductance impacts on GABAergic synaptic inhibition in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. We asked whether anoctamin channels may underlie this chloride conductance. We identified two anoctamin channel proteins, ANO1 and ANO2, in the cerebellar cortex. ANO1 was expressed in inhibitory interneurons of the molecular layer and the granule cell layer. Both channels were expressed in Purkinje cells but, while ANO1 appeared to be retained in the cell body, ANO2 was targeted to the dendritic tree. Functional studies confirmed that ANO2 was involved in a calcium-dependent mode of ionic plasticity that reduces the efficacy of GABAergic synapses. ANO2 channels attenuated GABAergic transmission by increasing the postsynaptic chloride concentration, hence reducing the driving force for chloride influx. Our data suggest that ANO2 channels are involved in a Ca2+-dependent regulation of synaptic weight in GABAergic inhibition. Thus, in balance with the chloride extrusion mechanism via the co-transporter KCC2, ANO2 appears to regulate ionic plasticity in the cerebellum. PMID:26558388

  13. Cellular and Metabolic Origins of Flavoprotein Autofluorescence in the Cerebellar Cortex in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Reinert, Kenneth C.; Gao, Wangcai; Chen, Gang; Wang, Xinming; Peng, Yu-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Flavoprotein autofluorescence imaging, an intrinsic mitochondrial signal, has proven useful for monitoring neuronal activity. In the cerebellar cortex, parallel fiber stimulation evokes a beam-like response consisting of an initial, short-duration increase in fluorescence (on-beam light phase) followed by a longer duration decrease (on-beam dark phase). Also evoked are parasagittal bands of decreased fluorescence due to molecular layer inhibition. Previous work suggests that the on-beam light phase is due to oxidative metabolism in neurons. The present study further investigated the metabolic and cellular origins of the flavoprotein signal in vivo, testing the hypotheses that the dark phase is mediated by glia activation and the inhibitory bands reflect decreased flavoprotein oxidation and increased glycolysis in neurons. Blocking postsynaptic ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors abolished the onbeam light phase and the parasagittal bands without altering the on-beam dark phase. Adding glutamate transporter blockers reduced the dark phase. Replacing glucose with lactate (or pyruvate) or adding lactate to the bathing media abolished the on-beam dark phase and reduced the inhibitory bands without affecting the light phase. Blocking monocarboxylate transporters eliminated the on-beam dark phase and increased the light phase. These results confirm that the on-beam light phase is due primarily to increased oxidative metabolism in neurons. They also show that the on-beam dark phase involves activation of glycolysis in glia resulting in the generation of lactate that is transferred to neurons. Oxidative savings in neurons contributes to the decrease in fluorescence characterizing the inhibitory bands. These findings provide strong in vivo support for the astrocyte–neuron lactate shuttle hypothesis. PMID:21503591

  14. Developmental Injury to the Cerebellar Cortex Following Hydroxyurea Treatment in Early Postnatal Life: An Immunohistochemical and Electron Microscopic Study.

    PubMed

    Martí, Joaquín; Molina, Vanesa; Santa-Cruz, M C; Hervás, José P

    2017-02-01

    Postnatal development of the cerebellar cortex was studied in rats administered with a single dose (2 mg/g) of the cytotoxic agent hydroxyurea (HU) on postnatal day (P) 9 and collected at appropriate times ranging from 6 h to 45 days. Quantification of several parameters such as the density of pyknotic, mitotic, BrdU-positive, and vimentin-stained cells revealed that HU compromises the survival of the external granular layer (EGL) cells. Moreover, vimentin immunocytochemistry revealed overexpression and thicker immunoreactive glial processes in HU-treated rats. On the other hand, we also show that HU leads to the activation of apoptotic cellular events, resulting in a substantial number of dying EGL cells, as revealed by TUNEL staining and at the electron microscope level. Additionally, we quantified several features of the cerebellar cortex of rats exposed to HU in early postnatal life and collected in adulthood. Data analysis indicated that the analyzed parameters were less pronounced in rats administered with this agent. Moreover, we observed several alterations in the cerebellar cortex cytoarchitecture of rats injected with HU. Anomalies included ectopic placement of Purkinje cells and abnormities in the dendritic arbor of these macroneurons. Ectopic granule cells were also found in the molecular layer. These findings provide a clue for investigating the mechanisms of HU-induced toxicity during the development of the central nervous system. Our results also suggest that it is essential to avoid underestimating the adverse effects of this hydroxylated analog of urea when administered during early postnatal life.

  15. Transcranial theta-burst stimulation alters GLT-1 and vGluT1 expression in rat cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Mancic, Bojana; Stevanovic, Ivana; Ilic, Tihomir V; Djuric, Ana; Stojanovic, Ivana; Milanovic, Sladjan; Ninkovic, Milica

    2016-11-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) induces changes in expression of proteins engaged in activity of excitatory and inhibitory systems as well as redox homeostasis. Our aim was to investigate the effect of single (SS) and repeated session (RS) of intermittent and continuous theta-burst stimulation (iTBS; cTBS) on the expression of vesicular and plasmatic glutamate transporters 1 (vGluT1 and GLT-1), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and influence on oxidative status in rats cerebellar tissue and plasma. Redox state parameters in cerebellar tissue and plasma were assessed 24 h after single and 48 h after the last TBS session. Molecular changes were examined by immunofluorescence. Stimulation significantly increased thiol groups (SH) in tissue of SS iTBS group, and decreased in iTBS RS. Activity of glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase (G6PD) was increased markedly in cTBS RS. Immunoreactivity of vGluT1 in cTBS RS decreased, while GLT-1 increased in cTBS SS and cTBS RS, compared to control. Present study gives insight in molecular and biochemical mechanisms by which iTBS and cTBS exerts its effects on rats cerebellar cortex.

  16. Topographical organization of pathways from somatosensory cortex through the pontine nuclei to tactile regions of the rat cerebellar hemispheres.

    PubMed

    Leergaard, Trygve B; Lillehaug, Sveinung; De Schutter, Erik; Bower, James M; Bjaalie, Jan G

    2006-11-01

    The granule cell layer of the cerebellar hemispheres contains a patchy and noncontinuous map of the body surface, consisting of a complex mosaic of multiple perioral tactile representations. Previous physiological studies have shown that cerebrocerebellar mossy fibre projections, conveyed through the pontine nuclei, are mapped in registration with peripheral tactile projections to the cerebellum. In contrast to the fractured cerebellar map, the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) is somatotopically organized. To understand better the map transformation occurring in cerebrocerebellar pathways, we injected axonal tracers in electrophysiologically defined locations in Sprague-Dawley rat folium crus IIa, and mapped the distribution of retrogradely labelled neurons within the pontine nuclei using three-dimensional (3-D) reconstructions. Tracer injections within the large central upper lip patch in crus IIa-labelled neurons located centrally in the pontine nuclei, primarily contralateral to the injected side. Larger injections (covering multiple crus IIa perioral representations) resulted in labelling extending only slightly beyond this region, with a higher density and more ipsilaterally labelled neurons. Combined axonal tracer injections in upper lip representations in SI and crus IIa, revealed a close spatial correspondence between the cerebropontine terminal fields and the crus IIa projecting neurons. Finally, comparisons with previously published three-dimensional distributions of pontine neurons labelled following tracer injections in face receiving regions in the paramedian lobule (downloaded from http://www.rbwb.org) revealed similar correspondence. The present data support the coherent topographical organization of cerebro-ponto-cerebellar networks previously suggested from physiological studies. We discuss the present findings in the context of transformations from cerebral somatotopic to cerebellar fractured tactile representations.

  17. Importance of nitric oxide for local increases of blood flow in rat cerebellar cortex during electrical stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Akgören, N; Fabricius, M; Lauritzen, M

    1994-01-01

    The endothelium-derived relaxing factor, probably nitric oxide (NO), is a potent vasodilator that regulates the vascular tone in several vascular beds, including the brain. We explored the possibility that NO might be of importance for the increase of cerebral blood flow (CBF) associated with activity of the well-defined neuronal circuits of the rat cerebellar cortex. Laser-Doppler flowmetry was used to measure increases of cerebellar blood flow evoked by trains of electrical stimulations of the dorsal surface. The evoked increases of CBF were frequency-dependent, being larger on than off the parallel fiber tracts, suggesting that conduction along parallel fibers and synaptic activation of target cells were important for the increase of CBF. This was verified experimentally since the evoked CBF increases were abolished by tetrodotoxin and reduced by 10 mM Mg2+ and selective antagonists for non-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. The cerebellar cortex contains high levels of NO synthase. This raised the possibility that NO was involved in the increase of CBF associated with neuronal activation. NO synthase inhibition by topical application of NG-nitro-L-arginine attenuated the evoked CBF increase by about 50%. This effect was partially reversed by pretreatment with L-arginine, the natural substrate for the enzyme, while NG-nitro-D-arginine, the inactive enantiomer, had no effect on the evoked CBF increases. Simultaneous blockade of non-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and NO synthase had no further suppressing effect on the blood flow increase than either substance alone, suggesting that the NO-dependent flow rise was dependent on postsynaptic mechanisms. These findings are consistent with the idea that local synthesis of NO is involved in the transduction mechanism between neuronal activity and increased CBF. Images PMID:7517038

  18. The Morpho/Functional Discrepancy in the Cerebellar Cortex: Looks Alone are Deceptive

    PubMed Central

    Rokni, Dan; Llinas, Rodolfo; Yarom, Yosef

    2008-01-01

    In a recent report we demonstrated that stimulation of cerebellar mossy fibers synchronously activates Purkinje cells that are located directly above the site of stimulation. We found that the activated Purkinje cells are arranged in a radial patch on the cerebellar surface and that this organization is independent of the integrity of the inhibitory system. This arrangement of activity is counterintuitive. The anatomical structure with the extensive parallel fiber system implies that mossy fiber stimulation will activate Purkinje cells along a beam of parallel fibers. In this short review we highlight this discrepancy between anatomical structure and functional dynamics and suggest a plausible underlying mechanism. PMID:19225592

  19. Effects of cerebellar transcranial alternating current stimulation on motor cortex excitability and motor function.

    PubMed

    Naro, Antonino; Bramanti, Alessia; Leo, Antonino; Manuli, Alfredo; Sciarrone, Francesca; Russo, Margherita; Bramanti, Placido; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore

    2017-01-07

    The cerebellum regulates several motor functions through two main mechanisms, the cerebellum-brain inhibition (CBI) and the motor surround inhibition (MSI). Although the exact cerebellar structures and functions involved in such processes are partially known, Purkinje cells (PC) and their surrounding interneuronal networks may play a pivotal role concerning CBI and MSI. Cerebellar transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) has been proven to shape specific cerebellar components in a feasible, safe, effective, and non-invasive manner. The aim of our study was to characterize the cerebellar structures and functions subtending CBI and MSI using a tACS approach. Fifteen healthy individuals underwent a cerebellar tACS protocol at 10, 50, and 300 Hz, or a sham-tACS over the right cerebellar hemisphere. We measured the tACS aftereffects on motor-evoked potential (MEP) amplitude, CBI induced by tACS (tiCBI) at different frequencies, MSI, and hand motor task performance. None of the participants had any side effect related to tACS. After 50-Hz tACS, we observed a clear tiCBI-50Hz weakening (about +30%, p < 0.001) paralleled by a MEP amplitude increase (about +30%, p = 0.001) and a reduction of the time required to complete some motor task (about -20%, p = 0.01), lasting up to 30 min. The 300-Hz tACS induced a selective, specific tiCBI-300Hz and tiCBI-50Hz modulation in surrounding muscles (about -15%, p = 0.01) and MSI potentiation (about +40%, p < 0.001). The 10-Hz tACS and the sham-tACS were ineffective (p > 0.6). Our preliminary data suggest that PC may represent the last mediator of tiCBI and that the surrounding interneuronal network may have an important role in updating MSI, tiCBI, and M1 excitability during tonic muscle contraction, by acting onto the PC. The knowledge of these neurophysiological issues offers new cues to design innovative, non-invasive neuromodulation protocols to shape cerebellar-cerebral functions.

  20. Cellular and Subcellular Localization of the RGS7/Gβ5/R7BP Complex in the Cerebellar Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Carolina; Orlandi, Cesare; Fajardo-Serrano, Ana; Gil-Minguez, Mercedes; Martemyanov, Kirill A.; Luján, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    A member of regulator of G-protein signaling family, RGS7, is an essential modulator of signaling through GABAB receptors. RGS7 functions as a macromolecular complex with type 5 G protein β (Gβ5) and R7 binding protein (R7BP) to control the localization and function of the resultant heterotrimeric complexes. Here, we used co-immunoprecipitation, in situ hybridization, histoblot and immunohistochemical techniques at the light and electron microscopic level to advance understanding of RGS7-Gβ5-R7BP complexes in the central nervous system, focusing on distinct neuronal populations in the cerebellar cortex. Histoblot analysis showed that RGS7, Gβ5 and R7BP proteins were widely expressed in the brain, with mostly an overlapping pattern and showing a high expression level in the molecular layer of the cerebellar cortex. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments established that the RGS7/Gβ5 forms complexes with R7BP in the cerebellum. At the cellular level, RGS7 and R7BP mRNAs were expressed at the highest level in Purkinje cells (PCs) and Golgi cells, and at low levels in granule cells. Immunohistochemistry confirmed that labeling for RGS7, Gβ5 and R7BP were present in the three neuronal populations and concentrated in dendrites and spines. At the electron microscopic level, immunolabeling for RGS7, Gβ5 and R7BP proteins was found both at postsynaptic and presynaptic sites and showed similar distribution patterns. Immunoreactivity for the three proteins was mostly localized along the extrasynaptic plasma membrane of dendritic shafts and spines of PCs and to a lesser extent, in axon terminals (AT) establishing excitatory synapses. Quantitative analysis of immunogold particles for RGS7, Gβ5 and R7BP revealed that they are non-uniformly distributed along the surface of PCs, and show enrichment around excitatory synapses on dendritic spines. We further report that deletion of R7BP in mice reduced the targeting of both RGS7 and Gβ5 to the plasma membrane. Altogether, these

  1. [Cytochemical research on the matrix activity and status of the histone component of the neurocyte chromatin in the rat cerebellar cortex during postnatal differentiation].

    PubMed

    Grigor'eva, A V; Iarygin, V N

    1986-08-01

    Evident differences in the ammoniacal silver staining pattern of histones were demonstrated for neurones of different layers of adult rat cerebellar cortex. These differences were formed during postnatal differentiation. It has been also shown for Purkinje and granular cells that time-course of age-dependent changes in histone staining are not coincident with that for template activity of these cells.

  2. Developmental regulation of glucose transporters GLUT3, GLUT4 and GLUT8 in the mouse cerebellar cortex

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Olga; Ballester-Lurbe, Begoña; Poch, Enric; Mesonero, José E; Terrado, José

    2010-01-01

    Glucose uptake into the mammalian nervous system is mediated by the family of facilitative glucose transporter proteins (GLUT). In this work we investigate how the expression of the main neuronal glucose transporters (GLUT3, GLUT4 and GLUT8) is modified during cerebellar cortex maturation. Our results reveal that the levels of the three transporters increase during the postnatal development of the cerebellum. GLUT3 localizes in the growing molecular layer and in the internal granule cell layer. However, the external granule cell layer, Purkinje cell cytoplasm and cytoplasm of the other cerebellar cells lack GLUT3 expression. GLUT4 and GLUT8 have partially overlapping patterns, which are detected in the cytoplasm and dendrites of Purkinje cells, and also in the internal granule cell layer where GLUT8 displays a more diffuse pattern. The differential localization of the transporters suggests that they play different roles in the cerebellum, although GLUT4 and GLUT8 could also perform some compensatory or redundant functions. In addition, the increase in the levels and the area expressing the three transporters suggests that these roles become more important as development advances. Interestingly, the external granule cells, which have been shown to express the monocarboxylate transporter MCT2, express none of the three main neuronal GLUTs. However, when these cells migrate inwardly to differentiate in the internal granule cells, they begin to produce GLUT3, GLUT4 and GLUT8, suggesting that the maturation of the cerebellar granule cells involves a switch in their metabolism in such a way that they start using glucose as they mature. PMID:20819112

  3. Consensus Paper: Towards a Systems-Level View of Cerebellar Function: the Interplay Between Cerebellum, Basal Ganglia, and Cortex.

    PubMed

    Caligiore, Daniele; Pezzulo, Giovanni; Baldassarre, Gianluca; Bostan, Andreea C; Strick, Peter L; Doya, Kenji; Helmich, Rick C; Dirkx, Michiel; Houk, James; Jörntell, Henrik; Lago-Rodriguez, Angel; Galea, Joseph M; Miall, R Chris; Popa, Traian; Kishore, Asha; Verschure, Paul F M J; Zucca, Riccardo; Herreros, Ivan

    2017-02-01

    Despite increasing evidence suggesting the cerebellum works in concert with the cortex and basal ganglia, the nature of the reciprocal interactions between these three brain regions remains unclear. This consensus paper gathers diverse recent views on a variety of important roles played by the cerebellum within the cerebello-basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical system across a range of motor and cognitive functions. The paper includes theoretical and empirical contributions, which cover the following topics: recent evidence supporting the dynamical interplay between cerebellum, basal ganglia, and cortical areas in humans and other animals; theoretical neuroscience perspectives and empirical evidence on the reciprocal influences between cerebellum, basal ganglia, and cortex in learning and control processes; and data suggesting possible roles of the cerebellum in basal ganglia movement disorders. Although starting from different backgrounds and dealing with different topics, all the contributors agree that viewing the cerebellum, basal ganglia, and cortex as an integrated system enables us to understand the function of these areas in radically different ways. In addition, there is unanimous consensus between the authors that future experimental and computational work is needed to understand the function of cerebellar-basal ganglia circuitry in both motor and non-motor functions. The paper reports the most advanced perspectives on the role of the cerebellum within the cerebello-basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical system and illustrates other elements of consensus as well as disagreements and open questions in the field.

  4. VAMP-2, SNAP-25A/B and syntaxin-1 in glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses of the rat cerebellar cortex

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the distribution of key SNARE proteins in glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses of the adult rat cerebellar cortex using light microscopy immunohistochemical techniques. Analysis was made of co-localizations of vGluT-1 and vGluT-2, vesicular transporters of glutamate and markers of glutamatergic synapses, or GAD, the GABA synthetic enzyme and marker of GABAergic synapses, with VAMP-2, SNAP-25A/B and syntaxin-1. Results The examined SNARE proteins were found to be diffusely expressed in glutamatergic synapses, whereas they were rarely observed in GABAergic synapses. However, among glutamatergic synapses, subpopulations which did not contain VAMP-2, SNAP-25A/B and syntaxin-1 were detected. They included virtually all the synapses established by terminals of climbing fibres (immunoreactive for vGluT-2) and some synapses established by terminals of parallel and mossy fibres (immunoreactive for vGluT-1, and for vGluT-1 and 2, respectively). The only GABA synapses expressing the SNARE proteins studied were the synapses established by axon terminals of basket neurons. Conclusion The present study supplies a detailed morphological description of VAMP-2, SNAP-25A/B and syntaxin-1 in the different types of glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses of the rat cerebellar cortex. The examined SNARE proteins characterize most of glutamatergic synapses and only one type of GABAergic synapses. In the subpopulations of glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses lacking the SNARE protein isoforms examined, alternative mechanisms for regulating trafficking of synaptic vesicles may be hypothesized, possibly mediated by different isoforms or homologous proteins. PMID:22094010

  5. Distinct subsynaptic localization of type 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors at glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses in the rodent cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Mahnaz; Kasugai, Yu; Fukazawa, Yugo; Bertaso, Federica; Raynaud, Fabrice; Perroy, Julie; Fagni, Laurent; Kaufmann, Walter A; Watanabe, Masahiko; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Ferraguti, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu1) receptors play a pivotal role in different forms of synaptic plasticity in the cerebellar cortex, e.g. long-term depression at glutamatergic synapses and rebound potentiation at GABAergic synapses. These various forms of plasticity might depend on the subsynaptic arrangement of the receptor in Purkinje cells that can be regulated by protein-protein interactions. This study investigated, by means of the freeze-fracture replica immunogold labelling method, the subcellular localization of mGlu1 receptors in the rodent cerebellum and whether Homer proteins regulate their subsynaptic distribution. We observed a widespread extrasynaptic localization of mGlu1 receptors and confirmed their peri-synaptic enrichment at glutamatergic synapses. Conversely, we detected mGlu1 receptors within the main body of GABAergic synapses onto Purkinje cell dendrites. Although Homer proteins are known to interact with the mGlu1 receptor C-terminus, we could not detect Homer3, the most abundant Homer protein in the cerebellar cortex, at GABAergic synapses by pre-embedding and post-embedding immunoelectron microscopy. We then hypothesized a critical role for Homer proteins in the peri-junctional localization of mGlu1 receptors at glutamatergic synapses. To disrupt Homer-associated protein complexes, mice were tail-vein injected with the membrane-permeable dominant-negative TAT-Homer1a. Freeze-fracture replica immunogold labelling analysis showed no significant alteration in the mGlu1 receptor distribution pattern at parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses, suggesting that other scaffolding proteins are involved in the peri-synaptic confinement. The identification of interactors that regulate the subsynaptic localization of the mGlu1 receptor at neurochemically distinct synapses may offer new insight into its trafficking and intracellular signalling.

  6. Effects of prenatal paraquat and mancozeb exposure on amino acid synaptic transmission in developing mouse cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Contreras, Leticia; Dávila-Ovalles, Rosaura; Benítez-Díaz, Pedro; Peña-Contreras, Zulma; Palacios-Prü, Ernesto

    2005-11-07

    The goal of this study was to analyze the effects of prenatal exposure to the pesticides paraquat (PQ) and mancozeb (MZ) on the development of synaptic transmission in mouse cerebellar cortex. Pregnant NMRI mice were treated with either saline, 10 mg/kg PQ, 30 mg/kg MZ or the combination of PQ + MZ, between gestational days 12 (E12) and E20. Variation in the levels of amino acid neurotransmitters was determined by HPLC, between postnatal day 1 (P1) and P30. Motor coordination was assessed by locomotor activity evaluation of control and experimental pups at P14, P21 and P30. Significant reductions in the levels of excitatory neurotransmitters, aspartate and glutamate, were observed in PQ-, MZ- or combined PQ + MZ-exposed pups, with respect to control, during peak periods of excitatory innervation of Purkinje cells: between P2-P5 and P11-P15. However, at P30, lower aspartate contents, in contrast with increased glutamate levels, were detected in all experimental groups. During the first two postnatal weeks, delays in GABA and glycine ontogenesis were observed in PQ- and PQ + MZ-exposed pups, whereas notable decrements in GABA and glycine levels were seen in PQ + MZ-exposed animals. Decreased taurine contents were detected at P3 and P11 in PQ- and PQ + MZ-exposed mice. Pups in different experimental groups all showed hyperactivity at P14 and then exhibited reduced locomotor activity at P30. Taken together, our results indicate that prenatal exposure to either PQ or MZ or the combination of both could alter the chronology and magnitude of synaptic transmission in developing mouse cerebellar cortex.

  7. The treasury of the commons: making use of public gene expression resources to better characterize the molecular diversity of inhibitory interneurons in the cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Karl; Oberdick, John

    2009-12-01

    We mined the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas for genes expressed in cerebellar cortical inhibitory interneurons that would allow identification and possibly distinction of these cells. We identified some 90 genes that are highly expressed in specific subsets of cerebellar cortical inhibitory interneurons or various combinations thereof. Four genes are exclusively expressed, within the cerebellar cortex, in molecular layer interneurons, and ten genes label exclusively inhibitory interneurons in the granule cell layer or subsets thereof. Differential expression of many of these genes in cells residing in the lower versus the upper molecular layer provides evidence that these cells, traditionally referred to as basket and stellate cells, are indeed molecularly distinct. Two genes could be identified as novel markers for unipolar brush cells. Intersection of these data with embryonic expression patterns as documented in the genepaint repository does not support a hierarchical model of cerebellar interneuron development, but may be more easily reconciled with the view that cerebellar inhibitory interneurons derive from a common precursor pool from which they are specified only late into their development. The novel markers identified here should prove useful for probing the timing and mechanisms supporting cerebellar cortical interneuron specification and diversification.

  8. Compartmentation of the cerebellar cortex: adaptation to lifestyle in the star-nosed mole Condylura cristata.

    PubMed

    Marzban, Hassan; Hoy, Nathan; Buchok, Matthew; Catania, Kenneth C; Hawkes, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The adult mammalian cerebellum is histologically uniform. However, concealed beneath the simple laminar architecture, it is organized rostrocaudally and mediolaterally into complex arrays of transverse zones and parasagittal stripes that is both highly reproducible between individuals and generally conserved across mammals and birds. Beyond this conservation, the general architecture appears to be adapted to the animal's way of life. To test this hypothesis, we have examined cerebellar compartmentation in the talpid star-nosed mole Condylura cristata. The star-nosed mole leads a subterranean life. It is largely blind and instead uses an array of fleshy appendages (the "star") to navigate and locate its prey. The hypothesis suggests that cerebellar architecture would be modified to reduce regions receiving visual input and expand those that receive trigeminal afferents from the star. Zebrin II and phospholipase Cß4 (PLCß4) immunocytochemistry was used to map the zone-and-stripe architecture of the cerebellum of the adult star-nosed mole. The general zone-and-stripe architecture characteristic of all mammals is present in the star-nosed mole. In the vermis, the four typical transverse zones are present, two with alternating zebrin II/PLCß4 stripes, two wholly zebrin II+/PLCß4-. However, the central and nodular zones (prominent visual receiving areas) are proportionally reduced in size and conversely, the trigeminal-receiving areas (the posterior zone of the vermis and crus I/II of the hemispheres) are uncharacteristically large. We therefore conclude that cerebellar architecture is generally conserved across the Mammalia but adapted to the specific lifestyle of the species.

  9. Age-Related Changes in Processing Speed: Unique Contributions of Cerebellar and Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Mark A.; Keren, Noam I.; Roberts, Donna R.; Calhoun, Vince D.; Harris, Kelly C.

    2010-01-01

    Age-related declines in processing speed are hypothesized to underlie the widespread changes in cognition experienced by older adults. We used a structural covariance approach to identify putative neural networks that underlie age-related structural changes associated with processing speed for 42 adults ranging in age from 19 to 79 years. To characterize a potential mechanism by which age-related gray matter changes lead to slower processing speed, we examined the extent to which cerebral small vessel disease influenced the association between age-related gray matter changes and processing speed. A frontal pattern of gray matter and white matter variation that was related to cerebral small vessel disease, as well as a cerebellar pattern of gray matter and white matter variation were uniquely related to age-related declines in processing speed. These results demonstrate that at least two distinct factors affect age-related changes in processing speed, which might be slowed by mitigating cerebral small vessel disease and factors affecting declines in cerebellar morphology. PMID:20300463

  10. Cerebellar and Prefrontal Cortex Contributions to Adaptation, Strategies, and Reinforcement Learning

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jordan A.; Ivry, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, motor learning has been studied as an implicit learning process, one in which movement errors are used to improve performance in a continuous, gradual manner. The cerebellum figures prominently in this literature given well-established ideas about the role of this system in error-based learning and the production of automatized skills. Recent developments have brought into focus the relevance of multiple learning mechanisms for sensorimotor learning. These include processes involving repetition, reinforcement learning, and strategy utilization. We examine these developments, considering their implications for understanding cerebellar function and how this structure interacts with other neural systems to support motor learning. Converging lines of evidence from behavioral, computational, and neuropsychological studies suggest a fundamental distinction between processes that use error information to improve action execution or action selection. While the cerebellum is clearly linked to the former, its role in the latter remains an open question. PMID:24916295

  11. Cerebellar and prefrontal cortex contributions to adaptation, strategies, and reinforcement learning.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jordan A; Ivry, Richard B

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, motor learning has been studied as an implicit learning process, one in which movement errors are used to improve performance in a continuous, gradual manner. The cerebellum figures prominently in this literature given well-established ideas about the role of this system in error-based learning and the production of automatized skills. Recent developments have brought into focus the relevance of multiple learning mechanisms for sensorimotor learning. These include processes involving repetition, reinforcement learning, and strategy utilization. We examine these developments, considering their implications for understanding cerebellar function and how this structure interacts with other neural systems to support motor learning. Converging lines of evidence from behavioral, computational, and neuropsychological studies suggest a fundamental distinction between processes that use error information to improve action execution or action selection. While the cerebellum is clearly linked to the former, its role in the latter remains an open question.

  12. Sensory Stimulation-Dependent Plasticity in the Cerebellar Cortex of Alert Mice

    PubMed Central

    Márquez-Ruiz, Javier; Cheron, Guy

    2012-01-01

    In vitro studies have supported the occurrence of cerebellar long-term depression (LTD), an interaction between the parallel fibers and Purkinje cells (PCs) that requires the combined activation of the parallel and climbing fibers. To demonstrate the existence of LTD in alert animals, we investigated the plasticity of local field potentials (LFPs) evoked by electrical stimulation of the whisker pad. The recorded LFP showed two major negative waves corresponding to trigeminal (broken into the N2 and N3 components) and cortical responses. PC unitary extracellular recording showed that N2 and N3 occurred concurrently with PC evoked simple spikes, followed by an evoked complex spike. Polarity inversion of the N3 component at the PC level and N3 amplitude reduction after electrical stimulation of the parallel fiber volley applied on the surface of the cerebellum 2 ms earlier strongly suggest that N3 was related to the parallel fiber–PC synapse activity. LFP measurements elicited by single whisker pad stimulus were performed before and after trains of electrical stimuli given at a frequency of 8 Hz for 10 min. We demonstrated that during this later situation, the stimulation of the PC by parallel and climbing fibers was reinforced. After 8-Hz stimulation, we observed long-term modifications (lasting at least 30 min) characterized by a specific decrease of the N3 amplitude accompanied by an increase of the N2 and N3 latency peaks. These plastic modifications indicated the existence of cerebellar LTD in alert animals involving both timing and synaptic modulations. These results corroborate the idea that LTD may underlie basic physiological functions related to calcium-dependent synaptic plasticity in the cerebellum. PMID:22563448

  13. In vivo imaging of neural reactive plasticity after laser axotomy in cerebellar cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allegra Mascaro, A. L.; Sacconi, L.; Maco, B.; Knott, G. W.; Pavone, F. S.

    2014-03-01

    Multi-photon imaging provides valuable insights into the continuous reshaping of neuronal connectivity in live brain. We previously showed that single neuron or even single spine ablation can be achieved by laser-mediated dissection. Furthermore, single axonal branches can be dissected avoiding collateral damage to the adjacent dendrite and the formation of a persistent glial scar. Here, we describe the procedure to address the structural plasticity of cerebellar climbing fibers by combining two-photon in vivo imaging with laser axotomy in a mouse model. This method is a powerful tool to study the basic mechanisms of axonal rewiring after single branch axotomy in vivo. In fact, despite the denervated area being very small, the injured axons consistently reshape the connectivity with surrounding neurons, as indicated by the increase in the turnover of synaptic boutons. In addition, time-lapse imaging reveals the sprouting of new branches from the injured axon. Newly formed branches with varicosities suggest the possible formation of synaptic contacts. Correlative light and electron microscopy revealed that the sprouted branch contains large numbers of vesicles, with varicosities in the close vicinity of Purkinje dendrites.

  14. Role of the cerebellar cortex in conditioned goal-directed behavior.

    PubMed

    Burguière, Eric; Arabo, Arnaud; Jarlier, Frederic; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Rondi-Reig, Laure

    2010-10-06

    Learning a new goal-directed behavioral task often requires the improvement of at least two processes, including an enhanced stimulus-response association and an optimization of the execution of the motor response. The cerebellum has recently been shown to play a role in acquiring goal-directed behavior, but it is unclear to what extent it contributes to a change in the stimulus-response association and/or the optimization of the execution of the motor response. We therefore designed the stimulus-dependent water Y-maze conditioning task, which allows discrimination between both processes, and we subsequently subjected Purkinje cell-specific mutant mice to this new task. The mouse mutants L7-PKCi, which suffer from impaired PKC-dependent processes such as parallel fiber to Purkinje cell long-term depression (PF-PC LTD), were able to acquire the stimulus-response association, but exhibited a reduced optimization of their motor performance. These data show that PF-PC LTD is not required for learning a stimulus-response association, but they do suggest that a PKC-dependent process in cerebellar Purkinje cells is required for optimization of motor responses.

  15. Differential effects of primary motor cortex and cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation on motor learning in healthy individuals: A randomized double-blind sham-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Ehsani, F; Bakhtiary, A H; Jaberzadeh, S; Talimkhani, A; Hajihasani, A

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of study was to compare the effect of primary motor cortex (M1) and cerebellar anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (a-tDCS) on online and offline motor learning in healthy individuals. Fifty-nine healthy volunteers were randomly divided into three groups (n=20 in two experimental groups and n=19 in sham-control group). One experimental group received M1a-tDCSand another received cerebellar a-tDCS. The main outcome measure were response time (RT) and number of errors during serial response time test (SRTT) which were assessed prior, 35min and 48h after the interventions. Reduction of response time (RT) and error numbers at last block of the test compared to the first block was considered online learning. Comparison of assessments during retention tests was considered as short-term and long-term offline learning. Online RT reduction was not different among groups (P>0.05), while online error reduction was significantly greater in cerebellar a-tDCS than sham-control group (P<0.017). Moreover, a-tDCS on both M1 and cerebellar regions produced more long-term offline learning as compared to sham tDCS (P<0.01), while short-term offline RT reduction was significantly greater in M1a-tDCS than sham-control group (P<0.05). The findings indicated that although cerebellar a-tDCS enhances online learning and M1a-tDCS has more effect on short-term offline learning, both M1 and cerebellar a-tDCS can be used as a boosting technique for improvement of offline motor learning in healthy individuals.

  16. Cerebellar cortex granular layer interneurons in the macaque monkey are functionally driven by mossy fiber pathways through net excitation or inhibition.

    PubMed

    Laurens, Jean; Heiney, Shane A; Kim, Gyutae; Blazquez, Pablo M

    2013-01-01

    The granular layer is the input layer of the cerebellar cortex. It receives information through mossy fibers, which contact local granular layer interneurons (GLIs) and granular layer output neurons (granule cells). GLIs provide one of the first signal processing stages in the cerebellar cortex by exciting or inhibiting granule cells. Despite the importance of this early processing stage for later cerebellar computations, the responses of GLIs and the functional connections of mossy fibers with GLIs in awake animals are poorly understood. Here, we recorded GLIs and mossy fibers in the macaque ventral-paraflocculus (VPFL) during oculomotor tasks, providing the first full inventory of GLI responses in the VPFL of awake primates. We found that while mossy fiber responses are characterized by a linear monotonic relationship between firing rate and eye position, GLIs show complex response profiles characterized by "eye position fields" and single or double directional tunings. For the majority of GLIs, prominent features of their responses can be explained by assuming that a single GLI receives inputs from mossy fibers with similar or opposite directional preferences, and that these mossy fiber inputs influence GLI discharge through net excitatory or inhibitory pathways. Importantly, GLIs receiving mossy fiber inputs through these putative excitatory and inhibitory pathways show different firing properties, suggesting that they indeed correspond to two distinct classes of interneurons. We propose a new interpretation of the information flow through the cerebellar cortex granular layer, in which mossy fiber input patterns drive the responses of GLIs not only through excitatory but also through net inhibitory pathways, and that excited and inhibited GLIs can be identified based on their responses and their intrinsic properties.

  17. Model-Founded Explorations of the Roles of Molecular Layer Inhibition in Regulating Purkinje Cell Responses in Cerebellar Cortex: More Trouble for the Beam Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Bower, James M.

    2010-01-01

    For most of the last 50 years, the functional interpretation for inhibition in cerebellar cortical circuitry has been dominated by the relatively simple notion that excitatory and inhibitory dendritic inputs sum, and if that sum crosses threshold at the soma the Purkinje cell generates an action potential. Thus, inhibition has traditionally been relegated to a role of sculpting, restricting, or blocking excitation. At the level of networks, this relatively simply notion is manifest in mechanisms like “surround inhibition” which is purported to “shape” or “tune” excitatory neuronal responses. In the cerebellum, where all cell types except one (the granule cell) are inhibitory, these assumptions regarding the role of inhibition continue to dominate. Based on our recent series of modeling and experimental studies, we now suspect that inhibition may play a much more complex, subtle, and central role in the physiological and functional organization of cerebellar cortex. This paper outlines how model-based studies are changing our thinking about the role of feed-forward molecular layer inhibition in the cerebellar cortex. The results not only have important implications for continuing efforts to understand what the cerebellum computes, but might also reveal important features of the evolution of this large and quintessentially vertebrate brain structure. PMID:20877427

  18. Dorsomedial prefrontal cortex and cerebellar contribution to in-group attitudes: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    PubMed

    Gamond, Lucile; Ferrari, Chiara; La Rocca, Stefania; Cattaneo, Zaira

    2017-04-01

    We tend to express more positive judgments and behaviors toward individuals belonging to our own group compared to other (out-) groups. In this study, we assessed the role of the cerebellum and of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) - two regions critically implicated in social cognition processes - in mediating implicit valenced attitudes toward in-group and out-group individuals. To this aim, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in combination with a standard attitude priming task, in which Caucasian participants had to categorize the valence of a series of adjectives primed by either an in-group or an out-group face. In two behavioral experiments, we found an in-group bias (i.e. faster categorization of positive adjectives when preceded by in-group faces) but no evidence of an out-group bias. Interestingly, TMS over both the dmPFC and over the (right) cerebellum significantly interfered with the modulation exerted by group membership on adjective valence classification, abolishing the in-group bias observed at baseline. Overall, our data suggest that both the dmPFC and the cerebellum play a causal role in mediating implicit social attitudes.

  19. Assessment of Anterior Cingulate Cortex (ACC) and Left Cerebellar Metabolism in Asperger's Syndrome with Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS)

    PubMed Central

    Goji, Aya; Ito, Hiromichi; Mori, Kenji; Harada, Masafumi; Hisaoka, Sonoka; Toda, Yoshihiro; Mori, Tatsuo; Abe, Yoko; Miyazaki, Masahito; Kagami, Shoji

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) is a noninvasive neuroimaging method to quantify biochemical metabolites in vivo and it can serve as a powerful tool to monitor neurobiochemical profiles in the brain. Asperger’s syndrome (AS) is a type of autism spectrum disorder, which is characterized by impaired social skills and restrictive, repetitive patterns of interest and activities, while intellectual levels and language skills are relatively preserved. Despite clinical aspects have been well-characterized, neurometabolic profiling in the brain of AS remains to be clear. The present study used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) to investigate whether pediatric AS is associated with measurable neurometabolic abnormalities that can contribute new information on the neurobiological underpinnings of the disorder. Methods Study participants consisted of 34 children with AS (2–12 years old; mean age 5.2 (±2.0); 28 boys) and 19 typically developed children (2–11 years old; mean age 5.6 (±2.6); 12 boys) who served as the normal control group. The 1H MRS data were obtained from two regions of interest: the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and left cerebellum. Results In the ACC, levels of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), total creatine (tCr), total choline-containing compounds (tCho) and myo-Inositol (mI) were significantly decreased in children with AS compared to controls. On the other hand, no significant group differences in any of the metabolites were found in the left cerebellum. Neither age nor sex accounted for the metabolic findings in the regions. Conclusion The finding of decreased levels of NAA, tCr, tCho, and mI in the ACC but not in left cerebellar voxels in the AS, suggests a lower ACC neuronal density in the present AS cohort compared to controls. PMID:28060873

  20. FoxP2 expression in the cerebellum and inferior olive: development of the transverse stripe-shaped expression pattern in the mouse cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hirofumi; Sugihara, Izumi

    2012-02-15

    Many molecules are expressed heterogeneously in subpopulations of cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) and inferior olive (IO) neurons during development or in adulthood. These expression patterns are often organized in longitudinal stripes in the cerebellar cortex, which may be related to functional compartmentalization. FoxP2, a transcription factor, is expressed in PCs and IO neurons, but the details of its expression pattern remain unclear. Here we examined FoxP2 expression patterns systematically by immunostaining serial sections of the hindbrain from embryonic day 14.5 to adulthood in mice. FoxP2 was highly expressed in virtually all PCs at and before postnatal day 6 (P6), except for those in the flocculus and small parts of the nodulus (vermal lobule X), where FoxP2 expression was moderate or absent. After P6, FoxP2 expression gradually diminished in PCs in some areas. In adults, FoxP2 was expressed, less intensely than in earlier stages, in subsets of PCs that were mostly arranged transversely along the folial apices. In contrast, FoxP2 was expressed intensely in most IO neurons during development and in adulthood. FoxP2 was also expressed in a small population of neurons in the cerebellar nuclei. FoxP2 expression in adult rats and chicks was generally comparable to that in adult mice, suggesting evolutionary conservation of the expression pattern. Thus, the FoxP2 expression pattern reflects new transverse compartmentalization in the adult cerebellar cortex, although its functional significance remains unclear.

  1. [Atrophy of the granular layer of the cerebellar cortex in patients with nonlymphoblastic leukemia treated with cytosine arabinoside].

    PubMed

    Nowacki, P; Dolińska, D; Honczarenko, K; Zyluk, B

    1992-01-01

    The reported analysis comprised 81 patients dying of acute non-lymphoblastic leukaemia type M1, M2, M4 and blastic crises in chronic myelocytic leukaemia. It was observed that the number of cases of cerebellar granular layer atrophy rose markedly in the years 1984-1990 as compared with 1976-1983 (45.4% vs 16.2%). It is suggested that this was due to the introduction of cytostatic treatment schedules with higher doses of cytosine arabinoside (ARAC), especially TAD (6-thioguanine, ARAC, daunorubicin). Cerebellar granular layer atrophy seems to be dependent rather on the cumulative dose of ARAC and not on a single high dose of that drug.

  2. Antenatal betamethasone produces protracted changes in anxiety-like behaviors and in the expression of microtubule-associated protein 2, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and the tyrosine kinase B receptor in the rat cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Rodrigo; Valencia, Martina; Bustamante, Carlos

    2015-06-01

    Using classic Golgi staining methods, we previously showed that the administration of synthetic glucocorticoid betamethasone in equivalent doses to those given in cases of human premature birth generates long-term alterations in Purkinje cell dendritic development in the cerebellar cortex. In the present study, we evaluated whether betamethasone alters the immunohistochemical expression of proteins that participate in cerebellar Purkinje cell dendritic development and maintenance, including microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and the tyrosine kinase B receptor (TrkB), which are located predominantly in the cerebellar molecular layer where Purkinje cell dendritogenesis occurs. Consistent with our previous Golgi stain studies, we observed that animals prenatally exposed to a single course of betamethasone showed long-term alterations in the expression of MAP2, BDNF and TrkB. Additionally, these protracted molecular changes were accompanied by anxiety-like behaviors in the elevated plus maze and marble burying tests.

  3. Cerebellar Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2008-01-01

    Recent Advances The molecular control of cell type specification within the developing cerebellum as well as the genetic causes of the most common human developmental cerebellar disorders have long remained mysterious. Recent genetic lineage and loss-of-function data from mice have revealed unique and non-overlapping anatomical origins for GABAergic neurons from ventricular zone precursors and glutamatergic cell from rhombic lip precursors, mirroring distinct origins for these neurotransmitter-specific cell types in the cerebral cortex. Mouse studies elucidating the role of Ptf1a as a cerebellar ventricular zone GABerigic fate switch were actually preceded by the recognition that PTF1A mutations in humans cause cerebellar agenesis, a birth defect of the human cerebellum. Indeed, several genes for congenital human cerebellar malformations have recently been identified, including genes causing Joubert syndrome, Dandy-Walker malformation and Ponto-cerebellar hypoplasia. These studies have pointed to surprisingly complex roles for transcriptional regulation, mitochondrial function and neuronal cilia in patterning, homeostasis and cell proliferation during cerebellar development. Together mouse and human studies are synergistically advancing our understanding of the developmental mechanisms that generate the uniquely complex mature cerebellum. PMID:18513948

  4. [Ultrastructure of the cortex of the cerebellar nodulus in rats after a flight on the biosatellite Kosmos-1514].

    PubMed

    Krasnov, I B; D'iachkova, L N

    1986-01-01

    The ultrastructure of moss fibers and granule cells of the cortex of the cerebellum nodulus of rats flown for 5 days onboard the biosatellite Cosmos-1514 and exposed to 1 g for 6-8 hours upon return to Earth is indicative of an excess excitation of terminals of moss fibers and excitation of granule cells. The excitation of moss fiber terminals reflect the excitatory state of hair cells of the otolith apparatus and neurons of the vestibular ganglion produced by the effect of 1 g after exposure to microgravity. This state can be viewed as evidence of a greater sensitivity of the hair cell of the otolith organ--neuron of the vestibular ganglion system during exposure to microgravity. It is hypothesized that the sensitivity of this system of other mammals may also increase in microgravity.

  5. A model of long-term memory storage in the cerebellar cortex: a possible role for plasticity at parallel fiber synapses onto stellate/basket interneurons.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, G T

    1997-12-09

    By evoking changes in climbing fiber activity, movement errors are thought to modify synapses from parallel fibers onto Purkinje cells (pf*Pkj) so as to improve subsequent motor performance. Theoretical arguments suggest there is an intrinsic tradeoff, however, between motor adaptation and long-term storage. Assuming a baseline rate of motor errors is always present, then repeated performance of any learned movement will generate a series of climbing fiber-mediated corrections. By reshuffling the synaptic weights responsible for any given movement, such corrections will degrade the memories for other learned movements stored in overlapping sets of synapses. The present paper shows that long-term storage can be accomplished by a second site of plasticity at synapses from parallel fibers onto stellate/basket interneurons (pf*St/Bk). Plasticity at pf*St/Bk synapses can be insulated from ongoing fluctuations in climbing fiber activity by assuming that changes in pf*St/Bk synapses occur only after changes in pf*Pkj synapses have built up to a threshold level. Although climbing fiber-dependent plasticity at pf*Pkj synapses allows for the exploration of novel motor strategies in response to changing environmental conditions, plasticity at pf*St/Bk synapses transfers successful strategies to stable long-term storage. To quantify this hypothesis, both sites of plasticity are incorporated into a dynamical model of the cerebellar cortex and its interactions with the inferior olive. When used to simulate idealized motor conditioning trials, the model predicts that plasticity develops first at pf*Pkj synapses, but with additional training is transferred to pf*St/Bk synapses for long-term storage.

  6. [Cerebellar hypoplasias].

    PubMed

    Safronova, Marta Maia; Barbot, Clara; Resende Pereira, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Cerebellar hypoplasias are cerebellar malformations with small but completely formed cerebellum. They can be divided in focal and in diffuse or generalized. It is sometimes difficult to make distinction between cerebellar atrophy (progressive condition) and hipoplasia (not progressive condition). Focal hypoplasias are restricted to one cerebellar hemisphere or to the vermis. Diffuse hypoplasias refer to both cerebellar hemispheres and vermis. If there is associated IVth ventricle enlargement, hypoplasias occur in the context of Dandy-Walker complex, a continuum of posterior fossa cystic anomalies. A revision of cerebellar hypoplasias and associated pathology is done, illustrated with 22 cases tha include focal and diffuse cerebellar hypoplasias, Dandy-Walker malformations and its variant, persistent Blake's pouch cyst, megacisterna magna, PEHO síndrome (progressive encephalopathy with oedema, hipsarrhythmia and optic atrophy), Joubert syndrome, congenital disorder of glycosylation type Ia, pontocerebellar hipoplasias Barth type I and II, diffuse subcortical heterotopia. The imaging finding of structural cerebellar anomalies frequently leads to diagnostic incertainty as the anomalies are mostly unspecific, implying an extenuating analytical and genetic workup. Their knowledge and classification may be useful to decide the patient adjusted laboratorial workup.

  7. [Memory transfer in cerebellar motor learning].

    PubMed

    Nagao, Soichi

    2012-01-01

    Most of our motor skills are acquired through learning. Experiments of gain adaptation of ocular reflexes have consistently suggested that the memory of adaptation is initially formed in the cerebellar cortex, and is transferred to the cerebellar (vestibular) nuclei for consolidation to long-term memory after repetitions of training. We have recently developed a new system to evaluate the motor learning in human subjects using prism adaptation of hand reaching movement, by referring to the prism adaptation of dart throwing of Martin et al. (1996). In our system, the subject views the small target presented in the touch-panel screen, and touches it with his/her finger without direct visual feedback. After 15-30 trials of touching wearing prisms, an adaptation occurs in healthy subjects: they became able to touch the target correctly. Meanwhile, such an adaptation was impaired in patients of cerebellar disease. We have proposed a model of human prism adaptation that the memory of adaptation is initially encoded in the cerebellar cortex, and is later transferred to the cerebellar nuclei after repetitions of training. The memory in the cerebellar cortex may be formed and extinguished independently of the memory maintained in the cerebellar nuclei, and these two memories work cooperatively.

  8. Cerebellar Ataxia.

    PubMed

    Perlman

    2000-05-01

    There is nothing more discouraging than for a patient to be given a specific diagnosis, then to be told that there is nothing that can be done. Physicians are equally disheartened to see exponential progress being made in the understanding of the pathophysiology of a complex disorder but few direct benefits resulting for their patients. Over the past 5 years, molecular genetic research has completely revolutionized the way in which the progressive cerebellar ataxias are classified and diagnosed, but it has yet to produce effective gene-based, neuroprotective, or neurorestorative therapies. The treatment of cerebellar ataxia remains primarily a neurorehabilitation challenge, employing physical, occupational, speech, and swallowing therapy; adaptive equipment; driver safety training; and nutritional counseling. Modest additional gains are seen with the use of medications that can improve imbalance, incoordination, or dysarthria (amantadine, buspirone, acetazolamide); cerebellar tremor (clonazepam, propranolol); and cerebellar or central vestibular nystagmus (gabapentin, baclofen, clonazepam). Many of the progressive cerebellar syndromes have associated features involving other neurologic systems (eg, spasticity, dystonia or rigidity, resting or rubral tremor, chorea, motor unit weakness or fatigue, autonomic dysfunction, peripheral or posterior column sensory loss, neuropathic pain or cramping, double vision, vision and hearing loss, dementia, and bowel, bladder, and sexual dysfunction), which can impede the treatment of the ataxic symptoms or can worsen with the use of certain drugs. Treatment of the associated features themselves may in turn worsen the ataxia either directly (as side effects of medication) or indirectly (eg, relaxation of lower limb spasticity that was acting as a stabilizer for an ataxic gait). Secondary complications of progressive ataxia can include deconditioning or immobility, weight loss or gain, skin breakdown, recurrent pulmonary and

  9. Cerebellar Stroke-manifesting as Mania

    PubMed Central

    Jagadesan, Venkatesan; Thiruvengadam, Kannapiran R.; Muralidharan, Rengarajalu

    2014-01-01

    Secondary mania resulting from cerebral Cortex are described commonly. But secondary mania produced by cerebellar lesions are relatively uncommon. This case report describes a patient who developed cerebellar stoke and manic features simultaneously. 28 years old male developed giddiness and projectile vomiting. Then he would lie down for about an hour only to find that he could not walk. He became quarrelsome. His Psycho motor activities and speech were increased. He was euphoric and was expressing grandiose ideas. Bender Gestalt Test showed signs of organicity. Score in Young mania relating scale was 32; productivity was low in Rorschach. Neurological examination revealed left cerebellar signs like ataxia and slurring of speech. Computed tomography of brain showed left cerebellar infarct. Relationship between Psychiatric manifestations and cerebellar lesion are discussed. PMID:25035567

  10. Linking oscillations in cerebellar circuits

    PubMed Central

    Courtemanche, Richard; Robinson, Jennifer C.; Aponte, Daniel I.

    2013-01-01

    In many neuroscience fields, the study of local and global rhythmicity has been receiving increasing attention. These network influences could directly impact on how neuronal groups interact together, organizing for different contexts. The cerebellar cortex harbors a variety of such local circuit rhythms, from the rhythms in the cerebellar cortex per se, or those dictated from important afferents. We present here certain cerebellar oscillatory phenomena that have been recorded in rodents and primates. Those take place in a range of frequencies: from the more known oscillations in the 4–25 Hz band, such as the olivocerebellar oscillatory activity and the granule cell layer oscillations, to the more recently reported slow (<1 Hz oscillations), and the fast (>150 Hz) activity in the Purkinje cell layer. Many of these oscillations appear spontaneously in the circuits, and are modulated by behavioral imperatives. We review here how those oscillations are recorded, some of their modulatory mechanisms, and also identify some of the cerebellar nodes where they could interact. A particular emphasis has been placed on how these oscillations could be modulated by movement and certain neuropathological manifestations. Many of those oscillations could have a definite impact on the way information is processed in the cerebellum and how it interacts with other structures in a variety of contexts. PMID:23908606

  11. Altered cerebellar feedback projections in Asperger syndrome.

    PubMed

    Catani, Marco; Jones, Derek K; Daly, Eileen; Embiricos, Nitzia; Deeley, Quinton; Pugliese, Luca; Curran, Sarah; Robertson, Dene; Murphy, Declan G M

    2008-07-15

    It has been proposed that the biological basis of autism spectrum disorder includes cerebellar 'disconnection'. However, direct in vivo evidence in support of this is lacking. Here, the microstructural integrity of cerebellar white matter in adults with Asperger syndrome was studied using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance tractography. Fifteen adults with Asperger syndrome and 16 age-IQ-gender-matched healthy controls underwent diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging. For each subject, tract-specific measurements of mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy were made within the inferior, middle, superior cerebellar peduncles and short intracerebellar fibres. No group differences were observed in mean diffusivity. However, people with Asperger syndrome had significantly lower fractional anisotropy in the short intracerebellar fibres (p<0.001) and right superior cerebellar (output) peduncle (p<0.001) compared to controls; but no difference in the input tracts. Severity of social impairment, as measured by the Autistic Diagnostic Interview, was negatively correlated with diffusion anisotropy in the fibres of the left superior cerebellar peduncle. These findings suggest a vulnerability of specific cerebellar neural pathways in people with Asperger syndrome. The localised abnormalities in the main cerebellar outflow pathway may prevent the cerebral cortex from receiving those cerebellar feedback inputs necessary for a successful adaptive social behaviour.

  12. A probabilistic atlas of the cerebellar white matter.

    PubMed

    van Baarsen, K M; Kleinnijenhuis, M; Jbabdi, S; Sotiropoulos, S N; Grotenhuis, J A; van Cappellen van Walsum, A M

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of the cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei and their connectivity are gaining attraction, due to the important role the cerebellum plays in cognition and motor control. Atlases of the cerebellar cortex and nuclei are used to locate regions of interest in clinical and neuroscience studies. However, the white matter that connects these relay stations is of at least similar functional importance. Damage to these cerebellar white matter tracts may lead to serious language, cognitive and emotional disturbances, although the pathophysiological mechanism behind it is still debated. Differences in white matter integrity between patients and controls might shed light on structure-function correlations. A probabilistic parcellation atlas of the cerebellar white matter would help these studies by facilitating automatic segmentation of the cerebellar peduncles, the localization of lesions and the comparison of white matter integrity between patients and controls. In this work a digital three-dimensional probabilistic atlas of the cerebellar white matter is presented, based on high quality 3T, 1.25mm resolution diffusion MRI data from 90 subjects participating in the Human Connectome Project. The white matter tracts were estimated using probabilistic tractography. Results over 90 subjects were symmetrical and trajectories of superior, middle and inferior cerebellar peduncles resembled the anatomy as known from anatomical studies. This atlas will contribute to a better understanding of cerebellar white matter architecture. It may eventually aid in defining structure-function correlations in patients with cerebellar disorders.

  13. Changes in the cerebellar and cerebro-cerebellar circuit in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fang, Peng; An, Jie; Tan, Xin; Zeng, Ling-Li; Shen, Hui; Qiu, Shijun; Hu, Dewen

    2017-01-11

    Currently, 422 million adults suffer from diabetes worldwide, leading to tremendous disabilities and a great burden to families and society. Functional and structural MRIs have demonstrated that patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) exhibit abnormalities in brain regions in the cerebral cortex. However, the changes of cerebellar anatomical connections in diabetic patients remains unclear. In the current study, diffusion tensor imaging deterministic tractography and statistical analysis were employed to investigate abnormal cerebellar anatomical connections in diabetic patients. This is the first study to investigate the altered cerebellar anatomical connectivity in T2DM patients. Decreased anatomical connections were found in the cerebellar and cerebro-cerebellar circuits of T2DM patients, providing valuable new insights into the potential neuro-pathophysiology of diabetes-related motor and cognitive deficits.

  14. Cerebellar modules operate at different frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haibo; Lin, Zhanmin; Voges, Kai; Ju, Chiheng; Gao, Zhenyu; Bosman, Laurens WJ; Ruigrok, Tom JH; Hoebeek, Freek E

    2014-01-01

    Due to the uniform cyto-architecture of the cerebellar cortex, its overall physiological characteristics have traditionally been considered to be homogeneous. In this study, we show in awake mice at rest that spiking activity of Purkinje cells, the sole output cells of the cerebellar cortex, differs between cerebellar modules and correlates with their expression of the glycolytic enzyme aldolase C or zebrin. Simple spike and complex spike frequencies were significantly higher in Purkinje cells located in zebrin-negative than zebrin-positive modules. The difference in simple spike frequency persisted when the synaptic input to, but not intrinsic activity of, Purkinje cells was manipulated. Blocking TRPC3, the effector channel of a cascade of proteins that have zebrin-like distribution patterns, attenuated the simple spike frequency difference. Our results indicate that zebrin-discriminated cerebellar modules operate at different frequencies, which depend on activation of TRPC3, and that this property is relevant for all cerebellar functions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02536.001 PMID:24843004

  15. Regionalization of the isthmic and cerebellar primordia.

    PubMed

    Narboux-Nême, Nicolas; Louvi, Angeliki; Alexandre, Paula; Wassef, Marion

    2005-01-01

    The complex migrations of neurons born in the dorsal neural tube of the isthmic and rhombomere l (rl) domains complicate the delineation of the cerebellar primordium. We show that Purkinje cells (P) are likely generated over a wide territory before gathering in the future cerebellar primordium under the developing external granular layer. Later expansion of the cerebellum over a restricted ependymal domain could rely on mutual interations between P cells and granule cell progenitors (GCP). P are attracted by GCP and in turn stimulate their proliferation, increasing the surface of the developing cortex. At later stages, regionalization of the developing and adult cerebellar cortex can be detected through regional variations in the distribution of several P cell markers. Whether and how the developmental and adult P subtypes are related is still unknown and it is unclear if they delineate the same sets of cerebellar subdivisions. We provide evidence that the early P regionalization is involved in intrinsic patterning of the cerebellar primordium, in particular it relate to the organization of the corticonuclear connection. We propose that the early P regionalization provides a scaffold to the mature P regionalization but that the development of functional afferent connections induces a period of P plasticity during which the early regional identity of P could be remodeled.

  16. Crossed Cerebellar Atrophy of the Lateral Cerebellar Nucleus in an Endothelin-1-Induced, Rodent Model of Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Hugh H.; Cooperrider, Jessica L.; Park, Hyun-Joo; Wathen, Connor A.; Gale, John T.; Baker, Kenneth B.; Machado, Andre G.

    2017-01-01

    Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) is a functional deficit of the cerebellar hemisphere resulting from loss of afferent input consequent to a lesion of the contralateral cerebral hemisphere. It is manifested as a reduction of metabolism and blood flow and, depending on severity and duration, it can result in atrophy, a phenomenon known as crossed cerebellar atrophy (CCA). While CCA has been well-demonstrated in humans, it remains poorly characterized in animal models of stroke. In this study we evaluated the effects of cerebral cortical ischemia on contralateral cerebellar anatomy using an established rodent model of chronic stroke. The effects of cortical ischemia on the cerebellar hemispheres, vermis and deep nuclei were characterized. Intracortical microinjections of endothelin-1 (ET-1) were delivered to the motor cortex of Long Evans rats to induce ischemic stroke, with animals sacrificed 6 weeks later. Naive animals served as controls. Cerebral sections and cerebellar sections including the deep nuclei were prepared for analysis with Nissl staining. Cortical ischemia was associated with significant thickness reduction of the molecular layer at the Crus 1 and parafloccular lobule (PFL), but not in fourth cerebellar lobule (4Cb), as compared to the ipsilesional cerebellar hemisphere. A significant reduction in volume and cell density of the lateral cerebellar nucleus (LCN), the rodent correlate of the dentate nucleus, was also noted. The results highlight the relevance of corticopontocerebellar (CPC) projections for cerebellar metabolism and function, including its direct projections to the LCN. PMID:28261086

  17. Distributed Cerebellar Motor Learning: A Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity Model.

    PubMed

    Luque, Niceto R; Garrido, Jesús A; Naveros, Francisco; Carrillo, Richard R; D'Angelo, Egidio; Ros, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Deep cerebellar nuclei neurons receive both inhibitory (GABAergic) synaptic currents from Purkinje cells (within the cerebellar cortex) and excitatory (glutamatergic) synaptic currents from mossy fibers. Those two deep cerebellar nucleus inputs are thought to be also adaptive, embedding interesting properties in the framework of accurate movements. We show that distributed spike-timing-dependent plasticity mechanisms (STDP) located at different cerebellar sites (parallel fibers to Purkinje cells, mossy fibers to deep cerebellar nucleus cells, and Purkinje cells to deep cerebellar nucleus cells) in close-loop simulations provide an explanation for the complex learning properties of the cerebellum in motor learning. Concretely, we propose a new mechanistic cerebellar spiking model. In this new model, deep cerebellar nuclei embed a dual functionality: deep cerebellar nuclei acting as a gain adaptation mechanism and as a facilitator for the slow memory consolidation at mossy fibers to deep cerebellar nucleus synapses. Equipping the cerebellum with excitatory (e-STDP) and inhibitory (i-STDP) mechanisms at deep cerebellar nuclei afferents allows the accommodation of synaptic memories that were formed at parallel fibers to Purkinje cells synapses and then transferred to mossy fibers to deep cerebellar nucleus synapses. These adaptive mechanisms also contribute to modulate the deep-cerebellar-nucleus-output firing rate (output gain modulation toward optimizing its working range).

  18. Distributed Cerebellar Motor Learning: A Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity Model

    PubMed Central

    Luque, Niceto R.; Garrido, Jesús A.; Naveros, Francisco; Carrillo, Richard R.; D'Angelo, Egidio; Ros, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Deep cerebellar nuclei neurons receive both inhibitory (GABAergic) synaptic currents from Purkinje cells (within the cerebellar cortex) and excitatory (glutamatergic) synaptic currents from mossy fibers. Those two deep cerebellar nucleus inputs are thought to be also adaptive, embedding interesting properties in the framework of accurate movements. We show that distributed spike-timing-dependent plasticity mechanisms (STDP) located at different cerebellar sites (parallel fibers to Purkinje cells, mossy fibers to deep cerebellar nucleus cells, and Purkinje cells to deep cerebellar nucleus cells) in close-loop simulations provide an explanation for the complex learning properties of the cerebellum in motor learning. Concretely, we propose a new mechanistic cerebellar spiking model. In this new model, deep cerebellar nuclei embed a dual functionality: deep cerebellar nuclei acting as a gain adaptation mechanism and as a facilitator for the slow memory consolidation at mossy fibers to deep cerebellar nucleus synapses. Equipping the cerebellum with excitatory (e-STDP) and inhibitory (i-STDP) mechanisms at deep cerebellar nuclei afferents allows the accommodation of synaptic memories that were formed at parallel fibers to Purkinje cells synapses and then transferred to mossy fibers to deep cerebellar nucleus synapses. These adaptive mechanisms also contribute to modulate the deep-cerebellar-nucleus-output firing rate (output gain modulation toward optimizing its working range). PMID:26973504

  19. Distinct critical cerebellar subregions for components of verbal working memory

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Freya E.; Grube, Manon; Von Kriegstein, Katharina; Kumar, Sukhbinder; English, Philip; Kelly, Thomas P.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Griffiths, Timothy D.

    2014-01-01

    A role for the cerebellum in cognition has been proposed based on studies suggesting a profile of cognitive deficits due to cerebellar stroke. Such studies are limited in the determination of the detailed organisation of cerebellar subregions that are critical for different aspects of cognition. In this study we examined the correlation between cognitive performance and cerebellar integrity in a specific degeneration of the cerebellar cortex: Spinocerebellar Ataxia type 6 (SCA6). The results demonstrate a critical relationship between verbal working memory and grey matter density in superior (bilateral lobules VI and crus I of lobule VII) and inferior (bilateral lobules VIIIa and VIIIb, and right lobule IX) parts of the cerebellum. We demonstrate that distinct cerebellar regions subserve different components of the prevalent psychological model for verbal working memory based on a phonological loop. The work confirms the involvement of the cerebellum in verbal working memory and defines specific subsystems for this within the cerebellum. PMID:22133495

  20. The physiological basis of therapies for cerebellar ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Mitoma, Hiroshi; Manto, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxias represent a group of heterogeneous disorders impacting on activities of daily living and quality of life. Various therapies have been proposed to improve symptoms in cerebellar ataxias. This review examines the physiological background of the various treatments currently administered worldwide. We analyze the mechanisms of action of drugs with a focus on aminopyridines and other antiataxic medications, of noninvasive cerebellar stimulation, and of motor rehabilitation. Considering the cerebellum as a controller, we propose the novel concept of ‘restorable stage’. Because of its unique anatomical architecture and its diffuse connectivity in particular with the cerebral cortex, keeping in mind the anatomophysiology of the cerebellar circuitry is a necessary step to understand the rationale of therapies of cerebellar ataxias and develop novel therapeutic tools. PMID:27582895

  1. Cerebellar mass as a location of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Desideri, Ilaria; Canovetti, Silvia; Pesaresi, Ilaria; Caniglia, Michele; Ciancia, Eugenio; Bartolozzi, Carlo; Puglioli, Michele; Cosottini, Mirco

    2014-09-01

    A 22-year-old man with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia was referred to our observation for headache, cervical pain and sopor. A computed tomography study revealed triventricular obstructive hydrocephalus due to a left cerebellar hyperdense mass impinging on the fourth ventricle. A magnetic resonance study demonstrated an area of hyperintensity on T2-weighted images, hypointensity on T1, restricted diffusivity and contrast enhancement involving the left hemispherical cerebellar cortex and the vermis and causing cerebellar herniation. After surgical excision of the lesion, histological examination revealed an infiltrate of lymphoblastic leukaemia with B cells. Leukaemic intracranial masses are rare. Our report describes a case presenting a cerebellar mass of leukaemic tissue characterized by high cellularity and low apparent diffusion coefficient value comparable to acute ischaemia. Therefore leukaemic intracranial mass has to be considered in the differential diagnosis of cerebellar masses.

  2. Metabolic anatomy of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, N.E.; Posner, J.B.; Sidtis, J.J.; Moeller, J.R.; Strother, S.C.; Dhawan, V.; Rottenberg, D.A.

    1988-06-01

    Eleven patients with acquired cerebellar degeneration (10 of whom had paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD)) were evaluated using neuropsychological tests and /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose/positron emission tomography to (1) quantify motor, cognitive, and metabolic abnormalities; (2) determine if characteristic alterations in the regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRGlc) are associated with PCD; and (3) correlate behavioral and metabolic measures of disease severity. Eighteen volunteer subjects served as normal controls. Although some PCD neuropsychological test scores were abnormal, these results could not, in general, be dissociated from the effects of dysarthria and ataxia. rCMRGlc was reduced in patients with PCD (versus normal control subjects) in all regions except the brainstem. Analysis of patient and control rCMRGlc data using a mathematical model of regional metabolic interactions revealed two metabolic pattern descriptors, SSF1 and SSF2, which distinguished patients with PCD from normal control subjects; SSF2, which described a metabolic coupling between cerebellum, cuneus, and posterior temporal, lateral frontal, and paracentral cortex, correlated with quantitative indices of cerebellar dysfunction. Our inability to document substantial intellectual impairment in 7 of 10 patients with PCD contrasts with the 50% incidence of dementia in PCD reported by previous investigators. Widespread reductions in PCD rCMRGlc may result from the loss of cerebellar efferents to thalamus and forebrain structures, a reverse cerebellar diaschisis.

  3. Neurogenesis and Morphogenesis in the Cerebellar Cortex*

    PubMed Central

    Eccles, J. C.

    1970-01-01

    The cerebellum presents the best site in the central nervous system for defining fundamental problems concerning the origin and differentiation of neurones, and their growth and development. The many recent experimental investigations of these problems are reviewed, and hypotheses based upon them are developed in relation to neurogenesis, morphogenesis, and synaptogenesis. PMID:4915885

  4. Cerebellar secretin modulates eyeblink classical conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Jason R.; Robinson, Gain M.; Dean, Aaron M.; Schoenberg, Heidi E.; Williams, Michael R.; Morielli, Anthony D.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that intracerebellar infusion of the neuropeptide secretin enhances the acquisition phase of eyeblink conditioning (EBC). Here, we sought to test whether endogenous secretin also regulates EBC and to test whether the effect of exogenous and endogenous secretin is specific to acquisition. In Experiment 1, rats received intracerebellar infusions of the secretin receptor antagonist 5-27 secretin or vehicle into the lobulus simplex of cerebellar cortex immediately prior to sessions 1–3 of acquisition. Antagonist-infused rats showed a reduction in the percentage of eyeblink CRs compared with vehicle-infused rats. In Experiment 2, rats received intracerebellar infusions of secretin or vehicle immediately prior to sessions 1–2 of extinction. Secretin did not significantly affect extinction performance. In Experiment 3, rats received intracerebellar infusions of 5-27 secretin or vehicle immediately prior to sessions 1–2 of extinction. The secretin antagonist did not significantly affect extinction performance. Together, our current and previous results indicate that both exogenous and endogenous cerebellar secretin modulate acquisition, but not extinction, of EBC. We have previously shown that (1) secretin reduces surface expression of the voltage-gated potassium channel α-subunit Kv1.2 in cerebellar cortex and (2) intracerebellar infusions of a Kv1.2 blocker enhance EBC acquisition, much like secretin. Kv1.2 is almost exclusively expressed in cerebellar cortex at basket cell–Purkinje cell pinceaus and Purkinje cell dendrites; we propose that EBC-induced secretin release from PCs modulates EBC acquisition by reducing surface expression of Kv1.2 at one or both of these sites. PMID:25403455

  5. Clumsiness and disturbed cerebellar development: insights from animal experiments.

    PubMed

    Gramsbergen, Albert

    2003-01-01

    Cerebellar functioning has been implied in the fine adjustments of muscle tone, in the coordination and the feed-forward control of movements and posture, as well as in the establishment and performance of motor skills. The cerebellar cortex in mammals develops late in neuro-ontogeny and an extrapolation from experimental results indicates that in the human the proliferation of the granule cells and the development of circuitry in the cerebellar cortex starts only in the last trimester of pregnancy and lasts until beyond the first birthday. This late development makes the cerebellar development particularly vulnerable to situations like an insufficient supply of nutrients, which may follow placental dysfunction, or to side effects of pharmacological treatments like the administration of corticosteroids in the postnatal period. We studied whether such situations might also lead to motor impairments. In rats, the effects of undernutrition during the brain growth spurt were investigated as well as those of corticosteroids administered in a period that is analogous to the 7th to 8th month of pregnancy in the human. Both these interferences affect cerebellar development and our results in rats indicate that they also lead to retardations in the emergence of certain reflexes, as well as to longer lasting motor impairments during locomotion. Extrapolation of these results strongly suggests that a disturbed cerebellar development should be considered as an important etiological factor in clumsiness in human children.

  6. Thalamic, brainstem, and cerebellar glucose metabolism in the hemiplegic monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoyama, I.; Dauth, G.W.; Gilman, S.; Frey, K.A.; Penney, J.B. Jr.

    1988-12-01

    Unilateral ablation of cerebral cortical areas 4 and 6 of Brodmann in the macaque monkey results in a contralateral hemiplegia that resolves partially with time. During the phase of dense hemiplegia, local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (1CMRG1c) is decreased significantly in most of the thalamic nuclei ipsilateral to the ablation, and there are slight contralateral decreases. The lCMRGlc is reduced bilaterally in most of the brainstem nuclei and bilaterally in the deep cerebellar nuclei, but only in the contralateral cerebellar cortex. During the phase of partial motor recovery, lCMRGlc is incompletely restored in many of the thalamic nuclei ipsilateral to the ablation and completely restored in the contralateral nuclei. In the brainstem and deep cerebellar nuclei, poor to moderate recovery occurs bilaterally. Moderate recovery occurs in the contralateral cerebellar cortex. The findings demonstrate that a unilateral cerebral cortical lesion strongly affects lCMRGlc in the thalamus ipsilaterally and in the cerebellar cortex contralaterally, but in the brainstem bilaterally. Partial recovery of lCMRGlc accompanies the progressive motor recovery. The structures affected include those with direct, and also those with indirect, connections to the areas ablated.

  7. Iatrogenic postoperative cerebellar cyst.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Robin; Moscovici, Samuel; Wygoda, Marc; Eliahou, Ruth; Spektor, Sergey

    2016-12-01

    Cerebellar cyst is a known but uncommon entity. It is congenital in most cases, or may develop after brain parenchyma injuries or interventions. To our knowledge, de novo cerebellar cyst after extra-axial tumor excision, has not been described in the literature. We present the first reported case of a de novo cerebellar cyst developing in a 70-year-old woman following retrosigmoid craniotomy for vestibular schwannoma excision, and discuss the possible causes. Following cyst fenestration, there was no clinical or radiological evidence of a residual cyst.

  8. A neural model of cerebellar learning for arm movement control: cortico-spino-cerebellar dynamics.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Vidal, J L; Grossberg, S; Bullock, D

    1997-01-01

    A neural network model of opponent cerebellar learning for arm movement control is proposed. The model illustrates how a central pattern generator in cortex and basal ganglia, a neuromuscular force controller in spinal cord, and an adaptive cerebellum cooperate to reduce motor variability during multijoint arm movements using mono- and bi-articular muscles. Cerebellar learning modifies velocity commands to produce phasic antagonist bursts at interpositus nucleus cells whose feed-forward action overcomes inherent limitations of spinal feedback control of tracking. Excitation of alpha motoneuron pools, combined with inhibition of their Renshaw cells by the cerebellum, facilitate movement initiation and optimal execution. Transcerebellar pathways are opened by learning through long-term depression (LTD) of parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses in response to conjunctive stimulation of parallel fibers and climbing fiber discharges that signal muscle stretch errors. The cerebellar circuitry also learns to control opponent muscles pairs, allowing cocontraction and reciprocal inhibition of muscles. Learning is stable, exhibits load compensation properties, and generalizes better across movement speeds if motoneuron pools obey the size principle. The intermittency of climbing fiber discharges maintains stable learning. Long-term potentiation (LTP) in response to uncorrelated parallel fiber signals enables previously weakened synapses to recover. Loss of climbing fibers, in the presence of LTP, can erode normal opponent signal processing. Simulated lesions of the cerebellar network reproduce symptoms of cerebellar disease, including sluggish movement onsets, poor execution of multijoint plans, and abnormally prolonged endpoint oscillations.

  9. Inverse Stochastic Resonance in Cerebellar Purkinje Cells

    PubMed Central

    Häusser, Michael; Gutkin, Boris S.; Roth, Arnd

    2016-01-01

    Purkinje neurons play an important role in cerebellar computation since their axons are the only projection from the cerebellar cortex to deeper cerebellar structures. They have complex internal dynamics, which allow them to fire spontaneously, display bistability, and also to be involved in network phenomena such as high frequency oscillations and travelling waves. Purkinje cells exhibit type II excitability, which can be revealed by a discontinuity in their f-I curves. We show that this excitability mechanism allows Purkinje cells to be efficiently inhibited by noise of a particular variance, a phenomenon known as inverse stochastic resonance (ISR). While ISR has been described in theoretical models of single neurons, here we provide the first experimental evidence for this effect. We find that an adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire model fitted to the basic Purkinje cell characteristics using a modified dynamic IV method displays ISR and bistability between the resting state and a repetitive activity limit cycle. ISR allows the Purkinje cell to operate in different functional regimes: the all-or-none toggle or the linear filter mode, depending on the variance of the synaptic input. We propose that synaptic noise allows Purkinje cells to quickly switch between these functional regimes. Using mutual information analysis, we demonstrate that ISR can lead to a locally optimal information transfer between the input and output spike train of the Purkinje cell. These results provide the first experimental evidence for ISR and suggest a functional role for ISR in cerebellar information processing. PMID:27541958

  10. Memory impairment following right cerebellar infarction: a case study.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Fumiko Kusunoki; Tsutsumiuchi, Michiko; Maeda, Meiko Hashimoto; Uesaka, Yoshikazu; Takeda, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    We reported a patient with a right cerebellar infarction who showed anterograde amnesia. Cognitive dysfunction caused by cerebellar lesions was called cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome, and deactivation of the contralateral prefrontal cortex function due to disconnections of cerebello-cerebral fiber tracts have been hypothesized as mechanism underlying the syndrome. The episodic memory impairment, however, could not be supported by the same mechanism because the prefrontal lesions cannot cause amnesia syndrome. The feature of the impairment of our patient was similar to that of diencephalic amnesia, and a single photon emission computed tomography study showed a relative hypoperfusion in the right cerebellar hemisphere and left anterior thalamus. We considered that the memory deficit was caused by the dysfunction of the thalamus, which is a relay center of the cerebello-cerebral connectivity network.

  11. Acute cerebellar ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol, medications, and insecticides Bleeding into the cerebellum Multiple sclerosis Strokes of the cerebellum Vaccination ... swelling (inflammation) of the cerebellum (such as from multiple sclerosis) Cerebellar ataxia caused by a recent viral infection ...

  12. [Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias].

    PubMed

    Tranchant, Christine; Anheim, Mathieu

    2009-12-01

    Friedreich ataxia is the most frequent recessive cerebral ataxia d should always be researched first. Ataxia with isolated vitamin E deficiency and abetalipoproteinemia have a specific treatment. Associated neurological signs such polyneuroapthy, ophtalmologic or oculomotor signs, pyramidal signs, and cerebellar MRI can lead to the etiological diagnosis. Biological tests should be: vitamin E, cholesterol, alpha-fetoprotein levels, acanthocytes, than phytanic acid, cholestanol, lysosomal enzymes. Numerous autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia remain without etiology.

  13. Ontogeny of rapid estrogen-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling in the rat cerebellar cortex: potent nongenomic agonist and endocrine disrupting activity of the xenoestrogen bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Zsarnovszky, Attila; Le, Hoa H; Wang, Hong-Sheng; Belcher, Scott M

    2005-12-01

    In addition to regulating estrogen receptor-dependent gene expression, 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) can directly influence intracellular signaling. In primary cultured cerebellar neurons, E(2) was previously shown to regulate growth and oncotic cell death via rapid stimulation of ERK1/2 signaling. Here we show that ERK1/2 signaling in the cerebellum of neonatal and mature rats was rapidly responsive to E(2) and during development to the environmental estrogen bisphenol A (BPA). In vivo dose-response analysis for each estrogenic compound was performed by brief (6-min) intracerebellar injection, followed by rapid fixation and phosphorylation-state-specific immunohistochemistry to quantitatively characterize changes in activated ERK1/2 (pERK) immunopositive cell numbers. Beginning on postnatal d 8, E(2) significantly influenced the number of pERK-positive cells in a cell-specific manner that was dependent on concentration and age but not sex. In cerebellar granule cells on postnatal d 10, E(2) or BPA increased pERK-positive cell numbers at low doses (10(-12) to 10(-10) M) and at higher (10(-7) to 10(-6) M) concentrations. Intermediate concentrations of either estrogenic compound did not modify basal ERK signaling. Rapid E(2)-induced increases in pERK immunoreactivity were specific to the ERK1/2 pathway as demonstrated by coinjection of the mitogen-activated, ERK-activating kinase (MEK)1/2 inhibitor U0126. Coadministration of BPA (10(-12) to 10(-10) M) with 10(-10) M E(2) dose-dependently inhibited rapid E(2)-induced ERK1/2 activation in developing cerebellar neurons. The ability of BPA to act as a highly potent E(2) mimetic and to also disrupt the rapid actions of E(2) at very low concentrations during cerebellar development highlights the potential low-dose impact of xenoestrogens on the developing brain.

  14. Cerebellar Dysfunction in a Patient with HIV.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Ibarra, Fernando; Abdul, Waheed; Eivaz-Mohammadi, Sahar; Foscue, Christopher; Gongireddy, Srinivas; Syed, Amer

    2014-01-01

    A 50-year-old AIDS patient with a CD4 T-cell count of 114/mm(3) was admitted with cerebellar symptoms of left CN XI weakness, wide-based gait with left-sided dysmetria, abnormal heel-knee-shin test, and dysdiadochokinesia. MRI showed region of hyperintensity in the left inferior cerebellar hemisphere involving the cortex and underlying white matter. Serological tests for HSV1, HSV2, and syphilis were negative. Her CSF contained high protein content and a WBC of 71/mm(3), predominantly lymphocytes. The CSF was also negative for cryptococcal antigen and VDRL. CSF culture did not grow microbes. CSF PCR assay was negative for HSV1 and HSV2 but was positive for JC virus (1,276 copies). The most likely diagnosis is granule cell neuronopathy (GCN), which can only be definitively confirmed with biopsy and immunohistochemistry.

  15. Marijuana alters the human cerebellar clock.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Daniel S; Block, Robert I; Turner, Beth M; Koeppel, Julie; Magnotta, Vincent A; Ponto, Laura Boles; Watkins, G Leonard; Hichwa, Richard D; Andreasen, Nancy C

    2003-06-11

    The effects of marijuana on brain perfusion and internal timing were assessed using [15O] water PET in occasional and chronic users. Twelve volunteers who smoked marijuana recreationally about once weekly, and 12 volunteers who smoked daily for a number of years performed a self-paced counting task during PET imaging, before and after smoking marijuana and placebo cigarettes. Smoking marijuana increased rCBF in the ventral forebrain and cerebellar cortex in both groups, but resulted in significantly less frontal lobe activation in chronic users. Counting rate increased after smoking marijuana in both groups, as did a behavioral measure of self-paced tapping, and both increases correlated with rCBF in the cerebellum. Smoking marijuana appears to accelerate a cerebellar clock altering self-paced behaviors.

  16. A novel inhibitory nucleo-cortical circuit controls cerebellar Golgi cell activity

    PubMed Central

    Ankri, Lea; Husson, Zoé; Pietrajtis, Katarzyna; Proville, Rémi; Léna, Clément; Yarom, Yosef; Dieudonné, Stéphane; Uusisaari, Marylka Yoe

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum, a crucial center for motor coordination, is composed of a cortex and several nuclei. The main mode of interaction between these two parts is considered to be formed by the inhibitory control of the nuclei by cortical Purkinje neurons. We now amend this view by showing that inhibitory GABA-glycinergic neurons of the cerebellar nuclei (CN) project profusely into the cerebellar cortex, where they make synaptic contacts on a GABAergic subpopulation of cerebellar Golgi cells. These spontaneously firing Golgi cells are inhibited by optogenetic activation of the inhibitory nucleo-cortical fibers both in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggest that the CN may contribute to the functional recruitment of the cerebellar cortex by decreasing Golgi cell inhibition onto granule cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06262.001 PMID:25965178

  17. Improved segmentation of cerebellar structures in children

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Priya Lakshmi; Boonazier, Natalie; Warton, Christopher; Molteno, Christopher D; Joseph, Jesuchristopher; Jacobson, Joseph L; Jacobson, Sandra W; Zöllei, Lilla; Meintjes, Ernesta M

    2016-01-01

    Background Consistent localization of cerebellar cortex in a standard coordinate system is important for functional studies and detection of anatomical alterations in studies of morphometry. To date, no pediatric cerebellar atlas is available. New method The probabilistic Cape Town Pediatric Cerebellar Atlas (CAPCA18) was constructed in the age-appropriate National Institute of Health Pediatric Database asymmetric template space using manual tracings of 16 cerebellar compartments in 18 healthy children (9–13 years) from Cape Town, South Africa. The individual atlases of the training subjects were also used to implement multi atlas label fusion using multi atlas majority voting (MAMV) and multi atlas generative model (MAGM) approaches. Segmentation accuracy in 14 test subjects was compared for each method to ‘gold standard’ manual tracings. Results Spatial overlap between manual tracings and CAPCA18 automated segmentation was 73% or higher for all lobules in both hemispheres, except VIIb and X. Automated segmentation using MAGM yielded the best segmentation accuracy over all lobules (mean Dice Similarity Coefficient 0.76; range 0.55–0.91). Comparison with existing methods In all lobules, spatial overlap of CAPCA18 segmentations with manual tracings was similar or higher than those obtained with SUIT (spatially unbiased infra-tentorial template), providing additional evidence of the benefits of an age appropriate atlas. MAGM segmentation accuracy was comparable to values reported recently by Park et al. (2014) in adults (across all lobules mean DSC = 0.73, range 0.40–0.89). Conclusions CAPCA18 and the associated multi atlases of the training subjects yield improved segmentation of cerebellar structures in children. PMID:26743973

  18. Distribution of cerebello-olivary degeneration in idiopathic late cortical cerebellar atrophy: clinicopathological study of four autopsy cases.

    PubMed

    Ota, Satoru; Tsuchiya, Kuniaki; Anno, Midori; Niizato, Kazuhiro; Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2008-02-01

    Late cortical cerebellar atrophy (LCCA) is a neurodegenerative disease which presents with slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia as a prominent symptom and is characterized neuropathologically by a limited main lesion to the cerebellar cortex and inferior olivary nucleus. To elucidate the features of lesions in the cerebellar cortex and inferior olivary nucleus, four autopsy cases suffering from idiopathic LCCA without other cortical cerebellar atrophies, such as alcoholic cerebellar degeneration, phenytoin intoxication, or hereditary cerebellar atrophy including spinocerebellar ataxia type 6, were examined. All affected patients had identical distinct features of cerebellar cortical lesions. In all four cases, the most obvious pathological finding throughout the cerebellum was loss of Purkinje cells, but the rarefaction of granular cell layers was observed only where loss of Purkinje cells was very severe, and thinning of the molecular layer was seen only where the rarefaction of granular cell layers was moderate to severe. Two patients presented with vermis dominant cerebellar cortical lesions, but the other two patients showed hemispheric dominant pathological changes. Neuronal loss of the inferior olivary nucleus was observed in the three autopsy cases. Two of the three cases had a prominent lesion in the dorsal part of the inferior olive and the cerebellar cortical lesion disclosed the vermis dominance, but the other patient, showing prominent neuronal loss in the ventral olivary nucleus, had a cerebellar hemisphere dominant lesion. The patient without neuronal loss in the inferior olivary nucleus had suffered from a shorter period of disease than the others and the rarefaction of granular cell layers and narrowing of the molecular layer of the cerebellar cortex were mild. Therefore, it is obvious that there are two types of cerebellar cortex lesions in idiopathic LCCA; one is vermis dominant and the other is cerebellar hemispheric dominant. The lesion of the

  19. Cerebellar network plasticity: from genes to fast oscillation.

    PubMed

    Cheron, G; Servais, L; Dan, B

    2008-04-22

    The role of the cerebellum has been increasingly recognized not only in motor control but in sensory, cognitive and emotional learning and regulation. Purkinje cells, being the sole output from the cerebellar cortex, occupy an integrative position in this network. Plasticity at this level is known to critically involve calcium signaling. In the last few years, electrophysiological study of genetically engineered mice has demonstrated the topical role of several genes encoding calcium-binding proteins (calretinin, calbindin, parvalbumin). Specific inactivation of these genes results in the emergence of a fast network oscillation (ca. 160 Hz) throughout the cerebellar cortex in alert animals, associated with ataxia. This oscillation is produced by synchronization of Purkinje cells along the parallel fiber beam. It behaves as an electrophysiological arrest rhythm, being blocked by sensorimotor stimulation. Pharmacological manipulations showed that the oscillation is blocked by GABA(A) and NMDA antagonists as well as gap junction blockers. This cerebellar network oscillation has also been documented in mouse models of human conditions with complex developmental cerebellar dysfunction, such as Angelman syndrome and fetal alcohol syndrome. Recent evidence suggests a relationship between fast oscillation and cerebellar long term depression (LTD). This may have major implications for future therapeutic targeting.

  20. Motor learning of mice lacking cerebellar Purkinje cells

    PubMed Central

    Porras-García, M. Elena; Ruiz, Rocío; Pérez-Villegas, Eva M.; Armengol, José Á.

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellum plays a key role in the acquisition and execution of motor tasks whose physiological foundations were postulated on Purkinje cells' long-term depression (LTD). Numerous research efforts have been focused on understanding the cerebellum as a site of learning and/or memory storage. However, the controversy on which part of the cerebellum participates in motor learning, and how the process takes place, remains unsolved. In fact, it has been suggested that cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei, and/or their combination with some brain structures other than the cerebellum are responsible for motor learning. Different experimental approaches have been used to tackle this question (cerebellar lesions, pharmacological agonist and/or antagonist of cerebellar neurotransmitters, virus tract tracings, etc.). One of these approaches is the study of spontaneous mutations affecting the cerebellar cortex and depriving it of its main input–output organizer (i.e., the Purkinje cell). In this review, we discuss the results obtained in our laboratory in motor learning of both Lurcher (Lc/+) and tambaleante (tbl/tbl) mice as models of Purkinje-cell-devoid cerebellum. PMID:23630472

  1. Motor learning of mice lacking cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Porras-García, M Elena; Ruiz, Rocío; Pérez-Villegas, Eva M; Armengol, José Á

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellum plays a key role in the acquisition and execution of motor tasks whose physiological foundations were postulated on Purkinje cells' long-term depression (LTD). Numerous research efforts have been focused on understanding the cerebellum as a site of learning and/or memory storage. However, the controversy on which part of the cerebellum participates in motor learning, and how the process takes place, remains unsolved. In fact, it has been suggested that cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei, and/or their combination with some brain structures other than the cerebellum are responsible for motor learning. Different experimental approaches have been used to tackle this question (cerebellar lesions, pharmacological agonist and/or antagonist of cerebellar neurotransmitters, virus tract tracings, etc.). One of these approaches is the study of spontaneous mutations affecting the cerebellar cortex and depriving it of its main input-output organizer (i.e., the Purkinje cell). In this review, we discuss the results obtained in our laboratory in motor learning of both Lurcher (Lc/+) and tambaleante (tbl/tbl) mice as models of Purkinje-cell-devoid cerebellum.

  2. Upregulation of cortico-cerebellar functional connectivity after motor learning.

    PubMed

    Mehrkanoon, Saeid; Boonstra, Tjeerd W; Breakspear, Michael; Hinder, Mark; Summers, Jeffery J

    2016-03-01

    Interactions between the cerebellum and primary motor cortex are crucial for the acquisition of new motor skills. Recent neuroimaging studies indicate that learning motor skills is associated with subsequent modulation of resting-state functional connectivity in the cerebellar and cerebral cortices. The neuronal processes underlying the motor-learning-induced plasticity are not well understood. Here, we investigate changes in functional connectivity in source-reconstructed electroencephalography (EEG) following the performance of a single session of a dynamic force task in twenty young adults. Source activity was reconstructed in 112 regions of interest (ROIs) and the functional connectivity between all ROIs was estimated using the imaginary part of coherence. Significant changes in resting-state connectivity were assessed using partial least squares (PLS). We found that subjects adapted their motor performance during the training session and showed improved accuracy but with slower movement times. A number of connections were significantly upregulated after motor training, principally involving connections within the cerebellum and between the cerebellum and motor cortex. Increased connectivity was confined to specific frequency ranges in the mu- and beta-bands. Post hoc analysis of the phase spectra of these cerebellar and cortico-cerebellar connections revealed an increased phase lag between motor cortical and cerebellar activity following motor practice. These findings show a reorganization of intrinsic cortico-cerebellar connectivity related to motor adaptation and demonstrate the potential of EEG connectivity analysis in source space to reveal the neuronal processes that underpin neural plasticity.

  3. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with cerebellar stroke.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Martínez, A; Arpa, J

    1997-01-01

    Conduction time of the central motor pathways (CMCT) by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was performed within the first two weeks in 7 patients with isolated hemicerebellar lesions after stroke. Cerebellar infarcts were small (< 2 cm in diameter) in 5 patients and no brainstem structure was involved in CT studies. The threshold (3 cases) and CMCT (4 cases) were abnormal or asymmetric by stimulation of the motor cortex contralateral to the impaired hemicerebellum. The follow-up study in 2 patients revealed electrophysiological improvement closely related to clinical cerebellar recovery rate. CMCT was significantly longer by cortex stimulation contralateral to the impaired hemicerebellum than by ipsilateral stimulation. Prolonged CMCT was significantly correlated with the rated severity of cerebellar signs. Increased threshold may be due to depressed facilitating action of the deep cerebellar nuclei on contralateral motor cortex. Abnormal CMCT might result in reduced size and increased dispersion of the efferent volleys. Recovery of electrophysiological results could represent in part true potentially reversible functional deficit. Whichever the pathophysiological mechanisms involved, our results demonstrate that the cerebellum dysfunction plays a role in the abnormalities of CMCT elicited by TMS.

  4. Differential Purkinje cell simple spike activity and pausing behavior related to cerebellar modules

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haibo; Voges, Kai; Lin, Zhanmin; Ju, Chiheng

    2015-01-01

    The massive computational capacity of the cerebellar cortex is conveyed by Purkinje cells onto cerebellar and vestibular nuclei neurons through their GABAergic, inhibitory output. This implies that pauses in Purkinje cell simple spike activity are potentially instrumental in cerebellar information processing, but their occurrence and extent are still heavily debated. The cerebellar cortex, although often treated as such, is not homogeneous. Cerebellar modules with distinct anatomical connectivity and gene expression have been described, and Purkinje cells in these modules also differ in firing rate of simple and complex spikes. In this study we systematically correlate, in awake mice, the pausing in simple spike activity of Purkinje cells recorded throughout the entire cerebellum, with their location in terms of lobule, transverse zone, and zebrin-identified cerebellar module. A subset of Purkinje cells displayed long (>500-ms) pauses, but we found that their occurrence correlated with tissue damage and lower temperature. In contrast to long pauses, short pauses (<500 ms) and the shape of the interspike interval (ISI) distributions can differ between Purkinje cells of different lobules and cerebellar modules. In fact, the ISI distributions can differ both between and within populations of Purkinje cells with the same zebrin identity, and these differences are at least in part caused by differential synaptic inputs. Our results suggest that long pauses are rare but that there are differences related to shorter intersimple spike intervals between and within specific subsets of Purkinje cells, indicating a potential further segregation in the activity of cerebellar Purkinje cells. PMID:25717166

  5. Restoring cognitive functions using non-invasive brain stimulation techniques in patients with cerebellar disorders.

    PubMed

    Pope, Paul A; Miall, R Chris

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have highlighted the possibility of modulating the excitability of cerebro-cerebellar circuits bi-directionally using transcranial electrical brain stimulation, in a manner akin to that observed using magnetic stimulation protocols. It has been proposed that cerebellar stimulation activates Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex, leading to inhibition of the dentate nucleus, which exerts a tonic facilitatory drive onto motor and cognitive regions of cortex through a synaptic relay in the ventral-lateral thalamus. Some cerebellar deficits present with cognitive impairments if damage to non-motor regions of the cerebellum disrupts the coupling with cerebral cortical areas for thinking and reasoning. Indeed, white matter changes in the dentato-rubral tract correlate with cognitive assessments in patients with Friedreich ataxia, suggesting that this pathway is one component of the anatomical substrate supporting a cerebellar contribution to cognition. An understanding of the physiology of the cerebro-cerebellar pathway previously helped us to constrain our interpretation of results from two recent studies in which we showed cognitive enhancements in healthy participants during tests of arithmetic after electrical stimulation of the cerebellum, but only when task demands were high. Others studies have also shown how excitation of the prefrontal cortex can enhance performance in a variety of working memory tasks. Thus, future efforts might be guided toward neuro-enhancement in certain patient populations, using what is commonly termed "non-invasive brain stimulation" as a cognitive rehabilitation tool to modulate cerebro-cerebellar circuits, or for stimulation over the cerebral cortex to compensate for decreased cerebellar drive to this region. This article will address these possibilities with a review of the relevant literature covering ataxias and cerebellar cognitive affective disorders, which are characterized by thalamo-cortical disturbances.

  6. Precise localization of the voltage-gated potassium channel subunits Kv3.1b and Kv3.3 revealed in the molecular layer of the rat cerebellar cortex by a pre-embedding immunogold method.

    PubMed

    Puente, Nagore; Mendizabal-Zubiaga, Juan; Elezgarai, Izaskun; Reguero, Leire; Buceta, Ianire; Grandes, Pedro

    2010-10-01

    A proper motor activity relies on a correct cerebellar function. The Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 voltage-gated potassium channels are key proteins involved in cerebellar function and dysfunction, as the lack of these causes severe motor deficits. Both channel subunits are coexpressed in granule cells and are rapidly activated at relatively positive potentials to support the generation of fast action potentials. However, the contribution of each subunit to the molecular architecture of the parallel fibers, the granule cell axons, is so far unknown. The goal of this study was to elucidate the relative distribution of Kv3.1b and Kv3.3 in specific compartments of the rat parallel fibers by using a pre-embedding immunocytochemical method for electron microscopy. Numerous Kv3.1b and Kv3.3 silver-intensified gold particles were associated with membranes of parallel fiber synaptic terminals and their intervaricose segments. Kv3.1b was found in about 85% of parallel fiber synaptic terminals and in about 47% of their intervaricose portions. However, only 28% of intervaricosities and 23% of parallel fiber presynaptic boutons were Kv3.3 immunopositive. The analysis also revealed that 54% of Purkinje cell dendritic spines localized Kv3.3. Although both potassium channel subunits share localization in the same presynaptic parallel fiber compartments, the present results with the method used indicate that there are a higher percentage of parallel fibers labeled for Kv3.1b than for Kv3.3, and that the labeling intensity for each subunit is higher in specific subcompartments analyzed than in others.

  7. Non-invasive cerebellar stimulation--a consensus paper.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, G; Argyropoulos, G P; Boehringer, A; Celnik, P; Edwards, M J; Ferrucci, R; Galea, J M; Groiss, S J; Hiraoka, K; Kassavetis, P; Lesage, E; Manto, M; Miall, R C; Priori, A; Sadnicka, A; Ugawa, Y; Ziemann, U

    2014-02-01

    The field of neurostimulation of the cerebellum either with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS; single pulse or repetitive (rTMS)) or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS; anodal or cathodal) is gaining popularity in the scientific community, in particular because these stimulation techniques are non-invasive and provide novel information on cerebellar functions. There is a consensus amongst the panel of experts that both TMS and tDCS can effectively influence cerebellar functions, not only in the motor domain, with effects on visually guided tracking tasks, motor surround inhibition, motor adaptation and learning, but also for the cognitive and affective operations handled by the cerebro-cerebellar circuits. Verbal working memory, semantic associations and predictive language processing are amongst these operations. Both TMS and tDCS modulate the connectivity between the cerebellum and the primary motor cortex, tuning cerebellar excitability. Cerebellar TMS is an effective and valuable method to evaluate the cerebello-thalamo-cortical loop functions and for the study of the pathophysiology of ataxia. In most circumstances, DCS induces a polarity-dependent site-specific modulation of cerebellar activity. Paired associative stimulation of the cerebello-dentato-thalamo-M1 pathway can induce bidirectional long-term spike-timing-dependent plasticity-like changes of corticospinal excitability. However, the panel of experts considers that several important issues still remain unresolved and require further research. In particular, the role of TMS in promoting cerebellar plasticity is not established. Moreover, the exact positioning of electrode stimulation and the duration of the after effects of tDCS remain unclear. Future studies are required to better define how DCS over particular regions of the cerebellum affects individual cerebellar symptoms, given the topographical organization of cerebellar symptoms. The long-term neural consequences of non

  8. Excitatory Cerebellar Nucleocortical Circuit Provides Internal Amplification during Associative Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhenyu; Proietti-Onori, Martina; Lin, Zhanmin; ten Brinke, Michiel M.; Boele, Henk-Jan; Potters, Jan-Willem; Ruigrok, Tom J.H.; Hoebeek, Freek E.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Closed-loop circuitries between cortical and subcortical regions can facilitate precision of output patterns, but the role of such networks in the cerebellum remains to be elucidated. Here, we characterize the role of internal feedback from the cerebellar nuclei to the cerebellar cortex in classical eyeblink conditioning. We find that excitatory output neurons in the interposed nucleus provide efference-copy signals via mossy fibers to the cerebellar cortical zones that belong to the same module, triggering monosynaptic responses in granule and Golgi cells and indirectly inhibiting Purkinje cells. Upon conditioning, the local density of nucleocortical mossy fiber terminals significantly increases. Optogenetic activation and inhibition of nucleocortical fibers in conditioned animals increases and decreases the amplitude of learned eyeblink responses, respectively. Our data show that the excitatory nucleocortical closed-loop circuitry of the cerebellum relays a corollary discharge of premotor signals and suggests an amplifying role of this circuitry in controlling associative motor learning. PMID:26844836

  9. Understanding and modulating motor learning with Cerebellar stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Celnik, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive brain stimulation techniques are a powerful approach to investigate the physiology and function of the central nervous system. Recent years have seen numerous investigations delivering transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to the cerebellum to determine its role in motor, cognitive and emotional behaviours. Early studies have shown that it is possible to assess cerebellar-motor cortex (CB-M1) connectivity using a paired-pulse TMS paradigm called cerebellar inhibition (CBI), and indirectly infer the state of cerebellar excitability. Thus, it has been shown that CBI changes proportionally to the magnitude of locomotor learning and in association with reaching adaption tasks. In addition, CBI has been used to demonstrate at a physiological level the effects of applying TMS or tDCS to modulate, up or down, the excitability of cerebellar-M1 connectivity. These studies became the fundamental substrate to newer investigations showing that we can affect motor, cognitive and emotional behaviour when TMS or tDCS targeting the cerebellum is delivered in the context of performance. Furthermore, newer investigations are starting to report the effects of cerebellar non-invasive stimulation to treat symptoms associated with neurological conditions such as stroke and dystonia. Altogether, non-invasive cerebellar stimulation can potentially become a game changer for the management of conditions that affect the cerebellum given the scarcity of current effective therapeutic options. In this brief manuscript, some of the current evidence demonstrating the effects of cerebellar stimulation to modulate motor behaviour and its use to assess physiological processes underlying motor learning are presented. PMID:25283180

  10. Modeling the Generation of Output by the Cerebellar Nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Steuber, Volker; Jaeger, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    Functional aspects of network integration in the cerebellar cortex have been studied experimentally and modeled in much detail ever since the early work by theoreticians such as Marr, Albus and Braitenberg more than 40 years ago. In contrast, much less is known about cerebellar processing at the output stage, namely in the cerebellar nuclei (CN). Here, input from Purkinje cells converges to control CN neuron spiking via GABAergic inhibition, before the output from the CN reaches cerebellar targets such as the brainstem and the motor thalamus. In this article we review modeling studies that address how the CN may integrate cerebellar cortical inputs, and what kind of signals may be transmitted. Specific hypotheses in the literature contrast rate coding and temporal coding of information in the spiking output from the CN. One popular hypothesis states that postinhibitory rebound spiking may be an important mechanism by which Purkinje cell inhibition is turned into CN output spiking, but this hypothesis remains controversial. Rate coding clearly does take place, but in what way it may be augmented by temporal codes remains to be more clearly established. Several candidate mechanisms distinct from rebound spiking are discussed, such as the significance of spike time correlations between Purkinje cell pools to determine CN spike timing, irregularity of Purkinje cell spiking as a determinant of CN firing rate, and shared brief pauses between Purkinje cell pools that may trigger individual CN spikes precisely. PMID:23200193

  11. Intra-cerebellar infusion of the protein kinase Mzeta (PKMζ) inhibitor ZIP disrupts eyeblink classical conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Chihabi, Kutibh; Morielli, Anthony D.; Green, John T.

    2016-01-01

    PKM-ζ, a constitutively active N-terminal truncated form of PKC-ζ, has long been implicated in a cellular correlate of learning, long-term potentiation (LTP). Inhibition of PKM-ζ with Zeta-inhibitory peptide (ZIP) has been shown in many brain structures to disrupt maintenance of AMPA receptors, irreversibly disrupting numerous forms of learning and memory that have been maintained for weeks. Delay eyeblink conditioning (EBC) is an established model for the assessment of cerebellar learning; here, we show that PKC-ζ and PKM-ζ are highly expressed in the cerebellar cortex, with highest expression found in Purkinje cell (PC) nuclei. Despite being highly expressed in the cerebellar cortex, no studies have examined how regulation of cerebellar PKM-ζ may affect cerebellar-dependent learning and memory. Given its disruption of learning in other brain structures, we hypothesized that ZIP would also disrupt delay EBC. We have shown that infusion of ZIP into the lobulus simplex of the rat cerebellar cortex can indeed significantly disrupt delay EBC. PMID:26949968

  12. Genetics Home Reference: lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia (LCH) affects brain development, resulting in the brain ...

  13. A Developmental Study of the Cerebellar Nucleus in the Catshark, a Basal Gnathostome.

    PubMed

    Pose-Méndez, Sol; Rodríguez-Moldes, Isabel; Candal, Eva; Mazan, Sylvie; Anadón, Ramón

    2017-01-01

    The output of the cerebellar cortex is mainly released via cerebellar nuclei which vary in number and complexity among gnathostomes, extant vertebrates with a cerebellum. Cartilaginous fishes, a basal gnathostome lineage, show a conspicuous, well-organized cerebellar nucleus, unlike ray-finned fishes. To gain insight into the evolution and development of the cerebellar nucleus, we analyzed in the shark Scyliorhinus canicula (a chondrichthyan model species) the developmental expression of several genes coding for transcription factors (ScLhx5,ScLhx9,ScTbr1, and ScEn2) and the distribution of the protein calbindin, since all appear to be involved in cerebellar nuclei patterning in other gnathostomes. Three regions (subventricular, medial or central, and lateral or superficial) became recognizable in the cerebellar nucleus of this shark during development. Present genoarchitectonic and neurochemical data in embryos provide insight into the origin of the cerebellar nucleus in chondrichthyans and support a tripartite mediolateral organization of the cerebellar nucleus, as previously described in adult sharks. Furthermore, the expression pattern of ScLhx5,ScLhx9, and ScTbr1 in this shark, together with that of markers of proliferation, migration, and early differentiation of neurons, is compatible with the hypothesis that, as in mammals, different subsets of cerebellar nucleus neurons are originated from progenitors of 2 different sources: the ventricular zone of the cerebellar plate and the rhombic lip. We also present suggestive evidence that Lhx9 expression is involved in cerebellar nuclei patterning early on in gnathostome evolution, rather than representing an evolutionary innovation of the dentate nucleus in mammals, as previously hypothesized.

  14. [Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome secondary to a cerebellar tumour].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Carral, J; Carreras-Sáez, I; García-Peñas, J J; Fournier-Del Castillo, C; Villalobos-Reales, J

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome is characterized by disturbances of executive function, impaired spatial cognition, linguistic difficulties, and personality change. The case of an 11 year old boy is presented, with behavior problems, learning difficulties and social interaction problems. In the physical examination he had poor visual contact, immature behavior, reduced expressive language and global motor disability with gait dyspraxia, with no defined cerebellar motor signs. In the neuropsychological evaluation he has a full scale overall intellectual quotient of 84, with signs of cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome. A tumour affecting inferior cerebellar vermis was observed in the magnetic resonance imaging, which had not significantly grown during 5 years of follow up. The cerebellum participates in controlling cognitive and affective functions. Cerebellar pathology must be considered in the differential diagnosis of children with cognitive or learning disorder with associated behavioral and emotional components.

  15. Coordinated scaling of cortical and cerebellar numbers of neurons.

    PubMed

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2010-01-01

    While larger brains possess concertedly larger cerebral cortices and cerebella, the relative size of the cerebral cortex increases with brain size, but relative cerebellar size does not. In the absence of data on numbers of neurons in these structures, this discrepancy has been used to dispute the hypothesis that the cerebral cortex and cerebellum function and have evolved in concert and to support a trend towards neocorticalization in evolution. However, the rationale for interpreting changes in absolute and relative size of the cerebral cortex and cerebellum relies on the assumption that they reflect absolute and relative numbers of neurons in these structures across all species - an assumption that our recent studies have shown to be flawed. Here I show for the first time that the numbers of neurons in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum are directly correlated across 19 mammalian species of four different orders, including humans, and increase concertedly in a similar fashion both within and across the orders Eulipotyphla (Insectivora), Rodentia, Scandentia and Primata, such that on average a ratio of 3.6 neurons in the cerebellum to every neuron in the cerebral cortex is maintained across species. This coordinated scaling of cortical and cerebellar numbers of neurons provides direct evidence in favor of concerted function, scaling and evolution of these brain structures, and suggests that the common notion that equates cognitive advancement with neocortical expansion should be revisited to consider in its stead the coordinated scaling of neocortex and cerebellum as a functional ensemble.

  16. Coordinated Scaling of Cortical and Cerebellar Numbers of Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2010-01-01

    While larger brains possess concertedly larger cerebral cortices and cerebella, the relative size of the cerebral cortex increases with brain size, but relative cerebellar size does not. In the absence of data on numbers of neurons in these structures, this discrepancy has been used to dispute the hypothesis that the cerebral cortex and cerebellum function and have evolved in concert and to support a trend towards neocorticalization in evolution. However, the rationale for interpreting changes in absolute and relative size of the cerebral cortex and cerebellum relies on the assumption that they reflect absolute and relative numbers of neurons in these structures across all species – an assumption that our recent studies have shown to be flawed. Here I show for the first time that the numbers of neurons in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum are directly correlated across 19 mammalian species of four different orders, including humans, and increase concertedly in a similar fashion both within and across the orders Eulipotyphla (Insectivora), Rodentia, Scandentia and Primata, such that on average a ratio of 3.6 neurons in the cerebellum to every neuron in the cerebral cortex is maintained across species. This coordinated scaling of cortical and cerebellar numbers of neurons provides direct evidence in favor of concerted function, scaling and evolution of these brain structures, and suggests that the common notion that equates cognitive advancement with neocortical expansion should be revisited to consider in its stead the coordinated scaling of neocortex and cerebellum as a functional ensemble. PMID:20300467

  17. Childhood Cerebellar Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Brent L.

    2012-01-01

    Childhood presentations of ataxia, an impairment of balance and coordination caused by damage to or dysfunction of the cerebellum, can often be challenging to diagnose. Presentations tend to be clinically heterogeneous but key considerations may vary based on the child's age at onset, the course of illness, and subtle differences in phenotype. Systematic investigation is recommended for efficient diagnosis. In this review, we outline common etiologies and describe a comprehensive approach to the evaluation of both acquired and genetic cerebellar ataxia in children. PMID:22764177

  18. Long lasting cerebellar alterations after perinatal asphyxia in rats.

    PubMed

    Campanille, Verónica; Saraceno, G Ezequiel; Rivière, Stéphanie; Logica, Tamara; Kölliker, Rodolfo; Capani, Francisco; Castilla, Rocío

    2015-07-01

    The developing brain may be particularly vulnerable to injury before, at and after birth. Among possible insults, hypoxia suffered as a consequence of perinatal asphyxia (PA) exhibits the highest incidence levels and the cerebellar circuitry appears to be particularly susceptible, as the cellular makeup and the quantity of inputs change quickly during days and weeks following birth. In this work, we have used a murine model to induce severe global PA in rats at the time of birth. Short-term cerebellar alterations within this PA model have been previously reported but whether such alterations remain in adulthood has not been conclusively determined yet. For this reason, and given the crucial cerebellar role in determining connectivity patterns in the brain, the aim of our work is to unveil long-term cerebellum histomorphology following a PA insult. Morphological and cytological neuronal changes and glial reaction in the cerebellar cortex were analyzed at postnatal 120 (P120) following injury performed at birth. As compared to control, PA animals exhibited: (1) an increase in molecular and granular thickness, both presenting lower cellular density; (2) a disarrayed Purkinje cell layer presenting a higher number of anomalous calbindin-stained cells. (3) focal swelling and marked fragmentation of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2) in Purkinje cell dendrites and, (4) an increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in Bergmann cells and the granular layer. In conclusion, we demonstrate that PA produces long-term damage in cellular histomorphology in rat cerebellar cortex which could be involved in the pathogenesis of cognitive deficits observed in both animals and humans.

  19. Crossed Cerebellar Diaschisis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shuguang; Wang, Xiaopeng; Xu, Kai; Hu, Chunfeng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) describes a depression of oxidative metabolism glucose and blood flow in the cerebellum secondary to a supratentorial lesion in the contralateral cerebral hemisphere. PET/MR has the potential to become a powerful tool for demonstrating and imaging intracranial lesions .We herein report 3 cases of CCD imaging using a tri-modality PET/CT–MR set-up for investigating the value of adding MRI rather than CT to PET in clinical routine. We describe 3 patients with CCD and neurological symptoms in conjunction with abnormal cerebral fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography-magnetic resonance imaging (PET/CT–MR) manifestations including arterial spin-labeling (ASL) and T2-weighted images. In all, 18FDG-PET/CT detected positive FDG uptake in supratentorial lesions, and hypometabolism with atrophy in the contralateral cerebellum. More than that, hybrid PET/MRI provided a more accurate anatomic localization and ASL indicated disruption of the cortico-ponto-cerebellar pathway. Using pathology or long-term clinical follow-up to confirm the PET and ASL findings, the supratentorial lesions of the 3 patients were respectively diagnosed with cerebral infarction, recurrent glioma, and metastasis. The reports emphasize the significance of multimodality radiological examinations. Multimodality imaging contributes to proper diagnosis, management, and follow-up of supratentorial lesions with CCD. PMID:26765477

  20. Cortical networks of procedural learning: evidence from cerebellar damage.

    PubMed

    Torriero, Sara; Oliveri, Massimiliano; Koch, Giacomo; Lo Gerfo, Emanuele; Salerno, Silvia; Petrosini, Laura; Caltagirone, Carlo

    2007-03-25

    The lateral cerebellum plays a critical role in procedural learning that goes beyond the strict motor control functions attributed to it. Patients with cerebellar damage show marked impairment in the acquisition of procedures, as revealed by their performance on the serial reaction time task (SRTT). Here we present the case of a patient affected by ischemic damage involving the left cerebellum who showed a selective deficit in procedural learning while performing the SRTT with the left hand. The deficit recovered when the cortical excitability of an extensive network involving both cerebellar hemispheres and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) was decreased by low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). Although inhibition of the right DLPFC or a control fronto-parietal region did not modify the patient's performance, inhibition of the right (unaffected) cerebellum and the left DLPFC markedly improved task performance. These findings could be explained by the modulation of a set of inhibitory and excitatory connections between the lateral cerebellum and the contralateral prefrontal area induced by rTMS. The presence of left cerebellar damage is likely associated with a reduced excitatory drive from sub-cortical left cerebellar nuclei towards the right DLPFC, causing reduced excitability of the right DLPFC and, conversely, unbalanced activation of the left DLPFC. Inhibition of the left DLPFC would reduce the unbalancing of cortical activation, thus explaining the observed selective recovery of procedural memory.

  1. Cerebellar rTMS disrupts predictive language processing

    PubMed Central

    Lesage, Elise; Morgan, Blaire E.; Olson, Andrew C.; Meyer, Antje S.; Miall, R. Chris

    2012-01-01

    Summary The human cerebellum plays an important role in language, amongst other cognitive and motor functions [1], but a unifying theoretical framework about cerebellar language function is lacking. In an established model of motor control, the cerebellum is seen as a predictive machine, making short-term estimations about the outcome of motor commands. This allows for flexible control, on-line correction, and coordination of movements [2]. The homogeneous cytoarchitecture of the cerebellar cortex suggests that similar computations occur throughout the structure, operating on different input signals and with different output targets [3]. Several authors have therefore argued that this ‘motor’ model may extend to cerebellar nonmotor functions [3–5], and that the cerebellum may support prediction in language processing [6]. However, this hypothesis has never been directly tested. Here, we used the ‘Visual World’ paradigm [7], where on-line processing of spoken sentence content can be assessed by recording the latencies of listeners' eye movements towards objects mentioned. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) was used to disrupt function in the right cerebellum, a region implicated in language [8]. After cerebellar rTMS, listeners showed delayed eye fixations to target objects predicted by sentence content, while there was no effect on eye fixations in sentences without predictable content. The prediction deficit was absent in two control groups. Our findings support the hypothesis that computational operations performed by the cerebellum may support prediction during both motor control and language processing. PMID:23017990

  2. Early Cerebellar Network Shifting in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6.

    PubMed

    Falcon, M I; Gomez, C M; Chen, E E; Shereen, A; Solodkin, A

    2016-07-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 6 (SCA6), an autosomal dominant degenerative disease, is characterized by diplopia, gait ataxia, and incoordination due to severe progressive degeneration of Purkinje cells in the vestibulo- and spinocerebellum. Ocular motor deficits are common, including difficulty fixating on moving objects, nystagmus and disruption of smooth pursuit movements. In presymptomatic SCA6, there are alterations in saccades and smooth-pursuit movements. We sought to assess functional and structural changes in cerebellar connectivity associated with a visual task, hypothesizing that gradual changes would parallel disease progression. We acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging data during a passive smooth-pursuit task in 14 SCA6 patients, representing a range of disease duration and severity, and performed a cross-sectional comparison of cerebellar networks compared with healthy controls. We identified a shift in activation from vermis in presymptomatic individuals to lateral cerebellum in moderate-to-severe cases. Concomitantly, effective connectivity between regions of cerebral cortex and cerebellum was at its highest in moderate cases, and disappeared in severe cases. Finally, we noted structural differences in the cerebral and cerebellar peduncles. These unique results, spanning both functional and structural domains, highlight widespread changes in SCA6 and compensatory mechanisms associated with cerebellar physiology that could be utilized in developing new therapies.

  3. Translational Approach to Behavioral Learning: Lessons from Cerebellar Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Cheron, Guy; Dan, Bernard; Márquez-Ruiz, Javier

    2013-01-01

    The role of cerebellar plasticity has been increasingly recognized in learning. The privileged relationship between the cerebellum and the inferior olive offers an ideal circuit for attempting to integrate the numerous evidences of neuronal plasticity into a translational perspective. The high learning capacity of the Purkinje cells specifically controlled by the climbing fiber represents a major element within the feed-forward and feedback loops of the cerebellar cortex. Reciprocally connected with the basal ganglia and multimodal cerebral domains, this cerebellar network may realize fundamental functions in a wide range of behaviors. This review will outline the current understanding of three main experimental paradigms largely used for revealing cerebellar functions in behavioral learning: (1) the vestibuloocular reflex and smooth pursuit control, (2) the eyeblink conditioning, and (3) the sensory envelope plasticity. For each of these experimental conditions, we have critically revisited the chain of causalities linking together neural circuits, neural signals, and plasticity mechanisms, giving preference to behaving or alert animal physiology. Namely, recent experimental approaches mixing neural units and local field potentials recordings have demonstrated a spike timing dependent plasticity by which the cerebellum remains at a strategic crossroad for deciphering fundamental and translational mechanisms from cellular to network levels. PMID:24319600

  4. Changes in cerebro-cerebellar interaction during response inhibition after performance improvement.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Satoshi; Jimura, Koji; Kunimatsu, Akira; Abe, Osamu; Ohtomo, Kuni; Miyashita, Yasushi; Konishi, Seiki

    2014-10-01

    It has been demonstrated that motor learning is supported by the cerebellum and the cerebro-cerebellar interaction. Response inhibition involves motor responses and the higher-order inhibition that controls the motor responses. In this functional MRI study, we measured the cerebro-cerebellar interaction during response inhibition in two separate days of task performance, and detected the changes in the interaction following performance improvement. Behaviorally, performance improved in the second day, compared to the first day. The psycho-physiological interaction (PPI) analysis revealed the interaction decrease from the right inferior frontal cortex (rIFC) to the cerebellum (lobule VII or VI). It was also revealed that the interaction increased from the same cerebellar region to the primary motor area. These results suggest the involvement of the cerebellum in response inhibition, and raise the possibility that the performance improvement was supported by the changes in the cerebro-cerebellar interaction.

  5. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Palau, Francesc; Espinós, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCA) are a heterogeneous group of rare neurological disorders involving both central and peripheral nervous system, and in some case other systems and organs, and characterized by degeneration or abnormal development of cerebellum and spinal cord, autosomal recessive inheritance and, in most cases, early onset occurring before the age of 20 years. This group encompasses a large number of rare diseases, the most frequent in Caucasian population being Friedreich ataxia (estimated prevalence 2–4/100,000), ataxia-telangiectasia (1–2.5/100,000) and early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes (1/100,000). Other forms ARCA are much less common. Based on clinicogenetic criteria, five main types ARCA can be distinguished: congenital ataxias (developmental disorder), ataxias associated with metabolic disorders, ataxias with a DNA repair defect, degenerative ataxias, and ataxia associated with other features. These diseases are due to mutations in specific genes, some of which have been identified, such as frataxin in Friedreich ataxia, α-tocopherol transfer protein in ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED), aprataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA1), and senataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA2). Clinical diagnosis is confirmed by ancillary tests such as neuroimaging (magnetic resonance imaging, scanning), electrophysiological examination, and mutation analysis when the causative gene is identified. Correct clinical and genetic diagnosis is important for appropriate genetic counseling and prognosis and, in some instances, pharmacological treatment. Due to autosomal recessive inheritance, previous familial history of affected individuals is unlikely. For most ARCA there is no specific drug treatment except for coenzyme Q10 deficiency and abetalipoproteinemia. PMID:17112370

  6. Cadherins in cerebellar development: translation of embryonic patterning into mature functional compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Redies, Christoph; Neudert, Franziska; Lin, Juntang

    2011-09-01

    Cadherins are cell adhesion molecules with multiple morphogenic functions in brain development, for example, in neuroblast migration and aggregation, axon navigation, neural circuit formation, and synaptogenesis. More than 100 members of the cadherin superfamily are expressed in the developing and mature brain. Most of the cadherins investigated, in particular classic cadherins and δ-protocadherins, are expressed in the cerebellum. For several cadherin subtypes, expression begins at early embryonic stages and persists until mature stages of cerebellar development. At intermediate stages, distinct Purkinje cell clusters exhibit unique rostrocaudal and mediolateral expression profiles for each cadherin. In the chicken, mouse, and other species, the Purkinje cell clusters are separated by intervening raphes of migrating granule cells. This pattern of Purkinje cell clusters/raphes is, at least in part, continuous with the parasagittal striping pattern that is apparent in the mature cerebellar cortex, for example, for zebrin II/aldolase C. Moreover, subregions of the deep cerebellar nuclei, vestibular nuclei and the olivary complex also express cadherins differentially. Neuroanatomical evidence suggests that the nuclear subregions and cortical domains that express the same cadherin subtype are connected to each other, to form neural subcircuits of the cerebellar system. Cadherins thus provide a molecular code that specifies not only embryonic structures but also functional cerebellar compartmentalization. By following the implementation of this code, it can be revealed how mature functional architecture emerges from embryonic patterning during cerebellar development. Dysfunction of some cadherins is associated with psychiatric diseases and developmental impairments and may also affect cerebellar function.

  7. Dissociation of locomotor and cerebellar deficits in a murine Angelman syndrome model

    PubMed Central

    Bruinsma, Caroline F.; Schonewille, Martijn; Gao, Zhenyu; Aronica, Eleonora M.A.; Judson, Matthew C.; Philpot, Benjamin D.; Hoebeek, Freek E.; van Woerden, Geeske M.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Elgersma, Ype

    2015-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a severe neurological disorder that is associated with prominent movement and balance impairments that are widely considered to be due to defects of cerebellar origin. Here, using the cerebellar-specific vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) paradigm, we determined that cerebellar function is only mildly impaired in the Ube3am–/p+ mouse model of AS. VOR phase-reversal learning was singularly impaired in these animals and correlated with reduced tonic inhibition between Golgi cells and granule cells. Purkinje cell physiology, in contrast, was normal in AS mice as shown by synaptic plasticity and spontaneous firing properties that resembled those of controls. Accordingly, neither VOR phase-reversal learning nor locomotion was impaired following selective deletion of Ube3a in Purkinje cells. However, genetic normalization of αCaMKII inhibitory phosphorylation fully rescued locomotor deficits despite failing to improve cerebellar learning in AS mice, suggesting extracerebellar circuit involvement in locomotor learning. We confirmed this hypothesis through cerebellum-specific reinstatement of Ube3a, which ameliorated cerebellar learning deficits but did not rescue locomotor deficits. This double dissociation of locomotion and cerebellar phenotypes strongly suggests that the locomotor deficits of AS mice do not arise from impaired cerebellar cortex function. Our results provide important insights into the etiology of the motor deficits associated with AS. PMID:26485287

  8. Development of cerebellar connectivity in human fetal brains revealed by high angular resolution diffusion tractography.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Emi; Hayashi, Emiko; Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Grant, P Ellen

    2014-08-01

    High angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) tractography has provided insights into major white matter pathways and cortical development in the human fetal cerebrum. Our objective in this study was to further apply HARDI tracography to the developing human cerebellum ranging from fetal to adult stages, to outline in broad strokes the 3-dimensional development of white matter and local gray matter organization in the cerebellum. We imaged intact fixed fetal cerebellum specimens at 17 gestational weeks (W), 21W, 31W, 36W, and 38W along with an adult cerebellum for comparison. At the earliest gestational age studied (17W), coherent pathways that formed the superior, middle, and inferior cerebellar peduncles were already detected, but pathways between deep cerebellar nuclei and the cortex were not observed until after 38W. At 36-38W, we identified emerging regional specification of the middle cerebellar peduncle. In the cerebellar cortex, we observed disappearance of radial organization in the sagittal orientation during the studied developmental stages similar to our previous observations in developing cerebral cortex. In contrast, in the axial orientation, cerebellar cortical pathways emerged first sparsely (31W) and then with increased prominence at 36-38W with pathways detected both in the radial and tangential directions to the cortical surface. The cerebellar vermis first contained only pathways tangential to the long axes of folia (17-21W), but pathways parallel to the long axes of folia emerged between 21 and 31W. Our results show the potential for HARDI tractography to image developing human cerebellar connectivity.

  9. Cerebellar Contribution to Context Processing in Extinction Learning and Recall.

    PubMed

    Chang, D-I; Lissek, S; Ernst, T M; Thürling, M; Uengoer, M; Tegenthoff, M; Ladd, M E; Timmann, D

    2015-12-01

    Whereas acquisition of new associations is considered largely independent of the context, context dependency is a hallmark of extinction of the learned associations. The hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex are known to be involved in context processing during extinction learning and recall. Although the cerebellum has known functional and anatomic connections to the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex, cerebellar contributions to context processing of extinction have rarely been studied. In the present study, we reanalyzed functional brain imaging data (fMRI) of previous work investigating context effects during extinction in a cognitive associative learning paradigm in 28 young and healthy subjects (Lissek et al. Neuroimage. 81:131-3, 2013). In that study, event-related fMRI analysis did not include the cerebellum. The 3 T fMRI dataset was reanalyzed using a spatial normalization method optimized for the cerebellum. Data of seven participants had to be excluded because the cerebellum had not been scanned in full. Cerebellar activation related to context change during extinction learning was most prominent in lobule Crus II bilaterally (p < 0.01, t > 2.53; partially corrected by predetermined cluster size). No significant cerebellar activations were observed related to context change during extinction retrieval. The posterolateral cerebellum appears to contribute to context-related processes during extinction learning, but not (or less) during extinction retrieval. The cerebellum may support context learning during extinction via its connections to the hippocampus. Alternatively, the cerebellum may support the shifting of attention to the context via its known connections to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Because the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) is critically involved in context-related processes during extinction retrieval, and there are no known connections between the cerebellum and the vmPFC, the cerebellum may be less important

  10. Redistribution of crossed cerebellar diaschisis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.M.; Park, C.H.; Intenzo, C.M.; Bell, R.

    1989-04-01

    Crossed cerebellar diaschisis refers to a functional decrease in blood flow to the cerebellar hemisphere contralateral to the infarcted or ischemic cerebral hemisphere. This phenomenon can be depicted using PET as well as using SPECT. This condition, seen on early I-123 IMP brain scans, can show redistribution on the three hour delayed scan, presumably due to normal non-specific amine receptor sites of the affected cerebellum. One such case is reported.

  11. Speech prosody in cerebellar ataxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, Maureen

    The present study sought an acoustic signature for the speech disturbance recognized in cerebellar degeneration. Magnetic resonance imaging was used for a radiological rating of cerebellar involvement in six cerebellar ataxic dysarthric speakers. Acoustic measures of the [pap] syllables in contrastive prosodic conditions and of normal vs. brain-damaged patients were used to further our understanding both of the speech degeneration that accompanies cerebellar pathology and of speech motor control and movement in general. Pair-wise comparisons of the prosodic conditions within the normal group showed statistically significant differences for four prosodic contrasts. For three of the four contrasts analyzed, the normal speakers showed both longer durations and higher formant and fundamental frequency values in the more prominent first condition of the contrast. The acoustic measures of the normal prosodic contrast values were then used as a model to measure the degree of speech deterioration for individual cerebellar subjects. This estimate of speech deterioration as determined by individual differences between cerebellar and normal subjects' acoustic values of the four prosodic contrasts was used in correlation analyses with MRI ratings. Moderate correlations between speech deterioration and cerebellar atrophy were found in the measures of syllable duration and f0. A strong negative correlation was found for F1. Moreover, the normal model presented by these acoustic data allows for a description of the flexibility of task- oriented behavior in normal speech motor control. These data challenge spatio-temporal theory which explains movement as an artifact of time wherein longer durations predict more extreme movements and give further evidence for gestural internal dynamics of movement in which time emerges from articulatory events rather than dictating those events. This model provides a sensitive index of cerebellar pathology with quantitative acoustic

  12. Control of a simulated arm using a novel combination of Cerebellar learning mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assad, C.; Hartmann, M.; Paulin, M. G.

    2001-01-01

    We present a model of cerebellar cortex that combines two types of learning: feedforward predicitve association based on local Hebbian-type learning between granule cell ascending branch and parallel fiber inputs, and reinforcement learning with feedback error correction based on climbing fiber activity.

  13. Cerebellar lobules and dentate nuclei mirror cortical force-related-BOLD responses: Beyond all (linear) expectations.

    PubMed

    Alahmadi, Adnan A S; Pardini, Matteo; Samson, Rebecca S; Friston, Karl J; Toosy, Ahmed T; D'Angelo, Egidio; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M

    2017-02-27

    The relationship between the BOLD response and an applied force was quantified in the cerebellum using a power grip task. To investigate whether the cerebellum responds in an on/off way to motor demands or contributes to motor responses in a parametric fashion, similarly to the cortex, five grip force levels were investigated under visual feedback. Functional MRI data were acquired in 13 healthy volunteers and their responses were analyzed using a cerebellum-optimized pipeline. This allowed us to evaluate, within the cerebellum, voxelwise linear and non-linear associations between cerebellar activations and forces. We showed extensive non-linear activations (with a parametric design), covering the anterior and posterior lobes of the cerebellum with a BOLD-force relationship that is region-dependent. Linear responses were mainly located in the anterior lobe, similarly to the cortex, where linear responses are localized in M1. Complex responses were localized in the posterior lobe, reflecting its key role in attention and executive processing, required during visually guided movement. Given the highly organized responses in the cerebellar cortex, a key question is whether deep cerebellar nuclei show similar parametric effects. We found positive correlations with force in the ipsilateral dentate nucleus and negative correlations on the contralateral side, suggesting a somatotopic organization of the dentate nucleus in line with cerebellar and cortical areas. Our results confirm that there is cerebellar organization involving all grey matter structures that reflect functional segregation in the cortex, where cerebellar lobules and dentate nuclei contribute to complex motor tasks with different BOLD response profiles in relation to the forces. Hum Brain Mapp, 2017. © 2017 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Cerebellar-M1 Connectivity Changes Associated with Motor Learning Are Somatotopic Specific.

    PubMed

    Spampinato, Danny A; Block, Hannah J; Celnik, Pablo A

    2017-03-01

    One of the functions of the cerebellum in motor learning is to predict and account for systematic changes to the body or environment. This form of adaptive learning is mediated by plastic changes occurring within the cerebellar cortex. The strength of cerebellar-to-cerebral pathways for a given muscle may reflect aspects of cerebellum-dependent motor adaptation. These connections with motor cortex (M1) can be estimated as cerebellar inhibition (CBI): a conditioning pulse of transcranial magnetic stimulation delivered to the cerebellum before a test pulse over motor cortex. Previously, we have demonstrated that changes in CBI for a given muscle representation correlate with learning a motor adaptation task with the involved limb. However, the specificity of these effects is unknown. Here, we investigated whether CBI changes in humans are somatotopy specific and how they relate to motor adaptation. We found that learning a visuomotor rotation task with the right hand changed CBI, not only for the involved first dorsal interosseous of the right hand, but also for an uninvolved right leg muscle, the tibialis anterior, likely related to inter-effector transfer of learning. In two follow-up experiments, we investigated whether the preparation of a simple hand or leg movement would produce a somatotopy-specific modulation of CBI. We found that CBI changes only for the effector involved in the movement. These results indicate that learning-related changes in cerebellar-M1 connectivity reflect a somatotopy-specific interaction. Modulation of this pathway is also present in the context of interlimb transfer of learning.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Connectivity between the cerebellum and motor cortex is a critical pathway for the integrity of everyday movements and understanding the somatotopic specificity of this pathway in the context of motor learning is critical to advancing the efficacy of neurorehabilitation. We found that adaptive learning with the hand affects cerebellar

  15. Short latency cerebellar modulation of the basal ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Christopher H.; Fremont, Rachel; Arteaga-Bracho, Eduardo E.; Khodakhah, Kamran

    2014-01-01

    The graceful, purposeful motion of our body is an engineering feat which remains unparalleled in robotic devices using advanced artificial intelligence. Much of the information required for complex movements is generated by the cerebellum and the basal ganglia in conjunction with the cortex. Cerebellum and basal ganglia have been thought to communicate with each other only through slow multi-synaptic cortical loops, begging the question as to how they coordinate their outputs in real time. Here we show in mice that the cerebellum rapidly modulates the activity of the striatum via a disynaptic pathway. Under physiological conditions this short latency pathway is capable of facilitating optimal motor control by allowing the basal ganglia to incorporate time-sensitive cerebellar information and by guiding the sign of cortico-striatal plasticity. Conversely, under pathological condition this pathway relays aberrant cerebellar activity to the basal ganglia to cause dystonia. PMID:25402853

  16. Short latency cerebellar modulation of the basal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Christopher H; Fremont, Rachel; Arteaga-Bracho, Eduardo E; Khodakhah, Kamran

    2014-12-01

    The graceful, purposeful motion of our body is an engineering feat that remains unparalleled in robotic devices using advanced artificial intelligence. Much of the information required for complex movements is generated by the cerebellum and the basal ganglia in conjunction with the cortex. Cerebellum and basal ganglia have been thought to communicate with each other only through slow, multi-synaptic cortical loops, begging the question as to how they coordinate their outputs in real time. We found that the cerebellum rapidly modulates the activity of the striatum via a disynaptic pathway in mice. Under physiological conditions, this short latency pathway was capable of facilitating optimal motor control by allowing the basal ganglia to incorporate time-sensitive cerebellar information and by guiding the sign of cortico-striatal plasticity. Conversely, under pathological condition, this pathway relayed aberrant cerebellar activity to the basal ganglia to cause dystonia.

  17. Motor training compensates for cerebellar dysfunctions caused by oligodendrocyte ablation

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Ludovic; Usiello, Alessandro; Erbs, Eric; Mathis, Carole; Borrelli, Emiliana

    2004-01-01

    The role played by oligodendrocytes (OLs), the myelinating cells of the CNS, during brain development has not been fully explored. We have addressed this question by inducing a temporal and reversible ablation of OLs on postnatal CNS development. OL ablation in newborn mice leads to a profound alteration in the structure of the cerebellar cortex, which can be progressively rescued by newly generated cells, leading to a delayed myelination. Nevertheless, the temporal shift of the OL proliferation and myelinating program cannot completely compensate for developmental defects, resulting in impaired motor functions in the adult. Strikingly, we show that, despite these abnormalities, epigenetic factors, such as motor training, are able to fully rescue cerebellar-directed motor skills. PMID:14694200

  18. Functional Evidence for a Cerebellar Node of the Dorsal Attention Network

    PubMed Central

    Brissenden, James A.; Levin, Emily J.; Osher, David E.; Halko, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    The “dorsal attention network” or “frontoparietal network” refers to a network of cortical regions that support sustained attention and working memory. Recent work has demonstrated that cortical nodes of the dorsal attention network possess intrinsic functional connections with a region in ventral cerebellum, in the vicinity of lobules VII/VIII. Here, we performed a series of task-based and resting-state fMRI experiments to investigate cerebellar participation in the dorsal attention network in humans. We observed that visual working memory and visual attention tasks robustly recruit cerebellar lobules VIIb and VIIIa, in addition to canonical cortical dorsal attention network regions. Across the cerebellum, resting-state functional connectivity with the cortical dorsal attention network strongly predicted the level of activation produced by attention and working memory tasks. Critically, cerebellar voxels that were most strongly connected with the dorsal attention network selectively exhibited load-dependent activity, a hallmark of the neural structures that support visual working memory. Finally, we examined intrinsic functional connectivity between task-responsive portions of cerebellar lobules VIIb/VIIIa and cortex. Cerebellum-to-cortex functional connectivity strongly predicted the pattern of cortical activation during task performance. Moreover, resting-state connectivity patterns revealed that cerebellar lobules VIIb/VIIIa group with cortical nodes of the dorsal attention network. This evidence leads us to conclude that the conceptualization of the dorsal attention network should be expanded to include cerebellar lobules VIIb/VIIIa. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The functional participation of cerebellar structures in nonmotor cortical networks remains poorly understood and is highly understudied, despite the fact that the cerebellum possesses many more neurons than the cerebral cortex. Although visual attention paradigms have been reported to activate

  19. GDNF-induced cerebellar toxicity: A brief review.

    PubMed

    Luz, Matthias; Mohr, Erich; Fibiger, H Christian

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant-methionyl human glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is known for its neurorestorative and neuroprotective effects in rodent and primate models of Parkinson's disease (PD). When administered locally into the putamen of Parkinsonian subjects, early clinical studies showed its potential promise as a disease-modifying agent. However, the development of GDNF for the treatment of PD has been significantly clouded by findings of cerebellar toxicity after continuous intraputamenal high-dose administration in a 6-month treatment/3-month recovery toxicology study in rhesus monkeys. Specifically, multifocal cerebellar Purkinje cell loss affecting 1-21% of the cerebellar cortex was observed in 4 of 15 (26.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 10.5-52.4%) animals treated at the highest dose level tested (3000μg/month). No cerebellar toxicity was observed at lower doses (450 and 900μg/month) in the same study, or at similar or higher doses (up to 10,000μg/month) in subchronic or chronic toxicology studies testing intermittent intracerebroventricular administration. While seemingly associated with the use of GDNF, the pathogenesis of the cerebellar lesions has not been fully understood to date. This review integrates available information to evaluate potential pathogenic mechanisms and provide a consolidated assessment of the findings. While other explanations are considered, the existing evidence is most consistent with the hypothesis that leakage of GDNF into cerebrospinal fluid during chronic infusions into the putamen down-regulates GDNF receptors on Purkinje cells, and that subsequent acute withdrawal of GDNF generates the observed lesions. The implications of these findings for clinical studies with GDNF are discussed.

  20. Patterns of regional cerebellar atrophy in genetic frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Bocchetta, Martina; Cardoso, M. Jorge; Cash, David M.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Warren, Jason D.; Rohrer, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorder with a strong genetic component. The cerebellum has not traditionally been felt to be involved in FTD but recent research has suggested a potential role. Methods We investigated the volumetry of the cerebellum and its subregions in a cohort of 44 patients with genetic FTD (20 MAPT, 7 GRN, and 17 C9orf72 mutation carriers) compared with 18 cognitively normal controls. All groups were matched for age and gender. On volumetric T1-weighted magnetic resonance brain images we used an atlas propagation and label fusion strategy of the Diedrichsen cerebellar atlas to automatically extract subregions including the cerebellar lobules, the vermis and the deep nuclei. Results The global cerebellar volume was significantly smaller in C9orf72 carriers (mean (SD): 99989 (8939) mm3) compared with controls (108136 (7407) mm3). However, no significant differences were seen in the MAPT and GRN carriers compared with controls (104191 (6491) mm3 and 107883 (6205) mm3 respectively). Investigating the individual subregions, C9orf72 carriers had a significantly lower volume than controls in lobule VIIa-Crus I (15% smaller, p < 0.0005), whilst MAPT mutation carriers had a significantly lower vermal volume (10% smaller, p = 0.001) than controls. All cerebellar subregion volumes were preserved in GRN carriers compared with controls. Conclusion There appears to be a differential pattern of cerebellar atrophy in the major genetic forms of FTD, being relatively spared in GRN, localized to the lobule VIIa-Crus I in the superior-posterior region of the cerebellum in C9orf72, the area connected via the thalamus to the prefrontal cortex and involved in cognitive function, and localized to the vermis in MAPT, the ‘limbic cerebellum’ involved in emotional processing. PMID:26977398

  1. Global dysrhythmia of cerebro-basal ganglia-cerebellar networks underlies motor tics following striatal disinhibition.

    PubMed

    McCairn, Kevin W; Iriki, Atsushi; Isoda, Masaki

    2013-01-09

    Motor tics, a cardinal symptom of Tourette syndrome (TS), are hypothesized to arise from abnormalities within cerebro-basal ganglia circuits. Yet noninvasive neuroimaging of TS has previously identified robust activation in the cerebellum. To date, electrophysiological properties of cerebellar activation and its role in basal ganglia-mediated tic expression remain unknown. We performed multisite, multielectrode recordings of single-unit activity and local field potentials from the cerebellum, basal ganglia, and primary motor cortex using a pharmacologic monkey model of motor tics/TS. Following microinjections of bicuculline into the sensorimotor putamen, periodic tics occurred predominantly in the orofacial region, and a sizable number of cerebellar neurons showed phasic changes in activity associated with tic episodes. Specifically, 64% of the recorded cerebellar cortex neurons exhibited increases in activity, and 85% of the dentate nucleus neurons displayed excitatory, inhibitory, or multiphasic responses. Critically, abnormal discharges of cerebellar cortex neurons and excitatory-type dentate neurons mostly preceded behavioral tic onset, indicating their central origins. Latencies of pathological activity in the cerebellum and primary motor cortex substantially overlapped, suggesting that aberrant signals may be traveling along divergent pathways to these structures from the basal ganglia. Furthermore, the occurrence of tic movement was most closely associated with local field potential spikes in the cerebellum and primary motor cortex, implying that these structures may function as a gate to release overt tic movements. These findings indicate that tic-generating networks in basal ganglia mediated tic disorders extend beyond classical cerebro-basal ganglia circuits, leading to global network dysrhythmia including cerebellar circuits.

  2. Cellular localization of cerebellar muscarinic receptors: an autoradiographic analysis of weaver, reeler, Purkinje cell degeneration and staggerer mice

    SciTech Connect

    Neustadt, A.; Frostholm, A.; Rotter, A.

    1988-02-01

    Light microscopic autoradiography of (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding sites was used to study the distribution of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in mouse mutants which have abnormalities affecting specific cerebellar cell types. In the normal C57BL/6J mouse, binding sites were distributed throughout the cerebellar cortex, with the highest levels in the granule cell layer and deep cerebellar nuclei. Normal binding site density was observed in the cerebellum of the weaver mutant in which the majority of granule cells had degenerated. The density of (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding sites was elevated in the cortex of the reeler, despite a reduction in the number of granule cells. The concentration of binding sites was also high over the Purkinje cell masses where granule cells were largely absent. No significant reduction in cortical (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding site density was detected in the Purkinje cell degeneration mutant, in which essentially all Purkinje cells had degenerated. In contrast, receptor binding in the deep cerebellar nuclei of this mutant was significantly increased. A substantial increase in labeling was observed in the cortex and deep nuclei of the staggerer cerebellum in which a large fraction of Golgi II cells, Purkinje cells, granule cells and mossy fibers have degenerated. We discuss the possibility that the persistence of (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding sites in all four mutants may imply a non-neuronal localization for a large proportion of muscarinic receptors in the mouse cerebellar cortex.

  3. Cerebellar Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (ctDCS): A Novel Approach to Understanding Cerebellar Function in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Giuliana; Argyropoulos, Georgios P; Bastian, Amy; Cortes, Mar; Davis, Nicholas J; Edwards, Dylan J; Ferrucci, Roberta; Fregni, Felipe; Galea, Joseph M; Hamada, Masahi; Manto, Mario; Miall, R Chris; Morales-Quezada, Leon; Pope, Paul A; Priori, Alberto; Rothwell, John; Tomlinson, S Paul; Celnik, Pablo

    2016-02-01

    The cerebellum is critical for both motor and cognitive control. Dysfunction of the cerebellum is a component of multiple neurological disorders. In recent years, interventions have been developed that aim to excite or inhibit the activity and function of the human cerebellum. Transcranial direct current stimulation of the cerebellum (ctDCS) promises to be a powerful tool for the modulation of cerebellar excitability. This technique has gained popularity in recent years as it can be used to investigate human cerebellar function, is easily delivered, is well tolerated, and has not shown serious adverse effects. Importantly, the ability of ctDCS to modify behavior makes it an interesting approach with a potential therapeutic role for neurological patients. Through both electrical and non-electrical effects (vascular, metabolic) ctDCS is thought to modify the activity of the cerebellum and alter the output from cerebellar nuclei. Physiological studies have shown a polarity-specific effect on the modulation of cerebellar-motor cortex connectivity, likely via cerebellar-thalamocortical pathways. Modeling studies that have assessed commonly used electrode montages have shown that the ctDCS-generated electric field reaches the human cerebellum with little diffusion to neighboring structures. The posterior and inferior parts of the cerebellum (i.e., lobules VI-VIII) seem particularly susceptible to modulation by ctDCS. Numerous studies have shown to date that ctDCS can modulate motor learning, and affect cognitive and emotional processes. Importantly, this intervention has a good safety profile; similar to when applied over cerebral areas. Thus, investigations have begun exploring ctDCS as a viable intervention for patients with neurological conditions.

  4. Whole-Cell Properties of Cerebellar Nuclei Neurons In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Canto, Cathrin B; Witter, Laurens; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2016-01-01

    . Instead, using whole-cell parameters in combination with morphological criteria revealed by intracellular labelling with Neurobiotin (N = 18) allowed for electrophysiological identification of larger (29.3-50 μm soma diameter) and smaller (< 21.2 μm) cerebellar nuclei neurons with significant differences in membrane properties. Larger cells had a lower membrane resistance and a shorter spike, with a tendency for higher capacitance. Thus, in general cerebellar nuclei neurons appear to offer a rich and wide continuum of physiological properties that stand in contrast to neurons in most cortical regions such as those of the cerebral and cerebellar cortex, in which different classes of neurons operate in a narrower territory of electrophysiological parameter space. The current dataset will help computational modelers of the cerebellar nuclei to update and improve their cerebellar motor learning and performance models by incorporating the large variation of the in vivo properties of cerebellar nuclei neurons. The cellular complexity of cerebellar nuclei neurons may endow the nuclei to perform the intricate computations required for sensorimotor coordination.

  5. Whole-Cell Properties of Cerebellar Nuclei Neurons In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    De Zeeuw, Chris I.

    2016-01-01

    . Instead, using whole-cell parameters in combination with morphological criteria revealed by intracellular labelling with Neurobiotin (N = 18) allowed for electrophysiological identification of larger (29.3–50 μm soma diameter) and smaller (< 21.2 μm) cerebellar nuclei neurons with significant differences in membrane properties. Larger cells had a lower membrane resistance and a shorter spike, with a tendency for higher capacitance. Thus, in general cerebellar nuclei neurons appear to offer a rich and wide continuum of physiological properties that stand in contrast to neurons in most cortical regions such as those of the cerebral and cerebellar cortex, in which different classes of neurons operate in a narrower territory of electrophysiological parameter space. The current dataset will help computational modelers of the cerebellar nuclei to update and improve their cerebellar motor learning and performance models by incorporating the large variation of the in vivo properties of cerebellar nuclei neurons. The cellular complexity of cerebellar nuclei neurons may endow the nuclei to perform the intricate computations required for sensorimotor coordination. PMID:27851801

  6. Early Disruption of Extracellular Pleiotrophin Distribution Alters Cerebellar Neuronal Circuit Development and Function.

    PubMed

    Hamza, M M; Rey, S A; Hilber, P; Arabo, A; Collin, T; Vaudry, D; Burel, D

    2016-10-01

    The cerebellum is a structure of the central nervous system involved in balance, motor coordination, and voluntary movements. The elementary circuit implicated in the control of locomotion involves Purkinje cells, which receive excitatory inputs from parallel and climbing fibers, and are regulated by cerebellar interneurons. In mice as in human, the cerebellar cortex completes its development mainly after birth with the migration, differentiation, and synaptogenesis of granule cells. These cellular events are under the control of numerous extracellular matrix molecules including pleiotrophin (PTN). This cytokine has been shown to regulate the morphogenesis of Purkinje cells ex vivo and in vivo via its receptor PTPζ. Since Purkinje cells are the unique output of the cerebellar cortex, we explored the consequences of their PTN-induced atrophy on the function of the cerebellar neuronal circuit in mice. Behavioral experiments revealed that, despite a normal overall development, PTN-treated mice present a delay in the maturation of their flexion reflex. Moreover, patch clamp recording of Purkinje cells revealed a significant increase in the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents in PTN-treated mice, associated with a decrease of climbing fiber innervations and an abnormal perisomatic localization of the parallel fiber contacts. At adulthood, PTN-treated mice exhibit coordination impairment on the rotarod test associated with an alteration of the synchronization gait. Altogether these histological, electrophysiological, and behavior data reveal that an early ECM disruption of PTN composition induces short- and long-term defaults in the establishment of proper functional cerebellar circuit.

  7. Cerebellar brain inhibition in the target and surround muscles during voluntary tonic activation

    PubMed Central

    Panyakaew, Pattamon; Cho, Hyun Joo; Srivanitchapoom, Prachaya; Popa, Traian; Wu, Tianxia; Hallett, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Motor surround inhibition is the neural mechanism that selectively favors the contraction of target muscles and inhibits nearby muscles to prevent unwanted movements. This inhibition was previously reported at the onset of a movement, but not during a tonic contraction. Cerebellar brain inhibition (CBI) is reduced in active muscles during tonic activation; however, it has not been studied in the surround muscles. CBI was evaluated in the first dorsal interosseus (FDI) as the target muscle, and the abductor digiti minimi (ADM), flexor carpi radialis (FCR), and extensor carpi radialis (ECR) as surround muscles during rest and tonic activation of FDI in fourteen subjects. Cerebellar stimulation was performed under MRI-guided neuronavigation targeting lobule VIII of the cerebellar hemisphere. Stimulus intensities for cerebellar stimulation were based on the resting motor cortex threshold (RMT) and adjusted for the depth difference between the cerebellar and motor cortices. We used 90% to 120% of adjusted RMT as the conditioning stimulus intensity during rest. The intensity that generated the best CBI at rest in the FDI was selected for use during tonic activation. During selective tonic activation of FDI, CBI was significantly reduced only for FDI but not for the surround muscles. Unconditioned MEP sizes were increased in all muscles during FDI tonic activation compared to rest, despite background EMG activity increasing only for the FDI. Our study suggests that the cerebellum may play an important role in selective tonic finger movement by reducing its inhibition in the motor cortex only for the relevant agonist muscle. PMID:26900871

  8. IL1RAPL1 controls inhibitory networks during cerebellar development in mice.

    PubMed

    Gambino, Frédéric; Kneib, Marie; Pavlowsky, Alice; Skala, Henriette; Heitz, Stéphane; Vitale, Nicolas; Poulain, Bernard; Khelfaoui, Malik; Chelly, Jamel; Billuart, Pierre; Humeau, Yann

    2009-10-01

    Abnormalities in the formation and function of cerebellar circuitry potentially contribute to cognitive deficits in humans. In the adult, the activity of the sole output neurons of the cerebellar cortex - the Purkinje cells (PCs) - is shaped by the balance of activity between local excitatory and inhibitory circuits. However, how this balance is established during development remains poorly understood. Here, we investigate the role of interleukin-1 receptor accessory protein-like 1 (IL1RAPL1), a protein linked to cognitive function which interacts with neuronal calcium sensor 1 (NCS-1) in the development of mouse cerebellum. Using Il1rapl1-deficient mice, we found that absence of IL1RAPL1 causes a transient disinhibition of deep cerebellar nuclei neurons between postnatal days 10 and 14 (P10/P14). Upstream, in the cerebellar cortex, we found developmental perturbations in the activity level of molecular layer interneurons (MLIs), resulting in the premature appearance of giant GABAA-mediated inhibitory post-synaptic currents capable of silencing PCs. Examination of feed-forward recruitment of MLIs by parallel fibres shows that during this P10/P14 time window, MLIs were more responsive to incoming excitatory drive. Thus, we conclude that IL1RAPL1 exerts a key function during cerebellar development in establishing local excitation/inhibition balance.

  9. Autopsy study of cerebellar degeneration in siblings with ataxia-telangiectasia-like disorder.

    PubMed

    Oba, Daiju; Hayashi, Masaharu; Minamitani, Motoyuki; Hamano, Shinichiro; Uchisaka, Naoki; Kikuchi, Akira; Kishimoto, Hiroshi; Takagi, Masatoshi; Morio, Tomohiro; Mizutani, Shuki

    2010-04-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia-like disorder (ATLD) is caused by mutations of the MRE11 gene and is characterized by cerebellar ataxia, increased frequency of chromosomal translocations and hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation. ATLD is a rare genetic disease and the associated pathological changes in the brain are unclear. Here, we report the neuropathological findings in the first cases of genetically confirmed ATLD in a pair of Japanese male siblings. Magnetic resonance imaging studies performed during infancy revealed that both subjects had cerebellar atrophy. They died of pulmonary cancer at 9 and 16 years. The siblings had the same compound heterozygous mutations of the MRE11 gene. Brain autopsy demonstrated mild and severe cerebellar atrophy in the vermis and medial part of the hemispheres, oral to the horizontal fissure, respectively. Nuclear immunoreactivity for MRE11 was absent in neurons of cerebellar cortex, cerebral cortex, basal ganglia and midbrain, whereas being widespread in normal control brains. Immunoreactivity for the DNA oxidative stress marker, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, was identified in nuclei of granule cells and Bergmann glial cells. The combination of MRE11 deficiency and DNA oxidative injury might have led to selective cerebellar degeneration.

  10. Structural and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Cerebellum: Considerations for Assessing Cerebellar Ataxias.

    PubMed

    Deistung, Andreas; Stefanescu, Maria R; Ernst, Thomas M; Schlamann, Marc; Ladd, Mark E; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Timmann, Dagmar

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain is of high interest for diagnosing and understanding degenerative ataxias. Here, we present state-of-the-art MRI methods to characterize structural alterations of the cerebellum and introduce initial experiments to show abnormalities in the cerebellar nuclei. Clinically, T1-weighted MR images are used to assess atrophy of the cerebellar cortex, the brainstem, and the spinal cord, whereas T2-weighted and PD-weighted images are typically employed to depict potential white matter lesions that may be associated with certain types of ataxias. More recently, attention has also focused on the characterization of the cerebellar nuclei, which are discernible on spatially highly resolved iron-sensitive MR images due to their relatively high iron content, including T2 (*)-weighted images, susceptibility-weighted images (SWI), effective transverse relaxation rate (R2 (*)) maps, and quantitative susceptibility maps (QSM). Among these iron-sensitive techniques, QSM reveals the best contrast between cerebellar nuclei and their surroundings. In particular, the gyrification of the dentate nuclei is prominently depicted, even at the clinically widely available field strength of 3 T. The linear relationship between magnetic susceptibility and local iron content allows for determination of iron deposition in cerebellar nuclei non-invasively. The increased signal-to-noise ratio of ultrahigh-field MRI (B0 ≥ 7 T) and advances in spatial normalization methods enable functional MRI (fMRI) at the level of the cerebellar cortex and cerebellar nuclei. Data from initial fMRI studies are presented in three common forms of hereditary ataxias (Friedreich's ataxia, spinocerebellar ataxia type 3, and spinocerebellar ataxia type 6). Characteristic changes in the fMRI signal are discussed in the light of histopathological data and current knowledge of the underlying physiology of the fMRI signal in the cerebellum.

  11. Cerebellar sensory processing alterations impact motor cortical plasticity in Parkinson's disease: clues from dyskinetic patients.

    PubMed

    Kishore, Asha; Popa, Traian; Balachandran, Ammu; Chandran, Shyambabu; Pradeep, Salini; Backer, Febina; Krishnan, Syam; Meunier, Sabine

    2014-08-01

    The plasticity of primary motor cortex (M1) in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LIDs) is severely impaired. We recently reported in young healthy subjects that inhibitory cerebellar stimulation enhanced the sensorimotor plasticity of M1 that was induced by paired associative stimulation (PAS). This study demonstrates that the deficient sensorimotor M1 plasticity in 16 patients with LIDs could be reinstated by a single session of real inhibitory cerebellar stimulation but not sham stimulation. This was evident only when a sensory component was involved in the induction of plasticity, indicating that cerebellar sensory processing function is involved in the resurgence of M1 plasticity. The benefit of inhibitory cerebellar stimulation on LIDs is known. To explore whether this benefit is linked to the restoration of sensorimotor plasticity of M1, we conducted an additional study looking at changes in LIDs and PAS-induced plasticity after 10 sessions of either bilateral, real inhibitory cerebellar stimulation or sham stimulation. Only real and not sham stimulation had an antidyskinetic effect and it was paralleled by a resurgence in the sensorimotor plasticity of M1. These results suggest that alterations in cerebellar sensory processing function, occurring secondary to abnormal basal ganglia signals reaching it, may be an important element contributing to the maladaptive sensorimotor plasticity of M1 and the emergence of abnormal involuntary movements.

  12. Neurogenin 2 regulates progenitor cell-cycle progression and Purkinje cell dendritogenesis in cerebellar development.

    PubMed

    Florio, Marta; Leto, Ketty; Muzio, Luca; Tinterri, Andrea; Badaloni, Aurora; Croci, Laura; Zordan, Paola; Barili, Valeria; Albieri, Ilaria; Guillemot, François; Rossi, Ferdinando; Consalez, G Giacomo

    2012-07-01

    By serving as the sole output of the cerebellar cortex, integrating a myriad of afferent stimuli, Purkinje cells (PCs) constitute the principal neuron in cerebellar circuits. Several neurodegenerative cerebellar ataxias feature a selective cell-autonomous loss of PCs, warranting the development of regenerative strategies. To date, very little is known as to the regulatory cascades controlling PC development. During central nervous system development, the proneural gene neurogenin 2 (Neurog2) contributes to many distinct neuronal types by specifying their fate and/or dictating development of their morphological features. By analyzing a mouse knock-in line expressing Cre recombinase under the control of Neurog2 cis-acting sequences we show that, in the cerebellar primordium, Neurog2 is expressed by cycling progenitors cell-autonomously fated to become PCs, even when transplanted heterochronically. During cerebellar development, Neurog2 is expressed in G1 phase by progenitors poised to exit the cell cycle. We demonstrate that, in the absence of Neurog2, both cell-cycle progression and neuronal output are significantly affected, leading to an overall reduction of the mature cerebellar volume. Although PC fate identity is correctly specified, the maturation of their dendritic arbor is severely affected in the absence of Neurog2, as null PCs develop stunted and poorly branched dendrites, a defect evident from the early stages of dendritogenesis. Thus, Neurog2 represents a key regulator of PC development and maturation.

  13. Alcohol Withdrawal and Cerebellar Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jung, Marianna E

    2015-08-01

    Cerebellar disorders trigger the symptoms of movement problems, imbalance, incoordination, and frequent fall. Cerebellar disorders are shown in various CNS illnesses including a drinking disorder called alcoholism. Alcoholism is manifested as an inability to control drinking in spite of adverse consequences. Human and animal studies have shown that cerebellar symptoms persist even after complete abstinence from drinking. In particular, the abrupt termination (ethanol withdrawal) of long-term excessive ethanol consumption has shown to provoke a variety of neuronal and mitochondrial damage to the cerebellum. Upon ethanol withdrawal, excitatory neurotransmitter molecules such as glutamate are overly released in brain areas including cerebellum. This is particularly relevant to the cerebellar neuronal network as glutamate signals are projected to Purkinje neurons through granular cells that are the most populated neuronal type in CNS. This excitatory neuronal signal may be elevated by ethanol withdrawal stress, which promotes an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) level and a decrease in a Ca(2+)-binding protein, both of which result in the excessive entry of Ca(2+) to the mitochondria. Subsequently, mitochondria undergo a prolonged opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore and the overproduction of harmful free radicals, impeding adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-generating function. This in turn provokes the leakage of mitochondrial molecule cytochrome c to the cytosol, which triggers a cascade of adverse cytosol reactions. Upstream to this pathway, cerebellum under the condition of ethanol withdrawal has shown aberrant gene modifications through altered DNA methylation, histone acetylation, or microRNA expression. Interplay between these events and molecules may result in functional damage to cerebellar mitochondria and consequent neuronal degeneration, thereby contributing to motoric deficit. Mitochondria-targeting research may help develop a powerful new

  14. Effects of ethanol on sensory stimulus-evoked responses in the cerebellar molecular layer in vivo in mice.

    PubMed

    Cui, Song-Biao; Cui, Bai-Ri; Liu, Heng; Wu, Mao-Cheng; Xu, Yin-Hua; Bian, Jin-Hua; Chu, Chun-Ping; Qiu, De-Lai

    2014-08-08

    Overdose intake of ethanol can impair cerebellar cortical neurons to integrate and transfer external information, resulting in a dysfunction of cerebellar motor regulation or cerebellar ataxia. However, the mechanisms underlying ethanol-impaired transfer of sensory information from cerebellar cortical molecular layer neurons remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effects of ethanol on sensory stimulation-evoked responses in the cerebellar molecular layer of urethane-anesthetized mice, by electrophysiological and pharmacological methods. Our results demonstrated that air-puff stimulation (30 ms, 50-60 psi) of the ipsilateral whisker-pad evoked field potential responses in the molecular layer of the cerebellar cortex folium Crus II, which expressed a negative component (N1) followed by a gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor A (GABAA)-mediated positive component (P1). Cerebellar surface perfusion of ethanol between 2 and 5mM did not change the latency of the evoked responses and the amplitude of N1, but enhanced the amplitude and the area under the curve of P1. Interestingly, high concentrations (>20mM) of ethanol induced a significantly decrease in the amplitude and area under the curve of P1. Furthermore, high concentration ethanol (300 mM) significantly decreased the rise in tau and tau decay value of P1, whereas low concentration ethanol (2-5mM) significantly increased these values of P1. Inhibition of GABAA receptor activity reversed P1 and also abolished the effects of ethanol on sensory stimulation-evoked responses. These results indicated that ethanol induced a bidirectional effect on the sensory stimulation-evoked GABAergic responses in the cerebellar cortical molecular layer, suggesting that acute alcohol intake impacted the sensory information processing of cerebellar cortex.

  15. Decreased cerebellar blood flow in postinfectious acute cerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Nagamitsu, S.; Matsuishi, T.; Ishibashi, M.; Yamashita, Y.; Nishimi, T.; Ichikawa, K.; Yamanishi, K.; Kato, H.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—The aim of the present study was to evaluate the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with postinfectious acute cerebellar ataxia using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT).
METHODS—Five children with postinfectious acute cerebellar ataxia and five control subjects were examined. The distribution of rCBF was measured by SPECT imaging after intravenous administration of 123I-IMP (111 MBq). The rCBF ratio—defined as the ratio of rCBF in the region of interest (ROI) to that in the occipital cortex—was calculated for each cortical and subcortical ROI. The mean rCBF ratio of each region was then compared between the ataxic and control subjects. These patients and all control subjects were also evaluated using MRI.
RESULTS—The rCBF ratio was significantly lower in the cerebellum of the ataxic patients than in the cerebellum of the control subjects (p<0.05). No abnormal cerebellar morphology and no abnormal signal intensities were found on MRI.
CONCLUSION—123I-IMP SPECT clearly demonstrated the decreased rCBF in the cerebellum of all patients with postinfectious acute cerebellar ataxia.

 PMID:10369834

  16. Dysfunctions of the basal ganglia-cerebellar-thalamo-cortical system produce motor tics in Tourette syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Arbib, Michael A.; Baldassarre, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    Motor tics are a cardinal feature of Tourette syndrome and are traditionally associated with an excess of striatal dopamine in the basal ganglia. Recent evidence increasingly supports a more articulated view where cerebellum and cortex, working closely in concert with basal ganglia, are also involved in tic production. Building on such evidence, this article proposes a computational model of the basal ganglia-cerebellar-thalamo-cortical system to study how motor tics are generated in Tourette syndrome. In particular, the model: (i) reproduces the main results of recent experiments about the involvement of the basal ganglia-cerebellar-thalamo-cortical system in tic generation; (ii) suggests an explanation of the system-level mechanisms underlying motor tic production: in this respect, the model predicts that the interplay between dopaminergic signal and cortical activity contributes to triggering the tic event and that the recently discovered basal ganglia-cerebellar anatomical pathway may support the involvement of the cerebellum in tic production; (iii) furnishes predictions on the amount of tics generated when striatal dopamine increases and when the cortex is externally stimulated. These predictions could be important in identifying new brain target areas for future therapies. Finally, the model represents the first computational attempt to study the role of the recently discovered basal ganglia-cerebellar anatomical links. Studying this non-cortex-mediated basal ganglia-cerebellar interaction could radically change our perspective about how these areas interact with each other and with the cortex. Overall, the model also shows the utility of casting Tourette syndrome within a system-level perspective rather than viewing it as related to the dysfunction of a single brain area. PMID:28358814

  17. The Changeable Nervous System: Studies On Neuroplasticity In Cerebellar Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Seil, Fredrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Circuit reorganization after injury was studied in a cerebellar culture model. When cerebellar cultures derived from newborn mice were exposed at explantation to a preparation of cytosine arabinoside that destroyed granule cells and oligodendrocytes and compromised astrocytes, Purkinje cells surviving in greater than usual numbers were unensheathed by astrocytic processes and received twice the control number of inhibitory axosomatic synapses. Purkinje cell axon collaterals sprouted and many of their terminals formed heterotypical synapses with other Purkinje cell dendritic spines. The resulting circuit reorganization preserved inhibition in the cerebellar cortex. Following this reorganization, replacement of the missing granule cells and glia was followed by a restitution of the normal circuitry. Most of these developmental and reconstructive changes were not dependent on neuronal activity, the major exception being inhibitory synaptogenesis. The full complement of inhibitory synapses did not develop in the absence of neuronal activity, which could be mitigated by application of exogenous TrkB receptor ligands. Inhibitory synaptogenesis could also be promoted by activity-induced release of endogenous TrkB receptor ligands or by antibody activation of the TrkB receptor. PMID:24933693

  18. Evidence for Cerebellar Contributions to Adaptive Plasticity in Speech Perception.

    PubMed

    Guediche, Sara; Holt, Lori L; Laurent, Patryk; Lim, Sung-Joo; Fiez, Julie A

    2015-07-01

    Human speech perception rapidly adapts to maintain comprehension under adverse listening conditions. For example, with exposure listeners can adapt to heavily accented speech produced by a non-native speaker. Outside the domain of speech perception, adaptive changes in sensory and motor processing have been attributed to cerebellar functions. The present functional magnetic resonance imaging study investigates whether adaptation in speech perception also involves the cerebellum. Acoustic stimuli were distorted using a vocoding plus spectral-shift manipulation and presented in a word recognition task. Regions in the cerebellum that showed differences before versus after adaptation were identified, and the relationship between activity during adaptation and subsequent behavioral improvements was examined. These analyses implicated the right Crus I region of the cerebellum in adaptive changes in speech perception. A functional correlation analysis with the right Crus I as a seed region probed for cerebral cortical regions with covarying hemodynamic responses during the adaptation period. The results provided evidence of a functional network between the cerebellum and language-related regions in the temporal and parietal lobes of the cerebral cortex. Consistent with known cerebellar contributions to sensorimotor adaptation, cerebro-cerebellar interactions may support supervised learning mechanisms that rely on sensory prediction error signals in speech perception.

  19. Orthostatic tremor: a cerebellar pathology?

    PubMed

    Gallea, Cécile; Popa, Traian; García-Lorenzo, Daniel; Valabregue, Romain; Legrand, André-Pierre; Apartis, Emmanuelle; Marais, Lea; Degos, Bertrand; Hubsch, Cecile; Fernández-Vidal, Sara; Bardinet, Eric; Roze, Emmanuel; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Meunier, Sabine; Vidailhet, Marie

    2016-08-01

    SEE MUTHURAMAN ET AL DOI101093/AWW164 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: Primary orthostatic tremor is characterized by high frequency tremor affecting the legs and trunk during the standing position. Cerebellar defects were suggested in orthostatic tremor without direct evidence. We aimed to characterize the anatomo-functional defects of the cerebellar motor pathways in orthostatic tremor. We used multimodal neuroimaging to compare 17 patients with orthostatic tremor and 17 age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers. Nine of the patients with orthostatic tremor underwent repetitive transcranial stimulation applied over the cerebellum during five consecutive days. We quantified the duration of standing position and tremor severity through electromyographic recordings. Compared to healthy volunteers, grey matter volume in patients with orthostatic tremor was (i) increased in the cerebellar vermis and correlated positively with the duration of the standing position; and (ii) increased in the supplementary motor area and decreased in the lateral cerebellum, which both correlated with the disease duration. Functional connectivity between the lateral cerebellum and the supplementary motor area was abnormally increased in patients with orthostatic tremor, and correlated positively with tremor severity. After repetitive transcranial stimulation, tremor severity and functional connectivity between the lateral cerebellum and the supplementary motor area were reduced. We provide an explanation for orthostatic tremor pathophysiology, and demonstrate the functional relevance of cerebello-thalamo-cortical connections in tremor related to cerebellar defects.

  20. Speech Prosody in Cerebellar Ataxia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casper, Maureen A.; Raphael, Lawrence J.; Harris, Katherine S.; Geibel, Jennifer M.

    2007-01-01

    Persons with cerebellar ataxia exhibit changes in physical coordination and speech and voice production. Previously, these alterations of speech and voice production were described primarily via perceptual coordinates. In this study, the spatial-temporal properties of syllable production were examined in 12 speakers, six of whom were healthy…

  1. Cerebellar lesions and prism adaptation in macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Baizer, J S; Kralj-Hans, I; Glickstein, M

    1999-04-01

    If a laterally displacing prism is placed in front of one eye of a person or monkey with the other eye occluded, they initially will point to one side of a target that is located directly in front of them. Normally, people and monkeys adapt easily to the displaced vision and correct their aim after a few trials. If the prism then is removed, there is a postadaptation shift in which the subject misses the target and points in the opposite direction for a few trials. We tested five Macaque monkeys for their ability to adapt to a laterally displacing prism and to show the expected postadaptation shift. When tested as normals, all five animals showed the typical pattern of adaptation and postadaptation shift. Like human subjects, the monkeys also showed complete interocular transfer of the adaptation but no transfer of the adaptation between the two arms. When preoperative training and testing was complete, we made lesions of various target areas on the cerebellar cortex. A cerebellar lesion that included the dorsal paraflocculus and uvula abolished completely the normal prism adaptation for the arm ipsilateral to the lesion in one of the five monkeys. The other four animals retained the ability to prism-adapt normally and showed the expected postadaptation shift. In the one case in which the lesion abolished prism adaptation, the damage included Crus I and II, paramedian lobule and the dorsal paraflocculus of the cerebellar hemispheres as well as lobule IX, of the vermis. Thus in this case, the lesion included virtually all the cerebellar cortex that receives mossy-fiber visual information relayed via the pontine nuclei from the cerebral cortex. The other four animals had damage to lobule V, the classical anterior lobe arm area and/or vermian lobules VI/VII, the oculomotor region. When tested postoperatively, some of these animals showed a degree of ataxia equivalent to that of the case in which prism adaptation was affected, but prism adaptation and the

  2. Motor thalamus integration of cortical, cerebellar and basal ganglia information: implications for normal and parkinsonian conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bosch-Bouju, Clémentine; Hyland, Brian I.; Parr-Brownlie, Louise C.

    2013-01-01

    Motor thalamus (Mthal) is implicated in the control of movement because it is strategically located between motor areas of the cerebral cortex and motor-related subcortical structures, such as the cerebellum and basal ganglia (BG). The role of BG and cerebellum in motor control has been extensively studied but how Mthal processes inputs from these two networks is unclear. Specifically, there is considerable debate about the role of BG inputs on Mthal activity. This review summarizes anatomical and physiological knowledge of the Mthal and its afferents and reviews current theories of Mthal function by discussing the impact of cortical, BG and cerebellar inputs on Mthal activity. One view is that Mthal activity in BG and cerebellar-receiving territories is primarily “driven” by glutamatergic inputs from the cortex or cerebellum, respectively, whereas BG inputs are modulatory and do not strongly determine Mthal activity. This theory is steeped in the assumption that the Mthal processes information in the same way as sensory thalamus, through interactions of modulatory inputs with a single driver input. Another view, from BG models, is that BG exert primary control on the BG-receiving Mthal so it effectively relays information from BG to cortex. We propose a new “super-integrator” theory where each Mthal territory processes multiple driver or driver-like inputs (cortex and BG, cortex and cerebellum), which are the result of considerable integrative processing. Thus, BG and cerebellar Mthal territories assimilate motivational and proprioceptive motor information previously integrated in cortico-BG and cortico-cerebellar networks, respectively, to develop sophisticated motor signals that are transmitted in parallel pathways to cortical areas for optimal generation of motor programmes. Finally, we briefly review the pathophysiological changes that occur in the BG in parkinsonism and generate testable hypotheses about how these may affect processing of inputs in

  3. Imaging calcium waves in cerebellar Bergmann glia.

    PubMed

    Beierlein, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This protocol describes methods for recording synaptically evoked Ca(2+) waves from individual Bergmann glia (BG) in slices of cerebellar cortex. Unlike protoplasmic, star-shaped astrocytes, whose thin processes pose a serious challenge to stable Ca(2+) measurements, BG are large radial cells, with several main processes that run over distances of several hundred micrometers toward the pia and ensheathe thousands of parallel fiber (PF) synapses. Stimulation of PF synapses with brief bursts can trigger long-lasting Ca(2+) responses in BG processes, which can be reliably recorded using a cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. This protocol was developed to enable measurements of Ca(2+) waves in individual BG loaded with a high-affinity Ca(2+) indicator such as Fura-2 for up to 2 h. Because BG recorded in slices rarely display spontaneous (i.e., tetrodotoxin [TTX]-sensitive) or intrinsic Ca(2+) transients, Ca(2+) waves can be evoked repeatedly and reliably, which permits quantitative studies using pharmacological tools. Fluorescence measurements obtained using CCD technology offer a straightforward means of characterizing the mechanisms and potential functional consequences of widespread and long-lasting, store-mediated Ca(2+) increases in astrocytes.

  4. Cerebellar granule cells acquire a widespread predictive feedback signal during motor learning.

    PubMed

    Giovannucci, Andrea; Badura, Aleksandra; Deverett, Ben; Najafi, Farzaneh; Pereira, Talmo D; Gao, Zhenyu; Ozden, Ilker; Kloth, Alexander D; Pnevmatikakis, Eftychios; Paninski, Liam; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Medina, Javier F; Wang, Samuel S-H

    2017-03-20

    Cerebellar granule cells, which constitute half the brain's neurons, supply Purkinje cells with contextual information necessary for motor learning, but how they encode this information is unknown. Here we show, using two-photon microscopy to track neural activity over multiple days of cerebellum-dependent eyeblink conditioning in mice, that granule cell populations acquire a dense representation of the anticipatory eyelid movement. Initially, granule cells responded to neutral visual and somatosensory stimuli as well as periorbital airpuffs used for training. As learning progressed, two-thirds of monitored granule cells acquired a conditional response whose timing matched or preceded the learned eyelid movements. Granule cell activity covaried trial by trial to form a redundant code. Many granule cells were also active during movements of nearby body structures. Thus, a predictive signal about the upcoming movement is widely available at the input stage of the cerebellar cortex, as required by forward models of cerebellar control.

  5. Functional Cortical and Cerebellar Reorganization in a Case of Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    Calabrò, Rocco S.; Bramanti, Placido; Baglieri, Annalisa; Corallo, Francesco; De Luca, Rosaria; De Salvo, Simona

    2015-01-01

    Background: Functional studies have been previous reported in stroke patients, but no studies of functional magnetic resonance imaging have been performed in Moyamoya disease. Objective: To assess the cortical and cerebellar reorganization in a moyamoya patient. Methods: We reported a case of a patient suffering from moyamoya disease, undergoing a neuropsychological assessment, a neurocognitive rehabilitative treatment, an electroencephalogram evaluation, and a functional magnetic resonance imaging examination. Results: The subject showed a cognitive impairment, a slow electroencephalogram activity, and the ipsi- and controlateral motor cortex and cerebellar functional magnetic resonance imaging activation. Conclusions: This is the first functional magnetic resonance imaging case study reported in moyamoya disease. We showed a cortical reorganization, which could play an important role in clinical evaluation and motor recovery. The cerebellar activation, showed after cognitive and motor rehabilitation, could support the idea that the cerebellum contains several cognitive-related subregions involved in different functional networks in moyamoya disease. PMID:25852976

  6. Cochlear implantation following cerebellar surgery.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Shahad; Mawman, Deborah; Green, Kevin

    2011-08-01

    Cochlear implantation in patients with known central nervous system conditions can result in wide-ranging outcomes. The aim of this study is to report two cases of cochlear implantation outcomes in patients with acquired cerebellar ataxia following cerebellar surgery. The first is a female implanted with the Nucleus 24 implant in September 2000 and the second is a male implanted with a MED-EL Sonata Flexsoft electro-acoustic stimulation in July 2009. Programming these patients resulted in significant non-auditory stimulation which resulted in less than optimum map fittings. The patients did not gain any open set speech perception benefit although both of them gained an awareness of sound with the device. However, patient 2 elected to become a non-user because of the limited benefit.

  7. Modeling possible effects of atypical cerebellar processing on eyeblink conditioning in autism.

    PubMed

    Radell, Milen L; Mercado, Eduardo

    2014-09-01

    Autism is unique among other disorders in that acquisition of conditioned eyeblink responses is enhanced in children, occurring in a fraction of the trials required for control participants. The timing of learned responses is, however, atypical. Two animal models of autism display a similar phenotype. Researchers have hypothesized that these differences in conditioning reflect cerebellar abnormalities. The present study used computer simulations of the cerebellar cortex, including inhibition by the molecular layer interneurons, to more closely examine whether atypical cerebellar processing can account for faster conditioning in individuals with autism. In particular, the effects of inhibitory levels on delay eyeblink conditioning were simulated, as were the effects of learning-related synaptic changes at either parallel fibers or ascending branch synapses from granule cells to Purkinje cells. Results from these simulations predict that whether molecular layer inhibition results in an enhancement or an impairment of acquisition, or changes in timing, may depend on (1) the sources of inhibition, (2) the levels of inhibition, and (3) the locations of learning-related changes (parallel vs. ascending branch synapses). Overall, the simulations predict that a disruption in the balance or an overall increase of inhibition within the cerebellar cortex may contribute to atypical eyeblink conditioning in children with autism and in animal models of autism.

  8. Nonsurgical cerebellar mutism (anarthria) in two children.

    PubMed

    Mewasingh, Leena D; Kadhim, Hazim; Christophe, Catherine; Christiaens, Florence J; Dan, Bernard

    2003-01-01

    Cerebellar mutism (anarthria) is a well-described complication of posterior fossa tumor resection. It is accompanied by a characteristic behavior including irritability and autistic features. This syndrome is typically reversible within days to months. Underlying pathophysiology is unknown. We describe two children who presented with a similar clinical finding after nonsurgical cerebellar involvement, hemolytic-uremic syndrome in one and cerebellitis in the other. Postmortem pathologic findings in the first patient indicated cerebellar ischemic necrosis. Single-photon emission computed tomography in the second patient revealed diffuse cerebellar hypoperfusion with no supratentorial abnormalities, refuting a phenomenon of diaschisis between cerebellar and frontal connections. These findings confirm that this clinical syndrome may occur in a nonsurgical, nontraumatic context. They are consistent with recent integrative hypotheses explaining cerebellar anarthria.

  9. Modality specific cerebro-cerebellar activations in verbal working memory: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Kirschen, Matthew P; Chen, S H Annabel; Desmond, John E

    2010-01-01

    Verbal working memory (VWM) engages frontal and temporal/parietal circuits subserving the phonological loop, as well as, superior and inferior cerebellar regions which have projections from these neocortical areas. Different cerebro-cerebellar circuits may be engaged for integrating aurally- and visually-presented information for VWM. The present fMRI study investigated load (2, 4, or 6 letters) and modality (auditory and visual) dependent cerebro-cerebellar VWM activation using a Sternberg task. FMRI revealed modality-independent activations in left frontal (BA 6/9/44), insular, cingulate (BA 32), and bilateral inferior parietal/supramarginal (BA 40) regions, as well as in bilateral superior (HVI) and right inferior (HVIII) cerebellar regions. Visual presentation evoked prominent activations in right superior (HVI/CrusI) cerebellum, bilateral occipital (BA19) and left parietal (BA7/40) cortex while auditory presentation showed robust activations predominantly in bilateral temporal regions (BA21/22). In the cerebellum, we noted a visual to auditory emphasis of function progressing from superior to inferior and from lateral to medial regions. These results extend our previous findings of fMRI activation in cerebro-cerebellar networks during VWM, and demonstrate both modality dependent commonalities and differences in activations with increasing memory load.

  10. Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration with a circulating antibody against neurons and non-neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Tomimoto, H; Brengman, J M; Yanagihara, T

    1993-01-01

    We describe a woman with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration associated with para-ovarian adenocarcinoma, who had a circulating antibody with a corresponding antigen not only in cerebellar Purkinje cells but also in neurons located in the molecular layer of the human and rat cerebellum. The antigen was also present in neurons in the cerebral cortex, brain stem, anterior horn cells, dorsal root ganglia, intestinal autonomic neurons, retinal ganglion cells, Schwann cells of the peripheral nerve and epithelial cells of the renal glomerulus in rats. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed immunoprecipitates in the smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum and polyribosomes in human and rat cerebellar Purkinje cells and other neuronal cell bodies as well as Schwann cells of the peripheral nerve. Even though patients with this disorder manifest primarily with cerebellar and some extracerebellar signs, the antigen also exists in many neurons other than cerebellar Purkinje cells and even in non-neuronal cells. The clinicopathologic significance of the observed immunologic reaction in diverse neurons remains to be determined.

  11. Cerebellar Dysfunction and Ataxia in Patients with Epilepsy: Coincidence, Consequence, or Cause?

    PubMed Central

    Marcián, Václav; Filip, Pavel; Bareš, Martin; Brázdil, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Basic epilepsy teachings assert that seizures arise from the cerebral cortex, glossing over infratentorial structures such as the cerebellum that are believed to modulate rather than generate seizures. Nonetheless, ataxia and other clinical findings in epileptic patients are slowly but inevitably drawing attention to this neural node. Tracing the evolution of this line of inquiry from the observed coincidence of cerebellar atrophy and cerebellar dysfunction (most apparently manifested as ataxia) in epilepsy to their close association, this review considers converging clinical, physiological, histological, and neuroimaging evidence that support incorporating the cerebellum into epilepsy pathology. We examine reports of still controversial cerebellar epilepsy, studies of cerebellar stimulation alleviating paroxysmal epileptic activity, studies and case reports of cerebellar lesions directly associated with seizures, and conditions in which ataxia is accompanied by epileptic seizures. Finally, the review substantiates the role of this complex brain structure in epilepsy whether by coincidence, as a consequence of deleterious cortical epileptic activity or antiepileptic drugs, or the very cause of the disease. PMID:27375960

  12. Cerebellar cortical neuron responses evoked from the spinal border cell tract.

    PubMed

    Geborek, Pontus; Spanne, Anton; Bengtsson, Fredrik; Jörntell, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Spinocerebellar systems are likely to be crucial for cerebellar hallmark functions such as coordination. However, in terms of cerebellar functional analyses, these are perhaps among the least explored systems. The aim of the present study is to achieve activation of a single component of the spinocerebellar systems and to explore to what extent it can influence the spike output of granule cells, Golgi cells, molecular layer (ML) interneurons (stellate and basket cells) and Purkinje cells (PCs). For this purpose, we took advantage of a unique arrangement discovered in neuroanatomical studies, in which the spinal border cell (SBC) component of the ventral spinocerebellar system was found to be the only spinocerebellar tract which ascends in the contralateral lateral funiculus (coLF) and have terminations in sublobulus C1 of the paramedian lobule in the posterior cerebellum. Using electrical stimulation of this tract, we find a subset of the cerebellar cortical neurons in this region to be moderately or powerfully activated. For example, some of our granule cells displayed high intensity responses whereas the majority of the granule cells displayed no response at all. The finding that more than half of the PCs were activated by stimulation of the SBC tract indicated that this system is capable of directly influencing cerebellar cortical output. The implications of these findings for the view of the integrative functions of the cerebellar cortex are discussed.

  13. Cerebellar Dysfunction and Ataxia in Patients with Epilepsy: Coincidence, Consequence, or Cause?

    PubMed

    Marcián, Václav; Filip, Pavel; Bareš, Martin; Brázdil, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Basic epilepsy teachings assert that seizures arise from the cerebral cortex, glossing over infratentorial structures such as the cerebellum that are believed to modulate rather than generate seizures. Nonetheless, ataxia and other clinical findings in epileptic patients are slowly but inevitably drawing attention to this neural node. Tracing the evolution of this line of inquiry from the observed coincidence of cerebellar atrophy and cerebellar dysfunction (most apparently manifested as ataxia) in epilepsy to their close association, this review considers converging clinical, physiological, histological, and neuroimaging evidence that support incorporating the cerebellum into epilepsy pathology. We examine reports of still controversial cerebellar epilepsy, studies of cerebellar stimulation alleviating paroxysmal epileptic activity, studies and case reports of cerebellar lesions directly associated with seizures, and conditions in which ataxia is accompanied by epileptic seizures. Finally, the review substantiates the role of this complex brain structure in epilepsy whether by coincidence, as a consequence of deleterious cortical epileptic activity or antiepileptic drugs, or the very cause of the disease.

  14. Integration of Purkinje cell inhibition by cerebellar nucleo-olivary neurons.

    PubMed

    Najac, Marion; Raman, Indira M

    2015-01-14

    Neurons in the cerebellar cortex, cerebellar nuclei, and inferior olive (IO) form a trisynaptic loop critical for motor learning. IO neurons excite Purkinje cells via climbing fibers and depress their parallel fiber inputs. Purkinje cells inhibit diverse cells in the cerebellar nuclei, including small GABAergic nucleo-olivary neurons that project to the IO. To investigate how these neurons integrate synaptic signals from Purkinje cells, we retrogradely labeled nucleo-olivary cells in the contralateral interpositus and lateral nuclei with cholera toxin subunit B-Alexa Fluor 488 and recorded their electrophysiological properties in cerebellar slices from weanling mice. Nucleo-olivary cells fired action potentials over a relatively narrow dynamic range (maximal rate, ∼ 70 spikes/s), unlike large cells that project to premotor areas (maximal rate, ∼ 400 spikes/s). GABA(A) receptor-mediated IPSCs evoked by electrical or optogenetic stimulation of Purkinje cells were more than 10-fold slower in nucleo-olivary cells (decay time, ∼ 25 ms) than in large cells (∼ 2 ms), and repetitive stimulation at 20-150 Hz evoked greatly summating IPSCs. Nucleo-olivary firing rates varied inversely with IPSP frequency, and the timing of Purkinje IPSPs and nucleo-olivary spikes was uncorrelated. These attributes contrast with large cells, whose brief IPSCs and rapid firing rates can permit well timed postinhibitory spiking. Thus, the intrinsic and synaptic properties of these two projection neurons from the cerebellar nuclei tailor them for differential integration and transmission of their Purkinje cell input.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: VLDLR-associated cerebellar hypoplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions VLDLR-associated cerebellar hypoplasia VLDLR-associated cerebellar hypoplasia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description VLDLR -associated cerebellar hypoplasia is an inherited condition that affects the development ...

  16. Neuroligins Are Selectively Essential for NMDAR Signaling in Cerebellar Stellate Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Südhof, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroligins are postsynaptic cell-adhesion molecules that contribute to synapse specification. However, many other postsynaptic cell-adhesion molecules are known and the relative contributions of neuroligins versus other such molecules in different types of synapses and neurons remains largely unknown. Here, we have studied the role of neuroligins in cerebellar stellate interneurons that participate in a well defined circuit that converges on Purkinje cells as the major output neurons of cerebellar cortex. By crossing triple conditional knock-out (cKO) mice targeting all three major neuroligins [neuroligin-1 to neuroligin-3 (NL123)] with parvalbumin-Cre (PV-Cre) transgenic mice, we deleted neuroligins from inhibitory cerebellar interneurons and Purkinje cells, allowing us to study the effects of neuroligin deletions on cerebellar stellate cell synapses by electrophysiology in acute slices. PV-Cre/NL123 cKO mice did not exhibit gross alterations of cerebellar structure or cerebellar interneuron morphology. Strikingly, electrophysiological recordings in stellate cells from these PV-Cre/NL123 cKO mice revealed a large decrease in NMDAR-mediated excitatory synaptic responses, which, in stellate cells, are largely extrasynaptic, without a change in AMPA-receptor-mediated responses. Parallel analyses in PV-Cre/NL1 mice that are single NL1 cKO mice uncovered the same phenotype, demonstrating that NL1 is responsible for recruiting extrasynaptic NMDARs. Moreover, we observed only a modest impairment in inhibitory synaptic responses in stellate cells lacking NL123 despite a nearly complete suppression of inhibitory synaptic transmission in Purkinje cells by the same genetic manipulation. Our results suggest that, unlike other types of neurons investigated, neuroligins are selectively essential in cerebellar stellate interneurons for enabling the function of extrasynaptic NMDARs. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neuroligins are postsynaptic cell-adhesion molecules genetically linked to

  17. Respective implications of glutamate decarboxylase antibodies in stiff person syndrome and cerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To investigate whether Stiff-person syndrome (SPS) and cerebellar ataxia (CA) are associated with distinct GAD65-Ab epitope specificities and neuronal effects. Methods Purified GAD65-Ab from neurological patients and monoclonal GAD65-Ab with distinct epitope specificities (b78 and b96.11) were administered in vivo to rat cerebellum. Effects of intra-cerebellar administration of GAD65-Ab were determined using neurophysiological and neurochemical methods. Results Intra-cerebellar administration of GAD65-Ab from a SPS patient (Ab SPS) impaired the NMDA-mediated turnover of glutamate, but had no effect on NMDA-mediated turnover of glycerol. By contrast, GAD65-Ab from a patient with cerebellar ataxia (Ab CA) markedly decreased the NMDA-mediated turnover of glycerol. Both GAD65-Ab increased the excitability of the spinal cord, as assessed by the F wave/M wave ratios. The administration of BFA, an inhibitor of the recycling of vesicles, followed by high-frequency stimulation of the cerebellum, severely impaired the cerebello-cortical inhibition only when Ab CA was used. Moreover, administration of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the motor cortex revealed a strong disinhibition of the motor cortex with Ab CA. Monoclonal antibodies b78 and b96.11 showed distinct effects, with greater effects of b78 in terms of increase of glutamate concentrations, impairment of the adaptation of the motor cortex to repetitive peripheral stimulation, disinhibition of the motor cortex following tDCS, and increase of the F/M ratios. Ab SPS shared antibody characteristics with b78, both in epitope recognition and ability to inhibit enzyme activity, while Ab CA had no effect on GAD65 enzyme activity. Conclusions These results suggest that, in vivo, neurological impairments caused by GAD65-Ab could vary according to epitope specificities. These results could explain the different neurological syndromes observed in patients with GAD65-Ab. PMID:21294897

  18. Hereditary lissencephaly and cerebellar hypoplasia in Churra lambs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lissencephaly is a rare developmental brain disorder in veterinary and human medicine associated with defects in neuronal migration leading to a characteristic marked reduction or absence of the convolutional pattern of the cerebral hemispheres. In many human cases the disease has a genetic basis. In sheep, brain malformations, mainly cerebellar hypoplasia and forms of hydrocephalus, are frequently due to in utero viral infections. Although breed-related malformations of the brain have been described in sheep, breed-related lissencephaly has not been previously recorded in a peer reviewed publication. Results Here we report neuropathological findings in 42 newborn lambs from a pure Churra breed flock, with clinical signs of weakness, inability to walk, difficulty in sucking and muscular rigidity observed immediately after birth. All the lambs showed near-total agyria with only a rudimentary formation of few sulci and gyri, and a severe cerebellar hypoplasia. On coronal section, the cerebral grey matter was markedly thicker than that of age-matched unaffected lambs and the ventricular system was moderately dilated. Histologically, the normal layers of the cerebral cortex were disorganized and, using an immunohistochemical technique against neurofilaments, three layers were identified instead of the six present in normal brains. The hippocampus was also markedly disorganised and the number and size of lobules were reduced in the cerebellum. Heterotopic neurons were present in different areas of the white matter. The remainder of the brain structures appeared normal. The pathological features reported are consistent with the type LCH-b (lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia group b) defined in human medicine. No involvement of pestivirus or bluetongue virus was detected by immunohistochemistry. An analysis of pedigree data was consistent with a monogenic autosomal recessive pattern inheritance. Conclusions The study describes the clinical and

  19. Comparative anatomical studies on the cerebellar nuclei of the pangolins.

    PubMed

    Ishimoto, Y

    1983-01-01

    The configurations and volumes of the cerebellar nuclei of left and right 10 sides of 5 cases of the pangolins (Manis pentadactyla) were examined with sagittal myelin sheath and toluidine blue stained serial sections and reconstruction models based upon these serial sections respectively. The cerebellar nuclei of the pangolins, same as in other mammals can be divided into four nuclei, nucleus medialis (M), nucleus interpositus posterior (P), nucleus interpositus anterior (A) and nucleus lateralis (L). In all cases from medially to laterally, M, P, A and L appear in order and disappear M, A, P and L in order respectively. The volume of each nucleus in the total volume of the cerebellar nuclei is: M; 5.3-7.9% P; 27.1-31.2% A; 17.6-22.9% L; 42.4-46.2% In right and left each cerebellar nuclei significant difference is not recognized as p is less than 0.05. The posterior protuberance of the nucleus medialis protrudes remarkably in 4 cases of No. 1, No. 2, No. 3 and No. 4 but in only 1 case of No. 5 it protrudes slightly. In nucleus interpositus posterior the ventrolateral protuberance protrudes slightly in 4 cases of No. 1, No. 3, No. 4 and No. 5 but in only 1 case of No. 2 it protrudes remarkably. The anterior protuberance protrudes remarkably in all cases and the superior protuberance protrudes remarkably in 3 cases of No. 2, No. 3 and No. 4 but in 2 cases of No. 1 and No. 5 it protrudes slightly. In sulci, sulcus b and sulcus a' are distinct in all cases and sulcus a, sulcus c, sulcus b' and sulcus c' are considerably remarkable. In the toluidine blue stained serial sections, the nucleus medialis is composed of close small nerve cells, nucleus interpositus posterior is composed of the diffuse medium-sized nerve cells, nucleus interpositus anterior is composed of the close medium-sized nerve cells and nucleus lateralis is composed of the diffuse large nerve cells. In projection pictures of each subnuclei to the cerebellar cortex in each directions in the dorsal view

  20. Cerebellar theta burst stimulation modulates the neural activity of interconnected parietal and motor areas

    PubMed Central

    Casula, Elias Paolo; Pellicciari, Maria Concetta; Ponzo, Viviana; Stampanoni Bassi, Mario; Veniero, Domenica; Caltagirone, Carlo; Koch, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    Voluntary movement control and execution are regulated by the influence of the cerebellar output over different interconnected cortical areas, through dentato-thalamo connections. In the present study we applied transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electroencephalography (EEG) to directly assess the effects of cerebellar theta-burst stimulation (TBS) over the controlateral primary motor cortex (M1) and posterior parietal cortex (PPC) in a group of healthy volunteers. We found a TBS-dependent bidirectional modulation over TMS-evoked activity; specifically, cTBS increased whereas iTBS decreased activity between 100 and 200 ms after TMS, in a similar manner over both M1 and PPC areas. On the oscillatory domain, TBS induced specific changes over M1 natural frequencies of oscillation: TMS-evoked alpha activity was decreased by cTBS whereas beta activity was enhanced by iTBS. No effects were observed after sham stimulation. Our data provide novel evidence showing that the cerebellum exerts its control on the cortex likely by impinging on specific set of interneurons dependent on GABA-ergic activity. We show that cerebellar TBS modulates cortical excitability of distant interconnected cortical areas by acting through common temporal, spatial and frequency domains. PMID:27796359

  1. Learning of Sensory Sequences in Cerebellar Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frings, Markus; Boenisch, Raoul; Gerwig, Marcus; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Timmann, Dagmar

    2004-01-01

    A possible role of the cerebellum in detecting and recognizing event sequences has been proposed. The present study sought to determine whether patients with cerebellar lesions are impaired in the acquisition and discrimination of sequences of sensory stimuli of different modalities. A group of 26 cerebellar patients and 26 controls matched for…

  2. Acute cerebellar ataxia and infectious mononucleosis.

    PubMed Central

    Wadhwa, N. K.; Ghose, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    A 28-year-old man, who presented with acute cerebellar ataxia, was found to have haematological features of infectious mononucleosis. There was serological evidence of recent infection with Epstein-Barr virus. It is speculated that cerebellar dysfunction results from virus-induced inflammatory changes within the central nervous system. PMID:6312442

  3. Consensus Paper: Management of Degenerative Cerebellar Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ilg, W.; Bastian, A. J.; Boesch, S.; Burciu, R. G.; Celnik, P.; Claaßen, J.; Feil, K.; Kalla, R.; Miyai, I.; Nachbauer, W.; Schöls, L.; Strupp, M.; Synofzik, M.; Teufel, J.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of motor symptoms of degenerative cerebellar ataxia remains difficult. Yet there are recent developments that are likely to lead to significant improvements in the future. Most desirable would be a causative treatment of the underlying cerebellar disease. This is currently available only for a very small subset of cerebellar ataxias with known metabolic dysfunction. However, increasing knowledge of the pathophysiology of hereditary ataxia should lead to an increasing number of medically sensible drug trials. In this paper, data from recent drug trials in patients with recessive and dominant cerebellar ataxias will be summarized. There is consensus that up to date, no medication has been proven effective. Aminopyridines and acetazolamide are the only exception, which are beneficial in patients with episodic ataxia type 2. Aminopyridines are also effective in a subset of patients presenting with downbeat nystagmus. As such, all authors agreed that the mainstays of treatment of degenerative cerebellar ataxia are currently physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy. For many years, well-controlled rehabilitation studies in patients with cerebellar ataxia were lacking. Data of recently published studies show that coordinative training improves motor function in both adult and juvenile patients with cerebellar degeneration. Given the well-known contribution of the cerebellum to motor learning, possible mechanisms underlying improvement will be outlined. There is consensus that evidence-based guidelines for the physiotherapy of degenerative cerebellar ataxia need to be developed. Future developments in physiotherapeutical interventions will be discussed including application of non-invasive brain stimulation. PMID:24222635

  4. Cerebellar Neural Circuits Involving Executive Control Network Predict Response to Group Cognitive Behavior Therapy in Social Anxiety Disorder.

    PubMed

    MinlanYuan; Meng, Yajing; Zhang, Yan; Nie, Xiaojing; Ren, Zhengjia; Zhu, Hongru; Li, Yuchen; Lui, Su; Gong, Qiyong; Qiu, Changjian; Zhang, Wei

    2017-02-02

    Some intrinsic connectivity networks including the default mode network (DMN) and executive control network (ECN) may underlie social anxiety disorder (SAD). Although the cerebellum has been implicated in the pathophysiology of SAD and several networks relevant to higher-order cognition, it remains unknown whether cerebellar areas involved in DMN and ECN exhibit altered resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) with cortical networks in SAD. Forty-six patients with SAD and 64 healthy controls (HC) were included and submitted to the baseline resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Seventeen SAD patients who completed post-treatment clinical assessments were included after group cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). RsFC of three cerebellar subregions in both groups was assessed respectively in a voxel-wise way, and these rsFC maps were compared by two-sample t tests between groups. Whole-brain voxel-wise regression was performed to examine whether cerebellar connectivity networks can predict response to CBT. Lower rsFC circuits of cerebellar subregions compared with HC at baseline (p < 0.05, corrected by false discovery rate) were revealed. The left Crus I rsFC with dorsal medial prefrontal cortex was negatively correlated with symptom severity. The clinical assessments in SAD patients were significantly decreased after CBT. Higher pretreatment cerebellar rsFC with angular gyrus and dorsal lateral frontal cortex corresponded with greater symptom improvement following CBT. Cerebellar rsFC circuits involving DMN and ECN are possible neuropathologic mechanisms of SAD. Stronger pretreatment cerebellar rsFC circuits involving ECN suggest potential neural markers to predict CBT response.

  5. Metronidazole-Induced Cerebellar Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Amit; Kanekar, Sangam; Sabat, Shyam; Thamburaj, Krishnamurthy

    2016-01-01

    Metronidazole is a very common antibacterial and antiprotozoal with wide usage across the globe, including the least developed countries. It is generally well-tolerated with a low incidence of serious side-effects. Neurological toxicity is fairly common with this drug, however majority of these are peripheral neuropathy with very few cases of central nervous toxicity reported. We report the imaging findings in two patients with cerebellar dysfunction after Metronidazole usage. Signal changes in the dentate and red nucleus were seen on magnetic resonance imaging in these patients. Most of the cases reported in literature reported similar findings, suggesting high predilection for the dentate nucleus in metronidazole induced encephalopathy. PMID:27127600

  6. Cerebellar brain inhibition in the target and surround muscles during voluntary tonic activation.

    PubMed

    Panyakaew, Pattamon; Cho, Hyun Joo; Srivanitchapoom, Prachaya; Popa, Traian; Wu, Tianxia; Hallett, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Motor surround inhibition is the neural mechanism that selectively favours the contraction of target muscles and inhibits nearby muscles to prevent unwanted movements. This inhibition was previously reported at the onset of a movement, but not during a tonic contraction. Cerebellar brain inhibition (CBI) is reduced in active muscles during tonic activation; however, it has not been studied in the surround muscles. CBI was evaluated in the first dorsal interosseus (FDI) muscle as the target muscle, and the abductor digiti minimi, flexor carpi radialis and extensor carpi radialis muscles as surround muscles, during rest and tonic activation of the FDI muscle in 21 subjects. Cerebellar stimulation was performed under magnetic resonance imaging-guided neuronavigation targeting lobule VIII of the cerebellar hemisphere. Stimulus intensities for cerebellar stimulation were based on the resting motor cortex threshold (RMT) and adjusted for the depth difference between the cerebellar and motor cortices. We used 90-120% of the adjusted RMT as the conditioning stimulus intensity during rest. The intensity that generated the best CBI at rest in the FDI muscle was selected for use during tonic activation. During selective tonic activation of the FDI muscle, CBI was significantly reduced only for the FDI muscle, and not for the surround muscles. Unconditioned motor evoked potential sizes were increased in all muscles during FDI muscle tonic activation as compared with rest, despite background electromyography activity increasing only for the FDI muscle. Our study suggests that the cerebellum may play an important role in selective tonic finger movement by reducing its inhibition in the motor cortex only for the relevant agonist muscle.

  7. Abnormal Cerebellar Cytoarchitecture and Impaired Inhibitory Signaling in Adult Mice Lacking Testicular Orphan Nuclear Receptor 4

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yei-Tsung; Collins, Loretta L.; Uno, Hideo; Chou, Samuel M.; Meshul, Charles K.; Chang, Shu-Shi; Chang, Chawnshang

    2007-01-01

    Since Testicular orphan nuclear receptor 4 (TR4) was cloned, its physiological functions remain largely unknown. In this study, the TR4 knockout (TR4−/−) mouse model was used to investigate the role of TR4 in the adult cerebellum. Behaviorally, these null mice exhibit unsteady gait, as well as involuntary postural and kinetic movements, indicating a disturbance of cerebellar function. In the TR4−/− brain, cerebellar restricted hypoplasia is severe and cerebellar vermal lobules VI and VII are underdeveloped, while no structural alterations in the cerebral cortex are observed. Histological analysis of the TR4−/− cerebellar cortex reveals reductions in granule cell density, as well as a decreased number of parallel fiber boutons that are enlarged in size. Further analyses reveal that the levels of GABA and GAD are decreased in both Purkinje cells and interneurons of the TR4−/− cerebellum, suggesting that the inhibitory circuits signaling within and from the cerebellum may be perturbed. In addition, in the TR4−/− cerebellum, immunoreactivity of GluR2/3 was reduced in Purkinje cells, but increased in the deep cerebellar nuclei. Together, these results suggest that the behavioral phenotype of TR4−/− mice may result from disrupted inhibitory pathways in the cerebellum. No progressive atrophy was observed at various adult stages in the TR4−/− brain, therefore the disturbances most likely originate from a failure to establish proper connections between principal neurons in the cerebellum during development. PMID:17706948

  8. Cerebellar Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (ctDCS)

    PubMed Central

    Grimaldi, Giuliana; Argyropoulos, Georgios P.; Bastian, Amy; Cortes, Mar; Davis, Nicholas J.; Edwards, Dylan J.; Ferrucci, Roberta; Fregni, Felipe; Galea, Joseph M.; Hamada, Masahi; Manto, Mario; Miall, R. Chris; Morales-Quezada, Leon; Pope, Paul A.; Priori, Alberto; Rothwell, John; Tomlinson, S. Paul; Celnik, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellum is critical for both motor and cognitive control. Dysfunction of the cerebellum is a component of multiple neurological disorders. In recent years, interventions have been developed that aim to excite or inhibit the activity and function of the human cerebellum. Transcranial direct current stimulation of the cerebellum (ctDCS) promises to be a powerful tool for the modulation of cerebellar excitability. This technique has gained popularity in recent years as it can be used to investigate human cerebellar function, is easily delivered, is well tolerated, and has not shown serious adverse effects. Importantly, the ability of ctDCS to modify behavior makes it an interesting approach with a potential therapeutic role for neurological patients. Through both electrical and non-electrical effects (vascular, metabolic) ctDCS is thought to modify the activity of the cerebellum and alter the output from cerebellar nuclei. Physiological studies have shown a polarity-specific effect on the modulation of cerebellar–motor cortex connectivity, likely via cerebellar–thalamocortical pathways. Modeling studies that have assessed commonly used electrode montages have shown that the ctDCS-generated electric field reaches the human cerebellum with little diffusion to neighboring structures. The posterior and inferior parts of the cerebellum (i.e., lobules VI-VIII) seem particularly susceptible to modulation by ctDCS. Numerous studies have shown to date that ctDCS can modulate motor learning, and affect cognitive and emotional processes. Importantly, this intervention has a good safety profile; similar to when applied over cerebral areas. Thus, investigations have begun exploring ctDCS as a viable intervention for patients with neurological conditions. PMID:25406224

  9. Inhibition promotes long-term potentiation at cerebellar excitatory synapses

    PubMed Central

    Binda, F.; Dorgans, K.; Reibel, S.; Sakimura, K.; Kano, M.; Poulain, B.; Isope, P.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of the cerebellar cortex to learn from experience ensures the accuracy of movements and reflex adaptation, processes which require long-term plasticity at granule cell (GC) to Purkinje neuron (PN) excitatory synapses. PNs also receive GABAergic inhibitory inputs via GCs activation of interneurons; despite the involvement of inhibition in motor learning, its role in long-term plasticity is poorly characterized. Here we reveal a functional coupling between ionotropic GABAA receptors and low threshold CaV3 calcium channels in PNs that sustains calcium influx and promotes long-term potentiation (LTP) at GC to PN synapses. High frequency stimulation induces LTP at GC to PN synapses and CaV3-mediated calcium influx provided that inhibition is intact; LTP is mGluR1, intracellular calcium store and CaV3 dependent. LTP is impaired in CaV3.1 knockout mice but it is nevertheless recovered by strengthening inhibitory transmission onto PNs; promoting a stronger hyperpolarization via GABAA receptor activation leads to an enhanced availability of an alternative Purkinje-expressed CaV3 isoform compensating for the lack of CaV3.1 and restoring LTP. Accordingly, a stronger hyperpolarization also restores CaV3-mediated calcium influx in PNs from CaV3.1 knockout mice. We conclude that by favoring CaV3 channels availability inhibition promotes LTP at cerebellar excitatory synapses. PMID:27641070

  10. Changes in cortical, cerebellar and basal ganglia representation after comprehensive long term unilateral hand motor training.

    PubMed

    Walz, A D; Doppl, K; Kaza, E; Roschka, S; Platz, T; Lotze, M

    2015-02-01

    We were interested in motor performance gain after unilateral hand motor training and associated changes of cerebral and cerebellar movement representation tested with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) before and after training. Therefore, we trained the left hand of strongly right-handed healthy participants with a comprehensive training (arm ability training, AAT) over two weeks. Motor performance was tested for the trained and non-trained hand before and after the training period. Functional imaging was performed for the trained and the non-trained hand separately and comprised force modulation with the fist, sequential finger movements and a fast writing task. After the training period the performance gain of tapping movements was comparable for both hand sides, whereas the motor performance for writing showed a higher training effect for the trained hand. fMRI showed a reduction of activation in supplementary motor, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, parietal cortical areas and lateral cerebellar areas during sequential finger movements over time. During left hand writing lateral cerebellar hemisphere also showed reduced activation, while activation of the anterior cerebellar hemisphere was increased. An initially high anterior cerebellar activation magnitude was a predictive value for high training outcome of finger tapping and visual guided movements. During the force modulation task we found increased activation in the striate. Overall, a comprehensive long-term training of the less skillful hand in healthy participants resulted in relevant motor performance improvements, as well as an intermanual learning transfer differently pronounced for the type of movement tested. Whereas cortical motor area activation decreased over time, cerebellar anterior hemisphere and striatum activity seem to represent increasing resources after long-term motor training.

  11. Purkinje cell activity in the cerebellar anterior lobe after rabbit eyeblink conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Green, John T.; Steinmetz, Joseph E.

    2005-01-01

    The cerebellar anterior lobe may play a critical role in the execution and proper timing of learned responses. The current study was designed to monitor Purkinje cell activity in the rabbit cerebellar anterior lobe after eyeblink conditioning, and to assess whether Purkinje cells in recording locations may project to the interpositus nucleus. Rabbits were trained in an interstimulus interval discrimination procedure in which one tone signaled a 250-msec conditioned stimulus-unconditioned stimulus (CS-US) interval and a second tone signaled a 750-msec CS-US interval. All rabbits showed conditioned responses to each CS with mean onset and peak latencies that coincided with the CS-US interval. Many anterior lobe Purkinje cells showed significant learning-related activity after eyeblink conditioning to one or both of the CSs. More Purkinje cells responded with inhibition than with excitation to CS presentation. In addition, when the firing patterns of all conditioning-related Purkinje cells were pooled, it appeared that the population showed a pattern of excitation followed by inhibition during the CS-US interval. Using cholera toxin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase, Purkinje cells in recording areas were found to project to the interpositus nucleus. These data support previous studies that have suggested a role for the anterior cerebellar cortex in eyeblink conditioning as well as models of cerebellar-mediated CR timing that postulate that Purkinje cell activity inhibits conditioned response (CR) generation during the early portion of a trial by inhibiting the deep cerebellar nuclei and permits CR generation during the later portion of a trial through disinhibition of the cerebellar nuclei. PMID:15897252

  12. Cerebellar and Spinal Direct Current Stimulation in Children: Computational Modeling of the Induced Electric Field

    PubMed Central

    Fiocchi, Serena; Ravazzani, Paolo; Priori, Alberto; Parazzini, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the specific application of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the cerebellum can modulate cerebellar activity. In parallel, transcutaneous spinal DC stimulation (tsDCS) was found to be able to modulate conduction along the spinal cord and spinal cord functions. Of particular interest is the possible use of these techniques in pediatric age, since many pathologies and injuries, which affect the cerebellar cortex as well as spinal cord circuits, are diffuse in adults as well as in children. Up to now, experimental studies of cerebellar and spinal DC stimulation on children are completely missing and therefore there is a lack of information about the safety of this technique as well as the appropriate dose to be used during the treatment. Therefore, the knowledge of electric quantities induced into the cerebellum and over the spinal cord during cerebellar tDCS and tsDCS, respectively, is required. This work attempts to address this issue by estimating through computational techniques, the electric field distributions induced in the target tissues during the two stimulation techniques applied to different models of children of various ages and gender. In detail, we used four voxel child models, aged between 5- and 8-years. Results revealed that, despite inter-individual differences, the cerebellum is the structure mainly involved by cerebellar tDCS, whereas the electric field generated by tsDCS can reach the spinal cord also in children. Moreover, it was found that there is a considerable spread toward the anterior area of the cerebellum and the brainstem region for cerebellar tDCS and in the spinal nerve for spinal direct current stimulation. Our study therefore predicts that the electric field spreads in complex patterns that strongly depend on individual anatomy, thus giving further insight into safety issues and informing data for pediatric investigations of these stimulation techniques. PMID:27799905

  13. Cerebellar and Spinal Direct Current Stimulation in Children: Computational Modeling of the Induced Electric Field.

    PubMed

    Fiocchi, Serena; Ravazzani, Paolo; Priori, Alberto; Parazzini, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the specific application of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the cerebellum can modulate cerebellar activity. In parallel, transcutaneous spinal DC stimulation (tsDCS) was found to be able to modulate conduction along the spinal cord and spinal cord functions. Of particular interest is the possible use of these techniques in pediatric age, since many pathologies and injuries, which affect the cerebellar cortex as well as spinal cord circuits, are diffuse in adults as well as in children. Up to now, experimental studies of cerebellar and spinal DC stimulation on children are completely missing and therefore there is a lack of information about the safety of this technique as well as the appropriate dose to be used during the treatment. Therefore, the knowledge of electric quantities induced into the cerebellum and over the spinal cord during cerebellar tDCS and tsDCS, respectively, is required. This work attempts to address this issue by estimating through computational techniques, the electric field distributions induced in the target tissues during the two stimulation techniques applied to different models of children of various ages and gender. In detail, we used four voxel child models, aged between 5- and 8-years. Results revealed that, despite inter-individual differences, the cerebellum is the structure mainly involved by cerebellar tDCS, whereas the electric field generated by tsDCS can reach the spinal cord also in children. Moreover, it was found that there is a considerable spread toward the anterior area of the cerebellum and the brainstem region for cerebellar tDCS and in the spinal nerve for spinal direct current stimulation. Our study therefore predicts that the electric field spreads in complex patterns that strongly depend on individual anatomy, thus giving further insight into safety issues and informing data for pediatric investigations of these stimulation techniques.

  14. Sonic hedgehog patterning during cerebellar development.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Annarita; Cerrato, Valentina; Fucà, Elisa; Parmigiani, Elena; Buffo, Annalisa; Leto, Ketty

    2016-01-01

    The morphogenic factor sonic hedgehog (Shh) actively orchestrates many aspects of cerebellar development and maturation. During embryogenesis, Shh signaling is active in the ventricular germinal zone (VZ) and represents an essential signal for proliferation of VZ-derived progenitors. Later, Shh secreted by Purkinje cells sustains the amplification of postnatal neurogenic niches: the external granular layer and the prospective white matter, where excitatory granule cells and inhibitory interneurons are produced, respectively. Moreover, Shh signaling affects Bergmann glial differentiation and promotes cerebellar foliation during development. Here we review the most relevant functions of Shh during cerebellar ontogenesis, underlying its role in physiological and pathological conditions.

  15. Postnatal dendritic morphogenesis of cerebellar basket and stellate cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Spatkowski, Gabriele; Schilling, Karl

    2003-05-01

    Inhibitory interneurons in the molecular layer of the cerebellar cortex play an essential role in cerebellar physiology by providing feed-forward inhibition to efferent Purkinje cells. Morphologic characteristics have been utilized to classify these cells as either basket cells or stellate cells. Conflicting evidence exists as to whether these cells are of distinct lineage and develop by employing discrete genetic programs, or whether their characteristic morphologic differences result from external cues that they encounter only after they have settled in their final territory in the molecular layer. We used primary dissociated cerebellar cultures established from early postnatal mice to study dendritogenesis of basket/stellate cells, identified by immunostaining for parvalbumin, under experimentally controlled conditions. We find that the radial axonal orientation of stem dendrites is non-random, suggesting a cell-intrinsic component defining this morphologic trait. In contrast, the expanse and complexity of basket/stellate cell dendrites is modulated by the granule cell derived neurotrophin, BDNF. BDNF-induced morphogenetic effects decline with ongoing development. Overall, our data do not provide evidence for a distinct lineage or genetic makeup of cerebellar molecular layer inhibitory interneurons.

  16. A cerebellar model for predictive motor control tested in a brain-based device.

    PubMed

    McKinstry, Jeffrey L; Edelman, Gerald M; Krichmar, Jeffrey L

    2006-02-28

    The cerebellum is known to be critical for accurate adaptive control and motor learning. We propose here a mechanism by which the cerebellum may replace reflex control with predictive control. This mechanism is embedded in a learning rule (the delayed eligibility trace rule) in which synapses onto a Purkinje cell or onto a cell in the deep cerebellar nuclei become eligible for plasticity only after a fixed delay from the onset of suprathreshold presynaptic activity. To investigate the proposal that the cerebellum is a general-purpose predictive controller guided by a delayed eligibility trace rule, a computer model based on the anatomy and dynamics of the cerebellum was constructed. It contained components simulating cerebellar cortex and deep cerebellar nuclei, and it received input from a middle temporal visual area and the inferior olive. The model was incorporated in a real-world brain-based device (BBD) built on a Segway robotic platform that learned to traverse curved paths. The BBD learned which visual motion cues predicted impending collisions and used this experience to avoid path boundaries. During learning, the BBD adapted its velocity and turning rate to successfully traverse various curved paths. By examining neuronal activity and synaptic changes during this behavior, we found that the cerebellar circuit selectively responded to motion cues in specific receptive fields of simulated middle temporal visual areas. The system described here prompts several hypotheses about the relationship between perception and motor control and may be useful in the development of general-purpose motor learning systems for machines.

  17. Interference of left and right cerebellar rTMS with procedural learning.

    PubMed

    Torriero, Sara; Oliveri, Massimiliano; Koch, Giacomo; Caltagirone, Carlo; Petrosini, Laura

    2004-11-01

    Increasing evidence suggests cerebellar involvement in procedural learning. To further analyze its role and to assess whether it has a lateralized influence, in the present study we used a repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation interference approach in a group of normal subjects performing a serial reaction time task. We studied 36 normal volunteers: 13 subjects underwent repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on the left cerebellum and performed the task with the right (6 subjects) or left (7 subjects) hand; 10 subjects underwent repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on the right cerebellum and performed the task with the hand ipsilateral (5 subjects) or contralateral (5 subjects) to the stimulation; another 13 subjects served as controls and were not submitted to repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation; 7 of them performed the task with the right hand and 6 with the left hand. The main results show that interference with the activity of the lateral cerebellum induces a significant decrease of procedural learning: Interference with the right cerebellar hemisphere activity induces a significant decrease in procedural learning regardless of the hand used to perform the serial reaction time task, whereas left cerebellar hemisphere activity seems more linked with procedural learning through the ipsilateral hand. In conclusion, the present study shows for the first time that a transient interference with the functions of the cerebellar cortex results in an impairment of procedural learning in normal subjects and it provides new evidences for interhemispheric differences in the lateral cerebellum.

  18. Compensatory striatal-cerebellar connectivity in mild-moderate Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Simioni, Alison C; Dagher, Alain; Fellows, Lesley K

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine depletion in the putamen is associated with altered motor network functional connectivity in people with Parkinson's disease (PD), but the functional significance of these changes remains unclear, attributed to either pathological or compensatory mechanisms in different studies. Here, we examined the effects of PD on dorsal caudal putamen functional connectivity, off and on dopamine replacement therapy (DRT), using resting state fMRI. Motor performance was assessed with the Purdue pegboard task. Twenty-one patients with mild-moderate Parkinson's disease were studied twice, once after an overnight DRT washout and once after the administration of a standard dose of levodopa (Sinemet), and compared to 20 demographically-matched healthy control participants. PD patients off DRT showed increased putamen functional connectivity with both the cerebellum (lobule V) and primary motor cortex (M1), relative to healthy controls. Greater putamen-cerebellar functional connectivity was significantly correlated with better motor performance, whereas greater putamen-M1 functional connectivity was predictive of poorer motor performance. The administration of levodopa improved motor performance in the PD group, as expected, and reduced putamen-cerebellar connectivity to levels comparable to the healthy control group. The strength of putamen-cerebellar functional connectivity continued to predict motor performance in the PD group while on levodopa. These findings argue that increased putamen-M1 functional connectivity reflects a pathological change, deleterious to motor performance. In contrast, increased putamen-cerebellar connectivity reflects a compensatory mechanism.

  19. Long-term supratentorial brain structure and cognitive function following cerebellar tumour resections in childhood.

    PubMed

    Moberget, T; Andersson, S; Lundar, T; Due-Tønnessen, B J; Heldal, A; Endestad, T; Westlye, L T

    2015-03-01

    The cerebellum is connected to extensive regions of the cerebrum, and cognitive deficits following cerebellar lesions may thus be related to disrupted cerebello-cerebral connectivity. Moreover, early cerebellar lesions could affect distal brain development, effectively inducing long-term changes in brain structure and cognitive function. Here, we characterize supratentorial brain structure and cognitive function in 20 adult patients treated for cerebellar tumours in childhood (mean age at surgery: 7.1 years) and 26 matched controls. Relative to controls, patients showed reduced cognitive function and increased grey matter density in bilateral cingulum, left orbitofrontal cortex and the left hippocampus. Within the patient group, increased grey matter density in these regions was associated with decreased performance on tests of processing speed and executive function. Further, diffusion tensor imaging revealed widespread alterations in white matter microstructure in patients. While current ventricle volume (an index of previous hydrocephalus severity it patients) was associated with grey matter density and white matter microstructure in patients, this could only partially account for the observed group differences in brain structure and cognitive function. In conclusion, our results show distal effects of cerebellar lesions on cerebral integrity and wiring, likely caused by a combination of neurodegenerative processes and perturbed neurodevelopment.

  20. Does modulation of the endocannabinoid system have potential therapeutic utility in cerebellar ataxia?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cerebellar ataxias represent a spectrum of disorders which are, however, linked by common symptoms of motor incoordination and typically associated with deficiency in Purkinje cell firing activity and, often, degeneration. Cerebellar ataxias currently lack a curative agent. The endocannabinoid (eCB) system includes eCB compounds and their associated metabolic enzymes, together with cannabinoid receptors, predominantly the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) in the cerebellum; activation of this system in the cerebellar cortex is associated with deficits in motor coordination characteristic of ataxia, effects which can be prevented by CB1R antagonists. Of further interest are various findings that CB1R deficits may also induce a progressive ataxic phenotype. Together these studies suggest that motor coordination is reliant on maintaining the correct balance in eCB system signalling. Recent work also demonstrates deficient cannabinoid signalling in the mouse ‘ducky2J’ model of ataxia. In light of these points, the potential mechanisms whereby cannabinoids may modulate the eCB system to ameliorate dysfunction associated with cerebellar ataxias are considered. PMID:26970080

  1. Promoting Motor Cortical Plasticity with Acute Aerobic Exercise: A Role for Cerebellar Circuits.

    PubMed

    Mang, Cameron S; Brown, Katlyn E; Neva, Jason L; Snow, Nicholas J; Campbell, Kristin L; Boyd, Lara A

    2016-01-01

    Acute aerobic exercise facilitated long-term potentiation-like plasticity in the human primary motor cortex (M1). Here, we investigated the effect of acute aerobic exercise on cerebellar circuits, and their potential contribution to altered M1 plasticity in healthy individuals (age: 24.8 ± 4.1 years). In Experiment   1, acute aerobic exercise reduced cerebellar inhibition (CBI) (n = 10, p = 0.01), elicited by dual-coil paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation. In Experiment   2, we evaluated the facilitatory effects of aerobic exercise on responses to paired associative stimulation, delivered with a 25 ms (PAS25) or 21 ms (PAS21) interstimulus interval (n = 16 per group). Increased M1 excitability evoked by PAS25, but not PAS21, relies on trans-cerebellar sensory pathways. The magnitude of the aerobic exercise effect on PAS response was not significantly different between PAS protocols (interaction effect: p = 0.30); however, planned comparisons indicated that, relative to a period of rest, acute aerobic exercise enhanced the excitatory response to PAS25 (p = 0.02), but not PAS21 (p = 0.30). Thus, the results of these planned comparisons indirectly provide modest evidence that modulation of cerebellar circuits may contribute to exercise-induced increases in M1 plasticity. The findings have implications for developing aerobic exercise strategies to "prime" M1 plasticity for enhanced motor skill learning in applied settings.

  2. Promoting Motor Cortical Plasticity with Acute Aerobic Exercise: A Role for Cerebellar Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Mang, Cameron S.; Brown, Katlyn E.; Neva, Jason L.; Snow, Nicholas J.; Campbell, Kristin L.; Boyd, Lara A.

    2016-01-01

    Acute aerobic exercise facilitated long-term potentiation-like plasticity in the human primary motor cortex (M1). Here, we investigated the effect of acute aerobic exercise on cerebellar circuits, and their potential contribution to altered M1 plasticity in healthy individuals (age: 24.8 ± 4.1 years). In Experiment   1, acute aerobic exercise reduced cerebellar inhibition (CBI) (n = 10, p = 0.01), elicited by dual-coil paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation. In Experiment   2, we evaluated the facilitatory effects of aerobic exercise on responses to paired associative stimulation, delivered with a 25 ms (PAS25) or 21 ms (PAS21) interstimulus interval (n = 16 per group). Increased M1 excitability evoked by PAS25, but not PAS21, relies on trans-cerebellar sensory pathways. The magnitude of the aerobic exercise effect on PAS response was not significantly different between PAS protocols (interaction effect: p = 0.30); however, planned comparisons indicated that, relative to a period of rest, acute aerobic exercise enhanced the excitatory response to PAS25 (p = 0.02), but not PAS21 (p = 0.30). Thus, the results of these planned comparisons indirectly provide modest evidence that modulation of cerebellar circuits may contribute to exercise-induced increases in M1 plasticity. The findings have implications for developing aerobic exercise strategies to “prime” M1 plasticity for enhanced motor skill learning in applied settings. PMID:27127659

  3. Cystic cerebellar astrocytomas in childhood.

    PubMed

    Griffin, T W; Beaufait, D; Blasko, J C

    1979-07-01

    Thirty-nine patients with low grade cystic cerebellar astrocytomas were treated at the University of Washington and Children's Orthopedic Hospital in Seattle, Washington, between 1955 and 1977; 29 were treated with partial or complete resection alone, and 10 received radiation therapy after various types of surgical procedures. With a mean follow-up time of 7 years, the survival rate for patients who had complete resections of their primary disease was 100%. The relapse-free survival rate was 82%. The relapse-free survival rate for patients treated primarily with partial resection alone was 36%. Postoperative irradiation after partial resection for both primary and recurrent disease resulted in a relapse-free survival rate of 83%. If complete tumor excision is not possible, postoperative radiation therapy is recommended following partial resection.

  4. Impact of cerebellar atrophy on cortical gray matter and cerebellar peduncles as assessed by voxel-based morphometry and high angular resolution diffusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, Michael; Olivito, Giusy; Molinari, Marco; Cercignani, Mara; Bozzali, Marco; Leggio, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Summary In recent years the cerebellum has been attributed a more important role in higher-level functions than previously believed. We examined a cohort of patients suffering from cerebellar atrophy resulting in ataxia, with two main objectives: first to investigate which regions of the cerebrum were affected by the cerebellar degeneration, and second to assess whether diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) metrics within the medial (MCP) and superior cerebellar peduncle (SCP) – namely fractional anisotropy (FA) and radial diffusivity (RD) – could be used as a biomarker in patients with this condition. Structural and dMRI data of seven patients with cerebellar atrophy (2 with spinocerebellar atrophy type 2, 1 with Friedreich’s ataxia, 4 with idiopathic cerebellar ataxia) and no visible cortical lesions or cortical atrophy were investigated with Freesurfer and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of gray matter (GM) as well as MCP and SCP FA maps. Correlations of MCP and SCP mean FA with ataxia scores and subscores were also evaluated. Freesurfer showed that patients had significantly reduced volume of the thalamus, ventral diencephalon and pallidum. VBM also demonstrated significantly lower local GM volumes in patients, notably in the head of the caudate nucleus, posterior cingulate gyrus and orbitofrontal cortex bilaterally, as well as in Broca’s area in the left hemisphere, and a significant increase in RD in the MCP and SCP of both hemispheres. A significant correlation was found between MCP mean FA and total ataxia score (R=−0.7, p=0.03), and subscores for kinetic functions (R=−0.74, p=0.03) and oculomotor disorders (R=−0.70, p=0.04). The regions of the cerebrum found to have significantly lower local GM volumes have been described to be involved in higher-level cerebellar functions such as initiation of voluntary movements, emotional control, memory retrieval and general cognition. Our findings corroborate recent research pointing to a more

  5. Genetic manipulation of cerebellar granule neurons in vitro and in vivo to study neuronal morphology and migration.

    PubMed

    Holubowska, Anna; Mukherjee, Chaitali; Vadhvani, Mayur; Stegmüller, Judith

    2014-03-17

    Developmental events in the brain including neuronal morphogenesis and migration are highly orchestrated processes. In vitro and in vivo analyses allow for an in-depth characterization to identify pathways involved in these events. Cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) that are derived from the developing cerebellum are an ideal model system that allows for morphological analyses. Here, we describe a method of how to genetically manipulate CGNs and how to study axono- and dendritogenesis of individual neurons. With this method the effects of RNA interference, overexpression or small molecules can be compared to control neurons. In addition, the rodent cerebellar cortex is an easily accessible in vivo system owing to its predominant postnatal development. We also present an in vivo electroporation technique to genetically manipulate the developing cerebella and describe subsequent cerebellar analyses to assess neuronal morphology and migration.

  6. On the Effect of Sex on Prefrontal and Cerebellar Neurometabolites in Healthy Adults: An MRS Study

    PubMed Central

    Endres, Dominique; Tebartz van Elst, Ludger; Feige, Bernd; Backenecker, Stephan; Nickel, Kathrin; Bubl, Anna; Lange, Thomas; Mader, Irina; Maier, Simon; Perlov, Evgeniy

    2016-01-01

    In neuropsychiatric research, the aspects of sex have received increasing attention over the past decade. With regard to the neurometabolic differences in the prefrontal cortex and the cerebellum of both men and women, we performed a magnetic resonance spectroscopic (MRS) study of a large group of healthy subjects. For neurometabolic measurements, we used single-voxel proton MRS. The voxels of interest (VOI) were placed in the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex (pACC) and the left cerebellar hemisphere. Absolute quantification of creatine (Cre), total choline (t-Cho), glutamate and glutamine (Glx), N-acetylaspartate, and myo-inositol (mI) was performed. Thirty-three automatically matched ACCs and 31 cerebellar male–female pairs were statistically analyzed. We found no significant neurometabolic differences in the pACC region (Wilks' lambda: p = 0.657). In the left cerebellar region, we detected significant variations between the male and female groups (p = 0.001). Specifically, we detected significantly higher Cre (p = 0.005) and t-Cho (p = 0.000) levels in men. Additionally, males tended to have higher Glx and mI concentrations. This is the first study to report neurometabolic sex differences in the cerebellum. The effects of sexual hormones might have influenced our findings. Our data indicates the importance of adjusting for the confounding effects of sex in MRS studies. PMID:27531975

  7. Evidence for a motor somatotopy in the cerebellar dentate nucleus--an FMRI study in humans.

    PubMed

    Küper, Michael; Thürling, Markus; Stefanescu, Roxana; Maderwald, Stefan; Roths, Johannes; Elles, Hans G; Ladd, Mark E; Diedrichsen, Jörn; Timmann, Dagmar

    2012-11-01

    Previous anatomical studies in monkeys have shown that forelimb motor representation is located caudal to hindlimb representation within the dorso-rostral dentate nucleus. Here we investigate human dentate nucleus motor somatotopy by means of ultra-highfield (7 T) functional magnetic brain imaging (fMRI). Twenty five young healthy males participated in the study. Simple finger and foot movement tasks were performed to identify dentate nucleus motor areas. Recently developed normalization procedures for group analyses were used for the cerebellar cortex and the cerebellar dentate nucleus. Cortical activations were in good accordance with the known somatotopy of the human cerebellar cortex. Dentate nucleus activations following motor tasks were found in particular in the ipsilateral dorso-rostral nucleus. Activations were also present in other parts of the nucleus including the contralateral side, and there was some overlap between the body part representations. Within the ipsilateral dorso-rostral dentate, finger activations were located caudally compared to foot movement-related activations in fMRI group analysis. Likewise, the centre of gravity (COG) for the finger activation was more caudal than the COG of the foot activation across participants. A multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) on the x, y, and z coordinates of the COG indicated that this difference was significant (P = 0.043). These results indicate that in humans, the lower and upper limbs are arranged rostro-caudally in the dorsal aspect of the dentate nucleus, which is consistent with studies in non-human primates.

  8. Consensus Paper: Radiological Biomarkers of Cerebellar Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Baldarçara, Leonardo; Currie, Stuart; Hadjivassiliou, M.; Hoggard, Nigel; Jack, Allison; Jackowski, Andrea P.; Mascalchi, Mario; Parazzini, Cecilia; Reetz, Kathrin; Righini, Andrea; Schulz, Jörg B.; Vella, Alessandra; Webb, Sara Jane; Habas, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary and sporadic cerebellar ataxias represent a vast and still growing group of diseases whose diagnosis and differentiation cannot only rely on clinical evaluation. Brain imaging including magnetic resonance (MR) and nuclear medicine techniques allows for characterization of structural and functional abnormalities underlying symptomatic ataxias. These methods thus constitute a potential source of radiological biomarkers, which could be used to identify these diseases and differentiate subgroups of them, and to assess their severity and their evolution. Such biomarkers mainly comprise qualitative and quantitative data obtained from MR including proton spectroscopy, diffusion imaging, tractography, voxel-based morphometry, functional imaging during task execution or in a resting state, and from SPETC and PET with several radiotracers. In the current article, we aim to illustrate briefly some applications of these neuroimaging tools to evaluation of cerebellar disorders such as inherited cerebellar ataxia, fetal developmental malformations, and immune-mediated cerebellar diseases and of neurodegenerative or early-developing diseases, such as dementia and autism in which cerebellar involvement is an emerging feature. Although these radiological biomarkers appear promising and helpful to better understand ataxia-related anatomical and physiological impairments, to date, very few of them have turned out to be specific for a given ataxia with atrophy of the cerebellar system being the main and the most usual alteration being observed. Consequently, much remains to be done to establish sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of available MR and nuclear medicine features as diagnostic, progression and surrogate biomarkers in clinical routine. PMID:25382714

  9. Cerebellar function and ischemic brain lesions in migraine patients from the general population.

    PubMed

    Koppen, Hille; Boele, Henk-Jan; Palm-Meinders, Inge H; Koutstaal, Bastiaan J; Horlings, Corinne Gc; Koekkoek, Bas K; van der Geest, Jos; Smit, Albertine E; van Buchem, Mark A; Launer, Lenore J; Terwindt, Gisela M; Bloem, Bas R; Kruit, Mark C; Ferrari, Michel D; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2017-02-01

    Objective The objective of this article is to obtain detailed quantitative assessment of cerebellar function and structure in unselected migraine patients and controls from the general population. Methods A total of 282 clinically well-defined participants (migraine with aura n = 111; migraine without aura n = 89; non-migraine controls n = 82; age range 43-72; 72% female) from a population-based study were subjected to a range of sensitive and validated cerebellar tests that cover functions of all main parts of the cerebellar cortex, including cerebrocerebellum, spinocerebellum, and vestibulocerebellum. In addition, all participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain to screen for cerebellar lesions. As a positive control, the same cerebellar tests were conducted in 13 patients with familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1; age range 19-64; 69% female) all carrying a CACNA1A mutation known to affect cerebellar function. Results MRI revealed cerebellar ischemic lesions in 17/196 (8.5%) migraine patients and 3/79 (4%) controls, which were always located in the posterior lobe except for one control. With regard to the cerebellar tests, there were no differences between migraine patients with aura, migraine patients without aura, and controls for the: (i) Purdue-pegboard test for fine motor skills (assembly scores p = 0.1); (ii) block-design test for visuospatial ability (mean scaled scores p = 0.2); (iii) prism-adaptation task for limb learning (shift scores p = 0.8); (iv) eyeblink-conditioning task for learning-dependent timing (peak-time p = 0.1); and (v) body-sway test for balance capabilities (pitch velocity score under two-legs stance condition p = 0.5). Among migraine patients, those with cerebellar ischaemic lesions performed worse than those without lesions on the assembly scores of the pegboard task ( p < 0.005), but not on the primary outcome measures of the other tasks. Compared with controls and non

  10. Introducing treatment strategy for cerebellar ataxia in mutant med mice: combination of acetazolamide and 4-aminopyridine.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Samira; Abbasi, Ataollah; Sarbaz, Yashar

    2014-02-01

    Purkinje neurons are the sole output neuron of the cerebellar cortex, and they generate high-frequency action potentials. Electrophysiological dysfunction of Purkinje neurons causes cerebellar ataxia. Mutant med mice have the lack of expression of the Scn8a gene. This gene encodes the NaV1.6 protein. In med Purkinje neurons, regular high-frequency firing is slowed, and med mice are ataxic. The aim of this study was to propose the neuroprotective drugs which could be useful for ataxia treatment in med mice, and to investigate the neuroprotective effects of these drugs by simulation. Simulation results showed that Kv4 channel inhibitors and BK channel activators restored the normal electrophysiological properties of the med Purkinje neurons. 4-Aminopyridine (4-AP) and acetazolamide (ACTZ) were proposed as neuroprotective drugs for Kv4 channel inhibitor and BK channel activator, respectively.

  11. Cerebellar and Motor Cortical Transcranial Stimulation Decrease Levodopa-Induced Dyskinesias in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ferrucci, Roberta; Cortese, Francesca; Bianchi, Marta; Pittera, Dario; Turrone, Rosanna; Bocci, Tommaso; Borroni, Barbara; Vergari, Maurizio; Cogiamanian, Filippo; Ardolino, Gianluca; Di Fonzo, Alessio; Padovani, Alessandro; Priori, Alberto

    2016-02-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive technique for inducing prolonged functional changes in the human cerebral cortex. This simple and safe neurostimulation technique for modulating motor functions in Parkinson's disease could extend treatment option for patients with movement disorders. We assessed whether tDCS applied daily over the cerebellum (cerebellar tDCS) and motor cortex (M1-tDCS) improves motor and cognitive symptoms and levodopa-induced dyskinesias in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Nine patients (aged 60-85 years; four women; Hoehn & Yahr scale score 2-3) diagnosed as having idiopathic PD were recruited. To evaluate how tDCS (cerebellar tDCS or M1-tDCS) affects motor and cognitive function in PD, we delivered bilateral anodal (2 mA, 20 min, five consecutive days) and sham tDCS, in random order, in three separate experimental sessions held at least 1 month apart. In each session, as outcome variables, patients underwent the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS III and IV) and cognitive testing before treatment (baseline), when treatment ended on day 5 (T1), 1 week later (T2), and then 4 weeks later (T3), at the same time each day. After patients received anodal cerebellar tDCS and M1-tDCS for five days, the UPDRS IV (dyskinesias section) improved (p < 0.001). Conversely, sham tDCS, cerebellar tDCS, and M1-tDCS left the other variables studied unchanged (p > 0.05). Despite the small sample size, our preliminary results show that anodal tDCS applied for five consecutive days over the motor cortical areas and cerebellum improves parkinsonian patients' levodopa-induced dyskinesias.

  12. Cerebellar contribution to higher and lower order rule learning and cognitive flexibility in mice.

    PubMed

    Dickson, P E; Cairns, J; Goldowitz, D; Mittleman, G

    2017-03-14

    Cognitive flexibility has traditionally been considered a frontal lobe function. However, converging evidence suggests involvement of a larger brain circuit which includes the cerebellum. Reciprocal pathways connecting the cerebellum to the prefrontal cortex provide a biological substrate through which the cerebellum may modulate higher cognitive functions, and it has been observed that cognitive inflexibility and cerebellar pathology co-occur in psychiatric disorders (e.g., autism, schizophrenia, addiction). However, the degree to which the cerebellum contributes to distinct forms of cognitive flexibility and rule learning is unknown. We tested lurcher↔wildtype aggregation chimeras which lose 0-100% of cerebellar Purkinje cells during development on a touchscreen-mediated attentional set-shifting task to assess the contribution of the cerebellum to higher and lower order rule learning and cognitive flexibility. Purkinje cells, the sole output of the cerebellar cortex, ranged from 0 to 108,390 in tested mice. Reversal learning and extradimensional set-shifting were impaired in mice with⩾95% Purkinje cell loss. Cognitive deficits were unrelated to motor deficits in ataxic mice. Acquisition of a simple visual discrimination and an attentional-set were unrelated to Purkinje cells. A positive relationship was observed between Purkinje cells and errors when exemplars from a novel, non-relevant dimension were introduced. Collectively, these data suggest that the cerebellum contributes to higher order cognitive flexibility, lower order cognitive flexibility, and attention to novel stimuli, but not the acquisition of higher and lower order rules. These data indicate that the cerebellar pathology observed in psychiatric disorders may underlie deficits involving cognitive flexibility and attention to novel stimuli.

  13. Cell death and neurodegeneration in the postnatal development of cerebellar vermis in normal and Reeler mice.

    PubMed

    Castagna, Claudia; Merighi, Adalberto; Lossi, Laura

    2016-09-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) was demonstrated in neurons and glia in normal brain development, plasticity, and aging, but also in neurodegeneration. (Macro)autophagy, characterized by cytoplasmic vacuolization and activation of lysosomal hydrolases, and apoptosis, typically entailing cell shrinkage, chromatin and nuclear condensation, are the two more common forms of PCD. Their underlying intracellular pathways are partly shared and neurons can die following both modalities, according to the type of death-triggering stimulus. Reelin is an extracellular protein necessary for proper neuronal migration and brain lamination. In the mutant Reeler mouse, its absence causes neuronal mispositioning, with a notable degree of cerebellar hypoplasia that was tentatively related to an increase in PCD. We have carried out an ultrastructural analysis on the occurrence and type of postnatal PCD affecting the cerebellar neurons in normal and Reeler mice. In the forming cerebellar cortex, PCD took the form of apoptosis or autophagy and mainly affected the cerebellar granule cells (CGCs). Densities of apoptotic CGCs were comparable in both mouse strains at P0-P10, while, in mutants, they increased to become significantly higher at P15. In WT mice the density of autophagic neurons did not display statistically significant differences in the time interval examined in this study, whereas it was reduced in Reeler in the P0-P10 interval, but increased at P15. Besides CGCs, the Purkinje neurons also displayed autophagic features in both WT and Reeler mice. Therefore, cerebellar neurons undergo different types of PCD and a Reelin deficiency affects the type and degree of neuronal death during postnatal development of the cerebellum.

  14. The dynamic relationship between cerebellar Purkinje cell simple spikes and the spikelet number of complex spikes

    PubMed Central

    Burroughs, Amelia; Wise, Andrew K.; Xiao, Jianqiang; Houghton, Conor; Tang, Tianyu; Suh, Colleen Y.; Lang, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Purkinje cells are the sole output of the cerebellar cortex and fire two distinct types of action potential: simple spikes and complex spikes.Previous studies have mainly considered complex spikes as unitary events, even though the waveform is composed of varying numbers of spikelets.The extent to which differences in spikelet number affect simple spike activity (and vice versa) remains unclear.We found that complex spikes with greater numbers of spikelets are preceded by higher simple spike firing rates but, following the complex spike, simple spikes are reduced in a manner that is graded with spikelet number.This dynamic interaction has important implications for cerebellar information processing, and suggests that complex spike spikelet number may maintain Purkinje cells within their operational range. Abstract Purkinje cells are central to cerebellar function because they form the sole output of the cerebellar cortex. They exhibit two distinct types of action potential: simple spikes and complex spikes. It is widely accepted that interaction between these two types of impulse is central to cerebellar cortical information processing. Previous investigations of the interactions between simple spikes and complex spikes have mainly considered complex spikes as unitary events. However, complex spikes are composed of an initial large spike followed by a number of secondary components, termed spikelets. The number of spikelets within individual complex spikes is highly variable and the extent to which differences in complex spike spikelet number affects simple spike activity (and vice versa) remains poorly understood. In anaesthetized adult rats, we have found that Purkinje cells recorded from the posterior lobe vermis and hemisphere have high simple spike firing frequencies that precede complex spikes with greater numbers of spikelets. This finding was also evident in a small sample of Purkinje cells recorded from the posterior lobe hemisphere in awake

  15. A case-control proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study confirms cerebellar dysfunction in benign adult familial myoclonic epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Long, Lili; Song, Yanmin; Zhang, Linlin; Hu, Chongyu; Gong, Jian; Xu, Lin; Long, Hongyu; Zhou, Luo; Zhang, Yunci; Zhang, Yong; Xiao, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Background Benign adult familial myoclonic epilepsy (BAFME) is a rare form of epilepsy syndrome. The pathogenesis of BAFME remains unclear, though it seems to involve dysfunction of the cerebellum. Objectives The purpose of this study was to use proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) to investigate whether neurochemical changes underlie abnormal brain function in BAFME. Methods Twelve BAFME patients from one family and 12 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled in this study. The ratios of NAA/Cr, NAA/Cho, Cho/Cr, and NAA/(Cr+Cho) were analyzed. Results The BAFME patients exhibited a decreased N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/choline (Cho) ratio in the cerebellar cortex, whereas there were no significant differences in the NAA/creatine (Cr), Cho/Cr, and NAA/(Cr+Cho) ratios compared with healthy controls. There were no significant differences in 1H-MRS values in the frontal cortex or thalamus between the BAFME patients and controls. No correlation was detected between the NAA/Cho ratio in the cerebellar cortex and disease duration, myoclonus severity, or tremor severity. Conclusion Our results indicate clear cerebellar dysfunction in BAFME. 1H-MRS is a useful tool for the diagnosis of BAFME in combination with family history and electrophysiological examination. PMID:25750529

  16. The cerebellum and cognition: cerebellar lesions do not impair spatial working memory or visual associative learning in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Nixon, P D; Passingham, R E

    1999-11-01

    Anatomical studies in non-human primates have shown that the cerebellum has prominent connections with the dorsal, but not the ventral, visual pathways of the cerebral cortex. Recently, it has been shown that the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DPFC) and cerebellum are interconnected in monkeys. This has been cited in support of the view that the cerebellum may be involved in cognitive functions, e.g. working memory. Six monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) were therefore trained on a classic test of working memory, the spatial delayed alternation (SDA) task, and also on a visual concurrent discrimination (VCD) task. Excitotoxic lesions were made in the lateral cerebellar nuclei, bilaterally, in three of the animals. When retested after surgery the lesioned animals were as quick to relearn both tasks as the remaining unoperated animals. However, when the response times (RT) for each task were directly compared, on the SDA task the monkeys with cerebellar lesions were relatively slow to decide where to respond. We argue that on the SDA task animals can prepare their responses between trials whereas this is not possible on the VCD task, and that the cerebellar lesions may disrupt this response preparation. We subsequently made bilateral lesions in the DPFC of the control animals and retested them on the SDA task. These monkeys failed to relearn the task. The results show that, unlike the dorsal prefrontal cortex, the cerebellum is not essential for working memory or the executive processes that are necessary for correct performance, though it may contribute to the preparation of responses.

  17. Secondary orthostatic tremor in the setting of cerebellar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Sarva, Harini; Severt, William Lawrence; Jacoby, Nuri; Pullman, Seth L; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel

    2016-05-01

    Orthostatic tremor (OT) and cerebellar ataxia are uncommon and difficult to treat. We present two patients with OT and cerebellar degeneration, one of whom had spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 and a good treatment response.

  18. Neurodevelopmental malformations of the cerebellar vermis in genetically engineered rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cerebellar vermis is particularly vulnerable to neurodevelopmental malformations in humans and rodents. Sprague-Dawley, and Long-Evans rats exhibit spontaneous cerebellar malformations consisting of heterotopic neurons and glia in the molecular layer of the vermis. Malformati...

  19. Encoding of whisker input by cerebellar Purkinje cells

    PubMed Central

    Bosman, Laurens W J; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan K E; Shapiro, Joël; Rijken, Bianca F M; Zandstra, Froukje; van der Ende, Barry; Owens, Cullen B; Potters, Jan-Willem; de Gruijl, Jornt R; Ruigrok, Tom J H; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2010-01-01

    The cerebellar cortex is crucial for sensorimotor integration. Sensorimotor inputs converge on cerebellar Purkinje cells via two afferent pathways: the climbing fibre pathway triggering complex spikes, and the mossy fibre–parallel fibre pathway, modulating the simple spike activities of Purkinje cells. We used, for the first time, the mouse whisker system as a model system to study the encoding of somatosensory input by Purkinje cells. We show that most Purkinje cells in ipsilateral crus 1 and crus 2 of awake mice respond to whisker stimulation with complex spike and/or simple spike responses. Single-whisker stimulation in anaesthetised mice revealed that the receptive fields of complex spike and simple spike responses were strikingly different. Complex spike responses, which proved to be sensitive to the amplitude, speed and direction of whisker movement, were evoked by only one or a few whiskers. Simple spike responses, which were not affected by the direction of movement, could be evoked by many individual whiskers. The receptive fields of Purkinje cells were largely intermingled, and we suggest that this facilitates the rapid integration of sensory inputs from different sources. Furthermore, we describe that individual Purkinje cells, at least under anaesthesia, may be bound in two functional ensembles based on the receptive fields and the synchrony of the complex spike and simple spike responses. The ‘complex spike ensembles’ were oriented in the sagittal plane, following the anatomical organization of the climbing fibres, while the ‘simple spike ensembles’ were oriented in the transversal plane, as are the beams of parallel fibres. PMID:20724365

  20. The cerebellar serotoninergic system and its possible involvement in cerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Trouillas, P

    1993-05-01

    A review concerning the characteristics of the cerebellar serotoninergic system is presented. In rat, cat and oppossum, the perikarya of origin are located in the brain stem raphe nuclei and in other brainstem structures. The projections to the cerebellar layers and deep nuclei include synaptic connections, but also non synaptic terminals, especially in a diffuse cortical plexus. Serotoninergic receptors have been described: 5-HT1B in the molecular layer and 5-HT2 in the inferior olive. Serotonin exerts neurophysiological effects on several target cells, directly or indirectly, presynaptically or postsynaptically. A modulatory effect on Purkinje cells is well documented. In thiamine deprived animals, a specific serotoninergic cerebellar syndrome includes a selective degeneration of the serotoninergic cerebellar system, an increase of the 5-HIAA cerebellar values and an exaggerated serotoninergic turnover. In human heredoataxias (Friedreich's ataxia and cerebellar cortical atrophy), serotoninergic disturbances have been observed in the CSF, including low 5-HIAA values and an increased serotoninergic turnover. Therapeutic results have been obtained with L-5-HTP, a precursor of serotonin, in several conditions presenting cerebellar ataxia. L-5-HTP resistance of olivopontocerebellar atrophies may be explained by the destruction of serotonin-sensitive target cells, especially Purkinje cells.

  1. Landmark based shape analysis for cerebellar ataxia classification and cerebellar atrophy pattern visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhen; Abulnaga, S. Mazdak; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Onyike, Chiadi; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction can lead to a wide range of movement disorders. Studying the cerebellar atrophy pattern associated with different cerebellar disease types can potentially help in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment planning. In this paper, we present a landmark based shape analysis pipeline to classify healthy control and different ataxia types and to visualize the characteristic cerebellar atrophy patterns associated with different types. A highly informative feature representation of the cerebellar structure is constructed by extracting dense homologous landmarks on the boundary surfaces of cerebellar sub-structures. A diagnosis group classifier based on this representation is built using partial least square dimension reduction and regularized linear discriminant analysis. The characteristic atrophy pattern for an ataxia type is visualized by sampling along the discriminant direction between healthy controls and the ataxia type. Experimental results show that the proposed method can successfully classify healthy controls and different ataxia types. The visualized cerebellar atrophy patterns were consistent with the regional volume decreases observed in previous studies, but the proposed method provides intuitive and detailed understanding about changes of overall size and shape of the cerebellum, as well as that of individual lobules.

  2. Landmark Based Shape Analysis for Cerebellar Ataxia Classification and Cerebellar Atrophy Pattern Visualization

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhen; Abulnaga, S. Mazdak; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Onyike, Chiadi; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction can lead to a wide range of movement disorders. Studying the cerebellar atrophy pattern associated with different cerebellar disease types can potentially help in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment planning. In this paper, we present a landmark based shape analysis pipeline to classify healthy control and different ataxia types and to visualize the characteristic cerebellar atrophy patterns associated with different types. A highly informative feature representation of the cerebellar structure is constructed by extracting dense homologous landmarks on the boundary surfaces of cerebellar sub-structures. A diagnosis group classifier based on this representation is built using partial least square dimension reduction and regularized linear discriminant analysis. The characteristic atrophy pattern for an ataxia type is visualized by sampling along the discriminant direction between healthy controls and the ataxia type. Experimental results show that the proposed method can successfully classify healthy controls and different ataxia types. The visualized cerebellar atrophy patterns were consistent with the regional volume decreases observed in previous studies, but the proposed method provides intuitive and detailed understanding about changes of overall size and shape of the cerebellum, as well as that of individual lobules. PMID:27303111

  3. Morphine-induced changes in cerebral and cerebellar nitric oxide synthase activity.

    PubMed

    Leza, J C; Lizasoain, I; San-Martín-Clark, O; Lorenzo, P

    1995-10-04

    The effect of acute and chronic morphine treatment on nitric oxide (NO) synthase activity (determined by the rate of conversion of [14C]arginine into [14C]citrulline) on mouse brain was studied. Acute morphine treatment induced an increased in Ca2+ -dependent NO synthase in cerebellum. This effect was blocked by coadministration with naloxone. Chronic morphine treatment (by s.c. pellet) also produced an increase in cerebellar NO synthase, with a maximum on the second day of implantation. No significant changes were found in frontal cortex and forebrain during acute or chronic morphine treatment. The relationship between opiate effects and the L-arginine: NO pathway is discussed.

  4. [Study of cerebellar infarction with isolated vertigo].

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Ai; Enomoto, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Kaoru; Kimura, Yu; Koizuka, Izumi; Tsukuda, Mamoru

    2010-07-01

    Isolated vertigo is generally attributed to labyrinthine disease, but may also signal otherwise asymptomatic cerebellar infarction. Of 309 subjects admitted between April 2004 and March 2009 for the single symptom of acute vertigo initially thought to be labyrinthine, four were found to have cerebellar infarction of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery area (PICA). All were over 60 years old and had risk factors including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, arrhythmia, and/or hyperlipidemia. Two had trunk ataxia, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showing infarction within a few days. The other two could walk without apparent trunk ataxia, however, it took 4 to 7 days to find the infarction, mainly through neurological, neurootological, and MRI findings. Neurologically, astasia, dysbasia or trunk ataxia were important signs. Neurootologically, nystagmus and electronystagmographic testing involving eye tracking, saccade, and optokinetic patttens were useful.

  5. 21 CFR 882.5820 - Implanted cerebellar stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implanted cerebellar stimulator. 882.5820 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5820 Implanted cerebellar stimulator. (a) Identification. An implanted cerebellar stimulator is a device used to...

  6. The Cerebellar Mutism Syndrome and Its Relation to Cerebellar Cognitive Function and the Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Elizabeth M.; Walsh, Karin S.; Khademian, Zarir P.; Keating, Robert F.; Packer, Roger J.

    2008-01-01

    The postoperative cerebellar mutism syndrome (CMS), consisting of diminished speech output, hypotonia, ataxia, and emotional lability, occurs after surgery in up to 25% of patients with medulloblastoma and occasionally after removal of other posterior fossa tumors. Although the mutism is transient, speech rarely normalizes and the syndrome is…

  7. Cerebellar Structure and Function in Male Wistar-Kyoto Hyperactive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Thanellou, Alexandra; Green, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that the Wistar-Kyoto Hyperactive (WKHA) rat strain may model some of the behavioral features associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We have shown that, in cerebellar-dependent eyeblink conditioning, WKHA emit eyeblink CRs with shortened onset latencies. To further characterize the shortened CR onset latencies seen in WKHA rats, we examined 750-ms delay conditioning with either a tone CS or a light CS, we extended acquisition training, and we included Wistar rats as an additional, outbred control strain. Our results indicated that WKHAs learned more quickly and showed a shortened CR onset latency to a tone CS compared to both Wistar-Kyoto Hypertensive (WKHT) and Wistars. WKHAs and Wistars show a lengthening of CR onset latency over conditioning with a tone CS and an increasing confinement of CRs to the later part of the tone CS (inhibition of delay). WKHAs learned more quickly to a light CS only in comparison to WKHTs and showed a shortened CR onset latency only in comparison to Wistars. Wistars showed an increasing confinement of CRs to the late part of the light CS over conditioning. We used unbiased stereology to estimate the number of Purkinje and granule cells in the cerebellar cortex of the three strains. Our results indicated that WKHAs have more granule cells than Wistars and WKHTs and more Purkinje cells than Wistars. Results are discussed in terms of CS processing and cerebellar cortical contributions to EBC. PMID:23398437

  8. [A case of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration associated with small cell lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Nakashima, N; Takayama, K; Nakanishi, Y; Ishihara, S; Tanaka, T; Kaneko, Y; Takano, K; Inoue, K; Hara, N

    1999-02-01

    Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD) is a clinical syndrome and known to be occasionally associated with small cell carcinoma of the lung (SCLC). PCD usually affects patients before the cancer is evident. The disorder evolves subacutely, and causes severe pancerebellar dysfunction. In this paper, we report a case of PCD associated with SCLC. A 65-year-old man presenting with 2 weeks of progressive vertigo, gait ataxia, and speech disturbance, was readmitted to our hospital. He had earlier been given a diagnosis of SCLC, oat cell carcinoma, and had undergone high-dose chemotherapy with peripheral blood stem cell transplantation during his first admission. Following that treatment regimen, the tumor disappeared completely and the patient had been in remission. Based on neurological findings and the presence of anti-neuronal antibodies a diagnosis of PCD was made. Although cyclophosphamide (500 mg/m2) was administered, the patient experienced no relief of his cerebellar ataxia. Six months afer readmission, he died of cardiac tamponade due to malignant pericarditis. A histological examination at autopsy found few Purkinje cells and a proliferation of Bergmann's astrocytes in the cerebellar cortex. These findings were consistent with the diagnosis of PCD.

  9. Cerebellar structure and function in male Wistar-Kyoto hyperactive rats.

    PubMed

    Thanellou, Alexandra; Green, John T

    2013-04-01

    Previous research has suggested that the Wistar-Kyoto Hyperactive (WKHA) rat strain may model some of the behavioral features associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We have shown that, in cerebellar-dependent eyeblink conditioning, male WKHAs emit eyeblink CRs with shortened onset latencies. To further characterize the shortened CR onset latencies seen in male WKHA rats, we examined 750-ms delay conditioning with either a tone conditional stimulus (CS) or a light CS, we extended acquisition training, and we included Wistar rats as an additional, outbred control strain. Our results indicated that WKHAs learned more quickly and showed a shortened CR onset latency to a tone CS compared to both Wistar-Kyoto Hypertensive (WKHT) and Wistars. WKHAs and Wistars show a lengthening of CR onset latency over conditioning with a tone CS and an increasing confinement of CRs to the later part of the tone CS (inhibition of delay). WKHAs learned more quickly to a light CS only in comparison to WKHTs, and showed a shortened CR onset latency only in comparison to Wistars. Wistars showed an increasing confinement of CRs to the late part of the light CS over conditioning. We used unbiased stereology to estimate the number of Purkinje and granule cells in the cerebellar cortex of the three strains. Our results indicated that WKHAs have more granule cells than Wistars and WKHTs and more Purkinje cells than Wistars. Results are discussed in terms of CS processing and cerebellar cortical contributions to EBC.

  10. Modeled changes of cerebellar activity in mutant mice are predictive of their learning impairments

    PubMed Central

    Badura, Aleksandra; Clopath, Claudia; Schonewille, Martijn; De Zeeuw, Chris I.

    2016-01-01

    Translating neuronal activity to measurable behavioral changes has been a long-standing goal of systems neuroscience. Recently, we have developed a model of phase-reversal learning of the vestibulo-ocular reflex, a well-established, cerebellar-dependent task. The model, comprising both the cerebellar cortex and vestibular nuclei, reproduces behavioral data and accounts for the changes in neural activity during learning in wild type mice. Here, we used our model to predict Purkinje cell spiking as well as behavior before and after learning of five different lines of mutant mice with distinct cell-specific alterations of the cerebellar cortical circuitry. We tested these predictions by obtaining electrophysiological data depicting changes in neuronal spiking. We show that our data is largely consistent with the model predictions for simple spike modulation of Purkinje cells and concomitant behavioral learning in four of the mutants. In addition, our model accurately predicts a shift in simple spike activity in a mutant mouse with a brainstem specific mutation. This combination of electrophysiological and computational techniques opens a possibility of predicting behavioral impairments from neural activity. PMID:27805050

  11. Convergence of pontine and proprioceptive streams onto multimodal cerebellar granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cheng-Chiu; Sugino, Ken; Shima, Yasuyuki; Guo, Caiying; Bai, Suxia; Mensh, Brett D; Nelson, Sacha B; Hantman, Adam W

    2013-01-01

    Cerebellar granule cells constitute the majority of neurons in the brain and are the primary conveyors of sensory and motor-related mossy fiber information to Purkinje cells. The functional capability of the cerebellum hinges on whether individual granule cells receive mossy fiber inputs from multiple precerebellar nuclei or are instead unimodal; this distinction is unresolved. Using cell-type-specific projection mapping with synaptic resolution, we observed the convergence of separate sensory (upper body proprioceptive) and basilar pontine pathways onto individual granule cells and mapped this convergence across cerebellar cortex. These findings inform the long-standing debate about the multimodality of mammalian granule cells and substantiate their associative capacity predicted in the Marr-Albus theory of cerebellar function. We also provide evidence that the convergent basilar pontine pathways carry corollary discharges from upper body motor cortical areas. Such merging of related corollary and sensory streams is a critical component of circuit models of predictive motor control. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00400.001 PMID:23467508

  12. Identification of CHIP as a Novel Causative Gene for Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yuting; Wang, Junling; Li, Jia-Da; Ren, Haigang; Guan, Wenjuan; He, Miao; Yan, Weiqian; Zhou, Ying; Hu, Zhengmao; Zhang, Jianguo; Xiao, Jingjing; Su, Zheng; Dai, Meizhi; Wang, Jun; Jiang, Hong; Guo, Jifeng; Zhou, Yafang; Zhang, Fufeng; Li, Nan; Du, Juan; Xu, Qian; Hu, Yacen; Pan, Qian; Shen, Lu; Wang, Guanghui; Xia, Kun; Zhang, Zhuohua; Tang, Beisha

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias are a group of neurodegenerative disorders that are characterized by complex clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Although more than 20 disease-causing genes have been identified, many patients are still currently without a molecular diagnosis. In a two-generation autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia family, we mapped a linkage to a minimal candidate region on chromosome 16p13.3 flanked by single-nucleotide polymorphism markers rs11248850 and rs1218762. By combining the defined linkage region with the whole-exome sequencing results, we identified a homozygous mutation (c.493CT) in CHIP (NM_005861) in this family. Using Sanger sequencing, we also identified two compound heterozygous mutations (c.389AT/c.441GT; c.621C>G/c.707GC) in CHIP gene in two additional kindreds. These mutations co-segregated exactly with the disease in these families and were not observed in 500 control subjects with matched ancestry. CHIP colocalized with NR2A, a subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, in the cerebellum, pons, medulla oblongata, hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Wild-type, but not disease-associated mutant CHIPs promoted the degradation of NR2A, which may underlie the pathogenesis of ataxia. In conclusion, using a combination of whole-exome sequencing and linkage analysis, we identified CHIP, encoding a U-box containing ubiquitin E3 ligase, as a novel causative gene for autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia. PMID:24312598

  13. Modeled changes of cerebellar activity in mutant mice are predictive of their learning impairments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badura, Aleksandra; Clopath, Claudia; Schonewille, Martijn; de Zeeuw, Chris I.

    2016-11-01

    Translating neuronal activity to measurable behavioral changes has been a long-standing goal of systems neuroscience. Recently, we have developed a model of phase-reversal learning of the vestibulo-ocular reflex, a well-established, cerebellar-dependent task. The model, comprising both the cerebellar cortex and vestibular nuclei, reproduces behavioral data and accounts for the changes in neural activity during learning in wild type mice. Here, we used our model to predict Purkinje cell spiking as well as behavior before and after learning of five different lines of mutant mice with distinct cell-specific alterations of the cerebellar cortical circuitry. We tested these predictions by obtaining electrophysiological data depicting changes in neuronal spiking. We show that our data is largely consistent with the model predictions for simple spike modulation of Purkinje cells and concomitant behavioral learning in four of the mutants. In addition, our model accurately predicts a shift in simple spike activity in a mutant mouse with a brainstem specific mutation. This combination of electrophysiological and computational techniques opens a possibility of predicting behavioral impairments from neural activity.

  14. The 5-HT7 receptor triggers cerebellar long-term synaptic depression via PKC-MAPK.

    PubMed

    Lippiello, Pellegrino; Hoxha, Eriola; Speranza, Luisa; Volpicelli, Floriana; Ferraro, Angela; Leopoldo, Marcello; Lacivita, Enza; Perrone-Capano, Carla; Tempia, Filippo; Miniaci, Maria Concetta

    2016-02-01

    The 5-HT7 receptor (5-HT7R) mediates important physiological effects of serotonin, such as memory and emotion, and is emerging as a therapeutic target for the treatment of cognitive disorders and depression. Although previous studies have revealed an expression of 5-HT7R in cerebellum, particularly at Purkinje cells, its functional role and signaling mechanisms have never been described. Using patch-clamp recordings in cerebellar slices of adult mice, we investigated the effects of a selective 5-HT7R agonist, LP-211, on the main plastic site of the cerebellar cortex, the parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse. Here we show that 5-HT7R activation induces long-term depression of parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse via a postsynaptic mechanism that involves the PKC-MAPK signaling pathway. Moreover, a 5-HT7R antagonist abolished the expression of PF-LTD, produced by pairing parallel fiber stimulation with Purkinje cell depolarization; whereas, application of a 5-HT7R agonist impaired LTP induced by 1 Hz parallel fiber stimulation. Our results indicate for the first time that 5-HT7R exerts a fine regulation of cerebellar bidirectional synaptic plasticity that might be involved in cognitive processes and neuropsychiatric disorders involving the cerebellum.

  15. Cerebellar Hypoplasia and Dysmorphia in Neurofibromatosis Type 1.

    PubMed

    Toelle, Sandra P; Poretti, Andrea; Weber, Peter; Seute, Tatjana; Bromberg, Jacoline E C; Scheer, Ianina; Boltshauser, Eugen

    2015-12-01

    Unidentified bright objects (UBO) and tumors are well-known cerebellar abnormalities in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Literature reports on malformative cerebellar anomalies in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), however, are scant. We retrospectively studied the clinical and neuroimaging findings of 5 patients with NF1 (4 females, age 6 to 29 years at last follow-up) and cerebellar anomalies. Cerebellar symptoms on neurological examination were mild or even not evident whereas learning disabilities were more or less pronounced in four patients. Two patients had cerebellar hypoplasia (diffusely enlarged cerebellar interfoliar spaces) and three cerebellar dysmorphias involving mainly one cerebellar hemisphere. In NF1, malformative cerebellar anomalies are rare (estimated prevalence of about 1%), but most likely underestimated and easily overlooked, because physicians tend to focus on more prevalent, obvious, and well-known findings such as optic pathway gliomas, other tumors, and UBO. This kind of cerebellar anomaly in NF1 has most likely a malformative origin, but the exact pathogenesis is unknown. The individual clinical significance is difficult to determine. We suggest that cerebellar anomalies should be systematically evaluated in neuroimaging studies of NF1 patients.

  16. Vergence Deficits in Patients with Cerebellar Lesions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, T.; Sprenger, A.; Neumann, G.; Machner, B.; Gottschalk, S.; Rambold, H.; Helmchen, C.

    2009-01-01

    The cerebellum is part of the cortico-ponto-cerebellar circuit for conjugate eye movements. Recent animal data suggest an additional role of the cerebellum for the control of binocular alignment and disconjugate, i.e. vergence eye movements. The latter is separated into two different components: fast vergence (to step targets) and slow vergence…

  17. Improving cerebellar segmentation with statistical fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plassard, Andrew J.; Yang, Zhen; Prince, Jerry L.; Claassen, Daniel O.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-03-01

    The cerebellum is a somatotopically organized central component of the central nervous system well known to be involved with motor coordination and increasingly recognized roles in cognition and planning. Recent work in multiatlas labeling has created methods that offer the potential for fully automated 3-D parcellation of the cerebellar lobules and vermis (which are organizationally equivalent to cortical gray matter areas). This work explores the trade offs of using different statistical fusion techniques and post hoc optimizations in two datasets with distinct imaging protocols. We offer a novel fusion technique by extending the ideas of the Selective and Iterative Method for Performance Level Estimation (SIMPLE) to a patch-based performance model. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm, Non- Local SIMPLE, for segmentation of a mixed population of healthy subjects and patients with severe cerebellar anatomy. Under the first imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold-standard segmentation techniques. In the second imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold standard techniques but is outperformed by a non-locally weighted vote with the deeper population of atlases available. This work advances the state of the art in open source cerebellar segmentation algorithms and offers the opportunity for routinely including cerebellar segmentation in magnetic resonance imaging studies that acquire whole brain T1-weighted volumes with approximately 1 mm isotropic resolution.

  18. Improving Cerebellar Segmentation with Statistical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Plassard, Andrew J.; Yang, Zhen; Prince, Jerry L.; Claassen, Daniel O.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellum is a somatotopically organized central component of the central nervous system well known to be involved with motor coordination and increasingly recognized roles in cognition and planning. Recent work in multi-atlas labeling has created methods that offer the potential for fully automated 3-D parcellation of the cerebellar lobules and vermis (which are organizationally equivalent to cortical gray matter areas). This work explores the trade offs of using different statistical fusion techniques and post hoc optimizations in two datasets with distinct imaging protocols. We offer a novel fusion technique by extending the ideas of the Selective and Iterative Method for Performance Level Estimation (SIMPLE) to a patch-based performance model. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm, Non-Local SIMPLE, for segmentation of a mixed population of healthy subjects and patients with severe cerebellar anatomy. Under the first imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold-standard segmentation techniques. In the second imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold standard techniques but is outperformed by a non-locally weighted vote with the deeper population of atlases available. This work advances the state of the art in open source cerebellar segmentation algorithms and offers the opportunity for routinely including cerebellar segmentation in magnetic resonance imaging studies that acquire whole brain T1-weighted volumes with approximately 1 mm isotropic resolution. PMID:27127334

  19. Improving Cerebellar Segmentation with Statistical Fusion.

    PubMed

    Plassard, Andrew J; Yang, Zhen; Prince, Jerry L; Claassen, Daniel O; Landman, Bennett A

    2016-02-27

    The cerebellum is a somatotopically organized central component of the central nervous system well known to be involved with motor coordination and increasingly recognized roles in cognition and planning. Recent work in multi-atlas labeling has created methods that offer the potential for fully automated 3-D parcellation of the cerebellar lobules and vermis (which are organizationally equivalent to cortical gray matter areas). This work explores the trade offs of using different statistical fusion techniques and post hoc optimizations in two datasets with distinct imaging protocols. We offer a novel fusion technique by extending the ideas of the Selective and Iterative Method for Performance Level Estimation (SIMPLE) to a patch-based performance model. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm, Non-Local SIMPLE, for segmentation of a mixed population of healthy subjects and patients with severe cerebellar anatomy. Under the first imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold-standard segmentation techniques. In the second imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold standard techniques but is outperformed by a non-locally weighted vote with the deeper population of atlases available. This work advances the state of the art in open source cerebellar segmentation algorithms and offers the opportunity for routinely including cerebellar segmentation in magnetic resonance imaging studies that acquire whole brain T1-weighted volumes with approximately 1 mm isotropic resolution.

  20. A Novel and Multivalent Role of Pax6 in Cerebellar Development

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Joanna; Ha, Thomas J.; Swanson, Douglas J.

    2016-01-01

    Pax6 is a prominent gene in brain development. The deletion of Pax6 results in devastated development of eye, olfactory bulb, and cortex. However, it has been reported that the Pax6-null Sey cerebellum only has minor defects involving granule cells despite Pax6 being expressed throughout cerebellar development. The present work has uncovered a requirement of Pax6 in the development of all rhombic lip (RL) lineages. A significant downregulation of Tbr1 and Tbr2 expression is found in the Sey cerebellum, these are cell-specific markers of cerebellar nuclear (CN) neurons and unipolar brush cells (UBCs), respectively. The examination of Tbr1 and Lmx1a immunolabeling and Nissl staining confirmed the loss of CN neurons from the Sey cerebellum. CN neuron progenitors are produced in the mutant but there is an enhanced death of these neurons as shown by increased presence of caspase-3-positive cells. These data indicate that Pax6 regulates the survival of CN neuron progenitors. Furthermore, the analysis of experimental mouse chimeras suggests a cell-extrinsic role of Pax6 in CN neuron survival. For UBCs, using Tbr2 immunolabeling, these cells are significantly reduced in the Sey cerebellum. The loss of UBCs in the mutant is due partly to cell death in the RL and also to the reduced production of progenitors from the RL. These results demonstrate a critical role for Pax6 in regulating the generation and survival of UBCs. This and previous work from our laboratory demonstrate a seminal role of Pax6 in the development of all cerebellar glutamatergic neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Pax6 is a key molecule in development. Pax6 is best known as the master control gene in eye development with mutations causing aniridia in humans. Pax6 also plays important developmental roles in the cortex and olfactory bulb. During cerebellar development, Pax6 is robustly expressed in the germinal zone of all glutamatergic neurons [cerebellar nuclear (CN) neurons, granule cells, and unipolar brush

  1. Acute cerebellar ataxia, acute cerebellitis, and opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Desai, Jay; Mitchell, Wendy G

    2012-11-01

    Acute cerebellar ataxia and acute cerebellitis represent a process characterized by parainfectious, postinfectious, or postvaccination cerebellar inflammation. There is considerable overlap between these entities. The mildest cases of acute cerebellar ataxia represent a benign condition that is characterized by acute truncal and gait ataxia, variably with appendicular ataxia, nystagmus, dysarthria, and hypotonia. It occurs mostly in young children, presents abruptly, and recovers over weeks. Neuroimaging is normal. Severe cases of cerebellitis represent the other end of the spectrum, presenting with acute cerebellar signs often overshadowed by alteration of consciousness, focal neurological deficits, raised intracranial pressure, hydrocephalus, and even herniation. Neuroimaging is abnormal and the prognosis is less favorable than in acute cerebellar ataxia. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis may be confused with acute cerebellitis when the clinical findings are predominantly cerebellar, but lesions on neuroimaging are usually widespread. Paraneoplastic opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome is often initially misdiagnosed as acute cerebellar ataxia, but has very specific features, course, and etiopathogensis.

  2. Motor cortex rTMS improves dexterity in relapsing-remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Elzamarany, Eman; Afifi, Lamia; El-Fayoumy, Neveen M; Salah, Husam; Nada, Mona

    2016-06-01

    The motor cortex (MC) receives an excitatory input from the cerebellum which is reduced in patients with cerebellar lesions. High-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) induces cortical facilitation which can counteract the reduced cerebellar drive to the MC. Our study included 24 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) patients with dysmetria. The patients were divided into two groups: Group A received two sessions of real MC rTMS and Group B received one session of real rTMS and one session of sham rTMS. Ten healthy volunteers formed group C. Evaluation was carried out using the nine-hole pegboard task and the cerebellar functional system score (FSS) of the expanded disability status scale (EDSS). Group A patients showed a significant improvement in the time required to finish the pegboard task (P = 0.002) and in their cerebellar FSS (P = 0.000) directly after the second session and 1 month later. The RRMS patients showed more improvement than the SPMS patients. Group B patients did not show any improvement in the pegboard task or the cerebellar FSS. These results indicate that MC rTMS can be a promising option in treating both RRMS or SPMS patients with cerebellar impairment and that its effect can be long-lasting.

  3. Responses of the red nucleus neurons to stimulation of the paw pads of forelimbs before and after cerebellar lesions.

    PubMed

    Tarnecki, R; Lupa, K; Niechaj, A

    2001-09-01

    Cerebellar cortex ablation releases deep cerebellar nuclei of monosynaptic inhibition from Purkinje cells. Therefore, it strengthens excitatory influence from Interpositus Nucleus (IN) upon Red Nucleus (RN), which results in much higher facilitation of the rubro-spinal neurons. This causes a big increase of spontaneous discharge rate, and eliminates brakes of discharges from responses generated by somatosensory stimuli. These two changes destroy content and timing of feedback information flowing through the spino-cerebello-rubro-spinal loop. This false bias of the feedback information, very important for fast postural adjustment and coordination of ongoing movements executed by central motor program, may at least in part be responsible for abnormal motor behavior evoked by cerebellar damage. Hemicerebellectomy resulted in dramatically reduced spontaneous activity and responses to limb stimulation because of severing a major input to the red nucleus from deep cerebellar nuclei. Due to direct somatosensory input to magnocellular Red Nucleus (mcRN) from the spinal cord that bypassed the cerebellum, the latency of response to limb stimulation was not changed and the narrower receptive fields were still present.

  4. Primary cerebral and cerebellar astrocytes display differential sensitivity to extracellular sodium with significant effects on apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Tomohiko; Makinodan, Manabu; Fukami, Shin-ichi; Toritsuka, Michihiro; Ikawa, Daisuke; Yamashita, Yasunori; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2014-06-01

    Central pontine myelinolysis is one of the idiopathic or iatrogenic brain dysfunction, and the most common cause is excessively rapid correction of chronic hyponatraemia. While myelin disruption is the main pathology, as the diagnostic name indicates, a previous study has reported that astrocyte death precedes the destruction of the myelin sheath after the rapid correction of chronic low Na(+) levels, and interestingly, certain brain regions (cerebral cortex, hippocampus, etc.) are specifically damaged but not cerebellum. Here, using primary astrocyte cultures derived from rat cerebral cortex and cerebellum, we examined how extracellular Na(+) alterations affect astrocyte death and whether the response is different between the two populations of astrocytes. Twice the amount of extracellular [Na(+) ] and voltage-gated Na(+) channel opening induced substantial apoptosis in both populations of astrocytes, while, in contrast, one half [Na(+) ] prevented apoptosis in cerebellar astrocytes, in which the Na(+) -Ca(2+) exchanger, NCX2, was highly expressed but not in cerebral astrocytes. Strikingly, the rapid correction of chronic one half [Na(+) ] exposure significantly increased apoptosis in cerebellar astrocytes but not in cerebral astrocytes. These results indicate that extracellular [Na(+) ] affects astrocyte apoptosis, and the response to alterations in [Na(+) ] is dependent on the brain region from which the astrocyte is derived.

  5. Morphological development and neurochemical differentiation of cerebellar inhibitory interneurons in microexplant cultures.

    PubMed

    Koscheck, T; Weyer, A; Schilling, R L; Schilling, K

    2003-01-01

    The cerebellar cortex comprises a rather limited variety of interneurons, prominently among them inhibitory basket and stellate cells and Golgi neurons. To identify mechanisms subserving the positioning, morphogenesis, and neurochemical maturation of these inhibitory interneurons, we analyzed their development in primary microexplant cultures of the early postnatal cerebellar cortex. These provide a well-defined, patterned lattice within which the development of individual cells is readily accessible to experimental manipulation and observation. Pax-2-positive precursors of inhibitory interneurons were found to effectively segregate from granule cell perikarya. They emigrate from the core explant and avoid the vicinity of granule cells, which also emigrate and aggregate into small clusters around the explant proper. This contrasts with the behavior of Purkinje neurons, which remain within the explant proper. During migration, a subset of Pax-2-positive cells gradually acquires a GABAergic phenotype, and subsequently also expresses the type 2 metabotropic receptor for glutamate, or parvalbumin, markers for Golgi neurons and basket or stellate cells, respectively. The latter eventually orient their dendrites such that they take a preferentially perpendicular orientation relative to granule cell axons. Both the neurochemical maturation of basket/stellate cells and the specific orientation of their dendrites are independent of their continuous contact with radially oriented glia or Purkinje cell dendrites projecting from the core explant. Numbers of parvalbumin-positive basket/stellate cells and the prevalence of glutamate-positive neurites, which form a dense network preferentially within cell clusters containing granule cell perikarya and their dendrites, are subject to regulation by chronic depolarization. In contrast, brain-derived neurotrophic factor results in a drastic decrease of numbers of basket/stellate cells. These findings document that granule cell axons

  6. In vivo properties of cerebellar interneurons in the macaque caudal vestibular vermis

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Hui; Laurens, Jean; Blázquez, Pablo M; Angelaki, Dora E

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellar cortex is among the brain’s most well-studied circuits and includes distinct classes of excitatory and inhibitory interneurons. Several studies have attempted to characterize the in vivo properties of cerebellar interneurons, yet little is currently known about their stimulus-driven properties. Here we quantify both spontaneous and stimulus-driven responses of interneurons in lobules X (nodulus) and IXc,d (ventral uvula) of the macaque caudal vermis during vestibular stimulation. Interneurons were identified as cells located >100 μm from the Purkinje cell layer that did not exhibit complex spikes. Based on baseline firing, three types of interneurons could be distinguished. First, there was a group of very regular firing interneurons with high mean discharge rates, which consistently encoded tilt, rather than translational head movements. Second, there was a group of low firing interneurons with a range of discharge regularity. This group had more diverse vestibular properties, where most were translation-selective and a few tilt- or gravitoinertial acceleration-selective. Third, we also encountered interneurons that were similar to Purkinje cells in terms of discharge regularity and mean firing rate. This group also encoded mixtures of tilt and translation signals. A few mossy fibres showed unprocessed, otolith afferent-like properties, encoding the gravitoinertial acceleration. We conclude that tilt- and translation-selective signals, which reflect neural computations transforming vestibular afferent information, are not only encountered in Purkinje cell responses. Instead, upstream interneurons within the cerebellar cortex are also characterized by similar properties, thus implying a widespread network computation. PMID:25556803

  7. Plasticity of cerebellar Purkinje cells in behavioral training of body balance control

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ray X.; Huang, Jian-Jia; Huang, Chiming; Tsai, Meng-Li; Yen, Chen-Tung

    2015-01-01

    Neural responses to sensory inputs caused by self-generated movements (reafference) and external passive stimulation (exafference) differ in various brain regions. The ability to differentiate such sensory information can lead to movement execution with better accuracy. However, how sensory responses are adjusted in regard to this distinguishability during motor learning is still poorly understood. The cerebellum has been hypothesized to analyze the functional significance of sensory information during motor learning, and is thought to be a key region of reafference computation in the vestibular system. In this study, we investigated Purkinje cell (PC) spike trains as cerebellar cortical output when rats learned to balance on a suspended dowel. Rats progressively reduced the amplitude of body swing and made fewer foot slips during a 5-min balancing task. Both PC simple (SSs; 17 of 26) and complex spikes (CSs; 7 of 12) were found to code initially on the angle of the heads with respect to a fixed reference. Using periods with comparable degrees of movement, we found that such SS coding of information in most PCs (10 of 17) decreased rapidly during balance learning. In response to unexpected perturbations and under anesthesia, SS coding capability of these PCs recovered. By plotting SS and CS firing frequencies over 15-s time windows in double-logarithmic plots, a negative correlation between SS and CS was found in awake, but not anesthetized, rats. PCs with prominent SS coding attenuation during motor learning showed weaker SS-CS correlation. Hence, we demonstrate that neural plasticity for filtering out sensory reafference from active motion occurs in the cerebellar cortex in rats during balance learning. SS-CS interaction may contribute to this rapid plasticity as a form of receptive field plasticity in the cerebellar cortex between two receptive maps of sensory inputs from the external world and of efference copies from the will center for volitional movements

  8. Cerebro-cerebellar connectivity is increased in primary lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Meoded, Avner; Morrissette, Arthur E; Katipally, Rohan; Schanz, Olivia; Gotts, Stephen J; Floeter, Mary Kay

    2015-01-01

    Increased functional connectivity in resting state networks was found in several studies of patients with motor neuron disorders, although diffusion tensor imaging studies consistently show loss of white matter integrity. To understand the relationship between structural connectivity and functional connectivity, we examined the structural connections between regions with altered functional connectivity in patients with primary lateral sclerosis (PLS), a long-lived motor neuron disease. Connectivity matrices were constructed from resting state fMRI in 16 PLS patients to identify areas of differing connectivity between patients and healthy controls. Probabilistic fiber tracking was used to examine structural connections between regions of differing connectivity. PLS patients had 12 regions with increased functional connectivity compared to controls, with a predominance of cerebro-cerebellar connections. Increased functional connectivity was strongest between the cerebellum and cortical motor areas and between the cerebellum and frontal and temporal cortex. Fiber tracking detected no difference in connections between regions with increased functional connectivity. We conclude that functional connectivity changes are not strongly based in structural connectivity. Increased functional connectivity may be caused by common inputs, or by reduced selectivity of cortical activation, which could result from loss of intracortical inhibition when cortical afferents are intact.

  9. Cerebellar Synaptic Plasticity and the Credit Assignment Problem.

    PubMed

    Jörntell, Henrik

    2016-04-01

    The mechanism by which a learnt synaptic weight change can contribute to learning or adaptation of brain function is a type of credit assignment problem, which is a key issue for many parts of the brain. In the cerebellum, detailed knowledge not only of the local circuitry connectivity but also of the topography of different sources of afferent/external information makes this problem particularly tractable. In addition, multiple forms of synaptic plasticity and their general rules of induction have been identified. In this review, we will discuss the possible roles of synaptic and cellular plasticity at specific locations in contributing to behavioral changes. Focus will be on the parts of the cerebellum that are devoted to limb control, which constitute a large proportion of the cortex and where the knowledge of the external connectivity is particularly well known. From this perspective, a number of sites of synaptic plasticity appear to primarily have the function of balancing the overall level of activity in the cerebellar circuitry, whereas the locations at which synaptic plasticity leads to functional changes in terms of limb control are more limited. Specifically, the postsynaptic forms of long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) at the parallel fiber synapses made on interneurons and Purkinje cells, respectively, are the types of plasticity that mediate the widest associative capacity and the tightest link between the synaptic change and the external functions that are to be controlled.

  10. Cerebello-thalamo-cortical projections to the posterior parietal cortex in the macaque monkey.

    PubMed

    Amino, Y; Kyuhou, S; Matsuzaki, R; Gemba, H

    2001-08-17

    The cerebello-thalamo-posterior parietal cortical projections were investigated electrophysiologically and morphologically in macaque monkeys. In anesthetized monkeys, electrical stimulation of every cerebellar nucleus evoked marked surface-positive, depth-negative (s-P, d-N) cortical field potentials in the superior parietal lobule and the cortical bank of the intraparietal sulcus, but no responses in the inferior parietal lobule. Tract-tracing experiments combining the anterograde method with the retrograde one indicated that the interposed and lateral cerebellar nuclei projected to the posterior parietal cortex mainly through the nucleus ventral lateralis caudalis of the thalamus. The significance of the projections is discussed in connection with cognitive functions.

  11. Hydroxyurea Treatment and Development of the Rat Cerebellum: Effects on the Neurogenetic Profiles and Settled Patterns of Purkinje Cells and Deep Cerebellar Nuclei Neurons.

    PubMed

    Martí, Joaquín; Santa-Cruz, M C; Serra, Roger; Hervás, José P

    2016-11-01

    The current paper analyzes the development of the male and female rat cerebellum exposed to hydroxyurea (HU) (300 or 600 mg/kg) as embryo and collected at postnatal day 90. Our study reveals that the administration of this drug compromises neither the cytoarchitecture of the cerebellar cortex nor deep nuclei (DCN). However, in comparison with the saline group, we observed that several cerebellar parameters were lower in the HU injected groups. These parameters included area of the cerebellum, cerebellar cortex length, molecular layer area, Purkinje cell number, granule cell counts, internal granular layer, white matter and cerebellar nuclei areas, and number of deep cerebellar nuclei neurons. These features were larger in the rats injected with saline, smaller in those exposed to 300 mg/kg of HU and smallest in the group receiving 600 mg/kg of this agent. No sex differences in the effect of the HU were observed. In addition, we infer the neurogenetic timetables and the neurogenetic gradients of PCs and DCN neurons in rats exposed to either saline or HU as embryos. For this purpose, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine was injected into pregnant rats previously administered with saline or HU. This thymidine analog was administered following a progressively delayed cumulative labeling method. The data presented here show that systematic differences exist in the pattern of neurogenesis and in the spatial location of cerebellar neurons between rats injected with saline or HU. No sex differences in the effect of the HU were observed. These findings have implications for the administration of this compound to women in gestation as the effects of HU on the development of the cerebellum might persist throughout their offsprings' life.

  12. Cooling of the cerebellar interpositus nucleus abolishes somatosensory cortical learning-related activity in eyeblink conditioned rabbits.

    PubMed

    Wikgren, Jan; Lavond, David G; Ruusuvirta, Timo; Korhonen, Tapani

    2006-06-03

    Nictitating membrane movement and multiple-unit activity in the somatosensory cortex were recorded from rabbits during paired (N=6) and unpaired (N=5) presentations of a tone conditioned stimulus (CS) and an airpuff unconditioned stimulus (US). A behavioural conditioned response (CR) to the CS and an accompanying neural response in the somatosensory cortex developed only in the paired group. Inactivation of the cerebellar interpositus nucleus abolished both the acquired CR and the accompanying neural response. However, the CS facilitated both behavioural and neural responses to the US during the inactivation. Thus, the absence of the CR could not be accounted for by the general inability of the CS to alter the behaviour constituting the CR or the activity of the somatosensory cortex. These findings suggest that the efferent copy of the signal related to the eyeblink CR is projected from the cerebellum to the cerebral cortical areas of the US modality.

  13. Structural cerebellar correlates of cognitive and motor dysfunctions in cerebellar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kansal, Kalyani; Yang, Zhen; Fishman, Ann M; Sair, Haris I; Ying, Sarah H; Jedynak, Bruno M; Prince, Jerry L; Onyike, Chiadi U

    2017-03-01

    See King et al. (doi:10.1093/aww348) for a scientific commentary on this article.Detailed mapping of clinical dysfunctions to the cerebellar lobules in disease populations is necessary to establish the functional significance of lobules implicated in cognitive and motor functions in normal subjects. This study constitutes the first quantitative examination of the lobular correlates of a broad range of cognitive and motor phenomena in cerebellar disease. We analysed cross-sectional data from 72 cases with cerebellar disease and 36 controls without cerebellar disease. Cerebellar lobule volumes were derived from a graph-cut based segmentation algorithm. Sparse partial least squares, a variable selection approach, was used to identify lobules associated with motor function, language, executive function, memory, verbal learning, perceptual organization and visuomotor coordination. Motor dysfunctions were chiefly associated with the anterior lobe and posterior lobule HVI. Confrontation naming, noun fluency, recognition, and perceptual organization did not have cerebellar associations. Verb and phonemic fluency, working memory, cognitive flexibility, immediate and delayed recall, verbal learning, and visuomotor coordination were variably associated with HVI, Crus I, Crus II, HVII B and/or HIX. Immediate and delayed recall also showed associations with the anterior lobe. These findings provide preliminary anatomical evidence for a functional topography of the cerebellum first defined in task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of normal subjects and support the hypotheses that (i) cerebellar efferents target frontal lobe neurons involved in forming action representations and new search strategies; (ii) there is greater involvement of the cerebellum when immediate recall tasks involve more complex verbal stimuli (e.g. longer words versus digits); and (iii) it is involved in spontaneous retrieval of long-term memory. More generally, they provide an anatomical

  14. A toolbox to visually explore cerebellar shape changes in cerebellar disease and dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abulnaga, S. Mazdak; Yang, Zhen; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Onyike, Chiadi U.; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    The cerebellum plays an important role in motor control and is also involved in cognitive processes. Cerebellar function is specialized by location, although the exact topographic functional relationship is not fully understood. The spinocerebellar ataxias are a group of neurodegenerative diseases that cause regional atrophy in the cerebellum, yielding distinct motor and cognitive problems. The ability to study the region-specific atrophy patterns can provide insight into the problem of relating cerebellar function to location. In an effort to study these structural change patterns, we developed a toolbox in MATLAB to provide researchers a unique way to visually explore the correlation between cerebellar lobule shape changes and function loss, with a rich set of visualization and analysis modules. In this paper, we outline the functions and highlight the utility of the toolbox. The toolbox takes as input landmark shape representations of subjects' cerebellar substructures. A principal component analysis is used for dimension reduction. Following this, a linear discriminant analysis and a regression analysis can be performed to find the discriminant direction associated with a specific disease type, or the regression line of a specific functional measure can be generated. The characteristic structural change pattern of a disease type or of a functional score is visualized by sampling points on the discriminant or regression line. The sampled points are used to reconstruct synthetic cerebellar lobule shapes. We showed a few case studies highlighting the utility of the toolbox and we compare the analysis results with the literature.

  15. l-Serine and glycine serve as major astroglia-derived trophic factors for cerebellar Purkinje neurons

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Shigeki; Tabata, Toshihide; Mitoma, Junya; Yamada, Keiko; Yamasaki, Miwako; Makino, Asami; Yamamoto, Toshifumi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kano, Masanobu; Hirabayashi, Yoshio

    2000-01-01

    Glial cells support the survival and development of central neurons through the supply of trophic factors. Here we demonstrate that l-serine (l-Ser) and glycine (Gly) also are glia-derived trophic factors. These amino acids are released by astroglial cells and promote the survival, dendritogenesis, and electrophysiological development of cultured cerebellar Purkinje neurons. Although l-Ser and Gly are generally classified as nonessential amino acids, 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3PGDH), a key enzyme for their biosynthesis, is not expressed in Purkinje neurons. By contrast, the Bergman glia, a native astroglia in the cerebellar cortex, highly expresses 3PGDH. These data suggest that l-Ser and Gly mediate the trophic actions of glial cells on Purkinje neurons. PMID:11016963

  16. Homozygous Deletion of the Very Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Gene Causes Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Hypoplasia with Cerebral Gyral Simplification

    PubMed Central

    Boycott, Kym M.; Flavelle, Shauna; Bureau, Alexandre; Glass, Hannah C.; Fujiwara, T. Mary; Wirrell, Elaine; Davey, Krista; Chudley, Albert E.; Scott, James N.; McLeod, D. Ross; Parboosingh, Jillian S.

    2005-01-01

    An autosomal recessive syndrome of nonprogressive cerebellar ataxia and mental retardation is associated with inferior cerebellar hypoplasia and mild cerebral gyral simplification in the Hutterite population. An identity-by-descent mapping approach using eight patients from three interrelated Hutterite families localized the gene for this syndrome to chromosome region 9p24. Haplotype analysis identified familial and ancestral recombination events and refined the minimal region to a 2-Mb interval between markers D9S129 and D9S1871. A 199-kb homozygous deletion encompassing the entire very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) gene was present in all affected individuals. VLDLR is part of the reelin signaling pathway, which guides neuroblast migration in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum. To our knowledge, this syndrome represents the first human lipoprotein receptor malformation syndrome and the second human disease associated with a reelin pathway defect. PMID:16080122

  17. The brain-specific RasGEF very-KIND is required for normal dendritic growth in cerebellar granule cells and proper motor coordination

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Kanehiro; Furuya, Asako; Sakamaki, Yuriko; Akagi, Takumi; Shinoda, Yo; Sadakata, Tetsushi; Hashikawa, Tsutomu; Shimizu, Kazuki; Minami, Haruka; Sano, Yoshitake; Nakayama, Manabu

    2017-01-01

    Very-KIND/Kndc1/KIAA1768 (v-KIND) is a brain-specific Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factor carrying two sets of the kinase non-catalytic C-lobe domain (KIND), and is predominantly expressed in cerebellar granule cells. Here, we report the impact of v-KIND deficiency on dendritic and synaptic growth in cerebellar granule cells in v-KIND knockout (KO) mice. Furthermore, we evaluate motor function in these animals. The gross anatomy of the cerebellum, including the cerebellar lobules, layered cerebellar cortex and densely-packed granule cell layer, in KO mice appeared normal, and was similar to wild-type (WT) mice. However, KO mice displayed an overgrowth of cerebellar granule cell dendrites, compared with WT mice, resulting in an increased number of dendrites, dendritic branches and terminals. Immunoreactivity for vGluT2 (a marker for excitatory presynapses of mossy fiber terminals) was increased in the cerebellar glomeruli of KO mice, compared with WT mice. The postsynaptic density around the terminals of mossy fibers was also increased in KO mice. Although there were no significant differences in locomotor ability between KO and WT animals in their home cages or in the open field, young adult KO mice had an increased grip strength and a tendency to exhibit better motor performance in balance-related tests compared with WT animals. Taken together, our results suggest that v-KIND is required for compact dendritic growth and proper excitatory synaptic connections in cerebellar granule cells, which are necessary for normal motor coordination and balance. PMID:28264072

  18. Autism and cerebellar dysfunction: Evidence from animal models.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Peter T

    2016-10-01

    Autism is a prevalent neurodevelopmental disorder whose origins are not well understood. Cerebellar involvement has been implicated in the pathogenesis of autism spectrum disorders with increasing evidence from both clinical studies and animal models supporting an important role for cerebellar dysfunction in autism spectrum disorders. This article discusses the various cerebellar contributions to autism spectrum disorders. Both clinical and preclinical studies are discussed and future research directions highlighted.

  19. Cerebro-cerebellar circuits in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    D'Mello, Anila M; Stoodley, Catherine J

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is one of the most consistent sites of abnormality in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and cerebellar damage is associated with an increased risk of ASD symptoms, suggesting that cerebellar dysfunction may play a crucial role in the etiology of ASD. The cerebellum forms multiple closed-loop circuits with cerebral cortical regions that underpin movement, language, and social processing. Through these circuits, cerebellar dysfunction could impact the core ASD symptoms of social and communication deficits and repetitive and stereotyped behaviors. The emerging topography of sensorimotor, cognitive, and affective subregions in the cerebellum provides a new framework for interpreting the significance of regional cerebellar findings in ASD and their relationship to broader cerebro-cerebellar circuits. Further, recent research supports the idea that the integrity of cerebro-cerebellar loops might be important for early cortical development; disruptions in specific cerebro-cerebellar loops in ASD might impede the specialization of cortical regions involved in motor control, language, and social interaction, leading to impairments in these domains. Consistent with this concept, structural, and functional differences in sensorimotor regions of the cerebellum and sensorimotor cerebro-cerebellar circuits are associated with deficits in motor control and increased repetitive and stereotyped behaviors in ASD. Further, communication and social impairments are associated with atypical activation and structure in cerebro-cerebellar loops underpinning language and social cognition. Finally, there is converging evidence from structural, functional, and connectivity neuroimaging studies that cerebellar right Crus I/II abnormalities are related to more severe ASD impairments in all domains. We propose that cerebellar abnormalities may disrupt optimization of both structure and function in specific cerebro-cerebellar circuits in ASD.

  20. Cerebro-cerebellar circuits in autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    D'Mello, Anila M.; Stoodley, Catherine J.

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is one of the most consistent sites of abnormality in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and cerebellar damage is associated with an increased risk of ASD symptoms, suggesting that cerebellar dysfunction may play a crucial role in the etiology of ASD. The cerebellum forms multiple closed-loop circuits with cerebral cortical regions that underpin movement, language, and social processing. Through these circuits, cerebellar dysfunction could impact the core ASD symptoms of social and communication deficits and repetitive and stereotyped behaviors. The emerging topography of sensorimotor, cognitive, and affective subregions in the cerebellum provides a new framework for interpreting the significance of regional cerebellar findings in ASD and their relationship to broader cerebro-cerebellar circuits. Further, recent research supports the idea that the integrity of cerebro-cerebellar loops might be important for early cortical development; disruptions in specific cerebro-cerebellar loops in ASD might impede the specialization of cortical regions involved in motor control, language, and social interaction, leading to impairments in these domains. Consistent with this concept, structural, and functional differences in sensorimotor regions of the cerebellum and sensorimotor cerebro-cerebellar circuits are associated with deficits in motor control and increased repetitive and stereotyped behaviors in ASD. Further, communication and social impairments are associated with atypical activation and structure in cerebro-cerebellar loops underpinning language and social cognition. Finally, there is converging evidence from structural, functional, and connectivity neuroimaging studies that cerebellar right Crus I/II abnormalities are related to more severe ASD impairments in all domains. We propose that cerebellar abnormalities may disrupt optimization of both structure and function in specific cerebro-cerebellar circuits in ASD. PMID:26594140

  1. Acute bilateral cerebellar infarction in the territory of the medial branches of posterior inferior cerebellar arteries.

    PubMed

    Gurer, G; Sahin, G; Cekirge, S; Tan, E; Saribas, O

    2001-10-01

    The most frequent type of cerebellar infarcts involved the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) and superior cerebellar artery territories but bilateral involvement of lateral or medial branches of PICA is extremely rare. In this report, we present a 55-year-old male who admitted to hospital with vomiting, nausea and dizziness. On examination left-sided hemiparesia and ataxic gait were detected. Infarct on bilateral medial branch of PICA artery territories was found out with cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique and 99% stenosis of the left vertebral artery was found out with digital subtraction arteriography. The patient was put on heparin treatment. After 3 weeks, his complaints and symptoms had disappeared except for mild gait ataxia.

  2. Pitch discrimination in cerebellar patients: evidence for a sensory deficit.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Lawrence M; Petacchi, Augusto; Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Bower, James M

    2009-12-15

    In the last two decades, a growing body of research showing cerebellar involvement in an increasing number of nonmotor tasks and systems has prompted an expansion of speculations concerning the function of the cerebellum. Here, we tested the predictions of a hypothesis positing cerebellar involvement in sensory data acquisition. Specifically, we examined the effect of global cerebellar degeneration on primary auditory sensory function by means of a pitch discrimination task. The just noticeable difference in pitch between two tones was measured in 15 healthy controls and in 15 high functioning patients afflicted with varying degrees of global cerebellar degeneration caused by hereditary, idiopathic, paraneoplastic, or postinfectious pancerebellitis. Participants also performed an auditory detection task assessing sustained attention, a test of verbal auditory working memory, and an audiometric test. Patient pitch discrimination thresholds were on average five and a half times those of controls and were proportional to the degree of cerebellar ataxia assessed independently. Patients and controls showed normal hearing thresholds and similar performance in control tasks in sustained attention and verbal auditory working memory. These results suggest there is an effect of cerebellar degeneration on primary auditory function. The findings are consistent with other recent demonstrations of cerebellar-related sensory impairments, and with robust cerebellar auditorily evoked activity, confirmed by quantitative meta-analysis, across a range of functional neuroimaging studies dissociated from attention, motor, affective, and cognitive variables. The data are interpreted in the context of a sensory hypothesis of cerebellar function.

  3. Cerebellar on-beam and lateral inhibition: two functionally distinct circuits.

    PubMed

    Cohen, D; Yarom, Y

    2000-04-01

    Optical imaging of voltage-sensitive dyes in an isolated cerebellum preparation was used to study the spatiotemporal functional organization of the inhibitory systems in the cerebellar cortex. Responses to surface stimulation of the cortex reveal two physiologically distinct inhibitory systems, which we refer to as lateral and on-beam inhibition following classical terminology. Lateral inhibition occurs throughout the area responding to a stimulus, whereas on-beam inhibition is confined to the area directly excited by parallel fibers. The time course of the lateral inhibition is twice as long as that of the on-beam inhibition. Both inhibitory responses increase with stimulus intensity, but the lateral inhibition has a lower threshold, and it saturates at lower stimulus intensity. The amplitude of the on-beam inhibition is linearly related to the excitation at the same location, whereas that of the lateral inhibition is linearly related to the excitation at the center of the beam. Repetitive stimulation is required to activate on-beam inhibition, whereas the same stimulus paradigm reveals prolonged depression of the lateral inhibition. We conclude that lateral inhibition reflects the activation of molecular layer interneurons, and its major role is to increase the excitability of the activated area by disinhibition. The on-beam inhibition most likely reflects Golgi cell inhibition of granule cells. However, Purkinje cell collateral inhibition of Golgi cells cannot be excluded. Both possibilities suggest that the role of the on-beam inhibition is to efficiently modulate, in time and space, the mossy fiber input to the cerebellar cortex.

  4. Cerebellar cortical efferent fibers of the paraflocculus of tree shrew (Tupaia glis).

    PubMed

    Haines, D E; Whitworth, R H

    1978-11-01

    Efferent projections from the paraflocculus of the tree shrew (Tupaia glis) were studied utilizing the Fink and Heimer ('67) method. Cerebellar corticonuclear fibers of both dorsal (Dpf) and ventral (Vpf) divisions of the paraflocculus terminate in the lateral cerebellar nucelus (NL) and in the posterior interposed nucleus (NIP). These fibers are ipsilateral, topographically organized and arranged into at least two zones. Following injury to either the Dpf or Vpf, degenerated axons are found in lateral and caudal regions of the NIP respectively. Consequently, these two portions of the paraflocculus have relatively exclusive terminal fields with overlap only at the periphery. Preterminal debris is seen in basically similar areas of the NL (caudolateral, caudal, ventral) after damage to either the Dpf or Vpf. This observation leads to the conclusion that the terminal fields for these areas of parafloccular cortex are largely coextensive in the NL. In addition to the topographical representation of the Dpf and Vpf in both the NL and NIP, there is evidence that these corticonuclear fibers are also organized into the general zonal pattern hypothesized by Voogd ('69). Persistent and numerous degenerated axons from both the Dpf and Vpf end in lateral and caudal NIP, respectively, corroborating the presence of a relatively wide zone C2 in both divisions of the paraflocculus. The Dpf and Vpf also project into the NL to a terminal field that appears to consist of two portions. One part located in caudal, ventral and/or caudoventral areas of the NL and a second at slightly more rostral and rostrolateral areas. The presence of a cortical region which is affiliated with two areas of the NL substantiates not only the existence of zone D in the paraflocculus, but gives experimental evidence that it may consist of two parts as previously suggested (Voogd, '69). From the Dpf many fibers enter the NL while few are seen in this nucleus after damage to the Vpf. This suggests that zone

  5. Acute cerebellar ataxia with human parvovirus B19 infection

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Y.; Ueno, T.; Komatsu, H.; Takada, H.; Nunoue, T.

    1999-01-01

    A 2 year old boy developed acute cerebellar ataxia in association with erythema infectiosum. During the disease, genomic DNA and antibodies against human parvovirus B19 were detected in serum but not in cerebrospinal fluid. Parvovirus B19 associated acute cerebellar ataxia might occur due to transient vascular reaction in the cerebellum during infection.

 PMID:10325764

  6. [Clinical study of two cases of traumatic cerebellar injury].

    PubMed

    Yokota, H; Nakazawa, S; Kobayashi, S; Taniguchi, Y; Yukihide, T

    1990-01-01

    Two cases of traumatic cerebellar injury complicated with a traumatic medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF) syndrome or cerebellar mutism were reported, and the cause of these mechanisms was discussed: Case 1: A 9-year-old boy who struck his head in the occipital region during an automobile accident was operated on for a delayed traumatic intracerebellar hematoma. The operation improved the level of his consciousness but MLF syndrome was noticed. The mechanism of traumatic MLF syndrome was discussed in relation to vascular injury and to neurovascular friction. The outcome of the syndrome including our case, which recovered spontaneously, seemed to support the theory of neurovascular injury. Case 2: A 6-year-old boy who struck his head in the temporooccipital region during an automobile accident was admitted to our hospital without conciousness. On admission, contusion of the temporal lobe and left cerebellar hemisphere was demonstrated by a computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A mute state (cerebellar mutism) was recognized after his recovery of consciousness. The cause of the cerebellar mutism was thought to be an injury of the cerebellar vermis or left cerebellar hemisphere. The findings of CT scan and MRI in our case suggested that the cause of the cerebellar mutism was the contusion of these areas.

  7. Distinct Critical Cerebellar Subregions for Components of Verbal Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Freya E.; Grube, Manon; Von Kriegstein, Katharina; Kumar, Sukhbinder; English, Philip; Kelly, Thomas P.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Griffiths, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    A role for the cerebellum in cognition has been proposed based on studies suggesting a profile of cognitive deficits due to cerebellar stroke. Such studies are limited in the determination of the detailed organisation of cerebellar subregions that are critical for different aspects of cognition. In this study we examined the correlation between…

  8. Humor and laughter in patients with cerebellar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Frank, B; Propson, B; Göricke, S; Jacobi, H; Wild, B; Timmann, D

    2012-06-01

    Humor is a complex behavior which includes cognitive, affective and motor responses. Based on observations of affective changes in patients with cerebellar lesions, the cerebellum may support cerebral and brainstem areas involved in understanding and appreciation of humorous stimuli and expression of laughter. The aim of the present study was to examine if humor appreciation, perception of humorous stimuli, and the succeeding facial reaction differ between patients with cerebellar degeneration and healthy controls. Twenty-three adults with pure cerebellar degeneration were compared with 23 age-, gender-, and education-matched healthy control subjects. No significant difference in humor appreciation and perception of humorous stimuli could be found between groups using the 3 Witz-Dimensionen Test, a validated test asking for funniness and aversiveness of jokes and cartoons. Furthermore, while observing jokes, humorous cartoons, and video sketches, facial expressions of subjects were videotaped and afterwards analysed using the Facial Action Coding System. Using depression as a covariate, the number, and to a lesser degree, the duration of facial expressions during laughter were reduced in cerebellar patients compared to healthy controls. In sum, appreciation of humor appears to be largely preserved in patients with chronic cerebellar degeneration. Cerebellar circuits may contribute to the expression of laughter. Findings add to the literature that non-motor disorders in patients with chronic cerebellar disease are generally mild, but do not exclude that more marked disorders may show up in acute cerebellar disease and/or in more specific tests of humor appreciation.

  9. Preterm cerebellar growth impairment after postnatal exposure to glucocorticoids

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Emily W. Y.; Chau, Vann; Ferriero, Donna M.; Barkovich, A. James; Poskitt, Kenneth J.; Studholme, Colin; Fok, Eric D.-Y.; Grunau, Ruth E.; Glidden, David V.; Miller, Steven P.

    2012-01-01

    With improving survival rates of preterm newborns, adverse cognitive outcomes are increasingly recognized. Adverse cognitive outcomes are associated with decreased cerebellar volumes, and modifiable risk factors for these adverse outcomes should be identified. Animal models demonstrate reduced preterm cerebellar growth after exposure to glucocorticoids. Preterm neonates were prospectively studied with serial MRI examinations near birth and again near term-equivalent age. Adjusting for associated clinical factors, antenatal bethamethasone was not associated with changes in cerebellar volume. Postnatal exposure to clinically routine doses of hydrocortisone or dexamethasone were associated with impaired cerebellar, but not cerebral, growth. Modifying postnatal risk factors for impaired cerebellar development, and particularly glucocorticoid exposure, may help to decrease risk for adverse neurological outcome after preterm birth. PMID:22013125

  10. Cerebellar vermis plays a causal role in visual motion discrimination.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Zaira; Renzi, Chiara; Casali, Stefano; Silvanto, Juha; Vecchi, Tomaso; Papagno, Costanza; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2014-09-01

    Cerebellar patients have been found to show deficits in visual motion discrimination, suggesting that the cerebellum may play a role in visual sensory processing beyond mediating motor control. Here we show that triple-pulse online transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over cerebellar vermis but not over the cerebellar hemispheres significantly impaired motion discrimination. Critically, the interference caused by vermis TMS on motion discrimination did not depend on an indirect effect of TMS over nearby visual areas, as demonstrated by a control experiment in which TMS over V1 but not over cerebellar vermis significantly impaired orientation discrimination. These findings demonstrate the causal role of the cerebellar vermis in visual motion processing in neurologically normal participants.

  11. New evidence for the cerebellar involvement in personality traits

    PubMed Central

    Picerni, Eleonora; Petrosini, Laura; Piras, Fabrizio; Laricchiuta, Daniela; Cutuli, Debora; Chiapponi, Chiara; Fagioli, Sabrina; Girardi, Paolo; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Following the recognition of its role in sensory-motor coordination and learning, the cerebellum has been involved in cognitive, emotional, and even personality domains. This study investigated the relationships between cerebellar macro- and micro-structural variations and temperamental traits measured by Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). High resolution T1-weighted, and Diffusion Tensor Images of 100 healthy subjects aged 18–59 years were acquired by 3 Tesla Magnetic Resonance scanner. In multiple regression analyses, cerebellar Gray Matter (GM) or White Matter (WM) volumes, GM Mean Diffusivity (MD), and WM Fractional Anisotropy (FA) were used as dependent variables, TCI scores as regressors, gender, age, and education years as covariates. Novelty Seeking scores were associated positively with the cerebellar GM volumes and FA, and negatively with MD. No significant association between Harm Avoidance, Reward Dependence or Persistence scores and cerebellar structural measures was found. The present data put toward a cerebellar involvement in the management of novelty. PMID:24106465

  12. New evidence for the cerebellar involvement in personality traits.

    PubMed

    Picerni, Eleonora; Petrosini, Laura; Piras, Fabrizio; Laricchiuta, Daniela; Cutuli, Debora; Chiapponi, Chiara; Fagioli, Sabrina; Girardi, Paolo; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Following the recognition of its role in sensory-motor coordination and learning, the cerebellum has been involved in cognitive, emotional, and even personality domains. This study investigated the relationships between cerebellar macro- and micro-structural variations and temperamental traits measured by Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). High resolution T1-weighted, and Diffusion Tensor Images of 100 healthy subjects aged 18-59 years were acquired by 3 Tesla Magnetic Resonance scanner. In multiple regression analyses, cerebellar Gray Matter (GM) or White Matter (WM) volumes, GM Mean Diffusivity (MD), and WM Fractional Anisotropy (FA) were used as dependent variables, TCI scores as regressors, gender, age, and education years as covariates. Novelty Seeking scores were associated positively with the cerebellar GM volumes and FA, and negatively with MD. No significant association between Harm Avoidance, Reward Dependence or Persistence scores and cerebellar structural measures was found. The present data put toward a cerebellar involvement in the management of novelty.

  13. Genetic ablation of homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 selectively induces apoptosis of cerebellar Purkinje cells during adulthood and generates an ataxic-like phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Anzilotti, S; Tornincasa, M; Gerlini, R; Conte, A; Brancaccio, P; Cuomo, O; Bianco, G; Fusco, A; Annunziato, L; Pignataro, G; Pierantoni, G M

    2015-01-01

    Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) is a multitalented coregulator of an increasing number of transcription factors and cofactors involved in cell death and proliferation in several organs and systems. As Hipk2−/− mice show behavioral abnormalities consistent with cerebellar dysfunction, we investigated whether Hipk2 is involved in these neurological symptoms. To this aim, we characterized the postnatal developmental expression profile of Hipk2 in the brain cortex, hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellum of mice by real-time PCR, western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry. Notably, we found that whereas in the brain cortex, hippocampus, and striatum, HIPK2 expression progressively decreased with age, that is, from postnatal day 1 to adulthood, it increased in the cerebellum. Interestingly, mice lacking Hipk2 displayed atrophic lobules and a visibly smaller cerebellum than did wild-type mice. More important, the cerebellum of Hipk2−/− mice showed a strong reduction in cerebellar Purkinje neurons during adulthood. Such reduction is due to the activation of an apoptotic process associated with a compromised proteasomal function followed by an unpredicted accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins. In particular, Purkinje cell dysfunction was characterized by a strong accumulation of ubiquitinated β-catenin. Moreover, our behavioral tests showed that Hipk2−/− mice displayed muscle and balance impairment, indicative of Hipk2 involvement in cerebellar function. Taken together, these results indicate that Hipk2 exerts a relevant role in the survival of cerebellar Purkinje cells and that Hipk2 genetic ablation generates cerebellar dysfunction compatible with an ataxic-like phenotype. PMID:26633710

  14. Integration and regulation of glomerular inhibition in the cerebellar granular layer circuit

    PubMed Central

    Mapelli, Lisa; Solinas, Sergio; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitory synapses can be organized in different ways and be regulated by a multitude of mechanisms. One of the best known examples is provided by the inhibitory synapses formed by Golgi cells onto granule cells in the cerebellar glomeruli. These synapses are GABAergic and inhibit granule cells through two main mechanisms, phasic and tonic. The former is based on vesicular neurotransmitter release, the latter on the establishment of tonic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels determined by spillover and regulation of GABA uptake. The mechanisms of post-synaptic integration have been clarified to a considerable extent and have been shown to differentially involve α1 and α6 subunit-containing GABA-A receptors. Here, after reviewing the basic mechanisms of GABAergic transmission in the cerebellar glomeruli, we examine how inhibition controls signal transfer at the mossy fiber-granule cell relay. First of all, we consider how vesicular release impacts on signal timing and how tonic GABA levels control neurotransmission gain. Then, we analyze the integration of these inhibitory mechanisms within the granular layer network. Interestingly, it turns out that glomerular inhibition is just one element in a large integrated signaling system controlled at various levels by metabotropic receptors. GABA-B receptor activation by ambient GABA regulates glutamate release from mossy fibers through a pre-synaptic cross-talk mechanisms, GABA release through pre-synaptic auto-receptors, and granule cell input resistance through post-synaptic receptor activation and inhibition of a K inward-rectifier current. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) control GABA release from Golgi cell terminals and Golgi cell input resistance and autorhythmic firing. This complex set of mechanisms implements both homeostatic and winner-take-all processes, providing the basis for fine-tuning inhibitory neurotransmission and for optimizing signal transfer through the cerebellar cortex. PMID:24616663

  15. Glucocortiocoid Treatment of MCMV Infected Newborn Mice Attenuates CNS Inflammation and Limits Deficits in Cerebellar Development

    PubMed Central

    Kosmac, Kate; Bantug, Glenn R.; Pugel, Ester P.; Cekinovic, Djurdjica; Jonjic, Stipan; Britt, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Infection of the developing fetus with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a major cause of central nervous system disease in infants and children; however, mechanism(s) of disease associated with this intrauterine infection remain poorly understood. Utilizing a mouse model of HCMV infection of the developing CNS, we have shown that peripheral inoculation of newborn mice with murine CMV (MCMV) results in CNS infection and developmental abnormalities that recapitulate key features of the human infection. In this model, animals exhibit decreased granule neuron precursor cell (GNPC) proliferation and altered morphogenesis of the cerebellar cortex. Deficits in cerebellar cortical development are symmetric and global even though infection of the CNS results in a non-necrotizing encephalitis characterized by widely scattered foci of virus-infected cells with mononuclear cell infiltrates. These findings suggested that inflammation induced by MCMV infection could underlie deficits in CNS development. We investigated the contribution of host inflammatory responses to abnormal cerebellar development by modulating inflammatory responses in infected mice with glucocorticoids. Treatment of infected animals with glucocorticoids decreased activation of CNS mononuclear cells and expression of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-β and IFNγ) in the CNS while minimally impacting CNS virus replication. Glucocorticoid treatment also limited morphogenic abnormalities and normalized the expression of developmentally regulated genes within the cerebellum. Importantly, GNPC proliferation deficits were normalized in MCMV infected mice following glucocorticoid treatment. Our findings argue that host inflammatory responses to MCMV infection contribute to deficits in CNS development in MCMV infected mice and suggest that similar mechanisms of disease could be responsible for the abnormal CNS development in human infants infected in-utero with HCMV. PMID:23505367

  16. An adaptive filter model of cerebellar zone C3 as a basis for safe limb control?

    PubMed

    Dean, Paul; Anderson, Sean; Porrill, John; Jörntell, Henrik

    2013-11-15

    The review asks how the adaptive filter model of the cerebellum might be relevant to experimental work on zone C3, one of the most extensively studied regions of cerebellar cortex. As far as features of the cerebellar microcircuit are concerned, the model appears to fit very well with electrophysiological discoveries concerning the importance of molecular layer interneurons and their plasticity, the significance of long-term potentiation and the striking number of silent parallel fibre synapses. Regarding external connectivity and functionality, a key feature of the adaptive filter model is its use of the decorrelation algorithm, which renders it uniquely suited to problems of sensory noise cancellation. However, this capacity can be extended to the avoidance of sensory interference, by appropriate movements of, for example, the eyes in the vestibulo-ocular reflex. Avoidance becomes particularly important when painful signals are involved, and as the climbing fibre input to zone C3 is extremely responsive to nociceptive stimuli, it is proposed that one function of this zone is the avoidance of pain by, for example, adjusting movements of the body to avoid self-harm. This hypothesis appears consistent with evidence from humans and animals concerning the role of the intermediate cerebellum in classically conditioned withdrawal reflexes, but further experiments focusing on conditioned avoidance are required to test the hypothesis more stringently. The proposed architecture may also be useful for automatic self-adjusting damage avoidance in robots, an important consideration for next generation 'soft' robots designed to interact with people.

  17. WNT3 Inhibits Cerebellar Granule Neuron Progenitor Proliferation and Medulloblastoma Formation via MAPK Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ayrault, Olivier; Kim, Jee Hae; Zhu, Xiaodong; Murphy, David A.; Van Aelst, Linda; Roussel, Martine F.; Hatten, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    During normal cerebellar development, the remarkable expansion of granule cell progenitors (GCPs) generates a population of granule neurons that outnumbers the total neuronal population of the cerebral cortex, and provides a model for identifying signaling pathways that may be defective in medulloblastoma. While many studies focus on identifying pathways that promote growth of GCPs, a critical unanswered question concerns the identification of signaling pathways that block mitogenic stimulation and induce early steps in differentiation. Here we identify WNT3 as a novel suppressor of GCP proliferation during cerebellar development and an inhibitor of medulloblastoma growth in mice. WNT3, produced in early postnatal cerebellum, inhibits GCP proliferation by down-regulating pro-proliferative target genes of the mitogen Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) and the bHLH transcription factor Atoh1. WNT3 suppresses GCP growth through a non-canonical Wnt signaling pathway, activating prototypic mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), the Ras-dependent extracellular-signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) and ERK5, instead of the classical β-catenin pathway. Inhibition of MAPK activity using a MAPK kinase (MEK) inhibitor reversed the inhibitory effect of WNT3 on GCP proliferation. Importantly, WNT3 inhibits proliferation of medulloblastoma tumor growth in mouse models by a similar mechanism. Thus, the present study suggests a novel role for WNT3 as a regulator of neurogenesis and repressor of neural tumors. PMID:24303070

  18. Mechanisms and functional roles of glutamatergic synapse diversity in a cerebellar circuit

    PubMed Central

    Zampini, Valeria; Liu, Jian K; Diana, Marco A; Maldonado, Paloma P; Brunel, Nicolas; Dieudonné, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic currents display a large degree of heterogeneity of their temporal characteristics, but the functional role of such heterogeneities remains unknown. We investigated in rat cerebellar slices synaptic currents in Unipolar Brush Cells (UBCs), which generate intrinsic mossy fibers relaying vestibular inputs to the cerebellar cortex. We show that UBCs respond to sinusoidal modulations of their sensory input with heterogeneous amplitudes and phase shifts. Experiments and modeling indicate that this variability results both from the kinetics of synaptic glutamate transients and from the diversity of postsynaptic receptors. While phase inversion is produced by an mGluR2-activated outward conductance in OFF-UBCs, the phase delay of ON UBCs is caused by a late rebound current resulting from AMPAR recovery from desensitization. Granular layer network modeling indicates that phase dispersion of UBC responses generates diverse phase coding in the granule cell population, allowing climbing-fiber-driven Purkinje cell learning at arbitrary phases of the vestibular input. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15872.001 PMID:27642013

  19. Normal Neurochemistry in the Prefrontal and Cerebellar Brain of Adults with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    PubMed

    Endres, Dominique; Perlov, Evgeniy; Maier, Simon; Feige, Bernd; Nickel, Kathrin; Goll, Peter; Bubl, Emanuel; Lange, Thomas; Glauche, Volkmar; Graf, Erika; Ebert, Dieter; Sobanski, Esther; Philipsen, Alexandra; Tebartz van Elst, Ludger

    2015-01-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common neurodevelopmental disorder. In an attempt to extend earlier neurochemical findings, we organized a magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) study as part of a large, government-funded, prospective, randomized, multicenter clinical trial comparing the effectiveness of specific psychotherapy with counseling and stimulant treatment with placebo treatment (Comparison of Methylphenidate and Psychotherapy Study). We report the baseline neurochemical data for the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and the cerebellum in a case-control setting. For the trial, 1,480 adult patients were contacted for participation, 518 were assessed for eligibility, 433 were randomized, and 187 were potentially eligible for neuroimaging. The control group included 119 healthy volunteers. Single-voxel proton MRS was performed. In the patient group, 113 ACC and 104 cerebellar spectra fulfilled all quality criteria for inclusion in statistical calculations, as did 82 ACC and 78 cerebellar spectra in the control group. We did not find any significant neurometabolic differences between the ADHD and control group in the ACC (Wilks' lambda test: p = 0.97) or in the cerebellum (p = 0.62). Thus, we were unable to replicate earlier findings in this methodologically sophisticated study. We discuss our findings in the context of a comprehensive review of other MRS studies on ADHD and a somewhat skeptical neuropsychiatric research perspective. As in other neuropsychiatric disorders, the unclear nosological status of ADHD might be an explanation for false-negative findings.

  20. Optogenetic Modulation and Multi-Electrode Analysis of Cerebellar Networks In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Wolfgang; Krause, Martin; Aarse, Janna; Mark, Melanie D.; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise; Herlitze, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The firing patterns of cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs), as the sole output of the cerebellar cortex, determine and tune motor behavior. PC firing is modulated by various inputs from different brain regions and by cell-types including granule cells (GCs), climbing fibers and inhibitory interneurons. To understand how signal integration in PCs occurs and how subtle changes in the modulation of PC firing lead to adjustment of motor behaviors, it is important to precisely record PC firing in vivo and to control modulatory pathways in a spatio-temporal manner. Combining optogenetic and multi-electrode approaches, we established a new method to integrate light-guides into a multi-electrode system. With this method we are able to variably position the light-guide in defined regions relative to the recording electrode with micrometer precision. We show that PC firing can be precisely monitored and modulated by light-activation of channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) expressed in PCs, GCs and interneurons. Thus, this method is ideally suited to investigate the spatio/temporal modulation of PCs in anesthetized and in behaving mice. PMID:25144735

  1. Hyperpolarization induces a long-term increase in the spontaneous firing rate of cerebellar Golgi cells

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Court; Chu, YunXiang; Thanawala, Monica; Regehr, Wade G.

    2013-01-01

    Golgi cells (GoCs) are inhibitory interneurons that influence the cerebellar cortical response to sensory input by regulating the excitability of the granule cell layer. While GoC inhibition is essential for normal motor coordination, little is known about the circuit dynamics that govern the activity of these cells. In particular, while GoC spontaneous spiking influences the extent of inhibition and gain throughout the granule cell layer, it is not known whether this spontaneous activity can be modulated in a long-term manner. Here we describe a form of long-term plasticity that regulates the spontaneous firing rate of GoCs in the rat cerebellar cortex. We find that membrane hyperpolarization, either by mGluR2 activation of potassium channels, or by somatic current injection, induces a long-lasting increase in GoC spontaneous firing. This spike rate plasticity appears to result from a strong reduction in the spike afterhyperpolarization (AHP). Pharmacological manipulations suggest the involvement of calcium-calmodulin dependent kinase II (CaMKII) and calcium-activated potassium channels in mediating these firing rate increases. As a consequence of this plasticity, GoC spontaneous spiking is selectively enhanced, but the gain of evoked spiking is unaffected. Hence this plasticity is well-suited for selectively regulating the tonic output of GoCs rather than their sensory-evoked responses. PMID:23554471

  2. Electrical Stimulation Normalizes c-Fos Expression in the Deep Cerebellar Nuclei of Depressive-like Rats: Implication of Antidepressant Activity.

    PubMed

    Huguet, Gemma; Kadar, Elisabet; Temel, Yasin; Lim, Lee Wei

    2017-04-01

    The electrical stimulation of specific brain targets has been shown to induce striking antidepressant effects. Despite that recent data have indicated that cerebellum is involved in emotional regulation, the mechanisms by which stimulation improved mood-related behaviors in the cerebellum remained largely obscure. Here, we investigated the stimulation effects of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), nucleus accumbens (NAc), and lateral habenular nucleus on the c-Fos neuronal activity in various deep cerebellar and vestibular nuclei using the unpredictable chronic mild stress (CMS) animal model of depression. Our results showed that stressed animals had increased number of c-Fos cells in the cerebellar dentate and fastigial nuclei, as well as in the spinal vestibular nucleus. To examine the stimulation effects, we found that vmPFC stimulation significantly decreased the c-Fos activity within the cerebellar fastigial nucleus as compared to the CMS sham. Similarly, there was also a reduction of c-Fos expression in the magnocellular part of the medial vestibular nucleus in vmPFC- and NAc core-stimulated animals when compared to the CMS sham. Correlational analyses showed that the anxiety measure of home-cage emergence escape latency was positively correlated with the c-Fos neuronal activity of the cerebellar fastigial and magnocellular and parvicellular parts of the interposed nuclei in CMS vmPFC-stimulated animals. Interestingly, there was a strong correlation among activation in these cerebellar nuclei, indicating that the antidepressant-like behaviors were possibly mediated by the vmPFC stimulation-induced remodeling within the forebrain-cerebellar neurocircuitry.

  3. The long-term structural plasticity of cerebellar parallel fiber axons and its modulation by motor learning.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Jennifer; Cheng, Shao-Ying; Ko, Kwang Woo; Jones, Theresa A; Nishiyama, Hiroshi

    2013-05-08

    Presynaptic axonal varicosities, like postsynaptic spines, are dynamically added and eliminated even in mature neuronal circuitry. To study the role of this axonal structural plasticity in behavioral learning, we performed two-photon in vivo imaging of cerebellar parallel fibers (PFs) in adult mice. PFs make excitatory synapses on Purkinje cells (PCs) in the cerebellar cortex, and long-term potentiation and depression at PF-PC synapses are thought to play crucial roles in cerebellar-dependent learning. Time-lapse vital imaging of PFs revealed that, under a control condition (no behavioral training), ∼10% of PF varicosities appeared and disappeared over a period of 2 weeks without changing the total number of varicosities. The fraction of dynamic PF varicosities significantly diminished during training on an acrobatic motor skill learning task, largely because of reduced addition of new varicosities. Thus, this form of motor learning was associated with greater structural stability of PFs and a slight decrease in the total number of varicosities. Together with prior findings that the number of PF-PC synapses increases during similar training, our results suggest that acrobatic motor skill learning involves a reduction of some PF inputs and a strengthening of others, probably via the conversion of some preexisting PF varicosities into multisynaptic terminals.

  4. Deficits in Motor Coordination with Aberrant Cerebellar Development in Mice Lacking Testicular Orphan Nuclear Receptor 4†

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yei-Tsung; Collins, Loretta L.; Uno, Hideo; Chang, Chawnshang

    2005-01-01

    Since testicular orphan nuclear receptor 4 (TR4) was cloned, its physiological function has remained largely unknown. Throughout postnatal development, TR4-knockout (TR4−/−) mice exhibited behavioral deficits in motor coordination, suggesting impaired cerebellar function. Histological examination of the postnatal TR4−/− cerebellum revealed gross abnormalities in foliation; specifically, lobule VII in the anterior vermis was missing. Further analyses demonstrated that the laminations of the TR4−/− cerebellar cortex were changed, including reductions in the thickness of the molecular layer and the internal granule layer, as well as delayed disappearance of the external granule cell layer (EGL). These lamination irregularities may result from interference with granule cell proliferation within the EGL, delayed inward migration of postmitotic granule cells, and a higher incidence of apoptotis. In addition, abnormal development of Purkinje cells was observed in the postnatal TR4−/− cerebellum, as evidenced by aberrant dendritic arborization and reduced calbindin staining intensity. Expression of Pax-6, Sonic Hedgehog (Shh), astrotactin (Astn), reelin, and Cdk-5, genes correlated with the morphological development of the cerebellum, is reduced in the developing TR4−/− cerebellum. Together, our findings suggest that TR4 is required for normal cerebellar development. PMID:15767677

  5. Cerebellar modulation of human associative plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Masashi; Strigaro, Gionata; Murase, Nagako; Sadnicka, Anna; Galea, Joseph M; Edwards, Mark J; Rothwell, John C

    2012-01-01

    Paired associative stimulation (PAS) is a method commonly used in human studies of motor cortex synaptic plasticity. It involves repeated pairs of electrical stimuli to the median nerve and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex. If the interval between peripheral and TMS stimulation is around 21–25 ms, corticospinal excitability is increased for the following 30–60 min via a long term potentiation (LTP)-like effect within the primary motor cortex. Previous work has shown that PAS depends on the present and previous levels of activity in cortex, and that it can be modified by motor learning or attention. Here we show that simultaneous transcranial direct current stimulation (TDCS; 2 mA) over the cerebellum can abolish the PAS effect entirely. Surprisingly, the effect is seen when the PAS interval is 25 ms but not when it is 21.5 ms. There are two implications from this work. First, the cerebellum influences PAS effects in motor cortex; second, LTP-like effects of PAS have at least two different mechanisms. The results are relevant for interpretation of pathological changes that have been reported in response to PAS in people with movement disorders and to changes in healthy individuals following exercise or other interventions. PMID:22473780

  6. Contribution of the cerebellar flocculus to gaze control during active head movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belton, T.; McCrea, R. A.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The flocculus and ventral paraflocculus are adjacent regions of the cerebellar cortex that are essential for controlling smooth pursuit eye movements and for altering the performance of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). The question addressed in this study is whether these regions of the cerebellum are more globally involved in controlling gaze, regardless of whether eye or active head movements are used to pursue moving visual targets. Single-unit recordings were obtained from Purkinje (Pk) cells in the floccular region of squirrel monkeys that were trained to fixate and pursue small visual targets. Cell firing rate was recorded during smooth pursuit eye movements, cancellation of the VOR, combined eye-head pursuit, and spontaneous gaze shifts in the absence of targets. Pk cells were found to be much less sensitive to gaze velocity during combined eye-head pursuit than during ocular pursuit. They were not sensitive to gaze or head velocity during gaze saccades. Temporary inactivation of the floccular region by muscimol injection compromised ocular pursuit but had little effect on the ability of monkeys to pursue visual targets with head movements or to cancel the VOR during active head movements. Thus the signals produced by Pk cells in the floccular region are necessary for controlling smooth pursuit eye movements but not for coordinating gaze during active head movements. The results imply that individual functional modules in the cerebellar cortex are less involved in the global organization and coordination of movements than with parametric control of movements produced by a specific part of the body.

  7. Abnormal cerebellar morphometry in abstinent adolescent marijuana users

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Krista Lisdahl; Nagel, Bonnie J.; Tapert, Susan F.

    2010-01-01

    Background Functional neuroimaging data from adults have, in general, found frontocerebellar dysfunction associated with acute and chronic marijuana (MJ) use (Loeber & Yurgelun-Todd, 1999). One structural neuroimaging study found reduced cerebellar vermis volume in young adult MJ users with a history of heavy polysubstance use (Aasly et al., 1993). The goal of this study was to characterize cerebellar volume in adolescent chronic MJ users following one month of monitored abstinence. Method Participants were MJ users (n=16) and controls (n=16) aged 16-18 years. Extensive exclusionary criteria included history of psychiatric or neurologic disorders. Drug use history, neuropsychological data, and structural brain scans were collected after 28 days of monitored abstinence. Trained research staff defined cerebellar volumes (including three cerebellar vermis lobes and both cerebellar hemispheres) on high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance images. Results Adolescent MJ users demonstrated significantly larger inferior posterior (lobules VIII-X) vermis volume (p<.009) than controls, above and beyond effects of lifetime alcohol and other drug use, gender, and intracranial volume. Larger vermis volumes were associated with poorer executive functioning (p’s<.05). Conclusions Following one month of abstinence, adolescent MJ users had significantly larger posterior cerebellar vermis volumes than non-using controls. These greater volumes are suggested to be pathological based on linkage to poorer executive functioning. Longitudinal studies are needed to examine typical cerebellar development during adolescence and the influence of marijuana use. PMID:20413277

  8. Fatal remote cerebellar hemorrhage after supratentorial unruptured aneurysm surgery in patient with previous cerebellar infarction

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Eun-Jeong; Park, Jung-Soo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) is a rare complication of supratentorial and spinal surgeries, seldom requiring intervention but occasionally causing significant morbidity or even mortality. Although a number of theories have been proposed, the exact pathophysiology of RCH remains incompletely understood. Patient concerns: We present a 62-year-old patient with RCH encountered following surgical clipping of an unruptured middle cerebral artery bifurcation aneurysm in a patient with previous cerebellar infarction. Lessons: It is extremely rare, but sometimes, RCH can be life-threatening. It is necessary to check the patient's general condition, underlying diseases and medical history. And controlled drainage of the CSF seems to be most important. Arachnoidplasty may be a consideration and the position of the drain string might have to be carefully determined. PMID:28121936

  9. NEURON SPECIFIC α-ADRENERGIC RECEPTOR EXPRESSION IN HUMAN CEREBELLUM: IMPLICATIONS FOR EMERGING CEREBELLAR ROLES IN NEUROLOGIC DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    SCHAMBRA, U. B.; MACKENSEN, G. B.; STAFFORD-SMITH, M.; HAINES, D. E.; SCHWINN, D. A.

    2008-01-01

    Recent data suggest novel functional roles for cerebellar involvement in a number of neurologic diseases. Function of cerebellar neurons is known to be modulated by norepinephrine and adrenergic receptors. The distribution of adrenergic receptor subtypes has been described in experimental animals, but corroboration of such studies in the human cerebellum, necessary for drug treatment, is still lacking. In the present work we studied cell-specific localizations of α1 adrenergic receptor subtype mRNA (α1a, α1b, α1d), and α2 adrenergic receptor subtype mRNA (α2a, α2b, α2c) by in situ hybridization on cryostat sections of human cerebellum (cortical layers and dentate nucleus). We observed unique neuron-specific α1 adrenergic receptor and α2 adrenergic receptor subtype distribution in human cerebellum. The cerebellar cortex expresses mRNA encoding all six α adrenergic receptor subtypes, whereas dentate nucleus neurons express all subtype mRNAs, except α2a adrenergic receptor mRNA. All Purkinje cells label strongly for α2a and α2b adrenergic receptor mRNA. Additionally, Purkinje cells of the anterior lobe vermis (lobules I to V) and uvula/tonsil (lobules IX/HIX) express α1a and α2c subtypes, and Purkinje cells in the ansiform lobule (lobule HVII) and uvula/tonsil express α1b and α2c adrenergic receptor subtypes. Basket cells show a strong signal for α1a, moderate signal for α2a and light label for α2b adrenergic receptor mRNA. In stellate cells, besides a strong label of α2a adrenergic receptor mRNA in all and moderate label of α2b message in select stellate cells, the inner stellate cells are also moderately positive for α1b adrenergic receptor mRNA. Granule and Golgi cells express high levels of α2a and α2b adrenergic receptor mRNAs. These data contribute new information regarding specific location of adrenergic receptor subtypes in human cerebellar neurons. We discuss our observations in terms of possible modulatory roles of adrenergic

  10. Cerebral venous thrombosis presenting with cerebellar ataxia and cortical blindness.

    PubMed

    Ben Sassi, Samia; Mizouni, Habiba; Nabli, Fatma; Kallel, Lamia; Kefi, Mounir; Hentati, Fayçal

    2010-01-01

    Venous infarction in the cerebellum has been reported only rarely, probably because of the abundant venous collateral drainage in this region. Bilateral occipital infarction is a rare cause of visual loss in cerebral venous thrombosis. We describe a 50-year-old woman with a history of ulcerative colitis who developed acute cerebellar ataxia and cortical blindness. She had bilateral cerebellar and occipital lesions related to sigmoid venous thrombosis and achieved complete recovery with anticoagulation therapy. Cerebral venous thrombosis should be considered in cases of simultaneous cerebellar and occipital vascular lesions.

  11. Cerebellar Mutism Following Closed Head Injury in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Kariyattil, Rajeev; Rahim, Mohamed I. A.; Muthukuttiparambil, Unnikrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar mutism is a rare occurrence following paediatric trauma. Although it is quite common after posterior fossa surgery in children, this phenomenon has rarely been reported following other insults, such as trauma, and its pathophysiology remains poorly understood. We report a seven-year-old child who presented to the casualty department of Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in May 2013 with a traumatic right cerebellar contusion. The child presented with clinical features of cerebellar mutism but underwent a rapid and spontaneous recovery. The possible mechanism of this occurrence is discussed. PMID:25685374

  12. Lissencephaly with brainstem and cerebellar hypoplasia and congenital cataracts.

    PubMed

    Abumansour, Iman S; Wrogemann, Jens; Chudley, Albert E; Chodirker, Bernard N; Salman, Michael S

    2014-06-01

    Classical lissencephaly may be associated with cerebellar hypoplasia and when significant cerebellar abnormalities occur, defects in proteins encoded by TUBA1A, RELN, and very-low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) genes have been reported. We present a neonate with a severe neurologic phenotype associated with hypotonia, oropharyngeal incoordination that required a gastric tube for feeding, intractable epilepsy, and congenital cataracts. Her brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed classical lissencephaly, ventriculomegaly, absent corpus callosum, globular and vertical hippocampi, and severe cerebellar and brainstem hypoplasia. She died at 6 weeks of age. No specific molecular diagnosis was made. This likely represents a previously undescribed genetic lissencephaly syndrome.

  13. Differential prefrontal-like deficit in children after cerebellar astrocytoma and medulloblastoma tumor

    PubMed Central

    Vaquero, Encarna; Gómez, Carlos M; Quintero, Eliana A; González-Rosa, Javier J; Márquez, Javier

    2008-01-01

    Background This study was realized thanks to the collaboration of children and adolescents who had been resected from cerebellar tumors. The medulloblastoma group (CE+, n = 7) in addition to surgery received radiation and chemotherapy. The astrocytoma group (CE, n = 13) did not receive additional treatments. Each clinical group was compared in their executive functioning with a paired control group (n = 12). The performances of the clinical groups with respect to controls were compared considering the tumor's localization (vermis or hemisphere) and the affectation (or not) of the dentate nucleus. Executive variables were correlated with the age at surgery, the time between surgery-evaluation and the resected volume. Methods The executive functioning was assessed by means of WCST, Complex Rey Figure, Controlled Oral Word Association Test (letter and animal categories), Digits span (WISC-R verbal scale) and Stroop test. These tests are very sensitive to dorsolateral PFC and/or to medial frontal cortex functions. The scores for the non-verbal Raven IQ were also obtained. Direct scores were corrected by age and transformed in standard scores using normative data. The neuropsychological evaluation was made at 3.25 (SD = 2.74) years from surgery in CE group and at 6.47 (SD = 2.77) in CE+ group. Results The Medulloblastoma group showed severe executive deficit (≤ 1.5 SD below normal mean) in all assessed tests, the most severe occurring in vermal patients. The Astrocytoma group also showed executive deficits in digits span, semantic fluency (animal category) and moderate to slight deficit in Stroop (word and colour) tests. In the astrocytoma group, the tumor's localization and dentate affectation showed different profile and level of impairment: moderate to slight for vermal and hemispheric patients respectively. The resected volume, age at surgery and the time between surgery-evaluation correlated with some neuropsychological executive variables. Conclusion Results

  14. Age-related changes in rat cerebellar basket cells: a quantitative study using unbiased stereological methods

    PubMed Central

    HENRIQUE, RUI M. F.; ROCHA, EDUARDO; REIS, ALCINDA; MARCOS, RICARDO; OLIVEIRA, MARIA H.; SILVA, MARIA W.; MONTEIRO, ROGÉRIO A. F.

    2001-01-01

    Cortical cerebellar basket cells are stable postmitotic cells; hence, they are liable to endure age-related changes. Since the cerebellum is a vital organ for the postural control, equilibrium and motor coordination, we aimed to determine the quantitative morphological changes in those interneurons with the ageing process, using unbiased techniques. Material from the cerebellar cortex (Crus I and Crus II) was collected from female rats aged 2, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21 and 24 mo (5 animals per each age group), fixed by intracardiac perfusion, and processed for transmission electron microscopy, using conventional techniques. Serial semithin sections were obtained (5 blocks from each rat), enabling the determination of the number-weighted mean nuclear volume (by the nucleator method). On ultrathin sections, 25 cell profiles from each animal were photographed. The volume density of the nucleus, ground substance, mitochondria, Golgi apparatus (Golgi) and dense bodies (DB), and the mean surface density of the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) were determined, by point counting, using a morphometric grid. The mean total volumes of the soma and organelles and the mean total surface area of the RER [s̄N (RER)] were then calculated. The results were analysed with 1-way ANOVA; posthoc pairwise comparisons of group means were performed using the Newman-Keuls test. The relation between age and each of the parameters was studied by regression analysis. Significant age-related changes were observed for the mean volumes of the soma, ground substance, Golgi, DB, and s̄N (RER). Positive linear trends were found for the mean volumes of the ground substance, Golgi, and DB; a negative linear trend was found for the s̄N (RER). These results indicate that rat cerebellar basket cells endure important age-related changes. The significant decrease in the s̄N (RER) may be responsible for a reduction in the rate of protein synthesis. Additionally, it may be implicated in a cascade of events

  15. Gestational lead exposure induces developmental abnormalities and up-regulates apoptosis of fetal cerebellar cells in rats.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Alyaa M; Al-Fadhli, Ameera S; Rao, Muddanna S; Kilarkaje, Narayana

    2015-01-01

    Lead (Pb), a known environmental toxicant, adversely affects almost all organ systems. In this study, we investigated the effects of maternal lead exposure on fetal rat cerebellum. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were given lead nitrate in drinking water (0, 0.5, and 1%) for two weeks before conception, and during pregnancy. Fetuses were collected by caesarian section on gestational day 21 and observed for developmental abnormalities. The fetal cerebellar sections from control and 1% lead group were stained with cresyl violet. Immunohistochemical expressions of p53, Bax, Bcl-2, and caspase 3 were quantified by AnalySIS image analyzer (Life Science, Germany). Lead exposure induced developmental abnormalities of eyes, ear, limbs, neck and ventral abdominal wall; however, these abnormalities were commonly seen in the 1% lead-treated group. In addition, lead also caused fetal mortality and reduced body growth in both dose groups and reduced brain weight in the 1% lead-treated group. The fetal cerebella from the 1% lead-treated group showed unorganized cerebellar cortical layers, and degenerative changes in granule and Purkinje cells such as the formation of clumps of Nissl granules. An increase in Bax and caspase 3, and a decrease in Bcl-2 (p < 0.05), but not in p53, showed apoptosis of the neurons. In conclusion, gestational lead exposure in rats induces fetal toxicity and developmental abnormalities. The lead exposure also impairs development of cerebellar layers, induces structural changes, and apoptosis in the fetal cerebellar cortex. These results suggest that lead exposure during gestation is extremely toxic to developing cerebellum in rats.

  16. Chronic THC intake modifies fundamental cerebellar functions

    PubMed Central

    Stella, Nephi

    2013-01-01

    Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the principal bioactive component in the Cannabis plant, is truly a captivating drug. Acute and chronic THC intake produces a spectrum of biological effects ranging from transient psychotropic effects to prolonged medicinal benefits, many of which have been fostered for centuries by our society. In the July 2013 issue of the JCI, Cutando et al. combined mouse genetics with classic mouse behavioral analysis to deepen our understanding of the physiological consequence of subchronic THC intake on eyeblink reflexes, a fundamental neuronal adaptive response, revealing that this regimen leads to downregulation of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (referred to as CB1 in the Cutando et al. article) in cerebellar stress fibers and the activation of microglia, raising provocative new questions about the safety profile of regimented THC intake. PMID:23863631

  17. Classically conditioned postural reflex in cerebellar patients.

    PubMed

    Kolb, F P; Lachauer, S; Maschke, M; Timmann, D

    2004-09-01

    The aim of the current study was to compare postural responses to repetitive platform-evoked perturbations in cerebellar patients with those of healthy subjects using a classical conditioning paradigm. The perturbations consisted of tilting of the platform (unconditioned stimulus: US) at random time intervals, preceded by an auditory signal that represented the conditioning stimulus (CS). Physiological reactions were recorded biomechanically by measuring the vertical ground forces, yielding the center of vertical pressure (CVP), and electrophysiologically by EMG measurements of the main muscle groups of both legs. The recording session consisted of a control section with US-alone trials, a testing section with paired stimuli and a brief final section with US-alone trials. Healthy control subjects were divided into those establishing conditioned responses (CR) in all muscles tested (strategy I) and those with CR in the gastrocnemius muscles only (strategy II), suggesting an associative motor-related process is involved. Patients with a diffuse, non-localized disease were almost unable to establish CR. This was also true for a patient with a focal surgical lesion with no CR on the affected side but who, simultaneously, showed an essentially normal CR incidence on the intact side. During US-alone trials healthy controls exhibited a remarkable decay of the UR amplitude due to a non-associative motor-related process such as habituation. The decay was most prominent in the paired trials section. In contrast, patients showed no significant differences in the UR amplitude throughout the entire recording session. Analysis of the CVP supported the electrophysiological findings, showing CR in the controls only. The differences between the responses of control subjects and those of the cerebellar patients imply strongly that the cerebellum is involved critically in controlling associative and non-associative motor-related processes.

  18. Motor dysfunction in the tottering mouse is linked to cerebellar spontaneous low frequency oscillations revealed by flavoprotein autofluorescence optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang; Popa, Laurentiu S.; Wang, Xinming; Gao, Wangcai; Barnes, Justin; Hendrix, Claudia M.; Hess, Ellen J.; Ebner, Timothy J.

    2009-02-01

    Flavoprotein autofluorescence optical imaging is developing into a powerful research tool to study neural activity, particularly in vivo. In this study we used this imaging technique to investigate the neuronal mechanism underlying the episodic movement disorder that is characteristic of the tottering (tg) mouse, a model of episodic ataxia type 2. Both EA2 and the tg mouse are caused by mutations in the gene encoding Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. These mutations result in a reduction in P/Q Ca2+ channel function. Both EA2 patients and tg mice have a characteristic phenotype consisting of transient motor attacks triggered by stress, caffeine or ethanol. The neural events underlying these episodes of dystonia are unknown. Flavoprotein autofluorescence optical imaging revealed spontaneous, transient, low frequency oscillations in the cerebellar cortex of the tg mouse. Lasting from 30 - 120 minutes, the oscillations originate in one area then spread to surrounding regions over 30 - 60 minutes. The oscillations are reduced by removing extracellular Ca2+ and blocking Cav 1.2/1.3 (L-type) Ca2+ channels. The oscillations are not affected by blocking AMPA receptors or by electrical stimulation of the parallel fiber - Purkinje cell circuit, suggesting the oscillations are generated intrinsically in the cerebellar cortex. Conversely, L-type Ca2+ agonists generate oscillations with similar properties. In the awake tg mouse, transcranial flavoprotein imaging revealed low frequency oscillations that are accentuated during caffeine induced attacks of dystonia. The oscillations increase during the attacks of dystonia and are coupled to oscillations in face and hindlimb EMG activity. These transient oscillations and the associated cerebellar dysfunction provide a novel mechanism by which an ion channel disorder results in episodic motor dysfunction.

  19. Interaction between Purkinje Cells and Inhibitory Interneurons May Create Adjustable Output Waveforms to Generate Timed Cerebellar Output

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Simon; Optican, Lance M.

    2008-01-01

    We develop a new model that explains how the cerebellum may generate the timing in classical delay eyeblink conditioning. Recent studies show that both Purkinje cells (PCs) and inhibitory interneurons (INs) have parallel signal processing streams with two time scales: an AMPA receptor-mediated fast process and a metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-mediated slow process. Moreover, one consistent finding is an increased excitability of PC dendrites (in Larsell's lobule HVI) in animals when they acquire the classical delay eyeblink conditioning naturally, in contrast to in vitro studies, where learning involves long-term depression (LTD). Our model proposes that the delayed response comes from the slow dynamics of mGluR-mediated IP3 activation, and the ensuing calcium concentration change, and not from LTP/LTD. The conditioned stimulus (tone), arriving on the parallel fibers, triggers this slow activation in INs and PC spines. These excitatory (from PC spines) and inhibitory (from INs) signals then interact at the PC dendrites to generate variable waveforms of PC activation. When the unconditioned stimulus (puff), arriving on the climbing fibers, is coupled frequently with this slow activation the waveform is amplified (due to an increased excitability) and leads to a timed pause in the PC population. The disinhibition of deep cerebellar nuclei by this timed pause causes the delayed conditioned response. This suggested PC-IN interaction emphasizes a richer role of the INs in learning and also conforms to the recent evidence that mGluR in the cerebellar cortex may participate in slow motor execution. We show that the suggested mechanism can endow the cerebellar cortex with the versatility to learn almost any temporal pattern, in addition to those that arise in classical conditioning. PMID:18648667

  20. Patients with first-episode, drug-naive schizophrenia and subjects at ultra-high risk of psychosis shared increased cerebellar-default mode network connectivity at rest

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Houliang; Guo, Wenbin; Liu, Feng; Wang, Guodong; Lyu, Hailong; Wu, Renrong; Chen, Jindong; Wang, Shuai; Li, Lehua; Zhao, Jingping

    2016-01-01

    Increased cerebellar-default mode network (DMN) connectivity has been observed in first-episode, drug-naive patients with schizophrenia. However, it remains unclear whether increased cerebellar-DMN connectivity starts earlier than disease onset. Thirty-four ultra-high risk (UHR) subjects, 31 first-episode, drug-naive patients with schizophrenia and 37 healthy controls were enrolled for a resting-state scan. The imaging data were analyzed using the seed-based functional connectivity (FC) method. Compared with the controls, UHR subjects and patients with schizophrenia shared increased connectivity between the right Crus I and bilateral posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus and between Lobule IX and the left superior medial prefrontal cortex. There are positive correlations between the right Crus I-bilateral precuneus connectivity and clinical variables (Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes/Positive and Negative Symptom Scale negative symptoms/total scores) in the UHR subjects. Increased cerebellar-DMN connectivity shared by the UHR subjects and the patients not only highlights the importance of the DMN in the pathophysiology of psychosis but also may be a trait alteration for psychosis. PMID:27188233

  1. Pharmacologically Counteracting a Phenotypic Difference in Cerebellar GABAA Receptor Response to Alcohol Prevents Excessive Alcohol Consumption in a High Alcohol-Consuming Rodent Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Josh Steven; Nipper, Michelle A.; Richardson, Ben D.; Jensen, Jeremiah; Helms, Melinda; Finn, Deborah Ann

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar granule cell GABAA receptor responses to alcohol vary as a function of alcohol consumption phenotype, representing a potential neural mechanism for genetic predilection for alcohol abuse (Kaplan et al., 2013; Mohr et al., 2013). However, there are numerous molecular targets of alcohol in the cerebellum, and it is not known how they interact to affect cerebellar processing during consumption of socially relevant amounts of alcohol. Importantly, direct evidence for a causative role of the cerebellum in alcohol consumption phenotype is lacking. Here we determined that concentrations of alcohol that would be achieved in the blood after consumption of 1–2 standard units (9 mm) suppresses transmission through the cerebellar cortex in low, but not high, alcohol consuming rodent genotypes (DBA/2J and C57BL/6J mice, respectively). This genotype-selective suppression is mediated exclusively by enhancement of granule cell GABAA receptor currents, which only occurs in DBA/2J mice. Simulating the DBA/2J cellular phenotype in C57BL/6J mice by infusing the GABAA receptor agonist, 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo-[5,4-c]pyridine-3-ol hydrochloride, into cerebellar lobules IV–VI, in vivo, significantly reduced their alcohol consumption and blood alcohol concentrations achieved. 4,5,6,7-Tetrahydroisoxazolo-[5,4-c]pyridine-3-ol hydrochloride infusions also significantly decreased sucrose consumption, but they did not affect consumption of water or general locomotion. Thus, genetic differences in cerebellar response to alcohol contributes to alcohol consumption phenotype, and targeting the cerebellar GABAA receptor system may be a clinically viable therapeutic strategy for reducing excessive alcohol consumption. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Alcohol abuse is a leading cause of preventable death and illness; and although alcohol use disorders are 50%–60% genetically determined, the cellular and molecular mechanisms of such genetic influences are largely unknown. Here we

  2. Past, Present and Future Therapeutics for Cerebellar Ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Marmolino, D; Manto, M

    2010-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxias are a group of disabling neurological disorders. Patients exhibit a cerebellar syndrome and can also present with extra-cerebellar deficits, namely pigmentary retinopathy, extrapyramidal movement disorders, pyramidal signs, cortical symptoms (seizures, cognitive impairment/behavioural symptoms), and peripheral neuropathy. Recently, deficits in cognitive operations have been unraveled. Cerebellar ataxias are heterogeneous both at the phenotypic and genotypic point of view. Therapeutical trials performed during these last 4 decades have failed in most cases, in particular because drugs were not targeting a deleterious pathway, but were given to counteract putative defects in neurotransmission. The identification of the causative mutations of many hereditary ataxias, the development of relevant animal models and the recent identifications of the molecular mechanisms underlying ataxias are impacting on the development of new drugs. We provide an overview of the pharmacological treatments currently used in the clinical practice and we discuss the drugs under development. PMID:20808545

  3. Asterixis as a Presentation of Cerebellar Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Siniscalchi, Antonio; Gallelli, Luca; Di Benedetto, Olindo; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2012-01-01

    Asterixis is not yet considered a common neurological sign of cerebellum infarction, and the pathogenic mechanism for asterixis remains elusive. We report a 58-year-old male with moderate hypertension who presented to our emergency department for acute headache in both cervical and occipital regions of the left side. About 2 hours later the patient developed ipsilateral asterixis in the upper left limb; 3 days later the asterixis disappeared. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain disclosed cerebellar infarctions at the left superior cerebellar artery. In conclusion, we observed that a transitory asterixis associated with ipsilateral headache can be an initial clinical manifestation of ipsilateral cerebellar infarctions in the superior cerebellar artery area. PMID:23359270

  4. Hypocupremia: A Possible Association with Late Cortical Cerebellar Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Shivam Om; Machado, Duarte G.

    2014-01-01

    Background We report a patient, diagnosed with late cortical cerebellar atrophy, who had persistent low serum copper levels. Case report A 48-year-old male developed progressive difficulty with balance, frequent falls, and dysarthric speech, which worsened over a short time span. He had an extensive ataxia work-up, which was unremarkable except for persistent low serum copper levels despite adequate supplementation. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed marked cerebellar atrophy. The patient experienced progressive worsening of symptoms, which did not improve with either oral or parenteral copper supplementation. Discussion To our knowledge, ours is the first case report of late cortical cerebellar atrophy in the setting of low serum copper levels. The current report should trigger further research in mechanisms leading to copper deficiency and its possible role in cerebellar disease. PMID:25247109

  5. Cerebellar blood flow in methylmercury poisoning (Minamata disease).

    PubMed

    Itoh, K; Korogi, Y; Tomiguchi, S; Takahashi, M; Okajima, T; Sato, H

    2001-04-01

    We looked at regional cerebellar blood flow in patients with Minamata disease (MD) using technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer (99m-Tc-ECD). We carried out single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on 15 patients with MD (eight men, seven women, aged 51-78 years, mean 70.5 years) and 11 control subjects (eight men, three women, aged 62-80 years, mean 72.5 years). Regional blood flow was measured in the superior, middle, and inferior portions of the cerebellar hemispheres, and the frontal, temporal and occipital cerebral lobes. The degree of cerebellar atrophy was assessed on MRI. There were significant differences in regional blood flow in all parts of the cerebellum between patients and control, but no significant decrease was observed in the cerebrum. Blood flow was lower in the inferior cerebellum than in the other parts. Even in patients without cerebellar atrophy, flow was significantly decreased regional blood flow in the inferior part.

  6. Anomalous Cerebellar Anatomy in Chinese Children with Dyslexia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Chen, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Yi-Wei; Bi, Hong-Yan

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellar deficit hypothesis for developmental dyslexia claims that cerebellar dysfunction causes the failures in the acquisition of visuomotor skills and automatic reading and writing skills. In people with dyslexia in the alphabetic languages, the abnormal activation and structure of the right or bilateral cerebellar lobes have been identified. Using a typical implicit motor learning task, however, one neuroimaging study demonstrated the left cerebellar dysfunction in Chinese children with dyslexia. In the present study, using voxel-based morphometry, we found decreased gray matter volume in the left cerebellum in Chinese children with dyslexia relative to age-matched controls. The positive correlation between reading performance and regional gray matter volume suggests that the abnormal structure in the left cerebellum is responsible for reading disability in Chinese children with dyslexia. PMID:27047403

  7. Malignant cerebellar peduncle lesions - rapid progression and poor outcome

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Navneet; Kapoor, Ankur; Savardekar, Amey; Radotra, B. D.; Chatterjee, Debjyoti; Gupta, Sunil K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tumors arising from cerebellar peduncle are extremely rare and behave aggressively. The inclusion of these into either cerebellar or brainstem gliomas is contentious. Case Description: We performed clinicopathological review of three patients treated at our institute and surveyed the literature for previous such reported cases. Mean duration of symptoms in our patients was 2 weeks. Subtotal tumor resection was performed in two patients while the third underwent stereotactic biopsy followed by chemoradiotherapy. Histopathology revealed glioblastoma in initial two patients and medulloblastoma Grade IV in the third. The two patients who underwent surgical excision succumbed to the illness within 2 days and a month, respectively. Conclusion: Malignant cerebellar peduncular lesions have poor overall survival despite surgical debulking. It is not confirmed whether these tumors should be considered as cerebellar lesions or brainstem gliomas due to aggressive clinical behavior, and so the ideal line of management is not yet known. PMID:27057396

  8. Isolated cerebellar toxoplasmosis as a complication of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Pott, H; Castelo, A

    2013-01-01

    Isolated cerebellar mass lesion is an uncommon presentation of toxoplasmosis. The authors report one rare case in a 50-year-old HIV-infected male patient who presented with clipped speech, gait ataxia and incoordination. The cerebellar toxoplasmosis was suspected based on imaging findings, despite the atypical location. This case highlights the need for a high index of clinical suspicion among HIV-infected patients with neurological manifestations and suspicious neuroimaging findings.

  9. Primary cerebellopontine progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy diagnosed premortem by cerebellar biopsy.

    PubMed

    Jones, H R; Hedley-Whyte, E T; Freidberg, S R; Kelleher, J E; Krolikowski, J

    1982-02-01

    A subacute progressive cerebellar brainstem syndrome developed in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus in remission. Cerebellar biopsy documented the diagnosis of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Data from this patient and 10 others in the literature emphasize the need to consider this diagnosis when ataxia develops in any patient with underlying malignancy, chronic infection, or other disease that involves immunological incompetence. Although the ataxic form of PML is not of nosological relevance, early diagnosis may eventually have therapeutic importance.

  10. Glucose utilization in the inferior cerebellar vermis and ocular myoclonus.

    PubMed

    Yakushiji, Y; Otsubo, R; Hayashi, T; Fukuchi, K; Yamada, N; Hasegawa, Y; Minematsu, K

    2006-07-11

    In a patient with symptomatic ocular myoclonus, the authors observed the regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose use (rCMRGlu) before and after successful treatment with clonazepam. Even after the symptoms resolved, the rCMRGlu in the hypertrophic olive increased persistently, whereas that in the inferior cerebellar vermis contralateral to the hypertrophic olive decreased. The inferior cerebellar vermis, belonging to the vestibulocerebellar system, may be associated with the generation of symptomatic ocular myoclonus.

  11. Neurochondrin is a neuronal target antigen in autoimmune cerebellar degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Miske, Ramona; Gross, Catharina C.; Scharf, Madeleine; Golombeck, Kristin S.; Hartwig, Marvin; Bhatia, Urvashi; Schulte-Mecklenbeck, Andreas; Bönte, Kathrin; Strippel, Christine; Schöls, Ludger; Synofzik, Matthis; Lohmann, Hubertus; Dettmann, Inga Madeleine; Deppe, Michael; Mindorf, Swantje; Warnecke, Tobias; Denno, Yvonne; Teegen, Bianca; Probst, Christian; Brakopp, Stefanie; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter; Wiendl, Heinz; Stöcker, Winfried; Meuth, Sven G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To report on a novel neuronal target antigen in 3 patients with autoimmune cerebellar degeneration. Methods: Three patients with subacute to chronic cerebellar ataxia and controls underwent detailed clinical and neuropsychological assessment together with quantitative high-resolution structural MRI. Sera and CSF were subjected to comprehensive autoantibody screening by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and immunoblot. Immunoprecipitation with lysates of hippocampus and cerebellum combined with mass spectrometric analysis was used to identify the autoantigen, which was verified by recombinant expression in HEK293 cells and use in several immunoassays. Multiparameter flow cytometry was performed on peripheral blood and CSF, and peripheral blood was subjected to T-cell receptor spectratyping. Results: Patients presented with a subacute to chronic cerebellar and brainstem syndrome. MRI was consistent with cortical and cerebellar gray matter atrophy associated with subsequent neuroaxonal degeneration. IFA screening revealed strong immunoglobulin G1 reactivity in sera and CSF with hippocampal and cerebellar molecular and granular layers, but not with a panel of 30 recombinantly expressed established neural autoantigens. Neurochondrin was subsequently identified as the target antigen, verified by IFA and immunoblot with HEK293 cells expressing human neurochondrin as well as the ability of recombinant neurochondrin to neutralize the autoantibodies' tissue reaction. Immune phenotyping revealed intrathecal accumulation and activation of B and T cells during the acute but not chronic phase of the disease. T-cell receptor spectratyping suggested an antigen-specific T-cell response accompanying the formation of antineurochondrin autoantibodies. No such neurochondrin reactivity was found in control cohorts of various neural autoantibody-associated neurologic syndromes, relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, cerebellar type of multiple system atrophy, hereditary

  12. Proprioceptive Localization Deficits in People With Cerebellar Damage.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Heidi M; Therrien, Amanda S; Bastian, Amy J

    2017-04-01

    It has been hypothesized that an important function of the cerebellum is predicting the state of the body during movement. Yet, the extent of cerebellar involvement in perception of limb state (i.e., proprioception, specifically limb position sense) has yet to be determined. Here, we investigated whether patients with cerebellar damage have deficits when trying to locate their hand in space (i.e., proprioceptive localization), which is highly important for everyday movements. By comparing performance during passive robot-controlled and active self-made multi-joint movements, we were able to determine that some cerebellar patients show improved precision during active movement (i.e., active benefit), comparable to controls, whereas other patients have reduced active benefit. Importantly, the differences in patient performance are not explained by patient diagnosis or clinical ratings of impairment. Furthermore, a subsequent experiment confirmed that active deficits in proprioceptive localization occur during both single-joint and multi-joint movements. As such, it is unlikely that localization deficits can be explained by the multi-joint coordination deficits occurring after cerebellar damage. Our results suggest that cerebellar damage may cause varied impairments to different elements of proprioceptive sense. It follows that proprioceptive localization should be adequately accounted for in clinical testing and rehabilitation of people with cerebellar damage.

  13. Transplantation and Stem Cell Therapy for Cerebellar Degenerations.

    PubMed

    Cendelin, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Stem cell-based and regenerative therapy may become a hopeful treatment for neurodegenerative diseases including hereditary cerebellar degenerations. Neurotransplantation therapy mainly aims to substitute lost cells, but potential effects might include various mechanisms including nonspecific trophic effects and stimulation of endogenous regenerative processes and neural plasticity. Nevertheless, currently, there remain serious limitations. There is a wide spectrum of human hereditary cerebellar degenerations as well as numerous cerebellar mutant mouse strains that serve as models for the development of effective therapy. By now, transplantation has been shown to ameliorate cerebellar function, e.g. in Purkinje cell degeneration mice, Lurcher mutant mice and mouse models of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 and type 2 and Niemann-Pick disease type C. Despite the lack of direct comparative studies, it appears that there might be differences in graft development and functioning between various types of cerebellar degeneration. Investigation of the relation of graft development to specific morphological, microvascular or biochemical features of the diseased host tissue in various cerebellar degenerations may help to identify factors determining the fate of grafted cells and potential of their functional integration.

  14. Neurodevelopmental Malformations of the Cerebellar Vermis in Genetically Engineered Rats.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Raddy L; Van Dine, Sarah E; Gilbert, Mary E; Leheste, Joerg R; Torres, German

    2015-12-01

    The cerebellar vermis is particularly vulnerable to neurodevelopmental malformations in humans and rodents. Sprague-Dawley, and Long-Evans rats exhibit spontaneous cerebellar malformations consisting of heterotopic neurons and glia in the molecular layer of the vermis. Malformations are almost exclusively found along the primary fissure and are indicative of deficits of neuronal migration during cerebellar development. In the present report, we test the prediction that genetically engineered rats on Sprague-Dawley or Long-Evans backgrounds will also exhibit the same cerebellar malformations. Consistent with our hypothesis, we found that three different transgenic lines on two different backgrounds had cerebellar malformations. Heterotopia in transgenic rats had identical cytoarchitecture as that observed in wild-type rats including altered morphology of Bergmann glia. In light of the possibility that heterotopia could affect results from behavioral studies, these data suggest that histological analyses be performed in studies of cerebellar function or development when using genetically engineered rats on these backgrounds in order to have more careful interpretation of experimental findings.

  15. Voltage-gated calcium channel autoimmune cerebellar degeneration

    PubMed Central

    McKasson, Marilyn; Clawson, Susan A.; Hill, Kenneth E.; Wood, Blair; Carlson, Noel; Bromberg, Mark; Greenlee, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To describe response to treatment in a patient with autoantibodies against voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) who presented with autoimmune cerebellar degeneration and subsequently developed Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS), and to study the effect of the patient's autoantibodies on Purkinje cells in rat cerebellar slice cultures. Methods: Case report and study of rat cerebellar slice cultures incubated with patient VGCC autoantibodies. Results: A 53-year-old man developed progressive incoordination with ataxic speech. Laboratory evaluation revealed VGCC autoantibodies without other antineuronal autoantibodies. Whole-body PET scans 6 and 12 months after presentation detected no malignancy. The patient improved significantly with IV immunoglobulin G (IgG), prednisone, and mycophenolate mofetil, but worsened after IV IgG was halted secondary to aseptic meningitis. He subsequently developed weakness with electrodiagnostic evidence of LEMS. The patient's IgG bound to Purkinje cells in rat cerebellar slice cultures, followed by neuronal death. Reactivity of the patient's autoantibodies with VGCCs was confirmed by blocking studies with defined VGCC antibodies. Conclusions: Autoimmune cerebellar degeneration associated with VGCC autoantibodies may precede onset of LEMS and may improve with immunosuppressive treatment. Binding of anti-VGCC antibodies to Purkinje cells in cerebellar slice cultures may be followed by cell death. Patients with anti-VGCC autoantibodies may be at risk of irreversible neurologic injury over time, and treatment should be initiated early. PMID:27088118

  16. Altered cerebellar connectivity in Parkinson's patients ON and OFF L-DOPA medication

    PubMed Central

    Festini, Sara B.; Bernard, Jessica A.; Kwak, Youngbin; Peltier, Scott; Bohnen, Nicolaas I.; Müller, Martijn L. T. M.; Dayalu, Praveen; Seidler, Rachael D.

    2015-01-01

    Although nigrostriatal changes are most commonly affiliated with Parkinson's disease, the role of the cerebellum in Parkinson's has become increasingly apparent. The present study used lobule-based cerebellar resting state functional connectivity to (1) compare cerebellar-whole brain and cerebellar-cerebellar connectivity in Parkinson's patients both ON and OFF L-DOPA medication and controls, and to (2) relate variations in cerebellar connectivity to behavioral performance. Results indicated that, when contrasted to the control group, Parkinson's patients OFF medication had increased levels of cerebellar-whole brain and cerebellar-cerebellar connectivity, whereas Parkinson's patients ON medication had decreased levels of cerebellar-whole brain and cerebellar-cerebellar connectivity. Moreover, analyses relating levels of cerebellar connectivity to behavioral measures demonstrated that, within each group, increased levels of connectivity were most often associated with improved cognitive and motor performance, but there were several instances where increased connectivity was related to poorer performance. Overall, the present study found medication-variant cerebellar connectivity in Parkinson's patients, further demonstrating cerebellar changes associated with Parkinson's disease and the moderating effects of medication. PMID:25954184

  17. Disruption of the LTD dialogue between the cerebellum and the cortex in Angelman syndrome model: a timing hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Cheron, Guy; Márquez-Ruiz, Javier; Kishino, Tatsuya; Dan, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a genetic neurodevelopmental disorder in which cerebellar functioning impairment has been documented despite the absence of gross structural abnormalities. Characteristically, a spontaneous 160 Hz oscillation emerges in the Purkinje cells network of the Ube3am−/p+ Angelman mouse model. This abnormal oscillation is induced by enhanced Purkinje cell rhythmicity and hypersynchrony along the parallel fiber beam. We present a pathophysiological hypothesis for the neurophysiology underlying major aspects of the clinical phenotype of AS, including cognitive, language and motor deficits, involving long-range connection between the cerebellar and the cortical networks. This hypothesis states that the alteration of the cerebellar rhythmic activity impinges cerebellar long-term depression (LTD) plasticity, which in turn alters the LTD plasticity in the cerebral cortex. This hypothesis was based on preliminary experiments using electrical stimulation of the whiskers pad performed in alert mice showing that after a 8 Hz LTD-inducing protocol, the cerebellar LTD accompanied by a delayed response in the wild type (WT) mice is missing in Ube3am−/p+ mice and that the LTD induced in the barrel cortex following the same peripheral stimulation in wild mice is reversed into a LTP in the Ube3am−/p+ mice. The control exerted by the cerebellum on the excitation vs. inhibition balance in the cerebral cortex and possible role played by the timing plasticity of the Purkinje cell LTD on the spike–timing dependent plasticity (STDP) of the pyramidal neurons are discussed in the context of the present hypothesis. PMID:25477791

  18. Cerebellar-Motor Dysfunction in Schizophrenia and Psychosis-Risk: The Importance of Regional Cerebellar Analysis Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Jessica A.; Mittal, Vijay A.

    2014-01-01

    Motor abnormalities in individuals with schizophrenia and those at-risk for psychosis are well documented. An accumulating body of work has also highlighted motor abnormalities related to cerebellar dysfunction in schizophrenia including eye-blink conditioning, timing, postural control, and motor learning. We have also recently found evidence for motor dysfunction in individuals at ultra high-risk for psychosis (1–3). This is particularly relevant as the cerebellum is thought to be central to the cognitive dysmetria model of schizophrenia, and these overt motor signs may point to more general cerebellar dysfunction in the etiology of psychotic disorders. While studies have provided evidence indicative of motor cerebellar dysfunction in at-risk populations and in schizophrenia, findings with respect to the cerebellum have been mixed. One factor potentially contributing to these mixed results is the whole-structure approach taken when investigating the cerebellum. In non-human primates, there are distinct closed-loop circuits between the cerebellum, thalamus, and brain with motor and non-motor cortical regions. Recent human neuroimaging has supported this finding and indicates that there is a cerebellar functional topography (4), and this information is being missed with whole-structure approaches. Here, we review cerebellar-motor dysfunction in individuals with schizophrenia and those at-risk for psychosis. We also discuss cerebellar abnormalities in psychosis, and the cerebellar functional topography. Because of the segregated functional regions of the cerebellum, we propose that it is important to look at the structure regionally in order to better understand its role in motor dysfunction in these populations. This is analogous to approaches taken with the basal ganglia, where each region is considered separately. Such an approach is necessary to better understand cerebellar pathophysiology on a macro-structural level with respect to the pathogenesis of

  19. In vivo single branch axotomy induces GAP-43-dependent sprouting and synaptic remodeling in cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Allegra Mascaro, Anna Letizia; Cesare, Paolo; Sacconi, Leonardo; Grasselli, Giorgio; Mandolesi, Georgia; Maco, Bohumil; Knott, Graham W; Huang, Lieven; De Paola, Vincenzo; Strata, Piergiorgio; Pavone, Francesco S

    2013-06-25

    Plasticity in the central nervous system in response to injury is a complex process involving axonal remodeling regulated by specific molecular pathways. Here, we dissected the role of growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43; also known as neuromodulin and B-50) in axonal structural plasticity by using, as a model, climbing fibers. Single axonal branches were dissected by laser axotomy, avoiding collateral damage to the adjacent dendrite and the formation of a persistent glial scar. Despite the very small denervated area, the injured axons consistently reshape the connectivity with surrounding neurons. At the same time, adult climbing fibers react by sprouting new branches through the intact surroundings. Newly formed branches presented varicosities, suggesting that new axons were more than just exploratory sprouts. Correlative light and electron microscopy reveals that the sprouted branch contains large numbers of vesicles, with varicosities in the close vicinity of Purkinje dendrites. By using an RNA interference approach, we found that downregulating GAP-43 causes a significant increase in the turnover of presynaptic boutons. In addition, silencing hampers the generation of reactive sprouts. Our findings show the requirement of GAP-43 in sustaining synaptic stability and promoting the initiation of axonal regrowth.

  20. Model-based action planning involves cortico-cerebellar and basal ganglia networks

    PubMed Central

    Fermin, Alan S. R.; Yoshida, Takehiko; Yoshimoto, Junichiro; Ito, Makoto; Tanaka, Saori C.; Doya, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Humans can select actions by learning, planning, or retrieving motor memories. Reinforcement Learning (RL) associates these processes with three major classes of strategies for action selection: exploratory RL learns state-action values by exploration, model-based RL uses internal models to simulate future states reached by hypothetical actions, and motor-memory RL selects past successful state-action mapping. In order to investigate the neural substrates that implement these strategies, we conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment while humans performed a sequential action selection task under conditions that promoted the use of a specific RL strategy. The ventromedial prefrontal cortex and ventral striatum increased activity in the exploratory condition; the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, dorsomedial striatum, and lateral cerebellum in the model-based condition; and the supplementary motor area, putamen, and anterior cerebellum in the motor-memory condition. These findings suggest that a distinct prefrontal-basal ganglia and cerebellar network implements the model-based RL action selection strategy. PMID:27539554

  1. The cerebral cortex of the pygmy hippopotamus, Hexaprotodon liberiensis (Cetartiodactyla, Hippopotamidae): MRI, cytoarchitecture, and neuronal morphology.

    PubMed

    Butti, Camilla; Ewan Fordyce, R; Ann Raghanti, Mary; Gu, Xiaosi; Bonar, Christopher J; Wicinski, Bridget A; Wong, Edmund W; Roman, Jessica; Brake, Alanna; Eaves, Emily; Spocter, Muhammad A; Tang, Cheuk Y; Jacobs, Bob; Sherwood, Chet C; Hof, Patrick R

    2014-04-01

    The structure of the hippopotamus brain is virtually unknown because few studies have examined more than its external morphology. In view of their semiaquatic lifestyle and phylogenetic relatedness to cetaceans, the brain of hippopotamuses represents a unique opportunity for better understanding the selective pressures that have shaped the organization of the brain during the evolutionary process of adaptation to an aquatic environment. Here we examined the histology of the cerebral cortex of the pygmy hippopotamus (Hexaprotodon liberiensis) by means of Nissl, Golgi, and calretinin (CR) immunostaining, and provide a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) structural and volumetric dataset of the anatomy of its brain. We calculated the corpus callosum area/brain mass ratio (CCA/BM), the gyrencephalic index (GI), the cerebellar quotient (CQ), and the cerebellar index (CI). Results indicate that the cortex of H. liberiensis shares one feature exclusively with cetaceans (the lack of layer IV across the entire cerebral cortex), other features exclusively with artiodactyls (e.g., the morphologiy of CR-immunoreactive multipolar neurons in deep cortical layers, gyrencephalic index values, hippocampus and cerebellum volumetrics), and others with at least some species of cetartiodactyls (e.g., the presence of a thick layer I, the pattern of distribution of CR-immunoreactive neurons, the presence of von Economo neurons, clustering of layer II in the occipital cortex). The present study thus provides a comprehensive dataset of the neuroanatomy of H. liberiensis that sets the ground for future comparative studies including the larger Hippopotamus amphibius.

  2. Kv3.3 channels harbouring a mutation of spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 alter excitability and induce cell death in cultured cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Irie, Tomohiko; Matsuzaki, Yasunori; Sekino, Yuko; Hirai, Hirokazu

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum plays crucial roles in controlling sensorimotor functions. The neural output from the cerebellar cortex is transmitted solely by Purkinje cells (PCs), whose impairment causes cerebellar ataxia. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 (SCA13) is an autosomal dominant disease, and SCA13 patients exhibit cerebellar atrophy and cerebellar symptoms. Recent studies have shown that missense mutations in the voltage-gated K(+) channel Kv3.3 are responsible for SCA13. In the rodent brain, Kv3.3 mRNAs are expressed most strongly in PCs, suggesting that the mutations severely affect PCs in SCA13 patients. Nevertheless, how these mutations affect the function of Kv3.3 in PCs and, consequently, the morphology and neuronal excitability of PCs remains unclear. To address these questions, we used lentiviral vectors to express mutant mouse Kv3.3 (mKv3.3) channels harbouring an R424H missense mutation, which corresponds to the R423H mutation in the Kv3.3 channels of SCA13 patients, in mouse cerebellar cultures. The R424H mutant-expressing PCs showed decreased outward current density, broadened action potentials and elevated basal [Ca(2+)]i compared with PCs expressing wild-type mKv3.3 subunits or those expressing green fluorescent protein alone. Moreover, expression of R424H mutant subunits induced impaired dendrite development and cell death selectively in PCs, both of which were rescued by blocking P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels in the culture conditions. We therefore concluded that expression of R424H mutant subunits in PCs markedly affects the function of endogenous Kv3 channels, neuronal excitability and, eventually, basal [Ca(2+)]i, leading to cell death. These results suggest that PCs in SCA13 patients also exhibit similar defects in PC excitability and induced cell death, which may explain the pathology of SCA13.

  3. Differences in cortico-striatal-cerebellar activation during working memory in syndromal and nonsyndromal children with prenatal alcohol exposure.

    PubMed

    Diwadkar, Vaibhav A; Meintjes, Ernesta M; Goradia, Dhruman; Dodge, Neil C; Warton, Christopher; Molteno, Christopher D; Jacobson, Sandra W; Jacobson, Joseph L

    2013-08-01

    Although children with heavy prenatal alcohol exposure may exhibit the distinctive facial dysmorphology seen in full or partial fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS/PFAS), many lack that dysmorphology. This study examined the functional organization of working memory in the brain in three groups of children-those meeting diagnostic criteria for FAS or PFAS, heavily exposed (HE) nonsyndromal children, and healthy controls. A verbal n-back task (1-back and 0-back) was administered to 47 children (17 with FAS/PFAS, 13 HE, and 17 controls) during fMRI. Intra-group one-sample t-tests were used to identify activity regions of interest central to verbal working memory including the dorsal prefrontal cortex (dPFC), inferior frontal gyrus, caudate/putamen, parietal cortex, and cerebellar Crus I/lobule VI and lobule VIIB-IX. Whereas groups did not differ in task sensitivity, fMRI analyses suggested different patterns of sub-network recruitment across groups. Controls primarily recruited left inferior frontal gyrus (Broca's area). By contrast, HE primarily recruited an extensive set of fronto-striatal regions, including left dPFC and left caudate, and the FAS/PFAS group relied primarily on two cerebellar subregions and parietal cortex. This study is, to our knowledge, the first to demonstrate differential recruitment of critical brain regions that subserve basic function in children with different fetal alcohol spectrum disorders compared to controls. The distinct activation patterns seen in the two exposed groups may be related to substantial differences in alcohol dose/occasion to which these groups were exposed in utero.

  4. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia deafness and narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Melberg, A; Hetta, J; Dahl, N; Nennesmo, I; Bengtsson, M; Wibom, R; Grant, C; Gustavson, K H; Lundberg, P O

    1995-12-01

    A new autosomal dominant syndrome in a Swedish pedigree is described. Five patients were affected with cerebellar ataxia and sensorineural deafness. Four of these patients had symptoms of narcolepsy. Optic atrophy, other neurological abnormalities and psychiatric symptoms developed with increasing disease duration. Three patients had non-neurological disease in addition, including diabetes mellitus in two and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in one. Autopsy with neuropathological examination was performed in one case. Molecular studies focused on the short arm of chromosome 6, including the HLA DR2 locus associated with narcolepsy and the (CAG)n repeat at the spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) locus. Biochemical investigation of muscle biopsy of one case indicated mitochondrial dysfunction with selective decrease in ATP production for substrates that normally give the highest rates. The activity of glutamate dehydrogenase was reduced, indicating a low mitochondrial density. We postulate an autosomal dominant genetic factor responsible for this syndrome. Linkage was excluded to HLA DR2, and a normal sized SCA1 repeat was observed. We conclude that a locus predisposing to ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy exists outside this region of chromosome 6.

  5. Effect of Valsartan on Cerebellar Adrenomedullin System Dysregulation During Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Figueira, Leticia; Israel, Anita

    2017-02-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) and its receptors components, calcitonin-receptor-like receptor (CRLR), and receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP1, RAMP2, and RAMP3) are expressed in cerebellum. Cerebellar AM, AM binding sites and receptor components are altered during hypertension, suggesting a role for cerebellar AM in blood pressure regulation. Thus, we assessed the effect of valsartan, on AM and its receptor components expression in the cerebellar vermis of Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats. Additionally, we evaluated AM action on superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) production in cerebellar vermis. Animals were treated with valsartan or vehicle for 11 days. Rats were sacrificed by decapitation; cerebellar vermis was dissected; and AM, CRLR, RAMP1, RAMP2, and RAMP3 expression was quantified by Western blot analysis. CAT, SOD, and GPx activity was determined spectrophotometrically and blood pressure by non-invasive plethysmography. We demonstrate that AM and RAMP2 expression was lower in cerebellum of SHR rats, while CRLR, RAMP1, and RAMP3 expression was higher than those of WKY rats. AM reduced cerebellar CAT, SOD, GPx activities, and TBARS production in WKY rats, but not in SHR rats. Valsartan reduced blood pressure and reversed the altered expression of AM and its receptors components, as well the loss of AM capacity to reduce antioxidant enzyme activity and TBARS production in SHR rats. These findings demonstrate that valsartan is able to reverse the dysregulation of cerebellar adrenomedullinergic system; and they suggest that altered AM system in the cerebellum could represent the primary abnormality leading to hypertension.

  6. A Cerebellar Neuroprosthetic System: Computational Architecture and in vivo Test

    PubMed Central

    Herreros, Ivan; Giovannucci, Andrea; Taub, Aryeh H.; Hogri, Roni; Magal, Ari; Bamford, Sim; Prueckl, Robert; Verschure, Paul F. M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Emulating the input–output functions performed by a brain structure opens the possibility for developing neuroprosthetic systems that replace damaged neuronal circuits. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of this approach by replacing the cerebellar circuit responsible for the acquisition and extinction of motor memories. Specifically, we show that a rat can undergo acquisition, retention, and extinction of the eye-blink reflex even though the biological circuit responsible for this task has been chemically inactivated via anesthesia. This is achieved by first developing a computational model of the cerebellar microcircuit involved in the acquisition of conditioned reflexes and training it with synthetic data generated based on physiological recordings. Secondly, the cerebellar model is interfaced with the brain of an anesthetized rat, connecting the model’s inputs and outputs to afferent and efferent cerebellar structures. As a result, we show that the anesthetized rat, equipped with our neuroprosthetic system, can be classically conditioned to the acquisition of an eye-blink response. However, non-stationarities in the recorded biological signals limit the performance of the cerebellar model. Thus, we introduce an updated cerebellar model and validate it with physiological recordings showing that learning becomes stable and reliable. The resulting system represents an important step toward replacing lost functions of the central nervous system via neuroprosthetics, obtained by integrating a synthetic circuit with the afferent and efferent pathways of a damaged brain region. These results also embody an early example of science-based medicine, where on the one hand the neuroprosthetic system directly validates a theory of cerebellar learning that informed the design of the system, and on the other one it takes a step toward the development of neuro-prostheses that could recover lost learning functions in animals and, in the longer term, humans. PMID:25152887

  7. Computation of inverse functions in a model of cerebellar and reflex pathways allows to control a mobile mechanical segment.

    PubMed

    Ebadzadeh, M; Tondu, B; Darlot, C

    2005-01-01

    The command and control of limb movements by the cerebellar and reflex pathways are modeled by means of a circuit whose structure is deduced from functional constraints. One constraint is that fast limb movements must be accurate although they cannot be continuously controlled in closed loop by use of sensory signals. Thus, the pathways which process the motor orders must contain approximate inverse functions of the bio-mechanical functions of the limb and of the muscles. This can be achieved by means of parallel feedback loops, whose pattern turns out to be comparable to the anatomy of the cerebellar pathways. They contain neural networks able to anticipate the motor consequences of the motor orders, modeled by artificial neural networks whose connectivity is similar to that of the cerebellar cortex. These networks learn the direct biomechanical functions of the limbs and muscles by means of a supervised learning process. Teaching signals calculated from motor errors are sent to the learning sites, as, in the cerebellum, complex spikes issued from the inferior olive are conveyed to the Purkinje cells by climbing fibers. Learning rules are deduced by a differential calculation, as classical gradient rules, and they account for the long term depression which takes place in the dendritic arborizations of the Purkinje cells. Another constraint is that reflexes must not impede voluntary movements while remaining at any instant ready to oppose perturbations. Therefore, efferent copies of the motor orders are sent to the interneurones of the reflexes, where they cancel the sensory-motor consequences of the voluntary movements. After learning, the model is able to drive accurately, both in velocity and position, angular movements of a rod actuated by two pneumatic McKibben muscles. Reflexes comparable to the myotatic and tendinous reflexes, and stabilizing reactions comparable to the cerebellar sensory-motor reactions, reduce efficiently the effects of perturbing torques

  8. Effects of Transforming Growth Factor Beta 1 in Cerebellar Development: Role in Synapse Formation

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Ana P. B.; Diniz, Luan P.; Eller, Cristiane M.; de Matos, Beatriz G.; Martinez, Rodrigo; Gomes, Flávia C. A.

    2016-01-01

    Granule cells (GC) are the most numerous glutamatergic neurons in the cerebellar cortex and represent almost half of the neurons of the central nervous system. Despite recent advances, the mechanisms of how the glutamatergic synapses are formed in the cerebellum remain unclear. Among the TGF-β family, TGF-beta 1 (TGF-β1) has been described as a synaptogenic molecule in invertebrates and in the vertebrate peripheral nervous system. A recent paper from our group demonstrated that TGF-β1 increases the excitatory synapse formation in cortical neurons. Here, we investigated the role of TGF-β1 in glutamatergic cerebellar neurons. We showed that the expression profile of TGF-β1 and its receptor, TβRII, in the cerebellum is consistent with a role in synapse formation in vitro and in vivo. It is low in the early postnatal days (P1–P9), increases after postnatal day 12 (P12), and remains high until adulthood (P30). We also found that granule neurons express the TGF-β receptor mRNA and protein, suggesting that they may be responsive to the synaptogenic effect of TGF-β1. Treatment of granular cell cultures with TGF-β1 increased the number of glutamatergic excitatory synapses by 100%, as shown by immunocytochemistry assays for presynaptic (synaptophysin) and post-synaptic (PSD-95) proteins. This effect was dependent on TβRI activation because addition of a pharmacological inhibitor of TGF-β, SB-431542, impaired the formation of synapses between granular neurons. Together, these findings suggest that TGF-β1 has a specific key function in the cerebellum through regulation of excitatory synapse formation between granule neurons. PMID:27199658

  9. Ethanol Modulates the Spontaneous Complex Spike Waveform of Cerebellar Purkinje Cells Recorded in vivo in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guang-Jian; Wu, Mao-Cheng; Shi, Jin-Di; Xu, Yin-Hua; Chu, Chun-Ping; Cui, Song-Biao; Qiu, De-Lai

    2017-01-01

    Cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) are sensitive to ethanol, but the effect of ethanol on spontaneous complex spike (CS) activity in these cells in vivo is currently unknown. Here, we investigated the effect of ethanol on spontaneous CS activity in PCs in urethane-anesthetized mice using in vivo patch-clamp recordings and pharmacological manipulation. Ethanol (300 mM) induced a decrease in the CS-evoked pause in simple spike (SS) firing and in the amplitude of the afterhyperpolarization (AHP) under current clamp conditions. Under voltage-clamp conditions, ethanol significantly decreased the area under the curve (AUC) and the number of CS spikelets, without changing the spontaneous frequency of the CSs or the instantaneous frequency of the CS spikelets. Ethanol-induced a decrease in the AUC of spontaneous CSs was concentration dependent. The EC50 of ethanol for decreasing the AUC of spontaneous CSs was 168.5 mM. Blocking N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) failed to prevent the ethanol-induced decreases in the CS waveform parameters. However, blockade of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) significantly suppressed the ethanol-induced effects on the CS-evoked pause in SS firing, amplitude of the AHP, spikelet number and the AUC of CSs. Moreover, a CB1 receptor agonist not only reduced the number of spikelets and the AUC of CSs, but also prevented the ethanol-induced inhibition of CS activity. Our results indicate that ethanol inhibits CS activity via activation of the CB1 receptor in vivo in mice, suggesting that excessive ethanol intake inhibits climbing fiber (CF)–PC synaptic transmission by modulating CB1 receptors in the cerebellar cortex. PMID:28293172

  10. Role of Plasticity at Different Sites across the Time Course of Cerebellar Motor Learning

    PubMed Central

    Lisberger, Stephen G.

    2014-01-01

    Learning comprises multiple components that probably involve cellular and synaptic plasticity at multiple sites. Different neural sites may play their largest roles at different times during behavioral learning. We have used motor learning in smooth pursuit eye movements of monkeys to determine how and when different components of learning occur in a known cerebellar circuit. The earliest learning occurs when one climbing-fiber response to a learning instruction causes simple-spike firing rate of Purkinje cells in the floccular complex of the cerebellum to be depressed transiently at the time of the instruction on the next trial. Trial-over-trial depression and the associated learning in eye movement are forgotten in <6 s, but facilitate long-term behavioral learning over a time scale of ∼5 min. During 100 repetitions of a learning instruction, simple-spike firing rate becomes progressively depressed in Purkinje cells that receive climbing-fiber inputs from the instruction. In Purkinje cells that prefer the opposite direction of pursuit and therefore do not receive climbing-fiber inputs related to the instruction, simple-spike responses undergo potentiation, but more weakly and more slowly. Analysis of the relationship between the learned changes in simple-spike firing and learning in eye velocity suggests an orderly progression of plasticity: first on Purkinje cells with complex-spike (CS) responses to the instruction, later on Purkinje cells with CS responses to the opposite direction of instruction, and last in sites outside the cerebellar cortex. Climbing-fiber inputs appear to play a fast and primary, but nonexclusive, role in pursuit learning. PMID:24849344

  11. Presynaptic Calcium Signalling in Cerebellar Mossy Fibres

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Louiza B.; Jörntell, Henrik; Midtgaard, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Whole-cell recordings were obtained from mossy fibre terminals in adult turtles in order to characterize the basic membrane properties. Calcium imaging of presynaptic calcium signals was carried out in order to analyse calcium dynamics and presynaptic GABA B inhibition. A tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive fast Na+ spike faithfully followed repetitive depolarizing pulses with little change in spike duration or amplitude, while a strong outward rectification dominated responses to long-lasting depolarizations. High-threshold calcium spikes were uncovered following addition of potassium channel blockers. Calcium imaging using Calcium-Green dextran revealed a stimulus-evoked all-or-none TTX-sensitive calcium signal in simple and complex rosettes. All compartments of a complex rosette were activated during electrical activation of the mossy fibre, while individual simple and complex rosettes along an axon appeared to be isolated from one another in terms of calcium signalling. CGP55845 application showed that GABA B receptors mediated presynaptic inhibition of the calcium signal over the entire firing frequency range of mossy fibres. A paired-pulse depression of the calcium signal lasting more than 1 s affected burst firing in mossy fibres; this paired-pulse depression was reduced by GABA B antagonists. While our results indicated that a presynaptic rosette electrophysiologically functioned as a unit, topical GABA application showed that calcium signals in the branches of complex rosettes could be modulated locally, suggesting that cerebellar glomeruli may be dynamically sub-compartmentalized due to ongoing inhibition mediated by Golgi cells. This could provide a fine-grained control of mossy fibre-granule cell information transfer and synaptic plasticity within a mossy fibre rosette. PMID:20162034

  12. Disruption of cerebellar microzonal organization in GluD2 (GluRδ2) knockout mouse

    PubMed Central

    Hashizume, Miki; Miyazaki, Taisuke; Sakimura, Kenji; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kitamura, Kazuo; Kano, Masanobu

    2013-01-01

    Cerebellar cortex has an elaborate rostrocaudal organization comprised of numerous microzones. Purkinje cells (PCs) in the same microzone show synchronous activity of complex spikes (CSs) evoked by excitatory inputs from climbing fibers (CFs) that arise from neurons in the inferior olive (IO). The synchronous CS activity is considered to depend on electrical coupling among IO neurons and anatomical organization of the olivo-cerebellar projection. To determine how the CF–PC wiring contributes to the formation of microzone, we examined the synchronous CS activities between neighboring PCs in the glutamate receptor δ2 knockout (GluD2 KO) mouse in which exuberant surplus CFs make ectopic innervations onto distal dendrites of PCs. We performed in vivo two-photon calcium imaging for PC populations to detect CF inputs. Neighboring PCs in GluD2 KO mice showed higher synchrony of calcium transients than those in wild-type (control) mice. Moreover, the synchrony in GluD2 KO mice hardly declined with mediolateral separation between PCs up to ~200 μm, which was in marked contrast to the falloff of the synchrony in control mice. The enhanced synchrony was only partially affected by the blockade of gap junctional coupling. On the other hand, transverse CF collaterals in GluD2 KO mice extended beyond the border of microzone and formed locally clustered ectopic synapses onto dendrites of neighboring PCs. Furthermore, PCs in GluD2 KO mice exhibited clustered firing (Cf), the characteristic CF response that was not found in PCs of wild-type mice. Importantly, Cf was often associated with localized calcium transients in distal dendrites of PCs, which are likely to contribute to the enhanced synchrony of calcium signals in GluD2 KO mice. Thus, our results indicate that CF signals in GluD2 KO mice propagate across multiple microzones, and that proper formation of longitudinal olivo-cerebellar projection is essential for the spatiotemporal organization of CS activity in the

  13. Behavioral effects of neonatal lesions on the cerebellar system.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, Robert; Strazielle, Catherine

    2015-06-01

    Several rodent models with spontaneous mutations causing cerebellar pathology are impaired in motor functions during the neonatal period, including Grid2(Lc), Rora(sg), Dab1(scm), Girk2(Wv), Lmx1a(dr-sst), Myo5a(dn), Inpp4a(wbl), and Cacna1a(rol) mice as well as shaker and dystonic rats. Deficits are also evident in murine null mutants such as Zic1, Fgfr1/FgFr2, and Xpa/Ercc8. Behavioral deficits are time-dependent following X-irradiated- or aspiration-induced lesions of the cerebellum in rats. In addition, motor functions are deficient after lesions in cerebellar-related pathways. As in animal subjects, sensorimotor disturbances have been described in children with cerebellar lesions. These results underline the importance of the cerebellum and its connections in the development of motor functions.

  14. Preterm cerebellar growth impairment after postnatal exposure to glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Tam, Emily W Y; Chau, Vann; Ferriero, Donna M; Barkovich, A James; Poskitt, Kenneth J; Studholme, Colin; Fok, Eric D-Y; Grunau, Ruth E; Glidden, David V; Miller, Steven P

    2011-10-19

    As survival rates of preterm newborns improve as a result of better medical management, these children increasingly show impaired cognition. These adverse cognitive outcomes are associated with decreases in the volume of the cerebellum. Because animals exhibit reduced preterm cerebellar growth after perinatal exposure to glucocorticoids, we sought to determine whether glucocorticoid exposure and other modifiable factors increased the risk for these adverse outcomes in human neonates. We studied 172 preterm neonatal infants from two medical centers, the University of British Columbia and the University of California, San Francisco, by performing serial magnetic resonance imaging examinations near birth and again near term-equivalent age. After we adjusted for associated clinical factors, antenatal betamethasone was not associated with changes in cerebellar volume. Postnatal exposure to clinically routine doses of hydrocortisone or dexamethasone was associated with impaired cerebellar, but not cerebral, growth. Alterations in treatment after preterm birth, particularly glucocorticoid exposure, may help to decrease risk for adverse neurological outcome after preterm birth.

  15. Cerebellar Development and Autism Spectrum Disorder in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, Maria; Sahin, Mustafa

    2015-12-01

    Approximately 50% of patients with the genetic disease tuberous sclerosis complex present with autism spectrum disorder. Although a number of studies have investigated the link between autism and tuberous sclerosis complex, the etiology of autism spectrum disorder in these patients remains unclear. Abnormal cerebellar function during critical phases of development could disrupt functional processes in the brain, leading to development of autistic features. Accordingly, the authors review the potential role of cerebellar dysfunction in the pathogenesis of autism spectrum disorder in tuberous sclerosis complex. The authors also introduce conditional knockout mouse models of Tsc1 and Tsc2 that link cerebellar circuitry to the development of autistic-like features. Taken together, these preclinical and clinical investigations indicate the cerebellum has a profound regulatory role during development of social communication and repetitive behaviors.

  16. A composite neurobehavioral test to evaluate acute functional deficits after cerebellar haemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    McBride, Devin W; Nowrangi, Derek; Kaur, Harpreet; Wu, Guangyong; Huang, Lei; Lekic, Tim; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2017-01-01

    Cerebellar haemorrhage accounts for 5-10% of all intracerebral haemorrhages and leads to severe, long-lasting functional deficits. Currently, there is limited research on this stroke subtype, which may be due to the lack of a suitable composite neuroscoring system specific for cerebellar injury in rodents. The purpose of this study is to develop a comprehensive composite neuroscore test for cerebellar injury using a rat model of cerebellar haemorrhage. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either sham surgery or cerebellar haemorrhage. Twenty-four hours post-injury, neurological behaviour was evaluated using 17 cost-effective and easy-to-perform tests, and a composite neuroscore was developed. The composite neuroscore was then used to assess functional recovery over seven days after cerebellar haemorrhage. Differences in the composite neuroscore deficits for the mild and moderate cerebellar haemorrhage models were observed for up to five days post-ictus. Until now, a composite neuroscore for cerebellar injury was not available for rodent studies. Herein, using mild and moderate cerebellar haemorrhage rat models a composite neuroscore for cerebellar injury was developed and used to assess functional deficits after cerebellar haemorrhage. This composite neuroscore may also be useful for other cerebellar injury models.

  17. 3D morphometric analysis of human fetal cerebellar development.

    PubMed

    Scott, Julia A; Hamzelou, Kia S; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Habas, Piotr A; Kim, Kio; Barkovich, A James; Glenn, Orit A; Studholme, Colin

    2012-09-01

    To date, growth of the human fetal cerebellum has been estimated primarily from linear measurements from ultrasound and 2D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we use 3D analytical methods to develop normative growth trajectories for the cerebellum in utero. We measured cerebellar volume, linear dimensions, and local surface curvature from 3D reconstructed MRI of the human fetal brain (N = 46). We found that cerebellar volume increased approximately 7-fold from 20 to 31 gestational weeks. The better fit of the exponential curve (R (2) = 0.96) compared to the linear curve (R (2) = 0.92) indicated acceleration in growth. Within-subject cerebellar and cerebral volumes were highly correlated (R (2) = 0.94), though the cerebellar percentage of total brain volume increased from approximately 2.4% to 3.7% (R (2) = 0.63). Right and left hemispheric volumes did not significantly differ. Transcerebellar diameter, vermal height, and vermal anterior to posterior diameter increased significantly at constant rates. From the local curvature analysis, we found that expansion along the inferior and superior aspects of the hemispheres resulted in decreased convexity, which is likely due to the physical constraints of the dura surrounding the cerebellum and the adjacent brainstem. The paired decrease in convexity along the inferior vermis and increased convexity of the medial hemisphere represents development of the paravermian fissure, which becomes more visible during this period. In this 3D morphometric analysis of the human fetal cerebellum, we have shown that cerebellar growth is accelerating at a greater pace than the cerebrum and described how cerebellar growth impacts the shape of the structure.

  18. 3D Morphometric Analysis of Human Fetal Cerebellar Development

    PubMed Central

    Hamzelou, Kia S.; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Habas, Piotr A.; Kim, Kio; Barkovich, A. James; Glenn, Orit A.; Studholme, Colin

    2012-01-01

    To date, growth of the human fetal cerebellum has been estimated primarily from linear measurements from ultrasound and 2D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we use 3D analytical methods to develop normative growth trajectories for the cerebellum in utero. We measured cerebellar volume, linear dimensions, and local surface curvature from 3D reconstructed MRI of the human fetal brain (N = 46). We found that cerebellar volume increased approximately 7-fold from 20 to 31 gestational weeks. The better fit of the exponential curve (R2 = 0.96) compared to the linear curve (R2 = 0.92) indicated acceleration in growth. Within-subject cerebellar and cerebral volumes were highly correlated (R2 = 0.94), though the cerebellar percentage of total brain volume increased from approximately 2.4% to 3.7% (R2 = 0.63). Right and left hemispheric volumes did not significantly differ. Transcerebellar diameter, vermal height, and vermal anterior to posterior diameter increased significantly at constant rates. From the local curvature analysis, we found that expansion along the inferior and superior aspects of the hemispheres resulted in decreased convexity, which is likely due to the physical constraints of the dura surrounding the cerebellum and the adjacent brainstem. The paired decrease in convexity along the inferior vermis and increased convexity of the medial hemisphere represents development of the paravermian fissure, which becomes more visible during this period. In this 3D morphometric analysis of the human fetal cerebellum, we have shown that cerebellar growth is accelerating at a greater pace than the cerebrum and described how cerebellar growth impacts the shape of the structure. PMID:22198870

  19. Cerebellar cysts in children: a pattern recognition approach.

    PubMed

    Boltshauser, Eugen; Scheer, Ianina; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2015-06-01

    Cerebellar cysts may be seen in selected genetic disorders and acquired anomalies. Here, we review our experience, excluding cystic tumors and parasitic cysts. The pathogenesis is heterogeneous: Cysts may involve/represent normal structures (e.g., Virchow-Robin spaces), be "destructive" (such as in some types of pontocerebellar hypoplasias), "malformative" (such as in some forms of congenital muscular dystrophies and GPR56-related migration disorders), or "disruptive" (such as in some cerebellar dysplasias). The provided checklist may be useful in deciding targeted diagnostic workup.

  20. Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration as a marker of endometrial cancer recurrence.

    PubMed

    Lie, Geoffrey; Morley, Thomas; Chowdhury, Muhammad

    2016-05-18

    An 84-year-old woman developed a cerebellar syndrome having undergone a total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy for endometrial cancer 1 year previously. She was found to be anti-Yo antibody positive and was diagnosed with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD). A subsequent positron emission tomography scan and lymph node biopsy identified recurrence of her endometrial cancer. This case illustrates how PCD can be an indicator of cancer recurrence, underlines the significance of PCD as a prompt to search for underlying malignancy, and highlights the difficulties PCD poses to the clinician in terms of diagnosis and management.

  1. [Type I Chiari malformation associated with cerebellar atrophy. Case report].

    PubMed

    Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael; Calderón-Miranda, Willem Guillermo; Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Lee-Aguirre, Ángel; Alcalá-Cerra, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Chiari malformation is characterized by caudal displacement of the cerebellar tonsils that penetrate into the spinal canal through the foramen magnum, achieving reach the atlas or axis. trunk and any drop of the fourth ventricle is observed. Typically is seen in young adults. In some cases scoliosis and Syringomyelic cavities may occur. The authors present (as far as they know) the first case in the literature with long term follow-up, of a caucasian woman with an unusual form of cerebellar atrophy and Chiari Type I malformation, suffering from weakness in his upper and lower extremities with rapidly progression. The patient was successfully treated with suboccipital decompression and C1 laminectomy.

  2. Symptomatic cerebellar hemorrhage from recurrent hemangioblastoma during delivery. Case report.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shigeto; Takeda, Naoya; Komura, Eiji

    2010-01-01

    A 30-year-old woman suffered cerebellar hemorrhage during the delivery of her first child. She had undergone surgical removal of a symptomatic cerebellar hemangioblastoma 6 years previously. Neuroradiological examinations indicated recurrent hemangioblastoma, confirmed by histological examination of the surgical specimen. She was discharged with no neurological deficit. Hemangioblastomas are benign tumors that are curable with surgical removal, but can grow during pregnancy. Women of reproductive age who have been treated for hemangioblastoma need careful long-term follow up, even if they show no signs of lesion recurrence.

  3. [Anatomical and clinical correlations in the cerebellar eredodegeneration].

    PubMed

    Pea, Umberto; de Luca, Francesco; Nicola, Massimiliano; Galli, Luigi

    2003-06-01

    Spinocerebellar hereditary degeneration makes up a heterogeneous group of diseases headed by Strumpell-Lorrain syndrome and Friedreich's disease. They are a heterogeneous group characterized by spasticity and paraplegia and related to demyelinization of the pyramidal tract and of the posterior cordons. During a 4-year period, we studied 14 patients (42-61 years old) suffering cerebellar eredodegeneration (hereditary ataxia). The aim of our work was to correlate anatomopathological findings with clinical signs. The important role played by the cerebellum in vesicosphincterial coordination was shown; in particular severe alteration of the ponto-cerebellar bundles could be cause of the abnormal behaviour of the detrusor.

  4. Inside the Thompson laboratory during the "cerebellar years" and the continuing cerebellar story.

    PubMed

    Lavond, D G; Wikgren, J; Nokia, M S

    2011-02-01

    This paper is based on the talk by one of the authors (DL) given at the symposium for the retirement of RF Thompson (RF Thompson: A bridge between 20th and 21st century neuroscience). We first make some informal observations of the historical times and research conditions in the Thompson laboratory when the cerebellum was found to play a critical role in eye lid classical conditioning, the "cerebellar years". These conditions influenced our collaborative international program on the phenomenon known as "transfer of training" or "savings". Our research shows that the appearance of "savings" is an artifact of the order of testing, and depends upon the functioning of the contralateral interpositus nucleus (IPN) in a way that is complementary to the role of the IPN in normal eyelid classical conditioning.

  5. Cytoarchitectonic mapping of the human brain cerebellar nuclei in stereotaxic space and delineation of their co-activation patterns.

    PubMed

    Tellmann, Stefanie; Bludau, Sebastian; Eickhoff, Simon; Mohlberg, Hartmut; Minnerop, Martina; Amunts, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellar nuclei are involved in several brain functions, including the modulation of motor and cognitive performance. To differentiate their participation in these functions, and to analyze their changes in neurodegenerative and other diseases as revealed by neuroimaging, stereotaxic maps are necessary. These maps reflect the complex spatial structure of cerebellar nuclei with adequate spatial resolution and detail. Here we report on the cytoarchitecture of the dentate, interposed (emboliform and globose) and fastigial nuclei, and introduce 3D probability maps in stereotaxic MNI-Colin27 space as a prerequisite for subsequent meta-analysis of their functional involvement. Histological sections of 10 human post mortem brains were therefore examined. Differences in cell density were measured and used to distinguish a dorsal from a ventral part of the dentate nucleus. Probabilistic maps were calculated, which indicate the position and extent of the nuclei in 3D-space, while considering their intersubject variability. The maps of the interposed and the dentate nuclei differed with respect to their interaction patterns and functions based on meta-analytic connectivity modeling and quantitative functional decoding, respectively. For the dentate nucleus, significant (p < 0.05) co-activations were observed with thalamus, supplementary motor area (SMA), putamen, BA 44 of Broca's region, areas of superior and inferior parietal cortex, and the superior frontal gyrus (SFG). In contrast, the interposed nucleus showed more limited co-activations with SMA, area 44, putamen, and SFG. Thus, the new stereotaxic maps contribute to analyze structure and function of the cerebellum. These maps can be used for anatomically reliable and precise identification of degenerative alteration in MRI-data of patients who suffer from various cerebellar diseases.

  6. BK Channels Localize to the Paranodal Junction and Regulate Action Potentials in Myelinated Axons of Cerebellar Purkinje Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirono, Moritoshi; Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Misono, Kaori; Zollinger, Daniel R.; Trimmer, James S.

    2015-01-01

    In myelinated axons, K+ channels are clustered in distinct membrane domains to regulate action potentials (APs). At nodes of Ranvier, Kv7 channels are expressed with Na+ channels, whereas Kv1 channels flank nodes at juxtaparanodes. Regulation of axonal APs by K+ channels would be particularly important in fast-spiking projection neurons such as cerebellar Purkinje cells. Here, we show that BK/Slo1 channels are clustered at the paranodal junctions of myelinated Purkinje cell axons of rat and mouse. The paranodal junction is formed by a set of cell-adhesion molecules, including Caspr, between the node and juxtaparanodes in which it separates nodal from internodal membrane domains. Remarkably, only Purkinje cell axons have detectable paranodal BK channels, whose clustering requires the formation of the paranodal junction via Caspr. Thus, BK channels occupy this unique domain in Purkinje cell axons along with the other K+ channel complexes at nodes and juxtaparanodes. To investigate the physiological role of novel paranodal BK channels, we examined the effect of BK channel blockers on antidromic AP conduction. We found that local application of blockers to the axon resulted in a significant increase in antidromic AP failure at frequencies above 100 Hz. We also found that Ni2+ elicited a similar effect on APs, indicating the involvement of Ni2+-sensitive Ca2+ channels. Furthermore, axonal application of BK channel blockers decreased the inhibitory synaptic response in the deep cerebellar nuclei. Thus, paranodal BK channels uniquely support high-fidelity firing of APs in myelinated Purkinje cell axons, thereby underpinning the output of the cerebellar cortex. PMID:25948259

  7. Chronic electrical stimulation of the contralesional lateral cerebellar nucleus enhances recovery of motor function after cerebral ischemia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Andre G.; Baker, Kenneth B.; Schuster, Daniel; Butler, Robert S.; Rezai, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Novel neurorehabilitative strategies are needed to improve motor outcomes following stroke. Based on the disynaptic excitatory projections of the dentatothalamocortical pathway to the motor cortex as well as anterior and posterior cortical areas, we hypothesize that chronic electrical stimulation of the contralesional dentate (lateral cerebellar) nucleus output can enhance motor recovery after ischemia via augmentation of perilesional cortical excitability. Seventy five Wistar rats were pre-trained in the Montoya staircase task and subsequently suffered left cerebral ischemia with the 3-vessel occlusion model. All survivors underwent stereotactic right lateral cerebellar nucleus (LCN) implantation of bipolar electrodes. Rats were then randomized to 4 groups: LCN stimulation at 10 pps, 20 pps, 50 pps or sham stimulation, which was delivered for a period of six weeks. Performance on the Montoya task was re-assessed over the last four weeks of the stimulation period. On the right (contralesional) side, motor performance of the groups undergoing sham, 10 pps, 20 pps and 50 pps stimulation was, respectively, 2.5± 2.7; 2.1 ± 2.5; 6.0 ± 3.9 (p<0.01) and 4.5 ± 3.5 pellets. There was no difference on the left (ipsilesional) side motor performance among the sham or stimulation groups, varying from 15.9 ± 6.7 to 17.2 ± 2.1 pellets. We conclude that contralesional chronic electrical stimulation of the lateral cerebellar nucleus at 20 pps but not at 10 or 50 pps improves motor recovery in rats following ischemic strokes. This effect is likely to be mediated by increased perilesional cortical excitability via chronic activation of the dentatothalamocortical pathway. PMID:19445910

  8. Increased GAD67 mRNA expression in cerebellar interneurons in autism: implications for Purkinje cell dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Yip, Jane; Soghomonian, Jean-Jacques; Blatt, Gene J

    2008-02-15

    It has been widely reported that in autism, the number of Purkinje cells (PCs) is decreased, and recently, decreased expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) mRNA in Purkinje cells also has been observed. However, the autism literature has not addressed key GABAergic inputs into Purkinje cells. Inhibitory basket and stellate cell interneurons in the molecular layer of the cerebellar cortex provide direct key GABAergic input into Purkinje cells and could potently influence the output of Purkinje cells to deep cerebellar nuclei. We investigated the capacity for interneuronal synthesis of gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) in both types of interneurons that innervate the remaining PCs in the posterolateral cerebellar hemisphere in autism. The level of GAD67 mRNA, one of the isoforms of the key synthesizing enzymes for GABA, was quantified at the single-cell level using in situ hybridization in brains of autistic and aged-matched controls. The National Institutes of Health imaging system showed that expression of GAD67 mRNA in basket cells was significantly up-regulated, by 28%, in eight autistic brains compared with that in eight control brains (mean +/- SEM pixels per cell, 1.03 +/- 0.05 versus 0.69 +/- 0.05, respectively; P < 0.0001 by independent t test). Stellate cells showed a trend toward a small increase in GAD67 mRNA levels, but this did not reach significance. The results suggest that basket cells likely provide increased GABAergic feed-forward inhibition to PCs in autism, directly affecting PC output to target neurons in the dentate nucleus and potentially disrupting its modulatory role in key motor and/or cognitive behaviors in autistic individuals.

  9. Differential GABAergic and glycinergic inputs of inhibitory interneurons and Purkinje cells to principal cells of the cerebellar nuclei.

    PubMed

    Husson, Zoé; Rousseau, Charly V; Broll, Ilja; Zeilhofer, Hanns Ulrich; Dieudonné, Stéphane

    2014-07-09

    The principal neurons of the cerebellar nuclei (CN), the sole output of the olivo-cerebellar system, receive a massive inhibitory input from Purkinje cells (PCs) of the cerebellar cortex. Morphological evidence suggests that CN principal cells are also contacted by inhibitory interneurons, but the properties of this connection are unknown. Using transgenic, tracing, and immunohistochemical approaches in mice, we show that CN interneurons form a large heterogeneous population with GABA/glycinergic phenotypes, distinct from GABAergic olive-projecting neurons. CN interneurons are found to contact principal output neurons, via glycine receptor (GlyR)-enriched synapses, virtually devoid of the main GABA receptor (GABAR) subunits α1 and γ2. Those clusters account for 5% of the total number of inhibitory receptor clusters on principal neurons. Brief optogenetic stimulations of CN interneurons, through selective expression of channelrhodopsin 2 after viral-mediated transfection of the flexed gene in GlyT2-Cre transgenic mice, evoked fast IPSCs in principal cells. GlyR activation accounted for 15% of interneuron IPSC amplitude, while the remaining current was mediated by activation of GABAR. Surprisingly, small GlyR clusters were also found at PC synapses onto principal CN neurons in addition to α1 and γ2 GABAR subunits. However, GlyR activation was found to account for <3% of the PC inhibitory synaptic currents evoked by electrical stimulation. This work establishes CN glycinergic neurons as a significant source of inhibition to CN principal cells, forming contacts molecularly distinct from, but functionally similar to, Purkinje cell synapses. Their impact on CN output, motor learning, and motor execution deserves further investigation.

  10. Dyslexic Children Show Atypical Cerebellar Activation and Cerebro-Cerebellar Functional Connectivity in Orthographic and Phonological Processing.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaoxia; Li, Le; Zhang, Manli; Yang, Xiujie; Tian, Mengyu; Xie, Weiyi; Lu, Yao; Liu, Li; Bélanger, Nathalie N; Meng, Xiangzhi; Ding, Guosheng

    2017-04-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies have found atypical cerebellar activation in individuals with dyslexia in either motor-related tasks or language tasks. However, studies investigating atypical cerebellar activation in individuals with dyslexia have mostly used tasks tapping phonological processing. A question that is yet unanswered is whether the cerebellum in individuals with dyslexia functions properly during orthographic processing of words, as growing evidence shows that the cerebellum is also involved in visual and spatial processing. Here, we investigated cerebellar activation and cerebro-cerebellar functional connectivity during word processing in dyslexic readers and typically developing readers using tasks that tap orthographic and phonological codes. In children with dyslexia, we observed an abnormally higher engagement of the bilateral cerebellum for the orthographic task, which was negatively correlated with literacy measures. The greater the reading impairment was for young dyslexic readers, the stronger the cerebellar activation was. This suggests a compensatory role of the cerebellum in reading for children with dyslexia. In addition, a tendency for higher cerebellar activation in dyslexic readers was found in the phonological task. Moreover, the functional connectivity was stronger for dyslexic readers relative to typically developing readers between the lobule VI of the right cerebellum and the left fusiform gyrus during the orthographic task and between the lobule VI of the left cerebellum and the left supramarginal gyrus during the phonological task. This pattern of results suggests that the cerebellum compensates for reading impairment through the connections with specific brain regions responsible for the ongoing reading task. These findings enhance our understanding of the cerebellum's involvement in reading and reading impairment.

  11. Contribution of Somatic and Dendritic SK Channels in the Firing Rate of Deep Cerebellar Nuclei: Implication in Cerebellar Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Samira; Abbasi, Ataollah; Sarbaz, Yashar; Shahabi, Parviz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Loss of inhibitory output from Purkinje cells leads to hyperexcitability of the Deep Cerebellar Nuclei (DCN), which results in cerebellar ataxia. Also, inhibition of small-conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channel increases firing rate of DCN, which could cause cerebellar ataxia. Therefore, SK channel activators can be effective in reducing the symptoms of this disease, and used for the treatment of cerebellar ataxia. In this regard, we hypothesized that blockade of SK channels in different compartments of DCN would increase firing rate with different value. The location of these channels has different effects on increasing firing rate. Methods: In this study, multi-compartment computational model of DCN was used. This computational stimulation allowed us to study the changes in the firing activity of DCN neuron without concerns about interfering parameters in the experiment. Results: The simulation results demonstrated that blockade of somatic and dendritic SK channel increased the firing rate of DCN. In addition, after hyperpolarization (AHP) amplitude increased with blocking SK channel, and its regularity and resting potential changed. However, action potentials amplitude and duration had no significant changes. The simulation results illustrated a more significant contribution of SK channels on the dendritic tree to the DCN firing rate. SK channels in the proximal dendrites have more impact on firing rate compared to distal dendrites. Discussion: Therefore, inhibition of SK channel in DCN can cause cerebellar ataxia, and SK channel openers can have a therapeutic effect on cerebellar ataxia. In addition, the location of SK channels could be important in therapeutic goals. Dendritic SK channels can be a more effective target compared to somatic SK channels. PMID:27303600

  12. Postural Ataxia in Cerebellar Downbeat Nystagmus: Its Relation to Visual, Proprioceptive and Vestibular Signals and Cerebellar Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Helmchen, Christoph; Kirchhoff, Jan-Birger; Göttlich, Martin; Sprenger, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Background The cerebellum integrates proprioceptive, vestibular and visual signals for postural control. Cerebellar patients with downbeat nystagmus (DBN) complain of unsteadiness of stance and gait as well as blurred vision and oscillopsia. Objectives The aim of this study was to elucidate the differential role of visual input, gaze eccentricity, vestibular and proprioceptive input on the postural stability in a large cohort of cerebellar patients with DBN, in comparison to healthy age-matched control subjects. Methods Oculomotor (nystagmus, smooth pursuit eye movements) and postural (postural sway speed) parameters were recorded and related to each other and volumetric changes of the cerebellum (voxel-based morphometry, SPM). Results Twenty-seven patients showed larger postural instability in all experimental conditions. Postural sway increased with nystagmus in the eyes closed condition but not with the eyes open. Romberg’s ratio remained stable and was not different from healthy controls. Postural sway did not change with gaze position or graviceptive input. It increased with attenuated proprioceptive input and on tandem stance in both groups but Romberg’s ratio also did not differ. Cerebellar atrophy (vermal lobule VI, VIII) correlated with the severity of impaired smooth pursuit eye movements of DBN patients. Conclusions Postural ataxia of cerebellar patients with DBN cannot be explained by impaired visual feedback. Despite oscillopsia visual feedback control on cerebellar postural control seems to be preserved as postural sway was strongest on visual deprivation. The increase in postural ataxia is neither related to modulations of single components characterizing nystagmus nor to deprivation of single sensory (visual, proprioceptive) inputs usually stabilizing stance. Re-weighting of multisensory signals and/or inappropriate cerebellar motor commands might account for this postural ataxia. PMID:28056109

  13. [Neuroanatomy of Frontal Association Cortex].

    PubMed

    Takada, Masahiko

    2016-11-01

    The frontal association cortex is composed of the prefrontal cortex and the motor-related areas except the primary motor cortex (i.e., the so-called higher motor areas), and is well-developed in primates, including humans. The prefrontal cortex receives and integrates large bits of diverse information from the parietal, temporal, and occipital association cortical areas (termed the posterior association cortex), and paralimbic association cortical areas. This information is then transmitted to the primary motor cortex via multiple motor-related areas. Given these facts, it is likely that the prefrontal cortex exerts executive functions for behavioral control. The functional input pathways from the posterior and paralimbic association cortical areas to the prefrontal cortex are classified primarily into six groups. Cognitive signals derived from the prefrontal cortex are conveyed to the rostral motor-related areas to transform them into motor signals, which finally enter the primary motor cortex via the caudal motor-related areas. Furthermore, it has been shown that, similar to the primary motor cortex, areas of the frontal association cortex form individual networks (known as "loop circuits") with the basal ganglia and cerebellum via the thalamus, and hence are extensively involved in the expression and control of behavioral actions.

  14. [Intraabdominal metastasis of cerebellar medulloblastoma through ventriculoperitoneal shunt].

    PubMed

    Carrasco Torrents, R; Sancho, M A; Juliá, V; Montaner, A; Costa, J M; Morales, L

    2001-01-01

    We present a 6-year-old girl with cerebellar medulloblastoma causing obstructive hydrocephalus that was treated by ventriculoperitoneal shunting. The patient subsequently underwent surgical excision of the tumor followed by adjuvant craniospinal radiotherapy. Nine months after shunting, multiple intraabdominal metastatic lesions were found. Although the risk is low, ventriculoperitoneal shunting may facilitate the spread of malignant cells.

  15. Cerebro-cerebellar interactions underlying temporal information processing.

    PubMed

    Aso, Kenji; Hanakawa, Takashi; Aso, Toshihiko; Fukuyama, Hidenao

    2010-12-01

    The neural basis of temporal information processing remains unclear, but it is proposed that the cerebellum plays an important role through its internal clock or feed-forward computation functions. In this study, fMRI was used to investigate the brain networks engaged in perceptual and motor aspects of subsecond temporal processing without accompanying coprocessing of spatial information. Direct comparison between perceptual and motor aspects of time processing was made with a categorical-design analysis. The right lateral cerebellum (lobule VI) was active during a time discrimination task, whereas the left cerebellar lobule VI was activated during a timed movement generation task. These findings were consistent with the idea that the cerebellum contributed to subsecond time processing in both perceptual and motor aspects. The feed-forward computational theory of the cerebellum predicted increased cerebro-cerebellar interactions during time information processing. In fact, a psychophysiological interaction analysis identified the supplementary motor and dorsal premotor areas, which had a significant functional connectivity with the right cerebellar region during a time discrimination task and with the left lateral cerebellum during a timed movement generation task. The involvement of cerebro-cerebellar interactions may provide supportive evidence that temporal information processing relies on the simulation of timing information through feed-forward computation in the cerebellum.

  16. Cerebellar Damage Produces Selective Deficits in Verbal Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravizza, Susan M.; Mccormick, Cristin A.; Schlerf, John E.; Justus, Timothy; Ivry, Richard B.; Fiez, Julie A.

    2006-01-01

    The cerebellum is often active in imaging studies of verbal working memory, consistent with a putative role in articulatory rehearsal. While patients with cerebellar damage occasionally exhibit a mild impairment on standard neuropsychological tests of working memory, these tests are not diagnostic for exploring these processes in detail. The…

  17. The Contribution of Brainstem and Cerebellar Pathways to Auditory Recognition

    PubMed Central

    McLachlan, Neil M.; Wilson, Sarah J.

    2017-01-01

    The cerebellum has been known to play an important role in motor functions for many years. More recently its role has been expanded to include a range of cognitive and sensory-motor processes, and substantial neuroimaging and clinical evidence now points to cerebellar involvement in most auditory processing tasks. In particular, an increase in the size of the cerebellum over recent human evolution has been attributed in part to the development of speech. Despite this, the auditory cognition literature has largely overlooked afferent auditory connections to the cerebellum that have been implicated in acoustically conditioned reflexes in animals, and could subserve speech and other auditory processing in humans. This review expands our understanding of auditory processing by incorporating cerebellar pathways into the anatomy and functions of the human auditory system. We reason that plasticity in the cerebellar pathways underpins implicit learning of spectrotemporal information necessary for sound and speech recognition. Once learnt, this information automatically recognizes incoming auditory signals and predicts likely subsequent information based on previous experience. Since sound recognition processes involving the brainstem and cerebellum initiate early in auditory processing, learnt information stored in cerebellar memory templates could then support a range of auditory processing functions such as streaming, habituation, the integration of auditory feature information such as pitch, and the recognition of vocal communications. PMID:28373850

  18. Speech and Language Findings Associated with Paraneoplastic Cerebellar Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paslawski, Teresa; Duffy, Joseph R.; Vernino, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD) is an autoimmune disease that can be associated with cancer of the breast, lung, and ovary. The clinical presentation of PCD commonly includes ataxia, visual disturbances, and dysarthria. The speech disturbances associated with PCD have not been well characterized, despite general acceptance that…

  19. Bilateral cerebellar activation in unilaterally challenged essential tremor.

    PubMed

    Broersma, Marja; van der Stouwe, Anna M M; Buijink, Arthur W G; de Jong, Bauke M; Groot, Paul F C; Speelman, Johannes D; Tijssen, Marina A J; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Maurits, Natasha M

    2016-01-01

    •We added EMG as an index of tremor intensity to fMRI to study essential tremor.•Block- and tremor-related activations during a unilateral motor task were separated.•Block-related activations were found in the classical motor network.•Tremor-related activations were found in bilateral cerebellar lobules V, VI and VIII.

  20. Arachnodactyly, aminoaciduria, congenital cataracts, cerebellar ataxia, and delayed developmental milestones

    PubMed Central

    Bhaskar, P. A.; Jagannathan, K.; Valmikinathan, K.

    1974-01-01

    Two male cousins are reported with arachnodactyly, selective aminoaciduria, congenital cataracts, cerebellar ataxia, and delayed developmental milestones, and a distant female relative with similar abnormalities. The syndrome is thought to be previously undescribed, though it has resemblances to Marinesco-Sjögren and Marfan's syndromes. Images PMID:4448994

  1. Cerebellar Zonal Patterning Relies on Purkinje Cell Neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    White, Joshua J.; Arancillo, Marife; Stay, Trace L.; George-Jones, Nicholas A.; Levy, Sabrina L.; Heck, Detlef H.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar circuits are patterned into an array of topographic parasagittal domains called zones. The proper connectivity of zones is critical for motor coordination and motor learning, and in several neurological diseases cerebellar circuits degenerate in zonal patterns. Despite recent advances in understanding zone function, we still have a limited understanding of how zones are formed. Here, we focused our attention on Purkinje cells to gain a better understanding of their specific role in establishing zonal circuits. We used conditional mouse genetics to test the hypothesis that Purkinje cell neurotransmission is essential for refining prefunctional developmental zones into sharp functional zones. Our results show that inhibitory synaptic transmission in Purkinje cells is necessary for the precise patterning of Purkinje cell zones and the topographic targeting of mossy fiber afferents. As expected, blocking Purkinje cell neurotransmission caused ataxia. Using in vivo electrophysiology, we demonstrate that loss of Purkinje cell communication altered the firing rate and pattern of their target cerebellar nuclear neurons. Analysis of Purkinje cell complex spike firing revealed that feedback in the cerebellar nuclei to inferior olive to Purkinje cell loop is obstructed. Loss of Purkinje neurotransmission also caused ectopic zonal expression of tyrosine hydroxylase, which is only expressed in adult Purkinje cells when calcium is dysregulated and if excitability is altered. Our results suggest that Purkinje cell inhibitory neurotransmission establishes the functional circuitry of the cerebellum by patterning the molecular zones, fine-tuning afferent circuitry, and shaping neuronal activity. PMID:24920627

  2. The Contribution of Brainstem and Cerebellar Pathways to Auditory Recognition.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, Neil M; Wilson, Sarah J

    2017-01-01

    The cerebellum has been known to play an important role in motor functions for many years. More recently its role has been expanded to include a range of cognitive and sensory-motor processes, and substantial neuroimaging and clinical evidence now points to cerebellar involvement in most auditory processing tasks. In particular, an increase in the size of the cerebellum over recent human evolution has been attributed in part to the development of speech. Despite this, the auditory cognition literature has largely overlooked afferent auditory connections to the cerebellum that have been implicated in acoustically conditioned reflexes in animals, and could subserve speech and other auditory processing in humans. This review expands our understanding of auditory processing by incorporating cerebellar pathways into the anatomy and functions of the human auditory system. We reason that plasticity in the cerebellar pathways underpins implicit learning of spectrotemporal information necessary for sound and speech recognition. Once learnt, this information automatically recognizes incoming auditory signals and predicts likely subsequent information based on previous experience. Since sound recognition processes involving the brainstem and cerebellum initiate early in auditory processing, learnt information stored in cerebellar memory templates could then support a range of auditory processing functions such as streaming, habituation, the integration of auditory feature information such as pitch, and the recognition of vocal communications.

  3. Hippocampo-cerebellar theta band phase synchrony in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Wikgren, J; Nokia, M S; Penttonen, M

    2010-02-17

    Hippocampal functioning, in the form of theta band oscillation, has been shown to modulate and predict cerebellar learning of which rabbit eyeblink conditioning is perhaps the most well-known example. The contribution of hippocampal neural activity to cerebellar learning is only possible if there is a functional connection between the two structures. Here, in the context of trace eyeblink conditioning, we show (1) that, in addition to the hippocampus, prominent theta oscillation also occurs in the cerebellum, and (2) that cerebellar theta oscillation is synchronized with that in the hippocampus. Further, the degree of phase synchrony (PS) increased both as a response to the conditioning stimuli and as a function of the relative power of hippocampal theta oscillation. However, the degree of PS did not change as a function of either training or learning nor did it predict learning rate as the hippocampal theta ratio did. Nevertheless, theta band synchronization might reflect the formation of transient neural assemblies between the hippocampus and the cerebellum. These findings help us understand how hippocampal function can affect eyeblink conditioning, during which the critical plasticity occurs in the cerebellum. Future studies should examine cerebellar unit activity in relation to hippocampal theta oscillations in order to discover the detailed mechanisms of theta-paced neural activity.

  4. Verb Generation in Children and Adolescents with Acute Cerebellar Lesions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, B.; Schoch, B.; Hein-Kropp, C.; Dimitrova, A.; Hovel, M.; Ziegler, W.; Gizewski, E. R.; Timmann, D.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine verb generation in a larger group of children and adolescents with acute focal lesions of the cerebellum. Nine children and adolescents with cerebellar tumours participated. Subjects were tested a few days after tumour surgery. For comparison, a subgroup was tested also 1 or 2 days before surgery. None…

  5. 21 CFR 882.5820 - Implanted cerebellar stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Implanted cerebellar stimulator. 882.5820 Section 882.5820 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5820...

  6. 21 CFR 882.5820 - Implanted cerebellar stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Implanted cerebellar stimulator. 882.5820 Section 882.5820 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5820...

  7. 21 CFR 882.5820 - Implanted cerebellar stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Implanted cerebellar stimulator. 882.5820 Section 882.5820 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5820...

  8. Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Children with Cerebellar Malformations: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolduc, Marie-Eve; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Cerebellar malformations are increasingly diagnosed in the fetal period. Consequently, their consideration requires stressful and often critical decisions from both clinicians and families. This has resulted in an emergent need to understand better the impact of these early life lesions on child development. We performed a comprehensive literature…

  9. Predicting and correcting ataxia using a model of cerebellar function

    PubMed Central

    Bhanpuri, Nasir H.; Okamura, Allison M.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar damage results in uncoordinated, variable and dysmetric movements known as ataxia. Here we show that we can reliably model single-joint reaching trajectories of patients (n = 10), reproduce patient-like deficits in the behaviour of controls (n = 11), and apply patient-specific compensations that improve reaching accuracy (P < 0.02). Our approach was motivated by the theory that the cerebellum is essential for updating and/or storing an internal dynamic model that relates motor commands to changes in body state (e.g. arm position and velocity). We hypothesized that cerebellar damage causes a mismatch between the brain’s modelled dynamics and the actual body dynamics, resulting in ataxia. We used both behavioural and computational approaches to demonstrate that specific cerebellar patient deficits result from biased internal models. Our results strongly support the idea that an intact cerebellum is critical for maintaining accurate internal models of dynamics. Importantly, we demonstrate how subject-specific compensation can improve movement in cerebellar patients, who are notoriously unresponsive to treatment. PMID:24812203

  10. Is a Cerebellar Deficit the Underlying Cause of Reading Disabilities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irannejad, Shahrzad; Savage, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated whether children with dyslexia differed in their performance on reading, phonological, rapid naming, motor, and cerebellar-related tasks and automaticity measures compared to reading age (RA)-matched and chronological age (CA)-matched control groups. Participants were 51 children attending mainstream English elementary…

  11. Adaptive Robotic Control Driven by a Versatile Spiking Cerebellar Network

    PubMed Central

    Casellato, Claudia; Antonietti, Alberto; Garrido, Jesus A.; Carrillo, Richard R.; Luque, Niceto R.; Ros, Eduardo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is involved in a large number of different neural processes, especially in associative learning and in fine motor control. To develop a comprehensive theory of sensorimotor learning and control, it is crucial to determine the neural basis of coding and plasticity embedded into the cerebellar neural circuit and how they are translated into behavioral outcomes in learning paradigms. Learning has to be inferred from the interaction of an embodied system with its real environment, and the same cerebellar principles derived from cell physiology have to be able to drive a variety of tasks of different nature, calling for complex timing and movement patterns. We have coupled a realistic cerebellar spiking neural network (SNN) with a real robot and challenged it in multiple diverse sensorimotor tasks. Encoding and decoding strategies based on neuronal firing rates were applied. Adaptive motor control protocols with acquisition and extinction phases have been designed and tested, including an associative Pavlovian task (Eye blinking classical conditioning), a vestibulo-ocular task and a perturbed arm reaching task operating in closed-loop. The SNN processed in real-time mossy fiber inputs as arbitrary contextual signals, irrespective of whether they conveyed a tone, a vestibular stimulus or the position of a limb. A bidirectional long-term plasticity rule implemented at parallel fibers-Purkinje cell synapses modulated the output activity in the deep cerebellar nuclei. In all tasks, the neurorobot learned to adjust timing and gain of the motor responses by tuning its output discharge. It succeeded in reproducing how human biological systems acquire, extinguish and express knowledge of a noisy and changing world. By varying stimuli and perturbations patterns, real-time control robustness and generalizability were validated. The implicit spiking dynamics of the cerebellar model fulfill timing, prediction and learning functions. PMID:25390365

  12. Neuroimaging Evidence of Cerebellar Involvement in Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Rapkin, Andrea J.; Berman, Steven M.; Mandelkern, Mark A.; Silverman, Daniel H. S.; Morgan, Melinda; London, Edythe D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a debilitating cyclic disorder that is characterized by affective symptoms, including irritability, depression, and anxiety which arise in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle and resolve soon after the onset of menses. Despite a prevalence of up to 8% in women of reproductive age, few studies have investigated the brain mechanisms that underlie this disorder. Methods We used positron emission tomography with [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose and self-report questionnaires to assess cerebral glucose metabolism and mood in 12 women with PMDD and 12 healthy comparison subjects in the follicular and late luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. The primary biological endpoint was incorporated regional cerebral radioactivity (scaled to the global mean) as an index of glucose metabolism. Relationships between regional brain activity and mood ratings were assessed. Blood samples were taken before each session for assay of plasma estradiol and progesterone concentrations. Results There were no group differences in hormone levels in either the follicular or late luteal phase, but the groups differed in the effect of menstrual phase on cerebellar activity. Women with PMDD, but not comparison subjects, showed an increase in cerebellar activity (particularly in the right cerebellar vermis) from the follicular phase to the late luteal phase (p = 0.003). In the PMDD group, this increase in cerebellar activity was correlated with worsening of mood (p = 0.018). Conclusions These findings suggest that the midline cerebellar nuclei, which have been implicated in other mood disorders, also contribute to negative mood in PMDD. PMID:21092938

  13. Developmental enhancement of alpha2-adrenoceptor-mediated suppression of inhibitory synaptic transmission onto mouse cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Hirono, M; Matsunaga, W; Chimura, T; Obata, K

    2008-09-22

    Noradrenaline (NA) modulates glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission in various areas of the brain. It is reported that some alpha2-adrenoceptor subtypes are expressed in the cerebellar cortex and alpha2-adrenoceptors may play a role in motor coordination. Our previous study demonstrated that the selective alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine partially depresses spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in mouse cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs). Here we found that the inhibitory effect of clonidine on sIPSCs was enhanced during postnatal development. The activation of alpha2-adrenoceptors by clonidine did not affect sIPSCs in PCs at postnatal days (P) 8-10, when PCs showed a few sIPSCs and interneurons in the molecular layer (MLIs) did not cause action potential (AP). In the second postnatal week, the frequency of sIPSCs increased temporarily and reached a plateau at P14. By contrast, MLIs began to fire at P11 with the firing rate gradually increasing thereafter and reaching a plateau at P21. In parallel with this rise in the rate of firing, the magnitude of the clonidine-mediated inhibition of sIPSCs increased during postnatal development. Furthermore, the magnitude of the clonidine-mediated firing suppression in MLIs, which seemed to be mediated by a reduction in amplitude of the hyperpolarization-activated nonselective cation current, I(h), was constant across development. Both alpha2A- and alpha2B-, but not alpha2C-, adrenoceptors were strongly expressed in MLIs at P13, and P31. Therefore, the developmental enhancement of the clonidine-mediated inhibition of sIPSCs is attributed to an age-dependent increase in AP-derived sIPSCs, which can be blocked by clonidine. Thus, presynaptic activation of alpha2-adrenoceptors inhibits cerebellar inhibitory synaptic transmission after the second postnatal week, leading to a restriction of NA signaling, which is mainly mediated by alpha1- and beta2-adrenoceptors in the adult cerebellar neuronal circuit.

  14. Parallel contributions of cerebellar, striatal and M1 mechanisms to motor sequence learning.

    PubMed

    Penhune, Virginia B; Steele, Christopher J

    2012-01-15

    When learning a new motor sequence, we must execute the correct order of movements while simultaneously optimizing sensorimotor parameters such as trajectory, timing, velocity and force. Neurophysiological studies in animals and humans have identified the major brain regions involved in sequence learning, including the motor cortex (M1), basal ganglia (BG) and cerebellum. Current models link these regions to different stages of learning (early vs. late) or different components of performance (spatial vs. sensorimotor). At the same time, research in motor control has given rise to the concept that internal models at different levels of the motor system may contribute to learning. The goal of this review is to develop a new framework for motor sequence learning that combines stage and component models within the context of internal models. To do this, we review behavioral and neuroimaging studies in humans and neurophysiological studies in animals. Based on this evidence, we present a model proposing that sequence learning is underwritten by parallel, interacting processes, including internal model formation and sequence representation, that are instantiated in specific cerebellar, BG or M1 mechanisms depending on task demands and the stage of learning. The striatal system learns predictive stimulus-response associations and is critical for motor chunking. The role of the cerebellum is to acquire the optimal internal model for sequence performance in a particular context, and to contribute to error correction and control of on-going movement. M1 acts to store the representation of a learned sequence, likely as part of a distributed network including the parietal lobe and premotor cortex.

  15. Development of cerebellar neurons and glias revealed by in utero electroporation: Golgi-like labeling of cerebellar neurons and glias.

    PubMed

    Kita, Yoshiaki; Kawakami, Koichi; Takahashi, Yoshiko; Murakami, Fujio

    2013-01-01

    Cerebellar cortical functions rely on precisely arranged cytoarchitectures composed of several distinct types of neurons and glias. Studies have indicated that cerebellar excitatory and inhibitory neurons have distinct spatial origins, the upper rhombic lip (uRL) and ventricular zone (VZ), respectively, and that different types of neurons have different birthdates. However, the spatiotemporal relationship between uRL/VZ progenitors and their final phenotype remains poorly understood due to technical limitations. To address this issue, we performed in utero electroporation (IUE) of fluorescent protein plasmids using mouse embryos to label uRL/VZ progenitors at specific developmental stages, and observed labeled cells at maturity. To overcome any potential dilution of the plasmids caused by progenitor division, we also utilized constructs that enable permanent labeling of cells. Cerebellar neurons and glias were labeled in a Golgi-like manner enabling ready identification of labeled cells. Five types of cerebellar neurons, namely Purkinje, Golgi, Lugaro and unipolar brush cells, large-diameter deep nuclei (DN) neurons, and DN astrocytes were labeled by conventional plasmids, whereas plasmids that enable permanent labeling additionally labeled stellate, basket, and granule cells as well as three types of glias. IUE allows us to label uRL/VZ progenitors at different developmental stages. We found that the five types of neurons and DN astrocytes were labeled in an IUE stage-dependent manner, while stellate, basket, granule cells and three types of glias were labeled regardless of the IUE stage. Thus, the results indicate the IUE is an efficient method to track the development of cerebellar cells from uRL/VZ progenitors facing the ventricular lumen. They also indicate that while the generation of the five types of neurons by uRL/VZ progenitors is regulated in a time-dependent manner, the progenitor pool retains multipotency throughout embryonic development.

  16. Differential cerebellar and cortical involvement according to various attentional load: role of educational level.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Melissa C; Dilharreguy, Bixente; Allard, Michele; Deloire, Mathilde S A; Petry, Klaus G; Brochet, Bruno

    2009-04-01

    Recent imaging studies have evidenced various cerebral patterns dependent on educational level during cognitive tasks in neurodegenerative diseases. Determining relationships between educational status and cerebral activation during cognitive demands in physiological conditions may help to better understand the role of education on cognitive efficacy and functional reorganisation in pathological conditions. We proposed to analyse by functional MRI (fMRI) the relationship between educational status and cerebral activation during various attentional requests in healthy young adults. Twenty healthy young adults completed four successive conditions of a Go/No-go test of increasing complexity under fMRI. An effect of education was observed on attentional performances. Both in-scanner response times and cerebral activation increased during the Go/No-go paradigm. Healthy subjects with higher education exhibited higher activity in cerebellum and lower activity in medial prefrontal and inferior parietal regions compared with the healthy subjects with lower educational levels while performing the conditions of Go/No-go task. Our data evidence the influence of education on automatized strategies in healthy adults by modulating a functional balance of activation between cerebral cortex and cerebellar regions during attentional processes.

  17. Cerebellar tDCS does not improve performance in probabilistic classification learning.

    PubMed

    Seyed Majidi, N; Verhage, M C; Donchin, O; Holland, P; Frens, M A; van der Geest, J N

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the role of the cerebellum in a cognitive learning task using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) was investigated. Using a weather prediction task, subjects had to learn the probabilistic associations between a stimulus (a combination of cards) and an outcome (sun or rain). This task is a variant of a probabilistic classification learning task, for which it has been reported that prefrontal tDCS enhances performance. Using a between-subject design, all 30 subjects learned to improve their performance with increasing accuracies and shortened response times over a series of 500 trials. Subjects also became more confident in their prediction during the experiment. However, no differences in performance and learning were observed between subjects receiving sham stimulation (n = 10) or anodal stimulation (2 mA for 20 min) over either the right cerebellum (n = 10) or the left prefrontal cortex (n = 10). This suggests that stimulating the brain with cerebellar tDCS does not readily influence probabilistic classification performances, probably due to the rather complex nature of this cognitive task.

  18. CX-516 Cortex pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Danysz, Wojciech

    2002-07-01

    CX-516 is one of a series of AMPA modulators under development by Cortex, in collaboration with Shire and Servier, for the potential treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD), schizophrenia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) [234221]. By June 2001, CX-516 was in phase II trials for both schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) [412513]. A phase II trial in fragile X syndrome and autism was expected to start in May 2002 [449861]. In October 2001, Cortex was awarded a Phase II SBIR grant of $769,818 from the National Institutes of Mental Health to investigate the therapeutic potential of AMPAkines in schizophrenia. This award was to support a phase IIb study of CX-516 as a combination therapy in schizophrenia patients concomitantly treated with olanzapine. The trial was to enroll 80 patients and employ a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design in which the placebo group was to receive olanzapine plus placebo and the active group was to receive olanzapine plus CX-516 [425982]. In April 2000, Shire and Cortex signed an option agreement in which Shire was to evaluate CX-516for the treatment of ADHD. Under the terms of the agreement, Shire would undertake a double-blind, placebo-controlled evaluation of CX-516 involving ADHD patients. If the study proved effective, Shire would have the right to convert its option into an exclusive worldwide license for the AMPAkines for ADHD under a development and licensing agreement. Should Shire elect to execute this agreement, Shire would bear all future developmental costs [363618]. By February 2002, Cortex and Servier had revealed their intention to begin enrolment for an international study of an AMPAkine compound as a potential treatment for MCI in the near future. Assuming enrollment proceeded as anticipated, results were expected during the second quarter of 2003 [439301]. By May 2002, phase II trials were underway [450134]. In March 2002, Cortex was awarded extended funding under the

  19. Cerebellar white matter pathways are associated with reading skills in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Travis, Katherine E; Leitner, Yael; Feldman, Heidi M; Ben-Shachar, Michal

    2015-04-01

    Reading is a critical life skill in the modern world. The neural basis of reading incorporates a distributed network of cortical areas and their white matter connections. The cerebellum has also been implicated in reading and reading disabilities. However, little is known about the contribution of cerebellar white matter pathways to major component skills of reading. We used diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) with tractography to identify the cerebellar peduncles in a group of 9- to 17-year-old children and adolescents born full term (FT, n = 19) or preterm (PT, n = 26). In this cohort, no significant differences were found between fractional anisotropy (FA) measures of the peduncles in the PT and FT groups. FA of the cerebellar peduncles correlated significantly with measures of decoding and reading comprehension in the combined sample of FT and PT subjects. Correlations were negative in the superior and inferior cerebellar peduncles and positive in the middle cerebellar peduncle. Additional analyses revealed that FT and PT groups demonstrated similar patterns of reading associations within the left superior cerebellar peduncle, middle cerebellar peduncle, and left inferior cerebellar peduncle. Partial correlation analyses showed that distinct sub-skills of reading were associated with FA in segments of different cerebellar peduncles. Overall, the present findings are the first to document associations of microstructure of the cerebellar peduncles and the component skills of reading.

  20. Cerebellar deficits and hyperactivity in mice lacking Smad4.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong-Xing; Zhao, Mingrui; Li, Dan; Shimazu, Kazuhiro; Sakata, Kazuko; Deng, Chu-Xia; Lu, Bai

    2003-10-24

    Smad4 is a central mediator of TGF-beta signals, which are known to play essential roles in many biological processes. Using a Cre-loxP approach to overcome early embryonic lethality, we have studied functions of TGF-beta/Smad4 signals in the central nervous system (CNS). No obvious deficits were detected in mice carrying the targeted disruption of Smad4 in the CNS. The overall morphology of the hippocampus appeared normal. There was no change in the proliferation of neuronal precursor cells, nor in several forms of synaptic plasticity. In contrast, deletion of Smad4 resulted in a marked decrease in the number of cerebellar Purkinje cells and parvalbumin-positive interneurons. Accompanied by the abnormality in the cerebellum, mutant mice also exhibited significantly increased vertical activity. Thus, our study reveals an unexpected role for Smad4 in cerebellar development and in the control of motor function.

  1. Palatoglossal fusion with cleft palate and hypoplasia of cerebellar vermis

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Shailesh; Babu, M. Narendra; Gowrishankar; Ramesh, S.

    2016-01-01

    A new-born male presented within 12 h of birth with respiratory distress. On examination and workup, he had palatoglossal fusion, cleft palate and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. A 2.5 Fr endotracheal tube was inserted into the pharynx through nostril as a nasopharyngeal stent, following which his respiratory distress improved. Once child was optimised, then feeding was started by nasogastric tube and feeds were tolerated well. Elective tracheostomy and gastrostomy were done, followed by release of adhesions between the tongue and palate at a later stage. Review of literature suggests that palatoglossal fusion is uncommon and presents as an emergency. Mostly, these oral synechiae are associated with digital and/or cardiac anomaly. Other disorders associated with intra-oral synechiae include congenital alveolar synechiae, van der Woude syndrome, popliteal pterygium syndrome and oromandibular limb hypogenesis syndrome. The authors report a hitherto undescribed association of palatoglossal fusion with cleft palate and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. PMID:27274132

  2. Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome presented as severe borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Pesic, Danilo; Peljto, Amir; Lukic, Biljana; Milovanovic, Maja; Svetozarevic, Snezana; Lecic Tosevski, Dusica

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of findings confirm the significance of cerebellum in affecting regulation and early learning. Most consistent findings refer to association of congenital vermis anomalies with deficits in nonmotor functions of cerebellum. In this paper we presented a young woman who was treated since sixteen years of age for polysubstance abuse, affective instability, and self-harming who was later diagnosed with borderline personality disorder. Since the neurological and neuropsychological reports pointed to signs of cerebellar dysfunction and dysexecutive syndrome, we performed magnetic resonance imaging of brain which demonstrated partially developed vermis and rhombencephalosynapsis. These findings match the description of cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome and show an overlap with clinical manifestations of borderline personality disorder.

  3. Correlation between vestibular habituation and postural recovery in cerebellar patients.

    PubMed

    Suarez, H; Caffa, C; Macadar, O

    1992-01-01

    Vestibular habituation was studied in normal subjects and in patients with cerebellar disease using a stimulation paradigm proposed in this paper. Six caloric stimuli were repeated daily in the same ear during six days and electronystagmographic responses at the beginning and the end of that period were compared. The normal behaviour was a clear reduction of the response across time. Two groups of cerebellar patients were identified by their ability to recover from positional imbalance after treatment. Compensated patients responded to repeated caloric stimulation in the same way as normal subjects. Conversely, uncompensated patients increased their response after the stimulation paradigm. The role played by the cerebellum in vestibular plasticity is discussed together with the observed correlation between vestibular habituation and the ability for postural recovery to occur.

  4. Evidence for distinct cognitive deficits after focal cerebellar lesions

    PubMed Central

    Gottwald, B; Wilde, B; Mihajlovic, Z; Mehdorn, H

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: Anatomical evidence and lesion studies, as well as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies, indicate that the cerebellum contributes to higher cognitive functions. Cerebellar posterior lateral regions seem to be relevant for cognition, while vermal lesions seem to be associated with changes in affect. However, the results remain controversial. Deficits of patients are sometimes still attributed to motor impairment. Methods: We present data from a detailed neuropsychological examination of 21 patients with cerebellar lesions due to tumour or haematoma, and 21 controls matched for age, sex, and years of education. Results: Patients showed deficits in executive function, and in attentional processes such as working memory and divided attention. Further analysis revealed that patients with right-sided lesions were in general more impaired than those with left-sided lesions. Conclusions: Those hypotheses that suggest that lesions of the right cerebellar hemisphere lead to verbal deficits, while those of the left lead to non-verbal deficits, have in part been confirmed. The generally greater impairment of those patients with a right-sided lesion has been interpreted as resulting from the connection of the right cerebellum to the left cerebral hemisphere, which is dominant for language functions and crucial for right hand movements. Motor impairment was correlated with less than half of the cognitive measures, with no stronger tendency for correlation with cognitive tests that require motor responses discernible. The results are discussed on the basis of an assumption that the cerebellum has a predicting and preparing function, indicating that cerebellar lesions lead to a "dysmetria of thought." PMID:15489381

  5. Familial Aggregation of the Cerebellar Signs in Familial Essential Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Elan D.; Hernandez, Nora; Chen, Karen P.; Naranjo, Kelly V.; Park, Jemin; Clark, Lorraine N.; Ottman, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    Background Although the hallmark feature of essential tremor (ET) is kinetic tremor, patients may exhibit additional motor features (e.g., intention tremor and mild gait ataxia) that are markers of an underlying abnormality of cerebellar function. ET is also a highly familial disorder, but we do not know whether the presence and expression of cerebellar signs are similar across family members. There are simply no published data. The alternative possibility is that these features are not heritable. We tested the specific hypothesis that the presence of cerebellar signs (i.e., intention tremor, tandem gait difficulty) ran in ET families. Methods ET probands and relatives enrolled in a genetic study at Yale and Columbia universities underwent a detailed videotaped neurological examination. Results There were 187 enrollees (59 probands, 128 affected relatives). In a bivariate logistic regression model, the presence of intention tremor in the proband was not a predictor of the presence of intention tremor in the relatives (odds ratio [OR] = 0.60, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.28–1.27, p = 0.18). In a similar model, the presence of greater tandem gait difficulty (i.e., a tandem gait score in the upper quartile) in the proband was not a predictor of the presence of such difficulty in the relatives (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 0.41–3.66, p = 0.73). Discussion The presence of cerebellar signs did not aggregate in families with ET. In the current dataset, these did not seem to be disease features that were heritable. PMID:28176975

  6. Typhoid fever presenting as acute cerebellar ataxia and severe thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Cheong, B M K

    2008-03-01

    Typhoid fever being a systemic infection can present in a multitude of ways, involving various systems. Here we describe a case of typhoid fever presenting with acute cerebellar ataxia and marked thrombocytopenia. This atypical presentation is not common in typhoid fever and can lead to misdiagnosis as well as a delay in the initiation of appropriate therapy. Prompt clinical improvement and the return of platelet counts to normal were noted after the patient was started on IV Ceftriaxone.

  7. Bilateral cerebellar activation in unilaterally challenged essential tremor

    PubMed Central

    Broersma, Marja; van der Stouwe, Anna M.M.; Buijink, Arthur W.G.; de Jong, Bauke M.; Groot, Paul F.C.; Speelman, Johannes D.; Tijssen, Marina A.J.; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Maurits, Natasha M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Essential tremor (ET) is one of the most common hyperkinetic movement disorders. Previous research into the pathophysiology of ET suggested underlying cerebellar abnormalities. Objective In this study, we added electromyography as an index of tremor intensity to functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (EMG-fMRI) to study a group of ET patients selected according to strict criteria to achieve maximal homogeneity. With this approach we expected to improve upon the localization of the bilateral cerebellar abnormalities found in earlier fMRI studies. Methods We included 21 propranolol sensitive patients, who were not using other tremor medication, with a definite diagnosis of ET defined by the Tremor Investigation Group. Simultaneous EMG-fMRI recordings were performed while patients were off tremor medication. Patients performed unilateral right hand and arm extension, inducing tremor, alternated with relaxation (rest). Twenty-one healthy, age- and sex-matched participants mimicked tremor during right arm extension. EMG power variability at the individual tremor frequency as a measure of tremor intensity variability was used as a regressor, mathematically independent of the block regressor, in the general linear model used for fMRI analysis, to find specific tremor-related activations. Results Block-related activations were found in the classical upper-limb motor network, both for ET patients and healthy participants in motor, premotor and supplementary motor areas. In ET patients, we found tremor-related activations bilaterally in the cerebellum: in left lobules V, VI, VIIb and IX and in right lobules V, VI, VIIIa and b, and in the brainstem. In healthy controls we found simulated tremor-related activations in right cerebellar lobule V. Conclusions Our results expand on previous findings of bilateral cerebellar involvement in ET. We have identified specific areas in the bilateral somatomotor regions of the cerebellum: lobules V, VI and VIII. PMID:26909321

  8. Sensitivity of cerebellar glutathione system to neonatal ionizing radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Di Toro, C G; Di Toro, P A; Zieher, L M; Guelman, L R

    2007-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are relevant components of living organisms that, besides their role in the regulation of different important physiological functions, when present in excess are capable to affect cell oxidative status, leading to damage of cellular molecules and disturbance of normal cell function. ROS accumulation has been associated with a variety of conditions such as neurodegenerative diseases and ionizing radiation exposure. Cell ability to counteract ROS overproduction depends on the capacity of the endogenous antioxidant defenses--which includes the glutathione (GSH) system--to cope with. Since developing central nervous system (CNS) is especially sensitive to ROS-induced damage, the aim of the present work was to evaluate ROS, reduced GSH and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) levels in the cerebellum at different developmental ages after irradiation, in order to test if any changes were induced on these key oxidative stress-related cellular markers that might explain the high cerebellar vulnerability to radiation-induced injury. Since intracellular levels of GSH are maintained by glutathione reductase (GSHr), this enzymatic activity was also evaluated. Newborn Wistar rats were irradiated in their cephalic ends and the different parameters were measured, from 1h to 90 days post-irradiation. Results showed that an early transient increase in ROS levels followed by a decrease in cerebellar weight at 3-5 days post-irradiation were induced. An increase in cerebellar GSH levels was induced at 30 days after irradiation, together with a decrease in GSHr activity. These results support the hypothesis that ROS may represent a marker of damage prior to radiation-induced cell death. In contrast, it would be suggested that GSH system might play a role in the compensatory mechanisms triggered to counteract radiation-induced cerebellar damage.

  9. Endogenous cerebellar neurogenesis in adult mice with progressive ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Csaba, Zsolt; Peineau, Stéphane; Srivastava, Rupali; Rasika, Sowmyalakshmi; Mani, Shyamala; Gressens, Pierre; El Ghouzzi, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Objective Transplanting exogenous neuronal progenitors to replace damaged neurons in the adult brain following injury or neurodegenerative disorders and achieve functional amelioration is a realistic goal. However, studies so far have rarely taken into consideration the preexisting inflammation triggered by the disease process that could hamper the effectiveness of transplanted cells. Here, we examined the fate and long-term consequences of human cerebellar granule neuron precursors (GNP) transplanted into the cerebellum of Harlequin mice, an adult model of progressive cerebellar degeneration with early-onset microgliosis. Methods Human embryonic stem cell-derived progenitors expressing Atoh1, a transcription factor key to GNP specification, were generated in vitro and stereotaxically transplanted into the cerebellum of preataxic Harlequin mice. The histological and functional impact of these transplants was followed using immunolabeling and Rotarod analysis. Results Although transplanted GNPs did not survive beyond a few weeks, they triggered the proliferation of endogenous nestin-positive precursors in the leptomeninges that crossed the molecular layer and differentiated into mature neurons. These phenomena were accompanied by the preservation of the granule and Purkinje cell layers and delayed ataxic changes. In vitro neurosphere generation confirmed the enhanced neurogenic potential of the cerebellar leptomeninges of Harlequin mice transplanted with exogenous GNPs. Interpretation The cerebellar leptomeninges of adult mice contain an endogenous neurogenic niche that can be stimulated to yield mature neurons from an as-yet unidentified population of progenitors. The transplantation of human GNPs not only stimulates this neurogenesis, but, despite the potentially hostile environment, leads to neuroprotection and functional amelioration. PMID:25574472

  10. [Aneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery: case report].

    PubMed

    Adorno, Juan Oscar Alarcón; de Andrade, Guilherme Cabral

    2002-12-01

    The intracranial aneurysms of the posterior circulation have been reported between 5 and 10% of all cerebral aneurysms and the aneurysms of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) are considered rare, can cause cerebello pontine angle (CPA) syndrome with or without subarachnoid hemorrhage. Since 1948 few cases were described in the literature. We report on a 33 year-old female patient with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to sacular aneurysm of the left AICA. She was submitted to clipage of the aneurysm without complications.

  11. Successfull management of a life threatening cerebellar haemorrhage following spine surgery - a case report -.

    PubMed

    Pallud, Johan; Belaïd, Hayat; Aldea, Sorin

    2009-06-01

    Cerebellar haemorrhages are rare life-threatening complications following spine surgery that present challenges for their diagnostic and their therapeutic management. Their patho-physiology remains unclear.We report a case of a life-threatening cerebellar haemorrhage secondary to an occult dural tear following a planned L5-S1 laminectomy. The patient was treated with emergent external ventriculostomy following by a posterior fossa decompressive craniectomy. Cerebellar haemorrhages have to be suspected systematically when unexpected neurological signs occur after spine surgery since their rapid management lead to favourable outcomes. The present imaging findings allow us proposing that cerebellar haemorrhages result primarily from superior cerebellar venous stretching and tearing, and that cerebellar infarction and swelling occur secondarily.

  12. Maternal Postsecondary Education Associated With Improved Cerebellar Growth After Preterm Birth.

    PubMed

    Stiver, Mikaela L; Kamino, Daphne; Guo, Ting; Thompson, Angela; Duerden, Emma G; Taylor, Margot J; Tam, Emily W Y

    2015-10-01

    The preterm cerebellum is vulnerable to impaired development impacting long-term outcome. Preterm newborns (<32 weeks) underwent serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. The association between parental education and cerebellar volume at each time point was assessed, adjusting for age at scan. In 26 infants, cerebellar volumes at term (P = .001), but not birth (P = .4), were associated with 2-year volumes. For 1 cm(3) smaller cerebellar volume (4% total volume) at term, the cerebellum was 3.18 cm(3) smaller (3% total volume) by 2 years. Maternal postsecondary education was not associated with cerebellar volume at term (P = .16). Maternal postsecondary education was a significant confounder in the relationship between term and 2-year cerebellar volumes (P = .016), with higher education associated with improved volumes by 2 years. Although preterm birth has been found to be associated with smaller cerebellar volumes at term, maternal postsecondary education is associated with improved growth detectable by 2 years.

  13. Cerebellar cortical degeneration with selective granule cell loss in Bavarian mountain dogs.

    PubMed

    Flegel, T; Matiasek, K; Henke, D; Grevel, V

    2007-08-01

    Three Bavarian mountain dogs aged between 18 and 20 months, not related to each other, were presented with chronic signs of cerebellar dysfunction. On sagittal T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging brain images, the tentative diagnosis of cerebellar hypoplasia was established based on an enlarged cerebrospinal fluid space around the cerebellum and an increased cerebrospinal fluid signal between the folia. Post-mortem examination was performed in one dog and did show an overall reduction of cerebellar size. On histopathologic examination, a selective loss of cerebellar granule cells with sparing of Purkinje cells was evident. Therefore, the Bavarian mountain dog is a breed where cerebellar cortical degeneration caused by the rather exceptional selective granule cell loss can be seen as cause of chronic, slowly progressive cerebellar dysfunction starting at an age of several months.

  14. Controversies in the neurosurgical management of cerebellar hemorrhage and infarction.

    PubMed

    Amar, Arun Paul

    2012-04-01

    Evidence-based guidelines for the management of hemorrhagic and ischemic cerebellar stroke are sparse, and most available data come from Class III studies. As a result, opinions and practices regarding the nature and role of neurosurgical intervention vary widely. A comprehensive literature review was conducted to adjudicate several contentious issues, such as the difference in the management of cerebellar hemorrhage versus infarction, criteria for imaging to exclude an underlying structural lesion, the value of MRI for patient selection, the role of external ventricular drainage, the indications for operative management, the timing of surgical intervention, and various options of surgical technique, among others. Treatment algorithms proposed in several different studies are compared and contrasted. This analysis is concluded by a summary of the recommendations from the American Stroke Association, which advises that patients with cerebellar hemorrhage who experience neurological deterioration or who have brainstem compression and/or hydrocephalus due to ventricular obstruction should undergo surgical evacuation of the hemorrhage as soon as possible, and that initial treatment of such patients with ventricular drainage alone rather than surgical removal of the hemorrhage is not recommended.

  15. Behavior modification after inactivation of cerebellar dentate nuclei.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Todd C; Villatoro, Lee; Arneson, Tom; Ahuja, Brittany; Voss, Stephanie; Swain, Rodney A

    2012-08-01

    Effort-based decision making occurs when subjects are given a choice between a reward available at a high response cost and a reward available at a low response cost and is altered in individuals with disorders such as autism or particular patterns of brain injury. The current study explored the relationship between effort-based decision making and reinforcement characteristics in the T maze. This was done using both normal animals and animals with bilateral inactivation of the cerebellar dentate nuclei. Rats chose between alternatives in which one arm contained high-density reinforcement (HR) and the other arm contained low-density reinforcement (LR). During training, the HR arm was obstructed and the point at which the animal no longer worked for reinforcement (breaking point) was determined. The cerebellar dentate nuclei were then transiently inactivated and once again breaking points were assessed. The results indicated that inactivation of the dentate nucleus disrupted effort-based decision making. Additionally, altering both the palatability and the magnitude of the reinforcement were assessed in an attempt to reestablish the original preinactivation breaking point. It was hypothesized that an increase in the strength or magnitude of the reinforcement would promote an increase in the breaking point of the animal even when the cerebellum was inactivated. The results indicated that with both strategies animals effectively reestablished original breaking points. The results of this study will inform the current literature regarding the modification of behavior after brain injury and further the understanding of the behavioral deficits associated with cerebellar dysfunction.

  16. Monoaminergic modulation of GABAergic transmission onto cerebellar globular cells.

    PubMed

    Hirono, Moritoshi; Nagao, Soichi; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Konishi, Shiro

    2017-03-11

    Cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) project their axon collaterals to underneath of the PC layer and make GABAergic synaptic contacts with globular cells, a subgroup of Lugaro cells. GABAergic transmission derived from the PC axon collaterals is so powerful that it could inhibit globular cells and regulate their firing patterns. However, the physiological properties and implications of the GABAergic synapses on globular cells remain unknown. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from globular cells in the mouse cerebellum, we examined the monoaminergic modulation of GABAergic inputs to these cells. Application of either serotonin (5-HT) or noradrenaline (NA) excited globular cells, thereby leading to their firing. The 5-HT- and NA-induced firing was temporally confined and attenuated by GABAergic transmission, although 5-HT and NA exerted an inhibitory effect on the release of GABA from presynaptic terminals of PC axon collaterals. Agonists for 5-HT1B receptors and α2-adrenoceptors mimicked the 5-HT- and NA-induced suppression of GABAergic activity. Through their differential modulatory actions on the cerebellar inhibitory neural circuits, 5-HT facilitated PC firing, whereas NA suppressed it. These results indicate that 5-HT and NA regulate the membrane excitability of globular cells and PCs through their differential modulation of not only the membrane potential but also GABAergic synaptic circuits. Monoaminergic modulation of the neural connections between globular cells and PCs could play a role in cerebellar motor coordination.

  17. Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration with anti-Yo antibodies - a review.

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Anand; Opal, Puneet

    2016-08-01

    The ataxic syndrome associated with Anti-Yo antibody, or Purkinje cell cytoplasmic antibody type 1 (PCA1), is the most common variant of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD). The typical presentation involves the subacute development of pancerebellar deficits with a clinical plateau within 6 months. The vast majority of cases have been reported in women with pelvic or breast tumors. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain is often normal in the early stages, with cerebellar atrophy seen later. The underlying mechanism is believed to be an immunological reaction to cerebellar degeneration-related protein 2 (CDR2), a protein usually found in the cerebellum that is ectopically produced by tumor cells. Although both B- and T-cell abnormalities are seen, there is debate about the relative importance of the autoantibodies and cytotoxic T lymphocytes in the neuronal loss. Cerebrospinal fluid abnormalities, primarily elevated protein, lymphocytic pleocytosis, and oligoclonal bands, are common in the early stages. The low prevalence of this condition has not allowed for large-scale randomized controlled trials. Immunotherapies, such as steroids, intravenous immune globulins, and plasma exchange, have been extensively used in managing this condition, with limited success. Although some reports indicate benefit from antitumor therapies like surgery and chemotherapy, this has not been consistently observed. The prognosis for anti-Yo PCD is almost uniformly poor, with most patients left bedridden. Further studies are required to clarify the pathophysiology and provide evidence-based treatment options.

  18. Sustained Reduction of Cerebellar Activity in Experimental Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Rijkers, Kim; Moers-Hornikx, Véronique M. P.; Hemmes, Roelof J.; Aalbers, Marlien W.; Temel, Yasin; Vles, Johan S. H.; Hoogland, Govert

    2015-01-01

    Clinical and experimental evidence suggests a role for the cerebellum in seizure control, while no data are available on cerebellar activity between seizures. We hypothesized that interictal regional activity of the deep cerebellar nuclei is reduced in epilepsy and tested this in an animal model by using ΔFosB and cytochrome oxidase (COX) (immuno)histochemistry. The expression of these two markers of neuronal activity was analysed in the dentate nucleus (DN), interpositus nucleus (IN), and fastigial nucleus (FN) of the cerebellum of fully amygdala kindled rats that were sacrificed 48 hours after their last seizure. The DN and FN of kindled rats exhibited 25 to 29% less ΔFosB immunopositive cells than their respective counterpart in sham controls (P < 0.05). COX expression in the DN and FN of kindled animals was reduced by 32 to 33% compared to respective control values (P < 0.05). These results indicate that an epileptogenic state is characterized by decreased activity of deep cerebellar nuclei, especially the DN and FN. Possible consequences may include a decreased activation of the thalamus, contributing to further seizure spread. Restoration of FN activity by low frequency electrical stimulation is suggested as a possible treatment option in chronic epilepsy. PMID:26417599

  19. Junctophilin-mediated channel crosstalk essential for cerebellar synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kakizawa, Sho; Kishimoto, Yasushi; Hashimoto, Kouichi; Miyazaki, Taisuke; Furutani, Kazuharu; Shimizu, Hidemi; Fukaya, Masahiro; Nishi, Miyuki; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Atsushi; Kondo, Hisatake; Kano, Masanobu; Watanabe, Masahiko; Iino, Masamitsu; Takeshima, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Functional crosstalk between cell-surface and intracellular ion channels plays important roles in excitable cells and is structurally supported by junctophilins (JPs) in muscle cells. Here, we report a novel form of channel crosstalk in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs). The generation of slow afterhyperpolarization (sAHP) following complex spikes in PCs required ryanodine receptor (RyR)-mediated Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release and the subsequent opening of small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) channels in somatodendritic regions. Despite the normal expression levels of these channels, sAHP was abolished in PCs from mutant mice lacking neural JP subtypes (JP-DKO), and this defect was restored by exogenously expressing JPs or enhancing SK channel activation. The stimulation paradigm for inducing long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fiber–PC synapses adversely established long-term potentiation in the JP-DKO cerebellum, primarily due to the sAHP deficiency. Furthermore, JP-DKO mice exhibited impairments of motor coordination and learning, although normal cerebellar histology was retained. Therefore, JPs support the Ca2+-mediated communication between voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, RyRs and SK channels, which modulates the excitability of PCs and is fundamental to cerebellar LTD and motor functions. PMID:17347645

  20. Inpatient Rehabilitation Performance of Patients with Paraneoplastic Cerebellar Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jack B.; Raj, Vishwa S.; Asher, Arash; Lee, Jay; Guo, Ying; Konzen, Benedict S.; Bruera, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the functional improvement of rehabilitation inpatients with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Design Retrospective Review Setting Three tertiary referral based hospitals. Interventions Medical records were retrospectively analyzed for demographic, laboratory, medical and functional data. Main Outcome Measure Functional Independence Measure (FIM) Participants Cancer rehabilitation inpatients admitted to three different cancer centers with a diagnosis of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (n=7). Results All 7 patients were white females. Median age was 62. Primary cancers included ovarian carcinoma (2), small cell lung cancer (2), uterine carcinoma (2), and invasive ductal breast carcinoma. Mean admission total FIM score was 61.0 (SD=23.97). Mean discharge total FIM score was 73.6 (SD=29.35). The mean change in total FIM score was 12.6 (p=.0018). The mean length of rehabilitation stay was 17.1 days. The mean total FIM efficiency was 0.73. 5/7 (71%) patients were discharged home. 1/7 (14%) was discharged to a nursing home. 1/7 (14%) transferred to the primary acute care service. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate the functional performance of a group of rehabilitation inpatients with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Despite the poor neurologic prognosis associated with this syndrome, these patients made significant functional improvements on inpatient rehabilitation. When appropriate, inpatient rehabilitation should be considered. Further studies with larger sample sizes are needed. PMID:25051460

  1. Neurocontrol in sensory cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritt, Jason; Nandi, Anirban; Schroeder, Joseph; Ching, Shinung

    Technology to control neural ensembles is rapidly advancing, but many important challenges remain in applications, such as design of controls (e.g. stimulation patterns) with specificity comparable to natural sensory encoding. We use the rodent whisker tactile system as a model for active touch, in which sensory information is acquired in a closed loop between feedforward encoding of sensory information and feedback guidance of sensing motions. Motivated by this system, we present optimal control strategies that are tailored for underactuation (a large ratio of neurons or degrees of freedom to stimulation channels) and limited observability (absence of direct measurement of the system state), common in available stimulation technologies for freely behaving animals. Using a control framework, we have begun to elucidate the feedback effect of sensory cortex activity on sensing in behaving animals. For example, by optogenetically perturbing primary sensory cortex (SI) activity at varied timing relative to individual whisker motions, we find that SI modulates future sensing behavior within 15 msec, on a whisk by whisk basis, changing the flow of incoming sensory information based on past experience. J.T.R. and S.C. hold Career Awards at the Scientific Interface from the Burroughs Wellcome Fund.

  2. Two distinct interneuron circuits in human motor cortex are linked to different subsets of physiological and behavioral plasticity.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Masashi; Galea, Joseph M; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Mazzone, Paolo; Ziemann, Ulf; Rothwell, John C

    2014-09-17

    How does a single brain region participate in multiple behaviors? Here we argue that two separate interneuron circuits in the primary motor cortex (M1) contribute differently to two varieties of physiological and behavioral plasticity. To test this in human brain noninvasively, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of M1 hand area to activate two independent sets of synaptic inputs to corticospinal neurons by changing the direction of current induced in the brain: posterior-to-anterior current (PA inputs) and anterior-to-posterior current (AP inputs). We demonstrate that excitability changes produced by repetitive activation of AP inputs depend on cerebellar activity and selectively alter model-based motor learning. In contrast, the changes observed with repetitive stimulation of PA inputs are independent of cerebellar activity and specifically modulate model-free motor learning. The findings are highly suggestive that separate circuits in M1 subserve different forms of motor learning.

  3. Differential Effects of Intraventricular Hemorrhage and White Matter Injury on Preterm Cerebellar Growth

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Emily W.Y.; Miller, Steven P.; Studholme, Colin; Chau, Vann; Glidden, David; Poskitt, Kenneth J.; Ferriero, Donna M.; Barkovich, A. James

    2010-01-01

    Objective To hypothesize that detailed examination of early cerebellar volumes over time would distinguish differences in cerebellar growth associated with intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) and white matter injury (WMI) in preterm infants. Study design Preterm newborns at the University of California San Francisco (n=57) and the University of British Columbia (n=115) were studied using serial MRI scans near birth and again at near term-equivalent age. Interactive semi-automated tools were used to determine volumes of the cerebellar hemispheres. Results Adjusting for supratentorial brain injury, cerebellar hemorrhage, and study site, cerebellar volume increased 1.7cm3/week postmenstrual age (95% CI 1.6–1.7, P<0.001). More severe supratentorial IVH was associated with slower growth of cerebellar volumes (P<0.001). Volumes by 40 weeks were 1.4 cm3 lower in premature infants with grade 1–2 IVH and 5.4 cm3 lower with grade 3–4 IVH. The same magnitude of decrease was found between ipsilateral and contralateral IVH. No association was found with severity of WMI (P=0.3). Conclusions Early effects of decreased cerebellar volume associated with supratentorial IVH in either hemisphere may be a result of concurrent cerebellar injury or direct effects of subarachnoid blood on cerebellar development. PMID:20961562

  4. Contribution of tonic vibration reflex to the evaluation and diagnosis of cerebellar disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Abbruzzese, G; Abbruzzese, M; Ratto, S; Favale, E

    1982-01-01

    Biceps brachii tonic vibration reflexes were elicited in patients with either focal or diffuse cerebellar damage and spino-cerebellar degenerations. As compared to normal controls, tonic vibration reflex amplitude was reduced in cerebellar patients, particularly in cases with unilateral hemispheric lesion, who exhibited a clear cut tonic vibration reflex asymmetry even when clinical symptoms were mild. These reflexes were absent or very weak in patients with spino-cerebellar degenerations. Muscle vibration induced in most of the patients an enhancement of mild or latent clinical symptoms such as intention tremor, difficulty in muscle relaxation or motor incoordination. PMID:7119815

  5. Medical management of cerebellar abscess: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Turner, Ryan C; Dodson, Sean C; Rosen, Charles L

    2011-01-01

    A large abscess of the posterior fossa often warrants surgical intervention. We report a case of a 50-year-old male presenting with a cerebellar abscess measuring 2.8 cm x 1.6 cm located in the left cerebellar hemisphere at the level of the middle cerebellar peduncle that was treated conservatively and successfully with antibiotics. Therapeutic management options are discussed in regards to this case specifically as well as a review of the literature. This case illustrates the successful medical management of a cerebellar abscess of otogenic origin in an adult, a unique result in terms of abscess size and age of the patient.

  6. JC virus variant associated with cerebellar atrophy in a patient with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Roux, Damien; Bouldouyre, Marie-Anne; Mercier-Delarue, Séverine; Seilhean, Danielle; Zagdanski, Anne-Marie; Delaugerre, Constance; Simon, François; Molina, Jean-Michel; Legoff, Jerôme

    2011-06-01

    The human polyomavirus JC virus (JCV) is the agent of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). It has also recently been involved in cerebellar atrophy. Factors involved in this entity are elusive. We present a case of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patient with PML and cerebellar atrophy. In addition to a compartmentalization of JCV strains between urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and cerebellum, specific rearrangements in the JCV regulatory region were observed in the cerebellum, resulting in alterations of transcription factor binding sites. Our data underline the importance of searching for JCV in HIV-infected patients with cerebellar disorders and suggest that mutations in the regulatory region may be involved in cerebellar degeneration.

  7. Specific cerebellar activation during Braille reading in blind subjects.

    PubMed

    Gizewski, Elke R; Timmann, Dagmar; Forsting, Michael

    2004-07-01

    The traditional view that the cerebellum is involved only in the control of movements has been changed recently. It has been suggested that the human cerebellum is involved in cognition and language. Likewise, besides cortical activity in sensorimotor and visual areas, an increased global activation of the cerebellum has been revealed during Braille reading in blind subjects. Our purpose was to investigate whether there is cerebellar activation during Braille reading by blind subjects other than sensorimotor activation related to finger movements. Early blind and normal sighted subjects were studied with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during Braille reading, tactile discrimination of nonsense dots, dots forming symbols, and finger tapping. The experiments were done in block design. Echo planar imaging sequences were carried out on a 1.5-T MR scanner. All blind individuals reading Braille showed robust activation of the posterior and lateral aspects of cerebellar hemispheral lobules Crus I bilaterally but more predominately on the right side. Additionally, activation was present in the medial cerebellum within lobules IV, V, and VIIIA, predominantly on the right. Discriminating nonsense dots did not reveal any activation of Crus I, but did reveal activation within the medial part of lobules IV, V, and VIIIA, predominately on the right. Analysis of sighted subjects during reading of printed text revealed activation of the posterolateral cerebellar hemisphere in Crus I bilaterally, predominantly on the right. Tactile analysis of dots representing symbols revealed an activation in lobules IV and VIII and in right Crus II but not in Crus I. In conclusion, parts of cerebellar activation during Braille reading in blind subjects (i.e., within lobules IV, V, and VIII) overlap with the known hand representation within the cerebellum and are likely related to the sensorimotor part of the task. Cerebellar activation during Braille reading within bilateral Crus I

  8. Transformation of spatiotemporal dynamics in the macaque vestibular system from otolith afferents to cortex

    PubMed Central

    Laurens, Jean; Liu, Sheng; Yu, Xiong-Jie; Chan, Raymond; Dickman, David; DeAngelis, Gregory C; Angelaki, Dora E

    2017-01-01

    Sensory signals undergo substantial recoding when neural activity is relayed from sensors through pre-thalamic and thalamic nuclei to cortex. To explore how temporal dynamics and directional tuning are sculpted in hierarchical vestibular circuits, we compared responses of macaque otolith afferents with neurons in the vestibular and cerebellar nuclei, as well as five cortical areas, to identical three-dimensional translational motion. We demonstrate a remarkable spatio-temporal transformation: otolith afferents carry spatially aligned cosine-tuned translational acceleration and jerk signals. In contrast, brainstem and cerebellar neurons exhibit non-linear, mixed selectivity for translational velocity, acceleration, jerk and position. Furthermore, these components often show dissimilar spatial tuning. Moderate further transformation of translation signals occurs in the cortex, such that similar spatio-temporal properties are found in multiple cortical areas. These results suggest that the first synapse represents a key processing element in vestibular pathways, robustly shaping how self-motion is represented in central vestibular circuits and cortical areas. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20787.001 PMID:28075326

  9. Word Recognition in Auditory Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWitt, Iain D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Although spoken word recognition is more fundamental to human communication than text recognition, knowledge of word-processing in auditory cortex is comparatively impoverished. This dissertation synthesizes current models of auditory cortex, models of cortical pattern recognition, models of single-word reading, results in phonetics and results in…

  10. Cerebellum to motor cortex paired associative stimulation induces bidirectional STDP-like plasticity in human motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming-Kuei; Tsai, Chon-Haw; Ziemann, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    The cerebellum is crucially important for motor control and adaptation. Recent non-invasive brain stimulation studies have indicated the possibility to alter the excitability of the cerebellum and its projections to the contralateral motor cortex, with behavioral consequences on motor control and adaptation. Here we sought to induce bidirectional spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP)-like modifications of motor cortex (M1) excitability by application of paired associative stimulation (PAS) in healthy subjects. Conditioning stimulation over the right lateral cerebellum (CB) preceded focal transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the left M1 hand area at an interstimulus interval of 2 ms (CB→M1 PAS(2 ms)), 6 ms (CB→M1 PAS(6 ms)) or 10 ms (CB→M1 PAS(10 ms)) or randomly alternating intervals of 2 and 10 ms (CB→M1 PAS(Control)). Effects of PAS on M1 excitability were assessed by the motor-evoked potential (MEP) amplitude, short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI), intracortical facilitation (ICF) and cerebellar-motor cortex inhibition (CBI) in the first dorsal interosseous muscle of the right hand. CB→M1 PAS(2 ms) resulted in MEP potentiation, CB→M1 PAS(6 ms) and CB→M1 PAS(10 ms) in MEP depression, and CB→M1 PAS(Control) in no change. The MEP changes lasted for 30-60 min after PAS. SICI and CBI decreased non-specifically after all PAS protocols, while ICF remained unaltered. The physiological mechanisms underlying these MEP changes are carefully discussed. Findings support the notion of bidirectional STDP-like plasticity in M1 mediated by associative stimulation of the cerebello-dentato-thalamo-cortical pathway and M1. Future studies may investigate the behavioral significance of this plasticity.

  11. Stargazin (TARP gamma-2) is required for compartment-specific AMPA receptor trafficking and synaptic plasticity in cerebellar stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Alexander C; Nicoll, Roger A

    2011-03-16

    In the cerebellar cortex, parallel fiber-to-stellate cell (PF-SC) synapses exhibit a form of synaptic plasticity manifested as a switch in the subunit composition of synaptic AMPA receptors (AMPARs) from calcium-permeable, GluA2-lacking to calcium-impermeable, GluA2-containing receptors. Here, we examine the role of stargazin (γ-2), canonical member of the transmembrane AMPAR regulatory protein (TARP) family, in the regulation of GluA2-lacking AMPARs and synaptic plasticity in SCs from epileptic and ataxic stargazer mutant mice. We found that AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission is severely diminished in stargazer SCs, and that the rectification index (RI) of AMPAR current is reduced. Activity-dependent plasticity in the rectification of synaptic AMPARs is also impaired in stargazer SCs. Despite the dramatic loss in synaptic AMPARs, extrasynaptic AMPARs are preserved. We then examined the role of stargazin in regulating the rectification of extrasynaptic AMPARs in nucleated patches and found, in contrast to previous reports, that wild-type extrasynaptic AMPARs have moderate RI values (average RI = 0.38), while those in stargazer SCs are low (average RI = 0.24). The GluA2-lacking AMPAR blocker, philanthotoxin-433 (PhTx-433), was used as an alternative measure of GluA2 content in wild-type and stargazer SCs. Despite the difference in RI, PhTx-433 sensitivity of both synaptic and extrasynaptic AMPARs remains unchanged, suggesting that the dramatic changes in RI and the impairment in synaptic plasticity observed in the stargazer mouse are not the result of a specific impairment in GluA2 trafficking. Together, these data suggest that stargazin regulates compartment-specific AMPAR trafficking, as well as activity-dependent plasticity in synaptic AMPAR rectification at cerebellar PF-SC synapses.

  12. Tenascin promotes cerebellar granule cell migration and neurite outgrowth by different domains in the fibronectin type III repeats

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The extracellular matrix molecule tenascin has been implicated in neuron-glia recognition in the developing central and peripheral nervous system and in regeneration. In this study, its role in Bergmann glial process-mediated neuronal migration was assayed in vitro using tissue explants of the early postnatal mouse cerebellar cortex. Of the five mAbs reacting with nonoverlapping epitopes on tenascin, mAbs J1/tn1, J1/tn4, and J1/tn5, but not mAbs J1/tn2 and J1/tn3 inhibited granule cell migration. Localization of the immunoreactive domains by EM of rotary shadowed tenascin molecules revealed that the mAbs J1/tn4 and J1/tn5, like the previously described J1/tn1 antibody, bound between the third and fifth fibronectin type III homologous repeats and mAb J1/tn3 bound between the third and fifth EGF-like repeats. mAb J1/tn2 had previously been found to react between fibronectin type III homologous repeats 10 and 11 of the mouse molecule (Lochter, A., L. Vaughan, A. Kaplony, A. Prochiantz, M. Schachner, and A. Faissner. 1991. J. Cell Biol. 113:1159-1171). When postnatal granule cell neurons were cultured on tenascin adsorbed to polyornithine, both the percentage of neurite-bearing cells and the length of outgrowing neurites were increased when compared to neurons growing on polyornithine alone. This neurite outgrowth promoting effect of tenascin was abolished only by mAb J1/tn2 or tenascin added to the culture medium in soluble form. The other antibodies did not modify the stimulatory or inhibitory effects of the molecule. These observations indicate that tenascin influences neurite outgrowth and migration of cerebellar granule cells by different domains in the fibronectin type III homologous repeats. PMID:1371773

  13. Tenascin promotes cerebellar granule cell migration and neurite outgrowth by different domains in the fibronectin type III repeats.

    PubMed

    Husmann, K; Faissner, A; Schachner, M

    1992-03-01

    The extracellular matrix molecule tenascin has been implicated in neuron-glia recognition in the developing central and peripheral nervous system and in regeneration. In this study, its role in Bergmann glial process-mediated neuronal migration was assayed in vitro using tissue explants of the early postnatal mouse cerebellar cortex. Of the five mAbs reacting with nonoverlapping epitopes on tenascin, mAbs J1/tn1, J1/tn4, and J1/tn5, but not mAbs J1/tn2 and J1/tn3 inhibited granule cell migration. Localization of the immunoreactive domains by EM of rotary shadowed tenascin molecules revealed that the mAbs J1/tn4 and J1/tn5, like the previously described J1/tn1 antibody, bound between the third and fifth fibronectin type III homologous repeats and mAb J1/tn3 bound between the third and fifth EGF-like repeats. mAb J1/tn2 had previously been found to react between fibronectin type III homologous repeats 10 and 11 of the mouse molecule (Lochter, A., L. Vaughan, A. Kaplony, A. Prochiantz, M. Schachner, and A. Faissner. 1991. J. Cell Biol. 113:1159-1171). When postnatal granule cell neurons were cultured on tenascin adsorbed to polyornithine, both the percentage of neurite-bearing cells and the length of outgrowing neurites were increased when compared to neurons growing on polyornithine alone. This neurite outgrowth promoting effect of tenascin was abolished only by mAb J1/tn2 or tenascin added to the culture medium in soluble form. The other antibodies did not modify the stimulatory or inhibitory effects of the molecule. These observations indicate that tenascin influences neurite outgrowth and migration of cerebellar granule cells by different domains in the fibronectin type III homologous repeats.

  14. Model of very fast (>75 Hz) network oscillations generated by electrical coupling between the proximal axons of cerebellar Purkinje cells

    PubMed Central

    Traub, Roger D; Middleton, Steven J; Knöpfel, Thomas; Whittington, Miles A

    2009-01-01

    Very fast oscillations (VFO, >75 Hz) occur transiently in vivo, in the cerebellum of mice genetically modified to model Angelman syndrome, and in a mouse model of fetal alcohol syndrome. We recently reported VFO in slices of mouse cerebellar cortex (Crus I and II of ansiform and paramedian lobules), either in association with gamma oscillations (~40 Hz, evoked by nicotine), or in isolation (evoked by nicotine in combination with GABAA receptor blockade). The experimental data suggest a role for electrical coupling between Purkinje cells (blockade of VFO by drugs reducing gap junction conductance, and spikelets in some Purkinje cells); and the data suggest the specific involvement of Purkinje cell axons (because of field oscillation maxima in the granular layer). We show here that a detailed network model (1,000 multicompartment Purkinje cells) replicates the experimental data, when gap junctions are located on the proximal axons of Purkinje cells, provided sufficient spontaneous firing is present. Unlike other VFO models, most somatic spikelets do not correspond to axonal spikes in the parent axon, but reflect spikes in electrically coupled axons. The model predicts gating of VFO frequency by gNa inactivation, and experiments prolonging this inactivation time constant, with β-pompilidotoxin, are consistent with this prediction. The model also predicts that cerebellar VFO can be explained as an electrically coupled system of axons which are not intrinsic oscillators: the electrically uncoupled cells do not individually oscillate (in the model), and axonal firing rates are much lower in the uncoupled state than in the coupled state. PMID:18973579

  15. Regular Patterns in Cerebellar Purkinje Cell Simple Spike Trains

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Soon-Lim; Hoebeek, Freek E.; Schonewille, Martijn; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Aertsen, Ad; De Schutter, Erik

    2007-01-01

    Background Cerebellar Purkinje cells (PC) in vivo are commonly reported to generate irregular spike trains, documented by high coefficients of variation of interspike-intervals (ISI). In strong contrast, they fire very regularly in the in vitro slice preparation. We studied the nature of this difference in firing properties by focusing on short-term variability and its dependence on behavioral state. Methodology/Principal Findings Using an analysis based on CV2 values, we could isolate precise regular spiking patterns, lasting up to hundreds of milliseconds, in PC simple spike trains recorded in both anesthetized and awake rodents. Regular spike patterns, defined by low variability of successive ISIs, comprised over half of the spikes, showed a wide range of mean ISIs, and were affected by behavioral state and tactile stimulation. Interestingly, regular patterns often coincided in nearby Purkinje cells without precise synchronization of individual spikes. Regular patterns exclusively appeared during the up state of the PC membrane potential, while single ISIs occurred both during up and down states. Possible functional consequences of regular spike patterns were investigated by modeling the synaptic conductance in neurons of the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN). Simulations showed that these regular patterns caused epochs of relatively constant synaptic conductance in DCN neurons. Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicate that the apparent irregularity in cerebellar PC simple spike trains in vivo is most likely caused by mixing of different regular spike patterns, separated by single long intervals, over time. We propose that PCs may signal information, at least in part, in regular spike patterns to downstream DCN neurons. PMID:17534435

  16. Incidence of Dysarthria in Children with Cerebellar Tumors: A Prospective Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richter, S.; Schoch, B.; Ozimek, A.; Gorissen, B.; Hein-Kropp, C.; Kaiser, O.; Hovel, M.; Wieland, R.; Gizewski, E.; Timmann, D.

    2005-01-01

    The present study investigated dysarthric symptoms in children with cerebellar tumors. Ten children with cerebellar tumors and 10 orthopedic control children were tested prior and one week after surgery. Clinical dysarthric symptoms were quantified in spontaneous speech. Syllable durations were analyzed in syllable repetition and sentence…

  17. Congenital torticollis due to sternomastoid aplasia with unilateral cerebellar hypoplasia: a rare association.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V R Ravi; Sabapathy, S Raja; Duraisami, Vijayagiri

    2012-10-01

    Congenital torticollis is most commonly caused by sternomastoid contracture. Aplasia of sternomastoid muscle causing congenital torticollis, though rare, has been reported. However the association of cerebellar hypoplasia with sternomastoid aplasia is extremely rare. The authors describe a case of congenital torticollis due to absence of the left sternomastoid with ipsilateral cerebellar hypoplasia, confirmed by MRI.

  18. Parvovirus associated cerebellar hypoplasia and hydrocephalus in day-old broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cerebellar hypoplasia and hydrocephalus were detected in day-old broiler chickens. Brains of chickens evaluated at necropsy appeared to be abnormal; some were disfigured and cerebellae appeared to be smaller than normal. Histopathologic examination of brains revealed cerebellar folia that were sho...

  19. The Cerebellar Deficit Hypothesis and Dyslexic Tendencies in a Non-Clinical Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookes, Rebecca L.; Stirling, John

    2005-01-01

    In order to assess the relationship between cerebellar deficits and dyslexic tendencies in a non-clinical sample, 27 primary school children aged 8-9 completed a cerebellar soft signs battery and were additionally assessed for reading age, sequential memory, picture arrangement and knowledge of common sequences. An average measure of the soft…

  20. Socioeconomic status and the cerebellar grey matter volume. Data from a well-characterised population sample.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, Jonathan; Krishnadas, Rajeev; Batty, G David; Burns, Harry; Deans, Kevin A; Ford, Ian; McConnachie, Alex; McGinty, Agnes; McLean, Jennifer S; Millar, Keith; Sattar, Naveed; Shiels, Paul G; Tannahill, Carol; Velupillai, Yoga N; Packard, Chris J; McLean, John

    2013-12-01

    The cerebellum is highly sensitive to adverse environmental factors throughout the life span. Socioeconomic deprivation has been associated with greater inflammatory and cardiometabolic risk, and poor neurocognitive function. Given the increasing awareness of the association between early-life adversities on cerebellar structure, we aimed to explore the relationship between early life (ESES) and current socioeconomic status (CSES) and cerebellar volume. T1-weighted MRI was used to create models of cerebellar grey matter volumes in 42 adult neurologically healthy males selected from the Psychological, Social and Biological Determinants of Ill Health study. The relationship between potential risk factors, including ESES, CSES and cerebellar grey matter volumes were examined using multiple regression techniques. We also examined if greater multisystem physiological risk index-derived from inflammatory and cardiometabolic risk markers-mediated the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and cerebellar grey matter volume. Both ESES and CSES explained the greatest variance in cerebellar grey matter volume, with age and alcohol use as a covariate in the model. Low CSES explained additional significant variance to low ESES on grey matter decrease. The multisystem physiological risk index mediated the relationship between both early life and current SES and grey matter volume in cerebellum. In a randomly selected sample of neurologically healthy males, poorer socioeconomic status was associated with a smaller cerebellar volume. Early and current socioeconomic status and the multisystem physiological risk index also apparently influence cerebellar volume. These findings provide data on the relationship between socioeconomic deprivation and a brain region highly sensitive to environmental factors.

  1. Purkinje Cell Activity in the Cerebellar Anterior Lobe after Rabbit Eyeblink Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, John T.; Steinmetz, Joseph E.

    2005-01-01

    The cerebellar anterior lobe may play a critical role in the execution and proper timing of learned responses. The current study was designed to monitor Purkinje cell activity in the rabbit cerebellar anterior lobe after eyeblink conditioning, and to assess whether Purkinje cells in recording locations may project to the interpositus nucleus.…

  2. Purkinje cell apoptosis in arabian horses with cerebellar abiotrophy.

    PubMed

    Blanco, A; Moyano, R; Vivo, J; Flores-Acuña, R; Molina, A; Blanco, C; Monterde, J G

    2006-08-01

    Purkinje cerebellar cells were studied in three Arabian horses aged between 6 and 8 months with clinical disorders in their movements, tremors and ataxia; the occurrence of apoptosis in this cell population was investigated by the (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL) method. Both optical and electron microscopical images showed a scant number of Purkinje cells, most of them with morphological features of apoptosis such as condensation of the nucleus and cytoplasm as well as segregation and fragmentation of the nucleus into apoptotic bodies. The TUNEL technique revealed a substantial number (65%) of positive immunoreactive Purkinje cells.

  3. Ionic mechanisms of autorhythmic firing in rat cerebellar Golgi cells

    PubMed Central

    Elisabetta Cesana, Lia Forti; Mapelli, Jonathan; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2006-01-01

    Although Golgi cells (GoCs), the main type of inhibitory interneuron in the cerebellar granular layer (GL), are thought to play a central role in cerebellar network function, their excitable properties have remained unexplored. GoCs fire rhythmically in vivo and in slices, but it was unclear whether this activity originated from pacemaker ionic mechanisms. We explored this issue in acute cerebellar slices from 3-week-old rats by combining loose cell-attached (LCA) and whole-cell (WC) recordings. GoCs displayed spontaneous firing at 1–10 Hz (room temperature) and 2–20 Hz (35–37°C), which persisted in the presence of blockers of fast synaptic receptors and mGluR and GABAB receptors, thus behaving, in our conditions, as pacemaker neurons. ZD 7288 (20 μm), a potent hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih) blocker, slowed down pacemaker frequency. The role of subthreshold Na+ currents (INa,sub) could not be tested directly, but we observed a robust TTX-sensitive, non-inactivating Na+ current in the subthreshold voltage range. When studying repolarizing currents, we found that retigabine (5 μm), an activator of KCNQ K+ channels generating neuronal M-type K+ (IM) currents, reduced GoC excitability in the threshold region. The KCNQ channel antagonist XE991 (5 μm) did not modify firing, suggesting that GoC IM has low XE991 sensitivity. Spike repolarization was followed by an after-hyperpolarization (AHP) supported by apamin-sensitive Ca2+-dependent K+ currents (Iapa). Block of Iapa decreased pacemaker precision without altering average frequency. We propose that feed-forward depolarization is sustained by Ih and INa,sub, and that delayed repolarizing feedback involves an IM-like current whose properties remain to be characterized. The multiple ionic mechanisms shown here to contribute to GoC pacemaking should provide the substrate for fine regulation of firing frequency and precision, thus influencing the cyclic inhibition exerted by GoCs onto the cerebellar GL

  4. Infantile intracranial aneurysm of the superior cerebellar artery.

    PubMed

    Del Santo, Molly Ann; Cordina, Steve Mario

    2016-03-03

    Intracranial aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare. We report a case of a 3-month-old infant who presented with inconsolable crying, vomiting, and sunset eye sign. CT revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage, with CT angiogram revealing a superior cerebellar artery aneurysm. An external ventricular drain was placed for acute management of hydrocephalus, with definitive treatment by endovascular technique with a total of six microcoils to embolize the aneurysm. Serial transcranial Dopplers revealed no subsequent vasospasm. Although aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare, once the diagnosis is established, early treatment results in better outcomes.

  5. Infantile intracranial aneurysm of the superior cerebellar artery.

    PubMed

    Del Santo, Molly Ann; Cordina, Steve Mario

    2016-02-29

    Intracranial aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare. We report a case of a 3-month-old infant who presented with inconsolable crying, vomiting, and sunset eye sign. CT revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage, with CT angiogram revealing a superior cerebellar artery aneurysm. An external ventricular drain was placed for acute management of hydrocephalus, with definitive treatment by endovascular technique with a total of six microcoils to embolize the aneurysm. Serial transcranial Dopplers revealed no subsequent vasospasm. Although aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare, once the diagnosis is established, early treatment results in better outcomes.

  6. Understanding Cerebellar Liponeurocytomas: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Oudrhiri, M. Y.; Raouzi, N.; El Kacemi, I.; El Fatemi, N.; Gana, R.; Maaqili, M. R.; Bellakhdar, F.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar liponeurocytomas were recognized in the 2000 WHO 3rd edition of CNS tumors as a distinct grade I pathological entity, a tumor with a more favorable prognosis than medulloblastoma. But reports of long-term recurrences and some possible aggressive behavior led to an upgrade on the latest WHO 4th edition of CNS tumors. The case of a 64-year-old female patient is reported in this paper. More than 30 cases of this lately recognized pathological entity have been reported to date. The diagnostic, radiological, and pathological features associated with this tumor are discussed through a literature review. PMID:24716015

  7. Clipping of ipsilateral posterior communicating and superior cerebellar artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Welch, Babu G

    2015-01-01

    The case is a 55-year-old female who presented with dizziness as the chief complaint. She has a family history of two relatives with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Digital subtraction angiography revealed the presence of a left-sided posterior communicating artery aneurysm and an ipsilateral superior cerebellar artery (SCA) aneurysm. Due to the smaller nature of the SCA, a decision was made to proceed with surgical clipping of both lesions through a pterional approach. A narrated video with illustrations depicts the intraoperative management of these lesions with postoperative angiography results. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/HCHToSsXv-4 .

  8. Application of a simple cerebellar model to geologic surface mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagens, A.; Doveton, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    Neurophysiological research into the structure and function of the cerebellum has inspired computational models that simulate information processing associated with coordination and motor movement. The cerebellar model arithmetic computer (CMAC) has a design structure which makes it readily applicable as an automated mapping device that "senses" a surface, based on a sample of discrete observations of surface elevation. The model operates as an iterative learning process, where cell weights are continuously modified by feedback to improve surface representation. The storage requirements are substantially less than those of a conventional memory allocation, and the model is extended easily to mapping in multidimensional space, where the memory savings are even greater. ?? 1991.

  9. Modulation of cortical motor evoked potential after stroke during electrical stimulation of the lateral cerebellar nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun-Joo; Furmaga, Havan; Cooperrider, Jessica; Gale, John T.; Baker, Kenneth B.; Machado, Andre G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) targeting the dentato-thalamo-cortical (DTC) pathway at its origin in the lateral cerebellar nucleus (LCN) has been shown to enhance motor recovery in a rodent model of cortical ischemia. LCN DBS also yielded frequency specific changes in motor cortex excitability in the normal brain, indexed by motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude. Objective To investigate the effect of cortical stroke on cortical motor excitability in a rodent ischemia model and to measure the effects of LCN DBS on post-ischemia excitability as a function of stimulation parameters. Methods Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups: naïve and stroke, with cortical ischemia induced through multiple, unilateral endothelin-1 injections. All animals were implanted with a bipolar electrode in the LCN opposite the affected hemisphere. MEPs were elicited from the affected hemisphere using intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) techniques. Multiple LCN DBS parameters were examined, including isochronal stimulation at 20, 30, 50, and 100 Hz as well as a novel burst stimulation pattern. Results ICMS-evoked MEPs were reduced in stroke (n=10) relative to naïve (n=12) animals. However, both groups showed frequency-dependent augmentation of cortical excitability in response to LCN DBS. In the naïve group, LCN DBS increased MEPs by 22–58%, while in the stroke group, MEPs were enhanced by 9–41% compared to OFF DBS conditions. Conclusions Activation of the DTC pathway increases cortical excitability in both naïve and post-stroke animals. These effects may underlie, at least partially, functional reorganization and therapeutic benefits associated with chronic LCN DBS in post-stroke animals. PMID:26215752

  10. Excitation of Rat Cerebellar Golgi Cells by Ethanol: Further Characterization of the Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Botta, Paolo; de Souza, Fabio M. Simões; Sangrey, Thomas; De Schutter, Erik; Valenzuela, C. Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies with rodents suggest that acute ethanol exposure impairs information flow through the cerebellar cortex, in part, by increasing GABAergic input to granule cells. Experiments suggest that an increase in the excitability of specialized GABAergic interneurons that regulate granule cell activity (i.e. Golgi cells, GoCs) contributes to this effect. In GoCs, ethanol increases spontaneous action potential firing frequency, decreased the afterhyperpolarization amplitude, and depolarized the membrane potential. Studies suggest that these effects could be mediated by inhibition of the Na+/K+ ATPase. The purpose of this study was to characterize the potential role of other GoC conductances in the mechanism of action of ethanol. Methods Computer modeling techniques and patch-clamp electrophysiological recordings with acute slices from rat cerebella were used for these studies. Results Computer modeling suggested that modulation of subthreshold Na+ channels, hyperpolarization activated currents and several K+ conductances could explain some but not all actions of ethanol on GoCs. Electrophysiological studies did not find evidence consistent with a contribution of these conductances. Quinidine, a non-selective blocker of several types of channels (including several K+ channels) that also antagonizes the Na+/K+ ATPase, reduced the effect of ethanol on GoC firing. Conclusions These findings lend further support to the conclusion that ethanol increases GoC excitability via modulation of the Na+/K+ ATPase, and suggest that a quinidine-sensitive K+ channel may also play a role in the mechanism of action of ethanol. PMID:22004123

  11. Diagnostic Approach to Childhood-onset Cerebellar Atrophy: A 10-Year Retrospective Study of 300 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maawali, Almundher; Blaser, Susan; Yoon, Grace

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary ataxias associated with cerebellar atrophy are a heterogeneous group of disorders. Selection of appropriate clinical and genetic tests for patients with cerebellar atrophy poses a diagnostic challenge. Neuroimaging is a crucial initial investigation in the diagnostic evaluation of ataxia in childhood, and the presence of cerebellar atrophy helps guide further investigations. We performed a detailed review of 300 patients with confirmed cerebellar atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging over a 10-year period. A diagnosis was established in 47% of patients: Mitochondrial disorders were most common, followed by the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses, ataxia telangectasia, and late GM2-gangliosidosis. We review the common causes of cerebellar atrophy in childhood and propose a diagnostic approach based on correlating specific neuroimaging patterns with clinical and genetic diagnoses. PMID:22764178

  12. Megalographia in children with cerebellar lesions and in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Frings, Markus; Gaertner, Kristina; Buderath, Paul; Christiansen, Hanna; Gerwig, Marcus; Hein-Kropp, Christoph; Schoch, Beate; Hebebrand, Johannes; Timmann, Dagmar

    2010-09-01

    Structural changes of the cerebellum have been reported in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in several studies. The cerebellum is a structure essential for motor coordination and motor learning. Beside behavioral deficits, children with ADHD often show slight motor abnormalities. In the present study, handwriting was examined in both children with ADHD and children with cerebellar lesions. By writing the same sentence several times, letter height increased in the ADHD and cerebellar groups but not in controls. Comparable disorders of handwriting in cerebellar and ADHD children support previous studies, which suggest a contribution of cerebellar dysfunction to motor abnormalities in ADHD. However, an involvement of non-cerebellar dysfunctions in ADHD cannot be excluded.

  13. Somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold is increased in patients with cerebellar atrophy.

    PubMed

    Manganelli, Fiore; Dubbioso, Raffaele; Pisciotta, Chiara; Antenora, Antonella; Nolano, Maria; De Michele, Giuseppe; Filla, Alessandro; Berardelli, Alfredo; Santoro, Lucio

    2013-08-01

    Processing of time in the millisecond range seems to depend on cerebellar function and it can be assessed by using the somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold testing. No studies have yet investigated this temporal discrimination task in patients with cerebellar atrophy. Eleven patients with degenerative cerebellar ataxia and 11 controls underwent somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold evaluation. The degree of cerebellar dysfunction was measured by the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale. Somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold was higher in patients compared to controls for each stimulated site (hand, neck, and eye). Age, disease duration, and International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale scores were not correlated to somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold. Somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold is abnormal in patients with cerebellar atrophy. These findings suggest that the cerebellum plays a role in modulating the somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold and confirm the role of cerebellum in the processing of time in the millisecond range.

  14. Anti-Ca/anti-ARHGAP26 antibodies associated with cerebellar atrophy and cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Doss, Sarah; Nümann, Astrid; Ziegler, Annerose; Siebert, Eberhard; Borowski, Kathrin; Stöcker, Winfried; Prüss, Harald; Wildemann, Brigitte; Endres, Matthias; Jarius, Sven

    2014-02-15

    Recently, we identified a novel Purkinje cell-specific autoantibody (termed anti-Ca) targeting rhoGTPase-activating-protein-26 (ARHGAP26) in a patient with cerebellar ataxia. Here we describe a new case of anti-Ca/ARHGAP26 antibody-positive cerebellar ataxia. Cerebellar ataxia was associated with signs of possible limbic encephalitis in this case. The 24-year-old man presented with subacute pancerebellar ataxia, flattened affect, and cognitive decline. Neuropsychological testing revealed working memory deficits, compromised verbal learning and recall, attention deficits, slowed information processing, interference difficulty, and reduced spatial recognition. MRI showed severe pancerebellar atrophy. Serological examinations revealed high-titre anti-Ca/anti-ARHGAP26 antibodies. The antibodies belonged to the IgG1 subclass and were produced intrathecally. This case further corroborates the association of anti-Ca antibodies with cerebellar ataxia, expands the clinical spectrum, and highlights the necessity of antigen-specific diagnostic testing in immune-mediated cerebellar ataxia.

  15. Novel compound heterozygous mutations in a child with Ataxia-Telangiectasia showing unrelated cerebellar disorders.

    PubMed

    Piane, Maria; Molinaro, Anna; Soresina, Annarosa; Costa, Silvia; Maffeis, Marianna; Germani, Aldo; Pinelli, Lorenzo; Meschini, Roberta; Plebani, Alessandro; Chessa, Luciana; Micheli, Roberto

    2016-12-15

    We report the case of a 6-year-old female patient with Ataxia Telangiectasia, an extremely rare condition, who developed in addition a left cerebellar astrocytoma and a right cerebellar infarction, considered as two independent events. Children with AT have an increased risk of developing cancer, but only few cases of glioma are reported and, at our knowledge, no other case of unrelated cerebellar glioma and cerebellar infarction in with the same AT patient have been described. The molecular analysis of ATM (Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated) gene showed that the patient is compound heterozygote for two previously unreported mutations: c.3291delC (p.Phe1097fs) at exon 25 and c.8198A>C (p.Gln2733Pro) at exon 58. The role of the identified ATM gene mutations in the pathogenesis of Ataxia Telangiectasia and the coexisting cerebellar disorders is discussed.

  16. Differential effects of deep cerebellar nuclei inactivation on reaching and adaptive control.

    PubMed

    Martin, J H; Cooper, S E; Hacking, A; Ghez, C

    2000-04-01

    This study examined the effects of selective inactivation of the cerebellar nuclei in the cat on the control of multijoint trajectories and trajectory adaptation to avoid obstacles. Animals were restrained in a hammock and trained to perform a prehension task in which they reached to grasp a small cube of meat from a narrow food well. To examine trajectory adaptation, reaching was obstructed by placing a horizontal bar in the limb's path. Inactivation was produced by microinjection of the GABA agonist muscimol (0.25-1.0 microg in 1 microL saline). Fastigial nucleus inactivation produced a severe impairment in balance and in head and trunk control but no effect on reaching and grasping. Dentate inactivation slowed movements significantly and produced a significant increase in tip path curvature but did not impair reaching and grasping. Selective inactivation of the anterior and posterior interpositus nuclei did not impair grasping but severely decreased the accuracy of reaching movements and produced different biases in wrist and paw paths. Anterior interpositus inactivation produced movement slowing (wrist speed) and under-reaching to the food well. Wrist and tip paths showed anterior biases and became more curved. Also animals could no longer make anticipatory adjustments in limb kinematics to avoid obstructions but sensory-evoked corrective responses were preserved. Posterior interpositus inactivation produced a significant increase in wrist speed and overreaching. Wrist and tip paths showed a posterior bias and became more curved, although in a different way than during anterior interpositus inactivation. Posterior interpositus inactivation did not impair trajectory adaptation to reach over the obstacle. During inactivation of either interpositus nucleus, all measures of kinematic temporal and spatial variability increased with somewhat greater effects being produced by anterior interpositus inactivation. We discuss our results in relation to the hypothesis that

  17. Chronic Deep Cerebellar Stimulation Promotes Long-Term Potentiation, Microstructural Plasticity, and Reorganization of Perilesional Cortical Representation in a Rodent Model

    PubMed Central

    Cooperrider, Jessica; Furmaga, Havan; Plow, Ela; Park, Hyun-Joo; Chen, Zhihong; Kidd, Grahame; Baker, Kenneth B.; Gale, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Control over postinjury CNS plasticity is a major frontier of science that, if conquered, would open new avenues for treatment of neurological disorders. Here we investigate the functional, physiological, and structural changes in the cerebral cortex associated with chronic deep brain stimulation of the cerebellar output, a treatment approach that has been shown to improve postischemia motor recovery in a rodent model of cortical infarcts. Long–Evans rats were pretrained on the pasta-matrix retrieval task, followed by induction of focal cortical ischemia and implantation of a macroelectrode in the contralesional lateral cerebellar nucleus. Animals were assigned to one of three treatment groups pseudorandomly to balance severity of poststroke motor deficits: REGULAR stimulation, BURST stimulation, or SHAM. Treatment initiated 2 weeks post surgery and continued for 5 weeks. At the end, animals were randomly selected for perilesional intracortical microstimulation mapping and tissue sampling for Western blot analysis or contributed tissue for 3D electron microscopy. Evidence of enhanced cortical plasticity with therapeutically effective stimulation is shown, marked by greater perilesional reorganization in stimulation- treated animals versus SHAM. BURST stimulation was significantly effective for promoting distal forepaw cortical representation. Stimulation-treated animals showed a twofold increase in synaptic density compared with SHAM. In addition, treated animals demonstrated increased expression of synaptic markers of long-term potentiation and plasticity, including synaptophysin, NMDAR1, CaMKII, and PSD95. These findings provide a critical foundation of how deep cerebellar stimulation may guide plastic reparative reorganization after nonprogressive brain injury and indicate strong translational potential. PMID:24990924

  18. Clinical significance of increased cerebellar default-mode network connectivity in resting-state patients with drug-naive somatization disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Houliang; Guo, Wenbin; Liu, Feng; Chen, Jindong; Wu, Renrong; Zhang, Zhikun; Yu, Miaoyu; Li, Lehua; Zhao, Jingping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The cerebellum has been proven to be connected to the brain network, as in the default-mode network (DMN), among healthy subjects and patients with psychiatric disorders. However, whether or not abnormal cerebellar DMN connectivity exists and what its clinical significance is among drug-naive patients with somatization disorder (SD) at rest remain unclear. A total of 25 drug-naive patients with SD and 28 healthy controls were enrolled for a resting-state scan. The imaging data were analyzed using the seed-based functional connectivity (FC) method. Compared with the controls, patients with SD showed increased left/right Crus I-left/right angular gyrus (AG) connectivity and Lobule IX-left superior medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) connectivity. The FC values of the left/right Crus I-right AG connectivity of the patients were positively correlated with their scores in the somatization subscale of the symptom checklist-90 (Scl-90). A trend level of correlations was observed between the FC values of the left Crus I-left AG connectivity of the patients and their scores for the somatization subscale of Scl-90, as well as between the FC values of their Lobule IX-left superior MPFC connectivity and their scores for the Eysenck personality questionnaire (EPQ) extraversion. Our findings show the increased cerebellar DMN connectivity in patients with SD and therefore highlight the importance of the DMN in the neurobiology of SD. Increased cerebellar DMN connectivities are also correlated with their somatization severity and personality, both of which bear clinical significance. PMID:27428190

  19. Location of lesion determines motor vs. cognitive consequences in patients with cerebellar stroke.

    PubMed

    Stoodley, Catherine J; MacMore, Jason P; Makris, Nikos; Sherman, Janet C; Schmahmann, Jeremy D

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar lesions can cause motor deficits and/or the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome (CCAS; Schmahmann's syndrome). We used voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping to test the hypothesis that the cerebellar motor syndrome results from anterior lobe damage whereas lesions in the posterolateral cerebellum produce the CCAS. Eighteen patients with isolated cerebellar stroke (13 males, 5 females; 20-66 years old) were evaluated using measures of ataxia and neurocognitive ability. Patients showed a wide range of motor and cognitive performance, from normal to severely impaired; individual deficits varied according to lesion location within the cerebellum. Patients with damage to cerebellar lobules III-VI had worse ataxia scores: as predicted, the cerebellar motor syndrome resulted from lesions involving the anterior cerebellum. Poorer performance on fine motor tasks was associated primarily with strokes affecting the anterior lobe extending into lobule VI, with right-handed finger tapping and peg-placement associated with damage to the right cerebellum, and left-handed finger tapping associated with left cerebellar damage. Patients with the CCAS in the absence of cerebellar motor syndrome had damage to posterior lobe regions, with lesions leading to significantly poorer scores on language (e.g. right Crus I and II extending through IX), spatial (bilateral Crus I, Crus II, and right lobule VIII), and executive function measures (lobules VII-VIII). These data reveal clinically significant functional regions underpinning movement and cognition in the cerebellum, with a broad anterior-posterior distinction. Motor and cognitive outcomes following cerebellar damage appear to reflect the disruption of different cerebro-cerebellar motor and cognitive loops.

  20. Cerebellar TMS in Treatment of a Patient with Cerebellar Ataxia: Evidence from Clinical, Biomechanics and Neurophysiological Assessments

    PubMed Central

    Farzan, Faranak; Wu, Yunfen; Manor, Brad; Anastasio, Elana M.; Lough, Matthew; Novak, Vera; Greenstein, Patricia E.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    We describe a patient with a probable diagnosis of idiopathic late-onset cerebellar atrophy who shows improvement of limb coordination, speech and gait following 21 days of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) applied to scalp regions presumably corresponding to the cerebellum. This case study provides, for the first time, a quantitative assessment of gait improvement in response to TMS therapy in ataxia, as well as neurophysiological evidence in support of modification of cerebello-cortical interaction that may underlie some of the improvements. PMID:23625327

  1. Chemosensory Learning in the Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Rolls, Edmund T.

    2011-01-01

    Taste is a primary reinforcer. Olfactory–taste and visual–taste association learning takes place in the primate including human orbitofrontal cortex to build representations of flavor. Rapid reversal of this learning can occur using a rule-based learning system that can be reset when an expected taste or flavor reward is not obtained, that is by negative reward prediction error, to which a population of neurons in the orbitofrontal cortex responds. The representation in the orbitofrontal cortex but not the primary taste or olfactory cortex is of the reward value of the visual/olfactory/taste input as shown by devaluation experiments in which food is fed to satiety, and by correlations of the activations with subjective pleasantness ratings in humans. Sensory-specific satiety for taste, olfactory, visual, and oral somatosensory inputs produced by feeding a particular food to satiety is implemented it is proposed by medium-term synaptic adaptation in the orbitofrontal cortex. Cognitive factors, including word-level descriptions, modulate the representation of the reward value of food in the orbitofrontal cortex, and this effect is learned it is proposed by associative modification of top-down synapses onto neurons activated by bottom-up taste and olfactory inputs when both are active in the orbitofrontal cortex. A similar associative synaptic learning process is proposed to be part of the mechanism for the top-down attentional control to the reward value vs. the sensory properties such as intensity of taste and olfactory inputs in the orbitofrontal cortex, as part of a biased activation theory of selective attention. PMID:21954379

  2. Cerebellar-Dependent Eyeblink Conditioning Deficits in Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, Jennifer K.; Bolbecker, Amanda R.; Mehta, Crystal S.; Klaunig, Mallory J.; Steinmetz, Joseph E.; O'Donnell, Brian F.; Hetrick, William P.

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that abnormalities in neural circuitry and timing associated with the cerebellum may play a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Schizotypal personality disorder (SPD) may be genetically linked to schizophrenia, but individuals with SPD are freer from potential research confounds and may therefore offer insight into psychophysiological correlates of schizophrenia. The present study employed a delay eyeblink conditioning (EBC) procedure to examine cerebellar-dependent learning in schizophrenia, SPD, and healthy control subjects (n = 18 per group) who were matched for age and gender. The conditioned stimulus was a 400-ms tone that coterminated with a 50 ms unconditioned stimulus air puff. Cognitive performance on the Picture Completion, Digit Symbol Coding, Similarities, and Digit Span subscales of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale—Third Edition was also investigated. The schizophrenia and SPD groups demonstrated robust EBC impairment relative to the control subjects; they had significantly fewer conditioned responses (CRs), as well as smaller CR amplitudes. Schizophrenia subjects showed cognitive impairment across subscales compared with SPD and control subjects; SPD subjects showed intermediate performance to schizophrenia and control subjects and performed significantly worse than controls on Picture Completion. Impaired EBC was significantly related to decreased processing speed in schizophrenia spectrum subjects. These findings support the role of altered cortico-cerebellar-thalamic-cortical circuitry in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. PMID:21148238

  3. Primary cerebellar extramedullary myeloid cell tumor mimicking oligodendroglioma.

    PubMed

    Ho, D M; Wong, T T; Guo, W Y; Chang, K P; Yen, S H

    1997-10-01

    Extramedullary myeloid cell tumors (EMCTs) are tumors consisting of immature cells of the myeloid series that occur outside the bone marrow. Most of them are associated with acute myelogenous leukemia or other myeloproliferative disorders, and a small number occur as primary lesions, i.e., are not associated with hematological disorders. Occurrence inside the cranium is rare, and there has been only one case of primary EMCT involving the cerebellum reported in the literature. The case we report here is a blastic EMCT occurring in the cerebellum of a 3-year-old boy who had no signs of leukemia or any hematological disorder throughout the entire course. The cerebellar tumor was at first misdiagnosed as an "oligodendroglioma" because of the uniformity and "fried egg" artifact of the tumor cells. The tumor disappeared during chemotherapy consisting of 12 treatments. However, it recurred and metastasized to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shortly after the therapy was completed. A diagnosis of EMCT was suspected because of the presence of immature myeloid cells in the CSF, and was confirmed by anti-myeloperoxidase and anti-lysozyme immunoreactivity of the cerebellar tumor. The patient succumbed 1 year and 3 months after the first presentation of the disease.

  4. Biosensor measurement of purine release from cerebellar cultures and slices.

    PubMed

    Wall, Mark; Eason, Robert; Dale, Nicholas

    2010-09-01

    We have previously described an action-potential and Ca(2+)-dependent form of adenosine release in the molecular layer of cerebellar slices. The most likely source of the adenosine is the parallel fibres, the axons of granule cells. Using microelectrode biosensors, we have therefore investigated whether cultured granule cells (from postnatal day 7-8 rats) can release adenosine. Although no purine release could be detected in response to focal electrical stimulation, purine (adenosine, inosine or hypoxanthine) release occurred in response to an increase in extracellular K(+) concentration from 3 to 25 mM coupled with addition of 1 mM glutamate. The mechanism of purine release was transport from the cytoplasm via an ENT transporter. This process did not require action-potential firing but was Ca(2+)dependent. The major purine released was not adenosine, but was either inosine or hypoxanthine. In order for inosine/hypoxanthine release to occur, cultures had to contain both granule cells and glial cells; neither cellular component was sufficient alone. Using the same stimulus in cerebellar slices (postnatal day 7-25), it was possible to release purines. The release however was not blocked by ENT blockers and there was a shift in the Ca(2+) dependence during development. This data from cultures and slices further illustrates the complexities of purine release, which is dependent on cellular composition and developmental stage.

  5. Speech prosody in Friedreich's and olivo-ponto cerebellar atrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, Maureen

    2004-05-01

    A critical issue in the study of speech motor control is the identification of the mechanisms that generate the temporal flow of serially ordered articulatory events. Two staged models of serial ordered events (Lashley, 1951; Lindblom, 1963) claim that time controls events whereas dynamic models predict a relative relation between time and space. Each of these models predicts a different relation between the acoustic measures of formant frequency and segmental duration. The most recent method described herein provides a sensitive index of speech deterioration which is both acoustically robust and phonetically systematic. Both acoustic and magnetic resonance imaging measures were used to describe the speech disturbance in two neurologically distinct groups of cerebellar ataxia: Friedreich's ataxia and olivo-ponto cerebellar ataxia. The speaking task was designed to elicit six different prosodic conditions and four prosodic contrasts. All subjects read the same syllable embedded in a sentence, under six different prosodic conditions. Pair-wise comparisons derived from the six conditions were used to describe (1) final lengthening, (2) phrasal accent, (3) nuclear accent and (4) syllable reduction. An estimate of speech deterioration as determined by individual and normal subects' acoustic values of syllable duration, formant and fundamental frequencies was used in correlation analyses with magnetic resonance imaging ratings.

  6. Development of the cerebellum and cerebellar neural circuits.

    PubMed

    Hibi, Masahiko; Shimizu, Takashi

    2012-03-01

    The cerebellum, a structure derived from the dorsal part of the most anterior hindbrain, is important for integrating sensory perception and motor control. While the structure and development of the cerebellum have been analyzed most extensively in mammals,recent studies have shown that the anatomy and development of the cerebellum is conserved between mammals and bony fish (teleost) species, including zebrafish. In the mammalian and teleost cerebellum,Purkinje and granule cells serve, respectively, as the major GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons. Purkinje cells originate in the ventricular zone (VZ), and receive inputs from climbing fibers. Granule cells originate in the upper rhombic lip (URL) and receive inputs from mossy fibers. Thus, the teleost cerebellum shares many features with the cerebellum of other vertebrates, and isa good model system for studying cerebellar function and development. The teleost cerebellum also has features that are specific to teleosts or have not been elucidated in mammals, including eurydendroid cells and adult neurogenesis. Furthermore, the neural circuitry in part of the optic tectum and the dorsal hindbrain closely resembles the circuitry of the teleost cerebellum; hence,these are called cerebellum-like structures. Here we describe the anatomy and development of cerebellar neurons and their circuitry, and discuss the possible roles of the cerebellum and cerebellum-like structures in behavior and higher cognitive functions. We also consider the potential use of genetics and novel techniques for studying the cerebellum in zebrafish.

  7. Impaired predictive motor timing in patients with cerebellar disorders.

    PubMed

    Bares, Martin; Lungu, Ovidiu; Liu, Tao; Waechter, Tobias; Gomez, Christopher M; Ashe, James

    2007-06-01

    The ability to precisely time events is essential for both perception and action. There is evidence that the cerebellum is important for the neural representation of time in a variety of behaviors including time perception, the tapping of specific time intervals, and eye-blink conditioning. It has been difficult to assess the contribution of the cerebellum to timing during more dynamic motor behavior because the component movements themselves may be abnormal or any motor deficit may be due to an inability to combine the component movements into a complete action rather than timing per se. Here we investigated the performance of subjects with cerebellar disease in predictive motor timing using a task that involved mediated interception of a moving target, and we tested the effect of movement type (acceleration, deceleration, constant), speed (slow, medium, fast), and angle (0 degrees , 15 degrees and 30 degrees) on performance. The subjects with cerebellar damage were significantly worse at interception than healthy controls even when we controlled for basic motor impairments such as response time. Our data suggest that subjects with damage to the cerebellum have a fundamental problem with predictive motor timing and indicate that the cerebellum plays an essential role in integrating incoming visual information with motor output when making predictions about upcoming actions. The findings demonstrate that the cerebellum may have properties that would facilitate the processing or storage of internal models of motor behavior.

  8. MRI volumetry of prefrontal cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheline, Yvette I.; Black, Kevin J.; Lin, Daniel Y.; Pimmel, Joseph; Wang, Po; Haller, John W.; Csernansky, John G.; Gado, Mokhtar; Walkup, Ronald K.; Brunsden, Barry S.; Vannier, Michael W.

    1995-05-01

    Prefrontal cortex volumetry by brain magnetic resonance (MR) is required to estimate changes postulated to occur in certain psychiatric and neurologic disorders. A semiautomated method with quantitative characterization of its performance is sought to reliably distinguish small prefrontal cortex volume changes within individuals and between groups. Stereological methods were tested by a blinded comparison of measurements applied to 3D MR scans obtained using an MPRAGE protocol. Fixed grid stereologic methods were used to estimate prefrontal cortex volumes on a graphic workstation, after the images are scaled from 16 to 8 bits using a histogram method. In addition images were resliced into coronal sections perpendicular to the bicommissural plane. Prefrontal cortex volumes were defined as all sections of the frontal lobe anterior to the anterior commissure. Ventricular volumes were excluded. Stereological measurement yielded high repeatability and precision, and was time efficient for the raters. The coefficient of error was cortex boundaries on 3D images was critical to obtaining accurate measurements. MR prefrontal cortex volumetry by stereology can yield accurate and repeatable measurements. Small frontal lobe volume reductions in patients with brain disorders such as depression and schizophrenia can be efficiently assessed using this method.

  9. Aneurysm in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery-posterior inferior cerebellar artery variant: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Saad; Azeem, Abdul; Jiwani, Amyna; Javed, Gohar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There are variations in the anatomy of the vertebrobasilar system amongst which the Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery-Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery (AICA-PICA) variant is thought to have a prevalence of 20–24% (based on retrospective studies). Despite this, aneurysms of the AICA-PICA variant are rare. We present a case of an AICA-PICA aneurysm and discuss its presentation and management, along with a review of literature. Presentation of case We describe the case of a 35 year old female who presented with signs of meningismus. On the basis of radiological imaging it was initially misdiagnosed as a thrombosed arteriovenous malformation (AVM). The patient was eventually discharged with a plan of interval imaging and interventional radiology (if required). The patient presented again with similar signs and symptoms. Re-evaluation of imaging revealed an aneurysm of the AICA-PICA variant which was managed surgically. Discussion Aneurysms of the AICA-PICA variant are rare. The radiological features and surgical management represent a unique clinical entity and are discussed below. Conclusion The prevalence of the AICA-PICA variant might be high but aneurysms in this vessel are rare. The scant knowledge available on this subject makes it a diagnostic difficulty. PMID:27017276

  10. Selective Loss of Presynaptic Potassium Channel Clusters at the Cerebellar Basket Cell Terminal Pinceau in Adam11 Mutants Reveals Their Role in Ephaptic Control of Purkinje Cell Firing

    PubMed Central

    Kole, Matthew J.; Qian, Jing; Waase, Marc P.; Klassen, Tara L.; Chen, Tim T.; Augustine, George J.

    2015-01-01

    A specialized axonal ending, the basket cell “pinceau,” encapsulates the Purkinje cell axon initial segment (AIS), exerting final inhibitory control over the integrated outflow of the cerebellar cortex. This nonconventional axo-axonic contact extends beyond the perisomatic chemical GABAergic synaptic boutons to the distal AIS, lacks both sodium channels and local exocytotic machinery, and yet contains a dense cluster of voltage-gated potassium channels whose functional contribution is unknown. Here, we show that ADAM11, a transmembrane noncatalytic disintegrin, is the first reported Kv1-interacting protein essential for localizing Kv1.1 and Kv1.2 subunit complexes to the distal terminal. Selective absence of these channels at the pinceau due to mutation of ADAM11 spares spontaneous GABA release from basket cells at the perisomatic synapse yet eliminates ultrarapid ephaptic inhibitory synchronization of Purkinje cell firing. Our findings identify a critical role for presynaptic K+ channels at the pinceau in ephaptic control over the speed and stability of spike rate coding at the Purkinje cell AIS in mice. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study identifies ADAM11 as the first essential molecule for the proper localization of potassium ion channels at presynaptic nerve terminals, where they modulate excitability and the release of neural transmitters. Genetic truncation of the transmembrane disintegrin and metalloproteinase protein ADAM11 resulted in the absence of Kv1 channels that are normally densely clustered at the terminals of basket cell axons in the cerebellar cortex. These specialized terminals are responsible for the release of the neurotransmitter GABA onto Purkinje cells and also display electrical signaling. In the ADAM11 mutant, GABAergic release was not altered, but the ultrarapid electrical signal was absent, demonstrating that the dense presynaptic cluster of Kv1 ion channels at these terminals mediate electrical transmission. Therefore, ADAM11 plays a

  11. Interhemispheric Connectivity Characterizes Cortical Reorganization in Motor-Related Networks After Cerebellar Lesions.

    PubMed

    De Vico Fallani, Fabrizio; Clausi, Silvia; Leggio, Maria; Chavez, Mario; Valencia, Miguel; Maglione, Anton Giulio; Babiloni, Fabio; Cincotti, Febo; Mattia, Donatella; Molinari, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Although cerebellar-cortical interactions have been studied extensively in animal models and humans using modern neuroimaging techniques, the effects of cerebellar stroke and focal lesions on cerebral cortical processing remain unknown. In the present study, we analyzed the large-scale functional connectivity at the cortical level by combining high-density electroencephalography (EEG) and source imaging techniques to evaluate and quantify the compensatory reorganization of brain networks after cerebellar damage. The experimental protocol comprised a repetitive finger extension task by 10 patients with unilateral focal cerebellar lesions and 10 matched healthy controls. A graph theoretical approach was used to investigate the functional reorganization of cortical networks. Our patients, compared with controls, exhibited significant differences at global and local topological level of their brain networks. An abnormal rise in small-world network efficiency was observed in the gamma band (30-40 Hz) during execution of the task, paralleled by increased long-range connectivity between cortical hemispheres. Our findings show that a pervasive reorganization of the brain network is associated with cerebellar focal damage and support the idea that the cerebellum boosts or refines cortical functions. Clinically, these results suggest that cortical changes after cerebellar damage are achieved through an increase in the interactions between remote cortical areas and that rehabilitation should aim to reshape functional activation patterns. Future studies should determine whether these hypotheses are limited to motor tasks or if they also apply to cerebro-cerebellar dysfunction in general.

  12. Modality specificity in the cerebro-cerebellar neurocircuitry during working memory.

    PubMed

    Ng, H B Tommy; Kao, K-L Cathy; Chan, Y C; Chew, Effie; Chuang, K H; Chen, S H Annabel

    2016-05-15

    Previous studies have suggested cerebro-cerebellar circuitry in working memory. The present fMRI study aims to distinguish differential cerebro-cerebellar activation patterns in verbal and visual working memory, and employs a quantitative analysis to deterimine lateralization of the activation patterns observed. Consistent with Chen and Desmond (2005a,b) predictions, verbal working memory activated a cerebro-cerebellar circuitry that comprised left-lateralized language-related brain regions including the inferior frontal and posterior parietal areas, and subcortically, right-lateralized superior (lobule VI) and inferior cerebellar (lobule VIIIA/VIIB) areas. In contrast, a distributed network of bilateral inferior frontal and inferior temporal areas, and bilateral superior (lobule VI) and inferior (lobule VIIB) cerebellar areas, was recruited during visual working memory. Results of the study verified that a distinct cross cerebro-cerebellar circuitry underlies verbal working memory. However, a neural circuitry involving specialized brain areas in bilateral neocortical and bilateral cerebellar hemispheres subserving visual working memory is observed. Findings are discussed in the light of current models of working memory and data from related neuroimaging studies.

  13. Systemic glycerol decreases neonatal rabbit brain and cerebellar growth independent of intraventricular hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Traudt, Christopher M; McPherson, Ron J; Studholme, Colin; Millen, Kathleen J; Juul, Sandra E

    2014-01-01

    Background Cerebellar hypoplasia is common problem for preterm infants, and infants that suffer intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH). To evaluate the effects of IVH on cerebellar growth and development, we used a neonatal rabbit model of systemic glycerol to produce IVH. Methods New Zealand White rabbit kits were surgically delivered 2 d preterm, and treated with i.p. glycerol (3.25 to 6.5 g/kg). Controls were born at term. IVH was documented by ultrasound. Brain MRI volumes, cerebellar foliation, proliferation (Ki-67) and Purkinje cell density were done at two weeks of life. Tissue glycerol and glutathione concentrations were measured. Results Glycerol increased IVH, subarachnoid hemorrhages and mortality in a dose-dependent manner. Total cerebellar volumes, cerebellar foliation and cerebellar proliferation were decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Glycerol accumulated rapidly in blood, brain and liver and was associated with increased glutathione concentration. All of these results were independent of IVH status. Conclusions Cerebellar hypoplasia was induced after glycerol administration in a dose-dependent manner. Given rapid tissue accumulation of glycerol, dose dependent decreased brain growth and lack of IVH effect on measured outcomes we question the validity of this model as glycerol toxicity cannot be ruled out. A more physiologic model of IVH is needed. PMID:24346111

  14. Cerebellar mutism in children: report of six cases and potential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Koh, S; Turkel, S B; Baram, T Z

    1997-04-01

    Cerebellar mutism is a rare finding associated with resection of posterior fossa tumors or cerebellar hemorrhages. We reviewed the medical records of six children, aged 6 to 12 years, who developed cerebellar mutism after resection of a posterior fossa mass or as a result of posterior fossa trauma. From 1989 to 1994, 210 children underwent posterior fossa resection at our institution, and four developed mutism (an incidence of 1.6%). All four patients had primitive neuroectodermal tumors. The fifth patient experienced trauma, and another patient had an arteriovenous malformation (AVM). In four children, hydrocephalus developed as a result of their tumor or AVM. Four developed cerebellar mutism 24 to 48 hours after surgery or trauma, and one developed cerebellar mutism 5 days after surgery, coincident with hydrocephalus. In one, mutism occurred after a second resection was performed for a recurrence of his posterior fossa tumor. Cerebellar mutism lasted 10 days in one patient and 2 to 8 weeks in the other four. Dysarthria was apparent in four patients during the recovery phase. We suggest trauma to the dentate nucleus and/or its outflow tract, the superior cerebellar peduncle, as a cause of reversible mutism. Because posterior fossa tumors are common in children, mutism should be recognized as an important side effect of surgery.

  15. Relationships between regional cerebellar volume and sensorimotor and cognitive function in young and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Jessica A.; Seidler, Rachael D.

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellum has been implicated in both sensorimotor and cognitive function, but is known to undergo volumetric declines with advanced age. Individual differences in regional cerebellar volume may therefore provide insight into performance variability across the lifespan, as has been shown with other brain structures and behaviors. Here, we investigated whether there are regional age differences in cerebellar volume in young and older adults, and whether these volumes explain, in part, individual differences in sensorimotor and cognitive task performance. We found that older adults had smaller cerebellar volume than young adults; specifically, lobules in the anterior cerebellum were more impacted by age. Multiple regression analyses for both age groups revealed associations between sensorimotor task performance in several domains (balance, choice reaction time, and timing) and regional cerebellar volume. There were also relationships with working memory, but none with measures of general cognitive or executive function. Follow-up analyses revealed several differential relationships with age between regional volume and sensorimotor performance. These relationships were predominantly selective to cerebellar regions that have been implicated in cognitive functions. Therefore, it may be the cognitive aspects of sensorimotor task performance that are best explained by individual differences in regional cerebellar volumes. In sum, our results demonstrate the importance of regional cerebellar volume with respect to both sensorimotor and cognitive performance, and we provide additional insight into the role of the cerebellum in age-related performance declines. PMID:23625382

  16. Autistic-like behaviour and cerebellar dysfunction in Purkinje cell Tsc1 mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Peter T; Hull, Court; Chu, YunXiang; Greene-Colozzi, Emily; Sadowski, Abbey R; Leech, Jarrett M; Steinberg, Jason; Crawley, Jacqueline N; Regehr, Wade G; Sahin, Mustafa

    2012-08-30

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are highly prevalent neurodevelopmental disorders, but the underlying pathogenesis remains poorly understood. Recent studies have implicated the cerebellum in these disorders, with post-mortem studies in ASD patients showing cerebellar Purkinje cell (PC) loss, and isolated cerebellar injury has been associated wi