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  1. Mrs. Chandrasekhar addresses the media in TRW Media Hospitality Tent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mrs. Lalitha Chandrasekhar (right), wife of the late Indian- American Nobel Laureate Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, addresses the media and other invited guests in the TRW Media Hospitality Tent at the NASA Press Site at KSC as Dr. Alan Bunner, Science Program Director, Structure and Evolution of the Universe, Office of Space Science, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C., looks on. The name 'Chandra,' a shortened version of her husband's name which he preferred among friends and colleagues, was chosen in a contest to rename the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility. 'Chandra' also means 'Moon' or 'luminous' in Sanskrit. The observatory is scheduled to be launched aboard Columbia on Space Shuttle mission STS-93.

  2. Mrs. Chandrasekhar addresses the media in TRW Media Hospitality Tent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mrs. Lalitha Chandrasekhar (at podium), wife of the late Indian- American Nobel Laureate Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, addresses the media and other invited guests in the TRW Media Hospitality Tent at the NASA Press Site at KSC. Other participants in the program (seated facing the audience, left to right) are the winners of the contest to rename the telescope, Jatila van der Veen, academic coordinator and lecturer, Physics Dept., University of Santa Barbara, Calif., and Tyrel Johnson, high school student, Laclede, Idaho; Joanne Maguire, vice-president and general manager, TRW Space & Laser Programs Division; and Dr. Alan Bunner, Science Program Director, Structure and Evolution of the Universe, Office of Space Science, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The name 'Chandra,' a shortened version of Chandrasekhar, was the name the Nobel Laureate preferred among friends and colleagues. 'Chandra' also means 'Moon' or 'luminous' in Sanskrit. The observatory is scheduled to be launched aboard Columbia on Space Shuttle mission STS-93.

  3. Use of Social Media by Western European Hospitals: Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Berben, Sivera AA; Samsom, Melvin; Engelen, Lucien JLPG; Schoonhoven, Lisette

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients increasingly use social media to communicate. Their stories could support quality improvements in participatory health care and could support patient-centered care. Active use of social media by health care institutions could also speed up communication and information provision to patients and their families, thus increasing quality even more. Hospitals seem to be becoming aware of the benefits social media could offer. Data from the United States show that hospitals increasingly use social media, but it is unknown whether and how Western European hospitals use social media. Objective To identify to what extent Western European hospitals use social media. Methods In this longitudinal study, we explored the use of social media by hospitals in 12 Western European countries through an Internet search. We collected data for each country during the following three time periods: April to August 2009, August to December 2010, and April to July 2011. Results We included 873 hospitals from 12 Western European countries, of which 732 were general hospitals and 141 were university hospitals. The number of included hospitals per country ranged from 6 in Luxembourg to 347 in Germany. We found hospitals using social media in all countries. The use of social media increased significantly over time, especially for YouTube (n = 19, 2% to n = 172, 19.7%), LinkedIn (n =179, 20.5% to n = 278, 31.8%), and Facebook (n = 85, 10% to n = 585, 67.0%). Differences in social media usage between the included countries were significant. Conclusions Social media awareness in Western European hospitals is growing, as well as its use. Social media usage differs significantly between countries. Except for the Netherlands and the United Kingdom, the group of hospitals that is using social media remains small. Usage of LinkedIn for recruitment shows the awareness of the potential of social media. Future research is needed to investigate how social media lead to improved health

  4. A predictive model of hospitalization cost after cerebral aneurysm clipping

    PubMed Central

    Bekelis, Kimon; Missios, Symeon; MacKenzie, Todd A.; Labropoulos, Nicos; Roberts, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cost containment is the cornerstone of the Affordable Care Act. Although studies have compared the cost of cerebral aneurysm clipping (CAC) and coiling, they haven’t focused on the identification of drivers of cost after CAC, or the prediction of its magnitude. The objective of the present study was to develop and validate a predictive model of hospitalization cost after CAC. Methods We performed a retrospective study involving CAC patients who were registered in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database from 2005–2010. The two cohorts of ruptured and unruptured aneurysms underwent 1:1 randomization to create derivation and validation subsamples. Regression techniques were used for the creation of a parsimonious predictive model. Results Of the 7,798 patients undergoing CAC, 4,505 (58%) presented with unruptured, and 3,293 (42%) with ruptured aneurysms. The median hospitalization cost was $24,398 (Interquartile Range (IQR), $17,079 – $38,249), and $73,694 (IQR, $46,270 – $115,128) for the two cohorts, respectively. Common drivers of cost identified in the multivariate analyses included: length of stay, number of admission diagnoses and procedures, hospital size and region, and patient income. The models were validated in independent cohorts and demonstrated final R2 very similar to the initial models. The predicted and observed values in the validation cohort demonstrated good correlation. Conclusions This national study identified significant drivers of hospitalization cost after CAC. The presented model can be utilized as an adjunct in the cost containment debate and the creation of data-driven policies. PMID:25583532

  5. Health care and social media platforms in hospitals.

    PubMed

    McCarroll, Michele L; Armbruster, Shannon D; Chung, Jae Eun; Kim, Junghyun; McKenzie, Alissa; von Gruenigen, Vivian E

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this article is to illustrate user characteristics of a hospital's social media structure using analytics and user surveys. A 1-year retrospective analysis was conducted along with an Internet survey of users of the hospital's Facebook, Twitter, and blog. Of the survey respondents (n = 163), 95.7% are female and 4.3% are male; most are ages 50-59 years (31.5%) and 40-49 years (27.8%); and 93.2% are Caucasian. However, the hospital system database revealed 55% female and 37% minority population, respectively. Of the survey respondents, 61.4% reported having a bachelor's degree or higher, whereas only 11.7% reported having a high school degree/equivalent or lower. However, within the hospital patient databases, 93% of patients have a high school degree/equivalent or lower and only 3% have a bachelor's degree or higher in our women's services population. Social media were used to seek personal health information 68.7% (n = 112), to learn about hospital programming 27.6% (n = 45), and to seek family health information 25.2% (n = 41). Respondents younger than 49 years of age were more likely to seek personal health information using social media compared to those 50 years of age and older (p = .02). Respondents with a bachelor's degree or higher education were statistically less likely to search for physician information compared to those less educated individuals (p = .04). We conclude that social media may play an important role in personal health information, especially for young female respondents; however, the survey provides strong evidence that further research is needed to ensure that social network sites provided by hospitals are reaching the full spectrum of health system patients.

  6. The Effect of Otitis Media on Articulation in Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Vyver, Marguerite; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A study involving 20 Afrikaans-speaking children with cerebral palsy found that recurrent otitis media in early childhood had a negative effect on articulation abilities of the 7 to 11-year-old children but that other factors such as intelligence also played a role. (JDD)

  7. Media coverage and hospital notifications: Correlation analysis and optimal media impact duration to manage a pandemic.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qinling; Tang, Sanyi; Gabriele, Sandra; Wu, Jianhong

    2016-02-07

    News reporting has the potential to modify a community's knowledge of emerging infectious diseases and affect peoples' attitudes and behavior. Here we developed a quantitative approach to evaluate the effects of media on such behavior. Statistically significant correlations between the number of new hospital notifications, during the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza epidemic in the Shaanxi province of China, and the number of daily news items added to eight major websites were found from Pearson correlation and cross-correlation analyses. We also proposed a novel model to examine the implication for transmission dynamics of these correlations. The model incorporated the media impact function into the intensity of infection, and enhanced the traditional epidemic SEIR model with the addition of media dynamics. We used a nonlinear least squares estimation to identify the best-fit parameter values in the model from the observed data. We also carried out the uncertainty and sensitivity analyses to determine key parameters during early phase of the disease outbreak for the final outcome of the outbreak with media impact. The findings confirm the importance of responses by individuals to the media reports, with behavior changes having important consequence for the emerging infectious disease control. Therefore, for mitigating emerging infectious diseases, media reports should be focused on how to guide people's behavioral changes, which are critical for limiting the spread of disease.

  8. Social media: how hospitals use it, and opportunities for future use.

    PubMed

    Richter, Jason P; Muhlestein, David B; Wilks, Chrisanne E A

    2014-01-01

    When used effectively, social media benefits hospitals through increased revenue, employee recruitment, and increased customer satisfaction. Although 72% of adults who use the Internet engage in social media, little is known about its prevalence among hospitals and the ways in which hospitals use it. We examined hospital characteristics associated with social media use and how U.S. hospitals use Facebook. Through analysis of websites and Facebook pages, we found that seven in 10 hospitals use social media and that 9% of hospitals with a Facebook page do not provide a link to it from their web page. The odds of social media use were greater in large, urban, nonprofit hospitals; at hospitals affiliated with universities or health systems; and at hospitals that emphasize quality metrics or educational information. Hospitals use Facebook as a dissemination strategy to educate consumers, acknowledge staff, and share news of the hospital's awards. However, the majority of hospitals do not actively engage consumers on Facebook pages. We conclude that this lack of engagement is a lost opportunity to enhance customer service, improve quality of care, and build loyalty. For hospital executives, we illustrate that Facebook is underutilized and that considerable opportunity exists for consumer engagement at a low cost. For policymakers, there is a greater use of social media by nonprofit hospitals, compared to for-profit facilities. As Facebook is most commonly used as an educational tool, it is another example of nonprofit hospitals' heightened focus on health promotion and disease prevention.

  9. Conversations with the community: the Methodist Hospital System's experience with social media.

    PubMed

    Angelle, Denny; Rose, Clare L

    2011-01-01

    The Methodist Hospital System has maintained a social media presence on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube since 2009. After initial unofficial excursions into the world of social media, we discovered that social media can be a useful tool to extend a conversation with our patients and the community at large and share our hospital's culture with a larger base of like-minded people. But with this new power comes a heightened responsibility--platforms that can potentially reach millions of viewers and readers also provide a potential for misuse that can jeopardize patient privacy and place hospitals at risk. Because of their unique restrictions, even hospitals that use the tools regularly have much left to learn about social media. With constant monitoring and stewardship and a commitment to educating staff, hospitals can effectively use social media tools for marketing and education.

  10. "Social Media has Opened a World of 'Open communication:'" experiences of Adults with Cerebral Palsy who use Augmentative and Alternative Communication and Social Media.

    PubMed

    Caron, Jessica; Light, Janice

    2016-01-01

    An online focus group was used to investigate the experiences of nine individuals with cerebral palsy who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) and social media. Information was gathered related to (a) advantages of social media, (b) disadvantages of social media, (c) barriers to successful use, (d) supports to successful use, and (e) recommendations for other individuals using AAC, support personnel, policy makers, and technology developers. Participants primarily chose to focus on social media as a beneficial tool and viewed it as an important form of communication. The participants did describe barriers to social media use (e.g., technology). Despite barriers, all the participants in this study took an active role in learning to use social media. The results are discussed as they relate to themes and with reference to published literature.

  11. Usability testing of gaming and social media applications for stroke and cerebral palsy upper limb rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Bulmaro A; Hilderman, Courtney G E; Hung, Chai-Ting; Shirzad, Navid; Van der Loos, H F Machiel

    2014-01-01

    As part of the FEATHERS (Functional Engagement in Assisted Therapy Through Exercise Robotics) project, two motion tracking and one social networking applications were developed for upper limb rehabilitation of stroke survivors and teenagers with cerebral palsy. The project aims to improve the engagement of clients during therapy by using video games and a social media platform. The applications allow users to control a cursor on a personal computer through bimanual motions, and to interact with their peers and therapists through the social media. The tracking applications use either a Microsoft Kinect or a PlayStation Eye camera, and the social media application was developed on Facebook. This paper presents a usability testing of these applications that was conducted with therapists from two rehabilitation clinics. The "Cognitive Walkthrough" and "Think Aloud" methods were used. The objectives of the study were to investigate the ease of use and potential issues or improvements of the applications, as well as the factors that facilitate and impede the adoption of technology in current rehabilitation programs.

  12. Cerebral infarction in diabetes: Clinical pattern, stroke subtypes, and predictors of in-hospital mortality

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià; Rivas, Antoni; García-Eroles, Luis; de Marcos, Lourdes; Massons, Joan; Oliveres, Montserrat

    2005-01-01

    Background To compare the characteristics and prognostic features of ischemic stroke in patients with diabetes and without diabetes, and to determine the independent predictors of in-hospital mortality in people with diabetes and ischemic stroke. Methods Diabetes was diagnosed in 393 (21.3%) of 1,840 consecutive patients with cerebral infarction included in a prospective stroke registry over a 12-year period. Demographic characteristics, cardiovascular risk factors, clinical events, stroke subtypes, neuroimaging data, and outcome in ischemic stroke patients with and without diabetes were compared. Predictors of in-hospital mortality in diabetic patients with ischemic stroke were assessed by multivariate analysis. Results People with diabetes compared to people without diabetes presented more frequently atherothrombotic stroke (41.2% vs 27%) and lacunar infarction (35.1% vs 23.9%) (P < 0.01). The in-hospital mortality in ischemic stroke patients with diabetes was 12.5% and 14.6% in those without (P = NS). Ischemic heart disease, hyperlipidemia, subacute onset, 85 years old or more, atherothrombotic and lacunar infarcts, and thalamic topography were independently associated with ischemic stroke in patients with diabetes, whereas predictors of in-hospital mortality included the patient's age, decreased consciousness, chronic nephropathy, congestive heart failure and atrial fibrillation Conclusion Ischemic stroke in people with diabetes showed a different clinical pattern from those without diabetes, with atherothrombotic stroke and lacunar infarcts being more frequent. Clinical factors indicative of the severity of ischemic stroke available at onset have a predominant influence upon in-hospital mortality and may help clinicians to assess prognosis more accurately. PMID:15833108

  13. [Cerebral toxoplasmosis during AIDS in the infectious diseases department of Point-G Teaching Hospital, Bamako, Mali].

    PubMed

    Goïta, D; Karambe, M; Dembélé, J P; Sogoba, D; Sidibé, A F; Diaby, S; Cisse, I A; Fongoro, S; Dao, S

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral toxoplasmosis is common opportunistic infections of central nervous system in AIDS. It occurs most often in case of severe immunosuppression. The aim of this study is to investigate the general characteristics of cerebral toxoplasmosis during HIV infection and AIDS in hospital area in Bamako. It is a retrospective study of 5 years (form January 2001 to December 2005), conducted in the infectious diseases department of Point G Teaching Hospital of Bamako. It concerned all patients infected with HIV, hospitalized for cerebral toxoplasmosis. The diagnosis of cerebral toxoplasmosis was based on clinical, C T and therapeutic arguments. A total of 745 patients investigated, 26 met cerebral toxoplasmosis diagnostic criteria (14 men and 12 women). The rate of cerebral toxoplasmosis in the study population was 3.5%. The average age was 38.1 years (18-58 years). Focused neurological deficit (73.07%), intracranial hypertension signs (69.20%), meningeal syndrome (15.40%), seizures (57.69%) and consciousness disorders (30.80%) were the clinical characteristics. Hypodensity with or without peripheral enhancement images (93.75%) were found on CT. The average rate of CD4 T cells was 98.7cells/mm3 (5-473 cells/mm3). Oropharyngeal candidiasis in 61.53% of cases, intestinal cryptosporidiosis (11.53%), herpes zoster (3.84%) and Pott's disease (3.84%) were the opportunistic infections associated. Cotrimoxazole was used in 88.46% of patients and 3 patients (11.54%) received the standard treatment (Sulfadiazine-Pyrimethamine). Antitoxoplasmic treatment led to a clinical improvement in 84.61% and 4 deaths (15.39%). were recorded. The technical platform for etiological diagnosis of toxoplasmosis is not available at the Point-G Teaching Hospital, so in case of encephalitis signs in a HIV positive patient, CT should be urgently perform and a treatment trial must begin without delay.

  14. Ruptured cerebral fusiform aneurysm with mucopolysaccharide deposits in the tunica media in a patient with Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Yoshitaka; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Kurose, Akira; Kakino, Shunsuke; Tomitsuka, Nobuhiko; Ogawa, Akira

    2009-03-01

    Although aortic or cardiac complications are common in patients with Marfan syndrome, the presence of an intracranial aneurysm is comparatively rare. In this study, the authors report on their experience with resection of a ruptured fusiform aneurysm of the posterior cerebral artery in a 30-year-old woman with Marfan syndrome. Microscopic examination of the resected tissue showed many Alcian blue-staining deposits, consistent with the presence of mucopolysaccharide in the tunica media and focal fragmentation of the internal elastic lamina.

  15. Professionals' Views on the Roles and Needs of Family Carers of Adults with Cerebral Palsy and Complex Communication Needs in Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemsley, Bronwyn; Balandin, Susan; Togher, Leanne

    2008-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to explore the views of hospital and disability service staff on the roles and needs of family carers of adults with cerebral palsy (CP) and complex communication needs (CCN) in hospital. Method: We conducted a focus group with six hospital and disability service staff, analysed the content themes of the group…

  16. Use of Social Media by Spanish Hospitals: Perceptions, Difficulties, and Success Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bermúdez-Tamayo, Clara; Jiménez-Pernett, Jaime; García Gutiérrez, José-Francisco; Traver-Salcedo, Vicente; Yubraham-Sánchez, David

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This exploratory study has two aims: (1) to find out if and how social media (SM) applications are used by hospitals in Spain and (2) to assess hospital managers' perception of these applications in terms of their evaluation of them, reasons for use, success factors, and difficulties encountered during their implementation. A cross-sectional survey has been carried out using Spanish hospitals as the unit of analysis. Geographical differences in the use of SM were found. Social networks are used most often by larger hospitals (30% by medium-size, 28% by large-size). They are also more frequently used by public hospitals (19%, p<0.01) than by private ones. Respondents with a negative perception of SM felt that there is a chance they may be abused by healthcare professionals, whereas those with a positive perception believed that they can be used to improve communication both within and outside the hospital. Reasons for the use of SM include the idea of maximizing exposure of the hospital. The results show that Spanish hospitals are only just beginning to use SM applications and that hospital type can influence their use. The perceptions, reasons for use, success factors, and difficulties encountered during the implementation of SM mean that it is very important for healthcare professionals to use SM correctly and adequately. PMID:23368890

  17. Participatory ergonomics simulation of hospital work systems: The influence of simulation media on simulation outcome.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Simone Nyholm; Broberg, Ole

    2015-11-01

    Current application of work system simulation in participatory ergonomics (PE) design includes a variety of different simulation media. However, the actual influence of the media attributes on the simulation outcome has received less attention. This study investigates two simulation media: full-scale mock-ups and table-top models. The aim is to compare, how the media attributes of fidelity and affordance influence the ergonomics identification and evaluation in PE design of hospital work systems. The results illustrate, how the full-scale mock-ups' high fidelity of room layout and affordance of tool operation support ergonomics identification and evaluation related to the work system entities space and technologies & tools. The table-top models' high fidelity of function relations and affordance of a helicopter view support ergonomics identification and evaluation related to the entity organization. Furthermore, the study addresses the form of the identified and evaluated conditions, being either identified challenges or tangible design criteria.

  18. [Coordination to assist with hospital-to-home discharge after cerebral hemorrhage--perspectives of a patient's family and nurse].

    PubMed

    Waguchi, Hideko; Hidaka, Kumi; Shinoki, Keiji; Matsuoka, Mio; Mito, Saori; Doi, Seiko; Hata, Akiko; Ibata, Takeshi; Komuro, Ryutaro; Iijima, Shohei

    2013-12-01

    Discharge support, although provided for a limited time, is of vital importance in the acute phase care period. Such support is necessary to ensure continuity of care and treatment even after being discharged from the hospital. I acquired both the viewpoints of the family and the nurse of a patient who was about to be discharged from the hospital after cerebral hemorrhage. However, the patient's family and I were not able to decide on a home care plan or hospital-to-home transfer ahead of time because of the unstable condition of the patient, limited care power of the family, and varying discharge plans among the family members. I intended to help in the decision-making process, taking into consideration the patient's best interest. I evaluated the viewpoint of the family and was able to understand situations in which a family member, who assumes the role of a primary care giver, would need guidance in providing home care to the patient.

  19. Public hospital quality report awareness: evidence from National and Californian Internet searches and social media mentions, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Huesch, Marco D; Currid-Halkett, Elizabeth; Doctor, Jason N

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Publicly available hospital quality reports seek to inform consumers of important healthcare quality and affordability attributes, and may inform consumer decision-making. To understand how much consumers search for such information online on one Internet search engine, whether they mention such information in social media and how positively they view this information. Setting and design A leading Internet search engine (Google) was the main focus of the study. Google Trends and Google Adwords keyword analyses were performed for national and Californian searches between 1 August 2012 and 31 July 2013 for keywords related to ‘top hospital’, best hospital’, and ‘hospital quality’, as well as for six specific hospital quality reports. Separately, a proprietary social media monitoring tool was used to investigate blog, forum, social media and traditional media mentions of, and sentiment towards, major public reports of hospital quality in California in 2012. Primary outcome measures (1) Counts of searches for keywords performed on Google; (2) counts of and (3) sentiment of mentions of public reports on social media. Results National Google search volume for 75 hospital quality-related terms averaged 610 700 searches per month with strong variation by keyword and by state. A commercial report (Healthgrades) was more commonly searched for nationally on Google than the federal government's Hospital Compare, which otherwise dominated quality-related search terms. Social media references in California to quality reports were generally few, and commercially produced hospital quality reports were more widely mentioned than state (Office of Statewide Healthcare Planning and Development (OSHPD)), or non-profit (CalHospitalCompare) reports. Conclusions Consumers are somewhat aware of hospital quality based on Internet search activity and social media disclosures. Public stakeholders may be able to broaden their quality dissemination initiatives by

  20. Mass flows of X-ray contrast media and cytostatics in hospital wastewater.

    PubMed

    Weissbrodt, David; Kovalova, Lubomira; Ort, Christoph; Pazhepurackel, Vinitha; Moser, Ruedi; Hollender, Juliane; Siegrist, Hansruedi; Mcardell, Christa S

    2009-07-01

    Little is known about the significance of hospitals as point sources for emission of organic micropollutants into the aquatic environment. A mass flow analysis of pharmaceuticals and diagnostics used in hospitals was performed on the site of a representative Swiss cantonal hospital. Specifically, we analyzed the consumption of iodinated X-ray contrast media (ICM) and cytostatics in their corresponding medical applications of radiology and oncology, respectively, and their discharge into hospital wastewater and eventually into the wastewater of the municipal wastewater treatment plant. Emission levels within one day and over several days were found to correlate with the pharmacokinetic excretion pattern and the consumed amounts in the hospital during these days. ICM total emissions vary substantially from day to day from 255 to 1259 g/d, with a maximum on the day when the highest radiology treatment occurred. Parent cytostatic compounds reach maximal emissions of 8-10 mg/d. A total of 1.1%, 1.4%, and 3.7% of the excreted amounts of the cytostatics 5-fluorouracil, gemcitabine, and 2',2'-difluorodeoxyuridine (main metabolite of gemcitabine), respectively, were found in the hospital wastewater, whereas 49% of the total ICM was detected, showing a high variability among the compounds. These recoveries can essentially be explained by the high amount administered to out-patients (70% for cytostatics and 50% for ICM); therefore, only part of this dose is expected to be excreted on-site. In addition, this study emphasizes critical issues to consider when sampling in hospital sewer systems. Flow proportional sampling over a longer period is crucial to compute robust hospital mass flows.

  1. In the Know and in the News: How Science and the Media Communicate About Stem Cells, Autism and Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Kimberly; Di Pietro, Nina; Illes, Judy

    2016-02-01

    Stem cell research has generated considerable attention for its potential to remediate many disorders of the central nervous system including neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and cerebral palsy (CP) that place a high burden on individual children, families and society. Here we characterized messaging about the use of stem cells for ASD and CP in news media articles and concurrent dissemination of discoveries through conventional science discourse. We searched LexisNexis and Canadian Newsstand for news articles from the US, UK, Canada and Australia in the period between 2000 and 2014, and PubMed for peer reviewed articles for the same 10 years. Using in-depth content analysis methods, we found less cautionary messaging about stem cells for ASD and CP in the resulting sample of 73 media articles than in the sample of 87 science papers, and a privileging of benefits over risk. News media also present stem cells as ready for clinical application to treat these neurodevelopmental disorders, even while the science literature calls for further research. Investigative news reports that explicitly quote researchers, however, provide the most accurate information to actual science news. The hope, hype, and promise of stem cell interventions for neurodevelopmental disorders, combined with the extreme vulnerability of these children and their families, creates a perfect storm in which journalists and stem cell scientists must commit to a continued, if not even more robust, partnership to promote balanced and accurate messaging.

  2. The consumers' social media use in choosing physicians and hospitals: the case study of the province of Izmir.

    PubMed

    Tengilimoglu, Dilaver; Sarp, Nilgün; Yar, Cemre Eda; Bektaş, Meral; Hidir, Mehmet Nil; Korkmaz, Esin

    2017-01-01

    Manifested as a reflection of the Internet technology progress, web 2.0 has transformed communication among people to different dimensions while increasing the social use of Internet. Thus, the concept of social media has entered our lives. Blogs, forums, Facebook, Twitter and YouTube applications are but few of the social media platforms with active users exceeding millions. As in many other subjects, these and others are also environments where people share information and their positive or negative experiential views with respect to healthcare issues and services. Hence, the social media communication and exchange of information are deemed influential on the process of receiving health services. In the present study that aims to determine social media use of individuals in their choice of physicians, dentists and hospitals, a survey, as a data collection instrument, has been carried out to 947 residents of the province of Izmir. Individuals participating in the study have stated that they have used social media in choosing a physician (41.9% of the participants), dentist (34.1% of the participants) and hospitals (41.7% of the participants). The study has revealed that individuals are affected by social media in their healthcare choices. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. The Human Performance Technology Model as a Framework for Implementation of Social Media in Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szyszlo, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    Social media are ubiquitous and used by millions of people every day. Existing research on social media is primarily descriptive, survey based, and focused on who is using social media and how people and organizations are using the tools. Although many organizations have shown interest in using social media, they often demonstrate uncertainty…

  4. Status update. Hospitals are finding ways to use the social media revolution to raise money, engage patients and connect with their communities.

    PubMed

    Galloro, Vince

    2011-03-14

    As the social media revolution being built around Facebook, Twitter and YouTube has taken hold, hospitals haven't been left behind. Many see it as a vital part of communicating with their community. "We're really getting to the point where, if you want to be visible on the Internet, you have to be visible on social media," says Ed Bennett, left, of the University of Maryland Medical Center.

  5. Reason and Reaction: The Dual Route of Decision Making Process on Social Media Usage: The Case of Hospitality Brand Fan Pages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manthiou, Aikaterini

    2012-01-01

    A new phenomenon on Facebook, resulting from social media revolution, is the emergence of numerous Facebook fan pages. This form of online brand community is an effective tool for building relationships with consumers. Many hospitality firms (i.e. restaurants) have captured the strength of a fan page because it can enhance brand attractiveness and…

  6. Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis in Neonates and Children.

    PubMed

    Chung, Melissa G

    2016-03-01

    Investigators from Erasmus University Hospital in Belgium and Gustave-Dron Hospital and Roger-Salengro Hospital in France studied the clinical and neuroradiologic characteristics of cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CSVT) in neonates and children.

  7. A comparison of sampling media for environmental viable fungi collected in a hospital environment.

    PubMed

    Wu, P C; Su, H J; Ho, H M

    2000-03-01

    Quantitative evaluation of fungal exposure is often conducted by analysis of the composition of microbes in air samples and calculation of the concentrations afterward. The collecting medium that favors the growth for most saprophytic fungi is considered to be the ideal choice in most circumstances. Currently, the culture medium most frequently adopted in environmental sampling for airborne fungi is MEA (malt extract agar) recommended by the ACGIH for its suitability for most fungal growth. DG18 (dichloran glycerol-18), developed in 1980, is suggested for growth at lower water activity (a(w)=0.95) specifically and is not as commonly used in general studies. This investigation collected airborne viable fungi using a single stage/N6 Andersen impactor with MEA and DG18 agar plates attached simultaneously to the same set of samplers. The sampling locations were at 17 sites within a central air-conditioned hospital. After incubation and morphological identification, concentrations of airborne fungi and bacteria were expressed as CFU/m(3) (colony forming units/m(3)). There are 405 DG18 plates and 378 plates available for statistical analysis. Results show that the airborne fungal concentrations, shown by geometric mean (GM), are higher from the DG18 plates than from the MEA plates. The total fungal concentrations is 68.6 vs 12.94 CFU/m(3), and for Aspergillus spp., the concentration is 1.58 vs 0.72 CFU/m(3); for Penicillium spp., 3.37 vs 0.71; and for yeast, 5.09 vs 0.49 CFU/m(3). In addition, the number of different genera present is greater on the DG18 plates than on the MEA plates, on average, 2.85 types vs 1.72. This study suggests that in a hospital environment with 24-h, central air conditioning, DG18 plates appear to be more effective in collecting more fungal colonies in terms of both quantity and types of genera. Such a finding is presumed to be attributed to the characteristic of DG18 in slowing colony growth so that the dominating genus will not over occupy

  8. Decentralized collection of iodinated x-ray contrast media in hospitals-results of the feasibility study and the practice test phase.

    PubMed

    Heinzmann, Bernd; Schwarz, Rolf-Jürgen; Schuster, Petra; Pineau, Claire

    2008-01-01

    Iodinated x-ray contrast media are unmetabolized and almost completely with the urine in 24 hours emitted in the wastewater after their application by human being. These very polar, hydrophilic and hardly biodegradable substances have already been detected in the water cycle. The objective of this R&D project is the collection of the x-ray contrast media already at the source in the hospital and so the avoidance of an emission in the water cycle. Three concepts have been developed in the scope of this R&D project: a centralized collection concept with a no-mix toilet in the radiology unit, a decentralized collection concept featuring a no-mix toilet for every of the ward and another decentralized collection concept with mobile urine containers for the wards. The evaluation of the collection concepts has taken systematically into consideration costs, acceptance and a value benefit analysis. The feasibility study has shown that a separated collection of iodinated x-ray contrast media in hospitals is possible through the implementation of a decentralized urine collection concept using mobile urine containers. This decentralised collection concept was tested in each case on one main focus ward of two representative German hospitals for 20 weeks. In both wards of the hospitals around 60% of patients with an examination of x-ray contrast media took part in the voluntary urine collection. The AOX arose from the iodinated x-ray contrast media in the collected urine. The averaged measured AOI concentration in the patient's urine was 18 g/l. The total costs, formed by the costs for staff, material and disposal, were estimated at 10 euro per patient, 7 euro per litre urine and approximate 380 euro per kilogramme iodine for the separated urine collection in hospitals. The main part of the total costs is formed by the costs for staff with around 80%. This R&D project has shown that the separated collection of the patients' urine with a simple and decentralised collection

  9. Epidemiological and Clinical Aspects and Therapy of Chronic Otitis Media in the “ENT” and Cervicofacial Surgery Ward in the University Hospital of Ouagadougou

    PubMed Central

    Gyebre, Y. M. C.; Ouedraogo, R. W.-L.; Elola, A.; Ouedraogo, B. P.; Sereme, M.; Ouattara, M.; Ouoba, K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to analyze the epidemiological and clinical aspects of chronic otitis media and its therapeutic processes in our context. Patients and Methods. In a prospective study over a period of 1 year (March 2009–February 2010), 79 patients with chronic otitis media have been cared for in the otolaryngology ward of the University Hospital of Ouagadougou. Results. Chronic otitis media (COM) commonly occurs in the age group from 0 to 15 years (40.50%). Otorrhea was the main reason for consultation in 53 cases (67.10%); the most frequently encountered clinicopathological forms were simple COM (71%) followed by otitis media with effusion (24.30%). Intra-auricular instillations of traditional products (46.09%) were the dominant favoring factor. Treatment was essentially through medication in 59 cases with a stabilization of lesions. Endotemporal complications were noticed in 6 cases. Conclusion. The fight against chronic otitis media is carried out through preventive measures of education the of people. PMID:24066241

  10. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  11. Ecotoxicological risk assessment linked to the discharge by hospitals of bio-accumulative pharmaceuticals into aquatic media: The case of mitotane.

    PubMed

    Aurélien, Brackers de Hugo; Sylvie, Bony; Alain, Devaux; Jérôme, Guitton; Yves, Perrodin

    2013-11-01

    The release of hospital wastewater into the urban sewer networks contributes to the general contamination of aquatic media by pharmaceutical residues. These residues include bio-accumulative pharmaceuticals that lead to increased risk for ecosystems because they can concentrate in organisms and food chains, and therefore reach toxic levels. In order to assess the ecotoxicological risks linked to this particular category of residues, we have developed a specific method, by combining a theoretical calculation of pollutant concentrations in organisms to estimate Body Residue (BR), and ecotoxicity biomarkers in fish cell lines, enabling the calculation of a Critical Body Residue (CBR). This method finally results in the calculation of a specific risk quotient (Qb=BR/CBR), characterizing the risk linked to this type of pollutant. This method was applied to mitotane, a bio-accumulative pharmaceutical typically found in hospital wastewater, in the framework of an exposure scenario corresponding to the discharge of all the hospital wastewaters into the Rhone River which flows through the city of Lyon, France. This approach leads to risk quotients (Qb and Qbg) much higher than those found with the classical approach, i.e. Q=PEC/PNEC (Predictive Environmental Concentration/Predictive Non Effect Concentration)=0.0006. This difference in the appreciation of risk is important when using cytotoxicity as the criterion for measuring the toxicity of mitotane (Qb=0.056) and it is even greater when the criterion used is genotoxicity (Qbg=6.8). This study must be now consolidated by taking the biomagnification of the pharmaceuticals into consideration.

  12. Pharmaceuticals and iodinated contrast media in a hospital wastewater: A case study to analyse their presence and characterise their environmental risk and hazard.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, A; Aceña, J; Pérez, S; López de Alda, M; Barceló, D; Gil, A; Valcárcel, Y

    2015-07-01

    This work analyses the presence of twenty-five pharmaceutical compounds belonging to seven different therapeutic groups and one iodinated contrast media (ICM) in a Spanish medium-size hospital located in the Valencia Region. Analysis of the target compounds in the hospital wastewater was performed by means of solid phase extraction (SPE) followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis (HPLC-MS/MS). A screening level risk assessment combining the measured environmental concentrations (MECs) with dose-response data based on Predicted No Effect Concentration (PNEC) was also applied to estimate Hazard Quotients (HQs) for the compounds investigated. Additionally, the environmental hazard associated to the various compounds measured was assessed through the calculation of the Persistence, Bioaccumulation and Toxicity (PBT) Index, which categorizes compounds according to their environmentally damaging characteristics. The results of the study showed the presence of twenty-four out of the twenty-six compounds analysed at individual concentrations ranging from 5 ng L(-1) to 2 mg L(-1). The highest concentrations corresponded to the ICM iomeprol, found at levels between 424 and 2093 μg L(-1), the analgesic acetaminophen (15-44 μg L(-1)), the diuretic (DIU) furosemide (6-15 μg L(-1)), and the antibiotics (ABIs) ofloxacin and trimethoprim (2-5 μg L(-1)). The lowest levels corresponded to the anti-inflammatory propyphenazone, found at concentrations between 5 and 44 ng L(-1). Differences in terms of concentrations of the analysed compounds have been observed in all the therapeutic groups when comparing the results obtained in this and other recent studies carried out in hospitals with different characteristics from different geographical areas and in different seasons. The screening level risk assessment performed in raw water from the hospital effluent showed that the analgesics and anti-inflammatories (AAFs) acetaminophen, diclofenac, ibuprofen and

  13. Cerebral Paragonimiasis.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, I

    1975-01-01

    The first case of cerebral paragonimiasis was reported by Otani in Japan in 1887. This was nine years after Kerbert's discovery of the fluke in the lungs of Bengal tigers and seven years after a human pulmonary infection by the fluke was demonstrated by Baelz and Manson. The first case was a 26-year-old man who had been suffering from cough and hemosputum for one year. The patient developed convulsive seizures with subsequent coma and died. The postmortem examination showed cystic lesions in the right frontal and occipital lobes. An adult fluke was found in the occipital lesion and another was seen in a gross specimen of normal brain tissue around the affected occipital lobe. Two years after Otani's discovery, at autopsy a 29-year-old man with a history of Jacksonian seizure was reported as having cerebral paragonimiasis. Some time later, however, it was confirmed that the case was actually cerebral schistosomiasis japonica. Subsequently, cases of cerebral paragonimiasis were reported. However, the majority of these cases were not confirmed histologically. It was pointed out that some of these early cases were probably not Paragonimus infection. After World War II, reviews as well as case reports were published. Recently, investigations have been reported from Korea, with a clinicla study on 62 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis seen at the Neurology Department of the National Medical Center, Seoul, between 1958 and 1964. In 1971 Higashi described a statistical study on 105 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis that had been treated surgically in Japan.

  14. Cerebral Palsy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Parents > Cerebral Palsy A A A ... kids who are living with the condition. About Cerebral Palsy Cerebral palsy is one of the most common ...

  15. Cerebral palsy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cerebral palsy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cerebral palsy : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/cerebral_palsy/cerebral_palsy. ...

  16. How consumers view hospital advertising.

    PubMed

    Johns, H E; Moser, H R

    1988-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine: (a) consumers' attitudes toward advertising by hospitals; (b) which media consumers feel are appropriate for hospital advertising; and (c) whether consumers are seeing hospital advertisements, and if so, through which media. It was found that consumers indeed have a favorable attitude toward hospitals that advertise. It was also found that consumers feel that most media are appropriate for hospital advertising. Finally, it was found that most consumers have seen hospitals advertise their services, especially on television and radio and in the newspaper.

  17. Cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Colver, Allan; Fairhurst, Charles; Pharoah, Peter O D

    2014-04-05

    The syndrome of cerebral palsy encompasses a large group of childhood movement and posture disorders. Severity, patterns of motor involvement, and associated impairments such as those of communication, intellectual ability, and epilepsy vary widely. Overall prevalence has remained stable in the past 40 years at 2-3·5 cases per 1000 livebirths, despite changes in antenatal and perinatal care. The few studies available from developing countries suggest prevalence of comparable magnitude. Cerebral palsy is a lifelong disorder; approaches to intervention, whether at an individual or environmental level, should recognise that quality of life and social participation throughout life are what individuals with cerebral palsy seek, not improved physical function for its own sake. In the past few years, the cerebral palsy community has learned that the evidence of benefit for the numerous drugs, surgery, and therapies used over previous decades is weak. Improved understanding of the role of multiple gestation in pathogenesis, of gene environment interaction, and how to influence brain plasticity could yield significant advances in treatment of the disorder. Reduction in the prevalence of post-neonatal cerebral palsy, especially in developing countries, should be possible through improved nutrition, infection control, and accident prevention.

  18. Cerebral Malaria.

    PubMed

    Marsden, P D; Bruce-Chwatt, L J

    1975-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is an acute diffuse encephalopathy associated only with Plasmodium falciparum. It is probably a consequence of the rapid proliferation of the parasites in the body of man in relation to red cell invasion, and results in stagnation of blood flow in cerebralcapillaries with thromobotic occlusion of large numbers of cerebral capillaries. The subsequent cerebral pathology is cerebral infarction with haemorrhage and cerebral oedema. The wide prevalence of P. falciparum in highly endemic areas results in daily challenges to patients from several infected mosquitoes. It is thus important to understand the characteristics of P. falciparum, since this is one of the most important protozoan parasites of man and severe infection from it constitutes one of the few real clinical emergencies in tropical medicine. One of the more important aspects of the practice of medicine in the tropics is to establish a good understanding of the pattern of medical practice in that area. This applies to malaria as well as to other diseases. The neophyte might be somewhat surprised to learn, for example that an experienced colleague who lives in a holoendemic malarious area such as West Africa, sees no cerebral malaria. But the explanation is simple when the doctor concerned has a practice which involves treating adults only. Cerebral malaria is rare in adults, because in highly endemic areas, by the age of 1 year most of the infants in a group under study have already experienced their first falciparum infection. By the time they reach adult life, they have a solid immunity against severe falciparum infections. In fact, "clinical malaria" could occur in such a group under only two circumstances: 1) in pregnancy, a patent infection with P. falciparum might develop, probably due to an IgG drain across the placenta to the foetus;2) in an individual who has constantly taken antimalarials and who may have an immunity at such a low level that when antimalarial therapy is interrupted

  19. Cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    Newton, C.; Hien, T. T.; White, N.

    2000-01-01

    Cerebral malaria may be the most common non-traumatic encephalopathy in the world. The pathogenesis is heterogenous and the neurological complications are often part of a multisystem dysfunction. The clinical presentation and pathophysiology differs between adults and children. Recent studies have elucidated the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis and raised possible interventions. Antimalarial drugs, however, remain the only intervention that unequivocally affects outcome, although increasing resistance to the established antimalarial drugs is of grave concern. Artemisinin derivatives have made an impact on treatment, but other drugs may be required. With appropriate antimalarial drugs, the prognosis of cerebral malaria often depends on the management of other complications—for example, renal failure and acidosis. Neurological sequelae are increasingly recognised, but further research on the pathogenesis of coma and neurological damage is required to develop other ancillary treatments.

 PMID:10990500

  20. Cerebral Palsy (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Kids > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... the things that kids do every day. What's CP? Some kids with CP use wheelchairs and others ...

  1. Cerebral Palsy (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Kids > Cerebral Palsy A A A ... the things that kids do every day. What's CP? Some kids with CP use wheelchairs and others ...

  2. Cerebral air embolism from angioinvasive cavitary aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chen; Barrio, George A; Hurwitz, Lynne M; Kranz, Peter G

    2014-01-01

    Background. Nontraumatic cerebral air embolism cases are rare. We report a case of an air embolism resulting in cerebral infarction related to angioinvasive cavitary aspergillosis. To our knowledge, there have been no previous reports associating these two conditions together. Case Presentation. A 32-year-old female was admitted for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Her hospital course was complicated by pulmonary aspergillosis. On hospital day 55, she acutely developed severe global aphasia with right hemiplegia. A CT and CT-angiogram of her head and neck were obtained demonstrating intravascular air emboli within the left middle cerebral artery (MCA) branches. She was emergently taken for hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT). Evaluation for origin of the air embolus revealed an air focus along the left lower pulmonary vein. Over the course of 48 hours, her symptoms significantly improved. Conclusion. This unique case details an immunocompromised patient with pulmonary aspergillosis cavitary lesions that invaded into a pulmonary vein and caused a cerebral air embolism. With cerebral air embolisms, the acute treatment option differs from the typical ischemic stroke pathway and the provider should consider emergent HBOT. This case highlights the importance of considering atypical causes of acute ischemic stroke.

  3. Aging and Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Networker, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This special edition of "The Networker" contains several articles focusing on aging and cerebral palsy (CP). "Aging and Cerebral Palsy: Pathways to Successful Aging" (Jenny C. Overeynder) reports on the National Invitational Colloquium on Aging and Cerebral Palsy held in April 1993. "Observations from an Observer" (Kathleen K. Barrett) describes…

  4. Severe Cerebral Vasospasm in Patients with Hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyuk-Jin; Yoon, Seok-Mann; Oh, Jae-Sang; Shim, Jai-Joon; Bae, Hack-Gun

    2016-12-01

    Cerebral vasospasm associated with hyperthyroidism has not been reported to cause cerebral infarction. The case reported here is therefore the first of cerebral infarction co-existing with severe vasospasm and hyperthyroidism. A 30-year-old woman was transferred to our hospital in a stuporous state with right hemiparesis. At first, she complained of headache and dizziness. However, she had no neurological deficits or radiological abnormalities. She was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism 2 months ago, but she had discontinued the antithyroid medication herself three days ago. Magnetic resonance imaging and angiography showed cerebral infarction with severe vasospasm. Thus, chemical angioplasty using verapamil was performed two times, and antithyroid medication was administered. Follow-up angiography performed at 6 weeks demonstrated complete recovery of the vasospasm. At the 2-year clinical follow-up, she was alert with mild weakness and cortical blindness. Hyperthyroidism may influence cerebral vascular hemodynamics. Therefore, a sudden increase in the thyroid hormone levels in the clinical setting should be avoided to prevent cerebrovascular accidents. When neurological deterioration is noticed without primary cerebral parenchyma lesions, evaluation of thyroid function may be required before the symptoms occur.

  5. Severe Cerebral Vasospasm in Patients with Hyperthyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Hyuk-Jin; Oh, Jae-Sang; Shim, Jai-Joon; Bae, Hack-Gun

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm associated with hyperthyroidism has not been reported to cause cerebral infarction. The case reported here is therefore the first of cerebral infarction co-existing with severe vasospasm and hyperthyroidism. A 30-year-old woman was transferred to our hospital in a stuporous state with right hemiparesis. At first, she complained of headache and dizziness. However, she had no neurological deficits or radiological abnormalities. She was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism 2 months ago, but she had discontinued the antithyroid medication herself three days ago. Magnetic resonance imaging and angiography showed cerebral infarction with severe vasospasm. Thus, chemical angioplasty using verapamil was performed two times, and antithyroid medication was administered. Follow-up angiography performed at 6 weeks demonstrated complete recovery of the vasospasm. At the 2-year clinical follow-up, she was alert with mild weakness and cortical blindness. Hyperthyroidism may influence cerebral vascular hemodynamics. Therefore, a sudden increase in the thyroid hormone levels in the clinical setting should be avoided to prevent cerebrovascular accidents. When neurological deterioration is noticed without primary cerebral parenchyma lesions, evaluation of thyroid function may be required before the symptoms occur. PMID:28184350

  6. Media Clips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vennebush, G. Patrick

    2004-01-01

    Media Clips aims to offer readers contemporary, authentic applications of quantitative reasoning based on print or electronic media. Clips may be in text or graphic format, and clip sources may be either print or electronic media.

  7. Media education.

    PubMed

    Strasburger, Victor C

    2010-11-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recognizes that exposure to mass media (eg, television, movies, video and computer games, the Internet, music lyrics and videos, newspapers, magazines, books, advertising) presents health risks for children and adolescents but can provide benefits as well. Media education has the potential to reduce the harmful effects of media and accentuate the positive effects. By understanding and supporting media education, pediatricians can play an important role in reducing harmful effects of media on children and adolescents.

  8. Statins and cerebral hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Giannopoulos, Sotirios; Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Marshall, Randolph S

    2012-01-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are associated with improved stroke outcome. This observation has been attributed in part to the palliative effect of statins on cerebral hemodynamics and cerebral autoregulation (CA), which are mediated mainly through the upregulation of endothelium nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Several animal studies indicate that statin pretreatment enhances cerebral blood flow after ischemic stroke, although this finding is not further supported in clinical settings. Cerebral vasomotor reactivity, however, is significantly improved after long-term statin administration in most patients with severe small vessel disease, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, or impaired baseline CA. PMID:22929438

  9. Developmental disabilities: epilepsy, cerebral palsy, and autism.

    PubMed

    Surabian, S R

    2001-06-01

    This article provides the dentist with a review of the three developmental disabilities that do not have mental retardation as a diagnostic component: epilepsy, cerebral palsy, and autism. Discussion focuses on diagnostic criteria and other dental and medical considerations. A greater understanding of developmental disabilities allows the dentist to offer care in the dental office when feasible or to understand and develop referral relationships with colleagues who utilize the hospital operating room to provide comprehensive care.

  10. Hospitalizations of Children with Autism Increased from 1999 to 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nayfack, Aaron M.; Huffman, Lynne C.; Feldman, Heidi M.; Chan, Jia; Saynina, Olga; Wise, Paul H.

    2014-01-01

    We performed a retrospective analysis of hospital discharges for children with autism, in comparison to children with cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, mental retardation/intellectual disability, and the general population. Hospitalizations for autism increased nearly threefold over 10 years, especially at the oldest ages, while hospitalizations for…

  11. Cerebral Asymmetries and Reading Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirozzolo, Francis J.

    1978-01-01

    Reviewed are historical developments regarding the concepts of cerebral localization, and analyzed are implications of current research on the role of the cerebral hemispheres in reading disorders. (CL)

  12. Cerebral hemodynamics and endothelial function in patients with Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cerebral vasculopathy have been described in Fabry disease, in which altered cerebral blood flow, vascular remodelling or impairment of endothelial function could be involved. Our study aims to evaluate these three possibilities in a group of Fabry patients, and compare it to healthy controls. Methods Cerebral hemodynamics, vascular remodelling and systemic endothelial function were investigated in 10 Fabry patients and compared to data from 17 healthy controls. Transcranial Doppler was used to study blood flow velocity of intracranial arteries and cerebral vasomotor reactivity. For the study of vascular remodelling and endothelial function, intima-media thickness of common carotid arteries, flow-mediated dilation in brachial artery and serum levels of soluble VCAM-1, TNF-α, high-sensitive CRP and IL-6 were measured. Differences between groups were evaluated using appropriate tests. Results No relevant differences were observed in cerebral hemodynamic parameters, intima-media thickness or flow-mediated dilation. There was a trend for low serum levels of IL-6 and high serum levels of TNF-α and high-sensitive CRP in Fabry patients; plasma concentrations of soluble VCAM-1 were significantly higher in Fabry disease patients than in healthy volunteers (p = 0.02). Conclusions In our sample, we did not find relevant alterations of cerebral hemodynamics in Fabry disease patients. Increased levels of plasmatic endothelial biomarkers seem to be the most important feature indicative of possible vascular dysfunction in Fabry disease patients. PMID:24207059

  13. Media, Gadgets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes papers presented at the Sixth Biennial Conference on Chemical Education describing new media and gadgets, particularly models, computers, and other media. A bibliography of 15 presented papers on these topics is attached. (CS)

  14. Cerebral Palsy (CP) Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Pop Quiz: Cerebral Palsy Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Sandy is the parent of a child with cerebral palsy and the Board President of Gio’s Garden , a ...

  15. Media violence.

    PubMed

    Strasburger, V C

    1999-01-01

    For decades, media violence has been viewed as largely a Western problem. New studies indicate that Indian children have increasing access to the media and that media violence will subject them to the same problems as Western children: imitation, desensitization, fear, and inappropriate attitudes about violence and aggression. Solutions exist but will have to be implemented within the next decade to protect Indian children and adolescents from the harmful effects of media violence.

  16. Portrayals of People with Cerebral Palsy in Homicide News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucardie, Richard; Sobsey, Dick

    2005-01-01

    Through content analysis, employing qualitative and quantitative methods, Canadian media representation of people with cerebral palsy (PWCP) in public life was examined. Canadian NewsDisc, an online biographic database service, was used to examine the use of stigmatizing language such as afflicted by, afflicted with, suffered from, suffers from,…

  17. New Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downtown Business Quarterly, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue explores lower Manhattan's burgeoning "New Media" industry, a growing source of jobs in lower Manhattan. The first article, "New Media Manpower Issues" (Rodney Alexander), addresses manpower, training, and workforce demands faced by new media companies in New York City. The second article, "Case Study:…

  18. Media Panel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marklund, Inger, Ed.; Hanse, Mona-Britt, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    The Swedish Media Panel is a research program about children and young persons and their use of mass media. The aim of the ten-year (1975-1985) project is to explain how media habits originate, how they change as children grow older, what factors on the part of children themselves and in their surroundings may be connected with a certain use of…

  19. Social Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    4 Table 2: Traditional Media Usage (% of consumers ...media can be described in terms of content authors and passive consumers . Traditional media sources have dominated the landscape of news distribution...delivering software as a continually-updated service that gets better the more people use it, consuming and remixing data from multiple sources

  20. [Cognitive stimulation in children with cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Muriel, V; Garcia-Molina, A; Aparicio-Lopez, C; Ensenat, A; Roig-Rovira, T

    2014-11-16

    Introduccion. La paralisis cerebral a menudo cursa con deficits cognitivos de atencion, visuopercepcion, funciones ejecutivas y memoria de trabajo. Objetivo. Analizar el efecto de un tratamiento de estimulacion cognitiva sobre las capacidades cognitivas en niños con pa­ralisis cerebral. Pacientes y metodos. Muestra de 15 niños con paralisis cerebral, con una edad media de 8,80 ± 2,51 años, clasificados mediante el Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) en nivel I (n = 6), nivel II (n = 4), nivel III (n = 2) y nivel V (n = 3). Los deficits cognitivos se evaluaron mediante la escala de inteligencia de Wechsler para niños (WISC-IV) y el Continuous Performance Test (CPT-II). Se administraron los cuestionarios para padres y profesores del Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) y las escalas de evaluacion de Conners (CPRS-48 y CTRS-28). Se realizo un programa de estimulacion cognitiva dos horas semanales durante ocho semanas. Resultados. Se observaron diferencias estadisticamente significativas tras aplicar el tratamiento de estimulacion cognitivo en el indice de razonamiento perceptivo de la WISC-IV. No se obtuvieron diferencias antes y despues del tratamiento en las puntuaciones del Conners y del BRIEF. Tampoco se hallaron diferencias en los resultados de la WISC-IV en funcion del sexo ni en el GMFCS. Conclusion. El rendimiento cognitivo de los niños con paralisis cerebral mejora tras la aplicacion de un programa de rehabilitacion cognitiva.

  1. Norovirus - hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Gastroenteritis - norovirus; Colitis - norovirus; Hospital acquired infection - norovirus ... fluids ( dehydration ). Anyone can become infected with norovirus. Hospital patients who are very old, very young, or ...

  2. Cerebral monitoring during carotid endarterectomy by transcranial Doppler ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy and safety of cerebral monitoring by transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD) for the detection of cerebral ischemia during carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Methods From August 2004 to December 2013, 159 CEAs were performed in a tertiary hospital. All procedures were performed under general anesthesia. Intraoperative TCD was routinely used to detect cerebral ischemia. Of the 159 patients, 102 patients were included in this study, excluding 27 patients who had a poor transtemporal isonation window and 30 patients who used additional cerebral monitoring systems such as electroencephalography or somatosensory evoked potentials. When mean flow velocity in the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery decreased by >50% versus baseline during carotid clamping carotid shunting was selectively performed. The carotid shunt rate and incidence of perioperative (<30 days) stroke or death were investigated by reviewing medical records. Results Carotid shunting was performed in 31 of the 102 patients (30%). Perioperative stroke occurred in 2 patients (2%); a minor ischemic stroke caused by embolism in one and an intracerebral hemorrhage in the other. Perioperative death developed in the latter patient. Conclusion TCD is a safe cerebral monitoring tool to detect cerebral ischemia during CEA. It can reduce use of carotid shunt. PMID:28203558

  3. Cerebral Palsy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... palsy — causes a problem with balance and depth perception Since cerebral palsy affects muscle control and coordination, ... fluid into the lungs) gastroesophageal reflux (spitting up) speech problems drooling tooth decay sleep disorders osteoporosis (weak, ...

  4. Cerebral Contusions and Lacerations

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sports-Related Concussion Diffuse Axonal Injury Intracranial Hematomas Skull Fracture Cerebral contusions are bruises of the brain, ... object or pushed-in bone fragment from a skull fracture. Motor vehicle crashes and blows to the ...

  5. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 911) if you have sudden loss of movement , sensation, vision, or speech. Alternative Names Amyloidosis - cerebral; CAA; Congophilic angiopathy Images Amyloidosis on the fingers Arteries of the brain References Kase CS, Shoamanesh A. Intracerebral hemorrhage. In: Daroff ...

  6. Nanomedicine in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Bindu; Nance, Elizabeth; Johnston, Michael V; Kannan, Rangaramanujam; Kannan, Sujatha

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a chronic childhood disorder that can have diverse etiologies. Injury to the developing brain that occurs either in utero or soon after birth can result in the motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits seen in cerebral palsy. Although the etiologies for cerebral palsy are variable, neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the brain injury irrespective of the etiology. Currently, there is no effective cure for cerebral palsy. Nanomedicine offers a new frontier in the development of therapies for prevention and treatment of brain injury resulting in cerebral palsy. Nanomaterials such as dendrimers provide opportunities for the targeted delivery of multiple drugs that can mitigate several pathways involved in injury and can be delivered specifically to the cells that are responsible for neuroinflammation and injury. These materials also offer the opportunity to deliver agents that would promote repair and regeneration in the brain, resulting not only in attenuation of injury, but also enabling normal growth. In this review, the current advances in nanotechnology for treatment of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy. Future directions that would facilitate clinical translation in neonates and children are also addressed.

  7. [Physiopathology of nephropathy studied with contrast media].

    PubMed

    Morales Buenrostro, L E; Tellez Zenteno, J F; Torre Delgadillo, A

    2000-01-01

    For the technological advances in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, the use of intravenous contrast media in the hospital is more and more frequent. It can produce acute renal failure secondary to its nephrotoxicity known as contrast media nephropathy. This review describes the pathophysiologic mechanisms of contrast media injury, including cytotoxicity caused by hyperosmoloarity of contrast media, the hemodynamic factors and the role of the renin-angiotensin system, prostaglandins, oxygen free radicals, endothelin-1, adenosine, nitric oxide and others. The understanding of this information is of vital importance for the development of prophylactic strategies for contrast media nephropathy.

  8. A multi-media hospital equipment database.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, R; Richards, B

    1995-01-01

    A computer database system has been built which records all the necessary information on each item of equipment. This includes the name of the Department, the location (building and room number), a description of the asset (manufacturer, model number, serial number). The purchase date and source of funding (e.g., state or charity) are then recorded. The details of the maintenance program (e.g., company contracted, service date, service cost) follow next. Last and of equal importance, there follows one or more pictures of the item of equipment. Any special features can then be identified. These pictures form an integral part of each record in the database. The system runs on a desk-top PC under a networked system.

  9. Mixed Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Erin

    2010-01-01

    While institutions do not often have a hook as compelling as an eagerly awaited movie, great content is critical for media relations success--and coupling it with the right distribution channel can ensure the story finds the right audience. Even better, retooling it for several media platforms can extend the life and reach of a story. The changes…

  10. Earned Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunshine, Alice

    2011-01-01

    "Earned media" is exactly what one thinks it is. The people who do the necessary work to earn coverage of their issue or battle are the ones who will get their story out to the public. Earning media coverage involves giving careful attention to the mechanics of reaching out to news outlets. Most people can learn the mechanics through…

  11. Media Publics and Media Trust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaziano, Cecilie; McGrath, Kristin

    To gain a perspective on the kinds of people who find newspapers and television to be high or low in credibility, a two-phase study combined demographic and other characteristics, media behavior, and attitudes toward the media. The first phase involved a series of focused group discussions, while the second was a national, representative sampling…

  12. Media violence.

    PubMed

    Cantor, J

    2000-08-01

    Research on the effects of media violence is not well understood by the general public. Despite this fact, there is an overwhelming consensus in the scientific literature about the unhealthy effects of media violence. Meta-analyses show that media-violence viewing consistently is associated with higher levels of antisocial behavior, ranging from the trivial (imitative violence directed against toys) to the serious (criminal violence), with many consequential outcomes in between (acceptance of violence as a solution to problems, increased feelings of hostility, and the apparent delivery of painful stimulation to another person). Desensitization is another well-documented effect of viewing violence, which is observable in reduced arousal and emotional disturbance while witnessing violence, the reduced tendency to intervene in a fight, and less sympathy for the victims of violence. Although there is evidence that youth who are already violent are more likely to seek out violent entertainment, there is strong evidence that the relationship between violence viewing and antisocial behavior is bidirectional. There is growing evidence that media violence also engenders intense fear in children which often lasts days, months, and even years. The media's potential role in solutions to these problems is only beginning to be explored, in investigations examining the uses and effects of movie ratings, television ratings, and the V-chip, and the effects of media literacy programs and public education efforts. Future research should explore important individual differences in responses to media violence and effective ways to intervene in the negative effects.

  13. Understanding hospitality.

    PubMed

    Patten, C S

    1994-03-01

    Bridging patient/"customer" issues and business aspects can be aided through developing a specific nursing basis for hospitality. The ancient practice of hospitality has evolved into three distinct levels: public, personal and therapeutic. Understanding these levels is helpful in integrating various dimensions of guest relations programs in hospitals into a more comprehensive vision. Hospitality issues must become a greater part of today's nursing management.

  14. Use of gas liquid chromatography as an adjunct to conventional bacteriological methods in the diagnosis of anaerobic cerebral abscess.

    PubMed

    Pit, S; Jamal, F; Cheah, F K; Abbas, M A

    1991-07-01

    Forty cases of cerebral abscesses were studied prospectively to establish the microbial agents implicated in these cases. Chronic otitis media (14 patients, 35%), congenital heart disease (five patients, 12.5%),a and meningitis (five patients, 12.5%) were among the important predisposing factors. Streptococcus (14 patients, 35%) was the most common causative pre-isolated, the predominant species being Streptococcus milleri (11 patients, 27.5%). Other organisms isolated included Proteus mirabilis in six patients (15%) and Staphylococcus aureus in five patients (12.5%). Anaerobes (12 patients, 30%), predominantly Bacteroides sp. (eight patients, 20%), played an important role in these cases, the majority of which were isolated in mixed cultures. Gas-liquid chromatographic analysis of pus detected the presence of anaerobes in another 11 cases of cerebral abscess, in which cultures of anaerobes were negative. Therefore, gas-liquid chromotography is useful as an adjunct to conventional bacteriological methods in providing a rapid and sensitive means of detecting anaerobes in pus obtained especially from patients who had received antibiotic therapy prior to hospitalization.

  15. Hypernatraemia in cerebral disorders

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, W. H.

    1962-01-01

    Six patients are described in whom cerebral damage was associated with raised plasma sodium and chloride concentrations and with extremely low urinary outputs of sodium and chloride. The patients were not clinically dehydrated and direct determinations showed that the blood and plasma volumes, the endogenous creatinine clearance, and the urinary output of antidiuretic hormone were normal. For these and other reasons it is concluded that the metabolic picture results not from diminished circulatory volume, water deficiency, sodium deficiency, undetected diabetes insipidus or osmotic diuresis, but from the cerebral damage itself. In these and other cited cases, the cerebral damage was localized chiefly in the frontal lobes, hypothalamus or lower brain-stem, thus suggesting a descending pathway, the relationship of which to the pineal area controlling aldosterone secretion requires clarification. Images PMID:13920001

  16. Duplicated middle cerebral artery.

    PubMed

    Perez, Jesus; Machado, Calixto; Scherle, Claudio; Hierro, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Duplicated middle cerebral artery (DMCA) is an anomalous vessel arising from the internal carotid artery. The incidence DMCA is relatively law, and an association between this anomaly and cerebral aneurysms has been documented. There is a controversy whether DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is an important fact to consider in aneurysm surgery. We report the case of a 34-year-old black woman who suffered a subarachnoid hemorrhage and the angiography a left DMCA, and an aneurysm in an inferior branch of the main MCA. The DMCA and the MCA had perforating arteries. The aneurysm was clipped without complications. The observation of perforating arteries in our patient confirms that the DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is very important to be considered in cerebral aneurysms surgery. Moreover, the DMCA may potentially serve as a collateral blood supply to the MCA territory in cases of MCA occlusion.

  17. [Cerebral ischemia and histamine].

    PubMed

    Adachi, Naoto

    2002-10-01

    Cerebral ischemia induces excess release of glutamate and an increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, which provoke catastrophic enzymatic processes leading to irreversible neuronal injury. Histamine plays the role of neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and histaminergic fibers are widely distributed in the brain. In cerebral ischemia, release of histamine from nerve endings has been shown to be enhanced by facilitation of its activity. An inhibition of the histaminergic activity in ischemia aggravates the histologic outcome. In contrast, intracerebroventricular administration of histamine improves the aggravation, whereas blockade of histamine H2 receptors aggravates ischemic injury. Furthermore, H2 blockade enhances ischemic release of glutamate and dopamine. These findings suggest that central histamine provides beneficial effects against ischemic neuronal damage by suppressing release of excitatory neurotransmitters. However, histaminergic H2 action facilitates the permeability of the blood-brain barrier and shows deleterious effects on cerebral edema.

  18. [Brain abscess following cerebral infarction: a case report].

    PubMed

    Ichimi, K; Ishiguri, H; Kida, Y; Kinomoto, T

    1989-04-01

    The authors report a case of brain abscess following cerebral infarction. A 73-year-old man was admitted to our clinic with symptoms of right hemiparesis and total aphasia. CT scan revealed abnormal low density area in the left fronto-temporo-parietal region. Cerebral angiography demonstrated occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery at the M1 portion. On the 16th hospital day, an episode of generalized seizure with high fever appeared, and intermittent high fever persisted thereafter. Two months after admission, CT scan revealed several cystic lesions with marked ring enhancement at the site of cerebral infarction, suggesting multiple abscesses. Aspirations of left frontal and parietal abscesses were accomplished and the cultures of the pus disclosed Proteus vulgaris. Due to progressive hydrocephalus, a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was constructed one month later. Repeated CT scans showed a gradual diminution of the abscesses. It is considered that the blood-brain barrier is broken and the local immunological system against bacteria may be weakened when the brain is damaged by ischemia. Brain abscess seems to be developed in such circumstances even under the influence of transient bacteremia which originates in other parts of the body. Therefore the possibility of cerebral abscess should be suspected if patients with cerebral infarction suffer from the symptoms such as fever, neck stiffness or disturbance of consciousness.

  19. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis with cerebral hemorrhage during early pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Quanmin; Guo, Pin; Ge, Jianwei; Qiu, Yongming

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) rarely induces cerebral hemorrhage, and CVST with cerebral hemorrhage during early pregnancy is extremely rare. Upon literature review, we are able to find only one case of CVST with cerebral hemorrhage in early pregnancy. In this paper, we report another case of a 27-year-old patient who developed CVST with cerebral hemorrhage in her fifth week of pregnancy. Although the optimal treatment for this infrequent condition remains controversial, we adopted anticoagulation as the first choice of treatment and obtained favorable results. PMID:25630781

  20. Media violence.

    PubMed

    Willis, E; Strasburger, V C

    1998-04-01

    American media are the most violent in the world, and American society is now paying a high price in terms of real life violence. Research has confirmed that mass media violence contributes to aggressive behavior, fear, and desensitization of violence. Television, movies, music videos, computer/video games are pervasive media and represent important influences on children and adolescents. Portraying rewards and punishments and showing the consequences of violence are probably the two most essential contextual factors for viewers as they interpret the meaning of what they are viewing on television. Public health efforts have emphasized public education, media literacy campaign for children and parents, and an increased use of technology to prevent access to certain harmful medial materials.

  1. From Augmentation Media to Meme Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, Yuzuru

    Computers as meta media are now evolving from augmentation media vehicles to meme media vehicles. While an augmentation media system provides a seamlessly integrated environment of various tools and documents, meme media system provides further functions to edit and distribute tools and documents. Documents and tools on meme media can easily…

  2. [Myocardial infarction beginning with cerebral symptoms in 30 cases of cardio-cerebral apoplexy].

    PubMed

    Tsukazaki, T; Kuramoto, K; Oda, S; Ueda, S; Matsushita, S

    1991-01-01

    A clinicopathological analysis of myocardial infarction with an onset of stroke-like symptoms was carried out on 30 autopsy cases at the Tokyo Metropolitan Geriatric Hospital. The cases were classified into four groups according to the types of brain lesions, I: embolism (n = 17), II: thrombosis (n = 9), III: bleeding (n = 2), and IV: no remarkable focal lesion (n = 2). Classification was made based on clinical findings, and pathological features. The characteristic clinical findings were conciousness disturbance, no elevation of blood pressure at the onset of stroke, hemiplegia and shock. However, the typical anginal chest pain was found in only 17% of cases. The underlying diseases and complications were hypertension, atrial fibrillation (Af), disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), renal failure, malignant neoplasma, and diabetes mellitus. The incidences of Af, DIC, mural thrombus, non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis (NBTE) were significantly higher in the group with cerebral embolism than in the group with cerebral thrombosis. The coronary stenotic index was also smaller in the group with cerebral embolism. Therefore, the major etiology of cardio-cerebral apoplexy was a simultaneous embolism to the brain and heart due to Af, NBTE or, DIC.

  3. Cerebral Folate Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral folate deficiency (CFD) is associated with low levels of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with normal folate levels in the plasma and red blood cells. The onset of symptoms caused by the deficiency of folates in the brain is at around 4 to 6 months of age. This is followed by delayed development, with deceleration…

  4. United Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... be sure to follow us on Twitter ! Affiliate Network UCP affiliates provide services and support on a community-by-community basis, serving the unique needs of people with disabilities in their region. Find your ... and their networks. Individuals with cerebral palsy and other disabilities deserve ...

  5. Cerebral Palsy (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain is affected and which parts of the body that section of the brain controls. If CP affects both arms and both legs, ... the case of spastic CP) or to help control seizures. And some might have special surgeries to keep their arms or legs straighter and more ... Coping With Cerebral Palsy Puberty can ...

  6. Cerebral Palsy Litigation

    PubMed Central

    Sartwelle, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    The cardinal driver of cerebral palsy litigation is electronic fetal monitoring, which has continued unabated for 40 years. Electronic fetal monitoring, however, is based on 19th-century childbirth myths, a virtually nonexistent scientific foundation, and has a false positive rate exceeding 99%. It has not affected the incidence of cerebral palsy. Electronic fetal monitoring has, however, increased the cesarian section rate, with the expected increase in mortality and morbidity risks to mothers and babies alike. This article explains why electronic fetal monitoring remains endorsed as efficacious in the worlds’ labor rooms and courtrooms despite being such a feeble medical modality. It also reviews the reasons professional organizations have failed to condemn the use of electronic fetal monitoring in courtrooms. The failures of tort reform, special cerebral palsy courts, and damage limits to stem the escalating litigation are discussed. Finally, the authors propose using a currently available evidence rule—the Daubert doctrine that excludes “junk science” from the courtroom—as the beginning of the end to cerebral palsy litigation and electronic fetal monitoring’s 40-year masquerade as science. PMID:25183322

  7. Reversible cerebral shrinkage in kwashiorkor: an MRI study.

    PubMed

    Gunston, G D; Burkimsher, D; Malan, H; Sive, A A

    1992-08-01

    Protein energy malnutrition is associated with cerebral atrophy which may be detrimental to intellectual development. The aim of this study was to document the anatomical abnormalities which lead to the appearance of cerebral atrophy using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the acute stage of kwashiorkor and to monitor changes during nutritional rehabilitation. Twelve children aged 6 to 37 months requiring admission to hospital for the treatment of kwashiorkor were studied. The children were evaluated clinically, biochemically, and by MRI of their brains on admission and 30 and 90 days later. Brain shrinkage was present in every child on admission. White and grey matter appeared equally affected and the myelination was normal for age. At 90 days, the cerebral changes had resolved in nine and improved substantially in the remainder, by which time serum proteins and weight for age were within the normal range. The findings of this study suggest that brain shrinkage associated with kwashiorkor reverses rapidly with nutritional rehabilitation.

  8. [Spasticity in children cerebral palsy: diagnosis and treatment strategies].

    PubMed

    Kurenkov, A L; Batysheva, T T; Vinogradov, A V; Ziuziaeva, E K

    2012-01-01

    Spasticity in children cerebral palsy has its own peculiarities due to the presence of pathological tonic reflexes, pathological sinkinetic activity during arbitrary movements, disturbance of coordinative interactions of muscle synergists and antagonists, increase of total reflex excitability. Physiotherapeutic methods, massage, therapeutic exercises, kinesitherapy, biological feedback training (BFT), methods of orthopedic correction, neurosurgery are widely used in the treatment of spasticity. The use of botulinum toxin type A is a new effective approach to the treatment of spasticity that improves motor functions and quality of life of children with children cerebral palsy. It is being used in the treatment of children and adolescence in a polyclinic unit of the Moscow psychoneurological hospital since 2001. The experience of treatment with botulinum and wide implementation of this method indicated that botulinum toxin injections in the complex treatment of spasticity allow to optimize approaches to treatment of children and adolescence with children cerebral palsy and to increase significantly the quality of medical-social rehabilitation of patients.

  9. Media Training

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    With the LHC starting up soon, the world's media are again turning their attention to CERN. We're all likely to be called upon to explain what is happening at CERN to media, friends and neighbours. The seminar will be given by BBC television news journalists Liz Pike and Nadia Marchant, and will deal with the kind of questions we're likely to be confronted with through the restart period. The training is open for everybody. Make sure you arrive early enough to get a seat - there are only 200 seats in the Globe. The session will also be webcast: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  10. Media Training

    SciTech Connect

    2009-12-11

    With the LHC starting up soon, the world's media are again turning their attention to CERN. We're all likely to be called upon to explain what is happening at CERN to media, friends and neighbours. The seminar will be given by BBC television news journalists Liz Pike and Nadia Marchant, and will deal with the kind of questions we're likely to be confronted with through the restart period. The training is open for everybody. Make sure you arrive early enough to get a seat - there are only 200 seats in the Globe. The session will also be webcast: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  11. Streaming Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulley, John

    2009-01-01

    At a time when the evolutionary pace of new media resembles the real-time mutation of certain microorganisms, the age-old question of how best to connect with constituents can seem impossibly complex--even for an elite institution plugged into the motherboard of Silicon Valley. Identifying the most effective vehicle for reaching a particular…

  12. Media Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Kenneth J.; Pyrillis, Rita; Rosario, Ruben; Stuart, Reginald; Zinngrabe, Elaine

    2007-01-01

    This article presents five vignettes, written by veteran journalists, that focus on the current and future state of journalism. Despite almost daily reports of media consolidation and newspaper layoffs, the journalists sound a cautionary but optimistic tone about the industry. They weigh in on everything from the threats to diversity to the future…

  13. Cerebral venous thrombosis in a child with nephrotic syndrome: case report.

    PubMed

    Bhoobun, Shalinee; Jalloh, Alhaji Alusaine; Jacobsen, Kathryn H

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), a rare and life threatening complication of nephrotic syndrome, has a variable and non-specific presentation, posing diagnostic challenges. We describe a case of CVT in a Sierra Leonean child with nephrotic syndrome who was successfully treated for the condition despite the resource limitations of the hospital. This case highlights the importance of considering cerebral venous thrombosis as a complication of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome in children presenting with neurological symptoms.

  14. Managing Malignant Cerebral Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Sahuquillo, Juan; Sheth, Kevin N.; Kahle, Kristopher T.; Walcott, Brian P.

    2011-01-01

    Opinion statement Managing patients with malignant cerebral infarction remains one of the foremost challenges in medicine. These patients are at high risk for progressive neurologic deterioration and death due to malignant cerebral edema, and they are best cared for in the intensive care unit of a comprehensive stroke center. Careful initial assessment of neurologic function and of findings on MRI, coupled with frequent reassessment of clinical and radiologic findings using CT or MRI are mandatory to promote the prompt initiation of treatments that will ensure the best outcome in these patients. Significant deterioration in either neurologic function or radiologic findings or both demand timely treatment using the best medical management, which may include osmotherapy (mannitol or hypertonic saline), endotracheal intubation, and mechanical ventilation. Under appropriate circumstances, decompressive craniectomy may be warranted to improve outcome or to prevent death. PMID:21190097

  15. High Altitude Cerebral Edema

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    English literature and Hultgren et al (3.1) described four more cases of HAPE within the next year. In 1960, Chiodi (5) first reported on a Peruvian...altitude and treatment with steroids and diuretics, CSF pressure was 85 mm H 0. In 1960, Chiodi .(5) described a patient 2 suffering with HACE who...Biol. Chem., 157, 297-302, 1945. 5. Chiodi H: "Mal de montana a forma cerebral; possible mecanismo etiopathogenico," An. Fac. Med. Lima., 43, 437

  16. Primary cerebral malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Kai; Kong, Xiangyi; Mao, Gengsheng; Qiu, Ming; Zhu, Haibo; Zhou, Lei; Nie, Qingbin; Xu, Yi; Du, Shiwei

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Primary intracranial melanomas are uncommon and constitute approximately 1% of all melanoma cases and 0.07% of all brain tumors. In nature, these primary melanomas are very aggressive and can spread to other organs. We report an uncommon case of primary cerebral malignant melanoma—a challenging diagnosis guided by clinical presentations, radiological features, and surgical biopsy results, aiming to emphasize the importance of considering primary melanoma when making differential diagnoses of intracranial lesions. We present a rare case of a primary cerebral melanoma in the left temporal lobe. The mass appeared iso-hypodense on brain computed tomography (CT), short signal on T1-weighted magnetic resonance images (T1WI) and long signal on T2WI. It was not easy to make an accurate diagnosis before surgery. We showed the patient's disease course and reviewed related literatures, for readers’ reference. Written informed consent was obtained from the patient for publication of this case report and any accompanying images. Because of this, there is no need to conduct special ethic review and the ethical approval is not necessary. After surgery, the pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of melanoma. The patient was discharged without any complications and went on to receive adjuvant radiochemotherapy. It is difficult to diagnose primary cerebral melanoma in the absence of any cutaneous melanosis. A high index of clinical suspicion along with good pathology reporting is the key in diagnosing these extremely rare tumors. PMID:28121927

  17. Cerebral vasospasm. Part I. In cerebral vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Mohr, J P; Kase, C S

    1983-01-01

    This review enumerates the many proposed mechanisms of vasospasm, including cellular elements, agents derived from the blood and injured cerebral tissues, alteration of calcium: magnesium ratios, free radical reactions, hypothalamic injury, clogging of the subarachnoid space, obstructions of the vasa vasorum and necrosis of the media with subintimal proliferation and intraluminal acidosis. At present, no single agent has been demonstrated as the only source of vasospasm, and whether the disorder is spasm or a chronic arteriopathy remains the subject of argument. The factors influencing the frequency, timing, severity and distribution of angiographically documented vasospasm are discussed, including data from our own population-based study over a 3 year period showing an incidence of vasospasm of 73%. Special emphasis is given to the observation that differences in patient populations play a major role in the incidence and severity of reported vasospasm: those from non-selective populations show a higher incidence of vasospasm and a greater severity of the syndromes attributed to spasm. Hypotheses are offered to account for the low frequency of vasospasm in hemorrhages from arteriovenous malformations and mycotic aneurysms. Clinical syndromes of vasospasm are reviewed, with special emphasis on our own material. The mode of onset and subsequent course of syndromes include those of sudden onset consistent with embolism, and those of gradual onset suggesting a low flow state. Their relationship to the severity of the subarachnoid hemorrhage and the vasospasm is presented. The paucity of syndromes of isolated deep infarcts of the lacunar type is noted. An account is given of the many failed therapies and the future hopes for early surgery. Innovations in medical therapy, including the use of some platelet inhibitors available only in some countries, and rationales for the use of aspirin and even heparin is discussed.

  18. How Does the Use of Visual Media Affect a Nonverbal Student's Communication?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remmel-Gehm, Mary T.

    This report discusses the outcomes of a study that investigated how visual media would affect the communication skills of a 13-year-old nonverbal girl with cerebral palsy and whether the use of visual media would provide documentation of higher cognitive functioning. For the study, the subject used three different tools to add visual information…

  19. Paraplegia caused by cerebral contusions in the bilateral precentral gyri

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Hideaki; Fujimori, Hiroyuki; Sato, Naoaki; Matsumura, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Background: Paraplegia is mainly caused by spinal cord disease and rarely occurs due to head trauma. In this report, we describe a case of paraplegia caused by cerebral contusions in the bilateral precentral gyri. Case Description: A 72-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with mildly impaired consciousness and severe pure motor paralysis in both legs. He was healthy until the morning of the day, but his wife found him injured in front of his house upon returning home. He had a subcutaneous hematoma in his occipital region, and seemed to have slipped by accident. Computed tomography of the brain and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of his spinal cord revealed no apparent cause of the paraplegia, although an MRI of his brain clearly revealed cerebral contusions in the bilateral precentral gyri. The cerebral contusion was diagnosed as the cause of pure motor paralysis of lower extremities. He received rehabilitation, and manual muscle testing of his legs revealed improvements. In the subacute phase, the precentral gyrus lesion disappeared on MRI. Conclusion: We must emphasize that cerebral contusion can be a differential diagnosis for paraplegia. In the acute phase, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MRI coronal and sagittal images are useful for identifying precentral gyri contusions. Paraplegia caused by a cerebral contusion may be misdiagnosed as a spinal concussion due to the disappearance of the precentral gyrus lesion on FLAIR MRI in the subacute phase. PMID:27904755

  20. [Chronic otitis mediaChronic Otitis Media].

    PubMed

    Kohles, N; Schulz, T; Eßer, D

    2015-11-01

    There are 2 different kinds of chronic otitis media: Otitis media chronica mesotympanalis and otitis media chronica epitympanalis (cholesteatoma). The incidence of chronic otitis media as reported in literature differs in a wide range. The incidence rates vary between 0.45 and 46%. Both, otitis media chronica mesotympanalis and cholesteatoma, lead to eardrum perforation due to lengthy and recurring inflammations. Furthermore, chronic otitis media is characterized by frequently recurring otorrhea and conductive hearing loss.

  1. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema

    PubMed Central

    Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  2. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Stokum, Jesse A; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2016-03-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema.

  3. On Media Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedorov, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    This monograph analyzes the theory and practice of media education and media literacy. The book also includes the list of Russian media education literature and addresses of websites of the associations for media education.

  4. News Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    and airwaves clogged with commercials. In addition, consolidation allows only a few organizations to exert control over program content, an issue...estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources , gathering and maintaining... control number. 1. REPORT DATE 2005 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE News Media 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  5. Hospital marketing.

    PubMed

    Carter, Tony

    2003-01-01

    This article looks at a prescribed academic framework for various criteria that serve as a checklist for marketing performance that can be applied to hospital marketing organizations. These guidelines are drawn from some of Dr. Noel Capon of Columbia University's book Marketing Management in the 21st Century and applied to actual practices of hospital marketing organizations. In many ways this checklist can act as a "marketing" balanced scorecard to verify performance effectiveness and develop opportunities for innovation.

  6. Hospital philanthropy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dean G; Clement, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    It remains an open question whether hospital spending on fundraising efforts to garner philanthropy is a good use of funds. Research and industry reports provide conflicting results. We describe the accounting and data challenges in analysis of hospital philanthropy, which include measurement of donations, measurement of fundraising expenses, and finding the relationships among organizations where these cash flows occur. With these challenges, finding conflicting results is not a surprise.

  7. Media matters.

    PubMed

    Martinez, L M

    1995-01-01

    The impact of the mass media on woman's status was addressed at two 1995 conferences: the Fourth World Conference on Women, held in Beijing, China, and the Congress of the World Association for Christian Communication, held in Puebla, Mexico. The globalization process facilitated by the mass media has served to increase the power of patriarchy, with no advantages to the cause of women's rights. Coverage of popular movements has been suppressed out of deference to male-controlled governments. Coverage of the Beijing Conference highlighted celebrities and personal stories, to the exclusion of the economic and political issues under debate. Television has commodified women, reinforcing their oppression. On the other hand, the alternative media, which tend to be decentralized, democratic, low-cost, and low in technology, are presenting women as subjects rather than objects and deconstructing gender stereotypes. Of concern, however, is the tendency of computer technology to widen the gap between social classes and developed and developing countries. Women must use information networks to disseminate information on women's rights and strengthen the links between women throughout the world.

  8. Media Education Initiatives by Media Organizations: The Uses of Media Literacy in Hong Kong Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Donna; Lee, Alice Y. L.

    2014-01-01

    As more media organizations have engaged in media education, this paper investigates the goals and practices of these activities. This article coins media education initiatives by media organizations with the term "media-organization media literac"y (MOML). Four MOML projects in Hong Kong were selected for examination. Built on critical…

  9. Middle Cerebral Artery Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Hung-Wen; Liou, Michelle; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Liu, Hua-Shan; Tsai, Ping-Huei; Chiang, Shih-Wei; Chou, Ming-Chung; Peng, Giia-Sheun; Huang, Guo-Shu; Hsu, Hsian-He; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Calcification of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) is uncommon in the healthy elderly. Whether calcification of the MCA is associated with cerebral ischemic stroke remains undetermined. We intended to investigate the association using Agatston calcium scoring of the MCA. This study retrospectively included 354 subjects with ischemic stroke in the MCA territory and 1518 control subjects who underwent computed tomography (CT) of the brain. We recorded major known risk factors for ischemic stroke, including age, gender, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, hyperlipidemia, and obesity, along with the MCA calcium burden, measured with the Agatston calcium scoring method. Univariate and modified logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the association between the MCA calcification and ischemic stroke. The univariate analyses showed significant associations of ischemic stroke with age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, total MCA Agatston score, and the presence of calcification on both or either side of the MCA. Subjects with the presence of MCA calcification on both or either side of the MCA were 8.46 times (95% confidence interval, 4.93–14.53; P < 0.001) more likely to have a cerebral infarct than subjects without MCA calcification after adjustment for the major known risk factors, including age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and smoking. However, a higher degree of MCA calcification reflected by the Agatston score was not associated with higher risk of MCA ischemic stroke after adjustment for the confounding factors and presence of MCA calcification. These results suggest that MCA calcification is associated with ischemic stroke in the MCA territory. Further prospective studies are required to verify the clinical implications of the MCA calcification. PMID:26683969

  10. Resting cerebral blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Ances, B M.; Sisti, D; Vaida, F; Liang, C L.; Leontiev, O; Perthen, J E.; Buxton, R B.; Benson, D; Smith, D M.; Little, S J.; Richman, D D.; Moore, D J.; Ellis, R J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: HIV enters the brain soon after infection causing neuronal damage and microglial/astrocyte dysfunction leading to neuropsychological impairment. We examined the impact of HIV on resting cerebral blood flow (rCBF) within the lenticular nuclei (LN) and visual cortex (VC). Methods: This cross-sectional study used arterial spin labeling MRI (ASL-MRI) to measure rCBF within 33 HIV+ and 26 HIV− subjects. Nonparametric Wilcoxon rank sum test assessed rCBF differences due to HIV serostatus. Classification and regression tree (CART) analysis determined optimal rCBF cutoffs for differentiating HIV serostatus. The effects of neuropsychological impairment and infection duration on rCBF were evaluated. Results: rCBF within the LN and VC were significantly reduced for HIV+ compared to HIV− subjects. A 2-tiered CART approach using either LN rCBF ≤50.09 mL/100 mL/min or LN rCBF >50.09 mL/100 mL/min but VC rCBF ≤37.05 mL/100 mL/min yielded an 88% (29/33) sensitivity and an 88% (23/26) specificity for differentiating by HIV serostatus. HIV+ subjects, including neuropsychologically unimpaired, had reduced rCBF within the LN (p = 0.02) and VC (p = 0.001) compared to HIV− controls. A temporal progression of brain involvement occurred with LN rCBF significantly reduced for both acute/early (<1 year of seroconversion) and chronic HIV-infected subjects, whereas rCBF in the VC was diminished for only chronic HIV-infected subjects. Conclusion: Resting cerebral blood flow (rCBF) using arterial spin labeling MRI has the potential to be a noninvasive neuroimaging biomarker for assessing HIV in the brain. rCBF reductions that occur soon after seroconversion possibly reflect neuronal or vascular injury among HIV+ individuals not yet expressing neuropsychological impairment. GLOSSARY AEH = acute/early HIV infection; ANOVA = analysis of variance; ASL-MRI = arterial spin labeling MRI; CART = classification and regression tree; CBF = cerebral blood flow; CH = chronic HIV

  11. Oligodendrogenesis after cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruilan; Chopp, Michael; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2013-01-01

    Neural stem cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle of adult rodent brain generate oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) that disperse throughout the corpus callosum and striatum where some of OPCs differentiate into mature oligodendrocytes. Studies in animal models of stroke demonstrate that cerebral ischemia induces oligodendrogenesis during brain repair processes. This article will review evidence of stroke-induced proliferation and differentiation of OPCs that are either resident in white matter or are derived from SVZ neural progenitor cells and of therapies that amplify endogenous oligodendrogenesis in ischemic brain. PMID:24194700

  12. Cerebral Disorders of Calves.

    PubMed

    Dore, Vincent; Smith, Geof

    2017-03-01

    Neurologic diseases of the cerebrum are relatively common in cattle. In calves, the primary cerebral disorders are polioencephalomalacia, meningitis, and sodium toxicity. Because diagnostic testing is not always readily available, the practitioner must often decide on a course of treatment based on knowledge of the likely disease, as well as his or her own clinical experience. This is particularly true with neurologic diseases in which the prognosis is often poor and euthanasia may be the most humane outcome. This article reviews the most common diseases affecting the cerebrum of calves with a focus on pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

  13. Multiple fusiform cerebral aneurysms – case report

    PubMed Central

    Jaworska, Katarzyna; Dołowy, Joanna; Kuśmierska, Małgorzata; Kuniej, Tomasz; Jaźwiec, Przemysław

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: A true aneurysym is a dilation of arterial lumen as a consequence of congenital or acquired abnormalities leading to a reduction of mechanical resistance of vascular wall, most commonly caused by its defected structure in the form of absence or weakening of the muscular and/or elastic layer. From the pathophysiological point of view, cerebral aneurysms can be classified as ‘saccular’ – most commonly occurring, and ‘other types’, including fusiform/dolichoectatic, dissecting, serpentine, posttraumatic, mycotic and giant aneurysms with or without intra-aneurysmal thrombosis. Case Report: We present a rare case of a patient with multiple fusiform dilations of cerebral vessels and giant fusiform aneurysm in supraclinoid segment of the internal carotid artery. The patient presented to hospital because of sudden, severe vertigo with nausea, impaired balance and disturbed vision. Vascular anomalies were detected on CT scanning without contrast. The diagnostic work-up was complemented by CT angiography, MRI and cerebral angiography. Conclusions: Aneurysm located within the intracranial arteries is one of the most common vascular defects of the brain. The number, size and location of aneurysms are highly variable. Aneurysms can have either supra- or infratentorial location, affecting a single or multiple arteries within one or both brain hemispheres. There is often a correlation between the location of the aneurysm and its etiology, as in case of so-called mirror-image aneurysms. Symmetrically located aneurysms may indicate a defect in vascular structure. Asymmetric location, as in the patient described above, is more likely due to acquired causes, mainly atherosclerosis, but also septic emboli or blood disorders. PMID:22802866

  14. Rehabilitation outcomes of children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Yalcinkaya, Ebru Yilmaz; Caglar, Nil Sayıner; Tugcu, Betul; Tonbaklar, Aysegul

    2014-02-01

    [Purpose] To evaluate the results of Bobath-based rehabilitation performed at a pediatric cerebral palsy (CP) inpatient clinic. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects were 28 children with CP who were inpatients at a pediatric service. Inclusion criteria were: being an inpatient of our hospital aged 2-12 with a diagnosis of CP; having one permanent primary caregiver; and the caregiver having no medical or psychotic problems. All of the patients received Bobath treatment for 1 hour per day, 5 days a week. The locomotor system, neurologic and orthopedic examination, Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) of the patients, and Short Form-36 (SF-36) of permanent caregivers were evaluated at the time of admission to hospital, discharge from hospital, and at 1 and 3 months after discharge. [Results] Post-admission scores of GMFM at discharge, and 1 and 3 months later showed significant increase. Social function and emotional role subscores of SF-36 had increased significantly at discharge. [Conclusion] Bobath treatment is promising and randomized controlled further studies are needed for rehabilitation technics.

  15. Rehabilitation Outcomes of Children with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Yalcinkaya, Ebru Yilmaz; Caglar, Nil Sayıner; Tugcu, Betul; Tonbaklar, Aysegul

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] To evaluate the results of Bobath-based rehabilitation performed at a pediatric cerebral palsy (CP) inpatient clinic. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects were 28 children with CP who were inpatients at a pediatric service. Inclusion criteria were: being an inpatient of our hospital aged 2–12 with a diagnosis of CP; having one permanent primary caregiver; and the caregiver having no medical or psychotic problems. All of the patients received Bobath treatment for 1 hour per day, 5 days a week. The locomotor system, neurologic and orthopedic examination, Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) of the patients, and Short Form-36 (SF-36) of permanent caregivers were evaluated at the time of admission to hospital, discharge from hospital, and at 1 and 3 months after discharge. [Results] Post-admission scores of GMFM at discharge, and 1 and 3 months later showed significant increase. Social function and emotional role subscores of SF-36 had increased significantly at discharge. [Conclusion] Bobath treatment is promising and randomized controlled further studies are needed for rehabilitation technics. PMID:24648650

  16. Cerebral Gluconeogenesis and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yip, James; Geng, Xiaokun; Shen, Jiamei; Ding, Yuchuan

    2017-01-01

    The gluconeogenesis pathway, which has been known to normally present in the liver, kidney, intestine, or muscle, has four irreversible steps catalyzed by the enzymes: pyruvate carboxylase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase, and glucose 6-phosphatase. Studies have also demonstrated evidence that gluconeogenesis exists in brain astrocytes but no convincing data have yet been found in neurons. Astrocytes exhibit significant 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase-3 activity, a key mechanism for regulating glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. Astrocytes are unique in that they use glycolysis to produce lactate, which is then shuttled into neurons and used as gluconeogenic precursors for reduction. This gluconeogenesis pathway found in astrocytes is becoming more recognized as an important alternative glucose source for neurons, specifically in ischemic stroke and brain tumor. Further studies are needed to discover how the gluconeogenesis pathway is controlled in the brain, which may lead to the development of therapeutic targets to control energy levels and cellular survival in ischemic stroke patients, or inhibit gluconeogenesis in brain tumors to promote malignant cell death and tumor regression. While there are extensive studies on the mechanisms of cerebral glycolysis in ischemic stroke and brain tumors, studies on cerebral gluconeogenesis are limited. Here, we review studies done to date regarding gluconeogenesis to evaluate whether this metabolic pathway is beneficial or detrimental to the brain under these pathological conditions. PMID:28101056

  17. Cerebral cartography and connectomics

    PubMed Central

    Sporns, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cartography and connectomics pursue similar goals in attempting to create maps that can inform our understanding of the structural and functional organization of the cortex. Connectome maps explicitly aim at representing the brain as a complex network, a collection of nodes and their interconnecting edges. This article reflects on some of the challenges that currently arise in the intersection of cerebral cartography and connectomics. Principal challenges concern the temporal dynamics of functional brain connectivity, the definition of areal parcellations and their hierarchical organization into large-scale networks, the extension of whole-brain connectivity to cellular-scale networks, and the mapping of structure/function relations in empirical recordings and computational models. Successfully addressing these challenges will require extensions of methods and tools from network science to the mapping and analysis of human brain connectivity data. The emerging view that the brain is more than a collection of areas, but is fundamentally operating as a complex networked system, will continue to drive the creation of ever more detailed and multi-modal network maps as tools for on-going exploration and discovery in human connectomics. PMID:25823870

  18. Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome.

    PubMed

    van Mook, Walther N K A; Rennenberg, Roger J M W; Schurink, Geert Willem; van Oostenbrugge, Robert Jan; Mess, Werner H; Hofman, Paul A M; de Leeuw, Peter W

    2005-12-01

    Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS) after carotid endarterectomy is characterised by ipsilateral headache, hypertension, seizures, and focal neurological deficits. If not treated properly it can result in severe brain oedema, intracerebral or subarachnoid haemorrhage, and death. Knowledge of CHS among physicians is limited. Most studies report incidences of CHS of 0-3% after carotid endarterectomy. CHS is most common in patients with increases of more than 100% in perfusion compared with baseline after carotid endarterectomy and is rare in patients with increases in perfusion less than 100% compared with baseline. The most important risk factors in CHS are diminished cerebrovascular reserve, postoperative hypertension, and hyperperfusion lasting more than several hours after carotid endarterectomy. Impaired autoregulation as a result of endothelial dysfunction mediated by generation of free oxygen radicals is implicated in the pathogenesis of CHS. Treatment strategies are directed towards regulation of blood pressure and limitation of rises in cerebral perfusion. Complete recovery happens in mild cases, but disability and death can occur in more severe cases. More information about CHS and early institution of adequate treatment are of paramount importance in order to prevent these potentially severe complications.

  19. Cerebral cartography and connectomics.

    PubMed

    Sporns, Olaf

    2015-05-19

    Cerebral cartography and connectomics pursue similar goals in attempting to create maps that can inform our understanding of the structural and functional organization of the cortex. Connectome maps explicitly aim at representing the brain as a complex network, a collection of nodes and their interconnecting edges. This article reflects on some of the challenges that currently arise in the intersection of cerebral cartography and connectomics. Principal challenges concern the temporal dynamics of functional brain connectivity, the definition of areal parcellations and their hierarchical organization into large-scale networks, the extension of whole-brain connectivity to cellular-scale networks, and the mapping of structure/function relations in empirical recordings and computational models. Successfully addressing these challenges will require extensions of methods and tools from network science to the mapping and analysis of human brain connectivity data. The emerging view that the brain is more than a collection of areas, but is fundamentally operating as a complex networked system, will continue to drive the creation of ever more detailed and multi-modal network maps as tools for on-going exploration and discovery in human connectomics.

  20. Monitoring of cerebral autoregulation.

    PubMed

    Czosnyka, Marek; Miller, Chad

    2014-12-01

    Pressure autoregulation is an important hemodynamic mechanism that protects the brain against inappropriate fluctuations in cerebral blood flow in the face of changing cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP). Static autoregulation represents how far cerebrovascular resistance changes when CPP varies, and dynamic autoregulation represents how fast these changes happen. Both have been monitored in the setting of neurocritical care to aid prognostication and contribute to individualizing CPP targets in patients. Failure of autoregulation is associated with a worse outcome in various acute neurological diseases. Several studies have used transcranial Doppler ultrasound, intracranial pressure (ICP with vascular reactivity as surrogate measure of autoregulation), and near-infrared spectroscopy to continuously monitor the impact of spontaneous fluctuations in CPP on cerebrovascular physiology and to calculate derived variables of autoregulatory efficiency. Many patients who undergo such monitoring demonstrate a range of CPP in which autoregulatory efficiency is optimal. Management of patients at or near this optimal level of CPP is associated with better outcomes in traumatic brain injury. Many of these studies have utilized the concept of the pressure reactivity index, a correlation coefficient between ICP and mean arterial pressure. While further studies are needed, these data suggest that monitoring of autoregulation could aid prognostication and may help identify optimal CPP levels in individual patients.

  1. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Milena Castellar-Leones, Sandra; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT) and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24347950

  2. [Noradrenaline and cerebral aging].

    PubMed

    Jouvet, M; Albarede, J L; Lubin, S; Meyrignac, C

    1991-01-01

    The central functions of norepinephrine (NE) are a recent discovery: regulation of alertness and of the wakefulness-sleep cycle, maintenance of attention, memory and learning, cerebral plasticity and neuro-protection. The anatomical, histological, biochemical and physiological properties of the central noradrenergic system: extreme capacity for ramification and arborization; slow conduction, non-myelinized axons with extrasynaptic varicosities producing and releasing NE; frequency of co-transmission phenomena, and; neuromodulation with fiber effect responsible for improvement in the signal over background noise ratio and selection of significant stimuli form a true interface between the outside world and the central nervous system, notably for the neocortex in the context of the cognitive treatment of information. This central noradrenergic system is involved in the neurophysiology and the clinical features of cerebral aging (ideation-motor and cognitive function slowing down, loss of behavioral adjustment), neuro-degenerative disorders (SDAT, Parkinson's disease), certain aspects of depression and less obvious conditions (head injuries, sequelae of cerebrovascular accidents, sub-cortical dementia). The recent development of medications improving alertness (adrafinil, modafinil) with a pure central action and specifically noradrenergic, may contribute to an improvement in these multifactorial disorders.

  3. Photodynamic therapy of recurrent cerebral glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shu-Gan; Wu, Si-En; Chen, Zong-Qian; Sun, Wei

    1993-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) was performed on 11 cases of recurrent cerebral glioma, including 3 cases of recurrent glioblastoma, 7 of recurrent anaplastic astrocytoma, and 1 recurrent ependymoma. Hematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) was administered intravenously at a dose of 4 - 7 mg/kg 5 - 24 hours before the operation. All patients underwent a craniotomy with a nearly radical excision of the tumor following which the tumor bed was irradiated with 630 nm laser light emitting either an argon pumped dye laser or frequency double YAG pumped dye laser for 30 to 80 minutes with a total dose of 50 J/cm2 (n equals 1), 100 J/cm2 (n equals 2), 200 J/cm2 (n equals 7), and 300 J/cm2 (n equals 1). The temperature was kept below 37 degree(s)C by irrigation. Two patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy. There was no evidence of increased cerebral edema, and no other toxicity by the therapy. All patients were discharged from the hospital within 15 days after surgery. We conclude that PDT using 4 - 7 mg/kg of HPD and 630 nm light with a dose of up to 300 J/cm2 can be used as an adjuvant therapy with no additional complications. Adjuvant PDT in the treatment of recurrent glioma is better than simple surgery.

  4. Influence of medial collagen organization and axial in situ stretch on saccular cerebral aneurysm growth.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Thomas; Kroon, Martin; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2009-10-01

    A model for saccular cerebral aneurysm growth, proposed by Kroon and Holzapfel (2007, "A Model for Saccular Cerebral Aneurysm Growth in a Human Middle Cerebral Artery," J. Theor. Biol., 247, pp. 775-787; 2008, "Modeling of Saccular Aneurysm Growth in a Human Middle Cerebral Artery," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 130, p. 051012), is further investigated. A human middle cerebral artery is modeled as a two-layer cylinder where the layers correspond to the media and the adventitia. The immediate loss of media in the location of the aneurysm is taken to be responsible for the initiation of the aneurysm growth. The aneurysm is regarded as a development of the adventitia, which is composed of several distinct layers of collagen fibers perfectly aligned in specified directions. The collagen fibers are the only load-bearing constituent in the aneurysm wall; their production and degradation depend on the stretch of the wall and are responsible for the aneurysm growth. The anisotropy of the surrounding media was modeled using the strain-energy function proposed by Holzapfel et al. (2000, "A New Constitutive Framework for Arterial Wall Mechanics and a Comparative Study of Material Models," J. Elast., 61, pp. 1-48), which is valid for an elastic material with two families of fibers. It was shown that the inclusion of fibers in the media reduced the maximum principal Cauchy stress and the maximum shear stress in the aneurysm wall. The thickness increase in the aneurysm wall due to material growth was also decreased. Varying the fiber angle in the media from a circumferential direction to a deviation of 10 deg from the circumferential direction did, however, only show a little effect. Altering the axial in situ stretch of the artery had a much larger effect in terms of the steady-state shape of the aneurysm and the resulting stresses in the aneurysm wall. The peak values of the maximum principal stress and the thickness increase both became significantly higher for larger axial

  5. Hospitality Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of the Canyons, Valencia, CA.

    A project was conducted at College of the Canyons (Valencia, California) to initiate a new 2-year hospitality program with career options in hotel or restaurant management. A mail and telephone survey of area employers in the restaurant and hotel field demonstrated a need for, interest in, and willingness to provide internships for such a program.…

  6. Hospital finance.

    PubMed

    Herman, M J

    1998-01-01

    This article summarizes key areas of focus for the analysis of risk in the hospital segment of the health care industry. The article is written from a commercial bank lending perspective. Both for-profit (C-corporations) and 501 (c)(3) not-for-profit segments are addressed.

  7. Academic Hospitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  8. Multivariate Analysis of Risk Factors of Cerebral Infarction in 439 Patients Undergoing Thoracic Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kanaoka, Yuji; Ohki, Takao; Maeda, Koji; Baba, Takeshi; Fujita, Tetsuji

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study is to identify the potential risk factors of cerebral infarction associated with thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR). TEVAR was developed as a less invasive surgical alternative to conventional open repair for thoracic aortic aneurysm treatment. However, outcomes following TEVAR of aortic and distal arch aneurysms remain suboptimal. Cerebral infarction is a major concern during the perioperative period. We included 439 patients who underwent TEVAR of aortic aneurysms at a high-volume teaching hospital between July 2006 and June 2013. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify perioperative cerebral infarction risk factors. Four patients (0.9%) died within 30 days of TEVAR; 17 (3.9%) developed cerebral infarction. In univariate analysis, history of ischemic heart disease and cerebral infarction and concomitant cerebrovascular disease were significantly associated with cerebral infarction. “Shaggy aorta” presence, left subclavian artery coverage, carotid artery debranching, and pull-through wire use were identified as independent risk factors of cerebral infarction. In multivariate analysis, history of ischemic heart disease (odds ratio [OR] 6.49, P = 0.046) and cerebral infarction (OR 43.74, P = 0.031), “shaggy aorta” (OR 30.32, P < 0.001), pull-through wire use during surgery (OR 7.196, P = 0.014), and intraoperative blood loss ≥800 mL (OR 24.31, P = 0.017) were found to be independent risk factors of cerebral infarction. This study identified patient- and procedure-related risk factors of cerebral infarction following TEVAR. These results indicate that patient outcomes could be improved through the identification and management of procedure-related risk factors. PMID:27082585

  9. Measuring News Media Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maksl, Adam; Ashley, Seth; Craft, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    News media literacy refers to the knowledge and motivations needed to identify and engage with journalism. This study measured levels of news media literacy among 500 teenagers using a new scale measure based on Potter's model of media literacy and adapted to news media specifically. The adapted model posits that news media literate individuals…

  10. Geographic Media Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukinbeal, Chris

    2014-01-01

    While the use of media permeates geographic research and pedagogic practice, the underlying literacies that link geography and media remain uncharted. This article argues that geographic media literacy incorporates visual literacy, information technology literacy, information literacy, and media literacy. Geographic media literacy is the ability…

  11. Adolescents and media literacy.

    PubMed

    McCannon, Robert

    2005-06-01

    In the face of media industry consolidation, fewer people control media content which makes it harder for parents and citizens to know the research about media-related issues, such as video game violence, nutrition, and sexual risk-taking. Media literacy offers a popular and potentially successful way to counter the misinformation that is spread by Big Media public relations.

  12. The Mass Media Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmgren, Rod, Ed.; Norton, William, Ed.

    This anthology consists of two major sections, "The News Media" and "The Entertainment Media." Both feature essays by critics, working professionals, and professional observers of the media. One aim of the anthology is to show the pervasive effect of the media on us. The section on news media comments on such topics as credibility gap, Vice…

  13. All-Round Marketing Increases Hospital Popularity.

    PubMed

    Ziqi, Tao

    2015-06-01

    Xuzhou Center Hospital is in a competing medical market in Xuzhou city. This hospital has been dedicating to improve the medical skills and provide professional and individualized service to the patients in order to improve the patient's experience and increase the patient's satisfaction. On the other side, this hospital has provided an all-round marketing campaign to build up the social influence and public reputation through public-praise marketing, web marketing, media marketing, and scholar marketing. Besides, this hospital has been cooperating with foreign medical institutions and inviting foreign medical specialists to academic communication. With the combined effects of improving medical service and all-round marketing, the hospital's economic performance has been enhanced significantly and laid a solid foundation for its ambition to become the first-class hospital in Huaihai Economic Zone.

  14. Catatonia After Cerebral Hypoxia: Do the Usual Treatments Apply?

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Davin K.; Abbott, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Neurologic deterioration occurring days to weeks after a cerebral hypoxic event accompanied by diffuse white matter demyelination is called delayed post-hypoxic leukoencephalopathy (DPHL). Manifestations of DPHL are diverse, and include dementia, gait disturbance, incontinence, pyramidal tract signs, parkinsonism, chorea, mood and thought disorders, akinetic mutism, and rarely catatonia. Methods The authors report a case of malignant catatonia in a patient diagnosed with DPHL that was refractory to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), and review the literature on catatonia in DHPL. Results The patient was a 56 year-old female with schizoaffective disorder who was admitted with catatonia two weeks after hospitalization for drug overdose and respiratory failure. Her catatonic symptoms did not respond to lorazepam, amantadine, methylphenidate, or ten sessions of bilateral ECT at maximum energy. Repeat magnetic resonance imaging revealed extensive periventricular white matter lesions not present on admission scans, and she was diagnosed with DPHL. Discussion No treatment for DPHL has been proven to be widely effective. Hyperbaric oxygen treatments may reduce the rate of development, and symptom improvement has been reported with stimulants and other psychotropic agents. Review of the literature reveals rare success with GABAergic agents for catatonia after cerebral hypoxia, and no cases successfully treated with ECT. There are seven case reports of neurologic decompensation during ECT treatment after a cerebral hypoxic event. Conclusion Caution is advised when considering ECT for catatonia when delayed sequelae of cerebral hypoxia are on the differential diagnosis, as there is a dearth of evidence to support this treatment approach. PMID:25262046

  15. [Presentation of equipment: the monitor of cerebral function].

    PubMed

    Dubois, M

    1975-11-01

    From a pair of parietal electrodes, an original apparatus--the monitor of cerebral function--gives a non-stop recording of the brain electric activity for frequencies ranging from 2 to 15 Hertz. It is at the moment less expensive than an ordinary EEG apparatus, easy to carry, to use and to read. The artefacts, interferences or technical defects are either totally eliminated or immediately detected thanks to a parallel graph. It is the first apparatus that has been conceived and used as a routine instrument for cerebral monitoring. It can be used in the Intensive Care Unit as well as in the Operating Theatre:--preventively, whenever there is a risk of an alteration in the cerebral circulation (CEC - extracorporal circulation - for instance - as a diagnosis, a prognosis or a therapy when there is a cerebral lesion (whatever the origin of it can be). The use of this apparatus (that has now become part of the daily routine at the London Hospital) has quickly proved indispensable and the common EEG is no longer being resorted to except upon very few occasions.

  16. Cerebral Arterial Fenestrations

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Daniel L; Stout, Charles E; Kim, Warren T; Kansagra, Akash P; Yu, John Paul; Gu, Amy; Jewell, Nicholas P; Hetts, Steven W; Higashida, Randall T; Dowd, Christopher F; Halbach, Van V

    2014-01-01

    Summary Arterial fenestrations are an anatomic variant with indeterminate significance. Given the controversy surrounding fenestrations we sought their prevalence within our practice along with their association with other cerebrovascular anomalies. We retrospectively reviewed 10,927 patients undergoing digital subtraction angiography between 1992 and 2011. Dictated reports were searched for the terms “fenestration” or “fenestrated” with images reviewed for relevance, yielding 228 unique cases. A Medline database search from February 1964 to January 2013 generated 304 citations, 127 cases of which were selected for analysis. Cerebral arterial fenestrations were identified in 228 patients (2.1%). At least one aneurysm was noted in 60.5% of patients, with an aneurysm arising from the fenestration in 19.6% of patients. Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage or non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage were present in 60.1% and 15.8%, respectively. For the subset of patients with an aneurysm arising directly from a fenestration relative to those patients with an aneurysm not immediately associated with a fenestration, the prevalence of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage was 66.7% vs. 58.6% (p = 0.58). Fenestrations were more often within the posterior circulation (73.2%) than the anterior circulation (24.6%), though there was no difference in the prevalence of aneurysms within these groups (61.1% vs. 60.7%, p = 1.0). Cerebral arterial fenestrations are an anatomic variant more often manifesting at the anterior communicating arterial complex and basilar artery and with no definite pathological relationship with aneurysms. PMID:24976087

  17. Media Tactics in New Zealand's Crown Health Enterprises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comrie, Margie

    1997-01-01

    States that New Zealand's public hospitals, converted into Crown Health Enterprises (CHEs) and required to operate within commercial restraints, were the target of attacks from politicians, medical organizations, community groups, and media. Examines press coverage of two similar CHEs over three months. Shows proactive media relations paid off in…

  18. Strategic media planning: furthering the impact of health care advertising.

    PubMed

    Patrick, G

    1985-11-01

    The changing marketplace and the competitive atmosphere makes advertising increasingly necessary for health care providers. Alternative delivery systems are already using the media to promote their products and hospitals will also need to market the services they provide. This article traces the history of health care advertising and outlines how to prepare an effective media plan.

  19. [A case of accessory middle cerebral artery associated with internal carotid artery aneurysm (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Munekata, K; Omori, H; Kanazawa, Y; Miyazaki, S; Fukushima, H; Kamata, K

    1979-12-01

    A case of accessory middle cerebral artery associated with internal carotid artery aneurysm was reported. A 50-year-old female was admitted to our hospital with complaints of headache, nausea, vomiting and conciousness disturbance. Lumbar puncture showed bloody CSF. Right carotid angiogram revealed saccular aneurysm of the internal carotid-posterior communicating artery and accessory middle cerebral artery originating from the horizontal portion of the right anterior cerebral artery. No other vascular lesion was observed on other angiograms. Operation was performed 2 days after admission. The neck of the aneurysm was clipped. Postoperative aseptic meningitis was cured by frequent lumbar punctures, and her course was uneventful. The etiological hypothesis of these cerebral vascular anomalies was briefly discussed.

  20. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome in children with acute central nervous system injury.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Raquel; Casado-Flores, Juan; Nieto, Monserrat; García-Teresa, María Angeles

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to describe the causes, clinical pattern, and treatment of cerebral salt wasting syndrome in children with acute central nervous system injury. This retrospective study focused on patientscerebral salt wasting syndrome, over a period of 7 years, in the pediatric intensive care unit of a tertiary care hospital. Selection criteria included evidence of hyponatremia (serum sodium<130 mEq/L), polyuria, elevated urine sodium (>120 mEq/L), and volume depletion. Fourteen patients were identified with cerebral salt wasting syndrome, 12 after a neurosurgical procedure (8 brain tumor, 4 hydrocephalus) and 2 after severe brain trauma. In 11 patients the cerebral salt wasting syndrome was diagnosed during the first 48 hours of admission. Prevalence of cerebral salt wasting syndrome in neurosurgical children was 11.3/1000 surgical procedures. The minimum sodium was 122+/-7 mEq/L, the maximum urine osmolarity 644+/-59 mOsm/kgH2O. The maximum sodium supply was 1 mEq/kg/h (range, 0.1-2.4). The mean duration of cerebral salt wasting syndrome was 6+/-5 days (range 1-9). In conclusion, cerebral salt wasting syndrome can complicate the postoperative course of children with brain injury; it is frequently present after surgery for brain tumors and hydrocephalus and in patients with severe head trauma. Close monitoring of salt and fluid balance is essential to prevent severe neurologic and hemodynamic complications.

  1. Cerebral hydatid disease in Britain

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Milne; Bickerstaff, Edwin R.; Hamilton, J. G.

    1975-01-01

    Two cases of cerebral hydatid disease are described. This condition, acquired by Britons in Britain, is extremely rare as only two similar cases have been reported before. Details of clinical presentation, investigation and treatment are described. Images PMID:1206419

  2. Cerebral emboli of paradoxical origin.

    PubMed

    Jones, H R; Caplan, L R; Come, P C; Swinton, N W; Breslin, D J

    1983-03-01

    A diagnosis of paradoxical cerebral embolus (PCE) was made in five patients aged 31 to 62 years who sustained eight cerebral ischemic events. No patient had evidence of primary carotid system or left heart disease. A probe-patent foramen ovale was the presumed mechanism in four patients, and an unsuspected congenital atrial septal defect was found in the fifth patient. Clinically apparent pulmonary emboli or venous thrombosis preceded the cerebral event in only one instance. Review of the literature reveals a high mortality with PCE. However, careful clinical search for this lesion may be rewarding: four of our five patients survived. One should consider PCE in any patient with cerebral embolus in whom there is no demonstrable left-sided circulatory source. This principle applies particularly if there is concomitant venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, or enhanced potential for venous thrombosis due to, for example, morbid obesity, use of hormonal birth control pills, prolonged bed rest (especially postoperatively), or systemic carcinoma.

  3. Cerebral ganglioglioma. A Golgi study.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, I; Ribalta, T; Digon, E; Acebes, J

    1983-01-01

    The morphological characteristics of neurons revealed by Golgi's method are reported in a case of cerebral ganglioglioma. Spindle-shaped (leptodendritic) neurons and radiated type I neurons form the bulk of this tumour. According to Ramon-Moliner (1968) isodendritic neurons (both leptodendritic and radiate type I) are philogenetically primitive cells and differ greatly from those observed in most of the deep cerebral nuclei of the mammalian's brain.

  4. Resource Allocation in Cerebral Specialization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    of this multiple-resources view. EXTENSION OF THE THEORY TO THE TWO CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES Since the anatomical division of the brain invites...performance differences between the hemispheres (e.g., right-handed males with no familial history of left- handedness who use a normal rather than an...G. Beaumont (Eds.), Hemisphere function in the human rain.. New York: Halstead Press, 1974. Kinsbourne, M. The cerebral basis of lateral asymmetries

  5. Determinants of Intensity of Participation in Leisure and Recreational Activities by Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palisano, Robert J.; Chiarello, Lisa A.; Orlin, Margo; Oeffinger, Donna; Polansky, Marcy; Maggs, Jill; Bagley, Anita; Gorton, George

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To test a model of child, family, and service determinants of intensity of participation in leisure and recreational activities by children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Participants were 288 children with CP, age range 6 to 12 years (mean 9y 8mo, SD 2y), and their parents from seven children's hospitals. The sample comprised 166 (57.6%)…

  6. Reliability of the Functional Mobility Scale for Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Adrienne R.; Morris, Meg E.; Graham, H. Kerr; Wolfe, Rory; Baker, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This study examined inter-rater reliability of the Functional Mobility Scale (FMS) for children with cerebral palsy (CP) and the presence of rater bias. A consecutive sample of 118 children with CP, 2-18 years old (mean 10.3 years, SD 3.6), was recruited from a hospital setting. Children were classified using the gross motor function…

  7. Dental treatment under general anesthesia in a group of patients with cerebral palsy and a group of healthy pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Escanilla-Casal, Alejandro; Aznar-Gómez, Mirella; Viaño, José M.; Rivera-Baró, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    This is a comparative study between two groups, one of healthy children and the other of children with cerebral palsy, which underwent dental treatment under general anesthesia at Hospital Sant Joan de Déu Barcelona. The purpose of the study was to compare and determine oral pathology, frequency, severity and postoperative complications in pediatric patients with and without an underlying disease which undergo a dental treatment under general anesthesia. Key words:General anesthesia, cerebral palsy, pediatric patients. PMID:24608223

  8. Dependence of cerebral arterial contractions on intracellularly stored Ca++.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, T; Kassell, N F; Zuccarello, M

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the dependence of the arterial contractions induced by different vasoactive agents upon intracellularly stored calcium in canine versus monkey cerebral arteries. The potency for inducing contractions in Ca++-free media was in the order of 9,11-epithio-11,12-metano-thromboxane A2 (STXA2) greater than prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) much greater than serotonin greater than K+ in canine basilar arteries, and STXA2 greater than PGF2 alpha much greater than serotonin = K+ in monkey basilar arteries.

  9. Therapeutic implications of melatonin in cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Rathnasamy, Gurugirijha; Ling, Eng-Ang; Kaur, Charanjit

    2014-12-01

    Cerebral edema/brain edema refers to the accumulation of fluid in the brain and is one of the fatal conditions that require immediate medical attention. Cerebral edema develops as a consequence of cerebral trauma, cerebral infarction, hemorrhages, abscess, tumor, hypoxia, and other toxic or metabolic factors. Based on the causative factors cerebral edema is differentiated into cytotoxic cerebral edema, vasogenic cerebral edema, osmotic and interstitial cerebral edema. Treatment of cerebral edema depends on timely diagnosis and medical assistance. Pragmatic treatment strategies such as antihypertensive medications, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, barbiturates, steroids, glutamate and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists and trometamol are used in clinical practice. Although the above mentioned treatment approaches are being used, owing to the complexity of the mechanisms involved in cerebral edema, a single therapeutic strategy which could ameliorate cerebral edema is yet to be identified. However, recent experimental studies have suggested that melatonin, a neurohormone produced by the pineal gland, could be an effective alternative for treating cerebral edema. In animal models of stroke, melatonin was not only shown to reduce cerebral edema but also preserved the blood brain barrier. Melatonin's beneficial effects were attributed to its properties, such as being a potent anti-oxidant, and its ability to cross the blood brain barrier within minutes after its administration. This review summarizes the beneficial effects of melatonin when used for treating cerebral edema.

  10. Cortical blindness as a rare presentation of cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bonnie; Moon, Seong-Jin; Olivero, William C; Wang, Huan

    2013-05-09

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for clinicians. Manifesting in a remarkably wide spectrum of symptoms and signs, CVT often presents in a misleading fashion-if unrecognized or misdiagnosed, it carries potentially fatal consequences. Visual loss is quite rare as the initial presentation of CVT and is typically a finding more frequent in chronic cases with associated papilledema on funduscopy Ferro, Lopes, Rosas and Fontes (Delay in Hospital Admission of Patients with Cerebral Vein and Dural Sinus Thrombosis. Cerebrovasc Dis 2005;19: :152-6). We report a rare case of acute cortical blindness as the initial presentation of CVT in an 18-year-old female patient and review the current literature.

  11. Cerebral Salt-Wasting Syndrome Caused by Minor Head Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tsurumi, Yuko; Tsurumi, Arihito

    2017-01-01

    A 34-year-old woman was admitted to hospital after sustaining a head injury in a motor vehicle accident (day 1). No signs of neurological deficit, skull fracture, brain contusion, or intracranial bleeding were evident. She was discharged without symptoms on day 4. However, headache and nausea worsened on day 8, at which time serum sodium level was noted to be 121 mEq/L. Treatment with sodium chloride was initiated, but serum sodium decreased to 116 mEq/L on day 9. Body weight decreased in proportion to the decrease in serum sodium. Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome was diagnosed. This case represents the first illustration of severe hyponatremia related to cerebral salt-wasting syndrome caused by a minor head injury. PMID:28194285

  12. Cerebral Salt-Wasting Syndrome Caused by Minor Head Injury.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Toshiki; Tsurumi, Yuko; Tsurumi, Arihito

    2017-01-01

    A 34-year-old woman was admitted to hospital after sustaining a head injury in a motor vehicle accident (day 1). No signs of neurological deficit, skull fracture, brain contusion, or intracranial bleeding were evident. She was discharged without symptoms on day 4. However, headache and nausea worsened on day 8, at which time serum sodium level was noted to be 121 mEq/L. Treatment with sodium chloride was initiated, but serum sodium decreased to 116 mEq/L on day 9. Body weight decreased in proportion to the decrease in serum sodium. Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome was diagnosed. This case represents the first illustration of severe hyponatremia related to cerebral salt-wasting syndrome caused by a minor head injury.

  13. [A case of cerebral tuberculoma (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Shinmura, F; Sakakibara, T; Takayasu, K; Takagi, S; Satowa, S

    1979-02-01

    A 27-year-old woman was admitted to other hospital for acute pleuritis in May 1977. She suddenly had a focal epileptic seizure in the face with loss of consciousness on July 10, 1977. The same episodes of seizure occurred on Aug. 8, on Oct. 26, on Nov. 22, 1977. She was admitted to our hospital on Dec. 12, 1977. Neurological examinations showed no abnormality. Chest X-ray film showed bilateral severe thickening of the pleura. Plain skull films showed normal findings. Enhanced CT scanning showed a homogenous irregular contour of high density area surrounded by low density area in the right frontal region. The lateral ventricle was slightly shifted to the left side. 99mTc brain scan also detected a spherical abnormal uptake in this area. Right carotid angiography showed no abnormal vessels and increased vascularities. On Nov. 22, 1977, a craniotomy was made over the right fronto-temporal bone, and a walnut sized tumor in the frontal subcortex was totally removed successfully. Histologically, the tumor was diagnosed as brain tuberculoma. The antituberculous therapy (AB-PC, INAH, Rifampicin), high doses of gammabenin, and steroid were given. About four months later, she was in good health without neurologic deficits and returned to her work. The literature was reviewed, and the value of CT scan and RI scan in the diagnosis of cerebral tuberculoma was emphasized.

  14. Monitoring Cerebral Oxygenation in Neonates: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Dix, Laura Marie Louise; van Bel, Frank; Lemmers, Petra Maria Anna

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral oxygenation is not always reflected by systemic arterial oxygenation. Therefore, regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rScO2) monitoring with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is of added value in neonatal intensive care. rScO2 represents oxygen supply to the brain, while cerebral fractional tissue oxygen extraction, which is the ratio between rScO2 and systemic arterial oxygen saturation, reflects cerebral oxygen utilization. The balance between oxygen supply and utilization provides insight in neonatal cerebral (patho-)physiology. This review highlights the potential and limitations of cerebral oxygenation monitoring with NIRS in the neonatal intensive care unit. PMID:28352624

  15. [Cerebral paragonimiasis and Bo Sung Sim's hemispherectomy in Korea in 1950s-1960s].

    PubMed

    Park, Jiyoung; Miyagawa, Takuya; Hong, Jeonghwa; Kim, Ockjoo

    2011-06-30

    This paper deals with cerebral paragonimiasis and cerebral hemispherectomy conducted as a treatment of cerebral paragonimiasis by Bo Sung Sim in Korea in 1950s-1960s. He demonstrated that cerebral hemispherectomy could be used for unilateral diffuse cerebral paragonimiasis. Sim learned cerebral hemispherectomy from Dr. L. A. French. at the University of Minnesota from 1955 to 1957 in America. The authors argues that Bo Sung Sim's introduction of cerebral hemispherectomy to Korea was not a simple application of an advanced medical technology, but a complicated and active process in that Sim used the technique to intervene intractable complications from cerebral paragonimiasis such as generalized convulsions, spastic hemiplegia and mental deterioration. Bo Sung Sim, one of the neurosurgeons of the first generation in Korea, was trained in neurology, neuropathology, neuroradiology and animal experiments as well as in neurosurgery at the University of Minnesota. After returning to Korea, Sim faced parasitic diseases, one of the most serious public health problems at that time, which were far different from what he learned in America. As a neurosurgeon, Sim tackled with parasitic diseases of the central nervous system with various diagnostics and therapeutics. In 1950s, more than one million populations suffered from pulmonary paragonimiasis acquired by eating raw crabs or by feeding juice of crushed crayfish for the treatment of measles in Korea. About 26.6 percent of people with paragonimiasis had cerebral paragonimiasis. Before bithionol therapy was introduced in 1962, neurosurgery was the only available treatment to control increased intracranial pressures, intractable epilepsy, paralysis and mental deterioration. Between 1958 to 1962, Bo Sung Sim operated on 24 patients of cerebral paragonimiasis. In two of them, he performed cerebral hemispherectomy to control intractable convulsions when he found diffuse cerebral paragonimiasis and cerebral atrophy at the

  16. Encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis for cerebral proliferative angiopathy with cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Kono, Kenichi; Terada, Tomoaki

    2014-12-01

    Cerebral proliferative angiopathy (CPA) is a rare clinical entity. This disorder is characterized by diffuse vascular abnormalities with intermingled normal brain parenchyma, and is differentiated from classic arteriovenous malformations. The management of CPA in patients presenting with nonhemorrhagic neurological deficits due to cerebral ischemia is challenging and controversial. The authors report a case of adult CPA with cerebral ischemia in which neurological deficits were improved after encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis (EDAS). A 28-year-old man presented with epilepsy. Magnetic resonance imaging and angiography showed a diffuse vascular network (CPA) in the right hemisphere. Antiepileptic medications were administered. Four years after the initial onset of epilepsy, the patient's left-hand grip strength gradually decreased over the course of 1 year. The MRI studies showed no infarcts, but technetium-99m-labeled ethyl cysteinate dimer ((99m)Tc-ECD) SPECT studies obtained with acetazolamide challenge demonstrated hypoperfusion and severely impaired cerebrovascular reactivity over the affected hemisphere. This suggested that the patient's neurological deficits were associated with cerebral ischemia. The authors performed EDAS for cerebral ischemia, and the patient's hand grip strength gradually improved after the operation. Follow-up angiography studies obtained 7 months after the operation showed profound neovascularization through the superficial temporal artery and the middle meningeal artery. A SPECT study showed slight improvement of hypoperfusion at the focal region around the right motor area, indicating clinical improvement from the operation. The authors conclude that EDAS may be a treatment option for CPA-related hypoperfusion.

  17. [Plasma osmolarity and cerebral volume].

    PubMed

    Boulard, G

    2001-02-01

    Under normal physiological conditions, the osmolarity of extracellular fluids (ECFs) and natremia are controlled by two regulatory mechanisms modulating the water balance and sodium outflow from information collected by the osmoreceptors and baroreceptors, respectively. As well, under normal physiological conditions, water and electrolytes of brain ECFs are secreted by the endothelial cells of brain capillaries. Furthermore, isotonicity is present on both sides of the blood-brain barrier. In the event of systemic osmolarity disorders, water transport subject to osmosis laws occurs at the level of the blood-brain barrier. In the case of plasmatic hyperosmolarity cerebral dehydration is observed, while cerebral edema occurs in the contrary case. However, plasmatic osmolarity disorders have less effect on the cerebral volume when their introduction is slow. Experimentation in acute conditions shows that measured variations of the cerebral water content are lower than calculated variations, thus suggesting the existence of an adaptive mechanism, that is, the cerebral osmoregulation which limits the variation of the volume of brain cells by modulating their osmoactive molecule content. These osmoactive molecules are, on the one hand, the electrolytes, which are early and rapidly mobilized, and, on the other hand, the organic osmoles (amino acids, etc.), whose secretion is slower and delayed. This phenomenon should be taken into account in the treatment of osmolarity disorders. Thus, the related-risk of treatment for natremia disorders is therapeutic reversal of the osmotic gradient at the level of the blood-brain barrier. This reversal, which corresponds to a second osmotic stress, requires the implementation of a new procedure of cerebral osmoregulation in the opposite direction of the preceding one. As successive osmotic stresses decrease the effectiveness of brain osmoregulation, the risk for cerebral dehydration and pontine myelinolysis increases when the treatment

  18. The Media Teacher's Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarratt, Elaine, Ed.; Davison, Jon, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "The Media Teacher's Handbook" is an indispensible guide for all teachers, both specialist and non-specialist, delivering Media Studies and media education in secondary schools and colleges. It is the first text to draw together the three key elements of secondary sector teaching in relation to media study--the "theoretical",…

  19. How the Media Teach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortes, Carlos E.

    2005-01-01

    The mass media teach whether or not mediamakers intend to or realize it, and users learn from the media whether or not they try or are even aware of it. This means all of the media, including newspapers, magazines, movies, television, radio, and the new cyberspace media serve as informal yet omnipresent nonschool textbooks. This raises an…

  20. Selecting Media for Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, L. J.

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of instruction on using a formal media selection procedure on the media selection choices made by novice instructional designers. Twenty-nine male and female graduate students enrolled in a media design course at Arizona State University participated in the study. Media design problems were used…

  1. Living within the Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Erin

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author shares how media affects her as a teenager. The author says that media has such a relationship with the world today, specifically with teenagers like her. Media gives off so much information that can be valid or invalid, positive or negative. The media can persuade anyone to do something or to think a certain way.…

  2. Media Literacy Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Barry

    1989-01-01

    Provides an up-to-date bibliography of resources available for teaching media literacy. Groups resources into the areas of media education methodology, mass media texts, general background, television, film, the news and medium of print, advertising, gender and the media, popular culture, popular music and rock video, periodicals, and…

  3. Why Media Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locatis, Craig

    2007-01-01

    Whether media affect learning has been debated for decades. The discussion of media's effectiveness has raised questions about the usefulness of comparison studies, not only in assessing applications of technology but in other areas as well. Arguments that media do not affect learning are re-examined and issues concerning media effects on expert…

  4. Media Violence and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groebel, Jo

    1998-01-01

    Presents the results of the UNESCO global study on media violence and children which was conducted between 1996 and 1997. Highlights include the role of the media, media heroes as role models, media violence and aggression, differences by gender, rural versus urban environments, the pervasiveness of television, and recommendations. (Author/LRW)

  5. [Cerebral artery infarction presented as an unusual complication of acute middle otitis].

    PubMed

    Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael; Alcalá-Cerra, Gabriel; Castellar-Leones, Sandra Milena; Gutiérrez-Paternina, Juan José

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: la otitis media aguda es una inflamación del oído medio frecuente en la edad pediátrica. Aproximadamente 2 % de todos los casos desarrolla complicaciones intracraneales, más específicamente meningitis; por lo general, los infartos cerebrales originados por esta última son venosos. Rara vez se ha descrito la ocurrencia de un infarto arterial cerebral como complicación directa de la otitis media aguda. Caso clínico: niña de 12 meses de edad quien fue llevada a un servicio de urgencias por síndrome febril secundario a otitis media aguda y alteración del estado de conciencia. A la exploración física se identificó que estaba somnolienta, con anisocoria, midriasis en el ojo derecho y hemiparesia izquierda. Con la tomografía axial computarizada de cerebro se apreció un infarto arterial cerebral extenso. Los padres no autorizaron la craniectomía descompresiva y la paciente falleció a las 48 horas de su ingreso hospitalario. Conclusiones: a pesar de los recursos tecnológicos con los que se dispone actualmente, el infarto cerebral relacionado con la otitis media aguda tiene una evolución tórpida. Los signos neurológicos focalizadores y el deterioro progresivo deben apuntar a la ineficacia del tratamiento antimicrobiano instaurado.

  6. Do you use social media? A study into new nursing and midwifery graduates' uptake of social media.

    PubMed

    Tuckett, Anthony; Turner, Catherine

    2016-04-01

    Social media use is expanding rapidly, so too is its use within hospitals and amongst healthcare professionals. This study describes the use of social media by Australian and New Zealand nursing and midwifery graduates of the Graduate e-Cohort study; there were 112 (93%) respondents from a 2014 sample of 121 nurses and midwives. Findings suggest that the professional peak body goal of using social media as a vehicle for professional education requires consideration of the social media platforms that are actually being used by new graduates. We recommend that work by the respective professions at both an undergraduate and graduate level needs to focus on the implications of social media use or policy and practice to ensure that everyone is aware of when and how to engage in social media platforms and what to do and how to behave when using social media.

  7. Social media networking: blogging.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Andrew; Jackson, Rem; Baum, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Social media networking is not your teenager's social media. It is a powerful tool that will change the way you communicate with your patients. This article will review the impact of social media and how social media can be a valuable tool for your medical practice. This is the first of a three-part article on social media and will discuss the use of blogging for medical practices.

  8. Emerging trends in social media and plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Gould, Daniel J; Leland, Hyuma A; Ho, Adelyn L; Patel, Ketan M

    2016-12-01

    Social media has increasingly changed the landscape of medicine and surgery and is rapidly expanding its influence in most peoples' lives. The average person spends nearly 2 hours per day using social media, consuming information about everything from family updates to entertainment news to presidential elections. The concentration of consumers on social media platforms has resulted in direct medicine and medical products marketing to consumers. Similarly, social media is increasingly becoming a platform for interaction between physicians and potential patients. Some physicians have taken this opportunity to better educate patients, while allowing patients to learn more about their surgeons online. These tools can increase internet traffic online to bonafide internet sites, as well as bolster marketing for many hospitals, hospital systems, and individual doctors. It can also serve to increase knowledge about procedures and conditions through direct outreach to patients. Social media is a powerful tool which needs to be utilized wisely to avoid pitfalls.

  9. Emerging trends in social media and plastic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Leland, Hyuma A.; Ho, Adelyn L.; Patel, Ketan M.

    2016-01-01

    Social media has increasingly changed the landscape of medicine and surgery and is rapidly expanding its influence in most peoples’ lives. The average person spends nearly 2 hours per day using social media, consuming information about everything from family updates to entertainment news to presidential elections. The concentration of consumers on social media platforms has resulted in direct medicine and medical products marketing to consumers. Similarly, social media is increasingly becoming a platform for interaction between physicians and potential patients. Some physicians have taken this opportunity to better educate patients, while allowing patients to learn more about their surgeons online. These tools can increase internet traffic online to bonafide internet sites, as well as bolster marketing for many hospitals, hospital systems, and individual doctors. It can also serve to increase knowledge about procedures and conditions through direct outreach to patients. Social media is a powerful tool which needs to be utilized wisely to avoid pitfalls. PMID:28090511

  10. [Cerebral hydatid cyst: Clinical case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Acha-Sánchez, José Luis; Yaya-Loo, Héctor José; Chipana-Sotomayor, Marco Enrique

    2016-12-13

    Hydatid disease is an accidental parasitosis, with brain location being rare. The case is reported of a 33year-old male, with no history of note, who was admitted to hospital with intracranial hypertension syndrome and right hemiparesis. Computed tomography showed a cystic lesion in the left frontal-parietal lobule. Surgery was performed by complete excision of the lesion, with a good outcome. Hydatid disease is a rare condition in the brain. Clinical suspicion is important for an early diagnosis. A review is presented on the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of cerebral hydatid disease.

  11. [Superselective fibrinolysis for a middle cerebral artery embolism caused by a left atrial myxoma: case report].

    PubMed

    Yamanome, T; Yoshida, K; Miura, K; Ogawa, A

    2000-07-01

    A case of successful treatment by local fibrinolysis of a middle cerebral artery embolism caused by a thrombus from a left atrial myxoma is reported. A 62-year-old woman using a pacemaker and suffering from sick sinus syndrome was admitted on December 29th 1996, complaining of transient restlessness. CT and cerebral angiography revealed no abnormal vascular lesions. Eighteen months after the initial episode, she suffered a sudden onset of left hemiparesis and loss of consciousness. CT scan performed during the second episode revealed no lesions and, in particular, no early CT infarction sign, but emergent cerebral angiography revealed a right middle cerebral artery embolic occlusion. Local fibrinolysis using a tissue plasminogen activator was performed within 3 hours after the beginning of the episode, and partial recanalization was obtained within one hour after initiation of the fibrinolytic therapy. On the first hospital day, though CT revealed a small low-density area in the right basal ganglia, motor deficits gradually improved. Considering the possibility of a cardiac source of the embolism, trans-esophageal echocardiography was performed and revealed a left atrial tumor suspected to be a myxoma. It was removed by surgery on the 34th hospital day. Histological examination proved it to be a myxoma. Nine months after local fibrinolytic therapy, the patient returned to work. The diagnosis of cerebral embolism caused by cardiac myxoma is difficult to make at the time when the patient is first examined after admission. It is also hard to discover during emergent cerebral angiography with fibrinolytic therapy. Therefore, in the case of patients with cerebral embolism for which local fibrinolysis is ineffective, it should be presumed that cardiac myxoma is the source of the embolus. Direct PTA alone may be effective for such tumoral embolism.

  12. Neuroevolutional Approach to Cerebral Palsy and Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mysak, Edward D.

    Intended for cerebral palsy specialists, the book emphasizes the contribution that a neuroevolutional approach to therapy can make to habilitation goals of the child with cerebral palsy and applies the basic principles of the Bobath approach to therapy. The first section discusses cerebral palsy as a reflection of disturbed neuro-ontogenisis and…

  13. Cerebral vasculitis associated with cocaine abuse

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, B.R.; Fainstat, M.

    1987-10-16

    A case of cerebral vasculitis in a previously healthy 22-year-old man with a history of cocaine abuse is described. Cerebral angiograms showed evidence of vasculitis. A search for possible causes other than cocaine produced no results. The authors include cocaine with methamphetamines, heroin, and ephedrine as illicit drugs that can cause cerebral vasculitis.

  14. Behaviour Problems Amongst Children With Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oswin, Maureen

    Based on 6 years of work with cerebral palsied children, the thesis considers types and causes of cerebral palsy, the life pattern of the child with cerebral palsy from early years to adolescence, and the effect of the handicapped child on his parents and family. Literature on behavior disorders is reviewed, and kinds of behavior problems are…

  15. Effects of hyperglycemia and effects of ketosis on cerebral perfusion, cerebral water distribution, and cerebral metabolism.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Nicole; Ngo, Catherine; Anderson, Steven; Yuen, Natalie; Trifu, Alexandra; O'Donnell, Martha

    2012-07-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) may cause brain injuries in children. The mechanisms responsible are difficult to elucidate because DKA involves multiple metabolic derangements. We aimed to determine the independent effects of hyperglycemia and ketosis on cerebral metabolism, blood flow, and water distribution. We used magnetic resonance spectroscopy to measure ratios of cerebral metabolites (ATP to inorganic phosphate [Pi], phosphocreatine [PCr] to Pi, N-acetyl aspartate [NAA] to creatine [Cr], and lactate to Cr) and diffusion-weighted imaging and perfusion-weighted imaging to assess cerebral water distribution (apparent diffusion coefficient [ADC] values) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) in three groups of juvenile rats (hyperglycemic, ketotic, and normal control). ATP-to-Pi ratio was reduced in both hyperglycemic and ketotic rats in comparison with controls. PCr-to-Pi ratio was reduced in the ketotic group, and there was a trend toward reduction in the hyperglycemic group. No significant differences were observed in NAA-to-Cr or lactate-to-Cr ratio. Cortical ADC was reduced in both groups (indicating brain cell swelling). Cortical CBF was also reduced in both groups. We conclude that both hyperglycemia and ketosis independently cause reductions in cerebral high-energy phosphates, CBF, and cortical ADC values. These effects may play a role in the pathophysiology of DKA-related brain injury.

  16. Cerebral Palsy: A Dental Update

    PubMed Central

    Sehrawat, Nidhi; Bansal, Kalpana; Chopra, Radhika

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Special and medically compromised patients present a unique population that challenges the dentist’s skill and knowledge. Providing oral care to people with cerebral palsy (CP) requires adaptation of the skills we use everyday. In fact, most people with mild or moderate forms of CP can be treated successfully in the general practice setting. This article is to review various dental considerations and management of a CP patient. How to cite this article: Sehrawat N, Marwaha M, Bansal K, Chopra R. Cerebral Palsy: A Dental Update. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2):109-118. PMID:25356010

  17. A case of cerebral embolism with metastatic chondrosarcoma in the left atrium.

    PubMed

    Oizumi, Hideki; Tanaka, Ryota; Shimura, Hideki; Sasaki, Kumi; Koike, Hiroyuki; Hattori, Nobutaka; Tanaka, Shigeki

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac tumor is a rare, but clinically important source of cerebral embolism. We report a case of metastatic chondrosarcoma in the left atrium with multiple cerebral emboli. A computed tomography scan of the chest revealed a large mass in the left atrium and pulmonary vein. The patient underwent heart surgery to remove the metastatic chondrosarcoma in the left atrium, to prevent the formation of further systemic emboli and possible sudden death. The cardiac tumor resection was successful, and the patient was discharged from the hospital without any handicap. This is a rare case of metastatic cardiac tumor that was a source of emboli into the brain and was eradicated.

  18. Mass Media: The Invisible Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glessing, Robert J.; White, William P.

    This anthology for students of media consists of essays and articles grouped under four topics: media forms, media content, media environments, and "the last word." Media forms deals with the nature of these kinds of media: electronic, print, film, music, and comics, graffiti, and clothing. Media content contains articles on the news, advertising,…

  19. Caffeine induced changes in cerebral circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, R.J.; Wilson, W.H.

    1985-09-01

    While the caffeine induced cerebral vasoconstriction is well documented, the effects of oral ingestion of the drug in a dose range comparable to the quantities in which it is usually consumed and the intensity and duration of the associated reduction in cerebral circulation are unknown. Cerebral blood flow was measured via the TTXenon inhalation technique before and thirty and ninety minutes after the oral administration of 250 mg of caffeine or a placebo, under double-blind conditions. Caffeine ingestion was found to be associated with significant reductions in cerebral perfusion thirty and ninety minutes later. The placebo group showed no differences between the three sets of cerebral blood flow values.

  20. Using Social Media to Teach Social Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rheingold, Howard

    2008-01-01

    By showing students how to use Web-based channels to inform publics, advocate positions, contest claims, and organize action around issues they care about, participatory media education can influence civic behavior positively throughout their lives. Participatory media literacy is necessarily a hands-on enterprise, requiring active use of digital…

  1. Cerebral ventricular volume during hyponatraemia.

    PubMed Central

    Decaux, G; Szyper, M; Grivegnée, A

    1983-01-01

    In order to determine if the neurologic manifestations in chronic hyponatraemia result partly from brain oedema, we measured the cerebral ventricular volume before and after correction of hyponatraemia in eight patients with central nervous system manifestations. Only the three patients with seizures showed a clear change in the ventricular size and probably had brain oedema. PMID:6101182

  2. Investigating cerebral oedema using poroelasticity.

    PubMed

    Vardakis, John C; Chou, Dean; Tully, Brett J; Hung, Chang C; Lee, Tsong H; Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral oedema can be classified as the tangible swelling produced by expansion of the interstitial fluid volume. Hydrocephalus can be succinctly described as the abnormal accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within the brain which ultimately leads to oedema within specific sites of parenchymal tissue. Using hydrocephalus as a test bed, one is able to account for the necessary mechanisms involved in the interaction between oedema formation and cerebral fluid production, transport and drainage. The current state of knowledge about integrative cerebral dynamics and transport phenomena indicates that poroelastic theory may provide a suitable framework to better understand various diseases. In this work, Multiple-Network Poroelastic Theory (MPET) is used to develop a novel spatio-temporal model of fluid regulation and tissue displacement within the various scales of the cerebral environment. The model is applied through two formats, a one-dimensional finite difference - Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) coupling framework, as well as a two-dimensional Finite Element Method (FEM) formulation. These are used to investigate the role of endoscopic fourth ventriculostomy in alleviating oedema formation due to fourth ventricle outlet obstruction (1D coupled model) in addition to observing the capability of the FEM template in capturing important characteristics allied to oedema formation, like for instance in the periventricular region (2D model).

  3. Graft selection in cerebral revascularization.

    PubMed

    Baaj, Ali A; Agazzi, Siviero; van Loveren, Harry

    2009-05-01

    Cerebral revascularization constitutes an important treatment modality in the management of complex aneurysms, carotid occlusion, tumor, and moyamoya disease. Graft selection is a critical step in the planning of revascularization surgery, and depends on an understanding of graft and regional hemodynamics, accessibility, and patency rates. The goal of this review is to highlight some of these properties.

  4. Neuropathology of Acquired Cerebral Trauma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigler, Erin D.

    1987-01-01

    To help educators understand the cognitive and behavioral sequelae of cerebral injury, the neuropathology of traumatic brain injury and the main neuropathological features resulting from trauma-related brain damage are reviewed. A glossary with definitions of 37 neurological terms is appended. (Author/DB)

  5. Anxiety and Lateral Cerebral Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Don M.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Examines the effect of stressful and nonstressful experimental situations upon the processing capacity of each cerebral hemisphere, through observing the differential performance tasks presented to right and left visual half-fields (VHFs). Also examines attentional bias and lateral eye movements. (Author/RK)

  6. Sirt1 in cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Koronowski, Kevin B.; Perez-Pinzon, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia is among the leading causes of death worldwide. It is characterized by a lack of blood flow to the brain that results in cell death and damage, ultimately causing motor, sensory, and cognitive impairments. Today, clinical treatment of cerebral ischemia, mostly stroke and cardiac arrest, is limited and new neuroprotective therapies are desperately needed. The Sirtuin family of oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent deacylases has been shown to govern several processes within the central nervous system as well as to possess neuroprotective properties in a variety of pathological conditions such as Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, and Huntington’s Disease, among others. Recently, Sirt1 in particular has been identified as a mediator of cerebral ischemia, with potential as a possible therapeutic target. To gather studies relevant to this topic, we used PubMed and previous reviews to locate, select, and resynthesize the lines of evidence presented here. In this review, we will first describe some functions of Sirt1 in the brain, mainly neurodevelopment, learning and memory, and metabolic regulation. Second, we will discuss the experimental evidence that has implicated Sirt1 as a key protein in the regulation of cerebral ischemia as well as a potential target for the induction of ischemic tolerance. PMID:26819971

  7. Confusional state and cerebral infarcts.

    PubMed Central

    García-Albea, E.

    1989-01-01

    Thirteen patients with confusional state and cerebral infarction were studied. Seven patients had optic pathway alterations. On computed tomographic scan, 2 patients had multiple infarctions and 10 had single infarctions, predominantly located in the temporo-occipital associative cortex. One patient had a normal scan. Reduction of 'selective attention', 'release' hallucinations, amnesic syndrome and secondary individual adjustment could explain the confusional state. PMID:2608563

  8. Cerebral gigantism with West syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ray, Munni; Malhi, P; Bhalla, A K; Singhi, P D

    2003-07-01

    A case of cerebral gigantism (Sotos syndrome) with West syndrome in a one-year-old male child is reported. The case had a large stature, typical facies and neurodevelopmental delay along with infantile spasms, which were refractory to treatment with valproate and clonazepam.

  9. Examination of the effectiveness of DVD decision support tools for patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Kazuhiko; Okubo, Chie; Yokoyama, Yoko; Morita, Akio; Akamatsu, Rie; Nakayama, Takeo; Fukuhara, Shun-ichi; Hashimoto, Nobuo

    2007-12-01

    Preventative treatments for unruptured cerebral aneurysms include craniotomy, endovascular treatment, and follow up. Since there is no agreement as to the best procedure, it is important to provide adequate information so that the patient and physician can share in the decision-making process. A multi-media DVD was created to inform patients of the facts. This study examined how effectively this DVD changes patients' recognition including knowledge of unruptured cerebral aneurysms. Forty-seven patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysms who sought neurosurgery consultation between December 2005 and February 2006 completed a questionnaire before and after watching the DVD, as well as at 3 months follow up. Before watching the DVD, the average knowledge score was 8.72 out of 15 total points. The average score increased to 12.4 after watching the DVD (p < 0.001). At 3 months follow up, the average score was 10.34, which was still higher than before watching the DVD (p < 0.01). Participants' knowledge about treatment methods also increased after watching the DVD (p < 0.001). Compared to 63.2% who were satisfied with their treatment decision before watching the DVD, 69.6% were satisfied with their decision after watching the DVD. All participants responded that the use of multi-media images was helpful in better understanding treatment options and in making informed decisions. The DVD was favorably accepted as a decision support tool by patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysm and effectively increased patients' knowledge.

  10. Neuroprotection via matrix-trophic coupling between cerebral endothelial cells and neurons.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuzhen; Kim, Woo Jean; Lok, Josephine; Lee, Sun-Ryung; Besancon, Elaine; Luo, Bing-Hao; Stins, Monique F; Wang, Xiaoying; Dedhar, Shoukat; Lo, Eng H

    2008-05-27

    The neurovascular unit is an emerging concept that emphasizes homeostatic interactions between endothelium and cerebral parenchyma. Here, we show that cerebral endothelium are not just inert tubes for delivering blood, but they also secrete trophic factors that can be directly neuroprotective. Conditioned media from cerebral endothelial cells broadly protects neurons against oxygen-glucose deprivation, oxidative damage, endoplasmic reticulum stress, hypoxia, and amyloid neurotoxicity. This phenomenon is largely mediated by endothelial-produced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) because filtering endothelial-conditioned media with TrkB-Fc eliminates the neuroprotective effect. Endothelial production of BDNF is sustained by beta-1 integrin and integrin-linked kinase (ILK) signaling. Noncytotoxic levels of oxidative stress disrupts ILK signaling and reduces endothelial levels of neuroprotective BDNF. These data suggest that cerebral endothelium provides a critical source of homeostatic support for neurons. Targeting these signals of matrix and trophic coupling between endothelium and neurons may provide new therapeutic opportunities for stroke and other CNS disorders.

  11. Highlights from the 15th International Congress of Twin Studies/Twin Research: Differentiating MZ Co-twins Via SNPs; Mistaken Infant Twin-Singleton Hospital Registration; Narcolepsy With Cataplexy; Hearing Loss and Language Learning/Media Mentions: Broadway Musical Recalls Conjoined Hilton Twins; High Fashion Pair; Twins Turn 102; Insights From a Conjoined Twin Survivor.

    PubMed

    Segal, Nancy L

    2015-02-01

    Highlights from the 15th International Congress of Twin Studies are presented. The congress was held November 16-19, 2014 in Budapest, Hungary. This report is followed by summaries of research addressing the differentiation of MZ co-twins by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), an unusual error in infant twin-singleton hospital registration, twins with childhood-onset narcolepsy with cataplexy, and the parenting effects of hearing loss in one co-twin. Media interest in twins covers a new Broadway musical based on the conjoined twins Violet and Daisy Hilton, male twins becoming famous in fashion, twins who turned 102 and unique insights from a conjoined twin survivor. This article is dedicated to the memory of Elizabeth (Liz) Hamel, DZA twin who met her co-twin for the first time at age seventy-eight years. Liz and her co-twin, Ann Hunt, are listed in the 2015 Guinness Book of Records as the longest separated twins in the world.

  12. Regulation of cerebral autoregulation by carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lingzhong; Gelb, Adrian W

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral autoregulation describes a mechanism that maintains cerebral blood flow stable despite fluctuating perfusion pressure. Multiple nonperfusion pressure processes also regulate cerebral perfusion. These mechanisms are integrated. The effect of the interplay between carbon dioxide and perfusion pressure on cerebral circulation has not been specifically reviewed. On the basis of the published data and speculation on the aspects that are without supportive data, the authors offer a conceptualization delineating the regulation of cerebral autoregulation by carbon dioxide. The authors conclude that hypercapnia causes the plateau to progressively ascend, a rightward shift of the lower limit, and a leftward shift of the upper limit. Conversely, hypocapnia results in the plateau shifting to lower cerebral blood flows, unremarkable change of the lower limit, and unclear change of the upper limit. It is emphasized that a sound understanding of both the limitations and the dynamic and integrated nature of cerebral autoregulation fosters a safer clinical practice.

  13. Cerebral and subdural abscess with spatio-temporal multiplicity 12 years after initial craniotomy for acute subdural hematoma. Case report.

    PubMed

    Wakui, Daisuke; Nagashima, Goro; Takada, Tatsuro; Ueda, Toshihiro; Itoh, Hidemichi; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Hashimoto, Takuo

    2012-01-01

    A 34-year-old man presented with a case of subdural empyema and cerebral abscess that developed 12 years after initial neurosurgical intervention for a traffic accident in 1998. Under a diagnosis of acute subdural hematoma and cerebral contusion, several neurosurgical procedures were performed at another hospital, including hematoma removal by craniotomy, external decompression, duraplasty, and cranioplasty. The patient experienced an epileptic seizure, and was referred to our hospital in March 2010. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cerebral abscess extending to the subdural space just under the previous surgical field. Surgical intervention was refused and antimicrobial treatment was initiated, but proved ineffective. Surgical removal of artificial dura and cranium with subdural empyema, and resection of a cerebral abscess were performed on May 12, 2010. No organism was recovered from the surgical samples. Meropenem and vancomycin were selected as perioperative antimicrobial agents. No recurrence of infection has been observed. Postneurosurgical subdural empyema and cerebral abscess are recently emerging problems. Infections of neurosurgical sites containing implanted materials occur in 6% of cases, usually within several months of the surgery. Subdural empyema and cerebral abscess developing 12 years after neurosurgical interventions are extremely rare. The long-term clinical course suggests less pathogenic organisms as a cause of infection, and further investigations to develop appropriate antimicrobial selection and adequate duration of antimicrobial administration for these cases are needed.

  14. Automating the Media Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, Mary A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the need to develop more efficient information retrieval skills by the use of new technology. Lists four stages used in automating the media center. Describes North Carolina's pilot programs. Proposes benefits and looks at the media center's future. (MVL)

  15. Media, Metaphors, and Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costanzo, William V.

    1988-01-01

    Explores how students are influenced by media technology, specifically television and computers. Notes that media are not just a vehicle of information, but are primarily models of how to see, think, read, write, and reason. (MM)

  16. Pacific Southwest Media Center

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    News media, state and local officials, and others can find press releases, media events and contacts in EPA's Pacific Southwest. Additional resources include newsletters, annual reports, and library services that support regional activities.

  17. Catholic Media and Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunes, Stephen A.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the impact of media on youth and suggests some possible directions for the Catholic media, especially in the areas of textbooks, magazines, television, movies, and radio, in responding to the needs of youth. (Author/FM)

  18. Trends in media use.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Donald F; Foehr, Ulla G

    2008-01-01

    American youth are awash in media. They have television sets in their bedrooms, personal computers in their family rooms, and digital music players and cell phones in their backpacks. They spend more time with media than any single activity other than sleeping, with the average American eight- to eighteen-year-old reporting more than six hours of daily media use. The growing phenomenon of "media multitasking"--using several media concurrently--multiplies that figure to eight and a half hours of media exposure daily. Donald Roberts and Ulla Foehr examine how both media use and media exposure vary with demographic factors such as age, race and ethnicity, and household socioeconomic status, and with psychosocial variables such as academic performance and personal adjustment. They note that media exposure begins early, increases until children begin school, drops off briefly, then climbs again to peak at almost eight hours daily among eleven- and twelve-year-olds. Television and video exposure is particularly high among African American youth. Media exposure is negatively related to indicators of socioeconomic status, but that relationship may be diminishing. Media exposure is positively related to risk-taking behaviors and is negatively related to personal adjustment and school performance. Roberts and Foehr also review evidence pointing to the existence of a digital divide--variations in access to personal computers and allied technologies by socioeconomic status and by race and ethnicity. The authors also examine how the recent emergence of digital media such as personal computers, video game consoles, and portable music players, as well as the media multitasking phenomenon they facilitate, has increased young people's exposure to media messages while leaving media use time largely unchanged. Newer media, they point out, are not displacing older media but are being used in concert with them. The authors note which young people are more or less likely to use several

  19. Enhanced Cholinergic Activity Improves Cerebral Blood Flow during Orthostatic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Serrador, Jorge M.; Freeman, Roy

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and consequently orthostatic tolerance when upright depends on dilation of the cerebral vasculature in the face of reduced perfusion pressure associated with the hydrostatic gradient. However, it is still unclear if cholinergic activation plays a role in this dilation. To determine if enhancing central cholinergic activity with the centrally acting acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, physostigmine would increase CBF when upright compared to the peripherally acting acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, neostigmine, or saline. We performed a randomized double-blind dose-ranging study that took place over 3 days in a hospital-based research lab. Eight healthy controls (six women and two men, mean age, 26 years; range 21–33) were given infusions of physostigmine, neostigmine, or saline on three different days. Five-minute tilts were repeated at baseline (no infusion), Dose 1 (0.2 μg/kg/min physostigmine; 0.1 μg/kg/min neostigmine) and Dose 2 (0.6 μg/kg/min physostigmine or 0.3 μg/kg/min neostigmine), and placebo (0.9% NaCl). Cerebral blood velocity, beat-to-beat blood pressure, and end-tidal CO2 were continuously measured during tilts. Physostigmine (0.6 μg/kg/min) resulted in higher cerebral blood velocity during tilt (90.5 ± 1.5%) than the equivalent neostigmine (85.5 ± 2.6%) or saline (84.8 ± 1.7%) trials (P < 0.05). This increase occurred despite a greater postural hypocapnia, suggesting physostigmine had a direct vasodilatory effect on the cerebral vasculature. Cerebral hypoperfusion induced by repeated tilts was eliminated by infusion of physostigmine not neostigmine. In conclusion, this study provides the first evidence that enhancement of central, not peripheral, cholinergic activity attenuates the physiological decrease in CBF seen during upright tilt. These data support the need for further research to determine if enhancing central cholinergic activity may improve symptoms in patients with symptomatic

  20. Can hospitals compete on quality? Hospital competition.

    PubMed

    Sadat, Somayeh; Abouee-Mehrizi, Hossein; Carter, Michael W

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we consider two hospitals with different perceived quality of care competing to capture a fraction of the total market demand. Patients select the hospital that provides the highest utility, which is a function of price and the patient's perceived quality of life during their life expectancy. We consider a market with a single class of patients and show that depending on the market demand and perceived quality of care of the hospitals, patients may enjoy a positive utility. Moreover, hospitals share the market demand based on their perceived quality of care and capacity. We also show that in a monopoly market (a market with a single hospital) the optimal demand captured by the hospital is independent of the perceived quality of care. We investigate the effects of different parameters including the market demand, hospitals' capacities, and perceived quality of care on the fraction of the demand that each hospital captures using some numerical examples.

  1. Mass Media: A Casebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hixson, Richard F., Ed.

    Recognizing that mass media--now at a stage of viewing critically its effects and responsibilities--and society at large are interdependent, this casebook reviews the many facets of the media and mass communication as they relate to both producers and consumers of messages. The 23 chapters include discussions of the media's responsibility toward…

  2. Media Education: Sociology Surveys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedorov, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    In Russia as well as in foreign countries we can witness sort of the confusion of the terms of "media education" and "media literacy". There are quite a few differences in theoretical approaches to media education, to distinguishing of the most important aims, objectives, means of introduction into the teaching process, etc.…

  3. Children's Media Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Amy B.

    2008-01-01

    Amy Jordan addresses the need to balance the media industry's potentially important contributions to the healthy development of America's children against the consequences of excessive and age-inappropriate media exposure. Much of the philosophical tension regarding how much say the government should have about media content and delivery stems…

  4. Media, Minds, and Masses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baggot, James; Vino, Faith

    This booklet describes the language arts course "Media, Minds, and Masses," written for the Dade County, Fla., public schools. Topics for the course include the workings of contemporary radio, television, newspapers, magazines, and movies; the present status and power of media; the history and development of media; and the influences of…

  5. Sizing Up Social Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Jerold

    2010-01-01

    Most people are aware of the increasing importance of social media to institutional advancement, and many colleges and universities have started investing resources in these media. The next step is to measure the impact of social media on the institution and evaluate the success of one's efforts. Every advancement leader should understand how…

  6. Modern Media Education Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedorov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The author supposed that media education models can be divided into the following groups: (1) educational-information models (the study of the theory, history, language of media culture, etc.), based on the cultural, aesthetic, semiotic, socio-cultural theories of media education; (2) educational-ethical models (the study of moral, religions,…

  7. Media in the Netherlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klaver, Franca

    This 2-part report summarizes Dutch policy on mass media and reviews the status of cable television in the Netherlands. The first part defines the underlying principles of a national policy on mass media in relation to the press, commercial and educational television broadcasting, radio, cable television, and media research. Parliamentary debate…

  8. Youth Media and Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauge, Chelsey

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses how capacity is conceived of and understood in youth media/civic education programming, and how beliefs about agency, development, relationality and youth manifests in the discourses, programmes, and practices of organizations operating youth media programmes. Through attention to a youth media and development programme in…

  9. Administering Instructional Media Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Carlton W. H.

    This book presents a wide discussion of the educational and administrative tasks of the instructional media program director. It includes guidelines, principles, case studies, and examples of advanced media use, with emphasis on audiovisual media, the area in which innovation has occurred most. Strong leadership, technological competence, and good…

  10. Adolescents and the Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strasburgber, Victor C., Ed.; Comstock, George A., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    In the 1990s, the media represent the single most easily modifiable influence on children and adolescents. This series of articles offers medically oriented practitioners a review of current research on the influence of the media on children and adolescents. The 13 articles are: (1) "Children, Adolescents, and the Media: Five Crucial…

  11. Changing hospital payments: implications for teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bentley, J D

    1983-09-01

    Hospitals cannot continue to view themselves only as social institutions whose performance will be assessed on the good they do. Teaching hospitals, in particular, cannot view themselves simply as distinctive combinations of social and educational institutions. Under Medicare's prospective pricing system, the hospital's role as production system is enhanced, and all hospitals must learn to balance the new economic realities as they work with their medical staff to adapt to a changed future.

  12. Adjuvant photodynamic therapy in surgical management of cerebral tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zong-Qian; Wu, Si-En; Zhu, Shu-Gan

    1993-03-01

    We have performed high dose photoradiation therapy in patients with cerebral tumors. Twenty-seven patients had gliomas, two had metastatic cancer of the brain, one had malignant meningioma. Hematoporphyrin derivative was administered intravenously. All patients underwent a craniotomy with a radical or partial excision of the tumor. There was no evidence of increased cerebral edema and other toxicity from the therapy, and all patients were discharged from the hospital within 15 days after surgery. On the basis of animal experiments our institute started using photodynamic therapy (PDT) as an adjuvant measure to the operative therapy in 30 cases of cerebral tumors. Ten of these patients were excluded from this group because of the short postoperative following time. Here, the details of our experiences are presented as follows: 106 of C6 type glioma cell strain were implanted into the frontal lobe of a Chinese hamster. Fourteen days later intracranial gliomas developed, which were larger than 4 mm in diameter, HpD in a dosage of 4 mg/kg was injected into the tail vein of the animals. The fluorescence was seen 5 minutes later. The diagnostic laser used was He-Ca (Hc-type 15A, made at Shanghai Laser Institute) with a wavelength of 441.6 nm, power of 30 mw. The fluorescence reached its peak point 24 hours later, and the normal tissue can be identified by the lack of fluorescence. Then, the tumor tissue was further radiated with an Ar laser (made in Nanjing Electronic Factory, type 360), pumped dye-laser (made in Changchun Optic Machinery Institute, type 901) with a wavelength of 630 nm, and an energy density of more than 200 Joules/cm2, which might get the tumor cells destroyed selectively. The effect of photoradiation may reach as deep as 4 - 7 mm into the brain tissue without cerebral edema or necrosis.

  13. Going to the Hospital

    MedlinePlus

    ... Happens in the Operating Room? Going to the Hospital KidsHealth > For Kids > Going to the Hospital Print ... you flowers, balloons, or other treats! previous continue Hospital People You'll meet lots of people in ...

  14. Improved cerebral energetics and ketone body metabolism in db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Jens V; Christensen, Sofie K; Nissen, Jakob D; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2017-03-01

    It is becoming evident that type 2 diabetes mellitus is affecting brain energy metabolism. The importance of alternative substrates for the brain in type 2 diabetes mellitus is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ketone bodies are relevant candidates to compensate for cerebral glucose hypometabolism and unravel the functionality of cerebral mitochondria in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Acutely isolated cerebral cortical and hippocampal slices of db/db mice were incubated in media containing [U-(13)C]glucose, [1,2-(13)C]acetate or [U-(13)C]β-hydroxybutyrate and tissue extracts were analysed by mass spectrometry. Oxygen consumption and ATP synthesis of brain mitochondria of db/db mice were assessed by Seahorse XFe96 and luciferin-luciferase assay, respectively. Glucose hypometabolism was observed for both cerebral cortical and hippocampal slices of db/db mice. Significant increased metabolism of [1,2-(13)C]acetate and [U-(13)C]β-hydroxybutyrate was observed for hippocampal slices of db/db mice. Furthermore, brain mitochondria of db/db mice exhibited elevated oxygen consumption and ATP synthesis rate. This study provides evidence of several changes in brain energy metabolism in type 2 diabetes mellitus. The increased hippocampal ketone body utilization and improved mitochondrial function in db/db mice, may act as adaptive mechanisms in order to maintain cerebral energetics during hampered glucose metabolism.

  15. The Media Workshop Hybrid in Media Education Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCall, Jeffrey M.

    The media workshop and the media laboratory can fit meaningfully into the reforms of mass communication education, but there are distinct differences in their roles. The media workshop is a place where students can serve on-campus apprenticeships with a traditional media organization. The media laboratory is a futuristic media facility that…

  16. Cerebral Toxoplasmosis in a Patient with AIDS on F-18 FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hae Won; Won, Kyoung Sook; Choi, Byung Wook; Zeon, Seok Kil

    2010-04-01

    The distinction between primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma and nonmalignant lesions due to opportunistic infections, in particular cerebral toxoplasmosis, is important because of the different treatments involved. A 32-year-old patient with AIDS was hospitalized for intermittent headaches. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a small well-enhanced nodular lesion in the right frontal lobe. A fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scan showed moderate FDG uptake in the nodular lesion of the right frontal lobe. We present a case of cerebral toxoplasmosis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the usefulness of F-18 FDG PET/CT in the differential diagnosis of the cerebral toxoplasmosis will be discussed.

  17. Selective cerebral perfusion for cerebral protection: what we do know

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Gilbert H. L.

    2013-01-01

    Selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (SACP) for aortic arch surgery has evolved considerably since it was first reported. Various pressure rates have been investigated through animal models, as has the effect of warmer perfusate temperatures and hematocrit. Clinical research into pH management, the role of unilateral and bilateral perfusion, and core temperatures have further refined the procedure. We recommend the following protocol for SACP: perfusion pressure between 40-60 mmHg, flow rates between 6-10 mL/kg/min, and perfusate temperature of 20-28 °C; core cooling to 18-30 °C contingent on duration of arrest; alpha-stat pH management; hematocrit between 25-30%; near infrared spectroscopy to monitor cerebral perfusion; and bilateral perfusion when prolonged durations of SACP is anticipated. PMID:23977601

  18. Critical Access Hospitals (CAH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... use requirements for Critical Access Hospitals related to Electronic Health Records (EHRs)? Critical Access Hospital (CAH) are eligible for Electronic Health Record (EHR) incentive payments and can receive ...

  19. Genetics of cerebral small vessel disease.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jay Chol

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is an important cause of stroke and cognitive impairment among the elderly and is a more frequent cause of stroke in Asia than in the US or Europe. Although traditional risk factors such as hypertension or diabetes mellitus are important in the development of cerebral SVD, the exact pathogenesis is still uncertain. Both, twin and family history studies suggest heritability of sporadic cerebral SVD, while the candidate gene study and the genome-wide association study (GWAS) are mainly used in genetic research. Robust associations between the candidate genes and occurrence of various features of sporadic cerebral SVD, such as lacunar infarction, intracerebral hemorrhage, or white matter hyperintensities, have not yet been elucidated. GWAS, a relatively new technique, overcomes several shortcomings of previous genetic techniques, enabling the detection of several important genetic loci associated with cerebral SVD. In addition to the more common, sporadic cerebral SVD, several single-gene disorders causing cerebral SVD have been identified. The number of reported cases is increasing as the clinical features become clear and diagnostic examinations are more readily available. These include cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, cerebral autosomal recessive arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, COL4A1-related cerebral SVD, autosomal dominant retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy, and Fabry disease. These rare single-gene disorders are expected to play a crucial role in our understanding of cerebral SVD pathogenesis by providing animal models for the identification of cellular, molecular, and biochemical changes underlying cerebral small vessel damage.

  20. Genetics of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is an important cause of stroke and cognitive impairment among the elderly and is a more frequent cause of stroke in Asia than in the US or Europe. Although traditional risk factors such as hypertension or diabetes mellitus are important in the development of cerebral SVD, the exact pathogenesis is still uncertain. Both, twin and family history studies suggest heritability of sporadic cerebral SVD, while the candidate gene study and the genome-wide association study (GWAS) are mainly used in genetic research. Robust associations between the candidate genes and occurrence of various features of sporadic cerebral SVD, such as lacunar infarction, intracerebral hemorrhage, or white matter hyperintensities, have not yet been elucidated. GWAS, a relatively new technique, overcomes several shortcomings of previous genetic techniques, enabling the detection of several important genetic loci associated with cerebral SVD. In addition to the more common, sporadic cerebral SVD, several single-gene disorders causing cerebral SVD have been identified. The number of reported cases is increasing as the clinical features become clear and diagnostic examinations are more readily available. These include cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, cerebral autosomal recessive arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, COL4A1-related cerebral SVD, autosomal dominant retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy, and Fabry disease. These rare single-gene disorders are expected to play a crucial role in our understanding of cerebral SVD pathogenesis by providing animal models for the identification of cellular, molecular, and biochemical changes underlying cerebral small vessel damage. PMID:25692103

  1. Transient Global Amnesia After Cerebral Angiography With Iomeprol

    PubMed Central

    Tiu, Cristina; Terecoasă, Elena Oana; Grecu, Nicolae; Dorobăţ, Bogdan; Marinescu, Andreea Nicoleta; Băjenaru, Ovidiu Alexandru

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Transient global amnesia is now considered a very rare complication of cerebral angiography. Various etiological mechanisms have been suggested to account for this complication, but no consensus has been reached yet. This case report documents one of the few reported cases of cerebral angiography-related transient global amnesia associated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evidence of unilateral hippocampal ischemia, most probably as a consequence of a transient reduction in regional hippocampal blood flow. However, the possibility of a direct neurotoxic effect of the nonionic contrast media Iomeprol on the Cornu ammonis – field 1 neurons cannot be firmly ruled out. We describe the case of a 54-year-old woman admitted to our department for left upper limb weakness with acute onset 8 days before. The brain computed tomography (CT) scan performed at admission revealed subacute ischemic lesions in the right watershed superficial territories and a right thalamic lacunar infarct. Diagnostic digital subtraction cerebral angiography was performed 4 days after admission with the nonionic contrast media Iomeprol. A few minutes after completion of the procedure, the patient developed symptoms suggestive for transient global amnesia. The brain MRI performed 22 hours after the onset of symptoms demonstrated increased signal within the lateral part of the right hippocampus on the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) sequences, associated with a corresponding reduction in the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and increased signal on the fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences, consistent with acute hippocampal ischemia and several T2/FLAIR hyperintensities in the right watershed superficial territories and in the right thalamus, corresponding to the lesions already identified on the CT scan performed at admission. A follow-up MRI, performed 2 months later, demonstrated the disappearance of the increased signal within the right hippocampus on the DWI

  2. Mechanical Properties of the Plantarflexor Musculotendinous Unit during Passive Dorsiflexion in Children with Cerebral Palsy Compared with Typically Developing Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alhusaini, Adel A. A.; Crosbie, Jack; Shepherd, Roberta B.; Dean, Catherine M.; Scheinberg, Adam

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To examine the passive length-tension relations in the myotendinous components of the plantarflexor muscles of children with and without cerebral palsy (CP) under conditions excluding reflex muscle contraction. Method: A cross-sectional, non-interventional study was conducted in a hospital outpatient clinic. Passive torque-angle…

  3. Transition to Adulthood: Validation of the Rotterdam Transition Profile for Young Adults with Cerebral Palsy and Normal Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donkervoort, Mireille; Wiegerink, Diana J. H. G.; van Meeteren, Jetty; Stam, Henk J.; Roebroeck, Marij E.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the validity of the Rotterdam Transition Profile (RTP) to describe the transition process from childhood to adulthood in young adults with cerebral palsy (CP). Participants were recruited from rehabilitation centres and hospital departments of rehabilitation. In total, 81 young adults (47 males, 34 females)…

  4. Animal models of cerebral ischemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodanovich, M. Yu.; Kisel, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    Cerebral ischemia remains one of the most frequent causes of death and disability worldwide. Animal models are necessary to understand complex molecular mechanisms of brain damage as well as for the development of new therapies for stroke. This review considers a certain range of animal models of cerebral ischemia, including several types of focal and global ischemia. Since animal models vary in specificity for the human disease which they reproduce, the complexity of surgery, infarct size, reliability of reproduction for statistical analysis, and adequate models need to be chosen according to the aim of a study. The reproduction of a particular animal model needs to be evaluated using appropriate tools, including the behavioral assessment of injury and non-invasive and post-mortem control of brain damage. These problems also have been summarized in the review.

  5. Ginkgo biloba for cerebral insufficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Kleijnen, J; Knipschild, P

    1992-01-01

    1. By means of a critical review we tried to establish whether there is evidence from controlled trials in humans on the efficacy of Ginkgo biloba extracts in cerebral insufficiency. 2. The methodological quality of 40 trials on Ginkgo and cerebral insufficiency was assessed using a list of predefined criteria of good methodology, and the outcome of the trials was interpreted in relation to their quality. A comparison of the quality was made with trials of co-dergocrine, which is registered for the same indication. 3. There were eight well performed trials out of a total of 40. Shortcomings were limited numbers of patients included, and incomplete description of randomization procedures, patient characteristics, effect measurement and data presentation. In no trial was double-blindness checked. Virtually all trials reported positive results, in most trials the dosage was 120 mg Ginkgo extract a day, given for at least 4-6 weeks. For the best trials, there were no marked differences in the quality of the evidence of the efficacy of Ginkgo in cerebral insufficiency compared with co-dergocrine. The results of the review may be complicated by a combination of publication bias and other biases, because there were no negative results reported in many trials of low methodological quality. 4. Positive results have been reported for Ginkgo biloba extracts in the treatment of cerebral insufficiency. The clinical evidence is similar to that of a registered product which is prescribed for the same indication. However, further studies should be conducted for a more detailed assessment of the efficacy. PMID:1457269

  6. Cerebral Hemodynamics and Vigilance Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    use of another nonrestrictive and relatively economic alternative to PET and fMRI—the assessment of cerebral blood oxygen saturation using NIRS ( Gratton ...Blackwell Pub- lishers. Gratton , G., & Fabiani, M. (2007). Optical imaging of brain functioning. In R. Parasuraman & M. Rizzo (Eds.), Neuroergonomics: The...Cerebralvascular disorders (3rd ed.). New York: Raven. Toronov, V., Webb, A., Choi, J. H., Wolf, M., Michalos, A., Gratton , E., et al. (2001

  7. Cerebral circulation during acceleration stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirovic, Srdjan

    A mathematical model of the cerebrovascular system has been developed to examine the influence of acceleration on cerebral circulation. The objective is to distinguish the main factors that limit cerebral blood flow in pilots subjected to accelerations which exceed the gravitational acceleration of the earth (Gz > 1). The cerebrovascular system was approximated by an open-loop network of elastic tubes and the flow in blood vessels was modeled according to a one-dimensional theory of flow in collapsible tubes. Since linear analysis showed that the speed of pulse propagation in the intracranial vessels should not be modified by the skull constraint, the same governing equations were used for the intracranial vessels as for the rest of the network. The steady and pulsatile components of the cerebrospinal fluid pressure were determined from the condition that the cranial volume must be conserved. After the qualitative aspects of the model results were verified experimentally, the open-loop geometry was incorporated into a global mathematical model of the cardiovascular system. Both the mathematical models and the experiment show that cerebral blood flow diminishes for Gz > 1 due to an increase in the resistance of the large veins in the neck, which collapse as soon as the venous pressure becomes negative. In contrast, the conservation of the cranial volume requires that the cerebrospinal and venous pressure always be approximately the same, and the vessels contained in the cranial cavity do not collapse. Positive pressure breathing provides protection by elevating blood arterial and venous pressures at the heart, thus preventing the venous collapse and maintaining the normal cerebral vascular resistance.

  8. [Cerebral artery thrombosis in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Charco Roca, L M; Ortiz Sanchez, V E; Hernandez Gutierrez-Manchon, O; Quesada Villar, J; Bonmatí García, L; Rubio Postigo, G

    2015-11-01

    A 28 year old woman, ASA I, who, in the final stages of her pregnancy presented with signs of neural deficit that consisted of distortion of the oral commissure, dysphagia, dysarthria, and weakness on the left side of the body. She was diagnosed with thrombosis in a segment of the right middle cerebral artery which led to an ischemic area in the right frontal lobe. Termination of pregnancy and conservative treatment was decided, with good resolution of the symptoms.

  9. [Cerebral hydatid disease: imaging features].

    PubMed

    Tlili-Graiess, K; El-Ouni, F; Gharbi-Jemni, H; Arifa, N; Moulahi, H; Mrad-Dali, K; Guesmi, H; Abroug, S; Yacoub, M; Krifa, H

    2006-12-01

    Cerebral hytatid cysts (HC) are extremely rare, forming 2% of all intra cranial space occupying lesions even in counties where the disease is endemic. HC diagnosis is usually based on a pathognomonic computed tomography (CT) pattern. In order to assess the value of MR we reviewed the CT (n=25) and magnetic resonance (MR, n=4 including diffusion and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in 1) imaging of 25 patients with pathologically confirmed cerebral hydatid disease. 19 HC were seen in children under 16 years. All were supra tentorial with 22 in the middle cerebral artery territory. HC was solitary in 18 cases, unilocular in 23 and multi-vesicular in 2 with heavily calcified pericyst in 1. 2 cysts were intra ventricular and 1 intra aqueducal. The most typical features were well defined, smooth thin walled spherical or oval cystic lesions of CSF density and/or signal with considerable mass effect (20/25). Surrounding oedema with complete or incomplete rim enhancement was seen in 3 cases which were labelled as complicated and/or infected cysts. Although CT is diagnostic of hydatid disease in almost all cases (22/25), MRI including diffusion and spectroscopy precisely demonstrate location, number, cyst capsule, type of signal and enhancement and allows diagnosis of atypical or complicated HC and appears more helpful in surgical planning.

  10. Bone age in cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Eduardo Régis de Alencar Bona; Palmieri, Maurício D'arc; de Assumpção, Rodrigo Montezuma César; Yamada, Helder Henzo; Rancan, Daniela Regina; Fucs, Patrícia Maria de Moraes Barros

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the chronological age and bone age among cerebral palsy patients in the outpatient clinic and its correlation with the type of neurological involvement, gender and functional status. Methods 401 patients with spastic cerebral palsy, and ages ranging from three months to 20 years old, submitted to radiological examination for bone age and analyzed by two independent observers according Greulich & Pyle. Results In the topographic distribution, there was a significant delay (p<0.005) in tetraparetic (17.7 months), hemiparetic (10.1 months), and diparetic patients (7.9 months). In the hemiparetic group, the mean bone age in the affected side was 96.88 months and the uncompromised side was 101.13 months (p<0.005). Regarding functional status, the ambulatory group showed a delay of 18.73 months in bone age (p<0.005). Comparing bone age between genders, it was observed a greater delay in males (13.59 months) than in females (9.63 months), but not statistically significant (p = 0.54). Conclusion There is a delay in bone age compared to chronological age influenced by the topography of spasticity, functional level and gender in patients with cerebral palsy. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:24453693

  11. Cerebral ischaemia: A neuroradiological study

    SciTech Connect

    Bories, J.

    1985-01-01

    After a brief clinical and pathophysiological approach, the papers presented in this book are devoted to CT and angiography. Concerning CT, a particular study has been made of cerebral arterial territories on cuts parallel to the orbito-meatal line: these are very important in making the differential diagnosis from some tumors. Also concerning CT, a paper has been devoted to cerebral ''lacunae.'' The term ''lacuna'' as far as CT imaging is concerned, should be reserved only for those hypodense areas corresponding to small cavities containing fluid, which are sequelae of infarcts in the territory of penetrating arteries. Before this sequellar state come all the evolutive states of a small deep infarct. The angiographic study specifies the indications of angiography in the study of cerebral ischemia, and the techniques to be used. It shows the main etiologic aspects. Because of the important place of vascular surgery today, it seemed necessary to show also the main post operative angiographic aspects. After CT and angiography, some pages are reserved to more modern techniques. Finally, some pages are devoted to certain particular associations and etiologies: childhood, cardiopathies, migraine, oral contraception and end with venous infarction.

  12. Electroencephalographic Response to Sodium Nitrite May Predict Delayed Cerebral Ischemia After Severe Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Matthew J.; Ezra, Martyn; Herigstad, Mari; Hayen, Anja; Sleigh, Jamie W.; Westbrook, Jon; Warnaby, Catherine E.; Pattinson, Kyle T. S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage often leads to death and poor clinical outcome. Injury occurring during the first 72 hours is termed “early brain injury,” with disruption of the nitric oxide pathway playing an important pathophysiologic role in its development. Quantitative electroencephalographic variables, such as α/δ frequency ratio, are surrogate markers of cerebral ischemia. This study assessed the quantitative electroencephalographic response to a cerebral nitric oxide donor (intravenous sodium nitrite) to explore whether this correlates with the eventual development of delayed cerebral ischemia. Design: Unblinded pilot study testing response to drug intervention. Setting: Neuroscience ICU, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, United Kingdom. Patients: Fourteen World Federation of Neurosurgeons grades 3, 4, and 5 patients (mean age, 52.8 yr [range, 41–69 yr]; 11 women). Interventions: IV sodium nitrite (10 μg/kg/min) for 1 hour. Measurements and Main Results: Continuous electroencephalographic recording for 2 hours. The alpha/delta frequency ratio was measured before and during IV sodium nitrite infusion. Seven of 14 patients developed delayed cerebral ischemia. There was a +30% to +118% (range) increase in the alpha/delta frequency ratio in patients who did not develop delayed cerebral ischemia (p < 0.0001) but an overall decrease in the alpha/delta frequency ratio in those patients who did develop delayed cerebral ischemia (range, +11% to –31%) (p = 0.006, multivariate analysis accounting for major confounds). Conclusions: Administration of sodium nitrite after severe subarachnoid hemorrhage differentially influences quantitative electroencephalographic variables depending on the patient’s susceptibility to development of delayed cerebral ischemia. With further validation in a larger sample size, this response may be developed as a tool for risk stratification after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:27441898

  13. Neonatal risk factors for cerebral palsy in very preterm babies: case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, D. J.; Hope, P. L.; Johnson, A.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify neonatal risk factors for cerebral palsy among very preterm babies and in particular the associations independent of the coexistence of antenatal and intrapartum factors. DESIGN: Case-control study. SETTING: Oxford health region. SUBJECTS: Singleton babies born between 1984 and 1990 at less than 32 weeks' gestation who survived to discharge from hospital: 59 with cerebral palsy and 234 randomly selected controls without cerebral palsy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Adverse neonatal factors expressed as odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: Factors associated with an increased risk of cerebral palsy after adjustment for gestational age and the presence of previously identified antenatal and intrapartum risk factors were patent ductus arteriosus (odds ratio 2.3; 95% confidence interval 1.2 to 4.5), hypotension (2.3; 1.3 to 4.7), blood transfusion (4.8; 2.5 to 9.3), prolonged ventilation (4.8; 2.5 to 9.0), pneumothorax (3.5; 1.6 to 7.6), sepsis (3.6; 1.8 to 7.4), hyponatraemia (7.9; 2.1 to 29.6) and total parenteral nutrition (5.5; 2.8 to 10.5). Seizures were associated with an increased risk of cerebral palsy (10.0; 4.1 to 24.7), as were parenchymal damage (32; 12.4 to 84.4) and appreciable ventricular dilatation (5.4; 3.0 to 9.8) detected by cerebral ultrasound. CONCLUSION: A reduction in the rate of cerebral palsy in very preterm babies requires an integrated approach to management throughout the antenatal, intrapartum, and neonatal periods. PMID:9040385

  14. Cerebral embolic stroke after disappearing takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Matsuzono, Kosuke; Ikeda, Yoshio; Deguchi, Shoko; Yamashita, Toru; Kurata, Tomoko; Deguchi, Kentaro; Abe, Koji

    2013-11-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy can induce cerebral embolic stroke because of intracardiac thrombosis, but the timing of cardiogenic embolism relating to takotsubo cardiomyopathy has not been well described. We evaluated a 71-year-old woman with takotsubo cardiomyopathy, who developed cardiogenic cerebral embolism after recovery of cardiac wall motion. Nevertheless, we treated her with anticoagulation therapy. The present clinical observation suggests that attention should be paid to the timing when takotsubo cardiomyopathy resolves against risk of cardiogenic cerebral embolism.

  15. Specialty hospitals: can general hospitals compete?

    PubMed

    Dummit, Laura A

    2005-07-13

    The rapid increase in specialty cardiac, surgical, and orthopedic hospitals has captured the attention of general hospitals and policymakers. Although the number of specialty hospitals remains small in absolute terms, their entry into certain health care markets has fueled arguments about the rules of "fair" competition among health care providers. To allow the smoke to clear, Congress effectively stalled the growth in new specialty hospitals by temporarily prohibiting physicians from referring Medicare or Medicaid patients to specialty hospitals in which they had an ownership interest. During this 18-month moratorium, which expired June 8, 2005, two mandated studies of specialty hospitals provided information to help assess their potential effect on health care delivery. This issue brief discusses the research on specialty hospitals, including their payments under Medicare's hospital inpatient payment system, the quality and cost of care they deliver, their effect on general hospitals and on overall health care delivery, and the regulatory and legal environment in which they have proliferated. It concludes with open issues concerning physician self-referral and the role of general hospitals in providing a range of health care services.

  16. Measuring Rural Hospital Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moscovice, Ira; Wholey, Douglas R.; Klingner, Jill; Knott, Astrid

    2004-01-01

    Increased interest in the measurement of hospital quality has been stimulated by accrediting bodies, purchaser coalitions, government agencies, and other entities. This paper examines quality measurement for hospitals in rural settings. We seek to identify rural hospital quality measures that reflect quality in all hospitals and that are sensitive…

  17. Hospital marketing revisited.

    PubMed

    Costello, M M

    1987-05-01

    With more hospitals embracing the marketing function in their organizational management over the past decade, hospital marketing can no longer be considered a fad. However, a review of hospital marketing efforts as reported in the professional literature indicates that hospitals must pay greater attention to the marketing mix elements of service, price and distribution channels as their programs mature.

  18. Cerebral Palsy. Fact Sheet = La Paralisis Cerebral. Hojas Informativas Sobre Discapacidades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities, Washington, DC.

    This fact sheet on cerebral palsy is written in both English and Spanish. First, it provides a definition of cerebral palsy and considers various causes (e.g., an insufficient amount of oxygen reaching the fetal or newborn brain). The fact sheet then offers incidence figures and explains characteristics of the three main types of cerebral palsy:…

  19. Cerebral Palsy Checklist: Teens & Young Adult (13 to 21)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2-Year-Old Cerebral Palsy Checklist: Teens & Young Adults KidsHealth > For Parents > Cerebral Palsy Checklist: Teens & Young ... plan healthy meals. continue Step 3: Explore Young-Adult Education Young adults with cerebral palsy are entitled ...

  20. Acute cerebral vascular accident associated with hyperperfusion.

    PubMed

    Soin, J S; Burdine, J A

    1976-01-01

    Cerebral radionuclide angiography can demonstrate decreased or normal radioactivity in the affected region during the arterial phase in patients who have sustained a cerebral vascular accident and thus enhances the diagnostic specificity of the static brain image. In an occasional patient, however, a seemingly paradoxical pattern of regional hyperperfusion with a return to normal or subnormal perfusion following the acute phase has been observed. This phenomenon, called "luxury perfusion," has been defined using intra-arterial 133Xe for semiquantitative cerebral blood flow measurements and should be kept in mind as a potentially misleading cerebral imaging pattern.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Testing Registry: Dementia, familial Danish Genetic Testing Registry: Hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy, Icelandic type Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (2 links) Johns Hopkins Medicine: ...

  2. Competition among hospitals.

    PubMed

    Noether, M

    1988-09-01

    The traditional view of hospital competition has posited that hospitals compete primarily along 'quality' dimensions, in the form of fancy equipment to attract admitting physicians and pleasant surroundings to entice patients. Price competition among hospitals is thought to be non-existent. This paper estimates the effects of various hospital market characteristics on hospital prices and expenses in an attempt to determine the form of hospital competition. The results suggest that both price and quality competition are greater in markets that are less concentrated, although the net effect of the two on prices is insignificant. It appears, therefore, that, despite important distortions, hospital markets are not immune to standard competitive forces.

  3. Pervasive media violence.

    PubMed

    Schooler, C; Flora, J A

    1996-01-01

    In this review, we focus our discussion on studies examining effects on children and young adults. We believe that the current epidemic of youth violence in the United States justifies a focus on this vulnerable segment of society. We consider media effects on individual children's behaviors, such as imitating aggressive acts. In addition, we examine how the media influence young people's perceptions of norms regarding interpersonal relationships. Next, we assess mass media effects on societal beliefs, or what children and adolescents think the "real world" is like. We suggest these media influences are cumulative and mutually reinforcing, and discuss the implications of repeated exposure to prominent and prevalent violent media messages. Finally, we catalog multiple intervention possibilities ranging from education to regulation. From a public health perspective, therefore, we evaluate the effects that pervasive media messages depicting violence have on young people and present multiple strategies to promote more healthful outcomes.

  4. Division Level Social Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-12

    operating budget. The social media manager or group is responsible for posting pictures, stories, and links to social media pages. Every divisional unit...09-026– Responsible and Effective Use of Internet-based Capabilities; 5. Army’s Slide Share– Social Media Round Up. The U.S. Army Public Affairs...Officer is responsible for safeguarding information and government organizations and those who work for it. It is the first enclosure of the Social

  5. Media multitasking in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Cain, Matthew S; Leonard, Julia A; Gabrieli, John D E; Finn, Amy S

    2016-12-01

    Media use has been on the rise in adolescents overall, and in particular, the amount of media multitasking-multiple media consumed simultaneously, such as having a text message conversation while watching TV-has been increasing. In adults, heavy media multitasking has been linked with poorer performance on a number of laboratory measures of cognition, but no relationship has yet been established between media-multitasking behavior and real-world outcomes. Examining individual differences across a group of adolescents, we found that more frequent media multitasking in daily life was associated with poorer performance on statewide standardized achievement tests of math and English in the classroom, poorer performance on behavioral measures of executive function (working memory capacity) in the laboratory, and traits of greater impulsivity and lesser growth mindset. Greater media multitasking had a relatively circumscribed set of associations, and was not related to behavioral measures of cognitive processing speed, implicit learning, or manual dexterity, or to traits of grit and conscientiousness. Thus, individual differences in adolescent media multitasking were related to specific differences in executive function and in performance on real-world academic achievement measures: More media multitasking was associated with poorer executive function ability, worse academic achievement, and a reduced growth mindset.

  6. Media Monopoly in Brazil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amaral, Roberto; Guimaraes, Cesar

    1994-01-01

    Documents the process of broadcasting media development in Brazil, the failure of new technologies to produce democratization, and the barriers to democratization erected by monopolization and "metastasis." (SR)

  7. Overview: new media.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Gwenn Schurgin

    2012-06-01

    Pediatricians care for children's growth and development from the time they are born until they become adults. In addition, pediatricians must be vigilant for external influences. Technology influences children of all ages. Seventy-five percent of teenagers own cell phones, with 25% using them for social media. Technology can lead to an increase in skills and social benefits but there is also the potential for harm such as sexting, cyberbullying, privacy issues, and Internet addiction, all of which can affect health. Pediatricians must become well versed in the new media to provide media-oriented anticipatory guidance and advice on media-related issues.

  8. [Care for patients with altered states of consciousness in a hospital for chronic and long-stay patients].

    PubMed

    Más-Sesé, Gemma; Sanchis-Pellicer, M José; Tormo-Micó, Esther; Vicente-Más, Josep; Vallalta-Morales, Manuel; Rueda-Gordillo, Diego; Conejo-Alba, Antonia; Berbegal-Serra, Juan; Martínez-Avilés, Pedro; Oltra-Masanet, Joan A; Femenia-Pérez, Miquel

    2015-03-16

    Introduccion. Un 30-40% de los pacientes con daño cerebral presenta alteraciones del nivel de conciencia, y algunos casos, estados alterados de conciencia: sindrome de vigilia sin respuesta (SVSR) o estado de minima conciencia (EMC). La recuperacion es variable y la supervivencia esta amenazada por multiples complicaciones. Objetivos. Presentar la metodologia de trabajo del Hospital La Pedrera (HLP) para pacientes en SVSR o EMC y analizar las caracteristicas clinicas de los pacientes atendidos, la evolucion, y la situacion funcional y cognitiva en el momento del alta. Pacientes y metodos. Estudio descriptivo prospectivo de pacientes atendidos en el HLP durante el periodo 2009-2013, con diagnostico de SVSR o EMC. Resultados. El HLP trabaja mediante el metodo gestion de caso, ofreciendo una atencion integral por un equipo multidisciplinar. Los pacientes se clasifican segun objetivos asistenciales. Los pacientes con SVSR o EMC se incluyen en el programa de cuidados integrales y adaptacion. Se atendio a 23 pacientes (86,9% varones), con una edad media de 54,9 años. Etiologia: hemorragia cerebral, 30,4%; encefalopatia anoxica, 26,6%; encefalopatia metabolica, 17,3%; y otras causas, 17,3%. El 73,9% ingreso en SVSR y el resto en EMC. Evolucion: el 43,4% mejoro su situacion cognitiva inicial y el 88,8% presentaba una situacion de dependencia total en el momento del alta. Las complicaciones mas frecuentes fueron infecciones respiratorias y urinarias (53,6%). El 65,2% de los casos fueron exitus. Conclusiones. La asistencia en SVSR o EMC es compleja y precisa cuidados multidisciplinares. Casi la mitad de los pacientes mejoro su situacion cognitiva, lo que justifica una actitud proactiva que intente mejorar la calidad de vida de los pacientes y sus familias.

  9. Cerebral vascular findings in PAPA syndrome: cerebral arterial vasculopathy or vasculitis and a posterior cerebral artery dissecting aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Khatibi, Kasra; Heit, Jeremy J; Telischak, Nicholas A; Elbers, Jorina M; Do, Huy M

    2015-06-24

    A young patient with PAPA (pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne) syndrome developed an unusual cerebral arterial vasculopathy/vasculitis (CAV) that resulted in subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured dissecting posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysm. This aneurysm was successfully treated by endovascular coil sacrifice of the affected segment of the PCA. The patient made an excellent recovery with no significant residual neurologic deficit.

  10. Cerebral vascular findings in PAPA syndrome: cerebral arterial vasculopathy or vasculitis and a posterior cerebral artery dissecting aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Khatibi, Kasra; Heit, Jeremy J; Telischak, Nicholas A; Elbers, Jorina M; Do, Huy M

    2016-08-01

    A young patient with PAPA (pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne) syndrome developed an unusual cerebral arterial vasculopathy/vasculitis (CAV) that resulted in subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured dissecting posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysm. This aneurysm was successfully treated by endovascular coil sacrifice of the affected segment of the PCA. The patient made an excellent recovery with no significant residual neurologic deficit.

  11. Efficacy of cilostazol in preventing aspiration pneumonia in acute cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Aiko; Maeshima, Shinichiro; Tanahashi, Norio

    2013-08-01

    This retrospective study examined the effectiveness of cilostazol in preventing aspiration pneumonia in patients with acute cerebral infarction. The 189 subjects ranged in age from 31 to 95 years and included 57 with small-artery occlusion, 107 with large-artery atherothrombosis, and 25 with other disorders. Patients with cardiogenic cerebral embolism or preexisting pneumonia at the time of hospital admission were excluded from the analysis. Neurologic symptoms, cognitive function, and swallowing function were assessed at the first clinical examination, and the ability to perform activities of daily living was assessed at both hospital admission and discharge. Outcome and food intake status were also assessed at hospital discharge. Pneumonia was detected in 27 of 189 subjects (14.3%), in 20 subjects during nasogastric tube feeding implemented because of oral intake difficulties (fasting group) and in 7 subjects after initiation of oral feeding (oral intake group). Cilostazol was administered to 48 of the 189 subjects (25.4%). The incidence of pneumonia was 6.3% (3 of 48) in patients who received cilostazol, compared with 17% (24 of 141) in those who did not receive cilostazol. Our data suggest that cilostazol appears to prevent the occurrence of pneumonia in both the chronic and acute stages of cerebral infarction.

  12. Guide to Choosing a Hospital

    MedlinePlus

    ... your condition? Should you consider a specialty hospital, teaching hospital (usually part of a university), community hospital, ... been approved by Medicare. Hospitals may choose either method of evaluation. You can check with a hospital ...

  13. Regional cerebral oxygen saturation guided cerebral protection in a parturient with Takayasu's arteritis undergoing cesarean section: a case report.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wei; Wang, Tianlong; Fu, Wenya; Wang, Fengying; Zhao, Lei

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this case report is to present the successful use of regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rScO2) monitoring guided cerebral protection for cesarean delivery in a parturient with Takayasu's arteritis at 38weeks' gestation. The parturient presented with impaired cerebral and renal perfusion. Titrated epidural anesthesia was performed. During the procedure, we used rScO2 guided cerebral protection strategies, which helped to optimize cerebral oxygen delivery and prevent cerebral complications.

  14. Numerical predictions of hemodynamics following surgeries in cerebral aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayz, Vitaliy; Lawton, Michael; Boussel, Loic; Leach, Joseph; Acevedo, Gabriel; Halbach, Van; Saloner, David

    2014-11-01

    Large cerebral aneurysms present a danger of rupture or brain compression. In some cases, clinicians may attempt to change the pathological hemodynamics in order to inhibit disease progression. This can be achieved by changing the vascular geometry with an open surgery or by deploying a stent-like flow diverter device. Patient-specific CFD models can help evaluate treatment options by predicting flow regions that are likely to become occupied by thrombus (clot) following the procedure. In this study, alternative flow scenarios were modeled for several patients who underwent surgical treatment. Patient-specific geometries and flow boundary conditions were obtained from magnetic resonance angiography and velocimetry data. The Navier-Stokes equations were solved with a finite volume solver Fluent. A porous media approach was used to model flow-diverter devices. The advection-diffusion equation was solved in order to simulate contrast agent transport and the results were used to evaluate flow residence time changes. Thrombus layering was predicted in regions characterized by reduced velocities and shear stresses as well as increased flow residence time. The simulations indicated surgical options that could result in occlusion of vital arteries with thrombus. Numerical results were compared to experimental and clinical MRI data. The results demonstrate that image-based CFD models may help improve the outcome of surgeries in cerebral aneurysms. acknowledge R01HL115267.

  15. Noninvasive absolute cerebral oximetry with frequency-domain near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallacoglu, Bertan

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measurements of absolute concentrations of oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin in the human brain can provide critical information about cerebral physiology in terms of cerebral blood volume, blood flow, oxygen delivery, and metabolic rate of oxygen. We developed several frequency domain NIRS data acquisition and analysis methods aimed at absolute measurements of hemoglobin concentration and saturation in cerebral tissue of adult human subjects. Extensive experimental investigations were carried out in various homogenous and two-layered tissue-mimicking phantoms, and biological tissues. The advantages and limitations of commonly used homogenous models and inversion strategies were thoroughly investigated. Prior to human subjects, extensive studies were carried out in in vivo animal models. In rabbits, absolute hemoglobin oxygen desaturation was shown to depend strongly on surgically induced testicular torsion. Methods developed in this study were then adapted for measurements in the rat brain. Absolute values were demonstrated to discern cerebrovascular impairment in a rat model of diet-induced vascular cognitive impairment. These results facilitated the development of clinically useful optical measures of cerebrovascular health. In a large group of human subjects, employing a homogeneous model for absolute measurements was shown to be reliable and robust. However, it was also shown to be limited due to the relatively thick extracerebral tissue. The procedure we develop in this work and the thesis thereof performs a nonlinear inversion procedure with six unknown parameters with no other prior knowledge for the retrieval of the optical coefficients and top layer thickness with high accuracy on two-layered media. Our absolute measurements of cerebral hemoglobin concentration and saturation are based on the discrimination of extracerebral and cerebral tissue layers, and they can enhance the impact of NIRS for cerebral hemodynamics and

  16. Cerebral Venous Congestion as Indication for Thrombolytic Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Fong Y. Kostanian, Varoujan; Rivera, Monica; Lee, Kwo-Whie; Chen, Clayton C.; Nguyen, Thong H.

    2007-07-15

    ranging from 5 days to 2 months. Eight of these were diagnosed with dural sinus thrombosis only, and had a stable hospital course without worsening of symptoms. These patients also did not have imaging evidence of cerebral venous congestion. The remaining 2 patients had cerebral edema on the CT scan. One had only a small amount of edema in the right cerebellum, but the other had severe edema in the bilateral basal ganglia and thalamic areas. Nine of these patients had a stable hospitalization course and experienced a symptom-free recovery, but 1 died with severe cerebral edema and hemorrhage. Seven of the remaining 15 patients were initially treated with anticoagulation therapy for periods ranging from 2 days to 2 months (average 11 days). These 7 patients were considered to have failed anticoagulation therapy since they had worsening symptoms, and 5 of these had developed hemorrhage on subsequent CT or MR imaging scans. Five of the 7 then underwent thrombectomy with the administration of tPA. Of the remaining 2, 1 underwent thrombectomy alone without the administration of tPA, and the other was given 1 million units of urokinase instead of tPA. Three of these patients had a symptom-free recovery, but 2 had residual left-sided weakness, 1 patient had a minimal gait disturbance, and another patient developed a transverse sinus arteriovenous fistula 7 months after thrombolytic therapy. The remaining 8 patients did not receive anticoagulation therapy, and went straight to treatment with thrombectomy and administration of tPA. All of these presented with worsening clinical symptoms. Six had hemorrhage on their imaging studies, 1 had new edema on a subsequent CT scan, and 1 had edema along with the dural sinus thrombosis, but experienced worsening clinical symptoms consisting of headache and atypical dystonia. Five of these 8 patients experienced a symptom-free recovery, and 3 patients had mild residual weakness. Conclusion. In patients with acute dural sinus thrombosis, an

  17. Hemodynamic Intervention of Cerebral Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui

    2005-11-01

    Cerebral aneurysm is a pathological vascular response to hemodynamic stimuli. Endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms essentially alters the blood flow to stop them from continued growth and eventual rupture. Compared to surgical clipping, endovascular methods are minimally invasive and hence rapidly gaining popularity. However, they are not always effective with risks of aneurysm regrowth and various complications. We aim at developing a Virtual Intervention (VI) platform that allows: patient-specific flow calculation and risk prediction as well as recommendation of tailored intervention based on quantitative analysis. This is a lofty goal requiring advancement in three areas of research: (1). Advancement of image-based CFD; (2) Understanding the biological/pathological responses of tissue to hemodynamic factors in the context of cerebral aneurysms; and (3) Capability of designing and testing patient-specific endovascular devices. We have established CFD methodologies based on anatomical geometry obtained from 3D angiographic or CT images. To study the effect of hemodynamics on aneurysm development, we have created a canine model of a vascular bifurcation anastomosis to provide the hemodynamic environment similar to those in CA. Vascular remodeling was studied using histology and compared against the flow fields obtained from CFD. It was found that an intimal pad, similar to those frequently seen clinically, developed at the flow impingement site, bordering with an area of `groove' characteristic of an early stage of aneurysm, where the micro environment exhibits an elevated wall shear stresses. To further address the molecular mechanisms of the flow-mediated aneurysm pathology, we are also developing in vitro cell culture systems to complement the in vivo study. Our current effort in endovascular device development focuses on novel stents that alters the aneurysmal flow to promote thrombotic occlusion as well as favorable remodeling. Realization of an

  18. Media Education and Native Peoples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Sandy

    1991-01-01

    Media literacy encourages critical thinking about the news media, advertising, and popular culture. Media education of American Indian students challenges mass media's stereotyped aboriginal representations and the mainstream values of egotism and consumerism. Integrated across the curriculum at all grades, media education is empowering and…

  19. Variations in Writing Posture and Cerebral Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Jerre; Reid, Marylou

    1976-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between hand writing posture and cerebral dominance of 48 left handed writers and 25 right handed writers. Determined that cerebral dominance is related to handedness and to whether or not the writing hand posture is normal or inverted. (SL)

  20. New Hope for Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obringer, S. John

    This paper explains the use of a unique experimental therapy for students with a type of cerebral palsy specifically called Botox. Botulinum Toxin Type A has been tried on a sizable number of students with cerebral palsy in clinical settings to reduce spastic and dystonic movements. By injecting Botox into overly tight heel cords, a normal or near…

  1. Mobility Experiences of Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palisano, Robert J.; Shimmell, Lorie J.; Stewart, Debra; Lawless, John J.; Rosenbaum, Peter L.; Russell, Dianne J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how youth with cerebral palsy experience mobility in their daily lives using a phenomenological approach. The participants were 10 youth with cerebral palsy, 17 to 20 years of age, selected using purposeful sampling with maximum variation strategies. A total of 14 interviews were completed. Transcripts…

  2. Cerebral oximetry: a replacement for pulse oximetry?

    PubMed

    Frost, Elizabeth A M

    2012-10-01

    Cerebral oximetry has been around for some 3 decades but has had a somewhat checkered history regarding application and reliability. More recently several monitors have been approved in the United States and elsewhere and the technique is emerging as a useful tool for assessing not only adequate cerebral oxygenation but also tissue oxygenation and perfusion in other organs.

  3. Neurotransmitter Receptor Binding in Bovine Cerebral Microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peroutka, Stephen J.; Moskowitz, Michael A.; Reinhard, John F.; Synder, Solomon H.

    1980-05-01

    Purified preparations of microvessels from bovine cerebral cortex contain substantial levels of alpha-adrenergic, beta-adrenergic, and histamine 1 receptor binding sites but only negligible serotonin, muscarinic cholinergic, opiate, and benzodiazepine receptor binding. Norepinephrine and histamine may be endogenous regulators of the cerebral microcirculation at the observed receptors.

  4. Restenosis After Balloon Angioplasty for Cerebral Vasospasm

    SciTech Connect

    Sedat, J. Chau, Y.; Popolo, M.; Gindre, S.; Rami, L.; Orban, J. C.

    2009-03-15

    Transluminal balloon dilatation for symptomatic vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage is effective, and clinical studies have shown that it achieves long-lasting dilatation of spastic cerebral arteries. Delayed arterial renarrowing has not been reported. Here we report the case of a 58-year-old woman who presented asymptomatic and permanent restenosis after angioplasty for cerebral vasospasm.

  5. Multiple brain abscesses from isolated cerebral mucormycosis.

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, A; Del Brutto, O H

    1990-01-01

    A report is presented of a patient with cerebral mucormycosis without rhinosinusal or systemic evidence of the disease. The predisposing condition was drug-induced immunosuppression. Computed tomography (CT) showed focal areas of abnormal enhancement which correlated with necropsy findings of localised parenchymal brain damage; this represented encapsulated brain abscesses, a rare form of presentation of cerebral mucormycosis. Images PMID:2351973

  6. Cerebral-Body Perfusion Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    compared to the 0.5g curve) fall in flow. Fig. 9b, showing the 5g case, strongly suggests a possible, so-called, " luxury perfusion ", in which natural...as the luxury perfusion situation which bypasses the flow with the nutrients it carries (through newly opened collaterals) and result in a "blackout...89-0054 CEREBRAL-BODY PERFUSION MODEL S. Sorek’, J. Bear2, and M., Feinsod3 in Collaboration with K. Allen4, L. Bunt5 and S. Ben-IHaiM6 July 1990

  7. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome: review.

    PubMed

    Cerdà-Esteve, M; Cuadrado-Godia, E; Chillaron, J J; Pont-Sunyer, C; Cucurella, G; Fernández, M; Goday, A; Cano-Pérez, J F; Rodríguez-Campello, A; Roquer, J

    2008-06-01

    Hyponatremia is the most frequent electrolyte disorder in critically neurological patients. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSW) is defined as a renal loss of sodium during intracranial disease leading to hyponatremia and a decrease in extracellular fluid volume. The pathogenesis of this disorder is still not completely understood. Sympathetic responses as well as some natriuretic factors play a role in this syndrome. Distinction between SIADH and CSW might be difficult. The essential point is the volemic state. It is necessary to rule out other intermediate causes. Treatment requires volume replacement and maintenance of a positive salt balance. Mineral corticoids may be useful in complicated cases.

  8. Cerebral asymmetry in insomnia sufferers.

    PubMed

    St-Jean, Geneviève; Turcotte, Isabelle; Bastien, Célyne H

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral asymmetry is used to describe the differences in electroencephalographic activity between regions of the brain. The objective of this study was to document frontal, central, and parietal asymmetry in psychophysiological (Psy-I) and paradoxical (Para-I) insomnia sufferers as well as good sleeper (GS) controls, and to compare their patterns of asymmetry to others already found in anxiety and depression. Additionally, asymmetry variations between nights were assessed. Participants were 17 Psy-I, 14 Para-I, and 19 GS (mean age = 40 years, SD = 9.4). They completed three nights of polysomnography (PSG) recordings following a clinical evaluation in a sleep laboratory. All sleep cycles of Nights 2 and 3 were retained for power spectral analysis. The absolute activity in frequency bands (0.00-125.00 Hz) was computed at multiple frontal, central, and parietal sites in rapid eye movement and non-rapid eye movement sleep to provide cerebral asymmetry measures. Mixed model ANOVAs were computed to assess differences between groups and nights. Correlations were performed with asymmetry and symptoms of depression and anxiety from self-reported questionnaires. Over the course of the two nights, Para-I tended to present hypoactivation of their left frontal region but hyperactivation of their right one compared with GS. As for Psy-I, they presented increased activation of their right parietal region compared with Para-I. Asymmetry at frontal, central, and parietal region differed between nights. On a more disrupted night of sleep, Psy-I had increased activity in their right parietal region while Para-I presented a decrease in cerebral activity in the right central region on their less disrupted night of sleep. Anxious and depressive symptoms did not correlate with asymmetry at any region. Therefore, Psy-I and Para-I present unique patterns of cerebral asymmetry that do not relate to depression or anxiety, and asymmetry varies between nights, maybe as a

  9. [Cerebral oedema: new therapeutic ways].

    PubMed

    Quintard, H; Ichai, C

    2014-06-01

    Cerebral oedema (CO) after brain injury can occur from different ways. The vasogenic and cytotoxic oedema are usually described but osmotic and hydrostatic CO, respectively secondary to plasmatic hypotonia or increase in blood pressure, can also be encountered. Addition of these several mechanisms can worsen injuries. Consequences are major, leading quickly to death secondary to intracerebral hypertension and later to neuropsychic sequelae. So therapeutic care to control this phenomenon is essential and osmotherapy is actually the only way. A better understanding of physiopathological disorders, particularly energetic ways (lactate), aquaporine function, inflammation lead to new therapeutic hopes. The promising experimental results need now to be confirmed by clinical data.

  10. Treating cerebral palsy with aculaser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Shahzad; Nazir Khan, Malik M.; Nadeem Khan, Malik M.; Qazi, Faiza M.; Awan, Abid H.; Dar, Irfan

    2008-03-01

    A single, open and non comparative study was conducted at Anwar Shah Trust for C.P. & Paralysis in collaboration with the Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Children Hospital Lahore, Pakistan to evaluate the effects of ACULASER THERAPY in childern suffering from Cerebral Palsy (C.P.) and associated Neurological Disorders like epilepsy, cortical blindness, spasticity, hemiplegia, paraplegia, diplegia, quadriplegia, monoplegia, sensory-neural deafness and speech disorders. In all 250 childern were treated and the data was gathered during a period of 3 years from December 2003 till December 2006. These children were further classified according to the type of C.P. (spastic, athetoid, mixed) they suffered from and associated Neurological Disorders. This article shows results in C.P. childern who were treated with ACULASER THERAPY for minimum 6 weeks and more or had minimum of 15 treatment sessions and more. This article also shows that those childern who were given a break in the treatment for 1 month to 1 year did not show any reversal of the signs and symptoms. Analysis of the data showed that out of 171 children with Spasticity and Stiffness 147 showed marked improvement showing 87% success rate, out of 126 children with Epileptic fits, there was a significant reduction in the intensity, frequency and duration of Epileptic fits in 91 children showing 72% success rate, out of 48 children with Cortical Blindness 30 children showed improvement accounting for 63% efficacy rate, out of 105 children with Hearing Difficulties, 63 showed marked improvement accounting for 60% improvement rate, out of 190 children with Speech Disorders 122 showed improvement reflecting 64% improvement rate, out of 96 children with Hemiplegia 71 showed improvement in movement, tone and power accounting for 74% improvement rate, out of 76 children with Quadriplegia 52 showed improvement in gross and fine motor functions showing 69% success rate and out of 58 children with Paraplegia of

  11. Handling Europe's first Ebola case: internal hospital communication experience.

    PubMed

    Mosquera, Margarita; Melendez, Victoria; Latasa, Pello

    2015-04-01

    Europe's first Ebola virus disease (EVD) case was diagnosed in our hospital. There was an unjustified panic in the population because of an imbalance of credibility assigned to the media as opposed to scientific information. A reinforcement of hospital internal communication was needed to keep health care workers informed with up-to-date scientific EVD information. The proactive management of information flow to both internal and external actors is required to reduce unjustified fear within the public.

  12. The Day Reagan Was Shot: How a University Hospital PR Staff Handled the Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turk, Emily R.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The experiences of George Washington University Hospital's public relations staff when it handled the crisis of the shooting of President Reagan is described. Security, choice of a spokesperson, relations with the news media, dealing with VIPs, etc., are discussed. (MLW)

  13. Successful Endovascular Neurosurgical Practice in Resource-poor Exclusive Rural Neuro-hospital Setup

    PubMed Central

    Harsha, Kamble Jayaprakash

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study to evaluate the feasibility of establishing endovascular neurosurgery in remote resource-poor neuro-hospital setup and evaluate its outcome. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of diagnostic and therapeutic endovascular neurosurgical procedures performed during September 2013–June 2016. Results: A total of 174 diagnostic cerebral and spinal digital subtraction angiograms and 70 major endovascular neurosurgeries were performed during the period. The endovascular neurosurgical procedures included 54 aneurysms coiled, 4 cerebral arteriovenous malformation embolization, 2 dural arteriovenous fistulas embolization, 2 cerebral tumor embolizations, 2 intracranial stentings, 5 extracranial carotid stentings, 1 transverse sinus stenting. No complications were seen during diagnostic procedures. Operation related morbidity of 1.4% and mortality of 1.4% seen, with a procedural success rate of 97.2%. Conclusion: Endovascular neurosurgery is feasible in resource-poor remote rural exclusive neuro-hospital setup with procedural success rate and outcomes comparable to existing literature. PMID:28163497

  14. Digital Media and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    MacArthur launched the digital media and learning initiative in 2006 to explore how digital media are changing the way young people learn, socialize, communicate, and play. Since 2006, the Foundation has awarded grants totaling more than $100 million for research, development of innovative new technologies, new learning environments for youth,…

  15. Photonic layered media

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2002-01-01

    A new class of structured dielectric media which exhibit significant photonic bandstructure has been invented. The new structures, called photonic layered media, are easy to fabricate using existing layer-by-layer growth techniques, and offer the ability to significantly extend our practical ability to tailor the properties of such optical materials.

  16. EMMSE Media Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Clifford A., Comp.; McKinstry, Herbert A., Comp.

    This index provides a topical taxonomy of media which have been selected for their relevance in the teaching of materials science and engineering. The index is keyed to a matrix which matches topical and/or class material with six classifications of media: print, 16mm film, super 8 film, slide/tape, videotape, and other (including interactive…

  17. Computer Produced Media Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffcott, Janet B.

    To increase access to the media collection at the Madison Area Technical College (Wisconsin) a computer-produced key work index was created using an International Business Machine (IBM) 360 model 40 computer and a duplicating facility with offset capability. A standard 80 column IBM card was used reserving columns 1-9 for the media item number,…

  18. Minorities in the Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherard, Regina G., Comp.; And Others

    The four reports in this compilation focus on the role of blacks in the various media. The first report provides a general discussion of the status of blacks in the media, and notes that it has been largely analogous to their political and economic development. The second report traces the changing image of blacks as it has been portrayed on…

  19. Trends in Media Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Donald F.; Foehr, Ulla G.

    2008-01-01

    American youth are awash in media. They have television sets in their bedrooms, personal computers in their family rooms, and digital music players and cell phones in their backpacks. They spend more time with media than any single activity other than sleeping, with the average American eight- to eighteen-year-old reporting more than six hours of…

  20. Social Media. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    The growing use of social media by students and adults is impacting schools. A recent Pew study found that 73% of teens use social-networking sites to connect with others. Social media includes blogs, wikis, and podcasts as well as sites such as MySpace, Facebook, and Linkedin. While such sites promote connection with others, their use has created…

  1. News Media Industry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    convergence of media types, rapidly evolving technology, changing consumer behavior , and traditionalists ensconced in the ways of the past all...changing consumer behavior have all contributed to uncertain times for these media icons. Newspaper readership and subscriptions levels continue to...consistently center on changing technologies, corporate pressures, changing consumer behavior and revenue generation (advertising). Because it’s

  2. The Media Gospel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christians, Clifford G.; Fortner, Robert S.

    1981-01-01

    Examines four recent books on the religious media: Ben Armstrong's "The Electric Church," James F. Engel's "Contemporary Christian Communications: Its Theory and Practice," Malcolm Muggeridge's "Christ and the Media," and Virginia Stem Owens'"The Total Image: or Selling Jesus in the Modern Age." Evaluates…

  3. Advertising Pressures on Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammitt, Harry

    The majority of the media in the United States is funded through revenues derived from the sale of advertising space. The problem that arises from this situation is fundamentally an economic one: if advertisers are paying the bills for the media, how much control over content should they have? This report offers a review of instances in which…

  4. Accessing the Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Judy

    This guide for school districts offers a quick outline for developing good communications skills and public relations with news media personnel. Guidelines for good press relations are provided that emphasize the importance of keeping two-way, open communications with the media, with attention to: accuracy; being prepared; sharing the bad news as…

  5. Writing and Digital Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Waes, Luuk, Ed.; Leijten, Marielle, Ed.; Neuwirth, Chris, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Digital media has become an increasingly powerful force in modern society. This volume brings together outstanding European, American and Australian research in "writing and digital media" and explores its cognitive, social and cultural implications. In addition to presenting programs of original research by internationally known…

  6. Literacy, Learning, and Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Dennis; Hamm, Mary

    2000-01-01

    Considers the expanding definition of literacy from traditional reading and writing skills to include technological, visual, information, and networking literacy. Discusses the impact of media on social interactions and intellectual development; linking technology to educational goals; influences of new media symbol systems on communication;…

  7. Media: Eyeing the News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gage, Susan

    1990-01-01

    This issue of "Teachergram" addresses media-related issues such as the kind of world picture Canadians receive from mainstream media, the ability of television to describe the complexity of world events, and the claim of distorted and simplistic portrayal of developing nations. Students are encouraged critical perspective--to help them…

  8. Choosing Training Delivery Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hybert, Peter R.

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on decisionmaking about delivery media, and introduces CADDI's Performance-based, Accelerated, Customer-Stakeholder-driven Training & Development(SM) (PACT) Processes for training and development (T&D). Describes the media decisions that correspond with the design three levels of PACT: Curriculum Architecture Design, Modular Curriculum…

  9. Folk Media in Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructional Technology Report, 1975

    1975-01-01

    This issue is dedicated to folk media. Using Indonesia for his case study, Dr. Nat Colletta analyzes traditional culture as a medium for development. Juan Diaz Bordenave expresses doubts about adapting folk media to development objectives; Susan Hostetler and Arthur Gillette report on uses of the theater to promote development objectives; and…

  10. Remodeling the Media Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baule, Steven M.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses items that need to be considered when remodeling a school media center. Highlights include space and location for various functions, including projections of print versus electronic media; electrical and data wiring needs; lighting; security and supervision; and reuse of existing furniture and equipment. (LRW)

  11. Building Social Media Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferriter, William N.; Ramsden, Jason T.; Sheninger, Eric C.

    2012-01-01

    Incorporating social media tools into your professional practices does not have to be intimidating as long as you are willing to tackle five action steps. It is far easier to articulate the strengths--and to imagine the possibilities--of social media spaces as tools for communication and professional development when you are actively using those…

  12. Working with News Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosenbaugh, Dick

    To work effectively with personnel in the news media, one needs to assist them in doing their job by getting accurate information to them (in plenty of time for their deadline) and in providing information about meetings (when they do not have a reporter to cover the event). Familiarity aids in communication with news media personnel so one should…

  13. Wisconsin Ideas in Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Rose, Ed.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    These two documents contain a variety of articles on media use in education. The first provides 16 articles that focus on justifying media programs in the 1980's. Topics include selling your program to administrators; reorganization of the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction; video literacy; student-made videotape recordings; interactive…

  14. The application of hospitality elements in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ziqi; Robson, Stephani; Hollis, Brooke

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, many hospital designs have taken inspiration from hotels, spurred by factors such as increased patient and family expectations and regulatory or financial incentives. Increasingly, research evidence suggests the value of enhancing the physical environment to foster healing and drive consumer decisions and perceptions of service quality. Although interest is increasing in the broader applicability of numerous hospitality concepts to the healthcare field, the focus of this article is design innovations, and the services that such innovations support, from the hospitality industry. To identify physical hotel design elements and associated operational features that have been used in the healthcare arena, a series of interviews with hospital and hotel design experts were conducted. Current examples and suggestions for future hospitality elements were also sought from the experts, academic journals, and news articles. Hospitality elements applied in existing hospitals that are addressed in this article include hotel-like rooms and decor; actual hotels incorporated into medical centers; hotel-quality food, room service, and dining facilities for families; welcoming lobbies and common spaces; hospitality-oriented customer service training; enhanced service offerings, including concierges; spas or therapy centers; hotel-style signage and way-finding tools; and entertainment features. Selected elements that have potential for future incorporation include executive lounges and/or communal lobbies with complimentary wireless Internet and refreshments, centralized controls for patients, and flexible furniture. Although the findings from this study underscore the need for more hospitality-like environments in hospitals, the investment decisions made by healthcare executives must be balanced with cost-effectiveness and the assurance that clinical excellence remains the top priority.

  15. Anterior Knee Pain in Patients with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young; Lee, Sang Hyeong; Chung, Chin Youb; Park, Moon Seok; Lee, Kyoung Min; Sung, Ki Hyuk; Won, Sung Hun; Lee, In Hyeok; Choi, In Ho; Cho, Tae-Joon; Yoo, Won Joon

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors for anterior knee pain in patients with cerebral palsy. Methods This prospective study investigated the risk factors for anterior knee pain in 127 ambulatory patients with spastic cerebral palsy in terms of walking pain, resting pain, and provocative pain. Demographic data analysis and physical examination for measuring the knee flexion contracture and unilateral and bilateral popliteal angles were performed. Patellar height was measured on radiographs, and patella alta was identified. The risk factors for anterior knee pain were analyzed using multivariate analysis with a generalized estimating equation. Results Seventy-seven patients were found to have patella alta based on the radiographic measurements (60.6%). Overall, sixteen patients (12.6%) had either unilateral or bilateral anterior knee pain. Of these, 6 patients showed a visual analogue scale (VAS) ≤ 3, 9 patients showed 3 < VAS ≤ 7, and one patient showed a VAS > 7. Age was found to be a significant risk factor for walking pain and resting pain with odds ratios (ORs) of 1.08 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02 to 1.14) and 1.09 (95% CI, 1.03 to 1.15), respectively. In the multivariate analysis, knee flexion contracture was a significant protective factor with an OR of 0.92 (95% CI, 0.85 to 0.98). Conclusions Approximately 12.6% of ambulatory patients with spastic cerebral palsy were found to have anterior knee pain in our hospital-based cohort study. Age was found to be a significant risk factor for anterior knee pain while walking and resting. PMID:25436067

  16. Social Justice and Media. Media Corner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Joseph A., III, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    Contends that the end of slavery, women's suffrage, and the civil rights movement were watershed events of social justice in U.S. history. Provides reviews of two media-based sets of instructional materials that can help students understand the struggle by disenfranchised groups to become full participants in society. (CFR)

  17. Media Roles and Legislators' New Media Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riffe, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    Surveys 82 Alabama legislators and finds officials' views of the press as adversary or agent of consensus relates to perceived value of media for job-relevant information. Suggests a dysfunction of the "watch-dog" role because those believing the consensus model found the press more useful than those seeing the press as an adversary. (MG)

  18. Help prevent hospital errors

    MedlinePlus

    ... www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23330698 . The Joint Commission. Hospital: 2014 National Patient Safety Goals. www.jointcommission. ... October 24, 2014. Accessed October 27, 2016. The Joint Commission. Hospital: 2016 National Patient Safety Goals. Updated January ...

  19. Hospitals as health educators

    MedlinePlus

    ... than your local hospital. From health videos to yoga classes, many hospitals offer information families need to ... care and breastfeeding Parenting Baby sign language Baby yoga or massage Babysitting courses for teens Exercise classes ...

  20. Surviving Your Child's Hospitalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The parent of a young child who required major open heart surgery shares his suggestions for coping with a young child's hospitalization including parent visitation, relating to the hospital staff, getting answers to questions, and utilizing available services. (DB)

  1. Cerebral oxygenation following epinephrine infusion.

    PubMed

    Steinback, Craig D; Zubin, Petra; Breskovic, Toni; Bakovic, Darija; Pivac, Nediljko; Dujic, Zeljko

    2012-10-15

    Evidence suggests that the autonomic nervous system may actively regulate the cerebral vasculature. In this study, central hemodynamics and brain oxy-hemoglobin, deoxy-hemoglobin and total hemoglobin changes (bO₂Hb, bdHb and bTHb) were monitored during infusion of epinephrine (0.06 μg/kg/min over 6 min, and 0.12 μg/kg/min for 3 min) in 12 men. Epinephrine decreased mean arterial pressure (MAP) and total peripheral resistance (TPR), while heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) increased, but did not affect bO₂Hb, bdHb or bTHb. However, upon the cessation of epinephrine infusion an increase in both Oxy- and Total Hb occurred which peaked at 3 min post infusion (+6.0±4.6 and +4.9±4.8 μmol/L respectively, P<0.05) and persisted for 20 min post infusion (+1.5±2.2 and +1.8±2.7 μmol/L respectively, P<0.05). No evidence was found for reduction in cerebral oxygenation during a cold-pressor test. The results of the present study demonstrated that clinical doses of epinephrine result in a delayed increase in cortical blood volume due to an increase in Oxy-Hb, consistent with vasodilation.

  2. Variation in Rates of Diagnosis of Acute Otitis Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berwick, Donald M.; Thibodeau, Lawrence A.

    1980-01-01

    Over 13 weeks during two periods in 1978 the diagnostic rate for acute otitis media was monitored among febrile children in the emergency room of a large children's hospital. Temporal variation in diagnostic rates by physicians was largely attributable to differences among individual providers and independent of level of training. (Author/MLW)

  3. MediaTracker system

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, D. M.; Strittmatter, R. B.; Abeyta, J. D.; Brown, J.; Marks, T. , Jr.; Martinez, B. J.; Jones, D. B.; Hsue, W.

    2004-01-01

    The initial objectives of this effort were to provide a hardware and software platform that can address the requirements for the accountability of classified removable electronic media and vault access logging. The Media Tracker system software assists classified media custodian in managing vault access logging and Media Tracking to prevent the inadvertent violation of rules or policies for the access to a restricted area and the movement and use of tracked items. The MediaTracker system includes the software tools to track and account for high consequence security assets and high value items. The overall benefits include: (1) real-time access to the disposition of all Classified Removable Electronic Media (CREM), (2) streamlined security procedures and requirements, (3) removal of ambiguity and managerial inconsistencies, (4) prevention of incidents that can and should be prevented, (5) alignment with the DOE's initiative to achieve improvements in security and facility operations through technology deployment, and (6) enhanced individual responsibility by providing a consistent method of dealing with daily responsibilities. In response to initiatives to enhance the control of classified removable electronic media (CREM), the Media Tracker software suite was developed, piloted and implemented at the Los Alamos National Laboratory beginning in July 2000. The Media Tracker software suite assists in the accountability and tracking of CREM and other high-value assets. One component of the MediaTracker software suite provides a Laboratory-approved media tracking system. Using commercial touch screen and bar code technology, the MediaTracker (MT) component of the MediaTracker software suite provides an efficient and effective means to meet current Laboratory requirements and provides new-engineered controls to help assure compliance with those requirements. It also establishes a computer infrastructure at vault entrances for vault access logging, and can accommodate

  4. Cerebral toxoplasmosis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Naqi, Rohana; Azeemuddin, Muhammad; Ahsan, Humera

    2010-04-01

    Cerebral toxoplasmosis commonly affects patients with advanced HIV immunodeficiency. Toxoplasmosis in patients who are immunocompromised can be severe and debilitating in patients with Central Nervous System (CNS) involvement and the condition may be fatal. We report the case of a 40-year-old man who was a known case of HIV and presented with cerebral toxoplasmosis. His Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scan showed multiple ring enhancing lesions with extensive surrounding oedema in supratentorial as well as infratentorial region. Lesions were mainly located in the periventricular region as well as at the grey-white matter junction and showed enhancement in the periphery as well as a tiny nodular enhancement in the centre. Patient was started on Septran DS, empirically for toxoplasmosis and steroids to reduce intracranial pressure. On follow up MRI scan after 10 days there was a reduction in size, number and enhancement of the masses with decrease in the surrounding oedema. Patient was clinically stable, oriented and his fever settled. He was discharged from hospital on same medication and advised to continue regular follow-up.

  5. Cerebral venous thrombosis: a Moroccan retrospective study of 30 cases

    PubMed Central

    Souirti, Zouhayr; Messouak, Ouafae; Belahsen, Faouzi

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare origin of stroke, the clinical presentation and etiologies vary. The prognosis is shown to be better than arterial thrombosis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and MR Venograpgy (MRV) are currently important tools for the diagnosis. We studied 30 cases of CVT diagnosed in the department of neurology at the University Hospital of Fez (Morocco). Patients diagnosed with CVT signs between January 2003 and October 2007 were included in the study. Cerebral CT-scan was performed in 27 cases (90%) while the MRI examination was done in 18 patients (67%); and most patients (90%) received anticoagulant therapy. The mean age of our patients was of 29 years (age range between 18 days and 65 years). A female predominance was observed (70%). The clinical presentation of patients was dominated by: headache in 24 cases (80%), motor and sensory disability in 15 cases (50%), seizures in 10 cases (33%), consciousness disorder in 10 cases (33%). CVT was associated to post-partum in 10 cases (33%), infectious origin in 8 cases (26%), Behçet disease in 2 cases (7%), pulmonary carcinoma in 1 case, thrombocytemia in 1 case and idiopathic in 7 cases (23%). The evolution was good in 20 cases (67%), minor squelaes were observed in 6 patients (20%), while major squelaes were observed in 2 cases. Two cases of death were registered. The CVT is a pathology of good prognosis once the diagnosis is promptly established and early heparin treatment initiated. PMID:25317229

  6. Hospital Dermatology, Introduction.

    PubMed

    Fox, Lindy P

    2017-03-01

    Inpatient dermatology is emerging as a distinct dermatology subspecialty where dermatologists specialize in caring for patients hospitalized with skin disease. While the main focus of inpatient dermatology is the delivery of top-quality and timely dermatologic care to patients in the hospital setting, the practice of hospital-based dermatology has many additional components that are critical to its success.

  7. Caring for Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Team Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dormans, John P., Ed.; Pellegrino, Louis, Ed.

    Twenty-one papers on caring for children with cerebral palsy are organized into four sections, including: (1) cerebral palsy and the interdisciplinary team approach; (2) management of impairments related to cerebral palsy; (3) preventing disability by optimizing function of the child with cerebral palsy; and (4) preventing handicap by creating…

  8. Hemodynamic and tubular changes induced by contrast media.

    PubMed

    Caiazza, Antonella; Russo, Luigi; Sabbatini, Massimo; Russo, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of acute kidney injury induced by contrast media (CI-AKI) is the third cause of AKI in hospitalized patients. Contrast media cause relevant alterations both in renal hemodynamics and in renal tubular cell function that lead to CI-AKI. The vasoconstriction of intrarenal vasculature is the main hemodynamic change induced by contrast media; the vasoconstriction is accompanied by a cascade of events leading to ischemia and reduction of glomerular filtration rate. Cytotoxicity of contrast media causes apoptosis of tubular cells with consequent formation of casts and worsening of ischemia. There is an interplay between the negative effects of contrast media on renal hemodynamics and on tubular cell function that leads to activation of renin-angiotensin system and increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within the kidney. Production of ROS intensifies cellular hypoxia through endothelial dysfunction and alteration of mechanisms regulating tubular cells transport. The physiochemical characteristics of contrast media play a critical role in the incidence of CI-AKI. Guidelines suggest the use of either isoosmolar or low-osmolar contrast media rather than high-osmolar contrast media particularly in patients at increased risk of CI-AKI. Older age, presence of atherosclerosis, congestive heart failure, chronic renal disease, nephrotoxic drugs, and diuretics may multiply the risk of CI-AKI.

  9. Infant Media Exposure and Toddler Development

    PubMed Central

    Tomopoulos, Suzy; Dreyer, Benard P.; Berkule, Samantha; Fierman, Arthur H.; Brockmeyer, Carolyn; Mendelsohn, Alan L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine whether duration and content of media exposure in 6-month-old infants are associated with development at age 14 months. Design Longitudinal analysis of 259 mother-infant dyads participating in a long-term study related to early child development, from November 23, 2005, through January 14, 2008. Setting An urban public hospital. Participants Mothers with low socioeconomic status and their infants. Main Exposure Duration and content of media exposure at age 6 months. Main Outcome Measures Cognitive and language development at age 14 months. Results Of 259 infants, 249 (96.1%) were exposed to media at age 6 months, with mean (SD) total exposure of 152.7 (124.5) min/d. In unadjusted and adjusted analyses, duration of media exposure at age 6 months was associated with lower cognitive development at age 14 months (unadjusted: r=−0.17, P<.01; adjusted: β=−0.15, P=.02) and lower language development (r=−0.16, P<.01; β=−0.16, P<.01). Of 3 types of content assessed, only 1 (older child/adult–oriented) was associated with lower cognitive and language development at age 14 months. No significant associations were seen with exposure to young child–oriented educational or noneducational content. Conclusions This study is the first, to our knowledge, to have longitudinally assessed associations between media exposure in infancy and subsequent developmental outcomes in children from families with low socioeconomic status in the United States. Findings provide strong evidence in support of the American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations of no media exposure prior to age 2 years, although further research is needed. PMID:21135338

  10. Coupling flood forecasting and social media crowdsourcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalas, Milan; Kliment, Tomas; Salamon, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Social and mainstream media monitoring is being more and more recognized as valuable source of information in disaster management and response. The information on ongoing disasters could be detected in very short time and the social media can bring additional information to traditional data feeds (ground, remote observation schemes). Probably the biggest attempt to use the social media in the crisis management was the activation of the Digital Humanitarian Network by the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs in response to Typhoon Yolanda. The network of volunteers performing rapid needs & damage assessment by tagging reports posted to social media which were then used by machine learning classifiers as a training set to automatically identify tweets referring to both urgent needs and offers of help. In this work we will present the potential of coupling a social media streaming and news monitoring application ( GlobalFloodNews - www.globalfloodsystem.com) with a flood forecasting system (www.globalfloods.eu) and the geo-catalogue of the OGC services discovered in the Google Search Engine (WMS, WFS, WCS, etc.) to provide a full suite of information available to crisis management centers as fast as possible. In GlobalFloodNews we use advanced filtering of the real-time Twitter stream, where the relevant information is automatically extracted using natural language and signal processing techniques. The keyword filters are adjusted and optimized automatically using machine learning algorithms as new reports are added to the system. In order to refine the search results the forecasting system will be triggering an event-based search on the social media and OGC services relevant for crisis response (population distribution, critical infrastructure, hospitals etc.). The current version of the system makes use of USHAHIDI Crowdmap platform, which is designed to easily crowdsource information using multiple channels, including SMS, email

  11. Epilepsy, cerebral blood flow, and cerebral metabolic rate.

    PubMed

    Duncan, R

    1992-01-01

    Penfield's observations in the 1930s provided the first systematic evidence of changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) associated with focal seizures. Further studies in humans and animals confirmed increases in cerebral blood flow and metabolism during generalised seizures, but the interictal, ictal, and postictal changes in focal epilepsy have begun to be elucidated in the last decade with the advent of in vivo imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and, in the case of animal studies, of autoradiography. Most studies have been of temporal lobe epilepsy. Interictally, the characteristic finding has been reduced blood flow and/or metabolism in the affected temporal lobe, or more extensively in the ipsilateral hemisphere. The few studies to date of ictal or postictal changes have been of rCBF using SPECT. They show hyperperfusion of the whole temporal lobe ictally, hyperperfusion of the hippocampus, combined with hypoperfusion of lateral structures in the immediate postictal period. Later in the postictal period, hypoperfusion alone is seen. Studies of focal seizures in animals have shown hyperperfusion and hypermetabolism at the site of the focus often with widespread depression of both parameters in the ipsilateral neocortex. Limited studies of coupling between blood flow and metabolism in humans have suggested that flow during seizures is adequate for metabolic demand, although some animal studies have suggested localised areas of uncoupling. The results of modern in vivo imaging of ictal and postictal changes in blood flow and metabolism have correlated well with Penfield's observations, and these changes are now being used to help localise epileptic foci, allowing wider use of the surgical treatment he pioneered.

  12. Autonomic control of cerebral circulation: exercise.

    PubMed

    Ogoh, Shigehiko

    2008-12-01

    On the basis of measurement techniques that require steady-state hemodynamic conditions when the measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) is being obtained, cerebral autoregulation (CA) maintains CBF stable over a wide range of cerebral perfusion pressures. When an acute (or dynamic) change in cerebral perfusion pressure (seconds) is imposed, CBF is not maintained. For example, after thigh cuff occlusion, its release induces an acute drop in arterial blood pressure (ABP). The sharp decrease in CBF indicates that CA was unable to respond to the dynamic (or rapid) changes in cerebral perfusion pressure. Therefore, control mechanisms of arterial pressure with short time constants must contribute importantly to CBF regulation. In order for CA to be effective, the cerebral perfusion pressure must lie within an autoregulatory range of perfusion pressures. The traditional thinking is that changes in sympathetic tone have a limited effect on CBF at rest. However, moderate- to heavy-intensity exercise causes only moderate increases in CBF despite large increases in sympathetic activity and ABP. Animal studies demonstrate that increases in sympathetic nerve activity cause cerebral vasoconstriction and protection against disruption of the blood-brain barrier. These findings suggest that the regulation of CBF during exercise is modulated not only by CA but also by autonomic nervous system and the arterial baroreflex-mediated control of the systemic circulation.

  13. Cerebral blood flow determination within the first 8 hours of cerebral infarction using stable xenon-enhanced computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.L.; Yonas, H.; Gur, D.; Latchaw, R.

    1989-06-01

    Cerebral blood flow mapping with stable xenon-enhanced computed tomography (Xe/CT) was performed in conjunction with conventional computed tomography (CT) within the first 8 hours after the onset of symptoms in seven patients with cerebral infarction. Six patients had hemispheric infarctions, and one had a progressive brainstem infarction. Three patients with very low (less than 10 ml/100 g/min) blood flow in an anatomic area appropriate for the neurologic deficit had no clinical improvement by the time of discharge from the hospital; follow-up CT scans of these three patients confirmed infarction in the area of very low blood flow. Three patients with moderate blood flow reductions (15-45 ml/100 g/min) in the appropriate anatomic area had significant clinical improvement from their initial deficits and had normal follow-up CT scans. One patient studied 8 hours after stroke had increased blood flow (hyperemia) in the appropriate anatomic area and made no clinical recovery.

  14. Media violence and youth.

    PubMed

    Beresin, E V

    1999-06-01

    This column reviews the literature on violence in the media and its effects on youth. The author summarizes the findings of naturalistic, longitudinal, and population-based studies conducted over the last 30 years. The literature provides compelling evidence that exposure of media violence to children plays a major role in the etiology of aggressive behavior. Psychiatrists can facilitate primary prevention of violence in our society by discussing the problem of media violence with parents, medical students, residents, and allied health and school professionals.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamics of fractal media

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2006-05-15

    The fractal distribution of charged particles is considered. An example of this distribution is the charged particles that are distributed over the fractal. The fractional integrals are used to describe fractal distribution. These integrals are considered as approximations of integrals on fractals. Typical turbulent media could be of a fractal structure and the corresponding equations should be changed to include the fractal features of the media. The magnetohydrodynamics equations for fractal media are derived from the fractional generalization of integral Maxwell equations and integral hydrodynamics (balance) equations. Possible equilibrium states for these equations are considered.

  16. Ethics and social media.

    PubMed

    Milton, Constance L

    2014-10-01

    Nurses' use of social media has increased significantly with growing numbers of media-sharing opportunities, platforms, and emerging forms of electronic applications. With the proliferation, opportunities and limitations surface regarding the responsibilities and accountability that nurses have in choosing technology applications with an embedded philosophical ethos that is consistent with the discipline's societal mandate of serving humankind in ways that honor human dignity. This article begins a discussion addressing possible disciplinary obligations and responsibilities for the implementation of social media platforms and possible implications for its future use in the discipline of nursing.

  17. Cerebral Hypoperfusion Precedes Nausea During Centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serrador, Jorge M.; Schlegel, Todd T.; Black, F. Owen; Wood, Scott J.

    2004-01-01

    Nausea and motion sickness are important operational concerns for aviators and astronauts. Understanding underlying mechanisms associated with motion sickness may lead to new treatments. The goal of this work was to determine if cerebral blood flow changes precede the development of nausea in motion sick susceptible subjects. Cerebral flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (transcranial Doppler), blood pressure (Finapres) and end-tidal CO2 were measured while subjects were rotated on a centrifuge (250 degrees/sec). Following 5 min of rotation, subjects were translated 0.504 m off-center, creating a +lGx centripetal acceleration in the nasal-occipital plane. Ten subjects completed the protocol without symptoms while 5 developed nausea (4 while 6ff-center and 1 while rotating on-center). Prior to nausea, subjects had significant increases in blood pressure (+13plus or minus 3 mmHg, P less than 0.05) and cerebrovascular resistance (+46 plus or minus 17%, P less than 0.05) and decreases in cerebral flow velocity both in the second (-13 plus or minus 4%) and last minute (-22 plus or minus 5%) before symptoms (P less than 0.05). In comparison, controls demonstrated no change in blood pressure or cerebrovascular resistance in the last minute of off-center rotation and only a 7 plus or minus 2% decrease in cerebral flow velocity. All subjects had significant hypocapnia (-3.8 plus or minus 0.4 mmHg, P less than 0.05), however this hypocapnia could not fully explain the cerebral hypoperfusion associated with the development of nausea. These data indicate that reductions in cerebral blood flow precede the development of nausea. Further work is necessary to determine what role cerebral hypoperfusion plays in motion sickness and whether cerebral hypoperfusion can be used to predict the development of nausea in susceptible individuals.

  18. Novel treatment targets for cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Brian P; Kahle, Kristopher T; Simard, J Marc

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral edema is a common finding in a variety of neurological conditions, including ischemic stroke, traumatic brain injury, ruptured cerebral aneurysm, and neoplasia. With the possible exception of neoplasia, most pathological processes leading to edema seem to share similar molecular mechanisms of edema formation. Challenges to brain-cell volume homeostasis can have dramatic consequences, given the fixed volume of the rigid skull and the effect of swelling on secondary neuronal injury. With even small changes in cellular and extracellular volume, cerebral edema can compromise regional or global cerebral blood flow and metabolism or result in compression of vital brain structures. Osmotherapy has been the mainstay of pharmacologic therapy and is typically administered as part of an escalating medical treatment algorithm that can include corticosteroids, diuretics, and pharmacological cerebral metabolic suppression. Novel treatment targets for cerebral edema include the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) co-transporter (NKCC1) and the SUR1-regulated NC(Ca-ATP) (SUR1/TRPM4) channel. These two ion channels have been demonstrated to be critical mediators of edema formation in brain-injured states. Their specific inhibitors, bumetanide and glibenclamide, respectively, are well-characterized Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs with excellent safety profiles. Directed inhibition of these ion transporters has the potential to reduce the development of cerebral edema and is currently being investigated in human clinical trials. Another class of treatment agents for cerebral edema is vasopressin receptor antagonists. Euvolemic hyponatremia is present in a myriad of neurological conditions resulting in cerebral edema. A specific antagonist of the vasopressin V1A- and V2-receptor, conivaptan, promotes water excretion while sparing electrolytes through a process known as aquaresis.

  19. Positioning hospitals: a model for regional hospitals.

    PubMed

    Reddy, A C; Campbell, D P

    1993-01-01

    In an age of marketing warfare in the health care industry, hospitals need creative strategies to compete successfully. Lately, positioning concepts have been added to the health care marketer's arsenal of strategies. To blend theory with practice, the authors review basic positioning theory and present a framework for developing positioning strategies. They also evaluate the marketing strategies of a regional hospital to provide a case example.

  20. Teaching Media-Savvy Students about the Popular Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maness, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    A framework for media education that helps students enhance their understanding of the media and use their knowledge to influence individual and community action is proposed. It is experienced that the problem with educating children against, rather than about, the media is the assumption that students are passive audiences of the media, lacking…

  1. Factors Secreted by Endothelial Progenitor Cells Enhance Neurorepair Responses after Cerebral Ischemia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rosell, Anna; Morancho, Anna; Navarro-Sobrino, Miriam; Martínez-Saez, Elena; Hernández-Guillamon, Mar; Lope-Piedrafita, Silvia; Barceló, Verónica; Borrás, Francesc; Penalba, Anna; García-Bonilla, Lidia; Montaner, Joan

    2013-01-01

    Cell therapy with endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) has emerged as a promising strategy to regenerate the brain after stroke. Here, we aimed to investigate if treatment with EPCs or their secreted factors could potentiate angiogenesis and neurogenesis after permanent focal cerebral ischemia in a mouse model of ischemic stroke. BALB/C male mice were subjected to distal occlusion of the middle cerebral artery, and EPCs, cell-free conditioned media (CM) obtained from EPCs, or vehicle media were administered one day after ischemia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed at baseline to confirm that the lesions were similar between groups. Immunohistochemical and histological evaluation of the brain was performed to evaluate angio-neurogenesis and neurological outcome at two weeks. CM contained growth factors, such as VEGF, FGF-b and PDGF-bb. A significant increase in capillary density was noted in the peri-infarct areas of EPC- and CM-treated animals. Bielschowsky’s staining revealed a significant increase in axonal rewiring in EPC-treated animals compared with shams, but not in CM-treated mice, in close proximity with DCX-positive migrating neuroblasts. At the functional level, post-ischemia forelimb strength was significantly improved in animals receiving EPCs or CM, but not in those receiving vehicle media. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that the administration of EPC-secreted factors could become a safe and effective cell-free option to be considered in future therapeutic strategies for stroke. PMID:24023842

  2. Ovine middle cerebral artery characterization and quantification of ultrastructure and other features: changes with development.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Ravi; Henderson, David A; Chu, Nina; Longo, Lawrence D

    2012-02-15

    Regulation of tone, blood pressure, and blood flow in the cerebral vasculature is of vital importance, particularly in the developing infant. We tested the hypothesis that, in addition to accretion of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in cell layers with vessel thickening, significant changes in smooth muscle structure, as well as phenotype, extracellular matrix, and membrane proteins, in the media of cerebral arteries (CAs) during the course of late fetal development account for associated changes in contractility. Using transmission electron, confocal, wide-field epifluorescence, and light microscopy, we examined the structure and ultrastructure of CAs. Also, we utilized wire myography, Western immunoblotting, and real-time quantitative PCR to examine several other features of these arteries. We compared the main branch ovine middle CAs of 95- and 140-gestational day (GD) fetuses with those of adults (n = 5 for each experimental group). We observed a graded increase in phenylephrine- and KCl-induced contractile responses with development. Structurally, lumen diameter, media thickness, and media cross-sectional area increased dramatically from one age group to the next. With maturation, the cross-sectional profiles of CA SMCs changed from flattened bands in the 95-GD fetus to irregular ovoid-shaped fascicles in the 140-GD fetus and adult. We also observed a change in the type of collagen, specific integrin molecules, and several other parameters of SMC morphology with maturation. Ovine CAs at 95 GD appeared morphologically immature and poorly equipped to respond to major hemodynamic adjustments with maturation.

  3. Cerebral and non-cerebral coenurosis: on the genotypic and phenotypic diversity of Taenia multiceps.

    PubMed

    Christodoulopoulos, Georgios; Dinkel, Anke; Romig, Thomas; Ebi, Dennis; Mackenstedt, Ute; Loos-Frank, Brigitte

    2016-12-01

    We characterised the causative agents of cerebral and non-cerebral coenurosis in livestock by determining the mitochondrial genotypes and morphological phenotypes of 52 Taenia multiceps isolates from a wide geographical range in Europe, Africa, and western Asia. Three studies were conducted: (1) a morphological comparison of the rostellar hooks of cerebral and non-cerebral cysts of sheep and goats, (2) a morphological comparison of adult worms experimentally produced in dogs, and (3) a molecular analysis of three partial mitochondrial genes (nad1, cox1, and 12S rRNA) of the same isolates. No significant morphological or genetic differences were associated with the species of the intermediate host. Adult parasites originating from cerebral and non-cerebral cysts differed morphologically, e.g. the shape of the small hooks and the distribution of the testes in the mature proglottids. The phylogenetic analysis of the mitochondrial haplotypes produced three distinct clusters: one cluster including both cerebral isolates from Greece and non-cerebral isolates from tropical and subtropical countries, and two clusters including cerebral isolates from Greece. The majority of the non-cerebral specimens clustered together but did not form a monophyletic group. No monophyletic groups were observed based on geography, although specimens from the same region tended to cluster. The clustering indicates high intraspecific diversity. The phylogenetic analysis suggests that all variants of T. multiceps can cause cerebral coenurosis in sheep (which may be the ancestral phenotype), and some variants, predominantly from one genetic cluster, acquired the additional capacity to produce non-cerebral forms in goats and more rarely in sheep.

  4. Cerebral Palsy Gait, Clinical Importance

    PubMed Central

    TUGUI, Raluca Dana; ANTONESCU, Dinu

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cerebral palsy refers to a lesion on an immature brain, that determines permanent neurological disorders. Knowing the exact cause of the disease does not alter the treatment management. The etiology is 2-2.5/1000 births and the rate is constant in the last 40-50 years because advances in medical technologies have permitted the survival of smaller and premature new born children. Gait analysis has four directions: kinematics (represents body movements analysis without calculating the forces), kinetics (represents body moments and forces), energy consumption (measured by oximetry), and neuromuscular activity (measured by EMG). Gait analysis can observe specific deviations in a patient, allowing us to be more accurate in motor diagnoses and treatment solutions: surgery intervention, botulinum toxin injection, use of orthosis, physical kinetic therapy, oral medications, baclofen pump. PMID:24790675

  5. Cerebral astroblastoma: A radiopathological diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Deepak Kumar; Singh, Neha; Singh, Ragini; Husain, Nuzhat

    2014-01-01

    Astroblastoma is a rare glial neoplasm whose histogenesis has been clarified recently. It primarily occurs in children and young adults. We are reporting a case of 12-year-old girl child who presented with features of raised intracranial tension and generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large well-circumscribed, cystic lesion without perifocal edema, and enhancing mural nodule in right parietal region. A radiological differential diagnosis of pilocytic astrocytoma and cerebral astroblastoma was made. A complete excision was done and histologically the lesion turned out to be an astroblastoma. We review the histology, immunohistochemistry, and imaging features of astroblastoma and survey the current literature, treatment strategies, and prognostic aspects for the management of this rare neoplasm. PMID:24891904

  6. Mixed-Media Owls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    The fun of creating collages is there are unlimited possibilities for the different kinds of materials one can use. In this article, the author describes how her eighth-grade students created an owl using mixed media.

  7. TECHNETIUM SORPTION MEDIA REVIEW

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN JB; KELLY SE; ROBBINS RA; ADAMS RD; THORSON MA; HAASS CC

    2011-08-25

    This report presents information and references to aid in the selection of 99Tc sorption media for feasibility studies regarding the removal of 99Tc from Hanford's low activity waste. The report contains literature search material for sorption media (including ion exchange media) for the most tested media to date, including SuperLig 639, Reillex HPQ, TAM (Kruion), Purolite A520E and A530E, and Dowex 1X8. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for management and completion of the River Protection Project (RPP) mission, which comprises both the Hanford Site tank farms and the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The RPP mission is to store, retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste; store and dispose of treated wastes; and close the tank farm waste management areas and treatment facilities in a safe, environmentally compliant, cost-effective and energy-effective manner.

  8. Congressional and Media Protocols

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The OIG's Office of Congressional and Public Affairs is the primary point of contact for all media and congressional inquiries on matters related to the OIG, which ensures that they are handled expeditiously.

  9. Media independent interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The work done on the Media Independent Interface (MII) Interface Control Document (ICD) program is described and recommendations based on it were made. Explanations and rationale for the content of the ICD itself are presented.

  10. Intrathecal baclofen therapy for spasticity of cerebral origin: cerebral palsy and brain injury.

    PubMed

    Nuttin, B; Ivanhoe, C; Albright, L; Dimitrijevic, M; Saltuari, L

    1999-04-01

    drug delivery catheter. Intrathecal baclofen treatment may be cost effective, primarily due to a reduced need for hospitalizations and treatment of adverse events related to uncontrolled spasticity, and may improve quality of life. Intrathecal baclofen shows long-term efficacy in both higher and lower level patients with cerebral origin spasticity.

  11. Poor Prognostic Outcome in Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis Associated with Dyskinesia and Elevated Platelet Volume.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shousen; Xu, Bingyang; Zhao, Qingshuang; Li, Jun; Hong, Jingfang; Wei, Liangfeng; Zhao, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Although about 80% of patients with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis have a good prognosis, some patients develop severe complications and a small proportion do not survive. The study included patients who had been diagnosed with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in our hospital from May 2008 to February 2014. Based on the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) scores at 3 months for outcome, the patients were divided into two groups: good prognosis (mRS score ≤ 2) and poor prognosis (mRS score > 2). Univariate and multivariate regression analysis were performed to identify significant prognostic factors for poor outcome. A total of 86 patients with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, 54 males and 32 females, average age 41.3 years (range, 3-83 years), were enrolled. Of these 86 patients, 64 (74.4%) had a good prognosis and 22 (25.6%) a poor prognosis. Univariate analysis revealed that dyskinesia was a significant risk factor (factor with odds ratio >1) for poor prognosis. In multivariate analysis, the risk of poor prognosis in patients with dyskinesia was 23 times higher than for those without dyskinesia (p < 0.001). Thrombosis of the sinus transervus was found to reduce the risk of poor prognosis in both univariate and multivariate analysis. Most patients with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis have a good prognosis but patients with dyskinesia have a poorer prognosis.

  12. Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy: Emerging Concepts

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) involves cerebrovascular amyloid deposition and is classified into several types according to the amyloid protein involved. Of these, sporadic amyloid β-protein (Aβ)-type CAA is most commonly found in older individuals and in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Cerebrovascular Aβ deposits accompany functional and pathological changes in cerebral blood vessels (CAA-associated vasculopathies). CAA-associated vasculopathies lead to development of hemorrhagic lesions [lobar intracerebral macrohemorrhage, cortical microhemorrhage, and cortical superficial siderosis (cSS)/focal convexity subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)], ischemic lesions (cortical infarction and ischemic changes of the white matter), and encephalopathies that include subacute leukoencephalopathy caused by CAA-associated inflammation/angiitis. Thus, CAA is related to dementia, stroke, and encephalopathies. Recent advances in diagnostic procedures, particularly neuroimaging, have enabled us to establish a clinical diagnosis of CAA without brain biopsies. Sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods, such as gradient-echo T2* imaging and susceptibility-weighted imaging, are useful for detecting cortical microhemorrhages and cSS. Amyloid imaging with amyloid-binding positron emission tomography (PET) ligands, such as Pittsburgh Compound B, can detect CAA, although they cannot discriminate vascular from parenchymal amyloid deposits. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid markers may be useful, including levels of Aβ40 for CAA and anti-Aβ antibody for CAA-related inflammation. Moreover, cSS is closely associated with transient focal neurological episodes (TFNE). CAA-related inflammation/angiitis shares pathophysiology with amyloid-related imaging abnormalities (ARIA) induced by Aβ immunotherapies in AD patients. This article reviews CAA and CAA-related disorders with respect to their epidemiology, pathology, pathophysiology, clinical features, biomarkers, diagnosis

  13. Communications and media services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcculla, James W.; Kukowski, James F.

    1990-01-01

    NASA's internal and external communication methods are reviewed. NASA information services for the media, for the public, and for employees are discussed. Consideration is given to electron information distribution, the NASA TV-audio system, the NASA broadcast news service, astronaut appearances, technology and information exhibits, speaker services, and NASA news reports for internal communications. Also, the NASA worldwide electronic mail network is described and trends for future NASA communications and media services are outlined.

  14. Establishing access to technology: an evaluation and intervention model to increase the participation of children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Elizabeth; Morress, Claire

    2009-08-01

    Children with a diagnosis of cerebral palsy often have significant physical limitations that prevent exploration and full participation in the environment. Assistive technology systems can provide opportunities for children with physical limitations to interact with their world, enabling play, communication, and daily living skills. Efficient access to and control of the technology is critical for successful use; however, establishing consistent access is often difficult because of the nature of the movement patterns exhibited by children with cerebral palsy. This article describes a 3-phase model of evaluation and intervention developed and used by Assistive Technology Services at the Aaron W. Perlman Center, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, to establish successful access to technology systems in children with cerebral palsy.

  15. [Cerebral hydatic cyst and psychiatric disorders. Two cases].

    PubMed

    Asri, F; Tazi, I; Maaroufi, K; El Moudden, A; Ghannane, H; Ait Benali, S

    2007-01-01

    The hydatidosis is an endemic illness in regions of the Middle Orient, Mediterranean, south of America, north Africa and the Australia. The preferential localization of cyst hydatic is the liver (48%), the lung (36%) and in 6% of cases it localizes in unaccustomed place as the brain. Intracerebral localization is relatively rare, its impact is 1 to 5% of all cases of hydatidose. This localization is the child's appendage with a masculine predominance. The cyst hydatic intracranien is often lone, of localization usually supratentorielle, sometimes infratentorielle. Symptoms are especially the diffuse headache associated to various neurological signs in relation with sits of the tumor. The psychiatrics symptoms depends on its localization, sides, intracranial hypertension, and the previous personality. In 15 to 20% of cases these tumors can appear in the beginning of their evolution by the isolated psychiatric symptoms. We report the case of two patients that have been hospitalized first in the Academic Psychiatric Unit of Marrakech for isolates psychiatric disorders and whose scanning revealed the presence of cerebral hydatic cyst and that required a surgical intervention in neurosurgery. Case 1 - Patient 29 years old, bachelor, uneducated, leaving in country outside, fermar, in permanent contact with dogs. No particular medical history. The patient has been brought by his family to the psychiatric emergencies after behavior disorders. The beginning of his symptomatology was one year ago by behavior disorders: instability, violence, isolation, and a corporo-sartorial carelessness. His symptomatology worsened and the patient became very aggressive. In psychiatric unit, he was disregarded, sad, anguished, indifferent to his state, very dissonant, completely detached, depersonalized. He brought back some visual and auditory hallucinations with attitude of monitoring. He was raving with delirium of persecution, of ideas of reference and delirium of bewithment. He was

  16. A case series of complicated infective otitis media requiring surgery in adults

    PubMed Central

    Heah, Harold; Soon, Sue Rene; Yuen, Heng-Wai

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION With the advent of antibiotics, complications of otitis media have become less common. It is crucial for physicians to recognise otitis media and treat its complications early. Herein, we present our institution’s experience with patients who required emergency surgical intervention for complications of otitis media. METHODS Data on patients who underwent emergency surgery for complications of otitis media from 2004 to 2011 was retrieved from the archives of the Department of Otolaryngology, Changi General Hospital, Singapore. RESULTS A total of 12 patients (10 male, two female) underwent emergency surgery for complications of otitis media. The median age of the patients was 25 years. Otalgia, otorrhoea, headache and fever were the main presenting symptoms. Extracranial complications were observed in 11 patients, and six patients had associated intracranial complications. The primary otologic disease was acute otitis media in six patients, chronic otitis media without cholesteatoma in three patients and chronic otitis media with cholesteatoma in three patients. Mastoidectomy and drainage of abscess through the mastoid, with insertion of grommet tube, was the main surgical approach. Two patients required craniotomy. The mean length of hospital stay was 16.2 days and the mean follow-up period was 16.3 months. Five patients had residual conductive hearing loss; two patients with facial palsy had full recovery. CONCLUSION Otitis media can still result in serious complications in the post-antibiotic era. Patients with otitis media should be monitored, and prompt surgical intervention should be performed when necessary to attain good outcomes. PMID:26843060

  17. The Success Rate of Pediatric In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Ahvaz Training Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Assar, Shideh; Husseinzadeh, Mohsen; Nikravesh, Abdul Hussein; Davoodzadeh, Hannaneh

    2016-01-01

    Research Objective. This study determined the outcome of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) after in-hospital cardiac arrest and factors influencing it in two training hospitals in Ahvaz. Method. Patients hospitalized in the pediatric wards and exposed to CPR during hospital stay were included in the study (September 2013 to May 2014). The primary outcome of CPR was assumed to be the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and the secondary outcome was assumed to be survival to discharge. The neurological outcome of survivors was assessed using the Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category (PCPC) method. Results. Of the 279 study participants, 138 patients (49.4%) showed ROSC, 81 patients (29%) survived for 24 hours after the CPR, and 33 patients (11.8%) survived to discharge. Of the surviving patients, 16 (48.5%) had favorable neurological outcome. The resuscitation during holidays resulted in fewer ROSC. Multivariate analysis showed that longer CPR duration, CPR by junior residents, growth deficiency, and prearrest vasoactive drug infusion were associated with decreased survival to discharge (p < 0.05). Infants and patients with respiratory disease had higher survival rates. Conclusion. The rate of successful CPR in our study was lower than rates reported by developed countries. However, factors influencing the outcome of CPR were similar. These results reflect the necessity of paying more attention to pediatric CPR training, postresuscitation conditions, and expansion of intensive care facilities. PMID:27293983

  18. Delusional Disorder, Erotomanic Type, Exacerbated by Social Media Use

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Jonathan; Mistry, Ronak; Wang, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    Erotomania is an uncommon form of delusional disorder in which an individual has an unfounded belief that another is in love with him. Previous case reports have shown that social media networks may play a role in worsening delusional beliefs. We report the case of a 24-year-old male college student that utilized social media to stalk a female college student, resulting in his suspension from school and hospitalization. The student was diagnosed with delusional disorder, erotomanic type, and started on risperidone. He showed little improvement and was transferred to another facility. This is the first identified case of social media triggering or exacerbating delusional disorder. We recommend increasing education on the ramifications of sharing personal information on social media. PMID:28367347

  19. Media preparation and bacteriological tools.

    PubMed

    Elbing, Karen; Brent, Roger

    2002-08-01

    Recipes are provided in this unit for minimal liquid media, rich liquid media, solid media, top agar, and stab agar. Also included are descriptions and useful information about tools used with growth media such as inoculating loops, sterile toothpicks and spreaders.

  20. Media Education: An Indian Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Keval Joe

    This paper provides both a preliminary analysis of a survey on media education in India, and reviews of the research on media education in the western world, the limited media education research already done in India, and the more extensive research that has been done on the sociology of Indian youth and the media. The purpose of the survey was to…

  1. Mass Media as Community Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookfield, Stephen D.

    1990-01-01

    Despite the image of the pernicious effects of mass media, media consumers are not passive receptors of media-generated beliefs and ideas. Educators can help adults become media literate by helping them decode, filter, and interpret the messages they read, see, and hear through content and context analysis. (SK)

  2. Media Services and Captioned Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norwood, Malcolm J.

    1972-01-01

    Described are organizational changes which brought the Clearinghouse for Exceptional Children, Regional Media Centers for the Deaf, the Educational Media Distribution Center, and the forthcoming National Center for Educational Media and Materials for the Handicapped under the Media Services and Captioned Films Branch of the Division of Educational…

  3. The Economics of Educational Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Leslie

    This guide to the economic analysis of media use in education reviews the evidence on the costs and benefits of educational media and provides a methodology for future decision-making. It includes chapters on establishing a framework for media choice, evaluating the effectiveness of media use, and analyzing costs. The empirical evidence from past…

  4. Cerebral intraventricular echinococcosis in an adult

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Sharad; Pandey, Deepa; Shende, Neeraj; Sahu, Anurag; Sharma, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Background: Echinococcosis in humans occurs as a result of infection by the larval stages of taeniid cestodes of the genus echinococcus. Intracranial hydatid cysts usually develop at an intraparenchymal site. Hydatid cyst within the cerebral ventricle is quite unusual. Methods: We reviewed the literature on adult intraventricular hydatid cyst and found case reports mainly in children with an only handful of cases in adults. We reported a rare case of cerebral intraventricular (left lateral ventricle) hydatid cyst in a 21-year-old adult female. Results: Although cerebral hydatid cysts are most commonly seen in children and young adults cerebral intraventricular hydatid cyst are comparatively rarer in adults. Conclusion: The possibility of infection with Echinococcus granulosus should be included in the differential diagnosis of raised intracranial hypertension in patients from endemic areas. PMID:26392915

  5. 11 Things to Know about Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emails CDC Features 11 Things to Know about Cerebral Palsy Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... and families living with CP. Early Signs of CP From birth to 5 years of age, a ...

  6. Molecular basis of human cerebral malaria development.

    PubMed

    Wah, Saw Thu; Hananantachai, Hathairad; Kerdpin, Usanee; Plabplueng, Chotiros; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Nuchnoi, Pornlada

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is still a deleterious health problem in tropical countries. The wide spread of malarial drug resistance and the lack of an effective vaccine are obstacles for disease management and prevention. Parasite and human genetic factors play important roles in malaria susceptibility and disease severity. The malaria parasite exerted a potent selective signature on the human genome, which is apparent in the genetic polymorphism landscape of genes related to pathogenesis. Currently, much genomic data and a novel body of knowledge, including the identification of microRNAs, are being increasingly accumulated for the development of laboratory testing cassettes for cerebral malaria prevention. Therefore, understanding of the underlying complex molecular basis of cerebral malaria is important for the design of strategy for cerebral malaria treatment and control.

  7. Cerebral blood flow: Physiologic and clinical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 46 chapters divided among nine sections. The section titles are: Historical Perspectives; Cerebrovascular Anatomy; Cerebrovascular Physiology; Methods of Clinical Measurement; Experimental Methods; Imaging of Cerebral Circulation; Cerebrovascular Pathophysiology; Cerebrovascular Pharmacology; and Surgical and Interventional Augmentation.

  8. Contrasting pediatric and adult cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, Michael; Elphinstone, Robyn E; Conroy, Andrea L; Kain, Kevin C

    2013-01-01

    Malaria affects millions of people around the world and a small subset of those infected develop cerebral malaria. The clinical presentation of cerebral malaria differs between children and adults, and it has been suggested that age-related changes in the endothelial response may account for some of these differences. During cerebral malaria, parasites sequester within the brain microvasculature but do not penetrate into the brain parenchyma and yet, the infection causes severe neurological symptoms. Endothelial dysfunction is thought to play an important role in mediating these adverse clinical outcomes. During infection, the endothelium becomes activated and more permeable, which leads to increased inflammation, hemorrhages, and edema in the surrounding tissue. We hypothesize that post-natal developmental changes, occurring in both endothelial response and the neurovascular unit, account for the differences observed in the clinical presentations of cerebral malaria in children compared with adults. PMID:23924893

  9. Mitochondrial Targeted Antioxidant in Cerebral Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ejaz; Donovan, Tucker; Yujiao, Lu; Zhang, Quanguang

    There has been much evidence suggesting that reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated in mitochondria during cerebral ischemia play a major role in programming the senescence of organism. Antioxidants dealing with mitochondria slow down the appearance and progression of symptoms in cerebral ischemia and increase the life span of organisms. The mechanisms of mitochondrial targeted antioxidants, such as SKQ1, Coenzyme Q10, MitoQ, and Methylene blue, include increasing adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production, decreasing production of ROS and increasing antioxidant defenses, providing benefits in neuroprotection following cerebral ischemia. A number of studies have shown the neuroprotective role of these mitochondrial targeted antioxidants in cerebral ischemia. Here in this short review we have compiled the literature supporting consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction, and the protective role of mitochondrial targeted antioxidants.

  10. Children's media policy.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Amy B

    2008-01-01

    Amy Jordan addresses the need to balance the media industry's potentially important contributions to the healthy development of America's children against the consequences of excessive and age-inappropriate media exposure. Much of the philosophical tension regarding how much say the government should have about media content and delivery stems from the U.S. Constitution's First Amendment protection against government interference in free speech, including commercial speech. Courts, Jordan says, have repeatedly had to weigh the rights of commercial entities to say what they please against the need to protect vulnerable citizens such as children. This balancing act is complicated even further, she says, because many government regulations apply only to broadcast television and not to non-broadcast media such as the Internet or cable television, though Congress has addressed the need to protect children's privacy online. The need to protect both free speech and children has given rise to a fluid media policy mix of federal mandates and industry self-regulation. Jordan describes the role of the three branches of the federal government in formulating and implementing media policy. She also notes the jockeying for influence in policymaking by industry lobbies, child advocacy groups, and academic researchers. The media industry itself, says Jordan, is spurred to self-regulation when public disapproval grows severe enough to raise the possibility of new government action. Jordan surveys a range of government and industry actions, from legislatively required parental monitoring tools, such as the V-Chip blocking device on television sets, to the voluntary industry ratings systems governing television, movies, and video games, to voluntary social website disclosures to outright government bans, such as indecency and child privacy information collection. She considers the success of these efforts in limiting children's exposure to damaging content and in improving parents

  11. Depth discrimination in acousto-optic cerebral blood flow measurement simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsalach, A.; Schiffer, Z.; Ratner, E.; Breskin, I.; Zeitak, R.; Shechter, R.; Balberg, M.

    2016-03-01

    Monitoring cerebral blood flow (CBF) is crucial, as inadequate perfusion, even for relatively short periods of time, may lead to brain damage or even death. Thus, significant research efforts are directed at developing reliable monitoring tools that will enable continuous, bed side, simple and cost-effective monitoring of CBF. All existing non invasive bed side monitoring methods, which are mostly NIRS based, such as Laser Doppler or DCS, tend to underestimate CBF in adults, due to the indefinite effect of extra-cerebral tissues on the obtained signal. If those are to find place in day to day clinical practice, the contribution of extra-cerebral tissues must be eliminated and data from the depth (brain) should be extracted and discriminated. Recently, a novel technique, based on ultrasound modulation of light was developed for non-invasive, continuous CBF monitoring (termed ultrasound-tagged light (UTL or UT-NIRS)), and shown to correlate with readings of 133Xe SPECT and laser Doppler. We have assembled a comprehensive computerized simulation, modeling this acousto-optic technique in a highly scattering media. Using the combination of light and ultrasound, we show how depth information may be extracted, thus distinguishing between flow patterns taking place at different depths. Our algorithm, based on the analysis of light modulated by ultrasound, is presented and examined in a computerized simulation. Distinct depth discrimination ability is presented, suggesting that using such method one can effectively nullify the extra-cerebral tissues influence on the obtained signals, and specifically extract cerebral flow data.

  12. Plasma catecholamine concentrations associated with cerebral vasospasm.

    PubMed

    Loach, A B; Benedict, C R

    1980-03-01

    Plasma concentrations of adrenaline and noradrenaline were measured sequentially over the immediate post-operative period following clipping of an intracranial aneurysm in 11 patients. Those patients who developed local cerebral vasospasm showed a sustained rise in plasma catecholamines, particularly noradrenaline, whilst those patients who developed generalised cerebral vasospasm showed early peaks of very high concentrations of adrenaline and noradrenaline which preceded radiological evidence of generalized vasospam.

  13. Cumulative Effect of Repeated Brief Cerebral Ischemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-31

    KL, Pohost GM and Conger KA, Correlating EEG and Lactate Kinetics During Repeated Brief Cerebral Ischemia, Proceedings of the American Heart Association 1993...Cornelating EEG and Lactate Kinetics During Repeated Brief Cerebral Ischemia, Proceedings of the American Heart Association 1993. 4) HP Hetherington...thes Bernhard Foundation. ass- 134 󈧑&.1 n5. 9# American Heart Association 026085 66th Scientific Sessions Abstract Form Medical Research Nursing

  14. Wearable wireless cerebral oximeter (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Jiang, Tianzi

    2016-03-01

    Cerebral oximeters measure continuous cerebral oxygen saturation using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technology noninvasively. It has been involved into operating room setting to monitor oxygenation within patient's brain when surgeons are concerned that a patient's levels might drop. Recently, cerebral oxygen saturation has also been related with chronic cerebral vascular insufficiency (CCVI). Patients with CCVI would be benefited if there would be a wearable system to measure their cerebral oxygen saturation in need. However, there has yet to be a wearable wireless cerebral oximeter to measure the saturation in 24 hours. So we proposed to develop the wearable wireless cerebral oximeter. The mechanism of the system follows the NIRS technology. Emitted light at wavelengths of 740nm and 860nm are sent from the light source penetrating the skull and cerebrum, and the light detector(s) receives the light not absorbed during the light pathway through the skull and cerebrum. The amount of oxygen absorbed within the brain is the difference between the amount of light sent out and received by the probe, which can be used to calculate the percentage of oxygen saturation. In the system, it has one source and four detectors. The source, located in the middle of forehead, can emit two near infrared light, 740nm and 860nm. Two detectors are arranged in one side in 2 centimeters and 3 centimeters from the source. Their measurements are used to calculate the saturation in the cerebral cortex. The system has included the rechargeable lithium battery and Bluetooth smart wireless micro-computer unit.

  15. Thrombosis of the Azygos Anterior Cerebral Artery

    PubMed Central

    Avelino, Marcelo Coelho; Bastos, Breno Braga; Moreira de Sousa, Rafael Soares

    2017-01-01

    The azygos anterior cerebral artery is a rare variant, characterized by the absence of the anterior communicating artery and the union of two proximal segments of the anterior cerebral artery, forming a single trunk and ascending through the interhemispheric fissure. The incidence in the population varies from 0.3 to 2%. The presence of occlusion for this vessel causes bifrontal infarcts, with potentially devastating functional consequences, hence the importance of recognizing this anatomical variation in imaging exams. PMID:28299225

  16. Pulmonary pathology in pediatric cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Milner, Danny; Factor, Rachel; Whitten, Rich; Carr, Richard A; Kamiza, Steve; Pinkus, Geraldine; Molyneux, Malcolm; Taylor, Terrie

    2013-12-01

    Respiratory signs are common in African children where malaria is highly endemic, and thus, parsing the role of pulmonary pathology in illness is challenging. We examined the lungs of 100 children from an autopsy series in Blantyre, Malawi, many of whom death was attributed to Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Our aim was to describe the pathologic manifestations of fatal malaria; to understand the role of parasites, pigment, and macrophages; and to catalog comorbidities. From available patients, which included 55 patients with cerebral malaria and 45 controls, we obtained 4 cores of lung tissue for immunohistochemistry and morphological evaluation. We found that, in patients with cerebral malaria, large numbers of malaria parasites were present in pulmonary alveolar capillaries, together with extensive deposits of malaria pigment (hemozoin). The number of pulmonary macrophages in this vascular bed did not differ between patients with cerebral malaria, noncerebral malaria, and nonmalarial diagnoses. Comorbidities found in some cerebral malaria patients included pneumonia, pulmonary edema, hemorrhage, and systemic activation of coagulation. We conclude that the respiratory distress seen in patients with cerebral malaria does not appear to be anatomic in origin but that increasing malaria pigment is strongly associated with cerebral malaria at autopsy.

  17. Hereditary cerebral small vessel disease and stroke.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Christian Baastrup; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Hansen, Christine Krarup; Christensen, Hanne

    2017-04-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease is considered hereditary in about 5% of patients and is characterized by lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities on MRI. Several monogenic hereditary diseases causing cerebral small vessel disease and stroke have been identified. The purpose of this systematic review is to provide a guide for determining when to consider molecular genetic testing in patients presenting with small vessel disease and stroke. CADASIL, CARASIL, collagen type IV mutations (including PADMAL), retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy, Fabry disease, hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis, and forkhead box C1 mutations are described in terms of genetics, pathology, clinical manifestation, imaging, and diagnosis. These monogenic disorders are often characterized by early-age stroke, but also by migraine, mood disturbances, vascular dementia and often gait disturbances. Some also present with extra-cerebral manifestations such as microangiopathy of the eyes and kidneys. Many present with clinically recognizable syndromes. Investigations include a thorough family medical history, medical history, neurological examination, neuroimaging, often supplemented by specific examinations e.g of the of vision, retinal changes, as well as kidney and heart function. However molecular genetic analysis is the final gold standard of diagnosis. There are increasing numbers of reports on new monogenic syndromes causing cerebral small vessel disease. Genetic counseling is important. Enzyme replacement therapy is possible in Fabry disease, but treatment options remain overall very limited.

  18. Effects of hindlimb unloading on rat cerebral, splenic, and mesenteric resistance artery morphology.

    PubMed

    Wilkerson, M K; Muller-Delp, J; Colleran, P N; Delp, M D

    1999-12-01

    Hindlimb unloading (HU) of rats induces a cephalic shift in body fluids. We hypothesized that the putative increase in cranial fluid pressure and decrease in peripheral fluid pressure would alter the morphology of resistance arteries from 2-wk HU male Sprague-Dawley rats. To test this hypothesis, the cerebral basilar, mesenteric, and splenic arteries were removed from control (C) and HU animals. The vessels were cannulated, and luminal pressure was set to 60 cmH(2)O. The resistance arteries were then relaxed with 10(-4) M nitroprusside, fixed, and cut into transverse cross sections (5 microm thick). Media cross-sectional area (CSA), intraluminal CSA, media layer thickness, vessel outer perimeter, and media nuclei number were determined. In the basilar artery, both media CSA (HU 17, 893 +/- 2,539 microm(2); C 12,904 +/- 1,433 microm(2)) and thickness (HU 33.9 +/- 4.1 microm; C 22.3 +/- 3.2 microm) were increased with hindlimb unloading (P < 0.05), intraluminal CSA decreased (HU 7,816 +/- 3,045 microm(2); C 13,469 +/- 5,500 microm(2)) (P < 0.05), and vessel outer perimeter and media nuclei number were unaltered. There were no differences in mesenteric or splenic resistance artery morphology between HU and C rats. These findings suggest that hindlimb unloading-induced increases in cephalic arterial pressure and, correspondingly, increases in circumferential wall stress result in the hypertrophy of basilar artery smooth muscle cells.

  19. Practical Guidance: The Use of Social Media In Oncology Practice

    PubMed Central

    Dizon, Don S.; Graham, David; Thompson, Michael A.; Johnson, Lisa J.; Johnston, Claire; Fisch, Michael J.; Miller, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The penetration of social media into modern society has become a worldwide cultural phenomenon. Social media use widely accessible Web-based and mobile technologies to facilitate the creation and sharing of user-generated content in a collaborative and social manner. The uptake of social media in medicine provides new opportunities for health care professionals and institutions to interact with patients and other professionals. Oncologists may use social media as a platform for patient education and authoritative health messaging, for professional development and knowledge sharing, and for direct patient interaction, although this may be fraught with important legal and privacy concerns. In this article, a working group of the ASCO Integrated Media and Technology Committee explores how oncologists might responsibly use social media in their professional lives. Existing social media policies from hospitals, health systems, and pharmaceutical industries are examined to identify common concepts informing the development of future guidelines. Key principles identified include establishing institutional ownership of social media activities and safeguarding protected health information. Furthermore, oncologists must not confuse the roles of provider of information and provider of care, must understand regulations related to state licensure and medical records, and must recognize the importance of transparency and disclosure of potential conflicts of interest. social media may be particularly useful for raising the awareness of and recruitment to clinical trials, but compliance with federal and state regulations and areas under the purview of a local institutional review board must also be ensured. Examples of constructive use of social media in oncology with Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube are provided. PMID:23277774

  20. Central line infections - hospitals

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection; CVC - infection; Central venous device - infection; Infection control - central line infection; Nosocomial infection - central line infection; Hospital acquired infection - central line infection; Patient safety - central ...

  1. Measuring hospital competition.

    PubMed

    White, S L; Chirikos, T N

    1988-03-01

    This paper appraises the use of the Herfindahl market share index as an exogenous competition variable in empirical studies of the hospital sector. An analysis of cross-sectional Florida data shows that this index itself is significantly influenced by the demand and supply factors commonly included in econometric models of hospital performance. The analysis then illustrates that biased inferences about the effects of market competition on the costs of hospital care may result unless the values of the Herfindahl Index are treated endogenously in hospital cost models.

  2. Marketing the charitable image of the non-profit hospital.

    PubMed

    Kolu, S; Parsons, R J

    1992-01-01

    Because of nonprofit hospitals' charitable contribution to communities, the great majority of these nonprofit hospitals deserve their tax-exempt status. In order for them to maintain this status, hospitals must promote their charitable image in the community. The hospital that is successful in promoting this image will benefit in several ways: 1. The citizens of the community will look on the hospital in a favorable light. 2. The local and state government officials will not feel compelled to vigorously pursue hospital tax dollars. 3. Those people in the community who need charity care will know of its availability. 4. New taxing legislation is less likely to be passed if the legislators know that their public is well educated on the benefits the hospitals provide. Over the years, the image of the hospital has become that of a business rather than that of a charitable service organization. The public has been inundated with information by the media on the business of healthcare rather than the social service role of the hospital. In order for nonprofit institutions to survive, they will need to communicate otherwise the public will remain ignorant, and the repercussions could be disastrous.

  3. Lower extremity orthoses in children with spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy: implications for nurses, parents, and caregivers.

    PubMed

    Cervasio, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    Understanding trends in the prevalence of children with cerebral palsy is vital to evaluating and estimating supportive services for children, families, and caregivers. The majority of children with cerebral palsy require lower extremity orthoses to stabilize their muscles. The pediatric nurse needs a special body of knowledge to accurately assess, apply, manage, teach, and evaluate the use of lower extremity orthoses typically prescribed for this vulnerable population. Inherent in caring for these children is the need to teach the child, the family, and significant others the proper application and care of the orthoses used in hospital and community settings. Nursing literature review does not provide a basis for evidence in designing and teaching orthopaedic care for children with orthoses. A protocol for orthoses management has been developed to assist caregivers to accurately care for children with lower extremity orthotic devices.

  4. Endovascular Treatment of Giant Serpentine Aneurysm of the Middle Cerebral Artery

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Young Ha; Koo, Youn Moo; Choi, Jong Wook; Whang, Kum; Hu, Chul; Cho, Sung Min

    2016-01-01

    Giant serpentine aneurysms are uncommon types of aneurysmal disease and have angiographically authentic features. We report a case of a 44-year-old male with headache and seizure. He presented a giant serpentine aneurysm arising from the middle cerebral artery (MCA). It was a large intracranial aneurysm thrombosed as a mass-like lesion while it maintained its outflow drainage into the distal MCA branches. The balloon occlusion test (BOT) was performed to test the tolerance of temporary collateral circulation. Following routine cerebral angiography, we performed an endovascular embolization on the proximal artery of MCA. He was discharged from the hospital with alert mental status and mild Gerstmann syndrome. The short-term follow-up imaging studies showed the decreased mass effect, and the patient presented an improved Gerstmann syndrome. After a careful evaluation of BOT, an endovascular embolization can be one of the powerful therapeutic instruments for giant serpentine aneurysm. PMID:27847772

  5. [Regional cerebral blood flow-SPECT "OFF-ON": a case report of catatonia].

    PubMed

    Moreno Caballero, M; Corchos González, N; De Antonio Rubio, I; Gómez-Río, M; Guerrero Velázquez, J F; Rodríguez Fernández, A; Llamas Elvira, J M

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with a long history of dysthymia and major depressive episodes requiring repeated hospitalization. We describe the most recent episode, associated with catatonia symptomatology and features suggestive of cognitive impairment. The absence of a clear initial psychopharmacological response alongside the clinical severity made the patient a potential candidate for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). A regional cerebral blood flow SPECT (SPECT-rCBF), performed to rule out concomitant Alzheimer disease (AD), revealed a markedly decreased neocortical uptake, with no definitive pattern of concomitant primary cognitive impairment. Because a gradual clinical improvement was observed in the patient, with evidence of enhanced cerebral reperfusion in a second SPECT-rCBF study at two weeks after admission, the application of ECT was discounted and an expectant attitude was adopted.

  6. Comparison of Cerebral Oximeter and Pulse Oximeter Values in the First 72 Hours in Premature, Asphyctic and Healthy Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, A; Okur, M; Sal, E; Peker, E; Köstü, M; Tuncer, O; Kirimi, E

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: The monitoring of oxygenation is essential for providing patient safety and optimal results. We aimed to determine brain oxygen saturation values in healthy, asphyctic and premature newborns and to compare cerebral oximeter and pulse oximeter values in the first 72 hours of life in neonatal intensive care units. Methods: This study was conducted at the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of Van Yüzüncü Yil University Research and Administration Hospital. Seventy-five neonatal infants were included in the study (28 asphyxia, 24 premature and 23 mature healthy infants for control group). All infants were studied within the first 72 hours of life. We used a Somanetics 5100C cerebral oximeter (INVOS cerebral/somatic oximeter, Troy, MI, USA). The oxygen saturation information was collected by a Nellcor N-560 pulse oximeter (Nellcor-Puriton Bennet Inc, Pleasanton, CA, USA). Results: In the asphyxia group, the cerebral oximeter average was 76.85 ± 14.1, the pulse oximeter average was 91.86 ± 5.9 and the heart rate average was 139.91 ± 22.3. Among the premature group, the cerebral oximeter average was 79.08 ± 9.04, the pulse oximeter average was 92.01 ± 5.3 and the heart rate average was 135.35 ± 17.03. In the control group, the cerebral oximeter average was 77.56 ± 7.6, the pulse oximeter average was 92.82 ± 3.8 and the heart rate average was 127.04 ± 19.7. Conclusion: Cerebral oximeter is a promising modality in bedside monitoring in neonatal intensive care units. It is complementary to pulse oximeter. It may be used routinely in neonatal intensive care units. PMID:25867556

  7. Diazepam prophylaxis of contrast media-induced seizures during computed tomography of patients with brain metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Pagani, J.J.; Hayman, L.A.; Bigelow, R.H.; Libshitz, H.I.; Lepke, R.A.; Wallace, S.

    1983-04-01

    The effect of 5 mg of intravenous diazepam (Valium) on contrast media-associated seizer incidence was studied in a randomized controlled trial involving 284 patients with known or suspected brain metastases undergoing cerebral computed tomography. Of these patients, 188 were found to have brain metastases, and it is estimated that for this subgroup prophylactic diazepam reduces the risk of contrast-assocated seizure by a factor of 0.26. Seizures occurred in three of 96 patients with metastases on diazepam and in 14 of 92 patients with metastases but without diazepam. Factors related to increased risk of contrast media-associated seizures are: (1) prior seizure history due to brain metatases and/or prior contrast, (2) progressive cerebral metastases, and (3) prior or concurrent brain antineoplastic therapy. Factors not related to an increased risk of these seizures are: (1) contrast media dosage, chemical composition, or osmolarity, (2) computed tomographic appearance of metastases, and (3) type of primary malignancy. Concomitant therapeutic levels of diphenylhydantoin (Dilantin) do not protect completely against contrast media-associated seizures. Pathophysiology of contrast media-associated seizures is discussed in view of the risk factors determined by this study.

  8. Correlation of CT cerebral vascular territories with function. 3. Middle cerebral artery

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, S.A.; Hayman, L.A.; Hinck, V.C.

    1984-05-01

    Schematic displays are presented of the cerebral territories supplied by branches of the middle cerebral artery as they would appear on axial and coronal computed tomographic (CT) scan sections. Companion diagrams of regional cortical function and a discussion of the fiber tracts are provided to simplify correlation of clinical deficits with coronal and axial CT abnormalities.

  9. Fulminant cerebral infarction of anterior and posterior cerebral circulation after ascending type of facial necrotizing fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Ho; Choi, Hui-Chul; Kim, Chulho; Sohn, Jong Hee; Kim, Heung Cheol

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a soft tissue infection that is characterized by extensive necrosis of the subcutaneous fat, neurovascular structures, and fascia. Cerebral infarction after facial necrotizing fasciitis has been rarely reported. A 61-year-old woman with diabetes was admitted with painful swelling of her right cheek. One day later, she was stuporous and quadriplegic. A computed tomographic scan of her face revealed right facial infection in the periorbital soft tissue, parotid, buccal muscle, and maxillary sinusitis. A computed tomographic scan of the brain revealed cerebral infarction in the right hemisphere, left frontal area, and both cerebellum. Four days later, she died from cerebral edema and septic shock. Involvement of the cerebral vasculature, such as the carotid or vertebral artery by necrotizing fasciitis, can cause cerebral infarction. Facial necrotizing fasciitis should be treated early with surgical treatment and the appropriate antibiotic therapy.

  10. Open Media Training Session

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Have you ever wondered how the media work and why some topics make it into the news and other don't? Would you like to know how to (and how not to) give an interview to a journalist? With the LHC preparing for first collisions at high energies, the world's media are again turning their attention to CERN. We're all likely to be called upon to explain what is happening at CERN to media, friends and neighbours. The seminar will be given by BBC television news journalists Liz Pike and Nadia Marchant, and will deal with the kind of questions we're likely to be confronted with through the restart period. Follow the webcast: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  11. Laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fixation for cervical spondylotic myelopathy in patients with athetoid cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hua; Liu, Zhong-jun; Wang, Shao-bo; Pan, Sheng-fa; Yan, Ming; Zhang, Feng-shan; Sun, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although several studies report various treatment solutions for cervical spondylotic myelopathy in patients with athetoid cerebral palsy, long-term follow-up studies are very rare. None of the reported treatment solutions represent a gold standard for this disease owing to the small number of cases and lack of long-term follow-up. This study aimed to evaluate the outcomes of laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fixation to treat cervical spondylotic myelopathy in patients with athetoid cerebral palsy from a single center. This retrospective study included 15 patients (9 male patients and 6 female patients) with athetoid cerebral palsy who underwent laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fixation for cervical spondylotic myelopathy at our hospital between March 2006 and June 2010. Demographic variables, radiographic parameters, and pre- and postoperative clinical outcomes determined by the modified Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA), Neck Disability Index (NDI), and visual analog scale (VAS) scores were assessed. The mean follow-up time was 80.5 months. Developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis (P = 0.02) and cervical lordosis (P = 0.04) were significantly correlated with lower preoperative modified JOA scores. The mean modified JOA scores increased from 7.97 preoperatively to 12.1 postoperatively (P < 0.01). The mean VAS score decreased from 5.30 to 3.13 (P < 0.01), and the mean NDI score decreased from 31.73 to 19.93 (P < 0.01). There was a significant negative correlation between developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis and recovery rate of the modified JOA score (P = 0.01). Developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis is significantly related to neurological function in patients with athetoid cerebral palsy. Laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fixation is an effective treatment for cervical spondylotic myelopathy in patients with athetoid cerebral palsy and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis. PMID:27684879

  12. Ultra-early angiographic vasospasm associated with delayed cerebral ischemia and infarction following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Al-Mufti, Fawaz; Roh, David; Lahiri, Shouri; Meyers, Emma; Witsch, Jens; Frey, Hans-Peter; Dangayach, Neha; Falo, Cristina; Mayer, Stephan A; Agarwal, Sachin; Park, Soojin; Meyers, Philip M; Sander Connolly, E; Claassen, Jan; Michael Schmidt, J

    2016-05-27

    OBJECTIVE The clinical significance of cerebral ultra-early angiographic vasospasm (UEAV), defined as cerebral arterial narrowing within the first 48 hours of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH), remains poorly characterized. The authors sought to determine its frequency, predictors, and impact on functional outcome. METHODS The authors prospectively studied UEAV in a cohort of 1286 consecutively admitted patients with aSAH between August 1996 and June 2013. Admission clinical, radiographic, and acute clinical course information was documented during patient hospitalization. Functional outcome was assessed at 3 months using the modified Rankin Scale. Logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards models were generated to assess predictors of UEAV and its relationship to delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) and outcome. Multiple imputation methods were used to address data lost to follow-up. RESULTS The cohort incidence rate of UEAV was 4.6%. Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that younger age, sentinel bleed, and poor admission clinical grade were significantly associated with UEAV. Patients with UEAV had a 2-fold increased risk of DCI (odds ratio [OR] 2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-3.9, p = 0.002) and cerebral infarction (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.0-3.9, p = 0.04), after adjusting for known predictors. Excluding patients who experienced sentinel bleeding did not change this effect. Patients with UEAV also had a significantly higher hazard for DCI in a multivariable model. UEAV was not found to be significantly associated with poor functional outcome (OR 0.8, 95% CI 0.4-1.6, p = 0.5). CONCLUSIONS UEAV may be less frequent than has been reported previously. Patients who exhibit UEAV are at higher risk for refractory DCI that results in cerebral infarction. These patients may benefit from earlier monitoring for signs of DCI and more aggressive treatment. Further study is needed to determine the long-term functional significance of UEAV.

  13. Comparison of clipping and coiling in elderly patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Bekelis, Kimon; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Su, Yin; O’Malley, A. James; Labropoulos, Nicos; Goodney, Philip; Lawton, Michael T.; MacKenzie, Todd A.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The comparative effectiveness of the 2 treatment options—surgical clipping and endovascular coiling—for unruptured cerebral aneurysms remains an issue of debate and has not been studied in clinical trials. The authors investigated the association between treatment method for unruptured cerebral aneurysms and outcomes in elderly patients. METHODS The authors performed a cohort study of 100% of Medicare fee-for-service claims data for elderly patients who had treatment for unruptured cerebral aneurysms between 2007 and 2012. To control for measured confounding, the authors used propensity score conditioning and inverse probability weighting with mixed effects to account for clustering at the level of the hospital referral region (HRR). An instrumental variable (regional rates of coiling) analysis was used to control for unmeasured confounding and to create pseudo-randomization on the treatment method. RESULTS During the study period, 8705 patients underwent treatment for unruptured cerebral aneurysms and met the study inclusion criteria. Of these patients, 2585 (29.7%) had surgical clipping and 6120 (70.3%) had endovascular coiling. Instrumental variable analysis demonstrated no difference between coiling and clipping in 1-year postoperative mortality (OR 1.25, 95% CI 0.68–2.31) or 90-day readmission rate (OR 1.04, 95% CI 0.66–1.62). However, clipping was associated with a greater likelihood of discharge to rehabilitation (OR 6.39, 95% CI 3.85–10.59) and 3.6 days longer length of stay (LOS; 95% CI 2.90–4.71). The same associations were present in propensity score–adjusted and inverse probability– weighted models. CONCLUSIONS In a cohort of Medicare patients, there was no difference in mortality and the readmission rate between clipping and coiling of unruptured cerebral aneurysms. Clipping was associated with a higher rate of discharge to a rehabilitation facility and a longer LOS. PMID:27203150

  14. Comparison of clipping and coiling in elderly patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Bekelis, Kimon; Gottlieb, Daniel J; Su, Yin; O'Malley, A James; Labropoulos, Nicos; Goodney, Philip; Lawton, Michael T; MacKenzie, Todd A

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE The comparative effectiveness of the 2 treatment options-surgical clipping and endovascular coiling-for unruptured cerebral aneurysms remains an issue of debate and has not been studied in clinical trials. The authors investigated the association between treatment method for unruptured cerebral aneurysms and outcomes in elderly patients. METHODS The authors performed a cohort study of 100% of Medicare fee-for-service claims data for elderly patients who had treatment for unruptured cerebral aneurysms between 2007 and 2012. To control for measured confounding, the authors used propensity score conditioning and inverse probability weighting with mixed effects to account for clustering at the level of the hospital referral region (HRR). An instrumental variable (regional rates of coiling) analysis was used to control for unmeasured confounding and to create pseudo-randomization on the treatment method. RESULTS During the study period, 8705 patients underwent treatment for unruptured cerebral aneurysms and met the study inclusion criteria. Of these patients, 2585 (29.7%) had surgical clipping and 6120 (70.3%) had endovascular coiling. Instrumental variable analysis demonstrated no difference between coiling and clipping in 1-year postoperative mortality (OR 1.25, 95% CI 0.68-2.31) or 90-day readmission rate (OR 1.04, 95% CI 0.66-1.62). However, clipping was associated with a greater likelihood of discharge to rehabilitation (OR 6.39, 95% CI 3.85-10.59) and 3.6 days longer length of stay (LOS; 95% CI 2.90-4.71). The same associations were present in propensity score-adjusted and inverse probability-weighted models. CONCLUSIONS In a cohort of Medicare patients, there was no difference in mortality and the readmission rate between clipping and coiling of unruptured cerebral aneurysms. Clipping was associated with a higher rate of discharge to a rehabilitation facility and a longer LOS.

  15. Media and risky behaviors.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Chaves, Soledad Liliana; Anderson, Craig A

    2008-01-01

    Liliana Escobar-Chaves and Craig Anderson investigate two important trends among American youth and examine the extent to which the two trends might be related. First, the authors note that U.S. youth are spending increasing amounts of time using electronic media, with the average American youngster now spending one-third of each day with some form of electronic media. Second, the authors demonstrate that American adolescents are engaging in a number of unhealthful behaviors that impose huge societal costs. Escobar-Chaves and Anderson detail the extent of five critical types of adolescent health risk behaviors identified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-obesity, smoking, drinking, sexual risk taking, and violence. Obesity, the authors note, has become an epidemic among America's young people. Cigarette smoking among adolescents is one of the ten leading health indicators of greatest government concern. Alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence are widespread problems among the nation's youth and are the source of the three leading causes of death among youth. More than 20 percent of American high school students have sexual intercourse for the first time before they reach the age of fourteen. And twelve- to twenty-year-olds perpetrated 28 percent of the single-offender and 41 percent of multiple-offender violent crimes in the United States in 2005. Escobar-Chaves and Anderson present and evaluate research findings on the influence of electronic media on these five risk behaviors among adolescents. Researchers, they say, have found modest evidence that media consumption contributes to the problem of obesity, modest to strong evidence that it contributes to drinking and smoking, and strong evidence that it contributes to violence. Research has been insufficient to find links between heavy media exposure and early sexual initiation. The authors note the need for more large-scale longitudinal studies that specifically examine the cumulative effects of

  16. Multifractality of cerebral blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Bruce J.; Latka, Miroslaw; Glaubic-Latka, Marta; Latka, Dariusz

    2003-02-01

    Scale invariance, the property relating time series across multiple scales, has provided a new perspective of physiological phenomena and their underlying control systems. The traditional “signal plus noise” paradigm of the engineer was first replaced with a model in which biological time series have a fractal structure in time (Fractal Physiology, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1994). This new paradigm was subsequently shown to be overly restrictive when certain physiological signals were found to be characterized by more than one scaling parameter and therefore to belong to a class of more complex processes known as multifractals (Fractals, Plenum Press, New York, 1988). Here we demonstrate that in addition to heart rate (Nature 399 (1999) 461) and human gait (Phys. Rev. E, submitted for publication), the nonlinear control system for cerebral blood flow (CBF) (Phys. Rev. Lett., submitted for publication; Phys. Rev. E 59 (1999) 3492) is multifractal. We also find that this multifractality is greatly reduced for subjects with “serious” migraine and we present a simple model for the underlying control process to describe this effect.

  17. Cerebral concussion: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Maroon, Joseph C; Mathyssek, Christina; Bost, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    No topic in sports has gathered more attention and publicity than the diagnosis, management, and long-term effects of cerebral concussion. The relevant history of concussion starts in 1905 when President Theodore Roosevelt drew attention to the football 'death harvest'. Soon after, rules started to change to reduce the amount and severity of head injuries in football. Up until 1980, the primary focus regarding concussions was to diagnose a potentially fatal intracranial hemorrhage. While aware of long-term consequences of concussions, the perception at the time was that virtually all concussions would 'clear' with time and rest. Concussion management guidelines gave way to objective neuropsychological testing in the early 1990s with the development of the ImPACT™ (Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing) neurocognitive test. Led by organized football, in 1994 the National Football League (NFL) formed the Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Committee which began to investigate the cause of concussions, evaluate equipment (particularly helmets), and recommend methods for prevention. In 2005, the first case of chronic traumatic encephalopathy was described in a deceased football player, raising concerns about the long-term consequences of head injuries and concussions. Major advancements in contact sports and the military are underway to reduce the incidence of concussions and subconcussive blows to the head.

  18. Preemptive Medicine for Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    AOKI, Tomohiro; NOZAKI, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Most of cerebral aneurysms (CAs) are incidentally discovered without any neurological symptoms and the risk of rupture of CAs is relatively higher in Japanese population. The goal of treatments for patients with CAs is complete exclusion of the aneurysmal rupture risk for their lives. Since two currently available major treatments, microsurgical clipping and endovascular coiling, have inherent incompleteness to achieve cure of CAs with some considerable treatment risks, and there is no effective surgical or medical intervention to inhibit the formation of CAs in patients with ruptured and unruptured CAs, new treatment strategies with lower risk and higher efficacy should be developed to prevent the formation, growth, and rupture of CAs. Preemptive medicine for CAs should be designed to prevent or delay the onset of symptoms from CAs found in an asymptomatic state or inhibit the de novo formation of CAs, but we have no definite methods to distinguish rupture-prone aneurysms from rupture-resistant ones. Recent advancements in the research of CAs have provided us with some clues, and one of the new treatment strategies for CAs will be developed based on the findings that several inflammatory pathways may be involved in the formation, growth, and rupture of CAs. Preemptive medicine for CAs will be established with specific biomarkers and imaging modalities which can sensor the development of CAs. PMID:27053328

  19. Clinical presentation of cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Cianfoni, Alessandro; Pravatà, Emanuele; De Blasi, Roberto; Tschuor, Costa Silvia; Bonaldi, Giuseppe

    2013-10-01

    Presentation of a cerebral aneurysm can be incidental, discovered at imaging obtained for unrelated causes, can occur in the occasion of imaging obtained for symptoms possibly or likely related to the presence of an unruptured aneurysm, or can occur with signs and symptoms at the time of aneurismal rupture. Most unruptured intracranial aneurysms are thought to be asymptomatic, or present with vague or non-specific symptoms like headache or dizziness. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsies, however, may typically indicate the presence of a posterior circulation aneurysm. Ruptured intracranial aneurysms are by far the most common cause of non-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage and represent a neurological emergency with potentially devastating consequences. Subarachnoid hemorrhage may be easily suspected in the presence of sudden and severe headache, vomiting, meningism signs, and/or altered mental status. However, failure to recognize milder and more ambiguous clinical pictures may result in a delayed or missed diagnosis. In this paper we will describe the clinical spectrum of unruptured and ruptured intracranial aneurysms by discussing both typical and uncommon clinical features emerging from the literature review. We will additionally provide the reader with descriptions of the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms, and main diagnostic pitfalls.

  20. Diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Thomas Michael

    2008-12-01

    Cerebral palsy is the most prevalent cause of persisting motor function impairment with a frequency of about 1/500 births. In developed countries, the prevalence rose after introduction of neonatal intensive care, but in the past decade, this trend has reversed. A recent international workshop defined cerebral palsy as "a group of permanent disorders of the development of movement and posture, causing activity limitation, that are attributed to non-progressive disturbances that occurred in the developing fetal or infant brain." In a majority of cases, the predominant motor abnormality is spasticity; other forms of cerebral palsy include dyskinetic (dystonia or choreo-athetosis) and ataxic cerebral palsy. In preterm infants, about one-half of the cases have neuroimaging abnormalities, such as echolucency in the periventricular white matter or ventricular enlargement on cranial ultrasound. Among children born at or near term, about two-thirds have neuroimaging abnormalities, including focal infarction, brain malformations, and periventricular leukomalacia. In addition to the motor impairment, individuals with cerebral palsy may have sensory impairments, cognitive impairment, and epilepsy. Ambulation status, intelligence quotient, quality of speech, and hand function together are predictive of employment status. Mortality risk increases incrementally with increasing number of impairments, including intellectual, limb function, hearing, and vision. The care of individuals with cerebral palsy should include the provision of a primary care medical home for care coordination and support; diagnostic evaluations to identify brain abnormalities, severity of neurologic and functional abnormalities, and associated impairments; management of spasticity; and care for associated problems such as nutritional deficiencies, pain, dental care, bowel and bladder continence, and orthopedic complications. Current strategies to decrease the risk of cerebral palsy include interventions to

  1. Hospitality Occupations. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Homemaking Education.

    This curriculum guide on the hospitality occupations was developed to help secondary and postsecondary home economics teachers prepare individuals for entry-level jobs in the hospitality industry. The content is in seven sections. The first section presents organizational charts of a medium-size hotel, food and beverage division, housekeeping and…

  2. Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novachek, James

    The Northern Arizona Hospitality Education Program is an exemplary three-year project designed to help students, mainly Indian, obtain job skills and attitudes necessary for successful employment in the hospitality industry. Nine high schools from Apache, Coconino, and Navajo Counties participated in the project. Objectives included providing an…

  3. Handbook on Hospital Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prynne, T. A.

    Designed for both hospital personnel interested in television and audiovisual personnel entering the medical field, this handbook is a verbal and pictorial survey of what is being done with TV within the medical profession. After an introduction which answers technical questions about medical TV posed during the American Hospital Association's…

  4. Hospitality Services. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This guide, which was developed as part of Texas' home economics education program, is intended to assist teachers of a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The first 40% of the approximately 600-page guide consists of strategies for teaching each of 29 essential…

  5. Hospitality Services Reference Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This reference book provides information needed by employees in hospitality services occupations. It includes 29 chapters that cover the following topics: the hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization and management structures; safety practices and emergency procedures; technology; property maintenance and repair; purchasing…

  6. Virtual Pediatric Hospital

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thoracopaedia - An Imaging Encyclopedia of Pediatric Thoracic Disease Virtual Pediatric Hospital is the Apprentice's Assistant™ Last revised ... pediatric resources: GeneralPediatrics.com | PediatricEducation.org | SearchingPediatrics.com Virtual Pediatric Hospital is curated by Donna M. D' ...

  7. Hospital benefit segmentation.

    PubMed

    Finn, D W; Lamb, C W

    1986-12-01

    Market segmentation is an important topic to both health care practitioners and researchers. The authors explore the relative importance that health care consumers attach to various benefits available in a major metropolitan area hospital. The purposes of the study are to test, and provide data to illustrate, the efficacy of one approach to hospital benefit segmentation analysis.

  8. Leading a hospital closure.

    PubMed

    Lucey, Paula A

    2002-01-01

    Hospital closures have become more common. The challenges facing a nursing leader in this situation are complex and difficult. This author suggests that looking for new beginnings rather than focusing on endings created an approach to closing a public hospital. The article includes approaches to employee morale, staffing, and patient care.

  9. Acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Gretchen

    2014-03-01

    One in 4 children will have at least 1 episode of acute otitis media (AOM) by age 10 years. AOM results from infection of fluid that has become trapped in the middle ear. The bacteria that most often cause AOM are Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis. Differentiating AOM from otitis media with effusion (OME) is a critical skill for physicians, as accurate diagnosis will guide appropriate treatment of these conditions. Although fluid is present in the middle ear in both conditions, the fluid is not infected in OME as is seen in AOM patients.

  10. Otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Helen; Wallis, Sebastian; Coatesworth, Andrew P

    2015-05-01

    Otitis media with effusion (OME) is a common problem facing general practitioners, pediatricians and otolaryngologists. This article reviews the etiopathogenesis, epidemiology, presentation, natural history and management of OME. The literature was reviewed by using the PubMed search engine and entering a combination of terms including 'otitis media with effusion', 'epidemiology' and 'management'. Relevant articles were identified and examined for content. What is the take home message? While OME is a very common entity in the pediatric population, the majority of cases will resolve spontaneously. Surgery in the form of grommet insertion, with or without adenoidectomy is the most effective treatment in persistent symptomatic cases.

  11. Media and Influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, William H.

    The public information media provides information on current events (news), entertainment (programming), and opinions offered by trusted public sources (e.g., business, academic or religious spokespersons, journalists, and government officials). Consequently, it is a major force in shaping a populace's attitudes toward significant social issues and of great interest to intervention planners. The chapter attempts to provide modelers and intervention analysts alike with sufficient understanding of media mechanisms and current research that they can begin contributing to, and benefiting from this important area of study.

  12. Effects of Pulsatile Versus Nonpulsatile Flow on Cerebral Hemodynamics During Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Bypass With Deep Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    after cardiac surgery . This study is designed to determine the effects of pulsatile versus nonpulsatile perfusion on regional and global cerebral blood...A. Anesthesia / Surgery Animals were premedicated with intramuscular ketamine hydrochloride (20 mg/kg), acepromazine maleate (1 mg/kg), and...DEEP HYPOTHERMIC CIRCULATORY ARREST A. Ündar1,2,3, W. K. Vaughn4, and J. H. Calhoon5 1Congenital Heart Surgery Service, Texas Children’s Hospital

  13. Competition among hospitals.

    PubMed

    Gaynor, Martin; Vogt, William B

    2003-01-01

    We examine competition in the hospital industry, in particular the effect of ownership type (for-profit, not-for-profit, government). We estimate a structural model of demand and pricing in the hospital industry in California, then use the estimates to simulate the effect of a merger. California hospitals in 1995 face an average price elasticity of demand of -4.85. Not-for-profit hospitals face less elastic demand and act as if they have lower marginal costs. Their prices are lower than those of for-profits, but markups are higher. We simulate the effects of the 1997 merger of two hospital chains. In San Luis Obispo County, where the merger creates a near monopoly, prices rise by up to 53%, and the predicted price increase would not be substantially smaller were the chains not-for-profit.

  14. Cerebral Tissue Oxygenation during Immediate Neonatal Transition and Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Pichler, Gerhard; Schmölzer, Georg M.; Urlesberger, Berndt

    2017-01-01

    This article provides a review of cerebral tissue oxygenation during immediate transition after birth in human neonates. Recommended routine monitoring, especially if resuscitation is needed, during this period includes arterial oxygen saturation and heart rate measured by pulse oximetry and electrocardiogram. However, there is increasing interest to monitor in addition with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) the oxygenation of the brain. There is a different pattern of increase between cerebral tissue oxygenation and arterial oxygen saturation during the immediate transition, with cerebral tissue oxygenation reaching a plateau faster than arterial oxygen saturation. Differences can be explained, since cerebral tissue oxygenation is not only affected by arterial oxygen saturation but also by cerebral blood flow, hemoglobin content, and cerebral oxygen consumption. Normal values have already been established for different devices, gestational ages, and modes of delivery in neonates without any medical support. Cerebral hypoxia during immediate transition might cause brain damage. In preterm neonates with cerebral hemorrhage evolving in the first week after birth, the cerebral tissue oxygenation is already lower in the first minutes after birth compared to preterm neonates without cerebral hemorrhage. Using cerebral NIRS in combination with intervention guidelines has been shown to reduce the burden of cerebral hypoxia in preterm neonates. Cerebral tissue oxygenation during immediate transition seems to have an impact on outcome, whereby NIRS monitoring is feasible and has the advantage of continuous, non-invasive recording. The impact of NIRS monitoring and interventions on short- and long-term outcomes still need to be evaluated. PMID:28280719

  15. Cerebral Tissue Oxygenation during Immediate Neonatal Transition and Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Pichler, Gerhard; Schmölzer, Georg M; Urlesberger, Berndt

    2017-01-01

    This article provides a review of cerebral tissue oxygenation during immediate transition after birth in human neonates. Recommended routine monitoring, especially if resuscitation is needed, during this period includes arterial oxygen saturation and heart rate measured by pulse oximetry and electrocardiogram. However, there is increasing interest to monitor in addition with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) the oxygenation of the brain. There is a different pattern of increase between cerebral tissue oxygenation and arterial oxygen saturation during the immediate transition, with cerebral tissue oxygenation reaching a plateau faster than arterial oxygen saturation. Differences can be explained, since cerebral tissue oxygenation is not only affected by arterial oxygen saturation but also by cerebral blood flow, hemoglobin content, and cerebral oxygen consumption. Normal values have already been established for different devices, gestational ages, and modes of delivery in neonates without any medical support. Cerebral hypoxia during immediate transition might cause brain damage. In preterm neonates with cerebral hemorrhage evolving in the first week after birth, the cerebral tissue oxygenation is already lower in the first minutes after birth compared to preterm neonates without cerebral hemorrhage. Using cerebral NIRS in combination with intervention guidelines has been shown to reduce the burden of cerebral hypoxia in preterm neonates. Cerebral tissue oxygenation during immediate transition seems to have an impact on outcome, whereby NIRS monitoring is feasible and has the advantage of continuous, non-invasive recording. The impact of NIRS monitoring and interventions on short- and long-term outcomes still need to be evaluated.

  16. Cerebral microbleeds topography and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Shams, Sara; Granberg, Tobias; Martola, Juha; Charidimou, Andreas; Li, Xiaozhen; Shams, Mana; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Cavallin, Lena; Aspelin, Peter; Wiberg-Kristoffersen, Maria; Wahlund, Lars-Olof

    2017-03-01

    Cerebral microbleeds, a marker of small vessel disease, are thought to be of importance in cognitive impairment. We aimed to study topographical distribution of cerebral microbleeds, and their involvement in disease pathophysiology, reflected by cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers; 1039 patients undergoing memory investigation underwent lumbar puncture and a brain magnetic resonance imaging scan. Cerebrospinal fluid samples were analyzed for amyloid β(Aβ)42, total tau(T-tau), tau phosphorylated at threonine 18(P-tau) and cerebrospinal fluid/serum albumin ratios. Magnetic resonance imaging sequences were evaluated for small vessel disease markers, including cerebral microbleeds, white matter hyperintensities and lacunes. Low Aβ42 levels were associated with lobar cerebral microbleeds in the whole cohort and Alzheimer's disease ( P < 0.001). High cerebrospinal fluid/serum albumin ratios were seen with increased number of cerebral microbleeds in the brainstem ( P < 0.001). There were tendencies for increased Aβ42 levels and decreased Tau levels with deep and infratentorial cerebral microbleeds ( P < 0.05). Lobar cerebral microbleeds were associated with white matter hyperintensities and lacunes ( P < 0.001). Probable cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related cerebral microbleeds were associated with low Aβ42 levels and lacunes, whereas probable cerebral amyloid angiopathy-unrelated cerebral microbleeds were associated with white matter hyperintensities ( P < 0.001). Our findings show that cerebral microbleed distribution is associated with different patterns of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers, supporting different pathogenesis of deep/infratentorial and lobar cerebral microbleeds.

  17. Mass media influences on sexuality.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jane D

    2002-02-01

    The mainstream mass media (television, magazines, movies, music, and the Internet) provide increasingly frequent portrayals of sexuality. We still know relatively little about how this content is used and how it affects sexual beliefs and behaviors. The few available studies suggest that the media do have an impact because the media keep sexual behavior on public and personal agendas, media portrayals reinforce a relatively consistent set of sexual and relationship norms, and the media rarely depict sexually responsible models. More longitudinal research, especially with early adolescents is needed to learn more about how media content is attended to, interpreted, and incorporated into developing sexual lives.

  18. Progressive Ischemic Stroke due to Thyroid Storm-Associated Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Natsumi; Hiraoka, Eiji; Hoshino, Masataka; Deshpande, Gautam A.; Sawada, Kana; Norisue, Yasuhiro; Tsukuda, Jumpei; Suzuki, Toshihiko

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Female, 49 Final Diagnosis: Cerebral venous thrombosis Symptoms: Altered mental state • weakness in limbs Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Endocrinology and Metabolic Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare but fatal complication of hyperthyroidism that is induced by the hypercoagulable state of thyrotoxicosis. Although it is frequently difficult to diagnose CVT promptly, it is important to consider it in the differential diagnosis when a hyperthyroid patient presents with atypical neurologic symptoms. Care Report: A 49-year-old Japanese female with unremarkable medical history came in with thyroid storm and multiple progressive ischemic stroke identified at another hospital. Treatment for thyroid storm with beta-blocker, glucocorticoid, and potassium iodide-iodine was started and MR venography was performed on hospital day 3 for further evaluation of her progressive ischemic stroke. The MRI showed CVT, and anticoagulation therapy, in addition to the anti-thyroid agents, was initiated. The patient’s thyroid function was successfully stabilized by hospital day 10 and further progression of CVT was prevented. Conclusions: Physicians should consider CVT when a patient presents with atypical course of stroke or with atypical MRI findings such as high intensity area in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) mapping. Not only is an early diagnosis and initiation of anticoagulation important, but identifying and treating the underlying disease is essential to avoid the progression of CVT. PMID:28228636

  19. Antegrade cerebral perfusion at 25 °C for arch reconstruction in newborns and children preserves perioperative cerebral oxygenation and serum creatinine

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Bhawna; Dodge-Khatami, Ali; Tucker, Juan; Taylor, Mary B.; Maposa, Douglas; Urencio, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Background Antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) typically is used with deep hypothermia for cerebral protection during aortic arch reconstructions. The impact of ACP on cerebral oxygenation and serum creatinine at a more tepid 25 °C was studied in newborns and children. Methods Between 2010 and 2014, 61 newborns and children (<5 years old) underwent aortic arch reconstruction using moderate hypothermia (25.0±0.9 °C) with ACP and a pH-stat blood gas management strategy. These included 44% Norwood-type operations, 30% isolated arch reconstructions, and 26% arch reconstructions with other major procedures. Median patient age at surgery was 9 days (range, 3 days–4.7 years). Cerebral oxygenation (NIRS) was monitored continuously perioperatively for 120 hours. Serum creatinine was monitored daily. Results Median cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and cross clamp times were 181 minutes (range, 82–652 minutes) and 72 minutes (range, 10–364 minutes), respectively. ACP was performed at a mean flow rate of 46±6 mL/min/kg for a median of 48 minutes (range, 10–123 minutes). Cerebral and somatic NIRS were preserved intraoperatively and remained at baseline postoperatively during the first 120 hours. Peak postoperative serum creatinine levels averaged 0.7±0.3 mg/dL for all patients. There were 4 (6.6%) discharge mortalities. Six patients (9.8%) required ECMO support. Median postoperative length of hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) stay were 16 days(range, 4–104 days) and 9 days (range, 1–104 days), respectively. Two patients (3.3%) received short-term peritoneal dialysis for fluid removal, and none required hemodialysis. Three patients (4.9%) had an isolated seizure which resolved with medical therapy, and none had a neurologic deficit or stroke. Conclusions ACP at 25 °C preserved perioperative cerebral oxygenation and serum creatinine for newborns and children undergoing arch reconstruction. Early outcomes are encouraging, and additional study is warranted to

  20. New Insights into Eosinophilic Otitis Media.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Hiromi; Yoshida, Naohiro; Iino, Yukiko

    2015-12-01

    Eosinophilic otitis media (EOM) is a type of intractable otitis media that occurs mainly in patients with bronchial asthma (BA). In 2011, the diagnostic criteria for EOM were established. EOM is characterized by the presence of a highly viscous yellowish effusion containing eosinophils and immunoglobulin E (IgE), eosinophil chemoattractants, such as eosinophil cationic protein, interleukin-5, and eotaxin. Local sensitization against foreign agents such as fungi or bacteria (e.g., Staphylococcus aureus) may result in local IgE production in the middle ear and may be responsible for the severity of EOM. The clinical features of EOM closely resemble localized eosinophilic granulomatosis polyangiitis, therefore it is necessary to be vigilant to the symptoms of mononeuritis, polyneuritis, and skin purpura during diagnosis. Standard treatment for EOM is the instillation of triamcinolone acetonide into the mesotympanum. However, severe cases exhibiting strong inflammation and otorrhea are not easily controlled with antibiotics and/or corticosteroids. We proposed the introduction of a severity score to evaluate the severity of EOM. This score correlated with local IgE levels in middle ear effusion. Clinically, the risk factors associated with this severity score were body mass index, and the duration of bronchial asthma (from the onset of BA to the age of the first consultation of otitis media to our hospital). We emphasize that early diagnosis and adequate treatment are vital in preventing progressive and sudden hearing loss resulting from EOM.

  1. Social media: ubiquitous community and patient engagement.

    PubMed

    Thielst, Christina Beach

    2011-01-01

    The business model of healthcare is changing. Value-based purchasing and accountable care initiatives, along with reimbursement incentives and penalties, are creating pressures that are reshaping healthcare delivery approaches and care processes. And today's patients are more engaged and familiar with multimedia information technologies. This article highlights how healthcare organizations are applying social media technologies to address the challenges they face. I explore how these tools are useful for monitoring conversations, proactively resolving complaints, and facilitating transparency. I also review how these tools contribute to enhanced patient experiences and help organizations comply with meaningful use criteria, such as engaging patients and families in their care, improving quality and care coordination, and reducing disparities. The story of Louise, a virtual patient-discharge advocate, demonstrates how social media is helping providers improve health outcomes, reduce costs, and decrease rehospitalizations. Other examples highlight how one secure social networking community is helping case managers better support patients who are on the road to recovery from addiction and describe one hospital's use of a virtual world to help train staff for emergency evacuation. Social media can be used to deliver more patient-centered care and fluid care processes between patients and physicians. Combined with today's mobile technologies, it is a ubiquitous tool that can easily be applied in healthcare environments to solve today's challenges.

  2. A reappraisal of retrograde cerebral perfusion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Brain protection during aortic arch surgery by perfusing cold oxygenated blood into the superior vena cava was first reported by Lemole et al. In 1990 Ueda and associates first described the routine use of continuous retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP) in thoracic aortic surgery for the purpose of cerebral protection during the interval of obligatory interruption of anterograde cerebral flow. The beneficial effects of RCP may be its ability to sustain brain hypothermia during hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA) and removal of embolic material from the arterial circulation of the brain. RCP can offer effective brain protection during HCA for about 40 to 60 minutes. Animal experiments revealed that RCP provided inadequate cerebral perfusion and that neurological recovery was improved with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP), however, both RCP and ACP provide comparable clinical outcomes regarding both the mortality and stroke rates by risk-adjusted and case-matched comparative study. RCP still remains a valuable adjunct for brain protection during aortic arch repair in particular pathologies and patients. PMID:23977600

  3. Mechanisms of Astrocyte-Mediated Cerebral Edema

    PubMed Central

    Stokum, Jesse A.; Kurland, David B.; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J. Marc

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral edema formation stems from disruption of blood brain barrier (BBB) integrity and occurs after injury to the CNS. Due to the restrictive skull, relatively small increases in brain volume can translate into impaired tissue perfusion and brain herniation. In excess, cerebral edema can be gravely harmful. Astrocytes are key participants in cerebral edema by virtue of their relationship with the cerebral vasculature, their unique compliment of solute and water transport proteins, and their general role in brain volume homeostasis. Following the discovery of aquaporins, passive conduits of water flow, aquaporin 4 (AQP4) was identified as the predominant astrocyte water channel. Normally, AQP4 is highly enriched at perivascular endfeet, the outermost layer of the BBB, whereas after injury, AQP4 expression disseminates to the entire astrocytic plasmalemma, a phenomenon termed dysregulation. Arguably, the most important role of AQP4 is to rapidly neutralize osmotic gradients generated by ionic transporters. In pathological conditions, AQP4 is believed to be intimately involved in the formation and clearance of cerebral edema. In this review, we discuss aquaporin function and localization in the BBB during health and injury, and we examine post-injury ionic events that modulate AQP4- dependent edema formation. PMID:24996934

  4. Cerebral infarction pattern in tuberculous meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Mei-Ling Sharon; Viswanathan, Shanthi; Rahmat, Kartini; Nor, Hazman Mohd; Kadir, Khairul Azmi Abdul; Goh, Khean Jin; Ramli, Norlisah; Bakar, Fatimah Kamila Abu; Zain, Norzaini Rose Mohd; Yap, Jun Fai; Ong, Beng Hooi; Rafia, Mohd Hanip; Tan, Chong Tin

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) causes significant morbidity and mortality. The primary objective was to re-examine the concept of “TB zone” and “ischaemic zone” in cerebral infarction in patients with tuberculous meningitis. The secondary objective was to evaluate cerebral infarction, vasculitis and vasospasm in tuberculous meningitis infections. Between 2009 and 2014, TBM patients were recruited. Neuroimaging was performed and findings of cerebral infarction, vasculitis and vasospasm were recorded. Infarcts were classified based on arterial supply and Hsieh’s classification. Fifty-one TBM patients were recruited of whom 34 patients (67%) had cerebral infarction. Based on Hsieh’s classification, 20 patients (59%) had infarcts in both “TB zone” and “ischaemic zones”. 12 patients (35%) had infarcts in “ischaemic zone” and two (6%) patients had infarcts in “TB zone”. In terms of vascular supply, almost all patients (35/36) had infarcts involving perforators and cortical branches. 25 patients (73%) and 14 patients (41%) had infarcts supplied by lateral lenticulostriate and medial lenticulostriate arteries respectively. 15 patients (37%) had vasculitis. Vasospasm was present in six patients (15%). 29 patients (85%) with cerebral infarction also had leptomeningeal enhancement (p = 0.002). In summary, infarcts involved mainly perforators and cortical branches, rather than “TB zone” versus “ischaemic zone”. PMID:27958312

  5. Effects of desflurane on cerebral autoregulation.

    PubMed

    Bedforth, N M; Girling, K J; Skinner, H J; Mahajan, R P

    2001-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of desflurane, at 1 and 1.5 MAC, on cerebral autoregulation. Data were analysed from eight patients undergoing non-neurosurgical procedure. The blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery was measured by transcranial Doppler ultrasound and cerebral autoregulation was assessed by the transient hyperaemic response test. Partial pressure of the end-tidal carbon dioxide (PE'(CO(2))) and mean arterial pressure were measured throughout the study. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol and was maintained with desflurane at end-tidal concentrations of 7.4% (1 MAC) or 10.8% (1.5 MAC). The order of administration of the desflurane concentrations was determined randomly and a period of 15 min was allowed for equilibration at each concentration. The transient hyperaemic response tests were performed before induction of anaesthesia and after equilibration with each concentration of desflurane. An infusion of phenylephrine was used to maintain pre-induction mean arterial pressure and ventilation was adjusted to maintain the pre-induction value of PE'(CO(2)) throughout the study. Two indices derived from the transient hyperaemic response test (the transient hyperaemic response ratio and the strength of autoregulation) were used to assess cerebral autoregulation. Desflurane resulted in a marked and significant impairment in cerebral autoregulation; at concentrations of 1.5 MAC, autoregulation was almost abolished.

  6. Cerebral Vascular Injury in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Kimbra; Amyot, Franck; Haber, Margalit; Pronger, Angela; Bogoslovsky, Tanya; Moore, Carol; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic cerebral vascular injury (TCVI) is a very frequent, if not universal, feature after traumatic brain injury (TBI). It is likely responsible, at least in part, for functional deficits and TBI-related chronic disability. Because there are multiple pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapies that promote vascular health, TCVI is an attractive target for therapeutic intervention after TBI. The cerebral microvasculature is a component of the neurovascular unit (NVU) coupling neuronal metabolism with local cerebral blood flow. The NVU participates in the pathogenesis of TBI, either directly from physical trauma or as part of the cascade of secondary injury that occurs after TBI. Pathologically, there is extensive cerebral microvascular injury in humans and experimental animal, identified with either conventional light microscopy or ultrastructural examination. It is seen in acute and chronic TBI, and even described in chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Non-invasive, physiologic measures of cerebral microvascular function show dysfunction after TBI in humans and experimental animal models of TBI. These include imaging sequences (MRI-ASL), Transcranial Doppler (TCD), and Near InfraRed Spectroscopy (NIRS). Understanding the pathophysiology of TCVI, a relatively under-studied component of TBI, has promise for the development of novel therapies for TBI.

  7. [A Case of Ruptured Peripheral Cerebral Aneurysm at Abnormal Vessels Associated with Middle Cerebral Artery Stenosis:Similarity to Moyamoya Disease].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Hajime; Kohno, Kanehisa; Tanaka, Hideo; Fukumoto, Shinya; Ichikawa, Haruhisa; Onoue, Shinji; Fumoto, Noriyuki; Ozaki, Saya; Maeda, Toshiharu

    2016-04-01

    We report a case of ruptured peripheral cerebral aneurysm at abnormal vessels associated with severe stenosis at the middle cerebral artery (MCA). A 66-year-old woman was admitted at our hospital with headache on foot. Computed tomography (CT) showed intracerebral hemorrhage in the left fronto-basal area. Three-dimensional-CT and conventional angiogram revealed abnormal vessels, which were similar to those seen in moyamoya disease, with a small enhancement close to the hematoma. On day 11, subsequent cerebral angiogram demonstrated an aneurysm at the peripheral portion of an abnormal vessel arising from the left A2. On day 17, soon after the diagnosis of the ruptured aneurysm was made (while still at the subacute stage), we operated on the aneurysm. Superficial temporal artery (STA)-MCA anastomosis was also performed to preserve cerebral blood flow and reduce hemodynamic stress. Several days after the operation, she had transient aphasia due to hyperperfusion of the MCA territory, but eventually recovered with no neurological deficit at discharge. Follow-up study revealed revascularization from the branches of the external carotid artery as well as the STA. On admission, we initially thought that this patient had abnormal vessels associated with arteriosclerotic MCA stenosis. However, the postoperative clinical course as well as the histopathological specimens of both the abnormal artery with the aneurysm and the STA revealed similar findings to those of moyamoya disease. Although this case did not satisfy the criteria for moyamoya disease, it is conceivable that a single arterial occlusive lesion associated with moyamoya-like vessels might develop in the same mechanism with that of moyamoya disease.

  8. Library Media Services Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winnipeg School Div. Number 1, Manitoba (Canada).

    This 1991 edition of the handbook for Winnipeg School Division Number 1 school library media programs presents detailed program guidelines, objectives, philosophies, and goals in five major sections: (1) Library Policy and Practices (statement of the division's educational philosophy and goals, philosophy and goals of the division's library…

  9. Cyberbullying via Social Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittaker, Elizabeth; Kowalski, Robin M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed a surge of research on cyberbullying. In this article, three studies examined prevalence rates of cyberbullying among college-age students, venues through which cyberbullying occurs, with a particular focus on social media, and perceptions of cyberbullying as a function of features of the target (e.g., peer, celebrity,…

  10. The Media in China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howkins, John

    1980-01-01

    Provides a brief history of television and radio in China and describes the use of television, radio, and film there, noting the number of television sets, radios, public loudspeakers, and cinemas. Article is comprised of extracts from the author's 193-page publication "China Media Industry Report 1980." (JD)

  11. Teleconferencing and Interactive Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Lorne A., Comp.; Olgren, Christine H., Comp.

    This publication contains more than 50 papers on the latest developments and applications of interactive media to link distant locations. The contributors, who represent business, government, education, medical, and telecommunications organizations in the United States, Canada, England, and Australia, have had direct experience with the full range…

  12. Media and Risky Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escobar-Chaves, Soledad Liliana; Anderson, Craig A.

    2008-01-01

    Liliana Escobar-Chaves and Craig Anderson investigate two important trends among American youth and examine the extent to which the two trends might be related. First, the authors note that U.S. youth are spending increasing amounts of time using electronic media, with the average American youngster now spending one-third of each day with some…

  13. Basic Media in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrell, John

    Intended as a guide to the use of different media for use in the classroom, this document demonstrates alternative approaches that may be taken to depicting and communicating images and concepts to others. Some basic tools and materials--including a ruler, matte knife, rubber cement, stapler, felt-tip pens, paint brushes, and lettering pens--are…

  14. Media Specialist's Corner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrini, Michelle; Kittlaus, Jennifer

    2001-01-01

    Presents resources relating to this issue of "Insights on Law and Society" that are intended for students, teachers, and school library media specialists. Includes resources, such as primary documents for students, Web sites, Supreme Court cases, books, an online article, and lessons. (CMK)

  15. Media Specialist's Corner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrini, Michelle; Kittlaus, Jennifer

    2002-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography of resources for students, teachers, and school library media specialists related to the topic, "Youth, Rights, and the Constitution," found in this issue of "Insights on Law and Society." Includes books and primary sources for students. (CMK)

  16. Photochemistry in Organized Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fendler, Janos H.

    1983-01-01

    Describes common artificially produced organized media such as colloids, surfactants, and polymers and their usefulness in studying complex biochemical processes. Discusses selected recent photophysical and photochemical exploitations of these systems, including artificial photosynthesis, in situ generation of colloidal gold and platinum,…

  17. The Indian Media Scenario.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eapen, K. E.

    As background information for a discussion of India's communication system and its potential for social change, this paper briefly describes the country's physical characteristics, some of its cultural heritage and demographics, and the development of its education and railways. After a discussion of the folk media (traditional changes) of…

  18. THE EDUCATIONAL MEDIA INDEX.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Media Council, Inc., New York, NY.

    THIS 14-VOLUME SERIES INCLUDES TITLES AND DESCRIPTIONS FOR ALL CURRENT AND GENERALLY AVAILABLE EDUCATIONAL MEDIA, EXCLUDING STANDARD PRINT MATERIALS. EACH VOLUME COVERS A SPECIFIC SUBJECT AREA, LISTS TITLES ALPHABETICALLY AND BY SUBJECT, DESCRIBES EACH ENTRY, AND LISTS NAMES AND ADDRESSES OF SOURCES FOR THE MATERIALS. VOLUME 14 IS A CUMULATIVE…

  19. The Media Works.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdes, Joan; Crow, Jeanne

    This student text and activity book provides information on and suggests ways to examine seven of the mass media: movies, television, advertising, magazines, comics, radio, and newspapers. Much of the learning takes place by actual examination of actual products to learn characteristics common to them. The first section investigates the process of…

  20. Mass Media and Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Alan

    Designed to serve as a basic text for general liberal arts courses in mass communication, this book presents essays, largely from recent magazine articles, written from the layman (although there are a few more overtly scholarly articles). It begins with an examination of the media industries in the United States, treating them as complex…

  1. Contextualised Media for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Jong, Tim; Specht, Marcus; Koper, Rob

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we analyse how contextualised media can be used to support learning. Additionally, the advantages of contextualised learning and the types of learning that are fit to be supported are discussed. Our focus throughout the paper will be on lifelong learning, and the integration of formal and informal learning therein. However, we…

  2. Archive Storage Media Alternatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranade, Sanjay

    1990-01-01

    Reviews requirements for a data archive system and describes storage media alternatives that are currently available. Topics discussed include data storage; data distribution; hierarchical storage architecture, including inline storage, online storage, nearline storage, and offline storage; magnetic disks; optical disks; conventional magnetic…

  3. Media Matters in Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Kell

    1998-01-01

    Describes how a teacher helped transform a K-12 Christian school near Sydney, Australia, from a book-bound media studies program into a hands-on learning experience for students. Various projects allow students to operate advanced equipment, evaluate their own and their peers' work, present research results to the class, and produce live media…

  4. New-Media Literacies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohler, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Being literate in a real-world sense means being able to read and write using the media forms of the day, whatever they may be. For centuries, consuming and producing words through reading and writing and, to a lesser extent, listening and speaking were sufficient. But because of inexpensive, easy-to-use, and widely available new tools, literacy…

  5. Educational Media Yearbook 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, James W., Ed.

    This collection of articles brings together the historical, statistical, and factual data needed to lend perspective to the attempt to understand the past and foresee the future of educational media. Coinciding with the 50th anniversary of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology, the Yearbook stresses the need for cooperation…

  6. Media Literacy: Good News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenner, Adam; Rivera, Sheryl

    2007-01-01

    Media has always had the power to affect people on a nonverbal and emotional level. At its best, it can be a source of aesthetic pleasure and deep personal satisfaction. At its worst, citizens and consumers are exposed to psychological and political manipulation which may make them anxious and depressed, dissatisfied with what they have,…

  7. Looking at Mass Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sive, Mary Robinson

    1979-01-01

    This article offers a bibliography of recent inexpensive filmstrips, slide sets, and study prints that can expand students' awareness of such issues as psychic manipulation in TV commercials, the intrusion of show biz into news reporting, and the role of the advertiser in determining media content. (Editor/SJL)

  8. Language and the Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Allan

    1995-01-01

    Reviews recent research on the use of language in the mass media, focusing on the work of Teun van Dijk, A. Bell, Roger Fowler, and Norman Fairclough, as well as research on broadcast interviews, talk shows, and advertising. An annotated bibliography discusses 16 important works in the field. (58 references) (MDM)

  9. English in Indian Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khubchandani, Lachman M.

    2000-01-01

    Examines the use of English in urban India, with specific focus on the three domains of mass media, print, television, and advertising. Points to the emergence of Angrezi, which can potentially take a divergent path as an Ausbau language different from the global English. Brings under discussion interesting examples of bilingual and biscriptal…

  10. Microphones and Educational Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Marilyn

    This paper describes the types of microphones that are available for use in media production. Definitions of 16 words and phrases used to describe microphones are followed by detailed descriptions of the two kinds of microphones as classified by mode of operation, i.e., velocity, or ribbon microphones, and pressure operated microphones, which…

  11. Media Now: A Historical Review of a Media Literacy Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friesem, Yonty; Quaglia, Diane; Crane, Ed

    2014-01-01

    The Elizabeth Thoman Archive at the Harrington School of Communication and Media, University of Rhode Island, has the last complete kit of one of the milestones in the early chronology of media literacy, the 1972 Media Now curriculum. This curriculum was the first of its kind, using self-contained lesson modules that were part of a larger series…

  12. Need for Orientation, Media Uses and Gratifications, and Media Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, David

    In order to study the influence of need for orientation and media gratifications on media use and media effects in political communication, two previous surveys were studied to compare the causal modeling approach and the contingent conditions approach. In the first study, 339 personal interviews were conducted with registered voters during a…

  13. Media, Media Technologies, and Language Learning: Some Applied Linguistic Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, David

    An applied linguistic framework is presented within which specific applications of media technologies may be applied to language learning. The first two parts of the paper focus on the impact of media on linguistic communication and the possibilities offered by media technologies such as newspapers, radio, television, telephone/telex, computer…

  14. Obesity in Pregnancy Tied to Cerebral Palsy Risk in Kids

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_163962.html Obesity in Pregnancy Tied to Cerebral Palsy Risk in Kids But study authors stress that ... chances that their baby could be born with cerebral palsy, a new study suggests. Researchers looked at information ...

  15. Attitudes and Needs of Parents of Cerebral Palsied Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knott, Gladys P.

    1979-01-01

    The article reviews the literature in the following five areas of concern for parents of cerebral palsied children: causes and effects of cerebral palsy, family dynamics, counseling, educational and vocational programs, and employment. (PHR)

  16. Hospitals' Internal Accountability

    PubMed Central

    Kraetschmer, Nancy; Jass, Janak; Woodman, Cheryl; Koo, Irene; Kromm, Seija K.; Deber, Raisa B.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to enhance understanding of the dimensions of accountability captured and not captured in acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Based on an Ontario-wide survey and follow-up interviews with three acute care hospitals in the Greater Toronto Area, we found that the two dominant dimensions of hospital accountability being reported are financial and quality performance. These two dimensions drove both internal and external reporting. Hospitals' internal reports typically included performance measures that were required or mandated in external reports. Although respondents saw reporting as a valuable mechanism for hospitals and the health system to monitor and track progress against desired outcomes, multiple challenges with current reporting requirements were communicated, including the following: 58% of survey respondents indicated that performance-reporting resources were insufficient; manual data capture and performance reporting were prevalent, with the majority of hospitals lacking sophisticated tools or technology to effectively capture, analyze and report performance data; hospitals tended to focus on those processes and outcomes with high measurability; and 53% of respondents indicated that valuable cross-system accountability, performance measures or both were not captured by current reporting requirements. PMID:25305387

  17. Hypothermia reduces cerebral metabolic rate and cerebral blood flow in newborn pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Busija, D.W.; Leffler, C.W. )

    1987-10-01

    The authors examined effects of hypothermia on cerebral metabolic rate and cerebral blood flow in anesthetized, newborn pigs (1-4 days old). Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was determined with 15-{mu}m radioactive microspheres. Regional CBF ranged from 44 to 66 ml{center dot}min{sup {minus}1}{center dot}100 g{sup {minus}1}, and cerebral metabolic rate was 1.94 {plus minus} 0.23 ml O{sub 2}{center dot}100 g{sup {minus}1}{center dot}min{sup {minus}1} during normothermia (39{degree}C). Reduction of rectal temperature to 34-35{degree}C decreased CBF and cerebral metabolic rate 40-50%. In another group of piglets, they examined responsiveness of the cerebral circulation to arterial hypercapnia during hypothermia. Although absolute values for normocapnic and hypercapnic CBF were reduced by hypothermia and absolute values for normocapnic and hypercapnic cerebrovascular resistance were increased, the percentage changes from control in these variables during hypercapnia were similar during normothermia and hypothermia. In another group of animals that were maintained normothermic and exposed to two episodes of hypercapnia, there was no attenuation of cerebrovascular dilation during the second episode. They conclude that hypothermia reduces CBF secondarily to a decrease in cerebral metabolic rate and that percent dilator responsiveness to arterial hypercapnia is unaltered when body temperature is reduced.

  18. Children and the Mass Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winston, Shirley

    1970-01-01

    Resume of testimony given at hearings at the White House Conference on Children, September, 1970. Topics considered were the influence of the mass media on children and ways to improve media products. (NH)

  19. Demography and the Mass Media.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    discussion of demography, its history, methodology and limitations, followed by a review of communications theory as it applies to the mass media . The...interrelations among the mass media , the government, and target audiences are demonstrated. (Modified author abstract)

  20. Multiple medullary venous malformations decreasing cerebral blood flow: Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Tomura, N.; Inugami, A.; Uemura, K.; Hadeishi, H.; Yasui, N. )

    1991-02-01

    A rare case of multiple medullary venous malformations in the right cerebral hemisphere is reported. The literature review yielded only one case of multiple medullary venous malformations. Computed tomography scan showed multiple calcified lesions with linear contrast enhancement representing abnormal dilated vessels and mild atrophic change of the right cerebral hemisphere. Single-photon emission computed tomography using N-isopropyl-p-({sup 123}I) iodoamphetamine demonstrated decreased cerebral blood flow in the right cerebral hemisphere.

  1. Acute Cardioembolic Cerebral Infarction: Answers to Clinical Questions*

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià; Alió, Josefina

    2012-01-01

    Cardioembolic cerebral infarction (CI) is the most severe subtype of ischaemic stroke but some clinical aspects of this condition are still unclear. This article provides the reader with an overview and up-date of relevant aspects related to clinical features, specific cardiac disorders and prognosis of CI. CI accounts for 14−30% of ischemic strokes; patients with CI are prone to early and long-term stroke recurrence, although recurrences may be preventable by appropriate treatment during the acute phase and strict control at follow-up. Certain clinical features are suggestive of CI, including sudden onset to maximal deficit, decreased level of consciousness at onset, Wernicke’s aphasia or global aphasia without hemiparesis, a Valsalva manoeuvre at the time of stroke onset, and co-occurrence of cerebral and systemic emboli. Lacunar clinical presentations, a lacunar infarct and especially multiple lacunar infarcts, make cardioembolic origin unlikely. The most common disorders associated with a high risk of cardioembolism include atrial fibrillation, recent myocardial infarction, mechanical prosthetic valve, dilated myocardiopathy and mitral rheumatic stenosis. Patent foramen ovale and complex atheromatosis of the aortic arch are potentially emerging sources of cardioembolic infarction. Mitral annular calcification can be a marker of complex aortic atheroma in stroke patients of unkown etiology. Transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiogram can disclose structural heart diseases. Paroxysmal atrial dysrhyhtmia can be detected by Holter monitoring. Magnetic resonance imaging, transcranial Doppler, and electrophysiological studies are useful to document the source of cardioembolism. In-hospital mortality in cardioembolic stroke (27.3%, in our series) is the highest as compared with other subtypes of cerebral infarction. Secondary prevention with anticoagulants should be started immediately if possible in patients at high risk for recurrent cardioembolic stroke in

  2. Hospital service recovery.

    PubMed

    Gutbezahl, Cary; Haan, Perry

    2006-01-01

    An organization's ability to correct service errors is an important factor in achieving success in today's service economy. This paper examines service recovery in hospitals in the U.S. First is a general review of service recovery theories. Next is a discussion of specific service issues related to the hospital environment. The literature on service recovery is used to make specific recommendations to hospitals for ways to improve their ability to remedy service errors when they occur. Suggestions for future research in the field of service recovery are also made.

  3. Predicting hospital accounting costs

    PubMed Central

    Newhouse, Joseph P.; Cretin, Shan; Witsberger, Christina J.

    1989-01-01

    Two alternative methods to Medicare Cost Reports that provide information about hospital costs more promptly but less accurately are investigated. Both employ utilization data from current-year bills. The first attaches costs to utilization data using cost-charge ratios from the previous year's cost report; the second uses charges from current year's bills. The first method is the more accurate of the two, but even using it, only 40 percent of hospitals had predicted costs within plus or minus 5 percent of actual costs. The feasibility and cost of obtaining cost reports from a small, fast-track sample of hospitals should be investigated. PMID:10313352

  4. [Chronic cerebral ischemia associated with Raynaud's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Putilina, M V

    2015-01-01

    Over the last years, a number of patients with chronic cerebral ischemia has been increased significantly. Compensatory possibilities of the brain and cerebral circulatory system are so great that even serious disturbances of blood circulation could not cause clinical signs of brain dysfunction for a long time. At the same time, long-term ischemia can lead to peripheral local disturbances of microcirculation that is appears to be a first signal of the problems with homeostasis. Therefore, Raynaud's syndrome may be one of the predictors of standard symptoms of chronic cerebral ischemia (CCI). This phenomenon is explicitly considered as a sign of blood circulation impairment while the pathogenetic mechanism of vascular arterial bed instability is completely ignored. Detailed study of clinical correlations of Raynaud's syndrome in CCI would help to develop a common pharmacotherapeutic approach to its treatment.

  5. [Does cerebral salt wasting syndrome exist?].

    PubMed

    Leblanc, P-E; Cheisson, G; Geeraerts, T; Tazarourte, K; Duranteau, J; Vigué, B

    2007-11-01

    Increased natriuresis is a frequent situation after subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). It may be responsible for hyponatremia, which can be dangerous in case of severe hypo-osmolarity or hypovolemia. Inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone or cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSWS) have been incriminated for hyponatremia after SAH, but it remains difficult to distinguish between both syndromes. There are many explanations for increased natriuresis after SAH, depending on the level of blood pressure, the volemia, and the presence or not of natriuretic peptides. The cerebral insult and the treatments, which are done to fight against elevated intracranial pressure or vasospasm, can modify any of these parameters. So it appears that the word "cerebral" in CSWS is probably not a good term and it would be better to talk about appropriate or non-appropriate natriuretic response. Corticoïds or urea can be useful for controlling hypernatriuresis.

  6. Cerebral blood flow variations in CNS lupus

    SciTech Connect

    Kushner, M.J.; Tobin, M.; Fazekas, F.; Chawluk, J.; Jamieson, D.; Freundlich, B.; Grenell, S.; Freemen, L.; Reivich, M. )

    1990-01-01

    We studied the patterns of cerebral blood flow (CBF), over time, in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and varying neurologic manifestations including headache, stroke, psychosis, and encephalopathy. For 20 paired xenon-133 CBF measurements, CBF was normal during CNS remissions, regardless of the symptoms. CBF was significantly depressed during CNS exacerbations. The magnitude of change in CBF varied with the neurologic syndrome. CBF was least affected in patients with nonspecific symptoms such as headache or malaise, whereas patients with encephalopathy or psychosis exhibited the greatest reductions in CBF. In 1 patient with affective psychosis, without clinical or CT evidence of cerebral ischemia, serial SPECT studies showed resolution of multifocal cerebral perfusion defects which paralleled clinical recovery.

  7. Assessment of the hand in cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Praveen; Sabapathy, S. Raja

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is the musculoskeletal manifestation of a nonprogressive central nervous system lesion that usually occurs due to a perinatal insult to the brain. Though the cerebral insult is static the musculoskeletal pathology is progressive. Some patients with cerebral palsy whose hands are affected can be made better by surgery. The surgical procedures as such are not very technically demanding but the assessment, decision-making, and selecting the procedures for the given patient make this field challenging. When done well, the results are rewarding not only in terms of improvement in hand function but also in appearance and personal hygiene, which leads to better self-image and permits better acceptance in the society. This article focuses on the clinical examination, patient selection, and decision-making while managing these patients. PMID:22022045

  8. Data Mining in Social Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbier, Geoffrey; Liu, Huan

    The rise of online social media is providing a wealth of social network data. Data mining techniques provide researchers and practitioners the tools needed to analyze large, complex, and frequently changing social media data. This chapter introduces the basics of data mining, reviews social media, discusses how to mine social media data, and highlights some illustrative examples with an emphasis on social networking sites and blogs.

  9. A Case of Cerebral Sinus Venous Thrombosis Resulting in Mortality in Severe Preeclamptic Pregnant Woman

    PubMed Central

    Soydinc, Hatice Ender; Ozler, Ali; Evsen, Mehmet Sıddık; Sak, Muhammet Erdal; Basaranoglu, Serdar; Dusak, Abdurrahim; Cetincakmak, Mehmet Guli

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is a rarely encountered condition during pregnancy. A 21-year-old pregnant woman with labour pains was hospitalized in our clinic. Diagnosis of severe preeclampsia was made based on her clinical and laboratory findings. She suffered from convulsive episodes during postpartum period which lead to initiation of treatment for eclampsia. However neurological and radiological examinations were performed after emergence of additional neurological symptoms disclosed the diagnosis of CVST. In this paper, we aimed to present a case with CVST which diagnosis was confused with eclampsia and resulting in maternal mortality. PMID:23509646

  10. Infarctions in the vascular territory of the posterior cerebral artery: clinical features in 232 patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ischemic stroke caused by infarction in the territory of the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) has not been studied as extensively as infarctions in other vascular territories. This single centre, retrospective clinical study was conducted a) to describe salient characteristics of stroke patients with PCA infarction, b) to compare data of these patients with those with ischaemic stroke due to middle cerebral artery (MCA) and anterior cerebral artery (ACA) infarctions, and c) to identify predictors of PCA stroke. Findings A total of 232 patients with PCA stroke were included in the "Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona Stroke Registry" during a period of 19 years (1986-2004). Data from stroke patients are entered in the stroke registry following a standardized protocol with 161 items regarding demographics, risk factors, clinical features, laboratory and neuroimaging data, complications and outcome. The characteristics of these 232 patients with PCA stroke were compared with those of the 1355 patients with MCA infarctions and 51 patients with ACA infarctions included in the registry. Infarctions of the PCA accounted for 6.8% of all cases of stroke (n = 3808) and 9.6% of cerebral infarctions (n = 2704). Lacunar infarction was the most frequent stroke subtype (34.5%) followed by atherothrombotic infarction (29.3%) and cardioembolic infarction (21.6%). In-hospital mortality was 3.9% (n = 9). Forty-five patients (19.4%) were symptom-free at hospital discharge. Hemianopia (odds ratio [OR] = 6.43), lacunar stroke subtype (OR = 2.18), symptom-free at discharge (OR = 1.92), limb weakness (OR = 0.10), speech disorders (OR = 0.33) and cardioembolism (OR = 0.65) were independent variables of PCA stroke in comparison with MCA infarction, whereas sensory deficit (OR = 2.36), limb weakness (OR = 0.11) and cardioembolism as stroke mechanism (OR = 0.43) were independent variables associated with PCA stroke in comparison with ACA infarction. Conclusions Lacunar stroke is the

  11. Cerebral Salt-wasting Syndrome and Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone Syndrome after Subarachnoid Hemorrhaging.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hanako; Okada, Hiroshi; Hirose, Kazuki; Murakami, Toru; Shiotsu, Yayoi; Kadono, Mayuko; Inoue, Mamoru; Hasegawa, Goji

    2017-01-01

    Hyponatremia is a common finding after subarachnoid hemorrhaging (SAH) and can be caused by either cerebral salt-wasting syndrome (CSWS) or syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). Distinguishing between these two entities can be difficult because they have similar manifestations, including hyponatremia, serum hypo-osmolality, and high urine osmolality. We herein report the case of a 60-year-old man who suffered from SAH complicated by hyponatremia. During his initial hospitalization, he was diagnosed with CSWS. He was readmitted one week later with hyponatremia and was diagnosed with SIADH. This is the first report of SAH causing CSWS followed by SIADH. These two different sources of hyponatremia require different treatments.

  12. Best strategy for cerebral protection in arch surgery - antegrade selective cerebral perfusion and adequate hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Friedrich W.; Etz, Christian D.

    2013-01-01

    Aortic arch surgery remains a complex surgical operation that necessitates specific neuroprotection strategies. Various approaches, such as hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA), retrograde cerebral perfusion, and antegrade selective cerebral perfusion (aSCP), have each enjoyed periods of popularity. However, while the overall surgical approach tend to favour HCA with aSCP, technical factors, such as perfusion site, perfusate temperature and flow rate and pH management, have not been conclusively elucidated. The optimal extent of hypothermia during circulatory arrest is also unclear, particularly with recent partiality for warmer temperatures. The following perspective details the preferred surgical practice for cerebral protection in aortic arch surgery, based on existing evidence. PMID:23977602

  13. Mental Imagery Abilities in Adolescents with Spastic Diplegic Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courbois, Yanick; Coello, Yann; Bouchart, Isabelle

    2004-01-01

    Four visual imagery tasks were presented to three groups of adolescents with or without spastic diplegic cerebral palsy. The first group was composed of six adolescents with cerebral palsy who had associated visual-perceptual deficits (CP-PD), the second group was composed of five adolescents with cerebral palsy and no associated visual-perceptual…

  14. Ruptured Intracranial Dermoid Cyst Associated with Rupture of Cerebral Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Hong

    2011-01-01

    Many tumors have been reported to coexist with cerebral aneurysm. However, intracranial dermoid cysts associated with cerebral aneurysm are very rare. We report a case in which rupture of a cerebral aneurysm resulted in a ruptured dermoid cyst. We present this interesting case and review current literature about the relationship between tumors and aneurysm formation. PMID:22259693

  15. Auditory Selective Attention in Cerebral-Palsied Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laraway, Lee Ann

    1985-01-01

    To examine differences between auditory selective attention abilities of normal and cerebral-palsied individuals, 23 cerebral-palsied and 23 normal subjects (5-21) were asked to repeat a series of 30 items in presence of intermittent white noise. Results indicated that cerebral-palsied individuals perform significantly more poorly when the…

  16. Cerebral microbleeds in a neonatal rat model

    PubMed Central

    Carusillo Theriault, Brianna; Woo, Seung Kyoon; Karimy, Jason K.; Keledjian, Kaspar; Stokum, Jesse A.; Sarkar, Amrita; Coksaygan, Turhan; Ivanova, Svetlana; Gerzanich, Volodymyr

    2017-01-01

    Background In adult humans, cerebral microbleeds play important roles in neurodegenerative diseases but in neonates, the consequences of cerebral microbleeds are unknown. In rats, a single pro-angiogenic stimulus in utero predisposes to cerebral microbleeds after birth at term, a time when late oligodendrocyte progenitors (pre-oligodendrocytes) dominate in the rat brain. We hypothesized that two independent pro-angiogenic stimuli in utero would be associated with a high likelihood of perinatal microbleeds that would be severely damaging to white matter. Methods Pregnant Wistar rats were subjected to intrauterine ischemia (IUI) and low-dose maternal lipopolysaccharide (mLPS) at embryonic day (E) 19. Pups were born vaginally or abdominally at E21-22. Brains were evaluated for angiogenic markers, microhemorrhages, myelination and axonal development. Neurological function was assessed out to 6 weeks. Results mRNA (Vegf, Cd31, Mmp2, Mmp9, Timp1, Timp2) and protein (CD31, MMP2, MMP9) for angiogenic markers, in situ proteolytic activity, and collagen IV immunoreactivity were altered, consistent with an angiogenic response. Vaginally delivered pups exposed to prenatal IUI+mLPS had spontaneous cerebral microbleeds, abnormal neurological function, and dysmorphic, hypomyelinated white matter and axonopathy. Pups exposed to the same pro-angiogenic stimuli in utero but delivered abdominally had minimal cerebral microbleeds, preserved myelination and axonal development, and neurological function similar to naïve controls. Conclusions In rats, pro-angiogenic stimuli in utero can predispose to vascular fragility and lead to cerebral microbleeds. The study of microbleeds in the neonatal rat brain at full gestation may give insights into the consequences of microbleeds in human preterm infants during critical periods of white matter development. PMID:28158198

  17. [Old picture postcards depicting hospital wards--puzzling similarities].

    PubMed

    Schretlen, Ignace

    2013-01-01

    Picture postcards were as popular in the beginning of the twentieth century as social media is today. Hospital wards were also depicted on them. It is curious to note the similarities between these pictures. This can be explained by developments in the architecture of hospitals. This architecture underwent radical changes in the second half of the nineteenth century: to prevent complications caused by infections, patients were cared for in pavilions. Light, clean air and space did indeed result in a considerable reduction of these complications. The prototype of such a pavilion in the Charité Hospital in Berlin was brought to fruition in many countries. This explains the remarkable uniformity of hospital wards found on old picture postcards.

  18. Improved media performance in optimally coupled exchange spring layer media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, A.; Supper, N.; Ikeda, Y.; Lengsfield, B.; Moser, A.; Fullerton, E. E.

    2008-09-01

    We have studied the recording performance of perpendicular exchange spring layer (ESL)-media for hard disk drive recording. In particular, we investigated the role of interlayer coupling by varying the thickness of a nonmagnetic coupling layer (CL). We demonstrate that not only the media writeability is improved upon optimizing the CL thickness, but also that substantial recording performance improvements can be achieved due to improved media noise properties. The potential of these media structures for high areal density recording is demonstrated by performing areal density measurements, which showed a substantial improvement for optimally coupled ESL-media.

  19. [Media for 21st century--towards human communication media].

    PubMed

    Harashima, H

    2000-05-01

    Today, with the approach of the 21st century, attention is focused on multi-media communications combining computer, visual and audio technologies. This article discusses the communication media target and the technological problems constituting the nucleus of multi-media. The communication media is becoming an environment from which no one can escape. Since the media has such a great power, what is needed now is not to predict the future technologies, but to estimate the future world and take to responsibility for future environments.

  20. Comparison of effects of equiosmolar doses of mannitol and hypertonic saline on cerebral blood flow and metabolism in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Cottenceau, Vincent; Masson, Francoise; Mahamid, Eugenia; Petit, Laurent; Shik, Venyamin; Sztark, Francois; Zaaroor, Menashe; Soustiel, Jean Francois

    2011-10-01

    The potential superiority of hypertonic saline (HTS) over mannitol (MTL) for control of intracranial pressure (ICP) following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is still debated. Forty-seven severe TBI patients with increased ICP were prospectively recruited in two university hospitals and randomly treated with equiosmolar infusions of either MTL 20% (4 mL/kg; n=25 patients) or HTS 7.5% (2 mL/kg; n=22 patients). Serum sodium, hematocrit, ICP, arterial blood pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), shear rate, global indices of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism were measured before, and 30 and 120 min following each infusion during the course of illness. Outcome was assessed at 6 months. Both HTS and MTL effectively and equally reduced ICP levels with subsequent elevation of CPP and CBF, although this effect was significantly stronger and of longer duration after HTS and correlated with improved rheological blood properties induced by HTS. Further, effect of HTS on ICP appeared to be more robust in patients with diffuse brain injury. In contrast, oxygen and glucose metabolic rates were left equally unaffected by both solutions. Accordingly, there was no significant difference in neurological outcome between the two groups. In conclusion, MTL was as effective as HTS in decreasing ICP in TBI patients although both solutions failed to improved cerebral metabolism. HTS showed an additional and stronger effect on cerebral perfusion of potential benefit in the presence of cerebral ischemia. Treatment selection should therefore be individually based on sodium level and cerebral hemodynamics.

  1. The Impact of Mass Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldrich, Pearl G.

    In order to bring the student's contemporary environment into the classroom for study and to avoid topicality, this book provides general principles by which to evaluate current media offerings, outlines the patterns from which media materials are cut for public consumption, and focuses the student's attention on the mass media themselves. Each of…

  2. Media Literacy. Technical Assistance Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Join Together, Boston, MA.

    The media play an increasingly strong role in transmitting values; behaviors; social norms; attitudes; and knowledge to youth and adults. Media literacy involves the ability to ask questions about what is watched, heard, or read. It involves learning what to look for, what to ask, and how to question these many influences. Media literacy also…

  3. MASS MEDIA AND SOCIAL CHANGE

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The relationships between mass media of communication and social change are discussed, and the significance and roles of the mass media in developing and modernized countries are summarized. On the assumption that the contents of the... mass media mirror as well as affect the perspectives and values

  4. Approaching the media with confidence.

    PubMed

    Meade, C D

    1992-09-01

    The media are useful in communicating health information to the public. They are also a powerful way to promote and maintain positive nursing images. This paper examines the past portrayals of nurses in the media, explores the benefits of communicating nursing knowledge to the profession and to the community, and suggests strategies to access the media.

  5. Issues in Media Management, 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, David R., Ed.

    Nine papers from a two-day workshop concentrate on curriculum development, guidance, and counseling. Topics covered in these papers include media and instruction, humanistic education, the instructional team approach, media and methods, Title IV Elementary Secondary Education Act, media and guidance, and the art of writing a grant. (DS)

  6. Transmedia Play: Literacy across Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alper, Meryl; Herr-Stephenson, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Transmedia play is a new way to understand how children develop critical media literacy and new media literacies through their interactions with contemporary media that links stories and structures across platforms. This essay highlights five characteristics of transmedia play that make it particularly useful for learning:…

  7. REPORT ON UNDERSTANDING NEW MEDIA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCLUHAN, MARSHALL

    IN TYPICAL MCLUHAN STYLE, THE AUTHOR OF THIS WORKING PAPER TRACES HISTORICAL-CULTURAL TRANSITIONS FROM PHONETIC ALPHABET TECHNOLOGY TO MEDIA OF THE NEW ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY. THESE MEDIA ARE VIEWED AS EXTENSIONS OF MAN'S SENSES, AND AS LANGUAGES THEMSELVES, WHOSE ONLY CONTENT ARE OTHER MEDIA. EACH MEDIUM (E.G. SPEECH, WRITING, PRINT, PHOTOGRAPHY,…

  8. Media Violence and Young People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oaks, Harold R.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the possibility of a connection between violence in the media and actual adolescent behavior. Explores the nature of the connection, why it exists, and possible courses of action to correct the problem. States that 3,000 studies have explored the link between media violence and adolescent behavior. Concludes that the media should show…

  9. Memory Processes in Media Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellermann, Kathy

    1985-01-01

    Explores the role of memory in mediating mass communication effects. Examines (1) the nature of memory, (2) issues in retention and recall of media messages, (3) methods of promoting retention and recall of media messages, and (4) implications of memory processes for mass media effects. (PD)

  10. [Congenital anomalies of cerebral artery and intracranial aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Nakajima, K; Ito, Z; Hen, R; Uemura, K; Matsuoka, S

    1976-02-01

    It is well known that congenital anomalies such as polycystic kidney, aortic coarctation, Marfan syndrome, Ehler-Danlos syndrome are apt to be complicated by intracranial aneurysms. In this report we attempt to reveal the relation and incidence between cerebrovascular anomalies and intracranial aneurysms. The etiology of aneurysms has been discussed, too. 12 cases of persistent trigeminl artery, 2 cases of persistent hypoglossal artery and 11 cases of fenestration were obtained from 3841 patients who were angiographically examined in our clinic for 5 years. The incidence is 0.31%, 0.05% and 0.29%, respectively. Persistent trigeminal arteries were complicated by 2 cases of intracranial aneurysms and one case of arterivenous malformations (AVM), persistent hypoglossal arteries were complicated by one case of aneurysm, and fenestrations were complicated by 2 cases of aneurysms and one case of AVM. One case of congenital agenesis of right internal carotid artery was obtained which was complicated by aneurysm of anterior communicating artery. Totally, 8 cases of aneurysms and AVM were obtained from 26 cases of cerebrovascular anomalies (incidence 30.8%). On the other hand, thalamic or caudate hemorrhage revealed the highest incidence of complication of intracranial aneurysms among intracerebral hematomas (10.7%). Compared with the incidence of aneurysms between cerebro vascular anomalies (30.8%) and thalamic or caudate hemorrhage (10.7%), the difference is statistically signigicant (P less than 0.05). The cause of intracranial aneurysm has not yet been clarified. But it is well accepted that the defect of tunica media vasorum is most responsible factor as to the occurrence of intracranial aneurysms. We concluded that the genetic error of cerebral vessels including defect of media caused intracranial aneurysms, and this result was supported from the evidence that cerebrovascular anomalies showed statistically high incidence of complication of intracranial aneurysms.

  11. Progressive cerebral atrophy in neuromyelitis optica.

    PubMed

    Warabi, Yoko; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Isozaki, Eiji

    2015-12-01

    We report two cases of neuromyelitis optica patients with progressive cerebral atrophy. The patients exhibited characteristic clinical features, including elderly onset, secondary progressive tetraparesis and cognitive impairment, abnormally elevated CSF protein and myelin basic protein levels, and extremely highly elevated serum anti-AQP-4 antibody titer. Because neuromyelitis optica pathology cannot switch from an inflammatory phase to the degenerative phase until the terminal phase, neuromyelitis optica rarely appears as a secondary progressive clinical course caused by axonal degeneration. However, severe intrathecal inflammation and massive destruction of neuroglia could cause a secondary progressive clinical course associated with cerebral atrophy in neuromyelitis optica patients.

  12. Cerebral Fat Embolism: A diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Babita; Kaur, Manpreet; D’souza, Nita; Dey, Chandan Kumar; Shende, Seema; Kumar, Atin; Gamangatti, Shivanand

    2011-01-01

    Fat embolism syndrome (FES) is a rare but a serious clinical catastrophe occurring after traumatic injury to long bones. Cerebral involvement in the absence of pulmonary or dermatological manifestation on initial presentation may delay the diagnosis of cerebral fat embolism (CFE). We discuss a case series of CFE which posed a challenge in diagnosis. The clinical presentations of these patients did not satisfy the commonly used clinical criteria for aiding the diagnosis of FES. Early MRI brain (DWI and T2 weighted sequences) in patients with neurological symptoms after trauma even in the absence of pulmonary and dermatological findings should be the goal. PMID:21957425

  13. [Cerebral salt wasting syndrome in bacterial meningitis].

    PubMed

    Attout, H; Guez, S; Seriès, C

    2007-10-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage is the most common cause of cerebral salt wasting syndrome. There are few reports of this condition in infectious meningitis. We describe a patient with hyponatremia and bacterial meningitis. Hyponatremia rapidly improved after administration of sodium chloride. The purpose of this report is to alert clinicians to the fact that hyponatremic patients with central nervous system disease do not necessarily have a syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH), but may have cerebral salt wasting syndrome. By contrast with SIADH, the treatment requires saline administration.

  14. Cerebral salt wasting in a postoperative period.

    PubMed

    Janus, Dominika; Wojcik, Malgorzata; Dolezal-Oltarzewska, Katarzyna; Kalicka-Kasperczyk, Anna; Poplawska, Karolina; Starzyk, Jerzy B

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSW-cerebral salt wasting) was first described in 1950 by Peters. This syndrome can occur in patients who have sustained damage to the central nervous system (e.g. patients with subarachnoid bleeding, bacterial meningitis or after neurosurgery). Patients present with excessive natriuresis and hyponatremic dehydration. Differentiating this syndrome with the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH-syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion), which may occur in the same group of patients, is necessary in order to administer the correct treatment which consists of fluid restriction and sodium replacement in SIADH and fluid and sodium replacement as well as occasional mineralocorticoid therapy in CSW.

  15. Functional stability of cerebral circulatory system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskalenko, Y. Y.

    1980-01-01

    The functional stability of the cerebral circulation system seems to be based on the active mechanisms and on those stemming from specific of the biophysical structure of the system under study. This latter parameter has some relevant criteria for its quantitative estimation. The data obtained suggest that the essential part of the mechanism for active responses of cerebral vessels which maintains the functional stability of this portion of the vascular system, consists of a neurogenic component involving central nervous structures localized, for instance, in the medulla oblongata.

  16. A Case of Cerebral Cysticercosis in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Thammachantha, Samasuk; Kunnatiranont, Ratana; Polpong, Pongwat

    2016-01-01

    Cysticercosis and sparganosis are not uncommon parasitic infections in the developing world. Central nervous system infection by both cestodes can present with neurological signs and symptoms, such as seizure and mass effect, including brain hernia. Early detection and accurate diagnosis can prevent a fatal outcome. Histological examinations of brain tissues can confirm the diagnosis of cerebral cysticercosis, which differs from sparganosis by the presence of a cavitated body. We report here a case of cerebral cysticercosis which has the similar clinical and imaging findings as sparganosis. PMID:28095665

  17. Cerebral palsy. A pediatric developmentalist's overview.

    PubMed

    Vining, E P; Accardo, P J; Rubenstein, J E; Farrell, S E; Roizen, N J

    1976-06-01

    Exploration of the history, terminology, and classification of cerebral palsy reveals it as a complex entity. Criteria exist that may make early diagnosis and appropriate intervention possible. Dealing with patients who have cerebral palsy requires recognition of the associated problems and deficits. Comprehensive management usually requires a multidisciplinary setting, which is used to outline the contributions of many therapeutic modalities--developmental pediatrics, occupational and physical therapy, hearing and speech, psychology, social services, special education, ophthalamology, neurology, orthopedics and neurosurgery. The poor prognosis for full function within the community is recognized, as are areas of research that require investigation.

  18. Impaired cerebral autoregulation in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Fred; Roux, Francoise; Schindler, Joseph; Mohsenin, Vahid

    2008-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) increases the risk of stroke independent of known vascular and metabolic risk factors. Although patients with OSA have higher prevalence of hypertension and evidence of hypercoagulability, the mechanism of this increased risk is unknown. Obstructive apnea events are associated with surges in blood pressure, hypercapnia, and fluctuations in cerebral blood flow. These perturbations can adversely affect the cerebral circulation. We hypothesized that patients with OSA have impaired cerebral autoregulation, which may contribute to the increased risk of cerebral ischemia and stroke. We examined cerebral autoregulation in patients with and without OSA by measuring cerebral artery blood flow velocity (CBFV) by using transcranial Doppler ultrasound and arterial blood pressure using finger pulse photoplethysmography during orthostatic hypotension and recovery as well as during 5% CO(2) inhalation. Cerebral vascular conductance and reactivity were determined. Forty-eight subjects, 26 controls (age 41.0+/-2.3 yr) and 22 OSA (age 46.8+/-2.3 yr) free of cerebrovascular and active coronary artery disease participated in this study. OSA patients had a mean apnea-hypopnea index of 78.4+/-7.1 vs. 1.8+/-0.3 events/h in controls. The oxygen saturation during sleep was significantly lower in the OSA group (78+/-2%) vs. 91+/-1% in controls. The dynamic vascular analysis showed mean CBFV was significantly lower in OSA patients compared with controls (48+/-3 vs. 55+/-2 cm/s; P <0.05, respectively). The OSA group had a lower rate of recovery of cerebrovascular conductance for a given drop in blood pressure compared with controls (0.06+/-0.02 vs. 0.20+/-0.06 cm.s(-2).mmHg(-1); P <0.05). There was no difference in cerebrovascular vasodilatation in response to CO(2). The findings showed that patients with OSA have decreased CBFV at baseline and delayed cerebrovascular compensatory response to changes in blood pressure but not to CO(2). These perturbations may

  19. Hospital-acquired thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Christine M; Cuker, Adam

    2014-10-01

    The development of thrombocytopenia is common in hospitalized patients and is associated with increased mortality. Frequent and important causes of thrombocytopenia in hospitalized patients include etiologies related to the underlying illness for which the patient is admitted, such as infection and disseminated intravascular coagulation, and iatrogenic etiologies such as drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia, heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, posttransfusion purpura, hemodilution, major surgery, and extracorporeal circuitry. This review presents a brief discussion of the pathophysiology, distinguishing clinical features, and management of these etiologies, and provides a diagnostic approach to hospital-acquired thrombocytopenia that considers the timing and severity of the platelet count fall, the presence of hemorrhage or thrombosis, the clinical context, and the peripheral blood smear. This approach may offer guidance to clinicians in distinguishing among the various causes of hospital-acquired thrombocytopenia and providing management appropriate to the etiology.

  20. Surgery, Hospitals, and Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... products that are not commonly stocked in hospital pharmacies. Examples include: Salagen ® , Evoxac ® , and Restasis ® Eye drops, ... prescription and OTC medications/products in their labeled pharmacy container or packaging. This is important in case ...

  1. Home versus hospital confinement

    PubMed Central

    Barry, C. N.

    1980-01-01

    The case for hospital rather than home delivery has been powerfully argued, especially in and since the Report of the Peel Committee. Nevertheless, evidence of comparison with other countries, notably the Netherlands, suggests the choice is not necessarily simple. Some general practitioner units are now reporting perinatal mortality rates which are consistently lower than those of specialist units, and recent statistical analyses suggest that the presence of more high risk cases in consultant units does not explain this. The only big controlled home-versus-hospital trial did not lead to a significantly lower perinatal mortality rate in the hospital group. The onus of proof now seems to lie with those who advocate 100 per cent hospital confinement. PMID:7373581

  2. Objections to hospital philosophers.

    PubMed Central

    Ruddick, W; Finn, W

    1985-01-01

    Like morally sensitive hospital staff, philosophers resist routine simplification of morally complex cases. Like hospital clergy, they favour reflective and principled decision-making. Like hospital lawyers, they refine and extend the language we use to formulate and defend our complex decisions. But hospital philosophers are not redundant: they have a wider range of principles and categories and a sharper eye for self-serving presuppositions and implicit contradictions within our practices. As semi-outsiders, they are often best able to take an 'external point of view,' unburdened by routine, details, and departmental loyalties. Their clarifications can temporarily disrupt routine, but can eventually improve staff morale, hence team practice and patient welfare. PMID:3981573

  3. Hospital free cash flow.

    PubMed

    Kauer, R T; Silvers, J B

    1991-01-01

    Hospital managers may find it difficult to admit their investments have been suboptimal, but such investments often lead to poor returns and less future cash. Inappropriate use of free cash flow produces large transaction costs of exit. The relative efficiency of investor-owned and tax-exempt hospitals in the product market for hospital services is examined as the free cash flow theory is used to explore capital-market conditions of hospitals. Hypotheses concerning the current competitive conditions in the industry are set forth, and the implications of free cash flow for risk, capital-market efficiency, and the cost of capital to tax-exempt institution is compared to capital-market norms.

  4. American Hospital Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hospitals & Health Networks H & HN Daily Trustee Research & Trends AHA Policy Research Health Research & Educational Trust AHA ... Associations unless otherwise indicated. AHA does not claim ownership of any content, including content incorporated by permission ...

  5. Incidence and Predictors of Angiographic Vasospasm, Symptomatic Vasospasm and Cerebral Infarction in Chinese Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Axier, Aximujiang; Amuti, Maiwulanjiang; Guohua, Zhu; Xiaojiang, Cheng; Kadeer, Kaheerman; Xixian, Wang; Geng, Dangmurenjiafu; Maimaitili, Aisha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cerebral vasospasm (CVS) is the most common neurological complication after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) and associated with poor functional outcome and mortality. Reports on incidence and predictors of CVS in Chinese patients with aSAH were scarce. We aimed to estimate the incidence and predictors of angiographic vasospasm (AV), symptomatic vasospasm (SV), and cerebral infarction in Chinese patients with aSAH. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 542 consecutive aSAH patients admitted to neurosurgery department of the First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University in Urumqi city of China between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2015. AV, SV and cerebral infarction were defined based on clinical data and neuroimaging findings. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of AV, SV or cerebral infarction. Results 343 (63.3%) patients fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Of them, 182(53.1%) developed AV, 99 (28.9%) developed SV, and 87 (25.4%) developed cerebral infarction. A history of hypertension, poor modified Fisher grade (3–4) and poor Hunt-Hess grade (4–5) on admission were common risk factors for AV, SV and cerebral infarction. Patients from Uyghur ethnic group or other minorities were less likely to develop AV, SV or cerebral infarction, compared to those from Han ethic group after adjustment of other potential confounders. Additionally, age ≥53 years, leukocyte count ≥11× 109/L on admission and being current or former smokers were independent risk factors of cerebral infarction. Leukocyte count ≥11× 109/L on admission and aneurysm size ≥ 10 mm were independent risk factors of SV. Serum glucose level ≥7.0 mmol/L on admission was an independent risk factor of AV. Conclusion Risk factors of different definitions of CVS were diverse in Chinese patients with aSAH; however, risk factors of SV and cerebral infarction seem to be similar. We recommend

  6. Normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass increases cerebral tissue oxygenation during combined valve surgery: a single-centre, randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Lenkin, Andrey I.; Zaharov, Viktor I.; Lenkin, Pavel I.; Smetkin, Alexey A.; Bjertnaes, Lars J.; Kirov, Mikhail Y.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES In cardiac surgery, the choice of temperature regimen during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) remains a subject of debate. Hypothermia reduces tissue metabolic demands, but may impair the autoregulation of cerebral blood flow and contribute to neurological morbidity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two different temperature regimens during CPB on the systemic oxygen transport and the cerebral oxygenation during surgical correction of acquired heart diseases. METHODS In a prospective study, we randomized 40 adult patients with combined valvular disorders requiring surgical correction of two or more valves into two groups: (i) a normothermic (NMTH) group (n = 20), in which the body core temperature was maintained at 36.6°C during CPB and (ii) a hypothermic (HPTH) group (n = 20), in which the body was cooled to a core temperature of 32°C maintained throughout the period of CPB. The systemic oxygen transport and the cerebral oxygen saturation (SctO2) were assessed by means of a PiCCO2 haemodynamic monitor and a cerebral oximeter, respectively. All the patients received standard perioperative monitoring. We assessed haemodynamic and oxygen transport parameters, the duration of mechanical ventilation and the length of the ICU and the hospital stays. RESULTS During CPB, central venous oxygen saturation was significantly higher in the HPTH group but SctO2 was increased in the NMTH group (P < 0.05). Cardiac index, systemic oxygen delivery and consumption increased postoperatively in both groups. However, oxygen delivery and consumption were significantly higher in the NMTH group (P < 0.05). The duration of respiratory support and the length of ICU and hospital stays did not differ between the groups. CONCLUSIONS During combined valve surgery, normothermic CPB provides lower central venous oxygen saturation, but increases cerebral tissue oxygenation when compared with the hypothermic regimen. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER NCT01685554. PMID:23407696

  7. Hospital Ship Replacement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    designed to operate primarily when anchored to reduce the effects of roll. Quantum markets two separate zero speed active roll fin models for small ...ships. Feasibility of scaling fins to the size of the hospital ship requires validation. 3.12 Lifeboats and Liferafts The safety appliances designated ...for Innovation in Ship Design Technical Report Hospital Ship Replacement By Hannah Allison, Christopher Mehrvarzi, Rebecca Piks, Beau Lovdahl

  8. Fast tracking hospital construction.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    Hospital leaders should consider four factors in determining whether to fast track a hospital construction project: Expectations of project length, quality, and cost. Whether decisions can be made quickly as issues arise. Their own time commitment to the project, as well as that of architects, engineers, construction managers, and others. The extent to which they are willing to share with the design and construction teams how and why decisions are being made.

  9. [Relationship between executive functioning and behaviour in children with cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Muriel, V; Garcia-Molina, A; Aparicio-Lopez, C; Ensenat, A; Roig-Rovira, T

    2015-10-16

    Introduccion. La paralisis cerebral se define como un grupo de trastornos del desarrollo del movimiento y la postura que cursa con deficits cognitivos, alteraciones emocionales, de conducta y sociales. Objetivo. Estudiar la relacion entre el funcionamiento ejecutivo y la conducta en niños con paralisis cerebral a partir de las respuestas aportadas por padres y profesores en el Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) y el sistema de evaluacion de la conducta adaptativa (ABAS-II). Pacientes y metodos. La muestra quedo formada por 46 niños con paralisis cerebral, con una edad media de 10,26 ± 2,95 años. Del total, 44 niños se distribuyeron en el Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) en nivel I (n = 16), nivel II (n = 3), nivel III (n = 11), nivel IV (n = 10) y nivel V (n = 4). Resultados. Los resultados mostraron relacion entre el BRIEF y el ABAS-II; ademas, se obtuvieron discrepancias entre las respuestas aportadas por padres y profesores, tanto en el ABAS-II como en el BRIEF. Asimismo, se hallo relacion entre el GMFCS y los subindices de vida en el hogar, indice practico y autocuidado del ABAS-II. Conclusiones. Se encontro relacion entre el funcionamiento ejecutivo y la conducta adaptativa en niños con paralisis cerebral. Se hallaron discrepancias en las respuestas aportadas por padres y profesores. Por ultimo, los datos muestran que, a mayor afectacion motora, mayores dificultades en el hogar, en el indice practico y en el autocuidado.

  10. Media Makes for Public Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockman, S.

    2013-12-01

    Learning from media: what studies of media projects can help us understand about informing the public about science issues. Saul Rockman, has studied a variety of television and radio projects funded by NSF, NASA, and foundations. He will highlight findings that inform strategies to increase learning about science content and issues through the media, as well as inform policy on communicating complex scientific ideas to citizens of all ages. Rockman has gathered evidence from science media ranging from Bill Nye The Science Guy to BURN, An Energy Journal.Media for Children vs. Adults

  11. Michael Faraday, media man.

    PubMed

    Fara, Patricia

    2006-03-01

    Michael Faraday was an enthusiastic portrait collector, and he welcomed the invention of photography not only as a possible means of recording observations accurately, but also as a method for advertising science and its practitioners. This article (which is part of the Science in the Industrial Revolution series) shows that like many eminent scientists, Faraday took advantage of the burgeoning Victorian media industry by posing in various roles.

  12. 2004 News Media Industry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    Content and credibility vary, and few online news organizations conduct reporting operations. The Wall Street Journal Online is a notable...served by the Wall Street Journal Online, but innovative advertising schemes coupled with rising market shares should propel the more traditional news...Votes to Scrap New Media Rules.” Wall Street Journal (Sep 17, 2003). Downie, Leonard Jr. and Robert G. Kaiser. The News About the News: American

  13. The ethics of clinical photography and social media.

    PubMed

    Palacios-González, César

    2015-02-01

    Clinical photography is an important tool for medical practice, training and research. While in the past clinical pictures were confined to the stringent controls of surgeries and hospitals technological advances have made possible to take pictures and share them through the internet with only a few clicks. Confronted with this possibility I explore if a case could be made for using clinical photography in tandem with social media. In order to do this I explore: (1) if patient's informed consent is required for the publication of any clinical images that depicts her, irrespective of whether the patient can be identified from the image or not, (2) if social media is an adequate place for clinical images to be displayed, and finally (3) if there are special considerations that should be taken into account when publishing clinical images on social media.

  14. Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome after intracranial stenting of the middle cerebral artery

    PubMed Central

    Maramattom, Boby Varkey

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS) is a rare complication following cerebral revascularization. It presents with ipsilateral headache, seizures, and intracerebral hemorrhage. It has mostly been described following extracranial carotid endarterectomy and stenting and it is very unusual after intracranial stenting. A 71-year-old man with a stuttering stroke was taken up for a cerebral angiogram (digital subtraction angiography), which showed a dissection of the distal left middle cerebral artery. This was recanalized with a solitaire AB stent. After 12 h, the patient developed a right hemiplegia and aphasia. Computed tomography brain showed two discrete intracerebral hematomas in the left hemisphere. This is the first reported case of CHS following intracranial stenting from India. PMID:27829722

  15. Children and media.

    PubMed

    Patankar, M

    1989-01-01

    Program developers in India's mass media are turning to the discipline of child development to increase their sensitivity to the special needs and capacities of child audiences. Children are particularly susceptible to having their thoughts, feelings, values, and behavior influenced by media programming. In India, radio is the medium with the greatest opportunity to communicate with children and programming for young people includes educational material, variety programs, quiz shows, drama, and live programs in which children participate. The 1st Children's Film Festival was held in India in 1952 and India participates in the International Center of Films for Children and Young People. Television enjoys popularity among children, illiterates, and the poor, but its potential to create social awareness, change behaviors, and raise the standard of living of the Indian people has not been fully realized. Drama is less able to reach large numbers of children, but offers children the opportunity to participate directly in the portrayal of different characters and emotions. Recently, the tradition of puppetry has been rivived and integrated into India's school curriculum. Finally, India is taking steps to expand the number of books available to children and the Government has established 2 trusts to support the publication of children's literature. Regardless of the form of media, it is important for parents to play a role in ensuring the appropriateness of the programming for the child and processing its content.

  16. Heterogeneous recording media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhanov, Vitaly I.

    1991-02-01

    The paper summarizes the results of investigations performed to obtain deep 3-D holograms with 102 i0 mkm physical thickness allowing the postexposure amplification and the a posteriori changing of the grating parameters. This aim has been achieved by developing heterogeneous systems on the basis of porous glass with light-sensitive compositions introduced into it. 1. INTRODUCTION. LIGHT-SENSITIVE MEDIA FOR 3-D HOLOGRAMS RECORDING. The 3-D holograms have many useful properties: very high diffraction efficiency angular and spectral selectivity but low level of noise. It shoud be noted that in this case deep 3-D holograms are dealt with whose physical thickness is as high as 102 -i mkm. Such hologram recording is usually done using homogeneous light-sensitive media for example dyed acid-halide and electrooptical crystals photochrome glass photostructurized polimer compositions and so on. The nature of photophisical and photochemical processes responsible for the light sensitivity of these materials exclude the possibility of post-exposure treatment. This does not allow to enhance the recorded holograms and considerably hampers their fixing or makes it practically impossible. The object of our work is to create the media which are quite suitable for two-stage processes of the deep hologram formation with post-exposure processing. Such material must satisfy the following requirements: a)they must have high permeability for the developing substances in order to make the development duration suitable for practical applications b)they must be shrinkproof to prevent deformation of the

  17. Update on Otitis Media in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoem, Scott R.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses otitis media in children. It addresses risk factors for otitis media, pathogenesis, diagnosis, bacteria causing otitis media, and treatment for acute otitis media, recurrent acute otitis media, and persistent otitis media with effusion, including antibiotics, steroids, allergy control, autoinflation, mechanical ventilation,…

  18. Media Literacy: 21st Century Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Frank W.

    2011-01-01

    The media, for better or worse, deliver the news and the gossip; they entertain, educate and inform. The media have not always been in American classrooms. Yes, teachers teach with media, but rarely do they teach "about" the media. It's called media literacy. Most students are not receiving adequate media literacy instruction, mostly because their…

  19. Cerebral blood flow in humans following resuscitation from cardiac arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Cohan, S.L.; Mun, S.K.; Petite, J.; Correia, J.; Tavelra Da Silva, A.T.; Waldhorn, R.E.

    1989-06-01

    Cerebral blood flow was measured by xenon-133 washout in 13 patients 6-46 hours after being resuscitated from cardiac arrest. Patients regaining consciousness had relatively normal cerebral blood flow before regaining consciousness, but all patients who died without regaining consciousness had increased cerebral blood flow that appeared within 24 hours after resuscitation (except in one patient in whom the first measurement was delayed until 28 hours after resuscitation, by which time cerebral blood flow was increased). The cause of the delayed-onset increase in cerebral blood flow is not known, but the increase may have adverse effects on brain function and may indicate the onset of irreversible brain damage.

  20. Information Provenance in Social Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbier, Geoffrey; Liu, Huan

    Information appearing in social media provides a challenge for determining the provenance of the information. However, the same characteristics that make the social media environment challenging provide unique and untapped opportunities for solving the information provenance problem for social media. Current approaches for tracking provenance information do not scale for social media and consequently there is a gap in provenance methodologies and technologies providing exciting research opportunities for computer scientists and sociologists. This paper introduces a theoretical approach aimed guiding future efforts to realize a provenance capability for social media that is not available today. The guiding vision is the use of social media information itself to realize a useful amount provenance data for information in social media.