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Sample records for cerebral asymmetries complementary

  1. Cerebral asymmetry in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Oertel-Knöchel, Viola; Linden, David E J

    2011-10-01

    The hemispheres of the human brain are anatomically and functionally asymmetric, and many cognitive and motor functions such as language and handedness are lateralized. This review examines anatomical, psychological, and physiological approaches to the understanding of separate hemispheric functions and their integration. The concept of hemispheric laterality plays a central role in current neuropsychological and pathophysiological models of schizophrenia. Reduced hemispheric asymmetry has also been reported for other mental disorders, for example, bipolar disorder. Recent research reflects an increasing interest in the molecular and population genetics of laterality and its potential link with animal models of schizophrenia. The authors review the principles of laterality and brain asymmetry and discuss the evidence for changes in asymmetry in schizophrenia and other mental disorders.

  2. Cerebral asymmetry in insomnia sufferers.

    PubMed

    St-Jean, Geneviève; Turcotte, Isabelle; Bastien, Célyne H

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral asymmetry is used to describe the differences in electroencephalographic activity between regions of the brain. The objective of this study was to document frontal, central, and parietal asymmetry in psychophysiological (Psy-I) and paradoxical (Para-I) insomnia sufferers as well as good sleeper (GS) controls, and to compare their patterns of asymmetry to others already found in anxiety and depression. Additionally, asymmetry variations between nights were assessed. Participants were 17 Psy-I, 14 Para-I, and 19 GS (mean age = 40 years, SD = 9.4). They completed three nights of polysomnography (PSG) recordings following a clinical evaluation in a sleep laboratory. All sleep cycles of Nights 2 and 3 were retained for power spectral analysis. The absolute activity in frequency bands (0.00-125.00 Hz) was computed at multiple frontal, central, and parietal sites in rapid eye movement and non-rapid eye movement sleep to provide cerebral asymmetry measures. Mixed model ANOVAs were computed to assess differences between groups and nights. Correlations were performed with asymmetry and symptoms of depression and anxiety from self-reported questionnaires. Over the course of the two nights, Para-I tended to present hypoactivation of their left frontal region but hyperactivation of their right one compared with GS. As for Psy-I, they presented increased activation of their right parietal region compared with Para-I. Asymmetry at frontal, central, and parietal region differed between nights. On a more disrupted night of sleep, Psy-I had increased activity in their right parietal region while Para-I presented a decrease in cerebral activity in the right central region on their less disrupted night of sleep. Anxious and depressive symptoms did not correlate with asymmetry at any region. Therefore, Psy-I and Para-I present unique patterns of cerebral asymmetry that do not relate to depression or anxiety, and asymmetry varies between nights, maybe as a

  3. Volumetric assessment of cerebral asymmetries in dogs.

    PubMed

    Siniscalchi, Marcello; Franchini, Delia; Pepe, Anna M; Sasso, Raffaella; Dimatteo, Salvatore; Vallortigara, Giorgio; Quaranta, Angelo

    2011-09-01

    In the present study we quantified volumetric brain asymmetries from computed tomography (CT) scans in 12 healthy dogs, using a semi-automated technique for assessing in vivo structure asymmetry. Volumetric assessment of asymmetrical cerebral lateral ventricle (ALV) was also investigated. Our results showed that seven dogs exhibited a right hemisphere significantly greater than the left, two dogs had a left-greater-than-right hemisphere asymmetry, and finally two dogs displayed no significant brain volumetric asymmetry. This right-biased hemispheric asymmetry supports data reported previously using post-mortem morphological studies in both dogs and other mammalian species.

  4. Cerebral Asymmetries and Reading Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirozzolo, Francis J.

    1978-01-01

    Reviewed are historical developments regarding the concepts of cerebral localization, and analyzed are implications of current research on the role of the cerebral hemispheres in reading disorders. (CL)

  5. The evolution and genetics of cerebral asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Corballis, Michael C

    2009-04-12

    Handedness and cerebral asymmetry are commonly assumed to be uniquely human, and even defining characteristics of our species. This is increasingly refuted by the evidence of behavioural asymmetries in non-human species. Although complex manual skill and language are indeed unique to our species and are represented asymmetrically in the brain, some non-human asymmetries appear to be precursors, and others are shared between humans and non-humans. In all behavioural and cerebral asymmetries so far investigated, a minority of individuals reverse or negate the dominant asymmetry, suggesting that such asymmetries are best understood in the context of the overriding bilateral symmetry of the brain and body, and a trade-off between the relative advantages and disadvantages of symmetry and asymmetry. Genetic models of handedness, for example, typically postulate a gene with two alleles, one disposing towards right-handedness and the other imposing no directional influence. There is as yet no convincing evidence as to the location of this putative gene, suggesting that several genes may be involved, or that the gene may be monomorphic with variations due to environmental or epigenetic influences. Nevertheless, it is suggested that, in behavioural, neurological and evolutionary terms, it may be more profitable to examine the degree rather than the direction of asymmetry.

  6. The evolution and genetics of cerebral asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Corballis, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    Handedness and cerebral asymmetry are commonly assumed to be uniquely human, and even defining characteristics of our species. This is increasingly refuted by the evidence of behavioural asymmetries in non-human species. Although complex manual skill and language are indeed unique to our species and are represented asymmetrically in the brain, some non-human asymmetries appear to be precursors, and others are shared between humans and non-humans. In all behavioural and cerebral asymmetries so far investigated, a minority of individuals reverse or negate the dominant asymmetry, suggesting that such asymmetries are best understood in the context of the overriding bilateral symmetry of the brain and body, and a trade-off between the relative advantages and disadvantages of symmetry and asymmetry. Genetic models of handedness, for example, typically postulate a gene with two alleles, one disposing towards right-handedness and the other imposing no directional influence. There is as yet no convincing evidence as to the location of this putative gene, suggesting that several genes may be involved, or that the gene may be monomorphic with variations due to environmental or epigenetic influences. Nevertheless, it is suggested that, in behavioural, neurological and evolutionary terms, it may be more profitable to examine the degree rather than the direction of asymmetry. PMID:19064358

  7. Cerebellar asymmetry and its relation to cerebral asymmetry estimated by intrinsic functional connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Danhong; Buckner, Randy L.

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetry of the human cerebellum was investigated using intrinsic functional connectivity. Regions of functional asymmetry within the cerebellum were identified during resting-state functional MRI (n = 500 subjects) and replicated in an independent cohort (n = 500 subjects). The most strongly right lateralized cerebellar regions fell within the posterior lobe, including crus I and crus II, in regions estimated to link to the cerebral association cortex. The most strongly left lateralized cerebellar regions were located in lobules VI and VIII in regions linked to distinct cerebral association networks. Comparison of cerebellar asymmetry with independently estimated cerebral asymmetry revealed that the lateralized regions of the cerebellum belong to the same networks that are strongly lateralized in the cerebrum. The degree of functional asymmetry of the cerebellum across individuals was significantly correlated with cerebral asymmetry and varied with handedness. In addition, cerebellar asymmetry estimated at rest predicted cerebral lateralization during an active language task. These results demonstrate that functional lateralization is likely a unitary feature of large-scale cerebrocerebellar networks, consistent with the hypothesis that the cerebellum possesses a roughly homotopic map of the cerebral cortex including the prominent asymmetries of the association cortex. PMID:23076113

  8. Cerebral blood flow asymmetries in headache-free migraineurs

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, S.R.; Welch, K.M.; Ewing, J.R.; Joseph, R.; D'Andrea, G.

    1987-11-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) asymmetries were studied in controls and patients with common and classic/complicated migraine using /sup 133/Xe inhalation with 8 homologously situated external collimators over each cerebral hemisphere. Migraine patients as a group more frequently had posterior rCBF asymmetries than controls (p less than 0.03). Although there were no differences in the number of anterior rCBF asymmetries, migraine patients had 2 or more asymmetric probe pairs more often than controls (p less than 0.02). The posterior rCBF asymmetries, consistent with the site of activation of many migraine attacks, may be related to more labile control of the cerebral circulation.

  9. Regional differences in cerebral asymmetries of human cortical white matter.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, Sarina J; Häberling, Isabelle S; Badzakova-Trajkov, Gjurgjica; Patston, Lucy L M; Waldie, Karen E; Tippett, Lynette J; Corballis, Michael C; Kirk, Ian J

    2011-11-01

    The form of the structural asymmetries across the cerebral hemispheres, that support well-established functional asymmetries, are not well understood. Although, many previous studies have investigated structural differences in areas associated with strong functional asymmetries, such as language processes, regions of the brain with less well established functional laterality have received less attention. The current study aims to address this by exploring global white matter asymmetries of the healthy human brain using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and tractography. DTI was conducted on twenty-nine healthy right-handed males, and pathways from the four major lobes were reconstructed using probabilistic tractography. Mean FA, parallel and perpendicular diffusion values were calculated and compared across hemispheres for each pathway generated. Significant asymmetries in the parietal (rightward asymmetry) and occipital (leftward asymmetry) pathways were found in FA measures. However, asymmetric patterns in parallel and/or perpendicular diffusion were observed in all four lobes, even in pathways with symmetrical FA. For instance, significant rightward asymmetry in parallel diffusion was found in the parietal and frontal lobes, whereas significant leftward asymmetry was found in the temporal and occipital lobes. We suggest that these different patterns of diffusion asymmetry reflect differences in microanatomy that support the known patterns of differential functional asymmetry. The different directions of anatomical asymmetry support the notion that there may be a number of different lateralising influences operating in the brain.

  10. Handedness and cerebral anatomical asymmetries in young adult males.

    PubMed

    Hervé, Pierre-Yves; Crivello, Fabrice; Perchey, Guy; Mazoyer, Bernard; Tzourio-Mazoyer, Nathalie

    2006-02-15

    Using voxel-based morphometry, we measured the cerebral anatomical asymmetries in a sample of 56 young right-handed males and then compared voxelwise asymmetry indices of these subjects to those of 56 young left-handed males. In the right-handed, the clusters of grey matter asymmetry corresponding to the leftward occipital petalia and planum temporale asymmetries were retrieved. Strong rightward temporo-parietal asymmetries were also observed, but the rightward grey matter asymmetry in the frontal lobe was less massive than previously described. Group comparisons of left- and right-handed subjects' asymmetry maps, performed at a statistical threshold not corrected for multiple comparisons, revealed significant effects of handedness on this pattern of anatomical asymmetry in frontal regions, notably in the lower central and precentral sulci, and also in the planum temporale, with right-handed subjects being more leftward asymmetric. Concerning white matter, although almost no focal differences between left- and right-handed subjects were detected, volumetric analyses at the hemispheric level revealed a leftward asymmetry, which happened to be significantly less marked in the left-handed. This latter result, together with the pattern of leftward white matter asymmetries, suggested that anatomical correlates of the left hemispheric specialization for language would exist in white matter. In the population we studied, differences in anatomical asymmetry between left- and right-handed subjects provided structural arguments for a greater functional ambilaterality in left-handed subjects.

  11. Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liptak, Gregory S.

    2005-01-01

    The optimal practice of medicine includes integrating individual clinical expertise with the best available clinical evidence from systematic research. This article reviews nine treatment modalities used for children who have cerebral palsy (CP), including hyperbaric oxygen, the Adeli Suit, patterning, electrical stimulation, conductive education,…

  12. Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liptak, Gregory S.

    2005-01-01

    The optimal practice of medicine includes integrating individual clinical expertise with the best available clinical evidence from systematic research. This article reviews nine treatment modalities used for children who have cerebral palsy (CP), including hyperbaric oxygen, the Adeli Suit, patterning, electrical stimulation, conductive education,…

  13. Cerebral asymmetry in twins: predictions of the right shift theory.

    PubMed

    Annett, Marian

    2003-01-01

    A study of the heritability of lobar brain volumes in twins has introduced a new approach to questions about the genetics of cerebral asymmetry. In addition to the classic comparison between monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins, a contrast was made between pairs of two right-handers (RR pairs) and pairs including one or more non-right-hander (non-RR pairs), in the light of the right shift (RS) theory of handedness. This paper explains the predictions of the RS model for pair concordance for genotype, cerebral asymmetry and handedness in healthy MZ and DZ twins. It shows how predictions for cerebral asymmetry vary between RR and non-RR pairs over a range of incidences of left-handedness. Although MZ twins are always concordant for genotype and DZ twins may be discordant, differences for handedness and cerebral asymmetry are expected to be small, consistent with the scarcity of significant effects in the literature. Marked differences between RR and non-RR pairs are predicted at all levels of incidence, the differences slightly larger in MZ than DZ pairs.

  14. Complementary and alternative therapies for cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Liptak, Gregory S

    2005-01-01

    The optimal practice of medicine includes integrating individual clinical expertise with the best available clinical evidence from systematic research. This article reviews nine treatment modalities used for children who have cerebral palsy (CP), including hyperbaric oxygen, the Adeli Suit, patterning, electrical stimulation, conductive education, equine-assisted therapy, craniosacral therapy, Feldenkrais therapy, and acupuncture. Unfortunately, these modalities have different degrees of published evidence to support or refute their effectiveness. Uncontrolled and controlled trials of hippotherapy have shown beneficial effects on body structures and functioning. Studies of acupuncture are promising, but more studies are required before specific recommendations can be made. Most studies of patterning have been negative and its use cannot be recommended. However, for the other interventions, such as hyperbaric oxygen, more evidence is required before recommendations can be made. The individual with CP and his or her family have a right to full disclosure of all possible treatment options and whatever knowledge currently is available regarding these therapies.

  15. Cerebral asymmetry and language development: cause, correlate, or consequence?

    PubMed

    Bishop, Dorothy V M

    2013-06-14

    In most people, language is processed predominantly by the left hemisphere of the brain, but we do not know how or why. A popular view is that developmental language disorders result from a poorly lateralized brain, but until recently, evidence has been weak and indirect. Modern neuroimaging methods have made it possible to study normal and abnormal development of lateralized function in the developing brain and have confirmed links with language and literacy impairments. However, there is little evidence that weak cerebral lateralization has common genetic origins with language and literacy impairments. Our understanding of the association between atypical language lateralization and developmental disorders may benefit if we reconceptualize the nature of cerebral asymmetry to recognize its multidimensionality and consider variation in lateralization over developmental time. Contrary to popular belief, cerebral lateralization may not be a highly heritable, stable characteristic of individuals; rather, weak lateralization may be a consequence of impaired language learning.

  16. Cerebral asymmetry and language development: cause, correlate or consequence?

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Dorothy V. M.

    2014-01-01

    In most people language is processed predominantly by the left hemisphere, but we don’t know how or why. A popular view is that developmental language disorders result from a poorly lateralized brain, but until recently evidence has been weak and indirect. Modern neuroimaging methods have made it possible to study normal and abnormal development of lateralized function in the developing brain and have confirmed links with language and literacy impairments. However, there is little evidence that weak cerebral lateralization has common genetic origins with language/literacy impairments. Our understanding of the association between atypical language lateralization and developmental disorders may benefit if we reconceptualise the nature of cerebral asymmetry to recognize its multidimensional nature and to take into account variation in lateralization over developmental time. Contrary to popular belief, cerebral lateralization may not be a highly heritable, stable characteristic of individuals; rather, weak lateralization may be a consequence of impaired language learning. PMID:23766329

  17. Locus of control and cerebral asymmetry.

    PubMed

    De Brabander, B; Boone, C; Gerits, P

    1992-08-01

    Data about the lack of synchronism of flexor carpi ulnaris peak EMG values of bimanual reactions during a semantic and during a visuospatial discrimination reaction time task are reported. The effects of type of task as well as the presence or absence of an unexpected stimulus preceding the reaction stimulus on lack of synchronism clearly depend upon the locus of control of the subjects, as measured on Rotter's I-E scale. On the basis of several arguments it is proposed that the measure of lack of synchronism reflects in an opposite sense the amount of dopaminergic activation or motor readiness in the sense in which Pribram and McGuinness in 1975 and Tucker and Williamson in 1984 have defined these concepts. The results for 15 women and 18 men show that more internally oriented subjects are more activated by a semantic task and by an unexpected preparatory stimulus in this type of task than more externally oriented subjects. The opposite appears to hold on the visuospatial task and unexpected preparatory stimuli therein. Together with earlier findings about reaction times and a number of relevant findings in the literature, the results are interpreted as indicative of basic differences in asymmetric tonic activation of the cerebral hemispheres between more internally and more externally oriented subjects. A model is proposed to explain phasic activating effects which ensue when tonically more left- or right-activated subjects perform left- or right-hemisphere tasks and when supplementary irrelevant stimuli are received.

  18. Cerebral asymmetry: a quantitative, multifactorial, and plastic brain phenotype.

    PubMed

    Rentería, Miguel E

    2012-06-01

    The longitudinal fissure separates the human brain into two hemispheres that remain connected through the corpus callosum. The left and the right halves of the brain resemble each other, and almost every structure present in one side has an equivalent structure in the other. Despite this exceptional correspondence, the two hemispheres also display important anatomical differences and there is marked lateralization of certain cognitive and motor functions such as language and handedness. However, the mechanisms that underlie the establishment of these hemispheric specializations, as well as their physiological and behavioral implications, remain largely unknown. Thanks to recent advances in neuroimaging, a series of studies documenting variation in symmetry and asymmetry as a function of age, gender, brain region, and pathological state, have been published in the past decade. Here, we review evidence of normal and atypical cerebral asymmetry, and the factors that influence it at the macrostructural level. Given the prominent role that cerebral asymmetry plays in the organization of the brain, and its possible implication in neurodevelopmental and psychiatric conditions, further research in this area is anticipated.

  19. Automatic analysis of cerebral asymmetry: an exploratory study of the relationship between brain torque and planum temporale asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Barrick, Thomas R; Mackay, Clare E; Prima, Sylvain; Maes, Frederik; Vandermeulen, Dirk; Crow, Timothy J; Roberts, Neil

    2005-02-01

    Leftward occipital and rightward frontal lobe asymmetry (brain torque) and leftward planum temporale asymmetry have been consistently reported in postmortem and in vivo neuroimaging studies of the human brain. Here automatic image analysis techniques are applied to quantify global and local asymmetries, and investigate the relationship between brain torque and planum temporale asymmetries on T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images of 30 right-handed young healthy subjects (15 male, 15 female). Previously described automatic cerebral hemisphere extraction and 3D interhemispheric reflection-based methods for studying brain asymmetry are applied with a new technique, LowD (Low Dimension), which enables automatic quantification of brain torque. LowD integrates extracted left and right cerebral hemispheres in columns orthogonal to the midsagittal plane (2D column maps), and subsequently integrates slices along the brain's anterior-posterior axis (1D slice profiles). A torque index defined as the magnitude of occipital and frontal lobe asymmetry is computed allowing exploratory investigation of relationships between this global asymmetry and local asymmetries found in the planum temporale. LowD detected significant torque in the 30 subjects with occipital and frontal components found to be highly correlated (P<0.02). Significant leftward planum temporale asymmetry was detected (P<0.05), and the torque index correlated with planum temporale asymmetry (P<0.001). However, torque and total brain volume were not correlated. Therefore, although components of cerebral asymmetry may be related, their magnitude is not influenced by total hemisphere volume. LowD provides increased sensitivity for detection and quantification of brain torque on an individual subject basis, and future studies will apply these techniques to investigate the relationship between cerebral asymmetry and functional laterality.

  20. Complementary Hemispheric Asymmetries in Object Naming and Recognition: A Voxel-Based Correlational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acres, K.; Taylor, K. I.; Moss, H. E.; Stamatakis, E. A.; Tyler, L. K.

    2009-01-01

    Cognitive neuroscientific research proposes complementary hemispheric asymmetries in naming and recognising visual objects, with a left temporal lobe advantage for object naming and a right temporal lobe advantage for object recognition. Specifically, it has been proposed that the left inferior temporal lobe plays a mediational role linking…

  1. Complementary Hemispheric Asymmetries in Object Naming and Recognition: A Voxel-Based Correlational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acres, K.; Taylor, K. I.; Moss, H. E.; Stamatakis, E. A.; Tyler, L. K.

    2009-01-01

    Cognitive neuroscientific research proposes complementary hemispheric asymmetries in naming and recognising visual objects, with a left temporal lobe advantage for object naming and a right temporal lobe advantage for object recognition. Specifically, it has been proposed that the left inferior temporal lobe plays a mediational role linking…

  2. Music-induced changes in functional cerebral asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Markus; Hodgetts, Sophie; Eerola, Tuomas

    2016-04-01

    After decades of research, it remains unclear whether emotion lateralization occurs because one hemisphere is dominant for processing the emotional content of the stimuli, or whether emotional stimuli activate lateralised networks associated with the subjective emotional experience. By using emotion-induction procedures, we investigated the effect of listening to happy and sad music on three well-established lateralization tasks. In a prestudy, Mozart's piano sonata (K. 448) and Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata were rated as the most happy and sad excerpts, respectively. Participants listened to either one emotional excerpt, or sat in silence before completing an emotional chimeric faces task (Experiment 1), visual line bisection task (Experiment 2) and a dichotic listening task (Experiment 3 and 4). Listening to happy music resulted in a reduced right hemispheric bias in facial emotion recognition (Experiment 1) and visuospatial attention (Experiment 2) and increased left hemispheric bias in language lateralization (Experiments 3 and 4). Although Experiments 1-3 revealed an increased positive emotional state after listening to happy music, mediation analyses revealed that the effect on hemispheric asymmetries was not mediated by music-induced emotional changes. The direct effect of music listening on lateralization was investigated in Experiment 4 in which tempo of the happy excerpt was manipulated by controlling for other acoustic features. However, the results of Experiment 4 made it rather unlikely that tempo is the critical cue accounting for the effects. We conclude that listening to music can affect functional cerebral asymmetries in well-established emotional and cognitive laterality tasks, independent of music-induced changes in the emotion state.

  3. Toward localizing genes underlying cerebral asymmetry and mental health.

    PubMed

    Smalley, Susan L; Loo, Sandra K; Yang, May H; Cantor, Rita M

    2005-05-05

    Genome investigations of autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and dyslexia suggest possible genetic overlap. Atypical cerebral asymmetry (ACA), the absence of the left hemisphere dominance for language, may be a shared phenotype due to genes located in regions of overlap. A binomal test is used to evaluate whether linked regions overlap more than expected by chance for 15 genome-wide scans in autism, ADHD, and dyslexia. Significant evidence of linkage overlap (P = 10(-7)) is seen for autism, ADHD, and dyslexia for seven chromosomal regions (2p11-12, 5p13, 7q22-33, 9q33-34, 13q22, 16p13, and 17p11-q11). Linkage analysis of ACA and molecular markers for 270 sibling pairs with ADHD is conducted using the Haseman-Elston statistic. Linkage analysis supports ACA as a shared phenotype with risk genes located on 9q33-34 or 16p13 (P < 0.004). Further support stems from the overlap of these regions in schizophrenia, bipolar illness, specific language impairment (SLI), and handedness, all traits associated with ACA. Autism, ADHD, and dyslexia share regions of linkage overlap and ACA may be a shared phenotype for such genes similar to HLA in autoimmune disease. Because ACA is associated with certain aspects of creativity, such risk genes may also be enhancer genes for creativity. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Early asymmetry of gene transcription between embryonic human left and right cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Tao; Patoine, Christina; Abu-Khalil, Amir; Visvader, Jane; Sum, Eleanor; Cherry, Timothy J.; Orkin, Stuart H.; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2009-01-01

    The human left and right cerebral hemispheres are anatomically and functionally asymmetric. To test whether human cortical asymmetry has a molecular basis, we studied gene expression levels between the left and right embryonic hemispheres using Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE), and identified and verified 27 differentially expressed genes, suggesting that human cortical asymmetry is accompanied by early, striking transcriptional asymmetries. LMO4 is consistently more highly expressed in the right perisylvian human cerebral cortex than in the left, and is essential for cortical development in mice, suggesting that human left-right specialization reflects asymmetric cortical development at early stages. PMID:15894532

  5. The effect of caffeine on cerebral asymmetry in rats

    PubMed Central

    Voiculescu, M; Segarceanu, A; Negutu, M; Ghita, I; Fulga, I; Coman, OA

    2015-01-01

    the frequency range of 0.5-4 Hz. The higher dose of caffeine modified the percentage of alpha 1, alpha2, beta, delta and theta2 waves compared to the control group. The group that received 150 mg caffeine/ kg.b.w. recorded a reversal in the cerebral asymmetry of rats in the 1.7-13.9 Hz, 15-19 Hz and 21-25 Hz frequency ranges. PMID:26664474

  6. The effect of caffeine on cerebral asymmetry in rats.

    PubMed

    Voiculescu, M; Segarceanu, A; Negutu, M; Ghita, I; Fulga, I; Coman, O A

    2015-01-01

    the frequency range of 0.5-4 Hz. The higher dose of caffeine modified the percentage of alpha 1, alpha2, beta, delta and theta2 waves compared to the control group. The group that received 150 mg caffeine/ kg.b.w. recorded a reversal in the cerebral asymmetry of rats in the 1.7-13.9 Hz, 15-19 Hz and 21-25 Hz frequency ranges.

  7. Complementary acupuncture treatment increases cerebral metabolism in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong; Jiang, Xuemei; Zhuo, Ying; Tang, Anwu; Wik, Gustav

    2009-01-01

    We used positron emission tomography (PET) and the 18-flourodeoxyglucose tracer to study cerebral effects of complementary acupuncture in Parkinson's disease. Five patients received scalp-acupuncture and Madopa, while the other five had Madopa only. PET scans before and after 5 weeks of complementary acupuncture treatment show increased glucose metabolisms in parietal, temporal, occipital lobes, the thalamus, and the cerebellum in the light-diseased hemisphere, and in parietal and occipital lobes of the severe-diseased hemisphere. No changes were observed in the Madopa-only group. Acupuncture in combination with Madopa may improve cerebral glucose metabolism in Parkinson's disease.

  8. The effect of cerebral asymmetries and eye scanning on pseudoneglect for a visual search task.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Michael E R; Hobson, Amelia; Petty, Joanne; Churches, Owen; Thomas, Nicole A

    2017-02-01

    Pseudoneglect is the tendency for the general population to over-attend to the left. While pseudoneglect is classically demonstrated using line bisection, it also occurs for visual search. The current study explored the influence of eye movements and functional cerebral asymmetry on asymmetries for visual search. In Experiment 1, 24 participants carried out a conjunction search for a target within a rectangular array. A leftward advantage for detecting targets was observed when the eyes were free to move, but not when they were restricted by short exposure durations. In Experiment 2, the effect of functional cerebral asymmetry was explored by comparing 20 right-handers and 19 left-handers. Results showed a stronger leftward bias for the right-handers, consistent with a mechanism related to cerebral asymmetry. In Experiment 3, an eye-tracker directly controlled eye movements in 25 participants. A leftward advantage emerged when the eyes were still, but not when they were free to move. Experiments 1 and 3 produced contradictory results in relation to eye movements, which may be related to task-related demands. On balance, the data suggest that asymmetries in visual search can occur in the absence of eye movements and that they are related to right hemisphere specialisation for spatial attention.

  9. Menstrual Cycle-Related Changes of Functional Cerebral Asymmetries in Fine Motor Coordination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayer, Ulrike; Hausmann, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Fluctuating sex hormone levels during the menstrual cycle have been shown to affect functional cerebral asymmetries in cognitive domains. These effects seem to result from the neuromodulatory properties of sex hormones and their metabolites on interhemispheric processing. The present study was carried out to investigate whether functional cerebral…

  10. The Influence of Sex Hormones on Functional Cerebral Asymmetries in Postmenopausal Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayer, Ulrike; Erdmann, Gisela

    2008-01-01

    Studies investigating changes in functional cerebral asymmetries (FCAs) with hormonal fluctuations during the menstrual cycle in young women have led to controversial hypotheses about an influence of estrogen (E) and/or progesterone (P) on FCAs. Based on methodical, but also on principal problems in deriving conclusions about hormone effects from…

  11. The Influence of Sex Hormones on Functional Cerebral Asymmetries in Postmenopausal Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayer, Ulrike; Erdmann, Gisela

    2008-01-01

    Studies investigating changes in functional cerebral asymmetries (FCAs) with hormonal fluctuations during the menstrual cycle in young women have led to controversial hypotheses about an influence of estrogen (E) and/or progesterone (P) on FCAs. Based on methodical, but also on principal problems in deriving conclusions about hormone effects from…

  12. Menstrual Cycle-Related Changes of Functional Cerebral Asymmetries in Fine Motor Coordination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayer, Ulrike; Hausmann, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Fluctuating sex hormone levels during the menstrual cycle have been shown to affect functional cerebral asymmetries in cognitive domains. These effects seem to result from the neuromodulatory properties of sex hormones and their metabolites on interhemispheric processing. The present study was carried out to investigate whether functional cerebral…

  13. Morphometry, asymmetry and variations of cerebral sulci on superolateral surface of cerebrum in autopsy cases.

    PubMed

    Gonul, Yucel; Songur, Ahmet; Uzun, Ibrahim; Uygur, Ramazan; Alkoc, Ozan Alper; Caglar, Veli; Kucuker, Hudaverdi

    2014-09-01

    The cerebral sulci are known as main microanatomical borders that serve as a gateway and surgical passage to reach the ventricles or to the deeper lesions. It is a matter of curiosity that whether there is a convergence between the morphological asymmetry and the functional asymmetry, and also its significance in surgery. The aim of this study is make morphometric measurements and evaluate asymmetry of several sulci on the lateral aspects of the cerebrum in regard to main sulci and related reference key points. A total of 100 cerebral hemispheres from 50 autopsy cadavers were examined. The lengths of several sulci on the superolateral aspect of the hemispheres and the distances between the sulci and nearby sulci and the reference key points were measured. Encountered variations were examined and photographed. Evaluation of the variations: superior frontal sulcus (SFS), inferior frontal sulcus, superior temporal sulcus (STS), precentral sulcus and postcentral sulcus were found to be discontinuous in 60, 46, 41, 84 and 70 % of the hemispheres, respectively. Evaluation of the asymmetry: the distances between SFS posterior end and longitudinal fissure, STS posterior end and lateral sulcus posterior end, as well as lengths of external occipital fissure (EOF), and discontinuous course of STS were significantly different between left and right hemispheres. There is usually a morphological partial asymmetry between the right and left hemispheres for any individual. Also, some of our measurements were found to be compatible with the ones in the literature, while others were incompatible.

  14. Cognitive Control Processes and Functional Cerebral Asymmetries: Association with Variation in the Handedness-Associated Gene LRRTM1.

    PubMed

    Beste, Christian; Arning, Larissa; Gerding, Wanda M; Epplen, Jörg T; Mertins, Alexandra; Röder, Melanie C; Bless, Josef J; Hugdahl, Kenneth; Westerhausen, René; Güntürkün, Onur; Ocklenburg, Sebastian

    2017-03-21

    Cognitive control processes play an essential role not only in controlling actions but also in guiding attentional selection processes. Interestingly, these processes are strongly affected by organizational principles of the cerebral cortex and related functional asymmetries, but the neurobiological foundations are elusive. We ask whether neurobiological mechanisms that affect functional cerebral asymmetries will also modulate effects of top-down control processes on functional cerebral asymmetries. To this end, we examined potential effects of the imprinted gene leucine-rich repeat transmembrane neuronal 1 (LRRTM1) on attentional biasing processes in a forced attention dichotic listening task in 983 healthy adult participants of Caucasian descent using the "iDichotic smartphone app." The results show that functional cerebral asymmetries in the language domain are associated with the rs6733871 LRRTM1 polymorphism when cognitive control and top-down attentional mechanisms modulate processes in bottom-up attentional selection processes that are dependent on functional cerebral asymmetries. There is no evidence for an effect of LRRTM1 on functional cerebral asymmetries in the language domain unrelated to cognitive control processes. The results suggest that cognitive control processes are an important factor to consider when being interested in the molecular genetic basis of functional cerebral architecture.

  15. Micronuclei and fluctuating asymmetry in brown trout (Salmo trutta): complementary methods to biomonitor freshwater ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Galán, S; Linde, A R; Izquierdo, J I; García-Vázquez, E

    1998-02-13

    In this work we measured both micronuclei number in kidney erythrocytes and fluctuating asymmetry in wild brown trout (Salmo trutta), caught in different fluvial ecosystems of Asturias (northern Spain) characterized by different levels of anthropic influence. Brown trout samples from rivers with high anthropic influence possessed significantly higher averages of both micronuclei and fluctuating asymmetry than brown trout samples from less anthropic-influenced rivers. These findings demonstrated the sensitivity of the micronucleus test in kidney erythrocytes to biomonitor freshwater ecosystems. The positive association found between micronuclei average and fluctuating asymmetry at the populational level suggests that fluctuating asymmetry tests could be potential indicators of environmental threat. Variation of fish asymmetry with ageing indicates that fluctuating asymmetry surveys of wild populations should be carried out in trouts of the same age class.

  16. Regional Gray Matter Growth, Sexual Dimorphism, and Cerebral Asymmetry in the Neonatal Brain

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, John H.; Lin, Weili; Prastawa, Marcel W.; Looney, Christopher B.; Vetsa, Y. Sampath K.; Knickmeyer, Rebecca C.; Evans, Dianne D.; Smith, J. Keith; Hamer, Robert M.; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.; Gerig, Guido

    2010-01-01

    Although there has been recent interest in the study of childhood and adolescent brain development, very little is known about normal brain development in the first few months of life. In older children, there are regional differences in cortical gray matter development, whereas cortical gray and white matter growth after birth has not been studied to a great extent. The adult human brain is also characterized by cerebral asymmetries and sexual dimorphisms, although very little is known about how these asymmetries and dimorphisms develop. We used magnetic resonance imaging and an automatic segmentation methodology to study brain structure in 74 neonates in the first few weeks after birth. We found robust cortical gray matter growth compared with white matter growth, with occipital regions growing much faster than prefrontal regions. Sexual dimorphism is present at birth, with males having larger total brain cortical gray and white matter volumes than females. In contrast to adults and older children, the left hemisphere is larger than the right hemisphere, and the normal pattern of fronto-occipital asymmetry described in older children and adults is not present. Regional differences in cortical gray matter growth are likely related to differential maturation of sensory and motor systems compared with prefrontal executive function after birth. These findings also indicate that whereas some adult patterns of sexual dimorphism and cerebral asymmetries are present at birth, others develop after birth. PMID:17287499

  17. Regional gray matter growth, sexual dimorphism, and cerebral asymmetry in the neonatal brain.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, John H; Lin, Weili; Prastawa, Marcel W; Looney, Christopher B; Vetsa, Y Sampath K; Knickmeyer, Rebecca C; Evans, Dianne D; Smith, J Keith; Hamer, Robert M; Lieberman, Jeffrey A; Gerig, Guido

    2007-02-07

    Although there has been recent interest in the study of childhood and adolescent brain development, very little is known about normal brain development in the first few months of life. In older children, there are regional differences in cortical gray matter development, whereas cortical gray and white matter growth after birth has not been studied to a great extent. The adult human brain is also characterized by cerebral asymmetries and sexual dimorphisms, although very little is known about how these asymmetries and dimorphisms develop. We used magnetic resonance imaging and an automatic segmentation methodology to study brain structure in 74 neonates in the first few weeks after birth. We found robust cortical gray matter growth compared with white matter growth, with occipital regions growing much faster than prefrontal regions. Sexual dimorphism is present at birth, with males having larger total brain cortical gray and white matter volumes than females. In contrast to adults and older children, the left hemisphere is larger than the right hemisphere, and the normal pattern of fronto-occipital asymmetry described in older children and adults is not present. Regional differences in cortical gray matter growth are likely related to differential maturation of sensory and motor systems compared with prefrontal executive function after birth. These findings also indicate that whereas some adult patterns of sexual dimorphism and cerebral asymmetries are present at birth, others develop after birth.

  18. Cerebral asymmetry for language: Comparing production with comprehension.

    PubMed

    Häberling, Isabelle S; Steinemann, Anita; Corballis, Michael C

    2016-01-08

    Although left-hemispheric damage can impair both the production and comprehension of language, it has been claimed that comprehension is more bilaterally represented than is production. A variant of this theme is based on the theory that different aspects of language are processed by a dorsal stream, responsible for mapping words to articulation, and a ventral stream for processing input for meaning. Some have claimed that the dorsal stream is left-hemispheric, while the ventral stream is bilaterally organized. We used fMRI to record activation while left- and right-handed participants performed covert word-generation task and judged whether word pairs were synonyms. Regions of interest were Broca's area as part of the dorsal stream and the superior and middle temporal gyri as part of the ventral stream. Laterality indices showed equal left-hemispheric lateralization in Broca's area for word generation and both Broca's area and temporal lobe for the synonym judgments. Handedness influenced laterality equally in each area and task, with right-handers showing stronger left-hemispheric dominance than left-handers. Although our findings provide no evidence that asymmetry is more pronounced for production than for comprehension, correlations between the tasks and regions of interest support the view that lateralization in the temporal lobe depends on feedback influences from frontal regions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Asymmetry of cerebral gray and white matter and structural volumes in relation to sex hormones and chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Savic, Ivanka

    2014-01-01

    Whilst many studies show sex differences in cerebral asymmetry, their mechanisms are still unknown. This report describes the potential impact of sex hormones and sex chromosomes by comparing MR data from 39 male and 47 female controls and 33 men with an extra X-chromosome (47,XXY). Regional asymmetry in gray and white matter volumes (GMV and WMV) was calculated using voxel based moprhometry (SPM5), by contrasting the unflipped and flipped individual GMV and WMV images. In addition, structural volumes were calculated for the thalamus, caudate, putamen, amygdala, and hippocampus, using the FreeSurfer software. Effects of plasma testosterone and estrogen on the GMV and WMV, as well on the right/left ratios of the subcortical volumes were tested by multi-regression analysis. All three groups showed a leftward asymmetry in the motor cortex and the planum temporale, and a rightward asymmetry of the middle occipital cortex. Both asymmetries were more pronounced in 46,XY males than 46,XX females and 47,XXY males, and were positively correlated with testosterone levels. There was also a rightward asymmetry of the vermis and leftward GMV asymmetry in the cerebellar hemispheres in all groups. Notably, cerebellar asymmetries were larger in 46,XX females and 47,XXY males, but were not related to sex hormone levels. No asymmetry differences between 46,XX females and 47,XXY males, and no overall effects of brain size were detected. The asymmetry in the planum temporale area and the occipital cortex seem related to processes associated with testosterone, whereas the observed cerebellar asymmetries suggest a link with X-chromosome escapee genes. Sex differences in cerebral asymmetry are moderated by sex hormones and X-chromosome genes, in a regionally differentiated manner.

  20. Asymmetry of cerebral gray and white matter and structural volumes in relation to sex hormones and chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Savic, Ivanka

    2014-01-01

    Whilst many studies show sex differences in cerebral asymmetry, their mechanisms are still unknown. This report describes the potential impact of sex hormones and sex chromosomes by comparing MR data from 39 male and 47 female controls and 33 men with an extra X-chromosome (47,XXY). Methods: Regional asymmetry in gray and white matter volumes (GMV and WMV) was calculated using voxel based moprhometry (SPM5), by contrasting the unflipped and flipped individual GMV and WMV images. In addition, structural volumes were calculated for the thalamus, caudate, putamen, amygdala, and hippocampus, using the FreeSurfer software. Effects of plasma testosterone and estrogen on the GMV and WMV, as well on the right/left ratios of the subcortical volumes were tested by multi-regression analysis. Results: All three groups showed a leftward asymmetry in the motor cortex and the planum temporale, and a rightward asymmetry of the middle occipital cortex. Both asymmetries were more pronounced in 46,XY males than 46,XX females and 47,XXY males, and were positively correlated with testosterone levels. There was also a rightward asymmetry of the vermis and leftward GMV asymmetry in the cerebellar hemispheres in all groups. Notably, cerebellar asymmetries were larger in 46,XX females and 47,XXY males, but were not related to sex hormone levels. No asymmetry differences between 46,XX females and 47,XXY males, and no overall effects of brain size were detected. Conclusion: The asymmetry in the planum temporale area and the occipital cortex seem related to processes associated with testosterone, whereas the observed cerebellar asymmetries suggest a link with X-chromosome escapee genes. Sex differences in cerebral asymmetry are moderated by sex hormones and X-chromosome genes, in a regionally differentiated manner. PMID:25505869

  1. Anomalies of cerebral asymmetry in schizophrenia interact with gender and age of onset: a post-mortem study.

    PubMed

    Highley, J R; Esiri, M M; McDonald, B; Cortina-Borja, M; Cooper, S J; Herron, B M; Crow, T J

    1998-11-09

    In a post-mortem study of cerebral asymmetry in schizophrenia it was found that asymmetry of the length from the frontal pole to the central sulcus measured dorsally over the external surface of the brain on both hemispheres, showed a gender x diagnosis interaction (p = 0.002). Female controls had a left-greater-than-right asymmetry, and the male controls had a right-greater-than-left asymmetry. This pattern was reversed in schizophrenia. The converse effect was observed on a similar measure of the occipito-parietal lobes (p = 0.028). Significant changes were not seen in measures taken around the lateral surface of the hemispheres. Further, within the patient group, the frontal lobe asymmetry was related to age of onset such that leftward asymmetrical brains were associated with a later age of onset than rightward asymmetrical brains (p = 0.0463 for the females; p = 0.0162 for the males). The occipito-parietal asymmetry was not related to age of onset. We conclude that the asymmetry of the relative distribution of tissue between frontal and posterior regions of the hemispheres is altered in schizophrenia. The findings also suggest that there is an interaction between gender and cerebral asymmetry that is critical in determining age of onset.

  2. Atypically rightward cerebral asymmetry in male adults with autism stratifies individuals with and without language delay

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Meng‐Chuan; Auer, Tibor; Lombardo, Michael V.; Ecker, Christine; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Wheelwright, Sally J.; Bullmore, Edward T.; Murphy, Declan G.M.; Baron‐Cohen, Simon; Suckling, John

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In humans, both language and fine motor skills are associated with left‐hemisphere specialization, whereas visuospatial skills are associated with right‐hemisphere specialization. Individuals with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) show a profile of deficits and strengths that involves these lateralized cognitive functions. Here we test the hypothesis that regions implicated in these functions are atypically rightward lateralized in individuals with ASC and, that such atypicality is associated with functional performance. Participants included 67 male, right‐handed adults with ASC and 69 age‐ and IQ‐matched neurotypical males. We assessed group differences in structural asymmetries in cortical regions of interest with voxel‐based analysis of grey matter volumes, followed by correlational analyses with measures of language, motor and visuospatial skills. We found stronger rightward lateralization within the inferior parietal lobule and reduced leftward lateralization extending along the auditory cortex comprising the planum temporale, Heschl's gyrus, posterior supramarginal gyrus, and parietal operculum, which was more pronounced in ASC individuals with delayed language onset compared to those without. Planned correlational analyses showed that for individuals with ASC, reduced leftward asymmetry in the auditory region was associated with more childhood social reciprocity difficulties. We conclude that atypical cerebral structural asymmetry is a potential candidate neurophenotype of ASC. Hum Brain Mapp 37:230–253, 2016. © 2015 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26493275

  3. Atypically rightward cerebral asymmetry in male adults with autism stratifies individuals with and without language delay.

    PubMed

    Floris, Dorothea L; Lai, Meng-Chuan; Auer, Tibor; Lombardo, Michael V; Ecker, Christine; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Wheelwright, Sally J; Bullmore, Edward T; Murphy, Declan G M; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Suckling, John

    2016-01-01

    In humans, both language and fine motor skills are associated with left-hemisphere specialization, whereas visuospatial skills are associated with right-hemisphere specialization. Individuals with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) show a profile of deficits and strengths that involves these lateralized cognitive functions. Here we test the hypothesis that regions implicated in these functions are atypically rightward lateralized in individuals with ASC and, that such atypicality is associated with functional performance. Participants included 67 male, right-handed adults with ASC and 69 age- and IQ-matched neurotypical males. We assessed group differences in structural asymmetries in cortical regions of interest with voxel-based analysis of grey matter volumes, followed by correlational analyses with measures of language, motor and visuospatial skills. We found stronger rightward lateralization within the inferior parietal lobule and reduced leftward lateralization extending along the auditory cortex comprising the planum temporale, Heschl's gyrus, posterior supramarginal gyrus, and parietal operculum, which was more pronounced in ASC individuals with delayed language onset compared to those without. Planned correlational analyses showed that for individuals with ASC, reduced leftward asymmetry in the auditory region was associated with more childhood social reciprocity difficulties. We conclude that atypical cerebral structural asymmetry is a potential candidate neurophenotype of ASC.

  4. The importance of bilateral monitoring of cerebral oxygenation (NIRS): Clinical case of asymmetry during cardiopulmonary bypass secondary to previous cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Matcan, S; Sanabria Carretero, P; Gómez Rojo, M; Castro Parga, L; Reinoso-Barbero, F

    2017-09-25

    Cerebral oximetry based on near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technology is used to determine cerebral tissue oxygenation. We hereby present the clinical case of a 12-month old child with right hemiparesis secondary to prior left middle cerebral artery stroke 8 months ago. The child underwent surgical enlargement of the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) with cardiopulmonary bypass. During cardiopulmonary bypass, asymmetric NIRS results were detected between both hemispheres. The utilization of multimodal neuromonitoring (NIRS-BIS) allowed acting on both perfusion pressure and anesthetic depth to balance out the supply and demand of cerebral oxygen consumption. No new neurological sequelae were observed postoperatively. We consider bilateral NIRS monitoring necessary in order to detect asymmetries between cerebral hemispheres. Although asymmetries were not present at baseline, they can arise intraoperatively and its monitoring thus allows the detection and treatment of cerebral ischemia-hypoxia in the healthy hemisphere, which if undetected and untreated would lead to additional neurological damage. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. [The individual profile characteristics of cerebral interhemispheric asymmetry during visual stimulation in healthy subjects and in patients with the spastic form of infantile cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Iavorskiĭ, A B; Nemkova, S A; Kobrin, V I; Sologubov, E G; Sinel'nikova, A N

    1998-01-01

    Individual profiles of brain interhemispheric asymmetry (IPA) and stability in maintenance of the vertical posture have been studied in healthy children and adults and patients with the spastic form of the infantile cerebral palsy before and after visual stimulation. The IPA were built on the basis of motor asymmetry of hands, asymmetry of visual half-fields, and asymmetry of muscle extension tone in vertical position in Romberg test at computer stabilograph. The visual stimulation was realized by unilateral tachistoscopic administration of a verbal stimulus in the visual half-field on the side of worst detection of the master stimulus during the procedure of initial IPA construction. The IPA were different in children, adults, and patients. Even single visual stimulation changed the initial IPA (not only its visual but motor and stability-related components). A correlation was shown between the individual features of realization of the vertical position, initial IPA, age of the subjects, and presence/absence of the cerebral palsy. The visual stimulation led to a decrease in initially low stability and, on the contrary, an increase in initially high stability both in healthy subjects and patients with cerebral palsy, regardless of their handedness. Increase in stability of the vertical posture was accompanied by a decrease in the role of the visual analyzer, and, on the contrary, decrease in stability was associated with an increase in the role of the visual analyzer in stability control. It is necessary to take into account the dissimilar action of sensory stimulation on the IPA and stability of the vertical posture in assessment of the effects of sensory stimulation on healthy persons and patients with CNS lesions, in particular, with cerebral palsy, in the course of development of new ways of treatment.

  6. Relationship of neonatal cerebral blood flow velocity asymmetry with early motor, cognitive and language development in term infants.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying-Chin; Hsieh, Wu-Shiun; Hsu, Chyong-Hsin; Chiu, Nan-Chang; Chou, Hung-Chieh; Chen, Chien-Yi; Peng, Shinn-Forng; Hung, Han-Yang; Chang, Jui-Hsing; Chen, Wei J; Jeng, Suh-Fang

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationships of Doppler cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) asymmetry measures with developmental outcomes in term infants. Doppler CBFV parameters (peak systolic velocity [PSV] and mean velocity [MV]) of the bilateral middle cerebral arteries of 52 healthy term infants were prospectively examined on postnatal days 1-5, and then their motor, cognitive and language development was evaluated with the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition, at 6, 12, 18 and 24 months of age. The left CBFV asymmetry measure (PSV or MV) was calculated by subtracting the right-side value from the left-side value. Left CBFV asymmetry measures were significantly positively related to motor scores at 6 (r = 0.3-0.32, p < 0.05) and 12 (r = 0.35, p < 0.05) months of age, but were not related to cognitive or language outcome. Thus, the leftward hemodynamic status of the middle cerebral arteries, as measured by cranial Doppler ultrasound in the neonatal period, predicts early motor outcome in term infants.

  7. Combination of blood flow asymmetry in the cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres on brain perfusion SPECT predicts 5-year outcome in patients with symptomatic unilateral major cerebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Jun-ichi; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Saito, Hideo; Terasaki, Kazunori; Matsumoto, Yoshiyasu; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Ogasawara, Yasushi; Saura, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Koji; Sato, Yuiko; Kubo, Yoshitaka; Ogawa, Akira

    2014-03-01

    Misery perfusion increases the risk of stroke recurrence in patients with symptomatic major cerebral artery occlusion. The ratio of brain perfusion contralateral-to-affected asymmetry in the cerebellar hemisphere to brain perfusion affected-to-contralateral asymmetry in the cerebral hemisphere (CblPR/CbrPR) indicates affected-to-contralateral asymmetry of oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) in the cerebral hemisphere. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether the CblPR/CbrPR on brain perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) predicts 5-year outcomes in patients with symptomatic unilateral occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) or internal carotid artery (ICA). Brain perfusion was assessed using N-isopropyl-p-[123I]-iodoamphetamine (123I-IMP) SPECT in 70 patients. A region of interest (ROI) was manually placed in the bilateral MCA territories and in the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres, and the CblPR/CbrPR was calculated. All patients were prospectively followed for 5 years. The primary end points were stroke recurrence or death. A total of 17 patients exhibited the primary end points, 11 of whom experienced subsequent ipsilateral strokes. Multivariate analysis revealed that only high CblPR/CbrPR was significantly associated with the development of the primary end point or subsequent ipsilateral strokes (95% confidential limits [CIs], 1.130-3.145; P  =  0.0114 or 95% CIs, 2.558-5.140; P  =  0.0045, respectively). The CblPR/CbrPR provided 65% (11/17) or 91% (10/11) sensitivity and 88% (47/53) or 88% (52/59) specificity in predicting the primary end point or subsequent ipsilateral strokes, respectively. The CblPR/CbrPR on brain perfusion SPECT predicts 5-year outcomes in patients with symptomatic unilateral occlusion of the MCA or ICA.

  8. Dynamic resources used in ambulation by children with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy: relationship to kinematics, energetics, and asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Sérgio T; Holt, Kenneth G; Fetters, Linda; Saltzman, Elliot

    2004-04-01

    The atypical walking pattern in children with spastic cerebral palsy is assumed to involve kinematic and morphological adaptations that allow them to move. The purpose of this study was to explore how the requirements of the task and the energy-generating and energy-conserving capabilities of children with cerebral palsy relate to kinematic and mechanical energy patterns of walking. Six children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy and a matched group of typically developing children participated in the study. Kinematic data were collected at 5 different walking speeds. Vertical stiffness, mechanical energy parameters, and landing angle were measured during the stance phase. The affected side of the children with cerebral palsy showed greater vertical stiffness, a greater ratio of kinetic forward energy to potential energy, and a smaller landing angle when compared with those of the nonaffected lower extremity and with those of typically developing children. Previous research has shown that children with cerebral palsy assumed a gait similar to an inverted pendulum on the nonaffected limb and a pogo stick on the affected limb. Our results indicate that asymmetries between lower extremities and differences from typically developing children in the landing angle of the lower extremity, vertical lower-extremity stiffness, and kinetic and potential energy profiles support the claim that walking patterns in children with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy emerge as a function of the resources available to them.

  9. [The influence of space loading suits on interhemispheric asymmetry of the brain in infantile spastic cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Iavorskiĭ, A B; Sologubov, E G; Kobrin, V I; Sinel'nikova, A N; Nemkova, S A

    1998-01-01

    The paper presents the study concerning influence of somatosensory stimulation (single wearing of either space loading costume "PENGUIN" or its modification--"ADELY" costume) on the individual profile of interhemispheral cerebral assymmetry (IPIHCA) in patients with spastic form of infantile cerebral paralysis (ICP). The computer stabilograph analyzed motor arms' asymmetry, sensory asymmetry of visual hemiareas, asymmetry of the position of centre of gravity. It is shown that peculiarities of the realization of the standing position either with visual control or without it both in healthy individuals and in patients depended on initial IPIHCA. Initial stability was higher in healthy individuals than in patients, besides in healthy persons it was higher in right-handers while in patients--in left-handers. There was possibility of changes of both IPIHCA and stability during keeping up vertical position even during single somatosensory stimulation. For elaboration of new criteria of the estimation of the efficiency of treatment in patients with CNS damages, including ICP, it is necessary to take into consideration different influence of somatosensory stimulation on IPIHC in right-handers and left-handers.

  10. [Emotional behavior in schizophrenia and one-sided brain damage. Cerebral hemispheric asymmetry. Part I].

    PubMed

    Kucharska-Pietura, Katarzyna; Hunca-Bednarska, Anna

    2002-01-01

    Although, emotions play a crucial role in schizophrenia, the changes in emotional dimension in relation to brain asymmetry still remain controversial. The aim of our work was: 1) to compare the emotional behaviour between the examined groups: S--non-chronic schizophrenic patients (n = 50), CS--chronic schizophrenic patients (n = 50), N--healthy controls (n = 50), R--right brain-damaged patients (n = 30), and L--left brain-damaged patients (n = 30), 2) to assess the changes in attitude processes and in types of emotional reactions, its relation to lateralised hemisphere damage and chronicity of the schizophrenic process. All psychiatric subjects were diagnosed as paranoid schizophrenics according to DSM-IV criteria and were scored on the PANSS scale after four weeks of neuroleptic treatment. Brain-damaged patients were included if they experienced single-episode cerebrovascular accidents causing right or left hemisphere damage (confirmed in CT scan reports). The neurological patients were examined at least 3 weeks after the onset of the episode. Emotional behaviour was assessed using Observational Scale of Emotional Behaviour aimed at the evaluation of: A) attitude processes B) the emotional reactions. Our results revealed differentiated type of emotional behaviour in the examined population. Right brain-damaged patients significantly often revealed elevated mood, lack of adequacy of self-evaluation and active or negative attitude towards the environment. Left brain-damaged patients showed depressed mood, resignation, positive or seldom passive attitude to others and adequate self-evaluation. Schizophrenic patients mostly revealed indifferent mood and passive attitude to environment, their self-evaluation was rather adequate. Based on our data, the changes in emotional behaviour in schizophrenic patients might reflect frontal lobes dysfunction rather than dysfunction localised in one of cerebral hemispheres.

  11. A theory of the origin of cerebral asymmetry: epigenetic variation superimposed on a fixed right-shift.

    PubMed

    Crow, T J

    2010-05-01

    A theory of the genetic basis of cerebral asymmetry is outlined according to which (1) a single right-shift factor in all human individuals interacts with (2) epigenetic variation that is apparently random, transmissible between parent and child, but with a half-life extending over a small number of generations. The right-shift factor arose late (150 to 200 thousand years ago [KYA]) in hominid evolution as a mutation in the X copy of a gene pair (Protocadherin 11XY) in a region of homology between the X and Y chromosomes created by a duplication 6MYA at the chimpanzee hominid separation. The epigenetic imprint originates in the process now known as "meiotic suppression of unpaired chromosomes" (MSUC); it reflects random pairing of partly homologous X and Y chromosome regions in male meiosis, and confers species-specific diversity of cerebral structure on the human population.

  12. Comparative Evaluation between Diameter Difference of the Thumb and Asymmetry of Lateral Cerebral Ventricles in Children with Developmental Delay: A New Finding

    PubMed Central

    KEIHANI DOUST, Zarintaj; SHARIAT, Mamak; RAHIMIAN, Elham; TEHRANI, Fatemeh; SADDIGHI, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Objective Anthropometry (measurement of body dimensions) has been used for clinical diagnosis of growth and developmental disorders during pregnancy and after birth. Different brain volumes have also been shown in abnormal developmental disorders. This study compares the different horizontal diameters of the left- and right-hand thumbnails and asymmetry of lateral cerebral ventricles in children with developmental delays. Materials & Methods This retrospective case control study was carried out in the Pediatric Neurologic Outpatient of a university hospital in Tehran, Iran (2009–2011). Twenty-eight patients with motor developmental disorders (case) and 28 healthy individuals (control) had brain MRIs and volume of lateral cerebral ventricles size had been studied. The maximum horizontal diameters of the left and right thumbnails were measured by calipers during physical and neurological exams by a pediatric neurologist. Finally, we compared and analyzed different horizontal diameters of the left and right hand thumbnails and asymmetry of lateral cerebral ventricles. Results There was a significant correlation between asymmetry of brain lateral ventricles size and mean difference of horizontal diameter of thumb nails (P = 0.0001). A meaningful relation between brain hemispheres asymmetry and developmental delay (P = 0.04) was seen. Conclusion The asymmetry of thumbnails can be a marker for asymmetry of lateral ventricles and child developmental delays. PMID:26401147

  13. Cerebral Asymmetry and the Development of Infantile Autism. Report No. 64.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackstock, Edward G.

    The notion that autistic children process information predominantly by strategies of the right cerebral hemisphere from birth, and unless unusual events occur, continue to be right hemisphere processors throughout their life, is examined. Evidence that suggests that cerebral dominance may be present at birth in normal humans, and that for normal…

  14. Magnitude of Cerebral Asymmetry at Rest: Covariation with Baseline Cardiovascular Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Paul S.; Harrison, David W.

    2006-01-01

    The cerebral regulation of cardiovascular functioning varies along both a lateral and a longitudinal axis. The parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems are lateralized to the left and right cerebral hemispheres, respectively. Further, the frontal lobes are known to be inhibitory in nature, whereas the temporal lobes are excitatory. However,…

  15. Magnitude of Cerebral Asymmetry at Rest: Covariation with Baseline Cardiovascular Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Paul S.; Harrison, David W.

    2006-01-01

    The cerebral regulation of cardiovascular functioning varies along both a lateral and a longitudinal axis. The parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems are lateralized to the left and right cerebral hemispheres, respectively. Further, the frontal lobes are known to be inhibitory in nature, whereas the temporal lobes are excitatory. However,…

  16. Cerebral Asymmetry and the Development of Infantile Autism. Report No. 64.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackstock, Edward G.

    The notion that autistic children process information predominantly by strategies of the right cerebral hemisphere from birth, and unless unusual events occur, continue to be right hemisphere processors throughout their life, is examined. Evidence that suggests that cerebral dominance may be present at birth in normal humans, and that for normal…

  17. Parents' attitudes toward the use of complementary therapy by their children with moderate or severe cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Wray, Jo; Edwards, Vanessa; Wyatt, Katrina; Maddick, Andrew; Logan, Stuart; Franck, Linda

    2014-02-01

    To describe the use of, and attitudes toward, complementary therapy (CT) by parents of children with moderate to severe cerebral palsy. Parents of 32 children with cerebral palsy (age 5-12 years) enrolled in a randomized trial of cranial osteopathy prospectively participated in semi-structured interviews in the home to explore the use of CT and views regarding access to and expectations of these therapies. Interview transcripts were analyzed thematically, and content analysis was used to determine the frequency of use of different therapies. Sixteen children (50%) had received one or more types of CT, although only three were currently receiving any CT. The primary reasons for trying CT were to reduce children's pain and improve physical function. Parents had limited knowledge of the range of, and possible indications for, CT and expressed concerns about CT safety and effectiveness. Practical considerations of time and cost were also identified. Some parents had strong beliefs about the benefits, and, overall, parents indicated a high level of commitment to finding any treatments, conventional or CT, to help their children. Parents of children with cerebral palsy want to help their child, but they need information, guidance, and practical support to facilitate their decision-making regarding the use of CT. A clearer understanding of factors predictive of optimal outcomes will enable resources to be targeted effectively.

  18. Dependence of Gait Deviation on Weight-Bearing Asymmetry and Postural Instability in Children with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Domagalska-Szopa, Małgorzata; Szopa, Andrzej; Czamara, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Postural control deficits have been suggested to be a major component of gait disorders in children with cerebral palsy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between postural stability and treadmill walking, in children with unilateral cerebral palsy, by defining dependence between the posturographic weight-bearing distribution and center of pressure (CoP) sway during quiet standing with Gillette Gait Index and the 16 distinct gait parameters that composed the Gillette Gait Index. Forty-five children with unilateral cerebral palsy from 7–12 years of age were included in this study. A posturographic procedure and 3-dimensional instrumented gait analysis was developed. In general, across the entire tested group, the significant correlations concerned only the asymmetry of the weight bearing and a few of the distinct gait parameters that compose the Gillette Gait Index; moreover, correlation coefficients were low. The division of subjects into two clinical subgroups: children that exhibited a tendency to overload (1) and to underload (2) the affected body side, modified the results of the explored relationships. Our findings revealed that the difficulties experienced by children with hemiplegia while controlled in a standing position result from tendency to excessively or insufficiently load the affected lower limbs, and thus establishes a direct relationship with inadequate affected peak ankle DF in both stance and swing gait phases. Given the presented relationship between postural instability and deviation of the particular gait parameters in children with unilateral cerebral palsy, a follow-up study will be needed to determine the therapeutic approaches that will be most effective in promoting increased improvement in gait pattern, as well as the static and dynamic balance in standing. PMID:27788247

  19. Sexual orientation differences in cerebral asymmetry and in the performance of sexually dimorphic cognitive and motor tasks.

    PubMed

    Sanders, G; Wright, M

    1997-10-01

    With each of the tasks in the present studies we expected to find the reported sex difference between heterosexual women and heterosexual men and we predicted a sexual orientation effect with the performance of homosexual men being similar to that of heterosexual women and different from that of heterosexual men. Study 1 aimed to replicate earlier findings by recording the performance of a group of homosexual men on a visuospatial task, the Vincent Mechanical Diagrams Test (VMDT), a dot detection divided visual field measure of functional cerebral asymmetry, and on five subtests of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS). For each task the profile of scores obtained for the homosexual men was similar to that of heterosexual women in that they scored lower than heterosexual men on the VMDT, they showed less asymmetry, and they recorded a higher Verbal than Performance IQ on the WAIS. In Study 2, a male-biased targeted throwing task favored heterosexual men while, in contrast, on the female-biased Purdue Pegboard single peg condition heterosexual men were outperformed by heterosexual women and homosexual men. On neither of these two tasks did the performances of homosexual men and heterosexual women differ. One task, manual speed, yielded neither sex nor sexual orientation differences. Another, the Purdue Pegboard assemblies condition, revealed a sex difference but no sexual orientation difference. Failure to obtain a sexual orientation difference in the presence of a sex difference suggests that the sexual orientation effect may be restricted to a subset of sexually dimorphic tasks.

  20. A possible relationship between Takotsubo cardiomyopathy and female sex steroid-related modulation of functional cerebral asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Drača, S

    2015-03-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (Tc) is a transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome, with symptoms and signs of acute myocardial infarction. Tc syndrome, which occurs predominantly in postmenopausal women, is characterized by increase of sympathetic activity. Studies on the gender-specific differences in sympatho-vagal regulation and functional cerebral asymmetry (FCA) imply that female pattern of dominance is characterized by the left hemisphere, which is believed to have parasympathetic predominance, whereas male pattern indicates dominance of the right hemisphere, which is believed to have sympathetic predominance. Fluctuating levels of female sex steroids are supposed to change FCA, modulating transcallosal inter-hemispheric inhibition across the menstrual cycle. The findings suggest that FCA is enhanced during the low steroid phase (menstrual phase), whereas, during high estrogen and/or progesterone phases (follicular and luteal phase) FCA is reduced. This theory is in line with concept of decreased magnitude of inter-hemispheric cortical lateralization in premenopausal women compared to men and postmenopausal women. Therefore, if postmenopausal women are more lateralized for a variety of cerebral functions, they have less balanced equilibrium between the right-sided sympathetic and left-sided parasympathetic predominance. Decrease of endogenous female sex steroid levels in postmenopausal women leads to reduced influence of estrogens to the left hemisphere, which is believed to have parasympathetic predominance. If both of these mechanisms result in sympatho-vagal imbalance, increasing sympathetic system activity in postmenopausal women, it seems reasonable why postmenopausal women became more susceptible to sympathetically-mediated syndromes such as Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

  1. Main effects and interactions of cerebral hemispheres, gender, and age in the calculation of volumes and asymmetries of selected structures of episodic memory

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Carmona, Rocio; Garcia-Lazaro, Haydee Guadalupe; Dominguez-Corrales, Brenda; Aguilar-Castañeda, Erika; Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to clarify the influence of anatomical (cerebral hemisphere) and demographic (age and gender) variables on the gray matter (GM) volumes and volumetric asymmetry indices (VAIs) of selected structures involved in episodic memory. A cross-sectional study was performed in 47 healthy volunteers. Neuropsychological evaluation revealed similar IQs across the sample. Using SPM-based software, brain segmentation, labeling and volume measurements of the hippocampus, amygdala, middle temporal gyrus and parahippocampal gyrus were performed in each cerebral hemisphere. A two-way between-groups multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) was applied to GM volumes and VAIs. The main effects of gender and cerebral hemisphere on GM volumes were significant (p < .001), while there was no significant interaction effect between gender and cerebral hemisphere. VAI measurements showed a non-significant effect of gender, but a significant influence of age (p = .015). The linear model of interactions and main effects explained 33% of the variance influencing the GM volume quantification. While cerebral hemisphere and gender were found to affect the volumes of brain structures involved in episodic memory, the calculation of VAIs was affected only by age. A comprehensive understanding of the main effects and interaction effects of cerebral hemisphere, gender and age on the volumes and asymmetries of structures related to episodic memory might help neurologists, psychiatrists, geriatricians and other neuroscientists in the study of degenerative brain diseases. PMID:28072386

  2. Main effects and interactions of cerebral hemispheres, gender, and age in the calculation of volumes and asymmetries of selected structures of episodic memory.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Carmona, Rocio; Garcia-Lazaro, Haydee Guadalupe; Dominguez-Corrales, Brenda; Aguilar-Castañeda, Erika; Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto

    The aim of this study was to clarify the influence of anatomical (cerebral hemisphere) and demographic (age and gender) variables on the gray matter (GM) volumes and volumetric asymmetry indices (VAIs) of selected structures involved in episodic memory. A cross-sectional study was performed in 47 healthy volunteers. Neuropsychological evaluation revealed similar IQs across the sample. Using SPM-based software, brain segmentation, labeling and volume measurements of the hippocampus, amygdala, middle temporal gyrus and parahippocampal gyrus were performed in each cerebral hemisphere. A two-way between-groups multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) was applied to GM volumes and VAIs. The main effects of gender and cerebral hemisphere on GM volumes were significant (p < .001), while there was no significant interaction effect between gender and cerebral hemisphere. VAI measurements showed a nonsignificant effect of gender, but a significant influence of age (p = .015). The linear model of interactions and main effects explained 33% of the variance influencing the GM volume quantification. While cerebral hemisphere and gender were found to affect the volumes of brain structures involved in episodic memory, the calculation of VAIs was affected only by age. A comprehensive understanding of the main effects and interaction effects of cerebral hemisphere, gender and age on the volumes and asymmetries of structures related to episodic memory might help neurologists, psychiatrists, geriatricians and other neuroscientists in the study of degenerative brain diseases.

  3. Parcellations and Hemispheric Asymmetries of Human Cerebral Cortex Analyzed on Surface-Based Atlases

    PubMed Central

    Glasser, Matthew F.; Dierker, Donna L.; Harwell, John; Coalson, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    We report on surface-based analyses that enhance our understanding of human cortical organization, including its convolutions and its parcellation into many distinct areas. The surface area of human neocortex averages 973 cm2 per hemisphere, based on cortical midthickness surfaces of 2 cohorts of subjects. We implemented a method to register individual subjects to a hybrid version of the FreeSurfer “fsaverage” atlas whose left and right hemispheres are in precise geographic correspondence. Cortical folding patterns in the resultant population-average “fs_LR” midthickness surfaces are remarkably similar in the left and right hemispheres, even in regions showing significant asymmetry in 3D position. Both hemispheres are equal in average surface area, but hotspots of surface area asymmetry are present in the Sylvian Fissure and elsewhere, together with a broad pattern of asymmetries that are significant though small in magnitude. Multiple cortical parcellation schemes registered to the human atlas provide valuable reference data sets for comparisons with other studies. Identified cortical areas vary in size by more than 2 orders of magnitude. The total number of human neocortical areas is estimated to be ∼150 to 200 areas per hemisphere, which is modestly larger than a recent estimate for the macaque. PMID:22047963

  4. Pseudo-asymmetry of cerebral blood flow in arterial spin labeling caused by unilateral fetal-type circle of Willis: Technical limitation or a way to better understanding physiological variations of cerebral perfusion and improving arterial spin labeling acquisition?

    PubMed

    Law-Ye, B; Geerts, B; Galanaud, D; Dormont, D; Pyatigorskaya, N

    2016-09-01

    In the recently published article, "Unilateral fetal-type circle of Willis anatomy causes right-left asymmetry in cerebral blood flow with pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling: A limitation of arterial spin labeling-based cerebral blood flow measurements?", it was shown by the method of arterial spin labeling (ASL) that unilateral fetal-type circle of Willis could induce variation of blood flow in cerebellar and posterior cerebral artery territory. We believe that the reported observation, rather than being a limitation, gives several interesting cues for understanding the ASL sequence. In this commentary, we formulate some suggestions regarding the use of ASL in clinical practice, discuss the potential causes of the above-mentioned pseudo-asymmetry and consider future improvements of the ASL technique. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Significant proteins affecting cerebral vasospasm using complementary ICPMS and MALDI-MS.

    PubMed

    Easter, Renee N; Barry, Colin G; Pyne-Geithman, Gail; Caruso, Joseph A

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm (CV) following subarachnoid hemorrhagic stroke affects more than one million people each year. The etiology and prevention of CV is currently of great interest to researchers in various fields of medical science. More recently, the idea that selenium could be playing a major role in the onset of cerebral vasospasm has come into the spotlight. This study focused on using newly established metallomics techniques in order to explore the proteome associated with CV and if selenium might affect the discovered proteins. Size exclusion chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, along with LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF were both essential in determining protein identifications in three different sample types; a control (normal, healthy patient, CSF control), SAH stroke patients (no vasospasm, CSF C) and SAH CV patients (CSF V). The results of this study, although preliminary, indicate the current methods are applicable and warrant further application to these clinically important targets. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  6. Evaluation of asymmetries of blood flow rate and of circulation time by intravenous radionuclide cerebral angiography in patients with ischemic completed stroke.

    PubMed

    Bartolini, A; Primavera, A; Gasparetto, B

    1984-12-01

    155 patients with ischemic completed stroke of varying severity and outcome have been evaluated by radionuclide cerebral angiography with analysis of regional time-activity curves. Two parameters have been evaluated: area under the upslope of the curve (Aup) reflecting regional blood flow rate and moment of the whole curve reflecting tracer circulation time (rABCT) Combination of these two methods ensured increased detection of perfusion asymmetries.

  7. Quantifying cerebral asymmetries for language in dextrals and adextrals with random-effects meta analysis

    PubMed Central

    Carey, David P.; Johnstone, Leah T.

    2014-01-01

    Speech and language-related functions tend to depend on the left hemisphere more than the right in most right-handed (dextral) participants. This relationship is less clear in non-right handed (adextral) people, resulting in surprisingly polarized opinion on whether or not they are as lateralized as right handers. The present analysis investigates this issue by largely ignoring methodological differences between the different neuroscientific approaches to language lateralization, as well as discrepancies in how dextral and adextral participants were recruited or defined. Here we evaluate the tendency for dextrals to be more left hemisphere dominant than adextrals, using random effects meta analyses. In spite of several limitations, including sample size (in the adextrals in particular), missing details on proportions of groups who show directional effects in many experiments, and so on, the different paradigms all point to proportionally increased left hemispheric dominance in the dextrals. These results are analyzed in light of the theoretical importance of these subtle differences for understanding the cognitive neuroscience of language, as well as the unusual asymmetry in most adextrals. PMID:25408673

  8. The protocadherin 11X/Y (PCDH11X/Y) gene pair as determinant of cerebral asymmetry in modern Homo sapiens

    PubMed Central

    Priddle, Thomas H; Crow, Timothy J

    2013-01-01

    Annett's right-shift theory proposes that human cerebral dominance (the functional and anatomical asymmetry or torque along the antero-posterior axis) and handedness are determined by a single “right-shift” gene. Familial transmission of handedness and specific deviations of cerebral dominance in sex chromosome aneuploidies implicate a locus within an X–Y homologous region of the sex chromosomes. The Xq21.3/Yp11.2 human-specific region of homology includes the protocadherin 11X/Y (PCDH11X/Y) gene pair, which encode cell adhesion molecules subject to accelerated evolution following the separation of the human and chimpanzee lineages six million years ago. PCDH11X and PCDH11Y, differentially regulated by retinoic acid, are highly expressed in the ventricular zone, subplate, and cortical plate of the developing cerebral cortex. Both proteins interact with β-catenin, a protein that plays a role in determining axis formation and regulating cortical size. In this way, the PCDH11X/Y gene pair determines cerebral asymmetry by initiating the right shift in Homo sapiens. PMID:23600975

  9. Pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling imaging of cerebral blood perfusion asymmetry in drug-naïve patients with first-episode major depression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guangdong; Bian, Haiman; Jiang, Deguo; Cui, Mingwei; Ji, Shengzhang; Liu, Mei; Lang, Xu; Zhuo, Chuanjun

    2016-01-01

    Many previous studies have reported that regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) aberrations may be one of the pathological characteristics of depression and rCBF has demonstrated a certain degree of asymmetry. However, studies investigating the cerebral blood perfusion asymmetry changes of drug-naïve patients experiencing their first episode of major depression using pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) are rare. Ten drug-naïve patients experiencing their first major depression episode and 15 healthy volunteers were enrolled in the current study. A novel pCASL method was applied to whole brain MRI scans of all of the samples. The Statistics Parameter Mapping and Relative Expression Software Tool software packages were used for the pre-processing and statistical analysis of the two sets of images, and the differences in the cerebral blood perfusion at the whole brain level were compared between the two groups. Compared with the healthy control group, the cerebral perfusion of the depression patients showed an asymmetric pattern. Decreased cerebral blood perfusion regions were primarily located in the left hemisphere, specifically in the left temporal lobe, frontal lobe and cingulate cortex [P<0.05 and cluster size ≥30 with false discovery rate (FDR) correction]. Simultaneously, increased perfusion regions were predominantly located in the right hemisphere, specifically in the right cerebellum, thalamus, frontal lobe and anterior cingulate cortex (P<0.05 and cluster size ≥30, with FDR correction). Thus, pCASL may characterize the alterations in cerebral blood perfusion of patients with depression. PMID:28101340

  10. Cerebral asymmetry and the effects of sex and handedness on brain structure: a voxel-based morphometric analysis of 465 normal adult human brains.

    PubMed

    Good, C D; Johnsrude, I; Ashburner, J; Henson, R N; Friston, K J; Frackowiak, R S

    2001-09-01

    We used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to examine human brain asymmetry and the effects of sex and handedness on brain structure in 465 normal adults. We observed significant asymmetry of cerebral grey and white matter in the occipital, frontal, and temporal lobes (petalia), including Heschl's gyrus, planum temporale (PT) and the hippocampal formation. Males demonstrated increased leftward asymmetry within Heschl's gyrus and PT compared to females. There was no significant interaction between asymmetry and handedness and no main effect of handedness. There was a significant main effect of sex on brain morphology, even after accounting for the larger global volumes of grey and white matter in males. Females had increased grey matter volume adjacent to the depths of both central sulci and the left superior temporal sulcus, in right Heschl's gyrus and PT, in right inferior frontal and frontomarginal gyri and in the cingulate gyrus. Females had significantly increased grey matter concentration extensively and relatively symmetrically in the cortical mantle, parahippocampal gyri, and in the banks of the cingulate and calcarine sulci. Males had increased grey matter volume bilaterally in the mesial temporal lobes, entorhinal and perirhinal cortex, and in the anterior lobes of the cerebellum, but no regions of increased grey matter concentration.

  11. Functional asymmetry of the cerebral hemispheres: its role in the pathogenesis of ectromelia and melanoma in (CBAxC57BL/6)F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Abramov, V V; Gontova, I A; Ignatiev, I M; Gelfgat, E L; Kozlov, V A

    2010-09-01

    The aim of the present work was to identify the role of functional asymmetry in the cerebral hemispheres in the pathogenesis of infectious and oncological pathology in (CBAxC57BL/6)F1 mice. Mice with lefthemisphere dominance of motor functions ("right-handers") were found to be more resistant to infection with ectromelia virus and to show slower growth of tumors after subcutaneous injection of B-16 melanoma than animals with right-hemisphere dominance of motor control ("left-handers"). Thus, this report provides the first evidence for the role of functional asymmetry of the nervous system in the pathogenesis of ectromelia and melanoma (B-16) in (CBAxC57BL/6)F1 mice.

  12. The influence of spatial registration on detection of cerebral asymmetries using voxel-based statistics of fractional anisotropy images and TBSS.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Siawoosh; Keller, Simon S; Glauche, Volkmar; Kugel, Harald; Jansen, Andreas; Hutton, Chloe; Flöel, Agnes; Deppe, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The sensitivity of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for detecting microstructural white matter alterations has motivated the application of voxel-based statistics (VBS) to fractional anisotropy (FA) images (FA-VBS). However, detected group differences may depend on the spatial registration method used. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of spatial registration on detecting cerebral asymmetries in FA-VBS analyses with reference to data obtained using Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS). In the first part of this study we performed FA-VBS analyses using three single-contrast and one multi-contrast registration: (i) whole-brain registration based on T2 contrast, (ii) whole-brain registration based on FA contrast, (iii) individual-hemisphere registration based on FA contrast, and (iv) a combination of (i) and (iii). We then compared the FA-VBS results with those obtained from TBSS. We found that the FA-VBS results depended strongly on the employed registration approach, with the best correspondence between FA-VBS and TBSS results when approach (iv), the "multi-contrast individual-hemisphere" method was employed. In the second part of the study, we investigated the spatial distribution of residual misregistration for each registration approach and the effect on FA-VBS results. For the FA-VBS analyses using the three single-contrast registration methods, we identified FA asymmetries that were (a) located in regions prone to misregistrations, (b) not detected by TBSS, and (c) specific to the applied registration approach. These asymmetries were considered candidates for apparent FA asymmetries due to systematic misregistrations associated with the FA-VBS approach. Finally, we demonstrated that the "multi-contrast individual-hemisphere" approach showed the least residual spatial misregistrations and thus might be most appropriate for cerebral FA-VBS analyses.

  13. Cerebral Asymmetry in Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh; Corballis, Michael C.

    This paper describes two experiments conducted to replicate the reported findings (Entus, 1975) that infants demonstrate a right ear advantage in the perception of dichotically presented syllables. Using the non-nutritive sucking paradigm, 48 infants 1-3 months of age were presented with verbal stimuli contingent upon criterion level sucking.…

  14. Does immobilization of dependent hand promote adaptative changes in cerebral cortex? An analysis through qEEG asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Manaia, Fernanda; Teixeira, Silmar; Velasques, Bruna; Bittencourt, Juliana; Salles, José Inácio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Basile, Luis F; Peressutti, Caroline; de Carvalho, Marcele Regine; Cagy, Mauricio; Piedade, Roberto; Ribeiro, Pedro; Machado, Sérgio

    2013-03-22

    This study aimed to elucidate electrophysiological and cortical mechanisms involved when 15 healthy right-handed subjects executed an index finger flexion and extension task before and after hand immobilization, using qEEG beta band (13-30Hz) asymmetry. This beta band is involved in motor activity and sensorial factors. Our hypothesis is that an increase in beta band asymmetry in pre-frontal, motor and parietal areas will occur in post-hand immobilization, because these areas need to reorganize for new planning, preparation and voluntary motor control. We found increase in beta band asymmetry during post-treatment task. We concluded that beta band asymmetry plays an important role in the analysis of cortical changes in several brain areas when associated to motor task. Furthermore, we assume that 48h of hand immobilization change cortical functioning.

  15. Localization of neuropeptide Y mRNA in neurons of human cerebral cortex by means of in situ hybridization with a complementary RNA probe

    SciTech Connect

    Terenghi, G.; Polak, J.M.; Hamid, Q.; O'Brien, E.; Denny, P.; Legon, S.; Dixon, J.; Minth, C.D.; Palay, S.L.; Yasargil, G.

    1987-10-01

    The distribution of mRNA encoding neuropeptide Y (NPY) in neurons of the normal human cerebral cortex in surgical biopsy specimens and postmortem brain was studied in situ hybridization techniques. A /sup 32/P-labeled complementary RNA (cRNA) probe was used on cryostat sections of 13 formaldehyde-fixed cortical biopsy specimens. Hybridization to NPY mRNA was found in all samples: after autoradiography, discrete deposits of silver granules were observed on neuronal cell bodies abundantly distributed in the deep layers of the cortex, particularly laminae IV and VI, and on smaller cell bodies in the white matter. The localization of the neurons hybridized for NPY mRNA was comparable to that of NPY-immunoreactive cells as shown in sections from the same tissue blocks immunostained by using NPY antibodies. The specificity of the in situ hybridization technique was confirmed by blot hybridization analysis of electrophoretically fractionated RNA. This study clearly demonstrated the consistent localization of NPY gene transcription and expression in normal human cortical neurons.

  16. Structural asymmetry of the human cerebral cortex: Regional and between-subject variability of surface area, cortical thickness, and local gyrification.

    PubMed

    Chiarello, Christine; Vazquez, David; Felton, Adam; McDowell, Alessandra

    2016-12-01

    Structural asymmetry varies across individuals, brain regions, and metrics of cortical organization. The current study investigated regional differences in asymmetry of cortical surface area, thickness, and local gyrification, and the extent of between-subject variability in these metrics, in a sample of healthy young adults (N=200). Between-subject variability in cortical structure may provide a means to assess the extent of biological flexibility or constraint of brain regions, and we explored the potential influence of this variability on the phenotypic expression of structural asymmetry. The findings demonstrate that structural asymmetries are nearly ubiquitous across the cortex, with differing regional organization for the three cortical metrics. This implies that there are multiple, only partially overlapping, maps of structural asymmetry. The results further indicate that the degree of asymmetry of a brain region can be predicted by the extent of the region's between-subject variability. These findings provide evidence that reduced biological constraint promotes the expression of strong structural asymmetry.

  17. Complementary Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... in mind, learn more about some complementary medicines: Antioxidants Vitamin C and E, the Mediterranean Diet Calcium ... Motor Symptoms Surgical Treatment Options Exercise Complementary Treatment Antioxidants: Vitamin C and E, Mediterranean Diet Calcium and ...

  18. Complementary medicine.

    PubMed

    Ernst, E

    2003-03-01

    Complementary medicine has become an important subject for rheumatologists, not least because many patients try complementary treatments. Recent clinical trials yield promising results. In particular, evidence suggests that several herbal medicines and dietary supplements can alleviate the pain of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Clearly, rigorous testing of complementary treatments is possible, and considering their popularity, should be encouraged.

  19. The Development of Functional Perceptual Asymmetries in the Cerebral Hemispheres of Man. Lektos: Interdisciplinary Working Papers in Language Sciences, Vol. 2, No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Leary, Daniel

    Studies investigating the functioning of persons who have cerebral lesions and evidence from the study of commisurotomized and normal subjects are reviewed. A study of recognition of pictorial stimuli by right-handed male children is also discussed. Studies about cerebral lesions and associated deficits have yielded information about the…

  20. Atypical Alpha Asymmetry in Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, T. Sigi; Smalley, Susan L.; Hanada, Grant; Macion, James; McCracken, James T.; McGough, James J.; Loo, Sandra K.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: A growing body of literature suggests atypical cerebral asymmetry and interhemispheric interaction in ADHD. A common means of assessing lateralized brain function in clinical populations has been to examine the relative proportion of EEG alpha activity (8-12 Hz) in each hemisphere (i.e., alpha asymmetry). Increased rightward alpha…

  1. Atypical Alpha Asymmetry in Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, T. Sigi; Smalley, Susan L.; Hanada, Grant; Macion, James; McCracken, James T.; McGough, James J.; Loo, Sandra K.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: A growing body of literature suggests atypical cerebral asymmetry and interhemispheric interaction in ADHD. A common means of assessing lateralized brain function in clinical populations has been to examine the relative proportion of EEG alpha activity (8-12 Hz) in each hemisphere (i.e., alpha asymmetry). Increased rightward alpha…

  2. In-vivo analysis of the human planum temporale (PT): does the definition of PT borders influence the results with regard to cerebral asymmetry and correlation with handedness?

    PubMed

    Zetzsche, T; Meisenzahl, E M; Preuss, U W; Holder, J J; Kathmann, N; Leinsinger, G; Hahn, K; Hegerl, U; Möller, H J

    2001-08-25

    The aim of our study was to examine whether the degree of planum temporale (PT) asymmetry and the possible correlation of morphological PT asymmetries with handedness are influenced by the definition of PT borders. For this reason, we applied three different anatomical PT definitions formerly used in the literature. The PT total (with the end of the Sylvian fissure (SF) as its posterior border) was separated into anterior and posterior regions. The border between anterior and posterior PT was set according to the following definitions: at the end of Heschl's gyrus (1st definition); at the start of the ascending SF ramus according to the 'knife-cut' method (2nd definition); and at the bifurcation of the SF (3rd definition). Thirty right-handed healthy men were recruited. MRI data sets analyzed with the software program BRAINS were used for in vivo PT volumetry. The Edinburgh Handedness Inventory (EHI) and the Hand Dominance Test were used to determine the degree of handedness. In summary, we detected that the type and the degree of asymmetry between left and right PT were strongly dependent on the definition used for PT borders: a left>right asymmetry was found in all PT regions, except a right>left asymmetry of the anterior PT according to our 1st PT definition (lateral to Heschl's gyrus) and a symmetry of the posterior PT according to our 3rd PT definition (posterior to SF bifurcation). In addition, a significant correlation was found between the degree of handedness measured by the EHI and the right posterior PT (3rd definition). We conclude that the influence of the definition of PT borders on the investigated variables may explain some of the variances between former investigations on PT asymmetry and handedness. The possible implications of the correlation between handedness and the extension of the right parietal PT are discussed and have to be elucidated by further studies.

  3. Complementary Treatment.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Joey

    2016-10-01

    As the debate over complementary and alternative medicine's place in medicine continues, Texas Medical Association policy recommends physicians stay on top of evidence-based studies of complementary and alternative therapies and routinely ask patients about their use of such therapies.

  4. Complementary actions.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Luisa; Betti, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Complementary colors are color pairs which, when combined in the right proportions, produce white or black. Complementary actions refer here to forms of social interaction wherein individuals adapt their joint actions according to a common aim. Notably, complementary actions are incongruent actions. But being incongruent is not sufficient to be complementary (i.e., to complete the action of another person). Successful complementary interactions are founded on the abilities: (i) to simulate another person's movements, (ii) to predict another person's future action/s, (iii) to produce an appropriate incongruent response which differ, while interacting, with observed ones, and (iv) to complete the social interaction by integrating the predicted effects of one's own action with those of another person. This definition clearly alludes to the functional importance of complementary actions in the perception-action cycle and prompts us to scrutinize what is taking place behind the scenes. Preliminary data on this topic have been provided by recent cutting-edge studies utilizing different research methods. This mini-review aims to provide an up-to-date overview of the processes and the specific activations underlying complementary actions.

  5. Complementary actions

    PubMed Central

    Sartori, Luisa; Betti, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Complementary colors are color pairs which, when combined in the right proportions, produce white or black. Complementary actions refer here to forms of social interaction wherein individuals adapt their joint actions according to a common aim. Notably, complementary actions are incongruent actions. But being incongruent is not sufficient to be complementary (i.e., to complete the action of another person). Successful complementary interactions are founded on the abilities: (i) to simulate another person’s movements, (ii) to predict another person’s future action/s, (iii) to produce an appropriate incongruent response which differ, while interacting, with observed ones, and (iv) to complete the social interaction by integrating the predicted effects of one’s own action with those of another person. This definition clearly alludes to the functional importance of complementary actions in the perception–action cycle and prompts us to scrutinize what is taking place behind the scenes. Preliminary data on this topic have been provided by recent cutting-edge studies utilizing different research methods. This mini-review aims to provide an up-to-date overview of the processes and the specific activations underlying complementary actions. PMID:25983717

  6. Unilateral fetal-type circle of Willis anatomy causes right-left asymmetry in cerebral blood flow with pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling: A limitation of arterial spin labeling-based cerebral blood flow measurements?

    PubMed

    Barkeij Wolf, Jurriaan Jh; Foster-Dingley, Jessica C; Moonen, Justine Ef; van Osch, Matthias Jp; de Craen, Anton Jm; de Ruijter, Wouter; van der Mast, Roos C; van der Grond, Jeroen

    2016-09-01

    The accuracy of cerebral blood flow measurements using pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling can be affected by vascular factors other than cerebral blood flow, such as flow velocity and arterial transit time. We aimed to elucidate the effects of common variations in vascular anatomy of the circle of Willis on pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling signal. In addition, we investigated whether possible differences in pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling signal could be mediated by differences in flow velocities. Two hundred and three elderly participants underwent magnetic resonance angiography of the circle of Willis and pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling scans. Mean pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling-cerebral blood flow signal was calculated for the gray matter of the main cerebral flow territories. Mean cerebellar gray matter pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling-cerebral blood flow was significantly lower in subjects having a posterior fetal circle of Willis variant with an absent P1 segment. The posterior fetal circle of Willis variants also showed a significantly higher pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling-cerebral blood flow signal in the ipsilateral flow territory of the posterior cerebral artery. Flow velocity in the basilar artery was significantly lower in these posterior fetal circle of Willis variants. This study indicates that pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling measurements underestimate cerebral blood flow in the posterior flow territories and cerebellum of subjects with a highly prevalent variation in circle of Willis morphology. Additionally, our data suggest that this effect is mediated by concomitant differences in flow velocity between the supplying arteries. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Complementary Study

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, H.

    2009-02-19

    In this lecture, it is emphasized that sufficient resolution of scientific issues for a fusion energy reactor can be given by complementary studies. Key scientific issues for a fusion energy reactor and ITER addressed by a complementary study in the Large Helical Device (LHD) are discussed. It should be noted that ITER is definitely a necessary condition but not a sufficient condition. Helical systems including stellarators and heliotrons are defined as alternative concepts. These approaches also aim at a fusion energy reactor based on their own concept and simultaneously benefit progress in tokamaks, more specifically ITER itself. The exact science to manage a 3-D geometry has been being developed in helical systems. A physical model with much accuracy and breadth will demonstrate its applicability to ITER. Topics to validate ''complementary'' approaches such as 3-D equilibrium, interchange MHD mode, control of radial electric field and structure formation, dynamics of a magnetic island, density limit and edge plasmas are discussed. Complementary is not Supplementary. ITER is complementary to development of a helical fusion energy reactor as well. Complementary approaches transcend existing disciplinary horizons and enable big challenges.

  8. Spiral computed tomography angiography (SCTA) and color coded duplex ultrasound (CCDUS): two complementary diagnostic techniques for assessment of extracranial cerebral artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Scaroni, Reana; Cardaioli, Gabriela; Pelliccioli, Gian Piero; Gallai, Virgilio

    2002-01-01

    Atherosclerotic lesions of the extracranial cerebral arteries account for ischemic stroke in over half of all cases. The risk of stroke associated with symptomatic carotid artery disease is related to the severity of the stenosis. Results of the two major clinical trials, North American Symptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Trial (NASCET) and European Carotid Surgery Trial (ECST), showed that patients with symptomatic carotid artery disease may benefit from carotid endarterectomy. Therefore, detection and quantification of stenosis are essential. Discrepancies in the angiographic criteria used in both NASCET and ECST trials resulted in continued controversy about the most accurate method of measuring carotid artery stenosis. Moreover, to avoid complications related to the angiography procedure, a good evaluation of vessel wall and plaque composition need to be considered. Both SCTA and CCDUS are non invasive techniques that could overcome angiographic complications and give detailed information on stenosis grading and plaque characteristics. They have been used to evaluate carotid stenosis as a single or combined methods.

  9. Brain Asymmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iannazzi, Marie

    1975-01-01

    Describes two activities dealing with cerebral dominance as a complement to a study of the nervous system which has students taking part in simple research oriented experiments, collecting data and interpreting results. (BR)

  10. Positron brain imaging--normal patterns and asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Finklestein, S.; Alpert, N.M.; Ackerman, R.H.; Correia, J.A.; Buonanno, F.S.; Chang, J.; Brownell, G.L.; Taveras, J.M.

    1982-07-01

    Regional brain physiology was investigated in 11 normal resting right-handed subjects using positron emission tomography. Cerebral blood flow was studied in all subjects. Cerebral oxygen metabolism was studied in six subjects, and cerebral glucose metabolism was also studied in one subject. In five subjects, physiological activity was higher in left frontotemporal regions than right. These findings may be related to structural cerebral asymmetries or to activation of brain language centers.

  11. Effects of flunitrazepam on responses to lateralized visual stimuli: evidence for cerebral asymmetry of execution of manual movements to targets in contralateral and ipsilateral visual space.

    PubMed

    Ingum, J; Bjørklund, R

    1994-05-01

    In order to examine the effects of benzodiazepines on response execution by the left and right hemisphere, flunitrazepam (1 mg) or placebo was administered to healthy, right handed volunteers in two separate experiments. In experiment 1, drug was administered daily during a treatment period of 8 days, and subjects were instructed to fixate vision centrally and to execute laterally directed manual responses corresponding to the position of visual stimuli presented in either the right or left hemifield. Experiment 2 was performed with a single dose and cross-over design, and subjects responded to the laterally presented visual stimuli by key press of a centrally positioned response device, i. e. neither detection of position of the stimulus in space nor response selection was required before initiation of the response. In experiment 1, intake of flunitrazepam generally increased reaction time more during response execution by the left as compared to the right hemisphere, and the most pronounced effect was observed on responses with the right hand, directed across the body axis, to visual stimuli presented in the left visual field. In contrast to these observations, in experiment 2, flunitrazepam impaired responses with the right and left hand practically to the same extent. Together, the results indicate that benzodiazepines may affect manual responses executed by left and right hemisphere differently, and that this asymmetry may be related to a stimulus-response compatibility effect in tasks that require response selection.

  12. Atypical alpha asymmetry in adults with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Hale, T Sigi; Smalley, Susan L; Hanada, Grant; Macion, James; McCracken, James T; McGough, James J; Loo, Sandra K

    2009-08-01

    A growing body of literature suggests atypical cerebral asymmetry and interhemispheric interaction in ADHD. A common means of assessing lateralized brain function in clinical populations has been to examine the relative proportion of EEG alpha activity (8-12 Hz) in each hemisphere (i.e., alpha asymmetry). Increased rightward alpha asymmetry has been associated with ADHD-like traits such as reduced reward responsiveness, a lack of inhibition toward aversive experience, and increased approach behaviors, and previous work has indicated increased rightward alpha asymmetry in children with ADHD. The current study explores whether increased rightward alpha asymmetry is also evident in adults with ADHD. We assessed low (8-10 Hz) and high (10-12 Hz) alpha asymmetry in adults with ADHD (n=29) versus controls (n=62) during baseline and cognitive activation conditions for nine homologous electrode pairs along the anterior-posterior axis. Seven results emerged (p<.05) showing increased rightward alpha asymmetry in adults with ADHD. This occurred in three specific electrode pairs across two testing conditions, and five of six results occurred in the lower alpha band. Finally, post hoc analysis indicated that increased rightward alpha asymmetry was generally associated with greater numbers of ADHD symptoms--with a possible parietal association for inattentive and a fronto-temporal association for hyperactivity symptoms. Increased rightward alpha asymmetry previously observed in children with ADHD appears to be a developmentally persistent feature of ADHD.

  13. Hemispheric Asymmetry of Visual Scene Processing in the Human Brain: Evidence from Repetition Priming and Intrinsic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Itamar; Wig, Gagan S.; Schacter, Daniel L.

    2012-01-01

    Asymmetrical specialization of cognitive processes across the cerebral hemispheres is a hallmark of healthy brain development and an important evolutionary trait underlying higher cognition in humans. While previous research, including studies of priming, divided visual field presentation, and split-brain patients, demonstrates a general pattern of right/left asymmetry of form-specific versus form-abstract visual processing, little is known about brain organization underlying this dissociation. Here, using repetition priming of complex visual scenes and high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we demonstrate asymmetrical form specificity of visual processing between the right and left hemispheres within a region known to be critical for processing of visual spatial scenes (parahippocampal place area [PPA]). Next, we use resting-state functional connectivity MRI analyses to demonstrate that this functional asymmetry is associated with differential intrinsic activity correlations of the right versus left PPA with regions critically involved in perceptual versus conceptual processing, respectively. Our results demonstrate that the PPA comprises lateralized subregions across the cerebral hemispheres that are engaged in functionally dissociable yet complementary components of visual scene analysis. Furthermore, this functional asymmetry is associated with differential intrinsic functional connectivity of the PPA with distinct brain areas known to mediate dissociable cognitive processes. PMID:21968568

  14. Hemispheric asymmetry of visual scene processing in the human brain: evidence from repetition priming and intrinsic activity.

    PubMed

    Stevens, W Dale; Kahn, Itamar; Wig, Gagan S; Schacter, Daniel L

    2012-08-01

    Asymmetrical specialization of cognitive processes across the cerebral hemispheres is a hallmark of healthy brain development and an important evolutionary trait underlying higher cognition in humans. While previous research, including studies of priming, divided visual field presentation, and split-brain patients, demonstrates a general pattern of right/left asymmetry of form-specific versus form-abstract visual processing, little is known about brain organization underlying this dissociation. Here, using repetition priming of complex visual scenes and high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we demonstrate asymmetrical form specificity of visual processing between the right and left hemispheres within a region known to be critical for processing of visual spatial scenes (parahippocampal place area [PPA]). Next, we use resting-state functional connectivity MRI analyses to demonstrate that this functional asymmetry is associated with differential intrinsic activity correlations of the right versus left PPA with regions critically involved in perceptual versus conceptual processing, respectively. Our results demonstrate that the PPA comprises lateralized subregions across the cerebral hemispheres that are engaged in functionally dissociable yet complementary components of visual scene analysis. Furthermore, this functional asymmetry is associated with differential intrinsic functional connectivity of the PPA with distinct brain areas known to mediate dissociable cognitive processes.

  15. Stochastic left-right neuronal asymmetry in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Alqadah, Amel; Hsieh, Yi-Wen; Xiong, Rui; Chuang, Chiou-Fen

    2016-12-19

    Left-right asymmetry in the nervous system is observed across species. Defects in left-right cerebral asymmetry are linked to several neurological diseases, but the molecular mechanisms underlying brain asymmetry in vertebrates are still not very well understood. The Caenorhabditis elegans left and right amphid wing 'C' (AWC) olfactory neurons communicate through intercellular calcium signalling in a transient embryonic gap junction neural network to specify two asymmetric subtypes, AWC(OFF) (default) and AWC(ON) (induced), in a stochastic manner. Here, we highlight the molecular mechanisms that establish and maintain stochastic AWC asymmetry. As the components of the AWC asymmetry pathway are highly conserved, insights from the model organism C. elegans may provide a window onto how brain asymmetry develops in humans.This article is part of the themed issue 'Provocative questions in left-right asymmetry'.

  16. How asymmetry in animals starts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güntürkün, Onur

    2005-10-01

    This review aims to present a speculation about mechanisms that shape the brains of humans and other animals into an asymmetrical organization. To this end, I will proceed in two steps: first, I want to recapitulate evidence from various experiments that show that some but not all asymmetries of the avian brain result from a prehatch light stimulation asymmetry. This should make it clear that avian embryos have a genetic predisposition to turn their head to the right. This results in a higher level of prehatch light stimulation of their right eye. The concomitant left-right difference in sensory input alters the brain circuits of the animal for the entire lifespan in a lateralized way. In the second part of the paper I will present evidence that some of the asymmetries of the human brain take a similar ontogenetic path as those observed in birds. This review provides the evidence that critical ontogenetic processes discovered in animal models could also be involved in the ontogeny of human cerebral asymmetries.

  17. Abnormal asymmetry of brain connectivity in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ribolsi, Michele; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Siracusano, Alberto; Koch, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a growing body of data has revealed that beyond a dysfunction of connectivity among different brain areas in schizophrenia patients (SCZ), there is also an abnormal asymmetry of functional connectivity compared with healthy subjects. The loss of the cerebral torque and the abnormalities of gyrification, with an increased or more complex cortical folding in the right hemisphere may provide an anatomical basis for such aberrant connectivity in SCZ. Furthermore, diffusion tensor imaging studies have shown a significant reduction of leftward asymmetry in some key white-matter tracts in SCZ. In this paper, we review the studies that investigated both structural brain asymmetry and asymmetry of functional connectivity in healthy subjects and SCZ. From an analysis of the existing literature on this topic, we can hypothesize an overall generally attenuated asymmetry of functional connectivity in SCZ compared to healthy controls. Such attenuated asymmetry increases with the duration of the disease and correlates with psychotic symptoms. Finally, we hypothesize that structural deficits across the corpus callosum may contribute to the abnormal asymmetry of intra-hemispheric connectivity in schizophrenia.

  18. Semantic Asymmetries Are Modulated by Phonological Asymmetries: Evidence from the Disambiguation of Homophonic versus Heterophonic Homographs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peleg, Orna; Eviatar, Zohar

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated cerebral asymmetries in accessing multiple meanings of two types of homographs: homophonic homographs (e.g., "bank") and heterophonic homographs (e.g., "tear"). Participants read homographs preceded by either a biasing or a non-biasing sentential context and performed a lexical decision on lateralized targets…

  19. Semantic Asymmetries Are Modulated by Phonological Asymmetries: Evidence from the Disambiguation of Homophonic versus Heterophonic Homographs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peleg, Orna; Eviatar, Zohar

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated cerebral asymmetries in accessing multiple meanings of two types of homographs: homophonic homographs (e.g., "bank") and heterophonic homographs (e.g., "tear"). Participants read homographs preceded by either a biasing or a non-biasing sentential context and performed a lexical decision on lateralized targets…

  20. Cerebral Asymmetry for Aspects of Language Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shedletsky, Leonard J.

    In a previous study, subjects that heard a monaurally presented two-clause sentence immediately followed by a probe word (identical word recognition) were faster at recognizing the probe as a sentence word with their left ears than with their right ears. This result suggested that the right ear was particularly efficient at transforming…

  1. Resource Allocation in Cerebral Specialization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    of this multiple-resources view. EXTENSION OF THE THEORY TO THE TWO CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES Since the anatomical division of the brain invites...performance differences between the hemispheres (e.g., right-handed males with no familial history of left- handedness who use a normal rather than an...G. Beaumont (Eds.), Hemisphere function in the human rain.. New York: Halstead Press, 1974. Kinsbourne, M. The cerebral basis of lateral asymmetries

  2. Preschoolers' mental rotation: sex differences in hemispheric asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Nicola; Jansen, Petra; Heil, Martin

    2010-06-01

    Mental rotation performance has been found to produce one of the largest sex differences in cognition accompanied by sex differences in functional cerebral asymmetry. Although sex differences in mental rotation performance can be reliably demonstrated as early as age 5 years old, that is, long before puberty, no data exist as to whether preschooler's mental rotation performance is accompanied by sex differences in functional cerebral asymmetry. Based on the electrophysiological brain correlates of mental rotation, we observed a bilateral parietal brain activity for preschool boys whereas the preschool girls' brain activity was clearly lateralized toward the left hemisphere if and only if mental rotation was needed to solve the task. Thus, sex differences in functional cerebral asymmetry during mental rotation do not require hormonal changes that occur during puberty.

  3. Sexually dimorphic brain and behavioral asymmetries in the neonatal rat.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, D A; Glick, S D; Meibach, R C

    1981-01-01

    The 2-deoxy-D-glucose method was used to study asymmetries in cerebral metabolic activity in neonatal rats. Left-right asymmetries in 2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake were observed in hippocampus, diencephalon, cortex, and medulla-pons: 2-deoxy-D-glucose incorporation was greater in right hippocampus, right diencephalon, left cortex, and left medulla-pons. These asymmetries occurred only in females. We also observed neonatal asymmetries in tail position that, in both sexes, were predictive of adult turning preferences; females had right-sided biases in both neonatal and adult characteristics. Collectively these data indicate that cerebral lateralization is sexually dimorphic and is present at birth. Images PMID:6940200

  4. Hemispheric Asymmetries in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewandowski, Lawrence

    1982-01-01

    Hemispheric specialization tasks were given to different-aged boys. Asymmetries were demonstrated on manual, visual, and auditory tasks; however, the degree of asymmetries did not change across age groups. There appears to be a dissociation between visual and auditory perceptual asymmetries. (Author/RD)

  5. Hemispheric Asymmetries in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewandowski, Lawrence

    1982-01-01

    Hemispheric specialization tasks were given to different-aged boys. Asymmetries were demonstrated on manual, visual, and auditory tasks; however, the degree of asymmetries did not change across age groups. There appears to be a dissociation between visual and auditory perceptual asymmetries. (Author/RD)

  6. Complementary and Integrative Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... medical treatments that are not part of mainstream medicine. When you are using these types of care, it may be called complementary, integrative, or alternative medicine. Complementary medicine is used together with mainstream medical ...

  7. Universal freezing of asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Da-Jian; Yu, Xiao-Dong; Huang, Hua-Lin; Tong, D. M.

    2017-02-01

    Asymmetry of quantum states is a useful resource in applications such as quantum metrology, quantum communication, and reference frame alignment. However, asymmetry of a state tends to be degraded in physical scenarios where environment-induced noise is described by covariant operations, e.g., open systems constrained by superselection rules, and such degradations weaken the abilities of the state to implement quantum information processing tasks. In this paper, we investigate under which dynamical conditions asymmetry of a state is totally unaffected by the noise described by covariant operations. We find that all asymmetry measures are frozen for a state under a covariant operation if and only if the relative entropy of asymmetry is frozen for the state. Our finding reveals the existence of universal freezing of asymmetry, and provides a necessary and sufficient condition under which asymmetry is totally unaffected by the noise.

  8. The heritability of chimpanzee and human brain asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Robles, Aida; Hopkins, William D; Schapiro, Steven J; Sherwood, Chet C

    2016-12-28

    Human brains are markedly asymmetric in structure and lateralized in function, which suggests a relationship between these two properties. The brains of other closely related primates, such as chimpanzees, show similar patterns of asymmetry, but to a lesser degree, indicating an increase in anatomical and functional asymmetry during hominin evolution. We analysed the heritability of cerebral asymmetry in chimpanzees and humans using classic morphometrics, geometric morphometrics, and quantitative genetic techniques. In our analyses, we separated directional asymmetry and fluctuating asymmetry (FA), which is indicative of environmental influences during development. We show that directional patterns of asymmetry, those that are consistently present in most individuals in a population, do not have significant heritability when measured through simple linear metrics, but they have marginally significant heritability in humans when assessed through three-dimensional configurations of landmarks that reflect variation in the size, position, and orientation of different cortical regions with respect to each other. Furthermore, genetic correlations between left and right hemispheres are substantially lower in humans than in chimpanzees, which points to a relatively stronger environmental influence on left-right differences in humans. We also show that the level of FA has significant heritability in both species in some regions of the cerebral cortex. This suggests that brain responsiveness to environmental influences, which may reflect neural plasticity, has genetic bases in both species. These results have implications for the evolvability of brain asymmetry and plasticity among humans and our close relatives.

  9. Hemispheric Asymmetries and Cognitive Flexibility: An ERP and sLORETA Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ocklenburg, Sebastian; Gunturkun, Onur; Beste, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Although functional cerebral asymmetries (FCAs) affect all cognitive domains, their modulation of the efficacy of specific executive functions is largely unexplored. In the present study, we used a lateralized version of the task switching paradigm to investigate the relevance of hemispheric asymmetries for cognitive control processes. Words were…

  10. Hemispheric Asymmetries and Cognitive Flexibility: An ERP and sLORETA Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ocklenburg, Sebastian; Gunturkun, Onur; Beste, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Although functional cerebral asymmetries (FCAs) affect all cognitive domains, their modulation of the efficacy of specific executive functions is largely unexplored. In the present study, we used a lateralized version of the task switching paradigm to investigate the relevance of hemispheric asymmetries for cognitive control processes. Words were…

  11. The Principles of Asymmetry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-26

    THE PRINCIPLES OF ASYMMETRY A monograph presented to the Faculty of the US Army School of Advanced Military Studies in...DATES COVERED Monograph 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Principles pf Asymmetry 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Stephen D. Pomper Major, USA 7... principles of asymmetry. The ultimate goal of producing principles should allow soldiers to better appreciate a difficult, but important concept in

  12. Asymmetries at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bartos, Pavol

    2014-10-28

    In this report, we summarize the latest results of the top-quark pair production asymmetry and present the new result of bottom-quark pair production asymmetry. By looking at the results obtained by the CDF experiment, one can see a discrepancy in both $t\\bar{t}$ inclusive and lepton-based measurements. The D0 results of the $t\\bar{t}$ production asymmetry are compatible with the standard-model predictions as well as with the CDF results. The CDF measurement of $b\\bar{b}$ production asymmetry presents consistency with both zero and with the standard-model predictions.

  13. Asymmetry of Blinking

    PubMed Central

    Kassem, Iris S.; Evinger, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Too investigate asymmetry in eyelid movements with blinking, the stability of the asymmetry, and its modifiability in normal humans. Methods Differences in the start time and amplitude between the two eyelids were assessed for voluntary blinks and reflex blinks evoked by supraorbital trigeminal nerve stimulation. These variables were also measured before and up to 18 months after 2 hours of unilateral upper lid restraint. Results With voluntary blinks, one eyelid consistently began to close earlier and made a larger eyelid movement than the other eyelid. Stimulation of the supraorbital branch of the trigeminal nerve evoked relatively larger amplitude blinks in one eyelid that correlated with the asymmetries of voluntary blinks. There was a continuum of eyelid asymmetry across all subjects that was stable and independent of other biological asymmetries, such as handedness. Briefly reducing eyelid mobility created a long-lasting change in eyelid asymmetry with blinking. Conclusions Eyelid asymmetry results from differences in the excitability of motoneurons in the left and right facial motor nuclei and does not appear to involve asymmetries in cortical inputs to the brain stem. Because adaptive processes modify the motoneuron excitability that creates eyelid asymmetry, these processes may underlie changes in blinking associated with facial palsy and may play a role in the development of disorders that affect one side of the face, such as hemifacial spasm. PMID:16384962

  14. Age-Related Differences in Bilateral Asymmetry in Cycling Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Ting; Jensen, Jody L.

    2012-01-01

    Bilateral asymmetry, a form of limb laterality in the context of moving two limbs, emerges in childhood. Children and adults show lateral preference in tasks that involve the upper and lower limbs. The importance of research in limb laterality is the insight it could provide about lateralized functions of the cerebral hemispheres. Analyzing…

  15. Age-Related Differences in Bilateral Asymmetry in Cycling Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Ting; Jensen, Jody L.

    2012-01-01

    Bilateral asymmetry, a form of limb laterality in the context of moving two limbs, emerges in childhood. Children and adults show lateral preference in tasks that involve the upper and lower limbs. The importance of research in limb laterality is the insight it could provide about lateralized functions of the cerebral hemispheres. Analyzing…

  16. Preschoolers' Mental Rotation: Sex Differences in Hemispheric Asymmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, Nicola; Jansen, Petra; Heil, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Mental rotation performance has been found to produce one of the largest sex differences in cognition accompanied by sex differences in functional cerebral asymmetry. Although sex differences in mental rotation performance can be reliably demonstrated as early as age 5 years old, that is, long before puberty, no data exist as to whether…

  17. Fluctuating Asymmetry and Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Timothy C.

    2007-01-01

    The general factor of mental ability ("g") may reflect general biological fitness. If so, "g"-loaded measures such as Raven's progressive matrices should be related to morphological measures of fitness such as fluctuating asymmetry (FA: left-right asymmetry of a set of typically left-right symmetrical body traits such as finger…

  18. Footwear Decreases Gait Asymmetry during Running

    PubMed Central

    Hoerzer, Stefan; Federolf, Peter A.; Maurer, Christian; Baltich, Jennifer; Nigg, Benno M.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on elderly people has suggested that footwear may improve neuromuscular control of motion. If footwear does in fact improve neuromuscular control, then such an influence might already be present in young, healthy adults. A feature that is often used to assess neuromuscular control of motion is the level of gait asymmetry. The objectives of the study were (a) to develop a comprehensive asymmetry index (CAI) that is capable of detecting gait asymmetry changes caused by external boundary conditions such as footwear, and (b) to use the CAI to investigate whether footwear influences gait asymmetry during running in a healthy, young cohort. Kinematic and kinetic data were collected for both legs of 15 subjects performing five barefoot and five shod over-ground running trials. Thirty continuous gait variables including ground reaction forces and variables of the hip, knee, and ankle joints were computed for each leg. For each individual, the differences between the variables for the right and left leg were calculated. Using this data, a principal component analysis was conducted to obtain the CAI. This study had two main outcomes. First, a sensitivity analysis suggested that the CAI had an improved sensitivity for detecting changes in gait asymmetry caused by external boundary conditions. The CAI may, therefore, have important clinical applications such as monitoring the progress of neuromuscular diseases (e.g. stroke or cerebral palsy). Second, the mean CAI for shod running (131.2 ± 48.5; mean ± standard deviation) was significantly lower (p = 0.041) than the CAI for barefoot running (155.7 ± 39.5). This finding suggests that in healthy, young adults gait asymmetry is reduced when running in shoes compared to running barefoot, which may be a result of improved neuromuscular control caused by changes in the afferent sensory feedback. PMID:26488484

  19. Footwear Decreases Gait Asymmetry during Running.

    PubMed

    Hoerzer, Stefan; Federolf, Peter A; Maurer, Christian; Baltich, Jennifer; Nigg, Benno M

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on elderly people has suggested that footwear may improve neuromuscular control of motion. If footwear does in fact improve neuromuscular control, then such an influence might already be present in young, healthy adults. A feature that is often used to assess neuromuscular control of motion is the level of gait asymmetry. The objectives of the study were (a) to develop a comprehensive asymmetry index (CAI) that is capable of detecting gait asymmetry changes caused by external boundary conditions such as footwear, and (b) to use the CAI to investigate whether footwear influences gait asymmetry during running in a healthy, young cohort. Kinematic and kinetic data were collected for both legs of 15 subjects performing five barefoot and five shod over-ground running trials. Thirty continuous gait variables including ground reaction forces and variables of the hip, knee, and ankle joints were computed for each leg. For each individual, the differences between the variables for the right and left leg were calculated. Using this data, a principal component analysis was conducted to obtain the CAI. This study had two main outcomes. First, a sensitivity analysis suggested that the CAI had an improved sensitivity for detecting changes in gait asymmetry caused by external boundary conditions. The CAI may, therefore, have important clinical applications such as monitoring the progress of neuromuscular diseases (e.g. stroke or cerebral palsy). Second, the mean CAI for shod running (131.2 ± 48.5; mean ± standard deviation) was significantly lower (p = 0.041) than the CAI for barefoot running (155.7 ± 39.5). This finding suggests that in healthy, young adults gait asymmetry is reduced when running in shoes compared to running barefoot, which may be a result of improved neuromuscular control caused by changes in the afferent sensory feedback.

  20. Brain Responses and Information Processing III. Hemispheric Asymmetry in Event Related Potentials and Performance during Discrimination of Line Orientation and Velocity of Motion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-30

    dissertation, City University of New York, 1981. Molfese, D.L. Cerebral asymmetry in infants, children, and adults : Auditory evoked responses to speech and...Related Brain Potentials Introduction Cerebral hemispheric asymmetry has been extensively studied under many different experimental situations over the...in hemispheric asymmetry . Harris (1978) suggests that the male brain is lateralized with respect to linguistic-visuo-spatial functions (i.e., left

  1. Complementary and Integrative Therapies

    MedlinePlus

    ... relieve side effects of treatment or the breast cancer itself. Complementary therapies are used along with (not instead of) standard ... Some can be harmful for people going through cancer treatment. Is complementary therapy right for you? 1 Talk with your doctor. ...

  2. Attenuated asymmetry of functional connectivity in schizophrenia: a high-resolution EEG study.

    PubMed

    Jalili, Mahdi; Meuli, Reto; Do, Kim Q; Hasler, Martin; Crow, Timothy J; Knyazeva, Maria G

    2010-07-01

    The interhemispheric asymmetries that originate from connectivity-related structuring of the cortex are compromised in schizophrenia (SZ). Under the assumption that such abnormalities affect functional connectivity, we analyzed its correlate-EEG synchronization-in SZ patients and matched controls. We applied multivariate synchronization measures based on Laplacian EEG and tuned to various spatial scales. Compared to the controls who had rightward asymmetry at a local level (EEG power), rightward anterior and leftward posterior asymmetries at an intraregional level (1st and 2nd order S-estimator), and rightward global asymmetry (hemispheric S-estimator), SZ patients showed generally attenuated asymmetry, the effect being strongest for intraregional synchronization in the alpha and beta bands. The abnormalities of asymmetry increased with the duration of the disease and correlated with the negative symptoms. We discuss the tentative links between these findings and gross anatomical asymmetries, including the cerebral torque and gyrification pattern, in normal subjects and SZ patients.

  3. Motor asymmetry reduction in older adults.

    PubMed

    Przybyla, Andrzej; Haaland, Kathleen Y; Bagesteiro, Leia B; Sainburg, Robert L

    2011-02-04

    While cerebral lateralization has previously been well documented for many neurobehavioral functions, recent research has shown that as people age, formerly lateralized processes recruit more symmetric patterns of neural activity. Such findings provide the foundation for the model of hemispheric asymmetry reduction in older adults, or "HAROLD"[4]. Previous studies that have measured reaction time and movement time have suggested that aging does not affect manual asymmetries. However, whether these findings can be extended to kinematic variables associated with motor coordination remains largely unknown. The purpose of the current study is to determine whether asymmetries in intralimb coordination are also reduced during the aging process. We examined multidirectional reaching in two different right handed age groups, a younger group from 20 to 40 years of age, and an older group, from 60 to 80 years of age. Measures of final position accuracy, precision, and trajectory linearity showed robust asymmetries between the left and right arm groups of young adults. However, the trajectories and accuracies of the older subjects were symmetric, such that our dependent measures were not significantly different between the right and left arm groups. Our findings extend the HAROLD model to motor behavior, suggesting that aging results in decrements in motor lateralization.

  4. Lowering of Asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, K. K.; Hiremath, K. M.; Yellaiah, G.

    2017-03-01

    Asymmetry, a well established fact, can be extracted from various solar atmospheric activity indices. Although asymmetry is being localized within short time scale, it also persists at different time scales. In the present study we examine the character and nature of asymmetry at various time scales by optimizing the data set, in units of Carrington Rotations (CRs), for Sunspot Area (SA) and soft X-ray flare index (FI SXR). We find from three solar cycles (21-23) that at a small time scale (viz., daily, CRs and monthly) activity appears to be asymmetric with less significance. At larger time scales (≥01 CRs) strength of asymmetry enhances. Number of significant asymmetry points probably depends upon the solar heights. For different combination of data, asymmetry strength appears to be lowered at certain periods ˜06, ˜12, ˜18 CRs (164, 327 and 492 days i.e., harmonics of ˜1.3 years. Owing to similar behavior of emergence of magnetic flux, it is conjectured that emergence of flux on the surface probably contributes to the asymmetry of the solar activity.

  5. Evidence from intrinsic activity that asymmetry of the human brain is controlled by multiple factors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hesheng; Stufflebeam, Steven M.; Sepulcre, Jorge; Hedden, Trey; Buckner, Randy L.

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral lateralization is a fundamental property of the human brain and a marker of successful development. Here we provide evidence that multiple mechanisms control asymmetry for distinct brain systems. Using intrinsic activity to measure asymmetry in 300 adults, we mapped the most strongly lateralized brain regions. Both men and women showed strong asymmetries with a significant, but small, group difference. Factor analysis on the asymmetric regions revealed 4 separate factors that each accounted for significant variation across subjects. The factors were associated with brain systems involved in vision, internal thought (the default network), attention, and language. An independent sample of right- and left-handed individuals showed that hand dominance affects brain asymmetry but differentially across the 4 factors supporting their independence. These findings show the feasibility of measuring brain asymmetry using intrinsic activity fluctuations and suggest that multiple genetic or environmental mechanisms control cerebral lateralization. PMID:19918055

  6. Evidence from intrinsic activity that asymmetry of the human brain is controlled by multiple factors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hesheng; Stufflebeam, Steven M; Sepulcre, Jorge; Hedden, Trey; Buckner, Randy L

    2009-12-01

    Cerebral lateralization is a fundamental property of the human brain and a marker of successful development. Here we provide evidence that multiple mechanisms control asymmetry for distinct brain systems. Using intrinsic activity to measure asymmetry in 300 adults, we mapped the most strongly lateralized brain regions. Both men and women showed strong asymmetries with a significant, but small, group difference. Factor analysis on the asymmetric regions revealed 4 separate factors that each accounted for significant variation across subjects. The factors were associated with brain systems involved in vision, internal thought (the default network), attention, and language. An independent sample of right- and left-handed individuals showed that hand dominance affects brain asymmetry but differentially across the 4 factors supporting their independence. These findings show the feasibility of measuring brain asymmetry using intrinsic activity fluctuations and suggest that multiple genetic or environmental mechanisms control cerebral lateralization.

  7. Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... use practices like acupuncture in medicine. But until recently, most Western hospitals didn't provide any alternative ... medicine is often used instead of conventional medical techniques. Complementary medicine is used in addition to conventional ...

  8. Complementary Health Approaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... on some complementary approaches, such as acupuncture and yoga, but there have been fewer studies on other approaches, so much less is known about them. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is sponsoring research to learn more about ...

  9. Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... their care. Some approaches like meditation, yoga, and massage therapy are known as “complementary medicine” because they “ ... variety of procedures and techniques, such as acupuncture, massage therapy, spinal manipulation, yoga, tai chi and qi ...

  10. Auditory Evoked Potentials and Hand Preference in 6-Month-Old Infants: Possible Gender-Related Differences in Cerebral Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shucard, Janet L.; Shucard, David W.

    1990-01-01

    Verbal and musical stimuli were presented to infants in a study of the relations of evoked potential left-right amplitude asymmetries to gender and hand preference. There was a relation between asymmetry and hand preference, and for girls, between asymmetry and stimulus condition. Results suggest a gender difference in cerebral hemisphere…

  11. [History of complementary feeding].

    PubMed

    Turck, D

    2010-12-01

    Complementary feeding, which embraces all solid and liquid foods other than breast milk or infant formula, is strongly influenced by cultural, familial and economic factors. For many times, there was a strong taboo on the use of colostrum ("the white blood") during the first week after delivery, sometimes even the first month. Therefore, the newborn baby received complementary foods as gruel, or panada. However, in the Greek civilization, wet nurses were asked by contract to breastfeed exclusively for the first 6 months and to start complementary feeding thereafter. From the sixteenth century onwards, many writers deplored the practice of giving gruel and panada during the first six months before the teeth erupted. In 1921, a Swedish pediatrician, Jundell, reported for the first time that starting complementary feeding at 6 months of age was associated with a better growth and resistance to infections. The recommendation of the World Health Organization to start complementary feeding after a 6-month period of exclusive breastfeeding is often in contradiction with the habits of the populations to propose very early other food sources than breast milk. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Cerebral Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... cerebral aneurysm may be required to restore deteriorating respiration and reduce abnormally high pressure within the brain. ... cerebral aneurysm may be required to restore deteriorating respiration and reduce abnormally high pressure within the brain. ...

  13. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... ol (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of disorders that affect ... resource—it highlights the ADDM Network’s data on cerebral palsy in a way that is useful for stakeholders ...

  14. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  15. Comments on biological asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Opitz, J M; Utkus, A

    2001-07-15

    Gross forms of asymmetry of biological structure, hence of development, are generally considered abnormalities of conformation with "perfect" symmetry, whether bilateral or radial, being regarded as the "ideal" form. This notion, primarily a cultural deceit of neo-Platonic origin, can easily be shown to be wrong or at best only skin-deep by any student of anatomy or surgery who finds the heart not in the midline but, most of the time on the left, liver on the right, gut coiled and disposed in a certain direction with appendix in the right lower quadrant, and so forth. Indeed, since the beginning of Amphioxus, a major effect of evolutionary developmental modification has been the abolition of the visceral symmetry which characterized this cephalochordate with introduction of a specific pattern of asymmetry called laterality determination. This embryonic process, which is beginning to yield its universal molecular basis, is probably not responsible for another type of biological phenomenon designated fluctuating asymmetry well known to anthropologists (on the basis of quantitative studies of morphometric traits of teeth, appendicular skeleton, dermatoglyphics) and well-known to the ancients who in their most beautiful Hellenistic sculptures introduced deliberate asymmetries into facial structure and expression. Photographic images constructed of 2 right or 2 left facial halves may differ to a starling degree from the authentic face (Fig. 1). The relatively random nature of fluctuating asymmetry makes it less likely to be under strong natural selection. 1 Middle panel: Frontal view of face of a normal man. Left panel: "Artificial" face constructed out of two right halves of the same face. Right panel: Face constructed out of two left halves. A careful study of the right and left panels makes it easier to appreciate the actual degree of asymmetry present in the unaltered middle image/face. However, in addition to laterality determination and fluctuating asymmetry

  16. The relationship between growth, brain asymmetry and behavioural lateralization in a cichlid fish.

    PubMed

    Reddon, Adam R; Gutiérrez-Ibáñez, Cristián; Wylie, Douglas R; Hurd, Peter L

    2009-07-19

    Cerebral lateralization, the partitioning of cognitive tasks to one cerebral hemisphere, is a widespread phenomenon among vertebrates. Despite this diversity, every species studied to date shows substantial individual variation in the strength of lateralization. The neural basis of this trait is unclear, although asymmetries in cerebral structures have been investigated for over a century. The habenular nuclei, for example, have been shown to present striking neuroanatomical and/or neurochemical asymmetries in species ranging from jawless fish to mammals. In teleost fish, these nuclei are relatively symmetrical in most species. Those teleosts that do have asymmetrical habenular nuclei, show varying patterns of asymmetry in different species. Here we investigate the relationship between individual variation of asymmetry in the habenula of a South American cichlid fish, Geophagus brasiliensis, and behaviour in a commonly used test for visual laterality in fish, the detour task. We show that the strength of asymmetry in the habenula is correlated with strength of behavioural lateralization in the detour task. Both the strength and direction of habenular asymmetry are correlated with individual differences in growth rate. We suggest that this relationship results from processes linking growth rate and sexual differentiation to frequency-dependent variation in life-history strategies. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate a relationship at the individual level between neural asymmetry and lateralized behaviour in a fish.

  17. Asymmetry through time dependency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantzaris, Alexander V.; Higham, Desmond J.

    2016-03-01

    Given a single network of interactions, asymmetry arises when the links are directed. For example, if protein A upregulates protein B and protein B upregulates protein C, then (in the absence of any further relationships between them) A may affect C but not vice versa. This type of imbalance is reflected in the associated adjacency matrix, which will lack symmetry. A different type of imbalance can arise when interactions appear and disappear over time. If A meets B today and B meets C tomorrow, then (in the absence of any further relationships between them) A may pass a message or disease to C, but not vice versa. Hence, even when each interaction is a two-way exchange, the effect of time ordering can introduce asymmetry. This observation is very closely related to the fact that matrix multiplication is not commutative. In this work, we describe a method that has been designed to reveal asymmetry in static networks and show how it may be combined with a measure that summarizes the potential information flow between nodes in the temporal case. This results in a new method that quantifies the asymmetry arising through time ordering. We show by example that the new tool can be used to visualize and quantify the amount of asymmetry caused by the arrow of time.

  18. Complementary and Integrative Gastroenterology.

    PubMed

    Korzenik, Joshua; Koch, Anna K; Langhorst, Jost

    2017-09-01

    Complementary and integrative medicine is developing within gastroenterology, expanding options particularly for inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and reflux esophagitis. This article encompasses new developments in complementary integrative medicine with an emphasis on herbal therapies. Studies of potential therapies have been advancing with increasing sophistication. The best studied with the most promising results in ulcerative colitis is the use of curcumin both for the induction and maintenance of remission. Other polyphenols, such as resveratrol and epigallocatechin-3-gallate, also have supportive data for ulcerative colitis. Mind-body approaches have been applied in these diseases with positive data, particularly for irritable bowel syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cerebral Lateralities and Individualized Instruction. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federico, Pat-Anthony

    To ascertain whether cerebral lateralities can be considered aptitudes or individual difference measures within an aptitude-treatment-interaction (ATI) framework, hemispheric asymmetries and cognitive psychometric tests were administered to 50 right-handed, Caucasian, male Navy recruits. Principal factor analysis with varimax rotation was computed…

  20. Structural Connectivity Asymmetry in the Neonatal Brain

    PubMed Central

    Ratnarajah, Nagulan; Rifkin-Graboi, Anne; Fortier, Marielle V.; Chong, Yap Seng; Kwek, Kenneth; Saw, Seang-Mei; Godfrey, Keith M; Gluckman, Peter D.; Meaney, Michael J.; Qiu, Anqi

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetry of the neonatal brain is not yet understood at the level of structural connectivity. We utilized DTI deterministic tractography and structural network analysis based on graph theory to determine the pattern of structural connectivity asymmetry in 124 normal neonates. We tracted white matter axonal pathways characterizing interregional connections among brain regions and inferred asymmetry in left and right anatomical network properties. Our findings revealed that in neonates, small-world characteristics were exhibited, but did not differ between the two hemispheres, suggesting that neighboring brain regions connect tightly with each other, and that one region is only a few paths away from any other region within each hemisphere. Moreover, the neonatal brain showed greater structural efficiency in the left hemisphere than that in the right. In neonates, brain regions involved in motor, language, and memory functions play crucial roles in efficient communication in the left hemisphere, while brain regions involved in emotional processes play crucial roles in efficient communication in the right hemisphere. These findings suggest that even at birth, the topology of each cerebral hemisphere is organized in an efficient and compact manner that maps onto asymmetric functional specializations seen in adults, implying lateralized brain functions in infancy. PMID:23501049

  1. Structural connectivity asymmetry in the neonatal brain.

    PubMed

    Ratnarajah, Nagulan; Rifkin-Graboi, Anne; Fortier, Marielle V; Chong, Yap Seng; Kwek, Kenneth; Saw, Seang-Mei; Godfrey, Keith M; Gluckman, Peter D; Meaney, Michael J; Qiu, Anqi

    2013-07-15

    Asymmetry of the neonatal brain is not yet understood at the level of structural connectivity. We utilized DTI deterministic tractography and structural network analysis based on graph theory to determine the pattern of structural connectivity asymmetry in 124 normal neonates. We tracted white matter axonal pathways characterizing interregional connections among brain regions and inferred asymmetry in left and right anatomical network properties. Our findings revealed that in neonates, small-world characteristics were exhibited, but did not differ between the two hemispheres, suggesting that neighboring brain regions connect tightly with each other, and that one region is only a few paths away from any other region within each hemisphere. Moreover, the neonatal brain showed greater structural efficiency in the left hemisphere than that in the right. In neonates, brain regions involved in motor, language, and memory functions play crucial roles in efficient communication in the left hemisphere, while brain regions involved in emotional processes play crucial roles in efficient communication in the right hemisphere. These findings suggest that even at birth, the topology of each cerebral hemisphere is organized in an efficient and compact manner that maps onto asymmetric functional specializations seen in adults, implying lateralized brain functions in infancy.

  2. Nuclear asymmetry enthalpy

    SciTech Connect

    Sobotka, L. G.

    2011-07-15

    Recent work has sought to extract the asymmetry energy at very low density from observables in heavy-ion collisions. The logic employed starts from the assumption that the fragment yields are determined by a minimization of the Helmholtz free energy. As volume is in reality unconstrained, nor can a single freeze-out volume be expected, the physical relevance of the Helmholtz free energy must be questioned. If, for example, the identical logic were used, but the Gibbs free energy was the more relevant quantity to minimize, it would be the asymmetry enthalpy that would be extracted. The purpose of this report is to provide one measure of the difference between the asymmetry energy and enthalpy.

  3. A study on the cerebral sizes of Koreans in their 20S and 40S.

    PubMed

    Chung, Soon-Cheol; Choi, Mi-Hyun; Lee, Bongsoo; Tack, Gye-Rae; Jun, Jae-Hoon; Park, Jong-Rak; Min, Byung-Chan; Park, Byung-Gi

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the cerebral sizes of Korean adults in their third (20s) and fifth decades (40s) of life using Talairach-Nowinski reference points to determine the effect of sex and age on cerebral size and asymmetry. Magnetic resonance images of the brain of 94 adults between 20 and 29 years of age (43 males and 51 females) and 99 adults between 40 and 49 years of age (38 males and 61 females) were measured. The distance between reference points and cerebral size of males was greater than those of females. Cerebral width and the size of the left cerebrum of those in their 40s decreased more than those in their 20s. The effect of age on left cerebral atrophy of males was greater than that of females. Left cerebral size was greater than right cerebral size. There was no difference in cerebral asymmetry between the genders. Cerebral asymmetry of those in their 40s was smaller than of those in their 20s and the decrease of cerebral asymmetry of males due to age was greater than that of females. A positive relationship existed between cerebral height, and body height and weight for males in their 20s.

  4. The influence of sex chromosome aneuploidy on brain asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Rezaie, Roozbeh; Daly, Eileen M; Cutter, William J; Murphy, Declan G M; Robertson, Dene M W; DeLisi, Lynn E; Mackay, Clare E; Barrick, Thomas R; Crow, Timothy J; Roberts, Neil

    2009-01-05

    The cognitive deficits present in individuals with sex chromosome aneuploidies suggest that hemispheric differentiation of function is determined by an X-Y homologous gene [Crow (1993); Lancet 342:594-598]. In particular, females with Turner's syndrome (TS) who have only one X-chromosome exhibit deficits of spatial ability whereas males with Klinefelter's syndrome (KS) who possess a supernumerary X-chromosome are delayed in acquiring words. Since spatial and verbal abilities are generally associated with right and left hemispheric function, such deficits may relate to anomalies of cerebral asymmetry. We therefore applied a novel image analysis technique to investigate the relationship between sex chromosome dosage and structural brain asymmetry. Specifically, we tested Crow's prediction that the magnitude of the brain torque (i.e., a combination of rightward frontal and leftward occipital asymmetry) would, as a function of sex chromosome dosage, be respectively decreased in TS women and increased in KS men, relative to genotypically normal controls. We found that brain torque was not significantly different in TS women and KS men, in comparison to controls. However, TS women exhibited significantly increased leftward brain asymmetry, restricted to the posterior of the brain and focused on the superior temporal and parietal-occipital association cortex, while KS men showed a trend for decreased brain asymmetry throughout the frontal lobes. The findings suggest that the number of sex chromosomes influences the development of brain asymmetry not simply to modify the torque but in a complex pattern along the antero-posterior axis.

  5. Mutually Exclusive, Complementary, or . . .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schloemer, Cathy G.

    2016-01-01

    Whether students are beginning their study of probability or are well into it, distinctions between complementary sets and mutually exclusive sets can be confusing. Cathy Schloemer writes in this article that for years she used typical classroom examples but was not happy with the student engagement or the level of understanding they produced.…

  6. Complementary Coffee Cups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banchoff, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    What may have been the birth of a new calculus problem took place when the author noticed that two coffee cups, one convex and one concave, fit nicely together, and he wondered which held more coffee. The fact that their volumes were about equal led to the topic of this article: complementary surfaces of revolution with equal volumes.

  7. Mutually Exclusive, Complementary, or . . .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schloemer, Cathy G.

    2016-01-01

    Whether students are beginning their study of probability or are well into it, distinctions between complementary sets and mutually exclusive sets can be confusing. Cathy Schloemer writes in this article that for years she used typical classroom examples but was not happy with the student engagement or the level of understanding they produced.…

  8. Complementary Coffee Cups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banchoff, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    What may have been the birth of a new calculus problem took place when the author noticed that two coffee cups, one convex and one concave, fit nicely together, and he wondered which held more coffee. The fact that their volumes were about equal led to the topic of this article: complementary surfaces of revolution with equal volumes.

  9. Asymmetry of lexico-semantic processing in schizophrenia changes with disease progression.

    PubMed

    Lam, M; Collinson, S L; Sim, K; Mackay, C E; James, A C D; Crow, T J

    2012-02-01

    Are anomalies of cerebral asymmetry integral to the disease process? Here, we examined the influence of age, chronicity and age of onset of illness in 34 patients with early onset schizophrenia and 20 controls in relation to structural asymmetries of the temporal lobe and performance asymmetries on a semantic language lexical decision task. Volumetric MRI and a novel divided visual field probe of lateralised lexico-semantic language were assessed in patients with early onset schizophrenia (EOS) and controls. Novel ratios of age-illness overlap and directional asymmetry were developed in order to examine the association of chronicity factors to asymmetry. Loss of laterality on the lexical decision task and discordant structural asymmetry were correlated with duration of illness but were not seen in younger, less chronic patients. Reduced lateral processing speed, and discordant structural asymmetry were associated with greater proportion of lifetime schizophrenia. Although the conclusions are limited by the cross sectional nature of the study, anomalies of cerebral asymmetry in early onset patients may be an index of disease progression, and reflect directly on the disease process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. TRANSVERSITY SINGLE SPIN ASYMMETRIES.

    SciTech Connect

    BOER,D.

    2001-04-27

    The theoretical aspects of two leading twist transversity single spin asymmetries, one arising from the Collins effect and one from the interference fragmentation functions, are reviewed. Issues of factorization, evolution and Sudakov factors for the relevant observables are discussed. These theoretical considerations pinpoint the most realistic scenarios towards measurements of transversity.

  11. Early signs of brain asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Corballis, Michael C

    2013-11-01

    A new study shows a leftward asymmetry of the choroid plexus in two-thirds of first-trimester human fetuses. This is the earliest brain asymmetry so far identified and may be a precursor to other asymmetries, including that of the temporal planum, which is evident from the 31st week of gestation.

  12. Complementary and Alternative Methods and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Effects Complementary and Alternative Medicine Complementary and Alternative Methods and Cancer Complementary and alternative are terms used ... with cancer here. What Are Complementary and Alternative Methods? How Are Complementary Methods Used to Manage Cancer? ...

  13. Functional asymmetries revealed in visually guided saccades: an FMRI study.

    PubMed

    Petit, Laurent; Zago, Laure; Vigneau, Mathieu; Andersson, Frédéric; Crivello, Fabrice; Mazoyer, Bernard; Mellet, Emmanuel; Tzourio-Mazoyer, Nathalie

    2009-11-01

    Because eye movements are a fundamental tool for spatial exploration, we hypothesized that the neural bases of these movements in humans should be under right cerebral dominance, as already described for spatial attention. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging in 27 right-handed participants who alternated central fixation with either large or small visually guided saccades (VGS), equally performed in both directions. Hemispheric functional asymmetry was analyzed to identify whether brain regions showing VGS activation elicited hemispheric asymmetries. Hemispheric anatomical asymmetry was also estimated to assess its influence on the VGS functional lateralization. Right asymmetrical activations of a saccadic/attentional system were observed in the lateral frontal eye fields (FEF), the anterior part of the intraparietal sulcus (aIPS), the posterior third of the superior temporal sulcus (STS), the occipitotemporal junction (MT/V5 area), the middle occipital gyrus, and medially along the calcarine fissure (V1). The present rightward functional asymmetries were not related to differences in gray matter (GM) density/sulci positions between right and left hemispheres in the precentral, intraparietal, superior temporal, and extrastriate regions. Only V1 asymmetries were explained for almost 20% of the variance by a difference in the position of the right and left calcarine fissures. Left asymmetrical activations of a saccadic motor system were observed in the medial FEF and in the motor strip eye field along the Rolando sulcus. They were not explained by GM asymmetries. We suggest that the leftward saccadic motor asymmetry is part of a general dominance of the left motor cortex in right-handers, which must include an effect of sighting dominance. Our results demonstrate that, although bilateral by nature, the brain network involved in the execution of VGSs, irrespective of their direction, presented specific right and left asymmetries that were not related to

  14. Sexual dimorphism of sulcal length asymmetry in the cerebrum of adult cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Imai, Noritaka; Sawada, Kazuhiko; Fukunishi, Katsuhiro; Sakata-Haga, Hiromi; Fukui, Yoshihiro

    2011-12-01

    The present study aimed to quantitatively clarify the gross anatomical asymmetry and sexual dimorphism of the cerebral hemispheres of cynomolgus monkeys. While the fronto-occipital length of the right and left cerebral hemispheres was not different between sexes, a statistically significant rightward asymmetry was detected in the cerebral width at the perisylvian region in females, but not in males (narrower width of the left side in the females). An asymmetry quotient of the sulcal lengths revealed a rightward asymmetry in the inferior occipital sulcus and a leftward asymmetry in the central and intraparietal sulci in both sexes. However, the laterality of the lengths of other sulci was different for males and females. The arcuate sulcus was directed rightward in males but there was no rightward bias in females. Interestingly, the principle sulcus and lateral fissure were left-lateralized in the males, but right-lateralized in the females. The results suggest that lateralization patterns are regionally and sexually different in the cerebrum of cynomolgus monkeys. The present results provide a reference for quantitatively evaluating the normality of the cerebral cortical morphology in cynomolgus monkeys. © 2011 The Authors. Congenital Anomalies © 2011 Japanese Teratology Society.

  15. Neutrino helicity asymmetries in leptogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bento, Luis; Santos, Francisco C.

    2005-05-01

    It is pointed out that the heavy singlet neutrinos characteristic of leptogenesis develop asymmetries in the abundances of the two helicity states as a result of the same mechanism that generates asymmetries in the standard lepton sector. Neutrinos and standard leptons interchange asymmetries in collisions with each other. It is shown that an appropriate quantum number, B-L{sup '}, combining baryon, lepton and neutrino asymmetries, is not violated as fast as the standard B-L. This suppresses the washout effects relevant for the derivation of the final baryon asymmetry. One presents detailed calculations for the period of neutrino thermal production in the framework of the singlet seesaw mechanism.

  16. [Asymmetry of signs of finger dermatoglyphics, physical potential and physical qualities of a man].

    PubMed

    Abramova, T F; Nikitina, T M; Izaak, S I; Kochetkova, N I

    2000-01-01

    Correlation between asymmetry of total signs of digital dermatoglyphs and general level of physical potential and basic physical qualities was studied. Highly qualified sportsmen were examined: men (231) and women (95) 20-38 yrs old; MPU students--men (106) and women (92) 17-20 yrs old; children with infantile cerebral paralysis, boys (12) and girls (42) 4-13 yrs old and parents of these children, man (12) and women (42) 25-48 yrs old. Variability of asymmetry of basic of digital dermatoglyfied was associated with sexual peculiarities of dominance of right or left hemisphere in functional asymmetry of brain.

  17. Bessel Weighted Asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Avakian, Harut; Gamberg, Leonard; Rossi, Patrizia; Prokudin, Alexei

    2016-05-01

    We review the concept of Bessel weighted asymmetries for semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering and focus on the cross section in Fourier space, conjugate to the outgoing hadron’s transverse momentum, where convolutions of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions and fragmentation functions become simple products. Individual asymmetric terms in the cross section can be projected out by means of a generalized set of weights involving Bessel functions. The procedure is applied to studies of the double longitudinal spin asymmetry in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering using a new dedicated Monte Carlo generator which includes quark intrinsic transverse momentum within the generalized parton model. We observe a few percent systematic offset of the Bessel-weighted asymmetry obtained from Monte Carlo extraction compared to input model calculations, which is due to the limitations imposed by the energy and momentum conservation at the given energy and hard scale Q2. We find that the Bessel weighting technique provides a powerful and reliable tool to study the Fourier transform of TMDs with controlled systematics due to experimental acceptances and resolutions with different TMD model inputs.

  18. Hemispheric Asymmetry of Supplementary Motor Area Proper: A Functional Connectivity Study of the Motor Network.

    PubMed

    Dinomais, Mickael; Chinier, Eva; Richard, Isabelle; Ricalens, Emmanuel; Aubé, Christophe; N'Guyen The Tich, Sylvie; Ter Minassian, Aram

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral asymmetry is a common feature of human functions. However, there are discrepancies in the literature about functional hemispheric asymmetries in the supplementary motor area (SMA), specifically in the posterior part (SMA-proper). We used resting state functional connectivity MRI to investigate the left-right asymmetries of the functional networks associated with primary motor cortex (M1) and SMA-proper using a "seed"-based correlation analysis in 30 healthy right-handed subjects. We showed that left M1 was more connected with areas involved in the motor system than right M1, and that right SMA-proper had more functional connections than its left counterpart. Our results are in agreement with a leftward asymmetry for M1 connectivity, whereas there is a rightward asymmetry of the SMA-proper connectivity.

  19. Prevalence of lateral ventricle asymmetry in brain MRI studies of neurologically normal dogs and dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Pivetta, Mauro; De Risio, Luisa; Newton, Richard; Dennis, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetry of the cerebral lateral ventricles is a common finding in cross-sectional imaging of otherwise normal canine brains and has been assumed to be incidental. The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare the prevalence of ventricular asymmetry in brain MRI studies of normal dogs and dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. Brain MRI archives were searched for 100 neurologically normal dogs (Group 1) and 100 dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (Group 2). For each dog, asymmetry of the lateral ventricles was subjectively classified as absent, mild, moderate, and severe based on a consensus of two observers who were unaware of group status. Ventricular areas were measured from transverse T1W images at the level of the interthalamic adhesion. An asymmetry ratio was calculated as the ratio of the larger to smaller ventricular transverse area. There was excellent agreement between subjective assessments of ventricular asymmetry and quantitative assessments using asymmetry ratios (k = 0.995). The prevalence of asymmetry was 38% in Group 1 dogs and 44% in Group 2 dogs. Assymmetry was scored as mild in the majority of Group 2 dogs. There was no significant association between presence/absence and degree of ventricular asymmetry vs. dog group, age, gender, or skull conformation. Findings from the current study supported previously published assumptions that asymmetry of the lateral cerebral ventricles is an incidental finding in MRI studies of the canine brain.

  20. Cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    Rénia, Laurent; Wu Howland, Shanshan; Claser, Carla; Charlotte Gruner, Anne; Suwanarusk, Rossarin; Hui Teo, Teck; Russell, Bruce; Ng, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is the most severe pathology caused by the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. The pathogenic mechanisms leading to cerebral malaria are still poorly defined as studies have been hampered by limited accessibility to human tissues. Nevertheless, histopathology of post-mortem human tissues and mouse models of cerebral malaria have indicated involvement of the blood-brain barrier in cerebral malaria. In contrast to viruses and bacteria, malaria parasites do not infiltrate and infect the brain parenchyma. Instead, rupture of the blood-brain barrier occurs and may lead to hemorrhages resulting in neurological alterations. Here, we review the most recent findings from human studies and mouse models on the interactions of malaria parasites and the blood-brain barrier, shedding light on the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria, which may provide directions for possible interventions. PMID:22460644

  1. Facial asymmetry: a current review

    PubMed Central

    Thiesen, Guilherme; Gribel, Bruno Frazão; Freitas, Maria Perpétua Mota

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The term "asymmetry" is used to make reference to dissimilarity between homologous elements, altering the balance between structures. Facial asymmetry is common in the overall population and is often presented subclinically. Nevertheless, on occasion, significant facial asymmetry results not only in functional, but also esthetic issues. Under these conditions, its etiology should be carefully investigated in order to achieve an adequate treatment plan. Facial asymmetry assessment comprises patient's first interview, extra- as well as intraoral clinical examination, and supplementary imaging examination. Subsequent asymmetry treatment depends on patient's age, the etiology of the condition and on the degree of disharmony, and might include from asymmetrical orthodontic mechanics to orthognathic surgery. Thus, the present study aims at addressing important aspects to be considered by the orthodontist reaching an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan of facial asymmetry, in addition to reporting treatment of some patients carriers of such challenging disharmony. PMID:26691977

  2. White matter microstructure asymmetry: effects of volume asymmetry on fractional anisotropy asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Takao, H; Hayashi, N; Ohtomo, K

    2013-02-12

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides information regarding white matter microstructure; however, macroscopic fiber architectures can affect DTI measures. A larger brain (fiber tract) has a 'relatively' smaller voxel size, and the voxels are less likely to contain more than one fiber orientation and more likely to have higher fractional anisotropy (FA). Previous DTI studies report left-to-right differences in the white matter; however, these may reflect true microscopic differences or be caused purely by volume differences. Using tract-based spatial statistics, we investigated left-to-right differences in white matter microstructure across the whole brain. Voxel-wise analysis revealed a large number of white matter volume asymmetries, including leftward asymmetry of the arcuate fasciculus and cingulum. In many white matter regions, FA asymmetry was positively correlated with volume asymmetry. Voxel-wise analysis with adjustment for volume asymmetry revealed many white matter FA asymmetries, including leftward asymmetry of the arcuate fasciculus and cingulum. The voxel-wise analysis showed a reduced number of regions with significant FA asymmetry compared with analysis performed without adjustment for volume asymmetry; however, the overall trend of the results was unchanged. The results of the present study suggest that these FA asymmetries are not caused by volume differences and reflect microscopic differences in the white matter.

  3. Position sense asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Adamo, Diane E; Martin, Bernard J

    2009-01-01

    Asymmetries in upper limb position sense have been explained in the context of a left limb advantage derived from differences in hemispheric specialization in the processing of kinesthetic information. However, it is not clearly understood how the comparison of perceptual information associated with passive limb displacement and the corresponding matching movement resulting from the execution of a motor command contributes to these differences. In the present study, upper limb position sense was investigated in 12 right-hand-dominant young adults performing wrist position matching tasks which varied in terms of interhemispheric transfer, memory retrieval and whether the reference position was provided by the same or opposite limb. Right and left hand absolute matching errors were similar when the reference and matching positions were produced by the same hand but were 36% greater when matching the reference position with the opposite hand. When examining the constant errors generated from matching movements made with the same hand that provided the reference, the right and left hand matching errors (approximately 3 degrees) were similar. However, when matching with the opposite limb, a large overshoot (P < 0.05) characterized the error when the right hand matched the left hand reference while a large undershoot (P < 0.05) characterized the error when the left hand matched the right hand reference. The overshoot and undershoot were of similar magnitude (approximately 4 degrees). Although asymmetries in the central processing of proprioceptive information such as interhemispheric transfer may exist, the present study suggests that asymmetries in position sense predominantly result from a difference in the "gain of the respective proprioceptive sensory-motor loops". This new hypothesis is strongly supported by a dual-linear model representing the right and left hand sensory-motor systems as well as morphological and physiological data.

  4. Rubber friction directional asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, A.; Dorogin, L.; Steenwyk, B.; Warhadpande, A.; Motamedi, M.; Fortunato, G.; Ciaravola, V.; Persson, B. N. J.

    2016-12-01

    In rubber friction studies it is usually assumed that the friction force does not depend on the sliding direction, unless the substrate has anisotropic properties, like a steel surface grinded in one direction. Here we will present experimental results for rubber friction, where we observe a strong asymmetry between forward and backward sliding, where forward and backward refer to the run-in direction of the rubber block. The observed effect could be very important in tire applications, where directional properties of the rubber friction could be induced during braking.

  5. Complementary acupuncture in Parkinson's disease: a spect study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong; Jiang, Xuemei; Zhuo, Ying; Wik, Gustav

    2010-02-01

    We studied cerebral effects of complementary acupuncture in Parkinson's disease using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) measures of 99mTc-ECD and 99mTc-TRODAT-4, before and after five weeks of treatment. Ten patients were randomly assigned to receive levodopa alone (controls) or levodopa and complementary scalp electro-acupuncture. Before treatment, no hemispheric regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) differences were found, whereas striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) activity was lower in the most affected hemisphere. Treatment with levodopa alone did not change rCBF, whereas it increased basal ganglion DAT activity in the most affected hemisphere. Patients who received levodopa and complementary acupuncture had increased rCBF in the frontal lobe, the occipital lobe, the basal ganglion, and the cerebellum in the most affected hemisphere as compared to baseline, but there were no changes in basal ganglia DAT levels. Thus, complementary acupuncture treatment in Parkinson's disease may affect rCBF but not basal ganglion DAT.

  6. A complementary MOS process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, M. D.

    1977-01-01

    The complete sequence used to manufacture complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits is described. The fixed-gate array concept is presented as a means of obtaining CMOS integrated circuits in a fast and reliable fashion. Examples of CMOS circuits fabricated by both the conventional method and the fixed-gate array method are included. The electrical parameter specifications and characteristics are given along with typical values used to produce CMOS circuits. Temperature-bias stressing data illustrating the thermal stability of devices manufactured by this process are presented. Results of a preliminary study on the radiation sensitivity of circuits manufactured by this process are discussed. Some process modifications are given which have improved the radiation hardness of our CMOS devices. A formula description of the chemicals and gases along with the gas flow rates is also included.

  7. Assortativity of complementary graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Winterbach, W.; van Mieghem, P.

    2011-09-01

    Newman's measure for (dis)assortativity, the linear degree correlationρD, is widely studied although analytic insight into the assortativity of an arbitrary network remains far from well understood. In this paper, we derive the general relation (2), (3) and Theorem 1 between the assortativity ρD(G) of a graph G and the assortativityρD(Gc) of its complement Gc. Both ρD(G) and ρD(Gc) are linearly related by the degree distribution in G. When the graph G(N,p) possesses a binomial degree distribution as in the Erdős-Rényi random graphs Gp(N), its complementary graph Gpc(N) = G1-p(N) follows a binomial degree distribution as in the Erdős-Rényi random graphs G1-p(N). We prove that the maximum and minimum assortativity of a class of graphs with a binomial distribution are asymptotically antisymmetric: ρmax(N,p) = -ρmin(N,p) for N → ∞. The general relation (3) nicely leads to (a) the relation (10) and (16) between the assortativity range ρmax(G)-ρmin(G) of a graph with a given degree distribution and the range ρmax(Gc)-ρmin(Gc) of its complementary graph and (b) new bounds (6) and (15) of the assortativity. These results together with our numerical experiments in over 30 real-world complex networks illustrate that the assortativity range ρmax-ρmin is generally large in sparse networks, which underlines the importance of assortativity as a network characterizer.

  8. Hemispheric Asymmetry for Linguistic Prosody: A Study of Stress Perception in Croatian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mildner, Vesna

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study was to test for possible functional cerebral asymmetry in processing one segment of linguistic prosody, namely word stress, in Croatian. The test material consisted of eight tokens of the word "pas" under a falling accent, varying only in vowel duration between 119 and 185ms, attached to the end of a frame sentence. The…

  9. The Role of Hemispheral Asymmetry and Regional Activity of Quantitative EEG in Children with Stuttering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozge, Aynur; Toros, Fevziye; Comelekoglu, Ulku

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the role of delayed cerebral maturation, hemisphere asymmetry and regional differences in children with stuttering and healthy controls during resting state and hyperventilation, using conventional EEG techniques and quantitative EEG (QEEG) analysis. This cross-sectional case control study included 26 children with stuttering and…

  10. Psychological Correlates of Handedness and Corpus Callosum Asymmetry in Autism: The Left Hemisphere Dysfunction Theory Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floris, Dorothea L.; Chura, Lindsay R.; Holt, Rosemary J.; Suckling, John; Bullmore, Edward T.; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Spencer, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Rightward cerebral lateralization has been suggested to be involved in the neuropathology of autism spectrum conditions. We investigated functional and neuroanatomical asymmetry, in terms of handedness and corpus callosum measurements in male adolescents with autism, their unaffected siblings and controls, and their associations with executive…

  11. The Role of Hemispheral Asymmetry and Regional Activity of Quantitative EEG in Children with Stuttering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozge, Aynur; Toros, Fevziye; Comelekoglu, Ulku

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the role of delayed cerebral maturation, hemisphere asymmetry and regional differences in children with stuttering and healthy controls during resting state and hyperventilation, using conventional EEG techniques and quantitative EEG (QEEG) analysis. This cross-sectional case control study included 26 children with stuttering and…

  12. Psychological Correlates of Handedness and Corpus Callosum Asymmetry in Autism: The Left Hemisphere Dysfunction Theory Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floris, Dorothea L.; Chura, Lindsay R.; Holt, Rosemary J.; Suckling, John; Bullmore, Edward T.; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Spencer, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Rightward cerebral lateralization has been suggested to be involved in the neuropathology of autism spectrum conditions. We investigated functional and neuroanatomical asymmetry, in terms of handedness and corpus callosum measurements in male adolescents with autism, their unaffected siblings and controls, and their associations with executive…

  13. Automated analysis of perfusion weighted MRI using asymmetry in vascular territories

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Neil R.; Ansari, Sameer A; Vakil, Parmede; Prabhakaran, Shyam; Carroll, Timothy J; Hurley, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the feasibility of automatic vascular territory region of interest (ROI) construction as a method for standardized quantification of cerebral blood flow (CBF) images. Materials and Methods An algorithm for automatic construction of vascular territory ROIs was performed on 10 healthy controls and 25 patients with perfusion abnormalities identified by retrospective chart review. The ROIs were used to quantify perfusion asymmetry for each territory, and perfusion asymmetry was compared in the two cohorts and against blinded neuroradiologist interpretation. The algorithm was additionally applied to a separate cohort of 23 prospectively enrolled patients and perfusion asymmetry was correlated against clinical variables. Results There was significantly greater perfusion asymmetry in territories graded by neuroradiologists as hypoperfused compared to those graded as normally perfused (p<.05) and compared to healthy volunteers (p<.01). An ROC analysis showed that perfusion asymmetry was sensitive and specific for identifying hypoperfusion in vascular territories (84.9% sensitivity and 90.5% specificity for a threshold asymmetry index of .829). In the prospective cohort, perfusion asymmetry was correlated with initial NIH stroke scale (NIHSS) (p<.01) and length of stay (p<.05). Conclusions Automatic construction of vascular territory ROIs and calculation of perfusion asymmetry is a feasible method for analyzing CBF images. Because the technique is rapid and minimizes bias, it can facilitate analysis of larger scale research studies. PMID:25601529

  14. Cerebral Paragonimiasis.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, I

    1975-01-01

    The first case of cerebral paragonimiasis was reported by Otani in Japan in 1887. This was nine years after Kerbert's discovery of the fluke in the lungs of Bengal tigers and seven years after a human pulmonary infection by the fluke was demonstrated by Baelz and Manson. The first case was a 26-year-old man who had been suffering from cough and hemosputum for one year. The patient developed convulsive seizures with subsequent coma and died. The postmortem examination showed cystic lesions in the right frontal and occipital lobes. An adult fluke was found in the occipital lesion and another was seen in a gross specimen of normal brain tissue around the affected occipital lobe. Two years after Otani's discovery, at autopsy a 29-year-old man with a history of Jacksonian seizure was reported as having cerebral paragonimiasis. Some time later, however, it was confirmed that the case was actually cerebral schistosomiasis japonica. Subsequently, cases of cerebral paragonimiasis were reported. However, the majority of these cases were not confirmed histologically. It was pointed out that some of these early cases were probably not Paragonimus infection. After World War II, reviews as well as case reports were published. Recently, investigations have been reported from Korea, with a clinicla study on 62 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis seen at the Neurology Department of the National Medical Center, Seoul, between 1958 and 1964. In 1971 Higashi described a statistical study on 105 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis that had been treated surgically in Japan.

  15. Exchange asymmetry in experimental settings

    Treesearch

    Thomas C. Brown; Mark D. Morrison; Jacob A. Benfield; Gretchen Nurse Rainbolt; Paul A. Bell

    2015-01-01

    We review past trading experiments and present 11 new experiments designed to show how the trading rate responds to alterations of the experimental procedure. In agreement with earlier studies, results show that if the trade decision is converted to one resembling a choice between goods the exchange asymmetry disappears, but otherwise the asymmetry is...

  16. Lepton forward-backward asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Pain, R. ); DELPHI Collaboration,

    1992-02-01

    Results of Forward-Backward Asymmetries with Leptons measured at [ital Z][sup 0] energies are presented. Details of the analysis by the DELPHI Collaboration are given together with the most recent values of the peak Asymmetries for electrons, muons, and taus obtained by ALEPH, DELPHI, L3, and OPAL Collaborations at LEP.

  17. Lip asymmetry and smile aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Batwa, Waeil; McDonald, Fraser; Cash, Alex

    2013-11-01

    Objective : To determine if lip asymmetry can affect lip aesthetics. Setting and Participants : A group of dentists (n = 40) and cleft patients (n = 40) were recruited from the dental hospital and cleft service. Interventions : Still photographic digital images of lips and teeth were manipulated to produce a computerized gradient of smile appearance with different degrees of upper-lip vertical asymmetry. These five photographs (with 0 mm representing "symmetry," and 1, 2, 2.5, and 3 mm, asymmetries) were assessed by participants using a 5-point Likert scale. Statistics : Descriptive statistics in addition to chi-square test were used to analyze the data. In order to satisfy the requirement of the chi-square test, the five smile ratings were reduced to three. Results : Lip asymmetry did affect relative smile aesthetics, as determined by dentists and cleft patients. Both the dentists and cleft patients rated the 0-mm photograph more attractive than the 2.5-mm and 3-mm smiles (P < .05). The 0-, 1-, and 2-mm smiles were indistinguishable for both dentists and cleft patients. Conclusion : Lip asymmetry affects smile aesthetics. However, cleft patients and dentists were tolerant of minor asymmetries. This suggests that small degrees of lip asymmetry do not affect relative smile aesthetics as much as large degrees of lip asymmetry (2.5 mm or more).

  18. Atypical Cerebral Lateralisation in Adults with Compensated Developmental Dyslexia Demonstrated Using Functional Transcranial Doppler Ultrasound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illingworth, Sarah; Bishop, Dorothy V. M.

    2009-01-01

    Functional transcranial Doppler ultrasound (fTCD) is a relatively new and non-invasive technique that assesses cerebral lateralisation through measurements of blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral arteries. In this study fTCD was used to compare functional asymmetry during a word generation task between a group of 30 dyslexic adults and a…

  19. Atypical Cerebral Lateralisation in Adults with Compensated Developmental Dyslexia Demonstrated Using Functional Transcranial Doppler Ultrasound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illingworth, Sarah; Bishop, Dorothy V. M.

    2009-01-01

    Functional transcranial Doppler ultrasound (fTCD) is a relatively new and non-invasive technique that assesses cerebral lateralisation through measurements of blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral arteries. In this study fTCD was used to compare functional asymmetry during a word generation task between a group of 30 dyslexic adults and a…

  20. Believing in paranormal phenomena: relations to asymmetry of body and brain.

    PubMed

    Schulter, Günter; Papousek, Ilona

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the possible relationship between established measures of body and brain asymmetries and individual differences in paranormal beliefs. In addition to behavioural measures of cerebral laterality, measures of facial features and finger length were taken to calculate body asymmetry scores and indicators of fluctuating asymmetry (average absolute differences between left and right body features). Both the direction and degree of laterality measures were used. In addition to that, quantitative measures of inconsistency of cerebral lateralization were obtained. Results indicated that a stronger belief in paranormal phenomena was associated with fluctuating asymmetry of finger length, and that this aspect of body asymmetry may be related to greater intraindividual variability in the degree of 'atypical' functional lateralization. This intraindividual variability index, in turn, significantly predicted strength of belief in the paranormal. Belief in the paranormal was also higher in women than men and it was negatively correlated with the education level. In sum, these findings suggest that a part of the variance of strength of belief in paranormal phenomena can be explained by patterns of functional hemispheric asymmetry that may be related to perturbations during fetal development.

  1. Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.; Bandara, Sumith V.; Hill, Cory J.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2009-01-01

    The complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD) is designed to eliminate the major dark current sources in the superlattice infrared detector. The concept can also be applied to bulk semiconductor- based infrared detectors. CBIRD uses two different types of specially designed barriers: an electron barrier that blocks electrons but not holes, and a hole barrier that blocks holes but not electrons. The CBIRD structure consists of an n-contact, a hole barrier, an absorber, an electron barrier, and a p-contact. The barriers are placed at the contact-absorber junctions where, in a conventional p-i-n detector structure, there normally are depletion regions that produce generation-recombination (GR) dark currents due to Shockley-Read- Hall (SRH) processes. The wider-bandgap complementary barriers suppress G-R dark current. The barriers also block diffusion dark currents generated in the diffusion wings in the neutral regions. In addition, the wider gap barriers serve to reduce tunneling dark currents. In the case of a superlattice-based absorber, the superlattice itself can be designed to suppress dark currents due to Auger processes. At the same time, the barriers actually help to enhance the collection of photo-generated carriers by deflecting the photo-carriers that are diffusing in the wrong direction (i.e., away from collectors) and redirecting them toward the collecting contacts. The contact layers are made from materials with narrower bandgaps than the barriers. This allows good ohmic contacts to be made, resulting in lower contact resistances. Previously, THALES Research and Technology (France) demonstrated detectors with bulk InAsSb (specifically InAs0.91Sb0.09) absorber lattice-matched to GaSb substrates. The absorber is surrounded by two wider bandgap layers designed to minimize impedance to photocurrent flow. The wide bandgap materials also serve as contacts. The cutoff wavelength of the InAsSb absorber is fixed. CBIRD may be considered as a modified

  2. Measurements of W Charge Asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Holzbauer, J. L.

    2015-10-06

    We discuss W boson and lepton charge asymmetry measurements from W decays in the electron channel, which were made using 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ of RunII data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The electron charge asymmetry is presented as a function of pseudo-rapidity out to |$\\eta$| $\\le$ 3.2, in five symmetric and asymmetric kinematic bins of electron transverse momentum and the missing transverse energy of the event. We also give the W charge asymmetry as a function of W boson rapidity. The asymmetries are compared with next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations. These charge asymmetry measurements will allow more accurate determinations of the proton parton distribution functions and are the most precise to date.

  3. Structural asymmetry of cortical visual areas is related to ocular dominance.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Bettina H; Hougaard, Anders; Amin, Faisal M; Larsson, Henrik B W; Ashina, Messoud

    2015-12-02

    The grey matter of the human brain is asymmetrically distributed between the cerebral hemispheres. This asymmetry includes visual areas, but its relevance to visual function is not understood. Voxel-based morphometry is a well-established technique for localization and quantification of cerebral grey matter on the basis of MR images. This method has been used previously for interhemispheric comparison, but without examining the functional implications of the identified anatomical asymmetries of the visual system. The aim of the present study was to relate anatomical interhemispheric asymmetries to asymmetries of visual function. We examined grey matter asymmetries of visual areas in a large population (n=56) of ophthalmologically and neurologically healthy individuals. We used state-of-the-art 3 T MRI and voxel-based morphometry to relate the visual parameters, (a) ocular dominance, (b) interocular difference in visual acuity and (c) visual attention (i.e. deviation on a line-bisection task), to interhemispheric differences in grey matter volume. As most visual input from one eye is processed in the contralateral hemisphere, ocular features may also depend on cerebral lateralization. Several lateralized visual areas were identified, both right>left and left>right. When correlating the asymmetries to the functional parameters, we found a significant correlation to ocular dominance (P<0.05), whereas visual acuity and visual attention showed no such relationship. The lateral occipital complex was identified to be significantly larger in the left hemisphere for right-eyed participants and vice versa. These results suggest a cerebral basis for ocular dominance.

  4. Cerebral Palsy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Parents > Cerebral Palsy A A A ... kids who are living with the condition. About Cerebral Palsy Cerebral palsy is one of the most common ...

  5. Cerebral palsy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cerebral palsy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cerebral palsy : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/cerebral_palsy/cerebral_palsy. ...

  6. Cerebral Palsy (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Right Sport for You Healthy School Lunch Planner Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Teens > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... do just what everyone else does. What Is Cerebral Palsy? Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder of the ...

  7. Diagnosis and complementary examinations.

    PubMed

    Menghini, Moreno; Duncan, Jacque L

    2014-01-01

    Development of neuroprotective therapies requires an understanding of the mechanisms of retinal degeneration and a way to monitor response to treatment. With the increasing availability of genetic testing, precise characterization of the retinal degeneration phenotype is essential. This chapter covers standard and innovative diagnostic techniques and complementary examinations needed for the evaluation and treatment of retinal degenerative diseases. It aims to provide an overview of functional and structural diagnostic tools for the evaluation of retinal degenerative diseases, but is not intended as a comprehensive reference. Subjective assessment of visual function includes psychophysical tests, such as perimetry and microperimetry. Electrophysiology tests, such as the electroretinogram and electro-oculogram, are crucial in the assessment of retinal degenerative diseases and provide an objective assessment of global photoreceptor and retinal pigment epithelial cell function. Retinal structural measures are correlated with measures of retinal function to characterize the disease phenotype, including fundus photography using color, near-infrared, and autofluorescence imaging. Ocular perfusion can be assessed using fluorescein, indocyanine green, and noninvasive angiography. Optical coherence tomography provides information about retinal structure. Resolution of all images of retinal structure can be improved using adaptive optics, which permits visualization of individual photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial cells in the macula.

  8. Hypnosis and hemispheric asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Naish, Peter L N

    2010-03-01

    Participants of low and high hypnotic susceptibility were tested on a temporal order judgement task, both with and without hypnosis. Judgements were made of the order of presentation of light flashes appearing in first one hemi-field then the other. There were differences in the inter-stimulus intervals required accurately to report the order, depending upon which hemi-field led. This asymmetry was most marked in hypnotically susceptible participants and reversed when they were hypnotized. This implies not only that brain activity changes in hypnosis, but also that there is a difference in brain function between people of low and high hypnotic susceptibility. The latter exhibited a faster-acting left hemisphere in the waking state, but faster right when hypnotized.

  9. Dental arch asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zubair, Nabil Muhsen

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study was conducted to assess the dental arch asymmetry in a Yemeni sample aged (18-25) years. Materials and Methods: The investigation involved clinical examination of 1479 adults; only 253 (129 females, 124 males) out of the total sample were selected to fulfill the criteria for the study sample. Study models were constructed and evaluated to measure mandibular arch dimensions. Three linear distances were utilized on each side on the dental arch: Incisal-canine distance, canine-molar distance and incisal-molar distance, which represent the dental arch segmental measurements. Results: When applying “t-test” at P < 0.05, no significant differences were found between the right and left canine-molar, incisal-canine and incisal-molar distances in both dental arches for both sexes. The greater variation (0.30 mm) was observed between right and left canine-molar distance in the maxillary dental arch in male and the smaller (0.04 mm) in the mandibular dental arch between the right and left canine-molar distance in females. Conclusion: The findings of the present study revealed a symmetrical pattern of dental arches, since the right and left sides showed no statistically significant difference. In general, it can be observed that the measurements related to the central incisors and canines have the widest range of reading and give the impression that the location of central incisor and canines to each other and to other teeth is the strongest factor in determining the dental arch asymmetry. PMID:24966774

  10. Children and Complementary Health Approaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... NHIS study on children’s use of complementary health approaches, including natural products and mind and body practices, visit the National ... conventional care or prescribed medications with any health product or practice ... suggests a complementary approach, do not increase the dose or duration of ...

  11. Handedness, heritability, neurocognition and brain asymmetry in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Deep-Soboslay, Amy; Hyde, Thomas M.; Callicott, Joseph P.; Lener, Marc S.; Verchinski, Beth A.; Apud, José A.; Weinberger, Daniel R.

    2010-01-01

    Higher rates of non-right-handedness (i.e. left- and mixed-handedness) have been reported in schizophrenia and have been a centrepiece for theories of anomalous lateralization in this disorder. We investigated whether non-right-handedness is (i) more prevalent in patients as compared with unaffected siblings and healthy unrelated control participants; (ii) familial; (iii) associated with disproportionately poorer neurocognition; and (iv) associated with grey matter volume asymmetries. We examined 1445 participants (375 patients with schizophrenia, 502 unaffected siblings and 568 unrelated controls) using the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory, a battery of neuropsychological tasks and structural magnetic resonance imaging data. Patients displayed a leftward shift in Edinburgh Handedness Inventory laterality quotient scores as compared with both their unaffected siblings and unrelated controls, but this finding disappeared when sex was added to the model. Moreover, there was no evidence of increased familial risk for non-right-handedness. Non-right-handedness was not associated with disproportionate neurocognitive disadvantage or with grey matter volume asymmetries in the frontal pole, lateral occipital pole or temporal pole. Non-right-handedness was associated with a significant reduction in left asymmetry in the superior temporal gyrus in both patients and controls. Our data neither provide strong support for ‘atypical’ handedness as a schizophrenia risk-associated heritable phenotype nor that it is associated with poorer neurocognition or anomalous cerebral asymmetries. PMID:20639549

  12. Handedness, heritability, neurocognition and brain asymmetry in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Deep-Soboslay, Amy; Hyde, Thomas M; Callicott, Joseph P; Lener, Marc S; Verchinski, Beth A; Apud, José A; Weinberger, Daniel R; Elvevåg, Brita

    2010-10-01

    Higher rates of non-right-handedness (i.e. left- and mixed-handedness) have been reported in schizophrenia and have been a centrepiece for theories of anomalous lateralization in this disorder. We investigated whether non-right-handedness is (i) more prevalent in patients as compared with unaffected siblings and healthy unrelated control participants; (ii) familial; (iii) associated with disproportionately poorer neurocognition; and (iv) associated with grey matter volume asymmetries. We examined 1445 participants (375 patients with schizophrenia, 502 unaffected siblings and 568 unrelated controls) using the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory, a battery of neuropsychological tasks and structural magnetic resonance imaging data. Patients displayed a leftward shift in Edinburgh Handedness Inventory laterality quotient scores as compared with both their unaffected siblings and unrelated controls, but this finding disappeared when sex was added to the model. Moreover, there was no evidence of increased familial risk for non-right-handedness. Non-right-handedness was not associated with disproportionate neurocognitive disadvantage or with grey matter volume asymmetries in the frontal pole, lateral occipital pole or temporal pole. Non-right-handedness was associated with a significant reduction in left asymmetry in the superior temporal gyrus in both patients and controls. Our data neither provide strong support for 'atypical' handedness as a schizophrenia risk-associated heritable phenotype nor that it is associated with poorer neurocognition or anomalous cerebral asymmetries.

  13. Brain perfusion asymmetry in patients with oral somatic delusions.

    PubMed

    Umezaki, Yojiro; Katagiri, Ayano; Watanabe, Motoko; Takenoshita, Miho; Sakuma, Tomomi; Sako, Emi; Sato, Yusuke; Toriihara, Akira; Uezato, Akihito; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Nishikawa, Toru; Motomura, Haruhiko; Toyofuku, Akira

    2013-06-01

    Oral cenesthopathy is a somatic delusion or hallucination involving the oral area and is categorized as a delusional disorder, somatic type. The pathophysiology of this intractable condition remains obscure. In this study, we clarified the pathophysiology of oral cenesthopathy by evaluating regional brain perfusion. We performed single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using (99m)Tc-ethylcysteinate dimer in 16 subjects (cenesthopathy:control = 8:8). The SPECT images were visually assessed qualitatively, and quantitative analyses were also performed using a three-dimensional stereotactic region-of-interest template. The visual assessment revealed a right > left perfusion asymmetry in broad areas of the brain among the patients. The quantitative analysis confirmed that the regional cerebral blood flow values on the right side were significantly larger than those on the left side for most areas of the brain in the patients. A comparison of the R/(R + L) ratios in both groups confirmed the significant brain perfusion asymmetry between the two sides in the callosomarginal, precentral, and temporal regions in the patients. Qualitative evaluation of the SPECT images revealed right > left brain perfusion asymmetry in broad regions of the brain. Moreover, the quantitative analyses confirmed the perfusion asymmetry between the two sides in the frontal and temporal areas. Those may provide the key for elucidation of the pathophysiology of oral cenesthopathy.

  14. Cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Colver, Allan; Fairhurst, Charles; Pharoah, Peter O D

    2014-04-05

    The syndrome of cerebral palsy encompasses a large group of childhood movement and posture disorders. Severity, patterns of motor involvement, and associated impairments such as those of communication, intellectual ability, and epilepsy vary widely. Overall prevalence has remained stable in the past 40 years at 2-3·5 cases per 1000 livebirths, despite changes in antenatal and perinatal care. The few studies available from developing countries suggest prevalence of comparable magnitude. Cerebral palsy is a lifelong disorder; approaches to intervention, whether at an individual or environmental level, should recognise that quality of life and social participation throughout life are what individuals with cerebral palsy seek, not improved physical function for its own sake. In the past few years, the cerebral palsy community has learned that the evidence of benefit for the numerous drugs, surgery, and therapies used over previous decades is weak. Improved understanding of the role of multiple gestation in pathogenesis, of gene environment interaction, and how to influence brain plasticity could yield significant advances in treatment of the disorder. Reduction in the prevalence of post-neonatal cerebral palsy, especially in developing countries, should be possible through improved nutrition, infection control, and accident prevention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Preschoolers' mental rotation of letters: Sex differences in hemispheric asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Nicola; Jansen, Petra; Heil, Martin

    2010-12-01

    Adults' mental rotation performance has been found to produce one of the largest sex differences in cognition accompanied by sex differences in functional cerebral asymmetry. In this study sex differences in mental rotation of letters were investigated with children as young as five years. Based on the electrophysiological brain correlates of mental rotation, we observed a bilateral brain activity for preschool girls whereas the preschool boys' brain activity was clearly lateralized towards the right hemisphere if and only if mental rotation was needed to solve the task. At the same time, we did not find any sex differences in mental rotation speed or accuracy. Thus, sex differences in functional hemispheric asymmetry during mental rotation do not require hormonal changes that occur during puberty.

  16. Complementary and alternative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gaboury, Isabelle; Johnson, Noémie; Robin, Christine; Luc, Mireille; O’Connor, Daniel; Patenaude, Johane; Pélissier-Simard, Luce; Xhignesse, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine whether medical training prepares FPs to meet the requirements of the Collège des médecins du Québec for their role in advising patients on the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Design Secondary analysis of survey results. Setting Quebec. Participants Family physicians and GPs in active practice. Main outcome measures Perceptions of the role of the physician as an advisor on CAM; level of comfort responding to questions and advising patients on CAM; frequency with which patients ask their physicians about CAM; personal position on CAM; and desire for training on CAM. Results The response rate was 19.5% (195 respondents of 1000) and the sample appears to be representative of the target population. Most respondents (85.8%) reported being asked about CAM several times a month. A similar proportion (86.7%) believed it was their role to advise patients on CAM. However, of this group, only 33.1% reported being able to do so. There is an association between an urban practice and knowledge of the advisory role of physicians. More than three-quarters of respondents expressed interest in receiving additional training on CAM. Conclusion There is a gap between the training that Quebec physicians receive on CAM and their need to meet legal and ethical obligations designed to protect the public where CAM products and therapies are concerned. One solution might be more thorough training on CAM to help physicians meet the Collège des médecins du Québec requirements. PMID:27965354

  17. Cerebral Asymmetries in Sleep-Dependent Processes of Memory Consolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peigneux, Philippe; Schmitz, Remy; Willems, Sylvie

    2007-01-01

    Preference for previously seen, unfamiliar objects reflects a memory bias on affective judgment, known as the "mere exposure effect" (MEE). Here, we investigated the effect of time, post-exposure sleep, and the brain hemisphere solicited on preference generalization toward objects viewed in different perspectives. When presented in the right…

  18. The Relationship Between Piagetian Cognitive Development and Cerebral Cognitive Asymmetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Rick

    This paper reviews research and opinions concerned with the lateralization of brain functions and cognitive development as described by Piaget. Optimal cognitive functioning in humans is a product of the complete development of interhemispheric communication in the brain. Growth spurts in brain development have been found to correlate closely with…

  19. Cerebral Asymmetries in Sleep-Dependent Processes of Memory Consolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peigneux, Philippe; Schmitz, Remy; Willems, Sylvie

    2007-01-01

    Preference for previously seen, unfamiliar objects reflects a memory bias on affective judgment, known as the "mere exposure effect" (MEE). Here, we investigated the effect of time, post-exposure sleep, and the brain hemisphere solicited on preference generalization toward objects viewed in different perspectives. When presented in the right…

  20. [Complementary medicine--the facts].

    PubMed

    Grossman, Ehud

    2011-08-01

    The popularity of complementary medicine in the western world continues to grow. Complementary medicine has a wide scope of topics including acupuncture, hypnosis, meditation, chiropractic manipulation, tai chi, yoga, botanical and herbal supplements and many other undefined modalities such as copper bracelets, magnets, holy water etc. For most modalities the mechanism of action is unknown and the evidence of benefit is poor. Some modalities such as acupuncture, hypnosis and tai chi may improve pain and other subjective complains. It seems that most of the beneficial effects of complementary medicine are placebo effects. Complementary treatment may be associated with side effects and should not be an alternative to the conventional medicine. Complementary medicine can be used as an adjunct to the conventional medicine and should be used in full agreement with and under the supervision of the attending physician. Patients should be informed about the existing evidence and what to expect from complementary medicine. Further meticulous research should be conducted to expand our knowledge in complementary medicine.

  1. CMB maximum temperature asymmetry axis: Alignment with other cosmic asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariano, Antonio; Perivolaropoulos, Leandros

    2013-02-01

    We use a global pixel-based estimator to identify the axis of the residual Maximum Temperature Asymmetry (MTA) (after the dipole subtraction) of the WMAP seven-year Internal Linear Combination (ILC) cosmic microwave background temperature sky map. The estimator is based on considering the temperature differences between opposite pixels in the sky at various angular resolutions (4°-15°) and selecting the axis that maximizes this difference. We consider three large-scale HEALPix resolutions: Nside=16(3.7°), Nside=8(7.3°) and Nside=4(14.7°). We compare the direction and magnitude of this asymmetry with three other cosmic asymmetry axes (α dipole, dark energy dipole and dark flow) and find that the four asymmetry axes are abnormally close to each other. We compare the observed MTA axis with the corresponding MTA axes of 104 Gaussian isotropic simulated ILC maps (based on ΛCDM). The fraction of simulated ILC maps that reproduce the observed magnitude of the MTA asymmetry and alignment with the observed α dipole is in the range of 0.1%-0.5% (depending on the resolution chosen for the cosmic microwave background map). The corresponding magnitude+alignment probabilities with the other two asymmetry axes (dark energy dipole and dark flow) are at the level of about 1%. We propose Extended Topological Quintessence as a physical model qualitatively consistent with this coincidence of directions.

  2. Cerebral Dominance and Childhood Learning Disorders: Theoretical Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Raymond S.

    1981-01-01

    An examination of Orton's early hypothesis of inconsistent cerebral dominance for linguistically disabled children in light of some 50 years of research is provided. Although a hypothesis based on data from nonintrusive measures of functional asymmetry with learning impaired children is postulated, caution in this area is suggested. (Author/AL)

  3. Network asymmetry of motor areas revealed by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Yan, Li-Rong; Wu, Yi-Bo; Hu, De-Wen; Qin, Shang-Zhen; Xu, Guo-Zheng; Zeng, Xiao-Hua; Song, Hua

    2012-02-01

    There are ample functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies on functional brain asymmetries, and the asymmetry of cerebral network in the resting state may be crucial to brain function organization. In this paper, a unified schema of voxel-wise functional connectivity and asymmetry analysis was presented and the network asymmetry of motor areas was studied. Twelve healthy male subjects with mean age 29.8 ± 6.4 were studied. Functional network in the resting state was described by using functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) analysis. Motor areas were selected as regions of interest (ROIs). Network asymmetry, including intra- and inter-network asymmetries, was formulated and analyzed. The intra-network asymmetry was defined as the difference between the left and right part of a particular functional network. The inter-network asymmetry was defined as the difference between the networks for a specific ROI in the left hemisphere and its homotopic ROI in the right hemisphere. Primary motor area (M1), primary sensory area (S1) and premotor area (PMA) exhibited higher functional correlation with the right parietal-temporal-occipital circuit and the middle frontal gyrus than they did with the left hemisphere. Right S1 and right PMA exhibited higher functional correlation with the ipsilateral precentral and supramarginal areas. There exist the large-scale hierarchical network asymmetries of the motor areas in the resting state. These asymmetries imply the right hemisphere dominance for predictive motor coding based on spatial attention and higher sensory processing load for the motor performance of non-dominant hemisphere.

  4. Intrasubject corneal thickness asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Khachikian, Stephen S; Belin, Michael W; Ciolino, Joseph B

    2008-06-01

    To establish the normal distribution for intrasubject (right eye/left eye) central corneal pachymetry in a refractive surgery population. A retrospective analysis was performed on 1448 eyes of 724 consecutive patients evaluated for refractive surgery. Pachymetric data were obtained from the Pentacam Eye Scanner. Right and left eye pachymetry values were compared for the corneal apex, pupil center, and thinnest point. Statistical analysis was performed to determine normal levels of variance. The average apex reading was 539.3+/-36.8 microm, median 542 microm, and mode 539 microm (range: 411 to 664 microm). Values for the pupil center (average 538.7 microm) and thinnest point (average 536.1 microm) followed a similar distribution. The average pachymetry difference between fellow eyes was 8.8+/-7.2 microm at the apex, 8.9+/-8.3 microm at the pupil center, and 9.0+/-8.3 microm at the thinnest region. Individuals with a greater than 23.2 microm apical pachymetry difference represent less than 5% of the population. Individuals with an apical difference greater than 30.4 microm represent less than 0.5%. Pachymetric asymmetry outside the normal range should alert the clinician to examine for other parameters that are more established refractive surgery risk factors.

  5. [Dreams and interhemispheric asymmetry].

    PubMed

    Korabel'nikova, E A; Golubev, V L

    2001-01-01

    The dreams of 103 children and adolescents, aged 10-17 years, have been studied. The test group included 78 patients with neurotic disorders; control one consisted of 25 healthy subjects. Dream features, which were common for those with preferentially left asymmetry profile both in patients as well as in healthy subjects, were: less expressed novelty factor and frequent appearance of rare phenomena, such as "déjà vu in wakefulness", reality, "mixed" (overlapped) dreams, prolonged dreams in repeat sleep, frequent changes of personages and scenes of action. Left-hander dream peculiarities, being detected only in neurotic patients but not in healthy subjects, emerged as lucid phenomena deficit, "dream in dreams" and "dream reminiscence in dream" syndrome, which have been found only in left-handers. Right and left hemispheres seem to contribute in different ways to a dream formation. In authors believe that the left hemisphere seems to provide dream origin while the right hemisphere provides dream vividness, figurativeness and affective activation level.

  6. Asymmetry and dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Christiana M; Eckert, Mark A

    2008-01-01

    Developmental language disorders are characterized by a maturational trajectory that deviates or lags that of normal children. Given the wide variation in the rate of normal language development, diagnosis and classification of these disorders poses severe problems for the clinician. Our laboratory has been searching for anatomical signatures that could aid the development of a neurobiologically based classification. Quantitative analysis of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain scans of a series of samples of children and adults with reading and language disorders has identified two clusters with contrasting anatomical and reading profiles. Individuals with small symmetrical brain structures tend to have deficits in multiple domains of written and oral language whereas those with larger asymmetrical structures are more likely to have the isolated phonological deficits seen in adults with compensated dyslexia. Surprisingly, the anatomical risk factors that define these clusters do not form a continuum of increasing severity but deviate in opposite directions from normal. Individuals with moderate brain size and asymmetry typically demonstrate the best overall performance. Further research should determine if phonological impairments in the two clusters are associated with differing genetic and environmental risk factors requiring different types of intervention.

  7. Cerebral specialization. [greater performance efficiency for certain mental abilities or processes by one cerebral hemisphere over another

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Robin D.; Hopkins, William D.; Rumbaugh, Duane M.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of greater performance efficiency for certain mental abilities or processes in one cerebral hemisphere rather than the other is referred to as 'cerebral lateralization'. The experimental paradigm for lateralization research involves the study of patients with one damaged hemisphere, which prevents their performance of a certain task or function; this approach, however, presents many difficulties in extrapolating to brain function in normal patients. Attention is presently given to gender differences in lateralization, cerebral asymmetries in other species, and the evolutionary bases of hemispheric specialization.

  8. Cerebral specialization. [greater performance efficiency for certain mental abilities or processes by one cerebral hemisphere over another

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Robin D.; Hopkins, William D.; Rumbaugh, Duane M.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of greater performance efficiency for certain mental abilities or processes in one cerebral hemisphere rather than the other is referred to as 'cerebral lateralization'. The experimental paradigm for lateralization research involves the study of patients with one damaged hemisphere, which prevents their performance of a certain task or function; this approach, however, presents many difficulties in extrapolating to brain function in normal patients. Attention is presently given to gender differences in lateralization, cerebral asymmetries in other species, and the evolutionary bases of hemispheric specialization.

  9. Assessment of the Relationship between Asymmetry in Cerebral Hemisphere Arousal and Perceptual Asymmetry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    like the dying runner of Marathon, it had just enough strength to deliver its message. And it was a historic one: the mysterious, distant planet Uranus ,l...violent past. Waiting astronomers basked in their midwinter’s night dream. The mission to Uranus , its slender rings and giant Shakesperian moons...Oberon and Titania , was humankind’s first close look at the seventh planet in our solar system and its last for the millennium. Though some findings were

  10. Beam normal spin asymmetries: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    M. Vanderhaeghen

    2007-06-01

    The beam normal spin asymmetry in elastic electron-nucleon scattering is discussed. This beam normal spin asymmetry depends on the imaginary part of two-photon exchange processes between electron and nucleon, and measures the non-forward structure functions of the nucleon. After briefly reviewing the theoretical formalism, we discuss calculations in the threshold region, in the resonance region, as well as in the diffractive region, corresponding with high energy and forward angles.

  11. Electrodermal asymmetry during human sleep.

    PubMed

    Freixa i Baqué, E; de Bonis, M

    1983-01-01

    The bilateral spontaneous electrodermal activity (EDA) of four paid volunteer male students was recorded during three consecutive complete nights (after a habituation night). The results showed that: (a) there was a high proportion of electrodermal asymmetry (80%) during human sleep; (b) there were no significant differences in asymmetry between sleep stages; (c) electrodermal laterality during sleep seems to be under a random effects model; and (d) laterality appears to be an unreliable parameter. These results are discussed in terms of the activation theory.

  12. Subtasks affecting step-length asymmetry in post-stroke hemiparetic walking.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woo-Sub

    2016-10-01

    This study was performed to investigate whether components from trunk progression (TP) and step length were related to step length asymmetry in walking in patients with hemiparesis. Gait analysis was performed for participants with hemiparesis and healthy controls. The distance between the pelvis and foot in the anterior-posterior axis was calculated at initial-contact. Step length was partitioned into anterior foot placement (AFP) and posterior foot placement (PFP). TP was partitioned into anterior trunk progression (ATP) and posterior trunk progression (PTP). The TP pattern and step length pattern were defined to represent intra-TP and intra-step spatial balance, respectively. Of 29 participants with hemiparesis, nine participants showed longer paretic step length, eight participants showed symmetric step length, and 12 participants showed shorter paretic step length. For the hemiparesis group, linear regression analysis showed that ATP asymmetry, AFP asymmetry, and TP patterns had significant predictability regarding step length asymmetry. Prolonged paretic ATP and shortened paretic AFP was the predominant pattern in the hemiparesis group, even in participants with symmetric step length. However, some participants showed same direction of ATP and AFP asymmetry. These findings indicate the following: (1) ATP asymmetries should be observed to determine individual characteristics of step length asymmetry, and (2) TP patterns can provide complementary information for non-paretic limb compensation.

  13. Cerebral Malaria.

    PubMed

    Marsden, P D; Bruce-Chwatt, L J

    1975-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is an acute diffuse encephalopathy associated only with Plasmodium falciparum. It is probably a consequence of the rapid proliferation of the parasites in the body of man in relation to red cell invasion, and results in stagnation of blood flow in cerebralcapillaries with thromobotic occlusion of large numbers of cerebral capillaries. The subsequent cerebral pathology is cerebral infarction with haemorrhage and cerebral oedema. The wide prevalence of P. falciparum in highly endemic areas results in daily challenges to patients from several infected mosquitoes. It is thus important to understand the characteristics of P. falciparum, since this is one of the most important protozoan parasites of man and severe infection from it constitutes one of the few real clinical emergencies in tropical medicine. One of the more important aspects of the practice of medicine in the tropics is to establish a good understanding of the pattern of medical practice in that area. This applies to malaria as well as to other diseases. The neophyte might be somewhat surprised to learn, for example that an experienced colleague who lives in a holoendemic malarious area such as West Africa, sees no cerebral malaria. But the explanation is simple when the doctor concerned has a practice which involves treating adults only. Cerebral malaria is rare in adults, because in highly endemic areas, by the age of 1 year most of the infants in a group under study have already experienced their first falciparum infection. By the time they reach adult life, they have a solid immunity against severe falciparum infections. In fact, "clinical malaria" could occur in such a group under only two circumstances: 1) in pregnancy, a patent infection with P. falciparum might develop, probably due to an IgG drain across the placenta to the foetus;2) in an individual who has constantly taken antimalarials and who may have an immunity at such a low level that when antimalarial therapy is interrupted

  14. Intrachromosomal karyotype asymmetry in Orchidaceae

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros-Neto, Enoque; Nollet, Felipe; Moraes, Ana Paula; Felix, Leonardo P.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The asymmetry indexes have helped cytotaxonomists to interpret and classify plant karyotypes for species delimitation efforts. However, there is no consensus about the best method to calculate the intrachromosomal asymmetry. The present study aimed to compare different intrachromosomal asymmetry indexes in order to indicate which are more efficient for the estimation of asymmetry in different groups of orchids. Besides, we aimed to compare our results with the Orchidaceae phylogenetic proposal to test the hypothesis of Stebbins (1971). Through a literature review, karyotypes were selected and analyzed comparatively with ideal karyotypes in a cluster analysis. All karyotypes showed some level of interchromosomal asymmetry, ranging from slightly asymmetric to moderately asymmetric. The five tested intrachromosomal asymmetry indexes indicated Sarcoglottis grandiflora as the species with the most symmetrical karyotype and Christensonella pachyphylla with the most asymmetrical karyotype. In the cluster analysis, the largest number of species were grouped with the intermediary ideal karyotypes B or C. Considering our results, we recommend the combined use of at least two indexes, especially Ask% or A1 with Syi, for cytotaxonomic analysis in groups of orchids. In an evolutionary perspective, our results support Stebbins’ hypothesis that asymmetric karyotypes derive from a symmetric karyotypes. PMID:28644507

  15. Intrachromosomal karyotype asymmetry in Orchidaceae.

    PubMed

    Medeiros-Neto, Enoque; Nollet, Felipe; Moraes, Ana Paula; Felix, Leonardo P

    2017-01-01

    The asymmetry indexes have helped cytotaxonomists to interpret and classify plant karyotypes for species delimitation efforts. However, there is no consensus about the best method to calculate the intrachromosomal asymmetry. The present study aimed to compare different intrachromosomal asymmetry indexes in order to indicate which are more efficient for the estimation of asymmetry in different groups of orchids. Besides, we aimed to compare our results with the Orchidaceae phylogenetic proposal to test the hypothesis of Stebbins (1971). Through a literature review, karyotypes were selected and analyzed comparatively with ideal karyotypes in a cluster analysis. All karyotypes showed some level of interchromosomal asymmetry, ranging from slightly asymmetric to moderately asymmetric. The five tested intrachromosomal asymmetry indexes indicated Sarcoglottis grandiflora as the species with the most symmetrical karyotype and Christensonella pachyphylla with the most asymmetrical karyotype. In the cluster analysis, the largest number of species were grouped with the intermediary ideal karyotypes B or C. Considering our results, we recommend the combined use of at least two indexes, especially Ask% or A1 with Syi, for cytotaxonomic analysis in groups of orchids. In an evolutionary perspective, our results support Stebbins' hypothesis that asymmetric karyotypes derive from a symmetric karyotypes.

  16. Postnatal change in sulcal length asymmetry in cerebrum of cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kazuhito; Sawada, Kazuhiko; Fukunishi, Katsuhiro; Noritaka, Imai; Sakata-Haga, Hiromi; Yoshihiro, Fukui

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the timing of the onset of adult-type sulcal length asymmetry during postnatal development of the male cynomolgus monkey cerebrum. The monkey brain has already reached adult size by 3 months of age, although the body weight only represents 1/8 of the adult body weight by that time. The fronto-occipital length and the cerebral width also reached adult levels by that postnatal age with no left/right bias. Consistently, lengths of the major primary sulci reached adult levels by 3 months of age, and then decreased slightly in sexually mature monkeys (4-6.5 years of age). Asymmetry quotient analysis showed that sulcal length asymmetry patterns gradually changed during postnatal development. The male adult pattern of sulcal length asymmetry was acquired after 24 months of age. In particular, age-dependent rightward lateralization of the arcuate sulcal length was revealed during cerebral maturation by three-way ANOVA. The results suggest that the regional difference in cerebral maturation from adolescence to young adulthood modifies the sulcal morphology with characteristic asymmetric patterns in male cynomolgus monkeys.

  17. A Note on Complementary Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. Photo: iStock Herbal supplements, meditation, chiropractic manipulation, and acupuncture are types of complementary and ... useful to include acupuncture along with standard care. Chiropractic provides some benefit for low back pain, however ...

  18. Small sets of complementary observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassl, M.; McNulty, D.; Mišta, L.; Paterek, T.

    2017-01-01

    Two observables are called complementary if preparing a physical object in an eigenstate of one of them yields a completely random result in a measurement of the other. We investigate small sets of complementary observables that cannot be extended by yet another complementary observable. We construct explicit examples of unextendible sets up to dimension 16 and conjecture certain small sets to be unextendible in higher dimensions. Our constructions provide three complementary measurements, only one observable away from the ultimate minimum of two. Almost all our examples in finite dimensions are useful for discriminating pure states from some mixed states, and they help to shed light on the complex topology of the Bloch space of higher-dimensional quantum systems.

  19. Paying for Complementary Health Approaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... to chiropractic or osteopathic manipulation, yoga, meditation, and massage therapy. Out-of-Pocket Spending on Complementary Health ... integrative health practitioners such as chiropractors, acupuncturists, and massage therapists $12.8 billion out-of-pocket on ...

  20. Oncology pain and complementary therapy.

    PubMed

    Running, Alice; Turnbeaugh, Elizabeth

    2011-08-01

    Half of all patients with cancer experience some level of pain, so pain management is an important topic for oncology nurses. Pharmacologic measures traditionally are the primary intervention for bone, visceral, neuropathic, and procedural pain; however, many patients are turning to an integrative approach of Western and complementary therapies for pain and symptom management. The authors explored the current evidence concerning the effectiveness of complementary therapies in relation to cancer pain and symptom control.

  1. Cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    Newton, C.; Hien, T. T.; White, N.

    2000-01-01

    Cerebral malaria may be the most common non-traumatic encephalopathy in the world. The pathogenesis is heterogenous and the neurological complications are often part of a multisystem dysfunction. The clinical presentation and pathophysiology differs between adults and children. Recent studies have elucidated the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis and raised possible interventions. Antimalarial drugs, however, remain the only intervention that unequivocally affects outcome, although increasing resistance to the established antimalarial drugs is of grave concern. Artemisinin derivatives have made an impact on treatment, but other drugs may be required. With appropriate antimalarial drugs, the prognosis of cerebral malaria often depends on the management of other complications—for example, renal failure and acidosis. Neurological sequelae are increasingly recognised, but further research on the pathogenesis of coma and neurological damage is required to develop other ancillary treatments.

 PMID:10990500

  2. Shared pattern of endocranial shape asymmetries among great apes, anatomically modern humans, and fossil hominins.

    PubMed

    Balzeau, Antoine; Gilissen, Emmanuel; Grimaud-Hervé, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Anatomical asymmetries of the human brain are a topic of major interest because of their link with handedness and cognitive functions. Their emergence and occurrence have been extensively explored in human fossil records to document the evolution of brain capacities and behaviour. We quantified for the first time antero-posterior endocranial shape asymmetries in large samples of great apes, modern humans and fossil hominins through analysis of "virtual" 3D models of skull and endocranial cavity and we statistically test for departures from symmetry. Once based on continuous variables, we show that the analysis of these brain asymmetries gives original results that build upon previous analysis based on discrete traits. In particular, it emerges that the degree of petalial asymmetries differs between great apes and hominins without modification of their pattern. We indeed demonstrate the presence of shape asymmetries in great apes, with a pattern similar to modern humans but with a lower variation and a lower degree of fluctuating asymmetry. More importantly, variations in the position of the frontal and occipital poles on the right and left hemispheres would be expected to show some degree of antisymmetry when population distribution is considered, but the observed pattern of variation among the samples is related to fluctuating asymmetry for most of the components of the petalias. Moreover, the presence of a common pattern of significant directional asymmetry for two components of the petalias in hominids implicates that the observed traits were probably inherited from the last common ancestor of extant African great apes and Homo sapiens.These results also have important implications for the possible relationships between endocranial shape asymmetries and functional capacities in hominins. It emphasizes the uncoupling between lateralized activities, some of them well probably distinctive to Homo, and large-scale cerebral lateralization itself, which is not unique

  3. Cerebral cortex: an MRI-based study of volume and variance with age and sex.

    PubMed

    Carne, Ross P; Vogrin, Simon; Litewka, Lucas; Cook, Mark J

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine quantitative differences in lobar cerebral cortical volumes in a healthy adult population. Quantitative volumetric MRI of whole brain, cerebral and cerebellar volumes was performed in a cross-sectional analysis of 97 normal volunteers, with segmented frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital cortical volumes measured in a subgroup of 60 subjects, 30 male and 30 female, matched for age and sex. The right cerebral hemisphere was larger than the left across the study group with a small (<1%) but significant difference in symmetry (P<0.001). No difference was found between volumes of right and left cerebellar hemispheres. Rightward cerebral cortical asymmetry (right larger than left) was found to be significant across all lobes except parietal. Males had greater cerebral, cerebellar and cerebral cortical lobar volumes than females. Larger male cerebral cortical volumes were seen in all lobes except for left parietal. Females had greater left parietal to left cerebral hemisphere and smaller left temporal to left cerebral hemisphere ratios. There was a mild reduction in cerebral volumes with age, more marked in males. This study confirms and augments past work indicating underlying structural asymmetries in the human brain, and provides further evidence that brain structures in humans are differentially sensitive to the effects of both age and sex.

  4. Sulcal variability, stereological measurement and asymmetry of Broca's area on MR images

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Simon Sean; Highley, John Robin; Garcia-Finana, Marta; Sluming, Vanessa; Rezaie, Roozbeh; Roberts, Neil

    2007-01-01

    the shape of the posterior Sylvian fissure as a unilateral right or left upward oblique termination was always associated with leftward or rightward volume asymmetry respectively (P < 0.01). There was no relationship between volume asymmetries of the anterior and posterior speech regions. Our findings illustrate the extent of morphological variability of the anterior speech region and demonstrate the difficulties encountered when determining volumetric asymmetries of the inferior frontal gyrus, particularly when sulci are discontinuous, absent or bifid. When the intrasulcal grey matter of this region is exhaustively sampled according to strict anatomical landmarks, the volume of the pars opercularis is leftward asymmetrical. This manuscript illustrates the importance of simultaneous consideration of brain morphology and morphometry in studies of cerebral asymmetry. PMID:17727624

  5. Cerebral Palsy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 10 Tips for Parents Healthy Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Cerebral ... cerebral Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder that affects muscle tone, movement, and motor skills (the ability to move in a coordinated and ...

  6. Expected dipole asymmetry in CMB polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Namjoo, M.H.; Abolhasani, A.A.; Baghram, S.; Assadullahi, H.; Wands, D.; Firouzjahi, H. E-mail: abolhasani@ipm.ir E-mail: shant.baghramian@gmail.com E-mail: david.wands@port.ac.uk

    2015-05-01

    We explore the hemispherical asymmetry predicted in cosmic microwave background polarization when there is an asymmetry in temperature anisotropies due to primordial perturbations. We consider the cases of asymmetries due to adiabatic and isocurvature modes, and tensor perturbations. We show that the asymmetry in the TE, EE and/or BB correlations can be substantially larger than those in the TT power spectrum in certain cases. The relative asymmetry in the different cross-correlations, as well as the angular scale dependence, can in principle distinguish between different origins for the asymmetry.

  7. Geometric asymmetry driven Janus micromotors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guanjia; Pumera, Martin

    2014-10-07

    The production and application of nano-/micromotors is of great importance. In order for the motors to work, asymmetry in their chemical composition or physical geometry must be present if no external asymmetric field is applied. In this paper, we present a "coconut" micromotor made of platinum through the partial or complete etching of the silica templates. It was shown that although both the inner and outer surfaces are made of the same material (Pt), motion of the structure can be observed as the convex surface is capable of generating oxygen bubbles. This finding shows that not only the chemical asymmetry of the micromotor, but also its geometric asymmetry can lead to fast propulsion of the motor. Moreover, a considerably higher velocity can be seen for partially etched coconut structures than the velocities of Janus or fully etched, shell-like motors. These findings will have great importance on the design of future micromotors.

  8. Rift asymmetry and continental uplift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doglioni, Carlo; Carminati, Eugenio; Bonatti, Enrico

    2003-06-01

    The topography of ocean ridges and rifts show a distinct asymmetry. The eastern sides of the East Pacific Rise, the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and the NW Indian Ridge are, on average, 100-300 m more elevated than the conjugate flank to the west. The asymmetry is maintained when bathymetry is plotted versus the square root of crustal age. A comparable topographic asymmetry occurs in the Red Sea and Baikal rifts where the "eastern" continental shoulders are more elevated. We suggest that depleted and lighter asthenosphere generated below the ocean ridge was shifted "eastward" relative to the lithosphere, determining a density deficit below the eastern flank. The eastward migration of the lighter Atlantic asthenosphere below the African continent could eventually have contributed to the anomalous postrift uplift of Africa. This model suggests that the "westward" drift of the lithosphere relative to the underlying mantle might be a global phenomenon.

  9. Magnetic asymmetries of unmagnetized planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brecht, Stephen H.

    1990-01-01

    This letter discusses the results produced by three-dimensional hybrid particle code simulations of the solar wind interaction with unmagnetized planets such as Venus and Mars. The solar wind velocity is perpendicular to the IMF in the cases studied. It is found that there are asymmetries in both the magnetic structure and shock location for spherical obstacles ranging in radius from 1000 km to 6000 km. The asymmetries found are due to differences in the electron and ion current paths (diamagnetic behavior). Mass loading of 0(+) was not included in these simulations.

  10. Sylvian fissure asymmetries in monozygotic twins: a test of laterality in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bartley, A J; Jones, D W; Torrey, E F; Zigun, J R; Weinberger, D R

    1993-12-15

    To address prior reports that schizophrenia is associated with loss of normal brain asymmetry and that it might be linked to a defect of a gene controlling cerebral lateralization, we measured on three-dimensional cortical renderings from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans the lengths and angles of the sylvian fissures in 10 normal monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs (n = 10 pairs) and in 10 MZ pairs discordant for schizophrenia (n = 10 pairs). We confirmed in both sets of twins the expected normal asymmetries of length and angle of the sylvian fissure. We also confirmed that the length asymmetry occurs solely in the region of the planum temporale. In the discordant twins, affected and unaffected twins did not differ in asymmetry measures, thus failing to support an association between illness per se and diminished asymmetry. Moreover, the discordant twins as a group did not differ from the normal twins as a group, thus failing to confirm the hypothesis of a genetic association with abnormal asymmetry. The implications of variations in methodology and patient samples are discussed.

  11. Hemispheric Asymmetry of Human Brain Anatomical Network Revealed by Diffusion Tensor Tractography

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Ni; Liu, Yaou; Duan, Yunyun; Li, Kuncheng

    2015-01-01

    The topological architecture of the cerebral anatomical network reflects the structural organization of the human brain. Recently, topological measures based on graph theory have provided new approaches for quantifying large-scale anatomical networks. However, few studies have investigated the hemispheric asymmetries of the human brain from the perspective of the network model, and little is known about the asymmetries of the connection patterns of brain regions, which may reflect the functional integration and interaction between different regions. Here, we utilized diffusion tensor imaging to construct binary anatomical networks for 72 right-handed healthy adult subjects. We established the existence of structural connections between any pair of the 90 cortical and subcortical regions using deterministic tractography. To investigate the hemispheric asymmetries of the brain, statistical analyses were performed to reveal the brain regions with significant differences between bilateral topological properties, such as degree of connectivity, characteristic path length, and betweenness centrality. Furthermore, local structural connections were also investigated to examine the local asymmetries of some specific white matter tracts. From the perspective of both the global and local connection patterns, we identified the brain regions with hemispheric asymmetries. Combined with the previous studies, we suggested that the topological asymmetries in the anatomical network may reflect the functional lateralization of the human brain. PMID:26539535

  12. Hemispheric Asymmetry of Human Brain Anatomical Network Revealed by Diffusion Tensor Tractography.

    PubMed

    Shu, Ni; Liu, Yaou; Duan, Yunyun; Li, Kuncheng

    2015-01-01

    The topological architecture of the cerebral anatomical network reflects the structural organization of the human brain. Recently, topological measures based on graph theory have provided new approaches for quantifying large-scale anatomical networks. However, few studies have investigated the hemispheric asymmetries of the human brain from the perspective of the network model, and little is known about the asymmetries of the connection patterns of brain regions, which may reflect the functional integration and interaction between different regions. Here, we utilized diffusion tensor imaging to construct binary anatomical networks for 72 right-handed healthy adult subjects. We established the existence of structural connections between any pair of the 90 cortical and subcortical regions using deterministic tractography. To investigate the hemispheric asymmetries of the brain, statistical analyses were performed to reveal the brain regions with significant differences between bilateral topological properties, such as degree of connectivity, characteristic path length, and betweenness centrality. Furthermore, local structural connections were also investigated to examine the local asymmetries of some specific white matter tracts. From the perspective of both the global and local connection patterns, we identified the brain regions with hemispheric asymmetries. Combined with the previous studies, we suggested that the topological asymmetries in the anatomical network may reflect the functional lateralization of the human brain.

  13. NRZ Data Asymmetry Corrector and Convolutional Encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfiffner, H. J.

    1983-01-01

    Circuit compensates for timing, amplitude and symmetry perturbations. Data asymmetry corrector and convolutional encoder regenerate data and clock signals in spite of signal variations such as data or clock asymmetry, phase errors, and amplitude variations, then encode data for transmission.

  14. Perspectives on asymmetry: the Erickson Lecture.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M Michael

    2012-12-01

    Topics discussed include asymmetry of the brain; prosopagnosia with asymmetric involvement; the blaspheming brain; effects of the numbers of X chromosomes on brain asymmetry; normal facial asymmetry; kissing asymmetry; left- and right-handedness; left-sided baby cradling; Nodal signaling and left/right asymmetry; primary cilium and left/right asymmetry in zebrafish; right/left asymmetry in snails; species differences in Shh and Fgf8; primary cilium in vertebrate asymmetry; Hedgehog signaling on the cilium; Wnt signaling on the cilium; situs solitus, situs inversus, and situs ambiguus (heterotaxy); ciliopathies; right-sided injuries in trilobites; unilateral ocular use in the octopus; fiddler crabs; scale-eating cichlids; narwhals; left-footed parrots; asymmetric whisker use in rats; and right-sided fatigue fractures in greyhounds.

  15. The evolution of a brain abscess the complementary roles of radionuclide (RN) and computed tomography (CT) scans

    SciTech Connect

    Masucci, E.F.; Sauerbrunn, B.J.

    1982-04-01

    Serial /sup 99m/Tc glucoheptonate brain scans demonstrated a brain abscess in a patient from the earliest phase of acute focal encephalitis (cerebritis) through the capsule formation and the recovery phase. The role of the RN and CT scans in the diagnosis of the early stage of cerebritis and the complementary nature of RN and CT scans in intracranial infections, particularly abscesses, are discussed. Guidelines for the use of RN and CT scans are suggested.

  16. Complementary Colours for a Physicist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babic, Vitomir; Cepic, Mojca

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a simple experiment which enables splitting incident light into two different modes, each having a colour exactly complementary to the other. A brief historical development of colour theories and differences in a physicist's point of view with respect to an artist's one is discussed. An experimental system for producing…

  17. Hemispheric Asymmetries and Cognitive Attributes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federico, Pat-Anthony

    Visual, auditory, and bimodal event-related potentials were recorded from 50 males, and lateral asymmetry indices were derived. Eleven psychometric tests of different cognitive attributes were also administered to them. This area of research has been labeled aptitude-treatment-interaction (ATI). The emphasis of ATI research is on identification of…

  18. W asymmetries at CDF and D0

    SciTech Connect

    Schellman, H.

    2010-08-01

    We present recent W and charged lepton asymmetry measurements from the CDF and D0 experiments. Theoretical predictions agree with the CDF W asymmetry, measured using a new matrix element technique. These theoretical predictions are less consistent with the latest lepton asymmetry measurements from D0 and CDF, especially for high charged lepton transverse momentum.

  19. The polarization asymmetry in {gamma}e collisions at the NLC and triple gauge Boson couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, T.G.

    1996-09-01

    The capability of the NLC in the {gamma}e collider mode to probe the CP-conserving {gamma}WW and {gamma}ZZ anomalous couplings through the use of the polarization asymmetry is examined. When combined with other measurements, very strong constraints on both varieties of anomalous couplings can be obtained. The author shows that these bounds are complementary to those that can be extracted from data taken at the LHC.

  20. Geometric asymmetry driven Janus micromotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guanjia; Pumera, Martin

    2014-09-01

    The production and application of nano-/micromotors is of great importance. In order for the motors to work, asymmetry in their chemical composition or physical geometry must be present if no external asymmetric field is applied. In this paper, we present a ``coconut'' micromotor made of platinum through the partial or complete etching of the silica templates. It was shown that although both the inner and outer surfaces are made of the same material (Pt), motion of the structure can be observed as the convex surface is capable of generating oxygen bubbles. This finding shows that not only the chemical asymmetry of the micromotor, but also its geometric asymmetry can lead to fast propulsion of the motor. Moreover, a considerably higher velocity can be seen for partially etched coconut structures than the velocities of Janus or fully etched, shell-like motors. These findings will have great importance on the design of future micromotors.The production and application of nano-/micromotors is of great importance. In order for the motors to work, asymmetry in their chemical composition or physical geometry must be present if no external asymmetric field is applied. In this paper, we present a ``coconut'' micromotor made of platinum through the partial or complete etching of the silica templates. It was shown that although both the inner and outer surfaces are made of the same material (Pt), motion of the structure can be observed as the convex surface is capable of generating oxygen bubbles. This finding shows that not only the chemical asymmetry of the micromotor, but also its geometric asymmetry can lead to fast propulsion of the motor. Moreover, a considerably higher velocity can be seen for partially etched coconut structures than the velocities of Janus or fully etched, shell-like motors. These findings will have great importance on the design of future micromotors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional SEM images, data analysis, Videos S

  1. Selling Complementary Patents: Experimental Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Bjornstad, David J; Santore, Rudy; McKee, Michael

    2010-02-01

    Production requiring licensing groups of complementary patents implements a coordination game among patent holders, who can price patents by choosing among combinations of fixed and royalty fees. Summed across patents, these fees become the total producer cost of the package of patents. Royalties, because they function as excise taxes, add to marginal costs, resulting in higher prices and reduced quantities of the downstream product and lower payoffs to the patent holders. Using fixed fees eliminates this inefficiency but yields a more complex coordination game in which there are multiple equilibria, which are very fragile in that small mistakes can lead the downstream firm to not license the technology, resulting in inefficient outcomes. We report on a laboratory market investigation of the efficiency effects of coordinated pricing of patents in a patent pool. We find that pool-like pricing agreements can yield fewer coordination failures in the pricing of complementary patents.

  2. Complementary hemispheric specialization for language production and visuospatial attention.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qing; Van der Haegen, Lise; Brysbaert, Marc

    2013-01-22

    Language production and spatial attention are the most salient lateralized cerebral functions, and their complementary specialization has been observed in the majority of the population. To investigate whether the complementary specialization has a causal origin (the lateralization of one function causes the opposite lateralization of the other) or rather is a statistical phenomenon (different functions lateralize independently), we determined the lateralization for spatial attention in a group of individuals with known atypical right hemispheric (RH) lateralization for speech production, based on a previous large-scale screening of left-handers. We show that all 13 participants with RH language dominance have left-hemispheric dominance for spatial attention, and all but one of 16 participants with left-hemispheric language dominance are RH dominant for spatial attention. Activity was observed in the dorsal fronto-parietal pathway of attention, including the inferior parietal sulcus and superior parietal lobule, the frontal eye-movement field, and the inferior frontal sulcus/gyrus, and these regions functionally colateralized in the hemisphere dominant for attention, independently of the side of lateralization. Our results clearly support the Causal hypothesis about the complementary specialization, and we speculate that it derives from a longstanding evolutionary origin. We also suggest that the conclusions about lateralization based on an unselected sample of the population and laterality assessment using coarse functional transcranial Doppler sonography should be interpreted with more caution.

  3. [Cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Malagón Valdez, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    The term cerebral palsy (CP), is used for a great number of clinical neurological syndromes. The syndromes are characterized by having a common cause, motor defects. It is important, because they can cause a brain damage by presenting motor defects and some associated deficiencies, such as mental deficiency, epilepsy, language and visual defects and pseudobulbar paralysis, with the non-evolving fact. Some authors prefer using terms such as "non-evolving encephalopathies". In the treatment the utility of prevention programs of early stimulation and special rehabilitation methods, and treatment of associated deficiencies such as epilepsy, mental deficiency, language, audition and visual problems, and the attention deficit improve the prognosis in an important way. The prognosis depends on the severity of the disease and the associated manifestations.

  4. A Drosophila complementary DNA resource

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, Gerald M.; Hong, Ling; Brokstein, Peter; Evans-Holm, Martha; Frise, Erwin; Stapleton, Mark; Harvey, Damon A.

    2000-03-24

    Collections of nonredundant, full-length complementary DNA (cDNA) clones for each of the model organisms and humans will be important resources for studies of gene structure and function. We describe a general strategy for producing such collections and its implementation, which so far has generated a set of cDNAs corresponding to over 40% of the genes in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.

  5. Complementary MLS and GNSS operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Alexander E.; Burcham, Karen L.; McDonald, Keith D.

    A framework for developing complementary roles for the MLS and the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) is established. Emphasis is given to the development by the FAA and the aviation industry of techniques and the infrastructure to support fully integrated MLS and GNSS operations. The operational role of each system is evaluated during each flight phase, and the benefits attributable to reduced delays and optimum routings are discussed.

  6. Planum temporale asymmetry in people who stutter.

    PubMed

    Gough, Patricia M; Connally, Emily L; Howell, Peter; Ward, David; Chesters, Jennifer; Watkins, Kate E

    2017-06-16

    Previous studies have reported that the planum temporale - a language-related structure that normally shows a leftward asymmetry - had reduced asymmetry in people who stutter (PWS) and reversed asymmetry in those with severe stuttering. These findings are consistent with the theory that altered language lateralization may be a cause or consequence of stuttering. Here, we re-examined these findings in a larger sample of PWS. We evaluated planum temporale asymmetry in structural MRI scans obtained from 67 PWS and 63 age-matched controls using: 1) manual measurements of the surface area; 2) voxel-based morphometry to automatically calculate grey matter density. We examined the influences of gender, age, and stuttering severity on planum temporale asymmetry. The size of the planum temporale and its asymmetry were not different in PWS compared with Controls using either the manual or the automated method. Both groups showed a significant leftwards asymmetry on average (about one-third of PWS and Controls showed rightward asymmetry). Importantly, and contrary to previous reports, the degree of asymmetry was not related to stuttering severity. In the manual measurements, women who stutter had a tendency towards rightwards asymmetry but men who stutter showed the same degree of leftwards asymmetry as male Controls. In the automated measurements, Controls showed a significant increase in leftwards asymmetry with age but this relationship was not observed in PWS. We conclude that reduced planum temporale asymmetry is not a prominent feature of the brain in PWS and that the asymmetry is unrelated to stuttering severity. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cerebral glucose consumption following verbal auditory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kushner, M J; Schwartz, R; Alavi, A; Dann, R; Rosen, M; Silver, F; Reivich, M

    1987-04-14

    We studied the effect of auditory stimulation upon cerebral glucose metabolism in young normals. The stimulus consisted of a non-English discourse which was presented monaurally to 10 normal blindfolded subjects (5 left ear, 5 right); the opposite ear was plugged. Six subjects studied blindfolded and with ears plugged served as controls. Sixteen discrete homologous cortical and subcortical regions of interest were examined. Regional glucose consumption and side-to-side differences in glucose metabolism were analyzed. Monaural stimulation produced significant increases in temporal metabolism contralateral to the side of stimulation. Significant asymmetries in metabolism were found at the temporoparietal junction, inferior parietal region, insula and corpus collosum. The left frontal speech areas remained unaffected. These findings demonstrate that in man the primary auditory pathways retain a contralateral organization. Further, cerebral activation induced by non-meaningful verbal stimulation is widespread within the left temporal and parietal regions but does not impact upon the frontal speech cortices.

  8. Motor asymmetry in elite fencers.

    PubMed

    Akpinar, Selcuk; Sainburg, Robert L; Kirazci, Sadettin; Przybyla, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The authors previously reported that asymmetrical patterns of hand preference are updated and modified by present sensorimotor conditions. They examined whether participation in long-term training in the upper extremity sport fencing might modify arm selection and performance asymmetries. Eight fencers and eight nonfencers performed reaching movements under 3 experimental conditions: (a) nonchoice right, (b) nonchoice left, and (c) choice, either right or left arm as selected by subject. The nonchoice conditions allowed assessment of potential interlimb differences in movement performance, while the choice condition allowed assessment of the frequency and pattern of arm selection across subject groups. Our findings showed that the athlete group showed substantially greater symmetry in the performance and selection measures. These findings suggest that arm selection and performance asymmetries can be altered by intense long-term practice.

  9. Directional and fluctuating asymmetry in finger and a-b ridge counts in psychosis: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Sukanta; Loesch, Danuta; Chant, David; Welham, Joy; El-Saadi, Ossama; Fañanás, Lourdes; Mowry, Bryan; McGrath, John

    2003-01-01

    Background Several studies have reported alterations in finger and a-b ridge counts, and their derived measures of asymmetry, in schizophrenia compared to controls. Because ridges are fully formed by the end of the second trimester, they may provide clues to disturbed early development. The aim of this study was to assess these measures in a sample of patients with psychosis and normal controls. Methods Individuals with psychosis (n = 240), and normal controls (n = 228) were drawn from a catchment-area case-control study. Differences in finger and a-b ridge count and Fluctuating Asymmetry were assessed in three group comparisons (non-affective psychosis versus controls; affective psychosis versus controls; non-affective psychosis versus affective psychosis). The analyses were performed separately for males and females. Results There were no significant group differences for finger nor a-b ridge counts. While there were no group difference for Directional Asymmetry, for Fluctuating Asymmetry measures men with non-affective psychosis had significantly higher fluctuating asymmetry of the index finger ridge count (a) when compared to controls (FA-correlation score, p = 0.02), and (b) when compared to affective psychosis (adjusted FA-difference score, p = 0.04). Conclusion Overall, measures of finger and a-b ridge counts, and their derived measures of directional and fluctuating asymmetry were not prominent features of psychosis in this sample. While directional asymmetry in cerebral morphology is reduced in schizophrenia, this is not reflected in dermatoglyphic variables. PMID:12659652

  10. Brain Responses and Information Processing IV. Investigations of Hemispheric Asymmetry in Event Related Potentials and Performance during Discrimination of Line Orientation, Color, Shape and under Visual Masking.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-30

    which addressed developmental aspects of male -female cerebral lateralization (Molfese, 1973; Rudel et al., 1974; Wittelson, 1975) and others on adults ...and horizontal visual coordinates in man. Science, 1970, 167, 386-387. Molfese, D.L. Cerebral asymmetry in infnats, children, and adults : Auditory...perception and eye muscle balance (strabismus). We found that 4° vi approximately 14% of our young adult sample had eye muscle imbalance. The

  11. Nanocrystal Bioassembly: Asymmetry, Proximity, and Enzymatic Manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Claridge, Shelley A.

    2008-05-01

    Research at the interface between biomolecules and inorganic nanocrystals has resulted in a great number of new discoveries. In part this arises from the synergistic duality of the system: biomolecules may act as self-assembly agents for organizing inorganic nanocrystals into functional materials; alternatively, nanocrystals may act as microscopic or spectroscopic labels for elucidating the behavior of complex biomolecular systems. However, success in either of these functions relies heavily uponthe ability to control the conjugation and assembly processes.In the work presented here, we first design a branched DNA scaffold which allows hybridization of DNA-nanocrystal monoconjugates to form discrete assemblies. Importantly, the asymmetry of the branched scaffold allows the formation of asymmetric2assemblies of nanocrystals. In the context of a self-assembled device, this can be considered a step toward the ability to engineer functionally distinct inputs and outputs.Next we develop an anion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography purification method which allows large gold nanocrystals attached to single strands of very short DNA to be purified. When two such complementary conjugates are hybridized, the large nanocrystals are brought into close proximity, allowing their plasmon resonances to couple. Such plasmon-coupled constructs are of interest both as optical interconnects for nanoscale devices and as `plasmon ruler? biomolecular probes.We then present an enzymatic ligation strategy for creating multi-nanoparticle building blocks for self-assembly. In constructing a nanoscale device, such a strategy would allow pre-assembly and purification of components; these constructs can also act as multi-label probes of single-stranded DNA conformational dynamics. Finally we demonstrate a simple proof-of-concept of a nanoparticle analog of the polymerase chain reaction.

  12. Corticospinal tract asymmetry and handedness in right- and left-handers by diffusion tensor tractography

    PubMed Central

    Seizeur, Romuald; Magro, Elsa; Prima, Sylvain; Wiest-Daesslé, Nicolas; Maumet, Camille; Morandi, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cerebral hemispheres represent both structural and functional asymmetry, which differs among right- and left-handers. The left hemisphere is specialized for language and task execution of the right hand in right-handers. We studied the corticospinal tract in right- and left-handers by diffusion tensor imaging and tractography. The present study was aimed at revealing a morphological difference resulting from a region of interest (ROI) obtained by functional MRI (fMRI). Methods Twenty-five healthy participants (right-handed: 15, left-handed: 10) were enrolled in our assessment of morphological, functional and diffusion tensor MRI. Assessment of brain fibre reconstruction (tractography) was done using a deterministic algorithm. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were studied on the tractography traces of the reference slices. Results We observed a significant difference in number of leftward fibres based on laterality. The significant difference in regard to FA and MD was based on the slices obtained at different levels and the laterality index. We found left hand asymmetry and right hand asymmetry respectively for the MD and FA. Conclusions Our study showed the presence of hemispheric asymmetry based on laterality index in right- and left-handers. These results are inconsistent with some studies and consistent with others. The reported difference in hemispheric asymmetry could be related to dexterity (manual skill). PMID:23807198

  13. Corticospinal tract asymmetry and handedness in right- and left-handers by diffusion tensor tractography.

    PubMed

    Seizeur, Romuald; Magro, Elsa; Prima, Sylvain; Wiest-Daesslé, Nicolas; Maumet, Camille; Morandi, Xavier

    2014-03-01

    Cerebral hemispheres represent both structural and functional asymmetry, which differs among right- and left-handers. The left hemisphere is specialised for language and task execution of the right hand in right-handers. We studied the corticospinal tract in right- and left-handers by diffusion tensor imaging and tractography. The present study aimed at revealing a morphological difference resulting from a region of interest (ROI) obtained by functional MRI (fMRI). Twenty-five healthy participants (right-handed: 15, left-handed: 10) were enrolled in our assessment of morphological, functional and diffusion tensor MRI. Assessment of brain fibre reconstruction (tractography) was done using a deterministic algorithm. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were studied on the tractography traces of the reference slices. We observed a significant difference in number of leftward fibres based on laterality. The significant difference in regard to FA and MD was based on the slices obtained at different levels and the laterality index. We found left-hand asymmetry and right-hand asymmetry, respectively, for the MD and FA. Our study showed the presence of hemispheric asymmetry based on laterality index in right- and left-handers. These results are inconsistent with some studies and consistent with others. The reported difference in hemispheric asymmetry could be related to dexterity (manual skill).

  14. Plant secondary compounds as complementary resources: are they always complementary?

    PubMed

    Copani, G; Hall, J O; Miller, J; Priolo, A; Villalba, J J

    2013-08-01

    Generalist herbivores typically grow better on mixed- than on single-component diets. This response has been attributed to food complementarities that either enhance the utilization of nutrients or dilute the negative impacts of plant secondary compounds (PSC). For instance, when animals choose between foods that contain diverse PSC, they eat more than animals offered a food that contains just one PSC. In addition to their negative impacts on herbivore fitness, recent evidence suggests that at appropriate doses PSC may provide beneficial effects to herbivores (i.e., by reducing parasitic infections). Thus, complementarities among diverse PSC may not only influence an herbivore's ability to consume food but also reduce the incidence of disease. We assessed the complementary effects of two PSC by offering sheep (Ovis aries) a choice of foods containing condensed tannins and saponins while challenged with a parasitic (Haemonchus contortus) infection. Animals offered a choice ate more than animals just offered tannins or saponins in single rations. However, sheep offered choices displayed greater fecal egg counts (an indirect measurement of parasitic burdens) than sheep offered single rations. Thus, saponin- and tannin-containing foods were complementary resources regarding nutrient intake but antagonistic regarding effects on parasitic loads. The nature of the relationship among PSC may depend on the dimension (i.e., nutrient intake, disease) where the interaction occurs. A unifying currency such as growth or reproductive output may help understand the trade-offs between costs (disease) and benefits (nutrient and medicine intake) for herbivores grazing multiple PSC.

  15. The Use of Complementary and Alternative Therapies by the Families of Children with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickel, Robert E.; Gerlach, Elizabeth King

    2001-01-01

    This article presents a model for communication among providers and families of children with disabilities about complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). It discusses treatments for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and cerebral palsy, including the Feingold diet, herbal treatments, CranioSacral therapy, therapeutic…

  16. The Use of Complementary and Alternative Therapies by the Families of Children with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickel, Robert E.; Gerlach, Elizabeth King

    2001-01-01

    This article presents a model for communication among providers and families of children with disabilities about complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). It discusses treatments for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and cerebral palsy, including the Feingold diet, herbal treatments, CranioSacral therapy, therapeutic…

  17. Complementary feeding patterns in India.

    PubMed

    Kuriyan, R; Kurpad, A V

    2012-10-01

    There are far too many children in the world who suffer from under-nutrition and growth faltering, with life time consequences such as reduced work capacity, increased infections, impaired intellectual performance and an increased risk of non communicable diseases later in life. These changes occur early in life, and consequently, complementary feeding has been receiving increased attention in the international nutrition community. In India, common problems relate not only to insufficient breastfeeding, but also to detrimental feeding practices. Only about 20% of children aged 6-23 months were fed according to the three recommended Infant and Child Feeding practices. The most common types of solid or semi-solid foods fed to both breastfeeding and non-breastfeeding children under 3 years of age were foods made from grains and roots. These complementary feeding practices were found to be significantly associated with poor socioeconomic status, undesirable socio-cultural beliefs, maternal illiteracy, and ignorance. Although many initiatives have been carried out in India to promote Infant and Young Child Feeding, the progress in reducing the number of undernourished children in India over the last decade has been slow and modest. Equally, with the growing evidence and interest in the role of infant nutrition in the development of over nutrition and non-communicable disease, it is important to plan appropriate complementary feeding interventions that result in optimal growth. Contact opportunities with parents, specifically mothers, must be used for counseling through multiple communication channels such as local media, in order to constantly educate the population with consistent and simple messages on child feeding. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Neurophysiological origin of human brain asymmetry for speech and language.

    PubMed

    Morillon, Benjamin; Lehongre, Katia; Frackowiak, Richard S J; Ducorps, Antoine; Kleinschmidt, Andreas; Poeppel, David; Giraud, Anne-Lise

    2010-10-26

    The physiological basis of human cerebral asymmetry for language remains mysterious. We have used simultaneous physiological and anatomical measurements to investigate the issue. Concentrating on neural oscillatory activity in speech-specific frequency bands and exploring interactions between gestural (motor) and auditory-evoked activity, we find, in the absence of language-related processing, that left auditory, somatosensory, articulatory motor, and inferior parietal cortices show specific, lateralized, speech-related physiological properties. With the addition of ecologically valid audiovisual stimulation, activity in auditory cortex synchronizes with left-dominant input from the motor cortex at frequencies corresponding to syllabic, but not phonemic, speech rhythms. Our results support theories of language lateralization that posit a major role for intrinsic, hardwired perceptuomotor processing in syllabic parsing and are compatible both with the evolutionary view that speech arose from a combination of syllable-sized vocalizations and meaningful hand gestures and with developmental observations suggesting phonemic analysis is a developmentally acquired process.

  19. Exploratory voxel-based analysis of diffusion indices and hemispheric asymmetry in normal aging.

    PubMed

    Ardekani, Siamak; Kumar, Anand; Bartzokis, George; Sinha, Usha

    2007-02-01

    Age-related microstructural changes in brain white matter can be studied by utilizing indices derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI): apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA). The objective of this study is to examine alterations in FA and ADC by employing exploratory voxel-based analysis (VBA) and region(s) of interest (ROI)-based analysis. A highly nonlinear registration algorithm was used to align the ADC and FA image volumes of different subjects to perform accurate voxel-level statistics for two age groups, as well as for hemispheric asymmetry for both age groups. VBA shows significant age-related decline in FA with frontal predominance (frontal white matter, and genu and anterior body of the corpus callosum), superior portions of a splenium and highly oriented fibers of the posterior limb of the internal capsule and the anterior and posterior limbs of the external capsule. Hemispheric asymmetry of FA, as assessed by VBA, showed that for the young-age group, significant right-greater-than-left asymmetry exists in the genu, splenium and body of the corpus callosum and that left-greater-than-right asymmetry exists in the anterior limb of the external capsule and in the posterior limb of the internal capsule, thalamus, cerebral peduncle and temporal-parietal regions. VBA of the hemispheric asymmetry of the middle-age group revealed much less asymmetry. Regions showing age-related changes and hemispheric asymmetry from VBA were, for a majority of the findings, in conformance with ROI analysis and with the known pattern of development and age-related degradation of fiber tracks. The study shows the feasibility of the VBA of DTI indices for exploratory investigations of subtle differences in population cohorts, especially when findings are not localized and/or known a priori.

  20. The Cerebral Palsy Demonstration Project: a multidimensional research approach to cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Shevell, Michael; Miller, Steven P; Scherer, Stephen W; Yager, Jerome Y; Fehlings, Michael G

    2011-03-01

    Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of physical impairment in pediatrics. As a heterogeneous disorder in all its disparate aspects it defies a simplistic research approach that seeks to further our understanding of its mechanisms, outcomes and treatments. Within NeuroDevNet, with its focus on abnormal brain development, cerebral palsy was selected as one of the three neurodevelopmental disabilities to be the focus of a dedicated demonstration project. The Cerebral Palsy Demonstration Project will feature a multi-dimensional approach utilizing epidemiologic, imaging, genetics, animal models and stem cell modalities that will at all times emphasize clinical relevance, translation into practice, and potential synergies between investigators now segregated by both academic disciplines and geographic distance. The objective is to create a national platform of varied complementary and inter-digitated efforts. The specific research plan to enable this will be outlined in detail. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Complementary therapies for cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Cassileth, Barrie; Trevisan, Carrie; Gubili, Jyothirmai

    2007-08-01

    Pharmacologic treatment of pain does not always meet patients' needs and may produce difficult side effects. Complementary therapies, which are safe, noninvasive, and generally considered to be relatively free of toxicity, may be used adjunctively with standard pain management techniques to improve outcome and reduce the need for prescription medication. Approaches such as acupuncture, massage therapy, mind-body interventions, and music therapy effectively reduce pain, enhance quality of life, and provide patients with the opportunity to participate in their own care. Such therapies have an important role in modern pain management.

  2. Conjectured Strong Complementary Information Tradeoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renes, Joseph M.; Boileau, Jean-Christian

    2009-07-01

    We conjecture a new entropic uncertainty principle governing the entropy of complementary observations made on a system given side information in the form of quantum states, generalizing the entropic uncertainty relation of Maassen and Uffink [Phys. Rev. Lett. 60, 1103 (1988)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.60.1103]. We prove a special case for certain conjugate observables by adapting a similar result found by Christandl and Winter pertaining to quantum channels [IEEE Trans. Inf. Theory 51, 3159 (2005)IETTAW0018-944810.1109/TIT.2005.853338], and discuss possible applications of this result to the decoupling of quantum systems and for security analysis in quantum cryptography.

  3. Cerebral glucose metabolism in Wernicke's, Broca's, and conduction aphasia

    SciTech Connect

    Metter, E.J.; Kempler, D.; Jackson, C.; Hanson, W.R.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Phelps, M.E.

    1989-01-01

    Cerebral glucose metabolism was evaluated in patients with either Wernicke's (N = 7), Broca's (N = 11), or conduction (N = 10) aphasia using /sup 18/F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose with positron emission tomography. The three aphasic syndromes differed in the degree of left-to-right frontal metabolic asymmetry, with Broca's aphasia showing severe asymmetry and Wernicke's aphasia mild-to-moderate metabolic asymmetry, while patients with conduction aphasia were metabolically symmetric. On the other hand, the three syndromes showed the same degree of metabolic decline in the left temporal region. The parietal region appeared to separate conduction aphasia from both Broca's and Wernicke's aphasias. Common aphasic features in the three syndromes appear to be due to common changes in the temporal region, while unique features were associated with frontal and parietal metabolic differences.

  4. Thyroid Disease and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Alternative Medicine in Thyroid Disease Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Thyroid Disease (CAM) WHAT IS COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE (CAM)? Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) is defined ...

  5. Condylar-mandibular asymmetry, a reality.

    PubMed

    Boratto, R; Gambardella, U; Micheletti, P; Pagliani, L; Preda, L; Hansson, T L

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the possibility to recognize a condylar-mandibular asymmetry through a panoramic radiograph. Results from a previous work, in which 100 skulls from the Museum of the Institute of Anatomy of the University of Pavia were studied and measured, showed the presence of asymmetry. Using the same skulls we examined the possible correlation between morphological and radiological data. We did not find out correlation's between the condylar asymmetry evaluated at the anatomical level and the radiological asymmetry which was indeed found. This is probably due to the different positioning of the jaws during the two different measuring processes. Nevertheless our results confirm the daily experience of dentistry: asymmetry of mandibular condyle can be one of the mayor causes for the asymmetry of the stomatognatic apparatus.

  6. Write field asymmetry in perpendicular magnetic recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhanjie; Bai, Daniel Z.; Lin, Ed; Mao, Sining

    2012-04-01

    We present a systematic study of write field asymmetry by using micromagnetic modeling for a perpendicular magnetic recording (PMR) writer structure. Parameters investigated include initial magnetization condition, write current amplitude, write current frequency, and initial write current polarity. It is found that the write current amplitude and frequency (data rate) are the dominant factors that impact the field asymmetry. Lower write current amplitude and higher write current frequency will deteriorate the write field asymmetry, causing recording performance (such as bit error rate) degradation.

  7. Structural asymmetry of the insula is linked to the lateralization of gesture and language

    PubMed Central

    Biduła, Szymon P; Króliczak, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    The control of gesture is one of the most left-lateralized functions, and the insular cortex is one of the most left-biased structures in the human brain. Therefore, we investigated whether structural asymmetries of the insula are linked to the organization of functional activity during gesture planning. We reconstructed and parcellated the insular cortex of 27 participants. First, we tested 15 strongly left-handed individuals because of a higher incidence of atypical organization of functions such as gesture and language in such a population. The inter-hemispheric structural asymmetries were compared with the lateralization of activity for gesture in the supramarginal gyrus (the hotspot of signal increase regardless of the gesturing hand) and Broca’s area (the hotspot of signal increase for language production). The more pronounced leftward structural asymmetries were accompanied by greater left-hemisphere dominance for both of the studied functions. Conversely, an atypical, bilateral or rightward functional shift of gesture and language was accompanied by an attenuated leftward asymmetry of the insula. These significant relationships were driven primarily by differences in surface area. Subsequently, by adding 12 right-handed individuals to these analyses we demonstrated that the observed significant associations are generalizable to the population. These results provide the first demonstration of the relationships between structural inter-hemispheric differences of the insula and the cerebral specialization for gesture. They also corroborate the link between insular asymmetries and language lateralization. As such, these outcomes are relevant to the common cerebral specialization for gesture and language. PMID:25858359

  8. United Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... stay up to date with everything UCP! Affiliate Network UCP affiliates provide services and support on a ... with Cerebral Palsy and other disabilities and their networks. Individuals with cerebral palsy and other disabilities deserve ...

  9. Cerebral Palsy (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Kids > Cerebral Palsy A A A ... the things that kids do every day. What's CP? Some kids with CP use wheelchairs and others ...

  10. Discharge Asymmetry in Delta Bifurcations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, G.; Paola, C.; Voller, V. R.

    2015-12-01

    Distributary networks are formed by channels which bifurcate downstream in a river delta. Sediment and water fluxes are often split unequally in delta bifurcations. Understanding flux asymmetry in distributary networks is important for predicting how a delta will respond to sea-level rise. We present results of a quasi-1D model of a delta bifurcation. Consistent with previous results, in the absence of deposition, stable bifurcations may be either symmetric or asymmetric, depending on flow conditions. However, in a depositional setting, a stable asymmetric flow partitioning is no longer possible, as the dominant branch becomes less and less steep relative to the other branch. This feedback eventually causes the second branch to become favored. For the depositional case, we identify three regimes of bifurcation behavior: 1) stable symmetric bifurcation, 2) "soft" avulsions where the dominant branch switches without complete abandonment of the previous channel, and 3) complete avulsions where one branch is completely abandoned. In each case, the bifurcation is symmetric in the long-term average, but the latter two allow for short-term asymmetry. We find that keeping upstream sediment and water discharges fixed, as downstream channel length increases the regime shifts from symmetric to soft avulsions to complete avulsions. In the two avulsion regimes we examine the effect of upstream sediment and water discharges and downstream channel length on avulsion period and maximum discharge ratio. Finally, we compare numerical modeling results to a fixed-wall bifurcation experiment. As in the numerical model, the presence or absence of a downstream sink exerts a strong control on system behavior. If a sink is present, a bifurcation may be asymmetric indefinitely. Conversely, without a sink the system is depositional, and the feedback between sediment discharge asymmetry and slope causes the bifurcation to remain symmetric in the long-term average.

  11. On perturbative azimuthal asymmetry at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Rezaeian, A. H.

    2008-10-13

    We investigate the azimuthal asymmetry of partons and photons produced at the initial stage of nuclear collisions at the RHIC energy originating from quark-nucleus collisions. In our approach, the azimuthal asymmetry results from the correlation between color dipole orientation and impact parameter of the collision. The asymmetry is sensitive to the rapid variation of the nuclear density at the nuclear periphery. We either introduce the color-dipole orientation into the improved Born approximation, or model the dipole partial amplitude which satisfies available DIS data. We conclude that the azimuthal asymmetry coming from these mechanisms can be sizable.

  12. Measuring Asymmetry in Time-Stamped Phylogenies.

    PubMed

    Dearlove, Bethany L; Frost, Simon D W

    2015-07-01

    Previous work has shown that asymmetry in viral phylogenies may be indicative of heterogeneity in transmission, for example due to acute HIV infection or the presence of 'core groups' with higher contact rates. Hence, evidence of asymmetry may provide clues to underlying population structure, even when direct information on, for example, stage of infection or contact rates, are missing. However, current tests of phylogenetic asymmetry (a) suffer from false positives when the tips of the phylogeny are sampled at different times and (b) only test for global asymmetry, and hence suffer from false negatives when asymmetry is localised to part of a phylogeny. We present a simple permutation-based approach for testing for asymmetry in a phylogeny, where we compare the observed phylogeny with random phylogenies with the same sampling and coalescence times, to reduce the false positive rate. We also demonstrate how profiles of measures of asymmetry calculated over a range of evolutionary times in the phylogeny can be used to identify local asymmetry. In combination with different metrics of asymmetry, this combined approach offers detailed insights of how phylogenies reconstructed from real viral datasets may deviate from the simplistic assumptions of commonly used coalescent and birth-death process models.

  13. Quantum speed limits, coherence, and asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvian, Iman; Spekkens, Robert W.; Zanardi, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    The resource theory of asymmetry is a framework for classifying and quantifying the symmetry-breaking properties of both states and operations relative to a given symmetry. In the special case where the symmetry is the set of translations generated by a fixed observable, asymmetry can be interpreted as coherence relative to the observable eigenbasis, and the resource theory of asymmetry provides a framework to study this notion of coherence. We here show that this notion of coherence naturally arises in the context of quantum speed limits. Indeed, the very concept of speed of evolution, i.e., the inverse of the minimum time it takes the system to evolve to another (partially) distinguishable state, is a measure of asymmetry relative to the time translations generated by the system Hamiltonian. Furthermore, the celebrated Mandelstam-Tamm and Margolus-Levitin speed limits can be interpreted as upper bounds on this measure of asymmetry by functions which are themselves measures of asymmetry in the special case of pure states. Using measures of asymmetry that are not restricted to pure states, such as the Wigner-Yanase skew information, we obtain extensions of the Mandelstam-Tamm bound which are significantly tighter in the case of mixed states. We also clarify some confusions in the literature about coherence and asymmetry, and show that measures of coherence are a proper subset of measures of asymmetry.

  14. Dimensional and discrete dental trait asymmetry relationships.

    PubMed

    Mayhall, J T; Saunders, S R

    1986-03-01

    Inuit (Eskimos) from the Foxe Basin region of the Northwest Territories, Canada, were studied to ascertain the amount of dimensional and morphological asymmetry in their dentitions. The results indicate that dimensional asymmetry does not appear to be greater on either the maxillary or mandibular teeth. Both types of asymmetry show partial conformity to the model of tooth fields with an increasing amount of asymmetry as one goes distally in each tooth group. The morphological asymmetry exception, the mandibular incisors, follows Dahlberg's "Field Concept." Rank-order correlations between the amount of dimensional asymmetry and morphological asymmetry reveal no detectable patterns. There appear to be no associations between the presence or absence of morphological asymmetry and the size of the tooth. This lack of association might be explained by differences in developmental timing of tooth dimensions and morphological traits; however, such a hypothesis requires experimental testing. In this population and those for which published results are available, it is practically impossible to overcome the "noise" level and test recent hypotheses regarding random dental asymmetry.

  15. Jet vectoring through nozzle asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, Chris; Rosakis, Alexandros; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-11-01

    Previously, we explored the functionality of a tri-leaflet anal valve of a dragonfly larva. We saw that the dragonfly larva is capable of controlling the three leaflets independently to asymmetrically open the nozzle. Such control resulted in vectoring of the jet in various directions. To further understand the effect of asymmetric nozzle orifice, we tested jet flow through circular asymmetric nozzles. We report the relationship between nozzle asymmetry and redirecting of the jet at various Reynolds numbers. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CBET-1511414; additional support by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1144469.

  16. UV Observations of Hemispheric Asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, R. K.; Paxton, L. J.; Wolven, B. C.; Zhang, Y.; Romeo, G.

    2015-12-01

    Asymmetry in the auroral patterns can be an important diagnostic for understanding the dynamics of solar wind interaction with the magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere system (e.g., Newel and Meng, 1998; Fillingrim et al., 2005). Molecular nitrogen emission in the UV Lyman-Birge-Hopfield bands can be used to determine energy flux and electron mean energy (Sotirelis, et al, 2013) and thereby Hall and Pederson integrated conductances (Gjerloev, et al., 2014). UV imagery provided by the 4 SSUSI instruments on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F16-F19 spacecraft provide two dimensional maps of this emission at different local times. Often there are near simultaneous observations of both poles by some combination of the satellites. (see figure 1) The SSUSI auroral data products are well suited to this study, as they have the following features.: - dayglow has been subtracted on dayside aurora - electron energy flux and mean energy are pre-calculated - individual arcs have been identified through image processing. In order to intercompare data from multiple satellites, we must first ensure that the instrument calibrations are consistent. In this work we show that the instruments are consistently calibrated, and that results generated from the SSUSI data products can be trusted. Several examples of storm time asymmetries captured by the SSUSI instruments will be discussed. Fillingim, M. O., G. K. Parks, H. U. Frey, T. J. Immel, and S. B. Mende (2005), Hemispheric asymmetry of the afternoon electron aurora, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L03113, doi:10.1029/2004GL021635. Gjerloev, J., Schaefer, R., Paxton, L, and Zhang, Y. (2014), A comprehensive empirical model of the ionospheric conductivity derived from SSUSI/GUVI, SuperMAG and SuperDARN data, SM51G-4339, Fall 2014 AGU meeting, San Francisco. Newell, P. T., and C.-I. Meng (1988), Hemispherical asymmetry in cusp precipitation near solstices, J. Geophys. Res., 93(A4), 2643-2648, doi:10.1029/JA093iA04p02643

  17. Induction of asymmetry into homodimers.

    PubMed

    Bardsley, B; Cho, Y R; Westwell, M S; Williams, D H

    1998-01-01

    The self-regulation of biological signalling receptors via homodimerization is discussed in relation to the symmetry changes occurring when these receptors bind their target ligand. The idea of positive and negative cooperativity between dimerization and ligand binding, mediated by changes in the symmetry of the system as a source of signalling control is considered; an analogy made with the homodimerization of a glycopeptide antibiotic, ristocetin A, which displays negative cooperativity. Finally, the regulation of the bacterial aspartate receptor and the human growth hormone receptor is discussed as a function of ligand-induced asymmetry.

  18. Regional differences in cortical electroencephalogram (EEG) slow wave activity and interhemispheric EEG asymmetry in the fur seal.

    PubMed

    Lyamin, Oleg I; Pavlova, Ivetta F; Kosenko, Peter O; Mukhametov, Lev M; Siegel, Jerome M

    2012-12-01

    Slow wave sleep (SWS) in the northern fur seal (Callorhinus ursinus) is characterized by a highly expressed interhemispheric electroencephalogram (EEG) asymmetry, called 'unihemispheric' or 'asymmetrical' SWS. The aim of this study was to examine the regional differences in slow wave activity (SWA; power in the range of 1.2-4.0 Hz) within one hemisphere and differences in the degree of interhemispheric EEG asymmetry within this species. Three seals were implanted with 10 EEG electrodes, positioned bilaterally (five in each hemisphere) over the frontal, occipital and parietal cortex. The expression of interhemispheric SWA asymmetry between symmetrical monopolar recordings was estimated based on the asymmetry index [AI = (L-R)/(L+R), where L and R are the power in the left and right hemispheres, respectively]. Our findings indicate an anterior-posterior gradient in SWA during asymmetrical SWS in fur seals, which is opposite to that described for other mammals, including humans, with a larger SWA recorded in the parietal and occipital cortex. Interhemispheric EEG asymmetry in fur seals was recorded across the entire dorsal cerebral cortex, including sensory (visual and somatosensory), motor and associative (parietal or suprasylvian) cortical areas. The expression of asymmetry was greatest in occipital-lateral and parietal derivations and smallest in frontal-medial derivations. Regardless of regional differences in SWA, the majority (90%) of SWS episodes with interhemispheric EEG asymmetry meet the criteria for 'unihemispheric SWS' (one hemisphere is asleep while the other is awake). The remaining episodes can be described as episodes of bilateral SWS with a local activation in one cerebral hemisphere.

  19. Sensitivity and Source of Amine Proton EXchange (APEX) and Amide Proton Transfer (APT) MRI in Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Xiaopeng; Wang, Ping; Kim, Seong-Gi; Jin, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Amide proton transfer (APT) and amine-water proton exchange (APEX) can be viable to map pH-decreasing ischemic regions. However, their exact contributions are unclear. Methods We measured APEX- and APT-weighted magnetization transfer ratio asymmetry (denoted as APEXw and APTw), ADC, T2 and T1 images, and localized proton spectra in rats with permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion at 9.4 T. Phantoms and theoretical studies were also performed. Results Within one hour post-occlusion, APEXw and APTw maps showed hyperintensity (3.1% of M0) and hypointensity (−1.8%), respectively, in regions with decreased ADC. Ischemia increased lactate and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentrations, but decreased glutamate and taurine concentrations. Over time, the APEXw contrast decreased with glutamate, taurine and creatine, while the APTw contrast and lactate level were similar. Phantom and theoretical studies suggest that the source of APEXw signal is mainly from proteins at normal pH, while at decreased pH, GABA and glutamate contributions increase, inducing the positive APEXw contrast in ischemic regions. The APTw contrast is sensitive to lactate concentration and pH, but contaminated from contributions of the faster amine-water proton exchange processes. Conclusion Positive APEXw contrast is more sensitive to ischemia than negative APTw contrast. They may provide complementary tissue metabolic information. PMID:23401310

  20. Complementary examinations other than neuroimaging and neurosonology in acute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià; Obach, Víctor; Sánchez, Maria José; Massons, Joan

    2017-01-01

    The etiologic diagnosis of cerebrovascular diseases requires non-routine complementary examinations to be performed. Thus, in specific cases, after neuroimaging (computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging cerebral scan sequences) and neurosonology (Doppler test of the supra-aortic trunks, transcranial echography and echocardiography), which academically allow us to classify the patients according to their etiologic stroke subtype, further examinations must be used to make a correct etiologic diagnostic. The present review aims to update knowledge about the usefulness of the different tests of blood and urine, plain chest radiography, X-ray of the spine, skull and abdomen, lumbar puncture, electroencephalography, evoked potentials, polysomnography, and pathologic examination after biopsy of the artery, skin, muscles, nerves, meninges, and brain, in the management of patients who have suffered an acute stroke. PMID:28685132

  1. Cerebral Palsy (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CPR: A Real Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Kids > Cerebral Palsy Print A A A What's in this article? ... the first word you spoke? For kids with cerebral palsy, called CP for short, taking a first step ...

  2. Aging and Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Networker, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This special edition of "The Networker" contains several articles focusing on aging and cerebral palsy (CP). "Aging and Cerebral Palsy: Pathways to Successful Aging" (Jenny C. Overeynder) reports on the National Invitational Colloquium on Aging and Cerebral Palsy held in April 1993. "Observations from an Observer" (Kathleen K. Barrett) describes…

  3. Asymmetry within and around the human planum temporale is sexually dimorphic and influenced by genes involved in steroid hormone receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Guadalupe, Tulio; Zwiers, Marcel P; Wittfeld, Katharina; Teumer, Alexander; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Hoogman, Martine; Hagoort, Peter; Fernandez, Guillen; Buitelaar, Jan; van Bokhoven, Hans; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Völzke, Henry; Franke, Barbara; Fisher, Simon E; Grabe, Hans J; Francks, Clyde

    2015-01-01

    The genetic determinants of cerebral asymmetries are unknown. Sex differences in asymmetry of the planum temporale (PT), that overlaps Wernicke's classical language area, have been inconsistently reported. Meta-analysis of previous studies has suggested that publication bias established this sex difference in the literature. Using probabilistic definitions of cortical regions we screened over the cerebral cortex for sexual dimorphisms of asymmetry in 2337 healthy subjects, and found the PT to show the strongest sex-linked asymmetry of all regions, which was supported by two further datasets, and also by analysis with the FreeSurfer package that performs automated parcellation of cerebral cortical regions. We performed a genome-wide association scan (GWAS) meta-analysis of PT asymmetry in a pooled sample of 3095 subjects, followed by a candidate-driven approach which measured a significant enrichment of association in genes of the 'steroid hormone receptor activity' and 'steroid metabolic process' pathways. Variants in the genes and pathways identified may affect the role of the PT in language cognition.

  4. Fluctuating asymmetry and psychometric intelligence.

    PubMed Central

    Furlow, F B; Armijo-Prewitt, T; Gangestad, S W; Thornhill, R

    1997-01-01

    Little is known about the genetic nature of human psychometric intelligence (IQ), but it is widely assumed that IQ's heritability is at loci for intelligence per se. We present evidence consistent with a hypothesis that interindividual IQ differences are partly due to heritable vulnerabilities to environmental sources of developmental stress, an indirect genetic mechanism for the heritability of IQ. Using fluctuating asymmetry (FA) of the body (the asymmetry resulting from errors in the development of normally symmetrical bilateral traits under stressful conditions), we estimated the relative developmental instability of 112 undergraduates and administered to them Cattell's culture fair intelligence test (CFIT). A subsequent replication on 128 students was performed. In both samples, FA correlated negatively and significantly with CFIT scores. We propose two non-mutually exclusive physiological explanations for this correlation. First, external body FA may correlate negatively with the developmental integrity of the brain. Second, individual energy budget allocations and/or low metabolic efficiency in high-FA individuals may lower IQ scores. We review the data on IQ in light of our findings and conclude that improving developmental quality may increase average IQ in future generations. PMID:9265189

  5. Strangeness asymmetry in the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberg, Mary

    2015-04-01

    Strangeness asymmetry in the proton may arise from fluctuations of the proton into meson-baryon pairs. The leading contributions to proton strangeness are from the KΛ , KΣ , K* Λ and K* Σ states. We use a Fock state expansion of the proton in terms of these pairs to represent the strange meson cloud. We determine the strangeness distributions of the proton in a hybrid convolution model, in which the fluctuations are represented either by light-cone wave functions or meson-baryon splitting functions. For the parton distributions of the s(s) quarks in the bare baryons(mesons) of the Fock states, we use light cone wave functions or our statistical model, which expands the bare hadrons in terms of quark-gluon states. The momentum distributions of the s and s quarks in each Fock state differ because they are constituents of different hadrons. We present our results for proton strangeness asymmetry, and compare them to NuTeV and to global parton distributions. This research has been supported in part by NSF Award 1205686.

  6. Control of Angular Momentum during Walking in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Meyns, Pieter; Jonkers, Ilse; Kaat, Desloovere; Duysens, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Children with hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy (CP) walk with marked asymmetries. For instance, we have recently shown that they have less arm swing on the affected side, and more arm swing at the unaffected side. Such an increase in arm swing at the unaffected side may be aimed at controlling total body angular momentum about the vertical axis,…

  7. Reconceptualizing Cerebral Dominance: Implications for Reading- and Learning-Disabled Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hynd, George W.; Obrzut, John E.

    1981-01-01

    Recent research employing more direct measures of central functional asymmetry suggests that a reconceptualization of the notion of cerebral dominance may be in order. A rationale for this reconceptualization is provided and the implications for children with learning disorders is discussed. (Author)

  8. Control of Angular Momentum during Walking in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Meyns, Pieter; Jonkers, Ilse; Kaat, Desloovere; Duysens, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Children with hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy (CP) walk with marked asymmetries. For instance, we have recently shown that they have less arm swing on the affected side, and more arm swing at the unaffected side. Such an increase in arm swing at the unaffected side may be aimed at controlling total body angular momentum about the vertical axis,…

  9. Asymmetry in the epithalamus of vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    L. CONCHA, MIGUEL; W. WILSON, STEPHEN

    2001-01-01

    The epithalamus is a major subdivision of the diencephalon constituted by the habenular nuclei and pineal complex. Structural asymmetries in this region are widespread amongst vertebrates and involve differences in size, neuronal organisation, neurochemistry and connectivity. In species that possess a photoreceptive parapineal organ, this structure projects asymmetrically to the left habenula, and in teleosts it is also situated on the left side of the brain. Asymmetries in size between the left and right sides of the habenula are often associated with asymmetries in neuronal organisation, although these two types of asymmetry follow different evolutionary courses. While the former is more conspicuous in fishes (with the exception of teleosts), asymmetries in neuronal organisation are more robust in amphibia and reptiles. Connectivity of the parapineal organ with the left habenula is not always coupled with asymmetries in habenular size and/or neuronal organisation suggesting that, at least in some species, assignment of parapineal and habenular asymmetries may be independent events. The evolutionary origins of epithalamic structures are uncertain but asymmetry in this region is likely to have existed at the origin of the vertebrate, perhaps even the chordate, lineage. In at least some extant vertebrate species, epithalamic asymmetries are established early in development, suggesting a genetic regulation of asymmetry. In some cases, epigenetic factors such as hormones also influence the development of sexually dimorphic habenular asymmetries. Although the genetic and developmental mechanisms by which neuroanatomical asymmetries are established remain obscure, some clues regarding the mechanisms underlying laterality decisions have recently come from studies in zebrafish. The Nodal signalling pathway regulates laterality by biasing an otherwise stochastic laterality decision to the left side of the epithalamus. This genetic mechanism ensures a consistency of

  10. Multiple complementary gas distribution assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Ng, Tuoh-Bin; Melnik, Yuriy; Pang, Lily L; Tuncel, Eda; Nguyen, Son T; Chen, Lu

    2016-04-05

    In one embodiment, an apparatus includes a first gas distribution assembly that includes a first gas passage for introducing a first process gas into a second gas passage that introduces the first process gas into a processing chamber and a second gas distribution assembly that includes a third gas passage for introducing a second process gas into a fourth gas passage that introduces the second process gas into the processing chamber. The first and second gas distribution assemblies are each adapted to be coupled to at least one chamber wall of the processing chamber. The first gas passage is shaped as a first ring positioned within the processing chamber above the second gas passage that is shaped as a second ring positioned within the processing chamber. The gas distribution assemblies may be designed to have complementary characteristic radial film growth rate profiles.

  11. Increased morphological asymmetry, evolvability and plasticity in human brain evolution.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Robles, Aida; Hopkins, William D; Sherwood, Chet C

    2013-06-22

    The study of hominin brain evolution relies mostly on evaluation of the endocranial morphology of fossil skulls. However, only some general features of external brain morphology are evident from endocasts, and many anatomical details can be difficult or impossible to examine. In this study, we use geometric morphometric techniques to evaluate inter- and intraspecific differences in cerebral morphology in a sample of in vivo magnetic resonance imaging scans of chimpanzees and humans, with special emphasis on the study of asymmetric variation. Our study reveals that chimpanzee-human differences in cerebral morphology are mainly symmetric; by contrast, there is continuity in asymmetric variation between species, with humans showing an increased range of variation. Moreover, asymmetric variation does not appear to be the result of allometric scaling at intraspecific levels, whereas symmetric changes exhibit very slight allometric effects within each species. Our results emphasize two key properties of brain evolution in the hominine clade: first, evolution of chimpanzee and human brains (and probably their last common ancestor and related species) is not strongly morphologically constrained, thus making their brains highly evolvable and responsive to selective pressures; second, chimpanzee and, especially, human brains show high levels of fluctuating asymmetry indicative of pronounced developmental plasticity. We infer that these two characteristics can have a role in human cognitive evolution.

  12. Scintillation Monitoring Using Asymmetry Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Muhammad Mubasshir; Mahrous, Ayman; Abdallah, Amr; Notarpietro, Riccardo

    Variation in electron density can have significant effect on GNSS signals in terms of propagation delay. Ionospheric scintillation can be caused by rapid change of such delay, specifically, when they last for a longer period of time. Ionospheric irregularities that account for scintillation may vary significantly in spatial range and drift with the background plasma at speeds of 45 to 130 m/sec. These patchy irregularities may occur several times during night, e.g. in equatorial region, with the patches move through the ray paths of the GNSS satellite signals. These irregularities are often characterized as either ‘large scale’ (which can be as large as several hundred km in East-West direction and many times that in the North-South direction) or ‘small scale’ (which can be as small as 1m). These small scale irregularities are regarded as the main cause of scintillation [1,2]. In normal solar activity conditions, the mid-latitude ionosphere is not much disturbed. However, during severe magnetic storms, the aurora oval extends towards the equator and the equator anomaly region may stretched towards poles extending the scintillation phenomena more typically associated with those regions into mid-latitudes. In such stormy conditions, the predicted TEC may deviate largely from the true value of the TEC both at low and mid-latitudes due to which GNSS applications may be strongly degraded. This work is an attempt to analyze ionospheric scintillation (S4 index) using ionospheric asymmetry index [3]. The asymmetry index is based on trans-ionospheric propagation between GPS and LEO satellites in a radio occultation (RO) scenario, using background ionospheric data provided by MIDAS [4]. We attempted to simulate one of the recent geomagnetic storms (NOAA scale G4) occurred over low/mid-latitudes. The storm started on 26 September 2011 at UT 18:00 and lasted until early hours of 27 September 2011. The scintillation data for the storm was taken from an ionospheric

  13. Assessment of cerebral hemispheric symmetry in hatchling chickens exposed in ovo to polychlorinated biphenyl congeners.

    PubMed

    Lipsitz, L; Powell, D; Bursian, S; Tanaka, D

    1997-05-01

    Previous investigators have reported that exposure to a mixture of environmental contaminants, including polychlorinated biphenyls, results in morphologic asymmetry of the cerebral hemispheres in hatchling great blue herons (Ardea herodias) and have suggested that this asymmetry may be a useful biomarker for contamination. This study was made to determine whether exposure to PCB congeners 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (IUPAC #77) and 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (IUPAC #126) causes similar asymmetry in hatchling domestic chickens (Gallus domesticus). Eggs were injected at day 0 of incubation with either a high dose, low dose, or combination of each congener. At hatching, the chicks were perfused with 10% formalin-saline. The brains were removed, sectioned and stained with cresyl violet. Width and height measurements of each hemisphere were taken at eight locations, caudal to rostral, 400 microm apart starting at the level of the anterior commissure (CA) and ending at the lobus paraolfactorius (LPO). The absolute differences between measurements of the left and right sides were used to run a univariate split plot analysis of variance to determine if the amount of asymmetry present was associated with specific congeners or doses. Significant differences in asymmetry were found between noninjected control groups and vehicle-injected control groups (p asymmetry increasing from the most caudal section at the CA to the most rostral section at the LPO for both non-injected control and treatment groups (p asymmetry may be normal in avian brains resulting from both intrinsic structural asymmetry and extrinsic molding forces acting on the head during development. Both of these factors should be taken into consideration when assessing the usefulness of cerebral asymmetry as a

  14. Right-Left Asymmetries in the Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galaburda, Albert M.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Reports on structural asymmetrics between the hemispheres which are found in the human brain. Auditory region and Sylvian Fissure asymmetry have also been observed in the fetus and in other primates. Describes research which has correlated asymmetries with hand preference, certain childhood learning disabilities and some dementing illnesses of…

  15. beta. -decay asymmetry of the free neutron

    SciTech Connect

    Bopp, P.; Dubbers, D.; Klemt, E.; Last, J.; Schuetze, H.; Weibler, W.; Freedman, S.J.; Schaerpf, O.

    1983-01-01

    The ..beta..-decay of polarized neutrons has been studied with the new superconducting spectrometer PERKEO at the ILL. The energy dependence of the ..beta..-decay asymmetry has been measured for the first time. From the measured ..beta..-asymmetry parameter we obtain a new value for the ratio of weak coupling constants g/sub A//g/sub V/. 11 references.

  16. Asymmetries and Variations in Jupiter's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khurana, Krishan K.

    2003-01-01

    The investigation was carried out to infer the influence of solar wind on Jupiter's magnetosphere through studies of asymmetries and variations in the magnetosphere. We used the magnetic field observations from all of the pre-Galileo spacecraft and from the Galileo Prime and extended missions to understand asymmetries in magnetic field and various current systems in the magnetosphere.

  17. Jet Asymmetry in High Energy Diffractive Production

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2000-09-15

    The authors propose the asymmetry in the fractional energy of charm versus anticharm jets produced in high energy diffractive photoproduction as a sensitive test of the interference of the Odderon (C = {minus}) and Pomeron (C = +) exchange amplitudes in QCD. If measured at HERA, this asymmetry could provide the first experimental evidence of the Odderon.

  18. Asymmetry and Performance: Toward a Neurodevelopmental Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boles, David B.; Barth, Joan M.; Merrill, Edward C.

    2008-01-01

    Hemispheric asymmetry implies the existence of developmental influences that affect one hemisphere more than the other. However, those influences are poorly understood. One simple view is that asymmetry may exist because of a relationship between a mental process' degree of lateralization and how well it functions. Data scaling issues have largely…

  19. Right-Left Asymmetries in the Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galaburda, Albert M.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Reports on structural asymmetrics between the hemispheres which are found in the human brain. Auditory region and Sylvian Fissure asymmetry have also been observed in the fetus and in other primates. Describes research which has correlated asymmetries with hand preference, certain childhood learning disabilities and some dementing illnesses of…

  20. Asymmetry and Performance: Toward a Neurodevelopmental Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boles, David B.; Barth, Joan M.; Merrill, Edward C.

    2008-01-01

    Hemispheric asymmetry implies the existence of developmental influences that affect one hemisphere more than the other. However, those influences are poorly understood. One simple view is that asymmetry may exist because of a relationship between a mental process' degree of lateralization and how well it functions. Data scaling issues have largely…

  1. Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Search Home About Cancer Cancer Treatment Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) Cancer Treatment Types of Cancer Treatment Surgery Radiation Therapy Chemotherapy Immunotherapy Targeted Therapy Hormone Therapy Stem Cell ...

  2. Anatomic Brain Asymmetry in Vervet Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Fears, Scott C.; Scheibel, Kevin; Abaryan, Zvart; Lee, Chris; Service, Susan K.; Jorgensen, Matthew J.; Fairbanks, Lynn A.; Cantor, Rita M.; Freimer, Nelson B.; Woods, Roger P.

    2011-01-01

    Asymmetry is a prominent feature of human brains with important functional consequences. Many asymmetric traits show population bias, but little is known about the genetic and environmental sources contributing to inter-individual variance. Anatomic asymmetry has been observed in Old World monkeys, but the evidence for the direction and extent of asymmetry is equivocal and only one study has estimated the genetic contributions to inter-individual variance. In this study we characterize a range of qualitative and quantitative asymmetry measures in structural brain MRIs acquired from an extended pedigree of Old World vervet monkeys (n = 357), and implement variance component methods to estimate the proportion of trait variance attributable to genetic and environmental sources. Four of six asymmetry measures show pedigree-level bias and one of the traits has a significant heritability estimate of about 30%. We also found that environmental variables more significantly influence the width of the right compared to the left prefrontal lobe. PMID:22205941

  3. Anatomic brain asymmetry in vervet monkeys.

    PubMed

    Fears, Scott C; Scheibel, Kevin; Abaryan, Zvart; Lee, Chris; Service, Susan K; Jorgensen, Matthew J; Fairbanks, Lynn A; Cantor, Rita M; Freimer, Nelson B; Woods, Roger P

    2011-01-01

    Asymmetry is a prominent feature of human brains with important functional consequences. Many asymmetric traits show population bias, but little is known about the genetic and environmental sources contributing to inter-individual variance. Anatomic asymmetry has been observed in Old World monkeys, but the evidence for the direction and extent of asymmetry is equivocal and only one study has estimated the genetic contributions to inter-individual variance. In this study we characterize a range of qualitative and quantitative asymmetry measures in structural brain MRIs acquired from an extended pedigree of Old World vervet monkeys (n = 357), and implement variance component methods to estimate the proportion of trait variance attributable to genetic and environmental sources. Four of six asymmetry measures show pedigree-level bias and one of the traits has a significant heritability estimate of about 30%. We also found that environmental variables more significantly influence the width of the right compared to the left prefrontal lobe.

  4. Gender and age effects in structural brain asymmetry as measured by MRI texture analysis.

    PubMed

    Kovalev, Vassili A; Kruggel, Frithjof; von Cramon, D Yves

    2003-07-01

    Effects of gender and age on structural brain asymmetry were studied by 3D texture analysis in 380 adults. Asymmetry is detected by comparing the complex 3D gray-scale image patterns in the left and right cerebral hemispheres as revealed by anatomical T1-weighted MRI datasets. The Talairach and Tournoux parcellation system was applied to study the asymmetry on five levels: the whole cerebrum, nine coronal sections, 12 axial sections, boxes resulting from both coronal and axial subdivisions, and by a sliding spherical window of 9 mm diameter. The analysis revealed that the brain asymmetry increases in the anterior-posterior direction starting from the central region onward. Male brains were found to be more asymmetric than female. This gender-related effect is noticeable in all brain areas but is most significant in the superior temporal gyrus, Heschl's gyrus, the adjacent white matter regions in the temporal stem and the knee of the optic radiation, the thalamus, and the posterior cingulate. The brain asymmetry increases significantly with age in the inferior frontal gyrus, anterior insula, anterior cingulate, parahippocampal gyrus, retrosplenial cortex, coronal radiata, and knee region of the internal capsule. Asymmetry decreases with age in the optic radiation, precentral gyrus, and angular gyrus. The texture-based method reported here is based on extended multisort cooccurrence matrices that employ intensity, gradient, and anisotropy features in a uniform way. It is sensitive, simple to reproduce, robust, and unbiased in the sense that segmentation of brain compartments and spatial transformations are not necessary. Thus, it should be considered as another tool for digital morphometry in neuroscience.

  5. Asymmetry in zeta Auriage chromospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, I. A.

    1988-01-01

    Asymmetry in the ultraviolet spectra of zeta-Aur, similar to that reported in optical observations, was studied using IUE data. A plot of the integrated flux of zeta Aurigae from 1625 to 1675 A as a function of absolute phase shows no significant difference between the ingress and egress phases. A plot of the integrated flux from 1625 to 1675 A for 22 Vul as a function of absolute phase for both ingress and egress confirms that the atmospheric eclipse is asymmetric in 22 Vul. The eclipse in 22 Vul begins symmetrically but departs from symmetry at a phase greater than 0.05. The pronounced dip at ingress suggests a feature in the chromosphere.

  6. Asymmetry effects in fragment production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Manpreet; Kaur, Varinderjit

    2016-05-01

    The production of different fragments has been studied by taking into account the mass asymmetry of the reaction and employing the momentum dependent interactions. Two different set of asymmetric reactions have been analyzed while keeping Atotal fixed using soft momentum dependent equation of state. Our results indicate that the impact of momentum dependent interactions is different in lighter projectile systems as compared to heavier ones. The comparative analysis of IQMD simulations with the experimental data in case of heavier projectile and lighter target system for the reaction of 197Au+27Al (η = 0.7) at E = 600 MeV/nucleon shows that with the inclusion of MDI we are able, upto some extent, to reproduce the experimental universality of rise and fall of intermediate mass fragments (IMFs).

  7. Asymmetry effects in fragment production

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Manpreet; Kaur, Varinderjit

    2016-05-06

    The production of different fragments has been studied by taking into account the mass asymmetry of the reaction and employing the momentum dependent interactions. Two different set of asymmetric reactions have been analyzed while keeping At{sub otal} fixed using soft momentum dependent equation of state. Our results indicate that the impact of momentum dependent interactions is different in lighter projectile systems as compared to heavier ones. The comparative analysis of IQMD simulations with the experimental data in case of heavier projectile and lighter target system for the reaction of {sup 197}Au+{sup 27}Al (η = 0.7) at E = 600 MeV/nucleon shows that with the inclusion of MDI we are able, upto some extent, to reproduce the experimental universality of rise and fall of intermediate mass fragments (IMFs).

  8. Collins Asymmetry at Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Feng

    2008-01-17

    We study the Collins effect in the azimuthal asymmetricdistribution of hadrons inside a high energy jet in the single transversepolarized proton proton scattering. From the detailed analysis ofone-gluon and two-gluon exchange diagrams contributions, the Collinsfunction is found the same as that in the semi-inclusive deep inelasticscattering and e+e- annihilations. The eikonal propagators in thesediagrams do not contribute to the phase needed for the Collins-typesingle spin asymmetry, and the universality is derived as a result of theWard identity. We argue that this conclusion depends on the momentum flowof the exchanged gluon and the kinematic constraints in the fragmentationprocess, and is generic and model-independent.

  9. Special Section: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM):Quiz on Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Special Section CAM Quiz on Complementary and Alternative Medicine Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... low back pain. True False Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) includes: Meditation Chiropractic Use of natural products, ...

  10. Dual-task interference in right- and left-handers: typical laterality patterns are obtained despite reversal of baseline asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Caroselli, Jerome S; Hiscock, Merrill; Bullock, Ryan

    2006-01-01

    Lateralized interference between concurrent cognitive and manual activities is used to infer cerebral hemisphere specialization for the cognitive activity. However, some evidence indicates that lateralized interference depends largely on manual asymmetry in the single-task (baseline) condition. To test the competing explanations, we asked 40 right-handed (RH) and 40 left-handed (LH) adults to key press and calculate concurrently. Baseline manual asymmetries were manipulated by increasing the complexity of the task performed by the dominant hand. Nevertheless, in the dual-task conditions, RHs showed more overall interference when performing with the right hand and LHs showed a nonsignificant tendency in the opposite direction. The results indicate that differential interference patterns, similar to those previously reported for right- and left-handers, may be obtained even when the usual baseline manual asymmetries are reversed.

  11. Visual function and perinatal focal cerebral infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Mercuri, E; Atkinson, J; Braddick, O; Anker, S; Nokes, L; Cowan, F; Rutherford, M; Pennock, J; Dubowitz, L

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the visual function of infants with perinatal cerebral infarction in whom the site and size of the lesion has been determined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). METHODS: Twelve infants with cerebral infarction on MRI were studied with a battery of tests specifically designed to evaluate visual function in infancy. This included tests: for visual attention (fixation shifts); of cerebral asymmetry (optokinetic nystagmus, visual fields); for assessment of acuity (forced choice preferential looking); and neurophysiological measures of vision (phase reversal and orientation reversal visual evoked potential). RESULTS: A considerable incidence of abnormalities on at least one of the tests for visual function used was observed. The presence or severity of visual abnormalities could not always be predicted by the site and extent of the lesion seen on imaging. CONCLUSIONS: Early focal lesions affecting the visual pathway can, to some extent, be compensated for by the immature developing brain. These data suggest that all the infants presenting with focal lesions need to be investigated with a detailed assessment of various aspects of vision. Images PMID:8949687

  12. Tunable terahertz electromagnetically induced transparency based on a complementary graphene metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huiyun; Zhang, Xiaoqiuyan; Cao, Yanyan; Zeng, Beibei; Zhou, Mingdong; Zhang, Yuping

    2017-01-01

    We proposed a dynamically tunable electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in the terahertz region based on a complementary graphene metamaterials within two asymmetric slot structures. A transparency peak is enabled through the coupling between the asymmetric slot-structure elements when their symmetry is broken. The width of transparency window can be controlled by varying the asymmetry degree. Moreover, by varying the Fermi energy of graphene, the transmission peak can be dynamically tuned, realizing a blue-shift without re-optimizing or re-fabricating the nanostructure. Therefore, the work opens up opportunities for the development of tunable compact elements such as slow light devices, sensors and switches.

  13. Complementary chiral metasurface with strong broadband optical activity and enhanced transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Yan-Peng; Zhang, Yong-Liang; Dong, Xian-Zi E-mail: xmduan@mail.ipc.ac.cn; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Li, Jing; Liu, Jie; Zhao, Zhen-Sheng; Duan, Xuan-Ming E-mail: xmduan@mail.ipc.ac.cn

    2014-01-06

    We present the design and realization of ultra-thin chiral metasurfaces with giant broadband optical activity in the infrared wavelength. The chiral metasurfaces consisting of periodic hole arrays of complementary asymmetric split ring resonators are fabricated by femtosecond laser two-photon polymerization. Enhanced transmission with strong polarization conversion up to 97% is observed owing to the chiral surface plasmons resulting from mirror symmetry broken. The dependence of optical activity on the degree of structural asymmetry is investigated. This simple planar metasurface is expected to be useful for designing ultra-thin active devices and tailoring the polarization behavior of complex metallic nanostructures.

  14. Complementary medicine for the allergist.

    PubMed

    Bielory, L

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this article is to provide a historical overview of the present state of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in the treatment of atopic disorders. The evolution of medicine in the United States has been in flux with the advent of newer technologies, new designs in managed care, and integrating the cultural differences into a complex multidisciplinary health care delivery process. There have been several herbal modalities that contain various anti-allergy and asthma components with effects on bronchodilation, congestion, pulmonary function tests, and antagonism of asthma mediators such as histamine and PAF, corticosteroid levels, and clearance of mucus. In the field of allergy, asthma, and immunology, the popularity of CAM is more widespread than other common chronic medical problems. Overall, CAM use has created a $15-billion-a-year industry in dietary supplements alone. This has been especially fueled by the deregulation of the "herbal" industry by the congressional passage of the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994. It would appear that our specialty would clearly benefit from expanding its knowledge base about these entities because "allergies" are high on the list of patients seeking CAM. This will prepare us to better coordinate the future possibilities and to "doctor" (i.e., teach) our patients about the risks and benefits of these modalities.

  15. Measurement of CP-violation asymmetries in $D^0 \\to K_S \\pi^+ \\pi^-$

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-07-01

    We report a measurement of time-integrated CP-violation asymmetries in the resonant substructure of the three-body decay D{sup 0} {yields} K{sub s}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} using CDF II data corresponding to 6.0 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity from Tevatron p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s=1.96 TeV. The charm mesons used in this analysis come from D*{sup +}(2010){yields}D*{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and D*-(2010){yields}{bar D}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}, where the production flavor of the charm meson is determined by the charge of the accompanying pion. We apply a Dalitz-amplitude analysis for the description of the dynamic decay structure and use two complementary approaches, namely a full Dalitz-plot fit employing the isobar model for the contributing resonances and a model-independent bin-by-bin comparison of the D{sup 0} and {bar D}{sup -}{sup 0} Dalitz plots. We find no CP-violation effects and measure an asymmetry of A{sub CP}=(-0.05 {+-}0.57(stat){+-}0.54(syst))% for the overall integrated CP-violation asymmetry, CP-violation asymmetry, consistent with the standard model prediction.

  16. Adequacy of family foods for complementary feeding

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The WHO recommends that complementary foods be introduced to all infants at age 6 mo and that breastfeeding be continued until age 18–24 mo. Beginning at age 6 mo, complementary foods should be pureed, mashed, or semisolid, but by age 12 mo the child should be able to eat solid foods that are consum...

  17. The Complementary Function and the General Solution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramankutty, P.

    1991-01-01

    Clarified is the assertion that the so-called complementary function is indeed the general solution of the homogeneous equation associated with a linear nth-order differential equation. Methods to obtain the particular integral, once the complementary function is determined, are illustrated for both cases of constant and of variable coefficients.…

  18. A generalized complementary relationship between actual and potential evaporation defined by a reference surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminzadeh, Milad; Roderick, Michael L.; Or, Dani

    2016-01-01

    The definition of potential evaporation remains widely debated despite its centrality for hydrologic and climatic models. We employed an analytical pore-scale representation of evaporation from terrestrial surfaces to define potential evaporation using a hypothetical steady state reference temperature that is common to both air and evaporating surface. The feedback between drying land surfaces and overlaying air properties, central in the Bouchet (1963) complementary relationship, is implicitly incorporated in the hypothetical steady state where the sensible heat flux vanishes and the available energy is consumed by evaporation. Evaporation rates predicted based on the steady state reference temperature hypothesis were in good agreement with class A pan evaporation measurements suggesting that evaporation from pans occurs with negligible sensible heat flux. The model facilitates a new generalization of the asymmetric complementary relationship with the asymmetry parameter b analytically predicted for a wide range of meteorological conditions with initial tests yielding good agreement between measured and predicted actual evaporation.

  19. Palatal asymmetry during development: an anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Moreira, R S; Sgrott, E A; Stuker, H; Alonso, L G; Smith, R L

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate hard palate asymmetry during development. The palates of 248 dry skulls were photographed and evaluated digitally. The skulls were divided into seven groups: fetus, newborn, infant, child, adolescent, adult, and aged. Linear measures were obtained from great palatine foramen (GPF) to incisive fossa (INC) and to posterior nasal spine (PNS). Angular measures were obtained from the former landmarks plus the point on sutures intersection between maxillary and palatine bones. Asymmetry was evaluated intra and intergroups. All skulls showed some degree of right-left asymmetry in the hard palate. Regardless of hard palate asymmetry, none of the right-left side differences was statistically significant. For the intergroups assessment, none of the asymmetry index means were statistically different. The posterior part of palate (PNS x GPF) measures was more asymmetric than the anterior part (INC x GPF), showing, respectively, 4.6% and 2.8% of mean asymmetry index. Angular measures showed a more symmetric behavior than the linear ones. Hard palate asymmetry occurs even in the absence of masticatory function, showing that this feature begins early in fetal life and persists through development.

  20. Black–white asymmetry in visual perception

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhong-Lin; Sperling, George

    2012-01-01

    With eleven different types of stimuli that exercise a wide gamut of spatial and temporal visual processes, negative perturbations from mean luminance are found to be typically 25% more effective visually than positive perturbations of the same magnitude (range 8–67%). In Experiment 12, the magnitude of the black–white asymmetry is shown to be a saturating function of stimulus contrast. Experiment 13 shows black–white asymmetry primarily involves a nonlinearity in the visual representation of decrements. Black–white asymmetry in early visual processing produces even-harmonic distortion frequencies in all ordinary stimuli and in illusions such as the perceived asymmetry of optically perfect sine wave gratings. In stimuli intended to stimulate exclusively second-order processing in which motion or shape are defined not by luminance differences but by differences in texture contrast, the black–white asymmetry typically generates artifactual luminance (first-order) motion and shape components. Because black–white asymmetry pervades psychophysical and neurophysiological procedures that utilize spatial or temporal variations of luminance, it frequently needs to be considered in the design and evaluation of experiments that involve visual stimuli. Simple procedures to compensate for black–white asymmetry are proposed. PMID:22984221

  1. Adhesion of microchannel-based complementary surfaces.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arun K; Bai, Ying; Nadermann, Nichole; Jagota, Anand; Hui, Chung-Yuen

    2012-03-06

    We show that highly enhanced and selective adhesion can be achieved between surfaces patterned with complementary microchannel structures. An elastic material, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), was used to fabricate such surfaces by molding into a silicon master with microchannel profiles patterned by photolithography. We carried out adhesion tests on both complementary and mismatched microchannel/micropillar surfaces. Adhesion, as measured by the energy release rate required to propagate an interfacial crack, can be enhanced by up to 40 times by complementary interfaces, compared to a flat control, and slightly enhanced for some special noncomplementary samples, despite the nearly negligible adhesion for other mismatched surfaces. For each complementary surface, we observe defects in the form of visible striations, where pillars fail to insert fully into the channels. The adhesion between complementary microchannel surfaces is enhanced by a combination of a crack-trapping mechanism and friction between a pillar and channel and is attenuated by the presence of defects.

  2. Electron impact ionization of O2 and the interference effect from forward-backward asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Madhusree Roy; Tribedi, Lokesh C.

    2017-08-01

    Absolute double differential cross sections (DDCSs) of secondary electrons emitted from O2 under the impact of 7 keV electrons were measured for different emission angles between 30° and 145° having energies from 1-600 eV. The forward-backward angular asymmetry was observed from angular distribution of the DDCS of secondary electrons. The asymmetry parameter, thus obtained from the DDCS of two complementary angles, showed a clear signature of interference oscillation. The Cohen-Fano model of Young type electron interference at a molecular double slit is found to provide a good fit to the observed oscillatory structures. The present observation is in qualitative agreement with the recent results obtained from photoionization.

  3. SU(2) Flavor Asymmetry of the Proton Sea in Chiral Effective Theory

    SciTech Connect

    McKenney, J. R.; Sato Gonzalez, Nobuo; Melnitchouk, Wally; Ji, Cheung-Ryong

    2016-07-01

    We refine the computation of the $\\bar{d}$ - $\\bar{u}$ flavor asymmetry in the proton sea with a complementary effort to reveal the dynamics of pion exchange in high-energy processes. In particular, we discuss the efficacy of pion exchange models to simultaneously describe leading neutron electroproduction at HERA along with the $\\bar{d}$ - $\\bar{u}$ flavor asymmetry in the proton. A detailed χ2 analysis of the ZEUS and H1 data, when combined with constraints on the pion flux from Drell-Yan data, allows regions of applicability of one-pion exchange to be delineated. Based on the fit results, we also address a possible estimate for leading proton structure functions in upcoming tagged deep-inelastic scattering experiments at Jefferson Lab on the deuteron with forward protons.

  4. SU(2) Flavor Asymmetry of the Proton Sea in Chiral Effective Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenney, J. R.; Sato, Nobuo; Melnitchouk, W.; Ji, Chueng-Ryong

    2016-07-01

    We refine the computation of the d¯ - ū flavor asymmetry in the proton sea with a complementary effort to reveal the dynamics of pion exchange in high-energy processes. In particular, we discuss the efficacy of pion exchange models to simultaneously describe leading neutron electroproduction at HERA along with the d¯ - ū flavor asymmetry in the proton. A detailed {χ2} analysis of the ZEUS and H1 data, when combined with constraints on the pion flux from Drell-Yan data, allows regions of applicability of one-pion exchange to be delineated. Based on the fit results, we also address a possible estimate for leading proton structure functions in upcoming tagged deep-inelastic scattering experiments at Jefferson Lab on the deuteron with forward protons.

  5. Management of Asymmetry After Breast Reduction.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Onelio

    2016-04-01

    Breast reduction surgery has achieved one of the highest patient satisfaction rates among plastic surgery procedures. Most of the complications encountered are usually minor and related to wound healing. Revision surgery to address these problems is common and usually consists of scar revisions. Postoperative breast asymmetry of a mild degree is also common; however, postoperative asymmetry severe enough to warrant surgical revision is a rare event, occurring in less than 1% of cases. Postmammaplasty revision surgery needs to be individualized. The asymmetry could be the result of nipple malposition or it could consist of a volume or shape discrepancy between the breast mounds.

  6. Relic density of neutrinos with primordial asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Sergio; Pinto, Teguayco; Raffelt, Georg G

    2009-06-19

    We study flavor oscillations in the early Universe, assuming primordial neutrino-antineutrino asymmetries. Including collisions and pair processes in the kinetic equations, we not only estimate the degree of flavor equilibration, but for the first time also kinetic equilibration among neutrinos and with the ambient plasma. Typically, the restrictive big-bang nucleosynthesis bound on the nu_{e}nu[over]_{e} asymmetry indeed applies to all flavors as claimed in the previous literature, but fine-tuned initial asymmetries always allow for a large surviving neutrino excess radiation that may show up in precision cosmological data.

  7. Relic Density of Neutrinos with Primordial Asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Pastor, Sergio; Pinto, Teguayco; Raffelt, Georg G.

    2009-06-19

    We study flavor oscillations in the early Universe, assuming primordial neutrino-antineutrino asymmetries. Including collisions and pair processes in the kinetic equations, we not only estimate the degree of flavor equilibration, but for the first time also kinetic equilibration among neutrinos and with the ambient plasma. Typically, the restrictive big-bang nucleosynthesis bound on the nu{sub e}nu{sub e} asymmetry indeed applies to all flavors as claimed in the previous literature, but fine-tuned initial asymmetries always allow for a large surviving neutrino excess radiation that may show up in precision cosmological data.

  8. SUSY CP phases and asymmetries at colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittel, Olaf

    2009-06-01

    In the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, physical phases of complex parameters lead to CP violation. We show how triple products of particle momenta or spins can be used to construct asymmetries, that allow us to probe these CP phases. To give specific examples, we discuss the production of neutralinos at the International Linear Collider (ILC). For the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), we discuss CP asymmetries in squark decays, and in the tri-lepton signal. We find that the CP asymmetries can be as large as 60%.

  9. [Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome].

    PubMed

    Laakso, Elina; Pekkola, Johanna; Soinne, Lauri; Putaala, Jukka

    2014-01-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is increasingly recognized. The condition is characterized by multifocal vasoconstriction lesions in cerebral arteries. Headache is the central symptom, with an acute onset and paroxysmal occurrence. Some of the patients develop intracranial hemorrhage, ischemic disturbance of the cerebral circulation, hypertensive encephalopathy (PRES) or epileptic seizures as complications. The disease is most common in middle-aged women. Most patients have an underlying predisposing factor, most commonly vasoactive medications, drugs or puerperium. There is no evidence-based practice.

  10. Statins and cerebral hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Giannopoulos, Sotirios; Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Marshall, Randolph S

    2012-01-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are associated with improved stroke outcome. This observation has been attributed in part to the palliative effect of statins on cerebral hemodynamics and cerebral autoregulation (CA), which are mediated mainly through the upregulation of endothelium nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Several animal studies indicate that statin pretreatment enhances cerebral blood flow after ischemic stroke, although this finding is not further supported in clinical settings. Cerebral vasomotor reactivity, however, is significantly improved after long-term statin administration in most patients with severe small vessel disease, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, or impaired baseline CA. PMID:22929438

  11. Hemisphere Asymmetry of Response to Pharmacologic Treatment in an Alzheimer’s Disease Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Saito, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Yumi; Al-Daghri, Nasser M.; Ihara, Masafumi; Carare, Roxana O.; Garbis, Spiros D.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine hemisphere asymmetry of response to pharmacologic treatment in an Alzheimer’s disease mouse model using cilostazol as a chemical stimulus. Eight-month-old mice were assigned to vehicle or cilostazol treatment for three months and hemispheres were analyzed using quantitative proteomics. Bioinformatics interpretation showed that following treatment, aggregation of blood platelets significantly decreased in the right hemisphere whereas neurodegeneration significantly decreased and synaptic transmission increased in the left hemisphere only. Our study provides novel evidence on cerebral laterality of pharmacologic activity, with important implications in deciphering regional pharmacodynamic effects of existing drugs thus uncovering novel hemisphere-specific therapeutic targets. PMID:26836196

  12. [The effect of controlled afferentation on functional asymmetry in supraspinal disorders in children].

    PubMed

    Bogdanov, O V; Sheliakin, A M; Pinchuk, D Iu

    1991-10-01

    A reliable decrease of excitability of the motoneurons controlling the activity of right m. gastrocnemius as compared with the left one, was found in healthy children, where as there was no such difference in children suffering from cerebral paralysis. However, the difference did appear after several sessions of the muscle training with the aid of functional biocontrol technique. Possible mechanisms of the inter-hemisphere asymmetry effect in ontogenesis upon the spinal activity in norm, inherent motor pathology and in the course of the latter's correction, are discussed.

  13. Polarized view of the top asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Krohn, David; Liu Tao; Shelton, Jessie; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2011-10-01

    Recent experimental results from the CDF collaboration which study the top forward-backward asymmetry have strengthened the case that new physics is playing a role in tt production. Here, we propose a set of measurements, built from the charged lepton kinematics in semileptonic and fully leptonic tt events, designed to further probe the underlying causes of this asymmetry both at the Tevatron and at the LHC. Using a set of conservative reference models, we find that measurements of the charged lepton asymmetry, top polarization, and tt spin correlation can establish the existence of new physics and distinguish between competing models both at the Tevatron and the LHC. At the Tevatron, discrimination between models is possible at the 3{sigma} level. At the LHC, we demonstrate that a top forward-backward asymmetry can be established at > or approx. 3{sigma} in the first {approx}5 fb{sup -1} of data and show how competing explanations can be further disentangled.

  14. Detection of breast asymmetry using anatomical features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Peter; Astley, Susan M.

    1993-07-01

    We present a new approach to the detection of breast asymmetry, an important radiological sign of cancer. The conventional approach to this problem is to search for brightness or texture differences between corresponding locations on left and right breast images. Due to the difficulty in accurately identifying corresponding locations, asymmetry cues generated in this way are insufficiently specific to be used as prompts for small and subtle abnormalities in a computer-aided diagnosis system. We have undertaken studies to discover more about the visual cues utilized by radiologists. We propose a new automatic method for detecting asymmetry based on the comparison of corresponding anatomical structures, which are identified by an automatic segmentation of breast tissue types. We describe a number of methods for comparing the shape and grey-level distribution of these regions, and we have achieved promising results by combining evidence for asymmetry.

  15. Symmetry and asymmetry in the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugdahl, Kenneth

    2005-10-01

    Structural and functional asymmetry in the human brain and nervous system is reviewed in a historical perspective, focusing on the pioneering work of Broca, Wernicke, Sperry, and Geschwind. Structural and functional asymmetry is exemplified from work done in our laboratory on auditory laterality using an empirical procedure called dichotic listening. This also involves different ways of validating the dichotic listening procedure against both invasive and non-invasive techniques, including PET and fMRI blood flow recordings. A major argument is that the human brain shows a substantial interaction between structurally, or "bottom-up" asymmetry and cognitively, or "top-down" modulation, through a focus of attention to the right or left side in auditory space. These results open up a more dynamic and interactive view of functional brain asymmetry than the traditional static view that the brain is lateralized, or asymmetric, only for specific stimuli and stimulus properties.

  16. Leptogenesis and gravity: Baryon asymmetry without decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, J. I.; Shore, G. M.

    2017-03-01

    A popular class of theories attributes the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe to CP-violating decays of super-heavy BSM particles in the Early Universe. Recently, we discovered a new source of leptogenesis in these models, namely that the same Yukawa phases which provide the CP violation for decays, combined with curved-spacetime loop effects, lead to an entirely new gravitational mechanism for generating an asymmetry, driven by the expansion of the Universe and independent of the departure of the heavy particles from equilibrium. In this Letter, we build on previous work by analysing the full Boltzmann equation, exploring the full parameter space of the theory and studying the time-evolution of the asymmetry. Remarkably, we find regions of parameter space where decays play no part at all, and where the baryon asymmetry of the Universe is determined solely by gravitational effects.

  17. What’s Left in Asymmetry?

    PubMed Central

    Aw, Sherry

    2008-01-01

    Left-right patterning is a fascinating problem of morphogenesis, linking evolutionary and cellular signaling mechanisms across many levels of organization. In the last 15 years, enormous progress has been made in elucidating the molecular details of this process in embryos of several model species. While many outside the field seem to believe that the fundamental aspects of this pathway are now solved, workers on asymmetry are faced with considerable uncertainties over the details of specific mechanisms, a lack of conceptual unity of mechanisms across phyla, and important questions that are not being pursued in any of the popular model systems. Here, we suggest that data from clinical syndromes, cryptic asymmetries, and bilateral gynandromorphs, while not figuring prominently in the mainstream work on LR asymmetry, point to crucial and fundamental gaps of knowledge about asymmetry. We identify 12 big questions that provide exciting opportunities for fundamental new advances in this field. PMID:18488999

  18. Optimal Branching Asymmetry of Hydrodynamic Pulsatile Trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florens, Magali; Sapoval, Bernard; Filoche, Marcel

    2011-04-01

    Most of the studies on optimal transport are done for steady state regime conditions. Yet, there exists numerous examples in living systems where supply tree networks have to deliver products in a limited time due to the pulsatile character of the flow, as it is the case for mammalian respiration. We report here that introducing a systematic branching asymmetry allows the tree to reduce the average delivery time of the products. It simultaneously increases its robustness against the inevitable variability of sizes related to morphogenesis. We then apply this approach to the human tracheobronchial tree. We show that in this case all extremities are supplied with fresh air, provided that the asymmetry is smaller than a critical threshold which happens to match the asymmetry measured in the human lung. This could indicate that the structure is tuned at the maximum asymmetry level that allows the lung to feed all terminal units with fresh air.

  19. Brain asymmetry: both sides of the story.

    PubMed

    Samara, Athina; Tsangaris, George T

    2011-12-01

    Biological systems demonstrate asymmetry, while lateralization has been observed from humans to lower animals structurally, functionally and behaviorally. This may be derived from evolutionary, genetic, developmental, epigenetic and pathologic factors. However, brain structure and function is complex, and macroscopic or microscopic asymmetries are hard to discern from random fluctuations. In this article, we discuss brain laterality and lateralization, beginning with a brief review of the literature on brain structural and functional asymmetries. We conclude with methods to detect and quantify asymmetry, focusing on neuroproteomics, for retrieval of protein-expression patterns, as a method of diagnosis and treatment monitoring. We suggest inter-hemispheric differential proteomics as a valid method to assess the experimental and biological variations in the healthy brain, and neurologic and neuropsychiatric disorders.

  20. Handedness, dichotic-listening ear advantage, and gender effects on planum temporale asymmetry--a volumetric investigation using structural magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos Sequeira, Sarah; Woerner, Wolfgang; Walter, Christof; Kreuder, Frank; Lueken, Ulrike; Westerhausen, René; Wittling, Ralf Arne; Schweiger, Elisabeth; Wittling, Werner

    2006-01-01

    Previous research has often examined whether the asymmetrical structure of the planum temporale (PT) represents an anatomical correlate of lateralized language-processing functions, gathering diverging empirical evidence by comparing PT asymmetry in subjects with differing handedness, gender, or speech lateralization. Apart from other methodological problems, direct comparisons between studies are hampered by insufficient assessment and consideration of all three potential determinants of structural cerebral asymmetry. Based on volumetric assessment of structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans of 104 healthy subjects, the present study replicated earlier observations of an overall leftward PT asymmetry, which was found to prevail irrespective of handedness, gender, or dichotic-listening ear advantage. However, the mean magnitude of this leftward asymmetry was not determined by either one of these factors in itself, but varied depending on their specific combination. A clear correspondence between structural and functional asymmetry was only observed among right-handed males. In this particular subgroup, more pronounced structural asymmetry was associated with an enlarged PT on the left side, while the enhanced leftward asymmetry of female sinistrals resulted from smaller adjusted volumes of their right PT. The existence of such complex interactions suggests that future research in this area can only be expected to overcome past inconsistencies by adequately considering handedness, gender, and speech lateralization.

  1. Complementary therapies for acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huijuan; Yang, Guoyan; Wang, Yuyi; Liu, Jian Ping; Smith, Caroline A; Luo, Hui; Liu, Yueming

    2015-01-19

    Acne is a chronic skin disease characterised by inflamed spots and blackheads on the face, neck, back, and chest. Cysts and scarring can also occur, especially in more severe disease. People with acne often turn to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), such as herbal medicine, acupuncture, and dietary modifications, because of their concerns about the adverse effects of conventional medicines. However, evidence for CAM therapies has not been systematically assessed. To assess the effects and safety of any complementary therapies in people with acne vulgaris. We searched the following databases from inception up to 22 January 2014: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014,Issue 1), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), PsycINFO (from 1806), AMED (from 1985), CINAHL (from 1981), Scopus (from 1966), and a number of other databases listed in the Methods section of the review. The Cochrane CAM Field Specialised Register was searched up to May 2014. We also searched five trials registers and checked the reference lists of articles for further references to relevant trials. We included parallel-group randomised controlled trials (or the first phase data of randomised cross-over trials) of any kind of CAM, compared with no treatment, placebo, or other active therapies, in people with a diagnosis of acne vulgaris. Three authors collected data from each included trial and evaluated the methodological quality independently. They resolved disagreements by discussion and, as needed, arbitration by another author. We included 35 studies, with a total of 3227 participants. We evaluated the majority as having unclear risk of selection, attrition, reporting, detection, and other biases. Because of the clinical heterogeneity between trials and the incomplete data reporting, we could only include four trials in two meta-analyses, with two trials in each meta-analysis. The categories of CAM included

  2. Complementary therapies for acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Huijuan; Yang, Guoyan; Wang, Yuyi; Liu, Jian Ping; Smith, Caroline A; Luo, Hui; Liu, Yueming

    2015-01-01

    Background Acne is a chronic skin disease characterised by inflamed spots and blackheads on the face, neck, back, and chest. Cysts and scarring can also occur, especially in more severe disease. People with acne often turn to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), such as herbal medicine, acupuncture, and dietary modifications, because of their concerns about the adverse effects of conventional medicines. However, evidence for CAM therapies has not been systematically assessed. Objectives To assess the effects and safety of any complementary therapies in people with acne vulgaris. Search methods We searched the following databases from inception up to 22 January 2014: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 1), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), PsycINFO (from 1806), AMED (from 1985), CINAHL (from 1981), Scopus (from 1966), and a number of other databases listed in the Methods section of the review. The Cochrane CAM Field Specialised Register was searched up to May 2014. We also searched five trials registers and checked the reference lists of articles for further references to relevant trials. Selection criteria We included parallel-group randomised controlled trials (or the first phase data of randomised cross-over trials) of any kind of CAM, compared with no treatment, placebo, or other active therapies, in people with a diagnosis of acne vulgaris. Data collection and analysis Three authors collected data from each included trial and evaluated the methodological quality independently. They resolved disagreements by discussion and, as needed, arbitration by another author. Main results We included 35 studies, with a total of 3227 participants. We evaluated the majority as having unclear risk of selection, attrition, reporting, detection, and other biases. Because of the clinical heterogeneity between trials and the incomplete data reporting, we could only include four

  3. Asymmetry in mechanical polarization switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Haidong; Liu, Shi; Ye, Ziyu; Yasui, Shintaro; Funakubo, Hiroshi; Rappe, Andrew M.; Gruverman, Alexei

    2017-05-01

    Recent demonstration of a mechanical 180° switching of ferroelectric polarization has enabled an alternative polarization control mechanism based on the flexoelectric coupling between polarization and strain gradient. Mechanical switching is a highly asymmetric phenomenon associated with the inhomogeneous strain induced by an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip pressed against the ferroelectric surface. Here, we demonstrate the asymmetric domain switching behavior in the vicinity of the 180° domain wall in PbTiO3 thin films with respect to the AFM tip scanning direction. The writing-direction-dependent asymmetric domain response has been modeled by molecular dynamics simulation showing asymmetry in domain wall displacement due to the difference in the volume of mechanically switched domains. The obtained results show that the mechanically induced switching dynamics is very different from the conventional 180° switching realized by an external electric field and has to be exploited differently. In particular, nanoscale domain engineering via the tip-induced flexoelectric effect requires careful consideration of asymmetric interaction between the existing domain structures and the strain gradient.

  4. Actigraphic motor asymmetries during sleep.

    PubMed

    Violani, C; Testa, P; Casagrande, M

    1998-08-01

    Much evidence indicates that during sleep there is a repatterning of motor asymmetries with a relative advantage of the left hand (i.e., the left hand moves more than the right). This could be due to the ability of the right hemisphere in operating at levels of reduced arousal (arousal hypothesis) or to its superior spatial abilities (motor specificity hypothesis), or it could indicate a greater need for sleep in the left hemisphere (homeostatic hypothesis). Since only the latter hypothesis predicts that the repatterning should be present in the first part of sleep (i.e., when the homeostatic processes are more pronounced), the present study evaluated whether actigraphic data are consistent with this prediction. Sixteen right-handed college students wore actigraphs (AMI 16K) on both upper and lower limbs for about 56 hours. Factorial ANOVAS were carried out on side (left vs right) and part (first vs second) of the recording period during sleep and waking. During waking, the right hand showed more intense motor activity as compared to the left. During sleep, in the first part of the night, the right hand lost this advantage, while in the second part of the night it regained its superiority. Since this repatterning was specific for hand movements and no difference was found in overall motor activity and in arousal between the two parts of the sleep period, the results are interpreted as consistent with the homeostatic hypothesis.

  5. Electroencephalographic and clinical features of cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    Crawley, J; Smith, S; Muthinji, P; Marsh, K; Kirkham, F

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Seizures are a prominent feature of childhood cerebral malaria, and are associated with an increased risk of death and neurological sequelae. We present the electroencephalographic (EEG) findings from a detailed clinical and electrophysiological study.
METHODS—Children with cerebral malaria had EEGs recorded within six hours of admission, and at 12 hourly intervals until recovery of consciousness. Ten deeply comatose children underwent intracranial pressure monitoring. Children were not mechanically ventilated, which made it possible to directly correlate the clinical and EEG findings.
RESULTS—Of 65 children aged 9 months and above, 40 had one or more seizures, and 18 had an episode of status epilepticus. Most seizures were partial motor, and spike wave activity consistently arose from the posterior temporo-parietal region, a border zone area lying between territories supplied by the carotid and vertebrobasilar circulations. Fifteen children had seizures that were clinically subtle or electrographic. Clinical seizures were associated with an abrupt rise in intracranial pressure. Fifty children recovered fully, seven died, and eight had persistent neurological sequelae. Initial EEG recordings of very slow frequency, or with background asymmetry, burst suppression, or interictal discharges, were associated with an adverse outcome.
CONCLUSIONS—Serial EEG recording has uncovered a range of clinical, subtle, and electrographic seizures complicating childhood cerebral malaria, and has emphasised their importance in the pathogenesis of coma. Further work is required to determine the most appropriate regimen for the prophylaxis and treatment of seizures in cerebral malaria, in order to improve outcome.

 PMID:11207176

  6. Forward-backward asymmetries of atomic photoelectrons.

    SciTech Connect

    Biheux, J. C.; Dunford, R. W.; Gemmell, D. S.; Hasegawa, S.; Kanter, E. P.; Krassig, B.; Southworth, S. H.; Young, L.

    1999-01-19

    When atomic photoionization is treated beyond the dipole approximation, photoelectron angular distributions are asymmetric forward and backward with respect to the direction of the photon beam. We have measured forward-backward asymmetries of Ar 1s and Kr 1s and 2s photoelectrons using 2-19 keV x-rays. The measured asymmetries compare well with calculations which include interference between electric-dipole and electric-quadrupole amplitudes within the nonrelativistic, independent-particle approximations.

  7. Bottom production asymmetries at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Norrbin, E.; Vogt, R.

    1999-01-01

    We present results on bottom hadron production asymmetries at the LHC within both the Lund string fragmentation model and the intrinsic bottom model. The main aspects of the models are summarized and specific predictions for pp collisions at 14 TeV are given. Asymmetries are found to be very small at central rapidities increasing to a few percent at forward rapidities. At very large rapidities intrinsic production could dominate but this region is probably out of reach of any experiment.

  8. Cryptic asymmetry: unreliable signals mask asymmetric performance of crayfish weapons

    PubMed Central

    Angilletta, Michael J.; Wilson, Robbie S.

    2012-01-01

    Animals commonly use their limbs as signals and weapons during territorial aggression. Asymmetries of limb performance that do not relate to asymmetries of limb size (cryptic asymmetry) could substantially affect disputes, but this phenomenon has not been considered beyond primates. We investigated cryptic asymmetry in male crayfish (Cherax dispar), which commonly use unreliable signals of strength during aggression. Although the strength of a chela can vary by an order of magnitude for a given size, we found repeatable asymmetries of strength that were only weakly related to asymmetries of size. Size-adjusted strength of chelae and the asymmetry of strength between chelae were highly repeatable between environmental conditions, suggesting that asymmetries of strength stemmed from variation in capacity rather than motivation. Cryptic asymmetry adds another dimension of uncertainty during conflict between animals, which could influence the evolution of unreliable signals and morphological asymmetry. PMID:22417793

  9. Cryptic asymmetry: unreliable signals mask asymmetric performance of crayfish weapons.

    PubMed

    Angilletta, Michael J; Wilson, Robbie S

    2012-08-23

    Animals commonly use their limbs as signals and weapons during territorial aggression. Asymmetries of limb performance that do not relate to asymmetries of limb size (cryptic asymmetry) could substantially affect disputes, but this phenomenon has not been considered beyond primates. We investigated cryptic asymmetry in male crayfish (Cherax dispar), which commonly use unreliable signals of strength during aggression. Although the strength of a chela can vary by an order of magnitude for a given size, we found repeatable asymmetries of strength that were only weakly related to asymmetries of size. Size-adjusted strength of chelae and the asymmetry of strength between chelae were highly repeatable between environmental conditions, suggesting that asymmetries of strength stemmed from variation in capacity rather than motivation. Cryptic asymmetry adds another dimension of uncertainty during conflict between animals, which could influence the evolution of unreliable signals and morphological asymmetry.

  10. Asymmetries observed in Saturn's magnetopause geometry.

    PubMed

    Pilkington, N M; Achilleos, N; Arridge, C S; Guio, P; Masters, A; Ray, L C; Sergis, N; Thomsen, M F; Coates, A J; Dougherty, M K

    2015-09-16

    For over 10 years, the Cassini spacecraft has patrolled Saturn's magnetosphere and observed its magnetopause boundary over a wide range of prevailing solar wind and interior plasma conditions. We now have data that enable us to resolve a significant dawn-dusk asymmetry and find that the magnetosphere extends farther from the planet on the dawnside of the planet by 7 ± 1%. In addition, an opposing dawn-dusk asymmetry in the suprathermal plasma pressure adjacent to the magnetopause has been observed. This probably acts to reduce the size asymmetry and may explain the discrepancy between the degree of asymmetry found here and a similar asymmetry found by Kivelson and Jia (2014) using MHD simulations. Finally, these observations sample a wide range of season, allowing the "intrinsic" polar flattening (14 ± 1%) caused by the magnetodisc to be separated from the seasonally induced north-south asymmetry in the magnetopause shape found theoretically (5 ± 1% when the planet's magnetic dipole is tilted away from the Sun by 10-17°).

  11. Asymmetries observed in Saturn's magnetopause geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilkington, N. M.; Achilleos, N.; Arridge, C. S.; Guio, P.; Masters, A.; Ray, L. C.; Sergis, N.; Thomsen, M. F.; Coates, A. J.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2015-09-01

    For over 10 years, the Cassini spacecraft has patrolled Saturn's magnetosphere and observed its magnetopause boundary over a wide range of prevailing solar wind and interior plasma conditions. We now have data that enable us to resolve a significant dawn-dusk asymmetry and find that the magnetosphere extends farther from the planet on the dawnside of the planet by 7 ± 1%. In addition, an opposing dawn-dusk asymmetry in the suprathermal plasma pressure adjacent to the magnetopause has been observed. This probably acts to reduce the size asymmetry and may explain the discrepancy between the degree of asymmetry found here and a similar asymmetry found by Kivelson and Jia (2014) using MHD simulations. Finally, these observations sample a wide range of season, allowing the "intrinsic" polar flattening (14 ± 1%) caused by the magnetodisc to be separated from the seasonally induced north-south asymmetry in the magnetopause shape found theoretically (5 ± 1% when the planet's magnetic dipole is tilted away from the Sun by 10-17°).

  12. Poloidal asymmetries in edge transport barriersa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, R. M.; Theiler, C.; Lipschultz, B.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Reinke, M. L.; Whyte, D.; Hughes, J. W.; Catto, P.; Landreman, M.; Ernst, D.; Chang, C. S.; Hager, R.; Hubbard, A.; Ennever, P.; Walk, J. R.

    2015-05-01

    Measurements of impurities in Alcator C-Mod indicate that in the pedestal region, significant poloidal asymmetries can exist in the impurity density, ion temperature, and main ion density. In light of the observation that ion temperature and electrostatic potential are not constant on a flux surface [Theiler et al., Nucl. Fusion 54, 083017 (2014)], a technique based on total pressure conservation to align profiles measured at separate poloidal locations is presented and applied. Gyrokinetic neoclassical simulations with XGCa support the observed large poloidal variations in ion temperature and density, and that the total pressure is approximately constant on a flux surface. With the updated alignment technique, the observed in-out asymmetry in impurity density is reduced from previous publishing [Churchill et al., Nucl. Fusion 53, 122002 (2013)], but remains substantial ( n z , H / n z , L ˜ 6 ). Candidate asymmetry drivers are explored, showing that neither non-uniform impurity sources nor localized fluctuation-driven transport are able to explain satisfactorily the impurity density asymmetry. Since impurity density asymmetries are only present in plasmas with strong electron density gradients, and radial transport timescales become comparable to parallel transport timescales in the pedestal region, it is suggested that global transport effects relating to the strong electron density gradients in the pedestal are the main driver for the pedestal in-out impurity density asymmetry.

  13. Cerebral Lateralization is Protective in the Very Prematurely Born.

    PubMed

    Scheinost, Dustin; Lacadie, Cheryl; Vohr, Betty R; Schneider, Karen C; Papademetris, Xenophon; Constable, R Todd; Ment, Laura R

    2015-07-01

    Individuals born prematurely are at risk for developmental delay, and converging data suggest alterations in neural networks in the developing preterm brain. Nevertheless, those critical period processes such as cerebral lateralization that underlie these findings remain largely unexplored. To test the hypothesis that preterm birth alters the fundamental program of corticogenesis in the developing brain, we interrogated cerebral lateralization at rest in very prematurely born participants and term controls at young adulthood. Employing a novel, voxel-based measure of functional connectivity, these data demonstrate for the first time that cerebral lateralization of functional connectivity in right hemisphere language homologs is altered for very preterm participants. Very preterm participants with no evidence for severe brain injury exhibited a significant decrease in right hemisphere lateralization in the right parietal and temporal lobes in this data driven analysis. Further, for the very preterm participants, but not the term participants, these fundamental alterations in the cerebral lateralization for language significantly correlate with language scores. These findings provide evidence that cerebral asymmetry is both plastic and experiential, and suggest the need for further study of underlying environmental factors responsible for these changes.

  14. STUDIES IN CEREBRAL METABOLISM

    PubMed Central

    Gordan, Gilbert S.; Adams, John E.; Bentinck, Richard C.; Eisenberg, Eugene; Harper, Harold; Hobson, Quentin J. G.

    1953-01-01

    In numerous clinical observations, it has been noted that steroid hormones have effects upon the central nervous system. Earlier interpretations of this relationship were largely speculative until newer methods permitted quantitation of actions of hormones and hormonal deficiencies on cerebral metabolism. The present studies indicate that certain steroids which affect behavior also influence cerebral metabolism. PMID:13019600

  15. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, R; Ramadan, H; Bamford, J

    2013-01-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is an underdiagnosed condition which usually presents as severe headache with or without neurological deficit. We report the case of a 55-year-old woman who presented with headache and multifocal intracerebral haemorrhage. We review the literature regarding the presentation, pathophysiology and management of RCVS and discuss how to differentiate it from cerebral vasculitis.

  16. Cerebral Palsy (CP) Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... SSI file Error processing SSI file Pop Quiz: Cerebral Palsy Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Sandy is the parent of a child with cerebral palsy and the Board President of Gio’s Garden , a ...

  17. Chronic Pain and Complementary Health Approaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... More information on complementary health approaches for osteoarthritis Rheumatoid arthritis The amount of research on mind and body practices for rheumatoid arthritis pain is too small for conclusions to be ...

  18. Integrative Medicine and Complementary and Alternative Therapies

    MedlinePlus

    ... effective. Because of the emotional and physical toll cancer and its treatment takes, many people are turning to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies to provide relief and increase their sense of ...

  19. Office of Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Highlights CAM Highlights from NCI-Yoga and Cancer Spring 2013 Newsletter now available NCI’s newest CAM Annual Report now available Topics in Complementary and Alternative Therapies (PDQ®) High-Dose Vitamin C (PDQ®) summary now ...

  20. 6 Tips: IBS and Complementary Health Practices

    MedlinePlus

    ... Personnel and Veterans 5 Myths About Popular Natural Products Marketed for Disease Prevention and Wellness 5 Things to Know About Complementary Health Approaches for Parkinson’s Disease 7 Things To Know About ...

  1. Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Chronic Constipation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chronic constipation, an ancient disease, is prevalent, and costly in the general population. Complementary and alternative therapies are frequently used for constipation. This review introduces various methods of complementary and alternative therapies, including acupuncture, moxibustion, massage, and herbal medicine. Efficacy, safety, influence factors, sham control design, and mechanisms of these therapies are discussed and evaluated. Acupuncture or electroacupuncture was found to be most commonly used for constipation among these complementary and alternative therapies, followed by herbal medicine. Although only a small number of clinical studies are flawless, our review of the literature seems to suggest that acupuncture or electroacupuncture and herbal medicine are effective in treating constipation, whereas findings on massage and moxibustion are inconclusive. More well-designed clinical trials are needed to improve and prove the efficacy of the complementary and alternative therapies for constipation; mechanistic studies that would lead to wide spread use and improvement of the methods are also discussed in this review. PMID:26064163

  2. Sleep Disorders and Complementary Health Approaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... e63773. Gooneratne NS. Complementary and alternative medicine for sleep disturbances in older adults. Clinics in Geriatric Medicine . 2008; ... MV. A pilot study of gentle yoga for sleep disturbance in women with osteoarthritis. Sleep Medicine . 2011;12( ...

  3. Homogenization analysis of complementary waveguide metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landy, Nathan; Hunt, John; Smith, David R.

    2013-11-01

    We analyze the properties of complementary metamaterials as effective inclusions patterned into the conducting walls of metal waveguide structures. We show that guided wave metamaterials can be homogenized using the same retrieval techniques used for volumetric metamaterials, leading to a description in which a given complementary element is conceptually replaced by a block of material within the waveguide whose effective permittivity and permeability result in equivalent scattering characteristics. The use of effective constitutive parameters for waveguide materials provides an alternative point-of-view for the design of waveguide and microstrip based components, including planar lenses and filters, as well as devices with derived from a bulk material response. In addition to imparting effective constitutive properties to the waveguide, complementary metamaterials also couple energy from waveguide modes into radiation. Thus, complementary waveguide metamaterials can be used to modify and optimize a variety of antenna structures.

  4. Introducing complementary medicine into the medical curriculum.

    PubMed Central

    Rampes, H; Sharples, F; Maragh, S; Fisher, P

    1997-01-01

    We surveyed the deans of British medical schools to determine the provision of complementary medicine in the undergraduate curriculum. We also sampled medical students at one British medical school to determine their knowledge of, and views on instruction in, complementary medicine. There is little education in complementary medicine at British medical schools, but it is an area of active curriculum development. Students' levels of knowledge vary widely between different therapies. Most medical students would like to learn about acupuncture, hypnosis, homoeopathy and osteopathy. We conclude that complementary medicine should be included in the medical undergraduate curriculum. This could be done without a great increase in teaching of facts, and could serve as a vehicle to introduce broader issues, as recommended by the General Medical Council. PMID:9059376

  5. Complementary therapies for depression: an overview.

    PubMed

    Ernst, E; Rand, J I; Stevinson, C

    1998-11-01

    Depression is one of the most common reasons for using complementary and alternative therapies. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the evidence available on the treatment of depression with complementary therapies. Systematic literature searches were performed using several databases, reference list searching, and inquiry to colleagues. Data extraction followed a predefined protocol. The amount of rigorous scientific data to support the efficacy of complementary therapies in the treatment of depression is extremely limited. The areas with the most evidence for beneficial effects are exercise, herbal therapy (Hypericum perforatum), and, to a lesser extent, acupuncture and relaxation therapies. There is a need for further research involving randomized controlled trials into the efficacy of complementary and alternative therapies in the treatment of depression.

  6. Reciprocal organization of the cerebral hemispheres

    PubMed Central

    McGilchrist, Iain

    2010-01-01

    The cerebral hemispheres are anatomically and neurophysiologically asymmetrical. The evolutionary basis for these differences remains uncertain. There are, however, highly consistent differences between the hemispheres, evident in reptiles, birds, and mammals, as well as in humans, in the nature of the attention each applies to the environment. This permits the simultaneous application of precisely focused, but narrow, attention, needed for grasping food or prey, with broad, open, and uncommitted attention, needed to watch out for predators and to interpret the intentions of conspecifics. These different modes of attention can account for a very wide range of repeated observations relating to hemisphere specialization, and suggest that hemisphere differences lie not in discrete functional domains as such, but distinct modes of functioning within any one domain. These modes of attention are mutually incompatible, and their application depends on inhibitory transmission in the corpus callosum. There is also an asymmetry of interaction between the hemispheres at the phenomenological level. PMID:21319495

  7. Exponential Gaussian approach for spectral modelling: The EGO algorithm II. Band asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompilio, Loredana; Pedrazzi, Giuseppe; Cloutis, Edward A.; Craig, Michael A.; Roush, Ted L.

    2010-08-01

    The present investigation is complementary to a previous paper which introduced the EGO approach to spectral modelling of reflectance measurements acquired in the visible and near-IR range (Pompilio, L., Pedrazzi, G., Sgavetti, M., Cloutis, E.A., Craig, M.A., Roush, T.L. [2009]. Icarus, 201 (2), 781-794). Here, we show the performances of the EGO model in attempting to account for temperature-induced variations in spectra, specifically band asymmetry. Our main goals are: (1) to recognize and model thermal-induced band asymmetry in reflectance spectra; (2) to develop a basic approach for decomposition of remotely acquired spectra from planetary surfaces, where effects due to temperature variations are most prevalent; (3) to reduce the uncertainty related to quantitative estimation of band position and depth when band asymmetry is occurring. In order to accomplish these objectives, we tested the EGO algorithm on a number of measurements acquired on powdered pyroxenes at sample temperature ranging from 80 up to 400 K. The main results arising from this study are: (1) EGO model is able to numerically account for the occurrence of band asymmetry on reflectance spectra; (2) the returned set of EGO parameters can suggest the influence of some additional effect other than the electronic transition responsible for the absorption feature; (3) the returned set of EGO parameters can help in estimating the surface temperature of a planetary body; (4) the occurrence of absorptions which are less affected by temperature variations can be mapped for minerals and thus used for compositional estimates. Further work is still required in order to analyze the behaviour of the EGO algorithm with respect to temperature-induced band asymmetry using powdered pyroxene spanning a range of compositions and grain sizes and more complex band shapes.

  8. Speech processing: from peripheral to hemispheric asymmetry of the auditory system.

    PubMed

    Lazard, Diane S; Collette, Jean-Louis; Perrot, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Language processing from the cochlea to auditory association cortices shows side-dependent specificities with an apparent left hemispheric dominance. The aim of this article was to propose to nonspeech specialists a didactic review of two complementary theories about hemispheric asymmetry in speech processing. Starting from anatomico-physiological and clinical observations of auditory asymmetry and interhemispheric connections, this review then exposes behavioral (dichotic listening paradigm) as well as functional (functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography) experiments that assessed hemispheric specialization for speech processing. Even though speech at an early phonological level is regarded as being processed bilaterally, a left-hemispheric dominance exists for higher-level processing. This asymmetry may arise from a segregation of the speech signal, broken apart within nonprimary auditory areas in two distinct temporal integration windows--a fast one on the left and a slower one on the right--modeled through the asymmetric sampling in time theory or a spectro-temporal trade-off, with a higher temporal resolution in the left hemisphere and a higher spectral resolution in the right hemisphere, modeled through the spectral/temporal resolution trade-off theory. Both theories deal with the concept that lower-order tuning principles for acoustic signal might drive higher-order organization for speech processing. However, the precise nature, mechanisms, and origin of speech processing asymmetry are still being debated. Finally, an example of hemispheric asymmetry alteration, which has direct clinical implications, is given through the case of auditory aging that mixes peripheral disorder and modifications of central processing.

  9. Partial focusing by indefinite complementary metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Qiang; Liu, Ruopeng; Mock, Jack J.; Cui, Tie Jun; Smith, David R.

    2008-09-01

    We have experimentally realized a two-dimensional partial focusing within a planar waveguide using complementary indefinite metamaterials. When the electric fields emitted from the dipole are TE polarized, the focusing condition requires negative magnetic response in the propagation direction of the waveguide, which can be achieved by the complementary electric resonator (CELC) structures. We have carefully designed the experimental configurations and the dimensions for the CELC structures. The experimental result is consistent with the theoretical prediction, which validates the partial focusing phenomenon.

  10. AMED: The Allied and Complementary Medicine Database.

    PubMed

    Vardell, Emily

    2016-01-01

    AMED: The Allied and Complementary Medicine Database is a resource from the Health Care Information Service of the British Library. AMED offers access to complementary and alternative medicine topics, such as acupuncture, chiropractic, herbalism, homeopathy, hospice care, hypnosis, palliative care, physiotherapy, podiatry, and rehabilitation. This column features a sample search to demonstrate the type of information available within AMED. AMED is available through the EBSCOhost and OVID platforms.

  11. Management of cancer pain with complementary therapies.

    PubMed

    2007-04-01

    Pain is one of the most feared consequences of cancer. Pain is a major symptom in 75% of hospitalized cancer patients. Poorly relieved pain contributes to the suffering of the patient and family, which may motivate them to seek additional complementary and alternative therapies. Evidence-based complementary therapies are being used for symptom control and to improve quality of life. There is recent research on several complementary therapies-acupuncture, mind-body therapies, massage, reflexology, and Reiki--that provides evidence for pain management. These therapies are not well utilized due to a lack of information on benefits, risks, and resources. There is a call for education to alert patients, families, nurses, and physicians to the benefits of evidence-based complementary therapies and to the dangers of "unproven" cancer therapies. Oncology nurses are ideally positioned to assess patients' pain, to educate patients, to determine with the patient and physician the most appropriate and safe complementary therapy for pain, to refer patients to appropriate resources, and in some cases to provide the therapy itself. This article will discuss specific complementary therapies for pain control and will arm nurses with the confidence to intervene with knowledge, referrals, and ideas for hands-on implementation.

  12. Detraditionalisation, gender and alternative and complementary medicines.

    PubMed

    Sointu, Eeva

    2011-03-01

    This article is premised on the importance of locating the appeal and meaning of alternative and complementary medicines in the context of gendered identities. I argue that the discourse of wellbeing--captured in many alternative and complementary health practices--is congruent with culturally prevalent ideals of self-fulfilling, authentic, unique and self-responsible subjectivity. The discourse of wellbeing places the self at the centre, thus providing a contrast with traditional ideas of other-directed and caring femininity. As such, involvement in alternative and complementary medicines is entwined with a negotiation of shifting femininities in detraditionalising societies. Simultaneously, many alternative and complementary health practices readily tap into and reproduce traditional representations of caring femininity. It is through an emphasis on emotional honesty and intimacy that the discourse of wellbeing also captures a challenge to traditional ideas of masculinity. Expectations and experiences relating to gender add a further level of complexity to the meaningfulness and therapeutic value of alternative and complementary medicines and underlie the gender difference in the utilisation of holistic health practices. I draw on data from a qualitative study with 44, primarily white, middle-class users and practitioners of varied alternative and complementary medicines in the UK.

  13. Cerebral blood flow response pattern during balloon test occlusion of the internal carotid artery

    SciTech Connect

    Witt, J.P.; Yonas, H.; Jungreis, C.

    1994-05-01

    To evaluate the risk of temporary or permanent internal carotid artery occlusion. In 156 patients intraarterial balloon test occlusion in combination with a stable xenon-enhanced CT cerebral blood flow study was performed before radiologic or surgical treatment. All 156 patients passed the clinical balloon test occlusion and underwent a xenon study in combination with a second balloon test. Quantitative flow data were analyzed for absolute changes as well as changes in symmetry. Fourteen patients exhibited reduced flow values between 20 and 30 mL/100 g per minute, an absolute decrease in flow, and significant asymmetry in the middle cerebral artery territory during balloon test occlusion. These patients would be considered at high risk for cerebral infarction if internal carotid artery occlusion were to be performed. With one exception they belonged to a group (class I) of 61 patients who showed bilateral or ipsilateral flow decrease and significant asymmetry with lower flow on the side of occlusion. The other 95 patients, who showed a variety of cerebral blood flow response patterns including ipsilateral or bilateral flow increase, were at moderate (class II) or low (class III) stroke risk. In contrast to these findings, exclusively qualitative flow analysis failed to identify the patients at high risk: a threshold with an asymmetry index of 10% revealed only 16% specificity whereas an asymmetry index of 45% showed only 61% sensitivity for detection of low flow areas (<30 mL/100 g per minute). For achieving a minimal hemodynamic related-stroke rate associated with permanent clinical internal carotid artery occlusion we suggest integration of a thorough analysis of quantitative cerebral blood flow data before and during balloon test occlusion. 68 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Movement asymmetry in working polo horses.

    PubMed

    Pfau, T; Parkes, R S; Burden, E R; Bell, N; Fairhurst, H; Witte, T H

    2016-07-01

    The high, repetitive demands imposed on polo horses in training and competition may predispose them to musculoskeletal injuries and lameness. To quantify movement symmetry and lameness in a population of polo horses, and to investigate the existence of a relationship with age. Convenience sampled cross-sectional study. Sixty polo horses were equipped with inertial measurement units (IMUs) attached to the poll, and between the tubera sacrale. Six movement symmetry measures were calculated for vertical head and pelvic displacement during in-hand trot and compared with values for perfect symmetry, compared between left and right limb lame horses, and compared with published thresholds for lameness. Regression lines were calculated as a function of age of horse. Based on 2 different sets of published asymmetry thresholds 52-53% of the horses were quantified with head movement asymmetry and 27-50% with pelvic movement asymmetry resulting in 60-67% of horses being classified with movement asymmetry outside published guideline values for either the forelimbs, hindlimbs or both. Neither forelimb nor hindlimb asymmetries were preferentially left or right sided, with directional asymmetry values across all horses not different from perfect symmetry and absolute values not different between left and right lame horses (P values >0.6 for all forelimb symmetry measures and >0.2 for all hindlimb symmetry measures). None of the symmetry parameters increased or decreased significantly with age. A large proportion of polo horses show gait asymmetries consistent with previously defined thresholds for lameness. These do not appear to be lateralised or associated with age. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  15. [Dextrals and sinistrals (right-handers and left-handers): specificity of interhemispheric brain asymmetry and EEG coherence parameters].

    PubMed

    Zhavoronkova, L A

    2007-01-01

    Data of literature about morphological, functional and biochemical specificity of the brain interhemispheric asymmetry of healthy right-handers and left-handers and about peculiarity of dynamics of cerebral pathology in patients with different individual asymmetry profiles are presented at the present article. Results of our investigation by using coherence parameters of electroencephalogram (EEG) in healthy right-handers and left-handers in state of rest, during functional tests and sleeping and in patients with different forms of the brain organic damage were analyzed too. EEG coherence analysis revealed the reciprocal changing of alpha-beta and theta-delta spectral bands in right-handers whilein left-handers synchronous changing of all EEG spectral bands were observed. Data about regional-frequent specificity of EEG coherence, peculiarity of EEG asymmetry in right-handers and left-handers, aslo about specificity of EEG spectral band genesis and point of view about a role of the brain regulator systems in forming of interhemispheric asymmetry in different functional states allowed to propose the conception about principle of interhermispheric brain asymmetry formation in left-handers and left-handers. Following this conception in dextrals elements of concurrent (summary-reciprocal) cooperation are predominant at the character of interhemispheric and cortical-subcortical interaction while in sinistrals a principle of concordance (supplementary) is preferable. These peculiarities the brain organization determine, from the first side, the quicker revovery of functions damaged after cranio-cerebral trauma in left-handers in comparison right-handers and from the other side - they determine the forming of the more expressed pathology in the remote terms after exposure the low dose of radiation.

  16. Is Complementary and Alternative Therapy Effective for Women in the Climacteric Period?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Young; Ryu, Aeli

    2015-01-01

    Vasomotor symptoms start about 2 years prior to menopause in women who are approaching menopause, and early menopause symptoms appear including emotional disturbance and anxiety, followed by physical changes such as vaginal dryness, urinary incontinence and skin wrinkles. As time progresses, osteoporosis, cardiovascular diseases, and dementia occur consecutively. Hormone therapy is primarily considered for the relief of menopause symptoms in postmenopausal women. However, as hormone replacement has emerged as a therapy that increases the potential risk of thrombosis, cerebral infarction and breast cancer, complementary and alternative medicine has drawn much attention. This study aimed to examine the types and effects of evidence-based complementary and alternative therapies that are currently used. PMID:26046035

  17. Analytical formulation of lunar cratering asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nan; Zhou, Ji-Lin

    2016-10-01

    Context. The cratering asymmetry of a bombarded satellite is related to both its orbit and impactors. The inner solar system impactor populations, that is, the main-belt asteroids (MBAs) and the near-Earth objects (NEOs), have dominated during the late heavy bombardment (LHB) and ever since, respectively. Aims: We formulate the lunar cratering distribution and verify the cratering asymmetries generated by the MBAs as well as the NEOs. Methods: Based on a planar model that excludes the terrestrial and lunar gravitations on the impactors and assuming the impactor encounter speed with Earth venc is higher than the lunar orbital speed vM, we rigorously integrated the lunar cratering distribution, and derived its approximation to the first order of vM/venc. Numerical simulations of lunar bombardment by the MBAs during the LHB were performed with an Earth-Moon distance aM = 20-60 Earth radii in five cases. Results: The analytical model directly proves the existence of a leading/trailing asymmetry and the absence of near/far asymmetry. The approximate form of the leading/trailing asymmetry is (1 + A1cosβ), which decreases as the apex distance β increases. The numerical simulations show evidence of a pole/equator asymmetry as well as the leading/trailing asymmetry, and the former is empirically described as (1 + A2cos2ϕ), which decreases as the latitude modulus | ϕ | increases. The amplitudes A1,2 are reliable measurements of asymmetries. Our analysis explicitly indicates the quantitative relations between cratering distribution and bombardment conditions (impactor properties and the lunar orbital status) like A1 ∝ vM/venc, resulting in a method for reproducing the bombardment conditions through measuring the asymmetry. Mutual confirmation between analytical model and numerical simulations is found in terms of the cratering distribution and its variation with aM. Estimates of A1 for crater density distributions generated by the MBAs and the NEOs are 0.101-0.159 and 0

  18. The Inherent Asymmetry of DNA Replication.

    PubMed

    Snedeker, Jonathan; Wooten, Matthew; Chen, Xin

    2017-08-11

    Semiconservative DNA replication has provided an elegant solution to the fundamental problem of how life is able to proliferate in a way that allows cells, organisms, and populations to survive and replicate many times over. Somewhat lost, however, in our admiration for this elegant mechanism is an appreciation for the asymmetries that occur in the process of DNA replication. As we discuss in this review, these asymmetries arise as a consequence of the structure of the DNA molecule and the enzymatic mechanism of DNA synthesis. Increasing evidence suggests that asymmetries inDNAreplication are able to play a central role in the processes of adaptation and evolution by shaping the mutagenic landscape of cells. Additionally, in eukaryotes, recent work has demonstrated that the inherent asymmetries in DNA replication may play an important role in the process of chromatin replication. As chromatin plays an essential role in defining cell identity, asymmetries generated during the process of DNA replication may play critical roles in cell fate dicisions related to patterning and development. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Cell and Developmental Biology Volume 33 is October 6, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  19. Quantum asymmetry between time and space.

    PubMed

    Vaccaro, Joan A

    2016-01-01

    An asymmetry exists between time and space in the sense that physical systems inevitably evolve over time, whereas there is no corresponding ubiquitous translation over space. The asymmetry, which is presumed to be elemental, is represented by equations of motion and conservation laws that operate differently over time and space. If, however, the asymmetry was found to be due to deeper causes, this conventional view of time evolution would need reworking. Here we show, using a sum-over-paths formalism, that a violation of time reversal (T) symmetry might be such a cause. If T symmetry is obeyed, then the formalism treats time and space symmetrically such that states of matter are localized both in space and in time. In this case, equations of motion and conservation laws are undefined or inapplicable. However, if T symmetry is violated, then the same sum over paths formalism yields states that are localized in space and distributed without bound over time, creating an asymmetry between time and space. Moreover, the states satisfy an equation of motion (the Schrödinger equation) and conservation laws apply. This suggests that the time-space asymmetry is not elemental as currently presumed, and that T violation may have a deep connection with time evolution.

  20. Hemispheric asymmetries in cortical and subcortical anatomy.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xiaojian; Herron, Timothy J; Ettlinger, Marc; Woods, David L

    2015-01-01

    Previous research studies have reported many hemispherical asymmetries in cortical and subcortical anatomy, but only a subset of findings is consistent across studies. Here, we used improved Freesurfer-based automated methods to analyse the properties of the cortex and seven subcortical structures in 138 young adult subjects. Male and female subjects showed similar hemispheric asymmetries in gyral and sulcal structures, with many areas associated with language processing enlarged in the left hemisphere (LH) and a number of areas associated with visuospatial processing enlarged in the right hemisphere (RH). In addition, we found greater (non-directional) cortical asymmetries in subjects with larger brains. Asymmetries in subcortical structures included larger LH volumes of thalamus, putamen and globus pallidus and larger RH volumes of the cerebellum and the amygdala. We also found significant correlations between the subcortical structural volumes, particularly of the thalamus and cerebellum, with cortical area. These results help to resolve some of the inconsistencies in previous studies of hemispheric asymmetries in brain anatomy.

  1. Quantum asymmetry between time and space

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    An asymmetry exists between time and space in the sense that physical systems inevitably evolve over time, whereas there is no corresponding ubiquitous translation over space. The asymmetry, which is presumed to be elemental, is represented by equations of motion and conservation laws that operate differently over time and space. If, however, the asymmetry was found to be due to deeper causes, this conventional view of time evolution would need reworking. Here we show, using a sum-over-paths formalism, that a violation of time reversal (T) symmetry might be such a cause. If T symmetry is obeyed, then the formalism treats time and space symmetrically such that states of matter are localized both in space and in time. In this case, equations of motion and conservation laws are undefined or inapplicable. However, if T symmetry is violated, then the same sum over paths formalism yields states that are localized in space and distributed without bound over time, creating an asymmetry between time and space. Moreover, the states satisfy an equation of motion (the Schrödinger equation) and conservation laws apply. This suggests that the time–space asymmetry is not elemental as currently presumed, and that T violation may have a deep connection with time evolution. PMID:26997899

  2. Predicting combinations of left and right asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Annett, M

    2000-09-01

    This paper explains how combinations of asymmetries for pairs of laterality variables may be predicted. It shows that many pairs combine as expected by chance, plus the influence of the RS+ gene hypothesised by Annett (1978, 1985). These include: eye dominance with writing hand, with throwing hand, and with foot for kicking; nonright handedness with planum temporale asymmetry, with asymmetry of the parietal operculum, and the association between these two anatomical asymmetries. Handedness for writing and throwing, and hand and foot preferences are more strongly associated, suggesting the presence of an additional influence. The reliability of the present analyses was supported by replication, especially in findings for hand preferences for writing and throwing described by Gilbert and Wysocki (1992). The relative frequencies of discordant patterns of preference, LR (writing, throwing) versus RL, are a function of the frequencies of the two variables in the population. These differ between age groups and also with the classification of 'either' hand preferences. Patterns of preference for writing, throwing and eye-dominance (RRR, RRL etc) are related in an orderly manner to differences between the hands for peg moving time. The success of the present application of the RS theory strengthens the argument that individual differences for hand preference depend on a continuous distribution of asymmetry, not on the 'types' commonly assumed in the literature.

  3. Corrections to quark asymmetries at LEP

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, A.; Monig, K.; /DESY, Zeuthen

    2004-11-01

    The most precise measurement of the weak mixing angle sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub eff}{sup l} at LEP is from the forward-backward asymmetry e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} b{bar b} at the Z-pole. In this note the QED and electroweak radiative corrections to obtain the pole asymmetry from the measured asymmetry for b- and c-quarks have been calculated using ZFITTER, which has been amended to allow a consistent treatment of partial two-loop corrections for the b-quark final asymmetries. A total correction of {delta}A{sub FB}{sup b} = 0.0019 {+-} 0.0002 and {delta}A{sub FB}{sup c} = 0.0064 {+-} 0.0001 has been found, where the remaining theoretical uncertainty is much too small to explain the apparent discrepancy between sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub eff}{sup l} obtained from A{sub FB}{sup b} and from the left-right asymmetry at SLD.

  4. Toroidal current asymmetry in tokamak disruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, H. R.

    2014-10-15

    It was discovered on JET that disruptions were accompanied by toroidal asymmetry of the toroidal plasma current I{sub ϕ}. It was found that the toroidal current asymmetry was proportional to the vertical current moment asymmetry with positive sign for an upward vertical displacement event (VDE) and negative sign for a downward VDE. It was observed that greater displacement leads to greater measured I{sub ϕ} asymmetry. Here, it is shown that this is essentially a kinematic effect produced by a VDE interacting with three dimensional MHD perturbations. The relation of toroidal current asymmetry and vertical current moment is calculated analytically and is verified by numerical simulations. It is shown analytically that the toroidal variation of the toroidal plasma current is accompanied by an equal and opposite variation of the toroidal current flowing in a thin wall surrounding the plasma. These currents are connected by 3D halo current, which is π/2 radians out of phase with the n = 1 toroidal current variations.

  5. Asymmetry of the Brain: Development and Implications.

    PubMed

    Duboc, Véronique; Dufourcq, Pascale; Blader, Patrick; Roussigné, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Although the left and right hemispheres of our brains develop with a high degree of symmetry at both the anatomical and functional levels, it has become clear that subtle structural differences exist between the two sides and that each is dominant in processing specific cognitive tasks. As the result of evolutionary conservation or convergence, lateralization of the brain is found in both vertebrates and invertebrates, suggesting that it provides significant fitness for animal life. This widespread feature of hemispheric specialization has allowed the emergence of model systems to study its development and, in some cases, to link anatomical asymmetries to brain function and behavior. Here, we present some of what is known about brain asymmetry in humans and model organisms as well as what is known about the impact of environmental and genetic factors on brain asymmetry development. We specifically highlight the progress made in understanding the development of epithalamic asymmetries in zebrafish and how this model provides an exciting opportunity to address brain asymmetry at different levels of complexity.

  6. Hemispheric asymmetries for simple visual judgments in the split brain.

    PubMed

    Corballis, Paul M; Funnell, Margaret G; Gazzaniga, Michael S

    2002-01-01

    While it is commonly noted that the right cerebral hemisphere is specialized for visuospatial processing, the scope and nature of this specialization remain somewhat ill defined. Our previous research with callosotomy ('split-brain') patients has suggested that the asymmetry may be limited to conditions that have an explicit spatial component. To investigate this we compared the performance of the divided hemispheres of two callosotomy patients on four simple visual-matching tasks. These tasks were orientation discrimination, vernier offset discrimination, size discrimination, and luminance discrimination. In each task, two stimuli were presented briefly to one visual hemifield and the patient was asked to discriminate whether they were the same or different. The first three tasks (orientation, vernier, and size) were all spatial in nature and were performed better by the right hemisphere. The luminance discrimination task, which is non-spatial, was performed equivalently by the two hemispheres. These results support the view that the fundamental difference in visual function between the hemispheres is in the ability to perform spatial discriminations.

  7. Silent ischemic lesion laterality in asymptomatic internal carotid artery stenosis relates to reduced cerebral vasoreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Isozaki, Makoto; Kataoka, Hiroharu; Fukushima, Kazuhito; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Yamada, Naoaki; Iida, Hidehiro; Iihara, Koji

    2017-01-01

    Background: We investigated the relationship between silent ischemic lesions, defined as hyperintense lesions on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans of brain white matter and cerebral hemodynamics (baseline cerebral blood flow and cerebral vasoreactivity). Methods: Between January 2007 and December 2012, 61 patients with asymptomatic internal carotid artery stenosis were evaluated for asymptomatic silent ischemic lesions, acute infarction, and cerebral hemodynamics. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on silent ischemic lesion distribution; the Symmetry group (n = 34) included patients who showed symmetrical distribution of lesions (or had no lesions), and the Asymmetry group (n = 27) included patients with a greater number of lesions in the ipsilateral than that in the contralateral hemisphere. The Asymmetry group was further divided into Internal (n = 15) and External (n = 12) types. Results: Two External-type patients (17%) showed spotty asymptomatic acute infarction in the ipsilateral hemisphere. There were no significant differences in patient characteristics, histopathological findings, vascular risk factors, or cerebral blood flow values between the groups. The mean cerebral vasoreactivity value in the ipsilateral hemisphere for the Internal type was 13.0 ± 15.2% (range: −11.4% to 41.6%), which was significantly lower than values of the contralateral hemisphere (36.7 ± 20.8%; range: 3.9% to 75.7%; P <.01) and ipsilateral hemispheres of the other groups (P <.01). Conclusions: The finding that increased ipsilateral asymmetrical silent ischemic lesions correlated with cerebral vasoreactivity reduction may help predict the risk of cerebral infarction in patients with asymptomatic internal carotid artery stenosis. PMID:28217385

  8. [Complementary and alternative medicine in oncology].

    PubMed

    Hübner, J

    2013-06-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine are frequently used by cancer patients. The main benefit of complementary medicine is that it gives patients the chance to become active. Complementary therapy can reduce the side effects of conventional therapy. However, we have to give due consideration to side effects and interactions: the latter being able to reduce the effectiveness of cancer therapy and so to jeopardise the success of therapy. Therefore, complementary therapy should be managed by the oncologist. It is based on a common concept of cancerogenesis with conventional therapy. Complement therapy can be assessed in studies. Alternative medicine in contrast rejects common rules of evidence-based medicine. It starts from its own concepts of cancerogenesis, which is often in line with the thinking of lay persons. Alternative medicine is offered as either "alternative" to recommended cancer treatment or is used at the same time but without due regard for the interactions. Alternative medicine is a high risk to patients. In the following two parts of the article, the most important complementary and alternative therapies cancer patients use nowadays are presented and assessed according to published evidence.

  9. Growth and complementary feeding in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Lutter, C K

    2012-10-01

    To describe growth patterns of young children in Latin America and the Caribbean, the types of nationally representative data available on complementary feeding practices and complementary feeding practices. Data on growth, timing of introduction of liquids and foods, and complementary feeding practices were abstracted from nationally representative surveys. The high prevalence of stunting relative to the low prevalence of underweight is striking, with the "average" child in the region, with the exception of the Haitian child, short and chubby. The focus of the demographic and health surveys continues to be on undernutrition with only one question, intake of sugary foods, related foods that may have consequences for adult health. The United States has more comprehensive information; Mexico has information on beverage consumption and Brazil on soft drink and biscuit or snack consumption. In 14 of 19 countries, fewer than half of infants are exclusively breastfed for the first 6 months of life, indicating an early introduction of liquids and complementary foods. Among the 5 countries with data on the intake of sugary foods, intake in the previous 24 h among children 6-23 months of age ranged from 14% to 79%. The absence of data to characterize complementary feeding diets as they relate to risk of overweight and chronic diseases in the Region of the Americas calls attention to the need to improve data collection frameworks and methods to address this important gap in knowledge. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Cerebral vasospasm affects arterial critical closing pressure

    PubMed Central

    Varsos, Georgios V; Budohoski, Karol P; Czosnyka, Marek; Kolias, Angelos G; Nasr, Nathalie; Donnelly, Joseph; Liu, Xiuyun; Kim, Dong-Joo; Hutchinson, Peter J; Kirkpatrick, Peter J; Varsos, Vassilis G; Smielewski, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The effect of cerebral vasospasm (CVS) after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) on critical closing pressure (CrCP) has not been fully delineated. Using cerebral impedance methodology, we sought to assess the behavior of CrCP during CVS. As CrCP expresses the sum of intracranial pressure (ICP) and vascular wall tension, we also explored its role in reflecting changes in vascular tone occurring in small vessels distal to spasm. This retrospective analysis was performed using recordings from 52 patients, diagnosed with CVS through transcranial Doppler measurements. Critical closing pressure was calculated noninvasively using arterial blood pressure and blood flow velocity. Outcome was assessed at both discharge and 3 months after ictus with the Glasgow Outcome Scale. The onset of CVS caused significant decreases in CrCP (P=0.025), without any observed significant changes in ICP (P=0.134). Vasospasm induced asymmetry, with CrCP ipsilateral to CVS becoming significantly lower than contralateral (P=0.025). Unfavorable outcomes were associated with a significantly lower CrCP after the onset of CVS (discharge: P=0.014; 3 months after SAH: P=0.020). Critical closing pressure is reduced in the presence of CVS in both temporal and spatial assessments. As ICP remained unchanged during CVS, reduced CrCP most probably reflects a lower wall tension in dilated small vessels distal to spasm. PMID:25465041

  11. Probing lepton asymmetry with 21 cm fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Kohri, Kazunori; Oyama, Yoshihiko; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: oyamayo@post.kek.jp E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the issue of how accurately we can constrain the lepton number asymmetry ξ{sub ν}=μ{sub ν}/T{sub ν} in the Universe by using future observations of 21 cm line fluctuations and cosmic microwave background (CMB). We find that combinations of the 21 cm line and the CMB observations can constrain the lepton asymmetry better than big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). Additionally, we also discuss constraints on ξ{sub ν} in the presence of some extra radiation, and show that the 21 cm line observations can substantially improve the constraints obtained by CMB alone, and allow us to distinguish the effects of the lepton asymmetry from the ones of extra radiation.

  12. Superheavy thermal dark matter and primordial asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramante, Joseph; Unwin, James

    2017-02-01

    The early universe could feature multiple reheating events, leading to jumps in the visible sector entropy density that dilute both particle asymmetries and the number density of frozen-out states. In fact, late time entropy jumps are usually required in models of Affleck-Dine baryogenesis, which typically produces an initial particle-antiparticle asymmetry that is much too large. An important consequence of late time dilution, is that a smaller dark matter annihilation cross section is needed to obtain the observed dark matter relic density. For cosmologies with high scale baryogenesis, followed by radiation-dominated dark matter freeze-out, we show that the perturbative unitarity mass bound on thermal relic dark matter is relaxed to 1010 GeV. We proceed to study superheavy asym-metric dark matter models, made possible by a sizable entropy injection after dark matter freeze-out, and identify how the Affleck-Dine mechanism would generate the baryon and dark asymmetries.

  13. Preliminary Proton Spin Asymmetry Results from SANE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, James

    2010-11-01

    The Spin Asymetries of the Nucleon Experiment (SANE) is a measurement of parallel and near-perpendicular double spin asymmetries in an inclusive electron scattering experiment, with the aim of calculating the spin asymmetry of the proton A^1p and spin structure function g^2p. Using Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility's polarized electron beam and the University of Virginia's polarized frozen ammonia (^14NH3) target in Hall C, the experiment ran in 2009, collecting data in a Q^2 region from 2.5 to 6.5 GeV^2 in a Bjorken x region of 0.3 to 0.8. Particle detection was accomplished using the Big Electron Telescope Array (BETA), a novel non-magnetic detector array with a 194 msr acceptance. This talk will address the progress of the analysis toward the calculation of the proton spin asymmetry and structure functions, including calibration of the BETA detectors, event selection, and preliminary results.

  14. CP asymmetries in semiinclusive B0 decays

    SciTech Connect

    Dunietz, I.

    1999-02-01

    It was recently pointed out that inclusive B^0(t) decays could show CP violation. The totally inclusive asymmetry is expected to be tiny [O(10^{-3})] because of large cancellations among the asymmetries in the charmless, single charm and double charm final states. Enriching particular final state configurations could significantly increase the CP-asymmetry and observability. Such studies can extract fundamental CKM (Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa) parameters, and (perhaps) even Delta m(B_s). A superb vertex detector could see CP violation with 10^5 (10^6) flavor-tagged B_s (B_d) mesons within the CKM model. Because the effects could be significantly larger due to new physics, they should be searched for in existing or soon available data samples.

  15. Gain loss asymmetry for emerging stock markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpio, Krzysztof; Załuska–Kotur, Magdalena A.; Orłowski, Arkadiusz

    2007-03-01

    Stock indexes for some European emerging markets are analyzed using an investment-horizon approach. Austrian ATX index and Dow Jones have been studied and compared with several emerging European markets. The optimal investment horizons are plotted as a function of an absolute return value. Gain-loss asymmetry, originally found for American DJIA index, is observed for all analyzed data. It is shown, that this asymmetry has different character for emerging and for established markets. For established markets, gain curve lies typically above loss curve, whereas in the case of emerging markets the situation is just the opposite. We propose a measure quantifying the gain-loss asymmetry that clearly exhibits a difference between emerging and established markets.

  16. Effect of stress on structural brain asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Zach, Petr; Vales, Karel; Stuchlik, Ales; Cermakova, Pavla; Mrzilkova, Jana; Koutela, Antonella; Kutova, Martina

    2016-09-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that stressful events may affect the brain not only as a whole, but also in multiple laterality aspects. The present review is aimed at discussing the effect of stress and stress hormones on structural brain asymmetry. Differences and crossroads of functional and structural asymmetry are briefly mentioned throughout the document. The first part of this review summarizes major findings in the field of structural brain asymmetries in animals and humans from the evolutionary perspective. Additionally, effect of stress on animals is discussed generally. The second part then explores asymmetrical effects of stress on structural changes of principal brain areas - amygdala, hippocampus, neocortex, diencephalon, basal forebrain and basal ganglia from the point of normal lateralization, steroids, trauma and genetic factors. At the end we present hypothesis why stress appears to have asymmetrical effects on lateralized brain structures.

  17. Frontal alpha asymmetry and sexually motivated states.

    PubMed

    Prause, Nicole; Staley, Cameron; Roberts, Verena

    2014-03-01

    Anterior alpha asymmetry of electroencephalographic (EEG) signals has been suggested to index state approach (or avoidance) motivation. This model has not yet been extended to high approach-motivation sexual stimuli, which may represent an important model of reward system function. Sixty-five participants viewed a neutral and a sexually motivating film while their EEG was recorded, and reported their sexual feelings after each film. Greater alpha power in the left hemisphere during sexually motivated states was evident. A positive relationship between self-reported mental sexual arousal and alpha asymmetry was identified, where coherence between these indicators was higher in women. Notably, coherence was stronger when mental versus physical sexual arousal was rated. Alpha asymmetry appears to offer a new method for further examining this novel coherence pattern across men and women.

  18. Asymmetry dependence of the nuclear caloric curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, A. B.; Bonasera, A.; Cammarata, P.; Hagel, K.; Heilborn, L.; Kohley, Z.; Mabiala, J.; May, L. W.; Marini, P.; Raphelt, A.; Souliotis, G. A.; Wuenschel, S.; Zarrella, A.; Yennello, S. J.

    2013-02-01

    A basic feature of the nuclear equation of state is not yet understood: the dependence of the nuclear caloric curve on the neutron-proton asymmetry. Predictions of theoretical models differ on the magnitude and even the sign of this dependence. In this work, the nuclear caloric curve is examined for fully reconstructed quasi-projectiles around mass A = 50. The caloric curve extracted with the momentum quadrupole fluctuation thermometer shows that the temperature varies linearly with quasi-projectile asymmetry N-Z/A. An increase in asymmetry of 0.15 units corresponds to a decrease in temperature on the order of 1 MeV. These results also highlight the importance of a full quasi-projectile reconstruction in the study of thermodynamic properties of hot nuclei.

  19. Asymmetry Dependence of the Nuclear Caloric Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, A. B.; Bonasera, A.; Cammarata, P.; Hagel, K.; Heilborn, L.; Kohley, Z.; Mabiala, J.; May, L. W.; Marini, P.; Raphelt, A.; Souliotis, G. A.; Wuenschel, S.; Zarrella, A.; Yennello, S. J.

    2013-03-01

    A basic feature of the nuclear equation of state is not yet understood: the dependence of the nuclear caloric curve on the neutron-proton asymmetry. Predictions of theoretical models differ on the magnitude and even the sign of this dependence. In this work, the nuclear caloric curve is examined for fully reconstructed quasi-projectiles around mass A = 50. Two independent thermometers, the momentum quadrupole fluctuation thermometer and the Albergo yield ratio thermometer, are used to extract the caloric curve. For both methods, the caloric curve extracted shows that the temperature varies linearly with quasi-projectile asymmetry For the momentum quadrupole fluctuation thermometer, an increase in asymmetry of 0.15 units corresponds to a decrease in temperature on the order of 1 MeV. These results also highlight the importance of a full quasi-projectile reconstruction in the study of thermodynamic properties of hot nuclei.

  20. Early-light embryonic stimulation suggests a second route, via gene activation, to cerebral lateralization in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Chiandetti, Cinzia; Galliussi, Jessica; Andrew, Richard J.; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Genetic factors determine the asymmetrical position of vertebrate embryos allowing asymmetric environmental stimulation to shape cerebral lateralization. In birds, late-light stimulation, just before hatching, on the right optic nerve triggers anatomical and functional cerebral asymmetries. However, some brain asymmetries develop in absence of embryonic light stimulation. Furthermore, early-light action affects lateralization in the transparent zebrafish embryos before their visual system is functional. Here we investigated whether another pathway intervenes in establishing brain specialization. We exposed chicks' embryos to light before their visual system was formed. We observed that such early stimulation modulates cerebral lateralization in a comparable vein of late-light stimulation on active retinal cells. Our results show that, in a higher vertebrate brain, a second route, likely affecting the genetic expression of photosensitive regions, acts before the development of a functional visual system. More than one sensitive period seems thus available to light stimulation to trigger brain lateralization. PMID:24048072

  1. Early-light embryonic stimulation suggests a second route, via gene activation, to cerebral lateralization in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Chiandetti, Cinzia; Galliussi, Jessica; Andrew, Richard J; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Genetic factors determine the asymmetrical position of vertebrate embryos allowing asymmetric environmental stimulation to shape cerebral lateralization. In birds, late-light stimulation, just before hatching, on the right optic nerve triggers anatomical and functional cerebral asymmetries. However, some brain asymmetries develop in absence of embryonic light stimulation. Furthermore, early-light action affects lateralization in the transparent zebrafish embryos before their visual system is functional. Here we investigated whether another pathway intervenes in establishing brain specialization. We exposed chicks' embryos to light before their visual system was formed. We observed that such early stimulation modulates cerebral lateralization in a comparable vein of late-light stimulation on active retinal cells. Our results show that, in a higher vertebrate brain, a second route, likely affecting the genetic expression of photosensitive regions, acts before the development of a functional visual system. More than one sensitive period seems thus available to light stimulation to trigger brain lateralization.

  2. Asymmetry between pushing and pulling for crawling cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recho, Pierre; Truskinovsky, Lev

    2013-02-01

    Eukaryotic cells possess motility mechanisms allowing them not only to self-propel but also to exert forces on obstacles (to push) and to carry cargoes (to pull). To study the inherent asymmetry between active pushing and pulling we model a crawling acto-myosin cell extract as a one-dimensional layer of active gel subjected to external forces. We show that pushing is controlled by protrusion and that the macroscopic signature of the protrusion dominated motility mechanism is concavity of the force-velocity relation. In contrast, pulling is driven by protrusion only at small values of the pulling force and it is replaced by contraction when the pulling force is sufficiently large. This leads to more complex convex-concave structure of the force-velocity relation; in particular, competition between protrusion and contraction can produce negative mobility in a biologically relevant range. The model illustrates active readjustment of the force generating machinery in response to changes in the dipole structure of external forces. The possibility of switching between complementary active mechanisms implies that if necessary “pushers” can replace “pullers” and vice versa.

  3. First results from the Bulge Asymmetries and Dynamic Evolution survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pihlstrom, Ylva; Sjouwerman, Lorant; Rich, Robert Michael; Claussen, Mark J.; Morris, Mark; BAaDE Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the Bulge Asymmetries and Dynamic Evolution (BAaDE) project is to undertake the largest ever survey of red giant SiO maser sources (~20,000) in the bulge and inner Galaxy. This survey will provide a confusion-free, extinction-free, densely sampled set of point-masses in the regions of the Galaxy that are not reachable with optical surveys (concentrated along 0°Complementary near-infrared spectroscopy will be performed for a subsample of the stars, and higher resolution VLBA observations will be used to determine proper motions, parallaxes and orbit families for a subset of sources. Here we will describe the project aims and report on the first results.

  4. Cerebral Cavernous Malformations (CCM)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Registry Interest Form Contact Us | Login Disorder Definitions Learn More > Disorder Definitions Cerebral Cavernous Malformations (CCM) ... until it is too late to salvage vision. Routine screening is very important, even if there are ...

  5. Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Caregiver Education » Fact Sheets Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What ... Information Page NINDS Epilepsy Information Page NINDS Familial Periodic Paralyses Information Page NINDS Farber's Disease Information Page ...

  6. Acquired Cerebral Trauma: Epilogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigler, Erin D., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    The article summarizes a series of articles concerning acquired cerebral trauma. Reviewed are technological advances, treatment, assessment, potential innovative therapies, long-term outcome, family impact of chronic brain injury, and prevention. (DB)

  7. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 911) if you have sudden loss of movement , sensation, vision, or speech. Alternative Names Amyloidosis - cerebral; CAA; Congophilic angiopathy Images Amyloidosis on the fingers Arteries of the brain References Kase CS, Shoamanesh A. Intracerebral hemorrhage. In: Daroff ...

  8. Measurement of CP-violation asymmetries in D0→KS0π+π-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Dell'Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d'Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Soha, A.; Sorin, V.; Song, H.; Squillacioti, P.; Stancari, M.; Denis, R. St.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Varganov, A.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. L.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Wick, F.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2012-08-01

    We report a measurement of time-integrated CP-violation asymmetries in the resonant substructure of the three-body decay D0→KS0π+π- using CDF II data corresponding to 6.0fb-1 of integrated luminosity from Tevatron pp¯ collisions at s=1.96TeV. The charm mesons used in this analysis come from D*+(2010)→D0π+ and D*-(2010)→D¯0π-, where the production flavor of the charm meson is determined by the charge of the accompanying pion. We apply a Dalitz-amplitude analysis for the description of the dynamic decay structure and use two complementary approaches, namely, a full Dalitz-plot fit employing the isobar model for the contributing resonances and a model-independent bin-by-bin comparison of the D0 and D¯0 Dalitz plots. We find no CP-violation effects and measure an asymmetry of ACP=(-0.05±0.57(stat)±0.54(syst))% for the overall integrated CP-violation asymmetry, consistent with the standard model prediction.

  9. Single hadron transverse spin asymmetries from COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Bradamante, Franco

    2007-06-13

    Transverse spin physics is an important part of the scientific programme of the COMPASS experiment at CERN. The analysis of the data taken with the target polarized orthogonally to the 160 GeV/c muon beam momentum has allowed to measure for the first time the Collins and Sivers asymmetries of the deuteron. Both for the positive and the negative hadrons produced in semi-inclusive DIS the measured asymmetries are small and, within errors, compatible with zero. New results for {pi}{+-} ans K{+-} are presented here.

  10. Neutron single target spin asymmetries in SIDIS

    SciTech Connect

    Cisbani, Evaristo

    2010-04-01

    The experiment E06-010 in Hall A at Jefferson Lab took data between November 2008 and February 2009 to directly measure, for the first time, the pion (and kaon) single "neutron" target-spin asymmetry (SSA) in semi-inclusive DIS from a polarized 3He target. Collins, Sivers (and Pretzelosity) neutron asymmetries are going to be extracted from the measured SSA. Details of the experiment are described together with the preliminary results of the ongoing analysis. Near future Hall A experiments on transverse nucleon spin structure are shorty reviewed.

  11. Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome: A rare cause of cerebral hemiatrophy in children.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Pareshkumar A; Dave, Reema Haresh

    2016-01-01

    Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome (DDMS) is an uncommon condition, in which the diagnosis is mainly done by various clinical presentations along with positive radiological findings. Patients have facial asymmetry, seizures, learning difficulties, and contralateral hemiparesis. The radiological discoveries of the same incorporate cerebral hemiatrophy with homolateral hypertrophy of the skull and sinuses. Here, we report a case of a 10-year-old female child who presented with a single episode of convulsion, mental retardation, and contralateral hemiparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed unilateral atrophy of the left cerebral hemisphere with dilatation of ipsilateral lateral ventricle and ipsilateral sulcal prominence. These findings were suggestive of the diagnosis of DDMS.

  12. Nanomedicine in cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Bindu; Nance, Elizabeth; Johnston, Michael V; Kannan, Rangaramanujam; Kannan, Sujatha

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a chronic childhood disorder that can have diverse etiologies. Injury to the developing brain that occurs either in utero or soon after birth can result in the motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits seen in cerebral palsy. Although the etiologies for cerebral palsy are variable, neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the brain injury irrespective of the etiology. Currently, there is no effective cure for cerebral palsy. Nanomedicine offers a new frontier in the development of therapies for prevention and treatment of brain injury resulting in cerebral palsy. Nanomaterials such as dendrimers provide opportunities for the targeted delivery of multiple drugs that can mitigate several pathways involved in injury and can be delivered specifically to the cells that are responsible for neuroinflammation and injury. These materials also offer the opportunity to deliver agents that would promote repair and regeneration in the brain, resulting not only in attenuation of injury, but also enabling normal growth. In this review, the current advances in nanotechnology for treatment of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy. Future directions that would facilitate clinical translation in neonates and children are also addressed. PMID:24204146

  13. Nanomedicine in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Bindu; Nance, Elizabeth; Johnston, Michael V; Kannan, Rangaramanujam; Kannan, Sujatha

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a chronic childhood disorder that can have diverse etiologies. Injury to the developing brain that occurs either in utero or soon after birth can result in the motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits seen in cerebral palsy. Although the etiologies for cerebral palsy are variable, neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the brain injury irrespective of the etiology. Currently, there is no effective cure for cerebral palsy. Nanomedicine offers a new frontier in the development of therapies for prevention and treatment of brain injury resulting in cerebral palsy. Nanomaterials such as dendrimers provide opportunities for the targeted delivery of multiple drugs that can mitigate several pathways involved in injury and can be delivered specifically to the cells that are responsible for neuroinflammation and injury. These materials also offer the opportunity to deliver agents that would promote repair and regeneration in the brain, resulting not only in attenuation of injury, but also enabling normal growth. In this review, the current advances in nanotechnology for treatment of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy. Future directions that would facilitate clinical translation in neonates and children are also addressed.

  14. Complementary and alternative therapies and SCI nursing.

    PubMed

    Oliver, N R

    2001-01-01

    Increasing numbers of individuals are experimenting with different complementary and alternative techniques and practices in their quest to improve their health status or change symptom experiences. Consumer utilization patterns are described, activities to ensure the safety and efficacy of alternative practices are reviewed, and relationships to nursing interventions and nursing responsibilities are presented. The relationship between complementary/alternative therapies and spinal cord injury (SCI) nursing practice, education, and research are described, as well as strategies for integrating these therapies into SCI nursing. The potential roles for SCI nurses and benefits to individuals with SCI are unlimited.

  15. Proposal of spin complementary field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunihashi, Yoji; Kohda, Makoto; Sanada, Haruki; Gotoh, Hideki; Sogawa, Tetsuomi; Nitta, Junsaku

    2012-03-01

    Spin complementary field effect transistor is proposed on the basis of gate-controlled persistent spin helix (PSH) states. Uniaxial effective magnetic field in the PSH state creates coherent spin propagation with or without precession. By the gate control of the Rashba spin-orbit interaction, the PSH state can be reversed to the inverted PSH state. Switching between two PSH states enables complementary output depending on the channel direction. Our proposed device could be a reconfigurable minimum unit of the spin-based logic circuit.

  16. Complementary therapies for cancer-related symptoms.

    PubMed

    Deng, Gary; Cassileth, Barrie R; Yeung, K Simon

    2004-01-01

    Relief of cancer-related symptoms is essential in the supportive and palliative care of cancer patients. Complementary therapies such as acupuncture, mind-body techniques, and massage therapy can help when conventional treatment does not bring satisfactory relief or causes undesirable side effects. Controlled clinical trials show that acupuncture and hypnotherapy can reduce pain and nausea. Meditation, relaxation therapy, music therapy, and massage mitigate anxiety and distress. Pilot studies suggest that complementary therapies may treat xerostomia, hot flashes, and fatigue. Botanicals or dietary supplements are popular but often problematic. Concurrent use of herbal products with mainstream medical treatment should be discouraged.

  17. Surgery and complementary therapies: a review.

    PubMed

    Petry, J J

    2000-09-01

    The incorporation of complementary therapies into the surgical setting has been slow compared to that of other areas of conventional medicine. This paper summarizes the available information on complementary therapies in surgery from a broad range of sources in the medical literature. The effects of psychological distress on the surgical patient and potential relief from that distress by such methods as relaxation techniques, hypnosis, suggestion, and imagery, as well as the role of coping style and locus of control on choice of therapy are reviewed. The role of acupuncture, music, massage therapy, therapeutic touch, and Reiki, as well as the use of herbs and supplements in modifying surgical outcome, is explored.

  18. Complementary Therapies for Mental Health Disorders.

    PubMed

    Asher, Gary N; Gerkin, Jonathan; Gaynes, Bradley N

    2017-09-01

    Approximately 18% of the US adult population has a mental illness, yet only 13% with mental illness receive any treatment. Although pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy are the mainstays of treatment, treatment discontinuation and failure are common. Skepticism toward such treatments has fueled interest in and use of complementary therapies, such as acupuncture, meditation, and natural products. Many medical providers are unaware of the use of these therapies by their patients, and knowledge of the evidence base for these therapies is often lacking. This article presents current evidence-based recommendations for complementary therapies in the treatment of depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Arithmetic, mutually unbiased bases and complementary observables

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppeard, M. D.

    2010-02-15

    Complementary observables in quantum mechanics may be viewed as Frobenius structures in a dagger monoidal category, such as the category of finite dimensional Hilbert spaces over the complex numbers. On the other hand, their properties crucially depend on the discrete Fourier transform and its associated quantum torus, requiring only the finite fields that underlie mutually unbiased bases. In axiomatic topos theory, the complex numbers are difficult to describe and should not be invoked unnecessarily. This paper surveys some fundamentals of quantum arithmetic using finite field complementary observables, with a view considering more general axiom systems.

  20. Atypical cerebral lateralisation in adults with compensated developmental dyslexia demonstrated using functional transcranial Doppler ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Illingworth, Sarah; Bishop, Dorothy V.M.

    2009-01-01

    Functional transcranial Doppler ultrasound (fTCD) is a relatively new and non-invasive technique that assesses cerebral lateralisation through measurements of blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral arteries. In this study fTCD was used to compare functional asymmetry during a word generation task between a group of 30 dyslexic adults and a group of 30 non-dyslexic individuals. In light of previous evidence of atypical laterality in dyslexia, a reduced leftward asymmetry was predicted and confirmed. We know from previous research that most people with atypical language lateralisation have normal language and literacy skills: nevertheless, our results confirm that language laterality is reduced in those with dyslexia. Theoretical explanations for this apparent conundrum are discussed. PMID:19525003

  1. Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome: case report of fetal unilateral ventriculomegaly and hypoplastic left middle cerebral artery.

    PubMed

    Piro, Ettore; Piccione, Maria; Marrone, Gianluca; Giuffrè, Mario; Corsello, Giovanni

    2013-05-14

    Prenatal ultrasonographic detection of unilateral cerebral ventriculomegaly arises suspicion of pathological condition related to cerebrospinal fluid flow obstruction or cerebral parenchimal pathology. Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome is a rare condition characterized by cerebral hemiatrophy, calvarial thickening, skull and facial asymmetry, contralateral hemiparesis, cognitive impairment and seizures. Congenital and acquired types are recognized and have been described, mainly in late childhood, adolescence and adult ages. We describe a female infant with prenatal diagnosis of unilateral left ventriculomegaly in which early brain MRI and contrast enhanced-MRI angiography, showed cerebral left hemiatrophy associated with reduced caliber of the left middle cerebral artery revealing the characteristic findings of the Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome. Prenatal imaging, cerebral vascular anomaly responsible for the cerebral hemiatrophy and the early clinical evolution have never been described before in such a young child and complete the acquired clinical descriptions in older children. Differential diagnosis, genetic investigations, neurophysiologic assessments, short term clinical and developmental follow up are described. Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome must be ruled out in differential diagnosis of fetal unilateral ventriculomegaly. Early clinical assessment, differential diagnosis and cerebral imaging including cerebral MRI angiography allow the clinicians to diagnose also in early infancy this rare condition.

  2. Evidence for developmental programming of cerebral laterality in humans.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alexander; Osmond, Clive; Godfrey, Keith M; Phillips, David I W

    2011-02-16

    Adverse fetal environments are associated with depression, reduced cognitive ability and increased stress responsiveness in later life, but underlying mechanisms are unknown. Environmental pressures on the fetus, resulting from variations in placental function and maternal nutrition, health and stress might alter neurodevelopment, promoting the development of some brain regions over others. As asymmetry of cerebral activity, with greater right hemisphere activity, has been associated with psychopathology, we hypothesized that regional specialization during fetal life might be reflected persistently in the relative activity of the cerebral hemispheres. We tested this hypothesis in 140 healthy 8-9 year-old children, using tympanic membrane temperature to assess relative blood flow to the cerebral hemispheres at rest and following psychosocial stress (Trier Social Stress Test for Children). Their birth weight and placental weight had already been measured when their mothers took part in a previous study of pregnancy outcomes. We found that children who had a smaller weight at birth had evidence of greater blood flow to the right hemisphere than to the left hemisphere (r = -.09, P = .29 at rest; r = -.18, P = .04 following stress). This finding was strengthened if the children had a relatively low birth weight for their placental weight (r = -.17, P = .05 at rest; r = -.31, P = .0005 following stress). Our findings suggest that lateralization of cerebral activity is influenced persistently by early developmental experiences, with possible consequences for long-term neurocognitive function.

  3. The Energy of Substituted Ethanes. Asymmetry Orbitals

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Lionel; Hoffmann, Roald; Otto, Peter

    1973-01-01

    The leading terms in the energy of a general substituted ethane are derived in explicit form as a function of the torsional angle θ, the substituent electronegativities, and their mutual overlaps. The energy is found to be the sum of all four overlaps between pairs of asymmetry orbitals, and satisfies the requisite symmetry properties. PMID:16592060

  4. CP and charge asymmetries at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Morello, Michael; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa

    2007-11-01

    We present CDF results on the branching fractions and time-integrated direct CP asymmetries for B0 and B0s decay modes into pairs of charmless charged hadrons (pions or kaons). We report also the first observation of B0s->DsK mode and the measurement of its branching fraction.

  5. Phonological and Phonetic Asymmetries of Cw Combinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suh, Yunju

    2009-01-01

    This thesis investigates the relationship between the phonological distribution of Cw combinations, and the acoustic/perceptual distinctiveness between syllables with plain C onsets and with Cw combination onsets. Distributional asymmetries of Cw combinations discussed in this thesis include the avoidance of Cw combinations in the labial consonant…

  6. Search Asymmetry, Sustained Attention, and Response Inhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Hugh; Russell, Paul N.; Helton, William S.

    2011-01-01

    In the present experiment, we used search asymmetry to test whether the sustained attention to response task is a better measure of response inhibition or sustained attention. Participants performed feature present and feature absent target detection tasks using either a sustained attention to response task (SART; high Go low No-Go) or a…

  7. Lateral Asymmetries in Infant Melody Perception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balaban, Marie T.; Anderson, Linda M.; Wisniewski, Amy B.

    1998-01-01

    Two experiments investigated lateral asymmetries in eight-month-olds' perception of contour-altered and contour-preserved melody changes. Found that infants who heard a contour-altered change showed a left-ear advantage, whereas infants who heard a contour-preserved change showed a right-ear advantage. The pattern of lateralization for melody…

  8. The Cost of Action Miscues: Hemispheric Asymmetries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shenal, Brian V.; Hinze, Stephan; Heilman, Kenneth M.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive behaviors require preparation and when necessary inhibition or alteration of actions. The right hemisphere has been posited to be dominant for preparatory motor activation. This experiment was designed to learn if there are hemispheric asymmetries in the control of altered plans of actions. Cues, both valid and invalid, which indicate the…

  9. Mandibular asymmetry and the fourth dimension.

    PubMed

    Kaban, Leonard B

    2009-03-01

    This paper represents more than 30 years of discussion and collaboration with Drs Joseph Murray and John Mulliken in an attempt to understand growth patterns over time (ie, fourth dimension) in patients with hemifacial microsomia (HFM). This is essential for the development of rational treatment protocols for children and adults with jaw asymmetry. Traditionally, HFM was thought of as a unilateral deformity, but it was recognized that 20% to 30% of patients had bilateral abnormalities. However, early descriptions of skeletal correction addressed almost exclusively lengthening of the short (affected) side of the face. Based on longitudinal clinical observations of unoperated HFM patients, we hypothesized that abnormal mandibular growth is the earliest skeletal manifestation and that restricted growth of the mandible plays a pivotal role in progressive distortion of both the ipsilateral and contralateral facial skeleton. This hypothesis explains the progressive nature of the asymmetry in patients with HFM and provides the rationale for surgical lengthening of the mandible in children to prevent end-stage deformity. During the past 30 years, we have learned that this phenomenon of progressive distortion of the adjacent and contralateral facial skeleton occurs with other asymmetric mandibular undergrowth (tumor resection, radiation therapy, or posttraumatic defects) and overgrowth (mandibular condylar hyperplasia) conditions. In this paper, I describe the progression of deformity with time in patients with mandibular asymmetry as a result of undergrowth and overgrowth. Understanding these concepts is critical for the development of rational treatment protocols for adults with end-stage asymmetry and for children to minimize secondary deformity.

  10. Measuring Asymmetry in Insect-Plant Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, Cláudia P. T.; de Almeida, Adriana M.; Corso, Gilberto

    2011-03-01

    In this work we focus on interaction networks between insects and plants and in the characterization of insect plant asymmetry, an important issue in coevolution and evolutionary biology. We analyze in particular the asymmetry in the interaction matrix of animals (herbivorous insects) and plants (food resource for the insects). Instead of driving our attention to the interaction matrix itself we derive two networks associated to the bipartite network: the animal network, D1, and the plant network, D2. These networks are constructed according to the following recipe: two animal species are linked once if they interact with the same plant. In a similar way, in the plant network, two plants are linked if they interact with the same animal. To explore the asymmetry between D2 and D1 we test for a set of 23 networks from the ecologic literature networks: the difference in size, ΔL, clustering coefficient difference, ΔC, and mean connectivity difference, Δ. We used a nonparametric statistical test to check the differences in ΔL, ΔC and Δ. Our results indicate that ΔL and Δ show a significative asymmetry.

  11. Neutron contribution to nuclear DVCS asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Vadim Guzey

    2008-01-22

    Using a simple model for nuclear GPDs, we study the role of the neutron contribution to nuclear DVCS observables. As an example, we use the beam-spin asymmetry $A_{LU}^A$ measured in coherent and incoherent DVCS on a wide range of nuclear targets in the HERMES and JLab kinematics. We find that at small values of the momentum transfer $t$, $A_{LU}^A$ is dominated by the coherent-enriched contribution, which enhances $A_{LU}^A$ compared to the free proton asymmetry $A_{LU}^p$, $A_{LU}^A(\\phi)/A_{LU}^p(\\phi)=1.8-2.2$. At large values of $t$, the nuclear asymmetry is dominated by the incoherent contribution and $A_{LU}^A/(\\phi)A_{LU}^p(\\phi)=0.66-0.74$. The deviation of $A_{LU}^A(\\phi)/A_{LU}^p(\\phi)$ from unity at large $t$ is a result of the neutron contribution, which gives a possibility to constain neutron GPDs in incoherent nuclear DVCS. A similar trend is expected for other DVCS asymmetries.

  12. Infant Frontal Asymmetry Predicts Child Emotional Availability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Licata, Maria; Paulus, Markus; Kühn-Popp, Nina; Meinhardt, Jorg; Sodian, Beate

    2015-01-01

    While factors influencing maternal emotional availability (EA) have been well investigated, little is known about the development of child EA. The present longitudinal study investigated the role of frontal brain asymmetry in young children with regard to child EA (child responsiveness and involvement) in mother-child interaction in a sample of 28…

  13. Search Asymmetry, Sustained Attention, and Response Inhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Hugh; Russell, Paul N.; Helton, William S.

    2011-01-01

    In the present experiment, we used search asymmetry to test whether the sustained attention to response task is a better measure of response inhibition or sustained attention. Participants performed feature present and feature absent target detection tasks using either a sustained attention to response task (SART; high Go low No-Go) or a…

  14. Infant Frontal Asymmetry Predicts Child Emotional Availability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Licata, Maria; Paulus, Markus; Kühn-Popp, Nina; Meinhardt, Jorg; Sodian, Beate

    2015-01-01

    While factors influencing maternal emotional availability (EA) have been well investigated, little is known about the development of child EA. The present longitudinal study investigated the role of frontal brain asymmetry in young children with regard to child EA (child responsiveness and involvement) in mother-child interaction in a sample of 28…

  15. Task selection cost asymmetry without task switching.

    PubMed

    Bryck, Richard L; Mayr, Ulrch

    2008-02-01

    The switch cost asymmetry (i.e., larger costs when switching from a nondominant into a dominant task than vice versa) has been explained in terms of the trial-to-trial carryover of activation levels required for the dominant versus the nondominant task. However, there is an open question about whether an actual switch in task is in fact necessary to obtain a "selection" cost asymmetry. In Experiments 1 and 2, we modified an alternating-runs paradigm to include either long or short response-to-stimulus intervals (RSIs) after each pair of trials (i.e., AA-AA-BB-BB), thereby inducing selection costs not only at the point of a task switch (i.e., AA-BB), but also between same-task pairs (i.e., AA-AA). Using spatially compatible versus incompatible response rules (Experiment 1) and Stroop word versus color naming (Experiment 2), we found asymmetric effects not only at task-change transitions, but also at task-repeat transitions when the RSI was long (presumably inducing frequent losses of set). In Experiments 3A and 3B, a cost asymmetry for long RSIs was obtained even when competing tasks were separated into alternating single task blocks, but not when the tasks were compared in a between-subjects design. This general pattern cannot be explained by activation carryover models, but is consistent with the idea that the asymmetry arises as a result of interference from long-term memory traces.

  16. Instrumental Asymmetry Reduction in Polarized Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrikant, M. I.; Trantham, K. W.; Gay, T. J.

    2008-05-01

    We report progress in the reduction of instrumental asymmetries (IAs) related to the photoemission of polarized electrons from GaAs caused by circularly-polarized diode laser beams [1]. Such asymmetries can mask true helicity-dependent interactions between the emitted electrons and chiral targets. Minimization of laser intensity IAs is achieved by chopping two spatially separated light beams with orthogonal polarizations which are recombined and passed through a quarter-wave plate to yield a single beam with rapidly flipping helicity. We have demonstrated the ability to reduce intensity IAs of the laser beam itself to less than 2 x 10-6 [2]. We have also investigated the IAs of the photemission current from the GaAs. At present, we are able to reduce the photoemission asymmetry to values that are comparable to the laser intensity asymmetry. Implications for experiments measuring effects due to electron circular dichroism [3] will be discussed. [1]Trantham K.W. et al J. Phys. B. 28 L543 (1995) [2] Fabrikant M.I. et al submitted to Appl. Opt. [3] Mayer S., Kessler J. Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 4803 (1995) Funding for this project was provided by Undergraduate Creative Activities and Research Experiences (UCARE) and the National Science Foundation (PHY-0653379).

  17. Neutron contribution to nuclear DVCS asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Vadim Guzey

    2008-01-22

    Using a simple model for nuclear GPDs, we study the role of the neutron contribution to nuclear DVCS observables. As an example, we use the beam-spin asymmetry $A_{LU}^A$ measured in coherent and incoherent DVCS on a wide range of nuclear targets in the HERMES and JLab kinematics. We find that at small values of the momentum transfer $t$, $A_{LU}^A$ is dominated by the coherent-enriched contribution, which enhances $A_{LU}^A$ compared to the free proton asymmetry $A_{LU}^p$, $A_{LU}^A(\\phi)/A_{LU}^p(\\phi)=1.8-2.2$. At large values of $t$, the nuclear asymmetry is dominated by the incoherent contribution and $A_{LU}^A/(\\phi)A_{LU}^p(\\phi)=0.66-0.74$. The deviation of $A_{LU}^A(\\phi)/A_{LU}^p(\\phi)$ from unity at large $t$ is a result of the neutron contribution, which gives a possibility to constain neutron GPDs in incoherent nuclear DVCS. A similar trend is expected for other DVCS asymmetries.

  18. Phonological and Phonetic Asymmetries of Cw Combinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suh, Yunju

    2009-01-01

    This thesis investigates the relationship between the phonological distribution of Cw combinations, and the acoustic/perceptual distinctiveness between syllables with plain C onsets and with Cw combination onsets. Distributional asymmetries of Cw combinations discussed in this thesis include the avoidance of Cw combinations in the labial consonant…

  19. Auxin asymmetry during gravitropism by tomato hypocotyls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, M. A.; Pickard, B. G.

    1989-01-01

    Gravitropic asymmetry of auxin was observed in hypocotyls of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) soon after horizontal placement: the ratio of apically supplied [3H]IAA collected from the lower sides to that from the upper sides was about 1.4 between 5 and 10 minutes. This was adequately early to account for the beginning of curvature. The auxin asymmetry ratio rose to about 2.5 between 20 and 25 minutes, and to 3.5 during the main phase of curvature. This compares reasonably well with the roughly 3.9 ratio for elongation on the lower side to elongation on the upper side that is the basis for the curvature. These data extend evidence that the Went-Cholodny theory for the mediation of tropisms is valid for dicot stems. Also consistent with the theory, an auxin asymmetry ratio of 2.5 was observed when wrong-way gravitropic curvature developed following application of a high level of auxin. In addition to reversing the asymmetry of elongation, the large supplement of auxin resulted in lower net elongation. Previous data established that ethylene is not involved in this decrease of growth as a function of increasing level of auxin.

  20. On the nature of the baryon asymmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1984-01-01

    Whether the baryon asymmetry in the universe is a locally varying or universally fixed number is examined with focus on the existence of a possible matter antimatter domain structure in the universe arising from a GUT with spontaneous CP symmetry breaking. Theoretical considerations and observational data and astrophysical tests relating to this fundamental question are reviewed.

  1. The Cost of Action Miscues: Hemispheric Asymmetries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shenal, Brian V.; Hinze, Stephan; Heilman, Kenneth M.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive behaviors require preparation and when necessary inhibition or alteration of actions. The right hemisphere has been posited to be dominant for preparatory motor activation. This experiment was designed to learn if there are hemispheric asymmetries in the control of altered plans of actions. Cues, both valid and invalid, which indicate the…

  2. Auxin asymmetry during gravitropism by tomato hypocotyls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, M. A.; Pickard, B. G.

    1989-01-01

    Gravitropic asymmetry of auxin was observed in hypocotyls of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) soon after horizontal placement: the ratio of apically supplied [3H]IAA collected from the lower sides to that from the upper sides was about 1.4 between 5 and 10 minutes. This was adequately early to account for the beginning of curvature. The auxin asymmetry ratio rose to about 2.5 between 20 and 25 minutes, and to 3.5 during the main phase of curvature. This compares reasonably well with the roughly 3.9 ratio for elongation on the lower side to elongation on the upper side that is the basis for the curvature. These data extend evidence that the Went-Cholodny theory for the mediation of tropisms is valid for dicot stems. Also consistent with the theory, an auxin asymmetry ratio of 2.5 was observed when wrong-way gravitropic curvature developed following application of a high level of auxin. In addition to reversing the asymmetry of elongation, the large supplement of auxin resulted in lower net elongation. Previous data established that ethylene is not involved in this decrease of growth as a function of increasing level of auxin.

  3. Examining the exercise-affect dose-response relationship: does duration influence frontal EEG asymmetry?

    PubMed

    Woo, Minjung; Kim, Sungwoon; Kim, Jingu; Petruzzello, Steven J; Hatfield, Bradley D

    2009-05-01

    The "feel better" effect of exercise has been well established, but the specific influence of exercise duration on affect has not been systematically studied from a multi-level measurement approach. Such an approach offers the opportunity to assess psychophysiological responses that relate to psychological state. One relevant response is the change in frontal brain processes indexed by anterior EEG asymmetry, which is related to approach-withdrawal orientation and affective state [Davidson, R.J., 1993. Cerebral asymmetry and emotion: conceptual and methodological conundrums. Cogn. Emot. 7, 138; Davidson, R.J., 1998. Anterior electrophysiological asymmetries, emotion, and depression: Conceptual and methodological conundrums. Psychophysiology 35(5), 607-614.]. To examine the relationship between exercise duration and affective response, as well as the role of frontal brain processes in this relationship, female undergraduate students (N=16, VO(2) max=35.93 ml kg(-1) min(-1), aged 19-23 yrs) were assessed for frontal EEG and self-reported affective responses, as measured by the Profile of Mood States (POMS), following rest and three different durations of exercise (15, 30 and 45 min) performed at a standardized intensity (i.e., just below the ventilatory threshold (VT)). Psychological vigor and frontal EEG asymmetry following exercise of 30 min were elevated compared to that observed following rest and other exercise durations (i.e., 15, 45 min). The results support a dose-response relationship between exercise duration and affect characterized by an inverted-U. Furthermore, the covariance analysis, conducted to assess the role of cortical activation at the homologous sites in the post-exercise affective response, suggests that the enhanced vigor observed after 30 min of exercise results from the reduction of withdrawal-oriented processes rather than the facilitation of approach-oriented processes.

  4. Nasotemporal asymmetries in V1: ocular dominance columns of infant, adult, and strabismic macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Tychsen, L; Burkhalter, A

    1997-11-10

    To quantify asymmetries of input from the two eyes into each cerebral hemisphere, we measured ocular dominance column (ODC) widths and areas in the striate visual cortex (area V1) of macaque monkeys. Ocular dominance stripes in layer 4C were labeled by using transneuronal transport of intraocularly injected wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) or cytochrome oxidase (CO) histochemistry, after deafferentation of one eye or even by leaving afferent input intact. In infant monkey aged 4 and 8 weeks, ocular dominance stripes labeled by WGA-HRP appeared adultlike with smooth, sharply defined borders. In normal infant and normal adult macaque, ocular dominance stripes driven by the nasal retina (i.e., contralateral eye) were consistently wider than stripes driven by the temporal retina (i.e., ipsilateral eye). Asymmetries in the percentage of area V1 driven by nasal vs. temporal ODCs showed a similar "nasal bias": in infant macaque, approximately 58% of ODCs in V1 were driven by nasal retina, and in adult macaque approximately 57%. The asymmetries tended to be slightly smaller in opercular V1 and greater in calcarine V1. "Spontaneous" ocular dominance stripes were revealed by CO staining of V1 in a naturally strabismic monkey and in a monkey made strabismic by early postnatal alternating monocular occlusion. In these animals, ocular dominance stripes and CO blobs corresponding to the nasal retina stained more intensely for CO in both the right and left V1. ODC spacing and the nasotemporal asymmetry in ODC width and area were similar in strabismic and normal monkeys. Our results in normal monkeys extend the observations of previous investigators and verify that nasotemporal inputs to opercular and calcarine V1 are unequal, with a consistent bias favoring inputs from the nasal retina. The CO results in strabismic macaque suggest that the nasal ODC bias promotes interocular suppression when activity in neighboring ODCs is decorrelated by abnormal binocular

  5. Thinking about Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Free Copy This booklet covers: What complementary and alternative medicine is (CAM) is and why people use it The different types of CAM (mind-body methods, biologically based practices, body-based practices, energy medicine, and whole medical systems. How to talk ...

  6. Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roizen, Nancy J.

    2005-01-01

    In their role as committed advocates, parents of children with Down syndrome have always sought alternative therapies, mainly to enhance cognitive function but also to improve their appearance. Nutritional supplements have been the most frequent type of complementary and alternative therapy used. Cell therapy, plastic surgery, hormonal therapy,…

  7. Determining Complementary Properties with Quantum Clones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thekkadath, G. S.; Saaltink, R. Y.; Giner, L.; Lundeen, J. S.

    2017-08-01

    In a classical world, simultaneous measurements of complementary properties (e.g., position and momentum) give a system's state. In quantum mechanics, measurement-induced disturbance is largest for complementary properties and, hence, limits the precision with which such properties can be determined simultaneously. It is tempting to try to sidestep this disturbance by copying the system and measuring each complementary property on a separate copy. However, perfect copying is physically impossible in quantum mechanics. Here, we investigate using the closest quantum analog to this copying strategy, optimal cloning. The coherent portion of the generated clones' state corresponds to "twins" of the input system. Like perfect copies, both twins faithfully reproduce the properties of the input system. Unlike perfect copies, the twins are entangled. As such, a measurement on both twins is equivalent to a simultaneous measurement on the input system. For complementary observables, this joint measurement gives the system's state, just as in the classical case. We demonstrate this experimentally using polarized single photons.

  8. Building on basic metagenomics with complementary technologies

    PubMed Central

    Warnecke, Falk; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2007-01-01

    Metagenomics, the application of random shotgun sequencing to environmental samples, is a powerful approach for characterizing microbial communities. However, this method only represents the cornerstone of what can be achieved using a range of complementary technologies such as transcriptomics, proteomics, cell sorting and microfluidics. Together, these approaches hold great promise for the study of microbial ecology and evolution. PMID:18177506

  9. Niche engineering reveals complementary resource use

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Greater resource use by diverse communities might result from species occupying different, complementary niches. Niche partitioning is difficult to directly demonstrate, however, because differences among species in the resources they use are often difficult to separate from other species-specific t...

  10. Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roizen, Nancy J.

    2005-01-01

    In their role as committed advocates, parents of children with Down syndrome have always sought alternative therapies, mainly to enhance cognitive function but also to improve their appearance. Nutritional supplements have been the most frequent type of complementary and alternative therapy used. Cell therapy, plastic surgery, hormonal therapy,…

  11. Recruiting Faculty: Complementary Tales from Two Campuses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matier, Michael W.

    1991-01-01

    Factors influencing individuals with firm job offers to join the faculty at two research universities, urban and rural, are examined, focusing on the relative importance of tangible, intangible, and non-work-related benefits in the decision-making process. Comparisons are drawn to previous faculty recruitment studies and a complementary retention…

  12. Polish Complementary Schools in Iceland and England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zielinska, Malgorzata; Kowzan, Piotr; Ragnarsdóttir, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Since 2004, the opening of labour markets has spurred a considerable number of Poles to emigrate e.g. to Iceland and England. Families with school age children have had the challenge of adapting to foreign environments and school systems. Polish complementary schools have played an important, albeit ambivalent, role in this process. Through focus…

  13. Polish Complementary Schools in Iceland and England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zielinska, Malgorzata; Kowzan, Piotr; Ragnarsdóttir, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Since 2004, the opening of labour markets has spurred a considerable number of Poles to emigrate e.g. to Iceland and England. Families with school age children have had the challenge of adapting to foreign environments and school systems. Polish complementary schools have played an important, albeit ambivalent, role in this process. Through focus…

  14. Facial asymmetry in head and neck rhabdomyosarcoma survivors.

    PubMed

    Schoot, Reineke A; Hol, Marinka L F; Merks, Johannes H M; Suttie, Michael; Slater, Olga; van Lennep, Marinde; Hopman, Saskia M J; Dunaway, David; Syme-Grant, Jonathan; Smeele, Ludi E; Zwinderman, Koos H; Caron, Huib N; Hammond, Peter

    2017-10-01

    Radiotherapy is essential for achieving and maintaining local control in head and neck rhabdomyosarcoma (HNRMS) patients. However, radiotherapy may cause outgrowth disturbances of facial bone and soft tissue, resulting in facial asymmetry. The aim of this study was to develop a method to visualize and measure facial asymmetry in HNRMS survivors using three-dimensional (3D) imaging techniques. Facial deformity was evaluated in a multidisciplinary clinical assessment of 75 HNRMS survivors, treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT, n = 26) or Ablative surgery, MOulage brachytherapy, and REconstruction (AMORE, n = 49). Individual facial asymmetry was measured using 3D photogrammetry and expressed in a raw asymmetry index and a normalized sex-age-ethnicity-matched asymmetry signature weight. Facial asymmetry was also compared between British and Dutch controls and between survivors and their matched controls. Facial asymmetry was more pronounced with increasing age (P < 0.01) in British controls compared with Dutch controls (P = 0.04). Survivors developed more facial asymmetry than matched controls (P < 0.001). The clinical assessment of facial deformity correlated with the raw asymmetry index (r = 0.60, P < 0.001). 3D imaging can be used for objective measurement of facial asymmetry in HNRMS survivors. The raw asymmetry index correlated with a clinical assessment of facial deformity. Comparisons between treatment groups seemed inappropriate given the differences in facial asymmetry between British and Dutch controls. In future studies, pretreatment images could act as matched controls for posttreatment evaluation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Biological predictors of mandibular asymmetries in children with mixed dentition.

    PubMed

    Sop, Ivana; Mady Maricic, Barbara; Pavlic, Andrej; Legovic, Mario; Spalj, Stjepan

    2016-09-01

    The objective was to investigate the severity of skeletal mandibular asymmetry in children with mixed dentition and other factors associated with asymmetry. The study was cross sectional, with stratified sampling according to malocclusion type consisting of 205 subjects with mixed dentition (median 10, interquartile range 9-11 years). There were 59 subjects presenting Class II/1, 77 Class II/2, and 69 Class III. The mandibular asymmetry has been estimated from orthopantomograms using the Habets' method and the dental maturation by Demirjian's method. The sagittal skeletal relationship and facial growth pattern were assessed from lateral cephalograms. Asymmetries in general, were not rare and were more present in the condylar height rather than in the height of the ramus. The highest severity of condylar asymmetry was in Class II/2 subjects (median of asymmetry index 7.3; 64% subjects exhibiting moderate and severe asymmetry), while the Class III subjects exhibited the highest severity of both ramus and total height asymmetry (2.1; 13% and 2.0; 15%, respectively). Multiple logistic regression unveiled male gender as the only predictor of moderate or significant overall asymmetry. Dental age, the difference between dental and chronological age, and facial growth pattern were not significant predictors of asymmetries. Overall, asymmetries in mixed dentition cannot be considered rare; however, no strong relationships between asymmetry and observed biological factors were found.

  16. Mass predicts web asymmetry in Nephila spiders.

    PubMed

    Kuntner, Matjaz; Gregoric, Matjaz; Li, Daiqin

    2010-12-01

    The architecture of vertical aerial orb webs may be affected by spider size and gravity or by the available web space, in addition to phylogenetic and/or developmental factors. Vertical orb web asymmetry measured by hub displacement has been shown to increase in bigger and heavier spiders; however, previous studies have mostly focused on adult and subadult spiders or on several size classes with measured size parameters but no mass. Both estimations are suboptimal because (1) adult orb web spiders may not invest heavily in optimal web construction, whereas juveniles do; (2) size class/developmental stage is difficult to estimate in the field and is thus subjective, and (3) mass scales differently to size and is therefore more important in predicting aerial foraging success due to gravity. We studied vertical web asymmetry in a giant orb web spider, Nephila pilipes, across a wide range of size classes/developmental stages and tested the hypothesis that vertical web asymmetry (measured as hub displacement) is affected by gravity. On a sample of 100 webs, we found that hubs were more displaced in heavier and larger juveniles and that spider mass explained vertical web asymmetry better than other measures of spider size (carapace and leg lengths, developmental stage). Quantifying web shape via the ladder index suggested that, unlike in other nephilid taxa, growing Nephila orbs do not become vertically elongated. We conclude that the ontogenetic pattern of progressive vertical web asymmetry in Nephila can be explained by optimal foraging due to gravity, to which the opposing selective force may be high web-building costs in the lower orb. Recent literature finds little support for alternative explanations of ontogenetic orb web allometry such as the size limitation hypothesis and the biogenetic law.

  17. Mass predicts web asymmetry in Nephila spiders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntner, Matjaž; Gregorič, Matjaž; Li, Daiqin

    2010-12-01

    The architecture of vertical aerial orb webs may be affected by spider size and gravity or by the available web space, in addition to phylogenetic and/or developmental factors. Vertical orb web asymmetry measured by hub displacement has been shown to increase in bigger and heavier spiders; however, previous studies have mostly focused on adult and subadult spiders or on several size classes with measured size parameters but no mass. Both estimations are suboptimal because (1) adult orb web spiders may not invest heavily in optimal web construction, whereas juveniles do; (2) size class/developmental stage is difficult to estimate in the field and is thus subjective, and (3) mass scales differently to size and is therefore more important in predicting aerial foraging success due to gravity. We studied vertical web asymmetry in a giant orb web spider, Nephila pilipes, across a wide range of size classes/developmental stages and tested the hypothesis that vertical web asymmetry (measured as hub displacement) is affected by gravity. On a sample of 100 webs, we found that hubs were more displaced in heavier and larger juveniles and that spider mass explained vertical web asymmetry better than other measures of spider size (carapace and leg lengths, developmental stage). Quantifying web shape via the ladder index suggested that, unlike in other nephilid taxa, growing Nephila orbs do not become vertically elongated. We conclude that the ontogenetic pattern of progressive vertical web asymmetry in Nephila can be explained by optimal foraging due to gravity, to which the opposing selective force may be high web-building costs in the lower orb. Recent literature finds little support for alternative explanations of ontogenetic orb web allometry such as the size limitation hypothesis and the biogenetic law.

  18. Cerebral palsy: the whys and hows.

    PubMed

    Fairhurst, Charlie

    2012-08-01

    The descriptive term of cerebral palsy encompasses the largest group of childhood movement disorders. Severity and pattern of clinical involvement varies widely dependent on the area of the central nervous system compromised. A multidisciplinary team approach is vital for all the aspects of management to improve function and minimise disability. From a medical viewpoint, there are two pronged approaches. First a focus on developmental and clinical comorbidities such as communication, behaviour, epilepsy, feeding problems, gastro-oesophageal reflux and infections; and second on specifics of muscle tone, motor control and posture. With regards to the latter, there is an increasing number of available treatments including oral antispasticity and antidystonic medications, injectable botulinum toxin, multilevel orthopaedic and neurosurgical options and a variety of complementary and alternative therapies.

  19. Interhemispheric comparisons of cerebral blood flow velocity changes during mental tasks with transcranial Doppler sonography.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Kang; Ryu, Shan-Jin; Hsu, Peng-Wei

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate hemispheric asymmetry of cerebral blood flow changes during various mental tests by applying transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) to simultaneously monitor bilateral cerebral blood flow velocity changes. Twenty-one participants without cerebrovascular disease performed 3 left hemispheric tasks (reading, calculation, and color scaling) and 3 right hemispheric tasks (face recognition, space imagination, and line orientation). Mean velocities of the rest and performing periods did not differ significantly between the left and right hemispheric tasks. Although greater acceleration of blood flow velocity was observed on the left than on the right in most of the 6 tasks except line orientation (mean left - right ratio difference [D(l-r)] ranged from -0.018 to 0.071), this difference was larger for left hemispheric tasks (mean D(l-r) ranged from 0.050 to 0.071) than right hemispheric tasks (mean D(l-r) ranged from -0.018 to 0.034; P < .001). Further comparisons of each pair of (ie, left and right) hemispheric tasks revealed that the most suitable left and right hemispheric tasks to show hemispheric asymmetry were reading and line orientation, respectively (P < .001). Hemispheric asymmetry of cerebral blood flow changes during mental tests is demonstrable with TCD only when comparing the D(l-r) in response to suitable paired left and right hemispheric tasks.

  20. A measurement of the parity violating asymmetry in the neutron capture on 3He at the SNS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabir, Latiful; The n-3He Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Studies of parity violating (PV) observables in hadronic systems offer a unique probe of nucleon structure, complementary to other probes of low-energy non-perturbative QCD. The n-3He experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source at the ORNL measures the PV asymmetry of the recoil proton momentum k-> with respect to the neutron spin σ-> in the reaction n +3 He -> p + T + 764 keV . This asymmetry is sensitive to the isospin-conserving and isospin-changing (ΔI = 0, 1) channels of the Hadronic Weak Interaction, and is expected to be extremely small ( 10-7). The experiment will determine this PV asymmetry with the statistical sensitivity of the order of 10-8. Challenges like beam fluctuation, pedestal and background subtraction, instrumental interference, detector correlations and many others must be considered very carefully in the analysis to achieve this precision. I will discuss the data analysis and a method to extract the value for the PV asymmetry.

  1. [Sonographic patterns by transcranial Doppler in acute cerebral infarction].

    PubMed

    Arauz-Góngora, A; Cantú-Brito, C; Barinagarrementería-Aldatz, F

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the correlations between the patterns of Transcranial Doppler (TCD) and the extent and pathophysiologic mechanism of the ischemia as well as the prognosis of patients with acute ischemic stroke. 37 patients with ischemic stroke within the first 24 hours of evolution were examined using TCD, neuroimaging, and neurologic state at admission and disarcharge. The TCDs were grouped into four categories: normal, stenotic, hemispheric asymmetry and trunk occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA); they were correlated with the extent of brain damage, pathophysiologic mechanism of the stroke and prognosis. Normal TCD was highly predictive of lacunar infarction secondary to small vassels disease (p = 0.01) and good recovery (p < 0.02). The stenotic and hemispheric asymmetry patterns correlated highly with a cortical infarctions (p < 0.05) and a cardioembolic mechanism. The occlusion of the MCA was highly correlated with a large infarction (p < 0.01) and with poor outcome and death (p = 0.004). Our data show that TCD has a value in predicting the prognosis and the severity, location and pathophysiologic mechanism of cerebral strokes.

  2. Three-dimensional assessment of facial asymmetry: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Akhil, Gopi; Senthil Kumar, Kullampalayam Palanisamy; Raja, Subramani; Janardhanan, Kumaresan

    2015-01-01

    For patients with facial asymmetry, complete and precise diagnosis, and surgical treatments to correct the underlying cause of the asymmetry are significant. Conventional diagnostic radiographs (submento-vertex projections, posteroanterior radiography) have limitations in asymmetry diagnosis due to two-dimensional assessments of three-dimensional (3D) images. The advent of 3D images has greatly reduced the magnification and projection errors that are common in conventional radiographs making it as a precise diagnostic aid for assessment of facial asymmetry. Thus, this article attempts to review the newly introduced 3D tools in the diagnosis of more complex facial asymmetries. PMID:26538893

  3. [Cerebral ischemia and histamine].

    PubMed

    Adachi, Naoto

    2002-10-01

    Cerebral ischemia induces excess release of glutamate and an increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, which provoke catastrophic enzymatic processes leading to irreversible neuronal injury. Histamine plays the role of neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and histaminergic fibers are widely distributed in the brain. In cerebral ischemia, release of histamine from nerve endings has been shown to be enhanced by facilitation of its activity. An inhibition of the histaminergic activity in ischemia aggravates the histologic outcome. In contrast, intracerebroventricular administration of histamine improves the aggravation, whereas blockade of histamine H2 receptors aggravates ischemic injury. Furthermore, H2 blockade enhances ischemic release of glutamate and dopamine. These findings suggest that central histamine provides beneficial effects against ischemic neuronal damage by suppressing release of excitatory neurotransmitters. However, histaminergic H2 action facilitates the permeability of the blood-brain barrier and shows deleterious effects on cerebral edema.

  4. Hypernatraemia in cerebral disorders

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, W. H.

    1962-01-01

    Six patients are described in whom cerebral damage was associated with raised plasma sodium and chloride concentrations and with extremely low urinary outputs of sodium and chloride. The patients were not clinically dehydrated and direct determinations showed that the blood and plasma volumes, the endogenous creatinine clearance, and the urinary output of antidiuretic hormone were normal. For these and other reasons it is concluded that the metabolic picture results not from diminished circulatory volume, water deficiency, sodium deficiency, undetected diabetes insipidus or osmotic diuresis, but from the cerebral damage itself. In these and other cited cases, the cerebral damage was localized chiefly in the frontal lobes, hypothalamus or lower brain-stem, thus suggesting a descending pathway, the relationship of which to the pineal area controlling aldosterone secretion requires clarification. Images PMID:13920001

  5. Duplicated middle cerebral artery.

    PubMed

    Perez, Jesus; Machado, Calixto; Scherle, Claudio; Hierro, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Duplicated middle cerebral artery (DMCA) is an anomalous vessel arising from the internal carotid artery. The incidence DMCA is relatively law, and an association between this anomaly and cerebral aneurysms has been documented. There is a controversy whether DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is an important fact to consider in aneurysm surgery. We report the case of a 34-year-old black woman who suffered a subarachnoid hemorrhage and the angiography a left DMCA, and an aneurysm in an inferior branch of the main MCA. The DMCA and the MCA had perforating arteries. The aneurysm was clipped without complications. The observation of perforating arteries in our patient confirms that the DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is very important to be considered in cerebral aneurysms surgery. Moreover, the DMCA may potentially serve as a collateral blood supply to the MCA territory in cases of MCA occlusion.

  6. Anomalous CMB north-south asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Bernui, Armando

    2008-09-15

    Several accurate analyses have revealed a statistically significant north-south ecliptic asymmetry in the large-angle correlations strength of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation temperature field data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). This asymmetry is inconsistent with the statistical isotropy expected in the concordance cosmological model {lambda}CDM. It has been suggested that a possible cause-effect relationship exists between this large-angle anisotropy and the anomalous CMB quadrupole-octopole planes alignment. In turn, this later phenomenon (or both) would be a consequence of one or more of the following undesired effects in CMB data: a systematic error in the data processing or in the instrument characterization, residual foregrounds, and large-angle correlations induced by the incomplete sky CMB data (cut-sky masks are needed to reject galactic foregrounds). Here, it is proved that the north-south asymmetry is unrelated to the quadrupole (l=2) and the octopole (l=3) properties because we find, at high confidence levels, such large-angle anisotropy in three- and five-year WMAP CMB maps containing only the multipole components 4{<=}l{<=}10. The statistical significance depends on both, the CMB map analyzed as well as the cut-sky mask applied to exclude foregrounds. In general, we obtain that the significance level of the north-south asymmetry is less in five-year WMAP data with KQ75 (> or approx. 90% CL) than it is in three-year data with Kp0 (> or approx. 96% CL). For instance, in the WMAP internal linear combination (ILC)-five-year map with the KQ75 mask (a sky cut of 28.4%) this phenomenon is observed at 92.7% CL, whereas for the WMAP ILC-three-year map with the Kp0 mask (a sky cut of 23.5%) this phenomenon appears at 96.5% CL. Moreover, it is also shown that this hemispherical asymmetry is unlikely due to systematics or foreground contaminants, because it is present in single-frequency, multifrequency, and cleaned ILC

  7. Sagittal otolith morphogenesis asymmetry in marine fishes.

    PubMed

    Mille, T; Mahe, K; Villanueva, M C; De Pontual, H; Ernande, B

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated and compared asymmetry in sagittal otolith shape and length between left and right inner ears in four roundfish and four flatfish species of commercial interest. For each species, the effects of ontogenetic changes (individual age and total body length), sexual dimorphism (individual sex) and the otolith's location on the right or left side of the head, on the shape and length of paired otoliths (between 143 and 702 pairs according to species) were evaluated. Ontogenetic changes in otolith shape and length were observed for all species. Sexual dimorphism, either in otolith shape and length or in their ontogenetic changes, was detected for half of the species, be they round or flat. Significant directional asymmetry in otolith shape and length was detected in one roundfish species each, but its inconsistency across species and its small average amplitude (6·17% for shape and 1·99% for length) suggested that it has barely any biological relevance. Significant directional asymmetry in otolith shape and length was found for all flatfish species except otolith length for one species. Its average amplitude varied between 2·06 and 17·50% for shape and between 0·00 and 11·83% for length and increased significantly throughout ontogeny for two species, one dextral and one sinistral. The longer (length) and rounder otolith (shape) appeared to be always on the blind side whatever the species. These results suggest differential biomineralization between the blind and ocular inner ears in flatfish species that could result from perturbations of the proximal-distal gradient of otolith precursors in the endolymph and the otolith position relative to the geometry of the saccular epithelium due to body morphology asymmetry and lateralized behaviour. The fact that asymmetry never exceeded 18% even at the individual level suggests an evolutionary canalization of otolith shape symmetry to avoid negative effects on fish hearing and balance. Technically

  8. Is there an association between skeletal asymmetry and tooth absence?

    PubMed Central

    Thiesen, Guilherme; Gribel, Bruno Frazão; Pereira, Keila Cristina Rausch; Freitas, Maria Perpetua Mota

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Facial skeletal asymmetry is commonly found in humans and its main characteristic is menton deviation. The literature suggests that occlusal and masticatory problems arising from tooth absence could be related to the development of such asymmetries. Objective: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to estimate the prevalence of mandibular skeletal asymmetries and to investigate its association with posterior tooth absences. Methods: Tomographic images of 952 individuals aged from 18 to 75 years old were used. Asymmetry was the analyzed outcome, and it was categorized into three groups according to gnathion displacement in relation to the midsagittal plane (relative symmetry, moderate asymmetry, and severe asymmetry). Patients were sorted by the presence of all posterior teeth, unilateral posterior tooth absence, or bilateral posterior tooth absence. Chi-square test with a significance level of 5% was used to verify the association between posterior tooth absence and asymmetry. Results: Results show relative symmetry present in 55.3% of the sample, as well as the prevalence of 27.3% for moderate mandibular asymmetry and 17.4% for severe asymmetry. Moderate and severe mandibular asymmetries occurred in a higher proportion in patients with unilateral posterior tooth absence. However, there was no statistically significant difference between the analyzed groups (p = 0.691). Conclusions: In this study, mandibular asymmetries did not present any association with the absence of teeth on the posterior area of the arch. PMID:27653267

  9. Categories of manual asymmetry and their variation with advancing age.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Luis A

    2008-06-01

    Manual asymmetries were analyzed in 18- to 63-year-old right-handers in different motor tasks. This analysis aimed at describing the asymmetry profile for each task and assessing their stability across ages. For this purpose, performance of the right and left hands were analyzed in the following aspects: simple reaction time, rate of sequential finger movements, maximum grip force, accuracy in anticipatory timing, rate of repetitive tapping, and rate of drawing movements. In addition, stability of manual preference across ages was assessed through the Edinburgh inventory (Oldfield, 1971). The results indicated different profiles of manual asymmetry, with identification of three categories across tasks: symmetric performance (asymmetry indices close to zero), inconsistent asymmetry (asymmetry indices variable in magnitude and direction), and consistent asymmetry (asymmetry indices favoring a single hand). The different profiles observed in the young adults were stable across ages with two exceptions: decreased lateral asymmetry for maximum grip force and increased asymmetry for sequential drawing in older individuals. These results indicate that manual asymmetries are task specific. Such task specificity is interpreted to be the result of different sensorimotor requirements imposed by each motor task in association with motor experiences accumulated over the lifetime. Analysis of manual preference showed that strength of preference for the right hand was greater in older individuals.

  10. Mandibular asymmetry in patients with the crouzon or apert syndrome.

    PubMed

    Elmi, P; Reitsma, J H; Buschang, P H; Wolvius, E B; Ongkosuwito, E M

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to describe directional and fluctuating mandibular asymmetry over time in children with Crouzon or Apert syndrome. Mandibular asymmetry of children between 7.5 and 14 years of age with Crouzon syndrome (n = 35) and Apert syndrome (n = 24) were compared with controls (n = 327). From panoramic radiographs, mandibular directional and fluctuating asymmetry was determined for the three groups. Multilevel statistical techniques were used to describe mandibular asymmetry changes over time. Patients with Crouzon and Apert syndromes showed statistically significant more fluctuating asymmetry for mandibular measures than did controls. Between the Crouzon and Apert syndromes groups, no statistical differences were found in directional and fluctuating asymmetry. The control group showed statistically significantly more directional asymmetry than did patients with Crouzon or Apert syndrome. The controls showed no change over time for the directional asymmetry of condylar-ramal height; however, the directional asymmetry of the gonial angle increased. Patients with Crouzon syndrome showed side dominance for only condylar-ramal height; whereas, patients with Apert syndrome did not show dominance for any of the measurements. Apert and Crouzon syndromes showed developmental instability, in contrast to the controls. No statistically significant longitudinal differences were found for either the directional or the fluctuating asymmetry between Crouzon and Apert syndromes. Findings for fluctuating and directional asymmetry for both syndromes may indicate an inability to cope with genetic and environmental stress during development and treatment, compared with untreated nonsyndromic individuals.

  11. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis with cerebral hemorrhage during early pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Quanmin; Guo, Pin; Ge, Jianwei; Qiu, Yongming

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) rarely induces cerebral hemorrhage, and CVST with cerebral hemorrhage during early pregnancy is extremely rare. Upon literature review, we are able to find only one case of CVST with cerebral hemorrhage in early pregnancy. In this paper, we report another case of a 27-year-old patient who developed CVST with cerebral hemorrhage in her fifth week of pregnancy. Although the optimal treatment for this infrequent condition remains controversial, we adopted anticoagulation as the first choice of treatment and obtained favorable results. PMID:25630781

  12. Predictions of the poloidal asymmetries and transport frequencies in KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, C. Lee, S. G.; Terzolo, L.; Stacey, W. M.

    2014-01-15

    The extended neoclassical rotation theory formulated in Miller flux surface geometry enables unprecedented neoclassical calculations of the poloidal asymmetries in density, rotation velocities, electrostatic potential along the flux surfaces, and of the inertial (Reynolds stress) and gyroviscous transport frequencies, which are strong functions of these asymmetries. This paper presents such calculations of the poloidal asymmetries and non-negligible inertial and gyroviscous transport frequencies in two KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) [Kwon et al., Nucl. Fusion 51, 094006 (2011)] Neutral Beam Injection H-mode discharges. The in-out asymmetries in the velocities are an order of magnitude larger than their up-down asymmetries. The magnitudes of the predicted inertial and gyroviscous transport frequencies depend on the magnitudes of the density and velocity asymmetries. The neoclassically predicted density asymmetries are shown to correspond with the reported measurements in tokamaks and the predicted carbon toroidal velocities agree very well with the measurements in KSTAR.

  13. Observing the top energy asymmetry at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berge, S.; Westhoff, S.

    2017-01-01

    The top-antitop energy asymmetry is a promising observable of the charge asymmetry in jet-associated top-quark pair production at the LHC. We present new predictions of the energy asymmetry in proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV, including QCD corrections at the next-to-leading perturbative order. The effect of QCD corrections on the observable is moderate. With suitable phase-space cuts, the asymmetry can be enhanced at the cost of reducing the cross section. For instance, for a cross section of 1 pb after cuts, we predict an energy asymmetry of -6. 5-0.2+0.1% at the next-to-leading order in QCD. We also investigate scale uncertainties and parton-shower effects, which partially cancel in the normalized asymmetry. Our results provide a sound basis for a measurement of the energy asymmetry at the LHC during run II.

  14. Collider-Independent tt¯ Forward-Backward Asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Juste, A.

    2012-11-01

    We introduce the forward-backward asymmetries Au, Ad corresponding to uu¯, dd¯→tt¯ production, respectively, at hadron colliders. These are collider and center-of-mass independent observables, directly related to the forward-backward and charge asymmetries measured at the Tevatron and the LHC, respectively. We discuss how to extract these asymmetries from data. Because these asymmetries are collider independent, their measurement at these two colliders could elucidate the nature of the anomalous forward-backward asymmetry measured at the Tevatron. Our framework also shows in a model independent fashion that a positive Tevatron asymmetry exceeding the standard model expectation is compatible with the small asymmetry measured at the LHC.

  15. Field dependency, brain asymmetry and psychophysiological differences.

    PubMed

    Silverman, A J

    1979-01-01

    Field dependent individuals differ psychologically from field independent subjects. They use more primitive defense mechanisms, and are more responsive to social forces around them than field independent subjects. Psychophysiological differences exist between these groups which will be reviewed. Obesity and alcoholism are also related to field dependency, as well as other psychosomatic disorders. Our series of experiments show that field dependent subjects are less left cerebrally dominant, and show most elements (in subclinical form) of a left cerebral lobe (Gerstmann's) syndrome. Implications for psychosomatic medicine are noted in the psychophysiological differences seen.

  16. [Complementary and alternative therapies for climacteric symptoms].

    PubMed

    Reinhard-Hennch, Bettina; Strowitzki, Thomas; von Hagens, Cornelia

    2006-01-01

    Review on complementary and alternative therapies for climacteric symptoms. Search for publications about complementary or alternative treatments for climacteric symptoms based on Cochrane Library and Medline (1966-2006) including the references from the identified clinical trials and reviews. Cimicifuga may influence climacteric symptoms, especially hot flushes. Results for phytoestrogens, hop and Salvia seem promising but are less convincing. St. John's wort is an option for the treatment of moderate depressive symptoms. Phytoestrogens seem to have some potential for the prevention of osteoporosis and cardiovascular diseases. Results for the influence of lifestyle on hot flushes are conflicting, but interventions have demonstrated their use for the prevention of osteoporosis and cardiovascular diseases. Lifestyle modifications, Cimicifuga and phytoestrogens may relieve climacteric symptoms. Phytoestrogens and Cimicifuga should not be given to breast cancer survivors.

  17. Learning from nature: binary cooperative complementary nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Su, Bin; Guo, Wei; Jiang, Lei

    2015-03-01

    In this Review, nature-inspired binary cooperative complementary nanomaterials (BCCNMs), consisting of two components with entirely opposite physiochemical properties at the nanoscale, are presented as a novel concept for the building of promising materials. Once the distance between the two nanoscopic components is comparable to the characteristic length of some physical interactions, the cooperation between these complementary building blocks becomes dominant and endows the macroscopic materials with novel and superior properties. The first implementation of the BCCNMs is the design of bio-inspired smart materials with superwettability and their reversible switching between different wetting states in response to various kinds of external stimuli. Coincidentally, recent studies on other types of functional nanomaterials contribute more examples to support the idea of BCCNMs, which suggests a potential yet comprehensive range of future applications in both materials science and engineering.

  18. Complementary Proteomic Analysis of Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Todd M.; Miteva, Yana; Conlon, Frank L.; Cristea, Ileana M.

    2013-01-01

    Proteomic characterization of protein complexes leverages the versatile platform of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to elucidate molecular and cellular signaling processes underlying the dynamic regulation of macromolecular assemblies. Here, we describe a complementary proteomic approach optimized for immunoisolated protein complexes. As the relative complexity, abundance, and physiochemical properties of proteins can vary significantly between samples, we have provided (1) complementary sample preparation workflows, (2) detailed steps for HPLC and mass spectrometric method development, and (3) a bioinformatic workflow that provides confident peptide/protein identification paired with unbiased functional gene ontology analysis. This protocol can also be extended for characterization of larger complexity samples from whole cell or tissue Xenopus proteomes. PMID:22956100

  19. [Complementary and alternative medicine for insomnia].

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Hidehisa; Machino, Akihiko; Shishida, Kazuhiro; Yoshino, Atsuo; Yamawaki, Shigeto

    2015-06-01

    Frequency of insomnia is increasing with age. Benzodiazepine receptor agonist has been prescribed for insomnia in the elderly, but there are some patients who complain the effect is not sufficient. Adherence for sleeping pills is very low in elderly Japanese, because there has been strong stigma against sleeping pills. Complementary and alternative medicine for insomnia is widely used in elderly Japanese. Sedative antidepressants, novel antipsychotics, anti-histamine drugs, and supplements are used for insomnia as complementary and alternative medicine. But evidence of these drugs for insomnia is insufficient. In this paper, we outline the previous reports such as the advantages and disadvantages of these drugs for the treatment of insomnia in the elderly.

  20. Complementary heterojunction FET technology for space application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larue, George

    1993-01-01

    A 32-bit serial integer multiplier was designed to investigate the yield and performance of complementary heterojunction FET (CHFET) technology. This is the largest reported CHFET logic circuit. The maximum operating frequency was 500 MHz. Very low power dissipation of 3 mW was obtained at 5 MHz operation. Single-event upset (SEU) characteristics of CHFET devices and latches were also measured and indicates the potential for SEU hard circuits for space and military applications.

  1. Microscale Chemistry and Green Chemistry: Complementary Pedagogies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mono M.; Szafran, Zvi; Pike, R. M.

    1999-12-01

    This paper describes the complementary nature of microscale chemistry and green chemistry. Green chemistry emphasizes the concepts of atom economy, source reduction, pathway modification, solvent substitution, and pollution prevention as means of improving the environmental impact of industrial chemistry. Microscale chemistry serves as a tool for incorporating green chemistry ideas across the curriculum in educational institutions. Examples are drawn from microscale laboratory experiments to illustrate the pedagogic connection between the two areas.

  2. [Complementary care approaches, towards more humanity].

    PubMed

    Svandra, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Modern medicine, with its cutting-edge technology, questions the notions of dehumanisation, over-medicalisation, the relationship to care. It seems to be aimed more at the disease than the patient. Complementary care approaches, which also encompass conventional medicine, guide and support the patient. Today, they have a role in giving back to the patient a feeling of being present in the world and testify to different approaches.

  3. Using complementary and alternative medicines for depression.

    PubMed

    Fava, Maurizio

    2010-09-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) has increased among patients with psychiatric disorders over recent decades. Therefore, clinicians must inquire and be knowledgeable about the use of CAM therapies, not only to give their patients accurate and up-to-date information but also to know when to appropriately prescribe CAM therapies to patients. Of the available CAMs, omega-3 fatty acids, folate, SAM-e, and St John's wort are reviewed.

  4. Complementary arsenic speciation methods: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nearing, Michelle M.; Koch, Iris; Reimer, Kenneth J.

    2014-09-01

    The toxicity of arsenic greatly depends on its chemical form and oxidation state (speciation) and therefore accurate determination of arsenic speciation is a crucial step in understanding its chemistry and potential risk. High performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) is the most common analysis used for arsenic speciation but it has two major limitations: it relies on an extraction step (usually from a solid sample) that can be incomplete or alter the arsenic compounds; and it provides no structural information, relying on matching sample peaks to standard peaks. The use of additional analytical methods in a complementary manner introduces the ability to address these disadvantages. The use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with HPLC-ICP-MS can be used to identify compounds not extracted for HPLC-ICP-MS and provide minimal processing steps for solid state analysis that may help preserve labile compounds such as those containing arsenicsbnd sulfur bonds, which can degrade under chromatographic conditions. On the other hand, HPLC-ICP-MS is essential in confirming organoarsenic compounds with similar white line energies seen by using XAS, and identifying trace arsenic compounds that are too low to be detected by XAS. The complementary use of electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) with HPLC-ICP-MS provides confirmation of arsenic compounds identified during the HPLC-ICP-MS analysis, identification of unknown compounds observed during the HPLC-ICP-MS analysis and further resolves HPLC-ICP-MS by identifying co-eluting compounds. In the complementary use of HPLC-ICP-MS and ESI-MS, HPLC-ICP-MS helps to focus the ESI-MS selection of ions. Numerous studies have shown that the information obtained from HPLC-ICP-MS analysis can be greatly enhanced by complementary approaches.

  5. Complementary methods of transverse emittance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Zagel, James; Hu, Martin; Jansson, Andreas; Thurman-Keup, Randy; Yan, Ming-Jen; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    Several complementary transverse emittance monitors have been developed and used at the Fermilab accelerator complex. These include Ionization profile Monitors (IPM), Flying Wires, Schottky detectors and a Synchrotron Light Monitor (Synchlite). Mechanical scrapers have also been used for calibration purposes. This paper describes the various measurement devices by examining their basic features, calibration requirements, systematic uncertainties, and applications to collider operation. A comparison of results from different kinds of measurements is also presented.

  6. Complementary and Integrative Medicine for Neurologic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Wells, Rebecca Erwin; Baute, Vanessa; Wahbeh, Helané

    2017-09-01

    Although many neurologic conditions are common, cures are rare and conventional treatments are often limited. Many patients, therefore, turn to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The use of selected, evidence-based CAM therapies for the prevention and treatment of migraine, carpal tunnel syndrome, and dementia are presented. Evidence is growing many of modalities, including nutrition, exercise, mind-body medicine, supplements, and acupuncture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. GDH Integral on the Proton from Asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Prok, Yelena

    2004-05-01

    Inclusive double spin electron asymmetries have been measured by scattering polarized electrons off the solid polarized 15NH3 target in Hall B of Jefferson Lab in 2000-2001. The virtual photon asymmetry A1 (x), the longitudinal spin structure function, g1 (x, Q2), and the first moment, γ1p, have been evaluated for a kinematic range of 0.05 ≥ Q2 ≥ 4.5 GeV2. The extracted results complement the existing data in the resonance region, extending it to lower and higher Q2 regions. The results are important in the study of Q2 evolution of nucleon structure from the hadronic to partonic degrees of freedom.

  8. Local time asymmetries in the Venus thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, M. J.; Stewart, A. I. F.; Solomon, S. C.; Bougher, S. W.

    1993-06-01

    A comparison is presented of the 130-m images taken in the Venus thermosphere by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter Ultraviolet Spectrometer (PVOUVS) to predictions by a model which incorporates current understanding of the global structure of the thermosphere, the mechanisms which excite the 130-nm transition in O, and the radiative transport of the 130-nm triplet in the thermosphere. The features identified in the data/model comparison appear as a local time asymmetry in B(130) and O at altitudes poleward of 30 deg. Oxygen densities at the evening terminator are typically a factor of 2 higher than those at the morning terminator. This asymmetry in O has never before been observed or predicted in the global thermospheric models.

  9. Beam-Spin Asymmetry Measurements at CLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghasyan, M.

    2008-10-01

    The single-spin asymmetries (SSA) that have been reported recently in semi-inclusive DIS by HERMES, COMPASS and CLAS, have emerged as a powerful tool to access the orbital motion of partons. SSAs could arise in the fragmentation of polarized quarks (Collins effect) and from the interference of wavefunctions with different orbital angular momentum (Sivers effect). The two mechanisms produce different kinematical dependences and their contributions could be separated in measurements of different beam and target single-spin asymmetries. This contribution presents recent results from Jefferson Lab's CLAS detector on beam SSAs in single neutral pion electroproduction off an unpolarized hydrogen targets in the DIS regime (Q^2>1GeV^2,W^2>4GeV^2). The measured kinematical dependences are compared with model predictions.

  10. Complementary and Integrative Health Practices for Depression.

    PubMed

    Haefner, Judy

    2017-09-11

    The current article reviews selected complementary health approaches for the treatment of depressive symptoms. Complementary and integrative health (CIH) focuses on the whole person with the goal of optimal health-body, mind, and spirit. Patient use of integrative health practices and products is increasing; therefore, providers must understand these practices and products and be able to recommend or advise for or against their use based on research and guidelines. Difficulty with the current limitations of research on CIH practices is discussed, as these studies often may not have the same rigor or scientific weight as conventional treatment research. Although some individuals may use certain treatment options alone, such as massage therapy, meditation, and supplements to diet, the article discusses ways to combine CIH with allopathic care. Nurse practitioners should be open to considering complementary practices for health care and knowledgeable to guide patients in making safe health decisions. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(x), xx-xx.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Interhemispheric Asymmetries in Visual Evoked Potential Amplitude

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-12

    developed using many experimental techniques. Behavioral tasks have included dichotic listening (Kimura, 1961, 1967), reaction time, and other...channel was digitized by the ARll A-D converter- Fifty epochs of 512 msec were averaged for each brain site in each brain hemisphere for each stimulus...perception of verbal stimuli. Can. J. Psychol. 15: 166-171, 1961. Kimuri, D. Functional asymmetry of the brain in dichotic listening. Cortex 3, 163

  12. LETTER: Synchronization model for stock market asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donangelo, Raul; Jensen, Mogens H.; Simonsen, Ingve; Sneppen, Kim

    2006-11-01

    The waiting time needed for a stock market index to undergo a given percentage change in its value is found to have an up down asymmetry, which, surprisingly, is not observed for the individual stocks composing that index. To explain this, we introduce a market model consisting of randomly fluctuating stocks that occasionally synchronize their short term draw-downs. These synchronous events are parametrized by a 'fear factor', that reflects the occurrence of dramatic external events which affect the financial market.

  13. W mass and W asymmetry at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, S. Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa )

    1991-05-01

    The lepton charge asymmetry from W decaying into a lepton and a neutrino is discussed (preliminary result). This measurement gives information on parton distribution functions at low x values. The derivation of the recently published W mass value of 79.91 {plus minus} 0.39 GeV/c{sup 2} is also presented. M{sub W} is used to set an upper limit on the top quark mass. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Female and male orbit asymmetry: Digital analysis.

    PubMed

    Lepich, Tomasz; Dąbek, Józefa; Witkowska, Małgorzata; Jura-Szołtys, Edyta; Bajor, Grzegorz

    2017-01-01

    Standard anthropometric methods applied to measurements of the skull differentials are laden with mistakes stemming from the way the measuring devices are built and from a lack of experience on the part of the researchers. To increase objectivity, digital imaging measurements via computer systems were introduced. The aim of this research was to assess the asymmetry of the male and female orbit with the application of the new graphic methods: raster graphics and vector graphics. The examination was conducted on 184 well-preserved skulls. The photos were taken by a digital camera with high definition. Orbit asymmetry was examined by determining the distance between the centers of gravity of both orbits and the frontal median line d1 and d2. Then angles α and β were appointed. They are defined as angles between the line that runs through craniometrical points mf and ek on the right side (angle α) and on the left side (angle β), and the frontal median line at their crossing point. Distances r2 and r1, which are allocated points between the frontal median lines (LPP), were also set. Angles α and β were also analyzed while comparing the skulls of both genders. Statistically significant differences were only observed in male skulls. However, differences for both genders were noted in parameters d1 and d2. No statistically significant differences were discovered between men and women for parameters r1 and r2. The groups of women and men were merged, being treated as a population; which resulted in the conclusion that there are no statistically significant differences between these parameters. The skull's asymmetry connected to gender and the asymmetry of the right and left sides of examined craniums can be used in criminal examinations as well as in facial reconstructive surgeries.

  15. Hemispheric asymmetry: contributions from brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Hugdahl, Kenneth

    2011-09-01

    A series of studies using functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging, including diffusion tensor imaging measures also, to elucidate the aspects of hemispheric asymmetry are reviewed. It is suggested that laterality evolved as a response to the demands of language and the need for air-based communication which may have necessitated a division of labor between the hemispheres in order to avoid having duplicate copies in both the hemispheres that would increase processing redundancy. This would have put pressure on brain structures related to the evolution of language and speech, such as the left peri-Sylvian region. MRI data are provided showing structural and functional asymmetry in this region of the brain and how fibers connecting the right and left peri-Sylvian regions pass through the corpus callosum. It is further suggested that the so-called Yakelovian-torque, i.e., the twisting of the brain along the longitudinal axis, with the right frontal and left occipital poles protruding beyond the corresponding left and right sides, was necessary for the expansion of the left peri-Sylvian region and the right occipito-parietal regions subserving the processing of spatial relations. Functional magnetic resonance imaging data related to sex differences for visuo-spatial processing are presented showing enhanced right-sided activation in posterior parts of the brain in both sexes, and frontal activation including Broca's area in the female group only, suggesting that males and females use different strategies when solving a cognitive task. The paper ends with a discussion of the role of the corpus callosum in laterality and the role played by structural asymmetry in understanding corresponding functional asymmetry. WIREs Cogni Sci 2011 2 461-478 DOI: 10.1002/wcs.122 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  16. Nodal signalling determines biradial asymmetry in Hydra.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Schmidt, Heiko A; Kuhn, Anne; Höger, Stefanie K; Kocagöz, Yigit; Laumann-Lipp, Nico; Ozbek, Suat; Holstein, Thomas W

    2014-11-06

    In bilaterians, three orthogonal body axes define the animal form, with distinct anterior-posterior, dorsal-ventral and left-right asymmetries. The key signalling factors are Wnt family proteins for the anterior-posterior axis, Bmp family proteins for the dorsal-ventral axis and Nodal for the left-right axis. Cnidarians, the sister group to bilaterians, are characterized by one oral-aboral body axis, which exhibits a distinct biradiality of unknown molecular nature. Here we analysed the biradial growth pattern in the radially symmetrical cnidarian polyp Hydra, and we report evidence of Nodal in a pre-bilaterian clade. We identified a Nodal-related gene (Ndr) in Hydra magnipapillata, and this gene is essential for setting up an axial asymmetry along the main body axis. This asymmetry defines a lateral signalling centre, inducing a new body axis of a budding polyp orthogonal to the mother polyp's axis. Ndr is expressed exclusively in the lateral bud anlage and induces Pitx, which encodes an evolutionarily conserved transcription factor that functions downstream of Nodal. Reminiscent of its function in vertebrates, Nodal acts downstream of β-Catenin signalling. Our data support an evolutionary scenario in which a 'core-signalling cassette' consisting of β-Catenin, Nodal and Pitx pre-dated the cnidarian-bilaterian split. We presume that this cassette was co-opted for various modes of axial patterning: for example, for lateral branching in cnidarians and left-right patterning in bilaterians.

  17. Functional Asymmetry in Kinesin and Dynein Dimers

    PubMed Central

    Rank, Katherine C.; Rayment, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Active transport along the microtubule lattice is a complex process that involves both the Kinesin and Dynein superfamily of motors. Transportation requires sophisticated regulation much of which occurs through the motor’s tail domain. However, a significant portion of this regulation also occurs through structural changes that arise in the motor and the microtubule upon binding. The most obvious structural change being the manifestation of asymmetry. To a first approximation in solution, kinesin dimers exhibit two-fold symmetry, and microtubules, helical symmetry. The higher symmetries of both the kinesin dimers and microtubule lattice are lost on formation of the kinesin-microtubule complex. Loss of symmetry has functional consequences such as an asymmetric hand-over-hand mechanism in plus-end directed kinesins, asymmetric microtubule binding in the Kinesin-14 family, spatially biased stepping in dynein, and cooperative binding of additional motors to the microtubule. This review focuses on how the consequences of asymmetry affect regulation of motor heads within a dimer, dimers within an ensemble of motors, and suggests how these asymmetries may affect regulation of active transport within the cell. PMID:23066835

  18. Functional gait asymmetry of unilateral transfemoral amputees.

    PubMed

    Schaarschmidt, Margrit; Lipfert, Susanne W; Meier-Gratz, Christine; Scholle, Hans-Christoph; Seyfarth, Andre

    2012-08-01

    The aim of prosthetic devices is to mimic the function of biological systems. Numerous investigations have demonstrated significant asymmetries in unilateral amputee gait. The underlying interactions of prosthetic and intact leg are not widely discussed, so far. To get more insight into the functionality of asymmetries, we investigated temporal and kinetic parameters of walking transfemoral amputees wearing the computerized C-Leg and the non-computerized 3R80. Experiments were conducted on an instrumented treadmill at four different walking speeds (0.5, 0.8, 1.1, 1.4m/s) measuring vertical and horizontal ground reaction forces. Single support, double support and contact times, vertical and horizontal impulses as well as their asymmetry factors were calculated. Gait patterns were similar for both prosthetic knee joints, manifesting in (i) reduced stance times of the prosthetic leg, (ii) prolonged load transfer during double support from intact to prosthetic leg at lower speeds, (iii) reduced vertical and horizontal impulses of the prosthetic leg, (iv) net accelerating horizontal impulses during contact of the prosthetic leg, (v) missing impacts at touch-down of the prosthetic leg. Our results suggest that deficits of the prosthetic leg like missing active knee extension and ankle push-off are compensated by the intact leg. The altered touch-down configuration for the prosthetic leg enables it to provide forward propulsion while load bearing is largely shifted to the intact leg. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cerebral Folate Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral folate deficiency (CFD) is associated with low levels of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with normal folate levels in the plasma and red blood cells. The onset of symptoms caused by the deficiency of folates in the brain is at around 4 to 6 months of age. This is followed by delayed development, with deceleration…

  20. [Multiple cerebral tuberculomas].

    PubMed

    Noriega, L; Villarreal, F

    The tuberculosis is a disease that continues being important cause of morbidity and mortality at worldwide level. Its presentation as tuberculomas cerebral manifold at level of the central nervous system is little frequent in immunocompetent patients and can be confused with other etiology. An indigenous young man, immunocompetent consulted for history of headache, nausea, vomits, convulsions, double vision and hemiparesia left side, which in the cerebral tomography of revenue was showing injuries compatible with cerebral abscesses; for which he received treatment with antibiotics without improvement for what there takes biopsy of the injuries that reported tuberculomas, specific treatment being initiated later and the primary area being investigated without the same one be detecting. After the first procedural step with evident clinical and radiographic improvement. The tuberculosis in anyone of their forms of presentation must be included within the diagnosis differential of the patients in our endemic countries for this disease. The clinical and radiological diagnosis of cerebral injuries is difficult and single usually it obtains to the diagnosis during a pathology study that shows tuberculomas with caseosa necrosis, epiteliodes cell and the acid alcohol bacilli resistant.