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  1. Mrs. Chandrasekhar addresses the media in TRW Media Hospitality Tent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mrs. Lalitha Chandrasekhar (right), wife of the late Indian- American Nobel Laureate Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, addresses the media and other invited guests in the TRW Media Hospitality Tent at the NASA Press Site at KSC as Dr. Alan Bunner, Science Program Director, Structure and Evolution of the Universe, Office of Space Science, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C., looks on. The name 'Chandra,' a shortened version of her husband's name which he preferred among friends and colleagues, was chosen in a contest to rename the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility. 'Chandra' also means 'Moon' or 'luminous' in Sanskrit. The observatory is scheduled to be launched aboard Columbia on Space Shuttle mission STS-93.

  2. Mrs. Chandrasekhar addresses the media in TRW Media Hospitality Tent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mrs. Lalitha Chandrasekhar (at podium), wife of the late Indian- American Nobel Laureate Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, addresses the media and other invited guests in the TRW Media Hospitality Tent at the NASA Press Site at KSC. Other participants in the program (seated facing the audience, left to right) are the winners of the contest to rename the telescope, Jatila van der Veen, academic coordinator and lecturer, Physics Dept., University of Santa Barbara, Calif., and Tyrel Johnson, high school student, Laclede, Idaho; Joanne Maguire, vice-president and general manager, TRW Space & Laser Programs Division; and Dr. Alan Bunner, Science Program Director, Structure and Evolution of the Universe, Office of Space Science, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The name 'Chandra,' a shortened version of Chandrasekhar, was the name the Nobel Laureate preferred among friends and colleagues. 'Chandra' also means 'Moon' or 'luminous' in Sanskrit. The observatory is scheduled to be launched aboard Columbia on Space Shuttle mission STS-93.

  3. Use of Social Media by Western European Hospitals: Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Berben, Sivera AA; Samsom, Melvin; Engelen, Lucien JLPG; Schoonhoven, Lisette

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients increasingly use social media to communicate. Their stories could support quality improvements in participatory health care and could support patient-centered care. Active use of social media by health care institutions could also speed up communication and information provision to patients and their families, thus increasing quality even more. Hospitals seem to be becoming aware of the benefits social media could offer. Data from the United States show that hospitals increasingly use social media, but it is unknown whether and how Western European hospitals use social media. Objective To identify to what extent Western European hospitals use social media. Methods In this longitudinal study, we explored the use of social media by hospitals in 12 Western European countries through an Internet search. We collected data for each country during the following three time periods: April to August 2009, August to December 2010, and April to July 2011. Results We included 873 hospitals from 12 Western European countries, of which 732 were general hospitals and 141 were university hospitals. The number of included hospitals per country ranged from 6 in Luxembourg to 347 in Germany. We found hospitals using social media in all countries. The use of social media increased significantly over time, especially for YouTube (n = 19, 2% to n = 172, 19.7%), LinkedIn (n =179, 20.5% to n = 278, 31.8%), and Facebook (n = 85, 10% to n = 585, 67.0%). Differences in social media usage between the included countries were significant. Conclusions Social media awareness in Western European hospitals is growing, as well as its use. Social media usage differs significantly between countries. Except for the Netherlands and the United Kingdom, the group of hospitals that is using social media remains small. Usage of LinkedIn for recruitment shows the awareness of the potential of social media. Future research is needed to investigate how social media lead to improved health

  4. Hospital study reveals strategies for improving media relations.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, P E; Embrey-Wahl, L

    1987-01-01

    A nationwide study revealed that hospital administrators feel inadequate when dealing with the media, and also think the media does not understand the hospital business. Many strategies are available to counter these problems, including some that emphasize issues related to bed size. PMID:3583722

  5. Management of Media in Hospital Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Dorothy A.; And Others

    Intended for personnel with no prior experience or training in the provision of audiovisual materials, this continuing education course booklet presents an introduction to the acquisition and administration of 16 mm films, 35 mm slides, 3/4 inch videotape cassettes, 35 mm filmstrips, and audiotape cassettes in hospital libraries serving hospital…

  6. Clinical Profile of Cerebral Malaria at a Secondary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Koshy, Jency Maria; Koshy, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Cerebral malaria (CM) is one of the most common causes for non-traumatic encephalopathy in the world. It affects both the urban and rural population. It is a challenge to treat these patients in a resource limited setting; where majority of these cases present. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study carried out from September 2005 to December 2006 at Jiwan Jyoti Christian Hospital in Eastern Uttar Pradesh in India. This is a secondary level care with limited resources. We studied the clinical profile, treatment and outcome of all the patients above the age of 14 years diagnosed with CM. Results: There were a total of 53 patients with CM of which 38 (71.7%) of them were females. Among them, 35 (66%) patients were less than 30 years of age. The clinical features noted were seizure (39.62%), anemia (84.9%), icterus (16.98%), hypotension (13.2%), bleeding (3.7%), hepatomegaly (5.66%), splenomegaly (5.66%), non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema (16.98%) and renal dysfunction (37.36%). Co-infection with Plasmodium vivax was present in 13 (24.53%) of them. Treatment received included artesunin compounds or quinine. Median time of defervescence was 2 (interquartile range1-3). Complete recovery was achieved in 43 (81%) of them. Two (3.7%) of them died. Conclusion: CM, once considered to be a fatal disease has shown remarkable improvement in the outcome with the wide availability of artesunin and quinine components. To combat the malaria burden, physicians in resource limited setting should be well trained to manage these patients especially in the endemic areas. The key to management is early diagnosis and initiation of treatment based on a high index of suspicion. Anticipation and early recognition of the various complications are crucial. PMID:24791238

  7. Differentiating Acute Otitis Media and Acute Mastoiditis in Hospitalized Children.

    PubMed

    Laulajainen-Hongisto, Anu; Aarnisalo, Antti A; Jero, Jussi

    2016-10-01

    Acute otitis media is a common infection in children. Most acute otitis media episodes can be treated at an outpatient setting with antimicrobials, or only expectant observation. Hospital treatment with parenteral medication, and myringotomy or tympanostomy, may be needed to treat those with severe, prolonged symptoms, or with complications. The most common intratemporal complication of acute otitis media is acute mastoiditis. If a child with acute mastoiditis does not respond to this treatment, or if complications develop, further examinations and other surgical procedures, including mastoidectomy, are considered. Since the treatment of complicated acute otitis media and complicated acute mastoiditis differs, it is important to differentiate these two conditions. This article focuses on the differential diagnostics of acute otitis media and acute mastoiditis in children. PMID:27613655

  8. Differentiating Acute Otitis Media and Acute Mastoiditis in Hospitalized Children.

    PubMed

    Laulajainen-Hongisto, Anu; Aarnisalo, Antti A; Jero, Jussi

    2016-10-01

    Acute otitis media is a common infection in children. Most acute otitis media episodes can be treated at an outpatient setting with antimicrobials, or only expectant observation. Hospital treatment with parenteral medication, and myringotomy or tympanostomy, may be needed to treat those with severe, prolonged symptoms, or with complications. The most common intratemporal complication of acute otitis media is acute mastoiditis. If a child with acute mastoiditis does not respond to this treatment, or if complications develop, further examinations and other surgical procedures, including mastoidectomy, are considered. Since the treatment of complicated acute otitis media and complicated acute mastoiditis differs, it is important to differentiate these two conditions. This article focuses on the differential diagnostics of acute otitis media and acute mastoiditis in children.

  9. Hospital decentralisation in Romania: stakeholders' perspectives in the newsprint media.

    PubMed

    Popa, Adela Elena

    2014-01-01

    In the summer of 2010, Romania undertook a process of hospital decentralisation as part of the reform in the healthcare sector. The national newsprint media covered the process thoroughly. This paper is a study of how key stakeholders' views, attitudes, beliefs and attitudes towards decentralisation are represented in print media. 106 articles, published between June and September 2010, retrieved from the online databases of six leading national dailies were analysed. A mixed methodology was used in the data analysis stage. The qualitative data exploration identified five voices belonging to stakeholders involved directly or indirectly in the process: the representatives of central government, the local authorities (district and local councils, municipal mayors), health professionals (managers and physicians in hospitals), the media (journalists, analysts) and finally voices from civil society, professional associations and advocacy groups. These were the main actors negotiating the subjective meanings of the decentralisation process. An imbalance between these key actors were observed in the frequency, content and tone of the messages delivered in media during the four months. Central government and the local authorities were the most active voices, but the respective discourses differed significantly. An analysis of the accounts identified three main themes: the financial problem (hospitals liabilities and future spending), human resource in hospitals (the impact of decentralisation upon it) and the political character of the decentralisation.

  10. Health care and social media platforms in hospitals.

    PubMed

    McCarroll, Michele L; Armbruster, Shannon D; Chung, Jae Eun; Kim, Junghyun; McKenzie, Alissa; von Gruenigen, Vivian E

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this article is to illustrate user characteristics of a hospital's social media structure using analytics and user surveys. A 1-year retrospective analysis was conducted along with an Internet survey of users of the hospital's Facebook, Twitter, and blog. Of the survey respondents (n = 163), 95.7% are female and 4.3% are male; most are ages 50-59 years (31.5%) and 40-49 years (27.8%); and 93.2% are Caucasian. However, the hospital system database revealed 55% female and 37% minority population, respectively. Of the survey respondents, 61.4% reported having a bachelor's degree or higher, whereas only 11.7% reported having a high school degree/equivalent or lower. However, within the hospital patient databases, 93% of patients have a high school degree/equivalent or lower and only 3% have a bachelor's degree or higher in our women's services population. Social media were used to seek personal health information 68.7% (n = 112), to learn about hospital programming 27.6% (n = 45), and to seek family health information 25.2% (n = 41). Respondents younger than 49 years of age were more likely to seek personal health information using social media compared to those 50 years of age and older (p = .02). Respondents with a bachelor's degree or higher education were statistically less likely to search for physician information compared to those less educated individuals (p = .04). We conclude that social media may play an important role in personal health information, especially for young female respondents; however, the survey provides strong evidence that further research is needed to ensure that social network sites provided by hospitals are reaching the full spectrum of health system patients. PMID:24295109

  11. Health care and social media platforms in hospitals.

    PubMed

    McCarroll, Michele L; Armbruster, Shannon D; Chung, Jae Eun; Kim, Junghyun; McKenzie, Alissa; von Gruenigen, Vivian E

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this article is to illustrate user characteristics of a hospital's social media structure using analytics and user surveys. A 1-year retrospective analysis was conducted along with an Internet survey of users of the hospital's Facebook, Twitter, and blog. Of the survey respondents (n = 163), 95.7% are female and 4.3% are male; most are ages 50-59 years (31.5%) and 40-49 years (27.8%); and 93.2% are Caucasian. However, the hospital system database revealed 55% female and 37% minority population, respectively. Of the survey respondents, 61.4% reported having a bachelor's degree or higher, whereas only 11.7% reported having a high school degree/equivalent or lower. However, within the hospital patient databases, 93% of patients have a high school degree/equivalent or lower and only 3% have a bachelor's degree or higher in our women's services population. Social media were used to seek personal health information 68.7% (n = 112), to learn about hospital programming 27.6% (n = 45), and to seek family health information 25.2% (n = 41). Respondents younger than 49 years of age were more likely to seek personal health information using social media compared to those 50 years of age and older (p = .02). Respondents with a bachelor's degree or higher education were statistically less likely to search for physician information compared to those less educated individuals (p = .04). We conclude that social media may play an important role in personal health information, especially for young female respondents; however, the survey provides strong evidence that further research is needed to ensure that social network sites provided by hospitals are reaching the full spectrum of health system patients.

  12. The Effect of Otitis Media on Articulation in Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Vyver, Marguerite; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A study involving 20 Afrikaans-speaking children with cerebral palsy found that recurrent otitis media in early childhood had a negative effect on articulation abilities of the 7 to 11-year-old children but that other factors such as intelligence also played a role. (JDD)

  13. Use of Social Media Across US Hospitals: Descriptive Analysis of Adoption and Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Griffis, Heather M; Kilaru, Austin S; Werner, Rachel M; Asch, David A; Hershey, John C; Hill, Shawndra; Ha, Yoonhee P; Sellers, Allison; Mahoney, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Background Use of social media has become widespread across the United States. Although businesses have invested in social media to engage consumers and promote products, less is known about the extent to which hospitals are using social media to interact with patients and promote health. Objective The aim was to investigate the relationship between hospital social media extent of adoption and utilization relative to hospital characteristics. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional review of hospital-related activity on 4 social media platforms: Facebook, Twitter, Yelp, and Foursquare. All US hospitals were included that reported complete data for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey and the American Hospital Association Annual Survey. We reviewed hospital social media webpages to determine the extent of adoption relative to hospital characteristics, including geographic region, urban designation, bed size, ownership type, and teaching status. Social media utilization was estimated from user activity specific to each social media platform, including number of Facebook likes, Twitter followers, Foursquare check-ins, and Yelp reviews. Results Adoption of social media varied across hospitals with 94.41% (3351/3371) having a Facebook page and 50.82% (1713/3371) having a Twitter account. A majority of hospitals had a Yelp page (99.14%, 3342/3371) and almost all hospitals had check-ins on Foursquare (99.41%, 3351/3371). Large, urban, private nonprofit, and teaching hospitals were more likely to have higher utilization of these accounts. Conclusions Although most hospitals adopted at least one social media platform, utilization of social media varied according to several hospital characteristics. This preliminary investigation of social media adoption and utilization among US hospitals provides the framework for future studies investigating the effect of social media on patient outcomes

  14. Otogenic cerebral abscess: an unusual complication of otitis media.

    PubMed

    Chang, Alice E; O, Teresa M

    2011-11-01

    Intracranial complications of otitis media are rare in the age of antiobiotics and in the developed world, but they can be life threatening when they occur. We present a case of a 47-year-old woman with no contributory otologic history who developed an otogenic temporal lobe abscess.

  15. Social media: how hospitals use it, and opportunities for future use.

    PubMed

    Richter, Jason P; Muhlestein, David B; Wilks, Chrisanne E A

    2014-01-01

    When used effectively, social media benefits hospitals through increased revenue, employee recruitment, and increased customer satisfaction. Although 72% of adults who use the Internet engage in social media, little is known about its prevalence among hospitals and the ways in which hospitals use it. We examined hospital characteristics associated with social media use and how U.S. hospitals use Facebook. Through analysis of websites and Facebook pages, we found that seven in 10 hospitals use social media and that 9% of hospitals with a Facebook page do not provide a link to it from their web page. The odds of social media use were greater in large, urban, nonprofit hospitals; at hospitals affiliated with universities or health systems; and at hospitals that emphasize quality metrics or educational information. Hospitals use Facebook as a dissemination strategy to educate consumers, acknowledge staff, and share news of the hospital's awards. However, the majority of hospitals do not actively engage consumers on Facebook pages. We conclude that this lack of engagement is a lost opportunity to enhance customer service, improve quality of care, and build loyalty. For hospital executives, we illustrate that Facebook is underutilized and that considerable opportunity exists for consumer engagement at a low cost. For policymakers, there is a greater use of social media by nonprofit hospitals, compared to for-profit facilities. As Facebook is most commonly used as an educational tool, it is another example of nonprofit hospitals' heightened focus on health promotion and disease prevention.

  16. Social media: how hospitals use it, and opportunities for future use.

    PubMed

    Richter, Jason P; Muhlestein, David B; Wilks, Chrisanne E A

    2014-01-01

    When used effectively, social media benefits hospitals through increased revenue, employee recruitment, and increased customer satisfaction. Although 72% of adults who use the Internet engage in social media, little is known about its prevalence among hospitals and the ways in which hospitals use it. We examined hospital characteristics associated with social media use and how U.S. hospitals use Facebook. Through analysis of websites and Facebook pages, we found that seven in 10 hospitals use social media and that 9% of hospitals with a Facebook page do not provide a link to it from their web page. The odds of social media use were greater in large, urban, nonprofit hospitals; at hospitals affiliated with universities or health systems; and at hospitals that emphasize quality metrics or educational information. Hospitals use Facebook as a dissemination strategy to educate consumers, acknowledge staff, and share news of the hospital's awards. However, the majority of hospitals do not actively engage consumers on Facebook pages. We conclude that this lack of engagement is a lost opportunity to enhance customer service, improve quality of care, and build loyalty. For hospital executives, we illustrate that Facebook is underutilized and that considerable opportunity exists for consumer engagement at a low cost. For policymakers, there is a greater use of social media by nonprofit hospitals, compared to for-profit facilities. As Facebook is most commonly used as an educational tool, it is another example of nonprofit hospitals' heightened focus on health promotion and disease prevention. PMID:25647968

  17. Media coverage and hospital notifications: Correlation analysis and optimal media impact duration to manage a pandemic.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qinling; Tang, Sanyi; Gabriele, Sandra; Wu, Jianhong

    2016-02-01

    News reporting has the potential to modify a community's knowledge of emerging infectious diseases and affect peoples' attitudes and behavior. Here we developed a quantitative approach to evaluate the effects of media on such behavior. Statistically significant correlations between the number of new hospital notifications, during the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza epidemic in the Shaanxi province of China, and the number of daily news items added to eight major websites were found from Pearson correlation and cross-correlation analyses. We also proposed a novel model to examine the implication for transmission dynamics of these correlations. The model incorporated the media impact function into the intensity of infection, and enhanced the traditional epidemic SEIR model with the addition of media dynamics. We used a nonlinear least squares estimation to identify the best-fit parameter values in the model from the observed data. We also carried out the uncertainty and sensitivity analyses to determine key parameters during early phase of the disease outbreak for the final outcome of the outbreak with media impact. The findings confirm the importance of responses by individuals to the media reports, with behavior changes having important consequence for the emerging infectious disease control. Therefore, for mitigating emerging infectious diseases, media reports should be focused on how to guide people's behavioral changes, which are critical for limiting the spread of disease. PMID:26582723

  18. Media coverage and hospital notifications: Correlation analysis and optimal media impact duration to manage a pandemic.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qinling; Tang, Sanyi; Gabriele, Sandra; Wu, Jianhong

    2016-02-01

    News reporting has the potential to modify a community's knowledge of emerging infectious diseases and affect peoples' attitudes and behavior. Here we developed a quantitative approach to evaluate the effects of media on such behavior. Statistically significant correlations between the number of new hospital notifications, during the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza epidemic in the Shaanxi province of China, and the number of daily news items added to eight major websites were found from Pearson correlation and cross-correlation analyses. We also proposed a novel model to examine the implication for transmission dynamics of these correlations. The model incorporated the media impact function into the intensity of infection, and enhanced the traditional epidemic SEIR model with the addition of media dynamics. We used a nonlinear least squares estimation to identify the best-fit parameter values in the model from the observed data. We also carried out the uncertainty and sensitivity analyses to determine key parameters during early phase of the disease outbreak for the final outcome of the outbreak with media impact. The findings confirm the importance of responses by individuals to the media reports, with behavior changes having important consequence for the emerging infectious disease control. Therefore, for mitigating emerging infectious diseases, media reports should be focused on how to guide people's behavioral changes, which are critical for limiting the spread of disease.

  19. Safety of contrast media in cerebral angiography: iopamidol vs. methylglucamine iothalamate.

    PubMed

    Bird, C R; Drayer, B P; Velaj, R; Triolo, P J; Allen, S; Bates, M; Yeates, A E; Heinz, E R; Osborne, D R

    1984-01-01

    A randomized double-blind study was performed in 27 patients to compare the clinical safety, incidence of pain and warmth, and film quality produced by iopamidol and Conray-60 in selective cerebral angiography. No complications or adverse reactions occurred in either group. Iopamidol was significantly less painful than was methylglucamine iothalamate for common carotid artery injections and caused significantly less heat in both common carotid and internal carotid artery injections. Film quality and diagnostic accuracy were excellent in both groups. These results, when viewed in conjunction with laboratory data demonstrating the decreased neurotoxicity of nonionic contrast agents, suggest that iopamidol is an important advance in the development of angiographic contrast media.

  20. Conversations with the community: the Methodist Hospital System's experience with social media.

    PubMed

    Angelle, Denny; Rose, Clare L

    2011-01-01

    The Methodist Hospital System has maintained a social media presence on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube since 2009. After initial unofficial excursions into the world of social media, we discovered that social media can be a useful tool to extend a conversation with our patients and the community at large and share our hospital's culture with a larger base of like-minded people. But with this new power comes a heightened responsibility--platforms that can potentially reach millions of viewers and readers also provide a potential for misuse that can jeopardize patient privacy and place hospitals at risk. Because of their unique restrictions, even hospitals that use the tools regularly have much left to learn about social media. With constant monitoring and stewardship and a commitment to educating staff, hospitals can effectively use social media tools for marketing and education. PMID:22256507

  1. "Social Media has Opened a World of 'Open communication:'" experiences of Adults with Cerebral Palsy who use Augmentative and Alternative Communication and Social Media.

    PubMed

    Caron, Jessica; Light, Janice

    2016-01-01

    An online focus group was used to investigate the experiences of nine individuals with cerebral palsy who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) and social media. Information was gathered related to (a) advantages of social media, (b) disadvantages of social media, (c) barriers to successful use, (d) supports to successful use, and (e) recommendations for other individuals using AAC, support personnel, policy makers, and technology developers. Participants primarily chose to focus on social media as a beneficial tool and viewed it as an important form of communication. The participants did describe barriers to social media use (e.g., technology). Despite barriers, all the participants in this study took an active role in learning to use social media. The results are discussed as they relate to themes and with reference to published literature. PMID:26056722

  2. "Social Media has Opened a World of 'Open communication:'" experiences of Adults with Cerebral Palsy who use Augmentative and Alternative Communication and Social Media.

    PubMed

    Caron, Jessica; Light, Janice

    2016-01-01

    An online focus group was used to investigate the experiences of nine individuals with cerebral palsy who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) and social media. Information was gathered related to (a) advantages of social media, (b) disadvantages of social media, (c) barriers to successful use, (d) supports to successful use, and (e) recommendations for other individuals using AAC, support personnel, policy makers, and technology developers. Participants primarily chose to focus on social media as a beneficial tool and viewed it as an important form of communication. The participants did describe barriers to social media use (e.g., technology). Despite barriers, all the participants in this study took an active role in learning to use social media. The results are discussed as they relate to themes and with reference to published literature.

  3. Evaluation of adverse reactions to contrast media in the hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, J-H; Kim, E-Y

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine and analyse the characteristics of contrast media adverse reactions (CM-ARs) reported in a hospital. Methods: A retrospective review of CM-ARs from the electronic spontaneous adverse drug reaction (ADR) report system between January 2011 and August 2012 was conducted. CM-ARs were evaluated in terms of causality, severity, preventability and affected organs. Also, agreement and correlation among the tools used to evaluate CM-ARs were analysed. Results: The overall reaction rate was 1.5% (n = 286). In total, 269 CM-ARs were identified. For ADR causality, 96.7% (n = 260) and 98.5% (n = 265) were evaluated as “probable” ADR using the Naranjo probability scale and the World Health Organization–Uppsala Monitoring Centre causality categories, whereas 98.1% (n = 264) were evaluated as “certain” with Korean algorithm v. II. Of these, 91.4% (n = 246) were mild in severity and 96.7% (n = 260) were unpreventable. Most patients (n = 233, 86.7%) could be managed with observation and/or simple treatment. The most frequent reaction (n = 383, 79.5%) was dermatological. Spearman's correlation coefficient was 0.667 (p < 0.01), and the agreement was 98.1% between the Naranjo scale and the World Health Organization–Uppsala Monitoring Centre categories. No relationship was seen between CM-AR severity and gender or between in- and outpatients. Conclusion: In our study, most CM-ARs were mild and managed with simple treatment. However, as the number of patients undergoing CT procedures continues to increase, it is essential to identify and observe patients at risk for CM-ARs to prevent severe ADRs. Advances in knowledge: Continuous careful review of reporting and treatment protocols of CM-ARs is needed to prevent morbidity and mortality. PMID:24191123

  4. Usability testing of gaming and social media applications for stroke and cerebral palsy upper limb rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Bulmaro A; Hilderman, Courtney G E; Hung, Chai-Ting; Shirzad, Navid; Van der Loos, H F Machiel

    2014-01-01

    As part of the FEATHERS (Functional Engagement in Assisted Therapy Through Exercise Robotics) project, two motion tracking and one social networking applications were developed for upper limb rehabilitation of stroke survivors and teenagers with cerebral palsy. The project aims to improve the engagement of clients during therapy by using video games and a social media platform. The applications allow users to control a cursor on a personal computer through bimanual motions, and to interact with their peers and therapists through the social media. The tracking applications use either a Microsoft Kinect or a PlayStation Eye camera, and the social media application was developed on Facebook. This paper presents a usability testing of these applications that was conducted with therapists from two rehabilitation clinics. The "Cognitive Walkthrough" and "Think Aloud" methods were used. The objectives of the study were to investigate the ease of use and potential issues or improvements of the applications, as well as the factors that facilitate and impede the adoption of technology in current rehabilitation programs. PMID:25570770

  5. Cerebral infarction in diabetes: Clinical pattern, stroke subtypes, and predictors of in-hospital mortality

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià; Rivas, Antoni; García-Eroles, Luis; de Marcos, Lourdes; Massons, Joan; Oliveres, Montserrat

    2005-01-01

    Background To compare the characteristics and prognostic features of ischemic stroke in patients with diabetes and without diabetes, and to determine the independent predictors of in-hospital mortality in people with diabetes and ischemic stroke. Methods Diabetes was diagnosed in 393 (21.3%) of 1,840 consecutive patients with cerebral infarction included in a prospective stroke registry over a 12-year period. Demographic characteristics, cardiovascular risk factors, clinical events, stroke subtypes, neuroimaging data, and outcome in ischemic stroke patients with and without diabetes were compared. Predictors of in-hospital mortality in diabetic patients with ischemic stroke were assessed by multivariate analysis. Results People with diabetes compared to people without diabetes presented more frequently atherothrombotic stroke (41.2% vs 27%) and lacunar infarction (35.1% vs 23.9%) (P < 0.01). The in-hospital mortality in ischemic stroke patients with diabetes was 12.5% and 14.6% in those without (P = NS). Ischemic heart disease, hyperlipidemia, subacute onset, 85 years old or more, atherothrombotic and lacunar infarcts, and thalamic topography were independently associated with ischemic stroke in patients with diabetes, whereas predictors of in-hospital mortality included the patient's age, decreased consciousness, chronic nephropathy, congestive heart failure and atrial fibrillation Conclusion Ischemic stroke in people with diabetes showed a different clinical pattern from those without diabetes, with atherothrombotic stroke and lacunar infarcts being more frequent. Clinical factors indicative of the severity of ischemic stroke available at onset have a predominant influence upon in-hospital mortality and may help clinicians to assess prognosis more accurately. PMID:15833108

  6. Happy crisis tests hospitals' PR plan. Septuplets' arrival swamps Iowa hospitals with national, international media. Blank Children's Hospital, Iowa Methodist Medical Center, Des Moines.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    The public relations staff believed the birth of healthy septuplets would become a human interest story for local media. But the staff was stunned at the outpouring of international and national media knocking at their front doors. The staff of both Iowa Methodist Medical Center and Blank Children's Hospital in Des Moines, Iowa, organized a communications plan for 14 official press conferences, constant updates to the media and a website to handle ongoing inquiries from the public. As a result, the story of the McCaughey septuplets was shown in more than 10,000 television stories around the world. The hospitals received more than 36,000 magazine and newspaper articles. The public relations staff not only fielded more than 2,000 phone calls in the days following the Nov. 19 birth, but more than 15 major networks parked their vehicles and satellite dishes in front of the hospital.

  7. Ruptured cerebral fusiform aneurysm with mucopolysaccharide deposits in the tunica media in a patient with Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Yoshitaka; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Kurose, Akira; Kakino, Shunsuke; Tomitsuka, Nobuhiko; Ogawa, Akira

    2009-03-01

    Although aortic or cardiac complications are common in patients with Marfan syndrome, the presence of an intracranial aneurysm is comparatively rare. In this study, the authors report on their experience with resection of a ruptured fusiform aneurysm of the posterior cerebral artery in a 30-year-old woman with Marfan syndrome. Microscopic examination of the resected tissue showed many Alcian blue-staining deposits, consistent with the presence of mucopolysaccharide in the tunica media and focal fragmentation of the internal elastic lamina.

  8. Use of social media by Spanish hospitals: perceptions, difficulties, and success factors.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez-Tamayo, Clara; Alba-Ruiz, Ruben; Jiménez-Pernett, Jaime; García Gutiérrez, José-Francisco; Traver-Salcedo, Vicente; Yubraham-Sánchez, David

    2013-02-01

    This exploratory study has two aims: (1) to find out if and how social media (SM) applications are used by hospitals in Spain and (2) to assess hospital managers' perception of these applications in terms of their evaluation of them, reasons for use, success factors, and difficulties encountered during their implementation. A cross-sectional survey has been carried out using Spanish hospitals as the unit of analysis. Geographical differences in the use of SM were found. Social networks are used most often by larger hospitals (30% by medium-size, 28% by large-size). They are also more frequently used by public hospitals (19%, p<0.01) than by private ones. Respondents with a negative perception of SM felt that there is a chance they may be abused by healthcare professionals, whereas those with a positive perception believed that they can be used to improve communication both within and outside the hospital. Reasons for the use of SM include the idea of maximizing exposure of the hospital. The results show that Spanish hospitals are only just beginning to use SM applications and that hospital type can influence their use. The perceptions, reasons for use, success factors, and difficulties encountered during the implementation of SM mean that it is very important for healthcare professionals to use SM correctly and adequately. PMID:23368890

  9. Use of Social Media by Spanish Hospitals: Perceptions, Difficulties, and Success Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bermúdez-Tamayo, Clara; Jiménez-Pernett, Jaime; García Gutiérrez, José-Francisco; Traver-Salcedo, Vicente; Yubraham-Sánchez, David

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This exploratory study has two aims: (1) to find out if and how social media (SM) applications are used by hospitals in Spain and (2) to assess hospital managers' perception of these applications in terms of their evaluation of them, reasons for use, success factors, and difficulties encountered during their implementation. A cross-sectional survey has been carried out using Spanish hospitals as the unit of analysis. Geographical differences in the use of SM were found. Social networks are used most often by larger hospitals (30% by medium-size, 28% by large-size). They are also more frequently used by public hospitals (19%, p<0.01) than by private ones. Respondents with a negative perception of SM felt that there is a chance they may be abused by healthcare professionals, whereas those with a positive perception believed that they can be used to improve communication both within and outside the hospital. Reasons for the use of SM include the idea of maximizing exposure of the hospital. The results show that Spanish hospitals are only just beginning to use SM applications and that hospital type can influence their use. The perceptions, reasons for use, success factors, and difficulties encountered during the implementation of SM mean that it is very important for healthcare professionals to use SM correctly and adequately. PMID:23368890

  10. Use of social media by Spanish hospitals: perceptions, difficulties, and success factors.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez-Tamayo, Clara; Alba-Ruiz, Ruben; Jiménez-Pernett, Jaime; García Gutiérrez, José-Francisco; Traver-Salcedo, Vicente; Yubraham-Sánchez, David

    2013-02-01

    This exploratory study has two aims: (1) to find out if and how social media (SM) applications are used by hospitals in Spain and (2) to assess hospital managers' perception of these applications in terms of their evaluation of them, reasons for use, success factors, and difficulties encountered during their implementation. A cross-sectional survey has been carried out using Spanish hospitals as the unit of analysis. Geographical differences in the use of SM were found. Social networks are used most often by larger hospitals (30% by medium-size, 28% by large-size). They are also more frequently used by public hospitals (19%, p<0.01) than by private ones. Respondents with a negative perception of SM felt that there is a chance they may be abused by healthcare professionals, whereas those with a positive perception believed that they can be used to improve communication both within and outside the hospital. Reasons for the use of SM include the idea of maximizing exposure of the hospital. The results show that Spanish hospitals are only just beginning to use SM applications and that hospital type can influence their use. The perceptions, reasons for use, success factors, and difficulties encountered during the implementation of SM mean that it is very important for healthcare professionals to use SM correctly and adequately.

  11. Participatory ergonomics simulation of hospital work systems: The influence of simulation media on simulation outcome.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Simone Nyholm; Broberg, Ole

    2015-11-01

    Current application of work system simulation in participatory ergonomics (PE) design includes a variety of different simulation media. However, the actual influence of the media attributes on the simulation outcome has received less attention. This study investigates two simulation media: full-scale mock-ups and table-top models. The aim is to compare, how the media attributes of fidelity and affordance influence the ergonomics identification and evaluation in PE design of hospital work systems. The results illustrate, how the full-scale mock-ups' high fidelity of room layout and affordance of tool operation support ergonomics identification and evaluation related to the work system entities space and technologies & tools. The table-top models' high fidelity of function relations and affordance of a helicopter view support ergonomics identification and evaluation related to the entity organization. Furthermore, the study addresses the form of the identified and evaluated conditions, being either identified challenges or tangible design criteria.

  12. Bidirectional encroachment of collagen into the tunica media in cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hairong; Blaivas, Mila; Wang, Michael M

    2012-05-25

    Arteries in cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) are susceptible to smooth muscle loss and fibrosis, but the molecular components underlying these dramatic vascular changes are not well characterized. The purpose of this study was to investigate the distribution of collagen isoforms in the cerebral vessels of North American CADASIL patients with classical NOTCH3 mutations. Expression of types I-VI collagen in brains obtained at autopsy from six CADASIL patients with cysteine-altering mutations in NOTCH3 was compared to control brain expression. We identified a consistent increase of types I, III, IV, and VI collagen in CADASIL brains. Strong accumulation of types I, III, IV and VI collagen was noted in all calibers of vessels, including small and medium-sized leptomeningeal arteries, small penetrating white matter arteries, and capillaries. Within leptomeningeal arteries, where we could define the three tunicae of each vessel, we found distinct collagen subtype distribution patterns in CADASIL. Types I and III collagen were largely found in either adventitial/medial or transmural locations. Type IV collagen was strictly intimal/medial. Type VI collagen was adventitial or adventitial/medial. Within the thickened penetrating arteries of CADASIL patients, all four collagens extended through most of the arterial wall. We observed increased staining of capillaries in CADASIL for types I, IV, and VI collagen. In conclusion, brain vascular collagen subtypes are increased in CADASIL in multiple layers of all sizes of arteries, with disease-specific changes most prominent in the tunica media and thickened small penetrating vessels. In diseased arteries, types I, III, and VI collagen spreads from an external location (adventitia) into the vascular media, while type IV collagen accumulates in an internal pattern (intima and media). These observations are consistent with a pathological role for collagen

  13. Public hospital quality report awareness: evidence from National and Californian Internet searches and social media mentions, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Huesch, Marco D; Currid-Halkett, Elizabeth; Doctor, Jason N

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Publicly available hospital quality reports seek to inform consumers of important healthcare quality and affordability attributes, and may inform consumer decision-making. To understand how much consumers search for such information online on one Internet search engine, whether they mention such information in social media and how positively they view this information. Setting and design A leading Internet search engine (Google) was the main focus of the study. Google Trends and Google Adwords keyword analyses were performed for national and Californian searches between 1 August 2012 and 31 July 2013 for keywords related to ‘top hospital’, best hospital’, and ‘hospital quality’, as well as for six specific hospital quality reports. Separately, a proprietary social media monitoring tool was used to investigate blog, forum, social media and traditional media mentions of, and sentiment towards, major public reports of hospital quality in California in 2012. Primary outcome measures (1) Counts of searches for keywords performed on Google; (2) counts of and (3) sentiment of mentions of public reports on social media. Results National Google search volume for 75 hospital quality-related terms averaged 610 700 searches per month with strong variation by keyword and by state. A commercial report (Healthgrades) was more commonly searched for nationally on Google than the federal government's Hospital Compare, which otherwise dominated quality-related search terms. Social media references in California to quality reports were generally few, and commercially produced hospital quality reports were more widely mentioned than state (Office of Statewide Healthcare Planning and Development (OSHPD)), or non-profit (CalHospitalCompare) reports. Conclusions Consumers are somewhat aware of hospital quality based on Internet search activity and social media disclosures. Public stakeholders may be able to broaden their quality dissemination initiatives by

  14. Can social media be used as a hospital quality improvement tool?

    PubMed

    Lagu, Tara; Goff, Sarah L; Craft, Ben; Calcasola, Stephanie; Benjamin, Evan M; Priya, Aruna; Lindenauer, Peter K

    2016-01-01

    Many hospitals wish to improve their patients' experience of care. To learn whether social media could be used as a tool to engage patients and to identify opportunities for hospital quality improvement (QI), we solicited patients' narrative feedback on the Baystate Medical Center Facebook page during a 3-week period in 2014. Two investigators used directed qualitative content analysis to code comments and descriptive statistics to assess the frequency of selected codes and themes. We identified common themes, including: (1) comments about staff (17/37 respondents, 45.9%); (2) comments about specific departments (22/37, 59.5%); (3) comments on technical aspects of care, including perceived errors and inattention to pain control (9/37, 24.3%); and (4) comments describing the hospital physical plant, parking, and amenities (9/37, 24.3%). A small number (n = 3) of patients repeatedly responded, accounting for 30% (45/148) of narratives. Although patient feedback on social media could help to drive hospital QI efforts, any potential benefits must be weighed against the reputational risks, the lack of representativeness among respondents, and the volume of responses needed to identify areas of improvement.

  15. Can social media be used as a hospital quality improvement tool?

    PubMed

    Lagu, Tara; Goff, Sarah L; Craft, Ben; Calcasola, Stephanie; Benjamin, Evan M; Priya, Aruna; Lindenauer, Peter K

    2016-01-01

    Many hospitals wish to improve their patients' experience of care. To learn whether social media could be used as a tool to engage patients and to identify opportunities for hospital quality improvement (QI), we solicited patients' narrative feedback on the Baystate Medical Center Facebook page during a 3-week period in 2014. Two investigators used directed qualitative content analysis to code comments and descriptive statistics to assess the frequency of selected codes and themes. We identified common themes, including: (1) comments about staff (17/37 respondents, 45.9%); (2) comments about specific departments (22/37, 59.5%); (3) comments on technical aspects of care, including perceived errors and inattention to pain control (9/37, 24.3%); and (4) comments describing the hospital physical plant, parking, and amenities (9/37, 24.3%). A small number (n = 3) of patients repeatedly responded, accounting for 30% (45/148) of narratives. Although patient feedback on social media could help to drive hospital QI efforts, any potential benefits must be weighed against the reputational risks, the lack of representativeness among respondents, and the volume of responses needed to identify areas of improvement. PMID:26390277

  16. In the Know and in the News: How Science and the Media Communicate About Stem Cells, Autism and Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Kimberly; Di Pietro, Nina; Illes, Judy

    2016-02-01

    Stem cell research has generated considerable attention for its potential to remediate many disorders of the central nervous system including neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and cerebral palsy (CP) that place a high burden on individual children, families and society. Here we characterized messaging about the use of stem cells for ASD and CP in news media articles and concurrent dissemination of discoveries through conventional science discourse. We searched LexisNexis and Canadian Newsstand for news articles from the US, UK, Canada and Australia in the period between 2000 and 2014, and PubMed for peer reviewed articles for the same 10 years. Using in-depth content analysis methods, we found less cautionary messaging about stem cells for ASD and CP in the resulting sample of 73 media articles than in the sample of 87 science papers, and a privileging of benefits over risk. News media also present stem cells as ready for clinical application to treat these neurodevelopmental disorders, even while the science literature calls for further research. Investigative news reports that explicitly quote researchers, however, provide the most accurate information to actual science news. The hope, hype, and promise of stem cell interventions for neurodevelopmental disorders, combined with the extreme vulnerability of these children and their families, creates a perfect storm in which journalists and stem cell scientists must commit to a continued, if not even more robust, partnership to promote balanced and accurate messaging.

  17. Cerebral sinovenous thrombosis in a child with Crohn’s disease, otitis media, and meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Selvitop, Omer; Poretti, Andrea; Huisman, Thierry AGM

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CSVT) is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Severe long-term sequelae are reported in up to 48% of children. The most frequent location of CSVT in children is the superficial venous system. We present the neuroimaging findings using both computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a 10-year-old child with extensive superficial CSVT. Our report aims to stress the importance of awareness of risk factors in suspecting and rapidly diagnosing CSVT. The application of targeted conventional and advanced MRI sequences is the diagnostic tool of choice in children at risk of or with clinically suspected CSVT. PMID:26246095

  18. Web site for St. Jude Children's is lively with media, volunteer info. 'Danny Thomas' hospital' helps children with research.

    PubMed

    Botvin, J D

    2001-01-01

    The Web site for St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tenn., is lively with volunteer and fundraising information. The importance of media coverage is recognized in a section which provides a generous selection of radio, TV and print material. PMID:11467199

  19. Georgia Hospital Association leads long-term staff recruiting effort. Reaches wide target audience through innovative media use.

    PubMed

    Botvin, Judith D

    2003-01-01

    The Georgia Hospital Association (GHA), faced with a critical healthcare workforce shortage, created a long-term response to the problem by creating a Workforce Shortage Media Campaign. Its single purpose was to encourage Georgians to pursue careers in healthcare. The four-week campaign took six months to develop and included print, radio and television.

  20. Migrainous cerebral infarction in the Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona stroke registry.

    PubMed

    Arboix, A; Massons, J; García-Eroles, L; Oliveres, M; Balcells, M; Targa, C

    2003-06-01

    Nine of 2000 consecutive stroke patients included in the Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona Stroke Registry over a 10-year period fulfilled the strictly defined International Headache Society criteria for migrainous stroke and in whom other causes of stroke were ruled out. They accounted for 13% of all first-ever ischaemic stroke of unusual cause. Migrainous stroke was more common in women (67%) and in patients aged 45 years or younger (78%) compared to the remaining ischaemic strokes of unusual cause. No patient died during hospital stay and 67% were symptom-free at discharge. In the multivariate analysis, nausea or vomiting (odds ratio (OR) 8.40, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.49-47.21) and age (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.91-0.99) were predictors of migrainous stroke. Migrainous stroke is a rare entity. Vascular risk factors are uncommon and the prognosis is generally good. Patients with migrainous stroke present some different clinical features from other ischaemic strokes of unusual aetiology.

  1. The Human Performance Technology Model as a Framework for Implementation of Social Media in Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szyszlo, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    Social media are ubiquitous and used by millions of people every day. Existing research on social media is primarily descriptive, survey based, and focused on who is using social media and how people and organizations are using the tools. Although many organizations have shown interest in using social media, they often demonstrate uncertainty…

  2. Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Lee E., Ed.

    1974-01-01

    Intended for secondary English teachers, the materials and ideas presented here suggest ways to use media in the classroom in teaching visual and auditory discrimination while enlivening classes and motivating students. Contents include "Media Specialists Need Not Apply," which discusses the need for preparation of media educators with…

  3. Cerebral phaeohyphomycosis by Exophiala dermatitidis.

    PubMed

    Sood, S; Vaid, V K; Sharma, M; Bhartiya, H

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral phaeohyphomycosis is a rare and frequently fatal disease. We report a case of cerebral phaeohyphomycosis caused by Exophiala dermatitidis in a young immuno competent male presenting to a tertiary care hospital in Jaipur. PMID:24713913

  4. Microbiology of acute mastoiditis and complicated or refractory acute otitis media among hospitalized children in the postvaccination era.

    PubMed

    Giannakopoulos, Polyvios; Chrysovergis, Aristeidis; Xirogianni, Athanasia; Nikolopoulos, Thomas P; Radiotis, Alexandros; Lebessi, Evangelia; Tsakanikos, Michail; Tzanakaki, Georgina; Tsolia, Maria N

    2014-01-01

    In the post-heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine era, Streptococcus pneumoniae remains the leading cause of acute mastoiditis and other complicated or refractory acute otitis media among hospitalized children in our settings. Serotype 19A is predominant, invasive and multidrug resistant causing more than half of all mastoiditis cases, two-thirds of cases with subperiosteal abscess and all those requiring mastoidectomy. Continuous surveillance is required.

  5. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Teens > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... do just what everyone else does. What Is Cerebral Palsy? Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder of the ...

  6. Status update. Hospitals are finding ways to use the social media revolution to raise money, engage patients and connect with their communities.

    PubMed

    Galloro, Vince

    2011-03-14

    As the social media revolution being built around Facebook, Twitter and YouTube has taken hold, hospitals haven't been left behind. Many see it as a vital part of communicating with their community. "We're really getting to the point where, if you want to be visible on the Internet, you have to be visible on social media," says Ed Bennett, left, of the University of Maryland Medical Center. PMID:21513035

  7. Contrast Induced Nephropathy with Intravenous Iodinated Contrast Media in Routine Diagnostic Imaging: An Initial Experience in a Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Shuchi; Rajpal, Nipun; Rathi, Vineeta; Avasthi, Rajneesh

    2016-01-01

    Background. Contrast induced nephropathy (CIN) is common cause of hospital acquired renal failure, defined as iatrogenic deterioration of renal function following intravascular contrast administration in the absence of another nephrotoxic event. Objectives. Objectives were to calculate incidence of CIN with routine IV contrast usage and to identify its risk factors. Materials and Methods. Study was conducted on 250 patients (having eGFR ≥ 45 mL/min/1.73 m2) receiving intravenous contrast. Various clinical risk factors and details of contrast media were recorded. Patients showing 25% increase in postprocedural serum creatinine value or an absolute increase of 0.5 mg/dL (44.2 mmol/L) were diagnosed as having CIN. Results and Conclusions. Postprocedural serum creatinine showed significant increase from baseline levels. 25 patients (10%) developed CIN. CIN was transient in 21 (84%) patients developing CIN. One patient (4%) developed renal failure and another died due to unknown cause. Dehydration, preexisting renal disease, cardiac failure, previous contrast administration, and volume of contrast had significant correlation with development of CIN (p < 0.05); whereas demographic variables, baseline serum creatinine/eGFR, previous renal surgery, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, nephrotoxic drug intake, abnormal routine hematology, and contrast characteristics had no correlation with CIN. CIN is a matter of concern even in routine imaging requiring intravenous contrast media, in our set-up. PMID:27069686

  8. Using Social Media to Perform Local Influenza Surveillance in an Inner-City Hospital: A Retrospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Dredze, Mark; Paul, Michael J; Dugas, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background Public health officials and policy makers in the United States expend significant resources at the national, state, county, and city levels to measure the rate of influenza infection. These individuals rely on influenza infection rate information to make important decisions during the course of an influenza season driving vaccination campaigns, clinical guidelines, and medical staffing. Web and social media data sources have emerged as attractive alternatives to supplement existing practices. While traditional surveillance methods take 1-2 weeks, and significant labor, to produce an infection estimate in each locale, web and social media data are available in near real-time for a broad range of locations. Objective The objective of this study was to analyze the efficacy of flu surveillance from combining data from the websites Google Flu Trends and HealthTweets at the local level. We considered both emergency department influenza-like illness cases and laboratory-confirmed influenza cases for a single hospital in the City of Baltimore. Methods This was a retrospective observational study comparing estimates of influenza activity of Google Flu Trends and Twitter to actual counts of individuals with laboratory-confirmed influenza, and counts of individuals presenting to the emergency department with influenza-like illness cases. Data were collected from November 20, 2011 through March 16, 2014. Each parameter was evaluated on the municipal, regional, and national scale. We examined the utility of social media data for tracking actual influenza infection at the municipal, state, and national levels. Specifically, we compared the efficacy of Twitter and Google Flu Trends data. Results We found that municipal-level Twitter data was more effective than regional and national data when tracking actual influenza infection rates in a Baltimore inner-city hospital. When combined, national-level Twitter and Google Flu Trends data outperformed each data source

  9. Reason and Reaction: The Dual Route of Decision Making Process on Social Media Usage: The Case of Hospitality Brand Fan Pages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manthiou, Aikaterini

    2012-01-01

    A new phenomenon on Facebook, resulting from social media revolution, is the emergence of numerous Facebook fan pages. This form of online brand community is an effective tool for building relationships with consumers. Many hospitality firms (i.e. restaurants) have captured the strength of a fan page because it can enhance brand attractiveness and…

  10. Exploratory Study on the Ayurvedic Therapeutic Management of Cerebral Palsy in Children at a Tertiary Care Hospital of Karnataka, India

    PubMed Central

    Shailaja, U; Rao, Prasanna N.; Debnath, Parikshit; Adhikari, Anjan

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is the leading cause of childhood disability affecting cognitive function and developments in approximately 1.5 to 3 cases per 1000 live births. Based on Ayurvedic therapeutic principles, CP patients were subjected to Abhyanga (massage) with Moorchita Tila Taila (processed sesame oil) and Svedana (fomentation) with Shastikashali Pinda Sveda (fomentation with bolus of drugs prepared with boiled rice). Study group received Mustadi Rajayapana Basti (enema with herbal decoction) and Baladi Yoga (a poly-herbo-mineral formulation), while the placebo group received Godhuma Vati (tablet prepared with wheat powder) and saline water as enema. Treatment with Mustadi Rajayapana Basti and Baladi Yoga improved the activities of daily life by 8.79%, gross motor functions by 19.76%, and fine motor functions 15.05%, and mental functions like memory retention got improved by 15.43%. The placebo group showed an improvement of 0.21% in daily life activities, 2.8% in gross motor, and 2.4% in fine motor functions. Mustadi Rajayapana Basti and Baladi Yoga proved to be more supportive in improving the motor activities and gross behavioral pattern. Further clinical trials are required to evaluate and validate the maximum effect of the combination therapy in a large sample with repetition of the courses for longer duration. PMID:24872933

  11. Exploratory study on the ayurvedic therapeutic management of cerebral palsy in children at a tertiary care hospital of karnataka, India.

    PubMed

    Shailaja, U; Rao, Prasanna N; Debnath, Parikshit; Adhikari, Anjan

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is the leading cause of childhood disability affecting cognitive function and developments in approximately 1.5 to 3 cases per 1000 live births. Based on Ayurvedic therapeutic principles, CP patients were subjected to Abhyanga (massage) with Moorchita Tila Taila (processed sesame oil) and Svedana (fomentation) with Shastikashali Pinda Sveda (fomentation with bolus of drugs prepared with boiled rice). Study group received Mustadi Rajayapana Basti (enema with herbal decoction) and Baladi Yoga (a poly-herbo-mineral formulation), while the placebo group received Godhuma Vati (tablet prepared with wheat powder) and saline water as enema. Treatment with Mustadi Rajayapana Basti and Baladi Yoga improved the activities of daily life by 8.79%, gross motor functions by 19.76%, and fine motor functions 15.05%, and mental functions like memory retention got improved by 15.43%. The placebo group showed an improvement of 0.21% in daily life activities, 2.8% in gross motor, and 2.4% in fine motor functions. Mustadi Rajayapana Basti and Baladi Yoga proved to be more supportive in improving the motor activities and gross behavioral pattern. Further clinical trials are required to evaluate and validate the maximum effect of the combination therapy in a large sample with repetition of the courses for longer duration. PMID:24872933

  12. Cerebral Hypoxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Hypoxia Information Page Synonym(s): Hypoxia, Anoxia Table of Contents ( ... Trials Organizations Publicaciones en Español What is Cerebral Hypoxia? Cerebral hypoxia refers to a condition in which ...

  13. Decentralized collection of iodinated x-ray contrast media in hospitals-results of the feasibility study and the practice test phase.

    PubMed

    Heinzmann, Bernd; Schwarz, Rolf-Jürgen; Schuster, Petra; Pineau, Claire

    2008-01-01

    Iodinated x-ray contrast media are unmetabolized and almost completely with the urine in 24 hours emitted in the wastewater after their application by human being. These very polar, hydrophilic and hardly biodegradable substances have already been detected in the water cycle. The objective of this R&D project is the collection of the x-ray contrast media already at the source in the hospital and so the avoidance of an emission in the water cycle. Three concepts have been developed in the scope of this R&D project: a centralized collection concept with a no-mix toilet in the radiology unit, a decentralized collection concept featuring a no-mix toilet for every of the ward and another decentralized collection concept with mobile urine containers for the wards. The evaluation of the collection concepts has taken systematically into consideration costs, acceptance and a value benefit analysis. The feasibility study has shown that a separated collection of iodinated x-ray contrast media in hospitals is possible through the implementation of a decentralized urine collection concept using mobile urine containers. This decentralised collection concept was tested in each case on one main focus ward of two representative German hospitals for 20 weeks. In both wards of the hospitals around 60% of patients with an examination of x-ray contrast media took part in the voluntary urine collection. The AOX arose from the iodinated x-ray contrast media in the collected urine. The averaged measured AOI concentration in the patient's urine was 18 g/l. The total costs, formed by the costs for staff, material and disposal, were estimated at 10 euro per patient, 7 euro per litre urine and approximate 380 euro per kilogramme iodine for the separated urine collection in hospitals. The main part of the total costs is formed by the costs for staff with around 80%. This R&D project has shown that the separated collection of the patients' urine with a simple and decentralised collection

  14. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Kids > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... the things that kids do every day. What's CP? Some kids with CP use wheelchairs and others ...

  15. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss > Birth defects & other health conditions > Cerebral palsy Cerebral palsy E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... movement problems a child has. What is spastic CP? Spastic means tight or stiff muscles, or muscles ...

  16. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  17. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Palsy Information Page Clinical Trials Trial of Erythropoietin Neuroprotection ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Cerebral Palsy? The term cerebral palsy refers to a group ...

  18. Cerebral Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Aneurysms Information Page Synonym(s): Aneurysm, Brain Aneurysm Condensed from ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Cerebral Aneurysms? A cerebral aneurysm is a weak or thin ...

  19. Cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Wimalasundera, Neil; Stevenson, Valerie L

    2016-06-01

    Cerebral palsy has always been known as a disorder of movement and posture resulting from a non-progressive injury to the developing brain; however, more recent definitions allow clinicians to appreciate more than just the movement disorder. Accurate classification of cerebral palsy into distribution, motor type and functional level has advanced research. It also facilitates appropriate targeting of interventions to functional level and more accurate prognosis prediction. The prevalence of cerebral palsy remains fairly static at 2-3 per 1000 live births but there have been some changes in trends for specific causal groups. Interventions for cerebral palsy have historically been medical and physically focused, often with limited evidence to support their efficacy. The use of more appropriate outcome measures encompassing quality of life and participation is helping to deliver treatments which are more meaningful for people with cerebral palsy and their carers.

  20. Prospective study about the incidence of B lactamase producing bacteriae in otitis media in the population of the emergency room of the University Pediatric Hospital.

    PubMed

    Colón, I; García, H

    1990-05-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine the incidence of beta-lactamase producing pathogens causing otitis media (O.M.) in the Emergency Room population of the University Pediatric Hospital. In our first four months of study, 22 patients, between the ages of 6 months to 13 y/o have been evaluated. Middle ear secretion cultures were obtained by tympanocentesis. The organisms recovered from cultures were S. epidermidis 3 (14%), S. pneumoniae 2 (9%) H. influenzae 1 (5%), mix flora 1 (5%) and 13 (59%) with no growth. None of these organisms were beta-lactamase producers. Up to 64% of the patients had history of 2 to 5 OM episodes during the last six months. Interesting is the association of bronchial asthma, sinusitis and allergy history with OM. Final study results will be presented in a near future. PMID:2375816

  1. Cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Graham, H Kerr; Rosenbaum, Peter; Paneth, Nigel; Dan, Bernard; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Damiano, Diane L; Becher, Jules G; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; Colver, Allan; Reddihough, Dinah S; Crompton, Kylie E; Lieber, Richard L

    2016-01-07

    Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of childhood-onset, lifelong physical disability in most countries, affecting about 1 in 500 neonates with an estimated prevalence of 17 million people worldwide. Cerebral palsy is not a disease entity in the traditional sense but a clinical description of children who share features of a non-progressive brain injury or lesion acquired during the antenatal, perinatal or early postnatal period. The clinical manifestations of cerebral palsy vary greatly in the type of movement disorder, the degree of functional ability and limitation and the affected parts of the body. There is currently no cure, but progress is being made in both the prevention and the amelioration of the brain injury. For example, administration of magnesium sulfate during premature labour and cooling of high-risk infants can reduce the rate and severity of cerebral palsy. Although the disorder affects individuals throughout their lifetime, most cerebral palsy research efforts and management strategies currently focus on the needs of children. Clinical management of children with cerebral palsy is directed towards maximizing function and participation in activities and minimizing the effects of the factors that can make the condition worse, such as epilepsy, feeding challenges, hip dislocation and scoliosis. These management strategies include enhancing neurological function during early development; managing medical co-morbidities, weakness and hypertonia; using rehabilitation technologies to enhance motor function; and preventing secondary musculoskeletal problems. Meeting the needs of people with cerebral palsy in resource-poor settings is particularly challenging.

  2. Cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Graham, H Kerr; Rosenbaum, Peter; Paneth, Nigel; Dan, Bernard; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Damiano, Diane L; Becher, Jules G; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; Colver, Allan; Reddihough, Dinah S; Crompton, Kylie E; Lieber, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of childhood-onset, lifelong physical disability in most countries, affecting about 1 in 500 neonates with an estimated prevalence of 17 million people worldwide. Cerebral palsy is not a disease entity in the traditional sense but a clinical description of children who share features of a non-progressive brain injury or lesion acquired during the antenatal, perinatal or early postnatal period. The clinical manifestations of cerebral palsy vary greatly in the type of movement disorder, the degree of functional ability and limitation and the affected parts of the body. There is currently no cure, but progress is being made in both the prevention and the amelioration of the brain injury. For example, administration of magnesium sulfate during premature labour and cooling of high-risk infants can reduce the rate and severity of cerebral palsy. Although the disorder affects individuals throughout their lifetime, most cerebral palsy research efforts and management strategies currently focus on the needs of children. Clinical management of children with cerebral palsy is directed towards maximizing function and participation in activities and minimizing the effects of the factors that can make the condition worse, such as epilepsy, feeding challenges, hip dislocation and scoliosis. These management strategies include enhancing neurological function during early development; managing medical co-morbidities, weakness and hypertonia; using rehabilitation technologies to enhance motor function; and preventing secondary musculoskeletal problems. Meeting the needs of people with cerebral palsy in resource-poor settings is particularly challenging. PMID:27188686

  3. Prevalence and molecular characterization of Enterobacteriaceae producing NDM-1 carbapenemase at a military hospital in Pakistan and evaluation of two chromogenic media.

    PubMed

    Day, Kathryn M; Ali, Shamshad; Mirza, Irfan Ali; Sidjabat, Hanna E; Silvey, Anna; Lanyon, Clare V; Cummings, Stephen P; Abbasi, Shahid Ahmed; Raza, Muhammad W; Paterson, David L; Perry, John D

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the frequency and genotypic diversity of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) in stool samples from patients attending a military hospital in Pakistan. Further aims included the identification of factors that might predispose to faecal carriage and evaluation of 2 chromogenic culture media: Brilliance CRE and chromID CARBA. Of 175 patients, 32 (18.3%) had faecal carriage of CPE and all produced NDM-1 carbapenemase. All of these 32 patients were detected using chromID CARBA compared with 20 patients (62.5%) detected using Brilliance CRE (P = 0.0015). Duration of hospitalization and treatment with co-amoxyclav were statistically associated with a higher likelihood of carriage of CPE (P ≤ 0.05). The majority of NDM-1-producing Enterobacteriaceae co-produced CTX-M-1 group extended spectrum β-lactamase, and one third produced armA-type methylase. NDM-1 carbapenemase was most commonly found amongst commensal types of Escherichia coli, especially phylogenetic group B1.

  4. Cerebral palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... with pain and spasticity Place feeding tubes Release joint contractures ... the hip joint Injuries from falls Pressure sores Joint ... of the people who are affected by cerebral palsy) Social stigma

  5. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of disorders that affect a ... ability to move and maintain balance and posture. CP is the most common motor disability in childhood. ...

  6. Cerebral Arteriosclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cerebral arteriosclerosis is the result of thickening and hardening of the walls of the arteries in the ... cause an ischemic stroke. When the thickening and hardening is uneven, arterial walls can develop bulges (called ...

  7. Cerebral hypoxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... death. Treatment depends on the cause of the hypoxia. Basic life support is most important. Treatment involves: Breathing ... Complications of cerebral hypoxia include a prolonged vegetative ... sleep-wake cycle, and eye opening, but the person is not alert ...

  8. Cerebral Paragonimiasis.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, I

    1975-01-01

    The first case of cerebral paragonimiasis was reported by Otani in Japan in 1887. This was nine years after Kerbert's discovery of the fluke in the lungs of Bengal tigers and seven years after a human pulmonary infection by the fluke was demonstrated by Baelz and Manson. The first case was a 26-year-old man who had been suffering from cough and hemosputum for one year. The patient developed convulsive seizures with subsequent coma and died. The postmortem examination showed cystic lesions in the right frontal and occipital lobes. An adult fluke was found in the occipital lesion and another was seen in a gross specimen of normal brain tissue around the affected occipital lobe. Two years after Otani's discovery, at autopsy a 29-year-old man with a history of Jacksonian seizure was reported as having cerebral paragonimiasis. Some time later, however, it was confirmed that the case was actually cerebral schistosomiasis japonica. Subsequently, cases of cerebral paragonimiasis were reported. However, the majority of these cases were not confirmed histologically. It was pointed out that some of these early cases were probably not Paragonimus infection. After World War II, reviews as well as case reports were published. Recently, investigations have been reported from Korea, with a clinicla study on 62 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis seen at the Neurology Department of the National Medical Center, Seoul, between 1958 and 1964. In 1971 Higashi described a statistical study on 105 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis that had been treated surgically in Japan.

  9. Cerebral Paragonimiasis.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, I

    1975-01-01

    The first case of cerebral paragonimiasis was reported by Otani in Japan in 1887. This was nine years after Kerbert's discovery of the fluke in the lungs of Bengal tigers and seven years after a human pulmonary infection by the fluke was demonstrated by Baelz and Manson. The first case was a 26-year-old man who had been suffering from cough and hemosputum for one year. The patient developed convulsive seizures with subsequent coma and died. The postmortem examination showed cystic lesions in the right frontal and occipital lobes. An adult fluke was found in the occipital lesion and another was seen in a gross specimen of normal brain tissue around the affected occipital lobe. Two years after Otani's discovery, at autopsy a 29-year-old man with a history of Jacksonian seizure was reported as having cerebral paragonimiasis. Some time later, however, it was confirmed that the case was actually cerebral schistosomiasis japonica. Subsequently, cases of cerebral paragonimiasis were reported. However, the majority of these cases were not confirmed histologically. It was pointed out that some of these early cases were probably not Paragonimus infection. After World War II, reviews as well as case reports were published. Recently, investigations have been reported from Korea, with a clinicla study on 62 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis seen at the Neurology Department of the National Medical Center, Seoul, between 1958 and 1964. In 1971 Higashi described a statistical study on 105 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis that had been treated surgically in Japan. PMID:1095292

  10. Cerebral Palsy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Parents > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... kids who are living with the condition. About Cerebral Palsy Cerebral palsy is one of the most common ...

  11. Cerebral palsy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cerebral palsy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cerebral palsy : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/cerebral_palsy/cerebral_palsy. ...

  12. Pharmaceuticals and iodinated contrast media in a hospital wastewater: A case study to analyse their presence and characterise their environmental risk and hazard.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, A; Aceña, J; Pérez, S; López de Alda, M; Barceló, D; Gil, A; Valcárcel, Y

    2015-07-01

    This work analyses the presence of twenty-five pharmaceutical compounds belonging to seven different therapeutic groups and one iodinated contrast media (ICM) in a Spanish medium-size hospital located in the Valencia Region. Analysis of the target compounds in the hospital wastewater was performed by means of solid phase extraction (SPE) followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis (HPLC-MS/MS). A screening level risk assessment combining the measured environmental concentrations (MECs) with dose-response data based on Predicted No Effect Concentration (PNEC) was also applied to estimate Hazard Quotients (HQs) for the compounds investigated. Additionally, the environmental hazard associated to the various compounds measured was assessed through the calculation of the Persistence, Bioaccumulation and Toxicity (PBT) Index, which categorizes compounds according to their environmentally damaging characteristics. The results of the study showed the presence of twenty-four out of the twenty-six compounds analysed at individual concentrations ranging from 5 ng L(-1) to 2 mg L(-1). The highest concentrations corresponded to the ICM iomeprol, found at levels between 424 and 2093 μg L(-1), the analgesic acetaminophen (15-44 μg L(-1)), the diuretic (DIU) furosemide (6-15 μg L(-1)), and the antibiotics (ABIs) ofloxacin and trimethoprim (2-5 μg L(-1)). The lowest levels corresponded to the anti-inflammatory propyphenazone, found at concentrations between 5 and 44 ng L(-1). Differences in terms of concentrations of the analysed compounds have been observed in all the therapeutic groups when comparing the results obtained in this and other recent studies carried out in hospitals with different characteristics from different geographical areas and in different seasons. The screening level risk assessment performed in raw water from the hospital effluent showed that the analgesics and anti-inflammatories (AAFs) acetaminophen, diclofenac, ibuprofen and

  13. Cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Colver, Allan; Fairhurst, Charles; Pharoah, Peter O D

    2014-04-01

    The syndrome of cerebral palsy encompasses a large group of childhood movement and posture disorders. Severity, patterns of motor involvement, and associated impairments such as those of communication, intellectual ability, and epilepsy vary widely. Overall prevalence has remained stable in the past 40 years at 2-3·5 cases per 1000 livebirths, despite changes in antenatal and perinatal care. The few studies available from developing countries suggest prevalence of comparable magnitude. Cerebral palsy is a lifelong disorder; approaches to intervention, whether at an individual or environmental level, should recognise that quality of life and social participation throughout life are what individuals with cerebral palsy seek, not improved physical function for its own sake. In the past few years, the cerebral palsy community has learned that the evidence of benefit for the numerous drugs, surgery, and therapies used over previous decades is weak. Improved understanding of the role of multiple gestation in pathogenesis, of gene environment interaction, and how to influence brain plasticity could yield significant advances in treatment of the disorder. Reduction in the prevalence of post-neonatal cerebral palsy, especially in developing countries, should be possible through improved nutrition, infection control, and accident prevention.

  14. Employees with Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Cerebral Palsy (CP) By Eddie Whidden, MA Preface Introduction Information About ... SOAR) at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Cerebral Palsy (CP) What is CP? Cerebral palsy is a ...

  15. Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet See a list of all NINDS ... I get more information? What is a cerebral aneurysm? A cerebral aneurysm (also known as an intracranial ...

  16. Cerebral Microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Young, Bethany; Kalanuria, Atul; Kumar, Monisha; Burke, Kathryn; Balu, Ramani; Amendolia, Olivia; McNulty, Kyle; Marion, BethAnn; Beckmann, Brittany; Ciocco, Lauren; Miller, Kimberly; Schuele, Donnamarie; Maloney-Wilensky, Eileen; Frangos, Suzanne; Wright, Danielle

    2016-03-01

    A variety of neuromonitoring techniques are available to aid in the care of neurocritically ill patients. However, traditional monitors lack the ability to measure brain biochemistry and may provide inadequate warning of potentially reversible deleterious conditions. Cerebral microdialysis (CMD) is a safe, novel method of monitoring regional brain biochemistry. Analysis of CMD analytes as part of a multimodal approach may help inform clinical decision making, guide medical treatments, and aid in prognostication of patient outcome. Its use is most frequently documented in traumatic brain injury and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Incorporating CMD into clinical practice is a multidisciplinary effort.

  17. Cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Postels, Douglas G; Birbeck, Gretchen L

    2013-01-01

    Malaria, the most significant parasitic disease of man, kills approximately one million people per year. Half of these deaths occur in those with cerebral malaria (CM). The World Health Organization (WHO) defines CM as an otherwise unexplained coma in a patient with malarial parasitemia. Worldwide, CM occurs primarily in African children and Asian adults, with the vast majority (greater than 90%) of cases occurring in children 5 years old or younger in sub-Saharan Africa. The pathophysiology of the disease is complex and involves infected erythrocyte sequestration, cerebral inflammation, and breakdown of the blood-brain barrier. A recently characterized malarial retinopathy is visual evidence of Plasmodium falciparum's pathophysiological processes occurring in the affected patient. Treatment consists of supportive care and antimalarial administration. Thus far, adjuvant therapies have not been shown to improve mortality rates or neurological outcomes in children with CM. For those who survive CM, residual neurological abnormalities are common. Epilepsy, cognitive impairment, behavioral disorders, and gross neurological deficits which include motor, sensory, and language impairments are frequent sequelae. Primary prevention strategies, including bed nets, vaccine development, and chemoprophylaxis, are in varied states of development and implementation. Continuing efforts to find successful primary prevention options and strategies to decrease neurological sequelae are needed. PMID:23829902

  18. [Cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Malagón Valdez, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    The term cerebral palsy (CP), is used for a great number of clinical neurological syndromes. The syndromes are characterized by having a common cause, motor defects. It is important, because they can cause a brain damage by presenting motor defects and some associated deficiencies, such as mental deficiency, epilepsy, language and visual defects and pseudobulbar paralysis, with the non-evolving fact. Some authors prefer using terms such as "non-evolving encephalopathies". In the treatment the utility of prevention programs of early stimulation and special rehabilitation methods, and treatment of associated deficiencies such as epilepsy, mental deficiency, language, audition and visual problems, and the attention deficit improve the prognosis in an important way. The prognosis depends on the severity of the disease and the associated manifestations. PMID:18422084

  19. Cerebral Contusions and Lacerations

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stretch Additional Content Medical News Cerebral Contusions and Lacerations By James E. Wilberger, MD, Derrick A. Dupre, ... a direct, strong blow to the head. Cerebral lacerations are tears in brain tissue, caused by a ...

  20. Cerebral aneurysm (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... area within the vessel wall. If a cerebral (brain) aneurysm ruptures, the escaping blood within the brain may cause severe neurologic complications or death. A person who has a ruptured cerebral aneurysm may complain of the sudden onset of "the ...

  1. United Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... be sure to follow us on Twitter . United Cerebral Palsy UCP educates, advocates and provides support services to ... Partners Merz Logo Sprint Relay Copyright © 2015 United Cerebral Palsy 1825 K Street NW Suite 600 Washington, DC ...

  2. Aging and Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Networker, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This special edition of "The Networker" contains several articles focusing on aging and cerebral palsy (CP). "Aging and Cerebral Palsy: Pathways to Successful Aging" (Jenny C. Overeynder) reports on the National Invitational Colloquium on Aging and Cerebral Palsy held in April 1993. "Observations from an Observer" (Kathleen K. Barrett) describes…

  3. [Spontaneous dissection of the anterior cerebral artery presenting subarachnoid hemorrhage and cerebral infarction: a case report].

    PubMed

    Miyahara, K; Sakata, K; Gondo, G; Kanno, H; Yamamoto, I

    2001-04-01

    A case is reported of anterior cerebral artery dissecting aneurysm presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage and cerebral infarction. A 50-year-old man presented with sudden onset of weakness of the left lower limb was admitted to our hospital. CT scan on admission showed a subarachnoid hemorrhage in the interhemispheric fissure and CT on the 6th day demonstrated a cerebral infarction on the right medial frontal lobe. A carotid angiogram 12 hours after the onset showed no aneurysmal lesion, but, the angiogram repeated 11 days after the onset revealed an aneurysmal dilatation with distal narrowing at the right A2-A3 segment. To prevent rebleeding, we performed a wrapping procedure through the interhemispheric route on the 18th day after onset. The postoperative course was uneventful. We reviewed 27 previously reported cases with symptomatic dissecting aneurysm confined to the anterior cerebral artery.

  4. The early markers for later dyskinetic cerebral palsy are different from those for spastic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Einspieler, C; Cioni, G; Paolicelli, P B; Bos, A F; Dressler, A; Ferrari, F; Roversi, M F; Prechtl, H F R

    2002-04-01

    Qualitative abnormalities of spontaneous motor activity in newborns and young infants are early predictive markers for later spastic cerebral palsy. Aim of this research was to identify which motor patterns may be specific for later dyskinetic cerebral palsy. In a large, prospectively performed longitudinal study involving four European hospitals we identified twelve cases with the relatively rare condition of dyskinetic cerebral palsy and compared their early motor development with twelve spastic cerebral palsy cases and twelve controls. From birth to the fifth month post-term, all infants were repeatedly videoed and their spontaneous motor patterns, including general movements, were assessed. Until the second month post-term, the infants that later became dyskinetic displayed a poor repertoire of general movements, "arm movements in circles" and finger spreading. Abnormal arm and finger movements remained until at least five months and were then concurrent with a lack of arm and leg movements towards the midline. Later dyskinetic infants share with later spastic infants the absence of fidgety movements, a spontaneous movement pattern that is normally present from three to five months. Qualitative assessment of spontaneous motor patterns enabled us to identify infants at high risk for dyskinetic cerebral palsy early in life. Additionally, we were able to discriminate them from those infants at high risk for later spastic cerebral palsy. This is a matter of significant clinical relevance because the two types of cerebral palsy ask for different management and early intervention.

  5. Hydrocephalus in cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Zuurbier, Susanna M; van den Berg, René; Troost, Dirk; Majoie, Charles B; Stam, Jan; Coutinho, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    Increased intracranial pressure is common in cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), but hydrocephalus is rarely reported in these patients. We examined the frequency, pathophysiology and associated clinical manifestations of hydrocephalus in patients with CVT admitted to our hospital between 2000 and 2010 (prospectively since July 2006). Hydrocephalus was defined as a bicaudate index larger than the 95th percentile for age, and/or a radial width of the temporal horn of ≥ 5 mm. We excluded patients in whom hydrocephalus was caused by a disease other than CVT or if it was iatrogenic. 20 out of 99 patients with CVT had hydrocephalus. 6 patients with hydrocephalus were excluded from the analysis. Patients with hydrocephalus more often had focal neurological deficits (86 vs. 49%, p = 0.02) and were more frequently comatose (43 vs. 16%, p = 0.06), as compared to patients without hydrocephalus. Deep cerebral venous thrombosis (64 vs. 9%, p < 0.001) and edema of the basal ganglia and thalami (64 vs. 4%, p < 0.001) were more common in patients with hydrocephalus. Intraventricular hemorrhage was present in 1 patient with hydrocephalus, compared to none among patients without hydrocephalus (7 vs. 0%, p = 0.15). Outcome at follow-up was worse in patients with hydrocephalus (mRS 0-1, 36 vs. 68%, p = 0.02; mortality 29 vs. 9%, p = 0.07). Hydrocephalus occurs more frequently in cerebral venous thrombosis than previously believed, especially in patients with deep cerebral venous thrombosis and edema of the basal ganglia. The presence of hydrocephalus is associated with a worse clinical outcome, but a direct causal relation is unlikely. Routine shunting procedures are not advisable.

  6. [Cerebral venous thrombosis during tuberculous meningoencephalitis].

    PubMed

    Guenifi, W; Boukhrissa, H; Gasmi, A; Rais, M; Ouyahia, A; Hachani, A; Diab, N; Mechakra, S; Lacheheb, A

    2016-05-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis is a rare disease characterized by its clinical polymorphism and multiplicity of risk factors. Infections represent less than 10% of etiologies. Tuberculosis is not a common etiology, only a few observations are published in the literature. Between January 2005 and March 2015, 61 patients were hospitalized for neuro-meningeal tuberculosis. Among them, three young women had presented one or more cerebral venous sinus thromboses. No clinical feature was observed in these patients; vascular localizations were varied: sagittal sinus (2 cases), lateral sinus (2 cases) and transverse sinus (1 case). With anticoagulant and antituberculosis drugs, the outcome was favorable in all cases. During neuro-meningeal tuberculosis, the existence of consciousness disorders or neurological focal signs is not always the translation of encephalitis, hydrocephalus, tuberculoma or ischemic stroke; cerebral venous sinus thrombosis may be the cause and therefore should be sought. PMID:27090100

  7. [A case of cerebral embolism due to cardiac myxoma presenting with multiple cerebral microaneurysms detected on first MRI scans].

    PubMed

    Sato, Takahiro; Saji, Naoki; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Shibazaki, Kensaku; Kimura, Kazumi

    2016-01-01

    A 64-year-old man developed right arm weakness and dysarthria, and was admitted to our hospital. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed a high intensity area in the frontal lobe. T2*-weighted images showed multiple spotty low intensity lesions in bilateral cerebral hemispheres, mimicking cerebral microbleeds. Cerebral angiography showed multiple aneurysms in the anterior, middle, posterior cerebral arteries and cerebellar arteries. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed a floating structure in the left atrial chamber, indicating cardiac myxoma. We diagnosed cardioembolic ischemic stroke due to left atrial myxoma. Cardiac surgery for excision of a left atrial myxoma was performed on the 3rd hospital day. Multiple aneurysms should be taken into account for differential diagnosis in patients with cardiac myxoma and with atypical spotty low intensity on T2*-weighted images. PMID:26797485

  8. [The frequency of seizures in patients with primary brain tumors or cerebral metastases. An evaluation from the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute of Neuro-Oncology and the Department of Neurology, Kaiser Franz Josef Hospital, Vienna].

    PubMed

    Oberndorfer, Stefan; Schmal, Thomas; Lahrmann, Heinz; Urbanits, Sabine; Lindner, Klaus; Grisold, Wolfgang

    2002-11-30

    Epileptic seizures are common in patients with cerebral metastases as well as in patients with primary brain tumors. In cancer patients without primary brain tumors or brain metastasis, epileptic seizures may occur due to metabolic or toxic causes, or due to infections. We performed a retrospective analysis from our neurooncological database concerning the occurrence of seizures in patients with primary brain tumors, patients with cerebral metastases and in cancer patients without brain tumors. Patients with low grade gliomas, such as astrocytoma WHO I + II (69%), oligodendroglioma WHO II (50%), and mixed glioma WHO II-III (56%) were more likely to have seizures than patients with anaplastic glioma WHO III (44%), glioblastoma WHO IV (48%) or meningeoma (45%). In patients with brain metastasis, melanoma (67%), cancer of the lung (29%), and gastrointestinal tumors (21%) were the primaries with the highest frequency of seizures. In cancer patients without brain metastases or primary brain tumors, seizures occurred in 4%. In conclusion, the occurrence of epileptic seizures in patients suffering from primary brain tumors, as well as in patients with cerebral metastases, varied within the tumor entity. Therefore, especially in brain tumors where a higher probability of epileptic seizures is expected, they should be taken into account in the care of cancer patients.

  9. Statins and cerebral hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Giannopoulos, Sotirios; Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Marshall, Randolph S

    2012-01-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are associated with improved stroke outcome. This observation has been attributed in part to the palliative effect of statins on cerebral hemodynamics and cerebral autoregulation (CA), which are mediated mainly through the upregulation of endothelium nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Several animal studies indicate that statin pretreatment enhances cerebral blood flow after ischemic stroke, although this finding is not further supported in clinical settings. Cerebral vasomotor reactivity, however, is significantly improved after long-term statin administration in most patients with severe small vessel disease, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, or impaired baseline CA. PMID:22929438

  10. Cerebral Asymmetries and Reading Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirozzolo, Francis J.

    1978-01-01

    Reviewed are historical developments regarding the concepts of cerebral localization, and analyzed are implications of current research on the role of the cerebral hemispheres in reading disorders. (CL)

  11. Hospitalizations of Children with Autism Increased from 1999 to 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nayfack, Aaron M.; Huffman, Lynne C.; Feldman, Heidi M.; Chan, Jia; Saynina, Olga; Wise, Paul H.

    2014-01-01

    We performed a retrospective analysis of hospital discharges for children with autism, in comparison to children with cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, mental retardation/intellectual disability, and the general population. Hospitalizations for autism increased nearly threefold over 10 years, especially at the oldest ages, while hospitalizations for…

  12. Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome due to hemorrhagic brain infarction: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome is a condition featuring hyponatremia and dehydration caused by head injury, operation on the brain, subarachnoid hemorrhage, brain tumor and so on. However, there are a few reports of cerebral salt-wasting syndrome caused by cerebral infarction. We describe a patient with cerebral infarction who developed cerebral salt-wasting syndrome in the course of hemorrhagic transformation. Case presentation A 79-year-old Japanese woman with hypertension and arrhythmia was admitted to our hospital for mild consciousness disturbance, conjugate deviation to right, left unilateral spatial neglect and left hemiparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a broad ischemic change in right middle cerebral arterial territory. She was diagnosed as cardiogenic cerebral embolism because atrial fibrillation was detected on electrocardiogram on admission. She showed hyponatremia accompanied by polyuria complicated at the same time with the development of hemorrhagic transformation on day 14 after admission. Based on her hypovolemic hyponatremia, she was evaluated as not having syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone but cerebral salt-wasting syndrome. She fortunately recovered with proper fluid replacement and electrolyte management. Conclusions This is a rare case of cerebral infarction and cerebral salt-wasting syndrome in the course of hemorrhagic transformation. It may be difficult to distinguish cerebral salt-wasting syndrome from syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone, however, an accurate assessment is needed to reveal the diagnosis of cerebral salt-wasting syndrome because the recommended fluid management is opposite in the two conditions. PMID:25055823

  13. Cerebral Palsy (CP) Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Pop Quiz: Cerebral Palsy Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Sandy is the parent of a child with cerebral palsy and the Board President of Gio’s Garden , a ...

  14. Hemihyperhidrosis in cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Faruqi, Shoaib; Redmond, Gemma; Ram, Pusbar; Owens, Val B; Sangster, Graeme; Barrett, James A

    2004-09-01

    Increased sweating on the hemiparetic side in cerebral infarcts is not a common clinical finding. The onset, severity and duration of symptoms can vary. The structural lesion responsible for this is a subject of conjecture. We present the case of a 66-year-old man who developed hemihyperhidrosis secondary to a cerebral infarct. PMID:15315923

  15. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in HIV-infected patients: report of 2 cases

    PubMed Central

    Mwita, Julius Chacha; Baliki, Kgomotso; Tema, Ludo

    2013-01-01

    Infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with increased risk of cerebrovascular disease; however Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis (CVST) is rarely associated with HIV-related cerebrovascular events. We describe two cases of HIV-positive patients who, at the same time, presented to our hospital with deep cerebral venous thrombosis and stroke. PMID:24570775

  16. Portrayals of People with Cerebral Palsy in Homicide News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucardie, Richard; Sobsey, Dick

    2005-01-01

    Through content analysis, employing qualitative and quantitative methods, Canadian media representation of people with cerebral palsy (PWCP) in public life was examined. Canadian NewsDisc, an online biographic database service, was used to examine the use of stigmatizing language such as afflicted by, afflicted with, suffered from, suffers from,…

  17. [Cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Milojević, T M; Baljozović, B V; Rakić, M Lj; Nestorović, B D; Dostanić, M M; Milaković, B D; Kojić, Z Z; Repac, N R; Cvrkota, I S

    2008-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm causes permanent neurolological deficit or death occurance in 13% of clinical cases. Peak frequency is from 8-10th day after SAH. The purpose of this study is factor analysis that may have influence on vasospasm development , as well as predictor determination. The study is prospective and analysis 192 patients treated in Institute of Neurosurgery, Clinical Centre of Serbia, Belgrade. The majority of patients were admitted in hospital in first four days after SAH, and 184 had GCS over 7. Univariate methods of factor analysis were used, and for significance of predictors influence testing multivariante regression analysis was used. Vasospasm occurred in 22,40% of all cases. No relationships have been found between sex, age, previous hypertension, timing of surgery, appearance of hydrocephalus and intracerebral hematoma, hypertermia or mean arterial blood pressure, with occurrence of cerebral vasospasm. Factors with significantly associated with the occurance of vasospasm were: hearth disease, hypernatriemia, Hct, clinical grade on admission as well as preoperative clinical grade and Fisher CT scan grade. In the first four days after SAH, Fisher scan grade, preoperative clinical grade and Hct, appeared as predictors. After four days, clinical grade on admission and hypernatiemia, showed as poredictors. PMID:18792575

  18. Media education.

    PubMed

    Strasburger, Victor C

    2010-11-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recognizes that exposure to mass media (eg, television, movies, video and computer games, the Internet, music lyrics and videos, newspapers, magazines, books, advertising) presents health risks for children and adolescents but can provide benefits as well. Media education has the potential to reduce the harmful effects of media and accentuate the positive effects. By understanding and supporting media education, pediatricians can play an important role in reducing harmful effects of media on children and adolescents.

  19. Media education.

    PubMed

    Strasburger, Victor C

    2010-11-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recognizes that exposure to mass media (eg, television, movies, video and computer games, the Internet, music lyrics and videos, newspapers, magazines, books, advertising) presents health risks for children and adolescents but can provide benefits as well. Media education has the potential to reduce the harmful effects of media and accentuate the positive effects. By understanding and supporting media education, pediatricians can play an important role in reducing harmful effects of media on children and adolescents. PMID:20876180

  20. [Cognitive stimulation in children with cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Muriel, V; Garcia-Molina, A; Aparicio-Lopez, C; Ensenat, A; Roig-Rovira, T

    2014-11-16

    Introduccion. La paralisis cerebral a menudo cursa con deficits cognitivos de atencion, visuopercepcion, funciones ejecutivas y memoria de trabajo. Objetivo. Analizar el efecto de un tratamiento de estimulacion cognitiva sobre las capacidades cognitivas en niños con pa­ralisis cerebral. Pacientes y metodos. Muestra de 15 niños con paralisis cerebral, con una edad media de 8,80 ± 2,51 años, clasificados mediante el Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) en nivel I (n = 6), nivel II (n = 4), nivel III (n = 2) y nivel V (n = 3). Los deficits cognitivos se evaluaron mediante la escala de inteligencia de Wechsler para niños (WISC-IV) y el Continuous Performance Test (CPT-II). Se administraron los cuestionarios para padres y profesores del Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) y las escalas de evaluacion de Conners (CPRS-48 y CTRS-28). Se realizo un programa de estimulacion cognitiva dos horas semanales durante ocho semanas. Resultados. Se observaron diferencias estadisticamente significativas tras aplicar el tratamiento de estimulacion cognitivo en el indice de razonamiento perceptivo de la WISC-IV. No se obtuvieron diferencias antes y despues del tratamiento en las puntuaciones del Conners y del BRIEF. Tampoco se hallaron diferencias en los resultados de la WISC-IV en funcion del sexo ni en el GMFCS. Conclusion. El rendimiento cognitivo de los niños con paralisis cerebral mejora tras la aplicacion de un programa de rehabilitacion cognitiva.

  1. [Cerebral infarction in human immunodeficiency virus infection].

    PubMed

    Blanche, P; Toulon, P; de La Blanchardière, A; Sicard, D

    1995-06-01

    Patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) appear to have a high risk of ischaemic cerebral events. We observed two cases of cerebral infarction in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). In the first case, a 38-year-old homosexual with no cardiovascular risk other than smoking presented with rapidly progressive hemiparesia. Brain CT-scan visualized two infarcts in the territory of the right sylvian artery and the arteriography an occlusion of the internal carotid artery. In the second, a 37-year-old homosexual, hospitalization was required for a left-sided pure sensitive epilepsy seizure. There was no cardiovascular risk other than smoking. Magnetic resonance imaging showed parietal ischaemia and thrombus in the left atrium without atrial hypertrophy was seen at transoesophageal echocardiography. In both cases, there was no evidence of endocarditis, dissection of the neck vessels or disseminated intravascular coagulation nor of associated viral or bacterial infectious complication of AIDS. Angiographic findings eliminated cerebral vascularitis. Among the perturbed haemostasis factors previously reported in HIV+ patients, we observed free proteins S deficiency (68 and 43%) and heparin cofactor II deficiency (54 and 40%). Serum albumin was 33 and 32 g/l respectively. Outcome was favourable in both cases with anticoagulant therapy. These coagulation anomalies would not appear sufficient to explain cerebral infarction. Other mechanisms including immune complexed deposition, direct HIV toxicity for endothelial cells or the effect of cytokines on smooth muscles fibres and fibroblasts are probably more important causal factors. PMID:7638144

  2. Acute cerebral paragonimiasis presenting as hemorrhagic stroke in a child.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi; Zhu, Gang; Lin, Jiangkai; Wu, Nan; Feng, Hua

    2008-08-01

    A hemorrhagic stroke in children is rarely secondary to cerebral paragonimiasis. We describe a 9-year-old boy in whom an intracerebral hemorrhage was the leading clinical indication of acute cerebral paragonimiasis. He was hospitalized because of a sudden onset of headache, right hemiparesis, and dysarthria. A computed tomography scan revealed an intracerebral hemorrhage in the left parietal lobe. Magnetic resonance angiography did not confirm any vascular abnormalities at the location of the hematoma. Four weeks later, he presented with right hemiparesis again, and fever. A diagnosis of cerebral paragonimiasis was based on repeated magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for paragonimiasis. The patient gradually recovered with praziquantel treatment. Cerebral paragonimiasis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hemorrhagic strokes in children in areas where paragonimiasis is epidemic.

  3. Effectiveness of mechanical embolectomy for septic embolus in the cerebral artery complicated with infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Gimoon; Yang, Tae Ki; Choi, Joon Hyouk; Heo, Sang Taek

    2013-08-01

    There has been a controversy over data of thrombolytic and endovascular surgical treatment about cerebral infarction secondary to infective endocarditis. We report a woman who received early mechanical embolectomy as a treatment of acute stroke with infective endocarditis. A 35-yr-old woman was hospitalized due to right hemiparesis. Brain image showed cerebral infarction at the middle cerebral artery and echocardiography demonstrated vegetation at the mitral valve. She was successfully treated with embolectomy and parenteral antibiotics without any neurologic sequelae. This report shows that the early retrieve of septic cerebral emboli can be a helpful treatment of acute stroke associated with endocarditis.

  4. Acquired Cerebral Trauma: Epilogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigler, Erin D., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    The article summarizes a series of articles concerning acquired cerebral trauma. Reviewed are technological advances, treatment, assessment, potential innovative therapies, long-term outcome, family impact of chronic brain injury, and prevention. (DB)

  5. Nanomedicine in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Bindu; Nance, Elizabeth; Johnston, Michael V; Kannan, Rangaramanujam; Kannan, Sujatha

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a chronic childhood disorder that can have diverse etiologies. Injury to the developing brain that occurs either in utero or soon after birth can result in the motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits seen in cerebral palsy. Although the etiologies for cerebral palsy are variable, neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the brain injury irrespective of the etiology. Currently, there is no effective cure for cerebral palsy. Nanomedicine offers a new frontier in the development of therapies for prevention and treatment of brain injury resulting in cerebral palsy. Nanomaterials such as dendrimers provide opportunities for the targeted delivery of multiple drugs that can mitigate several pathways involved in injury and can be delivered specifically to the cells that are responsible for neuroinflammation and injury. These materials also offer the opportunity to deliver agents that would promote repair and regeneration in the brain, resulting not only in attenuation of injury, but also enabling normal growth. In this review, the current advances in nanotechnology for treatment of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy. Future directions that would facilitate clinical translation in neonates and children are also addressed.

  6. Media violence.

    PubMed

    Strasburger, V C

    1999-01-01

    For decades, media violence has been viewed as largely a Western problem. New studies indicate that Indian children have increasing access to the media and that media violence will subject them to the same problems as Western children: imitation, desensitization, fear, and inappropriate attitudes about violence and aggression. Solutions exist but will have to be implemented within the next decade to protect Indian children and adolescents from the harmful effects of media violence.

  7. New Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downtown Business Quarterly, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue explores lower Manhattan's burgeoning "New Media" industry, a growing source of jobs in lower Manhattan. The first article, "New Media Manpower Issues" (Rodney Alexander), addresses manpower, training, and workforce demands faced by new media companies in New York City. The second article, "Case Study: Hiring @ Dynamid" (John…

  8. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Allroggen, H.; Abbott, R.

    2000-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a challenging condition because of its variability of clinical symptoms and signs. It is very often unrecognised at initial presentation. All age groups can be affected. Large sinuses such as the superior sagittal sinus are most frequently involved. Extensive collateral circulation within the cerebral venous system allows for a significant degree of compensation in the early stages of thrombus formation. Systemic inflammatory diseases and inherited as well as acquired coagulation disorders are frequent causes, although in up to 30% of cases no underlying cause can be identified. The oral contraceptive pill appears to be an important additional risk factor. The spectrum of clinical presentations ranges from headache with papilloedema to focal deficit, seizures and coma. Magnetic resonance imaging with venography is the investigation of choice; computed tomography alone will miss a significant number of cases. It has now been conclusively shown that intravenous heparin is the first-line treatment for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis because of its efficacy, safety and feasability. Local thrombolysis may be indicated in cases of deterioration, despite adequate heparinisation. This should be followed by oral anticoagulation for 3-6 months. The prognosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is generally favourable. A high index of clinical suspicion is needed to diagnose this uncommon condition so that appropriate treatment can be initiated.


Keywords: cerebral venous sinus thrombosis PMID:10622773

  9. [CT findings in "fresh" cerebral paragonimiasis].

    PubMed

    Li, H Z; Xie, F W; Sun, S C

    1992-01-01

    There are few reports on CT findings in "fresh" cerebral paragonimiasis. We have experienced four cases of "fresh" cerebral paragonimiasis examined by CT scan. Three patients were children aged 7, 9, and 14 years, and one was an adult aged 25 years. Three patients were examined by CT scan 2 to 6 months after the onset of high grade fever, convulsion and focal deficit signs, and a patient was examined one month after his progressive visual disturbance. The unique CT findings are multilocular cystic lesions in temporo-occipital or in temporo-parietal lobes with extensive brain edema. Two cases were also associated with "soap-bubble" calcifications. The cysts were more dense than CSF and enhanced by contrast media. The histopathological specimen showed that the eggs of paragonimus were in the abscess cavity, of which the wall was composed with highly vascular gliomesenchymal capsule and numerous cell infiltration. Three patients underwent craniotomy for removal of abscess and decompression. Bitionol were administered and all patients recovered well. We also discussed the differential diagnosis of cerebral parasitic granulomas.

  10. Neuroprotection after cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Namura, Shobu; Ooboshi, Hiroaki; Liu, Jialing; Yenari, Midori A.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia, a focal or global insufficiency of blood flow to the brain, can arise through multiple mechanisms, including thrombosis and arterial hemorrhage. Ischemia is a major driver of stroke, one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. While the general etiology of cerebral ischemia and stroke has been known for some time, the conditions have only recently been considered treatable. This report describes current research in this field seeking to fully understand the pathomechanisms underlying stroke; to characterize the brain’s intrinsic injury, survival, and repair mechanisms; to identify putative drug targets as well as cell-based therapies; and to optimize the delivery of therapeutic agents to the damaged cerebral tissue. PMID:23488559

  11. Gait analysis of children with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy☆

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Yuexi

    2012-01-01

    An experiment was carried out in the key laboratory for Technique Diagnosis and Function Assessment of Winter Sports of China to investigate the differences in gait characteristics between healthy children and children with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy. With permission of their parents, 200 healthy children aged 3 to 6 years in the kindergarten of Northeastern University were enrolled in this experiment. Twenty children aged 3 to 6 years with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy from Shengjing Hospital, China were also enrolled in this experiment. Standard data were collected by simultaneously recording gait information from two digital cameras. DVracker was used to analyze the standard data. The children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy had a longer gait cycle, slower walking speed, and longer support phase than did the healthy children. The support phase was longer than the swing phase in the children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy. There were significant differences in the angles of the hip, knee, and ankle joint between children with cerebral palsy and healthy children at the moment of touching the ground and buffering, and during pedal extension. Children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy had poor motor coordination during walking, which basically resulted in a short stride, high stride frequency to maintain speed, more obvious swing, and poor stability. PMID:25657696

  12. Norovirus - hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Gastroenteritis - norovirus; Colitis - norovirus; Hospital acquired infection - norovirus ... Symptoms start within 24 to 48 hours of infection, and can last for 1 ... norovirus. Hospital patients who are very old, very young, or ...

  13. Unusual Cerebral Emboli.

    PubMed

    Zakhari, Nader; Castillo, Mauricio; Torres, Carlos

    2016-02-01

    The heart and the carotid arteries are the most common sites of origin of embolic disease to the brain. Clots arising from these locations are the most common types of brain emboli. Less common cerebral emboli include air, fat, calcium, infected vegetations, and tumor cells as well as emboli originating in the venous system. Although infarcts can be the final result of any type of embolism, described herein are the ancillary and sometimes unique imaging features of less common types of cerebral emboli that may allow for a specific diagnosis to be made or at least suspected in many patients.

  14. Does cerebral angiography of cadaveric kidney donors interfere with graft function?

    PubMed

    Weibull, H; Cederholm, C; Almén, T; Bergqvist, D; Takolander, R; Husberg, B

    1987-01-01

    Cerebral angiography is used to diagnose brain death of cadaver kidney donors. Clinical and animal data suggest that angiographic contrast media may potentiate the noxious effect of renal ischemia. In order to find out if cerebral angiography of cadaveric kidney donors prior to nephrectomy interferes with function or survival of the renal grafts, two groups of cadaveric donors were compared. One group had been exposed to contrast medium from cerebral angiography in median 18 hours before nephrectomy and the other had not. There was no difference in graft survival and function between the two groups. In a previous investigation angiography was performed two hours before explantation and in that investigation there was a shorter graft survival in the angiography group than in a control group. A delay of 12 hours is suggested between cerebral angiography and explanation, to decrease the combined harmful effects of contrast media and ischemia on renal grafts.

  15. Cysticercosis of the central nervous system. I. Surgical treatment of cerebral cysticercosis: a 23 years experience in the Hospital das Clínicas of Ribeirão Preto Medical School.

    PubMed

    Colli, B O; Martelli, N; Assirati Júnior, J A; Machado, H R; Salvarani, C P; Sassoli, V P; Forjaz, S V

    1994-06-01

    Cysticercosis is the most frequent parasitosis of the nervous system and nowadays it is widespread through the world. Despite the development of anticysticercal drugs (praziquantel and albendazole), their efficacy is more marked in cases with parenchymal active cysts and they do not prevent complications such as hydrocephalus. Thus, many patients with neurocysticercosis require surgical intervention, generally of palliative nature, but that may occasionally produce a cure. The clinical outcome of 180 patients with cerebral cysticercosis who underwent surgical treatment form 1970 to 1993 was analyzed. Surgical treatment was performed to control increased ICP in 177 patients and due to local compression of cranial nerves or brainstem in five. Some patients had more than one surgical procedure, totalizing 287 interventions. Increased intracranial pressure (ICP) was caused by hydrocephalus in 91%, by intracranial mass lesion (tumoral form) in 6.2% and by pseudotumor cerebri (pseudotumoral form) in 2.8% of the case. Based on the pathophysiological mechanisms of intracranial hypertension identified through conventional CT-scan, ventriculography, cysternotomography, ventriculotomography and MRI, different surgical approaches were indicated. Patients with tumoral form were submitted to direct approach and cyst removal and generally they had benefits from this procedure. Patients with pseudotumoral form whose clinical treatment failure underwent decompressive craniectomies and had a poor outcome (40% of good results). Direct removal of ventricular/cisternal cysts and/or ventriculoatrial/peritoneal shunting (VA/VPS) was performed in patients with hydrocephalus. Removal of free ventricular cysts in patients who had no ependimitis/arachnoiditis generally allowed a good outcome. Patients with adherent cysts and inflammatory process needed a VA/VPS posteriorly and the outcome was not so good. One hundred thirty-two patients were submitted to VA/VPS (109 as the first procedure

  16. Clinical Features of Liver Cancer with Cerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiuhong; Chen, Li; Zeng, Jinsheng; Huang, Gelun; Qin, Chao; Cheng, Daobin; Yu, Lixia; Liang, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cerebral hemorrhage is common in patients with cancer, but the clinical features and pathogenesis of liver cancer patients with cerebral hemorrhage are not well known. MATERIAL AND METHODS Liver cancer patients who developed cerebral hemorrhage were recruited from the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University between January 2003 and December 2014. We retrospectively analyzed clinical presentations, results of laboratory tests, and imaging examinations. The clinical features and pathogenesis were summarized. RESULTS Among 11133 patients with liver cancer, 9 patients (0.08%), including 3 females and 6 males met the inclusion criteria. The age range was 48-73 years and the average age was 61.67±8.97 years. Five patients did not have traditional hemorrhage risk factors and 4s had the risk factors; however, all had developed hepatocellular carcinoma, and 3 had developed metastasis. All 9 patients showed elevated tumor markers: an increased AFP level was detected in 6 patients, coagulation dysfunctions in 8 patients, and abnormal liver functions in 6 patients. Five patients had developed cerebral hemorrhagic lesions in the lobes of their brains, while hemorrhagic lesions in the basal ganglia occurred in 3 patients and in the brainstem in only 1 patient. Four patients had clear consciousness, while 5 patients were in coma and showed poor prognosis. CONCLUSIONS Patients who have liver cancer complicated with cerebral hemorrhage usually lack traditional risk factors of cerebral hemorrhage. The site of cerebral hemorrhage is often detected in the lobes of the brain. Coagulation dysfunctions might be the main pathogenesis of liver cancer complicated with cerebral hemorrhage. PMID:27209058

  17. Clinical Features of Liver Cancer with Cerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qiuhong; Chen, Li; Zeng, Jinsheng; Huang, Gelun; Qin, Chao; Cheng, Daobin; Yu, Lixia; Liang, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    Background Cerebral hemorrhage is common in patients with cancer, but the clinical features and pathogenesis of liver cancer patients with cerebral hemorrhage are not well known. Material/Methods Liver cancer patients who developed cerebral hemorrhage were recruited from the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University between January 2003 and December 2014. We retrospectively analyzed clinical presentations, results of laboratory tests, and imaging examinations. The clinical features and pathogenesis were summarized. Results Among 11133 patients with liver cancer, 9 patients (0.08%), including 3 females and 6 males met the inclusion criteria. The age range was 48–73 years and the average age was 61.67±8.97 years. Five patients did not have traditional hemorrhage risk factors and 4s had the risk factors; however, all had developed hepatocellular carcinoma, and 3 had developed metastasis. All 9 patients showed elevated tumor markers: an increased AFP level was detected in 6 patients, coagulation dysfunctions in 8 patients, and abnormal liver functions in 6 patients. Five patients had developed cerebral hemorrhagic lesions in the lobes of their brains, while hemorrhagic lesions in the basal ganglia occurred in 3 patients and in the brainstem in only 1 patient. Four patients had clear consciousness, while 5 patients were in coma and showed poor prognosis. Conclusions Patients who have liver cancer complicated with cerebral hemorrhage usually lack traditional risk factors of cerebral hemorrhage. The site of cerebral hemorrhage is often detected in the lobes of the brain. Coagulation dysfunctions might be the main pathogenesis of liver cancer complicated with cerebral hemorrhage. PMID:27209058

  18. Cerebral Folate Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral folate deficiency (CFD) is associated with low levels of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with normal folate levels in the plasma and red blood cells. The onset of symptoms caused by the deficiency of folates in the brain is at around 4 to 6 months of age. This is followed by delayed development, with deceleration…

  19. Cerebral Palsy Litigation

    PubMed Central

    Sartwelle, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    The cardinal driver of cerebral palsy litigation is electronic fetal monitoring, which has continued unabated for 40 years. Electronic fetal monitoring, however, is based on 19th-century childbirth myths, a virtually nonexistent scientific foundation, and has a false positive rate exceeding 99%. It has not affected the incidence of cerebral palsy. Electronic fetal monitoring has, however, increased the cesarian section rate, with the expected increase in mortality and morbidity risks to mothers and babies alike. This article explains why electronic fetal monitoring remains endorsed as efficacious in the worlds’ labor rooms and courtrooms despite being such a feeble medical modality. It also reviews the reasons professional organizations have failed to condemn the use of electronic fetal monitoring in courtrooms. The failures of tort reform, special cerebral palsy courts, and damage limits to stem the escalating litigation are discussed. Finally, the authors propose using a currently available evidence rule—the Daubert doctrine that excludes “junk science” from the courtroom—as the beginning of the end to cerebral palsy litigation and electronic fetal monitoring’s 40-year masquerade as science. PMID:25183322

  20. Mixed Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Erin

    2010-01-01

    While institutions do not often have a hook as compelling as an eagerly awaited movie, great content is critical for media relations success--and coupling it with the right distribution channel can ensure the story finds the right audience. Even better, retooling it for several media platforms can extend the life and reach of a story. The changes…

  1. Earned Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunshine, Alice

    2011-01-01

    "Earned media" is exactly what one thinks it is. The people who do the necessary work to earn coverage of their issue or battle are the ones who will get their story out to the public. Earning media coverage involves giving careful attention to the mechanics of reaching out to news outlets. Most people can learn the mechanics through workshops,…

  2. Media Now.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Ron

    Developed by the Southwest Iowa Learning Resources Center, Media Now is a course for secondary students in media studies. Curriculum concentration is on television, film, radio, and recorded sound. Individualization of instruction, behavioral science, and mediated learning packages are employed with each module interrelated through printed…

  3. Postpartum cerebral angiopathy presenting with non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and interval development of neurological deficits: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Bai, Harrison X; Zhao, Xin; Xiao, Yanqiao; Tan, Liming

    2013-01-01

    Postpartum cerebral angiopathy (PCA) is a cerebrovascular disease that occurs during the postpartum period. It is characterized by reversible multifocal vasoconstriction of the cerebral arteries. We report a patient with PCA proven by cerebral angiography that revealed multifocal, segmental narrowing of the cerebral arteries and non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. The patient suddenly deteriorated with focal neurological deficits on the 5 th day of hospitalization. She was treated with calcium-channel blockers and monitored with daily transcranial Doppler ultrasound. Her symptoms gradually improved and she was discharged on the 11 th day of hospitalization. At 1-month follow-up, patient was completely symptom-free with no neurological deficits.

  4. Cerebral White Matter

    PubMed Central

    Schmahmann, Jeremy D.; Smith, Eric E.; Eichler, Florian S.; Filley, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Lesions of the cerebral white matter (WM) result in focal neurobehavioral syndromes, neuropsychiatric phenomena, and dementia. The cerebral WM contains fiber pathways that convey axons linking cerebral cortical areas with each other and with subcortical structures, facilitating the distributed neural circuits that subserve sensorimotor function, intellect, and emotion. Recent neuroanatomical investigations reveal that these neural circuits are topographically linked by five groupings of fiber tracts emanating from every neocortical area: (1) cortico-cortical association fibers; (2) corticostriatal fibers; (3) commissural fibers; and cortico-subcortical pathways to (4) thalamus and (5) pontocerebellar system, brain stem, and/or spinal cord. Lesions of association fibers prevent communication between cortical areas engaged in different domains of behavior. Lesions of subcortical structures or projection/striatal fibers disrupt the contribution of subcortical nodes to behavior. Disconnection syndromes thus result from lesions of the cerebral cortex, subcortical structures, and WM tracts that link the nodes that make up the distributed circuits. The nature and the severity of the clinical manifestations of WM lesions are determined, in large part, by the location of the pathology: discrete neurological and neuropsychiatric symptoms result from focal WM lesions, whereas cognitive impairment across multiple domains—WM dementia—occurs in the setting of diffuse WM disease. We present a detailed review of the conditions affecting WM that produce these neurobehavioral syndromes, and consider the pathophysiology, clinical effects, and broad significance of the effects of aging and vascular compromise on cerebral WM, in an attempt to help further the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of these disorders. PMID:18990132

  5. Reversible cerebral shrinkage in kwashiorkor: an MRI study.

    PubMed

    Gunston, G D; Burkimsher, D; Malan, H; Sive, A A

    1992-08-01

    Protein energy malnutrition is associated with cerebral atrophy which may be detrimental to intellectual development. The aim of this study was to document the anatomical abnormalities which lead to the appearance of cerebral atrophy using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the acute stage of kwashiorkor and to monitor changes during nutritional rehabilitation. Twelve children aged 6 to 37 months requiring admission to hospital for the treatment of kwashiorkor were studied. The children were evaluated clinically, biochemically, and by MRI of their brains on admission and 30 and 90 days later. Brain shrinkage was present in every child on admission. White and grey matter appeared equally affected and the myelination was normal for age. At 90 days, the cerebral changes had resolved in nine and improved substantially in the remainder, by which time serum proteins and weight for age were within the normal range. The findings of this study suggest that brain shrinkage associated with kwashiorkor reverses rapidly with nutritional rehabilitation.

  6. The 2016 Satellite Meeting of the International Society of Twin Studies: An Overview/Tribute to Irving I. Gottesman/Research: MZ Twinning After Single Embryo Transfer; Twin Study of Mononucleosis; Cerebral Injury After Twin-To-Twin Transfusion Syndrome Surgery/Human Interest: Sixteen Twin Pairs Born in a Single Hospital; Death of an Identical Twin Playwright; Twin Themes in Advertising; Conjoined Twins Separated in Saudi Arabia; Murder of One Twin By Her Co-Twin Disproved.

    PubMed

    Segal, Nancy L

    2016-10-01

    The 2016 Satellite Meeting of the International Society of Twin Studies took place on June 20 in Brisbane, Australia. The host institution was the QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute. An overview of selected presentations and activities is provided. This synopsis is followed by a brief tribute to the recent passing of our esteemed colleague, Dr Irving I. Gottesman. Next, there are summaries of research on monozygotic twinning after single embryo transfer, a twin study of mononucleosis susceptibility, cerebral injury following twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome surgery, and a correction and clarification regarding an article by Segal (2016) on the Brazilian Twin Registry. Human interest articles cover a hospital whose 2015 newborns included 16 pairs of twins born in 1 month, the death of an identical twin playwright, twin themes in advertising, conjoined twins separated in Saudi Arabia, and the dismissed charges of the murder of one twin by her co-twin.

  7. The 2016 Satellite Meeting of the International Society of Twin Studies: An Overview/Tribute to Irving I. Gottesman/Research: MZ Twinning After Single Embryo Transfer; Twin Study of Mononucleosis; Cerebral Injury After Twin-To-Twin Transfusion Syndrome Surgery/Human Interest: Sixteen Twin Pairs Born in a Single Hospital; Death of an Identical Twin Playwright; Twin Themes in Advertising; Conjoined Twins Separated in Saudi Arabia; Murder of One Twin By Her Co-Twin Disproved.

    PubMed

    Segal, Nancy L

    2016-10-01

    The 2016 Satellite Meeting of the International Society of Twin Studies took place on June 20 in Brisbane, Australia. The host institution was the QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute. An overview of selected presentations and activities is provided. This synopsis is followed by a brief tribute to the recent passing of our esteemed colleague, Dr Irving I. Gottesman. Next, there are summaries of research on monozygotic twinning after single embryo transfer, a twin study of mononucleosis susceptibility, cerebral injury following twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome surgery, and a correction and clarification regarding an article by Segal (2016) on the Brazilian Twin Registry. Human interest articles cover a hospital whose 2015 newborns included 16 pairs of twins born in 1 month, the death of an identical twin playwright, twin themes in advertising, conjoined twins separated in Saudi Arabia, and the dismissed charges of the murder of one twin by her co-twin. PMID:27524469

  8. Cerebral and Tissue Oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Steppan, Jochen; Hogue, Charles W.

    2014-01-01

    The use of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been increasingly adopted in cardiac surgery to measure regional cerebral oxygen saturation. This method takes advantage of the fact that light in the near-infrared spectrum penetrates tissue, including bone and muscle. Sensors are placed at fixed distances from a light emitter, and algorithms subtract superficial light absorption from deep absorption to provide an index of tissue oxygenation. Although the popularity of NIRS monitoring is growing, definitive data that prove outcome benefits with its use remain sparse. Therefore, widespread, routine use of NIRS as a standard-of-care monitor cannot be recommended at present. Recent investigations have focused on the use of NIRS in subgroups that may benefit from NIRS monitoring, such as pediatric patients. Furthermore, a novel application of processed NIRS information for monitoring cerebral autoregulation and tissue oxygenation (e.g., kidneys and the gut) is promising. PMID:25480772

  9. Music and cerebral hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Marinoni, M; Grassi, E; Latorraca, S; Caruso, A; Sorbi, S

    2000-09-01

    Previous studies performed by positron emission tomography and Transcranial Doppler (TCD) found a different cerebral activation during musical stimuli in musicians compared to non-musicians. The aim of our study is to evaluate by means of TCD, possible different pattern of cerebral activation during the performance of different musical tasks in musicians, non-musicians and lyrical singers. Our findings show a left hemispheric activation in musicians and a right one in non-musicians. Preliminary data on lyrical singers' activation patterns need further confirmation with a larger population. These data could be related to a different approach to music listening in musicians (analytical) and non-musicians who are supposed to have an emotional approach to music. PMID:10942664

  10. Cerebral localization in antiquity.

    PubMed

    Rose, F Clifford

    2009-07-01

    Fragments of neurology can be found in the oldest medical writings in antiquity. Recognizable cerebral localization is seen in Egyptian medical papyri. Most notably, the Edwin Smith papyrus describes hemiplegia after a head injury. Similar echoes can be seen in Homer, the Bible, and the pre-Hippocratic writer Alcmaeon of Croton. While Biblical writers thought that the heart was the seat of the soul, Hippocratic writers located it in the head. Alexandrian anatomists described the nerves, and Galen developed the ventricular theory of cognition whereby mental functions are classified and localized in one of the cerebral ventricles. Medieval scholars, including the early Church Fathers, modified Galenic ventricular theory so as to make it a dynamic model of cognition. Physicians in antiquity subdivided the brain into separate areas and attributed to them different functions, a phenomenon that connects them with modern neurologists. PMID:20183203

  11. From Augmentation Media to Meme Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, Yuzuru

    Computers as meta media are now evolving from augmentation media vehicles to meme media vehicles. While an augmentation media system provides a seamlessly integrated environment of various tools and documents, meme media system provides further functions to edit and distribute tools and documents. Documents and tools on meme media can easily…

  12. [Anterior cerebral artery aneurism presenting as a third ventricular mass and hydrocephalus. Case report].

    PubMed

    Castro Castro, Julián; Agulleiro Díaz, Jesús Patricio; Villa Fernández, Juan Manuel; Pinzón Millán, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Aneurysms which appear as third ventricular masses are uncommon; most are giant aneurysms arising from the basilar apex. We present the case of a 67-year-old male who was admitted to hospital with a 4-week history of gait instability, urinary incontinence and progressive visual loss. A cranial computed tomography scan revealed a hyperdense mass in the third ventricle with triventricular dilatation. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance-angiography and conventional angiography identified this lesion as a partially thrombosed aneurysm of the anterior cerebral artery. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an anterior cerebral artery aneurysm with these clinical and radiological features. PMID:23098766

  13. [Anterior cerebral artery aneurism presenting as a third ventricular mass and hydrocephalus. Case report].

    PubMed

    Castro Castro, Julián; Agulleiro Díaz, Jesús Patricio; Villa Fernández, Juan Manuel; Pinzón Millán, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Aneurysms which appear as third ventricular masses are uncommon; most are giant aneurysms arising from the basilar apex. We present the case of a 67-year-old male who was admitted to hospital with a 4-week history of gait instability, urinary incontinence and progressive visual loss. A cranial computed tomography scan revealed a hyperdense mass in the third ventricle with triventricular dilatation. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance-angiography and conventional angiography identified this lesion as a partially thrombosed aneurysm of the anterior cerebral artery. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an anterior cerebral artery aneurysm with these clinical and radiological features.

  14. What You Should Know about Cerebral Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Stroke What You Should Know About Cerebral Aneurysms Updated:Jun 13,2014 About Cerebral Aneurysms Diagnosis ... to view an animation What is a cerebral aneurysm? An aneurysm is a weak area in a ...

  15. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Stokum, Jesse A; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2016-03-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  16. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema

    PubMed Central

    Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  17. Cerebral radiation necrosis following treatment of extracranial malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, J.P.; Hwang, T.L.; Leavens, M.E.; Libshitz, H.I.

    1984-11-01

    Nine patients with cerebral radiation necrosis following radiation therapy for extracranial neoplasms were seen at MD Anderson Hospital between 1956 and 1982. The diagnosis was confirmed at autopsy in one case, by surgical intervention in six cases, and strongly suspected based upon CT scan findings and radiation records in two cases. The world literature is reviewed, and diagnostic criteria using the CT scan and radiation doses presented.

  18. Hospital fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Althausen, Peter L; Hill, Austin D; Mead, Lisa

    2014-07-01

    Under the current system, orthopaedic trauma surgeons must work in some form of hospital setting as our primary service involves treatment of the trauma patient. We must not forget that just as a trauma center cannot exist without our services, we cannot function without their support. As a result, a clear understanding of the balance between physicians and hospitals is paramount. Historical perspective enables physicians and hospital personnel alike to understand the evolution of hospital-physician relationship. This process should be understood upon completion of this chapter. The relationship between physicians and hospitals is becoming increasingly complex and multiple forms of integration exist such as joint ventures, gain sharing, and co-management agreements. For the surgeon to negotiate well, an understanding of hospital governance and the role of the orthopaedic traumatologist is vital to success. An understanding of the value provided by the traumatologist includes all aspects of care including efficiency, availability, cost effectiveness, and research activities. To create effective and sustainable healthcare institutions, physicians and hospitals must be aligned over a sustained period of time. Unfortunately, external forces have eroded the historical basis for the working relationship between physicians and hospitals. Increased competition and reimbursement cuts, coupled with the increasing demands for quality, efficiency, and coordination and the payment changes outlined in healthcare reform, have left many organizations wondering how to best rebuild the relationship. The principal goal for the physician when partnering with a hospital or healthcare entity is to establish a sustainable model of service line management that protects or advances the physician's ability to make impactful improvements in quality of patient care, decreases in healthcare costs, and improvements in process efficiency through evidence-based practices and protocols. PMID

  19. Hospital fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Althausen, Peter L; Hill, Austin D; Mead, Lisa

    2014-07-01

    Under the current system, orthopaedic trauma surgeons must work in some form of hospital setting as our primary service involves treatment of the trauma patient. We must not forget that just as a trauma center cannot exist without our services, we cannot function without their support. As a result, a clear understanding of the balance between physicians and hospitals is paramount. Historical perspective enables physicians and hospital personnel alike to understand the evolution of hospital-physician relationship. This process should be understood upon completion of this chapter. The relationship between physicians and hospitals is becoming increasingly complex and multiple forms of integration exist such as joint ventures, gain sharing, and co-management agreements. For the surgeon to negotiate well, an understanding of hospital governance and the role of the orthopaedic traumatologist is vital to success. An understanding of the value provided by the traumatologist includes all aspects of care including efficiency, availability, cost effectiveness, and research activities. To create effective and sustainable healthcare institutions, physicians and hospitals must be aligned over a sustained period of time. Unfortunately, external forces have eroded the historical basis for the working relationship between physicians and hospitals. Increased competition and reimbursement cuts, coupled with the increasing demands for quality, efficiency, and coordination and the payment changes outlined in healthcare reform, have left many organizations wondering how to best rebuild the relationship. The principal goal for the physician when partnering with a hospital or healthcare entity is to establish a sustainable model of service line management that protects or advances the physician's ability to make impactful improvements in quality of patient care, decreases in healthcare costs, and improvements in process efficiency through evidence-based practices and protocols.

  20. Media Training

    SciTech Connect

    2009-12-11

    With the LHC starting up soon, the world's media are again turning their attention to CERN. We're all likely to be called upon to explain what is happening at CERN to media, friends and neighbours. The seminar will be given by BBC television news journalists Liz Pike and Nadia Marchant, and will deal with the kind of questions we're likely to be confronted with through the restart period. The training is open for everybody. Make sure you arrive early enough to get a seat - there are only 200 seats in the Globe. The session will also be webcast: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  1. Media Training

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    With the LHC starting up soon, the world's media are again turning their attention to CERN. We're all likely to be called upon to explain what is happening at CERN to media, friends and neighbours. The seminar will be given by BBC television news journalists Liz Pike and Nadia Marchant, and will deal with the kind of questions we're likely to be confronted with through the restart period. The training is open for everybody. Make sure you arrive early enough to get a seat - there are only 200 seats in the Globe. The session will also be webcast: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  2. Middle Cerebral Artery Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Hung-Wen; Liou, Michelle; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Liu, Hua-Shan; Tsai, Ping-Huei; Chiang, Shih-Wei; Chou, Ming-Chung; Peng, Giia-Sheun; Huang, Guo-Shu; Hsu, Hsian-He; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Calcification of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) is uncommon in the healthy elderly. Whether calcification of the MCA is associated with cerebral ischemic stroke remains undetermined. We intended to investigate the association using Agatston calcium scoring of the MCA. This study retrospectively included 354 subjects with ischemic stroke in the MCA territory and 1518 control subjects who underwent computed tomography (CT) of the brain. We recorded major known risk factors for ischemic stroke, including age, gender, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, hyperlipidemia, and obesity, along with the MCA calcium burden, measured with the Agatston calcium scoring method. Univariate and modified logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the association between the MCA calcification and ischemic stroke. The univariate analyses showed significant associations of ischemic stroke with age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, total MCA Agatston score, and the presence of calcification on both or either side of the MCA. Subjects with the presence of MCA calcification on both or either side of the MCA were 8.46 times (95% confidence interval, 4.93–14.53; P < 0.001) more likely to have a cerebral infarct than subjects without MCA calcification after adjustment for the major known risk factors, including age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and smoking. However, a higher degree of MCA calcification reflected by the Agatston score was not associated with higher risk of MCA ischemic stroke after adjustment for the confounding factors and presence of MCA calcification. These results suggest that MCA calcification is associated with ischemic stroke in the MCA territory. Further prospective studies are required to verify the clinical implications of the MCA calcification. PMID:26683969

  3. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome.

    PubMed

    Uygun, M A; Ozkal, E; Acar, O; Erongun, U

    1996-01-01

    Hyponatremia following acute or chronic central nervous system injury which is due to excessive Na+ loss in the urine without an increase in the body fluid, has been described as Cerebral Salt Wasting Syndrome (CSWS). This syndrome is often confused with dilutional hyponatremia secondary to inappropriate ADH secretion. Accurate diagnosis and management are mandatory for to improve the course of the disease. In this study a patient with CSW Syndrome is presented and the treatment and diagnosis of this syndrome are discussed in view of the literature.

  4. Hemodynamics of Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Sforza, Daniel M.; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan Raul

    2009-01-01

    The initiation and progression of cerebral aneurysms are degenerative processes of the arterial wall driven by a complex interaction of biological and hemodynamic factors. Endothelial cells on the artery wall respond physiologically to blood-flow patterns. In normal conditions, these responses are associated with nonpathological tissue remodeling and adaptation. The combination of abnormal blood patterns and genetics predisposition could lead to the pathological formation of aneurysms. Here, we review recent progress on the basic mechanisms of aneurysm formation and evolution, with a focus on the role of hemodynamic patterns. PMID:19784385

  5. Hospital marketing.

    PubMed

    Carter, Tony

    2003-01-01

    This article looks at a prescribed academic framework for various criteria that serve as a checklist for marketing performance that can be applied to hospital marketing organizations. These guidelines are drawn from some of Dr. Noel Capon of Columbia University's book Marketing Management in the 21st Century and applied to actual practices of hospital marketing organizations. In many ways this checklist can act as a "marketing" balanced scorecard to verify performance effectiveness and develop opportunities for innovation.

  6. Hospital philanthropy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dean G; Clement, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    It remains an open question whether hospital spending on fundraising efforts to garner philanthropy is a good use of funds. Research and industry reports provide conflicting results. We describe the accounting and data challenges in analysis of hospital philanthropy, which include measurement of donations, measurement of fundraising expenses, and finding the relationships among organizations where these cash flows occur. With these challenges, finding conflicting results is not a surprise. PMID:23614267

  7. Hospital marketing.

    PubMed

    Carter, Tony

    2003-01-01

    This article looks at a prescribed academic framework for various criteria that serve as a checklist for marketing performance that can be applied to hospital marketing organizations. These guidelines are drawn from some of Dr. Noel Capon of Columbia University's book Marketing Management in the 21st Century and applied to actual practices of hospital marketing organizations. In many ways this checklist can act as a "marketing" balanced scorecard to verify performance effectiveness and develop opportunities for innovation. PMID:14753323

  8. Rehabilitation Outcomes of Children with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Yalcinkaya, Ebru Yilmaz; Caglar, Nil Sayıner; Tugcu, Betul; Tonbaklar, Aysegul

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] To evaluate the results of Bobath-based rehabilitation performed at a pediatric cerebral palsy (CP) inpatient clinic. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects were 28 children with CP who were inpatients at a pediatric service. Inclusion criteria were: being an inpatient of our hospital aged 2–12 with a diagnosis of CP; having one permanent primary caregiver; and the caregiver having no medical or psychotic problems. All of the patients received Bobath treatment for 1 hour per day, 5 days a week. The locomotor system, neurologic and orthopedic examination, Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) of the patients, and Short Form-36 (SF-36) of permanent caregivers were evaluated at the time of admission to hospital, discharge from hospital, and at 1 and 3 months after discharge. [Results] Post-admission scores of GMFM at discharge, and 1 and 3 months later showed significant increase. Social function and emotional role subscores of SF-36 had increased significantly at discharge. [Conclusion] Bobath treatment is promising and randomized controlled further studies are needed for rehabilitation technics. PMID:24648650

  9. Rehabilitation outcomes of children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Yalcinkaya, Ebru Yilmaz; Caglar, Nil Sayıner; Tugcu, Betul; Tonbaklar, Aysegul

    2014-02-01

    [Purpose] To evaluate the results of Bobath-based rehabilitation performed at a pediatric cerebral palsy (CP) inpatient clinic. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects were 28 children with CP who were inpatients at a pediatric service. Inclusion criteria were: being an inpatient of our hospital aged 2-12 with a diagnosis of CP; having one permanent primary caregiver; and the caregiver having no medical or psychotic problems. All of the patients received Bobath treatment for 1 hour per day, 5 days a week. The locomotor system, neurologic and orthopedic examination, Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) of the patients, and Short Form-36 (SF-36) of permanent caregivers were evaluated at the time of admission to hospital, discharge from hospital, and at 1 and 3 months after discharge. [Results] Post-admission scores of GMFM at discharge, and 1 and 3 months later showed significant increase. Social function and emotional role subscores of SF-36 had increased significantly at discharge. [Conclusion] Bobath treatment is promising and randomized controlled further studies are needed for rehabilitation technics. PMID:24648650

  10. Multiple fusiform cerebral aneurysms – case report

    PubMed Central

    Jaworska, Katarzyna; Dołowy, Joanna; Kuśmierska, Małgorzata; Kuniej, Tomasz; Jaźwiec, Przemysław

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: A true aneurysym is a dilation of arterial lumen as a consequence of congenital or acquired abnormalities leading to a reduction of mechanical resistance of vascular wall, most commonly caused by its defected structure in the form of absence or weakening of the muscular and/or elastic layer. From the pathophysiological point of view, cerebral aneurysms can be classified as ‘saccular’ – most commonly occurring, and ‘other types’, including fusiform/dolichoectatic, dissecting, serpentine, posttraumatic, mycotic and giant aneurysms with or without intra-aneurysmal thrombosis. Case Report: We present a rare case of a patient with multiple fusiform dilations of cerebral vessels and giant fusiform aneurysm in supraclinoid segment of the internal carotid artery. The patient presented to hospital because of sudden, severe vertigo with nausea, impaired balance and disturbed vision. Vascular anomalies were detected on CT scanning without contrast. The diagnostic work-up was complemented by CT angiography, MRI and cerebral angiography. Conclusions: Aneurysm located within the intracranial arteries is one of the most common vascular defects of the brain. The number, size and location of aneurysms are highly variable. Aneurysms can have either supra- or infratentorial location, affecting a single or multiple arteries within one or both brain hemispheres. There is often a correlation between the location of the aneurysm and its etiology, as in case of so-called mirror-image aneurysms. Symmetrically located aneurysms may indicate a defect in vascular structure. Asymmetric location, as in the patient described above, is more likely due to acquired causes, mainly atherosclerosis, but also septic emboli or blood disorders. PMID:22802866

  11. Streaming Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulley, John

    2009-01-01

    At a time when the evolutionary pace of new media resembles the real-time mutation of certain microorganisms, the age-old question of how best to connect with constituents can seem impossibly complex--even for an elite institution plugged into the motherboard of Silicon Valley. Identifying the most effective vehicle for reaching a particular…

  12. Media Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Kenneth J.; Pyrillis, Rita; Rosario, Ruben; Stuart, Reginald; Zinngrabe, Elaine

    2007-01-01

    This article presents five vignettes, written by veteran journalists, that focus on the current and future state of journalism. Despite almost daily reports of media consolidation and newspaper layoffs, the journalists sound a cautionary but optimistic tone about the industry. They weigh in on everything from the threats to diversity to the future…

  13. Social media.

    PubMed

    Foster, James

    2013-01-01

    There is an argument that with the common use of a variety of media the professional expectations on our everyday life are becoming increasingly important. A moan about a patient on a Monday night 20 years ago may have been harmless. The same comment made using today's communication methods could result in a regulatory challenge. PMID:23729056

  14. Cerebral blood flow velocity in two patients with neonatal cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Nishimaki, S; Seki, K; Yokota, S

    2001-04-01

    Cerebral blood flow velocity was measured in the middle cerebral artery of two patients who exhibited unilateral neonatal cerebral infarction during the neonatal period. Doppler studies demonstrated increases in cerebral blood flow velocity but decreases in the resistance index on the affected side of the middle cerebral artery in the neonate who developed hemiplegia with cystic encephalomalacia, although the neonate with normal neurologic outcome exhibited symmetric cerebral blood flow velocity and resistance index. The asymmetry in cerebral blood flow velocity measurements of both middle cerebral arteries may be useful to evaluate the severity of brain damage and predict the neurodevelopmental prognosis of unilateral neonatal cerebral infarction. PMID:11377112

  15. Cerebral cartography and connectomics.

    PubMed

    Sporns, Olaf

    2015-05-19

    Cerebral cartography and connectomics pursue similar goals in attempting to create maps that can inform our understanding of the structural and functional organization of the cortex. Connectome maps explicitly aim at representing the brain as a complex network, a collection of nodes and their interconnecting edges. This article reflects on some of the challenges that currently arise in the intersection of cerebral cartography and connectomics. Principal challenges concern the temporal dynamics of functional brain connectivity, the definition of areal parcellations and their hierarchical organization into large-scale networks, the extension of whole-brain connectivity to cellular-scale networks, and the mapping of structure/function relations in empirical recordings and computational models. Successfully addressing these challenges will require extensions of methods and tools from network science to the mapping and analysis of human brain connectivity data. The emerging view that the brain is more than a collection of areas, but is fundamentally operating as a complex networked system, will continue to drive the creation of ever more detailed and multi-modal network maps as tools for on-going exploration and discovery in human connectomics.

  16. [Noradrenaline and cerebral aging].

    PubMed

    Jouvet, M; Albarede, J L; Lubin, S; Meyrignac, C

    1991-01-01

    The central functions of norepinephrine (NE) are a recent discovery: regulation of alertness and of the wakefulness-sleep cycle, maintenance of attention, memory and learning, cerebral plasticity and neuro-protection. The anatomical, histological, biochemical and physiological properties of the central noradrenergic system: extreme capacity for ramification and arborization; slow conduction, non-myelinized axons with extrasynaptic varicosities producing and releasing NE; frequency of co-transmission phenomena, and; neuromodulation with fiber effect responsible for improvement in the signal over background noise ratio and selection of significant stimuli form a true interface between the outside world and the central nervous system, notably for the neocortex in the context of the cognitive treatment of information. This central noradrenergic system is involved in the neurophysiology and the clinical features of cerebral aging (ideation-motor and cognitive function slowing down, loss of behavioral adjustment), neuro-degenerative disorders (SDAT, Parkinson's disease), certain aspects of depression and less obvious conditions (head injuries, sequelae of cerebrovascular accidents, sub-cortical dementia). The recent development of medications improving alertness (adrafinil, modafinil) with a pure central action and specifically noradrenergic, may contribute to an improvement in these multifactorial disorders. PMID:1864252

  17. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Milena Castellar-Leones, Sandra; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT) and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24347950

  18. What constitutes cerebral palsy?

    PubMed

    Badawi, N; Watson, L; Petterson, B; Blair, E; Slee, J; Haan, E; Stanley, F

    1998-08-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a term of convenience applied to a group of motor disorders of central origin defined by clinical description. It is not a diagnosis in that its application infers nothing about pathology, aetiology, or prognosis. It is an umbrella term covering a wide range of cerebral disorders which result in childhood motor impairment. The precise inclusion criteria vary with the objectives for using the term. For meaningful comparison of rates of CP, as performed by and between CP registers, it is important that the rates should be generated using the same criteria. As generally understood there must be motor impairment, and this impairment must stem from a malfunction of the brain (rather than spinal cord or muscles). Furthermore, the brain malfunction must be non-progressive and it must be manifest early in life. For the purposes of comparisons of rates across time even when the condition meets all the above criteria, it must not historically have been excluded from the category of CP. This paper addresses the problem of standardizing the inclusion criteria for selecting people included on CP registers with particular reference to this last criterion. PMID:9746004

  19. Reading Strategies in Children with Cerebral Visual Impairment Caused by Periventricular Leukomalacia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fellenius, Kerstin; Ek, Ulla; Jacobson, Lena

    2001-01-01

    Four children with cerebral visual impairment caused by periventricular leukomalacia were followed for two years during their process of learning to read in mainstream classes. Two of the children were offered both Braille and print reading as reading media. The other two children read ordinary print without special teaching. Differences in…

  20. Effects of publicity on a forensic hospital.

    PubMed

    Reichlin, S M; Bloom, J D

    1993-01-01

    Oregon's forensic psychiatry hospital experienced a convulsing chain of events that began with the escape of an insanity acquittee who had been hospitalized following two murders. Although the patient was arrested without reoffending, there were major repercussions in the hospital. This event and related state hospital topics became the subject of intense publicity in the local newspaper. Articles ran almost daily for over a month, the majority of which were on page one. We give here an account of the episode and examine the meaning of the media coverage in the light of administration of public mental health systems, particularly where forensic psychiatry is involved.

  1. Photodynamic therapy of recurrent cerebral glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shu-Gan; Wu, Si-En; Chen, Zong-Qian; Sun, Wei

    1993-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) was performed on 11 cases of recurrent cerebral glioma, including 3 cases of recurrent glioblastoma, 7 of recurrent anaplastic astrocytoma, and 1 recurrent ependymoma. Hematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) was administered intravenously at a dose of 4 - 7 mg/kg 5 - 24 hours before the operation. All patients underwent a craniotomy with a nearly radical excision of the tumor following which the tumor bed was irradiated with 630 nm laser light emitting either an argon pumped dye laser or frequency double YAG pumped dye laser for 30 to 80 minutes with a total dose of 50 J/cm2 (n equals 1), 100 J/cm2 (n equals 2), 200 J/cm2 (n equals 7), and 300 J/cm2 (n equals 1). The temperature was kept below 37 degree(s)C by irrigation. Two patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy. There was no evidence of increased cerebral edema, and no other toxicity by the therapy. All patients were discharged from the hospital within 15 days after surgery. We conclude that PDT using 4 - 7 mg/kg of HPD and 630 nm light with a dose of up to 300 J/cm2 can be used as an adjuvant therapy with no additional complications. Adjuvant PDT in the treatment of recurrent glioma is better than simple surgery.

  2. Hyponatremia—What Is Cerebral Salt Wasting?

    PubMed Central

    Momi, Jasminder; Tang, Christopher M; Abcar, Antoine C; Kujubu, Dean A; Sim, John J

    2010-01-01

    Background: Hyponatremia is a common electrolyte imbalance in hospitalized patients. It is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, especially if the underlying cause is incorrectly diagnosed and not treated appropriately. Often, the hospitalist is faced with a clinical dilemma when a patient presents with hyponatremia of an unclear etiology and with uncertain volume status. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) is frequently diagnosed in this clinical setting, but cerebral salt wasting (CSW) is an important diagnosis to consider. Objective: We wanted to describe the diagnosis, treatment, and history of CSW to provide clinicians with a better understanding of the differential diagnosis for hyponatremia. Conclusion: CSW is a process of extracellular volume depletion due to a tubular defect in sodium transport. Two postulated mechanisms for CSW are the excess secretion of natriuretic peptides and the loss of sympathetic stimulation to the kidney. Making the distinction between CSW and SIADH is important because the treatment for the two conditions is very different. PMID:20740122

  3. Developing a social media platform for nurses.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jennifer; Kennedy, Maggie

    2015-11-18

    Social media tools provide opportunities for nurses to connect with colleagues and patients and to advance personally and professionally. This article describes the process of developing an innovative social media platform at a large, multi-centre teaching hospital, The Ottawa Hospital, Canada, and its benefits for nurses. The platform, TOH Nurses, was developed using a nursing process approach, involving assessment, planning, implementation and evaluation. The aim of this initiative was to address the barriers to communication inherent in the large number of nurses employed by the organisation, the physical size of the multi-centre hospital and the shift-work nature of nursing. The platform was used to provide educational materials for clinical nurses, and to share information about professional practice. The implications of using a social media platform in a healthcare setting were considered carefully during its development and implementation, including concerns regarding privacy and confidentiality. PMID:26576914

  4. ADSORPTIVE MEDIA TECHNOLOGIES: MEDIA SELECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides information on six items to be considered when selecting an adsorptive media for removing arsenic from drinking water; performance, EBCT, pre-treatment, regeneration, residuals, and cost. Each item is discussed in general and data and photographs from th...

  5. Multivariate Analysis of Risk Factors of Cerebral Infarction in 439 Patients Undergoing Thoracic Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kanaoka, Yuji; Ohki, Takao; Maeda, Koji; Baba, Takeshi; Fujita, Tetsuji

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study is to identify the potential risk factors of cerebral infarction associated with thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR). TEVAR was developed as a less invasive surgical alternative to conventional open repair for thoracic aortic aneurysm treatment. However, outcomes following TEVAR of aortic and distal arch aneurysms remain suboptimal. Cerebral infarction is a major concern during the perioperative period. We included 439 patients who underwent TEVAR of aortic aneurysms at a high-volume teaching hospital between July 2006 and June 2013. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify perioperative cerebral infarction risk factors. Four patients (0.9%) died within 30 days of TEVAR; 17 (3.9%) developed cerebral infarction. In univariate analysis, history of ischemic heart disease and cerebral infarction and concomitant cerebrovascular disease were significantly associated with cerebral infarction. “Shaggy aorta” presence, left subclavian artery coverage, carotid artery debranching, and pull-through wire use were identified as independent risk factors of cerebral infarction. In multivariate analysis, history of ischemic heart disease (odds ratio [OR] 6.49, P = 0.046) and cerebral infarction (OR 43.74, P = 0.031), “shaggy aorta” (OR 30.32, P < 0.001), pull-through wire use during surgery (OR 7.196, P = 0.014), and intraoperative blood loss ≥800 mL (OR 24.31, P = 0.017) were found to be independent risk factors of cerebral infarction. This study identified patient- and procedure-related risk factors of cerebral infarction following TEVAR. These results indicate that patient outcomes could be improved through the identification and management of procedure-related risk factors. PMID:27082585

  6. On Media Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedorov, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    This monograph analyzes the theory and practice of media education and media literacy. The book also includes the list of Russian media education literature and addresses of websites of the associations for media education.

  7. Otitis media with effusion

    MedlinePlus

    OME; Secretory otitis media; Serous otitis media; Silent otitis media; Silent ear infection; Glue ear ... drains from the tube and is swallowed. Otitis media with effusion (OME) and ear infections are connected ...

  8. Otitis media.

    PubMed

    Schilder, Anne G M; Chonmaitree, Tasnee; Cripps, Allan W; Rosenfeld, Richard M; Casselbrant, Margaretha L; Haggard, Mark P; Venekamp, Roderick P

    2016-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) or middle ear inflammation is a spectrum of diseases, including acute otitis media (AOM), otitis media with effusion (OME; 'glue ear') and chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM). OM is among the most common diseases in young children worldwide. Although OM may resolve spontaneously without complications, it can be associated with hearing loss and life-long sequelae. In developing countries, CSOM is a leading cause of hearing loss. OM can be of bacterial or viral origin; during 'colds', viruses can ascend through the Eustachian tube to the middle ear and pave the way for bacterial otopathogens that reside in the nasopharynx. Diagnosis depends on typical signs and symptoms, such as acute ear pain and bulging of the tympanic membrane (eardrum) for AOM and hearing loss for OME; diagnostic modalities include (pneumatic) otoscopy, tympanometry and audiometry. Symptomatic management of ear pain and fever is the mainstay of AOM treatment, reserving antibiotics for children with severe, persistent or recurrent infections. Management of OME largely consists of watchful waiting, with ventilation (tympanostomy) tubes primarily for children with chronic effusions and hearing loss, developmental delays or learning difficulties. The role of hearing aids to alleviate symptoms of hearing loss in the management of OME needs further study. Insertion of ventilation tubes and adenoidectomy are common operations for recurrent AOM to prevent recurrences, but their effectiveness is still debated. Despite reports of a decline in the incidence of OM over the past decade, attributed to the implementation of clinical guidelines that promote accurate diagnosis and judicious use of antibiotics and to pneumococcal conjugate vaccination, OM continues to be a leading cause for medical consultation, antibiotic prescription and surgery in high-income countries. PMID:27604644

  9. Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Bain, John

    1992-01-01

    Otitis media remains one of the least understood conditions seen by a family physician. More attention to follow up instead of widespread use of antibiotics and decongestant mixtures could improve family practice care of children with middle ear disorders. Greater selection in resorting to surgical management would be helpful. Unnecessary interference is unlikely to be of long-term benefit to either children or their families. ImagesFigures 1-3Figures 4-5 PMID:21221314

  10. Media matters.

    PubMed

    Martinez, L M

    1995-01-01

    The impact of the mass media on woman's status was addressed at two 1995 conferences: the Fourth World Conference on Women, held in Beijing, China, and the Congress of the World Association for Christian Communication, held in Puebla, Mexico. The globalization process facilitated by the mass media has served to increase the power of patriarchy, with no advantages to the cause of women's rights. Coverage of popular movements has been suppressed out of deference to male-controlled governments. Coverage of the Beijing Conference highlighted celebrities and personal stories, to the exclusion of the economic and political issues under debate. Television has commodified women, reinforcing their oppression. On the other hand, the alternative media, which tend to be decentralized, democratic, low-cost, and low in technology, are presenting women as subjects rather than objects and deconstructing gender stereotypes. Of concern, however, is the tendency of computer technology to widen the gap between social classes and developed and developing countries. Women must use information networks to disseminate information on women's rights and strengthen the links between women throughout the world.

  11. Thrombosis of the great cerebral vein in a hemodialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Ratkovic, Marina; Basic-Jukic, Nikolina; Gledovic, Branka; Radunovic, Danilo

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis is a rare condition with various clinical presentations which may delay diagnosis. It is frequently associated with severe consequences. We present the first documented case of thrombosis of the great cerebral vein in a hemodialysis patient. A 29-year-old female patient with end-stage renal disease of unknown etiology was admitted to a hospital with altered consciousness and nausea. Severe headache in the right parietal area had started 2 days before. On examination, she was in the poor overall condition, dysartric, with a severe nystagmus. Urgent brain multislice computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed thrombosis of the great cerebral vein with hypodense zones in hypothalamus, thalamus and basal ganglia. She was treated with heparin bolus of 25000 IU with a favorable outcome. Detailed examination demonstrated increased lupus anticoagulant (LA) 1 and LA2 and increased LA1/LA2. Control magnetic resonance imaging performed 1 year later revealed multiple vascular lesions within the brain. Acetylsalicylate was introduced in therapy. Thrombosis of the cerebral veins should be suspected in patients with end-stage renal disease, altered neurological status and signs of increased intracranial pressure.

  12. Media Education Initiatives by Media Organizations: The Uses of Media Literacy in Hong Kong Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Donna; Lee, Alice Y. L.

    2014-01-01

    As more media organizations have engaged in media education, this paper investigates the goals and practices of these activities. This article coins media education initiatives by media organizations with the term "media-organization media literac"y (MOML). Four MOML projects in Hong Kong were selected for examination. Built on critical…

  13. Anesthesia and cerebral apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Brée, B; Gourdin, M; De Kock, M

    2008-01-01

    General anesthetics interact with targets at the cellular and molecular levels. They have the potential to induce changes in the body and the brain. Usually, these interactions are thought to be short lasting. In contrast, recent evidences suggest that alcohol, a toxic sharing many mechanisms with general anesthetics, induces long term effect at these levels. This is particularly evident in the period of synaptogenesis during which alcohol can induce excessive cerebral apoptosis (histopathologic changes) in juvenile animal models. Even if the vast majority of our patients seems to completely restore homeostasis after general anesthesia, we don't know if the changes induced at the brain level in animal models exist in human. This article intends to supply biological, pharmacological and experimental basis for a possible long term effect of general anesthetics on the human developing brain. PMID:19051443

  14. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome in children with acute central nervous system injury.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Raquel; Casado-Flores, Juan; Nieto, Monserrat; García-Teresa, María Angeles

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to describe the causes, clinical pattern, and treatment of cerebral salt wasting syndrome in children with acute central nervous system injury. This retrospective study focused on patientscerebral salt wasting syndrome, over a period of 7 years, in the pediatric intensive care unit of a tertiary care hospital. Selection criteria included evidence of hyponatremia (serum sodium<130 mEq/L), polyuria, elevated urine sodium (>120 mEq/L), and volume depletion. Fourteen patients were identified with cerebral salt wasting syndrome, 12 after a neurosurgical procedure (8 brain tumor, 4 hydrocephalus) and 2 after severe brain trauma. In 11 patients the cerebral salt wasting syndrome was diagnosed during the first 48 hours of admission. Prevalence of cerebral salt wasting syndrome in neurosurgical children was 11.3/1000 surgical procedures. The minimum sodium was 122+/-7 mEq/L, the maximum urine osmolarity 644+/-59 mOsm/kgH2O. The maximum sodium supply was 1 mEq/kg/h (range, 0.1-2.4). The mean duration of cerebral salt wasting syndrome was 6+/-5 days (range 1-9). In conclusion, cerebral salt wasting syndrome can complicate the postoperative course of children with brain injury; it is frequently present after surgery for brain tumors and hydrocephalus and in patients with severe head trauma. Close monitoring of salt and fluid balance is essential to prevent severe neurologic and hemodynamic complications.

  15. Cerebral paragonimiasis mimicking tuberculoma: First case report in India.

    PubMed

    Singh, T Shantikumar; Khamo, V; Sugiyama, H

    2011-01-01

    An 8-year-old male child of Tuensang District, Nagaland, India, attended Civil Hospital, Tuensang, complaining of cough, fever, headache, and inability to move right arm since one month. On clinical suspicion of tubercular meningitis, anti-tubercular therapy was initiated and the patient was referred to the Naga Hospital Authority. A brain computed tomography scan revealed an isodense area with surrounding edema on the left parietal lobe, which was diagnosed as tuberculoma and the anti-tubercular therapy was continued. As there was no sign of clinical improvement on completion of the three-month-ATD regimen, the patient was investigated for paragonimiasis. Laboratory investigations revealed peripheral blood eosinophilia, raised ESR, Paragonimus egg-positive sputum, and positive Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and ID tests for paragonimiasis. The Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) test and Acid Fast Bacilli (AFB) sputum smears were negative. Chest roentgenogram showed no abnormal findings. A final diagnosis of pulmonary paragonimiasis associated with cerebral paragonimiasis was made. The patient responded to praziquantel therapy. Cerebral paragonimiasis is a serious extrapulmonary form of paragonimiasis, sometimes life-threatening, but curable with praziquantel. It should be included in the differential diagnosis of cerebral granulomatous and other space-occupying lesions.

  16. Cerebral paragonimiasis mimicking tuberculoma: First case report in India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, T Shantikumar; Khamo, V; Sugiyama, H

    2011-01-01

    An 8-year-old male child of Tuensang District, Nagaland, India, attended Civil Hospital, Tuensang, complaining of cough, fever, headache, and inability to move right arm since one month. On clinical suspicion of tubercular meningitis, anti-tubercular therapy was initiated and the patient was referred to the Naga Hospital Authority. A brain computed tomography scan revealed an isodense area with surrounding edema on the left parietal lobe, which was diagnosed as tuberculoma and the anti-tubercular therapy was continued. As there was no sign of clinical improvement on completion of the three-month-ATD regimen, the patient was investigated for paragonimiasis. Laboratory investigations revealed peripheral blood eosinophilia, raised ESR, Paragonimus egg-positive sputum, and positive Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and ID tests for paragonimiasis. The Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) test and Acid Fast Bacilli (AFB) sputum smears were negative. Chest roentgenogram showed no abnormal findings. A final diagnosis of pulmonary paragonimiasis associated with cerebral paragonimiasis was made. The patient responded to praziquantel therapy. Cerebral paragonimiasis is a serious extrapulmonary form of paragonimiasis, sometimes life-threatening, but curable with praziquantel. It should be included in the differential diagnosis of cerebral granulomatous and other space-occupying lesions. PMID:23507623

  17. Hospitality Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of the Canyons, Valencia, CA.

    A project was conducted at College of the Canyons (Valencia, California) to initiate a new 2-year hospitality program with career options in hotel or restaurant management. A mail and telephone survey of area employers in the restaurant and hotel field demonstrated a need for, interest in, and willingness to provide internships for such a program.…

  18. Academic Hospitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  19. Memory impairment caused by cerebral hematoma in the left medial temporal lobe due to ruptured posterior cerebral artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cognitive disorders, such as memory disturbances, are often observed following a subarachnoid hemorrhage. We present a very rare case where rupture of a posterior cerebral artery aneurysm caused restricted damage to the hippocampus unilaterally, and caused memory disturbances. Case presentation A 56-year-old, right-handed man, with a formal education history of 16 years and company employees was admitted to our hospital because of a consciousness disturbance. He was diagnosed as having a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a left posterior cerebral artery dissecting aneurysm, and coil embolization was performed. Subsequently, he had neither motor paresis nor sensory disturbances, but he showed disorientation, and both retrograde and anterograde amnesia. Although immediate recall and remote memory were almost intact, his recent memory was moderately impaired. Both verbal and non-verbal memories were impaired. Brain computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a cerebral hematoma in the left temporal lobe involving the hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus, and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) demonstrated low perfusion areas in the left medial temporal lobe. Conclusions We suggest that the memory impairment was caused by local tissue destruction of Papez’s circuit in the dominant hemisphere due to the cerebral hematoma. PMID:24602130

  20. Cerebral Laterality and Verbal Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Jay L.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Research suggests that we process information by way of two distinct and functionally separate coding systems. Their location, somewhat dependent on cerebral laterality, varies in right- and left-handed persons. Tests this dual coding model. (Editor/RK)

  1. Reliability of the Functional Mobility Scale for Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Adrienne R.; Morris, Meg E.; Graham, H. Kerr; Wolfe, Rory; Baker, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This study examined inter-rater reliability of the Functional Mobility Scale (FMS) for children with cerebral palsy (CP) and the presence of rater bias. A consecutive sample of 118 children with CP, 2-18 years old (mean 10.3 years, SD 3.6), was recruited from a hospital setting. Children were classified using the gross motor function…

  2. Determinants of Intensity of Participation in Leisure and Recreational Activities by Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palisano, Robert J.; Chiarello, Lisa A.; Orlin, Margo; Oeffinger, Donna; Polansky, Marcy; Maggs, Jill; Bagley, Anita; Gorton, George

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To test a model of child, family, and service determinants of intensity of participation in leisure and recreational activities by children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Participants were 288 children with CP, age range 6 to 12 years (mean 9y 8mo, SD 2y), and their parents from seven children's hospitals. The sample comprised 166 (57.6%)…

  3. Dental treatment under general anesthesia in a group of patients with cerebral palsy and a group of healthy pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Escanilla-Casal, Alejandro; Aznar-Gómez, Mirella; Viaño, José M.; Rivera-Baró, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    This is a comparative study between two groups, one of healthy children and the other of children with cerebral palsy, which underwent dental treatment under general anesthesia at Hospital Sant Joan de Déu Barcelona. The purpose of the study was to compare and determine oral pathology, frequency, severity and postoperative complications in pediatric patients with and without an underlying disease which undergo a dental treatment under general anesthesia. Key words:General anesthesia, cerebral palsy, pediatric patients. PMID:24608223

  4. Media power and public mental health policy.

    PubMed

    Marcos, L R

    1989-09-01

    The author describes the functions of the news media and their influence on public mental health policy making. News media functions are divided into the categories of selecting the news, reporting information, serving as a channel of communication, presenting views and opinions, and legitimizing the issues. These functions are illustrated by focusing on a highly publicized New York City policy to involuntarily hospitalize mentally ill homeless people living in the streets. Strategies are suggested to mental health professionals on how to effectively interact with the news media. PMID:2764177

  5. Otitis media.

    PubMed

    Pichichero, Michael E

    2013-04-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is diagnosed based on visualization of a full or bulging tympanic membrane with middle ear effusion. The distribution of bacteria causing AOM in North America under the influence of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination and antibiotic selection pressure has resulted in a predominance of β-lactamase-producing Haemophilus influenzae followed by penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. Although guidelines continue to endorse amoxicillin as the preferred treatment, amoxicillin/clavulanate in high dosage would be the preferred treatment based on the otopathogen mix currently. Antibiotic prophylaxis has fallen into disfavor as a preventative strategy for AOM recurrences. PMID:23481107

  6. [A case of cerebral tuberculoma (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Shinmura, F; Sakakibara, T; Takayasu, K; Takagi, S; Satowa, S

    1979-02-01

    A 27-year-old woman was admitted to other hospital for acute pleuritis in May 1977. She suddenly had a focal epileptic seizure in the face with loss of consciousness on July 10, 1977. The same episodes of seizure occurred on Aug. 8, on Oct. 26, on Nov. 22, 1977. She was admitted to our hospital on Dec. 12, 1977. Neurological examinations showed no abnormality. Chest X-ray film showed bilateral severe thickening of the pleura. Plain skull films showed normal findings. Enhanced CT scanning showed a homogenous irregular contour of high density area surrounded by low density area in the right frontal region. The lateral ventricle was slightly shifted to the left side. 99mTc brain scan also detected a spherical abnormal uptake in this area. Right carotid angiography showed no abnormal vessels and increased vascularities. On Nov. 22, 1977, a craniotomy was made over the right fronto-temporal bone, and a walnut sized tumor in the frontal subcortex was totally removed successfully. Histologically, the tumor was diagnosed as brain tuberculoma. The antituberculous therapy (AB-PC, INAH, Rifampicin), high doses of gammabenin, and steroid were given. About four months later, she was in good health without neurologic deficits and returned to her work. The literature was reviewed, and the value of CT scan and RI scan in the diagnosis of cerebral tuberculoma was emphasized.

  7. [Cerebral paragonimiasis and Bo Sung Sim's hemispherectomy in Korea in 1950s-1960s].

    PubMed

    Park, Jiyoung; Miyagawa, Takuya; Hong, Jeonghwa; Kim, Ockjoo

    2011-06-30

    This paper deals with cerebral paragonimiasis and cerebral hemispherectomy conducted as a treatment of cerebral paragonimiasis by Bo Sung Sim in Korea in 1950s-1960s. He demonstrated that cerebral hemispherectomy could be used for unilateral diffuse cerebral paragonimiasis. Sim learned cerebral hemispherectomy from Dr. L. A. French. at the University of Minnesota from 1955 to 1957 in America. The authors argues that Bo Sung Sim's introduction of cerebral hemispherectomy to Korea was not a simple application of an advanced medical technology, but a complicated and active process in that Sim used the technique to intervene intractable complications from cerebral paragonimiasis such as generalized convulsions, spastic hemiplegia and mental deterioration. Bo Sung Sim, one of the neurosurgeons of the first generation in Korea, was trained in neurology, neuropathology, neuroradiology and animal experiments as well as in neurosurgery at the University of Minnesota. After returning to Korea, Sim faced parasitic diseases, one of the most serious public health problems at that time, which were far different from what he learned in America. As a neurosurgeon, Sim tackled with parasitic diseases of the central nervous system with various diagnostics and therapeutics. In 1950s, more than one million populations suffered from pulmonary paragonimiasis acquired by eating raw crabs or by feeding juice of crushed crayfish for the treatment of measles in Korea. About 26.6 percent of people with paragonimiasis had cerebral paragonimiasis. Before bithionol therapy was introduced in 1962, neurosurgery was the only available treatment to control increased intracranial pressures, intractable epilepsy, paralysis and mental deterioration. Between 1958 to 1962, Bo Sung Sim operated on 24 patients of cerebral paragonimiasis. In two of them, he performed cerebral hemispherectomy to control intractable convulsions when he found diffuse cerebral paragonimiasis and cerebral atrophy at the

  8. Cerebral Malaria in Children Is Associated With Long-term Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    John, Chandy C.; Bangirana, Paul; Byarugaba, Justus; Opoka, Robert O.; Idro, Richard; Jurek, Anne M.; Wu, Baolin; Boivin, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Cerebral malaria affects >785 000 African children every year. We previously documented an increased frequency of cognitive impairment in children with cerebral malaria 6 months after their initial malaria episode. This study was conducted to determine the long-term effects of cerebral malaria on the cognitive function of these children. METHODS Children who were 5 to 12 years of age and presented to Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda, with cerebral malaria (n = 44) or uncomplicated malaria (n = 54), along with healthy, asymptomatic community children (n = 89), were enrolled in a prospective cohort study of cognition. Cognitive testing was performed at enrollment and 2 years later. The primary outcome was presence of a deficit in ≥1 of 3 cognitive areas tested. RESULTS At 2-year follow-up testing, 26.3% of children with cerebral malaria and 12.5% with uncomplicated malaria had cognitive deficits in ≥1 area, as compared with 7.6% of community children. Deficits in children with cerebral malaria were primarily in the area of attention (cerebral malaria, 18.4%, vs community children, 2.5%). After adjustment for age, gender, nutrition, home environment, and school level, children with cerebral malaria had a 3.67-fold increased risk for a cognitive deficit compared with community children. Cognitive impairment at 2-year follow-up was associated with hyporeflexia on admission and neurologic deficits 3 months after discharge. CONCLUSIONS Cerebral malaria is associated with long-term cognitive impairments in 1 of 4 child survivors. Future studies should investigate the mechanisms involved so as to develop interventions aimed at prevention and rehabilitation. PMID:18541616

  9. Factors affecting daily activities of patients with cerebral infarction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Zhou, Cheng-ye; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Yun-feng; Zou, Chang-lin

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stroke is the leading cause of death and long-term disability. This study was undertaken to investigate the factors influencing daily activities of patients with cerebral infarction so as to take interventional measures earlier to improve their daily activities. METHODS: A total of 149 patients with first-episode cerebral infarction were recruited into this prospective study. They were admitted to the Encephalopathy Center, Department of Neurology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical College in Zhejiang Province from August 2008 to December 2008. The baseline characteristics of the patients and cerebral infarction risk factors on the first day of admission were recorded. White blood cell (WBC) count, plasma glucose (PG), and many others of laboratory targets were collected in the next morning. Barthel index (BI) was calculated at 2 weeks and 3 months respectively after onset of the disease at the outpatient clinic or by telephone call. Lung infection, urinary tract infection and atrial fibrillation if any were recorded on admission. The National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores and the GCS scores were recorded within 24 hours on and after admission, at the second week, and at the third month after the onset of cerebral infarction respectively. RESULTS: The factors of BI at 2 weeks and 3 months after onset were the initial PG level, WBC count and initial NIHSS scores. Besides, urinary tract infection on admission was also the factor for BI at 3 months. CONCLUSION: Active measures should be taken to control these factors to improve the daily activities of patients with cerebral infarction. PMID:25214953

  10. Geographic Media Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukinbeal, Chris

    2014-01-01

    While the use of media permeates geographic research and pedagogic practice, the underlying literacies that link geography and media remain uncharted. This article argues that geographic media literacy incorporates visual literacy, information technology literacy, information literacy, and media literacy. Geographic media literacy is the ability…

  11. Measuring News Media Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maksl, Adam; Ashley, Seth; Craft, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    News media literacy refers to the knowledge and motivations needed to identify and engage with journalism. This study measured levels of news media literacy among 500 teenagers using a new scale measure based on Potter's model of media literacy and adapted to news media specifically. The adapted model posits that news media literate individuals…

  12. The Mass Media Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmgren, Rod, Ed.; Norton, William, Ed.

    This anthology consists of two major sections, "The News Media" and "The Entertainment Media." Both feature essays by critics, working professionals, and professional observers of the media. One aim of the anthology is to show the pervasive effect of the media on us. The section on news media comments on such topics as credibility gap, Vice…

  13. Hydrostatic determinants of cerebral perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, E.M.; Traystman, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    We examined the cerebral blood flow response to alterations in perfusion pressure mediated through decreases in mean arterial pressure, increases in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure, and increases in jugular venous (JV) pressure in 42 pentobarbital anesthetized dogs. Each of these three pressures was independently controlled. Cerebral perfusion pressure was defined as mean arterial pressure minus JV or CSF pressure, depending on which was greater. Mean hemispheric blood flow was measured with the radiolabeled microsphere technique. Despite 30-mm Hg reductions in mean arterial pressure or increases in CSF or JV pressure, CBF did not change as long as the perfusion pressure remained greater than approximately 60 mm Hg. However, whenever perfusion pressure was reduced to an average of 48 mm Hg, cerebral blood flow decreased 27% to 33%. These results demonstrate the capacity of the cerebral vascular bed to respond similarly to changes in the perfusion pressure gradient obtained by decreasing mean arterial pressure, increasing JV pressure or increasing CSF pressure, and thereby support the above definition of cerebral perfusion pressure.

  14. [Cerebral artery infarction presented as an unusual complication of acute middle otitis].

    PubMed

    Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael; Alcalá-Cerra, Gabriel; Castellar-Leones, Sandra Milena; Gutiérrez-Paternina, Juan José

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: la otitis media aguda es una inflamación del oído medio frecuente en la edad pediátrica. Aproximadamente 2 % de todos los casos desarrolla complicaciones intracraneales, más específicamente meningitis; por lo general, los infartos cerebrales originados por esta última son venosos. Rara vez se ha descrito la ocurrencia de un infarto arterial cerebral como complicación directa de la otitis media aguda. Caso clínico: niña de 12 meses de edad quien fue llevada a un servicio de urgencias por síndrome febril secundario a otitis media aguda y alteración del estado de conciencia. A la exploración física se identificó que estaba somnolienta, con anisocoria, midriasis en el ojo derecho y hemiparesia izquierda. Con la tomografía axial computarizada de cerebro se apreció un infarto arterial cerebral extenso. Los padres no autorizaron la craniectomía descompresiva y la paciente falleció a las 48 horas de su ingreso hospitalario. Conclusiones: a pesar de los recursos tecnológicos con los que se dispone actualmente, el infarto cerebral relacionado con la otitis media aguda tiene una evolución tórpida. Los signos neurológicos focalizadores y el deterioro progresivo deben apuntar a la ineficacia del tratamiento antimicrobiano instaurado.

  15. [Real world study of Dengzhan xixin injection in treatment of cerebral infarction with medication].

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Cheng, Hao; Xie, Yan-Ming

    2014-09-01

    To analysis of Dengzhan Xixin injection (DZI) in treatment of cerebral infarction (EBHM) in the real world population characteristics and concomitant medication. By selecting the 20 hospital information system (HIS) used in the database of DZI and primary diagnosis of 2 484 cases of cerebral infarction patients information, use the Apriori algorithm to construct the model, using Clementine 12.0 analysis, cerebral infarction complicating diseases, commonly used drug combination analysis of DZI. The results showed that patients with more males than females (1.63: 1); age > 46 in older persons, treatment 7-14 days accounted for the majority of patients with hypertension, cerebral infarction, diabetes, coronary heart disease and other diseases; common drug combination can be divided into seven categories: medicine of antiplatelet therapy (aspirin, clopidogrel hydrogen), hypolipidemic drugs (atorvastatin, probucol), calcium channel blockers (cinepazide), cerebral protection drugs (laci staw), to improve cerebral circulation drugs (alprostadil), other traditional Chinese medicine injection (Shuxuetong injection, Xueshuantong), treatment with underlying disease: nifedipine, metoprolol, isosorbide dinitrate etc. The clinical cure rate and improvement rate of 97.60%. The next step needs to be combined with clinical practice, carry out analysis of effectiveness and safety of the combination scheme, and provide reference for clinical rational drug use.

  16. Primary brain tumors associated with cerebral aneurysm: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Suslu, Hikmet Turan; Bozbuga, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    The primary brain tumors associated with cerebral aneurysms are rare in neurosurgical practice. The present article constitutes an evaluation of the management of coexistent primary brain tumor and cerebral aneurysm. A retrospective study of three cases of primary brain tumor with cerebral aneurysm was performed. We evaluated the complications and clinic outcomes by assessing the clinical and imaging findings. Case 1 presented with a subarachnoid hemorrhage from an aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery, with an incidental left frontal oligodendroglioma. Case 2 presented with chronic headache due to left frontal convexity meningioma, with proximal internal carotid artery aneurysm which was found incidentally during preoperative magnetic resonance angiography. Case 3 was admitted to our hospital complaining of headache, memory disturbance, and weakness in her left lower extremity. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed right frontal lymphoma and an unruptured aneurysm at the left middle cerebral artery. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging revealed right frontal lymphoma and unruptured left middle cerebral artery. The frequency of primary brain tumor and cerebral aneurysm coexistence is increasing due to improvements in high-resolution imaging. In these complicated cases, the management will differ according to each pathology present, and this is an important problem for a neurosurgeon.

  17. Cerebral vasculitis associated with cocaine abuse

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, B.R.; Fainstat, M.

    1987-10-16

    A case of cerebral vasculitis in a previously healthy 22-year-old man with a history of cocaine abuse is described. Cerebral angiograms showed evidence of vasculitis. A search for possible causes other than cocaine produced no results. The authors include cocaine with methamphetamines, heroin, and ephedrine as illicit drugs that can cause cerebral vasculitis.

  18. A case of cerebral gigantism and hepatocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sugarman, G I; Heuser, E T; Reed, W B

    1977-06-01

    A 14-year-old boy, who had the physical and neurological characteristics of cerebral gigantism (Sotos syndrome), developed hepatocarcinoma. This tumor is rare in children and has never, to our knowledge, been recorded in a patient with cerebral gigantism. An autopsy was performed, the first we are aware of in a patient with cerebral gigantism without increased size in ventricles.

  19. Neuroevolutional Approach to Cerebral Palsy and Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mysak, Edward D.

    Intended for cerebral palsy specialists, the book emphasizes the contribution that a neuroevolutional approach to therapy can make to habilitation goals of the child with cerebral palsy and applies the basic principles of the Bobath approach to therapy. The first section discusses cerebral palsy as a reflection of disturbed neuro-ontogenisis and…

  20. Cerebral Palsy: A Dental Update

    PubMed Central

    Sehrawat, Nidhi; Bansal, Kalpana; Chopra, Radhika

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Special and medically compromised patients present a unique population that challenges the dentist’s skill and knowledge. Providing oral care to people with cerebral palsy (CP) requires adaptation of the skills we use everyday. In fact, most people with mild or moderate forms of CP can be treated successfully in the general practice setting. This article is to review various dental considerations and management of a CP patient. How to cite this article: Sehrawat N, Marwaha M, Bansal K, Chopra R. Cerebral Palsy: A Dental Update. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2):109-118. PMID:25356010

  1. Cerebral radionecrosis: is surgery necessary?

    PubMed Central

    Woo, E; Lam, K; Yu, Y L; Lee, P W; Huang, C Y

    1987-01-01

    Seven patients with cerebral necrosis after radiotherapy for carcinoma of the nasopharynx are presented. The clinical features included seizures and a varying degree of intellectual impairment. In spite of significant mass effect on CT scan, the patients remained alert, ambulatory and independent. We believe that some cases of cerebral necrosis following radiotherapy for extra-cranial neoplasms present in a more benign fashion than has been portrayed in the literature, and in the absence of clinical evidence of raised intracranial pressure, surgical intervention is unnecessary. The importance of careful fractionation of an optimum radiation dose as a preventive measure is emphasised. Images PMID:3694200

  2. Ohio hospital PR pros collaborate on crisis communications plan.

    PubMed

    Rees, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Two member hospitals of the Akron Regional Hospital Association (ARHA), Ohio, experienced crisis situations which severely strained their public relations resources. These events were the genesis for the development of a comprehensive plan for sharing public relations resources among 11 member hospitals. The plan details procedures for sharing help in the event of a crisis or specific hospital media event. It identifies three potential situations in which it can be implemented: internal disaster, external disaster, or a specific incident unique to one of the hospitals. No occasion has yet arisen to implement the plan.

  3. Caffeine induced changes in cerebral circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, R.J.; Wilson, W.H.

    1985-09-01

    While the caffeine induced cerebral vasoconstriction is well documented, the effects of oral ingestion of the drug in a dose range comparable to the quantities in which it is usually consumed and the intensity and duration of the associated reduction in cerebral circulation are unknown. Cerebral blood flow was measured via the TTXenon inhalation technique before and thirty and ninety minutes after the oral administration of 250 mg of caffeine or a placebo, under double-blind conditions. Caffeine ingestion was found to be associated with significant reductions in cerebral perfusion thirty and ninety minutes later. The placebo group showed no differences between the three sets of cerebral blood flow values.

  4. Pentoxifylline as an adjunct therapy in children with cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pentoxifylline (PTX) affects many processes that may contribute to the pathogenesis of severe malaria and it has been shown to reduce the duration of coma in children with cerebral malaria. This pilot study was performed to assess pharmacokinetics, safety and efficacy of PTX in African children with cerebral malaria. Methods Ten children admitted to the high dependency unit of the Kilifi District Hospital in Kenya with cerebral malaria (Blantyre coma score of 2 or less) received quinine plus a continuous infusion of 10 mg/kg/24 hours PTX for 72 hours. Five children were recruited as controls and received normal saline instead of PTX. Plasma samples were taken for PTX and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) levels. Blantyre Coma Score, parasitemia, hematology and vital signs were assessed 4 hourly. Results One child (20%) in the control group died, compared to four children (40%) in the PTX group. This difference was not significant (p = 0.60). Laboratory parameters and clinical data were comparable between groups. TNF levels were lower in children receiving PTX. Conclusions The small sample size does not permit definitive conclusions, but the mortality rate was unexpectedly high in the PTX group. PMID:21176151

  5. Investigating cerebral oedema using poroelasticity.

    PubMed

    Vardakis, John C; Chou, Dean; Tully, Brett J; Hung, Chang C; Lee, Tsong H; Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral oedema can be classified as the tangible swelling produced by expansion of the interstitial fluid volume. Hydrocephalus can be succinctly described as the abnormal accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within the brain which ultimately leads to oedema within specific sites of parenchymal tissue. Using hydrocephalus as a test bed, one is able to account for the necessary mechanisms involved in the interaction between oedema formation and cerebral fluid production, transport and drainage. The current state of knowledge about integrative cerebral dynamics and transport phenomena indicates that poroelastic theory may provide a suitable framework to better understand various diseases. In this work, Multiple-Network Poroelastic Theory (MPET) is used to develop a novel spatio-temporal model of fluid regulation and tissue displacement within the various scales of the cerebral environment. The model is applied through two formats, a one-dimensional finite difference - Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) coupling framework, as well as a two-dimensional Finite Element Method (FEM) formulation. These are used to investigate the role of endoscopic fourth ventriculostomy in alleviating oedema formation due to fourth ventricle outlet obstruction (1D coupled model) in addition to observing the capability of the FEM template in capturing important characteristics allied to oedema formation, like for instance in the periventricular region (2D model).

  6. Confusional state and cerebral infarcts.

    PubMed Central

    García-Albea, E.

    1989-01-01

    Thirteen patients with confusional state and cerebral infarction were studied. Seven patients had optic pathway alterations. On computed tomographic scan, 2 patients had multiple infarctions and 10 had single infarctions, predominantly located in the temporo-occipital associative cortex. One patient had a normal scan. Reduction of 'selective attention', 'release' hallucinations, amnesic syndrome and secondary individual adjustment could explain the confusional state. PMID:2608563

  7. Neuropathology of Acquired Cerebral Trauma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigler, Erin D.

    1987-01-01

    To help educators understand the cognitive and behavioral sequelae of cerebral injury, the neuropathology of traumatic brain injury and the main neuropathological features resulting from trauma-related brain damage are reviewed. A glossary with definitions of 37 neurological terms is appended. (Author/DB)

  8. Hospitals for sale.

    PubMed

    Costello, Michael M; West, Daniel J; Ramirez, Bernardo

    2011-01-01

    The pace of hospital merger and acquisition activity reflects the economic theory of supply and demand: Publicly traded hospital companies, private equity funds, and large nonprofit hospital systems are investing capital to purchase and operate freestanding community hospitals at a time when many of those hospitals find themselves short of capital reserves and certain forms of management expertise. But the sale of those community hospitals also raises questions about the impact of absentee ownership on the communities which those hospitals serve.

  9. Do you use social media? A study into new nursing and midwifery graduates' uptake of social media.

    PubMed

    Tuckett, Anthony; Turner, Catherine

    2016-04-01

    Social media use is expanding rapidly, so too is its use within hospitals and amongst healthcare professionals. This study describes the use of social media by Australian and New Zealand nursing and midwifery graduates of the Graduate e-Cohort study; there were 112 (93%) respondents from a 2014 sample of 121 nurses and midwives. Findings suggest that the professional peak body goal of using social media as a vehicle for professional education requires consideration of the social media platforms that are actually being used by new graduates. We recommend that work by the respective professions at both an undergraduate and graduate level needs to focus on the implications of social media use or policy and practice to ensure that everyone is aware of when and how to engage in social media platforms and what to do and how to behave when using social media.

  10. Media Violence and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groebel, Jo

    1998-01-01

    Presents the results of the UNESCO global study on media violence and children which was conducted between 1996 and 1997. Highlights include the role of the media, media heroes as role models, media violence and aggression, differences by gender, rural versus urban environments, the pervasiveness of television, and recommendations. (Author/LRW)

  11. Media Literacy Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Barry

    1989-01-01

    Provides an up-to-date bibliography of resources available for teaching media literacy. Groups resources into the areas of media education methodology, mass media texts, general background, television, film, the news and medium of print, advertising, gender and the media, popular culture, popular music and rock video, periodicals, and…

  12. Business and the Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barchie, Lisa

    By virtue of the different natures of the two institutions, the relationship between business and the media is simultaneously adversarial and symbiotic: the media see themselves as society's watchdog while business sees itself as society's driving economic force. Meanwhile, business relies on the media for information, and the media rely on…

  13. How the Media Teach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortes, Carlos E.

    2005-01-01

    The mass media teach whether or not mediamakers intend to or realize it, and users learn from the media whether or not they try or are even aware of it. This means all of the media, including newspapers, magazines, movies, television, radio, and the new cyberspace media serve as informal yet omnipresent nonschool textbooks. This raises an…

  14. Living within the Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Erin

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author shares how media affects her as a teenager. The author says that media has such a relationship with the world today, specifically with teenagers like her. Media gives off so much information that can be valid or invalid, positive or negative. The media can persuade anyone to do something or to think a certain way.…

  15. Why Media Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locatis, Craig

    2007-01-01

    Whether media affect learning has been debated for decades. The discussion of media's effectiveness has raised questions about the usefulness of comparison studies, not only in assessing applications of technology but in other areas as well. Arguments that media do not affect learning are re-examined and issues concerning media effects on expert…

  16. The Media Teacher's Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarratt, Elaine, Ed.; Davison, Jon, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "The Media Teacher's Handbook" is an indispensible guide for all teachers, both specialist and non-specialist, delivering Media Studies and media education in secondary schools and colleges. It is the first text to draw together the three key elements of secondary sector teaching in relation to media study--the "theoretical", the "practical" and…

  17. Promoting Media Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alice Yuet Lin

    1997-01-01

    The "critical viewing" model for teaching media studies is based on the assumptions that mass media spread evil influences and viewers are mindless and passive media consumers. In contrast, a "cultural reflective" model of media studies would enhance cultural understanding by enabling students to seek alternative ways to think about culture and…

  18. St. Mary's Hospital, rescued climber meet reporters as HIPAA rules begin.

    PubMed

    Botvin, Judith D

    2003-01-01

    St. Mary's Hospital, Grand Junction, Colo., is a regional hospital whose PR team is accustomed to media exposure. Just as tehy were instituting the patient privacy rules of HIPAA, a true-life reality drama landed on their doorstep. Aron Ralston, a 27-year old experienced mountain climber, became the hospital's highest profile patient and attracted worldwide media coverage after courageously rescuing himself from a near-disaster.

  19. Parenting stress among mothers of Malaysian children with cerebral palsy: predictors of child- and parent-related stress.

    PubMed

    Ong, L C; Afifah, I; Sofiah, A; Lye, M S

    1998-12-01

    A hospital study was carried out to compare parenting stress among 87 Malaysian mothers of children with cerebral palsy and a control group (comprising 87 mothers of children without disability who attended the walk-in paediatric clinic), using the Parenting Stress Index (PSI) questionnaire. Multiple regression analysis was used to determine socio-demographic and medical factors associated with child-domain stress (CDS) and parent-domain stress (PDS). Mothers of children with cerebral palsy scored significantly higher than control subjects on all sub-scales of CDS and PDS (p < 0.01), except for the sub-scale of 'role restriction'. The presence of cerebral palsy (p < 0.001) and activities of daily living (ADL) scores (p < 0.001) were significantly associated with CDS. Factors predictive of PDS were ADL scores (p < 0.001), number of hospitalizations over the past year (p = 0.024), level of maternal education (p = 0.018) and Chinese mothers (p < 0.001). Although this study demonstrated that Malaysian mothers of children with cerebral palsy experienced higher levels of stress than controls, the impact of cerebral palsy per se on parenting stress was modified by other factors such as increased care-giving demands, low maternal education and ethnic background. Habilitation should be directed at easing the burden of daily care, minimizing hospital re-admissions and targeting appropriate psychosocial support at specific subgroups to change parental perception and expectations.

  20. [THE EFFECTIVENESS OF DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF CEREBROVASCULAR DISORDERS IN HYPERTENSIVE ENCEPHALOPATHY IN ELDERLY PATIENTS BY STUDYING THE CHARACTERISTICS OF CEREBRAL HEMODYNAMICS AND CEREBRAL PERFUSION STATUS].

    PubMed

    Sviridova, N K; Yavorsky, V V

    2015-01-01

    Intrigue progression of hypertensive encephalopathy (HE) in older patients is that the development of cognitive impairment and high blood pressure underestimated, aslo exist without clinical manifestations. In recent decades convincing proved that the basis for the development of various diseases is cerebral dysfunction systems regulating brain blood flow, including--autoregulation system, which largely affects the blood supply to the brain. This explains the fact that patients with chronic brain ischemia cerebral hemodynamic status largely depends on the condition and stability of the regulatory mechanisms of systemic and cerebral hemodynamics, particularly of systemic blood pressure, regional cerebral blood supply, normalization which, in the early stages of development disorders, prevents of serious complications. In this paper the theoretical generalization and new solution of scientific and practical problems of hypertension influence on the formation of chronic cerebral ischemia in elderly patients on a background of hypertension--specified risk factors and especially the formation of a comprehensive study on the basis of clinical and neurological data, tool sand methods for neuroimaging research developed and improved methods of diagnosis. Found that in elderly patients with HE and HBP observed significant (P < 0.05) increase in the thickness of the intima-media complex was significantly higher (dextra--1.12 ± 0.03 and sinistra--1.11 ± 0.03), than middle-aged patients with hypertension at HE, which constitutes a violation of the elastic properties of the vascular wall. Established correlation data radionuclide study ultrasonic duplex scanning of vessels of the head and neck. A negative correlation of intima-media and severity of lesions according to hypoperfusion of computer tomography single photon emission (r = -0.49; P < 0.05); confirming the progression of HE in elderly patients needs improvement and treatment.

  1. [THE EFFECTIVENESS OF DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF CEREBROVASCULAR DISORDERS IN HYPERTENSIVE ENCEPHALOPATHY IN ELDERLY PATIENTS BY STUDYING THE CHARACTERISTICS OF CEREBRAL HEMODYNAMICS AND CEREBRAL PERFUSION STATUS].

    PubMed

    Sviridova, N K; Yavorsky, V V

    2015-01-01

    Intrigue progression of hypertensive encephalopathy (HE) in older patients is that the development of cognitive impairment and high blood pressure underestimated, aslo exist without clinical manifestations. In recent decades convincing proved that the basis for the development of various diseases is cerebral dysfunction systems regulating brain blood flow, including--autoregulation system, which largely affects the blood supply to the brain. This explains the fact that patients with chronic brain ischemia cerebral hemodynamic status largely depends on the condition and stability of the regulatory mechanisms of systemic and cerebral hemodynamics, particularly of systemic blood pressure, regional cerebral blood supply, normalization which, in the early stages of development disorders, prevents of serious complications. In this paper the theoretical generalization and new solution of scientific and practical problems of hypertension influence on the formation of chronic cerebral ischemia in elderly patients on a background of hypertension--specified risk factors and especially the formation of a comprehensive study on the basis of clinical and neurological data, tool sand methods for neuroimaging research developed and improved methods of diagnosis. Found that in elderly patients with HE and HBP observed significant (P < 0.05) increase in the thickness of the intima-media complex was significantly higher (dextra--1.12 ± 0.03 and sinistra--1.11 ± 0.03), than middle-aged patients with hypertension at HE, which constitutes a violation of the elastic properties of the vascular wall. Established correlation data radionuclide study ultrasonic duplex scanning of vessels of the head and neck. A negative correlation of intima-media and severity of lesions according to hypoperfusion of computer tomography single photon emission (r = -0.49; P < 0.05); confirming the progression of HE in elderly patients needs improvement and treatment. PMID:27089714

  2. Prognostic Predictors for Ambulation in Thai Children With Cerebral Palsy Aged 2 to 18 Years.

    PubMed

    Keeratisiroj, Orawan; Thawinchai, Nuanlaor; Siritaratiwat, Wantana; Buntragulpoontawee, Montana

    2015-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine prognostic predictors for ambulation among Thai children with cerebral palsy and identify their ambulatory status. A retrospective cohort study was performed at 6 special schools or hospitals for children with physical disabilities. The prognostic predictors for ambulation were analyzed by multivariable ordinal continuation ratio logistic regression. The 533 participants aged 2 to 18 years were divided into 3 groups: 186 with independent ambulation (Gross Motor Function Classification System [GMFCS I-II]), 71 with assisted ambulation (Gross Motor Function Classification System III), and 276 with nonambulation (Gross Motor Function Classification System IV-V). The significant positive predictors for ambulation were type of cerebral palsy (spastic diplegia, spastic hemiplegia, dyskinesia, ataxia, hypotonia, and mixed type), sitting independently at age 2 years, and eating independently. These predictors were used to develop clinical scoring for predicting the future ability to walk among Thai children with cerebral palsy.

  3. [Surgical treatment of cerebral paragonimiasis miyazakii].

    PubMed

    Soutsu, M; Nishida, S; Nakamura, N; Katakura, K; Kobayashi, A; Araki, K

    1984-06-01

    An operated case of cerebral paragonimiasis miyazakii was reported. A 25-year-old man was admitted to our hospital on Jan. 25, 1982, because of weakness, sensory disorder and focal convulsion of the right upper limb. He complained of slight headache but had no sign of meningeal irritation nor inflammation. CT scan revealed a left parietal low density mass with irregular ring-like contrast enhancement. Left carotid angiogram showed stretched arteries around the mass. Laboratory findings were normal except for eosinophilie (17%). Chest X-P was normal. Operation was performed under diagnosis of glioblastoma on Aug. 6, 1982. The tumor was well-circumscribed and had a firm capsule which containing necrotic substance. The tumor was removed totally and the bone flap was also removed since slight brain swelling was seen. Histologically it proved to be a granuloma and four eggs of helminth were found in the necrotic tissue. Post operative state of the patient was satisfactory and cranioplasty was performed 3 weeks later. On Aug. 31, he began to complain of chest pain, cough and hemosputum, and chest X-P disclosed a nodular shadow in the lower lobe of the right lung. Paragonimiasis was strongly suspected because he had a history of having three fresh-water crabs (Potamon dehaani) 18 months before. But not egg was found in either sputum nor stool. Skin test with paragonimus westermani antigen was highly positive.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Cognition after malignant media infarction and decompressive hemicraniectomy - a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Decompressive hemicraniectomy is a life-saving procedure for patients with malignant middle cerebral artery infarctions. However, the neuropsychological sequelae in such patients have up to now received little attention. In this study we not only describe neuropsychological deficits but also the quality of life and the extent of depression and other psychiatric symptoms in patients after complete media infarction of the non-speech dominant hemisphere. Methods 20 patients from two different university hospitals (mean ± standard deviation: 52 ± 14 years of age) who had undergone hemicraniectomy with duraplasty above the non-speech dominant hemisphere at least one year previously were examined using a thorough neurological and neuropsychological work-up. The quality of life and the extent of psychiatric problems were determined on the basis of self-estimation questionnaires. The patients were asked whether they would again opt for the surgical treatment when considering their own outcome. 20 healthy persons matched for age, gender and education served as a control group. Results All patients but one were neurologically handicapped, half of them severely. Age was significantly correlated with poorer values on the Rankin scale and Barthel index. All cognitive domain z values were significantly lower than in the control group. Upon re-examination, 18 of 20 patients were found to be cognitively impaired to a degree that fulfilled the formal DSM IV criteria for dementia. Conclusions Patients with non-speech dominant hemispheric infarctions and decompressive hemicraniectomy are at high risk of depression and severe cognitive impairment. PMID:21699727

  5. Cerebral autoregulation with changes in arterial and cerebral venous pressure

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, R.W.; Traystman, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of cerebral venous pressure (Pcv) elevation on cerebral autoregulation has been incompletely studied. The authors compared the effect of decreased cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) by elevated Pcv and decreased arterial pressure (Pa) on cerebral blood flow (CBF) in a canine modified bypass model. CPP of 80, 70, 60, 50, 40 and 30 mmHg were produced by decreasing Pa with intracranial pressure (ICP) and Pcv maintained at 0 mmHg (group 1, n = 5), or by elevating Pcv as Pa was maintained at 80 mmHg (group 2, n = 5. CBF was measured using radiolabeled microspheres, and CMRO/sub 2/ = CBF times arterial-sagittal sinus O/sub 2/ content difference. Cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) = CPP/CBF. In group 1 CBF (ml/100 gm/min) was unchanged from control (36 +/- 4) as CPP was decreased from 80 to 40 mmHg. As CPP was decreased to 30 mmHg, CBF decreased to 28 +/- 1. CVR (mmHg/ml/min/100 gm) was 2.3 +/- 0.3 and progressively decreased to 1.0 +/- 0.1 at CPP of 30 mmHg. In group 2 CBF was 34 +/- 3 and was unchanged as CPP decreased to 50 mmHg. At CPP of 40 and 30 mmHg CBF decreased to 25 +/- 3 and 22 +/- 2 respectively. Control CRV was 2.4 +/- 0.2 and progressively decreased to 1.4 +/- 0.1 as CPP decreased to 30 mmHg. CMRO/sub 2/ was unchanged from control in both groups. Thus, CBF is maintained to low CPP regardless of whether vascular transmural pressure was decreased (decrease Pa) or increased (increased Pcv) demonstrating that the myogenic mechanism of autoregulation may be unimportant in normoxic dogs.

  6. Potential interactions between pericytes and oligodendrocyte precursor cells in perivascular regions of cerebral white matter

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Takakuni; Maeda, Mitsuyo; Uemura, Maiko; Lo, Evan K.; Terasaki, Yasukazu; Liang, Anna C.; Shindo, Akihiro; Choi, Yoon Kyung; Taguchi, Akihiko; Matsuyama, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Ihara, Masafumi; Arai, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Pericytes are embedded within basal lamina and play multiple roles in the perivascular niche in brain. Recently, oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) have also been reported to associate with cerebral endothelium. Is it possible that within this gliovascular locus, there may also exist potential spatial and functional interactions between pericytes and OPCs? Here, we demonstrated that in the perivascular region of cerebral white matter, pericytes and OPCs may attach and support each other. Immunostaining showed that pericytes and OPCs are localized in close contact with each other in mouse white matter at postnatal days 0, 60 and 240. Electron microscopic analysis confirmed that pericytes attached to OPCs via basal lamina in the perivascular region. The close proximity between these two cell types was also observed in postmortem human brains. Functional interaction between pericytes and OPCs was assessed by in vitro media transfer experiments. When OPC cultures were treated with pericyte-conditioned media, OPC number increased. Similarly, pericyte number increased when pericytes were maintained in OPC-conditioned media. Taken together, our data suggest a potential anatomical and functional interaction between pericytes and OPCs in cerebral white matter. PMID:25936593

  7. Palliative social media.

    PubMed

    Taubert, Mark; Watts, Gareth; Boland, Jason; Radbruch, Lukas

    2014-03-01

    The uses of social media have become ubiquitous in contemporary society at an astonishingly fast-paced rate. The internet and in particular platforms such as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube are now part of most people's vocabulary and are starting to replace many face-to-face interactions. The online world, in particular, is alive with discussions, comments and anecdotes about the topics of illness, disease, hospitals, death and dying. The topic of death and dying had in the not too distant past been seen as taboo, but willingness and need to talk openly about it appears to be on the increase. In parallel to this, many public awareness campaigns are highlighting society's need to be more prepared for dying and death. This will have a significant impact on the way terminally ill patients and their families approach the last years, months and weeks of their lives and how they might expect palliative health and social care professionals working with them through these difficult periods to interact with them. We pay particular attention to the areas of digital posterity creation and memorialisation within the wider holistic context of end-of-life care. PMID:24644766

  8. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... tends to be more serious than other lung infections because: People in the hospital are often very sick and cannot fight off ... prevent pneumonia. Most hospitals have programs to prevent hospital-acquired infections.

  9. Transition to Adulthood: Validation of the Rotterdam Transition Profile for Young Adults with Cerebral Palsy and Normal Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donkervoort, Mireille; Wiegerink, Diana J. H. G.; van Meeteren, Jetty; Stam, Henk J.; Roebroeck, Marij E.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the validity of the Rotterdam Transition Profile (RTP) to describe the transition process from childhood to adulthood in young adults with cerebral palsy (CP). Participants were recruited from rehabilitation centres and hospital departments of rehabilitation. In total, 81 young adults (47 males, 34 females)…

  10. Mechanical Properties of the Plantarflexor Musculotendinous Unit during Passive Dorsiflexion in Children with Cerebral Palsy Compared with Typically Developing Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alhusaini, Adel A. A.; Crosbie, Jack; Shepherd, Roberta B.; Dean, Catherine M.; Scheinberg, Adam

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To examine the passive length-tension relations in the myotendinous components of the plantarflexor muscles of children with and without cerebral palsy (CP) under conditions excluding reflex muscle contraction. Method: A cross-sectional, non-interventional study was conducted in a hospital outpatient clinic. Passive torque-angle…

  11. Transient Global Amnesia After Cerebral Angiography With Iomeprol

    PubMed Central

    Tiu, Cristina; Terecoasă, Elena Oana; Grecu, Nicolae; Dorobăţ, Bogdan; Marinescu, Andreea Nicoleta; Băjenaru, Ovidiu Alexandru

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Transient global amnesia is now considered a very rare complication of cerebral angiography. Various etiological mechanisms have been suggested to account for this complication, but no consensus has been reached yet. This case report documents one of the few reported cases of cerebral angiography-related transient global amnesia associated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evidence of unilateral hippocampal ischemia, most probably as a consequence of a transient reduction in regional hippocampal blood flow. However, the possibility of a direct neurotoxic effect of the nonionic contrast media Iomeprol on the Cornu ammonis – field 1 neurons cannot be firmly ruled out. We describe the case of a 54-year-old woman admitted to our department for left upper limb weakness with acute onset 8 days before. The brain computed tomography (CT) scan performed at admission revealed subacute ischemic lesions in the right watershed superficial territories and a right thalamic lacunar infarct. Diagnostic digital subtraction cerebral angiography was performed 4 days after admission with the nonionic contrast media Iomeprol. A few minutes after completion of the procedure, the patient developed symptoms suggestive for transient global amnesia. The brain MRI performed 22 hours after the onset of symptoms demonstrated increased signal within the lateral part of the right hippocampus on the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) sequences, associated with a corresponding reduction in the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and increased signal on the fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences, consistent with acute hippocampal ischemia and several T2/FLAIR hyperintensities in the right watershed superficial territories and in the right thalamus, corresponding to the lesions already identified on the CT scan performed at admission. A follow-up MRI, performed 2 months later, demonstrated the disappearance of the increased signal within the right hippocampus on the DWI

  12. Animal models of cerebral ischemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodanovich, M. Yu.; Kisel, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    Cerebral ischemia remains one of the most frequent causes of death and disability worldwide. Animal models are necessary to understand complex molecular mechanisms of brain damage as well as for the development of new therapies for stroke. This review considers a certain range of animal models of cerebral ischemia, including several types of focal and global ischemia. Since animal models vary in specificity for the human disease which they reproduce, the complexity of surgery, infarct size, reliability of reproduction for statistical analysis, and adequate models need to be chosen according to the aim of a study. The reproduction of a particular animal model needs to be evaluated using appropriate tools, including the behavioral assessment of injury and non-invasive and post-mortem control of brain damage. These problems also have been summarized in the review.

  13. [Cerebral syndromes in premature children].

    PubMed

    Edel'shteĭn, E A; Bandarenko, E S

    1983-01-01

    Cerebral disturbances observed in premature infants are analyzed. These disturbances are a consequence of developmental slowdown and are associated with the pathological immaturity of the brain structures. On condition an active pathogenetic therapy is given these disturbances may gradually regress. On the basis of long-term observations of 600 prematurely born infants the authors describe the following clinical syndromes: muscular hypotonicity lasting up to 4-5 months and followed with a rise of the tone; the syndrome of "paretic hands" observed during the first two months of life; a hypertensive-hydrocephalic syndrome combined with a rise of the neuro-reflectory excitability; the syndrome of psychomotor development retardation followed at an age of over 1.5 to 2 years by complete recovery or minimal cerebral insufficiency with belated development of motor speech and neurosis-like reactions. PMID:6880498

  14. Mass Media: The Invisible Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glessing, Robert J.; White, William P.

    This anthology for students of media consists of essays and articles grouped under four topics: media forms, media content, media environments, and "the last word." Media forms deals with the nature of these kinds of media: electronic, print, film, music, and comics, graffiti, and clothing. Media content contains articles on the news, advertising,…

  15. [Cerebral artery thrombosis in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Charco Roca, L M; Ortiz Sanchez, V E; Hernandez Gutierrez-Manchon, O; Quesada Villar, J; Bonmatí García, L; Rubio Postigo, G

    2015-11-01

    A 28 year old woman, ASA I, who, in the final stages of her pregnancy presented with signs of neural deficit that consisted of distortion of the oral commissure, dysphagia, dysarthria, and weakness on the left side of the body. She was diagnosed with thrombosis in a segment of the right middle cerebral artery which led to an ischemic area in the right frontal lobe. Termination of pregnancy and conservative treatment was decided, with good resolution of the symptoms. PMID:25698610

  16. [Cerebral artery thrombosis in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Charco Roca, L M; Ortiz Sanchez, V E; Hernandez Gutierrez-Manchon, O; Quesada Villar, J; Bonmatí García, L; Rubio Postigo, G

    2015-11-01

    A 28 year old woman, ASA I, who, in the final stages of her pregnancy presented with signs of neural deficit that consisted of distortion of the oral commissure, dysphagia, dysarthria, and weakness on the left side of the body. She was diagnosed with thrombosis in a segment of the right middle cerebral artery which led to an ischemic area in the right frontal lobe. Termination of pregnancy and conservative treatment was decided, with good resolution of the symptoms.

  17. [Pathogenesis of infantile cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Semenova, K A

    1980-01-01

    Some causes of the pathological activity of postural reflexes and other motor disturbances underlying the clinical picture of infantile cerebral paralysis are considered. It is shown that disturbed metabolism of corticosteroids observed in that disease, as well as impaired functional activity of T lymphocytes promote the development of both inflammatory and neuroimmune processes in the brain, mainly in large hemispheres--and this may be one of the causes of the pathological postural activity. PMID:6969015

  18. The relationship between cerebral palsy and cryptorchidism.

    PubMed

    Smith, J A; Hutson, J M; Beasley, S W; Reddihough, D S

    1989-12-01

    This study examined the reported association between cerebral palsy and cryptorchidism. A comparison was made among 25 boys with cerebral palsy under the age of 2 years and 6 months, 25 boys with cerebral palsy aged between 5 and 10 years, and age-matched controls. The testes remained in the same position with age in boys with cerebral palsy, whereas in normal children the testes were slightly lower initially (P less than .005) and became lower still with growth (P less than .001). This result, taken in conjunction with previous studies, casts doubts on the theories of early damage to the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis as the cause of maldescent in cerebral palsy. It is postulated that any apparent increase in cryptorchidism in older patients with cerebral palsy may be caused by spasticity of the cremaster muscle leading to pathologic retraction of the testis out of the scrotum.

  19. Electroencephalographic Response to Sodium Nitrite May Predict Delayed Cerebral Ischemia After Severe Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Matthew J.; Ezra, Martyn; Herigstad, Mari; Hayen, Anja; Sleigh, Jamie W.; Westbrook, Jon; Warnaby, Catherine E.; Pattinson, Kyle T. S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage often leads to death and poor clinical outcome. Injury occurring during the first 72 hours is termed “early brain injury,” with disruption of the nitric oxide pathway playing an important pathophysiologic role in its development. Quantitative electroencephalographic variables, such as α/δ frequency ratio, are surrogate markers of cerebral ischemia. This study assessed the quantitative electroencephalographic response to a cerebral nitric oxide donor (intravenous sodium nitrite) to explore whether this correlates with the eventual development of delayed cerebral ischemia. Design: Unblinded pilot study testing response to drug intervention. Setting: Neuroscience ICU, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, United Kingdom. Patients: Fourteen World Federation of Neurosurgeons grades 3, 4, and 5 patients (mean age, 52.8 yr [range, 41–69 yr]; 11 women). Interventions: IV sodium nitrite (10 μg/kg/min) for 1 hour. Measurements and Main Results: Continuous electroencephalographic recording for 2 hours. The alpha/delta frequency ratio was measured before and during IV sodium nitrite infusion. Seven of 14 patients developed delayed cerebral ischemia. There was a +30% to +118% (range) increase in the alpha/delta frequency ratio in patients who did not develop delayed cerebral ischemia (p < 0.0001) but an overall decrease in the alpha/delta frequency ratio in those patients who did develop delayed cerebral ischemia (range, +11% to –31%) (p = 0.006, multivariate analysis accounting for major confounds). Conclusions: Administration of sodium nitrite after severe subarachnoid hemorrhage differentially influences quantitative electroencephalographic variables depending on the patient’s susceptibility to development of delayed cerebral ischemia. With further validation in a larger sample size, this response may be developed as a tool for risk stratification after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:27441898

  20. Cerebral ischaemia: A neuroradiological study

    SciTech Connect

    Bories, J.

    1985-01-01

    After a brief clinical and pathophysiological approach, the papers presented in this book are devoted to CT and angiography. Concerning CT, a particular study has been made of cerebral arterial territories on cuts parallel to the orbito-meatal line: these are very important in making the differential diagnosis from some tumors. Also concerning CT, a paper has been devoted to cerebral ''lacunae.'' The term ''lacuna'' as far as CT imaging is concerned, should be reserved only for those hypodense areas corresponding to small cavities containing fluid, which are sequelae of infarcts in the territory of penetrating arteries. Before this sequellar state come all the evolutive states of a small deep infarct. The angiographic study specifies the indications of angiography in the study of cerebral ischemia, and the techniques to be used. It shows the main etiologic aspects. Because of the important place of vascular surgery today, it seemed necessary to show also the main post operative angiographic aspects. After CT and angiography, some pages are reserved to more modern techniques. Finally, some pages are devoted to certain particular associations and etiologies: childhood, cardiopathies, migraine, oral contraception and end with venous infarction.

  1. Bone age in cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Eduardo Régis de Alencar Bona; Palmieri, Maurício D'arc; de Assumpção, Rodrigo Montezuma César; Yamada, Helder Henzo; Rancan, Daniela Regina; Fucs, Patrícia Maria de Moraes Barros

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the chronological age and bone age among cerebral palsy patients in the outpatient clinic and its correlation with the type of neurological involvement, gender and functional status. Methods 401 patients with spastic cerebral palsy, and ages ranging from three months to 20 years old, submitted to radiological examination for bone age and analyzed by two independent observers according Greulich & Pyle. Results In the topographic distribution, there was a significant delay (p<0.005) in tetraparetic (17.7 months), hemiparetic (10.1 months), and diparetic patients (7.9 months). In the hemiparetic group, the mean bone age in the affected side was 96.88 months and the uncompromised side was 101.13 months (p<0.005). Regarding functional status, the ambulatory group showed a delay of 18.73 months in bone age (p<0.005). Comparing bone age between genders, it was observed a greater delay in males (13.59 months) than in females (9.63 months), but not statistically significant (p = 0.54). Conclusion There is a delay in bone age compared to chronological age influenced by the topography of spasticity, functional level and gender in patients with cerebral palsy. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:24453693

  2. Distinct Clinical and Immunologic Profiles in Severe Malarial Anemia and Cerebral Malaria in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Thuma, Philip E.; van Dijk, Janneke; Bucala, Rick; Debebe, Zufan; Nekhai, Sergei; Kuddo, Thea; Nouraie, Mehdi; Weiss, Günter

    2011-01-01

    Background. The mechanisms of severe malarial anemia and cerebral malaria, which are extreme manifestations of Plasmodium falciparum malaria, are not fully understood. Methods. Children aged <6 years from southern Zambia presenting to the hospital with severe malarial anemia (n = 72), cerebral malaria (n = 28), or uncomplicated malaria (n = 66) were studied prospectively. Children with overlapping severe anemia and cerebral malaria were excluded. Results. Low interleukin 10 concentrations had the strongest association with severe anemia (standard β = .61; P < .001) followed by high tumor necrosis factor α and sFas concentrations, low weight-for-age z scores, presence of stool parasites, and splenomegaly (standard β = .15–.25; P ≤ .031); most of these factors were also associated with lower reticulocytes. Greater parasitemia was associated with higher interleukin 10 and tumor necrosis factor α concentrations, whereas sulfadoxizole/pyrimethamine therapy and lower weight-for-age z scores were associated with lower interleukin 10 levels. Thrombocytopenia and elevated tissue plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 levels had the strongest associations with cerebral malaria (standard β = .37 or .36; P < .0001), followed by exposure to traditional herbal medicine and hemoglobinuria (standard β = .21–.31; P ≤ .006). Conclusions. Predictors of severe malarial anemia (altered immune responses, poor nutrition, intestinal parasites, and impaired erythropoiesis) differed from those of cerebral malaria (thrombocytopenia, herbal medicine, and intravascular hemolysis). Improved preventive and therapeutic measures may need to consider these differences. PMID:21288821

  3. Media Directors Help Plan a Media Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, John H.

    In an effort to plan a more useful media course for advertising majors at Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, a survey was conducted, along with a series of informal interviews, of media directors with large and small advertising firms. The five participating directors completed broad questionnaires on which they rated on a five-point…

  4. Using Social Media to Teach Social Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rheingold, Howard

    2008-01-01

    By showing students how to use Web-based channels to inform publics, advocate positions, contest claims, and organize action around issues they care about, participatory media education can influence civic behavior positively throughout their lives. Participatory media literacy is necessarily a hands-on enterprise, requiring active use of digital…

  5. Cerebral Palsy. Fact Sheet = La Paralisis Cerebral. Hojas Informativas Sobre Discapacidades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities, Washington, DC.

    This fact sheet on cerebral palsy is written in both English and Spanish. First, it provides a definition of cerebral palsy and considers various causes (e.g., an insufficient amount of oxygen reaching the fetal or newborn brain). The fact sheet then offers incidence figures and explains characteristics of the three main types of cerebral palsy:…

  6. Hospital Charges of Potentially Preventable Pediatric Hospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Sam; Kuo, Dennis Z.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Reducing the number of preventable hospitalizations represents a possible source of healthcare savings. However, the current literature lacks a description of the extent of potentially preventable pediatric hospitalizations. The study objectives are to (1) identify the charges and (2) demographic characteristics associated with potentially preventable pediatric hospitalizations. Methods Secondary analysis of the 2006 Kids’ Inpatient Database (weighted N=7,558,812). ICD-9-CM codes for 16 previously validated pediatric ambulatory care-sensitive (ACS) conditions identified potentially preventable hospitalizations; seven additional conditions reflected updated care guidelines. Outcome variables included number of admissions, hospitalization days, and hospital charges. Demographic and diagnostic variables associated with an ACS condition were compared with regression analyses using appropriate person-level weights. Results Pediatric ACS hospitalizations totaled $4.05B in charges and 1,087,570 hospitalization days in 2006. Two respiratory conditions—asthma and bacterial pneumonia—comprised 48.4% of ACS hospital charges and 46.7% of ACS hospitalization days. In multivariate analysis, variables associated with an ACS condition included: male gender (OR: 1.10; 95% CI: 1.07–1.13); race/ethnicity of black (OR: 1.22; 95% CI: 1.16–1.27) or Hispanic (OR: 1.12; 95% CI: 1.06–1.18); and emergency department (ED) as admission source (OR: 1.37; 95% CI: 1.27–1.48). Conclusions Respiratory conditions comprised the largest proportion of potentially preventable pediatric hospitalizations, totaling as much as $1.96B in hospital charges. Children hospitalized with an ACS condition tend to be male, non-white, and admitted through the ED. Future research to prevent pediatric hospitalizations should examine targeted interventions in the primary care setting, specifically around respiratory conditions and minority populations. PMID:22922047

  7. Parasympathetic tonic dilatory influences on cerebral vessels.

    PubMed

    Boysen, Nicholas C; Dragon, Deidre Nitschke; Talman, William T

    2009-05-11

    Parasympathetic nerves from the pterygopalatine ganglia may participate in development of cluster headaches, in vascular responses to hypertension and in modulation of damage due to stroke. Stimulation of the nerves elicits cerebral vasodilatation, but it is not known if the nerves tonically influence cerebrovascular tone. We hypothesized that parasympathetics provide a tonic vasodilator influence and tested that hypothesis by measuring cerebral blood flow in anesthetized rats before and after removal of a pterygopalatine ganglion. Ganglion removal led to reduced cerebral blood flow without changing blood pressure. Thus, parasympathetic nerves provide tonic vasodilatory input to cerebral blood vessels. PMID:19195933

  8. Introduction to social media.

    PubMed

    Meru, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This overview of social media categories some of the typical types and uses of this form of communication and suggests common courtesies and effective strategies for participation in the social media culture.

  9. Acute otitis media and respiratory virus infections.

    PubMed

    Ruuskanen, O; Arola, M; Putto-Laurila, A; Mertsola, J; Meurman, O; Viljanen, M K; Halonen, P

    1989-02-01

    We studied the association of acute otitis media with different respiratory virus infections in a pediatric department on the basis of epidemics between 1980 and 1985. Altogether 4524 cases of acute otitis media were diagnosed. The diagnosis was confirmed by tympanocentesis in 3332 ears. Respiratory virus infection was diagnosed during the same period in 989 patients by detecting viral antigen in nasopharyngeal mucus. There was a significant correlation between acute otitis media and respiratory virus epidemics, especially respiratory syncytial virus epidemics. There was no significant correlation between outbreaks of other respiratory viruses and acute otitis media. Acute otitis media was diagnosed in 57% of respiratory syncytial virus, 35% of influenza A virus, 33% of parainfluenza type 3 virus, 30% of adenovirus, 28% of parainfluenza type 1 virus, 18% of influenza B virus and 10% of parainfluenza type 2 virus infections. These observations show a clear association of respiratory virus infections with acute otitis media. In this study on hospitalized children Haemophilus influenzae strains were the most common bacteriologic pathogens in middle ear fluid, occurring in 19% of cases. Streptococcus pneumoniae was present in 16% and Branhamella catarrhalis in 7% of cases. There was no association between specific viruses and bacteria observed in this study.

  10. Hospital Library Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Anne

    The objectives of a hospital are to improve patient care, while the objectives of a hospital library are to improve services to the staff which will support their efforts. This handbook dealing with hospital administration is designed to aid the librarian in either implementing a hospital library, or improving services in an existing medical…

  11. Hospital marketing revisited.

    PubMed

    Costello, M M

    1987-05-01

    With more hospitals embracing the marketing function in their organizational management over the past decade, hospital marketing can no longer be considered a fad. However, a review of hospital marketing efforts as reported in the professional literature indicates that hospitals must pay greater attention to the marketing mix elements of service, price and distribution channels as their programs mature.

  12. Measuring Rural Hospital Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moscovice, Ira; Wholey, Douglas R.; Klingner, Jill; Knott, Astrid

    2004-01-01

    Increased interest in the measurement of hospital quality has been stimulated by accrediting bodies, purchaser coalitions, government agencies, and other entities. This paper examines quality measurement for hospitals in rural settings. We seek to identify rural hospital quality measures that reflect quality in all hospitals and that are sensitive…

  13. Modern Media Education Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedorov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The author supposed that media education models can be divided into the following groups: (1) educational-information models (the study of the theory, history, language of media culture, etc.), based on the cultural, aesthetic, semiotic, socio-cultural theories of media education; (2) educational-ethical models (the study of moral, religions,…

  14. Children's Media Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Amy B.

    2008-01-01

    Amy Jordan addresses the need to balance the media industry's potentially important contributions to the healthy development of America's children against the consequences of excessive and age-inappropriate media exposure. Much of the philosophical tension regarding how much say the government should have about media content and delivery stems…

  15. Youth Media and Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauge, Chelsey

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses how capacity is conceived of and understood in youth media/civic education programming, and how beliefs about agency, development, relationality and youth manifests in the discourses, programmes, and practices of organizations operating youth media programmes. Through attention to a youth media and development programme in…

  16. Media Education: Sociology Surveys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedorov, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    In Russia as well as in foreign countries we can witness sort of the confusion of the terms of "media education" and "media literacy". There are quite a few differences in theoretical approaches to media education, to distinguishing of the most important aims, objectives, means of introduction into the teaching process, etc.…

  17. Sizing Up Social Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Jerold

    2010-01-01

    Most people are aware of the increasing importance of social media to institutional advancement, and many colleges and universities have started investing resources in these media. The next step is to measure the impact of social media on the institution and evaluate the success of one's efforts. Every advancement leader should understand how…

  18. Functions of Media Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffres, Leo W.

    Individuals engage in media behavior several times daily. If a medium is actually used, that decision is one of a series of points which constitute a media behavior unit. The media behavior unit is used in several ways. First, by looking at particular attributes, researchers can determine whether an individual is consistent in medium…

  19. The Electric Media Conspiracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loveless, Richard L.

    1983-01-01

    Media defines a process of marking time. I can only make my own marks as producer and consumer of my own media forms. Man is, all at once, life sound and life motion--a mark through time, leaving a trail of images behind. Media is a natural extension of being human. (SR)

  20. Creating Quality Media Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hortin, John A.; Bailey, Gerald D.

    1982-01-01

    Innovation, imagination, and student creativity are key ingredients in creating quality media materials for the small school. Student-produced media materials, slides without a camera, personalized slide programs and copy work, self-made task cards, self-made overhead transparencies, graphic materials, and utilization of the mass media are some of…

  1. Media in the Netherlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klaver, Franca

    This 2-part report summarizes Dutch policy on mass media and reviews the status of cable television in the Netherlands. The first part defines the underlying principles of a national policy on mass media in relation to the press, commercial and educational television broadcasting, radio, cable television, and media research. Parliamentary debate…

  2. Media Center: Operations Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dependents Schools (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This guide to basic technical procedures recommended in the operation of within-school media centers is intended for all Department of Defense Dependent Schools (DoDDS) media specialists, clerks, aides, and technicians. The first four sections refer to the general media program functions identified in the related manual, "A is for Apple:…

  3. Adolescents and the Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strasburgber, Victor C., Ed.; Comstock, George A., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    In the 1990s, the media represent the single most easily modifiable influence on children and adolescents. This series of articles offers medically oriented practitioners a review of current research on the influence of the media on children and adolescents. The 13 articles are: (1) "Children, Adolescents, and the Media: Five Crucial Issues"…

  4. Dietary Practices in Saudi Cerebral Palsy Children

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hammad, Nouf S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the dietary practices of Saudi cerebral palsy (CP) children. Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect the following information from parents of CP children: demographics, main source of dietary information, frequency of main meals, foods/drinks used for main meals and in-between-meals. Results: Parents of 157 CP children participated. Parents were divided into three, while children were divided into two age groups. The main sources of dietary information included popular media (46.5%) and dentist (36.3%). Most of the children had three meals (71.3%) or two meals (24.8%) daily. Choices for main meals included meats (68.8%), vegetables (65.6%), fruits (28.4%) and puddings (38.9%). The main three drinks choices with main meals included packed juices (59.9%), bottled water (58.8%) and fresh fruit juices (33.1%). The choices for in-between meals snacks included biscuits (61.1%), potato chips (51.6%), fruits (43.9%) and chocolates (41.4%). The choice of drinks with snacks was similar to that used with main meals. In cross-tabulation, older parents used meat (p=.03) and soft drinks (p=.04) more often for their children’s main meals. Older children were given meat (p=.004) and soft drinks (p=.04) more often with main meals. Older children were given potato chips as snacks more often than younger children (p=.02), and there was a trend towards use of chocolates as snacks in older children (p=.08). Conclusion: Parents of CP children need to be educated about dietary practices of their children especially in areas such as the use of packed juices, dairy products, soft drinks and chocolates. PMID:26430418

  5. Efficacy of cilostazol in preventing aspiration pneumonia in acute cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Aiko; Maeshima, Shinichiro; Tanahashi, Norio

    2013-08-01

    This retrospective study examined the effectiveness of cilostazol in preventing aspiration pneumonia in patients with acute cerebral infarction. The 189 subjects ranged in age from 31 to 95 years and included 57 with small-artery occlusion, 107 with large-artery atherothrombosis, and 25 with other disorders. Patients with cardiogenic cerebral embolism or preexisting pneumonia at the time of hospital admission were excluded from the analysis. Neurologic symptoms, cognitive function, and swallowing function were assessed at the first clinical examination, and the ability to perform activities of daily living was assessed at both hospital admission and discharge. Outcome and food intake status were also assessed at hospital discharge. Pneumonia was detected in 27 of 189 subjects (14.3%), in 20 subjects during nasogastric tube feeding implemented because of oral intake difficulties (fasting group) and in 7 subjects after initiation of oral feeding (oral intake group). Cilostazol was administered to 48 of the 189 subjects (25.4%). The incidence of pneumonia was 6.3% (3 of 48) in patients who received cilostazol, compared with 17% (24 of 141) in those who did not receive cilostazol. Our data suggest that cilostazol appears to prevent the occurrence of pneumonia in both the chronic and acute stages of cerebral infarction.

  6. Cerebral vascular findings in PAPA syndrome: cerebral arterial vasculopathy or vasculitis and a posterior cerebral artery dissecting aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Khatibi, Kasra; Heit, Jeremy J; Telischak, Nicholas A; Elbers, Jorina M; Do, Huy M

    2015-06-24

    A young patient with PAPA (pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne) syndrome developed an unusual cerebral arterial vasculopathy/vasculitis (CAV) that resulted in subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured dissecting posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysm. This aneurysm was successfully treated by endovascular coil sacrifice of the affected segment of the PCA. The patient made an excellent recovery with no significant residual neurologic deficit.

  7. Cerebral Venous Congestion as Indication for Thrombolytic Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Fong Y. Kostanian, Varoujan; Rivera, Monica; Lee, Kwo-Whie; Chen, Clayton C.; Nguyen, Thong H.

    2007-07-15

    ranging from 5 days to 2 months. Eight of these were diagnosed with dural sinus thrombosis only, and had a stable hospital course without worsening of symptoms. These patients also did not have imaging evidence of cerebral venous congestion. The remaining 2 patients had cerebral edema on the CT scan. One had only a small amount of edema in the right cerebellum, but the other had severe edema in the bilateral basal ganglia and thalamic areas. Nine of these patients had a stable hospitalization course and experienced a symptom-free recovery, but 1 died with severe cerebral edema and hemorrhage. Seven of the remaining 15 patients were initially treated with anticoagulation therapy for periods ranging from 2 days to 2 months (average 11 days). These 7 patients were considered to have failed anticoagulation therapy since they had worsening symptoms, and 5 of these had developed hemorrhage on subsequent CT or MR imaging scans. Five of the 7 then underwent thrombectomy with the administration of tPA. Of the remaining 2, 1 underwent thrombectomy alone without the administration of tPA, and the other was given 1 million units of urokinase instead of tPA. Three of these patients had a symptom-free recovery, but 2 had residual left-sided weakness, 1 patient had a minimal gait disturbance, and another patient developed a transverse sinus arteriovenous fistula 7 months after thrombolytic therapy. The remaining 8 patients did not receive anticoagulation therapy, and went straight to treatment with thrombectomy and administration of tPA. All of these presented with worsening clinical symptoms. Six had hemorrhage on their imaging studies, 1 had new edema on a subsequent CT scan, and 1 had edema along with the dural sinus thrombosis, but experienced worsening clinical symptoms consisting of headache and atypical dystonia. Five of these 8 patients experienced a symptom-free recovery, and 3 patients had mild residual weakness. Conclusion. In patients with acute dural sinus thrombosis, an

  8. Numerical predictions of hemodynamics following surgeries in cerebral aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayz, Vitaliy; Lawton, Michael; Boussel, Loic; Leach, Joseph; Acevedo, Gabriel; Halbach, Van; Saloner, David

    2014-11-01

    Large cerebral aneurysms present a danger of rupture or brain compression. In some cases, clinicians may attempt to change the pathological hemodynamics in order to inhibit disease progression. This can be achieved by changing the vascular geometry with an open surgery or by deploying a stent-like flow diverter device. Patient-specific CFD models can help evaluate treatment options by predicting flow regions that are likely to become occupied by thrombus (clot) following the procedure. In this study, alternative flow scenarios were modeled for several patients who underwent surgical treatment. Patient-specific geometries and flow boundary conditions were obtained from magnetic resonance angiography and velocimetry data. The Navier-Stokes equations were solved with a finite volume solver Fluent. A porous media approach was used to model flow-diverter devices. The advection-diffusion equation was solved in order to simulate contrast agent transport and the results were used to evaluate flow residence time changes. Thrombus layering was predicted in regions characterized by reduced velocities and shear stresses as well as increased flow residence time. The simulations indicated surgical options that could result in occlusion of vital arteries with thrombus. Numerical results were compared to experimental and clinical MRI data. The results demonstrate that image-based CFD models may help improve the outcome of surgeries in cerebral aneurysms. acknowledge R01HL115267.

  9. Prosocial effects of media.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Marjorie J

    2012-06-01

    Parents, teachers, health care providers, and other caring adults worry about the harmful influence of media messages and images on children and teens and wonder how to recognize and encourage positive and healthy use of media. For decades, experts have commented on the power of media. Media depictions can lead to negative attitudes and behavior in some young viewers. This article discusses whether prosocial, tolerant, and cooperative attitudes and behavior can be learned and imitated by children and adolescents and whether media can nurture or stimulate creativity or actively promote health and well-being in young consumers.

  10. Prosocial effects of media.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Marjorie J

    2012-06-01

    Parents, teachers, health care providers, and other caring adults worry about the harmful influence of media messages and images on children and teens and wonder how to recognize and encourage positive and healthy use of media. For decades, experts have commented on the power of media. Media depictions can lead to negative attitudes and behavior in some young viewers. This article discusses whether prosocial, tolerant, and cooperative attitudes and behavior can be learned and imitated by children and adolescents and whether media can nurture or stimulate creativity or actively promote health and well-being in young consumers. PMID:22643170

  11. [Care for patients with altered states of consciousness in a hospital for chronic and long-stay patients].

    PubMed

    Más-Sesé, Gemma; Sanchis-Pellicer, M José; Tormo-Micó, Esther; Vicente-Más, Josep; Vallalta-Morales, Manuel; Rueda-Gordillo, Diego; Conejo-Alba, Antonia; Berbegal-Serra, Juan; Martínez-Avilés, Pedro; Oltra-Masanet, Joan A; Femenia-Pérez, Miquel

    2015-03-16

    Introduccion. Un 30-40% de los pacientes con daño cerebral presenta alteraciones del nivel de conciencia, y algunos casos, estados alterados de conciencia: sindrome de vigilia sin respuesta (SVSR) o estado de minima conciencia (EMC). La recuperacion es variable y la supervivencia esta amenazada por multiples complicaciones. Objetivos. Presentar la metodologia de trabajo del Hospital La Pedrera (HLP) para pacientes en SVSR o EMC y analizar las caracteristicas clinicas de los pacientes atendidos, la evolucion, y la situacion funcional y cognitiva en el momento del alta. Pacientes y metodos. Estudio descriptivo prospectivo de pacientes atendidos en el HLP durante el periodo 2009-2013, con diagnostico de SVSR o EMC. Resultados. El HLP trabaja mediante el metodo gestion de caso, ofreciendo una atencion integral por un equipo multidisciplinar. Los pacientes se clasifican segun objetivos asistenciales. Los pacientes con SVSR o EMC se incluyen en el programa de cuidados integrales y adaptacion. Se atendio a 23 pacientes (86,9% varones), con una edad media de 54,9 años. Etiologia: hemorragia cerebral, 30,4%; encefalopatia anoxica, 26,6%; encefalopatia metabolica, 17,3%; y otras causas, 17,3%. El 73,9% ingreso en SVSR y el resto en EMC. Evolucion: el 43,4% mejoro su situacion cognitiva inicial y el 88,8% presentaba una situacion de dependencia total en el momento del alta. Las complicaciones mas frecuentes fueron infecciones respiratorias y urinarias (53,6%). El 65,2% de los casos fueron exitus. Conclusiones. La asistencia en SVSR o EMC es compleja y precisa cuidados multidisciplinares. Casi la mitad de los pacientes mejoro su situacion cognitiva, lo que justifica una actitud proactiva que intente mejorar la calidad de vida de los pacientes y sus familias.

  12. Hemodynamic Intervention of Cerebral Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui

    2005-11-01

    Cerebral aneurysm is a pathological vascular response to hemodynamic stimuli. Endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms essentially alters the blood flow to stop them from continued growth and eventual rupture. Compared to surgical clipping, endovascular methods are minimally invasive and hence rapidly gaining popularity. However, they are not always effective with risks of aneurysm regrowth and various complications. We aim at developing a Virtual Intervention (VI) platform that allows: patient-specific flow calculation and risk prediction as well as recommendation of tailored intervention based on quantitative analysis. This is a lofty goal requiring advancement in three areas of research: (1). Advancement of image-based CFD; (2) Understanding the biological/pathological responses of tissue to hemodynamic factors in the context of cerebral aneurysms; and (3) Capability of designing and testing patient-specific endovascular devices. We have established CFD methodologies based on anatomical geometry obtained from 3D angiographic or CT images. To study the effect of hemodynamics on aneurysm development, we have created a canine model of a vascular bifurcation anastomosis to provide the hemodynamic environment similar to those in CA. Vascular remodeling was studied using histology and compared against the flow fields obtained from CFD. It was found that an intimal pad, similar to those frequently seen clinically, developed at the flow impingement site, bordering with an area of `groove' characteristic of an early stage of aneurysm, where the micro environment exhibits an elevated wall shear stresses. To further address the molecular mechanisms of the flow-mediated aneurysm pathology, we are also developing in vitro cell culture systems to complement the in vivo study. Our current effort in endovascular device development focuses on novel stents that alters the aneurysmal flow to promote thrombotic occlusion as well as favorable remodeling. Realization of an

  13. Restenosis After Balloon Angioplasty for Cerebral Vasospasm

    SciTech Connect

    Sedat, J. Chau, Y.; Popolo, M.; Gindre, S.; Rami, L.; Orban, J. C.

    2009-03-15

    Transluminal balloon dilatation for symptomatic vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage is effective, and clinical studies have shown that it achieves long-lasting dilatation of spastic cerebral arteries. Delayed arterial renarrowing has not been reported. Here we report the case of a 58-year-old woman who presented asymptomatic and permanent restenosis after angioplasty for cerebral vasospasm.

  14. Primary cerebral alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma in adult

    PubMed Central

    Pirillo, Vania; Cipriano Cecchi, Paolo; Tripodi, Massimo; Maier, Klaus; Rizzo, Paolo; Schwarz, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Primary cerebral rhabdomyosarcomas are very rare and malignant tumors that occur predominantly in the posterior fossa of pediatric patients. We report a rare case of primary cerebral rhabdomyosarcoma located in the supratentorial compartment of a 51 year-old woman together with a review of the pertinent Literature especially regarding the histological diagnosis and pitfalls. PMID:21769325

  15. Neurotransmitter Receptor Binding in Bovine Cerebral Microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peroutka, Stephen J.; Moskowitz, Michael A.; Reinhard, John F.; Synder, Solomon H.

    1980-05-01

    Purified preparations of microvessels from bovine cerebral cortex contain substantial levels of alpha-adrenergic, beta-adrenergic, and histamine 1 receptor binding sites but only negligible serotonin, muscarinic cholinergic, opiate, and benzodiazepine receptor binding. Norepinephrine and histamine may be endogenous regulators of the cerebral microcirculation at the observed receptors.

  16. Sumatriptan and cerebral perfusion in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Scott, A K; Grimes, S; Ng, K; Critchley, M; Breckenridge, A M; Thomson, C; Pilgrim, A J

    1992-04-01

    1. The effect of sumatriptan on regional cerebral perfusion was studied in healthy volunteers. 2. Intravenous sumatriptan (2 mg) had no detectable effect on regional cerebral perfusion as measured using a SPECT system with 99technetiumm labelled hexemethylpropyleneamineoxime. 3. Sumatriptan had no effect on pulse, blood pressure or ECG indices. 4. All six volunteers experienced minor adverse effects during the intravenous infusion.

  17. Mobility Experiences of Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palisano, Robert J.; Shimmell, Lorie J.; Stewart, Debra; Lawless, John J.; Rosenbaum, Peter L.; Russell, Dianne J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how youth with cerebral palsy experience mobility in their daily lives using a phenomenological approach. The participants were 10 youth with cerebral palsy, 17 to 20 years of age, selected using purposeful sampling with maximum variation strategies. A total of 14 interviews were completed. Transcripts…

  18. Basal ganglia germinoma with progressive cerebral hemiatrophy.

    PubMed

    Liu, E; Robertson, R L; du Plessis, A; Pomeroy, S L

    1999-04-01

    The authors describe a 7-year-old Chinese-American female with a germinoma of the basal ganglia who presented with progressive hemiparesis and cerebral hemiatrophy. The additional finding of markedly elevated antiphospholipid antibodies suggests the possibility of an autoimmune pathogenesis for the progressive cerebral atrophy, as well as the later development of cognitive decline, tics, and obsessive-compulsive behaviors. PMID:10328283

  19. [The developing profile of cerebral ischemia].

    PubMed

    Martí-Vilalta, J L; Martí-Fábregas, J

    1999-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia, which may be silently manifested as transitory ischemia attacks or cerebral infarction, is not a stable, but rather, a moving process. In cerebral infarctions the initial ischemic area may change or move in a high percentage of patients and may involve a significant volume (mean of 32%) of neuronal tissue. The negative changes of initial cerebral ischemia which produce a worsening of the same may be due to the progression of the thrombus, appearance of new embolisms, cerebral edema, hemorrhage, blood reperfusion and systemias causes. These changes may determine the conversion of the shaded ischemic area into a definitive, irreversible infarction. The negative changes may also be produced some distance from the initial ischemic area, either because of microthromboembolisms or diaschisis. The positive changes of initial cerebral ischemia which produce as improvement of the same, may be due to collateral circulation, lysis or fragmentation of the embolism and a decrease in cerebral edema. Clinical changes with no evident clinical manifestations may also be produced and may be diagnosed with the use of clinical scales, imaging techniques, ultrasound and hematological and biochemical markers. Acknowledgement of these cerebral ischemia changes in the acute phase may determine the salvation of a part of the brain, and thereby modify the future clinical situation of the patient.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: cerebral cavernous malformation

    MedlinePlus

    ... R, Awad IA, Ginsberg MH. Cerebral cavernous malformations proteins inhibit Rho kinase to stabilize vascular integrity. J Exp Med. 2010 Apr 12;207(4):881-96. doi: 10.1084/jem.20091258. Epub 2010 Mar 22. Citation on ... CCM1 and CCM2 protein interactions in cell signaling: implications for cerebral cavernous ...

  1. Cerebral oximetry: a replacement for pulse oximetry?

    PubMed

    Frost, Elizabeth A M

    2012-10-01

    Cerebral oximetry has been around for some 3 decades but has had a somewhat checkered history regarding application and reliability. More recently several monitors have been approved in the United States and elsewhere and the technique is emerging as a useful tool for assessing not only adequate cerebral oxygenation but also tissue oxygenation and perfusion in other organs.

  2. Variations in Writing Posture and Cerebral Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Jerre; Reid, Marylou

    1976-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between hand writing posture and cerebral dominance of 48 left handed writers and 25 right handed writers. Determined that cerebral dominance is related to handedness and to whether or not the writing hand posture is normal or inverted. (SL)

  3. Cerebral lymphoma presenting as a leukoencephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ayuso-Peralta, L; Orti-Pareja, M; Zurdo-Hernandez, M; Jimenez-Jimenez, F; Tejeiro-Martinez, J; Ricoy, J; de la Lama, A; Bernardo, A

    2001-01-01

    Cerebral lymphoma is infrequent in immunocompetent patients. This tumour usually appears on CT and MRI as a single lesion or as multiple lesions with mass effect and homogeneous enhancement after contrast administration. A patient is described with a cerebral lymphoma, confirmed by histopathological examination, who presented as a progressive leukoencephalopathy.

 PMID:11459903

  4. Noninvasive absolute cerebral oximetry with frequency-domain near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallacoglu, Bertan

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measurements of absolute concentrations of oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin in the human brain can provide critical information about cerebral physiology in terms of cerebral blood volume, blood flow, oxygen delivery, and metabolic rate of oxygen. We developed several frequency domain NIRS data acquisition and analysis methods aimed at absolute measurements of hemoglobin concentration and saturation in cerebral tissue of adult human subjects. Extensive experimental investigations were carried out in various homogenous and two-layered tissue-mimicking phantoms, and biological tissues. The advantages and limitations of commonly used homogenous models and inversion strategies were thoroughly investigated. Prior to human subjects, extensive studies were carried out in in vivo animal models. In rabbits, absolute hemoglobin oxygen desaturation was shown to depend strongly on surgically induced testicular torsion. Methods developed in this study were then adapted for measurements in the rat brain. Absolute values were demonstrated to discern cerebrovascular impairment in a rat model of diet-induced vascular cognitive impairment. These results facilitated the development of clinically useful optical measures of cerebrovascular health. In a large group of human subjects, employing a homogeneous model for absolute measurements was shown to be reliable and robust. However, it was also shown to be limited due to the relatively thick extracerebral tissue. The procedure we develop in this work and the thesis thereof performs a nonlinear inversion procedure with six unknown parameters with no other prior knowledge for the retrieval of the optical coefficients and top layer thickness with high accuracy on two-layered media. Our absolute measurements of cerebral hemoglobin concentration and saturation are based on the discrimination of extracerebral and cerebral tissue layers, and they can enhance the impact of NIRS for cerebral hemodynamics and

  5. Anterior cerebral artery velocity changes in disease of the middle cerebral artery stem.

    PubMed

    Brass, L M; Duterte, D L; Mohr, J P

    1989-12-01

    Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography can map the changes in blood velocity that result from stenosis or occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. To evaluate patterns of collateral blood flow in disease of the middle cerebral artery stem, we used both cerebral angiography and transcranial Doppler ultrasonography to study the systolic blood velocities in both anterior cerebral arteries in 10 consecutive patients with middle cerebral artery stenosis or occlusion. Five patients had no evidence of hemodynamically significant carotid disease and good-quality measurements of systolic velocity in each anterior cerebral artery. Two of the five patients had middle cerebral artery stem stenosis and the other three had occlusion. The ratios of mean blood velocity in the normal compared with the abnormal side for the five patients (mean 1.34 +/- 0.23, range 1.15-1.74) were significantly higher than ratios for 10 controls (mean 1.04 +/- 0.12, range 0.76 +/- 1.19) using an unpaired t test (t = 3.492, 0.0005 less than p less than 0.005). Our results suggest that transcranial Doppler ultrasound measurements of anterior cerebral artery blood velocity may be a useful index of collateral blood flow from the anterior cerebral artery territory into the middle cerebral artery territory. Changes in mean velocity ratio may document the evolution and adequacy of collateral blood flow over the cerebral convexity in middle cerebral artery stem disease. In addition, the changes in anterior cerebral artery blood velocity appear to be an important corroborative finding for middle cerebral artery stem occlusion. PMID:2688197

  6. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome: review.

    PubMed

    Cerdà-Esteve, M; Cuadrado-Godia, E; Chillaron, J J; Pont-Sunyer, C; Cucurella, G; Fernández, M; Goday, A; Cano-Pérez, J F; Rodríguez-Campello, A; Roquer, J

    2008-06-01

    Hyponatremia is the most frequent electrolyte disorder in critically neurological patients. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSW) is defined as a renal loss of sodium during intracranial disease leading to hyponatremia and a decrease in extracellular fluid volume. The pathogenesis of this disorder is still not completely understood. Sympathetic responses as well as some natriuretic factors play a role in this syndrome. Distinction between SIADH and CSW might be difficult. The essential point is the volemic state. It is necessary to rule out other intermediate causes. Treatment requires volume replacement and maintenance of a positive salt balance. Mineral corticoids may be useful in complicated cases.

  7. Phase dynamics in cerebral autoregulation.

    PubMed

    Latka, Miroslaw; Turalska, Malgorzata; Glaubic-Latka, Marta; Kolodziej, Waldemar; Latka, Dariusz; West, Bruce J

    2005-11-01

    Complex continuous wavelet transforms are used to study the dynamics of instantaneous phase difference delta phi between the fluctuations of arterial blood pressure (ABP) and cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) in a middle cerebral artery. For healthy individuals, this phase difference changes slowly over time and has an almost uniform distribution for the very low-frequency (0.02-0.07 Hz) part of the spectrum. We quantify phase dynamics with the help of the synchronization index gamma = (sin delta phi)2 + (cos delta phi)2 that may vary between 0 (uniform distribution of phase differences, so the time series are statistically independent of one another) and 1 (phase locking of ABP and CBFV, so the former drives the latter). For healthy individuals, the group-averaged index gamma has two distinct peaks, one at 0.11 Hz [gamma = 0.59 +/- 0.09] and another at 0.33 Hz (gamma = 0.55 +/- 0.17). In the very low-frequency range (0.02-0.07 Hz), phase difference variability is an inherent property of an intact autoregulation system. Consequently, the average value of the synchronization parameter in this part of the spectrum is equal to 0.13 +/- 0.03. The phase difference variability sheds new light on the nature of cerebral hemodynamics, which so far has been predominantly characterized with the help of the high-pass filter model. In this intrinsically stationary approach, based on the transfer function formalism, the efficient autoregulation is associated with the positive phase shift between oscillations of CBFV and ABP. However, the method is applicable only in the part of the spectrum (0.1-0.3 Hz) where the coherence of these signals is high. We point out that synchrony analysis through the use of wavelet transforms is more general and allows us to study nonstationary aspects of cerebral hemodynamics in the very low-frequency range where the physiological significance of autoregulation is most strongly pronounced. PMID:16024579

  8. Apraxia in deep cerebral lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Agostoni, E; Coletti, A; Orlando, G; Tredici, G

    1983-01-01

    In a series of 50 patients with cerebrovascular lesions (demonstrated with CT scan), seven patients had lesions located in the basal ganglia and/or thalamus. All these seven patients were apractic. Ideomotor apraxia was present in all patients; five also had constructional apraxia, and one had bucco-facial apraxia. None of the patients had utilisation apraxia. These observations indicated that apraxia is not only a "high cerebral (cortical) function", but may depend also on the integrity of subcortical circuits and structures. PMID:6619888

  9. Cerebral Asymmetry in Insomnia Sufferers

    PubMed Central

    St-Jean, Geneviève; Turcotte, Isabelle; Bastien, Célyne H.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral asymmetry is used to describe the differences in electroencephalographic activity between regions of the brain. The objective of this study was to document frontal, central, and parietal asymmetry in psychophysiological (Psy-I) and paradoxical (Para-I) insomnia sufferers as well as good sleeper (GS) controls, and to compare their patterns of asymmetry to others already found in anxiety and depression. Additionally, asymmetry variations between nights were assessed. Participants were 17 Psy-I, 14 Para-I, and 19 GS (mean age = 40 years, SD = 9.4). They completed three nights of polysomnography (PSG) recordings following a clinical evaluation in a sleep laboratory. All sleep cycles of Nights 2 and 3 were retained for power spectral analysis. The absolute activity in frequency bands (0.00–125.00 Hz) was computed at multiple frontal, central, and parietal sites in rapid eye movement and non-rapid eye movement sleep to provide cerebral asymmetry measures. Mixed model ANOVAs were computed to assess differences between groups and nights. Correlations were performed with asymmetry and symptoms of depression and anxiety from self-reported questionnaires. Over the course of the two nights, Para-I tended to present hypoactivation of their left frontal region but hyperactivation of their right one compared with GS. As for Psy-I, they presented increased activation of their right parietal region compared with Para-I. Asymmetry at frontal, central, and parietal region differed between nights. On a more disrupted night of sleep, Psy-I had increased activity in their right parietal region while Para-I presented a decrease in cerebral activity in the right central region on their less disrupted night of sleep. Anxious and depressive symptoms did not correlate with asymmetry at any region. Therefore, Psy-I and Para-I present unique patterns of cerebral asymmetry that do not relate to depression or anxiety, and asymmetry varies between nights, maybe as a

  10. [Cerebral oedema: new therapeutic ways].

    PubMed

    Quintard, H; Ichai, C

    2014-06-01

    Cerebral oedema (CO) after brain injury can occur from different ways. The vasogenic and cytotoxic oedema are usually described but osmotic and hydrostatic CO, respectively secondary to plasmatic hypotonia or increase in blood pressure, can also be encountered. Addition of these several mechanisms can worsen injuries. Consequences are major, leading quickly to death secondary to intracerebral hypertension and later to neuropsychic sequelae. So therapeutic care to control this phenomenon is essential and osmotherapy is actually the only way. A better understanding of physiopathological disorders, particularly energetic ways (lactate), aquaporine function, inflammation lead to new therapeutic hopes. The promising experimental results need now to be confirmed by clinical data.

  11. [Orthotic management in cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Ofluoğlu, Demet

    2009-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) may have many musculoskeletal deformities depending on the type of CP. These deformities may result from (i) lack of motor control, (ii) abnormal biomechanical alignment, (iii) impairment in timing of muscle activation, (iv) impairment in normal agonist/antagonist muscle balance, (v) lack of power generation, and (vi) balance disorder. Rehabilitation, orthopedic surgical intervention, and additional orthotic management can prevent and correct these deformities. In this review, mainly lower extremity orthoses are described, with brief explanation on upper and spinal orthotic applications. PMID:19448357

  12. Treating cerebral palsy with aculaser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Shahzad; Nazir Khan, Malik M.; Nadeem Khan, Malik M.; Qazi, Faiza M.; Awan, Abid H.; Dar, Irfan

    2008-03-01

    A single, open and non comparative study was conducted at Anwar Shah Trust for C.P. & Paralysis in collaboration with the Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Children Hospital Lahore, Pakistan to evaluate the effects of ACULASER THERAPY in childern suffering from Cerebral Palsy (C.P.) and associated Neurological Disorders like epilepsy, cortical blindness, spasticity, hemiplegia, paraplegia, diplegia, quadriplegia, monoplegia, sensory-neural deafness and speech disorders. In all 250 childern were treated and the data was gathered during a period of 3 years from December 2003 till December 2006. These children were further classified according to the type of C.P. (spastic, athetoid, mixed) they suffered from and associated Neurological Disorders. This article shows results in C.P. childern who were treated with ACULASER THERAPY for minimum 6 weeks and more or had minimum of 15 treatment sessions and more. This article also shows that those childern who were given a break in the treatment for 1 month to 1 year did not show any reversal of the signs and symptoms. Analysis of the data showed that out of 171 children with Spasticity and Stiffness 147 showed marked improvement showing 87% success rate, out of 126 children with Epileptic fits, there was a significant reduction in the intensity, frequency and duration of Epileptic fits in 91 children showing 72% success rate, out of 48 children with Cortical Blindness 30 children showed improvement accounting for 63% efficacy rate, out of 105 children with Hearing Difficulties, 63 showed marked improvement accounting for 60% improvement rate, out of 190 children with Speech Disorders 122 showed improvement reflecting 64% improvement rate, out of 96 children with Hemiplegia 71 showed improvement in movement, tone and power accounting for 74% improvement rate, out of 76 children with Quadriplegia 52 showed improvement in gross and fine motor functions showing 69% success rate and out of 58 children with Paraplegia of

  13. [A Case of Aplastic or Twig-Like Middle Cerebral Artery Presenting with an Intracranial Hemorrhage Two Years after a Transient Ischemic Attack].

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Taku; Okamoto, Hiroaki; Koguchi, Motofumi; Tajima, Yutaka; Suzuyama, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    Aplastic or twig-like middle cerebral artery (Ap/T-MCA) is a rare anatomical anomaly, which can be associated with intracranial hemorrhage and cerebral ischemia. A 52-year-old woman who presented with sudden headache was admitted to our hospital. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging showed no abnormality; however, magnetic resonance angiogram revealed an occlusion or severe stenosis in the left middle cerebral artery. Three-dimensional CT angiography demonstrated severe stenosis in the left middle cerebral artery. The patient was discharged without any neurological deficit; however, she subsequently complained of temporary weakness in the right hand. It was possibly due to a transient ischemic attack; therefore, cilostazol 200 mg/day was administered for prevention of cerebral ischemia. Single photon emission computed tomography(with or without administration of acetazolamide)showed neither significant decrease in the cerebral blood flow nor cerebrovascular reactivity; hence, surgical revascularization was not performed. However, two years after the initial admission, she was urgently admitted to our hospital with sudden headache and nausea followed by aphasia and weakness of the right extremities. CT images showed diffuse subarachnoid hemorrhage and intracerebral hemorrhage in the left temporo-parietal lobe. Cerebral angiography revealed that the left middle cerebral artery was Ap/T-MCA without cerebral aneurysms. The patient was treated conservatively, and she eventually recovered without any neurological deficit except mild aphasia. Since Ap/T-MCA is associated with both hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke, antiplatelet therapy should be administered carefully. Moreover, it is necessary to consider extracranial-intracranial bypass to reduce hemodynamic stress on the abnormal vessels.

  14. Culture et medias (Culture and the Media).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abastado, Claude

    1982-01-01

    The traditional conception of pluralistic culture is contrasted with a new, separate form of culture: mass media culture. Its components are noted: medium, message, "mosaic," and strategy, and methodology for its study is discussed. (MSE)

  15. Efficacy and Safety Evaluation on Arterial Thrombolysis in Treating Acute Cerebral Infarction.

    PubMed

    Shen, Baozhong; Liu, Qingan; Gu, Yingli; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Zhuobo

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intra-arterial thrombolysis in treating acute cerebral infarction and further discuss the indications of acute cerebral infarction treatment, in order to enhance the therapeutic effects of arterial thrombolysis. The data of 164 patients with acute cerebral infarction who accepted intra-arterial thrombolysis treatment by using rt-PA or reteplase between 2009 and 2014 at the Department of Neurology of our hospital, were collected, including patients' medical history, characteristics of the onset procedure, intervals between onset and intra-arterial thrombolysis, bleeding or death, and the changing process of patient's main neurologic function after the treatment. The neurological functions including muscle strength, speech, and level of consciousness were chosen for evaluation. Through a review of cerebral angiography, we collected the digital subtraction angiography (DSA) morphological changes of blood vessels before and after arterial thrombolysis to evaluate whether those blood vessels had been reperfused. Thereafter, we analyzed and statistically processed above-mentioned data. The mean time of arterial thrombolysis was 5.7 h. DSA results were as follows: 22 patients had complete internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion; 49 patients middle cerebral artery's (MCA's) Ml or M2 segment occlusion; 6 patients anterior cerebral artery (ACA) occlusion; 58 patients reperfusion after thrombolysis, and the recanalization rate was 76 %. Based on vertebral-basilar artery (VBA) system, 18 patients had complete occlusion, 11 patients had reperfusion after thrombolysis, and the recanalization rate was 61 %. A total of 63 patients had severe stenosis, and they had significantly improved after thrombolysis. The clinical symptoms of patients were improved: 79 out of 164 patients with paralysis had partially recovered their limb muscle strength after operation, while 33 patients had completely recovered, and

  16. Hospitable Classrooms: Biblical Hospitality and Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, David W.

    2011-01-01

    This paper contributes to a Christian hermeneutic of special education by suggesting the biblical concept of hospitality as a necessary characteristic of classroom and school environments in which students with disabilities and other marginalized students can be effectively incorporated into the body of the classroom. Christian hospitality, seen…

  17. Lifetime costs of cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Marie; Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Madsen, Mette; Uldall, Peter

    2009-08-01

    This study quantified the lifetime costs of cerebral palsy (CP) in a register-based setting. It was the first study outside the US to assess the lifetime costs of CP. The lifetime costs attributable to CP were divided into three categories: health care costs, productivity costs, and social costs. The population analysed was retrieved from the Danish Cerebral Palsy Register, which covers the eastern part of the country and has registered about half of the Danish population of individuals with CP since 1950. For this study we analysed 2367 individuals with CP, who were born in 1930 to 2000 and were alive in 2000. The prevalence of CP in eastern Denmark was approximately 1.7 per 1000. Information on productivity and the use of health care was retrieved from registers. The lifetime cost of CP was about 860,000 euro for men and about 800,000 euro for women. The largest component was social care costs, particularly during childhood. A sensitivity analysis found that alterations in social care costs had a small effect, whereas lowering the discount rate from 5 to 3 per cent markedly increased total lifetime costs. Discounting decreases the value of costs in the future compared with the present. The high social care costs and productivity costs associated with CP point to a potential gain from labour market interventions that benefit individuals with CP. PMID:19416329

  18. Septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Ismail A; Wasay, Mohammad

    2016-03-15

    Septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, once a common and deadly disease, has fortunately become rare now. Not only that the incidence has fallen significantly after the antibiotic era, the morbidity and mortality has also decreased substantially. Cavernous sinus thrombosis is by far the commonest form of septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Due to its rare occurrence, a lot of current generation clinicians have not encountered the entity in person. Despite all the advances in diagnostic modalities, a high index of clinical suspicion remains the mainstay in prompt diagnosis and management of this potentially lethal condition. Keeping this in view, the authors have reviewed the subject including the old literature and have summarized the current approach to diagnosis and management. Septic cavernous thrombosis is a fulminant disease with dramatic presentation in most cases comprised of fever, periorbital pain and swelling, associated with systemic symptoms and signs. The preceding infection is usually in the central face or paranasal sinuses. The disease rapidly spreads to contralateral side and if remains undiagnosed and untreated can result in severe complications or even death. Prompt diagnosis using radiological imaging in suspected patient, early use of broad spectrum antibiotics, and judicial use of anticoagulation may save the life and prevent disability. Surgery is used only to treat the nidus of infection. PMID:26944152

  19. [Negative symptoms and cerebral imaging].

    PubMed

    Kaladjian, A; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Azorin, J-M

    2015-12-01

    A number of neuroanatomical and neurofonctional abnormalities have been evidenced by cerebral imaging studies in patients suffering from schizophrenia. Nevertheless, those specifically associated with the negative symptoms of this disease are still insufficiently known. This work is a review of selected studies that have assessed the brain correlates of negative symptoms in schizophrenia. Approaches using structural imaging have highlighted reduction of gray matter density or cortical thickness associated with negative symptoms, which is rather sparsely distributed within the frontal and temporal regions, localized nevertheless more particularly in the frontal medial and orbitofrontal areas, as well as the amygdalo-hippocampic complex. These deficits are concurrent with a loss of integrity of the principal paths of white matter tracts between frontal and limbic regions. On the other hand, neurofonctional abnormalities associated with negative symptoms involve especially the frontal areas and limbic striatum. A disturbed functioning within the fronto-striatal loops, related to a striatal dopaminergic deficit, may represent a potential explanatory hypothesis of the negative symptoms of schizophrenia, as suggested by studies using Positron Emission Tomography on this topic or neuroimaging studies on the effects of antipsychotics. A better identification of the cerebral abnormalities associated with the negative dimension of schizophrenia, with regard to the lateralization of these abnormalities or to their changes during the course of the disease, could offer new therapeutic modalities for the treatment of this dimension which, until now, remains few responsive to conventional pharmacological treatments. PMID:26776387

  20. Cerebral lateralization in simultaneous interpretation.

    PubMed

    Fabbro, F; Gran, L; Basso, G; Bava, A

    1990-07-01

    Cerebral asymmetries for L1 (Italian), L2 (English), and L3 (French, German, Spanish, or Russian) were studied, by using a verbal-manual interference paradigm, in a group of Italian right-handed polyglot female students at the Scuola Superiore di Lingue Moderne per Interpreti e Traduttori (SSLM-School for Interpreters and Translators) of the University of Trieste and in a control group of right-handed monolingual female students at the Medical School of the University of Trieste. In an automatic speech production task no significant cerebral lateralization was found for the mother tongue (L1) either in the interpreting students or in the control group; the interpreting students were not significantly lateralized for the third language (L3), while weak left hemispheric lateralization was shown for L2. A significantly higher degree of verbal-manual interference was found for L1 than for L2 and L3. A significantly higher disruption rate occurred in the meaning-based mode of simultaneous interpretation (from L2 into L1 and vice versa) than in the word-for-word mode (from L2 into L1 and vice versa). No significant overall or hemispheric differences were found during simultaneous interpretation from L1 into L2 or from L2 into L1. PMID:2207622

  1. Chronic cerebral paragonimiasis combined with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Choo, Juk-Dong; Suh, Bumn-Suk; Lee, Hyun-Sung; Lee, Jong-Soo; Song, Chang-June; Shin, Dae-Whan; Lee, Young-Ha

    2003-11-01

    A 67-year-old Korean woman attended our hospital complaining of a severe headache. A brain computed tomography scan showed conglomerated, high-density, calcified nodules in the left temporo-occipito-parietal area and high-density subarachnoid hemorrhage in the basal cisterns. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain shows multiple conglomerated iso- or low-signal intensity round nodules with peripheral rim enhancement. She underwent craniotomies to clip the aneurysm and remove the calcified masses. Paragonimus westermani eggs were identified in the calcified necrotic lesions. Results of parasitic examinations on the sputum and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for P. westermani were all negative. The patient presented with headache and dizziness that had occurred for more than 30 years. She had not eaten freshwater crayfish or crabs. However, she had sometimes prepared raw crabs for several decades. Overall, this case was diagnosed as chronic cerebral paragonimiasis, in which she may have been infected through the contamination of utensils during the preparation of the second intermediate hosts, combined with a cerebral hemorrhage.

  2. [Cerebral venous thrombosis in minimal change nephrotic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Hirata, M; Kuroda, M; Koni, I

    1999-06-01

    A 46-year old man presented with an eight-day history of edema and was found to be nephrotic, with a plasma albumin level of 1.1 g/dl and urine protein excretion of 13.3 g/24 hrs. The level of plasma creatinine was normal at 1.0 mg/dl. A finding of renal biopsy was consistent with minimal change glomerulopathy. On the 6th hospital day, he suddenly developed a severe headache and was noted to have bilateral papilledema. Lumbar puncture revealed an opening pressure of 250 mm of water. Magnetic resonance venography showed an irregular flow in the superior sagittal sinus and right transverse sinus, a finding consistent with thrombus. The diagnosis of cerebral venous thrombosis was made, and the patient was given both Warfarin 2 mg/day and prednisolone 60 mg/day. A complete recovery from nephrotic syndrome was achieved within eight weeks. Nephrotic syndrome causes a hypercoagulable state, leading to both venous and arterial thrombosis. The most common clinical features are renal vein thrombosis, femoral vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism, however, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is rare in patients with nephrotic syndrome. It is important to be aware of this complication, since prompt treatment with anticoagulation and control of nephrotic syndrome can lead to a successful outcome.

  3. SHUEE on the evaluation of upper limb in cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Tedesco, Ana Paula; Nicolini-Panisson, Renata D'Agostini; de Jesus, Aline

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the use of the tool for evaluation of spastic upper limb SHUEE (Shriners Hospital Upper Extremity Evaluation) in the evaluation of upper limb in cerebral palsy (CP) and its ability to detect changes after surgical treatment of identified deformities. METHODS: 19 patients with spastic hemiplegic CP had their upper limb evaluated by SHUEE. Five patients underwent surgical treatment of deformities detected and performed the test at one year postoperatively. RESULTS: The mean age was 9.02 years old; 18 patients were classified as level I GMFCS and one patient as level II. At baseline, the mean spontaneous functional analysis was 59.01; dynamic positional analysis was 58.05 and grasp-and-release function, was 91.21. In the postoperative period the scores were, respectively, 65.73, 69.62 and 100, showing an improvement of 3.5% in the spontaneous functional analysis and of 44.8% in dynamic positional analysis. CONCLUSIONS: SHUEE is a tool for evaluation of spastic upper limb in cerebral palsy that helps in the specific diagnosis of deformities, indication of treatment and objective detection of results after surgical treatment. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:26327806

  4. The application of hospitality elements in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ziqi; Robson, Stephani; Hollis, Brooke

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, many hospital designs have taken inspiration from hotels, spurred by factors such as increased patient and family expectations and regulatory or financial incentives. Increasingly, research evidence suggests the value of enhancing the physical environment to foster healing and drive consumer decisions and perceptions of service quality. Although interest is increasing in the broader applicability of numerous hospitality concepts to the healthcare field, the focus of this article is design innovations, and the services that such innovations support, from the hospitality industry. To identify physical hotel design elements and associated operational features that have been used in the healthcare arena, a series of interviews with hospital and hotel design experts were conducted. Current examples and suggestions for future hospitality elements were also sought from the experts, academic journals, and news articles. Hospitality elements applied in existing hospitals that are addressed in this article include hotel-like rooms and decor; actual hotels incorporated into medical centers; hotel-quality food, room service, and dining facilities for families; welcoming lobbies and common spaces; hospitality-oriented customer service training; enhanced service offerings, including concierges; spas or therapy centers; hotel-style signage and way-finding tools; and entertainment features. Selected elements that have potential for future incorporation include executive lounges and/or communal lobbies with complimentary wireless Internet and refreshments, centralized controls for patients, and flexible furniture. Although the findings from this study underscore the need for more hospitality-like environments in hospitals, the investment decisions made by healthcare executives must be balanced with cost-effectiveness and the assurance that clinical excellence remains the top priority.

  5. The application of hospitality elements in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ziqi; Robson, Stephani; Hollis, Brooke

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, many hospital designs have taken inspiration from hotels, spurred by factors such as increased patient and family expectations and regulatory or financial incentives. Increasingly, research evidence suggests the value of enhancing the physical environment to foster healing and drive consumer decisions and perceptions of service quality. Although interest is increasing in the broader applicability of numerous hospitality concepts to the healthcare field, the focus of this article is design innovations, and the services that such innovations support, from the hospitality industry. To identify physical hotel design elements and associated operational features that have been used in the healthcare arena, a series of interviews with hospital and hotel design experts were conducted. Current examples and suggestions for future hospitality elements were also sought from the experts, academic journals, and news articles. Hospitality elements applied in existing hospitals that are addressed in this article include hotel-like rooms and decor; actual hotels incorporated into medical centers; hotel-quality food, room service, and dining facilities for families; welcoming lobbies and common spaces; hospitality-oriented customer service training; enhanced service offerings, including concierges; spas or therapy centers; hotel-style signage and way-finding tools; and entertainment features. Selected elements that have potential for future incorporation include executive lounges and/or communal lobbies with complimentary wireless Internet and refreshments, centralized controls for patients, and flexible furniture. Although the findings from this study underscore the need for more hospitality-like environments in hospitals, the investment decisions made by healthcare executives must be balanced with cost-effectiveness and the assurance that clinical excellence remains the top priority. PMID:23424818

  6. [Orbito-rhino-cerebral phycomycosis (mucormycosis): report of a case].

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, C A; Nobrega, J P; Carvalho, M P

    1980-03-01

    The case of a 15 year old white man, diabetic in cetoacidosis, with a orbit-rhino-cerebral phycomycosis is reported. The illness had an acute onset and the treatment was iniciated early with Amphotericin-B and unilateral osteotomy of maxillary and ethmoidal sinus. With this treatment the patient did well with residuals of ophtalmoplegia and amaurosis on the right. Interesting investigation aspects are the occluded internal carotid on the same side of the affected orbit and the CAT-SCAN finding of moderated ventricular dilatation (two months after hospital admission). Mycology, pathophysiology, histopathology, clinical aspects, diagnosis and therapy are discussed, comparing the findings of this case with avaliable literature. An increased number of survivors can be expected with earlier recognition and more aggressive therapy. Treatment of the underlying debilitating disease, Amphotericin-B and surgical debridement of necrotic tissue, are frequently necessary such as observed in the case reported. The favorable results obtained with the proposed managment are stressed.

  7. An Unusual Presentation of Opioid Induced Cerebral Infarction.

    PubMed

    Butt, Mujeeb-Ur-Rehman Abid; Nadir, Reeja

    2016-06-01

    Opioid induced cerebral infarction is one of the most dreadful complications encountered in clinical practice. A30-year known hypertensive male presented to the emergency department of Shalamar Hospital, Lahore, Pakistan, with altered state of consciousness. He had been in his usual state of health a day before the presentation. On examination he was afebrile, his GCS was 3/15 having pinpoint pupils with absent doll's eye movements. His blood pressure was 90/60 mmHg, pulse rate was 62/minute, and respiratory rate was 10/minute. His right plantar was upgoing. He was resuscitated in emergency and was placed on ventilator due to hypoxemia. Computed tomography (CT) of brain revealed bilateral internal capsule hypolucencies and bilateral frontal lobe infarction. His urinary toxicological screening revealed extremely high concentrations of opioids and benzodiazepine. Patient made an uneventful recovery with antidote and supportive care. PMID:27376233

  8. Handling Europe's first Ebola case: internal hospital communication experience.

    PubMed

    Mosquera, Margarita; Melendez, Victoria; Latasa, Pello

    2015-04-01

    Europe's first Ebola virus disease (EVD) case was diagnosed in our hospital. There was an unjustified panic in the population because of an imbalance of credibility assigned to the media as opposed to scientific information. A reinforcement of hospital internal communication was needed to keep health care workers informed with up-to-date scientific EVD information. The proactive management of information flow to both internal and external actors is required to reduce unjustified fear within the public. PMID:25721062

  9. Community hospital successfully implements eRecord and CPOE.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Debra M; Greenhouse, Pamela K; Diamond, Joel N; Fera, William; McCormick, Donna L

    2006-01-01

    Despite media attention on converting the nation's paper-based medical record systems to electronic systems, few hospitals, and even fewer community hospitals, have done so. University of Pittsburgh Medical Center St. Margaret has converted to a comprehensive electronic health record system, known as eRecord, in a short time. The authors describe key factors that were critical to the success of the conversion, along with positive results on quality of care.

  10. Caring for Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Team Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dormans, John P., Ed.; Pellegrino, Louis, Ed.

    Twenty-one papers on caring for children with cerebral palsy are organized into four sections, including: (1) cerebral palsy and the interdisciplinary team approach; (2) management of impairments related to cerebral palsy; (3) preventing disability by optimizing function of the child with cerebral palsy; and (4) preventing handicap by creating…

  11. Predictors of poor hospital discharge outcome in acute stroke due to atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Melissa J; Tayal, Ashis H; Schlenk, Elizabeth A

    2015-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a frequent cause of acute ischemic stroke that results in severe neurological disability and death despite treatment with intravenous thrombolysis (intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator [rtPA]). We performed a retrospective review of a single-center registry of patients treated with intravenous rtPA for stroke. The purposes of this study were to compare intravenous rtPA treated patients with stroke with and without AF to examine independent predictors of poor hospital discharge outcome (in-hospital death or hospital discharge to a skilled nursing facility, long-term acute care facility, or hospice care). A univariate analysis was performed on 144 patients receiving intravenous rtPA for stroke secondary to AF and 190 patients without AF. Characteristics that were significantly different between the two groups were age, initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, length of hospital stay, gender, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking status, presence of large cerebral infarct, and hospital discharge outcome. Bivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that patients with stroke secondary to AF with a poor hospital discharge outcome had a greater likelihood of older age, higher initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores, longer length of hospital stay, intubation, and presence of large cerebral infarct compared with those with good hospital discharge outcome (discharged to home or inpatient rehabilitation or signed oneself out against medical advice). A multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that older age, longer length of hospital stay, and presence of large cerebral infarct were independent predictors of poor hospital discharge outcome. These predictors can guide nursing interventions, aid the multidisciplinary treating team with treatment decisions, and suggest future directions for research. PMID:25503541

  12. The Day Reagan Was Shot: How a University Hospital PR Staff Handled the Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turk, Emily R.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The experiences of George Washington University Hospital's public relations staff when it handled the crisis of the shooting of President Reagan is described. Security, choice of a spokesperson, relations with the news media, dealing with VIPs, etc., are discussed. (MLW)

  13. Hospitals as health educators

    MedlinePlus

    ... than your local hospital. From health videos to yoga classes, many hospitals offer information families need to ... care and breastfeeding Parenting Baby sign language Baby yoga or massage Babysitting courses for teens Exercise classes ...

  14. Surviving Your Child's Hospitalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The parent of a young child who required major open heart surgery shares his suggestions for coping with a young child's hospitalization including parent visitation, relating to the hospital staff, getting answers to questions, and utilizing available services. (DB)

  15. Pervasive media violence.

    PubMed

    Schooler, C; Flora, J A

    1996-01-01

    In this review, we focus our discussion on studies examining effects on children and young adults. We believe that the current epidemic of youth violence in the United States justifies a focus on this vulnerable segment of society. We consider media effects on individual children's behaviors, such as imitating aggressive acts. In addition, we examine how the media influence young people's perceptions of norms regarding interpersonal relationships. Next, we assess mass media effects on societal beliefs, or what children and adolescents think the "real world" is like. We suggest these media influences are cumulative and mutually reinforcing, and discuss the implications of repeated exposure to prominent and prevalent violent media messages. Finally, we catalog multiple intervention possibilities ranging from education to regulation. From a public health perspective, therefore, we evaluate the effects that pervasive media messages depicting violence have on young people and present multiple strategies to promote more healthful outcomes. PMID:8724228

  16. Cerebral blood flow determination within the first 8 hours of cerebral infarction using stable xenon-enhanced computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.L.; Yonas, H.; Gur, D.; Latchaw, R.

    1989-06-01

    Cerebral blood flow mapping with stable xenon-enhanced computed tomography (Xe/CT) was performed in conjunction with conventional computed tomography (CT) within the first 8 hours after the onset of symptoms in seven patients with cerebral infarction. Six patients had hemispheric infarctions, and one had a progressive brainstem infarction. Three patients with very low (less than 10 ml/100 g/min) blood flow in an anatomic area appropriate for the neurologic deficit had no clinical improvement by the time of discharge from the hospital; follow-up CT scans of these three patients confirmed infarction in the area of very low blood flow. Three patients with moderate blood flow reductions (15-45 ml/100 g/min) in the appropriate anatomic area had significant clinical improvement from their initial deficits and had normal follow-up CT scans. One patient studied 8 hours after stroke had increased blood flow (hyperemia) in the appropriate anatomic area and made no clinical recovery.

  17. Aerobic training in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Nsenga, A L; Shephard, R J; Ahmaidi, S; Ahmadi, S

    2013-06-01

    Rehabilitation is a major goal for children with cerebral palsy, although the potential to enhance cardio-respiratory fitness in such individuals remains unclear. This study thus compared current cardio-respiratory status between children with cerebral palsy and able-bodied children, and examined the ability to enhance the cardio-respiratory fitness of children with cerebral palsy by cycle ergometer training. 10 children with cerebral palsy (Gross Motor Function Classification System levels I and II) participated in thrice-weekly 30 min cycle ergometer training sessions for 8 weeks (mean age: 14.2±1.9 yrs). 10 additional subjects with cerebral palsy (mean age: 14.2±1.8 yrs) and 10 able-bodied subjects (mean age: 14.1±2.1 yrs) served as controls, undertaking no training. All subjects undertook a progressive cycle ergometer test of cardio-respiratory fitness at the beginning and end of the 8-week period. Cardio-respiratory parameters [oxygen intake V˙O2), ventilation V ˙ E) and heart rate (HR)] during testing were measured by Cosmed K4 b gas analyzer. The children with cerebral palsy who engaged in aerobic training improved their peak oxygen consumption, heart rate and ventilation significantly (p<0.05) and they also showed a non-significant trend to increased peak power output. In conclusion, children with cerebral palsy can benefit significantly from cardio-respiratory training, and such training should be included in rehabilitation programs.

  18. Cerebral Hypoperfusion Precedes Nausea During Centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serrador, Jorge M.; Schlegel, Todd T.; Black, F. Owen; Wood, Scott J.

    2004-01-01

    Nausea and motion sickness are important operational concerns for aviators and astronauts. Understanding underlying mechanisms associated with motion sickness may lead to new treatments. The goal of this work was to determine if cerebral blood flow changes precede the development of nausea in motion sick susceptible subjects. Cerebral flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (transcranial Doppler), blood pressure (Finapres) and end-tidal CO2 were measured while subjects were rotated on a centrifuge (250 degrees/sec). Following 5 min of rotation, subjects were translated 0.504 m off-center, creating a +lGx centripetal acceleration in the nasal-occipital plane. Ten subjects completed the protocol without symptoms while 5 developed nausea (4 while 6ff-center and 1 while rotating on-center). Prior to nausea, subjects had significant increases in blood pressure (+13plus or minus 3 mmHg, P less than 0.05) and cerebrovascular resistance (+46 plus or minus 17%, P less than 0.05) and decreases in cerebral flow velocity both in the second (-13 plus or minus 4%) and last minute (-22 plus or minus 5%) before symptoms (P less than 0.05). In comparison, controls demonstrated no change in blood pressure or cerebrovascular resistance in the last minute of off-center rotation and only a 7 plus or minus 2% decrease in cerebral flow velocity. All subjects had significant hypocapnia (-3.8 plus or minus 0.4 mmHg, P less than 0.05), however this hypocapnia could not fully explain the cerebral hypoperfusion associated with the development of nausea. These data indicate that reductions in cerebral blood flow precede the development of nausea. Further work is necessary to determine what role cerebral hypoperfusion plays in motion sickness and whether cerebral hypoperfusion can be used to predict the development of nausea in susceptible individuals.

  19. Cerebral Lactate Metabolism After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Patet, Camille; Suys, Tamarah; Carteron, Laurent; Oddo, Mauro

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral energy dysfunction has emerged as an important determinant of prognosis following traumatic brain injury (TBI). A number of studies using cerebral microdialysis, positron emission tomography, and jugular bulb oximetry to explore cerebral metabolism in patients with TBI have demonstrated a critical decrease in the availability of the main energy substrate of brain cells (i.e., glucose). Energy dysfunction induces adaptations of cerebral metabolism that include the utilization of alternative energy resources that the brain constitutively has, such as lactate. Two decades of experimental and human investigations have convincingly shown that lactate stands as a major actor of cerebral metabolism. Glutamate-induced activation of glycolysis stimulates lactate production from glucose in astrocytes, with subsequent lactate transfer to neurons (astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle). Lactate is not only used as an extra energy substrate but also acts as a signaling molecule and regulator of systemic and brain glucose use in the cerebral circulation. In animal models of brain injury (e.g., TBI, stroke), supplementation with exogenous lactate exerts significant neuroprotection. Here, we summarize the main clinical studies showing the pivotal role of lactate and cerebral lactate metabolism after TBI. We also review pilot interventional studies that examined exogenous lactate supplementation in patients with TBI and found hypertonic lactate infusions had several beneficial properties on the injured brain, including decrease of brain edema, improvement of neuroenergetics via a "cerebral glucose-sparing effect," and increase of cerebral blood flow. Hypertonic lactate represents a promising area of therapeutic investigation; however, larger studies are needed to further examine mechanisms of action and impact on outcome. PMID:26898683

  20. University Hospitals for Sale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culliton, Barbara J.

    1984-01-01

    Although faculty opposition stopped the sale of Harvard's McLean Hospital to the Hospital Corporation of America (HCA), a partnership remains a possibility. Issues related to the proposed sale as well as those affecting hospital economics are considered. Proposed terms of the sale are included. (JN)

  1. HOSPITALS FOR RURAL PEOPLE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MANNY, ELSIE S.; ROGERS, CHARLES E.

    MODERN ADVANCEMENTS IN MEDICAL SCIENCE HAVE PRECIPITATED THE NEED FOR ADEQUATE UP-TO-DATE HOSPITAL FACILITIES REASONABLY CLOSE TO ALL PEOPLE. RURAL COMMUNITIES HAVE UTILIZED FEDERAL AID, STATE AID, ASSISTANCE FROM FOUNDATIONS, CIVIC BONDS, AND VOLUNTEER CONTRIBUTIONS AND DRIVES TO ERECT AND EQUIP HOSPITALS. HOSPITAL CARE FOR RURAL PEOPLE USUALLY…

  2. Complementary media of electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Katsuyoshi

    2006-04-01

    The concept of complementary media, which cause negative refraction and make perfect lenses, was first introduced to electromagnetic waves. This paper extends it to general waves by expressing the complementarity in terms of a transfer matrix. As an example, complementary media of electrons are discussed theoretically. An application of complementary media to subsurface imaging by scanning tunnelling microscopy is described. For realistic materials the formulation of complementary media is extended to take account of the scattering at interfaces, and effectively complementary systems formed by interfaces are discussed. Interfaces of the graphitic lattice forming complementary systems are designed.

  3. Overview: new media.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Gwenn Schurgin

    2012-06-01

    Pediatricians care for children's growth and development from the time they are born until they become adults. In addition, pediatricians must be vigilant for external influences. Technology influences children of all ages. Seventy-five percent of teenagers own cell phones, with 25% using them for social media. Technology can lead to an increase in skills and social benefits but there is also the potential for harm such as sexting, cyberbullying, privacy issues, and Internet addiction, all of which can affect health. Pediatricians must become well versed in the new media to provide media-oriented anticipatory guidance and advice on media-related issues.

  4. The media and suicide.

    PubMed

    Tor, Phern Chern; Ng, Beng Yeong; Ang, Yong Guan

    2008-09-01

    Suicide is a common and preventable event that is often reported by the media when there are sensationalistic elements or if the suicide involves a celebrity. Media reports of suicide can induce a copycat or "Werther effect". There is increasing evidence that sensationalistic reporting of suicides has a direct effect on increasing suicide rates. Responsible reporting guidelines drawn up in consultation with media professionals have been shown to improve reporting of suicides. Local reporting on suicides tends to be sensationalistic but also has a strong educational slant. The media should educate both the public and the medical professional about their role in suicide prevention. PMID:18989499

  5. Overview: new media.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Gwenn Schurgin

    2012-06-01

    Pediatricians care for children's growth and development from the time they are born until they become adults. In addition, pediatricians must be vigilant for external influences. Technology influences children of all ages. Seventy-five percent of teenagers own cell phones, with 25% using them for social media. Technology can lead to an increase in skills and social benefits but there is also the potential for harm such as sexting, cyberbullying, privacy issues, and Internet addiction, all of which can affect health. Pediatricians must become well versed in the new media to provide media-oriented anticipatory guidance and advice on media-related issues. PMID:22643166

  6. Cerebral ultrasound findings in neonatal lupus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zuppa, A A; Gallini, F; De Luca, D; Luciano, R; Frezza, S; de Turris, P L; Tortorolo, G

    2004-01-01

    A prospective study was performed enrolling 11 newborns with neonatal lupus syndrome (NLS) and 22 control newborns to investigate cerebral ultrasound (US) anomalies and their relationship with clinical neurological signs and laboratory findings. Cerebral US detected a significantly higher incidence in the study group of both subependymal pseudocysts (SEPC) and subependymal hemorrhage (SEH), neither of which correlated to autoantibody levels. All infants had completely normal neurological examinations both at birth and follow-up. The etiopathogenesis of central nervous system findings in NLS is discussed. US evaluation identified minimal anomalies compatible with favorable outcome: further studies are necessary to investigate the possible long-term sequelae, pathogenesis and spectrum of cerebral US findings.

  7. The evolution of cerebral revascularization surgery.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Melanie G; Lee, Marco; Guzman, Raphael; Steinberg, Gary K

    2009-05-01

    Among the relatively few surgeons to be awarded the Nobel Prize was Alexis Carrel, a French surgeon and pioneer in revascularization surgery at the turn of the 20th century. The authors trace the humble beginnings of cerebral revascularization surgery through to the major developments that helped shape the modern practice of cerebral bypass surgery. They discuss the cornerstone studies in the development of this technique, including the Extracranial/Intracranial Bypass Study initiated in 1977. Recent innovations, including modern techniques to monitor cerebral blood flow, microanastomosis techniques, and ongoing trials that play an important role in the evolution of this field are also evaluated. PMID:19408995

  8. 3D Road-Mapping in the Endovascular Treatment of Cerebral Aneurysms and Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Rossitti, S.; Pfister, M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary 3D road-mapping with syngo iPilot was used as an additional tool for assessing cerebral aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) for endovascular therapy. This method provides accurate superimposition of a live fluoroscopic image (native or vascular road-map) and its matching 2D projection of the 3D data set, delivering more anatomic information on one additional display. In the endovascular management of cases with complex anatomy, 3D road-mapping provides excellent image quality at the intervention site. This method can potentially reduce intervention time, the number of DSA runs, fluoroscopy time and the amount of contrast media used in a procedure, with reservation for these factors being mainly operator-dependent. 3D road-mapping probably does not provide any advantage in the treatment of cerebral aneurysms or AVMs with very simple configuration, and it should not be used when acquisition of an optimum 3D data set is not feasible. PMID:20465911

  9. Influence of cerebral fluid drainage on the pharmacokinetics of vancomycin in neurosurgical patients.

    PubMed

    Ichie, T; Urano, K; Suzuki, D; Okada, T; Kobayashi, N; Hayashi, H; Sugiura, Y; Yamamura, K; Sugiyama, T

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to retrospectively investigate the influence of cerebral fluid drainage on the serum concentrations and pharmacokinetic parameters of vancomycin (VCM). We analyzed 55 patients with normal renal function who had been hospitalized in the neurosurgical ward and received intravenous infusions of VCM. We compared the daily doses of VCM, serum VCM concentrations, serum concentration/dose ratio (C/D ratio), and pharmacokinetic parameters calculated using the Sawchuk-Zaske method between patients who underwent cerebral fluid drainage (drainage group) and controls (non-drainage group). The patients in the drainage group showed a significantly lower trough concentration of VCM (5.8 ± 3.3 μg/mL) than that shown by the non-drainage group (9.9 ± 5.4 μg/mL, p = 0.017). Further, the patients in the drainage group showed a significantly lower trough C/D ratio (0.32 ± 0.17) than that shown by the non-drainage group (0.50 ± 0.31, p = 0.047). In conclusion, cerebral fluid drainage may influence VCM pharmacokinetics. Our findings strongly suggest that a high dose of VCM is required to maintain optimal serum concentrations of VCM in patients managed with cerebral fluid drainage.

  10. Is the rate of cerebral hemorrhages declining among stroke patients in South America?

    PubMed

    Del Brutto, Oscar H; Del Brutto, Victor J

    2014-02-01

    Recent stroke registries suggest that the rate of cerebral hemorrhages is declining among stroke patients in South America. High rates of cerebral hemorrhages (approaching 40% of stroke cases) reported in pioneer registries during the 1990s have not been duplicated in more recent studies. In contrast, almost all studies recruiting patients from 2003 on, reported less than 20% of cerebral hemorrhages among their stroke patients. Intermediate rates of hemorrhagic strokes (from 25% to 27%) were noted among registries recruiting patients by the end of the 20th century and the start of the new Millennium. We also noted a significant declining rate of hemorrhagic stroke over the past 20 years at our Institution. In a series of 651 consecutive first-ever stroke patients included in the Hospital-Clínica Kennedy stroke registry (Guayaquil), cerebral hemorrhages accounted for 26·3% of patients recruited between 1990 and 1994 but for only 16·5% of those seen between 2005 and 2009 (P = 0·03). More longitudinal studies are needed to confirm these findings and to determine whether the reported declining rate of hemorrhagic strokes in South America is related to increase life expectancy of the population, or to changes in lifestyle, dietary habits, or some other specific stroke risk factors not well evaluated so far.

  11. Intrathecal baclofen therapy for spasticity of cerebral origin: cerebral palsy and brain injury.

    PubMed

    Nuttin, B; Ivanhoe, C; Albright, L; Dimitrijevic, M; Saltuari, L

    1999-04-01

    drug delivery catheter. Intrathecal baclofen treatment may be cost effective, primarily due to a reduced need for hospitalizations and treatment of adverse events related to uncontrolled spasticity, and may improve quality of life. Intrathecal baclofen shows long-term efficacy in both higher and lower level patients with cerebral origin spasticity. PMID:22151115

  12. Malignant cerebral swelling following cranioplasty.

    PubMed

    Honeybul, S; Damodaran, O; Lind, C R P; Lee, G

    2016-07-01

    Over the past few years there have been a number of case reports and small cohort studies that have described so called "malignant" cerebral swelling following an uneventful cranioplasty procedure. The pathophysiology remains to be established however it has been suggested that it may be related to a combination of failure of autoregulation and the use of closed vacuum suction drainage. The current study presents three further patients who had had a decompressive hemicraniectomy for ischaemic stroke. If decompressive craniectomy is utilised in the management of neurological emergencies, close attention and wider reporting of this type of complication is required not only to focus attention on possible management strategies, but also to determine which patients are at most risk of this devastating complication. PMID:27189792

  13. Tumors of the cerebral aqueduct.

    PubMed

    Ho, K L

    1982-01-01

    Two cases of tumor of the cerebral aqueduct are described. Case 1 is a pilocytic astrocytoma in a 16-year-old girl with a two-year history of intermittent increase of intracranial pressure. The tumor was completely confined within the lumen of the aqueduct. Case 2 is a subependymoma of a 68-year-old man. The tumor extended beyond the aqueduct to the periaqueductal gray matter and produced signs and symptoms suggesting normal pressure hydrocephalus. The literature contains 18 other cases of tumor of the aqueduct: 13 gliomas and five vascular malformations. All, except one, produced clinical manifestations of generalized hydrocephalus lasting from 20 days to six years. The result generally did not correspond to the histologic type of the tumor. Like gliomas of the brainstem in general, those in the aqueduct tend to occur in childhood and adolescence and affect male more than female patients.

  14. Progression of stenosis into occlusion of the distal posterior cerebral artery supplying an occipital arteriovenous malformation manifesting as multiple ischemic attacks: case report.

    PubMed

    Goto, Hisaharu; Suzuki, Michiyasu; Akimura, Tatsuo; Fujisawa, Hirosuke; Yoneda, Hiroshi; Oka, Fumiaki; Nomura, Sadahiro; Kajiwara, Koji; Kato, Shoichi; Fujii, Masami

    2012-01-01

    A 31-year-old healthy male presented with a rare case of cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM) manifesting as repeated ischemic attacks and cerebral infarction causing left sensori-motor disturbance. Neuroimaging revealed cerebral infarction in the right thalamus as well as right occipital AVM without bleeding. The AVM was mainly fed by the right angular artery, and the right posterior cerebral artery (PCA) showed mild stenosis and segmental dilation at the P(2)-P(3) portion. After referral to our hospital, transient ischemic attacks causing left homonymous hemianopsia, and left arm and leg numbness were frequently recognized. Additional imaging revealed a new ischemic lesion in the occipital lobe, and repeated cerebral angiography showed right PCA occlusion at the P(2)-P(3) segment. Cerebral AVM presenting with cerebral infarction due to occlusion of feeding arteries is rare. In our case, intimal injury due to increased blood flow or spontaneous dissection of the artery were possible causes. We should monitor any changes in the architecture and rheology of the feeding vessels during the clinical course to prevent ischemic complications.

  15. Imaging findings and cerebral perfusion in arterial ischemic stroke due to transient cerebral arteriopathy in children.

    PubMed

    Barbosa Junior, Alcino Alves; Ellovitch, Saada Resende de Souza; Pincerato, Rita de Cassia Maciel

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of a 4-year-old female child who developed an arterial ischemic stroke in the left middle cerebral artery territory, due to a proximal stenosis of the supraclinoid internal carotid artery, most probably related to transient cerebral arteriopathy of childhood. Computed tomography scan, magnetic resonance imaging, perfusion magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance angiography are presented, as well as follow-up by magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance angiography exams. Changes in cerebral perfusion and diffusion-perfusion mismatch call attention. As far as we know, this is the first report of magnetic resonance perfusion findings in transient cerebral arteriopathy.

  16. Decreased light attenuation in cerebral cortex during cerebral edema detected using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Carissa L. R.; Szu, Jenny I.; Eberle, Melissa M.; Wang, Yan; Hsu, Mike S.; Binder, Devin K.; Park, B. Hyle

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Cerebral edema develops in response to a variety of conditions, including traumatic brain injury and stroke, and contributes to the poor prognosis associated with these injuries. This study examines the use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for detecting cerebral edema in vivo. Three-dimensional imaging of an in vivo water intoxication model in mice was performed using a spectral-domain OCT system centered at 1300 nm. The change in attenuation coefficient was calculated and cerebral blood flow was analyzed using Doppler OCT techniques. We found that the average attenuation coefficient in the cerebral cortex decreased over time as edema progressed. The initial decrease began within minutes of inducing cerebral edema and a maximum decrease of 8% was observed by the end of the experiment. Additionally, cerebral blood flow slowed during late-stage edema. Analysis of local regions revealed the same trend at various locations in the brain, consistent with the global nature of the cerebral edema model used in this study. These results demonstrate that OCT is capable of detecting in vivo optical changes occurring due to cerebral edema and highlights the potential of OCT for precise spatiotemporal detection of cerebral edema. PMID:25674578

  17. Rotary Microfilter Media Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M

    2005-04-20

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) received funding from DOE EM-21, Office of Cleanup Technologies, to develop the rotary microfilter for high level radioactive service. One aspect of this project evaluated alternative filter media to select one for the 2nd generation rotary microfilter being procured as a prefilter to a small column ion exchange process. The authors conducted screening tests on a variety of filter media and pore sizes using a stirred cell followed by pilot-scale testing on a more limited number of filter media and pore sizes with a three disk rotary microfilter. These tests used 5.6 molar sodium supernate, and sludge plus monosodium titanate (MST) solids. The conclusions from this work are: (1) The 0.1 {micro} nominal TruMem{reg_sign} ceramic and the Pall PMM M050 (0.5 {micro} nominal) stainless steel filter media produced the highest flux in rotary filter testing. (2) The Pall PMM M050 media produced the highest flux of the stainless steel media tested in rotary filter testing. (3) The Pall PMM M050 media met filtrate quality requirements for the rotary filter. (4) The 0.1 {micro} TruMem{reg_sign} and 0.1 {micro} Pall PMM media met filtrate quality requirements as well. (5) The Pall PMM M050 media produced comparable flux to the 0.1 {micro} TruMem{reg_sign} media, and proved more durable and easier to weld. Based on these test results, the authors recommend Pall PMM M050 filter media for the 2nd generation rotary microfilter.

  18. [Cerebral hydatic cyst and psychiatric disorders. Two cases].

    PubMed

    Asri, F; Tazi, I; Maaroufi, K; El Moudden, A; Ghannane, H; Ait Benali, S

    2007-01-01

    The hydatidosis is an endemic illness in regions of the Middle Orient, Mediterranean, south of America, north Africa and the Australia. The preferential localization of cyst hydatic is the liver (48%), the lung (36%) and in 6% of cases it localizes in unaccustomed place as the brain. Intracerebral localization is relatively rare, its impact is 1 to 5% of all cases of hydatidose. This localization is the child's appendage with a masculine predominance. The cyst hydatic intracranien is often lone, of localization usually supratentorielle, sometimes infratentorielle. Symptoms are especially the diffuse headache associated to various neurological signs in relation with sits of the tumor. The psychiatrics symptoms depends on its localization, sides, intracranial hypertension, and the previous personality. In 15 to 20% of cases these tumors can appear in the beginning of their evolution by the isolated psychiatric symptoms. We report the case of two patients that have been hospitalized first in the Academic Psychiatric Unit of Marrakech for isolates psychiatric disorders and whose scanning revealed the presence of cerebral hydatic cyst and that required a surgical intervention in neurosurgery. Case 1 - Patient 29 years old, bachelor, uneducated, leaving in country outside, fermar, in permanent contact with dogs. No particular medical history. The patient has been brought by his family to the psychiatric emergencies after behavior disorders. The beginning of his symptomatology was one year ago by behavior disorders: instability, violence, isolation, and a corporo-sartorial carelessness. His symptomatology worsened and the patient became very aggressive. In psychiatric unit, he was disregarded, sad, anguished, indifferent to his state, very dissonant, completely detached, depersonalized. He brought back some visual and auditory hallucinations with attitude of monitoring. He was raving with delirium of persecution, of ideas of reference and delirium of bewithment. He was

  19. Some Media Relations Success Stories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperbeck, John M.

    1997-01-01

    A panel of 29 extension faculty/staff members who work well with the media were interviewed to identify ways to improve their media relations. Reasons for working with the media, ways to develop relationships with media representatives, and suggestions for creating a more favorable climate for media relations in universities were noted. (JOW)

  20. Media Education and Native Peoples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Sandy

    1991-01-01

    Media literacy encourages critical thinking about the news media, advertising, and popular culture. Media education of American Indian students challenges mass media's stereotyped aboriginal representations and the mainstream values of egotism and consumerism. Integrated across the curriculum at all grades, media education is empowering and…

  1. Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital.

    PubMed

    1984-01-01

    The 465-bed Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital is the largest medical facility on the California coast between Los Angeles and the San Francisco bay area. The hospital dates back to 1888, when a group of local citizens began raising funds to build a "cottage-style" hospital for the growing community. Their original plans called for a complex in which each medical specialty would be housed in a separate bungalow. Even then, however, such a decentralized plan was too costly, so work began instead on a single cottage for all hospital departments. The first Cottage Hospital opened in 1891, with 25 beds housed in a two story Victorian building. Now a hugh medical complex employing some 1,500 people, the hospital continues to be called "Cottage" after the original home-like building. Rodney J. Lamb has been Hospital Administrator for the last 30 years.

  2. Variation in Rates of Diagnosis of Acute Otitis Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berwick, Donald M.; Thibodeau, Lawrence A.

    1980-01-01

    Over 13 weeks during two periods in 1978 the diagnostic rate for acute otitis media was monitored among febrile children in the emergency room of a large children's hospital. Temporal variation in diagnostic rates by physicians was largely attributable to differences among individual providers and independent of level of training. (Author/MLW)

  3. Cerebral blood flow: Physiologic and clinical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 46 chapters divided among nine sections. The section titles are: Historical Perspectives; Cerebrovascular Anatomy; Cerebrovascular Physiology; Methods of Clinical Measurement; Experimental Methods; Imaging of Cerebral Circulation; Cerebrovascular Pathophysiology; Cerebrovascular Pharmacology; and Surgical and Interventional Augmentation.

  4. Cerebral oxygenation and optimal vascular brain organization

    PubMed Central

    Hadjistassou, Constantinos; Bejan, Adrian; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2015-01-01

    The cerebral vascular network has evolved in such a way so as to minimize transport time and energy expenditure. This is accomplished by a subtle combination of the optimal arrangement of arteries, arterioles and capillaries and the transport mechanisms of convection and diffusion. Elucidating the interaction between cerebral vascular architectonics and the latter physical mechanisms can catalyse progress in treating cerebral pathologies such as stroke, brain tumours, dementia and targeted drug delivery. Here, we show that brain microvascular organization is predicated on commensurate intracapillary oxygen convection and parenchymal diffusion times. Cross-species grey matter results for the rat, cat, rabbit and human reveal very good correlation between the cerebral capillary and tissue mean axial oxygen convective and diffusion time intervals. These findings agree with the constructal principle. PMID:25972435

  5. Subarachnoid hemorrhage and cerebral vasospasm - literature review.

    PubMed

    Ciurea, A V; Palade, C; Voinescu, D; Nica, D A

    2013-06-15

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage represents a serious disease with high mortality and morbidity. Two important areas are becoming the central research interest of subarachnoid hemorrhage: cerebral vasospasm and early brain injury. The authors have reviewed the major contributions in experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage documented in the medical literature in the past 5 years. Treatments interfering with nitric oxide - or endothelin-pathways continue to show antispasmotic effects in experimental models of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Inflammation and oxidative stress play a vital role in the pathophysiology of cerebral vasospasm. Apoptosis, a relevant cause of early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage, also underline the etiology of cerebral vasospasm. Future research studies will continue to elucidate the pathophysiological pathways and treatment modalities targeting cerebral vasospasm and early brain injury, enabling an improvement in outcome for patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:23904869

  6. Cerebral malaria: gamma-interferon redux

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Nicholas H.; Ball, Helen J.; Hansen, Anna M.; Khaw, Loke T.; Guo, Jintao; Bakmiwewa, Supun; Mitchell, Andrew J.; Combes, Valéry; Grau, Georges E. R.

    2014-01-01

    There are two theories that seek to explain the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria, the mechanical obstruction hypothesis and the immunopathology hypothesis. Evidence consistent with both ideas has accumulated from studies of the human disease and experimental models. Thus, some combination of these concepts seems necessary to explain the very complex pattern of changes seen in cerebral malaria. The interactions between malaria parasites, erythrocytes, the cerebral microvascular endothelium, brain parenchymal cells, platelets and microparticles need to be considered. One factor that seems able to knit together much of this complexity is the cytokine interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). In this review we consider findings from the clinical disease, in vitro models and the murine counterpart of human cerebral malaria in order to evaluate the roles played by IFN-γ in the pathogenesis of this often fatal and debilitating condition. PMID:25177551

  7. Cerebral aneurysms: Formation, progression and developmental chronology

    PubMed Central

    Etminan, Nima; Buchholz, Bruce A.; Dreier, Rita; Bruckner, Peter; Torner, James C.; Steiger, Hans-Jakob; Hänggi, Daniel; Macdonald, R. Loch

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UAIs) in the general population is up to 3%. Existing epidemiological data suggests that only a small fraction of UIAs progress towards rupture over the lifetime of an individual, but the surrogates for subsequent rupture and the natural history of UIAs are discussed very controversially at present. In case of rupture of an UIA, the case-fatality is up to 50%, which therefore continues to stimulate interest in the pathogenesis of cerebral aneurysm formation and progression. Actual data on the chronological development of cerebral aneurysm has been especially difficult to obtain and, until recently, the existing knowledge in this respect is mainly derived from animal or mathematical models or short-term observational studies. Here, we highlight the current data on cerebral aneurysm formation and progression as well as a novel approach to investigate the developmental chronology of cerebral aneurysms. PMID:24323717

  8. Minorities in the Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherard, Regina G., Comp.; And Others

    The four reports in this compilation focus on the role of blacks in the various media. The first report provides a general discussion of the status of blacks in the media, and notes that it has been largely analogous to their political and economic development. The second report traces the changing image of blacks as it has been portrayed on…

  9. EMMSE Media Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Clifford A., Comp.; McKinstry, Herbert A., Comp.

    This index provides a topical taxonomy of media which have been selected for their relevance in the teaching of materials science and engineering. The index is keyed to a matrix which matches topical and/or class material with six classifications of media: print, 16mm film, super 8 film, slide/tape, videotape, and other (including interactive…

  10. Literacy, Learning, and Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Dennis; Hamm, Mary

    2000-01-01

    Considers the expanding definition of literacy from traditional reading and writing skills to include technological, visual, information, and networking literacy. Discusses the impact of media on social interactions and intellectual development; linking technology to educational goals; influences of new media symbol systems on communication;…

  11. Social Media. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    The growing use of social media by students and adults is impacting schools. A recent Pew study found that 73% of teens use social-networking sites to connect with others. Social media includes blogs, wikis, and podcasts as well as sites such as MySpace, Facebook, and Linkedin. While such sites promote connection with others, their use has created…

  12. Folk Media in Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructional Technology Report, 1975

    1975-01-01

    This issue is dedicated to folk media. Using Indonesia for his case study, Dr. Nat Colletta analyzes traditional culture as a medium for development. Juan Diaz Bordenave expresses doubts about adapting folk media to development objectives; Susan Hostetler and Arthur Gillette report on uses of the theater to promote development objectives; and…

  13. Digital Media and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    MacArthur launched the digital media and learning initiative in 2006 to explore how digital media are changing the way young people learn, socialize, communicate, and play. Since 2006, the Foundation has awarded grants totaling more than $100 million for research, development of innovative new technologies, new learning environments for youth,…

  14. Accessing the Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Judy

    This guide for school districts offers a quick outline for developing good communications skills and public relations with news media personnel. Guidelines for good press relations are provided that emphasize the importance of keeping two-way, open communications with the media, with attention to: accuracy; being prepared; sharing the bad news as…

  15. Wisconsin Ideas in Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Rose, Ed.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    These two documents contain a variety of articles on media use in education. The first provides 16 articles that focus on justifying media programs in the 1980's. Topics include selling your program to administrators; reorganization of the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction; video literacy; student-made videotape recordings; interactive…

  16. Speaking through the Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabrick, Andrea; Dessoff, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Offers advice for college communications officers in dealing with the media. Tips include: "bring in the big guns", "play show and tell", expand the media circle, understand reporters' jobs and respect deadlines, "keep it real", "stay in touch", and "hedge your bets". (EV)

  17. A Media Technology Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutgers, The State Univ., New Brunswick, NJ. Curriculum Lab.

    This curriculum guide is designed to train students who will assist in planning, designing, producing, and using media and multimedia materials. It offers a 2-year, competency-based, post-secondary program of studies in media technology, and uses an interdisciplinary approach drawn from the broad areas of art, business management, drafting,…

  18. The Organisation of Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chibnall, Bernard

    Many of the techniques used to structure, record, and store information contained in printed material should now be applied to the field of audiovisual media. The rules of communication and association which apply to printed knowledge can serve as tools to critically analyze messages delivered via audiovisual media. This text describes the…

  19. Japanese Media in English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, Sachiko Oda

    1995-01-01

    Describes the use of English in the media in Japan, focusing on the role and history of English-language newspapers, radio, and television programs, as well as the proliferation of English-language films shown in Japanese cinemas. Discusses the implications of English in the Japanese media. (20 references) (MDM)

  20. Working with News Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosenbaugh, Dick

    To work effectively with personnel in the news media, one needs to assist them in doing their job by getting accurate information to them (in plenty of time for their deadline) and in providing information about meetings (when they do not have a reporter to cover the event). Familiarity aids in communication with news media personnel so one should…

  1. New Media Publishing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritchie, Ian

    The media industry is the fastest growing business in the world today; additional leisure time, coupled with increasingly global distribution, has created large international markets for information and entertainment. The United Kingdom is relatively strong in the three main areas concerned with new media publishing: information technology,…

  2. Photonic layered media

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2002-01-01

    A new class of structured dielectric media which exhibit significant photonic bandstructure has been invented. The new structures, called photonic layered media, are easy to fabricate using existing layer-by-layer growth techniques, and offer the ability to significantly extend our practical ability to tailor the properties of such optical materials.

  3. Learning with Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozma, Robert B.

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical and research literature on learning from books, television, computers, and multimedia environments is examined. The media are distinguished by cognitively relevant characteristics of their technologies, symbol systems, and processing capabilities. The relative cognitive effects of learning with different media--particularly those…

  4. Building Social Media Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferriter, William N.; Ramsden, Jason T.; Sheninger, Eric C.

    2012-01-01

    Incorporating social media tools into your professional practices does not have to be intimidating as long as you are willing to tackle five action steps. It is far easier to articulate the strengths--and to imagine the possibilities--of social media spaces as tools for communication and professional development when you are actively using those…

  5. Evaluating Media in Malawi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warr, David

    1978-01-01

    The Extension Aids Branch (EAB) produces films, radio programs, posters, leaflets, and other media which support the Ministry's agricultural extention and rural development programs. The Evaluation and Action Research Unit works with EAB to do formative evaluation of each media project or campaign during the production stage. (JEG)

  6. Introduction to Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riler, Robert

    Designed for senior high school students, this one semester course focuses on four aspects of modern media: television, film, radio, and advertising. Each topic is worked into a weekly lesson plan format that stresses the active involvement of students in the learning process. The course outline contains lists of objectives and media materials…

  7. Trends in Media Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Donald F.; Foehr, Ulla G.

    2008-01-01

    American youth are awash in media. They have television sets in their bedrooms, personal computers in their family rooms, and digital music players and cell phones in their backpacks. They spend more time with media than any single activity other than sleeping, with the average American eight- to eighteen-year-old reporting more than six hours of…

  8. The Media Gospel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christians, Clifford G.; Fortner, Robert S.

    1981-01-01

    Examines four recent books on the religious media: Ben Armstrong's "The Electric Church," James F. Engel's "Contemporary Christian Communications: Its Theory and Practice," Malcolm Muggeridge's "Christ and the Media," and Virginia Stem Owens'"The Total Image: or Selling Jesus in the Modern Age." Evaluates the internal validity of each. (JMF)

  9. Writing and Digital Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Waes, Luuk, Ed.; Leijten, Marielle, Ed.; Neuwirth, Chris, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Digital media has become an increasingly powerful force in modern society. This volume brings together outstanding European, American and Australian research in "writing and digital media" and explores its cognitive, social and cultural implications. In addition to presenting programs of original research by internationally known scholars from a…

  10. Cerebral Microcirculation during Experimental Normovolaemic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Bellapart, Judith; Cuthbertson, Kylie; Dunster, Kimble; Diab, Sara; Platts, David G.; Raffel, O. Christopher; Gabrielian, Levon; Barnett, Adrian; Paratz, Jenifer; Boots, Rob; Fraser, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is accepted among critically ill patients as an alternative to elective blood transfusion. This practice has been extrapolated to head injury patients with only one study comparing the effects of mild anemia on neurological outcome. There are no studies quantifying microcirculation during anemia. Experimental studies suggest that anemia leads to cerebral hypoxia and increased rates of infarction, but the lack of clinical equipoise, when testing the cerebral effects of transfusion among critically injured patients, supports the need of experimental studies. The aim of this study was to quantify cerebral microcirculation and the potential presence of axonal damage in an experimental model exposed to normovolaemic anemia, with the intention of describing possible limitations within management practices in critically ill patients. Under non-recovered anesthesia, six Merino sheep were instrumented using an intracardiac transeptal catheter to inject coded microspheres into the left atrium to ensure systemic and non-chaotic distribution. Cytometric analyses quantified cerebral microcirculation at specific regions of the brain. Amyloid precursor protein staining was used as an indicator of axonal damage. Animals were exposed to normovolaemic anemia by blood extractions from the indwelling arterial catheter with simultaneous fluid replacement through a venous central catheter. Simultaneous data recording from cerebral tissue oxygenation, intracranial pressure, and cardiac output was monitored. A regression model was used to examine the effects of anemia on microcirculation with a mixed model to control for repeated measures. Homogeneous and normal cerebral microcirculation with no evidence of axonal damage was present in all cerebral regions, with no temporal variability, concluding that acute normovolaemic anemia does not result in short-term effects on cerebral microcirculation in the ovine brain. PMID:26869986

  11. Wearable wireless cerebral oximeter (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Jiang, Tianzi

    2016-03-01

    Cerebral oximeters measure continuous cerebral oxygen saturation using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technology noninvasively. It has been involved into operating room setting to monitor oxygenation within patient's brain when surgeons are concerned that a patient's levels might drop. Recently, cerebral oxygen saturation has also been related with chronic cerebral vascular insufficiency (CCVI). Patients with CCVI would be benefited if there would be a wearable system to measure their cerebral oxygen saturation in need. However, there has yet to be a wearable wireless cerebral oximeter to measure the saturation in 24 hours. So we proposed to develop the wearable wireless cerebral oximeter. The mechanism of the system follows the NIRS technology. Emitted light at wavelengths of 740nm and 860nm are sent from the light source penetrating the skull and cerebrum, and the light detector(s) receives the light not absorbed during the light pathway through the skull and cerebrum. The amount of oxygen absorbed within the brain is the difference between the amount of light sent out and received by the probe, which can be used to calculate the percentage of oxygen saturation. In the system, it has one source and four detectors. The source, located in the middle of forehead, can emit two near infrared light, 740nm and 860nm. Two detectors are arranged in one side in 2 centimeters and 3 centimeters from the source. Their measurements are used to calculate the saturation in the cerebral cortex. The system has included the rechargeable lithium battery and Bluetooth smart wireless micro-computer unit.

  12. The Success Rate of Pediatric In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Ahvaz Training Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Assar, Shideh; Husseinzadeh, Mohsen; Nikravesh, Abdul Hussein; Davoodzadeh, Hannaneh

    2016-01-01

    Research Objective. This study determined the outcome of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) after in-hospital cardiac arrest and factors influencing it in two training hospitals in Ahvaz. Method. Patients hospitalized in the pediatric wards and exposed to CPR during hospital stay were included in the study (September 2013 to May 2014). The primary outcome of CPR was assumed to be the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and the secondary outcome was assumed to be survival to discharge. The neurological outcome of survivors was assessed using the Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category (PCPC) method. Results. Of the 279 study participants, 138 patients (49.4%) showed ROSC, 81 patients (29%) survived for 24 hours after the CPR, and 33 patients (11.8%) survived to discharge. Of the surviving patients, 16 (48.5%) had favorable neurological outcome. The resuscitation during holidays resulted in fewer ROSC. Multivariate analysis showed that longer CPR duration, CPR by junior residents, growth deficiency, and prearrest vasoactive drug infusion were associated with decreased survival to discharge (p < 0.05). Infants and patients with respiratory disease had higher survival rates. Conclusion. The rate of successful CPR in our study was lower than rates reported by developed countries. However, factors influencing the outcome of CPR were similar. These results reflect the necessity of paying more attention to pediatric CPR training, postresuscitation conditions, and expansion of intensive care facilities. PMID:27293983

  13. Social Justice and Media. Media Corner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Joseph A., III, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    Contends that the end of slavery, women's suffrage, and the civil rights movement were watershed events of social justice in U.S. history. Provides reviews of two media-based sets of instructional materials that can help students understand the struggle by disenfranchised groups to become full participants in society. (CFR)

  14. Depth discrimination in acousto-optic cerebral blood flow measurement simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsalach, A.; Schiffer, Z.; Ratner, E.; Breskin, I.; Zeitak, R.; Shechter, R.; Balberg, M.

    2016-03-01

    Monitoring cerebral blood flow (CBF) is crucial, as inadequate perfusion, even for relatively short periods of time, may lead to brain damage or even death. Thus, significant research efforts are directed at developing reliable monitoring tools that will enable continuous, bed side, simple and cost-effective monitoring of CBF. All existing non invasive bed side monitoring methods, which are mostly NIRS based, such as Laser Doppler or DCS, tend to underestimate CBF in adults, due to the indefinite effect of extra-cerebral tissues on the obtained signal. If those are to find place in day to day clinical practice, the contribution of extra-cerebral tissues must be eliminated and data from the depth (brain) should be extracted and discriminated. Recently, a novel technique, based on ultrasound modulation of light was developed for non-invasive, continuous CBF monitoring (termed ultrasound-tagged light (UTL or UT-NIRS)), and shown to correlate with readings of 133Xe SPECT and laser Doppler. We have assembled a comprehensive computerized simulation, modeling this acousto-optic technique in a highly scattering media. Using the combination of light and ultrasound, we show how depth information may be extracted, thus distinguishing between flow patterns taking place at different depths. Our algorithm, based on the analysis of light modulated by ultrasound, is presented and examined in a computerized simulation. Distinct depth discrimination ability is presented, suggesting that using such method one can effectively nullify the extra-cerebral tissues influence on the obtained signals, and specifically extract cerebral flow data.

  15. Pulmonary pathology in pediatric cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Milner, Danny; Factor, Rachel; Whitten, Rich; Carr, Richard A; Kamiza, Steve; Pinkus, Geraldine; Molyneux, Malcolm; Taylor, Terrie

    2013-12-01

    Respiratory signs are common in African children where malaria is highly endemic, and thus, parsing the role of pulmonary pathology in illness is challenging. We examined the lungs of 100 children from an autopsy series in Blantyre, Malawi, many of whom death was attributed to Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Our aim was to describe the pathologic manifestations of fatal malaria; to understand the role of parasites, pigment, and macrophages; and to catalog comorbidities. From available patients, which included 55 patients with cerebral malaria and 45 controls, we obtained 4 cores of lung tissue for immunohistochemistry and morphological evaluation. We found that, in patients with cerebral malaria, large numbers of malaria parasites were present in pulmonary alveolar capillaries, together with extensive deposits of malaria pigment (hemozoin). The number of pulmonary macrophages in this vascular bed did not differ between patients with cerebral malaria, noncerebral malaria, and nonmalarial diagnoses. Comorbidities found in some cerebral malaria patients included pneumonia, pulmonary edema, hemorrhage, and systemic activation of coagulation. We conclude that the respiratory distress seen in patients with cerebral malaria does not appear to be anatomic in origin but that increasing malaria pigment is strongly associated with cerebral malaria at autopsy.

  16. Hospital diversification strategy.

    PubMed

    Eastaugh, Steven R

    2014-01-01

    To determine the impact of health system restructuring on the levels of hospital diversification and operating ratio this article analyzed 94 teaching hospitals and 94 community hospitals during the period 2008-2013. The 47 teaching hospitals are matched with 47 other teaching hospitals experiencing the same financial market position in 2008, but with different levels of preference for risk and diversification in their strategic plan. Covariates in the analysis included levels of hospital competition and the degree of local government planning (for example, highly regulated in New York, in contrast to Texas). Moreover, 47 nonteaching community hospitals are matched with 47 other community hospitals in 2008, having varying manager preferences for service-line diversification and risk. Diversification and operating ratio are modeled in a two-stage least squares (TSLS) framework as jointly dependent. Institutional diversification is found to yield better financial position, and the better operating profits provide the firm the wherewithal to diversify. Some services are in a growth phase, like bariatric weight-loss surgery and sleep disorder clinics. Hospital managers' preferences for risk/return potential were considered. An institution life cycle hypothesis is advanced to explain hospital behavior: boom and bust, diversification, and divestiture, occasionally leading to closure or merger. PMID:25223156

  17. Hospital diversification strategy.

    PubMed

    Eastaugh, Steven R

    2014-01-01

    To determine the impact of health system restructuring on the levels of hospital diversification and operating ratio this article analyzed 94 teaching hospitals and 94 community hospitals during the period 2008-2013. The 47 teaching hospitals are matched with 47 other teaching hospitals experiencing the same financial market position in 2008, but with different levels of preference for risk and diversification in their strategic plan. Covariates in the analysis included levels of hospital competition and the degree of local government planning (for example, highly regulated in New York, in contrast to Texas). Moreover, 47 nonteaching community hospitals are matched with 47 other community hospitals in 2008, having varying manager preferences for service-line diversification and risk. Diversification and operating ratio are modeled in a two-stage least squares (TSLS) framework as jointly dependent. Institutional diversification is found to yield better financial position, and the better operating profits provide the firm the wherewithal to diversify. Some services are in a growth phase, like bariatric weight-loss surgery and sleep disorder clinics. Hospital managers' preferences for risk/return potential were considered. An institution life cycle hypothesis is advanced to explain hospital behavior: boom and bust, diversification, and divestiture, occasionally leading to closure or merger.

  18. MediaTracker system

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, D. M.; Strittmatter, R. B.; Abeyta, J. D.; Brown, J.; Marks, T. , Jr.; Martinez, B. J.; Jones, D. B.; Hsue, W.

    2004-01-01

    The initial objectives of this effort were to provide a hardware and software platform that can address the requirements for the accountability of classified removable electronic media and vault access logging. The Media Tracker system software assists classified media custodian in managing vault access logging and Media Tracking to prevent the inadvertent violation of rules or policies for the access to a restricted area and the movement and use of tracked items. The MediaTracker system includes the software tools to track and account for high consequence security assets and high value items. The overall benefits include: (1) real-time access to the disposition of all Classified Removable Electronic Media (CREM), (2) streamlined security procedures and requirements, (3) removal of ambiguity and managerial inconsistencies, (4) prevention of incidents that can and should be prevented, (5) alignment with the DOE's initiative to achieve improvements in security and facility operations through technology deployment, and (6) enhanced individual responsibility by providing a consistent method of dealing with daily responsibilities. In response to initiatives to enhance the control of classified removable electronic media (CREM), the Media Tracker software suite was developed, piloted and implemented at the Los Alamos National Laboratory beginning in July 2000. The Media Tracker software suite assists in the accountability and tracking of CREM and other high-value assets. One component of the MediaTracker software suite provides a Laboratory-approved media tracking system. Using commercial touch screen and bar code technology, the MediaTracker (MT) component of the MediaTracker software suite provides an efficient and effective means to meet current Laboratory requirements and provides new-engineered controls to help assure compliance with those requirements. It also establishes a computer infrastructure at vault entrances for vault access logging, and can accommodate

  19. [A case of central homonymous hemianopsia due to cerebral infarction of the occipital tip].

    PubMed

    Kiriyama, K; Yoshimura, T; Furuya, H; Kobayashi, T; Hasuo, K

    1996-07-01

    A 54-year-old man was admitted to the hospital because of the restriction of the right visual field. Goldmann's visual field test revealed the right central hemianopsia. MRI showed the infarction of the left occipital lobe tip. Cerebral angiography showed the occlusion of the left calcarine artery but no abnormality in the branches of the middle cerebral artery (MCA). The occipital lobe tip receives the projection from the macular area and is supplied by both calcarine artery and a branch of MCA. Therefore, cases of central homonymous hemianopsia due to vascular disorders have been relatively rare and the macular vision is usually spared. In contrast to the above knowledge, only one artery occlusion resulted in the central hemianopsia in our case. Poor anastomosis between PCA and MCA in the occipital tip of our patient may explain occurrence of the infarction of that area.

  20. Cerebral Microinfarcts Associated with Severe Cerebral β-Amyloid Angiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Soontornniyomkij, Virawudh; Lynch, Matthew D.; Mermash, Sherin; Pomakian, Justine; Badkoobehi, Haleh; Clare, Ryan; Vinters, Harry V.

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is common in elderly individuals, especially those affected with Alzheimer's disease. To investigate whether the presence of severe CAA (SCAA) in the brains of demented patients was associated with a higher burden of old microinfarcts than those with mild CAA (MCAA), 18 brains with SCAA were compared to 21 brains with MCAA. Immunohistochemistry for CD68 was employed to highlight old microinfarcts in tissue blocks from various brain regions. Old microinfarcts, manually counted by light microscopy, were present in 14 of 18 SCAA brains, and in 7 of 21 MCAA brains (P = 0.01, 2-tailed Fisher’s exact test). The average number of old microinfarcts across geographic regions in each brain ranged from 0 to 1.95 (mean rank 24.94, sum of ranks 449) in the SCAA group, and from 0 to 0.35 (mean rank 15.76, sum of ranks 331) in the MCAA group (P = 0.008, 2-tailed Mann-Whitney U test). Frequent old microinfarcts in demented individuals with severe CAA may contribute a vascular component to the cognitive impairment in these patients. PMID:19725828

  1. Coupling flood forecasting and social media crowdsourcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalas, Milan; Kliment, Tomas; Salamon, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Social and mainstream media monitoring is being more and more recognized as valuable source of information in disaster management and response. The information on ongoing disasters could be detected in very short time and the social media can bring additional information to traditional data feeds (ground, remote observation schemes). Probably the biggest attempt to use the social media in the crisis management was the activation of the Digital Humanitarian Network by the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs in response to Typhoon Yolanda. The network of volunteers performing rapid needs & damage assessment by tagging reports posted to social media which were then used by machine learning classifiers as a training set to automatically identify tweets referring to both urgent needs and offers of help. In this work we will present the potential of coupling a social media streaming and news monitoring application ( GlobalFloodNews - www.globalfloodsystem.com) with a flood forecasting system (www.globalfloods.eu) and the geo-catalogue of the OGC services discovered in the Google Search Engine (WMS, WFS, WCS, etc.) to provide a full suite of information available to crisis management centers as fast as possible. In GlobalFloodNews we use advanced filtering of the real-time Twitter stream, where the relevant information is automatically extracted using natural language and signal processing techniques. The keyword filters are adjusted and optimized automatically using machine learning algorithms as new reports are added to the system. In order to refine the search results the forecasting system will be triggering an event-based search on the social media and OGC services relevant for crisis response (population distribution, critical infrastructure, hospitals etc.). The current version of the system makes use of USHAHIDI Crowdmap platform, which is designed to easily crowdsource information using multiple channels, including SMS, email

  2. In Seattle, Children's Hospital makes kids more aware of safety. Hospital scores big with Seattle Mariners, Safeco Insurance.

    PubMed

    Botvin, J D

    2001-01-01

    To leverage existing relationships, Children's Hospital (Seattle), the Seattle Mariners baseball team and Safeco Insurance teamed up to educate parents and children about home safety and emergency preparedness. The resulting multi media Safety All Stars program used a colorful, widely distributed safety poster to stimulate participation, and special activities knocked the message "home."

  3. Cerebral infarction and cerebral salt wasting syndrome in a patient with tuberculous meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Loo, K L; Ramachandran, R; Abdullah, B J; Chow, S K; Goh, E M L; Yeap, S S

    2003-09-01

    A 38-year old female with underlying systemic lupus erythematosus was admitted with tuberculous meningoencephalitis. After an initial good response to anti-tuberculous treatment, she developed cerebral infarction and profound hyponatremia. This was due to cerebral salt wasting syndrome, which has only previously been described in 2 cases. The difficulties in diagnosis and management of this case are discussed.

  4. Correlation of CT cerebral vascular territories with function. 3. Middle cerebral artery

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, S.A.; Hayman, L.A.; Hinck, V.C.

    1984-05-01

    Schematic displays are presented of the cerebral territories supplied by branches of the middle cerebral artery as they would appear on axial and coronal computed tomographic (CT) scan sections. Companion diagrams of regional cortical function and a discussion of the fiber tracts are provided to simplify correlation of clinical deficits with coronal and axial CT abnormalities.

  5. [Rapid 3-Dimensional Models of Cerebral Aneurysm for Emergency Surgical Clipping].

    PubMed

    Konno, Takehiko; Mashiko, Toshihiro; Oguma, Hirofumi; Kaneko, Naoki; Otani, Keisuke; Watanabe, Eiju

    2016-08-01

    We developed a method for manufacturing solid models of cerebral aneurysms, with a shorter printing time than that involved in conventional methods, using a compact 3D printer with acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene(ABS)resin. We further investigated the application and utility of this printing system in emergency clipping surgery. A total of 16 patients diagnosed with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage resulting from cerebral aneurysm rupture were enrolled in the present study. Emergency clipping was performed on the day of hospitalization. Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine(DICOM)data obtained from computed tomography angiography(CTA)scans were edited and converted to stereolithography(STL)file formats, followed by the production of 3D models of the cerebral aneurysm by using the 3D printer. The mean time from hospitalization to the commencement of surgery was 242 min, whereas the mean time required for manufacturing the 3D model was 67 min. The average cost of each 3D model was 194 Japanese Yen. The time required for manufacturing the 3D models shortened to approximately 1 hour with increasing experience of producing 3D models. Favorable impressions for the use of the 3D models in clipping were reported by almost all neurosurgeons included in this study. Although 3D printing is often considered to involve huge costs and long manufacturing time, the method used in the present study requires shorter time and lower costs than conventional methods for manufacturing 3D cerebral aneurysm models, thus making it suitable for use in emergency clipping. PMID:27506842

  6. Measuring Hospital Productivity

    PubMed Central

    Ruchlin, Hirsch S.; Leveson, Irving

    1974-01-01

    This study presents a comprehensive method for quantifying hospital output and estimating hospital productivity. A number of less comprehensive productivity measures that can be quantified from data available from regional third-party payers and from the American Hospital Association are also developed and evaluated as proxies for the comprehensive measure, which is based on local area data. Methods are discussed for estimating the necessary variables on a regional or national level. PMID:4461703

  7. Magnetohydrodynamics of fractal media

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2006-05-15

    The fractal distribution of charged particles is considered. An example of this distribution is the charged particles that are distributed over the fractal. The fractional integrals are used to describe fractal distribution. These integrals are considered as approximations of integrals on fractals. Typical turbulent media could be of a fractal structure and the corresponding equations should be changed to include the fractal features of the media. The magnetohydrodynamics equations for fractal media are derived from the fractional generalization of integral Maxwell equations and integral hydrodynamics (balance) equations. Possible equilibrium states for these equations are considered.

  8. Optical Recording Media Primer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenny, Tom

    1987-01-01

    This presentation is intended to provide the listener with a general overview of the optical media market. It deals with the basic questions and concerns expressed by those who are about to become involved in optical storage. Areas touched upon include the various types of optical media available, their storage capacities, how they're made, how they are used, life expectancy of media, states of various standards efforts, current and projected pricing and availability, market trends, and growth projecting for the next five years.

  9. Central line infections - hospitals

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection; CVC - infection; Central venous device - infection; Infection control - central line infection; Nosocomial infection - central line infection; Hospital acquired infection - central line infection; Patient safety - central ...

  10. Multifractality of cerebral blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Bruce J.; Latka, Miroslaw; Glaubic-Latka, Marta; Latka, Dariusz

    2003-02-01

    Scale invariance, the property relating time series across multiple scales, has provided a new perspective of physiological phenomena and their underlying control systems. The traditional “signal plus noise” paradigm of the engineer was first replaced with a model in which biological time series have a fractal structure in time (Fractal Physiology, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1994). This new paradigm was subsequently shown to be overly restrictive when certain physiological signals were found to be characterized by more than one scaling parameter and therefore to belong to a class of more complex processes known as multifractals (Fractals, Plenum Press, New York, 1988). Here we demonstrate that in addition to heart rate (Nature 399 (1999) 461) and human gait (Phys. Rev. E, submitted for publication), the nonlinear control system for cerebral blood flow (CBF) (Phys. Rev. Lett., submitted for publication; Phys. Rev. E 59 (1999) 3492) is multifractal. We also find that this multifractality is greatly reduced for subjects with “serious” migraine and we present a simple model for the underlying control process to describe this effect.

  11. The hip in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Bleck, E E

    1980-01-01

    Orthopedic surgery can alleviate the hip flexion, adduction, and medial rotation deformities of the hip and improve the function and appearance of gait. To accomplish this, however, careful examination and prudence in the operative procedure to avoid overdoing and overcorrecting are important. Orthopedic surgery can prevent subluxation and dislocation of the hip before the age of seven years, and consequently repetitive radiographic examinations of the hip in children who have spastic paralysis of the hip musculature should be a routine procedure. Subluxation and dislocation of the hip, when established, can be successfully treated with orthopedic surgical procedures. Physicians must keep in mind that the spastic paralysis of cerebral palsy originates in the brain, and therefore the spasticity cannot be eliminated. The best that can be done is to weaken or remove some muscles as deforming forces and to achieve compromises for continued function. The goal should be optimal independence for the child and adolescent during development, and freedom from pain with deteriorating function due to degenerative arthritis in the adult. PMID:7360505

  12. Preemptive Medicine for Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    AOKI, Tomohiro; NOZAKI, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Most of cerebral aneurysms (CAs) are incidentally discovered without any neurological symptoms and the risk of rupture of CAs is relatively higher in Japanese population. The goal of treatments for patients with CAs is complete exclusion of the aneurysmal rupture risk for their lives. Since two currently available major treatments, microsurgical clipping and endovascular coiling, have inherent incompleteness to achieve cure of CAs with some considerable treatment risks, and there is no effective surgical or medical intervention to inhibit the formation of CAs in patients with ruptured and unruptured CAs, new treatment strategies with lower risk and higher efficacy should be developed to prevent the formation, growth, and rupture of CAs. Preemptive medicine for CAs should be designed to prevent or delay the onset of symptoms from CAs found in an asymptomatic state or inhibit the de novo formation of CAs, but we have no definite methods to distinguish rupture-prone aneurysms from rupture-resistant ones. Recent advancements in the research of CAs have provided us with some clues, and one of the new treatment strategies for CAs will be developed based on the findings that several inflammatory pathways may be involved in the formation, growth, and rupture of CAs. Preemptive medicine for CAs will be established with specific biomarkers and imaging modalities which can sensor the development of CAs. PMID:27053328

  13. Posterior cerebral artery territory infarctions.

    PubMed

    Cereda, Carlo; Carrera, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Infarctions in the territory of the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) occur in about 5-10% of all ischemic strokes. The PCA can be divided into 'deep' (P1 and P2 segments) and 'superficial' (P3 and P4) segments. Occlusion of paramedian perforating arteries arising from P1 causes rostral midbrain infarction with or without thalamic lesion. The classical clinical triad after thalamomesencephalic infarcts is hypersomnolence, cognitive deficits and vertical oculomotor paresis. Two main arterial groups arise from P2: infarction in the territory of the thalamogeniculate arteries causes severe contralateral hypesthesia and ataxia, whereas infarction in the territory of the posterior choroidal arteries results in sectoranopia with involvement of the lateral geniculate body. After superficial PCA infarcts, visual field defects and somatosensory deficits are the most frequent signs. Additionally, disorders of reading may be seen after unilateral left infarction and disorientation for place and visual neglect after right lesion. After bilateral PCA infarcts, amnesia, cortical blindness (the patient cannot see but pretend he can) may occur. Acute thrombolysis is as useful after PCA infarctions as after anterior circulation strokes. Mortality after PCA strokes is low, but long-term behavioral and cognitive deficits are underestimated.

  14. Cerebral concussion: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Maroon, Joseph C; Mathyssek, Christina; Bost, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    No topic in sports has gathered more attention and publicity than the diagnosis, management, and long-term effects of cerebral concussion. The relevant history of concussion starts in 1905 when President Theodore Roosevelt drew attention to the football 'death harvest'. Soon after, rules started to change to reduce the amount and severity of head injuries in football. Up until 1980, the primary focus regarding concussions was to diagnose a potentially fatal intracranial hemorrhage. While aware of long-term consequences of concussions, the perception at the time was that virtually all concussions would 'clear' with time and rest. Concussion management guidelines gave way to objective neuropsychological testing in the early 1990s with the development of the ImPACT™ (Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing) neurocognitive test. Led by organized football, in 1994 the National Football League (NFL) formed the Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Committee which began to investigate the cause of concussions, evaluate equipment (particularly helmets), and recommend methods for prevention. In 2005, the first case of chronic traumatic encephalopathy was described in a deceased football player, raising concerns about the long-term consequences of head injuries and concussions. Major advancements in contact sports and the military are underway to reduce the incidence of concussions and subconcussive blows to the head.

  15. Arterial tree asymmetry reduces cerebral pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Vrselja, Zvonimir; Brkic, Hrvoje; Curic, Goran

    2015-11-01

    With each heartbeat, pressure wave (PW) propagates from aorta toward periphery. In cerebral circulation, at the level of circle of Willis (CW), four arteries and four PWs converge. Since the interference is an elemental property of the wave, PWs interfere at the level of CW. We hypothesize that the asymmetry of brain-supplying arteries (that join to form CW) creates phase difference between the four PWs that interfere at the level of CW and reduce downstream cerebral pulsatility. To best of our knowledge, the data about the sequence of PWs' arrival into the cerebral circulation is lacking. Evident imperfect bilateral symmetry of the vessels results with different path length of brain-supplying arteries, hence, PWs should arrive into the head at different times. The probabilistic calculation shows that asynchronous arrival is more probable than synchronous. The importance of PWs for the cerebral circulation is highlighted by the observation that barotrauma protection mechanisms are more influenced by the crest of PW (pulse pressure) than by the mean arterial pressure. In addition, an increased arterial pulsatility is associated with several brain pathologies. We created simple computational models of four converging arteries and found that asynchronous arrival of the PWs results with lower maximum pressure, slower rate of pressure amplification and lower downstream pulsatility. In analogy, the asynchronous arrival of the pressure waves into the cerebral circulation should decrease blood flow pulsatility and lower transmission of kinetic energy on arterial wall. We conclude that asynchronous arrival of PWs into the cerebral circulation influences cerebral hemodynamics and represents a physiological necessity.

  16. TECHNETIUM SORPTION MEDIA REVIEW

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN JB; KELLY SE; ROBBINS RA; ADAMS RD; THORSON MA; HAASS CC

    2011-08-25

    This report presents information and references to aid in the selection of 99Tc sorption media for feasibility studies regarding the removal of 99Tc from Hanford's low activity waste. The report contains literature search material for sorption media (including ion exchange media) for the most tested media to date, including SuperLig 639, Reillex HPQ, TAM (Kruion), Purolite A520E and A530E, and Dowex 1X8. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for management and completion of the River Protection Project (RPP) mission, which comprises both the Hanford Site tank farms and the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The RPP mission is to store, retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste; store and dispose of treated wastes; and close the tank farm waste management areas and treatment facilities in a safe, environmentally compliant, cost-effective and energy-effective manner.

  17. Media independent interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The work done on the Media Independent Interface (MII) Interface Control Document (ICD) program is described and recommendations based on it were made. Explanations and rationale for the content of the ICD itself are presented.

  18. Mixed-Media Owls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    The fun of creating collages is there are unlimited possibilities for the different kinds of materials one can use. In this article, the author describes how her eighth-grade students created an owl using mixed media.

  19. Libraries/Media Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the design of notable school libraries and media centers, including the educational context and design goals. Includes information on architects, suppliers, and cost, as well as photographs. (EV)

  20. Antegrade cerebral perfusion at 25 °C for arch reconstruction in newborns and children preserves perioperative cerebral oxygenation and serum creatinine

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Bhawna; Dodge-Khatami, Ali; Tucker, Juan; Taylor, Mary B.; Maposa, Douglas; Urencio, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Background Antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) typically is used with deep hypothermia for cerebral protection during aortic arch reconstructions. The impact of ACP on cerebral oxygenation and serum creatinine at a more tepid 25 °C was studied in newborns and children. Methods Between 2010 and 2014, 61 newborns and children (<5 years old) underwent aortic arch reconstruction using moderate hypothermia (25.0±0.9 °C) with ACP and a pH-stat blood gas management strategy. These included 44% Norwood-type operations, 30% isolated arch reconstructions, and 26% arch reconstructions with other major procedures. Median patient age at surgery was 9 days (range, 3 days–4.7 years). Cerebral oxygenation (NIRS) was monitored continuously perioperatively for 120 hours. Serum creatinine was monitored daily. Results Median cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and cross clamp times were 181 minutes (range, 82–652 minutes) and 72 minutes (range, 10–364 minutes), respectively. ACP was performed at a mean flow rate of 46±6 mL/min/kg for a median of 48 minutes (range, 10–123 minutes). Cerebral and somatic NIRS were preserved intraoperatively and remained at baseline postoperatively during the first 120 hours. Peak postoperative serum creatinine levels averaged 0.7±0.3 mg/dL for all patients. There were 4 (6.6%) discharge mortalities. Six patients (9.8%) required ECMO support. Median postoperative length of hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) stay were 16 days(range, 4–104 days) and 9 days (range, 1–104 days), respectively. Two patients (3.3%) received short-term peritoneal dialysis for fluid removal, and none required hemodialysis. Three patients (4.9%) had an isolated seizure which resolved with medical therapy, and none had a neurologic deficit or stroke. Conclusions ACP at 25 °C preserved perioperative cerebral oxygenation and serum creatinine for newborns and children undergoing arch reconstruction. Early outcomes are encouraging, and additional study is warranted to

  1. Communications and media services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcculla, James W.; Kukowski, James F.

    1990-01-01

    NASA's internal and external communication methods are reviewed. NASA information services for the media, for the public, and for employees are discussed. Consideration is given to electron information distribution, the NASA TV-audio system, the NASA broadcast news service, astronaut appearances, technology and information exhibits, speaker services, and NASA news reports for internal communications. Also, the NASA worldwide electronic mail network is described and trends for future NASA communications and media services are outlined.

  2. [A Case of Ruptured Peripheral Cerebral Aneurysm at Abnormal Vessels Associated with Middle Cerebral Artery Stenosis:Similarity to Moyamoya Disease].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Hajime; Kohno, Kanehisa; Tanaka, Hideo; Fukumoto, Shinya; Ichikawa, Haruhisa; Onoue, Shinji; Fumoto, Noriyuki; Ozaki, Saya; Maeda, Toshiharu

    2016-04-01

    We report a case of ruptured peripheral cerebral aneurysm at abnormal vessels associated with severe stenosis at the middle cerebral artery (MCA). A 66-year-old woman was admitted at our hospital with headache on foot. Computed tomography (CT) showed intracerebral hemorrhage in the left fronto-basal area. Three-dimensional-CT and conventional angiogram revealed abnormal vessels, which were similar to those seen in moyamoya disease, with a small enhancement close to the hematoma. On day 11, subsequent cerebral angiogram demonstrated an aneurysm at the peripheral portion of an abnormal vessel arising from the left A2. On day 17, soon after the diagnosis of the ruptured aneurysm was made (while still at the subacute stage), we operated on the aneurysm. Superficial temporal artery (STA)-MCA anastomosis was also performed to preserve cerebral blood flow and reduce hemodynamic stress. Several days after the operation, she had transient aphasia due to hyperperfusion of the MCA territory, but eventually recovered with no neurological deficit at discharge. Follow-up study revealed revascularization from the branches of the external carotid artery as well as the STA. On admission, we initially thought that this patient had abnormal vessels associated with arteriosclerotic MCA stenosis. However, the postoperative clinical course as well as the histopathological specimens of both the abnormal artery with the aneurysm and the STA revealed similar findings to those of moyamoya disease. Although this case did not satisfy the criteria for moyamoya disease, it is conceivable that a single arterial occlusive lesion associated with moyamoya-like vessels might develop in the same mechanism with that of moyamoya disease. PMID:27056872

  3. Analysis of Carotid color ultrasonography and high sensitive C-reactive protein in patients with atherosclerotic cerebral infarction

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lei; Zhai, Zhanyi; Hou, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To detect the correlation between high-sensitivity-CRP, carotid plaque, neurological function and intima–media thickness, and help physicians in the diagnosis of atherosclerotic cerebral infarction. Methods: A total of 96 patients with the first onset of atherosclerotic cerebral infarction were included in the study from July 2013 to May 2015. The test of high-sensitivity-CRP, examination of carotid color ultrasonography and neurological function evaluation were carried out for all the participants. Results: Ninety-six patients were divided into carotid plaque group and non-plaque group according to the existence of a carotid plaque after carotid artery ultrasonography. The carotid plaque group was further subdivided into stable plaque and unstable plaque subgroups according to plaque characteristics. The age in two subgroups was significantly higher than the non-plaque group (p<0.05). The unstable plaque subgroup presented with the highest values in intima–media thickness and high-sensitivity-CRP level, followed by stable plaque subgroup and non-plaque group (p<0.05). With the nervous damage scale increase, the level of high-sensitivity-CRP increase significantly (p<0.05). In addition, there was significant correlation between NIHSS score and high-sensitivity-CRP in patients with atherosclerotic cerebral infarction (p<0.05). Conclusion: The level of high-sensitivity-CRP and intima–media thickness is closely associated with the development of carotid plaque, and high-sensitivity-CRP can be regarded as a high sensitive index in deciding the risk and prognosis of atherosclerotic cerebral infarction. PMID:27648042

  4. Analysis of Carotid color ultrasonography and high sensitive C-reactive protein in patients with atherosclerotic cerebral infarction

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lei; Zhai, Zhanyi; Hou, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To detect the correlation between high-sensitivity-CRP, carotid plaque, neurological function and intima–media thickness, and help physicians in the diagnosis of atherosclerotic cerebral infarction. Methods: A total of 96 patients with the first onset of atherosclerotic cerebral infarction were included in the study from July 2013 to May 2015. The test of high-sensitivity-CRP, examination of carotid color ultrasonography and neurological function evaluation were carried out for all the participants. Results: Ninety-six patients were divided into carotid plaque group and non-plaque group according to the existence of a carotid plaque after carotid artery ultrasonography. The carotid plaque group was further subdivided into stable plaque and unstable plaque subgroups according to plaque characteristics. The age in two subgroups was significantly higher than the non-plaque group (p<0.05). The unstable plaque subgroup presented with the highest values in intima–media thickness and high-sensitivity-CRP level, followed by stable plaque subgroup and non-plaque group (p<0.05). With the nervous damage scale increase, the level of high-sensitivity-CRP increase significantly (p<0.05). In addition, there was significant correlation between NIHSS score and high-sensitivity-CRP in patients with atherosclerotic cerebral infarction (p<0.05). Conclusion: The level of high-sensitivity-CRP and intima–media thickness is closely associated with the development of carotid plaque, and high-sensitivity-CRP can be regarded as a high sensitive index in deciding the risk and prognosis of atherosclerotic cerebral infarction.

  5. Effects of cerebral ischemia on neuronal hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    He, Yangdong; Hua, Ya; Liu, Wenquan; Hu, Haitao; Keep, Richard F.; Xi, Guohua

    2009-01-01

    Summary The present study examined whether or not neuronal hemoglobin (Hb) is present in rats. It then examined whether cerebral ischemia or ischemic preconditioning (IPC) affects neuronal Hb levels in vivo and in vitro. In vivo, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either 15 minutes of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion with 24 hours of reperfusion, an IPC stimulus, or 24 hours of permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO), or IPC followed three days later by 24 hours of pMCAO. In vitro, primary cultured neurons were exposed to 2 hours of oxygen-glucose deprivation with 22 hours of reoxygenation. Results showed that Hb is widely expressed in rat cerebral neurons but not astrocytes. Hb expression was significantly upregulated in the ipsilateral caudate and the cortical core of the middle cerebral artery territory after IPC. Hb levels also increased in more penumbral cortex and the contralateral hemisphere 24 hours after pMCAO, but expression in the ipsilateral caudate and cortical core area were decreased. Ischemic preconditioning modified pMCAO-induced brain Hb changes. Neuronal Hb levels in vitro were increased by 2 hours of oxygen-glucose deprivation and 22 hours of reoxygenation. These results indicate that Hb is synthesized in neurons and can be upregulated by ischemia. PMID:19066615

  6. Mechanisms of Astrocyte-Mediated Cerebral Edema

    PubMed Central

    Stokum, Jesse A.; Kurland, David B.; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J. Marc

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral edema formation stems from disruption of blood brain barrier (BBB) integrity and occurs after injury to the CNS. Due to the restrictive skull, relatively small increases in brain volume can translate into impaired tissue perfusion and brain herniation. In excess, cerebral edema can be gravely harmful. Astrocytes are key participants in cerebral edema by virtue of their relationship with the cerebral vasculature, their unique compliment of solute and water transport proteins, and their general role in brain volume homeostasis. Following the discovery of aquaporins, passive conduits of water flow, aquaporin 4 (AQP4) was identified as the predominant astrocyte water channel. Normally, AQP4 is highly enriched at perivascular endfeet, the outermost layer of the BBB, whereas after injury, AQP4 expression disseminates to the entire astrocytic plasmalemma, a phenomenon termed dysregulation. Arguably, the most important role of AQP4 is to rapidly neutralize osmotic gradients generated by ionic transporters. In pathological conditions, AQP4 is believed to be intimately involved in the formation and clearance of cerebral edema. In this review, we discuss aquaporin function and localization in the BBB during health and injury, and we examine post-injury ionic events that modulate AQP4- dependent edema formation. PMID:24996934

  7. Radionuclide cerebral perfusion imaging: Normal pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, S.J.; Stritzke, P.; Losonczy, M.; Vallabhajosula, S.; Holan, V.; DaCosta, M.; Muzinic, M.

    1991-12-31

    Regional cerebral perfusion imaging using a new class of {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 123}I labeled compounds which traverse the blood brain barrier and SPECT imaging technology provides an opportunity to assess this physiologic phenomenon during normal cerebral function and as a manifestation of disease in the central nervous system disease. These applications pose a challenge to the nuclear medicine physician for several reasons: (a) the complex and somewhat unfamiliar functional anatomy, (b) the marked regional differences in regional cerebral perfusion at rest, (c) the lack of understanding of the effect of variations in ambient conditions on regional cerebral perfusion. The difficulties in interpretation are augmented by the display itself. There is frequently no difficulty in differentiating between gray and white matter. However, the frequently used {open_quotes}hot body{close_quotes} color maps, introduce a good deal of contrast, producing displays with apparent interruption in regional cortical perfusion whereas black and white displays provide minimal contrast in the regional cortical activity. The authors sought to define how much variation in regional cerebral perfusion is {open_quotes}allowed{close_quotes} under controlled conditions, to establish a basis to interpret if changes in the environment, psychological interventions, or disease states are accompanied by a measurable change. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Changes in cerebral hemodynamics during laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    De Cosmo, G; Iannace, E; Primieri, P; Valente, M R; Proietti, R; Matteis, M; Silvestrini, M

    1999-10-01

    Laparoscopic surgery requires a series of procedures, including intraperitoneal CO2 insufflation, which can cause cardiovascular and hemogasanalytic modifications, potentially able to impair cerebral perfusion. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in cerebral blood flow velocity during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Eighteen patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were studied. Middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity was monitored using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography. Electrical bioimpedance was employed to measure cardiac output, stroke volume and to calculate derived parameters. End-tidal CO2, mean arterial blood pressure, end expiratory anesthetic concentration and O2 saturation were monitored non-invasively. Cerebral artery blood flow velocity increased significantly after CO2 insufflation (p < 0.05) and remained stable. The highest values were reached after CO2 desufflation. A significant reduction in stroke volume and cardiac output (p < 0.05) associated with increased vascular systemic resistances (p < 0.001) was observed soon after CO2 insufflation. The decrease in cardiac output and the increase in vascular systemic resistances remained significant throughout abdominal insufflation. Heart rate and mean arterial pressure remained substantially unchanged with the exception of a significant decrease (p < 0.001) before CO2 insufflation. There was no significant change in end-tidal CO2 during abdominal insufflation. These findings suggest that the cerebrovascular system can undergo adaptive changes during all phases of laparoscopic surgery. However, the extent of cardio- and cerebrovascular variation indicates the need for careful preliminary evaluation of cerebral hemodynamics in patients with vascular disorders before laparoscopic surgery. PMID:10555187

  9. Time-Varying Modeling of Cerebral Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Marmarelis, Vasilis Z.; Shin, Dae C.; Orme, Melissa; Zhang, Rong

    2014-01-01

    The scientific and clinical importance of cerebral hemodynamics has generated considerable interest in their quantitative understanding via computational modeling. In particular, two aspects of cerebral hemodynamics, Cerebral Flow Autoregulation (CFA) and CO2 Vasomotor Reactivity (CVR), have attracted much attention because they are implicated in many important clinical conditions and pathologies (orthostatic intolerance, syncope, hypertension, stroke, vascular dementia, MCI, Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative diseases with cerebrovascular components). Both CFA and CVR are dynamic physiological processes by which cerebral blood flow is regulated in response to fluctuations in cerebral perfusion pressure and blood CO2 tension. Several modeling studies to date have analyzed beat-to-beat hemodynamic data in order to advance our quantitative understanding of CFA-CVR dynamics. A confounding factor in these studies is the fact that the dynamics of the CFA-CVR processes appear to vary with time (i.e. changes in cerebrovascular characteristics) due to neural, endocrine and metabolic effects. This paper seeks to address this issue by tracking the changes in linear time-invariant models obtained from short successive segments of data from 10 healthy human subjects. The results suggest that systemic variations exist but have stationary statistics and, therefore, the use of time-invariant modeling yields “time-averaged models” of physiological and clinical utility. PMID:24184697

  10. Time-varying modeling of cerebral hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Marmarelis, Vasilis Z; Shin, Dae C; Orme, Melissa; Rong Zhang

    2014-03-01

    The scientific and clinical importance of cerebral hemodynamics has generated considerable interest in their quantitative understanding via computational modeling. In particular, two aspects of cerebral hemodynamics, cerebral flow autoregulation (CFA) and CO2 vasomotor reactivity (CVR), have attracted much attention because they are implicated in many important clinical conditions and pathologies (orthostatic intolerance, syncope, hypertension, stroke, vascular dementia, mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's disease, and other neurodegenerative diseases with cerebrovascular components). Both CFA and CVR are dynamic physiological processes by which cerebral blood flow is regulated in response to fluctuations in cerebral perfusion pressure and blood CO2 tension. Several modeling studies to date have analyzed beat-to-beat hemodynamic data in order to advance our quantitative understanding of CFA-CVR dynamics. A confounding factor in these studies is the fact that the dynamics of the CFA-CVR processes appear to vary with time (i.e., changes in cerebrovascular characteristics) due to neural, endocrine, and metabolic effects. This paper seeks to address this issue by tracking the changes in linear time-invariant models obtained from short successive segments of data from ten healthy human subjects. The results suggest that systemic variations exist but have stationary statistics and, therefore, the use of time-invariant modeling yields "time-averaged models" of physiological and clinical utility.

  11. Hospital benefit segmentation.

    PubMed

    Finn, D W; Lamb, C W

    1986-12-01

    Market segmentation is an important topic to both health care practitioners and researchers. The authors explore the relative importance that health care consumers attach to various benefits available in a major metropolitan area hospital. The purposes of the study are to test, and provide data to illustrate, the efficacy of one approach to hospital benefit segmentation analysis.

  12. [Music in the hospital].

    PubMed

    Bouteloup, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Occasional events, regular workshops, concerts, shows, artists in residence, cultural outings...Hospital does not necessarily have to be a place of silence and sadness. But this situation has not always been so straightforward as on the face of it, nothing is more incompatible with a hospital environment than music, which, by definition, is festive and noisy. PMID:20684389

  13. Hospitality Occupations. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Homemaking Education.

    This curriculum guide on the hospitality occupations was developed to help secondary and postsecondary home economics teachers prepare individuals for entry-level jobs in the hospitality industry. The content is in seven sections. The first section presents organizational charts of a medium-size hotel, food and beverage division, housekeeping and…

  14. Hospitality Services Reference Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This reference book provides information needed by employees in hospitality services occupations. It includes 29 chapters that cover the following topics: the hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization and management structures; safety practices and emergency procedures; technology; property maintenance and repair; purchasing…

  15. Library Services in Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Health and Social Security, London (England).

    The memorandum gives guidance to the provision and organization of library services at hospitals both for staff and for patients. It also draws attention to the assistance available from outside sources towards the development and maintenance of these services so hospital authorities may make the most effective use of the available facilities.…

  16. Hospitals are dangerous places.

    PubMed

    de Richemond, Albert L

    2010-01-01

    Hospital fire dangers are real, widespread, and ever present, the article demonstrates, spelling out the locations, conditions, and ignition potentials which exist in such a setting. Knowledge of codes and standards, good maintenance practices, and frequent drills in fire prevention and suppression are among the practices recommended for keeping a hospital fire from becoming a disaster, the author says. PMID:20873506

  17. Smaller hospitals accept advertising.

    PubMed

    Mackesy, R

    1988-07-01

    Administrators at small- and medium-sized hospitals gradually have accepted the role of marketing in their organizations, albeit at a much slower rate than larger institutions. This update of a 1983 survey tracks the increasing competitiveness, complexity and specialization of providing health care and of advertising a small hospital's services. PMID:10288550

  18. Hospitality services generate revenue.

    PubMed

    Bizouati, S

    1993-01-01

    An increasing number of hospitals are undertaking external revenue-generating activities to supplement their shrinking budgets. Written at the request of Leadership, this article outlines an example of a successful catering service -- a money-generating business that more Canadian hospitals could profitably consider.

  19. Hospitality Services. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This guide, which was developed as part of Texas' home economics education program, is intended to assist teachers of a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The first 40% of the approximately 600-page guide consists of strategies for teaching each of 29 essential…

  20. Hospital 360°.

    PubMed

    Giraldo Valencia, Juan Carlos; Delgado, Liliana Claudia

    2015-01-01

    There are forces that are greater than the individual performance of each hospital institution and of the health system structural of each country. The world is changing and to face up to the future in the best possible way, we need to understand how contexts and emerging trends link up and how they affect the hospital sector. The Columbian Association of Hospitals and Clinics, ACHC, has thus come up with the Hospital 360° concept which uses hospitals capable of anticipating changing contexts by means of the transition between present and future and takes on board the experience of global, socio-economic, demographic, political, environmental and technological fields as its model. Hospital 360° is an invitation to reinvent processes and institution themselves allowing them to adapt and incorporate a high degree of functional flexibility. Hospital 360° purses goals of efficiency, effectiveness and relevance, but also of impact and sustainability, and is coherent with the internal needs of hospital institutions and society for long-term benefits. PMID:26521380

  1. Mental hospitals in India.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, K; Venugopal, D; Alimchandani, A K

    2000-04-01

    This review traces the history of the mental hospital movement, initially on the world stage, and later in India, in relation to advances in psychiatric care. Mental hospitals have played a significant role in the evolution of psychiatry to its present statusThe earliest hospital in India were established during the British colonial rule. They served as a means to isolate mentally ill persons from the societal mainstream and provide treatments that were in vogue at the time. Following India's independence, there has been a trend towards establishing general hospital psychiatry units and deinstitutionalization, while at the same time improving conditions in the existing mental hospitals.Since 1947, a series of workshops of superintendents was conducted to review the prevailing situations in mental hospitals and to propose recommendations to improve the same. Implementation of the Mental Health Act, 1987, and grovernmental focus upon mental hospital reform have paved way for a more specific and futuristic role for mental hospitals in planning psychiatric services for the new millenium, especially for severe mental illnesses. PMID:21407925

  2. [Music in the hospital].

    PubMed

    Bouteloup, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Occasional events, regular workshops, concerts, shows, artists in residence, cultural outings...Hospital does not necessarily have to be a place of silence and sadness. But this situation has not always been so straightforward as on the face of it, nothing is more incompatible with a hospital environment than music, which, by definition, is festive and noisy.

  3. Handbook on Hospital Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prynne, T. A.

    Designed for both hospital personnel interested in television and audiovisual personnel entering the medical field, this handbook is a verbal and pictorial survey of what is being done with TV within the medical profession. After an introduction which answers technical questions about medical TV posed during the American Hospital Association's…

  4. Designing sustainable acute hospitals.

    PubMed

    Cory, Alistair

    2008-01-01

    The need to provide sustainable hospitals lies in the fact that we have an obligation to act responsibly towards good stewardship of our environment and the world's precious resources, ensuring a healthy future for coming generations. As such, a sustainable hospital must sit squarely in a sustainable society, and the global and local context should be considered when designing a sustainable health facility.

  5. Hospitality services generate revenue.

    PubMed

    Bizouati, S

    1993-01-01

    An increasing number of hospitals are undertaking external revenue-generating activities to supplement their shrinking budgets. Written at the request of Leadership, this article outlines an example of a successful catering service -- a money-generating business that more Canadian hospitals could profitably consider. PMID:10127850

  6. [Hospital medicine in Chile].

    PubMed

    Eymin, Gonzalo; Jaffer, Amir K

    2013-03-01

    After 15 years of development of Hospital Medicine in Chile, there are several benefits of this discipline. Among others, a reduction in the length of hospital stay, readmissions, costs, and improved medical teaching of students, residents and fellows have been observed. However, in South América there are only isolated groups dedicated to Hospital Medicine in Chile, Argentina and Brazil, with a rather slow growth. The unjustified fear of competition from sub specialists, and the fee for service system of payment in our environment may be important factors to understand this phenomenon. The aging of the population makes imperative to improve the safety of our patients and to optimize processes and resources within the hospital, to avoid squandering healthcare resources. The following is a detailed and evidence-based article, on how hospital medicine might benefit both the public and prívate healthcare systems in Chile. PMID:23900327

  7. Hypothermia reduces cerebral metabolic rate and cerebral blood flow in newborn pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Busija, D.W.; Leffler, C.W. )

    1987-10-01

    The authors examined effects of hypothermia on cerebral metabolic rate and cerebral blood flow in anesthetized, newborn pigs (1-4 days old). Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was determined with 15-{mu}m radioactive microspheres. Regional CBF ranged from 44 to 66 ml{center dot}min{sup {minus}1}{center dot}100 g{sup {minus}1}, and cerebral metabolic rate was 1.94 {plus minus} 0.23 ml O{sub 2}{center dot}100 g{sup {minus}1}{center dot}min{sup {minus}1} during normothermia (39{degree}C). Reduction of rectal temperature to 34-35{degree}C decreased CBF and cerebral metabolic rate 40-50%. In another group of piglets, they examined responsiveness of the cerebral circulation to arterial hypercapnia during hypothermia. Although absolute values for normocapnic and hypercapnic CBF were reduced by hypothermia and absolute values for normocapnic and hypercapnic cerebrovascular resistance were increased, the percentage changes from control in these variables during hypercapnia were similar during normothermia and hypothermia. In another group of animals that were maintained normothermic and exposed to two episodes of hypercapnia, there was no attenuation of cerebrovascular dilation during the second episode. They conclude that hypothermia reduces CBF secondarily to a decrease in cerebral metabolic rate and that percent dilator responsiveness to arterial hypercapnia is unaltered when body temperature is reduced.

  8. Children's media policy.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Amy B

    2008-01-01

    Amy Jordan addresses the need to balance the media industry's potentially important contributions to the healthy development of America's children against the consequences of excessive and age-inappropriate media exposure. Much of the philosophical tension regarding how much say the government should have about media content and delivery stems from the U.S. Constitution's First Amendment protection against government interference in free speech, including commercial speech. Courts, Jordan says, have repeatedly had to weigh the rights of commercial entities to say what they please against the need to protect vulnerable citizens such as children. This balancing act is complicated even further, she says, because many government regulations apply only to broadcast television and not to non-broadcast media such as the Internet or cable television, though Congress has addressed the need to protect children's privacy online. The need to protect both free speech and children has given rise to a fluid media policy mix of federal mandates and industry self-regulation. Jordan describes the role of the three branches of the federal government in formulating and implementing media policy. She also notes the jockeying for influence in policymaking by industry lobbies, child advocacy groups, and academic researchers. The media industry itself, says Jordan, is spurred to self-regulation when public disapproval grows severe enough to raise the possibility of new government action. Jordan surveys a range of government and industry actions, from legislatively required parental monitoring tools, such as the V-Chip blocking device on television sets, to the voluntary industry ratings systems governing television, movies, and video games, to voluntary social website disclosures to outright government bans, such as indecency and child privacy information collection. She considers the success of these efforts in limiting children's exposure to damaging content and in improving parents

  9. Children's media policy.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Amy B

    2008-01-01

    Amy Jordan addresses the need to balance the media industry's potentially important contributions to the healthy development of America's children against the consequences of excessive and age-inappropriate media exposure. Much of the philosophical tension regarding how much say the government should have about media content and delivery stems from the U.S. Constitution's First Amendment protection against government interference in free speech, including commercial speech. Courts, Jordan says, have repeatedly had to weigh the rights of commercial entities to say what they please against the need to protect vulnerable citizens such as children. This balancing act is complicated even further, she says, because many government regulations apply only to broadcast television and not to non-broadcast media such as the Internet or cable television, though Congress has addressed the need to protect children's privacy online. The need to protect both free speech and children has given rise to a fluid media policy mix of federal mandates and industry self-regulation. Jordan describes the role of the three branches of the federal government in formulating and implementing media policy. She also notes the jockeying for influence in policymaking by industry lobbies, child advocacy groups, and academic researchers. The media industry itself, says Jordan, is spurred to self-regulation when public disapproval grows severe enough to raise the possibility of new government action. Jordan surveys a range of government and industry actions, from legislatively required parental monitoring tools, such as the V-Chip blocking device on television sets, to the voluntary industry ratings systems governing television, movies, and video games, to voluntary social website disclosures to outright government bans, such as indecency and child privacy information collection. She considers the success of these efforts in limiting children's exposure to damaging content and in improving parents

  10. Acute Cardioembolic Cerebral Infarction: Answers to Clinical Questions*

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià; Alió, Josefina

    2012-01-01

    Cardioembolic cerebral infarction (CI) is the most severe subtype of ischaemic stroke but some clinical aspects of this condition are still unclear. This article provides the reader with an overview and up-date of relevant aspects related to clinical features, specific cardiac disorders and prognosis of CI. CI accounts for 14−30% of ischemic strokes; patients with CI are prone to early and long-term stroke recurrence, although recurrences may be preventable by appropriate treatment during the acute phase and strict control at follow-up. Certain clinical features are suggestive of CI, including sudden onset to maximal deficit, decreased level of consciousness at onset, Wernicke’s aphasia or global aphasia without hemiparesis, a Valsalva manoeuvre at the time of stroke onset, and co-occurrence of cerebral and systemic emboli. Lacunar clinical presentations, a lacunar infarct and especially multiple lacunar infarcts, make cardioembolic origin unlikely. The most common disorders associated with a high risk of cardioembolism include atrial fibrillation, recent myocardial infarction, mechanical prosthetic valve, dilated myocardiopathy and mitral rheumatic stenosis. Patent foramen ovale and complex atheromatosis of the aortic arch are potentially emerging sources of cardioembolic infarction. Mitral annular calcification can be a marker of complex aortic atheroma in stroke patients of unkown etiology. Transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiogram can disclose structural heart diseases. Paroxysmal atrial dysrhyhtmia can be detected by Holter monitoring. Magnetic resonance imaging, transcranial Doppler, and electrophysiological studies are useful to document the source of cardioembolism. In-hospital mortality in cardioembolic stroke (27.3%, in our series) is the highest as compared with other subtypes of cerebral infarction. Secondary prevention with anticoagulants should be started immediately if possible in patients at high risk for recurrent cardioembolic stroke in

  11. Short-term memory and cerebral ischemia: pharmacological application.

    PubMed

    Le Poncin-Lafitte, M; Grosdemouge, C; Billon, C R; Duterte, D; Pontrat, P; Lespinasse, P; Rapin, J R

    1981-01-01

    Transient ischemia results in changes in the cerebral blood flow at the level of microinfarcts, enzymatic and metabolic changes and the development of a cerebral edema; all these disorders regress in the week following ischemia. Besides, the observed functional disorders disappear as the cerebral edema regresses. The brain functional activity is protected by the use of treatments which reduce the development of the cerebral edema and/or a quicker regression of the edema. PMID:7262126

  12. Multiple medullary venous malformations decreasing cerebral blood flow: Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Tomura, N.; Inugami, A.; Uemura, K.; Hadeishi, H.; Yasui, N. )

    1991-02-01

    A rare case of multiple medullary venous malformations in the right cerebral hemisphere is reported. The literature review yielded only one case of multiple medullary venous malformations. Computed tomography scan showed multiple calcified lesions with linear contrast enhancement representing abnormal dilated vessels and mild atrophic change of the right cerebral hemisphere. Single-photon emission computed tomography using N-isopropyl-p-({sup 123}I) iodoamphetamine demonstrated decreased cerebral blood flow in the right cerebral hemisphere.

  13. Transient ischemic cerebral lesions during induction chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pihko, H; Tyni, T; Virkola, K; Valanne, L; Sainio, K; Hovi, L; Saarinen, U M

    1993-11-01

    Ninety children were treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia or non-Hodgkin lymphoma during 1986 through 1992 in the Children's Hospital, University of Helsinki, in Finland. During induction chemotherapy, nine of the children had visual hallucinations progressing to confusion and seizure. The symptoms were often preceded by severe constipation and significantly elevated blood pressure. Neuroradiologic examinations showed bilateral cortical or subcortical white matter lesions. Despite the stroke like manifestations, the lesions were reversible. The triangular shape and location of the lesions in the watershed areas between the major cerebral arteries suggest vascular ischemia as the cause.

  14. Infarctions in the vascular territory of the posterior cerebral artery: clinical features in 232 patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ischemic stroke caused by infarction in the territory of the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) has not been studied as extensively as infarctions in other vascular territories. This single centre, retrospective clinical study was conducted a) to describe salient characteristics of stroke patients with PCA infarction, b) to compare data of these patients with those with ischaemic stroke due to middle cerebral artery (MCA) and anterior cerebral artery (ACA) infarctions, and c) to identify predictors of PCA stroke. Findings A total of 232 patients with PCA stroke were included in the "Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona Stroke Registry" during a period of 19 years (1986-2004). Data from stroke patients are entered in the stroke registry following a standardized protocol with 161 items regarding demographics, risk factors, clinical features, laboratory and neuroimaging data, complications and outcome. The characteristics of these 232 patients with PCA stroke were compared with those of the 1355 patients with MCA infarctions and 51 patients with ACA infarctions included in the registry. Infarctions of the PCA accounted for 6.8% of all cases of stroke (n = 3808) and 9.6% of cerebral infarctions (n = 2704). Lacunar infarction was the most frequent stroke subtype (34.5%) followed by atherothrombotic infarction (29.3%) and cardioembolic infarction (21.6%). In-hospital mortality was 3.9% (n = 9). Forty-five patients (19.4%) were symptom-free at hospital discharge. Hemianopia (odds ratio [OR] = 6.43), lacunar stroke subtype (OR = 2.18), symptom-free at discharge (OR = 1.92), limb weakness (OR = 0.10), speech disorders (OR = 0.33) and cardioembolism (OR = 0.65) were independent variables of PCA stroke in comparison with MCA infarction, whereas sensory deficit (OR = 2.36), limb weakness (OR = 0.11) and cardioembolism as stroke mechanism (OR = 0.43) were independent variables associated with PCA stroke in comparison with ACA infarction. Conclusions Lacunar stroke is the

  15. [Primary cerebral lymphomatoid granulomatosis in a HIV-positive patient. Case report].

    PubMed

    Schalper, Kurt A; Valbuena, José R

    2011-02-01

    We report a 34-years-old male, with a history of hepatitis B and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection that was admitted to the hospital with malaise, weight loss, frontal behavior and chest pain. Imaging studies showed two frontal cortical/subcortical nodules. A stereotactic cerebral biopsy showed reactive gliosis and a prominent atypical angiocentric and angiodestructive lymphoid infiltrate containing large pleomorphic CD20 and EBV-positive cells consistent with Lymphomatoid granulomatosis. Other studies were negative. The patient was lost from follow up.

  16. Relationship between cerebral sodium-glucose transporter and hyperglycemia in cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yui; Harada, Shinichi; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2015-09-14

    Post-ischemic hyperglycemia exacerbates the development of cerebral ischemia. To elucidate this exacerbation mechanism, we focused on sodium-glucose transporter (SGLT) as a mediator that lead hyperglycemia to cerebral ischemia. SGLT transport glucose into the cell, together with sodium ion, using the sodium concentration gradient. We have previously reported that suppression of cerebral SGLT ameliorates cerebral ischemic neuronal damage. However, detail relationship cerebral between SGLT and post-ischemic hyperglycemia remain incompletely defined. Therefore, we examined the involvement of cerebral SGLT on cerebral ischemic neuronal damage with or without hyperglycemic condition. Cell survival rate of primary cultured neurons was assessed by biochemical assay. A mouse model of focal ischemia was generated using a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Neuronal damage was assessed with histological and behavioral analyses. Concomitant hydrogen peroxide/glucose treatment exacerbated hydrogen peroxide alone-induced cell death. Although a SGLT family-specific inhibitor, phlorizin had no effect on developed hydrogen peroxide alone-induced cell death, it suppressed cell death induced by concomitant hydrogen peroxide/glucose treatment. α-MG induced a concentration-dependent and significant decrease in neuronal survival. PHZ administered on immediately after reperfusion had no effect, but PHZ given at 6h after reperfusion had an effect. Our in vitro study indicates that SGLT is not involved in neuronal cell death in non-hyperglycemic condition. We have already reported that post-ischemic hyperglycemia begins to develop at 6h after MCAO. Therefore, current our in vivo study show post-ischemic hyperglycemic condition may be necessary for the SGLT-mediated exacerbation of cerebral ischemic neuronal damage.

  17. Practical guidance: the use of social media in oncology practice.

    PubMed

    Dizon, Don S; Graham, David; Thompson, Michael A; Johnson, Lisa J; Johnston, Claire; Fisch, Michael J; Miller, Robert

    2012-09-01

    The penetration of social media into modern society has become a worldwide cultural phenomenon. Social media use widely accessible Web-based and mobile technologies to facilitate the creation and sharing of user-generated content in a collaborative and social manner. The uptake of social media in medicine provides new opportunities for health care professionals and institutions to interact with patients and other professionals. Oncologists may use social media as a platform for patient education and authoritative health messaging, for professional development and knowledge sharing, and for direct patient interaction, although this may be fraught with important legal and privacy concerns. In this article, a working group of the ASCO Integrated Media and Technology Committee explores how oncologists might responsibly use social media in their professional lives. Existing social media policies from hospitals, health systems, and pharmaceutical industries are examined to identify common concepts informing the development of future guidelines. Key principles identified include establishing institutional ownership of social media activities and safeguarding protected health information. Furthermore, oncologists must not confuse the roles of provider of information and provider of care, must understand regulations related to state licensure and medical records, and must recognize the importance of transparency and disclosure of potential conflicts of interest. social media may be particularly useful for raising the awareness of and recruitment to clinical trials, but compliance with federal and state regulations and areas under the purview of a local institutional review board must also be ensured. Examples of constructive use of social media in oncology with Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube are provided. PMID:23277774

  18. Practical guidance: the use of social media in oncology practice.

    PubMed

    Dizon, Don S; Graham, David; Thompson, Michael A; Johnson, Lisa J; Johnston, Claire; Fisch, Michael J; Miller, Robert

    2012-09-01

    The penetration of social media into modern society has become a worldwide cultural phenomenon. Social media use widely accessible Web-based and mobile technologies to facilitate the creation and sharing of user-generated content in a collaborative and social manner. The uptake of social media in medicine provides new opportunities for health care professionals and institutions to interact with patients and other professionals. Oncologists may use social media as a platform for patient education and authoritative health messaging, for professional development and knowledge sharing, and for direct patient interaction, although this may be fraught with important legal and privacy concerns. In this article, a working group of the ASCO Integrated Media and Technology Committee explores how oncologists might responsibly use social media in their professional lives. Existing social media policies from hospitals, health systems, and pharmaceutical industries are examined to identify common concepts informing the development of future guidelines. Key principles identified include establishing institutional ownership of social media activities and safeguarding protected health information. Furthermore, oncologists must not confuse the roles of provider of information and provider of care, must understand regulations related to state licensure and medical records, and must recognize the importance of transparency and disclosure of potential conflicts of interest. social media may be particularly useful for raising the awareness of and recruitment to clinical trials, but compliance with federal and state regulations and areas under the purview of a local institutional review board must also be ensured. Examples of constructive use of social media in oncology with Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube are provided.

  19. Practical Guidance: The Use of Social Media In Oncology Practice

    PubMed Central

    Dizon, Don S.; Graham, David; Thompson, Michael A.; Johnson, Lisa J.; Johnston, Claire; Fisch, Michael J.; Miller, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The penetration of social media into modern society has become a worldwide cultural phenomenon. Social media use widely accessible Web-based and mobile technologies to facilitate the creation and sharing of user-generated content in a collaborative and social manner. The uptake of social media in medicine provides new opportunities for health care professionals and institutions to interact with patients and other professionals. Oncologists may use social media as a platform for patient education and authoritative health messaging, for professional development and knowledge sharing, and for direct patient interaction, although this may be fraught with important legal and privacy concerns. In this article, a working group of the ASCO Integrated Media and Technology Committee explores how oncologists might responsibly use social media in their professional lives. Existing social media policies from hospitals, health systems, and pharmaceutical industries are examined to identify common concepts informing the development of future guidelines. Key principles identified include establishing institutional ownership of social media activities and safeguarding protected health information. Furthermore, oncologists must not confuse the roles of provider of information and provider of care, must understand regulations related to state licensure and medical records, and must recognize the importance of transparency and disclosure of potential conflicts of interest. social media may be particularly useful for raising the awareness of and recruitment to clinical trials, but compliance with federal and state regulations and areas under the purview of a local institutional review board must also be ensured. Examples of constructive use of social media in oncology with Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube are provided. PMID:23277774

  20. Hospitality as an Environmental Metaphor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horwood, Bert

    1991-01-01

    Compares stewardship and hospitality as they relate to the biosphere. Traces the origin of the word "hospitality," discusses cultural traditions of hospitality, and applies the concept of hospitality to the natural world. Considers forms of symbiosis in nature: commensals, mutualism, and parasitism. Hospitality promotes respect, humility, and…

  1. [Does cerebral salt wasting syndrome exist?].

    PubMed

    Leblanc, P-E; Cheisson, G; Geeraerts, T; Tazarourte, K; Duranteau, J; Vigué, B

    2007-11-01

    Increased natriuresis is a frequent situation after subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). It may be responsible for hyponatremia, which can be dangerous in case of severe hypo-osmolarity or hypovolemia. Inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone or cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSWS) have been incriminated for hyponatremia after SAH, but it remains difficult to distinguish between both syndromes. There are many explanations for increased natriuresis after SAH, depending on the level of blood pressure, the volemia, and the presence or not of natriuretic peptides. The cerebral insult and the treatments, which are done to fight against elevated intracranial pressure or vasospasm, can modify any of these parameters. So it appears that the word "cerebral" in CSWS is probably not a good term and it would be better to talk about appropriate or non-appropriate natriuretic response. Corticoïds or urea can be useful for controlling hypernatriuresis.

  2. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome: a review.

    PubMed

    Harrigan, M R

    1996-01-01

    Hyponatremia is frequently seen in neurosurgical patients and is often attributed to inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. A number of studies in recent years have shown that hyponatremia in many patients with intracranial disease may actually be caused by cerebral salt wasting, in which a renal loss of sodium leads to hyponatremia and a decrease in extracellular fluid volume. The appropriate treatment of cerebral salt wasting fluid and salt replacement, is opposite from the usual treatment of hyponatremia caused by inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. This review summarizes the evidence in favor of cerebral salt wasting in patients with intracranial disease, examines the possible mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon, and discusses methods for diagnosis and treatment.

  3. Cerebral blood flow variations in CNS lupus

    SciTech Connect

    Kushner, M.J.; Tobin, M.; Fazekas, F.; Chawluk, J.; Jamieson, D.; Freundlich, B.; Grenell, S.; Freemen, L.; Reivich, M. )

    1990-01-01

    We studied the patterns of cerebral blood flow (CBF), over time, in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and varying neurologic manifestations including headache, stroke, psychosis, and encephalopathy. For 20 paired xenon-133 CBF measurements, CBF was normal during CNS remissions, regardless of the symptoms. CBF was significantly depressed during CNS exacerbations. The magnitude of change in CBF varied with the neurologic syndrome. CBF was least affected in patients with nonspecific symptoms such as headache or malaise, whereas patients with encephalopathy or psychosis exhibited the greatest reductions in CBF. In 1 patient with affective psychosis, without clinical or CT evidence of cerebral ischemia, serial SPECT studies showed resolution of multifocal cerebral perfusion defects which paralleled clinical recovery.

  4. [Transcranial electrostimulation in chronic cerebral vascular insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Voropaev, A A; Mochalov, A D

    2006-01-01

    The method of transcranial electrostimulation (TCES) has been used for treatment of 68 patients with chronic cerebral vascular insufficiency, stages I and II. A treatment course included 7 daily procedures. The influence of TCES was evaluated clinically, by EEG, transcranial ultrasonic Doppler study and hemodynamic indices in arteries and veins as well as by expression of trait and state anxiety. All the parameters were compared to those of the control group which was treated using conventional methods. TCES resulted in normalization of cerebral vascular reactivity, a decrease of venous circulation disturbances, positive influence on cerebral blood flow and EEG parameters, that corresponded to global improvement of the patients' state, regress of cephalgic syndrome and reduction of trait and state anxiety. The method is simple and safety and can be recommended for wide application including outpatient setting.

  5. [Transcranial electrostimulation in chronic cerebral vascular insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Voropaev, A A; Mochalov, A D

    2006-01-01

    The method of transcranial electrostimulation (TCES) has been used for treatment of 68 patients with chronic cerebral vascular insufficiency, stages I and II. A treatment course included 7 daily procedures. The influence of TCES was evaluated clinically, by EEG, transcranial ultrasonic Doppler study and hemodynamic indices in arteries and veins as well as by expression of trait and state anxiety. All the parameters were compared to those of the control group which was treated using conventional methods. TCES resulted in normalization of cerebral vascular reactivity, a decrease of venous circulation disturbances, positive influence on cerebral blood flow and EEG parameters, that corresponded to global improvement of the patients' state, regress of cephalgic syndrome and reduction of trait and state anxiety. The method is simple and safety and can be recommended for wide application including outpatient setting. PMID:16768222

  6. Assessment of the hand in cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Praveen; Sabapathy, S. Raja

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is the musculoskeletal manifestation of a nonprogressive central nervous system lesion that usually occurs due to a perinatal insult to the brain. Though the cerebral insult is static the musculoskeletal pathology is progressive. Some patients with cerebral palsy whose hands are affected can be made better by surgery. The surgical procedures as such are not very technically demanding but the assessment, decision-making, and selecting the procedures for the given patient make this field challenging. When done well, the results are rewarding not only in terms of improvement in hand function but also in appearance and personal hygiene, which leads to better self-image and permits better acceptance in the society. This article focuses on the clinical examination, patient selection, and decision-making while managing these patients. PMID:22022045

  7. Neuropsychological Effects of Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy.

    PubMed

    Schrag, Matthew; Kirshner, Howard

    2016-08-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy is a condition of the cerebral arterioles and to a lesser extent capillaries and veins, wherein beta-amyloid is deposited. In arterioles, this preferentially targets vascular smooth muscle cells and in the later stages undermines the stability of the vessel. This condition is frequently comorbid with Alzheimer's disease and its role in cognitive impairment and dementia is a topic of considerable recent research. This article reviews recent literature which confirms that CAA independently contributes to cognitive impairment by potentiating the neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's disease, by predisposing to microhemorrhagic and microischemic injury to the brain parenchyma, and by interfering with the autoregulation of CNS blood flow. In this review, we discuss the clinical presentation of cerebral amyloid angiopathy, with a focus on the neuropsychological manifestations of this vasculopathy. PMID:27357378

  8. Mental Imagery Abilities in Adolescents with Spastic Diplegic Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courbois, Yanick; Coello, Yann; Bouchart, Isabelle

    2004-01-01

    Four visual imagery tasks were presented to three groups of adolescents with or without spastic diplegic cerebral palsy. The first group was composed of six adolescents with cerebral palsy who had associated visual-perceptual deficits (CP-PD), the second group was composed of five adolescents with cerebral palsy and no associated visual-perceptual…

  9. Cerebral ischaemia after repair of coarctation of the aorta.

    PubMed

    Gogou, Maria; Keivanidou, Anastasia; Giannopoulos, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    A 9-year-old boy, with a history of repair of severe coarctation of the aorta through balloon angioplasty 2 weeks ago, presented in the emergency paediatric department with symptoms consistent with transient cerebral ischaemia. MRI revealed an area of cerebral infarction in the right frontal lobe. Causes of cerebral ischaemia after aortic coarctation repair are briefly discussed.

  10. National Media Laboratory media testing results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mularie, William

    1993-01-01

    The government faces a crisis in data storage, analysis, archive, and communication. The sheer quantity of data being poured into the government systems on a daily basis is overwhelming systems ability to capture, analyze, disseminate, and store critical information. Future systems requirements are even more formidable: with single government platforms having data rate of over 1 Gbit/sec, greater than Terabyte/day storage requirements, and with expected data archive lifetimes of over 10 years. The charter of the National Media Laboratory (NML) is to focus the resources of industry, government, and academia on government needs in the evaluation, development, and field support of advanced recording systems.

  11. Progressive cerebral atrophy in neuromyelitis optica.

    PubMed

    Warabi, Yoko; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Isozaki, Eiji

    2015-12-01

    We report two cases of neuromyelitis optica patients with progressive cerebral atrophy. The patients exhibited characteristic clinical features, including elderly onset, secondary progressive tetraparesis and cognitive impairment, abnormally elevated CSF protein and myelin basic protein levels, and extremely highly elevated serum anti-AQP-4 antibody titer. Because neuromyelitis optica pathology cannot switch from an inflammatory phase to the degenerative phase until the terminal phase, neuromyelitis optica rarely appears as a secondary progressive clinical course caused by axonal degeneration. However, severe intrathecal inflammation and massive destruction of neuroglia could cause a secondary progressive clinical course associated with cerebral atrophy in neuromyelitis optica patients.

  12. Pathophysiology of muscle contractures in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Mathewson, Margie A; Lieber, Richard L

    2015-02-01

    Patients with cerebral palsy present with a variety of adaptations to muscle structure and function. These pathophysiologic symptoms include functional deficits such as decreased force production and range of motion, in addition to changes in muscle structure such as decreased muscle belly size, increased sarcomere length, and altered extracellular matrix structure and composition. On a cellular level, patients with cerebral palsy have fewer muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells, and altered gene expression. Understanding the nature of these changes may present opportunities for the development of new muscle treatment therapies.

  13. Functional stability of cerebral circulatory system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskalenko, Y. Y.

    1980-01-01

    The functional stability of the cerebral circulation system seems to be based on the active mechanisms and on those stemming from specific of the biophysical structure of the system under study. This latter parameter has some relevant criteria for its quantitative estimation. The data obtained suggest that the essential part of the mechanism for active responses of cerebral vessels which maintains the functional stability of this portion of the vascular system, consists of a neurogenic component involving central nervous structures localized, for instance, in the medulla oblongata.

  14. [Cerebral salt wasting syndrome in bacterial meningitis].

    PubMed

    Attout, H; Guez, S; Seriès, C

    2007-10-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage is the most common cause of cerebral salt wasting syndrome. There are few reports of this condition in infectious meningitis. We describe a patient with hyponatremia and bacterial meningitis. Hyponatremia rapidly improved after administration of sodium chloride. The purpose of this report is to alert clinicians to the fact that hyponatremic patients with central nervous system disease do not necessarily have a syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH), but may have cerebral salt wasting syndrome. By contrast with SIADH, the treatment requires saline administration.

  15. Regulation of cerebral blood flow during exercise.

    PubMed

    Querido, Jordan S; Sheel, A William

    2007-01-01

    Constant cerebral blood flow (CBF) is vital to human survival. Originally thought to receive steady blood flow, the brain has shown to experience increases in blood flow during exercise. Although increases have not consistently been documented, the overwhelming evidence supporting an increase may be a result of an increase in brain metabolism. While an increase in metabolism may be the underlying causative factor for the increase in CBF during exercise, there are many modulating variables. Arterial blood gas tensions, most specifically the partial pressure of carbon dioxide, strongly regulate CBF by affecting cerebral vessel diameter through changes in pH, while carbon dioxide reactivity increases from rest to exercise. Muscle mechanoreceptors may contribute to the initial increase in CBF at the onset of exercise, after which exercise-induced hyperventilation tends to decrease flow by pial vessel vasoconstriction. Although elite athletes may benefit from hyperoxia during intense exercise, cerebral tissue is well protected during exercise, and cerebral oxygenation does not appear to pose a limiting factor to exercise performance. The role of arterial blood pressure is important to the increase in CBF during exercise; however, during times of acute hypotension such as during diastole at high-intensity exercise or post-exercise hypotension, cerebral autoregulation may be impaired. The impairment of an increase in cardiac output during exercise with a large muscle mass similarly impairs the increase in CBF velocity, suggesting that cardiac output may play a key role in the CBF response to exercise. Glucose uptake and CBF do not appear to be related; however, there is growing evidence to suggest that lactate is used as a substrate when glucose levels are low. Traditionally thought to have no influence, neural innervation appears to be a protective mechanism to large increases in cardiac output. Changes in middle cerebral arterial velocity are independent of changes in

  16. Electrical Cerebral Stimulation Modifies Inhibitory Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuéllar-Herrera, M.; Rocha, L.

    2003-09-01

    Electrical stimulation of the nervous tissue has been proposed as a method to treat some neurological disorders, such as epilepsy. Epileptic seizures result from excessive, synchronous, abnormal firing patterns of neurons that are located predominantly in the cerebral cortex. Many people with epilepsy continue presenting seizures even though they are under regimens of antiepileptic medications. An alternative therapy for treatment resistant epilepsy is cerebral electrical stimulation. The present study is focused to review the effects of different types of electrical stimulation and specifically changes in amino acids.

  17. Role of Embolization for Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Jason A.; Lavine, Sean D.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are complex high-flow lesions that can result in devastating neurological injury when they hemorrhage. Embolization is a critical component in the management of many patients with cerebral AVMs. Embolization may be used as an independent curative therapy or more commonly in an adjuvant fashion prior to either micro- or radiosurgery. Although the treatment-related morbidity and mortality for AVMs—including that due to microsurgery, embolization, and radiosurgery—can be substantial, its natural history offers little solace. Fortunately, care by a multidisciplinary team experienced in the comprehensive management of AVMs can offer excellent results in most cases. PMID:25624978

  18. Cerebral Blood Flow Autoregulation and Dysautoregulation.

    PubMed

    Armstead, William M

    2016-09-01

    This article provides a review of cerebral autoregulation, particularly as it relates to the clinician scientist experienced in neuroscience in anesthesia and critical care. Topics covered are biological mechanisms; methods used for assessment of autoregulation; effects of anesthetics; role in control of cerebral hemodynamics in health and disease; and emerging areas, such as role of age and sex in contribution to dysautoregulation. Emphasis is placed on bidirectional translational research wherein the clinical informs the study design of basic science studies, which, in turn, informs the clinical to result in development of improved therapies for treatment of central nervous system conditions. PMID:27521192

  19. Progenitor genealogy in the developing cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Laguesse, Sophie; Peyre, Elise; Nguyen, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian cerebral cortex is characterized by a complex histological organization that reflects the spatio-temporal stratifications of related stem and neural progenitor cells, which are responsible for the generation of distinct glial and neuronal subtypes during development. Some work has been done to shed light on the existing filiations between these progenitors as well as their respective contribution to cortical neurogenesis. The aim of the present review is to summarize the current views of progenitor hierarchy and relationship in the developing cortex and to further discuss future research directions that would help us to understand the molecular and cellular regulating mechanisms involved in cerebral corticogenesis. PMID:25141969

  20. Acute quadriplegia due to bilateral cerebral metastases.

    PubMed

    Levine, D N; Black, P M; Kleinman, G M; Ojemann, R

    1981-03-01

    A 51-year-old man developed severe quadriparesis without sensory loss after a fall on the occiput. When he was treated with corticosteroids, the weakness worsened slightly for 2 days, but he then progressively improved and ultimately walked unassisted. Two months later, postmortem examination disclosed metastatic tumors in the superior portion of each precentral gyrus. The subjacent white matter was edematous. No spinal cord abnormalities were found. The clinical, radiologic, and neuropathologic findings suggest that the quadriplegia resulted from these bilateral cerebral lesions and not from spinal cord dysfunction. The rapid development of cerebral edema, perhaps precipitated by trauma, seemed to account for the acute onset of symptoms in this case.

  1. Hospital diversification: evaluating alternatives.

    PubMed

    Hammer, L

    1987-05-01

    The appropriateness of diversification as a growth strategy for hospitals is discussed, and planning for diversification is described. Because new forms of health-care delivery are now in direct competition with hospitals, many hospitals are confronting environmental pressures and preparing for future survival through diversification. To explore the potential risks and benefits of diversification, the hospital must identify opportunities for new business ventures. Diversification can be "related," through an expansion of the primary product line (health care), or "unrelated," into areas not directly associated with health care. The hospital must establish specific criteria for evaluating each diversification alternative, and the two or three most attractive options should be analyzed further through a financial feasibility study. The hospital should also seek legal advice to determine the implications of diversification for maintenance of tax status, antitrust limitations, and applicability of certificate of need. Although diversification may not be appropriate for every institution, hospitals should consider it as a strategy for increasing their revenue base, confronting environmental pressures, and securing future survival. PMID:3300300

  2. Philanthropy and hospital financing.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D G; Clement, J P; Wheeler, J R

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study explores the relationships among donations to not-for-profit hospitals, the returns provided by these hospitals, and fund-raising efforts. It tests a model of hospital behavior and addresses an earlier debate regarding the supply price of donations. DATA SOURCES. The main data source is the California Office of Statewide Health Planning data tapes of hospital financial disclosure reports for fiscal years 1980/1981 through 1986/1987. Complete data were available for 160 hospitals. STUDY DESIGN. Three structural equations (donations, returns, and fund-raising) are estimated as a system using a fixed-effects, pooled cross-section, time-series least squares regression. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Estimation results reveal the expected positive relation between donations and returns. The reverse relation between returns and donations is insignificant. The estimated effect of fund-raising on donations is insignificantly different from zero, and the effect of donations on fund-raising is negative. Fund-raising and returns are negatively associated with one another. CONCLUSION. The empirical results presented here suggest a positive donations-returns relations and are consistent with a positive supply price for donations. Hospitals appear to view a trade-off between providing returns and soliciting donations, but donors do not respond equally to these two activities. Attempts to increase free cash flow through expansion of community returns or fund-raising activity, at least in the short run, are not likely to be highly successful financing strategies for many hospitals. PMID:8537223

  3. Hospitals' Internal Accountability

    PubMed Central

    Kraetschmer, Nancy; Jass, Janak; Woodman, Cheryl; Koo, Irene; Kromm, Seija K.; Deber, Raisa B.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to enhance understanding of the dimensions of accountability captured and not captured in acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Based on an Ontario-wide survey and follow-up interviews with three acute care hospitals in the Greater Toronto Area, we found that the two dominant dimensions of hospital accountability being reported are financial and quality performance. These two dimensions drove both internal and external reporting. Hospitals' internal reports typically included performance measures that were required or mandated in external reports. Although respondents saw reporting as a valuable mechanism for hospitals and the health system to monitor and track progress against desired outcomes, multiple challenges with current reporting requirements were communicated, including the following: 58% of survey respondents indicated that performance-reporting resources were insufficient; manual data capture and performance reporting were prevalent, with the majority of hospitals lacking sophisticated tools or technology to effectively capture, analyze and report performance data; hospitals tended to focus on those processes and outcomes with high measurability; and 53% of respondents indicated that valuable cross-system accountability, performance measures or both were not captured by current reporting requirements. PMID:25305387

  4. Hospital diversification: evaluating alternatives.

    PubMed

    Hammer, L

    1987-05-01

    The appropriateness of diversification as a growth strategy for hospitals is discussed, and planning for diversification is described. Because new forms of health-care delivery are now in direct competition with hospitals, many hospitals are confronting environmental pressures and preparing for future survival through diversification. To explore the potential risks and benefits of diversification, the hospital must identify opportunities for new business ventures. Diversification can be "related," through an expansion of the primary product line (health care), or "unrelated," into areas not directly associated with health care. The hospital must establish specific criteria for evaluating each diversification alternative, and the two or three most attractive options should be analyzed further through a financial feasibility study. The hospital should also seek legal advice to determine the implications of diversification for maintenance of tax status, antitrust limitations, and applicability of certificate of need. Although diversification may not be appropriate for every institution, hospitals should consider it as a strategy for increasing their revenue base, confronting environmental pressures, and securing future survival.

  5. Hospitals' internal accountability.

    PubMed

    Kraetschmer, Nancy; Jass, Janak; Woodman, Cheryl; Koo, Irene; Kromm, Seija K; Deber, Raisa B

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to enhance understanding of the dimensions of accountability captured and not captured in acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Based on an Ontario-wide survey and follow-up interviews with three acute care hospitals in the Greater Toronto Area, we found that the two dominant dimensions of hospital accountability being reported are financial and quality performance. These two dimensions drove both internal and external reporting. Hospitals' internal reports typically included performance measures that were required or mandated in external reports. Although respondents saw reporting as a valuable mechanism for hospitals and the health system to monitor and track progress against desired outcomes, multiple challenges with current reporting requirements were communicated, including the following: 58% of survey respondents indicated that performance-reporting resources were insufficient; manual data capture and performance reporting were prevalent, with the majority of hospitals lacking sophisticated tools or technology to effectively capture, analyze and report performance data; hospitals tended to focus on those processes and outcomes with high measurability; and 53% of respondents indicated that valuable cross-system accountability, performance measures or both were not captured by current reporting requirements. PMID:25305387

  6. [Brain abscess caused by Streptococcus pyogenes as a complication of acute otitis media in 7-year-old girl - a case report].

    PubMed

    Załęska-Ponganis, Joanna; Jackowska, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is the most commonly diagnosed childhood disease, especially in infants and preschool children. Onset of AOM encourage frequent upper respiratory infections and debilitating conditions that cause nasal patency and trumpets auditory dysfunction. Complications of AOM currently are rare. We present a case of complications of acute otitis media in form of acute cerebral abscess in a 7-year-old previously healthy girl.

  7. [Intensive glycemia control in the first day of the acute cerebral blood flow disturbance in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2].

    PubMed

    Grigorian, I G; Gustov, A V; Strongin, L G; Beliaeva, N G

    2012-01-01

    Forty-seven patients with cerebral stroke and diabetes mellitus type 2 were included in the study. To maintain the target values of glycemia on the level 7.8-10.2 mmol/l, patients of the main group received the continuous intravenous infusion of insulin and patients of the control group received frequent (every 3h) subcutaneous injections of insulin during the first 24 h after the acute cerebral blood flow disturbance. The results obtained have shown that continuous intravenous insulin infusion reduces the risk of hypoglycemia, accelerates positive neurologic dynamics, reduces terms of hospitalization and decreases mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2.

  8. Fractal Dimension and Vessel Complexity in Patients with Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Reishofer, Gernot; Koschutnig, Karl; Enzinger, Christian; Ebner, Franz; Ahammer, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    The fractal dimension (FD) can be used as a measure for morphological complexity in biological systems. The aim of this study was to test the usefulness of this quantitative parameter in the context of cerebral vascular complexity. Fractal analysis was applied on ten patients with cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM) and ten healthy controls. Maximum intensity projections from Time-of-Flight MRI scans were analyzed using different measurements of FD, the Box-counting dimension, the Minkowski dimension and generalized dimensions evaluated by means of multifractal analysis. The physiological significance of this parameter was investigated by comparing values of FD first, with the maximum slope of contrast media transit obtained from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data and second, with the nidus size obtained from X-ray angiography data. We found that for all methods, the Box-counting dimension, the Minkowski dimension and the generalized dimensions FD was significantly higher in the hemisphere with AVM compared to the hemisphere without AVM indicating that FD is a sensitive parameter to capture vascular complexity. Furthermore we found a high correlation between FD and the maximum slope of contrast media transit and between FD and the size of the central nidus pointing out the physiological relevance of FD. The proposed method may therefore serve as an additional objective parameter, which can be assessed automatically and might assist in the complex workup of AVMs. PMID:22815946

  9. Hospitalized Patients and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... but can also be caused by fungi. Hospital construction. Hospital staff do everything they can to prevent ... patients staying at hospitals where there is ongoing construction or renovation. 5 This is thought to be ...

  10. Comparing the stigma of mental illness in a general hospital with a state mental hospital: a Singapore study.

    PubMed

    Chee, Cornelia Y I; Ng, Tze Pin; Kua, Ee Heok

    2005-08-01

    The stigma faced by psychiatric patients associated with the type of psychiatric facilities is controversial. This study was conducted to compare the stigma faced by patients with schizophrenia and non-schizophrenia psychiatric disorders in the outpatient departments of a state mental hospital with those in a general hospital in Singapore. A cross-sectional study involving two groups of outpatients in a state mental hospital (n=300) and in a university general hospital (n=300) were assessed with a 12-item stigma scale. Components of the scale assessed included social rejection, negative media perception, shame and social discrimination. Among schizophrenia patients, state mental hospital patients had significantly lower stigma scores compared to their counterparts in the general hospital. For other mental illnesses, the reverse was true: state mental hospital patients had significantly higher stigma scores compared to their counterparts in the general hospital. Stigma was also associated with a younger age and being employed though not by gender. The stigma faced by psychiatric patients is complex and may have institutional and disorder-specific elements. Possible reasons for this are discussed.

  11. Open Media Training Session

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-19

    Have you ever wondered how the media work and why some topics make it into the news and other don't? Would you like to know how to (and how not to) give an interview to a journalist? With the LHC preparing for first collisions at high energies, the world's media are again turning their attention to CERN. We're all likely to be called upon to explain what is happening at CERN to media, friends and neighbours. The seminar will be given by BBC television news journalists Liz Pike and Nadia Marchant, and will deal with the kind of questions we're likely to be confronted with through the restart period. Follow the webcast: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  12. Foams in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Marsden, S.S.

    1986-07-01

    In 1978 a literature search on selective blocking of fluid flow in porous media was done by Professor S.S. Marsden and two of his graduate students, Tom Elson and Kern Huppy. This was presented as SUPRI Report No. TR-3 entitled ''Literature Preview of the Selected Blockage of Fluids in Thermal Recovery Projects.'' Since then a lot of research on foam in porous media has been done on the SUPRI project and a great deal of new information has appeared in the literature. Therefore we believed that a new, up-to-date search should be done on foam alone, one which would be helpful to our students and perhaps of interest to others. This is a chronological survey showing the development of foam flow, blockage and use in porous media, starting with laboratory studies and eventually getting into field tests and demonstrations. It is arbitrarily divided into five-year time periods. 81 refs.

  13. Open Media Training Session

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Have you ever wondered how the media work and why some topics make it into the news and other don't? Would you like to know how to (and how not to) give an interview to a journalist? With the LHC preparing for first collisions at high energies, the world's media are again turning their attention to CERN. We're all likely to be called upon to explain what is happening at CERN to media, friends and neighbours. The seminar will be given by BBC television news journalists Liz Pike and Nadia Marchant, and will deal with the kind of questions we're likely to be confronted with through the restart period. Follow the webcast: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  14. Using the media.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    To use the mass media (newspaper, radio, and TV) to reach a large audience with information about AIDS, it is important to choose the media outlets carefully, since they use information that satisfies their audience in content and style. For example, radio, TV, or videos are best to reach illiterate groups. Ways to approach each sector of the written and electronic media include press releases, news conferences, information kits, and personal contacts. Letters to the editor and offers of submitting articles for publication are additional ways to approach newspapers. Audio- or videocassettes with interviews or images conveying HIV/AIDS prevention messages can be submitted to TV and radio stations. It is important to present the information attractively to gain the journalists' attention. News releases should include sources of information and a contact name. It is important to inform the mass media of successes revolving around AIDS prevention, emphasizing local successes. One should identify what media slots have the most influence. For example, a medical officer in Chiang Mai, Thailand, notes that popular disc jockeys have more influence than do government information broadcasts. It is best to promote facts that probably will increase support for AIDS prevention campaigns. If possible, groups should seek free space or air time for AIDS prevention messages. AIDS prevention messages should not use fear because it does not promote safer sexual behavior. Instead, they should link condom use with a sense of independence, responsibility, and being fashionable. Leaflets, posters, videotapes, slides, displays, slogans, audiocassettes, T-shirts, stickers, and other activities or products reinforce the effectiveness of media campaigns. Interviews with or feature articles and programs about people infected or affected by HIV/AIDS chip away at the belief that "AIDS could never happen to me." PMID:12287965

  15. Media and risky behaviors.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Chaves, Soledad Liliana; Anderson, Craig A

    2008-01-01

    Liliana Escobar-Chaves and Craig Anderson investigate two important trends among American youth and examine the extent to which the two trends might be related. First, the authors note that U.S. youth are spending increasing amounts of time using electronic media, with the average American youngster now spending one-third of each day with some form of electronic media. Second, the authors demonstrate that American adolescents are engaging in a number of unhealthful behaviors that impose huge societal costs. Escobar-Chaves and Anderson detail the extent of five critical types of adolescent health risk behaviors identified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-obesity, smoking, drinking, sexual risk taking, and violence. Obesity, the authors note, has become an epidemic among America's young people. Cigarette smoking among adolescents is one of the ten leading health indicators of greatest government concern. Alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence are widespread problems among the nation's youth and are the source of the three leading causes of death among youth. More than 20 percent of American high school students have sexual intercourse for the first time before they reach the age of fourteen. And twelve- to twenty-year-olds perpetrated 28 percent of the single-offender and 41 percent of multiple-offender violent crimes in the United States in 2005. Escobar-Chaves and Anderson present and evaluate research findings on the influence of electronic media on these five risk behaviors among adolescents. Researchers, they say, have found modest evidence that media consumption contributes to the problem of obesity, modest to strong evidence that it contributes to drinking and smoking, and strong evidence that it contributes to violence. Research has been insufficient to find links between heavy media exposure and early sexual initiation. The authors note the need for more large-scale longitudinal studies that specifically examine the cumulative effects of

  16. [Relationship between executive functioning and behaviour in children with cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Muriel, V; Garcia-Molina, A; Aparicio-Lopez, C; Ensenat, A; Roig-Rovira, T

    2015-10-16

    Introduccion. La paralisis cerebral se define como un grupo de trastornos del desarrollo del movimiento y la postura que cursa con deficits cognitivos, alteraciones emocionales, de conducta y sociales. Objetivo. Estudiar la relacion entre el funcionamiento ejecutivo y la conducta en niños con paralisis cerebral a partir de las respuestas aportadas por padres y profesores en el Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) y el sistema de evaluacion de la conducta adaptativa (ABAS-II). Pacientes y metodos. La muestra quedo formada por 46 niños con paralisis cerebral, con una edad media de 10,26 ± 2,95 años. Del total, 44 niños se distribuyeron en el Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) en nivel I (n = 16), nivel II (n = 3), nivel III (n = 11), nivel IV (n = 10) y nivel V (n = 4). Resultados. Los resultados mostraron relacion entre el BRIEF y el ABAS-II; ademas, se obtuvieron discrepancias entre las respuestas aportadas por padres y profesores, tanto en el ABAS-II como en el BRIEF. Asimismo, se hallo relacion entre el GMFCS y los subindices de vida en el hogar, indice practico y autocuidado del ABAS-II. Conclusiones. Se encontro relacion entre el funcionamiento ejecutivo y la conducta adaptativa en niños con paralisis cerebral. Se hallaron discrepancias en las respuestas aportadas por padres y profesores. Por ultimo, los datos muestran que, a mayor afectacion motora, mayores dificultades en el hogar, en el indice practico y en el autocuidado.

  17. Cerebral blood flow in humans following resuscitation from cardiac arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Cohan, S.L.; Mun, S.K.; Petite, J.; Correia, J.; Tavelra Da Silva, A.T.; Waldhorn, R.E.

    1989-06-01

    Cerebral blood flow was measured by xenon-133 washout in 13 patients 6-46 hours after being resuscitated from cardiac arrest. Patients regaining consciousness had relatively normal cerebral blood flow before regaining consciousness, but all patients who died without regaining consciousness had increased cerebral blood flow that appeared within 24 hours after resuscitation (except in one patient in whom the first measurement was delayed until 28 hours after resuscitation, by which time cerebral blood flow was increased). The cause of the delayed-onset increase in cerebral blood flow is not known, but the increase may have adverse effects on brain function and may indicate the onset of irreversible brain damage.

  18. Cerebral infarction in patient with minimal change nephrotic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Babu, A.; Boddana, P.; Robson, S.; Ludeman, L.

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of 68-year-old Caucasian man who presented with cerebral infarcts secondary to arterial thrombosis associated with nephrotic syndrome. His initial presentation included edema of legs, left hemiparesis, and right-sided cerebellar signs. Investigations with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of brain showed multiple cerebral infarcts in middle cerebral and posterior cerebral artery territory. Blood and urine investigations also showed impaired renal function, hypercholesterolemia, hypoalbuminaemia, and nephrotic range proteinuria. Renal biopsy showed minimal change disease. Cerebral infarcts were treated with antiplatelet agents and nephrotic syndrome was treated with high dose steroids. Patient responded well to the treatment and is all well till date. PMID:23580806

  19. Increased risk of cerebral palsy among very low-birthweight infants with chronic lung disease.

    PubMed

    Skidmore, M D; Rivers, A; Hack, M

    1990-04-01

    To determine the risk of cerebral palsy and other forms of neurosensory impairment in very low-birthweight infants (less than 1500g) with severe lung disease, as compared with those with lesser degrees of lung disease, and to examine perinatal and demographic correlates of chronic lung disease, the authors prospectively followed 249 survivors born between 1983 and 1984. 52 (21 per cent) developed chronic lung disease (CLD), defined as oxygen dependence greater than or equal to 28 days. 15 per cent of children with CLD developed cerebral palsy, compared with 3 per cent who required oxygen for between three and 27 days and 4 per cent of those requiring oxygen for two days or less. The overall neurological impairment rate, including cerebral palsy, abnormalities of muscle tone, hydrocephalus requiring a shunt, and severe visual or hearing impairment, was 29 per cent for infants with CLD. This compares with rates of 9 per cent for those requiring oxygen for between three and 27 days and 6 per cent for those on oxygen for two or less days. Infants with CLD had a significantly lower mean birthweight and gestational age; 43 per cent had grade III or IV intraventricular hemorrhages; and they also required longer periods in hospital.

  20. Longitudinal Cerebral Perfusion Change in Transient Global Amnesia Related to Left Posterior Medial Network Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jae-Won; Park, Young Ho; Park, So Young; Wang, Min Jeong; Lim, Jae-Sung; Kim, Sung-Hun; Chun, In KooK; Yang, Youngsoon; Kim, SangYun

    2015-01-01

    Background The pathophysiology of transient global amnesia (TGA) is not fully understood. Previous studies using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have reported inconclusive results regarding cerebral perfusion. This study was conducted to identify the patterns of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in TGA patients via longitudinal SPECT analysis. An association between the observed SPECT patterns and a pathophysiological mechanism was considered. Methods Based on the TGA registry database of Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, 22 TGA patients were retrospectively identified. The subjects underwent initial Tc-99m-ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD) SPECT within 4 days of an amnestic event and underwent follow-up scans approximately 6 months later. The difference in ECD uptake between the two scans was measured via voxel-based whole brain analysis, and the quantified ECD uptake was tested using a paired t-test. Results The TGA patients had significantly decreased cerebral perfusion at the left precuneus (P<0.001, uncorrected) and at the left superior parietal and inferior temporal gyrus according to the voxel-based whole brain analysis (P<0.005, uncorrected). A difference in the quantified ECD uptake between the 2 scans was also found at the left precuneus among the 62 cortical volumes of interest (P = 0.018, Cohen’s d = -0.25). Conclusion We identified left hemispheric lateralized hypoperfusion that may be related to posterior medial network disruption. These findings may be a contributing factor to the pathophysiology of TGA. PMID:26690067

  1. [Cerebral salt wasting syndrome secondary to head injury: a case report].

    PubMed

    Kawajiri, K; Matsuoka, Y; Kan, M

    1992-09-01

    A case of cerebral salt wasting syndrome secondary to head injury is reported here. A 4-year-old boy was admitted to our hospital with head injury. Neurological examination revealed no abnormal findings other than consciousness disturbance. Plain skull X-ray demonstrated a linear fracture of the bilateral parietal bones, and CT scan demonstrated subarachnoid hemorrhage of the tentorium of the cerebellum. He gradually improved, but on the 6th day deterioration of consciousness developed. At that time CT scan demonstrated no abnormal findings. Biochemical analysis showed hyponatremia (116mEq/L) with increased natriuresis. Although a high dose of NaCl was supplied, serum sodium levels did not normalize. So we suspected that SIADH might be causing the hyponatremia, and water restriction was started. He lost 1 kg in body weight over 3 days, but serum sodium levels remained low (118mEq/L) with increased natriuresis. We found that the hyponatremia was caused by cerebral salt wasting syndrome, so we treated the patient with fludrocortisone acetate. Consciousness disturbance improved two days after the medication with fludrocortisone acetate, and serum sodium levels became normal (137mEq/L) on the 27th day. The administration of fludrocortisone acetate was able to be stopped two months after admission, and then the patient was discharged without any neurological deficits. We discussed in detail the diagnosis and the treatment of cerebral salt wasting syndrome.

  2. Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome in a child with Wernicke encephalopathy treated with fludrocortisone therapy

    PubMed Central

    Han, Min Jeong; Kim, Soon Chul; Joo, Chan Uhng; Kim, Sun Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale for this case report: Cerebral Salt-Wasting Syndrome (CSWS) is characterized by hyponatremia and sodium wasting in the urine.[1] These conditions are triggered by various neurosurgical disorders such as subarachnoid hemorrhage, brain tumor, head injury, and brain surgery.[2,3] To our knowledge, CSWS caused by Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) has been rarely reported. Presenting concerns of the patient: A 2-year-old male patient presented to our hospital due to a seizure attack. He had been neglected and refused to take food for a long time (body weight < 3rd percentile). During admission, the patient showed low serum osmolality, high urine osmolality, dehydration state, increased urine output, and negative water balance, a diagnosis of CSWS was made. Diagnoses, interventions, and outcomes: Brain MRI displayed symmetrical lesions of T2WI and FLAIR high signal intensity in the peri-aqueductal and hypothalamic areas, which suggests Wernicke encephalopathy. For the early diagnosis of WE, neuroimaging studies can be an important marker. Thiamine hydrochloride was administered at a dose of 100 mg/day for 3 weeks. Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome was subsequently diagnosed due to persistent hyponatremia, dehydrated state, and high urine sodium with massive urination. Main lessons learned from this case: Wernicke encephalopathy is a very rare cause of cerebral salt-wasting syndrome in pediatrics patients. The patient had a good outcome after hypertonic solution and fludrocortisone therapy. PMID:27603336

  3. Never go to sleep on undrained pus: a retrospective review of surgery for intraparenchymal cerebral abscess.

    PubMed

    Smith, S J; Ughratdar, I; MacArthur, D C

    2009-08-01

    Cerebral abscess is an emergency requiring urgent drainage via craniotomy or burrhole aspiration. We examine whether initial method of drainage affects outcome and important characteristics in patients with cerebral abscess. This is a retrospective analysis of 62 patients operated on in our unit with a loculated infected cerebral collection in the years 2003-2007 inclusive. Full statistical analysis was performed using data appropriate tests. Burrhole and craniotomy groups were evenly matched with no difference in any demographic factors. Surgical method made no difference to rate of re-operation (p = 0.276), antibiotic duration (p = 0.648), discharge GCS (p = 0.509), length of stay (p = 0.647) or GOS (p = 0.968). There was a trend to worsened outcome with delay to surgery (p = 0.132) with delayed patients requiring longer hospital stays (p < or = 0.005). Patients requiring a longer antibiotic duration had worse outcomes (p < or = 0.005). Surgical method did not have a significant effect on outcome, so burrhole aspiration with its advantages in terms of speed and scale of surgery should be strongly considered. Delay had an adverse affect, so operation should be as expeditious as possible whenever the differential diagnosis includes abscess, diagnosis of which may be aided by advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques.

  4. Hospital free cash flow.

    PubMed

    Kauer, R T; Silvers, J B

    1991-01-01

    Hospital managers may find it difficult to admit their investments have been suboptimal, but such investments often lead to poor returns and less future cash. Inappropriate use of free cash flow produces large transaction costs of exit. The relative efficiency of investor-owned and tax-exempt hospitals in the product market for hospital services is examined as the free cash flow theory is used to explore capital-market conditions of hospitals. Hypotheses concerning the current competitive conditions in the industry are set forth, and the implications of free cash flow for risk, capital-market efficiency, and the cost of capital to tax-exempt institution is compared to capital-market norms.

  5. Critical Access Hospitals (CAH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CAH Conditions of Participation . What are the location requirements for CAH status? Critical Access Hospitals must be ... clinic that does not meet the CAH distance requirements? As of January 1, 2008, all CAHs, including ...

  6. Objections to hospital philosophers.

    PubMed Central

    Ruddick, W; Finn, W

    1985-01-01

    Like morally sensitive hospital staff, philosophers resist routine simplification of morally complex cases. Like hospital clergy, they favour reflective and principled decision-making. Like hospital lawyers, they refine and extend the language we use to formulate and defend our complex decisions. But hospital philosophers are not redundant: they have a wider range of principles and categories and a sharper eye for self-serving presuppositions and implicit contradictions within our practices. As semi-outsiders, they are often best able to take an 'external point of view,' unburdened by routine, details, and departmental loyalties. Their clarifications can temporarily disrupt routine, but can eventually improve staff morale, hence team practice and patient welfare. PMID:3981573

  7. Practice Hospital Bed Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bed? Todd says that there is no standard definition for hospital beds, a fact that consumers shopping ... in retail stores that don’t meet the definition of medical devices under the law, but which ...

  8. Hospital free cash flow.

    PubMed

    Kauer, R T; Silvers, J B

    1991-01-01

    Hospital managers may find it difficult to admit their investments have been suboptimal, but such investments often lead to poor returns and less future cash. Inappropriate use of free cash flow produces large transaction costs of exit. The relative efficiency of investor-owned and tax-exempt hospitals in the product market for hospital services is examined as the free cash flow theory is used to explore capital-market conditions of hospitals. Hypotheses concerning the current competitive conditions in the industry are set forth, and the implications of free cash flow for risk, capital-market efficiency, and the cost of capital to tax-exempt institution is compared to capital-market norms. PMID:1743965

  9. Home versus hospital confinement

    PubMed Central

    Barry, C. N.

    1980-01-01

    The case for hospital rather than home delivery has been powerfully argued, especially in and since the Report of the Peel Committee. Nevertheless, evidence of comparison with other countries, notably the Netherlands, suggests the choice is not necessarily simple. Some general practitioner units are now reporting perinatal mortality rates which are consistently lower than those of specialist units, and recent statistical analyses suggest that the presence of more high risk cases in consultant units does not explain this. The only big controlled home-versus-hospital trial did not lead to a significantly lower perinatal mortality rate in the hospital group. The onus of proof now seems to lie with those who advocate 100 per cent hospital confinement. PMID:7373581

  10. Media and Influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, William H.

    The public information media provides information on current events (news), entertainment (programming), and opinions offered by trusted public sources (e.g., business, academic or religious spokespersons, journalists, and government officials). Consequently, it is a major force in shaping a populace's attitudes toward significant social issues and of great interest to intervention planners. The chapter attempts to provide modelers and intervention analysts alike with sufficient understanding of media mechanisms and current research that they can begin contributing to, and benefiting from this important area of study.

  11. National Media Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Robert

    1992-01-01

    A review of the National Media Laboratory (NML) is presented. The mission of the NML is to support current government user data storage needs and assist them in getting the most efficient 'commercial' solutions in the future. The motivation for a National Media Laboratory is as follows: recording systems are the major government image and data exploitation bottleneck; government data recording performance and storage requirements lead commercial practice by 3-5 years; the supporting commercial recorder industry is large but principally focused on video not data formats; lack of standards; and lack of transfer of commercial knowledge base to program offices and operational sites.

  12. Acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Gretchen

    2014-03-01

    One in 4 children will have at least 1 episode of acute otitis media (AOM) by age 10 years. AOM results from infection of fluid that has become trapped in the middle ear. The bacteria that most often cause AOM are Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis. Differentiating AOM from otitis media with effusion (OME) is a critical skill for physicians, as accurate diagnosis will guide appropriate treatment of these conditions. Although fluid is present in the middle ear in both conditions, the fluid is not infected in OME as is seen in AOM patients. PMID:24439877

  13. Solitons in quadratic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, M.; Di Menza, L.; Saut, J. C.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the properties of solitonic structures arising in quadratic media. First, we recall the derivation of systems governing the interaction process for waves propagating in such media and we check the local and global well-posedness of the corresponding Cauchy problem. Then, we look for stationary states in the context of normal or anomalous dispersion regimes, that lead us to either elliptic or non-elliptic systems and we address the problem of orbital stability. Finally, some numerical experiments are carried out in order to compute localized states for several regimes and to study dynamic stability as well as long-time asymptotics.

  14. Acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Gretchen

    2014-03-01

    One in 4 children will have at least 1 episode of acute otitis media (AOM) by age 10 years. AOM results from infection of fluid that has become trapped in the middle ear. The bacteria that most often cause AOM are Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis. Differentiating AOM from otitis media with effusion (OME) is a critical skill for physicians, as accurate diagnosis will guide appropriate treatment of these conditions. Although fluid is present in the middle ear in both conditions, the fluid is not infected in OME as is seen in AOM patients.

  15. Morphometric analysis of cerebral ventricular system from MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Aamer; Hu, QingMao; Nowinski, Wieslaw L.

    2004-04-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid filled ventricular system is an essential part of brain. The volume, shape and size of this ventricular system remain more or less constant and various pathologies directly or indirectly affect them. Morphometric analysis of cerebral ventricular system is important for evaluating changes due to growth, aging, intrinsic and extrinsic pathologies. Previous quantification efforts using ex vivo techniques suffered considerable error due to deformation of slices during sectioning, and numerous other factors. In vivo studies using air or contrast media also introduce volumetric changes in the ventricles thus giving erroneous quantitative information. Imaging of ventricular anatomy avoids these problems and allows repetitive studies following progression of ventricular system changes due to disease or natural processes. We have developed a methodology for automated extraction of ventricular system from MR neuroimages. Once extracted, landmarks are located on the surface of ventricular system automatically. These landmarks are then used for calculation of the ventricular shape, volume and size. A total of 20 brain ventricular systems were analyzed. The morphometric dimensions of the ventricles are presented in this paper. This study forms an initial basis for more advanced work on ventricular segmentation and morphometry.

  16. Managing diversity in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, R H; Sullivan, D B

    1993-01-01

    Hospital work force diversity, although potentially a source of creativity and improved problem solving, is often a source of political strife and the mistreatment of people based on their identification with one or another of the diverse groups that are employed in hospitals. Factors linked to these phenomena are discussed and are the basis for suggestions about how administrators can deal with the organizational pathologies that are often associated with unmanaged work force diversity.

  17. [Hospital organizational structure].

    PubMed

    Bittar, O J

    1994-01-01

    The basic point for an Institution to work is the existence of a definite organizational structure that puts together similar areas allowing decisions and the operationalization of different tasks. Knowledge and analysis of structures of private and public hospitals and a bibliography review about the issue is the purpose of this paper. Suggestions are given about the elaboration of small structures and the utilization of matrix management in order to accomplish the hospitals objectives.

  18. Organizational leadership in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Longest, B B; Darr, K; Rakich, J S

    1993-01-01

    Hospitals face very dynamic environments and must meet diverse needs in the communities they serve and respond to multiple expectations imposed by their stakeholders. Coupled with these variables, the fact that leadership in these organizations is a shared phenomenon makes organizational leadership in them very complicated. An integrative overview of the organizational leadership role of CEOs in hospitals is presented, and determinants of success in playing this role are discussed.

  19. Cogeneration for hospitals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    With health care costs on the rise, hospitals are looking for ways to reduce operating expenses-especially utility bills. But hospitals, more than anyone else, need a continuous source of electricity, heating and air conditioning. They cannot turn off medical equipment or climate control systems in the name of energy conservation. Hospital Corporation of America (HCA), with the help of the Gas Research Institute (GRI), has found a way to supply affordable and efficient power to a mid-size hospital in Houston, Texas. A 500-kilowatt (kw) gasfired cogeneration system, sold as a package, is now being field-tested at the Medical Center Del Oro, a 258-bed hospital facility. The cogeneration system, which began operating last month, will supply the medical center with 145 tons of cooling (or 2.3 MMBtu/hour space heating) and 500,000 Btu/hour for water heating, in addition to the 500 kw of electricity. A Caterpillar continuous-duty turbocharged gas-fueled engine serves as the prime mover, and heat is recovered from its exhaust and from water used to cool the engine. A Trane single-effect absorption chiller supplies chilled water for air conditioning the hospital.

  20. Financing hospital disaster preparedness.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzo, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    Disaster preparedness and response have gained increased attention in the United States as a result of terrorism and disaster threats. However, funding of hospital preparedness, especially surge capacity, has lagged behind other preparedness priorities. Only a small portion of the money allocated for national preparedness is directed toward health care, and hospitals receive very little of that. Under current policy, virtually the entire funding stream for hospital preparedness comes from general tax revenues. Medical payers (e.g., Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurance) directly fund little, if any, of the current bill. Funding options to improve preparedness include increasing the current federal grants allocated to hospitals, using payer fees or a tax to subsidize preparedness, and financing other forms of expansion capability, such as mobile hospitals. Alternatively, the status quo of marginal preparedness can be maintained. In any event, achieving higher levels of preparedness likely will take the combined commitment of the hospital industry, public and private payers, and federal, state, and local governments. Ultimately, the costs of preparedness will be borne by the public in the form of taxes, higher healthcare costs, or through the acceptance of greater risk.