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Sample records for cerebral cortical circuits

  1. Mapping Synaptic Pathology within Cerebral Cortical Circuits in Subjects with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, Robert A.; Fish, Kenneth N.; Lewis, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Converging lines of evidence indicate that schizophrenia is characterized by impairments of synaptic machinery within cerebral cortical circuits. Efforts to localize these alterations in brain tissue from subjects with schizophrenia have frequently been limited to the quantification of structures that are non-selectively identified (e.g., dendritic spines labeled in Golgi preparations, axon boutons labeled with synaptophysin), or to quantification of proteins using methods unable to resolve relevant cellular compartments. Multiple label fluorescence confocal microscopy represents a means to circumvent many of these limitations, by concurrently extracting information regarding the number, morphology, and relative protein content of synaptic structures. An important adaptation required for studies of human disease is coupling this approach to stereologic methods for systematic random sampling of relevant brain regions. In this review article we consider the application of multiple label fluorescence confocal microscopy to the mapping of synaptic alterations in subjects with schizophrenia and describe the application of a novel, readily automated, iterative intensity/morphological segmentation algorithm for the extraction of information regarding synaptic structure number, size, and relative protein level from tissue sections obtained using unbiased stereological principles of sampling. In this context, we provide examples of the examination of pre- and post-synaptic structures within excitatory and inhibitory circuits of the cerebral cortex. PMID:20631852

  2. GENSAT BAC Cre-recombinase driver lines to study the functional organization of cerebral cortical and basal ganglia circuits

    PubMed Central

    Gerfen, Charles R.; Paletzki, Ronald; Heintz, Nathaniel

    2013-01-01

    Summary Recent development of molecular genetic techniques are rapidly advancing understanding of the functional role of brain circuits in behavior. Critical to this approach is the ability to target specific neuron populations and circuits. The collection of over 250 BAC Cre-recombinase driver lines produced by the GENSAT project provides a resource for such studies. Here we provide characterization of GENSAT BAC-Cre driver lines with expression in specific neuroanatomical pathways within the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia. PMID:24360541

  3. Modeling cortical circuits.

    SciTech Connect

    Rohrer, Brandon Robinson; Rothganger, Fredrick H.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon

    2010-09-01

    The neocortex is perhaps the highest region of the human brain, where audio and visual perception takes place along with many important cognitive functions. An important research goal is to describe the mechanisms implemented by the neocortex. There is an apparent regularity in the structure of the neocortex [Brodmann 1909, Mountcastle 1957] which may help simplify this task. The work reported here addresses the problem of how to describe the putative repeated units ('cortical circuits') in a manner that is easily understood and manipulated, with the long-term goal of developing a mathematical and algorithmic description of their function. The approach is to reduce each algorithm to an enhanced perceptron-like structure and describe its computation using difference equations. We organize this algorithmic processing into larger structures based on physiological observations, and implement key modeling concepts in software which runs on parallel computing hardware.

  4. Cortical circuits for perceptual inference.

    PubMed

    Friston, Karl; Kiebel, Stefan

    2009-10-01

    This paper assumes that cortical circuits have evolved to enable inference about the causes of sensory input received by the brain. This provides a principled specification of what neural circuits have to achieve. Here, we attempt to address how the brain makes inferences by casting inference as an optimisation problem. We look at how the ensuing recognition dynamics could be supported by directed connections and message-passing among neuronal populations, given our knowledge of intrinsic and extrinsic neuronal connections. We assume that the brain models the world as a dynamic system, which imposes causal structure on the sensorium. Perception is equated with the optimisation or inversion of this internal model, to explain sensory input. Given a model of how sensory data are generated, we use a generic variational approach to model inversion to furnish equations that prescribe recognition; i.e., the dynamics of neuronal activity that represents the causes of sensory input. Here, we focus on a model whose hierarchical and dynamical structure enables simulated brains to recognise and predict sequences of sensory states. We first review these models and their inversion under a variational free-energy formulation. We then show that the brain has the necessary infrastructure to implement this inversion and present stimulations using synthetic birds that generate and recognise birdsongs.

  5. Neurogliaform Cells in Cortical Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Overstreet-Wadiche, Linda; McBain, Chris J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research into local circuit GABAergic inhibitory interneurons of the mammalian central nervous system has provided unprecedented insight into our understanding of the mechanics of neuronal circuitry and its dysfunction. The recognition that inhibitory interneurons represent a broad array of anatomically and neurochemically diverse cell types suggests that each occupy an equally diverse functional role. Although neurogliaform cells were observed by Cajal over a century ago, our understanding of their functional roles is in its infancy. However, it is rapidly becoming clear that this cell type operates under a distinct repertoire of rules to provide novel forms of inhibitory control of numerous afferent pathways. PMID:26189693

  6. Cortical Feedback Control of Olfactory Bulb Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Alison M.; Sturgill, James F.; Poo, Cindy; Isaacson, Jeffry S.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Olfactory cortex pyramidal cells integrate sensory input from olfactory bulb mitral and tufted (M/T) cells and project axons back to the bulb. However, the impact of cortical feedback projections on olfactory bulb circuits is unclear. Here, we selectively express channelrhodopsin-2 in olfactory cortex pyramidal cells and show that cortical feedback projections excite diverse populations of bulb interneurons. Activation of cortical fibers directly excites GABAergic granule cells, which in turn inhibit M/T cells. However, we show that cortical inputs preferentially target short axon cells that drive feedforward inhibition of granule cells. In vivo, activation of olfactory cortex that only weakly affects spontaneous M/T cell firing strongly gates odor-evoked M/T cell responses: cortical activity suppresses odor-evoked excitation and enhances odor-evoked inhibition. Together, these results indicate that although cortical projections have diverse actions on olfactory bulb microcircuits, the net effect of cortical feedback on M/T cells is an amplification of odor-evoked inhibition. PMID:23259951

  7. A circuit for motor cortical modulation of auditory cortical activity.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Anders; Schneider, David M; Takatoh, Jun; Sakurai, Katsuyasu; Wang, Fan; Mooney, Richard

    2013-09-04

    Normal hearing depends on the ability to distinguish self-generated sounds from other sounds, and this ability is thought to involve neural circuits that convey copies of motor command signals to various levels of the auditory system. Although such interactions at the cortical level are believed to facilitate auditory comprehension during movements and drive auditory hallucinations in pathological states, the synaptic organization and function of circuitry linking the motor and auditory cortices remain unclear. Here we describe experiments in the mouse that characterize circuitry well suited to transmit motor-related signals to the auditory cortex. Using retrograde viral tracing, we established that neurons in superficial and deep layers of the medial agranular motor cortex (M2) project directly to the auditory cortex and that the axons of some of these deep-layer cells also target brainstem motor regions. Using in vitro whole-cell physiology, optogenetics, and pharmacology, we determined that M2 axons make excitatory synapses in the auditory cortex but exert a primarily suppressive effect on auditory cortical neuron activity mediated in part by feedforward inhibition involving parvalbumin-positive interneurons. Using in vivo intracellular physiology, optogenetics, and sound playback, we also found that directly activating M2 axon terminals in the auditory cortex suppresses spontaneous and stimulus-evoked synaptic activity in auditory cortical neurons and that this effect depends on the relative timing of motor cortical activity and auditory stimulation. These experiments delineate the structural and functional properties of a corticocortical circuit that could enable movement-related suppression of auditory cortical activity.

  8. A Circuit for Motor Cortical Modulation of Auditory Cortical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Anders; Schneider, David M.; Takatoh, Jun; Sakurai, Katsuyasu; Wang, Fan

    2013-01-01

    Normal hearing depends on the ability to distinguish self-generated sounds from other sounds, and this ability is thought to involve neural circuits that convey copies of motor command signals to various levels of the auditory system. Although such interactions at the cortical level are believed to facilitate auditory comprehension during movements and drive auditory hallucinations in pathological states, the synaptic organization and function of circuitry linking the motor and auditory cortices remain unclear. Here we describe experiments in the mouse that characterize circuitry well suited to transmit motor-related signals to the auditory cortex. Using retrograde viral tracing, we established that neurons in superficial and deep layers of the medial agranular motor cortex (M2) project directly to the auditory cortex and that the axons of some of these deep-layer cells also target brainstem motor regions. Using in vitro whole-cell physiology, optogenetics, and pharmacology, we determined that M2 axons make excitatory synapses in the auditory cortex but exert a primarily suppressive effect on auditory cortical neuron activity mediated in part by feedforward inhibition involving parvalbumin-positive interneurons. Using in vivo intracellular physiology, optogenetics, and sound playback, we also found that directly activating M2 axon terminals in the auditory cortex suppresses spontaneous and stimulus-evoked synaptic activity in auditory cortical neurons and that this effect depends on the relative timing of motor cortical activity and auditory stimulation. These experiments delineate the structural and functional properties of a corticocortical circuit that could enable movement-related suppression of auditory cortical activity. PMID:24005287

  9. Geometric and functional organization of cortical circuits.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Gordon M G; Stepanyants, Armen; Bureau, Ingrid; Chklovskii, Dmitri; Svoboda, Karel

    2005-06-01

    Can neuronal morphology predict functional synaptic circuits? In the rat barrel cortex, 'barrels' and 'septa' delineate an orderly matrix of cortical columns. Using quantitative laser scanning photostimulation we measured the strength of excitatory projections from layer 4 (L4) and L5A to L2/3 pyramidal cells in barrel- and septum-related columns. From morphological reconstructions of excitatory neurons we computed the geometric circuit predicted by axodendritic overlap. Within most individual projections, functional inputs were predicted by geometry and a single scale factor, the synaptic strength per potential synapse. This factor, however, varied between projections and, in one case, even within a projection, up to 20-fold. Relationships between geometric overlap and synaptic strength thus depend on the laminar and columnar locations of both the pre- and postsynaptic neurons, even for neurons of the same type. A large plasticity potential appears to be incorporated into these circuits, allowing for functional 'tuning' with fixed axonal and dendritic arbor geometry.

  10. Circuits that build visual cortical receptive fields.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Judith A; Martinez, Luis M

    2006-01-01

    Neural sensitivity to basic elements of the visual scene changes dramatically as information is handed from the thalamus to the primary visual cortex in cats. Famously, thalamic neurons are insensitive to stimulus orientation whereas their cortical targets easily resolve small changes in stimulus angle. There are two main types of cells in the visual cortex, simple and complex, defined by the structure of their receptive fields. Simple cells are thought to lay the groundwork for orientation selectivity. This review focuses on approaches that combine anatomy with physiology at the intracellular level, to explore the circuits that build simple receptive fields and that help to maintain neural sensitivity to stimulus features even when luminance contrast changes.

  11. Correlation of cerebral cortical morphology with behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, S.

    1989-03-01

    Association between functional damage and damage to the central nervous system from toxic agents can be used to determine the value of behavioral tests as predictors of damage to the nervous system. Variability in data from behavioral tests may be caused, in part, by varying levels of structural differences in the nervous system. Stepwise multiple regression is one method for analyzing the relationship between variability in data resulting from linkage between functional and morphological or other parameters of the structure of the nervous system. As an example, the predictive value of four behavioral tests is assessed in detecting thinning of the cerebral cortex following gestational exposure of rats to ionizing radiation. In this analysis, there were seven independent variables for predicting cortical thickness. The sequence of number of times each variable was used in prediction, from most frequent to least frequent, was: angle of stride greater than negative geotaxis greater than continuous corridor greater than body weight greater than width of stride greater than length of stride greater than reflex suspension. The data support the concept that there are varying degrees of predictive associations between these functional and cortical parameters.

  12. Inhibitory Circuits in Cortical Layer 5

    PubMed Central

    Naka, Alexander; Adesnik, Hillel

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory neurons play a fundamental role in cortical computation and behavior. Recent technological advances, such as two photon imaging, targeted in vivo recording, and molecular profiling, have improved our understanding of the function and diversity of cortical interneurons, but for technical reasons most work has been directed towards inhibitory neurons in the superficial cortical layers. Here we review current knowledge specifically on layer 5 (L5) inhibitory microcircuits, which play a critical role in controlling cortical output. We focus on recent work from the well-studied rodent barrel cortex, but also draw on evidence from studies in primary visual cortex and other cortical areas. The diversity of both deep inhibitory neurons and their pyramidal cell targets make this a challenging but essential area of study in cortical computation and sensory processing. PMID:27199675

  13. Toward a Genetic Dissection of Cortical Circuits in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Z. Josh

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian neocortex gives rise to a wide range of mental activities and consists of a constellation of interconnected areas that are built from a set of basic circuit templates. Major obstacles to understanding cortical architecture include the diversity of cell types, their highly recurrent local and global connectivity, dynamic circuit operations, and a convoluted developmental assembly process rooted in the genome. With our increasing knowledge of gene expression and developmental genetic principles, it is now feasible to launch a program of genetic dissection of cortical circuits through systematic targeting of cell types and fate-mapping of neural progenitors. Strategic design of even a modest number of mouse driver lines will facilitate efforts to compile a cell type parts list, build a Cortical Cell Atlas, establish experimental access to modern tools, and provide coordinates for tracing developmental trajectory from circuit assembly to functional operation. PMID:25233312

  14. Cortical hierarchy governs rat claustrocortical circuit organization.

    PubMed

    White, Michael G; Cody, Patrick A; Bubser, Michael; Wang, Hui-Dong; Deutch, Ariel Y; Mathur, Brian N

    2017-04-15

    The claustrum is a telencephalic gray matter structure with various proposed functions, including sensory integration and attentional allocation. Underlying these concepts is the reciprocal connectivity of the claustrum with most, if not all, areas of the cortex. What remains to be elucidated to inform functional hypotheses further is whether a pattern exists in the strength of connectivity between a given cortical area and the claustrum. To this end, we performed a series of retrograde neuronal tract tracer injections into rat cortical areas along the cortical processing hierarchy, from primary sensory and motor to frontal cortices. We observed that the number of claustrocortical projections increased as a function of processing hierarchy; claustrum neurons projecting to primary sensory cortices were scant and restricted in distribution across the claustrum, whereas neurons projecting to the cingulate cortex were densely packed and more evenly distributed throughout the claustrum. This connectivity pattern suggests that the claustrum may preferentially subserve executive functions orchestrated by the cingulate cortex. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:1347-1362, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Simulating Cortical Feedback Modulation as Changes in Excitation and Inhibition in a Cortical Circuit Model

    PubMed Central

    Murray, John D.; McCormick, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cortical feedback pathways are hypothesized to distribute context-dependent signals during flexible behavior. Recent experimental work has attempted to understand the mechanisms by which cortical feedback inputs modulate their target regions. Within the mouse whisker sensorimotor system, cortical feedback stimulation modulates spontaneous activity and sensory responsiveness, leading to enhanced sensory representations. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying these effects are currently unknown. In this study we use a simplified neural circuit model, which includes two recurrent excitatory populations and global inhibition, to simulate cortical modulation. First, we demonstrate how changes in the strengths of excitation and inhibition alter the input–output processing responses of our model. Second, we compare these responses with experimental findings from cortical feedback stimulation. Our analyses predict that enhanced inhibition underlies the changes in spontaneous and sensory evoked activity observed experimentally. More generally, these analyses provide a framework for relating cellular and synaptic properties to emergent circuit function and dynamic modulation. PMID:27595137

  16. A cortical disinhibitory circuit for enhancing adult plasticity.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yu; Kaneko, Megumi; Tang, Yunshuo; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Stryker, Michael P

    2015-01-27

    The adult brain continues to learn and can recover from injury, but the elements and operation of the neural circuits responsible for this plasticity are not known. In previous work, we have shown that locomotion dramatically enhances neural activity in the visual cortex (V1) of the mouse (Niell and Stryker, 2010), identified the cortical circuit responsible for this enhancement (Fu et al., 2014), and shown that locomotion also dramatically enhances adult plasticity (Kaneko and Stryker, 2014). The circuit that is responsible for enhancing neural activity in the visual cortex contains both vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and somatostatin (SST) neurons (Fu et al., 2014). Here, we ask whether this VIP-SST circuit enhances plasticity directly, independent of locomotion and aerobic activity. Optogenetic activation or genetic blockade of this circuit reveals that it is both necessary and sufficient for rapidly increasing V1 cortical responses following manipulation of visual experience in adult mice. These findings reveal a disinhibitory circuit that regulates adult cortical plasticity.

  17. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection: the impact of cerebral cortical malformations.

    PubMed

    Engman, M-L; Lewensohn-Fuchs, I; Mosskin, M; Malm, G

    2010-09-01

    Cytomegalovirus has been suggested to have a teratogenous influence during the migration of neural cells from the ventricular zones to the cortex during the gestational period. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of congenital cytomegalovirus infections in a cohort of children with neurological disability and cerebral cortical malformations recognized by neuroimaging. Twenty-six children with neurological disability and cerebral cortical malformations were investigated retrospectively for congenital cytomegalovirus infection by analysing the dried blood spot samples for cytomegalovirus deoxynucleic acid using qualitative polymerase chain reaction. CMV DNA in the dried blood spot samples was found in four out of 26 children. Two of these four had severe disabilities with mental retardation, autism, spastic cerebral palsy, epilepsy and deafness. A third child had epilepsy and unilateral cerebral palsy, while the fourth had a mild motor coordination dysfunction and hearing deficit. In our study, the number of congenital cytomegalovirus infections in children with cerebral cortical malformations was higher (4/26) than expected with reference to the birth prevalence (0.2-0.5%) of congenital cytomegalovirus infection in Sweden. We thus conclude that congenital cytomegalovirus infection should be considered in children with cortical malformations of unknown origin. © 2010 The Author(s)/Journal Compilation © 2010 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  18. Regulation of spike timing in visual cortical circuits

    PubMed Central

    Tiesinga, Paul; Fellous, Jean-Marc; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2010-01-01

    A train of action potentials (a spike train) can carry information in both the average firing rate and the pattern of spikes in the train. But can such a spike-pattern code be supported by cortical circuits? Neurons in vitro produce a spike pattern in response to the injection of a fluctuating current. However, cortical neurons in vivo are modulated by local oscillatory neuronal activity and by top-down inputs. In a cortical circuit, precise spike patterns thus reflect the interaction between internally generated activity and sensory information encoded by input spike trains. We review the evidence for precise and reliable spike timing in the cortex and discuss its computational role. PMID:18200026

  19. Somatostatin-Expressing Inhibitory Interneurons in Cortical Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Yavorska, Iryna; Wehr, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cortical inhibitory neurons exhibit remarkable diversity in their morphology, connectivity, and synaptic properties. Here, we review the function of somatostatin-expressing (SOM) inhibitory interneurons, focusing largely on sensory cortex. SOM neurons also comprise a number of subpopulations that can be distinguished by their morphology, input and output connectivity, laminar location, firing properties, and expression of molecular markers. Several of these classes of SOM neurons show unique dynamics and characteristics, such as facilitating synapses, specific axonal projections, intralaminar input, and top-down modulation, which suggest possible computational roles. SOM cells can be differentially modulated by behavioral state depending on their class, sensory system, and behavioral paradigm. The functional effects of such modulation have been studied with optogenetic manipulation of SOM cells, which produces effects on learning and memory, task performance, and the integration of cortical activity. Different classes of SOM cells participate in distinct disinhibitory circuits with different inhibitory partners and in different cortical layers. Through these disinhibitory circuits, SOM cells help encode the behavioral relevance of sensory stimuli by regulating the activity of cortical neurons based on subcortical and intracortical modulatory input. Associative learning leads to long-term changes in the strength of connectivity of SOM cells with other neurons, often influencing the strength of inhibitory input they receive. Thus despite their heterogeneity and variability across cortical areas, current evidence shows that SOM neurons perform unique neural computations, forming not only distinct molecular but also functional subclasses of cortical inhibitory interneurons. PMID:27746722

  20. A cortical circuit for gain control by behavioral state.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yu; Tucciarone, Jason M; Espinosa, J Sebastian; Sheng, Nengyin; Darcy, Daniel P; Nicoll, Roger A; Huang, Z Josh; Stryker, Michael P

    2014-03-13

    The brain's response to sensory input is strikingly modulated by behavioral state. Notably, the visual response of mouse primary visual cortex (V1) is enhanced by locomotion, a tractable and accessible example of a time-locked change in cortical state. The neural circuits that transmit behavioral state to sensory cortex to produce this modulation are unknown. In vivo calcium imaging of behaving animals revealed that locomotion activates vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-positive neurons in mouse V1 independent of visual stimulation and largely through nicotinic inputs from basal forebrain. Optogenetic activation of VIP neurons increased V1 visual responses in stationary awake mice, artificially mimicking the effect of locomotion, and photolytic damage of VIP neurons abolished the enhancement of V1 responses by locomotion. These findings establish a cortical circuit for the enhancement of visual response by locomotion and provide a potential common circuit for the modulation of sensory processing by behavioral state.

  1. Neuroelectric Tuning of Cortical Oscillations by Apical Dendrites in Loop Circuits.

    PubMed

    LaBerge, David; Kasevich, Ray S

    2017-01-01

    Bundles of relatively long apical dendrites dominate the neurons that make up the thickness of the cerebral cortex. It is proposed that a major function of the apical dendrite is to produce sustained oscillations at a specific frequency that can serve as a common timing unit for the processing of information in circuits connected to that apical dendrite. Many layer 5 and 6 pyramidal neurons are connected to thalamic neurons in loop circuits. A model of the apical dendrites of these pyramidal neurons has been used to simulate the electric activity of the apical dendrite. The results of that simulation demonstrated that subthreshold electric pulses in these apical dendrites can be tuned to specific frequencies and also can be fine-tuned to narrow bandwidths of less than one Hertz (1 Hz). Synchronous pulse outputs from the circuit loops containing apical dendrites can tune subthreshold membrane oscillations of neurons they contact. When the pulse outputs are finely tuned, they function as a local "clock," which enables the contacted neurons to synchronously communicate with each other. Thus, a shared tuning frequency can select neurons for membership in a circuit. Unlike layer 6 apical dendrites, layer 5 apical dendrites can produce burst firing in many of their neurons, which increases the amplitude of signals in the neurons they contact. This difference in amplitude of signals serves as basis of selecting a sub-circuit for specialized processing (e.g., sustained attention) within the typically larger layer 6-based circuit. After examining the sustaining of oscillations in loop circuits and the processing of spikes in network circuits, we propose that cortical functioning can be globally viewed as two systems: a loop system and a network system. The loop system oscillations influence the network system's timing and amplitude of pulse signals, both of which can select circuits that are momentarily dominant in cortical activity.

  2. Neuroelectric Tuning of Cortical Oscillations by Apical Dendrites in Loop Circuits

    PubMed Central

    LaBerge, David; Kasevich, Ray S.

    2017-01-01

    Bundles of relatively long apical dendrites dominate the neurons that make up the thickness of the cerebral cortex. It is proposed that a major function of the apical dendrite is to produce sustained oscillations at a specific frequency that can serve as a common timing unit for the processing of information in circuits connected to that apical dendrite. Many layer 5 and 6 pyramidal neurons are connected to thalamic neurons in loop circuits. A model of the apical dendrites of these pyramidal neurons has been used to simulate the electric activity of the apical dendrite. The results of that simulation demonstrated that subthreshold electric pulses in these apical dendrites can be tuned to specific frequencies and also can be fine-tuned to narrow bandwidths of less than one Hertz (1 Hz). Synchronous pulse outputs from the circuit loops containing apical dendrites can tune subthreshold membrane oscillations of neurons they contact. When the pulse outputs are finely tuned, they function as a local “clock,” which enables the contacted neurons to synchronously communicate with each other. Thus, a shared tuning frequency can select neurons for membership in a circuit. Unlike layer 6 apical dendrites, layer 5 apical dendrites can produce burst firing in many of their neurons, which increases the amplitude of signals in the neurons they contact. This difference in amplitude of signals serves as basis of selecting a sub-circuit for specialized processing (e.g., sustained attention) within the typically larger layer 6-based circuit. After examining the sustaining of oscillations in loop circuits and the processing of spikes in network circuits, we propose that cortical functioning can be globally viewed as two systems: a loop system and a network system. The loop system oscillations influence the network system’s timing and amplitude of pulse signals, both of which can select circuits that are momentarily dominant in cortical activity. PMID:28659768

  3. Development of cortical circuits: lessons from ocular dominance columns.

    PubMed

    Katz, Lawrence C; Crowley, Justin C

    2002-01-01

    The development of ocular dominance columns has served as a Rosetta stone for understanding the mechanisms that guide the construction of cortical circuits. Traditionally, the emergence of ocular dominance columns was thought to be closely tied to the critical period, during which columnar architecture is highly susceptible to alterations in visual input. However, recent findings in cats, monkeys and ferrets indicate that columns develop far earlier, more rapidly and with considerably greater precision than was previously suspected. These observations indicate that the initial establishment of cortical functional architecture, and its subsequent plasticity during the critical period, are distinct developmental phases that might reflect distinct mechanisms.

  4. Cortical subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Oda, Shinri; Shimoda, Masami; Hoshikawa, Kaori; Osada, Takahiro; Yoshiyama, Michitsura; Matsumae, Mitsunori

    2011-01-01

    Patients with non-traumatic, non-aneurysmal, and non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) tend to have clots circumscribed along the cortical convexity, a condition referred to as acute cortical SAH. Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a potential cause of cortical SAH. The study tried to establish the diagnosis and management of cortical SAH caused by CVT. Retrospective review of 145 patients with non-traumatic SAH identified 15 patients with no ruptured aneurysm. Clinical features were investigated with a specific focus on patients with SAH caused by CVT. Eight of the 15 patients had perimesencephalic SAH, and 7 had cortical SAH. SAH caused by CVT was diagnosed in 4 of the 7 patients with cortical SAH. The cortical SAH involved the unilateral convexity or sylvian cistern and spared the basal cistern on computed tomography in all 4 patients. CVT occurred in the transverse sinus and cortical vein (1 patient), insular vein (1 patient), and cortical vein (2 patients). Identification of thrombosed veins or sinuses was established directly by T(2)*-weighted and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the acute stage and diffusion-weighted and T(1)-weighted MR imaging in the subacute stage. All patients had cortical swelling without findings of venous hemorrhagic infarction on T(2)*-weighted MR imaging. None of the 4 patients received active treatment, and all had favorable outcomes. CVT in patients with non-traumatic cortical SAH should be first excluded as a potential hemorrhagic cause by MR imaging for thrombosed veins or sinuses before initiating antifibrinolytic therapy.

  5. Towards a Mathematical Theory of Cortical Micro-circuits

    PubMed Central

    George, Dileep; Hawkins, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    The theoretical setting of hierarchical Bayesian inference is gaining acceptance as a framework for understanding cortical computation. In this paper, we describe how Bayesian belief propagation in a spatio-temporal hierarchical model, called Hierarchical Temporal Memory (HTM), can lead to a mathematical model for cortical circuits. An HTM node is abstracted using a coincidence detector and a mixture of Markov chains. Bayesian belief propagation equations for such an HTM node define a set of functional constraints for a neuronal implementation. Anatomical data provide a contrasting set of organizational constraints. The combination of these two constraints suggests a theoretically derived interpretation for many anatomical and physiological features and predicts several others. We describe the pattern recognition capabilities of HTM networks and demonstrate the application of the derived circuits for modeling the subjective contour effect. We also discuss how the theory and the circuit can be extended to explain cortical features that are not explained by the current model and describe testable predictions that can be derived from the model. PMID:19816557

  6. A direct translaminar inhibitory circuit tunes cortical output

    PubMed Central

    Pluta, Scott; Naka, Alexander; Veit, Julia; Telian, Gregory; Yao, Lucille; Hakim, Richard; Taylor, David; Adesnik, Hillel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Anatomical and physiological experiments have outlined a blueprint for the feed-forward flow of activity in cortical circuits: signals are thought to propagate primarily from the middle cortical layer, L4, up to L2/3, and down to the major cortical output layer, L5. Pharmacological manipulations, however, have contested this model and suggested that L4 may not be critical for sensory responses of neurons in either superficial or deep layers. To address these conflicting models we reversibly manipulated L4 activity in awake, behaving mice using cell-type specific optogenetics. In contrast to both prevailing models, we show that activity in L4 directly suppresses L5, in part by activating deep, fast spiking inhibitory neurons. Our data suggest that the net impact of L4 activity is to sharpen the spatial representations of L5 neurons. Thus we establish a novel translaminar inhibitory circuit in the sensory cortex that acts to enhance the feature selectivity of cortical output. PMID:26414615

  7. A direct translaminar inhibitory circuit tunes cortical output.

    PubMed

    Pluta, Scott; Naka, Alexander; Veit, Julia; Telian, Gregory; Yao, Lucille; Hakim, Richard; Taylor, David; Adesnik, Hillel

    2015-11-01

    Anatomical and physiological experiments have outlined a blueprint for the feedforward flow of activity in cortical circuits: signals are thought to propagate primarily from the middle cortical layer (layer 4, L4) up to L2/3 and down to the major cortical output layer (L5). Pharmacological manipulations, however, have contested this model and have suggested that L4 may not be critical for sensory responses of neurons in either superficial or deep layers. To address these conflicting models, we reversibly manipulated L4 activity in awake, behaving mice using cell type-specific optogenetics. In contrast with both prevailing models, we found that activity in L4 directly suppressed L5, in part by activating deep, fast-spiking inhibitory neurons. Our data suggest that the net effect of L4 activity is to sharpen the spatial representations of L5 neurons. Thus, we establish a previously unknown translaminar inhibitory circuit in the sensory cortex that acts to enhance the feature selectivity of cortical output.

  8. The organization of two novel cortical interneuronal circuits

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaolong; Wang, Guangfu; Lee, Alice J.; Stornetta, Ruth L.; Zhu, J. Julius

    2013-01-01

    Deciphering interneuronal circuitry is central to understanding brain functions yet remains as a challenging task in neurobiology. Using simultaneous quadruple-octuple in vitro and dual in vivo whole-cell recordings, we found two previously unknown interneuronal circuits that link cortical layer 1–3 (L1-3) interneurons and L5 pyramidal neurons in the rat neocortex. L1 single-bouquet cells (SBCs) preferentially form unidirectional inhibitory connections on L2/3 interneurons that inhibit the entire dendritic-somato-axonal axis of ~1% of L5 pyramidal neurons located within the same column. In contrast, L1 elongated neurogliaform cells (ENGCs) frequently form mutual inhibitory and electric connections with L2/3 interneurons, and these L1-3 interneurons inhibit the distal apical dendrite of >60% of L5 pyramidal neurons across multiple columns. Functionally, SBC→L2/3 interneuron→L5 pyramidal neuronal circuits disinhibit and ENGC↔L2/3 interneuron→L5 pyramidal neuronal circuits inhibit the initiation of dendritic complex spikes in L5 pyramidal neurons. As dendritic complex spikes can serve coincidence detection, these cortical interneuronal circuits may be essential for salience selection. PMID:23313910

  9. The organization of two new cortical interneuronal circuits.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaolong; Wang, Guangfu; Lee, Alice J; Stornetta, Ruth L; Zhu, J Julius

    2013-02-01

    Deciphering the interneuronal circuitry is central to understanding brain functions, yet it remains a challenging task in neurobiology. Using simultaneous quadruple-octuple in vitro and dual in vivo whole-cell recordings, we found two previously unknown interneuronal circuits that link cortical layer 1-3 (L1-3) interneurons and L5 pyramidal neurons in the rat neocortex. L1 single-bouquet cells (SBCs) preferentially formed unidirectional inhibitory connections on L2/3 interneurons that inhibited the entire dendritic-somato-axonal axis of ∼1% of L5 pyramidal neurons located in the same column. In contrast, L1 elongated neurogliaform cells (ENGCs) frequently formed mutual inhibitory and electric connections with L2/3 interneurons, and these L1-3 interneurons inhibited the distal apical dendrite of >60% of L5 pyramidal neurons across multiple columns. Functionally, SBC→L2/3 interneuron→L5 pyramidal neuronal circuits disinhibited and ENGC↔L2/3 interneuron→L5 pyramidal neuronal circuits inhibited the initiation of dendritic complex spikes in L5 pyramidal neurons. As dendritic complex spikes can serve coincidence detection, these cortical interneuronal circuits may be essential for salience selection.

  10. Covert skill learning in a cortical-basal ganglia circuit.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, Jonathan D; Warren, Timothy L; Brainard, Michael S

    2012-05-20

    We learn complex skills such as speech and dance through a gradual process of trial and error. Cortical-basal ganglia circuits have an important yet unresolved function in this trial-and-error skill learning; influential 'actor-critic' models propose that basal ganglia circuits generate a variety of behaviours during training and learn to implement the successful behaviours in their repertoire. Here we show that the anterior forebrain pathway (AFP), a cortical-basal ganglia circuit, contributes to skill learning even when it does not contribute to such 'exploratory' variation in behavioural performance during training. Blocking the output of the AFP while training Bengalese finches to modify their songs prevented the gradual improvement that normally occurs in this complex skill during training. However, unblocking the output of the AFP after training caused an immediate transition from naive performance to excellent performance, indicating that the AFP covertly gained the ability to implement learned skill performance without contributing to skill practice. In contrast, inactivating the output nucleus of the AFP during training completely prevented learning, indicating that learning requires activity within the AFP during training. Our results suggest a revised model of skill learning: basal ganglia circuits can monitor the consequences of behavioural variation produced by other brain regions and then direct those brain regions to implement more successful behaviours. The ability of the AFP to identify successful performances generated by other brain regions indicates that basal ganglia circuits receive a detailed efference copy of premotor activity in those regions. The capacity of the AFP to implement successful performances that were initially produced by other brain regions indicates precise functional connections between basal ganglia circuits and the motor regions that directly control performance.

  11. Effect of anxiety on cortical cerebral blood flow and metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Gur, R.C.; Gur, R.E.; Resnick, S.M.; Skolnick, B.E.; Alavi, A.; Reivich, M.

    1987-04-01

    The relation between anxiety and cortical activity was compared in two samples of normal volunteers. One group was studied with the noninvasive xenon-133 inhalation technique for measuring cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the other with positron emission tomography (PET) using /sup 18/Flurodeoxyglucose (/sup 18/FDG) for measuring cerebral metabolic rates (CMR) for glucose. The inhalation technique produced less anxiety than the PET procedure, and for low anxiety subjects, there was a linear increase in CBF with anxiety. For higher anxiety subjects, however, there was a linear decrease in CBF with increased anxiety. The PET group manifested a linear decrease in CMR with increased anxiety. The results indicate that anxiety can have systematic effects on cortical activity, and this should be taken into consideration when comparing data from different procedures. They also suggest a physiologic explanation of a fundamental behavioral law that stipulates a curvilinear, inverted-U relationship between anxiety and performance.

  12. Emerging roles of Axin in cerebral cortical development

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Tao; Fu, Amy K. Y.; Ip, Nancy Y.

    2015-01-01

    Proper functioning of the cerebral cortex depends on the appropriate production and positioning of neurons, establishment of axon–dendrite polarity, and formation of proper neuronal connectivity. Deficits in any of these processes greatly impair neural functions and are associated with various human neurodevelopmental disorders including microcephaly, cortical heterotopias, and autism. The application of in vivo manipulation techniques such as in utero electroporation has resulted in significant advances in our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie neural development in vivo. Axin is a scaffold protein that regulates neuronal differentiation and morphogenesis in vitro. Recent studies provide novel insights into the emerging roles of Axin in gene expression and cytoskeletal regulation during neurogenesis, neuronal polarization, and axon formation. This review summarizes current knowledge on Axin as a key molecular controller of cerebral cortical development. PMID:26106297

  13. Signal transfer within a cultured asymmetric cortical neuron circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isomura, Takuya; Shimba, Kenta; Takayama, Yuzo; Takeuchi, Akimasa; Kotani, Kiyoshi; Jimbo, Yasuhiko

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Simplified neuronal circuits are required for investigating information representation in nervous systems and for validating theoretical neural network models. Here, we developed patterned neuronal circuits using micro fabricated devices, comprising a micro-well array bonded to a microelectrode-array substrate. Approach. The micro-well array consisted of micrometre-scale wells connected by tunnels, all contained within a silicone slab called a micro-chamber. The design of the micro-chamber confined somata to the wells and allowed axons to grow through the tunnels bidirectionally but with a designed, unidirectional bias. We guided axons into the point of the arrow structure where one of the two tunnel entrances is located, making that the preferred direction. Main results. When rat cortical neurons were cultured in the wells, their axons grew through the tunnels and connected to neurons in adjoining wells. Unidirectional burst transfers and other asymmetric signal-propagation phenomena were observed via the substrate-embedded electrodes. Seventy-nine percent of burst transfers were in the forward direction. We also observed rapid propagation of activity from sites of local electrical stimulation, and significant effects of inhibitory synapse blockade on bursting activity. Significance. These results suggest that this simple, substrate-controlled neuronal circuit can be applied to develop in vitro models of the function of cortical microcircuits or deep neural networks, better to elucidate the laws governing the dynamics of neuronal networks.

  14. Hierarchical computation in the canonical auditory cortical circuit

    PubMed Central

    Atencio, Craig A.; Sharpee, Tatyana O.; Schreiner, Christoph E.

    2009-01-01

    Sensory cortical anatomy has identified a canonical microcircuit underlying computations between and within layers. This feed-forward circuit processes information serially from granular to supragranular and to infragranular layers. How this substrate correlates with an auditory cortical processing hierarchy is unclear. We recorded simultaneously from all layers in cat primary auditory cortex (AI) and estimated spectrotemporal receptive fields (STRFs) and associated nonlinearities. Spike-triggered averaged STRFs revealed that temporal precision, spectrotemporal separability, and feature selectivity varied with layer according to a hierarchical processing model. STRFs from maximally informative dimension (MID) analysis confirmed hierarchical processing. Of two cooperative MIDs identified for each neuron, the first comprised the majority of stimulus information in granular layers. Second MID contributions and nonlinear cooperativity increased in supragranular and infragranular layers. The AI microcircuit provides a valid template for three independent hierarchical computation principles. Increases in processing complexity, STRF cooperativity, and nonlinearity correlate with the synaptic distance from granular layers. PMID:19918079

  15. Visuomotor expertise and dimensional complexity of cerebral cortical activity.

    PubMed

    Hung, Tsung-Min; Haufler, Amy J; Lo, Li-Chuan; Mayer-Kress, Gottfried; Hatfield, Bradley D

    2008-04-01

    This study employed the correlation dimension (D2) to examine whether visuomotor expertise was inversely related to the complexity of cerebral cortical activity. Expert rifle shooters (N = 15) and novices (N = 21) completed 40 shots in the standing position during which the electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded at 10 sites (F3, F4, C3, C4, T3, T4, P3, P4, O1, and O2) during a 5-s aiming period prior to trigger pull. D2 was derived for each trial and averaged across shots. A 2 x 2 x 5 (group x cerebral hemisphere x region) ANOVA was employed to contrast D2, while correlation analyses were used to determine the relationship between D2 and target shooting accuracy as well as variability of shot placement. As predicted, experts exhibited lower D2 (5.02 +/- 0.16 vs 5.49 +/- 0.13, respectively) and greater accuracy of shot placement ((339.8 +/- 44.7 vs 90.7 +/- 38.9 points out of 400 possible, respectively). Experts also exhibited an inverse relationship between D2 and shooting accuracy, while, in contrast, novices revealed a positive relationship. The results suggest that refinement and efficiency of cerebral cortical activity facilitates visuomotor performance. Lower complexity may be associated with less neuromotor "noise" in the brain, thus reducing interference with intended action.

  16. Cortical blindness as a rare presentation of cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bonnie; Moon, Seong-Jin; Olivero, William C; Wang, Huan

    2013-05-09

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for clinicians. Manifesting in a remarkably wide spectrum of symptoms and signs, CVT often presents in a misleading fashion-if unrecognized or misdiagnosed, it carries potentially fatal consequences. Visual loss is quite rare as the initial presentation of CVT and is typically a finding more frequent in chronic cases with associated papilledema on funduscopy Ferro, Lopes, Rosas and Fontes (Delay in Hospital Admission of Patients with Cerebral Vein and Dural Sinus Thrombosis. Cerebrovasc Dis 2005;19: :152-6). We report a rare case of acute cortical blindness as the initial presentation of CVT in an 18-year-old female patient and review the current literature. Published by Oxford University Press and JSCR Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved. © The Author 2013.

  17. Cortical blindness as a rare presentation of cerebral venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bonnie; Moon, Seong-Jin; Olivero, William C.; Wang, Huan

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for clinicians. Manifesting in a remarkably wide spectrum of symptoms and signs, CVT often presents in a misleading fashion—if unrecognized or misdiagnosed, it carries potentially fatal consequences. Visual loss is quite rare as the initial presentation of CVT and is typically a finding more frequent in chronic cases with associated papilledema on funduscopy Ferro, Lopes, Rosas and Fontes (Delay in Hospital Admission of Patients with Cerebral Vein and Dural Sinus Thrombosis. Cerebrovasc Dis 2005;19:152–6). We report a rare case of acute cortical blindness as the initial presentation of CVT in an 18-year-old female patient and review the current literature. PMID:24964444

  18. Regulation of cerebral metabolism during cortical spreading depression

    PubMed Central

    Feuerstein, Delphine; Gramer, Markus; Takagaki, Masatoshi; Gabel, Paula; Kumagai, Tetsuya; Graf, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed the metabolic response to cortical spreading depression that drastically increases local energy demand to restore ion homeostasis. During single and multiple cortical spreading depressions in the rat cortex, we simultaneously monitored extracellular levels of glucose and lactate using rapid sampling microdialysis and glucose influx using 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography while tracking cortical spreading depression using laser speckle imaging. Combining the acquired data with steady-state requirements we developed a mass-conserving compartment model including neurons and glia that was consistent with the observed data. In summary, our findings are: (1) Early breakdown of glial glycogen provides a major source of energy during increased energy demand and leaves 80% of blood-borne glucose to neurons. (2) Lactate is used solely by neurons and only if extracellular lactate levels are >80% above normal. (3) Although the ratio of oxygen and glucose consumption transiently reaches levels <3, the major part (>90%) of the overall energy supply is from oxidative metabolism. (4) During cortical spreading depression, brain release of lactate exceeds its consumption suggesting that lactate is only a circumstantial energy substrate. Our findings provide a general scenario for the metabolic response to increased cerebral energy demand. PMID:26661217

  19. Spreading depression and focal venous cerebral ischemia enhance cortical neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tamaki, Ryo; Orie, Samuel Ige; Alessandri, Beat; Kempski, Oliver; Heimann, Axel

    2017-01-01

    Endogenous neurogenesis can arise from a variety of physiological stimuli including exercise, learning, or “enriched environment” as well as pathological conditions such as ischemia, epilepsy or cortical spreading depression. Whether all these conditions use a common trigger to set off endogenous neurogenesis is yet unclear. We hypothesized that cortical spreading depression (CSD) induces neurogenesis in the cerebral cortex and dentate gyrus after cerebral venous ischemia. Forty-two Wistar rats alternatively underwent sham operation (Sham), induction of ten CSDs or venous ischemia provoked via occlusion of two adjacent superficial cortical vein followed by ten induced CSDs (CSD + 2-VO). As an additional control, 15 naïve rats received no intervention except 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) treatment for 7 days. Sagittal brain slices (40 μm thick) were co-stained for BrdU and doublecortin (DCX; new immature neuronal cells) on day 9 or NeuN (new mature neuronal cells) on day 28. On day 9 after sham operation, cell proliferation and neurogenesis occurred in the cortex in rats. The sole induction of CSD had no effect. But on days 9 and 28, more proliferating cells and newly formed neurons in the ipsilateral cortex were observed in rats subjected to CSD + 2VO than in rats subjected to sham operation. On days 9 and 28, cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the ipsilateral dentate gyrus was increased in sham-operated rats than in naïve rats. Our data supports the hypothesis that induced cortical neurogenesis after CSD + 2-VO is a direct effect of ischemia, rather than of CSD alone. PMID:28966642

  20. Response of Quiescent Cerebral Cortical Astrocytes to Nanofibrillar Scaffold Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Virginia; Mujdat Tiryaki, Volkan; Xie, Kan; Ahmed, Ijaz; Shreiber, David I.

    2013-03-01

    We present results of an investigation to examine the hypothesis that the extracellular environment can trigger specific signaling cascades with morphological consequences. Differences in the morphological responses of quiescent cerebral cortical astrocytes cultured on the nanofibrillar matrices versus poly-L-lysine functionalized glass and Aclar, and unfunctionalized Aclar surfaces were demonstrated using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and phalloidin staining of F-actin. The differences and similarities of the morphological responses were consistent with differences and similarities of the surface polarity and surface roughness of the four surfaces investigated in this work, characterized using contact angle and AFM measurements. The three-dimensional capability of AFM was also used to identify differences in cell spreading. An initial quantitative immunolabeling study further identified significant differences in the activation of the Rho GTPases: Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoA, which are upstream regulators of the observed morphological responses: filopodia, lamellipodia, and stress fiber formation. The results support the hypothesis that the extracellular environment can trigger preferential activation of members of the Rho GTPase family with demonstrable morphological consequences for cerebral cortical astrocytes. The support of NSF PHY-095776 is acknowledged.

  1. The cortical language circuit: from auditory perception to sentence comprehension.

    PubMed

    Friederici, Angela D

    2012-05-01

    Over the years, a large body of work on the brain basis of language comprehension has accumulated, paving the way for the formulation of a comprehensive model. The model proposed here describes the functional neuroanatomy of the different processing steps from auditory perception to comprehension as located in different gray matter brain regions. It also specifies the information flow between these regions, taking into account white matter fiber tract connections. Bottom-up, input-driven processes proceeding from the auditory cortex to the anterior superior temporal cortex and from there to the prefrontal cortex, as well as top-down, controlled and predictive processes from the prefrontal cortex back to the temporal cortex are proposed to constitute the cortical language circuit.

  2. Cortical Motor Circuits after Piano Training in Adulthood: Neurophysiologic Evidence.

    PubMed

    Houdayer, Elise; Cursi, Marco; Nuara, Arturo; Zanini, Sonia; Gatti, Roberto; Comi, Giancarlo; Leocani, Letizia

    2016-01-01

    The neuronal mechanisms involved in brain plasticity after skilled motor learning are not completely understood. We aimed to study the short-term effects of keyboard training in music-naive subjects on the motor/premotor cortex activity and interhemispheric interactions, using electroencephalography and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Twelve subjects (experimental group) underwent, before and after a two week-piano training: (1) hand-motor function tests: Jamar, grip and nine-hole peg tests; (2) electroencephalography, evaluating the mu rhythm task-related desynchronization (TRD) during keyboard performance; and (3) TMS, targeting bilateral abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM), to obtain duration and area of ipsilateral silent period (ISP) during simultaneous tonic contraction of APB and ADM. Data were compared with 13 controls who underwent twice these measurements, in a two-week interval, without undergoing piano training. Every subject in the experimental group improved keyboard performance and left-hand nine-hole peg test scores. Pre-training, ISP durations were asymmetrical, left being longer than right. Post-training, right ISPAPB increased, leading to symmetrical ISPAPB. Mu TRD during motor performance became more focal and had a lesser amplitude than in pre-training, due to decreased activity over ventral premotor cortices. No such changes were evidenced in controls. We demonstrated that a 10-day piano-training was associated with balanced interhemispheric interactions both at rest and during motor activation. Piano training, in a short timeframe, may reshape local and inter-hemispheric motor cortical circuits.

  3. Cortical Motor Circuits after Piano Training in Adulthood: Neurophysiologic Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Nuara, Arturo; Zanini, Sonia; Gatti, Roberto; Comi, Giancarlo; Leocani, Letizia

    2016-01-01

    The neuronal mechanisms involved in brain plasticity after skilled motor learning are not completely understood. We aimed to study the short-term effects of keyboard training in music-naive subjects on the motor/premotor cortex activity and interhemispheric interactions, using electroencephalography and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Twelve subjects (experimental group) underwent, before and after a two week-piano training: (1) hand-motor function tests: Jamar, grip and nine-hole peg tests; (2) electroencephalography, evaluating the mu rhythm task-related desynchronization (TRD) during keyboard performance; and (3) TMS, targeting bilateral abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM), to obtain duration and area of ipsilateral silent period (ISP) during simultaneous tonic contraction of APB and ADM. Data were compared with 13 controls who underwent twice these measurements, in a two-week interval, without undergoing piano training. Every subject in the experimental group improved keyboard performance and left-hand nine-hole peg test scores. Pre-training, ISP durations were asymmetrical, left being longer than right. Post-training, right ISPAPB increased, leading to symmetrical ISPAPB. Mu TRD during motor performance became more focal and had a lesser amplitude than in pre-training, due to decreased activity over ventral premotor cortices. No such changes were evidenced in controls. We demonstrated that a 10-day piano-training was associated with balanced interhemispheric interactions both at rest and during motor activation. Piano training, in a short timeframe, may reshape local and inter-hemispheric motor cortical circuits. PMID:27309353

  4. How Close Are We to Understanding What (if Anything) γ Oscillations Do in Cortical Circuits?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    γ oscillations, which can be identified by rhythmic electrical signals ∼30–100 Hz, consist of interactions between excitatory and inhibitory neurons that result in rhythmic inhibition capable of entraining firing within local cortical circuits. Many possible mechanisms have been described through which γ oscillations could act on cortical circuits to modulate their responses to input, alter their patterns of activity, and/or enhance the efficacy of their outputs onto downstream targets. Recently, several studies have observed changes in behavior after optogenetically manipulating neocortical γ oscillations. Now, future studies should determine whether these manipulations elicit physiological correlates associated with specific mechanisms through which γ oscillations are hypothesized to modulate cortical circuit function. There are numerous such mechanisms, so identifying which ones are actually engaged by optogenetic manipulations known to affect behavior would help flesh out exactly how γ oscillations contribute to cortical circuit function under normal and/or pathological conditions. PMID:27733600

  5. Identification of a brainstem circuit regulating visual cortical state in parallel with locomotion.

    PubMed

    Lee, A Moses; Hoy, Jennifer L; Bonci, Antonello; Wilbrecht, Linda; Stryker, Michael P; Niell, Cristopher M

    2014-07-16

    Sensory processing is dependent upon behavioral state. In mice, locomotion is accompanied by changes in cortical state and enhanced visual responses. Although recent studies have begun to elucidate intrinsic cortical mechanisms underlying this effect, the neural circuits that initially couple locomotion to cortical processing are unknown. The mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR) has been shown to be capable of initiating running and is associated with the ascending reticular activating system. Here, we find that optogenetic stimulation of the MLR in awake, head-fixed mice can induce both locomotion and increases in the gain of cortical responses. MLR stimulation below the threshold for overt movement similarly changed cortical processing, revealing that MLR's effects on cortex are dissociable from locomotion. Likewise, stimulation of MLR projections to the basal forebrain also enhanced cortical responses, suggesting a pathway linking the MLR to cortex. These studies demonstrate that the MLR regulates cortical state in parallel with locomotion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cholinergic systems are essential for late-stage maturation and refinement of motor cortical circuits

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Dhakshin S.; Conner, James M.; Anilkumar, Arjun A.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies reported that early postnatal cholinergic lesions severely perturb early cortical development, impairing neuronal cortical migration and the formation of cortical dendrites and synapses. These severe effects of early postnatal cholinergic lesions preclude our ability to understand the contribution of cholinergic systems to the later-stage maturation of topographic cortical representations. To study cholinergic mechanisms contributing to the later maturation of motor cortical circuits, we first characterized the temporal course of cortical motor map development and maturation in rats. In this study, we focused our attention on the maturation of cortical motor representations after postnatal day 25 (PND 25), a time after neuronal migration has been accomplished and cortical volume has reached adult size. We found significant maturation of cortical motor representations after this time, including both an expansion of forelimb representations in motor cortex and a shift from proximal to distal forelimb representations to an extent unexplainable by simple volume enlargement of the neocortex. Specific cholinergic lesions placed at PND 24 impaired enlargement of distal forelimb representations in particular and markedly reduced the ability to learn skilled motor tasks as adults. These results identify a novel and essential role for cholinergic systems in the late refinement and maturation of cortical circuits. Dysfunctions in this system may constitute a mechanism of late-onset neurodevelopmental disorders such as Rett syndrome and schizophrenia. PMID:25505106

  7. [Preoperative direct cortical and sub-cortical electric stimulation during cerebral surgery in functional areas].

    PubMed

    Duffau, H; Capelle, L; Sichez, J P; Bitar, A; Faillot, T; Arthuis, F; Van Effenterre, R; Fohanno, D

    1999-09-01

    Indications of surgical treatment for lesions in functional cerebral areas depend on the ratio between the definitive neurological deficit and the beneficial effect of resection. Detection of eloquent cortex is difficult because of important individual variability. Peroperative direct cortical and subcortical electrical stimulations (DCS) provide the most precise and reliable method currently available allowing identification and preservation of neurons essential for motricity, sensitivity++ and language. We report our preliminary experience with DCS in surgery of intracerebral infiltrative tumors with a consecutive series of 15 patients operated from November 96 through September 97 in our institution. Presenting symptoms in the 15 patients (8 males, 7 females, mean age 43 years) were seizures in 11 cases (73%) and neurological deficit in 4 cases (27%). Clinical examination was normal in 11 patients and revealed hemiparesia in 4. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with three-dimensional reconstruction showed a precentral tumor in 10 cases, central lesion in one patient, postcentral lesion in two cases, right insular tumor (non-dominant hemisphere) in one case. All patients underwent surgical resection using DCS with detection in 13 cases of motor cortex and subcortical pathways under genera anesthesia, in one case of somatosensory area under local anesthesia, and in one case of language areas also under local anesthesia. The tumor was recurrent in two patients had been operated earlier but without DCS. Resection, verified by postoperative MRI, was total in 12 cases (80%) and estimated at 80% in 3 patients. Histological examination revealed an infiltrative glioma in 12 cases (8 low grade astrocytomas, 3 low grade oligodendrogliomas, and one anaplastic oligodendroglioma), and metastases in 3 cases. Eight patients had no postoperative deficit, while the other 7 patients were impaired, with, in all cases except one, complete recovery in 15 days to 2 months. Direct

  8. Canonical Organization of Layer 1 Neuron-Led Cortical Inhibitory and Disinhibitory Interneuronal Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Alice J.; Wang, Guangfu; Jiang, Xiaolong; Johnson, Seraphina M.; Hoang, Elizabeth T.; Lanté, Fabien; Stornetta, Ruth L.; Beenhakker, Mark P.; Shen, Ying; Julius Zhu, J.

    2015-01-01

    Interneurons play a key role in cortical function and dysfunction, yet organization of cortical interneuronal circuitry remains poorly understood. Cortical Layer 1 (L1) contains 2 general GABAergic interneuron groups, namely single bouquet cells (SBCs) and elongated neurogliaform cells (ENGCs). SBCs predominantly make unidirectional inhibitory connections (SBC→) with L2/3 interneurons, whereas ENGCs frequently form reciprocal inhibitory and electric connections (ENGC↔) with L2/3 interneurons. Here, we describe a systematic investigation of the pyramidal neuron targets of L1 neuron-led interneuronal circuits in the rat barrel cortex with simultaneous octuple whole-cell recordings and report a simple organizational scheme of the interneuronal circuits. Both SBCs→ and ENGC ↔ L2/3 interneuronal circuits connect to L2/3 and L5, but not L6, pyramidal neurons. SBC → L2/3 interneuronal circuits primarily inhibit the entire dendritic–somato–axonal axis of a few L2/3 and L5 pyramidal neurons located within the same column. In contrast, ENGC ↔ L2/3 interneuronal circuits generally inhibit the distal apical dendrite of many L2/3 and L5 pyramidal neurons across multiple columns. Finally, L1 interneuron-led circuits target distinct subcellular compartments of L2/3 and L5 pyramidal neurons in a L2/3 interneuron type-dependent manner. These results suggest that L1 neurons form canonical interneuronal circuits to control information processes in both supra- and infragranular cortical layers. PMID:24554728

  9. Canonical Organization of Layer 1 Neuron-Led Cortical Inhibitory and Disinhibitory Interneuronal Circuits.

    PubMed

    Lee, Alice J; Wang, Guangfu; Jiang, Xiaolong; Johnson, Seraphina M; Hoang, Elizabeth T; Lanté, Fabien; Stornetta, Ruth L; Beenhakker, Mark P; Shen, Ying; Julius Zhu, J

    2015-08-01

    Interneurons play a key role in cortical function and dysfunction, yet organization of cortical interneuronal circuitry remains poorly understood. Cortical Layer 1 (L1) contains 2 general GABAergic interneuron groups, namely single bouquet cells (SBCs) and elongated neurogliaform cells (ENGCs). SBCs predominantly make unidirectional inhibitory connections (SBC→) with L2/3 interneurons, whereas ENGCs frequently form reciprocal inhibitory and electric connections (ENGC↔) with L2/3 interneurons. Here, we describe a systematic investigation of the pyramidal neuron targets of L1 neuron-led interneuronal circuits in the rat barrel cortex with simultaneous octuple whole-cell recordings and report a simple organizational scheme of the interneuronal circuits. Both SBCs→ and ENGC ↔ L2/3 interneuronal circuits connect to L2/3 and L5, but not L6, pyramidal neurons. SBC → L2/3 interneuronal circuits primarily inhibit the entire dendritic-somato-axonal axis of a few L2/3 and L5 pyramidal neurons located within the same column. In contrast, ENGC ↔ L2/3 interneuronal circuits generally inhibit the distal apical dendrite of many L2/3 and L5 pyramidal neurons across multiple columns. Finally, L1 interneuron-led circuits target distinct subcellular compartments of L2/3 and L5 pyramidal neurons in a L2/3 interneuron type-dependent manner. These results suggest that L1 neurons form canonical interneuronal circuits to control information processes in both supra- and infragranular cortical layers.

  10. Expression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor in cerebral cortical neurons of embryos and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Quintanar, J Luis; Salinas, Eva; González, Rodolfo

    2007-01-03

    Mammalian gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) was initially isolated from hypothalamus and its receptor from anterior pituitary, although extrapituitary GnRH receptors have been reported. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether GnRH receptor and its mRNA are expressed in cerebral cortical neurons of rat embryos and adult rats using immunohistochemical and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) techniques. The immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR analysis showed expression of GnRH receptor and presence of its mRNA, in both cerebral cortical neurons of rat embryos and cerebral cortical tissues of adult rats. Additional experiments showed a decrease in the receptor mRNA expression when cultured neurons of rat embryos were treated with GnRH. It is possible that the presence of GnRH receptors in cortical neurons of rat may be involved in other physiological roles such as neurohormone or neuromodulator.

  11. Cortical Interneurons Require Jnk1 to Enter and Navigate the Developing Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Abigail K.; Meechan, Daniel W.; Adney, Danielle R.

    2014-01-01

    Proper assembly of cortical circuitry relies on the correct migration of cortical interneurons from their place of birth in the ganglionic eminences to their place of terminal differentiation in the cerebral cortex. Although molecular mechanisms mediating cortical interneuron migration have been well studied, intracellular signals directing their migration are largely unknown. Here we illustrate a novel and essential role for c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling in guiding the pioneering population of cortical interneurons into the mouse cerebral cortex. Migrating cortical interneurons express Jnk proteins at the entrance to the cortical rudiment and have enriched expression of Jnk1 relative to noninterneuronal cortical cells. Pharmacological blockade of JNK signaling in ex vivo slice cultures resulted in dose-dependent and highly specific disruption of interneuron migration into the nascent cortex. Time-lapse imaging revealed that JNK-inhibited cortical interneurons advanced slowly and assumed aberrant migratory trajectories while traversing the cortical entry zone. In vivo analyses of JNK-deficient embryos supported our ex vivo pharmacological data. Deficits in interneuron migration were observed in Jnk1 but not Jnk2 single nulls, and those migratory deficits were further exacerbated when homozygous loss of Jnk1 was combined with heterozygous reduction of Jnk2. Finally, genetic ablation of Jnk1 and Jnk2 from cortical interneurons significantly perturbed migration in vivo, but not in vitro, suggesting JNK activity functions to direct their guidance rather than enhance their motility. These data suggest JNK signaling, predominantly mediated by interneuron expressed Jnk1, is required for guiding migration of cortical interneurons into and within the developing cerebral cortex. PMID:24899703

  12. Integrated mechanisms of anticipation and rate-of-change computations in cortical circuits.

    PubMed

    Puccini, Gabriel D; Sanchez-Vives, Maria V; Compte, Albert

    2007-05-01

    Local neocortical circuits are characterized by stereotypical physiological and structural features that subserve generic computational operations. These basic computations of the cortical microcircuit emerge through the interplay of neuronal connectivity, cellular intrinsic properties, and synaptic plasticity dynamics. How these interacting mechanisms generate specific computational operations in the cortical circuit remains largely unknown. Here, we identify the neurophysiological basis of both the rate of change and anticipation computations on synaptic inputs in a cortical circuit. Through biophysically realistic computer simulations and neuronal recordings, we show that the rate-of-change computation is operated robustly in cortical networks through the combination of two ubiquitous brain mechanisms: short-term synaptic depression and spike-frequency adaptation. We then show how this rate-of-change circuit can be embedded in a convergently connected network to anticipate temporally incoming synaptic inputs, in quantitative agreement with experimental findings on anticipatory responses to moving stimuli in the primary visual cortex. Given the robustness of the mechanism and the widespread nature of the physiological machinery involved, we suggest that rate-of-change computation and temporal anticipation are principal, hard-wired functions of neural information processing in the cortical microcircuit.

  13. Comodulation Enhances Signal Detection via Priming of Auditory Cortical Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Sollini, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic environments are composed of complex overlapping sounds that the auditory system is required to segregate into discrete perceptual objects. The functions of distinct auditory processing stations in this challenging task are poorly understood. Here we show a direct role for mouse auditory cortex in detection and segregation of acoustic information. We measured the sensitivity of auditory cortical neurons to brief tones embedded in masking noise. By altering spectrotemporal characteristics of the masker, we reveal that sensitivity to pure tone stimuli is strongly enhanced in coherently modulated broadband noise, corresponding to the psychoacoustic phenomenon comodulation masking release. Improvements in detection were largest following priming periods of noise alone, indicating that cortical segregation is enhanced over time. Transient opsin-mediated silencing of auditory cortex during the priming period almost completely abolished these improvements, suggesting that cortical processing may play a direct and significant role in detection of quiet sounds in noisy environments. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Auditory systems are adept at detecting and segregating competing sound sources, but there is little direct evidence of how this process occurs in the mammalian auditory pathway. We demonstrate that coherent broadband noise enhances signal representation in auditory cortex, and that prolonged exposure to noise is necessary to produce this enhancement. Using optogenetic perturbation to selectively silence auditory cortex during early noise processing, we show that cortical processing plays a crucial role in the segregation of competing sounds. PMID:27927950

  14. Molecular Pathways Underlying Projection Neuron Production and Migration during Cerebral Cortical Development

    PubMed Central

    Ohtaka-Maruyama, Chiaki; Okado, Haruo

    2015-01-01

    Glutamatergic neurons of the mammalian cerebral cortex originate from radial glia (RG) progenitors in the ventricular zone (VZ). During corticogenesis, neuroblasts migrate toward the pial surface using two different migration modes. One is multipolar (MP) migration with random directional movement, and the other is locomotion, which is a unidirectional movement guided by the RG fiber. After reaching their final destination, the neurons finalize their migration by terminal translocation, which is followed by maturation via dendrite extension to initiate synaptogenesis and thereby complete neural circuit formation. This switching of migration modes during cortical development is unique in mammals, which suggests that the RG-guided locomotion mode may contribute to the evolution of the mammalian neocortical 6-layer structure. Many factors have been reported to be involved in the regulation of this radial neuronal migration process. In general, the radial migration can be largely divided into four steps; (1) maintenance and departure from the VZ of neural progenitor cells, (2) MP migration and transition to bipolar cells, (3) RG-guided locomotion, and (4) terminal translocation and dendrite maturation. Among these, many different gene mutations or knockdown effects have resulted in failure of the MP to bipolar transition (step 2), suggesting that it is a critical step, particularly in radial migration. Moreover, this transition occurs at the subplate layer. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying each of these steps. Finally, we discuss the evolutionary aspects of neuronal migration in corticogenesis. PMID:26733777

  15. Modeling a model: Mouse genetics, 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome, and disorders of cortical circuit development

    PubMed Central

    Meechan, Daniel W.; Maynard, Thomas M.; Fernandez, Alejandra; Karpinski, Beverly A.; Rothblat, Lawrence A.; LaMantia, Anthony S.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the developmental etiology of autistic spectrum disorders, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and schizophrenia remains a major challenge for establishing new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to these common, difficult-to-treat diseases that compromise neural circuits in the cerebral cortex. One aspect of this challenge is the breadth and overlap of ASD, ADHD, and SCZ deficits; another is the complexity of mutations associated with each, and a third is the difficulty of analyzing disrupted development in at-risk or affected human fetuses. The identification of distinct genetic syndromes that include behavioral deficits similar to those in ASD, ADHC and SCZ provides a critical starting point for meeting this challenge. We summarize clinical and behavioral impairments in children and adults with one such genetic syndrome, the 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome, routinely called 22q11DS, caused by micro-deletions of between 1.5 and 3.0 MB on human chromosome 22. Among many syndromic features, including cardiovascular and craniofacial anomalies, 22q11DS patients have a high incidence of brain structural, functional, and behavioral deficits that reflect cerebral cortical dysfunction and fall within the spectrum that defines ASD, ADHD, and SCZ. We show that developmental pathogenesis underlying this apparent genetic “model” syndrome in patients can be defined and analyzed mechanistically using genomically accurate mouse models of the deletion that causes 22q11DS. We conclude that “modeling a model”, in this case 22q11DS as a model for idiopathic ASD, ADHD and SCZ, as well as other behavioral disorders like anxiety frequently seen in 22q11DS patients, in genetically engineered mice provides a foundation for understanding the causes and improving diagnosis and therapy for these disorders of cortical circuit development. PMID:25866365

  16. Membrane-Associated Molecules Regulate the Formation of Layer-Specific Cortical Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellani, Valerie; Bolz, Jurgen

    1997-06-01

    The columnar organization of the mammalian neocortex is based on radially oriented axon collaterals which precisely link cells from distinct cortical layers. During development, these interlaminar connections are specific from their initial outgrowth: collaterals form only in the target layers and there are no transient axonal collaterals in the nontarget layers. To examine whether positional cues within individual cortical layers regulate the laminar specificity of collateral formation, explants of cells destined for different cortical layers were cultured on membranes prepared from target and nontarget layers. Axonal growth and branching were examined on homogeneous membrane substrates and on alternating stripes of membranes from different layers. Results show that axons branch preferentially on membrane substrates from those layers that they would target in vivo. In addition, when cortical axons were given a choice to grow on membranes from either their target or their nontarget layer, they exhibited a clear preference for the target layers. This indicates that membrane-associated cues confined to individual layers regulate the formation of collaterals of cortical axons and restrict their growth to their target layers. Heat inactivation of membranes from target layers resulted in reduced axonal branching. The same manipulation of membranes from nontarget layers increased axonal branching for one population of cortical neurons. Taken together, these results suggest that membrane-associated molecules confined to individual layers induce and prevent the formation of axon collaterals in distinct populations of cortical neurons. Thus, the expression of layer-specific cues provides important constraints for the remodeling of local circuits during cortical development.

  17. Development of cortical GABAergic circuits and its implications for neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Di Cristo, G

    2007-07-01

    GABAergic interneurons powerfully control the function of cortical networks. In addition, they strongly regulate cortical development by modulating several cellular processes such as neuronal proliferation, migration, differentiation and connectivity. Not surprisingly, aberrant development of GABAergic circuits has been implicated in many neurodevelopmental disorders including schizophrenia, autism and Tourette's syndrome. Unfortunately, efforts directed towards the comprehension of the mechanisms regulating GABAergic circuits formation and function have been impaired by the strikingly heterogeneity, both at the morphological and functional level, of GABAergic interneurons. Recent technical advances, including the improvement of interneurons-specific labelling techniques, have started to reveal the basic principles underlying this process. This review summarizes recent findings on the mechanisms underlying the construction of GABAergic circuits in the cortex, with a particular focus on potential implications for brain diseases with neurodevelopmental origin.

  18. A Survey of Parents of Children with Cortical or Cerebral Visual Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackel, Bernadette; Wilson, Michelle; Hartmann, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Cortical or cerebral visual impairment (CVI) can result when the visual pathways and visual processing areas of the brain have been damaged. Children with CVI may have difficulty finding an object among other objects, viewing in the distance, orienting themselves in space, going from grass to pavement or other changes in surface, and copying…

  19. On the cerebral origin of EEG responses to TMS: insights from severe cortical lesions.

    PubMed

    Gosseries, Olivia; Sarasso, Simone; Casarotto, Silvia; Boly, Mélanie; Schnakers, Caroline; Napolitani, Martino; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie; Ledoux, Didier; Tshibanda, Jean-Flory; Massimini, Marcello; Laureys, Steven; Rosanova, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with electroencephalography (TMS/EEG) represents a valuable tool to probe cortical excitability and connectivity. Although several procedures have been devised to abolish TMS-related artifacts, direct evidence that it is possible to record TMS-evoked potentials (TEPs) that purely reflect cortical responses to TMS are still lacking. To demonstrate that when TMS is delivered on a human head with intact nerves, scalp and ocular muscles, TEPs are present only if a functional portion of cortex is targeted and is absent otherwise. We performed extensive navigated TMS/EEG mappings in three vegetative state patients and in eight healthy controls. Patients were selected based on the extension of their cortical lesions as revealed by structural/functional imaging: the cerebral cortex was globally damaged in Patient 1 due to cerebral anoxia, Patient 2 showed a traumatic damage affecting one cerebral hemisphere, while Patient 3 was characterized by one left sided and one right-sided focal ischemic lesion. In Patient 1, TMS performed at any targeted cortical site did not elicit statistically significant TEPs. In Patient 2, TEPs were absent when the damaged hemisphere was targeted, while were present over the healthy side. In Patient 3, significant TEPs were absent when cortical lesions were targeted and present otherwise. Significant TEPs were always present in healthy controls. These findings suggest that, provided that appropriate experimental procedures are employed, TEPs are genuine cortical responses detectable only when preserved cortical tissue is stimulated. Hence, a dependable assessment of cortical excitability and connectivity in brain-injured patients requires the use of neuronavigated TMS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cerebral-cortical networking and activation increase as a function of cognitive-motor task difficulty.

    PubMed

    Rietschel, Jeremy C; Miller, Matthew W; Gentili, Rodolphe J; Goodman, Ronald N; McDonald, Craig G; Hatfield, Bradley D

    2012-05-01

    Excessive increases in task difficulty typically result in marked attenuation of cognitive-motor performance. The psychomotor efficiency hypothesis suggests that poor performance is mediated by non-essential neural activity and cerebral cortical networking (inefficient cortical dynamics). This phenomenon may underlie the inverse relationship between excessive task difficulty and performance. However, investigation of the psychomotor efficiency hypothesis as it relates to task difficulty has not been conducted. The present study used electroencephalography (EEG) to examine cerebral cortical dynamics while participants were challenged with both Easy and Hard conditions during a cognitive-motor task (Tetris(®)). In accord with the psychomotor efficiency hypothesis, it was predicted that with increases in task difficulty, participants would demonstrate greater 'neural effort,' as indexed by EEG spectral power and cortical networking (i.e., EEG coherence) between the premotor (motor planning) region and sensory, executive, and motor regions. Increases in neural activation and cortical networking were observed during the Hard condition relative to the Easy condition, thus supporting the psychomotor efficiency hypothesis. To further determine the unique contributions of cognitive versus sensory-motor demands, a control experiment was conducted in which cognitive demand was increased while sensory-motor demand was held constant. This experiment revealed that regionally specific neural activation was influenced by changes in cognitive demand, whereas cortical networking to the motor planning region was sensitive only to changes in sensory-motor demand. Crucially, the present study is the first, to our knowledge, to characterize the separate impact of cognitive versus sensory-motor demands on cerebral cortical dynamics. The findings further inform the dynamics of the cortical processes that underlie the quality of cognitive-motor performance particularly with regard to task

  1. Developmental Profiles of Infant EEG: Overlap with Transient Cortical Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Myers, M.M.; Grieve, P.G.; Izraelit, A.; Fifer, W.P.; Isler, J.R.; Darnall, R.A.; Stark, R.I.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To quantify spectral power in frequency specific bands and commonly observed types of bursting activities in the EEG during early human development. Methods An extensive archive of EEG data from human infants from 35 to 52 weeks postmenstrual age obtained in a prior multi-center study was analyzed using power spectrum analyses and a high frequency burst detection algorithm. Results Low frequency power increased with age; however, high frequency power decreased from 35 to 45 weeks. This unexpected decrease was largely attributable to a rapid decline in the number of high frequency bursts. Conclusions The decline in high frequency bursting activity overlaps with a developmental shift in GABA's actions on neurons from depolarizing to hyperpolarizing and the dissolution of the gap junction circuitry of the cortical subplate. PMID:22341979

  2. The development of cortical circuits for motion discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Gordon B.; Sederberg, Audrey; Elyada, Yishai M.; Van Hooser, Stephen D.; Kaschube, Matthias; Fitzpatrick, David

    2014-01-01

    Stimulus discrimination depends on the selectivity and variability of neural responses, as well as the size and correlation structure of the responsive population. For direction discrimination in visual cortex, only the selectivity of neurons has been well characterized across development. Here we show in ferrets that at eye opening, the cortical response to visual stimulation exhibits several immaturities, including: a high density of active neurons that display prominent wave-like activity, a high degree of variability, and strong noise correlations. Over the next three weeks, the population response becomes increasingly sparse, wave-like activity disappears, and variability and noise correlations are markedly reduced. Similar changes are observed in identified neuronal populations imaged repeatedly over days. Furthermore, experience with a moving stimulus is capable of driving a reduction in noise correlations over a matter of hours. These changes in variability and correlation contribute significantly to a marked improvement in direction discriminability over development. PMID:25599224

  3. Cortical local circuit axons do not mature after early deafferentation.

    PubMed

    McCasland, J S; Bernardo, K L; Probst, K L; Woolsey, T A

    1992-03-01

    The processes underlying development, refinement, and retention of the intracortical connections critical for the function of the mammalian brain are unknown. Horseradish peroxidase-labeled fibers in mouse somatosensory barrel cortex, which is patterned like the whiskers on the contralateral face from which it receives inputs, were evaluated by automated image analysis. The sensory nerve to the whiskers was sectioned on postnatal day 7, after the whisker map is set. The deprived barrel cortices, examined in adults, showed drastically diminished intracortical projections relative to normal controls, although the map of the whiskers in the cortex was unchanged. This demonstrates anatomically that the normal pattern of intracortical connections, like the normal sensory map, is dependent upon the sensory periphery four synapses away.

  4. Increased interictal cerebral glucose metabolism in a cortical-subcortical network in drug naive patients with cryptogenic temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed Central

    Franceschi, M; Lucignani, G; Del Sole, A; Grana, C; Bressi, S; Minicucci, F; Messa, C; Canevini, M P; Fazio, F

    1995-01-01

    Positron emission tomography with [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]FDG) has been used to assess the pattern of cerebral metabolism in different types of epilepsies. However, PET with [18F]FDG has never been used to evaluate drug naive patients with cryptogenic temporal lobe epilepsy, in whom the mechanism of origin and diffusion of the epileptic discharge may differ from that underlying other epilepsies. In a group of patients with cryptogenic temporal lobe epilepsy, never treated with antiepileptic drugs, evidence has been found of significant interictal glucose hypermetabolism in a bilateral neural network including the temporal lobes, thalami, basal ganglia, and cingular cortices. The metabolism in these areas and frontal lateral cortex enables the correct classification of all patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and controls by discriminant function analysis. Other cortical areas--namely, frontal basal and lateral, temporal mesial, and cerebellar cortices--had bilateral increases of glucose metabolism ranging from 10 to 15% of normal controls, although lacking stringent statistical significance. This metabolic pattern could represent a pathophysiological state of hyperactivity predisposing to epileptic discharge generation or diffusion, or else a network of inhibitory circuits activated to prevent the diffusion of the epileptic discharge. PMID:7561924

  5. Neuropeptide Y protects cerebral cortical neurons by regulating microglial immune function

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qijun; Dong, Changzheng; Li, Wenling; Bu, Wei; Wu, Jiang; Zhao, Wenqing

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y has been shown to inhibit the immunological activity of reactive microglia in the rat cerebral cortex, to reduce N-methyl-D-aspartate current (INMDA) in cortical neurons, and protect neurons. In this study, after primary cultured microglia from the cerebral cortex of rats were treated with lipopolysaccharide, interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α levels in the cell culture medium increased, and mRNA expression of these cytokines also increased. After primary cultured cortical neurons were incubated with the lipopolysaccharide-treated microglial conditioned medium, peak INMDA in neurons increased. These effects of lipopolysaccharide were suppressed by neuropeptide Y. After addition of the neuropeptide Y Y1 receptor antagonist BIBP3226, the effects of neuropeptide Y completely disappeared. These results suggest that neuropeptide Y prevents excessive production of interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α by inhibiting microglial reactivity. This reduces INMDA in rat cortical neurons, preventing excitotoxicity, thereby protecting neurons. PMID:25206918

  6. Nerve transfer helps repair brachial plexus injury by increasing cerebral cortical plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Guixin; Wu, Zuopei; Wang, Xinhong; Tan, Xiaoxiao; Gu, Yudong

    2014-01-01

    In the treatment of brachial plexus injury, nerves that are functionally less important are transferred onto the distal ends of damaged crucial nerves to help recover neuromuscular function in the target region. For example, intercostal nerves are transferred onto axillary nerves, and accessory nerves are transferred onto suprascapular nerves, the phrenic nerve is transferred onto the musculocutaneous nerves, and the contralateral C7 nerve is transferred onto the median or radial nerves. Nerve transfer has become a major method for reconstructing the brachial plexus after avulsion injury. Many experiments have shown that nerve transfers for treatment of brachial plexus injury can help reconstruct cerebral cortical function and increase cortical plasticity. In this review article, we summarize the recent progress in the use of diverse nerve transfer methods for the repair of brachial plexus injury, and we discuss the impact of nerve transfer on cerebral cortical plasticity after brachial plexus injury. PMID:25657729

  7. Potentiation of the depression by adenosine of rat cerebral cortical neurones by progestational agents.

    PubMed Central

    Phillis, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of four progestational agents pregnenolone sulphate, cyproterone acetate, norethindrone acetate and progesterone, on adenosine-evoked depression of the firing of rat cerebral cortical neurones have been studied. When applied iontophoretically, pregnenolone sulphate, cyproterone, and norethindrone enhanced the actions of iontophoretically applied adenosine and failed to potentiate the depressant effects of adenosine 5'-N-ethylcarboxamide and gamma-aminobutyric acid. Cyproterone acetate (50 micrograms kg-1) and progesterone (200 micrograms kg-1) administered intravenously enhanced the depressant actions of iontophoretically applied adenosine. When applied by large currents, cyproterone, and less frequently norethindrone, depressed the firing of cerebral cortical neurones. The depressant effects of cyproterone were antagonized by caffeine. Pregnenolone sulphate tended to excite cortical neurones but neither this action, nor its potentiation of adenosine were reproduced by application of sulphate ions. It is hypothesized that some of the psychotropic actions of progestational agents may involve an enhancement of 'purinergic' tone in the central nervous system. PMID:3814905

  8. Dendritic nonlinearities are tuned for efficient spike-based computations in cortical circuits

    PubMed Central

    Ujfalussy, Balázs B; Makara, Judit K; Branco, Tiago; Lengyel, Máté

    2015-01-01

    Cortical neurons integrate thousands of synaptic inputs in their dendrites in highly nonlinear ways. It is unknown how these dendritic nonlinearities in individual cells contribute to computations at the level of neural circuits. Here, we show that dendritic nonlinearities are critical for the efficient integration of synaptic inputs in circuits performing analog computations with spiking neurons. We developed a theory that formalizes how a neuron's dendritic nonlinearity that is optimal for integrating synaptic inputs depends on the statistics of its presynaptic activity patterns. Based on their in vivo preynaptic population statistics (firing rates, membrane potential fluctuations, and correlations due to ensemble dynamics), our theory accurately predicted the responses of two different types of cortical pyramidal cells to patterned stimulation by two-photon glutamate uncaging. These results reveal a new computational principle underlying dendritic integration in cortical neurons by suggesting a functional link between cellular and systems--level properties of cortical circuits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10056.001 PMID:26705334

  9. Prefrontal cortical control of a brainstem social behavior circuit.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Tamara B; Silva, Bianca A; Perova, Zinaida; Marrone, Livia; Masferrer, Maria E; Zhan, Yang; Kaplan, Angie; Greetham, Louise; Verrechia, Violaine; Halman, Andreas; Pagella, Sara; Vyssotski, Alexei L; Illarionova, Anna; Grinevich, Valery; Branco, Tiago; Gross, Cornelius T

    2017-02-01

    The prefrontal cortex helps adjust an organism's behavior to its environment. In particular, numerous studies have implicated the prefrontal cortex in the control of social behavior, but the neural circuits that mediate these effects remain unknown. Here we investigated behavioral adaptation to social defeat in mice and uncovered a critical contribution of neural projections from the medial prefrontal cortex to the dorsal periaqueductal gray, a brainstem area vital for defensive responses. Social defeat caused a weakening of functional connectivity between these two areas, and selective inhibition of these projections mimicked the behavioral effects of social defeat. These findings define a specific neural projection by which the prefrontal cortex can control and adapt social behavior.

  10. Stochastic transitions into silence cause noise correlations in cortical circuits

    PubMed Central

    Mochol, Gabriela; Hermoso-Mendizabal, Ainhoa; Sakata, Shuzo; Harris, Kenneth D.; de la Rocha, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    The spiking activity of cortical neurons is highly variable. This variability is generally correlated among nearby neurons, an effect commonly interpreted to reflect the coactivation of neurons due to anatomically shared inputs. Recent findings, however, indicate that correlations can be dynamically modulated, suggesting that the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that correlations are dominated by neuronal coinactivation: the occurrence of brief silent periods during which all neurons in the local network stop firing. We recorded spiking activity from large populations of neurons in the auditory cortex of anesthetized rats across different brain states. During spontaneous activity, the reduction of correlation accompanying brain state desynchronization was largely explained by a decrease in the density of the silent periods. The presentation of a stimulus caused an initial drop of correlations followed by a rebound, a time course that was mimicked by the instantaneous silence density. We built a rate network model with fluctuation-driven transitions between a silent and an active attractor and assumed that neurons fired Poisson spike trains with a rate following the model dynamics. Variations of the network external input altered the transition rate into the silent attractor and reproduced the relation between correlation and silence density found in the data, both in spontaneous and evoked conditions. This suggests that the observed changes in correlation, occurring gradually with brain state variations or abruptly with sensory stimulation, are due to changes in the likeliness of the microcircuit to transiently cease firing. PMID:25739962

  11. Stochastic transitions into silence cause noise correlations in cortical circuits.

    PubMed

    Mochol, Gabriela; Hermoso-Mendizabal, Ainhoa; Sakata, Shuzo; Harris, Kenneth D; de la Rocha, Jaime

    2015-03-17

    The spiking activity of cortical neurons is highly variable. This variability is generally correlated among nearby neurons, an effect commonly interpreted to reflect the coactivation of neurons due to anatomically shared inputs. Recent findings, however, indicate that correlations can be dynamically modulated, suggesting that the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that correlations are dominated by neuronal coinactivation: the occurrence of brief silent periods during which all neurons in the local network stop firing. We recorded spiking activity from large populations of neurons in the auditory cortex of anesthetized rats across different brain states. During spontaneous activity, the reduction of correlation accompanying brain state desynchronization was largely explained by a decrease in the density of the silent periods. The presentation of a stimulus caused an initial drop of correlations followed by a rebound, a time course that was mimicked by the instantaneous silence density. We built a rate network model with fluctuation-driven transitions between a silent and an active attractor and assumed that neurons fired Poisson spike trains with a rate following the model dynamics. Variations of the network external input altered the transition rate into the silent attractor and reproduced the relation between correlation and silence density found in the data, both in spontaneous and evoked conditions. This suggests that the observed changes in correlation, occurring gradually with brain state variations or abruptly with sensory stimulation, are due to changes in the likeliness of the microcircuit to transiently cease firing.

  12. Beyond descriptive neurology: Broca, cerebral hemodynamics, and cortical function.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, Richard

    2017-08-04

    Pierre-Paul Broca's studies in neurobiology remain of interest. I review a previously neglected aspect of Broca's work in which he presages the use of modern scanning techniques. Broca's goal was to correlate cerebral metabolism to regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) using a novel method, to which he referred as cerebral thermometry. Broca attempted to measure changes in temperatures from the ischemic area and across the watershed regions during a stroke, and the increased CBF produced by performing a cognitive task such as reading aloud. The method involved measurements of local temperatures at specific points about the head with an array of strategically placed thermometers much as EEG electrodes are arrayed to record the electrical activity of the brain. Although his technique was inaccurate and unreliable, the concept of measuring CBF as a diagnostic aid and as a cognitive research tool was prescient. Broca's limitation was not conceptual but purely technological. Broca's attempt to measure CBF as a surrogate for cerebral metabolism was conceptually valid but premature because he lacked the technology necessary to do so.

  13. Swallow-related cerebral cortical activity maps are not specific to deglutition.

    PubMed

    Kern, M; Birn, R; Jaradeh, S; Jesmanowicz, A; Cox, R; Hyde, J; Shaker, R

    2001-04-01

    Cortical representation of swallow-related motor tasks has not been systematically investigated. In this study, we elucidated and compared these cortical representations to those of volitional swallow using block-trial and single-trial methods. Fourteen volunteers were studied by functional magnetic resonance imaging. Cortical activation during both swallowing and swallow-related motor tasks that can be performed independent of swallowing, such as jaw clenching, lip pursing, and tongue rolling, was found in four general areas: the anterior cingulate, motor/premotor cortex, insula, and occipital/parietal region corresponding to Brodmann's areas 7, 19, and 31. Regions of activity, volume of activated voxels, and increases in signal intensity were found to be similar between volitional swallow and swallow-related motor tasks. These findings, using both block-trial and single-trial techniques, suggest that cerebral cortical regions activated during swallowing may not be specific to deglutitive function.

  14. Postnatal Erythropoietin Mitigates Impaired Cerebral Cortical Development Following Subplate Loss from Prenatal Hypoxia–Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Jantzie, Lauren L.; Corbett, Christopher J.; Firl, Daniel J.; Robinson, Shenandoah

    2015-01-01

    Preterm birth impacts brain development and leads to chronic deficits including cognitive delay, behavioral problems, and epilepsy. Premature loss of the subplate, a transient subcortical layer that guides development of the cerebral cortex and axonal refinement, has been implicated in these neurological disorders. Subplate neurons influence postnatal upregulation of the potassium chloride co-transporter KCC2 and maturation of γ-amino-butyric acid A receptor (GABAAR) subunits. We hypothesized that prenatal transient systemic hypoxia–ischemia (TSHI) in Sprague–Dawley rats that mimic brain injury from extreme prematurity in humans would cause premature subplate loss and affect cortical layer IV development. Further, we predicted that the neuroprotective agent erythropoietin (EPO) could attenuate the injury. Prenatal TSHI induced subplate neuronal loss via apoptosis. TSHI impaired cortical layer IV postnatal upregulation of KCC2 and GABAAR subunits, and postnatal EPO treatment mitigated the loss (n ≥ 8). To specifically address how subplate loss affects cortical development, we used in vitro mechanical subplate ablation in slice cultures (n ≥ 3) and found EPO treatment attenuates KCC2 loss. Together, these results show that subplate loss contributes to impaired cerebral development, and EPO treatment diminishes the damage. Limitation of premature subplate loss and the resultant impaired cortical development may minimize cerebral deficits suffered by extremely preterm infants. PMID:24722771

  15. Postnatal Erythropoietin Mitigates Impaired Cerebral Cortical Development Following Subplate Loss from Prenatal Hypoxia-Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Jantzie, Lauren L; Corbett, Christopher J; Firl, Daniel J; Robinson, Shenandoah

    2015-09-01

    Preterm birth impacts brain development and leads to chronic deficits including cognitive delay, behavioral problems, and epilepsy. Premature loss of the subplate, a transient subcortical layer that guides development of the cerebral cortex and axonal refinement, has been implicated in these neurological disorders. Subplate neurons influence postnatal upregulation of the potassium chloride co-transporter KCC2 and maturation of γ-amino-butyric acid A receptor (GABAAR) subunits. We hypothesized that prenatal transient systemic hypoxia-ischemia (TSHI) in Sprague-Dawley rats that mimic brain injury from extreme prematurity in humans would cause premature subplate loss and affect cortical layer IV development. Further, we predicted that the neuroprotective agent erythropoietin (EPO) could attenuate the injury. Prenatal TSHI induced subplate neuronal loss via apoptosis. TSHI impaired cortical layer IV postnatal upregulation of KCC2 and GABAAR subunits, and postnatal EPO treatment mitigated the loss (n ≥ 8). To specifically address how subplate loss affects cortical development, we used in vitro mechanical subplate ablation in slice cultures (n ≥ 3) and found EPO treatment attenuates KCC2 loss. Together, these results show that subplate loss contributes to impaired cerebral development, and EPO treatment diminishes the damage. Limitation of premature subplate loss and the resultant impaired cortical development may minimize cerebral deficits suffered by extremely preterm infants.

  16. Arachidonic acid stimulates glucose uptake in cerebral cortical astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, N; Martin, J L; Stella, N; Magistretti, P J

    1993-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) has recently been shown to influence various cellular functions in the central nervous system. Here we report that AA increases, in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, 2-deoxy-D-[1-3H]glucose ([3H]2DG) uptake in primary cultures of astrocytes prepared from the cerebral cortex of neonatal mice. This effect is mimicked by an unsaturated fatty acid such as linolenic acid, while palmitic and arachidic acids, two saturated fatty acids, are inactive. Pharmacological agents that increase the endogenous levels of AA by stimulating AA release (melittin) or by inhibiting its reacylation (thimerosal) also promote [3H]2DG uptake by astrocytes. We also report that norepinephrine (NE) stimulates the release of [3H]AA from membrane phospholipids, with an EC50 of 3 microM; this effect is accompanied, with a temporal delay of approximately 4 min, by the stimulation of [3H]2DG uptake, for which the EC50 of NE is 1 microM. Since the cerebral cortex, the brain region from which astrocytes used in this study were prepared, receives a massive noradrenergic innervation, originating from the locus coeruleus, the effects of NE reported here further stress the notion that certain neurotransmitters may play a role in the regulation of energy metabolism in the cerebral cortex and point at astrocytes as the likely targets of such metabolic effects. PMID:8483920

  17. Parcellation of the primary cerebral cortices based on local connectivity profiles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiaojun; Song, Ming; Fan, Lingzhong; Liu, Yong; Jiang, Tianzi

    2015-01-01

    Connectivity-based parcellation using diffusion MRI has been extensively used to parcellate subcortical areas and the association cortex. Connectivity profiles are vital for connectivity-based parcellation. Two categories of connectivity profiles are generally utilized, including global connectivity profiles, in which the connectivity information is from the seed to the whole brain, and long connectivity profiles, in which the connectivity information is from the seed to other brain regions after excluding the seed. However, whether global or long connectivity profiles should be applied in parcellating the primary cortex utilizing connectivity-based parcellation is unclear. Many sources of evidence have indicated that the primary cerebral cortices are composed of structurally and functionally distinct subregions. Because the primary cerebral cortices are rich in local anatomic hierarchical connections and possess high degree of local functional connectivity profiles, we proposed that local connectivity profiles, that is the connectivity information within a seed region of interest, might be used for parcellating the primary cerebral cortices. In this study, the global, long, and local connectivity profiles were separately used to parcellate the bilateral M1, A1, S1, and V1. We found that results using the three profiles were all quite consistent with reported cytoarchitectonic evidence. More importantly, the results using local connectivity profiles showed less inter-subject variability than the results using the other two, a finding which suggests that local connectivity profiles are superior to global and long connectivity profiles for parcellating the primary cerebral cortices. This also implies that, depending on the characteristics of specific areas of the cerebral cortex, different connectivity profiles may need to be adopted to parcellate different areas. PMID:25964743

  18. Cognitive processes and cerebral cortical fundi: findings from positron-emission tomography studies.

    PubMed

    Markowitsch, H J; Tulving, E

    1994-10-25

    Positron-emission tomography (PET) studies of regional cerebral blood flow have provided evidence relevant to localization of cognitive functions. The critical loci identified in these studies are typically described in terms of macroanatomically labeled cortical and subcortical regions. We report the results of a meta-analysis of localization of changes in blood flow, based on nearly 1000 cerebral cortical peaks of activity obtained from groups of subjects in 30 PET studies. The results showed that, on average, 47% of these peaks were localized within the fundus regions of cortical sulci. This is an unexpectedly high proportion because fundal regions compose < 8% of the cortical mantle. Further analysis suggested a coarse correlation between the extent of fundal activation observed in different studies and the estimated cognitive complexity of the tasks used in the studies. These findings are potentially interesting because (i) the preponderance of fundal activation has implications for the interpretation of the PET data, (ii) they suggest that cortical sulcal and fundal regions may play a distinctive role in higher cognitive processing, or (iii) both of the above.

  19. Progressive Cortical Neuronal Damage and Chronic Hemodynamic Impairment in Atherosclerotic Major Cerebral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Kagawa, Shinya; Kishibe, Yoshihiko; Takahashi, Masaaki; Higashi, Tatsuya

    2016-06-01

    Cross-sectional studies suggest that chronic hemodynamic impairment may cause selective cortical neuronal damage in patients with atherosclerotic internal carotid artery or middle cerebral artery occlusive disease. The purpose of this longitudinal study was to determine whether the progression of cortical neuronal damage, evaluated as a decrease in central benzodiazepine receptors (BZRs), is associated with hemodynamic impairment at baseline or hemodynamic deterioration during follow-up. We evaluated the distribution of BZRs twice using positron emission tomography and (11)C-flumazenil over time in 80 medically treated patients with atherosclerotic internal carotid artery or middle cerebral artery occlusive disease that had no ischemic episodes during follow-up. Using 3D stereotactic surface projections, we quantified abnormal decreases in the BZRs in the cerebral cortex within the middle cerebral artery distribution and correlated changes in the BZR index with the mean hemispheric values of hemodynamic parameters obtained from (15)O gas positron emission tomography. In the hemisphere affected by arterial disease, the BZR index in 40 patients (50%) was increased during follow-up (mean 26±20 months). In multivariable logistic regression analyses, increases in the BZR index were associated with the decreased cerebral blood flow at baseline and an increased oxygen extraction fraction during follow-up. Increases in the oxygen extraction fraction during follow-up were associated with a lack of statin use. In patients with atherosclerotic internal carotid artery or middle cerebral artery disease, the progression of cortical neuronal damage was associated with hemodynamic impairment at baseline and hemodynamic deterioration during follow-up. Statin use may be beneficial against hemodynamic deterioration and therefore neuroprotective. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Sensory inputs control the integration of neurogliaform interneurons into cortical circuits

    PubMed Central

    De Marco García, Natalia V; Priya, Rashi; Tuncdemir, Sebnem N; Fishell, Gord; Karayannis, Theofanis

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal microcircuits in the superficial layers of the mammalian cortex provide the substrate for associative cortical computation. Inhibitory interneurons constitute an essential component of the circuitry and are fundamental to the integration of local and long-range information. Here we report that, during early development, superficially positioned Reelin-expressing neurogliaform interneurons in the mouse somatosensory cortex receive afferent innervation from both cortical and thalamic excitatory sources. Attenuation of ascending sensory, but not intracortical, excitation leads to axo-dendritic morphological defects in these interneurons. Moreover, abrogation of the NMDA receptors through which the thalamic inputs signal results in a similar phenotype, as well as in the selective loss of thalamic and a concomitant increase in intracortical connectivity. These results suggest that thalamic inputs are critical in determining the balance between local and long-range connectivity and are fundamental to the proper integration of Reelin-expressing interneurons into nascent cortical circuits. PMID:25664912

  1. Sensory inputs control the integration of neurogliaform interneurons into cortical circuits.

    PubMed

    De Marco García, Natalia V; Priya, Rashi; Tuncdemir, Sebnem N; Fishell, Gord; Karayannis, Theofanis

    2015-03-01

    Neuronal microcircuits in the superficial layers of the mammalian cortex provide the substrate for associative cortical computation. Inhibitory interneurons constitute an essential component of the circuitry and are fundamental to the integration of local and long-range information. Here we report that, during early development, superficially positioned Reelin-expressing neurogliaform interneurons in the mouse somatosensory cortex receive afferent innervation from both cortical and thalamic excitatory sources. Attenuation of ascending sensory, but not intracortical, excitation leads to axo-dendritic morphological defects in these interneurons. Moreover, abrogation of the NMDA receptors through which the thalamic inputs signal results in a similar phenotype, as well as in the selective loss of thalamic and a concomitant increase in intracortical connectivity. These results suggest that thalamic inputs are critical in determining the balance between local and long-range connectivity and are fundamental to the proper integration of Reelin-expressing interneurons into nascent cortical circuits.

  2. Inclusion bodies in cerebral cortical astrocytes: a new change of astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Minagawa, M; Shioda, K; Shimizu, Y; Isshiki, T

    1992-01-01

    A unique pathological finding of astrocytes was observed in the brain of a 20-year-old man who had severe physical and mental retardation. The brain was malformed showing micropolygyria in several cortical areas. A large number of hypertrophic astrocytes with eosinophilic granular substances in their cytoplasm were found throughout the cerebral cortex. Several staining procedures and electron microscopical examinations were carried out on these intracytoplasmic inclusion. It was found that the appearance and staining character of these inclusions were different from other astrocytic changes, especially the Rosenthal fiber, described so far. The authors consider that these inclusion bodies in cerebral cortical astrocytes represent new pathological changes of astrocytes that appear to be associated with malformation of the brain.

  3. Emergence of Small-World and Limitations to Its Maximization in a Macaque Cerebral Cortical Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qing-Bai; Liao, Meng-Jie; Chen, Qi-Cai

    2011-06-01

    We study both the emergence of small-world topology in a macaque cerebral cortical network and the limitations to maximization of small-worldness. The results show that the maximization of neural complexity leads to a small-world topology, but it also limits the maximization of small-worldness. It is suggested that the modular organization that corresponds to different functions may be a limitation. Additionally, the need for strong resilience against attacks may be another limitation.

  4. Diffuse optical correlation tomography of cerebral blood flow during cortical spreading depression in rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chao; Yu, Guoqiang; Furuya, Daisuke; Greenberg, Joel; Yodh, Arjun; Durduran, Turgut

    2006-02-01

    Diffuse optical correlation methods were adapted for three-dimensional (3D) tomography of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in small animal models. The image reconstruction was optimized using a noise model for diffuse correlation tomography which enabled better data selection and regularization. The tomographic approach was demonstrated with simulated data and during in-vivo cortical spreading depression (CSD) in rat brain. Three-dimensional images of CBF were obtained through intact skull in tissues(~4mm) deep below the cortex.

  5. Role of perinatal long-chain omega-3 fatty acids in cortical circuit maturation: Mechanisms and implications for psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Robert K; Vannest, Jennifer J; Valentine, Christina J

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating translational evidence suggests that the long-chain omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) plays a role in the maturation and stability of cortical circuits that are impaired in different recurrent psychiatric disorders. Specifically, rodent and cell culture studies find that DHA preferentially accumulates in synaptic and growth cone membranes and promotes neurite outgrowth, dendritic spine stability, and synaptogenesis. Additional evidence suggests that DHA may play a role in microglia-mediated synaptic pruning, as well as myelin development and resilience. In non-human primates n-3 fatty acid insufficiency during perinatal development leads to widespread deficits in functional connectivity in adult frontal cortical networks compared to primates raised on DHA-fortified diet. Preterm delivery in non-human primates and humans is associated with early deficits in cortical DHA accrual. Human preterm birth is associated with long-standing deficits in myelin integrity and cortical circuit connectivity and increased risk for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), mood, and psychotic disorders. In general, ADHD and mood and psychotic disorders initially emerge during rapid periods of cortical circuit maturation and are characterized by DHA deficits, myelin pathology, and impaired cortical circuit connectivity. Together these associations suggest that early and uncorrected deficits in fetal brain DHA accrual may represent a modifiable risk factor for cortical circuit maturation deficits in psychiatric disorders, and could therefore have significant implications for informing early intervention and prevention strategies. PMID:25815252

  6. Cerebral cortical neurons with activity linked to central neurogenic spontaneous and evoked elevations in cerebral blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golanov, E. V.; Reis, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    We recorded neurons in rat cerebral cortex with activity relating to the neurogenic elevations in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) coupled to stereotyped bursts of EEG activity, burst-cerebrovascular wave complexes, appearing spontaneously or evoked by electrical stimulation of rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVL) or fastigial nucleus (FN). Of 333 spontaneously active neurons only 15 (5%), in layers 5-6, consistently (P < 0.05, chi-square) increased their activity during the earliest potential of the complex, approximately 1.3 s before the rise of rCBF, and during the minutes-long elevation of rCBF elicited by 10 s of stimulation of RVL or FN. The results indicate the presence of a small population of neurons in deep cortical laminae whose activity correlates with neurogenic elevations of rCBF. These neurons may function to transduce afferent neuronal signals into vasodilation.

  7. Cerebral cortical neurons with activity linked to central neurogenic spontaneous and evoked elevations in cerebral blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golanov, E. V.; Reis, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    We recorded neurons in rat cerebral cortex with activity relating to the neurogenic elevations in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) coupled to stereotyped bursts of EEG activity, burst-cerebrovascular wave complexes, appearing spontaneously or evoked by electrical stimulation of rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVL) or fastigial nucleus (FN). Of 333 spontaneously active neurons only 15 (5%), in layers 5-6, consistently (P < 0.05, chi-square) increased their activity during the earliest potential of the complex, approximately 1.3 s before the rise of rCBF, and during the minutes-long elevation of rCBF elicited by 10 s of stimulation of RVL or FN. The results indicate the presence of a small population of neurons in deep cortical laminae whose activity correlates with neurogenic elevations of rCBF. These neurons may function to transduce afferent neuronal signals into vasodilation.

  8. Huntingtin is required for normal excitatory synapse development in cortical and striatal circuits.

    PubMed

    McKinstry, Spencer U; Karadeniz, Yonca B; Worthington, Atesh K; Hayrapetyan, Volodya Y; Ozlu, M Ilcim; Serafin-Molina, Karol; Risher, W Christopher; Ustunkaya, Tuna; Dragatsis, Ioannis; Zeitlin, Scott; Yin, Henry H; Eroglu, Cagla

    2014-07-09

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by the expansion of a poly-glutamine (poly-Q) stretch in the huntingtin (Htt) protein. Gain-of-function effects of mutant Htt have been extensively investigated as the major driver of neurodegeneration in HD. However, loss-of-function effects of poly-Q mutations recently emerged as potential drivers of disease pathophysiology. Early synaptic problems in the excitatory cortical and striatal connections have been reported in HD, but the role of Htt protein in synaptic connectivity was unknown. Therefore, we investigated the role of Htt in synaptic connectivity in vivo by conditionally silencing Htt in the developing mouse cortex. When cortical Htt function was silenced, cortical and striatal excitatory synapses formed and matured at an accelerated pace through postnatal day 21 (P21). This exuberant synaptic connectivity was lost over time in the cortex, resulting in the deterioration of synapses by 5 weeks. Synaptic decline in the cortex was accompanied with layer- and region-specific reactive gliosis without cell loss. To determine whether the disease-causing poly-Q mutation in Htt affects synapse development, we next investigated the synaptic connectivity in a full-length knock-in mouse model of HD, the zQ175 mouse. Similar to the cortical conditional knock-outs, we found excessive excitatory synapse formation and maturation in the cortices of P21 zQ175, which was lost by 5 weeks. Together, our findings reveal that cortical Htt is required for the correct establishment of cortical and striatal excitatory circuits, and this function of Htt is lost when the mutant Htt is present. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/349455-18$15.00/0.

  9. Distribution of neurons in functional areas of the mouse cerebral cortex reveals quantitatively different cortical zones.

    PubMed

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Watson, Charles; Paxinos, George

    2013-01-01

    How are neurons distributed along the cortical surface and across functional areas? Here we use the isotropic fractionator (Herculano-Houzel and Lent, 2005) to analyze the distribution of neurons across the entire isocortex of the mouse, divided into 18 functional areas defined anatomically. We find that the number of neurons underneath a surface area (the N/A ratio) varies 4.5-fold across functional areas and neuronal density varies 3.2-fold. The face area of S1 contains the most neurons, followed by motor cortex and the primary visual cortex. Remarkably, while the distribution of neurons across functional areas does not accompany the distribution of surface area, it mirrors closely the distribution of cortical volumes-with the exception of the visual areas, which hold more neurons than expected for their volume. Across the non-visual cortex, the volume of individual functional areas is a shared linear function of their number of neurons, while in the visual areas, neuronal densities are much higher than in all other areas. In contrast, the 18 functional areas cluster into three different zones according to the relationship between the N/A ratio and cortical thickness and neuronal density: these three clusters can be called visual, sensory, and, possibly, associative. These findings are remarkably similar to those in the human cerebral cortex (Ribeiro et al., 2013) and suggest that, like the human cerebral cortex, the mouse cerebral cortex comprises two zones that differ in how neurons form the cortical volume, and three zones that differ in how neurons are distributed underneath the cortical surface, possibly in relation to local differences in connectivity through the white matter. Our results suggest that beyond the developmental divide into visual and non-visual cortex, functional areas initially share a common distribution of neurons along the parenchyma that become delimited into functional areas according to the pattern of connectivity established later.

  10. Peripheral sensory activation of cortical circuits in the leg motor cortex of man

    PubMed Central

    Roy, François D; Gorassini, Monica A

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral sensory afferents in the hand activate both excitatory and inhibitory intracortical circuits to potentially facilitate and prune descending motor commands. In this study, we characterized how afferent inputs modulate the excitability of cortical circuits in the leg area of the primary motor cortex by examining how stimulation of the tibial nerve (TN) at the ankle alters motor evoked potentials (MEPs) activated by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Resting MEPs in the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle were facilitated in response to heteronymous activation of the TN 45–50 ms earlier, whereas MEPs were inhibited at interstimulus intervals of 32.5–37.5 ms. Similar time-dependent modulation occurred in the soleus (SOL) muscle with stimulation of the homonymous posterior tibial nerve (PTN) at the knee. To determine the site of this afferent-evoked facilitation and inhibition (spinal or cortical), we compared the effects of afferent stimulation to responses evoked at subcortical sites. At interstimulus intervals where MEP facilitation was observed (near 50 ms), spinal H-reflexes and responses evoked from corticospinal tract stimulation at the brainstem were predominantly depressed by the sensory stimulus suggesting that the observed MEP facilitation was cortical in origin. At interstimulus intervals where MEP depression was observed (near 35 ms), brainstem evoked responses were depressed to a similar degree and, in contrast to the hand, this suggests that spinal rather than cortical circuits mediate short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI) of leg MEPs. When the MEP was facilitated by afferent inputs, short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) was reduced and intracortical facilitation (ICF) was increased, but long-interval intracortical inhibition (LICI) at a 100 ms interval was unchanged. In addition, sensory excitation increased the recruitment of early, middle and late descending corticospinal volleys as evidenced from increases in MEP facilitation

  11. Rescue of the Functional Alterations of Motor Cortical Circuits in Arginase Deficiency by Neonatal Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cantero, Gloria; Liu, Xiao-Bo; Mervis, Ronald F.; Lazaro, Maria T.; Cederbaum, Stephen D.; Golshani, Peyman

    2016-01-01

    Arginase 1 deficiency is a urea cycle disorder associated with hyperargininemia, spastic diplegia, loss of ambulation, intellectual disability, and seizures. To gain insight on how loss of arginase expression affects the excitability and synaptic connectivity of the cortical neurons in the developing brain, we used anatomical, ultrastructural, and electrophysiological techniques to determine how single-copy and double-copy arginase deletion affects cortical circuits in mice. We find that the loss of arginase 1 expression results in decreased dendritic complexity, decreased excitatory and inhibitory synapse numbers, decreased intrinsic excitability, and altered synaptic transmission in layer 5 motor cortical neurons. Hepatic arginase 1 gene therapy using adeno-associated virus rescued nearly all these abnormalities when administered to neonatal homozygous knock-out animals. Therefore, gene therapeutic strategies can reverse physiological and anatomical markers of arginase 1 deficiency and therefore may be of therapeutic benefit for the neurological disabilities in this syndrome. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT These studies are one of the few investigations to try to understand the underlying neurological dysfunction that occurs in urea cycle disorders and the only to examine arginase deficiency. We have demonstrated by multiple modalities that, in murine layer 5 cortical neurons, a gradation of abnormalities exists based on the functional copy number of arginase: intrinsic excitability is altered, there is decreased density in asymmetrical and perisomatic synapses, and analysis of the dendritic complexity is lowest in the homozygous knock-out. With neonatal administration of adeno-associated virus expressing arginase, there is near-total recovery of the abnormalities in neurons and cortical circuits, supporting the concept that neonatal gene therapy may prevent the functional abnormalities that occur in arginase deficiency. PMID:27335400

  12. Intraoperative imaging of cortical cerebral perfusion by time-resolved thermography and multivariate data analysis.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Gerald; Sobottka, Stephan B; Koch, Edmund; Schackert, Gabriele; Kirsch, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    A new approach to cortical perfusion imaging is demonstrated using high-sensitivity thermography in conjunction with multivariate statistical data analysis. Local temperature changes caused by a cold bolus are imaged and transferred to a false color image. A cold bolus of 10 ml saline at ice temperature is injected systemically via a central venous access. During the injection, a sequence of 735 thermographic images are recorded within 2 min. The recorded data cube is subjected to a principal component analysis (PCA) to select slight changes of the cortical temperature caused by the cold bolus. PCA reveals that 11 s after injection the temperature of blood vessels is shortly decreased followed by an increase to the temperature before the cold bolus is injected. We demonstrate the potential of intraoperative thermography in combination with multivariate data analysis to image cortical cerebral perfusion without any markers. We provide the first in vivo application of multivariate thermographic imaging.

  13. Cortical reorganization induced by virtual reality therapy in a child with hemiparetic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    You, Sung H; Jang, Sung Ho; Kim, Yun-Hee; Kwon, Yong-Hyun; Barrow, Irene; Hallett, Mark

    2005-09-01

    Virtual reality (VR) therapy is a new, neurorehabilitation intervention aimed at enhancing motor performance in children with hemiparetic cerebral palsy (CP). This case report investigated the effects of VR therapy on cortical reorganization and associated motor function in an 8-year-old male with hemiparetic CP. Cortical activation and associated motor development were measured before and after VR therapy using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and standardized motor tests. Before VR therapy, the bilateral primary sensorimotor cortices (SMCs) and ipsilateral supplementary motor area (SMA) were predominantly activated during affected elbow movement. After VR therapy, the altered activations disappeared and the contralateral SMC was activated. This neuroplastic change was associated with enhanced functional motor skills including reaching, self-feeding, and dressing. These functions were not possible before the intervention. To our knowledge, this is the first fMRI study in the literature that provides evidence for neuroplasticity after VR therapy in a child with hemiparetic CP.

  14. A pediatric case of reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome with cortical subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Seiichiro; Takano, Tomoyuki; Ryujin, Fukiko; Takeuchi, Yoshihiro

    2012-10-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is a rare disorder characterized by acute onset, severe headache, with reversible vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries often accompanied by additional neurological symptoms. This syndrome is seen mainly in middle-aged adults, predominantly women. Herein, we report on a pediatric case of RCVS with cortical subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A 12-year-old boy developed acute, severe headache with paralysis of lower extremities causing gait disturbance after administration of eletriptan. Brain magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) revealed multifocal narrowing of the cerebral arteries, whereas magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated sulcal hyperintensity on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, consistent with cortical SAH. The patient's clinical symptoms resolved spontaneously after a few days and the MRI and MRA findings disappeared 3 months later, suggesting a diagnosis of RCVS. Eletriptan might cause vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries. Although most patients with RCVS are adults and pediatric cases are rare, RCVS should be considered in a child complaining of severe headache. Copyright © 2012 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Simultaneous imaging of intrinsic optical signals and cerebral vessel responses during cortical spreading depression in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengcheng; Chen, Shangbin; Luo, Weihua; Luo, Qingming

    2003-12-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is an important disease model for migraine and cerebral ischemia. We investigated the spatio-temporal characteristics of the intrinsic optical signals (IOS) at 570 nm and the cerebral blood vessel responses during CSD simultaneously by optical reflectance imaging in vivo. The CSD were induced by pinprick in 10 α-chloralose/urethane anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats. A four-phasic IOS response was observed at pial arteries and parenchymal sites in all experimental animals and an initial slight pial arteries dilation (21.5%+/-13.6%) and constriction (-4.2%+/-3.5%) precedes the dramatic dilation (69.2%+/-26.1%) of pial arterioles was recorded. Our experimental results show a high correlation (r = 0.89+/-0.025) between the IOS response and the diameter changes of the cerebral blood vessels during CSD in rats.

  16. Cadherin 13: Human cis-Regulation and Selectively Altered Addiction Phenotypes and Cerebral Cortical Dopamine in Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Drgonova, Jana; Walther, Donna; Hartstein, G Luke; Bukhari, Mohammad O; Baumann, Michael H; Katz, Jonathan; Hall, F Scott; Arnold, Elizabeth R; Flax, Shaun; Riley, Anthony; Rivero, Olga; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Troncoso, Juan; Ranscht, Barbara; Uhl, George R

    2016-01-01

    The cadherin 13 (CDH13) gene encodes a cell adhesion molecule likely to influence development and connections of brain circuits that modulate addiction, locomotion and cognition, including those that involve midbrain dopamine neurons. Human CDH13 mRNA expression differs by more than 80% in postmortem cerebral cortical samples from individuals with different CDH13 genotypes, supporting examination of mice with altered CDH13 expression as models for common human variation at this locus. Constitutive CDH13 knockout mice display evidence for changed cocaine reward: shifted dose response relationship in tests of cocaine-conditioned place preference using doses that do not alter cocaine-conditioned taste aversion. Reduced adult CDH13 expression in conditional knockouts also alters cocaine reward in ways that correlate with individual differences in cortical CDH13 mRNA levels. In control and comparison behavioral assessments, knockout mice display modestly quicker acquisition of rotarod and water maze tasks, with a trend toward faster acquisition of 5-choice serial reaction time tasks that otherwise displayed no genotype-related differences. They display significant differences in locomotion in some settings, with larger effects in males. In assessments of brain changes that might contribute to these behavioral differences, there are selective alterations of dopamine levels, dopamine/metabolite ratios, dopaminergic fiber densities and mRNA encoding the activity dependent transcription factor npas4 in cerebral cortex of knockout mice. These novel data and previously reported human associations of CDH13 variants with addiction, individual differences in responses to stimulant administration and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) phenotypes suggest that levels of CDH13 expression, through mechanisms likely to include effects on mesocortical dopamine, influence stimulant reward and may contribute modestly to cognitive and locomotor phenotypes relevant to ADHD

  17. Automatic localization of cerebral cortical malformations using fractal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, A.; Arrigoni, F.; Romaniello, R.; Triulzi, F. M.; Peruzzo, D.; Bertoldo, A.

    2016-08-01

    Malformations of cortical development (MCDs) encompass a variety of brain disorders affecting the normal development and organization of the brain cortex. The relatively low incidence and the extreme heterogeneity of these disorders hamper the application of classical group level approaches for the detection of lesions. Here, we present a geometrical descriptor for a voxel level analysis based on fractal geometry, then define two similarity measures to detect the lesions at single subject level. The pipeline was applied to 15 normal children and nine pediatric patients affected by MCDs following two criteria, maximum accuracy (WACC) and minimization of false positives (FPR), and proved that our lesion detection algorithm is able to detect and locate abnormalities of the brain cortex with high specificity (WACC  =  85%, FPR  =  96%), sensitivity (WACC  =  83%, FPR  =  63%) and accuracy (WACC  =  85%, FPR  =  90%). The combination of global and local features proves to be effective, making the algorithm suitable for the detection of both focal and diffused malformations. Compared to other existing algorithms, this method shows higher accuracy and sensitivity.

  18. Regional differences in cerebral asymmetries of human cortical white matter.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, Sarina J; Häberling, Isabelle S; Badzakova-Trajkov, Gjurgjica; Patston, Lucy L M; Waldie, Karen E; Tippett, Lynette J; Corballis, Michael C; Kirk, Ian J

    2011-11-01

    The form of the structural asymmetries across the cerebral hemispheres, that support well-established functional asymmetries, are not well understood. Although, many previous studies have investigated structural differences in areas associated with strong functional asymmetries, such as language processes, regions of the brain with less well established functional laterality have received less attention. The current study aims to address this by exploring global white matter asymmetries of the healthy human brain using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and tractography. DTI was conducted on twenty-nine healthy right-handed males, and pathways from the four major lobes were reconstructed using probabilistic tractography. Mean FA, parallel and perpendicular diffusion values were calculated and compared across hemispheres for each pathway generated. Significant asymmetries in the parietal (rightward asymmetry) and occipital (leftward asymmetry) pathways were found in FA measures. However, asymmetric patterns in parallel and/or perpendicular diffusion were observed in all four lobes, even in pathways with symmetrical FA. For instance, significant rightward asymmetry in parallel diffusion was found in the parietal and frontal lobes, whereas significant leftward asymmetry was found in the temporal and occipital lobes. We suggest that these different patterns of diffusion asymmetry reflect differences in microanatomy that support the known patterns of differential functional asymmetry. The different directions of anatomical asymmetry support the notion that there may be a number of different lateralising influences operating in the brain.

  19. Canonical Cortical Circuit Model Explains Rivalry, Intermittent Rivalry, and Rivalry Memory.

    PubMed

    Vattikuti, Shashaank; Thangaraj, Phyllis; Xie, Hua W; Gotts, Stephen J; Martin, Alex; Chow, Carson C

    2016-05-01

    It has been shown that the same canonical cortical circuit model with mutual inhibition and a fatigue process can explain perceptual rivalry and other neurophysiological responses to a range of static stimuli. However, it has been proposed that this model cannot explain responses to dynamic inputs such as found in intermittent rivalry and rivalry memory, where maintenance of a percept when the stimulus is absent is required. This challenges the universality of the basic canonical cortical circuit. Here, we show that by including an overlooked realistic small nonspecific background neural activity, the same basic model can reproduce intermittent rivalry and rivalry memory without compromising static rivalry and other cortical phenomena. The background activity induces a mutual-inhibition mechanism for short-term memory, which is robust to noise and where fine-tuning of recurrent excitation or inclusion of sub-threshold currents or synaptic facilitation is unnecessary. We prove existence conditions for the mechanism and show that it can explain experimental results from the quartet apparent motion illusion, which is a prototypical intermittent rivalry stimulus.

  20. Canonical Cortical Circuit Model Explains Rivalry, Intermittent Rivalry, and Rivalry Memory

    PubMed Central

    Vattikuti, Shashaank; Xie, Hua W.; Gotts, Stephen J.; Martin, Alex; Chow, Carson C.

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that the same canonical cortical circuit model with mutual inhibition and a fatigue process can explain perceptual rivalry and other neurophysiological responses to a range of static stimuli. However, it has been proposed that this model cannot explain responses to dynamic inputs such as found in intermittent rivalry and rivalry memory, where maintenance of a percept when the stimulus is absent is required. This challenges the universality of the basic canonical cortical circuit. Here, we show that by including an overlooked realistic small nonspecific background neural activity, the same basic model can reproduce intermittent rivalry and rivalry memory without compromising static rivalry and other cortical phenomena. The background activity induces a mutual-inhibition mechanism for short-term memory, which is robust to noise and where fine-tuning of recurrent excitation or inclusion of sub-threshold currents or synaptic facilitation is unnecessary. We prove existence conditions for the mechanism and show that it can explain experimental results from the quartet apparent motion illusion, which is a prototypical intermittent rivalry stimulus. PMID:27138214

  1. Optogenetic spatial and temporal control of cortical circuits on a columnar scale

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Arani; Osik, Jason J.; Ritter, Neil J.; Wang, Shen; Shaw, James T.; Fiser, József

    2015-01-01

    Many circuits in the mammalian brain are organized in a topographic or columnar manner. These circuits could be activated—in ways that reveal circuit function or restore function after disease—by an artificial stimulation system that is capable of independently driving local groups of neurons. Here we present a simple custom microscope called ProjectorScope 1 that incorporates off-the-shelf parts and a liquid crystal display (LCD) projector to stimulate surface brain regions that express channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2). In principle, local optogenetic stimulation of the brain surface with optical projection systems might not produce local activation of a highly interconnected network like the cortex, because of potential stimulation of axons of passage or extended dendritic trees. However, here we demonstrate that the combination of virally mediated ChR2 expression levels and the light intensity of ProjectorScope 1 is capable of producing local spatial activation with a resolution of ∼200–300 μm. We use the system to examine the role of cortical activity in the experience-dependent emergence of motion selectivity in immature ferret visual cortex. We find that optogenetic cortical activation alone—without visual stimulation—is sufficient to produce increases in motion selectivity, suggesting the presence of a sharpening mechanism that does not require precise spatiotemporal activation of the visual system. These results demonstrate that optogenetic stimulation can sculpt the developing brain. PMID:26631152

  2. In Utero Electroporation: Assay System for Migration of Cerebral Cortical Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabata, Hidenori; Nakajima, Kazunori

    During the development of the cerebral cortex, the majority of cortical neurons are generated in the ventricular zone (VZ) facing the lateral ventricle and then migrate toward the pial surface to form the highly organized 6-layered cerebral cortex. Detailed profiles of these processes and their molecular mechanisms had been largely unknown because of the absence of an efficient assay system. The in vivo electroporation system was initially devised for use within chick embryos (Funahashi et al., 1999; Itasaki et al., 1999; Momose et al., 1999; Muramatsu et al., 1997), and we and other groups have used that system as a basis for developing an in utero electroporation system, which allows plasmid DNA to be introduced into cortical progenitor cells in developing mouse embryos in the uterus (Fukuchi-Shimogori and Grove, 2001; Saito and Nakatsuji, 2001; Tabata and Nakajima, 2001; Takahashi et al., 2002). In utero electroporation of other sites in the brain, including the hippocampus (Navarro-Quiroga et al., 2007), cerebral basal ganglia (Borrell et al., 2005; Nakahira et al., 2006), cortical hem (Takiguchi-Hayashi et al., 2004), and dorsal thalamus (Bonnin et al., 2007), has recently been reported. Introducing green fluorescent protein (GFP) enables the entire processes of migration and layer formation to be visualized (Ajioka and Nakajima, 2005; Sasaki et al., 2008; Tabata and Nakajima, 2002, 2003), and the role of any gene involved in these processes can be easily assessed by overexpressing the proteins or their mutants (Ohshima et al., 2007), or by knocking down the genes by the RNA interference technique (Bai et al., 2003). Furthermore, the Tet-On/Off system and/or other plasmid- vector-based technologies will expand the potential of the analyses. In this section we review the principles and methods of gene transfer into the cortical wall of mouse embryos by means of the in utero electroporation system.

  3. Development of cortical motor circuits between childhood and adulthood: A navigated TMS-HdEEG study.

    PubMed

    Määttä, Sara; Könönen, Mervi; Kallioniemi, Elisa; Lakka, Timo; Lintu, Niina; Lindi, Virpi; Ferreri, Florinda; Ponzo, David; Säisänen, Laura

    2017-02-20

    Motor functions improve during childhood and adolescence, but little is still known about the development of cortical motor circuits during early life. To elucidate the neurophysiological hallmarks of motor cortex development, we investigated the differences in motor cortical excitability and connectivity between healthy children, adolescents, and adults by means of navigated suprathreshold motor cortex transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) combined with high-density electroencephalography (EEG). We demonstrated that with development, the excitability of the motor system increases, the TMS-evoked EEG waveform increases in complexity, the magnitude of induced activation decreases, and signal spreading increases. Furthermore, the phase of the oscillatory response to TMS becomes less consistent with age. These changes parallel an improvement in manual dexterity and may reflect developmental changes in functional connectivity. Hum Brain Mapp, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Slicing, sampling, and distance-dependent effects affect network measures in simulated cortical circuit structures

    PubMed Central

    Miner, Daniel C.; Triesch, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    The neuroanatomical connectivity of cortical circuits is believed to follow certain rules, the exact origins of which are still poorly understood. In particular, numerous nonrandom features, such as common neighbor clustering, overrepresentation of reciprocal connectivity, and overrepresentation of certain triadic graph motifs have been experimentally observed in cortical slice data. Some of these data, particularly regarding bidirectional connectivity are seemingly contradictory, and the reasons for this are unclear. Here we present a simple static geometric network model with distance-dependent connectivity on a realistic scale that naturally gives rise to certain elements of these observed behaviors, and may provide plausible explanations for some of the conflicting findings. Specifically, investigation of the model shows that experimentally measured nonrandom effects, especially bidirectional connectivity, may depend sensitively on experimental parameters such as slice thickness and sampling area, suggesting potential explanations for the seemingly conflicting experimental results. PMID:25414647

  5. Distinct cortical circuit mechanisms for complex forelimb movement and motor map topography.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Thomas C; Ayling, Oliver G S; Murphy, Timothy H

    2012-04-26

    Cortical motor maps are the basis of voluntary movement, but they have proven difficult to understand in the context of their underlying neuronal circuits. We applied light-based motor mapping of Channelrhodopsin-2 mice to reveal a functional subdivision of the forelimb motor cortex based on the direction of movement evoked by brief (10 ms) pulses. Prolonged trains of electrical or optogenetic stimulation (100-500 ms) targeted to anterior or posterior subregions of motor cortex evoked reproducible complex movements of the forelimb to distinct positions in space. Blocking excitatory cortical synaptic transmission did not abolish basic motor map topography, but the site-specific expression of complex movements was lost. Our data suggest that the topography of movement maps arises from their segregated output projections, whereas complex movements evoked by prolonged stimulation require intracortical synaptic transmission.

  6. Cerebral Cortical Folding Analysis with Multivariate Modeling and Testing: Studies on Gender Differences and Neonatal Development

    PubMed Central

    Awate, Suyash P.; Yushkevich, Paul A.; Song, Zhuang; Licht, Daniel J.; Gee, James C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a novel statistical framework for human cortical folding pattern analysis that relies on a rich multivariate descriptor of folding patterns in a region of interest (ROI). The ROI-based approach avoids problems faced by spatial-normalization-based approaches stemming from the deficiency of homologous features between typical human cerebral cortices. Unlike typical ROI-based methods that summarize folding by a single number, the proposed descriptor unifies multiple characteristics of surface geometry in a high-dimensional space (hundreds/thousands of dimensions). In this way, the proposed framework couples the reliability of ROI-based analysis with the richness of the novel cortical folding pattern descriptor. This paper presents new mathematical insights into the relationship of cortical complexity with intra-cranial volume (ICV). It shows that conventional complexity descriptors implicitly handle ICV Differences in Different ways, thereby lending Different meanings to “complexity”. The paper proposes a new application of a non-parametric permutation-based approach for rigorous statistical hypothesis testing with multivariate cortical descriptors. The paper presents two cross-sectional studies applying the proposed framework to study folding Differences between genders and in neonates with complex congenital heart disease. Both studies lead to novel interesting results. PMID:20630489

  7. A proteomic survey of rat cerebral cortical synaptosomes

    PubMed Central

    Witzmann, Frank A.; Arnold, Randy J.; Bai, Fengju; Hrncirova, Petra; Kimpel, Mark W.; Mechref, Yehia S.; McBride, William J.; Novotny, Milos V.; Pedrick, Nathan M.; Ringham, Heather N.; Simon, Jay R.

    2006-01-01

    Previous findings from our laboratory and others indicate that two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) can be used to study protein expression in defined brain regions, but mainly the proteins which are present in high abundance in glia are readily detected. The current study was undertaken to determine the protein profile in a synaptosomal subcellular fraction isolated from the cerebral cortex of the rat. Both 2-DE and liquid chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) procedures were used to isolate and identify proteins in the synaptosomal fraction and accordingly >900 proteins were detected using 2-DE; the 167 most intense gel spots were isolated and identified with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization – time of flight peptide mass fingerprinting or LC-MS/MS. In addition, over 200 proteins were separated and identified with the LC-MS/MS “shotgun proteomics” technique, some in post-translationally modified form. The following classes of proteins associated with synaptic function were detected: (a) proteins involved in synaptic vesicle trafficking-docking (e.g., SNAP-25, synapsin I and II, synaptotagmin I, II, and V, VAMP-2, syntaxin 1A and 1B, etc.); (b) proteins that function as transporters or receptors (e.g., excitatory amino acid transporters 1 and 2, GABA transporter 1); (c) proteins that are associated with the synaptic plasma membrane (e.g., post-synaptic density-95/synapse-associated protein-90 complex, neuromodulin (GAP-43), voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein (VDACs), sodium-potassium ATPase subunits, alpha 2 spectrin, septin 7, etc.); and (d) proteins that mediate intracellular signaling cascades that modulate synaptic function (e.g., calmodulin, calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase subunits, etc.). Other identified proteins are associated with mitochondrial or general cytosolic function. Of the two proteins identified as endoplasmic reticular, both interact with the synaptic SNARE complex to regulate

  8. Cortical morphometry and IQ in VLBW children without cerebral palsy born in 2003–2007

    PubMed Central

    Sølsnes, Anne Elisabeth; Grunewaldt, Kristine H.; Bjuland, Knut J.; Stavnes, Elisabeth M.; Bastholm, Irén A.; Aanes, Synne; Østgård, Heidi F.; Håberg, Asta; Løhaugen, Gro C.C.; Skranes, Jon; Rimol, Lars M.

    2015-01-01

    Children born prematurely with very low birth weight (VLBW: bw  ≤ 1500 g) have an increased risk of preterm perinatal brain injury, which may subsequently alter the maturation of the brain, including the cerebral cortex. The aim of study was to assess cortical thickness and surface area in VLBW children compared with term-born controls, and to investigate possible relationships between cortical morphology and Full IQ. In this cross-sectional study, 37 VLBW and 104 term children born between the years 2003–2007 were assessed cognitively at 5–10 years of age, using age appropriate Wechsler tests. The FreeSurfer software was used to obtain estimates of cortical thickness and surface area based on T1-weighted MRI images at 1.5 Tesla. The VLBW children had smaller cortical surface area bilaterally in the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes. A thicker cortex in the frontal and occipital regions and a thinner cortex in posterior parietal areas were observed in the VLBW group. There were significant differences in Full IQ between groups (VLBW M = 98, SD = 9.71; controls M = 108, SD = 13.57; p < 0.001). There was a positive relationship between IQ and surface area in both groups, albeit significant only in the larger control group. In the VLBW group, reduced IQ was associated with frontal cortical thickening and temporo-parietal thinning. We conclude that cortical deviations are evident in childhood even in VLBW children born in 2003–2007 who have received state of the art medical treatment in the perinatal period and who did not present with focal brain injuries on neonatal ultrasonography. The cortical deviations were associated with reduced cognitive functioning. PMID:26106543

  9. Cortical morphometry and IQ in VLBW children without cerebral palsy born in 2003-2007.

    PubMed

    Sølsnes, Anne Elisabeth; Grunewaldt, Kristine H; Bjuland, Knut J; Stavnes, Elisabeth M; Bastholm, Irén A; Aanes, Synne; Østgård, Heidi F; Håberg, Asta; Løhaugen, Gro C C; Skranes, Jon; Rimol, Lars M

    2015-01-01

    Children born prematurely with very low birth weight (VLBW: bw  ≤ 1500 g) have an increased risk of preterm perinatal brain injury, which may subsequently alter the maturation of the brain, including the cerebral cortex. The aim of study was to assess cortical thickness and surface area in VLBW children compared with term-born controls, and to investigate possible relationships between cortical morphology and Full IQ. In this cross-sectional study, 37 VLBW and 104 term children born between the years 2003-2007 were assessed cognitively at 5-10 years of age, using age appropriate Wechsler tests. The FreeSurfer software was used to obtain estimates of cortical thickness and surface area based on T1-weighted MRI images at 1.5 Tesla. The VLBW children had smaller cortical surface area bilaterally in the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes. A thicker cortex in the frontal and occipital regions and a thinner cortex in posterior parietal areas were observed in the VLBW group. There were significant differences in Full IQ between groups (VLBW M = 98, SD = 9.71; controls M = 108, SD = 13.57; p < 0.001). There was a positive relationship between IQ and surface area in both groups, albeit significant only in the larger control group. In the VLBW group, reduced IQ was associated with frontal cortical thickening and temporo-parietal thinning. We conclude that cortical deviations are evident in childhood even in VLBW children born in 2003-2007 who have received state of the art medical treatment in the perinatal period and who did not present with focal brain injuries on neonatal ultrasonography. The cortical deviations were associated with reduced cognitive functioning.

  10. MOG antibody–positive, benign, unilateral, cerebral cortical encephalitis with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Ryo; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Kaneko, Kimihiko; Akaishi, Tetsuya; Takai, Yoshiki; Sato, Douglas Kazutoshi; Nishiyama, Shuhei; Misu, Tatsuro; Kuroda, Hiroshi; Aoki, Masashi; Fujihara, Kazuo

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To describe the features of adult patients with benign, unilateral cerebral cortical encephalitis positive for the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) antibody. Methods: In this retrospective, cross-sectional study, after we encountered an index case of MOG antibody–positive unilateral cortical encephalitis with epileptic seizure, we tested for MOG antibody using our in-house, cell-based assay in a cohort of 24 consecutive adult patients with steroid-responsive encephalitis of unknown etiology seen at Tohoku University Hospital (2008–2014). We then analyzed the findings in MOG antibody–positive cases. Results: Three more patients, as well as the index case, were MOG antibody–positive, and all were adult men (median age 37 years, range 23–39 years). The main symptom was generalized epileptic seizure with or without abnormal behavior or consciousness disturbance. Two patients also developed unilateral benign optic neuritis (before or after seizure). In all patients, brain MRI demonstrated unilateral cerebral cortical fluid-attenuated inversion recovery hyperintense lesions, which were swollen and corresponded to hyperperfusion on SPECT. CSF studies showed moderate mononuclear pleocytosis with some polymorphonuclear cells and mildly elevated total protein levels, but myelin basic protein was not elevated. A screening of encephalitis-associated autoantibodies, including aquaporin-4, glutamate receptor, and voltage-gated potassium channel antibodies, was negative. All patients received antiepilepsy drugs and fully recovered after high-dose methylprednisolone, and the unilateral cortical MRI lesions subsequently disappeared. No patient experienced relapse. Conclusions: These MOG antibody–positive cases represent unique benign unilateral cortical encephalitis with epileptic seizure. The pathology may be autoimmune, although the findings differ from MOG antibody–associated demyelination and Rasmussen and other known immune

  11. Altered Hippocampo-Cerebello-Cortical Circuit in Schizophrenia by a Spatiotemporal Consistency and Causal Connectivity Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Jiang, Yuchao; Chen, Lin; He, Hui; Dong, Li; Hou, Changyue; Duan, Mingjun; Yang, Mi; Yao, Dezhong; Luo, Cheng

    2017-01-01

    In the current study, FOur-dimensional Consistency of local neural Activities (FOCA) analysis was used to investigate the local consistency by integrating the temporal and spatial information of the local region. In the current study, resting-state fMRI data of 69 schizophrenia patients and 70 healthy controls were collected. FOCA was utilized to investigate the local consistency. Moreover, Granger causal analysis was used to investigate causal functional connectivity among these areas, which exhibited significantly different local consistency between groups. Compared with the healthy controls, the schizophrenia patients exhibited increased local consistency in hippocampus, basal ganglia and cerebellum regions, and decreased local consistency in sensoriperceptual cortex. In addition, altered causal functional connectivity was observed in hippocampo–cerebello-cortical (occipital) circuit. These findings suggested that this circuit might play a role in the motor dysfunction in schizophrenia, and should be paid more attention in future. PMID:28194095

  12. Towards a unified theory of neocortex: laminar cortical circuits for vision and cognition.

    PubMed

    Grossberg, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    A key goal of computational neuroscience is to link brain mechanisms to behavioral functions. The present article describes recent progress towards explaining how laminar neocortical circuits give rise to biological intelligence. These circuits embody two new and revolutionary computational paradigms: Complementary Computing and Laminar Computing. Circuit properties include a novel synthesis of feedforward and feedback processing, of digital and analog processing, and of preattentive and attentive processing. This synthesis clarifies the appeal of Bayesian approaches but has a far greater predictive range that naturally extends to self-organizing processes. Examples from vision and cognition are summarized. A LAMINART architecture unifies properties of visual development, learning, perceptual grouping, attention, and 3D vision. A key modeling theme is that the mechanisms which enable development and learning to occur in a stable way imply properties of adult behavior. It is noted how higher-order attentional constraints can influence multiple cortical regions, and how spatial and object attention work together to learn view-invariant object categories. In particular, a form-fitting spatial attentional shroud can allow an emerging view-invariant object category to remain active while multiple view categories are associated with it during sequences of saccadic eye movements. Finally, the chapter summarizes recent work on the LIST PARSE model of cognitive information processing by the laminar circuits of prefrontal cortex. LIST PARSE models the short-term storage of event sequences in working memory, their unitization through learning into sequence, or list, chunks, and their read-out in planned sequential performance that is under volitional control. LIST PARSE provides a laminar embodiment of Item and Order working memories, also called Competitive Queuing models, that have been supported by both psychophysical and neurobiological data. These examples show how

  13. Differences in cerebral cortical anatomy of left- and right-handers

    PubMed Central

    Guadalupe, Tulio; Willems, Roel M.; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Arias Vasquez, Alejandro; Hoogman, Martine; Hagoort, Peter; Fernandez, Guillen; Buitelaar, Jan; Franke, Barbara; Fisher, Simon E.; Francks, Clyde

    2014-01-01

    The left and right sides of the human brain are specialized for different kinds of information processing, and much of our cognition is lateralized to an extent toward one side or the other. Handedness is a reflection of nervous system lateralization. Roughly ten percent of people are mixed- or left-handed, and they show an elevated rate of reductions or reversals of some cerebral functional asymmetries compared to right-handers. Brain anatomical correlates of left-handedness have also been suggested. However, the relationships of left-handedness to brain structure and function remain far from clear. We carried out a comprehensive analysis of cortical surface area differences between 106 left-handed subjects and 1960 right-handed subjects, measured using an automated method of regional parcellation (FreeSurfer, Destrieux atlas). This is the largest study sample that has so far been used in relation to this issue. No individual cortical region showed an association with left-handedness that survived statistical correction for multiple testing, although there was a nominally significant association with the surface area of a previously implicated region: the left precentral sulcus. Identifying brain structural correlates of handedness may prove useful for genetic studies of cerebral asymmetries, as well as providing new avenues for the study of relations between handedness, cerebral lateralization and cognition. PMID:24734025

  14. Differences in cerebral cortical anatomy of left- and right-handers.

    PubMed

    Guadalupe, Tulio; Willems, Roel M; Zwiers, Marcel P; Arias Vasquez, Alejandro; Hoogman, Martine; Hagoort, Peter; Fernandez, Guillen; Buitelaar, Jan; Franke, Barbara; Fisher, Simon E; Francks, Clyde

    2014-01-01

    The left and right sides of the human brain are specialized for different kinds of information processing, and much of our cognition is lateralized to an extent toward one side or the other. Handedness is a reflection of nervous system lateralization. Roughly ten percent of people are mixed- or left-handed, and they show an elevated rate of reductions or reversals of some cerebral functional asymmetries compared to right-handers. Brain anatomical correlates of left-handedness have also been suggested. However, the relationships of left-handedness to brain structure and function remain far from clear. We carried out a comprehensive analysis of cortical surface area differences between 106 left-handed subjects and 1960 right-handed subjects, measured using an automated method of regional parcellation (FreeSurfer, Destrieux atlas). This is the largest study sample that has so far been used in relation to this issue. No individual cortical region showed an association with left-handedness that survived statistical correction for multiple testing, although there was a nominally significant association with the surface area of a previously implicated region: the left precentral sulcus. Identifying brain structural correlates of handedness may prove useful for genetic studies of cerebral asymmetries, as well as providing new avenues for the study of relations between handedness, cerebral lateralization and cognition.

  15. An automated pipeline for cortical surface generation and registration of the cerebral cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen; Ibanez, Luis; Gelas, Arnaud; Yeo, B. T. Thomas; Niethammer, Marc; Andreasen, Nancy C.; Magnotta, Vincent A.

    2011-03-01

    The human cerebral cortex is one of the most complicated structures in the body. It has a highly convoluted structure with much of the cortical sheet buried in sulci. Based on cytoarchitectural and functional imaging studies, it is possible to segment the cerebral cortex into several subregions. While it is only possible to differentiate the true anatomical subregions based on cytoarchitecture, the surface morphometry aligns closely with the underlying cytoarchitecture and provides features that allow the surface of the cortex to be parcellated based on the sulcal and gyral patterns that are readily visible on the MR images. We have developed a fully automated pipeline for the generation and registration of cortical surfaces in the spherical domain. The pipeline initiates with the BRAINS AutoWorkup pipeline. Subsequently, topology correction and surface generation is performed to generate a genus zero surface and mapped to a sphere. Several surface features are then calculated to drive the registration between the atlas surface and other datasets. A spherical diffeomorphic demons algorithm is used to co-register an atlas surface onto a subject surface. A lobar based atlas of the cerebral cortex was created from a manual parcellation of the cortex. The atlas surface was then co-registered to five additional subjects using a spherical diffeomorphic demons algorithm. The labels from the atlas surface were warped on the subject surface and compared to the manual raters. The average Dice overlap index was 0.89 across all regions.

  16. The cortical drive to human respiratory muscles in the awake state assessed by premotor cerebral potentials.

    PubMed Central

    Macefield, G; Gandevia, S C

    1991-01-01

    1. We investigated the possibility of a cortical contribution to human respiration by recording from the scalp of awake subjects the premotor cerebral potentials that are known to precede voluntary limb movements. 2. Electroencephalographic activity (EEG) was recorded from scalp electrodes and averaged for 1.8-2.0 s before the time at which airway pressure exceeded an inspiratory or expiratory threshold. Clear premotor cerebral potentials were recorded during brisk, self-paced nasal inhalations or exhalations. In ten subjects, a slow cortical negativity (Bereitschaftspotential) was apparent in the averaged EEG, commencing 1.2 +/- 0.3 s before the onset of inspiratory (scalene) or expiratory (abdominal) muscle activity (EMG). It was maximal at the vertex, with a mean slope of 12.3 +/- 5.8 microV/s, and was followed by a post-movement positivity. 3. In four subjects the inspiratory premotor potential culminated in a large negativity, the motor potential, which began 24 +/- 15 ms before the onset of scalene EMG. It is argued that such a short latency is consistent with a volitionally generated respiratory command which travels relatively directly to the respiratory muscles, having a total central delay which is no longer than that for voluntary finger movements. 4. That the respiratory premotor and motor potentials did not originate in subcortical structures was supported by their absence in a patient suffering from chronic reflexogenic hiccups, in whom cerebral activity was back-averaged from each brisk hiccup. 5. During quiet breathing, in which subjects were relaxed and distracted from thinking about their respiration, no premotor cerebral potentials preceding inspiration could be detected. This failure was not due to the slow rate of rise of inspiratory activity during quiet breathing as compared with a brisk sniff, because premotor potentials were detected when subjects intermittently generated slow active expiratory efforts. 6. These observations suggest that

  17. Effects of homeostatic constraints on associative memory storage and synaptic connectivity of cortical circuits

    PubMed Central

    Chapeton, Julio; Gala, Rohan; Stepanyants, Armen

    2015-01-01

    The impact of learning and long-term memory storage on synaptic connectivity is not completely understood. In this study, we examine the effects of associative learning on synaptic connectivity in adult cortical circuits by hypothesizing that these circuits function in a steady-state, in which the memory capacity of a circuit is maximal and learning must be accompanied by forgetting. Steady-state circuits should be characterized by unique connectivity features. To uncover such features we developed a biologically constrained, exactly solvable model of associative memory storage. The model is applicable to networks of multiple excitatory and inhibitory neuron classes and can account for homeostatic constraints on the number and the overall weight of functional connections received by each neuron. The results show that in spite of a large number of neuron classes, functional connections between potentially connected cells are realized with less than 50% probability if the presynaptic cell is excitatory and generally a much greater probability if it is inhibitory. We also find that constraining the overall weight of presynaptic connections leads to Gaussian connection weight distributions that are truncated at zero. In contrast, constraining the total number of functional presynaptic connections leads to non-Gaussian distributions, in which weak connections are absent. These theoretical predictions are compared with a large dataset of published experimental studies reporting amplitudes of unitary postsynaptic potentials and probabilities of connections between various classes of excitatory and inhibitory neurons in the cerebellum, neocortex, and hippocampus. PMID:26150784

  18. Design and fabrication of an implantable cortical semiconductor integrated circuit electrode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefevre, Pierre K.

    1990-12-01

    This research furthered the processing steps of the AFIT 16 by 16 implantable cortical semiconductor integrated circuit electrode array, or brain chip. The areas of interest include the brain chip electronics, metallization, ionic permeation, and implantation. The electronics and metallization are heavily covered. A high speed, single clock divide-by-two circuit was modified with a reset transistor and cascaded to form a ripple counter. This device had stable operation at specific source voltage and clock voltage and frequency. A 7-stage inverter with 10 unmodified divide-by-two circuits cascaded operated between 1.7 and 8 volts, and between 39 KHz and 1 MHz, respectively. The metallization process refers to coating Au/Ni or Pt onto exposed aluminum areas (pads) of a CMOS integrated circuit. Sputtering was used to coat the chip. And an Au/Ni etchant or Pt peel-off technique was used. The Au/Ni etchant used was iodine, potassium iodide, and deionized water solution.

  19. Relation between clinical findings and progression of cerebral cortical pathology in MM1-type sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: proposed staging of cerebral cortical pathology.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yasushi; Tatsumi, Shinsui; Mimuro, Maya; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki; Hashizume, Yoshio; Yoshida, Mari

    2014-06-15

    In our pathologic observation of the cerebral cortex including the neocortex, hippocampus, and limbic cortex in 43 Japanese patients with MM1-type sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, the earliest pathologic finding was spongiform change and next was gliosis. Subsequently, neuropil rarefaction appeared, followed by neuron loss. On the basis of these observations, we propose the following cortical pathologic staging: Stage I, spongiform change; Stage II, hypertrophic astrocytosis; Stage III, neuropil rarefaction; Stage IV, neuron loss; Stage V, status spongiosus; and Stage VI, large cavity formation. We also suggest a more simple staging classification: Stages I and II, mild; Stages III and IV, moderate; and Stages V and VI, severe involvement. Based on statistical analysis of the cases, strong correlation coefficients were obtained between the neocortical and limbic pathologic stage and both total disease duration and brain weight. We estimated that the first observation times of cortical hyperintensity on diffusion-weighted images of magnetic resonance imaging, myoclonus, and periodic sharp wave complexes on the electroencephalogram approximately correspond to the early phase of Stage II of the neocortex. The time to reach the akinetic mutism state approximately corresponds to the middle phase of Stage II of the neocortex. Therefore, we think that approximate clinical manifestations at death, total disease duration, and brain weight can be estimated according to the pathologic stage of the neocortex or limbic cortex. Panencephalopathic-type pathology appeared approximately 12 months after disease onset, and this time approximately corresponds to the middle phase of Stage III of the neocortex.

  20. Immunocompetent young man with cerebral abscess and cortical venous infarction mimicking cerebritis caused by Gemella morbillorum

    PubMed Central

    Milnik, Annette; Gazis, Angelos; Tammer, Ina; Bartels, Claudius

    2013-01-01

    Gemella morbillorum is an anaerobic gram-positive diplococcus and in most cases a harmless commensal, which occasionally causes infections in the central nervous system. We report on an immunocompetent young man with focal neurological symptoms and cephalgia caused by a cerebral abscess. Although successful treatment was done with neurosurgical intervention and antibiotic therapy, he suffered from a venous infarction 5 weeks after first diagnosis, which mimicked cerebritis as an early stage of relapsing abscess. Imaging and investigation of cerebrospinal fluid was necessary for sufficient differential diagnosis and antibiotic therapy could be stopped after altogether 8 weeks of treatment. In summary, G morbillorum causes not only biphasic infections, but also can be accompanied by infarction in the central nervous system despite sufficient antibiotic therapy. PMID:23355562

  1. Immunocompetent young man with cerebral abscess and cortical venous infarction mimicking cerebritis caused by Gemella morbillorum.

    PubMed

    Milnik, Annette; Gazis, Angelos; Tammer, Ina; Bartels, Claudius

    2013-01-25

    Gemella morbillorum is an anaerobic gram-positive diplococcus and in most cases a harmless commensal, which occasionally causes infections in the central nervous system. We report on an immunocompetent young man with focal neurological symptoms and cephalgia caused by a cerebral abscess. Although successful treatment was done with neurosurgical intervention and antibiotic therapy, he suffered from a venous infarction 5 weeks after first diagnosis, which mimicked cerebritis as an early stage of relapsing abscess. Imaging and investigation of cerebrospinal fluid was necessary for sufficient differential diagnosis and antibiotic therapy could be stopped after altogether 8 weeks of treatment. In summary, G morbillorum causes not only biphasic infections, but also can be accompanied by infarction in the central nervous system despite sufficient antibiotic therapy.

  2. A Neural Circuit That Controls Cortical State, Plasticity, and the Gain of Sensory Responses in Mouse.

    PubMed

    Stryker, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    Neurons in the visual cortex were first found to be exquisitely selective for particular properties of visual stimuli in anesthetized animals, including mice. Studies of alert mice in an apparatus that allowed them to stand or run revealed that locomotion causes a change in cortical state that dramatically increases the magnitude of responses in neurons of the visual cortex without altering selectivity, effectively changing the gain of sensory responses. Locomotion also dramatically enhances adult plasticity in the recovery from long-term visual deprivation. We have studied the elements and operation of the neural circuit responsible for the enhancement of activity and shown that it enhances plasticity even in mice not free to run. The circuit consists of projections ascending from the midbrain locomotor region (MLR) to the basal forebrain, activating cholinergic and perhaps other projections to excite inhibitory interneurons expressing vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in the visual cortex. VIP cells activated by locomotion inhibit interneurons that express somatostatin (SST), thereby disinhibiting the excitatory principal neurons and allowing them to respond more strongly to effective visual stimuli. These findings reveal in alert animals how the ascending reticular activating system described in anesthetized animals 50 years ago operates to control cortical state.

  3. Cerebral hypoxia, missing cortical somatosensory evoked potentials and recovery of consciousness

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bilaterally absent N20 components of the sensory evoked potentials (SEP) from the median nerve are regarded as accurately predicting poor outcome after cardiac arrest. Case presentation We are reporting on a patient, who regained consciousness despite this ominous finding. Early after cardiac arrest, MRI showed signal alterations in diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) bilaterally in the primary visual and sensorimotor cortex and in the basal ganglia. SEP were repeatedly absent. The patient survived shut out form sensory and visual experience and locked in for voluntary movements, but kept her verbal competence in several languages. Conclusion SEP inform about integrity only of a narrow cortical strip. It is unguarded, but common practice, to conclude from absent SEP, that a patient has suffered diffuse cortical damage after cardiac arrest. Cerebral MRI with DWI helps to avoid this prognostic error and furthers understanding of the sometimes very peculiar state of mind after cardiac arrest. PMID:24720818

  4. Loss of Wdfy3 in mice alters cerebral cortical neurogenesis reflecting aspects of the autism pathology

    PubMed Central

    Orosco, Lori A.; Ross, Adam P.; Cates, Staci L.; Scott, Sean E.; Wu, Dennis; Sohn, Jiho; Pleasure, David; Pleasure, Samuel J.; Adamopoulos, Iannis E.; Zarbalis, Konstantinos S.

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are complex and heterogeneous developmental disabilities affecting an ever-increasing number of children worldwide. The diverse manifestations and complex, largely genetic etiology of ASDs pose a major challenge to the identification of unifying neuropathological features. Here we describe the neurodevelopmental defects in mice that carry deleterious alleles of the Wdfy3 gene, recently recognized as causative in ASDs. Loss of Wdfy3 leads to a regionally enlarged cerebral cortex resembling early brain overgrowth described in many children on the autism spectrum. In addition, affected mouse mutants display migration defects of cortical projection neurons, a recognized cause of epilepsy, which is significantly comorbid with autism. Our analysis of affected mouse mutants defines an important role for Wdfy3 in regulating neural progenitor divisions and neural migration in the developing brain. Furthermore, Wdfy3 is essential to cerebral expansion and functional organization while its loss-of-function results in pathological changes characteristic of ASDs. PMID:25198012

  5. Mammalian cerebral cortical tissue responds to low-intensity visible light.

    PubMed Central

    Wade, P D; Taylor, J; Siekevitz, P

    1988-01-01

    Low levels of visible light directed onto slices of rat cerebral cortical tissue enhanced net potassium-induced release of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) from these brain slices. At higher light intensity, net potassium-induced release was suppressed. These effects were apparently not from increased temperature. The amount of light enhancing this neurotransmitter release is approximately equal to the amount of light that can penetrate the head and reach the brain at the intensities of sunlight; this was determined by measuring the light entering the rat head through fur, scalp, skull, and dura mater and considering several natural lighting conditions. These results suggest that ambient light may be sufficient to alter the release of transmitters from mammalian cerebral cortex in vivo. PMID:3194426

  6. Cortical subarachnoid hemorrhage associated with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome after elective triplet cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Albano, Beatrice; Del Sette, Massimo; Roccatagliata, Luca; Gandolfo, Carlo; Primavera, Alberto

    2011-06-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes (RCVS) comprise a group of disorders characterized by prolonged, but reversible vasoconstriction of the cerebral arteries, usually associated with acute-onset, severe, recurrent headaches, with or without additional neurological signs and symptoms. Various complications of this condition have been observed, such as cortical subarachnoid hemorrhages (cSAH), intracerebral hemorrhages, reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy, ischaemic strokes and transient ischaemic attacks. It is important to include RCVS in thunderclap headache differential diagnosis and among non-aneurismatic subarachnoid hemorrhage causes. In the past years, thanks to the major diffusion of new diagnostic tools such as magnetic resonance, computed tomography and digital subtraction angiography, RCVS have been demonstrated to be more frequent than previously thought. We report an illustrative case of a woman affected by a small cSAH, associated to RCVS, after elective triplet cesarean delivery. To our knowledge, this is the first case of cSAH associated to RCVS after a triplet pregnancy.

  7. Modeling of cerebral aneurysm using equivalent electrical circuit (Lumped Model).

    PubMed

    Abdi, M; Karimi, A; Navidbakhsh, M; Hassani, K; Faghihi, S

    2014-03-01

    The circle of Willis (CoW) is a key asset in brain performance as it supports adequate blood supply to the brain. The lumped method (electrical equivalent circuits) is a useful model to simulate the process of the human cardiovascular system. In this study, the whole cardiovascular system is modeled, using an equivalent electrical circuit to investigate an aneurysm in an artery. The cerebrovascular system consists of 29 compartments, which includes the CoW. Each vessel is modeled by a resistor, a capacitor and an inductor. Using MATLAB Simulink, the left and right ventricles are modeled by controlled voltage sources and diodes. The effects of the left internal carotid artery aneurysm (Fusiform) on the pressure of the efferent arteries in the circle of Willis are studied. The modeling results are entirely in agreement with the available clinical observations. The results of the present study may have clinical implications for modeling different cardiovascular diseases, such as arterial stiffness and atherosclerosis.

  8. The Functional Consequences of Cortical Circuit Abnormalities on Gamma Oscillations in Schizophrenia: Insights from Computational Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Kevin M.

    2009-01-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by cortical circuit abnormalities, which might be reflected in γ-frequency (30–100 Hz) oscillations in the electroencephalogram. Here we used a computational model of cortical circuitry to examine the effects that neural circuit abnormalities might have on γ generation and network excitability. The model network consisted of 1000 leaky integrate-and-fire neurons with realistic connectivity patterns and proportions of neuron types [pyramidal cells (PCs), regular-spiking inhibitory interneurons, and fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs)]. The network produced a γ oscillation when driven by noise input. We simulated reductions in: (1) recurrent excitatory inputs to PCs; (2) both excitatory and inhibitory inputs to PCs; (3) all possible connections between cells; (4) reduced inhibitory output from FSIs; and (5) reduced NMDA input to FSIs. Reducing all types of synaptic connectivity sharply reduced γ power and phase synchrony. Network excitability was reduced when recurrent excitatory connections were deleted, but the network showed disinhibition effects when inhibitory connections were deleted. Reducing FSI output impaired γ generation to a lesser degree than reducing synaptic connectivity, and increased network excitability. Reducing FSI NMDA input also increased network excitability, but increased γ power. The results of this study suggest that a multimodal approach, combining non-invasive neurophysiological and structural measures, might be able to distinguish between different neural circuit abnormalities in schizophrenia patients. Computational modeling may help to bridge the gaps between post-mortem studies, animal models, and experimental data in humans, and facilitate the development of new therapies for schizophrenia and neuropsychiatric disorders in general. PMID:19876408

  9. Brain circuit-gene expression relationships and neuroplasticity of multisensory cortices in blind children.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Terán, Laura; Diez, Ibai; Ortiz, Tomás; Perez, David L; Aragón, Jose Ignacio; Costumero, Victor; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; El Fakhri, Georges; Sepulcre, Jorge

    2017-06-27

    Sensory deprivation reorganizes neurocircuits in the human brain. The biological basis of such neuroplastic adaptations remains elusive. In this study, we applied two complementary graph theory-based functional connectivity analyses, one to evaluate whole-brain functional connectivity relationships and the second to specifically delineate distributed network connectivity profiles downstream of primary sensory cortices, to investigate neural reorganization in blind children compared with sighted controls. We also examined the relationship between connectivity changes and neuroplasticity-related gene expression profiles in the cerebral cortex. We observed that multisensory integration areas exhibited enhanced functional connectivity in blind children and that this reorganization was spatially associated with the transcription levels of specific members of the cAMP Response Element Binding protein gene family. Using systems-level analyses, this study advances our understanding of human neuroplasticity and its genetic underpinnings following sensory deprivation.

  10. Motor Cortical Functional Geometry in Cerebral Palsy and its Relationship to Disability

    PubMed Central

    Kesar, T.M.; Sawaki, L.; Burdette, J. H.; Cabrera, N.; Kolaski, K.; Smith, B.P.; O’Shea, T. M.; Koman, L. A.; Wittenberg, G. F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate motor cortical map patterns in children with diplegic and hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP), and the relationships between motor cortical geometry and motor function in CP. Methods Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to map motor cortical representations of the first dorsal interosseus (FDI) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles in 13 children with CP (age 9–16 years, 6 males.) The Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) and Melbourne upper extremity function were used to quantify motor ability. Results In the hemiplegic participants (N=7), the affected (right) FDI cortical representation was mapped on the ipsilateral (N=4), contralateral (N=2), or bilateral (N=1) cortex. Participants with diplegia (N=6) showed either bilateral (N=2) or contralateral (N=4) cortical hand maps. The FDI and TA motor map center-of-gravity mediolateral location ranged from 2–8 cm and 3–6 cm from the midline, respectively. Among diplegics, more lateral FDI representation locations were associated with lower Melbourne scores, i.e. worse hand motor function (Spearman’s Rho = −0.841, p=0.036) Conclusions Abnormalities in TMS-derived motor maps cut across the clinical classifications of hemiplegic and diplegic CP. The lateralization of the upper and lower extremity motor representation demonstrates reorganization after insults to the affected hemispheres of both diplegic and hemiplegic children. Significance The current study is a step towards defining the relationship between changes in motor maps and functional impairments in CP. These results suggest the need for further work to develop improved classification schemes that integrate clinical, radiologic, and neurophysiologic measures in CP. PMID:22153667

  11. Optical coherence tomography reveals in vivo cortical structures of adult rats in response to cerebral ischemia injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yi-rong; Guo, Zhou-yi; Shu, So-yun; Bao, Xin-min

    2008-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography(OCT) is a high resolution imaging technique which uses light to directly image living tissue. we investigate the potential use of OCT for structural imaging of the ischemia injury mammalian cerebral cortex. And we examine models of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in rats in vivo using OCT. In particular, we show that OCT can perform in vivo detection of cortex and differentiate normal and abnormal cortical anatomy. This OCT system in this study provided an axial resolution of 10~15μ m, the transverse resolution of the system is about 25 μm. OCT can provide cross-sectional images of cortical of adult rats in response to cerebral ischemia injury.We conclude that OCT represents an exciting new approach to visualize, in real-time, pathological changes in the cerebral cortex structures and may offer a new tool for Possible neuroscience clinical applications.

  12. Relationships between cerebral indices for 'extra' cortical parts and ecological categories in anthropoids.

    PubMed

    Sawaguchi, T

    1989-01-01

    The relationships between cerebral indices for 'extra' cortical parts associated with advanced functions [Jerison's 'extra' neurons (Nc), Hofman's 'extra' cortical volume (Ve)] and ecology and social structure were examined for a total of 86 species of anthropoids (28 species of New World monkeys, 48 species of Old World monkeys and 10 species of apes). The species were divided into a total of 39 'congeneric groups' of species which share common ecology and social structure (in most cases, congeneric groups are synonymous with genera). Both Nc and Ve were significantly larger for polygynous congeneric groups than for monogynous congeneric groups in the case of New World monkeys. In the case of Old World monkeys, both Nc and Ve were significantly larger for terrestrial congeneric groups than for arboreal congeneric groups. In the case of apes, although complete analyses could not be performed because of the limited size of the sample for which data were available, both Nc and Ve appeared to be larger for polygynous/terrestrial apes than for monogynous/arboreal apes. These results suggest that the expansion of the cerebral cortex in anthropoids may be associated with terrestriality and polygyny.

  13. Effects of selective phosphodiesterase inhibition on cyclic AMP hydrolysis in rat cerebral cortical slices.

    PubMed Central

    Challiss, R. A.; Nicholson, C. D.

    1990-01-01

    1. The effects of selective inhibition of phosphodiesterase activities on the concentration and rate of hydrolysis of adenosine 3':5' cyclic-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) in rat cerebral cortical slices has been studied. 2. Isoprenaline caused a rapid, concentration-dependent increase in cyclic AMP concentration to new steady-state levels (basal: 7.1 +/- 0.7; 10 microM isoprenaline: 14.3 +/- 1.4 pmol mg-1 protein). Addition of a beta-adrenoceptor antagonist to isoprenaline-stimulated cerebral cortical slices caused a rapid decrease in cyclic AMP concentration to basal levels (t1/2: 58 +/- 18 s). 3. Preincubation of slices for 30 min with the phosphodiesterase inhibitors 1-methyl-3-isobutylxanthine, denbufylline, rolipram or Ro20,1724 caused concentration-dependent increases in basal and isoprenaline-stimulated cyclic AMP concentrations and decreased the rate of cyclic AMP hydrolysis measured after addition of a beta-adrenoceptor antagonist. However, SKF 94120 and zaprinast had none of these effects. 4. The results are discussed with respect to previous studies of phosphodiesterase isozymic activities isolated from cerebrum and it is suggested that the Ca2+/calmodulin-independent, low Km cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase isozyme, which is selectively inhibited by denbufylline, rolipram and Ro20,1724, and is present in cerebrum is of critical importance to the regulation of cyclic AMP concentration in this tissue. PMID:2158837

  14. "Hyperglutamatergic cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuit" breaker drugs alleviate tics in a transgenic circuit model of Tourette׳s syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nordstrom, Eric J; Bittner, Katie C; McGrath, Michael J; Parks, Clinton R; Burton, Frank H

    2015-12-10

    The brain circuits underlying tics in Tourette׳s syndrome (TS) are unknown but thought to involve cortico/amygdalo-striato-thalamo-cortical (CSTC) loop hyperactivity. We previously engineered a transgenic mouse "circuit model" of TS by expressing an artificial neuropotentiating transgene (encoding the cAMP-elevating, intracellular A1 subunit of cholera toxin) within a small population of dopamine D1 receptor-expressing somatosensory cortical and limbic neurons that hyperactivate cortico/amygdalostriatal glutamatergic output circuits thought to be hyperactive in TS and comorbid obsessive-compulsive (OC) disorders. As in TS, these D1CT-7 ("Ticcy") transgenic mice׳s tics were alleviated by the TS drugs clonidine and dopamine D2 receptor antagonists; and their chronic glutamate-excited striatal motor output was unbalanced toward hyperactivity of the motoric direct pathway and inactivity of the cataleptic indirect pathway. Here we have examined whether these mice׳s tics are countered by drugs that "break" sequential elements of their hyperactive cortical/amygdalar glutamatergic and efferent striatal circuit: anti-serotonoceptive and anti-noradrenoceptive corticostriatal glutamate output blockers (the serotonin 5-HT2a,c receptor antagonist ritanserin and the NE alpha-1 receptor antagonist prazosin); agmatinergic striatothalamic GABA output blockers (the presynaptic agmatine/imidazoline I1 receptor agonist moxonidine); and nigrostriatal dopamine output blockers (the presynaptic D2 receptor agonist bromocriptine). Each drug class alleviates tics in the Ticcy mice, suggesting a hyperglutamatergic CSTC "tic circuit" could exist in TS wherein cortical/amygdalar pyramidal projection neurons׳ glutamatergic overexcitation of both striatal output neurons and nigrostriatal dopaminergic modulatory neurons unbalances their circuit integration to excite striatothalamic output and create tics, and illuminating new TS drug strategies.

  15. Decreased oxygen saturation in asymmetrically prominent cortical veins in patients with cerebral ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Xia, Shuang; Utriainen, David; Tang, Jin; Kou, Zhifeng; Zheng, Gang; Wang, Xuesong; Shen, Wen; Haacke, E Mark; Lu, Guangming

    2014-12-01

    Decreased oxygen saturation in asymmetrically prominent cortical veins (APCV) seen in ischemic stroke has been hypothesized to correlate with an increase of de-oxygenated hemoglobin. Our goal is to quantify magnetic susceptibility to define APCV by establishing a cutoff above which the deoxyhemoglobin levels are considered abnormal. A retrospective study was conducted on 26 patients with acute ischemic stroke in one cerebral hemisphere that exhibited APCV with 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) was used to calculate the magnetic susceptibility of the cortical veins. A paired t-test was used to compare the susceptibility of the cortical veins in the left and right hemispheres for healthy controls as well as in the contralateral hemisphere for stroke patients with APCV. The change in oxygen saturation in the APCV relative to the contralateral side was calculated after thresholding the susceptibility using the mean plus two standard deviations of the contralateral side for each individual. The thresholded susceptibility value of the APCVs in the stroke hemisphere was 254±48 ppb which was significantly higher (p<0.05) than that in the contralateral hemisphere (123±12 ppb) and in healthy controls (125±8 ppb). There was a decrease of oxygen saturation in the APCV ranging from 16% to 44% relative to the veins of the contralateral hemisphere. In conclusion, APCV seen in SWI correspond to reduced levels of oxygen saturation and these abnormal veins can be identified using a susceptibility threshold on the QSM data.

  16. Integration of gray matter nodules into functional cortical circuits in periventricular heterotopia.

    PubMed

    Christodoulou, Joanna A; Barnard, Mollie E; Del Tufo, Stephanie N; Katzir, Tami; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Gabrieli, John D E; Chang, Bernard S

    2013-11-01

    Alterations in neuronal circuitry are recognized as an important substrate of many neurological disorders, including epilepsy. Patients with the developmental brain malformation of periventricular nodular heterotopia (PNH) often have both seizures and dyslexia, and there is evidence to suggest that aberrant neuronal connectivity underlies both of these clinical features. We used task-based functional MRI (fMRI) to determine whether heterotopic nodules of gray matter in this condition are integrated into functional cortical circuits. Blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI was acquired in eight participants with PNH during the performance of reading-related tasks. Evidence of neural activation within heterotopic gray matter was identified, and regions of cortical coactivation were then mapped systematically. Findings were correlated with resting-state functional connectivity results and with performance on the fMRI reading-related tasks. Six participants (75%) demonstrated activation within at least one region of gray matter heterotopia. Cortical areas directly overlying the heterotopia were usually coactivated (60%), as were areas known to have functional connectivity to the heterotopia in the task-free resting state (73%). Six of seven (86%) primary task contrasts resulted in heterotopia activation in at least one participant. Activation was most commonly seen during rapid naming of visual stimuli, a characteristic impairment in this patient population. Our findings represent a systematic demonstration that heterotopic gray matter can be metabolically coactivated in a neuronal migration disorder associated with epilepsy and dyslexia. Gray matter nodules were most commonly coactivated with the anatomically overlying cortex and other regions with resting-state connectivity to heterotopia. These results have broader implications for understanding the network pathogenesis of both seizures and reading disabilities.

  17. Integration of gray matter nodules into functional cortical circuits in periventricular heterotopia

    PubMed Central

    Christodoulou, Joanna A.; Barnard, Mollie E.; Del Tufo, Stephanie N.; Katzir, Tami; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Gabrieli, John D.E.; Chang, Bernard S.

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in neuronal circuitry are recognized as an important substrate of many neurological disorders, including epilepsy. Patients with the developmental brain malformation of periventricular nodular heterotopia (PNH) often have both seizures and dyslexia, and there is evidence to suggest that aberrant neuronal connectivity underlies both of these clinical features. We used task-based functional MRI (fMRI) to determine whether heterotopic nodules of gray matter in this condition are integrated into functional cortical circuits. Blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI was acquired in eight participants with PNH during the performance of reading-related tasks. Evidence of neural activation within heterotopic gray matter was identified, and regions of cortical co-activation were then mapped systematically. Findings were correlated with resting-state functional connectivity results and with performance on the fMRI reading-related tasks. Six participants (75%) demonstrated activation within at least one region of gray matter heterotopia. Cortical areas directly overlying the heterotopia were usually co-activated (60%), as were areas known to have functional connectivity to the heterotopia in the task-free resting state (73%). Six of seven (86%) primary task contrasts resulted in heterotopia activation in at least one participant. Activation was most commonly seen during rapid naming of visual stimuli, a characteristic impairment in this patient population. Our findings represent a systematic demonstration that heterotopic gray matter can be metabolically coactivated in a neuronal migration disorder associated with epilepsy and dyslexia. Gray matter nodules were most commonly coactivated with anatomically overlying cortex and other regions with resting-state connectivity to heterotopia. These results have broader implications for understanding the network pathogenesis of both seizures and reading disabilities. PMID:24090774

  18. Cerebral causes and consequences of parkinsonian resting tremor: a tale of two circuits?

    PubMed

    Helmich, Rick C; Hallett, Mark; Deuschl, Günther; Toni, Ivan; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2012-11-01

    Tremor in Parkinson's disease has several mysterious features. Clinically, tremor is seen in only three out of four patients with Parkinson's disease, and tremor-dominant patients generally follow a more benign disease course than non-tremor patients. Pathophysiologically, tremor is linked to altered activity in not one, but two distinct circuits: the basal ganglia, which are primarily affected by dopamine depletion in Parkinson's disease, and the cerebello-thalamo-cortical circuit, which is also involved in many other tremors. The purpose of this review is to integrate these clinical and pathophysiological features of tremor in Parkinson's disease. We first describe clinical and pathological differences between tremor-dominant and non-tremor Parkinson's disease subtypes, and then summarize recent studies on the pathophysiology of tremor. We also discuss a newly proposed 'dimmer-switch model' that explains tremor as resulting from the combined actions of two circuits: the basal ganglia that trigger tremor episodes and the cerebello-thalamo-cortical circuit that produces the tremor. Finally, we address several important open questions: why resting tremor stops during voluntary movements, why it has a variable response to dopaminergic treatment, why it indicates a benign Parkinson's disease subtype and why its expression decreases with disease progression.

  19. Cerebral causes and consequences of parkinsonian resting tremor: a tale of two circuits?

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, Mark; Deuschl, Günther; Toni, Ivan; Bloem, Bastiaan R.

    2012-01-01

    Tremor in Parkinson's disease has several mysterious features. Clinically, tremor is seen in only three out of four patients with Parkinson's disease, and tremor-dominant patients generally follow a more benign disease course than non-tremor patients. Pathophysiologically, tremor is linked to altered activity in not one, but two distinct circuits: the basal ganglia, which are primarily affected by dopamine depletion in Parkinson's disease, and the cerebello-thalamo-cortical circuit, which is also involved in many other tremors. The purpose of this review is to integrate these clinical and pathophysiological features of tremor in Parkinson's disease. We first describe clinical and pathological differences between tremor-dominant and non-tremor Parkinson's disease subtypes, and then summarize recent studies on the pathophysiology of tremor. We also discuss a newly proposed ‘dimmer-switch model’ that explains tremor as resulting from the combined actions of two circuits: the basal ganglia that trigger tremor episodes and the cerebello-thalamo-cortical circuit that produces the tremor. Finally, we address several important open questions: why resting tremor stops during voluntary movements, why it has a variable response to dopaminergic treatment, why it indicates a benign Parkinson's disease subtype and why its expression decreases with disease progression. PMID:22382359

  20. Trading Speed and Accuracy by Coding Time: A Coupled-circuit Cortical Model

    PubMed Central

    Standage, Dominic; You, Hongzhi; Wang, Da-Hui; Dorris, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Our actions take place in space and time, but despite the role of time in decision theory and the growing acknowledgement that the encoding of time is crucial to behaviour, few studies have considered the interactions between neural codes for objects in space and for elapsed time during perceptual decisions. The speed-accuracy trade-off (SAT) provides a window into spatiotemporal interactions. Our hypothesis is that temporal coding determines the rate at which spatial evidence is integrated, controlling the SAT by gain modulation. Here, we propose that local cortical circuits are inherently suited to the relevant spatial and temporal coding. In simulations of an interval estimation task, we use a generic local-circuit model to encode time by ‘climbing’ activity, seen in cortex during tasks with a timing requirement. The model is a network of simulated pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons, connected by conductance synapses. A simple learning rule enables the network to quickly produce new interval estimates, which show signature characteristics of estimates by experimental subjects. Analysis of network dynamics formally characterizes this generic, local-circuit timing mechanism. In simulations of a perceptual decision task, we couple two such networks. Network function is determined only by spatial selectivity and NMDA receptor conductance strength; all other parameters are identical. To trade speed and accuracy, the timing network simply learns longer or shorter intervals, driving the rate of downstream decision processing by spatially non-selective input, an established form of gain modulation. Like the timing network's interval estimates, decision times show signature characteristics of those by experimental subjects. Overall, we propose, demonstrate and analyse a generic mechanism for timing, a generic mechanism for modulation of decision processing by temporal codes, and we make predictions for experimental verification. PMID:23592967

  1. A cellular mechanism for cortical associations: an organizing principle for the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Larkum, Matthew

    2013-03-01

    A basic feature of intelligent systems such as the cerebral cortex is the ability to freely associate aspects of perceived experience with an internal representation of the world and make predictions about the future. Here, a hypothesis is presented that the extraordinary performance of the cortex derives from an associative mechanism built in at the cellular level to the basic cortical neuronal unit: the pyramidal cell. The mechanism is robustly triggered by coincident input to opposite poles of the neuron, is exquisitely matched to the large- and fine-scale architecture of the cortex, and is tightly controlled by local microcircuits of inhibitory neurons targeting subcellular compartments. This article explores the experimental evidence and the implications for how the cortex operates. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Analysing coupling architecture in the cortical EEG of a patient with unilateral cerebral palsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilov, Maksim V.; Baas, C. Marjolein; van Rijn, Clementina M.; Sysoev, Ilya V.

    2016-04-01

    The detection of coupling presence and direction between cortical areas from the EEG is a popular approach in neuroscience. Granger causality method is promising for this task, since it allows to operate with short time series and to detect nonlinear coupling or coupling between nonlinear systems. In this study EEG multichannel data from adolescent children, suffering from unilateral cerebral palsy were investigated. Signals, obtained in rest and during motor activity of affected and less affected hand, were analysed. The changes in inter-hemispheric and intra-hemispheric interactions were studied over time with an interval of two months. The obtained results of coupling were tested for significance using surrogate times series. In the present proceeding paper we report the data of one patient. The modified nonlinear Granger causality is indeed able to reveal couplings within the human brain.

  3. Cortical electrical stimulation alone enhances functional recovery and dendritic structures after focal cerebral ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qin; Zhang, Qian; Zhao, Xueqing; Duan, Yanwen Y; Lu, Yi; Li, Chengyan; Li, Tao

    2010-01-22

    Using a fully implanted cortical electrical stimulation (CES) device with low-frequency burst impulse train, we investigated the effects of CES alone on behavioral recovery and surface density of dendritic structure in a rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). After MCAO in rats, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to confirm cortex infarction and to identify a location for implantation of stimulating electrode over the peri-infarct cortex. The device was implanted on the 6th day after MCAO with CES then lasting for 16 days. The stimulation program consisted of two sessions lasting half an hour in the morning (0.65 mA, 0.13 microC/phase) and in the afternoon (0.5 mA, 0.1 microC/phase). The stimulator delivered biphasic charge balanced pulses (pulse width=200 micros) with various frequencies of 50 Hz, 20 Hz and 5 Hz in repeated 10-s blocks. Rats in the CES group (n=12) spend a much shorter time to regain preoperative levels of body weight (BW) than those in the no stimulation (NS) group (n=9). In behavioral tests, the rats in the CES group showed greater functional recovery compared to the NS group. Moreover, the functional improvement coincided with an increase in surface density of dendritic processes immunoreactive to microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) in peri-infarct cortex. These results suggest the feasibility of the fully implanted CES device and the efficacy of the new stimulation protocol alone to improve functional outcome and cortical neuronal structural plasticity following focal cerebral ischemia in rats. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Tissue-type plasminogen activator induces synaptic vesicle endocytosis in cerebral cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Yepes, M; Wu, F; Torre, E; Cuellar-Giraldo, D; Jia, D; Cheng, L

    2016-04-05

    The release of the serine proteinase tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) from the presynaptic terminal of cerebral cortical neurons plays a central role in the development of synaptic plasticity, adaptation to metabolic stress and neuronal survival. Our earlier studies indicate that by inducing the recruitment of the cytoskeletal protein βII-spectrin and voltage-gated calcium channels to the active zone, tPA promotes Ca(2+)-dependent translocation of synaptic vesicles (SVs) to the synaptic release site where they release their load of neurotransmitters into the synaptic cleft. Here we used a combination of in vivo and in vitro experiments to investigate whether this effect leads to depletion of SVs in the presynaptic terminal. Our data indicate that tPA promotes SV endocytosis via a mechanism that does not require the conversion of plasminogen into plasmin. Instead, we show that tPA induces calcineurin-mediated dynamin I dephosphorylation, which is followed by dynamin I-induced recruitment of the actin-binding protein profilin II to the presynaptic membrane, and profilin II-induced F-actin formation. We report that this tPA-induced sequence of events leads to the association of newly formed SVs with F-actin clusters in the endocytic zone. In summary, the data presented here indicate that following the exocytotic release of neurotransmitters tPA activates the mechanism whereby SVs are retrieved from the presynaptic membrane and endocytosed to replenish the pool of vesicles available for a new cycle of exocytosis. Together, these results indicate that in murine cerebral cortical neurons tPA plays a central role coupling SVs exocytosis and endocytosis.

  5. Morphine enhances the release of /sup 3/H-purines from rat brain cerebral cortical prisms

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, P.H.; Phillis, J.W.; Yuen, H.

    1982-10-01

    In vitro experiments have shown that /sup 3/H-purines can be released from /sup 3/H-adenosine preloaded rat brain cortical prisms by a KCl-evoked depolarization. The KCl-evoked release of /sup 3/H-purines is dependent on the concentration of KCl present in the superfusate. At concentrations of 10(-7) approximately 10(-5)M morphine did not influence the basal release of /sup 3/H-purines from the prisms, although it enhanced the KCl-evoked release of /sup 3/H-purines. The enhancement of KCl-evoked /sup 3/H-purine release by morphine was concentration-dependent and was antagonized by naloxone, suggesting the involvement of opiate receptors. Uptake studies with rat brain cerebral cortical synaptosomes show that morphine is a very weak inhibitor of adenosine uptake. Comparisons with dipyridamole, a potent inhibitor of adenosine uptake, suggest that this low level of inhibition of the uptake did not contribute significantly to the release of /sup 3/H-purine by morphine seen in our experiments. It is therefore suggested that morphine enhances KCl-evoked /sup 3/H-purine release by an interaction with opiate receptors and that the resultant increase in extracellular purine (adenosine) levels may account for some of the actions of morphine.

  6. HIV-Associated Distal Neuropathic Pain is Associated with Smaller Total Cerebral Cortical Gray Matter

    PubMed Central

    Keltner, John R.; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Vaida, Florin; Wang, Dongzhe; Franklin, Donald R.; Dworkin, Robert H.; Sanders, Chelsea; McCutchan, J. Allen; Archibald, Sarah L.; Miller, David J.; Kesidis, George; Cushman, Clint; Kim, Sung Min; Abramson, Ian; Taylor, Michael J.; Theilmann, Rebecca J.; Julaton, Michelle D.; Notestine, Randy J.; Corkran, Stephanie; Cherner, Mariana; Duarte, Nichole A.; Alexander, Terry; Robinson-Papp, Jessica; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Simpson, David M.; Collier, Ann C.; Marra, Christina M.; Morgello, Susan; Brown, Greg; Grant, Igor; Atkinson, J. Hampton; Jernigan, Terry L.; Ellis, Ronald J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite modern antiretroviral therapy, HIV-associated sensory neuropathy affects over 50% of HIV patients. The clinical expression of HIV neuropathy is highly variable: many individuals report few symptoms, but about half report distal neuropathic pain (DNP), making it one of the most prevalent, disabling and treatment-resistant complications of HIV disease. The presence and intensity of pain is not fully explained by the degree of peripheral nerve damage, making it unclear why some patients do, and others do not, report pain. To better understand central nervous system contributions to HIV DNP, we performed a cross-sectional analysis of structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) volumes in 241 HIV-infected participants from an observational multi-site cohort study at five US sites (CNS HIV Antiretroviral Treatment Effects Research Study, CHARTER). The association between DNP and the structural imaging outcomes was investigated using both linear and nonlinear (Gaussian Kernel support vector) multivariable regression, controlling for key demographic and clinical variables. Severity of DNP symptoms was correlated with smaller total cerebral cortical gray matter volume (R = −0.24; p = 0.004). Understanding the mechanisms for this association between smaller total cortical volumes and DNP may provide insight into HIV DNP chronicity and treatment-resistance. PMID:24549970

  7. HIV-associated distal neuropathic pain is associated with smaller total cerebral cortical gray matter.

    PubMed

    Keltner, John R; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Vaida, Florin; Wang, Dongzhe; Franklin, Donald R; Dworkin, Robert H; Sanders, Chelsea; McCutchan, J Allen; Archibald, Sarah L; Miller, David J; Kesidis, George; Cushman, Clint; Kim, Sung Min; Abramson, Ian; Taylor, Michael J; Theilmann, Rebecca J; Julaton, Michelle D; Notestine, Randy J; Corkran, Stephanie; Cherner, Mariana; Duarte, Nichole A; Alexander, Terry; Robinson-Papp, Jessica; Gelman, Benjamin B; Simpson, David M; Collier, Ann C; Marra, Christina M; Morgello, Susan; Brown, Greg; Grant, Igor; Atkinson, J Hampton; Jernigan, Terry L; Ellis, Ronald J

    2014-06-01

    Despite modern antiretroviral therapy, HIV-associated sensory neuropathy affects over 50 % of HIV patients. The clinical expression of HIV neuropathy is highly variable: many individuals report few symptoms, but about half report distal neuropathic pain (DNP), making it one of the most prevalent, disabling, and treatment-resistant complications of HIV disease. The presence and intensity of pain is not fully explained by the degree of peripheral nerve damage, making it unclear why some patients do, and others do not, report pain. To better understand central nervous system contributions to HIV DNP, we performed a cross-sectional analysis of structural magnetic resonance imaging volumes in 241 HIV-infected participants from an observational multi-site cohort study at five US sites (CNS HIV Anti-Retroviral Treatment Effects Research Study, CHARTER). The association between DNP and the structural imaging outcomes was investigated using both linear and nonlinear (Gaussian Kernel support vector) multivariable regression, controlling for key demographic and clinical variables. Severity of DNP symptoms was correlated with smaller total cerebral cortical gray matter volume (r = -0.24; p = 0.004). Understanding the mechanisms for this association between smaller total cortical volumes and DNP may provide insight into HIV DNP chronicity and treatment-resistance.

  8. Overexpression of Nrf2 Protects Cerebral Cortical Neurons from Ethanol-Induced Apoptotic DeathS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhan, Madhusudhanan; Mahimainathan, Lenin; Rathinam, Mary Latha; Riar, Amanjot Kaur

    2011-01-01

    Ethanol (ETOH) can cause apoptotic death of neurons by depleting GSH with an associated increase in oxidative stress. The current study illustrates a means to overcome this ETOH-induced neurotoxicity by enhancing GSH through boosting Nrf2, a transcription factor that controls GSH homeostasis. ETOH treatment caused a significant increase in Nrf2 protein, transcript expression, Nrf2-DNA binding activity, and expression of its transcriptional target, NQO1, in primary cortical neuron (PCNs). However, this increase in Nrf2 did not maintain GSH levels in response to ETOH, and apoptotic death still occurred. To elucidate this phenomenon, we silenced Nrf2 in neurons and found that ETOH-induced GSH depletion and the increase in superoxide levels were exacerbated. Furthermore, Nrf2 knockdown resulted in significantly increased (P < 0.05) caspase 3 activity and apoptosis. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of Nrf2 prevented ETOH-induced depletion of GSH from the medium and high GSH subpopulations and prevented ETOH-related apoptotic death. These studies illustrate the importance of Nrf2-dependent maintenance of GSH homeostasis in cerebral cortical neurons in the defense against oxidative stress and apoptotic death elicited by ETOH exposure. PMID:21873460

  9. Disentangling How the Brain is "Wired" in Cortical (Cerebral) Visual Impairment.

    PubMed

    Merabet, Lotfi B; Mayer, D Luisa; Bauer, Corinna M; Wright, Darick; Kran, Barry S

    2017-05-01

    Cortical (cerebral) visual impairment (CVI) results from perinatal injury to visual processing structures and pathways of the brain and is the most common cause of severe visual impairment or blindness in children in developed countries. Children with CVI display a wide range of visual deficits including decreased visual acuity, impaired visual field function, as well as impairments in higher-order visual processing and attention. Together, these visual impairments can dramatically influence a child's development and well-being. Given the complex neurologic underpinnings of this condition, CVI is often undiagnosed by eye care practitioners. Furthermore, the neurophysiological basis of CVI in relation to observed visual processing deficits remains poorly understood. Here, we present some of the challenges associated with the clinical assessment and management of individuals with CVI. We discuss how advances in brain imaging are likely to help uncover the underlying neurophysiology of this condition. In particular, we demonstrate how structural and functional neuroimaging approaches can help gain insight into abnormalities of white matter connectivity and cortical activation patterns, respectively. Establishing a connection between how changes within the brain relate to visual impairments in CVI will be important for developing effective rehabilitative and education strategies for individuals living with this condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Spatio-temporal cerebral blood flow perfusion patterns in cortical spreading depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verisokin, Andrey Yu.; Verveyko, Darya V.; Postnov, Dmitry E.

    2017-04-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is an example of one of the most common abnormalities in biophysical brain functioning. Despite the fact that there are many mathematical models describing the cortical spreading depression (CSD), most of them do not take into consideration the role of redistribution of cerebral blood flow (CBF), that results in the formation of spatio-temporal patterns. The paper presents a mathematical model, which successfully explains the CBD role in the CSD process. Numerical study of this model has revealed the formation of stationary dissipative structures, visually analogous to Turing structures. However, the mechanism of their formation is not diffusion. We show these structures occur due to another type of spatial coupling, that is related to tissue perfusion rate. The proposed model predicts that at similar state of neurons the distribution of blood flow and oxygenation may by different. Currently, this effect is not taken into account when the Blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) contrast imaging used in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Thus, the diagnosis on the BOLD signal can be ambiguous. We believe that our results can be used in the future for a more correct interpretation of the data obtained with fMRI, NIRS and other similar methods for research of the brain activity.

  11. Dopamine Modulation of Emotional Processing in Cortical and Subcortical Neural Circuits: Evidence for a Final Common Pathway in Schizophrenia?

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    The neural regulation of emotional perception, learning, and memory is essential for normal behavioral and cognitive functioning. Many of the symptoms displayed by individuals with schizophrenia may arise from fundamental disturbances in the ability to accurately process emotionally salient sensory information. The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) and its ability to modulate neural regions involved in emotional learning, perception, and memory formation has received considerable research attention as a potential final common pathway to account for the aberrant emotional regulation and psychosis present in the schizophrenic syndrome. Evidence from both human neuroimaging studies and animal-based research using neurodevelopmental, behavioral, and electrophysiological techniques have implicated the mesocorticolimbic DA circuit as a crucial system for the encoding and expression of emotionally salient learning and memory formation. While many theories have examined the cortical-subcortical interactions between prefrontal cortical regions and subcortical DA substrates, many questions remain as to how DA may control emotional perception and learning and how disturbances linked to DA abnormalities may underlie the disturbed emotional processing in schizophrenia. Beyond the mesolimbic DA system, increasing evidence points to the amygdala-prefrontal cortical circuit as an important processor of emotionally salient information and how neurodevelopmental perturbances within this circuitry may lead to dysregulation of DAergic modulation of emotional processing and learning along this cortical-subcortical emotional processing circuit. PMID:17519393

  12. Tissue-type plasminogen activator triggers the synaptic vesicle cycle in cerebral cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fang; Torre, Enrique; Cuellar-Giraldo, David; Cheng, Lihong; Yi, Hong; Bichler, Edyta K; García, Paul S; Yepes, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The active zone (AZ) is a thickening of the presynaptic membrane where exocytosis takes place. Chemical synapses contain neurotransmitter-loaded synaptic vesicles (SVs) that at rest are tethered away from the synaptic release site, but after the presynaptic inflow of Ca+2 elicited by an action potential translocate to the AZ to release their neurotransmitter load. We report that tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is stored outside the AZ of cerebral cortical neurons, either intermixed with small clear-core vesicles or in direct contact with the presynaptic membrane. We found that cerebral ischemia-induced release of neuronal tPA, or treatment with recombinant tPA, recruits the cytoskeletal protein βII-spectrin to the AZ and promotes the binding of SVs to βII-spectrin, enlarging the population of SVs in proximity to the synaptic release site. This effect does not require the generation of plasmin and is followed by the recruitment of voltage gated calcium channels (VGCC) to the presynaptic terminal that leads to Ca+2-dependent synapsin I phosphorylation, freeing SVs to translocate to the AZ to deliver their neurotransmitter load. Our studies indicate that tPA activates the SV cycle and induces the structural and functional changes in the synapse that are required for successful neurotransmission. PMID:26126868

  13. Cerebral Cortical Thickness in Chronic Pain Due to Knee Osteoarthritis: The Effect of Pain Duration and Pain Sensitization

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study investigates associations between cortical thickness and pain duration, and central sensitization as markers of pain progression in painful knee osteoarthritis. Methods Whole brain cortical thickness and pressure pain thresholds were assessed in 70 participants; 40 patients with chronic painful knee osteoarthritis (age = 66.1± 8.5 years, 21 females, mean duration of pain = 8.5 years), and 30 healthy controls (age = 62.7± 7.4, 17 females). Results Cortical thickness negatively correlated with pain duration mainly in fronto-temporal areas outside of classical pain processing areas (p<0.05, age-controlled, FDR corrected). Pain sensitivity was unrelated to cortical thickness. Patients showed lower cortical thickness in the right anterior insula (p<0.001, uncorrected) with no changes surviving multiple test correction. Conclusion With increasing number of years of suffering from chronic arthritis pain we found increasing cortical thinning in extended cerebral cortical regions beyond recognised pain-processing areas. While the mechanisms of cortical thinning remain to be elucidated, we show that pain progression indexed by central sensitization does not play a major role. PMID:27658292

  14. Early magnetic resonance detection of cortical necrosis and acute network injury associated with neonatal and infantile cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Tetsuhiko; Aida, Noriko; Niwa, Tetsu; Nozawa, Kumiko; Shibasaki, Jun; Osaka, Hitoshi

    2014-05-01

    Knowledge of MRI findings in pediatric cerebral infarction is limited. To determine whether cortical necrosis and network injury appear in the acute phase in post-stroke children and to identify anatomical location of acute network injury and the ages at which these phenomena are seen. Images from 12 children (age range: 0-9 years; neonates [<1 month], n=5; infants [1 month-12 months], n=3; others [≥1 year], n=4) with acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) cortical infarction were retrospectively analyzed. Cortical necrosis was defined as hyperintense cortical lesions on T1-weighted imaging that lacked evidence of hemorrhage. Acute network injury was defined as hyperintense lesions on diffusion-weighted imaging that were not in the MCA territory and had fiber connections with the affected cerebral cortex. MRI was performed within the first week after disease onset. Cortical necrosis was only found in three neonates. Acute network injury was seen in the corticospinal tract (CST), thalamus and corpus callosum. Acute network injury along the CST was found in five neonates and one 7-month-old infant. Acute network injury was evident in the thalamus of four neonates and two infants (ages 4 and 7 months) and in the corpus callosum of five neonates and two infants (ages 4 and 7 months). The entire thalamus was involved in three children when infarction of MCA was complete. In acute MCA cortical infarction, MRI findings indicating cortical necrosis or acute network injury was frequently found in neonates and early infants. Response to injury in a developing brain may be faster than that in a mature one.

  15. Effects of the muscarinic antagonists pirenzepine and gallamine on spontaneous and evoked responses of rat cerebral cortical neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, T. H.; Phillis, J. W.

    1988-01-01

    1. The muscarinic receptor antagonists gallamine and pirenzepine were iontophoretically applied to rat cerebral cortical cholinoceptive neurones, including corticospinal neurones, to assess their effects on spontaneous firing, and firing induced by: stimulation of the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM); contralateral hindpaw stimulation; application of acetylcholine (ACh); and application of glutamate. 2. Both compounds potently inhibited firing induced by ACh iontophoresis, whilst neither compound consistently altered firing induced by application of glutamate. 3. Gallamine was very effective and pirenzepine less effective, at inhibiting both spontaneous firing and the delayed firing induced by NBM stimulation. The short-latency excitations elicited by NBM stimulation were enhanced by these muscarinic antagonists. 4. Gallamine and pirenzepine enhanced cortical cholinoceptive cell firing induced by contralateral hindpaw stimulation. 5. It is concluded that gallamine depresses spontaneous activity more than pirenzepine, and that both compounds can affect the cortical cell firing evoked by stimulation of the NBM and of thalamo-cortical afferent fibres. PMID:3401638

  16. CEREBRAL CORTICAL MICROVASCULAR RAREFACTION IN METABOLIC SYNDROME IS DEPENDENT ON INSULIN RESISTANCE AND LOSS OF NITRIC OXIDE BIOAVAILABILITY

    PubMed Central

    Chantler, Paul D.; Shrader, Carl D.; Tabone, Lawrence E.; d’Audiffret, Alexandre C.; Huseynova, Khumara; Brooks, Steven D.; Branyan, Kayla W.; Grogg, Kristin A.; Frisbee, Jefferson C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Chronic presentation of the metabolic syndrome (MS) is associated with an increased likelihood for stroke and poor stroke outcomes following occlusive cerebrovascular events. However, the physiological mechanisms contributing to compromised outcomes remain unclear, and the degree of cerebral cortical microvascular density (MVD) may represent a central determinant of stroke outcomes. Methods This study used the obese Zucker rat (OZR) model of MS and clinically-relevant, chronic interventions to determine the impact on cerebral cortical microvascular rarefaction via immunohistochemistry with a parallel determination of cerebrovascular function to identify putative mechanistic contributors. Results OZR exhibited a progressive rarefaction (to ~80% control MVD) of the cortical microvascular networks vs. lean Zucker rats. Chronic treatment with anti-hypertensive agents (captopril/hydralazine) had limited effectiveness in blunting rarefaction, although treatments improving glycemic control (metformin/rosiglitazone) were superior, maintaining ~94% control MVD. Chronic treatment with the antioxidant TEMPOL severely blunted rarefaction in OZR, although this ameliorative effect was prevented by concurrent NOS inhibition. Conclusions Further analyses revealed that the maintenance of glycemic control and vascular nitric oxide bioavailability were stronger predictors of cerebral cortical MVD in OZR than was prevention of hypertension, and this may have implications for chronic treatment of CVD risk under stroke-prone conditions. PMID:26014499

  17. Regional brain blood flow and cerebral cortical O2 consumption during sevoflurane anesthesia in healthy isocapnic swine.

    PubMed

    Manohar, M

    1986-01-01

    Regional distribution of brain blood flow was examined in seven previously catheterized healthy isocapnic swine while awake (control), and during 1.0 and 1.5 minimum alveolar concentration (MAC--2.66 and 3.99% end-tidal, respectively) sevoflurane anesthesia using radionuclide-labeled 15-micron diameter microspheres that were injected into the left atrium. In six additional pigs, the superior sagittal sinus was also catheterized so that cerebral cortical O2 consumption could be ascertained during these conditions. Control values of blood flow in the cerebral cortical gray matter, white matter, and caudate nuclei were 117 +/- 9, 38 +/- 2 and 105 +/- 8 ml X min-1 X 100 g-1, respectively. At 1.0 MAC sevoflurane, blood flow in these regions decreased to 66, 76, and 75% of respective control values, and these values were not different from those recorded at 1.5 MAC anesthesia. Cerebral cortical O2 consumption decreased by 50 and 52% at 1.0 and 1.5 MAC sevoflurane anesthesia, but the hemoglobin-O2 saturation in the cerebral cortical venous drainage (57 +/- 3% and 69 +/- 3% at 1.0 and 1.5 MAC) consistently exceeded control value (42 +/- 1%), suggesting that cortical O2 supply during both levels of sevoflurane anesthesia remained adequate. In cerebellum, blood flow decreased from 86 +/- 5 (control) to 68 +/- 4 ml X min-1 X 100 g-1 with 1.0 MAC sevoflurane, but returned toward control value at 1.5 MAC anesthesia. The thalamohypothalamic perfusion decreased to 59 and 75% of the control value with 1.0 and 1.5 MAC sevoflurane anesthesia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Simple Cortical and Thalamic Neuron Models for Digital Arithmetic Circuit Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Nanami, Takuya; Kohno, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Trade-off between reproducibility of neuronal activities and computational efficiency is one of crucial subjects in computational neuroscience and neuromorphic engineering. A wide variety of neuronal models have been studied from different viewpoints. The digital spiking silicon neuron (DSSN) model is a qualitative model that focuses on efficient implementation by digital arithmetic circuits. We expanded the DSSN model and found appropriate parameter sets with which it reproduces the dynamical behaviors of the ionic-conductance models of four classes of cortical and thalamic neurons. We first developed a four-variable model by reducing the number of variables in the ionic-conductance models and elucidated its mathematical structures using bifurcation analysis. Then, expanded DSSN models were constructed that reproduce these mathematical structures and capture the characteristic behavior of each neuron class. We confirmed that statistics of the neuronal spike sequences are similar in the DSSN and the ionic-conductance models. Computational cost of the DSSN model is larger than that of the recent sophisticated Integrate-and-Fire-based models, but smaller than the ionic-conductance models. This model is intended to provide another meeting point for above trade-off that satisfies the demand for large-scale neuronal network simulation with closer-to-biology models. PMID:27242397

  19. Functional states of rat cortical circuits during the unpredictable availability of a reward-related cue

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Lamo, Iván; Sánchez-Campusano, Raudel; Gruart, Agnès; Delgado-García M, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Proper performance of acquired abilities can be disturbed by the unexpected occurrence of external changes. Rats trained with an operant conditioning task (to press a lever in order to obtain a food pellet) using a fixed-ratio (1:1) schedule were subsequently placed in a Skinner box in which the lever could be removed randomly. Field postsynaptic potentials (fPSPs) were chronically evoked in perforant pathway-hippocampal CA1 (PP-CA1), CA1-subiculum (CA1-SUB), CA1-medial prefrontal cortex (CA1-mPFC), mPFC-nucleus accumbens (mPFC-NAc), and mPFC-basolateral amygdala (mPFC-BLA) synapses during lever IN and lever OUT situations. While lever presses were accompanied by a significant increase in fPSP slopes at the five synapses, the unpredictable absence of the lever were accompanied by decreased fPSP slopes in all, except PP-CA1 synapses. Spectral analysis of local field potentials (LFPs) recorded when the animal approached the corresponding area in the lever OUT situation presented lower spectral powers than during lever IN occasions for all recording sites, apart from CA1. Thus, the unpredictable availability of a reward-related cue modified the activity of cortical and subcortical areas related with the acquisition of operant learning tasks, suggesting an immediate functional reorganization of these neural circuits to address the changed situation and to modify ongoing behaviors accordingly. PMID:27869181

  20. Simple Cortical and Thalamic Neuron Models for Digital Arithmetic Circuit Implementation.

    PubMed

    Nanami, Takuya; Kohno, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Trade-off between reproducibility of neuronal activities and computational efficiency is one of crucial subjects in computational neuroscience and neuromorphic engineering. A wide variety of neuronal models have been studied from different viewpoints. The digital spiking silicon neuron (DSSN) model is a qualitative model that focuses on efficient implementation by digital arithmetic circuits. We expanded the DSSN model and found appropriate parameter sets with which it reproduces the dynamical behaviors of the ionic-conductance models of four classes of cortical and thalamic neurons. We first developed a four-variable model by reducing the number of variables in the ionic-conductance models and elucidated its mathematical structures using bifurcation analysis. Then, expanded DSSN models were constructed that reproduce these mathematical structures and capture the characteristic behavior of each neuron class. We confirmed that statistics of the neuronal spike sequences are similar in the DSSN and the ionic-conductance models. Computational cost of the DSSN model is larger than that of the recent sophisticated Integrate-and-Fire-based models, but smaller than the ionic-conductance models. This model is intended to provide another meeting point for above trade-off that satisfies the demand for large-scale neuronal network simulation with closer-to-biology models.

  1. Functional states of rat cortical circuits during the unpredictable availability of a reward-related cue.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Lamo, Iván; Sánchez-Campusano, Raudel; Gruart, Agnès; Delgado-García, José M

    2016-11-21

    Proper performance of acquired abilities can be disturbed by the unexpected occurrence of external changes. Rats trained with an operant conditioning task (to press a lever in order to obtain a food pellet) using a fixed-ratio (1:1) schedule were subsequently placed in a Skinner box in which the lever could be removed randomly. Field postsynaptic potentials (fPSPs) were chronically evoked in perforant pathway-hippocampal CA1 (PP-CA1), CA1-subiculum (CA1-SUB), CA1-medial prefrontal cortex (CA1-mPFC), mPFC-nucleus accumbens (mPFC-NAc), and mPFC-basolateral amygdala (mPFC-BLA) synapses during lever IN and lever OUT situations. While lever presses were accompanied by a significant increase in fPSP slopes at the five synapses, the unpredictable absence of the lever were accompanied by decreased fPSP slopes in all, except PP-CA1 synapses. Spectral analysis of local field potentials (LFPs) recorded when the animal approached the corresponding area in the lever OUT situation presented lower spectral powers than during lever IN occasions for all recording sites, apart from CA1. Thus, the unpredictable availability of a reward-related cue modified the activity of cortical and subcortical areas related with the acquisition of operant learning tasks, suggesting an immediate functional reorganization of these neural circuits to address the changed situation and to modify ongoing behaviors accordingly.

  2. Syngap1 haploinsufficiency damages a postnatal critical period of pyramidal cell structural maturation linked to cortical circuit assembly

    PubMed Central

    Aceti, Massimiliano; Creson, Thomas K.; Vaissiere, Thomas; Rojas, Camilo; Huang, Wen-Chin; Wang, Ya-Xian; Petralia, Ronald S.; Page, Damon T.; Miller, Courtney A.; Rumbaugh, Gavin

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic haploinsufficiency of Syngap1 commonly occurs in developmental brain disorders, such as intellectual disability (ID), epilepsy, schizophrenia (SCZ), and autism spectrum (ASD) disorder. Thus, studying mouse models of Syngap1 haploinsufficiency may uncover pathological developmental processes common among distinct brain disorders. Methods A Syngap1 haploinsufficiency model was used to explore the relationship between critical period dendritic spine damage, cortical circuit assembly and the window for genetic rescue in order to understand how damaging mutations disrupt key substrates of mouse brain development. Results Syngap1 mutations broadly disrupted a developmentally sensitive period that corresponded to the period of heightened postnatal cortical synaptogenesis. Pathogenic Syngap1 mutations caused a coordinated acceleration of dendrite elongation and spine morphogenesis, and pruning of these structures in neonatal cortical pyramidal neurons. These mutations also prevented a form of developmental structural plasticity associated with experience-dependent reorganization of brain circuits. Consistent with these findings, Syngap1 mutant mice displayed an altered pattern of long-distance synaptic inputs into a cortical area important for cognition. Interestingly, the ability to genetically improve the behavioral endophenotype of Syngap1 mice decreased slowly over postnatal development and mapped onto the developmental period of coordinated dendritic insults. Conclusions Pathogenic Syngap1 mutations have a profound impact on the dynamics and structural integrity of pyramidal cell postsynaptic structures known to guide the de novo wiring of nascent cortical circuits. These findings support the idea that disrupted critical periods of dendritic growth and spine plasticity may be a common pathological process in developmental brain disorders. PMID:25444158

  3. Long-tailed distribution of synaptic strength reveals origin and functional roles of ongoing fluctuation in cortical circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teramae, Jun-nosuke

    2016-06-01

    Neurons in the cortical circuit continuous to generate irregular spike firing with extremely low firing rate (about 1-2 Hz) even when animals neither receive any external stimuli nor they do not show any significant motor movement. The ongoing activity is often called neuronal noise because measured spike trains are often highly irregular and also spike timings are highly asynchronous among neurons. Many experiments imply that neural networks themselves must generate the noisy activity as an intrinsic property of cortical circuit. However, how a network of neurons sustains the irregular spike firings with low firing rate remains unclear. Recently, by focusing on long-tailed distribution of amplitude of synaptic connections or EPSP (Excitatory Post-Synaptic Potential), we successfully revealed that due to coexistence of a few extremely strong synaptic connections and majority of weak synapses, nonlinear dynamics of population of spiking neurons can have a nontrivial stable state that corresponding to the intrinsic ongoing fluctuation of the cortical circuit. We also found that due to the fluctuation fidelity of spike transmission between neurons are optimized. Here, we report our recent findings of the ongoing fluctuation from viewpoints of mathematical and computational side.

  4. Variability in action: Contributions of a songbird cortical-basal ganglia circuit to vocal motor learning and control.

    PubMed

    Woolley, S C; Kao, M H

    2015-06-18

    Many motor behaviors, from walking to speaking, are acquired through experience, in particular, through trial-and-error learning. The acquisition and maintenance of such motor behaviors in a wide range of species, including humans, appear to depend on cortical-basal ganglia circuits. In this review, we discuss recent studies in songbirds that have been pivotal in informing our current understanding of motor learning and cortical-basal ganglia function. Songbirds are important ethological model systems for the study of motor learning because young songbirds naturally develop and refine their songs through trial-and-error learning. In addition, reinforcement mechanisms are hypothesized to be important for the maintenance and plasticity of structured adult song. Computational and experimental studies highlight the importance of vocal motor variability as the substrate upon which reinforcement mechanisms could operate to shape developing song and to maintain adult song. Recent studies in songbirds indicate that this vocal motor variability is actively generated and modulated by a highly specialized cortical-basal ganglia circuit evolved for a single behavior, song. We argue that these and other recent findings illustrate how the tight association between a specialized neural circuit and a natural behavior make songbirds a unique and powerful model in which to investigate the neural substrates of motor learning and plasticity. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Association Between Subclinical Cardiac Biomarkers and Clinically Manifest Cardiac Diseases With Cortical Cerebral Microinfarcts.

    PubMed

    Hilal, Saima; Chai, Yuek Ling; van Veluw, Susanne; Shaik, Muhammad Amin; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Richards, Arthur Mark; Biessels, Geert Jan; Chen, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    Subclinical and clinical cardiac diseases have been previously linked to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) manifestations of cerebrovascular disease, such as lacunes and white matter hyperintensities, as well as dementia. Cortical cerebral microinfarcts (CMIs), a novel MRI marker of cerebral vascular disease, have not been studied, to date, in relation to subclinical and clinical cardiac diseases. To examine the association of blood biomarkers of subclinical cardiac disease and clinically manifest cardiac diseases with CMIs graded on 3-T MRI in a memory clinic population. This baseline cross-sectional analysis of a cohort study performed from August 12, 2010, to July 28, 2015, included 464 memory clinic participants. All participants underwent collection of blood samples, neuropsychological assessment, and 3-T MRI. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) concentrations were measured by electrochemiluminescence immunoassays. Cardiac disease was defined as a history of atrial fibrillation, ischemic heart diseases, or congestive heart failure. The CMIs were graded according to a previously validated protocol. Of 464 participants, 124 had insufficient blood plasma samples and 97 had no CMI grading (none, incomplete, or ungradable MRI), leaving a sample size of 243 for final analysis (mean [SD] age, 72.8 [9.1] years; 116 men [42.9%]). Seventy participants (28.8%) had cortical CMIs (median, 1; range, 0-43). Compared with participants with no CMIs, those with CMIs had a significantly higher prevalence of atrial fibrillation (rate ratio [RR], 1.62; 95% CI, 1.20-21.8), ischemic heart disease (RR, 4.31; 95% CI, 3.38-5.49), and congestive heart failure (RR, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.29-3.25). Significantly higher levels of NT-proBNP (RR, 3.16; 95% CI, 2.33-4.27) and hs-cTnT (RR, 2.17; 95% CI, 1.00-4.74) were found in participants with CMIs. In multivariate models adjusted for demographics and vascular risk factors, higher

  6. Children with cerebral palsy have uncharacteristic somatosensory cortical oscillations after stimulation of the hand mechanoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Kurz, M J; Becker, K M; Heinrichs-Graham, E; Wilson, T W

    2015-10-01

    Numerous clinical investigations have reported that children with cerebral palsy (CP) have tactile discrimination deficits that likely limit their ability to plan and manipulate objects. Despite this clinical awareness, we still have a substantial knowledge gap in our understanding of the neurological basis for these tactile discrimination deficits. Previously, we have shown that children with CP have aberrant theta-alpha (4-14 Hz) oscillations in the somatosensory cortices following tactile stimulation of the foot. In this investigation, we evaluated if these aberrant theta-alpha oscillations also extend to the hand. Magnetoencephalography was used to evaluate event-related changes in the theta-alpha and beta (18-34 Hz) somatosensory cortical oscillations in groups of children with CP and typically developing (TD) children following tactile stimulation of their hands. Our results showed that the somatosensory theta-alpha oscillations were relatively intact in children with CP, which is in contrast to our previous results for foot tactile stimulations. We suspect that these inter-study differences may be related to the higher probability that the neural tracts serving the lower extremities are damaged in children with CP, compared to those serving the upper extremities. This inference is plausible since the participating children with CP had Manual Ability Classification System (MACS) levels between I and II. In contrast to the theta-alpha results, children with CP did exhibit a sharp increase in beta activity during the same time period, which was not observed in TD children. This suggests that children with CP still have deficits in the computational aspect of somatosensory processing.

  7. ASPM and the Evolution of Cerebral Cortical Size in a Community of New World Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Villanea, Fernando A.; Perry, George H.; Gutiérrez-Espeleta, Gustavo A.; Dominy, Nathaniel J.

    2012-01-01

    The ASPM (abnormal spindle-like microcephaly associated) gene has been proposed as a major determinant of cerebral cortical size among primates, including humans. Yet the specific functions of ASPM and its connection to human intelligence remain controversial. This debate is limited in part by a taxonomic focus on Old World monkeys and apes. Here we expand the comparative context of ASPM sequence analyses with a study of New World monkeys, a radiation of primates in which enlarged brain size has evolved in parallel in spider monkeys (genus Ateles) and capuchins (genus Cebus). The primate community of Costa Rica is perhaps a model system because it allows for independent pairwise comparisons of smaller- and larger-brained species within two taxonomic families. Accordingly, we analyzed the complete sequence of exon 18 of ASPM in Ateles geoffroyi, Alouatta palliata, Cebus capucinus, and Saimiri oerstedii. As the analysis of multiple species in a genus improves phylogenetic reconstruction, we also analyzed eleven published sequences from other New World monkeys. Our exon-wide, lineage-specific analysis of eleven genera and the ratio of rates of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions (dN/dS) on ASPM revealed no detectable evidence for positive selection in the lineages leading to Ateles or Cebus, as indicated by dN/dS ratios of <1.0 (0.6502 and 0.4268, respectively). Our results suggest that a multitude of interacting genes have driven the evolution of larger brains among primates, with different genes involved in this process in different encephalized lineages, or at least with evidence for positive selection not readily apparent for the same genes in all lineages. The primate community of Costa Rica may serve as a model system for future studies that aim to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying cognitive capacity and cortical size. PMID:23028686

  8. Quantitative comparison of cortical and deep grey matter in pathological subtypes of unilateral cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Scheck, Simon M; Pannek, Kerstin; Fiori, Simona; Boyd, Roslyn N; Rose, Stephen E

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify grey matter changes in children with unilateral cerebral palsy (UCP), differentiating between cortical or deep grey matter (CDGM) lesions, periventricular white matter (PWM) lesions, and unilateral and bilateral lesions. In a cross-sectional study we obtained high resolution structural magnetic resonance images from 72 children (41 males, 31 females, mean age 10y 9mo [SD 3y 1mo], range 5y 1mo-17y 1mo) with UCP (33 left, 39 right hemiplegia; Manual Ability Classification System level I n=29, II n=43; Gross Motor Function Classification System level I n=46, II n=26), and 19 children with typical development (CTD; eight males, 11 females, mean age 11y 2mo [SD 2y 7mo], range 7y 8mo-16y 4mo). Images were classified by lesion type and analyzed using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and subcortical volumetric analysis. Deep grey matter volumes were not significantly different between children with CDGM and PWM lesions, with the thalamus, putamen, and globus pallidus being reduced unilaterally in both groups compared with CTD (p≤0.001). Children with CDGM lesions additionally showed widespread cortical changes involving all lobes using VBM (p<0.01). Children with bilateral lesions had reduced thalamus and putamen volumes bilaterally (p<0.001). The thalamic volume was reduced bilaterally in children with unilateral lesions (p=0.004). Lesions to the PWM cause secondary changes to the deep grey matter structures similar to primary changes seen in CDGM lesions. Despite having a unilateral phenotype, grey matter changes are observed bilaterally, even in children with unilateral lesions. © 2014 Mac Keith Press.

  9. Primates exposed to cocaine in utero display reduced density and number of cerebral cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Lidow, M S; Song, Z M

    2001-07-02

    This study examined the effects of cocaine use during the second trimester of pregnancy on cerebral neocortical volume and density, and total number of neocortical neurons and glia in offspring. We also evaluated the extent of postnatal recovery of cytoarchitectural abnormalities previously observed in the neocortex of two-month-old primates born from cocaine-treated mothers (Lidow [1995] Synapse 21:332-334). Pregnant monkeys received cocaine orally (20 mg/kg/day) from the 40th to 102nd days of pregnancy (embryonic day [E]40-E102). On E64 and E65, the animals were injected with [(3)H]thymidine. Cerebral hemispheres of the offspring were examined at three years of age. We found a reduction in the neocortical volume and density and total number of neocortical neurons. The observed reduction in neuronal number within the neocortex was not accounted for by the increase in the number of neurons in the white matter of cocaine-exposed animals, because the number of these "extra" neurons was equal to only half that of missing neurons. We detected no significant changes in the number of neocortical glia. The cytoarchitectural abnormalities in the neocortex of prenatally cocaine-exposed three-year-old monkeys closely resembled previously described neocortical abnormalities in similarly exposed two-month-old animals: the neocortex lacked a discernible lamination; the majority of the cells labeled by [(3)H]thymidine injected during neocortical neurogenesis did not reach their proper position within the cortical plate. Therefore, postnatal maturation is not associated with significant improvement in neocortical organization in primates prenatally exposed to cocaine. There was, however, a postnatal recovery of low glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunoreactivity previously observed in 2-month-old cocaine-exposed animals.

  10. [Protective effect of musk extract on rat's cerebral cortical neurons with inflammatory injury].

    PubMed

    Shi, Jin-Feng; Zhang, Bo-Ai; Jia, Yan-Jie

    2010-06-01

    To investigate the protective effects of musk extract (ME) and its possible mechanism on rat's cerebral cortical neurons with inflammatory injury induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Neurons and astrocytes from newborn rat cerebral cortex were cultured in vitro respectively, and the astrocyte conditioned medium (ACM), obtained by treating astrocytes with 10 mg/L LPS and different concentrations of ME for 24 h, was added in the culture fluid of neurons. The survival rate and apoptotic rate of neurons were measured by MTT method and AO/EB stain; and the changes of inflammatory factors in the ACM were determined by ELISA. The survival rate (%) of neurons treated by ACM with ME in concentrations of 18 mg/L, 36 mg/L, 72 mg/L and 144 mg/L was 52.55 +/- 3.52, 55.77 +/- 2.36, 64.89 +/- 3.45 and 73.67 +/- 1.80, respectively, significantly higher than that in the model neurons (43.62 +/- 4. 51, P < 0.05), while the apoptotic rate (%) in them, 68.11 +/- 2.16, 44.27 +/- 3.68, 32.56 +/- 2.14 and 21.89 +/- 2.46, respectively, was significantly lower than that in model neurons (71.33 +/- 3.25, P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). Level of IL-6 was decreasing along with the raising of ME concentration in the ACM, showing a concentration-dependent state. ME shows apparent protective effect on neurons against inflammatory injury, especially in a high concentration (144 mg/L), which may be associated with the reduction of IL-6 secreted by astrocytes.

  11. Alpha 2-adrenoceptor-mediated inhibition of histamine release from rat cerebral cortical slices.

    PubMed

    Hill, S J; Straw, R M

    1988-12-01

    1. Depolarization of rat cerebral cortical slices, prelabelled with [3H]-histidine, in high potassium (40 mM KCl) medium stimulated the release of [3H]-histamine. The K+-evoked release of [3H]-histamine was attenuated by incubation in calcium-free medium and prevented by prior incubation of brain slices with the selective histidine decarboxylase inhibitor S-(alpha)-fluoromethylhistidine. 2. The K+-evoked release of [3H]-histamine was significantly (P less than 0.001) reduced following stimulation of histamine H3-receptors with R-(alpha)-methylhistamine (1 microM) and this effect was antagonized by the H3-antagonist thioperamide (1 microM). 3. Noradrenaline and the alpha 2-selective adrenoceptor agonists clonidine and UK-14,304 inhibited the K+-evoked release of [3H]-histamine in a concentration-dependent manner yielding EC50 values of 2.5, 0.8 and 1.2 microM, respectively. However, the maximum response to clonidine was only 52 +/- 8% of that obtained with noradrenaline. 4. The inhibitory effect of noradrenaline was antagonized by the non-selective alpha-antagonist phentolamine and by the selective alpha 2-antagonists yohimbine and idazoxan. However, the response to noradrenaline was not inhibited by the alpha 1-antagonist prazosin at concentrations up to 1 microM. 5. These results suggest that both histamine H3-receptors and alpha 2-adrenoceptors are present on histamine-containing nerve terminals in rat cerebral cortex and can exert an inhibitory influence on neurotransmitter release.

  12. Relaxation from a voluntary contraction is preceded by increased excitability of motor cortical inhibitory circuits.

    PubMed

    Buccolieri, Alessandro; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Rothwell, John C

    2004-07-15

    Termination of a muscle contraction is as important a part of movement as muscle activation yet the mechanisms responsible are less well understood. In the present experiments we examined the possible role of intracortical inhibitory circuits in terminating a 20% maximum isometric contraction of the first dorsal interosseous muscle (FDI) in eight healthy subjects. Subjects performed the task simultaneously with both hands and received single or pairs (at an interstimulus interval of 3 ms to evaluate short interval intracortical inhibition, SICI) of transcranial magnetic stimuli (TMS) via a focal coil over the motor hand area of the left hemisphere at different times before and after the onset of relaxation. The amplitude of the motor-evoked potential (MEP) following a single or a pair of TMS pulses was measured in the right FDI and plotted relative to the onset of relaxation as estimated from the surface electromyogram (EMG) of the left FDI. MEPs were larger during contraction than after relaxation whereas SICI was absent during contraction and reappeared after relaxation. We found that in all subjects, the time course of MEP changes during relaxation was closely fitted by a Boltzmann sigmoidal curve which allowed us to estimate the mean MEP amplitudes as well as the ratio of the amplitudes after single or pairs of TMS pulses (i.e.%SICI) at any time in the task. The data showed that the amplitude of MEPs to single pulse TMS had started to decline at about the same time as the onset of EMG silence. Furthermore, the size of the MEPs evoked by paired pulses decreased up to 30 ms beforehand. The latter suggests that an increase in SICI occurs prior to the onset of MEP changes, and hence that increased cortical inhibition may play a role in suppressing corticospinal excitability during relaxation. A subsidiary experiment showed that the time relations of changes in SICI and MEP were unchanged by a period of 10 min training on the task.

  13. Cytokine immunoreactivity in cortical and subcortical neurons in periventricular leukomalacia: are cytokines implicated in neuronal dysfunction in cerebral palsy?

    PubMed

    Kadhim, Hazim; Tabarki, Brahim; De Prez, Carine; Sébire, Guillaume

    2003-03-01

    The major neuropathological substrate associated with cerebral palsy (CP) is a form of white matter (WM) injury known as periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). Proinflammatory cytokines were recently shown to be implicated in PVL pathogenesis. Many PVL patients develop cortical and deep gray neuronal dysfunctions such as epilepsy, cognitive deficits and extrapyramidal disorders. The precise nature of the relationship between the WM lesion and the subsequent neuronal disorders is unclear. Cytokines were shown to exert neurotoxicity in experimental models. This raises the need to investigate a possible noxious effect by cytokines on neuronal cortical development. In situ immunohistochemical methods were applied on 22 brains from infants both with PVL (study group) and without PVL (control group) to detect any immunoreactivity for cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6) in cortical and gray matter neurons. While cortical and other neuronal structures in PVL brains did not display noticeable pathological anomalies, strong cytokine immunoreactivity was detected in many neurons in the neocortex, hippocampus, basal ganglia and thalamus. There were, however, regional differences in cytokine labeling. In addition, there was more TNF-alpha staining than IL-1beta; IL-6 was negative. In contrast, neuronal cytokine labeling in the "control" brains was negligible. In conclusion, we report and characterize, for the first time, the in situ immunoreactivity for proinflammatory cytokines in cortical and deep gray neurons in PVL. These findings might provide insights into the neuro-anatomical correlate for the intellectual deficits and the other cortical and deep gray neuronal dysfunctions associated with PVL.

  14. Electroacupuncture induces acute changes in cerebral cortical miRNA profile, improves cerebral blood flow and alleviates neurological deficits in a rat model of stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hai-zhen; Jiang, Wei; Zhao, Xiao-feng; Du, Jing; Liu, Pan-gong; Chang, Li-dan; Li, Wen-bo; Hu, Han-tong; Shi, Xue-min

    2016-01-01

    Electroacupuncture has been shown to improve cerebral blood flow in animal models of stroke. However, it is unclear whether electroacupuncture alters miRNA expression in the cortex. In this study, we examined changes in the cerebral cortical miRNA profile, cerebral blood flow and neurological function induced by electroacupuncture in a rat model of stroke. Electroacupuncture was performed at Renzhong (GV26) and Neiguan (PC6), with a frequency of 2 Hz, continuous wave, current intensity of 3.0 mA, and stimulation time of 1 minute. Electroacupuncture increased cerebral blood flow and alleviated neurological impairment in the rats. miRNA microarray profiling revealed that the vascular endothelial growth factor signaling pathway, which links cell proliferation with stroke, was most significantly affected by electroacupuncture. Electroacupuncture induced changes in expression of rno-miR-206-3p, rno-miR-3473, rno-miR-6216 and rno-miR-494-3p, and these changes were confirmed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Our findings suggest that changes in cell proliferation-associated miRNA expression induced by electroacupuncture might be associated with the improved cerebral blood supply and functional recovery following stroke. PMID:28197190

  15. Computational model of cerebral blood flow redistribution during cortical spreading depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verisokin, Andrey Y.; Verveyko, Darya V.; Postnov, Dmitry E.

    2016-04-01

    In recent decades modelling studies on cortical spreading depression (CSD) and migraine waves successfully contributed to formation of modern view on these fundamental phenomena of brain physiology. However, due to the extreme complexity of object under study (brain cortex) and the diversity of involved physiological pathways, the development of new mathematical models of CSD is still a very relevant and challenging research problem. In our study we follow the functional modelling approach aimed to map the action of known physiological pathways to the specific nonlinear mechanisms that govern formation and evolution of CSD wave patterns. Specifically, we address the role of cerebral blood flow (CBF) redistribution that is caused by excessive neuronal activity by means of neurovascular coupling and mediates a spatial pattern of oxygen and glucose delivery. This in turn changes the local metabolic status of neural tissue. To build the model we simplify the web of known cell-to-cell interactions within a neurovascular unit by selecting the most relevant ones, such as local neuron-induced elevation of extracellular potassium concentration and biphasic response of arteriole radius. We propose the lumped description of distance-dependent hemodynamic coupling that fits the most recent experimental findings.

  16. Foxp1 Regulates Cortical Radial Migration and Neuronal Morphogenesis in Developing Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue; Xiao, Jian; Fröhlich, Henning; Tu, Xiaomeng; Li, Lianlian; Xu, Yue; Cao, Huateng; Qu, Jia; Rappold, Gudrun A.; Chen, Jie-Guang

    2015-01-01

    FOXP1 is a member of FOXP subfamily transcription factors. Mutations in FOXP1 gene have been found in various development-related cognitive disorders. However, little is known about the etiology of these symptoms, and specifically the function of FOXP1 in neuronal development. Here, we report that suppression of Foxp1 expression in mouse cerebral cortex led to a neuronal migration defect, which was rescued by overexpression of Foxp1. Mice with Foxp1 knockdown exhibited ectopic neurons in deep layers of the cortex postnatally. The neuronal differentiation of Foxp1-downregulated cells was normal. However, morphological analysis showed that the neurons with Foxp1 deficiency had an inhibited axonal growth in vitro and a weakened transition from multipolar to bipolar in vivo. Moreover, we found that the expression of Foxp1 modulated the dendritic maturation of neurons at a late postnatal date. Our results demonstrate critical roles of Foxp1 in the radial migration and morphogenesis of cortical neurons during development. This study may shed light on the complex relationship between neuronal development and the related cognitive disorders. PMID:26010426

  17. Enhanced cAMP accumulation by a phorbol ester in cerebral cortical cells

    SciTech Connect

    Beeler, J.F.; Davis, C.W.

    1987-05-01

    Phorbol 12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) was found to be selective in its ability to alter cAMP accumulations in cultured rat cerebral cortical cells. Basal levels of cAMP in cultured neuronal and nonneuronal cells preincubated in the absence or presence of PMA were 14 pmol/mg protein and 16 pmol/mg protein, respectively. Adenosine increased cAMP levels in a dose-dependent manner. cAMP accumulation in response to low concentrations of adenosine was not significantly altered by pretreatment with PMA but marked potentiation of adenosine elicited accumulations was observed at 10 and 100 ..mu..M adenosine. Longer preincubation with PMA resulted in a decreased ability of PMA to enhance adenosine elicited accumulations of cAMP. PMA did not significantly alter cAMP accumulation by forskolin (FOR) and enhanced norepinephrine stimulated cAMP by only 2-fold. For similarly potentiated adenosine/sub 2/ (A/sub 2/)- receptor elicited accumulation of cAMP which could be further enhanced by PMA. These results suggest that the effects of the phorbol ester are more specific for potentiating adenosine stimulated cAMP accumulation and may occur as a result of a more efficient coupling between the A/sub 2/-receptor, N-protein and adenylate cyclase.

  18. Vascular function, cerebral cortical thickness, and cognitive performance in middle-aged Hispanic and non-Hispanic Caucasian adults.

    PubMed

    Pasha, Evan P; Kaur, Sonya S; Gonzales, Mitzi M; Machin, Daniel R; Kasischke, Kennon; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Haley, Andreana P

    2015-04-01

    Hispanics are at increased risk for acquiring cardiovascular risk factors that contribute to cognitive dysfunction. To compare indices of vascular health with measures of cerebral gray matter integrity, 60 middle-aged Hispanic and non-Hispanic Caucasian participants were matched across age, sex, years of education, and mental status. Arterial stiffness was characterized by β-stiffness index and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, and magnetic resonance imaging estimated cortical thickness in a priori regions of interest known to be susceptible to vascular risk factors. Measures of arterial stiffness were significantly higher in Hispanics than in non-Hispanic Caucasians. Hispanics exhibited thinner left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) cortical thickness (P=.04) with concurrently lower language (P=.02), memory (P=.03), and attention-executive functioning (P=.02). These results suggest that compromised vascular health may occur simultaneously with cortical thinning of the LIFG as an early neuropathological alteration in Hispanics.

  19. Vision loss shifts the balance of feedforward and intracortical circuits in opposite directions in mouse primary auditory and visual cortices.

    PubMed

    Petrus, Emily; Rodriguez, Gabriela; Patterson, Ryan; Connor, Blaine; Kanold, Patrick O; Lee, Hey-Kyoung

    2015-06-10

    Loss of a sensory modality leads to widespread changes in synaptic function across sensory cortices, which are thought to be the basis for cross-modal adaptation. Previous studies suggest that experience-dependent cross-modal regulation of the spared sensory cortices may be mediated by changes in cortical circuits. Here, we report that loss of vision, in the form of dark exposure (DE) for 1 week, produces laminar-specific changes in excitatory and inhibitory circuits in the primary auditory cortex (A1) of adult mice to promote feedforward (FF) processing and also strengthens intracortical inputs to primary visual cortex (V1). Specifically, DE potentiated FF excitatory synapses from layer 4 (L4) to L2/3 in A1 and recurrent excitatory inputs in A1-L4 in parallel with a reduction in the strength of lateral intracortical excitatory inputs to A1-L2/3. This suggests a shift in processing in favor of FF information at the expense of intracortical processing. Vision loss also strengthened inhibitory synaptic function in L4 and L2/3 of A1, but via laminar specific mechanisms. In A1-L4, DE specifically potentiated the evoked synaptic transmission from parvalbumin-positive inhibitory interneurons to principal neurons without changes in spontaneous miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs). In contrast, DE specifically increased the frequency of mIPSCs in A1-L2/3. In V1, FF excitatory inputs were unaltered by DE, whereas lateral intracortical connections in L2/3 were strengthened, suggesting a shift toward intracortical processing. Our results suggest that loss of vision produces distinct circuit changes in the spared and deprived sensory cortices to shift between FF and intracortical processing to allow adaptation.

  20. Atypical form of Alzheimer's disease with prominent posterior cortical atrophy: a review of lesion distribution and circuit disconnection in cortical visual pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hof, P. R.; Vogt, B. A.; Bouras, C.; Morrison, J. H.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    In recent years, the existence of visual variants of Alzheimer's disease characterized by atypical clinical presentation at onset has been increasingly recognized. In many of these cases post-mortem neuropathological assessment revealed that correlations could be established between clinical symptoms and the distribution of neurodegenerative lesions. We have analyzed a series of Alzheimer's disease patients presenting with prominent visual symptomatology as a cardinal sign of the disease. In these cases, a shift in the distribution of pathological lesions was observed such that the primary visual areas and certain visual association areas within the occipito-parieto-temporal junction and posterior cingulate cortex had very high densities of lesions, whereas the prefrontal cortex had fewer lesions than usually observed in Alzheimer's disease. Previous quantitative analyses have demonstrated that in Alzheimer's disease, primary sensory and motor cortical areas are less damaged than the multimodal association areas of the frontal and temporal lobes, as indicated by the laminar and regional distribution patterns of neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques. The distribution of pathological lesions in the cerebral cortex of Alzheimer's disease cases with visual symptomatology revealed that specific visual association pathways were disrupted, whereas these particular connections are likely to be affected to a less severe degree in the more common form of Alzheimer's disease. These data suggest that in some cases with visual variants of Alzheimer's disease, the neurological symptomatology may be related to the loss of certain components of the cortical visual pathways, as reflected by the particular distribution of the neuropathological markers of the disease.

  1. Atypical form of Alzheimer's disease with prominent posterior cortical atrophy: a review of lesion distribution and circuit disconnection in cortical visual pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hof, P. R.; Vogt, B. A.; Bouras, C.; Morrison, J. H.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    In recent years, the existence of visual variants of Alzheimer's disease characterized by atypical clinical presentation at onset has been increasingly recognized. In many of these cases post-mortem neuropathological assessment revealed that correlations could be established between clinical symptoms and the distribution of neurodegenerative lesions. We have analyzed a series of Alzheimer's disease patients presenting with prominent visual symptomatology as a cardinal sign of the disease. In these cases, a shift in the distribution of pathological lesions was observed such that the primary visual areas and certain visual association areas within the occipito-parieto-temporal junction and posterior cingulate cortex had very high densities of lesions, whereas the prefrontal cortex had fewer lesions than usually observed in Alzheimer's disease. Previous quantitative analyses have demonstrated that in Alzheimer's disease, primary sensory and motor cortical areas are less damaged than the multimodal association areas of the frontal and temporal lobes, as indicated by the laminar and regional distribution patterns of neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques. The distribution of pathological lesions in the cerebral cortex of Alzheimer's disease cases with visual symptomatology revealed that specific visual association pathways were disrupted, whereas these particular connections are likely to be affected to a less severe degree in the more common form of Alzheimer's disease. These data suggest that in some cases with visual variants of Alzheimer's disease, the neurological symptomatology may be related to the loss of certain components of the cortical visual pathways, as reflected by the particular distribution of the neuropathological markers of the disease.

  2. Cortical Somatosensory Reorganization in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy: A Multimodal Neuroimaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Papadelis, Christos; Ahtam, Banu; Nazarova, Maria; Nimec, Donna; Snyder, Brian; Grant, Patricia Ellen; Okada, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    Although cerebral palsy (CP) is among the most common causes of physical disability in early childhood, we know little about the functional and structural changes of this disorder in the developing brain. Here, we investigated with three different neuroimaging modalities [magnetoencephalography (MEG), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and resting-state fMRI] whether spastic CP is associated with functional and anatomical abnormalities in the sensorimotor network. Ten children participated in the study: four with diplegic CP (DCP), three with hemiplegic CP (HCP), and three typically developing (TD) children. Somatosensory (SS)-evoked fields (SEFs) were recorded in response to pneumatic stimuli applied to digits D1, D3, and D5 of both hands. Several parameters of water diffusion were calculated from DTI between the thalamus and the pre-central and post-central gyri in both hemispheres. The sensorimotor resting-state networks (RSNs) were examined by using an independent component analysis method. Tactile stimulation of the fingers elicited the first prominent cortical response at ~50 ms, in all except one child, localized over the primary SS cortex (S1). In five CP children, abnormal somatotopic organization was observed in the affected (or more affected) hemisphere. Euclidean distances were markedly different between the two hemispheres in the HCP children, and between DCP and TD children for both hemispheres. DTI analysis revealed decreased fractional anisotropy and increased apparent diffusion coefficient for the thalamocortical pathways in the more affected compared to less affected hemisphere in CP children. Resting-state functional MRI results indicated absent and/or abnormal sensorimotor RSNs for children with HCP and DCP consistent with the severity and location of their lesions. Our findings suggest an abnormal SS processing mechanism in the sensorimotor network of children with CP possibly as a result of diminished thalamocortical projections. PMID:25309398

  3. Regional vulnerability of longitudinal cortical association connectivity: Associated with structural network topology alterations in preterm children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Ceschin, Rafael; Lee, Vince K; Schmithorst, Vince; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Preterm born children with spastic diplegia type of cerebral palsy and white matter injury or periventricular leukomalacia (PVL), are known to have motor, visual and cognitive impairments. Most diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies performed in this group have demonstrated widespread abnormalities using averaged deterministic tractography and voxel-based DTI measurements. Little is known about structural network correlates of white matter topography and reorganization in preterm cerebral palsy, despite the availability of new therapies and the need for brain imaging biomarkers. Here, we combined novel post-processing methodology of probabilistic tractography data in this preterm cohort to improve spatial and regional delineation of longitudinal cortical association tract abnormalities using an along-tract approach, and compared these data to structural DTI cortical network topology analysis. DTI images were acquired on 16 preterm children with cerebral palsy (mean age 5.6 ± 4) and 75 healthy controls (mean age 5.7 ± 3.4). Despite mean tract analysis, Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) demonstrating diffusely reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) reduction in all white matter tracts, the along-tract analysis improved the detection of regional tract vulnerability. The along-tract map-structural network topology correlates revealed two associations: (1) reduced regional posterior-anterior gradient in FA of the longitudinal visual cortical association tracts (inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, optic radiation, posterior thalamic radiation) correlated with reduced posterior-anterior gradient of intra-regional (nodal efficiency) metrics with relative sparing of frontal and temporal regions; and (2) reduced regional FA within frontal-thalamic-striatal white matter pathways (anterior limb/anterior thalamic radiation, superior longitudinal fasciculus and cortical spinal tract) correlated with

  4. Cortical Cerebral Blood Flow, Oxygen Extraction Fraction, and Metabolic Rate in Patients with Middle Cerebral Artery Stenosis or Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Li, Y

    2016-04-01

    With the advances of magnetic resonance technology, the CBF, oxygen extraction fraction, and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen can be measured in MRI. Our aim was to measure the CBF, oxygen extraction fraction, and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen use in patients with different severities of middle cerebral artery stenosis or acute stroke by using the arterial spin-labeling and susceptibility-weighted imaging techniques. Fifty-seven patients with MCA stenosis or acute stroke were recruited and classified into 4 groups: mild MCA stenosis (group 1), severe MCA stenosis (group 2), occluded MCA (group 3), and acute stroke (group 4). Arterial spin-labeling and SWI sequences were used to acquire CBF, oxygen extraction fraction, and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen. The oxygen extraction fraction in hemispheres with mild MCA stenosis (group 1) was remarkably higher than that in the contralateral hemisphere. In addition, hemispheres with severe MCA stenosis (group 2) had significantly lower CBF and a significantly higher oxygen extraction fraction than the contralateral hemisphere. Hemispheres with occluded MCA (group 3) or acute stroke (group 4) had a significantly lower CBF and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen and a significantly higher oxygen extraction fraction than the contralateral hemisphere. The oxygen extraction fraction gradually increased in groups 1-3. When this offset a decrease in CBF, the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen remained at a normal level. An occluded MCA led to reduction in both the CBF and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen. Moreover, the oxygen extraction fraction and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen significantly increased and decreased, respectively, in the occluded MCA region during acute stroke. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  5. Novel motor and somatosensory activity is associated with increased cerebral cortical blood volume measured by near-infrared optical topography.

    PubMed

    Peyton, Jeffery L; Bass, W Thomas; Burke, Bonnie L; Frank, L Matthew

    2005-10-01

    Recent reports suggest that learning is enhanced by emotion, spontaneity, and play. The mechanisms of this enhancement are unclear and might involve increased cortical stimulation by the limbic system. Since neuronal activity is tightly coupled to changes in cerebral blood flow and volume, the demonstration of increased cortical blood volume during playful versus routine motor and somatosensory activity would imply enhanced neuronal activity and provide insight into the complex interaction between play and learning. Near-infrared spectroscopy was used to detect changes in cortical blood volume during performance of (1) rudimentary visual, motor, and speech tasks; (2) integration of the tasks in a familiar routine manner; and (3) integration of the tasks in a novel, spontaneous, playful manner. No significant differences in cortical blood volume were found during the performance of the individual rudimentary tasks and their routine integration. However, the novel integration activity was associated with a significantly greater increase in frontal lobe oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and total hemoglobin, as well as parietal lobe total hemoglobin. This small pilot study provides a limited measure of physiologic support for a relationship between play and learning.

  6. Observations on regional cerebral blood flow in cortical and subcortical structures during language production in normal man

    SciTech Connect

    Wallesch, C.W.; Henriksen, L.; Kornhuber, H.H.; Paulson, O.B.

    1985-07-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was studied by single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) of inhaled xenon-133 in six normal volunteers during various language, articulatory, and control conditions. Language production increased rCBF in predominantly left-sided cortical and subcortical areas. The involved regions were anatomically related to a left frontal area (Broca's), to both caudate nuclei, to a left thalamic/pallidal area, and bilaterally in retrorolandic areas. The failure to demonstrate lateralized retrorolandic activity is thought to reflect the complexity of the tasks.

  7. Communication and wiring in the cortical connectome

    PubMed Central

    Budd, Julian M. L.; Kisvárday, Zoltán F.

    2012-01-01

    In cerebral cortex, the huge mass of axonal wiring that carries information between near and distant neurons is thought to provide the neural substrate for cognitive and perceptual function. The goal of mapping the connectivity of cortical axons at different spatial scales, the cortical connectome, is to trace the paths of information flow in cerebral cortex. To appreciate the relationship between the connectome and cortical function, we need to discover the nature and purpose of the wiring principles underlying cortical connectivity. A popular explanation has been that axonal length is strictly minimized both within and between cortical regions. In contrast, we have hypothesized the existence of a multi-scale principle of cortical wiring where to optimize communication there is a trade-off between spatial (construction) and temporal (routing) costs. Here, using recent evidence concerning cortical spatial networks we critically evaluate this hypothesis at neuron, local circuit, and pathway scales. We report three main conclusions. First, the axonal and dendritic arbor morphology of single neocortical neurons may be governed by a similar wiring principle, one that balances the conservation of cellular material and conduction delay. Second, the same principle may be observed for fiber tracts connecting cortical regions. Third, the absence of sufficient local circuit data currently prohibits any meaningful assessment of the hypothesis at this scale of cortical organization. To avoid neglecting neuron and microcircuit levels of cortical organization, the connectome framework should incorporate more morphological description. In addition, structural analyses of temporal cost for cortical circuits should take account of both axonal conduction and neuronal integration delays, which appear mostly of the same order of magnitude. We conclude the hypothesized trade-off between spatial and temporal costs may potentially offer a powerful explanation for cortical wiring patterns

  8. Anatomical studies on the nucleus reticularis tegmenti pontis in the pigmented rat. I. Cytoarchitecture, topography, and cerebral cortical afferents.

    PubMed

    Torigoe, Y; Blanks, R H; Precht, W

    1986-01-01

    The nucleus reticularis tegmenti pontis (NRTP) is a precerebellar reticular nucleus that has been found to be related to cerebropontocerebellar pathways and, more recently, to eye movements. The present study investigates the cytoarchitecture, the topography, and the cerebral cortical projections to the NRTP in the pigmented rat. The cytoarchitecture and topography of the NRTP was determined by examination of Nissl-stained material sectioned in the transverse and sagittal planes. Two cytoarchitectonically distinct portions of the NRTP are apparent; a central subdivision (NRTPc) composed of large multipolar, small spherical, and fusiform neurons, and a pericentral subdivision (NRTPp) composed of loosely packed small fusiform and spherical neurons. The NRTPc is located dorsal to the medial lemniscus and pyramidal tracts over the caudal two-thirds of the pons. It extends caudodorsally to the region just rostral and ventral to the abducens nucleus. The NRTPp is adjacent to the lateral margins of the NRTPc, rostrally, and lies ventral to the caudal portions of the NRTPc. Large injections of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) were made into the cerebellum in order to determine the degree to which each subdivision of the NRTP contributes to the cerebellar projection. A high percentage of NRTPc neurons and a lower percentage of NRTPp neurons were labeled. These differences in labeling density and neuronal morphology noted above confirm the appropriateness of subdividing the NRTP into central and pericentral subdivisions. The cerebral cortical afferents to the NRTP were examined by placing small iontophoretic injections of HRP into the NRTPc and NRTPp. A systematic examination of all cortical areas revealed that the HRP-labeled neurons are entirely localized within pyramidal layer V of three major cortical areas: the ipsilateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann areas 8, 8a, 11, and 32); the ipsilateral motor and somatosensory cortices (Brodmann areas 2, 4, 6, and 10), and the

  9. Complex, multifocal, individual-specific attention-related cortical functional circuits.

    PubMed

    Basile, Luis F H

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies focusing on the analysis of individual patterns of non-sensory-motor CNS activity may significantly alter our view of CNS functional mapping. We have recently provided evidence for highly variable attention-related Slow Potential (SP) generating cortical areas across individuals (Basile et al., 2003, 2006). In this work, we present new evidence, searching for other physiological indexes of attention by a new use of a well established method, for individual-specific sets of cortical areas active during expecting attention. We applied latency corrected peak averaging to oscillatory bursts, from 124-channel EEG recordings, and modeled their generators by current density reconstruction. We first computed event-related total power, and averaging was based on individual patterns of narrow task-induced band-power. This method is sensitive to activity out of synchrony with stimuli, and may detect task-related changes missed by regular Event-Related Potential (ERP) averaging. We additionally analyzed overall inter-electrode phase-coherence. The main results were (1) the detection of two bands of attention-induced beta range oscillations (around 25 and 21 Hz), whose scalp topography and current density cortical distribution were complex multi-focal, and highly variable across subjects, including prefrontal and posterior cortical areas. Most important, however, was the observation that (2) the generators of task-induced oscillations are largely the same individual-specific sets of cortical areas active during the resting, baseline state. We concluded that attention-related electrical cortical activity is highly individual-specific (significantly different from sensory-related visual evoked potentials or delta and theta induced band-power), and to a great extent already established during mere wakefulness. We discuss the critical implications of those results, in combination with other studies presenting individual data, to functional mapping: the need to

  10. Juvenile methylphenidate modulates reward-related behaviors and cerebral blood flow by decreasing cortical D3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Susan L; Napierata, Lee; Brenhouse, Heather C; Sonntag, Kai C

    2008-06-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is associated with reduced cortical blood flow that is reversible with exposure to the psychostimulant methylphenidate (MPH). D3 dopamine receptors modulate stimulant-induced changes in blood flow and are associated with reward processing during young adulthood, but their role in the enduring effects of MPH during development is unknown. Rats were given vehicle (VEH) or MPH (2 mg/kg between postnatal days 20-35) and assessed in young adulthood for regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) after MPH challenge and mRNA expression levels of dopamine receptors. To probe D3 receptor involvement, juvenile subjects were exposed to VEH, MPH, the D3-preferring agonist +/-7-OHDPAT (0.3 mg/kg), the D3 antagonist nafadotride (Naf; 0.05, 0.5 or 5.0 mg/kg) or a Naf (0.05 mg/kg)/MPH combination, and assessed biochemically and behaviorally. Juvenile MPH exposure increased MPH-induced rCBV in the cingulate and medial prefrontal cortex and thalamus in adulthood. Behaviorally, juvenile MPH- or +/-7-OHDPAT-exposed subjects demonstrated an aversion to cocaine-associated environments, which was prevented by juvenile co-treatment with MPH and Naf, or with adult cortical microinjections of +/-7-OHDPAT. Cortical D3 mRNA levels significantly decreased by 23.8 +/- 6.7% in MPH-treated subjects and normalized with combined Naf/MPH treatment, with no change in the other dopamine receptors. Enhanced cortical responsiveness to psychostimulants may occur through a reduction in D3 receptors, which in turn reduces drug-seeking behavior. These data provide evidence for a postnatal sensitive period when juvenile MPH exposure is able to alter cortical development.

  11. Inhibitory stabilization and visual coding in cortical circuits with multiple interneuron subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, Robert; Doiron, Brent

    2016-01-01

    Recent anatomical and functional characterization of cortical inhibitory interneurons has highlighted the diverse computations supported by different subtypes of interneurons. However, most theoretical models of cortex do not feature multiple classes of interneurons and rather assume a single homogeneous population. We study the dynamics of recurrent excitatory-inhibitory model cortical networks with parvalbumin (PV)-, somatostatin (SOM)-, and vasointestinal peptide-expressing (VIP) interneurons, with connectivity properties motivated by experimental recordings from mouse primary visual cortex. Our theory describes conditions under which the activity of such networks is stable and how perturbations of distinct neuronal subtypes recruit changes in activity through recurrent synaptic projections. We apply these conclusions to study the roles of each interneuron subtype in disinhibition, surround suppression, and subtractive or divisive modulation of orientation tuning curves. Our calculations and simulations determine the architectural and stimulus tuning conditions under which cortical activity consistent with experiment is possible. They also lead to novel predictions concerning connectivity and network dynamics that can be tested via optogenetic manipulations. Our work demonstrates that recurrent inhibitory dynamics must be taken into account to fully understand many properties of cortical dynamics observed in experiments. PMID:26740531

  12. Inhibitory stabilization and visual coding in cortical circuits with multiple interneuron subtypes.

    PubMed

    Litwin-Kumar, Ashok; Rosenbaum, Robert; Doiron, Brent

    2016-03-01

    Recent anatomical and functional characterization of cortical inhibitory interneurons has highlighted the diverse computations supported by different subtypes of interneurons. However, most theoretical models of cortex do not feature multiple classes of interneurons and rather assume a single homogeneous population. We study the dynamics of recurrent excitatory-inhibitory model cortical networks with parvalbumin (PV)-, somatostatin (SOM)-, and vasointestinal peptide-expressing (VIP) interneurons, with connectivity properties motivated by experimental recordings from mouse primary visual cortex. Our theory describes conditions under which the activity of such networks is stable and how perturbations of distinct neuronal subtypes recruit changes in activity through recurrent synaptic projections. We apply these conclusions to study the roles of each interneuron subtype in disinhibition, surround suppression, and subtractive or divisive modulation of orientation tuning curves. Our calculations and simulations determine the architectural and stimulus tuning conditions under which cortical activity consistent with experiment is possible. They also lead to novel predictions concerning connectivity and network dynamics that can be tested via optogenetic manipulations. Our work demonstrates that recurrent inhibitory dynamics must be taken into account to fully understand many properties of cortical dynamics observed in experiments.

  13. Neurotrophic effects of GnRH on neurite outgrowth and neurofilament protein expression in cultured cerebral cortical neurons of rat embryos.

    PubMed

    Quintanar, J Luis; Salinas, Eva

    2008-06-01

    The presence of GnRH receptor in cerebral cortical neurons of rat embryos and adult rats has been described. In this work, we studied the effects of GnRH on outgrowth and length of neurites and cytoskeletal neurofilament proteins expression (NF-68 and NF-200 kDa) by immunoblot of cultured cerebral cortical neurons of rat embryos. Our results show that GnRH increases both outgrowth and length of neurites accompanied by an increase in neurofilaments expression. It is conceivable that GnRH plays a role in neuronal plasticity parallel to its gonadal function.

  14. Organizing Principles of Cortical Layer 6

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Farran

    2009-01-01

    Neurons in the deepest layer of mammalian cerebral cortex are morphologically and physiological diverse and are situated in a strategic position to modulate neuronal activity locally and in other structures. The variety of neuronal circuits within which layer 6 neurons participate differs across species and cortical regions. However even amidst this diversity, common organizational features emerge. Examination of the anatomical and physiological characteristics of different classes of layer 6 neuron, each specialized to participate in distinct circuits, provides insight into the functional contributions of layer 6 neurons toward cortical information processing. PMID:20179784

  15. Cortical somatosensory evoked potentials and spasticity assessment after botulinum toxin type A injection in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Boćkowski, L; Okurowska-Zawada, B; Sobaniec, W; Kułak, W; Sendrowski, K

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism of Botulinum Toxin Type A (BTX-A) action at the neuromuscular junction is well known. But from the introduction of BTX-A, some authors have suggested a central action of BTX-A and possible side effects far from the site of injection. Some studies demonstrate an improvement of cortical SEPs associated with reduction of spasticity after BTX-A injection. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of BTX-A treatment on cortical somatosensory potentials (SEP). A group of twenty nine children ranging from 2 to 17 years old with cerebral palsy were studied. Each patients spasticity level was evaluated before, 2 weeks and 6 weeks after BTX-A injection by the Modified Ashworth Scale and modified Gait Physician's Rating Scale. The SEPs from lower and upper extremities were performed before and between 2 and 6 weeks (19.34 +/- 8.82 days) after BTX-A administration. The mean spasitity level was significantly lower 2 and 6 weeks after BTX-A injection. The gait analysis by modified Physician's Rating Scale (PRS) showed significant improvement two weeks and six weeks after BTX-A injection. SEPs results were abnormal before BTX-A injection in 25 children with cerebral palsy. However we didn't find any significant changes of SEPs latencies after BTX-A injection. The results of SEP after BTX-A administration in children with cerebral palsy do not confirm the central action of BTX-A on somatosensory pathways. We did not find any significant changes of SEP latencies associated with clinical reduction of spasticity. It seems that SEP results could support the opinion, that BTX-A does not have any direct central effect on sensory pathways. Remote side effects may be explained by an indirect mechanism due to modification of the central loops of reflexes or to hematogenous spread of BTX-A.

  16. Vascular Function, Cerebral Cortical Thickness, and Cognitive Performance in Middle-Aged Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Caucasian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Pasha, Evan; Kaur, Sonya S.; Gonzales, Mitzi M.; Machin, Daniel R.; Kasischke, Kennon; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Haley, Andreana P.

    2015-01-01

    Hispanics are at increased risk of acquiring cardiovascular risk factors that contribute to cognitive dysfunction. To compare indices of vascular health to measures of cerebral gray matter integrity, 60 middle-aged Hispanic and non-Hispanic Caucasian participants were matched across age, gender, years of education, and mental status. Arterial stiffness was characterized via β-stiffness index and carotid-femoral pulse-wave velocity, and magnetic resonance imaging estimated cortical thickness in a priori regions of interest known to be susceptible to vascular risk factors. Measures of arterial stiffness were significantly higher in Hispanics than in non-Hispanic Caucasians. Hispanics exhibited thinner left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) cortical thickness (p=0.04) with concurrently lower language (p=0.02), memory (p=0.03), and attention-executive functioning (p=0.02). These results suggest that compromised vascular health may occur simultaneously with cortical thinning of the LIFG as an early neuropathological alteration in Hispanics. PMID:25720950

  17. An Evo-Devo Approach to Thyroid Hormones in Cerebral and Cerebellar Cortical Development: Etiological Implications for Autism

    PubMed Central

    Berbel, Pere; Navarro, Daniela; Román, Gustavo C.

    2014-01-01

    The morphological alterations of cortical lamination observed in mouse models of developmental hypothyroidism prompted the recognition that these experimental changes resembled the brain lesions of children with autism; this led to recent studies showing that maternal thyroid hormone deficiency increases fourfold the risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), offering for the first time the possibility of prevention of some forms of ASD. For ethical reasons, the role of thyroid hormones on brain development is currently studied using animal models, usually mice and rats. Although mammals have in common many basic developmental principles regulating brain development, as well as fundamental basic mechanisms that are controlled by similar metabolic pathway activated genes, there are also important differences. For instance, the rodent cerebral cortex is basically a primary cortex, whereas the primary sensory areas in humans account for a very small surface in the cerebral cortex when compared to the associative and frontal areas that are more extensive. Associative and frontal areas in humans are involved in many neurological disorders, including ASD, attention deficit-hyperactive disorder, and dyslexia, among others. Therefore, an evo-devo approach to neocortical evolution among species is fundamental to understand not only the role of thyroid hormones and environmental thyroid disruptors on evolution, development, and organization of the cerebral cortex in mammals but also their role in neurological diseases associated to thyroid dysfunction. PMID:25250016

  18. An evo-devo approach to thyroid hormones in cerebral and cerebellar cortical development: etiological implications for autism.

    PubMed

    Berbel, Pere; Navarro, Daniela; Román, Gustavo C

    2014-01-01

    The morphological alterations of cortical lamination observed in mouse models of developmental hypothyroidism prompted the recognition that these experimental changes resembled the brain lesions of children with autism; this led to recent studies showing that maternal thyroid hormone deficiency increases fourfold the risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), offering for the first time the possibility of prevention of some forms of ASD. For ethical reasons, the role of thyroid hormones on brain development is currently studied using animal models, usually mice and rats. Although mammals have in common many basic developmental principles regulating brain development, as well as fundamental basic mechanisms that are controlled by similar metabolic pathway activated genes, there are also important differences. For instance, the rodent cerebral cortex is basically a primary cortex, whereas the primary sensory areas in humans account for a very small surface in the cerebral cortex when compared to the associative and frontal areas that are more extensive. Associative and frontal areas in humans are involved in many neurological disorders, including ASD, attention deficit-hyperactive disorder, and dyslexia, among others. Therefore, an evo-devo approach to neocortical evolution among species is fundamental to understand not only the role of thyroid hormones and environmental thyroid disruptors on evolution, development, and organization of the cerebral cortex in mammals but also their role in neurological diseases associated to thyroid dysfunction.

  19. [Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome with cortical subarachnoid hemorrhage presenting as thunderclap headache-a long followed up case].

    PubMed

    Ogura, Aya; Suzuki, Junichiro; Imai, Kazunori; Nishida, Suguru; Kato, Takashi; Yasuda, Takeshi; Ito, Yasuhiro

    2013-01-01

    A 59-year-old woman presented with thunderclap headache. Cranial CT showed cortical subarachnoid hemorrhage (cSAH) at the right parietal lobe and cerebral angiography on day 5 revealed multiple cerebral arterial constriction, diagnosed as reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS). We could not detect vasoconstriction in MRA at the first examination on day 4, and vasoconstrictive finding appeared around Willis circle 8 days later. There was a temporal difference in a cephalalgic symptom and vasoconstrictive appearance. Clinical symptoms completely recovered and head CT, MRI/MRA findings were reversible after two months, reflecting a rather good RCVS outcome. However, we also followed up this case precisely using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with easy Z-score imaging system (e-ZIS), and hypoperfusion at the locus of cSAH persisted for more than one year. This finding strongly suggests that tissue damage in the cSAH locus induced by RCVS may be subclinicaly irreversible, even though clinical symptoms and abnormalities in cranial MRI and MRA completely recover.SPECT may be a high sensitive technique to detect the irreversible lesion in RCVS.

  20. A novel inhibitory nucleo-cortical circuit controls cerebellar Golgi cell activity

    PubMed Central

    Ankri, Lea; Husson, Zoé; Pietrajtis, Katarzyna; Proville, Rémi; Léna, Clément; Yarom, Yosef; Dieudonné, Stéphane; Uusisaari, Marylka Yoe

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum, a crucial center for motor coordination, is composed of a cortex and several nuclei. The main mode of interaction between these two parts is considered to be formed by the inhibitory control of the nuclei by cortical Purkinje neurons. We now amend this view by showing that inhibitory GABA-glycinergic neurons of the cerebellar nuclei (CN) project profusely into the cerebellar cortex, where they make synaptic contacts on a GABAergic subpopulation of cerebellar Golgi cells. These spontaneously firing Golgi cells are inhibited by optogenetic activation of the inhibitory nucleo-cortical fibers both in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggest that the CN may contribute to the functional recruitment of the cerebellar cortex by decreasing Golgi cell inhibition onto granule cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06262.001 PMID:25965178

  1. Cell-specific gain modulation by synaptically released zinc in cortical circuits of audition.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Charles T; Kumar, Manoj; Xiong, Shanshan; Tzounopoulos, Thanos

    2017-09-09

    In many excitatory synapses, mobile zinc is found within glutamatergic vesicles and is coreleased with glutamate. Ex vivo studies established that synaptically released (synaptic) zinc inhibits excitatory neurotransmission at lower frequencies of synaptic activity but enhances steady state synaptic responses during higher frequencies of activity. However, it remains unknown how synaptic zinc affects neuronal processing in vivo. Here, we imaged the sound-evoked neuronal activity of the primary auditory cortex in awake mice. We discovered that synaptic zinc enhanced the gain of sound-evoked responses in CaMKII-expressing principal neurons, but it reduced the gain of parvalbumin- and somatostatin-expressing interneurons. This modulation was sound intensity-dependent and, in part, NMDA receptor-independent. By establishing a previously unknown link between synaptic zinc and gain control of auditory cortical processing, our findings advance understanding about cortical synaptic mechanisms and create a new framework for approaching and interpreting the role of the auditory cortex in sound processing.

  2. Functional MRI of the immediate impact of transcranial magnetic stimulation on cortical and subcortical motor circuits.

    PubMed

    Bestmann, Sven; Baudewig, Jürgen; Siebner, Hartwig R; Rothwell, John C; Frahm, Jens

    2004-04-01

    Recent studies indicate that the cortical effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) may not be localized to the site of stimulation, but spread to other distant areas. Using echo-planar imaging with blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) contrast at 3 Tesla, we measured MRI signal changes in cortical and subcortical motor regions during high-frequency (3.125 Hz) repetitive TMS (rTMS) of the left sensorimotor cortex (M1/S1) at intensities above and below the active motor threshold in healthy humans. The supra- and subthreshold nature of the TMS pulses was confirmed by simultaneous electromyographic monitoring of a hand muscle. Suprathreshold rTMS activated a network of primary and secondary cortical motor regions including M1/S1, supplementary motor area, dorsal premotor cortex, cingulate motor area, the putamen and thalamus. Subthreshold rTMS elicited no MRI-detectable activity in the stimulated M1/S1, but otherwise led to a similar activation pattern as obtained for suprathreshold stimulation though at reduced intensity. In addition, we observed activations within the auditory system, including the transverse and superior temporal gyrus, inferior colliculus and medial geniculate nucleus. The present findings support the notion that re-afferent feedback from evoked movements represents the dominant input to the motor system via M1 during suprathreshold stimulation. The BOLD MRI changes in motor areas distant from the site of subthreshold stimulation are likely to originate from altered synaptic transmissions due to induced excitability changes in M1/S1. They reflect the capability of rTMS to target both local and remote brain regions as tightly connected constituents of a cortical and subcortical network.

  3. Altered neural connectivity in excitatory and inhibitory cortical circuits in autism

    PubMed Central

    Zikopoulos, Basilis; Barbas, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Converging evidence from diverse studies suggests that atypical brain connectivity in autism affects in distinct ways short- and long-range cortical pathways, disrupting neural communication and the balance of excitation and inhibition. This hypothesis is based mostly on functional non-invasive studies that show atypical synchronization and connectivity patterns between cortical areas in children and adults with autism. Indirect methods to study the course and integrity of major brain pathways at low resolution show changes in fractional anisotropy (FA) or diffusivity of the white matter in autism. Findings in post-mortem brains of adults with autism provide evidence of changes in the fine structure of axons below prefrontal cortices, which communicate over short- or long-range pathways with other cortices and subcortical structures. Here we focus on evidence of cellular and axon features that likely underlie the changes in short- and long-range communication in autism. We review recent findings of changes in the shape, thickness, and volume of brain areas, cytoarchitecture, neuronal morphology, cellular elements, and structural and neurochemical features of individual axons in the white matter, where pathology is evident even in gross images. We relate cellular and molecular features to imaging and genetic studies that highlight a variety of polymorphisms and epigenetic factors that primarily affect neurite growth and synapse formation and function in autism. We report preliminary findings of changes in autism in the ratio of distinct types of inhibitory neurons in prefrontal cortex, known to shape network dynamics and the balance of excitation and inhibition. Finally we present a model that synthesizes diverse findings by relating them to developmental events, with a goal to identify common processes that perturb development in autism and affect neural communication, reflected in altered patterns of attention, social interactions, and language. PMID:24098278

  4. Cognitive enhancers versus addictive psychostimulants: The good and bad side of dopamine on prefrontal cortical circuits.

    PubMed

    Bisagno, Veronica; González, Betina; Urbano, Francisco J

    2016-07-01

    In this review we describe how highly addictive psychostimulants such as cocaine and methamphetamine actions might underlie hypoexcitabilty in frontal cortical areas observed in clinical and preclinical models of psychostimulant abuse. We discuss new mechanisms that describe how increments on synaptic dopamine release are linked to reduce calcium influx in both pre and postsynaptic compartments on medial PFC networks, therefore modulating synaptic integration and information. Sustained DA neuromodulation by addictive psychostimulants can "lock" frontal cortical networks in deficient states. On the other hand, other psychostimulants such as modafinil and methylphenidate are considered pharmacological neuroenhancement agents that are popular among healthy people seeking neuroenhancement. More clinical and preclinical research is needed to further clarify mechanisms of actions and physiological effects of cognitive enhancers which show an opposite pattern compared to chronic effect of addictive psychostimulants: they appear to increase cortical excitability. In conclusion, studies summarized here suggest that there is frontal cortex hypoactivity and deficient inhibitory control in drug-addicted individuals. Thus, additional research on physiological effects of cognitive enhancers like modafinil and methylphenidate seems necessary in order to expand current knowledge on mechanisms behind their therapeutic role in the treatment of addiction and other neuropsychiatric disorders.

  5. Attention modulates specific motor cortical circuits recruited by transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Mirdamadi, J L; Suzuki, L Y; Meehan, S K

    2017-09-17

    Skilled performance and acquisition is dependent upon afferent input to motor cortex. The present study used short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI) to probe how manipulation of sensory afference by attention affects different circuits projecting to pyramidal tract neurons in motor cortex. SAI was assessed in the first dorsal interosseous muscle while participants performed a low or high attention-demanding visual detection task. SAI was evoked by preceding a suprathreshold transcranial magnetic stimulus with electrical stimulation of the median nerve at the wrist. To isolate different afferent intracortical circuits in motor cortex SAI was evoked using either posterior-anterior (PA) or anterior-posterior (PA) monophasic current. In an independent sample, somatosensory processing during the same attention-demanding visual detection tasks was assessed using somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEP) elicited by median nerve stimulation. SAI elicited by AP TMS was reduced under high compared to low visual attention demands. SAI elicited by PA TMS was not affected by visual attention demands. SEPs revealed that the high visual attention load reduced the fronto-central P20-N30 but not the contralateral parietal N20-P25 SEP component. P20-N30 reduction confirmed that the visual attention task altered sensory afference. The current results offer further support that PA and AP TMS recruit different neuronal circuits. AP circuits may be one substrate by which cognitive strategies shape sensorimotor processing during skilled movement by altering sensory processing in premotor areas. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Chemically Based Mathematical Model for Development of Cerebral Cortical Folding Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Striegel, Deborah A.; Hurdal, Monica K.

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism for cortical folding pattern formation is not fully understood. Current models represent scenarios that describe pattern formation through local interactions, and one recent model is the intermediate progenitor model. The intermediate progenitor (IP) model describes a local chemically driven scenario, where an increase in intermediate progenitor cells in the subventricular zone correlates to gyral formation. Here we present a mathematical model that uses features of the IP model and further captures global characteristics of cortical pattern formation. A prolate spheroidal surface is used to approximate the ventricular zone. Prolate spheroidal harmonics are applied to a Turing reaction-diffusion system, providing a chemically based framework for cortical folding. Our model reveals a direct correlation between pattern formation and the size and shape of the lateral ventricle. Additionally, placement and directionality of sulci and the relationship between domain scaling and cortical pattern elaboration are explained. The significance of this model is that it elucidates the consistency of cortical patterns among individuals within a species and addresses inter-species variability based on global characteristics and provides a critical piece to the puzzle of cortical pattern formation. PMID:19779554

  7. Functions of gamma-band synchronization in cognition: from single circuits to functional diversity across cortical and subcortical systems.

    PubMed

    Bosman, Conrado A; Lansink, Carien S; Pennartz, Cyriel M A

    2014-06-01

    Gamma-band activity (30-90 Hz) and the synchronization of neural activity in the gamma-frequency range have been observed in different cortical and subcortical structures and have been associated with different cognitive functions. However, it is still unknown whether gamma-band synchronization subserves a single universal function or a diversity of functions across the full spectrum of cognitive processes. Here, we address this question reviewing the mechanisms of gamma-band oscillation generation and the functions associated with gamma-band activity across several cortical and subcortical structures. Additionally, we raise a plausible explanation of why gamma rhythms are found so ubiquitously across brain structures. Gamma band activity originates from the interplay between inhibition and excitation. We stress that gamma oscillations, associated with this interplay, originate from basic functional motifs that conferred advantages for low-level system processing and multiple cognitive functions throughout evolution. We illustrate the multifunctionality of gamma-band activity by considering its role in neural systems for perception, selective attention, memory, motivation and behavioral control. We conclude that gamma-band oscillations support multiple cognitive processes, rather than a single one, which, however, can be traced back to a limited set of circuit motifs which are found universally across species and brain structures. © 2014 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Cognitive ability is associated with altered medial frontal cortical circuits in the LgDel mouse model of 22q11.2DS.

    PubMed

    Meechan, D W; Rutz, H L H; Fralish, M S; Maynard, T M; Rothblat, L A; LaMantia, A-S

    2015-05-01

    We established a relationship between cognitive deficits and cortical circuits in the LgDel model of 22q11 Deletion Syndrome (22q11DS)-a genetic syndrome with one of the most significant risks for schizophrenia and autism. In the LgDel mouse, optimal acquisition, execution, and reversal of a visually guided discrimination task, comparable to executive function tasks in primates including humans, are compromised; however, there is significant individual variation in degree of impairment. The task relies critically on the integrity of circuits in medial anterior frontal cortical regions. Accordingly, we analyzed neuronal changes that reflect previously defined 22q11DS-related alterations of cortical development in the medial anterior frontal cortex of the behaviorally characterized LgDel mice. Interneuron placement, synapse distribution, and projection neuron frequency are altered in this region. The magnitude of one of these changes, layer 2/3 projection neuron frequency, is a robust predictor of behavioral performance: it is substantially and selectively lower in animals with the most significant behavioral deficits. These results parallel correlations of volume reduction and altered connectivity in comparable cortical regions with diminished executive function in 22q11DS patients. Apparently, 22q11 deletion alters behaviorally relevant circuits in a distinct cortical region that are essential for cognitive function.

  9. Children with cerebral palsy have altered oscillatory activity in the motor and visual cortices during a knee motor task.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Max J; Proskovec, Amy L; Gehringer, James E; Heinrichs-Graham, Elizabeth; Wilson, Tony W

    2017-01-01

    The neuroimaging literature on cerebral palsy (CP) has predominantly focused on identifying structural aberrations within the white matter (e.g., fiber track integrity), with very few studies examining neural activity within the key networks that serve the production of motor actions. The current investigation used high-density magnetoencephalography to begin to fill this knowledge gap by quantifying the temporal dynamics of the alpha and beta cortical oscillations in children with CP (age = 15.5 ± 3 years; GMFCS levels II-III) and typically developing (TD) children (age = 14.1 ± 3 years) during a goal-directed isometric target-matching task using the knee joint. Advanced beamforming methods were used to image the cortical oscillations during the movement planning and execution stages. Compared with the TD children, our results showed that the children with CP had stronger alpha and beta event-related desynchronization (ERD) within the primary motor cortices, premotor area, inferior parietal lobule, and inferior frontal gyrus during the motor planning stage. Differences in beta ERD amplitude extended through the motor execution stage within the supplementary motor area and premotor cortices, and a stronger alpha ERD was detected in the anterior cingulate. Interestingly, our results also indicated that alpha and beta oscillations were weaker in the children with CP within the occipital cortices and visual MT area during movement execution. These altered alpha and beta oscillations were accompanied by slower reaction times and substantial target matching errors in the children with CP. We also identified that the strength of the alpha and beta ERDs during the motor planning and execution stages were correlated with the motor performance. Lastly, our regression analyses suggested that the beta ERD within visual areas during motor execution primarily predicted the amount of motor errors. Overall, these data suggest that uncharacteristic alpha and beta

  10. Inter-neuronal correlation distinguishes mechanisms of direction selectivity in cortical circuit models.

    PubMed

    Baker, Pamela M; Bair, Wyeth

    2012-06-27

    Direction selectivity is a fundamental physiological property that arises from primary visual cortex (V1) circuitry, yet basic questions of how direction-selective (DS) receptive fields are constructed remain unanswered. We built a set of simple, plausible neuronal circuits that produce DS cells via different mechanisms and tested these circuits to determine how they can be distinguished experimentally. Our models consisted of populations of spiking units representing physiological cell classes ranging from LGN cells to V1 complex DS cells. They differed in network architecture and DS mechanism, including linear summation of non-DS simple-cell inputs or nonlinear pairwise combinations of non-DS inputs. The circuits also varied in the location of the DS time delay and whether the DS interaction was facilitatory or suppressive. We tested the models with visual stimuli often used experimentally, including sinusoidal gratings and flashed bars, and computed shuffle-corrected cross-correlograms (CCGs) of spike trains from pairs of units that would be accessible to extracellular recording. We found that CCGs revealed fundamental features of the DS models, including the location of signal delays in the DS circuit and the sign (facilitatory or suppressive) of DS interactions. We also found that correlation was strongly stimulus-dependent, changing with direction and temporal frequency in a manner that generalized across model architectures. Our models make specific predictions for designing, optimizing, and interpreting electrophysiology experiments aimed at resolving DS circuitry and provide new insights into mechanisms that could underlie stimulus-dependent correlation. The models are available and easy to explore at www.imodel.org.

  11. Inter-neuronal correlation distinguishes mechanisms of direction selectivity in cortical circuit models

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Pamela M.; Bair, Wyeth

    2012-01-01

    Direction selectivity is a fundamental physiological property that arises from V1 circuitry, yet basic questions of how direction selective (DS) receptive fields are constructed remain unanswered. We built a set of simple, plausible neuronal circuits that produce DS cells via different mechanisms and tested these circuits to determine how they can be distinguished experimentally. Our models consisted of populations of spiking units representing physiological cell classes ranging from LGN cells to V1 complex DS cells. They differed in network architecture and DS mechanism: including linear summation of non-DS simple cell inputs or nonlinear pairwise combinations of non-DS inputs. The circuits also varied in the location of the DS time delay and whether the DS interaction was facilitatory or suppressive. We tested the models with visual stimuli often employed experimentally, including sinusoidal gratings and flashed bars, and computed shuffle-corrected cross-correlograms (CCGs) of spike trains from pairs of units that would be accessible to extracellular recording. We found that CCGs revealed fundamental features of the DS models, including the location of signal delays in the DS circuit and the sign (facilitatory or suppressive) of DS interactions. We also found that correlation was strongly stimulus-dependent, changing with direction and temporal frequency in a manner that generalized across model architectures. Our models make specific predictions for designing, optimizing and interpreting electrophysiology experiments aimed at resolving DS circuitry and provide new insights into mechanisms that could underlie stimulus-dependent correlation. The models are available and easy to explore at www.iModel.org. PMID:22745482

  12. 20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acid Inhibition by HET0016 Offers Neuroprotection, Decreases Edema, and Increases Cortical Cerebral Blood Flow in a Pediatric Asphyxial Cardiac Arrest Model in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Jafar Sadik B; Poloyac, Samuel M; Kochanek, Patrick M; Alexander, Henry; Tudorascu, Dana L; Clark, Robert Sb; Manole, Mioara D

    2015-11-01

    Vasoconstrictive and vasodilatory eicosanoids generated after cardiac arrest (CA) may contribute to cerebral vasomotor disturbances and neurodegeneration. We evaluated the balance of vasodilator/vasoconstrictor eicosanoids produced by cytochrome P450 (CYP) metabolism, and determined their role on cortical perfusion, functional outcome, and neurodegeneration after pediatric asphyxial CA. Cardiac arrest of 9 and 12 minutes was induced in 16- to 18-day-old rats. At 5 and 120 minutes after CA, we quantified the concentration of CYP eicosanoids in the cortex and subcortical areas. In separate rats, we inhibited 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) synthesis after CA and assessed cortical cerebral blood flow (CBF), neurologic deficit score, neurodegeneration, and edema. After 9 minutes of CA, vasodilator eicosanoids markedly increased versus sham. Conversely, after 12 minutes of CA, vasoconstrictor eicosanoid 20-HETE increased versus sham, without compensatory increases in vasodilator eicosanoids. Inhibition of 20-HETE synthesis after 12 minutes of CA decreased cortical 20-HETE levels, increased CBF, reduced neurologic deficits at 3 hours, and reduced neurodegeneration and edema at 48 hours versus vehicle-treated rats. In conclusion, cerebral vasoconstrictor eicosanoids increased after a pediatric CA of 12 minutes. Inhibition of 20-HETE synthesis improved cortical perfusion and short-term neurologic outcome. These results suggest that alterations in CYP eicosanoids have a role in cerebral hypoperfusion and neurodegeneration after CA and may represent important therapeutic targets.

  13. Tangentially migrating transient glutamatergic neurons control neurogenesis and maintenance of cerebral cortical progenitor pools.

    PubMed

    Teissier, A; Waclaw, R R; Griveau, A; Campbell, K; Pierani, A

    2012-02-01

    The relative contribution of intrinsic and extrinsic cues in the regulation of cortical neurogenesis remains a crucial challenge in developmental neurobiology. We previously reported that a transient population of glutamatergic neurons, the cortical plate (CP) transient neurons, migrates from the ventral pallium (VP) over long distances and participate in neocortical development. Here, we show that the genetic ablation of this population leads to a reduction in the number of cortical neurons especially fated to superficial layers. These defects result from precocious neurogenesis followed by a depletion of the progenitor pools. Notably, these changes progress from caudolateral to rostrodorsal pallial territories between E12.5 and E14.5 along the expected trajectory of the ablated cells. Conversely, we describe enhanced proliferation resulting in an increase in the number of cortical neurons in the Gsx2 mutants which present an expansion of the VP and a higher number of CP transient neurons migrating into the pallium. Our findings indicate that these neurons act to maintain the proliferative state of neocortical progenitors and delay differentiation during their migration from extraneocortical regions and, thus, participate in the extrinsic control of cortical neuronal numbers.

  14. Slower postnatal growth is associated with delayed cerebral cortical maturation in preterm newborns.

    PubMed

    Vinall, Jillian; Grunau, Ruth E; Brant, Rollin; Chau, Vann; Poskitt, Kenneth J; Synnes, Anne R; Miller, Steven P

    2013-01-16

    Slower postnatal growth is an important predictor of adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes in infants born preterm. However, the relationship between postnatal growth and cortical development remains largely unknown. Therefore, we examined the association between neonatal growth and diffusion tensor imaging measures of microstructural cortical development in infants born very preterm. Participants were 95 neonates born between 24 and 32 weeks gestational age studied twice with diffusion tensor imaging: scan 1 at a median of 32.1 weeks (interquartile range, 30.4 to 33.6) and scan 2 at a median of 40.3 weeks (interquartile range, 38.7 to 42.7). Fractional anisotropy and eigenvalues were recorded from 15 anatomically defined cortical regions. Weight, head circumference, and length were recorded at birth and at the time of each scan. Growth between scans was examined in relation to diffusion tensor imaging measures at scans 1 and 2, accounting for gestational age, birth weight, sex, postmenstrual age, known brain injury (white matter injury, intraventricular hemorrhage, and cerebellar hemorrhage), and neonatal illness (patent ductus arteriosus, days intubated, infection, and necrotizing enterocolitis). Impaired weight, length, and head growth were associated with delayed microstructural development of the cortical gray matter (fractional anisotropy: P < 0.001), but not white matter (fractional anisotropy: P = 0.529), after accounting for prenatal growth, neonatal illness, and brain injury. Avoiding growth impairment during neonatal care may allow cortical development to proceed optimally and, ultimately, may provide an opportunity to reduce neurological disabilities related to preterm birth.

  15. Two functional inhibitory circuits are comprised of a heterogeneous population of fast-spiking cortical interneurons.

    PubMed

    Li, P; Huntsman, M M

    2014-04-18

    Cortical fast spiking (FS) interneurons possess autaptic, synaptic, and electrical synapses that serve to mediate a fast, coordinated response to their postsynaptic targets. While FS interneurons are known to participate in numerous and diverse actions, functional subgroupings within this multi-functional interneuron class remain to be identified. In the present study, we examined parvalbumin-positive FS interneurons in layer 4 of the primary somatosensory (barrel) cortex - a brain region well-known for specialized inhibitory function. Here we show that FS interneurons fall into two broad categories identified by the onset of the first action potential in a depolarizing train as: "delayed firing FS interneurons (FSD) and early onset firing FS interneurons (FSE). Subtle variations in action potential firing reveal six subtypes within these two categories: delayed non-accommodating (FSD-NAC), delayed stuttering (FSD-STUT), early onset stuttering (FSE-STUT), early onset-late spiking (FSE-LS), early onset early-spiking (FSE-ES), and early onset accommodating (FSE-AC). Using biophysical criteria previously employed to distinguish neuronal cell types, the FSD and FSE categories exhibit several shared biophysical and synaptic properties that coincide with the notion of specificity of inhibitory function within the cortical FS interneuron class.

  16. Evolutionarily Dynamic Alternative Splicing of GPR56 Regulates Regional Cerebral Cortical Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Byoung-Il; Tietjen, Ian; Atabay, Kutay D.; Evrony, Gilad D.; Johnson, Matthew B.; Asare, Ebenezer; Wang, Peter P.; Murayama, Ayako Y.; Im, Kiho; Lisgo, Steven N.; Overman, Lynne; Šestan, Nenad; Chang, Bernard S.; Barkovich, A. James; Grant, P. Ellen; Topçu, Meral; Politsky, Jeffrey; Okano, Hideyuki; Piao, Xianhua; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    The human neocortex has numerous specialized functional areas whose formation is poorly understood. Here, we describe a 15–base pair deletion mutation in a regulatory element of GPR56 that selectively disrupts human cortex surrounding the Sylvian fissure bilaterally including “Broca’s area,” the primary language area, by disrupting regional GPR56 expression and blocking RFX transcription factor binding. GPR56 encodes a heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide–binding protein (G protein)–coupled receptor required for normal cortical development and is expressed in cortical progenitor cells. GPR56 expression levels regulate progenitor proliferation. GPR56 splice forms are highly variable between mice and humans, and the regulatory element of gyrencephalic mammals directs restricted lateral cortical expression. Our data reveal a mechanism by which control of GPR56 expression pattern by multiple alternative promoters can influence stem cell proliferation, gyral patterning, and, potentially, neocortex evolution. PMID:24531968

  17. Regulation of Cerebral Cortical Size and Neuron Number by Fibroblast Growth Factors: Implications for Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaccarino, Flora M.; Grigorenko, Elena L.; Smith, Karen Muller; Stevens, Hanna E.

    2009-01-01

    Increased brain size is common in children with autism spectrum disorders. Here we propose that an increased number of cortical excitatory neurons may underlie the increased brain volume, minicolumn pathology and excessive network excitability, leading to sensory hyper-reactivity and seizures, which are often found in autism. We suggest that…

  18. New Approach for Exploring Cerebral Functional Connectivity: Review of Cortico-cortical Evoked Potential

    PubMed Central

    KUNIEDA, Takeharu; YAMAO, Yukihiro; KIKUCHI, Takayuki; MATSUMOTO, Riki

    2015-01-01

    There has been a paradigm shift in the understanding of brain function. The intrinsic architecture of neuronal connections forms a key component of the cortical organization in our brain. Many imaging studies, such as noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, have now enabled visualization of the white matter fiber tracts interconnecting the functional cortical areas in the living brain. Although such a structural connectome is essential for understanding of cortical function, the anatomical information alone is not sufficient. Practically, few techniques allow the investigation of the excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms of the cortex in vivo in humans. Several attempts have been made to track neuronal connectivity by applying direct electrical stimuli to the brain in order to stimulate subdural and/or depth electrodes and record responses from the functionally connected cortex. In vivo single-pulse electrical stimulation (SPES) and/or cortico-cortical evoked potential (CCEP) were recently introduced to track various brain networks. This article reviews the concepts, significance, methods, mechanisms, limitations, and clinical applications of CCEP in the analysis of these dynamic connections. PMID:25925755

  19. Regulation of Cerebral Cortical Size and Neuron Number by Fibroblast Growth Factors: Implications for Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaccarino, Flora M.; Grigorenko, Elena L.; Smith, Karen Muller; Stevens, Hanna E.

    2009-01-01

    Increased brain size is common in children with autism spectrum disorders. Here we propose that an increased number of cortical excitatory neurons may underlie the increased brain volume, minicolumn pathology and excessive network excitability, leading to sensory hyper-reactivity and seizures, which are often found in autism. We suggest that…

  20. Promoting Motor Cortical Plasticity with Acute Aerobic Exercise: A Role for Cerebellar Circuits.

    PubMed

    Mang, Cameron S; Brown, Katlyn E; Neva, Jason L; Snow, Nicholas J; Campbell, Kristin L; Boyd, Lara A

    2016-01-01

    Acute aerobic exercise facilitated long-term potentiation-like plasticity in the human primary motor cortex (M1). Here, we investigated the effect of acute aerobic exercise on cerebellar circuits, and their potential contribution to altered M1 plasticity in healthy individuals (age: 24.8 ± 4.1 years). In Experiment   1, acute aerobic exercise reduced cerebellar inhibition (CBI) (n = 10, p = 0.01), elicited by dual-coil paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation. In Experiment   2, we evaluated the facilitatory effects of aerobic exercise on responses to paired associative stimulation, delivered with a 25 ms (PAS25) or 21 ms (PAS21) interstimulus interval (n = 16 per group). Increased M1 excitability evoked by PAS25, but not PAS21, relies on trans-cerebellar sensory pathways. The magnitude of the aerobic exercise effect on PAS response was not significantly different between PAS protocols (interaction effect: p = 0.30); however, planned comparisons indicated that, relative to a period of rest, acute aerobic exercise enhanced the excitatory response to PAS25 (p = 0.02), but not PAS21 (p = 0.30). Thus, the results of these planned comparisons indirectly provide modest evidence that modulation of cerebellar circuits may contribute to exercise-induced increases in M1 plasticity. The findings have implications for developing aerobic exercise strategies to "prime" M1 plasticity for enhanced motor skill learning in applied settings.

  1. Promoting Motor Cortical Plasticity with Acute Aerobic Exercise: A Role for Cerebellar Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Mang, Cameron S.; Brown, Katlyn E.; Neva, Jason L.; Snow, Nicholas J.; Campbell, Kristin L.; Boyd, Lara A.

    2016-01-01

    Acute aerobic exercise facilitated long-term potentiation-like plasticity in the human primary motor cortex (M1). Here, we investigated the effect of acute aerobic exercise on cerebellar circuits, and their potential contribution to altered M1 plasticity in healthy individuals (age: 24.8 ± 4.1 years). In Experiment   1, acute aerobic exercise reduced cerebellar inhibition (CBI) (n = 10, p = 0.01), elicited by dual-coil paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation. In Experiment   2, we evaluated the facilitatory effects of aerobic exercise on responses to paired associative stimulation, delivered with a 25 ms (PAS25) or 21 ms (PAS21) interstimulus interval (n = 16 per group). Increased M1 excitability evoked by PAS25, but not PAS21, relies on trans-cerebellar sensory pathways. The magnitude of the aerobic exercise effect on PAS response was not significantly different between PAS protocols (interaction effect: p = 0.30); however, planned comparisons indicated that, relative to a period of rest, acute aerobic exercise enhanced the excitatory response to PAS25 (p = 0.02), but not PAS21 (p = 0.30). Thus, the results of these planned comparisons indirectly provide modest evidence that modulation of cerebellar circuits may contribute to exercise-induced increases in M1 plasticity. The findings have implications for developing aerobic exercise strategies to “prime” M1 plasticity for enhanced motor skill learning in applied settings. PMID:27127659

  2. Prefrontal cognitive deficits in mice with altered cerebral cortical GABAergic interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Bissonette, Gregory B.; Bae, Mihyun H.; Suresh, Tejas; Jaffe, David E.; Powell, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Alterations of inhibitory GABAergic neurons are implicated in multiple psychiatric and neurological disorders, including schizophrenia, autism and epilepsy. In particular, interneuron deficits in prefrontal areas, along with presumed decreased inhibition, have been reported in several human patients. The majority of forebrain GABAergic interneurons arise from a single subcortical source before migrating to their final regional destination. Factors that govern the interneuron populations have been identified, demonstrating that a single gene mutation may globally affect forebrain structures or a single area. In particular, mice lacking the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (Plaur) gene have decreased GABAergic interneurons in frontal and parietal, but not caudal, cortical regions. Plaur assists in the activation of hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF), and several of the interneuron deficits are correlated with decreased levels of HGF/SF. In some cortical regions, the interneuron deficit can be remediated by endogenous overexpression of HGF/SF. In this study, we demonstrate decreased parvalbumin-expressing interneurons in the medial frontal cortex, but not in the hippocampus or basal lateral amygdala in the Plaur null mouse. The Plaur null mouse demonstrates impaired medial frontal cortical function in extinction of cued fear conditioning and the inability to form attentional sets. Endogenous HGF/SF overexpression increased the number of PV-expressing cells in medial frontal cortical areas to levels greater than found in wildtype mice, but did not remediate the behavioral deficits. These data suggest that proper medial frontal cortical function is dependent upon optimum levels of inhibition and that a deficit or excess of interneuron numbers impairs normal cognition. PMID:24211452

  3. Different cerebral cortical areas influence the effect of subthalamic nucleus stimulation on parkinsonian motor deficits and freezing of gait.

    PubMed

    Lyoo, Chul Hyoung; Aalto, Sargo; Rinne, Juha O; Lee, Ki Ook; Oh, Seung Hun; Chang, Jin Woo; Lee, Myung Sik

    2007-11-15

    Inconsistent response in freezing of gait (FOG) with levodopa treatment or STN DBS makes the pathogenesis difficult to understand. We studied brain areas associated with the expression of STN DBS effect on parkinsonian motor deficits and FOG. Ten Parkinson's disease patients with typical FOG were included. One month before STN DBS, we performed [(18)F]-deoxyglucose PET scans and measured the UPDRS motor and modified FOG (mFOG) scores during levodopa off and on periods. At two months after STN DBS, same rating scores were measured. The percentage improvement of mFOG and UPDRS motor scores by STN DBS during levodopa off period was calculated. We searched for brain areas in which glucose metabolism correlated with the improvement of mFOG and UPDRS motor scores by DBS. During levodopa off period, STN DBS improved the UPDRS motor scores by 32.3% and the mFOG scores by 56.6%. There was no correlation between the improvements of both scores. The improvement of UPDRS motor score by DBS correlated with the metabolic activities of rostral supplementary motor area (Brodmann's area 8; BA8), anterior cingulate cortex (BA32), and prefrontal cortex (BA9). On the other hand, there was a positive correlation between the improvement of mFOG score by DBS and the metabolic activity of the parietal, occipital, and temporal sensory association cortices. In conclusion, dysfunction of different cerebral cortical areas limits the beneficial effects of DBS on parkinsonian motor deficits and FOG.

  4. Performing Permanent Distal Middle Cerebral with Common Carotid Artery Occlusion in Aged Rats to Study Cortical Ischemia with Sustained Disability

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Lisa A.; Haenzi, Barbara; Tsai, Shi-Yen; Kartje, Gwendolyn; Beech, John S.; Cash, Diana; Moon, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Stroke typically occurs in elderly people with a range of comorbidities including carotid (or other arterial) atherosclerosis, high blood pressure, obesity and diabetes. Accordingly, when evaluating therapies for stroke in animals, it is important to select a model with excellent face validity. Ischemic stroke accounts for 80% of all strokes, and the majority of these occur in the territory of the middle cerebral artery (MCA), often inducing infarcts that affect the sensorimotor cortex, causing persistent plegia or paresis on the contralateral side of the body. We demonstrate in this video a method for producing ischemic stroke in elderly rats, which causes sustained sensorimotor disability and substantial cortical infarcts. Specifically, we induce permanent distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in elderly female rats by using diathermy forceps to occlude a short segment of this artery. The carotid artery on the ipsilateral side to the lesion was then permanently occluded and the contralateral carotid artery was transiently occluded for 60 min. We measure the infarct size using structural T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 24 hr and 8 weeks after stroke. In this study, the mean infarct volume was 4.5% ± 2.0% (standard deviation) of the ipsilateral hemisphere at 24 hr (corrected for brain swelling using Gerriet’s equation, n = 5). This model is feasible and clinically relevant as it permits the induction of sustained sensorimotor deficits, which is important for the elucidation of pathophysiological mechanisms and novel treatments. PMID:26967269

  5. Performing Permanent Distal Middle Cerebral with Common Carotid Artery Occlusion in Aged Rats to Study Cortical Ischemia with Sustained Disability.

    PubMed

    Wayman, Christina; Duricki, Denise A; Roy, Lisa A; Haenzi, Barbara; Tsai, Shi-Yen; Kartje, Gwendolyn; Beech, John S; Cash, Diana; Moon, Lawrence

    2016-02-23

    Stroke typically occurs in elderly people with a range of comorbidities including carotid (or other arterial) atherosclerosis, high blood pressure, obesity and diabetes. Accordingly, when evaluating therapies for stroke in animals, it is important to select a model with excellent face validity. Ischemic stroke accounts for 80% of all strokes, and the majority of these occur in the territory of the middle cerebral artery (MCA), often inducing infarcts that affect the sensorimotor cortex, causing persistent plegia or paresis on the contralateral side of the body. We demonstrate in this video a method for producing ischemic stroke in elderly rats, which causes sustained sensorimotor disability and substantial cortical infarcts. Specifically, we induce permanent distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in elderly female rats by using diathermy forceps to occlude a short segment of this artery. The carotid artery on the ipsilateral side to the lesion was then permanently occluded and the contralateral carotid artery was transiently occluded for 60 min. We measure the infarct size using structural T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 24 hr and 8 weeks after stroke. In this study, the mean infarct volume was 4.5% ± 2.0% (standard deviation) of the ipsilateral hemisphere at 24 hr (corrected for brain swelling using Gerriet's equation, n = 5). This model is feasible and clinically relevant as it permits the induction of sustained sensorimotor deficits, which is important for the elucidation of pathophysiological mechanisms and novel treatments.

  6. Cerebral White Matter

    PubMed Central

    Schmahmann, Jeremy D.; Smith, Eric E.; Eichler, Florian S.; Filley, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Lesions of the cerebral white matter (WM) result in focal neurobehavioral syndromes, neuropsychiatric phenomena, and dementia. The cerebral WM contains fiber pathways that convey axons linking cerebral cortical areas with each other and with subcortical structures, facilitating the distributed neural circuits that subserve sensorimotor function, intellect, and emotion. Recent neuroanatomical investigations reveal that these neural circuits are topographically linked by five groupings of fiber tracts emanating from every neocortical area: (1) cortico-cortical association fibers; (2) corticostriatal fibers; (3) commissural fibers; and cortico-subcortical pathways to (4) thalamus and (5) pontocerebellar system, brain stem, and/or spinal cord. Lesions of association fibers prevent communication between cortical areas engaged in different domains of behavior. Lesions of subcortical structures or projection/striatal fibers disrupt the contribution of subcortical nodes to behavior. Disconnection syndromes thus result from lesions of the cerebral cortex, subcortical structures, and WM tracts that link the nodes that make up the distributed circuits. The nature and the severity of the clinical manifestations of WM lesions are determined, in large part, by the location of the pathology: discrete neurological and neuropsychiatric symptoms result from focal WM lesions, whereas cognitive impairment across multiple domains—WM dementia—occurs in the setting of diffuse WM disease. We present a detailed review of the conditions affecting WM that produce these neurobehavioral syndromes, and consider the pathophysiology, clinical effects, and broad significance of the effects of aging and vascular compromise on cerebral WM, in an attempt to help further the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of these disorders. PMID:18990132

  7. An autopsied case of MV2K + C-type sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease presenting with widespread cerebral cortical involvement and Kuru plaques.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yasushi; Saito, Yufuko; Aiba, Ikuko; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Mimuro, Maya; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki; Yoshida, Mari

    2017-06-01

    MV2-type sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), which was previously called "Kuru-plaque variant", was gradually revealed to have a wide spectrum and has been classified into three pathological subtypes: MV2K, MV2C and MV2K + C. We herein describe the detailed clinical findings and neuropathologic observations from an autopsied MV2K + C-type Japanese sCJD case with widespread cerebral cortical pathology and Kuru plaques. In the early stages of the disease, the patient exhibited gait disturbance with ataxia and dysarthria as well as gradual appearance of cognitive dysfunction. Diffusion-weighted images (DWI) on MRI revealed extensive cerebral cortical hyperintensity. Pathologic investigation revealed extensive spongiform change in the cerebral cortex, particularly in the deeper layers. Vacuole size varied, and some were confluent. Prion protein (PrP) immunostaining revealed extensive PrP deposition in the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus, cerebellum, brainstem and spinal cord. In the cerebral cortex, synaptic-type, Kuru plaque-like, and coarse plaque-type PrP depositions were mainly observed, along with some perivacuolar-type PrP depositions. Kuru plaques and coarse plaque-type PrP depositions also were observed in the cerebellar cortex. PrP gene analysis revealed no mutations, and polymorphic codon 129 exhibited Met/Val heterozygosity. Western blot analysis revealed a mixture of intermediate-type PrP(Sc) and type 2 PrP(Sc) . Based on previous reports regarding MV2-type sCJD and the clinicopathologic findings of the present case, we speculated that it may be possible to clinically distinguish each MV2 subtype. Clinical presentation of the MV2K + C subtype includes predominant cerebral cortical involvement signs with ataxia and DWI hyperintensity of the cerebral cortex on MRI. © 2016 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  8. Mirrored bilateral slow-wave cortical activity within local circuits revealed by fast bihemispheric voltage-sensitive dye imaging in anesthetized and awake mice.

    PubMed

    Mohajerani, Majid H; McVea, David A; Fingas, Matthew; Murphy, Timothy H

    2010-03-10

    Spontaneous slow-wave oscillations of neuronal membrane potential occur about once every second in the rodent cortex and may serve to shape the efficacy of evoked neuronal responses and consolidate memory during sleep. However, whether these oscillations reflect the entrainment of all cortical regions via propagating waves or whether they exhibit regional and temporal heterogeneity that reflects processing in local cortical circuits is unknown. Using voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) imaging within an adult C57BL/6J mouse cross-midline large craniotomy preparation, we recorded this depolarizing activity across most of both cortical hemispheres simultaneously in both anesthetized and quiet awake animals. Spontaneous oscillations in the VSD signal were highly synchronized between hemispheres, and acallosal I/LnJ mice indicated that synchrony depended on the corpus callosum. In both anesthetized and awake mice (recovered from anesthesia), the oscillations were not necessarily global changes in activity state but were made up of complex local patterns characterized by multiple discrete peaks that were unevenly distributed across cortex. Although the local patterns of depolarizing activity were complex and changed over tens of milliseconds, they were faithfully mirrored in both hemispheres in mice with an intact corpus callosum, to perhaps ensure parallel modification of related circuits in both hemispheres. We conclude that within global rhythms of spontaneous activity are complex events that reflect orchestrated processing within local cortical circuits.

  9. Neural Correlates for Apathy: Frontal-Prefrontal and Parietal Cortical- Subcortical Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Rita; Signori, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Apathy is an uncertain nosographical entity, which includes reduced motivation, abulia, decreased empathy, and lack of emotional involvement; it is an important and heavy-burden clinical condition which strongly impacts in everyday life events, affects the common daily living abilities, reduced the inner goal directed behavior, and gives the heaviest burden on caregivers. Is a quite common comorbidity of many neurological disease, However, there is no definite consensus on the role of apathy in clinical practice, no definite data on anatomical circuits involved in its development, and no definite instrument to detect it at bedside. As a general observation, the occurrence of apathy is connected to damage of prefrontal cortex (PFC) and basal ganglia; “emotional affective” apathy may be related to the orbitomedial PFC and ventral striatum; “cognitive apathy” may be associated with dysfunction of lateral PFC and dorsal caudate nuclei; deficit of “autoactivation” may be due to bilateral lesions of the internal portion of globus pallidus, bilateral paramedian thalamic lesions, or the dorsomedial portion of PFC. On the other hand, apathy severity has been connected to neurofibrillary tangles density in the anterior cingulate gyrus and to gray matter atrophy in the anterior cingulate (ACC) and in the left medial frontal cortex, confirmed by functional imaging studies. These neural networks are linked to projects, judjing and planning, execution and selection common actions, and through the basolateral amygdala and nucleus accumbens projects to the frontostriatal and to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Therefore, an alteration of these circuitry caused a lack of insight, a reduction of decision-making strategies, and a reduced speedness in action decision, major responsible for apathy. Emergent role concerns also the parietal cortex, with its direct action motivation control. We will discuss the importance of these circuits in different pathologies

  10. Neural Correlates for Apathy: Frontal-Prefrontal and Parietal Cortical- Subcortical Circuits.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Rita; Signori, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Apathy is an uncertain nosographical entity, which includes reduced motivation, abulia, decreased empathy, and lack of emotional involvement; it is an important and heavy-burden clinical condition which strongly impacts in everyday life events, affects the common daily living abilities, reduced the inner goal directed behavior, and gives the heaviest burden on caregivers. Is a quite common comorbidity of many neurological disease, However, there is no definite consensus on the role of apathy in clinical practice, no definite data on anatomical circuits involved in its development, and no definite instrument to detect it at bedside. As a general observation, the occurrence of apathy is connected to damage of prefrontal cortex (PFC) and basal ganglia; "emotional affective" apathy may be related to the orbitomedial PFC and ventral striatum; "cognitive apathy" may be associated with dysfunction of lateral PFC and dorsal caudate nuclei; deficit of "autoactivation" may be due to bilateral lesions of the internal portion of globus pallidus, bilateral paramedian thalamic lesions, or the dorsomedial portion of PFC. On the other hand, apathy severity has been connected to neurofibrillary tangles density in the anterior cingulate gyrus and to gray matter atrophy in the anterior cingulate (ACC) and in the left medial frontal cortex, confirmed by functional imaging studies. These neural networks are linked to projects, judjing and planning, execution and selection common actions, and through the basolateral amygdala and nucleus accumbens projects to the frontostriatal and to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Therefore, an alteration of these circuitry caused a lack of insight, a reduction of decision-making strategies, and a reduced speedness in action decision, major responsible for apathy. Emergent role concerns also the parietal cortex, with its direct action motivation control. We will discuss the importance of these circuits in different pathologies, degenerative or

  11. The apical complex couples cell fate and cell survival to cerebral cortical development

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seonhee; Lehtinen, Maria K.; Sessa, Alessandro; Zappaterra, Mauro; Cho, Seo-Hee; Gonzalez, Dilenny; Boggan, Brigid; Austin, Christina A.; Wijnholds, Jan; Gambello, Michael J.; Malicki, Jarema; LaMantia, Anthony S.; Broccoli, Vania; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2010-01-01

    Cortical development depends upon tightly controlled cell fate and cell survival decisions that generate a functional neuronal population, but the coordination of these two processes is poorly understood. Here we show that conditional removal of a key apical complex protein, Pals1, causes premature withdrawal from the cell cycle, inducing excessive generation of early-born postmitotic neurons followed by surprisingly massive and rapid cell death, leading to the abrogation of virtually the entire cortical structure. Pals1 loss shows exquisite dosage sensitivity, so that heterozygote mutants show an intermediate phenotype on cell fate and cell death. Loss of Pals1 blocks essential cell survival signals, including the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, while mTORC1 activation partially rescues Pals1 deficiency. These data highlight unexpected roles of the apical complex protein Pals1 in cell survival through interactions with mTOR signaling. PMID:20399730

  12. Individual language experience modulates rapid formation of cortical memory circuits for novel words.

    PubMed

    Kimppa, Lilli; Kujala, Teija; Shtyrov, Yury

    2016-07-22

    Mastering multiple languages is an increasingly important ability in the modern world; furthermore, multilingualism may affect human learning abilities. Here, we test how the brain's capacity to rapidly form new representations for spoken words is affected by prior individual experience in non-native language acquisition. Formation of new word memory traces is reflected in a neurophysiological response increase during a short exposure to novel lexicon. Therefore, we recorded changes in electrophysiological responses to phonologically native and non-native novel word-forms during a perceptual learning session, in which novel stimuli were repetitively presented to healthy adults in either ignore or attend conditions. We found that larger number of previously acquired languages and earlier average age of acquisition (AoA) predicted greater response increase to novel non-native word-forms. This suggests that early and extensive language experience is associated with greater neural flexibility for acquiring novel words with unfamiliar phonology. Conversely, later AoA was associated with a stronger response increase for phonologically native novel word-forms, indicating better tuning of neural linguistic circuits to native phonology. The results suggest that individual language experience has a strong effect on the neural mechanisms of word learning, and that it interacts with the phonological familiarity of the novel lexicon.

  13. A Cortical Circuit for Sexually Dimorphic Oxytocin-Dependent Anxiety Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kun; Nakajima, Miho; Ibañez-Tallon, Ines; Heintz, Nathaniel

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The frequency of human social and emotional disorders varies significantly between males and females. We have recently reported that oxytocin receptor interneurons (OxtrINs) modulate female sociosexual behavior. Here we show that in male mice OxtrINs regulate anxiety-related behaviors. We demonstrate that corticotropin releasing hormone binding protein (CRHBP), an antagonist of the stress hormone CRH, is specifically expressed in OxtrINs. Production of CRHBP blocks the CRH-induced potentiation of postsynaptic layer 2/3 pyramidal cell activity of male but not female mice, thus producing an anxiolytic effect. Our data identify OxtrINs as critical for modulation of social and emotional behaviors in both females and males, and reveal a molecular mechanism that acts on local mPFC circuits to coordinate responses to OXT and CRH. They suggest that additional studies of the impact of the OXT/OXTR and CRHBP/CRH pathways in males and females will be important in development of gender specific therapies. PMID:27641503

  14. Individual language experience modulates rapid formation of cortical memory circuits for novel words

    PubMed Central

    Kimppa, Lilli; Kujala, Teija; Shtyrov, Yury

    2016-01-01

    Mastering multiple languages is an increasingly important ability in the modern world; furthermore, multilingualism may affect human learning abilities. Here, we test how the brain’s capacity to rapidly form new representations for spoken words is affected by prior individual experience in non-native language acquisition. Formation of new word memory traces is reflected in a neurophysiological response increase during a short exposure to novel lexicon. Therefore, we recorded changes in electrophysiological responses to phonologically native and non-native novel word-forms during a perceptual learning session, in which novel stimuli were repetitively presented to healthy adults in either ignore or attend conditions. We found that larger number of previously acquired languages and earlier average age of acquisition (AoA) predicted greater response increase to novel non-native word-forms. This suggests that early and extensive language experience is associated with greater neural flexibility for acquiring novel words with unfamiliar phonology. Conversely, later AoA was associated with a stronger response increase for phonologically native novel word-forms, indicating better tuning of neural linguistic circuits to native phonology. The results suggest that individual language experience has a strong effect on the neural mechanisms of word learning, and that it interacts with the phonological familiarity of the novel lexicon. PMID:27444206

  15. An implantable wireless neural interface for recording cortical circuit dynamics in moving primates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borton, David A.; Yin, Ming; Aceros, Juan; Nurmikko, Arto

    2013-04-01

    Objective. Neural interface technology suitable for clinical translation has the potential to significantly impact the lives of amputees, spinal cord injury victims and those living with severe neuromotor disease. Such systems must be chronically safe, durable and effective. Approach. We have designed and implemented a neural interface microsystem, housed in a compact, subcutaneous and hermetically sealed titanium enclosure. The implanted device interfaces the brain with a 510k-approved, 100-element silicon-based microelectrode array via a custom hermetic feedthrough design. Full spectrum neural signals were amplified (0.1 Hz to 7.8 kHz, 200× gain) and multiplexed by a custom application specific integrated circuit, digitized and then packaged for transmission. The neural data (24 Mbps) were transmitted by a wireless data link carried on a frequency-shift-key-modulated signal at 3.2 and 3.8 GHz to a receiver 1 m away by design as a point-to-point communication link for human clinical use. The system was powered by an embedded medical grade rechargeable Li-ion battery for 7 h continuous operation between recharge via an inductive transcutaneous wireless power link at 2 MHz. Main results. Device verification and early validation were performed in both swine and non-human primate freely-moving animal models and showed that the wireless implant was electrically stable, effective in capturing and delivering broadband neural data, and safe for over one year of testing. In addition, we have used the multichannel data from these mobile animal models to demonstrate the ability to decode neural population dynamics associated with motor activity. Significance. We have developed an implanted wireless broadband neural recording device evaluated in non-human primate and swine. The use of this new implantable neural interface technology can provide insight into how to advance human neuroprostheses beyond the present early clinical trials. Further, such tools enable mobile

  16. An Implantable Wireless Neural Interface for Recording Cortical Circuit Dynamics in Moving Primates

    PubMed Central

    Borton, David A.; Yin, Ming; Aceros, Juan; Nurmikko, Arto

    2013-01-01

    Objective Neural interface technology suitable for clinical translation has the potential to significantly impact the lives of amputees, spinal cord injury victims, and those living with severe neuromotor disease. Such systems must be chronically safe, durable, and effective. Approach We have designed and implemented a neural interface microsystem, housed in a compact, subcutaneous, and hermetically sealed titanium enclosure. The implanted device interfaces the brain with a 510k-approved, 100-element silicon-based MEA via a custom hermetic feedthrough design. Full spectrum neural signals were amplified (0.1Hz to 7.8kHz, ×200 gain) and multiplexed by a custom application specific integrated circuit, digitized, and then packaged for transmission. The neural data (24 Mbps) was transmitted by a wireless data link carried on an frequency shift key modulated signal at 3.2GHz and 3.8GHz to a receiver 1 meter away by design as a point-to-point communication link for human clinical use. The system was powered by an embedded medical grade rechargeable Li-ion battery for 7-hour continuous operation between recharge via an inductive transcutaneous wireless power link at 2MHz. Main results Device verification and early validation was performed in both swine and non-human primate freely-moving animal models and showed that the wireless implant was electrically stable, effective in capturing and delivering broadband neural data, and safe for over one year of testing. In addition, we have used the multichannel data from these mobile animal models to demonstrate the ability to decode neural population dynamics associated with motor activity. Significance We have developed an implanted wireless broadband neural recording device evaluated in non-human primate and swine. The use of this new implantable neural interface technology can provide insight on how to advance human neuroprostheses beyond the present early clinical trials. Further, such tools enable mobile patient use, have

  17. Pharmacological characterization of metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated high-affinity GTPase activity in rat cerebral cortical membranes

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, Nobuyuki; Odagaki, Yuji; Koyama, Tsukasa

    2000-01-01

    Activation of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G-proteins) functionally coupled to metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) was assessed by agonist-induced high-affinity GTPase (EC3.6.1.-) activity in rat cerebral cortical membranes. L-Glutamate (1 mM) stimulated high-affinity GTPase activity to the same extent throughout the incubation period up to 20 min, in a Mg2+-dependent manner. The addition of 1 mM L-glutamate augmented Vmax of the enzyme activity (1670 to 3850 pmol mg−1 protein 15 min−1) with slight increase in KM value (0.26 to 0.63 μM). The high-affinity GTPase activity was stimulated by the following compounds with a rank order of potency of (2S,2′R,3′R)-2-(2′,3′-dicarboxycyclopropyl) glycine (DCG-IV) >  (2S,1′S,2′S)-2-(carboxycyclopyropyl)glycine (L-CCG-I) > L-glutamate ≥ 2R,4R-4-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate [(2R,4R)-APDC] > 1S,3R-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylate [(1S,3R)-ACPD] > (S)-4-carboxy-3-hydroxyphenylglycine [(S)-4C3HPG] > (S)-3-carboxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycine [(S)-3C4HPG] > ibotenate, but not by L-(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (L-AP4), (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine [(RS)-3,5-DHPG], quisqualate, or L-serine-O-phosphate (L-SOP), indicative of involvement of group II mGluRs, in particular mGluR2. (2S)-α-Ethylglutamate (EGLU), a presumably selective antagonist against group II mGluRs, inhibited DCG-IV-stimulated high-affinity GTPase activity in a competitive manner with an apparent KB of 220 μM. L-Glutamate-stimulated activity was eliminated by pretreatment of the membranes with sulfhydryl alkylating agent N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) at 30–50 μM, indicating that G-proteins of the Gi family are involved. These results indicate that mGluR agonist-induced high-affinity GTPase activity in rat cerebral cortical membranes may be used to detect the functional interaction between group II mGluRs, in particular mGluR2, and NEM-sensitive Gi proteins. PMID:10928972

  18. Cadmium-Induced Apoptosis in Primary Rat Cerebral Cortical Neurons Culture Is Mediated by a Calcium Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hui; Sun, Ya; Hu, Fei-fei; Bian, Jian-chun; Liu, Xue-zhong; Gu, Jian-hong; Liu, Zong-ping

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an extremely toxic metal, capable of severely damaging several organs, including the brain. Studies have shown that Cd disrupts intracellular free calcium ([Ca2+]i) homeostasis, leading to apoptosis in a variety of cells including primary murine neurons. Calcium is a ubiquitous intracellular ion which acts as a signaling mediator in numerous cellular processes including cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival/death. However, little is known about the role of calcium signaling in Cd-induced apoptosis in neuronal cells. Thus we investigated the role of calcium signaling in Cd-induced apoptosis in primary rat cerebral cortical neurons. Consistent with known toxic properties of Cd, exposure of cerebral cortical neurons to Cd caused morphological changes indicative of apoptosis and cell death. It also induced elevation of [Ca2+]i and inhibition of Na+/K+-ATPase and Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPase activities. This Cd-induced elevation of [Ca2+]i was suppressed by an IP3R inhibitor, 2-APB, suggesting that ER-regulated Ca2+ is involved. In addition, we observed elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, dysfunction of cytochrome oxidase subunits (COX-I/II/III), depletion of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), and cleavage of caspase-9, caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) during Cd exposure. Z-VAD-fmk, a pan caspase inhibitor, partially prevented Cd-induced apoptosis and cell death. Interestingly, apoptosis, cell death and these cellular events induced by Cd were blocked by BAPTA-AM, a specific intracellular Ca2+ chelator. Furthermore, western blot analysis revealed an up-regulated expression of Bcl-2 and down-regulated expression of Bax. However, these were not blocked by BAPTA-AM. Thus Cd toxicity is in part due to its disruption of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, by compromising ATPases activities and ER-regulated Ca2+, and this elevation in Ca2+ triggers the activation of the Ca2+-mitochondria apoptotic signaling pathway. This

  19. The excitability of human cortical inhibitory circuits responsible for the muscle silent period after transcranial brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bertasi, V; Bertolasi, L; Frasson, E; Priori, A

    2000-06-01

    The silent period after transcranial magnetic brain stimulation mainly reflects the activity of inhibitory circuits in the human motor cortex. To assess the excitability of the cortical inhibitory mechanisms responsible for the silent period after transcranial stimulation, we studied, in 15 healthy human subjects, the recovery cycle of the silent period evoked by transcranial and mixed nerve stimulation delivered with a paired stimulation technique. The recovery cycle is defined as the time course of the changes in the size or duration of a conditioned test response when pairs of stimuli (conditioning and test) are used at different conditioning-test intervals. The recovery cycle of the duration of the silent period in the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle during maximum voluntary contraction after transcranial magnetic stimulation was studied by delivering paired magnetic shocks (a conditioning shock and a test shock) at 120% motor-threshold intensity. Conditioning-test intervals ranged from 20-550 ms. The recovery cycle of the silent period in the FDI muscle during maximum voluntary contraction after nerve stimulation was evaluated by paired, supramaximum bipolar electrical stimulation of the ulnar nerve at the wrist (conditioning-test intervals ranging from 20 to 550 ms). Electromyographic activity was recorded by a pair of surface-disk electrodes over the FDI muscle. The recovery cycle of the silent period after transcranial magnetic stimulation delivered through the large round coil showed two phases of facilitation (lengthening of the silent period), one at 20-40 ms and the other at 180-350 ms conditioning-test intervals, with an interposed phase of inhibition (shortening of the silent period) at 80-160 ms. The conditioning magnetic shock left the size of the test motor-evoked potentials statistically unchanged during maximum voluntary contraction. Paired transcranial stimulation with a figure-of-eight coil increased the duration of the test silent

  20. Nerve cell nuclear and nucleolar abnormalities in the human oedematous cerebral cortex. An electron microscopic study using cortical biopsies.

    PubMed

    Castejón, O J; Arismendi, G J

    2004-01-01

    Cerebral cortical biopsies of 17 patients with clinical diagnosis of congenital hydrocephalus, complicated brain trauma, cerebellar syndrome and vascular anomaly were examined with the transmission electron microscope to study the nuclear and nucleolar abnormalities induced by moderate and severe brain oedema, and the associated anoxic-ischemic conditions of brain tissue. In infant patients with congenital hydrocephalus and Arnold-Chiari malformation two different structural patterns of immature chromatin organization were found: the clear type characterized by a clear granular and fibrillar structure of euchromatin, scarce heterochromatin masses and few perichromatin granules, and a dense granular and fibrillar euchromatin with abundant and scattered heterochromatin masses, and increased number of perichromatin granules. The lobulated nuclei exhibited an irregularly dilated and fragmented perinuclear cistern, and areas of apparently intact nuclear pore complexes alternating with regions of nuclear pore complex disassembly. In moderate traumatic brain injuries some nucleoli exhibit apparent intact nucleolar substructures, and in severe brain oedema some nucleoli appeared shrunken and irregularly outlined with one or two fibrillar centers, and others were disintegrated. The nuclear and nucleolar morphological alterations are discussed in relation with oxidative stress, peroxidative damage, hemoglobin-induced cytotoxicity, calcium overload, glutamate excitotoxicity, and caspase activation.

  1. Primary Somatosensory Cortices Contain Altered Patterns of Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in the Interictal Phase of Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Hodkinson, Duncan J.; Veggeberg, Rosanna; Wilcox, Sophie L.; Scrivani, Steven; Burstein, Rami; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) is a complex integrated process that is critical for supporting healthy brain function. Studies have demonstrated a high incidence of alterations in CBF in patients suffering from migraine with and without aura during different phases of attacks. However, the CBF data collected interictally has failed to show any distinguishing features or clues as to the underlying pathophysiology of the disease. In this study we used the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique—arterial spin labeling (ASL)—to non-invasively and quantitatively measure regional CBF (rCBF) in a case-controlled study of interictal migraine. We examined both the regional and global CBF differences between the groups, and found a significant increase in rCBF in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) of migraine patients. The CBF values in S1 were positively correlated with the headache attack frequency, but were unrelated to the duration of illness or age of the patients. Additionally, 82% of patients reported skin hypersensitivity (cutaneous allodynia) during migraine, suggesting atypical processing of somatosensory stimuli. Our results demonstrate the presence of a disease-specific functional deficit in a known region of the trigemino-cortical pathway, which may be driven by adaptive or maladaptive functional plasticity. These findings may in part explain the altered sensory experiences reported between migraine attacks. PMID:26372461

  2. Neurophysiological abnormalities in the sensorimotor cortices during the motor planning and movement execution stages of children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Max J; Becker, Katherine M; Heinrichs-Graham, Elizabeth; Wilson, Tony W

    2014-11-01

    This investigation used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to examine the neural oscillatory responses of the sensorimotor cortices during the motor planning and movement execution stages of children with typical development and children with cerebral palsy (CP). The study involved 13 children with CP (nine males, four females; mean [SD] age 14y 3mo [9mo], range 10-18y; height 1.61m [0.08m]; weight 52.65kg [13kg]), and 13 age- and sex-matched typically developing children (height 1.64m [0.06m]; weight 56.88kg [10kg]). The experiment required the children to extend their knee joint as whole-head MEG recordings were acquired. Beamformer imaging methods were employed to quantify the source activity of the beta-frequency (14-28Hz) event-related desynchronization (ERD) that occurs during the motor planning period, and the gamma-frequency (~50Hz) event-related synchronization (ERS) that occurs at the motor execution stage. The children with CP had a stronger mean beta ERD during the motor planning phase and reduced mean gamma ERS at the onset of movement. The uncharacteristic beta ERD in the children with CP suggests that they may have greater difficulty planning knee joint movements. We suggest that these aberrant beta ERD oscillations may have a cascading effect on the gamma ERS, which ultimately affects the execution of the motor command. © 2014 Mac Keith Press.

  3. Intracortical circuits, sensorimotor integration and plasticity in human motor cortical projections to muscles of the lower face

    PubMed Central

    Pilurzi, G; Hasan, A; Saifee, T A; Tolu, E; Rothwell, J C; Deriu, F

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies of the cortical control of human facial muscles documented the distribution of corticobulbar projections and the presence of intracortical inhibitory and facilitatory mechanisms. Yet surprisingly, given the importance and precision in control of facial expression, there have been no studies of the afferent modulation of corticobulbar excitability or of the plasticity of synaptic connections in the facial primary motor cortex (face M1). In 25 healthy volunteers, we used standard single- and paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) methods to probe motor-evoked potentials (MEPs), short-intracortical inhibition, intracortical facilitation, short-afferent and long-afferent inhibition and paired associative stimulation in relaxed and active depressor anguli oris muscles. Single-pulse TMS evoked bilateral MEPs at rest and during activity that were larger in contralateral muscles, confirming that corticobulbar projection to lower facial muscles is bilateral and asymmetric, with contralateral predominance. Both short-intracortical inhibition and intracortical facilitation were present bilaterally in resting and active conditions. Electrical stimulation of the facial nerve paired with a TMS pulse 5–200 ms later showed no short-afferent inhibition, but long-afferent inhibition was present. Paired associative stimulation tested with an electrical stimulation–TMS interval of 20 ms significantly facilitated MEPs for up to 30 min. The long-term potentiation, evoked for the first time in face M1, demonstrates that excitability of the facial motor cortex is prone to plastic changes after paired associative stimulation. Evaluation of intracortical circuits in both relaxed and active lower facial muscles as well as of plasticity in the facial motor cortex may provide further physiological insight into pathologies affecting the facial motor system. PMID:23297305

  4. Combined heterozygosity of factor V leiden and the G20210A prothrombin gene mutation in a patient with cerebral cortical vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, X Y; Gabig, T G; Bang, N U

    2000-07-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare type of stroke with a variety of causes. Several reports have suggested that either factor V Leiden or G20210A prothrombin gene mutation is associated with an increased risk of CVT. The genetic thrombophilias are typically associated with other predisposing factors. We report a unique case of CVT in a patient with both the factor V Leiden and the G20210A prothrombin gene mutations without other identifiable precipitating factors in a 28-year-old white male in good health. MRI and cerebral arterial angiography showed cerebral cortical venous thrombosis. This case suggests that combined heterozygous individuals may be particularly prone to spontaneous thrombosis, like CVT.

  5. Astrocyte Mediated Protection of Fetal Cerebral Cortical Neurons from Rotenone and Paraquat

    PubMed Central

    Rathinam, Mary Latha; Watts, Lora Talley; Narasimhan, Madhusudhanan; Riar, Amanjot Kaur; Mahimainathan, Lenin; Henderson, George.I.

    2012-01-01

    Primary cultures of fetal rat cortical neurons and astrocytes were used to test the hypothesis that astrocyte-mediated control of neuronal glutathione (GSH) is a potent factor in neuroprotection against rotenone and paraquat. In neurons, rotenone (0.025 to 1μM) for 4 and 24 h decreased viability as did paraquat (2 to 100μM). Rotenone (30nM) decreased neuronal viability and GSH by 24% and 30%, while ROS were increased by 56%. Paraquat (30μM) decreased neuronal viability and GSH by 36% and 70%, while ROS were increased by 23%. When neurons were co-cultured with astrocytes, their GSH increased 1.5 fold and 5 fold at 12 and 24 h. Co-culturing with astrocytes blocked neuronal death and damage by rotenone and paraquat. Astrocyte-mediated neuroprotection was dependent on the activity of components of the γ-glutamyl cycle. These studies illustrate the importance of astrocyte-mediated glutathione homeostasis for protection of neurons from rotenone and paraquat and the role of the γ-glutamyl cycle in this neuroprotection PMID:22301167

  6. Cellullar insights into cerebral cortical development: focusing on the locomotion mode of neuronal migration

    PubMed Central

    Kawauchi, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian brain consists of numerous compartments that are closely connected with each other via neural networks, comprising the basis of higher order brain functions. The highly specialized structure originates from simple pseudostratified neuroepithelium-derived neural progenitors located near the ventricle. A long journey by neurons from the ventricular side is essential for the formation of a sophisticated brain structure, including a mammalian-specific six-layered cerebral cortex. Neuronal migration consists of several contiguous steps, but the locomotion mode comprises a large part of the migration. The locomoting neurons exhibit unique features; a radial glial fiber-dependent migration requiring the endocytic recycling of N-cadherin and a neuron-specific migration mode with dilation/swelling formation that requires the actin and microtubule organization possibly regulated by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5), Dcx, p27kip1, Rac1, and POSH. Here I will introduce the roles of various cellular events, such as cytoskeletal organization, cell adhesion, and membrane trafficking, in the regulation of the neuronal migration, with particular focus on the locomotion mode. PMID:26500496

  7. Effects of activated ACM on expression of signal transducers in cerebral cortical neurons of rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojing; Li, Zhengli; Zhu, Changgeng; Li, Zhongyu

    2007-06-01

    To explore the roles of astrocytes in the epileptogenesis, astrocytes and neurons were isolated, purified and cultured in vitro from cerebral cortex of rats. The astrocytes were activated by ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and astrocytic conditioned medium (ACM) was collected to treat neurons for 4, 8 and 12 h. By using Western blot, the expression of calmodulin dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and adenylate cyclase (AC) was detected in neurons. The results showed that the expression of CaMK II, iNOS and AC was increased significantly in the neurons treated with ACM from 4 h to 12 h (P<0.05), and that of iNOS and AC peaked at 8 h and 12 h respectively. It was suggested that there might be some epileptogenic factors in the ACM and such signal pathways as NOS-NO-cGMP, Ca2+/CaM-CaMK II and AC-cAMP-PKA might take part in the signal transduction of epileptogenesis.

  8. Effects of a group circuit progressive resistance training program compared with a treadmill training program for adolescents with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Aviram, Ronit; Harries, Netta; Namourah, Ibtisam; Amro, Akram; Bar-Haim, Simona

    2017-08-01

    To determine whether goal-directed group circuit progressive resistance exercise training (GT) can improve motor function in adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) and to compare outcomes with a treadmill training (TT) intervention. In a multi-centered matched pairs study, 95 adolescents with spastic CP (GMFCS II-III) were allocated to GT or TT interventions for 30 bi-weekly one hour training. Outcome measures of GMFM-66, GMFM-D%, GMFM-E%, TUG, 10 meter walk test (10 MWT), and 6 minute walk test (6 MWT) were made at baseline (T1), after interventions (T2) and 6 months post training (T3). Both training programs induced significant improvement in all outcome measures (T2-T1) that were mostly retained at T3. At the end of the intervention, the GT group showed an advantage in all measured changes compared to the TT group and in percentage changes. Differences were significant (p < 0.02) for GMFM-66, GMFM-D%, GMFM-E% and TUG. The advantage trend for the GT group was less apparent at follow up (T3-T1). Both programs were effective in improving motor function in adolescents with cerebral palsy. The GT program had generally greater benefits based on the functional measures.

  9. Cortical reorganisation of cerebral networks after childhood stroke: impact on outcome.

    PubMed

    Kornfeld, Salome; Delgado Rodríguez, Juan Antonio; Everts, Regula; Kaelin-Lang, Alain; Wiest, Roland; Weisstanner, Christian; Mordasini, Pasquale; Steinlin, Maja; Grunt, Sebastian

    2015-06-10

    Recovery after arterial ischaemic stroke is known to largely depend on the plastic properties of the brain. The present study examines changes in the network topography of the developing brain after stroke. Effects of brain damage are best assessed by examining entire networks rather than single sites of structural lesions. Relating these changes to post-stroke neuropsychological variables and motor abilities will improve understanding of functional plasticity after stroke. Inclusion of healthy controls will provide additional insight into children's normal brain development. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging is a valid approach to topographically investigate the reorganisation of functional networks after a brain lesion. Transcranial magnetic stimulation provides complementary output information. This study will investigate functional reorganisation after paediatric arterial ischaemic stroke by means of resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation in a cross-sectional plus longitudinal study design. The general aim of this study is to better understand neuroplasticity of the developing brain after stroke in order to develop more efficacious therapy and to improve the post-stroke functional outcome. The cross-sectional part of the study will investigate the functional cerebral networks of 35 children with chronic arterial ischaemic stroke (time of the lesion >2 years). In the longitudinal part, 15 children with acute arterial ischaemic stroke (shortly after the acute phase of the stroke) will be included and investigations will be performed 3 times within the subsequent 9 months. We will also recruit 50 healthy controls, matched for age and sex. The neuroimaging and neurophysiological data will be correlated with neuropsychological and neurological variables. This study is the first to combine resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation in a paediatric

  10. Resonant antidromic cortical circuit activation as a consequence of high-frequency subthalamic deep-brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Li, S; Arbuthnott, G W; Jutras, M J; Goldberg, J A; Jaeger, D

    2007-12-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) for many patients. The most effective stimulation consists of high-frequency biphasic stimulation pulses around 130 Hz delivered between two active sites of an implanted depth electrode to the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS). Multiple studies have shown that a key effect of STN-DBS that correlates well with clinical outcome is the reduction of synchronous and oscillatory activity in cortical and basal ganglia networks. We hypothesized that antidromic cortical activation may provide an underlying mechanism responsible for this effect, because stimulation is usually performed in proximity to cortical efferent pathways. We show with intracellular cortical recordings in rats that STN-DBS did in fact lead to antidromic spiking of deep layer cortical neurons. Furthermore, antidromic spikes triggered a dampened oscillation of local field potentials in cortex with a resonant frequency around 120 Hz. The amplitude of antidromic activation was significantly correlated with an observed suppression of slow wave and beta band activity during STN-DBS. These findings were seen in ketamine-xylazine or isoflurane anesthesia in both normal and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats. Thus antidromic resonant activation of cortical microcircuits may make an important contribution toward counteracting the overly synchronous and oscillatory activity characteristic of cortical activity in PD.

  11. The effects of neck flexion on cerebral potentials evoked by visual, auditory and somatosensory stimuli and focal brain blood flow in related sensory cortices

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A flexed neck posture leads to non-specific activation of the brain. Sensory evoked cerebral potentials and focal brain blood flow have been used to evaluate the activation of the sensory cortex. We investigated the effects of a flexed neck posture on the cerebral potentials evoked by visual, auditory and somatosensory stimuli and focal brain blood flow in the related sensory cortices. Methods Twelve healthy young adults received right visual hemi-field, binaural auditory and left median nerve stimuli while sitting with the neck in a resting and flexed (20° flexion) position. Sensory evoked potentials were recorded from the right occipital region, Cz in accordance with the international 10–20 system, and 2 cm posterior from C4, during visual, auditory and somatosensory stimulations. The oxidative-hemoglobin concentration was measured in the respective sensory cortex using near-infrared spectroscopy. Results Latencies of the late component of all sensory evoked potentials significantly shortened, and the amplitude of auditory evoked potentials increased when the neck was in a flexed position. Oxidative-hemoglobin concentrations in the left and right visual cortices were higher during visual stimulation in the flexed neck position. The left visual cortex is responsible for receiving the visual information. In addition, oxidative-hemoglobin concentrations in the bilateral auditory cortex during auditory stimulation, and in the right somatosensory cortex during somatosensory stimulation, were higher in the flexed neck position. Conclusions Visual, auditory and somatosensory pathways were activated by neck flexion. The sensory cortices were selectively activated, reflecting the modalities in sensory projection to the cerebral cortex and inter-hemispheric connections. PMID:23199306

  12. [Comparative study of muscular tonus in spastic tetraparetic cerebral palsy in children with predominantly cortical and subcortical lesions in computerized tomography of the skull].

    PubMed

    Iwabe, Cristina; Piovesana, Ana Maria Sedrez Gonzaga

    2003-09-01

    To compare distribution and intensity of muscular tonus in spastic tetraparetic cerebral palsy (CP), correlating the clinical data with lesion location in the central nervous system. Twelve children aged two to four years old with predominantly cortical lesions (six children) and subcortical lesions (six children) were included. The tonus was analyzed in the upper (UULL) and lower limbs (LLLL) based on Durigon and Piemonte protocol. There was no significant difference regarding tonus intensity and distribution in the UULL and LLLL in both groups. Comparing the upper and lower limbs of subjects in the same group, the LLLL presented more asymmetry and higher tonus intensity than the UULL. In this study children with CP as a result of predominantly cortical or subcortical lesions present a similar deficit in tonus modulation, causing a symmetric and homogeneous distribution of hypertonicity, which is predominant in the LLLL.

  13. Effects of Nigella sativa on apoptosis and GABAA receptor density in cerebral cortical and hippocampal neurons in pentylenetetrazol induced kindling in rats.

    PubMed

    Meral, I; Esrefoglu, M; Dar, K A; Ustunova, S; Aydin, M S; Demirtas, M; Arifoglu, Y

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the effects of Nigella sativa on apoptosis and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptor density in cerebral cortical and hippocampal neurons in a pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced kindling model in rats. The PTZ kindling model was produced by injecting PTZ in subconvulsive doses to rats on days 1, 3, 5, 8, 10, 12, 15, 17, 19, 22 and 24 of the study into animals of PTZ treated (PTZ) and PTZ + N. sativa treated (PTZ + NS) groups. Clonic and tonic seizures were induced by injecting a convulsive dose of PTZ on day 26 of the study. Rats in the PTZ + NS group were treated also with a 10 mg/kg methanolic extract of N. sativa 2 h before each PTZ injection. Rats in the control group were treated with 4 ml/kg saline. The number of neurons that expressed GABAA receptors in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of rats in the PTZ and PTZ + NS groups increased significantly. There was no significant difference in the number of GABAA receptors between the PTZ and PTZ + NS groups. GABAA receptor density of the neurons in the cerebral cortex, but not hippocampus, was increased in PTZ group compared to controls. We observed a significant increase in the number of apoptotic neurons in the cerebral cortex of rats of both the PTZ and PTZ + NS groups compared to controls. We observed a significant decrease in the number of the apoptotic neurons in the cerebral cortex of rats in the PTZ + NS group compared to the PTZ group. N. sativa treatment ameliorated the PTZ induced neurodegeneration in the cerebral cortex as reflected by neuronal apoptosis and neuronal GABAA receptor frequency.

  14. Thalamocortical NMDA conductances and intracortical inhibition can explain cortical temporal tuning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krukowski, A. E.; Miller, K. D.

    2001-01-01

    Cells in cerebral cortex fail to respond to fast-moving stimuli that evoke strong responses in the thalamic nuclei innervating the cortex. The reason for this behavior has remained a mystery. We study an experimentally motivated model of the thalamic input-recipient layer of cat primary visual cortex that accounts for many aspects of cortical orientation tuning. In this circuit, inhibition dominates over excitation, but temporal modulations of excitation and inhibition occur out of phase with one another, allowing excitation to transiently drive cells. We show that this circuit provides a natural explanation of cortical low-pass temporal frequency tuning, provided N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are present in thalamocortical synapses in proportions measured experimentally. This suggests a new and unanticipated role for NMDA conductances in shaping the temporal response properties of cortical cells, and suggests that common cortical circuit mechanisms underlie both spatial and temporal response tuning.

  15. Thalamocortical NMDA conductances and intracortical inhibition can explain cortical temporal tuning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krukowski, A. E.; Miller, K. D.

    2001-01-01

    Cells in cerebral cortex fail to respond to fast-moving stimuli that evoke strong responses in the thalamic nuclei innervating the cortex. The reason for this behavior has remained a mystery. We study an experimentally motivated model of the thalamic input-recipient layer of cat primary visual cortex that accounts for many aspects of cortical orientation tuning. In this circuit, inhibition dominates over excitation, but temporal modulations of excitation and inhibition occur out of phase with one another, allowing excitation to transiently drive cells. We show that this circuit provides a natural explanation of cortical low-pass temporal frequency tuning, provided N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are present in thalamocortical synapses in proportions measured experimentally. This suggests a new and unanticipated role for NMDA conductances in shaping the temporal response properties of cortical cells, and suggests that common cortical circuit mechanisms underlie both spatial and temporal response tuning.

  16. Optical recording of cortical activity after in vitro perfusion of cerebral arteries with a voltage-sensitive dye.

    PubMed

    de Curtis, M; Takashima, I; Iijima, T

    1999-08-07

    Cortical neuronal architecture and connectivity can be analyzed with high-resolution optical imaging after staining the in vitro isolated guinea pig brain preparation by circulating the voltage-sensitive dye RH795 via the arterial system. To establish this new technique, electrical field potentials evoked in the piriform and entorhinal cortices by lateral olfactory tract stimulation were correlated to the optical signal. The depth analysis of the optical response was performed by evaluating the contribution of the mono- and poly-synaptic components of the signal generated in different layers after applying a pair-pulse stimulation protocol. The tangential propagation of neuronal activity in olfactory cortices was evaluated by gathering several 4.2 x 4.2 mm images recorded from adjacent cortical areas. The real-time optical imaging technique applied to the isolated guinea pig brain can be successfully utilized to study the integrative properties of cortical neurons ensembles. Copyright 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  17. Proxy-reported quality of life in adolescents and adults with dyskinetic cerebral palsy is associated with executive functions and cortical thickness.

    PubMed

    Laporta-Hoyos, O; Ballester-Plané, J; Póo, P; Macaya, A; Meléndez-Plumed, M; Vázquez, E; Delgado, I; Zubiaurre-Elorza, L; Botellero, V L; Narberhaus, A; Toro-Tamargo, E; Segarra, D; Pueyo, R

    2017-05-01

    Quality of life (QOL) is a key outcome for people with cerebral palsy (CP), and executive functioning is an important predictor of QOL in other health-related conditions. Little is known about this association in CP or about its neural substrate. We aim to analyze the influence of executive functioning (including cognitive flexibility) as well as that of other psychological, motor, communication and socioeconomic variables on QOL and to identify neuroanatomical areas related to QOL in adolescents and adults with CP. Fifty subjects diagnosed with dyskinetic CP (mean age 25.96 years) were recruited. Their caregivers completed the primary caregiver proxy report version of the CP QOL-Teen questionnaire. Motor status, communication, IQ, four executive function domains, anxiety/depression and socioeconomic status were evaluated. Correlations and multiple linear regression models were used to relate CP QOL domains and total score to these variables. Thirty-six participants underwent an MRI assessment. Correlations were examined between cortical thickness and CP QOL total score and between cortical thickness and variables that might predict the CP QOL total score. Executive functions predict scores in four domains of CP QOL (General well-being and participation, Communication and physical health, Family health and Feelings about functioning) in the regression model. Among the cognitive domains that comprise executive function, only cognitive flexibility measured in terms of performance on the Wisconsin card sorting test (WCST) predicts the CP QOL total score. Monthly income, fine motor functioning and communication ability predict scores on the domains Access to services and Family Health, Feelings about functioning and School well-being, respectively. The clusters resulting from the correlation between cortical thickness and both CP QOL total score and WCST performance overlapped in the posterior cingulate and precuneus cortices. Cognitive flexibility predicts proxy

  18. Accumulation of inositol phosphates and cyclic AMP in guinea-pig cerebral cortical preparations. Effects of norepinephrine, histamine, carbamylcholine and 2-chloroadenosine.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, E B; Daly, J W

    1985-11-20

    Norepinephrine and serotonin augment by about 2-fold the accumulation of cyclic [3H]AMP elicited by 2-chloroadenosine in [3H]adenine-labeled guinea-pig cerebral cortical slices. Histamine causes a 3-fold augmentation. The first two agents have no effect on cyclic AMP alone, while histamine has only a small effect alone. The augmentation of the 2-chloroadenosine response appears to be mediated by alpha 1-adrenergic, 5HT2-serotonergic and H2-histaminergic receptors. VIP-elicited accumulations of cyclic AMP are also augmented through stimulation of alpha 1-adrenergic, 5HT2-serotonergic and H1-histaminergic receptors. Activation of these amine receptors also increases the turnover of phosphatidylinositols in [3H]inositol-labeled guinea pig cerebral cortical slices. Norepinephrine causes a 5-fold, serotonin a 1.2-fold, and histamine a 2.5-fold increase in accumulations of [3H]inositol phosphates. 2-Chloroadenosine, vasoactive intestinal peptide, baclofen, and somatostatin have no effect on phosphatidylinositol turnover, nor do the last two agents augment accumulations of cyclic AMP elicited by 2-chloroadenosine. The data suggest a possible relationship between turnover of phosphatidylinositol and the augmentations of the cyclic AMP accumulations elicited by biogenic amines in brain slices.

  19. Tissue-type Plasminogen Activator (tPA) Modulates the Postsynaptic Response of Cerebral Cortical Neurons to the Presynaptic Release of Glutamate

    PubMed Central

    Jeanneret, Valerie; Wu, Fang; Merino, Paola; Torre, Enrique; Diaz, Ariel; Cheng, Lihong; Yepes, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine proteinase released by the presynaptic terminal of cerebral cortical neurons following membrane depolarization (Echeverry et al., 2010). Recent studies indicate that the release of tPA triggers the synaptic vesicle cycle and promotes the exocytosis (Wu et al., 2015) and endocytic retrieval (Yepes et al., 2016) of glutamate-containing synaptic vesicles. Here we used electron microscopy, proteomics, quantitative phosphoproteomics, biochemical analyses with extracts of the postsynaptic density (PSD), and an animal model of cerebral ischemia with mice overexpressing neuronal tPA to study whether the presynaptic release of tPA also has an effect on the postsynaptic terminal. We found that tPA has a bidirectional effect on the composition of the PSD of cerebral cortical neurons that is independent of the generation of plasmin and the presynaptic release of glutamate, but depends on the baseline level of neuronal activity and the extracellular concentrations of calcium (Ca2+). Accordingly, in neurons that are either inactive or incubated with low Ca2+ concentrations tPA induces phosphorylation and accumulation in the PSD of the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα (pCaMKIIα), followed by pCaMKIIα-mediated phosphorylation and synaptic recruitment of GluR1-containing α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors. In contrast, in neurons with previously increased baseline levels of pCaMKIIα in the PSD due to neuronal depolarization in vivo or incubation with high concentrations of either Ca2+ or glutamate in vitro, tPA induces pCaMKIIα and pGluR1 dephosphorylation and their subsequent removal from the PSD. We found that these effects of tPA are mediated by synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5)-induced phosphorylation of the protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) at T320. Our data indicate that by regulating the pCaMKIIα/PP1 balance in the PSD tPA acts

  20. Coordinated Recruitment of Cortical-Subcortical Circuits and Ascending Dopamine and Serotonin Neurons During Inhibitory Control of Cocaine Seeking in Rats.

    PubMed

    Navailles, Sylvia; Guillem, Karine; Vouillac-Mendoza, Caroline; Ahmed, Serge H

    2015-09-01

    People with cocaine addiction retain some degree of prefrontal cortex (PFC) inhibitory control of cocaine craving, a brain capacity that may underlie the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy for addiction. Similar findings were recently found in rats after extended access to and escalation of cocaine self-administration. Rats' inhibitory control of cocaine seeking was flexible, sufficiently strong to suppress cocaine-primed reinstatement and depended, at least in part, on neuronal activity within the prelimbic (PL) PFC. Here, we used a large-scale and high-resolution Fos mapping approach to identify, beyond the PL PFC, how top-down and/or bottom-up PFC-subcortical circuits are recruited during inhibition of cocaine seeking. Overall, we found that effective inhibitory control of cocaine seeking is associated with the coordinated recruitment of different top-down cortical-striatal circuits originating from different PFC territories, and of different bottom-up dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) midbrain subsystems that normally modulate activity in these circuits. This integrated brain response suggests that rats concomitantly engage and experience intricate cognitive and affective processes when they have to inhibit intense cocaine seeking. Thus, even after extended drug use, rats can be successfully trained to engage whole-brain inhibitory control mechanisms to suppress cocaine seeking.

  1. Cortical Venous Filling on Dynamic Computed Tomographic Angiography: A Novel Predictor of Clinical Outcome in Patients With Acute Middle Cerebral Artery Stroke.

    PubMed

    van den Wijngaard, Ido R; Wermer, Marieke J H; Boiten, Jelis; Algra, Ale; Holswilder, Ghislaine; Meijer, Frederick J A; Dippel, Diederik W J; Velthuis, Birgitta K; Majoie, Charles B L M; van Walderveen, Marianne A A

    2016-03-01

    Venous flow in the downstream territory of an occluded artery may influence patient prognosis after ischemic stroke. Our aim was to study cortical venous filling (CVF) in a time-resolved manner with dynamic computed tomographic angiography and to assess the relationship with clinical outcome. Patients with a proximal middle cerebral artery occlusion underwent noncontrast CT and whole-brain CT perfusion/dynamic CT angiography within 9 hours after stroke-onset. We defined poor outcome as a modified Rankin Scale score of ≥3. Association between the extent and velocity of CVF and poor outcome at 3 months was analyzed with Poisson-regression. Prognostic value of optimal CVF (maximum opacification of cortical veins) in addition to age, stroke severity, treatment, Alberta Stroke Program Early CT score, cerebral blood flow, and collateral status was assessed with logistic regression and summarized with the area under the curve. Eighty-eight patients were included, with a mean age of 67 years. By combining the extent and velocity of optimal CVF, we observed a decreased risk of poor outcome in patients with good and fast optimal CVF, risk ratio of 0.5 (95% confidence interval, 0.3-0.7). Extent and velocity of optimal CVF had additional prognostic value (area under the curve, 0.88; 95% confidence interval, 0.77-0.98; P<0.02) compared with a model without CVF information. The combination of extent and velocity of optimal CVF, as assessed with dynamic CT angiography, is useful to identify patients with acute middle cerebral artery stroke at higher risk of poor clinical outcome at 3-month follow-up. URL: http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg and http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NTR1804 and NCT00880113, respectively. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Selective 14-3-3γ induction quenches p-β-catenin Ser37/Bax-enhanced cell death in cerebral cortical neurons during ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Lai, X J; Ye, S Q; Zheng, L; Li, L; Liu, Q R; Yu, S B; Pang, Y; Jin, S; Li, Q; Yu, A C H; Chen, X Q

    2014-01-01

    Ischemia-induced cell death is a major cause of disability or death after stroke. Identifying the key intrinsic protective mechanisms induced by ischemia is critical for the development of effective stroke treatment. Here, we reported that 14-3-3γ was a selective ischemia-inducible survival factor in cerebral cortical neurons reducing cell death by downregulating Bax depend direct 14-3-3γ/p-β-catenin Ser37 interactions in the nucleus. 14-3-3γ, but not other 14-3-3 isoforms, was upregulated in primary cerebral cortical neurons upon oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD) as measured by quantitative PCR, western blot and fluorescent immunostaining. The selective induction of 14-3-3γ in cortical neurons by OGD was verified by the in vivo ischemic stroke model. Knocking down 14-3-3γ alone or inhibiting 14-3-3/client interactions was sufficient to induce cell death in normal cultured neurons and exacerbate OGD-induced neuronal death. Ectopic overexpression of 14-3-3γ significantly reduced OGD-induced cell death in cultured neurons. Co-immunoprecipitation and fluorescence resonance energy transfer demonstrated that endogenous 14-3-3γ bound directly to more p-β-catenin Ser37 but not p-Bad, p-Ask-1, p-p53 and Bax. During OGD, p-β-catenin Ser37 but not p-β-catenin Ser45 was increased prominently, which correlated with Bax elevation in cortical neurons. OGD promoted the entry of 14-3-3γ into the nuclei, in correlation with the increase of nuclear p-β-catenin Ser37 in neurons. Overexpression of 14-3-3γ significantly reduced Bax expression, whereas knockdown of 14-3-3γ increased Bax in cortical neurons. Abolishing β-catenin phosphorylation at Ser37 (S37A) significantly reduced Bax and cell death in neurons upon OGD. Finally, 14-3-3γ overexpression completely suppressed β-catenin-enhanced Bax and cell death in neurons upon OGD. Based on these data, we propose that the 14-3-3γ/p-β-catenin Ser37/Bax axis determines cell survival or death of neurons during ischemia

  3. Laminar cortical dynamics of cognitive and motor working memory, sequence learning and performance: toward a unified theory of how the cerebral cortex works.

    PubMed

    Grossberg, Stephen; Pearson, Lance R

    2008-07-01

    How does the brain carry out working memory storage, categorization, and voluntary performance of event sequences? The LIST PARSE neural model proposes an answer that unifies the explanation of cognitive, neurophysiological, and anatomical data. It quantitatively simulates human cognitive data about immediate serial recall and free recall, and monkey neurophysiological data from the prefrontal cortex obtained during sequential sensory-motor imitation and planned performance. The model clarifies why spatial and non-spatial working memories share the same type of circuit design. It proposes how laminar circuits of lateral prefrontal cortex carry out working memory storage of event sequences within layers 6 and 4, how these event sequences are unitized through learning into list chunks within layer 2/3, and how these stored sequences can be recalled at variable rates that are under volitional control by the basal ganglia. These laminar prefrontal circuits are variations of visual cortical circuits that explained data about how the brain sees. These examples from visual and prefrontal cortex illustrate how laminar neocortex can represent both spatial and temporal information, and open the way towards understanding how other behaviors derive from shared laminar neocortical designs.

  4. The human cerebral cortex is neither one nor many: neuronal distribution reveals two quantitatively different zones in the gray matter, three in the white matter, and explains local variations in cortical folding

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Pedro F. M.; Ventura-Antunes, Lissa; Gabi, Mariana; Mota, Bruno; Grinberg, Lea T.; Farfel, José M.; Ferretti-Rebustini, Renata E. L.; Leite, Renata E. P.; Filho, Wilson J.; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2013-01-01

    The human prefrontal cortex has been considered different in several aspects and relatively enlarged compared to the rest of the cortical areas. Here we determine whether the white and gray matter of the prefrontal portion of the human cerebral cortex have similar or different cellular compositions relative to the rest of the cortical regions by applying the Isotropic Fractionator to analyze the distribution of neurons along the entire anteroposterior axis of the cortex, and its relationship with the degree of gyrification, number of neurons under the cortical surface, and other parameters. The prefrontal region shares with the remainder of the cerebral cortex (except for occipital cortex) the same relationship between cortical volume and number of neurons. In contrast, both occipital and prefrontal areas vary from other cortical areas in their connectivity through the white matter, with a systematic reduction of cortical connectivity through the white matter and an increase of the mean axon caliber along the anteroposterior axis. These two parameters explain local differences in the distribution of neurons underneath the cortical surface. We also show that local variations in cortical folding are neither a function of local numbers of neurons nor of cortical thickness, but correlate with properties of the white matter, and are best explained by the folding of the white matter surface. Our results suggest that the human cerebral cortex is divided in two zones (occipital and non-occipital) that differ in how neurons are distributed across their gray matter volume and in three zones (prefrontal, occipital, and non-occipital) that differ in how neurons are connected through the white matter. Thus, the human prefrontal cortex has the largest fraction of neuronal connectivity through the white matter and the smallest average axonal caliber in the white matter within the cortex, although its neuronal composition fits the pattern found for other, non-occipital areas. PMID

  5. Real-time Recordings of Migrating Cortical Neurons from GFP and Cre Recombinase Expressing Mice.

    PubMed

    Tielens, Sylvia; Godin, Juliette D; Nguyen, Laurent

    2016-01-04

    The cerebral cortex is one of the most intricate regions of the brain that requires elaborate cell migration patterns for its development. Experimental observations show that projection neurons migrate radially within the cortical wall, whereas interneurons migrate along multiple tangential paths to reach the developing cortex. Tight regulation of the cell migration processes ensures proper positioning and functional integration of neurons to specific cerebral cortical circuits. Disruption of neuronal migration often leads to cortical dysfunction and/or malformation associated with neurological disorders. Unveiling the molecular control of neuron migration is thus fundamental to understanding the physiological or pathological development of the cerebral cortex. In this unit, protocols allowing detailed analysis of patterns of migration of both interneurons and projection neurons under different experimental conditions (i.e., loss or gain of function) are presented.

  6. Stereopsis and 3D surface perception by spiking neurons in laminar cortical circuits: a method for converting neural rate models into spiking models.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yongqiang; Grossberg, Stephen

    2012-02-01

    A laminar cortical model of stereopsis and 3D surface perception is developed and simulated. The model shows how spiking neurons that interact in hierarchically organized laminar circuits of the visual cortex can generate analog properties of 3D visual percepts. The model describes how monocular and binocular oriented filtering interact with later stages of 3D boundary formation and surface filling-in in the LGN and cortical areas V1, V2, and V4. It proposes how interactions between layers 4, 3B, and 2/3 in V1 and V2 contribute to stereopsis, and how binocular and monocular information combine to form 3D boundary and surface representations. The model suggests how surface-to-boundary feedback from V2 thin stripes to pale stripes helps to explain how computationally complementary boundary and surface formation properties lead to a single consistent percept, eliminate redundant 3D boundaries, and trigger figure-ground perception. The model also shows how false binocular boundary matches may be eliminated by Gestalt grouping properties. In particular, the disparity filter, which helps to solve the correspondence problem by eliminating false matches, is realized using inhibitory interneurons as part of the perceptual grouping process by horizontal connections in layer 2/3 of cortical area V2. The 3D sLAMINART model simulates 3D surface percepts that are consciously seen in 18 psychophysical experiments. These percepts include contrast variations of dichoptic masking and the correspondence problem, the effect of interocular contrast differences on stereoacuity, Panum's limiting case, the Venetian blind illusion, stereopsis with polarity-reversed stereograms, da Vinci stereopsis, and perceptual closure. The model hereby illustrates a general method of unlumping rate-based models that use the membrane equations of neurophysiology into models that use spiking neurons, and which may be embodied in VLSI chips that use spiking neurons to minimize heat production. Copyright

  7. Blocking Early GABA Depolarization with Bumetanide Results in Permanent Alterations in Cortical Circuits and Sensorimotor Gating Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Kriegstein, Arnold R.

    2011-01-01

    A high incidence of seizures occurs during the neonatal period when immature networks are hyperexcitable and susceptible to hypersyncrhonous activity. During development, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in adults, typically excites neurons due to high expression of the Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter (NKCC1). NKCC1 facilitates seizures because it renders GABA activity excitatory through intracellular Cl− accumulation, while blocking NKCC1 with bumetanide suppresses seizures. Bumetanide is currently being tested in clinical trials for treatment of neonatal seizures. By blocking NKCC1 with bumetanide during cortical development, we found a critical period for the development of α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate synapses. Disruption of GABA signaling during this window resulted in permanent decreases in excitatory synaptic transmission and sensorimotor gating deficits, a common feature in schizophrenia. Our study identifies an essential role for GABA-mediated depolarization in regulating the balance between cortical excitation and inhibition during a critical period and suggests a cautionary approach for using bumetanide in treating neonatal seizures. PMID:20624842

  8. Free Radicals Enhance Basal Release of D-[exp 3H]Aspartate from Cerebral Cortical Synaptosomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    release of neurotransmit - ter with exposure to peroxide-generated free radicals (Gilman et al., 1992). A similar increase in basal re- lease is...cortical iron injection: a model for post- traumatic epilepsy . Ann. Neurol. 4, 329-336. Willmore L. J., Hiramatsu M., Kochi H., and Mori A. (1983) For

  9. The Posterior Cerebral Artery and its Main Cortical Branches Identified with Noninvasive Transcranial Color-Coded Duplex Sonography

    PubMed Central

    Frid, P. E.; Schreiber, S. J.; Pade, O.; Doepp, F.; Valdueza, J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To differentiate PCA segments and cortical branches by means of transcranial color-coded duplex sonography (TCCD) and to measure flow parameters at rest and during visual stimulation. Materials and Methods: 60 healthy subjects with a good acoustic temporal bone window were examined. The main stem of the PCA (P1, P2 and P3) and 4 main cortical branches – the anterior temporal artery (ATA), the occipital temporal artery (OTA), the parietooccipital artery (POA) and the calcarine artery (CA) – were assessed using an axial transtemporal approach. Systolic and diastolic blood flow velocities (BFVs) were recorded at rest and during visual stimulation. Results: Identification of the P1 segment of the PCA was successful in 97.5% (117/120) of cases. The P2 and P3 segments were visualized in all cases. The 4 main cortical branches could be identified to varying degrees: ATA in 88%, OTA in 96%, POA in 69% and CA in 62%. There was an evoked flow response in the P2 main stem and in all cortical branches. The most pronounced increase in diastolic/systolic BFV after visual stimulation test was seen in the CA (42%/35%), followed by P2 (30%/24%), the POA (27%/27%), the OTA (16%/13%) and the ATA (9%/8%). Conclusion: Insonation through the temporal bone window with TCCD confidently allows the assessment of the P1 to P3 segments of the PCA as well as the 2 proximal branches, the ATA and the OTA. An ultrasound-based classification of PCA anatomy and its cortical branches may be used as a noninvasive method for the evaluation of posterior circulation pathology. PMID:27689154

  10. Topography of Cortical Microbleeds in Alzheimer's Disease with and without Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy: A Post-Mortem 7.0-Tesla MRI Study.

    PubMed

    De Reuck, J; Auger, F; Durieux, N; Deramecourt, V; Cordonnier, C; Pasquier, F; Maurage, C A; Leys, D; Bordet, R

    2015-11-01

    Cortical microbleeds (CMBs) detected on T2*-weighted gradient-echo (GRE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are considered as a possible hallmark of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). The present post-mortem 7.0-tesla MRI study investigates whether topographic differences exist in Alzheimer's brains without (AD) and with CAA (AD-CAA). The distribution of CMBs in thirty-two post-mortem brains, consisting of 12 AD, 8 AD-CAA and 12 controls, was mutually compared on T2*-GRE MRI of six coronal sections of a cerebral hemisphere. The mean numbers of CMBs were determined in twenty-two different gyri. As a whole there was a trend of more CMBs on GRE MRI in the prefrontal section of the AD, the AD-CAA as well as of the control brains. Compared to controls AD brains had significantly more CMBs in the superior frontal, the inferior temporal, the rectus and the cinguli gyrus, and in the insular cortex. In AD-CAA brains CMBs were increased in all gyri with exception of the medial parietal gyrus and the hippocampus. AD-CAA brains showed a highly significant increase of CMBs in the inferior parietal gyrus (p value: 0.001) and a significant increase in the precuneus and the cuneus (p value: 0.01) compared to the AD brains. The differences in topographic distribution of CMBs between AD and AD-CAA brains should be further investigated on MRI in clinically suspected patients.

  11. Potent enhancement of (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine binding in rat cerebral cortical and cardiac homogenates: a putative mechanism for the action of MDL 12,330A

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.R.; Jaros, J.A.; Roeske, W.R.; Wiech, N.L.; Ursillo, R.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1985-06-01

    (/sup 3/H)Nitrendipine ((/sup 3/H)NTD), a specific high-affinity calcium channel antagonist, was used to label dihydropyridine binding sites associated with calcium channels in rat cerebral cortical and cardiac homogenates. A novel lactamimide compound, MDL 12,330A, has been shown previously to have negative inotropic and chronotropic effects in isolated working guinea-pig hearts and these effects are reversed by the administration of calcium. MDL 12,330A is potent in enhancing (/sup 3/H)NTD binding in membranes prepared from the cerebral cortex and the heart, with EC50 values of 6.1 X 10(-8) and 3.4 X 10(-8) M, respectively, at 37 degrees C. This allosteric effect by MDL 12,330A is similar to that produced by a known calcium channel antagonist, d-cis diltiazem, which has been shown previously to enhance (/sup 3/H)NTD binding at 37 degrees C. The extent of enhancement by MDL 12,330A depends on incubation temperature (37 degrees C greater than 25 degrees C greater than 0 degrees C). The mechanism of this enhancement by MDL 12,330A is due to a decrease in the dissociation rate constant of the dihydropyridine-calcium channel supramolecular complex. MDL 12,330A is the most potent drug thus far examined which demonstrates the enhancement of (/sup 3/H)NTD binding.

  12. Prefrontal cortical circuit for depression- and anxiety-related behaviors mediated by cholecystokinin: role of ΔFosB.

    PubMed

    Vialou, Vincent; Bagot, Rosemary C; Cahill, Michael E; Ferguson, Deveroux; Robison, Alfred J; Dietz, David M; Fallon, Barbara; Mazei-Robison, Michelle; Ku, Stacy M; Harrigan, Eileen; Winstanley, Catherine A; Joshi, Tej; Feng, Jian; Berton, Olivier; Nestler, Eric J

    2014-03-12

    Decreased medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) neuronal activity is associated with social defeat-induced depression- and anxiety-like behaviors in mice. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the decreased mPFC activity and its prodepressant role remain unknown. We show here that induction of the transcription factor ΔFosB in mPFC, specifically in the prelimbic (PrL) area, mediates susceptibility to stress. ΔFosB induction in PrL occurred selectively in susceptible mice after chronic social defeat stress, and overexpression of ΔFosB in this region, but not in the nearby infralimbic (IL) area, enhanced stress susceptibility. ΔFosB produced these effects partly through induction of the cholecystokinin (CCK)-B receptor: CCKB blockade in mPFC induces a resilient phenotype, whereas CCK administration into mPFC mimics the anxiogenic- and depressant-like effects of social stress. We previously found that optogenetic stimulation of mPFC neurons in susceptible mice reverses several behavioral abnormalities seen after chronic social defeat stress. Therefore, we hypothesized that optogenetic stimulation of cortical projections would rescue the pathological effects of CCK in mPFC. After CCK infusion in mPFC, we optogenetically stimulated mPFC projections to basolateral amygdala or nucleus accumbens, two subcortical structures involved in mood regulation. Stimulation of corticoamygdala projections blocked the anxiogenic effect of CCK, although no effect was observed on other symptoms of social defeat. Conversely, stimulation of corticoaccumbens projections reversed CCK-induced social avoidance and sucrose preference deficits but not anxiogenic-like effects. Together, these results indicate that social stress-induced behavioral deficits are mediated partly by molecular adaptations in mPFC involving ΔFosB and CCK through cortical projections to distinct subcortical targets.

  13. Decreased cerebral cortical serotonin transporter binding in ecstasy users: a positron emission tomography/[11C]DASB and structural brain imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Lerch, Jason; Furukawa, Yoshiaki; Tong, Junchao; McCluskey, Tina; Wilkins, Diana; Houle, Sylvain; Meyer, Jeffrey; Mundo, Emanuela; Wilson, Alan A.; Rusjan, Pablo M.; Saint-Cyr, Jean A.; Guttman, Mark; Collins, D. Louis; Shapiro, Colin; Warsh, Jerry J.; Boileau, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    Animal data indicate that the recreational drug ecstasy (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) can damage brain serotonin neurons. However, human neuroimaging measurements of serotonin transporter binding, a serotonin neuron marker, remain contradictory, especially regarding brain areas affected; and the possibility that structural brain differences might account for serotonin transporter binding changes has not been explored. We measured brain serotonin transporter binding using [11C] N,N-dimethyl-2-(2-amino-4-cyanophenylthio) benzylamine in 50 control subjects and in 49 chronic (mean 4 years) ecstasy users (typically one to two tablets bi-monthly) withdrawn from the drug (mean 45 days). A magnetic resonance image for positron emission tomography image co-registration and structural analyses was acquired. Hair toxicology confirmed group allocation but also indicated use of other psychoactive drugs in most users. Serotonin transporter binding in ecstasy users was significantly decreased throughout all cerebral cortices (range –19 to –46%) and hippocampus (–21%) and related to the extent of drug use (years, maximum dose), but was normal in basal ganglia and midbrain. Substantial overlap was observed between control and user values except for insular cortex, in which 51% of ecstasy user values fell below the lower limit of the control range. Voxel-based analyses confirmed a caudorostral gradient of cortical serotonin transporter binding loss with occipital cortex most severely affected. Magnetic resonance image measurement revealed no overall regional volume differences between groups; however, a slight left-hemispheric biased cortical thinning was detected in methamphetamine-using ecstasy users. The serotonin transporter binding loss was not related to structural changes or partial volume effect, use of other stimulant drugs, blood testosterone or oestradiol levels, major serotonin transporter gene promoter polymorphisms, gender, psychiatric status, or self

  14. The influence of social evaluation on cerebral cortical activity and motor performance: a study of "Real-Life" competition.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, Bradley D; Costanzo, Michelle E; Goodman, Ronald N; Lo, Li-Chuan; Oh, Hyuk; Rietschel, Jeremy C; Saffer, Mark; Bradberry, Trent; Contreras-Vidal, Jose; Haufler, Amy

    2013-11-01

    Motor performance in a social evaluative environment was examined in participants (N = 19) who completed a pistol shooting task under both performance-alone (PA) and competitive (C) conditions. Electroencephalographic (EEG), autonomic, and psychoendocrine activity were recorded in addition to kinematic measures of the aiming behavior. State anxiety, heart rate, and cortisol were modestly elevated during C and accompanied by relative desynchrony of high-alpha power, increased cortico-cortical communication between motor and non-motor regions, and degradation of the fluency of aiming trajectory, but maintenance of performance outcome (i.e., score). The findings reveal that performance in a complex social-evaluative environment characterized by competition results in elevated cortical activity beyond that essentially required for motor performance that translated as less efficient motor behavior.

  15. Subplate Neurons: Crucial Regulators of Cortical Development and Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kanold, Patrick O.

    2009-01-01

    The developing cerebral cortex contains a distinct class of cells, subplate neurons, which form one of the first functional cortical circuits. Subplate neurons reside in the cortical white matter, receive thalamic inputs and project into the developing cortical plate, mostly to layer 4. Subplate neurons are present at key time points during development. Removal of subplate neurons profoundly affects cortical development. Subplate removal in visual cortex prevents the maturation of thalamocortical synapse, the maturation of inhibition in layer 4, the development of orientation selective responses in individual cortical neurons, and the formation of ocular dominance columns. In addition, monocular deprivation during development reveals that ocular dominance plasticity is paradoxical in the absence of subplate neurons. Because subplate neurons projecting to layer 4 are glutamatergic, these diverse deficits following subplate removal were hypothesized to be due to lack of feed-forward thalamic driven cortical excitation. A computational model of the developing thalamocortical pathway incorporating feed-forward excitatory subplate projections replicates both normal development and plasticity of ocular dominance as well as the effects of subplate removal. Therefore, we postulate that feed-forward excitatory projections from subplate neurons into the developing cortical plate enhance correlated activity between thalamus and layer 4 and, in concert with Hebbian learning rules in layer 4, allow maturational and plastic processes in layer 4 to commence. Thus subplate neurons are a crucial regulator of cortical development and plasticity, and damage to these neurons might play a role in the pathology of many neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:19738926

  16. Asymmetric Numb distribution is critical for asymmetric cell division of mouse cerebral cortical stem cells and neuroblasts.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qin; Zhong, Weimin; Jan, Yuh Nung; Temple, Sally

    2002-10-01

    Stem cells and neuroblasts derived from mouse embryos undergo repeated asymmetric cell divisions, generating neural lineage trees similar to those of invertebrates. In Drosophila, unequal distribution of Numb protein during mitosis produces asymmetric cell divisions and consequently diverse neural cell fates. We investigated whether a mouse homologue m-numb had a similar role during mouse cortical development. Progenitor cells isolated from the embryonic mouse cortex were followed as they underwent their next cell division in vitro. Numb distribution was predominantly asymmetric during asymmetric cell divisions yielding a beta-tubulin III(-) progenitor and a beta-tubulin III(+) neuronal cell (P/N divisions) and predominantly symmetric during divisions producing two neurons (N/N divisions). Cells from the numb knockout mouse underwent significantly fewer asymmetric P/N divisions compared to wild type, indicating a causal role for Numb. When progenitor cells derived from early (E10) cortex undergo P/N divisions, both daughters express the progenitor marker Nestin, indicating their immature state, and Numb segregates into the P or N daughter with similar frequency. In contrast, when progenitor cells derived from later E13 cortex (during active neurogenesis in vivo) undergo P/N divisions they produce a Nestin(+) progenitor and a Nestin(-) neuronal daughter, and Numb segregates preferentially into the neuronal daughter. Thus during mouse cortical neurogenesis, as in Drosophila neurogenesis, asymmetric segregation of Numb could inhibit Notch activity in one daughter to induce neuronal differentiation. At terminal divisions generating two neurons, Numb was symmetrically distributed in approximately 80% of pairs and asymmetrically in 20%. We found a significant association between Numb distribution and morphology: most sisters of neuron pairs with symmetric Numb were similar and most with asymmetric Numb were different. Developing cortical neurons with Numb had longer

  17. Lateralization of speech production starts in sensory cortices--a possible sensory origin of cerebral left dominance for speech.

    PubMed

    Kell, Christian Alexander; Morillon, Benjamin; Kouneiher, Frederique; Giraud, Anne-Lise

    2011-04-01

    Speech production is a left-lateralized brain function, which could arise from a left dominance either in speech executive or sensory processes or both. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in healthy subjects, we show that sensory cortices already lateralize when speaking is intended, while the frontal cortex only lateralizes when speech is acted out. The sequence of lateralization, first temporal then frontal lateralization, suggests that the functional lateralization of the auditory cortex could drive hemispheric specialization for speech production.

  18. Object-in-place associative recognition memory depends on glutamate receptor neurotransmission within two defined hippocampal-cortical circuits: a critical role for AMPA and NMDA receptors in the hippocampus, perirhinal, and prefrontal cortices.

    PubMed

    Barker, Gareth Robert Issac; Warburton, Elizabeth Clea

    2015-02-01

    Object-in-place associative recognition memory depends on an interaction between the hippocampus (HPC), perirhinal (PRH), and medial prefrontal (mPFC) cortices, yet the contribution of glutamate receptor neurotransmission to these interactions is unknown. NMDA receptors (NMDAR) in the HPC were critical for encoding of object-in-place memory but not for single-item object recognition. Next, a disconnection procedure was used to examine the importance of "concurrent" glutamate neurotransmission in the HPC-mPFC and HPC-PRH. Contralateral unilateral infusions of NBQX (AMPAR antagonist), into the HPC-mPFC, or HPC-PRH, either before acquisition or test, impaired object-in-place performance. Thus, both circuits are necessary for encoding and retrieval. Crossed unilateral AP5 (NMDAR antagonist) infusions into the HPC-mPFC or HPC-PRH impaired encoding, but not retrieval. Specifically crossed HPC-mPFC infusions impaired both short-term (5 min) and longer term (1 h) memory while HPC-PRH infusions impaired longer term memory only. This delay-dependent effect of AP5 in the HPC-PRH on object-in-place memory, accords with its effects in the PRH, on single item object recognition memory, thereby suggesting that a single PRH synaptic plasticity mechanism underpins different recognition memory processes. Further, blocking excitatory neurotransmission in any pair of structures within the networks impaired "both" encoding and retrieval, thus object-in-place memory clearly requires network interdependency across multiple structures.

  19. Object-in-Place Associative Recognition Memory Depends on Glutamate Receptor Neurotransmission Within Two Defined Hippocampal-Cortical Circuits: A Critical Role for AMPA and NMDA Receptors in the Hippocampus, Perirhinal, and Prefrontal Cortices

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Gareth Robert Issac; Warburton, Elizabeth Clea

    2015-01-01

    Object-in-place associative recognition memory depends on an interaction between the hippocampus (HPC), perirhinal (PRH), and medial prefrontal (mPFC) cortices, yet the contribution of glutamate receptor neurotransmission to these interactions is unknown. NMDA receptors (NMDAR) in the HPC were critical for encoding of object-in-place memory but not for single-item object recognition. Next, a disconnection procedure was used to examine the importance of “concurrent” glutamate neurotransmission in the HPC-mPFC and HPC-PRH. Contralateral unilateral infusions of NBQX (AMPAR antagonist), into the HPC-mPFC, or HPC-PRH, either before acquisition or test, impaired object-in-place performance. Thus, both circuits are necessary for encoding and retrieval. Crossed unilateral AP5 (NMDAR antagonist) infusions into the HPC-mPFC or HPC-PRH impaired encoding, but not retrieval. Specifically crossed HPC-mPFC infusions impaired both short-term (5 min) and longer term (1 h) memory while HPC-PRH infusions impaired longer term memory only. This delay-dependent effect of AP5 in the HPC-PRH on object-in-place memory, accords with its effects in the PRH, on single item object recognition memory, thereby suggesting that a single PRH synaptic plasticity mechanism underpins different recognition memory processes. Further, blocking excitatory neurotransmission in any pair of structures within the networks impaired “both” encoding and retrieval, thus object-in-place memory clearly requires network interdependency across multiple structures. PMID:24035904

  20. Inhibitory interneuron circuits at cortical and spinal levels are associated with individual differences in corticomuscular coherence during isometric voluntary contraction

    PubMed Central

    Matsuya, Ryosuke; Ushiyama, Junichi; Ushiba, Junichi

    2017-01-01

    Corticomuscular coherence (CMC) is an oscillatory synchronization of 15–35 Hz (β-band) between electroencephalogram (EEG) of the sensorimotor cortex and electromyogram of contracting muscles. Although we reported that the magnitude of CMC varies among individuals, the physiological mechanisms underlying this variation are still unclear. Here, we aimed to investigate the associations between CMC and intracortical inhibition (ICI) in the primary motor cortex (M1)/recurrent inhibition (RI) in the spinal cord, which probably affect oscillatory neural activities. Firstly, we quantified ICI from changes in motor-evoked potentials induced by paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation in M1 during tonic isometric voluntary contraction of the first dorsal interosseous. ICI showed a significant, negative correlation with the strength of EEG β-oscillation, but not with the magnitude of CMC across individuals. Next, we quantified RI from changes in H-reflexes induced by paired-pulse electrical nerve stimulation to the posterior tibial nerve during isometric contraction of the soleus muscle. We observed a significant, positive correlation between RI and peak CMC across individuals. These results suggest that the local inhibitory interneuron networks in cortical and spinal levels are associated with the oscillatory activity in corticospinal loop. PMID:28290507

  1. Effects of Shaoyao-Gancao Decoction on Infarcted Cerebral Cortical Neurons: Suppression of the Inflammatory Response following Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xinling; Yang, Jian; Li, Qing; Yan, Guofeng; Xu, Zhongju; Wang, Jingye

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which Shaoyao-Gancao decoction (SGD) inhibits the production of inflammatory cytokines in serum and brain tissue after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (CI-RP) in rats were investigated. A right middle cerebral artery occlusion was used to induce CI-RP after which the rats were divided into model (n = 39), SGD (n = 28), clopidogrel (n = 25) and sham operated (n = 34) groups. The Bederson scale was used to evaluate changes in behavioral indices. The levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, MCP-1, IL-10, RANTES, VEGF, and TGF-β1 in the serum and infarcted brain tissues were measured. Nissl body and immunohistochemical staining methods were used to detect biochemical changes in neurons, microglial cells, and astrocytes. Serum levels of VEGF, TNF-α, MCP-1, IL-1β, and IL-10 increased significantly 24 h after CI-RP. In brain tissue, levels of TNF-α and IL-1β significantly increased 24 h after CI-RP, whereas levels of TGF-β1 and MCP-1 were significantly higher 96 h after CI-RP (P < 0.05). SGD or clopidogrel after CI-RP reduced TNF-α and IL-1β levels in brain tissue and serum levels of MCP-1, IL-1β, and IL-10. SGD increased the number of NeuN-positive cells in infarcted brain tissue and reduced the number of IBA1-positive and GFAP-positive cells. The efficacy of SGD was significantly higher than that of clopidogrel. PMID:27413737

  2. Normal development of brain circuits.

    PubMed

    Tau, Gregory Z; Peterson, Bradley S

    2010-01-01

    Spanning functions from the simplest reflex arc to complex cognitive processes, neural circuits have diverse functional roles. In the cerebral cortex, functional domains such as visual processing, attention, memory, and cognitive control rely on the development of distinct yet interconnected sets of anatomically distributed cortical and subcortical regions. The developmental organization of these circuits is a remarkably complex process that is influenced by genetic predispositions, environmental events, and neuroplastic responses to experiential demand that modulates connectivity and communication among neurons, within individual brain regions and circuits, and across neural pathways. Recent advances in neuroimaging and computational neurobiology, together with traditional investigational approaches such as histological studies and cellular and molecular biology, have been invaluable in improving our understanding of these developmental processes in humans in both health and illness. To contextualize the developmental origins of a wide array of neuropsychiatric illnesses, this review describes the development and maturation of neural circuits from the first synapse through critical periods of vulnerability and opportunity to the emergent capacity for cognitive and behavioral regulation, and finally the dynamic interplay across levels of circuit organization and developmental epochs.

  3. Impact of tramadol and morphine abuse on the activities of acetylcholine esterase, Na+/K+-ATPase and related parameters in cerebral cortices of male adult rats

    PubMed Central

    El-Hamid Mohamed Elwy, Abd; Tabl, Ghada

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of the most commonly abused drugs (tramadol and morphine), on acetylcholine esterase (AChE), Na+/K+-ATPase activities and related parameters, Na+ and K+ as biomarkers of neurotoxicity. Methods Tramadol - as a weak μ opioid receptor agonist- and morphine - as opiate analgesic drugs, were chosen for the present study. Four series of experimental animals were conducted for either tramadol or morphine: control series; repeated single equal doses (therapeutic dose) series; cumulative increasing doses series and delay (withdrawal) series (96 hours withdrawal period after last administration), at time period intervals 7, 14 and 21 days. Acetylcholine esterase (AChE), Na+/K+-ATPase activities and related parameters, Na+ and K+ were measured in cerebral cortices of experimental rats. Results Acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity in the brain cerebral cortex increased after the administration of therapeutic repeated doses of either tramadol (20 mg/kg b.w.) or morphine (4 mg/kg b.w.) in different groups. The daily intraperitoneal injection of cumulative increasing dose levels of either tramadol 20, 40 and 80 mg/kg or morphine 4, 8 and 12 mg/kg revealed a significant increase in the mean of acetylcholine esterase activities. The withdrawal groups of either tramadol or morphine showed significant decreases in their levels. Na+/K+ ATPase activity in the brain cerebral cortex of either repeated therapeutic doses of tramadol (20 mg/kg) or morphine repeated therapeutic doses (4 mg/kg) for 21 consecutive days at different intervals 7, 14 and 21 days, induced a significant decrease in the levels of Na+/K+-ATPase in all groups. Withdrawal groups showed a significant decrease in Na+/K+-ATPase level. Furthermore, the daily intraperitoneal injection of cumulative increasing dose levels of either tramadol (20, 40 and 80 mg/kg b.w.) or morphine (4, 8 and 12 mg/kg b.w.) induced significant decreases in Na+/K+-ATPase levels in all studied groups. Regarding

  4. Impact of tramadol and morphine abuse on the activities of acetylcholine esterase, Na+/K+-ATPase and related parameters in cerebral cortices of male adult rats.

    PubMed

    El-Hamid Mohamed Elwy, Abd; Tabl, Ghada

    2017-03-01

    To determine the effect of the most commonly abused drugs (tramadol and morphine), on acetylcholine esterase (AChE), Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activities and related parameters, Na(+) and K(+) as biomarkers of neurotoxicity. Tramadol - as a weak μ opioid receptor agonist- and morphine - as opiate analgesic drugs, were chosen for the present study. Four series of experimental animals were conducted for either tramadol or morphine: control series; repeated single equal doses (therapeutic dose) series; cumulative increasing doses series and delay (withdrawal) series (96 hours withdrawal period after last administration), at time period intervals 7, 14 and 21 days. Acetylcholine esterase (AChE), Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activities and related parameters, Na(+) and K(+) were measured in cerebral cortices of experimental rats. Acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity in the brain cerebral cortex increased after the administration of therapeutic repeated doses of either tramadol (20 mg/kg b.w.) or morphine (4 mg/kg b.w.) in different groups. The daily intraperitoneal injection of cumulative increasing dose levels of either tramadol 20, 40 and 80 mg/kg or morphine 4, 8 and 12 mg/kg revealed a significant increase in the mean of acetylcholine esterase activities. The withdrawal groups of either tramadol or morphine showed significant decreases in their levels. Na(+)/K(+) ATPase activity in the brain cerebral cortex of either repeated therapeutic doses of tramadol (20 mg/kg) or morphine repeated therapeutic doses (4 mg/kg) for 21 consecutive days at different intervals 7, 14 and 21 days, induced a significant decrease in the levels of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in all groups. Withdrawal groups showed a significant decrease in Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase level. Furthermore, the daily intraperitoneal injection of cumulative increasing dose levels of either tramadol (20, 40 and 80 mg/kg b.w.) or morphine (4, 8 and 12 mg/kg b.w.) induced significant decreases in Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase levels in all studied groups

  5. Attention-dependent modulation of cortical taste circuits revealed by Granger causality with signal-dependent noise.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qiang; Ge, Tian; Grabenhorst, Fabian; Feng, Jianfeng; Rolls, Edmund T

    2013-10-01

    We show, for the first time, that in cortical areas, for example the insular, orbitofrontal, and lateral prefrontal cortex, there is signal-dependent noise in the fMRI blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) time series, with the variance of the noise increasing approximately linearly with the square of the signal. Classical Granger causal models are based on autoregressive models with time invariant covariance structure, and thus do not take this signal-dependent noise into account. To address this limitation, here we describe a Granger causal model with signal-dependent noise, and a novel, likelihood ratio test for causal inferences. We apply this approach to the data from an fMRI study to investigate the source of the top-down attentional control of taste intensity and taste pleasantness processing. The Granger causality with signal-dependent noise analysis reveals effects not identified by classical Granger causal analysis. In particular, there is a top-down effect from the posterior lateral prefrontal cortex to the insular taste cortex during attention to intensity but not to pleasantness, and there is a top-down effect from the anterior and posterior lateral prefrontal cortex to the orbitofrontal cortex during attention to pleasantness but not to intensity. In addition, there is stronger forward effective connectivity from the insular taste cortex to the orbitofrontal cortex during attention to pleasantness than during attention to intensity. These findings indicate the importance of explicitly modeling signal-dependent noise in functional neuroimaging, and reveal some of the processes involved in a biased activation theory of selective attention.

  6. Widespread hyperphosphorylated tau in the working memory circuit early after cortical impact injury of brain (Original study).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zi-Ai; Ning, Ya-Lei; Li, Ping; Yang, Nan; Peng, Yan; Xiong, Ren-Ping; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Dong; Zeng, Xu-Jia; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Zhou, Yuan-Guo

    2017-04-14

    A series of neurological and psychiatric symptoms occur after traumatic brain injury (TBI), with cognitive dysfunction being one of the most prominent sequela. Given that tau hyperphosphorylation is an important cause of cognitive impairment in patients of Alzheimer's disease, our present study detected the presence of hyperphosphorylated tau (p-tau), mainly at Ser404, in multiple brain regions, including the ipsilateral parietal cortex, contralateral hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, immediately after the injury in a mouse TBI model; these changes lasted for at least 4w. All of these brain regions play important roles in working memory. Hyperphosphorylated tau protein was primarily located in neurons and was accompanied by axonal injury and dendritic spine degeneration. Our study demonstrated that p-tau spreads gradually and selectively from the injured cortex to other brain regions after TBI and that all of the affected regions are part of the working memory circuit. These findings provide experimental support for the role of p-tau in cognitive impairment in the early phase after TBI.

  7. Dynamic cortical lateralization during olfactory discrimination learning

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Yaniv; Putrino, David; Wilson, Donald A

    2015-01-01

    Key points Odour discrimination and memory involve changes in the primary olfactory (piriform) cortex. The results obtained in the present study suggest that there is an asymmetry in piriform cortical change, with learning-related changes in cortical oscillations emerging with different time courses over the course of multiday training in the left and right piriform cortices in rats. There is an initial decrease in coherence between the left and right piriform cortices during the early stages of the odour discrimination task, which recovers as the animals approach criterion performance. This decreased coherence is expressed when the animals are performing the task relative to when they are in their home cage. The results suggest a transient cortical asymmetry during learning and raise new questions about the functions and mechanisms of cerebral lateralization. Abstract Bilateral cortical circuits are not necessarily symmetrical. Asymmetry, or cerebral lateralization, allows functional specialization of bilateral brain regions and has been described in humans for such diverse functions as perception, memory and emotion. There is also evidence for asymmetry in the human olfactory system, although evidence in non-human animal models is lacking. In the present study, we took advantage of the known changes in olfactory cortical local field potentials that occur over the course of odour discrimination training to test for functional asymmetry in piriform cortical activity during learning. Both right and left piriform cortex local field potential activities were recorded. The results obtained demonstrate a robust interhemispheric asymmetry in anterior piriform cortex activity that emerges during specific stages of odour discrimination learning, with a transient bias toward the left hemisphere. This asymmetry is not apparent during error trials. Furthermore, functional connectivity (coherence) between the bilateral anterior piriform cortices is learning- and context

  8. Two-photon mapping of neocortical circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolenko, Volodymyr

    The synaptic circuits of the cerebral cortex are still poorly understood, yet knowing their basic structure appears key for understanding their function (Lorente de No, 1949). While some argue that there is a basic modular circuit present in all cortical regions (Douglas et al., 1989; Hubel and Wiesel, 1977), others suggest that synaptic circuits could be randomly structured (Braitenberg and Schuz, 1998). To investigate the patterns of synaptic connections present in neocortex, I have developed a novel two-photon optical mapping method (Nikolenko et al., 2007) to systematically reveal cells that connect to four classes of neurons in slices of mouse primary sensory cortex. Inputs to these cells originated preferentially from specific cortical layers and often were laterally restricted, revealing functional columnar circuits with sharp boundaries. Moreover, many neurons extensively sampled particular territories, and, in some cases, virtually every cell from a particular layer was connected to the postsynaptic target. The results reveal circuits with dense columnar connectivity, approximating in some cases the complete sampling from every potential presynaptic cell in an input layer. I discuss the implications of these findings in the context of the computational strategies used by the cortex.

  9. Gain Modulation by an Urgency Signal Controls the Speed–Accuracy Trade-Off in a Network Model of a Cortical Decision Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Standage, Dominic; You, Hongzhi; Wang, Da-Hui; Dorris, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    The speed–accuracy trade-off (SAT) is ubiquitous in decision tasks. While the neural mechanisms underlying decisions are generally well characterized, the application of decision-theoretic methods to the SAT has been difficult to reconcile with experimental data suggesting that decision thresholds are inflexible. Using a network model of a cortical decision circuit, we demonstrate the SAT in a manner consistent with neural and behavioral data and with mathematical models that optimize speed and accuracy with respect to one another. In simulations of a reaction time task, we modulate the gain of the network with a signal encoding the urgency to respond. As the urgency signal builds up, the network progresses through a series of processing stages supporting noise filtering, integration of evidence, amplification of integrated evidence, and choice selection. Analysis of the network's dynamics formally characterizes this progression. Slower buildup of urgency increases accuracy by slowing down the progression. Faster buildup has the opposite effect. Because the network always progresses through the same stages, decision-selective firing rates are stereotyped at decision time. PMID:21415911

  10. Gain modulation by an urgency signal controls the speed-accuracy trade-off in a network model of a cortical decision circuit.

    PubMed

    Standage, Dominic; You, Hongzhi; Wang, Da-Hui; Dorris, Michael C

    2011-01-01

    The speed-accuracy trade-off (SAT) is ubiquitous in decision tasks. While the neural mechanisms underlying decisions are generally well characterized, the application of decision-theoretic methods to the SAT has been difficult to reconcile with experimental data suggesting that decision thresholds are inflexible. Using a network model of a cortical decision circuit, we demonstrate the SAT in a manner consistent with neural and behavioral data and with mathematical models that optimize speed and accuracy with respect to one another. In simulations of a reaction time task, we modulate the gain of the network with a signal encoding the urgency to respond. As the urgency signal builds up, the network progresses through a series of processing stages supporting noise filtering, integration of evidence, amplification of integrated evidence, and choice selection. Analysis of the network's dynamics formally characterizes this progression. Slower buildup of urgency increases accuracy by slowing down the progression. Faster buildup has the opposite effect. Because the network always progresses through the same stages, decision-selective firing rates are stereotyped at decision time.

  11. Opiate Exposure State Controls a D2-CaMKIIα-Dependent Memory Switch in the Amygdala-Prefrontal Cortical Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Laura G; Zunder, Jordan; Renard, Justine; Fu, Jennifer; Rushlow, Walter; Laviolette, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian basolateral amygdala (BLA) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) comprise a functionally interconnected circuit that is critical for processing opiate-related associative memories. In the opiate-naïve state, reward memory formation in the BLA involves a functional link between dopamine (DA) D1 receptor (D1R) and extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling substrates, but switches to a DA D2 (D2R)/Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα)-dependent memory substrate following chronic opiate exposure and spontaneous withdrawal. Using conditioned place preference (CPP) in rats paired with molecular analyses, we examined the role of intra-mPFC CaMKII, ERK and DAergic activity during the formation of opiate associative memories, and how opiate exposure state may regulate the functions of these molecular memory pathways. We report that the role of CaMKIIα signaling is functionally reversed within the BLA-mPFC pathway depending on opiate exposure state. Thus, in the opiate-naïve state, intra-mPFC but not intra-BLA blockade of CaMKII signaling prevents formation of opiate reward memory. However, following chronic opiate exposure and spontaneous withdrawal, the role of CaMKII signaling in the BLA-mPFC is functionally reversed. This behavioral memory switch corresponds to a selective increase in the expression of D2R and CaMKIIα, but not other calcium/calmodulin-related molecules, nor D1R expression levels within the mPFC. PMID:26174594

  12. Regulation of cerebral cortex development by Rho GTPases: insights from in vivo studies

    PubMed Central

    Azzarelli, Roberta; Kerloch, Thomas; Pacary, Emilie

    2015-01-01

    The cerebral cortex is the site of higher human cognitive and motor functions. Histologically, it is organized into six horizontal layers, each containing unique populations of molecularly and functionally distinct excitatory projection neurons and inhibitory interneurons. The stereotyped cellular distribution of cortical neurons is crucial for the formation of functional neural circuits and it is predominantly established during embryonic development. Cortical neuron development is a multiphasic process characterized by sequential steps of neural progenitor proliferation, cell cycle exit, neuroblast migration and neuronal differentiation. This series of events requires an extensive and dynamic remodeling of the cell cytoskeleton at each step of the process. As major regulators of the cytoskeleton, the family of small Rho GTPases has been shown to play essential functions in cerebral cortex development. Here we review in vivo findings that support the contribution of Rho GTPases to cortical projection neuron development and we address their involvement in the etiology of cerebral cortex malformations. PMID:25610373

  13. Computational modelling of the cerebral cortical microvasculature: effect of x-ray microbeams versus broad beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrem, A.; Bartzsch, S.; Laissue, J.; Oelfke, U.

    2017-05-01

    Microbeam Radiation Therapy is an innovative pre-clinical strategy which uses arrays of parallel, tens of micrometres wide kilo-voltage photon beams to treat tumours. These x-ray beams are typically generated on a synchrotron source. It was shown that these beam geometries allow exceptional normal tissue sparing from radiation damage while still being effective in tumour ablation. A final biological explanation for this enhanced therapeutic ratio has still not been found, some experimental data support an important role of the vasculature. In this work, the effect of microbeams on a normal microvascular network of the cerebral cortex was assessed in computer simulations and compared to the effect of homogeneous, seamless exposures at equal energy absorption. The anatomy of a cerebral microvascular network and the inflicted radiation damage were simulated to closely mimic experimental data using a novel probabilistic model of radiation damage to blood vessels. It was found that the spatial dose fractionation by microbeam arrays significantly decreased the vascular damage. The higher the peak-to-valley dose ratio, the more pronounced the sparing effect. Simulations of the radiation damage as a function of morphological parameters of the vascular network demonstrated that the distribution of blood vessel radii is a key parameter determining both the overall radiation damage of the vasculature and the dose-dependent differential effect of microbeam irradiation.

  14. Ethanol exposure during neurogenesis induces persistent effects on neural maturation: evidence from an ex vivo model of fetal cerebral cortical neuroepithelial progenitor maturation.

    PubMed

    Camarillo, Cynthia; Miranda, Rajesh C

    2008-01-01

    Ethanol is a significant neuroteratogen. We previously used fetal cortical-derived neurosphere cultures as an ex vivo model of the second trimester ventricular neuroepithelium, and showed that ethanol directly induced fetal stem and progenitor cell proliferation and maturation without inducing death. However, ethanol is defined as a teratogen because of its capacity to persistently disrupt neural maturation beyond a specific exposure period. We therefore utilized a simplified neuronal maturation paradigm to examine the immediate and persistent changes in neuronal migration following ethanol exposure during the phase of neuroepithelial proliferation. Our data indicate that mRNA transcripts for migration-associated genes RhoA, Paxillin (Pxn), and CDC42 were immediately induced following ethanol exposure, whereas dynein light chain, LC8-type 1 (DYNLL1), and growth-associated protein (Gap)-43 were suppressed. With the exception of Gap43, ethanol did not induce persistent changes in the other mRNAs, suggesting that ethanol had an activational, rather than organizational, impact on migration-associated mRNAs. However, despite this lack of persistent effects on these mRNAs, ethanol exposure during the proliferation period significantly increased subsequent neuronal migration. Moreover, differentiating neurons, pretreated with ethanol during the proliferation phase, exhibited reduced neurite branching and an increased length of primary neurites, indicating a persistent destabilization of neuronal maturation. Collectively, our data indicate that ethanol-exposed proliferating neuroepithelial precursors exhibit subsequent differentiation-associated increases in migratory behavior, independent of mRNA transcript levels. These data help explain the increased incidence of cerebral cortical neuronal heterotopias associated with the fetal alcohol syndrome.

  15. Cortical electrical stimulation promotes neuronal plasticity in the peri-ischemic cortex and contralesional anterior horn of cervical spinal cord in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian; Liu, Lingtong; Xue, Xiaowei; Li, Hao; Wang, Shuo; Cao, Yong; Zhao, Jizong

    2013-04-04

    This study evaluated the effect of cortical electrical stimulation (CES) on function recovery, dendritic plasticity, astrogliosis, and neuron recruitment in the peri-ischemic cortex (PIC) and contralesional anterior horn of cervical spinal cord (CSC) in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia. Rats were pre-trained on single pellet retrieval task, then received focal ischemic lesions and electrodes implantation. Seven days after surgery, rats received CES (CES group) or no stimulation (NS group) during 18 days of training. Behavior data on stimulation days 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16 and 18 were pooled for use. Immunohistochemical investigations for microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and neuronal nuclei antigen (NeuN) were performed. Rats in CES group showed greater functional recovery of the impaired forelimb compared to the NS group. Moreover, the functional improvement coincided with a significant increase in MAP-2-immunoreactive dendritic surface density in PIC and CSC (P=0.011; P=0.005, respectively). CES group had a significant decrease in GFAP-immunoreactive astrocytic surface density in PIC and CSC (P=0.039; P=0.013, respectively). In the immunoassaying of NeuN, there was no significant difference between the two groups in PIC and CSC (P=0.834, P=0.782, respectively). CES can promote dendritic plasticity and reduce astrogliosis in the PIC and CSC in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia. CES is still an appealing method for post-stroke rehabilitation provided that viability of pathways is evaluated presurgically. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Water immersion to the femur level affects cerebral cortical activity in humans: functional near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Sato, Daisuke; Onishi, Hideaki; Yamashiro, Koya; Iwabe, Tatsuya; Shimoyama, Yoshimitsu; Maruyama, Atsuo

    2012-04-01

    Water immersion is widely used in physiotherapy and may even improve the functional outcomes of hemiplegic patients after stroke. To investigate the cortical responses to water immersion, functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) was used to measure cortical activations in the primary somatosensory area (S1), parietal association area (PAA), supplementary motor area (SMA), and primary motor area (M1). Nine healthy adult males were rested in a sitting position for 15 min with simultaneous measurements of fNIRS, blood pressure, and skin temperature. The fNIRS signal and other physiological parameters were measured under three conditions, the non-immersed condition (baseline control), as the immersion tank was filling with water (pouring water condition), and during sustained water immersion. Each condition lasted for 5 min. The water level was allowed to reach the femur, and during the experiment, room and water temperatures were maintained at 34°C. Oxygenated hemoglobin (oxyHb) concentrations in the S1, PAA, SMA, and M1 remained stable during baseline recording but gradually increased during water pouring and immersion. Significantly higher oxyHb levels were observed in S1 at 20 s after the onset of water immersion condition and in the PAA at 40 s. Subsequently, oxyHb levels in the SMA and M1 increased significantly 100 s after the onset of water immersion condition. In contrast, no significant changes in blood pressure, heart rate, or skin temperature were observed. Water immersion resulted in increased activity in both sensory and motor areas of cortex as measured by non-invasive fNIRS. Water immersion may enhance the efficacy of physical therapy by providing background activation to affected areas of the cortex, thereby enhancing signal processing and learning.

  17. The contribution of alcohol, thiamine deficiency and cirrhosis of the liver to cerebral cortical damage in alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Kril, J J

    1995-03-01

    The relative roles of alcohol toxicity, thiamine deficiency and cirrhosis of the liver in the pathogenesis of alcohol-related brain damage are unclear. Brain shrinkage and neuronal loss from four regions of the cortex was determined in 22 alcoholics with the Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome (WKS), cirrhosis of the liver or neither of these complications and compared to 22 age-matched non-alcoholic controls. Brain shrinkage was most marked in those alcoholics with WKS. Neuronal loss occurred only from the superior cortex and was of equal magnitude in all alcoholic subgroups. In an animal model of alcohol abuse and thiamine deficiency, neuronal loss from the cerebral cortex occurred in a time-dependent manner. Furthermore, those cells which contained the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin appeared to be preferentially damaged in this model.

  18. Impaired vascular remodeling after endothelial progenitor cell transplantation in MMP9-deficient mice suffering cortical cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Morancho, Anna; Ma, Feifei; Barceló, Verónica; Giralt, Dolors; Montaner, Joan; Rosell, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are being investigated for advanced therapies, and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) has an important role in stroke recovery. Our aim was to determine whether tissue MMP9 influences the EPC-induced angiogenesis after ischemia. Wild-type (WT) and MMP9-deficient mice (MMP9/KO) were subjected to cerebral ischemia and treated with vehicle or outgrowth EPCs. After 3 weeks, we observed an increase in the peri-infarct vessel density in WT animals but not in MMP9/KO mice; no differences were found in the vehicle-treated groups. Our data suggest that tissue MMP9 has a crucial role in EPC-induced vascular remodeling after stroke. PMID:26219597

  19. FNIRS-based evaluation of cortical plasticity in children with cerebral palsy undergoing constraint-induced movement therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jianwei; Khan, Bilal; Hervey, Nathan; Tian, Fenghua; Delgado, Mauricio R.; Clegg, Nancy J.; Smith, Linsley; Roberts, Heather; Tulchin-Francis, Kirsten; Shierk, Angela; Shagman, Laura; MacFarlane, Duncan; Liu, Hanli; Alexandrakis, George

    2015-03-01

    Sensorimotor cortex plasticity induced by constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in six children (10.2 ± 2.1 years old) with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP) was assessed by functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). The activation laterality index and time-to-peak/duration during a finger tapping task were quantified before, immediately after, and six months after CIMT. Five age-matched healthy children (9.8 ± 1.3 years old) were also imaged at the same time points to provide comparative activation metrics for normal controls. In children with CP the activation time-to-peak/duration for all sensorimotor centers displayed significant normalization immediately after CIMT that persisted six months later. In contrast to this longer term improvement in localized activation response, the laterality index that depended on communication between sensorimotor centers improved immediately after CIMT, but relapsed six months later.

  20. Electro-acupuncture exerts beneficial effects against cerebral ischemia and promotes the proliferation of neural progenitor cells in the cortical peri-infarct area through the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Tao, Jing; Lin, Yukun; Lin, Ruhui; Liu, Weilin; Chen, Lidian

    2015-11-01

    Electro-acupuncture (EA) is a novel therapy based on combining traditional acupuncture with modern electrotherapy, and it is currently being investigated as a treatment for ischemic stroke. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the mechanisms through which EA regulates the proliferation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in the cortical peri‑infarct area after stroke. The neuroprotective effects of EA on ischemic rats were evaluated by determining the neurological deficit scores and cerebral infarct volumes. The proliferation of the NPCs and the activation of the Wnt/β‑catenin signaling pathway in the cortical peri‑infarct area were examined. Our results revealed that EA significantly alleviated neurological deficits, reduced the infarct volume and enhanced NPC proliferation [nestin/glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)‑double positive] in the cortex of rats subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Moreover, the Wnt1 and β‑catenin mRNA and protein levels were increased, while glycogen synthase kinase‑3 (GSK3) transcription was suppressed by EA. These results suggest that the upregulatory effects of EA on the Wnt/β‑catenin signaling pathway may promote NPC proliferation in the cortical peri-infarct area after stroke, consequently providing a therapeutic effect against cerebral ischemia.

  1. Storing maternal memories: Hypothesizing an interaction of experience and estrogen on sensory cortical plasticity to learn infant cues

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Sunayana B.; Liu, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Much of the literature on maternal behavior has focused on the role of infant experience and hormones in a canonical subcortical circuit for maternal motivation and maternal memory. Although early studies demonstrated that the cerebral cortex also plays a significant role in maternal behaviors, little has been done to explore what that role may be. Recent work though has provided evidence that the cortex, particularly sensory cortices, contains correlates of sensory memories of infant cues, consistent with classical studies of experience-dependent sensory cortical plasticity in non-maternal paradigms. By reviewing the literature from both the maternal behavior and sensory cortical plasticity fields, focusing on the auditory modality, we hypothesize that maternal hormones (predominantly estrogen) may act to prime auditory cortical neurons for a longer-lasting neural trace of infant vocal cues, thereby facilitating recognition and discrimination. This could then more efficiently activate the subcortical circuit to elicit and sustain maternal behavior. PMID:23916405

  2. Secretory function in subplate neurons during cortical development

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Shinichi; Al-Hasani, Hannah; Hoerder-Suabedissen, Anna; Wang, Wei Zhi; Molnár, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Subplate cells are among the first generated neurons in the mammalian cerebral cortex and have been implicated in the establishment of cortical wiring. In rodents some subplate neurons persist into adulthood. Here we would like to highlight several converging findings which suggest a novel secretory function of subplate neurons during cortical development. Throughout the postnatal period in rodents, subplate neurons have highly developed rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are under an ER stress condition. By comparing gene expression between subplate and layer 6, we found that several genes encoding secreted proteins are highly expressed in subplate neurons. One of these secreted proteins, neuroserpin, encoded by the serpini1 gene, is localized to the ER in subplate cells. We propose that subplate might influence cortical circuit formation through a transient secretory function. PMID:25859180

  3. Abnormal white matter tractography of visual pathways detected by high-angular-resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) corresponds to visual dysfunction in cortical/cerebral visual impairment.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Corinna M; Heidary, Gena; Koo, Bang-Bon; Killiany, Ronald J; Bex, Peter; Merabet, Lotfi B

    2014-08-01

    Cortical (cerebral) visual impairment (CVI) is characterized by visual dysfunction associated with damage to the optic radiations and/or visual cortex. Typically it results from pre- or perinatal hypoxic damage to postchiasmal visual structures and pathways. The neuroanatomical basis of this condition remains poorly understood, particularly with regard to how the resulting maldevelopment of visual processing pathways relates to observations in the clinical setting. We report our investigation of 2 young adults diagnosed with CVI and visual dysfunction characterized by difficulties related to visually guided attention and visuospatial processing. Using high-angular-resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI), we characterized and compared their individual white matter projections of the extrageniculo-striate visual system with a normal-sighted control. Compared to a sighted control, both CVI cases revealed a striking reduction in association fibers, including the inferior frontal-occipital fasciculus as well as superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi. This reduction in fibers associated with the major pathways implicated in visual processing may provide a neuroanatomical basis for the visual dysfunctions observed in these patients.

  4. l-Citrulline ameliorates cerebral blood flow during cortical spreading depression in rats: Involvement of nitric oxide- and prostanoids-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Kurauchi, Yuki; Mokudai, Koichi; Mori, Asami; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Morita, Masahiko; Kamimura, Ayako; Ishii, Kunio

    2017-02-17

    l-Citrulline is a potent precursor of l-arginine, and exerts beneficial effect on cardiovascular system via nitric oxide (NO) production. Migraine is one of the most popular neurovascular disorder, and imbalance of cerebral blood flow (CBF) observed in cortical spreading depression (CSD) contributes to the mechanism of migraine aura. Here, we investigated the effect of l-citrulline on cardiovascular changes to KCl-induced CSD. in rats. Intravenous injection of l-citrulline prevented the decrease in CBF, monitored by laser Doppler flowmetry, without affecting mean arterial pressure and heart rate during CSD. Moreover, l-citrulline attenuated propagation velocity of CSD induced by KCl. The effect of l-citrulline on CBF change was prevented by l-NAME, an inhibitor of NO synthase, but not by indomethacin, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase. On the other hand, attenuation effect of l-citrulline on CSD propagation velocity was prevented not only by l-NAME but also by indomethacin. In addition, propagation velocity of CSD was attenuated by intravenous injection of NOR3, a NO donor, which was diminished by ODQ, an inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase. These results suggest that NO/cyclic GMP- and prostanoids-mediated pathway differently contribute to the effect of l-citrulline on the maintenance of CBF.

  5. Quantitative Analyses of Postmortem Heat Shock Protein mRNA Profiles in the Occipital Lobes of Human Cerebral Cortices: Implications in Cause of Death

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ukhee; Seo, Joong-Seok; Kim, Yu-Hoon; Son, Gi Hoon; Hwang, Juck-Joon

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative RNA analyses of autopsy materials to diagnose the cause and mechanism of death are challenging tasks in the field of forensic molecular pathology. Alterations in mRNA profiles can be induced by cellular stress responses during supravital reactions as well as by lethal insults at the time of death. Here, we demonstrate that several gene transcripts encoding heat shock proteins (HSPs), a gene family primarily responsible for cellular stress responses, can be differentially expressed in the occipital region of postmortem human cerebral cortices with regard to the cause of death. HSPA2 mRNA levels were higher in subjects who died due to mechanical asphyxiation (ASP), compared with those who died by traumatic injury (TI). By contrast, HSPA7 and A13 gene transcripts were much higher in the TI group than in the ASP and sudden cardiac death (SCD) groups. More importantly, relative abundances between such HSP mRNA species exhibit a stronger correlation to, and thus provide more discriminative information on, the death process than does routine normalization to a housekeeping gene. Therefore, the present study proposes alterations in HSP mRNA composition in the occipital lobe as potential forensic biological markers, which may implicate the cause and process of death. PMID:23135635

  6. Effect of electrical stimulation therapy on upper extremity functional recovery and cerebral cortical changes in patients with chronic hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kana; Matsunaga, Toshiki; Tomite, Takenori; Yoshikawa, Takayuki; Shimada, Yoichi

    2012-04-01

    Hemiplegia is a common sequel of stroke and assisted living care is needed in many cases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of using surface electrode stimulation device in rehabilitation, in terms of functional improvement in upper limb and the changes in brain activation related to central nervous system reconstruction. Five patients with chronic hemiplegia received electrical stimulation therapy using the orthosis-type surface electrode stimulation device for 12 weeks. Training time was 30 min/day for the first weeks, and increased 30 min/day in every 4 weeks. Upper limb outcome measures included Brunnstrom stage, range of motion, Fugl-Meyer assessment and manual function test. Brain activation was measured using functional MRI. After therapy with therapeutic electrical stimulation (TES) for 12 weeks upper limb function improved in all cases. The results of brain activation showed two patterns. In the first, the stimulation produced an activity in the bilateral somatosensory cortices (SMC), which was seen to continue over time. The second, activation was bilateral and extensive before stimulation, but localized to the SMC after intervention. Treatment with TES using an orthosis-type electrode stimulation device improves upper limb function in chronic hemiplegia patients. The present findings suggest that there are not only efferent but also afferent effects that may promote central nervous system remodeling.

  7. Resting-State Functional Connectivity Changes Between Dentate Nucleus and Cortical Social Brain Regions in Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Olivito, Giusy; Clausi, Silvia; Laghi, Fiorenzo; Tedesco, Anna Maria; Baiocco, Roberto; Mastropasqua, Chiara; Molinari, Marco; Cercignani, Mara; Bozzali, Marco; Leggio, Maria

    2017-04-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are known to be characterized by restricted and repetitive behaviors and interests and by impairments in social communication and interactions mainly including "theory of mind" (ToM) processes. The cerebellum has emerged as one of the brain regions affected by ASDs. As the cerebellum is known to influence cerebral cortex activity via cerebello-thalamo-cortical (CTC) circuits, it has been proposed that cerebello-cortical "disconnection" could in part underlie autistic symptoms. We used resting-state (RS) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the potential RS connectivity changes between the cerebellar dentate nucleus (DN) and the CTC circuit targets, that may contribute to ASD pathophysiology. When comparing ASD patients to controls, we found decreased connectivity between the left DN and cerebral regions known to be components of the ToM network and the default mode network, implicated in specific aspects of mentalizing, social cognition processing, and higher order emotional processes. Further, a pattern of overconnectivity was also detected between the left DN and the supramodal cerebellar lobules associated with the default mode network. The presented RS-fMRI data provide evidence that functional connectivity (FC) between the dentate nucleus and the cerebral cortex is altered in ASD patients. This suggests that the dysfunction reported within the cerebral cortical network, typically related to social features of ASDs, may be at least partially related to an impaired interaction between cerebellum and key cortical social brain regions.

  8. Early phenotype expression of cortical neurons: Evidence that a subclass of migrating neurons have callosal axons

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, M.L.; Rakic, P.; Goldman-Rakic, P.S. )

    1991-02-15

    The use of ({sup 3}H)thymidine labeling in combination with various axonal transport tracers has revealed that a subset of migrating neurons in the fetal monkey cerebrum issue axons to the opposite cerebral hemisphere while still migrating to their final positions in the cortical plate. Other cortical neurons with the same birthdate (i.e., that underwent their last round of DNA synthesis on the same day) are not retrogradely labeled by tracer injections of the opposite hemisphere. These findings suggest that the cardinal distinction between projection and local circuit neurons may be specified in postmitotic neurons before they acquire their final positions in the cortex.

  9. High yield primary microglial cultures using granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor from embryonic murine cerebral cortical tissue.

    PubMed

    Yu, Adam C; Neil, Sarah E; Quandt, Jacqueline A

    2017-06-15

    Microglia play vital roles in neurotrophic support and modulating immune or inflammatory responses to pathogens or damage/stressors during disease. This study describes the ability to establish large numbers of microglia from embryonic tissues with the addition of granulocyte-macrophage stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and characterizes their similarities to adult microglia examined ex vivo as well as their responses to inflammatory mediators. Microglia were seeded from a primary embryonic mixed cortical suspension with the addition of GM-CSF. Microglial expression of CD45, CD11b, CD11c, MHC class I and II, CD40, CD80, and CD86 was analyzed by flow cytometry and compared to those isolated using different culture methods and to the BV-2 cell line. GM-CSF microglia immunoreactivity and cytokine production was examined in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Our results demonstrate GM-CSF addition during microglial culture yields higher cell numbers with greater purity than conventionally cultured primary microglia. We found that the expression of immune markers by GM-CSF microglia more closely resemble adult microglia than other methods or an immortalized BV-2 cell line. Primary differences amongst the different groups were reflected in their levels of CD39, CD86 and MHC class I expression. GM-CSF microglia produce CCL2, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6 and IL-10 following exposure to LPS and alter costimulatory marker expression in response to LPS or IFN-γ. Notably, GM-CSF microglia were often more responsive than the commonly used BV-2 cell line which produced negligible IL-10. GM-CSF cultured microglia closely model the phenotype of adult microglia examined ex vivo. GM-CSF microglia are robust in their responses to inflammatory stimuli, altering immune markers including Iba-1 and expressing an array of cytokines characteristic of both pro-inflammatory and reparative processes. Consequently, the addition of GM-CSF for the culturing of primary

  10. Early involvement of lysosome dysfunction in the degeneration of cerebral cortical neurons caused by the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shi; Eitan, Erez; Mattson, Mark P

    2017-03-01

    Free radical-mediated oxidative damage to proteins, lipids, and DNA occurs in neurons during acute brain injuries and in neurodegenerative disorders. Membrane lipid peroxidation contributes to neuronal dysfunction and death, in part by disrupting neuronal ion homeostasis and cellular bioenergetics. Emerging findings suggest that 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), an aldehyde produced during lipid peroxidation, impairs the function of various proteins involved in neuronal homeostasis. Here we tested the hypothesis that HNE impairs the cellular system that removes damaged proteins and organelles, the autophagy-lysosome pathway in rat primary cortical neurons. We found that HNE, at a concentration that causes apoptosis over a 48-72 h period, increases protein levels of LC3 II and p62 and within 1 and 4 h of exposure, respectively; LC3 II and p62 immunoreactive puncta were observed in the cytoplasm of HNE-treated neurons at 6 h. The extent of up-regulation of p62 and LC3 II in response to HNE was not affected by co-treatment with the lysosome inhibitor bafilomycin A1, suggesting that the effects of HNE on autophagy were secondary to lysosome inhibition. Indeed, we found that neurons exposed to HNE exhibit elevated pH levels, and decreased protein substrate hydrolysis and cathepsin B activity. Neurons exposed to HNE also exhibited the accumulation of K63-linked polyubiquitinated proteins, which are substrates targeted for lysosomal degradation. Moreover, we found that the levels of LAMP2a and constitutively active heat-shock protein 70, and numbers of LAMP2a-positive lysosomes, are decreased in neurons exposed to HNE. Our findings demonstrate that the lipid peroxidation product HNE causes early impairment of lysosomes which may contribute to the accumulation of damaged and dysfunctional proteins and organelles and consequent neuronal death. Because impaired lysosome function is increasingly recognized as an early event in the neuronal death that occurs in neurodegenerative

  11. Long-term sensory stimulation therapy improves hand function and restores cortical responsiveness in patients with chronic cerebral lesions. Three single case studies

    PubMed Central

    Kattenstroth, Jan-Christoph; Kalisch, Tobias; Peters, Sören; Tegenthoff, Martin; Dinse, Hubert R.

    2012-01-01

    Rehabilitation of sensorimotor impairment resulting from cerebral lesion (CL) utilizes task specific training and massed practice to drive reorganization and sensorimotor improvement due to induction of neuroplasticity mechanisms. Loss of sensory abilities often complicates recovery, and thus the individual's ability to use the affected body part for functional tasks. Therefore, the development of additional and alternative approaches that supplement, enhance, or even replace conventional training procedures would be advantageous. Repetitive sensory stimulation protocols (rSS) have been shown to evoke sensorimotor improvements of the affected limb in patients with chronic stroke. However, the possible impact of long-term rSS on sensorimotor performance of patients with CL, where the incident dated back many years remains unclear. The particular advantage of rSS is its passive nature, which does not require active participation of the subjects. Therefore, rSS can be applied in parallel to other occupations, making the intervention easier to implement and more acceptable to the individual. Here we report the effects of applying rSS for 8, 36, and 76 weeks to the paretic hand of three long-term patients with different types of CL. Different behavioral tests were used to assess sensory and/or sensorimotor performance of the upper extremities prior, after, and during the intervention. In one patient, the impact of long-term rSS on restoration of cortical activation was investigated by recording somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP). After long-term rSS all three patients showed considerable improvements of their sensory and motor abilities. In addition, almost normal evoked potentials could be recorded after rSS in one patient. Our data show that long-term rSS applied to patients with chronic CL can improve tactile and sensorimotor functions, which, however, developed in some cases only after many weeks of stimulation, and continued to further improve on a time scale of

  12. Long-term sensory stimulation therapy improves hand function and restores cortical responsiveness in patients with chronic cerebral lesions. Three single case studies.

    PubMed

    Kattenstroth, Jan-Christoph; Kalisch, Tobias; Peters, Sören; Tegenthoff, Martin; Dinse, Hubert R

    2012-01-01

    Rehabilitation of sensorimotor impairment resulting from cerebral lesion (CL) utilizes task specific training and massed practice to drive reorganization and sensorimotor improvement due to induction of neuroplasticity mechanisms. Loss of sensory abilities often complicates recovery, and thus the individual's ability to use the affected body part for functional tasks. Therefore, the development of additional and alternative approaches that supplement, enhance, or even replace conventional training procedures would be advantageous. Repetitive sensory stimulation protocols (rSS) have been shown to evoke sensorimotor improvements of the affected limb in patients with chronic stroke. However, the possible impact of long-term rSS on sensorimotor performance of patients with CL, where the incident dated back many years remains unclear. The particular advantage of rSS is its passive nature, which does not require active participation of the subjects. Therefore, rSS can be applied in parallel to other occupations, making the intervention easier to implement and more acceptable to the individual. Here we report the effects of applying rSS for 8, 36, and 76 weeks to the paretic hand of three long-term patients with different types of CL. Different behavioral tests were used to assess sensory and/or sensorimotor performance of the upper extremities prior, after, and during the intervention. In one patient, the impact of long-term rSS on restoration of cortical activation was investigated by recording somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP). After long-term rSS all three patients showed considerable improvements of their sensory and motor abilities. In addition, almost normal evoked potentials could be recorded after rSS in one patient. Our data show that long-term rSS applied to patients with chronic CL can improve tactile and sensorimotor functions, which, however, developed in some cases only after many weeks of stimulation, and continued to further improve on a time scale of

  13. Adolescent brain maturation and cortical folding: evidence for reductions in gyrification.

    PubMed

    Klein, Daniel; Rotarska-Jagiela, Anna; Genc, Erhan; Sritharan, Sharmili; Mohr, Harald; Roux, Frederic; Han, Cheol E; Kaiser, Marcus; Singer, Wolf; Uhlhaas, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Evidence from anatomical and functional imaging studies have highlighted major modifications of cortical circuits during adolescence. These include reductions of gray matter (GM), increases in the myelination of cortico-cortical connections and changes in the architecture of large-scale cortical networks. It is currently unclear, however, how the ongoing developmental processes impact upon the folding of the cerebral cortex and how changes in gyrification relate to maturation of GM/WM-volume, thickness and surface area. In the current study, we acquired high-resolution (3 Tesla) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data from 79 healthy subjects (34 males and 45 females) between the ages of 12 and 23 years and performed whole brain analysis of cortical folding patterns with the gyrification index (GI). In addition to GI-values, we obtained estimates of cortical thickness, surface area, GM and white matter (WM) volume which permitted correlations with changes in gyrification. Our data show pronounced and widespread reductions in GI-values during adolescence in several cortical regions which include precentral, temporal and frontal areas. Decreases in gyrification overlap only partially with changes in the thickness, volume and surface of GM and were characterized overall by a linear developmental trajectory. Our data suggest that the observed reductions in GI-values represent an additional, important modification of the cerebral cortex during late brain maturation which may be related to cognitive development.

  14. Neuronal Diversity and Temporal Dynamics: The Unity of Hippocampal Circuit Operations

    PubMed Central

    Klausberger, Thomas; Somogyi, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In the cerebral cortex, diverse types of neurons form intricate circuits and cooperate in time for the processing and storage of information. Recent advances reveal a spatiotemporal division of labor in cortical circuits, as exemplified in the CA1 hippocampal area. In particular, distinct GABAergic (γ-aminobutyric acid–releasing) cell types subdivide the surface of pyramidal cells and act in discrete time windows, either on the same or on different subcellular compartments. They also interact with glutamatergic pyramidal cell inputs in a domain-specific manner and support synaptic temporal dynamics, network oscillations, selection of cell assemblies, and the implementation of brain states. The spatiotemporal specializations in cortical circuits reveal that cellular diversity and temporal dynamics coemerged during evolution, providing a basis for cognitive behavior. PMID:18599766

  15. The Effects of Different Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) Protocols on Cortical Gene Expression in a Rat Model of Cerebral Ischemic-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ljubisavljevic, Milos R.; Javid, Asma; Oommen, Joji; Parekh, Khatija; Nagelkerke, Nico; Shehab, Safa; Adrian, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Although repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) in treatment of stroke in humans has been explored over the past decade the data remain controversial in terms of optimal stimulation parameters and the mechanisms of rTMS long-term effects. This study aimed to explore the potential of different rTMS protocols to induce changes in gene expression in rat cortices after acute ischemic-reperfusion brain injury. The stroke was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) with subsequent reperfusion. Changes in the expression of 96 genes were examined using low-density expression arrays after MCAO alone and after MCAO combined with 1Hz, 5Hz, continuous (cTBS) and intermittent (iTBS) theta-burst rTMS. rTMS over the lesioned hemisphere was given for two weeks (with a 2-day pause) in a single daily session and a total of 2400 pulses. MCAO alone induced significant upregulation in the expression of 44 genes and downregulation in 10. Two weeks of iTBS induced significant increase in the expression of 52 genes. There were no downregulated genes. 1Hz and 5Hz had no significant effects on gene expression, while cTBS effects were negligible. Upregulated genes included those involved in angiogenesis, inflammation, injury response and cellular repair, structural remodeling, neuroprotection, neurotransmission and neuronal plasticity. The results show that long-term rTMS in acute ischemic-reperfusion brain injury induces complex changes in gene expression that span multiple pathways, which generally promote the recovery. They also demonstrate that induced changes primarily depend on the rTMS frequency (1Hz and 5Hz vs. iTBS) and pattern (cTBS vs. iTBS). The results further underlines the premise that one of the benefits of rTMS application in stroke may be to prime the brain, enhancing its potential to cope with the injury and to rewire. This could further augment its potential to favorably respond to rehabilitation, and to restore some of the loss functions. PMID

  16. The Effects of Different Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) Protocols on Cortical Gene Expression in a Rat Model of Cerebral Ischemic-Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Ljubisavljevic, Milos R; Javid, Asma; Oommen, Joji; Parekh, Khatija; Nagelkerke, Nico; Shehab, Safa; Adrian, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    Although repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) in treatment of stroke in humans has been explored over the past decade the data remain controversial in terms of optimal stimulation parameters and the mechanisms of rTMS long-term effects. This study aimed to explore the potential of different rTMS protocols to induce changes in gene expression in rat cortices after acute ischemic-reperfusion brain injury. The stroke was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) with subsequent reperfusion. Changes in the expression of 96 genes were examined using low-density expression arrays after MCAO alone and after MCAO combined with 1Hz, 5Hz, continuous (cTBS) and intermittent (iTBS) theta-burst rTMS. rTMS over the lesioned hemisphere was given for two weeks (with a 2-day pause) in a single daily session and a total of 2400 pulses. MCAO alone induced significant upregulation in the expression of 44 genes and downregulation in 10. Two weeks of iTBS induced significant increase in the expression of 52 genes. There were no downregulated genes. 1Hz and 5Hz had no significant effects on gene expression, while cTBS effects were negligible. Upregulated genes included those involved in angiogenesis, inflammation, injury response and cellular repair, structural remodeling, neuroprotection, neurotransmission and neuronal plasticity. The results show that long-term rTMS in acute ischemic-reperfusion brain injury induces complex changes in gene expression that span multiple pathways, which generally promote the recovery. They also demonstrate that induced changes primarily depend on the rTMS frequency (1Hz and 5Hz vs. iTBS) and pattern (cTBS vs. iTBS). The results further underlines the premise that one of the benefits of rTMS application in stroke may be to prime the brain, enhancing its potential to cope with the injury and to rewire. This could further augment its potential to favorably respond to rehabilitation, and to restore some of the loss functions.

  17. Differences in the Mechanical Properties of the Developing Cerebral Cortical Proliferative Zone between Mice and Ferrets at both the Tissue and Single-Cell Levels

    PubMed Central

    Nagasaka, Arata; Shinoda, Tomoyasu; Kawaue, Takumi; Suzuki, Makoto; Nagayama, Kazuaki; Matsumoto, Takeo; Ueno, Naoto; Kawaguchi, Ayano; Miyata, Takaki

    2016-01-01

    Cell-producing events in developing tissues are mechanically dynamic throughout the cell cycle. In many epithelial systems, cells are apicobasally tall, with nuclei and somata that adopt different apicobasal positions because nuclei and somata move in a cell cycle–dependent manner. This movement is apical during G2 phase and basal during G1 phase, whereas mitosis occurs at the apical surface. These movements are collectively referred to as interkinetic nuclear migration, and such epithelia are called “pseudostratified.” The embryonic mammalian cerebral cortical neuroepithelium is a good model for highly pseudostratified epithelia, and we previously found differences between mice and ferrets in both horizontal cellular density (greater in ferrets) and nuclear/somal movements (slower during G2 and faster during G1 in ferrets). These differences suggest that neuroepithelial cells alter their nucleokinetic behavior in response to physical factors that they encounter, which may form the basis for evolutionary transitions toward more abundant brain-cell production from mice to ferrets and primates. To address how mouse and ferret neuroepithelia may differ physically in a quantitative manner, we used atomic force microscopy to determine that the vertical stiffness of their apical surface is greater in ferrets (Young's modulus = 1700 Pa) than in mice (1400 Pa). We systematically analyzed factors underlying the apical-surface stiffness through experiments to pharmacologically inhibit actomyosin or microtubules and to examine recoiling behaviors of the apical surface upon laser ablation and also through electron microscopy to observe adherens junction. We found that although both actomyosin and microtubules are partly responsible for the apical-surface stiffness, the mouse

  18. Computational modeling of stuttering caused by impairments in a basal ganglia thalamo-cortical circuit involved in syllable selection and initiation

    PubMed Central

    Civier, Oren; Bullock, Daniel; Max, Ludo; Guenther, Frank H.

    2013-01-01

    A typical white-matter integrity and elevated dopamine levels have been reported for individuals who stutter. We investigated how such abnormalities may lead to speech dysfluencies due to their effects on a syllable-sequencing circuit that consists of basal ganglia (BG), thalamus, and left ventral premotor cortex (vPMC). “Neurally impaired” versions of the neurocomputational speech production model GODIVA were utilized to test two hypotheses: (1) that white-matter abnormalities disturb the circuit via corticostriatal projections carrying copies of executed motor commands, and (2) that dopaminergic abnormalities disturb the circuit via the striatum. Simulation results support both hypotheses: in both scenarios, the neural abnormalities delay readout of the next syllable’s motor program, leading to dysfluency. The results also account for brain imaging findings during dysfluent speech. It is concluded that each of the two abnormality types can cause stuttering moments, probably by affecting the same BG-thalamus-vPMC circuit. PMID:23872286

  19. Dynamic Flux Tubes Form Reservoirs of Stability in Neuronal Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteforte, Michael; Wolf, Fred

    2012-10-01

    Neurons in cerebral cortical circuits interact by sending and receiving electrical impulses called spikes. The ongoing spiking activity of cortical circuits is fundamental to many cognitive functions including sensory processing, working memory, and decision making. London et al. [Sensitivity to Perturbations In Vivo Implies High Noise and Suggests Rate Coding in Cortex, Nature (London)NATUAS0028-0836 466, 123 (2010).10.1038/nature09086] recently argued that even a single additional spike can cause a cascade of extra spikes that rapidly decorrelate the microstate of the network. Here, we show theoretically in a minimal model of cortical neuronal circuits that single-spike perturbations trigger only a very weak rate response. Nevertheless, single-spike perturbations are found to rapidly decorrelate the microstate of the network, although the dynamics is stable with respect to small perturbations. The coexistence of stable and unstable dynamics results from a system of exponentially separating dynamic flux tubes around stable trajectories in the network’s phase space. The radius of these flux tubes appears to decrease algebraically with neuron number N and connectivity K, which implies that the entropy of the circuit’s repertoire of state sequences scales as Nln⁡(KN).

  20. Structural asymmetry of the human cerebral cortex: Regional and between-subject variability of surface area, cortical thickness, and local gyrification.

    PubMed

    Chiarello, Christine; Vazquez, David; Felton, Adam; McDowell, Alessandra

    2016-12-01

    Structural asymmetry varies across individuals, brain regions, and metrics of cortical organization. The current study investigated regional differences in asymmetry of cortical surface area, thickness, and local gyrification, and the extent of between-subject variability in these metrics, in a sample of healthy young adults (N=200). Between-subject variability in cortical structure may provide a means to assess the extent of biological flexibility or constraint of brain regions, and we explored the potential influence of this variability on the phenotypic expression of structural asymmetry. The findings demonstrate that structural asymmetries are nearly ubiquitous across the cortex, with differing regional organization for the three cortical metrics. This implies that there are multiple, only partially overlapping, maps of structural asymmetry. The results further indicate that the degree of asymmetry of a brain region can be predicted by the extent of the region's between-subject variability. These findings provide evidence that reduced biological constraint promotes the expression of strong structural asymmetry.

  1. The cortical motor system of the marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Bakola, Sophia; Burman, Kathleen J; Rosa, Marcello G P

    2015-04-01

    Precise descriptions of the anatomical pathways that link different areas of the cerebral cortex are essential to the understanding of the sensorimotor and association processes that underlie human actions, and their impairment in pathological situations. Many years of research in macaque monkeys have critically shaped how we currently think about cortical motor function in humans. However, it is important to obtain additional understanding about the homologies between cortical areas in human and various non-human primates, and in particular how evolutionary changes in connectivity within specific neural circuits impact on the capacity for different behaviors. Current research has converged on the New World marmoset monkey as an important animal model for cortical function and dysfunction, emphasizing advantages unique to this species. However, the motor repertoire of the marmoset differs from that of the macaque in many ways, including the capacity for skilled use of the hands. Here, we review current knowledge about the cortical frontal areas in marmosets, which are key to the generation and control of motor behaviors, with focus on comparative analyses. We note significant parallels with the macaque monkey, as well as a few potentially important differences, which suggest future directions for work involving architectonic and functional analyses.

  2. Cerebro-cerebellar circuits in autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    D'Mello, Anila M.; Stoodley, Catherine J.

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is one of the most consistent sites of abnormality in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and cerebellar damage is associated with an increased risk of ASD symptoms, suggesting that cerebellar dysfunction may play a crucial role in the etiology of ASD. The cerebellum forms multiple closed-loop circuits with cerebral cortical regions that underpin movement, language, and social processing. Through these circuits, cerebellar dysfunction could impact the core ASD symptoms of social and communication deficits and repetitive and stereotyped behaviors. The emerging topography of sensorimotor, cognitive, and affective subregions in the cerebellum provides a new framework for interpreting the significance of regional cerebellar findings in ASD and their relationship to broader cerebro-cerebellar circuits. Further, recent research supports the idea that the integrity of cerebro-cerebellar loops might be important for early cortical development; disruptions in specific cerebro-cerebellar loops in ASD might impede the specialization of cortical regions involved in motor control, language, and social interaction, leading to impairments in these domains. Consistent with this concept, structural, and functional differences in sensorimotor regions of the cerebellum and sensorimotor cerebro-cerebellar circuits are associated with deficits in motor control and increased repetitive and stereotyped behaviors in ASD. Further, communication and social impairments are associated with atypical activation and structure in cerebro-cerebellar loops underpinning language and social cognition. Finally, there is converging evidence from structural, functional, and connectivity neuroimaging studies that cerebellar right Crus I/II abnormalities are related to more severe ASD impairments in all domains. We propose that cerebellar abnormalities may disrupt optimization of both structure and function in specific cerebro-cerebellar circuits in ASD. PMID:26594140

  3. Cerebro-cerebellar circuits in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    D'Mello, Anila M; Stoodley, Catherine J

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is one of the most consistent sites of abnormality in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and cerebellar damage is associated with an increased risk of ASD symptoms, suggesting that cerebellar dysfunction may play a crucial role in the etiology of ASD. The cerebellum forms multiple closed-loop circuits with cerebral cortical regions that underpin movement, language, and social processing. Through these circuits, cerebellar dysfunction could impact the core ASD symptoms of social and communication deficits and repetitive and stereotyped behaviors. The emerging topography of sensorimotor, cognitive, and affective subregions in the cerebellum provides a new framework for interpreting the significance of regional cerebellar findings in ASD and their relationship to broader cerebro-cerebellar circuits. Further, recent research supports the idea that the integrity of cerebro-cerebellar loops might be important for early cortical development; disruptions in specific cerebro-cerebellar loops in ASD might impede the specialization of cortical regions involved in motor control, language, and social interaction, leading to impairments in these domains. Consistent with this concept, structural, and functional differences in sensorimotor regions of the cerebellum and sensorimotor cerebro-cerebellar circuits are associated with deficits in motor control and increased repetitive and stereotyped behaviors in ASD. Further, communication and social impairments are associated with atypical activation and structure in cerebro-cerebellar loops underpinning language and social cognition. Finally, there is converging evidence from structural, functional, and connectivity neuroimaging studies that cerebellar right Crus I/II abnormalities are related to more severe ASD impairments in all domains. We propose that cerebellar abnormalities may disrupt optimization of both structure and function in specific cerebro-cerebellar circuits in ASD.

  4. Cognitive Consilience: Primate Non-Primary Neuroanatomical Circuits Underlying Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Solari, Soren Van Hout; Stoner, Rich

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between the cerebral cortex, thalamus, and basal ganglia form the basis of cognitive information processing in the mammalian brain. Understanding the principles of neuroanatomical organization in these structures is critical to understanding the functions they perform and ultimately how the human brain works. We have manually distilled and synthesized hundreds of primate neuroanatomy facts into a single interactive visualization. The resulting picture represents the fundamental neuroanatomical blueprint upon which cognitive functions must be implemented. Within this framework we hypothesize and detail 7 functional circuits corresponding to psychological perspectives on the brain: consolidated long-term declarative memory, short-term declarative memory, working memory/information processing, behavioral memory selection, behavioral memory output, cognitive control, and cortical information flow regulation. Each circuit is described in terms of distinguishable neuronal groups including the cerebral isocortex (9 pyramidal neuronal groups), parahippocampal gyrus and hippocampus, thalamus (4 neuronal groups), basal ganglia (7 neuronal groups), metencephalon, basal forebrain, and other subcortical nuclei. We focus on neuroanatomy related to primate non-primary cortical systems to elucidate the basis underlying the distinct homotypical cognitive architecture. To display the breadth of this review, we introduce a novel method of integrating and presenting data in multiple independent visualizations: an interactive website (http://www.frontiersin.org/files/cognitiveconsilience/index.html) and standalone iPhone and iPad applications. With these tools we present a unique, annotated view of neuroanatomical consilience (integration of knowledge). PMID:22194717

  5. Cell types, circuits, computation.

    PubMed

    Azeredo da Silveira, Rava; Roska, Botond

    2011-10-01

    How does the connectivity of a neuronal circuit, together with the individual properties of the cell types that take part in it, result in a given computation? We examine this question in the context of retinal circuits. We suggest that the retina can be viewed as a parallel assemblage of many small computational devices, highly stereotypical and task-specific circuits afferent to a given ganglion cell type, and we discuss some rules that govern computation in these devices. Multi-device processing in retina poses conceptual problems when it is contrasted with cortical processing. We lay out open questions both on processing in retinal circuits and on implications for cortical processing of retinal inputs.

  6. Two-photon laser scanning microscopy imaging of intact spinal cord and cerebral cortex reveals requirement for CXCR6 and neuroinflammation in immune cell infiltration of cortical injury sites

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiyun V.; Jiang, Ning; Tadokoro, Carlos E.; Liu, Liping; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Lafaille, Juan J.; Dustin, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    The mouse spinal cord is an important site for autoimmune and injury models. Skull thinning surgery provides a minimally invasive window for microscopy of the mouse cerebral cortex, but there are no parallel methods for the spinal cord. We introduce a novel, facile and inexpensive method for two-photon laser scanning microscopy of the intact spinal cord in the mouse by taking advantage of the naturally accessible intervertebral space. These are powerful methods when combined with gene-targeted mice in which endogenous immune cells are labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP). We first demonstrate that generation of the intervertebral window does not elicit a reaction of GFP+ microglial cells in CX3CR1gfp/+ mice. We next demonstrate a distinct rostro-caudal migration of GFP+ immune cells in the spinal cord of CXCR6gfp/+ mice during active experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Interestingly, infiltration of the cerebral cortex by GFP+ cells in these mice required three conditions: EAE induction, cortical injury and expression of CXCR6 on immune cells. PMID:19800886

  7. Focal and Generalized Patterns of Cerebral Cortical Veins Due to Non-Convulsive Status Epilepticus or Prolonged Seizure Episode after Convulsive Status Epilepticus – A MRI Study Using Susceptibility Weighted Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajeev Kumar; Abela, Eugenio; Schindler, Kaspar; Krestel, Heinz; Springer, Elisabeth; Huber, Adrian; Weisstanner, Christian; Hauf, Martinus; Gralla, Jan; Wiest, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate variant patterns of cortical venous oxygenation during status epilepticus (SE) using susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI). Methods We analyzed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of 26 patients with clinically witnessed prolonged seizures and/or EEG-confirmed SE. All MRI exams encompassed SWI, dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion MRI (MRI-DSC) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). We aimed to identify distinct patterns of SWI signal alterations that revealed regional or global increases of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and DWI restrictions. We hypothesized that SWI-related oxygenation patterns reflect ictal or postictal patterns that resemble SE or sequelae of seizures. Results Sixteen patients were examined during nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) as confirmed by EEG, a further ten patients suffered from witnessed and prolonged seizure episode ahead of imaging without initial EEG. MRI patterns of 15 of the 26 patients revealed generalized hyperoxygenation by SWI in keeping with either global or multifocal cortical hyperperfusion. Eight patients revealed a focal hyperoxygenation pattern related to focal CBF increase and three patients showed a focal deoxygenation pattern related to focal CBF decrease. Conclusions SWI-related hyper- and deoxygenation patterns resemble ictal and postictal CBF changes within a range from globally increased to focally decreased perfusion. In all 26 patients the SWI patterns were in keeping with ictal hyperperfusion (hyperoxygenation patterns) or postictal hypoperfusion (deoxygenation patterns) respectively. A new finding of this study is that cortical venous patterns in SWI can be not only focally, but globally attenuated. SWI may thus be considered as an alternative contrast-free MR sequence to identify perfusion changes related to ictal or postictal conditions. PMID:27486662

  8. Cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuit abnormalities in obsessive-compulsive disorder: A voxel-based morphometric and fMRI study of the whole brain.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wenxin; Zhu, Qifeng; Gong, Xiangyang; Zhu, Cheng; Wang, Yiquan; Chen, Shulin

    2016-10-15

    The primary aim of this study was to identify structural and functional abnormalities in the brains of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) patients. Another aim was to assess the effect of serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on brain structure of OCD patients. All subjects underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and resting functional MRI (fMRI). High-resolution three-dimensional images were processed using the voxel-based morphometry (VBM) method. The final analysis included 18 OCD patients and 16 healthy controls. In the OCD patients there was a decrease in gray matter volume in the bilateral cingulate cortex and bilateral striatum. In some cortical structures including the cerebellar anterior lobe, left orbital frontal gyrus, right middle frontal gyrus, left middle temporal gyrus, precentral gyrus, and postcentral gyrus, there was an increase in gray matter volume. On fMRI the OCD patients had overactivation of the right cerebellum and right parietal lobe and reduced activation of the left cingulate gyrus, putamen, and caudate nucleus. Eleven OCD patients who improved during 12 weeks of drug treatment with sertraline hydrochloride had a significant increase in gray matter volume in several brain structures but no significant differences were found on resting fMRI. The results indicated a consistent trend between structural and functional images. Higher cortical structures showed increased gray matter volume and increased activation as did the cerebellum whereas subcortical structures showed decreased gray matter volume and decreased activation. And brain structure improvement consisted with symptom improvement after SSRIs treatment in OCD patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Tangential migration of glutamatergic neurons and cortical patterning during development: Lessons from Cajal-Retzius cells.

    PubMed

    Barber, Melissa; Pierani, Alessandra

    2016-08-01

    Tangential migration is a mode of cell movement, which in the developing cerebral cortex, is defined by displacement parallel to the ventricular surface and orthogonal to the radial glial fibers. This mode of long-range migration is a strategy by which distinct neuronal classes generated from spatially and molecularly distinct origins can integrate to form appropriate neural circuits within the cortical plate. While it was previously believed that only GABAergic cortical interneurons migrate tangentially from their origins in the subpallial ganglionic eminences to integrate in the cortical plate, it is now known that transient populations of glutamatergic neurons also adopt this mode of migration. These include Cajal-Retzius cells (CRs), subplate neurons (SPs), and cortical plate transient neurons (CPTs), which have crucial roles in orchestrating the radial and tangential development of the embryonic cerebral cortex in a noncell-autonomous manner. While CRs have been extensively studied, it is only in the last decade that the molecular mechanisms governing their tangential migration have begun to be elucidated. To date, the mechanisms of SPs and CPTs tangential migration remain unknown. We therefore review the known signaling pathways, which regulate parameters of CRs migration including their motility, contact-redistribution and adhesion to the pial surface, and discuss this in the context of how CR migration may regulate their signaling activity in a spatial and temporal manner. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 847-881, 2016.

  10. Source-reconstruction of event-related fields reveals hyperfunction and hypofunction of cortical circuits in antipsychotic-naive, first-episode schizophrenia patients during Mooney face processing.

    PubMed

    Rivolta, Davide; Castellanos, Nazareth P; Stawowsky, Cerisa; Helbling, Saskia; Wibral, Michael; Grützner, Christine; Koethe, Dagmar; Birkner, Katharina; Kranaster, Laura; Enning, Frank; Singer, Wolf; Leweke, F Markus; Uhlhaas, Peter J

    2014-04-23

    Schizophrenia is characterized by dysfunctions in neural circuits that can be investigated with electrophysiological methods, such as EEG and MEG. In the present human study, we examined event-related fields (ERFs), in a sample of medication-naive, first-episode schizophrenia (FE-ScZ) patients (n = 14) and healthy control participants (n = 17) during perception of Mooney faces to investigate the integrity of neuromagnetic responses and their experience-dependent modification. ERF responses were analyzed for M100, M170, and M250 components at the sensor and source levels. In addition, we analyzed peak latency and adaptation effects due to stimulus repetition. FE-ScZ patients were characterized by significantly impaired sensory processing, as indicated by a reduced discrimination index (A'). At the sensor level, M100 and M170 responses in FE-ScZ were within the normal range, whereas the M250 response was impaired. However, source localization revealed widespread elevated activity for M100 and M170 in FE-ScZ and delayed peak latencies for the M100 and M250 responses. In addition, M170 source activity in FE-ScZ was not modulated by stimulus repetitions. The present findings suggest that neural circuits in FE-ScZ may be characterized by a disturbed balance between excitation and inhibition that could lead to a failure to gate information flow and abnormal spreading of activity, which is compatible with dysfunctional glutamatergic neurotransmission.

  11. Disorders of cortical formation: MR imaging features.

    PubMed

    Abdel Razek, A A K; Kandell, A Y; Elsorogy, L G; Elmongy, A; Basett, A A

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the embryologic stages of the cerebral cortex, illustrate the classification of disorders of cortical formation, and finally describe the main MR imaging features of these disorders. Disorders of cortical formation are classified according to the embryologic stage of the cerebral cortex at which the abnormality occurred. MR imaging shows diminished cortical thickness and sulcation in microcephaly, enlarged dysplastic cortex in hemimegalencephaly, and ipsilateral focal cortical thickening with radial hyperintense bands in focal cortical dysplasia. MR imaging detects smooth brain in classic lissencephaly, the nodular cortex with cobblestone cortex with congenital muscular dystrophy, and the ectopic position of the gray matter with heterotopias. MR imaging can detect polymicrogyria and related syndromes as well as the types of schizencephaly. We concluded that MR imaging is essential to demonstrate the morphology, distribution, and extent of different disorders of cortical formation as well as the associated anomalies and related syndromes.

  12. Large-scale cortical networks and cognition.

    PubMed

    Bressler, S L

    1995-03-01

    The well-known parcellation of the mammalian cerebral cortex into a large number of functionally distinct cytoarchitectonic areas presents a problem for understanding the complex cortical integrative functions that underlie cognition. How do cortical areas having unique individual functional properties cooperate to accomplish these complex operations? Do neurons distributed throughout the cerebral cortex act together in large-scale functional assemblages? This review examines the substantial body of evidence supporting the view that complex integrative functions are carried out by large-scale networks of cortical areas. Pathway tracing studies in non-human primates have revealed widely distributed networks of interconnected cortical areas, providing an anatomical substrate for large-scale parallel processing of information in the cerebral cortex. Functional coactivation of multiple cortical areas has been demonstrated by neurophysiological studies in non-human primates and several different cognitive functions have been shown to depend on multiple distributed areas by human neuropsychological studies. Electrophysiological studies on interareal synchronization have provided evidence that active neurons in different cortical areas may become not only coactive, but also functionally interdependent. The computational advantages of synchronization between cortical areas in large-scale networks have been elucidated by studies using artificial neural network models. Recent observations of time-varying multi-areal cortical synchronization suggest that the functional topology of a large-scale cortical network is dynamically reorganized during visuomotor behavior.

  13. Cognitive Plasticity and Cortical Modules.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Eduardo

    2009-06-01

    Some organisms learn to calculate, accumulate knowledge, and communicate in ways that others do not. What factors determine which intellectual abilities a particular species or individual can easily acquire? I propose that cognitive-skill learning capacity reflects (a) the availability of specialized cortical circuits, (b) the flexibility with which cortical activity is coordinated, and (c) the customizability of cortical networks. This framework can potentially account for differences in learning capacity across species, individuals, and developmental stages. Understanding the mechanisms that constrain cognitive plasticity is fundamental to developing new technologies and educational practices that maximize intellectual advancements.

  14. Cognitive Plasticity and Cortical Modules

    PubMed Central

    Mercado, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Some organisms learn to calculate, accumulate knowledge, and communicate in ways that others do not. What factors determine which intellectual abilities a particular species or individual can easily acquire? I propose that cognitive-skill learning capacity reflects (a) the availability of specialized cortical circuits, (b) the flexibility with which cortical activity is coordinated, and (c) the customizability of cortical networks. This framework can potentially account for differences in learning capacity across species, individuals, and developmental stages. Understanding the mechanisms that constrain cognitive plasticity is fundamental to developing new technologies and educational practices that maximize intellectual advancements. PMID:19750239

  15. Effect of vitamin E on cerebral cortical oxidative stress and brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression induced by hypoxia and exercise in rats.

    PubMed

    Sakr, H F; Abbas, A M; El Samanoudy, A Z

    2015-04-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is involved in the proliferation of neurons, and its expression increases significantly with exercise. We aimed to investigate the effects of chronic exercise (swimming) and sustained hypoxia on cortical BDNF expression in both the presence and absence of vitamin E. Sixty four male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two equal groups; a normoxic group and a hypoxic group. Both groups were equally subdivided into four subgroups: sedentary, sedentary with vitamin E, chronic exercise either with or without vitamin E supplementation. Arterial PO(2), and the levels of cortical malondialdehyde (MDA), antioxidants (reduced glutathione GSH, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and vitamin E) and BDNF gene expression were investigated. Hypoxia significantly increased MDA production and BDNF gene expression and decreased the antioxidants compared to control rats. Chronic exercise in hypoxic and normoxic rats increased MDA level and BDNF gene expression and decreased the antioxidants. Providing vitamin E supplementation to the hypoxic and normoxic rats significantly reduced MDA and BDNF gene expression and increased antioxidants. We conclude that sustained hypoxia and chronic exercise increased BDNF gene expression and induced oxidative stress. Moreover, vitamin E attenuated the oxidative stress and decreased BDNF gene expression in sustained hypoxia and chronic exercise which confirms the oxidative stress-induced stimulation of BDNF gene expression.

  16. Human Auditory and Adjacent Nonauditory Cerebral Cortices Are Hypermetabolic in Tinnitus as Measured by Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS).

    PubMed

    Issa, Mohamad; Bisconti, Silvia; Kovelman, Ioulia; Kileny, Paul; Basura, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Tinnitus is the phantom perception of sound in the absence of an acoustic stimulus. To date, the purported neural correlates of tinnitus from animal models have not been adequately characterized with translational technology in the human brain. The aim of the present study was to measure changes in oxy-hemoglobin concentration from regions of interest (ROI; auditory cortex) and non-ROI (adjacent nonauditory cortices) during auditory stimulation and silence in participants with subjective tinnitus appreciated equally in both ears and in nontinnitus controls using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Control and tinnitus participants with normal/near-normal hearing were tested during a passive auditory task. Hemodynamic activity was monitored over ROI and non-ROI under episodic periods of auditory stimulation with 750 or 8000 Hz tones, broadband noise, and silence. During periods of silence, tinnitus participants maintained increased hemodynamic responses in ROI, while a significant deactivation was seen in controls. Interestingly, non-ROI activity was also increased in the tinnitus group as compared to controls during silence. The present results demonstrate that both auditory and select nonauditory cortices have elevated hemodynamic activity in participants with tinnitus in the absence of an external auditory stimulus, a finding that may reflect basic science neural correlates of tinnitus that ultimately contribute to phantom sound perception.

  17. Human Auditory and Adjacent Nonauditory Cerebral Cortices Are Hypermetabolic in Tinnitus as Measured by Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS)

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Mohamad; Bisconti, Silvia; Kovelman, Ioulia; Kileny, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Tinnitus is the phantom perception of sound in the absence of an acoustic stimulus. To date, the purported neural correlates of tinnitus from animal models have not been adequately characterized with translational technology in the human brain. The aim of the present study was to measure changes in oxy-hemoglobin concentration from regions of interest (ROI; auditory cortex) and non-ROI (adjacent nonauditory cortices) during auditory stimulation and silence in participants with subjective tinnitus appreciated equally in both ears and in nontinnitus controls using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Control and tinnitus participants with normal/near-normal hearing were tested during a passive auditory task. Hemodynamic activity was monitored over ROI and non-ROI under episodic periods of auditory stimulation with 750 or 8000 Hz tones, broadband noise, and silence. During periods of silence, tinnitus participants maintained increased hemodynamic responses in ROI, while a significant deactivation was seen in controls. Interestingly, non-ROI activity was also increased in the tinnitus group as compared to controls during silence. The present results demonstrate that both auditory and select nonauditory cortices have elevated hemodynamic activity in participants with tinnitus in the absence of an external auditory stimulus, a finding that may reflect basic science neural correlates of tinnitus that ultimately contribute to phantom sound perception. PMID:27042360

  18. Structure of Spontaneous UP and DOWN Transitions Self-Organizing in a Cortical Network Model

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Siu; Kitano, Katsunori; Fukai, Tomoki

    2008-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity is considered to play a crucial role in the experience-dependent self-organization of local cortical networks. In the absence of sensory stimuli, cerebral cortex exhibits spontaneous membrane potential transitions between an UP and a DOWN state. To reveal how cortical networks develop spontaneous activity, or conversely, how spontaneous activity structures cortical networks, we analyze the self-organization of a recurrent network model of excitatory and inhibitory neurons, which is realistic enough to replicate UP–DOWN states, with spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP). The individual neurons in the self-organized network exhibit a variety of temporal patterns in the two-state transitions. In addition, the model develops a feed-forward network-like structure that produces a diverse repertoire of precise sequences of the UP state. Our model shows that the self-organized activity well resembles the spontaneous activity of cortical networks if STDP is accompanied by the pruning of weak synapses. These results suggest that the two-state membrane potential transitions play an active role in structuring local cortical circuits. PMID:18369421

  19. The Microcircuit Concept Applied to Cortical Evolution: from Three-Layer to Six-Layer Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Gordon M.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the principles of organization of the cerebral cortex requires insight into its evolutionary history. This has traditionally been the province of anatomists, but evidence regarding the microcircuit organization of different cortical areas is providing new approaches to this problem. Here we use the microcircuit concept to focus first on the principles of microcircuit organization of three-layer cortex in the olfactory cortex, hippocampus, and turtle general cortex, and compare it with six-layer neocortex. From this perspective it is possible to identify basic circuit elements for recurrent excitation and lateral inhibition that are common across all the cortical regions. Special properties of the apical dendrites of pyramidal cells are reviewed that reflect the specific adaptations that characterize the functional operations in the different regions. These principles of microcircuit function provide a new approach to understanding the expanded functional capabilities elaborated by the evolution of the neocortex. PMID:21647397

  20. Functional involvement of cerebral cortex in human narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Oliviero, A; Della Marca, G; Tonali, P A; Pilato, F; Saturno, E; Dileone, M; Versace, V; Mennuni, G; Di Lazzaro, V

    2005-01-01

    The pathophysiology of human narcolepsy is still poorly understood. The hypoactivity of some neurotransmitter systems has been hypothesised on the basis of the canine model. To determine whether narcolepsy is associated with changes in excitability of the cerebral cortex, we assessed the excitability of the motor cortex with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in 13 patients with narcolepsy and in 12 control subjects. We used several TMS paradigms that can provide information on the excitability of the motor cortex. Resting and active motor thresholds were higher in narcoleptic patients than in controls and intracortical inhibition was more pronounced in narcoleptic patients. No changes in the other evaluated measures were detected. These results are consistent with an impaired balance between excitatory and inhibitory intracortical circuits in narcolepsy that leads to cortical hypoexcitability. We hypothesise that the deficiency of the excitatory hypocretin/orexin-neurotransmitter-system in narcolepsy is reflected in changes of cortical excitability since circuits originating in the lateral hypothalamus and in the basal forebrain project widely to the neocortex, including motor cortex. This abnormal excitability of cortical networks could be the physiological correlate of excessive daytime sleepiness and it could be the substrate for allowing dissociated states of wakefulness and sleep to emerge suddenly while patients are awake, which constitute the symptoms of narcolepsy.

  1. Syndrome-specific patterns of regional cerebral glucose metabolism in posterior cortical atrophy in comparison to dementia with Lewy bodies and Alzheimer's disease--a [F-18]-FDG pet study.

    PubMed

    Spehl, Timo S; Hellwig, Sabine; Amtage, Florian; Weiller, Cornelius; Bormann, Tobias; Weber, Wolfgang A; Hüll, Michael; Meyer, Philipp T; Frings, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a rare neurodegenerative syndrome with visuospatial deficits. PET studies have identified hypometabolism of the occipital cortex in PCA. There is, however, a huge overlap in clinical presentation and involvement of the occipital cortex between PCA, dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Syndrome-specific patterns of metabolism have not yet been demonstrated that allow for a reliable differentiation with [F-18]-FDG-PET. A total of 33 dementia patients (PCA n = 6, DLB n = 12, AD n = 15) who underwent [F-18]-FDG-PET imaging and a neuropsychological examination were retrospectively analyzed. Group comparisons of regional cerebral glucose metabolism were calculated with statistical parametric mapping. Extracted clusters were used to evaluate discrimination accuracy by logistic regression. PCA patients showed a syndrome-specific area of hypometabolism in the right lateral temporooccipital cortex. DLB patients showed specific hypometabolism predominantly in the left occipital cortex. Logistic regression based on these two regions correctly separated patients with a sensitivity/specificity of 83/93% for PCA, 75/86% for DLB and 67/78% for AD. Overall accuracy was 73%. [F-18]-FDG-PET could reveal syndrome-specific patterns of glucose metabolism in PCA and DLB. Accurate group discrimination in the differential diagnosis of dementia with visuospatial impairment is feasible. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  2. Natural frequencies of human corticothalamic circuits.

    PubMed

    Rosanova, Mario; Casali, Adenauer; Bellina, Valentina; Resta, Federico; Mariotti, Maurizio; Massimini, Marcello

    2009-06-17

    The frequency tuning of a system can be directly determined by perturbing it and by observing the rate of the ensuing oscillations, the so called natural frequency. This approach is used, for example, in physics, in geology, and also when one tunes a musical instrument. In the present study, we employ transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to directly perturb a set of selected corticothalamic modules (Brodmann areas 19, 7, and 6) and high-density electroencephalogram to measure their natural frequency. TMS consistently evoked dominant alpha-band oscillations (8-12 Hz) in the occipital cortex, beta-band oscillations (13-20 Hz) in the parietal cortex, and fast beta/gamma-band oscillations (21-50 Hz) in the frontal cortex. Each cortical area tended to preserve its own natural frequency also when indirectly engaged by TMS through brain connections and when stimulated at different intensities, indicating that the observed oscillations reflect local physiological mechanisms. These findings were reproducible across individuals and represent the first direct characterization of the coarse electrophysiological properties of three associative areas of the human cerebral cortex. Most importantly, they indicate that, in healthy subjects, each corticothalamic module is normally tuned to oscillate at a characteristic rate. The natural frequency can be directly measured in virtually any area of the cerebral cortex and may represent a straightforward and flexible way to probe the state of human thalamocortical circuits at the patient's bedside.

  3. Surgical pathology of epilepsy-associated non-neoplastic cerebral lesions: a brief introduction with special reference to hippocampal sclerosis and focal cortical dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Hajime; Hori, Tomokatsu; Vinters, Harry V.

    2014-01-01

    Among epilepsy-associated non-neoplastic lesions, mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (mTLE-HS) and malformation of cortical development (MCD) including focal cortical dysplasia (FCD), are the two most frequent causes of drug-resistant focal epilepsies constituting about 50% of all surgical pathology of epilepsy. Several distinct histological patterns have been historically recognized in both HS and FCD, and several studies have tried to perform clinicopathological correlation; results, however, have been controversial, particularly in terms of postsurgical seizure outcome. Recently, the International League Against Epilepsy constituted a Task Forces of Neuropathology and FCD within the Commission on Diagnostic Methods, to establish an international consensus of histological classification of HS and FCD, respectively, based on agreement with the recognition of the importance of defining a histopathological classification system that reliably has some clinicopathological correlation. Such consensus classifications are likely to facilitate future clinicopathological study. Meanwhile, we reviewed neuropathology of 41 surgical cases of mTLE, and confirmed three type/patterns of HS along with no HS, based on the qualitative evaluation of the distribution and severity of neuronal loss and gliosis within hippocampal formation; i.e., HS type 1 (61%) equivalent to ‘classical’ Ammon’s horn sclerosis, HS type 2 (2%) representing CA1 sclerosis, HS type 3 (17%) equivalent to end folium sclerosis, and no HS (19%). Furthermore we performed a neuropathological comparative study on mTLE-HS and dementia associated HS (d-HS) in elderly, and confirmed that neuropathological features differ between mTLE-HS and d-HS in the distribution of hippocampal neuronal loss and gliosis, morphology of reactive astrocytes and their protein expression, and presence of concomitant neurodegenerative changes particularly Alzheimer type and TDP-43 pathologies. These

  4. Neurotoxic mechanisms by which the USP14 inhibitor IU1 depletes ubiquitinated proteins and Tau in rat cerebral cortical neurons: relevance to Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Kiprowska, Magdalena J.; Stepanova, Anna; Todaro, Dustin R.; Galkin, Alexander; Haas, Arthur; Wilson, Scott M.; Figueiredo-Pereira, Maria E.

    2017-01-01

    In Alzheimer’s disease proteasome activity is reportedly downregulated, thus increasing it could be therapeutically beneficial. The proteasome-associated deubiquitinase USP14 disassembles polyubiquitin-chains, potentially delaying proteasome-dependent protein degradation. We assessed the protective efficacy of inhibiting or downregulating USP14 in rat and mouse (Usp14axJ) neuronal cultures treated with prostaglandin J2 (PGJ2). IU1 concentrations (HIU1 >25 μM) reported by others to inhibit USP14 and be protective in non-neuronal cells, reduced PGJ2-induced Ub-protein accumulation in neurons. However, HIU1 alone or with PGJ2 is neurotoxic, induces calpain-dependent Tau cleavage, and decreases E1~Ub thioester levels and 26S proteasome assembly, which are energy-dependent processes. We attribute the two latter HIU1 effects to ATP-deficits and mitochondrial Complex I inhibition, as shown herein. These HIU1 effects mimic those of mitochondrial inhibitors in general, thus supporting that ATP-depletion is a major mediator of HIU1-actions. In contrast, low IU1 concentrations (LIU1 ≤25 μM) or USP14 knockdown by siRNA in rat cortical cultures or loss of USP14 in cortical cultures from ataxia (Usp14axJ) mice, failed to prevent PGJ2-induced Ub-protein accumulation. PGJ2 alone induces Ub-protein accumulation and decreases E1~Ub thioester levels. This seemingly paradoxical result may be attributed to PGJ2 inhibiting some deubiquitinases (such as UCH-L1 but not USP14), thus triggering Ub-protein stabilization. Overall, IU1-concentrations that reduce PGJ2-induced accumulation of Ub-proteins are neurotoxic, trigger calpain-mediated Tau cleavage, lower ATP, E1~Ub thioester and E1 protein levels, and reduce proteasome activity. In conclusion, pharmacologically inhibiting (with low or high IU1 concentrations) or genetically down-regulating USP14 fail to enhance proteasomal degradation of Ub-proteins or Tau in neurons. PMID:28372990

  5. Motor, cognitive, and affective areas of the cerebral cortex influence the adrenal medulla

    PubMed Central

    Dum, Richard P.; Levinthal, David J.; Strick, Peter L.

    2016-01-01

    Modern medicine has generally viewed the concept of “psychosomatic” disease with suspicion. This view arose partly because no neural networks were known for the mind, conceptually associated with the cerebral cortex, to influence autonomic and endocrine systems that control internal organs. Here, we used transneuronal transport of rabies virus to identify the areas of the primate cerebral cortex that communicate through multisynaptic connections with a major sympathetic effector, the adrenal medulla. We demonstrate that two broad networks in the cerebral cortex have access to the adrenal medulla. The larger network includes all of the cortical motor areas in the frontal lobe and portions of somatosensory cortex. A major component of this network originates from the supplementary motor area and the cingulate motor areas on the medial wall of the hemisphere. These cortical areas are involved in all aspects of skeletomotor control from response selection to motor preparation and movement execution. The second, smaller network originates in regions of medial prefrontal cortex, including a major contribution from pregenual and subgenual regions of anterior cingulate cortex. These cortical areas are involved in higher-order aspects of cognition and affect. These results indicate that specific multisynaptic circuits exist to link movement, cognition, and affect to the function of the adrenal medulla. This circuitry may mediate the effects of internal states like chronic stress and depression on organ function and, thus, provide a concrete neural substrate for some psychosomatic illness. PMID:27528671

  6. Upregulation of the heteromeric y⁺LAT2 transporter contributes to ammonia-induced increase of arginine uptake in rat cerebral cortical astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zielińska, Magdalena; Skowrońska, Marta; Fręśko, Inez; Albrecht, Jan

    2012-09-01

    Increased l-Arg (Arg) uptake to astrocytes and neurons is thought to contribute to enhanced nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and oxidative/nitrosative stress associated with hyperammonemia (HA). Recently we had shown that HA increases the expression in the brain of y(+)LAT2, an isoform of the y(+)L heteromeric transporter which promotes [(3)H]Arg efflux form brain cells in the presence of l-glutamine (Gln) (Zielińska et al., 2011). In this study, we demonstrate that a significant proportion of [(3)H]Arg uptake to cultured cortical astrocytes is likewise mediated by system y(+)L, in addition to the uptake showing characteristics of systems y(+), B(0+) and b(0+). However, stimulation of [(3)H]Arg uptake by treatment with 5mM ammonium chloride ("ammonia") for 48 h could be solely ascribed to the y(+)L-mediated component of the uptake. Ammonia treatment increased the expression of the brain specific y(+)L isoform, y(+)LAT2, both at the mRNA and protein level, and silencing of the Slc7a6 gene coding for y(+)LAT2 protein specifically reduced the ammonia-induced [(3)H]Arg uptake. This study suggests an important role of y(+)LAT2 in the modulation of NO synthesis in the ammonia-exposed astrocytes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Detailed evidence of cerebral hemoglobin oxygenation changes in response to motor cortical activation revealed by a continuous-wave spectrophotometer with 10-Hz temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colier, Willy N.; Quaresima, Valentina; Baratelli, Giovanna; Cavallari, Paolo; van der Sluijs, Marco C.; Ferrari, Marco

    1997-08-01

    In the last four years near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been used in cerebral functional activation studies to monitor changes in concentration of oxy-, deoxy- and total hemoglobin [(O2Hb), (HHb) and (tHb) respectively] in response to different stimuli. Previous studies were performed with a 1 - 2 Hz temporal resolution and a poor signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. The aim of this study was to investigate the response of the motor cortex region during a finger opposition task in single subjects using a novel continuous wave NIRS instrument with enhanced temporal resolution and S/N ratio. Six subjects performed a sequential finger opposition task with the right hand (20 s duration; 2 Hz). The optodes were positioned over the left motor cortex region using an inter-optode distance of 3.5 cm. The high S/N ratio and 0.1 s sampling time allowed clear monitoring of (O2Hb) and (HHb) changes due to heart beat as well as to respiration. The contribution of the heart pulse to the total signal was less than 0.4%. As previously shown by others using pooled data, an increase of (O2Hb) during the activation accompanied by a decrease of (HHb) was found in most subjects for every activation cycle. Our approach provides a better insight into the underlying physiological mechanisms.

  8. Evaluation of cortical plasticity in children with cerebral palsy undergoing constraint-induced movement therapy based on functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jianwei; Khan, Bilal; Hervey, Nathan; Tian, Fenghua; Delgado, Mauricio R.; Clegg, Nancy J.; Smith, Linsley; Roberts, Heather; Tulchin-Francis, Kirsten; Shierk, Angela; Shagman, Laura; MacFarlane, Duncan; Liu, Hanli; Alexandrakis, George

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Sensorimotor cortex plasticity induced by constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in six children (10.2±2.1 years old) with hemiplegic cerebral palsy was assessed by functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). The activation laterality index and time-to-peak/duration during a finger-tapping task and the resting-state functional connectivity were quantified before, immediately after, and 6 months after CIMT. These fNIRS-based metrics were used to help explain changes in clinical scores of manual performance obtained concurrently with imaging time points. Five age-matched healthy children (9.8±1.3 years old) were also imaged to provide comparative activation metrics for normal controls. Interestingly, the activation time-to-peak/duration for all sensorimotor centers displayed significant normalization immediately after CIMT that persisted 6 months later. In contrast to this improved localized activation response, the laterality index and resting-state connectivity metrics that depended on communication between sensorimotor centers improved immediately after CIMT, but relapsed 6 months later. In addition, for the subjects measured in this work, there was either a trade-off between improving unimanual versus bimanual performance when sensorimotor activation patterns normalized after CIMT, or an improvement occurred in both unimanual and bimanual performance but at the cost of very abnormal plastic changes in sensorimotor activity. PMID:25900145

  9. Cerebral Blood Flow in Posterior Cortical Nodes of the Default Mode Network Decreases with Task Engagement but Remains Higher than in Most Brain Regions

    PubMed Central

    Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Chanraud, Sandra; Pitel, Anne-Lise; Müller-Oehring, Eva; Shankaranarayanan, Ajit; Alsop, David C.; Rohlfing, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies provide converging evidence for existence of intrinsic brain networks activated during resting states and deactivated with selective cognitive demands. Whether task-related deactivation of the default mode network signifies depressed activity relative to the remaining brain or simply lower activity relative to its resting state remains controversial. We employed 3D arterial spin labeling imaging to examine regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) during rest, a spatial working memory task, and a second rest. Change in regional CBF from rest to task showed significant normalized and absolute CBF reductions in posterior cingulate, posterior-inferior precuneus, and medial frontal lobes . A Statistical Parametric Mapping connectivity analysis, with an a priori seed in the posterior cingulate cortex, produced deactivation connectivity patterns consistent with the classic “default mode network” and activation connectivity anatomically consistent with engagement in visuospatial tasks. The large task-related CBF decrease in posterior-inferior precuneus relative to its anterior and middle portions adds evidence for the precuneus' heterogeneity. The posterior cingulate and posterior-inferior precuneus were also regions of the highest CBF at rest and during task performance. The difference in regional CBF between intrinsic (resting) and evoked (task) activity levels may represent functional readiness or reserve vulnerable to diminution by conditions affecting perfusion. PMID:20484322

  10. Evaluation of cortical plasticity in children with cerebral palsy undergoing constraint-induced movement therapy based on functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jianwei; Khan, Bilal; Hervey, Nathan; Tian, Fenghua; Delgado, Mauricio R.; Clegg, Nancy J.; Smith, Linsley; Roberts, Heather; Tulchin-Francis, Kirsten; Shierk, Angela; Shagman, Laura; MacFarlane, Duncan; Liu, Hanli; Alexandrakis, George

    2015-04-01

    Sensorimotor cortex plasticity induced by constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in six children (10.2±2.1 years old) with hemiplegic cerebral palsy was assessed by functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). The activation laterality index and time-to-peak/duration during a finger-tapping task and the resting-state functional connectivity were quantified before, immediately after, and 6 months after CIMT. These fNIRS-based metrics were used to help explain changes in clinical scores of manual performance obtained concurrently with imaging time points. Five age-matched healthy children (9.8±1.3 years old) were also imaged to provide comparative activation metrics for normal controls. Interestingly, the activation time-to-peak/duration for all sensorimotor centers displayed significant normalization immediately after CIMT that persisted 6 months later. In contrast to this improved localized activation response, the laterality index and resting-state connectivity metrics that depended on communication between sensorimotor centers improved immediately after CIMT, but relapsed 6 months later. In addition, for the subjects measured in this work, there was either a trade-off between improving unimanual versus bimanual performance when sensorimotor activation patterns normalized after CIMT, or an improvement occurred in both unimanual and bimanual performance but at the cost of very abnormal plastic changes in sensorimotor activity.

  11. Exploring the Nature of Cortical Recurrent Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Kenji; Kalra, Rita; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Robinson, Hugh P. C.

    2011-09-01

    Fast rhythmic activity of neural population has been frequently observed in cortical circuits, and suggested to be associated with various cognitive functions including working memory and selective attention. However, precisely how recurrent synaptic interactions, that are prominent in these circuits, shape and/or modulate such population rhythm has not been fully elucidated. We have addressed this issue by combining electrophysiological and computational approaches.

  12. Neuronal activity (c-Fos) delineating interactions of the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Mei-Hong; Chen, Michael C.; Huang, Zhi-Li; Lu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The cerebral cortex and basal ganglia (BG) form a neural circuit that is disrupted in disorders such as Parkinson’s disease. We found that neuronal activity (c-Fos) in the BG followed cortical activity, i.e., high in arousal state and low in sleep state. To determine if cortical activity is necessary for BG activity, we administered atropine to rats to induce a dissociative state resulting in slow-wave electroencephalography but hyperactive motor behaviors. Atropine blocked c-Fos expression in the cortex and BG, despite high c-Fos expression in the sub-cortical arousal neuronal groups and thalamus, indicating that cortical activity is required for BG activation. To identify which glutamate receptors in the BG that mediate cortical inputs, we injected ketamine [N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist] and 6-cyano-nitroquinoxaline-2, 3-dione (CNQX, a non-NMDA receptor antagonist). Systemic ketamine and CNQX administration revealed that NMDA receptors mediated subthalamic nucleus (STN) input to internal globus pallidus (GPi) and substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr), while non-NMDA receptor mediated cortical input to the STN. Both types of glutamate receptors were involved in mediating cortical input to the striatum. Dorsal striatal (caudoputamen, CPu) dopamine depletion by 6-hydroxydopamine resulted in reduced activity of the CPu, globus pallidus externa (GPe), and STN but increased activity of the GPi, SNr, and putative layer V neurons in the motor cortex. Our results reveal that the cortical activity is necessary for BG activity and clarifies the pathways and properties of the BG-cortical network and their putative role in the pathophysiology of BG disorders. PMID:24723855

  13. Layer- and area-specific actions of norepinephrine on cortical synaptic transmission.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Humberto; Treviño, Mario; Atzori, Marco

    2016-06-15

    The cerebral cortex is a critical target of the central noradrenergic system. The importance of norepinephrine (NE) in the regulation of cortical activity is underscored by clinical findings that involve this catecholamine and its receptor subtypes in the regulation of a large number of emotional and cognitive functions and illnesses. In this review, we highlight diverse effects of the LC/NE system in the mammalian cortex. Indeed, electrophysiological, pharmacological, and behavioral studies in the last few decades reveal that NE elicits a mixed repertoire of excitatory, inhibitory, and biphasic effects on the firing activity and transmitter release of cortical neurons. At the intrinsic cellular level, NE can produce a series of effects similar to those elicited by other monoamines or acetylcholine, associated with systemic arousal. At the synaptic level, NE induces numerous acute changes in synaptic function, and ׳gates' the induction of long-term plasticity of glutamatergic synapses, consisting in an enhancement of engaged and relevant cortical synapses and/or depression of unengaged synapses. Equally important in shaping cortical function, in many cortical areas NE promotes a characteristic, most often reversible, increase in the gain of local inhibitory synapses, whose extent and temporal properties vary between different areas and sometimes even between cortical layers of the same area. While we are still a long way from a comprehensive theory of the function of the LC/NE system, its cellular, synaptic, and plastic effects are consistent with the hypothesis that noradrenergic modulation is critical in coordinating the activity of cortical and subcortical circuits for the integration of sensory activity and working memory. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Noradrenergic System.

  14. [Cortico-basal ganglia circuits--parallel closed loops and convergent/divergent connections].

    PubMed

    Miyachi, Shigehiro

    2009-04-01

    The basal ganglia play important roles not only in motor control but also in higher cognitive functions such as reinforcement learning and procedural memory. Anatomical studies on the neuronal connections between the basal ganglia, cerebral cortex, and thalamus have demonstrated that these nuclei and cortical areas are interconnected via independent parallel loop circuits. The association, motor, and limbic cortices project to specific domains in the striatum, which, in turn, project back to the corresponding cortical areas via the substantia nigra/globus pallidus and the thalamus. Likewise, subregions in the motor cortex representing different body parts project to specific regions in the putamen, which project back to the original motor cortical regions. These parallel loops have been thought to be the basic anatomical structures involved in the basal ganglia functions. Furthermore, neuronal projections communicating between different loops (or functional domains) have also been discovered. A considerable number of corticostriatal projections from functionally interrelated cortical areas (e. g., hand representations of the motor cortex and somatosensory cortex) converge at the striatum. It has also been suggested that the location of the substantia nigra is in such that it can transmit information from the 'limbic loop' to the 'association loop', and from the 'association loop' to the 'motor loop'. Furthermore, a recent transsynaptic neuronal tracing study conducted at our laboratory demonstrated that the ventral (limbic) striatum sends divergent outputs to multiple regions in the frontal cortex. These 'inter-loop' connections would be important for the integration of information to achieve goal-directed behaviors.

  15. D1 dopamine receptor regulation of the levels of the cell-cycle-controlling proteins, cyclin D, P27 and Raf-1, in cerebral cortical precursor cells is mediated through cAMP-independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Bai, Jie; Undie, Ashiwel S; Bergson, Clare; Lidow, Michael S

    2005-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) agonists inhibit epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced passage of mouse fetal cerebral cortical precursor cells from the G1 phase to the S phase of the cell cycle. Here, we report that this action of D1R agonists may involve regulation of cyclin D, and P27, which respectively promote and suppress the G1 to S transition. Furthermore, regulation of Raf-1, a component of the receptor tyrosine kinase mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway engaged in the mitogenic activity of EGF, may also be involved. Specifically, levels of cyclin D and Raf-1 decrease, whereas those of P27 first increase and then decrease in a dose-dependent fashion in response to the D1R agonist, SKF38393. This agonist also promotes Raf-1 phosphorylation on serine 338 residue, suggesting increased activation of this protein. Only the latter effect can be blocked by adenylyl cyclase (AC) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors, and mimicked by agonists of the cAMP signaling pathway. Another D1R agonist, SKF83959, which stimulates phospholipase Cbeta (PLCbeta) but not AC, reduces levels of Raf-1 and cyclin D similar to SKF38393. However, we detected only down-regulation of P27 by this agonist. Additionally, the concentration-dependent patterns of both SKF38393- and SKF83959-induced alterations in the levels of P27 closely resemble the effects of these ligands on the levels of the D1R-PLCbeta-associated second-messenger cascades linker, calcyon. These findings suggest that D1R-induced suppression of the cell cycle progression in EGF-supported fetal cortical precursor cells represents a net effect of competing cell cycle promoting and inhibiting molecular changes, which involve cyclin D, P27 and Raf-1. The data also show that cAMP second messenger cascade is not engaged in the D1R-induced regulation of the levels of these three proteins. Such regulation probably involves PLCbeta-associated pathways.

  16. Laminar cortical necrosis in mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef

    2009-10-01

    Laminar cortical necrosis, defined as focal or diffuse necrosis of one or more cortical lamina, represents an increasingly recognized neuropathological endpoint of vascular, endocrine, immunologic, metabolic, or toxic conditions, of which mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are the third most frequent after cerebral ischemia and hypoxia. To investigate the prevalence of laminar cortical necrosis in MIDs, types of MIDs associated with laminar cortical necrosis, and the morphological characteristics on imaging and autopsy. Medline literature review for the terms "laminar cortical necrosis", "cortical signal change", "mitochondrial" and all acronyms of syndromatic MIDs. Among 139 hits for "laminar cortical necrosis", 10 articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria (7%). Among the ten hits five were case series and the other five single case reports. The syndromic MID most frequently associated with laminar cortical necrosis is the MELAS syndrome, but was also described in a single patient each with Leigh syndrome, mitochondrial depletion syndrome, and mitochondrial spinocerebellar ataxia. The morphological and pathohistological features of laminar cortical necrosis in MIDs were not at variance from those in non-mitochondrial disorders. In MIDs laminar cortical necrosis represents the histopathological and imaging endpoint of a stroke-like lesion. Though laminar cortical necrosis may have a wide pathophysiological background the histological and imaging characteristics do not vary between the different underlying conditions.

  17. Similar Motor Cortical Control Mechanisms for Precise Limb Control during Reaching and Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Yakovenko, Sergiy

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the course of evolution there has been a parallel development of the complexity and flexibility of the nervous system and the skeletomuscular system that it controls. This development is particularly evident for the cerebral cortical areas and the transformation of the use of the upper limbs from a purely locomotor function to one including, or restricted to, reaching and grasping. This study addresses the issue of whether the control of reaching has involved the development of new cortical circuits or whether the same neurons are used to control both locomotion and reaching. We recorded the activity of pyramidal tract neurons in the motor cortex of the cat both during voluntary gait modifications and during reaching. All cells showed generally similar patterns of activity in both tasks. More specifically, we showed that, in many cases, cells maintained a constant temporal relationship to the activity of synergistic muscle groups in each task. In addition, in some cells the relationship between the intensity of the cell discharge activity and the magnitude of the EMG activity was equally constant during gait modifications and reaching. As such, the results are compatible with the hypothesis that the corticospinal circuits used to control reaching evolved from those used to precisely modify gait. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In an article in 1989, Georgopoulos and Grillner (1989) proposed that the corticospinal control mechanisms used for reaching movements in primates may have evolved from those used to control precise modifications of gait during quadrupedal locomotion. In this article, we provide a test of this hypothesis by recording the activity of individual motor cortical cells during both behaviors. Our results are compatible with the hypothesis in that they demonstrate that individual cortical neurons exhibit similar qualitative and quantitative patterns during each behavior. Beyond a general similarity of activity patterns, we show that some cortical

  18. Synchronous Changes of Cortical Thickness and Corresponding White Matter Microstructure During Brain Development Accessed by Diffusion MRI Tractography from Parcellated Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Tina; Mishra, Virendra; Ouyang, Minhui; Chen, Min; Huang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Cortical thickness (CT) changes during normal brain development is associated with complicated cellular and molecular processes including synaptic pruning and apoptosis. In parallel, the microstructural enhancement of developmental white matter (WM) axons with their neuronal bodies in the cerebral cortex has been widely reported with measurements of metrics derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), especially fractional anisotropy (FA). We hypothesized that the changes of CT and microstructural enhancement of corresponding axons are highly interacted during development. DTI and T1-weighted images of 50 healthy children and adolescents between the ages of 7 and 25 years were acquired. With the parcellated cortical gyri transformed from T1-weighted images to DTI space as the tractography seeds, probabilistic tracking was performed to delineate the WM fibers traced from specific parcellated cortical regions. CT was measured at certain cortical regions and FA was measured from the WM fibers traced from same cortical regions. The CT of all frontal cortical gyri, including Brodmann areas 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 44, 45, 46, and 47, decreased significantly and heterogeneously; concurrently, significant, and heterogeneous increases of FA of WM traced from corresponding regions were found. We further revealed significant correlation between the slopes of the CT decrease and the slopes of corresponding WM FA increase in all frontal cortical gyri, suggesting coherent cortical pruning and corresponding WM microstructural enhancement. Such correlation was not found in cortical regions other than frontal cortex. The molecular and cellular mechanisms of these synchronous changes may be associated with overlapping signaling pathways of axonal guidance, synaptic pruning, neuronal apoptosis, and more prevalent interstitial neurons in the prefrontal cortex. Revealing the coherence of cortical and WM structural changes during development may open a new window for understanding the

  19. Measuring circuit

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Shan C.; Chaprnka, Anthony G.

    1977-01-11

    An automatic gain control circuit functions to adjust the magnitude of an input signal supplied to a measuring circuit to a level within the dynamic range of the measuring circuit while a log-ratio circuit adjusts the magnitude of the output signal from the measuring circuit to the level of the input signal and optimizes the signal-to-noise ratio performance of the measuring circuit.

  20. [Posterior cortical atrophy].

    PubMed

    Solyga, Volker Moræus; Western, Elin; Solheim, Hanne; Hassel, Bjørnar; Kerty, Emilia

    2015-06-02

    Posterior cortical atrophy is a neurodegenerative condition with atrophy of posterior parts of the cerebral cortex, including the visual cortex and parts of the parietal and temporal cortices. It presents early, in the 50s or 60s, with nonspecific visual disturbances that are often misinterpreted as ophthalmological, which can delay the diagnosis. The purpose of this article is to present current knowledge about symptoms, diagnostics and treatment of this condition. The review is based on a selection of relevant articles in PubMed and on the authors' own experience with the patient group. Posterior cortical atrophy causes gradually increasing impairment in reading, distance judgement, and the ability to perceive complex images. Examination of higher visual functions, neuropsychological testing, and neuroimaging contribute to diagnosis. In the early stages, patients do not have problems with memory or insight, but cognitive impairment and dementia can develop. It is unclear whether the condition is a variant of Alzheimer's disease, or whether it is a separate disease entity. There is no established treatment, but practical measures such as the aid of social care workers, telephones with large keypads, computers with voice recognition software and audiobooks can be useful. Currently available treatment has very limited effect on the disease itself. Nevertheless it is important to identify and diagnose the condition in its early stages in order to be able to offer patients practical assistance in their daily lives.

  1. Adult Visual Cortical Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Charles D.; Li, Wu

    2012-01-01

    The visual cortex has the capacity for experience dependent change, or cortical plasticity, that is retained throughout life. Plasticity is invoked for encoding information during perceptual learning, by internally representing the regularities of the visual environment, which is useful for facilitating intermediate level vision - contour integration and surface segmentation. The same mechanisms have adaptive value for functional recovery after CNS damage, such as that associated with stroke or neurodegenerative disease. A common feature to plasticity in primary visual cortex (V1) is an association field that links contour elements across the visual field. The circuitry underlying the association field includes a plexus of long range horizontal connections formed by cortical pyramidal cells. These connections undergo rapid and exuberant sprouting and pruning in response to removal of sensory input, which can account for the topographic reorganization following retinal lesions. Similar alterations in cortical circuitry may be involved in perceptual learning, and the changes observed in V1 may be representative of how learned information is encoded throughout the cerebral cortex. PMID:22841310

  2. Relaxed genetic control of cortical organization in human brains compared with chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Robles, Aida; Hopkins, William D.; Schapiro, Steven J.; Sherwood, Chet C.

    2015-01-01

    The study of hominin brain evolution has focused largely on the neocortical expansion and reorganization undergone by humans as inferred from the endocranial fossil record. Comparisons of modern human brains with those of chimpanzees provide an additional line of evidence to define key neural traits that have emerged in human evolution and that underlie our unique behavioral specializations. In an attempt to identify fundamental developmental differences, we have estimated the genetic bases of brain size and cortical organization in chimpanzees and humans by studying phenotypic similarities between individuals with known kinship relationships. We show that, although heritability for brain size and cortical organization is high in chimpanzees, cerebral cortical anatomy is substantially less genetically heritable than brain size in humans, indicating greater plasticity and increased environmental influence on neurodevelopment in our species. This relaxed genetic control on cortical organization is especially marked in association areas and likely is related to underlying microstructural changes in neural circuitry. A major result of increased plasticity is that the development of neural circuits that underlie behavior is shaped by the environmental, social, and cultural context more intensively in humans than in other primate species, thus providing an anatomical basis for behavioral and cognitive evolution. PMID:26627234

  3. Relaxed genetic control of cortical organization in human brains compared with chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Robles, Aida; Hopkins, William D; Schapiro, Steven J; Sherwood, Chet C

    2015-12-01

    The study of hominin brain evolution has focused largely on the neocortical expansion and reorganization undergone by humans as inferred from the endocranial fossil record. Comparisons of modern human brains with those of chimpanzees provide an additional line of evidence to define key neural traits that have emerged in human evolution and that underlie our unique behavioral specializations. In an attempt to identify fundamental developmental differences, we have estimated the genetic bases of brain size and cortical organization in chimpanzees and humans by studying phenotypic similarities between individuals with known kinship relationships. We show that, although heritability for brain size and cortical organization is high in chimpanzees, cerebral cortical anatomy is substantially less genetically heritable than brain size in humans, indicating greater plasticity and increased environmental influence on neurodevelopment in our species. This relaxed genetic control on cortical organization is especially marked in association areas and likely is related to underlying microstructural changes in neural circuitry. A major result of increased plasticity is that the development of neural circuits that underlie behavior is shaped by the environmental, social, and cultural context more intensively in humans than in other primate species, thus providing an anatomical basis for behavioral and cognitive evolution.

  4. Function and regulation of Rnd proteins in cortical projection neuron migration

    PubMed Central

    Azzarelli, Roberta; Guillemot, François; Pacary, Emilie

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian cerebral cortex contains a high variety of neuronal subtypes that acquire precise spatial locations and form long or short-range connections to establish functional neuronal circuits. During embryonic development, cortical projection neurons are generated in the areas lining the lateral ventricles and they subsequently undergo radial migration to reach the position of their final maturation within the cortical plate. The control of the neuroblast migratory behavior and the coordination of the migration process with other neurogenic events such as cell cycle exit, differentiation and final maturation are crucial to normal brain development. Among the key regulators of cortical neuron migration, the small GTP binding proteins of the Rho family and the atypical Rnd members play important roles in integrating intracellular signaling pathways into changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and motility behavior. Here we review the role of Rnd proteins during cortical neuronal migration and we discuss both the upstream mechanisms that regulate Rnd protein activity and the downstream molecular pathways that mediate Rnd effects on cell cytoskeleton. PMID:25705175

  5. Alterations of cortical pyramidal neurons in mice lacking high-affinity nicotinic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ballesteros-Yáñez, Inmaculada; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Bourgeois, Jean-Pierre; Changeux, Jean-Pierre; DeFelipe, Javier

    2010-01-01

    The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are allosteric membrane proteins involved in multiple cognitive processes, including attention, learning, and memory. The most abundant form of heterooligomeric nAChRs in the brain contains the β2- and α4- subunits and binds nicotinic agonists with high affinity. In the present study, we investigated in the mouse the consequences of the deletion of one of the nAChR components: the β2-subunit (β2−/−) on the microanatomy of cortical pyramidal cells. Using an intracellular injection method, complete basal dendritic arbors of 650 layer III pyramidal neurons were sampled from seven cortical fields, including primary sensory, motor, and associational areas, in both β2−/− and WT animals. We observed that the pyramidal cell phenotype shows significant quantitative differences among different cortical areas in mutant and WT mice. In WT mice, the density of dendritic spines was rather similar in all cortical fields, except in the prelimbic/infralimbic cortex, where it was significantly higher. In the absence of the β2-subunit, the most significant reduction in the density of spines took place in this high-order associational field. Our data suggest that the β2-subunit is involved in the dendritic morphogenesis of pyramidal neurons and, in particular, in the circuits that contribute to the high-order functional connectivity of the cerebral cortex. PMID:20534523

  6. Differential distribution of neurons in the gyral white matter of the human cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    García-Marín, V; Blazquez-Llorca, L; Rodriguez, J R; Gonzalez-Soriano, J; DeFelipe, J

    2010-12-01

    The neurons in the cortical white matter (WM neurons) originate from the first set of postmitotic neurons that migrates from the ventricular zone. In particular, they arise in the subplate that contains the earliest cells generated in the telencephalon, prior to the appearance of neurons in gray matter cortical layers. These cortical WM neurons are very numerous during development, when they are thought to participate in transient synaptic networks, although many of these cells later die, and relatively few cells survive as WM neurons in the adult. We used light and electron microscopy to analyze the distribution and density of WM neurons in various areas of the adult human cerebral cortex. Furthermore, we examined the perisomatic innervation of these neurons and estimated the density of synapses in the white matter. Finally, we examined the distribution and neurochemical nature of interneurons that putatively innervate the somata of WM neurons. From the data obtained, we can draw three main conclusions: first, the density of WM neurons varies depending on the cortical areas; second, calretinin-immunoreactive neurons represent the major subpopulation of GABAergic WM neurons; and, third, the somata of WM neurons are surrounded by both glutamatergic and GABAergic axon terminals, although only symmetric axosomatic synapses were found. By contrast, both symmetric and asymmetric axodendritic synapses were observed in the neuropil. We discuss the possible functional implications of these findings in terms of cortical circuits. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Prefrontal cortical microcircuits bind perception to executive control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opris, Ioan; Santos, Lucas; Gerhardt, Greg A.; Song, Dong; Berger, Theodore W.; Hampson, Robert E.; Deadwyler, Sam A.

    2013-07-01

    During the perception-to-action cycle, our cerebral cortex mediates the interactions between the environment and the perceptual-executive systems of the brain. At the top of the executive hierarchy, prefrontal cortical microcircuits are assumed to bind perceptual and executive control information to guide goal-driven behavior. Here, we tested this hypothesis by comparing simultaneously recorded neuron firing in prefrontal cortical layers and the caudate-putamen of rhesus monkeys, trained in a spatial-versus-object, rule-based match-to-sample task. We found that during the perception and executive selection phases, cell firing in the localized prefrontal layers and caudate-putamen region exhibited similar location preferences on spatial-trials, but less on object- trials. Then, we facilitated the perceptual-executive circuit by stimulating the prefrontal infra-granular-layers with patterns previously derived from supra-granular-layers, and produced stimulation-induced spatial preference in percent correct performance on spatial trials, similar to neural tuning. These results show that inter-laminar prefrontal microcircuits play causal roles to the perception-to-action cycle.

  8. The organization of the human cerebral cortex estimated by intrinsic functional connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Thomas Yeo, B. T.; Krienen, Fenna M.; Sepulcre, Jorge; Sabuncu, Mert R.; Lashkari, Danial; Hollinshead, Marisa; Roffman, Joshua L.; Smoller, Jordan W.; Zöllei, Lilla; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Fischl, Bruce; Liu, Hesheng

    2011-01-01

    Information processing in the cerebral cortex involves interactions among distributed areas. Anatomical connectivity suggests that certain areas form local hierarchical relations such as within the visual system. Other connectivity patterns, particularly among association areas, suggest the presence of large-scale circuits without clear hierarchical relations. In this study the organization of networks in the human cerebrum was explored using resting-state functional connectivity MRI. Data from 1,000 subjects were registered using surface-based alignment. A clustering approach was employed to identify and replicate networks of functionally coupled regions across the cerebral cortex. The results revealed local networks confined to sensory and motor cortices as well as distributed networks of association regions. Within the sensory and motor cortices, functional connectivity followed topographic representations across adjacent areas. In association cortex, the connectivity patterns often showed abrupt transitions between network boundaries. Focused analyses were performed to better understand properties of network connectivity. A canonical sensory-motor pathway involving primary visual area, putative middle temporal area complex (MT+), lateral intraparietal area, and frontal eye field was analyzed to explore how interactions might arise within and between networks. Results showed that adjacent regions of the MT+ complex demonstrate differential connectivity consistent with a hierarchical pathway that spans networks. The functional connectivity of parietal and prefrontal association cortices was next explored. Distinct connectivity profiles of neighboring regions suggest they participate in distributed networks that, while showing evidence for interactions, are embedded within largely parallel, interdigitated circuits. We conclude by discussing the organization of these large-scale cerebral networks in relation to monkey anatomy and their potential evolutionary

  9. Imprinting and Recalling Cortical Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo-Reid, Luis; Yang, Weijian; Bando, Yuki; Peterka, Darcy S.; Yuste, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal ensembles are coactive groups of neurons that may represent emergent building blocks of neural circuits. They could be formed by Hebbian plasticity, whereby synapses between coactive neurons are strengthened. Here we report that repetitive activation with two-photon optogenetics of neuronal populations in visual cortex of awake mice generates artificially induced ensembles which recur spontaneously after being imprinted and do not disrupt preexistent ones. Moreover, imprinted ensembles can be recalled by single cell stimulation and remain coactive on consecutive days. Our results demonstrate the persistent reconfiguration of cortical circuits by two-photon optogenetics into neuronal ensembles that can perform pattern completion. PMID:27516599

  10. In Vitro, Ex Vivo and In Vivo Techniques to Study Neuronal Migration in the Developing Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Azzarelli, Roberta; Oleari, Roberto; Lettieri, Antonella; Andre', Valentina; Cariboni, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal migration is a fundamental biological process that underlies proper brain development and neuronal circuit formation. In the developing cerebral cortex, distinct neuronal populations, producing excitatory, inhibitory and modulatory neurotransmitters, are generated in different germinative areas and migrate along various routes to reach their final positions within the cortex. Different technical approaches and experimental models have been adopted to study the mechanisms regulating neuronal migration in the cortex. In this review, we will discuss the most common in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo techniques to visualize and study cortical neuronal migration. PMID:28448448

  11. Imprinting and recalling cortical ensembles.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Reid, Luis; Yang, Weijian; Bando, Yuki; Peterka, Darcy S; Yuste, Rafael

    2016-08-12

    Neuronal ensembles are coactive groups of neurons that may represent building blocks of cortical circuits. These ensembles could be formed by Hebbian plasticity, whereby synapses between coactive neurons are strengthened. Here we report that repetitive activation with two-photon optogenetics of neuronal populations from ensembles in the visual cortex of awake mice builds neuronal ensembles that recur spontaneously after being imprinted and do not disrupt preexisting ones. Moreover, imprinted ensembles can be recalled by single- cell stimulation and remain coactive on consecutive days. Our results demonstrate the persistent reconfiguration of cortical circuits by two-photon optogenetics into neuronal ensembles that can perform pattern completion. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. Regulation of cortical microcircuits by unitary GABAergic volume transmission

    PubMed Central

    Oláh, Szabolcs; Füle, Miklós; Komlósi, Gergely; Varga, Csaba; Báldi, Rita; Barzó, Pál; Tamás, Gábor

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is predominantly released by local interneurons in the cerebral cortex to particular subcellular domains of the target cells1,2. This suggests that compartmentalized, synapse specific action of GABA is required in cortical networks for phasic inhibition2–4. However, GABA released at the synaptic cleft diffuses to receptors outside the postsynaptic density and thus tonically activates extrasynaptic GABAA and GABAB receptors, which include subtypes of both receptor families especially sensitive to low concentrations of GABA3–7. The synaptic and extrasynaptic action of GABA is in line with idea that neurons of the brain use synaptic (or wiring) transmission and nonsynaptic (or volume) transmission for communication8,9. However, reuptake mechanisms restrict the spatial extent of extrasynaptic GABAergic effects10,11 and it was proposed that concerted action of several presynaptic interneurons or sustained firing of individual cells or increased release site density is required to reach ambient GABA levels sufficient to activate extrasynaptic receptors4,9,11–13. Here we show that individual neurogliaform cells release GABA sufficient for volume transmission within the axonal cloud and thus neurogliaform cells do not require synapses to produce inhibitory responses in the overwhelming majority of nearby neurons. Neurogliaform cells suppress connections between other neurons acting on presynaptic terminals which do not receive synapses at all in the cerebral cortex and, moreover, reach extrasynaptic, δ subunit containing GABAA (GABAAδ) receptors responsible for tonic inhibition. We reveal that GABAAδ receptors are localized to neurogliaform cells preferentially among cortical interneurons. Neurosteroids, which are modulators of GABAAδ receptors, alter unitary GABAergic effects between neurogliaform cells. In contrast to the specifically placed synapses formed by other interneurons, the output of neurosteroid sensitive neurogliaform

  13. "The developmental and functional logic of neuronal circuits": commentary on the Kavli Prize in Neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Glover, J C

    2009-11-10

    The first Kavli Prize in Neuroscience recognizes a confluence of career achievements that together provide a fundamental understanding of how brain and spinal cord circuits are assembled during development and function in the adult. The members of the Kavli Neuroscience Prize Committee have decided to reward three scientists (Sten Grillner, Thomas Jessell, and Pasko Rakic) jointly "for discoveries on the developmental and functional logic of neuronal circuits". Pasko Rakic performed groundbreaking studies of the developing cerebral cortex, including the discovery of how radial glia guide the neuronal migration that establishes cortical layers and for the radial unit hypothesis and its implications for cortical connectivity and evolution. Thomas Jessell discovered molecular principles governing the specification and patterning of different neuron types and the development of their synaptic interconnection into sensorimotor circuits. Sten Grillner elucidated principles of network organization in the vertebrate locomotor central pattern generator, along with its command systems and sensory and higher order control. The discoveries of Rakic, Jessell and Grillner provide a framework for how neurons obtain their identities and ultimate locations, establish appropriate connections with each other, and how the resultant neuronal networks operate. Their work has significantly advanced our understanding of brain development and function and created new opportunities for the treatment of neurological disorders. Each has pioneered an important area of neuroscience research and left a legacy of exceptional scientific achievement, insight, communication, mentoring and leadership.

  14. Frontal-thalamic circuits associated with language.

    PubMed

    Barbas, Helen; García-Cabezas, Miguel Ángel; Zikopoulos, Basilis

    2013-07-01

    Thalamic nuclei associated with language including the ventral lateral, ventral anterior, intralaminar and mediodorsal form a hub that uniquely receives the output of the basal ganglia and cerebellum, and is connected with frontal (premotor and prefrontal) cortices through two parallel circuits: a thalamic pathway targets the middle frontal cortical layers focally, and the other innervates widely cortical layer 1, poised to recruit other cortices and thalamic nuclei for complex cognitive operations. Return frontal pathways to the thalamus originate from cortical layers 6 and 5. Information through this integrated thalamo-cortical system is gated by the inhibitory thalamic reticular nucleus and modulated by dopamine, representing a specialization in primates. The intricate dialogue of distinct thalamic nuclei with the basal ganglia, cerebellum, and specific dorsolateral prefrontal and premotor cortices associated with language, suggests synergistic roles in the complex but seemingly effortless sequential transformation of cognitive operations for speech production in humans.

  15. Cerebral toxoplasmosis in Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients also provides unifying pathophysiologic hypotheses for Holmes tremor.

    PubMed

    Lekoubou, Alain; Njouoguep, Rodrigue; Kuate, Callixte; Kengne, André Pascal

    2010-06-03

    Holmes tremor is a rare symptomatic movement disorder. Currently suggested pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease are mostly derived from stroke cases. Although rare, cerebral toxoplasmosis may strengthen the pathophysiologic mechanism of disease. A case of Holmes tremor secondary to cerebral toxoplasmosis in an AIDS patient is presented. A relevant literature search was performed, using pubmed and several entries for Holmes tremor as labelled in the literature. The unifying feature of our case and those of the literature is the involvement of either the cerebello-thalamo-cortical and/or the dentato-rubro-olivary pathways. The abscess or the extension of surrounding edema beyond these two circuits may account for the superimposed dysfunction of the nigrostriatal system in some but not all cases. The short delay observed in our observation and the dramatic response to treatment may indirectly support the secondary neuronal degeneration theory in the mechanism of Holmes tremor. Cases of cerebral toxoplasmosis in AIDS patients also provide arguments for the role of the thalamo-cortical and/or the dentato-rubro-olivary pathways dysfunction in the pathogenesis of Holmes tremor. Involvement of the nigro-striatal pathway may not be crucial in the development of this syndrome. Our case also brings additional indirect arguments for the role of secondary neuronal degeneration in the mechanism of Holmes tremor.

  16. Cerebral toxoplasmosis in Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients also provides unifying pathophysiologic hypotheses for Holmes tremor

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Holmes tremor is a rare symptomatic movement disorder. Currently suggested pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease are mostly derived from stroke cases. Although rare, cerebral toxoplasmosis may strengthen the pathophysiologic mechanism of disease. Case presentation A case of Holmes tremor secondary to cerebral toxoplasmosis in an AIDS patient is presented. A relevant literature search was performed, using pubmed and several entries for Holmes tremor as labelled in the literature. The unifying feature of our case and those of the literature is the involvement of either the cerebello-thalamo-cortical and/or the dentato-rubro-olivary pathways. The abscess or the extension of surrounding edema beyond these two circuits may account for the superimposed dysfunction of the nigrostriatal system in some but not all cases. The short delay observed in our observation and the dramatic response to treatment may indirectly support the secondary neuronal degeneration theory in the mechanism of Holmes tremor. Conclusion Cases of cerebral toxoplasmosis in AIDS patients also provide arguments for the role of the thalamo-cortical and/or the dentato-rubro-olivary pathways dysfunction in the pathogenesis of Holmes tremor. Involvement of the nigro-striatal pathway may not be crucial in the development of this syndrome. Our case also brings additional indirect arguments for the role of secondary neuronal degeneration in the mechanism of Holmes tremor. PMID:20525304

  17. Somatic Mutations in Cerebral Cortical Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Jamuar, Saumya S.; Lam, Anh-Thu N.; Kircher, Martin; D'Gama, Alissa M.; Wang, Jian; Barry, Brenda J.; Zhang, Xiaochang; Hill, Robert Sean; Partlow, Jennifer N.; Rozzo, Aldo; Servattalab, Sarah; Mehta, Bhaven K.; Topcu, Meral; Amrom, Dina; Andermann, Eva; Dan, Bernard; Parrini, Elena; Guerrini, Renzo; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Leventer, Richard J.; Shen, Yiping; Wu, Bai Lin; Barkovich, A. James; Sahin, Mustafa; Chang, Bernard S.; Bamshad, Michael; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Shendure, Jay; Poduri, Annapurna; Yu, Timothy W.; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although there is increasing recognition of the role of somatic mutations in genetic disorders, the prevalence of somatic mutations in neurodevelopmental disease and the optimal techniques to detect somatic mosaicism have not been systematically evaluated. METHODS Using a customized panel of known and candidate genes associated with brain malformations, we applied targeted high-coverage sequencing (depth, ≥200×) to leukocyte-derived DNA samples from 158 persons with brain malformations, including the double-cortex syndrome (subcortical band heterotopia, 30 persons), polymicrogyria with megalencephaly (20), periventricular nodular heterotopia (61), and pachygyria (47). We validated candidate mutations with the use of Sanger sequencing and, for variants present at unequal read depths, subcloning followed by colony sequencing. RESULTS Validated, causal mutations were found in 27 persons (17%; range, 10 to 30% for each phenotype). Mutations were somatic in 8 of the 27 (30%), predominantly in persons with the double-cortex syndrome (in whom we found mutations in DCX and LIS1), persons with periventricular nodular heterotopia (FLNA), and persons with pachygyria (TUBB2B). Of the somatic mutations we detected, 5 (63%) were undetectable with the use of traditional Sanger sequencing but were validated through subcloning and subsequent sequencing of the subcloned DNA. We found potentially causal mutations in the candidate genes DYNC1H1, KIF5C, and other kinesin genes in persons with pachygyria. CONCLUSIONS Targeted sequencing was found to be useful for detecting somatic mutations in patients with brain malformations. High-coverage sequencing panels provide an important complement to whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing in the evaluation of somatic mutations in neuropsychiatric disease. (Funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and others.) PMID:25140959

  18. Correlation of CT cerebral vascular territories with function. 3. Middle cerebral artery

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, S.A.; Hayman, L.A.; Hinck, V.C.

    1984-05-01

    Schematic displays are presented of the cerebral territories supplied by branches of the middle cerebral artery as they would appear on axial and coronal computed tomographic (CT) scan sections. Companion diagrams of regional cortical function and a discussion of the fiber tracts are provided to simplify correlation of clinical deficits with coronal and axial CT abnormalities.

  19. Similar Motor Cortical Control Mechanisms for Precise Limb Control during Reaching and Locomotion.

    PubMed

    Yakovenko, Sergiy; Drew, Trevor

    2015-10-28

    Throughout the course of evolution there has been a parallel development of the complexity and flexibility of the nervous system and the skeletomuscular system that it controls. This development is particularly evident for the cerebral cortical areas and the transformation of the use of the upper limbs from a purely locomotor function to one including, or restricted to, reaching and grasping. This study addresses the issue of whether the control of reaching has involved the development of new cortical circuits or whether the same neurons are used to control both locomotion and reaching. We recorded the activity of pyramidal tract neurons in the motor cortex of the cat both during voluntary gait modifications and during reaching. All cells showed generally similar patterns of activity in both tasks. More specifically, we showed that, in many cases, cells maintained a constant temporal relationship to the activity of synergistic muscle groups in each task. In addition, in some cells the relationship between the intensity of the cell discharge activity and the magnitude of the EMG activity was equally constant during gait modifications and reaching. As such, the results are compatible with the hypothesis that the corticospinal circuits used to control reaching evolved from those used to precisely modify gait. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3514476-15$15.00/0.

  20. Effects of Hyperglycemia and Effects of Ketosis on Cerebral Perfusion, Cerebral Water Distribution, and Cerebral Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Nicole; Ngo, Catherine; Anderson, Steven; Yuen, Natalie; Trifu, Alexandra; O’Donnell, Martha

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) may cause brain injuries in children. The mechanisms responsible are difficult to elucidate because DKA involves multiple metabolic derangements. We aimed to determine the independent effects of hyperglycemia and ketosis on cerebral metabolism, blood flow, and water distribution. We used magnetic resonance spectroscopy to measure ratios of cerebral metabolites (ATP to inorganic phosphate [Pi], phosphocreatine [PCr] to Pi, N-acetyl aspartate [NAA] to creatine [Cr], and lactate to Cr) and diffusion-weighted imaging and perfusion-weighted imaging to assess cerebral water distribution (apparent diffusion coefficient [ADC] values) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) in three groups of juvenile rats (hyperglycemic, ketotic, and normal control). ATP-to-Pi ratio was reduced in both hyperglycemic and ketotic rats in comparison with controls. PCr-to-Pi ratio was reduced in the ketotic group, and there was a trend toward reduction in the hyperglycemic group. No significant differences were observed in NAA-to-Cr or lactate-to-Cr ratio. Cortical ADC was reduced in both groups (indicating brain cell swelling). Cortical CBF was also reduced in both groups. We conclude that both hyperglycemia and ketosis independently cause reductions in cerebral high-energy phosphates, CBF, and cortical ADC values. These effects may play a role in the pathophysiology of DKA-related brain injury. PMID:22498698

  1. Effects of hyperglycemia and effects of ketosis on cerebral perfusion, cerebral water distribution, and cerebral metabolism.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Nicole; Ngo, Catherine; Anderson, Steven; Yuen, Natalie; Trifu, Alexandra; O'Donnell, Martha

    2012-07-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) may cause brain injuries in children. The mechanisms responsible are difficult to elucidate because DKA involves multiple metabolic derangements. We aimed to determine the independent effects of hyperglycemia and ketosis on cerebral metabolism, blood flow, and water distribution. We used magnetic resonance spectroscopy to measure ratios of cerebral metabolites (ATP to inorganic phosphate [Pi], phosphocreatine [PCr] to Pi, N-acetyl aspartate [NAA] to creatine [Cr], and lactate to Cr) and diffusion-weighted imaging and perfusion-weighted imaging to assess cerebral water distribution (apparent diffusion coefficient [ADC] values) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) in three groups of juvenile rats (hyperglycemic, ketotic, and normal control). ATP-to-Pi ratio was reduced in both hyperglycemic and ketotic rats in comparison with controls. PCr-to-Pi ratio was reduced in the ketotic group, and there was a trend toward reduction in the hyperglycemic group. No significant differences were observed in NAA-to-Cr or lactate-to-Cr ratio. Cortical ADC was reduced in both groups (indicating brain cell swelling). Cortical CBF was also reduced in both groups. We conclude that both hyperglycemia and ketosis independently cause reductions in cerebral high-energy phosphates, CBF, and cortical ADC values. These effects may play a role in the pathophysiology of DKA-related brain injury.

  2. ADDER CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Jacobsohn, D.H.; Merrill, L.C.

    1959-01-20

    An improved parallel addition unit is described which is especially adapted for use in electronic digital computers and characterized by propagation of the carry signal through each of a plurality of denominationally ordered stages within a minimum time interval. In its broadest aspects, the invention incorporates a fast multistage parallel digital adder including a plurality of adder circuits, carry-propagation circuit means in all but the most significant digit stage, means for conditioning each carry-propagation circuit during the time period in which information is placed into the adder circuits, and means coupling carry-generation portions of thc adder circuit to the carry propagating means.

  3. CREB-Dependent Regulation of GAD65 Transcription by BDNF/TrkB in Cortical Interneurons.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Huertas, Carlos; Rico, Beatriz

    2011-04-01

    In the cerebral cortex, the functional output of projection neurons is fine-tuned by inhibitory neurons present in the network, which use γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as their main neurotransmitter. Previous studies have suggested that the expression levels of the rate-limiting GABA synthetic enzyme, GAD65, depend on brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/TrkB activation. However, the molecular mechanisms by which this neurotrophic factor and its receptor controls GABA synthesis are still unknown. Here, we show a direct regulation of the GAD65 gene by BDNF-TrkB signaling via CREB in cortical interneurons. Conditional ablation of TrkB in cortical interneurons causes a cell-autonomous decrease in the synaptically enriched GAD65 protein and its transcripts levels, suggesting that transcriptional regulation of the GAD65 gene is altered. Dissection of the intracellular pathway that underlies this process revealed that BDNF/TrkB signaling controls the transcription of GAD65 in a Ras-ERK-CREB-dependent manner. Our study reveals a novel molecular mechanism through which BDNF/TrkB signaling may modulate the maturation and function of cortical inhibitory circuits.

  4. Human-Specific Cortical Synaptic Connections and Their Plasticity: Is That What Makes Us Human?

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço, Joana; Bacci, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    One outstanding difference between Homo sapiens and other mammals is the ability to perform highly complex cognitive tasks and behaviors, such as language, abstract thinking, and cultural diversity. How is this accomplished? According to one prominent theory, cognitive complexity is proportional to the repetition of specific computational modules over a large surface expansion of the cerebral cortex (neocortex). However, the human neocortex was shown to also possess unique features at the cellular and synaptic levels, raising the possibility that expanding the computational module is not the only mechanism underlying complex thinking. In a study published in PLOS Biology, Szegedi and colleagues analyzed a specific cortical circuit from live postoperative human tissue, showing that human-specific, very powerful excitatory connections between principal pyramidal neurons and inhibitory neurons are highly plastic. This suggests that exclusive plasticity of specific microcircuits might be considered among the mechanisms endowing the human neocortex with the ability to perform highly complex cognitive tasks. PMID:28103228

  5. Malformations of Cortical Development: From Postnatal to Fetal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Leibovitz, Zvi

    2016-09-01

    Abnormal fetal corticogenesis results in malformations of cortical development (MCD). Abnormal cell proliferation leads to microcephaly or megalencephaly, incomplete neuronal migration results in heterotopia and lissencephaly, neuronal overmigration manifests as cobblestone malformations, and anomalous postmigrational cortical organization is responsible for polymicrogyria and focal cortical dysplasias. MCD comprises various congenital brain disorders, caused by different genetic, infectious, or vascular etiologies and is associated with significant neurological morbidity. Although MCD are rarely diagnosed prenatally, both dedicated multiplanar neurosonography and magnetic resonance imaging enable good demonstration of fetal cortical development. The imaging signs of fetal MCD are: delayed or absent cerebral sulcation; premature abnormal sulci; thin and irregular hemispheric parenchyma; wide abnormal overdeveloped gyri; wide opening of isolated sulci; nodular bulging into the lateral ventricles; cortical clefts; intraparenchymal echogenic nodules; and cortical thickening. The postnatal and prenatal imaging features of four main malformations of cortical development-lissencephaly, cobblestone malformations, periventricular nodular heterotopia, and polymicrogyria-are described.

  6. Malformations of cortical development: genetic mechanisms and diagnostic approach

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Malformations of cortical development are rare congenital anomalies of the cerebral cortex, wherein patients present with intractable epilepsy and various degrees of developmental delay. Cases show a spectrum of anomalous cortical formations with diverse anatomic and morphological abnormalities, a variety of genetic causes, and different clinical presentations. Brain magnetic resonance imaging has been of great help in determining the exact morphologies of cortical malformations. The hypothetical mechanisms of malformation include interruptions during the formation of cerebral cortex in the form of viral infection, genetic causes, and vascular events. Recent remarkable developments in genetic analysis methods have improved our understanding of these pathological mechanisms. The present review will discuss normal cortical development, the current proposed malformation classifications, and the diagnostic approach for malformations of cortical development. PMID:28203254

  7. Malformations of cortical development: genetic mechanisms and diagnostic approach.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeehun

    2017-01-01

    Malformations of cortical development are rare congenital anomalies of the cerebral cortex, wherein patients present with intractable epilepsy and various degrees of developmental delay. Cases show a spectrum of anomalous cortical formations with diverse anatomic and morphological abnormalities, a variety of genetic causes, and different clinical presentations. Brain magnetic resonance imaging has been of great help in determining the exact morphologies of cortical malformations. The hypothetical mechanisms of malformation include interruptions during the formation of cerebral cortex in the form of viral infection, genetic causes, and vascular events. Recent remarkable developments in genetic analysis methods have improved our understanding of these pathological mechanisms. The present review will discuss normal cortical development, the current proposed malformation classifications, and the diagnostic approach for malformations of cortical development.

  8. Lineage-specific laminar organization of cortical GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Ciceri, Gabriele; Dehorter, Nathalie; Sols, Ignasi; Huang, Z Josh; Maravall, Miguel; Marín, Oscar

    2013-09-01

    In the cerebral cortex, pyramidal cells and interneurons are generated in distant germinal zones, and so the mechanisms that control their precise assembly into specific microcircuits remain an enigma. Here we report that cortical interneurons labeled at the clonal level do not distribute randomly but rather have a strong tendency to cluster in the mouse neocortex. This behavior is common to different classes of interneurons, independently of their origin. Interneuron clusters are typically contained within one or two adjacent cortical layers, are largely formed by isochronically generated neurons and populate specific layers, as revealed by unbiased hierarchical clustering methods. Our results suggest that different progenitor cells give rise to interneurons populating infra- and supragranular cortical layers, which challenges current views of cortical neurogenesis. Thus, specific lineages of cortical interneurons seem to be produced to primarily mirror the laminar structure of the cerebral cortex, rather than its columnar organization.

  9. Multiresolution Diffeomorphic Mapping for Cortical Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tan, Mingzhen; Qiu, Anqi

    2015-01-01

    Due to the convoluted folding pattern of the cerebral cortex, accurate alignment of cortical surfaces remains challenging. In this paper, we present a multiresolution diffeomorphic surface mapping algorithm under the framework of large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping (LDDMM). Our algorithm takes advantage of multiresolution analysis (MRA) for surfaces and constructs cortical surfaces at multiresolution. This family of multiresolution surfaces are used as natural sparse priors of the cortical anatomy and provide the anchor points where the parametrization of deformation vector fields is supported. This naturally constructs tangent bundles of diffeomorphisms at different resolution levels and hence generates multiresolution diffeomorphic transformation. We show that our construction of multiresolution LDDMM surface mapping can potentially reduce computational cost and improves the mapping accuracy of cortical surfaces.

  10. Cortically-Controlled Population Stochastic Facilitation as a Plausible Substrate for Guiding Sensory Transfer across the Thalamic Gateway

    PubMed Central

    Béhuret, Sébastien; Deleuze, Charlotte; Gomez, Leonel; Frégnac, Yves; Bal, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    The thalamus is the primary gateway that relays sensory information to the cerebral cortex. While a single recipient cortical cell receives the convergence of many principal relay cells of the thalamus, each thalamic cell in turn integrates a dense and distributed synaptic feedback from the cortex. During sensory processing, the influence of this functional loop remains largely ignored. Using dynamic-clamp techniques in thalamic slices in vitro, we combined theoretical and experimental approaches to implement a realistic hybrid retino-thalamo-cortical pathway mixing biological cells and simulated circuits. The synaptic bombardment of cortical origin was mimicked through the injection of a stochastic mixture of excitatory and inhibitory conductances, resulting in a gradable correlation level of afferent activity shared by thalamic cells. The study of the impact of the simulated cortical input on the global retinocortical signal transfer efficiency revealed a novel control mechanism resulting from the collective resonance of all thalamic relay neurons. We show here that the transfer efficiency of sensory input transmission depends on three key features: i) the number of thalamocortical cells involved in the many-to-one convergence from thalamus to cortex, ii) the statistics of the corticothalamic synaptic bombardment and iii) the level of correlation imposed between converging thalamic relay cells. In particular, our results demonstrate counterintuitively that the retinocortical signal transfer efficiency increases when the level of correlation across thalamic cells decreases. This suggests that the transfer efficiency of relay cells could be selectively amplified when they become simultaneously desynchronized by the cortical feedback. When applied to the intact brain, this network regulation mechanism could direct an attentional focus to specific thalamic subassemblies and select the appropriate input lines to the cortex according to the descending influence of

  11. Cortical operation of the ventral striatal switchboard

    PubMed Central

    Stuber, Garret D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary How does the ventral striatum (VS) prioritize and process afferent input? In this issue, Calhoon and O’Donnell demonstrate that cortical projections to the VS can attenuate hippocampal and thalamic VS input, suggesting that the cortex can uniquely control VS circuit dynamics. PMID:23583104

  12. Cortical Visual Impairment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Cortical Visual Impairment En Español Read in Chinese What is cortical visual impairment? Cortical visual impairment (CVI) is a decreased ...

  13. Cerebral Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... cerebral aneurysm may be required to restore deteriorating respiration and reduce abnormally high pressure within the brain. ... cerebral aneurysm may be required to restore deteriorating respiration and reduce abnormally high pressure within the brain. ...

  14. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... ol (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of disorders that affect ... resource—it highlights the ADDM Network’s data on cerebral palsy in a way that is useful for stakeholders ...

  15. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  16. Modeling Early Cortical Serotonergic Deficits in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Boylan, Carolyn B.; Blue, Mary E.; Hohmann, Christine F.

    2007-01-01

    Autism is a developmental brain disorder characterized by deficits in social interaction, language and behavior. Brain imaging studies demonstrate increased cerebral cortical volumes and micro- and macroscopic neuroanatomic changes in children with this disorder. Alterations in forebrain serotonergic function may underlie the neuroanatomic and behavioral features of autism. Serotonin is involved in neuronal growth and plasticity and these actions are likely mediated via serotonergic and glutamatergic receptors. Few animal models of autism have been described that replicate both etiology and pathophysiology. We report here on a selective serotonin (5-HT) depletion model of this disorder in neonatal mice that mimics neurochemical and structural changes in cortex and, in addition, displays a behavioral phenotype consistent with autism. Newborn male and female mice were depleted of forebrain 5-HT with injections of the serotonergic neurotoxin, 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT), into the bilateral medial forebrain bundle (mfb). Behavioral testing of these animals as adults revealed alterations in social, sensory and stereotypic behaviors. Lesioned mice showed significantly increased cortical width. Serotonin immunocytochemistry showed a dramatic long-lasting depletion of 5-HT containing fibers in cerebral cortex until postnatal day (PND) 60. Autoradiographic binding to high affinity 5-HT transporters was significantly but transiently reduced in cerebral cortex of 5,7-DHT-depleted mice. AMPA glutamate receptor binding was decreased at PND 15. We hypothesize that increased cerebral cortical volume and sensorimotor, cognitive and social deficits observed in both 5-HT-depleted animals and in individuals with autism, may be the result of deficiencies in timely axonal pruning to key cerebral cortical areas. PMID:17034875

  17. A Computational Model of Cerebral Cortex Folding

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Jingxin; Guo, Lei; Li, Gang; Faraco, Carlos; Miller, L Stephen; Liu, Tianming

    2010-01-01

    The geometric complexity and variability of the human cerebral cortex has long intrigued the scientific community. As a result, quantitative description of cortical folding patterns and the understanding of underlying folding mechanisms have emerged as important research goals. This paper presents a computational 3-dimensional geometric model of cerebral cortex folding initialized by MRI data of a human fetal brain and deformed under the governance of a partial differential equation modeling cortical growth. By applying different simulation parameters, our model is able to generate folding convolutions and shape dynamics of the cerebral cortex. The simulations of this 3D geometric model provide computational experimental support to the following hypotheses: 1) Mechanical constraints of the skull regulate the cortical folding process. 2) The cortical folding pattern is dependent on the global cell growth rate of the whole cortex. 3) The cortical folding pattern is dependent on relative rates of cell growth in different cortical areas. 4) The cortical folding pattern is dependent on the initial geometry of the cortex. PMID:20167224

  18. Incidental Cerebral Microbleeds and Cerebral Blood Flow in Elderly Individuals.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Nicholas M; Kim, Albert E; Gurol, M Edip; Lopez, Oscar L; Aizenstein, Howard J; Price, Julie C; Mathis, Chester A; James, Jeffrey A; Snitz, Beth E; Cohen, Ann D; Kamboh, M Ilyas; Minhas, Davneet; Weissfeld, Lisa A; Tamburo, Erica L; Klunk, William E

    2015-09-01

    Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) are collections of blood breakdown products that are a common incidental finding in magnetic resonance imaging of elderly individuals. Cerebral microbleeds are associated with cognitive deficits, but the mechanism is unclear. Studies show that individuals with CMBs related to symptomatic cerebral amyloid angiopathy have abnormal vascular reactivity and cerebral blood flow (CBF), but, to our knowledge, abnormalities in cerebral blood flow have not been reported for healthy individuals with incidental CMBs. To evaluate the association of incidental CMBs with resting-state CBF, cerebral metabolism, cerebrovascular disease, β-amyloid (Aβ), and cognition. A cross-sectional study of 55 cognitively normal individuals with a mean (SD) age of 86.8 (2.7) years was conducted from May 1, 2010, to May 1, 2013, in an academic medical center in Pittsburgh; data analysis was performed between June 10, 2013, and April 9, 2015. 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging was performed with susceptibility-weighted imaging or gradient-recalled echo to assess CMBs, arterial spin labeling for CBF, and T1- and T2-weighted imaging for atrophy, white matter hyperintensities, and infarcts. Positron emission tomography was conducted with fluorodeoxyglucose to measure cerebral metabolism and Pittsburgh compound B for fibrillar Aβ. Neuropsychological evaluation, including the Clinical Dementia Rating scale, was performed. Magnetic resonance images were rated for the presence and location of CMBs. Lobar CMBs were subclassified as cortical or subcortical. Measurements of CBF, metabolism, and Aβ were compared with the presence and number of CMBs with voxelwise and region-of-interest analyses. The presence of cortical CMBs was associated with significantly reduced CBF in multiple regions on voxelwise and region-of-interest analyses (percentage difference in global CBF, -25.3%; P = .0003), with the largest reductions in the parietal cortex (-37.6%; P < .0001) and

  19. A developmental and genetic classification for malformations of cortical development: update 2012.

    PubMed

    Barkovich, A James; Guerrini, Renzo; Kuzniecky, Ruben I; Jackson, Graeme D; Dobyns, William B

    2012-05-01

    Malformations of cerebral cortical development include a wide range of developmental disorders that are common causes of neurodevelopmental delay and epilepsy. In addition, study of these disorders contributes greatly to the understanding of normal brain development and its perturbations. The rapid recent evolution of molecular biology, genetics and imaging has resulted in an explosive increase in our knowledge of cerebral cortex development and in the number and types of malformations of cortical development that have been reported. These advances continue to modify our perception of these malformations. This review addresses recent changes in our perception of these disorders and proposes a modified classification based upon updates in our knowledge of cerebral cortical development.

  20. Evidence of cortical reorganization in hemiparetic patients

    SciTech Connect

    Brion, J.P.; Demeurisse, G.; Capon, A. )

    1989-08-01

    We studied the mechanisms underlying the recovery of motor function of the hand using a bidimensional xenon-133 inhalation technique to measure regional cerebral blood flow at rest and during the performance of a motor task (test condition). The regional cerebral blood flow patterns under rest and test conditions were compared in normal control and in stroke patients with either a cortico-subcortical or a deep-seated lesion. Functional recovery appears to depend upon cortical reorganization involving both hemispheres, particularly in both parietal regions in the subgroup of patients with cortico-subcortical lesions.

  1. Cortical High-Density Counterstream Architectures

    PubMed Central

    Markov, Nikola T.; Ercsey-Ravasz, Mária; Van Essen, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Small-world networks provide an appealing description of cortical architecture owing to their capacity for integration and segregation combined with an economy of connectivity. Previous reports of low-density interareal graphs and apparent small-world properties are challenged by data that reveal high-density cortical graphs in which economy of connections is achieved by weight heterogeneity and distance-weight correlations. These properties define a model that predicts many binary and weighted features of the cortical network including a core-periphery, a typical feature of self-organizing information processing systems. Feedback and feedforward pathways between areas exhibit a dual counterstream organization, and their integration into local circuits constrains cortical computation. Here, we propose a bow-tie representation of interareal architecture derived from the hierarchical laminar weights of pathways between the high-efficiency dense core and periphery. PMID:24179228

  2. Cortical high-density counterstream architectures.

    PubMed

    Markov, Nikola T; Ercsey-Ravasz, Mária; Van Essen, David C; Knoblauch, Kenneth; Toroczkai, Zoltán; Kennedy, Henry

    2013-11-01

    Small-world networks provide an appealing description of cortical architecture owing to their capacity for integration and segregation combined with an economy of connectivity. Previous reports of low-density interareal graphs and apparent small-world properties are challenged by data that reveal high-density cortical graphs in which economy of connections is achieved by weight heterogeneity and distance-weight correlations. These properties define a model that predicts many binary and weighted features of the cortical network including a core-periphery, a typical feature of self-organizing information processing systems. Feedback and feedforward pathways between areas exhibit a dual counterstream organization, and their integration into local circuits constrains cortical computation. Here, we propose a bow-tie representation of interareal architecture derived from the hierarchical laminar weights of pathways between the high-efficiency dense core and periphery.

  3. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome presenting as subarachnoid hemorrhage, reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy, and cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Noda, Kazuyuki; Fukae, Jiro; Fujishima, Kenji; Mori, Kentaro; Urabe, Takao; Hattori, Nobutaka; Okuma, Yasuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is characterized by acute severe headache with or without additional neurological symptoms and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction. Unruptured aneurysm has been reported in some cases with RCVS. We report a severe case of a 53-year-old woman with RCVS having an unruptured cerebral aneurysm and presenting as cortical subarachnoid hemorrhage, reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome, and cerebral infarction. She was successfully treated with corticosteroids and a calcium channel blocker and the aneurysm was clipped. Her various complications are due to the responsible vasoconstriction that started distally and progressed towards proximal arteries. This case demonstrates the spectrum of presentations of RCVS, a clinically complicated condition.

  4. GATING CIRCUITS

    DOEpatents

    Merrill, L.C.

    1958-10-14

    Control circuits for vacuum tubes are described, and a binary counter having an improved trigger circuit is reported. The salient feature of the binary counter is the application of the input signal to the cathode of each of two vacuum tubes through separate capacitors and the connection of each cathode to ground through separate diodes. The control of the binary counter is achieved in this manner without special pulse shaping of the input signal. A further advantage of the circuit is the simplicity and minimum nuruber of components required, making its use particularly desirable in computer machines.

  5. MULTIPLIER CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, R.E.

    1959-01-20

    An electronic circuit is presented for automatically computing the product of two selected variables by multiplying the voltage pulses proportional to the variables. The multiplier circuit has a plurality of parallel resistors of predetermined values connected through separate gate circults between a first input and the output terminal. One voltage pulse is applied to thc flrst input while the second voltage pulse is applied to control circuitry for the respective gate circuits. Thc magnitude of the second voltage pulse selects the resistors upon which the first voltage pulse is imprcssed, whereby the resultant output voltage is proportional to the product of the input voltage pulses

  6. The basic nonuniformity of the cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Collins, Christine E.; Wong, Peiyan; Kaas, Jon H.; Lent, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Evolutionary changes in the size of the cerebral cortex, a columnar structure, often occur through the addition or subtraction of columnar modules with the same number of neurons underneath a unit area of cortical surface. This view is based on the work of Rockel et al. [Rockel AJ, Hiorns RW, Powell TP (1980) The basic uniformity in structure of the neocortex. Brain 103:221–244], who found a steady number of approximately 110 neurons underneath a surface area of 750 μm2 (147,000 underneath 1 mm2) of the cerebral cortex of five species from different mammalian orders. These results have since been either corroborated or disputed by different groups. Here, we show that the number of neurons underneath 1 mm2 of the cerebral cortical surface of nine primate species and the closely related Tupaia sp. is not constant and varies by three times across species. We found that cortical thickness is not inversely proportional to neuronal density across species and that total cortical surface area increases more slowly than, rather than linearly with, the number of neurons underneath it. The number of neurons beneath a unit area of cortical surface varies linearly with neuronal density, a parameter that is neither related to cortical size nor total number of neurons. Our finding of a variable number of neurons underneath a unit area of the cerebral cortex across primate species indicates that models of cortical organization cannot assume that cortical columns in different primates consist of invariant numbers of neurons. PMID:18689685

  7. Striatal dopamine and glutamate receptors modulate methamphetamine-induced cortical Fos expression

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Noah B.; Marshall, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Methamphetamine (mAMPH) is a psychostimulant drug that increases extracellular levels of monoamines throughout the brain. It has previously been observed that a single injection of mAMPH increases immediate early gene (IEG) expression in both the striatum and cerebral cortex. Moreover, this effect is modulated by dopamine and glutamate receptors since systemic administration of dopamine or glutamate antagonists has been found to alter mAMPH-induced striatal and cortical IEG expression. However, because dopamine and glutamate receptors are found in extra-striatal as well as striatal brain regions, studies employing systemic injection of dopamine or glutamate antagonists fail to localize the effects of mAMPH-induced activation. In the present experiments, the roles of striatal dopamine and glutamate receptors in mAMPH-induced gene expression in the striatum and cerebral cortex were examined. The nuclear expression of Fos, the protein product of the IEG c-fos, was quantified in both the striatum and the cortex of animals receiving intrastriatal dopamine or glutamate antagonist administration. Intrastriatal infusion of dopamine (D1 or D2) or glutamate [N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) or alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)] antagonists affected not only mAMPH-induced striatal, but also cortical, Fos expression. Overall, the effects of the antagonists occurred dose-dependently, in both the infused and non-infused hemispheres, with greater influences occurring in the infused hemisphere. Finally, unilateral intrastriatal infusion of dopamine or glutamate antagonists changed the behavior of the rats from characteristic mAMPH-induced stereotypy to rotation ipsilateral to the infusion. These results demonstrate that mAMPH’s actions on striatal dopamine and glutamate receptors modulate the widespread cortical activation induced by mAMPH. It is hypothesized that dopamine release from nigrostriatal terminals modulates activity within striatal

  8. TRIPPING CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Lees, G.W.; McCormick, E.D.

    1962-05-22

    A tripping circuit employing a magnetic amplifier for tripping a reactor in response to power level, period, or instrument failure is described. A reference winding and signal winding are wound in opposite directions on the core. Current from an ion chamber passes through both windings. If the current increases at too fast a rate, a shunt circuit bypasses one or the windings and the amplifier output reverses polarity. (AEC)

  9. Ischemia-Reperfusion Induced Neovascularization in the Cerebral Cortex of the Ovine Fetus

    PubMed Central

    Virgintino, Daniela; Girolamo, Francesco; Rizzi, Marco; Ahmedli, Nigar; Sadowska, Grazyna B.; Stopa, Edward G.; Zhang, Jiyong; Stonestreet, Barbara S.

    2014-01-01

    Information is limited regarding the effects of injury on neovascularization in the immature brain. We investigated effects of ischemia on cerebral cortical neovascularization after exposure of fetuses to 30 minutes of cerebral ischemia and 48- (I/R-48) or 72- (I/R-72) hours of reperfusion or sham-control treatment (Non-I/R). Immunohistochemical and morphometric analyses of cerebral cortical sections included immunostaining for glial fibrillary acidic protein and collagen type IV (Coll IV), a molecular component of the vascular basal lamina, to determine the glial-vascular network in fetal brains, and Ki67 as a proliferation marker. Cerebral cortices from I/R-48 and I/R-72 fetuses exhibited general responses to ischemia, including reactive astrocyte morphology, which was not observed in Non-I/R fetuses. Cell bodies of reactive, proliferating astrocytes along with large end-feet surrounded walls of cerebral cortical microvessels in addition to the thick Coll IV-enriched basal lamina. Morphometric analysis of Non-I/R with I/R-48 and I/R-72 groups revealed increased Coll IV density in I/R-72 cerebral cortical microvessels (p < 0.01), which also frequently displayed a sprouting appearance, characterized by growing tip cells and activated pericytes. Increases in cerebral cortical basic fibroblast growth factor were associated with neovascularization. We conclude that increased neovascularization occurs within 72 hours after ischemia in fetal cerebral cortices. PMID:24806298

  10. Reduced Cortical Thickness in Mental Retardation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Wang, Jiaojian; Zhang, Yun; Yu, Chunshui; Jiang, Tianzi

    2011-01-01

    Mental retardation is a developmental disorder associated with impaired cognitive functioning and deficits in adaptive behaviors. Many studies have addressed white matter abnormalities in patients with mental retardation, while the changes of the cerebral cortex have been studied to a lesser extent. Quantitative analysis of cortical integrity using cortical thickness measurement may provide new insights into the gray matter pathology. In this study, cortical thickness was compared between 13 patients with mental retardation and 26 demographically matched healthy controls. We found that patients with mental retardation had significantly reduced cortical thickness in multiple brain regions compared with healthy controls. These regions include the bilateral lingual gyrus, the bilateral fusiform gyrus, the bilateral parahippocampal gyrus, the bilateral temporal pole, the left inferior temporal gyrus, the right lateral orbitofrontal cortex and the right precentral gyrus. The observed cortical thickness reductions might be the anatomical substrates for the impaired cognitive functioning and deficits in adaptive behaviors in patients with mental retardation. Cortical thickness measurement might provide a sensitive prospective surrogate marker for clinical trials of neuroprotective medications. PMID:22216343

  11. Prox1 Regulates the Subtype-Specific Development of Caudal Ganglionic Eminence-Derived GABAergic Cortical Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Young, Allison; Petros, Timothy; Karayannis, Theofanis; McKenzie Chang, Melissa; Lavado, Alfonso; Iwano, Tomohiko; Nakajima, Miho; Taniguchi, Hiroki; Huang, Z. Josh; Heintz, Nathaniel; Oliver, Guillermo; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Machold, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Neurogliaform (RELN+) and bipolar (VIP+) GABAergic interneurons of the mammalian cerebral cortex provide critical inhibition locally within the superficial layers. While these subtypes are known to originate from the embryonic caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE), the specific genetic programs that direct their positioning, maturation, and integration into the cortical network have not been elucidated. Here, we report that in mice expression of the transcription factor Prox1 is selectively maintained in postmitotic CGE-derived cortical interneuron precursors and that loss of Prox1 impairs the integration of these cells into superficial layers. Moreover, Prox1 differentially regulates the postnatal maturation of each specific subtype originating from the CGE (RELN, Calb2/VIP, and VIP). Interestingly, Prox1 promotes the maturation of CGE-derived interneuron subtypes through intrinsic differentiation programs that operate in tandem with extrinsically driven neuronal activity-dependent pathways. Thus Prox1 represents the first identified transcription factor specifically required for the embryonic and postnatal acquisition of CGE-derived cortical interneuron properties. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Despite the recognition that 30% of GABAergic cortical interneurons originate from the caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE), to date, a specific transcriptional program that selectively regulates the development of these populations has not yet been identified. Moreover, while CGE-derived interneurons display unique patterns of tangential and radial migration and preferentially populate the superficial layers of the cortex, identification of a molecular program that controls these events is lacking. Here, we demonstrate that the homeodomain transcription factor Prox1 is expressed in postmitotic CGE-derived cortical interneuron precursors and is maintained into adulthood. We found that Prox1 function is differentially required during both embryonic and postnatal stages of development to

  12. Continuous monitoring of cortical perfusion by laser Doppler flowmetry in ventilated patients with head injury.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, P J; Smielewski, P; Czosnyka, M; Pickard, J D

    1994-01-01

    A method for monitoring cortical perfusion by laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) in the neurointensive care unit is described. Out of 22 patients with head injuries, reliable and long term recordings were obtained in 16. Laser Doppler flowmetry registered changes in cortical microcirculatory flow in response to spontaneous waves of raised intracranial pressure, and to therapeutic manoeuvres that altered the cerebral perfusion pressure. Comparisons of variations in flux signal with cerebral perfusion pressure provided an indication of the autoregulatory state of the cortical microcirculation, and analysis of raw LDF data demonstrated an autoregulatory breakpoint of cerebral perfusion pressure of 58 mm Hg, below which cortical perfusion failed. Although middle cerebral artery flow velocities were generally tightly coupled with LDF signal changes, episodes of uncoupling were seen. The potential uses and limitations of LDF in the neurointensive care setting are discussed. Images PMID:7964816

  13. Layer III neurons control synchronized waves in the immature cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Namiki, Shigehiro; Norimoto, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Chiaki; Nakatani, Kei; Matsuki, Norio; Ikegaya, Yuji

    2013-01-16

    Correlated spiking activity prevails in immature cortical networks and is believed to contribute to neuronal circuit maturation; however, its spatiotemporal organization is not fully understood. Using wide-field calcium imaging from acute whole-brain slices of rat pups on postnatal days 1-6, we found that correlated spikes were initiated in the anterior part of the lateral entorhinal cortex and propagated anteriorly to the frontal cortex and posteriorly to the medial entorhinal cortex, forming traveling waves that engaged almost the entire cortex. The waves were blocked by ionotropic glutamatergic receptor antagonists but not by GABAergic receptor antagonists. During wave events, glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic inputs were balanced and induced UP state-like depolarization. Magnified monitoring with cellular resolution revealed that the layer III neurons were first activated when the waves were initiated. Consistent with this finding, layer III contained a larger number of neurons that were autonomously active, even under a blockade of synaptic transmission. During wave propagation, the layer III neurons constituted a leading front of the wave. The waves did not enter the parasubiculum; however, in some cases, they were reflected at the parasubicular border and propagated back in the opposite direction. During this reflection process, the layer III neurons in the medial entorhinal cortex maintained persistent activity. Thus, our data emphasize the role of layer III in early network behaviors and provide insight into the circuit mechanisms through which cerebral cortical networks maturate.

  14. Neurodynamics of somatosensory cortices studied by magnetoencephelography.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Kuniharu

    2013-09-01

    From the viewpoint of statistical inverse problems, identification of transfer functions in feedback models is applied for neurodynamics of somatosensory cortices, and brain communication among active regions can be expressed in terms of transfer functions. However, brain activities have been investigated mainly by averaged waveforms in the conventional magnetoencephalography analysis, and thus brain communication among active regions has not yet been identified. It is shown that brain communication among two more than three brain regions is determined, when fluctuations related to concatenate averaged waveforms can be obtained by using a suitable blind source separation method. In blind identification of feedback model, some transfer functions or their impulse responses between output variables of current dipoles corresponding to active regions are identified from reconstructed time series data of fluctuations by the method of inverse problem. Neurodynamics of somatosensory cortices in 5 Hz median nerve stimuli can be shown by cerebral communication among active regions of somatosensory cortices in terms of impulse responses of feedback model.

  15. Decision by division: making cortical maps

    PubMed Central

    Rakic, Pasko; Ayoub, Albert E.; Breunig, Joshua J.; Dominguez, Martin H.

    2013-01-01

    In the past three decades, mounting evidence has revealed that specification of the basic cortical neuronal classes starts at the time of their final mitotic divisions in the embryonic proliferative zones. This early cell determination continues during the migration of the newborn neurons across the widening cerebral wall, and it is in the cortical plate that they attain their final positions and establish species-specific cytoarchitectonic areas. Here, the development and evolutionary expansion of the neocortex is viewed in the context of the radial unit and protomap hypotheses. A broad spectrum of findings gave insight into the pathogenesis of cortical malformations and the biological bases for the evolution of the modern human neocortex. We examine the history and evidence behind the concept of early specification of neurons and provide the latest compendium of genes and signaling molecules involved in neuronal fate determination and specification. PMID:19380167

  16. Targeting circuits

    PubMed Central

    Rajasethupathy, Priyamvada; Ferenczi, Emily; Deisseroth, Karl

    2017-01-01

    Current optogenetic methodology enables precise inhibition or excitation of neural circuits, spanning timescales as needed from the acute (milliseconds) to the chronic (many days or more), for experimental modulation of network activity and animal behavior. Such broad temporal versatility, unique to optogenetic control, is particularly powerful when combined with brain activity measurements that span both acute and chronic timescales as well. This enables, for instance, the study of adaptive circuit dynamics across the intact brain, and tuning interventions to match activity patterns naturally observed during behavior in the same individual. Although the impact of this approach has been greater on basic research than on clinical translation, it is natural to ask if specific neural circuit activity patterns discovered to be involved in controlling adaptive or maladaptive behaviors could become targets for treatment of neuropsychiatric diseases. Here we consider the landscape of such ideas related to therapeutic targeting of circuit dynamics, taking note of developments not only in optical but also in ultrasonic, magnetic, and thermal methods. We note the recent emergence of first-in-kind optogenetically-guided clinical outcomes, as well as opportunities related to the integration of interventions and readouts spanning diverse circuit-physiology, molecular, and behavioral modalities. PMID:27104976

  17. Cerebral cortex: an MRI-based study of volume and variance with age and sex.

    PubMed

    Carne, Ross P; Vogrin, Simon; Litewka, Lucas; Cook, Mark J

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine quantitative differences in lobar cerebral cortical volumes in a healthy adult population. Quantitative volumetric MRI of whole brain, cerebral and cerebellar volumes was performed in a cross-sectional analysis of 97 normal volunteers, with segmented frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital cortical volumes measured in a subgroup of 60 subjects, 30 male and 30 female, matched for age and sex. The right cerebral hemisphere was larger than the left across the study group with a small (<1%) but significant difference in symmetry (P<0.001). No difference was found between volumes of right and left cerebellar hemispheres. Rightward cerebral cortical asymmetry (right larger than left) was found to be significant across all lobes except parietal. Males had greater cerebral, cerebellar and cerebral cortical lobar volumes than females. Larger male cerebral cortical volumes were seen in all lobes except for left parietal. Females had greater left parietal to left cerebral hemisphere and smaller left temporal to left cerebral hemisphere ratios. There was a mild reduction in cerebral volumes with age, more marked in males. This study confirms and augments past work indicating underlying structural asymmetries in the human brain, and provides further evidence that brain structures in humans are differentially sensitive to the effects of both age and sex.

  18. Sex differences of human cortical blood flow and energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Aanerud, Joel; Borghammer, Per; Rodell, Anders; Jónsdottir, Kristjana Y; Gjedde, Albert

    2017-07-01

    Brain energy metabolism is held to reflect energy demanding processes in neuropil related to the density and activity of synapses. There is recent evidence that men have higher density of synapses in temporal cortex than women. One consequence of these differences would be different rates of cortical energy turnover and blood flow in men and women. To test the hypotheses that rates of oxygen consumption (CMRO2) and cerebral blood flow are higher in men than in women in regions of cerebral cortex, and that the differences persist with aging, we used positron emission tomography to determine cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen as functions of age in healthy volunteers of both sexes. Cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen did not change with age for either sex and there were no differences of mean values of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen between men and women in cerebral cortex. Women had significant decreases of cerebral blood flow as function of age in frontal and parietal lobes. Young women had significantly higher cerebral blood flow than men in frontal and temporal lobes, but these differences had disappeared at age 65. The absent sex difference of cerebral energy turnover suggests that the known differences of synaptic density between the sexes are counteracted by opposite differences of individual synaptic activity.

  19. Sensorimotor modulation of human cortical swallowing pathways.

    PubMed

    Hamdy, S; Aziz, Q; Rothwell, J C; Hobson, A; Thompson, D G

    1998-02-01

    1. Transcranial magnetic stimulation over motor areas of cerebral cortex in man can activate short latency bilateral cortical projections to the pharynx and oesophagus. In the present paper we investigate the interaction between pathways from each hemisphere and explore how activity in these pathways is modulated by afferent feedback from the face, pharynx and oesophagus. 2. Comparison of unilateral and bilateral stimulation (using interstimulus intervals (ISIs) of 1, 5 or 10 ms between shocks) showed spatial summation of responses from each hemisphere at an ISI of 1 ms, indicating that cortical efferents project onto a shared population of target neurones. Such summation was not evident at ISIs of 5 or 10 ms. There was little evidence for transcallosal inhibition of responses from each hemisphere, as described for limb muscles. 3. Single stimuli applied to the vagus nerve in the neck or the supraorbital nerve, which alone produce intermediate (onset 20-30 ms) and long (50-70 ms) latency reflex responses in the pharynx and oesophagus, were used to condition the cortical responses. Compared with rest, responses evoked by cortical stimulation were facilitated when they were timed to coincide with the late part of the reflex. The onset latency was reduced during both parts of the reflex response. No facilitation was observed with subthreshold reflex stimuli. 4. Single electrical stimuli applied to the pharynx or oesophagus had no effect on the response to cortical stimulation. However, trains of stimuli at frequencies varying from 0.2 to 10 Hz decreased the latency of the cortically evoked responses without consistently influencing their amplitudes. The effect was site specific: pharyngeal stimulation shortened both pharyngeal and oesophageal response latencies, whereas oesophageal stimulation shortened only the oesophageal response latencies. 5. Cortical swallowing motor pathways from each hemisphere interact and their excitability is modulated in a site

  20. Sensorimotor modulation of human cortical swallowing pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hamdy, Shaheen; Aziz, Qasim; Rothwell, John C; Hobson, Anthony; Thompson, David G

    1998-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation over motor areas of cerebral cortex in man can activate short latency bilateral cortical projections to the pharynx and oesophagus. In the present paper we investigate the interaction between pathways from each hemisphere and explore how activity in these pathways is modulated by afferent feedback from the face, pharynx and oesophagus.Comparison of unilateral and bilateral stimulation (using interstimulus intervals (ISIs) of 1, 5 or 10 ms between shocks) showed spatial summation of responses from each hemisphere at an ISI of 1 ms, indicating that cortical efferents project onto a shared population of target neurones. Such summation was not evident at ISIs of 5 or 10 ms. There was little evidence for transcallosal inhibition of responses from each hemisphere, as described for limb muscles.Single stimuli applied to the vagus nerve in the neck or the supraorbital nerve, which alone produce intermediate (onset 20-30 ms) and long (50-70 ms) latency reflex responses in the pharynx and oesophagus, were used to condition the cortical responses. Compared with rest, responses evoked by cortical stimulation were facilitated when they were timed to coincide with the late part of the reflex. The onset latency was reduced during both parts of the reflex response. No facilitation was observed with subthreshold reflex stimuli.Single electrical stimuli applied to the pharynx or oesophagus had no effect on the response to cortical stimulation. However, trains of stimuli at frequencies varying from 0.2 to 10 Hz decreased the latency of the cortically evoked responses without consistently influencing their amplitudes. The effect was site specific: pharyngeal stimulation shortened both pharyngeal and oesophageal response latencies, whereas oesophageal stimulation shortened only the oesophageal response latencies.Cortical swallowing motor pathways from each hemisphere interact and their excitability is modulated in a site-specific manner by sensory

  1. Cortical pathways to the mammalian amygdala.

    PubMed

    McDonald, A J

    1998-06-01

    The amygdaloid nuclear complex is critical for producing appropriate emotional and behavioral responses to biologically relevant sensory stimuli. It constitutes an essential link between sensory and limbic areas of the cerebral cortex and subcortical brain regions, such as the hypothalamus, brainstem, and striatum, that are responsible for eliciting emotional and motivational responses. This review summarizes the anatomy and physiology of the cortical pathways to the amygdala in the rat, cat and monkey. Although the basic anatomy of these systems in the cat and monkey was largely delineated in studies conducted during the 1970s and 1980s, detailed information regarding the cortico-amygdalar pathways in the rat was only obtained in the past several years. The purpose of this review is to describe the results of recent studies in the rat and to compare the organization of cortico-amygdalar projections in this species with that seen in the cat and monkey. In all three species visual, auditory, and somatosensory information is transmitted to the amygdala by a series of modality-specific cortico-cortical pathways ("cascades") that originate in the primary sensory cortices and flow toward higher order association areas. The cortical areas in the more distal portions of these cascades have stronger and more extensive projections to the amygdala than the more proximal areas. In all three species olfactory and gustatory/visceral information has access to the amygdala at an earlier stage of cortical processing than visual, auditory and somatosensory information. There are also important polysensory cortical inputs to the mammalian amygdala from the prefrontal and hippocampal regions. Whereas the overall organization of cortical pathways is basically similar in all mammalian species, there is anatomical evidence which suggests that there are important differences in the extent of convergence of cortical projections in the primate versus the nonprimate amygdala.

  2. Cortical Neural Computation by Discrete Results Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Castejon, Carlos; Nuñez, Angel

    2016-01-01

    One of the most challenging problems we face in neuroscience is to understand how the cortex performs computations. There is increasing evidence that the power of the cortical processing is produced by populations of neurons forming dynamic neuronal ensembles. Theoretical proposals and multineuronal experimental studies have revealed that ensembles of neurons can form emergent functional units. However, how these ensembles are implicated in cortical computations is still a mystery. Although cell ensembles have been associated with brain rhythms, the functional interaction remains largely unclear. It is still unknown how spatially distributed neuronal activity can be temporally integrated to contribute to cortical computations. A theoretical explanation integrating spatial and temporal aspects of cortical processing is still lacking. In this Hypothesis and Theory article, we propose a new functional theoretical framework to explain the computational roles of these ensembles in cortical processing. We suggest that complex neural computations underlying cortical processing could be temporally discrete and that sensory information would need to be quantized to be computed by the cerebral cortex. Accordingly, we propose that cortical processing is produced by the computation of discrete spatio-temporal functional units that we have called "Discrete Results" (Discrete Results Hypothesis). This hypothesis represents a novel functional mechanism by which information processing is computed in the cortex. Furthermore, we propose that precise dynamic sequences of "Discrete Results" is the mechanism used by the cortex to extract, code, memorize and transmit neural information. The novel "Discrete Results" concept has the ability to match the spatial and temporal aspects of cortical processing. We discuss the possible neural underpinnings of these functional computational units and describe the empirical evidence supporting our hypothesis. We propose that fast-spiking (FS

  3. Cortical Neural Computation by Discrete Results Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Castejon, Carlos; Nuñez, Angel

    2016-01-01

    One of the most challenging problems we face in neuroscience is to understand how the cortex performs computations. There is increasing evidence that the power of the cortical processing is produced by populations of neurons forming dynamic neuronal ensembles. Theoretical proposals and multineuronal experimental studies have revealed that ensembles of neurons can form emergent functional units. However, how these ensembles are implicated in cortical computations is still a mystery. Although cell ensembles have been associated with brain rhythms, the functional interaction remains largely unclear. It is still unknown how spatially distributed neuronal activity can be temporally integrated to contribute to cortical computations. A theoretical explanation integrating spatial and temporal aspects of cortical processing is still lacking. In this Hypothesis and Theory article, we propose a new functional theoretical framework to explain the computational roles of these ensembles in cortical processing. We suggest that complex neural computations underlying cortical processing could be temporally discrete and that sensory information would need to be quantized to be computed by the cerebral cortex. Accordingly, we propose that cortical processing is produced by the computation of discrete spatio-temporal functional units that we have called “Discrete Results” (Discrete Results Hypothesis). This hypothesis represents a novel functional mechanism by which information processing is computed in the cortex. Furthermore, we propose that precise dynamic sequences of “Discrete Results” is the mechanism used by the cortex to extract, code, memorize and transmit neural information. The novel “Discrete Results” concept has the ability to match the spatial and temporal aspects of cortical processing. We discuss the possible neural underpinnings of these functional computational units and describe the empirical evidence supporting our hypothesis. We propose that fast

  4. Trigger Circuit.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A wire of Nitinol can be stretched up to a given amount and will remain in this stretched state until heated to a critical temperature. When heated...circuit of this invention provides a current pulse for the required time period to heat the Nitinol wire to its critical temperature to thereby restore the...wire to its original length. The circuit includes a high power transistor which is gated on for a controlled time to provide the required power to heat the Nitinol wire to its critical temperature. (Author)

  5. MULTIPLIER CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Chase, R.L.

    1963-05-01

    An electronic fast multiplier circuit utilizing a transistor controlled voltage divider network is presented. The multiplier includes a stepped potentiometer in which solid state or transistor switches are substituted for mechanical wipers in order to obtain electronic switching that is extremely fast as compared to the usual servo-driven mechanical wipers. While this multiplier circuit operates as an approximation and in steps to obtain a voltage that is the product of two input voltages, any desired degree of accuracy can be obtained with the proper number of increments and adjustment of parameters. (AEC)

  6. Change in the cortical complexity of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 appears earlier than clinical symptoms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tzu-Yun; Jao, Chii-Wen; Soong, Bing-Wen; Wu, Hsiu-Mei; Shyu, Kuo-Kai; Wang, Po-Shan; Wu, Yu-Te

    2015-01-01

    Patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) have exhibited cerebral cortical involvement and various mental deficits in previous studies. Clinically, conventional measurements, such as the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and electroencephalography (EEG), are insensitive to cerebral cortical involvement and mental deficits associated with SCA3, particularly at the early stage of the disease. We applied a three-dimensional fractal dimension (3D-FD) method, which can be used to quantify the shape complexity of cortical folding, in assessing cortical degeneration. We evaluated 48 genetically confirmed SCA3 patients by employing clinical scales and magnetic resonance imaging and using 50 healthy participants as a control group. According to the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA), the SCA3 patients were diagnosed with cortical dysfunction in the cerebellar cortex; however, no significant difference in the cerebral cortex was observed according to the patients' MMSE ratings. Using the 3D-FD method, we determined that cortical involvement was more extensive than involvement of traditional olivopontocerebellar regions and the corticocerebellar system. Moreover, the significant correlation between decreased 3D-FD values and disease duration may indicate atrophy of the cerebellar cortex and cerebral cortex in SCA3 patients. The change of the cerebral complexity in the SCA3 patients can be detected throughout the disease duration, especially it becomes substantial at the late stage of the disease. Furthermore, we determined that atrophy of the cerebral cortex may occur earlier than changes in MMSE scores and EEG signals.

  7. Opposite effects of mu and delta opioid receptor agonists on excitatory propagation induced in rat somatosensory and insular cortices by dental pulp stimulation.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Eiko; Koyanagi, Yuko; Nakamura, Hiroko; Horinuki, Eri; Oi, Yoshiyuki; Kobayashi, Masayuki

    2016-08-15

    The insular cortex (IC) contributes to nociceptive information processing. IC neurons express opioid receptors, including the mu (MOR), kappa (KOR), and delta (DOR) subtypes. Opioidergic agonists suppress excitatory synaptic transmission in the cerebral cortex. In addition, morphine injection into the IC reduces responses to noxious thermal stimuli. However, the mechanisms of the opioid-dependent modulation of cortical excitation at the macroscopic level, which bridge the cellular and behavioral findings, have remained unknown. The present in vivo optical imaging study aimed to examine the effects of the agonists of each subtype on cortical excitatory propagation in the IC and the neighboring cortices, the primary (S1) and secondary somatosensory (S2) areas. To assess the opioidergic effects on the cortical circuits, we applied electrical stimulation to the maxillary 1st molar pulp, which induced excitation in the ventral part of S1 and the S2/insular oral region (IOR). The initial excitatory response was observed 10-14ms after stimulation, and then excitation propagated concentrically. DAMGO (10-100μM), an MOR agonist, suppressed the amplitude of cortical excitation and shrank the maximum excitation areas in S1 and S2/IOR. In contrast, 10-100μM DPDPE, a DOR agonist, increased the amplitude of excitation and expanded the area of maximum excitation. U50488 (10-100μM), a KOR agonist, had little effect on cortical excitation. These results suggest that MOR-induced suppression of excitatory propagation in the IC is an underlying mechanism of the powerful analgesic effects of MOR agonists. In contrast, DOR may play a minor role in suppressing acute pain.

  8. Estimation of the effective and functional human cortical connectivity with structural equation modeling and directed transfer function applied to high-resolution EEG.

    PubMed

    Astolfi, Laura; Cincotti, Febo; Mattia, Donatella; Salinari, Serenella; Babiloni, Claudio; Basilisco, Alessandra; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Ding, Lei; Ni, Ying; He, Bin; Marciani, Maria Grazia; Babiloni, Fabio

    2004-12-01

    Different brain imaging devices are presently available to provide images of the human functional cortical activity, based on hemodynamic, metabolic or electromagnetic measurements. However, static images of brain regions activated during particular tasks do not convey the information of how these regions are interconnected. The concept of brain connectivity plays a central role in the neuroscience, and different definitions of connectivity, functional and effective, have been adopted in literature. While the functional connectivity is defined as the temporal coherence among the activities of different brain areas, the effective connectivity is defined as the simplest brain circuit that would produce the same temporal relationship as observed experimentally among cortical sites. The structural equation modeling (SEM) is the most used method to estimate effective connectivity in neuroscience, and its typical application is on data related to brain hemodynamic behavior tested by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), whereas the directed transfer function (DTF) method is a frequency-domain approach based on both a multivariate autoregressive (MVAR) modeling of time series and on the concept of Granger causality. This study presents advanced methods for the estimation of cortical connectivity by applying SEM and DTF on the cortical signals estimated from high-resolution electroencephalography (EEG) recordings, since these signals exhibit a higher spatial resolution than conventional cerebral electromagnetic measures. To estimate correctly the cortical signals, we used a subject's multicompartment head model (scalp, skull, dura mater, cortex) constructed from individual MRI, a distributed source model and a regularized linear inverse source estimates of cortical current density. Before the application of SEM and DTF methodology to the cortical waveforms estimated from high-resolution EEG data, we performed a simulation study, in which different main factors

  9. Astrocytes regulate cortical state switching in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Poskanzer, Kira E.; Yuste, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    The role of astrocytes in neuronal function has received increasing recognition, but disagreement remains about their function at the circuit level. Here we use in vivo two-photon calcium imaging of neocortical astrocytes while monitoring the activity state of the local neuronal circuit electrophysiologically and optically. We find that astrocytic calcium activity precedes spontaneous circuit shifts to the slow-oscillation–dominated state, a neocortical rhythm characterized by synchronized neuronal firing and important for sleep and memory. Further, we show that optogenetic activation of astrocytes switches the local neuronal circuit to this slow-oscillation state. Finally, using two-photon imaging of extracellular glutamate, we find that astrocytic transients in glutamate co-occur with shifts to the synchronized state and that optogenetically activated astrocytes can generate these glutamate transients. We conclude that astrocytes can indeed trigger the low-frequency state of a cortical circuit by altering extracellular glutamate, and therefore play a causal role in the control of cortical synchronizations. PMID:27122314

  10. Cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    Rénia, Laurent; Wu Howland, Shanshan; Claser, Carla; Charlotte Gruner, Anne; Suwanarusk, Rossarin; Hui Teo, Teck; Russell, Bruce; Ng, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is the most severe pathology caused by the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. The pathogenic mechanisms leading to cerebral malaria are still poorly defined as studies have been hampered by limited accessibility to human tissues. Nevertheless, histopathology of post-mortem human tissues and mouse models of cerebral malaria have indicated involvement of the blood-brain barrier in cerebral malaria. In contrast to viruses and bacteria, malaria parasites do not infiltrate and infect the brain parenchyma. Instead, rupture of the blood-brain barrier occurs and may lead to hemorrhages resulting in neurological alterations. Here, we review the most recent findings from human studies and mouse models on the interactions of malaria parasites and the blood-brain barrier, shedding light on the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria, which may provide directions for possible interventions. PMID:22460644

  11. Local connections of excitatory neurons in motor-associated cortical areas of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    In spite of recent progress in brain sciences, the local circuit of the cerebral neocortex, including motor areas, still remains elusive. Morphological works on excitatory cortical circuitry from thalamocortical (TC) afferents to corticospinal neurons (CSNs) in motor-associated areas are reviewed here. First, TC axons of motor thalamic nuclei have been re-examined by the single-neuron labeling method. There are middle layer (ML)-targeting and layer (L) 1-preferring TC axon types in motor-associated areas, being analogous to core and matrix types, respectively, of Jones (1998) in sensory areas. However, the arborization of core-like motor TC axons spreads widely and disregards the columnar structure that is the basis of information processing in sensory areas, suggesting that motor areas adopt a different information-processing framework such as area-wide laminar organization. Second, L5 CSNs receive local excitatory inputs not only from L2/3 pyramidal neurons but also from ML spiny neurons, the latter directly processing cerebellar information of core-like TC neurons (TCNs). In contrast, basal ganglia information is targeted to apical dendrites of L2/3 and L5 pyramidal neurons through matrix TCNs. Third, L6 corticothalamic neurons (CTNs) are most densely innervated by ML spiny neurons located just above CTNs. Since CTNs receive only weak connections from L2/3 and L5 pyramidal neurons, the TC recurrent circuit composed of TCNs, ML spiny neurons and CTNs appears relatively independent of the results of processing in L2/3 and L5. It is proposed that two circuits sharing the same TC projection and ML neurons are embedded in the neocortex: one includes L2/3 and L5 neurons, processes afferent information in a feedforward way and sends the processed information to other cortical areas and subcortical regions; and the other circuit participates in a dynamical system of the TC recurrent circuit and may serve as the basis of autonomous activity of the neocortex. PMID

  12. Transient Cortical Blindness after Cardiac Catheterization with Iobitridol

    PubMed Central

    Yazici, Mehmet; Ozhan, Hakan; Kinay, Ozan; Kilicaslan, Baris; Karaca, Mustafa; Cece, Hasan; Biceroglu, Serdar; Ergene, Oktay

    2007-01-01

    The occurrence rate of transient cortical blindness after contrast media exposure has been reported to be as high as 1% to 4% after cerebral or vertebral angiography, but such blindness has been described in only a few cases of coronary angiography with modern, non-ionic, low-osmolality radio-contrast agents. In this study, we present a case of abrupt cortical blindness after exposure to contrast media during diagnostic coronary angiography; to our knowledge, this is the 1st report in the medical literature that describes transient cortical blindness after iobitridol use. PMID:17948092

  13. A cortical-hippocampal-cortical loop of information processing during memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Rothschild, Gideon; Eban, Elad; Frank, Loren M

    2017-02-01

    Hippocampal replay during sharp-wave ripple events (SWRs) is thought to drive memory consolidation in hippocampal and cortical circuits. Changes in neocortical activity can precede SWR events, but whether and how these changes influence the content of replay remains unknown. Here we show that during sleep there is a rapid cortical-hippocampal-cortical loop of information flow around the times of SWRs. We recorded neural activity in auditory cortex (AC) and hippocampus of rats as they learned a sound-guided task and during sleep. We found that patterned activation in AC precedes and predicts the subsequent content of hippocampal activity during SWRs, while hippocampal patterns during SWRs predict subsequent AC activity. Delivering sounds during sleep biased AC activity patterns, and sound-biased AC patterns predicted subsequent hippocampal activity. These findings suggest that activation of specific cortical representations during sleep influences the identity of the memories that are consolidated into long-term stores.

  14. Whisker stimulation metabolically activates thalamus following cortical transplantation but not following cortical ablation.

    PubMed

    Ciricillo, S P; Hill, M P; Gonzalez, M F; Smalley, S; Morton, M T; Sharp, F R

    1994-04-01

    Local cerebral glucose utilization was assessed during whisker stimulation by 2-deoxyglucose autoradiography. Whisker stimulation increased local cerebral glucose utilization in brainstem, thalamus and whisker sensory cortex in normal rats. Whereas whisker stimulation increased glucose metabolism in brainstem, whisker stimulation failed to increase glucose metabolism in thalamus of rats that had whisker sensory cortex ablated 5 h to five weeks previously. The failure of whisker stimulation to activate thalamus after cortical ablations was probably not due to decreased cortical input to thalamus because whisker stimulation activated thalamus after large cortical tetrodotoxin injections. Failure of whisker stimulation to activate thalamus at early times (5 h and one day) after cortical ablations was not due to thalamic neuronal death, since it takes days to weeks for axotomized thalamic neurons to die. The failure of whisker stimulation to activate thalamus at early times after cortical ablations was likely due to the failure of trigeminal brainstem neurons that project to thalamus to activate axotomized thalamic neurons. This might occur because of synaptic retraction, glial stripping or inhibition of trigeminal brainstem synapses onto thalamic neurons. The thalamic neuronal death that occurs over the days and weeks following cortical ablations was associated with thalamic hypometabolism. This is consistent with the idea that the thalamic neurons die because of the absence of a cortically derived trophic factor, since the excitotoxic thalamic cell death that occurs following cortical kainate injections is associated with thalamic hypermetabolism. The glucose metabolism of parts of the host thalamus was higher and the glucose metabolism in surrounding nuclei lower than the normal side of thalamus in rats that sat quietly and had fetal cortex transplants placed into cavities in whisker sensory cortex five to 16 weeks previously. Whisker stimulation in these subjects

  15. Phase Difference between Model Cortical Areas Determines Level of Information Transfer

    PubMed Central

    ter Wal, Marije; Tiesinga, Paul H.

    2017-01-01

    Communication between cortical sites is mediated by long-range synaptic connections. However, these connections are relatively static, while everyday cognitive tasks demand a fast and flexible routing of information in the brain. Synchronization of activity between distant cortical sites has been proposed as the mechanism underlying such a dynamic communication structure. Here, we study how oscillatory activity affects the excitability and input-output relation of local cortical circuits and how it alters the transmission of information between cortical circuits. To this end, we develop model circuits showing fast oscillations by the PING mechanism, of which the oscillatory characteristics can be altered. We identify conditions for synchronization between two brain circuits and show that the level of intercircuit coherence and the phase difference is set by the frequency difference between the intrinsic oscillations. We show that the susceptibility of the circuits to inputs, i.e., the degree of change in circuit output following input pulses, is not uniform throughout the oscillation period and that both firing rate, frequency and power are differentially modulated by inputs arriving at different phases. As a result, an appropriate phase difference between the circuits is critical for the susceptibility windows of the circuits in the network to align and for information to be efficiently transferred. We demonstrate that changes in synchrony and phase difference can be used to set up or abolish information transfer in a network of cortical circuits. PMID:28232796

  16. Neuronal networks and mediators of cortical neurovascular coupling responses in normal and altered brain states.

    PubMed

    Lecrux, C; Hamel, E

    2016-10-05

    Brain imaging techniques that use vascular signals to map changes in neuronal activity, such as blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging, rely on the spatial and temporal coupling between changes in neurophysiology and haemodynamics, known as 'neurovascular coupling (NVC)'. Accordingly, NVC responses, mapped by changes in brain haemodynamics, have been validated for different stimuli under physiological conditions. In the cerebral cortex, the networks of excitatory pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons generating the changes in neural activity and the key mediators that signal to the vascular unit have been identified for some incoming afferent pathways. The neural circuits recruited by whisker glutamatergic-, basal forebrain cholinergic- or locus coeruleus noradrenergic pathway stimulation were found to be highly specific and discriminative, particularly when comparing the two modulatory systems to the sensory response. However, it is largely unknown whether or not NVC is still reliable when brain states are altered or in disease conditions. This lack of knowledge is surprising since brain imaging is broadly used in humans and, ultimately, in conditions that deviate from baseline brain function. Using the whisker-to-barrel pathway as a model of NVC, we can interrogate the reliability of NVC under enhanced cholinergic or noradrenergic modulation of cortical circuits that alters brain states.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'.

  17. Functioning of Circuits Connecting Thalamus and Cortex.

    PubMed

    Sherman, S Murray

    2017-03-16

    Glutamatergic pathways in thalamus and cortex are divided into two distinct classes: driver, which carries the main information between cells, and modulator, which modifies how driver inputs function. Identifying driver inputs helps to reveal functional computational circuits, and one set of such circuits identified by this approach are cortico-thalamo-cortical (or transthalamic corticocortical) circuits. This, in turn, leads to the conclusion that there are two types of thalamic relay: first order nuclei (such as the lateral geniculate nucleus) that relay driver input from a subcortical source (i.e., retina), and higher order nuclei (such as the pulvinar) which are involved in these transthalamic pathways by relaying driver input from layer 5 of one cortical area to another. This thalamic division is also seen in other sensory pathways and beyond these so that most of thalamus by volume consists of higher-order relays. Many, and perhaps all, direct driver connections between cortical areas are paralleled by an indirect cortico-thalamo-cortical (transthalamic) driver route involving higher order thalamic relays. Such thalamic relays represent a heretofore unappreciated role in cortical functioning, and this assessment challenges and extends conventional views regarding both the role of thalamus and mechanisms of corticocortical communication. Finally, many and perhaps the vast majority of driver inputs relayed through thalamus arrive via branching axons, with extrathalamic targets often being subcortical motor centers. This raises the possibility that inputs relayed by thalamus to cortex also serve as efference copies, and this may represent an important feature of information relayed up the cortical hierarchy via transthalamic circuits. © 2017 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 7:713-739, 2017.

  18. Cortical Interneuron Subtypes Vary in Their Axonal Action Potential Properties.

    PubMed

    Casale, Amanda E; Foust, Amanda J; Bal, Thierry; McCormick, David A

    2015-11-25

    The role of interneurons in cortical microcircuits is strongly influenced by their passive and active electrical properties. Although different types of interneurons exhibit unique electrophysiological properties recorded at the soma, it is not yet clear whether these differences are also manifested in other neuronal compartments. To address this question, we have used voltage-sensitive dye to image the propagation of action potentials into the fine collaterals of axons and dendrites in two of the largest cortical interneuron subtypes in the mouse: fast-spiking interneurons, which are typically basket or chandelier neurons; and somatostatin containing interneurons, which are typically regular spiking Martinotti cells. We found that fast-spiking and somatostatin-expressing interneurons differed in their electrophysiological characteristics along their entire dendrosomatoaxonal extent. The action potentials generated in the somata and axons, including axon collaterals, of somatostatin-expressing interneurons are significantly broader than those generated in the same compartments of fast-spiking inhibitory interneurons. In addition, action potentials back-propagated into the dendrites of somatostatin-expressing interneurons much more readily than fast-spiking interneurons. Pharmacological investigations suggested that axonal action potential repolarization in both cell types depends critically upon Kv1 channels, whereas the axonal and somatic action potentials of somatostatin-expressing interneurons also depend on BK Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels. These results indicate that the two broad classes of interneurons studied here have expressly different subcellular physiological properties, allowing them to perform unique computational roles in cortical circuit operations. Neurons in the cerebral cortex are of two major types: excitatory and inhibitory. The proper balance of excitation and inhibition in the brain is critical for its operation. Neurons contain three main

  19. Cortical Interneuron Subtypes Vary in Their Axonal Action Potential Properties

    PubMed Central

    Casale, Amanda E.; Foust, Amanda J.; Bal, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    The role of interneurons in cortical microcircuits is strongly influenced by their passive and active electrical properties. Although different types of interneurons exhibit unique electrophysiological properties recorded at the soma, it is not yet clear whether these differences are also manifested in other neuronal compartments. To address this question, we have used voltage-sensitive dye to image the propagation of action potentials into the fine collaterals of axons and dendrites in two of the largest cortical interneuron subtypes in the mouse: fast-spiking interneurons, which are typically basket or chandelier neurons; and somatostatin containing interneurons, which are typically regular spiking Martinotti cells. We found that fast-spiking and somatostatin-expressing interneurons differed in their electrophysiological characteristics along their entire dendrosomatoaxonal extent. The action potentials generated in the somata and axons, including axon collaterals, of somatostatin-expressing interneurons are significantly broader than those generated in the same compartments of fast-spiking inhibitory interneurons. In addition, action potentials back-propagated into the dendrites of somatostatin-expressing interneurons much more readily than fast-spiking interneurons. Pharmacological investigations suggested that axonal action potential repolarization in both cell types depends critically upon Kv1 channels, whereas the axonal and somatic action potentials of somatostatin-expressing interneurons also depend on BK Ca2+-activated K+ channels. These results indicate that the two broad classes of interneurons studied here have expressly different subcellular physiological properties, allowing them to perform unique computational roles in cortical circuit operations. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neurons in the cerebral cortex are of two major types: excitatory and inhibitory. The proper balance of excitation and inhibition in the brain is critical for its operation. Neurons

  20. Negative Correlations in Visual Cortical Networks

    PubMed Central

    Chelaru, Mircea I.; Dragoi, Valentin

    2016-01-01

    The amount of information encoded by cortical circuits depends critically on the capacity of nearby neurons to exhibit trial-to-trial (noise) correlations in their responses. Depending on their sign and relationship to signal correlations, noise correlations can either increase or decrease the population code accuracy relative to uncorrelated neuronal firing. Whereas positive noise correlations have been extensively studied using experimental and theoretical tools, the functional role of negative correlations in cortical circuits has remained elusive. We addressed this issue by performing multiple-electrode recording in the superficial layers of the primary visual cortex (V1) of alert monkey. Despite the fact that positive noise correlations decayed exponentially with the difference in the orientation preference between cells, negative correlations were uniformly distributed across the population. Using a statistical model for Fisher Information estimation, we found that a mild increase in negative correlations causes a sharp increase in network accuracy even when mean correlations were held constant. To examine the variables controlling the strength of negative correlations, we implemented a recurrent spiking network model of V1. We found that increasing local inhibition and reducing excitation causes a decrease in the firing rates of neurons while increasing the negative noise correlations, which in turn increase the population signal-to-noise ratio and network accuracy. Altogether, these results contribute to our understanding of the neuronal mechanism involved in the generation of negative correlations and their beneficial impact on cortical circuit function. PMID:25217468

  1. Activity-Dependent Callosal Axon Projections in Neonatal Mouse Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Tagawa, Yoshiaki; Hirano, Tomoo

    2012-01-01

    Callosal axon projections are among the major long-range axonal projections in the mammalian brain. They are formed during the prenatal and early postnatal periods in the mouse, and their development relies on both activity-independent and -dependent mechanisms. In this paper, we review recent findings about the roles of neuronal activity in callosal axon projections. In addition to the well-documented role of sensory-driven neuronal activity, recent studies using in utero electroporation demonstrated an essential role of spontaneous neuronal activity generated in neonatal cortical circuits. Both presynaptic and postsynaptic neuronal activities are critically involved in the axon development. Studies have begun to reveal intracellular signaling pathway which works downstream of neuronal activity. We also review several distinct patterns of neuronal activity observed in the developing cerebral cortex, which might play roles in activity-dependent circuit construction. Such neuronal activity during the neonatal period can be disrupted by genetic factors, such as mutations in ion channels. It has been speculated that abnormal activity caused by such factors may affect activity-dependent circuit construction, leading to some developmental disorders. We discuss a possibility that genetic mutation in ion channels may impair callosal axon projections through an activity-dependent mechanism. PMID:23213574

  2. Aging and Cortical Mechanisms of Speech Perception in Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Patrick C. M.; Jin, James Xumin; Gunasekera, Geshri M.; Abel, Rebekah; Lee, Edward R.; Dhar, Sumitrajit

    2009-01-01

    Spoken language processing in noisy environments, a hallmark of the human brain, is subject to age-related decline, even when peripheral hearing might be intact. The present study examines the cortical cerebral hemodynamics (measured by fMRI) associated with such processing in the aging brain. Younger and older subjects identified single words in…

  3. MR imaging and positron emission tomography of cortical heterotopia

    SciTech Connect

    Bairamian, D.; Di Chiro, G.; Theodore, W.H.; Holmes, M.D.; Dorwart, R.H.; Larson, S.M.

    1985-11-01

    Heterotopia of the gray matter is a developmental malformation in which ectopic cortex is found in the white matter of the brain. A case of a 33-year-old man with cortical heterotopia who had a lifelong history of seizures and psychomotor retardation is reported, including the results of cerebral CT, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography using YF-2-deoxyglucose.

  4. Aging and Cortical Mechanisms of Speech Perception in Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Patrick C. M.; Jin, James Xumin; Gunasekera, Geshri M.; Abel, Rebekah; Lee, Edward R.; Dhar, Sumitrajit

    2009-01-01

    Spoken language processing in noisy environments, a hallmark of the human brain, is subject to age-related decline, even when peripheral hearing might be intact. The present study examines the cortical cerebral hemodynamics (measured by fMRI) associated with such processing in the aging brain. Younger and older subjects identified single words in…

  5. Cortical Reorganization of Language Functioning Following Perinatal Left MCA Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillema, Jan-Mendelt; Byars, Anna W.; Jacola, Lisa M.; Schapiro, Mark B.; Schmithorst, Vince J.; Szaflarski, Jerzy P.; Holland, Scott K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Functional MRI was used to determine differences in patterns of cortical activation between children who suffered perinatal left middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke and healthy children performing a silent verb generation task. Methods: Ten children with prior perinatal left MCA stroke (age 6-16 years) and ten healthy age matched…

  6. Short-Term Variations in Response Distribution to Cortical Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesser, Ronald P.; Lee, Hyang Woon; Webber, W. R. S.; Prince, Barry; Crone, Nathan E.; Miglioretti, Diana L.

    2008-01-01

    Patterns of responses in the cerebral cortex can vary, and are influenced by pre-existing cortical function, bu