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Sample records for cerebral metabolic features

  1. [Cerebral hydatid disease: imaging features].

    PubMed

    Tlili-Graiess, K; El-Ouni, F; Gharbi-Jemni, H; Arifa, N; Moulahi, H; Mrad-Dali, K; Guesmi, H; Abroug, S; Yacoub, M; Krifa, H

    2006-12-01

    Cerebral hytatid cysts (HC) are extremely rare, forming 2% of all intra cranial space occupying lesions even in counties where the disease is endemic. HC diagnosis is usually based on a pathognomonic computed tomography (CT) pattern. In order to assess the value of MR we reviewed the CT (n=25) and magnetic resonance (MR, n=4 including diffusion and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in 1) imaging of 25 patients with pathologically confirmed cerebral hydatid disease. 19 HC were seen in children under 16 years. All were supra tentorial with 22 in the middle cerebral artery territory. HC was solitary in 18 cases, unilocular in 23 and multi-vesicular in 2 with heavily calcified pericyst in 1. 2 cysts were intra ventricular and 1 intra aqueducal. The most typical features were well defined, smooth thin walled spherical or oval cystic lesions of CSF density and/or signal with considerable mass effect (20/25). Surrounding oedema with complete or incomplete rim enhancement was seen in 3 cases which were labelled as complicated and/or infected cysts. Although CT is diagnostic of hydatid disease in almost all cases (22/25), MRI including diffusion and spectroscopy precisely demonstrate location, number, cyst capsule, type of signal and enhancement and allows diagnosis of atypical or complicated HC and appears more helpful in surgical planning.

  2. Hyperglycemia accelerates apparent diffusion coefficient-defined lesion growth after focal cerebral ischemia in rats with and without features of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tarr, David; Graham, Delyth; Roy, Lisa A; Holmes, William M; McCabe, Christopher; Mhairi Macrae, I; Muir, Keith W; Dewar, Deborah

    2013-10-01

    Poststroke hyperglycemia is associated with a poor outcome yet clinical management is inadequately informed. We sought to determine whether clinically relevant levels of hyperglycemia exert detrimental effects on the early evolution of focal ischemic brain damage, as determined by magnetic resonance imaging, in normal rats and in those modeling the 'metabolic syndrome'. Wistar Kyoto (WKY) or fructose-fed spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone (ffSHRSP) rats were randomly allocated to groups for glucose or vehicle administration before permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. Diffusion-weighted imaging was carried out over the first 4 hours after middle cerebral artery occlusion and lesion volume calculated from apparent diffusion coefficient maps. Infarct volume and immunostaining for markers of oxidative stress were measured in the fixed brain sections at 24 hours. Hyperglycemia rapidly exacerbated early ischemic damage in both WKY and ffSHRSP rats but increased infarct volume only in WKY rats. There was only limited evidence of oxidative stress in hyperglycemic animals. Acute hyperglycemia, at clinically relevant levels, exacerbates early ischemic damage in both normal and metabolic syndrome rats. Management of hyperglycemia may have greatest benefit when performed in the acute phase after stroke in the absence or presence of comorbidities.

  3. Cerebral metabolic adaptation and ketone metabolism after brain injury.

    PubMed

    Prins, Mayumi L

    2008-01-01

    The developing central nervous system has the capacity to metabolize ketone bodies. It was once accepted that on weaning, the 'post-weaned/adult' brain was limited solely to glucose metabolism. However, increasing evidence from conditions of inadequate glucose availability or increased energy demands has shown that the adult brain is not static in its fuel options. The objective of this review is to summarize the body of literature specifically regarding cerebral ketone metabolism at different ages, under conditions of starvation and after various pathologic conditions. The evidence presented supports the following findings: (1) there is an inverse relationship between age and the brain's capacity for ketone metabolism that continues well after weaning; (2) neuroprotective potentials of ketone administration have been shown for neurodegenerative conditions, epilepsy, hypoxia/ischemia, and traumatic brain injury; and (3) there is an age-related therapeutic potential for ketone as an alternative substrate. The concept of cerebral metabolic adaptation under various physiologic and pathologic conditions is not new, but it has taken the contribution of numerous studies over many years to break the previously accepted dogma of cerebral metabolism. Our emerging understanding of cerebral metabolism is far more complex than could have been imagined. It is clear that in addition to glucose, other substrates must be considered along with fuel interactions, metabolic challenges, and cerebral maturation.

  4. Cerebral glucose metabolism in Wernicke's, Broca's, and conduction aphasia

    SciTech Connect

    Metter, E.J.; Kempler, D.; Jackson, C.; Hanson, W.R.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Phelps, M.E.

    1989-01-01

    Cerebral glucose metabolism was evaluated in patients with either Wernicke's (N = 7), Broca's (N = 11), or conduction (N = 10) aphasia using /sup 18/F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose with positron emission tomography. The three aphasic syndromes differed in the degree of left-to-right frontal metabolic asymmetry, with Broca's aphasia showing severe asymmetry and Wernicke's aphasia mild-to-moderate metabolic asymmetry, while patients with conduction aphasia were metabolically symmetric. On the other hand, the three syndromes showed the same degree of metabolic decline in the left temporal region. The parietal region appeared to separate conduction aphasia from both Broca's and Wernicke's aphasias. Common aphasic features in the three syndromes appear to be due to common changes in the temporal region, while unique features were associated with frontal and parietal metabolic differences.

  5. Electroencephalographic and clinical features of cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    Crawley, J; Smith, S; Muthinji, P; Marsh, K; Kirkham, F

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Seizures are a prominent feature of childhood cerebral malaria, and are associated with an increased risk of death and neurological sequelae. We present the electroencephalographic (EEG) findings from a detailed clinical and electrophysiological study.
METHODS—Children with cerebral malaria had EEGs recorded within six hours of admission, and at 12 hourly intervals until recovery of consciousness. Ten deeply comatose children underwent intracranial pressure monitoring. Children were not mechanically ventilated, which made it possible to directly correlate the clinical and EEG findings.
RESULTS—Of 65 children aged 9 months and above, 40 had one or more seizures, and 18 had an episode of status epilepticus. Most seizures were partial motor, and spike wave activity consistently arose from the posterior temporo-parietal region, a border zone area lying between territories supplied by the carotid and vertebrobasilar circulations. Fifteen children had seizures that were clinically subtle or electrographic. Clinical seizures were associated with an abrupt rise in intracranial pressure. Fifty children recovered fully, seven died, and eight had persistent neurological sequelae. Initial EEG recordings of very slow frequency, or with background asymmetry, burst suppression, or interictal discharges, were associated with an adverse outcome.
CONCLUSIONS—Serial EEG recording has uncovered a range of clinical, subtle, and electrographic seizures complicating childhood cerebral malaria, and has emphasised their importance in the pathogenesis of coma. Further work is required to determine the most appropriate regimen for the prophylaxis and treatment of seizures in cerebral malaria, in order to improve outcome.

 PMID:11207176

  6. Epilepsy, cerebral blood flow, and cerebral metabolic rate.

    PubMed

    Duncan, R

    1992-01-01

    Penfield's observations in the 1930s provided the first systematic evidence of changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) associated with focal seizures. Further studies in humans and animals confirmed increases in cerebral blood flow and metabolism during generalised seizures, but the interictal, ictal, and postictal changes in focal epilepsy have begun to be elucidated in the last decade with the advent of in vivo imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and, in the case of animal studies, of autoradiography. Most studies have been of temporal lobe epilepsy. Interictally, the characteristic finding has been reduced blood flow and/or metabolism in the affected temporal lobe, or more extensively in the ipsilateral hemisphere. The few studies to date of ictal or postictal changes have been of rCBF using SPECT. They show hyperperfusion of the whole temporal lobe ictally, hyperperfusion of the hippocampus, combined with hypoperfusion of lateral structures in the immediate postictal period. Later in the postictal period, hypoperfusion alone is seen. Studies of focal seizures in animals have shown hyperperfusion and hypermetabolism at the site of the focus often with widespread depression of both parameters in the ipsilateral neocortex. Limited studies of coupling between blood flow and metabolism in humans have suggested that flow during seizures is adequate for metabolic demand, although some animal studies have suggested localised areas of uncoupling. The results of modern in vivo imaging of ictal and postictal changes in blood flow and metabolism have correlated well with Penfield's observations, and these changes are now being used to help localise epileptic foci, allowing wider use of the surgical treatment he pioneered.

  7. Patterns of human local cerebral glucose metabolism during epileptic seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J. Jr.; Kuhl, D.E.; Phelps, M.E.

    1982-10-01

    Ictal patterns of local cerebral metabolic rate have been studied in epileptic patients by positron computed tomography with /sup 18/F-labeled 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Partial seizures were associated with activation of anatomic structures unique to each patient studied. Ictal increases and decreases in local cerebral metabolism were observed. Scans performed during generalized convulsions induced by electroshock demonstrated a diffuse ictal increase and postictal decrease in cerebral metabolism. Petit mal absences were associated with a diffuse increase in cerebral metabolic rate. The ictal fluorodeoxyglucose patterns obtained from patients do not resemble autoradiographic patterns obtained from common experimental animal models of epilepsy.

  8. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism during sleep.

    PubMed

    Madsen, P L; Vorstrup, S

    1991-01-01

    A review of the current literature regarding sleep-induced changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate (CMR) is presented. Early investigations have led to the notion that dreamless sleep was characterized by global values of CBF and CMR practically at the level of wakefulness, while rapid eye movement (REM) sleep (dream sleep) was a state characterized by a dramatically increased level of CBF and possibly also of CMR. However, recent investigations firmly contradict this notion. Investigations on CBF and CMR performed during non-REM sleep, taking the effect of different levels of sleep into consideration, show that light sleep (stage II) is characterized by global levels of CBF and CMR only slightly reduced by 3-10% below the level associated with wakefulness, whereas CBF and CMR during deep sleep (stage III-IV) is dramatically reduced by 25-44%. Furthermore, recent data indicate that global levels of CBF and CMR are about the same during REM sleep as in wakefulness. On the regional level, deep sleep seems to be associated with a uniform decrease in regional CBF and CMR. Investigations concerning regional CBF and CMR during REM sleep are few but data from recent investigations seem to identify site-specific changes in regional CBF and CMR during REM sleep. CBF and CMR are reflections of cerebral synaptic activity and the magnitude of reduction in these variables associated with deep sleep indicates that overall cerebral synaptic activity is reduced to approximately one-half the level associated with wakefulness, while cerebral synaptic activity levels during REM sleep are similar to wakefulness. However, even though the new understanding of CBF and CMR during sleep provides significant and important information of the brain's mode of working during sleep, it does not at its current state identify the physiological processes involved in sleep or the physiological role of sleep.

  9. Effects of hyperglycemia and effects of ketosis on cerebral perfusion, cerebral water distribution, and cerebral metabolism.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Nicole; Ngo, Catherine; Anderson, Steven; Yuen, Natalie; Trifu, Alexandra; O'Donnell, Martha

    2012-07-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) may cause brain injuries in children. The mechanisms responsible are difficult to elucidate because DKA involves multiple metabolic derangements. We aimed to determine the independent effects of hyperglycemia and ketosis on cerebral metabolism, blood flow, and water distribution. We used magnetic resonance spectroscopy to measure ratios of cerebral metabolites (ATP to inorganic phosphate [Pi], phosphocreatine [PCr] to Pi, N-acetyl aspartate [NAA] to creatine [Cr], and lactate to Cr) and diffusion-weighted imaging and perfusion-weighted imaging to assess cerebral water distribution (apparent diffusion coefficient [ADC] values) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) in three groups of juvenile rats (hyperglycemic, ketotic, and normal control). ATP-to-Pi ratio was reduced in both hyperglycemic and ketotic rats in comparison with controls. PCr-to-Pi ratio was reduced in the ketotic group, and there was a trend toward reduction in the hyperglycemic group. No significant differences were observed in NAA-to-Cr or lactate-to-Cr ratio. Cortical ADC was reduced in both groups (indicating brain cell swelling). Cortical CBF was also reduced in both groups. We conclude that both hyperglycemia and ketosis independently cause reductions in cerebral high-energy phosphates, CBF, and cortical ADC values. These effects may play a role in the pathophysiology of DKA-related brain injury.

  10. Cerebral energy metabolism and microdialysis in neurocritical care.

    PubMed

    Nordström, Carl-Henrik

    2010-04-01

    It is of obvious clinical importance to monitor cerebral metabolism--in particular, cerebral energy metabolism and indicators of cellular damage-online at the bedside. The technique of cerebral microdialysis provides the opportunity for continuous monitoring of metabolic changes in the tissue before they are reflected in peripheral blood chemistry or in systemic physiological parameters. The basic idea of microdialysis is to mimic the function of a blood capillary by positioning a thin dialysis tube in the tissue and to be used to analyze the chemical composition of the interstitial fluid. The biochemical variables used during routine monitoring were chosen to cover important aspects of cerebral energy metabolism (glucose, pyruvate and lactate), to indicate excessive interstitial levels of excitatory transmitter substance (glutamate) and to give indications of degradation of cellular membranes (glycerol). Furthermore, pharmokinetic studies can be conducted using microdialysis. This article discusses technical and physiological aspects of microdialysis, and its clinical applications in brain injury.

  11. Similarities of cerebral glucose metabolism in Alzheimer's and Parkinsonian dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.; Metter, E.J.; Benson, D.F.; Ashford, J.W.; Riege, W.H.; Fujikawa, D.G.; Markham, C.H.; Maltese, A.

    1985-05-01

    In the dementia of probable Alzheimer's Disease (AD), there is a decrease in the metabolic ratio of parietal cortex/caudate-thalamus which relates measures in the most and in the least severely affected locations. Since some demented patients with Parkinson's Disease (PDD) are known to share pathological and neurochemical features with AD patients, the authors evaluated if the distribution of cerebral hypometabolism in PDD and AD were the same. Local cerebral metabolic rates were determined using the FDG method and positron tomography in subjects with AD (N=23), and PDD (N=7), multiple infarct dementia (MID)(N=6), and controls (N=10). In MID, the mean par/caudthal ratio was normal (0.79 +- 0.9, N=6). In AD and PDD patients, this ratio correlated negatively with both the severity (r=-0.624, rho=0.001) and duration (r=-0.657, rho=0.001) of dementia. The ratio was markedly decreased in subjects with mild to severe dementia (0.46 +- 0.09, N=21) and with dementia duration greater than two years (0.44 +- 0.08, N=18), but the ratio was also significantly decreased in patients with less advanced disease, i.e., when dementia was only questionable (0.64 +- 0.14, N=9) (t=2.27, rho<0.037) and when duration was two years or less (0.62 +- 0.13, N=12)(t=2.88, rho<0.009). This similarity of hypometabolism in AD and PDD is additional evidence that a common mechanism may operate in both disorders. The par/caud-thal metabolic ratio may be an index useful in the differential diagnosis of early dementia.

  12. Multimodal optical imaging system for in vivo investigation of cerebral oxygen delivery and energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Gorczynska, Iwona; Fujimoto, James G.; Boas, David A.; Sakadžić, Sava

    2015-01-01

    Improving our understanding of brain function requires novel tools to observe multiple physiological parameters with high resolution in vivo. We have developed a multimodal imaging system for investigating multiple facets of cerebral blood flow and metabolism in small animals. The system was custom designed and features multiple optical imaging capabilities, including 2-photon and confocal lifetime microscopy, optical coherence tomography, laser speckle imaging, and optical intrinsic signal imaging. Here, we provide details of the system’s design and present in vivo observations of multiple metrics of cerebral oxygen delivery and energy metabolism, including oxygen partial pressure, microvascular blood flow, and NADH autofluorescence. PMID:26713212

  13. Hypothermia reduces cerebral metabolic rate and cerebral blood flow in newborn pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Busija, D.W.; Leffler, C.W. )

    1987-10-01

    The authors examined effects of hypothermia on cerebral metabolic rate and cerebral blood flow in anesthetized, newborn pigs (1-4 days old). Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was determined with 15-{mu}m radioactive microspheres. Regional CBF ranged from 44 to 66 ml{center dot}min{sup {minus}1}{center dot}100 g{sup {minus}1}, and cerebral metabolic rate was 1.94 {plus minus} 0.23 ml O{sub 2}{center dot}100 g{sup {minus}1}{center dot}min{sup {minus}1} during normothermia (39{degree}C). Reduction of rectal temperature to 34-35{degree}C decreased CBF and cerebral metabolic rate 40-50%. In another group of piglets, they examined responsiveness of the cerebral circulation to arterial hypercapnia during hypothermia. Although absolute values for normocapnic and hypercapnic CBF were reduced by hypothermia and absolute values for normocapnic and hypercapnic cerebrovascular resistance were increased, the percentage changes from control in these variables during hypercapnia were similar during normothermia and hypothermia. In another group of animals that were maintained normothermic and exposed to two episodes of hypercapnia, there was no attenuation of cerebrovascular dilation during the second episode. They conclude that hypothermia reduces CBF secondarily to a decrease in cerebral metabolic rate and that percent dilator responsiveness to arterial hypercapnia is unaltered when body temperature is reduced.

  14. Cerebral tumors: specific features in children.

    PubMed

    Koob, M; Girard, N

    2014-10-01

    Brain tumors are the second leading cause of cancer in children. Primary tumors predominate and are of very varied histological types. Their prognosis and treatment depend on the histological type and grade. The diagnostic approach to these includes analysis of the site of the lesion and appearances on computed tomography and MR, and taking account of the age and clinical features of the child. CT is used to diagnose the tumor in an emergency situation. Conventional MR provides a morphological approach and allows a staging assessment to be carried out before surgery. Advanced MR techniques (diffusion-weighted and perfusion imaging, MR spectroscopy) provide further information for the differential diagnosis, presumptive diagnosis of type and grade and to guide biopsy towards the most malignant areas in the lesion.

  15. An Evidence-Based Review of Related Metabolites and Metabolic Network Research on Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mengting; Tang, Liying; Liu, Xin; Fang, Jing; Zhan, Hao; Wu, Hongwei; Yang, Hongjun

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, metabolomics analyses have been widely applied to cerebral ischemia research. This paper introduces the latest proceedings of metabolomics research on cerebral ischemia. The main techniques, models, animals, and biomarkers of cerebral ischemia will be discussed. With analysis help from the MBRole website and the KEGG database, the altered metabolites in rat cerebral ischemia were used for metabolic pathway enrichment analyses. Our results identify the main metabolic pathways that are related to cerebral ischemia and further construct a metabolic network. These results will provide useful information for elucidating the pathogenesis of cerebral ischemia, as well as the discovery of cerebral ischemia biomarkers. PMID:27274780

  16. Metabolic myopathies: clinical features and diagnostic approach.

    PubMed

    Smith, Edward C; El-Gharbawy, Areeg; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2011-05-01

    The rheumatologist is frequently called on to evaluate patients with complaints of myalgia, muscle cramps, and fatigue. The evaluation of these patients presents a diagnostic challenge given the nonspecific and intermittent nature of their complaints, often leading to inappropriate diagnostic testing. When these symptoms are associated with physical exertion, a metabolic myopathy should be suspected Although inflammatory myopathies may present with similar features, such a pattern should prompt a thorough evaluation for an underlying metabolic myopathy. This review discusses the most common causes of metabolic myopathies and reviews the current diagnostic options available to the clinician.

  17. Local cerebral metabolism during partial seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J. Jr.; Kuhl, D.E.; Phelps, M.E.; Rausch, R.; Nuwer, M.

    1983-04-01

    Interictal and ictal fluorodeoxyglucose scans were obtained with positron CT from four patients with spontaneous recurrent partial seizures, one with epilepsia partialis continua, and one with a single partial seizure induced by electrical stimulation of the hippocampus. Ictal metabolic patterns were different for each patient studied. Focal and generalized increased and decreased metabolism were observed. Ictal hypermetabolism may exceed six times the interictal rate and could represent activation of excitatory or inhibitory synapses in the epileptogenic region and its projection fields. Hypometabolism seen on ictal scans most likely reflects postictal depression and may indicate projection fields of inhibited neurons. No quantitative relationship between alterations in metabolism and EEG or behavioral measurements of ictal events could be demonstrated.

  18. History of International Society for Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Paulson, Olaf B; Kanno, Iwao; Reivich, Martin; Sokoloff, Louis

    2012-07-01

    Interest in the brain's circulation dates back more than a century and has been steadily growing. Quantitative methods for measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and energy metabolism became available in the middle of the 20th century and gave a new boost to the research. Scientific meetings dealing with CBF and metabolism were arranged, and the fast growing research led to a demand for a specialized journal. In this scientific environment, the International Society for Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism (ISCBFM) and its official Journal of Cerebral Metabolism were established in 1981 and has since then been a major success. The development of new brain imaging methods has had a major impact. Regulation of CBF and ischemia has been the main topics at the meetings. A new field of brain mapping research emerged and has now its own society and meetings. Brain emission tomography research has grown within the society and is now an integrated part. The ISCBFM is a sound society, and support of young scientists is among its goals. Several awards have been established. Other activities including summer schools, courses, satellite meetings, and Gordon conferences have contributed to the success of the society and strengthened the research.

  19. History of International Society for Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, Olaf B; Kanno, Iwao; Reivich, Martin; Sokoloff, Louis

    2012-01-01

    Interest in the brain's circulation dates back more than a century and has been steadily growing. Quantitative methods for measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and energy metabolism became available in the middle of the 20th century and gave a new boost to the research. Scientific meetings dealing with CBF and metabolism were arranged, and the fast growing research led to a demand for a specialized journal. In this scientific environment, the International Society for Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism (ISCBFM) and its official Journal of Cerebral Metabolism were established in 1981 and has since then been a major success. The development of new brain imaging methods has had a major impact. Regulation of CBF and ischemia has been the main topics at the meetings. A new field of brain mapping research emerged and has now its own society and meetings. Brain emission tomography research has grown within the society and is now an integrated part. The ISCBFM is a sound society, and support of young scientists is among its goals. Several awards have been established. Other activities including summer schools, courses, satellite meetings, and Gordon conferences have contributed to the success of the society and strengthened the research. PMID:22186671

  20. Regional cerebral glucose metabolism in patients with alcoholic Korsakoff's syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, R.M.; Parker, E.S.; Clark, C.M.; Martin, P.R.; George, D.T.; Weingartner, H.; Sokoloff, L.; Ebert, M.H.; Mishkin, M.

    1985-05-01

    Seven alcoholic male subjects diagnosed as having Korsakoff's syndrome and eight age-matched male normal volunteers were studied with /sup 18/F 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2/sup 18/FDG). All subjects were examined at rest with eyes covered in a quiet, darkened room. Serial plasma samples were obtained following injection of 4 to 5 mCi of 2/sup 18/FDG. Tomographic slices spaced at 10mm axial increments were obtained (in-plane resolution = 1.75 cm, axial resolution = 1.78 cm). Four planes were selected from each subject, and a total of 46 regions of interest were sampled and glucose metabolic rates for each region calculated. The mean glucose metalbolic rate for the 46 regions in the Korsakoff subjects was significantly lower than that in the normal controls (5.17 +- .43 versus 6.6 +- 1.31). A Q-component analysis, which examined each subject's regional rates relative to his mean rate, revealed two distinct patterns in the Korsakoff group. Glucose metabolism was significantly reduced in 37 of the 46 regions sampled. Reduced cerebral glucose metabolism in a nondemented group of subjects has not previously been reported. The reduction in cortical metabolism may be the result of damage to sub-cortical projecting systems. The differing patterns of cerebral metabolism in Korsakoff's syndrome suggests subgroups with differing neuropathology. Regions implicated in memory function, medial temporal, thalamic and medial prefrontal were among the regions reduced in metabolism.

  1. Metabolic profiling reveals key metabolic features of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Catchpole, Gareth; Platzer, Alexander; Weikert, Cornelia; Kempkensteffen, Carsten; Johannsen, Manfred; Krause, Hans; Jung, Klaus; Miller, Kurt; Willmitzer, Lothar; Selbig, Joachim; Weikert, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that metabolic changes play a pivotal role in the biology of cancer and in particular renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Here, a global metabolite profiling approach was applied to characterize the metabolite pool of RCC and normal renal tissue. Advanced decision tree models were applied to characterize the metabolic signature of RCC and to explore features of metastasized tumours. The findings were validated in a second independent dataset. Vitamin E derivates and metabolites of glucose, fatty acid, and inositol phosphate metabolism determined the metabolic profile of RCC. α-tocopherol, hippuric acid, myoinositol, fructose-1-phosphate and glucose-1-phosphate contributed most to the tumour/normal discrimination and all showed pronounced concentration changes in RCC. The identified metabolic profile was characterized by a low recognition error of only 5% for tumour versus normal samples. Data on metastasized tumours suggested a key role for metabolic pathways involving arachidonic acid, free fatty acids, proline, uracil and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. These results illustrate the potential of mass spectroscopy based metabolomics in conjunction with sophisticated data analysis methods to uncover the metabolic phenotype of cancer. Differentially regulated metabolites, such as vitamin E compounds, hippuric acid and myoinositol, provide leads for the characterization of novel pathways in RCC.

  2. Determination of patterns of regional cerebral glucose metabolism in normal aging and dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Alavi, A.; Chawluk, J.; Hurtig, H.; Dann, R.; Rosen, M.; Kushner, M.; Silver, F.; Reivich, M.

    1985-05-01

    Regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose (rCMRGlc) were measured using 18F-FDG and positron emission tomography (PET) in 14 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) (age=64), 9 elderly controls (age=61), and 9 young controls (age=28). PET studies were performed without sensory stimulation or deprivation. Metabolic rates in individual brain regions were determined using an atlas overlay. Relative metabolic rates (rCMRGl c/global CMRGlc) were determined for all subjects. Comparison of young and elderly controls demonstrated significant decreases in frontal metabolism (rho<0.005) and right inferior parietal (IP) metabolism (rho<0.02) with normal aging. Patients with mild-moderate AD (NMAD) (n=8) when compared to age-matched controls, showed further reduction in right IP metabolism (rho<0.02). SAD patients also demonstrated metabolic decrements in left hemisphere language areas (rho<0.01). This latter finding is consistent with language disturbance observed late in the course of the disease. Out data reveal progressive changes in patterns of cerebral glucose utilization with aging and demential with reflect salient clinical features of these processes.

  3. [Cerebral venous thrombosis imagiologic features in a pregnant woman].

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Maria Madalena; Rios, Ana Cristina; Fragata, Isabel; Baptista, José Tiago; Manaças, Rui; Reis, João

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a relatively rare but serious condition potentially reversible upon accurate diagnosis and adequate therapy. The peri-partum state and pregnancy are predisposing factors and TVC accounts for about 6% of maternal deaths. Its clinical symptoms depend on the the thrombus site and extension, and also on the existing collateral vessels network. We present the case of a 33 year-old woman, 13 weeks pregnant, that complained of headaches and whose cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed a subtotal oclusión of the superior sagittal sinus. We discuss the imaging features of dural venous thrombosis in the acute phase.

  4. Correlation between cerebral oxygen metabolism and cerebral blood flow simultaneously measured before and after acetazolamide administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroichiro; Yamauchi, Hideto; Hazama, Shiro; Hamamoto, Hirotsugu; Inoue, Nobuhiro

    1999-10-01

    The cerebral circulation and metabolism of ten preoperative cardiac surgery patients were assessed. Alterations in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), measured by 123I-N- isopropyl-p-iodo-amphetamine single-photon emission computed tomography, and in cerebral oxygen metabolism, simultaneously detected by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) before and after acetazolamide administration, were investigated. The rCBF (ml/min/100 g) increased significantly from 40.21 +/- 7.65 to 56.24 +/- 13.69 (p equals 0.001), and a significant increase in oxyhemoglobin (Oxy-Hb) of 13.9% (p equals 0.0022) and total hemoglobin (Total-Hb) of 5.7% (0.0047) along with a significant decrease in deoxyhemoglobin (Deoxy-Hb) of 8.9% (p equals 0.0414) were observed concomitantly. Thus, the Oxy-Hb/Total- Hb ratio (%Oxy-Hb) rose significantly from 67.26 +/- 9.82% to 72.98 +/- 8.09% (p equals 0.0022). Examination of the relationships between individual parameters showed that the percentage changes in rCBF and Oxy-Hb were significantly correlated (r equals 0.758, p equals 0.011). The percentage changes in rCBF and %Oxy-Hb were also correlated significantly (r equals 0.740, p equals 0.014). In conclusion, this evidence suggested that NIRS is able to detect relative changes in cerebral hemodynamics and reflect luxury perfusion induced by acetazolamide.

  5. PET measurements of cerebral metabolism corrected for CSF contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Chawluk, J.; Alavi, A.; Dann, R.; Kushner, M.J.; Hurtig, H.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Reivich, M.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-three subjects have been studied with PET and anatomic imaging (proton-NMR and/or CT) in order to determine the effect of cerebral atrophy on calculations of metabolic rates. Subgroups of neurologic disease investigated include stroke, brain tumor, epilepsy, psychosis, and dementia. Anatomic images were digitized through a Vidicon camera and analyzed volumetrically. Relative areas for ventricles, sulci, and brain tissue were calculated. Preliminary analysis suggests that ventricular volumes as determined by NMR and CT are similar, while sulcal volumes are larger on NMR scans. Metabolic rates (18F-FDG) were calculated before and after correction for CSF spaces, with initial focus upon dementia and normal aging. Correction for atrophy led to a greater increase (%) in global metabolic rates in demented individuals (18.2 +- 5.3) compared to elderly controls (8.3 +- 3.0,p < .05). A trend towards significantly lower glucose metabolism in demented subjects before CSF correction was not seen following correction for atrophy. These data suggest that volumetric analysis of NMR images may more accurately reflect the degree of cerebral atrophy, since NMR does not suffer from beam hardening artifact due to bone-parenchyma juxtapositions. Furthermore, appropriate correction for CSF spaces should be employed if current resolution PET scanners are to accurately measure residual brain tissue metabolism in various pathological states.

  6. Effect of anxiety on cortical cerebral blood flow and metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Gur, R.C.; Gur, R.E.; Resnick, S.M.; Skolnick, B.E.; Alavi, A.; Reivich, M.

    1987-04-01

    The relation between anxiety and cortical activity was compared in two samples of normal volunteers. One group was studied with the noninvasive xenon-133 inhalation technique for measuring cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the other with positron emission tomography (PET) using /sup 18/Flurodeoxyglucose (/sup 18/FDG) for measuring cerebral metabolic rates (CMR) for glucose. The inhalation technique produced less anxiety than the PET procedure, and for low anxiety subjects, there was a linear increase in CBF with anxiety. For higher anxiety subjects, however, there was a linear decrease in CBF with increased anxiety. The PET group manifested a linear decrease in CMR with increased anxiety. The results indicate that anxiety can have systematic effects on cortical activity, and this should be taken into consideration when comparing data from different procedures. They also suggest a physiologic explanation of a fundamental behavioral law that stipulates a curvilinear, inverted-U relationship between anxiety and performance.

  7. CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW AND METABOLISM IN ANXIETY AND ANXIETY DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Roy J.

    1994-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are some of the commonest psychiatric disorders and anxiety commonly co-exists with other psychiatric conditions. Anxiety can also be a normal emotion. Thus, study of the neurobiological effects of anxiety is of considerable significance. In the normal brain, cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism (CMR) serve as indices of brain function. CBF/CMR research is expected to provide new insight into alterations in brain function in anxiety disorders and other psychiatric disorders. Possible associations between stress I anxiety I panic and cerebral ischemia I stroke give additional significance to the effects of anxiety on CBF. With the advent of non-invasive techniques, study of CBF/CMR in anxiety disorders became easier. A large numbers of research reports are available on the effects of stress, anxiety and panic on CBF/CMR in normals and anxiety disorder patients. This article reviews the available human research on this topic. PMID:21743685

  8. Correlation between cerebral oxygen metabolism and cerebral blood flow simultaneously measured before and after acetazolamide administration.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, H; Yamauchi, H; Hazama, S; Hamamoto, H; Inoue, N

    1999-10-01

    The cerebral circulation and metabolism of ten preoperative cardiac surgery patients were assessed. Alterations in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), measured by 123I-N-isopropyl-p-iodo-amphetamine single-photon emission computed tomography, and in cerebral oxygen metabolism, simultaneously detected by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) before and after acetazolamide administration, were investigated. The rCBF (ml/min/100 g) increased significantly from 40.21±7.65 to 56.24±13.69(p<0.001), and a significant increase in oxyhemoglobin (Oxy-Hb) of 13.9% (p=0.0022) and total hemoglobin (Total-Hb) of 5.7% (0.0047) along with a significant decrease in deoxyhemoglobin (Deoxy-Hb) of 8.9% (p=0.0414) were observed concomitantly. Thus, the Oxy-Hb/Total-Hb ratio (%Oxy-Hb) rose significantly from 67.26±9.82% to 72.98±8.09%(p=0.0022). Examination of the relationships between individual parameters showed that the percentage changes in rCBF and Oxy-Hb were significantly correlated (r=0.758,p=0.011). The percentage changes in rCBF and %Oxy-Hb were also correlated significantly (r=0.740,p=0.014). In conclusion, this evidence suggested that NIRS is able to detect relative changes in cerebral hemodynamics and reflect luxury perfusion induced by acetazolamide. © 1999 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

  9. Cerebral metabolism of glucose in benign hereditary chorea

    SciTech Connect

    Suchowersky, O.; Hayden, M.R.; Martin, W.R.; Stoessl, A.J.; Hildebrand, A.M.; Pate, B.D.

    1986-01-01

    Benign hereditary chorea (BHC) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by chorea of early onset with little or no progression. There is marked clinical variability in this disease with some subjects having onset in infancy and others with onset in early adulthood. In contrast to Huntington's disease (HD), there is no dementia. Computed tomography is normal in all subjects with no evidence of caudate nucleus atrophy. We present the results of positron emission tomography using YF-2-fluorodeoxyglucose on three patients with this disorder from two families. Cerebral glucose metabolism in one patient was decreased in the caudate nucleus, as previously reported in HD. The other two persons from a second family showed a relative decrease in metabolic rates of glucose in the caudate when compared with the thalamus. It appears that caudate hypometabolism is not specific for HD. These findings suggest that the caudate nucleus may play a significant role in the pathophysiology of some persons with BHC.

  10. Sustained high-altitude hypoxia increases cerebral oxygen metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Zachary M.; Krizay, Erin; Guo, Jia; Shin, David D.; Scadeng, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is a common condition occurring within hours of rapid exposure to high altitude. Despite its frequent occurrence, the pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie the condition remain poorly understood. We investigated the role of cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO2) in AMS. The purpose of this study was to test 1) if CMRO2 changes in response to hypoxia, and 2) if there is a difference in how individuals adapt to oxygen metabolic changes that may determine who develops AMS and who does not. Twenty-six normal human subjects were recruited into two groups based on Lake Louise AMS score (LLS): those with no AMS (LLS ≤ 2), and those with unambiguous AMS (LLS ≥ 5). [Subjects with intermediate scores (LLS 3–4) were not included.] CMRO2 was calculated from cerebral blood flow and arterial-venous difference in O2 content. Cerebral blood flow was measured using arterial spin labeling MRI; venous O2 saturation was calculated from the MRI of transverse relaxation in the superior sagittal sinus. Arterial O2 saturation was measured via pulse oximeter. Measurements were made during normoxia and after 2-day high-altitude exposure at 3,800 m. In all subjects, CMRO2 increased with sustained high-altitude hypoxia [1.54 (0.37) to 1.82 (0.49) μmol·g−1·min−1, n = 26, P = 0.045]. There was no significant difference in CMRO2 between AMS and no-AMS groups. End-tidal Pco2 was significantly reduced during hypoxia. Low arterial Pco2 is known to increase neural excitability, and we hypothesize that the low arterial Pco2 resulting from ventilatory acclimatization causes the observed increase in CMRO2. PMID:23019310

  11. Cognitive tasks during walking affect cerebral blood flow signal features in middle cerebral arteries and their correlation to gait characteristics.

    PubMed

    Gatouillat, Arthur; Bleton, Héloïse; VanSwearingen, Jessie; Perera, Subashan; Thompson, Scott; Smith, Traci; Sejdić, Ervin

    2015-09-26

    Gait is a complex process involving both cognitive and sensory ability and is strongly impacted by the environment. In this paper, we propose to study of the impact of a cognitive task during gait on the cerebral blood flow velocity, the blood flow signal features and the correlation of gait and blood flow features through a dual task methodology. Both cerebral blood flow velocity and gait characteristics of eleven participants with no history of brain or gait conditions were recorded using transcranial Doppler on mid-cerebral artery while on a treadmill. The cognitive task was induced by a backward counting starting from 10,000 with decrement of 7. Central blood flow velocity raw and envelope features were extracted in both time, frequency and time-scale domain; information-theoretic metrics were also extracted and statistical significances were inspected. A similar feature extraction was performed on the stride interval signal. Statistical differences between the cognitive and baseline trials, between the left and right mid-cerebral arteries signals and the impact of the antropometric variables where studied using linear mixed models. No statistical differences were found between the left and right mid-cerebral arteries flows or the baseline and cognitive state gait features, while statistical differences for specific features were measured between cognitive and baseline states. These statistical differences found between the baseline and cognitive states show that cognitive process has an impact on the cerebral activity during walking. The state was found to have an impact on the correlation between the gait and blood flow features.

  12. Regulation of cerebral metabolism during cortical spreading depression

    PubMed Central

    Feuerstein, Delphine; Gramer, Markus; Takagaki, Masatoshi; Gabel, Paula; Kumagai, Tetsuya; Graf, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed the metabolic response to cortical spreading depression that drastically increases local energy demand to restore ion homeostasis. During single and multiple cortical spreading depressions in the rat cortex, we simultaneously monitored extracellular levels of glucose and lactate using rapid sampling microdialysis and glucose influx using 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography while tracking cortical spreading depression using laser speckle imaging. Combining the acquired data with steady-state requirements we developed a mass-conserving compartment model including neurons and glia that was consistent with the observed data. In summary, our findings are: (1) Early breakdown of glial glycogen provides a major source of energy during increased energy demand and leaves 80% of blood-borne glucose to neurons. (2) Lactate is used solely by neurons and only if extracellular lactate levels are >80% above normal. (3) Although the ratio of oxygen and glucose consumption transiently reaches levels <3, the major part (>90%) of the overall energy supply is from oxidative metabolism. (4) During cortical spreading depression, brain release of lactate exceeds its consumption suggesting that lactate is only a circumstantial energy substrate. Our findings provide a general scenario for the metabolic response to increased cerebral energy demand. PMID:26661217

  13. Hepatic and cerebral energy metabolism after neonatal canine alimentation.

    PubMed

    Kliegman, R M; Miettinen, E L; Morton, S K

    1983-04-01

    Intrahepatic and intracerebral metabolic responses to neonatal fasting or enteric carbohydrate alimentation were investigated among newborn dogs. Pups were either fasted or given an intravenous glucose infusion (alimented) before an enteric feeding of physiologic quantities of either glucose or galactose. These pups were also compared to another group which was completely starved throughout the study period. Gastrointestinal carbohydrate feeding resulted in enhanced hepatic glycogen content among pups after a prior state of fasting. Though there were no differences of glycogen content between glucose or galactose feeding in this previously fasted group, combined intravenous glucose and enteric galactose administration produced the greatest effect on hepatic glycogen synthesis. Intrahepatic fructose 1, 6-diphosphate and phosphoenolpyruvate levels were increased among previously fasted pups fed enteric monosaccharides compared to completely starved control pups, whereas intrahepatic phosphoenolpyruvate and pyruvate levels were elevated after combined intravenous and enteric carbohydrate administration. Of greater interest was the observation that hepatic levels of ATP were significantly elevated among all groups given exogenous carbohydrates compared to the completely starved control group. In contrast to the augmented hepatic glycogen and ATP levels, there were no alterations of cerebral glycogen or ATP after alimentation. Nevertheless, cerebral pyruvate and/or phosphoenolpyruvate concentrations were elevated after enteric or combined intravenous and enteric alimentation compared to the totally starved control pups.

  14. A practical method of serial bedside measurement of cerebral blood flow and metabolism during neurointensive care.

    PubMed Central

    Sharples, P M; Stuart, A G; Aynsley-Green, A; Heaviside, D; Pay, D A; McGann, A; Crawford, P J; Harpin, R; Eyre, J A

    1991-01-01

    Acute encephalopathy is a major cause of death and neurological handicap in children. The principle aims of treatment are to provide adequate cerebral blood flow for the brain's metabolic needs and to prevent intracranial pressure rising above the level at which brain herniation occurs. Rational management requires an understanding of the pathophysiological changes in cerebral blood flow and metabolism which occur. The paucity of data on this subject reflects the perceived difficulty of measuring cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolism in children. A modification of the Kety Schmidt technique of measuring cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolism is described. This modification makes it possible to perform serial bedside measurements in children receiving intensive care. This method was used to perform 348 measurements in 58 children. The method was reproducible and no significant complications were encountered. The results indicated that appreciable changes in cerebral blood flow and metabolism could occur in individual patients over time, emphasising the importance of serial measurements. This technique may provide a practical means of monitoring cerebral blood flow and metabolism in very sick children receiving neurointensive care and evaluating the efficacy of treatment. PMID:1755648

  15. Heterogeneous cerebral glucose metabolism in normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    PubMed Central

    Tedeschi, E; Hasselbalch, S G; Waldemar, G; Juhler, M; Høgh, P; Holm, S; Garde, L; Knudsen, L L; Klinken, L; Gjerris, F

    1995-01-01

    The regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRglu) has never been investigated in large consecutive groups of patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH), a potentially treatable form of dementia with an unpredictable outcome after shunt surgery. Using PET and 18F-2-fluorodeoxyglucose, rCMRglu was studied in 18 patients who fulfilled hydrodynamic criteria for NPH and in whom a biopsy of the frontal cortex was obtained. When compared with an age matched group of 11 healthy subjects, the patients with NPH showed a significant rCMRglu reduction in all cortical and subcortical regions of interest. Individual metabolic patterns, however, disclosed a large topographical heterogeneity. Furthermore, histopathological examination identified Alzheimer's disease or cerebrovascular disease in six cases, and no parenchymal disease or non-specific degenerative processes in the remaining 12. After separating the patients according to the histological diagnosis, the rCMRglu patterns were still heterogeneous, the abnormalities ranging from focal to diffuse in both subgroups. After shunt operation, 11 patients did not improve or worsened clinically. Six patients improved; of those, two had Alzheimer changes and two cerebrovascular changes in their biopsy. The metabolic pattern of these six patients did not differ from the rest of the NPH group. The results indicate that the NPH syndrome may be non-specifically associated with different degenerative disorders. The metabolic heterogeneity, together with the heterogeneous histopathological findings, indicate the necessity of reevaluating the pathogenesis of the NPH syndrome, and may account for the high variability in the success rate of shunt surgery series. Images PMID:7500099

  16. Cerebral proliferative angiopathy: Clinical, angiographic features and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Lv, Xianli; Lv, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Here we present our experience with five cerebral proliferative angiopathy (CPA) patients to better delineate the clinical and angiographic features as well as the treatment selection of this disease. Methods Between October 2008 and October 2012, five consecutive patients diagnosed with CPA were admitted to our department in our hospital. All the five patients received magnetic resonance imaging, digital subtraction angiography, and positron emission computed tomography (PET) to definitively confirm this disease. We also collected 15 previously published instances of CPA to analyze the characteristics of this rare entity. Results As to the five patients, three were female and two were male, between the ages of 4 and 52 years with a mean age of 24.8 ± 20.6 years. The PET results showed that perfusion was decreased over the affected hemispheres in all five patients. As to the treatment, only one patient received encephalo-duro-arterio-synangiosis (EDAS) revascularization surgery. The other four patients were conservatively observed. During the follow-up period (range 3–6 years, mean 4 ± 1.9 years), the patient who underwent EDAS surgery manifested relief of clinical symptoms. In the conservative series, the symptoms in two patients aggravated and suffered permanent neurologic deficits. Conclusion CPA is a rare entity. Natural history has showed this disease is not stable and may progress at a certain time point. The EDAS procedure may be a treatment for CPA-related oligemia since there is currently little data and follow-up available. PMID:26472638

  17. Acute hypoxia increases the cerebral metabolic rate – a magnetic resonance imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Ulrich; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob; Lisbjerg, Kristian; Christensen, Søren Just; Law, Ian; Rasmussen, Peter; Olsen, Niels V; Larsson, Henrik BW

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine changes in cerebral metabolism by magnetic resonance imaging of healthy subjects during inhalation of 10% O2 hypoxic air. Hypoxic exposure elevates cerebral perfusion, but its effect on energy metabolism has been less investigated. Magnetic resonance imaging techniques were used to measure global cerebral blood flow and the venous oxygen saturation in the sagittal sinus. Global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen was quantified from cerebral blood flow and arteriovenous oxygen saturation difference. Concentrations of lactate, glutamate, N-acetylaspartate, creatine and phosphocreatine were measured in the visual cortex by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Twenty-three young healthy males were scanned for 60 min during normoxia, followed by 40 min of breathing hypoxic air. Inhalation of hypoxic air resulted in an increase in cerebral blood flow of 15.5% (p = 0.058), and an increase in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen of 8.5% (p = 0.035). Cerebral lactate concentration increased by 180.3% (p<10-6), glutamate increased by 4.7% (p<10-4) and creatine and phosphocreatine decreased by 15.2% (p<10-3). The N-acetylaspartate concentration was unchanged (p = 0.36). In conclusion, acute hypoxia in healthy subjects increased perfusion and metabolic rate, which could represent an increase in neuronal activity. We conclude that marked changes in brain homeostasis occur in the healthy human brain during exposure to acute hypoxia. PMID:26661163

  18. In vivo imaging of cerebral energy metabolism with two-photon fluorescence lifetime microscopy of NADH

    PubMed Central

    Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Sakadžić, Sava; Wu, Weicheng; Becker, Wolfgang; Kasischke, Karl A.; Boas, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Minimally invasive, specific measurement of cellular energy metabolism is crucial for understanding cerebral pathophysiology. Here, we present high-resolution, in vivo observations of autofluorescence lifetime as a biomarker of cerebral energy metabolism in exposed rat cortices. We describe a customized two-photon imaging system with time correlated single photon counting detection and specialized software for modeling multiple-component fits of fluorescence decay and monitoring their transient behaviors. In vivo cerebral NADH fluorescence suggests the presence of four distinct components, which respond differently to brief periods of anoxia and likely indicate different enzymatic formulations. Individual components show potential as indicators of specific molecular pathways involved in oxidative metabolism. PMID:23412419

  19. In vivo imaging of cerebral energy metabolism with two-photon fluorescence lifetime microscopy of NADH.

    PubMed

    Yaseen, Mohammad A; Sakadžić, Sava; Wu, Weicheng; Becker, Wolfgang; Kasischke, Karl A; Boas, David A

    2013-02-01

    Minimally invasive, specific measurement of cellular energy metabolism is crucial for understanding cerebral pathophysiology. Here, we present high-resolution, in vivo observations of autofluorescence lifetime as a biomarker of cerebral energy metabolism in exposed rat cortices. We describe a customized two-photon imaging system with time correlated single photon counting detection and specialized software for modeling multiple-component fits of fluorescence decay and monitoring their transient behaviors. In vivo cerebral NADH fluorescence suggests the presence of four distinct components, which respond differently to brief periods of anoxia and likely indicate different enzymatic formulations. Individual components show potential as indicators of specific molecular pathways involved in oxidative metabolism.

  20. Age differences in intercorrelations between regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, B.; Duara, R.; Rapoport, S.I.

    1986-01-01

    Patterns of cerebral metabolic intercorrelations were compared in the resting state in 15 healthy young men (ages 20 to 32 years) and 15 healthy elderly men (ages 64 to 83 years). Controlling for whole-brain glucose metabolism, partial correlation coefficients were determined between pairs of regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose determined by positron emission tomography using (18F)fluorodeoxyglucose and obtained in 59 brain regions. Compared with the young men, the elderly men had fewer statistically significant correlations, with the most notable reductions observed between the parietal lobe regions, and between the parietal and frontal lobe regions. These results suggest that cerebral functional interactions are reduced in healthy elderly men.

  1. Evaluation of MR derived cerebral oxygen metabolic index in experimental hyperoxic hypercapnia, hypoxia and ischemia

    PubMed Central

    An, Hongyu; Liu, Qingwei; Chen, Yasheng; Lin, Weili

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose A non-invasive MRI method to measure cerebral oxygen metabolism has the potential to assess tissue viability during cerebral ischemia. The purposes of this study were 1) to validate MR oxygenation measurements across a wide range of global cerebral oxygenation; and 2) to examine the spatiotemporal evolution of oxygen metabolism during focal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in rats. Methods A group of rats (n=28) under normal, hyperoxic hypercapnia and hypoxia were studied to compare MR measured cerebral oxygen saturation (O2SatMRv) with blood gas oximetry measurements in the jugular vein (O2SatJV) and superior sagittal sinus (O2SatSSS). In a separate group of rats (n=31), MR measured cerebral oxygen metabolic index (MR_COMI) was acquired at multiple time-points during MCAO. Histogram analysis was performed on the normalized MR_COMI (rMR_COMI) to examine evolution of oxygen metabolism during acute ischemia. Results Highly linear relationships were obtained between O2SatMRv and O2SatJV/O2SatSSS in rats under global cerebral oxygenation alterations. In the focal ischemia study, rMR_COMI values were significantly lower within the areas of eventual infarction than other regions. Moreover, the rMR_COMI values within the ischemic territory decreased with time, concomitant with an increase in the number of voxels with severely impaired oxygen metabolism. Conclusion Accurate estimates of O2SatMRv can be obtained across a broad and physiologically relevant range of cerebral oxygenation. Furthermore, this method demonstrates a dynamic alteration of cerebral oxygen metabolism during acute ischemia in rats. PMID:19359642

  2. Perioperative cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism in neonates with single-ventricle physiology

    PubMed Central

    Dehaes, Mathieu; Cheng, Henry H.; Buckley, Erin M.; Lin, Pei-Yi; Ferradal, Silvina; Williams, Kathryn; Vyas, Rutvi; Hagan, Katherine; Wigmore, Daniel; McDavitt, Erica; Soul, Janet S.; Franceschini, Maria Angela; Newburger, Jane W.; Ellen Grant, P.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) patients are at risk for neurodevelopmental delay. The etiology of these delays is unclear, but abnormal prenatal cerebral maturation and postoperative hemodynamic instability likely play a role. A better understanding of these factors is needed to improve neurodevelopmental outcome. In this study, we used bedside frequency-domain near infrared spectroscopy (FDNIRS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) to assess cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism in neonates with single-ventricle (SV) CHD undergoing surgery and compared them to controls. Our goals were 1) to compare cerebral hemodynamics between unanesthetized SV and healthy neonates, and 2) to determine if FDNIRS-DCS could detect alterations in cerebral hemodynamics beyond cerebral hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2). Eleven SV neonates were recruited and compared to 13 controls. Preoperatively, SV patients showed decreased cerebral blood flow (CBFi), cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO2i) and SO2; and increased oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) compared to controls. Compared to preoperative values, unstable postoperative SV patients had decreased CMRO2i and CBFi, which returned to baseline when stable. However, SO2 showed no difference between unstable and stable states. Preoperative SV neonates are flow-limited and show signs of impaired cerebral development compared to controls. FDNIRS-DCS shows potential to improve assessment of cerebral development and postoperative hemodynamics compared to SO2 alone. PMID:26713191

  3. Metabolic Features of Cancer Treatment Resistance.

    PubMed

    Viale, Andrea; Draetta, Giulio F

    A major barrier to achieving durable remission and a definitive cure in oncology patients is the emergence of tumor resistance, a common outcome of different disease types, and independent from the therapeutic approach undertaken. In recent years, subpopulations of slow-cycling cells endowed with enhanced tumorigenic potential and multidrug resistance have been isolated in different tumors, and mounting experimental evidence suggests these resistant cells are responsible for tumor relapse. An in-depth metabolic characterization of resistant tumor stem cells revealed that they rely more on mitochondrial respiration and less on glycolysis than other tumor cells, a finding that challenges the assumption that tumors have a primarily glycolytic metabolism and defective mitochondria. The demonstration of a metabolic program in resistant tumorigenic cells that may be present in the majority of tumors has important therapeutic implications and is a critical consideration as we address the challenge of identifying new vulnerabilities that might be exploited therapeutically.

  4. Cerebral glucose metabolism after portacaval shunting in the rat. Patterns of metabolism and implications for the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Lockwood, A H; Ginsberg, M D; Rhoades, H M; Gutierrez, M T

    1986-01-01

    The regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was measured in normal and portacaval shunted rats and the effects of unilateral carotid infusions of "threshold" amounts of ammonia were assessed. 8 wk after shunting the glucose metabolic rate was increased in all 20 brain regions sampled. Effects on subcortical and phylogenetically older regions of the brain were most pronounced with a 74% increase observed in the reticular formation at the collicular level. Increases in the cerebral cortex ranged from 12 to 18%. Unilateral infusions of ammonia did not affect behavior but altered the electroencephalogram and selectively increased the glucose metabolic rate in the thalamus, hypothalamus, and substantia nigra in half of the animals, a pattern similar to that seen after a portacaval shunt, suggesting hyperammonemia as the cause of postshunt increases in glucose metabolism. Visual inspection of autoradiograms, computed correlation coefficients relating interregional metabolism, and principal component analysis suggest that normal cerebral metabolic and functional interrelationships are altered by shunting. Ammonia stimulation of the hypothalamic satiety centers may suppress appetite and lead to cachexia. Reductions in the ammonia detoxification capacity of skeletal muscle may increase the probability of developing future episodes of hyperammonemia, perpetuating the process. Direct effects of ammonia on specific brain centers such as the dorsomedial hypothalamus and reticular activating system may combine with global disruptions of cerebral metabolic-functional relationships to produce the protean manifestations of portal-systemic encephalopathy. Images PMID:3722388

  5. Cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism during mild hypothermia in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, S; Suzuki, A; Hadeishi, H; Yasui, N; Hatazawa, J

    2000-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow and O2 metabolism during hypothermia (33-34 degrees C) was evaluated in 5 patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage by positron emission tomography (PET). Their preoperative clinical condition was WFNS scale IV or V. The patients received surface cooling postoperatively, and were maintained in a hypothermic state during transfer for radiological examination. Positron emission tomography revealed a decrease in cerebral blood flow and O2 metabolic rate. Cerebral blood flow was 34.8+/-15.1 ml/100 ml/min and the O2 metabolic rate was 1.85+/-0.61 ml/100 ml/min in areas of the middle cerebral artery ipsilateral to the ruptured aneurysms, whereas these values were 30.8+/-7.1 and 2.21+/-0.45 ml/100 ml/min, respectively, on the contralateral side. This represents a decrease of 37+/-27% compared to normal cerebral blood flow and 52+/-16% compared to normal O2 metabolic rate (p < 0.02) in the ipsilateral areas, and decreases of 44+/-13% and 43+/-12%, respectively, on the contralateral side. The present results reflected the luxury perfusion state in almost all cases and provide the first PET evidence of decreased cerebral blood flow and metabolic rate of O2 during hypothermia in humans.

  6. Metabolic brain imaging correlated with clinical features of brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Alavi, J.; Alavi, A.; Dann, R.; Kushner, M.; Chawluk, J.; Powlis, W.; Reivich, M.

    1985-05-01

    Nineteen adults with brain tumors have been studied with positron emission tomography utilizing FDG. Fourteen had biopsy proven cerebral malignant glioma, one each had meningioma, hemangiopericytoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET), two had unbiopsied lesions, and one patient had an area of biopsy proven radiation necrosis. Three different patterns of glucose metabolism are observed: marked increase in metabolism at the site of the known tumor in (10 high grade gliomas and the PNET), lower than normal metabolism at the tumor (in 1 grade II glioma, 3 grade III gliomas, 2 unbiopsied low density nonenhancing lesions, and the meningioma), no abnormality (1 enhancing glioma, the hemangiopericytoma and the radiation necrosis.) The metabolic rate of the tumor or the surrounding brain did not appear to be correlated with the history of previous irradiation or chemotherapy. Decreased metabolism was frequently observed in the rest of the affected hemisphere and in the contralateral cerebellum. Tumors of high grade or with enhancing CT characteristics were more likely to show increased metabolism. Among the patients with proven gliomas, survival after PETT scan tended to be longer for those with low metabolic activity tumors than for those with highly active tumors. The authors conclude that PETT may help to predict the malignant potential of tumors, and may add useful clinical information to the CT scan.

  7. Cerebral circulatory and metabolic effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine in anesthetized baboons.

    PubMed Central

    Harper, M A; MacKenzie, E T

    1977-01-01

    1. The cerebral circulatory effects of the intracarotid administration of 5-hydroxytryptamine were examined in anaesthetized baboons. Cerebral blood flow was measured by the intracarotid 133Xe technique, cerebral O2 consumption and glucose uptake were measured as indices of brain metabolism and electrocortical activity was continuously monitored. 2. Despite a marked reduction in the calibre of the internal carotid artery (assessed angiographically), the intracarotid infusion of 5-hydroxytryptamine 0-1 microgram/kg. min did not effect any significant changes in cerebral blood flow, O2 consumption or glucose uptake. 3. Following transient osmotic disruption of the blood-brain barrier with the intracarotid infusion of hypertonic urea, the same dose of 5-hydroxytryptamine effected a marked reduction in cerebral blood flow from 51 +/- 2 to 36 +/- 2 ml./100 g. min (mean +/- S.E.; P less than 0-01). Both indices of cerebral metabolism were reduced significantly and the e.e.g. showed a more pronounced suppression-burst pattern. 4. We postulate that the cerebral circulatory responses to 5-hydroxytryptamine are dependent upon the integrity of the blood-brain barrier and the predominant effect of the intravascular administration of 5-hydroxytryptamine is on cortical activity or metabolism, rather than on cerebrovascular smooth muscle. Images Plate 1 PMID:411921

  8. Impact of Nutrition on Cerebral Circulation and Cognition in the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mellendijk, Laura; Wiesmann, Maximilian; Kiliaan, Amanda J.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome (MetS), defined as the clustering of abdominal obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and hyperglycemia, appears to be driving the global epidemics cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Nutrition has a major impact on MetS and plays an important role in the prevention, development, and treatment of its features. Structural and functional alterations in the vasculature, associated with MetS, might form the link between MetS and the increased risk of developing CVD and T2DM. Not only does the peripheral vasculature seem to be affected, but the syndrome has a profound impact on the cerebral circulation and thence brain structure as well. Furthermore, strong associations are shown with stroke, cognitive impairment, and dementia. In this review the impact of nutrition on the individual components of MetS, the effects of MetS on peripheral and cerebral vasculature, and its consequences for brain structure and function will be discussed. PMID:26580647

  9. Metabolic features of chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Naviaux, Robert K; Naviaux, Jane C; Li, Kefeng; Bright, A Taylor; Alaynick, William A; Wang, Lin; Baxter, Asha; Nathan, Neil; Anderson, Wayne; Gordon, Eric

    2016-09-13

    More than 2 million people in the United States have myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). We performed targeted, broad-spectrum metabolomics to gain insights into the biology of CFS. We studied a total of 84 subjects using these methods. Forty-five subjects (n = 22 men and 23 women) met diagnostic criteria for ME/CFS by Institute of Medicine, Canadian, and Fukuda criteria. Thirty-nine subjects (n = 18 men and 21 women) were age- and sex-matched normal controls. Males with CFS were 53 (±2.8) y old (mean ± SEM; range, 21-67 y). Females were 52 (±2.5) y old (range, 20-67 y). The Karnofsky performance scores were 62 (±3.2) for males and 54 (±3.3) for females. We targeted 612 metabolites in plasma from 63 biochemical pathways by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography, electrospray ionization, and tandem mass spectrometry in a single-injection method. Patients with CFS showed abnormalities in 20 metabolic pathways. Eighty percent of the diagnostic metabolites were decreased, consistent with a hypometabolic syndrome. Pathway abnormalities included sphingolipid, phospholipid, purine, cholesterol, microbiome, pyrroline-5-carboxylate, riboflavin, branch chain amino acid, peroxisomal, and mitochondrial metabolism. Area under the receiver operator characteristic curve analysis showed diagnostic accuracies of 94% [95% confidence interval (CI), 84-100%] in males using eight metabolites and 96% (95% CI, 86-100%) in females using 13 metabolites. Our data show that despite the heterogeneity of factors leading to CFS, the cellular metabolic response in patients was homogeneous, statistically robust, and chemically similar to the evolutionarily conserved persistence response to environmental stress known as dauer.

  10. Metabolic features of chronic fatigue syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Naviaux, Robert K.; Naviaux, Jane C.; Li, Kefeng; Bright, A. Taylor; Alaynick, William A.; Wang, Lin; Baxter, Asha; Nathan, Neil; Anderson, Wayne; Gordon, Eric

    2016-01-01

    More than 2 million people in the United States have myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). We performed targeted, broad-spectrum metabolomics to gain insights into the biology of CFS. We studied a total of 84 subjects using these methods. Forty-five subjects (n = 22 men and 23 women) met diagnostic criteria for ME/CFS by Institute of Medicine, Canadian, and Fukuda criteria. Thirty-nine subjects (n = 18 men and 21 women) were age- and sex-matched normal controls. Males with CFS were 53 (±2.8) y old (mean ± SEM; range, 21–67 y). Females were 52 (±2.5) y old (range, 20–67 y). The Karnofsky performance scores were 62 (±3.2) for males and 54 (±3.3) for females. We targeted 612 metabolites in plasma from 63 biochemical pathways by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography, electrospray ionization, and tandem mass spectrometry in a single-injection method. Patients with CFS showed abnormalities in 20 metabolic pathways. Eighty percent of the diagnostic metabolites were decreased, consistent with a hypometabolic syndrome. Pathway abnormalities included sphingolipid, phospholipid, purine, cholesterol, microbiome, pyrroline-5-carboxylate, riboflavin, branch chain amino acid, peroxisomal, and mitochondrial metabolism. Area under the receiver operator characteristic curve analysis showed diagnostic accuracies of 94% [95% confidence interval (CI), 84–100%] in males using eight metabolites and 96% (95% CI, 86–100%) in females using 13 metabolites. Our data show that despite the heterogeneity of factors leading to CFS, the cellular metabolic response in patients was homogeneous, statistically robust, and chemically similar to the evolutionarily conserved persistence response to environmental stress known as dauer. PMID:27573827

  11. The micro-architecture of the cerebral cortex: Functional neuroimaging models and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Riera, Jorge J.; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S.; Howarth, Clare; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2014-01-01

    In order to interpret/integrate data obtained with different functional neuroimaging modalities (e.g. fMRI, EEG/MEG, PET/SPECT, fNIRS), forward-generative models of a diversity of brain mechanisms at the mesoscopic level are considered necessary. For the cerebral cortex, the brain structure with possibly the most relevance for functional neuroimaging, a variety of such biophysical models has been proposed over the last decade. The development of technological tools to investigate in vitro the physiological, anatomical and biochemical principles at the microscopic scale in comparative studies formed the basis for such theoretical progresses. However, with the most recent introduction of systems to record electrical (e.g. miniaturized probes chronically/acutely implantable in the brain), optical (e.g. two-photon laser scanning microscopy) and atomic nuclear spectral (e.g. nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy) signals using living laboratory animals, the field is receiving even greater attention. Major advances have been achieved by combining such sophisticated recording systems with new experimental strategies (e.g. transgenic/knock-out animals, high resolution stereotaxic manipulation systems for probe-guidance and cellular-scale chemical-delivery). Theoreticians may now be encouraged to re-consider previously formulated mesoscopic level models in order to incorporate important findings recently made at the microscopic scale. In this series of reviews, we summarize the background at the microscopic scale, which we suggest will constitute the foundations for upcoming representations at the mesoscopic level. In this first part, we focus our attention on the nerve ending particles in order to summarize basic principles and mechanisms underlying cellular metabolism in the cerebral cortex. It will be followed by two parts highlighting major features in its organization/working-principles to regulate both cerebral blood circulation and neuronal activity, respectively

  12. Metabolic Pattern of the Acute Phase of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in a Novel Porcine Model: Studies with Cerebral Microdialysis with High Temporal Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Nyberg, Christoffer; Karlsson, Torbjörn; Hillered, Lars; Engström, Elisabeth Ronne

    2014-01-01

    Background Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) may produce cerebral ischemia and systemic responses including stress. To study immediate cerebral and systemic changes in response to aneurysm rupture, animal models are needed. Objective To study early cerebral energy changes in an animal model. Methods Experimental SAH was induced in 11 pigs by autologous blood injection to the anterior skull base, with simultaneous control of intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures. Intracerebral microdialysis was used to monitor concentrations of glucose, pyruvate and lactate. Results In nine of the pigs, a pattern of transient ischemia was produced, with a dramatic reduction of cerebral perfusion pressure soon after blood injection, associated with a quick glucose and pyruvate decrease. This was followed by a lactate increase and a delayed pyruvate increase, producing a marked but short elevation of the lactate/pyruvate ratio. Glucose, pyruvate, lactate and lactate/pyruvate ratio thereafter returned toward baseline. The two remaining pigs had a more severe metabolic reaction with glucose and pyruvate rapidly decreasing to undetectable levels while lactate increased and remained elevated, suggesting persisting ischemia. Conclusion The animal model simulates the conditions of SAH not only by deposition of blood in the basal cisterns, but also creating the transient global ischemic impact of aneurysmal SAH. The metabolic cerebral changes suggest immediate transient substrate failure followed by hypermetabolism of glucose upon reperfusion. The model has features that resemble spontaneous bleeding, and is suitable for future research of the early cerebral and systemic responses to SAH that are difficult to study in humans. PMID:24940881

  13. Defective autophagy is a key feature of cerebral cavernous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Marchi, Saverio; Corricelli, Mariangela; Trapani, Eliana; Bravi, Luca; Pittaro, Alessandra; Delle Monache, Simona; Ferroni, Letizia; Patergnani, Simone; Missiroli, Sonia; Goitre, Luca; Trabalzini, Lorenza; Rimessi, Alessandro; Giorgi, Carlotta; Zavan, Barbara; Cassoni, Paola; Dejana, Elisabetta; Retta, Saverio Francesco; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) is a major cerebrovascular disease affecting approximately 0.3–0.5% of the population and is characterized by enlarged and leaky capillaries that predispose to seizures, focal neurological deficits, and fatal intracerebral hemorrhages. Cerebral cavernous malformation is a genetic disease that may arise sporadically or be inherited as an autosomal dominant condition with incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity. Causative loss-of-function mutations have been identified in three genes, KRIT1 (CCM1), CCM2 (MGC4607), and PDCD10 (CCM3), which occur in both sporadic and familial forms. Autophagy is a bulk degradation process that maintains intracellular homeostasis and that plays essential quality control functions within the cell. Indeed, several studies have identified the association between dysregulated autophagy and different human diseases. Here, we show that the ablation of the KRIT1 gene strongly suppresses autophagy, leading to the aberrant accumulation of the autophagy adaptor p62/SQSTM1, defective quality control systems, and increased intracellular stress. KRIT1 loss-of-function activates the mTOR-ULK1 pathway, which is a master regulator of autophagy, and treatment with mTOR inhibitors rescues some of the mole-cular and cellular phenotypes associated with CCM. Insufficient autophagy is also evident in CCM2-silenced human endothelial cells and in both cells and tissues from an endothelial-specific CCM3-knockout mouse model, as well as in human CCM lesions. Furthermore, defective autophagy is highly correlated to endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a crucial event that contributes to CCM progression. Taken together, our data point to a key role for defective autophagy in CCM disease pathogenesis, thus providing a novel framework for the development of new pharmacological strategies to prevent or reverse adverse clinical outcomes of CCM lesions. PMID:26417067

  14. Defective autophagy is a key feature of cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Saverio; Corricelli, Mariangela; Trapani, Eliana; Bravi, Luca; Pittaro, Alessandra; Delle Monache, Simona; Ferroni, Letizia; Patergnani, Simone; Missiroli, Sonia; Goitre, Luca; Trabalzini, Lorenza; Rimessi, Alessandro; Giorgi, Carlotta; Zavan, Barbara; Cassoni, Paola; Dejana, Elisabetta; Retta, Saverio Francesco; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) is a major cerebrovascular disease affecting approximately 0.3-0.5% of the population and is characterized by enlarged and leaky capillaries that predispose to seizures, focal neurological deficits, and fatal intracerebral hemorrhages. Cerebral cavernous malformation is a genetic disease that may arise sporadically or be inherited as an autosomal dominant condition with incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity. Causative loss-of-function mutations have been identified in three genes, KRIT1 (CCM1), CCM2 (MGC4607), and PDCD10 (CCM3), which occur in both sporadic and familial forms. Autophagy is a bulk degradation process that maintains intracellular homeostasis and that plays essential quality control functions within the cell. Indeed, several studies have identified the association between dysregulated autophagy and different human diseases. Here, we show that the ablation of the KRIT1 gene strongly suppresses autophagy, leading to the aberrant accumulation of the autophagy adaptor p62/SQSTM1, defective quality control systems, and increased intracellular stress. KRIT1 loss-of-function activates the mTOR-ULK1 pathway, which is a master regulator of autophagy, and treatment with mTOR inhibitors rescues some of the mole-cular and cellular phenotypes associated with CCM. Insufficient autophagy is also evident in CCM2-silenced human endothelial cells and in both cells and tissues from an endothelial-specific CCM3-knockout mouse model, as well as in human CCM lesions. Furthermore, defective autophagy is highly correlated to endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a crucial event that contributes to CCM progression. Taken together, our data point to a key role for defective autophagy in CCM disease pathogenesis, thus providing a novel framework for the development of new pharmacological strategies to prevent or reverse adverse clinical outcomes of CCM lesions.

  15. Improved cerebral energetics and ketone body metabolism in db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Jens V; Christensen, Sofie K; Nissen, Jakob D; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2017-03-01

    It is becoming evident that type 2 diabetes mellitus is affecting brain energy metabolism. The importance of alternative substrates for the brain in type 2 diabetes mellitus is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ketone bodies are relevant candidates to compensate for cerebral glucose hypometabolism and unravel the functionality of cerebral mitochondria in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Acutely isolated cerebral cortical and hippocampal slices of db/db mice were incubated in media containing [U-(13)C]glucose, [1,2-(13)C]acetate or [U-(13)C]β-hydroxybutyrate and tissue extracts were analysed by mass spectrometry. Oxygen consumption and ATP synthesis of brain mitochondria of db/db mice were assessed by Seahorse XFe96 and luciferin-luciferase assay, respectively. Glucose hypometabolism was observed for both cerebral cortical and hippocampal slices of db/db mice. Significant increased metabolism of [1,2-(13)C]acetate and [U-(13)C]β-hydroxybutyrate was observed for hippocampal slices of db/db mice. Furthermore, brain mitochondria of db/db mice exhibited elevated oxygen consumption and ATP synthesis rate. This study provides evidence of several changes in brain energy metabolism in type 2 diabetes mellitus. The increased hippocampal ketone body utilization and improved mitochondrial function in db/db mice, may act as adaptive mechanisms in order to maintain cerebral energetics during hampered glucose metabolism.

  16. Complementary acupuncture treatment increases cerebral metabolism in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong; Jiang, Xuemei; Zhuo, Ying; Tang, Anwu; Wik, Gustav

    2009-01-01

    We used positron emission tomography (PET) and the 18-flourodeoxyglucose tracer to study cerebral effects of complementary acupuncture in Parkinson's disease. Five patients received scalp-acupuncture and Madopa, while the other five had Madopa only. PET scans before and after 5 weeks of complementary acupuncture treatment show increased glucose metabolisms in parietal, temporal, occipital lobes, the thalamus, and the cerebellum in the light-diseased hemisphere, and in parietal and occipital lobes of the severe-diseased hemisphere. No changes were observed in the Madopa-only group. Acupuncture in combination with Madopa may improve cerebral glucose metabolism in Parkinson's disease.

  17. [Study of regional cerebral glucose metabolism, in man, while awake or asleep, by positron emission tomography].

    PubMed

    Franck, G; Salmon, E; Poirrier, R; Sadzot, B; Franco, G

    1987-03-01

    Measurements of regional cerebral glucose uptake by the 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose technique (18FDG) and positron emission tomography (PET) along with polygraph recordings were made serially during relaxed wakefulness and different stages of nocturnal sleep in two right-handed normal volunteers. During stage III-IV sleep, values declined diffusely in both hemispheric regions (-31%), thalamus (-33%), cerebellum (-33%) and brain stem (-25%). During paradoxical sleep regional values increased diffusely compared with slow wave sleep. Compared to wakefulness, regional metabolic values seemed to increase but the results were more variable from one volunteer to the other. These preliminary data indicate important regional alterations in cerebral metabolism between sleep states.

  18. Metabolic control of resting hemispheric cerebral blood flow is oxidative, not glycolytic.

    PubMed

    Powers, William J; Videen, Tom O; Markham, Joanne; Walter, Vonn; Perlmutter, Joel S

    2011-05-01

    Although the close regional coupling of resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) with both cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)) and cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc) within individuals is well documented, there are few data regarding the coupling between whole brain flow and metabolism among different subjects. To investigate the metabolic control of resting whole brain CBF, we performed multivariate analysis of hemispheric CMRO(2), CMRglc, and other covariates as predictors of resting CBF among 23 normal humans. The univariate analysis showed that only CMRO(2) was a significant predictor of CBF. The final multivariate model contained two additional terms in addition to CMRO(2): arterial oxygen content and oxygen extraction fraction. Notably, arterial plasma glucose concentration and CMRglc were not included in the final model. Our data demonstrate that the metabolic factor controlling hemispheric CBF in the normal resting brain is CMRO(2) and that CMRglc does not make a contribution. Our findings provide evidence for compartmentalization of brain metabolism into a basal component in which CBF is coupled to oxygen metabolism and an activation component in which CBF is controlled by another mechanism.

  19. Persistence of cerebral metabolic abnormalities in chronic schizophrenia as determined by positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wolkin, A.; Jaeger, J.; Brodie, J.D.; Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.; Rotrosen, J.; Gomez-Mont, F.; Cancro, R.

    1985-05-01

    Local cerebral metabolic rates were determined by positron emission tomography and the deoxyglucose method in a group of 10 chronic schizophrenic subjects before and after somatic treatment and in eight normal subjects. Before treatment, schizophrenic subjects had markedly lower absolute metabolic activity than did normal controls in both frontal and temporal regions and a trend toward relative hyperactivity in the basal ganglia area. After treatment, their metabolic rates approached those seen in normal subjects in nearly all regions except frontal. Persistence of diminished frontal metabolism was manifested as significant relative hypofrontality. These findings suggest specific loci of aberrant cerebral functioning in chronic schizophrenia and the utility of positron emission tomography in characterizing these abnormalities.

  20. Program for PET image alignment: Effects on calculated differences in cerebral metabolic rates for glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, R.L.; London, E.D.; Links, J.M.; Cascella, N.G. )

    1990-12-01

    A program was developed to align positron emission tomography images from multiple studies on the same subject. The program allowed alignment of two images with a fineness of one-tenth the width of a pixel. The indications and effects of misalignment were assessed in eight subjects from a placebo-controlled double-blind crossover study on the effects of cocaine on regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose. Visual examination of a difference image provided a sensitive and accurate tool for assessing image alignment. Image alignment within 2.8 mm was essential to reduce variability of measured cerebral metabolic rates for glucose. Misalignment by this amount introduced errors on the order of 20% in the computed metabolic rate for glucose. These errors propagate to the difference between metabolic rates for a subject measured in basal versus perturbed states.

  1. Cerebral energy metabolism, glucose transport and blood flow: changes with maturation and adaptation to hypoglycaemia.

    PubMed

    Nehlig, A

    1997-02-01

    Brain maturation is characterized by a peak of cerebral energy metabolism and blood flow occurring between 3 and 8 years of age in humans and around 14-17 days of postnatal life in rats. This high activity coincides with the period of active brain growth. The human brain is dependent on glucose alone during that period, whereas rat brain uses both glucose and ketone bodies to cover its energetic and biosynthetic needs. The maturation of the density of glucose transporter sites-GLUT1 located at the blood-brain barrier and GLUT3 at the neuronal membrane-parallels the development of cerebral glucose utilization. During moderate acute hypoglycaemia, there are no changes in cerebral functional activity; cerebral glucose utilization decreases and blood flow increases only when hypoglycaemia is severe (lower than 2 mumol/ml). During chronic hypoglycaemia, the brain adapts to the low circulating levels of glucose: the number of glucose transporter sites is increased, and cerebral glucose utilization and function are maintained at normal levels while cerebral blood flow is more moderately increased than during acute hypoglycaemia. Neuronal damage consecutive to severe and prolonged hypoglycaemia occurs mainly in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and caudate-putamen as a result of active release of excitatory amino acids.

  2. Brain Size and Cerebral Glucose Metabolic Rate in Nonspecific Retardation and Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haier, Richard J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Brain size and cerebral glucose metabolic rate were determined for 10 individuals with mild mental retardation (MR), 7 individuals with Down syndrome (DS), and 10 matched controls. MR and DS groups both had brain volumes of about 80% compared to controls, with variance greatest within the MR group. (SLD)

  3. Mechanisms of murine cerebral malaria: Multimodal imaging of altered cerebral metabolism and protein oxidation at hemorrhage sites

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Mark J.; Aitken, Jade B.; El-Assaad, Fatima; McQuillan, James A.; Carter, Elizabeth A.; Ball, Helen J.; Tobin, Mark J.; Paterson, David; de Jonge, Martin D.; Siegele, Rainer; Cohen, David D.; Vogt, Stefan; Grau, Georges E.; Hunt, Nicholas H.; Lay, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Using a multimodal biospectroscopic approach, we settle several long-standing controversies over the molecular mechanisms that lead to brain damage in cerebral malaria, which is a major health concern in developing countries because of high levels of mortality and permanent brain damage. Our results provide the first conclusive evidence that important components of the pathology of cerebral malaria include peroxidative stress and protein oxidation within cerebellar gray matter, which are colocalized with elevated nonheme iron at the site of microhemorrhage. Such information could not be obtained previously from routine imaging methods, such as electron microscopy, fluorescence, and optical microscopy in combination with immunocytochemistry, or from bulk assays, where the level of spatial information is restricted to the minimum size of tissue that can be dissected. We describe the novel combination of chemical probe–free, multimodal imaging to quantify molecular markers of disturbed energy metabolism and peroxidative stress, which were used to provide new insights into understanding the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria. In addition to these mechanistic insights, the approach described acts as a template for the future use of multimodal biospectroscopy for understanding the molecular processes involved in a range of clinically important acute and chronic (neurodegenerative) brain diseases to improve treatment strategies. PMID:26824064

  4. Sex influences the effect of a lifelong increase in serotonin transporter function on cerebral metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Neil; Ferrington, Linda; Olverman, Henry J; Harmar, Anthony J; Kelly, Paul A T

    2009-08-01

    Polymorphic variation in the human serotonin transporter (SERT; 5-HTT) gene resulting in a lifelong increase in SERT expression is associated with reduced anxiety and a reduced risk of affective disorder. Evidence also suggests that sex influences the effect of this polymorphism on affective functioning. Here we use novel transgenic mice overexpressing human SERT (hSERT OVR) to investigate the possible influence of sex on the alterations in SERT protein expression and cerebral function that occur in response to increased SERT gene transcription. SERT binding levels were significantly increased in the brain of hSERT OVR mice in a region-dependent manner. The increased SERT binding in hSERT OVR mice was more pronounced in female than in male mice. Cerebral metabolism, as reflected by a quantitative index of local cerebral glucose utilization (iLCMRglu), was significantly decreased in many brain regions in hSERT OVR female as compared with wild-type female mice, whereas there was no evidence for a significant effect in any region in males. The ability of hSERT overexpression to modify cerebral metabolism was significantly greater in females than in males. This effect was particularly pronounced in the medial striatum, globus pallidus, somatosensory cortex, mamillary body, and ventrolateral thalamus. Overall, these findings demonstrate that the influence of a lifelong increase in SERT gene transcription on cerebral function is greater in females than in males and may relate, in part, to the influence of sex on genetically driven increases in SERT protein expression.

  5. Regional Cerebral Glucose Metabolism in Novelty Seeking and Antisocial Personality: A Positron Emission Tomography Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, So Hyeon; Park, Hyun Soo

    2016-01-01

    Novelty seeking (NS) and antisocial personality (ASP) are commonly exhibited by those who suffer from addictions, such as substance abuse. NS has been suggested to be a fundamental aspect of ASP. To investigate the neurobiological substrate of NS and ASP, we tested the relationship between regional cerebral glucose metabolism and the level of NS, determining the differences between individuals with and without ASP. Seventy-two healthy adults (43 males, mean age±SD=38.8±16.6 years, range=20~70 years; 29 females, 44.2±20.1 years, range=19~72 years) underwent resting-state brain positron emission tomography (PET) 40 minutes after 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) injection. Within 10 days of the FDG PET study, participants completed Cloninger's 240-item Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) to determine NS scores. Participants with and without ASP were grouped according to their TCI profiles. Statistical parametric mapping analysis was performed using the FDG PET and TCI profile data. NS scores positively correlated with metabolism in the left anterior cingulate gyrus and the insula on both sides of the brain and negatively correlated with metabolism in the right pallidum and putamen. Participants with ASP showed differences in cerebral glucose metabolism across various cortical and subcortical regions, mainly in the frontal and prefrontal areas. These data demonstrate altered regional cerebral glucose metabolism in individuals with NS and ASP and inform our understanding of the neurobiological substrates of problematic behaviors and personality disorders. PMID:27574485

  6. Alleviation of Brain Injury-Induced Cerebral Metabolic Depression by Amphetamine: A Cytochrome Oxidase Histochemistry Study

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Richard L.; Hovda, David A.; Chen, Michael J.; Feeney, Dennis M.

    2000-01-01

    Measurements of oxidative metabolic capacity following the ablation of rat sensorimotor cortex and ,he administration of amphetamine were examined to determine their effects on the metabolic dysfunction that follows brain injury. Twenty-four hours after surgery, rats sustaining either sham operations or unilateral cortical ablation were administered a single injection of D-amphetamine (2 mg/kg; i.p.) or saline and then sacrificed 24 h later. Brain tissue was processed for cytochrome oxidase histochemistry, and 12 bilateral cerebral areas were measured, using optical density as an index of the relative amounts of the enzyme. Compared with that of the control groups, cytochrome oxidase in the injured animals was significantly reduced throughout the cerebral cortex and in 5 of II subcortical structures. This injury-induced depression of oxidative capacity was most pronounced in regions of the hemisphere ipsilateral to the ablation. Animals given D-amphetamine had less depression of oxidative capacity, which was most pronounced bilaterally in the cerebral cortex, red nucleus, and superior colliculus; and in the nucleus accumbens, caudateputamen, and globus pallidus ipsilaterai to the ablation. The ability of D-amphetamine to alleviate depressed cerebral oxidative metabolism following cortical injury may be one mechanism by which drugs increasing noradrenaline release accelerate functional recovery in both animals and humans. PMID:10709218

  7. Clinical and metabolic features of urolithiasis and microlithiasis in children.

    PubMed

    Alpay, Harika; Ozen, Ahmet; Gokce, Ibrahim; Biyikli, Nese

    2009-11-01

    We evaluated the clinical, radiological and metabolic features of 162 children with urolithiasis or microlithiasis who had been referred to our pediatric nephrology clinics between 1998 and 2008 with suspected urolithiasis. The medical histories of these children (78 girls, 84 boys), who ranged in age from 2 months to 16 years (mean age 5.59 +/- 0.35 years), were reviewed retrospectively for clinical and metabolic features of urinary tract calculi. Urinary tract infections (UTI) were present in 45.9% of the cases. The most common presenting symptoms were flank pain or restlessness (25.3%) and hematuria (21.6%), followed by UTI (16%), whereas 23.5% of the cases were detected incidentally during evaluation for other medical conditions. Other symptoms at presentation included dysuria, passing stones, penile edema, enuresis, vomiting and anorexia. Urine analysis revealed metabolic abnormalities in 87% of the cases, including hypercalciuria (33.8%), hypocitraturia (33.1%), hyperoxaluria (26.5%), hyperuricosuria (25.4%), hypocitraturia + hypercalciuria (21.1%), hyperphosphaturia (20.8%) and cystinuria (5.7%). Almost 50% of the patients had a positive family history for urolithiasis. The most frequently involved site was in the kidneys (86%). Ureters and bladder were involved in 12 and 2% of the cases, respectively. A family history of urolithiasis, presenting symptoms and underlying metabolic abnormalities were similar for microlithiasis and the patients with larger stones. However, in our study population, microlithiasis was mainly a disease of young infants, with a greater chance for remission and often not associated with structural changes. The presenting symptoms of urolithiasis show a wide spectrum, so that a high index of suspicion is important for early detection. A metabolic abnormality can be identified in 87% of cases of urolithiasis. Detection of microlithiasis may explain a number of symptoms, thus reducing invasive diagnostic procedures and allowing early

  8. Non-invasive optical measurement of cerebral metabolism and hemodynamics in infants.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pei-Yi; Roche-Labarbe, Nadege; Dehaes, Mathieu; Carp, Stefan; Fenoglio, Angela; Barbieri, Beniamino; Hagan, Katherine; Grant, P Ellen; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    2013-03-14

    Perinatal brain injury remains a significant cause of infant mortality and morbidity, but there is not yet an effective bedside tool that can accurately screen for brain injury, monitor injury evolution, or assess response to therapy. The energy used by neurons is derived largely from tissue oxidative metabolism, and neural hyperactivity and cell death are reflected by corresponding changes in cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO₂). Thus, measures of CMRO₂ are reflective of neuronal viability and provide critical diagnostic information, making CMRO₂ an ideal target for bedside measurement of brain health. Brain-imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) yield measures of cerebral glucose and oxygen metabolism, but these techniques require the administration of radionucleotides, so they are used in only the most acute cases. Continuous-wave near-infrared spectroscopy (CWNIRS) provides non-invasive and non-ionizing radiation measures of hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO₂) as a surrogate for cerebral oxygen consumption. However, SO₂ is less than ideal as a surrogate for cerebral oxygen metabolism as it is influenced by both oxygen delivery and consumption. Furthermore, measurements of SO₂ are not sensitive enough to detect brain injury hours after the insult, because oxygen consumption and delivery reach equilibrium after acute transients. We investigated the possibility of using more sophisticated NIRS optical methods to quantify cerebral oxygen metabolism at the bedside in healthy and brain-injured newborns. More specifically, we combined the frequency-domain NIRS (FDNIRS) measure of SO2 with the diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) measure of blood flow index (CBFi) to yield an index of CMRO₂ (CMRO₂i). With the combined FDNIRS/DCS system we are able to quantify cerebral metabolism and hemodynamics. This represents an improvement over CWNIRS for detecting brain health, brain

  9. Low Cerebral Glucose Metabolism: A Potential Predictor for the Severity of Vascular Parkinsonism and Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yunqi; Wei, Xiaobo; Liu, Xu; Liao, Jinchi; Lin, Jiaping; Zhu, Cansheng; Meng, Xiaochun; Xie, Dongsi; Chao, Dongman; Fenoy, Albert J; Cheng, Muhua; Tang, Beisha; Zhang, Zhuohua; Xia, Ying; Wang, Qing

    2015-11-01

    This study explored the association between cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (CMRGlc) and the severity of Vascular Parkinsonism (VP) and Parkinson's disease (PD). A cross-sectional study was performed to compare CMRGlc in normal subjects vs. VP and PD patients. Twelve normal subjects, 22 VP, and 11 PD patients were evaluated with the H&Y and MMSE, and underwent 18F-FDG measurements. Pearson's correlations were used to identify potential associations between the severity of VP/PD and CMRGlc. A pronounced reduction of CMRGlc in the frontal lobe and caudate putamen was detected in patients with VP and PD when compared with normal subjects. The VP patients displayed a slight CMRGlc decrease in the caudate putamen and frontal lobe in comparison with PD patients. These decreases in CMRGlc in the frontal lobe and caudate putamen were significantly correlated with the VP patients' H&Y, UPDRS II, UPDRS III, MMSE, cardiovascular, and attention/memory scores. Similarly, significant correlations were observed in patients with PD. This is the first clinical study finding strong evidence for an association between low cerebral glucose metabolism and the severity of VP and PD. Our findings suggest that these changes in glucose metabolism in the frontal lobe and caudate putamen may underlie the pathophysiological mechanisms of VP and PD. As the scramble to find imaging biomarkers or predictors of the disease intensifies, a better understanding of the roles of cerebral glucose metabolism may give us insight into the pathogenesis of VP and PD.

  10. Bone Metabolism in Cerebral Palsy and the Effect of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kengo; Ohshiro, Toshio; Ohshiro, Takafumi

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, through the availability of examination by bone metabolism markers, diagnosis and treatment for osteoporosis in elderly people has been greatly advanced. However, bone metabolism in cases of cerebral palsy has not been fully examined. Though children with cerebral palsy tend to be susceptible to insufficiency fractures, a method of treatment for insufficiency fractures has not been established. In the longitudinal progress of bone metabolism, although there was a difference depending on the severity, reduced bone resorption tended to be mild but osteo-genesis tended to decrease in the severe cases. Osteogenesis and bone resorption markers decreased at around ages 8 and 15. The bone resorption marker maintained mild advancement after age 15. With LED irradiation, all of IGF-1, ucOC, osteogenic marker; BAP, and urinary bone resorption marker; NTx/Cr showed a tendency to normalize. In particular, IGF-1, BAP, and NTx/Cr increased significantly one month after irradiation, compared to the non-irradiation group. Bone density assessed by the DIP method showed no apparent change in the short term either. Irradiation by a commercial LED light bulb indicated a possible positive effect on bone metabolism for children with severe cerebral palsy. PMID:24610978

  11. Cerebral glucose metabolism in childhood-onset obsessive-compulsive disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Swedo, S.E.; Schapiro, M.B.; Grady, C.L.; Cheslow, D.L.; Leonard, H.L.; Kumar, A.; Friedland, R.; Rapoport, S.I.; Rapoport, J.L.

    1989-06-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was studied in 18 adults with childhood-onset obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and in age- and sex-matched controls using positron emission tomography and fludeoxyglucose F 18. Both groups were scanned during rest, with reduced auditory and visual stimulation. The group with OCD showed an increased glucose metabolism in the left orbital frontal, right sensorimotor, and bilateral prefrontal and anterior cingulate regions as compared with controls. Ratios of regional activity to mean cortical gray matter metabolism were increased for the right prefrontal and left anterior cingulate regions in the group with OCD as a whole. Correlations between glucose metabolism and clinical assessment measures showed a significant relationship between metabolic activity and both state and trait measurements of OCD and anxiety as well as the response to clomipramine hydrochloride therapy. These results are consistent with the suggestion that OCD may result from a functional disturbance in the frontal-limbic-basal ganglia system.

  12. Fatigue in Parkinson's disease: The contribution of cerebral metabolic changes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sang Soo; Aminian, Kelly; Li, Crystal; Lang, Anthony E; Houle, Sylvain; Strafella, Antonio P

    2017-01-01

    Fatigue is a common and disabling non-motor symptom in Parkinson's disease associated with a feeling of overwhelming lack of energy. The aim of this study was to identify the neural substrates that may contribute to the development of fatigue in Parkinson's disease. Twenty-three Parkinson's disease patients meeting UK Brain Bank criteria for the diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease were recruited and completed the 2-[(18) F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-PET scan. The metabolic activities of Parkinson's disease patients with fatigue were compared to those without fatigue using statistical parametric mapping analysis. The Parkinson's disease group exhibiting higher level of fatigue showed anti-correlated metabolic changes in cortical regions associated with the salience (i.e., right insular region) and default (i.e., bilateral posterior cingulate cortex) networks. The metabolic abnormalities detected in these brain regions displayed a significant correlation with level of fatigue and were associated with a disruption of the functional correlations with different cortical areas. These observations suggest that fatigue in Parkinson's disease may be the expression of metabolic abnormalities and impaired functional interactions between brain regions linked to the salience network and other neural networks. Hum Brain Mapp 38:283-292, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. SUPPLY AND DEMAND IN CEREBRAL ENERGY METABOLISM: THE ROLE OF NUTRIENT TRANSPORTERS

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Ian A.; Carruthers, Anthony; Vannucci, Susan J.

    2007-01-01

    Glucose is the obligate energetic fuel for the mammalian brain and most studies of cerebral energy metabolism assume that the vast majority of cerebral glucose utilization fuels neuronal activity via oxidative metabolism, both in the basal and activated state. Glucose transporter proteins (GLUTs) deliver glucose from the circulation to the brain: GLUT1 in the microvascular endothelial cells of the blood brain barrier (BBB) and glia; GLUT3 in neurons. Lactate, the glycolytic product of glucose metabolism, is transported into and out of neural cells by the monocarboxylate transporters: MCT1 in the BBB and astrocytes and MCT2 in neurons. The proposal of the astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle hypothesis (Pellerin and Magistretti, 1994) suggested that astrocytes play the primary role in cerebral glucose utilization and generate lactate for neuronal energetics, especially during activation. Since the identification of the GLUTs and MCTs in brain, much has been learned about their transport properties, i.e. capacity and affinity for substrate, which must be considered in any model of cerebral glucose uptake and utilization. Using concentrations and kinetic parameters of GLUT1 and GLUT3 in BBB endothelial cells, astrocytes and neurons, along with the corresponding kinetic properties of the monocarboxylate transporters, we have successfully modeled brain glucose and lactate levels as well as lactate transients in response to neuronal stimulation. Simulations based on these parameters suggest that glucose readily diffuses through the basal lamina and interstitium to neurons, which are primarily responsible for glucose uptake, metabolism, and the generation of the lactate transients observed upon neuronal activation. PMID:17579656

  14. Radioactive oxygen-15 in the study of cerebral blood flow, blood volume, and oxygen metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Ter-Pogossian, M.M.; Herscovitch, P.

    1985-10-01

    The short half-life of /sup 15/O led early observers to believe that it was unsuitable for use as a biological tracer. However, initial studies with this nuclide demonstrated its potential usefulness for in vivo, regional physiologic measurements. Subsequently, techniques were developed to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF), blood volume, and oxygen metabolism using intracarotid injection of /sup 15/O-labeled radiopharmaceuticals and highly collimated scintillation probes to record the time course of radioactivity in the brain. The development of positron emission tomography (PET) made possible the in vivo, noninvasive measurement of the absolute concentration of positron-emitting nuclides. A variety of tracer kinetic models were formulated to obtain physiologic measurements from tomographic images of the distribution of 15O-labeled radiopharmaceuticals in the brain. Regional cerebral oxygen metabolism is measured using scan data obtained following the inhalation of /sup 15/O-labeled oxygen. The tracer kinetic models used to measure rCBV, blood flow, and oxygen metabolism will be described and their relative advantages and limitations discussed. Several examples of the use of /sup 15/O tracer methods will be reviewed to demonstrate their widespread applicability to the study of cerebral physiology and pathophysiology. 110 references.

  15. Regional cerebral glucose metabolic rate in human sleep assessed by positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, M.S.; Wu, J.; Hazlett, E.; Sicotte, N.; Bunney, W.E. Jr. ); Gillin, J.C. )

    1989-01-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate of glucose was measured during nighttime sleep in 36 normal volunteers using positron emission tomography and fluorine-18-labeled 2-deoxyglucose (FDG). In comparison to waking controls, subjects given FDG during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep showed about a 23% reduction in metabolic rate across the entire brain. This decrease was greater for the frontal than temporal or occipital lobes, and greater for basal ganglia and thalamus than cortex. Subjects in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep tended to have higher cortical metabolic rates than walking subjects. The cingulate gyrus was the only cortical structure to show a significant increase in glucose metabolic rate in REM sleep in comparison to waking. The basal ganglia were relatively more active on the right in REM sleep and symmetrical in NREM sleep.

  16. Brain metabolism in autism. Resting cerebral glucose utilization rates as measured with positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Rumsey, J.M.; Duara, R.; Grady, C.; Rapoport, J.L.; Margolin, R.A.; Rapoport, S.I.; Cutler, N.R.

    1985-05-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was studied in ten men (mean age = 26 years) with well-documented histories of infantile autism and in 15 age-matched normal male controls using positron emission tomography and (F-18) 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Positron emission tomography was completed during rest, with reduced visual and auditory stimulation. While the autistic group as a whole showed significantly elevated glucose utilization in widespread regions of the brain, there was considerable overlap between the two groups. No brain region showed a reduced metabolic rate in the autistic group. Significantly more autistic, as compared with control, subjects showed extreme relative metabolic rates (ratios of regional metabolic rates to whole brain rates and asymmetries) in one or more brain regions.

  17. Argon does not affect cerebral circulation or metabolism in male humans

    PubMed Central

    Kazmaier, Stephan; Hoeks, Sanne Elisabeth; Stolker, Robert Jan; Coburn, Marc; Weyland, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Objective Accumulating data have recently underlined argon´s neuroprotective potential. However, to the best of our knowledge, no data are available on the cerebrovascular effects of argon (Ar) in humans. We hypothesized that argon inhalation does not affect mean blood flow velocity of the middle cerebral artery (Vmca), cerebral flow index (FI), zero flow pressure (ZFP), effective cerebral perfusion pressure (CPPe), resistance area product (RAP) and the arterio-jugular venous content differences of oxygen (AJVDO2), glucose (AJVDG), and lactate (AJVDL) in anesthetized patients. Materials and methods In a secondary analysis of an earlier controlled cross-over trial we compared parameters of the cerebral circulation under 15 minutes exposure to 70%Ar/30%O2 versus 70%N2/30%O2 in 29 male patients under fentanyl-midazolam anaesthesia before coronary surgery. Vmca was measured by transcranial Doppler sonography. ZFP and RAP were estimated by linear regression analysis of pressure-flow velocity relationships of the middle cerebral artery. CPPe was calculated as the difference between mean arterial pressure and ZFP. AJVDO2, AJVDG and AJVDL were calculated as the differences in contents between arterial and jugular-venous blood of oxygen, glucose, and lactate. Statistical analysis was done by t-tests and ANOVA. Results Mechanical ventilation with 70% Ar did not cause any significant changes in mean arterial pressure, Vmca, FI, ZFP, CPPe, RAP, AJVDO2, AJVDG, and AJVDL. Discussion Short-term inhalation of 70% Ar does not affect global cerebral circulation or metabolism in male humans under general anaesthesia. PMID:28207907

  18. Neurodynamics of abnormalities in cerebral metabolism and structure in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Waddington, J L

    1993-01-01

    Much evidence points to the importance of intrauterine events in the etiology of schizophrenia and suggests a complex interplay between dysfunctional and intact neurons in the pathophysiology of the disorder. This article contrasts what is known of the topographies of metabolic and structural brain abnormalities in schizophrenia at differing stages of the illness. From these contrasts, a schema is elaborated by which subtle neurodevelopmental perturbation in early to middle gestation might give rise to functional and structural abnormalities that ultimately release the diagnostic symptoms of schizophrenia. An interaction between those mechanisms mediating the expression of psychosis and the initially subtle stages of normal aging is posited to act on the substrate of a brain that is already developmentally compromised. Such a process might masquerade as "progression" in the absence of any active disease directly attributable to the original etiological event.

  19. The Impact of Venoarterial and Venovenous Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation on Cerebral Metabolism in the Newborn Brain

    PubMed Central

    Reitman, Aaron J.; Chapman, Rachel; Stein, James E.; Paquette, Lisa; Panigrahy, Ashok; Nelson, Marvin D.; Friedlich, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is an effective therapy for supporting infants with reversible cardiopulmonary failure. Still, survivors are at risk for long-term neurodevelopmental impairments, the cause of which is not fully understood. Objective To elucidate the effects of ECMO on the newborn brain. We hypothesized that the cerebral metabolic profile of neonates who received ECMO would differ from neonates who did not receive ECMO. To address this, we used magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) to investigate the effects of venoarterial and venovenous ECMO on cerebral metabolism. Methods 41 neonates treated with ECMO were contrasted to 38 age-matched neonates. Results All 1H-MRS data were acquired from standardized grey matter and white matter regions of interest using a short-echo (TE = 35 milliseconds), point-resolved spectroscopy sequence (PRESS) and quantitated using LCModel. Metabolite concentrations (mmol/kg) were compared across groups using multivariate analysis of covariance. Elevated creatine (p = 0.002) and choline (p = 0.005) concentrations were observed in the grey matter among neonates treated with ECMO relative to the reference group. Likewise, choline concentrations were elevated in the white matter (p = 0.003) while glutamate was reduced (p = 0.03). Contrasts between ECMO groups revealed lower osmolite concentrations (e.g. myoinositol) among the venovenous ECMO group. Conclusion Neonates who underwent ECMO were found to have an abnormal cerebral metabolic profile, with the pattern of abnormalities suggestive of an underlying inflammatory process. Additionally, neonates who underwent venovenous ECMO had low cerebral osmolite concentrations as seen in vasogenic edema. PMID:28033354

  20. Propofol Compared to Isoflurane Inhibits Mitochondrial Metabolism in Immature Swine Cerebral Cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Atkinson, D. B.; Ledee, Dolena R.; Kayser, Ernst-Bernhard; Morgan, Phil G.; Sedensky, Margaret M.; Isern, Nancy G.; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2014-01-08

    Anesthetics used in infants and children are implicated in development of neurocognitive disorders. Although propofol induces neuroapoptosis in developing brain, the underlying mechanisms require elucidation and may have an energetic basis. We studied substrate utilization in an immature swine model anesthetized with either propofol or isoflurane for 4 hours. Piglets were infused with 13-Carbon labeled glucose and leucine in the common carotid artery in order to assess citric acid cycle (CAC) metabolism in the parietal cortex. The anesthetics produced similar systemic hemodynamics and cerebral oxygen saturation by near-infrared-spectroscopy. Compared to isoflurane, propofol depleted ATP and glycogen stores. Propofol also decreased pools of the CAC intermediates, citrate and α-ketoglutarate, while markedly increasing succinate along with decreasing mitochondrial complex II activity. Propofol also inhibited acetyl-CoA entry into the CAC through pyruvate dehydrogenase, while promoting glycolytic flux with marked accumulation of lactate. Although oxygen supply appeared similar between the anesthetic groups, propofol yielded a metabolic phenotype which resembled a hypoxic state. Propofol impairs substrate flux through the CAC in the immature cerebral cortex. These impairments occurred without systemic metabolic perturbations which typically accompany propofol infusion syndrome. These metabolic abnormalities may play a role in neurotoxity observed with propofol in the vulnerable immature brain.

  1. [Differential effects of isoflurane and nitrous oxide on cerebral blood flow, metabolism and electrocorticogram after incomplete cerebral ischemia in the rat].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, T; Maekawa, T; Shinohara, K; Sakabe, T; Takeshita, H

    1989-07-01

    Differential effects of isoflurane (ISOF) and N2O on cerebral blood flow, metabolism and electrocorticogram (ECoG) were examined in rats subjected to 15 min-incomplete cerebral ischemia. In the first study, regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and ECoG were measured during and after ischemia. In the second study, local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) and glucose utilization (LCGU) were determined at 60 min after reperfusion. In the N2O group, rCBF in both the cerebral cortex and hippocampus decreased significantly to less than 10% of the pre-ischemic value during ischemia, and it increased to 170% at 10 min after reperfusion. The ECoG became flat during ischemia and reappeared at 21 min after reperfusion. In the ISOF group, rCBF decreased significantly to 25% during ischemia and returned to the preischemic value after reperfusion. The ECoG became flat during ischemia and reappeared at 14 min. In the N2O group, LCBFs decreased significantly to 40-50% of the pre-ischemic values in the forebrain. LCGUs decreased significantly to 30-50% in all structures of the forebrain. In the ISOF group, LCBFs decreased significantly to 60-80% in the forebrain, but were not different in other structures. LCGUs did not differ from pre-ischemic values in all structures except for in the thalamus and habenula. These results may indicate cerebral protective effects of ISOF on incomplete cerebral ischemia in rats.

  2. Effect of adenosine triphosphate and some derivatives on cerebral blood flow and metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, T; Harper, A M; MacKenzie, E T; Thomson, E M

    1979-01-01

    1. Responses of cerebral blood vessels to peri- and intravascular doses of ATP (adenosine triphosphate) and some derivatives were studied in cat and baboon. 2. Perivascular application of ATP to cat pial arterioles gave a threshold dilatory effect at a concentration of 10(-11) M. This figure is comparable to the amount of ATP calculated to be released from electrically stimulated brain slices. 3. It is concluded that adenine nucleotides have a major role to play in the local control of cerebral blood flow. 4. Intracarotid injection of ATP showed a calculated threshold effect at 4 x 10(8) M in the cat and 4 x 10(-9) M in the baboon. 5. The threshold response of the vasculature to intracarotid adenosine lay between 4 x 10(-7) M and 4 x 10(-6) M in the baboon. Little effect was produced with AMP, pyrophosphate and inorganic phosphate. 6. Intracarotid ATP increased the oxygen consumption of the baboon brain parenchyma. This effect was attributed in part to an elevation of the cellular cyclic AMP levels. 7. Osmotic disruption of the blood-brain barrier in baboon did not affect the vasodilatory or metabolic effect of intracarotid ATP. 8. It is postulated that circulating purine compounds mediate a form of metabolic communication inthe body. Also, release of purine compounds from active local nerves might influence cerebral blood flow. PMID:119042

  3. Constancy and trade-offs in the neuroanatomical and metabolic design of the cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Karbowski, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian brains span about four orders of magnitude in cortical volume and have to operate in different environments that require diverse behavioral skills. Despite these geometric and behavioral diversities, the examination of cerebral cortex across species reveals that it contains a substantial number of conserved characteristics that are associated with neuroanatomy and metabolism, i.e., with neuronal connectivity and function. Some of these cortical constants or invariants have been known for a long time but not sufficiently appreciated, and others were only recently discovered. The focus of this review is to present the cortical invariants and discuss their role in the efficient information processing. Global conservation in neuroanatomy and metabolism, as well as their correlated regional and developmental variability suggest that these two parallel systems are mutually coupled. It is argued that energetic constraint on cortical organization can be strong if cerebral blood supplied is either below or above a certain level, and it is rather soft otherwise. Moreover, because maximization or minimization of parameters associated with cortical connectivity, function and cost often leads to conflicts in design, it is argued that the architecture of the cerebral cortex is a result of structural and functional compromises. PMID:24574975

  4. Constancy and trade-offs in the neuroanatomical and metabolic design of the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Karbowski, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian brains span about four orders of magnitude in cortical volume and have to operate in different environments that require diverse behavioral skills. Despite these geometric and behavioral diversities, the examination of cerebral cortex across species reveals that it contains a substantial number of conserved characteristics that are associated with neuroanatomy and metabolism, i.e., with neuronal connectivity and function. Some of these cortical constants or invariants have been known for a long time but not sufficiently appreciated, and others were only recently discovered. The focus of this review is to present the cortical invariants and discuss their role in the efficient information processing. Global conservation in neuroanatomy and metabolism, as well as their correlated regional and developmental variability suggest that these two parallel systems are mutually coupled. It is argued that energetic constraint on cortical organization can be strong if cerebral blood supplied is either below or above a certain level, and it is rather soft otherwise. Moreover, because maximization or minimization of parameters associated with cortical connectivity, function and cost often leads to conflicts in design, it is argued that the architecture of the cerebral cortex is a result of structural and functional compromises.

  5. Regulation of cerebral cholesterol metabolism in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Reiss, Allison B; Voloshyna, Iryna

    2012-03-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder that manifests as a progressive loss of memory and deterioration of higher cognitive functions. Alzheimer disease is characterized by accumulation in the brain of the β-amyloid peptide generated by β- and γ-secretase processing of amyloid precursor protein. Epidemiological studies have linked elevated plasma cholesterol and lipoprotein levels in midlife with AD development. Cholesterol-fed animal models exhibit neuropathologic features of AD including accumulation of β-amyloid peptide. Specific isoforms of the cholesterol transporter apolipoprotein E are associated with susceptibility to AD. Although multiple lines of evidence indicate a role for cholesterol in AD, the exact impact and mechanisms involved remain largely unknown. This review summarizes the current state of our knowledge of the influence of cholesterol and lipid pathways in AD pathogenesis in vitro and in vivo.

  6. Petilla terminology: nomenclature of features of GABAergic interneurons of the cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Neuroscience produces a vast amount of data from an enormous diversity of neurons. A neuronal classification system is essential to organize such data and the knowledge that is derived from them. Classification depends on the unequivocal identification of the features that distinguish one type of neuron from another. The problems inherent in this are particularly acute when studying cortical interneurons. To tackle this, we convened a representative group of researchers to agree on a set of terms to describe the anatomical, physiological and molecular features of GABAergic interneurons of the cerebral cortex. The resulting terminology might provide a stepping stone towards a future classification of these complex and heterogeneous cells. Consistent adoption will be important for the success of such an initiative, and we also encourage the active involvement of the broader scientific community in the dynamic evolution of this project. PMID:18568015

  7. Genetic enhancement of microsomal epoxide hydrolase improves metabolic detoxification but impairs cerebral blood flow regulation.

    PubMed

    Marowsky, Anne; Haenel, Karen; Bockamp, Ernesto; Heck, Rosario; Rutishauser, Sibylle; Mule, Nandkishor; Kindler, Diana; Rudin, Markus; Arand, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) is a detoxifying enzyme for xenobiotic compounds. Enzymatic activity of mEH can be greatly increased by a point mutation, leading to an E404D amino acid exchange in its catalytic triad. Surprisingly, this variant is not found in any vertebrate species, despite the obvious advantage of accelerated detoxification. We hypothesized that this evolutionary avoidance is due to the fact that the mEH plays a dualistic role in detoxification and control of endogenous vascular signaling molecules. To test this, we generated mEH E404D mice and assessed them for detoxification capacity and vascular dynamics. In liver microsomes from these mice, turnover of the xenobiotic compound phenanthrene-9,10-oxide was four times faster compared to WT liver microsomes, confirming accelerated detoxification. mEH E404D animals also showed faster metabolization of a specific class of endogenous eicosanoids, arachidonic acid-derived epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) to dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs). Significantly higher DHETs/EETs ratios were found in mEH E404D liver, urine, plasma, brain and cerebral endothelial cells compared to WT controls, suggesting a broad impact of the mEH mutant on endogenous EETs metabolism. Because EETs are strong vasodilators in cerebral vasculature, hemodynamics were assessed in mEH E404D and WT cerebral cortex and hippocampus using cerebral blood volume (CBV)-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Basal CBV0 levels were similar between mEH E404D and control mice in both brain areas. But vascular reactivity and vasodilation in response to the vasodilatory drug acetazolamide were reduced in mEH E404D forebrain compared to WT controls by factor 3 and 2.6, respectively. These results demonstrate a critical role for mEH E404D in vasodynamics and suggest that deregulation of endogenous signaling pathways is the undesirable gain of function associated with the E404D variant.

  8. Infarctions in the vascular territory of the posterior cerebral artery: clinical features in 232 patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ischemic stroke caused by infarction in the territory of the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) has not been studied as extensively as infarctions in other vascular territories. This single centre, retrospective clinical study was conducted a) to describe salient characteristics of stroke patients with PCA infarction, b) to compare data of these patients with those with ischaemic stroke due to middle cerebral artery (MCA) and anterior cerebral artery (ACA) infarctions, and c) to identify predictors of PCA stroke. Findings A total of 232 patients with PCA stroke were included in the "Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona Stroke Registry" during a period of 19 years (1986-2004). Data from stroke patients are entered in the stroke registry following a standardized protocol with 161 items regarding demographics, risk factors, clinical features, laboratory and neuroimaging data, complications and outcome. The characteristics of these 232 patients with PCA stroke were compared with those of the 1355 patients with MCA infarctions and 51 patients with ACA infarctions included in the registry. Infarctions of the PCA accounted for 6.8% of all cases of stroke (n = 3808) and 9.6% of cerebral infarctions (n = 2704). Lacunar infarction was the most frequent stroke subtype (34.5%) followed by atherothrombotic infarction (29.3%) and cardioembolic infarction (21.6%). In-hospital mortality was 3.9% (n = 9). Forty-five patients (19.4%) were symptom-free at hospital discharge. Hemianopia (odds ratio [OR] = 6.43), lacunar stroke subtype (OR = 2.18), symptom-free at discharge (OR = 1.92), limb weakness (OR = 0.10), speech disorders (OR = 0.33) and cardioembolism (OR = 0.65) were independent variables of PCA stroke in comparison with MCA infarction, whereas sensory deficit (OR = 2.36), limb weakness (OR = 0.11) and cardioembolism as stroke mechanism (OR = 0.43) were independent variables associated with PCA stroke in comparison with ACA infarction. Conclusions Lacunar stroke is the

  9. A reduced cerebral metabolic ratio in exercise reflects metabolism and not accumulation of lactate within the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Dalsgaard, Mads K; Quistorff, Bjørn; Danielsen, Else R; Selmer, Christian; Vogelsang, Thomas; Secher, Niels H

    2004-01-01

    During maximal exercise lactate taken up by the human brain contributes to reduce the cerebral metabolic ratio, O2/(glucose + 1/2 lactate), but it is not known whether the lactate is metabolized or if it accumulates in a distribution volume. In one experiment the cerebral arterio-venous differences (AV) for O2, glucose (glc) and lactate (lac) were evaluated in nine healthy subjects at rest and during and after exercise to exhaustion. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was drained through a lumbar puncture immediately after exercise, while control values were obtained from six other healthy young subjects. In a second experiment magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) was performed after exhaustive exercise to assess lactate levels in the brain (n = 5). Exercise increased the AVO2 from 3.2 ± 0.1 at rest to 3.5 ± 0.2 mm (mean ± s.e.m.; P < 0.05) and the AVglc from 0.6 ± 0.0 to 0.9 ± 0.1 mm (P < 0.01). Notably, the AVlac increased from 0.0 ± 0.0 to 1.3 ± 0.2 mm at the point of exhaustion (P < 0.01). Thus, maximal exercise reduced the cerebral metabolic ratio from 6.0 ± 0.3 to 2.8 ± 0.2 (P < 0.05) and it remained low during the early recovery. Despite this, the CSF concentration of lactate postexercise (1.2 ± 0.1 mm; n = 7) was not different from baseline (1.4 ± 0.1 mm; n = 6). Also, the 1H-MRS signal from lactate obtained after exercise was smaller than the estimated detection limit of ∼1.5 mm. The finding that an increase in lactate could not be detected in the CSF or within the brain rules out accumulation in a distribution volume and indicates that the lactate taken up by the brain is metabolized. PMID:14608005

  10. 13C-labelled microdialysis studies of cerebral metabolism in TBI patients☆

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Keri L.H.; Jalloh, Ibrahim; Gallagher, Clare N.; Grice, Peter; Howe, Duncan J.; Mason, Andrew; Timofeev, Ivan; Helmy, Adel; Murphy, Michael P.; Menon, David K.; Kirkpatrick, Peter J.; Carpenter, T. Adrian; Sutherland, Garnette R.; Pickard, John D.; Hutchinson, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Human brain chemistry is incompletely understood and better methodologies are needed. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes metabolic perturbations, one result of which includes increased brain lactate levels. Attention has largely focussed on glycolysis, whereby glucose is converted to pyruvate and lactate, and is proposed to act as an energy source by feeding into neurons’ tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, generating ATP. Also reportedly upregulated by TBI is the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) that does not generate ATP but produces various molecules that are putatively neuroprotective, antioxidant and reparative, in addition to lactate among the end products. We have developed a novel combination of 13C-labelled cerebral microdialysis both to deliver 13C-labelled substrates into brains of TBI patients and recover the 13C-labelled metabolites, with high-resolution 13C NMR analysis of the microdialysates. This methodology has enabled us to achieve the first direct demonstration in humans that the brain can utilise lactate via the TCA cycle. We are currently using this methodology to make the first direct comparison of glycolysis and the PPP in human brain. In this article, we consider the application of 13C-labelled cerebral microdialysis for studying brain energy metabolism in patients. We set this methodology within the context of metabolic pathways in the brain, and 13C research modalities addressing them. PMID:24361470

  11. (13)C-labelled microdialysis studies of cerebral metabolism in TBI patients.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Keri L H; Jalloh, Ibrahim; Gallagher, Clare N; Grice, Peter; Howe, Duncan J; Mason, Andrew; Timofeev, Ivan; Helmy, Adel; Murphy, Michael P; Menon, David K; Kirkpatrick, Peter J; Carpenter, T Adrian; Sutherland, Garnette R; Pickard, John D; Hutchinson, Peter J

    2014-06-16

    Human brain chemistry is incompletely understood and better methodologies are needed. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes metabolic perturbations, one result of which includes increased brain lactate levels. Attention has largely focussed on glycolysis, whereby glucose is converted to pyruvate and lactate, and is proposed to act as an energy source by feeding into neurons' tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, generating ATP. Also reportedly upregulated by TBI is the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) that does not generate ATP but produces various molecules that are putatively neuroprotective, antioxidant and reparative, in addition to lactate among the end products. We have developed a novel combination of (13)C-labelled cerebral microdialysis both to deliver (13)C-labelled substrates into brains of TBI patients and recover the (13)C-labelled metabolites, with high-resolution (13)C NMR analysis of the microdialysates. This methodology has enabled us to achieve the first direct demonstration in humans that the brain can utilise lactate via the TCA cycle. We are currently using this methodology to make the first direct comparison of glycolysis and the PPP in human brain. In this article, we consider the application of (13)C-labelled cerebral microdialysis for studying brain energy metabolism in patients. We set this methodology within the context of metabolic pathways in the brain, and (13)C research modalities addressing them.

  12. Brain Tissue Oxygenation and Cerebral Metabolic Patterns in Focal and Diffuse Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Purins, Karlis; Lewén, Anders; Hillered, Lars; Howells, Tim; Enblad, Per

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Neurointensive care of traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients is currently based on intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) targeted protocols. There are reasons to believe that knowledge of brain tissue oxygenation (BtipO2) would add information with the potential of improving patient outcome. The aim of this study was to examine BtipO2 and cerebral metabolism using the Neurovent-PTO probe and cerebral microdialysis (MD) in TBI patients. Methods: Twenty-three severe TBI patients with monitoring of physiological parameters, ICP, CPP, BtipO2, and MD for biomarkers of energy metabolism (glucose, lactate, and pyruvate) and cellular distress (glutamate, glycerol) were included. Patients were grouped according to injury type (focal/diffuse) and placement of the Neurovent-PTO probe and MD catheter (injured/non-injured hemisphere). Results: We observed different patterns in BtipO2 and MD biomarkers in diffuse and focal injury where placement of the probe also influenced the results (ipsilateral/contralateral). In all groups, despite fairly normal levels of ICP and CPP, increased MD levels of glutamate, glycerol, or the L/P ratio were observed at BtipO2 <5 mmHg, indicating increased vulnerability of the brain at this level. Conclusion: Monitoring of BtipO2 adds important information in addition to traditional ICP and CPP surveillance. Because of the different metabolic responses to very low BtipO2 in the individual patient groups we submit that brain tissue oximetry is a complementary tool rather than an alternative to MD monitoring. PMID:24817863

  13. Clinical presentation and metabolic features of overt and occult urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Polito, Cesare; Apicella, Andrea; Marte, Antonio; Signoriello, Giuseppe; La Manna, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Although pediatricians are frequently confronted with patients presenting urolithiasis symptoms without obvious stones, the syndrome of occult urolithiasis may be still viewed with some skepticism. We have compared the clinical and metabolic features of 197 children with obvious calculi, 189 with microcalculi (diameter ≤ 3 mm based on renal sonography), and 114 with symptoms of urolithiasis and normal renal sonography findings. Only microcalculi and normal sonography subjects with a urinary abnormality potentially leading to urolithiasis were included in the study. Age at presentation increased significantly (p = 0.0001) in the groups in the order normal sonography to microcalculi to calculi groups. There was no significant difference among the three groups in terms of family history of urolithiasis, gender distribution, and degree of hypercalciuria, hyperuricosuria, hyperoxaluria, or hypocitraturia. The average frequency of pain attacks of patients with recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) ranged from 3.6 to 4.6 days of pain per month among the three groups, which is four to ninefold lower than that reported for children with functional or organic gastrointestinal RAP. The consistency of many clinical and urinary metabolic characteristics indicates a common underlying disorder in overt and occult urolithiasis. The increase of age at presentation from the normal sonography to microcalculi and calculi groups may reflect progressive crystal accretion leading ultimately to overt stone formation.

  14. Ovine middle cerebral artery characterization and quantification of ultrastructure and other features: changes with development.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Ravi; Henderson, David A; Chu, Nina; Longo, Lawrence D

    2012-02-15

    Regulation of tone, blood pressure, and blood flow in the cerebral vasculature is of vital importance, particularly in the developing infant. We tested the hypothesis that, in addition to accretion of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in cell layers with vessel thickening, significant changes in smooth muscle structure, as well as phenotype, extracellular matrix, and membrane proteins, in the media of cerebral arteries (CAs) during the course of late fetal development account for associated changes in contractility. Using transmission electron, confocal, wide-field epifluorescence, and light microscopy, we examined the structure and ultrastructure of CAs. Also, we utilized wire myography, Western immunoblotting, and real-time quantitative PCR to examine several other features of these arteries. We compared the main branch ovine middle CAs of 95- and 140-gestational day (GD) fetuses with those of adults (n = 5 for each experimental group). We observed a graded increase in phenylephrine- and KCl-induced contractile responses with development. Structurally, lumen diameter, media thickness, and media cross-sectional area increased dramatically from one age group to the next. With maturation, the cross-sectional profiles of CA SMCs changed from flattened bands in the 95-GD fetus to irregular ovoid-shaped fascicles in the 140-GD fetus and adult. We also observed a change in the type of collagen, specific integrin molecules, and several other parameters of SMC morphology with maturation. Ovine CAs at 95 GD appeared morphologically immature and poorly equipped to respond to major hemodynamic adjustments with maturation.

  15. Cerebral autoregulation and flow/metabolism coupling during cardiopulmonary bypass: the influence of PaCO/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Murkin, J.M.; Farrar, J.K.; Tweed, W.A.; McKenzie, F.N.; Guiraudon, G.

    1987-09-01

    Measurement of /sup 133/Xe clearance and effluent cerebral venous blood sampling were used in 38 patients to determine the effects of cardiopulmonary bypass, and of maintaining temperature corrected or noncorrected PaCO/sub 2/ at 40 mm Hg on regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and flow/metabolism coupling. After induction of anesthesia with diazepam and fentanyl, mean CBF was 25 ml X 100 g-1 X min-1 and cerebral oxygen consumption, 1.67 ml X 100 g-1 X min-1. Cerebral oxygen consumption during nonpulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass at 26 degrees C was reduced to 0.42 ml X 100 g-1 X min-1 in both groups. CBF was reduced to 14-15 ml X 100 g-1 X min-1 in the non-temperature-corrected group (n = 21), was independent of cerebral perfusion pressure over the range of 20-100 mm Hg, but correlated with cerebral oxygen consumption. In the temperature-corrected group (n = 17), CBF varied from 22 to 32 ml X 100 g-1 X min-1, and flow/metabolism coupling was not maintained (i.e., CBF and cerebral oxygen consumption varied independently). However, variation in CBF correlated significantly with cerebral perfusion pressure over the pressure range of 15-95 mm Hg. This study demonstrates a profound reduction in cerebral oxygen consumption during hypothermic nonpulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass. When a non-temperature-corrected PaCO/sub 2/ of approximately 40 mm Hg was maintained, CBF was lower, and analysis of pooled data suggested that CBF regulation was better preserved, i.e., CBF was independent of pressure changes and dependent upon cerebral oxygen consumption.

  16. Metabolic syndrome impairs reactivity and wall mechanics of cerebral resistance arteries in obese Zucker rats

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Steven D.; DeVallance, Evan; d'Audiffret, Alexandre C.; Tabone, Lawrence E.; Shrader, Carl D.; Frisbee, Jefferson C.; Chantler, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is highly prevalent in the North American population and is associated with increased risk for development of cerebrovascular disease. This study determined the structural and functional changes in the middle cerebral arteries (MCA) during the progression of MetS and the effects of chronic pharmacological interventions on mitigating vascular alterations in obese Zucker rats (OZR), a translationally relevant model of MetS. The reactivity and wall mechanics of ex vivo pressurized MCA from lean Zucker rats (LZR) and OZR were determined at 7–8, 12–13, and 16–17 wk of age under control conditions and following chronic treatment with pharmacological agents targeting specific systemic pathologies. With increasing age, control OZR demonstrated reduced nitric oxide bioavailability, impaired dilator (acetylcholine) reactivity, elevated myogenic properties, structural narrowing, and wall stiffening compared with LZR. Antihypertensive therapy (e.g., captopril or hydralazine) starting at 7–8 wk of age blunted the progression of arterial stiffening compared with OZR controls, while treatments that reduced inflammation and oxidative stress (e.g., atorvastatin, rosiglitazone, and captopril) improved NO bioavailability and vascular reactivity compared with OZR controls and had mixed effects on structural remodeling. These data identify specific functional and structural cerebral adaptations that limit cerebrovascular blood flow in MetS patients, contributing to increased risk of cognitive decline, cerebral hypoperfusion, and ischemic stroke; however, these pathological adaptations could potentially be blunted if treated early in the progression of MetS. PMID:26475592

  17. Changes in Cerebral Oxidative Metabolism during Neonatal Seizures Following Hypoxic–Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Subhabrata; Bale, Gemma; Mathieson, Sean; Uria-Avellanal, Cristina; Meek, Judith; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Robertson, Nicola J.

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are common following hypoxic–ischemic brain injury in newborn infants. Prolonged or recurrent seizures have been shown to exacerbate neuronal damage in the developing brain; however, the precise mechanism is not fully understood. Cytochrome-c-oxidase is responsible for more than 90% of ATP production inside mitochondria. Using a novel broadband near-infrared spectroscopy system, we measured the concentration changes in the oxidation state of cerebral cytochrome-c-oxidase (Δ[oxCCO]) and hemodynamics during recurrent neonatal seizures following hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy in a newborn infant. A rapid increase in Δ[oxCCO] was noted at the onset of seizures along with a rise in the baseline of amplitude-integrated electroencephalogram. Cerebral oxygenation and cerebral blood volume fell just prior to the seizure onset but recovered rapidly during seizures. Δ[oxCCO] during seizures correlated with changes in mean electroencephalogram voltage indicating an increase in neuronal activation and energy demand. The progressive decline in the Δ[oxCCO] baseline during seizures suggests a progressive decrease of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. PMID:27559538

  18. Positron emission tomography in ischaemic stroke: cerebral perfusion and metabolism after stroke onset.

    PubMed

    Yasaka, M; Read, S J; O'Keefe, G J; Egan, G F; Pointon, O; McKay, W J; Donnan, G A

    1998-10-01

    PET studies were performed in 37 patients up to 1 month after ischaemic stroke to observe the relationships between cerebral blood flow (CBF), rate of cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO(2)) and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) with time. PET findings were classified as misery perfusion (two patients), luxury perfusion (15 patients), matched hypoperfusion-hypometabolism (17 patients) or normal (nine patients). Misery perfusion was seen up to 3 days post-stroke, suggesting an extended time window during which at least some tissue may be salvageable. Luxury perfusion, an indication of non-nutritional flow, was seen as early as 30 h and as late as 23 days, but more commonly between 3 and 7 days. A matched reduction of CBF and CMRO(2) was seen during all time periods, but as early as 27 hours. Since this was associated with severely impaired CBF, presumably from the onset of stroke, it can be assumed that the duration of cerebral tissue survival is less than 27 h under these conditions. We inferred that, for maximal tissue recovery, therapy will need to be introduced within 27 h after stroke, but that at least some potential for recovery exists up to 3 days.

  19. Metabolic syndrome impairs reactivity and wall mechanics of cerebral resistance arteries in obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Steven D; DeVallance, Evan; d'Audiffret, Alexandre C; Frisbee, Stephanie J; Tabone, Lawrence E; Shrader, Carl D; Frisbee, Jefferson C; Chantler, Paul D

    2015-12-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is highly prevalent in the North American population and is associated with increased risk for development of cerebrovascular disease. This study determined the structural and functional changes in the middle cerebral arteries (MCA) during the progression of MetS and the effects of chronic pharmacological interventions on mitigating vascular alterations in obese Zucker rats (OZR), a translationally relevant model of MetS. The reactivity and wall mechanics of ex vivo pressurized MCA from lean Zucker rats (LZR) and OZR were determined at 7-8, 12-13, and 16-17 wk of age under control conditions and following chronic treatment with pharmacological agents targeting specific systemic pathologies. With increasing age, control OZR demonstrated reduced nitric oxide bioavailability, impaired dilator (acetylcholine) reactivity, elevated myogenic properties, structural narrowing, and wall stiffening compared with LZR. Antihypertensive therapy (e.g., captopril or hydralazine) starting at 7-8 wk of age blunted the progression of arterial stiffening compared with OZR controls, while treatments that reduced inflammation and oxidative stress (e.g., atorvastatin, rosiglitazone, and captopril) improved NO bioavailability and vascular reactivity compared with OZR controls and had mixed effects on structural remodeling. These data identify specific functional and structural cerebral adaptations that limit cerebrovascular blood flow in MetS patients, contributing to increased risk of cognitive decline, cerebral hypoperfusion, and ischemic stroke; however, these pathological adaptations could potentially be blunted if treated early in the progression of MetS.

  20. New insights into coupling and uncoupling of cerebral blood flow and metabolism in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Venkat, Poornima; Chopp, Michael; Chen, Jieli

    2016-01-01

    The brain has high metabolic and energy needs and requires continuous cerebral blood flow (CBF), which is facilitated by a tight coupling between neuronal activity, CBF, and metabolism. Upon neuronal activation, there is an increase in energy demand, which is then met by a hemodynamic response that increases CBF. Such regional CBF increase in response to neuronal activation is observed using neuroimaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography. The mechanisms and mediators (eg, nitric oxide, astrocytes, and ion channels) that regulate CBF-metabolism coupling have been extensively studied. The neurovascular unit is a conceptual model encompassing the anatomical and metabolic interactions between the neurons, vascular components, and glial cells in the brain. It is compromised under disease states such as stroke, diabetes, hypertension, dementias, and with aging, all of which trigger a cascade of inflammatory responses that exacerbate brain damage. Hence, tight regulation and maintenance of neurovascular coupling is central for brain homeostasis. This review article also discusses the waste clearance pathways in the brain such as the glymphatic system. The glymphatic system is a functional waste clearance pathway that removes metabolic wastes and neurotoxins from the brain along paravascular channels. Disruption of the glymphatic system burdens the brain with accumulating waste and has been reported in aging as well as several neurological diseases. PMID:27374823

  1. New insights into coupling and uncoupling of cerebral blood flow and metabolism in the brain.

    PubMed

    Venkat, Poornima; Chopp, Michael; Chen, Jieli

    2016-06-30

    The brain has high metabolic and energy needs and requires continuous cerebral blood flow (CBF), which is facilitated by a tight coupling between neuronal activity, CBF, and metabolism. Upon neuronal activation, there is an increase in energy demand, which is then met by a hemodynamic response that increases CBF. Such regional CBF increase in response to neuronal activation is observed using neuroimaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography. The mechanisms and mediators (eg, nitric oxide, astrocytes, and ion channels) that regulate CBF-metabolism coupling have been extensively studied. The neurovascular unit is a conceptual model encompassing the anatomical and metabolic interactions between the neurons, vascular components, and glial cells in the brain. It is compromised under disease states such as stroke, diabetes, hypertension, dementias, and with aging, all of which trigger a cascade of inflammatory responses that exacerbate brain damage. Hence, tight regulation and maintenance of neurovascular coupling is central for brain homeostasis. This review article also discusses the waste clearance pathways in the brain such as the glymphatic system. The glymphatic system is a functional waste clearance pathway that removes metabolic wastes and neurotoxins from the brain along paravascular channels. Disruption of the glymphatic system burdens the brain with accumulating waste and has been reported in aging as well as several neurological diseases.

  2. Sleep Disorders in Parkinson’s Disease: Clinical Features, Iron Metabolism and Related Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shu-yang; Sun, Li; Liu, Zhuo; Huang, Xi-yan; Zuo, Li-jun; Cao, Chen-jie; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Xiao-min

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate clinical features, iron metabolism and neuroinflammation in Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients with sleep disorders (SD). Methods 211 PD patients were evaluated by Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and a body of scales for motor symptoms and non-motor symptoms. 94 blood and 38 cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) samples were collected and iron and its metabolism-relating proteins, neuroinflammatory factors were detected and analyzed. Results 136 cases (64.5%) of PD patients were accompanied by SD. Factor with the highest score in PSQI was daytime dysfunction. Depression, restless leg syndrome, autonomic symptoms and fatigue contributed 68.6% of the variance of PSQI score. Transferrin level in serum and tumor necrosis factor–α level in CSF decreased, and the levels of iron, transferrin, lactoferrin and prostaglandin E2 in CSF increased in PD patients with SD compared with those without SD. In CSF, prostaglandin E2 level was positively correlated with the levels of transferrin and lactoferrin, and tumor necrosis factor–α level was negatively correlated with the levels of iron, transferrin and lactoferrin in CSF. Conclusions Depression, restless leg syndrome, autonomic disorders and fatigue are the important contributors for the poor sleep in PD patients. Abnormal iron metabolism may cause excessive iron deposition in brain and be related to SD in PD patients through dual potential mechanisms, including neuroinflammation by activating microglia and neurotoxicity by targeting neurons. Hence, inhibition of iron deposition-related neuroinflammation and neurotoxicity may cast a new light for drug development for SD in PD patients. PMID:24376607

  3. Sequential metabolic changes in rat brain following middle cerebral artery occlusion: A 2-deoxyglucose study

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, K.; Sharp, F.R.; Simon, R.P. )

    1989-12-01

    The distribution and time course of altered cerebral metabolism following permanent focal ischemia was studied in rat using the 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) technique. Increased 2DG uptake preceded decreased 2DG uptake and infarction in the caudate putamen and cortex. Decreased 2DG uptake without infarction was observed for 72 h in thalamus and for 24 h in hippocampus (areas remote from the ischemic zones). This study supports the concept of cell excitation as a pathophysiologic process in permanent focal ischemia. The time course of increased metabolism may demarcate the time window of opportunity for the previously demonstrated attenuation of stroke size with inhibition of cell excitation by pharmacologic blockade of excitatory amino acid neurotransmission.

  4. Exenatide Regulates Cerebral Glucose Metabolism in Brain Areas Associated With Glucose Homeostasis and Reward System.

    PubMed

    Daniele, Giuseppe; Iozzo, Patricia; Molina-Carrion, Marjorie; Lancaster, Jack; Ciociaro, Demetrio; Cersosimo, Eugenio; Tripathy, Devjit; Triplitt, Curtis; Fox, Peter; Musi, Nicolas; DeFronzo, Ralph; Gastaldelli, Amalia

    2015-10-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) have been found in the brain, but whether GLP-1R agonists (GLP-1RAs) influence brain glucose metabolism is currently unknown. The study aim was to evaluate the effects of a single injection of the GLP-1RA exenatide on cerebral and peripheral glucose metabolism in response to a glucose load. In 15 male subjects with HbA1c of 5.7 ± 0.1%, fasting glucose of 114 ± 3 mg/dL, and 2-h glucose of 177 ± 11 mg/dL, exenatide (5 μg) or placebo was injected in double-blind, randomized fashion subcutaneously 30 min before an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). The cerebral glucose metabolic rate (CMRglu) was measured by positron emission tomography after an injection of [(18)F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose before the OGTT, and the rate of glucose absorption (RaO) and disposal was assessed using stable isotope tracers. Exenatide reduced RaO0-60 min (4.6 ± 1.4 vs. 13.1 ± 1.7 μmol/min ⋅ kg) and decreased the rise in mean glucose0-60 min (107 ± 6 vs. 138 ± 8 mg/dL) and insulin0-60 min (17.3 ± 3.1 vs. 24.7 ± 3.8 mU/L). Exenatide increased CMRglu in areas of the brain related to glucose homeostasis, appetite, and food reward, despite lower plasma insulin concentrations, but reduced glucose uptake in the hypothalamus. Decreased RaO0-60 min after exenatide was inversely correlated to CMRglu. In conclusion, these results demonstrate, for the first time in man, a major effect of a GLP-1RA on regulation of brain glucose metabolism in the absorptive state.

  5. Cyclooxygenase-derived vasoconstriction restrains hypoxia-mediated cerebral vasodilation in young adults with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Harrell, John W; Schrage, William G

    2014-01-15

    Poor cerebrovascular function in metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) likely contributes to elevated risk of cerebrovascular disease in this growing clinical population. Younger MetSyn adults without clinical evidence of cerebrovascular disease exhibit preserved hypercapnic vasodilation yet markedly impaired hypoxic vasodilation, but the mechanisms behind reduced hypoxic vasodilation are unknown. Based on data from rats, we tested the hypothesis that younger adults with MetSyn exhibit reduced cerebral hypoxic vasodilation due to loss of vasodilating prostaglandins. Middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAv) was measured with transcranial Doppler ultrasound in adults with MetSyn (n = 13, 33 ± 3 yr) and healthy controls (n = 15, 31 ± 2 yr). Isocapnic hypoxia was induced by titrating inspired oxygen to lower arterial saturation to 90% and 80% for 5 min each. Separately, hypercapnia was induced by increasing end-tidal CO2 10 mmHg above baseline levels. Cyclooxygenase inhibition (100 mg indomethacin) was conducted in a randomized double-blind, placebo controlled design. MCAv was normalized for group differences in blood pressure (healthy: 89 ± 2 mmHg vs. MetSyn: 102 ± 2 mmHg) as cerebrovascular conductance index (CVCi), and used to assess cerebral vasodilation. Hypoxia increased CVCi in both groups; however, vasodilation was ∼55% lower in MetSyn at SpO2 = 80% (P < 0.05). Indomethacin tended to decrease hypoxic vasodilation in healthy controls, and unexpectedly increased dilation in MetSyn (P < 0.05). In contrast to hypoxia, hypercapnia-mediated vasodilation was similar between groups, as was the decrease in vasodilation with indomethacin. These data indicate increased production of vasoconstrictor prostaglandins restrains hypoxic cerebral vasodilation in MetSyn, preventing them from responding appropriately to this important physiological stressor.

  6. Glucose and fatty acid metabolism in normal and diabetic rabbit cerebral microvessels

    SciTech Connect

    Hingorani, V.; Brecher, P.

    1987-05-01

    Rabbit cerebral microvessels were used to study fatty acid metabolism and its utilization relative to glucose. Microvessels were incubated with either (6-/sup 14/C)glucose or (1-/sup 14/C)oleic acid and the incorporation of radioactivity into /sup 14/CO/sub 2/, lactate, triglyceride, cholesterol ester, and phospholipid was determined. The inclusion of 5.5 mM glucose in the incubation mixture reduced oleate oxidation by 50% and increased esterification into both phospholipid and triglyceride. Glucose oxidation to CO/sub 2/ was reduced by oleate addition, whereas lactate production was unaffected. 2'-Tetradecylglycidic acid, an inhibitor of carnitine acyltransferase I, blocked oleic acid oxidation in the presence and absence of glucose. It did not effect fatty acid esterification when glucose was absent and eliminated the inhibition of oleate on glucose oxidation. Glucose oxidation to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ was markedly suppressed in microvessels from alloxan-treated diabetic rabbits but lactate formation was unchanged. Fatty acid oxidation to CO/sub 2/ and incorporation into triglyceride, phospholipid, and cholesterol ester remained unchanged in the diabetic state. The experiments show that both fatty acid and glucose can be used as a fuel source by the cerebral microvessels, and the interactions found between fatty acid and glucose metabolism are similar to the fatty acid-glucose cycle, described previously.

  7. Cocaine abstinence following chronic treatment alters cerebral metabolism in dopaminergic reward regions. Bromocriptine enhances recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Clow, D.W.; Hammer, R.P. Jr. )

    1991-01-01

    2-(14C)deoxyglucose autoradiography was used to determine local cerebral glucose utilization (lCGU) in rats following chronic cocaine treatment and subsequent abstinence. lCGU was examined in 43 discrete brain regions in animals which had received daily injections of cocaine for 14 days (10 mg/kg) followed by 3 days of saline or bromocriptine (10 mg/kg) treatment. Cocaine abstinence following chronic treatment significantly reduced lCGU in several regions including mesocorticolimbic structures such as ventral tegmental area, medial prefrontal cortex, and nucleus accumbens (NAc). Within the NAc, however, only the rostral pole showed significant reduction. In contrast, when bromocriptine treatment accompanied abstinence, lCGU was no longer reduced in mesocorticolimbic and most other regions, implying that metabolic recovery was enhanced by bromocriptine treatment during early abstinence following chronic cocaine treatment. These data suggest that cerebral metabolism is decreased during cocaine abstinence following chronic treatment in critical brain regions, and that this alteration can be prevented by treatment with direct-acting dopamine agonists such as bromocriptine.

  8. Multichannel optical brain imaging to separate cerebral vascular, tissue metabolic, and neuronal effects of cocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hugang; Luo, Zhongchi; Yuan, Zhijia; Pan, Yingtian; Du, Congwu

    2012-02-01

    Characterization of cerebral hemodynamic and oxygenation metabolic changes, as well neuronal function is of great importance to study of brain functions and the relevant brain disorders such as drug addiction. Compared with other neuroimaging modalities, optical imaging techniques have the potential for high spatiotemporal resolution and dissection of the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), blood volume (CBV), and hemoglobing oxygenation and intracellular Ca ([Ca2+]i), which serves as markers of vascular function, tissue metabolism and neuronal activity, respectively. Recently, we developed a multiwavelength imaging system and integrated it into a surgical microscope. Three LEDs of λ1=530nm, λ2=570nm and λ3=630nm were used for exciting [Ca2+]i fluorescence labeled by Rhod2 (AM) and sensitizing total hemoglobin (i.e., CBV), and deoxygenated-hemoglobin, whereas one LD of λ1=830nm was used for laser speckle imaging to form a CBF mapping of the brain. These light sources were time-sharing for illumination on the brain and synchronized with the exposure of CCD camera for multichannel images of the brain. Our animal studies indicated that this optical approach enabled simultaneous mapping of cocaine-induced changes in CBF, CBV and oxygenated- and deoxygenated hemoglobin as well as [Ca2+]i in the cortical brain. Its high spatiotemporal resolution (30μm, 10Hz) and large field of view (4x5 mm2) are advanced as a neuroimaging tool for brain functional study.

  9. Cerebral acetylcholine and energy metabolism changes in acute ammonia intoxication in the lower primate Tupaia glis.

    PubMed

    McCandless, D W; Looney, G A; Modak, A T; Stavinoha, W B

    1985-08-01

    Ammonia levels are elevated in many patients with hepatic encephalopathy. This observation, coupled with animal studies showing an encephalogenic role for ammonia, has led to the concept that ammonia is an important toxin in the production of neurologic symptoms. Studies in rodents have shown that ammonia alters cerebral energy metabolism in the reticular formation, an area important in the modulation of consciousness. Our study was undertaken to extend these observations to the lower primate Tupaia glis, the tree shrew. The energy metabolites glucose, glycogen, lactate, adenosine triphosphate, and phosphocreatine were measured in the reticular formation by microanalytic techniques and enzymatic cycling. Acetylcholine was measured in brain regions by gas chromatography. Acetylcholine levels were increased significantly only in the medulla-pons and diencephalon in the coma stage. The energy metabolites glucose, glycogen, and phosphocreatine were decreased in reticular formation cells during the coma, whereas lactate was increased. During the precoma, glycogen and phosphocreatine were decreased. It appears, therefore, that the tree shrew has a metabolic response to ammonia similar to that of mice. A lowering of energy metabolism in the area of brain-regulating consciousness may act to place the animal in a coma. This coma in turn acts to decrease overall metabolic demand, which allows the animal an opportunity to conserve its threatened energy reserves.

  10. Cerebral glucose metabolic patterns in Alzheimer's disease. Effect of gender and age at dementia onset

    SciTech Connect

    Small, G.W.; Kuhl, D.E.; Riege, W.H.; Fujikawa, D.G.; Ashford, J.W.; Metter, E.J.; Mazziotta, J.C.

    1989-06-01

    No previous study of Alzheimer's disease has, to our knowledge, assessed the effect of both age at dementia onset and gender on cerebral glucose metabolic patterns. To this end, we used positron emission tomography (fludeoxyglucose F 18 method) to study 24 patients with clinical diagnoses of probable Alzheimer's disease. Comparisons of the 13 patients with early-onset dementia (less than 65 years of age) with the 11 patients with late-onset dementia (greater than 65 years of age) revealed significantly lower left parietal metabolic ratios (left posterior parietal region divided by the hemispheric average) in the early-onset group. The metabolic ratio of posterior parietal cortex divided by the relatively disease-stable average of caudate and thalamus also separated patients with early-onset dementia from those with late-onset dementia, but not men from women. Further comparisons between sexes showed that, in all brain regions studied, the 9 postmenopausal women had higher nonweighted mean metabolic rates than the 15 men from the same age group, with hemispheric sex differences of 9% on the right and 7% on the left. These results demonstrate decreased parietal ratios in early-onset dementia of Alzheimer's disease, independent of a gender effect.

  11. Dehydration accelerates reductions in cerebral blood flow during prolonged exercise in the heat without compromising brain metabolism.

    PubMed

    Trangmar, Steven J; Chiesa, Scott T; Llodio, Iñaki; Garcia, Benjamin; Kalsi, Kameljit K; Secher, Niels H; González-Alonso, José

    2015-11-01

    Dehydration hastens the decline in cerebral blood flow (CBF) during incremental exercise, whereas the cerebral metabolic rate for O2 (CMRO2 ) is preserved. It remains unknown whether CMRO2 is also maintained during prolonged exercise in the heat and whether an eventual decline in CBF is coupled to fatigue. Two studies were undertaken. In study 1, 10 male cyclists cycled in the heat for ∼2 h with (control) and without fluid replacement (dehydration) while internal and external carotid artery blood flow and core and blood temperature were obtained. Arterial and internal jugular venous blood samples were assessed with dehydration to evaluate CMRO2 . In study 2, in 8 male subjects, middle cerebral artery blood velocity was measured during prolonged exercise to exhaustion in both dehydrated and euhydrated states. After a rise at the onset of exercise, internal carotid artery flow declined to baseline with progressive dehydration (P < 0.05). However, cerebral metabolism remained stable through enhanced O2 and glucose extraction (P < 0.05). External carotid artery flow increased for 1 h but declined before exhaustion. Fluid ingestion maintained cerebral and extracranial perfusion throughout nonfatiguing exercise. During exhaustive exercise, however, euhydration delayed but did not prevent the decline in cerebral perfusion. In conclusion, during prolonged exercise in the heat, dehydration accelerates the decline in CBF without affecting CMRO2 and also restricts extracranial perfusion. Thus, fatigue is related to a reduction in CBF and extracranial perfusion rather than CMRO2 .

  12. Early Cerebral Hemodynamic, Metabolic, and Histological Changes in Hypoxic–Ischemic Fetal Lambs during Postnatal Life

    PubMed Central

    Rey-Santano, Carmen; Mielgo, Victoria E.; Gastiasoro, Elena; Murgia, Xabier; Lafuente, Hector; Ruiz-del-Yerro, Estibaliz; Valls-i-Soler, Adolf; Hilario, Enrique; Alvarez, Francisco J.

    2011-01-01

    The hemodynamic, metabolic, and biochemical changes produced during the transition from fetal to neonatal life may be aggravated if an episode of asphyxia occurs during fetal life. The aim of the study was to examine regional cerebral blood flow (RCBF), histological changes, and cerebral brain metabolism in preterm lambs, and to analyze the role of oxidative stress in the first hours of postnatal life following severe fetal asphyxia. Eighteen chronically instrumented newborn lambs were randomly assigned to either a control group or the hypoxic–ischemic (HI) group, in which case fetal asphyxia was induced just before delivery. All the animals were maintained on intermittent positive pressure ventilation for 3 h after delivery. During the HI insult, the injured group developed acidosis, hypoxia, hypercapnia, lactic acidosis, and tachycardia (relative to the control group), without hypotension. The intermittent positive pressure ventilation transiently improved gas exchange and cardiovascular parameters. After HI injury and during ventilatory support, there continued to be an increased RCBF in inner regions among the HI group, but no significant differences were detected in cortical flow compared to the control group. Also, the magnitude of the increase in TUNEL positive cells (apoptosis) and antioxidant enzymes, and decrease of ATP reserves was significantly greater in the brain regions where the RCBF was not higher. In conclusion, our findings identify early metabolic, histological, and hemodynamic changes involved in brain damage in premature asphyxiated lambs. Such changes have been described in human neonates, so our model could be useful to test the safety and the effectiveness of different neuroprotective or ventilation strategies applied in the first hours after fetal HI injury. PMID:21960958

  13. Cerebral and extracerebral cholesterol metabolism and CSF markers of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Popp, Julius; Meichsner, Sabrina; Kölsch, Heike; Lewczuk, Piotr; Maier, Wolfgang; Kornhuber, Johannes; Jessen, Frank; Lütjohann, Dieter

    2013-07-01

    The disturbances of the cholesterol synthesis and metabolism described in Alzheimer's disease (AD) may be both a consequence of the neurodegenerative process and a contributor to the pathogenesis. These putative relationships and their underlying mechanisms are not well understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the cerebral and extracerebral cholesterol synthesis and metabolism, and the AD pathology as reflected by CSF markers in humans. We evaluated the relationships between the plasma and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of cholesterol, the cholesterol precursors lanosterol, lathosterol and desmosterol, and the cholesterol elimination products 24S-hydroxycholesterol and 27-hydroxycholesterol, and the CSF markers for AD pathology Aβ1-42 and p-tau181 in 86 subjects with normal cognition and in 107 AD patients. CSF desmosterol, cholesterol and 24S-hydroxycholesterol in the AD group, and CSF 24S-hydroxycholesterol in the control group correlated with the p-tau181 levels. Neither CSF nor plasma concentrations of the included compounds correlated with the CSF Aβ1-42 levels. In multivariate regression tests including age, gender, albumin ratio, number of the APOEε4 alleles, and diagnosis, p-tau181 levels independently predicted the CSF desmosterol, cholesterol and 24S-hydroxycholesterol concentrations. The associations remained significant for CSF cholesterol and 24S-hydroxycholesterol when analyses were separately performed in the AD group. The results suggest that alterations of CNS cholesterol de novo genesis and metabolism are related to neurodegeneration and in particular to the cerebral accumulation of phosphorylated tau.

  14. Delayed administration of the GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide improves metabolic and functional recovery after cerebral ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wenbin; Miao, Yunping; Chen, Aiying; Cheng, Min; Ye, Xiaodi; Song, Fahuan; Zheng, Gaoli

    2017-02-22

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists administered before or immediately after induction of experimental stroke have been shown to provide acute neuroprotection. Here, we determined whether delayed treatment with a GLP-1R agonist could improve metabolic and functional recovery after stroke. Rats were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and given the well-established GLP-1R agonist liraglutide (50, 100, or 200μg/kg) or normal saline (NS) daily for 4 weeks, starting 1 day after MCAO. Cerebral glucose metabolism and neurological deficits were evaluated using (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and modified neurological severity score (mNSS) test. Levels of neuronal nuclei (NeuN), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), von Willebrand factor (vWF), and GLP-1R were assessed by immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analysis. PET imaging showed that animals treated with liraglutide had significantly higher (18)F-FDG accumulation in the cerebral infarction compared with animals treated with NS. Liraglutide significantly reduced the mNSS score. It also greatly increased the expression of NeuN, GFAP, vWF, and GLP-1R in the cerebral ischemic area at postoperative week 4. These results demonstrated metabolic and functional recovery after delayed treatment with liraglutide in a rat model of cerebral ischemia.

  15. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism during cardiopulmonary bypass with special reference to effects of hypotension induced by prostacyclin

    SciTech Connect

    Feddersen, K.; Aren, C.; Nilsson, N.J.; Radegran, K.

    1986-04-01

    Cerebral blood flow and metabolism of oxygen, glucose, and lactate were studied in 43 patients undergoing aortocoronary bypass. Twenty-five patients received prostacyclin infusion, 50 ng per kilogram of body weight per minute, during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), and 18 patients served as a control group. Regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) was studied by intraarterially injected xenon 133 and a single scintillation detector. Oxygen tension, carbon dioxide tension, oxygen saturation, glucose, and lactate were measured in arterial and cerebral venous blood. Mean arterial blood pressure decreased during hypothermia and prostacyclin infusion to less than 30 mm Hg. The regional CBF was, on average, 22 (standard deviation (SD) 4) ml/100 gm/min before CPB. It increased in the control group during hypothermia to 34 (SD 12) ml/100 gm/min, but decreased in the prostacyclin group to 15 (SD 5) ml/100 gm/min. It increased during rewarming in the prostacyclin group. After CPB, regional CBF was about 40 ml/100 gm/min in both groups. The cerebral arteriovenous oxygen pressure difference decreased more in the control group than in the prostacyclin group during hypothermia. The cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen decreased in both groups from approximately 2 ml/100 gm/min to about 1 ml/100 gm/min during hypothermia, increased again during rewarming, and after CPB was at the levels measured before bypass in both groups. There was no difference between the groups in regard to glucose and lactate metabolism.

  16. Early postoperative changes in cerebral oxygen metabolism following neonatal cardiac surgery: Effects of surgical duration

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Erin M.; Lynch, Jennifer M.; Goff, Donna A.; Schwab, Peter J.; Baker, Wesley B.; Durduran, Turgut; Busch, David R.; Nicolson, Susan C.; Montenegro, Lisa M.; Naim, Maryam Y.; Xiao, Rui; Spray, Thomas L.; Yodh, A. G.; Gaynor, J. William; Licht, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The early postoperative period following neonatal cardiac surgery is a time of increased risk for brain injury, yet the mechanisms underlying this risk are unknown. To understand these risks more completely, we quantified changes in postoperative cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), and cerebral blood flow (CBF) compared with preoperative levels by using noninvasive optical modalities. Methods Diffuse optical spectroscopy and diffuse correlation spectroscopy were used concurrently to derive cerebral blood flow and oxygen utilization postoperatively for 12 hours. Relative changes in CMRO2, OEF, and CBF were quantified with reference to preoperative data. A mixed-effect model was used to investigate the influence of total support time and deep hypothermic circulatory arrest duration on relative changes in CMRO2, OEF, and CBF. Results Relative changes in CMRO2, OEF, and CBF were assessed in 36 patients, 21 with single-ventricle defects and 15 with 2-ventricle defects. Among patients with single-ventricle lesions, deep hypothermic circulatory arrest duration did not affect relative changes in CMRO2, CBF, or OEF (P > .05). Among 2-ventricle patients, total support time was not a significant predictor of relative changes in CMRO2 or CBF (P > .05), although longer total support time was associated significantly with greater increases in relative change of postoperative OEF (P = .008). Conclusions Noninvasive diffuse optical techniques were used to quantify postoperative relative changes in CMRO2, CBF, and OEF for the first time in this observational pilot study. Pilot data suggest that surgical duration does not account for observed variability in the relative change in CMRO2, and that more comprehensive clinical studies using the new technology are feasible and warranted to elucidate these issues further. PMID:23111021

  17. Cerebral energy metabolism in diving and non-diving birds during hypoxia and apnoeic asphyxia.

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, R M; Jones, D R

    1980-01-01

    1. Cerebral energy metabolism during apnoeic asphyxia and steady-state hypoxia was compared in ducks and chickens; ducks tolerate apnoeic asphyxia 3-8 times longer than chickens. 2. Fluctuations in the reduced form of respiratory chain nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) were monitored from the left cerebral hemisphere by a noninvasive fluorometric technique and used as an indicator of mitochondrial hypoxia. NADH fluorescence was expressed in aribtrary units (a.u.) where 100 a.u. was defined as the fluorescence change from normoxia to anoxia. Electroencephalogram (e.e.g.) and surface Po2 were recorded from the right hemisphere. 3. After 1 min of asphyxia NADH fluorescence increased by 37 a.u.+/-3.60 S.E. of mean (n=54) in paralysed chickens and 8 a.u.+/-1.41 (n=55) in aralysed ducks. After 2 min the fluorescence increased by only 15 a.u.+/-1.95 in ducks. 4. Both species showed an isoelectric e.e.g. when fluorescence increased by approximately 35 a.u., indicating that anaerobic ATP production in ducks did not maintain brain function (e.e.g.) for a greater accumulation of respiratory chain NADH. 5. At a given decrease in tissue Po2 ducks and chickens showed the same level of NADH increase, indicating that both species are equally dependent on tissue Po2 for the maintenance of redox state. 6. We conclude that biochemical adjustment which enhance anaerobic ATP production and/or prolong oxidative phosphorylation during progressive hypoxia are not responsible for increased cerebral tolerance to apnoeic asphyxia in the duck. PMID:7381772

  18. Adenosine mediates decreased cerebral metabolic rate and increased cerebral blood flow during acute moderate hypoxia in the near-term fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Blood, Arlin B; Hunter, Christian J; Power, Gordon G

    2003-12-15

    Exposure of the fetal sheep to moderate to severe hypoxic stress results in both increased cortical blood flow and decreased metabolic rate. Using intravenous infusion of 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX), a selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist that is permeable to the blood brain barrier, we examine the role of adenosine A1 receptors in mediating cortical blood flow and metabolic responses to moderate hypoxia. The effects of DPCPX blockade are compared to controls as well as animals receiving intravenous 8-(p-sulfophenyl)-theophylline) (8-SPT), a non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist which has been found to be blood brain barrier impermeable. Laser Doppler flow probes, tissue PO2, and thermocouples were implanted in the cerebral cortices of near-term fetal sheep. Catheters were placed in the brachial artery and sagittal sinus vein for collection of samples for blood gas analysis. Three to seven days later responses to a 30-min period of fetal hypoxemia (arterial PO2 10-12 mmHg) were studied with administration of 8-SPT, DPCPX, or vehicle. Cerebral metabolic rate was determined by calculation of both brain heat production and oxygen consumption. In response to hypoxia, control experiments demonstrated a 42 +/- 7 % decrease in cortical heat production and a 35 +/- 10 % reduction in oxygen consumption. In contrast, DPCPX infusion during hypoxia resulted in no significant change in brain heat production or oxygen consumption, suggesting the adenosine A1 receptor is involved in lowering metabolic rate during hypoxia. The decrease in cerebral metabolic rate was not altered by 8-SPT infusion, suggesting that the response is not mediated by adenosine receptors located outside the blood brain barrier. In response to hypoxia, control experiments demonstrated a 35 +/- 7 % increase in cortical blood flow. DPCPX infusion did not change this increase in cortical blood flow, however 8-SPT infusion attenuated increases in flow, indicating that hypoxic

  19. Revealing the cerebral regions and networks mediating vulnerability to depression: oxidative metabolism mapping of rat brain.

    PubMed

    Harro, Jaanus; Kanarik, Margus; Kaart, Tanel; Matrov, Denis; Kõiv, Kadri; Mällo, Tanel; Del Río, Joaquin; Tordera, Rosa M; Ramirez, Maria J

    2014-07-01

    The large variety of available animal models has revealed much on the neurobiology of depression, but each model appears as specific to a significant extent, and distinction between stress response, pathogenesis of depression and underlying vulnerability is difficult to make. Evidence from epidemiological studies suggests that depression occurs in biologically predisposed subjects under impact of adverse life events. We applied the diathesis-stress concept to reveal brain regions and functional networks that mediate vulnerability to depression and response to chronic stress by collapsing data on cerebral long term neuronal activity as measured by cytochrome c oxidase histochemistry in distinct animal models. Rats were rendered vulnerable to depression either by partial serotonergic lesion or by maternal deprivation, or selected for a vulnerable phenotype (low positive affect, low novelty-related activity or high hedonic response). Environmental adversity was brought about by applying chronic variable stress or chronic social defeat. Several brain regions, most significantly median raphe, habenula, retrosplenial cortex and reticular thalamus, were universally implicated in long-term metabolic stress response, vulnerability to depression, or both. Vulnerability was associated with higher oxidative metabolism levels as compared to resilience to chronic stress. Chronic stress, in contrast, had three distinct patterns of effect on oxidative metabolism in vulnerable vs. resilient animals. In general, associations between regional activities in several brain circuits were strongest in vulnerable animals, and chronic stress disrupted this interrelatedness. These findings highlight networks that underlie resilience to stress, and the distinct response to stress that occurs in vulnerable subjects.

  20. Metabolic, cardiorespiratory, and neuromuscular fitness performance in children with cerebral palsy: A comparison with healthy youth

    PubMed Central

    García, Claudia Cardona; Alcocer-Gamboa, Alberto; Ruiz, Margarita Pérez; Caballero, Ignacio Martínez; Faigenbaum, Avery D.; Esteve-Lanao, Jonathan; Saiz, Beatriz Moral; Lorenzo, Teresa Martín; Lara, Sergio Lerma

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess metabolic, cardiorespiratory, and neuromuscular fitness parameters in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) and to compare these findings with typically developing children. 40 children with CP (21 males, 19 females; mean age, 11.0±3.3 yr; range, 6.5–17.1 yr; Gross Motor Function Classification System levels 1 or 2) and 40 healthy, age- and sex-matched children completed a test battery that consisted of 8 tests and 28 measures that assessed cardio-respiratory fitness, energy expenditure, anaerobic endurance, muscle strength, agility, stability and flexibility. Children with CP had significantly lower performance (P<0.05) on most cardiorespiratory and metabolic tests than those of healthy children, Differences in neuromuscular measures of muscular strength, speed, agility, anaerobic endurance, and flexibility between groups were most apparent. Grouped differences in cardiorespiratory variables revealed a 25% difference in performance, whereas grouped differences in metabolic and neuromuscular measures were 43% and 60%, respectively. The physical fitness of contemporary children with CP is significantly less than healthy, age-matched children. Significant differences in neuromuscular measures between groups can aid in the identification of specific fitness abilities in need of improvement in this population. PMID:27162775

  1. Regional cerebral energy metabolism during intravenous anesthesia with etomidate, ketamine or thiopental

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Regional brain glucose utilization (rCMRglc) was measured in rats during steady-state levels of intravenous anesthesia to determine if alterations in brain function due to anesthesia could provide information on the mechanisms of anesthesia. Intravenous anesthetics from three different chemical classes were studied: etomidate, ketamine and thiopental. All rCMRglc experiments were conducted in freely moving rats in isolation chambers, with the use of (6-/sup 14/C) glucose and guantitative autoradiography. Etomidate caused a rostral-to-caudal gradient of depression of rCMRglc. The four doses of etomidate did not differ in their effects on energy metabolism. Sub-anesthetic (5 mg kg/sup -1/) and anesthetic (30 mg kg /sup -1/) doses of ketamine produced markedly different patterns of behavior. Brain energy metabolism during the sub-anesthetic dose was stimulated in most regions, while the anesthetic dose selectively stimulated the hippocampus, leaving most brain regions unaffected. Thiopental produced a dose-dependent reduction of rCMRglc in all gray matter regions. No brain region was selectively affected. Comparison of the drug-specific alterations of cerebral energy metabolism suggests these anesthetics do not act through a common mechanism. The hypothesis that each acts by binding to specific cell membrane receptors is consistent with these observations.

  2. Cerebral Metabolic Differences Associated with Cognitive Impairment in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fengtao; Wu, Ping; Guo, Sisi; Liu, Zhenyang; Wang, Yixuan; Wang, Ying; Ding, Zhengtong; Wu, Jianjun; Zuo, Chuantao; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To characterize cerebral glucose metabolism associated with different cognitive states in Parkinson’s disease (PD) using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Methods Three groups of patients were recruited in this study including PD patients with dementia (PDD; n = 10), with mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI; n = 20), and with no cognitive impairment (PD-NC; n = 30). The groups were matched for age, sex, education, disease duration, motor disability, levodopa equivalent dose and Geriatric Depression Rating Scale (GDS) score. All subjects underwent a FDG-PET study. Maps of regional metabolism in the three groups were compared using statistical parametric mapping (SPM5). Results PD-MCI patients exhibited limited areas of hypometabolism in the frontal, temporal and parahippocampal gyrus compared with the PD-NC patients (p < 0.01). PDD patients had bilateral areas of hypometabolism in the frontal and posterior parietal-occipital lobes compared with PD-MCI patients (p < 0.01), and exhibited greater metabolic reductions in comparison with PD-NC patients (p < 0.01). Conclusions Compared with PD-NC patients, hypometabolism was much higher in the PDD patients than in PD-MCI patients, mainly in the posterior cortical areas. The result might suggest an association between posterior cortical hypometabolism and more severe cognitive impairment. PD-MCI might be important for early targeted therapeutic intervention and disease modification. PMID:27064684

  3. Caffeine’s effects on cerebrovascular reactivity and coupling between cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yufen; Parrish, Todd B.

    2009-01-01

    The blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) signal is dependent on multiple physiological factors such as cerebral blood flow (CBF), local oxygen metabolism (CMRO2) and cerebral blood volume (CBV). Since caffeine affects both CBF and neural activity, its effects on BOLD remain controversial. The calibrated BOLD approach is an excellent tool to study caffeine because it combines CBF and BOLD measures to estimate changes in CMRO2. The present study used the calibrated BOLD approach with 5% CO2 to determine if a 2.5mg/kg intravenous injection of caffeine changes the coupling between CBF and CMRO2 during motor and visual tasks. The results show that caffeine decreases n, the CBF:CMRO2 coupling ratio, from 2.58 to 2.33 in motor (p=0.006) and from 2.45 to 2.23 in visual (p=0.002) areas respectively. The current study also demonstrated that caffeine does not alter cerebrovascular reactivity to CO2. These results highlight the importance of the calibrated BOLD approach in improving interpretation of the BOLD signal in the presence of substances like caffeine. PMID:19000770

  4. Combined administration of hyperbaric oxygen and hydroxocobalamin improves cerebral metabolism after acute cyanide poisoning in rats.

    PubMed

    Hansen, M B; Olsen, N V; Hyldegaard, O

    2013-11-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) or intravenous hydroxocobalamin (OHCob) both abolish cyanide (CN)-induced surges in interstitial brain lactate and glucose concentrations. HBOT has been shown to induce a delayed increase in whole blood CN concentrations, whereas OHCob may act as an intravascular CN scavenger. Additionally, HBOT may prevent respiratory distress and restore blood pressure during CN intoxication, an effect not seen with OHCob administration. In this report, we evaluated the combined effects of HBOT and OHCob on interstitial lactate, glucose, and glycerol concentrations as well as lactate-to-pyruvate ratio in rat brain by means of microdialysis during acute CN poisoning. Anesthetized rats were allocated to three groups: 1) vehicle (1.2 ml isotonic NaCl intra-arterially); 2) potassium CN (5.4 mg/kg intra-arterially); 3) potassium CN, OHCob (100 mg/kg intra-arterially) and subsequent HBOT (284 kPa in 90 min). OHCob and HBOT significantly attenuated the acute surges in interstitial cerebral lactate, glucose, and glycerol concentrations compared with the intoxicated rats given no treatment. Furthermore, the combined treatment resulted in consistent low lactate, glucose, and glycerol concentrations, as well as in low lactate-to-pyruvate ratios compared with CN intoxicated controls. In rats receiving OHCob and HBOT, respiration improved and cyanosis disappeared, with subsequent stabilization of mean arterial blood pressure. The present findings indicate that a combined administration of OHCob and HBOT has a beneficial and persistent effect on the cerebral metabolism during CN intoxication.

  5. Improving estimates of the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen from optical imaging data.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Matthew J P; Suresh, Vinod

    2015-02-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) is an important measure of brain function. Since it is challenging to measure directly, especially dynamically, a number of neuroimaging techniques aim to infer activation-induced changes in CMRO2 from indirect data. Here, we employed a mathematical modelling approach, based on fundamental biophysical principles, to investigate the validity of the widely-used method to calculate CMRO2 from optical measurements of cerebral blood flow and haemoglobin saturation. In model-only simulations and simulations of in vivo data changes in CMRO2 calculated in this way differed substantially from the changes in CMRO2 directly imposed on the model, under both steady state and dynamic conditions. These results suggest that the assumptions underlying the calculation method are not appropriate, and that it is important to take into account, under steady state conditions: 1) the presence of deoxyhaemoglobin in arteriolar vessels; and 2) blood volume changes, especially in veins. Under dynamic conditions, the model predicted that calculated changes in CMRO2 are moderately correlated with the rate of oxygen extraction--not consumption--during the initial phase of stimulation. However, during later phases of stimulation the calculation is dominated by the change in blood flow. Therefore, we propose that a more sophisticated approach is required to estimate CMRO2 changes from these types of data.

  6. Optical measurement of cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism in neonates with congenital heart defects

    PubMed Central

    Durduran, Turgut; Zhou, Chao; Buckley, Erin M.; Kim, Meeri N.; Yu, Guoqiang; Choe, Regine; Gaynor, J. William; Spray, Thomas L.; Durning, Suzanne M.; Mason, Stefanie E.; Montenegro, Lisa M.; Nicolson, Susan C.; Zimmerman, Robert A.; Putt, Mary E.; Wang, Jiongjiong; Greenberg, Joel H.; Detre, John A.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Licht, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    We employ a hybrid diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) monitor for neonates with congenital heart disease (n=33). The NIRS-DCS device measured changes during hypercapnia of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and total hemoglobin concentrations; cerebral blood flow (rCBFDCS); and oxygen metabolism (rCMRO2). Concurrent measurements with arterial spin-labeled magnetic resonance imaging (rCBFASL-MRI, n=12) cross-validate rCBFDCS against rCBFASL-MRI, showing good agreement (R=0.7, p=0.01). The study demonstrates use of NIRS-DCS on a critically ill neonatal population, and the results indicate that the optical technology is a promising clinical method for monitoring this population. PMID:20615033

  7. Optical measurement of cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism in neonates with congenital heart defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durduran, Turgut; Zhou, Chao; Buckley, Erin M.; Kim, Meeri N.; Yu, Guoqiang; Choe, Regine; Gaynor, J. William; Spray, Thomas L.; Durning, Suzanne M.; Mason, Stefanie E.; Montenegro, Lisa M.; Nicolson, Susan C.; Zimmerman, Robert A.; Putt, Mary E.; Wang, Jiongjiong; Greenberg, Joel H.; Detre, John A.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Licht, Daniel J.

    2010-05-01

    We employ a hybrid diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) monitor for neonates with congenital heart disease (n=33). The NIRS-DCS device measured changes during hypercapnia of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and total hemoglobin concentrations; cerebral blood flow (rCBFDCS); and oxygen metabolism (rCMRO2). Concurrent measurements with arterial spin-labeled magnetic resonance imaging (rCBFASL-MRI, n=12) cross-validate rCBFDCS against rCBFASL-MRI, showing good agreement (R=0.7, p=0.01). The study demonstrates use of NIRS-DCS on a critically ill neonatal population, and the results indicate that the optical technology is a promising clinical method for monitoring this population.

  8. Cerebral metabolic effects of fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine and sertraline in the conscious rat.

    PubMed

    Freo, Ulderico; Merico, Antonio; Ermani, Mario; Ori, Carlo

    2008-05-09

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) exert a wide range of neurochemical and therapeutic activities. To investigate the neural effectors of SSRIs, we measured the regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose (rCMRglc) in 56 brain regions of Fischer-344 rats 30 min after intraperitoneal injection of 0.4, 4 or 40 mg/kg of fluoxetine or fluvoxamine or after 4 mg/kg of paroxetine or sertraline. Both shared and drug-specific effects were detected. While all four SSRIs similarly reduced rCMRglc in a network of subcortical brain regions including the amygdala, locus coeruleus, basal ganglia and hypothalamic paraventricular nuclei, fluvoxamine, paroxetine and sertraline reduced rCMRglc also in the hippocampus and sertraline in the lateral habenula. The topography and the relation to dose of rCMRglc reductions by SSRIs differ from those of other classes of antidepressants, thus suggesting that SSRIs may specifically modulate brain areas involved in the physiological responses to stress.

  9. Safety of lumbar puncture in comatose children with clinical features of cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    Moxon, Christopher A.; Zhao, Lei; Li, Chenxi; Seydel, Karl B.; MacCormick, Ian J.; Diggle, Peter J.; Mallewa, Macpherson; Solomon, Tom; Beare, Nicholas A.; Glover, Simon J.; Harding, Simon P.; Lewallen, Susan; Kampondeni, Sam; Potchen, Michael J.; Taylor, Terrie E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We assessed the independent association of lumbar puncture (LP) and death in Malawian children admitted to the hospital with the clinical features of cerebral malaria (CM). Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study in Malawian children with clinical features of CM. Allocation to LP was nonrandom and was associated with severity of illness. Propensity score–based analyses were used to adjust for this bias and assess the independent association between LP and mortality. Results: Data were available for 1,075 children: 866 (80.6%) underwent LP and 209 (19.4%) did not. Unadjusted mortality rates were lower in children who underwent LP (15.3% vs 26.7% in the no-LP group) but differences in covariates between the 2 groups suggested bias in LP allocation. After propensity score matching, all covariates were balanced. Propensity score–based analyses showed no change in mortality rate associated with LP: by inverse probability weighting, the average risk reduction was 2.0% at 12 hours (95% confidence interval −1.5% to 5.5%, p = 0.27) and 1.7% during hospital admission (95% confidence interval −4.5% to 7.9%, p = 0.60). Undergoing LP did not change the risk of mortality in subanalyses of children with severe brain swelling on MRI or in those with papilledema. Conclusion: In comatose children with suspected CM who were clinically stable, we found no evidence that LP increases mortality, even in children with objective signs of raised intracranial pressure. PMID:27794112

  10. Optical detection of brain function: simultaneous imaging of cerebral vascular response, tissue metabolism, and cellular activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Du, Congwu; Pan, Yingtian

    2011-01-01

    It is known that a remaining challenge for functional brain imaging is to distinguish the coupling and decoupling effects among neuronal activity, cerebral metabolism, and vascular hemodynamics, which highlights the need for new tools to enable simultaneous measures of these three properties in vivo. Here, we review current neuroimaging techniques and their prospects and potential limitations for tackling this challenge. We then report a novel dual-wavelength laser speckle imaging (DW-LSI) tool developed in our labs that enables simultaneous imaging of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume, and tissue hemoglobin oxygenation, which allows us to monitor neurovascular and tissue metabolic activities at high spatiotemporal resolutions over a relatively large field of view. Moreover, we report digital frequency ramping Doppler optical coherence tomography (DFR-OCT) that allows for quantitative 3D imaging of the CBF network in vivo. In parallel, we review calcium imaging techniques to track neuronal activity, including intracellular calcium approach using Rhod2 fluorescence technique that we develop to detect neuronal activity in vivo. We report a new multimodality imaging platform that combines DW-LSI, DFR-OCT, and calcium fluorescence imaging for simultaneous detection of cortical hemodynamics, cerebral metabolism, and neuronal activities of the animal brain in vivo, as well as its integration with microprobes for imaging neuronal function in deep brain regions in vivo. Promising results of in vivo animal brain functional studies suggest the potential of this multimodality approach for future awake animal and behavioral studies.

  11. Non-invasive Quantification of Whole-brain Cerebral Metabolic Rate of Oxygen by MRI

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Ge, Yulin; Lu, Hanzhang

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) is an important marker for brain function and brain health. Existing techniques for quantification of CMRO2 with Positron Emission Tomography (PET) or MRI involve special equipment and/or exogenous agent, and may not be suitable for routine clinical studies. In the present study, a non-invasive method is developed to estimate whole-brain CMRO2 in humans. This method applies phase-contrast MRI for quantitative blood flow measurement and T2-Relaxation-Under-Spin-Tagging (TRUST) MRI for venous oxygenation estimation, and uses the Fick principle of arteriovenous difference for the calculation of CMRO2. Whole-brain averaged CMRO2 values in young, healthy subjects were 132.1±20.0 μmol/100g/min, in good agreement with literature reports using PET. Various acquisition strategies for phase-contrast and TRUST MRI were compared, and it was found that non-gated phase-contrast and sagittal sinus TRUST MRI were able to provide the most efficient and accurate estimation of CMRO2. In addition, blood flow and venous oxygenation were found to be positively correlated across subjects. Owing to the non-invasive nature of this method, it may be a convenient and useful approach for assessment of brain metabolism in brain disorders as well as under various physiologic conditions. PMID:19353674

  12. Developmental Sex Differences in the Metabolism of Cardiolipin in Mouse Cerebral Cortex Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Acaz-Fonseca, Estefanía; Ortiz-Rodriguez, Ana; Lopez-Rodriguez, Ana B.; Garcia-Segura, Luis M.; Astiz, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) is a mitochondrial-specific phospholipid. CL content and acyl chain composition are crucial for energy production. Given that estradiol induces CL synthesis in neurons, we aimed to assess CL metabolism in the cerebral cortex (CC) of male and female mice during early postnatal life, when sex steroids induce sex-dimorphic maturation of the brain. Despite the fact that total amount of CL was similar, its fatty acid composition differed between males and females at birth. In males, CL was more mature (lower saturation ratio) and the expression of the enzymes involved in synthetic and remodeling pathways was higher, compared to females. Importantly, the sex differences found in CL metabolism were due to the testosterone peak that male mice experience perinatally. These changes were associated with a higher expression of UCP-2 and its activators in the CC of males. Overall, our results suggest that the perinatal testosterone surge in male mice regulates CL biosynthesis and remodeling in the CC, inducing a sex-dimorphic fatty acid composition. In male’s CC, CL is more susceptible to peroxidation, likely explaining the testosterone-dependent induction of neuroprotective molecules such as UCP-2. These differences may account for the sex-dependent mitochondrial susceptibility after perinatal hypoxia/ischemia. PMID:28262723

  13. Developmental Sex Differences in the Metabolism of Cardiolipin in Mouse Cerebral Cortex Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Acaz-Fonseca, Estefanía; Ortiz-Rodriguez, Ana; Lopez-Rodriguez, Ana B; Garcia-Segura, Luis M; Astiz, Mariana

    2017-03-06

    Cardiolipin (CL) is a mitochondrial-specific phospholipid. CL content and acyl chain composition are crucial for energy production. Given that estradiol induces CL synthesis in neurons, we aimed to assess CL metabolism in the cerebral cortex (CC) of male and female mice during early postnatal life, when sex steroids induce sex-dimorphic maturation of the brain. Despite the fact that total amount of CL was similar, its fatty acid composition differed between males and females at birth. In males, CL was more mature (lower saturation ratio) and the expression of the enzymes involved in synthetic and remodeling pathways was higher, compared to females. Importantly, the sex differences found in CL metabolism were due to the testosterone peak that male mice experience perinatally. These changes were associated with a higher expression of UCP-2 and its activators in the CC of males. Overall, our results suggest that the perinatal testosterone surge in male mice regulates CL biosynthesis and remodeling in the CC, inducing a sex-dimorphic fatty acid composition. In male's CC, CL is more susceptible to peroxidation, likely explaining the testosterone-dependent induction of neuroprotective molecules such as UCP-2. These differences may account for the sex-dependent mitochondrial susceptibility after perinatal hypoxia/ischemia.

  14. Multiplexed MRI methods for rapid estimation of global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunyeol; Langham, Michael C; Rodriguez-Soto, Ana E; Wehrli, Felix W

    2017-04-01

    The global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2), which reflects metabolic activity of the brain under various physiologic conditions, can be quantified using a method, referred to as 'OxFlow', which simultaneously measures hemoglobin oxygen saturation in a draining vein (Yv) and total cerebral blood flow (tCBF). Conventional OxFlow (Conv-OxFlow) entails four interleaves incorporated in a single pulse sequence - two for phase-contrast based measurement of tCBF in the supplying arteries of the neck, and two to measure the intra- to extravascular phase difference in the superior sagittal sinus to derive Yv [Jain et al., JCBFM 2010]. However, this approach limits achievable temporal resolution thus precluding capture of rapid changes of brain metabolic states such as the response to apneic stimuli. Here, we developed a time-efficient, multiplexed OxFlow method and evaluated its potential for measuring dynamic alterations in global CMRO2 during a breath-hold challenge. Two different implementations of multiplexed OxFlow were investigated: 1) simultaneous-echo-refocusing based OxFlow (SER-OxFlow) and 2) simultaneous-multi-slice imaging-based dual-band OxFlow (DB-OxFlow). The two sequences were implemented on 3T scanners (Siemens TIM Trio and Prisma) and their performance was evaluated in comparison to Conv-OxFlow in ten healthy subjects for baseline CMRO2 quantification. Comparison of measured parameters (Yv, tCBF, CMRO2) revealed no significant bias of SER-OxFlow and DB-OxFlow, with respect to the reference Conv-OxFlow while improving temporal resolution two-fold (12.5 versus 25s). Further acceleration shortened scan time to 8 and 6s for SER and DB-OxFlow, respectively, for time-resolved CMRO2 measurement. The two sequences were able of capturing smooth transitions of Yv, tCBF, and CMRO2 over the time course consisting of 30s of normal breathing, 30s of volitional apnea, and 90s of recovery. While both SER- and DB-OxFlow techniques provide significantly improved

  15. A primitive study of voxel feature generation by multiple stacked denoising autoencoders for detecting cerebral aneurysms on MRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemoto, Mitsutaka; Hayashi, Naoto; Hanaoka, Shouhei; Nomura, Yukihiro; Miki, Soichiro; Yoshikawa, Takeharu; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of a novel feature generation, which is based on multiple deep neural networks (DNNs) with boosting, for computer-assisted detection (CADe). It is hard and time-consuming to optimize the hyperparameters for DNNs such as stacked denoising autoencoder (SdA). The proposed method allows using SdA based features without the burden of the hyperparameter setting. The proposed method was evaluated by an application for detecting cerebral aneurysms on magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA). A baseline CADe process included four components; scaling, candidate area limitation, candidate detection, and candidate classification. Proposed feature generation method was applied to extract the optimal features for candidate classification. Proposed method only required setting range of the hyperparameters for SdA. The optimal feature set was selected from a large quantity of SdA based features by multiple SdAs, each of which was trained using different hyperparameter set. The feature selection was operated through ada-boost ensemble learning method. Training of the baseline CADe process and proposed feature generation were operated with 200 MRA cases, and the evaluation was performed with 100 MRA cases. Proposed method successfully provided SdA based features just setting the range of some hyperparameters for SdA. The CADe process by using both previous voxel features and SdA based features had the best performance with 0.838 of an area under ROC curve and 0.312 of ANODE score. The results showed that proposed method was effective in the application for detecting cerebral aneurysms on MRA.

  16. Clinical features, risk factors, and outcome of cerebral venous thrombosis in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Yadegari, Samira; Ghorbani, Askar; Miri, S. Roohollah; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Rostami, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Despite increasing the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) has remained an under-diagnosed condition. In this study, characteristics and frequency of various risk factors of CVST patients in a tertiary referral hospital were closely assessed. Methods: Patients with an unequivocal diagnosis of CVST confirmed by MRI and magnetic resonance venography during 6 years of the study were included. All data from the onset of symptoms regarding clinical signs and symptoms, hospital admission, seasonal distribution, medical and drug history, thrombophilic profile, D-dimer, neuroimaging, cerebrospinal fluid findings, mortality, and outcome were collected and closely analyzed. Result: A total of 53 patients with female to male ratio of 3.07 and mean age of 33.7 years were included in the study. Headache and papilledema were the most frequent clinical features (44 and 36 patients, respectively). An underlying disease (diagnosed previously or after admission) was the most common identified risk factor for CVST in both females and males (21 patients). A total of 15 women used the oral contraceptive pill (OCP) where 12 of them had simultaneously other predisposing factors. Overall, 19 patients (36%) had more than one contributing factor. D-dimer had a sensitivity of 71.4% in CVST patients. The mortality of patients in this study was 3.7% (n = 2). Focal neurologic deficit and multicranial nerve palsy were associated with poor outcome which defined as death, recurrence, and massive intracranial hemorrhage due to anticoagulation (P = 0.050 and 0.004, respectively). Conclusion: Unlike most of the CVST studies in which OCP was the main factor; in this study, an underlying disease was the most identified cause. Considering the high probability of multiple risk factors in CVST that was shown by this study, appropriate work up should be noted to uncover them. PMID:27695236

  17. Quantitative Mapping of Cerebral Metabolic Rate of Oxygen (CMRO2) using Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingwei; Liu, Tian; Gupta, Ajay; Spincemaille, Pascal; Nguyen, Thanh D.; Wang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To quantitatively map cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) in human brains using quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) and arterial spin labeling measured cerebral blood flow (CBF) before and after caffeine vasoconstriction. Methods Using the multiecho 3D gradient echo sequence and an oral bolus of 200 mg caffeine, whole brain CMRO2 and OEF were mapped at 3mm isotropic resolution on 13 healthy subjects. The QSM based CMRO2 was compared with an R2* based CMRO2 to analyze the regional consistency within cortical gray matter (CGM) with the scaling in the R2* method set to provide same total CMRO2 as the QSM method for each subject. Results Compared to pre-caffeine, susceptibility increased (5.1±1.1ppb, p<0.01) and CBF decreased (−23.6±6.7ml/100g/min, p<0.01) at 25min post-caffeine in CGM. This corresponded to a CMRO2 of 153.0±26.4µmol/100g/min with an OEF of 33.9±9.6% and 54.5±13.2% (p<0.01) pre- and post- caffeine respectively at CGM, and a CMRO2 of 58.0±26.6µmol/100g/min at white matter. CMRO2 from both QSM and R2* based methods showed good regional consistency (p>0.05), but quantitation of R2* based CMRO2 required an additional scaling factor. Conclusion QSM can be used with perfusion measurements pre- and post- caffeine vascoconstriction to map CMRO2 and OEF. PMID:25263499

  18. Impacts of small arteriovenous malformations (AVM) on regional cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, R.S.; Yeh, S.H.; Chu, L.S.

    1994-05-01

    This study assessed the effects of small AVMs (<3 cm) on the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) by Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT and on the glucose metabolism (rCGlcM) by [F-18]-FDG PET. Seven AVM patients (pts) were studied. All AVMs were confirmed by cerebral angiography and CT/MR scans. Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT and [F-18]-PDG PET images were interpreted visually to detect the changes of rCBF and rCGlcM. All pts except one brain stem AVM had defects in the regions of nidi on HMPAO and FDG images. FDG PET disclosed low rCGlcM in surrounding areas of AVMs in 6 pts, while HMPAO SPECT detected only 4 cases. One AVM had increased rCBF surrounding the nidus despite of decreased rCGlcM in the same region. Five pts had abnormal rCGlcM over ipsilateral remote cortex but only one had corresponding abnormal rCBF. Contralateral cortical hypofunction was noted in 3 pts by FDG PET but none by HMPAO SPECT. Cross cerebellar diaschisis was found in 2 AVMs by FDG PET and only one by HMPAO SPECT. All regions with abnormal HMPAO uptake did not look as discernibly as seen on the FDG PET scan. CT/MR scans detected the nidi of AVMs of all pts and old hemorrhage in one pt. In conclusion, either HMPAO SPECT or FDG PET is sensitive to detect the functional abnormalities in the region of nidus of small AVM and the surrounding brain tissue. FDG PET is better than HMPAO SPECT to detect functional changes in the remote cortex and diaschisis.

  19. Cerebral metabolism following traumatic brain injury: new discoveries with implications for treatment.

    PubMed

    Brooks, George A; Martin, Neil A

    2014-01-01

    Because it is the product of glycolysis and main substrate for mitochondrial respiration, lactate is the central metabolic intermediate in cerebral energy substrate delivery. Our recent studies on healthy controls and patients following traumatic brain injury (TBI) using [6,6-(2)H2]glucose and [3-(13)C]lactate, along with cerebral blood flow (CBF) and arterial-venous (jugular bulb) difference measurements for oxygen, metabolite levels, isotopic enrichments and (13)CO2 show a massive and previously unrecognized mobilization of lactate from corporeal (muscle, skin, and other) glycogen reserves in TBI patients who were studied 5.7 ± 2.2 days after injury at which time brain oxygen consumption and glucose uptake (CMRO2 and CMRgluc, respectively) were depressed. By tracking the incorporation of the (13)C from lactate tracer we found that gluconeogenesis (GNG) from lactate accounted for 67.1 ± 6.9%, of whole-body glucose appearance rate (Ra) in TBI, which was compared to 15.2 ± 2.8% (mean ± SD, respectively) in healthy, well-nourished controls. Standard of care treatment of TBI patients in state-of-the-art facilities by talented and dedicated heath care professionals reveals presence of a catabolic Body Energy State (BES). Results are interpreted to mean that additional nutritive support is required to fuel the body and brain following TBI. Use of a diagnostic to monitor BES to provide health care professionals with actionable data in providing nutritive formulations to fuel the body and brain and achieve exquisite glycemic control are discussed. In particular, the advantages of using inorganic and organic lactate salts, esters and other compounds are examined. To date, several investigations on brain-injured patients with intact hepatic and renal functions show that compared to dextrose + insulin treatment, exogenous lactate infusion results in normal glycemia.

  20. A novel Bayesian approach to accounting for uncertainty in fMRI-derived estimates of cerebral oxygen metabolism fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Aaron B.; Dubowitz, David J.; Blockley, Nicholas P.; Buxton, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Calibrated blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) imaging is a multimodal functional MRI technique designed to estimate changes in cerebral oxygen metabolism from measured changes in cerebral blood flow and the BOLD signal. This technique addresses fundamental ambiguities associated with quantitative BOLD signal analysis; however, its dependence on biophysical modeling creates uncertainty in the resulting oxygen metabolism estimates. In this work, we developed a Bayesian approach to estimating the oxygen metabolism response to a neural stimulus and used it to examine the uncertainty that arises in calibrated BOLD estimation due to the presence of unmeasured model parameters. We applied our approach to estimate the CMRO2 response to a visual task using the traditional hypercapnia calibration experiment as well as to estimate the metabolic response to both a visual task and hypercapnia using the measurement of baseline apparent R2′ as a calibration technique. Further, in order to examine the effects of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) signal contamination on the measurement of apparent R2′, we examined the effects of measuring this parameter with and without CSF-nulling. We found that the two calibration techniques provided consistent estimates of the metabolic response on average, with a median R2′-based estimate of the metabolic response to CO2 of 1.4%, and R2′- and hypercapnia-calibrated estimates of the visual response of 27% and 24%, respectively. However, these estimates were sensitive to different sources of estimation uncertainty. The R2′-calibrated estimate was highly sensitive to CSF contamination and to uncertainty in unmeasured model parameters describing flow-volume coupling, capillary bed characteristics, and the iso-susceptibility saturation of blood. The hypercapnia-calibrated estimate was relatively insensitive to these parameters but highly sensitive to the assumed metabolic response to CO2. PMID:26790354

  1. A novel Bayesian approach to accounting for uncertainty in fMRI-derived estimates of cerebral oxygen metabolism fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Simon, Aaron B; Dubowitz, David J; Blockley, Nicholas P; Buxton, Richard B

    2016-04-01

    Calibrated blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) imaging is a multimodal functional MRI technique designed to estimate changes in cerebral oxygen metabolism from measured changes in cerebral blood flow and the BOLD signal. This technique addresses fundamental ambiguities associated with quantitative BOLD signal analysis; however, its dependence on biophysical modeling creates uncertainty in the resulting oxygen metabolism estimates. In this work, we developed a Bayesian approach to estimating the oxygen metabolism response to a neural stimulus and used it to examine the uncertainty that arises in calibrated BOLD estimation due to the presence of unmeasured model parameters. We applied our approach to estimate the CMRO2 response to a visual task using the traditional hypercapnia calibration experiment as well as to estimate the metabolic response to both a visual task and hypercapnia using the measurement of baseline apparent R2' as a calibration technique. Further, in order to examine the effects of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) signal contamination on the measurement of apparent R2', we examined the effects of measuring this parameter with and without CSF-nulling. We found that the two calibration techniques provided consistent estimates of the metabolic response on average, with a median R2'-based estimate of the metabolic response to CO2 of 1.4%, and R2'- and hypercapnia-calibrated estimates of the visual response of 27% and 24%, respectively. However, these estimates were sensitive to different sources of estimation uncertainty. The R2'-calibrated estimate was highly sensitive to CSF contamination and to uncertainty in unmeasured model parameters describing flow-volume coupling, capillary bed characteristics, and the iso-susceptibility saturation of blood. The hypercapnia-calibrated estimate was relatively insensitive to these parameters but highly sensitive to the assumed metabolic response to CO2.

  2. Positron computed tomography studies of cerebral glucose metabolism in man: theory and application in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Phelps, M E

    1981-01-01

    The capability of positron computed tomography (PCT) to delineate the substructures of the brain and its facility for accurately measuring the local tissue radioactivity concentration allow the application of tracer kinetic models for the study of local cerebral function in man. This principle and an adaptation of the 14C-deoxyglucose (DG) model of Sokoloff et al. with 18F-2-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is being used at UCLA. Brookhaven National Laboratory, University of Pennsylvania, NIH, and the Massachusetts General Hospital to determine the local cerebral glucose metabolic rate (LCMRGIc) in normal man at rest and during sensory activation and the changes that occur in patients with a variety of cerebral disorders. Kinetic studies with PCT have been employed to measure the rate constants of the model in different gray and white matter structures of the brain in both normal and ischemic states. The precision of the method in normals has been shown to be about +/- 5% for 1.5-2.0 sq cm regions of the brain. Studies in normals have yielded values for hemispheric CMRGIc that are in agreement with measurement using the Kety-Schmidt technique and LCMRGIc values in agreement with values in monkeys using DG autoradiography. Studies in volunteers subjected to visual and auditory stimulation are demonstrating the potential of this technique for investigating the human brain's response to different stimuli. STudies in patients with stroke show excellent correlation between the degree, extent, and particular structures involved and the clinical symptoms. The method consistently detected hypometabolism in cortical, thalamic, and striatal tissues that were dysfunctional due to deactivation or damage but which appeared normal on x-ray CT. Studies in patients with partial epilepsy have shown hypometabolic zones that highly correlated anatomically with interictal EEG spike foci and were associated with normal x-ray CT studies in 77% of the patients studied. The studies on

  3. Decreased cerebral metabolism in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) with stroke and its possible improvement by Solcoseryl.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Y; Yamamoto, Y; Senga, Y; Isogai, M; Shimizu, H; Yamori, Y

    1991-01-01

    Local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) was decreased in SHRSP with stroke compared with normotensive Wistar rats. The decrement of LCGU was less in Solcoseryl-treated SHRSP with stroke than that in saline-treated SHRSP with stroke and these brain areas where LCGU was less damaged, in Solcoseryl-treated SHRSP were consistent with the important functioning sites of emotion, motor movement and memory. The result suggests that Solcoseryl may be useful for metabolic improvement of the brain damage after stroke.

  4. Cerebral Blood Flow and Glucose Metabolism Measured With Positron Emission Tomography Are Decreased in Human Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    van Golen, Larissa W.; Huisman, Marc C.; Ijzerman, Richard G.; Hoetjes, Nikie J.; Schwarte, Lothar A.; Lammertsma, Adriaan A.; Diamant, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    Subclinical systemic microvascular dysfunction exists in asymptomatic patients with type 1 diabetes. We hypothesized that microangiopathy, resulting from long-standing systemic hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia, may be generalized to the brain, resulting in changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism in these patients. We performed dynamic [15O]H2O and [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose brain positron emission tomography scans to measure CBF and cerebral glucose metabolism (CMRglu), respectively, in 30 type 1 diabetic patients and 12 age-matched healthy controls after an overnight fast. Regions of interest were automatically delineated on coregistered magnetic resonance images and full kinetic analysis was performed. Plasma glucose and insulin levels were higher in patients versus controls. Total gray matter CBF was 9%, whereas CMRglu was 21% lower in type 1 diabetic subjects versus control subjects. We conclude that at real-life fasting glucose and insulin levels, type 1 diabetes is associated with decreased resting cerebral glucose metabolism, which is only partially explained by the decreased CBF. These findings suggest that mechanisms other than generalized microangiopathy account for the altered CMRglu observed in well-controlled type 1 diabetes. PMID:23530004

  5. Cerebral glucose metabolism in neurofibromatosis type 1 assessed with [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose and PET.

    PubMed Central

    Balestri, P; Lucignani, G; Fois, A; Magliani, L; Calistri, L; Grana, C; Di Bartolo, R M; Perani, D; Fazio, F

    1994-01-01

    Cerebral PET with [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose has been performed in four patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) to assess the relation between cerebral metabolic activity, MRI, and the presence of neurological symptoms, including seizures, as well as mental and language retardation. Widespread hypometabolism occurred in three of the patients. The lesions on MRI, which were localised in the subcortical white matter and grey structures, had normal rates of glucose metabolism. This finding suggests that the abnormalities seen on MRI are not due to defective blood supply, localised oedema, or grey matter heterotopic foci as previously hypothesised. The presence of the hypometabolic areas seems to be inconsistently related to the occurrence of seizures and is not proportional to the degree of mental impairment. This study provides evidence of a widespread cerebral hypometabolism that is not related to the presence of MRI abnormalities; conversely normal metabolism was present in the areas with an abnormal MRI signal. Images PMID:7798976

  6. Reduced cerebral glucose metabolism and increased brain capillary permeability following high-dose methotrexate chemotherapy: a positron emission tomographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, P.C.; Dhawan, V.; Strother, S.C.; Sidtis, J.J.; Evans, A.C.; Allen, J.C.; Rottenberg, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Regional glucose metabolic rate constants and blood-to-brain transport of rubidium were estimated using positron emission tomography in an adolescent patient with a brain tumor, before and after chemotherapy with intravenous high-dose methotrexate. Widespread depression of cerebral glucose metabolism was apparent 24 hours after drug administration, which may reflect reduced glucose phosphorylation, and the influx rate constant for /sup 82/Rb was increased, indicating a drug-induced alteration in blood-brain barrier function. Associated changes in neuropsychological performance, electroencephalogram, and plasma amino acid concentration were identified in the absence of evidence of systemic methotrexate toxicity, suggesting primary methotrexate neurotoxicity.

  7. Hypothalamic sensing of ketone bodies after prolonged cerebral exposure leads to metabolic control dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Lionel; Geller, Sarah; Hébert, Audrey; Repond, Cendrine; Fioramonti, Xavier; Leloup, Corinne; Pellerin, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Ketone bodies have been shown to transiently stimulate food intake and modify energy homeostasis regulatory systems following cerebral infusion for a moderate period of time (<6 hours). As ketone bodies are usually enhanced during episodes of fasting, this effect might correspond to a physiological regulation. In contrast, ketone bodies levels remain elevated for prolonged periods during obesity, and thus could play an important role in the development of this pathology. In order to understand this transition, ketone bodies were infused through a catheter inserted in the carotid to directly stimulate the brain for a period of 24 hours. Food ingested and blood circulating parameters involved in metabolic control as well as glucose homeostasis were determined. Results show that ketone bodies infusion for 24 hours increased food intake associated with a stimulation of hypothalamic orexigenic neuropeptides. Moreover, insulinemia was increased and caused a decrease in glucose production despite an increased resistance to insulin. The present study confirms that ketone bodies reaching the brain stimulates food intake. Moreover, we provide evidence that a prolonged hyperketonemia leads to a dysregulation of energy homeostasis control mechanisms. Finally, this study shows that brain exposure to ketone bodies alters insulin signaling and consequently glucose homeostasis. PMID:27708432

  8. [Effect of normobaric hyperoxia on cerebral oxygenation, metabolism and oxidative stress in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by intracranial aneurysm rupture].

    PubMed

    Solodov, A A; Petrikov, S S; Klychnikova, E V; Tazina, E V; Krylov, V V; Godkov, M A; Khamidova, L T

    2013-01-01

    The development of cerebral vasospasm in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to cerebral aneurysms rupture results in cerebral circulation disturbances. Application of normobaric hyperoxia can be an effective way for improving of oxygen delivery to injured brain tissues. The purpose of this study was to assess of normobaric hyperoxia influence on intracranial pressure (ICP), cerebral oxygenation and metabolism, oxidative stress and endogenous factors of vascular regulation in II critically ill patients with nontraumatic SAH due to cerebral aneurysms rupture. Increase of FiO2 from 0.3 to 0.5 and 1.0 was accompanied with brain oxygen tension (PbrO2) increase and cerebral extraction ratio for oxygen (O2ER) decrease. Application of normobaric hyperoxia had no effect on ICP, cerebral perfusion pressure, arterial blood pressure and cerebral metabolism. The results obtained from patients with nontraumatic SAH showed an evident increase of oxidative stress which had a significant effect on vascular endothelial function, causing an imbalance in the endogenous regulation of vascular tone. Application of normobaric hyperoxia was not accompanied by an increase of free-radical processes in critically ill patients with nontraumatic SAH due to cerebral aneurysms rupture.

  9. Studying cerebral hemodynamics and metabolism using simultaneous near-infrared spectroscopy and transcranial Doppler ultrasound: a hyperventilation and caffeine study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Runze; Brugniaux, Julien; Dhaliwal, Harinder; Beaudin, Andrew E; Eliasziw, Misha; Poulin, Marc J; Dunn, Jeff F

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine is one of the most widely consumed psycho-stimulants in the world, yet little is known about its effects on brain oxygenation and metabolism. Using a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized cross-over study design, we combined transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to study caffeine's effect on middle cerebral artery peak blood flow velocity (Vp), brain tissue oxygenation (StO2), total hemoglobin (tHb), and cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO2) in five subjects. Hyperventilation-induced hypocapnia served as a control to verify the sensitivity of our measurements. During hypocapnia (∼16 mmHg below resting values), Vp decreased by 40.0 ± 2.4% (95% CI, P < 0.001), while StO2 and tHb decreased by 2.9 ± 0.3% and 2.6 ± 0.4%, respectively (P = 0.003 and P = 0.002, respectively). CMRO2, calculated using the Fick equation, was reduced by 29.3 ± 9% compared to the isocapnic-euoxia baseline (P < 0.001). In the pharmacological experiments, there was a significant decrease in Vp, StO2, and tHb after ingestion of 200 mg of caffeine compared with placebo. There was no significant difference in CMRO2 between caffeine and placebo. Both showed a CMRO2 decline compared to baseline showing the importance of a placebo control. In conclusion, this study showed that profound hypocapnia impairs cerebral oxidative metabolism. We provide new insight into the effects of caffeine on cerebral hemodynamics. Moreover, this study showed that multimodal NIRS/TCD is an excellent tool for studying brain hemodynamic responses to pharmacological interventions and physiological challenges. PMID:25907789

  10. Distinction of Neurons, Glia and Endothelial Cells in the Cerebral Cortex: An Algorithm Based on Cytological Features

    PubMed Central

    García-Cabezas, Miguel Á.; John, Yohan J.; Barbas, Helen; Zikopoulos, Basilis

    2016-01-01

    The estimation of the number or density of neurons and types of glial cells and their relative proportions in different brain areas are at the core of rigorous quantitative neuroanatomical studies. Unfortunately, the lack of detailed, updated, systematic and well-illustrated descriptions of the cytology of neurons and glial cell types, especially in the primate brain, makes such studies especially demanding, often limiting their scope and broad use. Here, following an extensive analysis of histological materials and the review of current and classical literature, we compile a list of precise morphological criteria that can facilitate and standardize identification of cells in stained sections examined under the microscope. We describe systematically and in detail the cytological features of neurons and glial cell types in the cerebral cortex of the macaque monkey and the human using semithin and thick sections stained for Nissl. We used this classical staining technique because it labels all cells in the brain in distinct ways. In addition, we corroborate key distinguishing characteristics of different cell types in sections immunolabeled for specific markers counterstained for Nissl and in ultrathin sections processed for electron microscopy. Finally, we summarize the core features that distinguish each cell type in easy-to-use tables and sketches, and structure these key features in an algorithm that can be used to systematically distinguish cellular types in the cerebral cortex. Moreover, we report high inter-observer algorithm reliability, which is a crucial test for obtaining consistent and reproducible cell counts in unbiased stereological studies. This protocol establishes a consistent framework that can be used to reliably identify and quantify cells in the cerebral cortex of primates as well as other mammalian species in health and disease. PMID:27847469

  11. Electron microscopic features of brain edema in rodent cerebral malaria in relation to glial fibrillary acidic protein expression.

    PubMed

    Ampawong, Sumate; Chaisri, Urai; Viriyavejakul, Parnpen; Nontprasert, Apichart; Grau, Georges E; Pongponratn, Emsri

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms leading to cerebral malaria (CM) are not completely understood. Brain edema has been suggested as having an important role in experimental CM. In this study, CBA/CaH mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA blood-stage and when typical symptoms of CM developed on day 7, brain tissues were processed for electron-microscopic and immunohistochemical studies. The study demonstrated ultrastructural hallmarks of cerebral edema by perivascular edema and astroglial dilatation confirming existing evidence of vasogenic and cytogenic edema. This correlates closely with the clinical features of CM. An adaptive response of astrocytic activity, represented by increasing glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in the perivascular area and increasing numbers of large astrocyte clusters were predominately found in the CM mice. The presence of multivesicular and lamellar bodies indicates the severity of cerebral damage in experimental CM. Congestion of the microvessels with occluded white blood cells (WBCs), parasitized red blood cells (PRBCs) and platelets is also a crucial covariate role for CM pathogenesis.

  12. PET studies of changes in cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism after unilateral microembolization of the brain in anesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Weyne, J; De Ley, G; Demeester, G; Vandecasteele, C; Vermeulen, F L; Donche, H; Deman, J

    1987-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism have been measured with the steady-state oxygen-15 technique and positron emission tomography in anesthetized dogs. Regional microembolization was induced by infusing Sephadex particles (diameter, 40 micron) into one of the common carotid arteries. In the first series of experiments, 2.5 mg Sephadex was infused, and the dogs were examined within 3-4 hours after embolization. In a second series 0.55 mg Sephadex was infused, and the dogs were examined either in the first 3-4 hours or 24-48 hours after embolization. Cerebral blood flow, oxygen extraction ratio, and cerebral oxygen utilization were measured at 3 PCO2 levels. In the acute experiments, cerebral oxygen utilization in the embolized hemisphere was 6 (0.55 mg Sephadex) and 25% (2.5 mg Sephadex) lower than on the contralateral side. While cerebral blood flow was symmetrically distributed in normocapnia and hypocapnia, it was 9 (0.55 mg Sephadex) and 35% (2.5 mg Sephadex) lower in the embolized hemisphere during hypercapnia. In normocapnia and hypocapnia the lower oxygen utilization in the embolized hemisphere was characterized by a lower oxygen extraction ratio, and in hypercapnia by an unchanged (0.55 mg Sephadex) or by a higher (2.5 mg Sephadex) extraction ratio. The different effect on oxygen extraction ratio in the control and embolized hemispheres resulted in images of uncoupling between perfusion and oxygen demand that varied according to the PCO2. The experiments also showed a fall in cerebral blood flow in the embolized hemisphere after 3-4 hours, indicating delayed hypoperfusion. After 24-48 hours, blood flow was about 10% higher in the embolized hemisphere, and this was observed at the 3 PCO2 levels, while the oxygen extraction ratio was systematically lower. Oxygen utilization in the embolized hemisphere was depressed to practically the same extent as in acute experiments. It can be concluded that between 4 and 24 hours after microembolization the cerebral

  13. Reduced cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in extremely preterm neonates with low-grade germinal matrix- intraventricular hemorrhage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Pei-Yi; Hagan, Katherine; Fenoglio, Angela; Grant, P. Ellen; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    2016-05-01

    Low-grade germinal matrix-intraventricular hemorrhage (GM-IVH) is the most common complication in extremely premature neonates. The occurrence of GM-IVH is highly associated with hemodynamic instability in the premature brain, yet the long-term impact of low-grade GM-IVH on cerebral blood flow and neuronal health have not been fully investigated. We used an innovative combination of frequency-domain near infrared spectroscopy and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (FDNIRS-DCS) to measure cerebral oxygen saturation (SO2) and an index of cerebral blood flow (CBFi) at the infant’s bedside and compute an index of cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO2i). We enrolled twenty extremely low gestational age (ELGA) neonates (seven with low-grade GM-IVH) and monitored them weekly until they reached full-term equivalent age. During their hospital stay, we observed consistently lower CBFi and CMRO2i in ELGA neonates with low-grade GM-IVH compared to neonates without hemorrhages. Furthermore, lower CBFi and CMRO2i in the former group persists even after the resolution of the hemorrhage. In contrast, SO2 does not differ between groups. Thus, CBFi and CMRO2i may have better sensitivity than SO2 in detecting GM-IVH-related effects on infant brain development. FDNIRS-DCS methods may have clinical benefit for monitoring the evolution of GM-IVH, evaluating treatment response, and potentially predicting neurodevelopmental outcome.

  14. Comparison of cerebral regional glucose metabolic relationships in resting and auditory stimulated states

    SciTech Connect

    Metter, E.J.; Riege, W.H.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Phelps, M.E.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    FDG positron computed tomography has demonstrated strong correlations between high frontal and occipital glucose metabolism in normal resting subjects, which varied by age and were lost in Huntington's and Parkinson's Diseases. The studies raised the question whether the findings may be explained by anatomic and not metabolic factors. An approach to the issue was to examine subjects scanned under two states, where functional and not anatomic features would account for relationship differences. Seventeen subjects were identified who had scans under resting and auditory stimulated states. Measurements were taken from 12 brain regions and were expressed as percentage of mean metabolism. A principal components analysis of the resting state demonstrated 3 components (73% of variance), while the stimulated states showed 4 (79% of variance). The first resting factor related frontal, right posterior inferior frontal and superior temporal regions, while in the stimulated, the frontal associated with the occipital. The second resting factor related both angular gyri and posterior temporal, while the third related left posterior inferior frontal, superior temporal and right occipital. With stimulation both factors were replaced by three others. The change in the first factor and its presence in other subject groups points to a functional relationship between the regions. Comparison to previous studies suggest the frontal-occipital association may involve aspects of attention. The variability in other factors was similar to loose correlations noted in normal studies and may reflect the differential response to several tasks.

  15. Quantifying the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen by combining diffuse correlation spectroscopy and time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Verdecchia, Kyle; Diop, Mamadou; Lee, Ting-Yim; St Lawrence, Keith

    2013-02-01

    Preterm infants are highly susceptible to ischemic brain injury; consequently, continuous bedside monitoring to detect ischemia before irreversible damage occurs would improve patient outcome. In addition to monitoring cerebral blood flow (CBF), assessing the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) would be beneficial considering that metabolic thresholds can be used to evaluate tissue viability. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that changes in absolute CMRO2 could be measured by combining diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) with time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (TR-NIRS). Absolute CBF was determined using bolus-tracking TR-NIRS to calibrate the DCS measurements. Cerebral venous blood oxygenation (SvO2) was determined by multiwavelength TR-NIRS measurements, the accuracy of which was assessed by directly measuring the oxygenation of sagittal sinus blood. In eight newborn piglets, CMRO2 was manipulated by varying the anesthetics and by injecting sodium cyanide. No significant differences were found between the two sets of SvO2 measurements obtained by TR-NIRS or sagittal sinus blood samples and the corresponding CMRO2 measurements. Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean CMRO2 difference of 0.0268 ± 0.8340 mLO2/100 g/min between the two techniques over a range from 0.3 to 4 mL O2/100 g/min.

  16. Quantifying the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen by combining diffuse correlation spectroscopy and time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdecchia, Kyle; Diop, Mamadou; Lee, Ting-Yim; St. Lawrence, Keith

    2013-02-01

    Preterm infants are highly susceptible to ischemic brain injury; consequently, continuous bedside monitoring to detect ischemia before irreversible damage occurs would improve patient outcome. In addition to monitoring cerebral blood flow (CBF), assessing the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) would be beneficial considering that metabolic thresholds can be used to evaluate tissue viability. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that changes in absolute CMRO2 could be measured by combining diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) with time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (TR-NIRS). Absolute CBF was determined using bolus-tracking TR-NIRS to calibrate the DCS measurements. Cerebral venous blood oxygenation (SvO2) was determined by multiwavelength TR-NIRS measurements, the accuracy of which was assessed by directly measuring the oxygenation of sagittal sinus blood. In eight newborn piglets, CMRO2 was manipulated by varying the anesthetics and by injecting sodium cyanide. No significant differences were found between the two sets of SvO2 measurements obtained by TR-NIRS or sagittal sinus blood samples and the corresponding CMRO2 measurements. Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean CMRO2 difference of 0.0268±0.8340 mL O2/100 g/min between the two techniques over a range from 0.3 to 4 mL O2/100 g/min.

  17. Metabolic Cycles in Yeast Share Features Conserved among Circadian Rhythms.

    PubMed

    Causton, Helen C; Feeney, Kevin A; Ziegler, Christine A; O'Neill, John S

    2015-04-20

    Cell-autonomous circadian rhythms allow organisms to temporally orchestrate their internal state to anticipate and/or resonate with the external environment. Although ∼24-hr periodicity is observed across aerobic eukaryotes, the central mechanism has been hard to dissect because few simple models exist, and known clock proteins are not conserved across phylogenetic kingdoms. In contrast, contributions to circadian rhythmicity made by a handful of post-translational mechanisms, such as phosphorylation of clock proteins by casein kinase 1 (CK1) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), appear conserved among phyla. These kinases have many other essential cellular functions and are better conserved in their contribution to timekeeping than any of the clock proteins they phosphorylate. Rhythmic oscillations in cellular redox state are another universal feature of circadian timekeeping, e.g., over-oxidation cycles of abundant peroxiredoxin proteins. Here, we use comparative chronobiology to distinguish fundamental clock mechanisms from species and/or tissue-specific adaptations and thereby identify features shared between circadian rhythms in mammalian cells and non-circadian temperature-compensated respiratory oscillations in budding yeast. We find that both types of oscillations are coupled with the cell division cycle, exhibit period determination by CK1 and GSK3, and have peroxiredoxin over-oxidation cycles. We also explore how peroxiredoxins contribute to YROs. Our data point to common mechanisms underlying both YROs and circadian rhythms and suggest two interpretations: either certain biochemical systems are simply permissive for cellular oscillations (with frequencies from hours to days) or this commonality arose via divergence from an ancestral cellular clock.

  18. Effect of ethanol on cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism (CMRO2) in conscious sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Krasney, J.A.; Zubkov, B.; Iwamoto, J. )

    1991-03-11

    A moderate dose of ethanol severely depresses CBF and CMRO2 in the awake sheep fetus. However, the effects of ethanol on CBF and CMRO2 in the adult are unclear. The same dose of ethanol was infused for 2 hr in 5 ewes instrumented with aortic, left ventricular and sagittal sinus catheters. Ethanol caused ataxia accompanied by early modest and variable increases of total and regional CBF and CMRO2, followed by later modest and variable decreases of total and regional CBF (cerebellum) and CMRO2. Ethanol caused a cerebral transcapillary fluid shift as indicated by significant increases of the arterial-cerebral venous differences for hematocrit and hemoglobin. Brain wet-dry ratios increased by 10% above control levels. However, cerebral venous pressures were unchanged. The authors conclude that the adult cerebral response to ethanol differs quantitatively from that of the fetus. The functional significance of the cerebral fluid shift is unclear.

  19. Can the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen be estimated with near-infrared spectroscopy?

    PubMed

    Boas, D A; Strangman, G; Culver, J P; Hoge, R D; Jasdzewski, G; Poldrack, R A; Rosen, B R; Mandeville, J B

    2003-08-07

    We have measured the changes in oxy-haemoglobin and deoxy-haemoglobin in the adult human brain during a brief finger tapping exercise using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). The cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) can be estimated from these NIRS data provided certain model assumptions. The change in CMRO2 is related to changes in the total haemoglobin concentration, deoxy-haemoglobin concentration and blood flow. As NIRS does not provide a measure of dynamic changes in blood flow during brain activation, we relied on a Windkessel model that relates dynamic blood volume and flow changes, which has been used previously for estimating CMRO2 from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. Because of the partial volume effect we are unable to quantify the absolute changes in the local brain haemoglobin concentrations with NIRS and thus are unable to obtain an estimate of the absolute CMRO2 change. An absolute estimate is also confounded by uncertainty in the flow-volume relationship. However, the ratio of the flow change to the CMRO2 change is relatively insensitive to these uncertainties. For the linger tapping task, we estimate a most probable flow-consumption ratio ranging from 1.5 to 3 in agreement with previous findings presented in the literature, although we cannot exclude the possibility that there is no CMRO2 change. The large range in the ratio arises from the large number of model parameters that must be estimated from the data. A more precise estimate of the flow-consumption ratio will require better estimates of the model parameters or flow information, as can be provided by combining NIRS with fMRI.

  20. Can the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen be estimated with near-infrared spectroscopy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boas, D. A.; Strangman, G.; Culver, J. P.; Hoge, R. D.; Jasdzewski, G.; Poldrack, R. A.; Rosen, B. R.; Mandeville, J. B.

    2003-08-01

    We have measured the changes in oxy-haemoglobin and deoxy-haemoglobin in the adult human brain during a brief finger tapping exercise using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). The cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) can be estimated from these NIRS data provided certain model assumptions. The change in CMRO2 is related to changes in the total haemoglobin concentration, deoxy-haemoglobin concentration and blood flow. As NIRS does not provide a measure of dynamic changes in blood flow during brain activation, we relied on a Windkessel model that relates dynamic blood volume and flow changes, which has been used previously for estimating CMRO2 from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. Because of the partial volume effect we are unable to quantify the absolute changes in the local brain haemoglobin concentrations with NIRS and thus are unable to obtain an estimate of the absolute CMRO2 change. An absolute estimate is also confounded by uncertainty in the flow-volume relationship. However, the ratio of the flow change to the CMRO2 change is relatively insensitive to these uncertainties. For the finger tapping task, we estimate a most probable flow-consumption ratio ranging from 1.5 to 3 in agreement with previous findings presented in the literature, although we cannot exclude the possibility that there is no CMRO2 change. The large range in the ratio arises from the large number of model parameters that must be estimated from the data. A more precise estimate of the flow-consumption ratio will require better estimates of the model parameters or flow information, as can be provided by combining NIRS with fMRI.

  1. Metabolic Features Across the Female Life Span in Women with PCOS.

    PubMed

    Sir-Petermann, Teresa; Echiburú, Bárbara; Crisosto, Nicolás; Maliqueo, Manuel; Bravo, Francisco Pérez

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a highly prevalent endocrine metabolic disorder and is presently considered a family pathology. It is associated with obesity, insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. Racial, ethnic and environmental factors may be important in determining the clinical manifestations of this syndrome. Polycystic ovary syndrome is an exclusion diagnosis and, therefore, should be distinguished from the physiological changes typical for the age and from other hyperandrogenic disorders. Early diagnosis is important since this syndrome is associated with reproductive, oncologic and metabolic risks. Interestingly, the clinical features of this disorder may change throughout the lifespan of a PCOS woman, starting from adolescence to postmenopausal age. During the first decades of life the main features are in the reproductive area, while later in life metabolic abnormalities are more evident. While the assessment of insulin resistance is not part of the diagnosis of PCOS, it has been demonstrated that this metabolic component appears early in life and persists over time. Moreover during puberty and pregnancy, insulin resistance is exacerbated. Pregnancy represents an important stage, as the offspring of these patients may be reprogrammed and inherit some of the metabolic and reproductive features of their mothers. In the present review, we will focus on several metabolic aspects of the PCOS condition at different stages of life in a Chilean population.

  2. Computer-aided classification of Alzheimer's disease based on support vector machine with combination of cerebral image features in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jongkreangkrai, C.; Vichianin, Y.; Tocharoenchai, C.; Arimura, H.; Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    2016-03-01

    Several studies have differentiated Alzheimer's disease (AD) using cerebral image features derived from MR brain images. In this study, we were interested in combining hippocampus and amygdala volumes and entorhinal cortex thickness to improve the performance of AD differentiation. Thus, our objective was to investigate the useful features obtained from MRI for classification of AD patients using support vector machine (SVM). T1-weighted MR brain images of 100 AD patients and 100 normal subjects were processed using FreeSurfer software to measure hippocampus and amygdala volumes and entorhinal cortex thicknesses in both brain hemispheres. Relative volumes of hippocampus and amygdala were calculated to correct variation in individual head size. SVM was employed with five combinations of features (H: hippocampus relative volumes, A: amygdala relative volumes, E: entorhinal cortex thicknesses, HA: hippocampus and amygdala relative volumes and ALL: all features). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the method. AUC values of five combinations were 0.8575 (H), 0.8374 (A), 0.8422 (E), 0.8631 (HA) and 0.8906 (ALL). Although “ALL” provided the highest AUC, there were no statistically significant differences among them except for “A” feature. Our results showed that all suggested features may be feasible for computer-aided classification of AD patients.

  3. Dehydration affects cerebral blood flow but not its metabolic rate for oxygen during maximal exercise in trained humans.

    PubMed

    Trangmar, Steven J; Chiesa, Scott T; Stock, Christopher G; Kalsi, Kameljit K; Secher, Niels H; González-Alonso, José

    2014-07-15

    Intense exercise is associated with a reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF), but regulation of CBF during strenuous exercise in the heat with dehydration is unclear. We assessed internal (ICA) and common carotid artery (CCA) haemodynamics (indicative of CBF and extra-cranial blood flow), middle cerebral artery velocity (MCA Vmean), arterial-venous differences and blood temperature in 10 trained males during incremental cycling to exhaustion in the heat (35°C) in control, dehydrated and rehydrated states. Dehydration reduced body mass (75.8 ± 3 vs. 78.2 ± 3 kg), increased internal temperature (38.3 ± 0.1 vs. 36.8 ± 0.1°C), impaired exercise capacity (269 ± 11 vs. 336 ± 14 W), and lowered ICA and MCA Vmean by 12-23% without compromising CCA blood flow. During euhydrated incremental exercise on a separate day, however, exercise capacity and ICA, MCA Vmean and CCA dynamics were preserved. The fast decline in cerebral perfusion with dehydration was accompanied by increased O2 extraction (P < 0.05), resulting in a maintained cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO2). In all conditions, reductions in ICA and MCA Vmean were associated with declining cerebral vascular conductance, increasing jugular venous noradrenaline, and falling arterial carbon dioxide tension (P aCO 2) (R(2) ≥ 0.41, P ≤ 0.01) whereas CCA flow and conductance were related to elevated blood temperature. In conclusion, dehydration accelerated the decline in CBF by decreasing P aCO 2 and enhancing vasoconstrictor activity. However, the circulatory strain on the human brain during maximal exercise does not compromise CMRO2 because of compensatory increases in O2 extraction.

  4. Dehydration affects cerebral blood flow but not its metabolic rate for oxygen during maximal exercise in trained humans

    PubMed Central

    Trangmar, Steven J; Chiesa, Scott T; Stock, Christopher G; Kalsi, Kameljit K; Secher, Niels H; González-Alonso, José

    2014-01-01

    Intense exercise is associated with a reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF), but regulation of CBF during strenuous exercise in the heat with dehydration is unclear. We assessed internal (ICA) and common carotid artery (CCA) haemodynamics (indicative of CBF and extra-cranial blood flow), middle cerebral artery velocity (MCA Vmean), arterial–venous differences and blood temperature in 10 trained males during incremental cycling to exhaustion in the heat (35°C) in control, dehydrated and rehydrated states. Dehydration reduced body mass (75.8 ± 3 vs. 78.2 ± 3 kg), increased internal temperature (38.3 ± 0.1 vs. 36.8 ± 0.1°C), impaired exercise capacity (269 ± 11 vs. 336 ± 14 W), and lowered ICA and MCA Vmean by 12–23% without compromising CCA blood flow. During euhydrated incremental exercise on a separate day, however, exercise capacity and ICA, MCA Vmean and CCA dynamics were preserved. The fast decline in cerebral perfusion with dehydration was accompanied by increased O2 extraction (P < 0.05), resulting in a maintained cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO2). In all conditions, reductions in ICA and MCA Vmean were associated with declining cerebral vascular conductance, increasing jugular venous noradrenaline, and falling arterial carbon dioxide tension () (R2 ≥ 0.41, P ≤ 0.01) whereas CCA flow and conductance were related to elevated blood temperature. In conclusion, dehydration accelerated the decline in CBF by decreasing and enhancing vasoconstrictor activity. However, the circulatory strain on the human brain during maximal exercise does not compromise CMRO2 because of compensatory increases in O2 extraction. PMID:24835170

  5. Evolutionary neuropathology & congenital mental retardation: environmental cues predictive of maternal deprivation influence the fetus to minimize cerebral metabolism in order to express bioenergetic thrift.

    PubMed

    Reser, Jared Edward

    2006-01-01

    This article will propose that humans have an adaptive vulnerability to certain forms of mental retardation, specifically, neuropathological disorders that cause decreased energy expenditure in the hippocampus and the cerebral cortex. This hypothesis will be analyzed in terms of the thrifty phenotype paradigm according to which adverse prenatal events can cause differential gene expression resulting in a phenotype that is better suited, metabolically, for a deprived environment. For example, a malnourished mother has an increased propensity to give birth to offspring that feature a "thrifty phenotype" which permits highly efficient calorie utilization, increased fat deposition and a sedentary nature. This article interprets several prenatal occurrences, including maternal malnourishment, low birth weight, multiparity, short birth interval, advanced maternal age and maternal stress--which are currently identified by the epidemiological literature as risk factors for neuropathology--to be environmental cues that communicate to the fetus that, because it will be neglected of maternal investment, developing a metabolically conservative brain will be the most effective ecological strategy. Success in hunting and foraging in mammals, primates and especially humans is known to be dependent on prolonged maternal investment. Low levels of maternal care are known to result in low survivorship of offspring, largely because the offspring are forced to subsist using simple, low-yield foraging strategies. A predictive, adaptive response, marked by cerebral hypometabolism, may produce a level of metabolic conservancy that mitigates the risks associated with low levels of maternal care. This article will suggest that certain, human neuropathological phenotypes would have been well suited for an ecological niche that closely resembled the less skill-intensive niche of our less encephalized, primate ancestors. The forms of congenital neuropathology discussed in this article do not

  6. Coupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism is conserved for chromatic and luminance stimuli in human visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Leontiev, Oleg; Buracas, Giedrius T.; Liang, Christine; Ances, Beau M.; Perthen, Joanna E.; Shmuel, Amir; Buxton, Richard B.

    2013-01-01

    The ratio of the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) during brain activation is a critical determinant of the magnitude of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Cytochrome oxidase (CO), a key component of oxidative metabolism in the mitochondria, is non-uniformly distributed in visual area V1 in distinct blob and interblob regions, suggesting significant spatial variation in the capacity for oxygen metabolism. The goal of this study was to test whether CBF/CMRO2 coupling differed when these subpopulations of neurons were preferentially stimulated, using chromatic and luminance stimuli to preferentially stimulate either the blob or interblob regions. A dual-echo spiral arterial spin labeling (ASL) technique was used to measure CBF and BOLD responses simultaneously in 7 healthy human subjects. When the stimulus contrast levels were adjusted to evoke similar CBF responses (mean 65.4%±19.0% and 64.6%±19.9%, respectively for chromatic and luminance contrast), the BOLD responses were remarkably similar (1.57%±0.39% and 1.59%±0.35%) for both types of stimuli. We conclude that CBF-CMRO2 coupling is conserved for the chromatic and luminance stimuli used, suggesting a consistent coupling for blob and inter-blob neuronal populations despite the difference in CO concentration. PMID:23238435

  7. Coupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism is conserved for chromatic and luminance stimuli in human visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Leontiev, Oleg; Buracas, Giedrius T; Liang, Christine; Ances, Beau M; Perthen, Joanna E; Shmuel, Amir; Buxton, Richard B

    2013-03-01

    The ratio of the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)) during brain activation is a critical determinant of the magnitude of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Cytochrome oxidase (CO), a key component of oxidative metabolism in the mitochondria, is non-uniformly distributed in visual area V1 in distinct blob and interblob regions, suggesting significant spatial variation in the capacity for oxygen metabolism. The goal of this study was to test whether CBF/CMRO(2) coupling differed when these subpopulations of neurons were preferentially stimulated, using chromatic and luminance stimuli to preferentially stimulate either the blob or interblob regions. A dual-echo spiral arterial spin labeling (ASL) technique was used to measure CBF and BOLD responses simultaneously in 7 healthy human subjects. When the stimulus contrast levels were adjusted to evoke similar CBF responses (mean 65.4% ± 19.0% and 64.6% ± 19.9%, respectively for chromatic and luminance contrast), the BOLD responses were remarkably similar (1.57% ± 0.39% and 1.59% ± 0.35%) for both types of stimuli. We conclude that CBF-CMRO(2) coupling is conserved for the chromatic and luminance stimuli used, suggesting a consistent coupling for blob and inter-blob neuronal populations despite the difference in CO concentration.

  8. Imaging Features of the Brain, Cerebral Vessels and Spine in Pediatric Tuberculous Meningitis with Associated Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Rohlwink, Ursula K; Kilborn, Tracy; Wieselthaler, Nicky; Banderker, Ebrahim; Zwane, Eugene; Figaji, Anthony A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pediatric tuberculous meningitis leads to high rates of mortality and morbidity. Prompt diagnosis and initiation of treatment are challenging; imaging findings play a key role in establishing the presumptive diagnosis. General brain imaging findings are well reported; however, specific data on cerebral vascular and spinal involvement in children are sparse. Methods This prospective cohort study examined admission and follow up computed tomography brain scans and magnetic resonance imaging scans of the brain, cerebral vessels (magnetic resonance angiogram) and spine at 3 weeks in children treated for tuberculous meningitis with hydrocephalus (inclusion criteria). Exclusion criteria were no hydrocephalus on admission, treatment of hydrocephalus or commencement of anti-TB treatment before study enrolment. Imaging findings were examined in association with outcome at 6 months. Results Forty-four patients (median age 3.3 [0.3-13.1] years) with definite (54%) or probable tuberculous meningitis were enrolled. Good clinical outcome was reported in 72%; the mortality rate was 16%. Infarcts were reported in 66% of patients and were predictive of poor outcome. Magnetic resonance angiogram abnormalities were reported in 55% of patients. Delayed tuberculomas developed in 11% of patients (after starting treatment). Spinal pathology was more common than expected, occurring in 76% of patients. Exudate in the spinal canal increased the difficulty of lumbar puncture and correlated with high cerebrospinal fluid protein content. Conclusion Tuberculous meningitis involves extensive pathology in the central nervous system. Severe infarction was predictive of poor outcome although this was not the case for angiographic abnormalities. Spinal disease occurs commonly and has important implications for diagnosis and treatment. Comprehensive imaging of the brain, spine and cerebral vessels adds insight into disease pathophysiology. PMID:27213261

  9. The effects of fenvalerate on hepatic and cerebral xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in selenium and/or iodine deficient rats

    PubMed Central

    Caglayan, Aydan; Kocer-Gumusel, Belma; Erkekoglu, Pinar; Hincal, Filiz

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Particularly in developing countries, selenium and/or iodine deficiencies are encountered and use of pesticides in agriculture are not well-controlled. Fenvalerate is a pyrethroid insectide used in agriculture and has applications against a wide range of pests. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of fenvalerate on hepatic and cerebral xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme activities in the presence of iodine and/or selenium deficiency on a rat model. Materials and Methods: Iodine and/or selenium deficiency was induced by feeding three-week-old Wistar rats with a diet containing <0.005 mg selenium kg-1, and/or administering 1% sodium perchlorate in drinking water for 7 weeks. Test groups received fenvalerate (100 mg kg-1 BW IP) for the last 7 days. Hepatic and cerebral microsomal aniline hydroxylase (CYP2E1) and cytosolic glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities were determined. Besides, hepatic NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (P450R), ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD, CYP1A1/1A2) and penthoxyresorufin O-depenthylase (PROD, CYP2B1/2B2), activities were also measured. Results: Fenvalerate had a general inductive effect on the hepatic and cerebral xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme activities. Moreover, enzyme activities were also altered by iodine and/or selenium deficiency, but the effects seemed to be enzyme- and tissue-specific. Conclusion: The inductive effect of fenvalerate, particularly in high dose exposures, may change the metabolism of several xenobiotics, including drugs, as well as endogenous substrates. The effects may vary depending on the selenium and/or iodine status of individual. PMID:27872699

  10. Medium- and long-term effects of repeated bicuculline-induced seizures in developing rats on local cerebral energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Doriat, J F; Koziel, V; Humbert, A C; Daval, J L

    1998-07-27

    To assess long-term metabolic consequences of recurrent ictal events arising during development, seizures were repeatedly generated in rats at different stages of cerebral maturation. Seizures were induced by i.p. injections of bicuculline for three consecutive days, starting from postnatal day 5 (P5), when the brain is very immature, or from P15, a period at which the brain is more structurally organized. Local cerebral metabolic rates for glucose were measured in 74 structures at P15, P25 and in adults (P60), by the autoradiographic method using 2-D-[14C]deoxyglucose. Repeated seizures in P5 to P7 pups led to a reduction (16-34%) of glucose consumption at P15, mainly significant in sensory, motor and functionally non-specific areas as well as in cerebellar nuclei. Selective decreases in metabolic activity were still recorded in adults, mostly in auditory system (20%) and cerebellar nuclei (27%). Seizures generated from P15 to P17 led to an overall mortality rate of 62% (versus 22% at P5 to P7). Surviving animals exhibited reduced metabolic rates for glucose (by 7-27%) at P25, significant in 23 structures, and depicting pronounced changes in limbic, hypothalamic, sensory and white matter areas, whereas brain functional activity finally returned to basal values at P60. Therefore, while younger rats seemed to better tolerate repeated bicuculline-induced seizures than older animals, the reverse was true for long-term metabolic effects, and the more immature the brain when seizures arise, the more persistent the functional consequences.

  11. Leukoencephalopathy with cerebral calcifications and cysts: clinical and pathological features in two adults.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuejun; Zheng, Xueping; Sui, Qinglan; Xu, Wenjian; Zee, Chi-Shing

    2016-03-01

    Two adult patients diagnosed with Leukoencephalopathy with cerebral calcifications and cysts (LCC) were presented. Both patients had a long-term (8-10 years) following-up. Radiological findings of both patients revealed the characteristic signs of LCC: cerebral white matter abnormalities, calcifications, and cysts. In case 1, the initial CT scan showed a low-density area in the right frontal lobe and it had developed into a large cystic lesion after 8 years. Histopathological determination revealed that the cyst wall was associated with hemorrhage, angiomatous formation, and some Rosenthal fibers. In case 2, a major cystic lesion was located at the left parietal lobe which was resected and an old hematoma was found inside the cyst. Nine years later, the follow-up neuroimaging of case 2 showed a remarkable improvement of white matter abnormalities and cystic lesions. Hemorrhagic fluid was observed inside the cysts. Additionally, follow-up CT and MR scans showed a rapid enlargement of cystic lesions accompanied with hemorrhagic fluid levels after a year. Then, a major cyst was surgically removed to relieve pressure symptoms. Pathology of the resected cyst exhibited an organized hemorrhage inside the cyst and a large amount of hemosiderin surrounding the cyst wall. In conclusion, our two cases demonstrated that angiomatous changes subsequent with hemorrhage may be the major mechanism of cyst formation and development.

  12. Bidirectional Relationships and Disconnects between NAFLD and Features of the Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Patrick; Byrne, Christopher D

    2016-03-11

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents a wide spectrum of liver disease from simple steatosis, to steatohepatitis, (both with and without liver fibrosis), cirrhosis and end-stage liver failure. NAFLD also increases the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and both HCC and end stage liver disease may markedly increase risk of liver-related mortality. NAFLD is increasing in prevalence and is presently the second most frequent indication for liver transplantation. As NAFLD is frequently associated with insulin resistance, central obesity, dyslipidaemia, hypertension and hyperglycaemia, NAFLD is often considered the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. There is growing evidence that this relationship between NAFLD and metabolic syndrome is bidirectional, in that NAFLD can predispose to metabolic syndrome features, which can in turn exacerbate NAFLD or increase the risk of its development in those without a pre-existing diagnosis. Although the relationship between NAFLD and metabolic syndrome is frequently bidirectional, recently there has been much interest in genotype/phenotype relationships where there is a disconnect between the liver disease and metabolic syndrome features. Such potential examples of genotypes that are associated with a dissociation between liver disease and metabolic syndrome are patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein-3 (PNPLA3) (I148M) and transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2 protein (TM6SF2) (E167K) genotypes. This review will explore the bidirectional relationship between metabolic syndrome and NAFLD, and will also discuss recent insights from studies of PNPLA3 and TM6SF2 genotypes that may give insight into how and why metabolic syndrome features and liver disease are linked in NAFLD.

  13. "Relevance vector machine" consciousness classifier applied to cerebral metabolism of vegetative and locked-in patients.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Christophe L; Bruno, Marie-Aurelie; Maquet, Pierre; Boly, Mélanie; Noirhomme, Quentin; Schnakers, Caroline; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey; Bonjean, Maxime; Hustinx, Roland; Moonen, Gustave; Luxen, André; Laureys, Steven

    2011-05-15

    The vegetative state is a devastating condition where patients awaken from their coma (i.e., open their eyes) but fail to show any behavioural sign of conscious awareness. Locked-in syndrome patients also awaken from their coma and are unable to show any motor response to command (except for small eye movements or blinks) but recover full conscious awareness of self and environment. Bedside evaluation of residual cognitive function in coma survivors often is difficult because motor responses may be very limited or inconsistent. We here aimed to disentangle vegetative from "locked-in" patients by an automatic procedure based on machine learning using fluorodeoxyglucose PET data obtained in 37 healthy controls and in 13 patients in a vegetative state. Next, the trained machine was tested on brain scans obtained in 8 patients with locked-in syndrome. We used a sparse probabilistic Bayesian learning framework called "relevance vector machine" (RVM) to classify the scans. The trained RVM classifier, applied on an input scan, returns a probability value (p-value) of being in one class or the other, here being "conscious" or not. Training on the control and vegetative state groups was assessed with a leave-one-out cross-validation procedure, leading to 100% classification accuracy. When applied on the locked-in patients, all scans were classified as "conscious" with a mean p-value of .95 (min .85). In conclusion, even with this relatively limited data set, we could train a classifier distinguishing between normal consciousness (i.e., wakeful conscious awareness) and the vegetative state (i.e., wakeful unawareness). Cross-validation also indicated that the clinical classification and the one predicted by the automatic RVM classifier were in accordance. Moreover, when applied on a third group of "locked-in" consciously aware patients, they all had a strong probability of being similar to the normal controls, as expected. Therefore, RVM classification of cerebral metabolic

  14. Comparison of effects of equiosmolar doses of mannitol and hypertonic saline on cerebral blood flow and metabolism in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Cottenceau, Vincent; Masson, Francoise; Mahamid, Eugenia; Petit, Laurent; Shik, Venyamin; Sztark, Francois; Zaaroor, Menashe; Soustiel, Jean Francois

    2011-10-01

    The potential superiority of hypertonic saline (HTS) over mannitol (MTL) for control of intracranial pressure (ICP) following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is still debated. Forty-seven severe TBI patients with increased ICP were prospectively recruited in two university hospitals and randomly treated with equiosmolar infusions of either MTL 20% (4 mL/kg; n=25 patients) or HTS 7.5% (2 mL/kg; n=22 patients). Serum sodium, hematocrit, ICP, arterial blood pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), shear rate, global indices of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism were measured before, and 30 and 120 min following each infusion during the course of illness. Outcome was assessed at 6 months. Both HTS and MTL effectively and equally reduced ICP levels with subsequent elevation of CPP and CBF, although this effect was significantly stronger and of longer duration after HTS and correlated with improved rheological blood properties induced by HTS. Further, effect of HTS on ICP appeared to be more robust in patients with diffuse brain injury. In contrast, oxygen and glucose metabolic rates were left equally unaffected by both solutions. Accordingly, there was no significant difference in neurological outcome between the two groups. In conclusion, MTL was as effective as HTS in decreasing ICP in TBI patients although both solutions failed to improved cerebral metabolism. HTS showed an additional and stronger effect on cerebral perfusion of potential benefit in the presence of cerebral ischemia. Treatment selection should therefore be individually based on sodium level and cerebral hemodynamics.

  15. CEREBRAL CORTICAL MICROVASCULAR RAREFACTION IN METABOLIC SYNDROME IS DEPENDENT ON INSULIN RESISTANCE AND LOSS OF NITRIC OXIDE BIOAVAILABILITY

    PubMed Central

    Chantler, Paul D.; Shrader, Carl D.; Tabone, Lawrence E.; d’Audiffret, Alexandre C.; Huseynova, Khumara; Brooks, Steven D.; Branyan, Kayla W.; Grogg, Kristin A.; Frisbee, Jefferson C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Chronic presentation of the metabolic syndrome (MS) is associated with an increased likelihood for stroke and poor stroke outcomes following occlusive cerebrovascular events. However, the physiological mechanisms contributing to compromised outcomes remain unclear, and the degree of cerebral cortical microvascular density (MVD) may represent a central determinant of stroke outcomes. Methods This study used the obese Zucker rat (OZR) model of MS and clinically-relevant, chronic interventions to determine the impact on cerebral cortical microvascular rarefaction via immunohistochemistry with a parallel determination of cerebrovascular function to identify putative mechanistic contributors. Results OZR exhibited a progressive rarefaction (to ~80% control MVD) of the cortical microvascular networks vs. lean Zucker rats. Chronic treatment with anti-hypertensive agents (captopril/hydralazine) had limited effectiveness in blunting rarefaction, although treatments improving glycemic control (metformin/rosiglitazone) were superior, maintaining ~94% control MVD. Chronic treatment with the antioxidant TEMPOL severely blunted rarefaction in OZR, although this ameliorative effect was prevented by concurrent NOS inhibition. Conclusions Further analyses revealed that the maintenance of glycemic control and vascular nitric oxide bioavailability were stronger predictors of cerebral cortical MVD in OZR than was prevention of hypertension, and this may have implications for chronic treatment of CVD risk under stroke-prone conditions. PMID:26014499

  16. Age-related changes in ultrastructural features of cathepsin B- and D-containing neurons in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Jung, H; Lee, E Y; Lee, S I

    1999-10-09

    The present study examines age-related changes in the subcellular localization of cathepsin B (cath B) and cathepsin D (cath D), as well as morphological features of the cathepsin-immunoreactive (ir) neurons in rat cerebral cortex. Sprague-Dawley rats were studied at 3 and 26 months. By immunoelectron microscopy cath B- or cath D-immunoreactivities were found in many, but not all, pyramidal neurons. In young rat cerebral cortical neurons, cath B was observed not only in lysosomal systems such as multivesicular bodies, dense bodies, and lipofuscin granules, but also in extralysosomal sites. By contrast, cath D was confined mainly to lysosomal systems in young rats. In aged rats, cath B showed a similar pattern in its subcellular localization compared to the young control, but some of the dense bodies containing cath B was closely apposed to the outer nuclear envelope. These cells exhibited a relatively normal appearance. Regardless of subcellular localization, approximately 10% of cath B-ir neurons displayed ultrastructural disturbances presumed to indicate an early stage of degeneration. The nucleus was indented, nuclear boundary was indistinct, nuclear pore structures appeared separately with high frequency, and the endoplasmic reticulum appeared to be affected. In addition to its presence in lysosomal structures, cath D-immunoreactivity in aged cerebral cortex was noted prominently in the cytosol as diffuse granules. About 37% of cath D-ir cells showed this age-related change. Among the neurons with the diffusely scattered form of cath D, approximately 70% of cells exhibited the degenerating features. These cells were characterized by large amounts of diffuse cath D, reduced cellular size, loss of the nuclear boundary, scattered nuclear pore structures, an often fragmentation of the nucleus, disturbances of endoplasmic reticular system, and in advanced stages, condensed nucleus and poor preservation of almost cytoplasmic organelles. Though some of these features

  17. Cerebral coenurosis in a cat caused by Taenia serialis: neurological, magnetic resonance imaging and pathological features.

    PubMed

    Jull, Philip; Browne, Elizabeth; Boufana, Belgees S; Schöniger, Sandra; Davies, Emma

    2012-09-01

    CLINICAL SUMMARY: A 4-year-old Birman cat was presented with marked obtundation and non-ambulatory tetraparesis. Two well-demarcated, intra-axial T2-hyperintense, T1-hypointense structures, which did not contrast enhance, were evident on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Histopathology of the structures revealed metacestodes that were morphologically indicative of larval stages of Taenia species. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of a fragment within the 12S rRNA gene confirmed the subspecies as Taenia serialis. PRACTICAL SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report of MRI findings of cerebral coenurosis caused by T serialis in a cat. Early MRI should be considered an important part of the diagnostic work-up for this rare clinical disease, as it will help guide subsequent treatment and may improve the prognosis.

  18. The value of anthropometric indices for identifying women with features of metabolic syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BMI is a widely used anthropometric measure for identifying CVD and metabolic syndrome (MetS) risk. Two new anthropometric indices are A Body Shape Index (ABSI) and Body Roundness Index (BRI) that may provide better correlations to features of MetS. Methods: Subject data were obtained from 91 over...

  19. Optically based quantification of absolute cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) with high spatial resolution in rodents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Sakadžić, Sava; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Boas, David A.

    2010-02-01

    Measuring oxygen delivery in brain tissue is important for identifying the pathophysiological changes associated with brain injury and various diseases such as cancer, stroke, and Alzheimer's disease. We have developed a multi-modal imaging system for minimally invasive measurement of cerebral oxygenation and blood flow in small animals with high spatial resolution. The system allows for simultaneous measurement of blood flow using Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography, and oxygen partial pressure (pO2) using either confocal or multiphoton phosphorescence lifetime imaging with exogenous porphyrin-based dyes sensitive to dissolved oxygen. Here we present the changes in pO2 and blood flow in superficial cortical vessels of Sprague Dawley rats in response to conditions such as hypoxia, hyperoxia, and functional stimulation. pO2 measurements display considerable heterogeneity over distances that cannot be resolved with more widely used oxygen-monitoring techniques such as BOLD-fMRI. Large increases in blood flow are observed in response to functional stimulation and hypoxia. Our system allows for quantification of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) with high spatial resolution, providing a better understanding of metabolic dynamics during functional stimulation and under various neuropathologies. Ultimately, better insight into the underlying mechanisms of neuropathologies will facilitate the development of improved therapeutic strategies to minimize damage to brain tissue.

  20. Increased interictal cerebral glucose metabolism in a cortical-subcortical network in drug naive patients with cryptogenic temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed Central

    Franceschi, M; Lucignani, G; Del Sole, A; Grana, C; Bressi, S; Minicucci, F; Messa, C; Canevini, M P; Fazio, F

    1995-01-01

    Positron emission tomography with [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]FDG) has been used to assess the pattern of cerebral metabolism in different types of epilepsies. However, PET with [18F]FDG has never been used to evaluate drug naive patients with cryptogenic temporal lobe epilepsy, in whom the mechanism of origin and diffusion of the epileptic discharge may differ from that underlying other epilepsies. In a group of patients with cryptogenic temporal lobe epilepsy, never treated with antiepileptic drugs, evidence has been found of significant interictal glucose hypermetabolism in a bilateral neural network including the temporal lobes, thalami, basal ganglia, and cingular cortices. The metabolism in these areas and frontal lateral cortex enables the correct classification of all patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and controls by discriminant function analysis. Other cortical areas--namely, frontal basal and lateral, temporal mesial, and cerebellar cortices--had bilateral increases of glucose metabolism ranging from 10 to 15% of normal controls, although lacking stringent statistical significance. This metabolic pattern could represent a pathophysiological state of hyperactivity predisposing to epileptic discharge generation or diffusion, or else a network of inhibitory circuits activated to prevent the diffusion of the epileptic discharge. PMID:7561924

  1. Specific features of sensorimotor cerebral cortex activity modulation by dopamine releaser amantadine.

    PubMed

    Storozhuk, Viktor M; Zinyuk, Larissa E

    2007-09-01

    The modulatory effects of amantadine (1-adamantanamine) on the activity of sensorimotor cerebral cortex neurones during microiontophoretic application of agonists of glutamatergic and GABA-ergic (gamma-aminobutyric acid) transmission were studied. In non-anaesthetised cats, dopamine (DA) released by amantadine application in a small area of the neocortex increased baseline and evoked neuronal activity, providing stabilization and optimum course of both the neuronal and the conditioned responses of the animal. Amantadine eliminates a decrease in the level of neuronal baseline and evoked activity and marked increase in the latency of neuronal activation and conditioned movement mediated by D2 receptor antagonist sulpiride ((S)-5-aminosulfonyl-N-[(1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl) methyl]-2-methoamantadineybenzamide) or GABA. This is reflected by a proportionate decrease in the onset of neuronal impulse reaction and latency of conditioned movement. Combined NMDA (N-methyl-D: -aspartate) and amantadine application also caused a considerable increase in baseline and evoked activity, but produced a slightly weaker effect than that evoked by NMDA application alone. A decrease in the baseline and evoked neuronal activity after NMDA withdrawn lasted during next control session (up to 40 min). The ability of DA releaser amantadine to alleviate significant increase in the latency of neuronal responses and conditioned movement induced by sulpiride or GABA suggests that dopamine modulates the activity of GABA-ergic inhibitory fast spike interneurons in the cat sensorimotor cortex during conditioning.

  2. A combination of physical activity and computerized brain training improves verbal memory and increases cerebral glucose metabolism in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Shah, T; Verdile, G; Sohrabi, H; Campbell, A; Putland, E; Cheetham, C; Dhaliwal, S; Weinborn, M; Maruff, P; Darby, D; Martins, R N

    2014-12-02

    Physical exercise interventions and cognitive training programs have individually been reported to improve cognition in the healthy elderly population; however, the clinical significance of using a combined approach is currently lacking. This study evaluated whether physical activity (PA), computerized cognitive training and/or a combination of both could improve cognition. In this nonrandomized study, 224 healthy community-dwelling older adults (60-85 years) were assigned to 16 weeks home-based PA (n=64), computerized cognitive stimulation (n=62), a combination of both (combined, n=51) or a control group (n=47). Cognition was assessed using the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, Controlled Oral Word Association Test and the CogState computerized battery at baseline, 8 and 16 weeks post intervention. Physical fitness assessments were performed at all time points. A subset (total n=45) of participants underwent [(18)F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scans at 16 weeks (post-intervention). One hundred and ninety-one participants completed the study and the data of 172 participants were included in the final analysis. Compared with the control group, the combined group showed improved verbal episodic memory and significantly higher brain glucose metabolism in the left sensorimotor cortex after controlling for age, sex, premorbid IQ, apolipoprotein E (APOE) status and history of head injury. The higher cerebral glucose metabolism in this brain region was positively associated with improved verbal memory seen in the combined group only. Our study provides evidence that a specific combination of physical and mental exercises for 16 weeks can improve cognition and increase cerebral glucose metabolism in cognitively intact healthy older adults.

  3. Effects of aging on cerebral blood flow, oxygen metabolism, and blood oxygenation level dependent responses to visual stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ances, Beau M; Liang, Christine L; Leontiev, Oleg; Perthen, Joanna E; Fleisher, Adam S; Lansing, Amy E; Buxton, Richard B

    2009-04-01

    Calibrated functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides a noninvasive technique to assess functional metabolic changes associated with normal aging. We simultaneously measured both the magnitude of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) responses in the visual cortex for separate conditions of mild hypercapnia (5% CO(2)) and a simple checkerboard stimulus in healthy younger (n = 10, mean: 28-years-old) and older (n = 10, mean: 53-years-old) adults. From these data we derived baseline CBF, the BOLD scaling parameter M, the fractional change in the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO(2)) with activation, and the coupling ratio n of the fractional changes in CBF and CMRO(2). For the functional activation paradigm, the magnitude of the BOLD response was significantly lower for the older group (0.57 +/- 0.07%) compared to the younger group (0.95 +/- 0.14%), despite the finding that the fractional CBF and CMRO(2) changes were similar for both groups. The weaker BOLD response for the older group was due to a reduction in the parameter M, which was significantly lower for older (4.6 +/- 0.4%) than younger subjects (6.5 +/- 0.8%), most likely reflecting a reduction in baseline CBF for older (41.7 +/- 4.8 mL/100 mL/min) compared to younger (59.6 +/- 9.1 mL/100 mL/min) subjects. In addition to these primary responses, for both groups the BOLD response exhibited a post-stimulus undershoot with no significant difference in this magnitude. However, the post-undershoot period of the CBF response was significantly greater for older compared to younger subjects. We conclude that when comparing two populations, the BOLD response can provide misleading reflections of underlying physiological changes. A calibrated approach provides a more quantitative reflection of underlying metabolic changes than the BOLD response alone.

  4. Post-traumatic hypoxia exacerbates neurological deficit, neuroinflammation and cerebral metabolism in rats with diffuse traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The combination of diffuse brain injury with a hypoxic insult is associated with poor outcomes in patients with traumatic brain injury. In this study, we investigated the impact of post-traumatic hypoxia in amplifying secondary brain damage using a rat model of diffuse traumatic axonal injury (TAI). Rats were examined for behavioral and sensorimotor deficits, increased brain production of inflammatory cytokines, formation of cerebral edema, changes in brain metabolism and enlargement of the lateral ventricles. Methods Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to diffuse TAI using the Marmarou impact-acceleration model. Subsequently, rats underwent a 30-minute period of hypoxic (12% O2/88% N2) or normoxic (22% O2/78% N2) ventilation. Hypoxia-only and sham surgery groups (without TAI) received 30 minutes of hypoxic or normoxic ventilation, respectively. The parameters examined included: 1) behavioural and sensorimotor deficit using the Rotarod, beam walk and adhesive tape removal tests, and voluntary open field exploration behavior; 2) formation of cerebral edema by the wet-dry tissue weight ratio method; 3) enlargement of the lateral ventricles; 4) production of inflammatory cytokines; and 5) real-time brain metabolite changes as assessed by microdialysis technique. Results TAI rats showed significant deficits in sensorimotor function, and developed substantial edema and ventricular enlargement when compared to shams. The additional hypoxic insult significantly exacerbated behavioural deficits and the cortical production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-1β and TNF but did not further enhance edema. TAI and particularly TAI+Hx rats experienced a substantial metabolic depression with respect to glucose, lactate, and glutamate levels. Conclusion Altogether, aggravated behavioural deficits observed in rats with diffuse TAI combined with hypoxia may be induced by enhanced neuroinflammation, and a prolonged period of metabolic dysfunction. PMID

  5. A combination of physical activity and computerized brain training improves verbal memory and increases cerebral glucose metabolism in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Shah, T; Verdile, G; Sohrabi, H; Campbell, A; Putland, E; Cheetham, C; Dhaliwal, S; Weinborn, M; Maruff, P; Darby, D; Martins, R N

    2014-01-01

    Physical exercise interventions and cognitive training programs have individually been reported to improve cognition in the healthy elderly population; however, the clinical significance of using a combined approach is currently lacking. This study evaluated whether physical activity (PA), computerized cognitive training and/or a combination of both could improve cognition. In this nonrandomized study, 224 healthy community-dwelling older adults (60–85 years) were assigned to 16 weeks home-based PA (n=64), computerized cognitive stimulation (n=62), a combination of both (combined, n=51) or a control group (n=47). Cognition was assessed using the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, Controlled Oral Word Association Test and the CogState computerized battery at baseline, 8 and 16 weeks post intervention. Physical fitness assessments were performed at all time points. A subset (total n=45) of participants underwent [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scans at 16 weeks (post-intervention). One hundred and ninety-one participants completed the study and the data of 172 participants were included in the final analysis. Compared with the control group, the combined group showed improved verbal episodic memory and significantly higher brain glucose metabolism in the left sensorimotor cortex after controlling for age, sex, premorbid IQ, apolipoprotein E (APOE) status and history of head injury. The higher cerebral glucose metabolism in this brain region was positively associated with improved verbal memory seen in the combined group only. Our study provides evidence that a specific combination of physical and mental exercises for 16 weeks can improve cognition and increase cerebral glucose metabolism in cognitively intact healthy older adults. PMID:25463973

  6. Using near-infrared spectroscopy to measure cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen under multiple levels of arterial oxygenation in piglets.

    PubMed

    Tichauer, Kenneth M; Elliott, Jonathan T; Hadway, Jennifer A; Lee, David S; Lee, Ting-Yim; St Lawrence, Keith

    2010-09-01

    Improving neurological care of neonates has been impeded by the absence of suitable techniques for measuring cerebral hemodynamics and energy metabolism at the bedside. Currently, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) appears to be the technology best suited to fill this gap, and techniques have been proposed to measure both cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2). We have developed a fast and reliable bolus-tracking method of determining CMRO2 that combines measurements of CBF and cerebral venous oxygenation [venous oxygen saturation (CSvO2)]. However, this method has never been validated at different levels of arterial oxygenation [arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2)], which can be highly variable in the clinical setting. In this study, NIRS measurements of CBF, CSvO2, and CMRO2 were obtained over a range of SaO2 in newborn piglets (n=12); CSvO2 values measured directly from sagittal sinus blood samples were collected for validation. Two alternative NIRS methods that measure CSvO2 by manipulating venous oxygenation (i.e., head tilt and partial venous occlusion methods) were also employed for comparison. Statistically significant correlations were found between each NIRS technique and sagittal sinus blood oxygenation (P<0.05). Correlation slopes were 1.03 (r=0.91), 0.73 (r=0.73), and 0.73 (r=0.81) for the bolus-tracking, head tilt, and partial venous occlusion methods, respectively. The bolus-tracking technique displayed the best correlation under hyperoxic (SaO2=99.9±0.03%) and normoxic (SaO2=86.9±6.6%) conditions and was comparable to the other techniques under hypoxic conditions (SaO2=40.7±9.9%). The reduced precision of the bolus-tracking method under hypoxia was attributed to errors in CSvO2 measurement that were magnified at low SaO2 levels. In conclusion, the bolus-tracking technique of measuring CSvO2, and therefore CMRO2, is accurate and robust for an SaO2>50% but provides reduced accuracy under more severe hypoxic levels.

  7. Characterization of the interaction between local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose and acid-base index in ischemic rat brain employing a double-isotope methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Peek, K.E.H.

    1988-01-01

    The association between increases in cerebral glucose metabolism and the development of acidosis is largely inferential, based on reports linking hyperglycemia with poor neurological outcome, lactate accumulation, and the severity of acidosis. We measured local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (lCMRglc) and an index of brain pH-the acid-base index (ABI)-concurrently and characterized their interaction in a model of focal cerebral ischemia in rats in a double-label autoradiographic study, using ({sup 14}C)2-deoxyglucose and ({sup 14}C)dimethyloxazolidinedione. Computer-assisted digitization and analysis permitted the simultaneous quantification of the two variables on a pixel-by-pixel basis in the same brain slices.

  8. Interregional cerebral metabolic associativity during a continuous performance task (Part II) : differential alterations in bipolar and unipolar disorders.

    PubMed

    Benson, Brenda E; Willis, Mark W; Ketter, Terence A; Speer, Andrew; Kimbrell, Tim A; George, Mark S; Herscovitch, Peter; Post, Robert M

    2008-10-30

    Unipolar and bipolar disorders have often been reported to exhibit abnormal regional brain activity in prefrontal cortex and paralimbic structures compared with healthy controls. We sought to ascertain how regions postulated to be abnormal in bipolar and unipolar disorders were functionally connected to the rest of the brain, and how this associativity differed from healthy controls. Thirty patients with bipolar disorder (BPs), 34 patients with unipolar disorder (UPs), and 66 healthy volunteers (Willis, M.W., Benson, B.E., Ketter, T.A., Kimbrell, T.A., George, M.S., Speer, A.M., Herscovitch, P., Post, R.M., 2008. Interregional cerebral metabolic associativity during a continuous performance task in healthy adults. Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging 164 (1)) were imaged using F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose and positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) while performing an auditory continuous performance task (CPT). Five bilateral regions of interest (ROIs), namely dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), insula, inferior parietal cortex (INFP), thalamus and cerebellum, were correlated with normalized cerebral metabolism in the rest of the brain while covarying out Hamilton Depression Rating Scale Scores. In bipolar patients compared with controls, metabolism in the left DLPFC and INFP, and bilateral thalamus and insula had more positive and fewer negative metabolic correlations with other brain regions. In contrast, compared with controls, unipolar patients had fewer significant correlative relationships, either positive or negative. In common, bipolar and unipolar patients lacked the normal inverse relationships between the DLPFC and cerebellum, as well as relationships between the primary ROIs and other limbic regions (medial prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate, and temporal lobes) compared with controls. Associations of DLPFC and INFP with other brain areas were different in each hemisphere in patients and controls. Bipolar patients exhibited exaggerated positive coherence

  9. The Effects of Conditions of Cerebral Anoxia, on Phospholipids, Metabolism, and Circulation of the Brain.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Anoxia, *Phospholipids, Blood circulation, Pathology, Blood plasma , Erythrocytes, Patients, Metabolism, Blood chemistry, Brain, Experimental data, Dogs, Laboratory animals, Tables(Data), Blood diseases

  10. Association of cerebral metabolic activity changes with vagus nerve stimulation antidepressant response in treatment-resistant depression

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Charles R.; Chibnall, John T.; Gebara, Marie Anne; Price, Joseph L.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Mintun, Mark A.; (Bud) Craig, A.D.; Cornell, Martha E.; Perantie, Dana C.; Giuffra, Luis A.; Bucholz, Richard D.; Sheline, Yvette I.

    2014-01-01

    Background Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has antidepressant effects in treatment resistant major depression (TRMD); these effects are poorly understood. This trial examines associations of subacute (3 months) and chronic (12 months) VNS with cerebral metabolism in TRMD. Objective 17Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography was used to examine associations between 12-month antidepressant VNS response and cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRGlu) changes at 3 and 12 months. Methods Thirteen TRMD patients received 12 months of VNS. Depression assessments (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale [HDRS]) and PET scans were obtained at baseline (pre-VNS) and 3/12 months. CMRGlu was assessed in eight a priori selected brain regions (bilateral anterior insular [AIC], orbitofrontal [OFC], dorsolateral prefrontal [DLPFC], and anterior cingulate cortices [ACC]). Regional CMRGlu changes over time were studied in VNS responders (decreased 12 month HDRS by ≥50%) and nonresponders. Results A significant trend (decreased 3 month CMRGlu) in the right DLPFC was observed over time in VNS responders (n = 9; P = 0.006). An exploratory whole brain analysis (Puncorrected = 0.005) demonstrated decreased 3 month right rostral cingulate and DLPFC CMRGlu, and increased 12 month left ventral tegmental CMRGlu in responders. Conclusions/Limitations VNS response may involve gradual (months in duration) brain adaptations. Early on, this process may involve decreased right-sided DLPFC/cingulate cortical activity; longer term effects (12 months) may lead to brainstem dopaminergic activation. Study limitations included: a) a small VNS nonresponders sample (N = 4), which limited conclusions about nonresponder CMRGlu changes; b) no control group; and, c) patients maintained their psychotropic medications. PMID:23485649

  11. Non-invasive Assessment of Cerebral Blood Flow and Oxygen Metabolism in Neonates during Hypothermic Cardiopulmonary Bypass: Feasibility and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Ferradal, Silvina L.; Yuki, Koichi; Vyas, Rutvi; Ha, Christopher G.; Yi, Francesca; Stopp, Christian; Wypij, David; Cheng, Henry H.; Newburger, Jane W.; Kaza, Aditya K.; Franceschini, Maria A.; Kussman, Barry D.; Grant, P. Ellen

    2017-01-01

    The neonatal brain is extremely vulnerable to injury during periods of hypoxia and/or ischemia. Risk of brain injury is increased during neonatal cardiac surgery, where pre-existing hemodynamic instability and metabolic abnormalities are combined with long periods of low cerebral blood flow and/or circulatory arrest. Our understanding of events associated with cerebral hypoxia-ischemia during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) remains limited, largely due to inadequate tools to quantify cerebral oxygen delivery and consumption non-invasively and in real-time. This pilot study aims to evaluate cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen metabolism (CMRO2) intraoperatively in neonates by combining two novel non-invasive optical techniques: frequency-domain near-infrared spectroscopy (FD-NIRS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS). CBF and CMRO2 were quantified before, during and after deep hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in nine neonates. Our results show significantly decreased CBF and CMRO2 during hypothermic CPB. More interestingly, a change of coupling between both variables is observed during deep hypothermic CPB in all subjects. Our results are consistent with previous studies using invasive techniques, supporting the concept of FD-NIRS/DCS as a promising technology to monitor cerebral physiology in neonates providing the potential for individual optimization of surgical management. PMID:28276534

  12. Npc1 haploinsufficiency promotes weight gain and metabolic features associated with insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Jelinek, David; Millward, Veronica; Birdi, Amandip; Trouard, Theodore P; Heidenreich, Randall A; Garver, William S

    2011-01-15

    A recent population-based genome-wide association study has revealed that the Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) gene is associated with early-onset and morbid adult obesity. Concurrently, our candidate gene-based mouse growth study performed using the BALB/cJ NPC1 mouse model (Npc1) with decreased Npc1 gene dosage independently supported these results by suggesting an Npc1 gene-diet interaction in relation to early-onset weight gain. To further investigate the Npc1 gene in relation to weight gain and metabolic features associated with insulin resistance, we interbred BALB/cJ Npc1(+/-) mice with wild-type C57BL/6J mice, the latter mouse strain commonly used to study aspects of diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. This breeding produced a hybrid (BALB/cJ-C57BL/6J) Npc1(+/-) mouse model with increased susceptibility to weight gain and insulin resistance. The results from our study indicated that these Npc1(+/-) mice were susceptible to increased weight gain characterized by increased whole body and abdominal adiposity, adipocyte hypertrophy and hepatic steatosis in the absence of hyperphagia. Moreover, these Npc1(+/-) mice developed abnormal metabolic features characterized by impaired fasting glucose, glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinemia, hyperleptinemia and dyslipidemia marked by an increased concentration of cholesterol and triacylglycerol associated with low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein. The overall results are consistent with a unique Npc1 gene-diet interaction that promotes both weight gain and metabolic features associated with insulin resistance. Therefore, the NPC1 gene now represents a previously unrecognized gene involved in maintaining energy and metabolic homeostasis that will contribute to our understanding concerning the current global epidemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  13. Effects of dietary polyphenols on metabolic syndrome features in humans: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Amiot, M J; Riva, C; Vinet, A

    2016-07-01

    Dietary polyphenols constitute a large family of bioactive substances potential beneficial effect on metabolic syndrome (MetS). This review summarizes the results of clinical studies on patients with MetS involving the chronic supplementation of a polyphenol-rich diet, foods, extracts or with single phenolics on the features of MetS (obesity, dyslipidemia, blood pressure and glycaemia) and associated complications (oxidative stress and inflammation). Polyphenols were shown to be efficient, especially at higher doses, and there were no specific foods or extracts able to alleviate all the features of MetS. Green tea, however, significantly reduced body mass index and waist circumference and improved lipid metabolism. Cocoa supplementation reduced blood pressure and blood glucose. Soy isoflavones, citrus products, hesperidin and quercetin improved lipid metabolism, whereas cinnamon reduced blood glucose. In numerous clinical studies, antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects were not significant after polyphenol supplementation in patients with MetS. However, some trials pointed towards an improvement of endothelial function in patients supplemented with cocoa, anthocyanin-rich berries, hesperidin or resveratrol. Therefore, diets rich in polyphenols, such as the Mediterranean diet, which promote the consumption of diverse polyphenol-rich products could be an effective nutritional strategy to improve the health of patients with MetS. © 2016 The Authors. Obesity Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of World Obesity.

  14. Lowered circulating aspartate is a metabolic feature of human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guoxiang; Zhou, Bingsen; Zhao, Aihua; Qiu, Yunping; Zhao, Xueqing; Garmire, Lana; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Yu, Herbert; Yen, Yun; Jia, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Distinct metabolic transformation is essential for cancer cells to sustain a high rate of proliferation and resist cell death signals. Such a metabolic transformation results in unique cellular metabolic phenotypes that are often reflected by distinct metabolite signatures in tumor tissues as well as circulating blood. Using a metabolomics platform, we find that breast cancer is associated with significantly (p = 6.27E-13) lowered plasma aspartate levels in a training group comprising 35 breast cancer patients and 35 controls. The result was validated with 103 plasma samples and 183 serum samples of two groups of primary breast cancer patients. Such a lowered aspartate level is specific to breast cancer as it has shown 0% sensitivity in serum from gastric (n = 114) and colorectal (n = 101) cancer patients. There was a significantly higher level of aspartate in breast cancer tissues (n = 20) than in adjacent non-tumor tissues, and in MCF-7 breast cancer cell line than in MCF-10A cell lines, suggesting that the depleted level of aspartate in blood of breast cancer patients is due to increased tumor aspartate utilization. Together, these findings suggest that lowed circulating aspartate is a key metabolic feature of human breast cancer. PMID:26452258

  15. Cerebral metabolic rate for glucose during the first six months of life: an FDG positron emission tomography study.

    PubMed Central

    Kinnala, A.; Suhonen-Polvi, H.; Aärimaa, T.; Kero, P.; Korvenranta, H.; Ruotsalainen, U.; Bergman, J.; Haaparanta, M.; Solin, O.; Nuutila, P.; Wegelius, U.

    1996-01-01

    AIM: To measure the local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (LCMRGlc) in neonatal brains during maturation using positron emission tomography (PET) and 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG). METHODS: Twenty infants were studied using PET during the neonatal period. The postconceptional age ranged from 32.7 to 60.3 weeks. All infants had normal neurodevelopment and were normoglycaemic. The development of the infants was carefully evaluated (follow up 12-36 months) clinically, and by using a method based on Gesell Amatruda's developmental diagnosis. LCMRGlc was quantitated using PET derived from FDG kinetics and calculated in the whole brain and for regional brain structures. RESULTS: LCMRGlc for various cortical brain regions and the basal ganglia was low at birth (from 4 to 16 mumol/100 g/minute). In infants 2 months of age and younger LCMRGlc was highest in the sensorimotor cortex, thalamus, and brain stem. By 5 months, LCMRGlc had increased in the frontal, parietal, temporal, occipital and cerebellar cortical regions. In general, the whole brain LCMRGlc correlated with postconceptional age (r = 0.90; P < 0.001). The change in the glucose metabolic pattern observed in the neonatal brain reflects the functional maturation of these brain regions. CONCLUSION: These findings show that LCMRGlc in infants increases with maturation. Accordingly, when LCMRGlc is measured during infancy, the postconceptional age has to be taken into account when interpretating the results. Images Figure 1 PMID:8777676

  16. Effects of Aging on Cerebral Blood Flow, Oxygen Metabolism, and Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent Responses to Visual Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ances, Beau M.; Liang, Christine L.; Leontiev, Oleg; Perthen, Joanna E.; Fleisher, Adam S.; Lansing, Amy E.; Buxton, Richard B.

    2010-01-01

    Calibrated functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides a noninvasive technique to assess functional metabolic changes associated with normal aging. We simultaneously measured both the magnitude of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) responses in the visual cortex for separate conditions of mild hypercapnia (5% CO2) and a simple checkerboard stimulus in healthy younger (n = 10, mean: 28-years-old) and older (n = 10, mean: 53-years-old) adults. From these data we derived baseline CBF, the BOLD scaling parameter M, the fractional change in the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO2) with activation, and the coupling ratio n of the fractional changes in CBF and CMRO2. For the functional activation paradigm, the magnitude of the BOLD response was significantly lower for the older group (0.57 ± 0.07%) compared to the younger group (0.95 ± 0.14%), despite the finding that the fractional CBF and CMRO2 changes were similar for both groups. The weaker BOLD response for the older group was due to a reduction in the parameter M, which was significantly lower for older (4.6 ± 0.4%) than younger subjects (6.5 ± 0.8%), most likely reflecting a reduction in baseline CBF for older (41.7 ± 4.8 mL/100 mL/min) compared to younger (59.6 ± 9.1 mL/100 mL/min) subjects. In addition to these primary responses, for both groups the BOLD response exhibited a post-stimulus undershoot with no significant difference in this magnitude. However, the post-undershoot period of the CBF response was significantly greater for older compared to younger subjects. We conclude that when comparing two populations, the BOLD response can provide misleading reflections of underlying physiological changes. A calibrated approach provides a more quantitative reflection of underlying metabolic changes than the BOLD response alone. PMID:18465743

  17. Blast Overpressure Waves Induce Transient Anxiety and Regional Changes in Cerebral Glucose Metabolism and Delayed Hyperarousal in Rats.

    PubMed

    Awwad, Hibah O; Gonzalez, Larry P; Tompkins, Paul; Lerner, Megan; Brackett, Daniel J; Awasthi, Vibhudutta; Standifer, Kelly M

    2015-01-01

    Physiological alterations, anxiety, and cognitive disorders are strongly associated with blast-induced traumatic brain injury (blast TBI), and are common symptoms in service personnel exposed to blasts. Since 2006, 25,000-30,000 new TBI cases are diagnosed annually in U.S. Service members; increasing evidence confirms that primary blast exposure causes diffuse axonal injury and is often accompanied by altered behavioral outcomes. Behavioral and acute metabolic effects resulting from blast to the head in the absence of thoracic contributions from the periphery were examined, following a single blast wave directed to the head of male Sprague-Dawley rats protected by a lead shield over the torso. An 80 psi head blast produced cognitive deficits that were detected in working memory. Blast TBI rats displayed increased anxiety as determined by elevated plus maze at day 9 post-blast compared to sham rats; blast TBI rats spent significantly more time than the sham controls in the closed arms (p < 0.05; n = 8-11). Interestingly, anxiety symptoms were absent at days 22 and 48 post-blast. Instead, blast TBI rats displayed increased rearing behavior at day 48 post-blast compared to sham rats. Blast TBI rats also exhibited suppressed acoustic startle responses, but similar pre-pulse inhibition at day 15 post-blast compared to sham rats. Acute physiological alterations in cerebral glucose metabolism were determined by positron emission tomography 1 and 9 days post-blast using (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG). Global glucose uptake in blast TBI rat brains increased at day 1 post-blast (p < 0.05; n = 4-6) and returned to sham levels by day 9. Our results indicate a transient increase in cerebral metabolism following a blast injury. Markers for reactive astrogliosis and neuronal damage were noted by immunoblotting motor cortex tissue from day 10 post-blast in blast TBI rats compared to sham controls (p < 0.05; n = 5-6).

  18. Sleep-Wake Differences in Relative Regional Cerebral Metabolic Rate for Glucose among Patients with Insomnia Compared with Good Sleepers

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Daniel B.; Karim, Helmet T.; Soehner, Adriane M.; Hasler, Brant P.; Wilckens, Kristine A.; James, Jeffrey A.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Price, Julie C.; Rosario, Bedda L.; Kupfer, David J.; Germain, Anne; Hall, Martica H.; Franzen, Peter L.; Nofzinger, Eric A.; Buysse, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: The neurobiological mechanisms of insomnia may involve altered patterns of activation across sleep-wake states in brain regions associated with cognition, self-referential processes, affect, and sleep-wake promotion. The objective of this study was to compare relative regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRglc) in these brain regions across wake and nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep states in patients with primary insomnia (PI) and good sleeper controls (GS). Methods: Participants included 44 PI and 40 GS matched for age (mean = 37 y old, range 21–60), sex, and race. We conducted [18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography scans in PI and GS during both morning wakefulness and NREM sleep at night. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to test for group (PI vs. GS) by state (wake vs. NREM sleep) interactions in relative rCMRglc. Results: Significant group-by-state interactions in relative rCMRglc were found in the precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex, left middle frontal gyrus, left inferior/superior parietal lobules, left lingual/fusiform/occipital gyri, and right lingual gyrus. All clusters were significant at Pcorrected < 0.05. Conclusions: Insomnia was characterized by regional alterations in relative glucose metabolism across NREM sleep and wakefulness. Significant group-by-state interactions in relative rCMRglc suggest that insomnia is associated with impaired disengagement of brain regions involved in cognition (left frontoparietal), self-referential processes (precuneus/posterior cingulate), and affect (left middle frontal, fusiform/lingual gyri) during NREM sleep, or alternatively, to impaired engagement of these regions during wakefulness. Citation: Kay DB, Karim HT, Soehner AM, Hasler BP, Wilckens KA, James JA, Aizenstein HJ, Price JC, Rosario BL, Kupfer DJ, Germain A, Hall MH, Franzen PL, Nofzinger EA, Buysse DJ. Sleep-wake differences in relative regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose among

  19. [Relationship between spot urine pH and number of metabolic syndrome features].

    PubMed

    Yamanishi, Hachiro

    2014-07-01

    A significant inverse relationship between the 24-hour urine pH and number of metabolic syndrome (MS) features(BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2, circumference > 88cm, HDL-cholesterol < 50mg/dL, etc.) was identified in individuals, which means that 24-hour urine pH values decrease with an increasing number of MS features. In this respect, we examined the association between the number of MS features and spot urine pH instead of 24-hour urine pH. A positive relationship was observed between the spot urine pH and number of MS features by analysis of covariance, with the age, gender, and eGFR as covariates. On the other hand, a high level of serum uric acid (UA) indicated a significantly lower spot urine pH compared with a normal level of UA. Serum UA was a significant independent variable explaining the decrease of the urine pH. The results of path analysis showed that UA had negative effects on the number of MS features and urine pH. Therefore, a positive relationship between the number of MS features and urine pH will be a spurious correlation with UA as a confounding factor. In addition, the negative relationship between the number of MS features and UA was also a spurious correlation with age as a confounding factor. From these results, the serum UA level should be considered to evaluate the relationship between the number of MS features and spot urine pH.

  20. Greater left cerebral hemispheric metabolism in bulimia assessed by positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.C.; Hagman, J.; Buchsbaum, M.S.; Blinder, B.; Derrfler, M.; Tai, W.Y.; Hazlett, E.; Sicotte, N. )

    1990-03-01

    Eight women with bulimia and eight age- and sex-matched normal control subjects were studied with positron emission tomography using (18F)-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) as a tracer of brain metabolic rate. Subjects performed a visual vigilance task during FDG uptake. In control subjects, the metabolic rate was higher in the right hemisphere than in the left, but patients with bulimia did not have this normal asymmetry. Lower metabolic rates in the basal ganglia, found in studies of depressed subjects, and higher rates in the basal ganglia, reported in a study of anorexia nervosa, were not found. This is consistent with the suggestion that bulimia is a diagnostic grouping distinct from these disorders.

  1. Circulatory and metabolic aspects of cerebral ischemia in experimental animals and in men.

    PubMed

    Fieschi, C; Battistini, N; Lenzi, G L

    1978-01-01

    In normal conditions, there is a precise link between regional metabolism and blood flow in the brain. In pathological states there may be an uncoupling between CBF and metabolism, due to many mechanisms. In particular, anaerobic glycolisis, membrane depolarization, and altered neurotransmitter release are relevant for the final damage of the tissue. Postischemic recovery was analyzed in experiments with 14C-deoxyglucose. In men, the noninvasive approach with 15O by inhalation allowed the determination of regional oxygen utilization. In TIAs, there is a chronic ischemic condition, while in strokes there is often a relative luxury perfusion.

  2. Stability of regional cerebral glucose metabolism in the normal brain measured by positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, J.L.; Strother, S.C.; Zatorre, R.J.; Alivisatos, B.; Worsley, K.J.; Diksic, M.; Yamamoto, Y.L.

    1988-05-01

    Cerebral glucose utilization (LCMRGI) was measured using the (/sup 18/F)fluorodeoxyglucose method with PET in two groups of ten healthy young volunteers, each scanned in a resting state under different methodological conditions. In addition, five subjects had a second scan within 48 hr. Mean hemispheric values averaged 45.8 +/- 3.3 mumol/100 g/min in the right cerebral hemisphere and 47.0 +/- 3.7 mumol/100 g/min in the left hemisphere. A four-way analysis of variance (group, sex, region, hemisphere) was carried out on the results using three different methods of data manipulation: (a) the raw values of glucose utilization, (b) LCMRGI values normalized by the mean hemispheric gray matter LCMRGI value, and (c) log transformed LCMRGI values. For all analysis techniques, significantly higher LCMRGI values were consistently seen in the left mid and posterior temporal area and caudate nucleus relative to the right, and in the right occipital region relative to the left. The coefficient of variation of intrasubject regional differences (9.9%) was significantly smaller than the coefficient of variation for regions between subjects (16.5%). No differences were noted between the sexes and no effect of repeat procedures was seen in subjects having multiple scans. In addition, inter-regional LCMRGI correlations were examined both in values from the 20 normal subjects, as well as in a set of hypothetical abnormal values. Results were compared with those reported from other PET centers; despite certain methodological differences, the intersubject and inter-regional variation of LCMRGI is fairly constant.

  3. Caffeine-induced uncoupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism: a calibrated BOLD fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Perthen, Joanna E; Lansing, Amy E; Liau, Joy; Liu, Thomas T; Buxton, Richard B

    2008-03-01

    Although functional MRI (fMRI) based on blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal changes is a sensitive tool for mapping brain activation, quantitative studies of the physiological effects of pharmacological agents using fMRI alone are difficult to interpret due to the complexities inherent in the BOLD response. Hypercapnia-calibrated BOLD methodology is potentially a more powerful physiological probe of brain function, providing measures of the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)). In this study, we implemented a quantitative R(2)* approach for assessing the BOLD response to improve the stability of repeated measurements, in combination with the calibrated BOLD method, to examine the CBF and CMRO(2) responses to caffeine ingestion. Ten regular caffeine consumers were imaged before and after a 200-mg caffeine dose. A dual-echo arterial spin labeling technique was used to measure CBF and BOLD responses to visual stimulation, caffeine consumption and mild hypercapnia. For a region of interest defined by CBF activation to the visual stimulus, the results were: hypercapnia increased CBF (+46.6%, +/-11.3, mean and standard error), visual stimulation increased both CBF (+47.9%, +/-2.9) and CMRO(2) (+20.7%, +/-1.4), and caffeine decreased CBF (-34.5%, +/-2.6) with a non-significant change in CMRO(2) (+5.2%, +/-6.4). The coupling between CBF and CMRO(2) was significantly different in response to visual stimulation compared to caffeine consumption. A calibrated BOLD methodology using R(2) * is a promising approach for evaluating CBF and CMRO(2) changes in response to pharmacological interventions.

  4. High temporal resolution MRI quantification of global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption in response to apneic challenge.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Zachary B; Jain, Varsha; Englund, Erin K; Langham, Michael C; Wehrli, Felix W

    2013-10-01

    We present a technique for quantifying global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO2) in absolute physiologic units at 3-second temporal resolution and apply the technique to quantify the dynamic CMRO2 response to volitional apnea. Temporal resolution of 3 seconds was achieved via a combination of view sharing and superior sagittal sinus-based estimation of total cerebral blood flow (tCBF) rather than tCBF measurement in the neck arteries. These modifications were first validated in three healthy adults and demonstrated to produce minimal errors in image-derived blood flow and venous oxygen saturation (SvO2) values. The technique was then applied in 10 healthy adults during an apnea paradigm of three repeated 30-second breath-holds. Subject-averaged baseline tCBF, arteriovenous oxygen difference (AVO2D), and CMRO2 were 48.6 ± 7.0 mL/100 g per minute, 29.4 ± 3.4 %HbO2, and 125.1 ± 11.4 μmol/100 g per minute, respectively. Subject-averaged maximum changes in tCBF and AVO2D were 43.5 ± 9.4% and -32.1 ± 5.7%, respectively, resulting in a small (6.0 ± 3.5%) but statistically significant (P=0.00044, two-tailed t-test) increase in average end-apneic CMRO2. This method could be used to investigate neurometabolic-hemodynamic relationships in normal physiology, to better define the biophysical origins of the BOLD signal, and to quantify neurometabolic responsiveness in diseases of altered neurovascular reactivity.

  5. Caffeine induced uncoupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism: A calibrated-BOLD fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Perthen, Joanna E; Lansing, Amy E; Liau, Joy; Liu, Thomas T; Buxton, Richard B

    2009-01-01

    Although functional MRI (fMRI) based on blood oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) signal changes is a sensitive tool for mapping brain activation, quantitative studies of the physiological effects of pharmacological agents using fMRI alone are difficult to interpret due to the complexities inherent in the BOLD response. Hypercapnia calibrated-BOLD methodology is potentially a more powerful physiological probe of brain function, providing measures of the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2). In this study, we implemented a quantitative R2* approach for assessing the BOLD response to improve the stability of repeated measurements, in combination with the calibrated-BOLD method, to examine the CBF and CMRO2 responses to caffeine ingestion. Ten regular caffeine consumers were imaged before and after a 200mg caffeine dose. A dual echo arterial spin labeling technique was used to measure CBF and BOLD responses to visual stimulation, caffeine consumption and mild hypercapnia. For a region of interest defined by CBF activation to the visual stimulus, the results were: hypercapnia increased CBF (+46.6%, ±11.3, mean and standard error), visual stimulation increased both CBF (+47.9%, ±2.9) and CMRO2 (+20.7%, ±1.4), and caffeine decreased CBF (-34.5%, ±2.6) with a non-significant change in CMRO2 (+5.2%, ±6.4). The coupling between CBF and CMRO2 was significantly different in response to visual stimulation compared to caffeine consumption. A calibrated-BOLD methodology using R2* is a promising approach for evaluating CBF and CMRO2 changes in response to pharmacological interventions. PMID:18191583

  6. Intelligence and Changes in Regional Cerebral Glucose Metabolic Rate Following Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haier, Richard J.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A study of eight normal right-handed men demonstrates widespread significant decreases in brain glucose metabolic rate (GMR) following learning a complex computer task, a computer game. Correlations between magnitude of GMR change and intelligence scores are also demonstrated. (SLD)

  7. In vivo imaging of hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism in acute focal cerebral ischemic rats with laser speckle imaging and functional photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zilin; Wang, Zhen; Yang, Xiaoquan; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui

    2012-08-01

    Stroke is a devastating disease. The changes in cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism associated with stroke play an important role in pathophysiology study. But the changes were difficult to describe with a single imaging modality. Here the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and oxygen saturation (SO2) were yielded with laser speckle imaging (LSI) and photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) during and after 3-h acute focal ischemic rats. These hemodynamic measures were further synthesized to deduce the changes in oxygen extraction fraction (OEF). The results indicate that all the hemodynamics except CBV had rapid declines within 40-min occlusion of middle cerebral artery (MCAO). CBV in arteries and veins first increased to the maximum value of 112.42±36.69% and 130.58±31.01% by 15 min MCAO; then all the hemodynamics had a persistent reduction with small fluctuations during the ischemic. When ischemia lasted for 3 h, CBF in arteries, veins decreased to 17±14.65%, 24.52±20.66%, respectively, CBV dropped to 62±18.56% and 59±18.48%. And the absolute SO2 decreased by 40.52±22.42% and 54.24±11.77%. After 180-min MCAO, the changes in hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism were also quantified. The study suggested that combining LSI and PAM provides an attractive approach for stroke detection in small animal studies.

  8. In vivo imaging of hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism in acute focal cerebral ischemic rats with laser speckle imaging and functional photoacoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zilin; Wang, Zhen; Yang, Xiaoquan; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui

    2012-08-01

    Stroke is a devastating disease. The changes in cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism associated with stroke play an important role in pathophysiology study. But the changes were difficult to describe with a single imaging modality. Here the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and oxygen saturation (SO2) were yielded with laser speckle imaging (LSI) and photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) during and after 3-h acute focal ischemic rats. These hemodynamic measures were further synthesized to deduce the changes in oxygen extraction fraction (OEF). The results indicate that all the hemodynamics except CBV had rapid declines within 40-min occlusion of middle cerebral artery (MCAO). CBV in arteries and veins first increased to the maximum value of 112.42 ± 36.69% and 130.58 ± 31.01% by 15 min MCAO; then all the hemodynamics had a persistent reduction with small fluctuations during the ischemic. When ischemia lasted for 3 h, CBF in arteries, veins decreased to 17 ± 14.65%, 24.52 ± 20.66%, respectively, CBV dropped to 62 ± 18.56% and 59 ± 18.48%. And the absolute SO2 decreased by 40.52 ± 22.42% and 54.24 ± 11.77%. After 180-min MCAO, the changes in hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism were also quantified. The study suggested that combining LSI and PAM provides an attractive approach for stroke detection in small animal studies.

  9. Comparative genomics of three Methanocellales strains reveal novel taxonomic and metabolic features.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Zhe; Lu, Yahai

    2015-06-01

    Methanocellales represents a new order of methanogens, which is widespread in environments and plays specifically the important role in methane emissions from paddy fields. To gain more insights into Methanocellales, comparative genomic studies were performed among three Methanocellales strains through the same annotation pipeline. Genetic relationships among strains revealed by genome alignment, pan-genome reconstruction and comparison of amino average identity suggest that they should be classified in different genera. In addition, multiple copies of cell cycle regulator proteins were identified for the first time in Archaea. Core metabolisms were reconstructed, predicting certain unique and novel features for Methanocellales, including a set of methanogenesis genes potentially organized toward specialization in utilizing low concentrations of H2, a new route of disulfide reduction catalysed by a disulfide-reducing hydrogenase (Drh) complex phylogenetically related to sulfate-reducing prokaryotes, an oxidative tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, a sophisticated nitrogen uptake and regulation system as well as a versatile sulfur utilization system. These core metabolisms are largely conserved among the three strains, but differences in gene copy number and metabolic diversity are evident. The present study thus adds new dimensions to the unique ecophysiology of Methanocellales and offers a road map for further experimental characterization of this methanogen lineage.

  10. Differentiated effect of ageing on the enzymes of Krebs' cycle, electron transfer complexes and glutamate metabolism of non-synaptic and intra-synaptic mitochondria from cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Villa, R F; Gorini, A; Hoyer, S

    2006-11-01

    The effect of ageing on the activity of enzymes linked to Krebs' cycle, electron transfer chain and glutamate metabolism was studied in three different types of mitochondria of cerebral cortex of 1-year old and 2-year old male Wistar rats. We assessed the maximum rate (V(max)) of the mitochondrial enzyme activities in non-synaptic perikaryal mitochondria, and in two populations of intra-synaptic mitochondria. The results indicated that: (i) in normal, steady-state cerebral cortex the values of the catalytic activities of the enzymes markedly differed in the various populations of mitochondria; (ii) in intra-synaptic mitochondria, ageing affected the catalytic properties of the enzymes linked to Krebs' cycle, electron transfer chain and glutamate metabolism; (iii) these changes were more evident in intra-synaptic "heavy" than "light" mitochondria. These results indicate a different age-related vulnerability of subpopulations of mitochondria in vivo located into synapses than non-synaptic ones.

  11. Eszopiclone and Dexmedetomidine Depress Ventilation in Obese Rats with Features of Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Filbey, William A.; Sanford, David T.; Baghdoyan, Helen A.; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Lydic, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obesity alters the therapeutic window of sedative/hypnotic drugs and increases the probability of respiratory complications. The current experiments used an established rodent model of obesity to test the hypothesis that the sedative/hypnotic drugs eszopiclone and dexmedetomidine alter ventilation differentially in obese rats compared with lean/fit rats. Design: This study used a within-groups/between-groups experimental design. Setting: University of Michigan. Participants: Experiments were conducted using lean/fit rats (n = 21) and obese rats (n = 21) that have features of metabolic syndrome. Interventions: Breathing was measured with whole-body plethysmography after systemic administration of vehicle (control), the nonbenzodiazepine, benzodiazepine site agonist eszopiclone, or the alpha-2 adrenergic receptor agonist dexmedetomidine. Measurements and Results: Data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and appropriate post hoc comparisons. At baseline, the obese/metabolic syndrome rats had increased respiratory rates (21.6%), lower tidal volumes/body weight (-24.1%), and no differences in minute ventilation compared to lean/fit rats. In the obese rats, respiratory rate was decreased by dexmedetomidine (-29%), but not eszopiclone. In the lean and the obese rats, eszopiclone decreased tidal volume (-12%). Both sedative/hypnotic drugs caused a greater decrease in minute ventilation in the obese (-26.3%) than lean (-18%) rats. Inspiratory flow rate (VT / TI) of the obese rats was decreased by dexmedetomidine (-10.6%) and eszopiclone (-18%). Duty cycle (TI / TTOT) in both rat lines was decreased by dexmedetomidine (-16.5%) but not by eszopiclone. Conclusions: Dexmedetomidine, in contrast to eszopiclone, decreased minute ventilation in the obese/metabolic syndrome rats by depressing both duty cycle and inspiratory flow rate. The results show for the first time that the obese phenotype differentially modulates the respiratory effects of

  12. Positron emission tomographic scan investigations of Huntington's disease: cerebral metabolic correlates of cognitive function

    SciTech Connect

    Berent, S.; Giordani, B.; Lehtinen, S.; Markel, D.; Penney, J.B.; Buchtel, H.A.; Starosta-Rubinstein, S.; Hichwa, R.; Young, A.B.

    1988-06-01

    Fifteen drug-free patients with early to mid-stage Huntington's disease (HD) were evaluated with positron emission tomographic (PET) scans of /sup 18/F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake and quantitative measures of neurological function, learning, memory, and general intelligence. In comparison with a group of normal volunteers, the HD patients showed lower metabolism in both caudate (p less than 0.001) and putamen (p less than 0.001) on PET scans. A significant and positive relationship was found between neuropsychological measures of verbal learning and memory and caudate metabolism in the patient group but not in the normal group. Visual-spatial learning did not reflect a similar pattern, but performance intelligence quotient was positively related to both caudate and putamen metabolism in the HD group. Vocabulary level was unrelated to either brain structure. Discussion focuses on these and other observed brain-behavior relationships and on the implications of these findings for general behaviors such as those involved in coping and adaptation.

  13. Altered cerebral glucose metabolism in an animal model of diabetes insipidus: a micro-PET study.

    PubMed

    Idbaih, Ahmed; Burlet, Arlette; Adle-Biassette, Homa; Boisgard, Raphaël; Coulon, Christine; Paris, Sophie; Marie, Yannick; Donadieu, Jean; Hoang-Xuan, Khê; Ribeiro, Maria-Joao

    2007-07-16

    The Brattleboro rat is an animal model of genetically induced central diabetes insipidus. These rats show cognitive and behavioral disorders, but no neurodegenerative disease has been observed. We studied brain glucose uptake, a marker of neuronal activity, in 6 Brattleboro rats, in comparison with 6 matched Long-Evans (LE) control rats. A group of 3 Brattleboro rats and 3 Long-Evans rats was studied in vivo and another group of animals was studied ex vivo. In vivo studies were performed using fluorodeoxyglucose labeled with fluorine 18 ((18)F-FDG) and a dedicated small-animal PET device. At 30 min and 60 min p.i., (18)F-FDG uptake was significantly higher in the frontal cortex, striatum, thalamus and cerebellum of Brattleboro rats than in LE rats when measured by PET in vivo (p<0.05), but only a trend towards higher values was found ex vivo. Our results show for the first time that brain glucose metabolism is modified in Brattleboro rats. This altered brain glucose metabolism in Brattleboro rats may be related to the observed cognitive and behavioral disorders. Functional analyses of brain metabolism are promising to investigate cognitive behavioral disturbances observed in Brattleboro rats and their link to diabetes insipidus.

  14. Cerebral toxoplasmosis in HIV-positive patients in Brazil: clinical features and predictors of treatment response in the HAART era.

    PubMed

    Vidal, José E; Hernandez, Adrian V; de Oliveira, Augusto C Penalva; Dauar, Rafi F; Barbosa, Silas Pereira; Focaccia, Roberto

    2005-10-01

    A prospective study of 55 confirmed or presumptive cases of cerebral toxoplasmosis in HIV positive patients in Brazil was performed to describe clinical characteristics and to identify predictive factors for clinical response to the anti-Toxoplasma treatment. Cerebral toxoplasmosis led to the diagnosis of HIV infection in 19 (35%) patients, whereas it was the AIDS defining disease in 41 (75%) patients. Of these, 22 (54%) patients were previously know to be HIV-positive. At diagnosis of cerebral toxoplasmosis, only 4 (7%) patients were on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), and 6 (11%) were receiving primary cerebral toxoplasmosis prophylaxis. The mean CD4+ cell count was 64.2 (+/- 69.1) cells per microliter. Forty-nine patients (78%) showed alterations consistent with toxoplasmosis on brain computed tomography. At 6 weeks of treatment, 23 (42%) patients had complete clinical response, 25 (46%) partial response, and 7 (13%) died. Alteration of consciousness, Karnofsky score less than 70, psychomotor slowing, hemoglobin less than 12 mg/dL, mental confusion, Glasgow Coma Scale less than 12 were the main predictors of partial clinical response. All patients were placed on HAART within the first 4 weeks of diagnosis of cerebral toxoplasmosis. One year after the diagnosis, all available patients were on HAART and toxoplasmosis prophylaxis, and only 2 patients had relapse of cerebral toxoplasmosis. In Brazilian patients with AIDS, cerebral toxoplasmosis mainly occurs as an AIDS-defining disease, and causes significant morbidity and mortality. Signs of neurologic deterioration predict an unfavorable response to the treatment. Early start of HAART seems to be related to better survival and less relapses.

  15. Regional cerebral metabolic alterations in dementia of the Alzheimer type: positron emission tomography with (/sup 18/F)fluorodeoxyglucose

    SciTech Connect

    Friedland, R.P.; Budinger, T.F.; Ganz, E.; Yano, Y.; Mathis, C.A.; Koss, B.; Ober, B.A.; Huesman, R.H.; Derenzo, S.E.

    1983-08-01

    Alzheimer disease is the most common cause of dementia in adults. Despite recent advances in our understanding of its anatomy and chemistry, we remain largely ignorant of its pathogenesis, physiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Dynamic positron emission tomography using (/sup 18/F)fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was performed on the Donner 280-crystal ring in 10 subjects with dementia of the Alzheimer type and six healthy age-matched controls. Ratios comparing mean counts per resolution element in frontal, temporoparietal, and entire cortex regions in brain sections 10 mm thick obtained 40-70 min following FDG injection showed relatively less FDG uptake in the temporoparietal cortex bilaterally in all the Alzheimer subjects (p less than 0.01). Left-right alterations were less prominent than the anteroposterior changes. This diminished uptake was due to lowered rates of FDG use and suggests that the metabolic effects of Alzheimer disease are most concentrated in the temporoparietal cortex. Positron emission tomography is a most powerful tool for the noninvasive in vivo assessment of cerebral pathophysiology in dementia.

  16. Selective alterations in cerebral metabolism within the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic system produced by acute cocaine administration in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Porrino, L.J.; Domer, F.R.; Crane, A.M.; Sokoloff, L.

    1988-05-01

    The 2-(/sup 14/C)deoxyglucose method was used to examine the effects of acute intravenous administration of cocaine on local cerebral glucose utilization in rats. These effects were correlated with the effects of cocaine on locomotor activity assessed simultaneously in the same animals. At the lowest dose of cocaine, 0.5 mg/kg (1.47 mumol/kg), alterations in glucose utilization were restricted to the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. Metabolic activity at 1.0 mg/kg (2.9 mumol/kg) was altered in these structures, but in the substantia nigra reticulata and lateral habenula as well. The selectivity of cocaine's effects at low doses demonstrates the particular sensitivity of these structures to cocaine's actions in the brain. In contrast, 5.0 mg/kg (14.7 mumol/kg) produced widespread changes in glucose utilization, particularly in the extrapyramidal system. Only this dose significantly increased locomotor activity above levels in vehicle-treated controls. Rates of glucose utilization were positively correlated with locomotor activity in the globus pallidus, substantia nigra reticulata, and subthalamic nucleus, and negatively correlated in the lateral habenula.

  17. [Effect of disulfiram on energy metabolism (redox potential shift) coupled to paradoxical sleep episodes in rat cerebral cortex].

    PubMed

    Shvets-Ténéta-Guriĭ, T B; Dubinin, A G; Troshin, G I

    2012-01-01

    Disulfiram (DS) is widely used to treat patients with chronic alcoholism. DS treatment multiplies PS episodes. In this work, DS effect on the number of PS episodes and on the energy metabolism changes in the cerebral cortex (coupled to PS episodes) was investigated for the first time in rats. Polygraphic recording of the redox potential E (with platinum electrodes implanted in several cortical sites), electrocorticogram, neck electromyogram, and general motor activity were made in sleep-wake cycles. Rats received DS (100 mg/kg) with meals for two nights, after which the number of PS episodes increased almost twice during two subsequent sessions (prior to receiving DS). This was evidence of an increase in PS pressure coupled to a decrease of norepinephrine level in the brain. DS also evoked sharp decrease in the amount of the positive E shifts related to PS, which were replaced by the negative E shifts or by the two-phase E shifts (negative-positive waves). The absolute mean amplitude decreased both for the positive E shifts and the negative E shifts. These findings demonstrate prevailing glycolytic compartment as a source of fuel supporting PS and the inhibition in all brain energetic compartments. The data presented well agree with the conception that glycolysis becomes the main source for the brain activity under pathology conditions.

  18. Regulation of cerebral CYP2D alters tramadol metabolism in the brain: interactions of tramadol with propranolol and nicotine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiaoli; Han, Xiaotong; Li, Jian; Gao, Xinghui; Wang, Yan; Liu, Mingzhou; Dong, Guicheng; Yue, Jiang

    2015-04-01

    1. Cytochrome P450 2D (CYP2D) protein is widely expressed across brain regions in human and rodents. We investigated the interactions between tramadol, a clinically used analgesic, and brain CYP2D regulators, by establishing concentration-time curves of tramadol and O-desmethyltramadol (M1) in rat cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma, as well as by analyzing the analgesia-time course of tramadol. 2. Propranolol (20 μg, intracerebroventricular injection), CYP2D inhibitor, prolonged the elimination t1/2 of tramadol (40 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection) in the CSF; meanwhile, lower Cmax and AUC0-∞ values of M1 were observed. Nicotine (1 mg base/kg, subcutaneous injection, seven days), brain CYP2D inducer, induced a shorter Tmax and elevated Cmax of M1 in CSF. No differences in the peripheral metabolism of tramadol were observed following propranolol and nicotine pretreatment. Nicotine increased areas under the analgesia-time curve (AUC) for 0-45 min and 0-90 min of tramadol, which was attenuated by propranolol administration. The analgesic actions of tramadol positively correlated with cerebral M1 concentration. 3. The results suggest that the regulation of brain CYP2D by xenobiotics may cause drug-drug interactions (DDIs) of tramadol. Brain CYPs may play an important role in DDIs of centrally active substances.

  19. Application of the ''bootstrap'' technique to understanding cerebral interregional metabolic relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Metter, E.J.; Riege, W.H.; Kuhl, D.E.; Phelps, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    The authors' previous studies using (F18)-flourodeoxyglucose with positron computed tomography examined region to region metabolic correlations in (1) normal subjects, (2) normal elderly versus younger individuals, and (3) Alzheimer's, Huntington's and Parkinson's Diseases. Variations in the correlation matrices suggested differences in how brain regions function together. An alternative explanation was that the distribution of each matrix was not distinctly different, and the observations represented variations from the same distribution. To examine this tissue, the authors focused on the observation of differences in the total number of reliable correlations (i.e. correlations with r representing a p .01 uncorrected for the number of correlations) between the groups. For example in Parkinson Disease a total of 12 reliable correlations were found, as compared to 34 in Alzheimer's Disease. Four groups were compared including normal elderly, normal young, Alzheimer and Parkinson's Diseases. For each group, random samples were drawn from the studied subjects, and correlation matrices were calculated from the new samples. 508 matrices were calculated for the two normal groups, and 1016 were calculated for the Alzheimer's and Parkinson's groups. The total number of reliable correlations were counted for each matrix and the distribution of these counts were examined. Distinct differences were found in the mean, median and mode for each group. In particular, Parkinson's Disease peaked the earliest of the four groups, while Alzheimer's peaked the latest. The findings demonstrated that the metabolic data for each group were derived from different populations.

  20. Cerebral energy metabolism and the brain's functional network architecture: an integrative review

    PubMed Central

    Lord, Louis-David; Expert, Paul; Huckins, Jeremy F; Turkheimer, Federico E

    2013-01-01

    Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have emphasized the contributions of synchronized activity in distributed brain networks to cognitive processes in both health and disease. The brain's ‘functional connectivity' is typically estimated from correlations in the activity time series of anatomically remote areas, and postulated to reflect information flow between neuronal populations. Although the topological properties of functional brain networks have been studied extensively, considerably less is known regarding the neurophysiological and biochemical factors underlying the temporal coordination of large neuronal ensembles. In this review, we highlight the critical contributions of high-frequency electrical oscillations in the γ-band (30 to 100 Hz) to the emergence of functional brain networks. After describing the neurobiological substrates of γ-band dynamics, we specifically discuss the elevated energy requirements of high-frequency neural oscillations, which represent a mechanistic link between the functional connectivity of brain regions and their respective metabolic demands. Experimental evidence is presented for the high oxygen and glucose consumption, and strong mitochondrial performance required to support rhythmic cortical activity in the γ-band. Finally, the implications of mitochondrial impairments and deficits in glucose metabolism for cognition and behavior are discussed in the context of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative syndromes characterized by large-scale changes in the organization of functional brain networks. PMID:23756687

  1. Effect of ageing and ischemia on enzymatic activities linked to Krebs' cycle, electron transfer chain, glutamate and aminoacids metabolism of free and intrasynaptic mitochondria of cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Villa, Roberto Federico; Gorini, Antonella; Hoyer, Siegfried

    2009-12-01

    The effect of ageing and the relationships between the catalytic properties of enzymes linked to Krebs' cycle, electron transfer chain, glutamate and aminoacid metabolism of cerebral cortex, a functional area very sensitive to both age and ischemia, were studied on mitochondria of adult and aged rats, after complete ischemia of 15 minutes duration. The maximum rate (Vmax) of the following enzyme activities: citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase for Krebs' cycle; NADH-cytochrome c reductase as total (integrated activity of Complex I-III), rotenone sensitive (Complex I) and cytochrome oxidase (Complex IV) for electron transfer chain; glutamate dehydrogenase, glutamate-oxaloacetate-and glutamate-pyruvate transaminases for glutamate metabolism were assayed in non-synaptic, perikaryal mitochondria and in two populations of intra-synaptic mitochondria, i.e., the light and heavy mitochondrial fraction. The results indicate that in normal, steady-state cerebral cortex, the value of the same enzyme activity markedly differs according (a) to the different populations of mitochondria, i.e., non-synaptic or intra-synaptic light and heavy, (b) and respect to ageing. After 15 min of complete ischemia, the enzyme activities of mitochondria located near the nucleus (perikaryal mitochondria) and in synaptic structures (intra-synaptic mitochondria) of the cerebral tissue were substantially modified by ischemia. Non-synaptic mitochondria seem to be more affected by ischemia in adult and particularly in aged animals than the intra-synaptic light and heavy mitochondria. The observed modifications in enzyme activities reflect the metabolic state of the tissue at each specific experimental condition, as shown by comparative evaluation with respect to the content of energy-linked metabolites and substrates. The derangements in enzyme activities due to ischemia is greater in aged than in adult animals and especially the non-synaptic and the intra-synaptic light

  2. Preoperative differences of cerebral metabolism relate to the outcome of cochlear implants in congenitally deaf children.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyo Jeong; Kang, Eunjoo; Oh, Seung-Ha; Kang, Hyejin; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Myung Chul; Kim, Chong-Sun

    2005-05-01

    In congenitally deaf children, chronological age is generally accepted as a critical factor that affects successful rehabilitation following cochlear implantation (CI). However, a wide variance among patients is known to exist regardless of the age at CI [Sarant, J.Z., Blamey, P.J., Dowell, R.C., Clark, G.M., Gibson, W.P., 2001. Variation in speech perception scores among children with cochlear implants. Ear Hear. 22, 18-28]. In a previous study, we reported that prelingually deaf children in the age range 5-7 years at implantation showed greatest outcome variability [Oh S.H., Kim C.S., Kang E.J., Lee D.S., Lee H.J., Chang S.O., Ahn S.H., Hwang C.H., Park H.J., Koo J.W., 2003. Speech perception after cochlear implantation over a 4-year time period. Acta Otolaryngol. 123, 148-153]. Eleven children who underwent CI between the age of 5 and 7 1/2 years were subdivided into a good (above 65%: GOOD) and a poor (below 45%: POOR) group based on the performance in a speech perception test given 2 years after CI. The preoperative (18)F-FDG-PET (F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography) images were compared between the two groups in order to examine if regional glucose metabolic difference preexisted before the CI surgery. In the GOOD group, metabolic activity was greater in diverse fronto-parietal regions compared to the POOR group. In the POOR group, the regions related to the ventral visual pathway showed greater metabolic activity relative to the GOOD group. These findings suggest that the deaf children who had developed greater executive and visuospatial functions subserved by the prefrontal and parietal cortices might be successful in auditory language learning after CI. On the contrary, greater dependency on the visual function subserved by the occipito-temporal region due to auditory deprivation may interfere with acquisition of auditory language after CI.

  3. Correlation Between Cerebral Atrophy and Texture Features in Alzheimer-type Dementia Brains: A 3-Year Follow-up MRI Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Naoki; Takeuchi, Hiroshi

    We assessed relationships between six texture features and changes in atrophy of the cerebral parenchyma, the hippocampus, and the parahippocampal gyrus in the Alzheimer-type dementia (ATD) brain to determine whether or not the features reflect cerebral atrophy in ATD patients. The subjects of this study were 10 ATD patients, and underwent an magnetic resonanse imaging test of the head annually for at least 3 consecutive years. They consisted of three men and seven women, with a mean age of 71.4 ± 6.7 years. The results of study, the mean run length nonuniformity (RLN), angular second moment (ASM), and contrast (CON) increased with time, whereas the mean gray level nonuniformity (GLN), run percentage (RPC), and entropy (ENT) decreased with time. There was a statistically significant correlation between brain-intracranial area ratio (BIR) and GLN (p = 0.039), between BIR and ASM (p = 0.011), and between BIR and ENT (p = 0.023) as well as between parahippocampal-intracranial area ratio and GLN (p = 0.049). These results indicate that the six texture features were shown to reflect gray matter atrophy associated with ATD and to change with the progress of the disease. Although the course of ATD can be followed up by measuring a hippocampal area or volume and determining a decrease in the area or volume, texture features should be a more effective instrument for identifying the progress of ATD.

  4. Inhibition of energy metabolism by 2-methylacetoacetate and 2-methyl-3-hydroxybutyrate in cerebral cortex of developing rats.

    PubMed

    Rosa, R B; Schuck, P F; de Assis, D R; Latini, A; Dalcin, K B; Ribeiro, C A J; da C Ferreira, G; Maria, R C; Leipnitz, G; Perry, M L S; Filho, C S Dutra; Wyse, A T S; Wannmacher, C M D; Wajner, M

    2005-01-01

    Mitochondrial beta-ketothiolase and 2-methyl-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase (MHBD) deficiencies are inherited neurometabolic disorders affecting isoleucine catabolism. Biochemically, beta-ketothiolase deficiency is characterized by intermittent ketoacidosis and urinary excretion of 2-methyl-acetoacetate (MAA), 2-methyl-3-hydroxybutyrate (MHB) and tiglylglycine (TG), whereas in MHBD deficiency only MHB and tiglylglycine accumulate. Lactic acid accumulation and excretion are also observed in these patients, being more pronounced in MHBD-deficient individuals, particularly during acute episodes of decompensation. Patients affected by MHBD deficiency usually manifest severe mental retardation and convulsions, whereas beta-ketothiolase-deficient patients present encephalopathic crises characterized by metabolic acidosis, vomiting and coma. Considering that the pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for the neurological alterations of these disorders are unknown and that lactic acidosis suggests an impairment of energy production, the objective of the present work was to investigate the in vitro effect of MAA and MHB, at concentrations varying from 0.01 to 1.0 mmol/L, on several parameters of energy metabolism in cerebral cortex from young rats. We observed that MAA markedly inhibited CO2 production from glucose, acetate and citrate at concentrations as low as 0.01 mmol/L. In addition, the activities of the respiratory chain complex II and succinate dehydrogenase were mildly inhibited by MAA. MHB, at 0.01 mmol/L and higher concentrations, strongly inhibited CO2 production from all tested substrates, as well as the respiratory chain complex IV activity. The other activities of the respiratory chain were not affected by these metabolites. The data indicate a marked blockage in the Krebs cycle and a mild inhibition of the respiratory chain caused by MAA and MHB. Furthermore, MHB inhibited total and mitochondrial creatine kinase activities, which was prevented by the

  5. Cyclic nucleotide regulation of inositol lipid metabolism in rat cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Nicchitta, C.V.; Williamson, J.R.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have investigated the effects of compounds known to elevate cAMP levels and/or activate the cAMP dependent protein kinase on resting and stimulated inositol lipid metabolism in rat cortical slices and synaptosomes. In (/sup 3/H)-myo-inositol-labeled brain slices, carbamylcholine-stimulated accumulation of (/sup 3/H)-myo-inositol 1-phosphate (IP/sub 1/) was decreased 50% by forskolin (150..mu..M) isobutylmethylxantihine (IBMX) (1mM), 8-bromo cAMP (5mM) or 8-(4-chlorophenylthio) cAMP (5mM). In studies with synaptosomes, the incorporation of (/sup 32/Pi) into phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PIP), phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP/sub 2/) and phosphatidic acid (PA) was also reduced in the presence of forskolin or the cAMP phosphodiesterase inhibitors IBMX and RO20-1724 (+/-)-4-(3-butoxy-4-methoxybenzyl)-2-imidazolidinone. In the presence of maximally effective concentrations of these agents, steady state PIP levels were reduced by 50% and PIP/sub 2/ and PA levels by 40%. The effects of these compounds on (/sup 32/Pi) labeling of the phosphoinositides and PA are consistent with an inhibition of flux through the inositide cycle, presumably through the action of cAMP. Such an inhibition may account for the reduction in carbamylcholine sensitive IP/sub 1/ accumulation observed in brain slices. These studies indicate that in rat brain, ..beta..-adrenergic stimulation may be involved in modulating the activity of muscarinic cholinergic agonists. This regulation appears to be at the level of inositol lipid metabolism.

  6. Frequency-dependent changes in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen during activation of human visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Vafaee, M S; Meyer, E; Marrett, S; Paus, T; Evans, A C; Gjedde, A

    1999-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that brain oxidative metabolism is significantly increased upon adequate stimulation, we varied the presentation of a visual stimulus to determine the frequency at which the metabolic response would be at maximum. The authors measured regional CMR(O2) in 12 healthy normal volunteers with the ECAT EXACT HR+ (CTI/Siemens, Knoxville, TN, U.S.A.) three-dimensional whole-body positron emission tomograph (PET). In seven successive activating conditions, subjects viewed a yellow-blue annular checkerboard reversing its contrast at frequencies of 0, 1, 4, 8, 16, 32, and 50 Hz. Stimulation began 4 minutes before and continued throughout the 3-minute dynamic scan. In the baseline condition, the subjects began fixating a cross hair 30 seconds before the scan and continued to do so for the duration of the 3-minute scan. At the start of each scan, the subjects inhaled 20 mCi of (15)O-O2 in a single breath. The CMR(O2) value was calculated using a two-compartment, weighted integration method. Normalized PET images were averaged across subjects and coregistered with the subjects' magnetic resonance imaging in stereotaxic space. Mean subtracted image volumes (activation minus baseline) of CMR(O2) then were obtained and converted to z statistic volumes. The authors found a statistically significant focal change of CMR(O2) in the striate cortex (x = 9; y = -89; z = -1) that reached a maximum at 4 Hz and dropped off sharply at higher stimulus frequencies.

  7. Invariant features of metabolic networks: a data analysis application on scaling properties of biochemical pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, Alessandro; Zbilut, Joseph P.; Conti, Filippo; Manetti, Cesare; Miccheli, Alfredo

    2004-06-01

    The network metaphor is currently one of the most common general paradigms in biological sciences: this paradigm spans different scales of definition going from gene regulation to protein-protein interaction studies and metabolic regulation networks. Generally, the networks are defined by the nature of the connected elements (nodes) and their relative relations (edges). In this paper we demonstrate how the same biochemical regulation network can assume different shapes in terms of both constituting elements and intervening relations while remaining recognizable as a specific entity. This behaviour can be explained by the general scaling properties of biological networks and points to regulation pathways as emergent features of biochemical systems posited at a different hierarchical level with respect to the intervening metabolites.

  8. Endocrino-metabolic features in women with polycystic ovary syndrome during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Paradisi, G; Fulghesu, A M; Ferrazzani, S; Moretti, S; Proto, C; Soranna, L; Caruso, A; Lanzone, A

    1998-03-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of metabolic adaptation of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) during pregnancy, the endocrino-metabolic features of a group of PCOS patients with or without gestational diabetes were studied longitudinally during the three trimesters of gestation. Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT, 100 g) and hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp were performed throughout the study. Plasma concentrations of insulin and glucose were determined by radioimmunoassay and glucose oxidase technique, respectively. Five of 13 PCOS patients developed gestational diabetes (GD) at the third trimester (PCOS-GD), while the other eight patients did not develop any alteration of glucose metabolism (PCOS-nGD). Both fasting glucose and insulin plasma concentrations did not change significantly during pregnancy and no difference was seen between the two groups. On the contrary PCOS-GD group early exhibited higher values of area under the curve (AUC) for glucose and insulin response to OGTT with respect to those found in PCOS-nGD group. This difference was already significant in the first gestational trimester. Moreover insulin sensitivity value (M) was significantly lower in the first trimester of gestation in PCOS-GD as compared with that found in PCOS-nGD group. However, as gestation proceeded, M value decreased in PCOS-nDG group and the difference from PCOS patients developing gestational diabetes was not sustained into the second and third trimesters. Both groups had similar body mass index values and AUC insulin increase from first to third trimester of gestation. It is concluded that early alteration of insulin sensitivity and secretion constitute specific risk factors in PCOS patients for the development of abnormalities of glucose tolerance.

  9. Probing genetic algorithms for feature selection in comprehensive metabolic profiling approach.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wei; Tolstikov, Vladimir V

    2008-04-01

    Six different clones of 1-year-old loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) seedlings grown under standardized conditions in a green house were used for sample preparation and further analysis. Three independent and complementary analytical techniques for metabolic profiling were applied in the present study: hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC-LC/ESI-MS), reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RP-LC/ESI-MS), and gas chromatography all coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/TOF-MS). Unsupervised methods, such as principle component analysis (PCA) and clustering, and supervised methods, such as classification, were used for data mining. Genetic algorithms (GA), a multivariate approach, was probed for selection of the smallest subsets of potentially discriminative classifiers. From more than 2000 peaks found in total, small subsets were selected by GA as highly potential classifiers allowing discrimination among six investigated genotypes. Annotated GC/TOF-MS data allowed the generation of a small subset of identified metabolites. LC/ESI-MS data and small subsets require further annotation. The present study demonstrated that combination of comprehensive metabolic profiling and advanced data mining techniques provides a powerful metabolomic approach for biomarker discovery among small molecules. Utilizing GA for feature selection allowed the generation of small subsets of potent classifiers.

  10. Metabolic disorders with clinical and radiologic features of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Rosenbloom, Michael H; Tartaglia, M Carmela; Forner, Sven A; Wong, Katherine K; Kuo, Amy; Johnson, David Y; Colacurcio, Valerie; Andrews, Bret D; Miller, Bruce L; DeArmond, Stephen J; Geschwind, Michael D

    2015-04-01

    Two patients with metabolic disorders presented with clinical and radiologic features suggestive of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). Case 1 was a 50-year-old man with rapid decline in cognitive, behavioral, and motor function following new-onset seizures. MRI was read as consistent with CJD, and he was referred for a treatment trial, but it was determined that he recently experienced rapid correction of hyponatremia resulting in extrapontine myelinolysis. Case 2 was a 66-year-old woman with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus who was found unconscious after a suspected insulin overdose. Examination showed altered mental status and neuroimaging was remarkable for cortical/striatal hyperintensities suggestive of sCJD. On autopsy, she had hypoglycemic/hypoxic nerve cell loss. Although characteristic MRI findings have high sensitivity and specificity for sCJD, potentially reversible metabolic disorders sometimes present rapidly and can resemble sCJD both clinically and radiologically. These cases highlight the importance of establishing a broad differential diagnosis when evaluating a patient with suspected sCJD.

  11. The genome of Pelobacter carbinolicus reveals surprising metabolic capabilities and physiological features

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The bacterium Pelobacter carbinolicus is able to grow by fermentation, syntrophic hydrogen/formate transfer, or electron transfer to sulfur from short-chain alcohols, hydrogen or formate; it does not oxidize acetate and is not known to ferment any sugars or grow autotrophically. The genome of P. carbinolicus was sequenced in order to understand its metabolic capabilities and physiological features in comparison with its relatives, acetate-oxidizing Geobacter species. Results Pathways were predicted for catabolism of known substrates: 2,3-butanediol, acetoin, glycerol, 1,2-ethanediol, ethanolamine, choline and ethanol. Multiple isozymes of 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase, ATP synthase and [FeFe]-hydrogenase were differentiated and assigned roles according to their structural properties and genomic contexts. The absence of asparagine synthetase and the presence of a mutant tRNA for asparagine encoded among RNA-active enzymes suggest that P. carbinolicus may make asparaginyl-tRNA in a novel way. Catabolic glutamate dehydrogenases were discovered, implying that the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle can function catabolically. A phosphotransferase system for uptake of sugars was discovered, along with enzymes that function in 2,3-butanediol production. Pyruvate:ferredoxin/flavodoxin oxidoreductase was identified as a potential bottleneck in both the supply of oxaloacetate for oxidation of acetate by the TCA cycle and the connection of glycolysis to production of ethanol. The P. carbinolicus genome was found to encode autotransporters and various appendages, including three proteins with similarity to the geopilin of electroconductive nanowires. Conclusions Several surprising metabolic capabilities and physiological features were predicted from the genome of P. carbinolicus, suggesting that it is more versatile than anticipated. PMID:23227809

  12. The genome of Pelobacter carbinolicus reveals surprising metabolic capabilities and physiological features

    SciTech Connect

    Aklujkar, Muktak; Haveman, Shelley; DiDonatoJr, Raymond; Chertkov, Olga; Han, Cliff; Land, Miriam L; Brown, Peter; Lovley, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Background: The bacterium Pelobacter carbinolicus is able to grow by fermentation, syntrophic hydrogen/formate transfer, or electron transfer to sulfur from short-chain alcohols, hydrogen or formate; it does not oxidize acetate and is not known to ferment any sugars or grow autotrophically. The genome of P. carbinolicus was sequenced in order to understand its metabolic capabilities and physiological features in comparison with its relatives, acetate-oxidizing Geobacter species. Results: Pathways were predicted for catabolism of known substrates: 2,3-butanediol, acetoin, glycerol, 1,2-ethanediol, ethanolamine, choline and ethanol. Multiple isozymes of 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase, ATP synthase and [FeFe]-hydrogenase were differentiated and assigned roles according to their structural properties and genomic contexts. The absence of asparagine synthetase and the presence of a mutant tRNA for asparagine encoded among RNA-active enzymes suggest that P. carbinolicus may make asparaginyl-tRNA in a novel way. Catabolic glutamate dehydrogenases were discovered, implying that the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle can function catabolically. A phosphotransferase system for uptake of sugars was discovered, along with enzymes that function in 2,3-butanediol production. Pyruvate: ferredoxin/flavodoxin oxidoreductase was identified as a potential bottleneck in both the supply of oxaloacetate for oxidation of acetate by the TCA cycle and the connection of glycolysis to production of ethanol. The P. carbinolicus genome was found to encode autotransporters and various appendages, including three proteins with similarity to the geopilin of electroconductive nanowires. Conclusions: Several surprising metabolic capabilities and physiological features were predicted from the genome of P. carbinolicus, suggesting that it is more versatile than anticipated.

  13. Effects of mild (33 degrees C) and moderate (29 degrees C) hypothermia on cerebral blood flow and metabolism, lactate, and extracellular glutamate in experimental head injury.

    PubMed

    Mori, K; Maeda, M; Miyazaki, M; Iwase, H

    1998-12-01

    The effects of mild (33 degrees C) and moderate (29 degrees C) hypothermia were investigated to determine which temperature was more effective against compression-induced cerebral ischemia. Eighteen cats were anesthetized. The animals were divided into three groups according to deep-brain temperature (control, 37 degrees C; mild hypothermia, 33 degrees C; and moderate hypothermia, 29 degrees C). Intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) were monitored, the latter by hydrogen clearance. Arteriovenous oxygen difference (AVDO2) and cerebral venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) were measured in blood samples from the superior sagittal sinus. The cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) and the cerebral metabolic rate of lactate (CMR lactate) were calculated. Extracellular glutamate was measured by microdialysis. ICP was increased by inflation of an epidural balloon until CBF became zero, and this ischemia was maintained for 5 min, after which the balloon was quickly deflated. All parameters were recorded over 6 h. Evans blue was injected to examine vascular permeability changes. CBF was decreased by 56% by mild hypothermia and by 77% by moderate hypothermia. Mild hypothermia had a coupled metabolic suppression whereas moderate hypothermia significantly increased AVDO2 and decreased ScvO2, producing a low CBF/CMRO2 (relative ischemia). After balloon deflation, all three groups showed reactive hyperemia, which was significantly reduced by mild and moderate hypothermia. CBF then decreased to 50% of pre-inflation values and ScvO2 decreased (post-ischemic hypoperfusion). CBF/CMRO2, ScvO2, and AVDO2 did not differ significantly between the three groups. After balloon deflation, all three groups showed increased CMR lactate, which was significantly reduced by mild and moderate hypothermia. Extracellular glutamate increased in control animals (3.8 +/- 1.72 microM), an effect most effectively suppressed in the mild hypothermia group (1.0 +/- 0.46 microM). Damaged

  14. Imaging the time-integrated cerebral metabolic activity with subcellular resolution through nanometer-scale detection of biosynthetic products deriving from (13)C-glucose.

    PubMed

    Takado, Yuhei; Knott, Graham; Humbel, Bruno M; Masoodi, Mojgan; Escrig, Stéphane; Meibom, Anders; Comment, Arnaud

    2015-11-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the brain but also an important source of building blocks for proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Little is known about the use of glucose for biosynthesis in tissues at the cellular level. We demonstrate that local cerebral metabolic activity can be mapped in mouse brain tissue by quantitatively imaging the biosynthetic products deriving from [U-(13)C]glucose metabolism using a combination of in situ electron microscopy and secondary ion mass-spectroscopy (NanoSIMS). Images of the (13)C-label incorporated into cerebral ultrastructure with ca. 100 nm resolution allowed us to determine the timescale on which the metabolic products of glucose are incorporated into different cells, their sub-compartments and organelles. These were mapped in astrocytes and neurons in the different layers of the motor cortex. We see evidence for high metabolic activity in neurons via the nucleus (13)C enrichment. We observe that in all the major cell compartments, such as e.g. nucleus and Golgi apparatus, neurons incorporate substantially higher concentrations of (13)C-label than astrocytes.

  15. Amyloid-β peptide absence in short term effects on kinase activity of energy metabolism in mice hippocampus and cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Ianiski, Francine R; Rech, Virginia C; Nishihira, Vivian S K; Alves, Catiane B; Baldissera, Matheus D; Wilhelm, Ethel A; Luchese, Cristiane

    2016-01-01

    Considering that Alzheimer's disease is a prevalent neurodegenerative disease worldwide, we investigated the activities of three key kinases: creatine kinase, pyruvate kinase and adenylate kinase in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex in Alzheimer's disease model. Male adult Swiss mice received amyloid-β or saline. One day after, mice were treated with blank nanocapsules (17 ml/kg) or meloxicam-loaded nanocapsules (5 mg/kg) or free meloxicam (5 mg/kg). Treatments were performed on alternating days, until the end of the experimental protocol. In the fourteenth day, kinases activities were performed. Amyloid-β did not change the kinases activity in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of mice. However, free meloxicam decrease the creatine kinase activity in mitochondrial-rich fraction in the group induced by amyloid-β, but for the cytosolic fraction, it has raised in the activity of pyruvate kinase activity in cerebral cortex. Further, meloxicam-loaded nanocapsules administration reduced adenylate kinase activity in the hippocampus of mice injected by amyloid-β. In conclusion we observed absence in short-term effects in kinases activities of energy metabolism in mice hippocampus and cerebral cortex using amyloid-β peptide model. These findings established the foundation to further study the kinases in phosphoryltransfer network changes observed in the brains of patients post-mortem with Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Local cerebral metabolic effects of L-dopa therapy in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced parkinsonism in monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Porrino, L.J.; Burns, R.S.; Crane, A.M.; Palombo, E.; Kopin, I.J.; Sokoloff, L.

    1987-08-01

    The quantitative 2-deoxy(/sup 14/C) glucose autoradiographic method was used to map the distribution of alterations in local cerebral glucose utilization that accompanies clinically effective chronic L-dopa therapy of rhesus monkeys made parkinsonian by the administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). This pattern of changes was compared to the effects of a similar treatment regimen in normal monkeys. L-Dopa was administered orally to normal and parkinsonian monkeys 3 times daily for 60-120 days prior to measurement of local cerebral glucose utilization. In parkinsonian monkeys treated with L-dopa, signs and symptoms of parkinsonism were controlled or suppressed, and widespread increases in glucose utilization were seen throughout the brain. Cerebral metabolic activity was increased both in areas rich in dopaminergic receptors, such as the caudate and putamen, and in nondopaminergic areas involved in motor functions. In many structures the rates of glucose utilization in L-dopa-treated parkinsonian monkeys were increased to levels that far exceeded rates measured in normal monkeys. In sharp contrast, similar treatment with L-dopa in normal monkeys had little if any effect on local cerebral glucose utilization. L-Dopa, then, appears to have an action in animals with selective lesions of the substantia nigra pars compacta produced by MPTP that is distinctly different from its effects in the normal monkey.

  17. Imaging based magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) localization for quantitative neurochemical analysis and cerebral metabolism studies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Phil; Adany, Peter; Choi, In-Young

    2017-01-10

    Accurate quantitative metabolic imaging of the brain presents significant challenges due to the complexity and heterogeneity of its structures and compositions with distinct compartmentations of brain tissue types (e.g., gray and white matter). The brain is compartmentalized into various regions based on their unique functions and locations. In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) techniques allow non-invasive measurements of neurochemicals in either single voxel or multiple voxels, yet the spatial resolution and detection sensitivity of MRS are significantly lower compared with MRI. A fundamentally different approach, namely spectral localization by imaging (SLIM) provides a new framework that overcomes major limitations of conventional MRS techniques. Conventional MRS allows only rectangular voxel shapes that do not conform to the shapes of brain structures or lesions, while SLIM allows compartments with arbitrary shapes. However, the restrictive assumption proposed in the original concept of SLIM, i.e., compartmental homogeneity, led to spectral localization errors, which have limited its broad applications. This review focuses on the recent technical frontiers of image-based MRS localization techniques that overcome the limitations of SLIM through the development and implementation of various new strategies, including incorporation of magnetic field inhomogeneity corrections, the use of multiple receiver coils, and prospective optimization of data acquisition.

  18. Interregional cerebral metabolic associativity during a continuous performance task (Part I): healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Willis, Mark W; Benson, Brenda E; Ketter, Terence A; Kimbrell, Tim A; George, Mark S; Speer, Andrew M; Herscovitch, Peter; Post, Robert M

    2008-10-30

    One emerging hypothesis regarding psychiatric illnesses is that they arise from the dysregulation of normal circuits or neuroanatomical patterns. In order to study mood disorders within this framework, we explored normal metabolic associativity patterns in healthy volunteers as a prelude to examining the same relationships in affectively ill patients (Part II). We applied correlational analyses to regional brain activity as measured with FDG-PET during an auditory continuous performance task (CPT) in 66 healthy volunteers. This simple attention task controlled for brain activity that otherwise might vary amongst affective and cognitive states. There were highly significant positive correlations between homologous regions in the two hemispheres in thalamic, extrapyramidal, orbital frontal, medial temporal and cerebellar areas. Dorsal frontal, lateral temporal, cingulate, and especially insula, and inferior parietal areas showed less significant homologous associativity, suggesting more specific lateralized function. The medulla and bilateral thalami exhibited the most diverse interregional associations. A general pattern emerged of cortical regions covarying inversely with subcortical structures, particularly the frontal cortex with cerebellum, amygdala and thalamus. These analytical data may help to confirm known functional and neuroanatomical relationships, elucidate others as yet unreported, and serve as a basis for comparison to patients with psychiatric illness.

  19. Identification of Inflammatory, Metabolic, and Cell Survival Pathways Contributing to Cerebral Small Vessel Disease by Postmortem Gene Expression Microarray.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Marie-Françoise; Grond-Ginsbach, Caspar; Kloss, Manja; Tolnay, Markus; Fluri, Felix; Bonati, Leo H; Traenka, Christopher; Zeis, Thomas; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole; Peters, Nils; Engelter, Stefan Thomas; Lyrer, Philippe Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral small-vessel disease (SVD) is characterized by periventricular white matter (WM) changes and general brain atrophy. SVD is prevalent in elderly individuals and is frequently associated with the development of vascular dementia (VaD). Studies of the molecular basis of SVD are sparse. We have to gain further insight into the pathogenic mechanisms of SVD. Therefore, we compared gene expression patterns in the brains of SVD and control patients, in order to identify cellular pathways changed in diseased brains. We compared the expression of mRNA transcripts in postmortem, macroscopically normal-appearing human brain tissues isolated from frontal, temporal and occipital cortical and subcortical regions in 5 SVD and 5 non-SVD control patients. Significant expression changes were determined by fold change F>1.2 in either direction, and p<0.05. We identified 228 genes differentially expressed in cortex (89 up-, 139 down-regulated) and 555 genes in WM (223 up-, 332 down-regulated) in SVD patients. Pathway analyses revealed that upregulated genes were associated with inflammation and apoptosis in WM, suggesting active cell death. Downregulated genes were associated with coagulation and fatty and amino acids metabolisms. In the cortex, down-regulated genes were principally associated with neuronal functions. Our data revealed widespread changes in the transcriptome profiles in the cortex and WM of human SVD brains, with a predominance of changes in WM. We provide for the first time a comprehensive view of the molecular alterations in human SVD brains that seem to contribute to the neuropathogenesis of SVD.

  20. MELANCHOLIC DEPRESSION PREDICTION BY IDENTIFYING REPRESENTATIVE FEATURES IN METABOLIC AND MICROARRAY PROFILES WITH MISSING VALUES

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Zhi; Yang, Tao; Liu, Yashu; Lin, Binbin; Li, Qingyang; Narayan, Vaibhav A; Wittenberg, Gayle; Ye, Jieping

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that melancholic depression, one major subtype of depression, is closely associated with the concentration of some metabolites and biological functions of certain genes and pathways. Meanwhile, recent advances in biotechnologies have allowed us to collect a large amount of genomic data, e.g., metabolites and microarray gene expression. With such a huge amount of information available, one approach that can give us new insights into the understanding of the fundamental biology underlying melancholic depression is to build disease status prediction models using classification or regression methods. However, the existence of strong empirical correlations, e.g., those exhibited by genes sharing the same biological pathway in microarray profiles, tremendously limits the performance of these methods. Furthermore, the occurrence of missing values which are ubiquitous in biomedical applications further complicates the problem. In this paper, we hypothesize that the problem of missing values might in some way benefit from the correlation between the variables and propose a method to learn a compressed set of representative features through an adapted version of sparse coding which is capable of identifying correlated variables and addressing the issue of missing values simultaneously. An efficient algorithm is also developed to solve the proposed formulation. We apply the proposed method on metabolic and microarray profiles collected from a group of subjects consisting of both patients with melancholic depression and healthy controls. Results show that the proposed method can not only produce meaningful clusters of variables but also generate a set of representative features that achieve superior classification performance over those generated by traditional clustering and data imputation techniques. In particular, on both datasets, we found that in comparison with the competing algorithms, the representative features learned by the proposed

  1. Melancholic depression prediction by identifying representative features in metabolic and microarray profiles with missing values.

    PubMed

    Nie, Zhi; Yang, Tao; Liu, Yashu; Li, Qingyang; Narayan, Vaibhav A; Wittenberg, Gayle; Ye, Jieping

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that melancholic depression, one major subtype of depression, is closely associated with the concentration of some metabolites and biological functions of certain genes and pathways. Meanwhile, recent advances in biotechnologies have allowed us to collect a large amount of genomic data, e.g., metabolites and microarray gene expression. With such a huge amount of information available, one approach that can give us new insights into the understanding of the fundamental biology underlying melancholic depression is to build disease status prediction models using classification or regression methods. However, the existence of strong empirical correlations, e.g., those exhibited by genes sharing the same biological pathway in microarray profiles, tremendously limits the performance of these methods. Furthermore, the occurrence of missing values which are ubiquitous in biomedical applications further complicates the problem. In this paper, we hypothesize that the problem of missing values might in some way benefit from the correlation between the variables and propose a method to learn a compressed set of representative features through an adapted version of sparse coding which is capable of identifying correlated variables and addressing the issue of missing values simultaneously. An efficient algorithm is also developed to solve the proposed formulation. We apply the proposed method on metabolic and microarray profiles collected from a group of subjects consisting of both patients with melancholic depression and healthy controls. Results show that the proposed method can not only produce meaningful clusters of variables but also generate a set of representative features that achieve superior classification performance over those generated by traditional clustering and data imputation techniques. In particular, on both datasets, we found that in comparison with the competing algorithms, the representative features learned by the proposed

  2. Unique metabolic features of pancreatic cancer stroma: relevance to the tumor compartment, prognosis, and invasive potential

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Erik S.; Balaji, Uthra; Freinkman, Elizaveta; McCue, Peter; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has a dismal prognosis. The aggressiveness and therapeutic recalcitrance of this malignancy has been attributed to multiple factors including the influence of an active desmoplastic stroma. How the stromal microenvironment of PDAC contributes to the fatal nature of this disease is not well defined. In the analysis of clinical specimens, we observed diverse expression of the hypoxic marker carbonic anhydrase IX and the lactate transporter MCT4 in the stromal compartment. These stromal features were associated with the epithelial to mesenchymal phenotype in PDAC tumor cells, and with shorter patient survival. Cultured cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) derived from primary PDAC exhibited a high basal level of hypoxia inducible factor 1a (HIF1α) that was both required and sufficient to modulate the expression of MCT4. This event was associated with increased transcription and protein synthesis of HIF1α in CAFs relative to PDAC cell lines, while surprisingly the protein turnover rate was equivalent. CAFs utilized glucose predominantly for glycolytic intermediates, whereas glutamine was the preferred metabolite for the TCA cycle. Unlike PDAC cell lines, CAFs were resistant to glucose withdrawal but sensitive to glutamine depletion. Consistent with the lack of reliance on glucose, CAFs could survive the acute depletion of MCT4. In co-culture and xenograft studies CAFs stimulated the invasive potential and metastatic spread of PDAC cell lines through a mechanism dependent on HIF1α and MCT4. Together, these data indicate that stromal metabolic features influence PDAC tumor cells to promote invasiveness and metastatic potential and associate with poor outcome in patients with PDAC. PMID:27623078

  3. The influence of intravenous laser irradiation of blood on some metabolic and functional parameters in intact rabbits and experimental cerebral ischaemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechipurenko, N.; Vasilevskaya, L.; Musienko, J.; Maslova, G.

    2007-07-01

    It has been studied the intravenous laser irradiation of blood (ILIB) influence with helium-neon laser (HNL) of 630 nm wavelength on some of lipid peroxidation (LPO) and antioxidant system (AOS) findings, aside-base status (ABS) and blood oxygen transport (BOT), state of dermal microhaemodynamics (MGD) in the intact rabbits and after modeling of local ischemia of brain (LIB). Depending on conditions of organism functioning (norm or brain ischaemia) ILIB has resulted in stimulating or normalizing effects on the whole metabolic and microhaemocirculation processes which had been studied during our investigation. It is discussed the mechanisms of pathogenetic directivity of ILIB influence in cerebral ischaemia

  4. A Mouse Model of Diet-Induced Obesity Resembling Most Features of Human Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Della Vedova, Maria C.; Muñoz, Marcos D.; Santillan, Lucas D.; Plateo-Pignatari, Maria G.; Germanó, Maria J.; Rinaldi Tosi, Martín E.; Garcia, Silvina; Gomez, Nidia N.; Fornes, Miguel W.; Gomez Mejiba, Sandra E.; Ramirez, Dario C.

    2016-01-01

    Increased chicken-derived fat and fructose consumption in the human diet is paralleled by an increasing prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome (MS). Herein, we aimed at developing and characterizing a mouse model of diet-induced obesity (DIO) resembling most of the key features of the human MS. To accomplish this, we fed male C57BL/6J mice for 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks with either a low-fat diet (LFD) or a high-chicken-fat diet (HFD) and tap water with or without 10% fructose (F). This experimental design resulted in the following four experimental groups: LFD, LFD + F, HFD, and HFD + F. Over the feeding period, and on a weekly basis, the HFD + F group had more caloric intake and gained more weight than the other experimental groups. Compared to the other groups, and at the end of the feeding period, the HFD + F group had a higher adipogenic index, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, fasting basal glycemia, insulin resistance, hypertension, and atherogenic index and showed steatohepatitis and systemic oxidative stress/inflammation. A mouse model of DIO that will allow us to study the effect of MS in different organs and systems has been developed and characterized. PMID:27980421

  5. [Several features of the metabolism of the fast and slow muscles of Emys orbicularis tortoises].

    PubMed

    Lebedinskaia, I I; Ogorodnikova, L G

    1978-01-01

    In skeletal muscles of the tortoise E. orbicularis, studies have been made on the content of glycogen, lactic acid, on the activity of glucose-6-phosphatase and phosphorylase. Histochemical studies were made on the lipid content. Experiments were performed on fast and slow bundles from mm. iliofibularis, testo cervicalis and retractor capitis. For comparison, the same indices of carbohydrate metabolism were investigated in fast m. plantaris and slow m. soleus of rats. In rats, slow muscles exhibit aerobic metabolism, in fast muscles--anaerobic one. In tortoises, slow muscles exhibit intermediate type of metabolism. Fast muscles show an anaerobic type or metabolism which is less intensive than anaerobic metabolism in slow muscles. Significant differences in some of the indices of carbohydrate metabolism were found in muscles which perform different functions in the organism.

  6. PEG-induced osmotic stress in Mentha x piperita L.: Structural features and metabolic responses.

    PubMed

    Búfalo, Jennifer; Rodrigues, Tatiane Maria; de Almeida, Luiz Fernando Rolim; Tozin, Luiz Ricardo Dos Santos; Marques, Marcia Ortiz Mayo; Boaro, Carmen Silvia Fernandes

    2016-08-01

    The present study investigated whether osmotic stress induced by the exposure of peppermint (Mentha x piperita L.) to moderate and severe stress for short periods of time changes the plant's physiological parameters, leaf anatomy and ultrastructure and essential oil. Plants were exposed to two levels of polyethyleneglycol (50 g L(-1) and 100 g L(-1) of PEG) in a hydroponic experiment. The plants exposed to 50 g L(-1) maintained metabolic functions similar to those of the control group (0 g L(-1)) without changes in gas exchange or structural characteristics. The increase in antioxidant enzyme activity reduced the presence of free radicals and protected membranes, including chloroplasts and mitochondria. In contrast, the osmotic stress caused by 100 g L(-1) of PEG inhibited leaf gas exchange, reduced the essential oil content and changed the oil composition, including a decrease in menthone and an increase in menthofuran. These plants also showed an increase in peroxidase activity, but this increase was not sufficient to decrease the lipid peroxidation level responsible for damaging the membranes of organelles. Morphological changes were correlated with the evaluated physiological features: plants exposed to 100 g L(-1) of PEG showed areas with collapsed cells, increases in mesophyll thickness and the area of the intercellular space, cuticle shrinkage, morphological changes in plastids, and lysis of mitochondria. In summary, our results revealed that PEG-induced osmotic stress in M. x piperita depends on the intensity level of the osmotic stress applied; severe osmotic stress changed the structural characteristics, caused damage at the cellular level, and reduced the essential oil content and quality.

  7. Energy metabolism in hypoxia: reinterpreting some features of muscle physiology on molecular grounds.

    PubMed

    Cerretelli, Paolo; Gelfi, Cecilia

    2011-03-01

    An holistic approach for interpreting classical data on the adaptation of the animal and, particularly, of the human body to hypoxic stress was promoted by the discovery of HIF-1, the "master regulator" of cell hypoxic signaling. Mitochondrial production of ROS stabilizes the O(2)-regulated HIF-1α subunit of the HIF-1 dimer promoting transaction functions in a large number of potential target genes, activating transcription of sequences into RNA and, eventually, protein production. The aim of the present preliminary study is to assess whether adaptive changes in oxygen sensing and metabolic signaling, particularly in the control of energy turnover known to occur in cultured cells exposed to hypoxia, are detectable also in the muscles of animals and man. For the present analysis, data obtained from the proteome of the rat gastrocnemius and of the vastus lateralis muscle of humans together with functional measurements were compared with homologous data from hypoxic cultured cells. In particular, the following variables were assessed: (1) the role of stress response proteins in the maintenance of ROS homeostasis, (2) the activity of the PDK1 gene on the shunting of pyruvate away from the TCA cycle in rodents and in humans, (3) the COX-4/COX-2 ratio in hypoxic rodents, (4) the overall efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation in humans during exercise in hypoxia, (5) some features of muscle mitochondrial autophagy in humans undergoing subchronic and chronic altitude exposure. Despite the limited number of observations and the differences in the experimental approach, some initial interesting results were obtained encouraging to pursue this innovative effort.

  8. Regional differences in the coupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism changes in response to activation: Implications for BOLD-fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Ances, Beau M.; Leontiev, Oleg; Perthen, Joanna E.; Liang, Christine; Lansing, Amy E.; Buxton, Richard B.

    2010-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) based on blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal changes is a sensitive tool for mapping brain activation, but quantitative interpretation of the BOLD response is problematic. The BOLD response is primarily driven by cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes, but is moderated by M, a scaling parameter reflecting baseline deoxyhemoglobin, and n, the ratio of fractional changes in CBF to cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO2). We compared M and n between cortical (visual cortex, VC) and subcortical (lentiform nuclei, LN) regions using a quantitative approach based on calibrating the BOLD response with a hypercapnia experiment. Although M was similar in both regions (∼5.8%), differences in n (2.21±0.03 in VC and 1.58±0.03 in LN; Cohen d=1.71) produced substantially weaker (∼3.7×) subcortical than cortical BOLD responses relative to CMRO2 changes. Because of this strong sensitivity to n, BOLD response amplitudes cannot be interpreted as a quantitative reflection of underlying metabolic changes, particularly when comparing cortical and sub-cortical regions. PMID:18164629

  9. Regional differences in the coupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism changes in response to activation: implications for BOLD-fMRI.

    PubMed

    Ances, Beau M; Leontiev, Oleg; Perthen, Joanna E; Liang, Christine; Lansing, Amy E; Buxton, Richard B

    2008-02-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) based on blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal changes is a sensitive tool for mapping brain activation, but quantitative interpretation of the BOLD response is problematic. The BOLD response is primarily driven by cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes, but is moderated by M, a scaling parameter reflecting baseline deoxyhemoglobin, and n, the ratio of fractional changes in CBF to cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO(2)). We compared M and n between cortical (visual cortex, VC) and subcortical (lentiform nuclei, LN) regions using a quantitative approach based on calibrating the BOLD response with a hypercapnia experiment. Although M was similar in both regions (~5.8%), differences in n (2.21+/-0.03 in VC and 1.58+/-0.03 in LN; Cohen d=1.71) produced substantially weaker (~3.7x) subcortical than cortical BOLD responses relative to CMRO(2) changes. Because of this strong sensitivity to n, BOLD response amplitudes cannot be interpreted as a quantitative reflection of underlying metabolic changes, particularly when comparing cortical and subcortical regions.

  10. Improved light collection and wavelet de-noising enable quantification of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism by a low-cost, off-the-shelf spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diop, Mamadou; Wright, Eric; Toronov, Vladislav; Lee, Ting-Yim; St. Lawrence, Keith

    2014-05-01

    Broadband continuous-wave near-infrared spectroscopy (CW-NIRS) is an attractive alternative to time-resolved and frequency-domain techniques for quantifying cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen metabolism in newborns. However, efficient light collection is critical to broadband CW-NIRS since only a small fraction of the injected light emerges from any given area of the scalp. Light collection is typically improved by optimizing the contact area between the detection system and the skin by means of light guides with large detection surface. Since the form-factor of these light guides do not match the entrance of commercial spectrometers, which are usually equipped with a narrow slit to improve their spectral resolution, broadband NIRS spectrometers are typically custom-built. Nonetheless, off-the-shelf spectrometers have attractive advantages compared to custom-made units, such as low cost, small footprint, and wide availability. We demonstrate that off-the-shelf spectrometers can be easily converted into suitable instruments for deep tissue spectroscopy by improving light collection, while maintaining good spectral resolution, and reducing measurement noise. The ability of this approach to provide reliable cerebral hemodynamics was illustrated in a piglet by measuring CBF and oxygen metabolism under different anesthetic regimens.

  11. Features of an altered AMPK metabolic pathway in Gilbert’s Syndrome, and its role in metabolic health

    PubMed Central

    Mölzer, Christine; Wallner, Marlies; Kern, Carina; Tosevska, Anela; Schwarz, Ursula; Zadnikar, Rene; Doberer, Daniel; Marculescu, Rodrig; Wagner, Karl-Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Energy metabolism, involving the ATP-dependent AMPK-PgC-Ppar pathway impacts metabolic health immensely, in that its impairment can lead to obesity, giving rise to disease. Based on observations that individuals with Gilbert’s syndrome (GS; UGT1A1*28 promoter mutation) are generally lighter, leaner and healthier than controls, specific inter-group differences in the AMPK pathway regulation were explored. Therefore, a case-control study involving 120 fasted, healthy, age- and gender matched subjects with/without GS, was conducted. By utilising intra-cellular flow cytometry (next to assessing AMPKα1 gene expression), levels of functioning proteins (phospho-AMPK α1/α2, PgC 1 α, Ppar α and γ) were measured in PBMCs (peripheral blood mononucleated cells). In GS individuals, rates of phospho-AMPK α1/α2, -Ppar α/γ and of PgC 1α were significantly higher, attesting to a boosted fasting response in this condition. In line with this finding, AMPKα1 gene expression was equal between the groups, possibly stressing the post-translational importance of boosted fasting effects in GS. In reflection of an apparently improved health status, GS individuals had significantly lower BMI, glucose, insulin, C-peptide and triglyceride levels. Herewith, we propose a new theory to explain why individuals having GS are leaner and healthier, and are therefore less likely to contract metabolic diseases or die prematurely thereof. PMID:27444220

  12. Specific gut microbiota features and metabolic markers in postmenopausal women with obesity

    PubMed Central

    Brahe, L K; Le Chatelier, E; Prifti, E; Pons, N; Kennedy, S; Hansen, T; Pedersen, O; Astrup, A; Ehrlich, S D; Larsen, L H

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gut microbial gene richness and specific bacterial species are associated with metabolic risk markers in humans, but the impact of host physiology and dietary habits on the link between the gut microbiota and metabolic markers remain unclear. The objective of this study was to identify gut metagenomic markers associated with estimates of insulin resistance, lipid metabolism and inflammation in obesity, and to explore whether the associations between metagenomic and metabolic markers persisted after adjustment for body fat, age and habitual dietary intake. Methods: Faecal DNA from 53 women with obesity was analysed through quantitative metagenomic sequencing and analysis, and a systematic search was performed for bacterial genes associated with estimates of insulin resistance, inflammation and lipid metabolism. Subsequently, the correlations between metagenomic species and metabolic markers were tested by linear regression models, with and without covariate adjustment. Results: One hundred and fourteen metagenomic species correlated with metabolic markers (P<0.001) including Akkermansia muciniphila, Bilophila wadsworthia, Bifidobacterium longum and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, but also species not previously associated with metabolic markers including Bacteroides faecis and Dorea longicatena. The majority of the identified correlations between bacterial species and metabolic markers persisted after adjustment for differences in body fat, age and dietary macronutrient composition; however, the negative correlation with insulin resistance observed for B. longum and F. prausnitzii appeared to be modified by the intake of dietary fibre and fat, respectively. Conclusions: This study shows that several gut bacterial species are linked to metabolic risk markers in obesity, also after adjustment for potential confounders, such as long-term diet composition. The study supports the use of gut metagenomic markers for metabolic disease prediction and warrants

  13. Control of the cerebral circulation and metabolism by the rostral ventrolateral medulla: Possible role in the cerebrovascular response to hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    Neurons within the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVL) corresponding to the location of adrenaline neurons of the C1 group (C1 area) maintain resting levels of arterial pressure (AP) and mediate the reflex cardiovascular responses to baro- and chemoreceptor activation and cerebral ischemia. The author therefore sought to determine whether neurons in the C1 area: (a) modulate regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and/or cerebral glucose utilization (rCGU), (b) participate in the maintenance of resting levels of CBF and CGU, and (c) mediate the CBF response to hypoxia. Rats were anesthetized, paralyzed and ventilated. The RVL was stimulated electrically or chemically, with kainic acid; lesions were placed electrolytically. rCBF was measured using 14-C-iodoantipyrine and rCGU with {sup 14}C-2-deoxyglucose in 11 dissected brain regions.

  14. GAD1 Upregulation Programs Aggressive Features of Cancer Cell Metabolism in the Brain Metastatic Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Schnepp, Patricia M; Lee, Dennis D; Guldner, Ian H; O'Tighearnaigh, Treasa K; Howe, Erin N; Palakurthi, Bhavana; Eckert, Kaitlyn E; Toni, Tiffany A; Ashfeld, Brandon L; Zhang, Siyuan

    2017-04-11

    The impact of altered amino acid metabolism on cancer progression is not fully understood. We hypothesized that a metabolic transcriptome shift during metastatic evolution is crucial for brain metastasis. Here we report a powerful impact in this setting caused by epigenetic upregulation of glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD1), a regulator of the GABA neurotransmitter metabolic pathway. In cell-based culture and brain metastasis models, we found that downegulation of the DNA methyltransferase DNMT1 induced by the brain microenvironment-derived clusterin resulted in decreased GAD1 promoter methylation and subsequent upregulation of GAD1 expression in brain metastatic tumor cells. In a system to dynamically visualize cellular metabolic responses mediated by GAD1, we monitored the cytosolic NADH:NAD+ equilibrium in tumor cells. Reducing GAD1 in metastatic cells by primary glia cell co-culture abolished the capacity of metastatic cells to utilize extracellular glutamine, leading to cytosolic accumulation of NADH and increased oxidative status. Similarly, genetic or pharmacological disruption of the GABA metabolic pathway decreased the incidence of brain metastasis in vivo. Taken together, our results show how epigenetic changes in GAD1 expression alter local glutamate metabolism in the brain metastatic microenvironment, contributing to a metabolic adaption that facilitates metastasis outgrowth in that setting.

  15. Cerebral Palsy (CP) Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Pop Quiz: Cerebral Palsy Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Sandy is the parent of a child with cerebral palsy and the Board President of Gio’s Garden , a ...

  16. New phenotype of the cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy mapped to chromosome 19: migraine as the prominent clinical feature.

    PubMed Central

    Vérin, M; Rolland, Y; Landgraf, F; Chabriat, H; Bompais, B; Michel, A; Vahedi, K; Martinet, J P; Tournier-Lasserve, E; Lemaitre, M H

    1995-01-01

    A survey was carried out on a large family presenting the symptoms of familial arteriopathy (CADASIL) recently mapped to chromosome 19. This is characterised clinically by recurrent subcortical infarcts developing into pseudobulbar palsy and subcortical dementia, and radiologically by early MRI abnormalities. To characterise this familial condition, 43 members older than 20 years and spreading over four generations were studied clinically (31 living, 12 deceased), genetically, and radiologically by MRI (n = 31). Twenty out of 43 were found to be clinically symptomatic and of these 13 out of 31 had MRI abnormalities. Genetic studies mapped this condition to the locus of CADASIL (lod score > 3). The natural history suggests a chronological clinicoradiological staging of this phenotype of CADASIL: stage I between 20 and 40 years with frequent migraine-like episodes and well delineated lesions of the white matter; stage II between 40 and 60 years with stroke-like episodes, bipolar or monopolar-like psychotic disorders, coalescent lesions of the white matter, and well delineated lesions of the basal ganglia; and stage III over 60 years with subcortical dementia, pseudobulbar palsy, diffuse leukoencephalopathy, and multiple well delineated lesions of the basal ganglia. This phenotype differs from the other two previously described by high frequency of migraine, frequency of psychotic disorders, and early neurological manifestations. The new acronym "cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts, leukoencephalopathy, and migraine" (CADASILM) is proposed to better describe this particular subvariety of CADASIL. Images PMID:7500094

  17. Triheptanoin for glucose transporter type I deficiency (G1D): Modulation of human ictogenesis, cerebral metabolic rate and cognitive indices by a food supplement

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Juan M.; Liu, Peiying; Mao, Deng; Kelly, Dorothy; Hernandez, Ana; Sheng, Min; Good, Levi B.; Ma, Qian; Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Zhang, Xuchen; Park, Jason Y.; Hynan, Linda S.; Stavinoha, Peter; Roe, Charles R.; Lu, Hanzhang

    2015-01-01

    Objective G1D is commonly associated with electrographic spike-wave and - less-noticeably – with absence seizures. The G1D syndrome has long been attributed to energy (i.e., ATP-synthetic) failure, as have experimental, toxic-rodent epilepsies to impaired brain metabolism and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate depletion. Indeed, a (seldom-acknowledged) function of glucose and other substrates is the generation of brain TCAs via carbon-donor reactions collectively named anaplerosis. However, TCAs are preserved in murine G1D. This renders inferences about energy failure premature and suggests a different hypothesis, also grounded on our findings, that consumption of alternate TCA precursors is stimulated, potentially detracting from other functions. Second, common ketogenic diets can ameliorate G1D seizures, but lead to a therapeutically-counterintuitive reduction in blood glucose available to the brain, and they can prove ineffective in 1/3 of cases. While developing G1D treatments, all of this motivated us to: a) uphold (rather than attenuate) the residual brain glucose flux that all G1D patients possess; and b) stimulate the TCA cycle, including anaplerosis. Therefore, we tested the medium-chain triglyceride triheptanoin, a widely-used medical food supplement that can fulfill both of these metabolic roles. The rationale is that ketone bodies derived from ketogenic diets are not anaplerotic, in contrast with triheptanoin metabolites, as we have shown in the G1D mouse brain. Design We supplemented the regular diet of a case series of G1D patients with food-grade triheptanoin. First we confirmed that, despite their frequent electroencephalographic (EEG) presence as spike-waves, most seizures are rarely visible, such that perceptions by patients or others are inadequate for treatment evaluation. Thus, we used EEG, quantitative neuropsychological, blood analytical, and MRI cerebral metabolic rate measurements as main outcomes. Setting Academic and

  18. A novel method of combining blood oxygenation and blood flow sensitive magnetic resonance imaging techniques to measure the cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism responses to an unknown neural stimulus.

    PubMed

    Simon, Aaron B; Griffeth, Valerie E M; Wong, Eric C; Buxton, Richard B

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous implementation of magnetic resonance imaging methods for Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) and Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) imaging makes it possible to quantitatively measure the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO(2)) that occur in response to neural stimuli. To date, however, the range of neural stimuli amenable to quantitative analysis is limited to those that may be presented in a simple block or event related design such that measurements may be repeated and averaged to improve precision. Here we examined the feasibility of using the relationship between cerebral blood flow and the BOLD signal to improve dynamic estimates of blood flow fluctuations as well as to estimate metabolic-hemodynamic coupling under conditions where a stimulus pattern is unknown. We found that by combining the information contained in simultaneously acquired BOLD and ASL signals through a method we term BOLD Constrained Perfusion (BCP) estimation, we could significantly improve the precision of our estimates of the hemodynamic response to a visual stimulus and, under the conditions of a calibrated BOLD experiment, accurately determine the ratio of the oxygen metabolic response to the hemodynamic response. Importantly we were able to accomplish this without utilizing a priori knowledge of the temporal nature of the neural stimulus, suggesting that BOLD Constrained Perfusion estimation may make it feasible to quantitatively study the cerebral metabolic and hemodynamic responses to more natural stimuli that cannot be easily repeated or averaged.

  19. High Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome Features in Patients Previously Treated for Nonfunctioning Pituitary Macroadenoma

    PubMed Central

    Joustra, Sjoerd D.; Claessen, Kim M. J. A.; Dekkers, Olaf M.; van Beek, André P.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Pereira, Alberto M.; Biermasz, Nienke R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Patients treated for nonfunctioning pituitary macroadenoma (NFMA) with suprasellar extension show disturbed sleep characteristics, possibly related to hypothalamic dysfunction. In addition to hypopituitarism, both structural hypothalamic damage and sleep restriction per se are associated with the metabolic syndrome. However, the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in patients with NFMA is not well established. Our objective was to study the prevalence and risk factors for (components of) the metabolic syndrome in patients treated for NFMA. Design The metabolic syndrome (NCEP-ATP III criteria) was studied in an unselected cohort of 145 NFMA patients (aged 26–88yr, 44% female) in long-term remission after treatment, receiving adequate stable hormone replacement for any pituitary deficiencies. The results were compared to population data of 63,995 Dutch inhabitants by standardization (LifeLines cohort study). Results NFMA patients showed increased risk for reduced HDL-cholesterol (SMR 1.59, 95% CI 1.13–2.11), increased triglyceride levels (SMR 2.31, 95% CI 1.78–2.90) and the metabolic syndrome (SMR 1.60, 95% CI 1.22–2.02), but not for increased blood pressure, waist circumference or hyperglycemia. Preoperative visual field defects independently affected the risk for increased blood pressure (OR 6.5, 95% CI 1.9–22.2), and hypopituitarism was associated with a body mass index - dependent risk for increased waist circumference (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2–2.2) and the metabolic syndrome (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.0–1.9). Conclusions Patients treated for NFMA are increased at risk for developing the metabolic syndrome, mainly due to decreased HDL-cholesterol and increased triglycerides. Risk factors included hypopituitarism and preoperative visual field defects. Hypothalamic dysfunction may explain the metabolic abnormalities, in addition to intrinsic imperfections of hormone replacement therapy. Additional research is required to explore the relation between

  20. Cerebral Vascular Injury in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Kimbra; Amyot, Franck; Haber, Margalit; Pronger, Angela; Bogoslovsky, Tanya; Moore, Carol; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic cerebral vascular injury (TCVI) is a very frequent, if not universal, feature after traumatic brain injury (TBI). It is likely responsible, at least in part, for functional deficits and TBI-related chronic disability. Because there are multiple pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapies that promote vascular health, TCVI is an attractive target for therapeutic intervention after TBI. The cerebral microvasculature is a component of the neurovascular unit (NVU) coupling neuronal metabolism with local cerebral blood flow. The NVU participates in the pathogenesis of TBI, either directly from physical trauma or as part of the cascade of secondary injury that occurs after TBI. Pathologically, there is extensive cerebral microvascular injury in humans and experimental animal, identified with either conventional light microscopy or ultrastructural examination. It is seen in acute and chronic TBI, and even described in chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Non-invasive, physiologic measures of cerebral microvascular function show dysfunction after TBI in humans and experimental animal models of TBI. These include imaging sequences (MRI-ASL), Transcranial Doppler (TCD), and Near InfraRed Spectroscopy (NIRS). Understanding the pathophysiology of TCVI, a relatively under-studied component of TBI, has promise for the development of novel therapies for TBI.

  1. Regional cerebral glucose metabolism differentiates danger- and non-danger-based traumas in post-traumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Litz, Brett T.; Resick, Patricia A.; Woolsey, Mary D.; Dondanville, Katherine A.; Young-McCaughan, Stacey; Borah, Adam M.; Borah, Elisa V.; Peterson, Alan L.; Fox, Peter T.

    2016-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is presumably the result of life threats and conditioned fear. However, the neurobiology of fear fails to explain the impact of traumas that do not entail threats. Neuronal function, assessed as glucose metabolism with 18fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography, was contrasted in active duty, treatment-seeking US Army Soldiers with PTSD endorsing either danger- (n = 19) or non-danger-based (n = 26) traumas, and was compared with soldiers without PTSD (Combat Controls, n = 26) and Civilian Controls (n = 24). Prior meta-analyses of regions associated with fear or trauma script imagery in PTSD were used to compare glucose metabolism across groups. Danger-based traumas were associated with higher metabolism in the right amygdala than the control groups, while non-danger-based traumas associated with heightened precuneus metabolism relative to the danger group. In the danger group, PTSD severity was associated with higher metabolism in precuneus and dorsal anterior cingulate and lower metabolism in left amygdala (R2 = 0.61). In the non-danger group, PTSD symptom severity was associated with higher precuneus metabolism and lower right amygdala metabolism (R2 = 0.64). These findings suggest a biological basis to consider subtyping PTSD according to the nature of the traumatic context. PMID:26373348

  2. Near Normalization of Metabolic and Functional Features of the Central Nervous System in Type 1 Diabetic Patients With End-Stage Renal Disease After Kidney-Pancreas Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fiorina, Paolo; Vezzulli, Paolo; Bassi, Roberto; Gremizzi, Chiara; Falautano, Monica; D’Addio, Francesca; Vergani, Andrea; Chabtini, Lola; Altamura, Erica; Mello, Alessandra; Caldara, Rossana; Scavini, Marina; Magnani, Giuseppe; Falini, Andrea; Secchi, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The pathogenesis of brain disorders in type 1 diabetes (T1D) is multifactorial and involves the adverse effects of chronic hyperglycemia and of recurrent hypoglycemia. Kidney-pancreas (KP), but not kidney alone (KD), transplantation is associated with sustained normoglycemia, improvement in quality of life, and reduction of morbidity/mortality in diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The aim of our study was to evaluate with magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) the cerebral morphology and metabolism of 15 ESRD plus T1D patients, 23 patients with ESRD plus T1D after KD (n = 9) and KP (n = 14) transplantation, and 8 age-matched control subjects. RESULTS Magnetic resonance imaging showed a higher prevalence of cerebrovascular disease in ESRD plus T1D patients (53% [95% CI 36–69]) compared with healthy subjects (25% [3–6], P = 0.04). Brain 1H MRS showed lower levels of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA)-to-choline ratio in ESRD plus T1D, KD, and KP patients compared with control subjects (control subjects vs. all, P < 0.05) and of NAA-to-creatine ratio in ESRD plus T1D compared with KP and control subjects (ESRD plus T1D vs. control and KP subjects, P ≤ 0.01). The evaluation of the most common scores of psychological and neuropsychological function showed a generally better intellectual profile in control and KP subjects compared with ESRD plus T1D and KD patients. CONCLUSIONS Diabetes and ESRD are associated with a precocious form of brain impairment, chronic cerebrovascular disease, and cognitive decline. In KP-transplanted patients, most of these features appeared to be near normalized after a 5-year follow-up period of sustained normoglycemia. PMID:22190674

  3. Reconstruction and flux analysis of coupling between metabolic pathways of astrocytes and neurons: application to cerebral hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Çakιr, Tunahan; Alsan, Selma; Saybaşιlι, Hale; Akιn, Ata; Ülgen, Kutlu Ö

    2007-01-01

    Background It is a daunting task to identify all the metabolic pathways of brain energy metabolism and develop a dynamic simulation environment that will cover a time scale ranging from seconds to hours. To simplify this task and make it more practicable, we undertook stoichiometric modeling of brain energy metabolism with the major aim of including the main interacting pathways in and between astrocytes and neurons. Model The constructed model includes central metabolism (glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, TCA cycle), lipid metabolism, reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification, amino acid metabolism (synthesis and catabolism), the well-known glutamate-glutamine cycle, other coupling reactions between astrocytes and neurons, and neurotransmitter metabolism. This is, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive attempt at stoichiometric modeling of brain metabolism to date in terms of its coverage of a wide range of metabolic pathways. We then attempted to model the basal physiological behaviour and hypoxic behaviour of the brain cells where astrocytes and neurons are tightly coupled. Results The reconstructed stoichiometric reaction model included 217 reactions (184 internal, 33 exchange) and 216 metabolites (183 internal, 33 external) distributed in and between astrocytes and neurons. Flux balance analysis (FBA) techniques were applied to the reconstructed model to elucidate the underlying cellular principles of neuron-astrocyte coupling. Simulation of resting conditions under the constraints of maximization of glutamate/glutamine/GABA cycle fluxes between the two cell types with subsequent minimization of Euclidean norm of fluxes resulted in a flux distribution in accordance with literature-based findings. As a further validation of our model, the effect of oxygen deprivation (hypoxia) on fluxes was simulated using an FBA-derivative approach, known as minimization of metabolic adjustment (MOMA). The results show the power of the constructed model to simulate

  4. Monitoring of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism Bedside in Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage – A Xenon-CT and Microdialysis Study

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Elham; Engquist, Henrik; Johnson, Ulf; Howells, Timothy; Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth; Nilsson, Pelle; Hillered, Lars; Lewén, Anders; Enblad, Per

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Although 70% of the patients show angiographic vasospasm only 30% develop symptomatic vasospasm defined as delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Early detection and management of reversible ischemia is of critical importance in patients with SAH. Using a bedside Xenon enhanced computerized tomography (Xenon-CT) scanner makes it possible to measure quantitative regional Cerebral blood flow (CBF) bedside in the neurointensive care setting and intracerebral microdialysis (MD) is a method that offers the possibility to monitor the metabolic state of the brain continuously. Here, we present results from nine SAH patients with both MD monitoring and bedside Xenon-CT measurements. CBF measurements were performed within the first 72 h following bleeding. Six out of nine patients developed DCI at a later stage. Five out of six patients who developed DCI had initial global CBF below 26 ml/100 g/min whereas one had 53 ml/100 g/min. The three patients who did not develop clinical vasospasm all had initial global CBF above 27 ml/100 g/min. High lactate/pyruvate (L/P) ratio was associated with lower CBF values in the area surrounding the catheter. Five out of nine patients had L/P ratio ≥25 and four of these patients had CBF ≤ 22 ml/100 g/min. These preliminary results suggest that patients with initially low global CBF on Xenon-CT may be more likely to develop DCI. Initially low global CBF was accompanied with metabolic disturbances determined by the MD. Most importantly, pathological findings on the Xenon-CT and MD could be observed before any clinical signs of DCI. Combining bedside Xenon-CT and MD was found to be useful and feasible. Further studies are needed to evaluate if DCI can be detected before any other signs of DCI to prevent progress to infarction. PMID:24917850

  5. Aspects of cerebral plasticity related to clinical features in acute vestibular neuritis: a "starting point" review from neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Micarelli, A; Chiaravalloti, A; Schillaci, O; Ottaviani, F; Alessandrini, M

    2016-04-01

    Vestibular neuritis (VN) is one of the most common causes of vertigo and is characterised by a sudden unilateral vestibular failure (UVF). Many neuroimaging studies in the last 10 years have focused on brain changes related to sudden vestibular deafferentation as in VN. However, most of these studies, also due to different possibilities across diverse centres, were based on different times of first acquisition from the onset of VN symptoms, neuroimaging techniques, statistical analysis and correlation with otoneurological and psychological findings. In the present review, the authors aim to merge together the similarities and discrepancies across various investigations that have employed neuroimaging techniques and group analysis with the purpose of better understanding about how the brain changes and what characteristic clinical features may relate to each other in the acute phase of VN. Six studies that strictly met inclusion criteria were analysed to assess cortical-subcortical correlates of acute clinical features related to VN. The present review clearly reveals that sudden UVF may induce a wide variety of cortical and subcortical responses - with changes in different sensory modules - as a result of acute plasticity in the central nervous system.

  6. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism refers to all the physical and chemical processes in the body that convert or use energy, ... Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Metabolism. In: Tortora GJ, Derrickson ... Physiology . 14th ed. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons; 2014:chap ...

  7. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... El metabolismo Metabolism Basics Our bodies get the energy they need from food through metabolism, the chemical ... that convert the fuel from food into the energy needed to do everything from moving to thinking ...

  8. Mitochondrial function, fatty acid metabolism, and immune system are relevant features of pig adipose tissue development.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Annie; Louveau, Isabelle; Gondret, Florence; Lebret, Bénédicte; Damon, Marie

    2012-11-15

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the genetic control of fat development in humans and livestock species still require characterization. To gain insights on gene expression patterns associated with genetic propensity for adiposity, we compared subcutaneous adipose tissue (SCAT) transcriptomics profiles from two contrasted pig breeds for body fatness. Samples were obtained from Large White (LW; lean phenotype) and Basque pigs (B; low growth and high fat content) at 35 kg (n = 5 per breed) or 145 kg body weight (n = 10 per breed). Using a custom adipose tissue microarray, we found 271 genes to be differentially expressed between the two breeds at both stages, out of which 123 were highly expressed in LW pigs and 148 genes were highly expressed in B pigs. Functional enrichment analysis based on gene ontology (GO) terms highlighted gene groups corresponding to the mitochondrial energy metabolism in LW pigs, whereas immune response was found significantly enriched in B pigs. Genes associated with lipid metabolism, such as ELOVL6, a gene involved in fatty acid elongation, had a lower expression in B compared with LW pigs. Furthermore, despite enlarged adipocyte diameters and higher plasma leptin concentration, B pigs displayed reduced lipogenic enzyme activities compared with LW pigs at 145 kg. Altogether, our results suggest that the development of adiposity was associated with a progressive worsening of the metabolic status, leading to a low-grade inflammatory state, and may thus be of significant interest for both livestock production and human health.

  9. Mitochondrial-associated metabolic changes and neurodegeneration in Huntington's disease - from clinical features to the bench.

    PubMed

    Rosenstock, Tatiana R; Duarte, Ana I; Rego, A Cristina

    2010-10-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a genetic neurodegenerative disease selectively leading to striatal neurodegeneration, but also affecting the cortex and the hypothalamus. Although it is hard to predict the sequence of cell-damaging events occurring in HD patients, several pathological mechanisms have been proposed to explain HD selective neurodegeneration and disease symptomatology. Abnormalities in mitochondrial function and bioenergetics contribute to cell death and have been reported in HD-affected individuals, both in central and peripheral tissues. Moreover, the latter has been characterized in several HD models. Thus, this review describes the converging mechanisms that lead to mitochondrial and metabolic abnormalities in thoroughly studied in vivo and in vitro HD models, including excitotoxicity, altered calcium handling, changes in mitochondrial structure and dynamics and transcription deregulation, which may represent important disease therapeutic targets. Furthermore, the review describes the current evidences of metabolic disturbances in the brain of HD-affected humans and of peripheral metabolic and mitochondrial changes, weight loss and endocrine abnormalities operating in the whole HD body.

  10. Sterol metabolism in the filasterean Capsaspora owczarzaki has features that resemble both fungi and animals

    PubMed Central

    Molina, María Celeste; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Uttaro, Antonio D.

    2016-01-01

    Sterols are essential for several physiological processes in most eukaryotes. Sterols regulate membrane homeostasis and participate in different signalling pathways not only as precursors of steroid hormones and vitamins, but also through its role in the formation of lipid rafts. Two major types of sterols, cholesterol and ergosterol, have been described so far in the opisthokonts, the clade that comprise animals, fungi and their unicellular relatives. Cholesterol predominates in derived bilaterians, whereas ergosterol is what generally defines fungi. We here characterize, by a combination of bioinformatic and biochemical analyses, the sterol metabolism in the filasterean Capsaspora owczarzaki, a close unicellular relative of animals that is becoming a model organism. We found that C. owczarzaki sterol metabolism combines enzymatic activities that are usually considered either characteristic of fungi or exclusive to metazoans. Moreover, we observe a differential transcriptional regulation of this metabolism across its life cycle. Thus, C. owczarzaki alternates between synthesizing 7-dehydrocholesterol de novo, which happens at the cystic stage, and the partial conversion—via a novel pathway—of incorporated cholesterol into ergosterol, the characteristic fungal sterol, in the filopodial and aggregative stages. PMID:27383626

  11. Sterol metabolism in the filasterean Capsaspora owczarzaki has features that resemble both fungi and animals.

    PubMed

    Najle, Sebastián R; Molina, María Celeste; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Uttaro, Antonio D

    2016-07-01

    Sterols are essential for several physiological processes in most eukaryotes. Sterols regulate membrane homeostasis and participate in different signalling pathways not only as precursors of steroid hormones and vitamins, but also through its role in the formation of lipid rafts. Two major types of sterols, cholesterol and ergosterol, have been described so far in the opisthokonts, the clade that comprise animals, fungi and their unicellular relatives. Cholesterol predominates in derived bilaterians, whereas ergosterol is what generally defines fungi. We here characterize, by a combination of bioinformatic and biochemical analyses, the sterol metabolism in the filasterean Capsaspora owczarzaki, a close unicellular relative of animals that is becoming a model organism. We found that C. owczarzaki sterol metabolism combines enzymatic activities that are usually considered either characteristic of fungi or exclusive to metazoans. Moreover, we observe a differential transcriptional regulation of this metabolism across its life cycle. Thus, C. owczarzaki alternates between synthesizing 7-dehydrocholesterol de novo, which happens at the cystic stage, and the partial conversion-via a novel pathway-of incorporated cholesterol into ergosterol, the characteristic fungal sterol, in the filopodial and aggregative stages.

  12. The Features of Copper Metabolism in the Rat Liver during Development

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Strong interest in copper homeostasis is due to the fact that copper is simultaneously a catalytic co-factor of the vital enzymes, a participant in signaling, and a toxic agent provoking oxidative stress. In mammals, during development copper metabolism is conformed to two types. In embryonic type copper metabolism (ETCM), newborns accumulate copper to high level in the liver because its excretion via bile is blocked; and serum copper concentration is low because ceruloplasmin (the main copper-containing protein of plasma) gene expression is repressed. In the late weaning, the ETCM switches to the adult type copper metabolism (ATCM), which is manifested by the unlocking of copper excretion and the induction of ceruloplasmin gene activity. The considerable progress has been made in the understanding of the molecular basis of copper metabolic turnover in the ATCM, but many aspects of the copper homeostasis in the ETCM remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the copper metabolism during transition from the ETCM (up to 12-days-old) to the ATCM in the rats. It was shown that in the liver, copper was accumulated in the nuclei during the first 5 days of life, and then it was re-located to the mitochondria. In parallel with the mitochondria, copper bulk bound with cytosolic metallothionein was increased. All compartments of the liver cells rapidly lost most of their copper on the 13th day of life. In newborns, serum copper concentration was low, and its major fraction was associated with holo-Cp, however, a small portion of copper was bound to extracellular metallothionein and a substance that was slowly eluted during gel-filtration. In adults, serum copper concentration increased by about a factor of 3, while metallothionein-bound copper level decreased by a factor of 2. During development, the expression level of Cp, Sod1, Cox4i1, Atp7b, Ctr1, Ctr2, Cox17, and Ccs genes was significantly increased, and metallothionein was decreased. Atp7a gene

  13. The Features of Copper Metabolism in the Rat Liver during Development.

    PubMed

    Zatulovskaia, Yulia A; Ilyechova, Ekaterina Y; Puchkova, Ludmila V

    2015-01-01

    Strong interest in copper homeostasis is due to the fact that copper is simultaneously a catalytic co-factor of the vital enzymes, a participant in signaling, and a toxic agent provoking oxidative stress. In mammals, during development copper metabolism is conformed to two types. In embryonic type copper metabolism (ETCM), newborns accumulate copper to high level in the liver because its excretion via bile is blocked; and serum copper concentration is low because ceruloplasmin (the main copper-containing protein of plasma) gene expression is repressed. In the late weaning, the ETCM switches to the adult type copper metabolism (ATCM), which is manifested by the unlocking of copper excretion and the induction of ceruloplasmin gene activity. The considerable progress has been made in the understanding of the molecular basis of copper metabolic turnover in the ATCM, but many aspects of the copper homeostasis in the ETCM remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the copper metabolism during transition from the ETCM (up to 12-days-old) to the ATCM in the rats. It was shown that in the liver, copper was accumulated in the nuclei during the first 5 days of life, and then it was re-located to the mitochondria. In parallel with the mitochondria, copper bulk bound with cytosolic metallothionein was increased. All compartments of the liver cells rapidly lost most of their copper on the 13th day of life. In newborns, serum copper concentration was low, and its major fraction was associated with holo-Cp, however, a small portion of copper was bound to extracellular metallothionein and a substance that was slowly eluted during gel-filtration. In adults, serum copper concentration increased by about a factor of 3, while metallothionein-bound copper level decreased by a factor of 2. During development, the expression level of Cp, Sod1, Cox4i1, Atp7b, Ctr1, Ctr2, Cox17, and Ccs genes was significantly increased, and metallothionein was decreased. Atp7a gene's activity

  14. Effects of a water-soluble cinnamon extract on body composition and features of the metabolic syndrome in pre-diabetic men and women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of supplementation with a water-soluble cinnamon extract (Cinnulin PF®) on body composition and features of the metabolic syndrome. Methods: Twenty-two subjects with prediabetes and the metabolic syndrome (mean ± SD: age, BMI, systolic ...

  15. Treatment of transtentorial herniation unresponsive to hyperventilation using hypertonic saline in dogs: effect on cerebral blood flow and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Adnan I; Wilson, David A; Traystman, Richard J

    2002-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that transtentorial herniation (TTH) represents a state of cerebral ischemia that can be reversed by hypertonic saline. Because of the high mortality associated with TTH, new therapeutic strategies need to be developed for rapid and effective reversal of this process. We produced TTH (defined by acute dilatation of one or both pupils) by creating supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage with autologous blood injection in seven mongrel dogs anesthetized using intravenous pentobarbital and fentanyl. We measured serial rCBF (regional cerebral blood flow) using radiolabeled microspheres in regions around and distant to the hematoma. Cerebral oxygen extraction and oxygen consumption (CMRO2) were measured by serial sampling of cerebral venous blood from the sagittal sinus. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and intracranial pressure (ICP) were continuously monitored. TTH was successfully reversed over a mean period of 25.7 +/- 4.9 minutes after intravenous administration of 23.4% sodium chloride (1.4 mL/kg) in all animals. All measurements were recorded 15, 30, 60, and 90 minutes after administration of 23.4% sodium chloride. Compared to prehematoma ICP (14.1 +/- 1.7 mm Hg, mean +/- SE), elevation in ICP was observed during TTH (36.2 +/- 7.2 mm Hg) with no change in cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) (80.4 +/- 4.7 vs. 76.7 +/- 10.1 mm Hg) because of concomitant elevation in mean arterial pressure. Compared to baseline values, there was a reduction in rCBF (mL/100 gm/min +/- SE) in brainstem (12.1 +/- 2.0 vs. 21.4 +/- 1.4), gray matter (18.2 +/- 2.1 vs. 31.4 +/- 1.8), and white matter (8.6 +/- 1.7 vs.18.7 +/- 0.9) in the hemisphere contralateral to the hematoma; and gray matter (12.9 +/- 2.9 vs. 27.9 +/- 2.2) and white matter (8.3 +/- 2.0 vs.19.9 +/- 1.0) in the ipsilateral hemisphere distant from the hematoma. Administration of 23.4% sodium chloride resulted in reduced ICP at 15 minutes (12.7 +/- 1.4) and 30 minutes (15.6 +/- 3.1) after administration

  16. Different metabolic features of Bacteroides fragilis growing in the presence of glucose and exopolysaccharides of bifidobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rios-Covian, David; Sánchez, Borja; Salazar, Nuria; Martínez, Noelia; Redruello, Begoña; Gueimonde, Miguel; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteroides is among the most abundant microorganism inhabiting the human intestine. They are saccharolytic bacteria able to use dietary or host-derived glycans as energy sources. Some Bacteroides fragilis strains contribute to the maturation of the immune system but it is also an opportunistic pathogen. The intestine is the habitat of most Bifidobacterium species, some of whose strains are considered probiotics. Bifidobacteria can synthesize exopolysaccharides (EPSs), which are complex carbohydrates that may be available in the intestinal environment. We studied the metabolism of B. fragilis when an EPS preparation from bifidobacteria was added to the growth medium compared to its behavior with added glucose. 2D-DIGE coupled with the identification by MALDI-TOF/TOF evidenced proteins that were differentially produced when EPS was added. The results were supported by RT-qPCR gene expression analysis. The intracellular and extracellular pattern of certain amino acids, the redox balance and the α-glucosidase activity were differently affected in EPS with respect to glucose. These results allowed us to hypothesize that three general main events, namely the activation of amino acids catabolism, enhancement of the transketolase reaction from the pentose-phosphate cycle, and activation of the succinate-propionate pathway, promote a shift of bacterial metabolism rendering more reducing power and optimizing the energetic yield in the form of ATP when Bacteroides grow with added EPSs. Our results expand the knowledge about the capacity of B. fragilis for adapting to complex carbohydrates and amino acids present in the intestinal environment. PMID:26347720

  17. Analytic Models of Oxygen and Nutrient Diffusion, Metabolism Dynamics, and Architecture Optimization in Three-Dimensional Tissue Constructs with Applications and Insights in Cerebral Organoids

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion models are important in tissue engineering as they enable an understanding of gas, nutrient, and signaling molecule delivery to cells in cell cultures and tissue constructs. As three-dimensional (3D) tissue constructs become larger, more intricate, and more clinically applicable, it will be essential to understand internal dynamics and signaling molecule concentrations throughout the tissue and whether cells are receiving appropriate nutrient delivery. Diffusion characteristics present a significant limitation in many engineered tissues, particularly for avascular tissues and for cells whose viability, differentiation, or function are affected by concentrations of oxygen and nutrients. This article seeks to provide novel analytic solutions for certain cases of steady-state and nonsteady-state diffusion and metabolism in basic 3D construct designs (planar, cylindrical, and spherical forms), solutions that would otherwise require mathematical approximations achieved through numerical methods. This model is applied to cerebral organoids, where it is shown that limitations in diffusion and organoid size can be partially overcome by localizing metabolically active cells to an outer layer in a sphere, a regionalization process that is known to occur through neuroglial precursor migration both in organoids and in early brain development. The given prototypical solutions include a review of metabolic information for many cell types and can be broadly applied to many forms of tissue constructs. This work enables researchers to model oxygen and nutrient delivery to cells, predict cell viability, study dynamics of mass transport in 3D tissue constructs, design constructs with improved diffusion capabilities, and accurately control molecular concentrations in tissue constructs that may be used in studying models of development and disease or for conditioning cells to enhance survival after insults like ischemia or implantation into the body, thereby providing a

  18. Association between cerebral metabolism and Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test performance in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Melrose, Rebecca J.; Harwood, Dylan; Khoo, Theresa; Mandelkern, Mark; Sultzer, David L.

    2013-01-01

    The copy condition of the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure (ROCF) is sensitive to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathology, but its neural correlates remain unclear. We used FDG-PET to elucidate this association in 77 patients with probable AD. We observed a correlation between ROCF and metabolic rate of bilateral temporal-parietal cortex and occipital lobe, and right frontal lobe. Global and local elements of the ROCF correlated with metabolic rate of these same regions. The copy approach correlated with right lateral temporal cortex. The ROCF appears reflective of posterior temporal-parietal cortex functioning, highlighting the role of visuospatial processing in constructional abilities in AD. PMID:23387510

  19. Fetal PCB syndrome: clinical features, intrauterine growth retardation and possible alteration in calcium metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, F; Hayashi, M

    1985-01-01

    Pregnant mothers with yusho in Fukuoka, Nagasaki and Kochi Prefectures delivered babies with a peculiar clinical manifestation which will be called fetal PCB syndrome (FPS). The birth rate incidences were 3.6% (Fukuoka Prefecture), 4% (Nagasaki Prefecture), 2.9% (Kochi Prefecture) and 3.9% (total). The manifestations consisted of dark brown pigmentation of the skin and the mucous membrane, gingival hyperplasia, exophthalmic edematous eye, dentition at birth, abnormal calcification of the skull as demonstrated by X-ray, rocker bottom heel and high incidence of light for date (low birth weight) babies. We suggest that there may be a possible alteration in calcium metabolism in these babies, related to the fragile egg shells observed in PCB-contaminated birds and to the female hormone-enhancing effect of PCB. The high incidence of low birth weight among these newborns and two other similar studies indicated that PCBs suppress fetal growth. PMID:3921362

  20. Fetal PCB syndrome: clinical features, intrauterine growth retardation and possible alteration in calcium metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, F.; Hayashi, M.

    1985-02-01

    Pregnant mothers with Yusho in Fukuoka, Nagasaki and Kochi Prefectures delivered babies with a peculiar clinical manifestation which will be called fetal PCB syndrome (FPS). The birth rate incidences were 3.6% (Fukuoka Prefecture), 4% (Nagasaki Prefecture), 2.9% (Kochi Prefecture) and 3.9% (total). The manifestations consisted of dark brown pigmentation of the skin and the mucous membrane, gingival hyperplasia, exophthalmic edematous eye, dentition at birth, abnormal calcification of the skull as demonstrated by X-ray, rocker bottom heel and high incidence of light for date (low birth weight) babies. The authors suggest that there may be a possible alteration in calcium metabolism in these babies, related to the fragile egg shells observed in PCB-contaminated birds and to the female hormone-enhancing effect of PCB. The high incidence of low birth weight among these newborns and two other similar studies indicated that PCBs suppress fetal growth.

  1. Physiological and genomic characterization of Arcobacter anaerophilus IR-1 reveals new metabolic features in Epsilonproteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Roalkvam, Irene; Drønen, Karine; Stokke, Runar; Daae, Frida L.; Dahle, Håkon; Steen, Ida H.

    2015-01-01

    In this study we characterized and sequenced the genome of Arcobacter anaerophilus strain IR-1 isolated from enrichment cultures used in nitrate-amended corrosion experiments. A. anaerophilus IR-1 could grow lithoautotrophically on hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide and lithoheterothrophically on thiosulfate and elemental sulfur. In addition, the strain grew organoheterotrophically on yeast extract, peptone, and various organic acids. We show for the first time that Arcobacter could grow on the complex organic substrate tryptone and oxidize acetate with elemental sulfur as electron acceptor. Electron acceptors utilized by most Epsilonproteobacteria, such as oxygen, nitrate, and sulfur, were also used by A. anaerophilus IR-1. Strain IR-1 was also uniquely able to use iron citrate as electron acceptor. Comparative genomics of the Arcobacter strains A. butzleri RM4018, A. nitrofigilis CI and A. anaerophilus IR-1 revealed that the free-living strains had a wider metabolic range and more genes in common compared to the pathogen strain. The presence of genes for NAD+-reducing hydrogenase (hox) and dissimilatory iron reduction (fre) were unique for A. anaerophilus IR-1 among Epsilonproteobacteria. Finally, the new strain had an incomplete denitrification pathway where the end product was nitrite, which is different from other Arcobacter strains where the end product is ammonia. Altogether, our study shows that traditional characterization in combination with a modern genomics approach can expand our knowledge on free-living Arcobacter, and that this complementary approach could also provide invaluable knowledge about the physiology and metabolic pathways in other Epsilonproteobacteria from various environments. PMID:26441916

  2. New Insights on Cytological and Metabolic Features of Ostreopsis cf. ovata Fukuyo (Dinophyceae): A Multidisciplinary Approach

    PubMed Central

    Honsell, Giorgio; Bonifacio, Alois; De Bortoli, Marco; Penna, Antonella; Battocchi, Cecilia; Ciminiello, Patrizia; Dell’Aversano, Carmela; Fattorusso, Ernesto; Sosa, Silvio; Yasumoto, Takeshi; Tubaro, Aurelia

    2013-01-01

    The harmful dinoflagellate Ostreopsis cf. ovata has been causing toxic events along the Mediterranean coasts and other temperate and tropical areas, with increasing frequency during the last decade. Despite many studies, important biological features of this species are still poorly known. An integrated study, using different microscopy and molecular techniques, Raman microspectroscopy and high resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HR LC-MS), was undertaken to elucidate cytological aspects, and identify main metabolites including toxins. The species was genetically identified as O. cf. ovata, Atlantic-Mediterranean clade. The ultrastructural results show unique features of the mucilage network abundantly produced by this species to colonize benthic substrates, with a new role of trichocysts, never described before. The amorphous polysaccharidic component of mucilage appears to derive from pusule fibrous material and mucocysts. In all stages of growth, the cells show an abundant production of lipids. Different developmental stages of chloroplasts are found in the peripheral cytoplasm and in the centre of cell. In vivo Raman microspectroscopy confirms the presence of the carotenoid peridinin in O. cf. ovata, and detects in several specimen the abundant presence of unsaturated lipids structurally related to docosahexaenoic acid. The HR LC-MS analysis reveals that ovatoxin-a is the predominant toxin, together with decreasing amounts of ovatoxin-b, -d/e, -c and putative palytoxin. Toxins concentration on a per cell basis increases from exponential to senescent phase. The results suggest that benthic blooms of this species are probably related to features such as the ability to create a unique mucilaginous sheath covering the sea bottom, associated with the production of potent toxins as palytoxin-like compounds. In this way, O. cf. ovata may be able to rapidly colonize benthic substrates outcompeting other species. PMID:23460837

  3. Clinically Important Features of Porphyrin and Heme Metabolism and the Porphyrias

    PubMed Central

    Besur, Siddesh; Hou, Weihong; Schmeltzer, Paul; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.

    2014-01-01

    Heme, like chlorophyll, is a primordial molecule and is one of the fundamental pigments of life. Disorders of normal heme synthesis may cause human diseases, including certain anemias (X-linked sideroblastic anemias) and porphyrias. Porphyrias are classified as hepatic and erythropoietic porphyrias based on the organ system in which heme precursors (5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), porphobilinogen and porphyrins) are chiefly overproduced. The hepatic porphyrias are further subdivided into acute porphyrias and chronic hepatic porphyrias. The acute porphyrias include acute intermittent, hereditary copro-, variegate and ALA dehydratase deficiency porphyria. Chronic hepatic porphyrias include porphyria cutanea tarda and hepatoerythropoietic porphyria. The erythropoietic porphyrias include congenital erythropoietic porphyria (Gűnther’s disease) and erythropoietic protoporphyria. In this review, we summarize the key features of normal heme synthesis and its differing regulation in liver versus bone marrow. In both organs, principal regulation is exerted at the level of the first and rate-controlling enzyme, but by different molecules (heme in the liver and iron in the bone marrow). We also describe salient clinical, laboratory and genetic features of the eight types of porphyria. PMID:25372274

  4. Clinically important features of porphyrin and heme metabolism and the porphyrias.

    PubMed

    Besur, Siddesh; Hou, Wehong; Schmeltzer, Paul; Bonkovsky, Herbert L

    2014-11-03

    Heme, like chlorophyll, is a primordial molecule and is one of the fundamental pigments of life. Disorders of normal heme synthesis may cause human diseases, including certain anemias (X-linked sideroblastic anemias) and porphyrias. Porphyrias are classified as hepatic and erythropoietic porphyrias based on the organ system in which heme precursors (5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), porphobilinogen and porphyrins) are chiefly overproduced. The hepatic porphyrias are further subdivided into acute porphyrias and chronic hepatic porphyrias. The acute porphyrias include acute intermittent, hereditary copro-, variegate and ALA dehydratase deficiency porphyria. Chronic hepatic porphyrias include porphyria cutanea tarda and hepatoerythropoietic porphyria. The erythropoietic porphyrias include congenital erythropoietic porphyria (Gűnther's disease) and erythropoietic protoporphyria. In this review, we summarize the key features of normal heme synthesis and its differing regulation in liver versus bone marrow. In both organs, principal regulation is exerted at the level of the first and rate-controlling enzyme, but by different molecules (heme in the liver and iron in the bone marrow). We also describe salient clinical, laboratory and genetic features of the eight types of porphyria.

  5. Technical and experimental features of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of brain glycogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Soares, Ana Francisca; Gruetter, Rolf; Lei, Hongxia

    2016-12-26

    In the brain, glycogen is a source of glucose not only in emergency situations but also during normal brain activity. Altered brain glycogen metabolism is associated with energetic dysregulation in pathological conditions, such as diabetes or epilepsy. Both in humans and animals, brain glycogen levels have been assessed non-invasively by Carbon-13 Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy ((13)C-MRS) in vivo. With this approach, glycogen synthesis and degradation may be followed in real time, thereby providing valuable insights into brain glycogen dynamics. However, compared to the liver and muscle, where glycogen is abundant, the sensitivity for detection of brain glycogen by (13)C-MRS is inherently low. In this review we focus on strategies used to optimize the sensitivity for (13)C-MRS detection of glycogen. Namely, we explore several technical perspectives, such as magnetic field strength, field homogeneity, coil design, decoupling, and localization methods. Furthermore, we also address basic principles underlying the use of (13)C-labeled precursors to enhance the detectable glycogen signal, emphasizing specific experimental aspects relevant for obtaining kinetic information on brain glycogen.

  6. Objective 3D surface evaluation of intracranial electrophysiologic correlates of cerebral glucose metabolic abnormalities in children with focal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jeong-Won; Asano, Eishi; Kumar Pilli, Vinod; Nakai, Yasuo; Chugani, Harry T; Juhász, Csaba

    2017-03-21

    To determine the spatial relationship between 2-deoxy-2[(18) F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) metabolic and intracranial electrophysiological abnormalities in children undergoing two-stage epilepsy surgery, statistical parametric mapping (SPM) was used to correlate hypo- and hypermetabolic cortical regions with ictal and interictal electrocorticography (ECoG) changes mapped onto the brain surface. Preoperative FDG-PET scans of 37 children with intractable epilepsy (31 with non-localizing MRI) were compared with age-matched pseudo-normal pediatric control PET data. Hypo-/hypermetabolic maps were transformed to 3D-MRI brain surface to compare the locations of metabolic changes with electrode coordinates of the ECoG-defined seizure onset zone (SOZ) and interictal spiking. While hypometabolic clusters showed a good agreement with the SOZ on the lobar level (sensitivity/specificity = 0.74/0.64), detailed surface-distance analysis demonstrated that large portions of ECoG-defined SOZ and interictal spiking area were located at least 3 cm beyond hypometabolic regions with the same statistical threshold (sensitivity/specificity = 0.18-0.25/0.94-0.90 for overlap 3-cm distance); for a lower threshold, sensitivity for SOZ at 3 cm increased to 0.39 with a modest compromise of specificity. Performance of FDG-PET SPM was slightly better in children with smaller as compared with widespread SOZ. The results demonstrate that SPM utilizing age-matched pseudocontrols can reliably detect the lobe of seizure onset. However, the spatial mismatch between metabolic and EEG epileptiform abnormalities indicates that a more complete SOZ detection could be achieved by extending intracranial electrode coverage at least 3 cm beyond the metabolic abnormality. Considering that the extent of feasible electrode coverage is limited, localization information from other modalities is particularly important to optimize grid coverage in cases of large hypometabolic cortex. Hum Brain Mapp, 2017. © 2017

  7. Tin chloride enhances parvalbumin-positive interneuron survival by modulating heme metabolism in a model of cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Li Volti, Giovanni; Zappalà, Agata; Leggio, Gian Marco; Mazzola, Carmen; Drago, Filippo; La Delia, Francesco; Serapide, Maria Francesca; Pellitteri, Rosalia; Giannone, Ignazio; Spatuzza, Michela; Cicirata, Valentina; Cicirata, Federico

    2011-03-29

    SnCl(2) has been reported to increase the expression of heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1), a major antioxidant enzyme, and to decrease ischemic injury, in non-nervous tissues. This study examined the neuroprotective effect of SnCl(2) in the hippocampus of rats submitted to cerebral ischemia. SnCl(2) was administered 18 h before bilateral carotids obstruction. Changes in HO-1 expression and activity, heme content, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and parvalbumin positive interneuron survival were studied. Thereafter both behavior and memory recovery were tested. The administration of SnCl(2) increased the expression of HO-1 protein and HO activity in the hippocampus and concomitantly decreased heme content at both mitochondrial and nuclear level. Furthermore, ischemized animals showed a strong increase in iNOS expression in the hippocampus, where a loss of parvalbumin positive interneurons also occurred. Pre-treatment with SnCl(2), decreased both iNOS expression in ischemized rats and increased cell survival. The beneficial effects of SnCl(2) were prevented by concomitant treatment with SnMP, a strong inhibitor of HO activity. SnCl(2) also caused an improvement in short term memory recovery. Our results showed that following SnCl(2) administration, HO-1 is strongly induced in the hippocampus and modulate iNOS expression, resulting in a strong neuroprotective effect.

  8. Ameliorating effect of hypothalamic brain-derived neurotrophic factor against impaired glucose metabolism after cerebral ischemic stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Harada, Shinichi; Fujita-Hamabe, Wakako; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2012-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a member of the neurotrophin family, has potent neuroprotective effects against brain injury. We recently reported that glucose intolerance/hyperglycemia could be induced by ischemic stress (i.e., post-ischemic glucose intolerance) following ischemic neuronal damage. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the effects of BDNF on the development of post-ischemic glucose intolerance and ischemic neuronal damage. Male ddY mice were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 2 h. On day 1, the expression levels of BDNF were significantly decreased in the cortex, hypothalamus, liver, skeletal muscle, and pancreas. The expression levels of tyrosine kinase B receptor, a BDNF receptor, decreased in the hypothalamus and liver and increased in the skeletal muscle and pancreas, but remained unchanged in the cortex. Intrahypothalamic administration of BDNF (50 ng/mouse) suppressed the development of post-ischemic glucose intolerance on day 1 and neuronal damage on day 3 after MCAO. In the liver and skeletal muscle, the expression levels of insulin receptors decreased, while gluconeogenic enzyme levels increased on day 1 after MCAO. These changes completely recovered to normal levels in the presence of BDNF. These results indicate that regulation of post-ischemic glucose intolerance by BDNF may suppress ischemic neuronal damage.

  9. Tomographic imaging of the spleen: the role of morphological and metabolic features in differentiating benign from malignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Iodice, Delfina; Cozzolino, Immacolata; Segreto, Sabrina; Capece, Sergio; Sica, Giacomo; Magliulo, Mario; Ciancia, Giuseppe; Pace, Leonardo; Salvatore, Marco

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the tomographic features in differentiating benign from malignant splenic diseases, 54 patients with a cytohistological examination and a contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography (ce-MDCT) and/or positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) were retrospectively selected. Significant associations were observed between ce-MDCT Pattern 3 (focal hyperdense lesion) and Pattern 4 (infarcts/cysts) as well as PET/CT Pattern 3 (focal photopenia/diffuse uptakemetabolic data do not improve the performance of morphological patterns.

  10. A Systematic Review of the Effects of Plant Compared with Animal Protein Sources on Features of Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chalvon-Demersay, Tristan; Azzout-Marniche, Dalila; Arfsten, Judith; Egli, Léonie; Gaudichon, Claire; Karagounis, Leonidas G; Tomé, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Dietary protein may play an important role in the prevention of metabolic dysfunctions. However, the way in which the protein source affects these dysfunctions has not been clearly established. The aim of the current systematic review was to compare the impact of plant- and animal-sourced dietary proteins on several features of metabolic syndrome in humans. The PubMed database was searched for both chronic and acute interventional studies, as well as observational studies, in healthy humans or those with metabolic dysfunctions, in which the impact of animal and plant protein intake was compared while using the following variables: cholesterolemia and triglyceridemia, blood pressure, glucose homeostasis, and body composition. Based on data extraction, we observed that soy protein consumption (with isoflavones), but not soy protein alone (without isoflavones) or other plant proteins (pea and lupine proteins, wheat gluten), leads to a 3% greater decrease in both total and LDL cholesterol compared with animal-sourced protein ingestion, especially in individuals with high fasting cholesterol concentrations. This observation was made when animal proteins were provided as a whole diet rather than given supplementally. Some observational studies reported an inverse association between plant protein intake and systolic and diastolic blood pressure, but this was not confirmed by intervention studies. Moreover, plant protein (wheat gluten, soy protein) intake as part of a mixed meal resulted in a lower postprandial insulin response than did whey. This systematic review provides some evidence that the intake of soy protein associated with isoflavones may prevent the onset of risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease, i.e., hypercholesterolemia and hypertension, in humans. However, we were not able to draw any further conclusions from the present work on the positive effects of plant proteins relating to glucose homeostasis and body composition.

  11. Differences in daily rhythms of wrist temperature between obese and normal-weight women: associations with metabolic syndrome features.

    PubMed

    Corbalán-Tutau, M D; Madrid, J A; Ordovás, J M; Smith, C E; Nicolás, F; Garaulet, M

    2011-05-01

    The circadian rhythm of core body temperature is associated with widespread physiological effects. However, studies with other more practical temperature measures, such as wrist (WT) and proximal temperatures, are still scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate whether obesity is associated with differences in mean WT values or in its daily rhythmicity patterns. Daily patterns of cortisol, melatonin, and different metabolic syndrome (MetS) features were also analyzed in an attempt to clarify the potential association between chronodisruption and MetS. The study was conducted on 20 normal-weight women (age: 38 ± 11 yrs and BMI: 22 ± 2.6 kg/m(2)) and 50 obese women (age: 42 ± 10 yrs and BMI: 33.5 ± 3.2 kg/m(2)) (mean ± SEM). Skin temperature was measured over a 3-day period every 10 min with the "Thermochron iButton." Rhythmic parameters were obtained using an integrated package for time-series analysis, "Circadianware." Obese women displayed significantly lower mean WT (34.1°C ± 0.3°C) with a more flattened 24-h pattern, a lower-quality rhythm, and a higher intraday variability (IV). Particularly interesting were the marked differences between obese and normal-weight women in the secondary WT peak in the postprandial period (second-harmonic power [P2]), considered as a marker of chronodisruption and of metabolic alterations. WT rhythmicity characteristics were related to MetS features, obesity-related proteins, and circadian markers, such as melatonin. In summary, obese women displayed a lower-quality WT daily rhythm with a more flattened pattern (particularly in the postprandial period) and increased IV, which suggests a greater fragmentation of the rest/activity rhythm compared to normal-weight women. These 24-h changes were associated with higher MetS risk.

  12. Randomised controlled trial of effect of whole soy replacement diet on features of metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhao-min; Ho, Suzanne; Hao, Yuan-tao; Chen, Yu-ming; Woo, Jean; Wong, Samuel Yeung-shan; He, Qiqiang; Tse, Lap Ah; Chen, Bailing; Su, Xue-fen; Lao, Xiang-qian; Wong, Carmen; Chan, Ruth; Ling, Wen-hua

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a public health problem in postmenopausal women. Whole soy foods are rich in unsaturated fats, high quality plant protein and various bioactive phytochemicals that may have a beneficial role in the management of MetS. The aim of the study is to examine the effect of whole soy replacement diet on the features of MetS among postmenopausal women. Methods and analysis This will be a 12-month, randomised, single-blind, parallel controlled trial among 208 postmenopausal women at risk of MetS or with early MetS. After 4 weeks' run-in, subjects will be randomly allocated to one of two intervention groups, whole soy replacement group or control group, each for 12 months. Subjects in the whole soy group will be required to include four servings of whole soy foods (containing 25 g soy protein) into their daily diet iso-calorically, replacing red or processed meat and high fat dairy products. Subjects in the control group will remain on a usual diet. The outcome measures will include metabolic parameters as well as a 10-year risk for ischaemic cardiovascular disease. We hypothesise that the whole soy substitution diet will notably improve features of MetS in postmenopausal women at risk of MetS or with early MetS. The study will have both theoretical and practical significance. If proven effective, the application of the whole soy replacement diet model will be a safe, practical and economical strategy for MetS prevention and treatment. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval has been obtained from the Ethics Committee of the Chinese University of Hong Kong. The results will be disseminated via conference presentations and papers in academic peer reviewed journals. Data files will be deposited in an accessible repository. Trial registration number NCT02610322. PMID:27678545

  13. Inhibition of central angiotensin converting enzyme ameliorates scopolamine induced memory impairment in mice: role of cholinergic neurotransmission, cerebral blood flow and brain energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tota, Santoshkumar; Nath, Chandishwar; Najmi, Abul Kalam; Shukla, Rakesh; Hanif, Kashif

    2012-06-15

    Evidences indicate that inhibition of central Renin angiotensin system (RAS) ameliorates memory impairment in animals and humans. Earlier we have reported involvement of central angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in streptozotocin induced neurodegeneration and memory impairment. The present study investigated the role of central ACE in cholinergic neurotransmission, brain energy metabolism and cerebral blood flow (CBF) in model of memory impairment induced by injection of scopolamine in mice. Perindopril (0.05 and 0.1 mg/kg, PO) was given orally for one week before administration of scopolamine (3mg/kg, IP). Then, memory function was evaluated by Morris water maze and passive avoidance tests. CBF was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry. Biochemical and molecular parameters were estimated after the completion of behavioral studies. Scopolamine caused impairment in memory which was associated with reduced CBF, acetylcholine (ACh) level and elevated acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) level. Perindopril ameliorated scopolamine induced amnesia in both the behavioral paradigms. Further, perindopril prevented elevation of AChE and MDA level in mice brain. There was a significant increase in CBF and ACh level in perindopril treated mice. However, scopolamine had no significant effect on ATP level and mRNA expression of angiotensin receptors and ACE in cortex and hippocampus. But, perindopril significantly decreased ACE activity in brain without affecting its mRNA expression. The study clearly showed the interaction between ACE and cholinergic neurotransmission and beneficial effect of perindopril can be attributed to improvement in central cholinergic neurotransmission and CBF.

  14. Cerebral metabolic responses to 5-HT2A/C receptor activation in mice with genetically modified serotonin transporter (SERT) expression.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Neil; Ferrington, Linda; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Kelly, Paul A T

    2011-01-01

    Variation in the human serotonin transporter gene (hSERT; 5-HTT) resulting in a life-long alteration in SERT function influences anxiety and the risk of developing affective disorders. The mechanisms underlying the influence of the hSERT gene on these phenotypes remain unclear but may involve altered 5-HT receptor function. Here we characterise the cerebral metabolic response to 5-HT(2A/C) receptor activation in two transgenic mouse models of altered SERT function, SERT knock-out (SERT KO) and hSERT over-expressing (hSERT OE) mice, to test the hypothesis that genetically mediated variability in SERT expression alters 5-HT(2A/C) function. We found that a constitutive increase in SERT expression (hSERT OE) enhanced, whereas a constitutive decrease in SERT expression (SERT KO) attenuated, 5-HT(2A/C) function. Therefore, altered 5-HT(2A/C) receptor functioning in response to hSERT gene variation may contribute to its influence on affective phenotypes.

  15. The measurement of sequential changes in cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism by positron computed tomography with continuous inhalation of oxygen-15 labeled gases

    SciTech Connect

    Tanada, S.; Yonekura, Y.; Senda, M.; Nishimura, K.; Tamaki, N.; Saji, H.; Fujita, T.; Kobayashi, A.; Taki, W.; Ishikawa, M.

    1984-01-01

    The use of continuous inhalation of oxygen-15 labeled gases is a widely accepted method to measure regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen metabolism (CMRO/sub 2/) with positron computed tomography (PCT). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility to measure sequential changes in CBF and CMRO/sub 2/ by PCT. The functional images of CBF, oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), and CMRO/sub 2/ were obtained using continuous inhalation of oxygen-15 labeled carbon dioxide and oxygen. The effects of spinal drainage in CBF and CMRO/sub 2/ were studied in patients with hydrocephalus following subarachnoid hemorrhage due to the rupture of intracranial aneurysm. Following the measurement in control state, 20 ml of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were withdrawn gradually through lumbar puncture, and sequential PCT scans were performed. CBF and CMRO/sub 2/ were markedly depressed in the case with hydrocephalus. The drainage of CSF significantly improved OEF and CMRO/sub 2/, whereas CBF remained depressed. In patients with chronic cerebrovascular disease, the changes in CBF were studied with inhalation of 5% carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/). CO/sub 2/ loading demonstrated the increase in CBF, while poor regional increase was observed in ''moyamoya'' disease, which permitted the assessment of vascular response to the elevation of plasma CO/sub 2/. The authors preliminary work indicated the potential usefulness of sequential PCT to study the changes in CBF and CMRO/sub 2/ with various interventions.

  16. Uncoupling Protein 2 (UCP2) Function in the Brain as Revealed by the Cerebral Metabolism of (1-(13)C)-Glucose.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Laura; Rial, Eduardo; Cerdan, Sebastian; Satrustegui, Jorgina

    2017-01-01

    The mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate transporter Aralar/AGC1/Slc25a12 is critically involved in brain aspartate synthesis, and AGC1 deficiency results in a drastic fall of brain aspartate levels in humans and mice. It has recently been described that the uncoupling protein UCP2 transports four carbon metabolites including aspartate. Since UCP2 is expressed in several brain cell types and AGC1 is mainly neuronal, we set to test whether UCP2 could be a mitochondrial aspartate carrier in the brain glial compartment. The study of the cerebral metabolism of (1-(13)C)-glucose in vivo in wild type and UCP2-knockout mice showed no differences in C3 or C2 labeling of aspartate, suggesting that UCP2 does not function as a mitochondrial aspartate carrier in brain. However, surprisingly, a clear decrease (of about 30-35 %) in the fractional enrichment of glutamate, glutamine and GABA was observed in the brains of UCP2-KO mice which was not associated with differences in either glucose or lactate enrichments. The results suggest that the dilution in the labeling of glutamate and its downstream metabolites could originate from the uptake of an unlabeled substrate that could not leave the matrix via UCP2 becoming trapped in the matrix. Understanding the nature of the unlabeled substrate and its precursor(s) as alternative substrates to glucose is of interest in the context of neurological diseases associated with UCP2.

  17. Changes in cerebral metabolism during ketogenic diet in patients with primary brain tumors: (1)H-MRS study.

    PubMed

    Artzi, Moran; Liberman, Gilad; Vaisman, Nachum; Bokstein, Felix; Vitinshtein, Faina; Aizenstein, Orna; Ben Bashat, Dafna

    2017-04-01

    Normal brain cells depend on glucose metabolism, yet they have the flexibility to switch to the usage of ketone bodies during caloric restriction. In contrast, tumor cells lack genomic and metabolic flexibility and are largely dependent on glucose. Ketogenic-diet (KD) was suggested as a therapeutic option for malignant brain cancer. This study aimed to detect metabolic brain changes in patients with malignant brain gliomas on KD using proton magnetic-resonance-spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS). Fifty MR scans were performed longitudinally in nine patients: four patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GB) treated with KD in addition to bevacizumab; one patient with gliomatosis-cerebri treated with KD only; and four patients with recurrent GB who did not receive KD. MR scans included conventional imaging and (1)H-MRS acquired from normal appearing-white-matter (NAWM) and lesion. High adherence to KD was obtained only in two patients, based on high urine ketones; in these two patients ketone bodies, Acetone and Acetoacetate were detected in four MR spectra-three within the NAWM and one in the lesion area -4 and 25 months following initiation of the diet. No ketone-bodies were detected in the control group. In one patient with gliomatosis-cerebri, who adhered to the diet for 3 years and showed stable disease, an increase in glutamin + glutamate and reduction in N-Acetyl-Aspartate and myo-inositol were detected during KD. (1)H-MRS was able to detect ketone-bodies in patients with brain tumors who adhered to KD. Yet it remains unclear whether accumulation of ketone bodies is due to increased brain uptake or decreased utilization of ketone bodies within the brain.

  18. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... and intestines. Several of the hormones of the endocrine system are involved in controlling the rate and direction ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Endocrine System What Can I Do About My High Metabolism? ...

  19. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms. Metabolic diseases and conditions include: Hyperthyroidism (pronounced: hi-per-THIGH-roy-dih-zum). Hyperthyroidism is caused ... or through surgery or radiation treatments. Hypothyroidism (pronounced: hi-po-THIGH-roy-dih-zum). Hypothyroidism is caused ...

  20. Metabolic aspects of acute cerebral hypoxia during extracorporeal circulation and their modification induced by acetyl-carnitine treatment.

    PubMed

    Corbucci, G G; Menichetti, A; Cogliatti, A; Nicoli, P; Arduini, A; Damonti, W; Marchionni, A; Calvani, M

    1992-01-01

    Following their previous research experiences in human tissue hypoxia, in the present study the authors. investigated the metabolic effects of acute brain hypoxia in a group of patients in course of extracorporeal circulation for aorto-pulmonary bypass. One hundred subjects were treated, half with a placebo and half with acetyl-carnitine to evaluate the effects of oxidative stress in some brain plasmatic metabolites and to verify the effect of acetyl-carnitine on the tissue energy capacity. The levels of lactate, pyruvate, succinate and fumarate showed a significant imbalance due to hypoxia, while the acetyl-carnitine treatment confined the metabolic gradients within physiological limits. This means that during the course of extracorporeal circulation brain hypoxia plays a pathological role assuming the typical picture of cellular oxidative damage and the acetyl-carnitine antagonizes these deleterious effects of hypoxia by a protective mechanism on the energy processes and then on the cellular enzymic activities. In this regard, the d-tyrosine levels, considered as a proteolytic index, confirm the action of acetyl-carnitine on the cell morpho-functional integrity.

  1. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  2. Genome-Scale NAD(H/+) Availability Patterns as a Differentiating Feature between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Scheffersomyces stipitis in Relation to Fermentative Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Alejandro; Aroca, German; Conejeros, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Scheffersomyces stipitis is a yeast able to ferment pentoses to ethanol, unlike Saccharomyces cerevisiae, it does not present the so-called overflow phenomenon. Metabolic features characterizing the presence or not of this phenomenon have not been fully elucidated. This work proposes that genome-scale metabolic response to variations in NAD(H/+) availability characterizes fermentative behavior in both yeasts. Thus, differentiating features in S. stipitis and S. cerevisiae were determined analyzing growth sensitivity response to changes in available reducing capacity in relation to ethanol production capacity and overall metabolic flux span. Using genome-scale constraint-based metabolic models, phenotypic phase planes and shadow price analyses, an excess of available reducing capacity for growth was found in S. cerevisiae at every metabolic phenotype where growth is limited by oxygen uptake, while in S. stipitis this was observed only for a subset of those phenotypes. Moreover, by using flux variability analysis, an increased metabolic flux span was found in S. cerevisiae at growth limited by oxygen uptake, while in S. stipitis flux span was invariant. Therefore, each yeast can be characterized by a significantly different metabolic response and flux span when growth is limited by oxygen uptake, both features suggesting a higher metabolic flexibility in S. cerevisiae. By applying an optimization-based approach on the genome-scale models, three single reaction deletions were found to generate in S. stipitis the reducing capacity availability pattern found in S. cerevisiae, two of them correspond to reactions involved in the overflow phenomenon. These results show a close relationship between the growth sensitivity response given by the metabolic network and fermentative behavior. PMID:24489927

  3. Reproductive, endocrine and metabolic feto-maternal features and placental gene expression in a swine breed with obesity/leptin resistance.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Bulnes, A; Torres-Rovira, L; Ovilo, C; Astiz, S; Gomez-Izquierdo, E; Gonzalez-Añover, P; Pallares, P; Perez-Solana, M L; Sanchez-Sanchez, R

    2012-03-01

    The current study was conducted in a swine breed (Iberian pig) with a genotype that predisposed the pig to obesity. The aim of the study was to determine the morphological, metabolomic and endocrine features of early conceptuses and to elucidate how placental gene expression (related to placentation, angiogenesis and fetal nutrition), maternal hormones and the metabolome affect the fetal environment and fetal growth. Conceptus viability and growth were found to be related to maternal endocrine (plasma progesterone levels) and metabolic features (plasma levels of leptin, cholesterol, HDL-c, LDL-c and triglycerides). These features were related to the placental expression of the vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) and leptin (LEP) genes, the placental efficiency and, thus, the nutrition and the metabolism of the fetus (availability of glucose, triglycerides and cholesterol, as HDL-c). Viability of conceptuses in females with evidence of dyslipidemia (low plasma levels of total cholesterol due to low HDL-c concentration but high levels of triglycerides) was diminished. The availability of nutrients and metabolic substrates to the conceptus was also affected in females with higher fat deposition and evidence of dyslipidemia. In conclusion, the conceptus viability and growth appear to be strongly related to maternal metabolic features and, thus, affected in females with alterations in lipid metabolism.

  4. Therapeutic implications of melatonin in cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Rathnasamy, Gurugirijha; Ling, Eng-Ang; Kaur, Charanjit

    2014-12-01

    Cerebral edema/brain edema refers to the accumulation of fluid in the brain and is one of the fatal conditions that require immediate medical attention. Cerebral edema develops as a consequence of cerebral trauma, cerebral infarction, hemorrhages, abscess, tumor, hypoxia, and other toxic or metabolic factors. Based on the causative factors cerebral edema is differentiated into cytotoxic cerebral edema, vasogenic cerebral edema, osmotic and interstitial cerebral edema. Treatment of cerebral edema depends on timely diagnosis and medical assistance. Pragmatic treatment strategies such as antihypertensive medications, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, barbiturates, steroids, glutamate and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists and trometamol are used in clinical practice. Although the above mentioned treatment approaches are being used, owing to the complexity of the mechanisms involved in cerebral edema, a single therapeutic strategy which could ameliorate cerebral edema is yet to be identified. However, recent experimental studies have suggested that melatonin, a neurohormone produced by the pineal gland, could be an effective alternative for treating cerebral edema. In animal models of stroke, melatonin was not only shown to reduce cerebral edema but also preserved the blood brain barrier. Melatonin's beneficial effects were attributed to its properties, such as being a potent anti-oxidant, and its ability to cross the blood brain barrier within minutes after its administration. This review summarizes the beneficial effects of melatonin when used for treating cerebral edema.

  5. Regulatory function of a malleable protein matrix as a novel fermented whey product on features defining the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, J; Millette, E; Trottier, E; Précourt, L-P; Dupont, C; Lemieux, P

    2010-06-01

    Previously, we reported that a malleable protein matrix (MPM), composed of whey fermented by a proprietary Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens strain, has immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. MPM consumption leads to a considerable reduction in the cytokine and chemokine production (tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta, and interleukin-6), thus lowering chronic inflammation or metaflammation. Inhibition of metaflammation should provide positive impact, particularly in the context of dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and hypertension. In this study, we investigated whether short-term MPM supplementation ameliorates those features of metabolic syndrome (MetS). The ability of MPM to potentially regulate triglyceride level, cholesterol level, blood glucose level, and hypertension was evaluated in different animal models. MPM lowers triglyceride level by 37% (P < .05) in a poloxamer 407 dyslipidemia-induced rat model. It also reduces total cholesterol by 18% (P < .05) and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol level by 32% (P < .05) and raises high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol level by 17% (P < .01) in Syrian Golden hamsters fed a high fat/high cholesterol diet for 2 weeks. MPM reestablishes the fasting glucose insulin ratio index to normal levels (P = .07) in this latter model and lowers the plasma glucose level area under the curve (-10%, P = .09) in fructose-fed rats after 2 weeks of treatment. In spontaneously hypertensive rats, MPM-treated animals showed a reduction of SBP by at least 13% (P < .05) for 4 weeks. Results from this study suggest that MPM is a functional ingredient with beneficial effects on lipid metabolism, blood glucose control, and hypertension that might contribute to the management of MetS and thus reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases.

  6. Analysis of Expressed Genes of the Bacterium ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma Mali’ Highlights Key Features of Virulence and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Siewert, Christin; Luge, Toni; Duduk, Bojan; Seemüller, Erich; Büttner, Carmen; Sauer, Sascha; Kube, Michael

    2014-01-01

    ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma mali’ is a phytopathogenic bacterium of the family Acholeplasmataceae assigned to the class Mollicutes. This causative agent of the apple proliferation colonizes in Malus domestica the sieve tubes of the plant phloem resulting in a range of symptoms such as witches’- broom formation, reduced vigor and affecting size and quality of the crop. The disease is responsible for strong economical losses in Europe. Although the genome sequence of the pathogen is available, there is only limited information on expression of selected genes and metabolic key features that have not been examined on the transcriptomic or proteomic level so far. This situation is similar to many other phytoplasmas. In the work presented here, RNA-Seq and mass spectrometry shotgun techniques were applied on tissue samples from Nicotiana occidentalis infected by ‘Ca. P. mali’ strain AT providing insights into transcriptome and proteome of the pathogen. Data analysis highlights expression of 208 genes including 14 proteins located in the terminal inverted repeats of the linear chromosome. Beside a high portion of house keeping genes, the recently discussed chaperone GroES/GroEL is expressed. Furthermore, gene expression involved in formation of a type IVB and of the Sec-dependent secretion system was identified as well as the highly expressed putative pathogenicity–related SAP11-like effector protein. Metabolism of phytoplasmas depends on the uptake of spermidine/putescine, amino acids, co-factors, carbohydrates and in particular malate/citrate. The expression of these transporters was confirmed and the analysis of the carbohydrate cycle supports the suggested alternative energy-providing pathway for phytoplasmas releasing acetate and providing ATP. The phylogenetic analyses of malate dehydrogenase and acetate kinase in phytoplasmas show a closer relatedness to the Firmicutes in comparison to Mycoplasma species indicating an early divergence of the

  7. Alterations in local cerebral metabolic rates for glucose (LCMRGlc) in childhood epilepsies as determined with FDG and PET

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, M.E.; Chugani, H.T.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Engel, Jr.

    1985-05-01

    The authors investigated LCMRGlc in Lennox-Gastant Syndrome (LGS) (n=15), infantile spasm (IS) (n=14) and Sturge-Weber Syndrome (SWS) (n=5). In children with LGS, 3 distinct metabolic patterns are seen interically: 1) unilateral focal hypometabolism in frontal or temporal lobes, 2) unilateral diffuse hypometabolism, and 3) bilateral diffuse hypometabolism. Therapeutic implications of this classification are: surgical resection in focal (i.e., as for partial epilepsy), corpus callosotomy in diffuse unilateral, and elimination of surgery for those with bilateral diffuse hypometabolism. Babies with idiopathic IS showed symmetrical hypometabolism of lenticular nuclei and midbrain/brain stem compared to cortex and is characterized by slightly better prognosis. In contrast, babies with symtomatic IS had additional CMRGlc disturbances such as bilateral assymetric and multi focal hypometabolism in infant with neurofibromatosis; right parieto-occipital hypometabolims in infant with tuberous sclerosis; intense hypermetabolism of hypothalamus (34.5 vs 3.18 ..mu..moles/-min/100g in other regions) in another where x-ray CT showed only obstructive hydrocephalus. Findings support classical notion of subcortical involvement in this disorder. In SWS, PET showed marked hypometabolism in affected hemisphere in older children, while a 9 month old showed increased LCMRGlc unilaterally (40-50 vs 28-44 ..mu.. moles/min/100g contralateral) with cross cerebellar hypermetabolism (48-50 vs 27-31 ..mu.. moles/min/100g) with no behavioral or EEG evidence of seizure during study. PET studies of LCMRGlc appear sensitive and useful in classifying heterogeneous syndromes into subtypes regarding differential therapy and prognosis, and provide more comprehensive identification of sites of disturbance for investigating mechanisms of these disorders.

  8. Neuropathological Changes and Clinical Features of Autism Spectrum Disorder Participants Are Similar to that Reported in Congenital and Chronic Cerebral Toxoplasmosis in Humans and Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prandota, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Anatomic, histopathologic, and MRI/SPET studies of autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) patients' brains confirm existence of very early developmental deficits. In congenital and chronic murine toxoplasmosis several cerebral anomalies also have been reported, and worldwide, approximately two billion people are chronically infected with T. "gondii"…

  9. First Chemical Feature Based Pharmacophore Modeling of Potent Retinoidal Retinoic Acid Metabolism Blocking Agents (RAMBAs): Identification of Novel RAMBA Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Purushottamachar, Puranik; Patel, Jyoti B.; Gediya, Lalji K; Clement, Omoshile O.; Njar, Vincent C. O.

    2011-01-01

    The first three-dimensional (3D) pharmacophore model was developed for potent retinoidal retinoic acid metabolism blocking agents (RAMBAs) with IC50 values ranging from 0.0009 to 5.84 nM. The seven common chemical features in these RAMBAs as deduced by the Catalyst/HipHop program include five hydrophobic groups (hydrophobes), one hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA) and one ring aromatic group. Using the pharmacophore model as a 3D search query against NCI and Maybridge conformational Catalyst formatted databases; we retrieved several compounds with different structures (scaffolds) as hits. Twenty one retrieved hits were tested for RAMBA activity at 100 nM concentration. The most potent of these compounds, NCI10308597 and HTS01914 showed inhibitory potencies less (54.7% and 53.2%, respectively, at 100 nM) than those of our best previously reported RAMBAs VN/12-1 and VN/14-1 (90% and 86%, respectively, at 100 nM). Docking studies using a CYP26A1 homology model revealed that our most potent RAMBAs showed similar binding to the one observed for a series of RAMBAs reported previously by others. Our data shows the potential of our pharmacophore model in identifying structurally diverse and potent RAMBAs. Further refinement of the model and searches of other robust databases is currently in progress with a view to identifying and optimizing new leads. PMID:22130607

  10. Hypernatraemia in cerebral disorders

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, W. H.

    1962-01-01

    Six patients are described in whom cerebral damage was associated with raised plasma sodium and chloride concentrations and with extremely low urinary outputs of sodium and chloride. The patients were not clinically dehydrated and direct determinations showed that the blood and plasma volumes, the endogenous creatinine clearance, and the urinary output of antidiuretic hormone were normal. For these and other reasons it is concluded that the metabolic picture results not from diminished circulatory volume, water deficiency, sodium deficiency, undetected diabetes insipidus or osmotic diuresis, but from the cerebral damage itself. In these and other cited cases, the cerebral damage was localized chiefly in the frontal lobes, hypothalamus or lower brain-stem, thus suggesting a descending pathway, the relationship of which to the pineal area controlling aldosterone secretion requires clarification. Images PMID:13920001

  11. [Cerebral circulation and metabolism in the patients with higher brain dysfunction caused by chronic minor traumatic brain injury: a study by the positron emission tomography in twenty subjects with normal MRI findings].

    PubMed

    Kabasawa, Hidehiro; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Iida, Akihiko; Matsubara, Michitaka

    2002-06-01

    Many individuals are affected on their higher brain functions, such as intelligence, memory, and attention, even after minor traumatic brain injury (MTBI). Although higher brain dysfunction is based on impairment of the cerbral circulation and metabolism, the precise relationship between them remains unknown. This study was undertaken to investigate the relationship between the cerebral circulation or cerebral metabolism and higher brain dysfunction. Twenty subjects with higher brain dysfunction caused by chronic MTBI were studied. They had no abnormal MRI findings. The full-scale intelligence quotient (FIQ) were quantitatively evaluated by the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R), and the subjects were classified into the normal group and the impaired group. Concurrent with the evaluation of FIQ, positron emission tomography (PET) was performed by the steady state method with 15O gases inhalation. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) were calculated in the bilateral frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital lobe. First, of all twenty subjects, we investigated rCBF, OEF and CMRO2 in all regions. Then we compared rCBF, OEF, and CMRO2 between the normal group and the impaired group based on FIQ score. We also studied the change of FIQ score of 13 subjects 9.3 months after the first evaluation. In addition, we investigated the change of rCBF, OEF and CMRO2 along with the improvement of FIQ score. Although rCBF and OEF of all subjects were within the normal range in all regions, CMRO2 of more than half of subjects was under the lower normal limit in all regions except in the right occipital lobe, showing the presence of "relative luxury perfusion". Comparison of rCBF, OEF and CMRO2 between normal group and impaired group revealed that CMRO2 of the impaired group was significantly lower than that of the normal group in the bilateral frontal, temporal, and occipital lobe. After

  12. Role of Standardized Grape Polyphenol Preparation as a novel treatment to improve synaptic plasticity through attenuation of features of metabolic syndrome in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Tang, Cheuk; Ferruzzi, Mario G.; Gong, Bing; Song, Brian J.; Janle, Elsa M.; Chen, Tzu-Ying; Cooper, Bruce; Varghese, Merina; Cheng, Alice; Freire, Daniel; Bilski, Amanda; Roman, Jessica; Nguyen, Tuyen; Ho, Lap; Talcott, Stephen T.; Simon, James E.; Wu, Qingli; Pasinetti, Giulio M.

    2013-01-01

    Scope Metabolic syndrome has become an epidemic and poses tremendous burden on the health system. People with metabolic syndrome are more likely to experience cognitive decline. As obesity and sedentary lifestyles become more common, the development of early prevention strategies are critical. In this study, we explore the potential beneficial effects of a combinatory polyphenol preparation composed of grape seed extract, Concord purple grape juice extract and resveratrol, referred to as Standardized Grape Polyphenol Preparation (SGP), on peripheral as well as brain dysfunction induced by metabolic syndrome. Methods We found dietary fat content had minimal effects on absorption and metabolites of major polyphenols derived from SGP. Using a diet-induced animal model of metabolic syndrome (DIM), we found that brain functional connectivity and synaptic plasticity are compromised in the DIM mice. Treatment with SGP not only prevented peripheral metabolic abnormality but also improved brain synaptic plasticity. Conclusion Our study demonstrated that SGP comprised of multiple bioavailable and bioactive components targeting a wide range of metabolic syndrome-related pathological features provides greater global protection against peripheral and central nervous system dysfunctions and can be potentially developed as novel prevention/treatment for improving brain connectivity and synaptic plasticity important for learning and memory. PMID:23963661

  13. Subpathway-CorSP: Identification of metabolic subpathways via integrating expression correlations and topological features between metabolites and genes of interest within pathways

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Chenchen; Zhang, Jian; Li, Xuecang; Ai, Bo; Han, Junwei; Wang, Qiuyu; Wei, Taiming; Xu, Yong; Li, Meng; Li, Shang; Song, Chao; Li, Chunquan

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic pathway analysis is a popular strategy for comprehensively researching metabolites and genes of interest associated with specific diseases. However, the traditional pathway identification methods do not accurately consider the combined effect of these interesting molecules and neglects expression correlations or topological features embedded in the pathways. In this study, we propose a powerful method, Subpathway-CorSP, for identifying metabolic subpathway regions. This method improved on original pathway identification methods by using a subpathway identification strategy and emphasizing expression correlations between metabolites and genes of interest based on topological features within the metabolic pathways. We analyzed a prostate cancer data set and its metastatic sub-group data set with detailed comparison of Subpathway-CorSP with four traditional pathway identification methods. Subpathway-CorSP was able to identify multiple subpathway regions whose entire corresponding pathways were not detected by traditional pathway identification methods. Further evidences indicated that Subpathway-CorSP provided a robust and efficient way of reliably recalling cancer-related subpathways and locating novel subpathways by the combined effect of metabolites and genes. This was a novel subpathway strategy based on systematically considering expression correlations and topological features between metabolites and genes of interest within given pathways. PMID:27625019

  14. [Cerebral toxoplasmosis in the pattern of secondary CNS involvements in HIV-infected patients in the Russian federation: clinical and diagnostic features].

    PubMed

    Ermak, T N; Peregudova, A B; Shakhgil'dian, V I; Goncharov, D B

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of cerebral toxoplasmosis (CT) among all brain involvements was determined in patients with Stage 4B HIV infection (AIDS) in 2003-2009. Clinical and laboratory parameters were estimated in 156 patients to reveal diagnostic criteria. As a result, CT was shown to be a leading cause of neurologic diseases in patients with late-stage HIV infection (34.7% of cases of brain involvement). In 11.5%, it took place as a generalized process. CT concurrent with cytomegalovirus infection, tuberculosis, or other secondary lesions was frequently diagnosed. Of importance in the diagnosis of CT are magnetic resonance imaging results in addition to basic, clinical data that can assume this diagnosis. The high and moderate serum concentrations of T.gondii IgG are of diagnostic value, which may be used as an auxiliary method to verify the diagnosis.

  15. INSULIN RESISTANCE IS ASSOCIATED WITH ALZHEIMER-LIKE REDUCTIONS IN REGIONAL CEREBRAL GLUCOSE METABOLISM FOR COGNITIVELY NORMAL ADULTS WITH PRE-DIABETES OR EARLY TYPE 2 DIABETES

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Laura D.; Cross, Donna; Minoshima, Satoshi; Belongia, Dana; Watson, G. Stennis; Craft, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    Background Insulin resistance is a causal factor in pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes (T2D), and also increases the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Reductions in cerebral glucose metabolic rate (CMRglu) as measured by fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) in parietotemporal, frontal, and cingulate cortex are also associated with increased AD risk, and can be observed years before dementia onset. Objectives We examined whether greater insulin resistance as indexed by the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR) would be associated with reduced resting CMRglu in areas known to be vulnerable in AD in a sample of cognitively normal adults with newly diagnosed pre-diabetes or T2D (P-D/T2D). We also determined whether P-D/T2D adults have abnormal patterns of CMRglu during a memory encoding task. Design Randomized crossover design of resting and activation [F-18] FDG-PET. Setting University Imaging Center and VA Clinical Research Unit. Participants Participants included 23 older adults (mean age±SEM=74.4±1.4) with no prior diagnosis of or treatment for diabetes, but who met American Diabetes Association glycemic criteria for pre-diabetes (n=11) or diabetes (n=12) based on fasting or 2-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) glucose values, and 6 adults (mean age±SEM=74.3±2.8) with normal fasting glucose and glucose tolerance. No participant met Petersen criteria for mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Intervention Fasting participants rested with eyes open in a dimly lit room and underwent resting and cognitive activation [F-18]FDG PET imaging on separate days, in randomized order, at 9 am. Following a 30-min transmission scan, subjects received an intravenous injection of 5 mCi [F-18]FDG, and the emission scan commenced 40 min post-injection. In the activation condition, a 35-min memory encoding task was initiated at the time of tracer injection. Subjects were instructed to remember a repeating list of 20 words that were randomly presented

  16. Cerebral glucose utilization during stage 2 sleep in man.

    PubMed

    Maquet, P; Dive, D; Salmon, E; Sadzot, B; Franco, G; Poirrier, R; Franck, G

    1992-01-31

    Using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose method and positron emission tomography, we performed paired determinations of the cerebral glucose utilization at one week intervals during sleep and wakefulness, in 12 young normal subjects. During 6 of 28 sleep runs, a stable stage 2 SWS was observed that fulfilled the steady-state conditions of the model. The cerebral glucose utilization during stage 2 SWS was lower than during wakefulness, but the variation did not significantly differ from zero (mean variation: -11.5 +/- 25.57%, P = 0.28). The analysis of 89 regions of interest showed that glucose metabolism differed significantly from that observed at wake in 6 brain regions, among them both thalamic nuclei. We conclude that the brain energy metabolism is not homogeneous throughout all the stages of non-REMS but decreases from stage 2 SWS to deep SWS; we suggest that a low thalamic glucose metabolism is a metabolic feature common to both stage 2 and deep SWS, reflecting the inhibitory processes observed in the thalamus during these stages of sleep. Stage 2 SWS might protect the stability of sleep by insulating the subject from the environment and might be a prerequisite to the full development of other phases of sleep, especially deep SWS.

  17. Cerebral Paragonimiasis.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, I

    1975-01-01

    The first case of cerebral paragonimiasis was reported by Otani in Japan in 1887. This was nine years after Kerbert's discovery of the fluke in the lungs of Bengal tigers and seven years after a human pulmonary infection by the fluke was demonstrated by Baelz and Manson. The first case was a 26-year-old man who had been suffering from cough and hemosputum for one year. The patient developed convulsive seizures with subsequent coma and died. The postmortem examination showed cystic lesions in the right frontal and occipital lobes. An adult fluke was found in the occipital lesion and another was seen in a gross specimen of normal brain tissue around the affected occipital lobe. Two years after Otani's discovery, at autopsy a 29-year-old man with a history of Jacksonian seizure was reported as having cerebral paragonimiasis. Some time later, however, it was confirmed that the case was actually cerebral schistosomiasis japonica. Subsequently, cases of cerebral paragonimiasis were reported. However, the majority of these cases were not confirmed histologically. It was pointed out that some of these early cases were probably not Paragonimus infection. After World War II, reviews as well as case reports were published. Recently, investigations have been reported from Korea, with a clinicla study on 62 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis seen at the Neurology Department of the National Medical Center, Seoul, between 1958 and 1964. In 1971 Higashi described a statistical study on 105 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis that had been treated surgically in Japan.

  18. The genome sequence of Geobacter metallireducens: features of metabolism, physiology and regulation common and dissimilar to Geobacter sulfurreducens

    SciTech Connect

    Aklujkar, Muktak; Krushkal, Julia; DiBartolo, Genevieve; Lapidus, Alla L.; Land, Miriam L; Lovley, Derek

    2009-01-01

    Background. The genome sequence of Geobacter metallireducens is the second to be completed from the metal-respiring genus Geobacter, and is compared in this report to that of Geobacter sulfurreducens in order to understand their metabolic, physiological and regulatory similarities and differences. Results. The experimentally observed greater metabolic versatility of G. metallireducens versus G. sulfurreducens is borne out by the presence of more numerous genes for metabolism of organic acids including acetate, propionate, and pyruvate. Although G. metallireducens lacks a dicarboxylic acid transporter, it has acquired a second succinate dehydrogenase/fumarate reductase complex, suggesting that respiration of fumarate was important until recently in its evolutionary history. Vestiges of the molybdate (ModE) regulon of G. sulfurreducens can be detected in G. metallireducens, which has lost the global regulatory protein ModE but retained some putative ModE-binding sites and multiplied certain genes of molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis. Several enzymes of amino acid metabolism are of different origin in the two species, but significant patterns of gene organization are conserved. Whereas most Geobacteraceae are predicted to obtain biosynthetic reducing equivalents from electron transfer pathways via a ferredoxin oxidoreductase, G. metallireducens can derive them from the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. In addition to the evidence of greater metabolic versatility, the G. metallireducens genome is also remarkable for the abundance of multicopy nucleotide sequences found in intergenic regions and even within genes. Conclusion. The genomic evidence suggests that metabolism, physiology Background. The genome sequence of Geobacter metallireducens is the second to be completed from the metal-respiring genus Geobacter, and is compared in this report to that of Geobacter sulfurreducens in order to understand their metabolic, physiological and regulatory similarities and

  19. The genome sequence of Geobacter metallireducens: features of metabolism, physiology and regulation common and dissimilar to Geobacter sulfurreducens

    SciTech Connect

    Aklujkar, Muktak; Krushkal, Julia; DiBartolo, Genevieve; Lapidus, Alla; Land, Miriam L.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2008-12-01

    Background: The genome sequence of Geobacter metallireducens is the second to be completed from the metal-respiring genus Geobacter, and is compared in this report to that of Geobacter sulfurreducens in order to understand their metabolic, physiological and regulatory similarities and differences. Results: The experimentally observed greater metabolic versatility of G. metallireducens versus G. sulfurreducens is borne out by the presence of more numerous genes for metabolism of organic acids including acetate, propionate, and pyruvate. Although G. metallireducens lacks a dicarboxylic acid transporter, it has acquired a second succinate dehydrogenase/fumarate reductase complex, suggesting that respiration of fumarate was important until recently in its evolutionary history. Vestiges of the molybdate (ModE) regulon of G. sulfurreducens can be detected in G. metallireducens, which has lost the global regulatory protein ModE but retained some putative ModE-binding sites and multiplied certain genes of molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis. Several enzymes of amino acid metabolism are of different origin in the two species, but significant patterns of gene organization are conserved. Whereas most Geobacteraceae are predicted to obtain biosynthetic reducing equivalents from electron transfer pathways via a ferredoxin oxidoreductase, G. metallireducens can derive them from the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. In addition to the evidence of greater metabolic versatility, the G. metallireducens genome is also remarkable for the abundance of multicopy nucleotide sequences found in intergenic regions and even within genes. Conclusion: The genomic evidence suggests that metabolism, physiology and regulation of gene expression in G. metallireducens may be dramatically different from other Geobacteraceae.

  20. The genome sequence of Geobacter metallireducens: features of metabolism, physiology and regulation common and dissimilar to Geobacter sulfurreducens

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The genome sequence of Geobacter metallireducens is the second to be completed from the metal-respiring genus Geobacter, and is compared in this report to that of Geobacter sulfurreducens in order to understand their metabolic, physiological and regulatory similarities and differences. Results The experimentally observed greater metabolic versatility of G. metallireducens versus G. sulfurreducens is borne out by the presence of more numerous genes for metabolism of organic acids including acetate, propionate, and pyruvate. Although G. metallireducens lacks a dicarboxylic acid transporter, it has acquired a second putative succinate dehydrogenase/fumarate reductase complex, suggesting that respiration of fumarate was important until recently in its evolutionary history. Vestiges of the molybdate (ModE) regulon of G. sulfurreducens can be detected in G. metallireducens, which has lost the global regulatory protein ModE but retained some putative ModE-binding sites and multiplied certain genes of molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis. Several enzymes of amino acid metabolism are of different origin in the two species, but significant patterns of gene organization are conserved. Whereas most Geobacteraceae are predicted to obtain biosynthetic reducing equivalents from electron transfer pathways via a ferredoxin oxidoreductase, G. metallireducens can derive them from the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. In addition to the evidence of greater metabolic versatility, the G. metallireducens genome is also remarkable for the abundance of multicopy nucleotide sequences found in intergenic regions and even within genes. Conclusion The genomic evidence suggests that metabolism, physiology and regulation of gene expression in G. metallireducens may be dramatically different from other Geobacteraceae. PMID:19473543

  1. Cerebral Palsy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Parents > Cerebral Palsy A A A ... kids who are living with the condition. About Cerebral Palsy Cerebral palsy is one of the most common ...

  2. Cerebral palsy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cerebral palsy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cerebral palsy : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/cerebral_palsy/cerebral_palsy. ...

  3. Mutations in mitochondrial enzyme GPT2 cause metabolic dysfunction and neurological disease with developmental and progressive features

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Qing; Nakayama, Tojo; Baytas, Ozan; Davidson, Shawn M.; Yang, Chendong; Schmidt, Michael; Lizarraga, Sofia B.; Mishra, Sasmita; EI-Quessny, Malak; Niaz, Saima; Gul Butt, Mirrat; Imran Murtaza, Syed; Javed, Afzal; Chaudhry, Haroon Rashid; Vaughan, Dylan J.; Hill, R. Sean; Partlow, Jennifer N.; Yoo, Seung-Yun; Lam, Anh-Thu N.; Nasir, Ramzi; Al-Saffar, Muna; Barkovich, A. James; Schwede, Matthew; Nagpal, Shailender; Rajab, Anna; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Housman, David E.; Mochida, Ganeshwaran H.; Morrow, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations that cause neurological phenotypes are highly informative with regard to mechanisms governing human brain function and disease. We report autosomal recessive mutations in the enzyme glutamate pyruvate transaminase 2 (GPT2) in large kindreds initially ascertained for intellectual and developmental disability (IDD). GPT2 [also known as alanine transaminase 2 (ALT2)] is one of two related transaminases that catalyze the reversible addition of an amino group from glutamate to pyruvate, yielding alanine and α-ketoglutarate. In addition to IDD, all affected individuals show postnatal microcephaly and ∼80% of those followed over time show progressive motor symptoms, a spastic paraplegia. Homozygous nonsense p.Arg404* and missense p.Pro272Leu mutations are shown biochemically to be loss of function. The GPT2 gene demonstrates increasing expression in brain in the early postnatal period, and GPT2 protein localizes to mitochondria. Akin to the human phenotype, Gpt2-null mice exhibit reduced brain growth. Through metabolomics and direct isotope tracing experiments, we find a number of metabolic abnormalities associated with loss of Gpt2. These include defects in amino acid metabolism such as low alanine levels and elevated essential amino acids. Also, we find defects in anaplerosis, the metabolic process involved in replenishing TCA cycle intermediates. Finally, mutant brains demonstrate misregulated metabolites in pathways implicated in neuroprotective mechanisms previously associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Overall, our data reveal an important role for the GPT2 enzyme in mitochondrial metabolism with relevance to developmental as well as potentially to neurodegenerative mechanisms. PMID:27601654

  4. Dietary nitrite reverses features of postmenopausal metabolic syndrome induced by high fat diet and ovariectomy in mice.

    PubMed

    Ohtake, Kazuo; Ehara, Nobuyuki; Chiba, Hiroshige; Nakano, Genya; Sonoda, Kunihiro; Ito, Junta; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Jun

    2017-02-14

    Menopausal women are at greater risk of developing metabolic syndrome with reduced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity. Hormone replacement therapy increases eNOS activity and normalizes some characteristics of metabolic syndrome. We hypothesized that nitric oxide (NO) supplementation should have a therapeutic effect in this syndrome. We examined the effect of dietary nitrite on mice model with postmenopausal metabolic syndrome induced by ovariectomy (OVX) with high fat diet (HF). C57BL/6 female mice were divided into five groups, sham+normal fat diet (NF), sham+ HF, OVX+HF without or with sodium nitrite (50mg and 150mg/L) in drinking water. Daily food intake and weekly body weight were monitored for 18 weeks. OVX and HF significantly reduced plasma levels of nitrate/nitrite (NOx), and developed obesity with visceral hypertrophic adipocytes, and increased transcriptional levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), tumor necrotizing factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in visceral fat tissues. The proinflammatory state in the adipocytes provoked severe hepatosteatosis and insulin resistance in OVX+HF group compared with sham+NF group. However, dietary nitrite significantly suppressed adipocyte hypertrophy and transcriptions of proinflammatory cytokines in visceral fat in a dose dependent manner. The improvement of visceral inflammatory state consequently reversed the hepatosteatosis and insulin resistance observed in OVX+HF mice. These results suggest that endogenous NO defect might underlie postmenopausal metabolic syndrome, and dietary nitrite provides an alternative source of NO, and subsequently compensating for metabolic impairments of this syndrome.

  5. Cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Colver, Allan; Fairhurst, Charles; Pharoah, Peter O D

    2014-04-05

    The syndrome of cerebral palsy encompasses a large group of childhood movement and posture disorders. Severity, patterns of motor involvement, and associated impairments such as those of communication, intellectual ability, and epilepsy vary widely. Overall prevalence has remained stable in the past 40 years at 2-3·5 cases per 1000 livebirths, despite changes in antenatal and perinatal care. The few studies available from developing countries suggest prevalence of comparable magnitude. Cerebral palsy is a lifelong disorder; approaches to intervention, whether at an individual or environmental level, should recognise that quality of life and social participation throughout life are what individuals with cerebral palsy seek, not improved physical function for its own sake. In the past few years, the cerebral palsy community has learned that the evidence of benefit for the numerous drugs, surgery, and therapies used over previous decades is weak. Improved understanding of the role of multiple gestation in pathogenesis, of gene environment interaction, and how to influence brain plasticity could yield significant advances in treatment of the disorder. Reduction in the prevalence of post-neonatal cerebral palsy, especially in developing countries, should be possible through improved nutrition, infection control, and accident prevention.

  6. Association of PCK1 with Body Mass Index and Other Metabolic Features in Patients With Psychotropic Treatments.

    PubMed

    Saigi-Morgui, Núria; Vandenberghe, Frederik; Delacrétaz, Aurélie; Quteineh, Lina; Choong, Eva; Gholamrezaee, Mehdi; Magistretti, Pierre; Aubry, Jean-Michel; von Gunten, Armin; Preisig, Martin; Castelao, Enrique; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Kutalik, Zoltán; Conus, Philippe; Eap, Chin B

    2015-10-01

    Weight gain is a major health problem among psychiatric populations. It implicates several receptors and hormones involved in energy balance and metabolism. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 is a rate-controlling enzyme involved in gluconeogenesis, glyceroneogenesis and cataplerosis and has been related to obesity and diabetes phenotypes in animals and humans. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 polymorphisms with metabolic traits in psychiatric patients treated with psychotropic drugs inducing weight gain and in general population samples. One polymorphism (rs11552145G > A) significantly associated with body mass index in the psychiatric discovery sample (n = 478) was replicated in 2 other psychiatric samples (n1 = 168, n2 = 188), with AA-genotype carriers having lower body mass index as compared to G-allele carriers. Stronger associations were found among women younger than 45 years carrying AA-genotype as compared to G-allele carriers (-2.25 kg/m, n = 151, P = 0.009) and in the discovery sample (-2.20 kg/m, n = 423, P = 0.0004). In the discovery sample for which metabolic parameters were available, AA-genotype showed lower waist circumference (-6.86 cm, P = 0.008) and triglycerides levels (-5.58 mg/100 mL, P < 0.002) when compared to G-allele carriers. Finally, waist-to-hip ratio was associated with rs6070157 (proxy of rs11552145, r = 0.99) in a population-based sample (N = 123,865, P = 0.022). Our results suggest an association of rs11552145G > A polymorphism with metabolic-related traits, especially in psychiatric populations and in women younger than 45 years.

  7. Genetics of cerebral small vessel disease.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jay Chol

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is an important cause of stroke and cognitive impairment among the elderly and is a more frequent cause of stroke in Asia than in the US or Europe. Although traditional risk factors such as hypertension or diabetes mellitus are important in the development of cerebral SVD, the exact pathogenesis is still uncertain. Both, twin and family history studies suggest heritability of sporadic cerebral SVD, while the candidate gene study and the genome-wide association study (GWAS) are mainly used in genetic research. Robust associations between the candidate genes and occurrence of various features of sporadic cerebral SVD, such as lacunar infarction, intracerebral hemorrhage, or white matter hyperintensities, have not yet been elucidated. GWAS, a relatively new technique, overcomes several shortcomings of previous genetic techniques, enabling the detection of several important genetic loci associated with cerebral SVD. In addition to the more common, sporadic cerebral SVD, several single-gene disorders causing cerebral SVD have been identified. The number of reported cases is increasing as the clinical features become clear and diagnostic examinations are more readily available. These include cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, cerebral autosomal recessive arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, COL4A1-related cerebral SVD, autosomal dominant retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy, and Fabry disease. These rare single-gene disorders are expected to play a crucial role in our understanding of cerebral SVD pathogenesis by providing animal models for the identification of cellular, molecular, and biochemical changes underlying cerebral small vessel damage.

  8. Genetics of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is an important cause of stroke and cognitive impairment among the elderly and is a more frequent cause of stroke in Asia than in the US or Europe. Although traditional risk factors such as hypertension or diabetes mellitus are important in the development of cerebral SVD, the exact pathogenesis is still uncertain. Both, twin and family history studies suggest heritability of sporadic cerebral SVD, while the candidate gene study and the genome-wide association study (GWAS) are mainly used in genetic research. Robust associations between the candidate genes and occurrence of various features of sporadic cerebral SVD, such as lacunar infarction, intracerebral hemorrhage, or white matter hyperintensities, have not yet been elucidated. GWAS, a relatively new technique, overcomes several shortcomings of previous genetic techniques, enabling the detection of several important genetic loci associated with cerebral SVD. In addition to the more common, sporadic cerebral SVD, several single-gene disorders causing cerebral SVD have been identified. The number of reported cases is increasing as the clinical features become clear and diagnostic examinations are more readily available. These include cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, cerebral autosomal recessive arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, COL4A1-related cerebral SVD, autosomal dominant retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy, and Fabry disease. These rare single-gene disorders are expected to play a crucial role in our understanding of cerebral SVD pathogenesis by providing animal models for the identification of cellular, molecular, and biochemical changes underlying cerebral small vessel damage. PMID:25692103

  9. Real-time segmentation and tracking of brain metabolic state in ICU EEG recordings of burst suppression.

    PubMed

    Westover, M Brandon; Ching, ShiNung; Shafi, Mouhsin M; Cash, Sydney S; Brown, Emery N

    2013-01-01

    We provide a method for estimating brain metabolic state based on a reduced-order model of EEG burst suppression. The model, derived from previously suggested biophysical mechanisms of burst suppression, describes important electrophysiological features and provides a direct link to cerebral metabolic rate. We design and fit the estimation method from EEG recordings of burst suppression from a neurological intensive care unit and test it on real and synthetic data.

  10. Transient Decrease in Circulatory Testosterone and Homocysteine Precedes the Development of Metabolic Syndrome Features in Fructose-Fed Sprague Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sakamuri, Anil; Pitla, Sujatha; Putcha, Uday Kumar; Jayapal, Sugeedha; Pothana, Sailaja; Vadakattu, Sai Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Background. Increased fructose consumption is linked to the development of metabolic syndrome (MS). Here we investigated the time course of development of MS features in high-fructose-fed Sprague Dawley rats along with circulatory testosterone and homocysteine levels. Methods. Rats were divided into control and experimental groups and fed with diets containing 54.5% starch and fructose, respectively, for 4, 12, and 24 weeks. Plasma testosterone and homocysteine levels were measured along with insulin, glucose, and lipids. Body composition, insulin resistance, and hepatic lipids were measured. Results. Increase in hepatic triglyceride content was first observed in metabolic disturbance followed by hypertriglyceridemia and systemic insulin resistance in fructose-fed rats. Hepatic lipids were increased in time-dependent manner by fructose-feeding starting from 4 weeks, but circulatory triglyceride levels were increased after 12 weeks. Fasting insulin and Homeostatis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) were increased after 12 weeks of fructose-feeding. Decreased visceral adiposity, circulatory testosterone, and homocysteine levels were observed after 4 weeks of fructose-feeding, which were normalized at 12 and 24 weeks. Conclusions. We conclude that transient decrease in circulatory testosterone and homocysteine levels and increased hepatic triglyceride content are the earliest metabolic disturbances that preceded hypertriglyceridemia and insulin resistance in fructose-fed SD rats. PMID:27818793

  11. Alterations of a Cellular Cholesterol Metabolism Network Are a Molecular Feature of Obesity-Related Type 2 Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jingzhong; Reynolds, Lindsay M.; Zeller, Tanja; Müller, Christian; Lohman, Kurt; Nicklas, Barbara J.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Huang, Zhiqing; de la Fuente, Alberto; Soranzo, Nicola; Settlage, Robert E.; Chuang, Chia-Chi; Howard, Timothy; Xu, Ning; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Chen, Y.-D. Ida; Rotter, Jerome I.; Siscovick, David S.; Parks, John S.; Murphy, Susan; Jacobs, David R.; Post, Wendy; Tracy, Russell P.; Wild, Philipp S.; Blankenberg, Stefan; Hoeschele, Ina; Herrington, David; McCall, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is linked to type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular diseases; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. We aimed to identify obesity-associated molecular features that may contribute to obesity-related diseases. Using circulating monocytes from 1,264 Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) participants, we quantified the transcriptome and epigenome. We discovered that alterations in a network of coexpressed cholesterol metabolism genes are a signature feature of obesity and inflammatory stress. This network included 11 BMI-associated genes related to sterol uptake (↑LDLR, ↓MYLIP), synthesis (↑SCD, FADS1, HMGCS1, FDFT1, SQLE, CYP51A1, SC4MOL), and efflux (↓ABCA1, ABCG1), producing a molecular profile expected to increase intracellular cholesterol. Importantly, these alterations were associated with T2D and coronary artery calcium (CAC), independent from cardiometabolic factors, including serum lipid profiles. This network mediated the associations between obesity and T2D/CAC. Several genes in the network harbored C-phosphorus-G dinucleotides (e.g., ABCG1/cg06500161), which overlapped Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE)-annotated regulatory regions and had methylation profiles that mediated the associations between BMI/inflammation and expression of their cognate genes. Taken together with several lines of previous experimental evidence, these data suggest that alterations of the cholesterol metabolism gene network represent a molecular link between obesity/inflammation and T2D/CAC. PMID:26153245

  12. Cerebral Malaria.

    PubMed

    Marsden, P D; Bruce-Chwatt, L J

    1975-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is an acute diffuse encephalopathy associated only with Plasmodium falciparum. It is probably a consequence of the rapid proliferation of the parasites in the body of man in relation to red cell invasion, and results in stagnation of blood flow in cerebralcapillaries with thromobotic occlusion of large numbers of cerebral capillaries. The subsequent cerebral pathology is cerebral infarction with haemorrhage and cerebral oedema. The wide prevalence of P. falciparum in highly endemic areas results in daily challenges to patients from several infected mosquitoes. It is thus important to understand the characteristics of P. falciparum, since this is one of the most important protozoan parasites of man and severe infection from it constitutes one of the few real clinical emergencies in tropical medicine. One of the more important aspects of the practice of medicine in the tropics is to establish a good understanding of the pattern of medical practice in that area. This applies to malaria as well as to other diseases. The neophyte might be somewhat surprised to learn, for example that an experienced colleague who lives in a holoendemic malarious area such as West Africa, sees no cerebral malaria. But the explanation is simple when the doctor concerned has a practice which involves treating adults only. Cerebral malaria is rare in adults, because in highly endemic areas, by the age of 1 year most of the infants in a group under study have already experienced their first falciparum infection. By the time they reach adult life, they have a solid immunity against severe falciparum infections. In fact, "clinical malaria" could occur in such a group under only two circumstances: 1) in pregnancy, a patent infection with P. falciparum might develop, probably due to an IgG drain across the placenta to the foetus;2) in an individual who has constantly taken antimalarials and who may have an immunity at such a low level that when antimalarial therapy is interrupted

  13. Effects of reactive oxygen species on metabolism monitored by longitudinal 1H single voxel MRS follow-up in patients with mitochondrial disease or cerebral tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constans, J. M.; Collet, S.; Guillamo, J. S.; Hossu, G.; Lacombe, S.; Gauduel, Y. A.; Houée Levin, C.; Dou, W.; Ruan, S.; Barré, L.; Rioult, F.; Derlon, J. M.; Lechapt-Zalcman, E.; Valable, S.; Chapon, F.; Courtheoux, P.; Fong, V.; Kauffmann, F.

    2011-01-01

    Free radicals, or Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), have an effect on energy and glycolytic metabolism, mitochondrial function, lipid metabolism, necrosis and apoptosis, cell proliferation, and infiltration. These changes could be monitored longitudinally (every 4 months over 6 years) in humans with glial brain tumors (low and high grade) after therapy, using conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) and MR perfusion. Some examples of early clinical data from longitudinal follow-up monitoring in humans of energy and glycolytic metabolism, lipid metabolism, necrosis, proliferation, and infiltration measured by conventional MRI, MRS and perfusion, and positron emission tomography (PET) are shown in glial brain tumors after therapy. Despite the difficulty, the variability and unknown factors, these repeated measurements give us a better insight into the nature of the different processes, tumor progression and therapeutic response.

  14. Subarachnoid hemorrhage in the rat: cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism after selective lesions of the catecholamine systems in the brainstem

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado, T.J.; Diemer, N.H.; Svendgaard, N.A.

    1986-10-01

    A double-isotope autoradiographic technique was used to evaluate CBF and glucose metabolism 2 days after a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in rats with lesions in the lower brainstem. Lesioning in the mesencephalon of the ascending catecholamine pathways from locus ceruleus and from the A1 and A2 nuclei, or lesioning in the medulla oblongata of the ascending fibers from A1 and A2, prevents the development of the global changes in flow and metabolism seen in normal animals post SAH. Also the focal low-flow areas with markedly elevated deoxyglucose uptake, which can develop in normal animals 2 days post SAH, were not seen in the lesioned animals after the SAH. The findings indicate that the A1 and A2 nuclei, which project to the hypothalamus-pituitary, are essential for the flow and metabolic changes after an SAH. The lesions per se did not change baseline flow and metabolism as compared with sham-lesioned animals.

  15. [FEATURES OF CLINICAL COURSE AND MORPHOMETRIC PARAMETERS OF BENIGN PROSTATIC HYPERPLASIA IN MEN WITH METABOLIC SYNDROME AND ANDROGEN DEFICIENCY].

    PubMed

    Tyuzikov, I A; Grekov, E A; Kalinchenko, S Yu

    2015-01-01

    The study was aimed to the evaluation of the effect of the components of the metabolic syndrome (obesity, insulin resistance (IR)) and androgen deficiency on the clinical course of lower urinary tract symptoms against the background of benign prostatic hyperplasia (LUTS/BPH) and nocturia, as well as on some of the parameters of BPH (prostate volume, residual urine volume, total prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood level). The comprehensive survey of 160 men with LUTS/BPH (mean age 56.7 ± 3.3 years) was performed; based on the results of survey, three comparison groups were formed: Group 1 (n = 70)--patients with isolated obesity; Group 2 (n = 36)--patients with obesity and insulin resistance; and Group 3 (n = 54)--patients with obesity, insulin resistance and androgen deficiency. The control group consisted of 30 patients with LUTS/BPH without these metabolic and hormonal disorders. In patients with LUTS/BPH and obesity, higher frequency of nocturia compared with the control group was revealed (63.7% vs 23.3%; P < 0.05), as well as the relationship between the waist circumference and free testosterone level (n = 160; r = -0.322; P = 0.005) and waist circumference and total prostate volume (n = 160; r = 0.121; P = 0.005). In patients of Group 2, significant positive correlation between waist circumference and blood insulin level was identified (n = 36; r = 0.461; P = 0.005). Patients with obesity, insulin resistance and androgen deficiency had the highest average prostate volume and residual urine volume compared with those of other groups (P < 0.05). Thus, obesity, insulin resistance, androgen deficiency are associated pathological conditions, greatly aggravating the clinical course of LUTS/BPH due to adverse impact on the BPH parameters, acting both together and separately. The most severe LUTS/BPH were associated with the presence of all three of the above systemic disorders.

  16. 11 Things to Know about Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emails CDC Features 11 Things to Know about Cerebral Palsy Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... and families living with CP. Early Signs of CP From birth to 5 years of age, a ...

  17. The coupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism with brain activation is similar for simple and complex stimuli in human primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Griffeth, Valerie E M; Simon, Aaron B; Buxton, Richard B

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative functional MRI (fMRI) experiments to measure blood flow and oxygen metabolism coupling in the brain typically rely on simple repetitive stimuli. Here we compared such stimuli with a more naturalistic stimulus. Previous work on the primary visual cortex showed that direct attentional modulation evokes a blood flow (CBF) response with a relatively large oxygen metabolism (CMRO2) response in comparison to an unattended stimulus, which evokes a much smaller metabolic response relative to the flow response. We hypothesized that a similar effect would be associated with a more engaging stimulus, and tested this by measuring the primary human visual cortex response to two contrast levels of a radial flickering checkerboard in comparison to the response to free viewing of brief movie clips. We did not find a significant difference in the blood flow-metabolism coupling (n=%ΔCBF/%ΔCMRO2) between the movie stimulus and the flickering checkerboards employing two different analysis methods: a standard analysis using the Davis model and a new analysis using a heuristic model dependent only on measured quantities. This finding suggests that in the primary visual cortex a naturalistic stimulus (in comparison to a simple repetitive stimulus) is either not sufficient to provoke a change in flow-metabolism coupling by attentional modulation as hypothesized, that the experimental design disrupted the cognitive processes underlying the response to a more natural stimulus, or that the technique used is not sensitive enough to detect a small difference.

  18. IMG-ABC: new features for bacterial secondary metabolism analysis and targeted biosynthetic gene cluster discovery in thousands of microbial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Hadjithomas, Michalis; Chen, I-Min A.; Chu, Ken; Huang, Jinghua; Ratner, Anna; Palaniappan, Krishna; Andersen, Evan; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Ivanova, Natalia N.

    2017-01-01

    Secondary metabolites produced by microbes have diverse biological functions, which makes them a great potential source of biotechnologically relevant compounds with antimicrobial, anti-cancer and other activities. The proteins needed to synthesize these natural products are often encoded by clusters of co-located genes called biosynthetic gene clusters (BCs). In order to advance the exploration of microbial secondary metabolism, we developed the largest publically available database of experimentally verified and predicted BCs, the Integrated Microbial Genomes Atlas of Biosynthetic gene Clusters (IMG-ABC) (https://img.jgi.doe.gov/abc/). Here, we describe an update of IMG-ABC, which includes ClusterScout, a tool for targeted identification of custom biosynthetic gene clusters across 40 000 isolate microbial genomes, and a new search capability to query more than 700 000 BCs from isolate genomes for clusters with similar Pfam composition. Additional features enable fast exploration and analysis of BCs through two new interactive visualization features, a BC function heatmap and a BC similarity network graph. These new tools and features add to the value of IMG-ABC's vast body of BC data, facilitating their in-depth analysis and accelerating secondary metabolite discovery. PMID:27903896

  19. Cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    Newton, C.; Hien, T. T.; White, N.

    2000-01-01

    Cerebral malaria may be the most common non-traumatic encephalopathy in the world. The pathogenesis is heterogenous and the neurological complications are often part of a multisystem dysfunction. The clinical presentation and pathophysiology differs between adults and children. Recent studies have elucidated the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis and raised possible interventions. Antimalarial drugs, however, remain the only intervention that unequivocally affects outcome, although increasing resistance to the established antimalarial drugs is of grave concern. Artemisinin derivatives have made an impact on treatment, but other drugs may be required. With appropriate antimalarial drugs, the prognosis of cerebral malaria often depends on the management of other complications—for example, renal failure and acidosis. Neurological sequelae are increasingly recognised, but further research on the pathogenesis of coma and neurological damage is required to develop other ancillary treatments.

 PMID:10990500

  20. Deep sequencing of the transcriptome reveals distinct flavonoid metabolism features of black tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum Garetn.).

    PubMed

    Yao, Huipeng; Li, Chenglei; Zhao, Haixia; Zhao, Jianlan; Chen, Hui; Bu, Tongliang; Anhu, Wang; Wu, Qi

    2017-03-01

    Black tartary buckwheat is recognized as 'black pearl' because of containg more rutin and other flavonoids as compared to yellow tartary buckwheat (traditional tartary buckwheat). Here, we show a genome-wide comparison of their transcriptomes by using an RNA-seq approach to elucidate the different molecular metabolism on the flowers from Black tartary buckwheat (HEIFENG No1) and yellow tartary buckwheat (XIQIAO No2). Over 48.4 million paired-end reads were assembled into 57,800 unigenes, of which about 57.9% (33, 472 unigenes) were annotated by BLAST searches in the NCBI non-redundant protein database. RPKM analysis showed that compared to YTB, the unigenes encoding phenylalanine ammonialyase (PAL), chalcone synthase (CHS) and chalcone isomerase (CHI) for early flavonoid synthesis and the unigene encoding quercetin 3-O-glucosyltransferase (UF3GT) for synthetizing rutin were at a higher level, but the unigene encoding Flavonol synthase (FLS) charging for kaempferol and quercetin synthesis at a lower level in BTB, which may be the reason for the higher content of rutin and the lower content of quercetin, the result obtained by HPLC, as confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis of these genes. The result will not only explain the molecular mechanism of flavonoid synthesis in balck tartary buckwheat, but also provide the basis for further genomics research on this species or its allies.

  1. Relationship Between Metabolic Syndrome and Clinical Features, and Its Personal-Social Performance in Patients with Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Saatcioglu, Omer; Kalkan, Murat; Fistikci, Nurhan; Erek, Sakire; Kilic, Kasim Candas

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the metabolic syndrome (MS) criteria and also to investigate the effects of MS on medical treatment, clinical course and personal and social performance in patients with schizophrenia. One hundred-sixteen patients with schizophrenia were included in the study. Measurements of MS were calculated in all patients. Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms, Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms, Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia, Personal and Social Performance Scale (PSP) were applied. The frequency of MS according to IDF criteria was 42.2 % among the patients. There was no significant difference between patients with and without MS in terms of age. The ratios of MS were 62.5 % for the group taking typical and atypical antipsychotics together and 35.7 % for the group taking two or more atypical antipsychotics together. The duration of disorder in patients with MS was higher than those without MS. Furthermore there was no significant difference between the schizophrenic patients with and without MS, in terms of PSP scores. Our findings showed that the duration of illness, high scores of BMI, use of clozapine or concurrent use of typical and atypical antipsychotics, depressive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia were significant risk factors for the development of MS.

  2. Neuropathology of Acquired Cerebral Trauma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigler, Erin D.

    1987-01-01

    To help educators understand the cognitive and behavioral sequelae of cerebral injury, the neuropathology of traumatic brain injury and the main neuropathological features resulting from trauma-related brain damage are reviewed. A glossary with definitions of 37 neurological terms is appended. (Author/DB)

  3. Quantitative comparison of cerebral artery development in metatherians and monotremes with non-human eutherians.

    PubMed

    Ashwell, Ken W S; Shulruf, Boaz

    2016-03-01

    A quantitative comparison of the internal diameters of cerebral feeder arteries (internal carotid and vertebral) and the aorta in developing non-human eutherians, metatherians and monotremes has been made, with the aim of determining if there are differences in cerebral arterial flow between the three infraclasses of mammals such as might reflect differences in metabolism of the developing brain. There were no significant differences between eutherians and metatherians in the internal radius of the aorta or the thickness of the aortic wall, but aortic internal radius was significantly smaller in developing monotremes than therians at the < 10 mm body length range. Aortic thickness in the developing monotremes also rose at a slower rate relative to body length than in metatherians or eutherians. The sums of the internal calibres of the internal carotid and vertebral arteries were significantly lower in metatherians as a group and monotremes compared with non-human eutherians at body lengths up to 20 mm and in metatherians at > 20 mm body length. The internal calibre of the internal carotids relative to the sum of all cerebral feeder arteries was also significantly lower in monotremes at < 10 mm body length compared with eutherians. It was noted that dasyurids differed from other metatherians in several measures of cerebral arterial calibre and aortic internal calibre. The findings suggest that: (i) both aortic outflow and cerebral arterial inflow may be lower in developing monotremes than in therians, particularly at small body size (< 20 mm); (ii) cerebral inflow may be lower in some developing metatherians than non-human eutherians; and (iii) dasyurids have unusual features of cerebral arteries possibly related to the extreme immaturity and small size at which they are born. The findings have implications for nutritional sourcing of the developing brain in the three infraclasses of mammals.

  4. Delayed development and lifespan extension as features of metabolic lifestyle alteration in C. elegans under dietary restriction.

    PubMed

    Szewczyk, Nathaniel J; Udranszky, Ingrid A; Kozak, Elena; Sunga, June; Kim, Stuart K; Jacobson, Lewis A; Conley, Catharine A

    2006-10-01

    Studies of the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans have almost exclusively utilized growth on a bacterial diet. Such culturing presents a challenge to automation of experimentation and introduces bacterial metabolism as a secondary concern in drug and environmental toxicology studies. Axenic cultivation of C. elegans can avoid these problems, yet past work suggests that axenic growth is unhealthy for C. elegans. Here we employ a chemically defined liquid medium to culture C. elegans and find development slows, fecundity declines, lifespan increases, lipid and protein stores decrease, and gene expression changes relative to that on a bacterial diet. These changes do not appear to be random pathologies associated with malnutrition, as there are no developmental delays associated with starvation, such as L1 or dauer diapause. Additionally, development and reproductive period are fixed percentages of lifespan regardless of diet, suggesting that these alterations are adaptive. We propose that C. elegans can exist as a healthy animal with at least two distinct adult life histories. One life history maximizes the intrinsic rate of population increase, the other maximizes the efficiency of exploitation of the carrying capacity of the environment. Microarray analysis reveals increased transcript levels of daf-16 and downstream targets and past experiments demonstrate that DAF-16 (FOXO) acting on downstream targets can influence all of the phenotypes we see altered in maintenance medium. Thus, life history alteration in response to diet may be modulated by DAF-16. Our observations introduce a powerful system for automation of experimentation on healthy C. elegans and for systematic analysis of the profound impact of diet on animal physiology.

  5. Primary cerebral malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Kai; Kong, Xiangyi; Mao, Gengsheng; Qiu, Ming; Zhu, Haibo; Zhou, Lei; Nie, Qingbin; Xu, Yi; Du, Shiwei

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Primary intracranial melanomas are uncommon and constitute approximately 1% of all melanoma cases and 0.07% of all brain tumors. In nature, these primary melanomas are very aggressive and can spread to other organs. We report an uncommon case of primary cerebral malignant melanoma—a challenging diagnosis guided by clinical presentations, radiological features, and surgical biopsy results, aiming to emphasize the importance of considering primary melanoma when making differential diagnoses of intracranial lesions. We present a rare case of a primary cerebral melanoma in the left temporal lobe. The mass appeared iso-hypodense on brain computed tomography (CT), short signal on T1-weighted magnetic resonance images (T1WI) and long signal on T2WI. It was not easy to make an accurate diagnosis before surgery. We showed the patient's disease course and reviewed related literatures, for readers’ reference. Written informed consent was obtained from the patient for publication of this case report and any accompanying images. Because of this, there is no need to conduct special ethic review and the ethical approval is not necessary. After surgery, the pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of melanoma. The patient was discharged without any complications and went on to receive adjuvant radiochemotherapy. It is difficult to diagnose primary cerebral melanoma in the absence of any cutaneous melanosis. A high index of clinical suspicion along with good pathology reporting is the key in diagnosing these extremely rare tumors. PMID:28121927

  6. Metabolic Versatility and Antibacterial Metabolite Biosynthesis Are Distinguishing Genomic Features of the Fire Blight Antagonist Pantoea vagans C9-1

    PubMed Central

    Smits, Theo H. M.; Rezzonico, Fabio; Kamber, Tim; Blom, Jochen; Goesmann, Alexander; Ishimaru, Carol A.; Frey, Jürg E.; Stockwell, Virginia O.; Duffy, Brion

    2011-01-01

    Background Pantoea vagans is a commercialized biological control agent used against the pome fruit bacterial disease fire blight, caused by Erwinia amylovora. Compared to other biocontrol agents, relatively little is currently known regarding Pantoea genetics. Better understanding of antagonist mechanisms of action and ecological fitness is critical to improving efficacy. Principal Findings Genome analysis indicated two major factors contribute to biocontrol activity: competition for limiting substrates and antibacterial metabolite production. Pathways for utilization of a broad diversity of sugars and acquisition of iron were identified. Metabolism of sorbitol by P. vagans C9-1 may be a major metabolic feature in biocontrol of fire blight. Biosynthetic genes for the antibacterial peptide pantocin A were found on a chromosomal 28-kb genomic island, and for dapdiamide E on the plasmid pPag2. There was no evidence of potential virulence factors that could enable an animal or phytopathogenic lifestyle and no indication of any genetic-based biosafety risk in the antagonist. Conclusions Identifying key determinants contributing to disease suppression allows the development of procedures to follow their expression in planta and the genome sequence contributes to rationale risk assessment regarding the use of the biocontrol strain in agricultural systems. PMID:21789243

  7. Diagnostic methods and recommendations for the cerebral creatine deficiency syndromes.

    PubMed

    Clark, Joseph F; Cecil, Kim M

    2015-03-01

    Primary care pediatricians and a variety of specialist physicians strive to define an accurate diagnosis for children presenting with impairment of expressive speech and delay in achieving developmental milestones. Within the past two decades, a group of disorders featuring this presentation have been identified as cerebral creatine deficiency syndromes (CCDS). Patients with these disorders were initially discerned using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the brain within a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination. The objective of this review is to provide the clinician with an overview of the current information available on identifying and treating these conditions. We explain the salient features of creatine metabolism, synthesis, and transport required for normal development. We propose diagnostic approaches for confirming a CCDS diagnosis. Finally, we describe treatment approaches for managing patients with these conditions.

  8. Modelling the effects of cerebral microvasculature morphology on oxygen transport.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang Sub; Payne, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral microvasculature plays a vital role in adequately supplying blood to the brain. Determining the health of the cerebral microvasculature is important during pathological conditions, such as stroke and dementia. Recent studies have shown the complex relationship between cerebral metabolic rate and transit time distribution, the transit times of all the possible pathways available dependent on network topology. In this paper, we extend a recently developed technique to solve for residue function, the amount of tracer left in the vasculature at any time, and transit time distribution in an existing model of the cerebral microvasculature to calculate cerebral metabolism. We present the mathematical theory needed to solve for oxygen concentration followed by results of the simulations. It is found that oxygen extraction fraction, the fraction of oxygen removed from the blood in the capillary network by the tissue, and cerebral metabolic rate are dependent on both mean and heterogeneity of the transit time distribution. For changes in cerebral blood flow, a positive correlation can be observed between mean transit time and oxygen extraction fraction, and a negative correlation between mean transit time and metabolic rate of oxygen. A negative correlation can also be observed between transit time heterogeneity and the metabolic rate of oxygen for a constant cerebral blood flow. A sensitivity analysis on the mean and heterogeneity of the transit time distribution was able to quantify their respective contributions to oxygen extraction fraction and metabolic rate of oxygen. Mean transit time has a greater contribution than the heterogeneity for oxygen extraction fraction. This is found to be opposite for metabolic rate of oxygen. These results provide information on the role of the cerebral microvasculature and its effects on flow and metabolism. They thus open up the possibility of obtaining additional valuable clinical information for diagnosing and treating

  9. Simultaneous electroencephalography, real-time measurement of lactate concentration and optogenetic manipulation of neuronal activity in the rodent cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Clegern, William C; Moore, Michele E; Schmidt, Michelle A; Wisor, Jonathan

    2012-12-19

    Although the brain represents less than 5% of the body by mass, it utilizes approximately one quarter of the glucose used by the body at rest(1). The function of non rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS), the largest portion of sleep by time, is uncertain. However, one salient feature of NREMS is a significant reduction in the rate of cerebral glucose utilization relative to wakefulness(2-4). This and other findings have led to the widely held belief that sleep serves a function related to cerebral metabolism. Yet, the mechanisms underlying the reduction in cerebral glucose metabolism during NREMS remain to be elucidated. One phenomenon associated with NREMS that might impact cerebral metabolic rate is the occurrence of slow waves, oscillations at frequencies less than 4 Hz, in the electroencephalogram(5,6). These slow waves detected at the level of the skull or cerebral cortical surface reflect the oscillations of underlying neurons between a depolarized/up state and a hyperpolarized/down state(7). During the down state, cells do not undergo action potentials for intervals of up to several hundred milliseconds. Restoration of ionic concentration gradients subsequent to action potentials represents a significant metabolic load on the cell(8); absence of action potentials during down states associated with NREMS may contribute to reduced metabolism relative to wake. Two technical challenges had to be addressed in order for this hypothetical relationship to be tested. First, it was necessary to measure cerebral glycolytic metabolism with a temporal resolution reflective of the dynamics of the cerebral EEG (that is, over seconds rather than minutes). To do so, we measured the concentration of lactate, the product of aerobic glycolysis, and therefore a readout of the rate of glucose metabolism in the brains of mice. Lactate was measured using a lactate oxidase based real time sensor embedded in the frontal cortex. The sensing mechanism consists of a platinum

  10. Foetal bovine intermuscular adipose tissue exhibits histological and metabolic features of brown and white adipocytes during the last third of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Taga, H; Chilliard, Y; Picard, B; Zingaretti, M C; Bonnet, M

    2012-04-01

    This study reports the metabolic and morphological characteristics of bovine intermuscular adipose tissue (AT) throughout foetal growth. Our hypothesis was that the histological and molecular features of intermuscular AT would be different from those previously reported for foetal perirenal AT, based on its anatomical location near the muscle and the recent identification of two distinct adipocyte precursors in mouse AT depending on their locations. To address this question, intermuscular AT was sampled from Charolais and Blond d'Aquitaine foetuses at 180, 210 and 260 days post conception (dpc). The two bovine breeds were chosen because of the higher adiposity of Charolais than Blond d'Aquitaine cattle during the postnatal life. Regardless of the breed, adipocyte volume increased slightly (+38%, P < 0.01) with increasing foetal age. This was concomitant with a decrease (P < 0.05) in the activity of enzymes involved in de novo fatty acid (FA) synthesis (FA synthase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) and FA esterification (glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) when expressed per million adipocytes, and with an increase (P ⩽ 0.01) in mRNA abundances for uncoupling protein 1, adiponectin and leptin (LEP) between 180 and 260 dpc. No difference was observed in the adipocyte volume between breeds, which was consistent with the lack of major between-breed differences in mRNA abundances or activities of enzymes involved in lipid metabolism. The mRNA abundance of lipoprotein lipase was maintained across ages, suggesting a storage of circulating FA rather than of FA synthesized de novo. Plasma LEP increased with foetal age, but only in the Charolais breed (+71%, P ⩽ 0.01), and was two- to threefold higher in Charolais than Blond d'Aquitaine foetuses. Regardless of the breed, bovine intermuscular AT contained predominantly unilocular adipocytes believed to be white adipocytes that were larger at 260 dpc than at 180 dpc. These data thus challenge current concepts of the

  11. An automated sleep-state classification algorithm for quantifying sleep timing and sleep-dependent dynamics of electroencephalographic and cerebral metabolic parameters

    PubMed Central

    Rempe, Michael J; Clegern, William C; Wisor, Jonathan P

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rodent sleep research uses electroencephalography (EEG) and electromyography (EMG) to determine the sleep state of an animal at any given time. EEG and EMG signals, typically sampled at >100 Hz, are segmented arbitrarily into epochs of equal duration (usually 2–10 seconds), and each epoch is scored as wake, slow-wave sleep (SWS), or rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS), on the basis of visual inspection. Automated state scoring can minimize the burden associated with state and thereby facilitate the use of shorter epoch durations. Methods We developed a semiautomated state-scoring procedure that uses a combination of principal component analysis and naïve Bayes classification, with the EEG and EMG as inputs. We validated this algorithm against human-scored sleep-state scoring of data from C57BL/6J and BALB/CJ mice. We then applied a general homeostatic model to characterize the state-dependent dynamics of sleep slow-wave activity and cerebral glycolytic flux, measured as lactate concentration. Results More than 89% of epochs scored as wake or SWS by the human were scored as the same state by the machine, whether scoring in 2-second or 10-second epochs. The majority of epochs scored as REMS by the human were also scored as REMS by the machine. However, of epochs scored as REMS by the human, more than 10% were scored as SWS by the machine and 18 (10-second epochs) to 28% (2-second epochs) were scored as wake. These biases were not strain-specific, as strain differences in sleep-state timing relative to the light/dark cycle, EEG power spectral profiles, and the homeostatic dynamics of both slow waves and lactate were detected equally effectively with the automated method or the manual scoring method. Error associated with mathematical modeling of temporal dynamics of both EEG slow-wave activity and cerebral lactate either did not differ significantly when state scoring was done with automated versus visual scoring, or was reduced with automated state

  12. Novel treatment targets for cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Brian P; Kahle, Kristopher T; Simard, J Marc

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral edema is a common finding in a variety of neurological conditions, including ischemic stroke, traumatic brain injury, ruptured cerebral aneurysm, and neoplasia. With the possible exception of neoplasia, most pathological processes leading to edema seem to share similar molecular mechanisms of edema formation. Challenges to brain-cell volume homeostasis can have dramatic consequences, given the fixed volume of the rigid skull and the effect of swelling on secondary neuronal injury. With even small changes in cellular and extracellular volume, cerebral edema can compromise regional or global cerebral blood flow and metabolism or result in compression of vital brain structures. Osmotherapy has been the mainstay of pharmacologic therapy and is typically administered as part of an escalating medical treatment algorithm that can include corticosteroids, diuretics, and pharmacological cerebral metabolic suppression. Novel treatment targets for cerebral edema include the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) co-transporter (NKCC1) and the SUR1-regulated NC(Ca-ATP) (SUR1/TRPM4) channel. These two ion channels have been demonstrated to be critical mediators of edema formation in brain-injured states. Their specific inhibitors, bumetanide and glibenclamide, respectively, are well-characterized Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs with excellent safety profiles. Directed inhibition of these ion transporters has the potential to reduce the development of cerebral edema and is currently being investigated in human clinical trials. Another class of treatment agents for cerebral edema is vasopressin receptor antagonists. Euvolemic hyponatremia is present in a myriad of neurological conditions resulting in cerebral edema. A specific antagonist of the vasopressin V1A- and V2-receptor, conivaptan, promotes water excretion while sparing electrolytes through a process known as aquaresis.

  13. Effects of α-Phenyl-N-tert-Butyl Nitrone (PBN) on Brain Cell Membrane Function and Energy Metabolism during Transient Global Cerebral Hypoxia-Ischemia and Reoxygenation-Reperfusion in Newborn Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chang Won; Hwang, Jong Hee; Chang, Yun Sil; Shin, Son Moon; Park, Won Soon

    2004-01-01

    We sought to know whether a free radical spin trap agent, α-phenyl-N-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN) influences brain cell membrane function and energy metabolism during and after transient global hypoxia-ischemia (HI) in the newborn piglets. Cerebral HI was induced by temporary complete occlusion of bilateral common carotid arteries and simultaneous breathing with 8% oxygen for 30 min, followed by release of carotid occlusion and normoxic ventilation for 1 hr (reoxygenation-reperfusion, RR). PBN (100 mg/kg) or vehicle was administered intravenously just before the induction of HI or RR. Brain cortex was harvested for the biochemical analyses at the end of HI or RR. The level of conjugated dienes significantly increased and the activity of Na+, K+-ATPase significantly decreased during HI, and they did not recover during RR. The levels of ATP and phosphocreatine (PCr) significantly decreased during HI, and recovered during RR. PBN significantly decreased the level of conjugated dienes both during HI and RR, but did not influence the activity of Na+, K+-ATPase and the levels of ATP and PCr. We demonstrated that PBN effectively reduced brain cell membrane lipid peroxidation, but did not reverse ongoing brain cell membrane dysfunction nor did restore brain cellular energy depletion, in our piglet model of global hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. PMID:15201509

  14. Cerebral Gluconeogenesis and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yip, James; Geng, Xiaokun; Shen, Jiamei; Ding, Yuchuan

    2017-01-01

    The gluconeogenesis pathway, which has been known to normally present in the liver, kidney, intestine, or muscle, has four irreversible steps catalyzed by the enzymes: pyruvate carboxylase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase, and glucose 6-phosphatase. Studies have also demonstrated evidence that gluconeogenesis exists in brain astrocytes but no convincing data have yet been found in neurons. Astrocytes exhibit significant 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase-3 activity, a key mechanism for regulating glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. Astrocytes are unique in that they use glycolysis to produce lactate, which is then shuttled into neurons and used as gluconeogenic precursors for reduction. This gluconeogenesis pathway found in astrocytes is becoming more recognized as an important alternative glucose source for neurons, specifically in ischemic stroke and brain tumor. Further studies are needed to discover how the gluconeogenesis pathway is controlled in the brain, which may lead to the development of therapeutic targets to control energy levels and cellular survival in ischemic stroke patients, or inhibit gluconeogenesis in brain tumors to promote malignant cell death and tumor regression. While there are extensive studies on the mechanisms of cerebral glycolysis in ischemic stroke and brain tumors, studies on cerebral gluconeogenesis are limited. Here, we review studies done to date regarding gluconeogenesis to evaluate whether this metabolic pathway is beneficial or detrimental to the brain under these pathological conditions. PMID:28101056

  15. Cerebral blood flow response to functional activation

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, Olaf B; Hasselbalch, Steen G; Rostrup, Egill; Knudsen, Gitte Moos; Pelligrino, Dale

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate are normally coupled, that is an increase in metabolic demand will lead to an increase in flow. However, during functional activation, CBF and glucose metabolism remain coupled as they increase in proportion, whereas oxygen metabolism only increases to a minor degree—the so-called uncoupling of CBF and oxidative metabolism. Several studies have dealt with these issues, and theories have been forwarded regarding the underlying mechanisms. Some reports have speculated about the existence of a potentially deficient oxygen supply to the tissue most distant from the capillaries, whereas other studies point to a shift toward a higher degree of non-oxidative glucose consumption during activation. In this review, we argue that the key mechanism responsible for the regional CBF (rCBF) increase during functional activation is a tight coupling between rCBF and glucose metabolism. We assert that uncoupling of rCBF and oxidative metabolism is a consequence of a less pronounced increase in oxygen consumption. On the basis of earlier studies, we take into consideration the functional recruitment of capillaries and attempt to accommodate the cerebral tissue's increased demand for glucose supply during neural activation with recent evidence supporting a key function for astrocytes in rCBF regulation. PMID:19738630

  16. Effects of a Water-Soluble Cinnamon Extract on Body Composition and Features of the Metabolic Syndrome in Pre-Diabetic Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Ziegenfuss, Tim N; Hofheins, Jennifer E; Mendel, Ronald W; Landis, Jamie; Anderson, Richard A

    2006-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of supplementation with a water-soluble cinnamon extract (Cinnulin PF®) on body composition and features of the metabolic syndrome. Methods Twenty-two subjects with prediabetes and the metabolic syndrome (mean ± SD: age, BMI, systolic blood pressure [SBP], fasting blood glucose [FBG]: 46.0 ± 9.7 y; 33.2 ± 9.3 kg/m2; 133 ± 17 mm Hg; 114.3 ± 11.6 mg/dL) were randomly assigned to supplement their diet with either Cinnulin PF® (500 mg/d) or a placebo for 12-weeks. Main outcome measures were changes in FBG, SBP, and body composition measured after 12-weeks of supplementation. The primary statistical analyses consisted of two factor (group × time), repeated-measures ANOVA for between group differences over time. In all analyses, an intent-to-treat approach was used and significance was accepted at P < 0.05. Results Subjects in the Cinnulin PF® group had significant decreases in FBG (-8.4%: 116.3 ± 12.8 mg/dL [pre] to 106.5 ± 20.1 mg/dL [post], p < 0.01), SBP (-3.8%: 133 ± 14 mm Hg [pre] to 128 ± 18 mm Hg [post], p < 0.001), and increases in lean mass (+1.1%: 53.7 ± 11.8 kg [pre] to 54.3 ± 11.8 kg [post], p < 0.002) compared with the placebo group. Additionally, within-group analyses uncovered small, but statistically significant decreases in body fat (-0.7%: 37.9 ± 9.2% [pre] to 37.2 ± 8.9% [post], p < 0.02) in the Cinnulin PF® group. No significant changes in clinical blood chemistries were observed between groups over time. Conclusion These data support the efficacy of Cinnulin PF® supplementation on reducing FBG and SBP, and improving body composition in men and women with the metabolic syndrome and suggest that this naturally-occurring spice can reduce risk factors associated with diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:18500972

  17. Cerebral creatine deficiencies: a group of treatable intellectual developmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Stockler-Ipsiroglu, Sylvia; van Karnebeek, Clara D M

    2014-07-01

    Currently there are 91 treatable inborn errors of metabolism that cause intellectual developmental disorders. Cerebral creatine deficiencies (CDD) comprise three of these: arginine: glycine amidinotransferase [AGAT], guanidinoacetate methyltransferase [GAMT], and X-linked creatine transporter deficiency [SLC6A8]. Intellectual developmental disorder and cerebral creatine deficiency are the hallmarks of CDD. Additional clinical features include prominent speech delay, autism, epilepsy, extrapyramidal movement disorders, and signal changes in the globus pallidus. Patients with GAMT deficiency exhibit the most severe clinical spectrum. Myopathy is a distinct feature in AGAT deficiency. Guanidinoacetate (GAA) is the immediate product in the creatine biosynthetic pathway. Low GAA concentrations in urine, plasma, and cerebrospinal fluid are characteristic diagnostic markers for AGAT deficiency, while high GAA concentrations are characteristic markers for GAMT deficiency. An elevated ratio of urinary creatine /creatinine excretion serves as a diagnostic marker in males with SLC6A8 deficiency. Treatment strategies include oral supplementation of high-dose creatine-monohydrate for all three CDD. Guanidinoacetate-reducing strategies (high-dose ornithine, arginine-restricted diet) are additionally employed in GAMT deficiency. Supplementation of substrates for intracerebral creatine synthesis (arginine, glycine) has been used additionally to treat SLC6A8 deficiency. Early recognition and treatment improves outcomes. Normal outcomes in neonatally ascertained siblings from index families with AGAT and GAMT deficiency suggest a potential benefit of newborn screening for these disorders.

  18. Sirt1 in cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Koronowski, Kevin B.; Perez-Pinzon, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia is among the leading causes of death worldwide. It is characterized by a lack of blood flow to the brain that results in cell death and damage, ultimately causing motor, sensory, and cognitive impairments. Today, clinical treatment of cerebral ischemia, mostly stroke and cardiac arrest, is limited and new neuroprotective therapies are desperately needed. The Sirtuin family of oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent deacylases has been shown to govern several processes within the central nervous system as well as to possess neuroprotective properties in a variety of pathological conditions such as Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, and Huntington’s Disease, among others. Recently, Sirt1 in particular has been identified as a mediator of cerebral ischemia, with potential as a possible therapeutic target. To gather studies relevant to this topic, we used PubMed and previous reviews to locate, select, and resynthesize the lines of evidence presented here. In this review, we will first describe some functions of Sirt1 in the brain, mainly neurodevelopment, learning and memory, and metabolic regulation. Second, we will discuss the experimental evidence that has implicated Sirt1 as a key protein in the regulation of cerebral ischemia as well as a potential target for the induction of ischemic tolerance. PMID:26819971

  19. Cerebral glucose consumption following verbal auditory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kushner, M J; Schwartz, R; Alavi, A; Dann, R; Rosen, M; Silver, F; Reivich, M

    1987-04-14

    We studied the effect of auditory stimulation upon cerebral glucose metabolism in young normals. The stimulus consisted of a non-English discourse which was presented monaurally to 10 normal blindfolded subjects (5 left ear, 5 right); the opposite ear was plugged. Six subjects studied blindfolded and with ears plugged served as controls. Sixteen discrete homologous cortical and subcortical regions of interest were examined. Regional glucose consumption and side-to-side differences in glucose metabolism were analyzed. Monaural stimulation produced significant increases in temporal metabolism contralateral to the side of stimulation. Significant asymmetries in metabolism were found at the temporoparietal junction, inferior parietal region, insula and corpus collosum. The left frontal speech areas remained unaffected. These findings demonstrate that in man the primary auditory pathways retain a contralateral organization. Further, cerebral activation induced by non-meaningful verbal stimulation is widespread within the left temporal and parietal regions but does not impact upon the frontal speech cortices.

  20. [Noradrenaline and cerebral aging].

    PubMed

    Jouvet, M; Albarede, J L; Lubin, S; Meyrignac, C

    1991-01-01

    The central functions of norepinephrine (NE) are a recent discovery: regulation of alertness and of the wakefulness-sleep cycle, maintenance of attention, memory and learning, cerebral plasticity and neuro-protection. The anatomical, histological, biochemical and physiological properties of the central noradrenergic system: extreme capacity for ramification and arborization; slow conduction, non-myelinized axons with extrasynaptic varicosities producing and releasing NE; frequency of co-transmission phenomena, and; neuromodulation with fiber effect responsible for improvement in the signal over background noise ratio and selection of significant stimuli form a true interface between the outside world and the central nervous system, notably for the neocortex in the context of the cognitive treatment of information. This central noradrenergic system is involved in the neurophysiology and the clinical features of cerebral aging (ideation-motor and cognitive function slowing down, loss of behavioral adjustment), neuro-degenerative disorders (SDAT, Parkinson's disease), certain aspects of depression and less obvious conditions (head injuries, sequelae of cerebrovascular accidents, sub-cortical dementia). The recent development of medications improving alertness (adrafinil, modafinil) with a pure central action and specifically noradrenergic, may contribute to an improvement in these multifactorial disorders.

  1. Cerebral Palsy (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Kids > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... the things that kids do every day. What's CP? Some kids with CP use wheelchairs and others ...

  2. Cerebral Palsy (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Kids > Cerebral Palsy A A A ... the things that kids do every day. What's CP? Some kids with CP use wheelchairs and others ...

  3. Aging and Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Networker, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This special edition of "The Networker" contains several articles focusing on aging and cerebral palsy (CP). "Aging and Cerebral Palsy: Pathways to Successful Aging" (Jenny C. Overeynder) reports on the National Invitational Colloquium on Aging and Cerebral Palsy held in April 1993. "Observations from an Observer" (Kathleen K. Barrett) describes…

  4. Differential diagnosis of cerebral hemispheric pathology: multimodal approach.

    PubMed

    Moritani, T; Smoker, W R K; Lee, H K; Sato, Y

    2011-06-01

    This article gives a comprehensive review and illustrations of the imaging features of various pathological conditions and clinical syndromes associated with cerebral hemispheric involvement. The various conditions are described and defined to provide a basis for the differential diagnostics. The hypotheses relating to the pathology of the various syndromes are discussed with special emphasis on excitotoxic mechanisms for explaining the subsequent cerebral hemiatrophy.

  5. Dual role of cerebral blood flow in regional brain temperature control in the healthy newborn infant.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Sachiko; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Takashima, Sachio; Matsuishi, Toyojiro; Robertson, Nicola J; Iwata, Osuke

    2014-10-01

    Small shifts in brain temperature after hypoxia-ischaemia affect cell viability. The main determinants of brain temperature are cerebral metabolism, which contributes to local heat production, and brain perfusion, which removes heat. However, few studies have addressed the effect of cerebral metabolism and perfusion on regional brain temperature in human neonates because of the lack of non-invasive cot-side monitors. This study aimed (i) to determine non-invasive monitoring tools of cerebral metabolism and perfusion by combining near-infrared spectroscopy and echocardiography, and (ii) to investigate the dependence of brain temperature on cerebral metabolism and perfusion in unsedated newborn infants. Thirty-two healthy newborn infants were recruited. They were studied with cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy, echocardiography, and a zero-heat flux tissue thermometer. A surrogate of cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured using superior vena cava flow adjusted for cerebral volume (rSVC flow). The tissue oxygenation index, fractional oxygen extraction (FOE), and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen relative to rSVC flow (CMRO₂ index) were also estimated. A greater rSVC flow was positively associated with higher brain temperatures, particularly for superficial structures. The CMRO₂ index and rSVC flow were positively coupled. However, brain temperature was independent of FOE and the CMRO₂ index. A cooler ambient temperature was associated with a greater temperature gradient between the scalp surface and the body core. Cerebral oxygen metabolism and perfusion were monitored in newborn infants without using tracers. In these healthy newborn infants, cerebral perfusion and ambient temperature were significant independent variables of brain temperature. CBF has primarily been associated with heat removal from the brain. However, our results suggest that CBF is likely to deliver heat specifically to the superficial brain. Further studies are required to assess the

  6. Toxoplasma gondii infection and cerebral toxoplasmosis in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Chioccola, Vera Lucia; Vidal, José Ernesto; Su, Chunlei

    2009-12-01

    Cerebral toxoplasmosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among HIV-infected patients, particularly from developing countries. This article summarizes current literature on cerebral toxoplasmosis. It focuses on: Toxoplasma gondii genetic diversity and its possible relationship with disease presentation; host responses to the parasite antigens; host immunosupression in HIV and cerebral toxoplasmosis as well as different diagnostic methods; clinical and radiological features; treatment; and the direction that studies on cerebral toxoplasmosis will likely take in the future.

  7. Ependymal lined paraventricular cerebral cysts; a report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Bouch, D. C.; Mitchell, I.; Maloney, A. F. J.

    1973-01-01

    Three cases are reported, each with a benign ependymal-lined cyst which produced clinical signs and symptoms simulating cerebrovascular disease or cerebral neoplasm. The pathological features are described and their histogenesis discussed. Images PMID:4731330

  8. Experiment K-6-21. Effect of microgravity on 1) metabolic enzymes of type 1 and type 2 muscle fibers and on 2) metabolic enzymes, neutransmitter amino acids, and neurotransmitter associated enzymes in motor and somatosensory cerebral cortex. Part 1: Metabolic enzymes of individual muscle fibers; part 2: metabolic enzymes of hippocampus and spinal cord

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, O.; Mcdougal, D., Jr.; Nemeth, Patti M.; Maggie, M.-Y. Chi; Pusateri, M.; Carter, J.; Manchester, J.; Norris, Beverly; Krasnov, I.

    1990-01-01

    The individual fibers of any individual muscle vary greatly in enzyme composition, a fact which is obscured when enzyme levels of a whole muscle are measured. The purpose of this study was therefore to assess the changes due to weightless on the enzyme patterns composed by the individual fibers within the flight muscles. In spite of the limitation in numbers of muscles examined, it is apparent that: (1) that the size of individual fibers (i.e., their dry weight) was reduced about a third, (2) that this loss in dry mass was accompanied by changes in the eight enzymes studied, and (3) that these changes were different for the two muscles, and different for the two enzyme groups. In the soleus muscle the absolute amounts of the three enzymes of oxidative metabolism decreased about in proportion to the dry weight loss, so that their concentration in the atrophic fibers was almost unchanged. In contrast, there was little loss among the four enzymes of glycogenolysis - glycolysis so that their concentrations were substantially increased in the atrophic fibers. In the TA muscle, these seven enzymes were affected in just the opposite direction. There appeared to be no absolute loss among the oxidative enzymes, whereas the glycogenolytic enzymes were reduced by nearly half, so that the concentrations of the first metabolic group were increased within the atrophic fibers and the concentrations of the second group were only marginally decreased. The behavior of hexokinase was exceptional in that it did not decrease in absolute terms in either type of muscle and probably increased as much as 50 percent in soleus. Thus, their was a large increase in concentration of this enzyme in the atrophied fibers of both muscles. Another clear-cut finding was the large increase in the range of activities of the glycolytic enzymes among individual fibers of TA muscles. This was due to the emergence of TA fibers with activities for enzymes of this group extending down to levels as low as

  9. Statins and cerebral hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Giannopoulos, Sotirios; Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Marshall, Randolph S

    2012-01-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are associated with improved stroke outcome. This observation has been attributed in part to the palliative effect of statins on cerebral hemodynamics and cerebral autoregulation (CA), which are mediated mainly through the upregulation of endothelium nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Several animal studies indicate that statin pretreatment enhances cerebral blood flow after ischemic stroke, although this finding is not further supported in clinical settings. Cerebral vasomotor reactivity, however, is significantly improved after long-term statin administration in most patients with severe small vessel disease, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, or impaired baseline CA. PMID:22929438

  10. Pediatric neuroradiology: Cerebral and cranial diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Diebler, C.; Dulac, O.

    1987-01-01

    In this book, a neuroradiologist and a neuropediatrician have combined forces to provide the widest possible knowledge in investigating cranial and cerebral disorders in infancy and childhood. Based on more than 20,000 pediatric CT examinations, with a follow-up time often exceeding ten years, the book aims to bridge interdisciplinary gaps and help radiologists, pediatricians and neurosurgeons solve the various problems of pediatric neuroradiology that frequently confront them. For each disease, the etiology, clinical manifestation, pathological lesions and radiological presentations are discussed, supported by extensive illustrations. Malformative, vascular, traumatic, tumoral, infectious and metabolic diseases are reviewed. Miscellaneous conditions presenting particular symptoms or syndromes are also studied, such as hydrocephalus and neurological complications of leukemia. Contents: Cerebral and cranial malformations; neurocutaneous syndromes; inherited metabolic diseases; infectious diseases - vascular disorders; intracranial tumors; cranial trauma - miscellaneous and subject index.

  11. [Multiple epiphyseal separations in a child with cerebral palsy and scurvy].

    PubMed

    Iacono, O; Datola, A; Barbagallo, M L; Greco, F; Sorge, G

    2009-08-01

    Scurvy is a dietary disease due to Vitamin C deficiency. Vitamin C is related to collagen synthesis and metabolism. Malnutrition, problems in bowel absorption, alcoholism and cerebral palsy are clearly often linked with scurvy, even it is no more common in the industrialized countries. Its clinical features are: asthenia, weight loss, appetite decrease, irritability, gingival or mucous lesions, porpora, follicular hyperkeratosis, musculoskeletal pain due to multiple fractures and subperiosteal bleedings, pseudoparalisis (frog-like position of legs) and refuse to walk. Authors report on a nine year-old girl with spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy, who at the first examination showed deep anemia, fever and multiple epiphyseal separation of the right shoulder and the left knee. Diagnosis of scurvy was been made. The aim of this article was to underline the rarity and gravity of this disease, and its even more frequent appearance in children affected of cerebral palsy. Substitutive therapy consists on ascorbic acid supplementation. Complete restitutio ad integrum of skin-mucous injuries, such as gingival bleedings, was achieved within three months.

  12. Muscle contractile and metabolic dysfunction is a common feature of sarcopenia of aging and chronic diseases: from sarcopenic obesity to cachexia.

    PubMed

    Biolo, Gianni; Cederholm, Tommy; Muscaritoli, Maurizio

    2014-10-01

    Skeletal muscle is the most abundant body tissue accounting for many physiological functions. However, muscle mass and functions are not routinely assessed. Sarcopenia is defined as skeletal muscle loss and dysfunction in aging and chronic diseases. Inactivity, inflammation, age-related factors, anorexia and unbalanced nutrition affect changes in skeletal muscle. Mechanisms are difficult to distinguish in individual subjects due to the multifactorial character of the condition. Sarcopenia includes both muscle loss and dysfunction which induce contractile impairment and metabolic and endocrine abnormalities, affecting whole-body metabolism and immune/inflammatory response. There are different metabolic trajectories for muscle loss versus fat changes in aging and chronic diseases. Appetite regulation and physical activity affect energy balance and changes in body fat mass. Appetite regulation by inflammatory mediators is poorly understood. In some patients, inflammation induces anorexia and fat loss in combination with sarcopenia. In others, appetite is maintained, despite activation of systemic inflammation, leading to sarcopenia with normal or increased BMI. Inactivity contributes to sarcopenia and increased fat tissue in aging and diseases. At the end of the metabolic trajectories, cachexia and sarcopenic obesity are paradigms of the two patient categories. Pre-cachexia and cachexia are observed in patients with cancer, chronic heart failure or liver cirrhosis. Sarcopenic obesity and sarcopenia with normal/increased BMI are observed in rheumatoid arthritis, breast cancer patients with adjuvant chemotherapy and in most of patients with COPD or chronic kidney disease. In these conditions, sarcopenia is a powerful prognostic factor for morbidity and mortality, independent of BMI.

  13. Cerebral Asymmetries and Reading Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirozzolo, Francis J.

    1978-01-01

    Reviewed are historical developments regarding the concepts of cerebral localization, and analyzed are implications of current research on the role of the cerebral hemispheres in reading disorders. (CL)

  14. New Features on the Environmental Regulation of Metabolism Revealed by Modeling the Cellular Proteomic Adaptations Induced by Light, Carbon, and Inorganic Nitrogen in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Gérin, Stéphanie; Leprince, Pierre; Sluse, Francis E.; Franck, Fabrice; Mathy, Grégory

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae are currently emerging to be very promising organisms for the production of biofuels and high-added value compounds. Understanding the influence of environmental alterations on their metabolism is a crucial issue. Light, carbon and nitrogen availability have been reported to induce important metabolic adaptations. So far, the influence of these variables has essentially been studied while varying only one or two environmental factors at the same time. The goal of the present work was to model the cellular proteomic adaptations of the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii upon the simultaneous changes of light intensity, carbon concentrations (CO2 and acetate), and inorganic nitrogen concentrations (nitrate and ammonium) in the culture medium. Statistical design of experiments (DOE) enabled to define 32 culture conditions to be tested experimentally. Relative protein abundance was quantified by two dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE). Additional assays for respiration, photosynthesis, and lipid and pigment concentrations were also carried out. A hierarchical clustering survey enabled to partition biological variables (proteins + assays) into eight co-regulated clusters. In most cases, the biological variables partitioned in the same cluster had already been reported to participate to common biological functions (acetate assimilation, bioenergetic processes, light harvesting, Calvin cycle, and protein metabolism). The environmental regulation within each cluster was further characterized by a series of multivariate methods including principal component analysis and multiple linear regressions. This metadata analysis enabled to highlight the existence of a clear regulatory pattern for every cluster and to mathematically simulate the effects of light, carbon, and nitrogen. The influence of these environmental variables on cellular metabolism is described in details and thoroughly discussed. This work provides an overview of the

  15. Progressive cerebral atrophy in neuromyelitis optica.

    PubMed

    Warabi, Yoko; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Isozaki, Eiji

    2015-12-01

    We report two cases of neuromyelitis optica patients with progressive cerebral atrophy. The patients exhibited characteristic clinical features, including elderly onset, secondary progressive tetraparesis and cognitive impairment, abnormally elevated CSF protein and myelin basic protein levels, and extremely highly elevated serum anti-AQP-4 antibody titer. Because neuromyelitis optica pathology cannot switch from an inflammatory phase to the degenerative phase until the terminal phase, neuromyelitis optica rarely appears as a secondary progressive clinical course caused by axonal degeneration. However, severe intrathecal inflammation and massive destruction of neuroglia could cause a secondary progressive clinical course associated with cerebral atrophy in neuromyelitis optica patients.

  16. Structural features of cytochromes P450 and ligands that affect drug metabolism as revealed by X-ray crystallography and NMR.

    PubMed

    Gay, Sean C; Roberts, Arthur G; Halpert, James R

    2010-09-01

    Cytochromes P450 (P450s) play a major role in the clearance of drugs, toxins, and environmental pollutants. Additionally, metabolism by P450s can result in toxic or carcinogenic products. The metabolism of pharmaceuticals by P450s is a major concern during the design of new drug candidates. Determining the interactions between P450s and compounds of very diverse structures is complicated by the variability in P450-ligand interactions. Understanding the protein structural elements and the chemical attributes of ligands that dictate their orientation in the P450 active site will aid in the development of effective and safe therapeutic agents. The goal of this review is to describe P450-ligand interactions from two perspectives. The first is the various structural elements that microsomal P450s have at their disposal to assume the different conformations observed in X-ray crystal structures. The second is P450-ligand dynamics analyzed by NMR relaxation studies.

  17. Metabolic Environments and Genomic Features Associated with Pathogenic and Mutualistic Interactions between Bacteria and Plants is accepted for publication in MPMI

    SciTech Connect

    Karpinets, Tatiana V; Park, Byung H; Syed, Mustafa H; Klotz, Martin G; Uberbacher, Edward C

    2014-01-01

    Most bacterial symbionts of plants are phenotypically characterized by their parasitic or matualistic relationship with the host; however, the genomic characteristics that likely discriminate mutualistic symbionts from pathogens of plants are poorly understood. This study comparatively analyzed the genomes of 54 plant-symbiontic bacteria, 27 mutualists and 27 pathogens, to discover genomic determinants of their parasitic and mutualistic nature in terms of protein family domains, KEGG orthologous groups, metabolic pathways and families of carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes). We further used all bacteria with sequenced genomesl, published microarrays and transcriptomics experimental datasets, and literature to validate and to explore results of the comparison. The analysis revealed that genomes of mutualists are larger in size and higher in GC content and encode greater molecular, functional and metabolic diversity than the investigated genomes of pathogens. This enriched molecular and functional enzyme diversity included constructive biosynthetic signatures of CAZymes and metabolic pathways in genomes of mutualists compared with catabolic signatures dominant in the genomes of pathogens. Another discriminative characteristic of mutualists is the co-occurence of gene clusters required for the expression and function of nitrogenase and RuBisCO. Analysis of previously published experimental data indicate that nitrogen-fixing mutualists may employ Rubisco to fix CO2 not in the canonical Calvin-Benson-Basham cycle but in a novel metabolic pathway, here called Rubisco-based glycolysis , to increase efficiency of sugar utilization during the symbiosis with plants. An important discriminative characteristic of plant pathogenic bacteria is two groups of genes likely encoding effector proteins involved in host invasion and a genomic locus encoding a putative secretion system that includes a DUF1525 domain protein conserved in pathogens of plants and of other organisms. The

  18. Antidepressants Alter Cerebrovascular Permeability and Metabolic Rate in Primates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preskorn, Sheldon H.; Raichle, Marcus E.; Hartman, Boyd K.

    1982-07-01

    External detection of the annihilation radiation produced by water labeled with oxygen-15 was used to measure cerebrovascular permeability and cerebral blood flow in six rhesus monkeys. Use of oxygen-15 also permitted assessment of cerebral metabolic rate in two of the monkeys. Amitriptyline produced a dose-dependent, reversible increase in permeability at plasma drug concentrations which are therapeutic for depressed patients. At the same concentrations the drug also produced a 20 to 30 percent reduction in cerebral metabolic rate. At higher doses normal autoregulation of cerebral blood flow was suspended, but responsivity to arterial carbon dioxide was normal.

  19. High-altitude cerebral oedema mimicking stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yanamandra, Uday; Gupta, Amul; Patyal, Sagarika; Varma, Prem Prakash

    2014-01-01

    High-altitude cerebral oedema (HACO) is the most fatal high-altitude illness seen by rural physicians practising in high-altitude areas. HACO presents clinically with cerebellar ataxia, features of raised intracranial pressure (ICP) and coma. Early identification is important as delay in diagnosis can be fatal. We present two cases of HACO presenting with focal deficits mimicking stroke. The first patient presented with left-sided hemiplegia associated with the rapid deterioration in the sensorium. Neuroimaging revealed features suggestive of vasogenic oedema. The second patient presented with monoplegia of the lower limb. Neuroimaging revealed perfusion deficit in anterior cerebral artery territory. Both patients were managed with dexamethasone and they improved dramatically. Clinical picture and neuroimaging closely resembled acute ischaemic stroke in both cases. Thrombolysis in these patients would have been disastrous. Recent travel to high altitude, young age, absence of atherosclerotic risk factors and features of raised ICP concomitantly directed the diagnosis to HACO. PMID:24671373

  20. Retinal Vascular Changes are a Marker for Cerebral Vascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Moss, Heather E

    2015-07-01

    The retinal circulation is a potential marker of cerebral vascular disease because it shares origin and drainage with the intracranial circulation and because it can be directly visualized using ophthalmoscopy. Cross-sectional and cohort studies have demonstrated associations between chronic retinal and cerebral vascular disease, acute retinal and cerebral vascular disease, and chronic retinal vascular disease and acute cerebral vascular disease. In particular, certain qualitative features of retinopathy, retinal artery occlusion, and increased retinal vein caliber are associated with concurrent and future cerebrovascular events. These associations persist after accounting for confounding variables known to be disease-causing in both circulations, which supports the potential use of retinal vasculature findings to stratify individuals with regards to cerebral vascular disease risk.

  1. Cerebral astroblastoma: A radiopathological diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Deepak Kumar; Singh, Neha; Singh, Ragini; Husain, Nuzhat

    2014-01-01

    Astroblastoma is a rare glial neoplasm whose histogenesis has been clarified recently. It primarily occurs in children and young adults. We are reporting a case of 12-year-old girl child who presented with features of raised intracranial tension and generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large well-circumscribed, cystic lesion without perifocal edema, and enhancing mural nodule in right parietal region. A radiological differential diagnosis of pilocytic astrocytoma and cerebral astroblastoma was made. A complete excision was done and histologically the lesion turned out to be an astroblastoma. We review the histology, immunohistochemistry, and imaging features of astroblastoma and survey the current literature, treatment strategies, and prognostic aspects for the management of this rare neoplasm. PMID:24891904

  2. H9c2 and HL-1 cells demonstrate distinct features of energy metabolism, mitochondrial function and sensitivity to hypoxia-reoxygenation.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Andrey V; Javadov, Sabzali; Sickinger, Stephan; Frotschnig, Sandra; Grimm, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Dysfunction of cardiac energy metabolism plays a critical role in many cardiac diseases, including heart failure, myocardial infarction and ischemia-reperfusion injury and organ transplantation. The characteristics of these diseases can be elucidated in vivo, though animal-free in vitro experiments, with primary adult or neonatal cardiomyocytes, the rat ventricular H9c2 cell line or the mouse atrial HL-1 cells, providing intriguing experimental alternatives. Currently, it is not clear how H9c2 and HL-1 cells mimic the responses of primary cardiomyocytes to hypoxia and oxidative stress. In the present study, we show that H9c2 cells are more similar to primary cardiomyocytes than HL-1 cells with regard to energy metabolism patterns, such as cellular ATP levels, bioenergetics, metabolism, function and morphology of mitochondria. In contrast to HL-1, H9c2 cells possess beta-tubulin II, a mitochondrial isoform of tubulin that plays an important role in mitochondrial function and regulation. We demonstrate that H9c2 cells are significantly more sensitive to hypoxia-reoxygenation injury in terms of loss of cell viability and mitochondrial respiration, whereas HL-1 cells were more resistant to hypoxia as evidenced by their relative stability. In comparison to HL-1 cells, H9c2 cells exhibit a higher phosphorylation (activation) state of AMP-activated protein kinase, but lower peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha levels, suggesting that each cell type is characterized by distinct regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. Our results provide evidence that H9c2 cardiomyoblasts are more energetically similar to primary cardiomyocytes than are atrial HL-1 cells. H9c2 cells can be successfully used as an in vitro model to simulate cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  3. [Specific features of neurological complications developing in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome: possibility for correction and prevention].

    PubMed

    Shishkova, V N

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and preceding metabolic disturbances has reached epidemic proportions. Oxidative stress plays a significant role in the development of micro- and macrovascular complications in patients with DM. The accumulation of free radicals is responsible for the development of systemic and vascular inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and hypercoagulable and ischemic states. Since vascular and nervous system damages do not level off even under adequate glycemic control, there is a need for complex pathogenetic treatment strategies. Antioxidant therapy using mexidol is one of the compulsory components of combination therapy for complications of DM.

  4. Chest pain and bilateral atrioventricular valve prolapse with normal coronary arteries in isolated corrected transposition of the great vessels. Clinical, angiographic and metabolic features.

    PubMed

    Cowley, M J; Coghlan, H C; Mantle, J A; Soto, B

    1977-09-01

    A man evaluated for disabling chest pain was found to have isolated anatomically corrected transposition of the great vessels. Angiography demonstrated right and left atrioventricular (A-V) valve prolapse and normal coronary arteries. Atrial pacing produced chest pain, ischemic electrocardiographic changes, abnormal myocardial lactate metabolism and marked elevation of the left ventricular end-diastolic pressure; all of these changes returned to normal on termination of pacing. The association of corrected transposition and bilateral A-V valve prolapse and the possible causes of myocardial ischemia in this patient are discussed.

  5. Green coffee polyphenols do not attenuate features of the metabolic syndrome and improve endothelial function in mice fed a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Li Kwok Cheong, J D; Croft, K D; Henry, P D; Matthews, V; Hodgson, J M; Ward, N C

    2014-10-01

    We have investigated the effects of the major polyphenol in coffee, chlorogenic acid (CGA), on obesity, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, systemic oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in a mouse model of the metabolic syndrome. Thirty C57BL6 mice were randomly divided into (n=10/group) (i) normal diet (ND), (ii) high fat diet (HFD), or (iii) high fat diet supplemented with 0.5% w/w green coffee bean extract (GCE) rich in chlorogenic acid (HFD+GCE). The high fat diet consisted of 28% fat and all animals were maintained on their diets for 12 weeks. The mice fed a HFD and HFD+GCE displayed symptoms of the metabolic syndrome compared to their normal fed counterparts, although no endothelial dysfunction was detected in the abdominal aortas after 12 weeks. GCE did not attenuate HFD-induced obesity, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance or systemic oxidative stress. Furthermore, GCE did not protect against ex vivo oxidant (hypochlorous acid)-induced endothelial dysfunction.

  6. Structural Features of Cytochromes P450 and Ligands that Affect Drug Metabolism as Revealed by X-ray Crystallography and NMR

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Sean C.; Roberts, Arthur G.; Halpert, James R.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Cytochromes P450 (P450s) play a major role in the clearance of drugs, toxins, and environmental pollutants. Additionally, metabolism by P450s can result in toxic or carcinogenic products. The metabolism of pharmaceuticals by P450s is a major concern during the design of new drug candidates. Determining the interactions between P450s and compounds of very diverse structures is complicated by the variability in P450-ligand interactions. Understanding the protein structural elements and the chemical attributes of ligands that dictate their orientation in the P450 active site will aid in the development of effective and safe therapeutic agents. The goal of this review is to describe P450-ligand interactions from two perspectives. The first is the various structural elements that microsomal P450s have at their disposal to assume the different conformations observed in X-ray crystal structures. The second is P450-ligand dynamics analyzed by NMR relaxation studies. PMID:21103389

  7. CEREBRAL VENOUS THROMBOSIS AND TURNER SYNDROME: A RARE REPORTED ASSOCIATION.

    PubMed

    Guler, A; Alpaydin, S; Bademkiran, F; Sirin, H; Celebisoy, N

    2015-01-01

    Turner Syndrome is the only known viable chromosomal monosomy, characterised by the complete or partial absence of an X chromosome. It's the most common chromosomal abnormality in females. Apart from the well known dysmorphic features of the syndrome, it has been associated with a number of vascular pathologies; mainly involving the cardiovascular, renovascular, peripheral vascular and cerebrovascular system. It seems striking that thromboembolism is not considered as a feature of the syndrome. Most of the thromboembolism cases are related to the arterial vascular system; except for some rare reported portal venous thrombosis cases, peripheral venous thrombosis cases and to the best of our knowledge a single case of cerebral venous thrombosis with Dandy Walker malformation and polymicrogyria. We herein report a cerebral venous thrombosis case with Turner Syndrome. With no other found underlying etiology, we want to highlight that Turner Syndrome, itself, may have a relationship not only with the cerebral arterial vascular system pathologies but also with the cerebral venous thrombosis.

  8. Acute presentation of gestational diabetes insipidus with pre-eclampsia complicated by cerebral vasoconstriction: a case report and review of the published work.

    PubMed

    Mor, Amir; Fuchs, Yael; Zafra, Kathleen; Haberman, Shoshana; Tal, Reshef

    2015-08-01

    Gestational diabetes insipidus (GDI) is a rare, self-limited complication of pregnancy. As it is related to excess placental vasopressinase enzyme activity, which is metabolized in the liver, GDI is more common in pregnancies complicated by conditions associated with liver dysfunction. We present a case of a 41-year-old woman at 38 weeks' gestation who presented with pre-eclampsia with severe features, including impaired liver function and renal insufficiency. Following cesarean section she was diagnosed with GDI, which was further complicated by cerebral vasoconstriction as demonstrated by magnetic resonance angiography. This case raises the possibility that cerebral vasoconstriction may be related to the cause of GDI. A high index of suspicion of GDI should be maintained in patients who present with typical signs and symptoms, especially in the setting of pregnancy complications associated with liver dysfunction.

  9. Disordered cholinergic neurotransmission and dysautoregulation after acute cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Ott, E O; Abraham, J; Meyer, J S; Achari, A N; Chee, A N; Mathew, N T

    1975-01-01

    The possible role of displaced neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACHh) in dysautoregulation was examined after experimental regional cerebral infarction was produced by occluding the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in babons. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured after intracarotid injection of 133Xenon using the gamma camera. Autoregulation was tested with metaraminol or angiotensin infusion and the autoregulation index (A.I.) was calculated. Acetylcholinesterase (ACHhE) was measured in brain tissue of noninfarcted and infarcted hemispheres. Cerebral arteriovenous (A-V) differences for cholinesterase (ChE) were also measured. Regional dysautoregulation was found in infarcted gray matter and correlated with increased AChE levels in the same zones of cortex and basal ganglia. The time course of onset of dysautoregulation correlated with increased ChE uptake by the brain. Intravenous infusion of the cholinergic neurotransmitter blocker, scopolamine, restored autoregulation to the ischemic zones. Autoregulation appears to be a myogenic reflex, influenced by neurogenic and metabolic mechanisms.

  10. Cerebral Palsy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... palsy — causes a problem with balance and depth perception Since cerebral palsy affects muscle control and coordination, ... fluid into the lungs) gastroesophageal reflux (spitting up) speech problems drooling tooth decay sleep disorders osteoporosis (weak, ...

  11. Cerebral Contusions and Lacerations

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sports-Related Concussion Diffuse Axonal Injury Intracranial Hematomas Skull Fracture Cerebral contusions are bruises of the brain, ... object or pushed-in bone fragment from a skull fracture. Motor vehicle crashes and blows to the ...

  12. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 911) if you have sudden loss of movement , sensation, vision, or speech. Alternative Names Amyloidosis - cerebral; CAA; Congophilic angiopathy Images Amyloidosis on the fingers Arteries of the brain References Kase CS, Shoamanesh A. Intracerebral hemorrhage. In: Daroff ...

  13. Impaired cerebral autoregulation in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Fred; Roux, Francoise; Schindler, Joseph; Mohsenin, Vahid

    2008-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) increases the risk of stroke independent of known vascular and metabolic risk factors. Although patients with OSA have higher prevalence of hypertension and evidence of hypercoagulability, the mechanism of this increased risk is unknown. Obstructive apnea events are associated with surges in blood pressure, hypercapnia, and fluctuations in cerebral blood flow. These perturbations can adversely affect the cerebral circulation. We hypothesized that patients with OSA have impaired cerebral autoregulation, which may contribute to the increased risk of cerebral ischemia and stroke. We examined cerebral autoregulation in patients with and without OSA by measuring cerebral artery blood flow velocity (CBFV) by using transcranial Doppler ultrasound and arterial blood pressure using finger pulse photoplethysmography during orthostatic hypotension and recovery as well as during 5% CO(2) inhalation. Cerebral vascular conductance and reactivity were determined. Forty-eight subjects, 26 controls (age 41.0+/-2.3 yr) and 22 OSA (age 46.8+/-2.3 yr) free of cerebrovascular and active coronary artery disease participated in this study. OSA patients had a mean apnea-hypopnea index of 78.4+/-7.1 vs. 1.8+/-0.3 events/h in controls. The oxygen saturation during sleep was significantly lower in the OSA group (78+/-2%) vs. 91+/-1% in controls. The dynamic vascular analysis showed mean CBFV was significantly lower in OSA patients compared with controls (48+/-3 vs. 55+/-2 cm/s; P <0.05, respectively). The OSA group had a lower rate of recovery of cerebrovascular conductance for a given drop in blood pressure compared with controls (0.06+/-0.02 vs. 0.20+/-0.06 cm.s(-2).mmHg(-1); P <0.05). There was no difference in cerebrovascular vasodilatation in response to CO(2). The findings showed that patients with OSA have decreased CBFV at baseline and delayed cerebrovascular compensatory response to changes in blood pressure but not to CO(2). These perturbations may

  14. Primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma – metabolic and anatomical features in 18FDG-PET/CT and response to therapy

    PubMed Central

    Małkowski, Bogdan; Giza, Agnieszka; Jurczak, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Determining the role of PET/CT imaging in the evaluation of treatment efficacy in primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBCL). Material and methods Retrospective analysis of seven PMBCL patients, treated at the University Hospital in Krakow, with interim PET/CT after the third course of chemo-immunotherapy.The analysis was based on the calculation of exact tumour volume and metabolic activity, compared with initial values (directly after diagnosis). Results Patients (five females, two males, average age 26.2 years, range 18–40 years), in clinical stage IIBX at diagnosis, were treated with eight cycles of R-CHOP-14 regimen, with radiotherapy consolidation (7/7) and central nervous system prophylaxis (6/7). The observed decrease in tumour volume between the initial staging and the interim PET ranged 72–89%. The mean ΔSUVmax reduction between initial (when available) and interim PET was 87% (range 84–89%). In 3/7 cases in the interim PET/CT, the uptake of the tumour was higher than the liver (Deauville Criteria score 4–5), and in 4/7 it was lower than the liver but higher than mediastinal blood pool structures (score 3 according to Deauville Criteria). After a median follow-up of 58 months – OS and EFS is 100%. Conclusions The excellent clinical outcome in the study group corresponds with very good metabolic and volumetric response in the interim PET. The ΔSUVmax seems to be easier in implementation and has a more significant impact than other measurements. PMID:27688726

  15. Classification and genetic features of neonatal haemochromatosis: a study of 27 affected pedigrees and molecular analysis of genes implicated in iron metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, A.; Lunt, P.; Rodrigues, F.; Berry, P; Flynn, D.; McKiernan, P.; Kelly, D.; Mieli-Vergani, G.; Cox, T.

    2001-01-01

    Neonatal haemochromatosis (NH) is a severe and newly recognised syndrome of uncertain aetiology, characterised by congenital cirrhosis or fulminant hepatitis and widespread tissue iron deposition. NH occurs in the context of maternal disease including viral infection, as a complication of metabolic disease in the fetus, and sporadically or recurrently, without overt cause, in sibs. Although an underlying genetic basis for NH has been suspected, no test is available for predictive analysis in at risk pregnancies.
  As a first step towards an understanding of the putative genetic basis for neonatal haemochromatosis, we have conducted a systematic study of the mode of transmission of this disorder in a total of 40 infants born to 27 families. We have moreover carried out a molecular analysis of candidate genes (β2-microglobulin, HFE, and haem oxygenases 1 and 2) implicated in iron metabolism. No pathogenic mutations in these genes were identified that segregate consistently with the disease phenotype in multiplex pedigrees. However, excluding four pedigrees with clear evidence of maternal infection associated with NH, a pedigree showing transmission of maternal antinuclear factor and ribonucleoprotein antibodies to the affected infants, and two families with possible matrilineal inheritance of disease in maternal half sibs, a large subgroup of the affected pedigrees point to the inheritance of an autosomal recessive trait. This included 14 pedigrees with affected and unaffected infants and a single pedigree where all four affected infants were the sole offspring of consanguineous but otherwise healthy parents.
  We thus report three distinct patterns of disease transmission in neonatal haemochromatosis. In the differentiation of a large subgroup showing transmission of disease in a manner suggesting autosomal recessive inheritance, we also provide the basis for further genome wide studies to define chromosomal determinants of iron storage disease in the

  16. Nanomedicine in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Bindu; Nance, Elizabeth; Johnston, Michael V; Kannan, Rangaramanujam; Kannan, Sujatha

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a chronic childhood disorder that can have diverse etiologies. Injury to the developing brain that occurs either in utero or soon after birth can result in the motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits seen in cerebral palsy. Although the etiologies for cerebral palsy are variable, neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the brain injury irrespective of the etiology. Currently, there is no effective cure for cerebral palsy. Nanomedicine offers a new frontier in the development of therapies for prevention and treatment of brain injury resulting in cerebral palsy. Nanomaterials such as dendrimers provide opportunities for the targeted delivery of multiple drugs that can mitigate several pathways involved in injury and can be delivered specifically to the cells that are responsible for neuroinflammation and injury. These materials also offer the opportunity to deliver agents that would promote repair and regeneration in the brain, resulting not only in attenuation of injury, but also enabling normal growth. In this review, the current advances in nanotechnology for treatment of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy. Future directions that would facilitate clinical translation in neonates and children are also addressed.

  17. Pseudotumoral presentation of cerebral amyloid angiopathy–related inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ronsin, Solène; Deiana, Gianluca; Geraldo, Ana Filipa; Durand-Dubief, Françoise; Thomas-Maisonneuve, Laure; Formaglio, Maïté; Desestret, Virginie; Meyronet, David; Nighoghossian, Norbert; Berthezène, Yves; Ducray, François

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify the clinical and radiologic features that should raise suspicion for the pseudotumoral presentation of cerebral amyloid angiopathy–related inflammation (CAA-I). Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the characteristics of 5 newly diagnosed and 23 previously reported patients in whom the CAA-I imaging findings were initially interpreted as CNS neoplasms. Results: Most cases (85%) occurred in patients >60 years old. The clinical characteristics at presentation included subacute cognitive decline (50%), confusion (32%), focal deficits (32%), seizures (25%), and headaches (21%). Brain MRI demonstrated infiltrative white matter lesions that exhibited a loco-regional mass effect without parenchymal enhancement (93%). In general, these findings were interpreted as low-grade glioma or lymphoma. Eighteen patients (64%) underwent a biopsy, which was nondiagnostic in 4 patients (14%), and 6 patients (21%) underwent a surgical resection. The primary reason for the misinterpretation of the imaging findings was the absence of T2*-weighted gradient recalled echo (T2*-GRE) sequences on initial imaging (89%). When subsequently performed (39%), the T2*-GRE sequences demonstrated multiple characteristic cortical and subcortical microhemorrhages in all cases. Perfusion MRI and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), which were performed on a subset of patients, indicated markedly reduced relative cerebral blood flow and a normal metabolic ratio. Conclusion: The identification of one or several nonenhancing space-occupying lesions, especially in elderly patients presenting with cognitive impairment, should raise suspicion for the pseudotumoral presentation of CAA-I and lead to T2*-GRE sequences. Perfusion MRI and MRS appear to be useful techniques for the differential diagnosis of this entity. PMID:26850981

  18. Use of amplitude integrated electroencephalography (aEEG) in patients with inborn errors of metabolism - a new tool for the metabolic geneticist.

    PubMed

    Theda, Christiane

    2010-01-01

    Patients with metabolic disorders often, especially as newborns, present with encephalopathy and seizures, frequently requiring intensive care during metabolic crises. Cerebral function monitoring using amplitude integrated electroencephalography (aEEG) can be utilized to supplement clinical assessment and other monitoring already in use in the intensive care setting. In this technique, a one or two-channel EEG tracing is obtained, processed, compressed and displayed. Use of aEEG is well established in evaluation and treatment of newborns with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. The basis of aEEG interpretation is the recognition of patterns which have been defined for different degrees of encephalopathy. Seizures are identified on the compressed tracing in combination with analysis of the corresponding raw EEG tracing. This review discusses the experience, although limited at this time, with use of aEEG in infants with inborn errors of metabolism. Through an international collaborative, the International Registry for Cerebral Function Monitoring in Patients with Genetics Disorders and Brain Malformations, aEEG tracings of patients with inborn errors of metabolism were collected. The features of 25 traces are included in this review. This collection includes patients with hyperammonemia (HA, n=4), disorders of energy metabolism (DEM, n=9), disorders of amino and organic acid metabolism (DAOAM, n=7), and peroxisomal disorders (PD, n=5). Fifteen of 25 patients demonstrated encephalopathic changes, including patients with HA, DEM and DAOAM, but not PD. In 15 of 25 patients seizure potentials were identified. In HA, DEM, and DAOAM both encephalopathy and seizures may coincide, while in peroxisomal disorders seizures were seen without background patterns indicating encephalopathy, likely due to neuronal migration defects as the underlying cause. The current experience with the use of aEEG in these patients, while limited, indicates that cerebral function monitoring

  19. The Role of −786T/C Polymorphism in the Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Gene in Males with Clinical and Biochemical Features of the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Misiak, Blazej; Krolik, Marta; Kukowka, Anna; Lewera, Anna; Leszczynski, Przemyslaw; Stankiewicz-Olczyk, Joanna; Slezak, Ryszard

    2011-01-01

    Background. Extensive evidence, arising from models of endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene (NOS3)-knockout mice supports the role of endothelial malfunction in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome (MS). Aims. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of −786T/C polymorphism in the etiology of MS and assess previously reported interaction with cigarette smoking. Methods. Based on International Diabetes Federation 2005 criteria, we recruited randomly 152 subjects with MS and 75 subjects without MS. Results. Allelic and genotype frequencies did not differ significantly between both groups. Total cholesterol level (CHOLT) and intima-media thickness of carotid arteries were significantly higher in −786CC homozygotes, in comparison with −786TC and −786TT patients. Regarding current smoking status, −786C allele was associated with higher CHOLT than −786T allele. Conclusion. Our study indicates the putative role of −786T/C polymorphism in the development of hypercholesterolemia, in patients with MS, which might be enhanced by cigarette smoking. PMID:22164159

  20. Special Feature: Oxygen isotope ratios of PO4: An inorganic indicator of enzymatic activity and P metabolism and a new biomarker in the search for life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Ruth E.; Alt, Jeffrey C.; Martini, Anna M.

    2001-02-01

    The distinctive relations between biological activity and isotopic effect recorded in biomarkers (e.g., carbon and sulfur isotope ratios) have allowed scientists to suggest that life originated on this planet nearly 3.8 billion years ago. The existence of life on other planets may be similarly identified by geochemical biomarkers, including the oxygen isotope ratio of phosphate (18Op) presented here. At low near-surface temperatures, the exchange of oxygen isotopes between phosphate and water requires enzymatic catalysis. Because enzymes are indicative of cellular activity,the demonstration of enzyme-catalyzed PO4-H2O exchange is indicative of the presence of life. Results of laboratory experiments are presented that clearly show that δ18OP values of inorganic phosphate can be used to detect enzymatic activity and microbial metabolism of phosphate. Applications of δ18Op as a biomarker are presented for two Earth environments relevant to the search for extraterrestrial life: a shallow groundwater reservoir and a marine hydrothermal vent system. With the development of in situ analytical techniques and future planned sample return strategies, δ18Op may provide an important biosignature of the presence of life in extraterrestrial systems such as that on Mars.

  1. Etiologic Framework for the Study of Neurodegenerative Disorders as Well as Vascular and Metabolic Comorbidities on the Grounds of Shared Epidemiologic and Biologic Features

    PubMed Central

    de Pedro-Cuesta, Jesús; Martínez-Martín, Pablo; Rábano, Alberto; Ruiz-Tovar, María; Alcalde-Cabero, Enrique; Calero, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Background: During the last two decades, protein aggregation at all organismal levels, from viruses to humans, has emerged from a neglected area of protein science to become a central issue in biology and biomedicine. This article constitutes a risk-based review aimed at supporting an etiologic scenario of selected, sporadic, protein-associated, i.e., conformational, neurodegenerative disorders (NDDs), and their vascular- and metabolic-associated ailments. Methods: A rationale is adopted, to incorporate selected clinical data and results from animal-model research, complementing epidemiologic evidences reported in two prior articles. Findings: Theory is formulated assuming an underlying conformational transmission mechanism, mediated either by horizontal transfer of mammalian genes coding for specific aggregation-prone proteins, or by xeno-templating between bacterial and host proteins. We build a few population-based and experimentally-testable hypotheses focusing on: (1) non-disposable surgical instruments for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) and other rapid progressive neurodegenerative dementia (sRPNDd), multiple system atrophy (MSA), and motor neuron disease (MND); and (2) specific bacterial infections such as B. pertussis and E. coli for all forms, but particularly for late-life sporadic conformational, NDDs, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and atherosclerosis where natural protein fibrils present in such organisms as a result of adaptation to the human host induce prion-like mechanisms. Conclusion: Implications for cohort alignment and experimental animal research are discussed and research lines proposed. PMID:27378910

  2. Impact of intermittent hypoxia and exercise on blood pressure and metabolic features from obese subjects suffering sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    González-Muniesa, P; Lopez-Pascual, A; de Andrés, J; Lasa, A; Portillo, M P; Arós, F; Durán, J; Egea, C J; Martinez, J A

    2015-09-01

    Strategies designed to reduce adiposity and cardiovascular-accompanying manifestations have been based on nutritional interventions conjointly with physical activity programs. The aim of this 13-week study was to investigate the putative benefits associated to hypoxia plus exercise on weight loss and relevant metabolic and cardiorespiratory variables, when prescribed to obese subjects with sleep apnea syndrome following dietary advice. The participants were randomly distributed in the following three groups: control, normoxia, and hypoxia. All the subjects received dietary advice while, additionally, normoxia group was trained under normal oxygen concentration and Hypoxia group under hypoxic conditions. There was a statistically significant decrease in fat-free mass (Kg) and water (%) on the control compared to normoxia group (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). Body weight, body mass index, and waist circumference decreased in all the groups after the study. Moreover, leukocyte count was increased after the intervention in hypoxia compared to control group (p < 0.05). There were no statistically significant variations within groups in other variables, although changes in appetite were found after the 13-week period. In addition, associations between the variations in the leukocyte count and fat mass have been found. The hypoxia group showed some specific benefits concerning appetite and cardiometabolic-related measurements as exertion time and diastolic blood pressure, with a therapeutical potential.

  3. Cerebral circulation in hypoxia and ischemia.

    PubMed

    Kovách, A G

    1988-01-01

    In conclusion our results clearly suggest that vital functions of the brain, in spite of its well developed autoregulation are impaired during prolonged hypovolemic conditions. Regional cerebral blood flow measured by the 133Xe clearance and 14C-antipyrine autoradiographic techniques demonstrated a progressive reduction in CBF, with the development of patchy and circumscribed ischemic areas during hemorrhagic shock which persisted after reinfusion. The regional distribution of the underperfused regions cannot be explained solely in terms of boundary zones between the main distribution fields of major cerebral arteries. Our results suggest the involvement of the sympathetic nervous system in the impairment of cerebral microcirculation during hemorrhagic shock. The patchy focal brain damage could be the background of the functional impairment. The focal appearances suggests that, in addition to generalized (blood borne) changes, local factors play an important role in the production of ischemic areas in the brain. Afferent neural nociceptive input to the brain seems to be elevated during shock. It may be presumed that this leads to increased tissue metabolism and the accumulation of metabolites. The low flow combined with elevated neuronal activity and cellular metabolism produces an imbalance between oxygen delivery and oxygen utilization. The local nature of afferent activation of the CNS can explain the regional impairment in the brain tissue. Nociceptive afferent stimulation increases, while denervation of the carotid sinus or transsection of the vagus or spinal afferent pathways decreases the sensitivity to shock. We have presented further evidence that stimulation of the C-fibres of the sciatic nerve reduced local cerebral blood flow and the tissue PO2 in the n. VPL thalami and VM hypothalami in cardiovascularly restricted (stabilized blood pressure) animals. Concerning the subcellular events that may lead to neuronal death during hemorrhagic shock, we believe

  4. Adrenergic and prostanoid mechanisms in control of cerebral blood flow in hypotensive newborn pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Armstead, W.M.; Leffler, C.W.; Busija, D.W.; Beasley, D.G.; Mirro, R. )

    1988-04-01

    The interaction between adrenergic and prostanoid mechanisms in the control of cerebral hemodynamics in the conscious, hypotensive newborn pig was investigated. Pretreatment with the selective {alpha}{sub 1}- and {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenoceptor antagonists prazosin and yohimbine, respectively, had no effect on cerebral blood flow, calculated cerebral vascular resistance, or cerebral metabolic rate either before or after hemmorrhagic hypotension. Indomethacin treatment (5 mg/kg ia) of piglets following hemorrhage caused a significant decrease in blood flow to all brain regions within 20 min. This decrease in cerebral blood flow resulted from increased cerebral vascular resistances of 54 and 177%, 20 and 40 min after treatment, respectively. Cerebral oxygen consumption was reduced from 2.42 {+-} 0.28 to 1.45 {+-} 0.28 ml{center dot}100 g{sup {minus}1} and to 1.0 {+-} 0.28 ml{center dot}100 g{sup {minus}1}{center dot}min{sup {minus}1} 20 and 40 min after indomethacin, respectively, in hemorrhaged piglets. Decreases in cerebral blood flow and metabolic rate and increases in vascular resistance on treatment with indomethacin were the same as in animals pretreated with vehicle, prazosin, or yohimbine. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that the prostanoid system contributes to the maintenance of cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic rate during hypotension in the newborn, as reported previously. These data do not implicate removal of sympathetic modulation by prostanoids as a mechanism for indomethacin-induced cerebral vasoconstriction in hypotensive newborn piglets.

  5. Metabolic phenotype and adipose and liver features in a high-fat Western diet-induced mouse model of obesity-linked NAFLD

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yuwen; Burrington, Christine M.; Graff, Emily C.; Zhang, Jian; Judd, Robert L.; Suksaranjit, Promporn; Kaewpoowat, Quanhathai; Davenport, Samantha K.; O'Neill, Ann Marie

    2015-01-01

    nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), an obesity and insulin resistance associated clinical condition - ranges from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. To model the human condition, a high-fat Western diet that includes liquid sugar consumption has been used in mice. Even though liver pathophysiology has been well characterized in the model, little is known about the metabolic phenotype (e.g., energy expenditure, activity, or food intake). Furthermore, whether the consumption of liquid sugar exacerbates the development of glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and adipose tissue dysfunction in the model is currently in question. In our study, a high-fat Western diet (HFWD) with liquid sugar [fructose and sucrose (F/S)] induced acute hyperphagia above that observed in HFWD-fed mice, yet without changes in energy expenditure. Liquid sugar (F/S) exacerbated HFWD-induced glucose intolerance and insulin resistance and impaired the storage capacity of epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT). Hepatic TG, plasma alanine aminotransferase, and normalized liver weight were significantly increased only in HFWD+F/S-fed mice. HFWD+F/S also resulted in increased hepatic fibrosis and elevated collagen 1a2, collagen 3a1, and TGFβ gene expression. Furthermore, HWFD+F/S-fed mice developed more profound eWAT inflammation characterized by adipocyte hypertrophy, macrophage infiltration, a dramatic increase in crown-like structures, and upregulated proinflammatory gene expression. An early hypoxia response in the eWAT led to reduced vascularization and increased fibrosis gene expression in the HFWD+F/S-fed mice. Our results demonstrate that sugary water consumption induces acute hyperphagia, limits adipose tissue expansion, and exacerbates glucose intolerance and insulin resistance, which are associated with NAFLD progression. PMID:26670487

  6. Effects of forskolin on cerebral blood flow: implications for a role of adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Wysham, D.G.; Brotherton, A.F.; Heistad, D.D.

    1986-11-01

    We have studied cerebral vascular effects of forskolin, a drug which stimulates adenylate cyclase and potentiates dilator effects of adenosine in other vascular beds. Our goals were to determine whether forskolin is a cerebral vasodilator and whether it potentiates cerebral vasodilator responses to adenosine. We measured cerebral blood flow with microspheres in anesthetized rabbits. Forskolin (10 micrograms/kg per min) increased blood flow (ml/min per 100 gm) from 39 +/- 5 (mean +/- S.E.) to 56 +/- 9 (p less than 0.05) in cerebrum, and increased flow to myocardium and kidney despite a decrease in mean arterial pressure. Forskolin did not alter cerebral oxygen consumption, which indicates that the increase in cerebral blood flow is a direct vasodilator effect and is not secondary to increased metabolism. We also examined effects of forskolin on the response to infusion of adenosine. Cerebral blood flow was measured during infusion of 1-5 microM/min adenosine into one internal carotid artery, under control conditions and during infusion of forskolin at 3 micrograms/kg per min i.v. Adenosine alone increased ipsilateral cerebral blood flow from 32 +/- 3 to 45 +/- 5 (p less than 0.05). Responses to adenosine were not augmented during infusion of forskolin. We conclude that forskolin is a direct cerebral vasodilator and forskolin does not potentiate cerebral vasodilator responses to adenosine.

  7. Engineering of metabolic control

    DOEpatents

    Liao, James C.

    2004-03-16

    The invention features a method of producing heterologous molecules in cells under the regulatory control of a metabolite and metabolic flux. The method can enhance the synthesis of heterologous polypeptides and metabolites.

  8. Engineering of metabolic control

    DOEpatents

    Liao, James C.

    2006-10-17

    The invention features a method of producing heterologous molecules in cells under the regulatory control of a metabolite and metabolic flux. The method can enhance the synthesis of heterologous polypeptides and metabolites.

  9. [Cerebral Doppler ultrasonography in newborn infants].

    PubMed

    Luciano, R; Velardi, F

    1995-01-01

    Following the first study of Bada et al. (1979), Doppler assessment of cerebral blood flow has increasingly been used in newborn infants, matching the technical progress in the available equipment. The experience gathered in recent years has confirmed that Doppler US is a reliable and reproducible examination while precising the limitations and the methodology to be followed in order to prevent gross errors of assessment and interpretation. The interest this procedure has arisen, among other things, stems from being noninvasive and feasible at the patient's bed. These features enable its repeated use in newborn infants in poor clinical condition. The diagnostic and prognostic role of Doppler velocimetry has been shown in a number of neonatal diseases and the cerebral hemodynamics has been assessed in physiologic conditions as well as after drug administration. The most common equipment used in newborn infants is at present Duplex Doppler consisting of a pulsed Doppler combined with bidimensional scanner, which, with visualization of study arteries, enables precise positioning of sample volume and correction of the ultrasonic angle of incidence with respect to the direction of blood flow in the examined vessel. In this report, after a survey of the techniques and modalities of cerebral Doppler examination in newborns, a review of the present state of the art, in neonatal cerebral as well as extracranial disease, is presented.

  10. An exploration of the associations of pregnancy and perinatal features with cytokines and tryptophan/kynurenine metabolism in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    PubMed

    Oades, Robert D

    2011-12-01

    Intra-individual variability of the characteristics of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity (ADHD) may reflect compromised glial energy supply in the synapse. We reported recently that while serum levels of a glial marker, the cytokine S100B, were not seriously altered, levels of other cytokines and tryptophan metabolites were related to symptoms, attention and variability. Here, we explore with a regression analysis whether levels of these substances were associated with features of the index pregnancy of potential aetiological significance. Serum was taken from 35 children with DSM-IV ADHD (14 on medication) and 21 typically developing controls to measure 8 cytokines (S100B, IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, IL-13, IL-16, TNF-α and IFN-γ) and 5 metabolites (Tryptophan, Kynurenine, Kynurenate [KA], 3-hydroxy-kynurenine [3HK] and 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid [5-HIAA]). The mothers received a 124-item questionnaire on features surrounding the pregnancy. (1) For children with ADHD, a shorter pregnancy and smaller birth weight were associated statistically with increased 3HK and IFN-γ and for obstetric problems with decreased TNF-α levels. (2) Maternal smoking related to decreasing kynurenine and increasing 3HK and S100B levels in ADHD children. Paternal smoking was associated with increased tryptophan in the controls and increased IL-6 levels in ADHD children. (3) The taking of supplements often related to decreasing TNF-α, increasing IL-10 and lower 5-HIAA levels in the ADHD children. Less 5-HIAA but more tryptophan was associated with earlier and later life events, respectively. (4) Increased IL-16 and 5-HIAA levels in the ADHD group related to reports of poorer infant health. Unexpectedly, more child care (seafood and time together) in ADHD than healthy families was implicated by lower tryptophan levels and an altered balance of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Across measures control families generally showed either non-significant associations or the opposite to those

  11. Duplicated middle cerebral artery.

    PubMed

    Perez, Jesus; Machado, Calixto; Scherle, Claudio; Hierro, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Duplicated middle cerebral artery (DMCA) is an anomalous vessel arising from the internal carotid artery. The incidence DMCA is relatively law, and an association between this anomaly and cerebral aneurysms has been documented. There is a controversy whether DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is an important fact to consider in aneurysm surgery. We report the case of a 34-year-old black woman who suffered a subarachnoid hemorrhage and the angiography a left DMCA, and an aneurysm in an inferior branch of the main MCA. The DMCA and the MCA had perforating arteries. The aneurysm was clipped without complications. The observation of perforating arteries in our patient confirms that the DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is very important to be considered in cerebral aneurysms surgery. Moreover, the DMCA may potentially serve as a collateral blood supply to the MCA territory in cases of MCA occlusion.

  12. [Cerebral ischemia and histamine].

    PubMed

    Adachi, Naoto

    2002-10-01

    Cerebral ischemia induces excess release of glutamate and an increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, which provoke catastrophic enzymatic processes leading to irreversible neuronal injury. Histamine plays the role of neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and histaminergic fibers are widely distributed in the brain. In cerebral ischemia, release of histamine from nerve endings has been shown to be enhanced by facilitation of its activity. An inhibition of the histaminergic activity in ischemia aggravates the histologic outcome. In contrast, intracerebroventricular administration of histamine improves the aggravation, whereas blockade of histamine H2 receptors aggravates ischemic injury. Furthermore, H2 blockade enhances ischemic release of glutamate and dopamine. These findings suggest that central histamine provides beneficial effects against ischemic neuronal damage by suppressing release of excitatory neurotransmitters. However, histaminergic H2 action facilitates the permeability of the blood-brain barrier and shows deleterious effects on cerebral edema.

  13. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis with cerebral hemorrhage during early pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Quanmin; Guo, Pin; Ge, Jianwei; Qiu, Yongming

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) rarely induces cerebral hemorrhage, and CVST with cerebral hemorrhage during early pregnancy is extremely rare. Upon literature review, we are able to find only one case of CVST with cerebral hemorrhage in early pregnancy. In this paper, we report another case of a 27-year-old patient who developed CVST with cerebral hemorrhage in her fifth week of pregnancy. Although the optimal treatment for this infrequent condition remains controversial, we adopted anticoagulation as the first choice of treatment and obtained favorable results. PMID:25630781

  14. Cerebral vascular regulation and brain injury in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Brew, Nadine; Walker, David; Wong, Flora Y

    2014-06-01

    Cerebrovascular lesions, mainly germinal matrix hemorrhage and ischemic injury to the periventricular white matter, are major causes of adverse neurodevelopmental outcome in preterm infants. Cerebrovascular lesions and neuromorbidity increase with decreasing gestational age, with the white matter predominantly affected. Developmental immaturity in the cerebral circulation, including ongoing angiogenesis and vasoregulatory immaturity, plays a major role in the severity and pattern of preterm brain injury. Prevention of this injury requires insight into pathogenesis. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is low in the preterm white matter, which also has blunted vasoreactivity compared with other brain regions. Vasoreactivity in the preterm brain to cerebral perfusion pressure, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and neuronal metabolism is also immature. This could be related to immaturity of both the vasculature and vasoactive signaling. Other pathologies arising from preterm birth and the neonatal intensive care environment itself may contribute to impaired vasoreactivity and ineffective CBF regulation, resulting in the marked variations in cerebral hemodynamics reported both within and between infants depending on their clinical condition. Many gaps exist in our understanding of how neonatal treatment procedures and medications have an impact on cerebral hemodynamics and preterm brain injury. Future research directions for neuroprotective strategies include establishing cotside, real-time clinical reference values for cerebral hemodynamics and vasoregulatory capacity and to demonstrate that these thresholds improve long-term outcomes for the preterm infant. In addition, stimulation of vascular development and repair with growth factor and cell-based therapies also hold promise.

  15. Local oestrogenic/androgenic balance in the cerebral vasculature.

    PubMed

    Krause, D N; Duckles, S P; Gonzales, R J

    2011-09-01

    Reproductive effects of sex steroids are well-known; however it is increasingly apparent that these hormones have important actions on non-reproductive tissues such as the vasculature. The latter effects can be relevant throughout the lifespan, not just limited to reproductive years, and are not necessarily restricted to one gender or the other. Our work has established that cerebral blood vessels are a non-reproductive target tissue for sex steroids. We have found that oestrogen and androgens alter vascular tone, endothelial function, oxidative stress and inflammatory responses in cerebral vessels. Often the actions of oestrogen and androgens oppose each other. Moreover, it is clear that cerebral vessels are directly targeted by sex steroids, as they express specific receptors for these hormones. Interestingly, cerebral blood vessels also express enzymes that metabolize sex steroids. These findings suggest that local synthesis of 17ß-estradiol and dihydrotestosterone can occur within the vessel wall. One of the enzymes present, aromatase, converts testosterone to 17ß-estradiol, which would alter the local balance of androgenic and oestrogenic influences. Thus cerebral vessels are affected by circulating sex hormones as well as locally synthesized sex steroids. The presence of vascular endocrine effector mechanisms has important implications for male-female differences in cerebrovascular function and disease. Moreover, the cerebral circulation is a target for gonadal hormones as well as anabolic steroids and therapeutic drugs used to manipulate sex steroid actions. The long-term consequences of these influences are yet to be determined.

  16. The effects of oxiracetam (CT-848) on local cerebral glucose utilization after focal cerebral ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Hokonohara, T; Sako, K; Shinoda, Y; Tomabechi, M; Yonemasu, Y

    1992-02-01

    The effects of oxiracetam on the reduction of brain metabolism induced by focal cerebral ischemia were investigated by measuring local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) in rats 24 hr after left middle cerebral artery occlusion. Focal cerebral ischemia reduced LCGU in the entire ipsilateral cortex, the greatest reduction being in the lateral parts of the frontoparietal cortex. LCGU was slightly reduced in the contralateral cortex; this reduction was considered to be caused by diaschisis. Oxiracetam was administered intraperitoneally for 3 days prior to middle cerebral artery occlusion. In the ipsilateral cortex, LCGU reduction was minimized in the ischemic center areas by oxiracetam at a dose of 400 mg/kg and in more extensive areas, by a dose of 800 mg/kg. Moreover, oxiracetam at a dose of 800 mg/kg enhanced metabolism impaired by diaschisis in the caudal areas of the contralateral cortex. These findings suggest that oxiracetam minimizes the reduction of brain function induced by ischemia and may therefore be useful in the treatment of cerebrovascular disease.

  17. Fractal dimension of cerebral surfaces using magnetic resonance images

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Prasad, R.R.

    1988-11-01

    The calculation of the fractal dimension of the surface bounded by the grey matter in the normal human brain using axial, sagittal, and coronal cross-sectional magnetic resonance (MR) images is presented. The fractal dimension in this case is a measure of the convolutedness of this cerebral surface. It is proposed that the fractal dimension, a feature that may be extracted from MR images, may potentially be used for image analysis, quantitative tissue characterization, and as a feature to monitor and identify cerebral abnormalities and developmental changes.

  18. Continuous cerebral hemodynamic measurement during deep hypothermic circulatory arrest

    PubMed Central

    Busch, David R.; Rusin, Craig G.; Miller-Hance, Wanda; Kibler, Kathy; Baker, Wesley B.; Heinle, Jeffrey S.; Fraser, Charles D.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Licht, Daniel J.; Brady, Kenneth M.

    2016-01-01

    While survival of children with complex congenital heart defects has improved in recent years, roughly half suffer neurological deficits suspected to be related to cerebral ischemia. Here we report the first demonstration of optical diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) for continuous and non-invasive monitoring of cerebral microvascular blood flow during complex human neonatal or cardiac surgery. Comparison between DCS and Doppler ultrasound flow measurements during deep hypothermia, circulatory arrest, and rewarming were in good agreement. Looking forward, DCS instrumentation, alone and with NIRS, could provide access to flow and metabolic biomarkers needed by clinicians to adjust neuroprotective therapy during surgery. PMID:27699112

  19. Mapping of the cerebral response to acetazolamide using graded asymmetric spin echo EPI.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Bhashkar; Preece, Mark; Houston, Gavin C; Papadakis, Nikolas G; Carpenter, T Adrian; Hall, Laurance D; Huang, Christopher L-H

    2005-11-01

    Cerebral vascular reactivity in different regions of the rat brain was quantitatively characterized by spatial and temporal measurements of blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD)-fMRI signals following intravenous administration of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide: this causes cerebral vasodilatation through a cerebral extracellular acidosis that spares neuronal metabolism and vascular smooth muscle function, thus separating vascular and cerebral metabolic events. An asymmetric spin echo-echo planar imaging (ASE-EPI) pulse sequence sensitised images selectively to oxygenation changes in the microvasculature; use of a surface coil receiver enhanced image signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Image SNRs and hardware integrity were verified by incorporating quality assurance procedures; cardiorespiratory stability in the physiological preparations were monitored and maintained through the duration of the experiments. These conditions made it possible to apply BOLD contrast fMRI to map regional changes in cerebral perfusion in response to acetazolamide administration. Thus, fMRI findings demonstrated cerebral responses to acetazolamide that directly paralleled the known physiological actions of acetazolamide and whose time courses were similar through all regions of interest, consistent with acetazolamide's initial distribution in brain plasma, where it affects cerebral haemodynamics by acting at cerebral capillary endothelial cells. However, marked variations in the magnitude of the responses suggested relative perfusion deficits in the hippocampus and white matter regions correlating well with their relatively low vascularity and the known vulnerability of the hippocampus to ischaemic damage.

  20. Cerebral Folate Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral folate deficiency (CFD) is associated with low levels of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with normal folate levels in the plasma and red blood cells. The onset of symptoms caused by the deficiency of folates in the brain is at around 4 to 6 months of age. This is followed by delayed development, with deceleration…

  1. United Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... be sure to follow us on Twitter ! Affiliate Network UCP affiliates provide services and support on a community-by-community basis, serving the unique needs of people with disabilities in their region. Find your ... and their networks. Individuals with cerebral palsy and other disabilities deserve ...

  2. Cerebral Palsy (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain is affected and which parts of the body that section of the brain controls. If CP affects both arms and both legs, ... the case of spastic CP) or to help control seizures. And some might have special surgeries to keep their arms or legs straighter and more ... Coping With Cerebral Palsy Puberty can ...

  3. Cerebral Palsy Litigation

    PubMed Central

    Sartwelle, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    The cardinal driver of cerebral palsy litigation is electronic fetal monitoring, which has continued unabated for 40 years. Electronic fetal monitoring, however, is based on 19th-century childbirth myths, a virtually nonexistent scientific foundation, and has a false positive rate exceeding 99%. It has not affected the incidence of cerebral palsy. Electronic fetal monitoring has, however, increased the cesarian section rate, with the expected increase in mortality and morbidity risks to mothers and babies alike. This article explains why electronic fetal monitoring remains endorsed as efficacious in the worlds’ labor rooms and courtrooms despite being such a feeble medical modality. It also reviews the reasons professional organizations have failed to condemn the use of electronic fetal monitoring in courtrooms. The failures of tort reform, special cerebral palsy courts, and damage limits to stem the escalating litigation are discussed. Finally, the authors propose using a currently available evidence rule—the Daubert doctrine that excludes “junk science” from the courtroom—as the beginning of the end to cerebral palsy litigation and electronic fetal monitoring’s 40-year masquerade as science. PMID:25183322

  4. Human brain temperature: regulation, measurement and relationship with cerebral trauma: part 1.

    PubMed

    Childs, Charmaine

    2008-08-01

    Temperature has a major effect on survival in all animal species. Despite wide variations in climate, organ temperature is regulated 'tightly' by homeostatic mechanisms controlling heat production and conservation, as well as heat loss. Although less is known about the temperature of the healthy or injured human brain, mammalian brain homeothermy involves interplay between neural metabolic heat production, cerebral blood flow and the temperature of incoming arterial blood. Recent advances in invasive and non-invasive thermometry have allowed measurement of brain temperature to be made in man. In health, small differences only exist between local brain and body core temperature. Large (negative) brain-body temperature dissociation, observed in some patients after severe brain damage, does not appear to be a feature of cerebral homeothermy in healthy people. The extent to which changes in brain temperature reflect, or 'drive', secondary cerebral pathology remains uncertain in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Raised temperature may be due to a regulated readjustment in the hypothalamic 'set-point' in response to inflammation and infection, or it may occur as a consequence of damage to the hypothalamus and/or its pathways. Diagnosis of the mechanism of raised temperature; fever v. neurogenic hyperthermia (regulated v. unregulated temperature rise) is difficult to make clinically. Whatever the cause, a 1-2 degrees C rise in brain or body temperature, especially when it develops early after injury, is widely regarded as harmful. There is no clear evidence that fever per se leads directly to worsened neurological damage or poor outcome, nor evidence that antipyretic treatments (pharmacological or cold-induced therapies) preserve damaged brain tissue or result in a better outcome. Part 2 follows part one with a detailed analysis of the evidence for the significance of raised temperature on outcome after TBI.

  5. A preliminary investigation into textural features of intratumoral metabolic heterogeneity in 18F-FDG PET for overall survival prognosis in patients with bulky cervical cancer treated with definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Kung-Chu; Fang, Yu-Hua Dean; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Ho, Tsung-Ying; Chou, Hung-Hsueh; Hong, Ji-Hong; Huang, Yi-Ting; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Lai, Chyong-Huey

    2016-01-01

    We examined the role of intratumoral metabolic heterogeneity on 18F-FDG PET during concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in predicting survival outcomes for patients with cervical cancer. This prospective study consisted of 44 patients with bulky (≥ 4 cm) cervical cancer treated with CCRT. All patients underwent serial 18F-FDG PET studies. Primary cervical tumor standardized uptake values, metabolic tumor volume, and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) were measured in pretreatment and intra-treatment (2 weeks) PET scans. Regional textural features were analyzed using the grey level run length encoding method (GLRLM) and grey-level size zone matrix. Associations between PET parameters and overall survival (OS) were tested by Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression model. In univariate analysis, pretreatment grey-level nonuniformity (GLNU) > 48 by GLRLM textural analysis and intra-treatment decline of run length nonuniformity < 55% and the decline of TLG (∆TLG) < 60% were associated with significantly worse OS. In multivariate analysis, only ∆TLG was significant (P = 0.009). Combining pretreatment with intra-treatment factors, we defined the patients with a initial GLNU > 48 and a ∆TLG ≤ 60% as the high-risk group and the other patients as the low-risk. The 5-year OS rate for the high-risk group was significantly worse than that for the low-risk group (42% vs. 81%, respectively, P = 0.001). The heterogeneity of intratumoral FDG distribution and the early temporal change in TLG may be an important predictor for OS in patients with bulky cervical cancer. This gives the opportunity to adjust individualized regimens early in the treatment course. PMID:27508103

  6. Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy: Emerging Concepts

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) involves cerebrovascular amyloid deposition and is classified into several types according to the amyloid protein involved. Of these, sporadic amyloid β-protein (Aβ)-type CAA is most commonly found in older individuals and in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Cerebrovascular Aβ deposits accompany functional and pathological changes in cerebral blood vessels (CAA-associated vasculopathies). CAA-associated vasculopathies lead to development of hemorrhagic lesions [lobar intracerebral macrohemorrhage, cortical microhemorrhage, and cortical superficial siderosis (cSS)/focal convexity subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)], ischemic lesions (cortical infarction and ischemic changes of the white matter), and encephalopathies that include subacute leukoencephalopathy caused by CAA-associated inflammation/angiitis. Thus, CAA is related to dementia, stroke, and encephalopathies. Recent advances in diagnostic procedures, particularly neuroimaging, have enabled us to establish a clinical diagnosis of CAA without brain biopsies. Sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods, such as gradient-echo T2* imaging and susceptibility-weighted imaging, are useful for detecting cortical microhemorrhages and cSS. Amyloid imaging with amyloid-binding positron emission tomography (PET) ligands, such as Pittsburgh Compound B, can detect CAA, although they cannot discriminate vascular from parenchymal amyloid deposits. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid markers may be useful, including levels of Aβ40 for CAA and anti-Aβ antibody for CAA-related inflammation. Moreover, cSS is closely associated with transient focal neurological episodes (TFNE). CAA-related inflammation/angiitis shares pathophysiology with amyloid-related imaging abnormalities (ARIA) induced by Aβ immunotherapies in AD patients. This article reviews CAA and CAA-related disorders with respect to their epidemiology, pathology, pathophysiology, clinical features, biomarkers, diagnosis

  7. Mucormycosis in India: unique features.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Arunaloke; Singh, Rachna

    2014-12-01

    Mucormycosis remains a devastating invasive fungal infection, with high mortality rates even after active management. The disease is being reported at an alarming frequency over the past decades from India. Indian mucormycosis has certain unique features. Rhino-orbito-cerebral presentation associated with uncontrolled diabetes is the predominant characteristic. Isolated renal mucormycosis has emerged as a new clinical entity. Apophysomyces elegans and Rhizopus homothallicus are emerging species in this region and uncommon agents such as Mucor irregularis and Thamnostylum lucknowense are also being reported. This review focuses on these distinct features of mucormycosis observed in India.

  8. Association between Apolipoprotein E genotype and cerebral palsy is not confirmed in a Caucasian population.

    PubMed

    McMichael, Gai L; Gibson, Catherine S; Goldwater, Paul N; Haan, Eric A; Priest, Kevin; Dekker, Gustaaf A; MacLennan, Alastair H

    2008-11-01

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE) plays a significant role in lipid metabolism and has been implicated in the growth and repair of injured neurons. Two small studies have suggested an association between APOE genotype and cerebral palsy. We investigated if APOE genotype is associated with an increased risk for cerebral palsy, influences the type of cerebral palsy or interacts with prenatal viral infection to influence risk of cerebral palsy. The population-based case-control study comprised newborn screening cards of 443 Caucasian patients with cerebral palsy and 883 Caucasian matched controls. APOE genotyping was performed on DNA extracted from dried blood spots. Allelic and genotypic frequencies did not differ between cases and controls and combined frequencies were 0.10 (epsilon2), 0.76 (epsilon3), 0.14 (epsilon4), 0.03 (epsilon2/epsilon2), 0.10 (epsilon2/epsilon3), 0.03 (epsilon2/epsilon4), 0.02 (epsilon4/epsilon4), 0.21 (epsilon3/epsilon4), 0.61 (epsilon3/epsilon3). APOE genotype was correlated with cerebral palsy, type of cerebral palsy, gestation at birth and the presence of viral nucleic acids detected in previous work. Analysis by gestational age (all gestational ages, >/=37, 32-36 and <32 weeks) and type of cerebral palsy (all types, diplegia, hemiplegia and quadriplegia) showed no association between APOE genotype and cerebral palsy in this Caucasian population. An association between prenatal viral infection, APOE genotype and cerebral palsy was not demonstrated. These results did not confirm an association between APOE genotype, cerebral palsy, type of cerebral palsy and prenatal infection in a Caucasian population. Given the low frequency of APOE epsilon2 and some of the heterozygote and homozygote combinations in this study, a larger study is assessing this further.

  9. Cerebral hemodynamics and endothelial function in patients with Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cerebral vasculopathy have been described in Fabry disease, in which altered cerebral blood flow, vascular remodelling or impairment of endothelial function could be involved. Our study aims to evaluate these three possibilities in a group of Fabry patients, and compare it to healthy controls. Methods Cerebral hemodynamics, vascular remodelling and systemic endothelial function were investigated in 10 Fabry patients and compared to data from 17 healthy controls. Transcranial Doppler was used to study blood flow velocity of intracranial arteries and cerebral vasomotor reactivity. For the study of vascular remodelling and endothelial function, intima-media thickness of common carotid arteries, flow-mediated dilation in brachial artery and serum levels of soluble VCAM-1, TNF-α, high-sensitive CRP and IL-6 were measured. Differences between groups were evaluated using appropriate tests. Results No relevant differences were observed in cerebral hemodynamic parameters, intima-media thickness or flow-mediated dilation. There was a trend for low serum levels of IL-6 and high serum levels of TNF-α and high-sensitive CRP in Fabry patients; plasma concentrations of soluble VCAM-1 were significantly higher in Fabry disease patients than in healthy volunteers (p = 0.02). Conclusions In our sample, we did not find relevant alterations of cerebral hemodynamics in Fabry disease patients. Increased levels of plasmatic endothelial biomarkers seem to be the most important feature indicative of possible vascular dysfunction in Fabry disease patients. PMID:24207059

  10. Managing Malignant Cerebral Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Sahuquillo, Juan; Sheth, Kevin N.; Kahle, Kristopher T.; Walcott, Brian P.

    2011-01-01

    Opinion statement Managing patients with malignant cerebral infarction remains one of the foremost challenges in medicine. These patients are at high risk for progressive neurologic deterioration and death due to malignant cerebral edema, and they are best cared for in the intensive care unit of a comprehensive stroke center. Careful initial assessment of neurologic function and of findings on MRI, coupled with frequent reassessment of clinical and radiologic findings using CT or MRI are mandatory to promote the prompt initiation of treatments that will ensure the best outcome in these patients. Significant deterioration in either neurologic function or radiologic findings or both demand timely treatment using the best medical management, which may include osmotherapy (mannitol or hypertonic saline), endotracheal intubation, and mechanical ventilation. Under appropriate circumstances, decompressive craniectomy may be warranted to improve outcome or to prevent death. PMID:21190097

  11. Modeling neurodegenerative disease pathophysiology in thiamine deficiency: consequences of impaired oxidative metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jhala, Shivraj S; Hazell, Alan S

    2011-02-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that thiamine deficiency (TD), the cause of Wernicke's encephalopathy, produces alterations in brain function and structural damage that closely model a number of maladies in which neurodegeneration is a characteristic feature, including Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, along with alcoholic brain disease, stroke, and traumatic brain injury. Impaired oxidative metabolism in TD due to decreased activity of thiamine-dependent enzymes leads to a multifactorial cascade of events in the brain that include focal decreases in energy status, oxidative stress, lactic acidosis, blood-brain barrier disruption, astrocyte dysfunction, glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity, amyloid deposition, decreased glucose utilization, immediate-early gene induction, and inflammation. This review describes our current understanding of the basis of these abnormal processes in TD, their interrelationships, and why this disorder can be useful for our understanding of how decreased cerebral energy metabolism can give rise to cell death in different neurodegenerative disease states.

  12. [Myocardial infarction beginning with cerebral symptoms in 30 cases of cardio-cerebral apoplexy].

    PubMed

    Tsukazaki, T; Kuramoto, K; Oda, S; Ueda, S; Matsushita, S

    1991-01-01

    A clinicopathological analysis of myocardial infarction with an onset of stroke-like symptoms was carried out on 30 autopsy cases at the Tokyo Metropolitan Geriatric Hospital. The cases were classified into four groups according to the types of brain lesions, I: embolism (n = 17), II: thrombosis (n = 9), III: bleeding (n = 2), and IV: no remarkable focal lesion (n = 2). Classification was made based on clinical findings, and pathological features. The characteristic clinical findings were conciousness disturbance, no elevation of blood pressure at the onset of stroke, hemiplegia and shock. However, the typical anginal chest pain was found in only 17% of cases. The underlying diseases and complications were hypertension, atrial fibrillation (Af), disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), renal failure, malignant neoplasma, and diabetes mellitus. The incidences of Af, DIC, mural thrombus, non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis (NBTE) were significantly higher in the group with cerebral embolism than in the group with cerebral thrombosis. The coronary stenotic index was also smaller in the group with cerebral embolism. Therefore, the major etiology of cardio-cerebral apoplexy was a simultaneous embolism to the brain and heart due to Af, NBTE or, DIC.

  13. High Altitude Cerebral Edema

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    English literature and Hultgren et al (3.1) described four more cases of HAPE within the next year. In 1960, Chiodi (5) first reported on a Peruvian...altitude and treatment with steroids and diuretics, CSF pressure was 85 mm H 0. In 1960, Chiodi .(5) described a patient 2 suffering with HACE who...Biol. Chem., 157, 297-302, 1945. 5. Chiodi H: "Mal de montana a forma cerebral; possible mecanismo etiopathogenico," An. Fac. Med. Lima., 43, 437

  14. Longitudinal Cerebral Blood Flow Changes during Speech in Hereditary Ataxia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidtis, John J.; Strother, Stephen C.; Naoum, Ansam; Rottenberg, David A.; Gomez, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The hereditary ataxias constitute a group of degenerative diseases that progress over years or decades. With principal pathology involving the cerebellum, dysarthria is an early feature of many of the ataxias. Positron emission tomography was used to study regional cerebral blood flow changes during speech production over a 21 month period in a…

  15. Training Guide to Cerebral Palsy Sports. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jeffery A., Ed.

    This official training manual of the United States Cerebral Palsy Athletic Association includes the latest coaching and training techniques specific to all sports in the national program. The book features guidelines for coaching over a dozen sports, including soccer, swimming, cycling, and track and field. It contains everything coaches,…

  16. Glycopyrrolate abolishes the exercise-induced increase in cerebral perfusion in humans.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Thomas; Fisher, James P; Young, Colin N; Hartwich, Doreen; Ogoh, Shigehiko; Raven, Peter B; Fadel, Paul J; Secher, Niels H

    2010-10-01

    Brain blood vessels contain muscarinic receptors that are important for cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation, but whether a cholinergic receptor mechanism is involved in the exercise-induced increase in cerebral perfusion or affects cerebral metabolism remains unknown. We evaluated CBF and cerebral metabolism (from arterial and internal jugular venous O(2), glucose and lactate differences), as well as the middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA V(mean); transcranial Doppler ultrasound) during a sustained static handgrip contraction at 40% of maximal voluntary contraction (n = 9) and the MCA V(mean) during ergometer cycling (n = 8). Separate, randomized and counterbalanced trials were performed in control (no drug) conditions and following muscarinic cholinergic receptor blockade by glycopyrrolate. Glycopyrrolate increased resting heart rate from approximately 60 to approximately 110 beats min(-1) (P < 0.01) and cardiac output by approximately 40% (P < 0.05), but did not affect mean arterial pressure. The central cardiovascular responses to exercise with glycopyrrolate were similar to the control responses, except that cardiac output did not increase during static handgrip with glycopyrrolate. Glycopyrrolate did not significantly affect cerebral metabolism during static handgrip, but a parallel increase in MCA V(mean) (approximately 16%; P < 0.01) and CBF (approximately 12%; P < 0.01) during static handgrip, as well as the increase in MCA V(mean) during cycling (approximately 15%; P < 0.01), were abolished by glycopyrrolate (P < 0.05). Thus, during both cycling and static handgrip, a cholinergic receptor mechanism is important for the exercise-induced increase in cerebral perfusion without affecting the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen.

  17. Absence of apolipoprotein E protects mice from cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Kassa, Fikregabrail Aberra; Van Den Ham, Kristin; Rainone, Anthony; Fournier, Sylvie; Boilard, Eric; Olivier, Martin

    2016-09-20

    Cerebral malaria claims the life of millions of people each year, particularly those of children, and is a major global public health problem. Thus, the identification of novel malaria biomarkers that could be utilized as diagnostic or therapeutic targets is becoming increasingly important. Using a proteomic approach, we previously identified unique biomarkers in the sera of malaria-infected individuals, including apolipoprotein E (ApoE). ApoE is the dominant apolipoprotein in the brain and has been implicated in several neurological disorders; therefore, we were interested in the potential role of ApoE in cerebral malaria. Here we report the first demonstration that cerebral malaria is markedly attenuated in ApoE(-/-) mice. The protection provided by the absence of ApoE was associated with decreased sequestration of parasites and T cells within the brain, and was determined to be independent from the involvement of ApoE receptors and from the altered lipid metabolism associated with the knock-out mice. Importantly, we demonstrated that treatment of mice with the ApoE antagonist heparin octasaccharide significantly decreased the incidence of cerebral malaria. Overall, our study indicates that the reduction of ApoE could be utilized in the development of therapeutic treatments aimed at mitigating the neuropathology of cerebral malaria.

  18. Absence of apolipoprotein E protects mice from cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    Kassa, Fikregabrail Aberra; Van Den Ham, Kristin; Rainone, Anthony; Fournier, Sylvie; Boilard, Eric; Olivier, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral malaria claims the life of millions of people each year, particularly those of children, and is a major global public health problem. Thus, the identification of novel malaria biomarkers that could be utilized as diagnostic or therapeutic targets is becoming increasingly important. Using a proteomic approach, we previously identified unique biomarkers in the sera of malaria-infected individuals, including apolipoprotein E (ApoE). ApoE is the dominant apolipoprotein in the brain and has been implicated in several neurological disorders; therefore, we were interested in the potential role of ApoE in cerebral malaria. Here we report the first demonstration that cerebral malaria is markedly attenuated in ApoE−/− mice. The protection provided by the absence of ApoE was associated with decreased sequestration of parasites and T cells within the brain, and was determined to be independent from the involvement of ApoE receptors and from the altered lipid metabolism associated with the knock-out mice. Importantly, we demonstrated that treatment of mice with the ApoE antagonist heparin octasaccharide significantly decreased the incidence of cerebral malaria. Overall, our study indicates that the reduction of ApoE could be utilized in the development of therapeutic treatments aimed at mitigating the neuropathology of cerebral malaria. PMID:27647324

  19. Cerebral blood flow in experimental ischemia assessed by sup 19 F magnetic resonance spectroscopy in cats

    SciTech Connect

    Brunetti, A.; Nagashima, G.; Bizzi, A.; DesPres, D.J. )

    1990-10-01

    We evaluated a 19F magnetic resonance spectroscopic technique that detects Freon-23 washout as a means of measuring cerebral blood flow in halothane-anesthetized adult cats during and after transient cerebral ischemia produced by vascular occlusion. The experiments were performed to test the ability of this recently developed method to detect postischemic flow deficits. Results were consistent with postischemic hypoperfusion. The method also proved valuable for measuring small residual flow during vascular occlusion. Our experiments indicate that this method provides simple, rapid, and repeatable flow measurements that can augment magnetic resonance examinations of cerebral metabolic parameters in the study of ischemia.

  20. Cerebral hypometabolism in progressive supranuclear palsy studied with positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, N.L.; Gilman, S.; Berent, S.; Morin, E.M.; Brown, M.B.; Koeppe, R.A.

    1988-09-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is characterized by supranuclear palsy of gaze, axial dystonia, bradykinesia, rigidity, and a progressive dementia. Pathological changes in this disorder are generally restricted to subcortical structures, yet the type and range of cognitive deficits suggest the involvement of many cerebral regions. We examined the extent of functional impairment to cerebral cortical and subcortical structures as measured by the level of glucose metabolic activity at rest. Fourteen patients with PSP were compared to 21 normal volunteers of similar age using 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose and positron emission tomography. Glucose metabolism was reduced in the caudate nucleus, putamen, thalamus, pons, and cerebral cortex, but not in the cerebellum in the patients with PSP as compared to the normal subjects. Analysis of individual brain regions revealed significant declines in cerebral glucose utilization in most regions throughout the cerebral cortex, particularly those in the superior half of the frontal lobe. Declines in the most affected regions of cerebral cortex were greater than those in any single subcortical structure. Although using conventional neuropathological techniques the cerebral cortex appears to be unaffected in PSP, significant and pervasive functional impairments in both cortical and subcortical structures are present. These observations help to account for the constellation of cognitive symptoms in individual patients with PSP and the difficulty encountered in identifying a characteristic psychometric profile for this group of patients.

  1. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema

    PubMed Central

    Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  2. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Stokum, Jesse A; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2016-03-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema.

  3. Cerebral tuberculomas – A clinical challenge

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Regina; Carneiro, José Carlos; Costa, Claúdia; Duarte, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral tuberculomas are a rare and serious form of tuberculosis (TB) due to the haematogenous spread of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis (MT). Symptoms and radiologic features are nonspecific, leading sometimes to misdiagnosis. Anti-TB drugs are essential for the successful treatment of cerebral tuberculomas but there is no agreement regarding the duration of therapy. The authors present a case of a 55 years old male, presented to the emergency room with sudden onset of diplopia. Cerebral computerized tomography revealed multiple brain lesions, with contrast enhancement and peri-lesional oedema. The patient was HIV negative and because of previous malignancy the first suspicion was metastatic disease. Cultural exam of the bronchial wash showed MT sensitive to all first-line drugs. The patient started antituberculosis treatment with 4 drugs (HRZE) for 2 months, followed by maintenance therapy (HR). Treatment was prolonged for 24 months because at 12th and 18th months of treatment one of the brain lesions, although significantly smaller, still showed contrast enhancement. Even though it is not clear if contrast enhancement lesions represent active lesions or just inflammation, continuing treatment until total resolution of the tuberculomas is probably prudent. PMID:26029627

  4. Metabolic Bone Disease in the Context of Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumor: Differentiation from Skeletal Metastasis, the Molecular PET–CT Imaging Features, and Exploring the Possible Etiopathologies Including Parathyroid Adenoma (MEN1) and Paraneoplastic Humoral Hypercalcemia of Malignancy Due to PTHrP Hypersecretion

    PubMed Central

    Ranade, Rohit; Basu, Sandip

    2017-01-01

    Three cases of metabolic bone disease in the setting of metastatic neuroendocrine tumor (NET) are illustrated with associated etiopathologies.  One of these cases harbored mixed lesions in the form of vertebral metastasis (biopsy proven) while the other skeletal lesions were caused due to metabolic bone disease related to multiple parathyroid adenomas. While the metastatic lesion was positive on 68Ga-DOTATATE positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT), the lesions of metabolic bone disease were negative and the 18F-fluoride PET-CT demonstrated the features of metabolic bone scan. Similar picture of metabolic bone disease [18-sodium fluoride (18NaF)/68Ga-DOTATATE mismatch] was documented in the other two patients, while fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET-CT was variably positive, primarily showing tracer uptake in the metabolic skeletal lesions of the patient with hypersecretion of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) by the underlying tumor. Discordance between 18NaF PET-CT and 68Ga-DOTATATE PET-CT serves as a good marker for identification of metabolic bone disease and diagnosing such a clinical entity. In a patient of NET with metabolic bone disease and hypercalcemia, thus, two causes need to be considered: (i) Coexisting parathyroid adenoma in multiple endocrine neoplasia type I (MEN-I) syndrome and (ii) humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy (HHM) related to hypersecretion of PTHrP by the tumor. The correct diagnosis of metabolic bone disease in metastatic NET can alter the management substantially. Interestingly, peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) can emerge as a very promising treatment modality in patients of metabolic bone disease caused by HHM in the setting of NET. PMID:28217023

  5. Cutis marmorata and cerebral arterial gas embolism.

    PubMed

    Wilmshurst, Peter T

    2015-12-01

    -to-left shunts and it is certain that some bubbles went into their cerebral circulations, but I have never seen and no patient has reported getting a rash. Nor am I aware of any reports of gas embolism causing a rash like cutaneous DCI without there being tissue supersaturation following some form of decompression. Kemper and colleagues injected between 0.25 and 1 ml·kg⁻¹ body weight of air into the ascending pharyngeal artery (roughly equivalent to human internal carotid artery) of pigs weighing 30-40kg. That immediately produced significant elevation of blood pressure and heart rate suggesting a 'sympathetic surge'. This is similar to the haemodynamic effects that can occur with subarachnoid haemorrhage and some other catastrophic brain injuries. That effect may have been potentiated by pre-treatment with atropine. There was also a considerable increase in intracranial pressure and major adverse effects on cerebral metabolism. Some pigs died quickly and the survivors were killed at the end of the experiment. I suspect that no pig would have survived the experiments without major neurological injury if they had not been killed. Most people with cutaneous DCI have no detectable neurological manifestations at the time that they have a rash. In those that do have neurological manifestations, it is rarely catastrophic. The increases in heart rate and blood pressure reported in the pigs are similar to the effects of a phaeochromocytoma, which can cause livido reticularis in man. Therefore, I wonder whether an alternative explanation for these observations might be that the cerebral injury in the pigs was so massive that the sympathetic surge was comparable to the effects of catecholamine release from a phaeochromocytoma and caused a rash similar to that seen in patients with a phaeochromocytoma.

  6. Cerebral computed tomography in maple syrup urine disease.

    PubMed

    Romero, F J; Ibarra, B; Rovira, M; Natal, A; Herrera, M; Segarra, A

    1984-06-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inherited metabolic disorder due to decreased decarboxylation of branched chain keto acids triggering an accumulation of leucine, isoleucine, and valine. We describe two infants with biochemically confirmed MSUD in whom computed tomography (CT) revealed cerebral edema. In one of these cases repeat CT 40 days after institution of appropriate therapy revealed that the edema had disappeared and the ventricles had enlarged.

  7. Clinical presentation of cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Cianfoni, Alessandro; Pravatà, Emanuele; De Blasi, Roberto; Tschuor, Costa Silvia; Bonaldi, Giuseppe

    2013-10-01

    Presentation of a cerebral aneurysm can be incidental, discovered at imaging obtained for unrelated causes, can occur in the occasion of imaging obtained for symptoms possibly or likely related to the presence of an unruptured aneurysm, or can occur with signs and symptoms at the time of aneurismal rupture. Most unruptured intracranial aneurysms are thought to be asymptomatic, or present with vague or non-specific symptoms like headache or dizziness. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsies, however, may typically indicate the presence of a posterior circulation aneurysm. Ruptured intracranial aneurysms are by far the most common cause of non-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage and represent a neurological emergency with potentially devastating consequences. Subarachnoid hemorrhage may be easily suspected in the presence of sudden and severe headache, vomiting, meningism signs, and/or altered mental status. However, failure to recognize milder and more ambiguous clinical pictures may result in a delayed or missed diagnosis. In this paper we will describe the clinical spectrum of unruptured and ruptured intracranial aneurysms by discussing both t