Science.gov

Sample records for cerebral vascular diseases

  1. Retinal Vascular Changes are a Marker for Cerebral Vascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Moss, Heather E

    2015-07-01

    The retinal circulation is a potential marker of cerebral vascular disease because it shares origin and drainage with the intracranial circulation and because it can be directly visualized using ophthalmoscopy. Cross-sectional and cohort studies have demonstrated associations between chronic retinal and cerebral vascular disease, acute retinal and cerebral vascular disease, and chronic retinal vascular disease and acute cerebral vascular disease. In particular, certain qualitative features of retinopathy, retinal artery occlusion, and increased retinal vein caliber are associated with concurrent and future cerebrovascular events. These associations persist after accounting for confounding variables known to be disease-causing in both circulations, which supports the potential use of retinal vasculature findings to stratify individuals with regards to cerebral vascular disease risk.

  2. Pathogenesis of diabetic cerebral vascular disease complication

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ren-Shi

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most potent independent risk factors for the development of diabetic cerebral vascular disease (CVD). Many evidences suggested that hyperglycemia caused excess free fatty acids, the loss of endothelium-derived nitric oxide, insulin resistance, the prothrombotic state, endothelial dysfunction, the abnormal release of endothelial vasoactivators, vascular smooth muscle dysfunction, oxidative stress, and the downregulation of miRs participated in vessel generation and recovery as well as the balance of endotheliocytes. In turn, these abnormalities, mainly via phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase, polyol, hexosamine, protein kinase C activation, and increased generation of advanced glycosylation end products pathway, play an important role in inducing diabetic CVD complication. A deeper comprehension of pathogenesis producing diabetic CVD could offer base for developing new therapeutic ways preventing diabetic CVD complications, therefore, in the paper we mainly reviewed present information about the possible pathogenesis of diabetic CVD complication. PMID:25685278

  3. Cerebral Vascular Disease and Neurovascular Injury in Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoming; De Silva, T Michael; Chen, Jun; Faraci, Frank M

    2017-02-03

    The consequences of cerebrovascular disease are among the leading health issues worldwide. Large and small cerebral vessel disease can trigger stroke and contribute to the vascular component of other forms of neurological dysfunction and degeneration. Both forms of vascular disease are driven by diverse risk factors, with hypertension as the leading contributor. Despite the importance of neurovascular disease and subsequent injury after ischemic events, fundamental knowledge in these areas lag behind our current understanding of neuroprotection and vascular biology in general. The goal of this review is to address select key structural and functional changes in the vasculature that promote hypoperfusion and ischemia, while also affecting the extent of injury and effectiveness of therapy. In addition, as damage to the blood-brain barrier is one of the major consequences of ischemia, we discuss cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying ischemia-induced changes in blood-brain barrier integrity and function, including alterations in endothelial cells and the contribution of pericytes, immune cells, and matrix metalloproteinases. Identification of cell types, pathways, and molecules that control vascular changes before and after ischemia may result in novel approaches to slow the progression of cerebrovascular disease and lessen both the frequency and impact of ischemic events.

  4. Neuropsychological assessment and cerebral vascular disease: the new standards.

    PubMed

    Godefroy, O; Leclercq, C; Bugnicourt, J-M; Roussel, M; Moroni, C; Quaglino, V; Beaunieux, H; Taillia, H; Nédélec-Ciceri, C; Bonnin, C; Thomas-Anterion, C; Varvat, J; Aboulafia-Brakha, T; Assal, F

    2013-10-01

    Vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) includes vascular dementia (VaD), vascular mild cognitive impairment (VaMCI) and mixed dementia. In clinical practice, VCI concerns patients referred for clinical stroke or cognitive complaint. To improve the characterization of VCI and to refine its diagnostic criteria, an international group has elaborated a new standardized evaluation battery of clinical, cognitive, behavioral and neuroradiological data which now constitutes the reference battery. The adaption of the battery for French-speaking subjects is reported as well as preliminary results of the on-going validation study of the GRECOG-VASC group [Clinical Trial NCT01339195]. The diagnostic accuracy of various screening tests is reviewed and showed an overall sub-optimal sensitivity (<0.8). Thus, the general recommendation is to perform systematically a comprehensive assessment in stroke patients at risk of VCI. Furthermore,the use of a structured interview has been shown to increase the detection of dementia. In addition to the well known NINDS-AIREN criteria of VaD, criteria of VCI have been recently proposed which are based on the demonstration of a cognitive disorder by neuropsychological testing and either history of clinical stroke or presence of vascular lesion by neuroimaging suggestive of a link between cognitive impairment and vascular disease. A memory deficit is no longer required for the diagnosis of VaD as it is based on the cognitive decline concerning two or more domains that affect activities of daily living. Both VaMCI and VaD are classified as probable or possible. These new criteria have yet to be validated. Considerable uncertainties remain regarding the determinant of VCI, and especially the lesion amount inducing VCI and VaD. The interaction between lesion amount and its location is currently re-examined using recent techniques for the analysis of MRI data. The high frequency of associated Alzheimer pathology is now assessable in vivo using amyloid

  5. Post-mortem assessment of hypoperfusion of cerebral cortex in Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Taya; Miners, Scott; Love, Seth

    2015-04-01

    Perfusion is reduced in the cerebral neocortex in Alzheimer's disease. We have explored some of the mechanisms, by measurement of perfusion-sensitive and disease-related proteins in post-mortem tissue from Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia and age-matched control brains. To distinguish physiological from pathological reduction in perfusion (i.e. reduction exceeding the decline in metabolic demand), we measured the concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a protein induced under conditions of tissue hypoxia through the actions of hypoxia-inducible factors, and the myelin associated glycoprotein to proteolipid protein 1 (MAG:PLP1) ratio, which declines in chronically hypoperfused brain tissue. To evaluate possible mechanisms of hypoperfusion, we also measured the levels of amyloid-β40, amyloid-β42, von Willebrand factor (VWF; a measure of microvascular density) and the potent vasoconstrictor endothelin 1 (EDN1); we assayed the activity of angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE), which catalyses the production of another potent vasoconstrictor, angiotensin II; and we scored the severity of arteriolosclerotic small vessel disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and determined the Braak tangle stage. VEGF was markedly increased in frontal and parahippocampal cortex in Alzheimer's disease but only slightly and not significantly in vascular dementia. In frontal cortex the MAG:PLP1 ratio was significantly reduced in Alzheimer's disease and even more so in vascular dementia. VEGF but not MAG:PLP1 increased with Alzheimer's disease severity, as measured by Braak tangle stage, and correlated with amyloid-β42 and amyloid-β42: amyloid-β40 but not amyloid-β40. Although MAG:PLP1 tended to be lowest in cortex from patients with severe small vessel disease or cerebral amyloid angiopathy, neither VEGF nor MAG:PLP1 correlated significantly with the severity of structural vascular pathology (small vessel disease, cerebral amyloid angiopathy or VWF

  6. Cerebral Blood Flow in Ischemic Vascular Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease By Arterial Spin Labeling MRI

    PubMed Central

    Schuff, N.; Matsumoto, S.; Kmiecik, J.; Studholme, C.; Du, A.T.; Ezekiel, F.; Miller, B.L.; Kramer, J.H.; Jagust, W.J.; Chui, H.C.; Weiner, M.W.

    2009-01-01

    Background The objectives were first to compare the effects of subcortical ischemic vascular dementia (SIVD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) on cerebral blood flow (CBF) and second to analyze the relationship between CBF and subcortical vascular disease, measured as volume of white matter lesions (WML). Methods Eight mildly demented patients with SIVD (77 ± 8 years, 26 ± 3 MMSE) and 14 patients with AD were compared to 18 cognitively normal elderly. All subjects had CBF measured using arterial spin labeling MRI and brain volumes assessed using structural MRI. Results AD and SIVD showed marked CBF reductions in frontal (p = 0.001) and parietal (p = 0.001) cortex. In SIVD, increased subcortical WML were associated with reduced CBF in frontal cortex (p = 0.04) in addition to cortical atrophy (frontal: p = 0.05; parietal: p = 0.03). Conclusions Subcortical vascular disease is associated with reduced CBF in the cortex, irrespective of brain atrophy. PMID:19896584

  7. Low Cerebral Glucose Metabolism: A Potential Predictor for the Severity of Vascular Parkinsonism and Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yunqi; Wei, Xiaobo; Liu, Xu; Liao, Jinchi; Lin, Jiaping; Zhu, Cansheng; Meng, Xiaochun; Xie, Dongsi; Chao, Dongman; Fenoy, Albert J; Cheng, Muhua; Tang, Beisha; Zhang, Zhuohua; Xia, Ying; Wang, Qing

    2015-11-01

    This study explored the association between cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (CMRGlc) and the severity of Vascular Parkinsonism (VP) and Parkinson's disease (PD). A cross-sectional study was performed to compare CMRGlc in normal subjects vs. VP and PD patients. Twelve normal subjects, 22 VP, and 11 PD patients were evaluated with the H&Y and MMSE, and underwent 18F-FDG measurements. Pearson's correlations were used to identify potential associations between the severity of VP/PD and CMRGlc. A pronounced reduction of CMRGlc in the frontal lobe and caudate putamen was detected in patients with VP and PD when compared with normal subjects. The VP patients displayed a slight CMRGlc decrease in the caudate putamen and frontal lobe in comparison with PD patients. These decreases in CMRGlc in the frontal lobe and caudate putamen were significantly correlated with the VP patients' H&Y, UPDRS II, UPDRS III, MMSE, cardiovascular, and attention/memory scores. Similarly, significant correlations were observed in patients with PD. This is the first clinical study finding strong evidence for an association between low cerebral glucose metabolism and the severity of VP and PD. Our findings suggest that these changes in glucose metabolism in the frontal lobe and caudate putamen may underlie the pathophysiological mechanisms of VP and PD. As the scramble to find imaging biomarkers or predictors of the disease intensifies, a better understanding of the roles of cerebral glucose metabolism may give us insight into the pathogenesis of VP and PD.

  8. Cerebral cavernous malformations as a disease of vascular permeability: from bench to bedside with caution.

    PubMed

    Yadla, Sanjay; Jabbour, Pascal M; Shenkar, Robert; Shi, Changbin; Campbell, Peter G; Awad, Issam A

    2010-09-01

    Tremendous insight into the molecular and genetic pathogenesis of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) has been gained over the past 2 decades. This includes the identification of 3 distinct genes involved in familial CCMs. Still, a number of unanswered questions regarding the process from gene mutation to vascular malformation remain. It is becoming more evident that the disruption of interendothelial junctions and ensuing vascular hyperpermeability play a principal role. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current understanding of CCM genes, associated proteins, and functional pathways. Promising molecular and genetic therapies targeted at identified molecular aberrations are discussed as well.

  9. Hydrogen peroxide induces apoptosis in cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells: possible relation to neurodegenerative diseases and strokes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianfeng; Li, Wenyan; Su, Jialin; Liu, Weimin; Altura, Bella T; Altura, Burton M

    2003-12-15

    Recently, reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been suggested as important mediators of brain damage in a number of disease states, including traumatic brain injury, neurodegenerative diseases and strokes. Apoptosis has been suggested to play an important role in neurodegenerative diseases, traumatic brain injury and strokes. The aim of this study was to determine whether or not cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells (CVSMCs) undergo apoptosis following treatment with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Herein, we demonstrate, for the first time, that H2O2 can induce apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner in primary cultured CVSMCs, as measured by several morphological and biochemical criteria. H2O2-induced apoptosis may be initiated by stimulating Ca2+-dependent endonuclease activity. The present new data suggest that apoptosis in cerebral VSMCs, induced by ROS, such as H2O2, could play important roles in neruodegenerative processes, traumatic brain injury and strokes.

  10. What Is Vascular Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Vascular Disease What is Vascular Disease? Education and Awareness Vascular Diseases Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Aortic Dissection Arteriovenous Malformation Atherosclerosis Buerger's Disease Carotid Artery Disease ...

  11. Vascular Disease Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Vascular Disease What is Vascular Disease? Education and Awareness Vascular Diseases Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Aortic Dissection Arteriovenous Malformation Atherosclerosis Buerger's Disease Carotid Artery Disease ...

  12. Peroxynitrite induces apoptosis in canine cerebral vascular muscle cells: possible relation to neurodegenerative diseases and strokes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianfeng; Su, Jialin; Li, Wenyan; Liu, Weimin; Altura, Bella T; Altura, Burton M

    2003-10-30

    Considerable evidence is accumulating to suggest that in vivo formation of free radicals in the brain, such as peroxynitrite (ONOO-), and programmed cell death (i.e. apoptosis) play important roles in neurodegeneration and stroke. However, it is not known whether ONOO- can induce apoptosis in cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells (CVSMCs). The present study was designed to determine whether or not canine CVSMCs undergo apoptosis following treatment with ONOO-. Direct exposure of canine CVSMCs to ONOO- induced apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner, as confirmed by means of fluorescence staining, TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling and comet assays. Peroxynitrite treatment resulted in an elevation of [Ca2+]i in the CVSMCs. Peroxynitrite-induced apoptosis may thus be brought about by activation of Ca2+-dependent endonucleases. Although the precise mechanisms by which peroxynitrite induces apoptosis need to be further investigated, the present findings could be used to suggest that ONOO- formation in the brain may play important roles in neurodegenerative processes and strokes via detrimental actions on cerebral microvessels and blood flow.

  13. [Diabetes mellitus and aging as a risk factor for cerebral vascular disease: epidemiology, pathophysiology and prevention].

    PubMed

    Cantú-Brito, Carlos; Mimenza-Alvarado, Alberto; Sánchez-Hernández, Juan José

    2010-01-01

    Older patients with diabetes have a high risk of vascular complications. They have an increase of approximately 3 times for developing stroke compared with subjects without diabetes. In addition, up to 75-80% of deaths in diabetic patients are associated with major cardiovascular events including stroke. The risk of stroke is high within 5 years of diagnosis for type 2 diabetes is 9% (mortality 21%), that is more than doubles the rate for the general population. From observational registries in a collaborative stroke study in Mexico, we analyzed clinical data, risk factors, and outcome of 1182 diabetic patients with cerebral ischemia, with focus in elderly subjects. There was a high frequency of hyperglycemia during the acute phase of stroke: the median value was 140 mg/dL and 40% had values higher than 180 mg/dL. Clinical outcome was usually unfavorable in elderly stroke patients with diabetes: case fatality rate was 30% at 30 days and survivors had moderate to severe disability, usually as consequence of the propensity to develop more systemic medical complications during hospital stay. Primary stroke prevention studies in patients with diabetes reveal that tight control of glucose is not associated with reduction in stroke risk. Therefore, proper control of other vascular risk factors is mandatory in patients with diabetes, in particular of arterial hypertension.

  14. beta-amyloid protein of Alzheimer's disease is found in cerebral and spinal cord vascular malformations.

    PubMed Central

    Hart, M. N.; Merz, P.; Bennett-Gray, J.; Menezes, A. H.; Goeken, J. A.; Schelper, R. L.; Wisniewski, H. M.

    1988-01-01

    Congo/Red deposition with birefringence to polarized light was demonstrated focally in cerebrovascular malformations removed surgically from 4 older patients (ages 85, 74, 74, and 63), and in a spinal cord vascular malformation in a 76-year-old patient. Lesser degrees of Congophilic change were observed in cerebrovascular malformations screened from 4 of 10 patients between the ages of 30 and 59. No Congophilic change was seen in 10 cerebrovascular malformations removed from patients under 30 years of age. Congophilic areas in all cases decorated with W-2 and 85/45 polyclonal antibodies raised to peptide sequences of cerebrovascular beta-amyloid and beta-amyloid of senile plaques from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Thus, the amyloid in these vascular malformations is immunologically related to beta-amyloid protein. This finding provides another indication that vascular beta-amyloid deposition is not specific for Alzheimer's disease and suggests that an existing abnormality of vessels may be a predisposing factor. Images Figure 1 Figure 2A Figure 2B Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3293463

  15. Regional cerebral blood flow and cerebrovascular reactivity in Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia assessed by arterial spinlabeling magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yong-Zhe; Zhang, Jun-Jian; Liu, Hui; Wu, Guang-Yao; Xiong, Li; Shu, Min

    2013-02-01

    Hemodynamic disturbance in cerebral blood flow (CBF) is common in both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD).The aim of this study is to investigate the different patterns of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) change and cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) in these two types of dementia. Mean flow velocity (MFV) of middle cerebral artery and rCBF were measured by Transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) and arterial spin-labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance, separately. CVR was evaluated by MFV or rCBF change in response to 5% CO2 inhalation. The ASL results showed that, rCBF was significantly lower in both the bilateral frontal and temporal lobes in AD group and lower in left frontal and temporal white matter in patients with VaD. CVR calculated by rCBF was impaired more severely in bilateral frontal cortices in AD. Conversely, TCD tests failed to demonstrate significant difference in MFV and CVR between the two groups. It is concluded that the different patterns detected by ASL in resting rCBF change and cerebrovascular reactivity in response to carbogen inhalation may serve as a potential marker to distinguish AD and VaD.

  16. Vascular permeability in cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Mikati, Abdul G; Khanna, Omaditya; Zhang, Lingjiao; Girard, Romuald; Shenkar, Robert; Guo, Xiaodong; Shah, Akash; Larsson, Henrik B W; Tan, Huan; Li, Luying; Wishnoff, Matthew S; Shi, Changbin; Christoforidis, Gregory A; Awad, Issam A

    2015-10-01

    Patients with the familial form of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are haploinsufficient for the CCM1, CCM2, or CCM3 gene. Loss of corresponding CCM proteins increases RhoA kinase-mediated endothelial permeability in vitro, and in mouse brains in vivo. A prospective case-controlled observational study investigated whether the brains of human subjects with familial CCM show vascular hyperpermeability by dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, in comparison with CCM cases without familial disease, and whether lesional or brain vascular permeability correlates with CCM disease activity. Permeability in white matter far (WMF) from lesions was significantly greater in familial than in sporadic cases, but was similar in CCM lesions. Permeability in WMF increased with age in sporadic patients, but not in familial cases. Patients with more aggressive familial CCM disease had greater WMF permeability compared to those with milder disease phenotype, but similar lesion permeability. Subjects receiving statin medications for routine cardiovascular indications had a trend of lower WMF, but not lesion, permeability. This is the first demonstration of brain vascular hyperpermeability in humans with an autosomal dominant disease, as predicted mechanistically. Brain permeability, more than lesion permeability, may serve as a biomarker of CCM disease activity, and help calibrate potential drug therapy.

  17. Vascular permeability in cerebral cavernous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Mikati, Abdul G; Khanna, Omaditya; Zhang, Lingjiao; Girard, Romuald; Shenkar, Robert; Guo, Xiaodong; Shah, Akash; Larsson, Henrik BW; Tan, Huan; Li, Luying; Wishnoff, Matthew S; Shi, Changbin; Christoforidis, Gregory A; Awad, Issam A

    2015-01-01

    Patients with the familial form of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are haploinsufficient for the CCM1, CCM2, or CCM3 gene. Loss of corresponding CCM proteins increases RhoA kinase-mediated endothelial permeability in vitro, and in mouse brains in vivo. A prospective case-controlled observational study investigated whether the brains of human subjects with familial CCM show vascular hyperpermeability by dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, in comparison with CCM cases without familial disease, and whether lesional or brain vascular permeability correlates with CCM disease activity. Permeability in white matter far (WMF) from lesions was significantly greater in familial than in sporadic cases, but was similar in CCM lesions. Permeability in WMF increased with age in sporadic patients, but not in familial cases. Patients with more aggressive familial CCM disease had greater WMF permeability compared to those with milder disease phenotype, but similar lesion permeability. Subjects receiving statin medications for routine cardiovascular indications had a trend of lower WMF, but not lesion, permeability. This is the first demonstration of brain vascular hyperpermeability in humans with an autosomal dominant disease, as predicted mechanistically. Brain permeability, more than lesion permeability, may serve as a biomarker of CCM disease activity, and help calibrate potential drug therapy. PMID:25966944

  18. Luxury perfusion syndrome in cerebral vascular disease evaluated with technetium-99m HM-PAO.

    PubMed

    Spreafico, G; Cammelli, F; Gadola, G; Freschi, R; Zancaner, F

    1987-03-01

    A recently developed Tc-99m radiocompound, hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (Tc-99m HM-PAO), exhibits favorable properties for regional cerebral blood flow study in man. The authors present a case of luxury perfusion syndrome observed in a 72-year-old patient with acute stroke and a right-sided hemiplegia, documented by planar scintigraphy and SPECT study in correlation with CT scan. The metabolic basis of this phenomenon is discussed and the usefulness of assessing regional brain perfusion by Tc-99m HM-PAO with conventional nuclear medicine equipment is underlined.

  19. Vascular pathology in Alzheimer disease: correlation of cerebral amyloid angiopathy and arteriosclerosis/lipohyalinosis with cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Thal, Dietmar Rudolf; Ghebremedhin, Estifanos; Orantes, Mario; Wiestler, Otmar D

    2003-12-01

    Sporadic, late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD) constitutes the most frequent cause of dementia in the elderly population. AD-related pathology is often accompanied by vascular changes. The predominant vascular lesions in AD are cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) and arteriosclerosis/lipohyalinosis (AS/LH). The present study was carried out to examine the coincidence of these small vessel pathologies during the development of cognitive deficits, amyloid beta-protein (A beta) deposition, and neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) formation in sporadic late-onset AD. We correlated the clinical dementia rating (CDR) score, the sequential extension of AD-related A beta deposition into different parts of the brain, and the extension of NFTs to involve more brain regions with the distribution of CAA and AS/LH in 52 human autopsy brains. The extension of CAA and AS/LH to involve different areas of the brain was associated with a rise of CDR scores and an increase in the extension of A beta deposition and NFT generation. AD cases showed a higher number of regions with CAA and AS/LH compared to nondemented patients with AD-related pathology and controls. Moreover, we demonstrated a hierarchical sequence in which the different regions of the brain exhibited CAA and AS/LH-affected vessels, allowing the distinction of 3 stages in the development of CAA and AS/LH. The first stage of CAA involved leptomeningeal and neocortical vessels. The second stage was characterized by additional A beta deposition in allocortical and midbrain vessels. Finally, in a third stage, CAA was observed in the basal ganglia, the thalamus, and in the lower brainstem. In contrast, AS/LH initially affected the basal ganglia in stage A. In stage B this pathology made inroads into the deep white matter, the leptomeningeal arteries of the cortex, the cerebellum, and into the thalamus. Stage C was characterized by AS/LH in brainstem vessels. Our results demonstrate widespread CAA and AS/LH to be associated with the

  20. P66(Shc)-SIRT1 Regulation of Oxidative Stress Protects Against Cardio-cerebral Vascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangyi; Guan, Jian; Li, Jun; Wei, Junji; Wang, Renzhi

    2016-08-30

    Growing evidence shows that acute and chronic overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increased oxidants under pathophysiologic circumstances are of vital importance in the development of cardio-cerebral vascular diseases (CCVDs). It has been revealed that the impact of ROS can be suppressed by sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a member of the highly conserved nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent class III histone deacetylases through protecting endothelial cells from oxidative injury. Plenty of evidences indicate that p66Shc stimulates mitochondrial ROS generation through its oxidoreductase activity and plays a vital role in the pathophysiology of CCVDs. The link between SIRT and p66Shc, though not very clear yet, may be generally illustrated like this: SIRT1 negatively regulates the expression of p66Shc in transcriptional level. In this review, the authors aimed to discuss the link between the pathogenesis of CCVDs, the regulation of ROS, the interrelation between SIRT1 and p66Shc, and the protective effect of the proper regulation of p66Shc/SIRT1 on CCVDs. The imbalance between the elimination and production of ROS can lead to oxidative stress (OS). More and more evidence suggest that ROS pathological overproduction is closely connected to the genesis and growth of CCVDs. P66shc is a gene that controls ROS level, apoptosis induction, and lifespan. Lots of evidence also indicate a role for SIRT1 mediating OS responses through several ways including directly deacetylating some transcription factors that control anti-OS genes. SIRT1 downregulation can lead to a decreased deacetylation of p66shc gene promoter and can then result in p66shc transcription. SIRT1 binds to the promoter of p66Shc where it can deacetylate histone H3, which weakens the transcription and translation of p66shc.

  1. Acute cerebral vascular accident associated with hyperperfusion.

    PubMed

    Soin, J S; Burdine, J A

    1976-01-01

    Cerebral radionuclide angiography can demonstrate decreased or normal radioactivity in the affected region during the arterial phase in patients who have sustained a cerebral vascular accident and thus enhances the diagnostic specificity of the static brain image. In an occasional patient, however, a seemingly paradoxical pattern of regional hyperperfusion with a return to normal or subnormal perfusion following the acute phase has been observed. This phenomenon, called "luxury perfusion," has been defined using intra-arterial 133Xe for semiquantitative cerebral blood flow measurements and should be kept in mind as a potentially misleading cerebral imaging pattern.

  2. [The blood glutathione system in cerebral vascular diseases and its treatment with alpha-lipoic acid].

    PubMed

    Kolesnichenko, L S; Kulinskiĭ, V I; Shprakh, V V; Bardymov, V V; Verlan, N V; Gubina, L P; Pensionerova, G A; Sergeeva, M P; Stanevich, L M; Filippova, G T

    2008-01-01

    The changes of glutathione metabolism are rare in dyscirculatory encephalopathy and ischemic stroke (IS) of mild severity. The frequent and considerable changes have been revealed in IS of moderate and high severity as well as in hemorrhagic stroke. An increase of activities of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione transferase is the most typical. The increase of enzyme activity was not observed at the beginning of treatment after 3 days and in patients with severe degree of disease who died later. A standard therapy decreased the quantity and/or expression of changes of the glutathione metabolism in patients with IS of moderate and high severity while the addition of alpha-lipoic acid (alpha-LA) led to the complete normalization in IS of moderate severity and normalization of most parameters in IS of high severity. The increase of functional activity of the glutathione system at the early stage of treatment of IS and the favorable changes during the treatment, in particular after the addition of alpha-LA, were correlated with the improvement of neurological status assessed with the NIHSS. It has been confirmed that the glutathione system plays an important role in the tolerance to brain ischemia.

  3. Cerebral vascular hamartoma in a geriatric cat

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Vaquero, Paula; Moore, Sarah A; Wolk, Kendra E; Oglesbee, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    An 11-year-old castrated male domestic medium hair cat was presented with neurological signs consistent with a right thalamocortical lesion. Computed tomography (CT) images revealed a heterogeneously, hyperattenuating, poorly contrast enhancing intra-axial mass within the right lateral ventricle. The histological diagnosis at post-mortem examination was vascular hamartoma with hemorrhage and necrosis. This is the first report of a vascular hamartoma affecting the thalamocortex in a geriatric cat. Also, this is the first time that CT images of a feline cerebral vascular hamartoma have been reported. PMID:21277244

  4. The Vascular Depression Hypothesis: Mechanisms Linking Vascular Disease with Depression

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Warren D.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Alexopoulos, George S.

    2013-01-01

    The ‘Vascular Depression’ hypothesis posits that cerebrovascular disease may predispose, precipitate, or perpetuate some geriatric depressive syndromes. This hypothesis stimulated much research that has improved our understanding of the complex relationships between late-life depression (LLD), vascular risk factors, and cognition. Succinctly, there are well-established relationships between late-life depression, vascular risk factors, and cerebral hyperintensities, the radiological hallmark of vascular depression. Cognitive dysfunction is common in late-life depression, particularly executive dysfunction, a finding predictive of poor antidepressant response. Over time, progression of hyperintensities and cognitive deficits predicts a poor course of depression and may reflect underlying worsening of vascular disease. This work laid the foundation for examining the mechanisms by which vascular disease influences brain circuits and influences the development and course of depression. We review data testing the vascular depression hypothesis with a focus on identifying potential underlying vascular mechanisms. We propose a disconnection hypothesis, wherein focal vascular damage and white matter lesion location is a crucial factor influencing neural connectivity that contributes to clinical symptomatology. We also propose inflammatory and hypoperfusion hypotheses, concepts that link underlying vascular processes with adverse effects on brain function that influence the development of depression. Testing such hypotheses will not only inform the relationship between vascular disease and depression but also provide guidance on the potential repurposing of pharmacological agents that may improve late-life depression outcomes. PMID:23439482

  5. Collagen vascular disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... developed these disorders were previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names ... be used. These include as undifferentiated systemic rheumatic (connective tissue) diseases or overlap syndromes. Images Dermatomyositis, heliotrope eyelids ...

  6. Astrocyte regulation of cerebral vascular tone

    PubMed Central

    Iddings, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow is controlled by two crucial processes, cerebral autoregulation (CA) and neurovascular coupling (NVC) or functional hyperemia. Whereas CA ensures constant blood flow over a wide range of systemic pressures, NVC ensures rapid spatial and temporal increases in cerebral blood flow in response to neuronal activation. The focus of this review is to discuss the cellular mechanisms by which astrocytes contribute to the regulation of vascular tone in terms of their participation in NVC and, to a lesser extent, CA. We discuss evidence for the various signaling modalities by which astrocytic activation leads to vasodilation and vasoconstriction of parenchymal arterioles. Moreover, we provide a rationale for the contribution of astrocytes to pressure-induced increases in vascular tone via the vasoconstrictor 20-HETE (a downstream metabolite of arachidonic acid). Along these lines, we highlight the importance of the transient receptor potential channel of the vanilloid family (TRPV4) as a key molecular determinant in the regulation of vascular tone in cerebral arterioles. Finally, we discuss current advances in the technical tools available to study NVC mechanisms in the brain as it relates to the participation of astrocytes. PMID:23792684

  7. Cerebral Vascular Injury in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Kimbra; Amyot, Franck; Haber, Margalit; Pronger, Angela; Bogoslovsky, Tanya; Moore, Carol; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic cerebral vascular injury (TCVI) is a very frequent, if not universal, feature after traumatic brain injury (TBI). It is likely responsible, at least in part, for functional deficits and TBI-related chronic disability. Because there are multiple pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapies that promote vascular health, TCVI is an attractive target for therapeutic intervention after TBI. The cerebral microvasculature is a component of the neurovascular unit (NVU) coupling neuronal metabolism with local cerebral blood flow. The NVU participates in the pathogenesis of TBI, either directly from physical trauma or as part of the cascade of secondary injury that occurs after TBI. Pathologically, there is extensive cerebral microvascular injury in humans and experimental animal, identified with either conventional light microscopy or ultrastructural examination. It is seen in acute and chronic TBI, and even described in chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Non-invasive, physiologic measures of cerebral microvascular function show dysfunction after TBI in humans and experimental animal models of TBI. These include imaging sequences (MRI-ASL), Transcranial Doppler (TCD), and Near InfraRed Spectroscopy (NIRS). Understanding the pathophysiology of TCVI, a relatively under-studied component of TBI, has promise for the development of novel therapies for TBI.

  8. Rho kinase as a target for cerebral vascular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Lisa M; Sellers, James R; McKerracher, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The development of novel pharmaceutical treatments for disorders of the cerebral vasculature is a serious unmet medical need. These vascular disorders are typified by a disruption in the delicate Rho signaling equilibrium within the blood vessel wall. In particular, Rho kinase overactivation in the smooth muscle and endothelial layers of the vessel wall results in cytoskeletal modifications that lead to reduced vascular integrity and abnormal vascular growth. Rho kinase is thus a promising target for the treatment of cerebral vascular disorders. Indeed, preclinical studies indicate that Rho kinase inhibition may reduce the formation/growth/rupture of both intracranial aneurysms and cerebral cavernous malformations. PMID:26062400

  9. Cerebral Blood Flow Alterations as Assessed by 3D ASL in Cognitive Impairment in Patients with Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment: A Marker for Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yawen; Cao, Wenwei; Ding, Weina; Wang, Yao; Han, Xu; Zhou, Yan; Xu, Qun; Zhang, Yong; Xu, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal reductions in cortical cerebral blood flow (CBF) have been identified in subcortical vascular cognitive impairment (SVCI). However, little is known about the pattern of CBF reduction in relation with the degree of cognitive impairment. CBF measured with three-dimensional (3D) Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) helps detect functional changes in subjects with SVCI. We aimed to compare CBF maps in subcortical ischemic vascular disease (SIVD) subjects with and without cognitive impairment and to detect the relationship of the regions of CBF reduction in the brain with the degree of cognitive impairment according to the z-score. A total of 53 subjects with SVCI and 23 matched SIVD subjects without cognitive impairment (controls), underwent a whole-brain 3D ASL MRI in the resting state. Regional CBF (rCBF) was compared voxel wise by using an analysis of variance design in a statistical parametric mapping program, with patient age and sex as covariates. Correlations were calculated between the rCBF value in the whole brain and the z-score in the 53 subjects with SVCI. Compared with the control subjects, SVCI group demonstrated diffuse decreased CBF in the brain. Significant positive correlations were determined in the rCBF values in the left hippocampus, left superior temporal pole gyrus, right superior frontal orbital lobe, right medial frontal orbital lobe, right middle temporal lobe, left thalamus and right insula with the z-scores in SVCI group. The noninvasively quantified resting CBF demonstrated altered CBF distributions in the SVCI brain. The deficit brain perfusions in the temporal and frontal lobe, hippocampus, thalamus and insula was related to the degree of cognitive impairment. Its relationship to cognition indicates the clinical relevance of this functional marker. Thus, our results provide further evidence for the mechanisms underlying the cognitive deficit in patients with SVCI. PMID:27630562

  10. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease, defined by a decreased glomerular filtration rate or albuminuria, is recognized as a major global health burden, mainly because it is an established risk factor for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. The magnitude of the effect of chronic kidney disease on incident stroke seems to be higher in persons of Asian ethnicity. Since the kidney and brain share unique susceptibilities to vascular injury due to similar anatomical and functional features of small artery diseases, kidney impairment can be predictive of the presence and severity of cerebral small vessel diseases. Chronic kidney disease has been reported to be associated with silent brain infarcts, cerebral white matter lesions, and cerebral microbleeds, independently of vascular risk factors. In addition, chronic kidney disease affects cognitive function, partly via the high prevalence of cerebral small vessel diseases. Retinal artery disease also has an independent relationship with chronic kidney disease and cognitive impairment. Stroke experts are no longer allowed to be ignorant of chronic kidney disease. Close liaison between neurologists and nephrologists can improve the management of cerebral small vessel diseases in kidney patients. PMID:25692105

  11. Hereditary cerebral small vessel disease and stroke.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Christian Baastrup; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Hansen, Christine Krarup; Christensen, Hanne

    2017-04-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease is considered hereditary in about 5% of patients and is characterized by lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities on MRI. Several monogenic hereditary diseases causing cerebral small vessel disease and stroke have been identified. The purpose of this systematic review is to provide a guide for determining when to consider molecular genetic testing in patients presenting with small vessel disease and stroke. CADASIL, CARASIL, collagen type IV mutations (including PADMAL), retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy, Fabry disease, hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis, and forkhead box C1 mutations are described in terms of genetics, pathology, clinical manifestation, imaging, and diagnosis. These monogenic disorders are often characterized by early-age stroke, but also by migraine, mood disturbances, vascular dementia and often gait disturbances. Some also present with extra-cerebral manifestations such as microangiopathy of the eyes and kidneys. Many present with clinically recognizable syndromes. Investigations include a thorough family medical history, medical history, neurological examination, neuroimaging, often supplemented by specific examinations e.g of the of vision, retinal changes, as well as kidney and heart function. However molecular genetic analysis is the final gold standard of diagnosis. There are increasing numbers of reports on new monogenic syndromes causing cerebral small vessel disease. Genetic counseling is important. Enzyme replacement therapy is possible in Fabry disease, but treatment options remain overall very limited.

  12. Pediatric neuroradiology: Cerebral and cranial diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Diebler, C.; Dulac, O.

    1987-01-01

    In this book, a neuroradiologist and a neuropediatrician have combined forces to provide the widest possible knowledge in investigating cranial and cerebral disorders in infancy and childhood. Based on more than 20,000 pediatric CT examinations, with a follow-up time often exceeding ten years, the book aims to bridge interdisciplinary gaps and help radiologists, pediatricians and neurosurgeons solve the various problems of pediatric neuroradiology that frequently confront them. For each disease, the etiology, clinical manifestation, pathological lesions and radiological presentations are discussed, supported by extensive illustrations. Malformative, vascular, traumatic, tumoral, infectious and metabolic diseases are reviewed. Miscellaneous conditions presenting particular symptoms or syndromes are also studied, such as hydrocephalus and neurological complications of leukemia. Contents: Cerebral and cranial malformations; neurocutaneous syndromes; inherited metabolic diseases; infectious diseases - vascular disorders; intracranial tumors; cranial trauma - miscellaneous and subject index.

  13. Vascular and metabolic reserve in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nagata, K; Kondoh, Y; Atchison, R; Sato, M; Satoh, Y; Watahiki, Y; Hirata, Y; Yokoyama, E

    2000-01-01

    Vascular and metabolic reserve were analyzed in probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD). Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)), and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) were measured quantitatively with positron emission tomography (PET). Vascular reactivity (VR) was also calculated by comparing the CBF during 5% CO(2) inhalation with the CBF during normal breathing. Vascular transit time (VTT) that was calculated as a ratio of CBV/CBF and VR reflect vasodilating capacity of the small resistance vessels, whereas OEF designates metabolic (oxygen-extraction) reserve in threatening brain ischemia. Significant increase in OEF was seen in the parieto-temporal cortex and both VTT and VR were preserved in AD patients. By constrast, there was no significant increase in OEF whereas VTT was prolonged and VR was markedly depressed in VaD patients. The increase of OEF and preserved VTT and VR seen in AD patients indicate the possible participation of vascular factors in the pathogenesis of AD perhaps at the capillary level.

  14. Are low levels of HDL2-cholesterol a risk factor for atherosclerosis of cerebral vascular disease? Case report.

    PubMed

    Cordova, C; Alessandri, C; Basili, S; Peverini, F; Ferro, D; Barsi, R; Paradiso, M

    1990-01-01

    A case of a 45 years old man with an atherosclerotic stenosis of right internal carotid and TIA event is reported. The patient showed an increase of total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol serum levels and, in particular, a very low familiar HDL2-cholesterol serum value. The possibility that this last condition could represent an important co-factor of the extracranial cerebrovascular disease is discussed. The usefulness of a long-term follow-up of all family members, showing the same lipids pattern, is also suggested.

  15. Calcium intake, vascular calcification, and vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Spence, Lisa A; Weaver, Connie M

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has reported a possible link between calcium supplementation and increased risk of cardiovascular disease and its endpoints in healthy, older adults. To evaluate the current evidence regarding the impact of calcium supplementation on cardiovascular disease risk and to address research gaps, the present review was conducted. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses were included, when available, along with original articles. The articles included in the review were obtained from PubMed using the following search terms: calcium intake, calcium supplementation, cardiovascular disease, myocardial infarction, mortality, and vascular calcification. The majority of the studies reviewed demonstrated no statistically significant adverse or beneficial effect of calcium supplementation on cardiovascular disease or its endpoints. While some studies indicate a possible increased risk, there is a lack of consensus on these findings and a need exists to further elucidate a mechanism. More experimental data are necessary to understand the impact of calcium intake, both levels and sources, on vascular calcification and vascular disease. The use of (41)C kinetic modeling in the Ossabaw swine provides an approach for assessing soft tissue calcification in an atherosclerotic and normal state to address research gaps.

  16. Vascular dysfunction as a target for adjuvant therapy in cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Leonardo José de Moura; Moreira, Aline da Silva; Daniel-Ribeiro, Cláudio Tadeu; Martins, Yuri Chaves

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a life-threatening complication of Plasmodium falciparum malaria that continues to be a major global health problem. Brain vascular dysfunction is a main factor underlying the pathogenesis of CM and can be a target for the development of adjuvant therapies for the disease. Vascular occlusion by parasitised red blood cells and vasoconstriction/vascular dysfunction results in impaired cerebral blood flow, ischaemia, hypoxia, acidosis and death. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of vascular dysfunction in CM and the roles of low nitric oxide bioavailability, high levels of endothelin-1 and dysfunction of the angiopoietin-Tie2 axis. We also discuss the usefulness and relevance of the murine experimental model of CM by Plasmodium berghei ANKA to identify mechanisms of disease and to screen potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:25185000

  17. Cerebral hydatid disease in Britain

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Milne; Bickerstaff, Edwin R.; Hamilton, J. G.

    1975-01-01

    Two cases of cerebral hydatid disease are described. This condition, acquired by Britons in Britain, is extremely rare as only two similar cases have been reported before. Details of clinical presentation, investigation and treatment are described. Images PMID:1206419

  18. Cerebral hemodynamics and endothelial function in patients with Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cerebral vasculopathy have been described in Fabry disease, in which altered cerebral blood flow, vascular remodelling or impairment of endothelial function could be involved. Our study aims to evaluate these three possibilities in a group of Fabry patients, and compare it to healthy controls. Methods Cerebral hemodynamics, vascular remodelling and systemic endothelial function were investigated in 10 Fabry patients and compared to data from 17 healthy controls. Transcranial Doppler was used to study blood flow velocity of intracranial arteries and cerebral vasomotor reactivity. For the study of vascular remodelling and endothelial function, intima-media thickness of common carotid arteries, flow-mediated dilation in brachial artery and serum levels of soluble VCAM-1, TNF-α, high-sensitive CRP and IL-6 were measured. Differences between groups were evaluated using appropriate tests. Results No relevant differences were observed in cerebral hemodynamic parameters, intima-media thickness or flow-mediated dilation. There was a trend for low serum levels of IL-6 and high serum levels of TNF-α and high-sensitive CRP in Fabry patients; plasma concentrations of soluble VCAM-1 were significantly higher in Fabry disease patients than in healthy volunteers (p = 0.02). Conclusions In our sample, we did not find relevant alterations of cerebral hemodynamics in Fabry disease patients. Increased levels of plasmatic endothelial biomarkers seem to be the most important feature indicative of possible vascular dysfunction in Fabry disease patients. PMID:24207059

  19. Demographic Features and Neuropsychological Correlates in a Cohort of 200 Patients with Vascular Cognitive Decline Due to Cerebral Small Vessel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Issac, Thomas Gregor; Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Rajeswaran, Jamuna; Christopher, Rita; Philip, Mariamma

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Vascular dementia is the second most common form of dementia and is potentially reversible. Small vessel disease (SVD) closely mimics degenerative dementia in view of its sub-acute onset and progressive course. Therefore, unlike large vessel disease, Hachinski Ischemic scale score may not always reflect vascular cognitive decline resulting in diagnostic and therapeutic confusions. Therefore, there is a need for detailed neuropsychological assessment for various cognitive domains for early identification of vascular cognitive decline as it carries a very good long term prognosis for cognitive morbidity, unlike degenerative dementias. Patients and Methods: This prospective study involves thorough domain based neuropsychological assessment of patients with a radiological diagnosis of SVD involving the following parameters-digit forward and backward, category fluency, color trails, stick test, logical memory test, and bender gestalt test. Magnetic resonance imaging scans done using 3-tesla machines and SVD graded using Fazekas visual scale. Results: The mean Hachinskis score was less sensitive for differentiating vascular dementia from degenerative dementia. However, the domain based neuropsychological scores were highly sensitive showing statistically significant impairment in all 6 domains tested and compared with Fazekas 1-3 grades in imaging. Discussion and Conclusion: This study aimed at establishing an early diagnosis of vascular mild cognitive impairment using domain wise neuropsychological testing and correlating it with radiological scores. Hachinskis score is more sensitive for large vessel disease in view of acute onset and step-like progression as against steady progression in SVD. However, domain-wise testing was highly sensitive in identifying early cognitive impairment in patients with SVD, and early therapeutic interventions are highly rewarding. PMID:27114624

  20. Association factor analysis between osteoporosis with cerebral artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Eun-Sun; Jeong, Je Hoon; Lee, Bora; Im, Soo Bin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical association factors between osteoporosis and cerebral artery disease in Korean population. Two hundred nineteen postmenopausal women and men undergoing cerebral computed tomography angiography were enrolled in this study to evaluate the cerebral artery disease by cross-sectional study. Cerebral artery disease was diagnosed if there was narrowing of 50% higher diameter in one or more cerebral vessel artery or presence of vascular calcification. History of osteoporotic fracture was assessed using medical record, and radiographic data such as simple radiography, MRI, and bone scan. Bone mineral density was checked by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. We reviewed clinical characteristics in all patients and also performed subgroup analysis for total or extracranial/ intracranial cerebral artery disease group retrospectively. We performed statistical analysis by means of chi-square test or Fisher's exact test for categorical variables and Student's t-test or Wilcoxon's rank sum test for continuous variables. We also used univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess the factors associated with the prevalence of cerebral artery disease. A two-tailed p-value of less than 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. All statistical analyses were performed using R (version 3.1.3; The R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria) and SPSS (version 14.0; SPSS, Inc, Chicago, Ill, USA). Of the 219 patients, 142 had cerebral artery disease. All vertebral fracture was observed in 29 (13.24%) patients. There was significant difference in hip fracture according to the presence or absence of cerebral artery disease. In logistic regression analysis, osteoporotic hip fracture was significantly associated with extracranial cerebral artery disease after adjusting for multiple risk factors. Females with osteoporotic hip fracture were associated with total calcified

  1. Hypertension-Induced Vascular Remodeling Contributes to Reduced Cerebral Perfusion and the Development of Spontaneous Stroke in Aged SHRSP Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    induced vascular remodeling contributes to reduced cerebral perfusion and the development of spontaneous stroke in aged SHRSP rats Erica C Henning1...spontaneously-hypertensive, stroke-prone (SHRSP) rats is of particular interest because the pathogenesis is believed to be similar to that in the...cerebral infarction and the specific role of cerebral perfusion in disease development. Twelve female SHRSP rats (age: - 1 year) were Imaged within 1

  2. Amputation in vascular disease.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, K.

    1980-01-01

    The management of vascular amputees in the Roehampton Limb Surgery Unit since its opening in 1975 is outlined and the results in 167 cases presented. Of the 35 patients over the age of 80, 57% were walking independently at the time of their discharge from the unit. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7377693

  3. [Aging and retinal vascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hitoshi

    2007-03-01

    Ocular vascular diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, retinal vein occlusion, and age-related macular degeneration, whose population increases along with aging, have become leading causes of severe visual disturbance. Macular edema and serous retinal detachment are associated with abnormal vascular leakage and tractional retinal detachment, and neovascular glaucoma is caused by retinal neovascularization. Such ocular vascular diseases are caused by vascular cell aging and vascular damage associated with lifestyle-related diseases including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and obesity. In the present study, we investigated molecular mechanisms in such vascular deficiencies using vascular cell biology methodology, and we propose novel strategies for the treatment of such vascular diseases. Along with aging, oxidative stress and physical stress, such as mechanical stretch, continuously and directly insult vascular cells. Such stress induces apoptosis by intracellular signaling through stress kinases in cultured retinal vascular cells. Inhibition of such stress kinases could be an effective treatment to protect the vascular cells against age-related damage. In a retinal vascular developmental model, pericyte loss causes pathology mimicking macular edema and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Angiopoietin 1 (Ang 1) secreted by pericytes suppresses oxidative stress-induced intracellular signaling through stress kinases linked to cell apoptosis and normalizes such retinal pathology. This suggests that the paracrine action of Ang 1 in the pericytes is necessary to sustain normal retinal vasculature, and that Ang 1-triggered intracellular signaling is useful for the treatment of vascular cell pathology associated with pericyte loss. In diabetic retinopathy and retinal vein occlusion, retinal vessels regress along with retinal vascular cell apoptosis, and the retina becomes ischemic followed by pathological retinal neovascularization. VEGF has been

  4. Evaluation of Bioenergetic Function in Cerebral Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Rellick, Stephanie L; Hu, Heng; Simpkins, James W; Ren, Xuefang

    2016-11-19

    The integrity of the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) is critical to prevent brain injury. Cerebral vascular endothelial (CVE) cells are one of the cell types that comprise the BBB; these cells have a very high-energy demand, which requires optimal mitochondrial function. In the case of disease or injury, the mitochondrial function in these cells can be altered, resulting in disease or the opening of the BBB. In this manuscript, we introduce a method to measure mitochondrial function in CVE cells by using whole, intact cells and a bioanalyzer. A mito-stress assay is used to challenge the cells that have been perturbed, either physically or chemically, and evaluate their bioenergetic function. Additionally, this method also provides a useful way to screen new therapeutics that have direct effects on mitochondrial function. We have optimized the cell density necessary to yield oxygen consumption rates that allow for the calculation of a variety of mitochondrial parameters, including ATP production, maximal respiration, and spare capacity. We also show the sensitivity of the assay by demonstrating that the introduction of the microRNA, miR-34a, leads to a pronounced and detectable decrease in mitochondrial activity. While the data shown in this paper is optimized for the bEnd.3 cell line, we have also optimized the protocol for primary CVE cells, further suggesting the utility in preclinical and clinical models.

  5. Soluble Endoglin Modulates Aberrant Cerebral Vascular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yongmei; Hao, Qi; Kim, Helen; Su, Hua; Letarte, Michelle; Karumanchi, S. Ananth; Lawton, Michael T.; Barbaro, Nicholas M.; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Young, William L.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are an important cause of neurological morbidity in young adults. The pathophysiology of these lesions is poorly understood. A soluble form of endoglin (sEng) has been shown to cause endothelial dysfunction and induce preeclampsia. We tested if sEng would be elevated in brain AVM tissues relative to epilepsy brain tissues, and also investigated whether sEng overexpression via gene transfer in the mouse brain would induce vascular dysplasia and associated changes in downstream signaling pathways. Methods Expression levels of sEng in surgical specimens were determined by Western blot assay and ELISA. Vascular dysplasia, levels of MMP and oxidative stress were determined by immunohistochemistry and gelatin zymography. Results Brain AVMs (n=33) had higher mean sEng levels (245 ± 175 vs 100 ± 60, % of control, P=0.04) compared with controls (n=8), as determined by Western blot. In contrast, membrane-bound Eng was not significantly different (108 ± 79 vs 100 ± 63, % of control, P=0.95). sEng gene transduction in the mouse brain induced abnormal vascular structures. It also increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity by 490 ± 30% (MMP-9), 220 ± 30% (MMP-2), and oxidants by 260 ± 20% (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal) at 2 weeks after injection, suggesting that MMPs and oxidative radicals may mediate sEng-induced pathological vascular remodeling. Interpretation The results suggest that elevated sEng may play a role in the generation of sporadic brain AVMs. Our findings may provide new targets for therapeutic intervention for patients with brain AVMs. PMID:19670444

  6. Cerebral vascular regulation and brain injury in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Brew, Nadine; Walker, David; Wong, Flora Y

    2014-06-01

    Cerebrovascular lesions, mainly germinal matrix hemorrhage and ischemic injury to the periventricular white matter, are major causes of adverse neurodevelopmental outcome in preterm infants. Cerebrovascular lesions and neuromorbidity increase with decreasing gestational age, with the white matter predominantly affected. Developmental immaturity in the cerebral circulation, including ongoing angiogenesis and vasoregulatory immaturity, plays a major role in the severity and pattern of preterm brain injury. Prevention of this injury requires insight into pathogenesis. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is low in the preterm white matter, which also has blunted vasoreactivity compared with other brain regions. Vasoreactivity in the preterm brain to cerebral perfusion pressure, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and neuronal metabolism is also immature. This could be related to immaturity of both the vasculature and vasoactive signaling. Other pathologies arising from preterm birth and the neonatal intensive care environment itself may contribute to impaired vasoreactivity and ineffective CBF regulation, resulting in the marked variations in cerebral hemodynamics reported both within and between infants depending on their clinical condition. Many gaps exist in our understanding of how neonatal treatment procedures and medications have an impact on cerebral hemodynamics and preterm brain injury. Future research directions for neuroprotective strategies include establishing cotside, real-time clinical reference values for cerebral hemodynamics and vasoregulatory capacity and to demonstrate that these thresholds improve long-term outcomes for the preterm infant. In addition, stimulation of vascular development and repair with growth factor and cell-based therapies also hold promise.

  7. Cerebral Gluconeogenesis and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yip, James; Geng, Xiaokun; Shen, Jiamei; Ding, Yuchuan

    2017-01-01

    The gluconeogenesis pathway, which has been known to normally present in the liver, kidney, intestine, or muscle, has four irreversible steps catalyzed by the enzymes: pyruvate carboxylase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase, and glucose 6-phosphatase. Studies have also demonstrated evidence that gluconeogenesis exists in brain astrocytes but no convincing data have yet been found in neurons. Astrocytes exhibit significant 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase-3 activity, a key mechanism for regulating glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. Astrocytes are unique in that they use glycolysis to produce lactate, which is then shuttled into neurons and used as gluconeogenic precursors for reduction. This gluconeogenesis pathway found in astrocytes is becoming more recognized as an important alternative glucose source for neurons, specifically in ischemic stroke and brain tumor. Further studies are needed to discover how the gluconeogenesis pathway is controlled in the brain, which may lead to the development of therapeutic targets to control energy levels and cellular survival in ischemic stroke patients, or inhibit gluconeogenesis in brain tumors to promote malignant cell death and tumor regression. While there are extensive studies on the mechanisms of cerebral glycolysis in ischemic stroke and brain tumors, studies on cerebral gluconeogenesis are limited. Here, we review studies done to date regarding gluconeogenesis to evaluate whether this metabolic pathway is beneficial or detrimental to the brain under these pathological conditions. PMID:28101056

  8. Cerebral vascular accident: some characteristics of occupational therapy evaluation forms.

    PubMed

    Ottenbacher, K

    1980-04-01

    To determine areas most commonly evaluated by occupational therapists and to ascertain methods in which evaluative information is gathered, 35 evaluation forms currently employed by occupational therapists to assess dysfunction in patients with cerebral vascular accident were collected. Five general areas including motor function, sensory deficit, hadn function, activities of daily living, and visual perception were found to be most frequently listed on the forms. These areas were divided into sub areas to operationally define the information collected. Analysis revealed that the level of measurement most frequently employed by therapists to record evaluate findings was the descriptive level. There was a tendency to collect data at "higher" or more sophisticated levels of measurement in those areas evaluated most frequently. The findings are discussed in relation to professional competency concerns and the need to develop unique occupational therapy evaluative instruments for areas of practice such as cerebral vascular accident.

  9. Akt isoforms in vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haixiang; Littlewood, Trevor; Bennett, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian serine/threonine Akt kinases comprise three closely related isoforms: Akt1, Akt2 and Akt3. Akt activation has been implicated in both normal and disease processes, including in development and metabolism, as well as cancer and cardiovascular disease. Although Akt signalling has been identified as a promising therapeutic target in cancer, its role in cardiovascular disease is less clear. Importantly, accumulating evidence suggests that the three Akt isoforms exhibit distinct tissue expression profiles, localise to different subcellular compartments, and have unique modes of activation. Consistent with in vitro findings, genetic studies in mice show distinct effects of individual Akt isoforms on the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease. This review summarises recent studies of individual Akt isoforms in atherosclerosis, vascular remodelling and aneurysm formation, to provide a comprehensive overview of Akt function in vascular disease. PMID:25929188

  10. Effect of age and vascular anatomy on blood flow in major cerebral vessels.

    PubMed

    Amin-Hanjani, Sepideh; Du, Xinjian; Pandey, Dilip K; Thulborn, Keith R; Charbel, Fady T

    2015-02-01

    Measurement of volume flow rates in major cerebral vessels can be used to evaluate the hemodynamic effects of cerebrovascular disease. However, both age and vascular anatomy can affect flow rates independent of disease. We prospectively evaluated 325 healthy adult volunteers using phase contrast quantitative magnetic resonance angiography to characterize these effects on cerebral vessel flow rates and establish clinically useful normative reference values. Flows were measured in the major intracranial and extracranial vessels. The cohort ranged from 18 to 84 years old, with 157 (48%) females. All individual vessel flows and total cerebral blood flow (TCBF) declined with age, at 2.6 mL/minute per year for TCBF. Basilar artery (BA) flow was significantly decreased in individuals with one or both fetal posterior cerebral arteries (PCAs). Internal carotid artery flows were significantly higher with a fetal PCA and decreased with a hypoplastic anterior cerebral artery. Indexing vessel flows to TCBF neutralized the age effect, but anatomic variations continued to impact indexed flow in the BA and internal carotid artery. Variability in normative flow ranges were reduced in distal vessels and by examining regional flows. Cerebral vessel flows are affected by age and cerebrovascular anatomy, which has important implications for interpretation of flows in the disease state.

  11. Cerebral vasospasm. Part I. In cerebral vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Mohr, J P; Kase, C S

    1983-01-01

    This review enumerates the many proposed mechanisms of vasospasm, including cellular elements, agents derived from the blood and injured cerebral tissues, alteration of calcium: magnesium ratios, free radical reactions, hypothalamic injury, clogging of the subarachnoid space, obstructions of the vasa vasorum and necrosis of the media with subintimal proliferation and intraluminal acidosis. At present, no single agent has been demonstrated as the only source of vasospasm, and whether the disorder is spasm or a chronic arteriopathy remains the subject of argument. The factors influencing the frequency, timing, severity and distribution of angiographically documented vasospasm are discussed, including data from our own population-based study over a 3 year period showing an incidence of vasospasm of 73%. Special emphasis is given to the observation that differences in patient populations play a major role in the incidence and severity of reported vasospasm: those from non-selective populations show a higher incidence of vasospasm and a greater severity of the syndromes attributed to spasm. Hypotheses are offered to account for the low frequency of vasospasm in hemorrhages from arteriovenous malformations and mycotic aneurysms. Clinical syndromes of vasospasm are reviewed, with special emphasis on our own material. The mode of onset and subsequent course of syndromes include those of sudden onset consistent with embolism, and those of gradual onset suggesting a low flow state. Their relationship to the severity of the subarachnoid hemorrhage and the vasospasm is presented. The paucity of syndromes of isolated deep infarcts of the lacunar type is noted. An account is given of the many failed therapies and the future hopes for early surgery. Innovations in medical therapy, including the use of some platelet inhibitors available only in some countries, and rationales for the use of aspirin and even heparin is discussed.

  12. Cerebral vascular reactivity on return from the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuj, Kathryn; Greaves, Danielle; Shoemaker, Kevin; Blaber, Andrew; Hughson, Richard L.

    Returning from spaceflight, astronauts experience a high incidence of orthostatic intolerance and syncope. Longer duration space flight may result in greater adaptations to microgravity which could increase the post-flight incidence of syncope. CCISS (Cardiovascular and Cerebovascular Control on return from the International Space Station) is an ongoing project designed to help determine adaptations that occur during spaceflight which may contribute to orthostatic intolerance. One component of this project involves looking at cerebral vascular responses before and after long duration spaceflight. As a known vasodilator, carbon dioxide (CO2) has been frequently used to assess changes in cerebral vascular reactivity. In this experiment, end tidal PCO2 was manipulated through changes in respired air. Two breaths of a 10% CO2 gas mixture were administered at 1-min intervals resulting in an increase in end tidal PCO2 . Throughout the testing, cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) was determined using transcranial Doppler ultrasound. The cerebral resistance index (RI) was calculated from the Doppler wave form using the equation; RI=(CBFVsystolic-CBFVdiastolic)/CBFVsystolic. Changes in this index have been shown to reflect changes in cerebral vascular resistance. Peak responses to the CO2 stimulus were determined and compared to baseline measures taken at the beginning of the testing. Cerebral blood flow velocity increased and RI decreased with the two breaths of CO2. Preliminary data show a 36.0% increase in CBFV and a 9.0% decrease in RI pre-flight. Post flight, the response to CO2 appears to change showing a potentially blunted decrease in resistance (6.8%) and a smaller increase in CBFV (22.8%). Long term spaceflight may result in cerebrovascular changes which could decrease the vasodilatory capacity of cerebral resistance vessels. Further investigations in the CCISS project will reveal the interactive role of CO2 and arterial blood pressure on maintenance of brain

  13. Cocaine induces apoptosis in cerebral vascular muscle cells: potential roles in strokes and brain damage.

    PubMed

    Su, Jialin; Li, Jianfeng; Li, Wenyan; Altura, Bella T; Altura, Burton M

    2003-12-15

    Cocaine abuse is known to induce different types of brain-microvascular damage and many adverse cerebrovascular effects, including cerebral vasculitis, intracranial hemorrhage, cerebral infarction and stroke. A major physiological event leading to these pathophysiological actions of cocaine could be apoptosis. Whether cocaine can cause brain-microvascular pathology and vascular toxicity by inducing apoptosis of cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells is not known. This study, using several different methods to discern apoptosis, was designed to investigate if primary cultured canine cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells can undergo apoptosis when treated with cocaine. After treatment with cocaine (10(-6)-10(-3) M) for 12-24 h, the death rates of cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells increased in a concentration-dependent manner compared with controls. Morphological analysis of cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells using confocal fluoresence microscopy showed that the percentage of apoptotic cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells increased after cocaine (10(-6)-10(-3) M) treatment in a concentration-dependent manner. TUNEL assays also showed positive results for cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells treated with cocaine. These results clearly demonstrate that cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells can undergo rapid apoptosis in response to cocaine in a concentration-dependent manner. Cocaine-induced apoptosis may thus play a major role in brain-microvascular damage, cerebral vascular toxicity and strokes.

  14. Monitoring cerebral oxygenation in a pediatric patient undergoing surgery for vascular ring.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Reena K; Motta, Pablo; Horibe, Mayumi; Mossad, Emad

    2006-02-01

    Regional cerebral oxygenation can be monitored using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Inadequacy of collateral cerebral circulation and regional cerebral ischemia during cardiac and vascular surgery may be detected by the use of NIRS monitoring. We report a 2-year-old child who underwent surgical repair of vascular ring and subclavian reimplantation, where use of NIRS helped in early detection and timely intervention to prevent prolonged cerebral ischemia.

  15. [Cerebral hydatid disease: imaging features].

    PubMed

    Tlili-Graiess, K; El-Ouni, F; Gharbi-Jemni, H; Arifa, N; Moulahi, H; Mrad-Dali, K; Guesmi, H; Abroug, S; Yacoub, M; Krifa, H

    2006-12-01

    Cerebral hytatid cysts (HC) are extremely rare, forming 2% of all intra cranial space occupying lesions even in counties where the disease is endemic. HC diagnosis is usually based on a pathognomonic computed tomography (CT) pattern. In order to assess the value of MR we reviewed the CT (n=25) and magnetic resonance (MR, n=4 including diffusion and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in 1) imaging of 25 patients with pathologically confirmed cerebral hydatid disease. 19 HC were seen in children under 16 years. All were supra tentorial with 22 in the middle cerebral artery territory. HC was solitary in 18 cases, unilocular in 23 and multi-vesicular in 2 with heavily calcified pericyst in 1. 2 cysts were intra ventricular and 1 intra aqueducal. The most typical features were well defined, smooth thin walled spherical or oval cystic lesions of CSF density and/or signal with considerable mass effect (20/25). Surrounding oedema with complete or incomplete rim enhancement was seen in 3 cases which were labelled as complicated and/or infected cysts. Although CT is diagnostic of hydatid disease in almost all cases (22/25), MRI including diffusion and spectroscopy precisely demonstrate location, number, cyst capsule, type of signal and enhancement and allows diagnosis of atypical or complicated HC and appears more helpful in surgical planning.

  16. Pregnancy and Vascular Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bissonnette, Julien; Durand, François; de Raucourt, Emmanuelle; Ceccaldi, Pierre-François; Plessier, Aurélie; Valla, Dominique; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Vascular disorders of the liver frequently affect women of childbearing age. Pregnancy and the postpartum are prothrombotic states. Pregnancy seems to be a trigger for Budd–Chiari syndrome in patients with an underlying prothrombotic disorder. Whether pregnancy is a risk factor for other vascular liver disorders is unknown. In women with a known vascular liver disorder and a desire for pregnancy, stabilisation of the liver disease, including the use of a portal decompressive procedure when indicated, should be reached prior to conception. The presence of esophageal varices should be screened and adequate prophylaxis of bleeding applied in a manner similar to what is recommended for patients with cirrhosis. Most women likely benefit from anticoagulation during pregnancy and the postpartum. Labor and delivery are best managed by a multidisciplinary team with experience in this situation. Assisted vaginal delivery is the preferred mode of delivery. Although the risk of miscarriage and premature birth is heightened, current management of these diseases makes it very likely to see the birth of a live baby when pregnancy reaches 20 weeks of gestation. PMID:25941432

  17. Role of Vascular Risk Factors and Vascular Dysfunction in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dickstein, Dara L.; Walsh, Jessica; Brautigam, Hannah; Stockton, Steven D.; Gandy, Samuel; Hof, Patrick R.

    2010-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that vascular risk factors and neurovascular dysfunction play integral roles in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. In addition to aging, the most common risk factors for Alzheimer's disease are apolipoprotein e4 allele, hypertension, hypotension, diabetes, and hypercholesterolemia. All of these can be characterized by vascular pathology attributed to conditions such as cerebral amyloid angiopathy and subsequent blood-brain barrier dysfunction. Many epidemiological, clinical, and pharmacotherapeutic studies have assessed the associations between such risk factors and Alzheimer's disease and have found positive associations between hypertension, hypotension, and diabetes mellitus. However, there are still many conflicting results from these population-based studies, and they should be interpreted carefully. Recognition of these factors and the mechanisms by which they contribute to Alzheimer's disease will be beneficial in the current treatment regimens for Alzheimer's disease and in the development of future therapies. Here we discuss vascular factors with respect to Alzheimer's disease and dementia and review the factors that give rise to vascular dysfunction and contribute to Alzheimer's disease. PMID:20101718

  18. Cerebral Cavernous Malformations: Somatic Mutations in Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gault, Judith; Awad, Issam A.; Recksiek, Peter; Shenkar, Robert; Breeze, Robert; Handler, Michael; Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, Bette Kay

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Germline mutations in three genes have been found in familial cases of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM). We previously discovered somatic and germline truncating mutations in the KRIT1 gene supporting the “two-hit” mechanism of CCM lesion formation in a single lesion. The purpose of this study was to screen for somatic, nonheritable, mutations in three more lesions from different patients and identify the cell type(s) in which somatic mutations occur. METHODS Somatic mutations were sought in DNA from three surgically excised, fresh-frozen CCM lesions by cloning and screening PCR products generated from KRIT1 or PDCD10 coding regions. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) was used to isolated endothelial and nonendothelial cells in order to determine if somatic mutations were found in endothelial cells. RESULTS A CCM lesion harbored somatic and germline KRIT1 mutations on different chromosomes and are therefore biallelic. Both mutations are predicted to truncate the protein. The KRIT1 somatic mutations (novel c.1800delG mutation and previously identified 34 nucleotide deletion) in CCMs from two different patients were only found in the vascular endothelial cells lining caverns. No obvious somatic mutations were identified in the two other lesions; however, the results were inconclusive possibly due to the technical limitations or the fact that these specimens had a small proportion of vascular endothelial cells lining pristine caverns. CONCLUSION The “two-hit” mechanism occurs in vascular endothelial cells lining CCM caverns from two patients with somatic and Hispanic-American KRIT1 germline mutations. Methods for somatic mutation detection should focus on vascular endothelial cells lining pristine caverns. PMID:19574835

  19. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease and Arterial Stiffness: Tsunami Effect in the Brain?

    PubMed Central

    Saji, Naoki; Toba, Kenji; Sakurai, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Background Cerebral small vessel diseases, including silent lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and microbleeds, pose a risk for cerebrovascular disease, cognitive impairment, and the geriatric syndrome via effects on arterial stiffness. However, the vascular, physiological, and metabolic roles of arterial stiffness in cerebral small vessel diseases remain unclear. Summary Arterial stiffness can be assessed using various indicators such as the ankle-brachial index, pulse wave velocity, cardio-ankle vascular index, and augmentation index. Arterial stiffness is independently associated with all components of cerebral small vessel disease including silent lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and microbleeds, although there are some methodological differences between the various surrogate markers. Evidence of arterial stiffness indicates microvessel arteriosclerosis presenting with vascular endothelial dysfunction. Further, vascular narrowing due to atherosclerosis and vascular stiffness due to lipohyalinosis can accelerate the pulse waves. This hemodynamic stress, pulsatile pressure, or blood pressure variability can cause a ‘tsunami effect’ towards the cerebral parenchyma and lead to cerebral small vessel disease. Previous studies have shown that silent lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities are strongly associated with arterial stiffness. However, the association between microbleeds and arterial stiffness remains controversial, as there are two vessel mechanisms related to microbleeds: cerebral amyloid angiopathy and hypertensive small vessel disease. Key Messages Cerebral small vessel disease with associated arterial stiffness is a risk factor for silent cerebral lesions, stroke, and cognitive impairment. Improvement of the living environment, management of risk factors, and innovation and development of novel drugs that improve arterial stiffness may suppress the progression of cerebral small vessel disease, and may reduce

  20. DNA Damage and Repair in Vascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Uryga, Anna; Gray, Kelly; Bennett, Martin

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage affecting both genomic and mitochondrial DNA is present in a variety of both inherited and acquired vascular diseases. Multiple cell types show persistent DNA damage and a range of lesions. In turn, DNA damage activates a variety of DNA repair mechanisms, many of which are activated in vascular disease. Such DNA repair mechanisms either stall the cell cycle to allow repair to occur or trigger apoptosis or cell senescence to prevent propagation of damaged DNA. Recent evidence has indicated that DNA damage occurs early, is progressive, and is sufficient to impair function of cells composing the vascular wall. The consequences of persistent genomic and mitochondrial DNA damage, including inflammation, cell senescence, and apoptosis, are present in vascular disease. DNA damage can thus directly cause vascular disease, opening up new possibilities for both prevention and treatment. We review the evidence for and the causes, types, and consequences of DNA damage in vascular disease.

  1. Demyelinating, degenerative, and vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Dooley, D M

    1977-01-01

    Fifty per cent of patients diagnosed as having multiple sclerosis, primary lateral sclerosis, or hereditary spinocerebellar disorders were observed to have enduring favorable changes in neurological function during the 15 to 27 months they have been followed. The patients who were the least severely disabled were benefitted the most by the stimulation and made the most rapid progress. For example, the patient having only an ataxic or a spastic gait typically was observed to improve faster than the patient having both an ataxic and a spastic gait. The long term effect of electrostimulation of the spinal cord on these patients is unknown. The purpose of the stimulation is to attempt to obtain an improvement in neurological function so that the patient may experience a better life style. It is not thought that the electrical current has any effect on the basic disease process. Electrostimulation over the posterior spinal roots and spinal cord, although not new, has not been used extensively for the treatment of patients with arterial disease. The patients who have responded the most dramatically to electrostimulation are those with vasospastic disorders. A larger percentage of patients showed a greater response to implanted stimulation than to transcutaneous stimulation. Electrostimulation of the nervous system is not designed to replace standard therapeutic measures of treatment of patients with vascular disease, but to supplement them.

  2. Cerebral cavernous malformations proteins inhibit Rho kinase to stabilize vascular integrity

    PubMed Central

    Stockton, Rebecca A.; Shenkar, Robert; Awad, Issam A.

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial cell–cell junctions regulate vascular permeability, vasculogenesis, and angiogenesis. Familial cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) in humans result from mutations of CCM2 (malcavernin, OSM, MGC4607), PDCD10 (CCM3), or KRIT1 (CCM1), a Rap1 effector which stabilizes endothelial cell–cell junctions. Homozygous loss of KRIT1 or CCM2 produces lethal vascular phenotypes in mice and zebrafish. We report that the physical interaction of KRIT1 and CCM2 proteins is required for endothelial cell–cell junctional localization, and lack of either protein destabilizes barrier function by sustaining activity of RhoA and its effector Rho kinase (ROCK). Protein haploinsufficient Krit1+/− or Ccm2+/− mouse endothelial cells manifested increased monolayer permeability in vitro, and both Krit1+/− and Ccm2+/− mice exhibited increased vascular leak in vivo, reversible by fasudil, a ROCK inhibitor. Furthermore, we show that ROCK hyperactivity occurs in sporadic and familial human CCM endothelium as judged by increased phosphorylation of myosin light chain. These data establish that KRIT1–CCM2 interaction regulates vascular barrier function by suppressing Rho/ROCK signaling and that this pathway is dysregulated in human CCM endothelium, and they suggest that fasudil could ameliorate both CCM disease and vascular leak. PMID:20308363

  3. Cerebral cavernous malformations proteins inhibit Rho kinase to stabilize vascular integrity.

    PubMed

    Stockton, Rebecca A; Shenkar, Robert; Awad, Issam A; Ginsberg, Mark H

    2010-04-12

    Endothelial cell-cell junctions regulate vascular permeability, vasculogenesis, and angiogenesis. Familial cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) in humans result from mutations of CCM2 (malcavernin, OSM, MGC4607), PDCD10 (CCM3), or KRIT1 (CCM1), a Rap1 effector which stabilizes endothelial cell-cell junctions. Homozygous loss of KRIT1 or CCM2 produces lethal vascular phenotypes in mice and zebrafish. We report that the physical interaction of KRIT1 and CCM2 proteins is required for endothelial cell-cell junctional localization, and lack of either protein destabilizes barrier function by sustaining activity of RhoA and its effector Rho kinase (ROCK). Protein haploinsufficient Krit1(+/-) or Ccm2(+/-) mouse endothelial cells manifested increased monolayer permeability in vitro, and both Krit1(+/-) and Ccm2(+/-) mice exhibited increased vascular leak in vivo, reversible by fasudil, a ROCK inhibitor. Furthermore, we show that ROCK hyperactivity occurs in sporadic and familial human CCM endothelium as judged by increased phosphorylation of myosin light chain. These data establish that KRIT1-CCM2 interaction regulates vascular barrier function by suppressing Rho/ROCK signaling and that this pathway is dysregulated in human CCM endothelium, and they suggest that fasudil could ameliorate both CCM disease and vascular leak.

  4. Genetics of cerebral small vessel disease.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jay Chol

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is an important cause of stroke and cognitive impairment among the elderly and is a more frequent cause of stroke in Asia than in the US or Europe. Although traditional risk factors such as hypertension or diabetes mellitus are important in the development of cerebral SVD, the exact pathogenesis is still uncertain. Both, twin and family history studies suggest heritability of sporadic cerebral SVD, while the candidate gene study and the genome-wide association study (GWAS) are mainly used in genetic research. Robust associations between the candidate genes and occurrence of various features of sporadic cerebral SVD, such as lacunar infarction, intracerebral hemorrhage, or white matter hyperintensities, have not yet been elucidated. GWAS, a relatively new technique, overcomes several shortcomings of previous genetic techniques, enabling the detection of several important genetic loci associated with cerebral SVD. In addition to the more common, sporadic cerebral SVD, several single-gene disorders causing cerebral SVD have been identified. The number of reported cases is increasing as the clinical features become clear and diagnostic examinations are more readily available. These include cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, cerebral autosomal recessive arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, COL4A1-related cerebral SVD, autosomal dominant retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy, and Fabry disease. These rare single-gene disorders are expected to play a crucial role in our understanding of cerebral SVD pathogenesis by providing animal models for the identification of cellular, molecular, and biochemical changes underlying cerebral small vessel damage.

  5. Genetics of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is an important cause of stroke and cognitive impairment among the elderly and is a more frequent cause of stroke in Asia than in the US or Europe. Although traditional risk factors such as hypertension or diabetes mellitus are important in the development of cerebral SVD, the exact pathogenesis is still uncertain. Both, twin and family history studies suggest heritability of sporadic cerebral SVD, while the candidate gene study and the genome-wide association study (GWAS) are mainly used in genetic research. Robust associations between the candidate genes and occurrence of various features of sporadic cerebral SVD, such as lacunar infarction, intracerebral hemorrhage, or white matter hyperintensities, have not yet been elucidated. GWAS, a relatively new technique, overcomes several shortcomings of previous genetic techniques, enabling the detection of several important genetic loci associated with cerebral SVD. In addition to the more common, sporadic cerebral SVD, several single-gene disorders causing cerebral SVD have been identified. The number of reported cases is increasing as the clinical features become clear and diagnostic examinations are more readily available. These include cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, cerebral autosomal recessive arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, COL4A1-related cerebral SVD, autosomal dominant retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy, and Fabry disease. These rare single-gene disorders are expected to play a crucial role in our understanding of cerebral SVD pathogenesis by providing animal models for the identification of cellular, molecular, and biochemical changes underlying cerebral small vessel damage. PMID:25692103

  6. Circulating Vascular Progenitor Cells in Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyun-Seung; Wang, Kyu-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Various approaches have been attempted in translational moyamoya disease research. One promising material for modeling and treating this disease is vascular progenitor cells, which can be acquired and expanded from patient peripheral blood. These cells may provide a novel experimental model and enable us to obtain insights regarding moyamoya disease pathogenesis. We briefly present the recent accomplishments in regard to the studies of vascular progenitor cells in moyamoya disease. PMID:26180610

  7. Livedo reticularis and cerebro-vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, W. P.; Ferguson, I. T.

    1982-01-01

    Three cases are described in which extensive livedo reticularis was associated with premature cerebrovascular disease. The patients presented with transient cerebral ischaemic attacks and gradually developed permanent neurological damage with intellectual impairment. The value of detailed neuropsychological testing to identify bilateral cortical abnormalities is demonstrated. CAT scanning may reveal multifocal cerebral infarction. The nature of this condition is not understood. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:7100027

  8. Association factor analysis between osteoporosis with cerebral artery disease: The STROBE study.

    PubMed

    Jin, Eun-Sun; Jeong, Je Hoon; Lee, Bora; Im, Soo Bin

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical association factors between osteoporosis and cerebral artery disease in Korean population. Two hundred nineteen postmenopausal women and men undergoing cerebral computed tomography angiography were enrolled in this study to evaluate the cerebral artery disease by cross-sectional study. Cerebral artery disease was diagnosed if there was narrowing of 50% higher diameter in one or more cerebral vessel artery or presence of vascular calcification. History of osteoporotic fracture was assessed using medical record, and radiographic data such as simple radiography, MRI, and bone scan. Bone mineral density was checked by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. We reviewed clinical characteristics in all patients and also performed subgroup analysis for total or extracranial/ intracranial cerebral artery disease group retrospectively. We performed statistical analysis by means of chi-square test or Fisher's exact test for categorical variables and Student's t-test or Wilcoxon's rank sum test for continuous variables. We also used univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess the factors associated with the prevalence of cerebral artery disease. A two-tailed p-value of less than 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. All statistical analyses were performed using R (version 3.1.3; The R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria) and SPSS (version 14.0; SPSS, Inc, Chicago, Ill, USA). Of the 219 patients, 142 had cerebral artery disease. All vertebral fracture was observed in 29 (13.24%) patients. There was significant difference in hip fracture according to the presence or absence of cerebral artery disease. In logistic regression analysis, osteoporotic hip fracture was significantly associated with extracranial cerebral artery disease after adjusting for multiple risk factors. Females with osteoporotic hip fracture were associated with total calcified cerebral artery

  9. Sulforaphane activates the cerebral vascular Nrf2-ARE pathway and suppresses inflammation to attenuate cerebral vasospasm in rat with subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xudong; Wen, Liting; Dong, Min; Lu, Xiaojie

    2016-12-15

    Nrf2-ARE pathway reportedly plays a protective role in several central nervous system diseases. No study has explored the role of the Nrf2-ARE pathway in cerebral vasospasm(CVS) after subarachnoid hemorrhage(SAH). The purpose of the present study was to investigate the activation of the cerebral vascular Nrf2-ARE pathway and to determine the potential role of this pathway in the development of CVS following SAH. We investigated whether the administration of sulforaphane (SFN, a specific Nrf2 activator) modulated vascular caliber, Nrf2-ARE pathway activity, proinflammatory cytokine expression, and clinical behavior in a rat model of SAH. A two-hemorrhage protocol was used to generate an animal model of SAH in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Administration of SFN to these rats following SAH enhanced the activity of the Nrf2-ARE pathway and suppressed the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Vasospasm was markedly attenuated in the basilar arteries after SFN therapy. Additionally, SFN administration significantly ameliorated two behavioral functions disrupted by SAH. These results suggest that SFN has a therapeutic benefit in post-SAH, and this may be due to elevated Nrf2-ARE pathway activity and inhibition of cerebral vascular proinflammatory cytokine expression.

  10. Psoriasis and vascular disease: an unsolved mystery.

    PubMed

    Shelling, Michael L; Federman, Daniel G; Prodanovich, Srdjan; Kirsner, Robert S

    2008-05-01

    Psoriasis is an immune disease most commonly recognized for its skin and joint manifestations. These produce significant physical, social, and psychological distress in affected patients and resultant reductions in their quality of life. As expected, these concerns are vital in providing symptomatic improvement and in selecting an individualized therapy. Yet, the approach in management of these patients is likely to change given the growing body of evidence linking psoriasis and vascular disease. Stemming from an anecdotally described relationship, the association between psoriasis and vascular disease has become a focus of current research to further elucidate the pathophysiology underlying and connecting these two diseases. This article includes a review of the classical cardiovascular risk factors, the atherothrombotic markers, and the environmental stressors associated with psoriasis, as well as a critical review of the observed vascular diseases, the proposed mechanism of atherosclerosis, and the benefits of treatment of psoriasis.

  11. Cerebral small vessel disease and incident parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    van der Holst, Helena M.; van Uden, Inge W.M.; Tuladhar, Anil M.; de Laat, Karlijn F.; van Norden, Anouk G.W.; Norris, David G.; van Dijk, Ewoud J.; Esselink, Rianne A.J.; Platel, Bram

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relation between baseline cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) and the risk of incident parkinsonism using different MRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures. Methods: In the Radboud University Nijmegen Diffusion Tensor and Magnetic Resonance Cohort (RUN DMC) study, a prospective cohort study, 503 elderly participants with SVD and without parkinsonism were included in 2006. During follow-up (2011–2012), parkinsonism was diagnosed according to UK Brain Bank criteria. Cox regression analysis was used to investigate the association between baseline imaging measures and incident all-cause parkinsonism and vascular parkinsonism (VP). Tract-based spatial statistics analysis was used to identify differences in baseline DTI measures of white matter (WM) tracts between participants with VP and without parkinsonism. Results: Follow-up was available from 501 participants (mean age 65.6 years; mean follow-up duration 5.2 years). Parkinsonism developed in 20 participants; 15 were diagnosed with VP. The 5-year risk of (any) parkinsonism was increased for those with a high white matter hyperintensity (WMH) volume (hazard ratio [HR] 1.8 per SD increase, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3–2.4) and a high number of lacunes (HR 1.4 per number increase, 95% CI 1.1–1.8) at baseline. For VP, this risk was also increased by the presence of microbleeds (HR 5.7, 95% CI 1.9–16.8) and a low gray matter volume (HR 0.4 per SD increase, 95% CI 0.2–0.8). Lower fractional anisotropy values in bifrontal WM tracts involved in movement control were observed in participants with VP compared to participants without parkinsonism. Conclusions: SVD at baseline, especially a high WMH volume and a high number of lacunes, is associated with incident parkinsonism. Our findings favor a role of SVD in the etiology of parkinsonism. PMID:26446068

  12. Structure and vascular function of MEKK3–cerebral cavernous malformations 2 complex

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Oriana S.; Deng, Hanqiang; Liu, Dou; Zhang, Ya; Wei, Rong; Deng, Yong; Zhang, Fan; Louvi, Angeliki; Turk, Benjamin E.; Boggon, Titus J.; Su, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations 2 (CCM2) loss is associated with the familial form of CCM disease. The protein kinase MEKK3 (MAP3K3) is essential for embryonic angiogenesis in mice and interacts physically with CCM2, but how this interaction is mediated and its relevance to cerebral vasculature are unknown. Here we report that Mekk3 plays an intrinsic role in embryonic vascular development. Inducible endothelial Mekk3 knockout in neonatal mice is lethal due to multiple intracranial haemorrhages and brain blood vessels leakage. We discover direct interaction between CCM2 harmonin homology domain (HHD) and the N terminus of MEKK3, and determine a 2.35 Å cocrystal structure. We find Mekk3 deficiency impairs neurovascular integrity, which is partially dependent on Rho–ROCK signalling, and that disruption of MEKK3:CCM2 interaction leads to similar neurovascular leakage. We conclude that CCM2:MEKK3-mediated regulation of Rho signalling is required for maintenance of neurovascular integrity, unravelling a mechanism by which CCM2 loss leads to disease. PMID:26235885

  13. Structure and vascular function of MEKK3–cerebral cavernous malformations 2 complex

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Oriana S.; Deng, Hanqiang; Liu, Dou; Zhang, Ya; Wei, Rong; Deng, Yong; Zhang, Fan; Louvi, Angeliki; Turk, Benjamin E.; Boggon, Titus J.; Su, Bing

    2015-08-03

    Cerebral cavernous malformations 2 (CCM2) loss is associated with the familial form of CCM disease. The protein kinase MEKK3 (MAP3K3) is essential for embryonic angiogenesis in mice and interacts physically with CCM2, but how this interaction is mediated and its relevance to cerebral vasculature are unknown. Here we report that Mekk3 plays an intrinsic role in embryonic vascular development. Inducible endothelial Mekk3 knockout in neonatal mice is lethal due to multiple intracranial haemorrhages and brain blood vessels leakage. We discover direct interaction between CCM2 harmonin homology domain (HHD) and the N terminus of MEKK3, and determine a 2.35 Å cocrystal structure. We find Mekk3 deficiency impairs neurovascular integrity, which is partially dependent on Rho–ROCK signalling, and that disruption of MEKK3:CCM2 interaction leads to similar neurovascular leakage. We conclude that CCM2:MEKK3-mediated regulation of Rho signalling is required for maintenance of neurovascular integrity, unravelling a mechanism by which CCM2 loss leads to disease.

  14. Cerebral/Peripheral Vascular Reactivity and Neurocognition in Middle-Age Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Tarumi, Takashi; Gonzales, Mitzi M.; Fallow, Bennett; Nualnim, Nantinee; Lee, Jeongseok; Pyron, Martha; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Haley, Andreana P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Midlife vascular disease risk is associated with higher incidence of cognitive impairment in late life. Regular aerobic exercise improves vascular function, which in turn may translate into better cognitive function. The purpose of this study was to determine the associations among cardiorespiratory fitness, cerebral and peripheral vascular reactivity, and cognitive function in the sedentary and endurance-trained middle-aged adults. Methods Thirty-two endurance-trained and 27 healthy sedentary participants aged 43–65 years underwent measurements of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), neurocognitive assessment, cerebrovascular reactivity to CO2 (CVR), and brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Results There were no group differences in age, sex, education level, fasting blood glucose, and blood pressure. Compared with sedentary subjects, endurance-trained athletes demonstrated better cognitive performance on memory (z-score: −0.36±1.11 vs. 0.30±0.76, P<0.01), attention-executive function (z-score: −0.21±0.53 vs. 0.18±0.72, P=0.02), and total cognitive composite scores (z-score: −0.27±0.63 vs. 0.23±0.57, P<0.01). Furthermore, brachial FMD (4.70±2.50 % vs. 7.13±3.09 %, P<0.01) and CVR (4.19±0.71 %/mmHg vs. 4.69±1.06 %/mmHg, P=0.052) were greater in endurance-trained individuals than in the sedentary subjects. Total cognitive composite scores showed a significant positive association with brachial FMD (r = 0.36, P < 0.01) and CVR (r = 0.30, P = 0.03). Finally, when brachial FMD and CVR were entered as covariates, fitness-related group differences in total cognitive composite score were significantly attenuated (all P>0.05). Conclusion Endurance-trained middle-aged adults demonstrated better cognitive performance which may, at least in part, be mediated by their enhanced vascular function, including cerebral and endothelial-dependent vascular reactivity. PMID:26083772

  15. Tobacco and vascular disease (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Tobacco use and exposure may cause an acceleration of coronary artery disease and peptic ulcer disease. It is also linked to reproductive disturbances, esophageal reflux, hypertension, fetal illness and death, and ...

  16. Emphysema: an autoimmune vascular disease?

    PubMed

    Voelkel, Norbert; Taraseviciene-Stewart, Laima

    2005-01-01

    We propose that an endogenous maintenance program controls lung cell turnover, apoptosis, and tissue repair, and that emphysema is a manifestation of the breakdown of the lung structure maintenance program. Emphysema can be induced experimentally in rats by three methods: blockade of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors using SU5416, a small molecule-tyrosine kinase inhibitor; methylprednisolone, which activates matrix metalloproteinase-9 and decreases Akt phosphorylation; and antibodies directed against endothelial cells (autoimmune emphysema). SU5416-induced emphysema is associated with lung induction of cytochrome P450 and oxidant stress, and a superoxide dismutase mimetic or N-acetylcysteine prevents this form of emphysema. A broad-spectrum metalloproteinase inhibitor prevents methylprednisolone-induced emphysema and, finally, autoimmune emphysema is associated with increased lung tissue metalloproteinase-9 expression and alveolar septal cell apoptosis. Athymic rats, which lack CD4+ T cells, are protected against autoimmune emphysema, whereas adoptive transfer of CD4+ T cells causes autoimmune emphysema in naive adult rats. It appears that vascular endothelial growth factor and signaling via its receptors plays a central role in the lung structural maintenance program, and oxidative stress, proteolysis, and apoptosis may coincide in the moment of lung cell destruction. Interestingly, the methylprednisolone model illustrates that inflammation is not necessary for the development of emphysema.

  17. Homocysteine and non-cardiac vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Katsiki, Niki; Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2017-03-17

    Elevated homocysteine (Hcy) levels are predictors of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Hyperhomocysteinemia has also been associated with total and CVD mortality. However, whether Hcy is just a marker or plays a causal role in CVD remains to be elucidated. In this narrative review, we discuss the associations between Hcy and non-cardiac vascular diseases, namely stroke, peripheral artery disease (PAD), carotid artery disease, chronic kidney disease (CKD), atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS), abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and erectile dysfunction (ED). The effects of several drugs on Hcy levels are also considered. Folic acid, vitamin B6 and B12 supplementation can significantly decrease circulating Hcy concentrations but their effects on CVD risk reduction are conflicting. No current guidelines recommend the routine screening of Hcy levels in patients with non-cardiac vascular diseases. Therefore, further research is needed to elucidate the use of Hcy in the clinical practice.

  18. Lysophosphatidic acid in vascular development and disease.

    PubMed

    Teo, Siew T; Yung, Yun C; Herr, Deron R; Chun, Jerold

    2009-08-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a small signaling lipid that is capable of stimulating a plethora of different cellular responses through the activation of its family of cognate G protein-coupled receptors. LPA mediates a wide range of biological effects in many tissue types that have been recently reviewed; however, its effects on vasculature development and function have received comparatively less examination. In this review, literature on the actions of LPA in three main aspects of vascular development (vasculogenesis, angiogenesis, and vascular maturation) is discussed. In addition, evidence for the roles of LPA signaling in the formation of secondary vascular structures, such as the blood brain barrier, is considered, consistent with significant roles for LPA signaling in vascular development, function, and disease.

  19. Nanoengineering of therapeutics for retinal vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Gahlaut, Nivriti; Suarez, Sandra; Uddin, Md Imam; Gordon, Andrew Y; Evans, Stephanie M; Jayagopal, Ashwath

    2015-09-01

    Retinal vascular diseases, including diabetic retinopathy, neovascular age related macular degeneration, and retinal vein occlusion, are leading causes of blindness in the Western world. These diseases share several common disease mechanisms, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling, hypoxia, and inflammation, which provide opportunities for common therapeutic strategies. Treatment of these diseases using laser therapy, anti-VEGF injections, and/or steroids has significantly improved clinical outcomes. However, these strategies do not address the underlying root causes of pathology, and may have deleterious side effects. Furthermore, many patients continue to progress toward legal blindness despite receiving regular therapy. Nanomedicine, the engineering of therapeutics at the 1-100 nm scale, is a promising approach for improving clinical management of retinal vascular diseases. Nanomedicine-based technologies have the potential to revolutionize the treatment of ophthalmology, through enabling sustained release of drugs over several months, reducing side effects due to specific targeting of dysfunctional cells, and interfacing with currently "undruggable" targets. We will discuss emerging nanomedicine-based applications for the treatment of complications associated with retinal vascular diseases, including angiogenesis and inflammation.

  20. Is Vasomotion in Cerebral Arteries Impaired in Alzheimer’s Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Di Marco, Luigi Yuri; Farkas, Eszter; Martin, Chris; Venneri, Annalena; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A substantial body of evidence supports the hypothesis of a vascular component in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Cerebral hypoperfusion and blood-brain barrier dysfunction have been indicated as key elements of this pathway. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a cerebrovascular disorder, frequent in AD, characterized by the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide in cerebral blood vessel walls. CAA is associated with loss of vascular integrity, resulting in impaired regulation of cerebral circulation, and increased susceptibility to cerebral ischemia, microhemorrhages, and white matter damage. Vasomotion— the spontaneous rhythmic modulation of arterial diameter, typically observed in arteries/arterioles in various vascular beds including the brain— is thought to participate in tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery regulation. Vasomotion is impaired in adverse conditions such as hypoperfusion and hypoxia. The perivascular and glymphatic pathways of Aβ clearance are thought to be driven by the systolic pulse. Vasomotion produces diameter changes of comparable amplitude, however at lower rates, and could contribute to these mechanisms of Aβ clearance. In spite of potential clinical interest, studies addressing cerebral vasomotion in the context of AD/CAA are limited. This study reviews the current literature on vasomotion, and hypothesizes potential paths implicating impaired cerebral vasomotion in AD/CAA. Aβ and oxidative stress cause vascular tone dysregulation through direct effects on vascular cells, and indirect effects mediated by impaired neurovascular coupling. Vascular tone dysregulation is further aggravated by cholinergic deficit and results in depressed cerebrovascular reactivity and (possibly) impaired vasomotion, aggravating regional hypoperfusion and promoting further Aβ and oxidative stress accumulation. PMID:25720414

  1. Semaphorin3A elevates vascular permeability and contributes to cerebral ischemia-induced brain damage.

    PubMed

    Hou, Sheng Tao; Nilchi, Ladan; Li, Xuesheng; Gangaraju, Sandhya; Jiang, Susan X; Aylsworth, Amy; Monette, Robert; Slinn, Jacqueline

    2015-01-20

    Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) increased significantly in mouse brain following cerebral ischemia. However, the role of Sema3A in stroke brain remains unknown. Our aim was to determine wether Sema3A functions as a vascular permeability factor and contributes to ischemic brain damage. Recombinant Sema3A injected intradermally to mouse skin, or stereotactically into the cerebral cortex, caused dose- and time-dependent increases in vascular permeability, with a degree comparable to that caused by injection of a known vascular permeability factor vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGF). Application of Sema3A to cultured endothelial cells caused disorganization of F-actin stress fibre bundles and increased endothelial monolayer permeability, confirming Sema3A as a permeability factor. Sema3A-mediated F-actin changes in endothelial cells were through binding to the neuropilin2/VEGFR1 receptor complex, which in turn directly activates Mical2, a F-actin modulator. Down-regulation of Mical2, using specific siRNA, alleviated Sema3A-induced F-actin disorganization, cellular morphology changes and endothelial permeability. Importantly, ablation of Sema3A expression, cerebrovascular permeability and brain damage were significantly reduced in response to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) and in a mouse model of cerebral ischemia/haemorrhagic transformation. Together, these studies demonstrated that Sema3A is a key mediator of cerebrovascular permeability and contributes to brain damage caused by cerebral ischemia.

  2. Protective or pathogenic effects of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as potential biomarker in cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    Canavese, Miriam; Spaccapelo, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is the major lethal complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection. It is characterized by persistent coma along with symmetrical motor signs. Several clinical, histopathological, and laboratory studies have suggested that cytoadherence of parasitized erythrocytes, neural injury by malarial toxin, and excessive inflammatory cytokine production are possible pathogenic mechanisms. Although the detailed pathophysiology of CM remains unsolved, it is thought that the binding of parasitized erythrocytes to the cerebral endothelia of microvessels, leading to their occlusion and the consequent angiogenic dysregulation play a key role in the disease pathogenesis. Recent evidences showed that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor-related molecules are over-expressed in the brain tissues of CM patients, as well as increased levels of VEGF are detectable in biologic samples from malaria patients. Whether the modulation of VEGF is causative agent of CM mortality or a specific phenotype of patients with susceptibility to fatal CM needs further evaluation. Currently, there is no biological test available to confirm the diagnosis of CM and its complications. It is hoped that development of biomarkers to identify patients and potential risk for adverse outcomes would greatly enhance better intervention and clinical management to improve the outcomes. We review and discuss here what it is currently known in regard to the role of VEGF in CM as well as VEGF as a potential biomarker. PMID:24601908

  3. Induction of hyperhomocysteinemia models vascular dementia by induction of cerebral microhemorrhages and neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sudduth, Tiffany L; Powell, David K; Smith, Charles D; Greenstein, Abigail; Wilcock, Donna M

    2013-01-01

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is the second leading cause of dementia behind Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is a frequent comorbidity with AD, estimated to occur in as many as 40% of AD patients. The causes of VaD are varied and include chronic cerebral hypoperfusion, microhemorrhages, hemorrhagic infarcts, or ischemic infarcts. We have developed a model of VaD by inducing hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) in wild-type mice. By placing wild-type mice on a diet deficient in folate, B6, and B12 and supplemented with excess methionine, we induced a moderate HHcy (plasma level homocysteine 82.93±3.561 μmol). After 11 weeks on the diet, the hyperhomocysteinemic mice showed a spatial memory deficit as assessed by the 2-day radial-arm water maze. Also, magnetic resonance imaging and subsequent histology revealed significant microhemorrhage occurrence. We found neuroinflammation induced in the hyperhomocysteinemic mice as determined by elevated interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, and IL-6 in brain tissue. Finally, we found increased expression and increased activity of the matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and MMP9 systems that are heavily implicated in the pathogenesis of cerebral hemorrhage. Overall, we have developed a dietary model of VaD that will be valuable for studying the pathophysiology of VaD and also for studying the comorbidity of VaD with other dementias and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:23361394

  4. Cerebral Hemodynamics and Vascular Reactivity in Mild and Severe Ischemic Rodent Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion Stroke Models

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Jeongeun; Jo, Areum; Kang, Bok-Man; Lee, Sohee; Bang, Oh Young; Heo, Chaejeong; Jhon, Gil-Ja; Lee, Youngmi

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia can cause decreased cerebral neurovascular coupling, leading to a failure in the autoregulation of cerebral blood flow. This study aims to investigate the effect of varying degrees of ischemia on cerebral hemodynamic reactivity using in vivo real-time optical imaging. We utilized direct cortical stimulation to elicit hyper-excitable neuronal activation, which leads to induced hemodynamic changes in both the normal and middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) ischemic stroke groups. Hemodynamic measurements from optical imaging accurately predict the severity of occlusion in mild and severe MCAO animals. There is neither an increase in cerebral blood volume nor in vessel reactivity in the ipsilateral hemisphere (I.H) of animals with severe MCAO. The pial artery in the contralateral hemisphere (C.H) of the severe MCAO group reacted more slowly than both hemispheres in the normal and mild MCAO groups. In addition, the arterial reactivity of the I.H in the mild MCAO animals was faster than the normal animals. Furthermore, artery reactivity is tightly correlated with histological and behavioral results in the MCAO ischemic group. Thus, in vivo optical imaging may offer a simple and useful tool to assess the degree of ischemia and to understand how cerebral hemodynamics and vascular reactivity are affected by ischemia. PMID:27358581

  5. Targeting heme oxygenase-1 in vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Durante, William

    2010-12-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) metabolizes heme to generate carbon monoxide (CO), biliverdin, and iron. Biliverdin is subsequently metabolized to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. HO-1 has recently emerged as a promising therapeutic target in the treatment of vascular disease. Pharmacological induction or gene transfer of HO-1 ameliorates vascular dysfunction in animal models of atherosclerosis, post-angioplasty restenosis, vein graft stenosis, thrombosis, myocardial infarction, and hypertension, while inhibition of HO-1 activity or gene deletion exacerbates these disorders. The vasoprotection afforded by HO-1 is largely attributable to its end products: CO and the bile pigments, biliverdin and bilirubin. These end products exert potent anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-apoptotic, and anti-thrombotic actions. In addition, CO and bile pigments act to preserve vascular homeostasis at sites of arterial injury by influencing the proliferation, migration, and adhesion of vascular smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, endothelial progenitor cells, or leukocytes. Several strategies are currently being developed to target HO-1 in vascular disease. Pharmacological induction of HO-1 by heme derivatives, dietary antioxidants, or currently available drugs, is a promising near-term approach, while HO-1 gene delivery is a long-term therapeutic goal. Direct administration of CO via inhalation or through the use of CO-releasing molecules and/or CO-sensitizing agents provides an attractive alternative approach in targeting HO-1. Furthermore, delivery of bile pigments, either alone or in combination with CO, presents another avenue for protecting against vascular disease. Since HO-1 and its products are potentially toxic, a major challenge will be to devise clinically effective therapeutic modalities that target HO-1 without causing any adverse effects.

  6. Hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis in patients of Dutch origin is related to Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    van Duinen, S.G.; Castano, E.M.; Prelli, F.; Bots, G.T.A.B.; Luyendijk, W.; Frangione, B.

    1987-08-01

    Hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis in Dutch patients is an autosomal dominant form of vascular amyloidosis restricted to the leptomeninges and cerebral cortex. Clinically the disease is characterized by cerebral hemorrhages leading to an early death. Immunohistochemical studies of five patients revealed that the vascular amyloid deposits reacted intensely with an antiserum raised against a synthetic peptide homologous to the Alzheimer disease-related ..beta..-protein. Silver stain-positive, senile plaque-like structures were also labeled by the antiserum, yet these lesions lacked the dense amyloid cores present in typical plaques of Alzheimer disease. No neurofibrillary tangles were present. Amyloid fibrils were purified from the leptomeningeal vessels of one patient who clinically had no signs of dementia. The protein had a molecular weight of approx. 4000 and its partial amino acid sequence to position 21 showed homology to the ..beta..-protein of Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome. These results suggest that hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis of Dutch origin is pathogenetically related to Alzheimer disease and support the concept that the initial amyloid deposition in this disorder occurs in the vessel walls before damaging the brain parenchyma. Thus, deposition of ..beta..-protein in brain tissue seems to be related to a spectrum of diseases involving vascular syndromes, progressive dementia, or both.

  7. Antioxidants prevent depletion of [Mg2+]i induced by alcohol in cultured canine cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells: possible relationship to alcohol-induced stroke.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Zheng, T; Altura, B T; Altura, B M

    2001-07-01

    Low serum concentrations of Mg(2+) ions have been reported, recently, in patients with coronary disease, atherosclerosis, and stroke as well as in patients with cerebral hemorrhage. The aim of the present study was to determine whether potent antioxidants [alpha-tocopherol and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC)] can prevent or ameliorate intracellular Mg(2+) ([Mg(2+)](i)) depletion associated with cerebral vascular injury induced by alcohol. Exposure of cultured canine cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells to alcohol (10-100 mM) for 24 h induced marked depletion in [Mg(2+)](i) (i.e., approximately 30-65%, depending upon alcohol concentration). Treatment of the cultured cells with either PDTC (0.1 microM) or alpha-tocopherol (15 microM) for 24 h, alone, failed to interfere with basal [Mg(2+)](i) levels. However, preincubation of the cells with either alpha-tocopherol or PDTC for 24 h completely inhibited the depletion of [Mg(2+)](i) induced by exposure to 10-100 mM ethanol. These results indicate that alpha-tocopherol and PDTC prevent decreases in [Mg(2+)](i) produced by ethanol. Moreover, these new results suggest that such protective effects of alpha-tocopherol and PDTC on cerebral vascular cells might be useful therapeutic tools in prevention and amelioration of cerebral vascular injury and stroke in alcoholics.

  8. Study of the Dynamics of Transcephalic Cerebral Impedance Data during Cardio-Vascular Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atefi, S. R.; Seoane, F.; Lindecrantz, K.

    2013-04-01

    Postoperative neurological deficits are one of the risks associated with cardio vascular surgery, necessitating development of new techniques for cerebral monitoring. In this study an experimental observation regarding the dynamics of transcephalic Electrical Bioimpedance (EBI) in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with and without extracorporeal circulation (ECC) was conducted to investigate the potential use of electrical Bioimpedance for cerebral monitoring in cardio vascular surgery. Tetrapolar transcephalic EBI measurements at single frequency of 50 kHz were recorded prior to and during cardio vascular surgery. The obtained results show that the transcephalic impedance decreases in both groups of patients as operation starts, however slight differences in these two groups were also observed with the cerebral impedance reduction in patients having no ECC being less common and not as pronounced as in the ECC group. Changes in the cerebral impedance were in agreement with changes of haematocrit and temperature. The origin of EBI changes is still unexplained however these results encourage us to continue investigating the application of electrical bioimpedance cerebral monitoring clinically.

  9. Vascular permeability and iron deposition biomarkers in longitudinal follow-up of cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Girard, Romuald; Fam, Maged D; Zeineddine, Hussein A; Tan, Huan; Mikati, Abdul Ghani; Shi, Changbin; Jesselson, Michael; Shenkar, Robert; Wu, Meijing; Cao, Ying; Hobson, Nicholas; Larsson, Henrik B W; Christoforidis, Gregory A; Awad, Issam A

    2016-08-05

    OBJECTIVE Vascular permeability and iron leakage are central features of cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) pathogenesis. The authors aimed to correlate prospective clinical behavior of CCM lesions with longitudinal changes in biomarkers of dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative permeability (DCEQP) and quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) assessed by MRI. METHODS Forty-six patients with CCMs underwent 2 or more permeability and/or susceptibility studies in conjunction with baseline and follow-up imaging and clinical surveillance during a mean 12.05 months of follow-up (range 2.4-31.27 months). Based on clinical and imaging features, cases/lesions were classified as stable, unstable, or recovering. Associated and predictive changes in quantitative permeability and susceptibility were investigated. RESULTS Lesional mean permeability and QSM values were not significantly different in stable versus unstable lesions at baseline. Mean lesional permeability in unstable CCMs with lesional bleeding or growth increased significantly (+85.9% change; p = 0.005), while mean permeability in stable and recovering lesions did not significantly change. Mean lesional QSM values significantly increased in unstable lesions (+44.1% change; p = 0.01), decreased slightly with statistical significance in stable lesions (-3.2% change; p = 0.003), and did not significantly change in recovering lesions. Familial cases developing new lesions during the follow-up period showed a higher background brain permeability at baseline (p = 0.001), as well as higher regional permeability (p = 0.003) in the area that would later develop a new lesion as compared with the homologous contralateral brain region. CONCLUSIONS In vivo assessment of vascular permeability and iron deposition on MRI can serve as objective and quantifiable biomarkers of disease activity in CCMs. This may be applied in natural history studies and may help calibrate clinical trials. The 2 techniques are likely applicable in

  10. Cerebral blood flow in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Roher, Alex E; Debbins, Josef P; Malek-Ahmadi, Michael; Chen, Kewei; Pipe, James G; Maze, Sharmeen; Belden, Christine; Maarouf, Chera L; Thiyyagura, Pradeep; Mo, Hua; Hunter, Jesse M; Kokjohn, Tyler A; Walker, Douglas G; Kruchowsky, Jane C; Belohlavek, Marek; Sabbagh, Marwan N; Beach, Thomas G

    2012-01-01

    Background Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia is a consequence of heterogeneous and complex interactions of age-related neurodegeneration and vascular-associated pathologies. Evidence has accumulated that there is increased atherosclerosis/arteriosclerosis of the intracranial arteries in AD and that this may be additive or synergistic with respect to the generation of hypoxia/ischemia and cognitive dysfunction. The effectiveness of pharmacologic therapies and lifestyle modification in reducing cardiovascular disease has prompted a reconsideration of the roles that cardiovascular disease and cerebrovascular function play in the pathogenesis of dementia. Methods Using two-dimensional phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging, we quantified cerebral blood flow within the internal carotid, basilar, and middle cerebral arteries in a group of individuals with mild to moderate AD (n = 8) and compared the results with those from a group of age-matched nondemented control (NDC) subjects (n = 9). Clinical and psychometric testing was performed on all individuals, as well as obtaining their magnetic resonance imaging-based hippocampal volumes. Results Our experiments reveal that total cerebral blood flow was 20% lower in the AD group than in the NDC group, and that these values were directly correlated with pulse pressure and cognitive measures. The AD group had a significantly lower pulse pressure (mean AD 48, mean NDC 71; P = 0.0004). A significant group difference was also observed in their hippocampal volumes. Composite z-scores for clinical, psychometric, hippocampal volume, and hemodynamic data differed between the AD and NDC subjects, with values in the former being significantly lower (t = 12.00, df = 1, P = 0.001) than in the latter. Conclusion These results indicate an association between brain hypoperfusion and the dementia of AD. Cardiovascular disease combined with brain hypoperfusion may participate in the pathogenesis/pathophysiology of neurodegenerative

  11. Visfatin and cardio-cerebro-vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Miao, Chao-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase is the rate-limiting enzyme that catalyzes the first step in the biosynthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide from nicotinamide. This protein was originally cloned as a putative pre-B cell colony-enhancing factor and also found to be a visceral fat-derived adipokine (visfatin). As a multifunctional protein, visfatin plays an important role in immunity, metabolism, aging, inflammation, and responses to stress. Visfatin also participates in several pathophysiological processes contributing to cardio-cerebro-vascular diseases, including hypertension, atherosclerosis, ischemic heart disease, and ischemic stroke. However, whether visfatin is a friend or a foe in these diseases remains uncertain. This brief review focuses on the current understanding of the complex role of visfatin in the cardio-cerebro-vascular system under normal and pathophysiological conditions.

  12. Vascular wall extracellular matrix proteins and vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junyan; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins form the basic structure of blood vessels. Along with providing basic structural support to blood vessels, matrix proteins interact with different sets of vascular cells via cell surface integrin or non-integrin receptors. Such interactions induce vascular cell de novo synthesis of new matrix proteins during blood vessel development or remodeling. Under pathological conditions, vascular matrix proteins undergo proteolytic processing, yielding bioactive fragments to influence vascular wall matrix remodeling. Vascular cells also produce alternatively spliced variants that induce vascular cell production of different matrix proteins to interrupt matrix homeostasis, leading to increased blood vessel stiffness; vascular cell migration, proliferation, or death; or vascular wall leakage and rupture. Destruction of vascular matrix proteins leads to vascular cell or blood-borne leukocyte accumulation, proliferation, and neointima formation within the vascular wall; blood vessels prone to uncontrolled enlargement during blood flow diastole; tortuous vein development; and neovascularization from existing pathological tissue microvessels. Here we summarize discoveries related to blood vessel matrix proteins within the past decade from basic and clinical studies in humans and animals — from expression to cross-linking, assembly, and degradation under physiological and vascular pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysms, varicose veins, and hypertension. PMID:25045854

  13. Correlation of CT cerebral vascular territories with function. 3. Middle cerebral artery

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, S.A.; Hayman, L.A.; Hinck, V.C.

    1984-05-01

    Schematic displays are presented of the cerebral territories supplied by branches of the middle cerebral artery as they would appear on axial and coronal computed tomographic (CT) scan sections. Companion diagrams of regional cortical function and a discussion of the fiber tracts are provided to simplify correlation of clinical deficits with coronal and axial CT abnormalities.

  14. Cerebral Blood Flow Heterogeneity in Preterm Sheep: Lack of Physiological Support for Vascular Boundary Zones in Fetal Cerebral White Matter

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Melissa; Riddle, Art; Manese, Mario; Luo, Ning Ling; Rorvik, Dawn A.; Kelly, Katherine A.; Barlow, Clyde H.; Kelly, Jeffrey J.; Vinecore, Kevin; Roberts, Colin; Hohimer, A. Roger; Back, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    Periventricular white matter (PVWM) injury is the leading cause of chronic neurological disability in survivors of prematurity. To address the role of cerebral ischemia in the pathogenesis of this injury, we tested the hypothesis that immaturity of spatially distal vascular “end” or “border” zones predisposes the PVWM to be more susceptible to falls in cerebral blood flow (CBF) than more proximal regions, such as the cerebral cortex. We used fluorescently-labeled microspheres to quantify regional CBF in situ in the 0.65 gestation fetal sheep in histopathologically-defined 3-dimensional regions by means of post hoc digital dissection and co-registration algorithms. Basal flow in PVWM was significantly lower than gyral white matter and cerebral cortex, but was equivalent in superficial, middle and deep PVWM. Absolute and relative CBF (expressed as percentage of basal) CBF did not differ during ischemia or reperfusion between the PVWM and more superficial gyral white matter or cortex. Moreover, CBF during ischemia and reperfusion was equivalent at three distinct levels of the PVWM. Absolute and relative CBF during ischemia and reperfusion was not predictive of the severity of PVWM injury, as defined by TUNEL staining. However, the magnitude of ischemia to the cerebral cortex directly correlated with lesion severity (r= −0.48, p<.05). Hence, the PVWM did not display unique CBF disturbances that accounted for the distribution of injury. These results suggest that previously-defined cellular-maturational factors have a greater influence on the vulnerability of PVWM to ischemic injury than the presence of immature vascular-boundary zones. PMID:18091757

  15. Human apolipoprotein E ɛ4 expression impairs cerebral vascularization and blood–brain barrier function in mice

    PubMed Central

    Alata, Wael; Ye, Yue; St-Amour, Isabelle; Vandal, Milène; Calon, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Human apolipoprotein E (APOE) exists in three isoforms ɛ2, ɛ3, and ɛ4, of which APOE4 is the main genetic risk factor of Alzheimer's disease (AD). As cerebrovascular defects are associated with AD, we tested whether APOE genotype has an impact on the integrity and function of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) in human APOE-targeted replacement mice. Using the quantitative in situ brain perfusion technique, we first found lower (13.0% and 17.0%) brain transport coefficient (Clup) of [3H]-diazepam in APOE4 mice at 4 and 12 months, compared with APOE2 and APOE3 mice, reflecting a decrease in cerebral vascularization. Accordingly, results from immunohistofluorescence experiments revealed a structurally reduced cerebral vascularization (26% and 38%) and thinner basement membranes (30% and 35%) in 12-month-old APOE4 mice compared with APOE2 and APOE3 mice, suggesting vascular atrophy. In addition, APOE4 mice displayed a 29% reduction in [3H]-d-glucose transport through the BBB compared with APOE2 mice without significant changes in the expression of its transporter GLUT1 in brain capillaries. However, an increase of 41.3% of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) was found in brain capillaries of 12-month-old APOE4 mice. In conclusion, profound divergences were observed between APOE genotypes at the cerebrovascular interface, suggesting that APOE4-induced BBB anomalies may contribute to AD development. PMID:25335802

  16. Mediterranean Diet, Alzheimer Disease, and Vascular Mediation

    PubMed Central

    Scarmeas, Nikolaos; Stern, Yaakov; Mayeux, Richard; Luchsinger, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To examine the association between the Mediterranean diet (MeDi) and Alzheimer disease (AD) in a different AD population and to investigate possible mediation by vascular pathways. Design, Setting, Patients, and Main Outcome Measures A case-control study nested within a community-based cohort in New York, NY. Adherence to the MeDi (0- to 9-point scale with higher scores indicating higher adherence) was the main predictor of AD status (194 patients with AD vs 1790 nondemented subjects) in logistic regression models that were adjusted for cohort, age, sex, ethnicity, education, apolipoprotein E genotype, caloric intake, smoking, medical comorbidity index, and body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared). We investigated whether there was attenuation of the association between MeDi and AD when vascular variables (stroke, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, heart disease, lipid levels) were simultaneously introduced in the models (which would constitute evidence of mediation). Results Higher adherence to the MeDi was associated with lower risk for AD (odds ratio, 0.76; 95% confidence interval, 0.67–0.87; P<.001). Compared with subjects in the lowest MeDi tertile, subjects in the middle MeDi tertile had an odds ratio of 0.47 (95% confidence interval, 0.29–0.76) and those at the highest tertile an odds ratio of 0.32 (95% confidence interval, 0.17–0.59) for AD (P for trend <.001). Introduction of the vascular variables in the model did not change the magnitude of the association. Conclusions We note once more that higher adherence to the MeDi is associated with a reduced risk for AD. The association does not seem to be mediated by vascular comorbidity. This could be the result of either other biological mechanisms (oxidative or inflammatory) being implicated or measurement error of the vascular variables. PMID:17030648

  17. Cerebral vascular findings in PAPA syndrome: cerebral arterial vasculopathy or vasculitis and a posterior cerebral artery dissecting aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Khatibi, Kasra; Heit, Jeremy J; Telischak, Nicholas A; Elbers, Jorina M; Do, Huy M

    2015-06-24

    A young patient with PAPA (pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne) syndrome developed an unusual cerebral arterial vasculopathy/vasculitis (CAV) that resulted in subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured dissecting posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysm. This aneurysm was successfully treated by endovascular coil sacrifice of the affected segment of the PCA. The patient made an excellent recovery with no significant residual neurologic deficit.

  18. Cerebral vascular findings in PAPA syndrome: cerebral arterial vasculopathy or vasculitis and a posterior cerebral artery dissecting aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Khatibi, Kasra; Heit, Jeremy J; Telischak, Nicholas A; Elbers, Jorina M; Do, Huy M

    2016-08-01

    A young patient with PAPA (pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne) syndrome developed an unusual cerebral arterial vasculopathy/vasculitis (CAV) that resulted in subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured dissecting posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysm. This aneurysm was successfully treated by endovascular coil sacrifice of the affected segment of the PCA. The patient made an excellent recovery with no significant residual neurologic deficit.

  19. The Association of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus with Cerebral Gray Matter Volume Is Independent of Retinal Vascular Architecture and Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Moran, C.; Tapp, R. J.; Hughes, A. D.; Magnussen, C. G.; Blizzard, L.; Phan, T. G.; Beare, R.; Witt, N.; Venn, A.; Münch, G.; Amaratunge, B. C.; Srikanth, V.

    2016-01-01

    It is uncertain whether small vessel disease underlies the relationship between Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) and brain atrophy. We aimed to study whether retinal vascular architecture, as a proxy for cerebral small vessel disease, may modify or mediate the associations of T2DM with brain volumes. In this cross-sectional study using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans and retinal photographs in 451 people with and without T2DM, we measured brain volumes, geometric measures of retinal vascular architecture, clinical retinopathy, and MRI cerebrovascular lesions. There were 270 people with (mean age 67.3 years) and 181 without T2DM (mean age 72.9 years). T2DM was associated with lower gray matter volume (p = 0.008). T2DM was associated with greater arteriolar diameter (p = 0.03) and optimality ratio (p = 0.04), but these associations were attenuated by adjustments for age and sex. Only optimality ratio was associated with lower gray matter volume (p = 0.03). The inclusion of retinal measures in regression models did not attenuate the association of T2DM with gray matter volume. The association of T2DM with lower gray matter volume was independent of retinal vascular architecture and clinical retinopathy. Retinal vascular measures or retinopathy may not be sufficiently sensitive to confirm a microvascular basis for T2DM-related brain atrophy. PMID:27314049

  20. The effect of ASK1 on vascular permeability and edema formation in cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Song, Juhyun; Cheon, So Yeong; Lee, Won Taek; Park, Kyung Ah; Lee, Jong Eun

    2015-01-21

    Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase-1 (ASK1) is the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) and participates in the various central nervous system (CNS) signaling pathways. In cerebral ischemia, vascular permeability in the brain is an important issue because regulation failure of it results in edema formation and blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. To determine the role of ASK1 on vascular permeability and edema formation following cerebral ischemia, we first investigated ASK1-related gene expression using microarray analyses of ischemic brain tissue. We then measured protein levels of ASK1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in brain endothelial cells after hypoxia injury. We also examined protein expression of ASK1 and VEGF, edema formation, and morphological alteration through cresyl violet staining in ischemic brain tissue using ASK1-small interference RNA (ASK1-siRNA). Finally, immunohistochemistry was performed to examine VEGF and aquaporin-1 (AQP-1) expression in ischemic brain injury. Based on our findings, we propose that ASK1 is a regulating factor of vascular permeability and edema formation in cerebral ischemia.

  1. Kienböck's disease in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, C; Xarchas, C

    1998-12-01

    The incidence of Kienböck's disease is known to be higher in cerebral palsy patients, but little has been written on treatment. We report a case of Kienböck's disease in a young man affected by cerebral palsy. A proximal row carpectomy was done, which relieved spasticity at the same time as treating the disease.

  2. Determination of Vascular Reactivity of Middle Cerebral Arteries from Stroke and Spinal Cord Injury Animal Models Using Pressure Myography.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Mohammad A; Eid, Ali H

    2016-01-01

    Stroke and other neurovascular derangements are main causes of global death. They, along with spinal cord injuries, are responsible for being the principal cause of disability due to neurological and cognitive problems. These problems then lead to a burden on scarce financial resources and societal care facilities as well as have a profound effect on patients' families. The mechanism of action in these debilitating diseases is complex and unclear. An important component of these problems arises from derangement of blood vessels, such as blockage due to clotting/embolism, endothelial dysfunction, and overreactivity to contractile agents, as well as alteration in endothelial permeability. Moreover, the cerebro-vasculature (large vessels and arterioles) is involved in regulating blood flow by facilitating auto-regulatory processes. Moreover, the anterior (middle cerebral artery and the surrounding region) and posterior (basilar artery and its immediate locality) regions of the brain play a significant role in triggering the pathological progression of ischemic stroke particularly due to inflammatory activity and oxidative stress. Interestingly, modifiable and non-modifiable cardiovascular risk factors are responsible for driving ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke and spinal cord injury. There are different stroke animal models to examine the pathophysiology of middle cerebral and basilar arteries. In this context, arterial myography offers an opportunity to determine the etiology of vascular dysfunction in these diseases. Herein, we describe the technique of pressure myography to examine the reactivity of cerebral vessels to contractile and vasodilator agents and a prelude to stroke and spinal cord injury.

  3. Occludin is overexpressed in Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Romanitan, Mihaela Oana; Popescu, Bogdan O; Winblad, Bengt; Bajenaru, Ovidiu Alexandru; Bogdanovic, Nenad

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The tight junctions (TJs) are key players in the control of blood-brain barrier (BBB) properties, the most complex TJs in the vascular system being found in the endothelial cells of brain capillaries. One of the main TJs proteins is occludin, which anchors plasma membranes of neighbour cells and is present in large amounts in the brain endothelia. Previous studies demonstrated that disruption of BBB in various pathological situations associates with changes in occludin expression, and this change could be responsible for malfunction of BBB. Therefore in this study, applying an immunohistochemical approach, we decided to explore the occludin expression in frontal cortex (FC) and basal ganglia in ageing control, Alzheimer's disease (AD), and vascular dementia (VD) brains, as far as all these pathologies associate microangiopathy and disruption of BBB. Strikingly, we found selected neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes expressing occludin, in all cases studied. To estimate the number of occludin-expressing neurons, we applied a stereological approach with random systematic sampling and the unbiased optical fractionator method. We report here a significant increase in ratio of occludin-expressing neurons in FC and basal ganglia regions in both AD and VD as compared to ageing controls. Within the cerebral cortex, occludin was selectively expressed by pyramidal neurons, which are the ones responsible for cognitive processes and affected by AD pathology. Our findings could be important in unravelling new pathogenic pathways in dementia disorders and new functions of occludin and TJs. PMID:17635647

  4. Small white matter lesion detection in cerebral small vessel disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafoorian, Mohsen; Karssemeijer, Nico; van Uden, Inge; de Leeuw, Frank E.; Heskes, Tom; Marchiori, Elena; Platel, Bram

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a common finding on magnetic resonance images of elderly people. White matter lesions (WML) are important markers for not only the small vessel disease, but also neuro-degenerative diseases including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. Volumetric measurements such as the "total lesion load", have been studied and related to these diseases. With respect to SVD we conjecture that small lesions are important, as they have been observed to grow over time and they form the majority of lesions in number. To study these small lesions they need to be annotated, which is a complex and time-consuming task. Existing (semi) automatic methods have been aimed at volumetric measurements and large lesions, and are not suitable for the detection of small lesions. In this research we established a supervised voxel classification CAD system, optimized and trained to exclusively detect small WMLs. To achieve this, several preprocessing steps were taken, which included a robust standardization of subject intensities to reduce inter-subject intensity variability as much as possible. A number of features that were found to be well identifying small lesions were calculated including multimodal intensities, tissue probabilities, several features for accurate location description, a number of second order derivative features as well as multi-scale annular filter for blobness detection. Only small lesions were used to learn the target concept via Adaboost using random forests as its basic classifiers. Finally the results were evaluated using Free-response receiver operating characteristic.

  5. [The family: the support for the elderly with cerebral-vascular accident].

    PubMed

    Guimarães Andrade, Oséias; Partezani Rodríguez, Rosalina Aparecida

    2005-12-01

    This project had these objectives: 1) understand the reality of the family care system for an elderly person suffering from cerebral-vascular accident (CVA), 2) implement an aid to the family care system for an elderly person suffering from cerebral-vascular accident (CVA) from a holistic perspective on health. The sample for this investigation was composed by five families which were intentionally selected, with whom the authors shared the care of an elderly person suffering from CVA in their homes over a six month period. Based on concepts having a holistic reference about health formulated by Capra, the authors drew up the development of a methodology for research and action which has a participatory observation and a Drawing-Record procedural technique for the production of data. These data were subjected to a thematic analysis which made it possible to identify three main themes: 1) the main caretaker as the focus of the family care system; 2) the family care system as a context which has complexities and singularities, 3) the holistic nature of the family care system for an eldely person suffering from cerebral-vascular accident (CVA).

  6. Ryanodine receptors, calcium signaling and regulation of vascular tone in the cerebral parenchymal microcirculation

    PubMed Central

    Dabertrand, Fabrice; Nelson, Mark T.; Brayden, Joseph E.

    2012-01-01

    The cerebral blood supply is delivered by a surface network of pial arteries and arterioles from which arise (parenchymal) arterioles that penetrate into the cortex and terminate in a rich capillary bed. The critical regulation of cerebral blood flow, locally and globally, requires precise vasomotor regulation of the intracerebral microvasculature. This vascular region is anatomically unique as illustrated by the presence of astrocytic processes that envelope almost the entire basolateral surface of parenchymal arterioles. There are, moreover, notable functional differences between pial arteries and parenchymal arterioles. For example, in pial vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), local calcium release events (“calcium sparks”) through ryanodine receptor (RyR) channels in sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane activate large conductance, calcium-sensitive potassium (BK) channels to modulate vascular diameter. In contrast, VSMCs in parenchymal arterioles express functional RyR and BK channels, but under physiological conditions these channels do not oppose pressure-induced vasoconstriction. Here we summarize the roles of ryanodine receptors in the parenchymal microvasculature under physiologic and pathologic conditions, and discuss their importance in the control of cerebral blood flow. PMID:23216877

  7. Both acute and prolonged administration of EPO reduce cerebral and systemic vascular conductance in humans.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Peter; Kim, Yu-Sok; Krogh-Madsen, Rikke; Lundby, Carsten; Olsen, Niels V; Secher, Niels H; van Lieshout, Johannes J

    2012-03-01

    Administration of erythropoietin (EPO) has been linked to cerebrovascular events. EPO reduces vascular conductance, possibly because of the increase in hematocrit. Whether EPO in itself affects the vasculature remains unknown; here it was evaluated in healthy males by determining systemic and cerebrovascular variables following acute (30,000 IU/d for 3 d; n=8) and chronic (5000 IU/week for 13 wk; n=8) administration of EPO, while the responsiveness of the vasculature was challenged during cycling exercise, with and without hypoxia. Prolonged administration of EPO increased hematocrit from 42.5 ± 3.7 to 47.6 ± 4.1% (P<0.01), whereas hematocrit was unaffected following acute EPO administration. Yet, the two EPO regimes increased arterial pressure similarly (by 8±4 and 7±3 mmHg, respectively; P=0.01) through reduced vascular conductance (by 7±3 and 5±2%; P<0.05). Also, both EPO regimes widened the arterial-to-jugular O(2) differences at rest as well as during normoxic and hypoxic exercise (P<0.01), which indicated reduced cerebral blood flow despite preserved dynamic cerebral autoregulation, and an increase in middle cerebral artery mean blood flow velocity (P<0.05), therefore, reflected vasoconstriction. Thus, administration of EPO to healthy humans lowers systemic and cerebral conductance independent of its effect on hematocrit.

  8. [Cerebro-vascular emergencies: cerebral and meningeal hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Philippon, Jacques

    2002-01-01

    Intracerebral haemorrhage is the most dramatic, even if not the most frequent among cerebrovascular emergencies. However the improved treatment of arterial hypertension has decreased its frequency. Modern neuroradiological methods have led to an easier diagnosis, but the best choice for treatment (medical or surgical) is still debated. Decision must be based upon different factors, the most important of which are clinical condition volume, and location of haemorrhage. If the general prognosis has been improved by the transfer to specialized Units, wherein such are available, the benefit of surgery, while indispensable in some cases, has yet to be demonstrated by prospective studies. The problem is far different in subarachnoïd haemorrhage due to rupture of a vascular malformation: the necessity of a rapid treatment by surgery or embolization is largely admitted except for those patients in a bad clinical conditions.

  9. The arterial circle of Willis of the mouse helps to decipher secrets of cerebral vascular accidents in the human.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, Shinichi; Okuyama, Jun; Okuyama, Junko; Tamatsu, Yuichi; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Hoshi, Hajime; Iwai, Junichi

    2004-01-01

    The human brain represents an elaborate product of hominizing evolution. Likewise, its supporting vasculature may also embody evolutionary consequences. Thus, it is conceivable that the human tendency to develop cerebral vascular accidents (CVAs) might represent a disease of hominization. In a search for hominizing changes on the arterial circle of Willis (hWAC), we attempted an anatomical comparison of the hWAC with that of the mouse (mWAC) by injecting aliquots of resin into the vasculature of the mouse and then creating vascular endocasts of the mWAC. The internal carotid artery of the mouse (mICA) unites with the mWAC midway between the middle cerebral artery (mMCA) and posterior cerebral artery (mPCA). The mWAC does not complete a circle: the mWAC nourishes the anterior portion of the circle which branches out to the olfactory artery (OlfA) and mPCA, along with the mMCA, and the basilar artery (mBA) does not connect to the mPCA. The OlfA is thicker than the mMCA. The relative brain weight of the mouse was 74 g on average for a 60 kg male and 86 g for a 60 kg female, respectively, as compared with 1424 g for a 60 kg man. These findings are consistent with the mouse being a nocturnal carnivore that lives on olfactory information in contrast to the human that lives diurnally and depends on visual and auditory information. In man, the human ICA (hICA) unites with the hWAC at a point where the human middle cerebral artery (hMCA) branches out, and thus, blood from the hICA does not flow through the hWAC but drains into the hMCA directly. The hMCA is thicker than the anterior cerebral artery. The hPCA receives blood from the hBA rather than from the hICA, and thus, the entire hWAC forms a closed circuit. Since the hICA drains directly into the hMCA without flowing a distance through the hWAC, the capacitor and equalizer functions of the WAC will be mitigated so much that the resultant hemodynamic changes would render the hMCA more likely to contribute to CVAs. Thus

  10. Vascular Manifestations of von Recklinghausen's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fye, Kenneth H.; Jacobs, Richard P.; Roe, Robert L.

    1975-01-01

    A casual relationship between von Recklinghausen's disease, or neurofibromatosis, and arteriolar abnormalities has been reported in the European literature. A patient was seen who had biopsy-proved neurofibromatosis and renovascular hypertension and retroperitoneal bleeding. An arteriographic study showed multiple small aneurysms throughout the coeliac axis, the superior mesenteric artery and in several small intrarenal vessels. Renal vein renin levels were elevated particularly in the right renal vein, supporting the diagnosis of renovascular hypertension. Both the aneurysms seen in angiographic studies and the retroperitoneal hemorrhage are probably vascular manifestations of von Recklinghausen's disease. Support for this conclusion is enhanced by the absence of clinical, laboratory or histologic data supporting the only tenable differential diagnosis, periarteritis nodosa. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:803743

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Plaque Burden in Vascular Walls of the Middle Cerebral Artery Correlates with Cerebral Infarction.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Chen, Qian-Xue; Chen, Zhi-Biao; Tian, Dao-Feng; Cai, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerosis may be related to the risk of ischemic stroke. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (H-R MRI) makes it possible to measure the intracranial atheroma in vivo. The aim of this study was to evaluate the plaque burden of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) using H-R MRI, and to determine its relationship with both cerebral infarction size and plaque burden in the carotid artery (CA). 54 patients with MCA territory infarction were enrolled and HR-MRI was performed within 7 days following stroke onset. The lumen area (LA), wall area (WA), total vessel area (TVA), and the normalized wall index (NWI) of MCA and CA were measured. We analyzed the status of MCA and CA atheroma, and the size of cerebral infarction, in the corresponding vascular territory. We observed a significant positive correlation between the NWI of the index artery and the volume of the ipsilateral ischemic lesions. In addition, the mean NWI of MCA was significantly correlated with that of the ipsilateral CA (left, r = 0.88, P.0.001; right, r = 0.79, P.0.001), and the plaque burden of the M1 segment of MCA was significantly higher than that of the ipsilateral CA (P < 0.05). There was no significant correlation between the TVA and WA of MCA and that of CA. Our findings suggest that MCA atherosclerosis is significantly correlated with cerebral infarction. In ischemic stroke patients, the plaque burden of M1 segment of MCA is more significant than that of CA.

  12. Clinical Decision Support for Vascular Disease in Community Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Keshavjee, K; Holbrook, AM; Lau, E; Esporlas-Jewer, I; Troyan, S

    2006-01-01

    The COMPETE III Vascular Disease Tracker (C3VT) is a personalized, Web-based, clinical decision support tool that provides patients and physicians access to a patient’s 16 individual vascular risk markers, specific advice for each marker and links to best practices in vascular disease management. It utilizes the chronic care model1 so that physicians can better manage patients with chronic diseases. Over 1100 patients have been enrolled into the COMPETE III study to date.

  13. [Inflammatory cerebro-vascular disease: angiographic findings and distribution patterns (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Stoeter, P; Ortega-Suhrkamp, E; Voigt, K

    1975-12-01

    Although cerebral angiography should be approached with caution in the diagnosis of inflammatory cerebro-vascular disease there are some characteristic angiographic findings which may be helpful for classification and differential diagnosis. The proximal cerebral arteries are favourably affected by basal meningitis and thrombangiitis obliterans with resulting stenoses and occlusions. Whereas those inflammations originating from neighbouring skull structures mostly involve the intracavernous parts of the carotid artery, the tuberculous and mycotic arteritis prefer the supraclinoid carotid siphon. Peripheral vascular changes are found in luetic endangiitis, necrotizing and toxic angiitis and in collagenoses. Simultaneous involvement of the temporal arteries is of great diagnostic importance demonstrating the systemic character of the inflammatory process; in Horton's arteritis it can be a pathognomonic finding. Infectious endocarditis, some mycoses and malaria may lead to embolic occlusion of cerebral vessels. Mycotic aneurysms mostly have a broad base or a fusiform shape and do not prefer the localizations of congenital aneurysms. Angiographically, abscesses, tuberculomas and viral encephalitis may result in circumscribed hypervascularized areas. The characteristic angiographic findings are exemplified and discussed on the basis of 8 cases of inflammatory cerebro-vascular disease (tuberculosis, pneumococcal and unspecific bacterial meningitis, syphilis, mycosis, Takayasu-syndrome, panarteritis nodosa, temporal arteritis).

  14. Antenatal betamethasone alters vascular reactivity in adult female ovine cerebral arteries.

    PubMed

    Eckman, Delrae M; Kerr, Brady A; Fuloria, Mamta; Simandle, Steve A; Watt, Suzanne E; Rose, James C; Figueroa, Jorge P

    2010-10-01

    Although the use of antenatal glucocorticoids has resulted in decreased neonatal morbidity/mortality, recent animal studies have raised concerns regarding adverse effects of these medications on postnatal cardiovascular function. We hypothesized that antenatal betamethasone (Beta) exposure alters cerebral vascular reactivity in adult female sheep. We observed that K-induced constriction was comparable in middle cerebral artery (MCA) from Beta-exposed animals and age-matched controls. Pressure-induced constriction was significantly attenuated in MCA from Beta-exposed compared with control sheep. Inhibition of NOS significantly augmented pressure-induced constriction in MCA from both Beta-exposed and control sheep, whereas cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition augmented pressure-induced constriction only in MCA from Beta-exposed sheep. Furthermore, NOS and COX inhibition significantly attenuated bradykinin (BK)-induced dilation in MCA from both Beta-exposed and control sheep. However, there seemed to be a greater contribution of both NOS and COX to BK-induced dilation in Beta-exposed compared with control MCA. Our findings demonstrate that fetal exposure to a clinically relevant course of Beta alters cerebral vascular tone and reactivity in adult female sheep.

  15. Cerebral Cortex Structure in Prodromal Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nopoulos, Peggy C.; Aylward, Elizabeth H.; Ross, Christopher A.; Johnson, Hans J.; Magnotta, Vincent A.; Juhl, Andrew R.; Pierson, Ronald K.; Mills, James; Langbehn, Douglas R.; Paulsen, Jane S.

    2010-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of subjects who are gene-expanded for Huntington Disease, but not yet diagnosed (termed prodromal HD), report that the cortex is “spared,” despite the decrement in striatal and cerebral white-matter volume. Measurement of whole-cortex volume can mask more subtle, but potentially clinically relevant regional changes in volume, thinning, or surface area. The current study addressed this limitation by evaluating cortical morphology of 523 prodromal HD subjects. Participants included 693 individuals enrolled in the PREDICT-HD protocol. Of these participants, 523 carried the HD gene mutation (prodromal HD group); the remaining 170 were non gene-expanded and served as the comparison group. Based on age and CAG repeat length, gene-expanded subjects were categorized as “Far from onset,” “Midway to onset,” “Near onset,” and “already diagnosed.” MRI scans were processed using FreeSurfer. Cortical volume, thickness, and surface area were not significantly different between the Far from onset group and controls. However, beginning in the Midway to onset group, the cortex showed significant volume decrement, affecting most the posterior and superior cerebral regions. This pattern progressed when evaluating the groups further into the disease process. Areas that remained mostly unaffected included ventral and medial regions of the frontal and temporal cortex. Morphologic changes were mostly in thinning as surface area did not substantially change in most regions. Early in the course of HD, the cortex shows changes that are manifest as cortical thinning and are most robust in the posterior and superior regions of the cerebrum. PMID:20688164

  16. Blood and CSF biomarkers in brain subcortical ischemic vascular disease: Involved pathways and clinical applicability

    PubMed Central

    Vilar-Bergua, A; Riba-Llena, I; Nafría, C; Bustamante, A; Llombart, V; Delgado, P

    2016-01-01

    Vascular dementia is the second most common type of dementia after Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Subcortical ischemic vascular disease refers to a form of vascular cognitive impairment characterized by the presence of diffuse white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) and multiple lacunar infarcts. These neuroimaging findings are mainly caused by cerebral small-vessel disease (cSVD) and relate to aging and cognitive impairment, but they can also be silent and highly prevalent in otherwise healthy individuals. We aimed to review studies on blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers related to the presence of WMHs and lacunar infarcts that have been conducted in the past in large population-based studies and in high-risk selected patients (such as those with vascular risk factors, vascular cognitive impairment, or AD). Relevant associations with the presence and progression of cSVD have been described in the blood for markers related to inflammatory processes, endothelial damage and coagulation/fibrinolysis processes, etc. Also, different combinations of CSF markers might help to differentiate between etiologic types of dementia. In the future, to translate these findings into clinical practice and use biomarkers to early diagnosis and monitoring vascular cognitive impairment would require the replication of candidate markers in large-scale, multicenter, and prospectively designed studies. PMID:25899297

  17. Cerebral vascular amyloid seeds drive amyloid β-protein fibril assembly with a distinct anti-parallel structure

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Fu, Ziao; Dass, Sharmila; Kotarba, AnnMarie E.; Davis, Judianne; Smith, Steven O.; Van Nostrand, William E.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrovascular accumulation of amyloid β-protein (Aβ), a condition known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), is a common pathological feature of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Familial Aβ mutations, such as Dutch-E22Q and Iowa-D23N, can cause severe cerebrovascular accumulation of amyloid that serves as a potent driver of vascular cognitive impairment and dementia. The distinctive features of vascular amyloid that underlie its unique pathological properties remain unknown. Here, we use transgenic mouse models producing CAA mutants (Tg-SwDI) or overproducing human wild-type Aβ (Tg2576) to demonstrate that CAA-mutant vascular amyloid influences wild-type Aβ deposition in brain. We also show isolated microvascular amyloid seeds from Tg-SwDI mice drive assembly of human wild-type Aβ into distinct anti-parallel β-sheet fibrils. These findings indicate that cerebrovascular amyloid can serve as an effective scaffold to promote rapid assembly and strong deposition of Aβ into a unique structure that likely contributes to its distinctive pathology. PMID:27869115

  18. Uric Acid, Hyperuricemia and Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ming; Yang, Fan; Yang, Irene; Yin, Ying; Luo, Jin Jun; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Uric acid is the product of purine metabolism. It is known that hyperuricemia, defined as high levels of blood uric acid, is the major etiological factor of gout. A number of epidemiological reports have increasingly linked hyperuricemia with cardiovascular and neurological diseases. Studies highlighting the pathogenic mechanisms of uric acid point to an inflammatory response as the primary mechanism for inducing gout and possibly contributing to uric acid's vascular effects. Monosodium urate (MSU) crystals induce an inflammatory reaction, which are recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLRs). These TLRs then activate NALP3 inflammasome. MSU also triggers neutrophil activation and further produces immune mediators, which lead to a proinflammatory response. In addition, soluble uric acid can also mediate the generation of free radicals and function as a pro-oxidant. This review summarizes the epidemiological studies of hyperuricemia and cardiovascular disease, takes a brief look at hyperuricemia and its role in neurological diseases, and highlights the studies of the advanced pathological mechanisms of uric acid and inflammation. PMID:22201767

  19. Microvasculature of the cerebral cortex: a vascular corrosion cast and immunocytochemical study.

    PubMed

    Scala, Gaetano

    2014-04-01

    In mammals, the cerebral cortex microvasculature (CCM) of the neopallium plays important roles in the physiological and pathological processes of the brain. The aim of the present work is to analyze the CCM by use of the SEM-vascular corrosion cast technique, and to examine the immunocytochemical characteristics of the CCM in adult domestic ruminants (cattle, buffalo, and sheep) by using the SEM-immunogold technique. The CCM originated from the very small, finger-like terminal branches of the macrovasculature of the brain. The superficial cortical arterioles were more numerous than the deep straight arterioles which proceeded toward the white matter. The surface casts of the arterioles and capillaries of the cerebral cortex showed ring-shaped formations in the arterioles and at the origin of the capillaries. All capillaries down-stream from these ring-shaped formations were flaccid. Casts of the capillaries showed wrinkles due to the presence of endothelial folds, which is characteristic of varying blood pressure. Formations having intense anti-GIFAP immunoreactivity were frequently evident along the course of the blood capillaries in the cerebral cortex. These formations were probably astrocytes that might regulate the cerebral microcirculation based on physiological and pathological stimuli, such as neuronal activation.

  20. Vascular Cures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Vascular Disease What is Vascular Disease? Education and Awareness Vascular Diseases Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Aortic Dissection Arteriovenous Malformation Atherosclerosis Buerger's Disease Carotid Artery Disease ...

  1. Decreased expression of transient receptor potential channels in cerebral vascular tissue from patients after hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Thilo, Florian; Suess, Olaf; Liu, Ying; Tepel, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Recent data indicate that transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels play an important role in hypertension. Now, we tested the hypothesis that TRP expression is altered in human cerebral vascular tissue in patients who had experienced hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage. TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPC5, TRPC6, TRPM4, TRPM6, and TRPM7 channels were detected in cerebral vascular tissue by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Control cerebral vascular tissue was obtained from normotensive patients who underwent neurosurgical operation because of brain tumor. To examine a possible relation between the expression of TRP expression and hypoxic conditions caused by the intracerebral bleeding, we examined the expression of hypoxia inducible factor 1a (HIF1a). Transcripts of TRPC3, TRPC5, TRPM6, and HIF1a were significantly reduced in cerebral vascular tissue from patients after hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage compared to controls. TRPC3 mRNA correlated well with the expression of HIF1a mRNA (r(2) = 0.59; p = 0.01). TRPC3 expression is associated with hypertension and hypoxic conditions in human cerebral vascular tissue.

  2. MMP-2 Is Mainly Expressed in Arterioles and Contributes to Cerebral Vascular Remodeling Associated with TGF-β1 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Hua, Ye; Zhang, Weifeng; Xie, Zhenying; Xu, Nanfei; Lu, Yunnan

    2016-07-01

    There is increasing evidence to suggest that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play a crucial role in vascular remodeling. It has been reported that hypoxia stimulated MMP-9 expression in brain endothelial cells and MMP-9 plays an important role in cerebral vascular remodeling. However, little is known about MMP-2 in the cerebral vessels remodeling. Herein, the aim of this study is to examine the class of vessel and cell type expressing MMP-2 in cerebral vessels and to investigate its potential role in vascular remodeling. In the present study, dual-immunofluorescence assay showed that MMP-2 was mainly expressed in arterioles. In addition, we found that MMP-2 expression in cerebral vessels was derived from endothelial cells, not astrocyte cells. Notably, in the normoxic central nervous system (CNS), there was no effect on vascular development, integrity, or endothelial proliferation when MMP-2 was knocked out, but lack of MMP-2 led to defective arteriolar remodeling and associated with transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) signaling in CNS. Moreover, blocking TGF-β with SB431542, a specific TGF-β inhibitor, significantly reduced the messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression levels of MMP-2 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Our findings reveal that the level of MMP-2 is high in arteriolar endothelial cells and demonstrate a novel connection between MMP-2 and TGF-β1 signaling in cerebral vascular remodeling.

  3. Mechanisms of vascular stability and the relationship to human disease

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Matthew C.P.; Li, Dean Y.; Whitehead, Kevin J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review The genetic basis for a variety of vascular malformation syndromes have been described, with an increasing functional understanding of the associated genes. Recent findings Genes responsible for familial vascular malformation syndromes have increasingly been shown to be involved in the control of vascular stability. Summary Genes involved in vascular stability pathways are good candidates for causing vascular malformation syndromes. Although these findings confirm the biologic importance of the involved pathways, further explanations are required to describe the focal nature of disease. PMID:20308891

  4. Stabiliztin of VEGFR2 Signaling by Cerebral Cavernous Malformation 3 is Critical for Vascular Development

    SciTech Connect

    Y He; H Zhang; L Yu; M Gunel; T Boggon; H Chen; W Min

    2011-12-31

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are human vascular malformations caused by mutations in three genes of unknown function: CCM1, CCM2, and CCM3. CCM3, also known as PDCD10 (programmed cell death 10), was initially identified as a messenger RNA whose abundance was induced by apoptotic stimuli in vitro. However, the in vivo function of CCM3 has not been determined. Here, we describe mice with a deletion of the CCM3 gene either ubiquitously or specifically in the vascular endothelium, smooth muscle cells, or neurons. Mice with global or endothelial cell-specific deletion of CCM3 exhibited defects in embryonic angiogenesis and died at an early embryonic stage. CCM3 deletion reduced vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) signaling in embryos and endothelial cells. In response to VEGF stimulation, CCM3 was recruited to and stabilized VEGFR2, and the carboxyl-terminal domain of CCM3 was required for the stabilization of VEGFR2. Indeed, the CCM3 mutants found in human patients lacking the carboxyl-terminal domain were labile and were unable to stabilize and activate VEGFR2. These results demonstrate that CCM3 promotes VEGFR2 signaling during vascular development.

  5. Simvastatin combined with antioxidant attenuates the cerebral vascular endothelial inflammatory response in a rat traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kuo-Wei; Wang, Hao-Kuang; Chen, Han-Jung; Liliang, Po-Chou; Liang, Cheng-Loong; Tsai, Yu-Duan; Cho, Chung-Lung; Lu, Kang

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) leads to important and deleterious neuroinflammation, as evidenced by indicators such as edema, cytokine production, induction of nitric oxide synthase, and leukocyte infiltration. After TBI, cerebral vascular endothelial cells play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of inflammation. In our previous study, we proved that simvastatin could attenuate cerebral vascular endothelial inflammatory response in a rat traumatic brain injury. This purpose of this study was to determine whether simvastatin combined with an antioxidant could produce the same effect or greater and to examine affected surrogate biomarkers for the neuroinflammation after traumatic brain injury in rat. In our study, cortical contusions were induced, and the effect of acute and continuous treatment of simvastatin and vitamin C on behavior and inflammation in adult rats following experimental TBI was evaluated. The results demonstrated that simvastatin combined with an antioxidant could provide neuroprotection and it may be attributed to a dampening of cerebral vascular endothelial inflammatory response.

  6. [Frequency and causes of vascular complications requiring surgery in patients without primary vascular disease].

    PubMed

    Pongratz, J; Reeps, C; Eckstein, H-H

    2011-10-01

    Arterial and venous vascular injuries are known but rare complications of severe multiple traumatised patients but are meanwhile more frequently induced iatrogenically. However there are only few reports about incidence, causes, surgical techniques and prognosis of these vascular emergencies. We have therefore analysed the causes, type of therapy, localisation of injury, primary dis-ease, morbidity and mortality of all vascular emergencies in patients without preexisting vascular disease. 2.9 % of all vascular repairs in our unit had to be performed for cases of iatrogenic (87 %) and non-iatrogenic (13 %) vascular complications. The overall mortality and major complication rate of these intrahospital iatrogenically aquired lesions were 4.8 % and 5 %, respectively, which are clearly below those of extrahospital vascular injuries. Thereby the observed increase of iatrogenic vascular injuries seems to be due to the increase in complex and even catheter-based techniques in modern therapy. The iliacofemoral region was affected in 45 % of the cases, in 50 % complex reconstructions and specific surgical skills were needed for the repair. This article on the incidence of and reasons for vascular iatrogenic lesions shows the importance of a planned management for the prognosis of these injuries.

  7. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Eye Disease

    PubMed Central

    Penn, J.S.; Madan, A.; Caldwell, R.B.; Bartoli, M.; Caldwell, R.W.; Hartnett, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    Collectively, angiogenic ocular conditions represent the leading cause of irreversible vision loss in developed countries. In the U.S., for example, retinopathy of prematurity, diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration are the principal causes of blindness in the infant, working age and elderly populations, respectively. Evidence suggests that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a 40 kDa dimeric glycoprotein, promotes angiogenesis in each of these conditions, making it a highly significant therapeutic target. However, VEGF is pleiotropic, affecting a broad spectrum of endothelial, neuronal and glial behaviors, and confounding the validity of anti-VEGF strategies, particularly under chronic disease conditions. In fact, among other functions VEGF can influence cell proliferation, cell migration, proteolysis, cell survival and vessel permeability in a wide variety of biological contexts. This article will describe the roles played by VEGF in the pathogenesis of retinopathy of prematurity, diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration. The potential disadvantages of inhibiting VEGF will be discussed, as will the rationales for targeting other VEGF-related modulators of angiogenesis. PMID:18653375

  8. Vascular Inward Rectifier K+ Channels as External K+ Sensors in the Control of Cerebral Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    LONGDEN, THOMAS A.; NELSON, MARK T.

    2015-01-01

    For decades it has been known that external potassium (K+) ions are rapid and potent vasodilators that increase cerebral blood flow (CBF). Recent studies have implicated the local release of K+ from astrocytic endfeet—which encase the entirety of the parenchymal vasculature—in the dynamic regulation of local CBF during neurovascular coupling (NVC). It has been proposed that the activation of strong inward rectifier K+ (KIR) channels in the vascular wall by external K+ is a central component of these hyperemic responses; however, a number of significant gaps in our knowledge remain. Here, we explore the concept that vascular KIR channels are the major extracellular K+ sensors in the control of CBF. We propose that K+ is an ideal mediator of NVC, and discuss KIR channels as effectors that produce rapid hyperpolarization and robust vasodilation of cerebral arterioles. We provide evidence that KIR channels, of the KIR2 subtype in particular, are present in both the endothelial and smooth muscle cells of parenchymal arterioles and propose that this dual positioning of KIR2 channels increases the robustness of the vasodilation to external K+, enables the endothelium to be actively engaged in neurovascular coupling, and permits electrical signaling through the endothelial syncytium to promote upstream vasodilation to modulate CBF. PMID:25641345

  9. Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformation Associated with Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Jung-Hoon; Yeon, Je Young; Park, Jae-Han

    2014-01-01

    The coexistence of moyamoya disease (MMD) with an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is exceedingly rare. We report two cases of AVM associated with MMD. The first case was an incidental AVM diagnosed simultaneously with MMD. This AVM was managed expectantly after encephalo-duro-arterio-synangiosis (EDAS) as the main feeders stemmed from the internal carotid artery, which we believed would be obliterated with the progression of MMD. However, the AVM persisted with replacement of the internal carotid artery feeders by new external carotid artery feeders from the EDAS site. The AVM was eventually treated with gamma knife radiosurgery considering an increasing steal effect. The second case was a de novo AVM case. The patient was initially diagnosed with MMD, and acquired an AVM eight years later that was slowly fed by the reconstituted anterior cerebral artery. Because the patient remained asymptomatic, the AVM is currently being closely followed for more than 2 years without further surgical intervention. Possible differences in the pathogenesis and the radiologic presentation of these AVMs are discussed with a literature review. No solid consensus exists on the optimal treatment of MMD-associated AVMs. Gamma knife radiosurgery appears to be an effective treatment option for an incidental AVM. However, a de novo AVM may be managed expectantly considering the possible risks of damaging established collaterals, low flow characteristics, and probably low risks of rupture. PMID:25371789

  10. Cerebral arteriovenous malformation associated with moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Noh, Jung-Hoon; Yeon, Je Young; Park, Jae-Han; Shin, Hyung Jin

    2014-10-01

    The coexistence of moyamoya disease (MMD) with an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is exceedingly rare. We report two cases of AVM associated with MMD. The first case was an incidental AVM diagnosed simultaneously with MMD. This AVM was managed expectantly after encephalo-duro-arterio-synangiosis (EDAS) as the main feeders stemmed from the internal carotid artery, which we believed would be obliterated with the progression of MMD. However, the AVM persisted with replacement of the internal carotid artery feeders by new external carotid artery feeders from the EDAS site. The AVM was eventually treated with gamma knife radiosurgery considering an increasing steal effect. The second case was a de novo AVM case. The patient was initially diagnosed with MMD, and acquired an AVM eight years later that was slowly fed by the reconstituted anterior cerebral artery. Because the patient remained asymptomatic, the AVM is currently being closely followed for more than 2 years without further surgical intervention. Possible differences in the pathogenesis and the radiologic presentation of these AVMs are discussed with a literature review. No solid consensus exists on the optimal treatment of MMD-associated AVMs. Gamma knife radiosurgery appears to be an effective treatment option for an incidental AVM. However, a de novo AVM may be managed expectantly considering the possible risks of damaging established collaterals, low flow characteristics, and probably low risks of rupture.

  11. Delivery of Polymeric Nanoparticles to Target Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Agyare, Edward; Kandimalla, Karunyna

    2015-01-01

    Current advances in nanotechnology have paved the way for the early detection, prevention and treatment of various diseases such as vascular disorders and cancer. These advances have provided novel approaches or modalities of incorporating or adsorbing therapeutic, biosensor and targeting agents into/on nanoparticles. With significant progress, nanomedicine for vascular therapy has shown significant advantages over traditional medicine because of its ability to selectively target the disease site and reduce adverse side effects. Targeted delivery of nanoparticles to vascular endothelial cells or the vascular wall provides an effective and more efficient way for early detection and/or treatment of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, thrombosis and Cerebrovascular Amyloid Angiopathy (CAA). Clinical applications of biocompatible and biodegradable polymers in areas such as vascular graft, implantable drug delivery, stent devices and tissue engineering scaffolds have advanced the candidature of polymers as potential nano-carriers for vascular-targeted delivery of diagnostic agents and drugs. This review focuses on the basic aspects of the vasculature and its associated diseases and relates them to polymeric nanoparticle-based strategies for targeting therapeutic agents to diseased vascular site. PMID:26069867

  12. Vascular lesions in mixed dementia, vascular dementia, and Alzheimer disease with cerebrovascular disease: the Kurihara Project.

    PubMed

    Meguro, Kenichi; Tanaka, Naofumi; Nakatsuka, Masahiro; Nakamura, Kei; Satoh, Masayuki

    2012-11-15

    The concept and diagnosis for mixed dementia is not simple, since it is difficult to identify the type and regions of cerebrovascular disease (CVD) responsible for causing dementia. An investigation is needed to confirm the presence of mixed dementia, those who met the criteria for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and those for vascular dementia (VaD). According to the community-based stroke, dementia, and bed-confinement prevention in Kurihara, northern Japan (Kurihara Project), the prevalence of dementia and dementing diseases was surveyed in 2008-2010. Five hundred and ninety people finally agreed to participate (47.0%), and 73 (12.4%) people were diagnosed with dementia according to the DSM-IV. Using MRI, intensive evaluations on CVDs were performed for the 49 dementia patients associated with CVDs (mixed dementia, VaD, and AD with CVD). For the mixed dementia group, all had left subcortical strategic CVDs. These included the caudate head and thalamus. For the VaD group, all patients had at least cortical CVDs or subcortical strategic CVDs. The AD with CVD group had non-strategic CVDs in cortical, subcortical, or other areas in 5 or 6 patients each. Two extreme concepts regarding CVD and dementia are possible. One is that there is no concept for mixed dementia or VaD. An alternative is that the vascular factor should be considered as primary. Our data showed an importance of cortical and subcortical "strategic" areas, the latter included thalamus and caudate head.

  13. Taxifolin inhibits amyloid-β oligomer formation and fully restores vascular integrity and memory in cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

    PubMed

    Saito, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Yumi; Maki, Takakuni; Hattori, Yorito; Ito, Hideki; Mizuno, Katsuhiko; Harada-Shiba, Mariko; Kalaria, Raj N; Fukushima, Masanori; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Ihara, Masafumi

    2017-04-04

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) induces various forms of cerebral infarcts and hemorrhages from vascular amyloid-β accumulation, resulting in acceleration of cognitive impairment, which is currently untreatable. Soluble amyloid-β protein likely impairs cerebrovascular integrity as well as cognitive function in early stage Alzheimer's disease. Taxifolin, a flavonol with strong anti-oxidative and anti-glycation activities, has been reported to disassemble amyloid-β in vitro but the in vivo relevance remains unknown. Here, we investigated whether taxifolin has therapeutic potential in attenuating CAA, hypothesizing that inhibiting amyloid-β assembly may facilitate its clearance through several elimination pathways. Vehicle- or taxifolin-treated Tg-SwDI mice (commonly used to model CAA) were used in this investigation. Cognitive and cerebrovascular function, as well as the solubility and oligomerization of brain amyloid-β proteins, were investigated. Spatial reference memory was assessed by water maze test. Cerebral blood flow was measured with laser speckle flowmetry and cerebrovascular reactivity evaluated by monitoring cerebral blood flow changes in response to hypercapnia. Significantly reduced cerebrovascular pan-amyloid-β and amyloid-β1-40 accumulation was found in taxifolin-treated Tg-SwDI mice compared to vehicle-treated counterparts (n = 5). Spatial reference memory was severely impaired in vehicle-treated Tg-SwDI mice but normalized after taxifolin treatment, with scoring similar to wild type mice (n = 10-17). Furthermore, taxifolin completely restored decreased cerebral blood flow and cerebrovascular reactivity in Tg-SwDI mice (n = 4-6). An in vitro thioflavin-T assay showed taxifolin treatment resulted in efficient inhibition of amyloid-β1-40 assembly. In addition, a filter trap assay and ELISA showed Tg-SwDI mouse brain homogenates exhibited significantly reduced levels of amyloid-β oligomers in vivo after taxifolin treatment (n

  14. Inapparent pulmonary vascular disease in an ex-heroin user

    SciTech Connect

    Antonelli Incalzi, R.; Ludovico Maini, C.; Giuliano Bonetti, M.; Campioni, P.; Pistelli, R.; Fuso, L.

    1986-04-01

    A severe pulmonary vascular derangement, usually reported in drug addicts, was diagnosed in a 28-year-old asymptomatic ex-heroin user by means of fortuitously performed pulmonary perfusion imaging. Neither physical findings nor pulmonary function tests, aroused suspicion of the diagnosis. A search for asymptomatic pulmonary vascular disease probably should be undertaken in drug addicts.

  15. l-arginine and l-NMMA for assessing cerebral endothelial dysfunction in ischaemic cerebrovascular disease: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, William K; Sørensen, Caspar G; Kruuse, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction (ED), in particular cerebral ED, may be an essential biomarker for ischaemic cerebrovascular disease. However, there is no consensus on methods to best estimate cerebral ED. In this systematic review, we evaluate the use of l-arginine and N(G) -monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA) for assessment of cerebral ED. A systematic search of PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library was done. We included studies investigating cerebrovascular response to l-arginine or l-NMMA in human subjects with vascular risk factors or ischaemic cerebrovascular disease. Seven studies (315 subjects) were eligible according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. Studies investigated the effect of age (n=2), type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) (n=1), cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) (n=1), leukoaraiosis (n=1), and prior ischaemic stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) (n=2) on cerebral ED. Most studies applied transcranial Doppler to quantify cerebral ED. Endothelium-dependent vasodilatation (EDV) induced by l-arginine was impaired in elderly and subjects with leukoaraiosis, but enhanced in CADASIL patients. Studies including subjects with prior ischaemic stroke or TIA reported both enhanced and impaired EDV to l-arginine. Responses to l-NMMA deviated between subjects with type 2 DM and the elderly. We found only few studies investigating cerebral endothelial responses to l-arginine and l-NMMA in subjects with vascular risk factors or ischaemic cerebrovascular disease. Inconsistencies in results were most likely due to variations in methods and included subject populations. In order to use cerebral ED as a prognostic marker, further studies are required to evaluate the association to cerebrovascular disease.

  16. Effect of combined VEGF165/ SDF-1 gene therapy on vascular remodeling and blood perfusion in cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guo-Jie; Feng, Yu-Gong; Lu, Wen-Peng; Li, Huan-Ting; Xie, Hong-Wei; Li, Shi-Fang

    2016-12-16

    OBJECTIVE Therapeutic neovascularization is a promising strategy for treating patients after an ischemic stroke; however, single-factor therapy has limitations. Stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) proteins synergistically promote angiogenesis. In this study, the authors assessed the effect of combined gene therapy with VEGF165 and SDF-1 in a rat model of cerebral infarction. METHODS An adenoviral vector expressing VEGF165 and SDF-1 connected via an internal ribosome entry site was constructed (Ad- VEGF165-SDF-1). A rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) was established; either Ad- VEGF165-SDF-1 or control adenovirus Ad- LacZ was stereotactically microinjected into the lateral ventricle of 80 rats 24 hours after MCAO. Coexpression and distribution of VEGF165 and SDF-1 were examined by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence. The neurological severity score of each rat was measured on Days 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 after MCAO. Angiogenesis and vascular remodeling were evaluated via bromodeoxyuridine and CD34 immunofluorescence labeling. Relative cerebral infarction volumes were determined by T2-weighted MRI and triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Cerebral blood flow, relative cerebral blood volume, and relative mean transmit time were assessed using perfusion-weighted MRI. RESULTS The Ad- VEGF165-SDF-1 vector mediated coexpression of VEGF165 and SDF-1 in multiple sites around the ischemic core, including the cortex, corpus striatum, and hippocampal granular layer. Coexpression of VEGF165 and SDF-1 improved neural function, reduced cerebral infarction volume, increased microvascular density and promoted angiogenesis in the ischemic penumbra, and improved cerebral blood flow and perfusion. CONCLUSIONS Combined VEGF165 and SDF-1 gene therapy represents a potential strategy for improving vascular remodeling and recovery of neural function after cerebral

  17. Vascular targeting of nanoparticles for molecular imaging of diseased endothelium.

    PubMed

    Atukorale, Prabhani U; Covarrubias, Gil; Bauer, Lisa; Karathanasis, Efstathios

    2016-09-15

    This review seeks to highlight the enormous potential of targeted nanoparticles for molecular imaging applications. Being the closest point-of-contact, circulating nanoparticles can gain direct access to targetable molecular markers of disease that appear on the endothelium. Further, nanoparticles are ideally suitable to vascular targeting due to geometrically enhanced multivalent attachment on the vascular target. This natural synergy between nanoparticles, vascular targeting and molecular imaging can provide new avenues for diagnosis and prognosis of disease with quantitative precision. In addition to the obvious applications of targeting molecular signatures of vascular diseases (e.g., atherosclerosis), deep-tissue diseases often manifest themselves by continuously altering and remodeling their neighboring blood vessels (e.g., cancer). Thus, the remodeled endothelium provides a wide range of targets for nanoparticles and molecular imaging. To demonstrate the potential of molecular imaging, we present a variety of nanoparticles designed for molecular imaging of cancer or atherosclerosis using different imaging modalities.

  18. Assessment of risk of peripheral vascular disease and vascular care capacity in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Gyedu, Adam; Stewart, Barclay T; Nakua, Emmanuel; Quansah, Robert; Donkor, Peter; Mock, Charles; Hardy, Mark A; Yangni-Angate, Koffi Herve

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This study aimed to describe national peripheral vascular disease (PVD) risk and health burden and vascular care capacity in Ghana. The gap between PVD burden and vascular care capacity in a low- and middle-income country (LMIC) is defined and capacity improvement priorities identified. Methods Data to estimate PVD risk factor burden were obtained from: i) World Health Organization’s Study on Global Ageing and Health (SAGE), Ghana; and ii) Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation Global Burden of Disease database (IHME GBD). In addition, a novel nationwide assessment of vascular care capacity was performed, with 20 vascular care items assessed at 40 hospitals in Ghana. Factors contributing to specific item deficiency were also described. Results From the SAGE database, there were 4,305 respondents aged at least 50 years with data to estimate PVD risk. Out of these 57% were at moderate to high PVD risk with ≥3 risk factors, thus giving 1,654,557 persons when extrapolated nationally. Using IHME GBD data, the estimated disability-adjusted life years incurred from PVD increased 5-fold from 1990 to 2010 (1.3 to 3.2 per 100,000 persons, respectively). Vascular care capacity assessment demonstrated marked deficiencies in items for diagnosis, perioperative and vascular surgical care. Deficiencies were most often due to absence of equipment, lack of training and technology breakage. Conclusion Risk factor reduction and management as well as optimization of current resources are paramount to avoid the large burden of peripheral vascular disease falling on healthcare systems in low- and middle-income countries that are not well equipped to handle vascular surgical care, and for which rapid development of such capacity would be difficult and expensive. PMID:26560502

  19. Biomedicine and diseases: the Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, vascular anomalies and vascular morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Timur, A. A.; Driscoll, D. J.

    2006-01-01

    Vascular morphogenesis is a vital process for embryonic development, normal physiologic conditions (e.g. wound healing) and pathological processes (e.g. atherosclerosis, cancer). Genetic studies of vascular anomalies have led to identification of critical genes involved in vascular morphogenesis. A susceptibility gene, VG5Q (formally named AGGF1), was cloned for Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS). AGGF1 encodes a potent angiogenic factor, and KTS-associated mutations enhance angiogenic activity of AGGF1, defining ‘increased angiogenesis’ as one molecular mechanism for the pathogenesis of KTS. Similar studies have identified other genes involved in vascular anomalies as important genes for vascular morphogenesis, including TIE2, VEGFR-3, RASA1, KRIT1, MGC4607, PDCD10, glomulin, FOXC2, NEMO, SOX18, ENG, ACVRLK1, MADH4, NDP, TIMP3, Notch3, COL3A1 and PTEN. Future studies of vascular anomaly genes will provide insights into the molecular mechanisms for vascular morphogenesis, and may lead to the development of therapeutic strategies for treating these and other angiogenesis-related diseases, including coronary artery disease and cancer. PMID:15905966

  20. Pathophysiology of white matter perfusion in Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Barker, Rachel; Ashby, Emma L; Wellington, Dannielle; Barrow, Vivienne M; Palmer, Jennifer C; Kehoe, Patrick G; Esiri, Margaret M; Love, Seth

    2014-05-01

    of reduced ratio of myelin-associated glycoprotein to proteolipid protein 1 are likely to be protective physiological responses to reduced white matter perfusion. Further analysis of the Bristol cohort showed that endothelin 1 was reduced in the white matter in Alzheimer's disease (P < 0.05) compared with control subjects, but not in vascular dementia, in which endothelin 1 tended to be elevated, perhaps reflecting abnormal regulation of white matter perfusion in vascular dementia. Our findings demonstrate the potential of post-mortem measurement of myelin proteins and mediators of vascular function, to assess physiological and pathological processes involved in the regulation of cerebral perfusion in Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

  1. Oscillation of Angiogenesis and Vascular Dropout in Progressive Human Vascular Disease. [Vascular Pattern as Useful Read-Out of Complex Molecular Signaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    When analyzed by VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN) software, vascular patterns provide useful integrative read-outs of complex, interacting molecular signaling pathways. Using VESGEN, we recently discovered and published our innovative, surprising findings that angiogenesis oscillated with vascular dropout throughout progression of diabetic retinopathy, a blinding vascular disease. Our findings provide a potential paradigm shift in the current prevailing view on progression and treatment of this disease, and a new early-stage window of regenerative therapeutic opportunities. The findings also suggest that angiogenesis may oscillate with vascular disease in a homeostatic-like manner during early stages of other inflammatory progressive diseases such as cancer and coronary vascular disease.

  2. Andrographolide, a Novel NF-κB Inhibitor, Inhibits Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Cerebral Endothelial Cell Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chao-Chien; Duann, Yeh-Fang; Yen, Ting-Lin; Chen, Yu-Ying; Jayakumar, Thanasekaran; Ong, Eng-Thiam; Sheu, Joen-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Background Aberrant vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and cerebral endothelial cell (CEC) dysfunction contribute significantly in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, inhibition of these cellular events would be by candidate agents for treating these diseases. In the present study, the mechanism of anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory effects of andrographolides, a novel nuclear factor-κB inhibitor, was investigated in VSMC and CEC cells. Methods VSMCs and CECs were isolated from rat artery and mouse brain, respectively, and cultured before experimentation. The effect of andro on platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) induced VSMC cell proliferation was evaluated by cell number, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The expression of extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and the effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) were detected by Western blotting. Results Andro significantly inhibited PDGF-BB (10 ng/ml) induced cell proliferation in a concentration (20-100 μM) dependent manner, which may be due to reducing the expression of ERK1/2, and by inhibiting the expression of PCNA. Andro also remarkably diminished LPS-induced iNOS and COX2 expression. Conclusions The results of this study suggested that the effects of andro against VSMCs proliferation and CECs dysfunction may represent a promising approach for treatment of vascular diseases. PMID:27122804

  3. Clinical imaging of vascular disease in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Sag, Alan A; Covic, Adrian; London, Gerard; Vervloet, Marc; Goldsmith, David; Gorriz, Jose Luis; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-06-01

    Arterial wall calcification, once considered an incidental finding, is now known to be a consistent and strong predictor of cardiovascular events in patients with chronic renal insufficiency. It is also commonly encountered in radiologic examinations as an incidental finding. Forthcoming bench, translational, and clinical data seek to establish this and pre-calcification changes as surrogate imaging biomarkers for noninvasive prognostication and treatment follow-up. Emerging paradigms seek to establish vascular calcification as a surrogate marker of disease. Imaging of pre-calcification and decalcification events may prove more important than imaging of the calcification itself. Data-driven approaches to screening will be necessary to limit radiation exposure and prevent over-utilization of expensive imaging techniques.

  4. The adverse effects of reduced cerebral perfusion on cognition and brain structure in older adults with cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Alosco, Michael L; Gunstad, John; Jerskey, Beth A; Xu, Xiaomeng; Clark, Uraina S; Hassenstab, Jason; Cote, Denise M; Walsh, Edward G; Labbe, Donald R; Hoge, Richard; Cohen, Ronald A; Sweet, Lawrence H

    2013-01-01

    Background It is well established that aging and vascular processes interact to disrupt cerebral hemodynamics in older adults. However, the independent effects of cerebral perfusion on neurocognitive function among older adults remain poorly understood. We examined the associations among cerebral perfusion, cognitive function, and brain structure in older adults with varying degrees of vascular disease using perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) arterial spin labeling (ASL). Materials and methods 52 older adults underwent neuroimaging and were administered the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS), and measures of attention/executive function. ASL and T1-weighted MRI were used to quantify total brain perfusion, total brain volume (TBV), and cortical thickness. Results Regression analyses showed reduced total brain perfusion was associated with poorer performance on the MMSE, RBANS total index, immediate and delayed memory composites, and Trail Making Test B. Reduced frontal lobe perfusion was associated with worse executive and memory function. A similar pattern emerged between temporal lobe perfusion and immediate memory. Regression analyses revealed that decreased total brain perfusion was associated with smaller TBV and mean cortical thickness. Regional effects of reduced total cerebral perfusion were found on temporal and parietal lobe volumes and frontal and temporal cortical thickness. Discussion Reduced cerebral perfusion is independently associated with poorer cognition, smaller TBV, and reduced cortical thickness in older adults. Conclusion Prospective studies are needed to clarify patterns of cognitive decline and brain atrophy associated with cerebral hypoperfusion. PMID:24363966

  5. Endothelial fluid shear stress sensing in vascular health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Bandyopadhyay, Chirosree; Coon, Brian G.; Yun, Sanguk; Schwartz, Martin A.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells transduce the frictional force from blood flow (fluid shear stress) into biochemical signals that regulate gene expression and cell behavior via specialized mechanisms and pathways. These pathways shape the vascular system during development and during postnatal and adult life to optimize flow to tissues. The same pathways also contribute to atherosclerosis and vascular malformations. This Review covers recent advances in basic mechanisms of flow signaling and the involvement of these mechanisms in vascular physiology, remodeling, and these diseases. We propose that flow sensing pathways that govern normal morphogenesis can contribute to disease under pathological conditions or can be altered to induce disease. Viewing atherosclerosis and vascular malformations as instances of pathological morphogenesis provides a unifying perspective that may aid in developing new therapies. PMID:26928035

  6. [Prevention of vascular events after transient ischemic attack or cerebral infarct].

    PubMed

    Leys, Didier; Cordonnier, Charlotte

    2006-09-15

    After a first cerebral ischemic event, secondary prevention should be started as soon as possible, especially in transient ischemic attacks where the risk of recurrence is the highest, especially during the first week, needing a diagnostic workup in a short period of time, secondary prevention measures depending on the presumed cause of the event. Secondary prevention of vascular events after transient ischemic attack or cerebral infarct consists of 3 types of strategies: 1. treatment of risk factors for stroke, especially high blood pressure, high cholesterol and smoking cessation; 2. aspirin (50 to 325 mg), or clopidogrel, or association aspirine-dipyridamole in high-risk subjects, or warfarin in patients with high-risk cardiopathies; and 3. carotid surgery in patients selected by clinical and imaging criteria. Other strategies are currently partly under evaluation: statins in normocholesterolemic ischemic stroke patients without coronary event, angioplasty with stenting. Audits of practice are necessary to determine whether patients are actually treated according to scientific evidence. This is a crucial issue if we want the results of trials to be translated in the true life, and really improve health at the community level.

  7. Multichannel optical brain imaging to separate cerebral vascular, tissue metabolic, and neuronal effects of cocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hugang; Luo, Zhongchi; Yuan, Zhijia; Pan, Yingtian; Du, Congwu

    2012-02-01

    Characterization of cerebral hemodynamic and oxygenation metabolic changes, as well neuronal function is of great importance to study of brain functions and the relevant brain disorders such as drug addiction. Compared with other neuroimaging modalities, optical imaging techniques have the potential for high spatiotemporal resolution and dissection of the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), blood volume (CBV), and hemoglobing oxygenation and intracellular Ca ([Ca2+]i), which serves as markers of vascular function, tissue metabolism and neuronal activity, respectively. Recently, we developed a multiwavelength imaging system and integrated it into a surgical microscope. Three LEDs of λ1=530nm, λ2=570nm and λ3=630nm were used for exciting [Ca2+]i fluorescence labeled by Rhod2 (AM) and sensitizing total hemoglobin (i.e., CBV), and deoxygenated-hemoglobin, whereas one LD of λ1=830nm was used for laser speckle imaging to form a CBF mapping of the brain. These light sources were time-sharing for illumination on the brain and synchronized with the exposure of CCD camera for multichannel images of the brain. Our animal studies indicated that this optical approach enabled simultaneous mapping of cocaine-induced changes in CBF, CBV and oxygenated- and deoxygenated hemoglobin as well as [Ca2+]i in the cortical brain. Its high spatiotemporal resolution (30μm, 10Hz) and large field of view (4x5 mm2) are advanced as a neuroimaging tool for brain functional study.

  8. Vascular dysfunction associated with type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease: a potential etiological linkage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuzhou; Guo, Xirong; Shen, Xiaofeng; Kream, Richard M; Mantione, Kirk J; Stefano, George B

    2014-08-01

    The endothelium performs a crucial role in maintaining vascular integrity leading to whole organ metabolic homeostasis. Endothelial dysfunction represents a key etiological factor leading to moderate to severe vasculopathies observed in both Type 2 diabetic and Alzheimer's Disease (AD) patients. Accordingly, evidence-based epidemiological factors support a compelling hypothesis stating that metabolic rundown encountered in Type 2 diabetes engenders severe cerebral vascular insufficiencies that are causally linked to long term neural degenerative processes in AD. Of mechanistic importance, Type 2 diabetes engenders an immunologically mediated chronic pro-inflammatory state involving interactive deleterious effects of leukocyte-derived cytokines and endothelial-derived chemotactic agents leading to vascular and whole organ dysfunction. The long term negative consequences of vascular pro-inflammatory processes on the integrity of CNS basal forebrain neuronal populations mediating complex cognitive functions establish a striking temporal comorbidity of AD with Type 2 diabetes. Extensive biomedical evidence supports the pivotal multi-functional role of constitutive nitric oxide (NO) production and release as a critical vasodilatory, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant, mechanism within the vascular endothelium. Within this context, we currently review the functional contributions of dysregulated endothelial NO expression to the etiology and persistence of Type 2 diabetes-related and co morbid AD-related vasculopathies. Additionally, we provide up-to-date perspectives on critical areas of AD research with special reference to common NO-related etiological factors linking Type 2 diabetes to the pathogenesis of AD.

  9. Kienböck's disease in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Rooker, G D; Goodfellow, J W

    1977-08-01

    Five cases of Kienböck's disease occurring in a group of fifty-three adults with cerebral palsy are described. The increased incidence of the disease is attributed to the flexed posture habitual in the affected wrist and to an effect on the pattern of blood supply to the lunate.

  10. Excessive vascular sprouting underlies cerebral hemorrhage in mice lacking αVβ8-TGFβ signaling in the brain.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Thomas D; Niaudet, Colin; Pang, Mei-Fong; Siegenthaler, Julie; Gaengel, Konstantin; Jung, Bongnam; Ferrero, Gina M; Mukouyama, Yoh-suke; Fuxe, Jonas; Akhurst, Rosemary; Betsholtz, Christer; Sheppard, Dean; Reichardt, Louis F

    2014-12-01

    Vascular development of the central nervous system and blood-brain barrier (BBB) induction are closely linked processes. The role of factors that promote endothelial sprouting and vascular leak, such as vascular endothelial growth factor A, are well described, but the factors that suppress angiogenic sprouting and their impact on the BBB are poorly understood. Here, we show that integrin αVβ8 activates angiosuppressive TGFβ gradients in the brain, which inhibit endothelial cell sprouting. Loss of αVβ8 in the brain or downstream TGFβ1-TGFBR2-ALK5-Smad3 signaling in endothelial cells increases vascular sprouting, branching and proliferation, leading to vascular dysplasia and hemorrhage. Importantly, BBB function in Itgb8 mutants is intact during early stages of vascular dysgenesis before hemorrhage. By contrast, Pdgfb(ret/ret) mice, which exhibit severe BBB disruption and vascular leak due to pericyte deficiency, have comparatively normal vascular morphogenesis and do not exhibit brain hemorrhage. Our data therefore suggest that abnormal vascular sprouting and patterning, not BBB dysfunction, underlie developmental cerebral hemorrhage.

  11. Selective arterial distribution of cerebral hyperperfusion in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Moore, D F; Herscovitch, P; Schiffmann, R

    2001-07-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked recessive deficiency of lysosomal alpha-galactosidase A associated with an increased risk of early onset cerebrovascular disease. The disorder is reported to affect the posterior circulation predominantly. This hypothesis was investigated directly by the measurement of regional cerebral blood flow with positron emission tomography (PET). Resting regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in 26 hemizygous patients with Fabry disease and 10 control participants was examined using H(2)15O and PET. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM(t), SPM99) and PET images of patients and controls were produced. Significantly increased SPM(t) clusters were then color coded and blended with a coregistered T1 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) template. Cerebral arterial territory maps were digitized and rescaled. Custom OpenGL and ImageVision Library C++ code was written to allow a first-order affine transformation of the blended SPM(t) and MRI template onto the arterial territory map. The affine transformation was constrained by choosing corresponding cerebral landmark "tie points" between the SPM(t) [symbol: see text] MRI template images and the cerebral arterial territory maps. The data demonstrated that the posterior circulation is the predominant arterial territory with a significantly increased rCBF in Fabry disease. No arterial distribution had a decreased rCBF.

  12. Aβ immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease: effects on apoE and cerebral vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kenji; Boche, Delphine; Carare, Roxana; Johnston, David; Holmes, Clive; Love, Seth; Nicoll, James A R

    2014-12-01

    Aβ immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease (AD) results in the removal of Aβ plaques and increased cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). In current clinical trials, amyloid-related imaging abnormalities (ARIAs), putatively due to exacerbation of CAA, are concerning side effects. We aimed to assess the role of the Aβ transporter apolipoprotein E (apoE) in the exacerbation of CAA and development of CAA-associated vasculopathy after Aβ immunotherapy. 12 Aβ42-immunized AD (iAD; AN1792, Elan Pharmaceuticals) cases were compared with 28 unimmunized AD (cAD) cases. Immunohistochemistry was quantified for Aβ42, apoE, apoE E4 and smooth muscle actin, and CAA-associated vasculopathy was analyzed. Aβ immunotherapy was associated with redistribution of apoE from cortical plaques to cerebral vessel walls, mirroring the altered distribution of Aβ42. Concentric vessel wall splitting was increased threefold in leptomeningeal vessels after immunotherapy (cAD 6.3 vs iAD 20.6 %, P < 0.001), but smooth muscle cell abnormalities did not differ. The findings suggest that apoE is involved in the removal of plaques and transport of Aβ to the cerebral vasculature induced by Aβ immunotherapy. Immunotherapy was not associated with CAA-related vascular smooth muscle damage, but was accompanied by increased splitting of the vessel wall, perhaps reflecting enhanced deposition and subsequent removal of Aβ. ARIA occurring in some current trials of Aβ immunotherapy may reflect an extreme form of these vascular changes.

  13. Matrix Metalloproteinases and their Inhibitors in Vascular Remodeling and Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Raffetto, Joseph D.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2008-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of proteolytic enzymes that degrade various components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Members of the MMP family include collagenases, gelatinases, stromelysins, matrilysins and membrane-type MMPs. ProMMPs are cleaved into active forms that promote degradation of ECM proteins. Also, recent evidence suggests direct or indirect effects of MMPs on ion channels in the endothelium and vascular smooth muscle, and on other mechanisms of vascular relaxation/contraction. Endogenous tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) reduce excessive proteolytic ECM degradation by MMPs. The balance between MMPs and TIMPs plays a major role in vascular remodeling, angiogenesis, and the uterine and systemic vasodilation during normal pregnancy. An imbalance in the MMPs/TIMPs activity ratio may underlie the pathogenesis of vascular diseases such as abdominal aortic aneurysm, varicose veins, hypertension and preeclampsia. Downregulation of MMPs using genetic manipulations of endogenous TIMPs, or synthetic pharmacological inhibitors such as BB-94 (Batimastat) and doxycycline, and Ro-28-2653, a more specific inhibitor of gelatinases and membrane type 1-MMP, could be beneficial in reducing the MMP-mediated vascular dysfunction and the progressive vessel wall damage associated with vascular disease. PMID:17678629

  14. Plasma β-amyloid in Alzheimer’s disease and vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Janelidze, Shorena; Stomrud, Erik; Palmqvist, Sebastian; Zetterberg, Henrik; van Westen, Danielle; Jeromin, Andreas; Song, Linan; Hanlon, David; Tan Hehir, Cristina A.; Baker, David; Blennow, Kaj; Hansson, Oskar

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of amyloid biomarkers in clinical practice would be accelerated if such biomarkers could be measured in blood. We analyzed plasma levels of Aβ42 and Aβ40 in a cohort of 719 individuals (the Swedish BioFINDER study), including patients with subjective cognitive decline (SCD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia and cognitively healthy elderly, using a ultrasensitive immunoassay (Simoa platform). There were weak positive correlations between plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels for both Aβ42 and Aβ40, and negative correlations between plasma Aβ42 and neocortical amyloid deposition (measured with PET). Plasma levels of Aβ42 and Aβ40 were reduced in AD dementia compared with all other diagnostic groups. However, during the preclinical or prodromal AD stages (i.e. in amyloid positive controls, SCD and MCI) plasma concentration of Aβ42 was just moderately decreased whereas Aβ40 levels were unchanged. Higher plasma (but not CSF) levels of Aβ were associated with white matter lesions, cerebral microbleeds, hypertension, diabetes and ischemic heart disease. In summary, plasma Aβ is overtly decreased during the dementia stage of AD indicating that prominent changes in Aβ metabolism occur later in the periphery compared to the brain. Further, increased levels of Aβ in plasma are associated with vascular disease. PMID:27241045

  15. Disruption of rich club organisation in cerebral small vessel disease.

    PubMed

    Tuladhar, Anil M; Lawrence, Andrew; Norris, David G; Barrick, Thomas R; Markus, Hugh S; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik

    2017-04-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is an important cause of vascular cognitive impairment. Recent studies have demonstrated that structural connectivity of brain networks in SVD is disrupted. However, little is known about the extent and location of the reduced connectivity in SVD. Here they investigate the rich club organisation-a set of highly connected and interconnected regions-and investigate whether there is preferential rich club disruption in SVD. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and cognitive assessment were performed in a discovery sample of SVD patients (n = 115) and healthy control subjects (n = 50). Results were replicated in an independent dataset (49 SVD with confluent WMH cases and 108 SVD controls) with SVD patients having a similar SVD phenotype to that of the discovery cases. Rich club organisation was examined in structural networks derived from DTI followed by deterministic tractography. Structural networks in SVD patients were less dense with lower network strength and efficiency. Reduced connectivity was found in SVD, which was preferentially located in the connectivity between the rich club nodes rather than in the feeder and peripheral connections, a finding confirmed in both datasets. In discovery dataset, lower rich club connectivity was associated with lower scores on psychomotor speed (β = 0.29, P < 0.001) and executive functions (β = 0.20, P = 0.009). These results suggest that SVD is characterized by abnormal connectivity between rich club hubs in SVD and provide evidence that abnormal rich club organisation might contribute to the development of cognitive impairment in SVD. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1751-1766, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Infarctions in the vascular territory of the posterior cerebral artery: clinical features in 232 patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ischemic stroke caused by infarction in the territory of the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) has not been studied as extensively as infarctions in other vascular territories. This single centre, retrospective clinical study was conducted a) to describe salient characteristics of stroke patients with PCA infarction, b) to compare data of these patients with those with ischaemic stroke due to middle cerebral artery (MCA) and anterior cerebral artery (ACA) infarctions, and c) to identify predictors of PCA stroke. Findings A total of 232 patients with PCA stroke were included in the "Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona Stroke Registry" during a period of 19 years (1986-2004). Data from stroke patients are entered in the stroke registry following a standardized protocol with 161 items regarding demographics, risk factors, clinical features, laboratory and neuroimaging data, complications and outcome. The characteristics of these 232 patients with PCA stroke were compared with those of the 1355 patients with MCA infarctions and 51 patients with ACA infarctions included in the registry. Infarctions of the PCA accounted for 6.8% of all cases of stroke (n = 3808) and 9.6% of cerebral infarctions (n = 2704). Lacunar infarction was the most frequent stroke subtype (34.5%) followed by atherothrombotic infarction (29.3%) and cardioembolic infarction (21.6%). In-hospital mortality was 3.9% (n = 9). Forty-five patients (19.4%) were symptom-free at hospital discharge. Hemianopia (odds ratio [OR] = 6.43), lacunar stroke subtype (OR = 2.18), symptom-free at discharge (OR = 1.92), limb weakness (OR = 0.10), speech disorders (OR = 0.33) and cardioembolism (OR = 0.65) were independent variables of PCA stroke in comparison with MCA infarction, whereas sensory deficit (OR = 2.36), limb weakness (OR = 0.11) and cardioembolism as stroke mechanism (OR = 0.43) were independent variables associated with PCA stroke in comparison with ACA infarction. Conclusions Lacunar stroke is the

  17. The use of erythtropoietin in cerebral diseases.

    PubMed

    Cotena, S; Piazza, O; Tufano, R

    2008-06-01

    Global and focal cerebral ischemia is followed by a secondary damage characterized by oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, inflammation and apoptosis. Erythropoietin (EPO) exerts antiapoptotic, anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, angiogenetic and neurotrophic properties. Its potential therapeutic role has been demonstrated in several animal models of cerebral ischemia and also in a clinical trial of ischemic stroke, so it could be considered an ideal compound for neuroprotection in ischemic stroke and in cardiac arrest. Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the least treatable form of stroke; the mechanisms involved in the secondary brain injury include hematoma mass effect, neuronal apoptosis and necrosis, inflammation. It has been demonstrated in an experimental ICH that EPO intervenes in the inflammatory process, reduces brain water content, hemorrhage volume and hemispheric atrophy, promotes cell survival, preserves cerebral blood flow, has antiapoptotic protective function against oxidative stress and excitotoxic damage. EPO can attenuate acute vasoconstriction and prevent brain ischemic damage in subarachnoid hemorrhage. The neuroprotective function of EPO has been studied also in traumatic brain injury: it reduces the inflammation and improves cognitive and motor deficits. The authors review some of the physiological actions of EPO in the physiopathology of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage and brain trauma, and its potential usefulness in the brain injured patient management.

  18. Pulmonary vascular response of dogs with heartworm disease.

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, C A

    1978-01-01

    Heartworm diseases in dogs is an infectious disease that produces pulmonary hypertension. Dogs with the early vascular changes of heartworm disease, but without the clinical cardiopulmonary signs and pulmonary hypertension, were studied. Dogs with early heartworm were identified that had an exaggerated hypertensive response to hypoxia and to postaglandin F2alpha as compared to those of normal dogs. The pulmonary hypertensive response of dogs with spontaneous heartworm disease varied widely between individuals. PMID:743600

  19. Pulmonary vascular response of dogs with heartworm disease.

    PubMed

    Rawlings, C A

    1978-10-01

    Heartworm diseases in dogs is an infectious disease that produces pulmonary hypertension. Dogs with the early vascular changes of heartworm disease, but without the clinical cardiopulmonary signs and pulmonary hypertension, were studied. Dogs with early heartworm were identified that had an exaggerated hypertensive response to hypoxia and to postaglandin F2alpha as compared to those of normal dogs. The pulmonary hypertensive response of dogs with spontaneous heartworm disease varied widely between individuals.

  20. Optical measures of changes in cerebral vascular tone during voluntary breath holding and a Sternberg memory task.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chin Hong; Low, Kathy A; Schneider-Garces, Nils; Zimmerman, Benjamin; Fletcher, Mark A; Maclin, Edward L; Chiarelli, Antonio M; Gratton, Gabriele; Fabiani, Monica

    2016-07-01

    The human cerebral vasculature responds to changes in blood pressure and demands for oxygenation via cerebral autoregulation. Changes in cerebrovascular tone (vasoconstriction and vasodilation) also mediate the changes in blood flow measured by the BOLD fMRI signal. This cerebrovascular reactivity is known to vary with age. In two experiments, we demonstrate that cerebral pulse parameters measured using optical imaging can quantify changes in cerebral vascular tone, both globally and locally. In experiment 1, 51 older adults (age range=55-87) performed a voluntary breath-holding task while cerebral pulse amplitude measures were taken. We found significant pulse amplitude variations across breath-holding periods, indicating vasodilation during, and vasoconstriction after breath holding. The breath-holding index (BHI), a measure of cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) was derived and found to correlate with age. BHI was also correlated with performance in the Modified Mini-Mental Status Examination, even after controlling for age and education. In experiment 2, the same participants performed a Sternberg task, and changes in regional pulse amplitude between high (set-size 6) and low (set-size 2) task loads were compared. Only task-related areas in the fronto-parietal network (FPN) showed significant reduction in pulse amplitude, indicating vasodilation. Non-task-related areas such as the somatosensory and auditory cortices did not show such reductions. Taken together, these experiments suggest that optical pulse parameters can index changes in brain vascular tone both globally and locally, using both physiological and cognitive load manipulations.

  1. miRNAs: roles and clinical applications in vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Jamaluddin, Md Saha; Weakley, Sarah M; Zhang, Lidong; Kougias, Panagiotis; Lin, Peter H; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Changyi

    2011-01-01

    miRNAs are small, endogenously expressed noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression, mainly at the post-transcriptional level, via degradation or translational inhibition of their target mRNAs. Functionally, an individual miRNA can regulate the expression of multiple target genes. The study of miRNAs is rapidly growing and recent studies have revealed a significant role of miRNAs in vascular biology and disease. Many miRNAs are highly expressed in the vasculature, and their expression is dysregulated in diseased vessels. Several miRNAs have been found to be critical modulators of vascular pathologies, such as atherosclerosis, lipoprotein metabolism, inflammation, arterial remodeling, angiogenesis, smooth muscle cell regeneration, hypertension, apoptosis, neointimal hyperplasia and signal transduction pathways. Thus, miRNAs may serve as novel biomarkers and/or therapeutic targets for vascular disease. This article summarizes the current studies related to the disease correlations and functional roles of miRNAs in the vascular system and discusses the potential applications of miRNAs in vascular disease.

  2. Platelets in the Alzheimer's disease brain: do they play a role in cerebral amyloid angiopathy?

    PubMed

    Kniewallner, Kathrin M; Ehrlich, Daniela; Kiefer, Andreas; Marksteiner, Josef; Humpel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by extracellular beta-amyloid plaques and intracellular tau tangles. AD-related pathology is often accompanied by vascular changes. The predominant vascular lesions in AD are cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) and arteriosclerosis. Platelets circulate along the vessel wall responding immediately to vascular injury. The aim of the present study was to explore the presence and migration of platelets (thrombocytes) to sites of small vascular bleedings and/or to beta-amyloid plaques in the brain. We infused fluorescently labeled red PKH26 mouse platelets into transgenic Alzheimer mice overexpressing APP with Swedish/Dutch/Iowa mutations (APP_SDI) and explored if platelets migrate into the brain. Further we studied whether platelets accumulate in the vicinity of β-amyloid plaques. Our animal data shows that infused platelets are found in the liver and partly in the lung, while in the brain platelets were visible to a minor degree. In mice, we did not observe a significant association of platelets with beta-amyloid plaques or vessels. In the brain of Alzheimer postmortem patients platelets could be detected by immunohistochemistry for CD41 and CD62P, but the majority was found in vessels with or without beta-amyloid load, and only a few single platelets migrated deeper into the brain. Our findings suggest that platelets do not migrate into the brains of Alzheimer disease but are concentrated in brain vessels.

  3. Brief Screening of Vascular Cognitive Impairment in Patients With Cerebral Autosomal-Dominant Arteriopathy With Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy Without Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Hollocks, Matthew J.; Tan, Rhea Y.Y.; Morris, Robin G.; Markus, Hugh S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a monogenic form of cerebral small vessel disease leading to early-onset stroke and dementia, with younger patients frequently showing subclinical deficits in cognition. At present, there are no targeted cognitive screening measures for this population. However, the Brief Memory and Executive Test (BMET) and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) have shown utility in detecting cognitive impairment in sporadic small vessel disease. This study assesses the BMET and the MoCA as clinical tools for detecting mild cognitive deficits in CADASIL. Methods— Sixty-six prospectively recruited patients with CADASIL, and 66 matched controls completed the BMET, with a subset of these also completing the MoCA. Receiver operating characteristic curves were calculated to examine the sensitivity and specificity of clinical cutoffs for the detection of vascular cognitive impairment and reduced activities of daily living. Results— Patients with CADASIL showed more cognitive impairment overall and were poorer on both executive/processing and memory indices of the BMET relative to controls. The BMET showed good accuracy in predicting vascular cognitive impairment (85% sensitivity and 84% specificity) and impaired instrumental activities of daily living (92% sensitivity and 77% specificity). The MoCA also showed good predictive validity for vascular cognitive impairment (80% sensitivity and 78% specificity) and instrumental activities of daily living (75% sensitivity and 76% specificity). The most important background predictor of vascular cognitive impairment was a history of stroke. Conclusions— The results indicate that the BMET and the MoCA are clinically useful and sensitive screening measures for early cognitive impairment in patients with CADASIL. PMID:27625375

  4. Thermolabile MTHFR genotype and retinal vascular occlusive disease

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, M; Karabatzaki, M; Donoghue, C; Meleady, R; Mynett-Johnson, L; Mooney, D; Graham, I; Whitehead, A; Shields, D

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Raised levels of total plasma homocysteine (tHcy) are associated with an increased risk of retinal vascular occlusive disease. A thermolabile form of a pivotal enzyme in homocysteine metabolism, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), has been associated with vascular occlusive disease and raised tHcy levels. The relation between thermolabile MTHFR genotype, tHcy, and retinal vascular occlusive disease has not been determined.
METHODS—A retrospective case-control study involving hospital based controls and cases with retinal vascular occlusions in whom tHcy levels had been determined was undertaken. Genotyping for the MTHFR 677 C-T mutation that specifies the thermolabile form of the enzyme was performed by established methods in all subjects. The relation between homozygosity for thermolabile MTHFR genotype (TT), raised tHcy levels, and risk of retinal vascular occlusive disease was examined.
RESULTS—87 cases of retinal vascular occlusive disease (mean age 68.7 years) comprising 26 cases of retinal artery occlusion and 61 of retinal vein occlusion were compared with 87 controls (mean age 70.2 years). The TT genotype did not confer a significantly increased risk of retinal vascular occlusive disease. The mean tHcy level was significantly higher in the cases than in the controls (p<0.0001). Overall, and in both the cases and controls, the frequency of the TT genotype was higher in those with normal tHcy levels than in those with increased levels of tHcy. However, the TT genotype did not significantly alter the risk of increased tHcy levels in these patients.
CONCLUSIONS—The TT genotype is not associated with an increased risk of retinal vascular occlusive disease or increased tHcy levels in this group of elderly patients. In older patients, nutritional rather than genetic factors may be more important in increasing tHcy levels, a known risk factor for retinal vascular occlusive disease.

 PMID:11133719

  5. Estrogen, vascular estrogen receptor and hormone therapy in postmenopausal vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Raouf A

    2013-12-15

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is less common in premenopausal women than men of the same age or postmenopausal women, suggesting vascular benefits of estrogen. Estrogen activates estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and GPR30 in endothelium and vascular smooth muscle (VSM), which trigger downstream signaling pathways and lead to genomic and non-genomic vascular effects such as vasodilation, decreased VSM contraction and growth and reduced vascular remodeling. However, randomized clinical trials (RCTs), such as the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) and Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS), have shown little vascular benefits and even adverse events with menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), likely due to factors related to the MHT used, ER profile, and RCT design. Some MHT forms, dose, combinations or route of administration may have inadequate vascular effects. Age-related changes in ER amount, distribution, integrity and post-ER signaling could alter the vascular response to MHT. The subject's age, preexisting CVD, and hormone environment could also reduce the effects of MHT. Further evaluation of natural and synthetic estrogens, phytoestrogens, and selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and the design of appropriate MHT combinations, dose, route and 'timing' could improve the effectiveness of conventional MHT and provide alternative therapies in the peri-menopausal period. Targeting ER using specific ER agonists, localized MHT delivery, and activation of specific post-ER signaling pathways could counter age-related changes in ER. Examination of the hormone environment and conditions associated with hormone imbalance such as polycystic ovary syndrome may reveal the causes of abnormal hormone-receptor interactions. Consideration of these factors in new RCTs such as the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) could enhance the vascular benefits of estrogen in postmenopausal CVD.

  6. Estrogen, Vascular Estrogen Receptor and Hormone Therapy in Postmenopausal Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Raouf A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is less common in premenopausal women than men of the same age or postmenopausal women, suggesting vascular benefits of estrogen. Estrogen activates estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and GPR30 in endothelium and vascular smooth muscle (VSM), which trigger downstream signaling pathways and lead to genomic and non-genomic vascular effects such as vasodilation, decreased VSM contraction and growth and reduced vascular remodeling. However, randomized clinical trials (RCTs), such as the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) and Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS), have shown little vascular benefits and even adverse events with menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), likely due to factors related to the MHT used, ER profile, and RCT design. Some MHT forms, dose, combinations or route of administration may have inadequate vascular effects. Age-related changes in ER amount, distribution, integrity and post-ER signaling could alter the vascular response to MHT. The subject’s age, preexisting CVD, and hormone environment could also reduce the effects of MHT. Further evaluation of natural and synthetic estrogens, phytoestrogens, and selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and the design of appropriate MHT combinations, dose, route and 'timing' could improve the effectiveness of conventional MHT and provide alternative therapies in the peri-menopausal period. Targeting ER using specific ER agonists, localized MHT delivery, and activation of specific post-ER signaling pathways could counter age-related changes in ER. Examination of the hormone environment and conditions associated with hormone imbalance such as polycystic ovary syndrome may reveal the causes of abnormal hormone-receptor interactions. Consideration of these factors in new RCTs such as the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) could enhance the vascular benefits of estrogen in postmenopausal CVD. PMID:24099797

  7. Early Detection System of Vascular Disease and Its Application Prospect

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Markers of imaging, structure, and function reflecting vascular damage, integrating a long time accumulation effect of traditional and unrecognized cardiovascular risk factors, can be regarded as surrogate endpoints of target organ damage before the occurrence of clinical events. Prevention of cardiovascular disease requires risk stratification and treatment of traditional risk factors, such as smoking, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes. However, traditional risk stratification is not sufficient to provide accurate assessment of future cardiovascular events. Therefore, vascular injury related parameters obtained by ultrasound or other noninvasive devices, as a surrogate parameter of subclinical cardiovascular disease, can improve cardiovascular risk assessment and optimize the preventive treatment strategy. Thus, we will summarize the research progress and clinical application of early assessment technology of vascular diseases in the present review. PMID:28042567

  8. Detection of cerebral amyloid angiopathy by 3-T magnetic resonance imaging and amyloid positron emission tomography in a patient with subcortical ischaemic vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Kida, Hirotaka; Satoh, Masayuki; Ii, Yuichiro; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Maeda, Masayuki; Tomimoto, Hidekazu

    2017-01-01

    The patient was an 81-year-old man who had been treated for hypertension for several decades. In 2012, he developed gait disturbance and mild amnesia. One year later, his gait disturbance worsened, and he developed urinary incontinence. Conventional brain magnetic resonance imaging using T 2 -weighted images and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery showed multiple lacunar infarctions. These findings fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for subcortical ischaemic vascular dementia. However, susceptibility weighted imaging showed multiple lobar microbleeds in the bilateral occipitoparietal lobes, and double inversion recovery and 3-D fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images on 3-T magnetic resonance imaging revealed cortical microinfarctions in the left parietal-temporo-occipito region. Pittsburgh compound B-positron emission tomography revealed diffuse uptake in the cerebral cortex. Therefore, we diagnosed the patient with subcortical ischaemic vascular dementia associated with Alzheimer's disease. The use of the double inversion recovery and susceptibility weighted imaging on 3-T magnetic resonance imaging may be a supplemental strategy for diagnosing cerebral amyloid angiopathy, which is closely associated with Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Deviation from Optimal Vascular Caliber Control at Middle Cerebral Artery Bifurcations Harboring Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Baharoglu, Merih I.; Lauric, Alexandra; Wu, Chengyuan; Hippelheuser, James; Malek, Adel M.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral aneurysms form preferentially at arterial bifurcations. The vascular optimality principle (VOP) decrees that minimal energy loss across bifurcations requires optimal caliber control between radii of parent (r0) and daughter branches (r1 and r2): r0n=r1n+r2n, with n approximating three. VOP entails constant wall shear stress (WSS), an endothelial phenotype regulator. We sought to determine if caliber control is maintained in aneurysmal intracranial bifurcations. Three-dimensional rotational angiographic volumes of 159 middle cerebral artery (MCA) bifurcations (62 aneurysmal) were processed using 3D gradient edge-detection filtering, enabling threshold-insensitive radius measurement. Radius ratio (RR)=r03/(r13+r23) and estimated junction exponent (n) were compared between aneurysmal and non-aneurysmal bifurcations using Student t-test and Wilcoxon rank-sum analysis. The results show that non-aneurysmal bifurcations display optimal caliber control with mean RR of 1.05 and median n of 2.84. In contrast, aneurysmal bifurcations had significantly lower RR (0.76, p<.0001) and higher n (4.28, p<.0001). Unexpectedly, 37% of aneurysmal bifurcations revealed a daughter branch larger than its parent vessel, an absolute violation of optimality, not witnessed in non-aneurysmal bifurcations. The aneurysms originated more often off the smaller daughter (52%) vs. larger daughter branch (16%). Aneurysm size was not statistically correlated to RR or n. Aneurysmal males showed higher deviation from VOP. Non-aneurysmal MCA bifurcations contralateral to aneurysmal ones showed optimal caliber control. Aneurysmal bifurcations, in contrast to non-aneurysmal counterparts, disobey the VOP and may exhibit dysregulation in WSS-mediated caliber control. The mechanism of this focal divergence from optimality may underlie aneurysm pathogenesis and requires further study. PMID:25242132

  10. Are vascular factors involved in Alzheimer's disease? Facts and theories.

    PubMed

    Di Iorio, A; Zito, M; Lupinetti, M; Abate, G

    1999-12-01

    The hypothesis that vascular factors may contribute to the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is supported by epidemiologic and pathologic observations. Arterial hypertension and diabetes have been found to be associated not only with vascular dementia, but also with AD; in addition, the treatment of hypertension with calcium antagonists seems to prevent degenerative dementias. Hypertension and hyperinsulinemia favor the deposition of amyloid substance in the brain. The histopathology of AD is marked not only by neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques, but also by macro and micro congophilic angiopathy and ischemic white matter rarefaction. The specific AD pathological lesions, if isolated, are not able to lead to an evident clinical picture of dementia, which, on the contrary, becomes evident when vascular, mainly subcortical, lesions are associated. These and other observations suggest that vascular factors may have a role in the development of AD. An aggressive approach to these factors could be of value in the prevention of AD.

  11. Diabetic Retinopathy: Vascular and Inflammatory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Semeraro, F.; Cancarini, A.; dell'Omo, R.; Rezzola, S.; Romano, M. R.; Costagliola, C.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of visual impairment in the working-age population of the Western world. The pathogenesis of DR is complex and several vascular, inflammatory, and neuronal mechanisms are involved. Inflammation mediates structural and molecular alterations associated with DR. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the inflammatory pathways associated with DR are not completely characterized. Previous studies indicate that tissue hypoxia and dysregulation of immune responses associated with diabetes mellitus can induce increased expression of numerous vitreous mediators responsible for DR development. Thus, analysis of vitreous humor obtained from diabetic patients has made it possible to identify some of the mediators (cytokines, chemokines, and other factors) responsible for DR pathogenesis. Further studies are needed to better understand the relationship between inflammation and DR. Herein the main vitreous-related factors triggering the occurrence of retinal complication in diabetes are highlighted. PMID:26137497

  12. Applications of Doppler ultrasound in clinical vascular disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, R. W.; Hokanson, D. E.; Sumner, D. S.; Strandness, D. E., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Doppler ultrasound has become the most useful and versatile noninvasive technique for objective evaluation of clinical vascular disease. Commercially available continuous-wave instruments provide qualitative and quantitative assessment of venous and arterial disease. Pulsed Doppler ultrasound was developed to provide longitudinal and transverse cross-sectional images of the arterial lumen with a resolution approaching that of conventional X-ray techniques. Application of Doppler ultrasound in venous, peripheral arterial, and cerebrovascular diseases is reviewed.

  13. Gorham's disease in humerus treated with autogenous vascularized fibular graft

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeung Woo; Kang, Hong Je; Kim, Dong Chul; Shin, Chang Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Gorham's disease is a rare disorder of the bone characterized by progressive massive osteolysis. The pathophysiology is unknown, and diagnosis is often difficult. Most cases are often recognized retrospectively. There is no standardized treatment and management for Gorham's disease. We report a case of an 18-year-old male presenting with a pathologic fracture in the humerus shaft diagnosed with Gorham's disease. Patient was treated with autogenous vascularized fibular graft with wide excision and a 10 years followup after first surgery.

  14. Renal vascular disease in neurofibromatosis type 2: association or coincidence?

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Nuno J V; Gardner, Kate R; Huson, Susan M; Stewart, Helen; Elston, John S; Howard, Emma L; Tullus, Kjell O; Pike, Michael G

    2006-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) remains a challenging diagnosis in childhood where there may be no neurological involvement. A 12-month-old male in whom NF2 was suspected because of characteristic ophthalmological and cutaneous lesions is reported. Cranial MRI showed no tumours. A pathogenic mutation was identified on NF2 gene analysis. The child developed hypertension due to renal vascular disease. Although renal vascular disease is a recognized complication of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), it has not been reported in NF2.

  15. Effects of dietary manipulation on vascular status of patients with peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, K; Oberle, K; Crockford, P; Grace, M; Whyte, L; Gee, M; Williams, T; Brown, G

    1983-06-24

    In a one-year, double-blind clinical trial, 45 patients with peripheral vascular disease (PVD) were randomly assigned to either the American Heart Association Hyperlipidemia Diet C (n = 20) or a low-fat, high-fiber, complex carbohydrate diet similar to the Pritikin Maintenance Diet (n = 25). Vascular status and blood lipid levels were monitored at 0, 2, 4, 6, and 12 months. Walking distance increased significantly in both groups, with no difference between groups. No vascular parameters changed significantly, suggesting that increased walking distance was due to improved metabolic capacity of the muscle. A trend toward lower blood lipid values was observed, with no significant differences within or between groups. We conclude that while patients with PVD benefit from a program of diet and exercise, there is no apparent advantage to the more difficult complex carbohydrate diet.

  16. Protein Kinase C Inhibitors as Modulators of Vascular Function and Their Application in Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Raouf A.

    2013-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) is regulated by multiple neuronal, hormonal, renal and vascular control mechanisms. Changes in signaling mechanisms in the endothelium, vascular smooth muscle (VSM) and extracellular matrix cause alterations in vascular tone and blood vessel remodeling and may lead to persistent increases in vascular resistance and hypertension (HTN). In VSM, activation of surface receptors by vasoconstrictor stimuli causes an increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), which forms a complex with calmodulin, activates myosin light chain (MLC) kinase and leads to MLC phosphorylation, actin-myosin interaction and VSM contraction. Vasoconstrictor agonists could also increase the production of diacylglycerol which activates protein kinase C (PKC). PKC is a family of Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+-independent isozymes that have different distributions in various blood vessels, and undergo translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane, cytoskeleton or the nucleus during cell activation. In VSM, PKC translocation to the cell surface may trigger a cascade of biochemical events leading to activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and MAPK kinase (MEK), a pathway that ultimately increases the myofilament force sensitivity to [Ca2+]i, and enhances actin-myosin interaction and VSM contraction. PKC translocation to the nucleus may induce transactivation of various genes and promote VSM growth and proliferation. PKC could also affect endothelium-derived relaxing and contracting factors as well as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the extracellular matrix further affecting vascular reactivity and remodeling. In addition to vasoactive factors, reactive oxygen species, inflammatory cytokines and other metabolic factors could affect PKC activity. Increased PKC expression and activity have been observed in vascular disease and in certain forms of experimental and human HTN. Targeting of vascular PKC using PKC inhibitors may function in concert with

  17. Management of retinal vascular diseases: a patient-centric approach.

    PubMed

    Brand, C S

    2012-04-01

    Retinal vascular diseases are a leading cause of blindness in the Western world. Advancement in the clinical management of these diseases has been fast-paced, with new treatments becoming available as well as license extensions of existing treatments. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been implicated in certain retinal vascular diseases, including wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic macular oedema (DMO), and retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Treatment of wet AMD and visual impairment due to either DMO or macular oedema secondary to RVO with an anti-VEGF on an as needed basis, rather than a fixed schedule, allows an individualised treatment approach; providing treatment when patients are most likely to benefit from it, while minimising the number of unnecessary intravitreal injections. Thus, an individualised treatment regimen reduces the chances of over-treatment and under-treatment, optimising both the risk/benefit profile of the treatment and the efficient use of NHS resource. Streamlining of treatment for patients with wet AMD and visual impairment due to either DMO or macular oedema secondary to RVO, by using one treatment with similar posology across all three diseases, may help to minimise burden of clinic capacity and complexity and hence optimise patient outcomes. Informed treatment decisions and efficient clinic throughput are important for optimal patient outcomes in the fast-changing field of retinal vascular diseases.

  18. Use of sulodexide in patients with peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Lasierra-Cirujeda, J; Coronel, P; Aza, Mj; Gimeno, M

    2010-01-01

    Sulodexide is a highly purified glycosaminoglycan containing a combination of heparan sulfate with affinity for antithrombin III and dermatan sulfate with affinity for heparin cofactor II. This antithrombotic and antithrombin activity is of great pharmacologic interest and makes sulodexide a suitable drug for the prophylaxis and treatment of arterial and venous peripheral diseases. In arterial pathology, changes in the Winsor Index, improvement in peripheral blood flow, and reduction in pain-free walking distance confirm that treatment with oral sulodexide is effective. Lipid components linked to the genesis of peripheral vascular processes, including triglycerides, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein fractions, as well as plasma and blood viscosity, are reduced by the administration of sulodexide, whereas the high-density lipoprotein fraction increases. Sulodexide inhibits aggregation and adhesion of platelets at the level of the vascular wall, reduces plasma fibrinogen concentrations, reduces plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and increases tissue plasminogen activator, as well as systemic fibrinolytic and thrombolytic activity, thereby demonstrating efficacy in the treatment of thromboembolic disease. There is no interaction between sulodexide and other drugs used as long-term treatment for peripheral vascular disease. It is well tolerated, and the adverse reactions described after oral administration are related mainly to transient gastrointestinal intolerance, ie, nausea, dyspepsia, and minor bowel symptoms. Sulodexide may become the treatment of choice when dealing with vascular diseases and their complications, as well as for the prevention of venous thromboembolic disease, being particularly indicated in elderly patients, due to its good tolerability and ease of management.

  19. Alcohol-induced apoptosis of canine cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells: role of extracellular and intracellular calcium ions.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyan; Li, Jianfeng; Liu, Weiming; Altura, Bella T; Altura, Burton M

    2004-01-16

    Exposure of canine cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to ethanol (10, 25 and 100 mM) for 1, 3 and 5 days induced apoptosis with its typical characteristics of nuclear shrinkage, condensation, and DNA breakage as well as formation of apoptotic bodies observed by fluorescence staining, terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling and comet assays. Such effects of alcohol on cerebral VSMCs were time- and concentration-dependent. The threshold ethanol concentration for induction of the apoptotic process was found to be 10 mM. Extracellular and intracellular Ca2+ chelators, i.e. ethylglycol-bisbeta-aminoethylether-N,N,N'N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA, 5 mM) and 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid AM (BAPTA, 10(-6) M), respectively, ameliorated greatly the number of cerebral VSMCs which underwent apoptosis. Verapamil, however, failed to inhibit apoptosis of cerebral VSMCs. From these new findings, we suggest that alcohol-induced apoptosis may contribute to alcohol-induced brain-vascular damage and stroke. In addition, our findings point to potential caution for humans who imbibe two or more standard drinks per day or who undergo 'binge drinking'.

  20. Evaluation and percutaneous management of atherosclerotic peripheral vascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Widlus, D.M.; Osterman, F.A. Jr. )

    1989-06-02

    Atherosclerotic peripheral vascular disease (PVD) of the lower extremities deprives a person of the ability to exercise to their satisfaction, later of the ability to perform the activities of their daily life, and finally of their legs themselves. Peripheral vascular disease has long been managed by the vascular surgeon utilizing endarterectomy and peripheral arterial bypass. Patient acceptance of nonsurgical, percutaneous procedures such as percutaneous transluminal balloon angioplasty (PTA) is high. Increased utilization of these procedures has led to improved techniques and adjuncts to therapy, as well as more critical review of long-term results. This article will review the evaluation and nonoperative management of PVD, with an emphasis on the newer modalities of management presently being investigated.

  1. The Utility of Cerebral Blood Flow as a Biomarker of Preclinical Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hays, Chelsea C.; Zlatar, Zvinka Z.; Wierenga, Christina E.

    2017-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence suggesting that changes in brain perfusion are present long before the clinical symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), perhaps even before amyloid-β accumulation or brain atrophy. This evidence, consistent with the vascular hypothesis of AD, implicates cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the pathogenesis of AD and suggests its utility as a biomarker of preclinical AD. The extended preclinical phase of AD holds particular significance for disease-modification, as treatment would likely be most effective in this early asymptomatic stage of disease. This highlights the importance of identifying reliable and accurate biomarkers of AD that can differentiate normal aging from preclinical AD prior to clinical symptom manifestation. Cerebral perfusion, as measured by arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging (ASL-MRI), has been shown to distinguish between normal controls and adults with AD. In addition to demonstrating diagnostic utility, CBF has shown usefulness as a tool for identifying those who are at risk for AD and for predicting subtle cognitive decline and conversion to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and AD. Taken together, this evidence not only implicates CBF as a useful biomarker for tracking disease severity and progression, but also suggests that ASL-measured CBF may be useful for identifying candidates for future AD treatment trials, especially in the preclinical, asymptomatic phases of the disease. PMID:26898552

  2. Contribution of neuroimaging to the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Román, Gustavo; Pascual, Belén

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to review, summarize and analyze recent findings relevant to the contribution of neuroimaging to the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD). Computerized tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provide accurate demonstration of the location and rate of progression of atrophic changes affecting the brain in AD and the different types of vascular lesions observed in mixed dementias and in pure VaD. Quantification of cortical thickness allows early diagnosis and rate of progression from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to dementia. White matter involvement can also be quantified with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and functional methods including fMRI, functional connectivity, and MR spectroscopy (MRS). Isotope-based techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) allow measurement of regional cerebral glucose metabolism using (18)F-2-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG). Cerebral blood flow can be measured using PET with H(2)(15)O or with single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) with technetium ((99m)Tc-HMPAO) or, more recently, arterial spin label (ASL) imaging. There are isotope markers for amyloid-beta ((11)O-PIB, (18)F-florbetapir), tau ((18)FDDNP) and activated microglia ((11)C-PK11195). Neuroimaging markers are particularly useful at the early symptomatic and preclinical asymptomatic phases of AD, as well as serving as endpoints in clinical trials.

  3. Differential impact of serum total bilirubin level on cerebral atherosclerosis and cerebral small vessel disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jonguk; Yoon, Seung-Jae; Woo, Min-Hee; Kim, Sang-Heum; Kim, Nam-Keun; Kim, Jinkwon; Kim, OK-Joon; Oh, Seung-Hun

    2017-01-01

    Background A low serum total bilirubin (T-bil) level is associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis. However, the differential impact of the serum T-bil level on cerebral atherosclerosis and cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is still unclear. Methods We evaluated serum T-bil levels from 1,128 neurologically healthy subjects. Indices of cerebral atherosclerosis (extracranial arterial stenosis [ECAS] and intracranial arterial stenosis [ICAS]), and indices of SVD (silent lacunar infarct [SLI], and moderate-to-severe white matter hyperintensities [msWMH]) were evaluated by the use of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR angiography. Results In logistic regression analysis after adjusting for confounding variables, subjects within middle T-bil (odds ratio [OR]: 0.63; 95% CI: 0.41–0.97) and high T-bil tertiles (OR: 0.54; 95% CI: 0.33–0.86) showed a lower prevalence of ECAS than those in a low T-bil tertile. Although subjects with a high T-bil tertile had a lower prevalence of ICAS than those with a low T-bil tertile, the statistical significance was marginal after adjusting for confounding variables. There were no significant differences in the proportions of subjects with SLI and msWMH across serum T-bil tertile groups. Conclusions The serum T-bil level is negatively associated with cerebral atherosclerosis, especially extracranial atherosclerosis, but not with SVD. PMID:28319156

  4. Language Impairment in Alzheimer's Disease and Vascular Dementia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lempinen, Maire; And Others

    A study of 21 patients with Alzheimer's Disease and 25 with vascular dementia, the two most common forms of dementia, investigated language impairments in the dementia syndrome to see if analysis of language disturbances is helpful in differential diagnosis. Diagnostic assessment included a neurological examination, detailed medical history,…

  5. Evidence of endothelial dysfunction in the development of Alzheimer’s disease: Is Alzheimer’s a vascular disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Kelleher, Rory J; Soiza, Roy L

    2013-01-01

    The etiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) remains unclear. The emerging view is that cerebrovascular dysfunction is a feature not only of cerebrovascular diseases, such as stroke, but also of neurodegenerative conditions, such as AD. In AD, there is impaired structure and function of cerebral blood vessels and cells in the neurovascular unit. These effects are mediated by vascular oxidative stress. Injury to the neurovascular unit alters cerebral blood flow regulation, depletes vascular reserves, disrupts the blood-brain barrier and reduces the brain’s repair capacity. Such injury can exacerbate the cognitive dysfunction exerted by incident ischemia and coexisting neurodegeneration. This article summarises data regarding cardiovascular risk factors, vascular abnormalities and brain endothelial damage in AD. In view of accumulating evidence of vascular pathology in AD, we also review the literature (MEDLINE, EMBASE) for clinical evidence of impaired endothelial function in AD. A total of 15 articles investigating endothelial dysfunction in AD were identified. 10 of these articles showed impaired endothelial function in AD patients. The current literature suggests endothelial dysfunction may be involved in the pathogenesis of AD. This aspect of AD pathology is particularly interesting in view of its potential for therapeutic intervention. Future research on endothelial function in AD should concentrate on population-based analysis and combine multiple methods to evaluate endothelial function. PMID:24224133

  6. Silent Cerebral Small Vessel Disease in Restless Legs Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Raffaele; Cosentino, Filomena I.I.; Moussouttas, Michael; Lanuzza, Bartolo; Aricò, Debora; Bagai, Kanika; Wang, Lily; McLaughlin, BethAnn; Walters, Arthur S.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Growing literature suggests that patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS) may be at increased risk for hypertension, heart disease, and stroke. Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a known risk factor for clinical stroke. This study evaluated silent cerebral SVD by MRI in patients with RLS, in the absence of a history of previous clinical stroke or known stroke risk factors and taking into account disease duration. Methods: Fifty-three patients with RLS < 10 y were prospectively recruited along with 44 with RLS > 10 y and 74 normal controls. A magnetic resonance imaging study was obtained from all subjects and scans were analyzed for area and volume of SVD. Results: There was a significant increase in SVD area in the entire group of RLS patients compared to controls (P = 0.036); this was almost entirely driven by the group with RLS > 10 y. SVD area and volume were significantly increased in patients with RLS > 10 y with respect to both controls (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.0014, respectively) and RLS < 10 y (P < 0.00022 and P < 0.003, respectively). Age, duration of RLS, and the interaction of age and duration of RLS were independent predictors of SVD disease. Duration of RLS was an independent predictor of the burden of cerebral SVD (area P < 0.00012 and volume P < 0.0025), whereas sex and insomnia were not. Conclusion: RLS duration should be taken into account when analyzing the association between RLS and cerebrovascular disease; our data support the hypothesis that a long-lasting RLS and its accompanying periodic limb movements in sleep are a risk factor for silent SVD and perhaps for the development of clinical stroke. Citation: Ferri R, Cosentino FI, Moussouttas M, Lanuzza B, Aricò D, Bagai K, Wang L, McLaughlin B, Walters AS. Silent cerebral small vessel disease in restless legs syndrome. SLEEP 2016;39(7):1371–1377. PMID:27091527

  7. Vascular function, cerebral cortical thickness, and cognitive performance in middle-aged Hispanic and non-Hispanic Caucasian adults.

    PubMed

    Pasha, Evan P; Kaur, Sonya S; Gonzales, Mitzi M; Machin, Daniel R; Kasischke, Kennon; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Haley, Andreana P

    2015-04-01

    Hispanics are at increased risk for acquiring cardiovascular risk factors that contribute to cognitive dysfunction. To compare indices of vascular health with measures of cerebral gray matter integrity, 60 middle-aged Hispanic and non-Hispanic Caucasian participants were matched across age, sex, years of education, and mental status. Arterial stiffness was characterized by β-stiffness index and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, and magnetic resonance imaging estimated cortical thickness in a priori regions of interest known to be susceptible to vascular risk factors. Measures of arterial stiffness were significantly higher in Hispanics than in non-Hispanic Caucasians. Hispanics exhibited thinner left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) cortical thickness (P=.04) with concurrently lower language (P=.02), memory (P=.03), and attention-executive functioning (P=.02). These results suggest that compromised vascular health may occur simultaneously with cortical thinning of the LIFG as an early neuropathological alteration in Hispanics.

  8. Diabetes mellitus is a coronary heart disease risk equivalent for peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Newman, Jonathan D; Rockman, Caron B; Kosiborod, Mikhail; Guo, Yu; Zhong, Hua; Weintraub, Howard S; Schwartzbard, Arthur Z; Adelman, Mark A; Berger, Jeffrey S

    2017-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus (diabetes) is associated with significantly increased risk of peripheral vascular disease. Diabetes is classified as a coronary heart disease (CHD) risk equivalent, but it is unknown whether diabetes is a CHD risk equivalent for peripheral vascular disease. The objective was to evaluate the odds of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) or carotid artery stenosis (CAS) among participants with diabetes, CHD, or both, compared with participants without diabetes or CHD, in a nationwide vascular screening database. We hypothesized that diabetes and CHD would confer similar odds of PAD and CAS.

  9. The vascular contribution to Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Robin; Rutledge, John C.

    2010-01-01

    AD (Alzheimer’s disease) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease of unknown origin. Despite questions as to the underlying cause(s) of this disease, shared risk factors for both AD and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease indicate that vascular mechanisms may critically contribute to the development and progression of both AD and atherosclerosis. An increased risk of developing AD is linked to the presence of the apoE4 (apolipoprotein E4) allele, which is also strongly associated with increased risk of developing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Recent studies also indicate that cardiovascular risk factors, including elevated blood cholesterol and triacylglycerol (triglyceride), increase the likelihood of AD and vascular dementia. Lipids and lipoproteins in the circulation interact intimately with the cerebrovasculature, and may have important effects on its constituent brain microvascular endothelial cells and the adjoining astrocytes, which are components of the neurovascular unit. The present review will examine the potential mechanisms for understanding the contributions of vascular factors, including lipids, lipoproteins and cerebrovascular Aβ (amyloid β), to AD, and suggest therapeutic strategies for the attenuation of this devastating disease process. Specifically, we will focus on the actions of apoE, TGRLs (triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins) and TGRL lipolysis products on injury of the neurovascular unit and increases in blood–brain barrier permeability. PMID:20684749

  10. Atlas-based method for segmentation of cerebral vascular trees from phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passat, Nicolas; Ronse, Christian; Baruthio, Joseph; Armspach, Jean-Paul; Maillot, Claude; Jahn, Christine

    2004-05-01

    Phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography (PC-MRA) can produce phase images which are 3-dimensional pictures of vascular structures. However, it also provides magnitude images, containing anatomical - but no vascular - data. Classically, algorithms dedicated to PC-MRA segmentation detect the cerebral vascular tree by only working on phase images. We propose here a new approach for segmentation of cerebral blood vessels in PC-MRA using both types of images. This approach is based on the hypothesis that a magnitude image contains anatomical information useful for vascular structures detection. That information can then be transposed from a normal case to any patient image by image registration. An atlas of the whole head has been developed in order to store such anatomical knowledge. It divides a magnitude image into several "vascular areas", each one having specific vessel properties. The atlas can be applied on any magnitude image of an entire or nearly entire head by deformable matching, thus helping to segment blood vessels from the associated phase image. The segmentation method used afterwards is composed of a topology-conserving region growing algorithm using adaptative threshold values depending on the current region of the atlas. This algorithm builds the arterial and venous trees by iteratively adding voxels which are selected according to their greyscale value and the variation of values in their neighborhood. The topology conservation is guaranteed by only selecting simple points during the growing process. The method has been performed on 15 PC-MRA's of the brain. The results have been validated using MIP and 3D surface rendering visualization; a comparison to other results obtained without an atlas proves that atlas-based methods are an effective way to optimize vascular segmentation strategies.

  11. Genetic determinants of obesity and related vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Winter, Yaroslav; Sankowski, Roman; Back, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is one of the major risk factors of vascular diseases, and its prevalence is increasing worldwide. In the past decade, progress has been made in the understanding of genetic determinants of obesity and obesity-associated diseases. Genome-wide association studies identified a number of genetic variants associated with obesity. In addition to common variants, FTO and MC4R, new loci, such as TMEM18, KCTD15, GNPDA2, SH2B1, MTCH2, and NEGR1 have been detected. In the past years, abdominal obesity has been shown to be a more important vascular risk factor than the body mass index. In the context of vascular risk assessment, identification of genetic polymorphisms associated with accumulation of visceral fat is of special importance. Some polymorphisms associated with abdominal obesity, such as variants of gene encoding microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, have been already discovered. In this chapter, we provide a review of genetic determinants of obesity and discuss their role in obesity-related vascular diseases.

  12. Pulmonary vascular disease in a rabbit a high altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Donald; Williams, David; Rios-Datenz, Jaime; Gosney, John

    1990-03-01

    A male weanling rabbit of the New Zealand White strain, born and living at an altitude of 3800 m in La Paz, Bolivia, developed right ventricular hypertrophy. This was found to be associated with growth of vascular smooth muscle cells in the intima of pulmonary arterioles, and contrasted with muscularization of the walls of pulmonary arterioles, without extension into the intima, found in a healthy, high-altitude control rabbit of the same strain. A low-altitude control showed no such muscularization. It is concluded that alveolar hypoxia, acting directly or through an intermediate agent, is a growth factor for vascular smooth muscle cells in pulmonary arterioles. This is the first report of pulmonary vascular disease due to high altitude in rabbits.

  13. Bile pigments in pulmonary and vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Ryter, Stefan W

    2012-01-01

    The bile pigments, biliverdin, and bilirubin, are endogenously derived substances generated during enzymatic heme degradation. These compounds have been shown to act as chemical antioxidants in vitro. Bilirubin formed in tissues circulates in the serum, prior to undergoing hepatic conjugation and biliary excretion. The excess production of bilirubin has been associated with neurotoxicity, in particular to the newborn. Nevertheless, clinical evidence suggests that mild states of hyperbilirubinemia may be beneficial in protecting against cardiovascular disease in adults. Pharmacological application of either bilirubin and/or its biological precursor biliverdin, can provide therapeutic benefit in several animal models of cardiovascular and pulmonary disease. Furthermore, biliverdin and bilirubin can confer protection against ischemia/reperfusion injury and graft rejection secondary to organ transplantation in animal models. Several possible mechanisms for these effects have been proposed, including direct antioxidant and scavenging effects, and modulation of signaling pathways regulating inflammation, apoptosis, cell proliferation, and immune responses. The practicality and therapeutic-effectiveness of bile pigment application to humans remains unclear.

  14. Information entropy-based fitting of the disease trajectory of brain ischemia-induced vascular cognitive impairment★

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lin; Huo, Ju; Zhao, Ying; Tian, Yu

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the disease trajectory of vascular cognitive impairment using the entropy of information in a neural network mathematical simulation based on the free radical and excitatory amino acids theories. Glutamate, malondialdehyde, and inducible nitric oxide synthase content was significantly elevated, but acetylcholine, catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and constitutive nitric oxide synthase content was significantly decreased in our vascular cognitive impairment model. The fitting curves for each factor were obtained using Matlab software. Nineteen, 30 and 49 days post ischemia were the main output time frames of the influence of these seven factors. Our results demonstrated that vascular cognitive impairment involves multiple factors. These factors include excitatory amino acid toxicity and nitric oxide toxicity. These toxicities disrupt the dynamic equilibrium of the production and removal of oxygen free radicals after cerebral ischemia, reducing the ability to clear oxygen free radicals and worsening brain injury. PMID:25745466

  15. Chronic depression as a model disease for cerebral aging.

    PubMed

    Bewernick, Bettina H; Schlaepfer, Thomas E

    2013-03-01

    Conceptualizations of the underlying neurobiology of major depression have changed their focus from dysfunctions of neurotransmission to dysfunctions of neurogenesis and neuroprotection. The "neurogenesis hypothesis of depression" posits that changes in the rate of neurogenesis are the underlying mechanism in the pathology and treatment of major depression. Stress, neuroinflammation, dysfunctional insulin regulation, oxidative stress, and alterations in neurotrophic factors possibly contribute to the development of depression. The influence of antidepressant therapies, namely pharmacotherapy and neuroprotectants, on cellular plasticity are summarized. A dysfunction of complex neuronal networks as a consequence of neural degeneration in neuropsychiatric diseases has led to the application of deep brain stimulation. We discuss the way depression seen in the light of the neurogenesis hypothesis can be used as a model disease for cerebral aging. A common pathological mechanism in depression and cerebral aging-a dysfunction of neuroprotection and neurogenesis-is discussed. This has implications for new treatment methods.

  16. Blood brain barrier breakdown as the starting point of cerebral small vessel disease? - New insights from a rat model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD, cerebral microangiopathy) leads to dementia and stroke-like symptoms. Lacunes, white matter lesions (WML) and microbleeds are the main pathological correlates depicted in in-vivo imaging diagnostics. Early studies described segmental arterial wall disorganizations of small penetrating cerebral arteries as the most pronounced underlying histopathology of lacunes. Luminal narrowing caused by arteriolosclerosis was supposed to result in hypoperfusion with WML and infarcts. We have used the model of spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone rats (SHRSP) for a longitudinal study to elucidate early histological changes in small cerebral vessels. We suggest that endothelial injuries lead to multiple sites with blood brain barrier (BBB) leakage which cause an ongoing damage of the vessel wall and finally resulting in vessel ruptures and microbleeds. These microbleeds together with reactive small vessel occlusions induce overt cystic infarcts of the surrounding parenchyma. Thus, multiple endothelial leakage sites seem to be the starting point of cerebral microangiopathy. The vascular system reacts with an activated coagulatory state to these early endothelial injuries and by this induces the formation of stases, accumulations of erythrocytes, which represent the earliest detectable histological peculiarity of small vessel disease in SHRSP. In this review we focus on the meaning of the BBB breakdown in CSVD and finally discuss possible consequences for clinicians. PMID:23497521

  17. Implications of Klotho in vascular health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Núñez, Ernesto; Donate-Correa, Javier; Muros-de-Fuentes, Mercedes; Mora-Fernández, Carmen; Navarro-González, Juan F

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a prevalent condition in general population and the first cause of death overall. Klotho, a pleiotropic protein related to longevity that acts as a co-receptor of the fibroblast growth factor 23, has been proposed as a key regulator of the development of CVD. In the few clinical studies made, it has been observed a relationship between low levels of soluble Klotho and the occurrence and severity of CVD, as well as a reduction of cardiovascular risk when they are high. Also, different polymorphisms of human Klotho gene have been related to the incidence of cardiovascular events. Moreover, several experimental studies indicate that this protein acts in the maintenance of vascular homeostasis. Klotho improves endothelial dysfunction through promotion of NO production and mediates anti-inflammatory and anti-aging effects such as suppression of adhesion molecules expression, attenuation of nuclear factor-kappa B or inhibition of Wnt signaling. Furthermore, this protein is related to the attenuation of vascular calcification as well as prevention of cardiac hypertrophy. The expression of this protein in the vascular wall implies a new scenario for the treatment of vascular disorders. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the relationship between the Klotho protein and CVD, in addition to its role in the maintenance of functional vascular integrity. PMID:25548616

  18. Endothelial dysfunction - a major mediator of diabetic vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Sena, Cristina M; Pereira, Ana M; Seiça, Raquel

    2013-12-01

    The vascular endothelium is a multifunctional organ and is critically involved in modulating vascular tone and structure. Endothelial cells produce a wide range of factors that also regulate cellular adhesion, thromboresistance, smooth muscle cell proliferation, and vessel wall inflammation. Thus, endothelial function is important for the homeostasis of the body and its dysfunction is associated with several pathophysiological conditions, including atherosclerosis, hypertension and diabetes. Patients with diabetes invariably show an impairment of endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Therefore, understanding and treating endothelial dysfunction is a major focus in the prevention of vascular complications associated with all forms of diabetes mellitus. The mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction in diabetes may point to new management strategies for the prevention of cardiovascular disease in diabetes. This review will focus on the mechanisms and therapeutics that specifically target endothelial dysfunction in the context of a diabetic setting. Mechanisms including altered glucose metabolism, impaired insulin signaling, low-grade inflammatory state, and increased reactive oxygen species generation will be discussed. The importance of developing new pharmacological approaches that upregulate endothelium-derived nitric oxide synthesis and target key vascular ROS-producing enzymes will be highlighted and new strategies that might prove clinically relevant in preventing the development and/or retarding the progression of diabetes associated vascular complications.

  19. Cerebral computed tomography in maple syrup urine disease.

    PubMed

    Romero, F J; Ibarra, B; Rovira, M; Natal, A; Herrera, M; Segarra, A

    1984-06-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inherited metabolic disorder due to decreased decarboxylation of branched chain keto acids triggering an accumulation of leucine, isoleucine, and valine. We describe two infants with biochemically confirmed MSUD in whom computed tomography (CT) revealed cerebral edema. In one of these cases repeat CT 40 days after institution of appropriate therapy revealed that the edema had disappeared and the ventricles had enlarged.

  20. Epilepsy: unusual presentation of cerebral hydatid disease in Children

    PubMed Central

    Hajhouji, Farouk; Aniba, Khalid; Laghmari, Mehdi; Lmejjati, Mohammed; Ghannane, Houssine; Benali, Said Ait

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral hydatid disease is very rare, representing only 2% of all cerebral space occupying lesions even in the countries where the disease is endemic. Intracranial hydatid cysts are more common in children and occur more frequently in the supratentorial space. The aim of this paper is to describe the characteristic features of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to determine the clinical presentation and surgical outcome of cerebral hydatid disease. A 7-year-old girl was admitted to the emergency department because of an epileptic attack. On radiological examination a round, cystic lesion appeared in the parietal lobe and caused shift of the midline structures. The cyst was successfully removed using the dowling technique. The postoperative period was uneventful and seizures were not seen during follow up. Hydatid cyst of the brain presents clinically as intracranial space occupying lesion and is more common in children, it is well demonstrated by CT and MR examinations, and Surgery is the treatment option with affordable morbidity and low mortality.

  1. Vascular health late after Kawasaki disease: implications for accelerated atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD), an acute vasculitis that primarily affects young children, is the most common acquired paediatric cardiovascular disease in developed countries. While sequelae of arterial inflammation in the acute phase of KD are well documented, its late effects on vascular health are increasingly unveiled. Late vascular dysfunction is characterized by structural alterations and functional impairment in term of arterial stiffening and endothelial dysfunction and shown to involve both coronary and systemic arteries. Further evidence suggests that continuous low grade inflammation and ongoing active remodeling of coronary arterial lesions occur late after acute illness and may play a role in structural and functional alterations of the arteries. Potential importance of genetic modulation on vascular health late after KD is implicated by associations between mannose binding lectin and inflammatory gene polymorphisms with severity of peripheral arterial stiffening and carotid intima-media thickening. The changes in cholesterol and lipoproteins levels late after KD further appear similar to those proposed to be atherogenic. While data on adverse vascular health are less controversial in patients with persistent or regressed coronary arterial aneurysms, data appear conflicting in individuals with no coronary arterial involvements or only transient coronary ectasia. Notwithstanding, concerns have been raised with regard to predisposition of KD in childhood to accelerated atherosclerosis in adulthood. Until further evidence-based data are available, however, it remains important to assess and monitor cardiovascular risk factors and to promote cardiovascular health in children with a history of KD in the long term. PMID:25550701

  2. Extracellular vesicles as mediators of vascular inflammation in kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Helmke, Alexandra; von Vietinghoff, Sibylle

    2016-01-01

    Vascular inflammation is a common cause of renal impairment and a major cause of morbidity and mortality of patients with kidney disease. Current studies consistently show an increase of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in acute vasculitis and in patients with atherosclerosis. Recent research has elucidated mechanisms that mediate vascular wall leukocyte accumulation and differentiation. This review addresses the role of EVs in this process. Part one of this review addresses functional roles of EVs in renal vasculitis. Most published data address anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) associated vasculitis and indicate that the number of EVs, mostly of platelet origin, is increased in active disease. EVs generated from neutrophils by activation by ANCA can contribute to vessel damage. While EVs are also elevated in other types of autoimmune vasculitis with renal involvement such as systemic lupus erythematodes, functional consequences beyond intravascular thrombosis remain to be established. In typical hemolytic uremic syndrome secondary to infection with shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli, EV numbers are elevated and contribute to toxin distribution into the vascular wall. Part two addresses mechanisms how EVs modulate vascular inflammation in atherosclerosis, a process that is aggravated in uremia. Elevated numbers of circulating endothelial EVs were associated with atherosclerotic complications in a number of studies in patients with and without kidney disease. Uremic endothelial EVs are defective in induction of vascular relaxation. Neutrophil adhesion and transmigration and intravascular thrombus formation are critically modulated by EVs, a process that is amenable to therapeutic interventions. EVs can enhance monocyte adhesion to the endothelium and modulate macrophage differentiation and cytokine production with major influence on the local inflammatory milieu in the plaque. They significantly influence lipid phagocytosis and antigen presentation by

  3. Novel Applications of Radionuclide Imaging in Peripheral Vascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Stacy, Mitchel R; Sinusas, Albert J

    2016-02-01

    Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) is a progressive atherosclerotic disease that leads to stenosis or occlusion of blood vessels supplying the lower extremities. Current diagnostic imaging techniques commonly focus on evaluation of anatomy or blood flow at the macrovascular level and do not permit assessment of the underlying pathophysiology associated with disease progression or treatment response. Molecular imaging with radionuclide-based approaches can offer novel insight into PVD by providing noninvasive assessment of biological processes such as angiogenesis and atherosclerosis. This article discusses emerging radionuclide-based imaging approaches that have potential clinical applications in the evaluation of PVD progression and treatment.

  4. Vascular calcification in chronic kidney disease: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Eddington, Helen; Sinha, Smeeta; Kalra, Philip A

    2009-03-01

    Vascular calcification, which is associated with arterial stiffness, is now known to be an important predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in patients with renal disease. This calcification starts developing in the early stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is present in over 50% of patients at the time of dialysis commencement. Once calcification is present it continues to progress, though some medications have been shown to slow this progression. Vascular calcification and bone abnormalities are now both encompassed by the term of CKD-mineral bone disorder and are thought to be part of the same disease process in CKD. Vascular calcification and arterial stiffness have been extensively researched in the renal population and many factors are known to be associated with their presence and progression. This calcification is an important factor to be considered in the management of the renal patient but there are different methods available for its measurement. These details will be discussed further in this review along with evidence available for management of this important complication of renal disease.

  5. Alzheimer's Disease with Vascular Component: A Distinct Clinical Entity?

    PubMed Central

    Olazarán, Javier; Navarro, Eloísa; Rojo, José Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Background Longitudinal reports on the clinical features of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and concomitant cerebrovascular disease are scarce. Methods We elaborated a working definition of AD with vascular component (ADVC), and this definition was retrospectively investigated in a cohort of patients with cognitive deterioration who were prescribed a cholinesterase inhibitor during usual practice. Results A total of 137 patients with probable AD and 66 patients with ADVC were studied during a mean follow-up period of 2.8 years. Univariate analyses demonstrated worse functional evolution and anticipation of psychotic symptoms and agitation in the ADVC group. Conclusions The present results are consistent with an additive model of predominantly frontal-subcortical vascular damage in AD. PMID:23139685

  6. Optical detection of brain function: simultaneous imaging of cerebral vascular response, tissue metabolism, and cellular activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Du, Congwu; Pan, Yingtian

    2011-01-01

    It is known that a remaining challenge for functional brain imaging is to distinguish the coupling and decoupling effects among neuronal activity, cerebral metabolism, and vascular hemodynamics, which highlights the need for new tools to enable simultaneous measures of these three properties in vivo. Here, we review current neuroimaging techniques and their prospects and potential limitations for tackling this challenge. We then report a novel dual-wavelength laser speckle imaging (DW-LSI) tool developed in our labs that enables simultaneous imaging of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume, and tissue hemoglobin oxygenation, which allows us to monitor neurovascular and tissue metabolic activities at high spatiotemporal resolutions over a relatively large field of view. Moreover, we report digital frequency ramping Doppler optical coherence tomography (DFR-OCT) that allows for quantitative 3D imaging of the CBF network in vivo. In parallel, we review calcium imaging techniques to track neuronal activity, including intracellular calcium approach using Rhod2 fluorescence technique that we develop to detect neuronal activity in vivo. We report a new multimodality imaging platform that combines DW-LSI, DFR-OCT, and calcium fluorescence imaging for simultaneous detection of cortical hemodynamics, cerebral metabolism, and neuronal activities of the animal brain in vivo, as well as its integration with microprobes for imaging neuronal function in deep brain regions in vivo. Promising results of in vivo animal brain functional studies suggest the potential of this multimodality approach for future awake animal and behavioral studies.

  7. Crystal Structure of CCM3, a Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Protein Critical for Vascular Integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Zhang, R; Zhang, H; He, Y; Ji, W; Min, W; Boggon, T

    2010-01-01

    CCM3 mutations are associated with cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM), a disease affecting 0.1-0.5% of the human population. CCM3 (PDCD10, TFAR15) is thought to form a CCM complex with CCM1 and CCM2; however, the molecular basis for these interactions is not known. We have determined the 2.5 {angstrom} crystal structure of CCM3. This structure shows an all {alpha}-helical protein containing two domains, an N-terminal dimerization domain with a fold not previously observed, and a C-terminal focal adhesion targeting (FAT)-homology domain. We show that CCM3 binds CCM2 via this FAT-homology domain and that mutation of a highly conserved FAK-like hydrophobic pocket (HP1) abrogates CCM3-CCM2 interaction. This CCM3 FAT-homology domain also interacts with paxillin LD motifs using the same surface, and partial CCM3 co-localization with paxillin in cells is lost on HP1 mutation. Disease-related CCM3 truncations affect the FAT-homology domain suggesting a role for the FAT-homology domain in the etiology of CCM.

  8. Crystal structure of CCM3, a cerebral cavernous malformation protein critical for vascular integrity.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Haifeng; He, Yun; Ji, Weidong; Min, Wang; Boggon, Titus J

    2010-07-30

    CCM3 mutations are associated with cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM), a disease affecting 0.1-0.5% of the human population. CCM3 (PDCD10, TFAR15) is thought to form a CCM complex with CCM1 and CCM2; however, the molecular basis for these interactions is not known. We have determined the 2.5 A crystal structure of CCM3. This structure shows an all alpha-helical protein containing two domains, an N-terminal dimerization domain with a fold not previously observed, and a C-terminal focal adhesion targeting (FAT)-homology domain. We show that CCM3 binds CCM2 via this FAT-homology domain and that mutation of a highly conserved FAK-like hydrophobic pocket (HP1) abrogates CCM3-CCM2 interaction. This CCM3 FAT-homology domain also interacts with paxillin LD motifs using the same surface, and partial CCM3 co-localization with paxillin in cells is lost on HP1 mutation. Disease-related CCM3 truncations affect the FAT-homology domain suggesting a role for the FAT-homology domain in the etiology of CCM.

  9. Oxidative stress and microRNAs in vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Magenta, Alessandra; Greco, Simona; Gaetano, Carlo; Martelli, Fabio

    2013-08-22

    Oxidative stress has been demonstrated to play a causal role in different vascular diseases, such as hypertension, diabetic vasculopathy, hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. Indeed, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is known to impair endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell functions, contributing to the development of cardiovascular diseases. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNA molecules that modulate the stability and/or the translational efficiency of target messenger RNAs. They have been shown to be modulated in most biological processes, including in cellular responses to redox imbalance. In particular, miR-200 family members play a crucial role in oxidative-stress dependent endothelial dysfunction, as well as in cardiovascular complications of diabetes and obesity. In addition, different miRNAs, such as miR-210, have been demonstrated to play a key role in mitochondrial metabolism, therefore modulating ROS production and sensitivity. In this review, we will discuss miRNAs modulated by ROS or involved in ROS production, and implicated in vascular diseases in which redox imbalance has a pathogenetic role.

  10. IR imaging of blood circulation of patients with vascular disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsin; Wade, Dwight R., Jr.; Kam, Jack

    2004-04-01

    We conducted a preliminary IR imaging study of blood circulation in patients with peripheral vascular diseases. Abnormal blood flow is common in older adults, especially those with elevated blood lipids, diabetes, hypertension, and a history of smoking. All of these conditions have a high prevalence in our population, often with more than one condition in the same individual. The differences in blood flow is revealed by temperature differences in areas of the extremities as well as other regions of the body. However, what is needed is an imaging technique that is relatively inexpensive and can reveal the blood flow in real time. The IR imaging can show detailed venous system and small tempearture changes associated with blood flow. Six patients with vascular diseases were tested in a clinic set up. Their legs and feet were imaged. We observed large temperature differences (cooling of more than 10° C) at the foot, especially toes. More valuable information were obtained from the temperature distribution maps. IR thermography is potentially a very valuable tool for medical application, especially for vascular diseases.

  11. Motor neuron disease: biomarker development for an expanding cerebral syndrome.

    PubMed

    Turner, Martin R

    2016-12-01

    Descriptions of motor neuron disease (MND) documented more than a century ago remain instantly recognisable to the physician. The muscle weakness, typically with signs of upper and lower motor neuron dysfunction, is uniquely relentless. Over the last 30 years, a wider cerebral pathology has emerged, despite the lack of overt cognitive impairment in the majority of patients. From the initial linkage of a small number of cases to mutations in SOD1, diverse cellular pathways have been implicated in pathogenesis. An increasingly complex clinical heterogeneity has emerged around a significant variability in survival. Defining a cellular signature of aggregated TDP-43 common to nearly all MND and a large proportion of frontotemporal dementia (FTD), has placed MND alongside more traditional cerebral neurodegeneration. With new genetic causes, most notably a hexanucleotide expansion in C9orf72 associated with both MND and FTD, the development of biomarkers against which to test therapeutic candidates is a priority.

  12. Hyponatremia in acute brain disease: the cerebral salt wasting syndrome.

    PubMed

    Betjes, Michiel G.H.

    2002-02-01

    Hyponatremia in acute brain disease is a common occurrence, especially after an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Originally, excessive natriuresis, called cerebral salt wasting, and later the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH), were considered to be the causes of hyponatremia. In recent years, it has become clear that most of these patients are volume-depleted and have a negative sodium balance, consistent with the original description of cerebral salt wasting. Elevated plasma concentrations of atrial or brain natriuretic peptide have been identified as the putative natriuretic factor. Hyponatremia and volume depletion may aggravate neurological symptoms, and timely treatment with adequate replacement of water and NaCl is essential. The use of fludrocortisone to increase sodium reabsorption by the renal tubules may be an alternative approach.

  13. Putative mechanisms behind effects of spinal cord stimulation on vascular diseases: a review of experimental studies

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mingyuan; Linderoth, Bengt; Foreman, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a widely used clinical technique to treat ischemic pain in peripheral, cardiac and cerebral vascular diseases. The use of this treatment advanced rapidly during the late 80's and 90's, particularly in Europe. Although the clinical benefits of SCS are clear and the success rate remains high, the mechanisms are not yet completely understood. SCS at lumbar spinal segments (L2-L3) produces vasodilation in the lower limbs and feet which is mediated by antidromic activation of sensory fibers and decreased sympathetic outflow. SCS at thoracic spinal segments (T1-T2) induces several benefits including pain relief, reduction in both frequency and severity of angina attacks, and reduced short-acting nitrate intake. The benefits to the heart are not likely due to an increase, or redistribution of local blood flow, rather, they are associated with SCS-induced myocardial protection and normalization of the intrinsic cardiac nervous system. At somewhat lower cervical levels (C3-C6), SCS induces increased blood flow in the upper extremities. SCS at the upper cervical spinal segments (C1-C2) increased cerebral blood flow, which is associated with a decrease in sympathetic activity, an increase in vasomotor center activity and a release of neurohumoral factors. This review will summarize the basic science studies that have contributed to our understanding about mechanisms through which SCS produces beneficial effects when used in the treatment of vascular diseases. Furthermore, this review will particularly focus on the antidromic mechanisms of SCS-induced vasodilation in the lower limbs and feet. PMID:18083639

  14. Association between Bacterial Infection and Peripheral Vascular Disease: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Budzyński, Jacek; Wiśniewska, Joanna; Ciecierski, Marek; Kędzia, Anna

    2015-01-01

    There are an increasing number of data showing a clinically important association between bacterial infection and peripheral artery disease (PAD). Bacteria suspected of being involved in PAD pathogenesis are: periodontal bacteria, gut microbiota, Helicobacter pylori, and Chlamydia pneumoniae. Infectious agents may be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis via activation of a systemic or local host immunological response to contamination of extravascular tissues or the vascular wall, respectively. A systemic immunological reaction may damage vascular walls in the course of autoimmunological cross-reactions between anti-pathogen antibodies and host vascular antigens (immunological mimicry), pathogen burden mechanisms (nonspecific activation of inflammatory processes in the vascular wall), and neuroendocrine-immune cross-talk. Besides activating the inflammatory pathway, bacterial infection may trigger PAD progression or exacerbation by enhancement of platelet reactivity, by a stimulatory effect on von Willebrand factor binding, factor VIII, fibrinogen, P-selectin activation, disturbances in plasma lipids, increase in oxidative stress, and resistance to insulin. Local inflammatory host reaction and induction of atherosclerotic plaque progression and/or instability result mainly from atherosclerotic plaque colonization by microorganisms. Despite these premises, the role of bacterial infection in PAD pathogenesis should still be recognized as controversial, and randomized, controlled trials are required to evaluate the outcome of periodontal or gut bacteria modification (through diet, prebiotics, and probiotics) or eradication (using antibiotics) in hard and surrogate cardiovascular endpoints. PMID:26900306

  15. Rac-1 as a new therapeutic target in cerebro- and cardio-vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Carrizzo, Albino; Forte, Maurizio; Lembo, Maria; Formisano, Luigi; Puca, Annibale A; Vecchione, Carmine

    2014-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays a prominent role in the development of cardio- and cerebro-vascular diseases. Among the mechanisms identified to produce oxidative stress in the vascular wall, those mediated by membrane-bound NAD(P)H oxidases represent a major one. NAD(P)H oxidases are a family of enzymes that generate ROS both in phagocytic and non-phagocytic cell types. Vascular NAD(P)H oxidase contains the membrane-bound subunits Nox1, Nox2 (gp91phox), Nox4 and p22phox, the catalytic site of the oxidase, and the cytosolic components p47phox and p67phox. Rac1 (Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate1) is a small GTPase essential for the assembly and activation of NADPH oxidase. Several molecular and cellular studies have reported the involvement of Rac1 in different cardiovascular pathologies, such as vascular smooth muscle proliferation, cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, endothelial cell shape change, atherosclerosis and endothelial dysfunction in hypertension. In addition, increased activation of NADPH oxidase by Rac1 has been reported in animals and humans after myocardial infarction and heart failure. The Rac1/NADPH pathway has also been found involved in different pathologies of the cerebral district, such as ischemic stroke, cognitive impairment, subaracnoid hemorrhage and neuronal oxidative damage typical of several neurodegenerative disorders. In addition, thrombotic events are an important step in the onset of cardio- and cerebrovascular diseases. Rac1 has been found involved also in platelet activation, inducing actin polymerization and lamellipodia formation, which are necessary steps for platelet aggregation. Taken together, the evidence candidates Rac1 as a new pharmacological target of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. Although the involvement of Rac1 in the beneficial pleiotropic effects of drugs such as statins is well known, and the onset of numerous side effects has raised concern for the

  16. Current Treatment Strategies: Collagen Vascular Diseases in Children

    PubMed Central

    Palit, Aparna; Inamadar, Arun C

    2012-01-01

    Of the various collagen vascular diseases seen in pediatric age group, discoid lupus erythematosus, systemic lupus erythematosus, neonatal lupus erythematosus, juvenile dermatomyositis and childhood scleroderma are common and of practical importance to clinicians. Various treatment modalities of these conditions have been discussed at length. Of these, some are conventional and routine,while others are used in challenging situations of these diseases. Autologous stem cell transplant, biological therapies, intravenous immunoglobulin and narrow band ultraviolet B are among the latest therapeutic options for these difficult-to-treat conditions in children. PMID:23248363

  17. Impact of Indoxyl Sulfate on Progenitor Cell-Related Neovascularization of Peripheral Arterial Disease and Post-Angioplasty Thrombosis of Dialysis Vascular Access

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chih-Cheng; Hung, Szu-Chun; Kuo, Ko-Lin; Tarng, Der-Cherng

    2017-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have an increased risk of vascular disease, which is associated with considerable health care costs. Vascular disease in CKD differs clinically and pathobiologically from that in patients with normal renal function. Besides the traditional risk factors, retention of uremic toxins contributes to the pathogenesis of vascular disease in patients with CKD. Indoxyl sulfate is a protein-bound uremic toxin and is inefficiently removed by conventional dialysis. Accumulating evidence suggests that indoxyl sulfate is a vascular toxin involved in atherosclerosis, arteriosclerosis, vascular calcification and vascular repair. Clinically, indoxyl sulfate is associated with total and cardiovascular mortality in patients with CKD. Recent studies have indicated that in addition to coronary and cerebral arteries, indoxyl sulfate plays a role in peripheral artery disease (PAD) and dialysis graft thrombosis. Emerging evidence suggests that indoxyl sulfate is implicated via novel mechanisms, including progenitor cell-related neovascularization and tissue factor-related hypercoagulability. These findings raise the possibility that strategies targeting serum indoxyl sulfate may have the potential to improve the outcomes of PAD and dialysis vascular access in patients with CKD. PMID:28067862

  18. Chronic rapamycin restores brain vascular integrity and function through NO synthase activation and improves memory in symptomatic mice modeling Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ai-Ling; Zheng, Wei; Halloran, Jonathan J; Burbank, Raquel R; Hussong, Stacy A; Hart, Matthew J; Javors, Martin; Shih, Yen-Yu Ian; Muir, Eric; Solano Fonseca, Rene; Strong, Randy; Richardson, Arlan G; Lechleiter, James D; Fox, Peter T; Galvan, Veronica

    2013-01-01

    Vascular pathology is a major feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other dementias. We recently showed that chronic administration of the target-of-rapamycin (TOR) inhibitor rapamycin, which extends lifespan and delays aging, halts the progression of AD-like disease in transgenic human (h)APP mice modeling AD when administered before disease onset. Here we demonstrate that chronic reduction of TOR activity by rapamycin treatment started after disease onset restored cerebral blood flow (CBF) and brain vascular density, reduced cerebral amyloid angiopathy and microhemorrhages, decreased amyloid burden, and improved cognitive function in symptomatic hAPP (AD) mice. Like acetylcholine (ACh), a potent vasodilator, acute rapamycin treatment induced the phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) and NO release in brain endothelium. Administration of the NOS inhibitor L-NG-Nitroarginine methyl ester reversed vasodilation as well as the protective effects of rapamycin on CBF and vasculature integrity, indicating that rapamycin preserves vascular density and CBF in AD mouse brains through NOS activation. Taken together, our data suggest that chronic reduction of TOR activity by rapamycin blocked the progression of AD-like cognitive and histopathological deficits by preserving brain vascular integrity and function. Drugs that inhibit the TOR pathway may have promise as a therapy for AD and possibly for vascular dementias. PMID:23801246

  19. Cerebral blood flow in sickle cell cerebrovascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Huttenlocher, P.R.; Moohr, J.W.; Johns, L.; Brown, F.D.

    1984-05-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) has been studied by the xenon-133 (/sup 133/Xe) inhalation method in 16 children with suspected sickle cell cerebrovascular disease. Abnormalities consisting of decreases in total, hemispheral, or regional CBF were found in 17 of 26 studies. Eleven studies performed immediately after stroke, transient ischemic attack, or depression of state of alertness showed abnormalities. In addition to confirming regional cerebrovascular insufficiency in children with stroke due to major cerebral artery occlusion, the method detected diffuse decrease in CBF in children with stupor, coma, and seizures who had normal angiographic findings. In contrast, six of seven studies obtained after exchange transfusion or during maintenance on hypertransfusion therapy showed normal findings. The difference between results in patients with acute neurologic disturbances and those receiving transfusion therapy was statistically significant (P less than .005). The data indicate that the /sup 133/Xe method reliably demonstrates cerebrovascular impairment in sickle cell disease. They also suggest that CBF changes in patients with sickle cell disease can be reversed by exchange transfusion and by hypertransfusion therapy. The /sup 133/Xe CBF method may be useful for following up children with sickle cell disease who are at high risk for recurrent stroke.

  20. The primary vascular dysregulation syndrome: implications for eye diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Vascular dysregulation refers to the regulation of blood flow that is not adapted to the needs of the respective tissue. We distinguish primary vascular dysregulation (PVD, formerly called vasospastic syndrome) and secondary vascular dysregulation (SVD). Subjects with PVD tend to have cold extremities, low blood pressure, reduced feeling of thirst, altered drug sensitivity, increased pain sensitivity, prolonged sleep onset time, altered gene expression in the lymphocytes, signs of oxidative stress, slightly increased endothelin-1 plasma level, low body mass index and often diffuse and fluctuating visual field defects. Coldness, emotional or mechanical stress and starving can provoke symptoms. Virtually all organs, particularly the eye, can be involved. In subjects with PVD, retinal vessels are stiffer and more irregular, and both neurovascular coupling and autoregulation capacity are reduced while retinal venous pressure is often increased. Subjects with PVD have increased risk for normal-tension glaucoma, optic nerve compartment syndrome, central serous choroidopathy, Susac syndrome, retinal artery and vein occlusions and anterior ischaemic neuropathy without atherosclerosis. Further characteristics are their weaker blood–brain and blood-retinal barriers and the higher prevalence of optic disc haemorrhages and activated astrocytes. Subjects with PVD tend to suffer more often from tinnitus, muscle cramps, migraine with aura and silent myocardial ischaemic and are at greater risk for altitude sickness. While the main cause of vascular dysregulation is vascular endotheliopathy, dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system is also involved. In contrast, SVD occurs in the context of other diseases such as multiple sclerosis, retrobulbar neuritis, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia and giant cell arteritis. Taking into consideration the high prevalence of PVD in the population and potentially linked pathologies, in the current article, the authors provide

  1. Diffuse and uncontrolled vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation in rapidly progressing pediatric moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Reid, Amy J; Bhattacharjee, Meenakshi B; Regalado, Ellen S; Milewicz, Allen L; El-Hakam, Lisa M; Dauser, Robert C; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2010-09-01

    Moyamoya disease is a rare stroke syndrome of unknown etiology resulting from stenosis or occlusion of the supraclinoid internal carotid artery (ICA) in association with an abnormal vascular network in the basal ganglia. Although the highest incidence of moyamoya disease is in pediatric patients, pathology reports have been primarily limited to adult samples and describe occlusive fibrocellular lesions in the intimae of affected arteries. We describe the case of a young girl with primary moyamoya disease who presented at 18 months of age with right hemiparesis following an ischemic stroke. Angiography showed stenosis of the distal left ICA, left middle cerebral artery, and right ICA. An emergent left-sided dural inversion was performed. Recurrent strokes and alternating hemiplegia necessitated a right dural inversion 6 months later. Nonetheless, her aggressive disease proved uniquely refractory to surgical revascularization, and she succumbed to recurrent strokes and neurological deterioration at 2.5 years of age. Pathological specimens revealed a striking bilateral occlusion of the anterior carotid circulation resulting from intimal proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Most strikingly, the ascending aorta and the superior mesenteric artery demonstrated similar intimal proliferation, along with SMC proliferation in the media. The systemic pathology involving multiple arteries in this extremely young child, the first case of its kind available for autopsy, suggests that globally uncontrolled SMC proliferation, in the absence of environmental risk factors and likely resulting from an underlying genetic alteration, may be a primary etiologic event leading to moyamoya disease.

  2. Optical Assessment of Vascular Disease Progression and Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuels, Joshua A.

    Vascular disease manifests itself in many different forms, including chronic ulcers which do not heal, impaired blood flow to the limbs, or damage to the natural reperfusion process. The current forms of assessing vascular disease are often subjective and provide incomplete knowledge about the tissue of interest. This work focused on developing non-invasive techniques to quantitatively evaluate three specific elements of vascular disease: diabetic ulcers, venous ulcers, and peripheral arterial disease. Diffuse Near Infrared Spectroscopy (DNIRS) was used to predict healing (82% positive predictive value) in diabetic ulcers after 4 weeks of assessment (sensitivity of 0.9 and specificity of 0.86; p<0.002), proving to be an alternative and superior method to wound size reduction alone (the current gold standard). A novel therapeutic ultrasound treatment for venous ulcers, using a low-frequency (20kHz), low intensity (<100mW/cm2 ISPTP), fully-wearable applicator, was assessed using DNIRS and Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy (DCS), wherein it was established that capillary flow changes over time in healing venous ulcers compared to wounds which do not heal (p<0.01). It was also determined that the ultrasound therapy was successful at improving wound outcomes, specifically the rate of wound closure per week (p<0.05 for wound size, p<0.01 for optical data). Finally, DNIRS and DCS were used in conjunction to assess the reactive hyperemic response in patients with suspected Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD). It was found that the time between the release of cuff occlusion in the diseased limb and the first peak of reperfusion (flow mediated dilatation) correlated to PAD severity, with longer times (>30 seconds) belonging to patients with PAD (p<0.05). Additionally, it was discovered that the magnitude of the reperfusion did not relate to PAD, but rather to tobacco use. Patients who smoked had reduced hyperemic responses (p<0.02), whether or not they had PAD. Overall, this

  3. [Application of multislice CT for the diagnosis of cerebro-vascular disease].

    PubMed

    Katada, Kazuhiro

    2004-11-01

    Introduction of multislice CT (MSCT) has revolutionizing the diagnosis of cerebro-vascular disease. Newly developed 32-slice MSCT enabled us to acquire isotropic volumetric data of whole brain with the resolution of 0.5-mm. CT perfusion is one of the promising application for the diagnosis of early-staged cerebral ischemia. However, it can be hazardous in terms of ionic radiation because of multiplied exposure to the same level. A new quantum denoising filter was developed in order to solve this problem. It is possible to reduce more than 80% of dose using the filter in combination with lower kv/lower mA technique. This filter can also aids to improve the detection of early CT signs, which is important for the diagnosis of cerebral ischemia. Detection of the penumbra can be made by revealing the absence of early CT sign and low perfusion area in CT perfusion. Isotropic volumetric data provided by MSCA can also be an ideal source data for the high-quality 3D-CT angiography. Improved temporal resolution of MSCT in obtaining volumetric data made it possible separated visualization of arteries and veins on single 3D-CTA image. The technique to visualize brain surface using isotropic data and volume rendering algorithm was also reported.

  4. Immunosuppression Related to Collagen-Vascular Disease or Its Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Carol Dukes

    2005-01-01

    Collagen-vascular diseases are associated with immune dysregulation and inflammation, leading to tissue destruction or compromise. Immunosuppression is more commonly associated with the drugs used to treat these disorders than with the diseases themselves. The newest agents being used to treat collagen-vascular diseases are the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors. U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved TNF-α inhibitors have differing effects on the immune system, reflecting their potency and mechanisms of action. They are particularly effective in breaking down granulomatous inflammation, which makes them effective treatment for sarcoidosis and Wegener's granulomatosis. This same property makes them likely to break down the host defense mechanism that normally contains pathogens such as mycobacteria and fungi in a dormant state, namely the physical and immunologic barrier formed by granulomas in the lung and elsewhere. The most common infection reported with the TNF-α inhibitors has been tuberculosis, which may manifest as pulmonary and/or extrapulmonary disease, with the latter being more common and severe than usual. Histoplasma capsulatum, Aspergillus, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Listeria monocytogenes have also been described in a number of cases, and their frequency is discussed. PMID:16322600

  5. Extracellular nucleotide and nucleoside signaling in vascular and blood disease

    PubMed Central

    Idzko, Marco; Ferrari, Davide; Riegel, Ann-Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    Nucleotides and nucleosides—such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine—are famous for their intracellular roles as building blocks for the genetic code or cellular energy currencies. In contrast, their function in the extracellular space is different. Here, they are primarily known as signaling molecules via activation of purinergic receptors, classified as P1 receptors for adenosine or P2 receptors for ATP. Because extracellular ATP is rapidly converted to adenosine by ectonucleotidase, nucleotide-phosphohydrolysis is important for controlling the balance between P2 and P1 signaling. Gene-targeted mice for P1, P2 receptors, or ectonucleotidase exhibit only very mild phenotypic manifestations at baseline. However, they demonstrate alterations in disease susceptibilities when exposed to a variety of vascular or blood diseases. Examples of phenotypic manifestations include vascular barrier dysfunction, graft-vs-host disease, platelet activation, ischemia, and reperfusion injury or sickle cell disease. Many of these studies highlight that purinergic signaling events can be targeted therapeutically. PMID:25001468

  6. Ambulatory arterial stiffness index is not associated with magnetic resonance imaging markers of cerebral small vessel disease in lacunar stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Klarenbeek, Pim; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; Staals, Julie

    2015-05-01

    Ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) is associated with microvascular damage in other organs, but the association with microvascular brain damage is unknown. The association of AASI with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) markers of cerebral small vessel disease in 143 patients with lacunar stroke was investigated. We performed 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and scored the presence of lacunes, white matter hyperintensities, perivascular spaces, and cerebral microbleeds on brain MRI. In logistic regression analyses, AASI was associated with white matter hyperintensities, but, after adjustment for age and sex, this association lost significance. AASI was not associated with lacunes, microbleeds, or perivascular spaces. Systolic and diastolic 24-hour blood pressure values were associated with lacunes, perivascular spaces, and microbleeds independent of age and sex. Despite its significance and growing interest as a possible prognostic and therapeutic target in (micro)vascular diseases, AASI seems to have no added value over standard 24-hour blood pressure in cerebral small vessel disease.

  7. Exercise, vascular wall and cardiovascular diseases: an update (Part 1).

    PubMed

    Leung, Fung Ping; Yung, Lai Ming; Laher, Ismail; Yao, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Zhen Yu; Huang, Yu

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of morbidity and premature mortality in both women and men in most industrialized countries, and has for some time also established a prominent role in developing nations. In fact, obesity, diabetes mellitus and hypertension are now commonplace even in children and youths. Regular exercise is rapidly gaining widespread advocacy as a preventative measure in schools, medical circles and in the popular media. There is overwhelming evidence garnered from a number of sources, including epidemiological, prospective cohort and intervention studies, suggesting that CVD is largely a disease associated with physical inactivity. A rapidly advancing body of human and animal data confirms an important beneficial role for exercise in the prevention and treatment of CVD. In Part 1 of this review we discuss the impact of exercise on CVD, and we highlight the effects of exercise on (i) endothelial function by regulation of endothelial genes mediating oxidative metabolism, inflammation, apoptosis, cellular growth and proliferation, increased superoxide dismutase (SOD)-1, down-regulation of p67phox, changes in intracellular calcium level, increased vascular endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), expression and eNOS Ser-1177 phosphorylation; (ii) vascular smooth muscle function by either an increased affinity of the Ca2+ extrusion mechanism or an augmented Ca2+ buffering system by the superficial sarcoplasmic reticulum to increase Ca2+ sequestration, increase in K+ channel activity and/or expression, and increase in L-type Ca2+ current density; (iii) antioxidant systems by elevation of Mn-SOD, Cu/Zn-SOD and catalase, increases in glutathione peroxidase activity and activation of vascular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate [(NAD(P)H] oxidase and p22phox expression; (iv) heat shock protein (HSP) expression by stimulating HSP70 expression in myocardium, skeletal muscle and even in human leucocytes, probably through heat

  8. Clinical applications of lightguide diffuse reflectance spectrophotometry in vascular disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, David K.; Delaney, Colin; Brown, Linda; Newton, David J.; McCollum, Peter T.

    1994-02-01

    There is enormous potential for application of lightguide tissue reflectance spectrophotometry in the diagnosis and treatment of peripheral vascular disease. In the present study, measurements were carried out in 10 such pre-amputation patients to compare the use of micro-lightguide spectrophotometry with the macro-lightguide technique. These preliminary results show excellent agreement between the new, non-invasive micro-lightguide technique and the `gold standard' skin blood flow measurements. This technique could thus provide a more functional, non-invasive assessment of healing potential than skin blood flow measurement.

  9. Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty in Peripheral Vascular Disease: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Eugene L. St.; Provan, John L.; Gray, Robin R.; Grosman, Harvey; Ameli, F. Michael; Elliott, David S.

    1982-01-01

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty is a relatively new technique employed in the treatment of stenoses or occlusions of peripheral arteries. While the longterm success rates have yet to be determined, short-term results have been excellent. The procedure has greatest value in the dilatation of localized lesions, avoiding surgery and its attendant risks. However, PTA and surgery are complementary, not competing, modes of therapy. PTA complements the traditional therapy of peripheral vascular disease, which remains reconstructive surgery. ImagesFig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:21286052

  10. Advances in non-invasive imaging of intracranial vascular disease.

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, H. R.; Grieve, J. P.

    2000-01-01

    Intra-arterial catheter angiography has, in the past, been the mainstay for the investigation of intracranial vascular disease. It is, however, invasive, usually requires in-patients admission, and is associated with a rate of neurological complications between 1% and 3%. In recent years, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and CT angiography (CTA) have emerged as non-invasive alternatives for imaging blood vessels and have made a significant impact on neuroradiological investigations. It is the purpose of this article to explain the basic technical principles of these two methods and to give an overview of their current clinical applications. PMID:10700757

  11. Isometric Exercise Training for Managing Vascular Risk Factors in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Nicole C. L.; Smart, Neil A.

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia diagnosed amongst the elderly. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a condition often indicative of the earliest symptomatology of AD with 10%–15% of MCI patients reportedly progressing to a diagnosis of AD. Individuals with a history of vascular risk factors (VRF’s) are considered high risk candidates for developing cognitive impairment in later life. Evidence suggests that vascular injury resulting from untreated VRF’s promotes progression from MCI to AD and exacerbates the severity of dementia in AD, and neuroimaging studies have found that the neurodegenerative processes associated with AD are heavily driven by VRF’s that promote cerebral hypoperfusion. Subsequently, common links between vascular disorders such as hypertension and neurodegenerative disorders such as AD include compromised vasculature, cerebral hypoperfusion and chronic low grade inflammation (a hallmark of both hypertension and AD). Exercise has been demonstrated to be an effective intervention for blood pressure management, chronic low grade inflammation and improvements in cognition. Data from recent analyses suggests that isometric exercise training (IET) may improve vascular integrity and elicit blood pressure reductions in hypertensives greater than those seen with dynamic aerobic and resistance exercise. IET may also play an effective role in the management of VRF’s at the MCI stage of AD and may prove to be a significant strategy in the prevention, attenuation or delay of progression to AD. A plausible hypothesis is that the reactive hyperemia stimulated by IET initiates a cascade of vascular, neurotrophic and neuro-endocrine events that lead to improvements in cognitive function. PMID:28316570

  12. Structural network connectivity and cognition in cerebral small vessel disease.

    PubMed

    Tuladhar, Anil M; van Dijk, Ewoud; Zwiers, Marcel P; van Norden, Anouk G W; de Laat, Karlijn F; Shumskaya, Elena; Norris, David G; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD), including white matter hyperintensities (WMH), lacunes and microbleeds, and brain atrophy, are related to cognitive impairment. However, these magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) markers for SVD do not account for all the clinical variances observed in subjects with SVD. Here, we investigated the relation between conventional MRI markers for SVD, network efficiency and cognitive performance in 436 nondemented elderly with cerebral SVD. We computed a weighted structural connectivity network from the diffusion tensor imaging and deterministic streamlining. We found that SVD-severity (indicated by higher WMH load, number of lacunes and microbleeds, and lower total brain volume) was related to networks with lower density, connection strengths, and network efficiency, and to lower scores on cognitive performance. In multiple regressions models, network efficiency remained significantly associated with cognitive index and psychomotor speed, independent of MRI markers for SVD and mediated the associations between these markers and cognition. This study provides evidence that network (in)efficiency might drive the association between SVD and cognitive performance. This highlights the importance of network analysis in our understanding of SVD-related cognitive impairment in addition to conventional MRI markers for SVD and might provide an useful tool as disease marker.

  13. Vascular Function, Cerebral Cortical Thickness, and Cognitive Performance in Middle-Aged Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Caucasian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Pasha, Evan; Kaur, Sonya S.; Gonzales, Mitzi M.; Machin, Daniel R.; Kasischke, Kennon; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Haley, Andreana P.

    2015-01-01

    Hispanics are at increased risk of acquiring cardiovascular risk factors that contribute to cognitive dysfunction. To compare indices of vascular health to measures of cerebral gray matter integrity, 60 middle-aged Hispanic and non-Hispanic Caucasian participants were matched across age, gender, years of education, and mental status. Arterial stiffness was characterized via β-stiffness index and carotid-femoral pulse-wave velocity, and magnetic resonance imaging estimated cortical thickness in a priori regions of interest known to be susceptible to vascular risk factors. Measures of arterial stiffness were significantly higher in Hispanics than in non-Hispanic Caucasians. Hispanics exhibited thinner left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) cortical thickness (p=0.04) with concurrently lower language (p=0.02), memory (p=0.03), and attention-executive functioning (p=0.02). These results suggest that compromised vascular health may occur simultaneously with cortical thinning of the LIFG as an early neuropathological alteration in Hispanics. PMID:25720950

  14. Reduced nitric oxide bioavailability mediates cerebroarterial dysfunction independent of cerebral amyloid angiopathy in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Merlini, Mario; Shi, Yi; Keller, Stephan; Savarese, Gianluigi; Akhmedov, Alexander; Derungs, Rebecca; Spescha, Remo D; Kulic, Luka; Nitsch, Roger M; Lüscher, Thomas F; Camici, Giovanni G

    2017-02-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), cerebral arteries, in contrast to cerebral microvessels, show both cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) -dependent and -independent vessel wall pathology. However, it remains unclear whether CAA-independent vessel wall pathology affects arterial function, thereby chronically reducing cerebral perfusion, and, if so, which mechanisms mediate this effect. To this end, we assessed the ex vivo vascular function of the basilar artery and a similar-sized peripheral artery (femoral artery) in the Swedish-Arctic (SweArc) transgenic AD mouse model at different disease stages. Furthermore, we used quantitative immunohistochemistry to analyze CAA, endothelial morphology, and molecular pathways pertinent to vascular relaxation. We found that endothelium-dependent, but not smooth muscle-dependent, vasorelaxation was significantly impaired in basilar and femoral arteries of 15-mo-old SweArc mice compared with that of age-matched wild-type and 6-mo-old SweArc mice. This impairment was accompanied by significantly reduced levels of cyclic GMP, indicating a reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. However, no age- and genotype-related differences in oxidative stress as measured by lipid peroxidation were observed. Although parenchymal capillaries, arterioles, and arteries showed abundant CAA in the 15-mo-old SweArc mice, no CAA or changes in endothelial morphology were detected histologically in the basilar and femoral artery. Thus our results suggest that, in this AD mouse model, dysfunction of large intracranial, extracerebral arteries important for brain perfusion is mediated by reduced NO bioavailability rather than by CAA. This finding supports the growing body of evidence highlighting the therapeutic importance of targeting the cerebrovasculature in AD.

  15. Inflammasomes link vascular disease with neuroinflammation and brain disorders.

    PubMed

    Lénárt, Nikolett; Brough, David; Dénes, Ádám

    2016-10-01

    The role of inflammation in neurological disorders is increasingly recognised. Inflammatory processes are associated with the aetiology and clinical progression of migraine, psychiatric conditions, epilepsy, cerebrovascular diseases, dementia and neurodegeneration, such as seen in Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease. Both central and systemic inflammatory actions have been linked with the development of brain diseases, suggesting that complex neuro-immune interactions could contribute to pathological changes in the brain across multiple temporal and spatial scales. However, the mechanisms through which inflammation impacts on neurological disease are improperly defined. To develop effective therapeutic approaches, it is imperative to understand how detrimental inflammatory processes could be blocked selectively, or controlled for prolonged periods, without compromising essential immune defence mechanisms. Increasing evidence indicates that common risk factors for brain disorders, such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, hypertension, obesity or infection involve the activation of NLRP3, NLRP1, NLRC4 or AIM2 inflammasomes, which are also associated with various neurological diseases. This review focuses on the mechanisms whereby inflammasomes, which integrate diverse inflammatory signals in response to pathogen-driven stimuli, tissue injury or metabolic alterations in multiple cell types and different organs of the body, could functionally link vascular- and neurological diseases and hence represent a promising therapeutic target.

  16. Non-atherosclerotic vascular disease in the young.

    PubMed

    Camilo, Osvaldo; Goldstein, Larry B

    2005-10-01

    There are a large variety of non-atherosclerotic causes of ischemic stroke in the young. Arterial dissection, most commonly associated with non-traumatic causes, is among the most common. Both the carotid and vertebrobasilar circulations can be affected. The vasculitidies represent a rare, but potentially treatable series of conditions that can lead to stroke through diverse mechanisms. Moyamoya is a nonatherosclerotic, noninflammatory, nonamyloid vasculopathy characterized by chronic progressive stenosis or occlusion of the distal internal carotid arteries and/or proximal portions of the middle and/or anterior cerebral arteries. Moyamoya can be idiopathic (moyamoya disease) or the result of other conditions. An appreciation of the unusual causes of stroke in the young is important when considering secondary prevention measures.

  17. Cerebral compensation during motor imagery in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Helmich, Rick C; de Lange, Floris P; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Toni, Ivan

    2007-06-11

    In neurodegenerative disorders, neural damage can trigger compensatory mechanisms that minimize behavioural impairments. Here, we aimed at characterizing cerebral compensation during motor imagery in Parkinson's disease (PD), while controlling for altered motor execution and sensory feedback. We used a within-patient design to compare the most and least affected hand in 19 right-handed PD patients with markedly right-lateralized symptoms. We used a motor imagery (MI) task in which the patients were required to judge the laterality of hand images, rotated either in a lateral or in a medial orientation with respect to the body sagittal plane. This design allowed us to compare cerebral activity (using fMRI) evoked by MI of each hand separately, while objectively monitoring task performance. Reaction times and parieto-premotor activity increased in a similar manner as a function of stimulus rotation during motor imagery of left and right hands. However, patients were markedly slower when judging images of the affected hand in lateral orientations, and there was a corresponding increase in activity in the right extrastriate body area (EBA) and occipito-parietal cortex during mental rotation of the affected hand. Furthermore, these regions increased their connectivity towards the left PMd for right (affected) hands in a lateral orientation. We infer that, in strongly lateralized PD patients, motor imagery of the most-affected hand exploits additional resources in extrastriate visual areas. These findings characterize the cerebral bases of the increased dependence on visual information processing during the generation of motor plans in PD, pointing to its compensatory role.

  18. Antiphospholipid Syndrome and Vascular Ischemic (Occlusive) Diseases: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is primarily considered to be an autoimmune pathological condition that is also referred to as "Hughes syndrome". It is characterized by arterial and/or venous thrombosis and pregnancy pathologies in the presence of anticardiolipin antibodies and/or lupus anticoagulant. APS can occur either as a primary disease or secondary to a connective tissue disorder, most frequently systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Damage to the nervous system is one of the most prominent clinical constellations of sequelae in APS and includes (i) arterial/venous thrombotic events, (ii) psychiatric features and (iii) other non-thrombotic neurological syndromes. In this overview we compare the most important vascular ischemic (occlusive) disturbances (VIOD) with neuro-psychiatric symptomatics, together with complete, updated classifications and hypotheses for the etio-pathogenesis of APS with underlying clinical and laboratory criteria for optimal diagnosis and disease management. PMID:18159581

  19. Cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) disease: from monogenic forms to genetic susceptibility factors.

    PubMed

    Trapani, E; Retta, S F

    2015-09-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) is a vascular disease of proven genetic origin, which may arise sporadically or can be inherited as autosomal dominant condition with incomplete penetrance and highly variable expressivity. CCM lesions manifest across a range of different phenotypes, including wide interindividual differences in lesion number, size and susceptibility to intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), and may remain asymptomatic during the host's lifetime or result in pathological conditions of various type and severity at any age, with symptoms ranging from relatively minor (but still disabling) headaches through to very severe neurological deficits, seizures, and stroke. Currently, surgical removal of accessible lesions is the only direct therapeutic approach for CCM disease. However, whereas little information is available on the natural history of risk for patients to develop serious complications, such as ICH, prognostic biomarkers remain to be identified in order to ensure timely and optimal clinical decision making. In recent years, it has become clear that the three known CCM genes play an important role in controlling signalling pathways involved in cell responses to oxidative stress, pointing to a novel pathogenic mechanism whereby the function of CCM genes may be relevant in preventing vascular dysfunctions triggered by oxidative stress events. In turn, these novel findings have raised the possibility that genetic susceptibility factors related to differences in sensitivity to oxidative stress, including genetic polymorphisms, may contribute to interindividual differences in CCM disease susceptibility and severity. This review discusses recent progress toward the understanding of molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis and the identification of genetic susceptibility factors that could influence onset, progression and clinical severity of CCM disease, as well as consequent implications for the development of novel, safe and effective therapeutic

  20. Cerebrolysin improves symptoms and delays progression in patients with Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Allegri, R F; Guekht, A

    2012-04-01

    Dementia is the result of various cerebral disorders, leading to an acquired loss of memory and impaired cognitive ability. The most common forms are Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD). Neurotrophic factors are essential for the survival and differentiation of developing neurons and protecting them against damage under pathologic conditions. Cerebrolysin is a peptide preparation that mimics the pleiotropic effects of neurotrophic factors. Several clinical trials investigating the therapeutic efficacy of Cerebrolysin in AD and VaD have confirmed the proof of concept. The results of these trials have shown statistically significant and clinically relevant treatment effects of Cerebrolysin on cognitive, global and functional domains in mild to moderately severe stages of dementia. Doses of 10 and 30 mL were the most effective, but higher doses of up to 60 mL turned out to be most effective in improving neuropsychiatric symptoms, which become relevant at later stages of the disease. Combining treatment with cholinesterase inhibitors and Cerebrolysin indicated long-term synergistic treatment effects in mild to moderate AD. The efficacy of Cerebrolysin persisted for up to several months after treatment suggesting Cerebrolysin has not merely symptomatic benefits, but a disease-delaying potential. This paper reviews the clinical efficacy of Cerebrolysin in the treatment of dementia. Data were obtained from international, multicenter, randomized clinical trials performed in compliance with Good Clinical Practice and the principles of the Declaration of Helsinki (1964) and subsequent revisions.

  1. Molecular Pathogenesis of Retinal and Choroidal Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Campochiaro, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    There are two major types of ocular neovascularization that affect the retina, retinal neovascularization (NV) and subretinal or choroidal NV. Retinal NV occurs in a group of diseases referred to as ischemic retinopathies in which damage to retinal vessels results in retinal ischemia. Most prevalent of these are diabetic retinopathy and retinal vein occlusions. Subretinal and choroidal NV occur in diseases of the outer retina and Bruch’s membrane, the most prevalent of which is age-related macular degeneration. Numerous studies in mouse models have helped to elucidate the molecular pathogenesis underlying retinal, subretinal, and choroidal NV. There is considerable overlap because the precipitating event in each is stabilization of hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) which leads to upregulation of several hypoxia-regulated gene products, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), angiopoietin 2, vascular endothelial-protein tyrosine phosphatase (VE-PTP), and several others. Stimulation of VEGF signaling and suppression of Tie2 by angiopoietin 2 and VE-PTP are critical for sprouting of retinal, subretinal, and choroidal NV, with perturbation of Bruch’s membrane also needed for the latter. Additional HIF-1-regulated gene products cause further stimulation of the NV. It is difficult to model macular edema in animals and therefore proof-of-concept clinical trials were done and demonstrated that VEGF plays a central role and that suppression of Tie2 is also important. Neutralization of VEGF is currently the first line therapy for all of the above disease processes, but new treatments directed at some of the other molecular targets, particularly stabilization of Tie2, are likely to provide additional benefit for subretinal/choroidal NV and macular edema. In addition, the chronicity of these diseases as well as the implication of VEGF as a cause of retinal nonperfusion and progression of background diabetic retinopathy make sustained delivery approaches for

  2. Doxycycline, a matrix metalloprotease inhibitor, reduces vascular remodeling and damage after cerebral ischemia in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Pires, Paulo W; Rogers, Curt T; McClain, Jonathon L; Garver, Hannah S; Fink, Gregory D; Dorrance, Anne M

    2011-07-01

    Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are a family of zinc peptidases involved in extracellular matrix turnover. There is evidence that increased MMP activity is involved in remodeling of resistance vessels in chronic hypertension. Thus we hypothesized that inhibition of MMP activity with doxycycline (DOX) would attenuate vascular remodeling. Six-week-old male stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) were treated with DOX (50 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) in the drinking water) for 6 wk. Untreated SHRSP were controls. Blood pressure was measured by telemetry during the last week. Middle cerebral artery (MCA) and mesenteric resistance artery (MRA) passive structures were assessed by pressure myography. MMP-2 expression in aortas was measured by Western blot. All results are means ± SE. DOX caused a small increase in mean arterial pressure (SHRSP, 154 ± 1; SHRSP + DOX, 159 ± 3 mmHg; P < 0.001). Active MMP-2 expression was reduced in aorta from SHRSP + DOX (0.21 ± 0.06 vs. 0.49 ± 0.13 arbitrary units; P < 0.05). In the MCA, at 80 mmHg, DOX treatment increased the lumen (273.2 ± 4.7 vs. 238.3 ± 6.3 μm; P < 0.05) and the outer diameter (321 ± 5.3 vs. 290 ± 7.6 μm; P < 0.05) and reduced the wall-to-lumen ratio (0.09 ± 0.002 vs. 0.11 ± 0.003; P < 0.05). Damage after transient cerebral ischemia (transient MCA occlusion) was reduced in SHRSP + DOX (20.7 ± 4 vs. 45.5 ± 5% of hemisphere infarcted; P < 0.05). In the MRA, at 90 mmHg DOX, reduced wall thickness (29 ± 1 vs. 22 ± 1 μm; P < 0.001) and wall-to-lumen ratio (0.08 ± 0.004 vs. 0.11 ± 0.008; P < 0.05) without changing lumen diameter. These results suggest that MMPs are involved in hypertensive vascular remodeling in both the peripheral and cerebral vasculature and that DOX reduced brain damage after cerebral ischemia.

  3. Spatial mapping of dynamic cerebral autoregulation by multichannel near-infrared spectroscopy in high-grade carotid artery disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhard, Matthias; Schumacher, F. Konrad; Rutsch, Sebastian; Oeinck, Maximilian; Timmer, Jens; Mader, Irina; Schelter, Björn; Weiller, Cornelius; Kaller, Christoph P.

    2014-09-01

    The exact spatial distribution of impaired cerebral autoregulation in carotid artery disease is unknown. In this pilot study, we present a new approach of multichannel near-infrared spectroscopy (mcNIRS) for noninvasive spatial mapping of dynamic autoregulation in carotid artery disease. In 15 patients with unilateral severe carotid artery stenosis or occlusion, cortical hemodynamics in the bilateral frontal cortex were assessed from changes in oxyhemoglobin concentration using 52-channel NIRS (spatial resolution ˜2 cm). Dynamic autoregulation was graded by the phase shift between respiratory-induced 0.1 Hz oscillations of blood pressure and oxyhemoglobin. Ten of 15 patients showed regular phase values in the expected (patho) physiological range. Five patients had clearly outlying irregular phase values mostly due to artifacts. In patients with a regular phase pattern, a significant side-to-side difference of dynamic autoregulation was observed for the cortical border zone area between the middle and anterior cerebral artery (p<0.05). In conclusion, dynamic cerebral autoregulation can be spatially assessed from slow hemodynamic oscillations with mcNIRS. In high-grade carotid artery disease, cortical dynamic autoregulation is affected mostly in the vascular border zone. Spatial mapping of dynamic autoregulation may serve as a powerful tool for identifying brain regions at specific risks for hemodynamic infarction.

  4. Role of cerebral cortex in the neuropathology of Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Sánchez, Ana M.; Rebec, George V.

    2013-01-01

    An expansion of glutamine repeats in the N-terminal domain of the huntingtin protein leads to Huntington's disease (HD), a neurodegenerative condition characterized by the presence of involuntary movements, dementia, and psychiatric disturbances. Evaluation of postmortem HD tissue indicates that the most prominent cell loss occurs in cerebral cortex and striatum, forebrain regions in which cortical pyramidal neurons (CPNs) and striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) are the most affected. Subsequent evidence obtained from HD patients and especially from transgenic mouse models of HD indicates that long before neuronal death, patterns of communication between CPNs and MSNs become dysfunctional. In fact, electrophysiological signaling in transgenic HD mice is altered even before the appearance of the HD behavioral phenotype, suggesting that dysfunctional cortical input to the striatum sets the stage for the emergence of HD neurological signs. Striatal MSNs, moreover, project back to cortex via multi-synaptic connections, allowing for even further disruptions in cortical processing. An effective therapeutic strategy for HD, therefore, may lie in understanding the synaptic mechanisms by which it dysregulates the corticostriatal system. Here, we review literature evaluating the molecular, morphological, and physiological alterations in the cerebral cortex, a key component of brain circuitry controlling motor behavior, as they occur in both patients and transgenic HD models. PMID:23423362

  5. Prevention and Management of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Lacunar infarcts/lacunes, white matter hyperintensities (WMH), and cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) are considered various manifestations of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD). Since the exact mechanisms of these manifestations differ, their associated risk factors differ. High blood pressure is the most consistent risk factor for all of these manifestations. However, a "J curve" phenomenon in terms of blood pressure probably exists for WMH. The association between cholesterol levels and lacunar infarcts/lacunes or WMH was less consistent and sometimes conflicting; a low cholesterol level probably increases the risk of CMBs. Homocysteinemia appears to be associated with WMH. It is noteworthy that the risk factors profile may also differ between different lacunar patterns and CMBs located at different parts of the brain. Thrombolysis, antihypertensives, and statins are used to treat patients with symptomatic lacunar infarction, just as in those with other stroke subtypes. However, it should be remembered that bleeding risks increase in patients with extensive WMH and CMBs after thrombolysis therapy. According to the Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes trial results, a blood pressure reduction to <130 mmHg is recommended in patients with symptomatic lacunar infarction. However, an excessive blood pressure decrease may induce cognitive decline in older patients with extensive WMH. Dual antiplatelet therapy (aspirin plus clopidogrel) should be avoided because of the excessive risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. Although no particular antiplatelet is recommended, drugs such as cilostazol or triflusal may have advantages for patients with SVD since they are associated with less frequent bleeding complications than aspirin. PMID:26060798

  6. Oxidative stress and inflammation in cerebral cavernous malformation disease pathogenesis: Two sides of the same coin.

    PubMed

    Retta, Saverio Francesco; Glading, Angela J

    2016-12-01

    Cerebral Cavernous Malformation (CCM) is a vascular disease of proven genetic origin, which may arise sporadically or is inherited as an autosomal dominant condition with incomplete penetrance and highly variable expressivity. CCM lesions exhibit a range of different phenotypes, including wide inter-individual differences in lesion number, size, and susceptibility to intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Lesions may remain asymptomatic or result in pathological conditions of various type and severity at any age, with symptoms ranging from recurrent headaches to severe neurological deficits, seizures, and stroke. To date there are no direct therapeutic approaches for CCM disease besides the surgical removal of accessible lesions. Novel pharmacological strategies are particularly needed to limit disease progression and severity and prevent de novo formation of CCM lesions in susceptible individuals. Useful insights into innovative approaches for CCM disease prevention and treatment are emerging from a growing understanding of the biological functions of the three known CCM proteins, CCM1/KRIT1, CCM2 and CCM3/PDCD10. In particular, accumulating evidence indicates that these proteins play major roles in distinct signaling pathways, including those involved in cellular responses to oxidative stress, inflammation and angiogenesis, pointing to pathophysiological mechanisms whereby the function of CCM proteins may be relevant in preventing vascular dysfunctions triggered by these events. Indeed, emerging findings demonstrate that the pleiotropic roles of CCM proteins reflect their critical capacity to modulate the fine-tuned crosstalk between redox signaling and autophagy that govern cell homeostasis and stress responses, providing a novel mechanistic scenario that reconciles both the multiple signaling pathways linked to CCM proteins and the distinct therapeutic approaches proposed so far. In addition, recent studies in CCM patient cohorts suggest that genetic susceptibility

  7. Dietary vitamin K and therapeutic warfarin alter susceptibility to vascular calcification in experimental chronic kidney disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is cardiovascular disease (CVD), with vascular calcification (VC) being a key modifier of disease progression. A local regulator of vascular calcification is vitamin K. This gamma-glutamyl carboxylase substrate is an essential ...

  8. [The vascular manifestations of Behçet's disease: a case report].

    PubMed

    Basaran, M; Sever, K; Kafali, E; Ugurlucan, M; Alpagut, U; Dayioglu, E

    2005-03-01

    Behçet's disease is an inflammatory vasculitis which affects the arteries and veins. The vascular pathologies are the rare complications of this disease. We present here a patient with Behçet's disease who has been hospitalized several times because of plurifocal vascular manifestations.

  9. Prevalence and impact of vascular and Alzheimer pathologies in Lewy body disease.

    PubMed

    Jellinger, Kurt A; Attems, Johannes

    2008-04-01

    Whereas the prevalence and impact of vascular pathology in Alzheimer diease (AD) are well established, the role of vascular and Alzheimer pathologies in the progression of neurodegeneration and cognitive impairment in Parkinson disease (PD) is under discussion. A retrospective clinico-pathologic study of 100 patients with autopsy proven PD (including 44 cases with dementia/PDD) and 20 cases of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) confirmed essential clinical (duration of illness, Mini-Mental State Examination/MMSE, age at death) and morphologic differences between these groups; Lewy body Braak scores and Alzheimer pathologies (neuritic Braak stage, cortical Abeta plaque load, and generalized cerebral amyloid angiopathy or CAA) were significantly higher/more severe in DLB and PDD than in PD without dementia. Duration of illness showed no association to any of the examined pathologic parameters, while there was a moderate association between LB scores and neuritic Braak stages, the latter significantly increasing with age. Significant association between cerebrovascular lesions and neuritic Braak stage was seen in PDD but not in PD subjects without dementia. These data suggest an influence of Alzheimer-related lesions on the progression of the neurodegenerative process and, in particular, on cognitive decline in both PDD and DLB. On the other hand, both these factors in PD and DLB appear to be largely independent from coexistent vascular pathology, except in cases with severe cerebrovascular lesions or those related to neuritic AD pathology. Assessment of ApoE genotype in a small number of cases showed no significant differences in the severity of Abeta plaque load and CAA except for much lower intensities in non-demented epsilon3/3 patients. Despite increasing evidence suggesting synergistic reactions between alpha-synuclein (alphaSyn), tau and Abeta-peptides, the major protein markers of both AD and Lewy body diseases, and of both vascular pathology and AD, the

  10. Impaired vascular remodeling after endothelial progenitor cell transplantation in MMP9-deficient mice suffering cortical cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Morancho, Anna; Ma, Feifei; Barceló, Verónica; Giralt, Dolors; Montaner, Joan; Rosell, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are being investigated for advanced therapies, and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) has an important role in stroke recovery. Our aim was to determine whether tissue MMP9 influences the EPC-induced angiogenesis after ischemia. Wild-type (WT) and MMP9-deficient mice (MMP9/KO) were subjected to cerebral ischemia and treated with vehicle or outgrowth EPCs. After 3 weeks, we observed an increase in the peri-infarct vessel density in WT animals but not in MMP9/KO mice; no differences were found in the vehicle-treated groups. Our data suggest that tissue MMP9 has a crucial role in EPC-induced vascular remodeling after stroke. PMID:26219597

  11. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease Burden Is Increased in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Wiseman, Stewart J.; Bastin, Mark E.; Jardine, Charlotte L.; Barclay, Gayle; Hamilton, Iona F.; Sandeman, Elaine; Hunt, David; Amft, E. Nicole; Thomson, Susan; Belch, Jill F.F.; Ralston, Stuart H.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) increases stroke risk, but the mechanism is uncertain. This study aimed to determine the association between SLE and features on neuroimaging of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD), a risk factor for stroke. Methods— Consecutive patients attending a clinic for SLE were recruited. All patients underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging; had blood samples taken for markers of inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, cholesterol, and autoantibodies; and underwent cognitive and psychiatric testing. The data were compared with sex- and age-matched healthy controls and patients with minor stroke. Features of SVD were measured, a total SVD score calculated, and associations sought with vascular risk factors, cognition, SLE activity, and disease duration. Results— Fifty-one SLE patients (age: 48.8 years; SD: 14.3 years) had a greater total SVD score compared with healthy controls (1 versus 0; P<0.0001) and stroke patients (1 versus 0; P=0.02). There were higher perivascular spaces and deep white matter hyperintensity scores and more superficial brain atrophy in SLE patients versus healthy controls. Despite fewer vascular risk factors than similarly aged stroke patients, SLE patients had similar or more of some SVD features. The total SVD score was not associated with SLE activity, cognition, disease duration, or any blood measure. Conclusions— In this data set, SLE patients had a high burden of SVD features on magnetic resonance imaging, particularly perivascular spaces. A larger longitudinal study is warranted to determine the causes of SVD features in SLE and clinical implications. PMID:27703087

  12. SPECT study of regional cerebral blood flow in Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bonte, F.J.; Ross, E.D.; Chehabi, H.H.; Devous, M.D. Sr.

    1986-07-01

    A common cause of dementia in late midlife and old age is Alzheimer disease (AD), which affects more than one in 20 individuals over the age of 65. Past studies of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with AD here suggested blood flow abnormalities, but findings have differed. We have studied 37 patients diagnosed as having AD with inhalation and washout of /sup 133/Xe and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), obtaining evidence of abnormal rCBF patterns in 19. Flow reductions were most common in the temporoparietal regions and were occasionally found in the frontal areas. Investigators using positron-emission tomography (PET) have identified similar findings with respect to rCBF and regional oxygen, glucose, and protein metabolism. The SPECT determination of rCBF, which gives information similar to that provided by PET, may assume importance in the diagnosis of AD and in the differential diagnosis of the dementias.

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus, herpes virus infections, and pulmonary vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Sonia C.; Almodovar, Sharilyn

    2013-01-01

    The following state-of-the-art seminar was delivered as part of the Aspen Lung Conference on Pulmonary Hypertension and Vascular Diseases held in Aspen, Colorado in June 2012. This paper will summarize the lecture and present results from a nonhuman primate model of infection with Simian (Human) Immunodeficiency Virus - nef chimeric virions as well as the idea that polymorphisms in the HIV-1 nef gene may be driving the immune response that results in exuberant inflammation and aberrant endothelial cell (EC) function. We will present data gathered from primary HIV nef isolates where we tested the biological consequences of these polymorphisms and how their presence in human populations may predict patients at risk for developing this disease. In this article, we also discuss how a dysregulated immune system, in conjunction with a viral infection, could contribute to pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Both autoimmune diseases and some viruses are associated with defects in the immune system, primarily in the function of regulatory T cells. These T-cell defects may be a common pathway in the formation of plexiform lesions. Regardless of the route by which viruses may lead to PAH, it is important to recognize their role in this rare disease. PMID:23662195

  14. Heterogeneity in vascular smooth muscle cell embryonic origin in relation to adult structure, physiology, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Pfaltzgraff, Elise R.; Bader, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Regional differences in vascular physiology and disease response exist throughout the vascular tree. While these differences in physiology and disease correspond to regional vascular environmental conditions, there is also compelling evidence that the embryonic origins of the smooth muscle inherent to the vessels may play a role. Here we review what is known regarding the role of embryonic origin of vascular smooth muscle cells during vascular development. The focus of this review is to highlight the heterogeneity in the origins of vascular smooth muscle cells and the resulting regional physiologies of the vessels. Our goal is to stimulate future investigation into this area and provide a better understanding of vascular organogenesis and disease. PMID:25546231

  15. Vascular structure and binomial statistics for response modeling in radiosurgery of cerebral arteriovenous malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andisheh, Bahram; Bitaraf, Mohammad A.; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Brahme, Anders; Lind, Bengt K.

    2010-04-01

    Radiation treatment of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) has a slow and progressive vaso-occlusive effect. Some studies suggested the possible role of vascular structure in this process. A detailed biomathematical model has been used, where the morphological, biophysical and hemodynamic characteristics of intracranial AVM vessels are faithfully reproduced. The effect of radiation on plexiform and fistulous AVM nidus vessels was simulated using this theoretical model. The similarities between vascular and electrical networks were used to construct this biomathematical AVM model and provide an accurate rendering of transnidal and intranidal hemodynamics. The response of different vessels to radiation and their obliteration probability as a function of different angiostructures were simulated and total obliteration was defined as the probability of obliteration of all possible vascular pathways. The dose response of the whole AVM is observed to depend on the vascular structure of the intra-nidus AVM. Furthermore, a plexiform AVM appears to be more prone to obliteration compared with an AVM of the same size but having more arteriovenous fistulas. Finally, a binomial model was introduced, which considers the number of crucial vessels and is able to predict the dose response behavior of AVMs with a complex vascular structure.

  16. The pathobiology of vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Iadecola, Costantino

    2013-01-01

    Vascular cognitive impairment defines alterations in cognition, ranging from subtle deficits to full-blown dementia, attributable to cerebrovascular causes. Often coexisting with Alzheimer’s disease, mixed vascular and neurodegenerative dementia has emerged as the leading cause of age-related cognitive impairment. Central to the disease mechanism is the crucial role that cerebral blood vessels play in brain health, not only for the delivery of oxygen and nutrients, but also for the trophic signaling that links inextricably the well being of neurons and glia to that of cerebrovascular cells. This review will examine how vascular damage disrupts these vital homeostatic interactions, focusing on the hemispheric white matter, a region at heightened risk for vascular damage, and on the interplay between vascular factors and Alzheimer’s disease. Finally, preventative and therapeutic prospects will be examined, highlighting the importance of midlife vascular risk factor control in the prevention of late-life dementia. PMID:24267647

  17. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease: Targeting Oxidative Stress as a Novel Therapeutic Strategy?

    PubMed Central

    De Silva, T. Michael; Miller, Alyson A.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a major contributor to stroke, and a leading cause of cognitive impairment and dementia. Despite the devastating effects of cerebral SVD, the pathogenesis of cerebral SVD is still not completely understood. Moreover, there are no specific pharmacological strategies for its prevention or treatment. Cerebral SVD is characterized by marked functional and structural abnormalities of the cerebral microcirculation. The clinical manifestations of these pathological changes include lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and cerebral microbleeds. The main purpose of this review is to discuss evidence implicating oxidative stress in the arteriopathy of both non-amyloid and amyloid (cerebral amyloid angiopathy) forms of cerebral SVD and its most important risk factors (hypertension and aging), as well as its contribution to cerebral SVD-related brain injury and cognitive impairment. We also highlight current evidence of the involvement of the NADPH oxidases in the development of oxidative stress, enzymes that are a major source of reactive oxygen species in the cerebral vasculature. Lastly, we discuss potential pharmacological strategies for oxidative stress in cerebral SVD, including some of the historical and emerging NADPH oxidase inhibitors. PMID:27014073

  18. Vascular aging: Chronic oxidative stress and impairment of redox signaling—consequences for vascular homeostasis and disease

    PubMed Central

    Bachschmid, Markus M.; Schildknecht, Stefan; Matsui, Reiko; Zee, Rebecca; Haeussler, Dagmar; Cohen, Richard A.; Pimental, David; van der Loo, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Characteristic morphological and molecular alterations such as vessel wall thickening and reduction of nitric oxide occur in the aging vasculature leading to the gradual loss of vascular homeostasis. Consequently, the risk of developing acute and chronic cardiovascular diseases increases with age. Current research of the underlying molecular mechanisms of endothelial function demonstrates a duality of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in contributing to vascular homeostasis or leading to detrimental effects when formed in excess. Furthermore, changes in function and redox status of vascular smooth muscle cells contribute to age-related vascular remodeling. The age-dependent increase in free radical formation causes deterioration of the nitric oxide signaling cascade, alters and activates prostaglandin metabolism, and promotes novel oxidative posttranslational protein modifications that interfere with vascular and cell signaling pathways. As a result, vascular dysfunction manifests. Compensatory mechanisms are initially activated to cope with age-induced oxidative stress, but become futile, which results in irreversible oxidative modifications of biological macromolecules. These findings support the ‘free radical theory of aging’ but also show that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are essential signaling molecules, regulating vascular homeostasis. PMID:22380696

  19. Family history of atherosclerotic vascular disease is associated with the presence of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zi; Bailey, Kent R; Austin, Erin; Kullo, Iftikhar J

    2016-02-01

    We investigated whether family history (FHx) of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) was associated with presence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The study cohort comprised of 696 patients with AAA (70±8 years, 84% men) and 2686 controls (68±10 years, 61% men) recruited from noninvasive vascular and stress electrocardiogram (ECG) laboratories at Mayo Clinic. AAA was defined as a transverse diameter of abdominal aorta ⩾ 3 cm or history of AAA repair. Controls were not known to have AAA. FHx was defined as having at least one first-degree relative with aortic aneurysm or with onset of ASCVD (coronary, cerebral or peripheral artery disease) before age 65 years. FHx of aortic aneurysm or ASCVD were each associated with presence of AAA after adjustment for age, sex, conventional risk factors and ASCVD: adjusted odds ratios (OR; 95% confidence interval): 2.17 (1.66-2.83, p < 0.01) and 1.31 (1.08-1.59, p < 0.01), respectively. FHx of ASCVD remained associated with AAA after additional adjustment for FHx of aortic aneurysm: adjusted OR: 1.27 (1.05-1.55, p = 0.01). FHx of ASCVD in multiple arterial locations was associated with higher odds of having AAA: the adjusted odds were 1.23 times higher for each additionally affected arterial location reported in the FHx (1.08-1.40, p = 0.01). Our results suggest both unique and shared environmental and genetic factors mediating susceptibility to AAA and ASCVD.

  20. Sympathetic regulation of vascular function in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Rosa M.; Ghiadoni, Lorenzo; Seravalle, Gino; Dell'Oro, Raffaella; Taddei, Stefano; Grassi, Guido

    2012-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) is known to play a pivotal role in short- and long-term regulation of different functions of the cardiovascular system. In the past decades increasing evidence demonstrated that sympathetic neural control is involved not only in the vasomotor control of small resistance arteries but also in modulation of large artery function. Sympathetic activity and vascular function, both of which are key factors in the development and prognosis of cardiovascular events and disease, are linked at several levels. Evidence from experimental studies indicates that the SNS is critically influenced, at the central and also at the peripheral level, by the most relevant factors regulating vascular function, such as nitric oxide (NO), reactive oxygen species (ROS), endothelin (ET), the renin-angiotensin system. Additionally, there is indirect evidence of a reciprocal relationship between endothelial function and activity of the SNS. A number of cardiovascular risk factors and diseases are characterized both by increased sympathetic outflow and decreased endothelial function. In healthy subjects, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) appears to be related to surrogate markers of endothelial function, and an acute increase in sympathetic activity has been associated with a decrease in endothelial function in healthy subjects. However, direct evidence of a cause-effect relationship from human studies is scanty. In humans large artery stiffness has been associated with increased sympathetic discharge, both in healthy subjects and in renal transplant recipients. Peripheral sympathetic discharge is also able to modulate wave reflection. On the other hand, large artery stiffness can interfere with autonomic regulation by impairing carotid baroreflex sensitivity. PMID:22934037

  1. Diffuse correlation spectroscopy for non-invasive, micro-vascular cerebral blood flow measurement

    PubMed Central

    Durduran, Turgut; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) uses the temporal fluctuations of near-infrared (NIR) light to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) non-invasively. Here, we provide a brief history of DCS applications in brain with an emphasis on the underlying physical ideas, common instrumentation and validation. Then we describe recent clinical research that employs DCS-measured CBF as a biomarker of patient well-being, and as an indicator of hemodynamic and metabolic response to functional stimuli. PMID:23770408

  2. Optical spectroscopy and prevention of deleterious cerebral vascular effects of ethanol by magnesium ions.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Randall L; Gebrewold, Asefa; Altura, Bella T; Altura, Burton M

    2002-06-28

    Previously, it has been suggested that acute ethanol (alcohol) administration can result in concentration-dependent vasoconstriction and decreased cerebral blood flow. Here, we present in vivo results using rapid (240 nm/min) optical backscatter measurements, with an intact cranial preparation in the rat, indicating that acute infusion of ethanol directly into the rat brain rapidly produces dose-dependent vasoconstriction of the cerebral microcirculation associated with a pronounced reduction in tissue blood content, pronounced rises in deoxyhemoglobin, significantly increased levels of reduced cytochrome oxidase and microvascular damage as the dose increases. Furthermore, we present in vivo experiments demonstrating the capability of magnesium ions (Mg(2+)) to attenuate and prevent these deleterious responses. Optical backscatter spectra (500-800 nm) were obtained by directing a single sending and receiving fiber to a portion of the left parietal cranium (in anesthetized rats), shaved to a translucent appearance to facilitate optical penetration. In the absence of added Mg(2+), infusion of a 10% solution of ethanol at 0.34 ml/min ( approximately 26.8 mg/min) produced prompt vasoconstriction as evidenced by a greater than 90% loss of oxyhemoglobin from the field-of-view and increases in levels of reduced cytochrome oxidase to between 50% and >90%. These effects were partially, to nearly completely, attenuated by the addition of MgCl(2) to the infusate containing added ethanol. Of special interest was the observation that attenuation of the vasoconstrictive effect of ethanol by Mg(2+) persisted despite a subsequent ethanol challenge without added Mg(2+). The results obtained demonstrate that, depending on dose, ethanol can produce prompt and severe vasoconstriction of the intact cerebral microcirculation and that infusion of moderate doses of Mg(2+) can largely attenuate and prevent this response. We conclude that appreciable, graded changes in cerebral cytochrome

  3. Posterior Cerebral Artery Insufficiency in Pediatric Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Yeoun; Kim, Seung-Ki; Phi, Ji Hoon

    2015-01-01

    The majority of clinical studies on moyamoya disease (MMD) have focused on anterior circulation. The disease involvement of posterior circulation in MMD, mainly in the posterior cerebral artery (PCA), has been mentioned since the early 1980s, and it has been repeatedly emphasized as one of the most important factors related to poor prognosis in MMD. However, its clinical features and outcome have only been elucidated during the last few years. In this review, the angiographic definition of PCA stenosis is summarized. The clinical features are elucidated as being either early-onset or delayed-onset, according to the time of PCA stenosis diagnosis in reference to the anterior circulation revascularization surgeries. The surgical strategy and hypothesis on the mechanism of PCA stenosis is also briefly mentioned. It appears that some MMD patients may show PCA stenosis during the early or late course of the disease and that the presenting symptoms may vary. Because the hemodynamic compromise caused by PCA stenosis may respond well to surgical treatment, clinicians should be aware of the condition, especially during follow-up of MMD patients. PMID:26180612

  4. Dual anca positivity in a child with moyamoya-like cerebral vascular changes: an unusual presentation with sudden homonymous hemianopsia.

    PubMed

    Sakalli, Hale; Baskin, Esra; Alehan, Füsun; Agıldere, Muhteşem; Akova, Yonca Aydin; Caner, Hakan

    2012-10-01

    A 12-year-old girl presented with a sudden decrease in her right visual acuity and homonymous hemianopsia. An angiography of the retinal arteries demonstrated recanalized occlusion of the right retinal artery. Cerebral angiography showed bilateral internal carotid artery stenosis associated with the development of collateral circulation. Laboratory evaluations revealed dual antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) positivity [anti-proteinase (anti-PR3) ANCA and anti-myeloperoxidase (anti-MPO) ANCA], anticardiolipin (aCL) antibodies, and low titers of antinuclear antibodies (ANA). There was no evidence of active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), ANCA-related vasculitis, or other risk factors for cerebral occlusion, such as antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Dual positivity for both cytoplasmic (c-ANCA) and perinuclear (p-ANCA) antineutrophil antibodies has been found previously in a small number of reports, but to our knowledge, this case represents the first case of moyamoya disease associated with dual ANCA positivity.

  5. Distinguishing between vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease by means of the WAIS: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Oosterman, Joukje M; Scherder, Erik J A

    2006-10-01

    This study was intended to, meta-analytically, review whether the subtests of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale are useful in differentiating between vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease. We expected the Alzheimer's disease group to outperform the vascular dementia group on those subtests that require executive functions, whereas inferior performance of the Alzheimer's disease patients was expected on memory tests. Two steps in the analysis were undertaken in an attempt to clarify this issue. The first step consisted of including all studies examining Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale subtest performance in vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease patients. Secondly, a subcortical vascular dementia subgroup was distinguished and performance of this subgroup was compared to that of the Alzheimer's disease group.Overall, the analyses showed that both the vascular dementia and, more strongly, the subcortical vascular dementia group revealed decreased executive functions on several subtests compared to the Alzheimer's disease group. The Alzheimer's disease group showed inferior performance on a single semantic memory test only compared to both the vascular dementia and the subcortical vascular dementia groups. These results indicate that several subtests of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale can differentiate between these two clinical groups, and that most of these tests reveal more impaired performance in the vascular dementia group.

  6. Education modifies the relation of vascular pathology to cognitive function: cognitive reserve in cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Zieren, Nikola; Duering, Marco; Peters, Nils; Reyes, Sonia; Jouvent, Eric; Hervé, Dominique; Gschwendtner, Andreas; Mewald, Yvonne; Opherk, Christian; Chabriat, Hugues; Dichgans, Martin

    2013-02-01

    A clinical impact of cognitive reserve (CR) has been demonstrated in Alzheimer's disease, whereas its role in vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the impact of CR in patients with cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), a genetic variant of pure VCI. A total of 247 NOTCH3 mutation carriers from a two-center study were investigated using detailed neuropsychological and neuroimaging protocols. CR was operationalized as years of formal education. Brain pathology was assessed by MRI using normalized brain volume and lacunar lesion volume as proxies. Multivariate analyses were done for each structural measure with scores of processing speed, executive function, and memory as dependent variables. Additional linear regression models were conducted with interaction terms for education × brain volume and education × lacunar lesion volume. Education had an independent impact on cognitive performance in subjects with mild and moderate degrees of brain pathology, whereas there was no significant influence of education on cognition in patients with severe MRI changes. This interaction was found for processing speed, the cognitive domain most impaired in our patients. Our findings demonstrate an interaction of education and brain pathology in regard to cognitive impairment: the effect of education seems most pronounced in early disease stages but may ultimately be overwhelmed by the pathological changes. The results extend the concept of CR to VCI.

  7. Mechanical Injury Induces Brain Endothelial-Derived Microvesicle Release: Implications for Cerebral Vascular Injury during Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Allison M.; Lutton, Evan M.; Merkel, Steven F.; Razmpour, Roshanak; Ramirez, Servio H.

    2016-01-01

    . These results indicate that following TBI, the cerebral endothelium undergoes vascular remodeling through shedding of eMVs containing TJPs and endothelial markers. The detection of this shedding potentially allows for a novel methodology for real-time monitoring of cerebral vascular health (remodeling), BBB status and neuroinflammation following a TBI event. PMID:26973460

  8. [Clinical associations between retinal vascular diseases and cardiovascular diseases in patients with systemic atheromatosis].

    PubMed

    Stefănescu-Dima, Alin; Bătăiosu, Constantin; Sas, Teodor; Puianu, Mihaela

    2013-01-01

    A clinical study was conducted on a sample of 48 patients examined within 3 months. Of these, 27 patients were recruited by ophtalmologic criteria and 21 recruited by cardiologic criteria, 25% of these patients coming for routine check. They were investigated by ophthalmic examination, cardiological examination, imaging and laboratory examination. Testing has shown a strong link between cardiovascular disease and the eye of the patients investigated. The study demonstrated the need for interdisciplinary consultation for patients with vascular complaints in the carotid territory and a close correlation between the vascular and ophthalmologic pathology at this level.

  9. Endothelial cells and human cerebral small vessel disease.

    PubMed

    Hainsworth, Atticus H; Oommen, Asho T; Bridges, Leslie R

    2015-01-01

    Brain endothelial cells have unique properties in terms of barrier function, local molecular signaling, regulation of local cerebral blood flow (CBF) and interactions with other members of the neurovascular unit. In cerebral small vessel disease (arteriolosclerosis; SVD), the endothelial cells in small arteries survive, even when mural pathology is advanced and myocytes are severely depleted. Here, we review aspects of altered endothelial functions that have been implicated in SVD: local CBF dysregulation, endothelial activation and blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction. Reduced CBF is reported in the diffuse white matter lesions that are a neuroradiological signature of SVD. This may reflect an underlying deficit in local CBF regulation (possibly via the nitric oxide/cGMP signaling pathway). While many laboratories have observed an association of symptomatic SVD with serum markers of endothelial activation, it is apparent that the origin of these circulating markers need not be brain endothelium. Our own neuropathology studies did not confirm local endothelial activation in small vessels exhibiting SVD. Local BBB failure has been proposed as a cause of SVD and associated parenchymal lesions. Some groups find that computational analyses of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, following systemic injection of a gadolinium-based contrast agent, suggest that extravasation into brain parenchyma is heightened in people with SVD. Our recent histochemical studies of donated brain tissue, using immunolabeling for large plasma proteins [fibrinogen, immunoglobulin G (IgG)], do not support an association of SVD with recent plasma protein extravasation. It is possible that a trigger leakage episode, or a size-selective loosening of the BBB, participates in SVD pathology.

  10. Vascular disease and risk factors are associated with cognitive decline in the alzheimer disease spectrum.

    PubMed

    Lorius, Natacha; Locascio, Joseph J; Rentz, Dorene M; Johnson, Keith A; Sperling, Reisa A; Viswanathan, Anand; Marshall, Gad A

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between vascular disease and risk factors versus cognitive decline cross-sectionally and longitudinally in normal older control, mild cognitive impairment, and mild Alzheimer disease (AD) dementia subjects. A total of 812 participants (229 normal older control, 395 mild cognitive impairment, 188 AD) underwent cognitive testing, brain magnetic resonance imaging, and clinical evaluations at baseline and over a period of 3 years. General linear, longitudinal mixed-effects, and Cox proportional hazards models were used. Greater homocysteine level and white matter hyperintensity volume were associated with processing speed impairment (homocysteine: P=0.02; white matter hyperintensity: P<0.0001); greater Vascular Index score was associated with memory impairment (P=0.007); and greater number of apolipoprotein E ε4 (APOE4) alleles was associated with global cognitive impairment (P=0.007) at baseline. Apolipoprotein E ε4 was associated with greater rate of increase in global cognitive impairment (P=0.002) and processing speed impairment (P=0.001) over time, whereas higher total cholesterol was associated with greater rate of increase in global cognitive impairment (P=0.02) and memory impairment (P=0.06) over time. These results suggest a significant association of increased vascular disease and risk factors with cognitive impairment at baseline and over time in the AD spectrum in a sample that was selected to have low vascular burden at baseline.

  11. Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction and Cerebral Small Vessel Disease (Arteriolosclerosis) in Brains of Older People

    PubMed Central

    Khoong, Cheryl H.L.; Poon, Wayne; Esiri, Margaret M.; Markus, Hugh S.; Hainsworth, Atticus H.

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) protects brain tissue from potentially harmful plasma components. Small vessel disease ([SVD], arteriolosclerosis) is common in the brains of older people and is associated with lacunar infarcts, leukoaraiosis and vascular dementia. To determine whether plasma extravasation is associated with SVD, we immunolabeled the plasma proteins fibrinogen and IgG, which are assumed to reflect BBB dysfunction, in deep grey matter (anterior caudate-putamen, [DGM]) and deep subcortical white matter (DWM) in the brains of a well-characterized patient cohort with minimal Alzheimer disease pathology (Braak stage 0-II) (n = 84; age ≥65 years). Morphometric measures of fibrinogen labeling were compared between people with neuropathologically defined SVD and aged control subjects. Parenchymal cellular labeling with fibrinogen and IgG was detectable in DGM and DWM in many subjects (>70%). Quantitative measures of fibrinogen were not associated with SVD in DGM or DWM; SVD severity was correlated between DGM and DWM (p < 0.0001). Fibrinogen in DGM showed a modest association with a history of hypertension; DWM fibrinogen was associated with dementia and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (all p < 0.05). In DWM, SVD was associated with leukoaraiosis identified in life (p < 0.05), but fibrinogen was not. Our data suggest that in aged brains plasma extravasation and hence local BBB dysfunction is common but do not support an association with SVD. PMID:25289893

  12. EXCEPTIONAL AGGRESSIVENESS OF CEREBRAL CAVERNOUS MALFORMATION DISEASE ASSOCIATED WITH PDCD10 MUTATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Rebeiz, Tania; Stockton, Rebecca A.; McDonald, David A.; Mikati, Abdul Ghani; Zhang, Lingjiao; Austin, Cecilia; Akers, Amy L.; Gallione, Carol J.; Rorrer, Autumn; Gunel, Murat; Min, Wang; De Souza, Jorge Marcondes; Lee, Connie

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The phenotypic manifestations of cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) disease caused by rare PDCD10 mutations have not been systematically examined, and a mechanistic link to Rho kinase (ROCK) mediated hyperpermeability, a potential therapeutic target, has not been established. Methods We analyze PDCD10-siRNA treated endothelial cells for stress fibers, ROCK activity and permeability. ROCK activity is assessed in CCM lesions. Brain permeability and CCM lesion burden is quantified, and clinical manifestations are assessed in prospectively enrolled subjects with PDCD10 mutations. Results We determine that PDCD10 protein suppresses endothelial stress fibers, ROCK activity and permeability in vitro. Pdcd10 heterozygous mice have greater lesion burden than other Ccm genotypes. We demonstrate robust ROCK activity in murine and human CCM vasculature, and increased brain vascular permeability in humans with PDCD10 mutation. Clinical phenotype is exceptionally aggressive compared to the more common KRIT1 and CCM2 familial and sporadic CCM, with greater lesion burden and more frequent hemorrhages earlier in life. We first report other phenotypic features including scoliosis, cognitive disability and skin lesions, unrelated to lesion burden or bleeding. Conclusion These findings define a unique CCM disease with exceptional aggressiveness, and they inform preclinical therapeutic testing, clinical counseling and the design of trials. PMID:25122144

  13. Dicarbonyl proteome and genome damage in metabolic and vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Naila; Thornalley, Paul J

    2014-04-01

    Methylglyoxal is a potent protein-glycating agent. It is an arginine-directed glycating agent and often modifies functionally important sites in proteins. Glycation forms mainly MG-H1 [Nδ-(5-hydro-5-methyl-4-imidazolon-2-yl)ornithine] residues. MG-H1 content of proteins is quantified by stable isotopic dilution analysis-MS/MS and also by immunoblotting with specific monoclonal antibodies. Methylglyoxal-modified proteins undergo cellular proteolysis and release MG-H1 free adduct for excretion. MG-H1 residues have been found in proteins of animals, plants, bacteria, fungi and protoctista. MG-H1 is often the major advanced glycation end-product in proteins of tissues and body fluids, increasing in diabetes and associated vascular complications, renal failure, cirrhosis, Alzheimer's disease, arthritis, Parkinson's disease and aging. Proteins susceptible to methylglyoxal modification with related functional impairment are called the DCP (dicarbonyl proteome). The DCP includes albumin, haemoglobin, transcription factors, mitochondrial proteins, extracellular matrix proteins, lens crystallins and others. DCP component proteins are linked to mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetes and aging, oxidative stress, dyslipidaemia, cell detachment and anoikis and apoptosis. Methylglyoxal also modifies DNA where deoxyguanosine residues are modified to imidazopurinone MGdG {3-(2'-deoxyribosyl)-6,7-dihydro-6,7-dihydroxy-6/7-methylimidazo-[2,3-b]purine-9(8)one} isomers. MGdG was the major quantitative adduct detected in vivo. It was linked to frequency of DNA strand breaks and increased markedly during apoptosis induced by a cell-permeant glyoxalase I inhibitor. Glyoxalase I metabolizes >99% methylglyoxal and thereby protects the proteome and genome. Gene deletion of GLO1 is embryonically lethal and GLO1 silencing increases methylglyoxal concentration, MG-H1 and MGdG, premature aging and disease. Studies of methylglyoxal glycation have importance for human health, longevity and

  14. Functional vascular diseases: Raynaud's syndrome, acrocyanosis and erythromelalgia.

    PubMed

    Heidrich, H

    2010-02-01

    Raynauds syndrome, acrocyanosis and erythromelalgia are functional vascular diseases that differ with respect to prevalence, clinical picture, therapy, prognosis, and impairment of quality of life. Raynauds syndrome occurs in 5 to 20 % of the population in Europe, is observed four times more often in women than in men and appears first at the age of 40 (3 to 80), on the average. Raynauds attacks are characterized by a paroxysmal white-blue-red or just white and blue discoloration of the fingers and toes; the attacks are induced by cold or stress, usually, cease after no more than some minutes (average 23 min.), but can also persist for hours. A distinction must be made between primary (aetiology unknown), secondary (aetiology known) and suspected secondary Raynauds syndromes (causal underlying disease suspected). There are several different therapy options, but not all of them have been substantiated by evidence. Acrocyanosis is rarer than Raynauds syndrome, and contrary to the latter, is characterized by nonparoxysmal, in most cases persistent, painless bluish-red symmetrical discolorations of the hands, feet and knees. It is more frequent in women than in men and becomes manifest before the 25th year of age, on the average (15th to 70th year of age). A distinction is made between primary acrocyanosis without detectable underlying disease and secondary acrocyanosis with a specific underlying disease. No effective therapy for primary acrocyanosis is known, but secondary forms can sometimes be treated. Patients with primary and secondary erythromelalgia, a very rare condition, sustain paroxysmal burning pain with marked reddening of the legs, feet and less often the hands. The attacks are triggered by warmth. Women are affected more often than men. The age of first manifestation is 40 to 55 years, but the first attacks may just as well occur during childhood. There are different therapeutic approaches with occasional success, but no general recommendations.

  15. Vascular diseases await translation of blood vessels engineered from stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Rekha; Duda, Dan G.; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) might pave the way toward a long-sought solution for obtaining sufficient numbers of autologous cells for tissue engineering. Several methods exist for generating endothelial cells or perivascular cells from hiPSCs in vitro for use in the building of vascular tissue. We discuss current developments in the generation of vascular progenitor cells from hiPSCs and the assessment of their functional capacity in vivo, opportunities and challenges for the clinical translation of engineered vascular tissue, and modeling of vascular diseases using hiPSC-derived vascular progenitor cells. PMID:26468328

  16. [Present and future in the management of venous vascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Gavorník, Peter; Dukát, Andrej; Gašpar, Ľudovít; Gavorníková, Eva

    2015-02-01

    The prevalence and the incidence of chronic and acute venous vascular disease has been shown to be globally very high, in both industrialized and developing countries. Chronic venous diseases of lower extremities are being an integral part of the third millennium's deadly angiopandemy, at the present time. The rate of the most severe cases with advanced stage of venous failure is approximately twice as high in the population (2.1 %) as has been assumed so far. Among venoactive drugs (VAD), micronized purified flavonoid fraction (MPFF) of diosmin hesperidin remains the agent with the highest degree of recommendation and it also indicated to pharmacotherapeutical support of leg ulcer healing, along with sulodexide and pentoxifylline. Compressive sclerotherapy, liquid or foam, is a safe and effective invasive method to treat telangiectasias, reticular varicose veins and subcutaneous varicose veins. Direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) represent one of the therapeutic and preventive options of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and of venous thromboembolism (VTE) with a limitation in patients with malignant conditions and in pregnancy. The most effective is triple simultaneous pharmaco-kinezio-mechano-phlebothromboemboloprophylaxis. Superficial vein thromboses longer than 5 cm are indicated to anticoagulant therapy too.

  17. Catalase prevents elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) induced by alcohol in cultured canine cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells: Possible relationship to alcohol-induced stroke and brain pathology.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyan; Liu, Weimin; Altura, Bella T; Altura, Burton M

    2003-01-15

    Several studies have suggested that alcohol-induced brain injury is associated with generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The recent findings, that antioxidants (Vitamin E and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC)) prevent intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)) overload in cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells, induced by alcohol, demonstrate indirectly that ROS formation is related to cerebral vascular injury. The present experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that catalase, an hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) scavenging enzyme, can prevent or ameliorate alcohol-induced elevation of [Ca(2+)](i). Preincubation of cultured canine cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells with catalase (20-1000 units/ml) didn't produce any apparent changes from controls in resting levels of [Ca(2+)](i) after 1-3 days. Exposure of the cerebral vascular cells to culture media containing 10-100mM ethanol resulted in significant rises in [Ca(2+)](i) (p<0.01). Although exposure of these cells to a low concentration of catalase (20 units/ml) failed to prevent the increased level of [Ca(2+)](i) induced by ethanol, concomitant addition of higher concentrations of catalase (100-1000 units/ml) and ethanol (10-100mM) inhibited or ameliorated the rises of [Ca(2+)](i) induced by ethanol either at 24h or at 3 days, in a concentration-dependent manner. Catalase, in the range of 100-200 units/ml, inhibited approximately 50% of the [Ca(2+)](i) increases caused by ethanol in the first 24h. Catalase at a concentration of 1000 units/ml inhibited completely excessive [Ca(2+)](i) accumulation. The present results when viewed in light of other recently published data suggest that H(2)O(2) generation may be one of the earliest events triggered by alcohol in alcohol-induced brain-vascular damage, neurobehavioral actions and stroke.

  18. Pulmonary vascular disease in transposition of the great vessels and intact ventricular septum.

    PubMed

    Newfeld, E A; Paul, M H; Muster, A J; Idriss, F S

    1979-03-01

    Eight of 135 (6%) children with d-transposition of the great vessels and with intact ventricular septum and no patent ductus arteriosus had evidence of progressive pulmonary vascular disease. Seven of 101 (7%) patients for whom histologic data was available, had Heath-Edwards grades IV or V pulmonary vascular disease, six had grade II, and 88 had either normal or grade I findings. One of 34 patients for whom histologic data was not available had hemodynamic evidence of pulmonary vascular disease at cardiac catheterization after the Mustard operation. When infants younger than 3 months old were excluded, eight of 85 (9%) had advanced pulmonary vascular disease. Twenty-three patients had microthrombi in their pulmonary arteries and arterioles, and in one patient thrombi were observed before the development of pulmonary vascular disease. Clinically unrecognized pulmonary microthrombi are suggested as a possible etiologic agent in the development of pulmonary vascular disease in patients with transposition of the great vessels. Progressive pulmonary vascular disease can first be discovered after the Mustard operation, even in patients without preoperative evidence of pulmonary hypertension or elevated pulmonary vascular resistance.

  19. Relationship between vascular endothelium and periodontal disease in atherosclerotic lesions: Review article

    PubMed Central

    Saffi, Marco Aurélio Lumertz; Furtado, Mariana Vargas; Polanczyk, Carisi Anne; Montenegro, Márlon Munhoz; Ribeiro, Ingrid Webb Josephson; Kampits, Cassio; Haas, Alex Nogueira; Rösing, Cassiano Kuchenbecker; Rabelo-Silva, Eneida Rejane

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and endothelial dysfunction are linked to the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic disease. Recent studies suggest that periodontal infection and the ensuing increase in the levels of inflammatory markers may be associated with myocardial infarction, peripheral vascular disease and cerebrovascular disease. The present article aimed at reviewing contemporary data on the pathophysiology of vascular endothelium and its association with periodontitis in the scenario of cardiovascular disease. PMID:25632316

  20. An Active Contour Model Based on Adaptive Threshold for Extraction of Cerebral Vascular Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiaxin; Zhao, Shifeng; Liu, Zifeng; Duan, Fuqing; Pan, Yutong

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral vessel segmentation is essential and helpful for the clinical diagnosis and the related research. However, automatic segmentation of brain vessels remains challenging because of the variable vessel shape and high complex of vessel geometry. This study proposes a new active contour model (ACM) implemented by the level-set method for segmenting vessels from TOF-MRA data. The energy function of the new model, combining both region intensity and boundary information, is composed of two region terms, one boundary term and one penalty term. The global threshold representing the lower gray boundary of the target object by maximum intensity projection (MIP) is defined in the first-region term, and it is used to guide the segmentation of the thick vessels. In the second term, a dynamic intensity threshold is employed to extract the tiny vessels. The boundary term is used to drive the contours to evolve towards the boundaries with high gradients. The penalty term is used to avoid reinitialization of the level-set function. Experimental results on 10 clinical brain data sets demonstrate that our method is not only able to achieve better Dice Similarity Coefficient than the global threshold based method and localized hybrid level-set method but also able to extract whole cerebral vessel trees, including the thin vessels. PMID:27597878

  1. An Active Contour Model Based on Adaptive Threshold for Extraction of Cerebral Vascular Structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaxin; Zhao, Shifeng; Liu, Zifeng; Tian, Yun; Duan, Fuqing; Pan, Yutong

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral vessel segmentation is essential and helpful for the clinical diagnosis and the related research. However, automatic segmentation of brain vessels remains challenging because of the variable vessel shape and high complex of vessel geometry. This study proposes a new active contour model (ACM) implemented by the level-set method for segmenting vessels from TOF-MRA data. The energy function of the new model, combining both region intensity and boundary information, is composed of two region terms, one boundary term and one penalty term. The global threshold representing the lower gray boundary of the target object by maximum intensity projection (MIP) is defined in the first-region term, and it is used to guide the segmentation of the thick vessels. In the second term, a dynamic intensity threshold is employed to extract the tiny vessels. The boundary term is used to drive the contours to evolve towards the boundaries with high gradients. The penalty term is used to avoid reinitialization of the level-set function. Experimental results on 10 clinical brain data sets demonstrate that our method is not only able to achieve better Dice Similarity Coefficient than the global threshold based method and localized hybrid level-set method but also able to extract whole cerebral vessel trees, including the thin vessels.

  2. Modelling Cerebral Blood Flow and Temperature Using a Vascular Porous Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blowers, Stephen; Thrippleton, Michael; Marshall, Ian; Harris, Bridget; Andrews, Peter; Valluri, Prashant

    2016-11-01

    Macro-modelling of cerebral blood flow can assist in determining the impact of temperature intervention to reduce permanent tissue damage during instances of brain trauma. Here we present a 3D two phase fluid-porous model for simulating blood flow through the capillary region linked to intersecting 1D arterial and venous vessel trees. This combined vasculature porous (VaPor) model simulates both flow and energy balances, including heat from metabolism, using a vasculature extracted from MRI data which are expanded upon using a tree generation algorithm. Validation of temperature balance has been achieved using rodent brain data. Direct flow validation is not as straight forward due to the method used in determining regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). In-vivo measurements are achieved using a tracer, which disagree with direct measurements of simulated flow. However, by modelling a virtual tracer, rCBF values are obtained that agree with those found in literature. Temperature profiles generated with the VaPor model show a reduction in core brain temperature after cooling the scalp not seen previously in other models.

  3. Remote effect of deep-seated vascular brain lesions on cerebral blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Attig, E.; Capon, A.; Demeurisse, G.; Verhas, M. )

    1990-11-01

    We measured regional cerebral blood flow using the xenon-133 inhalation method, at approximately 1 month after onset, in 60 stroke patients who had no evidence of major carotid artery stenosis or occlusion. Their single lesions (43 infarcts and 17 hematomas) were located in the capsulothalamolenticular region, sparing the cortex. Hemispheric mean cerebral blood flow was reduced on the side of the lesion in 25 patients and on both sides in 20. Regional hypoperfusion was observed in 46 patients (ipsilaterally in 34, bilaterally in 10, and contralaterally in two). Regional hypoperfusion was observed most frequently in the frontal lobe, particularly in the motor and premotor cortices of the prerolandic area. The 46 patients with regional hypoperfusion were compared with the 14 patients without regional hypoperfusion, considering the size and location of the lesion as well as the functional and analytic motor performances. As a rule, the lesion was slightly smaller and more posterior and the functional (p less than 0.001) and analytic (p less than 0.05) motor performances were significantly better in the 14 patients without regional hypoperfusion. Since the xenon-133 inhalation method examines cortical blood flow, we can attribute blood flow reductions resulting from deep-seated lesions to a functional depression akin to diaschisis. Interpretation of the clinical consequences and pathogenesis of this phenomenon requires further sequential and pathologic studies.

  4. Equol increases cerebral blood flow in rats via activation of large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei; Wang, Yan; Song, Zheng; Zhao, Li-Mei; Li, Gui-Rong; Deng, Xiu-Ling

    2016-05-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effect of equol on cerebral blood flow and the underlying molecular mechanisms. The regional cerebral blood flow in parietal lobe of rats was measured by using a laser Doppler flowmetry. Isolated cerebral basilar artery and mesenteric artery rings from rats were used for vascular reactivity measurement with a multi wire myography system. Outward K(+) current in smooth muscle cells of cerebral basilar artery, large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channel current in BK-HEK 293 cells stably expressing both human α (hSlo)- and β1-subunits, and hSlo channel current in hSlo-HEK 293 cells expressing only the α-subunit of BK channels were recorded with whole cell patch-clamp technique. The results showed that equol significantly increased regional cerebral blood flow in rats, and produced a concentration-dependent but endothelium-independent relaxation in rat cerebral basilar arteries. Both paxilline and iberiotoxin, two selective BK channel blockers, significantly inhibited equol-induced vasodilation in cerebral arteries. Outward K(+) currents in smooth muscle cells of cerebral basilar artery were increased by equol and fully reversed by washout or blockade of BK channels with iberiotoxin. Equol remarkably enhanced human BK current in BK-HEK 293 cells, but not hSlo current in hSlo-HEK 293 cells, and the increase was completely abolished by co-application of paxilline. Our findings provide the first information that equol selectively stimulates BK channel current by acting on its β1 subunit, which may in turn contribute to the equol-mediated vasodilation and cerebral blood flow increase.

  5. Can vessel dimension explain tolerance toward fungal vascular wilt diseases in woody plants? Lessons from Dutch elm disease and esca disease in grapevine

    PubMed Central

    Pouzoulet, Jérôme; Pivovaroff, Alexandria L.; Santiago, Louis S.; Rolshausen, Philippe E.

    2014-01-01

    This review illuminates key findings in our understanding of grapevine xylem resistance to fungal vascular wilt diseases. Grapevine (Vitis spp.) vascular diseases such as esca, botryosphaeria dieback, and eutypa dieback, are caused by a set of taxonomically unrelated ascomycete fungi. Fungal colonization of the vascular system leads to a decline of the plant host because of a loss of the xylem function and subsequent decrease in hydraulic conductivity. Fungal vascular pathogens use different colonization strategies to invade and kill their host. Vitis vinifera cultivars display different levels of tolerance toward vascular diseases caused by fungi, but the plant defense mechanisms underlying those observations have not been completely elucidated. In this review, we establish a parallel between two vascular diseases, grapevine esca disease and Dutch elm disease, and argue that the former should be viewed as a vascular wilt disease. Plant genotypes exhibit differences in xylem morphology and resistance to fungal pathogens causing vascular wilt diseases. We provide evidence that the susceptibility of three commercial V. vinifera cultivars to esca disease is correlated to large vessel diameter. Additionally, we explore how xylem morphological traits related to water transport are influenced by abiotic factors, and how these might impact host tolerance of vascular wilt fungi. Finally, we explore the utility of this concept for predicting which V. vinifera cultivars are most vulnerable of fungal vascular wilt diseases and propose new strategies for disease management. PMID:24971084

  6. Can vessel dimension explain tolerance toward fungal vascular wilt diseases in woody plants? Lessons from Dutch elm disease and esca disease in grapevine.

    PubMed

    Pouzoulet, Jérôme; Pivovaroff, Alexandria L; Santiago, Louis S; Rolshausen, Philippe E

    2014-01-01

    This review illuminates key findings in our understanding of grapevine xylem resistance to fungal vascular wilt diseases. Grapevine (Vitis spp.) vascular diseases such as esca, botryosphaeria dieback, and eutypa dieback, are caused by a set of taxonomically unrelated ascomycete fungi. Fungal colonization of the vascular system leads to a decline of the plant host because of a loss of the xylem function and subsequent decrease in hydraulic conductivity. Fungal vascular pathogens use different colonization strategies to invade and kill their host. Vitis vinifera cultivars display different levels of tolerance toward vascular diseases caused by fungi, but the plant defense mechanisms underlying those observations have not been completely elucidated. In this review, we establish a parallel between two vascular diseases, grapevine esca disease and Dutch elm disease, and argue that the former should be viewed as a vascular wilt disease. Plant genotypes exhibit differences in xylem morphology and resistance to fungal pathogens causing vascular wilt diseases. We provide evidence that the susceptibility of three commercial V. vinifera cultivars to esca disease is correlated to large vessel diameter. Additionally, we explore how xylem morphological traits related to water transport are influenced by abiotic factors, and how these might impact host tolerance of vascular wilt fungi. Finally, we explore the utility of this concept for predicting which V. vinifera cultivars are most vulnerable of fungal vascular wilt diseases and propose new strategies for disease management.

  7. Cardiac catheterization in children with pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Bobhate, Prashant; Guo, Long; Jain, Shreepal; Haugen, Richard; Coe, James Y; Cave, Dominic; Rutledge, Jennifer; Adatia, Ian

    2015-04-01

    The risks associated with cardiac catheterization in children with pulmonary hypertension (PH) are increased compared with adults. We reviewed retrospectively all clinical data in children with PH [mean pulmonary artery pressure (mean PAp) ≥25 mmHg and pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI) ≥3 Wood units m(2)] undergoing cardiac catheterization between 2009 and 2014. Our strategy included a team approach, minimal catheter manipulation and sildenafil administration prior to extubation. Adverse events occurring within 48 h were noted. Seventy-five patients (36 males), median age 4 years (0.3-17) and median weight 14.6 kg (2.6-77 kg), underwent 97 cardiac catheterizations. Diagnoses included idiopathic or heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) (29 %), PAH associated with congenital heart disease (52 %), left heart disease (5 %) and lung disease (14 %). Mean PAp was 43 ± 19 mmHg; mean PVRI was 9.7 ± 6 Wood units m(2). There were no deaths or serious arrhythmias. No patient required cardiac massage. Three patients who suffered adverse events had suprasystemic PAp (3/3), heritable PAH (2/3), decreased right ventricular function (3/3), and pulmonary artery capacitance index <1 ml/mmHg/m(2) (3/3) and were treatment naïve (3/3). No patient undergoing follow-up cardiac catheterization suffered a complication. In 45 % of cases, the data acquired from the follow-up cardiac catheterization resulted in an alteration of therapy. Three percent of children with PH undergoing cardiac catheterization suffered adverse events. However, there were no intra or post procedural deaths and no one required cardiac massage or cardioversion. Follow-up cardiac catheterization in patients receiving pulmonary hypertensive targeted therapy is safe and provides useful information.

  8. FLAIR vascular hyperintensities and 4D MR angiograms for the estimation of collateral blood flow in anterior cerebral artery ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Maros, Maté; Lobsien, Donald; Michalski, Dominik; Groden, Christoph; Hoffmann, Karl-Titus; Förster, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To assess FLAIR vascular hyperintensities (FVH) and dynamic (4D) angiograms derived from perfusion raw data as proposed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging markers of leptomeningeal collateral circulation in patients with ischemia in the territory of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA). Methods Forty patients from two tertiary care university hospitals were included. Infarct volumes and perfusion deficits were manually measured on DWI images and TTP maps, respectively. FVH and collateral flow on 4D MR angiograms were assessed and graded as previously specified. Results Forty-one hemispheres were affected. Mean DWI lesion volume was 8.2 (± 13.9; range 0–76.9) ml, mean TTP lesion volume was 24.5 (± 17.2, range 0–76.7) ml. FVH were observed in 26/41 (63.4%) hemispheres. Significant correlations were detected between FVH and TTP lesion volume (ρ = 0.4; P<0.01) absolute (ρ = 0.37; P<0.05) and relative mismatch volume (ρ = 0.35; P<0.05). The modified ASITN/SIR score correlated inversely with DWI lesion volume (ρ = -0.58; P<0.01) and positively with relative mismatch (ρ = 0.29; P< 0.05). ANOVA of the ASITN/SIR score revealed significant inter-group differences for DWI (P<0.001) and TTP lesion volumes (P<0.05). No correlation was observed between FVH scores and modified ASITH/SIR scores (ρ = -0.16; P = 0.32). Conclusions FVH and flow patterns on 4D MR angiograms are markers of perfusion deficits and tissue at risk. As both methods did not show a correlation between each other, they seem to provide complimentary instead of redundant information. Previously shown evidence for the meaning of these specific MR signs in internal carotid and middle cerebral artery stroke seems to be transferrable to ischemic stroke in the ACA territory. PMID:28234996

  9. The Role of Hippo/YAP Signaling in Vascular Remodeling and Related Diseases.

    PubMed

    He, Jinlong; Bao, Qiankun; Yan, Meng; Liang, Jing; Zhu, Yi; Wang, Chunjiong; Ai, Ding

    2017-04-03

    Vascular remodeling is a vital process of a wide range of cardiovascular diseases and represents the altered structure and arrangement of blood vessels. The Hippo pathway controls organ size by regulating cell survival, proliferation and apoptosis. Yes-associated protein (YAP), a transcription coactivator, is a downstream effector of the Hippo pathway. Emerging evidence supports that the Hippo/YAP pathway plays an important role in vascular-remodeling and related cardiovascular diseases. The Hippo/YAP pathway has been shown to alter extracellular matrix production or degradation and the growth, death and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells, which contributes to vascular remodeling in cardiovascular diseases such as pulmonary hypertension, atherosclerosis, restenosis, aortic aneurysms and angiogenesis. In this review, we summarize and discuss recent findings about the roles and mechanisms of Hippo/YAP signaling in vascular-remodeling and related diseases.

  10. The association between vibration and vascular injury in rheumatic diseases: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Jie; Huang, Xiao-Lei; Yan, Jun-Wei; Wan, Ya-Nan; Wang, Bing-Xiang; Tao, Jin-Hui; Chen, Bing; Li, Bao-Zhu; Yang, Guo-Jun; Wang, Jing

    2015-02-01

    Vascular manifestations can be seen early in the pathogenesis of inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Animal experiments, laboratory and clinical findings indicated that acute or long-term vibration exposure can induce vascular abnormalities. Recent years, in addition to Raynaud's phenomenon (RP), vibration as a risk factor for other rheumatic diseases has also received corresponding considered. This review is concentrated upon the role of vibration in the disease of systemic sclerosis (SSc). In this review, we are going to discuss the main mechanisms which are thought to be important in pathophysiology of vascular injury under the three broad headings of "vascular", "neural" and "intravascular". Aspects on the vibration and vascular inflammation are briefly discussed. And the epidemiological studies related to vibration studies in SSc and other rheumatic diseases are taken into account.

  11. Vascular collateralization along ventriculoperitoneal shunt catheters in moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Singla, Amit; Lin, Ning; Ho, Allen L; Scott, R Michael; Smith, Edward R

    2013-06-01

    Surgically created openings such as bur holes can serve as avenues for the development of collateral blood supply to the brain in patients with moyamoya disease. When such collateralization occurs through preexisting shunt catheter sites, the potential exists for perioperative stroke if these vessels are damaged during revision of a ventricular catheter for shunt malfunction. In this paper the authors report on a series of patients with a history of ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunts who later developed moyamoya disease and were found to have spontaneous transdural collateral vessels at ventricular catheter sites readily visualized on diagnostic angiography. A consecutive surgical series of 412 patients with moyamoya disease treated at Boston Children's Hospital from 1990 to 2010 were reviewed to identify patients with concomitant moyamoya and a VP shunt. The clinical records and angiograms of these patients were reviewed to determine the extent of bur hole collaterals through the shunt site. Three patients were identified who had VP shunts placed for hydrocephalus and subsequently developed moyamoya disease. All 3 patients demonstrated spontaneous transdural collaterals at the ventricular catheter bur hole, as confirmed by angiography during the workup for moyamoya disease. No patients required subsequent revision of their ventricular catheters following the diagnosis of moyamoya. All patients have remained stroke free and clinically stable following pial synangiosis. Although the association of moyamoya and shunted hydrocephalus is rare, it may present a significant potential problem for the neurosurgeon treating a shunt malfunction in this patient population, because shunt bur holes may become entry sites for the ingrowth of significant cortical transdural collateral blood supply to the underlying brain. Shunt revision might therefore be associated with an increased risk of postoperative stroke or operative-site hemorrhage in this population if this

  12. Recurrent acute obstructive hydrocephalus as clinical onset of cerebral Whipple's disease.

    PubMed

    Seneca, Vincenzo; Imperato, Alessia; Colella, Giuseppe; Cioffi, Valentina; Mariniello, Giuseppe; Gangemi, Michelangelo

    2010-10-01

    Whipple's disease is a rare multisystemic infection caused by the intracellular bacteria Thropheryma whippelii. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement is not rare. The most frequent CNS manifestations are cognitive and behavioural changes, sopranuclear ophtalmoplegia, myoclonus, epilepsy, ataxia, meningitis and focal cerebral palsy. We report one case of cerebral localization of Whipple's disease with a clinical presentation of recurrent endocranic hypertension and hydrocephalus, and uncommon neurological symptoms, successfully treated by endoscopic third ventriculostomy and antibiotic therapy with ceftriaxone and Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole.

  13. Cerebral blood flow in small vessel disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yulu; Thrippleton, Michael J; Makin, Stephen D; Marshall, Ian; Geerlings, Mirjam I; de Craen, Anton Jm; van Buchem, Mark A; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2016-10-01

    White matter hyperintensities are frequent on neuroimaging of older people and are a key feature of cerebral small vessel disease. They are commonly attributed to chronic hypoperfusion, although whether low cerebral blood flow is cause or effect is unclear. We systematically reviewed studies that assessed cerebral blood flow in small vessel disease patients, performed meta-analysis and sensitivity analysis of potential confounders. Thirty-eight studies (n = 4006) met the inclusion criteria, including four longitudinal and 34 cross-sectional studies. Most cerebral blood flow data were from grey matter. Twenty-four cross-sectional studies (n = 1161) were meta-analysed, showing that cerebral blood flow was lower in subjects with more white matter hyperintensity, globally and in most grey and white matter regions (e.g. mean global cerebral blood flow: standardised mean difference-0.71, 95% CI -1.12, -0.30). These cerebral blood flow differences were attenuated by excluding studies in dementia or that lacked age-matching. Four longitudinal studies (n = 1079) gave differing results, e.g., more baseline white matter hyperintensity predated falling cerebral blood flow (3.9 years, n = 575); cerebral blood flow was low in regions that developed white matter hyperintensity (1.5 years, n = 40). Cerebral blood flow is lower in subjects with more white matter hyperintensity cross-sectionally, but evidence for falling cerebral blood flow predating increasing white matter hyperintensity is conflicting. Future studies should be longitudinal, obtain more white matter data, use better age-correction and stratify by clinical diagnosis.

  14. Endothelium-Specific Interference with PPARγ Causes Cerebral Vascular Dysfunction in Response to a High Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Andreas M.; de Lange, Willem J.; Halabi, Carmen M.; Modrick, Mary L.; Keen, Henry L.; Faraci, Frank M.; Sigmund, Curt D.

    2008-01-01

    The ligand-activated transcription factor PPARγ is expressed in vascular endothelium where it exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects. However, its role in regulating vascular function remains undefined. We examined endothelial function in transgenic mice expressing dominant negative mutants of PPARγ under the control of an endothelial-specific promoter to test the hypothesis that endothelial PPARγ plays a protective role in the vasculature. Under baseline conditions, responses to the endothelium-dependent agonist acetylcholine (Ach) were not affected in either aorta or the basilar artery in vitro. In response to feeding a high fat diet for 12 weeks, Ach produced dilation that was markedly impaired in the basilar artery of mice expressing dominant negative mutants, but not in mice expressing wildtype PPARγ controlled by the same promoter. Unlike basilar artery, 12 weeks of high fat diet was not sufficient to cause endothelial dysfunction in the aorta of mice expressing dominant negative PPARγ, although it became evident after 25 weeks. The responses to Ach in basilar artery were restored to normal after treatment with a scavenger of superoxide. Baseline blood pressure was only slightly elevated in the transgenic mice, but the pressor response to angiotensin-II was augmented. Thus, interference with PPARγ in the endothelium produces endothelial dysfunction in the cerebral circulation via a mechanism involving oxidative stress. Consistent with its role as a fatty acid sensor, these findings provide genetic evidence that endothelial PPARγ plays a critical role in protecting a range of blood vessels in response to a high fat diet. PMID:18676352

  15. Vascular C-reactive protein in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease: role of vascular inflammation and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Nobutaka

    2006-12-01

    Atherosclerosis is considered to be a chronic inflammatory disease. Vascular inflammation occurs in response to injury induced by various stimuli, such as oxidative stress, shear stress, infection, and so on. This concept is supported by the recent clinical findings that C-reactive protein (CRP) is an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease. CRP, which was originally identified as a protein that could precipitate the C-polysaccharide of pneumococcal cell walls, has been widely used as a clinical marker of the state of inflammation, since its production by hepatocytes increases during the acute phase of the inflammatory response. Recent investigations have provided two new concepts for the research field of CRP, namely, its extra-hepatic production and its potent biological activities such as the induction of adhesion molecules and chemokines. Recently, we demonstrated that smooth muscle cells and macrophages in coronary arteries expressed CRP protein and mRNA, as evaluated using coronary specimens of coronary artery disease (CAD) patients obtained by atherectomy. The expression of vascular CRP was closely associated with NAD(P)H oxidase, an important enzymatic origin of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vessel walls. Furthermore, CRP directly up-regulated NAD(P)H oxidase p22(phox) and enhanced ROS generation in cultured coronary artery smooth muscle cells. Thus, vascular CRP is likely to be a direct participant in vascular inflammation and lesion formation via its potent biological effects. Since lysophosphatidylcholine, a major atherogenic lipid of oxidized LDL, was reported to activate vascular NAD(P)H oxidase, we speculate that there is a vicious circle consisting of vascular NAD(P)H oxidase, ROS and oxidized LDL. Since phagocytic NAD(P)H oxidase is at the first line of the host defense system, it is important to selectively suppress vascular NAD(P)H oxidase in the localized inflammatory lesions in therapeutic strategies for CAD. In this review, we

  16. Role of the Retinal Vascular Endothelial Cell in Ocular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Arpita S.; Appukuttan, Binoy; Wilmarth, Phillip A.; Pan, Yuzhen; Stempel, Andrew J.; Chipps, Timothy J.; Benedetti, Eric E.; Zamora, David O.; Choi, Dongseok; David, Larry L.; Smith, Justine R.

    2012-01-01

    Retinal endothelial cells line the arborizing microvasculature that supplies and drains the neural retina. The anatomical and physiological characteristics of these endothelial cells are consistent with nutritional requirements and protection of a tissue critical to vision. On the one hand, the endothelium must ensure the supply of oxygen and other nutrients to the metabolically active retina, and allow access to circulating cells that maintain the vasculature or survey the retina for the presence of potential pathogens. On the other hand, the endothelium contributes to the blood-retinal barrier that protects the retina by excluding circulating molecular toxins, microorganisms, and pro-inflammatory leukocytes. Features required to fulfill these functions may also predispose to disease processes, such as retinal vascular leakage and neovascularization, and trafficking of microbes and inflammatory cells. Thus, the retinal endothelial cell is a key participant in retinal ischemic vasculopathies that include diabetic retinopathy and retinopathy of prematurity, and retinal inflammation or infection, as occurs in posterior uveitis. Using gene expression and proteomic profiling, it has been possible to explore the molecular phenotype of the human retinal endothelial cell and contribute to understanding of the pathogenesis of these diseases. In addition to providing support for the involvement of well-characterized endothelial molecules, profiling has the power to identify new players in retinal pathologies. Findings may have implications for the design of new biological therapies. Additional progress in this field is anticipated as other technologies, including epigenetic profiling methods, whole transcriptome shotgun sequencing, and metabolomics, are used to study the human retinal endothelial cell. PMID:22982179

  17. Cerebral small vessel disease: Capillary pathways to stroke and cognitive decline

    PubMed Central

    Engedal, Thorbjørn S; Moreton, Fiona; Hansen, Mikkel B; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Dalkara, Turgay; Markus, Hugh S; Muir, Keith W

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) gives rise to one in five strokes worldwide and constitutes a major source of cognitive decline in the elderly. SVD is known to occur in relation to hypertension, diabetes, smoking, radiation therapy and in a range of inherited and genetic disorders, autoimmune disorders, connective tissue disorders, and infections. Until recently, changes in capillary patency and blood viscosity have received little attention in the aetiopathogenesis of SVD and the high risk of subsequent stroke and cognitive decline. Capillary flow patterns were, however, recently shown to limit the extraction efficacy of oxygen in tissue and capillary dysfunction therefore proposed as a source of stroke-like symptoms and neurodegeneration, even in the absence of physical flow-limiting vascular pathology. In this review, we examine whether capillary flow disturbances may be a shared feature of conditions that represent risk factors for SVD. We then discuss aspects of capillary dysfunction that could be prevented or alleviated and therefore might be of general benefit to patients at risk of SVD, stroke or cognitive decline. PMID:26661176

  18. Levodopa does not change cerebral vasoreactivity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Krainik, Alexandre; Maillet, Audrey; Fleury, Vanessa; Sahin, Mehmet; Troprès, Irène; Lamalle, Laurent; Thobois, Stephane; Fraix, Valerie; Villien, Marjorie; Warnking, Jan; Pollak, Pierre; Pinto, Serge; Krack, Paul

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work was to study cerebral vasoreactivity to hypercapnia in Parkinson's disease (PD) before and after levodopa administration. The prospective study was conducted in 20 patients presenting with PD, using 3T blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI) covering the whole brain. The hypercapnic stimulus was block-designed using carbogen inhalation, a gas mixture of 7% CO2 and 93% O2, before (OFF) and 60 minutes after administration of a suprathreshold (120%) therapeutic L-dopa dose (ON). Ten age-matched controls were enrolled for between-group comparisons. Analyses were conducted with a random effects model and corrected for multiple comparisons. No adverse reaction to the hypercapnic stimulus was reported. However, 10 patients and 2 controls were excluded because of incomplete protocol realization, inappropriate hypercapnic stimulus, or excessive movements, leaving 10 patients and 8 controls for further analyses. The hypercapnic stimulus increased whole-brain BOLD signal of 1.48% ± 0.06% (mean ± standard error) in controls, 1.59% ± 0.05% in patients OFF, and 1.62% ± 0.09% in patients ON. Regions of interest analyses showed a signal increase in gray matter of 2.60% ± 0.16% in controls, 2.89% ± 0.21% in patients OFF, and 2.87% ± 0.12% in patients ON. No global or regional significant difference was detected, when comparing patients OFF and ON L-dopa, or between patients and controls. Contrary to Alzheimer's disease, the vasoreactivity to hypercapnia was normal in PD before and after L-dopa administration, compared to controls. This negative result is an important finding, especially for neuroscientists using fMRI to investigate motricity and cognition, discarding a significant confounding effect.

  19. Cerebral glucose utilization and blood flow in Huntington's Disease (HD)

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, M.E.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Wapenski, J.; Riege, W.; Baxter, L.R.

    1985-05-01

    Previous studies in the authors' Laboratory have been carried out on 13 patients symptomatic of HD (SHD) and 15 asymptomatic at-risk for HD (ARHD) with a ECAT II and identification of changes in caudate metabolism using an index technique. The authors report now studies of additional 28 subjects (11 SHD, 17 ARHD) studied drug free and compared to age/sex matched controls using the higher resolution NeuroECAT, FDG for glucose utilization (LCMRGlc) and 0-15 water for cerebral blood flow (CBF). Patients had neurological, psychiatric-tests, x-ray CT and were video taped to determine type, timing and amount of choreathetic movements during study. In SHD (disease duration 4.9 +- 2.7 yrs), significant decreases (30%) in LCMRGlc were found in striatum (SHD=19.3 +- 7.7, controls = 29.9 +- 5.8 ..mu.. moles/min/100g) despite no to moderate caudate atrophy on x-ray CT. Hemisphere and cortical CMRGlc were not significantly decreased. There was a significant correlation between disease duration and ratio of caudate to putamen (Cd/Put). Pattern of LCMRGlc and CBF matched in SHD. The caudate to hemisphere LCMRGlc ratio was not different between ARHD and controls except variance was about 4 times greater for ARHD (ARHD=1.21 +- 0.15, controls = 1.28 +- 0.04) indicating presence of subpopulations in ARHD group. Four ARHD subjects had a ratio of 1 Std. Dev. from mean of SHD (no normals had values in this range). The 2 ARHD subjects with lowest caudate LCMRGlc had Cd/Put ratios > 2 Std. Dev. from controls. Results show 1) LCMRGlc abnormalities in all SHD patients and subpopulations in ARHD, 2) metabolic alterations appear to begin in caudate and spread to putamen and that a Cd/Put value of 0.7 should be found at start of symptoms, and 3) cortex and thalamus are relatively spared in ARHD and early SHD.

  20. Pattern and outcome of vascular involvement of Omani patients with Behcet's disease.

    PubMed

    Alkaabi, Juma K; Pathare, Anil

    2011-06-01

    The objective of the study is to study the pattern, frequency and outcome of vascular events in Omani patients with Behcet's disease (BD). Forty BD patients were recruited. Clinical data parameters were recorded, including age at onset, disease duration, current disease activity, and the vascular manifestations of the disease (current and past events). Disease activity was assessed by ESR, CRP and also clinically. For venous and arterial thrombotic events, imaging studies, such as Doppler ultrasonography, angiography, MRI, CT, and echocardiography were performed. Nine patients had vascular events (23%). The mean age of these patients at diagnosis of the vascular event was 24 years (range 15-37) and the mean disease duration at onset of the vascular event was 3.8 years (range 3-5); this was significant when compared with patients without thrombosis (P=0.001, Mann-Whitney test). In these patients with vascular involvement, two patients (22%) had venous lesions, three (33%) patients had arterial lesions and four patients (44%) had mixed lesions. Two patients (22%) had pulmonary artery aneurysm (PAA) and concomitant intracardiac thrombus, and further one patient also had PAA. Immunosuppressive therapy resulted in the resolution of PAA and intracardiac thrombous. In conclusion, the frequency of vascular complications of BD in our patients is similar to those reported around the world. We found younger male patients with short disease duration are at a greater risk of developing thrombosis. Medical treatment with immunosuppressive therapy without anticoagulation seems successful in treating PAA and intracardiac thrombus.

  1. Emerging translational approaches to target STAT3 signalling and its impact on vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Dutzmann, Jochen; Daniel, Jan-Marcus; Bauersachs, Johann; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Sedding, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    Acute and chronic inflammation responses characterize the vascular remodelling processes in atherosclerosis, restenosis, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and angiogenesis. The functional and phenotypic changes in diverse vascular cell types are mediated by complex signalling cascades that initiate and control genetic reprogramming. The signalling molecule's signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) plays a key role in the initiation and continuation of these pathophysiological changes. This review highlights the pivotal involvement of STAT3 in pathological vascular remodelling processes and discusses potential translational therapies, which target STAT3 signalling, to prevent and treat cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, current clinical trials using highly effective and selective inhibitors of STAT3 signalling for distinct diseases, such as myelofibrosis and rheumatoid arthritis, are discussed with regard to their vascular (side-) effects and their potential to pave the way for a direct use of these molecules for the prevention or treatment of vascular diseases. PMID:25784694

  2. Principal component analysis of indocyanine green fluorescence dynamics for diagnosis of vascular diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jihye; An, Yuri; Lee, Jungsul; Choi, Chulhee

    2015-03-01

    Indocyanine green (ICG), a near-infrared fluorophore, has been used in visualization of vascular structure and non-invasive diagnosis of vascular disease. Although many imaging techniques have been developed, there are still limitations in diagnosis of vascular diseases. We have recently developed a minimally invasive diagnostics system based on ICG fluorescence imaging for sensitive detection of vascular insufficiency. In this study, we used principal component analysis (PCA) to examine ICG spatiotemporal profile and to obtain pathophysiological information from ICG dynamics. Here we demonstrated that principal components of ICG dynamics in both feet showed significant differences between normal control and diabetic patients with vascula complications. We extracted the PCA time courses of the first three components and found distinct pattern in diabetic patient. We propose that PCA of ICG dynamics reveal better classification performance compared to fluorescence intensity analysis. We anticipate that specific feature of spatiotemporal ICG dynamics can be useful in diagnosis of various vascular diseases.

  3. Preoperative simulations of endovascular treatment for a cerebral aneurysm using a patient-specific vascular silicone model.

    PubMed

    Kono, Kenichi; Shintani, Aki; Okada, Hideo; Terada, Tomoaki

    2013-01-01

    Silicone models of cerebral aneurysms are used for evaluation of devices, training, or hemodynamic studies. We report preoperative simulations of endovascular treatment for a case with an unruptured wide-neck aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery using a patient-specific silicone model. Using a rapid prototyping system, we created a silicone model based on the vascular image obtained by three-dimensional rotational angiogram. The aneurysm and vessels formed a cavity in the silicone block model. We performed endovascular simulations using several difference devices and attempted possible methods for coil embolization. We designed treatment strategies based on the simulations and performed balloon-assisted coil embolization of the aneurysm. The simulations were especially useful in navigation of a microcatheter by planning the shape of its tip beforehand. There was one significant difference between the silicone model simulations and actual treatment: the shape of the vessel in the silicone block model was not changed by insertion of a catheter or guidewire. This is the first study to describe preoperative endovascular simulations using a patient-specific silicone model. Our methods of creating a patient-specific model are relatively simple and easy. Although this is a single case, we demonstrate that the simulations are feasible and helpful for designing a treatment strategy and safe manipulation of endovascular devices by experiencing their behavior before actual treatment.

  4. Mutation of the Alzheimer's Disease Amyloid Gene in Hereditary Cerebral Hemorrhage, Dutch Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Efrat; Carman, Mark D.; Fernandez-Madrid, Ivan J.; Power, Michael D.; Lieberburg, Ivan; van Duinen, Sjoerd G.; Bots, Gerard Th. A. M.; Luyendijk, Willem; Frangione, Blas

    1990-06-01

    An amyloid protein that precipitates in the cerebral vessel walls of Dutch patients with hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis is similar to the amyloid protein in vessel walls and senile plaques in brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease, Down syndrome, and sporadic cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Cloning and sequencing of the two exons that encode the amyloid protein from two patients with this amyloidosis revealed a cytosine-to-guanine transversion, a mutation that caused a single amino acid substitution (glutamine instead of glutamic acid) at position 22 of the amyloid protein. The mutation may account for the deposition of this amyloid protein in the cerebral vessel walls of these patients, leading to cerebral hemorrhages and premature death.

  5. The lymphatic vascular system in liver diseases: its role in ascites formation.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chuhan; Iwakiri, Yasuko

    2013-06-01

    The lymphatic system is part of the circulatory system and plays a key role in normal vascular function. Its failure plays a crucial role in the development and maintenance of various diseases including liver diseases. Lymphangiogenesis (the growth of lymphatic vessels) and changes in the properties of lymphatic vessels are associated with pathogenesis of tumor metastases, ascites formation, liver fibrosis/cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Despite its significant role in liver diseases and its importance as a potential therapeutic target for those diseases, the lymphatic vascular system of the liver is poorly understood. Therefore, how the lymphatic vascular system in general and lymphangiogenesis in particular are mechanistically related to the pathogenesis and maintenance of liver diseases are largely unknown. This article summarizes: 1) the lymphatic vascular system; 2) its role in liver tumors, liver fibrosis/cirrhosis and portal hypertension; and 3) its role in ascites formation.

  6. Diagnostic Utility of Contrast-enhanced 3D T1-weighted Imaging in Acute Cerebral Infarction Associated with Graves Disease.

    PubMed

    Gon, Yasufumi; Sakaguchi, Manabu; Oyama, Naoki; Mochizuki, Hideki

    2017-02-01

    Graves disease is rarely complicated with cerebrovascular steno-occlusive diseases. Previous studies have suggested several hypotheses for this occurrence, including excess thyroid hormone, which stimulates the sympathetic nervous system, which in turn causes an abnormal hemodynamic response with consequent atherosclerotic changes, and antithyroid antibodies cause local vascular inflammation in patients with Graves disease. However, radiological findings of vasculitis in patients with Graves disease and cerebral infarction remain less known. We report the case of a 30-year-old Japanese woman with acute cerebral infarction due to vasculitis associated with Graves disease. She was admitted to our hospital with a 4-day history of intermittent transient dysarthria and limb shaking of the left leg when standing. Three weeks before admission, she went to a local hospital because of general malaise and was diagnosed with Graves disease. Neurological examination revealed paralytic dysarthria, left central facial nerve palsy, and left hemiparesis (manual muscle testing, 4 of 5). Blood examinations showed hyperthyroidism (thyroid-stimulating hormone ≤.010 µU/mL; free T3 ≥25.0 pg/mL; free T4 ≥8.0 ng/dL) and elevation of antithyroid antibody levels (thyroid peroxidase antibody, 87 IU/mL). The vessel wall of the right internal carotid artery was markedly enhanced on contrast-enhanced three-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, suggesting vasculitis. Magnetic resonance angiography revealed right internal carotid artery occlusion after the branching ophthalmic artery. Arterial stenosis due to vasculitis was considered the cause of hemodynamic ischemic stroke. Vessel wall imaging such as high-resolution contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging seems useful for assessing the underlying mechanism of stroke in patients with Graves disease.

  7. Complementary acupuncture treatment increases cerebral metabolism in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong; Jiang, Xuemei; Zhuo, Ying; Tang, Anwu; Wik, Gustav

    2009-01-01

    We used positron emission tomography (PET) and the 18-flourodeoxyglucose tracer to study cerebral effects of complementary acupuncture in Parkinson's disease. Five patients received scalp-acupuncture and Madopa, while the other five had Madopa only. PET scans before and after 5 weeks of complementary acupuncture treatment show increased glucose metabolisms in parietal, temporal, occipital lobes, the thalamus, and the cerebellum in the light-diseased hemisphere, and in parietal and occipital lobes of the severe-diseased hemisphere. No changes were observed in the Madopa-only group. Acupuncture in combination with Madopa may improve cerebral glucose metabolism in Parkinson's disease.

  8. Modeling the Role of the Glymphatic Pathway and Cerebral Blood Vessel Properties in Alzheimer’s Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kyrtsos, Christina Rose; Baras, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly, affecting over 10% population over the age of 65 years. Clinically, AD is described by the symptom set of short term memory loss and cognitive decline, changes in mentation and behavior, and eventually long-term memory deficit as the disease progresses. On imaging studies, significant atrophy with subsequent increase in ventricular volume have been observed. Pathology on post-mortem brain specimens demonstrates the classic findings of increased beta amyloid (Aβ) deposition and the presence of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) within affected neurons. Neuroinflammation, dysregulation of blood-brain barrier transport and clearance, deposition of Aβ in cerebral blood vessels, vascular risk factors such as atherosclerosis and diabetes, and the presence of the apolipoprotein E4 allele have all been identified as playing possible roles in AD pathogenesis. Recent research has demonstrated the importance of the glymphatic system in the clearance of Aβ from the brain via the perivascular space surrounding cerebral blood vessels. Given the variety of hypotheses that have been proposed for AD pathogenesis, an interconnected, multilayer model offers a unique opportunity to combine these ideas into a single unifying model. Results of this model demonstrate the importance of vessel stiffness and heart rate in maintaining adequate clearance of Aβ from the brain. PMID:26448331

  9. Thiazine Red+ platelet inclusions in Cerebral Blood Vessels are first signs in an Alzheimer’s Disease mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kniewallner, Kathrin M.; Wenzel, Daniela; Humpel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Strong evidence shows an association between cerebral vascular diseases and Alzheimer´s disease (AD). In order to study the interaction of beta-amyloid (Aβ) plaques with brain vessels, we crossbred an AD mouse model (overexpressing amyloid precursor protein with the Swedish-Dutch-Iowa mutations, APP_SweDI) with mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the flt-1/VEGFR1 promoter in vessels (GFP_FLT1). Our data show, that only very few Aβ plaques were seen in 4-months old mice, focused in the mammillary body and in the lateral septal nucleus. The number of plaques markedly increased with age being most prominent in 12-months old mice. Thiazine Red was used to verify the plaques. Several Thiazine Red+ inclusions were found in GFP+ vessels, but only in non-perfused 4-months old mice. These inclusions were verified by Resorufin stainings possibly representing cerebral amyloid angiopathy. The inclusions were also seen in non-crossbred APP_SweDI but not in wildtype and GFP_FLT1 mice. In order to characterize these inclusions Flow Cytometry (FACS) analysis demonstrated that platelets were specifically stained by Thiazine Red+, more pronounced when aggregated. In conclusion, our data show that Thiazine Red+ inclusions representing aggregated platelets are a first pathological sign in AD before plaque development and may become important therapeutic targets in early AD. PMID:27345467

  10. [Oxidative stress: one of the major causes of vascular calcification in chronic kidney disease patients].

    PubMed

    Nyitrai, Mónika; Balla, György; Balla, József

    2015-11-22

    The leading cause of high mortality in dialyzed patients is cardiovascular disease. One of the main contributors of cardiovascular event is vascular calcification, which occurs even in very young patients. Multiple factors and complex mechanisms are involved in the formation of robust vascular calcification which affects a large vascular area observed in chronic kidney diseases. Patients on dialysis are exposed to enhanced oxidative stress as a result of increased pro-oxidant activity and reduced anti-oxidant systems. The oxidation of lipoprotein particles is implicated in the development of vascular damage representing oxidative threat, which leads to endothelial dysfunction. Moreover, in a pro-oxidant environment osteoblastic trans-differentiation of smooth muscle cells was shown to occur. Heme derived from oxidized hemoglobin might contribute to the formation of reactive lipid metabolites. This oxidative burden contributes to the development of atherosclerosis and vascular calcification. Heme oxygenase-1 and ferritin may serve as intracellular defense mechanisms against such an insult.

  11. Kuhlmann vascularized bone grafting for treatment of Kienböck's disease: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Sbai, Mohamed Ali; Msek, Hichem; Benzarti, Sofien; Boussen, Monia; Maalla, Riadh

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of Kienböck's disease has historically been determined by staging, ulnar variance, and presence or absence of arthritic changes. With the advent of newer techniques of vascularized bone grafting, the status of the cartilage shell of the lunate has become another factor that can influence the procedure performed. The purpose of this article is to describe the technique of Kuhlmann vascularized bone graft for Kienböck's disease. In addition, the indications, contraindications, and outcomes are described. PMID:27583101

  12. Kuhlmann vascularized bone grafting for treatment of Kienböck's disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sbai, Mohamed Ali; Msek, Hichem; Benzarti, Sofien; Boussen, Monia; Maalla, Riadh

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of Kienböck's disease has historically been determined by staging, ulnar variance, and presence or absence of arthritic changes. With the advent of newer techniques of vascularized bone grafting, the status of the cartilage shell of the lunate has become another factor that can influence the procedure performed. The purpose of this article is to describe the technique of Kuhlmann vascularized bone graft for Kienböck's disease. In addition, the indications, contraindications, and outcomes are described.

  13. Single Sustained Inflation followed by Ventilation Leads to Rapid Cardiorespiratory Recovery but Causes Cerebral Vascular Leakage in Asphyxiated Near-Term Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Sobotka, Kristina S.; Hooper, Stuart B.; Crossley, Kelly J.; Ong, Tracey; Schmölzer, Georg M.; Barton, Samantha K.; McDougall, Annie R. A.; Miller, Suzie L.; Tolcos, Mary; Klingenberg, Claus; Polglase, Graeme R.

    2016-01-01

    Background A sustained inflation (SI) rapidly restores cardiac function in asphyxic, bradycardic newborns but its effects on cerebral haemodynamics and brain injury are unknown. We determined the effect of different SI strategies on carotid blood flow (CaBF) and cerebral vascular integrity in asphyxiated near-term lambs. Methods Lambs were instrumented and delivered at 139 ± 2 d gestation and asphyxia was induced by delaying ventilation onset. Lambs were randomised to receive 5 consecutive 3 s SI (multiple SI; n = 6), a single 30 s SI (single SI; n = 6) or conventional ventilation (no SI; n = 6). Ventilation continued for 30 min in all lambs while CaBF and respiratory function parameters were recorded. Brains were assessed for gross histopathology and vascular leakage. Results CaBF increased more rapidly and to a greater extent during a single SI (p = 0.01), which then decreased below both other groups by 10 min, due to a higher cerebral oxygen delivery (p = 0.01). Blood brain barrier disruption was increased in single SI lambs as indicated by increased numbers of blood vessel profiles with plasma protein extravasation (p = 0.001) in the cerebral cortex. There were no differences in CaBF or cerebral oxygen delivery between the multiple SI and no SI lambs. Conclusions Ventilation with an initial single 30 s SI improves circulatory recovery, but is associated with greater disruption of blood brain barrier function, which may exacerbate brain injury suffered by asphyxiated newborns. This injury may occur as a direct result of the initial SI or to the higher tidal volumes delivered during subsequent ventilation. PMID:26765258

  14. Dyslipidemia Induced by Drugs Used for the Prevention and Treatment of Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Athyros, Vasilios G; Karagiannis, Asterios; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2011-01-01

    Dyslipidemia is a major vascular risk factor. Interestingly, several agents used for the prevention and treatment of vascular diseases have an adverse effect on the lipid profile. In addition, agents belonging to the same class (e.g. beta blockers) can have significantly different actions on lipid levels. We summarize the effects of drugs used for the prevention and treatment of vascular diseases on the lipid profile. These effects should be considered when selecting a specific agent, particularly in high-risk patients. PMID:21769302

  15. [Screening for systemic manifestations of vascular malformations in patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (Osler disease)].

    PubMed

    Cerra Pohl, Ana; Werner, Jochen Alfred; Folz, Benedikt Josef

    2008-11-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (Rendu-Osler- Weber syndrome) is a disease characterized by systemic vascular malformations. Typical clinical manifestations are recurrent epistaxis and telangiectases of the skin and the mucous membranes. The syndrome is furthermore characterized by its hereditary aspect. The disease seems to be much more complicated than previously thought, mainly because of the accompanying vascular malformations in vital organs, like the liver, the kidney, the lung, the brain, and the eyes. The diagnosis and treatment of systemic vascular malformations requires interdisciplinary management.

  16. Definition and therapy of chronic cerebro-vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Agnoli, A; Denaro, A; Ruggieri, S

    1982-05-01

    Chronic cerebro-vascular disorders could be considered in a broad sense as a large body of knowledge in which three main categories of clinical disturbances have to be be considered: 1) Pathological aging that manifest itself with light short term memory impairment associated with a mild parkinsonian symptomatology or pseudobulbar signs. 2) Senile dementia Alzheimer type and multi infarct dementia. 3) Chronic cerebro-vascular disorders as defined by the Ad Hoc Committee (Paris, 1980). At present the therapy of chronic cerebro-vascular disorders is based on two main groups of drugs and can be divided into: 1) A treatment of prevention or secondary prevention which tends to correct or modify the different risk factors. 2) A treatment that seeks to control and modify the neurological and neuropsychological after effects and the disorders of the higher nervous activities which result from the lesion.

  17. [Lin Xue-Jian's experience on treatment of a part of cerebral diseases with scalp acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Li; Wu, Jiu-Wei

    2005-10-01

    LIN Xue-Jian adopts Chinese traditional acupuncture and moxibustion manipulation methods to stimulate the special area of scalp to treat a part of brain-derived diseases, such as infantile cerebral palsy, nerve deafness, cerebellar ataxia, lacunar cerebral infarction, senile dementia, Parkinson's disease, anxiety, insomnia and central constipation, and so on. Scalp acupuncture can improve ability of blood and oxygen supply for general blood vessels; stimulation of corresponding acupoint area according to symptoms and signs can control condition of disease; and can repair, activate and regenerate the injured, dormancy and aging neurons, so as to dredge nerve network in the brain, hence better therapeutic effect.

  18. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease and Renal Function: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Makin, Stephen D.J.; Cook, F.A.B.; Dennis, Martin S.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The small vessel disease (SVD) that appears in the brain may be part of a multisystem disorder affecting other vascular beds such as the kidney and retina. Because renal failure is associated with both stroke and white matter hyperintensities we hypothesised that small vessel (lacunar) stroke would be more strongly associated with renal failure than cortical stroke. Therefore, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to establish first if lacunar stroke was associated with the renal function, and second, if cerebral small vessel disease seen on the MRI of patients without stroke was more common in patients with renal failure. Methods We searched Medline and EMBASE for studies in adults with cerebral SVD (lacunar stroke or white matter hyper intensities (WMH) on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)), in which renal function was assessed (estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) or proteinuria). We extracted data on SVD diagnosis, renal function, demographics and comorbidities. We performed two meta-analyses: first, we calculated the odds of renal impairment in lacunar (small vessel) ischaemic stroke compared to other ischaemic stroke subtypes (non-small vessel disease); and second, we calculated the odds of renal impairment in non-stroke individuals with WMH on MRI compared to individuals without WMH. We then performed a sensitivity analysis by excluding studies with certain characteristics and repeating the meta-analysis calculation. Results After screening 11,001 potentially suitable titles, we included 37 papers reporting 32 studies of 20,379 subjects: 15 of stroke patients and 17 of SVD features in non-stroke patients. To diagnose lacunar stroke, 13/15 of the studies used risk factor-based classification (none used diffusion-weighted MRI). 394/1,119 (35%) of patients with lacunar stroke had renal impairment compared with 1,443/4,217 (34%) of patients with non-lacunar stroke, OR 0.88, (95% CI 0.6-1.30). In individuals without stroke the

  19. Systemic Expression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Patients with Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Treated by Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Objective Increased expression of angiogenic factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), is associated with the pathogenesis of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs). The purpose of this study was to investigate plasma levels of VEGF in normal subjects and in patients with CCM and to evaluate change in these levels following stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods Peripheral venous blood was collected from 6 patients with CCM before SRS using Gamma Knife and at the 1 week, 1 month, 3month, and 6 month follow-up visits. Plasma VEGF levels were measured using commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from 10 healthy volunteers as controls. Results Mean plasma VEGF level of 41.9 pg/mL (range, 11.7–114.9 pg/mL) in patients with CCM at baseline was higher than that of the healthy controls (29.3 pg/mL, range, 9.2–64.3 pg/mL), without significant differences between CCM patients and controls (p=0.828). Plasma VEGF level following SRS dropped to 24.6 pg/mL after 1 week, and decreased to 18.5 pg/mL after 1 month, then increased to 24.3 pg/mL after 3 months, and 32.6 pg/mL after 6 months. Two patients suffering from rebleeding after SRS showed a higher level of VEGF at 6 months after SRS than their pretreatment level. Conclusion Plasma VEGF levels in patients with CCM were elevated over controls at baseline, and decreased from baseline to 1 month after SRS and increased further for up to 6 months. Theses results indicated that anti-angiogenic effect of SRS might play a role in the treatment of CCMs. PMID:27651861

  20. Near-infrared spectroscopy and transcranial sonography to evaluate cerebral autoregulation in middle cerebral artery steno-occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Oldag, Andreas; Neumann, Jens; Goertler, Michael; Hinrichs, Hermann; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Kupsch, Andreas; Sweeney-Reed, Catherine M; Kopitzki, Klaus

    2016-11-01

    The measurement of autoregulatory delay by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been proposed as an alternative technique to assess cerebral autoregulation, which is routinely assessed via transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) in most centers. Comparitive studies of NIRS and TCD, however, are largely missing. We investigated whether cerebrovascular reserve (CVR), as assessed via TCD, correlates with the delay of the autoregulatory response to changes in arterial blood pressure (ABP) as assessed by NIRS, i.e., if impaired upstream vasomotor reactivity is reflected by downstream cortical autoregulation. Twenty patients with unilateral high-grade steno-occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) underwent bilateral multichannel NIRS of the cortical MCA distributions over a period of 6 min while breathing at a constant rate of 6 cycles/min to induce stable oscillations in ABP. The phase shift φ between ABP and cortical blood oxygenation was calculated as a measure of autoregulatory latency. In a subgroup of 13 patients, CO2 reactivity of the MCAs was determined by TCD to assess CVR in terms of normalized autoregulatory response (NAR). Mean phase shift between ABP and blood oxygenation was significantly increased over the hemisphere ipsilateral to the steno-occlusion (n = 20, p = 0.042). The interhemispheric difference Δφ in phase shift was significantly larger in patients with markedly diminished or exhausted CVR (NAR < 10) than in patients with normal NAR values (NAR ≥ 10) (p = 0.007). Within the MCA core distribution territory, a strong correlation existed between Δφ and CO2 reactivity of the affected MCA (n = 13, r = -0.78, p = 0.011). NIRS may provide an alternative or supplementary approach to evaluate cerebral autoregulation in risk assessment of ischemic events in steno-occlusive disease of cerebral arteries, especially in patients with insufficient bone windows for TCD.

  1. Altered cerebral hemodynamics in early Alzheimer disease: a pilot study using transcranial Doppler.

    PubMed

    Claassen, Jurgen A H R; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Martin-Cook, Kristin; Levine, Benjamin D; Zhang, Rong

    2009-01-01

    Cerebrovascular disease may contribute to the development and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study investigated whether impairments in cerebral hemodynamics can be detected in early-stage AD. Nine patients with mild AD and eight cognitively normal controls matched for age underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging and neuropsychological evaluation, followed by assessment of steady-state cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV, transcranial Doppler), blood pressure (BP, Finapres), and cerebrovascular resistance index (BP/CBFV). Cerebral hemodynamics were quantified using spectral and transfer function analysis of BP and CBFV in rest, during standing up after squat, and during repeated squat-stand maneuvers. Compared to controls, AD patients had lower CBFV and higher cerebrovascular resistance index, unexplained by brain atrophy. Low-frequency variability of BP was enhanced, suggesting impaired arterial baroreflex function. However, CBFV variability was reduced despite enhanced BP variability, and dynamic cerebral autoregulation was not impaired. In conclusion, despite a distinct pattern of altered cerebral hemodynamics, AD patients may have normal autoregulation. However, the challenges for autoregulation in AD are higher, as our data show enhanced BP fluctuations. Increased cerebral vasoconstriction or reduced vasomotion also may attenuate CBFV variability.

  2. Ethanol induces rapid lipid peroxidation and activation of nuclear factor-kappa B in cerebral vascular smooth muscle: relation to alcohol-induced brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Altura, Burton M; Gebrewold, Asefa; Zhang, Aimin; Altura, Bella T

    2002-06-07

    The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that acute administration of alcohol (ethanol) to primary cultured cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells will cause lipid peroxidation, inhibition of IkappaB phosphorylation, and inhibition of nuclear transcription factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB). Ethanol (10, 25, 100 mM) resulted in concentration-dependent rises in malondialdehyde in as little as 30-45 min after exposure to the alcohol, rising to levels 2.5-10x normal after 18-24 h. Using EMSA assays and specific antibodies, ethanol caused three DNA-binding proteins (p50, p65, c-Rel) to rise in nuclear extracts in a concentration-dependent manner. Using a rabbit antibody, IkappaB phosphorylation (and degradation) was stimulated by ethanol (in a concentration-dependent manner) and inhibited by a low concentration of the NF-kappaB inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate. These new biochemical and molecular data indicate that ethanol, even in physiologic concentrations, can elicit rapid lipid peroxidation and activation of NF-kappaB in cerebral vascular muscle cells. The present results when viewed in light of other recently published data suggest that ethanol-induced lipid peroxidation and activation of nuclear transcription factors probably play important roles in alcohol-induced brain-vascular damage, neurobehavioral actions and stroke.

  3. Vascular Occlusions in Grapevines with Pierce’s Disease Make Disease Symptom Development Worse1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qiang; Sun, Yuliang; Walker, M. Andrew; Labavitch, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Vascular occlusions are common structural modifications made by many plant species in response to pathogen infection. However, the functional role(s) of occlusions in host plant disease resistance/susceptibility remains controversial. This study focuses on vascular occlusions that form in stem secondary xylem of grapevines (Vitis vinifera) infected with Pierce’s disease (PD) and the impact of occlusions on the hosts’ water transport and the systemic spread of the causal bacterium Xylella fastidiosa in infected vines. Tyloses are the predominant type of occlusion that forms in grapevine genotypes with differing PD resistances. Tyloses form throughout PD-susceptible grapevines with over 60% of the vessels in transverse sections of all examined internodes becoming fully blocked. By contrast, tylose development was mainly limited to a few internodes close to the point of inoculation in PD-resistant grapevines, impacting only 20% or less of the vessels. The extensive vessel blockage in PD-susceptible grapevines was correlated to a greater than 90% decrease in stem hydraulic conductivity, compared with an approximately 30% reduction in the stems of PD-resistant vines. Despite the systemic spread of X. fastidiosa in PD-susceptible grapevines, the pathogen colonized only 15% or less of the vessels in any internode and occurred in relatively small numbers, amounts much too small to directly block the vessels. Therefore, we concluded that the extensive formation of vascular occlusions in PD-susceptible grapevines does not prevent the pathogen’s systemic spread in them, but may significantly suppress the vines’ water conduction, contributing to PD symptom development and the vines’ eventual death. PMID:23292789

  4. Vascular occlusions in grapevines with Pierce's disease make disease symptom development worse.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiang; Sun, Yuliang; Walker, M Andrew; Labavitch, John M

    2013-03-01

    Vascular occlusions are common structural modifications made by many plant species in response to pathogen infection. However, the functional role(s) of occlusions in host plant disease resistance/susceptibility remains controversial. This study focuses on vascular occlusions that form in stem secondary xylem of grapevines (Vitis vinifera) infected with Pierce's disease (PD) and the impact of occlusions on the hosts' water transport and the systemic spread of the causal bacterium Xylella fastidiosa in infected vines. Tyloses are the predominant type of occlusion that forms in grapevine genotypes with differing PD resistances. Tyloses form throughout PD-susceptible grapevines with over 60% of the vessels in transverse sections of all examined internodes becoming fully blocked. By contrast, tylose development was mainly limited to a few internodes close to the point of inoculation in PD-resistant grapevines, impacting only 20% or less of the vessels. The extensive vessel blockage in PD-susceptible grapevines was correlated to a greater than 90% decrease in stem hydraulic conductivity, compared with an approximately 30% reduction in the stems of PD-resistant vines. Despite the systemic spread of X. fastidiosa in PD-susceptible grapevines, the pathogen colonized only 15% or less of the vessels in any internode and occurred in relatively small numbers, amounts much too small to directly block the vessels. Therefore, we concluded that the extensive formation of vascular occlusions in PD-susceptible grapevines does not prevent the pathogen's systemic spread in them, but may significantly suppress the vines' water conduction, contributing to PD symptom development and the vines' eventual death.

  5. Protective effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Ting; Chen, Ran-Chou; Lu, Wen-Wei; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Yang, Feng-Yi

    2015-04-01

    The protein expressions of neurotrophic factors can be enhanced by low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulation in the brain. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the protective effect of LIPUS stimulation against aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model. LIPUS was administered 7 days before each aluminum chloride (AlCl3) administration, and concomitantly given with AlCl3 daily for a period of 6 weeks. Neurotrophic factors in hippocampus were measured by western blot analysis. Behavioral changes in the Morris water maze and elevated plus maze were examined in rats after administration of AlCl3. Various biochemical analyses were performed to evaluate the extent of brain damages. LIPUS is capable of prompting levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in rat brain. AlCl3 administration resulted in a significant increase in the aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity and beta-amyloid (Aβ) deposition in AlCl3 treated rats. LIPUS stimulation significantly attenuated aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity, Aβ deposition and karyopyknosis in AlCl3 treated rats. Furthermore, LIPUS significantly improved memory retention in AlCl3-induced memory impairment. These experimental results indicate that LIPUS has neuroprotective effects against AlCl3-induced cerebral damages and cognitive dysfunction.

  6. Impact of Pulmonary Vascular Resistances in Heart Transplantation for Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gazit, Avihu Z; Canter, Charles E

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is one of the major diagnoses in pediatric heart transplantation recipients of all age groups. Assessment of pulmonary vascular resistance in these patients prior to transplantation is crucial to determine their candidacy, however, it is frequently inaccurate because of their abnormal anatomy and physiology. This problem places them at significant risk for pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular failure post transplantation. The pathophysiology of pulmonary vascular disease in children with congenital heart disease depends on their pulmonary blood flow patterns, systemic ventricle function, as well as semilunar valves and atrioventricular valves structure and function. In our review we analyze the pathophysiology of pulmonary vascular disease in children with congenital heart disease and end-stage heart failure, and outline the state of the art pre-transplantation medical and surgical management to achieve reverse remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature by using pulmonary vasodilators and mechanical circulatory support. PMID:22548028

  7. Assessing the effect of unilateral cerebral revascularisation on the vascular reactivity of the non-intervened hemisphere: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Sam, Kevin; Poublanc, Julien; Sobczyk, Olivia; Han, Jay S; Battisti-Charbonney, Anne; Mandell, Daniel M; Tymianski, Michael; Crawley, Adrian P; Fisher, Joseph A; Mikulis, David J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Unilateral haemodynamically significant large-vessel intracranial stenosis may be associated with reduced blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR), an indicator of autoregulatory reserve. Reduced CVR has been associated with ipsilateral cortical thinning and loss in cognitive function. These effects have been shown to be reversible following revascularisation. Our aim was to study the effects of unilateral revascularisation on CVR in the non-intervened hemisphere in bilateral steno-occlusive or Moyamoya disease. Study Design A retrospective observational study. Setting A routine follow-up assessment of CVR after a revascularisation procedure at a research teaching hospital in Toronto (Journal wants us to generalise). Participants Thirteen patients with bilateral Moyamoya disease (age range 18 to 52 years; 3 males), seven patients with steno-occlusive disease (age range 18 to 78 years; six males) and 27 approximately age-matched normal control subjects (age range 19–71 years; 16 males) with no history or findings suggestive of any neurological or systemic disease. Intervention Participants underwent BOLD CVR MRI using computerised prospective targeting of CO2, before and after unilateral revascularisation (extracranial–intracranial bypass, carotid endarterectomy or encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis). Pre-revascularisation and post-revascularisation CVR was assessed in each major arterial vascular territory of both hemispheres. Results As expected, surgical revascularisation improved grey matter CVR in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory of the intervened hemisphere (0.010±0.023 to 0.143±0.010%BOLD/mm Hg, p<0.01). There was also a significant post-revascularisation improvement in grey matter CVR in the MCA territory of the non-intervened hemisphere (0.101±0.025 to 0.165±0.015%BOLD/mm Hg, p<0.01). Conclusions Not only does CVR improve in the hemisphere ipsilateral to a flow restoration procedure, but it

  8. Homocysteinemia control by cysteine in cerebral vascular patients after methionine loading test: evidences in physiological and pathological conditions in cerebro-vascular and multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Ulivelli, Monica; Priora, Raffaella; Di Giuseppe, Danila; Coppo, Lucia; Summa, Domenico; Margaritis, Antonios; Frosali, Simona; Bartalini, Sabina; Martini, Giuseppe; Cerase, Alfonso; Di Simplicio, Paolo

    2016-06-01

    The toxicity risk of hyperhomocysteinemia is prevented through thiol drug administration which reduces plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations by activating thiol exchange reactions. Assuming that cysteine (Cys) is a homocysteinemia regulator, the hypothesis was verified in healthy and pathological individuals after the methionine loading test (MLT). The plasma variations of redox species of Cys, Hcy, cysteinylglycine, glutathione and albumin (reduced, HS-ALB, and at mixed disulfide, XSS-ALB) were compared in patients with cerebral small vessels disease (CSVD) (n = 11), multiple sclerosis (MS) (n = 12) and healthy controls (n = 11) at 2-4-6 h after MLT. In MLT-treated subjects, the activation of thiol exchange reactions provoked significant changes over time in redox species concentrations of Cys, Hcy, and albumin. Significant differences between controls and pathological groups were also observed. In non-methionine-treated subjects, total Cys concentrations, tHcy and thiol-protein mixed disulfides (CSS-ALB, HSS-ALB) of CSVD patients were higher than controls. After MLT, all groups displayed significant cystine (CSSC) increases and CSS-ALB decreases, that in pathological groups were significantly higher than controls. These data would confirm the Cys regulatory role on the homocysteinemia; they also explain that the Cys-Hcy mixed disulfide excretion is an important point of hyperhomocysteinemia control. Moreover, in all groups after MLT, significant increases in albumin concentrations, named total albumin (tALB) and measured as sum of HS-ALB (spectrophometric), and XSS-ALB (assayed at HPLC) were observed. tALB increases, more pronounced in healthy than in the pathological subjects, could indicate alterations of albumin equilibria between plasma and other extracellular spaces, whose toxicological consequences deserve further studies.

  9. Causes and consequences of cerebral small vessel disease. The RUN DMC study: a prospective cohort study. Study rationale and protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a frequent finding on CT and MRI scans of elderly people and is related to vascular risk factors and cognitive and motor impairment, ultimately leading to dementia or parkinsonism in some. In general, the relations are weak, and not all subjects with SVD become demented or get parkinsonism. This might be explained by the diversity of underlying pathology of both white matter lesions (WML) and the normal appearing white matter (NAWM). Both cannot be properly appreciated with conventional MRI. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides alternative information on microstructural white matter integrity. The association between SVD, its microstructural integrity, and incident dementia and parkinsonism has never been investigated. Methods/Design The RUN DMC study is a prospective cohort study on the risk factors and cognitive and motor consequences of brain changes among 503 non-demented elderly, aged between 50-85 years, with cerebral SVD. First follow up is being prepared for July 2011. Participants alive will be included and invited to the research centre to undergo a structured questionnaire on demographics and vascular risk factors, and a cognitive, and motor, assessment, followed by a MRI protocol including conventional MRI, DTI and resting state fMRI. Discussion The follow up of the RUN DMC study has the potential to further unravel the causes and possibly better predict the consequences of changes in white matter integrity in elderly with SVD by using relatively new imaging techniques. When proven, these changes might function as a surrogate endpoint for cognitive and motor function in future therapeutic trials. Our data could furthermore provide a better understanding of the pathophysiology of cognitive and motor disturbances in elderly with SVD. The execution and completion of the follow up of our study might ultimately unravel the role of SVD on the microstructural integrity of the white matter in the transition

  10. Fasudil Decreases Lesion Burden in a Murine Model of Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Disease

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, David A.; Shi, Changbin; Shenkar, Robert; Stockton, Rebecca A.; Liu, Feifei; Ginsberg, Mark H.; Marchuk, Douglas A.; Awad, Issam A.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are characterized by grossly dilated capillaries, associated with vascular leak and hemorrhage, and occur in sporadic or inherited (autosomal dominant) forms with mutations in one of three gene loci (CCM 1, 2 or 3). We previously reported that the CCM1 protein (KRIT1) localizes to endothelial cell-cell junctions and loss of KRIT1 leads to junctional instability associated with activation of RhoA and its effector Rho kinase (ROCK). Although ROCK inhibition has been proposed as potential therapy for CCM, there has been no demonstration of a therapeutic effect on CCM lesion genesis in vivo. Methods Our recently generated a model of CCM1 disease (Ccm1+/−Msh2−/−) was treated with ROCK inhibitor fasudil (100 mg/kg/day administered in drinking water from weaning to 5 months of age), or placebo, and blindly assessed CCM lesion burden by systematic survey of animals’ brains. For comparison, we also assessed therapeutic effect in previously described Ccm2+/−Trp53−/− mice, treated with the same dose and duration of fasudil and placebo. Results Fasudil treated Ccm1+/−Msh2−/− mice had a significantly decreased prevalence of CCM lesions compared to placebo controls. Lesions in treated animals were smaller and less likely associated with hemorrhage, inflammation and endothelial proliferation, and exhibited decreased expression of ROCK activation biomarkers. A therapeutic effect was also documented in Ccm2+/−Trp53−/− mice. Conclusion This represents the first report of therapeutic benefit of pharmacological therapy in development and progression of CCMs, and indicates that ROCK activation is a critical step in CCM lesion genesis and maturation. PMID:22034008

  11. [The structural and functional neurovisualization in patients with epileptic seizures in cerebro-vascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Bazilevich, S N; Odinak, M M; Dyskin, D E; Krasakov, I V; Fokin, V A; P'ianov, I V; Dekan, V S; Okol'zin, A V; Pozdniakov, A V; Stanzhevskiĭ, A A

    2008-01-01

    The results of the dynamic study of patients with epileptic seizures in chronic and acute cerebral vascular pathology are presented. Various methods of structural and functional neurovisualization--magnetic resonance tomography using perfusion- and diffusion-weighted imaging, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, positron emission tomography, single photon emission computed tomography were used. Based on the results obtained in the study, the authors discuss etiopathogenetic variants of the development of these seizures and new possible approaches to the complex treatment besides the administration of antiepileptic medications.

  12. New Insights Into Tobacco-Induced Vascular Disease: Clinical Ramifications.

    PubMed

    Cooke, John P

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco smoke contains more than 4,000 compounds. These include phenols, carbonyls, and nitrosamines that may be irritants and carcinogens; particulate matter such as tars; volatiles and gases such as carbon monoxide; and nicotine. Many of these compounds may contribute to the adverse health effects of tobacco. For example, recent findings have shown that the angiogenic and proliferative effects of nicotine are mediated by activation of nicotinic receptors on the vascular cells. Nicotine-induced activation of vascular cells may contribute to pathological neovascularization in cancer, age-related macular degeneration, and atherosclerosis. This review focuses on how nicotine adversely affects cardiovascular health and highlights intriguing new data about nicotine's potent angiogenic and proliferative properties.

  13. Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase in Vascular Physiology and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Eduardo D.; Rezende, Bruno A.; Cortes, Steyner F.; Lemos, Virginia S.

    2016-01-01

    The family of nitric oxide synthases (NOS) has significant importance in various physiological mechanisms and is also involved in many pathological processes. Three NOS isoforms have been identified: neuronal NOS (nNOS or NOS 1), endothelial NOS (eNOS or NOS 3), and an inducible NOS (iNOS or NOS 2). Both nNOS and eNOS are constitutively expressed. Classically, eNOS is considered the main isoform involved in the control of the vascular function. However, more recent studies have shown that nNOS is present in the vascular endothelium and importantly contributes to the maintenance of the homeostasis of the cardiovascular system. In physiological conditions, besides nitric oxide (NO), nNOS also produces hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide (O2•-) considered as key mediators in non-neuronal cells signaling. This mini-review highlights recent scientific releases on the role of nNOS in vascular homeostasis and cardiovascular disorders such as hypertension and atherosclerosis. PMID:27313545

  14. Total Cerebral Small Vessel Disease MRI Score Is Associated with Cognitive Decline in Executive Function in Patients with Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Uiterwijk, Renske; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J.; Huijts, Marjolein; De Leeuw, Peter W.; Kroon, Abraham A.; Staals, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Hypertension is a major risk factor for white matter hyperintensities (WMH), lacunes, cerebral microbleeds, and perivascular spaces, which are MRI markers of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD). Studies have shown associations between these individual MRI markers and cognitive functioning and decline. Recently, a “total SVD score” was proposed in which the different MRI markers were combined into one measure of SVD, to capture total SVD-related brain damage. We investigated if this SVD score was associated with cognitive decline over 4 years in patients with hypertension. Methods: In this longitudinal cohort study, 130 hypertensive patients (91 patients with uncomplicated hypertension and 39 hypertensive patients with a lacunar stroke) were included. They underwent a neuropsychological assessment at baseline and after 4 years. The presence of WMH, lacunes, cerebral microbleeds, and perivascular spaces were rated on baseline MRI. Presence of each individual marker was added to calculate the total SVD score (range 0–4) in each patient. Results: Uncorrected linear regression analyses showed associations between SVD score and decline in overall cognition (p = 0.017), executive functioning (p < 0.001) and information processing speed (p = 0.037), but not with memory (p = 0.911). The association between SVD score and decline in overall cognition and executive function remained significant after adjustment for age, sex, education, anxiety and depression score, potential vascular risk factors, patient group, and baseline cognitive performance. Conclusion: Our study shows that a total SVD score can predict cognitive decline, specifically in executive function, over 4 years in hypertensive patients. This emphasizes the importance of considering total brain damage due to SVD. PMID:28018214

  15. Total Cerebral Small Vessel Disease MRI Score Is Associated with Cognitive Decline in Executive Function in Patients with Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Uiterwijk, Renske; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; Huijts, Marjolein; De Leeuw, Peter W; Kroon, Abraham A; Staals, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Hypertension is a major risk factor for white matter hyperintensities (WMH), lacunes, cerebral microbleeds, and perivascular spaces, which are MRI markers of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD). Studies have shown associations between these individual MRI markers and cognitive functioning and decline. Recently, a "total SVD score" was proposed in which the different MRI markers were combined into one measure of SVD, to capture total SVD-related brain damage. We investigated if this SVD score was associated with cognitive decline over 4 years in patients with hypertension. Methods: In this longitudinal cohort study, 130 hypertensive patients (91 patients with uncomplicated hypertension and 39 hypertensive patients with a lacunar stroke) were included. They underwent a neuropsychological assessment at baseline and after 4 years. The presence of WMH, lacunes, cerebral microbleeds, and perivascular spaces were rated on baseline MRI. Presence of each individual marker was added to calculate the total SVD score (range 0-4) in each patient. Results: Uncorrected linear regression analyses showed associations between SVD score and decline in overall cognition (p = 0.017), executive functioning (p < 0.001) and information processing speed (p = 0.037), but not with memory (p = 0.911). The association between SVD score and decline in overall cognition and executive function remained significant after adjustment for age, sex, education, anxiety and depression score, potential vascular risk factors, patient group, and baseline cognitive performance. Conclusion: Our study shows that a total SVD score can predict cognitive decline, specifically in executive function, over 4 years in hypertensive patients. This emphasizes the importance of considering total brain damage due to SVD.

  16. Diabetes and vascular disease: pathophysiology, clinical consequences, and medical therapy: part I.

    PubMed

    Paneni, Francesco; Beckman, Joshua A; Creager, Mark A; Cosentino, Francesco

    2013-08-01

    Hyperglycemia and insulin resistance are key players in the development of atherosclerosis and its complications. A large body of evidence suggest that metabolic abnormalities cause overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In turn, ROS, via endothelial dysfunction and inflammation, play a major role in precipitating diabetic vascular disease. A better understanding of ROS-generating pathways may provide the basis to develop novel therapeutic strategies against vascular complications in this setting. Part I of this review will focus on the most current advances in the pathophysiological mechanisms of vascular disease: (i) emerging role of endothelium in obesity-induced insulin resistance; (ii) hyperglycemia-dependent microRNAs deregulation and impairment of vascular repair capacities; (iii) alterations of coagulation, platelet reactivity, and microparticle release; (iv) epigenetic-driven transcription of ROS-generating and proinflammatory genes. Taken together these novel insights point to the development of mechanism-based therapeutic strategies as a promising option to prevent cardiovascular complications in diabetes.

  17. [Retinal vascular changes--predictive and prognostic factor in systemic disease].

    PubMed

    Vicol, Anca Delia; Bogdănici, Tudor; Bogdănici, Camelia

    2014-01-01

    The retinal circulation represents a unique window for the direct, non invazive in vivo status of the systemic mycrocirculation, but it can also offer scientific support for theories related strictly to ocular diseases, such as glaucoma (vascular theory). The interaction between intraocular pressure, retinal vessels and cerebrospinal fluid pressure located at the retrolaminar part of the optic nerve has been of great interest for both ophthalmologists or neuroscientists, both clinicians and researchers. The retinal vascular bed has structural and functional similarities with other vascular teritories such as Central Nervous System (CNS), kidneys and heart, so as for the ophthalmologist any vascular change in the retina can signalize a systemic disease (diabetes mellitus, stroke, arterial hypertension) that is more or less symptomatic for the patient. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to reviview recent literature data related to the connections between different hemodynamic structures and their impact on the retinal blood flow.

  18. Interaction between periodontal disease and atherosclerotic vascular disease--Fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Aarabi, Ghazal; Eberhard, Jörg; Reissmann, Daniel R; Heydecke, Guido; Seedorf, Udo

    2015-08-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) level is associated with the 10-year risk of an atherosclerotic vascular disease (ASVD), suggesting presence of systemic inflammation probably long before ASVD is present. Where, however, does this systemic inflammation come from? One active area of research has been the study of dental infection and various forms of periodontal disease (PD), both of which are highly prevalent in populations at risk for ASVD. Recent data show that ASVD and PD interact with each other via systemic release of specific pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, small signal molecules and enzymes which modulate initiation and progression of the chronic inflammatory reaction involved in both diseases. In addition, periodontal pathogens were identified within atherosclerotic lesions and thrombi isolated from myocardial infarction patients. LDL cholesterol, a strong risk factor for ASVD, is also associated with PD; and statins, used to treat ASVD, are also active to prevent or reduce PD. Finally, there is growing evidence for common genetic susceptibility factors involved in both diseases. These findings support commonalities with respect to the pathogenic mechanisms involved in both inflammatory diseases. Conversely, a causative relationship cannot yet be concluded in the absence of data from large longitudinal cohort and randomized controlled intervention trials.

  19. Pulmonary vascular manifestations of mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Bull, Todd M; Fagan, Karen A; Badesch, David B

    2005-08-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) refers to a disease process with combined clinical features characteristic of systemic lupus erythematous, scleroderma, and polymyositis-dermatomyositis. This article focuses on the pulmonary vasculature manifestations of MCTD. We briefly discuss associations between MCTD and interstitial lung disease, pleural disease, and alveolar hemorrhage.

  20. The role of phosphodiesterase inhibitors in the management of pulmonary vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Butrous, Ghazwan

    2014-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase inhibitors (PDE) can be used as therapeutic agents for various diseases such as dementia, depression, schizophrenia and erectile dysfunction in men, as well as congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, rheumatoid arthritis, other inflammatory diseases, diabetes and various other conditions. In this review we will concentrate on one type of PDE, mainly PDE5 and its role in pulmonary vascular diseases. PMID:25780785

  1. Effects of cranberry juice consumption on vascular function in patients with coronary artery disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cranberry juice contains polyphenolic compounds that could improve endothelial function and reduce cardiovascular disease risk. The objective was to examine the effects of cranberry juice on vascular function in subjects with coronary artery disease. We completed an acute pilot study with no placebo...

  2. Vascular imaging: the evolving role of the multidisciplinary team meeting in peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Christie, Andrew; Roditi, Giles

    2014-12-01

    This article reviews the importance of preinterventional cross-sectional imaging in the evaluation of peripheral arterial disease, as well as discussing the pros and cons of each imaging modality. The importance of a multidisciplinary team approach is emphasized.

  3. Accelerated development of cerebral small vessel disease in young stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Arntz, Renate M.; van den Broek, Steffen M.A.; van Uden, Inge W.M.; Ghafoorian, Mohsen; Platel, Bram; Rutten-Jacobs, Loes C.A.; Maaijwee, Noortje A.M.; Schaapsmeerders, Pauline; Schoonderwaldt, Hennie C.; van Dijk, Ewoud J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the long-term prevalence of small vessel disease after young stroke and to compare this to healthy controls. Methods: This prospective cohort study comprises 337 patients with an ischemic stroke or TIA, aged 18–50 years, without a history of TIA or stroke. In addition, 90 age- and sex-matched controls were included. At follow-up, lacunes, microbleeds, and white matter hyperintensity (WMH) volume were assessed using MRI. To investigate the relation between risk factors and small vessel disease, logistic and linear regression were used. Results: After mean follow-up of 9.9 (SD 8.1) years, 337 patients were included (227 with an ischemic stroke and 110 with a TIA). Mean age of patients was 49.8 years (SD 10.3) and 45.4% were men; for controls, mean age was 49.4 years (SD 11.9) and 45.6% were men. Compared with controls, patients more often had at least 1 lacune (24.0% vs 4.5%, p < 0.0001). In addition, they had a higher WMH volume (median 1.5 mL [interquartile range (IQR) 0.5–3.7] vs 0.4 mL [IQR 0.0–1.0], p < 0.001). Compared with controls, patients had the same volume WMHs on average 10–20 years earlier. In the patient group, age at stroke (β = 0.03, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.02–0.04) hypertension (β = 0.22, 95% CI 0.04–0.39), and smoking (β = 0.18, 95% CI 0.01–0.34) at baseline were associated with WMH volume. Conclusions: Patients with a young stroke have a higher burden of small vessel disease than controls adjusted for confounders. Cerebral aging seems accelerated by 10–20 years in these patients, which may suggest an increased vulnerability to vascular risk factors. PMID:27521431

  4. ADVANCE: Study to Evaluate Cinacalcet Plus Low Dose Vitamin D on Vascular Calcification in Subjects With Chronic Kidney Disease Receiving Hemodialysis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-14

    Chronic Kidney Disease; End Stage Renal Disease; Coronary Artery Calcification; Vascular Calcification; Calcification; Cardiovascular Disease; Chronic Renal Failure; Hyperparathyroidism; Kidney Disease; Nephrology; Secondary Hyperparathyroidism

  5. Regulation of Hyaluronan Synthesis in Vascular Diseases and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Moretto, Paola; Karousou, Evgenia; Viola, Manuela; Caon, Ilaria; Passi, Alberto; Vigetti, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Cell microenvironment has a critical role determining cell fate and modulating cell responses to injuries. Hyaluronan (HA) is a ubiquitous extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycan that can be considered a signaling molecule. In fact, interacting with several cell surface receptors can deeply shape cell behavior. In vascular biology, HA triggers smooth muscle cells (SMCs) dedifferentiation which contributes to vessel wall thickening. Furthermore, HA is able to modulate inflammation by altering the adhesive properties of endothelial cells. In hyperglycemic conditions, HA accumulates in vessels and can contribute to the diabetic complications at micro- and macrovasculature. Due to the pivotal role in favoring atherogenesis and neointima formation after injuries, HA could be a new target for cardiovascular pathologies. This review will focus on the recent findings regarding the regulation of HA synthesis in human vascular SMCs. In particular, the effects of the intracellular HA substrates availability, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and protein O-GlcNAcylation on the main HA synthetic enzyme (i.e., HAS2) will be discussed. PMID:25834831

  6. Application of Diffusion Tensor Imaging Parameters to Detect Change in Longitudinal Studies in Cerebral Small Vessel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zeestraten, Eva Anna; Benjamin, Philip; Lambert, Christian; Lawrence, Andrew John; Williams, Owen Alan; Morris, Robin Guy; Barrick, Thomas Richard; Markus, Hugh Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is the major cause of vascular cognitive impairment, resulting in significant disability and reduced quality of life. Cognitive tests have been shown to be insensitive to change in longitudinal studies and, therefore, sensitive surrogate markers are needed to monitor disease progression and assess treatment effects in clinical trials. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is thought to offer great potential in this regard. Sensitivity of the various parameters that can be derived from DTI is however unknown. We aimed to evaluate the differential sensitivity of DTI markers to detect SVD progression, and to estimate sample sizes required to assess therapeutic interventions aimed at halting decline based on DTI data. We investigated 99 patients with symptomatic SVD, defined as clinical lacunar syndrome with MRI confirmation of a corresponding infarct as well as confluent white matter hyperintensities over a 3 year follow-up period. We evaluated change in DTI histogram parameters using linear mixed effect models and calculated sample size estimates. Over a three-year follow-up period we observed a decline in fractional anisotropy and increase in diffusivity in white matter tissue and most parameters changed significantly. Mean diffusivity peak height was the most sensitive marker for SVD progression as it had the smallest sample size estimate. This suggests disease progression can be monitored sensitively using DTI histogram analysis and confirms DTI’s potential as surrogate marker for SVD. PMID:26808982

  7. Cerebral blood flow is an earlier indicator of perfusion abnormalities than cerebral blood volume in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lacalle-Aurioles, María; Mateos-Pérez, José M; Guzmán-De-Villoria, Juan A; Olazarán, Javier; Cruz-Orduña, Isabel; Alemán-Gómez, Yasser; Martino, María-Elena; Desco, Manuel

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate whether cerebral blood flow (CBF) can better characterize perfusion abnormalities in predementia stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) than cerebral blood volume (CBV) and whether cortical atrophy is more associated with decreased CBV or with decreased CBF. We compared measurements of CBV, CBF, and mean cortical thickness obtained from magnetic resonance images in a group of healthy controls, patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) who converted to AD after 2 years of clinical follow-up (MCI-c), and patients with mild AD. A significant decrease in perfusion was detected in the parietal lobes of the MCI-c patients with CBF parametric maps but not with CBV maps. In the MCI-c group, a negative correlation between CBF values and cortical thickness in the right parahippocampal gyrus suggests an increase in CBF that depends on cortical atrophy in predementia stages of AD. Our study also suggests that CBF deficits appear before CBV deficits in the progression of AD, as CBV abnormalities were only detected at the AD stage, whereas CBF changes were already detected in the MCI stage. These results confirm the hypothesis that CBF is a more sensitive parameter than CBV for perfusion abnormalities in MCI-c patients.

  8. Cerebral blood flow is an earlier indicator of perfusion abnormalities than cerebral blood volume in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lacalle-Aurioles, María; Mateos-Pérez, José M; Guzmán-De-Villoria, Juan A; Olazarán, Javier; Cruz-Orduña, Isabel; Alemán-Gómez, Yasser; Martino, María-Elena; Desco, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate whether cerebral blood flow (CBF) can better characterize perfusion abnormalities in predementia stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) than cerebral blood volume (CBV) and whether cortical atrophy is more associated with decreased CBV or with decreased CBF. We compared measurements of CBV, CBF, and mean cortical thickness obtained from magnetic resonance images in a group of healthy controls, patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) who converted to AD after 2 years of clinical follow-up (MCI-c), and patients with mild AD. A significant decrease in perfusion was detected in the parietal lobes of the MCI-c patients with CBF parametric maps but not with CBV maps. In the MCI-c group, a negative correlation between CBF values and cortical thickness in the right parahippocampal gyrus suggests an increase in CBF that depends on cortical atrophy in predementia stages of AD. Our study also suggests that CBF deficits appear before CBV deficits in the progression of AD, as CBV abnormalities were only detected at the AD stage, whereas CBF changes were already detected in the MCI stage. These results confirm the hypothesis that CBF is a more sensitive parameter than CBV for perfusion abnormalities in MCI-c patients. PMID:24424381

  9. Cerebral hemodynamics of the aging brain: risk of Alzheimer disease and benefit of aerobic exercise.

    PubMed

    Tarumi, Takashi; Zhang, Rong

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) and cerebrovascular disease often coexist with advanced age. Mounting evidence indicates that the presence of vascular disease and its risk factors increase the risk of AD, suggesting a potential overlap of the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. In particular, atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction, and stiffening of central elastic arteries have been shown to associate with AD. Currently, there are no effective treatments for the cure and prevention of AD. Vascular risk factors are modifiable via either pharmacological or lifestyle intervention. In this regard, habitual aerobic exercise is increasingly recognized for its benefits on brain structure and cognitive function. Considering the well-established benefits of regular aerobic exercise on vascular health, exercise-related improvements in brain structure and cognitive function may be mediated by vascular adaptations. In this review, we will present the current evidence for the physiological mechanisms by which vascular health alters the structural and functional integrity of the aging brain and how improvements in vascular health, via regular aerobic exercise, potentially benefits cognitive function.

  10. Pulmonary vascular complications in portal hypertension and liver disease: a concise review.

    PubMed

    Porres-Aguilar, M; Gallegos-Orozco, J F; Garcia, H; Aguirre, J; Macias-Rodriguez, R U; Torre-Delgadillo, A

    2013-01-01

    Chronic liver disease and/or portal hypertension may be associated with one of the two pulmonary vascular complications: portopulmonary hypertension and hepatopulmonary syndrome. These pulmonary vascular disorders are notoriously underdiagnosed; however, they have a substantial negative impact on survival and require special attention in order to understand their diagnostic approach and to select the best therapeutic options. Portopulmonary hypertension results from excessive vasoconstriction, vascular remodeling, and proliferative and thrombotic events within the pulmonary circulation that lead to progressive right ventricular failure and ultimately to death. On the other hand, abnormal intrapulmonary vascular dilations, profound hypoxemia, and a wide alveolar-arterial gradient are the hallmarks of the hepatopulmonary syndrome, resulting in difficult-to-treat hypoxemia. The aim of this review is to summarize the latest pathophysiologic concepts, diagnostic approach, therapy, and prognosis of portopulmonary hypertension and hepatopulmonary syndrome, as well as to discuss the role of liver transplantation as a definitive therapy in selected patients with these conditions.

  11. Cell cycle-related protein expression in vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, M Z; Nagy, Z; Esiri, M M

    1999-08-13

    Recent findings from our and other laboratories indicate that cell cycle-related phenomena may play a key role in the formation of Alzheimer-type pathology and neuronal cell death in both Alzheimer's and cerebro-vascular diseases. In this study we examine the expression patterns of cyclins A, B1, D1 and E in neuronal nuclei in the hippocampus in autopsied healthy elderly individuals, Alzheimer's disease patients and subjects suffering from cerebrovascular disease with and without co-existing Alzheimer's disease. Nuclear cyclin B1 and cyclin E expression was detected in hippocampal neurones in each subject category. However, cyclin B1 expression was significantly elevated in the CA1 of patients suffering from cerebro-vascular disease alone, while cyclin E expression was significantly higher in the CA4 subfield in patients suffering from mixed Alzheimer's and cerebro-vascular diseases compared to subjects in other categories. We hypothesize that cell cycle re-entry may occur in healthy elderly people leading to age-related cell death and mild Alzheimer-type pathology in the hippocampus. However, in pathological conditions, the cell cycle arrest may lead either to the development of severe Alzheimer-related pathology or to excess apoptotic cell death as in vascular dementia.

  12. [New class of drugs for treatment of eye vascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Travkin, A G; Romashchenko, A D

    1997-01-01

    Hemolytic ocular film (HOF) represents a polymer-based "puff pastry" whose external layers contain antioxidant emoxipine and the internal layer contains an immobilized thrombolytic enzyme; such a structure ensures a successive multifunctional effect on the main components of pathogenesis: lipid peroxidation, local hemostasis, fibrinolysis, and immune system of patients with vascular abnormalities of the eyes. The drug was used in the treatment of 248 patients with intraocular hemorrhages of traumatic origin. Control group (150 patients with the same condition) was treated traditionally. Application of HOF resulted in complete or almost complete lysis of the blood in 95% of patients; in 5% the effect was null. Traditional therapy helped attain complete lysis of the blood in 9% and partial in 43% of patient; in 48% of patients the effect was null.

  13. Extracellular magnesium regulates nuclear and perinuclear free ionized calcium in cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells: possible relation to alcohol and central nervous system injury.

    PubMed

    Altura, B M; Zhang, A; Cheng, T P; Altura, B T

    2001-02-01

    Quantitative digital imaging microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and multiple molecular fluorescent probes were utilized to test the hypothesis that cerebral vascular muscle cell nuclear ([Ca(2+)](n)), perinuclear ([Ca(2+)](pn)), and cytoplasmic free calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) levels are regulated by the concentration of extracellular free magnesium ions ([Mg(2+)](o)). Primary cultured canine cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells were loaded with either fura-2/AM, indo-1/AM, or fluo-3/AM, and the subcellular Ca(2+) responses to stepwise reduction in [Mg(2+)](o) (i.e., from 1.36 to 0.17 mM) were analyzed over time. With normal 1.36 mM [Mg(2+)](o)-containing incubation media, basal mean [Ca(2+)](i) was 89.6+/-15 nM. Lowering [Mg(2+)](o) to 1.07, 0.88, 0.48, and 0.17 mM resulted in rapid (<4 min) increments in [Ca(2+)](i) going to 213+/-43, 368+/-67, 471+/-77, and 642+/-98 nM, respectively; the longer the exposure time (up to 30 min) to lowered [Mg(2+)](o), the higher the [Ca(2+)](i). Restoration of [Mg(2+)](o) to normal caused decreases in [Ca(2+)](i) to 215.9+/-42.3 nM, but only complete removal of [Ca(2+)](o) returned [Ca(2+)](i) to basal levels. Results show that basal [Ca(2+)](pn) (282+/-92 nM) exceeds basal cytoplasmic Ca(2+) (61+/-27.8 nM) and [Ca(2+)](n) (20+/-7.6 nM). However, reduction of normal [Mg(2+)](o) to 0.48 mM resulted in dramatic, rapid rises in all subcellular compartments, where [Ca(2+)](pn) (1503+/-102 nM)>cytoplasmic Ca(2+) (688+/-49 nM) approximately equal to [Ca(2+)](n) (674+/-12 nM). Nuclear Ca(2+) rose dramatically (e.g., 35-40 times basal levels). Both verapamil (1 microM) and Ni(2+) (5 mM) prevented, completely, the rises in Ca(2+) in all compartments, suggesting that Mg(2+)-dependent Ca(2+) accumulation may be dependent on nuclear, endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi, and cytoplasmic L-type voltage membrane-regulated Ca(2+) channels. The normally low [Ca(2+)](n) suggests that Ca(2+) does not transport passively across the nuclear

  14. Applications of contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasound on biliary, focal liver lesions and vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Seo, Dong-Wan

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, the clinical applications of contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasound (CH-EUS) have increased steadily. The development of second-generation ultrasound contrast agents has allowed superior visualization of the microvasculature and tissue perfusion of the target lesion. This methodology has proven useful in the differential diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses and lymph nodes. In addition, the applicability of CH-EUS has expanded to nonpancreas structures such as biliary, focal liver lesions, and vascular disease. This article focuses primarily on the novel applications of CH-EUS in biliary tract and visceral vascular diseases. PMID:28218196

  15. Research into Specific Modulators of Vascular Sex Hormone Receptors in the Management of Postmenopausal Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento, Graciliano R. A.; Barros, Yaskara V. R.; Wells, Amanda K.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is more common in men and postmenopausal women than premenopausal women, suggesting vascular benefits of female sex hormones. Studies on the vasculature have identified estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and a novel estrogen binding membrane protein GPR30, that mediate genomic and/or non-genomic effects. Estrogen promotes endothelium-dependent relaxation by inducing the production/activity of nitric oxide, prostacyclin, and hyperpolarizing factor, and inhibits the mechanisms of vascular smooth muscle contraction including [Ca2+]i, protein kinase C, Rho kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase. Additional effects of estrogen on the cytoskeleton, matrix metalloproteinases and inflammatory factors contribute to vascular remodeling. However, the experimental evidence did not translate into vascular benefits of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), and the HERS, HERS-II and WHI clinical trials demonstrated adverse cardiovascular events. The discrepancy has been partly related to delayed MHT and potential changes in the vascular ER amount, integrity, affinity, and downstream signaling pathways due to the subjects' age and preexisting CVD. The adverse vascular effects of MHT also highlighted the need of specific modulators of vascular sex hormone receptors. The effectiveness of MHT can be improved by delineating the differences in phramcokinetics and pharmacodynamics of natural, synthetic, and conjugated equine estrogens. Estriol, “hormone bioidenticals” and phytoestrogens are potential estradiol substitutes. The benefits of low dose MHT, and transdermal or vaginal estrogens over oral preparations are being evaluated. Specific ER modulators (SERMs) and ER agonists are being developed to maximize the effects on vascular ERs. Also, the effects of estrogen are being examined in the context of the whole body hormonal environment and the levels of progesterone and androgens. Thus, the experimental vascular benefits of estrogen can be translated to

  16. Simultaneous Vascular Targeting and Tumor Targeting of Cerebral Breast Cancer Metastases Using a T-Cell Receptor Mimic Antibody

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    Tumor Targeting of Cerebral Breast Cancer Metastases Using a T-Cell Receptor Mimic Antibody PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ulrich Bickel...of Cerebral Breast Cancer Metastases Using a T-Cell Receptor Mimic Antibody 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0184 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...tumors using a brain selective cell line, 231-BR, derived from human breast cancer . Therefore, the experimental model to be used must be immune

  17. Cerebral vasoconstriction reactions and plasma levels of ETBR, ET-1, and eNOS in patients with chronic high altitude disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shizheng; Hao, Guisheng; Zhang, Shukun; Jiang, Dongmei; Wuren, Tana; Luo, Junming

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine cerebral vasoconstriction in patients with chronic high altitude disease [cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR)], and to evaluate differences in alterations of brain vascular contractile reactivity of chronic mountain sickness (CMS) patients and healthy controls. Alterations of endothelin (ET) and its receptor, as well as endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) levels in the plasma were examined to determine the cerebral reservation capacities in CMS patients. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound and carbon dioxide analysis methods were used to detect the CVR variances. At the same time, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay approaches were utilized to detect the ET and ET B receptor and the eNOS levels in serum of the CMS patients and healthy controls. CVR and CVRI levels in CMS patients were lower than those of the healthy control subjects and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). By contrast, eNOS and ET-1 levels were not statistically significant for CMS and healthy controls (P>0.05). However, the ET receptor concentration level was higher in CMS than the healthy controls. Thus, ET-1 may not be a direct etiological variation but may play compensatory roles in CMS patients. The results of the study may provide scientific clues for the prevention and treatment of CMS with higher blood coagulation states of cerebral infarction in patients with chronic high altitude disease. PMID:27485004

  18. Use of an optical technique to evaluate the cerebral vascular effects of alcohol (A): Effects on deoxyhemoglobin (DH) and levels of reduced cytochrome oxidase (rCO)

    SciTech Connect

    Barbour, R.L.; Gebiewold, A.; Altura, B.M. )

    1992-02-26

    The dose-response effects of acute A infusion were studied to examine the suggestion that A can induce stroke-like events as a consequence of cerebral vasospasm. By employing a single sending and receiving fiber, an optical backscatter measurement was employed to monitor the levels in DH and rCO in a closed cranium preparation. Anesthetized rats were prepared by cannulating a branch of the internal carotid artery and subjected to either a bolus infusion (BI) or to a constant infusion (CI) of 5 or 10% A at various rates. Results showed that low BI doses of A typically produced a slight increase in the oxyhemoglobin signal indicating that vasodilation had probably occurred. Higher BI doses, however, produced a prompt and significant reduction in the hemoglobin signal with a rise in rCO suggesting a vasoconstrictor response leading to ischemia, followed by recovery within 3-5 min. CI of A produced a similar cerebral vascular response, in a dose-related manner, but of a more sustained nature. At 30-50% of the BI dose levels, a global blanching of the brain surface occurred; rCO levels increased by 50-90% with a corresponding decline in levels of oxyhemoglobin. Control experiments using identical volumes/flow rates of Ringers solution failed to produce any alterations in the optical spectrum. Overall, these data indicate that, depending on dose, (a) A can induce vasodilatory or vasoconstrictor effects in the intact brain; (b) the more pronounced effects involve vasospasm in the cortical microcirculation leading to global ischemia as determined by elevated levels of rCO and DH; (c) optical measurements permit direct noninvasive assessment of the cerebral vascular effects of substances of abuse.

  19. Increased arterial diameters in the posterior cerebral circulation in men with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Uçeyler, Nurcan; Homola, György A; Guerrero González, Hans; Kramer, Daniela; Wanner, Christoph; Weidemann, Frank; Solymosi, László; Sommer, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    A high load of white matter lesions and enlarged basilar arteries have been shown in selected patients with Fabry disease, a disorder associated with an increased stroke risk. We studied a large cohort of patients with Fabry disease to differentially investigate white matter lesion load and cerebral artery diameters. We retrospectively analyzed cranial magnetic resonance imaging scans of 87 consecutive Fabry patients, 20 patients with ischemic stroke, and 36 controls. We determined the white matter lesion load applying the Fazekas score on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences and measured the diameters of cerebral arteries on 3D-reconstructions of the time-of-flight-MR-angiography scans. Data of different Fabry patient subgroups (males-females; normal-impaired renal function) were compared with data of patients with stroke and controls. A history of stroke or transient ischemic attacks was present in 4/30 males (13%) and 5/57 (9%) females with Fabry disease, all in the anterior circulation. Only one man with Fabry disease showed confluent cerebral white matter lesions in the Fazekas score assessment (1%). Male Fabry patients had a larger basilar artery (p<0.01) and posterior cerebral artery diameter (p<0.05) compared to male controls. This was independent of disease severity as measured by renal function and did not lead to changes in arterial blood flow properties. A basilar artery diameter of >3.2 mm distinguished between men with Fabry disease and controls (sensitivity: 87%, specificity: 86%, p<0.001), but not from stroke patients. Enlarged arterial diameters of the posterior circulation are present only in men with Fabry disease independent of disease severity.

  20. The dysexecutive syndrome associated with ischaemic vascular disease and related subcortical neuropathology: a Boston process approach.

    PubMed

    Lamar, Melissa; Price, Cate C; Giovannetti, Tania; Swenson, Rod; Libon, David J

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of diagnostic criteria for vascular dementia has helped to re-define the impact of various subcortical neuropathologies on aging; however, state-of-the-art neuroimaging techniques and autopsy studies suggest that not all structural brain alterations associated with vascular dementia are exclusive to this neurodegenerative process alone. Thus, a detailed analysis of the cognitive phenotype associated with ischaemic vascular disease is key to our understanding of subcortical neuropathology and its associated behaviors. Over the past twenty years, we have operationally defined this cognitive phenotype using the Boston Process Approach to neuropsychological assessment. This has led to both an empirical, as well as a theoretical understanding of three core constructs related to the dysexecutive syndrome associated with ischaemic vascular disease affecting periventricular and deep white matter as well as subcortical structures connecting these regions with the prefrontal cortex. Thus, difficulties with mental set, cognitive control and mental manipulation negatively impact executive functioning. This review will outline the subtle markers underlying this prefrontal dysfunction, i.e., the dysexecutive phenotype, associated with ischaemic vascular disease and relate it to fundamental impairments of gating subserved by basal ganglia-thalamic pathways within and across various dementia syndromes.

  1. A new paradigm for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease: targeting vascular activation.

    PubMed

    Grammas, Paula; Martinez, Joseph; Sanchez, Alma; Yin, Xiangling; Riley, Jarred; Gay, Dylan; Desobry, Katherine; Tripathy, Debjani; Luo, Jinhua; Evola, Marianne; Young, Alice

    2014-01-01

    No disease-modifying therapies are currently available for Alzheimer's disease (AD), a neurodegenerative disorder that affects more than 36 million people worldwide. Although cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension and diabetes are increasingly implicated as contributing to the development of AD, the mechanisms whereby these factors influence pathological processes in the AD brain have not been defined. Here we propose, for the first time, vascular activation as a relevant mechanism in AD pathogenesis. We explore this hypothesis in two transgenic AD animal models: AD2576APPSwe (AD2576) and LaFerla 3xTg (3xTgAD) mice using the vascular activation inhibitor sunitinib. Our data show that in both AD animal models, the cerebrovasculature is activated and overexpresses amyloid beta, thrombin, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1 beta, interleukin-6, and matrix metalloproteinase 9. Oral administration of sunitinib significantly reduces vascular expression of these proteins. Furthermore, sunitinib improves cognitive function, as assessed by several behavioral paradigms, in both AD animal models. Finally, oxidant injury of brain endothelial cells in culture, resulting in expression of inflammatory proteins, is mitigated by sunitinib. The current data, as well as published studies showing cerebrovascular activation in human AD, support further exploration of vascular-based mechanisms in AD pathogenesis. New thinking about AD pathogenesis and novel, effective treatments are urgently needed. Identification of "vascular activation" as a heretofore unexplored target could stimulate translational investigations in this newly defined area, leading to innovative therapeutic approaches for the treatment of this devastating disease.

  2. Constraints on the cerebral basis for semantic processing from neuroimaging studies of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, M.; Payer, F.; Onishi, K.; White-Devine, T.; Morrison, D.; D'Esposito, M.; Robinson, K.; Alavi, A.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Functional activation studies of semantic processing in healthy adults have yielded conflicting results. The purpose was to evaluate the relative role of the brain regions implicated in semantic processing with converging evidence from imaging studies of patients with impaired semantic processing.
METHODS—Semantic memory was assessed in patients with Alzheimer's disease using two measures, and these performance patterns were related to profiles of reduced cerebral functioning obtained with high resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Patients with frontotemporal degeneration were similarly evaluated as a control group.
RESULTS—Reduced relative cerebral perfusion was seen in parietal and posterior temporal brain regions of patients with Alzheimer's disease but not patients with frontotemporal degeneration. Impairments on semantically guided category membership decision tasks were also seen in patients with Alzheimer's disease but not those with frontotemporal degeneration. Performance on the semantic measures correlated with relative cerebral perfusion in inferior parietal and superior temporal regions of the left hemisphere only in Alzheimer's disease. Relative perfusion was significantly lower in these regions in patients with Alzheimer's disease with semantic difficulty compared with patients with Alzheimer's disease with relatively preserved semantic processing.
CONCLUSION—These findings provide converging evidence to support the contribution of superior temporal and inferior parietal regions of the left hemisphere to semantic processing.

 PMID:9285450

  3. Simultaneous occurrence of diabetic ketoacidosis, thyroid storm, and multiple cerebral infarctions due to Moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Noh, Byoungho H; Cho, Sang-Won; Ahn, Sung Yeon

    2016-02-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is one of the precipitating factors that can evoke a thyroid storm. Thyroid storm may cause cerebral ischemia in Moyamoya disease, which can coexist in patients with Graves' disease. A 16-year-old girl complaining of dizziness and palpitations visited the emergency department and was diagnosed with DKA combined with hyperthyroidism. A thyroid storm occurred 6 h after the start of DKA management. Her Burch and Wartofsky score was 65 points. Right hemiplegia developed during the thyroid storm, and brain magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion-weighted images revealed multiple acute infarcts in both hemispheres. MR angiography showed stenosis of both distal internal carotid arteries and both M1 portions of the middle cerebral arteries, consistent with Moyamoya disease. After acute management for the thyroid storm with methimazole, Lugol solution and hydrocortisone, the patient's neurological symptoms completely resolved within 1 month, and free T4 level normalized within 2 months. Thyroid storm may trigger cerebral ischemia in Moyamoya disease and lead to rapid progression of cerebrovascular occlusive disease. As a simultaneous occurrence of DKA, thyroid storm and cerebrovascular accident in Moyamoya disease highly elevates morbidity and mortality, prompt recognition and management are critical to save the patient's life.

  4. The Role of Pathogen-Secreted Proteins in Fungal Vascular Wilt Diseases

    PubMed Central

    de Sain, Mara; Rep, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    A limited number of fungi can cause wilting disease in plants through colonization of the vascular system, the most well-known being Verticillium dahliae and Fusarium oxysporum. Like all pathogenic microorganisms, vascular wilt fungi secrete proteins during host colonization. Whole-genome sequencing and proteomics screens have identified many of these proteins, including small, usually cysteine-rich proteins, necrosis-inducing proteins and enzymes. Gene deletion experiments have provided evidence that some of these proteins are required for pathogenicity, while the role of other secreted proteins remains enigmatic. On the other hand, the plant immune system can recognize some secreted proteins or their actions, resulting in disease resistance. We give an overview of proteins currently known to be secreted by vascular wilt fungi and discuss their role in pathogenicity and plant immunity. PMID:26473835

  5. The Role of Pathogen-Secreted Proteins in Fungal Vascular Wilt Diseases.

    PubMed

    de Sain, Mara; Rep, Martijn

    2015-10-09

    A limited number of fungi can cause wilting disease in plants through colonization of the vascular system, the most well-known being Verticillium dahliae and Fusarium oxysporum. Like all pathogenic microorganisms, vascular wilt fungi secrete proteins during host colonization. Whole-genome sequencing and proteomics screens have identified many of these proteins, including small, usually cysteine-rich proteins, necrosis-inducing proteins and enzymes. Gene deletion experiments have provided evidence that some of these proteins are required for pathogenicity, while the role of other secreted proteins remains enigmatic. On the other hand, the plant immune system can recognize some secreted proteins or their actions, resulting in disease resistance. We give an overview of proteins currently known to be secreted by vascular wilt fungi and discuss their role in pathogenicity and plant immunity.

  6. [Lyme disease acrodermitis chronica atrophicans: misleading vascular signs].

    PubMed

    Blaise, S; Fiandrino, G; Satger, B; Carpentier, P-H

    2014-05-01

    Lyme disease acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans is a tertiary form of Lyme borrelliosis. It occurs at least six months, but also up to several years, after a tick bite. This rare condition is probably underestimated because of the difficult diagnosis. Clinical presentations of acrodermatitis chronic atrophicans are quite variable depending upon the duration of the disease. Complimentary explorations are difficult to interpret and rarely specific. Only rare configurations allow formal diagnosis of Borrelia burgdoferi infection. We present a patient who exhibited an atypical clinical presentation of Lyme disease acrodermatitis chronic atrophicans. The clinical outcome was quite favorable with treatment, confirming the diagnosis. Such treatments, which are well tolerated and highly effective, are essential since an untreated disease can lead to potentially severe neurological involvement.

  7. [Multicentric hyaline vascular Castleman's disease. A POEMS type variant].

    PubMed

    Gracia-Ramos, Abraham Edgar; Cruz-Domínguez, María del Pilar; Vera-Lastra, Olga Lidia

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: la enfermedad de Castleman es un trastorno linfoproliferativo atípico en el que pueden existir manifestaciones compatibles con síndrome POEMS. Caso clínico: hombre de 53 años de edad con antecedente de diabetes mellitus tipo 2, hipotiroidismo y enfermedad de Addison. Se iniciaron parestesias y debilidad en las extremidades y, posteriormente, disnea, endurecimiento cutáneo, fenómeno de Raynaud y pérdida de peso. Se identificó taquipnea, hiperpigmentación cutánea generalizada y extremidades con endurecimiento cutáneo, debilidad muscular, hipoestesia e hiporreflexia; así como hiperprolactinemia, testosterona baja, hipotiroidismo y enfermedad de Addison; los anticuerpos antinucleares y antiScl-70 fueron negativos. Los potenciales evocados somatosensoriales indicaron neuropatía periférica y la electromiografía, olineuropatía axonal severa. Radiografía torácica: infiltrado reticular bilateral y ensanchamiento mediastinal. Electrocardiograma: hipertensión arterial pulmonar moderada. Tomografía toracoabdominal: ganglios axilares, mediastinales y retroperitoneales. Con la biopsia se identificó enfermedad de Castleman multicéntrica hialina vascular. El paciente recibió rituximab. Conclusiones: si bien la experiencia con el rituximab aún es limitada, en el caso descrito se observó buena respuesta.

  8. [Evaluation of 99mTc-HM-PAO thigh accumulation in patients with cerebro-vascular disease].

    PubMed

    Nishigaki, H; Adachi, I; Komori, T; Tatsu, Y; Hisada, Y; Sueyoshi, K; Narabayashi, I

    1993-06-01

    99mTc-HM-PAO cerebral SPECT and whole body scintigraphy (WBS) were performed in 5 patients without cerebro-vascular disease (CVD) (Group 1), 31 patients with CVD but not hemiparesis (Group 2) and 18 patients with CVD and hemiparesis (Group 3). Four ROIs were drawn manually around the whole body (WB), brain (Br), right and left thigh (Th). We calculated some ratios: the total counts in the brain over the total counts in the whole body (Br/WB), the total counts in the thigh over the total counts in the whole body (Th/WB) and the mean counts in the thigh over the mean counts in the brain (Th/Br). The Br/WB was 6.9 +/- 1.8%, rt-Th/WB was 4.9 +/- 2.1%, lt-Th/WB was 5.1 +/- 1.3% and Th/Br was 0.46 +/- 0.17 in group 1. Whole body scintigraphies in group 1 revealed clear and similar images between right and left thigh. The Br/WB was 6.7 +/- 1.4%, Th/WB of paretic side was 4.6 +/- 1.0%, Th/WB of non-paretic side was 5.8 +/- 1.2% and Th/Br was 0.47 +/- 0.18 in group 3. The Th/WB in non paretic side was significantly higher than that in paretic side (p < 0.01). The thigh images in group 3 revealed clearly different between paretic and non-paretic thigh. In conclusion we could acquire the clear thigh images with 99mTc-HM-PAO. It was possible that we evaluated not only cerebral perfusion but also muscle atrophy and/or perfusion in patients with CVD using 99mTC-HM-PAO.

  9. Patterns of cerebral glucose utilization in depression, multiple infarct dementia, and Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.; Metter, E.J.; Riege, W.H.

    1983-01-01

    Patterns of local cerebral glucose utilization were determined in moderately to severely disabled patients with depression (n=7), multiple infarct dementia (n=6), and Alzheimer's disease (n=6), and in normal controls (n=6), using positron emission tomography with the /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose method. Average global metabolic rate was decreased 30% in patients with Alzheimer's disease, but overlap among the other groups reduced the discriminant value of this measure. In depressed patients, the cerebral metabolic pattern was normal, except for evidence of hypometabolic zone in the posterior-inferior frontal cortex which was of marginal statistical significance. In multiple infarct dementia, focal metabolic defects were scattered throughout the brain and exceeded the extent of infarction. In Alzheimer's disease, metabolism was markedly reduced in cortex, especially parietal cortex, but relatively preserved in caudate, thalamus, anterior cingulate gyrus, pre and post central gyrus, and calcarine occipital cortex, a pattern duplicating the degree and location of pathological and neurochemical alterations characteristic of this disorder.

  10. Atherosclerosis in vascular grafts for peripheral vascular disease. Part 2. Synthetic arterial prostheses.

    PubMed

    Walton, K W; Slaney, G; Ashton, F

    1986-08-01

    Thirty-nine synthetic (32 Dacron and 7 Teflon) arterial prostheses (from 38 patients with peripheral arterial disease) removed after periods between 2 months and 18 years, were examined by histology and immuno-histology. The grafts were initially permeated by thrombus containing platelet antigens and this became organised and converted to granulation, and then to fibrous, tissue. The newly-formed tissue contained 'foreign-body' giant-cells in contact with the plastic prosthesis and showed evidence of permeation by plasma proteins. In grafts of over 2 years duration, this reactive tissue no longer contained platelet antigens but invariably revealed bound lipid, identifiable as apolipoprotein-B-containing lipoproteins (LpB), and fibrinogen-related antigens (FRA), in a distribution resembling that seen in atherosclerotic arteries. LpB and FRA were also seen in organised, or partially organised, mural thrombi in older grafts. The oldest grafts additionally showed stenosis, calcification or aneurysm formation. Lipid deposition increases with the age of grafts; is independent of the nature of the plastic fibre used or its mode of fabrication; and sometimes contributes to graft failure. Immuno-histology indicates that this is an insudative process indistinguishable from 'true' atherosclerosis which occurs in graft-linings of prostheses of long duration and in old mural thrombi in grafts and that the lipid in these lesions derives from plasma LpB rather than from platelets. This source for the lipid suggests that the insudative and thrombogenic theories of atherogenesis can be reconciled.

  11. Type 2 diabetes aggravates Alzheimer's disease-associated vascular alterations of the aorta in mice.

    PubMed

    Sena, Cristina M; Pereira, Ana M; Carvalho, Cristina; Fernandes, Rosa; Seiça, Raquel M; Oliveira, Catarina R; Moreira, Paula I

    2015-01-01

    Vascular risk factors are associated with a higher incidence of dementia. In fact, diabetes mellitus is considered a main risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and both diseases are characterized by vascular dysfunction. However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, the effects of high-sucrose-induced type 2 diabetes (T2D) in the aorta of wild type (WT) and triple-transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) mice were investigated. 3xTg-AD mice showed a significant decrease in body weight and an increase in postprandial glycemia, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and vascular nitrotyrosine, superoxide anion (O2•-), receptor for the advanced glycation end products (RAGE) protein, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels when compared to WT mice. High-sucrose intake caused a significant increase in body weight, postprandial glycemia, HbA1c, triglycerides, plasma vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), and vascular nitrotyrosine, O2•-, RAGE, and MCP-1 levels in both WT and 3xTg-AD mice when compared to the respective control group. Also, a significant decrease in nitric oxide-dependent vasorelaxation was observed in 3xTg-AD and sucrose-treated WT mice. In conclusion, AD and T2D promote similar vascular dysfunction of the aorta, this effect being associated with elevated oxidative and nitrosative stress and inflammation. Also, AD-associated vascular alterations are potentiated by T2D. These findings support the idea that metabolic alterations predispose to the onset and progression of dementia.

  12. Vascular pathobiology in chronic liver disease and cirrhosis - current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Iwakiri, Yasuko; Shah, Vijay; Rockey, Don C

    2014-10-01

    Chronic liver disease is associated with remarkable alterations in the intra- and extrahepatic vasculature. Because of these changes, the fields of liver vasculature and portal hypertension have recently become closely integrated within the broader vascular biology discipline. As developments in vascular biology have evolved, a deeper understanding of vascular processes has led to a better understanding of the mechanisms of the dynamic vascular changes associated with portal hypertension and chronic liver disease. In this context, hepatic vascular cells, such as sinusoidal endothelial cells and pericyte-like hepatic stellate cells, are closely associated with one another, where they have paracrine and autocrine effects on each other and themselves. These cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis/cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Further, a variety of signaling pathways have recently come to light. These include growth factor pathways involving cytokines such as transforming growth factor β, platelet derived growth factor, and others as well as a variety of vasoactive peptides and other molecules. An early and consistent feature of liver injury is the development of an increase in intra-hepatic resistance; this is associated with changes in hepatic vascular cells and their signaling pathway that cause portal hypertension. A critical concept is that this process aggregates signals to the extrahepatic circulation, causing derangement in this system's cells and signaling pathways, which ultimately leads to the collateral vessel formation and arterial vasodilation in the splanchnic and systemic circulation, which by virtue of the hydraulic derivation of Ohm's law (pressure = resistance × flow), worsens portal hypertension. This review provides a detailed review of the current status and future direction of the basic biology of portal hypertension with a focus on the physiology, pathophysiology, and signaling of cells within the liver, as well

  13. Vascular pathobiology in chronic liver disease and cirrhosis – Current status and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Iwakiri, Yasuko; Shah, Vijay; Rockey, Don C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Chronic liver disease is associated with remarkable alterations in the intra- and extrahepatic vasculature. Because of these changes, the fields of liver vasculature and portal hypertension have recently become closely integrated within the broader vascular biology discipline. As developments in vascular biology have evolved, a deeper understanding of vascular processes has led to a better understanding of the mechanisms of the dynamic vascular changes associated with portal hypertension and chronic liver disease. In this context, hepatic vascular cells, such as sinusoidal endothelial cells and pericyte-like hepatic stellate cells, are closely associated with one another, where they have paracrine and autocrine effects on each other and themselves. These cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis/cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Further, a variety of signaling pathways have recently come to light. These include growth factor pathways involving cytokines such as transforming growth factor β, platelet derived growth factor, and others as well as a variety of vasoactive peptides and other molecules. An early and consistent feature of liver injury is the development of an increase in intra-hepatic resistance; this is associated with changes in hepatic vascular cells and their signaling pathway that cause portal hypertension. A critical concept is that this process aggregates signals to the extrahepatic circulation, causing derangement in this system’s cells and signaling pathways, which ultimately leads to the collateral vessel formation and arterial vasodilation in the splanchnic and systemic circulation, which by virtue of the hydraulic derivation of Ohm’s law (pressure = resistance × flow), worsens portal hypertension. This review provides a detailed review of the current status and future direction of the basic biology of portal hypertension with a focus on the physiology, pathophysiology, and signaling of cells within the

  14. Exercise-induced Signals for Vascular Endothelial Adaptations: Implications for Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Nathan T.; Martin, Jeffrey S.; Laughlin, M. Harold; Padilla, Jaume

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews recent advances in our understanding of hemodynamic signals, external/compressive forces, and circulating factors that mediate exercise training-induced vascular adaptations, with particular attention to the roles of these signals in prevention and treatment of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular (CV) diseases. PMID:22844545

  15. Notch Signaling in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Baeten, J T; Lilly, B

    2017-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is a highly conserved pathway involved in cell fate determination in embryonic development and also functions in the regulation of physiological processes in several systems. It plays an especially important role in vascular development and physiology by influencing angiogenesis, vessel patterning, arterial/venous specification, and vascular smooth muscle biology. Aberrant or dysregulated Notch signaling is the cause of or a contributing factor to many vascular disorders, including inherited vascular diseases, such as cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, associated with degeneration of the smooth muscle layer in cerebral arteries. Like most signaling pathways, the Notch signaling axis is influenced by complex interactions with mediators of other signaling pathways. This complexity is also compounded by different members of the Notch family having both overlapping and unique functions. Thus, it is vital to fully understand the roles and interactions of each Notch family member in order to effectively and specifically target their exact contributions to vascular disease. In this chapter, we will review the Notch signaling pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells as it relates to vascular development and human disease.

  16. Microparticles: A Pivotal Nexus in Vascular Homeostasis and Disease.

    PubMed

    McGinn, Ciaran M; MacDonnell, Brian F; Shan, Chun Xu; Wallace, Robert; Cummins, Philip M; Murphy, Ronan P

    2016-01-01

    Microvesicles (MVs) are submicron intact particles released from the cellular membrane of eukaryotic cells. MVs can be sub-categorised into microparticles (MPs), which are between 100nm- 1micron in size, and exosomes, measuring less than 100nm. Once thought to be cellular debris, MPs are now known to play important biological effector functions. Their biogenesis and release are as a result highly regulated processes in response to cellular activation or stress, and apoptosis. MPs are now known to play a crucial role in maintaining physiological homeostasis and have been demonstrated to be involved in numerous biological processes, including inflammation, cardiovascular disease, immune response, cancer dissemination, coagulation and angiogenesis. Consequently, there is active interest in studying MPs, and their 'cause and effect' in the initiation and potentiation of various pathologies. Circulating levels, both quantitative and qualitative, of MPs is thought to be a reflective index of cardiovascular competence. Therefore, studies to understand the biological relevance of the various permutations and combinations of circulating MPs, their cellular origin and bioactive cargo may lead to increased understanding of the sequelae of CVD and associated diseases. This review synopsizes our current understanding of the role of MPs in cardiovascular disease, their biogenesis and effector function, and their future use as both diagnostic and prognostic indices of cardiovascular disease.

  17. [Magnetotherapy in obliterating vascular diseases of the lower extremities].

    PubMed

    Kirillov, Iu B; Shval'b, P G; Lastushkin, A V; Baranov, V M; Sigaev, A A; Zueva, G V; Karpov, E I

    1992-01-01

    The investigators have developed a polymagnetic system "Avrora-MK-01" employing running impulse magnetic field to treat diseases of the leg vessels by the action on peripheral capillary bed. At a pregangrene stage a positive effect on peripheral capillaries was achieved in 75-82% of the patients treated.

  18. Laurel wilt: Understanding an unusual and exotic vascular wilt disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laurel wilt kills American members of the Lauraceae plant family (Laurales, Magnoliid complex). These include significant components of Coastal Plain forest communities in the southeastern USA, most importantly redbay, as well as the commercial crop avocado. The disease has decimated redbay, swamp ...

  19. Impact of Hydroxychloroquine on Atherosclerosis and Vascular Stiffness in the Presence of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Ashutosh M; Bose, Chhanda; Karaduta, Oleg K; Apostolov, Eugene O; Kaushal, Gur P; Fahmi, Tariq; Segal, Mark S; Shah, Sudhir V

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the largest cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage kidney disease, with nearly half of all deaths attributed to cardiovascular disease. Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), an anti-inflammatory drug, has been shown to have multiple pleiotropic actions relevant to atherosclerosis. We conducted a proof-of-efficacy study to evaluate the effects of hydroxychloroquine in an animal model of atherosclerosis in ApoE knockout mice with and without chronic kidney disease. Forty male, 6-week-old mice were divided into four groups in a 2 x 2 design: sham placebo group; sham treatment group; CKD placebo group; and CKD treatment group. CKD was induced by a two-step surgical procedure. All mice received a high-fat diet through the study duration and were sacrificed after 16 weeks of therapy. Mice were monitored with ante-mortem ultrasonic echography (AUE) for atherosclerosis and vascular stiffness and with post-mortem histology studies for atherosclerosis. Therapy with HCQ significantly reduced the severity of atherosclerosis in CKD mice and sham treated mice. HCQ reduced the area of aortic atherosclerosis on en face examination by approximately 60% in HCQ treated groups compared to the non-treated groups. Additionally, therapy with HCQ resulted in significant reduction in vascular endothelial dysfunction with improvement in vascular elasticity and flow patterns and better-preserved vascular wall thickness across multiple vascular beds. More importantly, we found that presence of CKD had no mitigating effect on HCQ's anti-atherosclerotic and vasculoprotective effects. These beneficial effects were not due to any significant effect of HCQ on inflammation, renal function, or lipid profile at the end of 16 weeks of therapy. This study, which demonstrates structural and functional protection against atherosclerosis by HCQ, provides a rationale to evaluate its use in CKD patients. Further studies are needed to

  20. Impact of Hydroxychloroquine on Atherosclerosis and Vascular Stiffness in the Presence of Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Ashutosh M.; Bose, Chhanda; Karaduta, Oleg K.; Apostolov, Eugene O.; Kaushal, Gur P.; Fahmi, Tariq; Segal, Mark S.; Shah, Sudhir V.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the largest cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage kidney disease, with nearly half of all deaths attributed to cardiovascular disease. Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), an anti-inflammatory drug, has been shown to have multiple pleiotropic actions relevant to atherosclerosis. We conducted a proof-of-efficacy study to evaluate the effects of hydroxychloroquine in an animal model of atherosclerosis in ApoE knockout mice with and without chronic kidney disease. Forty male, 6-week-old mice were divided into four groups in a 2 x 2 design: sham placebo group; sham treatment group; CKD placebo group; and CKD treatment group. CKD was induced by a two-step surgical procedure. All mice received a high-fat diet through the study duration and were sacrificed after 16 weeks of therapy. Mice were monitored with ante-mortem ultrasonic echography (AUE) for atherosclerosis and vascular stiffness and with post-mortem histology studies for atherosclerosis. Therapy with HCQ significantly reduced the severity of atherosclerosis in CKD mice and sham treated mice. HCQ reduced the area of aortic atherosclerosis on en face examination by approximately 60% in HCQ treated groups compared to the non-treated groups. Additionally, therapy with HCQ resulted in significant reduction in vascular endothelial dysfunction with improvement in vascular elasticity and flow patterns and better-preserved vascular wall thickness across multiple vascular beds. More importantly, we found that presence of CKD had no mitigating effect on HCQ’s anti-atherosclerotic and vasculoprotective effects. These beneficial effects were not due to any significant effect of HCQ on inflammation, renal function, or lipid profile at the end of 16 weeks of therapy. This study, which demonstrates structural and functional protection against atherosclerosis by HCQ, provides a rationale to evaluate its use in CKD patients. Further studies are needed to

  1. Fatigue in Parkinson's disease: The contribution of cerebral metabolic changes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sang Soo; Aminian, Kelly; Li, Crystal; Lang, Anthony E; Houle, Sylvain; Strafella, Antonio P

    2017-01-01

    Fatigue is a common and disabling non-motor symptom in Parkinson's disease associated with a feeling of overwhelming lack of energy. The aim of this study was to identify the neural substrates that may contribute to the development of fatigue in Parkinson's disease. Twenty-three Parkinson's disease patients meeting UK Brain Bank criteria for the diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease were recruited and completed the 2-[(18) F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-PET scan. The metabolic activities of Parkinson's disease patients with fatigue were compared to those without fatigue using statistical parametric mapping analysis. The Parkinson's disease group exhibiting higher level of fatigue showed anti-correlated metabolic changes in cortical regions associated with the salience (i.e., right insular region) and default (i.e., bilateral posterior cingulate cortex) networks. The metabolic abnormalities detected in these brain regions displayed a significant correlation with level of fatigue and were associated with a disruption of the functional correlations with different cortical areas. These observations suggest that fatigue in Parkinson's disease may be the expression of metabolic abnormalities and impaired functional interactions between brain regions linked to the salience network and other neural networks. Hum Brain Mapp 38:283-292, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Role of Inflammasome Activation in the Pathophysiology of Vascular Diseases of the Neurovascular Unit

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Islam N.; Ishrat, Tauheed; Fagan, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Inflammation is the standard double-edged defense mechanism that aims at protecting the human physiological homeostasis from devastating threats. Both acute and chronic inflammation have been implicated in the occurrence and progression of vascular diseases. Interference with components of the immune system to improve patient outcome after ischemic injury has been uniformly unsuccessful. There is a need for a deeper understanding of the innate immune response to injury in order to modulate, rather than to block inflammation and improve the outcome for vascular diseases. Recent Advances: Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors or NOD-like receptor proteins (NLRPs) can be activated by sterile and microbial inflammation. NLR family plays a major role in activating the inflammasome. Critical Issues: The aim of this work is to review recent findings that provided insights into key inflammatory mechanisms and define the place of the inflammasome, a multi-protein complex involved in instigating inflammation in neurovascular diseases, including retinopathy, neurodegenerative diseases, and stroke. Future Directions: The significant contribution of NLRP-inflammasome activation to vascular disease of the neurovascular unit in the brain and retina suggests that therapeutic strategies focused on specific targeting of inflammasome components could significantly improve the outcomes of these diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1188–1206. PMID:25275222

  3. KDM4B histone demethylase and G9a regulate expression of vascular adhesion proteins in cerebral microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji-Young; Yoon, Sang-Sun; Kim, Sang-Eun; Ahn Jo, Sangmee

    2017-01-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1) mediates the adhesion and transmigration of leukocytes across the endothelium, promoting inflammation. We investigated the epigenetic mechanism regulating ICAM1 expression. The pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α dramatically increased ICAM1 mRNA and protein levels in human brain microvascular endothelial cells and mouse brain microvessels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that TNF-α reduced methylation of histone H3 at lysines 9 and 27 (H3K9 and H3K27), well-known residues involved in gene suppression. Inhibition of G9a and EZH2, histone methyltransferases responsible for methylation at H3K9 and H3K27, respectively as well as G9a overexpression demonstrated the involvement of G9a in TNF-α-induced ICAM1 expression and leukocyte adhesion and transmigration. A specific role for KDM4B, a histone demethylase targeting H3K9me2, in TNF-α-induced ICAM1 upregulation was validated with siRNA. Moreover, treating mice with a KDM4 inhibitor ML324 blocked TNF-α-mediated neutrophil adhesion. Similarly, TNF-α-induced VCAM1 expression was suppressed by G9a overexpression and KDM4B knockdown. Collectively, we demonstrated that modification of H3K9me2 by G9a and KDM4B regulates expression of vascular adhesion molecules, and that depletion of these proteins or KDM4B reduces inflammation-induced leukocyte extravasation. Thus, blocking ICAM1 or KDM4B could offer a novel therapeutic opportunity treating brain diseases. PMID:28327608

  4. Vascular Stiffness in Children With Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Savant, Jonathan D; Betoko, Aisha; Meyers, Kevin E C; Mitsnefes, Mark; Flynn, Joseph T; Townsend, Raymond R; Greenbaum, Larry A; Dart, Allison; Warady, Bradley; Furth, Susan L

    2017-05-01

    Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) is a measure of arterial stiffness associated with cardiovascular events in the general population and in adults with chronic kidney disease. However, few data exist regarding cfPWV in children with chronic kidney disease. We compared observed cfPWV assessed via applanation tonometry in children enrolled in the CKiD cohort study (Chronic Kidney Disease in Children) to normative data in healthy children and examined risk factors associated with elevated cfPWV. cfPWV Z score for height/gender and age/gender was calculated from and compared with published pediatric norms. Multivariable linear regression was used to assess the relationship between cfPWV and age, gender, race, body mass index, diagnosis, urine protein-creatinine ratio, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, number of antihypertensive medications, uric acid, and serum low-density lipoprotein. Of the 95 participants with measured cfPWV, 60% were male, 19% were black, 46% had glomerular cause of chronic kidney disease, 22% had urine protein-creatinine ratio 0.5 to 2.0 mg/mg and 9% had >2.0 mg/mg, mean age was 15.1 years, average mean arterial pressure was 80 mm Hg, and median glomerular filtration rate was 63 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) Mean cfPWV was 5.0 m/s (SD, 0.8 m/s); mean cfPWV Z score by height/gender norms was -0.1 (SD, 1.1). cfPWV increased significantly with age, mean arterial pressure, and black race in multivariable analysis; no other variables, including glomerular filtration rate, were independently associated with cfPWV. In this pediatric cohort with mild kidney dysfunction, arterial stiffness was comparable to that of normal children. Future research is needed to examine the impact of chronic kidney disease progression on arterial stiffness and associated cardiovascular parameters in children.

  5. Cerebral correlates of psychotic syndromes in neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jellinger, Kurt A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Psychosis has been recognized as a common feature in neurodegenerative diseases and a core feature of dementia that worsens most clinical courses. It includes hallucinations, delusions including paranoia, aggressive behaviour, apathy and other psychotic phenomena that occur in a wide range of degenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease, synucleinopathies (Parkinson’s disease, dementia with Lewy bodies), Huntington’s disease, frontotemporal degenerations, motoneuron and prion diseases. Many of these psychiatric manifestations may be early expressions of cognitive impairment, but often there is a dissociation between psychotic/behavioural symptoms and the rather linear decline in cognitive function, suggesting independent pathophysiological mechanisms. Strictly neuropathological explanations are likely to be insufficient to explain them, and a large group of heterogeneous factors (environmental, neurochemical changes, genetic factors, etc.) may influence their pathogenesis. Clinico-pathological evaluation of behavioural and psychotic symptoms (PS) in the setting of neurodegenerative and dementing disorders presents a significant challenge for modern neurosciences. Recognition and understanding of these manifestations may lead to the development of more effective preventive and therapeutic options that can serve to delay long-term progression of these devastating disorders and improve the patients’ quality of life. A better understanding of the pathophysiology and distinctive pathological features underlying the development of PS in neurodegenerative diseases may provide important insights into psychotic processes in general. PMID:21418522

  6. Low levels of serum ionized magnesium are found in patients early after stroke which result in rapid elevation in cytosolic free calcium and spasm in cerebral vascular muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Altura, B T; Memon, Z I; Zhang, A; Cheng, T P; Silverman, R; Cracco, R Q; Altura, B M

    1997-07-11

    Ninety-eight patients admitted to the emergency rooms of three urban hospitals with a diagnosis of either ischemic stroke or hemorrhagic stroke exhibited early and significant deficits in serum ionized Mg2+ (IMg2+), but not total Mg, as measured with a unique Mg2+-sensitive ion-selective electrode. Twenty-five percent of these stroke patients exhibited >65% reductions in the mean serum IMg2+ found in normal healthy human volunteers or patients admitted for minor bruises, cuts or deep lacerations. The stroke patients also demonstrated significant elevation in the serum ionized Ca2+ (ICa2+)/IMg2+ ratio, a sign of increased vascular tone and cerebrovasospasm. Exposure of primary cultured canine cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells to the low concentrations of IMg2+ found in the stroke patients, e.g. 0.30-0.48 mM, resulted in rapid and marked elevations in cytosolic free calcium ions ([Ca2+]i) as measured with the fluorescent probe, fura-2, and digital image analysis. Coincident with the rise in [Ca2+]i, many of the cerebral vascular cells went into spasm. Reintroduction of normal extracellular Mg2+ ion concentrations failed to either lower the [Ca2+]i overload or reverse the rounding-up of the cerebral vascular cells. These results suggest that changes in Mg2+ metabolism play important roles in stroke syndromes and in the etiology of cerebrovasospasm associated with cerebral hemorrhage.

  7. Therapeutic Potential of Modulating microRNAs in Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Araldi, Elisa; Chamorro-Jorganes, Aranzazu; van Solingen, Coen; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos; Suárez, Yajaira

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis (also known as arteriosclerotic vascular disease) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial wall, characterized by the formation of lipid-laden lesions. The activation of endothelial cells at atherosclerotic lesion–prone sites in the arterial tree results in the up-regulation of cell adhesion molecules and chemokines, which mediate the recruitment of circulating monocytes. Accumulation of monocytes and monocyte-derived phagocytes in the wall of large arteries leads to chronic inflammation and the development and progression of atherosclerosis. The lesion experiences the following steps: foam cell formation, fatty streak accumulation, migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells, and fibrous cap formation. Finally, the rupture of the unstable fibrous cap causes thrombosis in complications of advanced lesions that leads to unstable coronary syndromes, myocardial infarction and stroke. MicroRNAs have recently emerged as a novel class of gene regulators at the post-transcriptional level. Several functions of vascular cells, such as cell differentiation, contraction, migration, proliferation and inflammation that are involved in angiogenesis, neointimal formation and lipid metabolism underlying various vascular diseases, have been found to be regulated by microRNAs and are described in the present review as well as their potential therapeutic application. PMID:23713860

  8. Comparative assessment of vascular function in autoimmune rheumatic diseases: considerations of prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Soltész, Pál; Kerekes, György; Dér, Henriett; Szücs, Gabriella; Szántó, Sándor; Kiss, Emese; Bodolay, Edit; Zeher, Margit; Timár, Orsolya; Szodoray, Péter; Szegedi, Gyula; Szekanecz, Zoltán

    2011-05-01

    Numerous autoimmune-inflammatory rheumatic diseases have been associated with accelerated atherosclerosis or other types of vasculopathy leading to increased cardio- and cerebrovascular disease risk. Traditional risk factors, as well as the role of systemic inflammation including cytokines, chemokines, proteases, autoantibodies, adhesion receptors and others have been implicated in the development of these vascular pathologies. The characteristics of vasculopathies may significantly differ depending on the underlying disease. While classical accelerated atherosclerosis has been associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) or spondyloarthropathies (SpA), obliterative vasculopathy may rather be characteristic for systemic sclerosis (SSc) or mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). Antiphospholipid antibodies have been implicated in vasculopathies underlying SLE, antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), RA and MCTD. There is also heterogeneity with respect to inflammatory risk factors. Cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) or interleukin 6 (IL-6) and immune complexes are primarily involved in arthritides, such as RA, SpA, as well as in SLE. On the other hand, autoantibodies including anti-oxLDL anti-cardiolipin and anti-β2GPI are rather involved in SLE- and APS-associated vasculopathies. Regarding the non-invasive assessment of vascular function, endothelial dysfunction, overt atherosclerosis and vascular stiffness may be indicated by brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD), common carotid intima-media thickness (ccIMT) and aortic pulse-wave velocity (PWV), respectively. These abnormalities have been described in most inflammatory rheumatic diseases. While ccIMT and stiffness are relatively stable, FMD may be influenced by many confounding factors. In addition to traditional vasculoprotection, immunosuppressive agents including corticosteroids, traditional and biologic DMARDs may have significant vascular and metabolic

  9. MTHFR and ACE Gene Polymorphisms and Risk of Vascular and Degenerative Dementias in the Elderly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandey, Pratima; Pradhan, Sunil; Modi, Dinesh Raj; Mittal, Balraj

    2009-01-01

    Focal lacunar infarctions due to cerebral small vessel atherosclerosis or single/multiple large cortical infarcts lead to vascular dementia, and different genes and environmental factors have been implicated in causation or aggravation of the disease. Previous reports suggest that some of the risk factors may be common to both vascular as well as…

  10. [Possible role of cytomegalovirus infection in the pathogenesis of human vascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Yonemitsu, Y; Komori, K; Sueishi, K; Sugimachi, K

    1998-01-01

    In order to evaluate the pathogenic role of human cytomegalovirus(CMV) infection in human vascular disease, we first examined the role of CMV immediate early gene (CMV-IE) expression in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation. The in vitro IE gene transfer stimulated VSMC proliferation. The in vivo IE gene transfer showed neointimal thickening while the control arteries did not. In the wall of "so-called" inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA), CMV infected cells were more frequently encountered than in that of AA and control cases. CMV infected cells were largely identified as macrophages or fibroblasts, and these cells frequently expressed CMV-IE gene. These findings thus suggest that the persistent expression of CMV-IE gene in the vessel wall may play a role in the vascular cellular responses, including progression of atherosclerosis or vasculitis, in vivo.

  11. Exercise, vascular wall and cardiovascular diseases: an update (part 2).

    PubMed

    Yung, Lai Ming; Laher, Ismail; Yao, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Zhen Yu; Huang, Yu; Leung, Fung Ping

    2009-01-01

    There is much evidence extolling the virtues of physical activity on cardiovascular disease (CVD). The evidence derives from different population groups where leisure time physical activity reduced the risk of coronary heart disease and cardiovascular mortality in both men and women. Recent meta-analyses have shown that large risk reductions for both ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke can be achieved by moderate or intense physical activity. There are many data from human and animal studies confirming a beneficial role for exercise in the prevention and treatment of CVD. Physical inactivity and obesity/overweight are not only associated with a number of health-related risk factors, but are considered to be independent risk factors for CVD, type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Clinical trials confirm that lifestyle interventions (dietary modification and increased physical activity) reduce the risk of progressing from impaired glucose tolerance to type 2 diabetes. Moreover, epidemiological studies indicate that the risk of hypertension increases by being overweight. Modest increases in exercise intensity and frequency have hypotensive effects in sedentary hypertensive patients. Long-term training improves endothelium-dependent dilatation in the aorta and resistance arteries of the heart, whereas short-term training increases endothelial function in coronary conduit arteries. Overall, more scientific evidence will undoubtedly encourage the widespread advocacy of the clinical benefits of exercise therapy in the prevention and treatment of CVD.

  12. Invasive pneumococcal disease complicated by cerebral vasculitis, transient diabetes insipidus and spondylodiscitis.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Sofia; Domingues, Vital; Faria, Raquel M; Mendonça, Teresa

    2013-08-19

    Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) is a potential life-threatening situation that requires immediate recognition and treatment. Cerebrovascular complications are uncommon and have been reported less frequently in adults than in children. We report a case of 59-year-old man with IPD complicated by cerebral vasculitis, transient central diabetes insipidus and spondylodiscitis. Each of these complications is rare and needs specific approach. Their association is even rarer and to the best of our knowledge this is the first case reported.

  13. The advantage of coronal scanning in cerebral computed angiotomography for diagnosis of moyamoya disease

    SciTech Connect

    Asari, S.; Satoh, T.; Sakurai, M.; Yamamoto, Y.; Sadamoto, K.

    1982-12-01

    The advantage of coronal scanning in cerebral computed angiotomography for diagnosis of and screening for moyamoya disease is demonstrated. Characteristic features on the coronal CT scan include (a) attenuation of and difficulty in following the supraclinoid internal carotid arteries and carotid fork and (b) abnormal ''nebula-like'' high-density areas consisting of irregular, tortuous, or patchy vessels arising in the basal cisterns and extending to the basal ganglia.

  14. Vascular hyperpolarization in human physiology and cardiovascular risk conditions and disease.

    PubMed

    Schinzari, F; Tesauro, M; Cardillo, C

    2017-01-01

    Hyperpolarization causing smooth muscle relaxation contributes to the maintenance of vascular homeostasis, particularly in small-calibre arteries and arterioles. It may also become a compensatory vasodilator mechanism upregulated in states with impaired nitric oxide (NO) availability. Bioassay of vascular hyperpolarization in the human circulation has been hampered by the complexity of mechanisms involved and the limited availability of investigational tools. Firm evidence, however, supports the notion that hyperpolarization participates in the regulation of resting vasodilator tone and vascular reactivity in healthy subjects. In addition, an enhanced endothelium-derived hyperpolarization contributes to both resting and agonist-stimulated vasodilation in a variety of cardiovascular risk conditions and disease. Thus, hyperpolarization mediated by epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and H2 O2 has been observed in coronary arterioles of patients with coronary artery disease. Similarly, ouabain-sensitive and EETs-mediated hyperpolarization has been observed to compensate for NO deficiency in patients with essential hypertension. Moreover, in non-hypertensive patients with multiple cardiovascular risk factors and in hypercholesterolaemia, KCa channel-mediated vasodilation appears to be activated. A novel paradigm establishes that perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) is an additional regulator of vascular tone/function and endothelium is not the only agent in vascular hyperpolarization. Indeed, some PVAT-derived relaxing substances, such as adiponectin and angiotensin 1-7, may exert anticontractile and vasodilator actions by the opening of KCa channels in smooth muscle cells. Conversely, PVAT-derived factors impair coronary vasodilation via differential inhibition of some K(+) channels. In view of adipose tissue abnormalities occurring in human obesity, changes in PVAT-dependent hyperpolarization may be relevant for vascular dysfunction also in this condition.

  15. Quantitative Micro-Computed Tomography Imaging of Vascular Dysfunction in Progressive Kidney Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ehling, Josef; Bábíčková, Janka; Gremse, Felix; Klinkhammer, Barbara M; Baetke, Sarah; Knuechel, Ruth; Kiessling, Fabian; Floege, Jürgen; Lammers, Twan; Boor, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Progressive kidney diseases and renal fibrosis are associated with endothelial injury and capillary rarefaction. However, our understanding of these processes has been hampered by the lack of tools enabling the quantitative and noninvasive monitoring of vessel functionality. Here, we used micro-computed tomography (µCT) for anatomical and functional imaging of vascular alterations in three murine models with distinct mechanisms of progressive kidney injury: ischemia-reperfusion (I/R, days 1-56), unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO, days 1-10), and Alport mice (6-8 weeks old). Contrast-enhanced in vivo µCT enabled robust, noninvasive, and longitudinal monitoring of vessel functionality and revealed a progressive decline of the renal relative blood volume in all models. This reduction ranged from -20% in early disease stages to -61% in late disease stages and preceded fibrosis. Upon Microfil perfusion, high-resolution ex vivo µCT allowed quantitative analyses of three-dimensional vascular networks in all three models. These analyses revealed significant and previously unrecognized alterations of preglomerular arteries: a reduction in vessel diameter, a prominent reduction in vessel branching, and increased vessel tortuosity. In summary, using µCT methodology, we revealed insights into macro-to-microvascular alterations in progressive renal disease and provide a platform that may serve as the basis to evaluate vascular therapeutics in renal disease.

  16. Heteroreceptors Modulating CGRP Release at Neurovascular Junction: Potential Therapeutic Implications on Some Vascular-Related Diseases.

    PubMed

    González-Hernández, Abimael; Marichal-Cancino, Bruno A; Lozano-Cuenca, Jair; López-Canales, Jorge S; Muñoz-Islas, Enriqueta; Ramírez-Rosas, Martha B; Villalón, Carlos M

    2016-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a 37-amino-acid neuropeptide belonging to the calcitonin gene peptide superfamily. CGRP is a potent vasodilator with potential therapeutic usefulness for treating vascular-related disease. This peptide is primarily located on C- and Aδ-fibers, which have extensive perivascular presence and a dual sensory-efferent function. Although CGRP has two major isoforms (α-CGRP and β-CGRP), the α-CGRP is the isoform related to vascular actions. Release of CGRP from afferent perivascular nerve terminals has been shown to result in vasodilatation, an effect mediated by at least one receptor (the CGRP receptor). This receptor is an atypical G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) composed of three functional proteins: (i) the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR; a seven-transmembrane protein), (ii) the activity-modifying protein type 1 (RAMP1), and (iii) a receptor component protein (RCP). Although under physiological conditions, CGRP seems not to play an important role in vascular tone regulation, this peptide has been strongly related as a key player in migraine and other vascular-related disorders (e.g., hypertension and preeclampsia). The present review aims at providing an overview on the role of sensory fibers and CGRP release on the modulation of vascular tone.

  17. Heteroreceptors Modulating CGRP Release at Neurovascular Junction: Potential Therapeutic Implications on Some Vascular-Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Marichal-Cancino, Bruno A.; Lozano-Cuenca, Jair; López-Canales, Jorge S.; Muñoz-Islas, Enriqueta; Ramírez-Rosas, Martha B.; Villalón, Carlos M.

    2016-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a 37-amino-acid neuropeptide belonging to the calcitonin gene peptide superfamily. CGRP is a potent vasodilator with potential therapeutic usefulness for treating vascular-related disease. This peptide is primarily located on C- and Aδ-fibers, which have extensive perivascular presence and a dual sensory-efferent function. Although CGRP has two major isoforms (α-CGRP and β-CGRP), the α-CGRP is the isoform related to vascular actions. Release of CGRP from afferent perivascular nerve terminals has been shown to result in vasodilatation, an effect mediated by at least one receptor (the CGRP receptor). This receptor is an atypical G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) composed of three functional proteins: (i) the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR; a seven-transmembrane protein), (ii) the activity-modifying protein type 1 (RAMP1), and (iii) a receptor component protein (RCP). Although under physiological conditions, CGRP seems not to play an important role in vascular tone regulation, this peptide has been strongly related as a key player in migraine and other vascular-related disorders (e.g., hypertension and preeclampsia). The present review aims at providing an overview on the role of sensory fibers and CGRP release on the modulation of vascular tone. PMID:28116293

  18. Cerebral blood flow abnormalities in children with sickle cell disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Behpour, Amir M; Shah, Prakesh S; Mikulis, David J; Kassner, Andrea

    2013-03-01

    A systematic review was performed to assess whether cerebral blood flow with different imaging modalities could identify brain abnormalities in children with sickle cell disease where structural magnetic resonance imaging and transcranial Doppler velocity appeared normal. A total of 11 studies were identified which reported cerebral blood flow abnormalities alongside structural magnetic resonance imaging or transcranial Doppler velocity abnormalities in patients with sickle cell disease. Potential for bias was assessed with the quality assessment of diagnostic accuracy studies scale in addition to treatment bias. Subjects of each study were categorized into patients with and without stroke. The prevalence of abnormalities for each modality was then separately calculated in each group. The included studies had mostly moderate degrees of bias. The prevalence of blood flow abnormalities compared with structural magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities was equal to or lower in patients with stroke and equal to or greater in patients without stroke. Blood flow abnormalities were more prevalent than transcranial Doppler abnormalities in four studies of patients without stroke and in one study of patients with stroke. The studies suggest that the assessment of cerebral blood flow in sickle cell disease can be of potential value in addressing brain abnormalities at the tissue level; however, further studies are warranted.

  19. Lowering homocysteine and modifying nutritional status with folic acid and vitamin B(12) in Indian patients of vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Seema; Ali, Arif; Bhargava, Eishaan Kamta; Manocha, Anjali; Kankra, Mamta; Das, Sabari; Mohan Srivastava, Lalit

    2012-05-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is more commonly associated with vascular disease in Indians than in the western populations. It is caused by genetic polymorphisms or dietary deficiencies of the B vitamins. We attempted to identify the association of hyperhomocysteinemia with vitamin B(12) and folate in Indian patients of vascular disease. Homocysteine, vitamin B(12) and folate levels were estimated in 100 controls and 100 patients of vascular disease. Homocysteine estimation was repeated in 73 patients on different vitamin supplements for 6 months. Homocysteine exhibited a significant negative correlation with B(12) only in cerebrovascular disease and peripheral vascular diseasepatients, and with folate in coronary artery disease and cerebrovascular disease patients as well as controls. Single daily dose of folate was as effective as a combination of folate and cobalamin in reducing plasma homocysteine concentrations. Low levels of B(12) contribute to the higher incidence of cerebrovascular disease and peripheral vascular disease, and low folate levels account for higher prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia in coronary artery disease and cerebrovascular disease. Moreover, irrespective of the cause of hyperhomocysteinemia, folate is known to ameliorate it. Hence, large-scale corrective measures like food fortification or dietary supplementation with folate might benefit the Indian population and reduce the incidence and morbidity of vascular disease.

  20. Cerebral cavernous malformations: from molecular pathogenesis to genetic counselling and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Haasdijk, Remco A; Cheng, Caroline; Maat-Kievit, Anneke J; Duckers, Henricus J

    2012-02-01

    Cerebral cavernous (or capillary-venous) malformations (CCM) have a prevalence of about 0.1-0.5% in the general population. Genes mutated in CCM encode proteins that modulate junction formation between vascular endothelial cells. Mutations lead to the development of abnormal vascular structures.In this article, we review the clinical features, molecular and genetic basis of the disease, and management.

  1. A recombinant inhibitory isoform of vascular endothelial growth factor164/165 aggravates ischemic brain damage in a mouse model of focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Chaitanya, Ganta V; Cromer, Walter E; Parker, Courtney P; Couraud, Pierre O; Romero, Ignacio A; Weksler, Babette; Mathis, J Michael; Minagar, Alireza; Alexander, J Steven

    2013-09-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) are a Janus-faced family of growth factors exerting both neuroprotective and maladaptive effects on the blood-brain barrier. For example, VEGFs are beneficial in promoting postischemic brain angiogenesis, but the newly formed vessels are leaky. We investigated the role of the naturally occurring murine inhibitory VEGF isoform VEGF165b in a mouse model of focal cerebral ischemia by middle cerebral artery occlusion and reperfusion (I/R) in male C57BL/6 mice. We investigated the roles of VEGF164/165 and VEGF165b in both brain and nonbrain endothelial barrier, angiogenesis, and neutrophil migration using oxygen glucose deprivation and reoxygenation as in vitro model. We investigated the role of VEGF165b in brain edema, neutrophil infiltration, ischemic brain damage, and neuronal death in vivo using an adenovirus encoding a recombinant VEGF164b isoform. Neither VEGF164/165 nor VEGF165b significantly altered brain endothelial barrier or angiogenesis in vitro. However, treatment of brain endothelial cells with VEGF165b increased neutrophil migration in vitro and exacerbated stroke injury by aggravating neutrophil infiltration and neurodegeneration in vivo. Our results indicate that alterations in the delicate balance in the relative levels of pro- and antiangiogenic VEGF isoforms can result in either adaptive or detrimental effects, depending on the VEGF isoform levels and on the duration and extent of injury.

  2. Targeting Nitric Oxide with Natural Derived Compounds as a Therapeutic Strategy in Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Forte, Maurizio; Damato, Antonio; Ambrosio, Mariateresa; Puca, Annibale A.; Sciarretta, Sebastiano; Frati, Giacomo; Vecchione, Carmine

    2016-01-01

    Within the family of endogenous gasotransmitters, nitric oxide (NO) is the smallest gaseous intercellular messenger involved in the modulation of several processes, such as blood flow and platelet aggregation control, essential to maintain vascular homeostasis. NO is produced by nitric oxide synthases (NOS) and its effects are mediated by cGMP-dependent or cGMP-independent mechanisms. Growing evidence suggests a crosstalk between the NO signaling and the occurrence of oxidative stress in the onset and progression of vascular diseases, such as hypertension, heart failure, ischemia, and stroke. For these reasons, NO is considered as an emerging molecular target for developing therapeutic strategies for cardio- and cerebrovascular pathologies. Several natural derived compounds, such as polyphenols, are now proposed as modulators of NO-mediated pathways. The aim of this review is to highlight the experimental evidence on the involvement of nitric oxide in vascular homeostasis focusing on the therapeutic potential of targeting NO with some natural compounds in patients with vascular diseases. PMID:27651855

  3. Targeting Nitric Oxide with Natural Derived Compounds as a Therapeutic Strategy in Vascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Forte, Maurizio; Conti, Valeria; Damato, Antonio; Ambrosio, Mariateresa; Puca, Annibale A; Sciarretta, Sebastiano; Frati, Giacomo; Vecchione, Carmine; Carrizzo, Albino

    2016-01-01

    Within the family of endogenous gasotransmitters, nitric oxide (NO) is the smallest gaseous intercellular messenger involved in the modulation of several processes, such as blood flow and platelet aggregation control, essential to maintain vascular homeostasis. NO is produced by nitric oxide synthases (NOS) and its effects are mediated by cGMP-dependent or cGMP-independent mechanisms. Growing evidence suggests a crosstalk between the NO signaling and the occurrence of oxidative stress in the onset and progression of vascular diseases, such as hypertension, heart failure, ischemia, and stroke. For these reasons, NO is considered as an emerging molecular target for developing therapeutic strategies for cardio- and cerebrovascular pathologies. Several natural derived compounds, such as polyphenols, are now proposed as modulators of NO-mediated pathways. The aim of this review is to highlight the experimental evidence on the involvement of nitric oxide in vascular homeostasis focusing on the therapeutic potential of targeting NO with some natural compounds in patients with vascular diseases.

  4. Effect of diesel exhaust particles on renal vascular responses in rats with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Al Suleimani, Y M; Al Mahruqi, A S; Al Za'abi, M; Shalaby, A; Ashique, M; Nemmar, A; Ali, B H

    2017-02-01

    Several recent studies have indicated the possible association between exposure to particulate air pollution and the increased rate of morbidity and mortality in patients with kidney diseases. The link of this observation to vascular damage has not been adequately addressed. Therefore, this study aims to investigate possible vascular damage that might be associated with exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DP) in adenine (AD)-induced chronic kidney disease (CKD) in rats, and the possible ameliorative effect of gum acacia (GA). CKD was induced by feeding AD (0.75%, w/w), and DP (0.5 mg/kg) was instilled intratracheally every second day and GA was given concomitantly in the drinking water at a dose of 15% w/v. All treatments were given concomitantly for 28 days. Changes in renal blood flow (RBF) and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were monitored in these animals after anesthesia, together with several other endpoints. Exposure to DP significantly reduced RBF and this was significantly potentiated in AD-treated rats. Phenylephrine-induced decreases in RBF and increases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure were severely potentiated in rats exposed to DP, and these actions were significantly augmented in AD-treated rats. GA did not significantly affect the vascular impairment induced by AD and DP given together. This study provides experimental evidence that exposure to particulate air pollution can exacerbate the vascular damage seen in patients with CKD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 541-549, 2017.

  5. Dysfunction of pulmonary vascular endothelium in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: basic considerations for future drug development.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qin; Underwood, Malcolm J; Hsin, Michael K Y; Liu, Xiao-Cheng; He, Guo-Wei

    2008-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the leading health problems worldwide and continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. The clinical features of COPD are chronic obstructive bronchiolitis and emphysema. Pulmonary vascular endothelial dysfunction is a characteristic pathological finding of COPD at different stages of the disease. Functional changes of pulmonary endothelial cells in COPD include antiplatelet abnormalities, anticoagulant disturbances, endothelial activation, atherogenesis, and compromised regulation of vascular tone which may adversely affect the ventilation-perfusion match in COPD. As the most important risk factor of COPD, cigarette smoking may initiate pulmonary vascular impairment through direct injury of endothelial cells or release of inflammatory mediators. Morphological changes such as denudation of endothelium and endothelial cell apoptosis have been observed in the pulmonary vasculature in COPD patients as well as functional alterations. Changes in the expression of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), thrombomodulin, selectins, and adhesion molecules in pulmonary endothelial cells as well as complex regulation and interaction of vasoactive substances and growth factors released from endothelium may underlie the mechanisms of pulmonary endothelial dysfunction in COPD. The mechanism of endothelial repair/regeneration in COPD, although not fully understood, may involve upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factors in the early stages along with an increased number of bone marrow-derived progenitor cells. These factors should be taken into account when developing new strategies for the pharmacological therapy of patients with COPD.

  6. Possible involvement of microRNAs in vascular damage in experimental chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Taïbi, Fatiha; Metzinger-Le Meuth, Valérie; M'Baya-Moutoula, Eléonore; Djelouat, Mohamed seif el Islam; Louvet, Loïc; Bugnicourt, Jean-Marc; Poirot, Sabrina; Bengrine, Abderrahmane; Chillon, Jean-Marc; Massy, Ziad A; Metzinger, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with vascular calcifications and atherosclerosis. There is a need for novel predictors to allow earlier diagnosis of these disorders, predict disease progression, and improve assessment of treatment response. We focused on microRNAs since they are implicated in a variety of cellular functions in cardiovascular pathology. We examined changes of microRNA expression in aortas of CKD and non-CKD wild type mice and apolipoprotein E knock-out mice, respectively. Both vascular smooth muscle-specific miR-143 and miR-145 expressions were decreased in states of atherosclerosis and/or CKD or both, and the expression level of protein target Myocardin was increased. The inflammatory miR-223 was increased in more advanced stages of CKD, and specific protein targets NFI-A and GLUT-4 were dramatically decreased. Expression of miR-126 was markedly increased and expression of protein targets VCAM-1 and SDF-1 was altered during the course of CKD. The drug sevelamer, commonly used in CKD, corrected partially these changes in microRNA expression, suggesting a direct link between the observed microRNA alterations and uremic vascular toxicity. Finally, miR-126, -143 and -223 expression levels were deregulated in murine serum during the course of experimental CKD. In conclusion, these miRNAs could have role(s) in CKD vascular remodeling and may therefore represent useful targets to prevent or treat complications of CKD.

  7. Vascular calcification: When should we interfere in chronic kidney disease patients and how?

    PubMed Central

    Sharaf El Din, Usama Abdel Azim; Salem, Mona Mansour; Abdulazim, Dina Ossama

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients are endangered with the highest mortality rate compared to other chronic diseases. Cardiovascular events account for up to 60% of the fatalities. Cardiovascular calcifications affect most of the CKD patients. Most of this calcification is related to disturbed renal phosphate handling. Fibroblast growth factor 23 and klotho deficiency were incriminated in the pathogenesis of vascular calcification through different mechanisms including their effects on endothelium and arterial wall smooth muscle cells. In addition, deficient klotho gene expression, a constant feature of CKD, promotes vascular pathology and shares in progression of the CKD. The role of gut in the etio-pathogenesis of systemic inflammation and vascular calcification is a newly discovered mechanism. This review will cover the medical history, prevalence, pathogenesis, clinical relevance, different tools used to diagnose, the ideal timing to prevent or to withhold the progression of vascular calcification and the different medications and medical procedures that can help to prolong the survival of CKD patients. PMID:27648404

  8. Vascular Health and Cognitive Function in Older Adults with Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Forman, Daniel E; Cohen, Ronald A; Hoth, Karin F; Haley, Andreana P; Poppas, Athena; Moser, David J; Gunstad, John; Paul, Robert H; Jefferson, Angela L; Tate, David F; Ono, Makoto; Wake, Nicole; Gerhard-Herman, Marie

    2008-02-01

    BACKGROUND: We hypothesized that changes in vascular flow dynamics resulting from age and cardiovascular disease (CVD) would correlate to neurocognitive capacities, even in adults screened to exclude dementia and neurological disease. We studied endothelial-dependent as well as endothelial-independent brachial responses in older adults with CVD to study the associations of vascular responses with cognition. Comprehensive neurocognitive testing was used to discern which specific cognitive domain(s) correlated to the vascular responses. METHODS: Eighty-eight independent, community-dwelling older adults (70.02+7.67 years) with mild to severe CVD were recruited. Enrollees were thoroughly screened to exclude neurological disease and dementia. Flow-mediated (endothelial-dependent) and nitroglycerin-mediated (endothelial-independent) brachial artery responses were assessed using 2-d ultrasound. Cognitive functioning was assessed using comprehensive neuropsychological testing. Linear regression analyses were used to evaluate the relationships between the endothelial-dependent and endothelial-independent vascular flow dynamics and specific domains of neurocognitive function. RESULTS: Endothelial-dependent and endothelial-independent brachial artery responses both correlated with neurocognitive testing indices. The strongest independent relationship was between endothelial function and measures of attention-executive functioning. CONCLUSIONS: Endothelial-dependent and endothelial-independent vascular responsiveness correlate with neurocognitive performance among older CVD patients, particularly in the attention-executive domain. While further study is needed to substantiate causal relationships, our data demonstrate that brachial responses serve as important markers of risk for common neurocognitive changes. Learning and behavior-modifying therapeutic strategies that compensate for such common, insidious neurocognitive limitations will likely improve caregiving efficacy.

  9. Regulation of cerebral cholesterol metabolism in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Reiss, Allison B; Voloshyna, Iryna

    2012-03-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder that manifests as a progressive loss of memory and deterioration of higher cognitive functions. Alzheimer disease is characterized by accumulation in the brain of the β-amyloid peptide generated by β- and γ-secretase processing of amyloid precursor protein. Epidemiological studies have linked elevated plasma cholesterol and lipoprotein levels in midlife with AD development. Cholesterol-fed animal models exhibit neuropathologic features of AD including accumulation of β-amyloid peptide. Specific isoforms of the cholesterol transporter apolipoprotein E are associated with susceptibility to AD. Although multiple lines of evidence indicate a role for cholesterol in AD, the exact impact and mechanisms involved remain largely unknown. This review summarizes the current state of our knowledge of the influence of cholesterol and lipid pathways in AD pathogenesis in vitro and in vivo.

  10. [The presence of aluminum in cerebral vessels in Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Senitz, D; Blüthner, K

    1990-01-01

    Morin staining is a specific method by which to detect aluminium in the brain. In cases of Alzheimer disease, aluminium was found to occur in neurons and glial cells, dense cores of senile plaques, primitive plaques, and intracortical congophilic vessels. Findings obtained are likely to suggest concomitant presence of aluminium and amyloid. Aluminium is assumed to have high affinity for amyloid. Aluminium is thus capable of overcoming the blood-brain barrier.

  11. Cerebral correlates of psychotic symptoms in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Mega, M.; Lee, L.; Dinov, I.; Mishkin, F.; Toga, A.; Cummings, J.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Psychotic symptoms are produced by distributed neuronal dysfunction. Abnormalities of reality testing and false inference implicate frontal lobe abnormalities.
OBJECTIVES—To identify the functional imaging profile of patients with Alzheimer's disease manifesting psychotic symptoms as measured by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT).
METHODS—Twenty patients with Alzheimer's disease who had SPECT and clinical evaluations were divided into two equal groups with similar mini mental status examination (MMSE), age, sex, and the range of behaviours documented by the neuropsychiatric inventory (NPI), except delusions and hallucinations. SPECT studies, registered to a probabilistic anatomical atlas, were normalised across the combined group mean intensity level, and subjected to a voxel by voxel subtraction of the non-psychotic minus psychotic groups. Subvolume thresholding (SVT) corrected random lobar noise to produce a three dimensional functional significance map.
RESULTS—The significance map showed lower regional perfusion in the right and left dorsolateral frontal, left anterior cingulate, and left ventral striatal regions along with the left pulvinar and dorsolateral parietal cortex, in the psychotic versus non-psychotic group.
CONCLUSION—Patients with Alzheimer's disease who manifest psychosis may have disproportionate dysfunction of frontal lobes and related subcortical and parietal structures.

 PMID:10896687

  12. Primary Open Angle Glaucoma is Associated with MR Biomarkers of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mercieca, Karl; Cain, John; Hansen, Thomas; Steeples, Laura; Watkins, Amy; Spencer, Fiona; Jackson, Alan

    2016-01-01

    This prospective study tests the hypotheses that: 1) glaucoma is associated with evidence of cerebral small vessel disease; 2) that imaging biomarkers of cerebral small vessel disease in POAG and NTG will show different characteristics. 12 normal controls, 7 patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) and 9 patients with normal tension glaucoma (NTG) were recruited. Ophthalmological clinical assessment and MR imaging of the brain were performed. MR imaging was used to quantify white matter lesion load, frequency of dilated perivascular spaces (PVS) and abnormalities in cerebral hydrodynamics. Patients with POAG had significantly greater white matter lesion load (p < 0.05), more PVS in the centrum semiovale (p < 0.05) and had higher overall PVS scores than controls (p < 0.05). In the POAG group, optic cup-to-disc ratio (CDR) was positively correlated with deep white matter hyperintensities (R2 = 0.928, p < 0.01). Mean deviation on the Humphrey visual field assessment was negatively correlated with deep white matter lesion load (R2 = −0.840, p < 0.01), total white matter lesion load (R2 = −0.928, p < 0.01) and total PVS (R2 = −0.820, p < 0.01). MR evidence of cerebral small vessel disease is strongly associated with a diagnosis of POAG and with the severity of abnormalities in CDR and visual field. PMID:26923106

  13. Coagulation Activation in Children with Sickle Cell Disease Is Associated with Cerebral Small Vessel Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Colombatti, Raffaella; De Bon, Emiliano; Bertomoro, Antonella; Casonato, Alessandra; Pontara, Elena; Omenetto, Elisabetta; Saggiorato, Graziella; Steffan, Agostino; Damian, Tamara; Cella, Giuseppe; Teso, Simone; Manara, Renzo; Rampazzo, Patrizia; Meneghetti, Giorgio; Basso, Giuseppe; Sartori, Maria Teresa; Sainati, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Background Thrombotic complications in Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) arise since infancy, but the role of the coagulation system in children has been poorly explored. To determine its role in the development of clinical complications in childhood we measured coagulation and endothelial parameters in children with SCD at steady state. Methods Markers of thrombin generation, fibrin dissolution and endothelial activation were evaluated in 38 children with SS-Sβ°, 6 with SC disease and 50 age and blood group matched controls. Coagulation variables were correlated with markers of hemolysis and inflammation, with the presence of cerebral and lung vasculopathy and with the frequency of clinical complications. Results SS-Sβ° patients presented higher levels of factor VIII, von Willebrand factor antigen (VWF:Ag) and collagen binding activity, tissue plasminogen activator antigen (t-PA:Ag), D-dimer, p-selectin, prothrombin fragment1+2 (F1+2) and lower ADAMTS-13:activity/VWF:Ag (p<0.05) compared to controls and SC patients. In SS-Sβ° patients coagulation variables correlated positively with markers of inflammation, hemolysis, and negatively with HbF (p<0.05). Patients with cerebral silent infarcts showed significant decrease in t-PA:Ag and ADAMTS-13 Antigen and a tendency toward higher D-dimer, F1+2, TAT compared to patients without them. D-dimer was associated with a six fold increased risk of cerebral silent infarcts. No correlation was found between coagulation activation and large vessel vasculopathy or other clinical events except for decreased t-PA:Ag in patients with tricuspid Rigurgitant Velocity >2.5m/sec. Conclusions SS-Sβ° disease is associated with extensive activation of the coagulation system at steady state since young age. ADAMTS-13 and t-PA:Ag are involved in the development of cerebral silent infarcts. PMID:24205317

  14. Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibitors as Investigative Tools in the Pathogenesis and Management of Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Mina M.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2012-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are proteolytic enzymes that degrade various components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). MMPs could also regulate the activity of several non-ECM bioactive substrates, and consequently affect different cellular functions. Members of the MMPs family include collagenases, gelatinases, stromelysins, matrilysins, membrane-type MMPs and others. Pro-MMPs are cleaved into active MMPs, which in turn act on various substrates in the ECM and on the cell surface. MMPs play an important role in the regulation of numerous physiological processes including vascular remodeling and angiogenesis. MMPs may also be involved in vascular diseases such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysm, and varicose veins. MMPs also play a role in the hemodynamic and vascular changes associated with pregnancy and preeclampsia. The role of MMPs is commonly assessed by measuring their gene expression, protein amount, and proteolyic activity using gel zymography. Because there are no specific activators of MMPs, MMP inhibitors are often used to investigate the role of MMPs in different physiologic processes and in the pathogenesis of specific diseases. MMP inhibitors include endogenous tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) and pharmacological inhibitors such as zinc chelators, doxycycline and marimastat. MMP inhibitors have been evaluated as diagnostic and therapeutic tools in cancer, autoimmune and cardiovascular disease. Although several MMP inhibitors have been synthesized and tested both experimentally and clinically, only on MMP inhibitor, i.e. doxycycline, is currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration. This is mainly due to the undesirable side effects of MMP inhibitors especially on the musculoskeletal system. While most experimental and clinical trials of MMP inhibitors have not demonstrated significant benefits, some trials still showed promising results. With the advent of new genetic and pharmacological tools, disease-specific MMP inhibitors

  15. Antioxidants prevent ethanol-induced contractions of canine cerebral vascular smooth muscle: relation to alcohol-induced brain injury.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Zheng, T; Altura, B T; Altura, B M

    2001-03-30

    The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that alpha-tocopherol (Vit. E) and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) might exert direct effects on alcohol-induced contractions of canine basilar cerebral arteries. After precontraction of arterial ring segments with ethanol, PDTC (10(-8)-10(-6) M) and Vit. E (10(-6)-10(-4) M) induced concentration-dependent relaxations of cerebral arteries, compared to untreated controls. The effective concentrations producing approximately 50% of the maximal relaxation responses (EC(50) values) were about 2.48+/-0.09 x 10(-7) M for PDTC, and 1.87+/-0.10 x 10(-5) mM for Vit. E, respectively. Preincubation of these arterial rings with EC(50)'s of PDTC or Vit. E for 40 min attenuate markedly the contractions produced by alcohol, at concentrations of 1-400 mM. However, both PDTC and Vit.E do not relax equi-potent precontractions induced by either KCl or prostaglandin F(2alpha) (PGF(2alpha)) or inhibit their contractions. These data suggest that alcohol-induced contractions of cerebral arteries are mediated via excitation-contraction coupling pathways different from those used by KCl or receptor-mediated agonists such as PGF(2alpha). The present results, when viewed in light of other recently published data, suggest that antioxidants may prove useful in the amelioration and treatment of alcohol-induced brain damage and strokes.

  16. Decreased Neprilysin and Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wick, Marilee J.; Buesing, Erica J.; Wehling, Carol A.; Loomis, Zoe L.; Cool, Carlyne D.; Zamora, Martin R.; Miller, York E.; Colgan, Sean P.; Hersh, Louis B.; Voelkel, Norbert F.; Dempsey, Edward C.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale: Studies with genetically engineered mice showed that decreased expression of the transmembrane peptidase neprilysin (NEP) increases susceptibility to hypoxic pulmonary vascular remodeling and hypertension; in hypoxic wild-type mice, expression is decreased early in distal pulmonary arteries, where prominent vascular remodeling occurs. Therefore, in humans with smoke- and hypoxia-induced vascular remodeling, as in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pulmonary activity/expression of NEP may likewise be decreased. Objectives: To test whether NEP activity and expression are reduced in COPD lungs and pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) exposed to cigarette smoke extract or hypoxia and begin to investigate mechanisms involved. Methods: Control and advanced COPD lung lysates (n = 13–14) were analyzed for NEP activity and protein and mRNA expression. As a control, dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity was analyzed. Lung sections were assessed for vascular remodeling and oxidant damage. Human pulmonary arterial SMCs were exposed to cigarette smoke extract, hypoxia, or H2O2, and incubated with antioxidants or lysosomal/proteasomal inhibitors. Measurements and Main Results: COPD lungs demonstrated areas of vascular rarification, distal muscularization, and variable intimal and prominent medial/adventitial thickening. NEP activity was reduced by 76%; NEP protein expression was decreased in alveolar walls and distal vessels; mRNA expression was also decreased. In SMCs exposed to cigarette smoke extract, hypoxia, and H2O2, NEP activity and expression were also reduced. Reactive oxygen species inactivated NEP activity; NEP protein degradation appeared to be substantially induced. Conclusions: Mechanisms responsible for reduced NEP activity and protein expression include oxidative reactions and protein degradation. Maintaining or increasing lung NEP may protect against pulmonary vascular remodeling in response to chronic smoke and hypoxia. PMID:20813891

  17. How I manage cerebral vasculopathy in children with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Brousse, Valentine; Kossorotoff, Manoelle; de Montalembert, Mariane

    2015-09-01

    Sickle cell disease induces specific brain alterations that involve both the macrocirculation and the microcirculation. The main overt neurovascular complications in children are infarctive stroke, transient ischaemic attack and cerebral haemorrhage. Silent cerebral infarction, cognitive dysfunction and recurrent headache are also common. Cerebrovascular disease selectively affects children with the HbSS or HbS-β(0) genotypes (i.e. sickle cell anaemia). The incidence of stroke peaks between 2 and 5 years of age (1·02/100 patient-years) and increases with the severity of the anaemia. Most strokes can be prevented by annual transcranial Doppler screening from 2 to 16 years of age and providing chronic blood transfusion when this investigation shows elevated blood-flow velocities. The role for hydroxycarbamide in children with abnormal transcranial Doppler findings is under investigation. After a stroke, chronic blood transfusion is very strongly recommended, unless haematopoietic stem cell transplantation can be performed. Routine magnetic resonance imaging shows that more than one-third of children have silent cerebral infarction, which is associated with cognitive impairments. Screening for silent infarcts seems legitimate, since their presence may lead to supportive treatments. The role for more aggressive interventions such as hydroxycarbamide or chronic blood transfusion is debated.

  18. Importance of magnesium ions in development of tolerance to ethanol: studies on cultured cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells, type-2 astrocytes and intact rat brain.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Zheng, T; Babu, A N; Altura, B T; Gupta, R K; Altura, B M

    2001-09-15

    This study was designed to examine the roles of intracellular free magnesium ion concentration ([Mg(2+)](i)) in ethanol-induced intoxication and development of tolerance in cultured canine cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells and astrocytes as well as intact rat brain. The basal, resting level of [Mg(2+)](i) in cerebrovascular cells was 732.5 +/- 82.4 microM. Exposure of cultured canine cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells to ethanol (10 and 25 mM) for 24 h reduced the concentrations of [Mg(2+)](i) to 521.1 +/- 59.6 microM, and 308.2 +/- 37.8 microM, respectively. However, exposure of these cultured vascular cells to the same concentrations of ethanol, after initial pretreatment with ethanol for 24 h, failed to interfere with the levels of [Mg(2+)](i). Measurement of [Mg(2+)](i) at 48 h and 72 h indicated that the decreased levels of [Mg(2+)](i) induced by ethanol at 24 h treatment returned toward baseline. Similar experiments were performed in cultured type-2 astrocytes isolated from neonatal rat brain. The basal level of [Mg(2+)](i) in type-2 astrocytes was about 125 microM. Incubation of these cells with 10 mM ethanol for 10 min resulted in a 27% reduction in the level of [Mg(2+)](i), whereas incubation with 25 mM ethanol resulted in almost a 50% reduction in [Mg(2+)](i). The decreased levels of [Mg(2+)](i) lasted around 30 min, until the measurement finished. Continuous incubation of these cultured astrocytes, with ethanol (either 10 mM or 25 mM), for more than 24 h, indicated that the concentrations of [Mg(2+)](i) in type-2 astrocytes were equivalent to those at basal, resting levels. In vivo 31P-NMR spectroscopy, performed on intact rat brains, indicated that an initial administration of 4 mg/kg ethanol ( approximately 20-25 mM blood alcohol level) resulted (after 20-40 min of exposure) in severe deficits in whole brain [Mg(2+)](i) (550 +/- 33 microM to 358 +/- 24 microM). Repeated injections of ethanol (4 mg/kg) over the next 24-72 h resulted in

  19. Disappointing reliability of pulsatility indices to identify candidates for magnetic resonance imaging screening in population-based studies assessing prevalence of cerebral small vessel disease

    PubMed Central

    Del Brutto, Oscar H.; Mera, Robertino M.; Andrade, María de la Luz; Castillo, Pablo R.; Zambrano, Mauricio; Nader, Juan A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diagnosis of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a challenge in remote areas where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not available. Hospital-based studies in high-risk or stroke patients have found an association between the pulsatility index (PI) of intracranial arteries – as derived from transcranial Doppler (TCD) – and white matter hyperintensities (WMH) of presumed vascular origin. We aimed to assess the reliability of cerebral pulsatility indices to identify candidates for MRI screening in population-based studies assessing prevalence of SVD. Methods: A representative sample of stroke-free Atahualpa residents aged ≥65 years investigated with MRI underwent TCD. Using generalized linear models, we evaluated whether the PI of major intracranial arteries correlate with WMH (used as a proxy of diffuse SVD), after adjusting for demographics and cardiovascular risk factors. Results: Out of 70 participants (mean age 70.6 ± 4.6 years, 57% women), 28 (40%) had moderate-to-severe WMH. In multivariate models, there were no differences across categories of WMH in the mean PI of middle cerebral arteries (1.10 ± 0.16 vs. 1.22 ± 0.24, β: 0.065, 95% confidence interval (CI): −0.084–0.177, P = 0.474) or vertebrobasilar arteries (1.11 ± 0.16 vs. 1.29 ± 0.27, β: 0.066, 95% CI: −0.0024–0.156, P = 0.146). Conclusions: Cerebral PI should not be used to identify candidates for MRI screening in population-based studies assessing the burden of SVD. PMID:26167015

  20. Detection of white matter lesions in cerebral small vessel disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riad, Medhat M.; Platel, Bram; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2013-02-01

    White matter lesions (WML) are diffuse white matter abnormalities commonly found in older subjects and are important indicators of stroke, multiple sclerosis, dementia and other disorders. We present an automated WML detection method and evaluate it on a dataset of small vessel disease (SVD) patients. In early SVD, small WMLs are expected to be of importance for the prediction of disease progression. Commonly used WML segmentation methods tend to ignore small WMLs and are mostly validated on the basis of total lesion load or a Dice coefficient for all detected WMLs. Therefore, in this paper, we present a method that is designed to detect individual lesions, large or small, and we validate the detection performance of our system with FROC (free-response ROC) analysis. For the automated detection, we use supervised classification making use of multimodal voxel based features from different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences, including intensities, tissue probabilities, voxel locations and distances, neighborhood textures and others. After preprocessing, including co-registration, brain extraction, bias correction, intensity normalization, and nonlinear registration, ventricle segmentation is performed and features are calculated for each brain voxel. A gentle-boost classifier is trained using these features from 50 manually annotated subjects to give each voxel a probability of being a lesion voxel. We perform ROC analysis to illustrate the benefits of using additional features to the commonly used voxel intensities; significantly increasing the area under the curve (Az) from 0.81 to 0.96 (p<0.05). We perform the FROC analysis by testing our classifier on 50 previously unseen subjects and compare the results with manual annotations performed by two experts. Using the first annotator results as our reference, the second annotator performs at a sensitivity of 0.90 with an average of 41 false positives per subject while our automated method reached the same

  1. Impaired renal function impacts negatively on vascular stiffness in patients with coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and coronary artery disease (CAD) are independently associated with increased vascular stiffness. We examined whether renal function contributes to vascular stiffness independently of CAD status. Methods We studied 160 patients with CAD and 169 subjects without CAD. The 4-variable MDRD formula was used to estimate glomerular filtration rate (eGFR); impaired renal function was defined as eGFR <60 mL/min. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured with the SphygmoCor® device. Circulating biomarkers were assessed in plasma using xMAP® multiplexing technology. Results Patients with CAD and impaired renal function had greater PWV compared to those with CAD and normal renal function (10.2 [9.1;11.2] vs 7.3 [6.9;7.7] m/s; P < 0.001). In all patients, PWV was a function of eGFR (β = −0.293; P < 0.001) even after adjustment for age, sex, systolic blood pressure, body mass index and presence or absence of CAD. Patients with CAD and impaired renal function had higher levels of adhesion and inflammatory molecules including E-selectin and osteopontin (all P < 0.05) compared to those with CAD alone, but had similar levels of markers of oxidative stress. Conclusions Renal function is a determinant of vascular stiffness even in patients with severe atherosclerotic disease. This was paralleled by differences in markers of cell adhesion and inflammation. Increased vascular stiffness may therefore be linked to inflammatory remodeling of the vasculature in people with impaired renal function, irrespective of concomitant atherosclerotic disease. PMID:23937620

  2. Cerebral Cavernous Malformations: Review of the Genetic and Protein-Protein Interactions Resulting in Disease Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Baranoski, Jacob F; Kalani, M Yashar S; Przybylowski, Colin J; Zabramski, Joseph M

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the genes KRIT1, CCM2, and PDCD10 are known to result in the formation of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs). CCMs are intracranial lesions composed of aberrantly enlarged "cavernous" endothelial channels that can result in cerebral hemorrhage, seizures, and neurologic deficits. Although these genes have been known to be associated with CCMs since the 1990s, numerous discoveries have been made that better elucidate how they and their subsequent protein products are involved in CCM pathogenesis. Since our last review of the molecular genetics of CCM pathogenesis in 2012, breakthroughs include a more thorough understanding of the protein structures of the gene products, involvement with integrin proteins, and MEKK3 signaling pathways, and the importance of CCM2-PDCD10 interactions. In this review, we highlight the advances that further our understanding of the "gene to protein to disease" relationships of CCMs.

  3. Laser in situ keratomileusis in patients with collagen vascular disease: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Rachel G; Moshirfar, Majid; Edmonds, Jason N; Christiansen, Steven M; Behunin, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the current United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommendations regarding laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) surgery in patients with collagen vascular diseases (CVD) and assess whether these patients make appropriate candidates for laser vision correction, and offer treatment recommendations based on identified clinical data. Methods A literature search was conducted using PubMed, Medline, and Ovid to identify all existing studies of LASIK in patients with collagen vascular diseases. The search was conducted without date limitations. Keywords used for the search included MeSH terms: laser in situ keratomileusis, LASIK, refractive surgery, ocular surgery, and cataract surgery connected by “and” with the following MeSH and natural-language terms: collagen vascular disease, rheumatic disease, systemic disease, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren’s syndrome, seronegative spondyloarthropathy, HLA B27, ankylosing spondylitis, reactive arthritis, psoriatic arthritis. The abstracts for all studies meeting initial search criteria were reviewed; relevant studies were included. No prospective studies were found; however, four retrospective case studies were identified that examined LASIK surgery in patients with CVD. Several case reports were also identified in similar fashion. Results The FDA considers CVD a relative contraindication to LASIK surgery, due largely to the ocular complications associated with disease in the CVD spectrum. However, recent studies of LASIK in patients with CVD indicate LASIK may be safe for patients with very well-controlled systemic disease, minimal ocular manifestations, and no clinical signs or history of dry-eye symptoms. Conclusion LASIK surgery may be safe in patients with rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosus and the seronegative spondyloarthropathies if stringent preoperative criteria are met. Evidence suggests patients with Sjögren’s syndrome are not

  4. Validation of the murine aortic arch as a model to study human vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Casteleyn, Christophe; Trachet, Bram; Van Loo, Denis; Devos, Daniel G H; Van den Broeck, Wim; Simoens, Paul; Cornillie, Pieter

    2010-01-01

    Although the murine thoracic aorta and its main branches are widely studied to gain more insight into the pathogenesis of human vascular diseases, detailed anatomical data on the murine aorta are sparse. Moreover, comparative studies between mice and men focusing on the topography and geometry of the heart and aorta are lacking. As this hampers the validation of murine vascular models, the branching pattern of the murine thoracic aorta was examined in 30 vascular corrosion casts. On six casts the intrathoracic position of the heart was compared with that of six younger and six older men of whom contrast-enhanced computer tomography images of the thorax were three-dimensionally reconstructed. In addition, the geometry of the human thoracic aorta was compared with that of the mouse by reconstructing micro-computer tomography images of six murine casts. It was found that the right brachiocephalic trunk, left common carotid artery and left subclavian artery branched subsequently from the aortic arch in both mice and men. The geometry of the branches of the murine aortic arch was quite similar to that of men. In both species the initial segment of the aorta, comprising the ascending aorta, aortic arch and cranial/superior part of the descending aorta, was sigmoidally curved on a cranial/superior view. Although some analogy between the intrathoracic position of the murine and human heart was observed, the murine heart manifestly deviated more ventrally. The major conclusion of this study is that, in both mice and men, the ascending and descending aorta do not lie in a single vertical plane (non-planar aortic geometry). This contrasts clearly with most domestic mammals in which a planar aortic pattern is present. As the vascular branching pattern of the aortic arch is also similar in mice and men, the murine model seems valuable to study human vascular diseases. PMID:20345858

  5. Exposure to Concentrated Ambient Particles Does Not Affect Vascular Function in Patients with Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Nicholas L.; Robinson, Simon D.; Fokkens, Paul H. B.; Leseman, Daan L. A. C.; Miller, Mark R.; Anderson, David; Freney, Evelyn J.; Heal, Mathew R.; Donovan, Robert J.; Blomberg, Anders; Sandström, Thomas; MacNee, William; Boon, Nicholas A.; Donaldson, Ken; Newby, David E.; Cassee, Flemming R.

    2008-01-01

    Background Exposure to fine particulate air pollution is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. We previously demonstrated that exposure to dilute diesel exhaust causes vascular dysfunction in humans. Objectives We conducted a study to determine whether exposure to ambient particulate matter causes vascular dysfunction. Methods Twelve male patients with stable coronary heart disease and 12 age-matched volunteers were exposed to concentrated ambient fine and ultrafine particles (CAPs) or filtered air for 2 hr using a randomized, double-blind cross-over study design. We measured peripheral vascular vasomotor and fibrinolytic function, and inflammatory variables—including circulating leukocytes, serum C-reactive protein, and exhaled breath 8-isoprostane and nitrotyrosine—6–8 hr after both exposures. Results Particulate concentrations (mean ± SE) in the exposure chamber (190 ± 37 μg/m3) were higher than ambient levels (31 ± 8 μg/m3) and levels in filtered air (0.5 ± 0.4 μg/m3; p < 0.001). Chemical analysis of CAPs identified low levels of elemental carbon. Exhaled breath 8-isoprostane concentrations increased after exposure to CAPs (16.9 ± 8.5 vs. 4.9 ± 1.2 pg/mL, p < 0.05), but markers of systemic inflammation were largely unchanged. Although there was a dose-dependent increase in blood flow and plasma tissue plasminogen activator release (p < 0.001 for all), CAPs exposure had no effect on vascular function in either group. Conclusions Despite achieving marked increases in particulate matter, exposure to CAPs—low in combustion-derived particles—did not affect vasomotor or fibrinolytic function in either middle-aged healthy volunteers or patients with coronary heart disease. These findings contrast with previous exposures to dilute diesel exhaust and highlight the importance of particle composition in determining the vascular effects of particulate matter in humans. PMID:18560524

  6. Validation of the murine aortic arch as a model to study human vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Casteleyn, Christophe; Trachet, Bram; Van Loo, Denis; Devos, Daniel G H; Van den Broeck, Wim; Simoens, Paul; Cornillie, Pieter

    2010-05-01

    Although the murine thoracic aorta and its main branches are widely studied to gain more insight into the pathogenesis of human vascular diseases, detailed anatomical data on the murine aorta are sparse. Moreover, comparative studies between mice and men focusing on the topography and geometry of the heart and aorta are lacking. As this hampers the validation of murine vascular models, the branching pattern of the murine thoracic aorta was examined in 30 vascular corrosion casts. On six casts the intrathoracic position of the heart was compared with that of six younger and six older men of whom contrast-enhanced computer tomography images of the thorax were three-dimensionally reconstructed. In addition, the geometry of the human thoracic aorta was compared with that of the mouse by reconstructing micro-computer tomography images of six murine casts. It was found that the right brachiocephalic trunk, left common carotid artery and left subclavian artery branched subsequently from the aortic arch in both mice and men. The geometry of the branches of the murine aortic arch was quite similar to that of men. In both species the initial segment of the aorta, comprising the ascending aorta, aortic arch and cranial/superior part of the descending aorta, was sigmoidally curved on a cranial/superior view. Although some analogy between the intrathoracic position of the murine and human heart was observed, the murine heart manifestly deviated more ventrally. The major conclusion of this study is that, in both mice and men, the ascending and descending aorta do not lie in a single vertical plane (non-planar aortic geometry). This contrasts clearly with most domestic mammals in which a planar aortic pattern is present. As the vascular branching pattern of the aortic arch is also similar in mice and men, the murine model seems valuable to study human vascular diseases.

  7. Cerebral ischemia and asymptomatic coronary artery disease: a prospective study of 83 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Di Pasquale, G.; Andreoli, A.; Pinelli, G.; Grazi, P.; Manini, G.; Tognetti, F.; Testa, C.

    1986-11-01

    A prospective cardiologic evaluation was performed in 83 consecutive patients with transient cerebral ischemia or mild stroke and without symptoms or electrocardiographic signs of ischemic heart disease. Patients were studied with an electrocardiographic exercise test; a positive test was followed by exercise Thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy. Results were compared to those obtained in a group of 83 age and sex-matched healthy subjects submitted to the same study protocol. Asymptomatic coronary artery disease was detected in 28% of cerebrovascular patients with adequate electrocardiographic exercise test. A scintigraphic perfusion defect of variable extension was found in 19 of them. In the control group the electrocardiographic exercise test was positive in only 6% (p less than 0.01). Our results support the concept that: asymptomatic ischemic heart disease is often associated with cerebrovascular disease; therefore cerebral ischemic attacks may be a marker of coronary artery disease, an active investigation of the heart should be considered in cerebrovascular patients in order to plan optimal, comprehensive management.

  8. Association of brain amyloid-β with cerebral perfusion and structure in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Niklas; Tosun, Duygu; Insel, Philip S; Simonson, Alix; Jack, Clifford R; Beckett, Laurel A; Donohue, Michael; Jagust, William; Schuff, Norbert; Weiner, Michael W

    2014-05-01

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease have reduced cerebral blood flow measured by arterial spin labelling magnetic resonance imaging, but it is unclear how this is related to amyloid-β pathology. Using 182 subjects from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative we tested associations of amyloid-β with regional cerebral blood flow in healthy controls (n = 51), early (n = 66) and late (n = 41) mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease with dementia (n = 24). Based on the theory that Alzheimer's disease starts with amyloid-β accumulation and progresses with symptoms and secondary pathologies in different trajectories, we tested if cerebral blood flow differed between amyloid-β-negative controls and -positive subjects in different diagnostic groups, and if amyloid-β had different associations with cerebral blood flow and grey matter volume. Global amyloid-β load was measured by florbetapir positron emission tomography, and regional blood flow and volume were measured in eight a priori defined regions of interest. Cerebral blood flow was reduced in patients with dementia in most brain regions. Higher amyloid-β load was related to lower cerebral blood flow in several regions, independent of diagnostic group. When comparing amyloid-β-positive subjects with -negative controls, we found reductions of cerebral blood flow in several diagnostic groups, including in precuneus, entorhinal cortex and hippocampus (dementia), inferior parietal cortex (late mild cognitive impairment and dementia), and inferior temporal cortex (early and late mild cognitive impairment and dementia). The associations of amyloid-β with cerebral blood flow and volume differed across the disease spectrum, with high amyloid-β being associated with greater cerebral blood flow reduction in controls and greater volume reduction in late mild cognitive impairment and dementia. In addition to disease stage, amyloid-β pathology affects cerebral blood flow across the span from controls to

  9. The Association of Serum Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Ferritin in Diabetic Microvascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Li; Jiang, Fang; Tang, Yue-Ting; Si, Meng-Ya

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic microvascular disease. Most diabetes patients have higher serum levels of ferritin that may participate in diabetic vascular complications through high oxidative stress induced by iron. However, the mechanistic link between ferritin and VEGF is obscure. The study investigated the association of VEGF and ferritin in patients with diabetic microvascular disease. Patients and Methods: Sixty patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and 26 healthy individuals were selected in this study. Serum ferritin, VEGF, hematological parameters, and clinical data were assessed in this cohort. The Spearman rank method was used to evaluate the associations among them. Results: Serum levels of VEGF and ferritin were significantly higher in diabetes patients compared with the controls; levels of both were elevated with development of the disease. There were positive correlations between VEGF and glucose levels and between VEGF and ferritin in diabetes groups, especially in patients with diabetic retinopathy. Positive correlations were also found between VEGF level and the parameters of age, hemoglobin, and albumin in patients with diabetes hypertension. Conclusions: Our data suggest that high ferritin levels in T2DM are closely related to the development of diabetic vascular complications through interaction with VEGF. PMID:24279470

  10. Endovascular excimer laser atherectomy techniques to treat complex peripheral vascular disease: an orderly process.

    PubMed

    Garnic, J Daniel; Hurwitz, Andrew S

    2005-12-01

    Peripheral vascular disease represents the largest obstructive subsegment within the vascular system. Advances in equipment, techniques, biochemical treatments, and the influx of multiple specialties into this arena indicate a coming tidal wave of change to the standard treatment plan for patients with claudication and especially critical limb ischemia. Initial attempts in the 1980s to utilize the "laser" to treat peripheral vascular disease led to a clinical debacle: wavelengths and methods were not optimized; tissue heating was excessive, resulting in restenosis. Since then the "laser" has fallen from grace for endovascular treatment, although it has an infinite set of potential wavelengths, energy levels, and delivery methods. The xenon chloride, excimer laser, a pulsed 308-nm system, has overcome many of these early catastrophes. The long, ongoing success of this method of photoablating thrombus and plaque represents a true step forward in the endovascular treatment of occlusive disease. Although only a tool, the excimer laser provides a means to utilize electromagnetic energy instead of shearing mechanical force to resolve occlusions. With its active element at the tip, the excimer laser requires much less mechanical translation force to cross total occlusions, find the distal lumen, and thereby cause less plaque destabilization. In addition, removing the firm surface layer of plaque, decapping, and some of the plaque volume, debulking, exposes the softer subsegments of the plaque to balloon angioplasty. Utilizing this method, more complex lesions can be approached safely, with a high likelihood of successful revascularization and a low risk of potentially limb-threatening complication.

  11. Diabetes and vascular disease: basic concepts of nitric oxide physiology, endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress and therapeutic possibilities.

    PubMed

    Capellini, Verena K; Celotto, Andrea C; Baldo, Caroline F; Olivon, Vania C; Viaro, Fernanda; Rodrigues, Alfredo J; Evora, Paulo R B

    2010-07-01

    The vascular manifestations associated with diabetes mellitus (DM) result from the dysfunction of several vascular physiology components mainly involving the endothelium, vascular smooth muscle and platelets. It is also known that hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress plays a role in the development of this dysfunction. This review considers the basic physiology of the endothelium, especially related to the synthesis and function of nitric oxide. We also discuss the pathophysiology of vascular disease associated with DM. This includes the role of hyperglycemia in the induction of oxidative stress and the role of advanced glycation end-products. We also consider therapeutic strategies.

  12. Vascular disease in women: comparison of diagnoses in hospital episode statistics and general practice records in England

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Electronic linkage to routine administrative datasets, such as the Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) in England, is increasingly used in medical research. Relatively little is known about the reliability of HES diagnostic information for epidemiological studies. In the United Kingdom (UK), general practitioners hold comprehensive records for individuals relating to their primary, secondary and tertiary care. For a random sample of participants in a large UK cohort, we compared vascular disease diagnoses in HES and general practice records to assess agreement between the two sources. Methods Million Women Study participants with a HES record of hospital admission with vascular disease (ischaemic heart disease [ICD-10 codes I20-I25], cerebrovascular disease [G45, I60-I69] or venous thromboembolism [I26, I80-I82]) between April 1st 1997 and March 31st 2005 were identified. In each broad diagnostic group and in women with no such HES diagnoses, a random sample of about a thousand women was selected for study. We asked each woman’s general practitioner to provide information on her history of vascular disease and this information was compared with the HES diagnosis record. Results Over 90% of study forms sent to general practitioners were returned and 88% of these contained analysable data. For the vast majority of study participants for whom information was available, diagnostic information from general practice and HES records was consistent. Overall, for 93% of women with a HES diagnosis of vascular disease, general practice records agreed with the HES diagnosis; and for 97% of women with no HES diagnosis of vascular disease, the general practitioner had no record of a diagnosis of vascular disease. For severe vascular disease, including myocardial infarction (I21-22), stroke, both overall (I60-64) and by subtype, and pulmonary embolism (I26), HES records appeared to be both reliable and complete. Conclusion Hospital admission data in England provide

  13. Comparison of the glycopattern alterations of mitochondrial proteins in cerebral cortex between rat Alzheimer’s disease and the cerebral ischemia model

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Houyou; Yang, Changwei; Chen, Shi; Huang, Yang; Liu, Chuanming; Liu, Jian; Yin, Wen

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and ischemic brain injury are two major neurodegenerative diseases. Mitochondrial dysfunction commonly occurs in AD and ischemic brain injury. Currently, little attention has been paid to the glycans on mitochondrial glycoproteins, which may play vital roles during the process of mitochondrial dysfunction. The aim of this study was to illustrate and compare the glycopattern alterations of mitochondrial glycoproteins extracted from the cerebral cortex of the rat models of these two diseases using High-throughput lectin microarrays. The results shown that the number of lectins with significant differences compared to normal brains was nine for the rat sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (SAD) model and eighteen for the rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model. Interestingly, five lectins showed opposite expression patterns between the SAD and MCAO rat models. We conclude that glycopattern alterations of mitochondrial glycoproteins in the cerebral cortex may provide vital information to help understand mitochondrial dysfunction in AD and ischemic brain injury. In addition, glycans recognized by diverse lectins with opposite expression patterns between these two diseases hints at the different pathomechanisms of mitochondrial dysfunction in AD and ischemic brain injury. PMID:28071664

  14. [Vascular Calcification - Pathological Mechanism and Clinical Application - . Vascular calcification in chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD)].

    PubMed

    Omata, Momoyo; Fukagawa, Masafumi; Kakuta, Takatoshi

    2015-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD), is sequential pathophysiology that starts in the very early stages of CKD. Three major aspects of CKD-MBD are laboratory abnormalities, bone abnormalities and vascular calcification. In dialysis patients, the prevalence of death due to cardiovascular disease accounts for more than 40% of all-cause mortality. Therefore, arteriosclerosis with vascular calcification may be an important pathophysiological mechanism in the development of cardiovascular disease. Vascular calcification is known to be an important risk factor influencing mortality in CKD patients. A number of studies have suggested a close association between serum FGF23 concentration and the risks of mortality, cardiovascular disease vascular calcification as well as CKD progression. Renal insufficiency leads to decline in klotho level and impaired phosphate excretion. However serum phosphate levels are maintained in the normal range by up regulation of FGF23 and PTH in early CKD stage. Early treatment intervention is necessary to improve the prognosis of the CKD patient.

  15. Intraoperative dexmedetomidine and postoperative cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome in patients who underwent superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery anastomosis for moyamoya disease

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyungseok; Ryu, Ho-Geol; Son, Je Do; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Ha, Eun Jin; Kim, Jeong-Eun; Park, Hee-Pyoung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Dexmedetomidine, a selective α2-agonist, reduces cerebral blood flow and has neuroprotective effects against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in experimental animals. We examined whether intraoperative dexmedetomidine would reduce the incidence of postoperative cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS) after superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) anastomosis in patients with moyamoya disease. The electronic medical records of 117 moyamoya patients who underwent STA-MCA anastomosis were reviewed retrospectively. The patients were divided into 2 groups: 48 patients received intraoperative dexmedetomidine (Group D), while 69 patients did not (Group ND). The incidence (primary outcome), onset, and duration of postoperative CHS were noted. The incidence of postoperative CHS was 45.8% and 40.6% in groups D and ND, respectively (P = 0.708). The duration of postoperative CHS was shorter in group D than in group ND (median [Q1–Q3], 5 [3–7] vs 8 [5–10] days, P = 0.021). There was no significant difference in the onset of CHS between group D and group ND (0 [0–2] vs 1 [0–3] days, P = 0.226). In conclusion, intraoperative dexmedetomidine did not reduce the incidence of postoperative CHS, although it reduced the duration of CHS, in patients who had undergone direct revascularization surgery for moyamoya disease. PMID:28033272

  16. Actions of vanadate on vascular tension and sodium pump activity in cat isolated cerebral and femoral arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Ferrer, C. F.; Marín, J.; Lluch, M.; Valverde, A.; Salaices, M.

    1988-01-01

    1. The mechanisms involved in the responses induced by sodium vanadate (Va3 VO4) on cat cerebral and femoral arteries were studied. The possibility that these responses were due to Na+, K+-ATPase inhibition was investigated by measuring the effect of vanadate on [3H]-ouabain binding to arterial membrane fractions, K+-induced vasodilatation and ouabain-sensitive 86Rb+ uptake. 2. The vanadium compounds (Na3VO4, VOSO4, VCl3 and O5V3) induced similar, concentration-dependent contractions in each kind of artery, the cerebral vessels being the most sensitive to these compounds. 3. Exposure of the arteries to a low-Na+ (25 mM) solution suppressed the contraction caused by vanadate in femoral but not in cerebral arteries. 4. Vanadate-induced contractions were reduced in Ca2+-free medium but remained unaffected by 3 x 10(-6) M phentolamine, reserpine pretreatment or 3 x 10(-6) M verapamil in both kinds of artery. 5. The addition of 7.5 mM K+ to the arteries immersed in a K+-free solution induced vasodilatation, which was not modified by 10(-3) M vanadate. 6. The consecutive administration of ouabain (10(-4) M) and vanadate (10(-3) M) (or vice versa), or the simultaneous administration of both agents (10(-8) to 10(-3) M) appeared to produce an additive contraction in both types of artery. 7. Vanadate (10(-7) to 10(-3) M) did not displace the [3H]-ouabain binding to arterial membrane fractions of these arteries, whereas 10(-4) M ouabain did. 8. In both kinds of artery, total 86Rb+ uptake was reduced by ouabain (10(-8) to 10(-3) M), in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas it was not modified by vanadate (10(-8)-10(-3) M).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3349233

  17. Abnormalities of Cerebral Deep Medullary Veins on 7 Tesla MRI in Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment and Early Alzheimer's Disease: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Bouvy, Willem H; Kuijf, Hugo J; Zwanenburg, Jaco J M; Koek, Huiberdina L; Kappelle, L Jaap; Luijten, Peter R; Ikram, M Kamran; Biessels, Geert Jan

    2017-03-06

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) contributes to cognitive impairment and dementia. SVD may affect veins, but veins are difficult to detect with 1.5 and 3T MRI. We compared deep medullary veins (DMVs) visualized on 7T-MRI between patients with early Alzheimer's sisease (eAD; n = 17) or amnestic MCI (aMCI; n = 12) and controls (n = 40). The number and density of DMVs was similar in patients and controls, but tortuosity was higher in eAD (Cohen's d = 0.7, 95% CI: 0.1-1.2, p = 0.02) and aMCI (Cohen's d = 0.8, 95% CI: 0.2-1.5, p = 0.01), independent of brain atrophy. Venous changes provide a new perspective on vascular involvement in dementia.

  18. Cerebral vascular autoregulation and CO2 reactivity following onset of the delayed postischemic hypoperfusion state in dogs.

    PubMed

    Christopherson, T J; Milde, J H; Michenfelder, J D

    1993-03-01

    A small number of animal studies have suggested that during the delayed postischemic hypoperfusion state, CO2 reactivity of the cerebral vasculature is lost whereas autoregulation is retained. These findings, however, are inconsistent with the bulk of experimental evidence which demonstrates that CO2 reactivity is more robust and may be retained in pathologic circumstances which abolish autoregulation. These opposing viewpoints were therefore further evaluated in 18 dogs in which complete global ischemia was induced by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compression for periods of 12 (n = 12) and 18 (n = 6) min. Following 45 min of reperfusion and with onset of the delayed postischemic hypoperfusion state, autoregulation and CO2 reactivity were evaluated using a continuous measurement of CBF (by sagittal sinus outflow). CO2 reactivity was tested over a PaCO2 range of 20 to 60 mm Hg; autoregulation was tested over a blood pressure range of 60 to 140 mm Hg. Results demonstrated that after both 12 and 18 min of complete global ischemia, autoregulation and CO2 reactivity of the cerebral vasculature were both present, but attenuated. In the case of CO2 reactivity, the slope of the CBF response was decreased approximately 75%. In the case of autoregulation, the response in some dogs was incomplete as compared with their preischemic response.

  19. Quantitative assessment of cerebral hemodynamic parameters by QUASAR arterial spin labeling in Alzheimer's disease and cognitively normal Elderly adults at 3-tesla.

    PubMed

    Mak, Henry K F; Chan, Queenie; Zhang, Zhipeng; Petersen, Esben T; Qiu, Deqiang; Zhang, Linda; Yau, Kelvin K W; Chu, Leung-Wing; Golay, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    QUASAR arterial spin labeling (ASL) was used to investigate the role of vascular impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We hypothesized that the hemodynamic parameters monitoring cerebrovascular integrity, i.e., cerebral blood flow (CBF), arterial blood volume (aBV), and arterial transit time (aTT), would be affected. 13 AD patients and 15 healthy control (HC) subjects underwent 3T MRI scanning. Two separate blood flow acquisitions were obtained with 1 slice overlap for whole brain coverage. CBF, aBV, and aTT maps were calculated using in-house software. Preprocessing and statistical analyses were performed on SPM5. Region-of-interest (ROI) studies of ten selected cerebral regions were also conducted. There were significant differences in mini mental status exam (MMSE) (AD: 16.3 ± 4.55, HC: 28.5 ± 2.00) and Alzheimer's disease assessment scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog) scores (AD: 25.25 ± 9.64, HC: 5.51 ± 2.62) between the 2 groups (p < 0.001) but none in age (p = 0.068). CBF decreased significantly (p < 0.01) in AD compared to controls in the right middle cingulate, left cuneus, left inferior and middle frontal, right superior frontal, left inferior parietal, and right supramarginal gyri. ROI studies confirmed significant hemodynamic impairments in AD compared to HC (p < 0.05): CBF in middle and posterior cingulate, aBV in left superior temporal, right inferior parietal, and posterior cingulate, and aTT in left inferior frontal and middle cingulate gyri. CBF correlated positively while aTT correlated negatively to MMSE, and vice versa for ADAS-cog. Using QUASAR ASL, we found patterns of regional hemodynamic impairment typical of moderate AD, suggesting underlying vascular abnormality. As potential biomarkers, these hemodynamic parameters could differentiate patients from volunteers, and possibly indicate the conversion from healthy aging to mild cognitive impairment to AD.

  20. The role of bone in CKD-mediated mineral and vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Khouzam, Nadine M; Wesseling-Perry, Katherine; Salusky, Isidro B

    2015-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in pediatric patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and vascular calcifications start early in the course of CKD. Based on the growing body of evidence that alterations of bone and mineral metabolism and the therapies designed to treat the skeletal consequences of CKD are linked to cardiovascular calcifications, the Kidney Disease, Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) working group redefined renal osteodystrophy as a systemic disorder of mineral and bone metabolism due to CKD, and this newly defined disorder is now known as "chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD)". Elevated fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), a bone-derived protein, is the first biochemical abnormality to be associated with CKD-MBD, and high FGF23 levels correlate with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, suggesting that bone is central to both initiating and perpetuating the abnormal mineral metabolism and vascular disease in CKD. The current standard therapies for CKD-MBD affect FGF23 levels differently; non-calcium-based binders with or without concurrent use of dietary phosphate restriction reduce FGF23 levels, while calcium-based binders seem to either increase or have no effect on FGF23 levels. Active vitamin D sterols increase FGF23 levels, whereas therapy with calcimimetics decreases FGF23 levels. Thus, the appropriate therapy that will minimize the rise in FGF23 and prevent cardiovascular morbidity remains to be defined.

  1. Identification of Inflammatory, Metabolic, and Cell Survival Pathways Contributing to Cerebral Small Vessel Disease by Postmortem Gene Expression Microarray.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Marie-Françoise; Grond-Ginsbach, Caspar; Kloss, Manja; Tolnay, Markus; Fluri, Felix; Bonati, Leo H; Traenka, Christopher; Zeis, Thomas; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole; Peters, Nils; Engelter, Stefan Thomas; Lyrer, Philippe Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral small-vessel disease (SVD) is characterized by periventricular white matter (WM) changes and general brain atrophy. SVD is prevalent in elderly individuals and is frequently associated with the development of vascular dementia (VaD). Studies of the molecular basis of SVD are sparse. We have to gain further insight into the pathogenic mechanisms of SVD. Therefore, we compared gene expression patterns in the brains of SVD and control patients, in order to identify cellular pathways changed in diseased brains. We compared the expression of mRNA transcripts in postmortem, macroscopically normal-appearing human brain tissues isolated from frontal, temporal and occipital cortical and subcortical regions in 5 SVD and 5 non-SVD control patients. Significant expression changes were determined by fold change F>1.2 in either direction, and p<0.05. We identified 228 genes differentially expressed in cortex (89 up-, 139 down-regulated) and 555 genes in WM (223 up-, 332 down-regulated) in SVD patients. Pathway analyses revealed that upregulated genes were associated with inflammation and apoptosis in WM, suggesting active cell death. Downregulated genes were associated with coagulation and fatty and amino acids metabolisms. In the cortex, down-regulated genes were principally associated with neuronal functions. Our data revealed widespread changes in the transcriptome profiles in the cortex and WM of human SVD brains, with a predominance of changes in WM. We provide for the first time a comprehensive view of the molecular alterations in human SVD brains that seem to contribute to the neuropathogenesis of SVD.

  2. Harnessing the Power of SIRT1 and Non-coding RNAs in Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Maiese, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) contribute to a significant amount of disability and death in the world. Of these disorders, vascular disease is ranked high, falls within the five leading causes of death, and impacts multiple other disease entities such as those of the cardiac system, nervous system, and metabolic disease. Targeting the silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) (SIRT1) pathway and the modulation of micro ribonucleic acids (miRNAs) may hold great promise for the development of novel strategies for the treatment of vascular disease since each of these pathways are highly relevant to cardiac and nervous system disorders as well as to metabolic dysfunction. SIRT1 is vital in determining the course of stem cell development and the survival, metabolism, and life span of differentiated cells that are overseen by both autophagy and apoptosis. SIRT1 interfaces with a number of pathways that involve forkhead transcription factors, mechanistic of rapamycin (mTOR), AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) and Wnt1 inducible signaling pathway protein 1 (WISP1) such that the level of activity of SIRT1 can become a critical determinant for biological and clinical outcomes. The essential fine control of SIRT1 is directly tied to the world of non-coding RNAs that ultimately oversee SIRT1 activity to either extend or end cellular survival. Future studies that can further elucidate the crosstalk between SIRT1 and non-coding RNAs should serve well our ability to harness the power of SIRT1 and non-coding RNAs for the treatment of vascular disorders. PMID:27897112

  3. The association between blood group and the risk of vascular disease in Quebec blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Blais, Claudia; Germain, Marc; Delage, Gilles; Grégoire, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Background The association between antigens A and B and arterial thrombosis, such as coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease or peripheral vascular disease, is still unclear. We evaluated the association between blood groups and thrombotic events in a cohort of blood donors from the province of Quebec, Canada. Material and methods Among all whole blood donors aged ≥18 years in Quebec between June 1990 and March 2009, a study sample with known blood groups was linked with the provincial hospitalisation and death records to count vascular events. All hospital admissions and deaths with codes for primary and relevant secondary diagnoses of coronary, cerebrovascular or peripheral diseases, including coronary heart disease interventions, were included. Cox regression was used to evaluate the hazard ratio associated between blood groups and these events adjusted for other baseline characteristics. Results Among the blood donors, 64,686 had a known blood group and were linked with the provincial health databases. The mean age of these donors was 38 years. The Cox multivariate adjusted hazard ratio for coronary, cerebrovascular or peripheral diseases was 1.19 (95% confidence interval: 1.01–1.40) for subjects with blood group AB compared to those with blood group O. There were no statistically significant associations with other blood groups. Only among women aged ≥40 years did those with blood group A have a higher hazard ratio for coronary heart disease (1.40 [1.01–1.92]) than those with blood group O, after adjusting for other characteristics. Discussion When compared to blood group O, only blood group AB was associated with a higher risk of hospitalisation or death because of thrombotic events such as coronary, cerebrovascular or peripheral diseases. However, the associations differed according to age and sex because only females aged ≥40 years with blood group A had a higher risk of coronary heart disease. PMID:27177404

  4. Clinical Outcomes of Radial Shortening Osteotomy and Vascularized Bone Graft in Kienböck's Disease.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Mohammad; Moshgelani, Mohammad Ali; Nouraei, Mohammad Hadi; Dehghani, Shaghayegh; Gholshahi, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare two surgery methods including radial shortening and radial shortening combined with vascularized bone graft for treatment of stage II or IIIa of Kienböck's disease. It is a randomized, controlled clinical trial, which was carried out in 2011-2013. Twenty-four patients were assigned equally to radial shortening group (A) or radial shortening combined with vascularized bone graft group (B). The outcome was assessed by Mayo Wrist score before and 9 months after surgery. The mean Mayo Wrist score (SD) was 27.1 (15.4) and 32.5 (18.3) before surgery and 74.6 (5.4) and 85.8 (5.1) after surgery for groups A and B, respectively. The mean score increased in both groups, and it was higher in group B significantly. Radial shortening combined with vascularized bone graft is a valuable method which can be more effective than radial shortening alone, in early stages of Kienböck's disease. This trial is registered with IRCT201404127841N5.

  5. Study of vascular supply of lunate and consideration applied to Kienböck disease.

    PubMed

    Dubey, P P; Chauhan, Navneet Kumar; Siddiqui, M S; Verma, Anoop K

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess vascularity of the lunate by number of foramina and radiography of vessels of the wrist. The genesis of lunatomalacia requires some vascular risk and mechanical predisposition. The findings were correlated with the cause of Kienböck's disease. The vascular foramina were more than two in 91.33% of the lunate. The lunate had consistent dorsal and palmar branches from radial artery. The additional branches from anterior interosseous artery in 72.22% and a branch of palmar inter carpal arch in 69.44% cases contributed in arterial anastomosis on palmar aspect of lunate. The dorsal blood supply was found by anterior interosseous artery in 85.71% of specimens and dorsal branch from dorsal intercarpal arch in 50% of specimens. The blood supply of lunate comes along with various ligaments which may be disrupted due to trauma or strain leading to avascular necrosis. The present observations are suggestive of rich blood supply of lunate in comparison of other investigations. Therefore Kienböck's disease is less common in northern India.

  6. Vascular risk factors and Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis: are conventional pharmacological approaches protective for cognitive decline progression?

    PubMed

    Safouris, Apostolos; Psaltopoulou, Theodora; Sergentanis, Theodoros N; Boutati, Eleni; Kapaki, Elisabeth; Tsivgoulis, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia, accounting for more than half of cases with cognitive impairment. With numbers of patients expected to rise sharply over the following years in parallel with the ageing of population, there is intense clinical interest in discovering modifiable risk factors that may contribute to the increasing prevalence of AD. Accumulating data from in vitro and epidemiological studies have highlighted the vascular component of AD and raised hope that treatment of vascular risk factors could eventually lead to primary prevention of AD. Among all the possible pathologic processes that have been tested for an association with AD, diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia are the most prominent. Here, we will briefly review the data highlighting a potential correlation of these diseases with AD. Then, we will present observational studies and clinical trials that assessed the impact of their respective approved medical therapies on AD incidence. We conclude by providing clinical information for the physician on potentially effective and non-effective medical treatments. Further research is ongoing and time will show whether AD will cease to be considered a pure, non-preventable neurodegenerative process or whether vascular risk factor management may also result in primary AD prevention.

  7. Clinical Outcomes of Radial Shortening Osteotomy and Vascularized Bone Graft in Kienböck's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Mohammad; Nouraei, Mohammad Hadi; Dehghani, Shaghayegh; Gholshahi, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare two surgery methods including radial shortening and radial shortening combined with vascularized bone graft for treatment of stage II or IIIa of Kienböck's disease. It is a randomized, controlled clinical trial, which was carried out in 2011–2013. Twenty-four patients were assigned equally to radial shortening group (A) or radial shortening combined with vascularized bone graft group (B). The outcome was assessed by Mayo Wrist score before and 9 months after surgery. The mean Mayo Wrist score (SD) was 27.1 (15.4) and 32.5 (18.3) before surgery and 74.6 (5.4) and 85.8 (5.1) after surgery for groups A and B, respectively. The mean score increased in both groups, and it was higher in group B significantly. Radial shortening combined with vascularized bone graft is a valuable method which can be more effective than radial shortening alone, in early stages of Kienböck's disease. This trial is registered with IRCT201404127841N5. PMID:27382615

  8. Internal carotid artery occlusion: association with atherosclerotic disease in other arterial beds and vascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Paraskevas, Kosmas I; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Liapis, Christos D

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate the association between internal carotid artery occlusion (ICAO) and the presence of atherosclerotic disease and vascular risk factors. The clinical characteristics and risk factors of 120 patients presenting with ICAO were retrospectively reviewed. All patients (n = 120) had at least 1 of the 4 vascular risk factor (diabetes, smoking, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertension); 2, 3, or all 4 risk factors were present in 14 to 82 of the patients (11.7% to 68.3%), 10 to 39 of the patients (8.3% to 32.5%), and 9 of the patients (7.5%), respectively. A total of 84 patients (70%) with ICAO had disease in at least 1 additional vascular bed (aorta, coronary or lower limb arteries). In addition to ICAO, vascular disease was present in 2 and all 3 of these arterial beds in 42 (35%) and 9 (7.5%) patients, respectively. Furthermore, stenosis or occlusion of the ipsilateral or contralateral vertebral arteries was recorded in 19 of 120 patients (15.8%). Regarding the contralateral carotid artery, 1 patient had bilateral ICAO. One patient had contralateral common carotid artery occlusion, and 1 patient was excluded from the analysis because of surgery to the contralateral carotid artery. Of the remaining 117 patients, 34 (29.0%) had less than 50% contralateral carotid artery stenosis. Thirty-two patients (27.4%) had 50% to 69%, and 51 (43.6%) had 70% to 99% stenosis. Ultrasonographic imaging of the carotid plaque of the contralateral carotid artery revealed that 52 of the 120 arteries (43.3%) were uniformly or predominantly echolucent (types I and II, respectively). Fifty-nine (49.2%) were predominantly or uniformly echogenic (types III and IV), and 9 (7.5%) could not be classified. A similar distribution of echomorphology was observed on the occluded side. ICAO is associated with widespread atherosclerotic disease and a high prevalence of vascular risk factors. Detection of ICAO should prompt the investigation of other arterial beds and

  9. Pharmacological treatment and prevention of cerebral small vessel disease: a review of potential interventions

    PubMed Central

    Wardlaw, Joanna M.

    2015-01-01

    Small vessel disease encompasses lacunar stroke, white matter hyperintensities, lacunes and microbleeds. It causes a quarter of all ischemic strokes, is the commonest cause of vascular dementia, and the cause is incompletely understood. Vascular prophylaxis, as appropriate for large artery disease and cardioembolism, includes antithrombotics, and blood pressure and lipid lowering; however, these strategies may not be effective for small vessel disease, or are already used routinely so precluding further detailed study. Further, intensive antiplatelet therapy is known to be hazardous in small vessel disease through enhanced bleeding. Whether acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, which delay the progression of Alzheimer's dementia, are relevant in small vessel disease remains unclear. Potential prophylactic and treatment strategies might be those that target brain microvascular endothelium and the blood brain barrier, microvascular function and neuroinflammation. Potential interventions include endothelin antagonists, neurotrophins, nitric oxide donors and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, peroxisome proliferator‐activated receptor‐gamma agonists, and prostacyclin mimics and phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitors. Several drugs that have relevant properties are licensed for other disorders, offering the possibility of drug repurposing. Others are in development. Since influencing multiple targets may be most effective, using multiple agents and/or those that have multiple effects may be preferable. We focus on potential small vessel disease mechanistic targets, summarize drugs that have relevant actions, and review data available from randomized trials on their actions and on the available evidence for their use in lacunar stroke. PMID:25727737

  10. Is Alzheimer's disease a neurodegenerative or a vascular disorder? Data, dogma, and dialectics.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Jack C

    2004-03-01

    The cause of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is unknown. This gap in knowledge has created a stumbling block in the search for a genuinely effective treatment or cure for this dementia. This article summarises the arguments for a causal role for either amyloid deposition or cerebrovascular pathology as the primary trigger in the development of non-genetic AD. A bare-bones survey of the published research reveals no compelling evidence that amyloid deposition is neurotoxic in human beings or that it results in neurodegenerative changes involving synaptic, metabolic, or neuronal loss in human or transgenic-mouse brains. By contrast, the data supporting AD as a primary vascular disorder are more convincing. Findings suggesting a vascular cause of AD come from epidemiological, neuroimaging, pathological, pharmacotherapeutic, and clinical studies. The consensus of these studies indicates that chronic brain hypoperfusion is linked to AD risk factors, AD preclinical detection and pharmacotherapeutic action of AD symptoms.

  11. Perivascular adipose tissue in vascular function and disease: a review of current research and animal models.

    PubMed

    Brown, Nicholas K; Zhou, Zhou; Zhang, Jifeng; Zeng, Rong; Wu, Jiarui; Eitzman, Daniel T; Chen, Y Eugene; Chang, Lin

    2014-08-01

    Perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT), long assumed to be nothing more than vessel-supporting connective tissue, is now understood to be an important, active component of the vasculature, with integral roles in vascular health and disease. PVAT is an adipose tissue with similarities to both brown and white adipose tissue, although recent evidence suggests that PVAT develops from its own precursors. Like other adipose tissue depots, PVAT secretes numerous biologically active substances that can act in both autocrine and paracrine fashion. PVAT has also proven to be involved in vascular inflammation. Although PVAT can support inflammation during atherosclerosis via macrophage accumulation, emerging evidence suggests that PVAT also has antiatherosclerotic properties related to its abilities to induce nonshivering thermogenesis and metabolize fatty acids. We here discuss the accumulated knowledge of PVAT biology and related research on models of hypertension and atherosclerosis.

  12. Widespread heterogeneous neuronal loss across the cerebral cortex in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Nana, Alissa L; Kim, Eric H; Thu, Doris C V; Oorschot, Dorothy E; Tippett, Lynette J; Hogg, Virginia M; Synek, Beth J; Roxburgh, Richard; Waldvogel, Henry J; Faull, Richard L M

    2014-01-01

    Huntington's disease is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease characterized by neuronal degeneration in the basal ganglia and cerebral cortex, and a variable symptom profile. Although progressive striatal degeneration is known to occur and is related to symptom profile, little is known about the cellular basis of symptom heterogeneity across the entire cerebral cortex. To investigate this, we have undertaken a double blind study using unbiased stereological cell counting techniques to determine the pattern of cell loss in six representative cortical regions from the frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital lobes in the brains of 14 Huntington's disease cases and 15 controls. The results clearly demonstrate a widespread loss of total neurons and pyramidal cells across all cortical regions studied, except for the primary visual cortex. Importantly, the results show that cell loss is remarkably variable both within and between Huntington's disease cases. The results also show that neuronal loss in the primary sensory and secondary visual cortices relate to Huntington's disease motor symptom profiles, and neuronal loss across the associational cortices in the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes is related to both Huntington's disease motor and to mood symptom profiles. This finding considerably extends a previous study (Thu et al., Brain, 2010; 133:1094-1110) which showed that neuronal loss in the primary motor cortex was related specifically to the motor symptom profiles while neuronal loss in the anterior cingulate cortex was related specifically to mood symptom profiles. The extent of cortical cell loss in the current study was generally related to the striatal neuropathological grade, but not to CAG repeat length on the HTT gene. Overall our findings show that Huntington's disease is characterized by a heterogeneous pattern of neuronal cell loss across the entire cerebrum which varies with symptom profile.

  13. A study on cerebral hemodynamic analysis of moyamoya disease by using perfusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Kyung-Rae; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Lee, Jae-Seung; Chung, Woon-Kwan

    2013-10-01

    This study examined the clinical applications of perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with moyamoya disease (MMD). Twenty-two patients with moyamoya disease (9 men and 13 women) with a mean age of 9.3 years (range: 4-22 years) were enrolled in this study. Perfusion MRI was performed by scanning the patients7.5 cm upward from the base of the cerebellum before their being process for post-treatment. The scan led to the acquisition of the following four map images: the cerebral blood volume (CBV), the cerebral blood flow (CBF), the mean transit time (MTT) for the contrast medium, and the time to peak (TTP) for the contrast medium. The lesions were assessed using the CBV, the CBF, the MTT and the TTP maps of perfusion MRI; the MTT and the TTP were measured in the lesion areas, as well as in the normal and the symmetric areas. Perfusion defects were recognizable in all four perfusion MRI maps, and the MTT and the TTP showed a conspicuous delay in the parts where perfusion defects were recognized. The MTT and the TTP images of perfusion MRI reflected a significant correlation between the degrees of stenosis and occlusion in the posterior cerebral artery (PCA), as well as the development of collateral vessels. The four perfusion MRI maps could be used to predict the degrees of stenosis and occlusion in the posterior circulation, as well as the development of the collateral vessels, which enabled a hemodynamic evaluation of the parts with perfusion defects. Overall, perfusion MRI is useful for the diagnosis and the treatment of moyamoya disease and can be applied to clinical practice.

  14. Complement depletion with humanised cobra venom factor: efficacy in preclinical models of vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Carl-Wilhelm; Fritzinger, David C; Gorsuch, W Brian; Stahl, Gregory L

    2015-03-01

    The complement system is an intrinsic part of the immune system and has important functions in both innate and adaptive immunity. On the other hand, inadvertent or misdirected complement activation is also involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases, contributing solely or significantly to tissue injury and disease development. Multiple approaches to develop pharmacological agents to inhibit complement are currently being pursued. We have developed a conceptually different approach of not inhibiting but depleting complement, based on the complement-depleting activities of cobra venom factor (CVF), a non-toxic cobra venom component with structural and functional homology to complement component C3. We developed a humanised version of CVF by creating human complement component C3 derivatives with complement-depleting activities of CVF (humanised CVF) as a promising therapeutic agent for diseases with complement pathogenesis. Here we review the beneficial therapeutic effect of humanised CVF in several murine models of vascular diseases such as reperfusion injury.