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Sample records for cerebrospinal fluid csf

  1. Reassessing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hydrodynamics: a literature review presenting a novel hypothesis for CSF physiology.

    PubMed

    Chikly, Bruno; Quaghebeur, Jörgen

    2013-07-01

    The traditional model of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hydrodynamics is being increasingly challenged in view of recent scientific evidences. The established model presumes that CSF is primarily produced in the choroid plexuses (CP), then flows from the ventricles to the subarachnoid spaces, and is mainly reabsorbed into arachnoid villi (AV). This model is seemingly based on faulty research and misinterpretations. This literature review presents numerous evidence for a new hypothesis of CSF physiology, namely, CSF is produced and reabsorbed throughout the entire CSF-Interstitial fluid (IF) functional unit. IF and CSF are mainly formed and reabsorbed across the walls of CNS blood capillaries. CP, AV and lymphatics become minor sites for CSF hydrodynamics. The lymphatics may play a more significant role in CSF absorption when CSF-IF pressure increases. The consequences of this complete reformulation of CSF hydrodynamics may influence applications in research, publications, including osteopathic manual treatments.

  2. In-depth Characterization of the Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Proteome Displayed Through the CSF Proteome Resource (CSF-PR)*

    PubMed Central

    Guldbrandsen, Astrid; Vethe, Heidrun; Farag, Yehia; Oveland, Eystein; Garberg, Hilde; Berle, Magnus; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Opsahl, Jill A.; Barsnes, Harald; Berven, Frode S.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteome was mapped using three different strategies prior to Orbitrap LC-MS/MS analysis: SDS-PAGE and mixed mode reversed phase-anion exchange for mapping the global CSF proteome, and hydrazide-based glycopeptide capture for mapping glycopeptides. A maximal protein set of 3081 proteins (28,811 peptide sequences) was identified, of which 520 were identified as glycoproteins from the glycopeptide enrichment strategy, including 1121 glycopeptides and their glycosylation sites. To our knowledge, this is the largest number of identified proteins and glycopeptides reported for CSF, including 417 glycosylation sites not previously reported. From parallel plasma samples, we identified 1050 proteins (9739 peptide sequences). An overlap of 877 proteins was found between the two body fluids, whereas 2204 proteins were identified only in CSF and 173 only in plasma. All mapping results are freely available via the new CSF Proteome Resource (http://probe.uib.no/csf-pr), which can be used to navigate the CSF proteome and help guide the selection of signature peptides in targeted quantitative proteomics. PMID:25038066

  3. Non Invasive Microwave Sensor for the Detection of Lactic Acid in Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goh, J. H.; Mason, A.; Al-Shamma'a, A. I.; Field, M.; Shackcloth, M.; Browning, P.

    2011-08-01

    This research involves the use of a low power microwave sensor for analysis of lactic acid in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), an indicator of neurological impairment during aortic aneurysm surgery which could provide the basis for improved treatment regimes and better quality of care with more efficient use of resources. This paper presents initial work using standard lactate curves in water followed by lactate in "synthetic CSF". A multi-modal spectral signature has been defined for lactate, forming the basis for subsequent development of microwave sensor platform that is able to detect concentrations of lactic acid in CSF of volumes less than 1ml.

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neuropeptide Y- and somatostatin-like immunoreactivities in man.

    PubMed

    Maeda, K; Yasuda, M; Kaneda, H; Maeda, S; Yamadori, A

    1994-12-01

    We have measured cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neuropeptide Y-like immunoreactivity (NPY-LI) and somatostatin-like immunoreactivity (SLI) in control subjects and in patients with various neurologic disorders. We observed a significant reduction in CSF SLI in control subjects over 60 years of age, compared with the younger controls. CSF SLI was significantly decreased in multiple sclerosis (MS), or Guillain-Barre syndrome, compared with that of age-matched control subjects. A reduced concentration of NPY-LI was found in CSF of patients with MS. We have also examined the molecular heterogeneity of peptide-LI in CSF. Gel chromatography, not high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), suggested two NPY immunoreactive materials in CSF. Gel chromatography and HPLC revealed three SLI components in CSF: somatostatin 14, somatostatin 28 and a higher molecular weight precursor. Our results suggest that 1) there may be more than one form of NPY in human CSF, and 2) somatostatin neurons might be more susceptible to alteration than NPY neurons in various pathological conditions and aging.

  5. Regulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in neurodegenerative, neurovascular and neuroinflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Matthew J.; Iliff, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation and turnover provides a sink for the elimination of solutes from the brain interstitium, serving an important homeostatic role for the function of the central nervous system. Disruption of normal CSF circulation and turnover is believed to contribute to the development of many diseases, including neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, ischemic and traumatic brain injury, and neuroinflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis. Recent insights into CSF biology suggesting that CSF and interstitial fluid exchange along a brain-wide network of perivascular spaces termed the ‘glymphatic’ system suggest that CSF circulation may interact intimately with glial and vascular function to regulate basic aspects of brain function. Dysfunction within this glial vascular network, which is a feature of the aging and injured brain, is a potentially critical link between brain injury, neuroinflammation and the development of chronic neurodegeneration. Ongoing research within this field may provide a powerful new framework for understanding the common links between neurodegenerative, neurovascular and neuroinflammatory disease, in addition to providing potentially novel therapeutic targets for these conditions. PMID:26499397

  6. Approach to Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Biomarker Discovery and Evaluation in HIV Infection

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Richard W.; Peterson, Julia; Fuchs, Dietmar; Angel, Thomas E.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hagberg, Lars; Spudich, Serena S.; Smith, Richard D.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Brown, Joseph N.; Gisslen, Magnus

    2013-12-13

    Central nervous system (CNS) infection is a nearly universal facet of systemic HIV infection that varies in character and neurological consequences. While clinical staging and neuropsychological test performance have been helpful in evaluating patients, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers present a valuable and objective approach to more accurate diagnosis, assessment of treatment effects and understanding of evolving pathobiology. We review some lessons from our recent experience with CSF biomarker studies. We have used two approaches to biomarker analysis: targeted, hypothesis-driven and non-targeted exploratory discovery methods. We illustrate the first with data from a cross-sectional study of defined subject groups across the spectrum of systemic and CNS disease progression and the second with a longitudinal study of the CSF proteome in subjects initiating antiretroviral treatment. Both approaches can be useful and, indeed, complementary. The first is helpful in assessing known or hypothesized biomarkers while the second can identify novel biomarkers and point to broad interactions in pathogenesis. Common to both is the need for well-defined samples and subjects that span a spectrum of biological activity and biomarker concentrations. Previouslydefined guide biomarkers of CNS infection, inflammation and neural injury are useful in categorizing samples for analysis and providing critical biological context for biomarker discovery studies. CSF biomarkers represent an underutilized but valuable approach to understanding the interactions of HIV and the CNS and to more objective diagnosis and assessment of disease activity. Both hypothesis-based and discovery methods can be useful in advancing the definition and use of these biomarkers.

  7. The circulation of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the spinal canal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Antonio L.; Martinez-Bazan, Carlos; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2016-11-01

    Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) is secreted in the choroid plexus in the lateral sinuses of the brain and fills the subarachnoid space bathing the external surfaces of the brain and the spinal canal. Absence of CSF circulation has been shown to impede its physiological function that includes, among others, supplying nutrients to neuronal and glial cells and removing the waste products of cellular metabolism. Radionuclide scanning images published by Di Chiro in 1964 showed upward migration of particle tracers from the lumbar region of the spinal canal, thereby suggesting the presence of an active bulk circulation responsible for bringing fresh CSF into the spinal canal and returning a portion of it to the cranial vault. However, the existence of this slow moving bulk circulation in the spinal canal has been a subject of dispute for the last 50 years. To date, there has been no physical explanation for the mechanism responsible for the establishment of such a bulk motion. We present a perturbation analysis of the flow in an idealized model of the spinal canal and show how steady streaming could be responsible for the establishment of such a circulation. The results of this analysis are compared to flow measurements conducted on in-vitro models of the spinal canal of adult humans.

  8. Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) collection

    MedlinePlus

    Spinal tap; Ventricular puncture; Lumbar puncture; Cisternal puncture; Cerebrospinal fluid culture ... different ways to get a sample of CSF. Lumbar puncture (spinal tap) is the most common method. ...

  9. Approach to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker discovery and evaluation in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Price, Richard W; Peterson, Julia; Fuchs, Dietmar; Angel, Thomas E; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hagberg, Lars; Spudich, Serena; Smith, Richard D; Jacobs, Jon M; Brown, Joseph N; Gisslen, Magnus

    2013-12-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) infection is a nearly universal facet of systemic HIV infection that varies in character and neurological consequences. While clinical staging and neuropsychological test performance have been helpful in evaluating patients, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers present a valuable and objective approach to more accurate diagnosis, assessment of treatment effects and understanding of evolving pathobiology. We review some lessons from our recent experience with CSF biomarker studies. We have used two approaches to biomarker analysis: targeted, hypothesis-driven and non-targeted exploratory discovery methods. We illustrate the first with data from a cross-sectional study of defined subject groups across the spectrum of systemic and CNS disease progression and the second with a longitudinal study of the CSF proteome in subjects initiating antiretroviral treatment. Both approaches can be useful and, indeed, complementary. The first is helpful in assessing known or hypothesized biomarkers while the second can identify novel biomarkers and point to broad interactions in pathogenesis. Common to both is the need for well-defined samples and subjects that span a spectrum of biological activity and biomarker concentrations. Previously-defined guide biomarkers of CNS infection, inflammation and neural injury are useful in categorizing samples for analysis and providing critical biological context for biomarker discovery studies. CSF biomarkers represent an underutilized but valuable approach to understanding the interactions of HIV and the CNS and to more objective diagnosis and assessment of disease activity. Both hypothesis-based and discovery methods can be useful in advancing the definition and use of these biomarkers.

  10. Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Neuronal Biomarkers across the Spectrum of HIV Infection: Hierarchy of Injury and Detection

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Julia; Gisslen, Magnus; Zetterberg, Henrik; Fuchs, Dietmar; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Hagberg, Lars; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T.; Spudich, Serena S.; Price, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    The character of central nervous system (CNS) HIV infection and its effects on neuronal integrity vary with evolving systemic infection. Using a cross-sectional design and archived samples, we compared concentrations of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neuronal biomarkers in 143 samples from 8 HIV-infected subject groups representing a spectrum of untreated systemic HIV progression and viral suppression: primary infection; four groups of chronic HIV infection neuroasymptomatic (NA) subjects defined by blood CD4+ T cells of >350, 200–349, 50–199, and <50 cells/µL; HAD; treatment-induced viral suppression; and ‘elite’ controllers. Samples from 20 HIV-uninfected controls were also examined. The neuronal biomarkers included neurofilament light chain protein (NFL), total and phosphorylated tau (t-tau, p-tau), soluble amyloid precursor proteins alpha and beta (sAPPα, sAPPβ) and amyloid beta (Aβ) fragments 1–42, 1–40 and 1–38. Comparison of the biomarker changes showed a hierarchy of sensitivity in detection and suggested evolving mechanisms with progressive injury. NFL was the most sensitive neuronal biomarker. Its CSF concentration exceeded age-adjusted norms in all HAD patients, 75% of NA CD4<50, 40% of NA CD4 50–199, and 42% of primary infection, indicating common neuronal injury with untreated systemic HIV disease progression as well as transiently during early infection. By contrast, only 75% of HAD subjects had abnormal CSF t-tau levels, and there were no significant differences in t-tau levels among the remaining groups. sAPPα and β were also abnormal (decreased) in HAD, showed less marked change than NFL with CD4 decline in the absence of HAD, and were not decreased in PHI. The CSF Aβ peptides and p-tau concentrations did not differ among the groups, distinguishing the HIV CNS injury profile from Alzheimer's disease. These CSF biomarkers can serve as useful tools in selected research and clinical settings for patient classification, pathogenetic

  11. Efficacy of the pedicled nasoseptal flap without cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diversion for repair of skull base defects: incidence of postoperative CSF leaks.

    PubMed

    Eloy, Jean Anderson; Kuperan, Arjuna B; Choudhry, Osamah J; Harirchian, Sanaz; Liu, James K

    2012-01-01

    The advances in endoscopic skull base surgery have led to the resection of increasingly larger cranial base lesions and the creation of larger skull base defects with the potential for increased postoperative high-flow cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks. These concerns led to the development of the vascularized pedicled nasoseptal flap (PNSF), which is now used as the mainstay for repair of large skull base defects in many academic centers. In this report, we review the incidence of postoperative CSF leaks in our institution in patients undergoing endoscopic skull base repair of high-flow CSF leaks with a vascularized PNSF without concurrent CSF diversion. We performed a retrospective analysis at our tertiary care medical center on patients who underwent endoscopic repair of high-flow CSF leaks using a PNSF without CSF diversion between July 2008 and August 2011. Repair materials, incidence of postoperative CSF leaks, and demographic data were collected. Fifty-nine high-flow CSF leaks were repaired with a PNSF and other repair materials, without the use of lumbar catheter drainage. No postoperative CSF leak occurred in this cohort of patients. The overall postoperative CSF leak rate was 0%. Meticulous multilayer-closure of skull base defects is critical to prevent postoperative CSF leaks. Although lumbar drainage may be useful in select scenarios, it carries inherent risks of intracranial hypotension and pneumocephalus, and may not be necessary for routine management of high-flow CSF leaks in conjunction with a robust PNSF. Further prospective randomized controlled studies may be warranted to evaluate the efficacy of postoperative lumbar drainage. Copyright © 2012 American Rhinologic Society-American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy, LLC.

  12. Comparison of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) toluidine red unheated serum test and the CSF rapid plasma reagin test with the CSF venereal disease research laboratory test for diagnosis of neurosyphilis among HIV-negative syphilis patients in China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin; Gu, Xin; Peng, Rui-Rui; Wang, Cuini; Gao, Zixiao; Zhou, Pingyu; Gao, Ying; Shi, Mei; Guan, Zhifang; Seña, Arlene C

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the performance of nontreponemal antibody tests in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens from syphilis patients. From September 2009 to September 2012, CSF specimens were collected at the Shanghai Skin Disease Hospital in Shanghai, China, from 1,132 syphilis patients without HIV infection, including 154 with symptomatic and 56 with asymptomatic neurosyphilis. All of the CSF specimens underwent testing with a rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test, an RPR-V (commercial RPR antigen diluted 1:2 in 10% saline) test, the toluidine red unheated serum test (TRUST), and the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) test. Specificities, sensitivities, positive predictive values (PPVs), negative predictive values (NPVs), and kappa values were calculated to determine the performances of the tests. We compared results of the CSF-VDRL, CSF-RPR, CSF-RPR-V, and CSF-TRUST among patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic neurosyphilis who had reactive CSF-Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) test results. Overall, the CSF-VDRL test was reactive in 261 patients (23.1%). There were no cases in which the CSF-VDRL was nonreactive and CSF-RPR, CSF-RPR-V, or CSF-TRUST was reactive. Agreement between the results of CSF-TRUST and CSF-RPR was almost perfect (κ=0.861), with substantial agreement between the results of CSF-RPR and CSF-RPR-V (κ=0.740). The sensitivities of CSF-VDRL, CSF-RPR, CSF-RPR-V, and CSF-TRUST were 81.4%, 76.2%, 79.5%, and 76.2%, respectively. Compared to CSF-VDRL, CSF-RPR, CSF-RPR-V, and CSF-TRUST had comparable PPVs and NPVs. However, the specificity of CSF-VDRL (90.3%) was significantly lower than those of the other tests (92.7 to 93.4%). Therefore, CSF-RPR, CSF-RPR-V, and CSF-TRUST can be considered alternative tests for neurosyphilis diagnosis in HIV-negative populations, particularly when the CSF-VDRL is not available.

  13. A differentially expressed set of microRNAs in cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) can diagnose CNS malignancies.

    PubMed

    Drusco, Alessandra; Bottoni, Arianna; Laganà, Alessandro; Acunzo, Mario; Fassan, Matteo; Cascione, Luciano; Antenucci, Anna; Kumchala, Prasanthi; Vicentini, Caterina; Gardiman, Marina P; Alder, Hansjuerg; Carosi, Mariantonia A; Ammirati, Mario; Gherardi, Stefano; Luscrì, Marilena; Carapella, Carmine; Zanesi, Nicola; Croce, Carlo M

    2015-08-28

    Central Nervous System malignancies often require stereotactic biopsy or biopsy for differential diagnosis, and for tumor staging and grading. Furthermore, stereotactic biopsy can be non-diagnostic or underestimate grading. Hence, there is a compelling need of new diagnostic biomarkers to avoid such invasive procedures. Several biological markers have been proposed, but they can only identify specific prognostic subtype of Central Nervous System tumors, and none of them has found a standardized clinical application.The aim of the study was to identify a Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA signature that could differentiate among Central Nervous System malignancies.CSF total RNA of 34 neoplastic and of 14 non-diseased patients was processed by NanoString. Comparison among groups (Normal, Benign, Glioblastoma, Medulloblastoma, Metastasis and Lymphoma) lead to the identification of a microRNA profile that was further confirmed by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization.Hsa-miR-451, -711, 935, -223 and -125b were significantly differentially expressed among the above mentioned groups, allowing us to draw an hypothetical diagnostic chart for Central Nervous System malignancies.This is the first study to employ the NanoString technique for Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA profiling. In this article, we demonstrated that Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA profiling mirrors Central Nervous System physiologic or pathologic conditions. Although more cases need to be tested, we identified a diagnostic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA signature with good perspectives for future diagnostic clinical applications.

  14. [Understanding of cerebrospinal fluid hydrodynamics in idiopathic hydrocephalus (A) Visualization of CSF bulk flow with MRI time-spatial labeling pulse method (time-SLIP)].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shinya; Goto, Tadateru

    2010-11-01

    Cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) hydrodynamics in normal and hydrocephalic brain was observed noninvasively using a time-spatial labeling inversion pulse (SLIP) technique. A time-SLIP technique applied label to CSF in the region of interest so that CSF became internal CSF tracer. CSF hydrodynamics even in normal brain appeared to be much different from it was imagine from conventional CSF physiology text books. Various amplitudes of pulsatile CSF flow were observed in the different regions of the brain. CSF hydrodynamics altered when hydrocephalus was developed. A time-SLIP CSF flow imaging is helpful to understand CSF hydrodynamics in the normal physiological and hydrocephalic brain. It may be useful to distinguish the hydrocephalus brain from the senile atrophic brain.

  15. CSF-PR 2.0: An Interactive Literature Guide to Quantitative Cerebrospinal Fluid Mass Spectrometry Data from Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Guldbrandsen, Astrid; Farag, Yehia; Kroksveen, Ann Cathrine; Oveland, Eystein; Lereim, Ragnhild R; Opsahl, Jill A; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Berven, Frode S; Barsnes, Harald

    2017-02-01

    The rapidly growing number of biomedical studies supported by mass spectrometry based quantitative proteomics data has made it increasingly difficult to obtain an overview of the current status of the research field. A better way of organizing the biomedical proteomics information from these studies and making it available to the research community is therefore called for. In the presented work, we have investigated scientific publications describing the analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid proteome in relation to multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Based on a detailed set of filtering criteria we extracted 85 data sets containing quantitative information for close to 2000 proteins. This information was made available in CSF-PR 2.0 (http://probe.uib.no/csf-pr-2.0), which includes novel approaches for filtering, visualizing and comparing quantitative proteomics information in an interactive and user-friendly environment. CSF-PR 2.0 will be an invaluable resource for anyone interested in quantitative proteomics on cerebrospinal fluid. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid enzymes in acute brain injury. 1. Dynamics of changes in CSF enzyme activity after acute experimental brain injury.

    PubMed Central

    Maas, A I

    1977-01-01

    Changes in CSF enzyme activity were studied after brain trauma for their prognostic value. Raised values of CPK and HBDH were demonstrated in the CSF of patients with severe brain injuries. Standardised cold lesions of the brain were induced in cats. The activities of the enzymes CPK, HBDH, LDH, GOT, GPT, and pseudocholinesterase were studied at half hour intervals in the cerebrospinal fluid and at hourly intervals in the serum. A statistically highly significant increase of all enzymes studied developed in the CSF. The greatest changes occurred within four hours of freezing. Large increases could occur in half an hour. Isoenzyme studies demonstrated that CPK and LDH were of cerebral origin. No consistently significant changes could be shown in the serum enzyme activity. It is concluded that after brain injuries, enzymes are released into the extracellular fluid of the brain and transported to the CSF. The limited value of a single enzyme estimation is emphasised. The results described seem to provide indirect evidence for transependymal flow of extracellular fluid in brain oedema. Images PMID:915509

  17. Flow cytometry of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lymphocytes: alterations of blood/CSF ratios of lymphocyte subsets in inflammation disorders of human central nervous system (CNS).

    PubMed

    Kleine, T O; Albrecht, J; Zöfel, P

    1999-03-01

    Flow cytometry was adapted to measure lymphocytes in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The method was sufficiently precise, reproducible and accurate despite low cell counts. In lumbar CSF of controls with 500 to 3500 (10(3)/l) leukocytes, lymphocyte counts correlated with those in corresponding venous blood: blood/CSF ratios of approximately 2000 : 1 were found for total T cells (CD3+) and CD3+ HLA-DR-, CD3+4+, CD3+8+ subsets, ratios were increased for the lymphocyte subsets CD3+ HLA-DR+ < or = CD3+16+56+ < CD16+56+3- < CD8+3- < CD19+; CD8+4+ ratio was half of CD3+ ratio. Data indicate selective barriers (blood-brain and blood-CSF barriers) to blood lymphocyte subsets which favor the transfer of T subsets. Correlation of the subset ratios to the CD3+ ratio indicates distinct barrier properties which changed differently with acute and subacute inflammations and neuroimmunological diseases of central nervous system (CNS) in lumbar or ventricular CSF, but not with simple protein barrier disturbance. HLA DR+ T ratios were higher than HLA DR- T ratios only with controls and some neuroimmunological diseases. Lymphocyte barrier characteristics were related to protein leakage situated at the same barriers, indicating for the lymphocyte subsets selective transfer routes in control subjects and non-selective routes in patients with CNS inflammation where altered ratios revealed a mixture of both routes.

  18. Facial herpes zoster complicated by varicella zoster virus (VZV) encephalitis: The diagnostic significance of atypical lymphocytes in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF).

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A; Strollo, Stephanie; Durie, Nicole; Ibrahim, Mohammad S

    2011-01-01

    In general, viral infections of the central nervous system (CNS) manifest as encephalitis and, less commonly, as meningoencephalitis or aseptic meningitis. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is an uncommon cause of encephalitis. Herpes zoster (shingles) is a cutaneous reactivation of previous chickenpox infection due to VZV. Herpes zoster may be dermatomal (ie, <3 dermatomes) or disseminated (ie, >3 dermatomes). Decreased cell-mediated immunity from stress, steroids, or immunosuppressive drugs often precede dermatomal/disseminated herpes zoster. With herpes zoster, the closer the dermatomal involvement is to the CNS (ie, head/neck shingles), the more likely a patient will have symptomatic CNS involvement (eg, encephalitis). Except for the association of the herpes zoster rash and the simultaneous/subsequent encephalitis, there are few clinical features that distinguish VZV encephalitis from that due to other viruses. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) profile of VZV encephalitis is usually clinically indistinguishable from that due to of other causes of viral encephalitis. In VZV meningoencephalitis or encephalitis, the CSF typically shows a modest lymphocytic pleocytosis with normal CSF glucose levels, variably elevated CSF protein levels, and normal CSF lactic acid levels. Atypical lymphocytes are rare in the CSF with VZV encephalitis. We present the case of a 75-year-old woman who developed VZV encephalitis after having herpes zoster on her forehead. Except for facial herpes zoster, there were no clinically distinguishing features to determine the cause of her encephalitis. Her CSF had 800 white blood cells/high power field with 26% lymphocytes (17% atypical lymphocytes). The patient's CSF glucose and CSF lactate dehydrogenase levels were normal, and her CSF protein was elevated. The CSF lactic acid was minimally elevated secondary to red blood cells in the CSF. Electroencephalogram showed general background slowing bilaterally, typical of viral encephalitis. The absence

  19. Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) CD8+ T-Cells That Express Interferon-Gamma Contribute to HIV Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND)

    PubMed Central

    Schrier, Rachel D.; Hong, Suzi; Crescini, Melanie; Ellis, Ronald; Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Spina, Celsa; Letendre, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) continue to affect cognition and everyday functioning despite anti-retroviral treatment (ART). Previous studies focused on mechanisms related to monocyte/macrophage mediated inflammation. However, in the ART era, there is increasing evidence for the involvement of CD8+ T-cells in CNS pathogenesis. Methods To investigate the relationship between T-cell responses and neurocognitive impairment (NCI), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and peripheral blood CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell intracellular cytokine (IFNγ, IL-2, TNFα) and lytic marker (CD107a) expression were assessed in HIV infected subjects who underwent comprehensive neurocognitive (NC) evaluation and either initiated or changed ART. Results Data were collected from 31 participants at 70 visits. The frequency of cytokine expressing T-cells in CSF was significantly higher than in peripheral blood for CD4+T-cells: TNFα, IL-2, IFNγ and CD8+T-cells: IL-2 and IFNγ. Analysis of T-cell activity and NCI as a function of CSF HIV RNA levels suggested a general association between NCI, high CSF CD8+ (but not CD4+T-cell) cytokine expression and CSF HIV RNA <103 copies/ml (p<0.0001). Specifically, CSF CD8+ T-cell IFNγ expression correlated with severity of NCI (r = 0.57, p = 0.004). Multivariable analyses indicated that CSF CD8+T-cell IFNγ and myeloid activation (CD163) contributed equally and independently to cognitive status and a composite variable produced the strongest correlation with NCI (r = 0.83, p = 0.0001). In contrast, CD8+ cytolytic activity (CD107a expression) was negatively correlated with NCI (p = 0.05) but was dependent on CD4 levels >400/μl and low CSF HIV RNA levels (<103 copies/ml). In our longitudinal analysis of 16 subjects, higher CSF CD8+IFNγ expression at baseline predicted NC decline at follow-up (p = 0.02). Severity of NCI at follow-up correlated with level of residual HIV RNA in CSF. Conclusions Presence of IFNγ expressing CD8+ T

  20. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) CD8+ T-cells that express interferon-gamma contribute to HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND).

    PubMed

    Schrier, Rachel D; Hong, Suzi; Crescini, Melanie; Ellis, Ronald; Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Spina, Celsa; Letendre, Scott

    2015-01-01

    HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) continue to affect cognition and everyday functioning despite anti-retroviral treatment (ART). Previous studies focused on mechanisms related to monocyte/macrophage mediated inflammation. However, in the ART era, there is increasing evidence for the involvement of CD8+ T-cells in CNS pathogenesis. To investigate the relationship between T-cell responses and neurocognitive impairment (NCI), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and peripheral blood CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell intracellular cytokine (IFNγ, IL-2, TNFα) and lytic marker (CD107a) expression were assessed in HIV infected subjects who underwent comprehensive neurocognitive (NC) evaluation and either initiated or changed ART. Data were collected from 31 participants at 70 visits. The frequency of cytokine expressing T-cells in CSF was significantly higher than in peripheral blood for CD4+T-cells: TNFα, IL-2, IFNγ and CD8+T-cells: IL-2 and IFNγ. Analysis of T-cell activity and NCI as a function of CSF HIV RNA levels suggested a general association between NCI, high CSF CD8+ (but not CD4+T-cell) cytokine expression and CSF HIV RNA <103 copies/ml (p<0.0001). Specifically, CSF CD8+ T-cell IFNγ expression correlated with severity of NCI (r = 0.57, p = 0.004). Multivariable analyses indicated that CSF CD8+T-cell IFNγ and myeloid activation (CD163) contributed equally and independently to cognitive status and a composite variable produced the strongest correlation with NCI (r = 0.83, p = 0.0001). In contrast, CD8+ cytolytic activity (CD107a expression) was negatively correlated with NCI (p = 0.05) but was dependent on CD4 levels >400/μl and low CSF HIV RNA levels (<103 copies/ml). In our longitudinal analysis of 16 subjects, higher CSF CD8+IFNγ expression at baseline predicted NC decline at follow-up (p = 0.02). Severity of NCI at follow-up correlated with level of residual HIV RNA in CSF. Presence of IFNγ expressing CD8+ T-cells, absence of cytolytic CD8+ T-cells, high

  1. A Pilot Longitudinal Study on Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Tau Protein in Alzheimer’s Disease and Vascular Dementia

    PubMed Central

    WANG, Haihong; WANG, Tao; QIAN, Shixing; BA, Li; LIN, Zhiguang

    2016-01-01

    Background Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has high a prevalence rate, high medical costs, and care difficulties, and has become a serious social and economic problem in our aging society. So far, there has not been a reliable and objective diagnostic criteria for AD found. In recent years, there have been many domestic and foreign studies on the biological markers of cerebrospinal fluid in the patients with AD, and high levels of the T-tau, P-tau found in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is at this point an indisputable fact. However, the relationship between these markers and the severity of dementia, as well as the development of the disease, should be further studied. Objective Compare the CSF level of total tau (T-tau) and phosphorylated tau at threonine 231 (P-tau231) between patients with moderate to severe Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and those with vascular dementia (VD) at baseline, and 6 month follow-up. Observe the differences between patients with AD and control group, as well as the changes as the disease develops. Methods There were 11 patients with moderate AD (10 ≤ MMSE ≤ 20), 10 patients with severe AD (MMSE ≤ 9), and 7 age-matched patients with severe VD at baseline, among which 7 AD patients and 6 VD patients completed the 6 months follow-up. CSF levels of T-tau, P-tau231 were measured with sandwich ELISA. Result At baseline, the concentrations of the CSF level of T-tau were 470.08 (263.58) pg/mL in the AD group and 208.76 (42.24) pg/mL in the VD group. This difference was statistically significant (Z= -3.369, p <0.001). The concentrations of CSF level of P-tau231 were 90.94 (49.86) pg/mL in the AD group and 42.96 (13.10) pg/mL in the VD group. This difference was also statistically significant (Z = -3.237, p <0.001). Compared to patients with severe VD, the concentration of CSF T-tau in patients with severe AD was significantly higher (Z= -2.830, p = 0.005), as well as the concentration of CSF P-tau231 (Z = -2.392, p = 0.017). The concentration of CSF

  2. Portable lactate analyzer for measuring lactate in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma – method-comparison evaluations

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Sérgio Monteiro; Marquie-Beck, Jennifer; Bhatt, Archana; Letendre, Scott; McCutchan, Allen; Ellis, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Increased plasma lactate levels can indicate the presence of metabolic disorders in HIV infected individuals. Objective To determine whether a portable analyzer is valid for measuring cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma lactate levels in HIV infected individuals. Method CSF and plasma were collected from 178 subjects. Samples tested by the Accutrend® portable analyzer were compared to those tested by a reference device (SYNCHRON LX® 20). Results The portable analyzer had in plasma sensitivity of 0.95 and specificity 0.87. For CSF the specificity was 0.95; the sensitivity 0.33; the negative predictive value was 95% and the positive predictive value 33%. Conclusions These findings support the validity of the portable analyzer in measuring lactate concentrations in CSF that fall within the normal range. The relatively poor positive predictive value indicates that a result above the reference range may represent a “false positive test”, and should be confirmed by the reference device before concluding abnormality. PMID:25054981

  3. Infusion of sodium bicarbonate in experimentally induced metabolic acidosis does not provoke cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) acidosis in calves

    PubMed Central

    Abeysekara, Saman; Zello, Gordon A.; Lohmann, Katharina L.; Alcorn, Jane; Hamilton, Don L.; Naylor, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    In a crossover study, 5 calves were made acidotic by intermittent intravenous infusion of isotonic hydrochloric acid (HCl) over approximately 24 h. This was followed by rapid (4 h) or slow (24 h) correction of blood pH with isotonic sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) to determine if rapid correction of acidemia produced paradoxical cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) acidosis. Infusion of HCl produced a marked metabolic acidosis with respiratory compensation. Venous blood pH (mean ± Sx) was 7.362 ± 0.021 and 7.116 ± 0.032, partial pressure of carbon dioxide (Pco2, torr) 48.8 ± 1.3 and 34.8 ± 1.4, and bicarbonate (mmol/L), 27.2 ± 1.27 and 11 ± 0.96; CSF pH was 7.344 ± 0.031 and 7.240 ± 0.039, Pco2 42.8 ± 2.9 and 34.5 ± 1.4, and bicarbonate 23.5 ± 0.91 and 14.2 ± 1.09 for the period before the infusion of hydrochloric acid and immediately before the start of sodium bicarbonate correction, respectively. In calves treated with rapid infusion of sodium bicarbonate, correction of venous acidemia was significantly more rapid and increases in Pco2 and bicarbonate in CSF were also more rapid. However, there was no significant difference in CSF pH. After 4 h of correction, CSF pH was 7.238 ± 0.040 and 7.256 ± 0.050, Pco2 44.4 ± 2.2 and 34.2 ± 2.1, and bicarbonate 17.8 ± 1.02 and 14.6 ± 1.4 for rapid and slow correction, respectively. Under the conditions of this experiment, rapid correction of acidemia did not provoke paradoxical CSF acidosis. PMID:22754090

  4. Optical analysis of suspended particles in the cerebrospinal fluid obtained by puncture from patients diagnosed with the disorders of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staroń, Waldemar; Herbowski, Leszek; Gurgul, Henryk

    2007-04-01

    The goal of the work was to determine the values of cumulative parameters of the cerebrospinal fluid. Values of the parameters characterise statistical cerebrospinal fluid obtained by puncture from the patients diagnosed due to suspicion of normotensive hydrocephalus. The cerebrospinal fluid taken by puncture for the routine examinations carried out at the patients suspected of normotensive hydrocephalus was analysed. In the paper there are presented results of examinations of several dozens of puncture samples of the cerebrospinal fluid coming from various patients. Each sample was examined under the microscope and photographed in 20 randomly chosen places. On the basis of analysis of the pictures showing the area of 100 x 100μm, the selected cumulative parameters such as count, numerical density, field area and field perimeter were determined for each sample. Then the average value of the parameters was determined as well.

  5. Antimicrobial sensitivity patterns of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) isolates in Namibia: implications for empirical antibiotic treatment of meningitis.

    PubMed

    Mengistu, Assegid; Gaeseb, Johannes; Uaaka, Gottfried; Ndjavera, Christophine; Kambyambya, Kennedy; Indongo, Lazarus; Kalemeera, Francis; Ntege, Christopher; Mabirizi, David; Joshi, Mohan P; Sagwa, Evans

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a medical emergency associated with high mortality rates. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) culture is the "gold standard" for diagnosis of meningitis and it is important to establish the susceptibility of the causative microorganism to rationalize treatment. The Namibia Standard Treatment Guidelines (STGs) recommends initiation of empirical antibiotic treatment in patients with signs and symptoms of meningitis after taking a CSF sample for culture and sensitivity. The objective of this study was to assess the antimicrobial sensitivity patterns of microorganisms isolated from CSF to antibiotics commonly used in the empirical treatment of suspected bacterial meningitis in Namibia. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study of routinely collected antibiotic susceptibility data from the Namibia Institute of Pathology (NIP) database. Results of CSF culture and sensitivity from January 1, 2009 to May 31, 2012, from 33 state hospitals throughout Namibia were analysed. The most common pathogens isolated were Streptococcus species, Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, Staphylococcus, and Escherichia coli. The common isolates from CSF showed high resistance (34.3% -73.5%) to penicillin. Over one third (34.3%) of Streptococcus were resistance to penicillin which was higher than 24.8% resistance in the United States. Meningococci were susceptible to several antimicrobial agents including penicillin. The sensitivity to cephalosporins remained high for Streptococcus, Neisseria, E. coli and Haemophilus. The highest percentage of resistance to cephalosporins was seen among ESBL K. pneumoniae (n = 7, 71%-100%), other Klebsiella species (n = 7, 28%-80%), and Staphylococcus (n = 36, 25%-40%). The common organisms isolated from CSF were Streptococcus Pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, Staphylococcus, and E. coli. All common organisms isolated from CSF showed high sensitivity to cephalosporins used in the empirical

  6. Antimicrobial sensitivity patterns of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) isolates in Namibia: implications for empirical antibiotic treatment of meningitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective Bacterial meningitis is a medical emergency associated with high mortality rates. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) culture is the “gold standard” for diagnosis of meningitis and it is important to establish the susceptibility of the causative microorganism to rationalize treatment. The Namibia Standard Treatment Guidelines (STGs) recommends initiation of empirical antibiotic treatment in patients with signs and symptoms of meningitis after taking a CSF sample for culture and sensitivity. The objective of this study was to assess the antimicrobial sensitivity patterns of microorganisms isolated from CSF to antibiotics commonly used in the empirical treatment of suspected bacterial meningitis in Namibia. Methods This was a cross-sectional descriptive study of routinely collected antibiotic susceptibility data from the Namibia Institute of Pathology (NIP) database. Results of CSF culture and sensitivity from January 1, 2009 to May 31, 2012, from 33 state hospitals throughout Namibia were analysed. Results The most common pathogens isolated were Streptococcus species, Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, Staphylococcus, and Escherichia coli. The common isolates from CSF showed high resistance (34.3% –73.5%) to penicillin. Over one third (34.3%) of Streptococcus were resistance to penicillin which was higher than 24.8% resistance in the United States. Meningococci were susceptible to several antimicrobial agents including penicillin. The sensitivity to cephalosporins remained high for Streptococcus, Neisseria, E. coli and Haemophilus. The highest percentage of resistance to cephalosporins was seen among ESBL K. pneumoniae (n = 7, 71%–100%), other Klebsiella species (n = 7, 28%–80%), and Staphylococcus (n = 36, 25%–40%). Conclusions The common organisms isolated from CSF were Streptococcus Pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, Staphylococcus, and E. coli. All common organisms isolated from CSF showed high

  7. High Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Penetration and Potent Bactericidal Activity in CSF of NZ2114, a Novel Plectasin Variant, during Experimental Pneumococcal Meningitis▿

    PubMed Central

    Østergaard, Christian; Sandvang, Dorthe; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Kristensen, Hans-Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Plectasin is the first defensin-type antimicrobial peptide isolated from a fungus and has potent activity against gram-positive bacteria. By using an experimental meningitis model, the penetration of plectasin into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of infected and uninfected rabbits and the bactericidal activities in CSF of the plectasin variant NZ2114 and ceftriaxone against a penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae strain (NZ2114 and ceftriaxone MICs, 0.25 and 0.5 μg/ml, respectively) were studied. Pharmacokinetic analysis showed that there was a significantly higher level of CSF penetration of NZ2114 through inflamed than through noninflamed meninges (area under the concentration-time curve for CSF/area under the concentration-time curve for serum, 33% and 1.1%, respectively; P = 0.03). The peak concentrations of NZ2114 in purulent CSF were observed ∼3 h after the infusion of an intravenous bolus of either 20 or 40 mg/kg of body weight and exceeded the MIC >10-fold for a 6-h study period. Treatment with NZ2114 (40 and 20 mg/kg at 0 and 5 h, respectively; n = 11) caused a significantly higher reduction in CSF bacterial concentrations than therapy with ceftriaxone (125 mg/kg at 0 h; n = 7) at 3 h (median changes, 3.7 log10 CFU/ml [interquartile range, 2.5 to 4.6 log10 CFU/ml] and 2.1 log10 CFU/ml [interquartile range, 1.7 to 2.6 log10 CFU/ml], respectively; P = 0.001), 5 h (median changes, 5.2 log10 CFU/ml [interquartile range, 3.6 to 6.1 log10 CFU/ml] and 3.1 log10 CFU/ml [interquartile range, 2.6 to 3.7 log10 CFU/ml], respectively; P = 0.01), and 10 h (median changes, 5.6 log10 CFU/ml [interquartile range, 5.2 to 5.9 log10 CFU/ml] and 4.2 log10 CFU/ml [interquartile range, 3.6 to 5.0 log10 CFU/ml], respectively; P = 0.03) after the start of therapy as well compared to the CSF bacterial concentrations in untreated rabbits with meningitis (n = 7, P < 0.05). Also, significantly more rabbits had sterile CSF at 5 and 10 h when they were treated with NZ2114 than

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid neopterin is brain-derived and not associated with blood-CSF barrier dysfunction in non-inflammatory affective and schizophrenic spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Kuehne, Leonie K; Reiber, Hansotto; Bechter, Karl; Hagberg, Lars; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2013-10-01

    Many psychiatric patients have a minor blood-CSF barrier dysfunction and increased Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neopterin concentrations. The source of normal CSF neopterin, a biomarker in inflammatory and non-inflammatory neurological diseases, has never been shown explicitly, a precondition for sensitive detection of pathologically increased CSF neopterin. Neopterin concentrations (ELISA) in CSF and serum of normal controls (n = 26) are evaluated by inter-individual variation propagation. Normal CSF neopterin is brain-derived: The inter-individual variation of CSF neopterin in the control group does not depend on serum neopterin concentration variation (coefficient of variation, CV-CSF = 9.7% < CV-serum = 24.5%). Additionally individual normal CSF neopterin concentrations are invariant to the variation of the albumin quotient, QAlb, i.e. CSF neopterin does not derive from leptomeninges. Subsequently CSF neopterin was interpreted with reference to its absolute concentration in CSF (cut off = 5.5 nmol/l). Patients (N = 44), retrospectively selected from a larger group with schizophrenic and affective spectrum disorder, are characterized by the absence of any clinical and neurochemical signs of inflammation. In this group 30% had an increased CSF neopterin concentration and 30% had an increased QAlb with only 7% combined pathologies. Increased CSF neopterin did not correlate with the blood-CSF barrier dysfunction. In the discussion we point to possible sources of both independent pathologies, connected either with reduced CSF flow rate (QAlb) or microglial activation (neopterin). With CSF neopterin analysis earlier in vitro studies about microglia activation in schizophrenic spectrum disorders or corresponding therapeutic efforts could get a more direct, in-vivo analytical tool. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The effect of preanalytical factors on stability of the proteome and selected metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF).

    PubMed

    Rosenling, Therese; Slim, Christiaan L; Christin, Christin; Coulier, Leon; Shi, Shanna; Stoop, Marcel P; Bosman, Jan; Suits, Frank; Horvatovich, Peter L; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, Norbert; Vreeken, Rob; Hankemeier, Thomas; van Gool, Alain J; Luider, Theo M; Bischoff, Rainer

    2009-12-01

    To standardize the use of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for biomarker research, a set of stability studies have been performed on porcine samples to investigate the influence of common sample handling procedures on proteins, peptides, metabolites and free amino acids. This study focuses at the effect on proteins and peptides, analyzed by applying label-free quantitation using microfluidics nanoscale liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (chipLC-MS) as well as matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (MALDI-FT-ICR-MS) and Orbitrap LC-MS/MS to trypsin-digested CSF samples. The factors assessed were a 30 or 120 min time delay at room temperature before storage at -80 degrees C after the collection of CSF in order to mimic potential delays in the clinic (delayed storage), storage at 4 degrees C after trypsin digestion to mimic the time that samples remain in the cooled autosampler of the analyzer, and repeated freeze-thaw cycles to mimic storage and handling procedures in the laboratory. The delayed storage factor was also analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for changes of metabolites and free amino acids, respectively. Our results show that repeated freeze/thawing introduced changes in transthyretin peptide levels. The trypsin digested samples left at 4 degrees C in the autosampler showed a time-dependent decrease of peak areas for peptides from prostaglandin D-synthase and serotransferrin. Delayed storage of CSF led to changes in prostaglandin D-synthase derived peptides as well as to increased levels of certain amino acids and metabolites. The changes of metabolites, amino acids and proteins in the delayed storage study appear to be related to remaining white blood cells. Our recommendations are to centrifuge CSF samples immediately after collection to remove white blood cells, aliquot, and then

  10. Numerical Study of the Cerebro-Spinal Fluid (CSF) Dynamics Under Quasistatic Condition During a Cardiac Cycle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    THE CEREBRO -SPINAL FLUID (CSF) DYNAMICS UNDER QUASI- STATIC CONDITION DURING A CARDIAC CYCLE Loïc FIN, Reinhard GREBE, Olivier BALÉDENT, Ilana...from... to) - Title and Subtitle Numerical Study of the Cerebro -Spinal Fluid (CSF) Dynamics Under Quasistatic Condition During a Cardiac Cycle

  11. Angiogenic potential of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with high-grade gliomas measured with the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane assay (CAM).

    PubMed

    Sinning, Mariana; Letelier, René; Rosas, Carlos; Fuenzalida, Marcela; Lemus, David

    2012-01-01

    High-grade gliomas are highly vascularized tumors. Neo-angiogenesis plays a key role in tumor growth and resistance to therapy. A cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sample could be a useful way to obtain pro-angiogenic predictive or prognostic markers at different stages of the disease. As a first step we looked for pro-angiogenic activity in the CSF of patients with high-grade gliomas. We performed the chicken embryo chorio-allantoic membrane (CAM) assay to study the angiogenic potential of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), obtained either by lumbar puncture (LP) or craniotomy from six patients with high-grade brain tumors (three glioblastoma (WHO grade IV), one anaplastic oligodendroglioma (WHO grade III), two anaplastic ganglioglioma (WHO grade III)), and four healthy controls. Significantly increased neo-angiogenesis was observed on the surface of the growing CAM in the 6 patients with high-grade gliomas compared to controls (3.69 ± 1.23 versus 2.16 ± 0.97 capillaries per area (mean ± SD), p<0.005). There was no statistical difference related to the hystological grade of the tumor (WHO grade III or IV), previous treatment (radio-chemotherapy plus temozolomide, temozolomide alone or no treatment), or the site of CSF sample (surgery or lumbar puncture). Our results suggest a pro-angiogenic potential in the CSF of patients with high-grade gliomas.

  12. UPLC-MS/MS assay of riluzole in human plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF): Application in samples from spinal cord injured patients.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Mahua; Grossman, Robert G; Toups, Elizabeth G; Chow, Diana S-L

    2017-09-01

    In the present study, a sensitive and robust LC-MS/MS method has been developed and validated for the quantification of riluzole in human plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in clinical samples from patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Riluzole and its labeled internal standard (IS) were isolated from plasma and CSF by liquid-liquid extraction using ethyl acetate. Riluzole (m/z 235→166) and IS (m/z 238→169) were detected by electrospray ionization (ESI) using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) in a positive mode. The assay was linear in the concentration range of 0.5 (LLOQ, signal/noise ratio>10)-800ng/ml in plasma, and 1.0 (LLOQ)-800ng/ml in CSF samples. The intra- and inter-day accuracy in plasma were 94.2-110.0% and 97.8-102.0%, respectively, and those in CSF were 87.6-105.1% and 91.9-98.8%, respectively. The intra- and inter-day precision were 2.2-7.2% and 4.0-9.1%, respectively, in plasma, and 1.4-14.1% and 2.6-11.5%, respectively in CSF. Matrix effect was negligible from both matrices with signal percentages of 97.6-100.6% in plasma and 99.4-106.4% in CSF. The recoveries were >75% in plasma, >84% in CSF with low protein (53.9mg/dl), and >68% in CSF with high protein (348.2mg/dl). This method was successfully applied to quantify riluzole concentrations in plasma and CSF from patients with SCI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alternative Names Culture - CSF; Spinal fluid culture; CSF ... In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods . 23d ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; ...

  14. miR-21 in the Extracellular Vesicles (EVs) of Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF): A Platform for Glioblastoma Biomarker Development

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ryan; Skog, Johan; Nakano, Ichiro; Pingle, Sandeep; Kalinina, Juliya; Hua, Wei; Kesari, Santosh; Mao, Ying; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Hochberg, Fred H.; Van Meir, Erwin G.; Carter, Bob S.; Chen, Clark C.

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma cells secrete extra-cellular vesicles (EVs) containing microRNAs (miRNAs). Analysis of these EV miRNAs in the bio-fluids of afflicted patients represents a potential platform for biomarker development. However, the analytic algorithm for quantitative assessment of EV miRNA remains under-developed. Here, we demonstrate that the reference transcripts commonly used for quantitative PCR (including GAPDH, 18S rRNA, and hsa-miR-103) were unreliable for assessing EV miRNA. In this context, we quantitated EV miRNA in absolute terms and normalized this value to the input EV number. Using this method, we examined the abundance of miR-21, a highly over-expressed miRNA in glioblastomas, in EVs. In a panel of glioblastoma cell lines, the cellular levels of miR-21 correlated with EV miR-21 levels (p<0.05), suggesting that glioblastoma cells actively secrete EVs containing miR-21. Consistent with this hypothesis, the CSF EV miR-21 levels of glioblastoma patients (n=13) were, on average, ten-fold higher than levels in EVs isolated from the CSF of non-oncologic patients (n=13, p<0.001). Notably, none of the glioblastoma CSF harbored EV miR-21 level below 0.25 copies per EV in this cohort. Using this cut-off value, we were able to prospectively distinguish CSF derived from glioblastoma and non-oncologic patients in an independent cohort of twenty-nine patients (Sensitivity=87%; Specificity=93%; AUC=0.91, p<0.01). Our results suggest that CSF EV miRNA analysis of miR-21 may serve as a platform for glioblastoma biomarker development. PMID:24205116

  15. Use of quantitative 16S rRNA PCR to determine bacterial load does not augment conventional cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cultures among children undergoing treatment for CSF shunt infection☆,☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Tamara D.; Van Yserloo, Brian; Nelson, Kevin; Gillespie, David; Jensen, Randy; McAllister, James P.; Riva-Cambrin, Jay; Stockmann, Chris; Daly, Judy A.; Blaschke, Anne J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a quantitative 16S rRNA assay for determination of bacterial nucleic acid load in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt infection and to compare quantitative 16S rRNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) findings to those of conventional bacterial culture in patients treated for CSF shunt infection. We developed a quantitative 16S rRNA PCR assay that detected bacterial load across a range of 2.5 × 109 down to 2.5 × 104 16S copies/mL CSF under experimental conditions for numerous Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. However, when applied to archived CSF samples from 25 shunt infection episodes, correlations between positive bacterial culture and 16S rRNA levels were seen in only half of infections, and 16S rRNA levels dropped precipitously after an initial peak on the first day of sample collection. Bacterial load measured using 16S rRNA PCR does not provide sufficient information beyond bacterial culture to inform CSF shunt infection treatment. PMID:23953744

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid flow in adults.

    PubMed

    Bradley, William G; Haughton, Victor; Mardal, Kent-Andre

    2016-01-01

    This chapter uses magnetic resonance imaging phase-contrast cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow measurements to predict which clinical normal-pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) patients will respond to shunting as well as which patients with Chiari I are likely to develop symptoms of syringomyelia. Symptomatic NPH patients with CSF flow (measured as the aqueductal CSF stroke volume) which is shown to be hyperdynamic (defined as twice normal) are quite likely to respond to ventriculoperitoneal shunting. The hyperdynamic CSF flow results from normal systolic brain expansion compressing the enlarged ventricles. When atrophy occurs, there is less brain expansion, decreased aqueductal CSF flow, and less likelihood of responding to shunting. It appears that NPH is a "two-hit" disease, starting as benign external hydrocephalus in infancy, followed by deep white-matter ischemia in late adulthood, which causes increased resistance to CSF outflow through the extracellular space of the brain. Using computational flow dynamics (CFD), CSF flow can be modeled at the foramen magnum and in the upper cervical spine. As in the case of NPH, hyperdynamic CSF flow appears to cause the signs and symptoms in Chiari I and can provide an additional indication for surgical decompression. CFD can also predict CSF pressures over the cardiac cycle. It has been hypothesized that elevated pressure pulses may be a significant etiologic factor in some cases of syringomyelia.

  17. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tumani, Hayrettin; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Hemmer, Bernhard; Teunissen, Charlotte; Deisenhammer, Florian; Giovannoni, Gavin; Zettl, Uwe K

    2009-08-01

    In patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) intensive efforts are directed at identifying biomarkers in bodily fluids related to underlying disease mechanisms, disease activity and progression, and therapeutic response. Besides MR imaging parameters cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers provide important and specific information since changes in the CSF composition may reflect disease mechanisms inherent to MS. The different cellular and protein-analytical methods of the CSF and the recommended standard of the diagnostic CSF profile in MS are described. A brief update on possible CSF biomarkers that might reflect key pathological processes of MS such as inflammation, demyelination, neuroaxonal loss, gliosis and regeneration is provided.

  18. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for Alzheimer’s Disease: A View of the Regulatory Science Qualification Landscape from the Coalition Against Major Diseases CSF Biomarker Team

    PubMed Central

    Arnerić, Stephen P.; Batrla-Utermann, Richard; Beckett, Laurel; Bittner, Tobias; Blennow, Kaj; Carter, Leslie; Dean, Robert; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Genius, Just; Gordon, Mark Forrest; Hitchcock, Janice; Kaplow, June; Luthman, Johan; Meibach, Richard; Raunig, David; Romero, Klaus; Samtani, Mahesh N.; Savage, Mary; Shaw, Leslie; Stephenson, Diane; Umek, Robert M.; Vanderstichele, Hugo; Willis, Brian; Yule, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Alzheimer’s disease (AD) drug development is burdened with the current requirement to conduct large, lengthy, and costly trials to overcome uncertainty in patient progression and effect size on treatment outcome measures. There is an urgent need for the discovery, development, and implementation of novel, objectively measured biomarkers for AD that would aid selection of the appropriate subpopulation of patients in clinical trials, and presumably, improve the likelihood of successfully evaluating innovative treatment options. Amyloid deposition and tau in the brain, which are most commonly assessed either in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or by molecular imaging, are consistently and widely accepted. Nonetheless, a clear gap still exists in the accurate identification of subjects that truly have the hallmarks of AD. The Coalition Against Major Diseases (CAMD), one of 12 consortia of the Critical Path Institute (C-Path), aims to streamline drug development for AD and related dementias by advancing regulatory approved drug development tools for clinical trials through precompetitive data sharing and adoption of consensus clinical data standards. This report focuses on the regulatory process for biomarker qualification, briefly comments on how it contrasts with approval or clearance of companion diagnostics, details the qualifications currently available to the field of AD, and highlights the current challenges facing the landscape of CSF biomarkers qualified as hallmarks of AD. Finally, it recommends actions to accelerate regulatory qualification of CSF biomarkers that would, in turn, improve the efficiency of AD therapeutic development. PMID:27662307

  19. Expression of HNF4alpha in the human and rat choroid plexus – Implications for drug transport across the blood-cerebrospinal-fluid (CSF) barrier

    PubMed Central

    Niehof, Monika; Borlak, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Background The choroid plexus consists of highly differentiated epithelium and functions as a barrier at the interface of the blood-cerebrospinal-fluid (CSF). This tissue may therefore determine the bioavailability and transport of drugs to the brain. Little is known about the expression of drug and xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (DME) and of drug transporters in the human choroid plexus. Notably, the transcription factor and zinc finger protein HNF4alpha is a master regulator of DMEs and of drug transporters. As of today its activity in the blood-CSF barrier is unknown. Here we report our efforts in determining HNF4alpha activity in the regulation of ABC transporters in the human and rat choroid plexus. Results We report expression of HNF4alpha by qRT-PCR and by immunohistochemistry and evidence transcript expression of the ATP-binding cassette transporters ABCB1, ABCB4, ABCC1-6 in choroid plexus. Additionally, HNF4alpha DNA binding activity at regulatory sequences of ABCB4 and ABCC1 was determined by EMSA bandshift assays with a specific antibody. We then performed siRNA mediated functional knock down of HNF4alpha in Caco-2 cells and found ABCC1 gene expression to be repressed in cell culture experiments. Conclusion Our study evidences activity of HNF4alpha in human and rat choroid plexus. This transcription factor targets DMEs and drug transporters and may well determine availability of drugs at the blood-CSF barrier. PMID:19575803

  20. Fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) MRI to investigate cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within dural reflections of posterior fossa cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Noble, David J; Scoffings, Daniel; Ajithkumar, Thankamma; Williams, Michael V; Jefferies, Sarah J

    2016-11-01

    There is no consensus approach to covering skull base meningeal reflections-and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) therein-of the posterior fossa cranial nerves (CNs VII-XII) when planning radiotherapy (RT) for medulloblastoma and ependymoma. We sought to determine whether MRI and specifically fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) sequences can answer this anatomical question and guide RT planning. 96 posterior fossa FIESTA sequences were reviewed. Following exclusions, measurements were made on the following scans for each foramen respectively (left, right); internal acoustic meatus (IAM) (86, 84), jugular foramen (JF) (83, 85) and hypoglossal canal (HC) (42, 45). A protocol describes measurement procedure. Two observers measured distances for five cases and agreement was assessed. One observer measured all the remaining cases. IAM and JF measurement interobserver variability was compared. Mean measurement difference between observers was -0.275 mm (standard deviation 0.557). IAM and JF measurements were normally distributed. Mean IAM distance was 12.2 mm [95% confidence interval (CI) 8.8-15.6]; JF was 7.3 mm (95% CI 4.0-10.6). The HC was difficult to visualize on many images and data followed a bimodal distribution. Dural reflections of posterior fossa CNs are well demonstrated by FIESTA MRI. Measuring CSF extension into these structures is feasible and robust; mean CSF extension into IAM and JF was measured. We plan further work to assess coverage of these structures with photon and proton RT plans. Advances in knowledge: We have described CSF extension beyond the internal table of the skull into the IAM, JF and HC. Oncologists planning RT for patients with medulloblastoma and ependymoma may use these data to guide contouring.

  1. [Cerebrospinal fluid diagnostics in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Ruprecht, K; Tumani, H

    2016-12-01

    As a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS), multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with characteristic abnormalities in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Thus, in addition to magnetic resonance imaging, CSF examination is a central diagnostic procedure in patients with MS, which can corroborate a diagnosis of MS and may also help to discern differential diagnoses. The most important CSF finding in MS is the detection of persistent polyspecific intrathecal immunoglobulin synthesis. This review summarizes CSF findings of patients with MS and addresses issues of relevance for clinical practice, potential diagnostic pitfalls as well as new developments in CSF diagnostics of MS.

  2. Network-based analysis of differentially expressed genes in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood reveals new candidate genes for multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Safari-Alighiarloo, Nahid; Taghizadeh, Mohammad; Tabatabaei, Seyyed Mohammad; Namaki, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Background The involvement of multiple genes and missing heritability, which are dominant in complex diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS), entail using network biology to better elucidate their molecular basis and genetic factors. We therefore aimed to integrate interactome (protein–protein interaction (PPI)) and transcriptomes data to construct and analyze PPI networks for MS disease. Methods Gene expression profiles in paired cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) samples from MS patients, sampled in relapse or remission and controls, were analyzed. Differentially expressed genes which determined only in CSF (MS vs. control) and PBMCs (relapse vs. remission) separately integrated with PPI data to construct the Query-Query PPI (QQPPI) networks. The networks were further analyzed to investigate more central genes, functional modules and complexes involved in MS progression. Results The networks were analyzed and high centrality genes were identified. Exploration of functional modules and complexes showed that the majority of high centrality genes incorporated in biological pathways driving MS pathogenesis. Proteasome and spliceosome were also noticeable in enriched pathways in PBMCs (relapse vs. remission) which were identified by both modularity and clique analyses. Finally, STK4, RB1, CDKN1A, CDK1, RAC1, EZH2, SDCBP genes in CSF (MS vs. control) and CDC37, MAP3K3, MYC genes in PBMCs (relapse vs. remission) were identified as potential candidate genes for MS, which were the more central genes involved in biological pathways. Discussion This study showed that network-based analysis could explicate the complex interplay between biological processes underlying MS. Furthermore, an experimental validation of candidate genes can lead to identification of potential therapeutic targets. PMID:28028462

  3. Cerebrospinal Fluid Dynamics and the Pathophysiology of Hydrocephalus: New Concepts.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shinya; Kelly, Erin

    2016-04-01

    Many controversies remain regarding basic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) physiology and the mechanism behind the development of hydrocephalus. Recent information obtained from CSF time spatial spin labeling inversion pulse method discovers different aspect of CSF dynamics. In this article, we would discuss how recent CSF imaging advances are leading to new concepts of CSF flow dynamics and the pathophysiology of hydrocephalus, with an emphasis on time spatial spin labeling inversion pulse imaging of CSF dynamics.

  4. Cell analysis in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) using Sysmex® hematology analyzers XT-4000i and XE-5000: evaluation with CSF controls of the Joint German Society for Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (DGKL).

    PubMed

    Kleine, Tilmann O; Nebe, Carl Thomas; Löwer, Christa; Geilenkeuser, Wolf-Jochen; Dorn-Beineke, Alexandra

    2012-03-01

    In cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis, hematology analyzers (HAs) Sysmex® XT-4000i and XE-5000, equipped with flow cytometry (FCM), were used to count cells and differentiate leukocytes into mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cells (MNCs, PMCs) applying body fluid mode. FCM was evaluated with 20 DGKL CSF controls containing viable human leukocytes and erythrocytes. HA values were compared with reference values by Passing/Bablok regression analysis to reveal conformity. Conformity of white blood cells (WBCs) was obtained with native leukocytes, counted in calibrated Fuchs-Rosenthal chamber as reference; red blood cell counts proved inaccurate. CV <40% with WBC counts <20 per μL impairs accuracy. Reference WBC differentiation was assayed using FACS Canto II™ and FC-500 SN with anti-CD45, anti-CD14, anti-CD16, anti-CD16/56 [Becton Dickinson (BD); Beckman Coulter (BC)]. BD FACS lysing solution®-no-wash-procedure was applied. BC pretreatment with Versalyse lysing solution was not recommended. MNCs (lymphocytes + monocytes) were significantly lower (∼14%) on both HAs; PMCs (granulocytes or sum of neutrophils + eosinophils + basophils: range 1-86 M/L) were significantly higher (∼2.2-fold). WBC HA differentiation is not reliable because MNC/PMC differentiation yielded lower and higher values than FACS-FCM references, respectively. This is attributed to incorrect discrimination of leukocytes with rounded/nonrounded nuclei; adding leukocytes with nonrounded nuclei to too low HA MNCs (about 40% not-activated) yielded P/B conformity; subtraction of leukocytes with nonrounded nuclei from elevated HA PMCs showed conformity (about 85% activated). Nucleus/activation state of leukocytes was assessed using microhistology. Sysmex XT-4000i and XE-5000 HAs systems are inappropriate for complete CSF cell analysis. Copyright © 2012 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  5. CEREBROSPINAL FLUID STASIS AND ITS CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE

    PubMed Central

    Whedon, James M.; Glassey, Donald

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesize that stasis of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) occurs commonly and is detrimental to health. Physiologic factors affecting the normal circulation of CSF include cardiovascular, respiratory, and vasomotor influences. The CSF maintains the electrolytic environment of the central nervous system (CNS), influences systemic acid-base balance, serves as a medium for the supply of nutrients to neuronal and glial cells, functions as a lymphatic system for the CNS by removing the waste products of cellular metabolism, and transports hormones, neurotransmitters, releasing factors, and other neuropeptides throughout the CNS. Physiologic impedance or cessation of CSF flow may occur commonly in the absence of degenerative changes or pathology and may compromise the normal physiologic functions of the CSF. CSF appears to be particularly prone to stasis within the spinal canal. CSF stasis may be associated with adverse mechanical cord tension, vertebral subluxation syndrome, reduced cranial rhythmic impulse, and restricted respiratory function. Increased sympathetic tone, facilitated spinal segments, dural tension, and decreased CSF flow have been described as closely related aspects of an overall pattern of structural and energetic dysfunction in the axial skeleton and CNS. Therapies directed at affecting CSF flow include osteopathic care (especially cranial manipulation), craniosacral therapy, chiropractic adjustment of the spine and cranium, Network Care (formerly Network Chiropractic), massage therapy (including lymphatic drainage techniques), yoga, therapeutic breathwork, and cerebrospinal fluid technique. Further investigation into the nature and causation of CSF stasis, its potential effects upon human health, and effective therapies for its correction is warranted. PMID:19472865

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid stasis and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Whedon, James M; Glassey, Donald

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesize that stasis of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) occurs commonly and is detrimental to health. Physiologic factors affecting the normal circulation of CSF include cardiovascular, respiratory, and vasomotor influences. The CSF maintains the electrolytic environment of the central nervous system (CNS), influences systemic acid-base balance, serves as a medium for the supply of nutrients to neuronal and glial cells, functions as a lymphatic system for the CNS by removing the waste products of cellular metabolism, and transports hormones, neurotransmitters, releasing factors, and other neuropeptides throughout the CNS. Physiologic impedance or cessation of CSF flow may occur commonly in the absence of degenerative changes or pathology and may compromise the normal physiologic functions of the CSF. CSF appears to be particularly prone to stasis within the spinal canal. CSF stasis may be associated with adverse mechanical cord tension, vertebral subluxation syndrome, reduced cranial rhythmic impulse, and restricted respiratory function. Increased sympathetic tone, facilitated spinal segments, dural tension, and decreased CSF flow have been described as closely related aspects of an overall pattern of structural and energetic dysfunction in the axial skeleton and CNS. Therapies directed at affecting CSF flow include osteopathic care (especially cranial manipulation), craniosacral therapy, chiropractic adjustment of the spine and cranium, Network Care (formerly Network Chiropractic), massage therapy (including lymphatic drainage techniques), yoga, therapeutic breath-work, and cerebrospinal fluid technique. Further investigation into the nature and causation of CSF stasis, its potential effects upon human health, and effective therapies for its correction is warranted.

  7. Characterization of individual mouse cerebrospinal fluid proteomes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeffrey S.; Angel, Thomas E.; Chavkin, Charles; Orton, Daniel J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-03-20

    Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) offers key insight into the status of the central nervous system. Characterization of murine CSF proteomes can provide a valuable resource for studying central nervous system injury and disease in animal models. However, the small volume of CSF in mice has thus far limited individual mouse proteome characterization. Through non-terminal CSF extractions in C57Bl/6 mice and high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of individual murine samples, we report the most comprehensive proteome characterization of individual murine CSF to date. Utilizing stringent protein inclusion criteria that required the identification of at least two unique peptides (1% false discovery rate at the peptide level) we identified a total of 566 unique proteins, including 128 proteins from three individual CSF samples that have been previously identified in brain tissue. Our methods and analysis provide a mechanism for individual murine CSF proteome analysis.

  8. A new look at cerebrospinal fluid circulation.

    PubMed

    Brinker, Thomas; Stopa, Edward; Morrison, John; Klinge, Petra

    2014-01-01

    According to the traditional understanding of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) physiology, the majority of CSF is produced by the choroid plexus, circulates through the ventricles, the cisterns, and the subarachnoid space to be absorbed into the blood by the arachnoid villi. This review surveys key developments leading to the traditional concept. Challenging this concept are novel insights utilizing molecular and cellular biology as well as neuroimaging, which indicate that CSF physiology may be much more complex than previously believed. The CSF circulation comprises not only a directed flow of CSF, but in addition a pulsatile to and fro movement throughout the entire brain with local fluid exchange between blood, interstitial fluid, and CSF. Astrocytes, aquaporins, and other membrane transporters are key elements in brain water and CSF homeostasis. A continuous bidirectional fluid exchange at the blood brain barrier produces flow rates, which exceed the choroidal CSF production rate by far. The CSF circulation around blood vessels penetrating from the subarachnoid space into the Virchow Robin spaces provides both a drainage pathway for the clearance of waste molecules from the brain and a site for the interaction of the systemic immune system with that of the brain. Important physiological functions, for example the regeneration of the brain during sleep, may depend on CSF circulation.

  9. A new look at cerebrospinal fluid circulation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    According to the traditional understanding of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) physiology, the majority of CSF is produced by the choroid plexus, circulates through the ventricles, the cisterns, and the subarachnoid space to be absorbed into the blood by the arachnoid villi. This review surveys key developments leading to the traditional concept. Challenging this concept are novel insights utilizing molecular and cellular biology as well as neuroimaging, which indicate that CSF physiology may be much more complex than previously believed. The CSF circulation comprises not only a directed flow of CSF, but in addition a pulsatile to and fro movement throughout the entire brain with local fluid exchange between blood, interstitial fluid, and CSF. Astrocytes, aquaporins, and other membrane transporters are key elements in brain water and CSF homeostasis. A continuous bidirectional fluid exchange at the blood brain barrier produces flow rates, which exceed the choroidal CSF production rate by far. The CSF circulation around blood vessels penetrating from the subarachnoid space into the Virchow Robin spaces provides both a drainage pathway for the clearance of waste molecules from the brain and a site for the interaction of the systemic immune system with that of the brain. Important physiological functions, for example the regeneration of the brain during sleep, may depend on CSF circulation. PMID:24817998

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid leaks following septoplasty.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Naren N; Mattox, Douglas E; Del Gaudio, John M

    2014-12-01

    We conducted a retrospective review to identify the characteristics of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak in patients who had undergone septoplasty and in selected patients who had experienced a spontaneous CSF leak. CSF leak is a known but infrequently reported complication of septoplasty; to the best of our knowledge, only 4 cases have been previously published in the literature. A review of our institution's database revealed 3 cases of postseptoplasty CSF leak. We reviewed all the available data to look for any commonalities among these 7 cases. In addition, we reviewed 6 cases of spontaneous CSF leak selected from our database for the same purpose. For all patients, we noted the side of the cribriform plate defect, its size and, for the postseptoplasty cases, the interval between the septoplasty and the leak repair. Overall, we found that leaks were much more common on the right side than on the left. The sizes of the leaks in the 2 postseptoplasty groups were comparable (mean: 14.0 × 6.4 mm). The interval between septoplasty and leak repair ranged from 2.5 to 20 years in our cases and from 3 days to 22 weeks in the previously published cases. All 3 of the postseptoplasty patients in our database presented with clear rhinorrhea. Two of the 3 patients had meningitis; 1 of these 2 also had pneumocephalus. Of the 6 cases of spontaneous CSF leaks, 4 occurred on the right and 2 on the left; the average size of the defect was 5.8 mm in the greatest dimension. The finding that cribriform plate defects after septoplasty were typically right-sided likely reflects the prevalence of left-sided surgical approaches. Also, the fact that the defects were larger in the postseptoplasty cases than in the spontaneous cases is likely attributable to the torque effect toward the thin skull base that occurs when the perpendicular plate is twisted during septoplasty.

  11. IL-6, IL-8, IP-10, MCP-1 and G-CSF are significantly increased in cerebrospinal fluid but not in sera of patients with central neuropsychiatric lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Yoshio, T; Okamoto, H; Kurasawa, K; Dei, Y; Hirohata, S; Minota, S

    2016-08-01

    To determine whether the intrathecal concentrations of cytokines/chemokines are associated with, or influenced by, serum concentrations in patients with central neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE), and to ascertain whether the increased production of cytokines/chemokines intrathecally relative to serum levels is associated with the presence of central NPSLE. 52 SLE patients (30 with central NPSLE and 22 with non-NPSLE), for whom the CSF and serum samples were obtained at the same time, were enrolled. 27 kinds of cytokine/chemokine concentrations other than IFN-α in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum samples were measured by Bio-Plex Pro Assays. IFN-α concentration and anti-ribosomal P protein antibody (anti-P) titres in CSF and serum samples were measured by ELISA. The mean concentrations of IL-6, IL-8, IP-10, MCP-1, G-CSF and GM-CSF were higher in the CSF than in the sera, respectively, while the mean concentrations of other 22 cytokines/chemokines, including RANTES and IFN-α, in the CSF were much lower than those in the sera, respectively. Furthermore, the concentrations of IL-6, IL-8, IP-10, MCP-1 and G-CSF in the CSF of the 30 patients with NPSLE were significantly higher than in the 22 patients with non-NPSLE (p = 6.82 × 10(-5), p = 0.00037, p = 0.0028, p = 0.00065, and p = 0.0001, respectively), while the concentration of GM-CSF in the CSF of the 30 patients with NPSLE was not significantly higher than in the 22 patients with non-NPSLE. Most importantly, the largest difference occurred in CSF IL-6 concentrations. A significant positive correlation between CSF anti-P titres and serum anti-P titres in 52 patients with SLE (r = 0.6316, p = 6.44 × 10(-6)) was found, while no significant positive correlation was observed between CSF levels and serum levels of each cytokine/chemokine in the 52 SLE patients. In central NPSLE the production of IL-6, IL-8, IP-10, MCP-1 and G-CSF might take place in the

  12. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Lauren M; Wild, Edward J

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is enriched in brain-derived components and represents an accessible and appealing means of interrogating the CNS milieu to study neurodegenerative diseases and identify biomarkers to facilitate the development of novel therapeutics. Many such CSF biomarkers have been proposed for Huntington's disease (HD) but none has been validated for clinical trial use. Across many studies proposing dozens of biomarker candidates, there is a notable lack of statistical power, consistency, rigor and validation. Here we review proposed CSF biomarkers including neurotransmitters, transglutaminase activity, kynurenine pathway metabolites, oxidative stress markers, inflammatory markers, neuroendocrine markers, protein markers of neuronal death, proteomic approaches and mutant huntingtin protein itself. We reflect on the need for large-scale, standardized CSF collections with detailed phenotypic data to validate and qualify much-needed CSF biomarkers for clinical trial use in HD.

  13. Elevated cerebrospinal fluid tau in Wernicke encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Frijlink, Daphne W; Tilanus, Joachim J; Roks, Gerwin

    2012-08-08

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) commonly presents with oculomotor abnormalities, gait ataxia and confusion. WE can mimic rapidly progressive dementia syndromes, such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau is frequently used for diagnosis of several dementia subtypes, predominantly CJD and Alzheimer's disease. The combination of very high CSF tau (tau) and normal phosphorylated tau (p-tau) levels is almost exclusively seen in aggressive diseases, such as CJD. The authors present a case of a woman with WE, caused by chronic insufficient dietary intake, with highly elevated CSF tau and normal p-tau. The clinical symptoms and CSF findings raised the suspicion of CJD. However, shortly after immediate treatment with thiamine the patient clinically improved. At follow-up, 2.5 months later, she had made a good recovery. This case of rapidly progressive dementia illustrates that, even in the case of a highly elevated CSF tau, clinicians should be alert for treatable causes such as WE.

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid tau proteins in status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Monti, Giulia; Tondelli, Manuela; Giovannini, Giada; Bedin, Roberta; Nichelli, Paolo F; Trenti, Tommaso; Meletti, Stefano; Chiari, Annalisa

    2015-08-01

    Tau protein is a phosphorylated microtubule-associated protein, principally localized at neuronal level in the central nervous system (CNS). Tau levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are considered to index both axonal and neuronal damage. To date, however, no study has specifically evaluated the CSF levels of tau proteins in patients with status epilepticus (SE). We evaluated these established biomarkers of neuronal damage in patients with SE who received a lumbar puncture during SE between 2007 and 2014. Status epilepticus cases due to acute structural brain damage, including CNS infection, were excluded. Clinical, biological, therapeutic, and follow-up data were collected. Group comparison between patients stratified according to SE response to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), disability, and epilepsy outcomes were performed. Twenty-eight patients were considered for the analyses (mean age 56 years): 14 patients had abnormally high CSF t-tau level, six patients had abnormally high CSF p-tau level, and only three patients had abnormally low Aβ1-42 level. Cerebrospinal fluid t-tau value was higher in patients who developed a refractory SE compared to patients with seizures controlled by AED. Cerebrospinal fluid t-tau values were positively correlated with SE duration and were higher in patients treated with propofol anesthesia compared to patients that had not received this treatment. Patients with higher CSF t-tau had higher risk of developing disability (OR = 32.5, p = 0.004) and chronic epilepsy (OR = 12; p = 0.016) in comparison with patients with lower CSF t-tau level. Our results suggest that CSF t-tau level might be proposed as a biomarker of SE severity and prognosis. Prospective studies are needed to evaluate the effects of propofol on tau pathology in this setting. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Status Epilepticus". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cerebrospinal fluid eosinophilia in a child with neuroborreliosis.

    PubMed

    Buda, Piotr; Zawadka, Konrad; Wadowska-Kłopotek, Weronika; Smorczewska-Kiljan, Anna; Wieteska-Klimczak, Anna; Marczyńska, Magdalena; Książyk, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid eosinophilia is rare and usually associated with eosinophilic meningitis caused by helminthic infections. It is also observed in bacterial or fungal meningitis (syphilis, tuberculosis, coccidioidomycosis), in patients with malignancies, ventriculoperitonial shunts, hypereosinophilic syndrome or allergy to some medications. Here we present a case of an 8-year-old boy admitted with fever and clinical signs of meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis showed marked eosinophilia. Basing on further serological CSF testing the diagnosis of borreliosis was established. Cerebrospinal fluid eosinophilia in Borrelia burgdorferi infection has never been reported before.

  16. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) cerebritis versus Listeria monocytogenes meningoencephalitis in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus on chronic corticosteroid therapy: the diagnostic importance of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of lactic acid levels.

    PubMed

    McCaffrey, Lucas M; Petelin, Andrew; Cunha, Burke A

    2012-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a motile, aerobic, Gram-positive intracellular bacillus that causes enteritis, meningitis, meningoencephalitis, or subacute bacterial endocarditis. Patients with impaired T-lymphocyte function/cell-mediated immunity are predisposed to intracellular pathogens, e.g., L. monocytogenes. In adults, infection by L. monocytogenes of the central nervous system (CNS) clinically manifests as either acute bacterial meningitis or meningoencephalitis. In patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) presenting with headache and fever, SLE cerebritis must be differentiated from acute bacterial meningitis by lumbar puncture and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis. Neuropathogenic viruses are the most common causes of meningoencephalitis. The most rapid and accurate way to differentiate bacterial meningoencephalitis from nonbacterial meningoencephalitis is CSF lactic acid levels. We present a patient receiving chronic corticosteroid therapy and manifesting SLE and severe L. monocytogenes meningoencephalitis. An early diagnosis of L. meningoencephalitis was achieved by demonstrating a very highly elevated level of lactic acid in his CSF, days before CSF and blood cultures tested positive for L. monocytogenes. In this patient, the highly elevated levels of lactic acid in his CSF ruled out both viral meningoencephalitis and SLE cerebritis. The case was complicated by communicating hydrocephalus, and the patient later underwent placement of a shunt. He completed 6 weeks of meningeal dosed ampicillin. Copyright © 2012. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  17. Minimally invasive neurosurgery for cerebrospinal fluid disorders.

    PubMed

    Guillaume, Daniel J

    2010-10-01

    This article focuses on minimally invasive approaches used to address disorders of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation. The author covers the primary CSF disorders that are amenable to minimally invasive treatment, including aqueductal stenosis, fourth ventricular outlet obstruction (including Chiari malformation), isolated lateral ventricle, isolated fourth ventricle, multiloculated hydrocephalus, arachnoid cysts, and tumors that block CSF flow. General approaches to evaluating disorders of CSF circulation, including detailed imaging studies, are discussed. Approaches to minimally invasive management of such disorders are described in general, and for each specific entity. For each procedure, indications, surgical technique, and known outcomes are detailed. Specific complications as well as strategies for their avoidance and management are addressed. Lastly, future directions and the need for structured outcome studies are discussed.

  18. Endonasal Endoscopic Closure of Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Schmerber, S.; Righini, Ch.; Lavielle, J.-P.; Passagia, J.-G.; Reyt, E.

    2001-01-01

    The authors review their experience with endoscopic repair of skull base defects associated with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea involving the paranasal sinuses. A total of 22 patients was treated endoscopically between 1992 and 1998. The repair method consisted of closure of the CSF fistula with a free autologous abdominal fat graft and fibrin glue, supported with a sheet of silastic. The primary closure rate was 82% (18/22), and the overall closure rate was 95.5% (21/22) without recurrence or complications within an average follow-up of 5 years (14-83 months). A single patient still complains of cerebrospinal rhinorrhea, although this was never proved by any clinical, endoscopic, or biological (β2-transferrin) examination. The repair of ethmoidal-sphenoidal cerebrospinal fluid fistulae by endonasal endoscopic surgery is an excellent technique, both safe and effective. Fat is a material of choice, as it is tight and resists infection well. The technique and indications for endoscopic management of cerebrospinal fluid leaks are discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17167603

  19. Endonasal endoscopic closure of cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea.

    PubMed

    Schmerber, S; Righini, C; Lavielle, J P; Passagia, J G; Reyt, E

    2001-02-01

    The authors review their experience with endoscopic repair of skull base defects associated with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea involving the paranasal sinuses. A total of 22 patients was treated endoscopically between 1992 and 1998. The repair method consisted of closure of the CSF fistula with a free autologous abdominal fat graft and fibrin glue, supported with a sheet of silastic. The primary closure rate was 82% (18/22), and the overall closure rate was 95.5% (21/22) without recurrence or complications within an average follow-up of 5 years (14-83 months). A single patient still complains of cerebrospinal rhinorrhea, although this was never proved by any clinical, endoscopic, or biological (beta(2)-transferrin) examination. The repair of ethmoidal-sphenoidal cerebrospinal fluid fistulae by endonasal endoscopic surgery is an excellent technique, both safe and effective. Fat is a material of choice, as it is tight and resists infection well. The technique and indications for endoscopic management of cerebrospinal fluid leaks are discussed.

  20. More Than the Brain's Drain: Does Cerebrospinal Fluid Help the Brain Convey Messages?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, John

    1999-01-01

    Examines the role of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), a clear, colorless liquid that constantly bathes the brain and spinal cord. Scientists argue that cerebrospinal fluid carries important signals for sleep, appetite, and sex. Evaluates past and current research documenting the purpose of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain. (CCM)

  1. More Than the Brain's Drain: Does Cerebrospinal Fluid Help the Brain Convey Messages?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, John

    1999-01-01

    Examines the role of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), a clear, colorless liquid that constantly bathes the brain and spinal cord. Scientists argue that cerebrospinal fluid carries important signals for sleep, appetite, and sex. Evaluates past and current research documenting the purpose of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain. (CCM)

  2. Cerebrospinal Fluid HIV Escape from Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Francesca; Gisslen, Magnus; Cinque, Paola; Price, Richard W

    2015-06-01

    CNS infection is a nearly constant facet of systemic CNS infection and is generally well controlled by suppressive systemic antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, there are instances when HIV can be detected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) despite suppression of plasma viruses below the clinical limits of measurement. We review three types of CSF viral escape: asymptomatic, neuro-symptomatic, and secondary. The first, asymptomatic CSF escape, is seemingly benign and characterized by lack of discernable neurological deterioration or subsequent CNS disease progression. Neuro-symptomatic CSF escape is an uncommon, but important, entity characterized by new or progressive CNS disease that is critical to recognize clinically because of its management implications. Finally, secondary CSF escape, which may be even more uncommon, is defined by an increase of CSF HIV replication in association with a concomitant non-HIV infection, as a consequence of the local inflammatory response. Understanding these CSF escape settings not only is important for clinical diagnosis and management but also may provide insight into the CNS HIV reservoir.

  3. Analysis of extracellular RNA in cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Saugstad, Julie A.; Lusardi, Theresa A.; Van Keuren-Jensen, Kendall R.; Phillips, Jay I.; Lind, Babett; Harrington, Christina A.; McFarland, Trevor J.; Courtright, Amanda L.; Reiman, Rebecca A.; Yeri, Ashish S.; Kalani, M. Yashar S.; Adelson, P. David; Arango, Jorge; Nolan, John P.; Duggan, Erika; Messer, Karen; Akers, Johnny C.; Galasko, Douglas R.; Quinn, Joseph F.; Carter, Bob S.; Hochberg, Fred H.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We examined the extracellular vesicle (EV) and RNA composition of pooled normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples and CSF from five major neurological disorders: Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), low-grade glioma (LGG), glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), and subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), representing neurodegenerative disease, cancer, and severe acute brain injury. We evaluated: (I) size and quantity of EVs by nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) and vesicle flow cytometry (VFC), (II) RNA yield and purity using four RNA isolation kits, (III) replication of RNA yields within and between laboratories, and (IV) composition of total and EV RNAs by reverse transcription–quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and RNA sequencing (RNASeq). The CSF contained ~106 EVs/μL by NTA and VFC. Brain tumour and SAH CSF contained more EVs and RNA relative to normal, AD, and PD. RT-qPCR and RNASeq identified disease-related populations of microRNAs and messenger RNAs (mRNAs) relative to normal CSF, in both total and EV fractions. This work presents relevant measures selected to inform the design of subsequent replicative CSF studies. The range of neurological diseases highlights variations in total and EV RNA content due to disease or collection site, revealing critical considerations guiding the selection of appropriate approaches and controls for CSF studies. PMID:28717417

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid lactic acidosis in bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Eross, J; Silink, M; Dorman, D

    1981-01-01

    A rapid, microenzymatic method was used to measure cerebrospinal fluid lactate levels in 205 children with suspected bacterial meningitis. Fifty children with normal CSF containing fewer than 0.005 X 10(9)/l WBC, no segmented neutrophils, glucose 3.4 +/- 0.8 mmol/l (61.2 +/- 14.4 mg/100 ml), and a protein of less than 0.30 g/l had CSF lactate levels below 2.0 mmol/l (18 mg/100 ml) (mean and standard deviation 1.3 +/- 0.3 mmol/l (11.8 +/- 2.7 mg/100 ml)). In 31 cases of proved viral meningitis as with 58 cases of clinically diagnosed viral meningitis, levels were below 3.8 mmol/l (34.5 mg/100 ml), being 2.3 +/- 0.6 mmol/l (20.9 +/- 5.4 mg/100 ml), and 2.1 +/- 0.7 mmol/l (19.1 +/- 6.4 mg/100 ml) respectively. Sixty-six cases of bacterial meningitis had CSF lactate levels ranging from 3.9 mmol/l (35.4 mg/100 ml) to greater than 10.0 mmol/l (90.0 mg/100 ml). Longitudinal studies in 7 children with bacterial meningitis showed that cerebrospinal fluid lactate levels differentiated bacterial from viral meningitis up to 4 days after starting treatment with antibiotics. Use of CSF lactate measurement for monitoring the efficacy of treatment is illustrated in a case of bacterial meningitis due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The origin of the cerebrospinal fluid lactate acidosis and the role of lactate in the pathophysiological cycle leading to intensification of brain tissue hypoxia and cellular damage is discussed with respect to the short-term prognosis and the long-term neurological sequelae. PMID:7294872

  5. Doxepin concentrations in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Schomburg, Robert; Remane, Daniela; Fassbender, Klaus; Maurer, Hans H; Spiegel, Jörg

    2011-04-01

    Doxepin--like other antidepressant drugs (ADs)--shows a variable antidepressant effect in clinical practice. The cause for this variability is as yet unclear; however, pharmacokinetic factors such as the variable permeability of doxepin into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), may contribute to the difference in therapeutic efficacy. We measured and correlated the concentration of doxepin and its active metabolite nordoxepin in both the plasma and CSF. Plasma and CSF samples were taken simultaneously from 21 patients who were treated with doxepin due to different clinical indications. The plasma concentration of both doxepin and nordoxepin correlated significantly with the oral dosage of doxepin (doxepin: r = +0.66, p < 0.001; nordoxepin: r = +0.78, p < 0.0001; Spearman's correlation). Furthermore, we found significant correlations between the plasma and CSF concentrations of both doxepin (r = +0.71; p < 0.001; Pearson's correlation) and nordoxepin (r = +0.74; p < 0.001). These highly significant correlations between the plasma and CSF concentrations indicate a constant CSF permeability of doxepin and its active metabolite nordoxepin.

  6. Proteome analysis of chick embryonic cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Parada, Carolina; Gato, Angel; Aparicio, Mariano; Bueno, David

    2006-01-01

    During early stages of embryo development, the brain cavity is filled with embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (E-CSF), a complex fluid containing different protein fractions that contributes to the regulation of the survival, proliferation and neurogenesis of the neuroectodermal stem cells. Using 2-DE, protein sequencing and database searches, we identified and analyzed the proteome of the E-CSF from chick embryos (Gallus gallus). We identified 26 different gene products, including proteins related to the extracellular matrix, proteins associated with the regulation of osmotic pressure and metal transport, proteins related to cell survival, MAP kinase activators, proteins involved in the transport of retinol and vitamin D, antioxidant and antimicrobial proteins, intracellular proteins and some unknown proteins. Most of these gene products are involved in the regulation of developmental processes during embryogenesis in systems other than E-CSF. Interestingly, 14 of them are also present in adult human CSF proteome, and it has been reported that they are altered in the CSF of patients suffering neurodegenerative diseases and/or neurological disorders. Understanding these molecules and the mechanisms they control during embryonic neurogenesis is a key contribution to the general understanding of CNS development, and may also contribute to greater knowledge of these human diseases.

  7. Evaluation of the Production and Absorption of Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    MIYAJIMA, Masakazu; ARAI, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    The traditional hypothesis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hydrodynamics presumes that CSF is primarily produced in the choroid plexus (CP), then flows from the ventricles into the subarachnoid spaces, and mainly reabsorbed in the arachnoid granulations. This hypothesis is necessary to reconsider in view of recent research and clinical observations. This literature review presents numerous evidence for a new hypothesis of CSF hydrodynamics—(1) A significantly strong relationship exists between the CSF and interstitial fluid (IF), (2) CSF and IF are mainly produced and absorbed in the parenchymal capillaries of the brain and spinal cord. A considerable amount of CSF and IF are also absorbed by the lymphatic system, and (3) CSF movement is not unidirectional flow. It is only local mixing and diffusion. PMID:26226980

  8. Cerebrospinal Fluid and Hydrocephalus: Physiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Filis, Andreas K; Aghayev, Kamran; Vrionis, Frank D

    2017-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is found around and inside the brain and vertebral column. CSF plays a crucial role in the protection and homeostasis of neural tissue. Key points on the physiology of CSF as well as the diagnostic and treatment options for hydrocephalus are discussed. Understanding the fundamentals of the production, absorption, dynamics, and pathophysiology of CSF is crucial for addressing hydrocephalus. Shunts and endoscopic third ventriculostomy have changed the therapeutic landscape of hydrocephalus. The treatment of hydrocephalus in adults and children represents a large part of everyday practice for the neurologist, both in benign cases and cancer-related diagnoses.

  9. Cerebrospinal Fluid Flow Studies and Recent Advancements.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Erin J; Yamada, Shinya

    2016-04-01

    This article provides an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques used to assess cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) movement in the central nervous system (CNS), including Phase-Contrast (PC), Time-Spatial Labeling Inversion Pulse, and simultaneous multi slice echo planar phase contrast imaging. These techniques have been used to assess CSF movement in the CNS under normal and pathophysiological situations. PC can quantitatively measure stroke volume in selected regions, particularly the aqueduct of Sylvius, as synchronized to the heartbeat. The PC is frequently used to investigate those patients with suspected normal pressure hydrocephalus and a Chiari I malformation. Time-Spatial Labeling Inversion Pulse, with high signal-to-noise ratio, captures motion of CSF anywhere in the CNS over a time period of up to 5 seconds. Variations of PC-MRI improved temporal resolution and included contributions from respiration. With non-invasive imaging such as these, more can be understood about CSF dynamics, especially with respect to the relative effects of cardiac and respiratory changes on CSF movement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Prognostic significance of the initial cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) involvement of children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) treated without cranial irradiation: results of European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Children Leukemia Group study 58881.

    PubMed

    Sirvent, Nicolas; Suciu, Stefan; Rialland, Xavier; Millot, Frédéric; Benoit, Yves; Plantaz, Dominique; Ferster, Alice; Robert, Alain; Lutz, Patrick; Nelken, Brigitte; Plouvier, Emmanuel; Norton, Lucilia; Bertrand, Yves; Otten, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic significance of the initial cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) involvement of children with ALL enrolled from 1989 to 1996 in the EORTC 58881 trial. Patients (2025) were categorised according to initial central nervous system (CNS) status: CNS-1 (CNS negative, n=1866), CNS-2 (<5 leucocytes/mm(3), CSF with blasts, n=50), CNS-3 (CNS positive, n=49), TLP+ (TLP with blasts, n=60). CNS-directed therapy consisted in intravenous (i.v.) methotrexate (5 g/sqm) in 4-10 courses, and intrathecal methotrexate injections (10-20), according to CNS status. Cranial irradiation was omitted in all patients. In the CNS1, TLP+, CNS2 and CNS3 group the 8-year EFS rate (SE%) was 69.7% (1.1%), 68.8% (6.2%), 71.3% (6.5%) and 68.3% (6.2%), respectively. The 8-year incidence of isolated CNS relapse (SE%) was 3.4% (0.4%), 1.7% (1.7%), 6.1% (3.5%) and 9.4% (4.5%), respectively, whereas the 8-year isolated or combined CNS relapse incidence was 7.6% (0.6%), 3.5% (2.4%), 10.2% (4.4%) and 11.7% (5.0%), respectively. Patients with CSF blasts had a higher rate of initial bad risk features. Multivariate analysis indicated that presence of blasts in the CSF had no prognostic value: (i) for EFS and OS; (ii) for isolated and isolated or combined CNS relapse; WBC count<25 × 10(9)/L and Medac E-coli asparaginase treatment were each related to a lower CNS relapse risk. The presence of initial CNS involvement has no prognostic significance in EORTC 58881. Intensification of CNS-directed chemotherapy, without CNS radiation, is an effective treatment of initial meningeal leukaemic involvement. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid drainage options for posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus in premature neonates.

    PubMed

    Melo, José Roberto Tude; Passos, Rosane Klein; Carvalho, Marcelo Liberato Coelho Mendes de

    2017-07-01

    The literature describes various cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage techniques to alleviate posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus in preterm newborns; however, consensus has not been reached. The scope of this study was describing a case series of premature neonates with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus and assessing the outcomes of different approaches used for CSF diversion. A consecutive review of the medical records of neonates with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus treated with CSF drainage was conducted. Forty premature neonates were included. Serial lumbar puncture, ventriculosubgaleal shunt, and ventriculoperitoneal shunt were the treatments of choice in 25%, 37.5% and 37.5% of the cases, respectively. Cerebrospinal fluid diversion should be tailored to each case with preference given to temporary CSF drainage in neonates with lower age and lower birth-weight, while the permanent ventriculoperitoneal shunt should be considered in healthier, higher birth-weight neonates born closer to term.

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid dynamics study in communicating hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Vengalathur Ganesan; Narasimhan, Vidhya; Balasubramanian, Chandramouli

    2017-01-01

    Communicating hydrocephalus often poses a challenge in diagnosis and management decisions. The objective of this study is to measure the opening pressure (Po), pressure volume index (PVI), and cerebrospinal fluid outflow resistance (Rout), in patients with communicating hydrocephalus using bolus lumbar injection method and to evaluate its diagnostic and prognostic value. The study was conducted in 50 patients with communicating hydrocephalus, including normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) (19), post-meningitic hydrocephalus (23) and post-traumatic hydrocephalus (8). An improvised bolus lumbar injection method [the Madras Institute of Neurology (MIN) method] was used. In the NPH Group, the CSF dynamics studies correlated well with the clinico-radiological classification. The prediction of shunt responsiveness by CSF dynamics studies correlated with good outcome in 87.5%. In the post-meningitic hydrocephalus group, the value of CSF dynamics studies in predicting patients needing shunt was 89.5%. The CSF dynamics studies detected patients who needed shunt earlier than clinical or radiological indications. In the post-traumatic hydrocephalus group, 62.5% of patients improved with the treatment based on CSF dynamics studies. The improvised bolus lumbar injection method (MIN method) is a very simple test with fairly reliable and reproducible results. Study of CSF dynamics is a valuable tool in communicating hydrocephalus for confirmation of diagnosis and predicting shunt responsiveness. This is the first time that the value of CSF dynamics has been studied in patients with post-meningitic hydrocephalus. It was also useful for early selection of cases for shunting and for identifying patients with atrophic ventriculomegaly, thereby avoiding unnecessary shunt.

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of neurodegeneration in chronic neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Tumani, Hayrettin; Teunissen, Charlotte; Süssmuth, Sigurd; Otto, Markus; Ludolph, Albert C; Brettschneider, Johannes

    2008-07-01

    Chronic neurological diseases (CND) like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), dementia or multiple sclerosis (MS) share a chronic progressive course of disease that frequently leads to the common pathological pathway of neurodegeneration, including neuroaxonal damage, apoptosis and gliosis. There is an ongoing search for biomarkers that could support early diagnosis of CND and help to identify responders to interventions in therapeutic treatment trials. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a promising source of biomarkers in CND, since the CSF compartment is in close anatomical contact with the brain interstitial fluid, where biochemical changes related to CND are reflected. We review recent advances in CSF biomarkers research in CND and thereby focus on markers associated with neurodegeneration.

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea and unilateral nasal polyposis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gallina, E; Gallo, O; Bottai, G V; Ammannati, F

    1990-01-01

    We report a case of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea and unilateral polyposis in a 53-year-old woman. The clinical features, tomograms, and CT scan with Metrizamide infusion are examined. The analysis of this case evidences that: 1) A CSF can occur also after a long time (3 years) following a head injury; 2) CT cisternography with Metrizamide can demonstrate a leakage, but not always the fluid egress from the intracranial cavity; and 3) A CSF rhinorrhea may be the primary cause and not an occasional association or complication of a reactive phlogistic nasal disease.

  15. Subcommissural organ, cerebrospinal fluid circulation, and hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Fígares, J M; Jimenez, A J; Rodríguez, E M

    2001-03-01

    Under normal physiological conditions the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is secreted continuously, although this secretion undergoes circadian variations. Mechanisms operating at the vascular side of the choroidal cells involve a sympathetic and a cholinergic innervation, with the former inhibiting and the latter stimulating CSF secretion. There are also regulatory mechanisms operating at the ventricular side of the choroidal cells, where receptors for monoamines such as dopamine, serotonin, and melatonin, and for neuropeptides such as vasopressin, atrial natriuretic hormone, and angiotensin II, have been identified. These compounds, that are normally present in the CSF, participate in the regulation of CSF secretion. Although the mechanisms responsible for the CSF circulation are not fully understood, several factors are known to play a role. There is evidence that the subcommissural organ (SCO)--Reissner's fiber (RF) complex is one of the factors involved in the CSF circulation. In mammals, the predominant route of escape of CSF into blood is through the arachnoid villi. In lower vertebrates, the dilatation of the distal end of the central canal, known as terminal ventricle or ampulla caudalis, represents the main site of CSF escape into blood. Both the function and the ultrastructural arrangement of the ampulla caudalis suggest that it may be the ancestor structure of the mammalian arachnoid villi. RF-glycoproteins reaching the ampulla caudalis might play a role in the formation and maintenance of the route communicating the CSF and blood compartments. The SCO-RF complex may participate, under physiological conditions, in the circulation and reabsorption of CSF. Under pathological conditions, the SCO appears to be involved in the pathogeneses of congenital hydrocephalus. Changes in the SCO have been described in all species developing congenital hydrocephalus. In these reports, the important question whether the changes occurring in the SCO precede hydrocephalus, or

  16. Idiopathic cerebrospinal fluid overproduction: case-based review of the pathophysiological mechanism implied in the cerebrospinal fluid production.

    PubMed

    Trevisi, Gianluca; Frassanito, Paolo; Di Rocco, Concezio

    2014-08-28

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) overproduction results from either CSF infection or choroid plexus hypertrophy or tumor, with only a single idiopathic case described so far. We report a unique case of a male infant with Crouzon syndrome who presented with intracranial hypertension, caused by up to 4-fold increase in CSF daily production. Conditions related to CSF overproduction, namely central nervous system infections and choroid plexus hypertrophy or tumor, were ruled out by repeated magnetic resonance imaging and CSF samples. Medical therapy failed to reduce CSF production and the patient underwent several shunting procedures, cranial expansion, and endoscopic coagulation of the choroid plexus. This article thoroughly reviews pertinent literature on CSF production mechanisms and possible therapeutic implications.

  17. Idiopathic cerebrospinal fluid overproduction: case-based review of the pathophysiological mechanism implied in the cerebrospinal fluid production

    PubMed Central

    Trevisi, Gianluca; Frassanito, Paolo; Di Rocco, Concezio

    2014-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) overproduction results from either CSF infection or choroid plexus hypertrophy or tumor, with only a single idiopathic case described so far. We report a unique case of a male infant with Crouzon syndrome who presented with intracranial hypertension, caused by up to 4-fold increase in CSF daily production. Conditions related to CSF overproduction, namely central nervous system infections and choroid plexus hypertrophy or tumor, were ruled out by repeated magnetic resonance imaging and CSF samples. Medical therapy failed to reduce CSF production and the patient underwent several shunting procedures, cranial expansion, and endoscopic coagulation of the choroid plexus. This article thoroughly reviews pertinent literature on CSF production mechanisms and possible therapeutic implications. PMID:25165051

  18. Vancomycin Cerebrospinal Fluid Pharmacokinetics in Children with Cerebral Ventricular Shunt Infections

    PubMed Central

    Autmizguine, Julie; Moran, Cassie; Gonzalez, Daniel; Capparelli, Edmund V.; Smith, P. Brian; Grant, Gerald A; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Watt, Kevin M

    2014-01-01

    This study described the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) exposure of vancomycin in 8 children prescribed intravenous vancomycin therapy for cerebral ventricular shunt infection. Vancomycin CSF concentrations ranged from 0.06 to 9.13 mg/L and the CSF: plasma ratio ranged from 0 to 0.66. Two children out of three with a staphylococcal CSF infection had CSF concentrations > minimal inhibitory concentration at the end of the dosing interval. PMID:24776517

  19. Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea.

    PubMed

    Yerkes, S A; Thompson, D H; Fisher, W S

    1992-07-01

    The diagnosis of CSF rhinorrhea requires the performance of a thorough history and physical examination. Often no objective findings can be found and further evaluation will be required. In our experience, metrizamide CT cisternography yields the most information for localization of the fistula. When indicated, patients can be protected against meningitis by using prophylactic antibiotics for 4-6 weeks to allow a fistula to close spontaneously. If the fistula fails to close during this time, surgical closure with dural or muscle graft with or without waxing of the bone is the treatment of choice.

  20. Embryonic blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier formation and function

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, David; Parvas, Maryam; Hermelo, Ismaïl; Garcia-Fernàndez, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    During embryonic development and adult life, brain cavities and ventricles are filled with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). CSF has attracted interest as an active signaling medium that regulates brain development, homeostasis and disease. CSF is a complex protein-rich fluid containing growth factors and signaling molecules that regulate multiple cell functions in the central nervous system (CNS). The composition and substance concentrations of CSF are tightly controlled. In recent years, it has been demonstrated that embryonic CSF (eCSF) has a key function as a fluid pathway for delivering diffusible signals to the developing brain, thus contributing to the proliferation, differentiation and survival of neural progenitor cells, and to the expansion and patterning of the brain. From fetal stages through to adult life, CSF is primarily produced by the choroid plexus. The development and functional activities of the choroid plexus and other blood–brain barrier (BBB) systems in adults and fetuses have been extensively analyzed. However, eCSF production and control of its homeostasis in embryos, from the closure of the anterior neuropore when the brain cavities become physiologically sealed, to the formation of the functional fetal choroid plexus, has not been studied in as much depth and remains open to debate. This review brings together the existing literature, some of which is based on experiments conducted by our research group, concerning the formation and function of a temporary embryonic blood–CSF barrier in the context of the crucial roles played by the molecules in eCSF. PMID:25389383

  1. Progranulin Protein Levels in Cerebrospinal Fluid in Primary Neurodegenerative Dementias.

    PubMed

    Morenas-Rodríguez, Estrella; Cervera-Carles, Laura; Vilaplana, Eduard; Alcolea, Daniel; Carmona-Iragui, María; Dols-Icardo, Oriol; Ribosa-Nogué, Roser; Muñoz-Llahuna, Laia; Sala, Isabel; Belén Sánchez-Saudinós, M; Blesa, Rafael; Clarimón, Jordi; Fortea, Juan; Lleó, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Progranulin is implicated in frontotemporal dementia (FTD), but its role in other neurodegenerative disorders is unknown. To investigate the levels of progranulin (PGRN) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in different neurodegenerative dementias and their correlation with levels in plasma in cognitively normal subjects. We measured PGRN in CSF in 229 patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's disease dementia, sporadic FTD, dementia with Lewy bodies, corticobasal syndrome, or progressive supranuclear palsy. We also measured PGRN in CSF and plasma in 74 cognitively normal individuals. We examined the correlation between PGRN levels in CSF and diagnosis, cortical thickness, genetic factors and other CSF biomarkers. We also investigated the correlation between plasma and CSF levels of PGRN in cognitively normal individuals. CSF levels did not differ across diagnoses or correlate with cortical thickness. Polymorphism rs5848 in GRN influenced CSF PGRN levels, but APOEɛ4 allele did not. Amyloid-β42, t-tau, p-tau, and YKL-40 levels correlated weakly with PGRN in CSF. We found a weak correlation (r = 0.362) between plasma and CSF PGRN levels in cognitively normal individuals. Our findings do not support a diagnostic value of CSF PGRN in neurodegenerative diseases. Our data confirm that levels of PGRN in plasma do not reflect accurately levels in CSF in cognitively normal controls. These data should be considered in clinical trials aiming to increase PGRN.

  2. Development and validation of a sample stabilization strategy and a UPLC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous quantitation of acetylcholine (ACh), histamine (HA), and its metabolites in rat cerebrospinal fluid (CSF).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanhua; Tingley, F David; Tseng, Elaine; Tella, Max; Yang, Xin; Groeber, Elizabeth; Liu, Jianhua; Li, Wenlin; Schmidt, Christopher J; Steenwyk, Rick

    2011-07-15

    A UPLC-MS/MS assay was developed and validated for simultaneous quantification of acetylcholine (ACh), histamine (HA), tele-methylhistamine (t-mHA), and tele-methylimidazolacetic acid (t-MIAA) in rat cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The biological stability of ACh in rat CSF was investigated. Following fit-for-purpose validation, the method was applied to monitor the drug-induced changes in ACh, HA, t-mHA, and t-MIAA in rat CSF following administration of donepezil or prucalopride. The quantitative method utilizes hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) Core-Shell HPLC column technology and a UPLC system to achieve separation with detection by positive ESI LC-MS/MS. This UPLC-MS/MS method does not require extraction or derivatization, utilizes a stable isotopically labeled internal standard (IS) for each analyte, and allows for rapid throughput with a 4 min run time. Without an acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor present, ACh was found to have 1.9±0.4 min in vitro half life in rat CSF. Stability studies and processing modification, including the use of AChE inhibitor eserine, extended this half life to more than 60 min. The UPLC-MS/MS method, including stabilization procedure, was validated over a linear concentration range of 0.025-5 ng/mL for ACh and 0.05-10 ng/mL for HA, t-mHA, and t-MIAA. The intra-run precision and accuracy for all analytes were 1.9-12.3% CV and -10.2 to 9.4% RE, respectively, while inter-run precision and accuracy were 4.0-16.0% CV and -5.3 to 13.4% RE, respectively. By using this developed and validated method, donepezil caused increases in ACh levels at 0.5, 1, 2, and 4h post dose as compared to the corresponding vehicle group, while prucalopride produced approximately 1.6- and 3.1-fold increases in the concentrations of ACh and t-mHA at 1h post dose, respectively, compared to the vehicle control. Overall, this methodology enables investigations into the use of CSF ACh and HA as biomarkers in the study of these neurotransmitter systems

  3. The cerebrospinal fluid: regulator of neurogenesis, behavior, and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Zappaterra, Mauro W.; Lehtinen, Maria K.

    2013-01-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has attracted renewed interest as an active signaling milieu that regulates brain development, homeostasis, and disease. Advances in proteomics research have enabled an improved characterization of the CSF from development through adulthood, and key neurogenic signaling pathways that are transmitted via the CSF are now being elucidated. Due to its immediate contact with neural stem cells in the developing and adult brain, the CSF's ability to swiftly distribute signals across vast distances in central nervous system is opening avenues to novel and exciting therapeutic approaches. In this review, we will discuss the development of the choroid plexus-CSF system, and review the current literature on how the CSF actively regulates mammalian brain development, behavior, and responses to traumatic brain injury. PMID:22415326

  4. Management of Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak following Posterior Cranial Fossa Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Altaf, Imran; Vohra, Anjum Habib; Shams, Shahzad

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Cerebrospinal fluid leakage remains a significant cause of morbidity following posterior fossa surgery, and its treatment remains a difficult problem. The aim of the study was to propose a treatment algorithm for its management. Methods: A retrospective, single-center study was conducted on 147 patients who underwent elective posterior fossa surgery for a variety of diseases. Patients with post operative CSF leakage had either been treated initially with conservative measures including re-suturing of the wound, with CSF lumbar drainage to be employed in case the CSF leakage didn’t stop, or the initial intervention was the institution of CSF lumbar drainage simultaneously with conservative measures. VP (ventriculo-peritoneal) shunt was done in patients with gross hydrocephalus on postoperative CT brain. Results: There were 25 (17%) cases of CSF leakage, including 24 incisional CSF leaks and one case of CSF otorrhea. In eight patients with incisional CSF leakage treated initially with conservative measures including re-suturing of the wound, CSF leakage stopped in only two cases. CSF lumbar drainage instituted later on in six cases with persistent leakage stopped the CSF leakage. In fourteen patients managed initially with re-suturing of the wound and concomitant CSF lumbar drainage, CSF leakage settled in all the cases. Two patients with gross hydrocephalus on post operative CT were managed successfully with VP shunt. Re-suturing of the wound with concomitant CSF lumbar drainage was found to be significantly associated (p=0.003) with the stoppage of CSF leakage, and the settlement of meningitis (p= 0.014). Conclusion: Incisional CSF leaks after posterior fossa surgery should be managed with re-suturing of the wound and concomitant CSF lumbar drainage, instead of an initial trial of conservative therapy alone. PMID:28083041

  5. Cerebrospinal Fluid Mechanics and Its Coupling to Cerebrovascular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linninger, Andreas A.; Tangen, Kevin; Hsu, Chih-Yang; Frim, David

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is not stagnant but displays fascinating oscillatory flow patterns inside the ventricular system and reversing fluid exchange between the cranial vault and spinal compartment. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of pulsatile CSF motion. Observations contradicting classical views about its bulk production and clearance are highlighted. A clinical account of diseases of abnormal CSF flow dynamics, including hydrocephalus, syringomyelia, Chiari malformation type 1, and pseudotumor cerebri, is also given. We survey medical imaging modalities used to observe intracranial dynamics in vivo. Additionally, we assess the state of the art in predictive models of CSF dynamics. The discussion addresses open questions regarding CSF dynamics as they relate to the understanding and management of diseases.

  6. Postmortem quantitative 1.5-T MRI for the differentiation and characterization of serous fluids, blood, CSF, and putrefied CSF.

    PubMed

    Zech, Wolf-Dieter; Schwendener, Nicole; Persson, Anders; Warntjes, Marcel J; Riva, Fabiano; Schuster, Frederick; Jackowski, Christian

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether serous fluids, blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and putrefied CSF can be characterized and differentiated in synthetically calculated magnetic resonance (MR) images based on their quantitative T1, T2, and proton density (PD) values. Images from 55 postmortem short axis cardiac and 31 axial brain 1.5-T MR examinations were quantified using a quantification sequence. Serous fluids, fluid blood, sedimented blood, blood clots, CSF, and putrefied CSF were analyzed for their mean T1, T2, and PD values. Body core temperature was measured during the MRI scans. The fluid-specific quantitative values were related to the body core temperature. Equations to correct for temperature differences were generated. In a 3D plot as well as in statistical analysis, the quantitative T1, T2 and PD values of serous fluids, fluid blood, sedimented blood, blood clots, CSF, and putrefied CSF could be well differentiated from each other. The quantitative T1 and T2 values were temperature-dependent. Correction of quantitative values to a temperature of 37 °C resulted in significantly better discrimination between all investigated fluid mediums. We conclude that postmortem 1.5-T MR quantification is feasible to discriminate between blood, serous fluids, CSF, and putrefied CSF. This finding provides a basis for the computer-aided diagnosis and detection of fluids and hemorrhages.

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of infantile congenital hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Limbrick, David D.; Baksh, Brandon; Morgan, Clinton D.; Habiyaremye, Gakwaya; McAllister, James P.; Inder, Terrie E.; Mercer, Deanna; Holtzman, David M.; Strahle, Jennifer; Wallendorf, Michael J.; Morales, Diego M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Hydrocephalus is a complex neurological disorder with a pervasive impact on the central nervous system. Previous work has demonstrated derangements in the biochemical profile of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in hydrocephalus, particularly in infants and children, in whom neurodevelopment is progressing in parallel with concomitant neurological injury. The objective of this study was to examine the CSF of children with congenital hydrocephalus (CHC) to gain insight into the pathophysiology of hydrocephalus and identify candidate biomarkers of CHC with potential diagnostic and therapeutic value. Methods CSF levels of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and derivative isoforms (sAPPα, sAPPβ, Aβ42), tau, phosphorylated tau (pTau), L1CAM, NCAM-1, aquaporin 4 (AQP4), and total protein (TP) were measured by ELISA in 20 children with CHC. Two comparative groups were included: age-matched controls and children with other neurological diseases. Demographic parameters, ventricular frontal-occipital horn ratio, associated brain malformations, genetic alterations, and surgical treatments were recorded. Logistic regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic curves were used to examine the association of each CSF protein with CHC. Results CSF levels of APP, sAPPα, sAPPβ, Aβ42, tau, pTau, L1CAM, and NCAM-1 but not AQP4 or TP were increased in untreated CHC. CSF TP and normalized L1CAM levels were associated with FOR in CHC subjects, while normalized CSF tau levels were associated with FOR in control subjects. Predictive ability for CHC was strongest for sAPPα, especially in subjects ≤12 months of age (p<0.0001 and AUC = 0.99), followed by normalized sAPPβ (p = 0.0001, AUC = 0.95), tau, APP, and L1CAM. Among subjects ≤12 months, a normalized CSF sAPPα cut-point of 0.41 provided the best prediction of CHC (odds ratio = 528, sensitivity = 0.94, specificity = 0.97); these infants were 32 times more likely to have CHC. Conclusions CSF proteins such as s

  8. Confocal Raman microscopy of pathologic cells in cerebrospinal fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonchukov, S. A.; Lonkina, T. V.; Minaeva, S. A.; Sundukov, A. V.; Migmanov, T. E.; Lademann, J.; Darvin, M. E.; Bagratashvili, V. N.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the spatial localization of leucocytes, bacteria, and erythrocytes in the crystal pattern of a dried droplet of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is established. Characteristic lines are detected and identified in the Raman spectrum of the CSF that point to the presence of pathologic cells therein and can be used in a timely way to diagnose meningitis, the spectroscopic sample preparation procedure being simple enough. A dry CSF sample retains its characteristic spectral features for no less than three days, which is important for its safe keeping and transportation, and also for the computer processing of its spectra.

  9. Secretion of laminin alpha 2 chain in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Yamada, H; Hori, H; Tanaka, T; Fujita, S; Fukuta-Ohi, H; Hojo, S; Tamura, A; Shimizu, T; Matsumura, K

    1995-11-27

    The absence of laminin alpha 2 chain causes muscle cell degeneration and peripheral dysmyelination in congenital muscular dystrophy patients and dy mice, suggesting its role in the maintenance of sarcolemmal architecture and peripheral myelinogenesis. Here we demonstrate the secretion of laminin alpha 2 chain in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Laminin alpha 2 chain was detected as a minor component of the total CSF proteins or glycoproteins. Laminin alpha 2 chain was localized in the cytoplasm of epithelial cells of choroid plexus, suggesting active secretion. Our results suggest that immunochemical analysis of CSF laminin alpha 2 chain could be useful as an aid for the diagnosis of congenital muscular dystrophy.

  10. [Strategies for cerebrospinal fluid analysis - Integrated results report].

    PubMed

    Uhr, M; Tumani, H; Lange, P

    2016-12-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis requires a combined assessment of all individual test findings in an integrated total report in order to achieve a reliable and specific diagnostic conclusion. Such a standard assessment strategy allows the identification of disease-typical result patterns and plausibility checks to avoid analytical errors. The integrated total report consists of 1) a basic CSF program with cytological and protein chemical parameters, 2) an expanded CSF program with special parameters for detection of pathogens and markers of neurodegeneration and 3) a final contextual interpretation considering methodological and clinical aspects.

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Sweetman, Brian; Linninger, Andreas A

    2011-01-01

    Cine-phase-contrast-MRI was used to measure the three-dimensional cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow field inside the central nervous system (CNS) of a healthy subject. Image reconstruction and grid generation tools were then used to develop a three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction model of the CSF flow inside the CNS. The CSF spaces were discretized using the finite-element method and the constitutive equations for fluid and solid motion solved in ADINA-FSI 8.6. Model predictions of CSF velocity magnitude and stroke volume were found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental data. CSF pressure gradients and amplitudes were computed in all regions of the CNS. The computed pressure gradients and amplitudes closely match values obtained clinically. The highest pressure amplitude of 77 Pa was predicted to occur in the lateral ventricles. The pressure gradient between the lateral ventricles and the lumbar region of the spinal canal did not exceed 132 Pa (~1 mmHg) at any time during the cardiac cycle. The pressure wave speed in the spinal canal was predicted and found to agree closely with values previously reported in the literature. Finally, the forward and backward motion of the CSF in the ventricles was visualized, revealing the complex mixing patterns in the CSF spaces. The mathematical model presented in this article is a prerequisite for developing a mechanistic understanding of the relationships among vasculature pulsations, CSF flow, and CSF pressure waves in the CNS.

  12. A mathematical model of blood, cerebrospinal fluid and brain dynamics.

    PubMed

    Linninger, Andreas A; Xenos, Michalis; Sweetman, Brian; Ponkshe, Sukruti; Guo, Xiaodong; Penn, Richard

    2009-12-01

    Using first principles of fluid and solid mechanics a comprehensive model of human intracranial dynamics is proposed. Blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and brain parenchyma as well as the spinal canal are included. The compartmental model predicts intracranial pressure gradients, blood and CSF flows and displacements in normal and pathological conditions like communicating hydrocephalus. The system of differential equations of first principles conservation balances is discretized and solved numerically. Fluid-solid interactions of the brain parenchyma with cerebral blood and CSF are calculated. The model provides the transitions from normal dynamics to the diseased state during the onset of communicating hydrocephalus. Predicted results were compared with physiological data from Cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging to verify the dynamic model. Bolus injections into the CSF are simulated in the model and found to agree with clinical measurements.

  13. Effect of cerebrospinal fluid shunts on intracranial pressure and on cerebrospinal fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Fox, John L.; McCullough, David C.; Green, Robert C.

    1973-01-01

    Part 2 describes measurements of intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure in 18 adult patients with CSF shunts, all pressure measurements being referred to a horizontal plane close to the foramina of Monro. All 18 patients had normal CSF pressure by lumbar puncture; however, in one patient an intracranial pressure of +280 mm was subsequently measured after pneumoencephalography. Twelve patients had pre-shunt CSF pressures measured intracranially: 11 ranged from +20 to +180 mm H2O and one was +280 mm H2O in the supine position. In the upright posture nine patients had values of −10 to −140 mm H2O, while three others were +60, +70, and +280 mm H2O. After CSF shunting in these 18 patients the pressures were −30 to +30 mm H2O in the supine position and −210 to −370 mm in the upright position. The effect of posture on the siphoning action of these longer shunts in the erect, adult patient is a major uncontrollable variable in maintenance of intracranial pressure after shunting. Other significant variables are reviewed. In Part 3 a concept of the hydrocephalus phenomenon is described. Emphasis is placed on the pressure differential (Pd) and force differential (Fd) causing pre-shunt ventricular enlargement and post-shunt ventricular size reduction. The site of Pd, which must be very small and not to be confused with measured ventricular pressure, P, must be at the ventricular wall. Images PMID:4541079

  14. Proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid extracellular vesicles: a comprehensive dataset.

    PubMed

    Chiasserini, Davide; van Weering, Jan R T; Piersma, Sander R; Pham, Thang V; Malekzadeh, Arjan; Teunissen, Charlotte E; de Wit, Heidi; Jiménez, Connie R

    2014-06-25

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are present in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), yet little is known about their protein composition. The aim of this study is to provide a comprehensive analysis of the proteome of CSF EVs by electron microscopy and high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) in conjunction with bioinformatics. We report an extensive catalog of 1315 proteins identified in EVs isolated from two different CSF pools by ultracentrifugation, including 230 novel EV proteins. Out of 1315 proteins, 760 were identified in both CSF pools and about 30% of those were also quantitatively enriched in the EV fraction versus the soluble CSF fraction. The proteome of CSF EVs was enriched in exosomal markers such as alix and syntenin-1, heat shock proteins and tetraspanins and contained a high proportion of brain-derived proteins (n=373). Interestingly, several known biomarkers for neurodegenerative diseases such as the amyloid precursor protein, the prion protein and DJ-1 were identified in the EV fractions. Our dataset represents the first comprehensive inventory of the EV proteome in CSF, underscoring the biomarker potential of this organelle. Further comparative studies on CSF EVs isolated from patients diagnosed with neurological disorders are warranted. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000608. Biological significance In this study we analyzed the protein composition of extracellular vesicles isolated from pooled samples of human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). CSF is a colorless fluid surrounding the brain and the spinal cord, important for the physiology of the central nervous system, ensuing mechanical protection, regulation of brain blood flow and elimination of byproducts of the brain. Since brain (patho)physiology is reflected in CSF, this biological fluid represents an ideal source of soluble and vesicle-based biomarkers for neurological diseases. Here we confirm the presence of exosome-like extracellular vesicles in CSF, underscoring

  15. Free and Total Vitamin B12 in Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Honor M.; Gould, C. E. G.; Thomas, J. W.

    1963-01-01

    Free and total vitamin B12 levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were bioassayed, since there were no available data on the relationship between free and total vitamin B12 in CSF or between free vitamin in serum and CSF vitamin B12. The subjects were 43 neurological patients. Serum levels were normal in 40 of 43 patients. Values for free and total vitamin B12 in CSF were the same in 42 of 43 patients. Mean CSF vitamin B12 was 21 μμg./ml. In 17 cases CSF vitamin B12 equalled free vitamin B12 level in serum, in 16 cases CSF vitamin B12 was lower than the free level in serum, and in 10 cases CSF vitamin B12 was higher than the free vitamin level in serum. There was no apparent diagnostic correlation. The findings suggest that vitamin B12 is not bound in CSF and that there is some selective control of passage of vitamin B12 across the blood-CSF barrier. PMID:14032478

  16. Imhotep and the Discovery of Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Blomstedt, Patric

    2014-01-01

    Herbowski (2013) suggested recently the Egyptian Imhotep from the 3rd dynasty in Egypt to be the discoverer of cerebrospinal fluid. There are, however, no sources within the first 2000 years after Imhotep suggesting him to be in any way connected with the field of medicine. Over the course of three millennia Imhotep evolves into the sage who besides architecture also masters the arts of medicine, magic, astronomy, and astrology, at the same time as him being transformed from man to demi-God, and finally to a God. The identification of Imhotep as a doctor has thus little to do with facts and it is unlikely that he had anything to do with the Edwin-Smith papyrus from a much later period where CSF is first mentioned. PMID:24744920

  17. Imhotep and the discovery of cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Blomstedt, Patric

    2014-01-01

    Herbowski (2013) suggested recently the Egyptian Imhotep from the 3rd dynasty in Egypt to be the discoverer of cerebrospinal fluid. There are, however, no sources within the first 2000 years after Imhotep suggesting him to be in any way connected with the field of medicine. Over the course of three millennia Imhotep evolves into the sage who besides architecture also masters the arts of medicine, magic, astronomy, and astrology, at the same time as him being transformed from man to demi-God, and finally to a God. The identification of Imhotep as a doctor has thus little to do with facts and it is unlikely that he had anything to do with the Edwin-Smith papyrus from a much later period where CSF is first mentioned.

  18. Spectrophotometry of cerebrospinal fluid in subacute and chronic subdural haematomas

    PubMed Central

    Kjellin, K. G.; Steiner, L.

    1974-01-01

    Spectrophotometric examinations were performed on cerebrospinal and subdural fluids in subacute (five patients) and chronic (20 patients) subdural haematomas, with special reference to the diagnostic aid of CSF spectrophotometry. Spectrophotometric xanthochromia of haemorrhagic origin was found in all CSFs examined, while definite visible xanthochromia was observed in only 28% and the CSF was judged as colourless in 52% of those cases. Characteristic bleeding patterns were found spectrophotometrically in all the 20 CSFs examined within 24 hours after lumbar puncture, haematoma patterns being detected in 90-95% of the cases. In many cases the electrophoretically separated protein fractions of CSF and subdural fluids were spectrophotometrically examined. In conclusion, CSF spectrophotometry is a simple, fast, and extremely sensitive method, which in our opinion should be used routinely in the diagnosis of suspected subdural haematomas, if lumbar puncture is not contraindicated. PMID:4140892

  19. Cytologic diagnosis of spinal cord ependymoma in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Kalogeraki, A; Tamiolakis, D; Sinatkas, V; Xekalou, A; Papadakis, M; Stathopoulos, E N

    2012-12-01

    Ependymoma cells are known to rarely exfoliate into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). However, the frequency of CSF involvement in patients with ependymoma is unclear, and to the author's knowledge the cytomorphologic features of tumour cells have not been well described to date. In this study, the CSF findings in a patient with ependymoma and the cytopathological features of this tumor are reported. The patient presented at the University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete, suffering from a chest to back pain. Computed tomography, scanning and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed and a mass of 3x2 cm in the thoracic aspect of the spinal cord was found. A sample of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was sent for cytologic examination and a diagnosis of ependymoma was made. A biopsy was performed and histology confirmed the cytologic diagnosis of ependymoma grade II (WHO). Exfoliated cells from ependymomas of spinal cord are rarely recognizable in CSF samples. Except in patients with myxopapillary tumours and anaplastic tumours, cytomorphologic features of ependymoma have been described only in case reports of intraoperative imprinting or fine needle aspiration biopsies (FNABs) and not in CSF cytology.

  20. Application of transport phenomena analysis technique to cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Lam, C H; Hansen, E A; Hall, W A; Hubel, A

    2013-12-01

    The study of hydrocephalus and the modeling of cerebrospinal fluid flow have proceeded in the past using mathematical analysis that was very capable of prediction phenomenonologically but not well in physiologic parameters. In this paper, the basis of fluid dynamics at the physiologic state is explained using first established equations of transport phenomenon. Then, microscopic and molecular level techniques of modeling are described using porous media theory and chemical kinetic theory and then applied to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics. Using techniques of transport analysis allows the field of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics to approach the level of sophistication of urine and blood transport. Concepts such as intracellular and intercellular pathways, compartmentalization, and tortuosity are associated with quantifiable parameters that are relevant to the anatomy and physiology of cerebrospinal fluid transport. The engineering field of transport phenomenon is rich and steeped in architectural, aeronautical, nautical, and more recently biological history. This paper summarizes and reviews the approaches that have been taken in the field of engineering and applies it to CSF flow.

  1. Endoscopic management of cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Parihar, Vijay; Janakiram, Narayanan; Pande, Sonjay; Bajaj, Jitin; Namdev, Hemant

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea occurs due to communication between the intracranial subarachnoid space and the sinonasal mucosa. It could be due to trauma, raised intracranial pressure (ICP), tumors, erosive diseases, and congenital skull defects. Some leaks could be spontaneous without any specific etiology. The potential leak sites include the cribriform plate, ethmoid, sphenoid, and frontal sinus. Glucose estimation, although non-specific, is the most popular and readily available method of diagnosis. Glucose concentration of > 30 mg/dl without any blood contamination strongly suggests presence and the absence of glucose rules out CSF in the fluid. Beta-2 transferrin test confirms the diagnosis. High-resolution computed tomography and magnetic resonance cisternography are complementary to each other and are the investigation of choice. Surgical intervention is indicated, when conservative management fails to prevent risk of meningitis. Endoscopic closure has revolutionized the management of CSF rhinorrhea due to its less morbidity and better closure rate. It is usually best suited for small defects in cribriform plate, sphenoid, and ethmoid sinus. Large defects can be repaired when sufficient experience is acquired. Most frontal sinus leaks, although difficult, can be successfully closed by modified Lothrop procedure. Factors associated with increased recurrences are middle age, obese female, raised ICP, diabetes mellitus, lateral sphenoid leaks, superior and lateral extension in frontal sinus, multiple leaks, and extensive skull base defects. Appropriate treatment for raised ICP, in addition to proper repair, should be done to prevent recurrence. Long follow-up is required before leveling successful repair as recurrences may occur very late. PMID:27366243

  2. Quantitative evaluation fo cerebrospinal fluid shunt flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chervu, S.; Chervu, L.R.; Vallabhajosyula, B.; Milstein, D.M.; Shapiro, K.M.; Shulman, K.; Blaufox, M.D.

    1984-01-01

    The authors describe a rigorous method for measuring the flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in shunt circuits implanted for the relief of obstructive hydrocephalus. Clearance of radioactivity for several calibrated flow rates was determined with a Harvard infusion pump by injecting the Rickham reservoir of a Rickham-Holter valve system with 100 ..mu..Ci of Tc-99m as pertechnetate. The elliptical and the cylindrical Holter valves used as adjunct valves with the Rickham reservoir yielded two different regression lines when the clearances were plotted against flow rats. The experimental regression lines were used to determine the in vivo flow rates from clearances calculated after injecting the Rickham reservoirs of the patients. The unique clearance characteristics of the individual shunt systems available requires that calibration curves be derived for an entire system identical to one implanted in the patient being evaluated, rather than just the injected chamber. Excellent correlation between flow rates and the clinical findings supports the reliability of this method of quantification of CSF shunt flow, and the results are fully accepted by neurosurgeons.

  3. Thermal effect of dielectrophoresis manipulation on cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Miled, Amine

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces an investigation on the thermal effects of dielectrophoresis on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). It highlights the temperature propagation in CSF according to applied voltage and generated electrical field in a limited area of the brain. Through the described study, the temperature increase is considerable in the close surrounding area of electrodes where applied voltage goes up to 20 V(rms) in order to generate dielectrophoretic forces for CSF sampling. Matlab simulations detailed in this work are based on the assumption that the propagation of temperature in CSF is linear. The objective of this research is to study the thermal side effects of direct measurements and manipulations of neurotransmitters in the brain versus in-channel measurement of neurotransmitter concentration. Indeed, according to simulation results, if the temperature in the top of electrodes is 46.85 °C then it will decrease only to 45.35 °C at 1 mm away from electrode surface.

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of insulin in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Molina, J A; Jiménez-Jiménez, F J; Vargas, C; Gómez, P; de Bustos, F; Gómez-Escalonilla, C; Zurdo, M; Tallón, A; Martínez-Salio, A; Porta-Etessam, J; Villanueva, C; Arenas, J

    2002-12-01

    Some previous reports suggested a potential role of insulin in memory and in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We assessed the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of insulin in patients with AD and in age and sex-matched controls trying to elucidate whether this value could be related with the risk or severity of AD. We measured the CSF insulin levels in 27 patients with AD and 16 matched controls using a RadioImmunoanalysis method. CSF insulin levels did not differ significantly between AD-patient and control groups. These values were not correlated with age, age at onset, duration of the disease, and scores of the MiniMental State Examination in the AD group. These results suggest that CSF insulin concentrations are not related with the risk or severity of AD. Copyright Blackwell Munksgaard 2002

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid otorrhea through a congenitally patent fallopian canal.

    PubMed

    Foyt, D; Brackmann, D E

    2000-04-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) otorrhea is a relatively rare entity that may occur either as a spontaneous occurrence or as a result of trauma or surgery. Spontaneous CSF leaks may be found during tympanocentesis, myringotomy, or tube insertion for chronic middle ear effusion. Rapid identification of the problem and timely treatment are required to avoid life-threatening complications such as meningitis. The site of leakage must also be identified so that the disorder can be treated effectively. Computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and radionucleotide localization scanning all play a role in the early identification of the leakage site. A detailed knowledge of possible CSF leakage pathways aids in evaluating imaging studies. We report 2 rare cases of CSF otorrhea through a congenitally patent facial canal and their management.

  6. Massive Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak of the Temporal Bone

    PubMed Central

    Manno, Alessandra; Pasqualitto, Emanuela; Ciofalo, Andrea; Angeletti, Diletta; Pasquariello, Benedetta

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage of the temporal bone region is defined as abnormal communications between the subarachnoidal space and the air-containing spaces of the temporal bone. CSF leak remains one of the most frequent complications after VS surgery. Radiotherapy is considered a predisposing factor for development of temporal bone CSF leak because it may impair dural repair mechanisms, thus causing inadequate dural sealing. The authors describe the case of a 47-year-old man with a massive effusion of CSF which extended from the posterior and lateral skull base to the first cervical vertebrae; this complication appeared after a partial enucleation of a vestibular schwannoma (VS) with subsequent radiation treatment and second operation with total VS resection. PMID:27597915

  7. Massive Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak of the Temporal Bone.

    PubMed

    Iannella, Giannicola; Manno, Alessandra; Pasqualitto, Emanuela; Ciofalo, Andrea; Angeletti, Diletta; Pasquariello, Benedetta; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage of the temporal bone region is defined as abnormal communications between the subarachnoidal space and the air-containing spaces of the temporal bone. CSF leak remains one of the most frequent complications after VS surgery. Radiotherapy is considered a predisposing factor for development of temporal bone CSF leak because it may impair dural repair mechanisms, thus causing inadequate dural sealing. The authors describe the case of a 47-year-old man with a massive effusion of CSF which extended from the posterior and lateral skull base to the first cervical vertebrae; this complication appeared after a partial enucleation of a vestibular schwannoma (VS) with subsequent radiation treatment and second operation with total VS resection.

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid galactorrhea: a rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunting.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sai-Cheung; Chen, Jyi-Feng; Tu, Po-Hsun; Lee, Shih-Tseng

    2008-06-01

    In this report we describe a 26-year-old woman who had an intra-abdominal pseudocyst located at the peritoneal catheter tip following ventriculo-peritoneal (VP) shunt implantation. Retrograde cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flowed outside the catheter and communicated with the right breast lactiferous ductal system and leaked from the nipple orifice. CSF galactorrhea only occurs when the lactiferous duct is injured during VP shunt implantation, in combination with the formation of an intra-abdominal CSF pseudocyst prior to lactiferous duct healing. Leakage of CSF from the nipple orifice can be successfully treated by simply guiding the peritoneal catheter tip into the peritoneal cavity through a new laparotomy; that is, shunt revision is not always required.

  9. Peptidome Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid by LC-MALDI MS

    PubMed Central

    Hölttä, Mikko; Zetterberg, Henrik; Mirgorodskaya, Ekaterina; Mattsson, Niklas; Blennow, Kaj; Gobom, Johan

    2012-01-01

    We report on the analysis of endogenous peptides in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by mass spectrometry. A method was developed for preparation of peptide extracts from CSF. Analysis of the extracts by offline LC-MALDI MS resulted in the detection of 3,000–4,000 peptide-like features. Out of these, 730 peptides were identified by MS/MS. The majority of these peptides have not been previously reported in CSF. The identified peptides were found to originate from 104 proteins, of which several have been reported to be involved in different disorders of the central nervous system. These results support the notion that CSF peptidomics may be viable complement to proteomics in the search of biomarkers of CNS disorders. PMID:22880031

  10. A novel method to study cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in rats

    PubMed Central

    Karimy, Jason K.; Kahle, Kristopher T.; Kurland, David B.; Yu, Edward; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J. Marc

    2014-01-01

    Background Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow dynamics play critical roles in both the immature and adult brain, with implications for neurodevelopment and disease processes such as hydrocephalus and neurodegeneration. Remarkably, the only reported method to date for measuring CSF formation in laboratory rats is the indirect tracer dilution method (a.k.a., ventriculocisternal perfusion), which has limitations. New Method Anesthetized rats were mounted in a stereotaxic apparatus, both lateral ventricles were cannulated, and the Sylvian aqueduct was occluded. Fluid exited one ventricle at a rate equal to the rate of CSF formation plus the rate of infusion (if any) into the contralateral ventricle. Pharmacological agents infused at a constant known rate into the contralateral ventricle were tested for their effect on CSF formation in real-time. Results The measured rate of CSF formation was increased by blockade of the Sylvian aqueduct but was not changed by increasing the outflow pressure (0–3 cm of H2O). In male Wistar rats, CSF formation was age-dependent: 0.39±0.06, 0.74±0.05, 1.02±0.04 and 1.40±0.06 µL/min at 8, 9, 10 and 12 weeks, respectively. CSF formation was reduced 57% by intraventricular infusion of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, acetazolamide. Comparison with existing methods Tracer dilution methods do not permit ongoing real-time determination of the rate of CSF formation, are not readily amenable to pharmacological manipulations, and require critical assumptions. Direct measurement of CSF formation overcomes these limitations. Conclusions Direct measurement of CSF formation in rats is feasible. Our method should prove useful for studying CSF dynamics in normal physiology and disease models. PMID:25554415

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of simian immunodeficiency virus encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Bissel, Stephanie J.; Kofler, Julia; Nyaundi, Julia; Murphey-Corb, Michael; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; Wiley, Clayton A.

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has led to increased survival of HIV-infected patients but also increased prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. We previously identified YKL40 as a potential cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker of lentiviral central nervous system (CNS) disease in HIV-infected patients and in the macaque model of HIV encephalitis. The aim of this study was to define the specificity and sensitivity along with the predictive value of YKL40 as a biomarker of encephalitis and to assess its relationship to CSF viral load. CSF YKL40 and SIV RNA concentrations were analyzed over the course of infection in 19 SIV-infected pigtailed macaques and statistical analyses were performed to evaluate the relationship to encephalitis. Using these relationships, CSF alterations of 31 neuroimmune markers were studied pre-infection, during acute and asymptomatic infection, at the onset of encephalitis, and at necropsy. YKL40 CSF concentrations above 1122 ng/ml were found to be a specific and sensitive biomarker for the presence of encephalitis and were highly correlated with CSF viral load. Macaques that developed encephalitis had evidence of chronic CNS immune activation during early, asymptomatic, and end stages of infection. At the onset of encephalitis, CSF demonstrated a rise of neuroimmune markers associated with macrophage recruitment, activation and interferon response. CSF YKL40 concentration and viral load are valuable biomarkers to define the onset of encephalitis. Chronic CNS immune activation precedes the development of encephalitis while some responses suggest protection from CNS lentiviral disease. PMID:27059917

  12. Embryonic cerebrospinal fluid in brain development: neural progenitor control.

    PubMed

    Gato, Angel; Alonso, M Isabel; Martín, Cristina; Carnicero, Estela; Moro, José Antonio; De la Mano, Aníbal; Fernández, José M F; Lamus, Francisco; Desmond, Mary E

    2014-08-28

    Due to the effort of several research teams across the world, today we have a solid base of knowledge on the liquid contained in the brain cavities, its composition, and biological roles. Although the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is among the most relevant parts of the central nervous system from the physiological point of view, it seems that it is not a permanent and stable entity because its composition and biological properties evolve across life. So, we can talk about different CSFs during the vertebrate life span. In this review, we focus on the CSF in an interesting period, early in vertebrate development before the formation of the choroid plexus. This specific entity is called "embryonic CSF." Based on the structure of the compartment, CSF composition, origin and circulation, and its interaction with neuroepithelial precursor cells (the target cells) we can conclude that embryonic CSF is different from the CSF in later developmental stages and from the adult CSF. This article presents arguments that support the singularity of the embryonic CSF, mainly focusing on its influence on neural precursor behavior during development and in adult life.

  13. Embryonic cerebrospinal fluid in brain development: neural progenitor control

    PubMed Central

    Gato, Angel; Alonso, M. Isabel; Martín, Cristina; Carnicero, Estela; Moro, José Antonio; De la Mano, Aníbal; Fernández, José M. F.; Lamus, Francisco; Desmond, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the effort of several research teams across the world, today we have a solid base of knowledge on the liquid contained in the brain cavities, its composition, and biological roles. Although the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is among the most relevant parts of the central nervous system from the physiological point of view, it seems that it is not a permanent and stable entity because its composition and biological properties evolve across life. So, we can talk about different CSFs during the vertebrate life span. In this review, we focus on the CSF in an interesting period, early in vertebrate development before the formation of the choroid plexus. This specific entity is called “embryonic CSF.” Based on the structure of the compartment, CSF composition, origin and circulation, and its interaction with neuroepithelial precursor cells (the target cells) we can conclude that embryonic CSF is different from the CSF in later developmental stages and from the adult CSF. This article presents arguments that support the singularity of the embryonic CSF, mainly focusing on its influence on neural precursor behavior during development and in adult life. PMID:25165044

  14. Subtotal petrosectomy and cerebrospinal fluid leakage in unilateral anacusis.

    PubMed

    Magliulo, Giuseppe; Iannella, Giannicola; Ciniglio Appiani, Mario; Re, Massimo

    2014-12-01

    Objective This study presents a group of patients experiencing recurrent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage associated with ipsilateral anacusis who underwent subtotal petrosectomies with the goal of stopping the CSF leak and preventing meningitis. Materials and Methods Eight patients with CSF leakage were enrolled: three patients with giant vestibular schwannomas had CSF leakage after gamma knife failure and subsequent removal via a retrosigmoid approach; two patients had malformations at the level of the inner ear with consequent translabyrinthine fistulas; two had posttraumatic CSF leakages; and one had a CSF leakage coexisting with an encephalocele. Two patients developed meningitis that resolved with antibiotic therapy. Each patient had preoperative anacusis and vestibular nerve areflexia on the affected side. Results The patients with congenital or posttraumatic CSF leaks had undergone at least one unsuccessful endaural approach to treat the fistula. All eight patients were treated successfully with a subtotal petrosectomy. The symptoms disappeared within 2 months postoperatively. No meningitis, signs of fistula, or other symptoms occurred during the follow-up. Conclusion A subtotal petrosectomy should be the first choice of treatment in patients with recurrent CSF leakage whenever there is associated unilateral anacusis.

  15. Subtotal Petrosectomy and Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage in Unilateral Anacusis

    PubMed Central

    Magliulo, Giuseppe; Iannella, Giannicola; Appiani, Mario Ciniglio; Re, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study presents a group of patients experiencing recurrent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage associated with ipsilateral anacusis who underwent subtotal petrosectomies with the goal of stopping the CSF leak and preventing meningitis. Materials and Methods Eight patients with CSF leakage were enrolled: three patients with giant vestibular schwannomas had CSF leakage after gamma knife failure and subsequent removal via a retrosigmoid approach; two patients had malformations at the level of the inner ear with consequent translabyrinthine fistulas; two had posttraumatic CSF leakages; and one had a CSF leakage coexisting with an encephalocele. Two patients developed meningitis that resolved with antibiotic therapy. Each patient had preoperative anacusis and vestibular nerve areflexia on the affected side. Results The patients with congenital or posttraumatic CSF leaks had undergone at least one unsuccessful endaural approach to treat the fistula. All eight patients were treated successfully with a subtotal petrosectomy. The symptoms disappeared within 2 months postoperatively. No meningitis, signs of fistula, or other symptoms occurred during the follow-up. Conclusion A subtotal petrosectomy should be the first choice of treatment in patients with recurrent CSF leakage whenever there is associated unilateral anacusis. PMID:25452896

  16. Oscillations of cerebrospinal fluid pressure in nonhydrocephalic persons.

    PubMed

    Droste, D W; Krauss, J K

    1997-04-01

    Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure oscillations with a wavelength of 0.5-2/min (B-waves) are used as a criterion for shunt insertion in hydrocephalic patients. We describe CSF pressure oscillations in two nonhydrocephalic patients with normal baseline CSF pressure. Intracranial pressure was recorded via a ventricular drainage in a 54-year-old male who had a lumber CSF leak after surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis and disc herniation after the leak was closed. In the second patient, a 42-year-old male, CSF pressure was monitored via a lumbar drainage which was placed for treatment of a subcutaneous CSF effusion after resection of a recurrent temporal meningioma. CSF pressure oscillations of a wavelength of 0.5-2/min were observed with a relative frequency of 50% (patient 1) and 60% (patient 2) of the recorded time. Also longer waves were observed. Our data suggest that CSF pressure oscillations are not confined to hydrocephalic patients with raised intracranial pressure.

  17. Letter to the editor: Identification of Sarcocystis capracanis in cerebrospinal fluid from sheep with neurological disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A recent report (Formisano et al., 2013) identified clinical sacrocystosis in 2 adult sheep. The diagnosis relied primarily on characterization of DNA extracted from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and paraffin-embedded heart tissue. Parasites identified as merozoites were identified in CSF smears stained...

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid flow imaging by using phase-contrast MR technique.

    PubMed

    Battal, B; Kocaoglu, M; Bulakbasi, N; Husmen, G; Tuba Sanal, H; Tayfun, C

    2011-08-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces include ventricles and cerebral and spinal subarachnoid spaces. CSF motion is a combined effect of CSF production rate and superimposed cardiac pulsations. Knowledge of CSF dynamics has benefited considerably from the development of phase-contrast (PC) MRI. There are several disorders such as communicating and non-communicating hydrocephalus, Chiari malformation, syringomyelic cyst and arachnoid cyst that can change the CSF dynamics. The aims of this pictorial review are to outline the PC MRI technique, CSF physiology and cerebrospinal space anatomy, to describe a group of congenital and acquired disorders that can alter the CSF dynamics, and to assess the use of PC MRI in the assessment of various central nervous system abnormalities.

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid flow imaging by using phase-contrast MR technique

    PubMed Central

    Battal, B; Kocaoglu, M; Bulakbasi, N; Husmen, G; Tuba Sanal, H; Tayfun, C

    2011-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces include ventricles and cerebral and spinal subarachnoid spaces. CSF motion is a combined effect of CSF production rate and superimposed cardiac pulsations. Knowledge of CSF dynamics has benefited considerably from the development of phase-contrast (PC) MRI. There are several disorders such as communicating and non-communicating hydrocephalus, Chiari malformation, syringomyelic cyst and arachnoid cyst that can change the CSF dynamics. The aims of this pictorial review are to outline the PC MRI technique, CSF physiology and cerebrospinal space anatomy, to describe a group of congenital and acquired disorders that can alter the CSF dynamics, and to assess the use of PC MRI in the assessment of various central nervous system abnormalities. PMID:21586507

  20. Endoscopic repair of cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea.

    PubMed

    Kljajić, Vladimir; Vuleković, Petar; Vlaški, Ljiljana; Savović, Slobodan; Dragičević, Danijela; Papić, Vladimir

    Nasal liquorrhea indicates a cerebrospinal fluid fistula, an open communication between the intracranial cerebrospinal fluid and the nasal cavity. It can be traumatic and spontaneous. The aim of this study was to assess the outcome of endoscopic repair of cerebrospinal fluid fistula using fluorescein. This retrospective study included 30 patients of both sexes, with a mean age of 48.7 years, treated in the period from 2007 to 2015. All patients underwent lumbar administration of 5% sodium fluorescein solution preoperatively. Fistula was closed using three-layer graft and fibrin glue. Cerebrospinal fluid fistulas were commonly located in the ethmoid (37%) and sphenoid sinus (33%). Most patients presented with traumatic cerebrospinal fluid fistulas (2/3 of patients). The reported success rate for the first repair attempt was 97%. Complications occurred in three patients: one patient presented with acute hydrocephalus, one with reversible encephalopathy syndrome on the fifth postoperative day with bilateral loss of vision, and one patient was diagnosed with hydrocephalus two years after the repair of cerebrospinal fluid fistula. Endoscopic diagnosis and repair of cerebrospinal fluid fistulas using fluorescein intrathecally has high success rate and low complication rate. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Microfilariae in the cerebrospinal fluid, and neurological complications, during treatment of onchocerciasis with diethylcarbamazine.

    PubMed

    Duke, B O; Vincelette, J; Moore, P J

    1976-06-01

    Microfilariae of Onchocerca volvulus were found in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 5/8 heavily infected onchocerciasis patients. During treatment with diethylcarbamazine citrate 10/11 patients showed increased numbers of 0. volvulus microfilariae in the CSF. Patients with concentrations of 8-31 mf/ml CSF developed severe vertigo, and some other neurological manifestations, during treatment. A hypothesis is put forward to account for this clinical piciture, and its importance in relation to the treatment of onchocerciasis is discussed.

  2. The Maze of the Cerebrospinal Fluid Discovery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The author analyzes a historical, long, and tortuous way to discover the cerebrospinal fluid. At least 35 physicians and anatomists described in the text have laid the fundamentals of recognition of this biological fluid's presence. On the basis of crucial anatomical, experimental, and clinical works there are four greatest physicians who should be considered as equal cerebrospinal fluid's discoverers: Egyptian Imhotep, Venetian Nicolo Massa, Italian Domenico Felice Cotugno, and French François Magendie. PMID:24396600

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in trials for Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases.

    PubMed

    Lleó, Alberto; Cavedo, Enrica; Parnetti, Lucilla; Vanderstichele, Hugo; Herukka, Sanna Kaisa; Andreasen, Niels; Ghidoni, Roberta; Lewczuk, Piotr; Jeromin, Andreas; Winblad, Bengt; Tsolaki, Magda; Mroczko, Barbara; Visser, Pieter Jelle; Santana, Isabel; Svenningsson, Per; Blennow, Kaj; Aarsland, Dag; Molinuevo, José Luis; Zetterberg, Henrik; Mollenhauer, Brit

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) and Parkinson disease (PD) are the most common neurodegenerative disorders. For both diseases, early intervention is thought to be essential to the success of disease-modifying treatments. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) can reflect some of the pathophysiological changes that occur in the brain, and the number of CSF biomarkers under investigation in neurodegenerative conditions has grown rapidly in the past 20 years. In AD, CSF biomarkers are increasingly being used in clinical practice, and have been incorporated into the majority of clinical trials to demonstrate target engagement, to enrich or stratify patient groups, and to find evidence of disease modification. In PD, CSF biomarkers have not yet reached the clinic, but are being studied in patients with parkinsonism, and are being used in clinical trials either to monitor progression or to demonstrate target engagement and downstream effects of drugs. CSF biomarkers might also serve as surrogate markers of clinical benefit after a specific therapeutic intervention, although additional data are required. It is anticipated that CSF biomarkers will have an important role in trials aimed at disease modification in the near future. In this Review, we provide an overview of CSF biomarkers in AD and PD, and discuss their role in clinical trials.

  4. Estimation of cerebrospinal fluid cortisol level in tuberculous meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Mahale, Rohan R.; Mehta, Anish; Uchil, Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in tuberculosis is around 5–10%. Of the various manifestations of CNS tuberculosis, meningitis is the most common (70–80%). Delay in diagnosis and treatment results in significant morbidity and mortality. Objective: To study the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cortisol levels in tubercular meningitis and compare the levels with controls. Methods: Cross-sectional, prospective, observational, hospital-based study done in 20 patients of tubercular meningitis, 20 patients of aseptic meningitis (AM) and 25 control subjects without any preexisting neurological disorders who have undergone lumbar puncture for spinal anesthesia. Results: Cortisol was detected in all 40 CSF samples of patients (100%). Mean CSF cortisol level was 8.82, 3.47 and 1.05 in tubercular meningitis, AM and controls, respectively. Mean CSF cortisol level in tubercular meningitis was significantly higher as compared to AM and controls (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Cortisol level estimation in CSF is one of the rapid, relatively inexpensive diagnostic markers in early identification of tubercular meningitis along with CSF findings of elevated proteins, hypoglycorrhachia and lymphocytic pleocytosis. This aids in earlier institution of appropriate treatment and thereby decreasing morbidity and mortality. This is the first study on the estimation of CSF cortisol level in tuberculous meningitis. PMID:26752900

  5. Increased cerebrospinal fluid chitotriosidase index in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Verbeek, M M; Notting, E A; Faas, B; Claessens-Linskens, R; Jongen, P J H

    2010-05-01

    To investigate chitotriosidase (CTTS) activity in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients in relation to disease course and CSF markers for immune activation or inflammation. We studied 80 patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), 24 with secondary progressive MS (SPMS), 20 with primary progressive MS (PPMS) and 29 patients with other neurological disorders (OND). We measured CTTS activity and studied the correlation with CSF mononuclear cell count (MNC) and intrathecal IgG production. CTTS activity was significantly higher in CSF, but not in serum, from the total MS group compared with OND and controls. In RRMS and SPMS CTTS, index was increased compared with controls (RRMS, 0.10 +/- 0.21; SPMS, 0.10 +/- 0.15; controls, 0.021 +/- 0.020), but not in PPMS (0.061 +/- 0.052). CTTS index was higher in MS patients with elevated MNC or CSF-restricted oligoclonal IgG bands than in MS patients without these CSF findings. CTTS index is elevated in RRMS and SPMS. The CTTS index is related to CSF markers of inflammation or immune activation.

  6. Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks in the anterior skull base secondary to idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Capoccioni, Gabriel; Serramito-García, Ramón; Martín-Bailón, Maria; García-Allut, Alfredo; Martín-Martín, Carlos

    2017-05-01

    Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks represent a clinical entity in which CSF rhinorrhea occurs in the absence of any inciting event. Spontaneous CSF leaks are associated with elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) or have underlying idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). We report a cohort of patients who have undergone nasal endoscopic repair for spontaneous CSF leaks. We review our perioperative complications and the effectiveness of the nasal endoscopic approach to repair spontaneous CSF leaks. Also, we examine the evidence correlating spontaneous CSF leaks and IIH and the role of decreasing ICP in the treatment of nasal spontaneous CSF leaks. A retrospective analysis of patients with nasal spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks was performed. Data on the nature of presentation, patient body mass index, defect location and size, ICP, clinical follow-up, and complications were collected. Thirty-five patients had nasal spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks with evidence of IIH's symptoms. The most common sites were the cribriform plate, the ethmoid roof, and sphenoid lateral pterygoid recess. All patients underwent endonasal endoscopic surgery to repair the defect. Postoperatively, all patients underwent lumbar drainage and acetazolamide therapy. Nasal spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks represent a surgical challenge because of their high recurrence rates. The most important factor for obtaining a successful repair in these patients is reducing their intracranial pressure through nutritional, medical, or surgical means.

  7. Increased digitalis-like activity in human cerebrospinal fluid after expansion of the extracellular fluid volume

    SciTech Connect

    Halperin, J.A.; Martin, A.M.; Malave, S.

    1985-08-12

    The present study was designed to determine whether acute expansion of the extracellular fluid volume influenced the digitalis-like activity of human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), previously described. Human CSF samples, drawn before and 30 minutes after the intravenous infusion of 1 liter of either saline or glucose solutions, were assayed for digitalis-like activity by inhibition of either the /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ uptake into human erythrocytes or by the activity of a purified Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ ATPase. The CSF inhibitory activity on both systems significantly increased after the infusion of sodium solutions but did not change after the infusion of glucose. These results indicate that the digitalis-like factor of human CSF might be involved in the regulation of the extracellular fluid volume and electrolyte content and thereby in some of the physiological responses to sodium loading. 31 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  8. Biofilm-associated infection: the hidden face of cerebrospinal fluid shunt malfunction.

    PubMed

    Mounier, Roman; Kapandji, Natacha; Birnbaum, Ron; Cook, Fabrice; Rodriguez, Cristophe; Nebbad, Bibba; Lobo, David; Dhonneur, Gilles

    2016-12-01

    Diagnosis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt infection is difficult. Growing evidence links this pattern to biofilm-associated infections (BAI). Biofilm may explain the indolent development of the infection, and the poor efficiency of traditional microbiologic methods. We report the case of a patient admitted for hydrocephalus associated to CSF shunt malfunction. None of the clinical, serum, or CSF laboratory findings were in favor of an infectious process. Only scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed the presence of biofilm. Hence, despite a broad CSF shunt infection definition, some infections could remain undiagnosed by the traditional approach. This study is the first to provide some direct evidence for bacterial biofilm-associated CSF shunt infection.

  9. An applicable method of drawing cerebrospinal fluid in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Xue-Wei; Liu, Ming; Huang, Shu-Ming

    2016-07-01

    Component analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is frequently required to probe the causes and pathologic mechanisms of disease and effective drugs in experimental studies of the central nervous system. Rat and mouse are two kinds of most frequently used animals in experimental studies. Rats are considered to be the most suitable animal for experimental analysis of CSF both on cost and manipulability as mice are too small for drawing CSF. However, drawing CSF from rats is still not easy, which makes many researchers choose bigger animals, such as rabbits. This paper introduced a highly applicable technique of CSF collection from cerebellomedullary cistern (CC) in rats. CSF collection with this technique was performed by direct CC puncture using a collection apparatus with negative pressure. The apparatus consists of a 1ml syringe, a disposable intravenous infusion needle and a clip. The needle was cut and made less sharp than the original one to avoid injury to the brain and spinal cord. We have collected CSF multiple times from each rat with this approach and the collection lasted less than 30s each time on average. The length of the collection needles of the CSF was conformed to the different body sizes (weight) of the rats in the 3 groups. Compared with currently existing methods, this is faster, safer, simpler and repeatable. CSF collection by CC puncture using a negative pressure collection apparatus is fast to operate, safe to the rats, and maximum amount of CSF can be collected. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Quantitative proteomics of delirium cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Poljak, A; Hill, M; Hall, R J; MacLullich, A M; Raftery, M J; Tai, J; Yan, S; Caplan, G A

    2014-01-01

    Delirium is a common cause and complication of hospitalization in older people, being associated with higher risk of future dementia and progression of existing dementia. However relatively little data are available on which biochemical pathways are dysregulated in the brain during delirium episodes, whether there are protein expression changes common among delirium subjects and whether there are any changes which correlate with the severity of delirium. We now present the first proteomic analysis of delirium cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and one of few studies exploring protein expression changes in delirium. More than 270 proteins were identified in two delirium cohorts, 16 of which were dysregulated in at least 8 of 17 delirium subjects compared with a mild Alzheimer's disease neurological control group, and 31 proteins were significantly correlated with cognitive scores (mini-mental state exam and acute physiology and chronic health evaluation III). Bioinformatics analyses revealed expression changes in several protein family groups, including apolipoproteins, secretogranins/chromogranins, clotting/fibrinolysis factors, serine protease inhibitors and acute-phase response elements. These data not only provide confirmatory evidence that the inflammatory response is a component of delirium, but also reveal dysregulation of protein expression in a number of novel and unexpected clusters of proteins, in particular the granins. Another surprising outcome of this work is the level of similarity of CSF protein profiles in delirium patients, given the diversity of causes of this syndrome. These data provide additional elements for consideration in the pathophysiology of delirium as well as potential biomarker candidates for delirium diagnosis. PMID:25369144

  11. [Two cases of herpes encephalitis with normal cerebrospinal fluid findings].

    PubMed

    Avkan Oğuz, Vildan; Yapar, Nur; Sezak, Nurbanu; Alp Cavuş, Sema; Kuruüzüm, Ziya; Sayiner, Arzu; Ada, Emel; Cakir, Nedim; Yüce, Ayşe

    2006-01-01

    In this report, characteristics of two cases of Herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis with normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) findings at the time of admission have been discussed and the current literature has been reviewed. The diagnosis of the cases (one was 23 years old male, and the other was 75 years old female patient) was made on the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings concordant with HSV encephalitis, together with HSV-1 DNA positivity by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Both of the patients were treated with acyclovir (3 x 750 mg/day) lasting for 15 days and 21 days, respectively. The first male patient recovered with mild neurological defects, whereas the second female patient died because of nosocomial pneumonia and septicemia. In conclusion, even the CSF findings are normal, in cases considered to be HSV encephalitis, MRI should be the first radiological diagnostic step and the diagnosis should be confirmed by the detection of HSV DNA in CSF by PCR.

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid proteome of patients with acute Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Warren, H. Shaw

    2012-01-01

    During acute Lyme disease, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of meningitis and other neurologic symptoms. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing a deep view into the proteome for patients diagnosed with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified differences in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. We identified 108 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease from controls. Comparison between infected patients and control subjects revealed differences in proteins in the CSF associated with cell death localized to brain synapses and others that likely originate from brain parenchyma. PMID:22900834

  13. A Subglandular Breast Cerebrospinal Fluid Pseudocyst Following Postsurgical Shunt Migration

    PubMed Central

    Mlynek, Karolina; Frautschi, Russell; Halasa, Brianna; Kwiecien, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage catheters have been associated with numerous complications in various anatomic locations, because of migration, infection, and obstruction. However, breast-related CSF shunt complications tend to occur infrequently or have seldom been reported in the empirical literature. Therefore, a case is presented detailing a breast pseudocyst caused by migration and subsequent coiling of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt in the right breast pocket. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first case that has been reported in the peer-reviewed literature of a pseudocyst resulting from a CSF drainage catheter coiling around the breast implant post pancreaticoduodenectomy. Moreover, this case highlights the importance of cross-disciplinary procedural awareness, particularly in regards to breast, ventriculoperitoneal shunt, and pancreatic procedures. PMID:26894004

  14. A Subglandular Breast Cerebrospinal Fluid Pseudocyst Following Postsurgical Shunt Migration.

    PubMed

    Mlynek, Karolina; Frautschi, Russell; Halasa, Brianna; Kwiecien, Grzegorz; Papay, Francis

    2015-12-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage catheters have been associated with numerous complications in various anatomic locations, because of migration, infection, and obstruction. However, breast-related CSF shunt complications tend to occur infrequently or have seldom been reported in the empirical literature. Therefore, a case is presented detailing a breast pseudocyst caused by migration and subsequent coiling of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt in the right breast pocket. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first case that has been reported in the peer-reviewed literature of a pseudocyst resulting from a CSF drainage catheter coiling around the breast implant post pancreaticoduodenectomy. Moreover, this case highlights the importance of cross-disciplinary procedural awareness, particularly in regards to breast, ventriculoperitoneal shunt, and pancreatic procedures.

  15. Acetylcholinesterase activity in the cerebrospinal fluid of dogs with seizures.

    PubMed

    Chai, Orit; Sommer, Adi; Zimmerman, Gabriel; Soreq, Hermona; Friedman, Alon; Bdolah-Abram, Tali; Aroch, Itamar; Shamir, Merav H

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies in animal models have focused on the role of cholinergic elements, mainly acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and the 'readthrough' acetylcholinesterase isoform (AChE-R), in seizures. A prospective double-masked study was conducted to assess the activity of AChE and AChE-R in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 26 dogs post-seizure, 28 dogs with intervertebral disc disease (IVDD) and 16 healthy dogs. AChE was also measured in the serum in the post-seizure and IVDD groups. The results showed no significant differences in CSF AChE among the three groups. AChE-R was not detected in any dog and AChE in the serum was similar between groups. This preliminary study provides new information on AChE and AChE-R in the CSF and sera of dogs following naturally-occurring seizures.

  16. Orbital cerebrospinal fluid accumulation after complicated pterional-orbitozygomatic craniotomy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Michael K; Piluek, Wachirapon Jordan; Ruggiero, Jason P; McDermott, Michael W; McCulley, Timothy J

    2014-12-01

    We describe 2 patients who developed postoperative orbital cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection after orbitozygomatic pterional craniotomy. An 18-year-old woman underwent exploratory pterional-orbitozygomatic craniotomy. Five days postoperatively, after removal of a lumbar drain, proptosis and a compressive optic neuropathy developed. Computed tomography demonstrated a CSF collection contiguous with the craniotomy site. Resolution followed percutaneous aspiration and replacement of the lumbar drain. A 57-year-old woman underwent a pterional-orbitozygomatic craniotomy for removal of a left anterior clinoid meningioma, complicated by a large left hemorrhagic stroke requiring decompressive hemicraniectomy. Extracranial CSF collections accumulated in both the orbit and subgaleal spaces. Resolution followed placement of an external ventricular drain. Based on these cases, the mechanism seems to be the combination of iatrogenic formation of a communication with the subarachnoid space and elevated intracranial pressure. Resolution was achieved by normalizing intracranial pressure.

  17. Cerebrospinal Fluid Particles in Alzheimer Disease and Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yue; Keene, C Dirk; Peskind, Elaine R; Galasko, Douglas R; Hu, Shu-Ching; Cudaback, Eiron; Wilson, Angela M; Li, Ge; Yu, Chang-En; Montine, Kathleen S; Zhang, Jing; Baird, Geoffrey S; Hyman, Bradley T; Montine, Thomas J

    2015-07-01

    Human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contains diverse lipid particles, including lipoproteins that are distinct from their plasma counterparts and contain apolipoprotein (apo) E isoforms, apoJ, and apoAI, and extracellular vesicles, which can be detected by annexin V binding. The aim of this study was to develop a method to quantify CSF particles and evaluate their relationship to aging and neurodegenerative diseases. We used a flow cytometric assay to detect annexin V-, apoE-, apoAI-, apoJ-, and amyloid (A) β42-positive particles in CSF from 131 research volunteers who were neurologically normal or had mild cognitive impairment (MCI), Alzheimer disease (AD) dementia, or Parkinson disease. APOE ε4/ε4 participants had CSF apoE-positive particles that were more frequently larger but at an 88% lower level versus those in APOE ε3/ε3 or APOE ε3/ε4 patients; this finding was reproduced in conditioned medium from mouse primary glial cell cultures with targeted replacement of apoE. Cerebrospinal fluid apoE-positive and β-amyloid (Aβ42)-positive particle concentrations were persistently reduced one-third to one-half in middle and older age subjects; apoAI-positive particle concentration progressively increased approximately 2-fold with age. Both apoAI-positive and annexin V-positive CSF particle levels were reduced one-third to one-half in CSF of MCI and/or AD dementia patients versus age-matched controls. Our approach provides new methods to investigate CNS lipid biology in relation to neurodegeneration and perhaps develop new biomarkers for diagnosis or treatment monitoring.

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid testing for the diagnosis of central nervous system infection.

    PubMed

    Zunt, J R; Marra, C M

    1999-11-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is susceptible to bacterial, viral, and fungal infections, and prion diseases. Examination of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is crucial in diagnosing these infections. Cerebrospinal tests may directly identify an organism and its nucleic acid and surface constituents by culture, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), or antigen detection. Alternatively, antibody to an organism may be identified in CSF by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blot, or complement fixation assay. This article discusses how these CSF tests are performed and addresses the sensitivity and specificity of such tests for the diagnosis of selected CNS infections.

  19. High Blood Pressure Effects on the Blood to Cerebrospinal Fluid Barrier and Cerebrospinal Fluid Protein Composition: A Two-Dimensional Electrophoresis Study in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    González-Marrero, Ibrahim; Castañeyra-Ruiz, Leandro; González-Toledo, Juan M.; Castañeyra-Ruiz, Agustín; de Paz-Carmona, Hector; Castro, Rafael; Hernandez-Fernaud, Juan R.; Castañeyra-Perdomo, Agustín; Carmona-Calero, Emilia M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to analyze the cerebrospinal fluid proteomic profile, trying to find possible biomarkers of the effects of hypertension of the blood to CSF barrier disruption in the brain and their participation in the cholesterol and β-amyloid metabolism and inflammatory processes. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a system linked to the brain and its composition can be altered not only by encephalic disorder, but also by systemic diseases such as arterial hypertension, which produces alterations in the choroid plexus and cerebrospinal fluid protein composition. 2D gel electrophoresis in cerebrospinal fluid extracted from the cistern magna before sacrifice of hypertensive and control rats was performed. The results showed different proteomic profiles between SHR and WKY, that α-1-antitrypsin, apolipoprotein A1, albumin, immunoglobulin G, vitamin D binding protein, haptoglobin and α-1-macroglobulin were found to be up-regulated in SHR, and apolipoprotein E, transthyretin, α-2-HS-glycoprotein, transferrin, α-1β-glycoprotein, kininogen and carbonic anhidrase II were down-regulated in SHR. The conclusion made here is that hypertension in SHR produces important variations in cerebrospinal fluid proteins that could be due to a choroid plexus dysfunction and this fact supports the close connection between hypertension and blood to cerebrospinal fluid barrier disruption. PMID:23401751

  20. Evaluation of cytospin precision in low cellularity canine cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Krimer, Paula M; Haley, Allison C; Harvey, Stephen B; Schatzberg, Scott J

    2016-03-01

    The cell count and differential of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytologic examination classify CSF as inflammatory or not. The cytospin cell yield is related to cell count, but to our knowledge a relationship has not been characterized and cytospin precision is undocumented in any species. The objective of our study was to calculate intra-assay precision of cellular yield and differential on cytocentrifuged canine CSF, determine the factors that may affect precision, and predict the number of cytospins necessary to confirm mild neutrophilic pleocytosis. Ten concurrent replicate cytospins were created from nonhemorrhagic CSF, obtained from 60 dogs in other terminal studies, with either a manual or calibrated pipetting technique. Up to 500 cells per cytospin were counted and classified on each slide. Coefficient of variation (CV), multiple regression, and probabilities were calculated for relationships between cell yield and independent factors including technique, total nucleated cell count, cell differential, and total protein. Manual and calibrated pipetting had similar CVs (average 31%) for total cell yield, but the calibrated technique had fewer foamy macrophages. CV for neutrophil percentage among low cellularity samples with any neutrophils was 146%. Probability based on linear regression showed that 1 cytospin is sufficient to identify samples with >3% neutrophils. Occasional neutrophils, eosinophils, mitotic figures, phagocytic cells, and ependymal cells were seen in many low cellularity canine CSF samples. Canine CSF cytospin cell yield and differential evaluations are imprecise. Calibrated rather than manual pipetting is recommended.

  1. Bioinformatic software for cerebrospinal fluid spectrophotometry in suspected subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Collet, Nicolas; Garcelon, Nicolas; Robbe, Valentin; Lucas-Clerc, Catherine; Cuggia, Marc; Bendavid, Claude

    2012-03-01

    Diagnosis of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is firstly based on imaging and secondly on spectrophotometry. Bilirubin may be detected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for up to two weeks after SAH. CSF pigment analysis is commonly performed according to the Chalmers manual technique but may be prone to operator error. We propose an online software solution, based on the United Kingdom National External Quality Assessment Service (UKNEQAS) recommendations, to support the interpretation of CSF pigment analysis. Based on the manual Chalmers technique, we have developed a web application (in Personal Home Page language including JpGraph module and an Oracle database(®)) that enables the calculation of net oxyhaemoglobin absorbance and net bilirubin absorbance. It uses data from the CSF spectrophotometry, CSF and serum protein concentrations, and serum bilirubin concentration to provide an interpretation based on the NEQAS decision tree. The application was retrospectively validated using the spectra from 350 patients, previously analysed by the manual method. In total, 91.1% interpretations from spectra analysed with the web application were in accordance with the results obtained manually. The 8.9% discordant results were mostly related to an incorrect interpretation using the manual technique. The software developed in our laboratory to interpret CSF pigment analysis results is a precise, robust and useful tool that allows reproducible conclusions to be drawn. This software is available through a web interface.

  2. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Leinonen, Ville; Menon, Lata G.; Carroll, Rona S.; Dello Iacono, Donna; Grevet, Jeremy; Jääskeläinen, Juha E.; Black, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) is still challenging. Alzheimer's disease (AD), along with vascular dementia, the most important differential diagnosis for iNPH, has several potential cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers which might help in the selection of patients for shunt treatment. The aim of this study was to compare a battery of CSF biomarkers including well-known AD-related proteins with CSF from patients with suspected iNPH collected from the external lumbar drainage test (ELD). A total of 35 patients with suspected iNPH patients were evaluated with ELD. CSF was collected in the beginning of the test, and the concentrations of total tau, ptau181, Aβ42, NFL, TNF-α, TGFβ1, and VEGF were analysed by ELISA. Twenty-six patients had a positive ELD result—that is, their gait symptoms improved; 9 patients had negative ELD. The levels of all analyzed CSF biomarkers were similar between the groups and none of them predicted the ELD result in these patients. Contrary to expectations lumbar CSF TNF-α concentration was low in iNPH patients. PMID:21660204

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid neopterin and cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Mercedes; Ormazábal, Aida; Antón, Jordi; Aróstegui, Juan I; García-Cazorla, Angels

    2009-12-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome is a category of autoinflammatory disorders caused by mutations of the NLRP3 gene, with chronic infantile neurologic cutaneous and articular syndrome being the severest clinical phenotype. Various pterins have been reported as mediating immunologic functions in the central nervous system, but to date studies of pterin cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) values and cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome have been lacking. A 2-year-old child was affected with a severe atypical form of cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome, suspected based on the analysis of neopterin in CSF. He initially presented isolated neurologic manifestations mimicking a neuroregressive disorder. Blood and CSF analyses did not present any routine inflammatory markers, but CSF neopterin was elevated. Later, the patient developed arthritis and recurrent episodes of fever, and the cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome diagnosis was confirmed by genetic studies. Neopterin was the most altered indicator over the time. Child neurologists should be on the alert when unexplained neurologic signs appear, giving consideration to the possibility of inflammatory or immune-mediated diseases. The present case demonstrates the clinical utility of measurement of CSF neopterin levels in screening for these immune-mediated diseases, especially when neurologic symptoms are associated with normal results on routine CSF tests.

  4. Endoscopic repair of frontal sinus cerebrospinal fluid leaks.

    PubMed

    Woodworth, B A; Schlosser, R J; Palmer, J N

    2005-09-01

    To describe endoscopic management of frontal sinus cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks. Retrospective. We reviewed all frontal sinus CSF leaks treated using an endoscopic approach at our institutions from 1998 to 2003. CSF leaks originated immediately adjacent to or within the frontal recess or frontal sinus proper for inclusion in the study. Data collected included demographics, presenting signs and symptoms, site and size of skull-base defect, surgical approach, repair technique, and clinical follow up. Seven frontal sinus CSF leaks in six patients were repaired endoscopically. Average age of presentation was 45 years (range 25-65 years). Aetiology was idiopathic (three), congenital (one), accidental trauma (one), and surgical trauma (two). All patients presented with CSF rhinorrhea; two patients presented with meningitis. Four defects originated in the frontal recess, while two others involved the posterior table and frontal sinus outflow tract. Four patients had associated encephaloceles. We performed endoscopic repair in all six patients with one patient requiring an adjuvant osteoplastic flap without obliteration. All repairs were successful at the first attempt with a mean follow up of 13 months. All frontal sinuses remained patent on both post-operative endoscopic and radiographic exam. Endoscopic repair of frontal sinus CSF leaks and encephaloceles can be an effective method if meticulous attention is directed toward preservation of the frontal sinus outflow tract, thus avoiding an osteoplastic flap and obliteration. The major limiting factor for an endoscopic approach is extreme extension superiorly or laterally within the posterior table beyond the reach of current instrumentation.

  5. Fluorescence imaging of lymphatic outflow of cerebrospinal fluid in mice.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sunkuk; Janssen, Christopher F; Velasquez, Fred Christian; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M

    2017-10-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is known to be reabsorbed by the lymphatic vessels and drain into the lymph nodes (LNs) through peripheral lymphatic vessels. In the peripheral lymphatics, the contractile pumping action of lymphangions mediates lymph drainage; yet it is unknown whether lymphatic vessels draining cranial and spinal CSF show similar function. Herein, we used non-invasive near-infrared fluorescence imaging (NIRFI) to image (i) indocyanine green (ICG) distribution along the neuraxis and (ii) routes of ICG-laden CSF outflow into the lymphatics following intrathecal lumbar administration. We demonstrate lymphatic contractile function in peripheral lymphatics draining from the nasal lymphatics to the mandibular LNs. In addition, we observed afferent sciatic lymphatic vessels, which also show contractile activity and transport spinal CSF into the sciatic LNs. This drainage pattern was also visualized by NIRFI following intrathecal thoracic injection. In situ intravital imaging following intrathecal lumbar injection of blue dye shows similar distributions to that seen in vivo with ICG. NIRFI could be used as a tool to probe CSF pathology including neurological disorders by imaging CSF outflow dynamics to lymphatics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Hepatic cerebrospinal fluid pseudocyst: A rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunt

    PubMed Central

    Dabdoub, Carlos B.; Fontoura, Emilio A.; Santos, Egmond A.; Romero, Paulo C.; Diniz, Cristiano A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunts are among the most frequently performed operations in the management of hydrocephalus. Hepatic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pseudocyst is a rare but important complication in patients with a VP shunt insertion. In addition to presenting our own case, we performed a PubMed search to comprehensively illustrate the predisposing factors, clinical picture, diagnostic methods, and surgical treatment. This article represents an update for this condition. Case Description: A 40-year-old male was admitted to a hospital complaining of fever, abdominal distention, and pain. He had undergone a VP shunt for communicating hydrocephalus caused by a head trauma one year earlier. Laboratory studies showed liver enzymes alterations, and imaging studies demonstrated a well-defined intraaxially hepatic cyst with the shunt catheter placed inside. Staphylococcus epidermis was cultured via CSF. After removing the VP shunt and an adequate antibiotic treatment, the complication of hepatic CSF pseudocyst was resolved. Conclusion: Hepatic CSF pseudocyst is a rare complication of a VP shunt. Once the diagnosis is verified and if the CSF is sterile, just simply remove the peritoneal catheter and reposition a new one in the abdomen. We believe that it is not necessary to remove or aspirate the hepatic intraaxial pseudocyst, because of the risk of bleeding. In case of CSF infection, the VP shunt can be removed and/or an external derivation can be made, and after treatment with antibiotics, a new VP shunt is placed in the opposite side of the peritoneum. PMID:24523999

  7. Diagnostic value of creatine kinase activity in canine cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether creatine kinase (CK) activity in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has diagnostic value for various groups of neurological conditions or for different anatomical areas of the nervous system (NS). The age, breed, results of CSF analysis, and diagnosis of 578 canine patients presenting with various neurological conditions between January 2009 and February 2015 were retrospectively collected. The cases were divided according to anatomical areas of the nervous system, i.e., brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nervous system, and into groups according to the nature of the condition diagnosed: vascular, immune/inflammatory/infectious, traumatic, toxic, anomalous, metabolic, idiopathic, neoplastic, and degenerative. Statistical analysis showed that CSF-CK alone cannot be used as a diagnostic tool and that total proteins in the CSF and red blood cells (RBCs) do not have a significant relationship with the CSF-CK activity. CSF-CK did not have a diagnostic value for different disease groups or anatomical areas of the nervous system. PMID:27708448

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid ascorbic acid levels in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Brau, R H; García-Castiñeiras, S; Rifkinson, N

    1984-02-01

    The ascorbic acid/dehydroascorbic acid system was analyzed in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 41 patients with different neurological disorders. The chi-square test of covariance analysis revealed in this sample significant differences in the CSF levels of total ascorbic acid when patients were classified by diagnostic categories. The population analyzed contained a group of 18 patients (back pain/sciatica group) in whom no overt neurological abnormalities were disclosed upon evaluation. Taking the CSF levels of total ascorbic acid and dehydroascorbic acid in these patients as the reference (3.57 +/- 0.87 (SD)/100 ml and 0.53 +/- 0.19 mg/100 ml, respectively), it was found that head-traumatized patients showed a significant reduction in the concentration of total ascorbic acid in the CSF. CSF ascorbic acid levels were also significantly lower in patients with increased intracranial pressure (noninfected hydrocephalus group) and in patients with cerebral tumors. Although the CSF concentration of dehydroascorbic acid did not correspondingly increase over the reference values in these three groups of patients, the tendency existed for dehydroascorbic acid to represent in them a higher percentage of total ascorbic acid. After examining different alternatives, it is concluded that the hypothesis of free radical damage to the central nervous system after certain types of injury (trauma, ischemia, and tumors) may provide a satisfactory explanation of our findings. A rationale for the use of vitamin C in the management of some neurological patients is also derived from this work.

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid neopterin decay characteristics after initiation of antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Aylin; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T; Fuchs, Dietmar; Price, Richard W; Crozier, Kathryn; Hagberg, Lars; Spudich, Serena; Gisslén, Magnus

    2013-05-10

    Neopterin, a biomarker of macrophage activation, is elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of most HIV-infected individuals and decreases after initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART). We studied decay characteristics of neopterin in CSF and blood after commencement of ART in HIV-infected subjects and estimated the set-point levels of CSF neopterin after ART-mediated viral suppression. CSF and blood neopterin were longitudinally measured in 102 neurologically asymptomatic HIV-infected subjects who were treatment-naïve or had been off ART for ≥ 6 months. We used a non-linear model to estimate neopterin decay in response to ART and a stable neopterin set-point attained after prolonged ART. Seven subjects with HIV-associated dementia (HAD) who initiated ART were studied for comparison. Non-HAD patients were followed for a median 84.7 months. Though CSF neopterin concentrations decreased rapidly after ART initiation, it was estimated that set-point levels would be below normal CSF neopterin levels (<5.8 nmol/L) in only 60/102 (59%) of these patients. Pre-ART CSF neopterin was the primary predictor of set-point (P <0.001). HAD subjects had higher baseline median CSF neopterin levels than non-HAD subjects (P <0.0001). Based on the non-HAD model, only 14% of HAD patients were predicted to reach normal levels. After virologically suppressive ART, abnormal CSF neopterin levels persisted in 41% of non-HAD and the majority of HAD patients. ART is not fully effective in ameliorating macrophage activation in CNS as well as blood, especially in subjects with higher pre-ART levels of immune activation.

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid neopterin decay characteristics after initiation of antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Neopterin, a biomarker of macrophage activation, is elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of most HIV-infected individuals and decreases after initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART). We studied decay characteristics of neopterin in CSF and blood after commencement of ART in HIV-infected subjects and estimated the set-point levels of CSF neopterin after ART-mediated viral suppression. Methods CSF and blood neopterin were longitudinally measured in 102 neurologically asymptomatic HIV-infected subjects who were treatment-naïve or had been off ART for ≥ 6 months. We used a non-linear model to estimate neopterin decay in response to ART and a stable neopterin set-point attained after prolonged ART. Seven subjects with HIV-associated dementia (HAD) who initiated ART were studied for comparison. Results Non-HAD patients were followed for a median 84.7 months. Though CSF neopterin concentrations decreased rapidly after ART initiation, it was estimated that set-point levels would be below normal CSF neopterin levels (<5.8 nmol/L) in only 60/102 (59%) of these patients. Pre-ART CSF neopterin was the primary predictor of set-point (P <0.001). HAD subjects had higher baseline median CSF neopterin levels than non-HAD subjects (P <0.0001). Based on the non-HAD model, only 14% of HAD patients were predicted to reach normal levels. Conclusions After virologically suppressive ART, abnormal CSF neopterin levels persisted in 41% of non-HAD and the majority of HAD patients. ART is not fully effective in ameliorating macrophage activation in CNS as well as blood, especially in subjects with higher pre-ART levels of immune activation. PMID:23664008

  11. An update on the use of cerebrospinal fluid analysis as a diagnostic tool in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gastaldi, Matteo; Zardini, Elisabetta; Franciotta, Diego

    2017-01-01

    Intrathecal B-lymphocyte activation is a hallmark of multiple sclerosis (MS), a multi-factorial inflammatory-demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Such activation has a counterpart in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) oligoclonal IgG bands (OCB), whose diagnostic role in MS has been downgraded within the current McDonald's criteria. With a theoretico-practical approach, the authors review the physiopathological basis of the CSF dynamics, and the state-of-the-art of routine CSF analysis and CSF biomarkers in MS. Areas covered: The authors discuss pros and cons of CSF analysis, including critical evaluations of both well-established, and promising diagnostic and prognostic laboratory tools. New acquisitions on the CSF and cerebral interstitial fluid dynamics are also presented. The authors searched the PubMed database for English-language articles reported between January 2010 and June 2016, using the key words 'multiple sclerosis', 'cerebrospinal fluid', 'oligoclonal bands'. Reference lists of relevant articles were scanned for additional studies. Expert commentary: The availability of performing high-quality, routine CSF tests in specialized laboratories, the emerging potential of novel CSF biomarkers, and the trend for early treatments should induce a reappraisal of CSF analysis for diagnostic and prognostic purposes in MS. Further procedural and methodological improvements seem to be necessary in both research and translational diagnostic CSF settings.

  12. The function and structure of the cerebrospinal fluid outflow system

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    This review traces the development of our understanding of the anatomy and physiological properties of the two systems responsible for the drainage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) into the systemic circulation. The roles of the cranial and spinal arachnoid villi (AV) and the lymphatic outflow systems are evaluated as to the dominance of one over the other in various species and degree of animal maturation. The functional capabilities of the total CSF drainage system are presented, with evidence that the duality of the system is supported by the changes in fluid outflow dynamics in human and sub-human primates in hydrocephalus. The review also reconciles the relative importance and alterations of each of the outflow systems in a variety of clinical pathological conditions. PMID:20565964

  13. Brain Gene Expression Signatures From Cerebrospinal Fluid Exosome RNA Profiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanello, S. B.; Stevens, B.; Calvillo, E.; Tang, R.; Gutierrez Flores, B.; Hu, L.; Skog, J.; Bershad, E.

    2016-01-01

    While the Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome observations have focused on ocular symptoms, spaceflight has been also associated with a number of other performance and neurologic signs, such as headaches, cognitive changes, vertigo, nausea, sleep/circadian disruption and mood alterations, which, albeit likely multifactorial, can also result from elevation of intracranial pressure (ICP). We therefore hypothesize that these various symptoms are caused by disturbances in the neurophysiology of the brain structures and are correlated with molecular markers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as indicators of neurophysiological changes. Exosomes are 30-200 nm microvesicles shed into all biofluids, including blood, urine, and CSF, carrying a highly rich source of intact protein and RNA cargo. Exosomes have been identified in human CSF, and their proteome and RNA pool is a potential new reservoir for biomarker discovery in neurological disorders. The purpose of this study is to investigate changes in brain gene expression via exosome analysis in patients suffering from ICP elevation of varied severity (idiopathic intracranial hypertension -IIH), a condition which shares some of the neuroophthalmological features of VIIP, as a first step toward obtaining evidence suggesting that cognitive function and ICP levels can be correlated with biomarkers in the CSF. Our preliminary work, reported last year, validated the exosomal technology applicable to CSF analysis and demonstrated that it was possible to obtain gene expression evidence of inflammation processes in traumatic brain injury patients. We are now recruiting patients with suspected IIH requiring lumbar puncture at Baylor College of Medicine. Both CSF (5 ml) and human plasma (10 ml) are being collected in order to compare the pattern of differentially expressed genes observed in CSF and in blood. Since blood is much more accessible than CSF, we would like to determine whether plasma biomarkers for

  14. [Idiopathic intracranial hypertension and spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid fistula. Usefulness of intracranial pressure monitoring].

    PubMed

    Horcajadas Almansa, Angel; Román Cutillas, Ana; Jorques Infante, Ana; Ruiz Gómez, José; Busquier, Heriberto

    Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistulas are rather common in daily practice. The aim of the surgical treatment is closure of the leak, but recurrences are quite frequent. The association between spontaneous CSF fistulas and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is not uncommon, and this is probably the cause of the low rate of success of the surgical treatment. Symptoms of IIH associated with spontaneous CSF fistula are atypical, and diagnosis is often missed. Continuous intracranial pressure monitoring is very useful in the diagnosis of chronic IIH and in patients with spontaneous CSF fistula, as it helps in making decisions on the treatment of these patients.

  15. Tau protein concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Jiménez, F J; Hernánz, A; Medina-Acebrón, S; de Bustos, F; Zurdo, J M; Alonso, H; Puertas, I; Barcenilla, B; Sayed, Y; Cabrera-Valdivia, F

    2005-02-01

    To elucidate whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of the microtubule-associated tau protein are related to the risk for sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (SALS). We measured tau concentrations in the CSF of 18 patients with SALS and 75 age- and sex-matched controls, using a specific ELISA method. The mean CSF concentrations of tau protein did not differ significantly between SALS patient and control groups, were not influenced by the clinical form (spinal vs bulbar) of ALS, and were not correlated with age, age at onset, and duration of the disease. CSF tau concentrations are not a biochemical marker of ALS.

  16. Choroid plexus protects cerebrospinal fluid against toxic metals

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Zheng; Perry, D.F.; Nelson, D.L.; Aposhian, H.V. )

    1991-05-01

    Although heavy metal ions are known to be toxic to the central nervous system (CNS), the mechanisms by which the CNS may protect itself from initial challenges of such toxic ions is unknown. The choroid plexus is the principal site of formation of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) which bathes the brain. We have determined in rats and rabbits that after intraperitoneal administration of lead, cadmium, mercury, and arsenic compounds, these toxic metal ions accumulated in the lateral choroid plexus at concentrations of Pb, Hg, and As that were 70-, 95-, and 40-fold higher, respectively, than those found in CSF. Cd was not detected in the CSF. In addition, concentrations of these heavy metal ions were found to be many fold greater in the choroid plexus than in the brain or blood. The accumulation of Pb in the choroid plexus was dose-dependent and time-related. When the choroid plexus was preincubated, in vitro, with ouabain (1.5 mM), the uptake of Cd from the CSF side of the choroid plexus was inhibited 57%. Cadmium metallothionein was not found in the choroid plexus. Whereas the concentration of reduced glutathione in the choroid plexus was less than that in the brain cortex, the concentration of cysteine was fourfold greater. The lateral choroid plexus sequesters Pb, Cd, As, and Hg. It appears to be one of the important mechanisms that protects the CSF and the brain from the fluxes of toxic heavy metals in the blood.

  17. A potential endophenotype for Alzheimer's disease: cerebrospinal fluid clusterin.

    PubMed

    Deming, Yuetiva; Xia, Jian; Cai, Yefei; Lord, Jenny; Holmans, Peter; Bertelsen, Sarah; Holtzman, David; Morris, John C; Bales, Kelly; Pickering, Eve H; Kauwe, John; Goate, Alison; Cruchaga, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have associated clusterin (CLU) variants with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the role of CLU on AD pathogenesis is not totally understood. We used cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma CLU levels as endophenotypes for genetic studies to understand the role of CLU in AD. CSF, but not plasma, CLU levels were significantly associated with AD status and CSF tau/amyloid-beta ratio, and highly correlated with CSF apolipoprotein E (APOE) levels. Several loci showed almost genome-wide significant associations including LINC00917 (p = 3.98 × 10(-7)) and interleukin 6 (IL6, p = 9.94 × 10(-6), in the entire data set and in the APOE ε4- individuals p = 7.40 × 10(-8)). Gene ontology analyses suggest that CSF CLU levels may be associated with wound healing and immune response which supports previous functional studies that demonstrated an association between CLU and IL6. CLU may play a role in AD by influencing immune system changes that have been observed in AD or by disrupting healing after neurodegeneration.

  18. Intracranial pressure and cerebrospinal fluid outflow conductance in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Albeck, M J; Børgesen, S E; Gjerris, F; Schmidt, J F; Sørensen, P S

    1991-04-01

    Conductance of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) outflow (Cout) is an important parameter to be considered in patients with CSF circulation abnormalities. In patients with normal-pressure hydrocephalus it is the single most important parameter in determining if the patient needs CSF shunting. The lower normal limit for Cout has been estimated from the effect of shunting in patients with normal-pressure hydrocephalus, from patients retrospectively reevaluated after recovering from illness, and from patients with known abnormalities in the brain or the CSF system. The true value of Cout in normal individuals, however, has hitherto not been reported. In the present study, Cout has been measured by a lumbar infusion test in eight young volunteers with no suspicion of disease. The mean intracranial pressure (ICP) was 11 mm Hg and a linear relationship was found between CSF absorption and ICP. The mean Cout was 0.11 ml/min/mm Hg and the lower 95% confidence level was 0.10 ml/min/mm Hg. These values are in accordance with those obtained from previous studies.

  19. Detection of immunoglobulin M in cerebrospinal fluid from syphilis patients by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J B; Farshy, C E; Hunter, E F; Hambie, E A; Wobig, G H; Larsen, S A

    1986-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were evaluated in an immunoglobulin M enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (IgM ELISA) for syphilis with sonic extracts of Treponema pallidum coated on polystyrene plates. The ELISA procedure was reproducible, and T. pallidum antigens were stable., A total of 15 CSF samples from patients with neurosyphilis, 18 CSF samples from patients with syphilis, 12 CSF samples from patients treated for syphilis, and 494 CSF samples from patients with neurologic or other systemic diseases were tested. The IgM ELISA gave reactive results in all of six symptomatic and congenital neurosyphilitic patients and none of nine asymptomatic neurosyphilitic patients. Of 524 CSF samples from nonneurosyphilitic individuals, 513 were nonreactive, resulting in 98% test specificity. The IgM ELISA in CSF should prove to be useful for confirmation of symptomatic neurosyphilis. PMID:3533984

  20. Incidence of cerebrospinal fluid leak following petrosectomy and analysis of avoidance techniques.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Brian P; Nahed, Brian V; Sarpong, Yaw; Kahle, Kristopher T; Sekhar, Laligam N; Ferreira, Manuel J

    2012-01-01

    A cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak following skull base surgery can lead to meningitis, impaired wound healing, and often requires re-operation and/or CSF diversion. Thirty-two patients underwent a presigmoid, transpetrosal approach to skull base aneurysms and tumors. A vascularized temporalis muscle flap was utilized during the closure of the initial skull base reconstruction in 18 of the 32 patients. A temporary CSF diversion was utilized in 23 of the 32 patients. A permanent shunt was placed in eight patients. One patient developed a postoperative CSF leak from the contralateral ear due to a congenital abnormality in the middle ear. Another patient, who did not have a vascularized temporalis muscle flap reconstruction, developed a postoperative CSF leak in the context of an operation for recurrent tumor and prior radiation treatment. CSF diversion and vascularized temporalis muscle flaps are effective in preventing the development of postoperative CSF leaks following petrosectomy.

  1. Assay of gentamicin in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Deacon, S

    1976-01-01

    A comparison of standard curves obtained from a conventional plate diffusion assay method revealed significant differences when gentamicin standards were made up in different media. Standards made up in distilled water resulted in a curve which differed from that of standards made up in pooled human cerebrospinal fluid by a factor of up to 4. When the assay medium was supplemented with 0-5% sodium chloride, the difference between the two standard curves was reduced to a factor of about 1-5. The curve obtained from standards made up in 150 mM sodium chloride/4-5 mM calcium chloride correlated well with that from standards made up in cerebrospinal fluid. There was no evidence of gentamicin being bound to protein in the cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:956457

  2. [Alpha-2 macroglobulin from cerebrospinal fluid in neurosurgical diseases].

    PubMed

    Vasil'eva, T G; Dobrogorskaia, L N; Kraeva, L N; Goncharova, V P

    1989-01-01

    Content of alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2-MG) was estimated in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with neurosurgical impairments. Minimal content of the globulin was found in patients with brain concussion (0.011 +/- 0.001 g/L, control group), maximal concentration--in severe craniocerebral trauma with brain contraction (0.056 +/- 0.007 g/L) and moderately increased content of alpha 2-MG was detected in intracranial tumors and drug-resistant epilepsy, 0.028 +/- 0.004 g/L and 0.025 +/- 0.004 g/L, respectively. Alteration in content of alpha 2-MG during postoperational period corresponded to clinical state of patients. Estimation of alpha 2-MG in CSF might be used as a criterion of brain impairment severity as well as for monitoring the treatment course.

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid centesis at the cerebellomedullary cistern of kittens.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Lola C; Vahlenkamp, Thomas W; Howard; Colby, Brenda; Tompkins; Meeker, Rick B

    2002-09-01

    We needed an effective technique for obtaining cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from young (2- to 18-week-old) kittens. Standard veterinary technique was not suitable, so we adapted a previously published technique for rats. We first established an effective isoflurane-only anesthetic protocol for young kittens. After inhalant anesthesia, the kittens were positioned on a supporting platform to gain flexion of the head and neck. A micromanipulator was used to hold and slowly advance the collection needle. At the time this report was written, we had collected a total of 33 samples from eight kittens without causing apparent neurologic deficits. Correct positioning of the animal and collection needle was critical for success. This procedure enabled the collection of approximately 0.5 ml CSF from kittens younger than 12 weeks and larger volumes from older kittens.

  4. Huntington's disease cerebrospinal fluid seeds aggregation of mutant huntingtin

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Z; Dai, W; van Erp, T G M; Overman, J; Demuro, A; Digman, M A; Hatami, A; Albay, R; Sontag, E M; Potkin, K T; Ling, S; Macciardi, F; Bunney, W E; Long, J D; Paulsen, J S; Ringman, J M; Parker, I; Glabe, C; Thompson, L M; Chiu, W; Potkin, S G

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD), a progressive neurodegenerative disease, is caused by an expanded CAG triplet repeat producing a mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT) with a polyglutamine-repeat expansion. Onset of symptoms in mutant huntingtin gene-carrying individuals remains unpredictable. We report that synthetic polyglutamine oligomers and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from BACHD transgenic rats and from human HD subjects can seed mutant huntingtin aggregation in a cell model and its cell lysate. Our studies demonstrate that seeding requires the mutant huntingtin template and may reflect an underlying prion-like protein propagation mechanism. Light and cryo-electron microscopy show that synthetic seeds nucleate and enhance mutant huntingtin aggregation. This seeding assay distinguishes HD subjects from healthy and non-HD dementia controls without overlap (blinded samples). Ultimately, this seeding property in HD patient CSF may form the basis of a molecular biomarker assay to monitor HD and evaluate therapies that target mHTT. PMID:26100538

  5. Alterations in Cerebrospinal Fluid in Patients with Bipolar Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Endres, Dominique; Dersch, Rick; Hottenrott, Tilman; Perlov, Evgeniy; Maier, Simon; van Calker, Dietrich; Hochstuhl, Benedikt; Venhoff, Nils; Stich, Oliver; van Elst, Ludger Tebartz

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a severe and lifelong condition. Primary endogenic polygenetic forms are common. Secondary organic forms have received increasing interest recently due to the detection of immunological encephalopathies that mimic various psychiatric syndromes, including BD. However, only limited data about routine findings of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analyses in BD are available. Therefore, we investigated the frequency of alterations in the CSF in patients with BD and the association with autoantibodies, cerebral magnetic resonance imaging, and electroencephalography findings. CSF samples of patients with BD collected from January 1998 until December 2015 were analyzed retrospectively. Patients with preexisting causes for alterations in the CSF (e.g., patients with obvious past or current neurological disorders) were excluded. In total, 63 patients with BD fulfilled the inclusion criteria for the study. In 1.6% of the patients with BD, an increased white blood cell count was found in the CSF. Increased albumin quotients were found in 12.9% of the patients, oligoclonal bands (OCBs) in 1.6%, and increased immunoglobulin (Ig) G indices in 3.2% (OCBs were not measured in case of increased IgG indices). No significant differences in CSF findings were found between patients with manic and depressive episodes. The main findings of this open uncontrolled study are that alterations in the CSF may be found in a small, but potentially relevant, subgroup of patients with BD. These findings are discussed in light of the new concepts of mild encephalitis and immunological encephalopathy. The detection of patients with possibly secondary organic bipolar syndromes could open up new causal treatment options with immunomodulatory medication. PMID:28008318

  6. Cerebrospinal Fluid Particles in Alzheimer Disease and Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yue; Keene, C. Dirk; Peskind, Elaine R.; Galasko, Douglas R.; Hu, Shu-Ching; Cudaback, Eiron; Wilson, Angela M.; Li, Ge; Yu, Chang-En; Montine, Kathleen S.; Zhang, Jing; Baird, Geoffrey S.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Montine, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contains diverse lipid particles, including lipoproteins that are distinct from their plasma counterparts and contain apolipoprotein (apo) E isoforms, apoJ, and apoAI, and extracellular vesicles, which can be detected by annexin V binding. The aim of this study was to develop a method to quantify CSF particles and evaluate their relationship to aging and neurodegenerative diseases. We used a flow cytometric assay to detect annexin V-, apoE-, apoAI-, apoJ- and amyloid (A) β42-positive particles in CSF from 131 research volunteers who were neurologically normal or had mild cognitive impairment (MCI), Alzheimer disease (AD) dementia, or Parkinson disease. APOE ε4/ε4 participants had CSF apoE-positive particles that were more frequently larger but at an 88% lower level vs. those in APOE ε3/ε3 or APOE ε3/ε4 patients; this finding was reproduced in conditioned medium from mouse primary glial cell cultures with targeted replacement of apoE. CSF apoE-positive and β-amyloid (Aβ42)-positive particle concentrations were persistently reduced one-third to one-half in middle and older age subjects; apoAI-positive particle concentration progressively increased approximately 2-fold with age. Both apoAI-positive and annexin V-positive CSF particle levels were reduced one-third to one-half in CSF of MCI and/or AD dementia patients vs. age-matched controls. Our approach provides new methods to investigate CNS lipid biology in relation to neurodegeneration and perhaps develop new biomarkers for diagnosis or treatment monitoring. PMID:26083568

  7. Increased cerebrospinal fluid Helicobacter pylori antibody in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kountouras, Jannis; Boziki, Marina; Gavalas, Emmanuel; Zavos, Christos; Deretzi, Georgia; Grigoriadis, Nikolaos; Tsolaki, Magda; Chatzopoulos, Dimitrios; Katsinelos, Panagiotis; Tzilves, Dimitrios; Zabouri, Athina; Michailidou, Ifigenia

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection may play a role in Alzheimer's disease (AD). A prospective, nonrandomized, comparative study was car- ried out to examine the levels of anti-H. pylori-specific IgG antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum of AD patients, compared with those of age-matched cognitively normal controls. CSF was aspirated from 27 AD patients and 27 age-matched cognitively normal patients with prostate hyperplasia or long-bone fractures necessitating surgery after epidural anesthesia. Serum samples were obtained from AD patients and the day before surgery from controls. CSF and serum anti-H. pylori IgG concentrations were measured by means of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The mean concentration of anti-H. pylori-specific IgG was significantly greater in (a) the CSF of AD patients (10.53 +/- 12.54 U/mL) than in controls (8.63 +/- 8.01 U/mL, p = 0.047), and (b) the serum of AD patients (30.44 +/- 33.94 U/mL) than in controls (16.24 +/- 5.77 U/mL, p = 0.041). CSF anti-H. pylori IgG antibodies correlated with the degree of severity of the disease. H. pylori-specific IgG antibody levels are significantly increased in CSF and serum of AD; its titer in CSF might reflect the AD severity, thereby supporting a role for this common infection in the pathobiology of the disease.

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid eosinophilia associated with intraventricular shunts.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Sofia; Frigeri, Thomas More; Severo, Carlos Marcelo; Santana, João Carlos Batista; Graeff-Teixeira, Carlos

    2011-06-01

    CSF eosinophilia (CSF-eo) is uncommon and is usually caused by helminthic infections. However, it has also been found in ∼30% of patients experiencing intraventricular shunt malfunctions. We present a case report and review the conditions associated with CSF-eo and their prophylaxis. An 8 year-old boy with tetraventricular hydrocephalus has had several shunt malfunctions over the last three years. During hospitalization in January 2009 for shunt revision, a transient 30% eosinophilia was detected in his cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) concomitant with Staphylococcus epidermidis infection and long term vancomycin administration. After several shunt replacements and antibiotic treatment, CSF-eo eventually disappeared with good overall clinical response. CSF-eo is a transient and focal event mainly associated with infection, reactions to foreign substances, particles or blood, or obstruction of tubing by normal or fibro-granulomatous tissues. Infection associated with CSF-eo is usually caused by S. epidermidis and Propioniumbacterium acnes. In addition to infection, allergy to silicone and other foreign materials may also be a cause of CSF-eo. We review the diversity of conditions and proposed mechanisms associated with CSF-eo, as well as recommendations for the care of patients with shunts. Detection of CSF-eo has been shown to be a useful indicator of shunt malfunction. As such, it provides physicians with an indicator of a hypersensitivity reaction that is underway or the need to identify bacterial infection. We also highlight the need for improved biocompatibility of shunt hardware and describe strategies to avoid conditions leading to shunt malfunction.

  9. [Cells in the cerebrospinal fluid of dogs and cats. Part 2].

    PubMed

    Grevel, V; Machus, B

    1992-02-01

    Three groups of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cells can be formed: 1. cells of the normal CSF, such as monocytes, small lymphocytes and occasionally cells of the ventricle system, 2. cells found in dogs and cats with neurologic disorders, such as reactive monocytes and lymphocytes, macrophages, neutrophils and eosinophils in addition to cells of the first group, 3. neoplastic cells. The different cells are introduced and their origin, function and occurrence are discussed. Mitotic figures, degenerated cells and artefacts are also mentioned.

  10. The longitudinal cerebrospinal fluid metabolomic profile of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Elizabeth; Larkin, James R.; Claridge, Tim D. W.; Talbot, Kevin; Sibson, Nicola R.; Turner, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    Neurochemical biomarkers are urgently sought in ALS. Metabolomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy is a highly sensitive method capable of revealing nervous system cellular pathology. The 1H-NMR CSF metabolomic signature of ALS was sought in a longitudinal cohort. Six-monthly serial collection was performed in ALS patients across a range of clinical sub-types (n = 41) for up to two years, and in healthy controls at a single time-point (n = 14). A multivariate statistical approach, partial least squares discriminant analysis, was used to determine differences between the NMR spectra from patients and controls. Significantly predictive models were found using those patients with at least one year's interval between recruitment and the second sample. Glucose, lactate, citric acid and, unexpectedly, ethanol were the discriminating metabolites elevated in ALS. It is concluded that 1H-NMR captured the CSF metabolomic signature associated with derangements in cellular energy utilization connected with ALS, and was most prominent in comparisons using patients with longer disease duration. The specific metabolites identified support the concept of a hypercatabolic state, possibly involving mitochondrial dysfunction specifically. Endogenous ethanol in the CSF may be an unrecognized novel marker of neuronal tissue injury in ALS. PMID:26121274

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid and plasma biomarkers in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Blennow, Kaj; Hampel, Harald; Weiner, Michael; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2010-03-01

    Intense multidisciplinary research has provided detailed knowledge of the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). This knowledge has been translated into new therapeutic strategies with putative disease-modifying effects. Several of the most promising approaches, such as amyloid-beta immunotherapy and secretase inhibition, are now being tested in clinical trials. Disease-modifying treatments might be at their most effective when initiated very early in the course of AD, before amyloid plaques and neurodegeneration become too widespread. Thus, biomarkers are needed that can detect AD in the predementia phase or, ideally, in presymptomatic individuals. In this Review, we present the rationales behind and the diagnostic performances of the core cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for AD, namely total tau, phosphorylated tau and the 42 amino acid form of amyloid-beta. These biomarkers reflect AD pathology, and are candidate markers for predicting future cognitive decline in healthy individuals and the progression to dementia in patients who are cognitively impaired. We also discuss emerging plasma and CSF biomarkers, and explore new proteomics-based strategies for identifying additional CSF markers. Furthermore, we outline the roles of CSF biomarkers in drug discovery and clinical trials, and provide perspectives on AD biomarker discovery and the validation of such markers for use in the clinic.

  12. Utility of cerebrospinal fluid cortisol level in acute bacterial meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Anish; Mahale, Rohan R.; Sudhir, Uchil; Javali, Mahendra; Srinivasa, Rangasetty

    2015-01-01

    Background: Meningitis remains a serious clinical problem in developing as well as developed countries. Delay in diagnosis and treatment results in significant morbidity and mortality. The role and levels of intrathecal endogenous cortisol is not known. Objective: To study the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cortisol levels and to evaluate its role as a diagnostic and therapeutic marker in acute bacterial meningitis. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients with acute bacterial meningitis with no prior treatment were evaluated. Cortisol levels were compared with 20 patients with aseptic (viral) meningitis and 25 control subjects. Results: Mean CSF cortisol level was 13.85, 3.47, and 1.05 in bacterial meningitis, aseptic meningitis, and controls, respectively. Mean CSF cortisol level in bacterial meningitis was significantly higher as compared to controls (P < 0.001). There was significant difference in CSFcortisol levels in bacterial and aseptic meningitis (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Cortisol levels in CSF are highly elevated in patients with acute bacterial meningitis. This suggests that intrathecalcortisol may serve as a valuable, rapid, relatively inexpensive diagnostic marker in discriminatingbetween bacterial and aseptic meningitis. This helps in earlier institution of appropriate treatment and thereby decreasing morbidity and mortality. PMID:26019421

  13. Molecular biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid of multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Fitzner, Brit; Hecker, Michael; Zettl, Uwe Klaus

    2015-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic immune-mediated disease of the central nervous system, usually occurring in young adults and leading to disability. Despite the progress in technology and intensive research work of the last years, diagnosing MS can still be challenging. A heterogenic and complex pathophysiology with various types of disease courses makes MS unique for each patient. There is an urgent need to identify markers facilitating rapid and accurate diagnosis and prognostic assessments with regard to optimal therapy for each MS patient. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is an outstanding source of specific markers related to MS pathology. Molecules reflecting specific pathological processes, such as inflammation, cellular damage, and loss of blood-brain-barrier integrity, are detectable in CSF. Clinically used biomarkers of CSF are oligoclonal bands, IgG-index, measles-rubella-zoster-reaction, anti-aquaporin 4 antibodies, and antibodies against John Cunningham virus. Many other potential biomarkers have been proposed in recent years. In this review we examine the current scientific knowledge on CSF molecular markers that could guide diagnosis and discrimination of different MS forms, support treatment decisions, or be helpful in monitoring and predicting disease progression, therapy response, and complications such as opportunistic infections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers mirror rate of cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Rolstad, Sindre; Berg, Anne Ingeborg; Bjerke, Maria; Johansson, Boo; Zetterberg, Henrik; Wallin, Anders

    2013-01-01

    The ability to predict future decline in cognitive systems using the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers 42 amino acid form of amyloid-β (Aβ42) and total tau (T-tau) is not fully understood. In a clinical sample ranging from cognitively healthy to dementia (n = 326), linear regression models were performed in order to investigate the ability of CSF biomarkers to predict cognitive decline in all cognitive domains from baseline to 2-year follow-up. Gender, age, and years of education were included as covariates. In patients with subjective cognitive impairment, T-tau had a small impact on executive functions (r2 = 0.07). T-tau had a small to moderate influence (r2 = 0.06-0.11) on all cognitive functions with the exception of visuospatial functions in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). In patients with dementia, the impact of T-tau was large (r2 = 0.29) on semantic memory. Aβ42 had a small effect (r2 = 0.07) on speed and executive functions in MCI. In patients with dementia, Aβ42 had a moderate influence (r2 = 0.13-0.24) on semantic and verbal working memory/fluency. Our results speak in favor of the notion that CSF biomarkers reflect the rate of cognitive decline across the continuum of cognitive impairment from healthy to dementia. CSF predicted subsequent decline in more cognitive domains among MCI cases, but the impact was most pronounced in patients with dementia.

  15. Mollaret's meningitis associated with cerebrospinal fluid leak.

    PubMed

    Plit, M L; Miller, G B; Berkowitz, F E; Gear, J H

    1982-10-23

    Mollaret's meningitis or the benign recurrent meningitis syndrome is a rare disorder not previously described in Africa. The syndrome has a characteristic clinical presentation with spinal fluid pleocytosis, often with unusual 'epithelial' cells. With contemporary techniques no causative organism has been incriminated. The aetiology remains speculative, but we report on a patient found to have a cerebrospinal fluid leak, which may represent a factor in the pathogenesis of this disorder.

  16. Zebrafish cerebrospinal fluid mediates cell survival through a retinoid signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jessica T.; Lehtinen, Maria K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) includes conserved factors whose function is largely unexplored. To assess the role of CSF during embryonic development, CSF was repeatedly drained from embryonic zebrafish brain ventricles soon after their inflation. Removal of CSF increased cell death in the diencephalon, indicating a survival function. Factors within the CSF are required for neuroepithelial cell survival as injected mouse CSF but not artificial CSF could prevent cell death after CSF depletion. Mass spectrometry analysis of the CSF identified retinol binding protein 4 (Rbp4), which transports retinol, the precursor to retinoic acid (RA). Consistent with a role for Rbp4 in cell survival, inhibition of Rbp4 or RA synthesis increased neuroepithelial cell death. Conversely, ventricle injection of exogenous human RBP4 plus retinol, or RA alone prevented cell death after CSF depletion. Zebrafish rbp4 is highly expressed in the yolk syncytial layer, suggesting Rbp4 protein and retinol/RA precursors can be transported into the CSF from the yolk. In accord with this suggestion, injection of human RBP4 protein into the yolk prevents neuroepithelial cell death in rbp4 loss‐of‐function embryos. Together, these data support the model that Rbp4 and RA precursors are present within the CSF and used for synthesis of RA, which promotes embryonic neuroepithelial survival. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 75–92, 2016 PMID:25980532

  17. Monoamine Neurotransmitter Metabolite Concentration as a Marker of Cerebrospinal Fluid Volume Changes.

    PubMed

    Maraković, Jurica; Vukić, Miroslav; Radoš, Milan; Chudy, Darko; Klarica, Marijan; Orešković, Darko

    2016-01-01

    In our previous papers we demonstrated that changes in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) osmolarity have a strong influence on CSF pressure and volume, which is in accordance with a new proposed hypothesis of CSF physiology. Thus, acute changes in CSF volume should be reflected in the CSF concentration of different central nervous system (CNS) metabolites. In anesthetized cats (n = 4) we measured the outflow volume of CSF by cisternal free drainage at a negative CSF pressure (-10 cmH2O) before and after the intraperitoneal (i.p.) application of a hypo-osmolar substance (distilled water). In samples of CSF collected at different time intervals (30 min) we measured the concentration of homovanillic acid (HVA). In spite of fact that constant CSF outflow volume was obtained after a 30-min period in our model, the concentration of HVA gradually increased over time and became stable after 90 min. After the i.p. application of distilled water the outflow CSF volume increased significantly, whereas the concentration of HVA significantly decreased over 30 min. The results observed suggest that alterations in serum osmolarity change the CSF volume and concentrations of neurotransmitter metabolites because of the osmotic arrival of water from CNS blood capillaries in all CSF compartments.

  18. Role of cerebrospinal fluid-contacting nucleus in sodium sensing and sodium appetite.

    PubMed

    Xing, Dan; Wu, Yuehong; Li, Guangling; Song, Siyuan; Liu, Yuepeng; Liu, He; Wang, Xing; Fei, Yan; Zhang, Chao; Li, Ying; Zhang, Licai

    2015-08-01

    The brainstem plays an important role in controlling sodium and water homeostasis. It is a major regulatory site for autonomic and motor functions. Moreover, it integrates cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) signals with neuronal and hormonal signals. Evidence suggests that the CSF-contacting nucleus (CSF-CN) transmits and integrates CSF signals, but, the definitive role of CSF-CN in sodium homeostasis is poorly understood. In this study, we used c-Fos as a marker of neuronal activity and causing colocalization of Nax channel and 5-HT. This proved that CSF-CN played a role in sensing the increase of CSF sodium level. Then, we determined the role of the CSF-contacting nucleus in increasing the sodium appetite of rats. So, we performed targeted lesion of the CSF-contacting nucleus in the brainstem using the cholera toxin subunit B-saporin (CB-SAP), a cytotoxin coupled to cholera toxin subunit B. The lesion of the CSF-CN showed decreased and degenerative neurons, while sodium appetite have increased and Fos immunocytochemistry detected neuronal activity in the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBN), but not in the subfornical organ (SFO) and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (OVLT). These results indicate that the CSF-CN plays an important role in sensing CSF sodium level and satiating sodium appetite by influencing the LPBN but not SFO and OVLT. The Nax channel and 5-HT might be the molecular mechanisms through which contribute to sodium homeostasis.

  19. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarker Candidates Associated with Human WNV Neuroinvasive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fraisier, Christophe; Papa, Anna; Granjeaud, Samuel; Hintzen, Rogier; Martina, Byron; Camoin, Luc; Almeras, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, the epidemiology of WNV in humans has changed in the southern regions of Europe, with high incidence of West Nile fever (WNF) cases, but also of West Nile neuroinvasive disease (WNND). The lack of human vaccine or specific treatment against WNV infection imparts a pressing need to characterize indicators associated with neurological involvement. By its intimacy with central nervous system (CNS) structures, modifications in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) composition could accurately reflect CNS pathological process. Until now, few studies investigated the association between imbalance of CSF elements and severity of WNV infection. The aim of the present study was to apply the iTRAQ technology in order to identify the CSF proteins whose abundances are modified in patients with WNND. Forty-seven proteins were found modified in the CSF of WNND patients as compared to control groups, and most of them are reported for the first time in the context of WNND. On the basis of their known biological functions, several of these proteins were associated with inflammatory response. Among them, Defensin-1 alpha (DEFA1), a protein reported with anti-viral effects, presented the highest increasing fold-change (FC>12). The augmentation of DEFA1 abundance in patients with WNND was confirmed at the CSF, but also in serum, compared to the control individual groups. Furthermore, the DEFA1 serum level was significantly elevated in WNND patients compared to subjects diagnosed for WNF. The present study provided the first insight into the potential CSF biomarkers associated with WNV neuroinvasion. Further investigation in larger cohorts with kinetic sampling could determine the usefulness of measuring DEFA1 as diagnostic or prognostic biomarker of detrimental WNND evolution. PMID:24695528

  20. Cerebrospinal Fluid Aβ to Tau Ratio and Postoperative Cognitive Change

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhongcong; McAuliffe, Sayre; Swain, Celeste A.; Ward, Sarah A. P.; Crosby, Catherine A.; Zheng, Hui; Sherman, Janet; Dong, Yuanlin; Zhang, Yiying; Sunder, Neelakantan; Burke, Dennis; Washicosky, Kevin J.; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Marcantonio, Edward R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Determination of biomarker and neuropathogenesis of postoperative cognitive change (POCC) or postoperative cognitive dysfunction. Background POCC is one of the most common postoperative complications in elderly patients. Whether preoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) β-amyloid protein (Aβ) to tau ratio, an Alzheimer disease biomarker, is a biomarker for risk of POCC remains unknown. We therefore set out to assess the association between preoperative CSF Aβ42 or Aβ40 to tau ratio and POCC. Methods Patients who had total hip/knee replacement were enrolled. The CSF was obtained during the administration of spinal anesthesia. Cognitive tests were performed with these participants at 1 week before and at 1 week and 3 to 6 months after the surgery. Z scores of the changes from preoperative to postoperative on several key domains of the cognitive battery were determined. We then examined the association between preoperative CSF Aβ42/tau or Aβ40/tau ratio and the outcome measures described earlier, adjusting for age and sex. Results Among the 136 participants (mean age = 71 ± 5 years; 55% men), preoperative CSF Aβ42/tau ratio was associated with postoperative Hopkins Verbal Learning Test Retention [Z score 8.351; age, sex-adjusted (adj.) P = 0.003], and the Benton Judgment of Line= Orientation (Z score 1.242; adj. p = 0.007). Aβ40/tau ratio was associated with Brief Visuospatial Memory Test Total Recall (Z score = 1.045; adj. P = 0.044). Conclusions Preoperative CSF Aβ/tau ratio is associated with postoperative changes in specific cognitive domains. The presence of the Alzheimer's disease biomarker, specifically the Aβ/tau ratio, may identify patients at higher risk for cognitive changes after surgery. PMID:23732272

  1. Hyperventilation and cerebrospinal fluid acidosis caused by topiramate.

    PubMed

    Montcriol, Ambroise; Meaudre, Eric; Kenane, Nadia; Asencio, Yves; Bordes, Julien; Palmier, Bruno

    2008-04-01

    To report a case of hyperventilation caused by topiramate therapy and propose a pathophysiologic mechanism for this disorder. A 52-year-old woman with refractory seizure disorder was admitted to the burn care unit with burns over 10% of her body. Her seizure medications, unchanged and well tolerated for several months, included carbamazepine 1200 mg, lamotrigine 500 mg, phenobarbital 80 mg, and topiramate 150 mg per day. During hospitalization, despite a relatively normal arterial pH, the woman developed persistent hyperventilation, with respiratory rates up to 50 breaths/min. Alkalinization did not reduce the hyperventilation. Thoracic contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scan ruled out pulmonary embolism and persistent pneumonia. Salicylate and biguanide screening were negative; results of repeated thyroid and liver function tests were normal. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging excluded a cerebral pathology. After cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis showed acidosis (pH 7.14), topiramate was withdrawn and the patient's general condition rapidly improved. Forty-eight hours later, the CSF pH had increased to 7.26. The woman was discharged from the burn care unit on the 42nd hospital day. Hyperchloremic normal anion gap metabolic acidosis, which can lead to hyperventilation, has been reported as an adverse effect of topiramate treatment. However, our patient had respiratory alkalosis. Concurrent etiologies of peripheral hyperventilation were excluded, leaving central neurogenic hyperventilation as the remaining etiology. Such central neurogenic hyperventilation associated with topiramate has previously been reported in intensive care. Our case report demonstrates CSF acidosis. Withdrawing topiramate reduced both CSF acidosis and hyperventilation. The mechanism of topiramate-induced CSF acidosis remains unclear. According to the Naranjo probability scale, the relationship of hyperventilation to administration of topiramate in our patient was probable. Normal doses

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid findings in children with fever-associated status epilepticus: results of the consequences of prolonged febrile seizures (FEBSTAT) study.

    PubMed

    Frank, L Matthew; Shinnar, Shlomo; Hesdorffer, Dale C; Shinnar, Ruth C; Pellock, John M; Gallentine, William; Nordli, Douglas R; Epstein, Leon G; Moshé, Solomon L; Lewis, Darrell V; Sun, Shumei

    2012-12-01

    This prospective multicenter study of 200 patients with fever-associated status epilepticus (FSE), of whom 136 underwent a nontraumatic lumbar puncture, confirms that FSE rarely causes cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis. CSF glucose and protein levels were unremarkable. Temperature, age, seizure focality, and seizure duration did not affect results. CSF pleocytosis should not be attributed to FSE.

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid diagnostic markers correlate with lower plasma copper and ceruloplasmin in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kessler, H; Pajonk, F-G; Meisser, P; Schneider-Axmann, T; Hoffmann, K-H; Supprian, T; Herrmann, W; Obeid, R; Multhaup, G; Falkai, P; Bayer, T A

    2006-11-01

    Increasing evidence links Alzheimer's disease (AD) with misbalanced Cu homeostasis. Recently, we have shown that dietary Cu supplementation in a transgenic mouse model for AD increases bioavailable brain Cu levels, restores Cu, Zn-super oxide-1 activity, prevents premature death, and lowers A beta levels. In the present report we investigated AD patients with normal levels of A beta 42, Tau and Phospho-Tau in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in comparison with AD patients exhibiting aberrant levels in these CSF biomarkers. The influence of these cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diagnostic markers with primary dependent variables blood Cu, Zn and ceruloplasmin (CB) and secondary with CSF profiles of Cu, Zn and neurotransmitters was determined. Multivariate tests revealed a significant effect of factor diagnostic group (no AD diagnosis in CSF or AD diagnosis in CSF) for variables plasma Cu and CB (F=4.80; df=2, 23; p=0.018). Subsequent univariate tests revealed significantly reduced plasma Cu (-12.7%; F=7.05; df=1, 25; p=0.014) and CB (-14.1%; F=9.44; df=1, 24; p=0.005) levels in patients with aberrant CSF biomarker concentrations. Although only AD patients were included, the reduced plasma Cu and CB levels in patients with a CSF diagnosis of advanced AD supports previous observations that a mild Cu deficiency might contribute to AD progression.

  4. Metabolic clearance of insulin from the cerebrospinal fluid in the anesthetized rat

    SciTech Connect

    Manin, M.; Broer, Y.; Balage, M.; Rostene, W.; Grizard, J. )

    1990-01-01

    Infusion of 125I-(Tyr A14)-insulin at tracer doses into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) resulted in a slow rate of increase in the CSF-labeled insulin during the first 2 hours with a plateau thereafter. Labeled insulin was cleared from the CSF at a higher rate than 3H-inulin, a marker of CSF bulk flow. The labeled insulin was mainly distributed in all the ventricular and periventricular brain regions. Small amounts of degraded insulin appeared in the CSF. Coinfusion with an excess of unlabeled insulin impaired the clearance and degradation of labeled insulin. It also inhibited the labeling in medial hypothalamus, olfactory bulbs and brain stem. In contrast, coinfusion of ribonuclease B (used to test the specificity of uptake) was without any effect. It was concluded that there is an active insulin intake from CSF into brain specific compartments that is presumably essential for the effects of insulin on brain function.

  5. Resistance to outflow of cerebrospinal fluid after central infusions of angiotensin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, B. A.; Keil, L. C.; Severs, W. B.

    1992-01-01

    Infusions of artificial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) into the cerebroventricles of conscious rats can raise CSF pressure (CSFp). This response can be modified by some neuropeptides. One of these, angiotensin, facilitates the rise in CSFp. We measured CSFp in conscious rats with a computerized system and evaluated resistance to CSF outflow during infusion of artificial CSF, with or without angiotensin, from the decay kinetics of superimposed bolus injections. Angiotensin (10 ng/min) raised CSFp (P less than 0.05) compared with solvent, but the resistance to CSF outflow of the two groups was similar (P greater than 0.05). Because CSFp was increased by angiotensin without an increase in the outflow resistance, a change in some volume compartment is likely. Angiotensin may raise CSFp by increasing CSF synthesis; this possibility is supported, since the choroid plexuses contain an intrinsic isorenin-angiotensin system. Alternatively, angiotensin may dilate pial arteries, leading to an increased intracranial blood volume.

  6. The Relief of Unilateral Painful Thoracic Radiculopathy without Headache from Remote Spontaneous Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak.

    PubMed

    Son, Byung-Chul; Ha, Sang-Woo; Lee, Si-Hoon; Choi, Jin-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) caused by spontaneous spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks produces orthostatic headaches. Although upper arm pain or paresthesia is reportedly associated with SIH from spontaneous spinal CSF leak in the presence of orthostatic headache, low thoracic radicular pain due to spontaneous spinal CSF leak unassociated with postural headache is extremely rare. We report a 67-year-old female who presented with chronic, positional radicular right T11 pain. Computed tomography myelography showed a spontaneous lumbar spinal CSF leak at L2-3 and repeated lumbar epidural blood patches significantly alleviated chronic, positional, and lower thoracic radiculopathic pain. The authors speculate that a chronic spontaneous spinal CSF leak not severe enough to cause typical orthostatic headache or epidural CSF collection may cause local symptoms such as irritation of a remote nerve root. There might be considerable variabilities in the clinical features of SIH which can present a diagnostic challenge.

  7. Kinetics of HIV-1 in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma in cryptococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Cecchini, Diego M.; Cañizal, Ana M.; Rojas, Haroldo; Arechavala, Alicia; Negroni, Ricardo; Bouzas, María B.; Benetucci, Jorge A.

    2012-01-01

    In order to determine HIV-1 kinetics in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma in patients with cryptococcal meningitis (CM), we undertook a prospective collection of paired CSF/plasma samples from antiretroviral therapy-free HIV-infected patients with CM. Samples were obtained at baseline (S1) and at the second (S2) and third (S3) weeks of antifungal therapy. HIV-1 CSF concentrations were significantly lower in both S2 and S3 with respect to S1. Plasma concentrations remained stable. HIV-1 concentrations were higher in plasma than CSF in all cases. Patients who survived the episode of CM (but not those who died) showed a decrease in CSF viral load, what suggests different viral kinetics of HIV-1 in the CSF according to the clinical course of this opportunistic disease. PMID:24470944

  8. Kinetics of HIV-1 in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma in cryptococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Cecchini, Diego M; Cañizal, Ana M; Rojas, Haroldo; Arechavala, Alicia; Negroni, Ricardo; Bouzas, María B; Benetucci, Jorge A

    2012-04-27

    In order to determine HIV-1 kinetics in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma in patients with cryptococcal meningitis (CM), we undertook a prospective collection of paired CSF/plasma samples from antiretroviral therapy-free HIV-infected patients with CM. Samples were obtained at baseline (S1) and at the second (S2) and third (S3) weeks of antifungal therapy. HIV-1 CSF concentrations were significantly lower in both S2 and S3 with respect to S1. Plasma concentrations remained stable. HIV-1 concentrations were higher in plasma than CSF in all cases. Patients who survived the episode of CM (but not those who died) showed a decrease in CSF viral load, what suggests different viral kinetics of HIV-1 in the CSF according to the clinical course of this opportunistic disease.

  9. Knowledge-base for interpretation of cerebrospinal fluid data patterns. Essentials in neurology and psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Reiber, Hansotto

    2016-06-01

    The physiological and biophysical knowledge base for interpretations of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) data and reference ranges are essential for the clinical pathologist and neurochemist. With the popular description of the CSF flow dependent barrier function, the dynamics and concentration gradients of blood-derived, brain-derived and leptomeningeal proteins in CSF or the specificity-independent functions of B-lymphocytes in brain also the neurologist, psychiatrist, neurosurgeon as well as the neuropharmacologist may find essentials for diagnosis, research or development of therapies. This review may help to replace the outdated ideas like "leakage" models of the barriers, linear immunoglobulin Index Interpretations or CSF electrophoresis. Calculations, Interpretations and analytical pitfalls are described for albumin quotients, quantitation of immunoglobulin synthesis in Reibergrams, oligoclonal IgG, IgM analysis, the polyspecific ( MRZ- ) antibody reaction, the statistical treatment of CSF data and general quality assessment in the CSF laboratory. The diagnostic relevance is documented in an accompaning review.

  10. The Relief of Unilateral Painful Thoracic Radiculopathy without Headache from Remote Spontaneous Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak

    PubMed Central

    Son, Byung-chul; Ha, Sang-woo; Lee, Si-hoon; Choi, Jin-gyu

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) caused by spontaneous spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks produces orthostatic headaches. Although upper arm pain or paresthesia is reportedly associated with SIH from spontaneous spinal CSF leak in the presence of orthostatic headache, low thoracic radicular pain due to spontaneous spinal CSF leak unassociated with postural headache is extremely rare. We report a 67-year-old female who presented with chronic, positional radicular right T11 pain. Computed tomography myelography showed a spontaneous lumbar spinal CSF leak at L2-3 and repeated lumbar epidural blood patches significantly alleviated chronic, positional, and lower thoracic radiculopathic pain. The authors speculate that a chronic spontaneous spinal CSF leak not severe enough to cause typical orthostatic headache or epidural CSF collection may cause local symptoms such as irritation of a remote nerve root. There might be considerable variabilities in the clinical features of SIH which can present a diagnostic challenge. PMID:27445613

  11. Multiplicity of cerebrospinal fluid functions: New challenges in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Johanson, Conrad E; Duncan, John A; Klinge, Petra M; Brinker, Thomas; Stopa, Edward G; Silverberg, Gerald D

    2008-01-01

    This review integrates eight aspects of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulatory dynamics: formation rate, pressure, flow, volume, turnover rate, composition, recycling and reabsorption. Novel ways to modulate CSF formation emanate from recent analyses of choroid plexus transcription factors (E2F5), ion transporters (NaHCO3 cotransport), transport enzymes (isoforms of carbonic anhydrase), aquaporin 1 regulation, and plasticity of receptors for fluid-regulating neuropeptides. A greater appreciation of CSF pressure (CSFP) is being generated by fresh insights on peptidergic regulatory servomechanisms, the role of dysfunctional ependyma and circumventricular organs in causing congenital hydrocephalus, and the clinical use of algorithms to delineate CSFP waveforms for diagnostic and prognostic utility. Increasing attention focuses on CSF flow: how it impacts cerebral metabolism and hemodynamics, neural stem cell progression in the subventricular zone, and catabolite/peptide clearance from the CNS. The pathophysiological significance of changes in CSF volume is assessed from the respective viewpoints of hemodynamics (choroid plexus blood flow and pulsatility), hydrodynamics (choroidal hypo- and hypersecretion) and neuroendocrine factors (i.e., coordinated regulation by atrial natriuretic peptide, arginine vasopressin and basic fibroblast growth factor). In aging, normal pressure hydrocephalus and Alzheimer's disease, the expanding CSF space reduces the CSF turnover rate, thus compromising the CSF sink action to clear harmful metabolites (e.g., amyloid) from the CNS. Dwindling CSF dynamics greatly harms the interstitial environment of neurons. Accordingly the altered CSF composition in neurodegenerative diseases and senescence, because of adverse effects on neural processes and cognition, needs more effective clinical management. CSF recycling between subarachnoid space, brain and ventricles promotes interstitial fluid (ISF) convection with both trophic and excretory

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics in patients with multiple sclerosis: a phase contrast magnetic resonance study.

    PubMed

    Gorucu, Y; Albayram, S; Balci, B; Hasiloglu, Z I; Yenigul, K; Yargic, F; Keser, Z; Kantarci, F; Kiris, A

    2011-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow dynamics, which supposedly have a strong relationship with chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI), might be expected to be affected in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. In this study, CSF flow at the level of the cerebral aqueduct was evaluated quantitatively by phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) to determine whether CSF flow dynamics are affected in MS patients. We studied 40 MS patients and 40 healthy controls using PC-MRI. We found significantly higher caudocranial (p=0.010) and craniocaudal CSF flow volumes (p=0.015) and stroke volume (p=0.010) in the MS patients compared with the controls. These findings may support the venous occlusion theory, but may also be explained by atrophy-dependent ventricular dilatation independent of the venous theory in MS patients.

  13. Antiretroviral treatment effect on immune activation reduces cerebrospinal fluid HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Elizabeth; Ronquillo, Rollie; Lollo, Nicole; Deeks, Steven G; Hunt, Peter; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T; Spudich, Serena; Price, Richard W

    2008-04-15

    To define the effect of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on activation of T cells in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood, and interactions of this activation with CSF HIV-1 RNA concentrations. Cross-sectional analysis of 14 HIV-negative subjects and 123 neuroasymptomatic HIV-1-infected subjects divided into 3 groups: not on ART (termed "offs"), on ART with plasma HIV-1 RNA >500 copies/mL ("failures"), and on ART with plasma HIV-1 RNA CSF neopterin and white blood cell (WBC) counts. CD8 T-cell activation in CSF and blood was highly correlated across all subjects and was highest in the offs, lower in the failures, and lower still in the successes. While CD8 activation was reduced in failures compared to offs across the range of plasma HIV-1, it maintained a coincident relation to CSF HIV-1 in both viremic groups. In addition to correlation with CSF HIV-1 concentrations, CD8 activation in blood and CSF correlated with CSF WBCs and CSF neopterin. Multivariate analysis confirmed the association of blood CD8 T-cell activation, along with plasma HIV-1 RNA and CSF neopterin, with CSF HIV-1 RNA levels. The similarity of CD8 T-cell activation in blood and CSF suggests these cells move from blood to CSF with only minor changes in CD38/HLA-DR expression. Differences in the relation of CD8 activation to HIV-1 concentrations in the blood and CSF in the 2 viremic groups suggest that changes in immune activation not only modulate CSF HIV-1 replication but also contribute to CSF treatment effects. The magnitude of systemic HIV-1 infection and intrathecal macrophage activation are also important determinants of CSF HIV-1 RNA levels.

  14. Endoscopic Endonasal Repair of Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage Caused by a Rare Traumatic Clival Fracture

    PubMed Central

    HIRAYAMA, Akihiro; KOMATSU, Fuminari; HOTTA, Kazuko; IMAI, Masaaki; ODA, Shinri; SHIMODA, Masami; MATSUMAE, Mitsunori

    2016-01-01

    An 89-year-old male presented with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea associated with head trauma sustained as a pedestrian in a traffic accident. Computed tomography (CT) showed pneumocephalus and multiple cranial bone fractures, including the clivus. Although the CSF rhinorrhea was treated conservatively for a week, clinical symptoms did not improve and surgical repair was performed. Preoperative thin-sliced bone CT and steady-state magnetic resonance images revealed a bone defect at the middle clivus and a collection of CSF fluid from the clival fistula in the sphenoid sinus. Endoscopic endonasal reconstruction was performed, and the 3-mm diameter dural tear and bone defect at the middle clivus were well visualized. The fistula was repaired using a pedicled nasoseptal mucosal flap. The CSF rhinorrhea completely disappeared as a result of the endoscopic endonasal surgery. The present report describes a rare case of CSF rhinorrhea caused by a traumatic clival fracture and surgical management by endoscopic endonasal surgery. PMID:26804187

  15. Abdominal cerebrospinal fluid pseudocyst: a complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunt in a Brazilian Amazon woman. Case report.

    PubMed

    Sena, F Gonçalves; Sousa, R Maia de; Meguins, L Crociati

    2010-01-01

    Ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS) is the most common treatment for hydrocephalus, however it is not free of complications. Abdominal cerebrospinal fluid pseudocyst (ACP) is an uncommon, but potentially life-threatening, complication of VPS. It is characterized by a fluid filled collection of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the peritoneal cavity containing the distal end of the VPS catheter and is surrounded by a wall composed of fibrous tissues without an epithelial lining. We report the case a Brazilian Amazon woman that presented ACP fifteen years after the placement of a VPS. Physicians should be aware of this possible complication once early diagnosis would improve outcome and reduce patient's suffering and distress.

  16. Pulsatile cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Linninger, Andreas A; Tsakiris, Cristian; Zhu, David C; Xenos, Michalis; Roycewicz, Peter; Danziger, Zachary; Penn, Richard

    2005-04-01

    Disturbances of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in the brain can lead to hydrocephalus, a condition affecting thousands of people annually in the US. Considerable controversy exists about fluid and pressure dynamics, and about how the brain responds to changes in flow patterns and compression in hydrocephalus. This paper presents a new model based on the first principles of fluid mechanics. This model of fluid-structure interactions predicts flows and pressures throughout the brain's ventricular pathways consistent with both animal intracranial pressure (ICP) measurements and human CINE phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging data. The computations provide approximations of the tissue deformations of the brain parenchyma. The model also quantifies the pulsatile CSF motion including flow reversal in the aqueduct as well as the changes in ICPs due to brain tissue compression. It does not require the existence of large transmural pressure differences as the force for ventricular expansion. Finally, the new model gives an explanation of communicating hydrocephalus and the phenomenon of asymmetric hydrocephalus.

  17. Increased cerebrospinal fluid progranulin correlates with interleukin-6 in the acute phase of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Akio; Takemura, Masao; Saito, Kuniaki; Serrero, Ginette; Yoshikura, Nobuaki; Hayashi, Yuichi; Inuzuka, Takashi

    2017-04-15

    We examined progranulin (PGRN) levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples during the acute phase in 15 patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD) and compared the results with those from 17 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), 30 patients with other inflammatory neurological diseases (OIND), and 20 non-inflammatory controls (NIC). CSF PGRN levels of NMOSD patients were significantly higher than those of MS patients and NICs. These levels correlated with CSF interleukin-6 levels, CSF cell counts, CSF protein levels, improvements in the Expanded Disability Status Scale score, and affected total spinal cord lesion length in the NMOSD patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Total glutamine synthetase levels in cerebrospinal fluid of Alzheimer's disease patients are unchanged.

    PubMed

    Timmer, Nienke M; Herbert, Megan K; Claassen, Jurgen A H R; Kuiperij, H Bea; Verbeek, Marcel M

    2015-03-01

    Decreased cerebral protein and activity levels of glutamine synthetase (GS) have been reported for Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Using a recently established method, we quantified total GS levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from AD patients and control subjects. Furthermore, we investigated if total GS levels in CSF could differentiate AD from frontotemperal dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies patients. As we found no significantly altered total GS levels in any of the patient groups compared with control subjects, we conclude that levels of total GS in CSF have no diagnostic value for AD, dementia with Lewy bodies, or frontotemperal dementia.

  19. Cerebrospinal Fluid from Alzheimer's Disease Patients Contains Fungal Proteins and DNA.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Ruth; Pisa, Diana; Rábano, Alberto; Rodal, Izaskun; Carrasco, Luis

    2015-01-01

    The identification of biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease is important for patient management and to assess the effectiveness of clinical intervention. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers constitute a powerful tool for diagnosis and monitoring disease progression. We have analyzed the presence of fungal proteins and DNA in CSF from AD patients. Our findings reveal that fungal proteins can be detected in CSF with different anti-fungal antibodies using a slot-blot assay. Additionally, amplification of fungal DNA by PCR followed by sequencing distinguished several fungal species. The possibility that these fungal macromolecules could represent AD biomarkers is discussed.

  20. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Diagnosing Alzheimer's Disease in Clinical Practice: An Illustration with 3 Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Slats, Diane; Spies, Petra E.; Sjögren, Magnus J.C.; Verhey, Frans R.J.; Verbeek, Marcel M.; Olde Rikkert, Marcel G.M.

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of the brain specific biomarkers amyloid β42 (Aβ42) and total tau (t-tau) protein in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has a sensitivity and specificity of more than 85% for differentiating Alzheimer's Disease (AD) from non-demented controls. International guidelines are contradictory in their advice on the use of CSF biomarkers in AD diagnostics, resulting in a lack of consistency in clinical practice. We present three case reports that illustrate clinical practice according to the Dutch and European guidelines and portray the value of CSF biomarker analysis as an add-on diagnostic to the standard diagnostic workup for AD. PMID:20689628

  1. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of somatostatin and neuropeptide Y in multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Vecsei, L.; Csala, B.; Widerloev, E.E.; Ekman, R.; Czopf, J.; Palffy, G. )

    1990-09-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of somatostatin and neuropeptide Y were investigated by use of radioimmunoassay in patients suffering from chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. The somatostatin level was significantly decreased in the CSF of patients with multiple sclerosis compared to the control group. The magnitude of this change was more pronounced in patients with severe clinical symptoms of the illness. The CSF neuropeptide Y concentration did not differ from the control values. These findings suggest a selective involvement of somatostatin neurotransmission in multiple sclerosis.

  2. Soluble Megalin is Reduced in Cerebrospinal Fluid Samples of Alzheimer’s Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Spuch, Carlos; Antequera, Desireé; Pascual, Consuelo; Abilleira, Soledad; Blanco, María; Moreno-Carretero, María José; Romero-López, Jesús; Ishida, Tetsuya; Molina, Jose Antonio; Villarejo, Alberto; Bermejo-Pareja, Felix; Carro, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Megalin or low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-2 is a member of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family, which has been linked to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) by clearing brain amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) across the blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier at the choroid plexus. Here, we found a soluble form of megalin secreted from choroid plexus epithelial cells. Soluble megalin levels were also localized in the human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), being reduced in AD patients. We have also shown that soluble megalin binding to Aβ is decreased in the CSF of AD patients, suggesting that decreased sequestration of Aβ in the CSF could be associated with defective clearance of Aβ and an increase of brain Aβ levels. Thus, therapies, which increase megalin expression, at the choroid plexus and/or enhance circulating soluble megalin hold potential to control brain Aβ-related pathologies in AD. PMID:25926771

  3. "Compensated hyperosmolarity" of cerebrospinal fluid and the development of hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Klarica, M; Miše, B; Vladić, A; Radoš, M; Orešković, D

    2013-09-17

    Acute osmolar loading of cerebrospinal fluid within one lateral ventricle of dogs was examined as a cause of water extraction from the bloodstream and an increase in intracranial pressure. We have shown that a certain amount of (3)H₂O from the bloodstream enters osmotically loaded cerebrospinal fluid significantly faster, hence causing a significant increase in intracranial pressure. The noted phenomenon in which intracranial pressure still significantly increases, but in which the hyperosmolarity of the cerebrospinal fluid is no longer present, was named "compensated hyperosmolarity". In the case of the sub-chronic application of hyperosmolar solutions into cat ventricles, we observed an increase in cerebrospinal fluid volume and a more pronounced development of hydrocephalus in the area of application, but without significant increase in intracranial pressure and without blockage of cerebrospinal fluid pathways. These results support the newly proposed hypothesis of cerebrospinal fluid hydrodynamics and the ability to develop new strategies for the treatment of cerebrospinal fluid-related diseases.

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid substance P concentrations are elevated in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Per; Almqvist, Erik G; Wallin, Anders; Johansson, Jan-Ove; Andreasson, Ulf; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Svensson, Johan

    2015-11-16

    The neuropeptides substance P, orexin A (hypocretin-1) and neurotensin are signaling molecules that influence brain activity. We examined their cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels in a study population consisting of Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) diagnosed with AD dementia upon follow-up (n=32), stable MCI (SMCI, n=13), other dementias (n=15), and healthy controls (n=20). CSF substance P level was increased in AD patients compared to patients with other dementias and healthy controls (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively). Patients with other dementia or SMCI had lower CSF orexin A level than AD patients (both P<0.05) and marginally lower level than healthy controls (both P=0.05). CSF neurotensin level was similar in all groups. In the total study population (n=80), CSF substance P level correlated positively with CSF levels of T-tau and P-tau, and in AD patients (n=32), CSF substance P level correlated positively with CSF Aβ1-42 level. In conclusion, CSF substance P level was elevated in AD patients and correlated with CSF Aβ1-42 level, a well established marker of senile plaque pathology. The role of low CSF orexin A level in other dementias or SMCI needs to be explored in further studies.

  5. Diagnostic Value of CYFRA 21-1 in the Cerebrospinal Fluid for Leptomeningeal Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Shi, Qiang; Hao, Jing; Zhao, Na; Liu, Zhijie

    2017-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytology has low sensitivity for leptomeningeal metastasis (LM); thus, new markers are needed to improve the diagnostic accuracy of LM. We measured carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and cytokeratin 19 fragments (CYFRA 21-1) in paired samples of CSF and serum from patients with LM and patients with nonmalignant neurological diseases (NMNDs) as controls. Receiver operating curve analysis was performed to assess their diagnostic accuracy for LM. In patients with NMNDs, CEA and CYFRA 21-1 levels in the CSF were significantly lower than the serum levels. In patients with LM, there was no significant difference between the CSF and serum CEA levels, whereas the CYFRA 21-1 levels were significantly higher in the CSF than the serum. CSF/serum quotients of CYFRA 21-1 were higher than those of CEA in patients with LM and patients with NMNDs. CSF CYFRA 21-1 and CSF/serum quotient of CYFRA 21-1 had high accuracy for differentiating LM from NMNDs that was similar to CSF CEA and CSF/serum quotient of CYFRA 21-1, whereas serum CYFRA 21-1 is of poor diagnostic value. Measurement of CSF CYFRA 21-1 should not be overlooked in patients with suspected LM, even if the serum CYFRA 21-1 level is within normal limits. PMID:28298807

  6. Quantitative Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure Gradients in Healthy Volunteers and Patients with Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    HAYASHI, Naokazu; MATSUMAE, Mitsunori; YATSUSHIRO, Satoshi; HIRAYAMA, Akihiro; ABDULLAH, Afnizanfaizal; KURODA, Kagayaki

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can depict not only anatomical information, but also physiological factors such as velocity and pressure gradient. Measurement of these physiological factors is necessary to understand the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) environment. In this study we quantified CSF motion in various parts of the CSF space, determined changes in the CSF environment with aging, and compared CSF pressure gradient between patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) and healthy elderly volunteers. Fifty-seven healthy volunteers and six iNPH patients underwent four-dimensional (4D) phase-contrast (PC) MRI. CSF motion was observed and the pressure gradient of CSF was quantified in the CSF space. In healthy volunteers, inhomogeneous CSF motion was observed whereby the pressure gradient markedly increased in the center of the skull and gradually decreased in the periphery of the skull. For example, the pressure gradient at the ventral surface of the brainstem was 6.6 times greater than that at the convexity of the cerebrum. The pressure gradient was statistically unchanged with aging. The pressure gradient of patients with iNPH was 3.2 times greater than that of healthy volunteers. The quantitative analysis of 4D-PC MRI data revealed that the pressure gradient of CSF can be used to understand the CSF environment, which is not sufficiently given by subjective impression of the anatomical image. PMID:26226976

  7. Avian cerebrospinal fluid: repeated collection and testing for a possible role in food intake regulation.

    PubMed

    Skewes, P A; Denbow, D M; Lacy, M P; Van Krey, H P

    1986-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if a factor(s) involved in the regulation of food intake exists in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of the domestic fowl. A technique was developed that allows blood-free CSF samples to be collected repeatedly from the cisterna magna for up to 6 weeks. Using this technique, CSF was collected from free-feeding and 24-hour fasted broiler cockerels and injected into the lateral cerebral ventricle of 8-week old Leghorn cockerels and 4-week old broiler cockerels. The free-feeding birds received 10 microliter intracerebroventricular injections of CSF either at normal concentration (1 X -CSF) (Experiments 1 and 3) or at four times normal concentration (4 X-CSF) (Experiments 2 and 4). Artificial CSF served as the control. Food and water consumption were monitored following injection. The 1 X- and 4 X-CSF collected from both the free-feeding and 24-hour fasted donors did not affect the food intake of either the Leghorn or the broiler recipients. Water intake, however, was significantly increased in the Leghorns and broilers receiving the 4 X-CSF collected from 24-hour fasted birds. Thus, there does not appear to be a factor(s) present in the CSF collected from the cisterna magna that alters food intake when injected into the lateral ventricle, but a factor may exist in the CSF collected from fasted donors that stimulates water intake.

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid volumetric MRI mapping as a simple measurement for evaluating brain atrophy.

    PubMed

    De Vis, J B; Zwanenburg, J J; van der Kleij, L A; Spijkerman, J M; Biessels, G J; Hendrikse, J; Petersen, E T

    2016-05-01

    To assess whether volumetric cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) MRI can be used as a surrogate for brain atrophy assessment and to evaluate how the T2 of the CSF relates to brain atrophy. Twenty-eight subjects [mean age 64 (sd 2) years] were included; T1-weighted and CSF MRI were performed. The first echo data of the CSF MRI sequence was used to obtain intracranial volume, CSF partial volume was measured voxel-wise to obtain CSF volume (VCSF) and the T2 of CSF (T2,CSF) was calculated. The correlation between VCSF/T2,CSF and brain atrophy scores [global cortical atrophy (GCA) and medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA)] was evaluated. Relative total, peripheral subarachnoidal, and ventricular VCSF increased significantly with increased scores on the GCA and MTA (R = 0.83, 0.78 and 0.78 and R = 0.72, 0.62 and 0.86). Total, peripheral subarachnoidal, and ventricular T2 of the CSF increased significantly with higher scores on the GCA and MTA (R = 0.72, 0.70 and 0.49 and R = 0.60, 0.57 and 0.41). A fast, fully automated CSF MRI volumetric sequence is an alternative for qualitative atrophy scales. The T2 of the CSF is related to brain atrophy and could thus be a marker of neurodegenerative disease. • A 1:11 min CSF MRI volumetric sequence can evaluate brain atrophy. • CSF MRI provides accurate atrophy assessment without partial volume effects. • CSF MRI data can be processed quickly without user interaction. • The measured T 2 of the CSF is related to brain atrophy.

  9. Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak at the clivus

    PubMed Central

    Składzien, Jacek; Betlej, Marek; Chrzan, Robert; Mika, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    We present a case report of a 60-year-old woman with a spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak at the clivus, obesity and no history of trauma. Follow-up imaging scans confirmed enlargement of the defect within the posterior clival framework to the size of 16 × 9 × 4 mm with a suspected meningocerebral hernia. The surgeons used the “two nostrils – four hands” endoscopic operating technique. The patient reported a history of cerebrospinal fluid leaks lasting for 3 years, with increasingly shorter leak-free periods and an increasing incidence of inflammatory complications. The patient recovered without complications, and she was discharged 14 days after the surgery. Good local outcome and improved patient condition were achieved postoperatively. PMID:26865899

  10. Cerebrospinal Fluid Levels of Monoamine Metabolites in the Epileptic Baboon

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, C. Ákos; Patel, Mayuri; Uteshev, Victor V.

    2016-01-01

    The baboon represents a natural model for genetic generalized epilepsy and sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). In this retrospective study, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) monoamine metabolites and scalp electroencephalography (EEG) were evaluated in 263 baboons of a pedigreed colony. CSF monoamine abnormalities have been linked to reduced seizure thresholds, behavioral abnormalities and SUDEP in various animal models of epilepsy. The levels of 3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenylglycol, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid and homovanillic acid in CSF samples drawn from the cisterna magna were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography. These levels were compared between baboons with seizures (SZ), craniofacial trauma (CFT) and asymptomatic, control (CTL) baboons, between baboons with abnormal and normal EEG studies. We hypothesized that the CSF levels of major monoaminergic metabolites (i.e., dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine) associate with the baboons’ electroclinical status and thus can be used as clinical biomarkers applicable to seizures/epilepsy. However, despite apparent differences in metabolite levels between the groups, usually lower in SZ and CFT baboons and in baboons with abnormal EEG studies, we did not find any statistically significant differences using a logistic regression analysis. Significant correlations between the metabolite levels, especially between 5-HIAA and HVA, were preserved in all electroclinical groups. While we were not able to demonstrate significant differences in monoamine metabolites in relation to seizures or EEG markers of epilepsy, we cannot exclude the monoaminergic system as a potential source of pathogenesis in epilepsy and SUDEP. A prospective study evaluating serial CSF monoamine levels in baboons with recently witnessed seizures, and evaluation of abnormal expression and function of monoaminergic receptors and transporters within epilepsy-related brain regions, may impact the electroclinical status. PMID:26924854

  11. Integration of the subarachnoid space and lymphatics: Is it time to embrace a new concept of cerebrospinal fluid absorption?

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Lena; Zakharov, Andrei; Johnston, Miles

    2005-01-01

    In most tissues and organs, the lymphatic circulation is responsible for the removal of interstitial protein and fluid but the parenchyma of the brain and spinal cord is devoid of lymphatic vessels. On the other hand, the literature is filled with qualitative and quantitative evidence supporting a lymphatic function in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) absorption. The experimental data seems to warrant a re-examination of CSF dynamics and consideration of a new conceptual foundation on which to base our understanding of disorders of the CSF system. The objective of this paper is to review the key studies pertaining to the role of the lymphatic system in CSF absorption. PMID:16174293

  12. Fistula detection in cerebrospinal fluid leakage1

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Marshall B.; Gammal, Taher el; Ihnen, Menard; Cowan, Morgan A.

    1972-01-01

    In two cases of cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhoea in which scinticisternography failed to identify the fistulae, the tracts were demonstrated by positive contrast ventriculography. It is postulated that the fistula communicated with the ventricles but was isolated from the subarachnoid space by adhesions (demonstrated at operation in one case). There was `high pressure rhinorrhoea' in one case. The rhinorrhoea ceased after insertion of ventriculoatrial shunt. Images PMID:4538888

  13. Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome of Patients with Acute Lyme Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-10-05

    Acute Lyme disease results from transmission of and infection by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi following a tick bite. During acute infection, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of Lyme meningitis. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing for a deep view into the proteome for a cohort of patients with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation leading to the identification of proteins that reflect host responses, which are distinct for subjects with acute Lyme disease. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified changes in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. The measured changes in protein abundances reflect the impact of acute Lyme disease on the CNS as presented in CSF. We have identified 89 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease. A number of the differentially abundant proteins have been found to be localized to brain synapse and thus constitute important leads for better understanding of the neurological consequence of disseminated Lyme disease.

  14. Florbetapir positron emission tomography and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Hake, Ann; Trzepacz, Paula T.; Wang, Shufang; Yu, Peng; Case, Michael; Hochstetler, Helen; Witte, Michael M.; Degenhardt, Elisabeth K.; Dean, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Background We evaluated the relationship between florbetapir-F18 positron emission tomography (FBP PET) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers. Methods Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI)-GO/2 healthy control (HC), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia subjects with clinical measures and CSF collected ±90 days of FBP PET data were analyzed using correlation and logistic regression. Results In HC and MCI subjects, FBP PET anterior and posterior cingulate and composite standard uptake value ratios correlated with CSF amyloid beta (Aβ1-42) and tau/Aβ1-42 ratios. Using logistic regression, Aβ1-42, total tau (t-tau), phosphorylated tau181P (p-tau), and FBP PET composite each differentiated HC versus AD. Aβ1-42 and t-tau distinguished MCI versus AD, without additional contribution by FBP PET. Total tau and p-tau added discriminative power to FBP PET when classifying HC versus AD. Conclusion Based on cross-sectional diagnostic groups, both amyloid and tau measures distinguish healthy from demented subjects. Longitudinal analyses are needed. PMID:25916563

  15. Cerebrospinal fluid shunt operations without cranial bandaging. Clinical article.

    PubMed

    Winston, Ken R; Trinidad, Elizabeth; Wilkinson, C Corbett; McBride, Lori A

    2009-06-01

    Cranial bandages are commonly applied over scalp incisions immediately after cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt surgery, putatively to prevent complications, particularly infection. These bandages require resources, consume the time of healthcare workers, and incur non-negligible expenses. It is therefore both reasonable and important to examine the efficacy of cranial bandaging. The combined experience of 3 neurosurgeons over 6.75 years with using no cranial bandaging after operations for implantation or revision of CSF shunts is the basis of this report. These data were prospectively accrued and retrospectively analyzed. The infection rate was 4.2% (95% CI 3.1-5.6%) for 1064 operations performed without postoperative cranial bandaging after either shunt insertion or revision surgery through clean or clean-contaminated wounds. The age distribution extended from premature infants through adults 77 years of age. The results of this investigation support the position that bandaging scalp wounds after CSF shunt implantation or revision surgery adds no benefit beyond the easier, simpler, faster, and cheaper practice of using antibiotic ointment as a dressing without bandaging.

  16. Nimodipine transfer into human breast milk and cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Carcas, A J; Abad-Santos, F; de Rosendo, J M; Frias, J

    1996-02-01

    To report nimodipine concentrations in breast milk and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of a lactating woman who was given the drug to prevent a vascular spasm secondary to angiographic examination. A 36-year-old woman received a total dose of nimodipine 46 mg iv over 24 hours. She extracted milk when she noted mammary tightness, and blood samples were taken simultaneously by venipuncture in the arm contralateral to that of the nimodipine infusion. A CSF sample also was taken in a diagnostic lumbar puncture. Nimodipine concentration in milk was much lower than that in serum, with a milk/serum ratio of 0.06-0.15. The CSF/serum ratio was 0.01. We estimate that the infant would have received between 0.008% and 0.092% of the weight-adjusted dose that was administered to the mother if the baby had been nursed. Nimodipine is transferred to human milk in a lower proportion than are other calcium-channel blockers. These results suggest that treating the mother with nimodipine would entail no risk to the nursing infant.

  17. Broadband Infrared Spectroscopy for Non-Contact Measurement of Neurological Disease Biomarkers in Cerebrospinal Fluid.

    PubMed

    Horosh, Michael; Feldman, Haim; Yablonovich, Avi; Firer, Michael A; Abookasis, David

    2017-03-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a clear and colorless biological fluid which circulates within brain ventricles (cavities), the spinal cord's central canal, the space between the brain and the spinal cord, as well as their protective coverings, the meninges. Cerebrospinal fluid contains different constituents, such as albumin and lactate, whose levels are used clinically as biomarkers of neurodegenerative disorders. In current clinical practice, analysis of CSF content for the diagnosis of central nervous system disorders requires an invasive procedure known as lumbar puncture or spinal tap. With the aim of developing a noninvasive alternative, we report here the spectral behavior of albumin and lactate over a broad wavelength range of 600-2000 nm, after each was added separately at varying normal and abnormal concentration levels to artificial CSF ( aCSF). Spectral measurements were conducted simultaneously by two different spectrometers working at different spectral ranges in transmittance mode. Spectral analysis revealed that albumin and lactate each possesses its own first and second derivative absorbance spectra fingerprint between 1660 and 1810 nm. Distinguishing albumin from lactate by their spectral data enabled the differentiation between aCSF conditions modeling different neurological disorders. Spectral changes of each compound strongly correlated ( R(2 )> 0.9) with absorbance derivative spectra peaks at specific wavelengths, when analyzed by linear regression with variations in their concentration. These findings suggest the feasibility of CSF biomarker assessment by broadband infrared spectroscopy.

  18. The cerebrospinal fluid provides a proliferative niche for neural progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Lehtinen, Maria K.; Zappaterra, Mauro W.; Chen, Xi; Yang, Yawei J.; Hill, Anthony; Lun, Melody; Maynard, Thomas; Gonzalez, Dilenny; Kim, Seonhee; Ye, Ping; D’Ercole, A. Joseph; Wong, Eric T.; LaMantia, Anthony S.; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    Cortical development depends on the active integration of cell autonomous and extrinsic cues, but the coordination of these processes is poorly understood. Here, we show that the apical complex protein Pals1 and Pten have opposing roles in localizing the Igf1R to the apical, ventricular domain of cerebral cortical progenitor cells. We found that the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which contacts this apical domain, has an age-dependent effect on proliferation, much of which is attributable to Igf2, but that CSF contains other signaling activities as well. CSF samples from patients with glioblastoma multiforme show elevated Igf2 and stimulate stem cell proliferation in an Igf2-dependent manner. Together, our findings demonstrate that the apical complex couples intrinsic and extrinsic signaling, enabling progenitors to sense and respond appropriately to diffusible CSF-borne signals distributed widely throughout the brain. The temporal control of CSF composition may have critical relevance to normal development and neuropathological conditions. PMID:21382550

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of alpha-tocopherol in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Jiménez, F J; de Bustos, F; Molina, J A; de Andrés, C; Gasalla, T; Ortí-Pareja, M; Zurdo, M; Porta, J; Castellano-Millán, F; Arenas, J; Enríquez de Salamanca, R

    1998-06-12

    We compared cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum levels, and the CSF/serum ratio of alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E), measured by HPLC, in 36 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and 32 matched controls. The mean CSF vitamin E levels and the CSF/serum vitamin E ratio did not differ significantly between the two study groups. The serum levels of vitamin E and the serum vitamin E/cholesterol ratio were significantly lower in MS patients when compared with controls (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). These values were not correlated with age, age at onset and duration of the disease in the patients group. These results suggest that CSF vitamin E concentrations are not a marker of activity of MS activity.

  20. New insights into the glucose oxidase stick test for cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhoea.

    PubMed

    Baker, E H; Wood, D M; Brennan, A L; Baines, D L; Philips, B J

    2005-08-01

    Rhinorrhoea is a clinical sign of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage in patients with skull fracture, but can also be attributable to respiratory secretions or tears. Laboratory tests confirming the presence of CSF are not sufficiently rapid to support clinical decision making in the emergency department and may not be universally available. Detection of glucose in nasal discharge was traditionally used to diagnose CSF leak at the bedside, but has fallen into disuse as it has poor positive predictive value. We propose an algorithm to improve the diagnostic value of this test taking into consideration factors we have found to affect the glucose concentration of respiratory secretions. In patients at risk of CSF leak, nasal discharge is likely to contain CSF if glucose is present in the absence of visible blood, if blood glucose is <6 mmol x L(-1), and if there are no symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection.

  1. False-positive cerebrospinal fluid cryptococcus antigen in Libman-Sacks endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Isseh, Iyad N; Bourgi, Kassem; Nakhle, Asaad; Ali, Mahmoud; Zervos, Marcus J

    2016-12-01

    Cryptococcus meningoencephalitis is a serious opportunistic infection associated with high morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised hosts, particularly patients with advanced AIDS disease. The diagnosis is established through cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cryptococcus antigen detection and cultures. Cryptococcus antigen testing is usually the initial test of choice due its high sensitivity and specificity along with the quick availability of the results. We hereby report a case of a false-positive CSF cryptococcus antigen assay in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus presenting with acute confusion. While initial CSF evaluation revealed a positive cryptococcus antigen assay, the patient's symptoms were inconsistent with cryptococcus meningoencephalitis. A repeat CSF evaluation, done 3 days later, revealed a negative CSF cryptococcus antigen assay. Given the patient's active lupus disease and the elevated antinuclear antibody titers, we believe that the initial positive result was a false positive caused by interference from autoantibodies.

  2. Delayed presentation of traumatic cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Guyer, Richard A; Turner, Justin H

    2015-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak is one of several complications that can occur after traumatic skull base injury. Although most patients present soon after the injury occurs, some can present years later, with resulting morbidity and the need for additional procedures. We present a case of a patient with a sphenoid sinus CSF leak who presented 12 years after a closed head injury that included a sphenoethmoid skull base fracture. We also reviewed the literature on this topic, with a discussion of previous reports of CSF leaks that occurred months, years, or decades after trauma. A late onset CSF leak appears to be a rare but important complication of traumatic skull base injury. This case highlights the need for clinicians to remain vigilant to the possibility of delayed CSF rhinorrhea, even years after traumatic head injury.

  3. Human Cerebrospinal Fluid Promotes Neuronal Viability and Activity of Hippocampal Neuronal Circuits In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Alcazar, Marta; Culley, Georgia; Lyckenvik, Tim; Mobarrez, Kristoffer; Bjorefeldt, Andreas; Wasling, Pontus; Seth, Henrik; Asztely, Frederik; Harrer, Andrea; Iglseder, Bernhard; Aigner, Ludwig; Hanse, Eric; Illes, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    For decades it has been hypothesized that molecules within the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diffuse into the brain parenchyma and influence the function of neurons. However, the functional consequences of CSF on neuronal circuits are largely unexplored and unknown. A major reason for this is the absence of appropriate neuronal in vitro model systems, and it is uncertain if neurons cultured in pure CSF survive and preserve electrophysiological functionality in vitro. In this article, we present an approach to address how human CSF (hCSF) influences neuronal circuits in vitro. We validate our approach by comparing the morphology, viability, and electrophysiological function of single neurons and at the network level in rat organotypic slice and primary neuronal cultures cultivated either in hCSF or in defined standard culture media. Our results demonstrate that rodent hippocampal slices and primary neurons cultured in hCSF maintain neuronal morphology and preserve synaptic transmission. Importantly, we show that hCSF increases neuronal viability and the number of electrophysiologically active neurons in comparison to the culture media. In summary, our data indicate that hCSF represents a physiological environment for neurons in vitro and a superior culture condition compared to the defined standard media. Moreover, this experimental approach paves the way to assess the functional consequences of CSF on neuronal circuits as well as suggesting a novel strategy for central nervous system (CNS) disease modeling. PMID:26973467

  4. Analysis of serum and cerebrospinal fluid in clinically normal adult miniature donkeys.

    PubMed

    Mozaffari, A A; Samadieh, H

    2013-09-01

    To establish reference intervals for serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) parameters in clinically healthy adult miniature donkeys. Experiments were conducted on 10 female and 10 male clinically normal adult miniature donkeys, randomly selected from five herds. Lumbosacral CSF collection was performed with the sedated donkey in the standing position. Cell analysis was performed immediately after the samples were collected. Blood samples were obtained from the jugular vein immediately after CSF sample collection. Sodium, potassium, glucose, urea nitrogen, total protein, calcium, chloride, phosphorous and magnesium concentrations were measured in CSF and serum samples. A paired t-test was used to compare mean values between female and male donkeys. The CSF was uniformly clear, colourless and free from flocculent material, with a specific gravity of 1.002. The range of total nucleated cell counts was 2-4 cells/μL. The differential white cell count comprised only small lymphocytes. No erythrocytes or polymorphonuclear cells were observed on cytological examination. Reference values were obtained for biochemical analysis of serum and CSF. Gender had no effect on any variables measured in serum or CSF (p>0.05). CSF analysis can provide important information in addition to that gained by clinical examination. CSF analysis has not previously been performed in miniature donkeys; this is the first report on the subject. In the present study, reference intervals for total nucleated cell count, total protein, glucose, urea nitrogen, sodium, potassium, chloride, calcium, phosphorous and magnesium concentrations of serum and CSF were determined for male and female miniature donkeys.

  5. Measurement of cerebrospinal fluid formation and absorption by ventriculo-cisternal perfusion: what is really measured?

    PubMed Central

    Orešković, Darko; Klarica, Marijan

    2014-01-01

    The generally accepted hypothesis on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hydrodynamics suggests that CSF is actively formed mainly by choroid plexuses, circulates unidirectionally along the brain ventricles and subarachnoid space, and is passively absorbed mainly into the dural venous sinuses. CSF formation rate (Vf) has been extensively studied using the ventriculo-cisternal perfusion technique and the results have been used as the key evidence confirming the mentioned hypothesis. This method and the equation for Vf calculation are based on the assumption that the dilution of the indicator substance is a consequence of the newly formed CSF, ie, that a higher CSF formation rate will result in a higher degree of dilution. However, it has been experimentally shown that the indicator substance dilution inside the CSF system does not occur because of a “newly formed” CSF, but as consequence of a number of other factors (departure of substances into the surrounding tissue, flowing around the collecting cannula into the cortical and spinal subarachnoid space, departure into the contralateral ventricle, etc). This technique allows “calculation” of the CSF formation even in dead animals, in an in vitro model, and in any other part of the CSF system outside the ventricles that is being perfused. Therefore, this method is indirect and any dilution of the indicator substance in the perfusate caused by other reasons would result in questionable and often contradictory conclusions regarding CSF formation rates. PMID:25165046

  6. Metronidazole and Hydroxymetronidazole Central Nervous System Distribution: 2. Cerebrospinal Fluid Concentration Measurements in Patients with External Ventricular Drain

    PubMed Central

    Frasca, Denis; Dahyot-Fizelier, Claire; Adier, Christophe; Mimoz, Olivier; Debaene, Bertrand; Couet, William

    2014-01-01

    This study explored metronidazole and hydroxymetronidazole distribution in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of brain-injured patients. Four brain-injured patients with external ventricular drain received 500 mg of metronidazole over 0.5 h every 8 h. CSF and blood samples were collected at steady state over 8 h, and the metronidazole and hydroxymetronidazole concentrations were assayed by high-pressure liquid chromatograph. A noncompartmental analysis was performed. Metronidazole is distributed extensively within CSF, with a mean CSF to unbound plasma AUC0–τ ratio of 86% ± 16%. However, the concentration profiles in CSF were mostly flat compared to the plasma profiles. Hydroxymetronidazole concentrations were much lower than those of metronidazole both in plasma and in CSF, with a corresponding CSF/unbound plasma AUC0–τ ratio of 79% ± 16%. We describe here for the first time in detail the pharmacokinetics of metronidazole and hydroxymetronidazole in CSF. PMID:24277050

  7. Metronidazole and hydroxymetronidazole central nervous system distribution: 2. cerebrospinal fluid concentration measurements in patients with external ventricular drain.

    PubMed

    Frasca, Denis; Dahyot-Fizelier, Claire; Adier, Christophe; Mimoz, Olivier; Debaene, Bertrand; Couet, William; Marchand, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    This study explored metronidazole and hydroxymetronidazole distribution in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of brain-injured patients. Four brain-injured patients with external ventricular drain received 500 mg of metronidazole over 0.5 h every 8 h. CSF and blood samples were collected at steady state over 8 h, and the metronidazole and hydroxymetronidazole concentrations were assayed by high-pressure liquid chromatograph. A noncompartmental analysis was performed. Metronidazole is distributed extensively within CSF, with a mean CSF to unbound plasma AUC0-τ ratio of 86% ± 16%. However, the concentration profiles in CSF were mostly flat compared to the plasma profiles. Hydroxymetronidazole concentrations were much lower than those of metronidazole both in plasma and in CSF, with a corresponding CSF/unbound plasma AUC0-τ ratio of 79% ± 16%. We describe here for the first time in detail the pharmacokinetics of metronidazole and hydroxymetronidazole in CSF.

  8. Baseline correlation and comparative kinetics of cerebrospinal fluid colony-forming unit counts and antigen titers in cryptococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Annemarie E; Teparrukkul, Paprit; Pinpraphaporn, Supraphada; Larsen, Robert A; Chierakul, Wirongrong; Peacock, Sharon; Day, Nicholas; White, Nicholas J; Harrison, Thomas S

    2005-08-15

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cryptococcal colony-forming unit counts and CSF cryptococcal antigen titers serve as alternative measures of organism load in cryptococcal meningitis. For these measures, we correlated baseline values and rates of decline during the first 2 weeks of therapy in 68 human immunodeficiency virus--seropositive patients with cryptococcal meningitis. At baseline, there was a strong correlation between CSF cryptococcal colony-forming unit counts and CSF cryptococcal antigen titers. During the first 2 weeks of therapy, CSF cryptococcal colony-forming unit counts decreased by >5 logs, and CSF cryptococcal antigen titers decreased by 1.5 dilutions. In individual patients, there was no correlation between the rate of decline in CSF cryptococcal colony-forming unit counts and that in CSF cryptococcal antigen titers.

  9. Apolipoprotein E genotype and the diagnostic accuracy of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Lautner, Ronald; Palmqvist, Sebastian; Mattsson, Niklas; Andreasson, Ulf; Wallin, Anders; Pålsson, Erik; Jakobsson, Joel; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa; Owenius, Rikard; Olsson, Bob; Hampel, Harald; Rujescu, Dan; Ewers, Michael; Landén, Mikael; Minthon, Lennart; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hansson, Oskar

    2014-10-01

    Several studies suggest that the apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele modulates cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of β-amyloid 42 (Aβ42). Whether this effect is secondary to the association of the APOE ε4 allele with cortical Aβ deposition or whether APOE ε4 directly influences CSF levels of Aβ42 independently of Aβ pathology remains unknown. To evaluate whether the APOE genotype affects the diagnostic accuracy of CSF biomarkers for Alzheimer disease (AD), in particular Aβ42 levels, and whether the association of APOE ε4 with CSF biomarkers depends on cortical Aβ status. We collected data from 4 different centers in Sweden, Finland, and Germany. Cohort A consisted of 1345 individuals aged 23 to 99 years with baseline CSF samples, including 309 with AD, 287 with prodromal AD, 399 with stable mild cognitive impairment, 99 with dementias other than AD, and 251 controls. Cohort B included 105 nondemented younger individuals (aged 20-34 years) with CSF samples available. Cohort C included 118 patients aged 60 to 80 years with mild cognitive symptoms who underwent flutemetamol F 18 ([18F]flumetamol) positron emission tomography amyloid imaging and CSF tap. Standard care. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of Aβ42 and total and phosphorylated tau in relation to the APOE ε2/ε3/ε4 polymorphism in different diagnostic groups and in cases with or without cortical uptake of [18F]flutemetamol. The CSF levels of Aβ42 but not total and phosphorylated tau were lower in APOE ε4 carriers compared with noncarriers irrespective of diagnostic group (cohort A). Despite this, CSF levels of Aβ42 differed between participants with AD when compared with controls and those with stable mild cognitive impairment, even when stratifying for APOE genotype (P < .001 to P = .006). Multiple binary logistic regression revealed that CSF levels of Aβ42 and APOE ε4 genotype were independent predictors of AD diagnosis. In cohort B, APOE ε4 carrier status did not influence CSF levels of

  10. Development and functions of the choroid plexus–cerebrospinal fluid system

    PubMed Central

    Lun, Melody P.; Monuki, Edwin S.; Lehtinen, Maria K.

    2015-01-01

    The choroid plexus (ChP) is the principal source of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which has accepted roles as a fluid cushion and a sink for nervous system waste in vertebrates. Various animal models have provided insight into how the ChP–CSF system develops and matures. In addition, recent studies have uncovered new, active roles for this dynamic system in the regulation of neural stem cells, critical periods and the overall health of the nervous system. Together, these findings have brought about a paradigm shift in our understanding of brain development and health, and have stimulated new initiatives for the treatment of neurological disease. PMID:26174708

  11. Numerical simulation of cerebrospinal fluid hydrodynamics in the healing process of hydrocephalus patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholampour, S.; Fatouraee, N.; Seddighi, A. S.; Seddighi, A.

    2017-05-01

    Three-dimensional computational models of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow and brain tissue are presented for evaluation of their hydrodynamic conditions before and after shunting for seven patients with non-communicating hydrocephalus. One healthy subject is also modeled to compare deviated patients data to normal conditions. The fluid-solid interaction simulation shows the CSF mean pressure and pressure amplitude (the superior index for evaluation of non-communicating hydrocephalus) in patients at a greater point than those in the healthy subject by 5.3 and 2 times, respectively.

  12. Utility of cerebrospinal fluid drug concentration as a surrogate for unbound brain concentration in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Nagaya, Yoko; Nozaki, Yoshitane; Kobayashi, Kazumasa; Takenaka, Osamu; Nakatani, Yosuke; Kusano, Kazutomi; Yoshimura, Tsutomu; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    In central nervous system drug discovery, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drug concentration (C(CSF)) has been widely used as a surrogate for unbound brain concentrations (C(u,brain)). However, previous rodent studies demonstrated that when drugs undergo active efflux by transporters, such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), at the blood-brain barrier, the C(CSF) overestimates the corresponding C(u,brain). To investigate the utility of C(CSF) as a surrogate for interstitial fluid (ISF) concentration (C(ISF)) in nonhuman primates, this study simultaneously determined the C(CSF) and C(ISF) of 12 compounds, including P-gp substrates, under steady-state conditions in cynomolgus monkeys using intracerebral microdialysis coupled with cisternal CSF sampling. Unbound plasma concentrations of non- or weak P-gp substrates were within 2.2-fold of the C(ISF) or C(CSF), whereas typical P-gp substrates (risperidone, verapamil, desloratadine, and quinidine) showed ISF-to-plasma unbound (K(p,uu,ISF)) and CSF-to-plasma unbound concentration ratios (K(p,uu,CSF)) that were appreciably lower than unity. Although the K(p,uu,CSF) of quinidine, verapamil, and desloratadine showed a trend of overestimating the K(p,uu,ISF), K(p,uu,CSF) showed a good agreement with K(p,uu,ISF) within 3-fold variations for all compounds examined. C(u,brain) of some basic compounds, as determined using brain homogenates, overestimated the C(ISF) and C(CSF). Therefore, C(CSF) could be used as a surrogate for C(ISF) in nonhuman primates.

  13. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolic profiling of cerebrospinal fluid from epileptic dogs.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Tetsuya; Sumita, Maho; Horitani, Yusuke; Tamai, Reo; Tanaka, Katsuhiro; Komori, Masayuki; Takenaka, Shigeo

    2014-04-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder with seizures, but diagnostic approaches in veterinary clinics remain limited. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a body fluid used for diagnosis in veterinary medicine. In this study, we explored canine epilepsy diagnostic biomarkers using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolic profiling of CSF and multivariate data analysis. Profiles for subjects with idiopathic epilepsy differed significantly from those of healthy controls and subjects with symptomatic epilepsy. Among 60 identified metabolites, the levels of 20 differed significantly among the three groups. Glutamic acid was significantly increased in idiopathic epilepsy, and some metabolites including ascorbic acid were changed in both forms of epilepsy. These findings show that metabolic profiles of CSF differ between idiopathic and symptomatic epilepsy and that metabolites including glutamic acid and ascorbic acid in CSF may be useful for diagnosis of canine epilepsy.

  14. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolic Profiling of Cerebrospinal Fluid from Epileptic Dogs

    PubMed Central

    HASEGAWA, Tetsuya; SUMITA, Maho; HORITANI, Yusuke; TAMAI, Reo; TANAKA, Katsuhiro; KOMORI, Masayuki; TAKENAKA, Shigeo

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder with seizures, but diagnostic approaches in veterinary clinics remain limited. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a body fluid used for diagnosis in veterinary medicine. In this study, we explored canine epilepsy diagnostic biomarkers using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolic profiling of CSF and multivariate data analysis. Profiles for subjects with idiopathic epilepsy differed significantly from those of healthy controls and subjects with symptomatic epilepsy. Among 60 identified metabolites, the levels of 20 differed significantly among the three groups. Glutamic acid was significantly increased in idiopathic epilepsy, and some metabolites including ascorbic acid were changed in both forms of epilepsy. These findings show that metabolic profiles of CSF differ between idiopathic and symptomatic epilepsy and that metabolites including glutamic acid and ascorbic acid in CSF may be useful for diagnosis of canine epilepsy. PMID:24334864

  15. Cerebrospinal fluid otorrhea and pseudomonal meningitis in a child with Mondini dysplasia: case report.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, R Nick; Changa, Abhinav R; Bassani, Luigi; Jyung, Robert W; Liu, James K

    2015-09-01

    Mondini dysplasia is a rare congenital inner ear malformation that presents with abnormal cochlear development with accompanied vestibular dilation and vestibular aqueduct enlargement. This dysfunctional anatomy provides the potential for sensorineural hearing deficits, cerebrospinal fluid leaks, and severe cases of recurrent meningitis. We present the case of a child with Mondini dysplasia who presented with unilateral hearing loss and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) otorrhea that was surgically repaired through a combined middle fossa/transmeatal middle ear approach to alleviate any recurrence of infection and cerebrospinal fluid otorrhea. Postoperatively, the patient remained neurologically stable without any further CSF leakage. CSF cultures revealed a Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, a rare occurrence within the context of Mondini dysplasia. Retrograde bacterial spread from the external ear canal into the CSF space has been theorized as the possible pathogenesis of the resulting meningitis. The patient was successfully treated with intravenous antibiotics without any neurologic complications. Although Mondini dysplasia is a rare malformation, the life-threatening sequelae of meningitis that can result from the dysfunctional anatomy makes it a condition that requires elevated clinical vigilance, especially when considering children with hearing loss associated with recurrent meningitis, otorrhea, or rhinorrhea.

  16. Embryonic cerebrospinal fluid regulates neuroepithelial survival, proliferation, and neurogenesis in chick embryos.

    PubMed

    Gato, Angel; Moro, J A; Alonso, M I; Bueno, D; De La Mano, A; Martín, C

    2005-05-01

    Early in development, the behavior of neuroepithelial cells is controlled by several factors, which act in a developmentally regulated manner. Diffusible factors are secreted locally by the neuroepithelium itself, although other nearby structures may also be involved. Evidence suggests a physiological role for the cerebrospinal fluid in the development of the brain. Here, using organotypic cultures of chick embryo neuroepithelial explants from the mesencephalon, we show that the neuroepithelium in vitro is not able to self-induce cell survival, replication, and neurogenesis. We also show that the embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (E-CSF) promotes neuroepithelial stem cell survival and induces proliferation and neurogenesis in mesencephalic explants. These data strongly suggest that E-CSF is involved in the regulation of neuroepithelial cells behavior, supporting the hypothesis that this fluid plays a key role during the early development of the central nervous system.

  17. Separation of beta2-transferrin by denaturing gel electrophoresis to detect cerebrospinal fluid in ear and nasal fluids.

    PubMed

    Görögh, Tibor; Rudolph, Pierre; Meyer, Jens Eduard; Werner, Jochen A; Lippert, Burkard M; Maune, Steffen

    2005-09-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage is a critical condition with a substantial risk of meningitis. We investigated the use of transferrin isoform analysis as a diagnostic marker for detection of CSF leakage in fluid samples. We analyzed 241 samples from patients with CSF leakage, most commonly presenting as otorrhea or rhinorrhea, by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) with subsequent Western blotting and immunostaining for transferrin. Tears, saliva, nasal fluid, and ear secretions (20 samples each) were analyzed in parallel, and normal human serum served as a control in each experiment. We compared the minimum volume of added CSF that could be detected in secretions by our assay with the minimum volume detected by the prostaglandin-D synthase (beta-trace) test. CSF was admixed with blood in different proportions to determine the influence of blood contamination on the transferrin pattern. In all CSF samples, beta1- and beta2-transferrin were present in nearly equal amounts. In tears and ear secretions, beta2-transferrin migrated in the gel in the same manner as in CSF, but its concentration was noticeably lower than that of beta1-transferrin, a difference that allowed a clear distinction from the transferrin pattern of CSF. In saliva, both transferrin isoforms were also present but could be distinguished from those of other fluids by electrophoretic migration pattern rather than relative concentrations. With the beta-trace test, a minimum of 5 microL of CSF was needed for detection, whereas our beta2-transferrin assay yielded a signal of comparable intensity with a minimum of 2 microL of CSF. Analysis of the transferrin microheterogeneity pattern by SDS-PAGE for the identification of CSF leakage is a highly sensitive and specific method that merits consideration as a routine technique.

  18. Cytotoxicity of ventricular cerebrospinal fluid from Parkinson patients: correlation with clinical profiles and neurochemistry.

    PubMed

    Mandybur, George T; Miyagi, Yasushi; Yin, Wei; Perkins, Eddie; Zhang, John H

    2003-01-01

    Other investigators have reported that the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) might contain endogenous dystrophic factors. Using CSF samples drawn from individual PD patients during surgery, we investigated the toxic effect of ventricular CSF (vCSF) on the growth of PC12 cells and the correlation between the clinical profiles of the patients and CSF neurochemistry. Ventricular CSF samples from 28 patients with PD or essential tremor (ET) were collected during ventriculography for stereotactic pallidotomy or thalamotomy. PC12 cells were incubated with 20% vCSF from both clinical groups for up to 72 h. Microdialysis was used to analyze four neurochemical parameters (glucose, lactate, pyruvate, and glutamate) in each vCSF sample. We observed that vCSF drawn from PD patients exerted nonspecific growth inhibition on PC12 cells in a time-dependent manner. The growth inhibitory action of PD-vCSF decreased significantly after heat treatment. Microdialysis demonstrated no statistical differences between PD and ET samples among the four parameters studied. In addition, PC12 cell survival after 72 h incubation with PD-vCSF correlated with no neurochemical parameter or individual clinical profile (age, onset age, duration of disease, Hoehn & Yahr stage, disease progression rate), except for a slight correlation between vCSF and disease progression rate in heat treated samples from female patients. One or more endogenous cytotoxic factors in PD-vCSF inhibit PC12 cell growth. This factor or factors are partially sensitive to heat which suggests proteins or peptides as possible agents. The cytotoxic effect of PD-vCSF did not directly correlate with any clinical profiles studied or energy metabolism of PD brain.

  19. Research into the Physiology of Cerebrospinal Fluid Reaches a New Horizon: Intimate Exchange between Cerebrospinal Fluid and Interstitial Fluid May Contribute to Maintenance of Homeostasis in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    MATSUMAE, Mitsunori; SATO, Osamu; HIRAYAMA, Akihiro; HAYASHI, Naokazu; TAKIZAWA, Ken; ATSUMI, Hideki; SORIMACHI, Takatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) plays an essential role in maintaining the homeostasis of the central nervous system. The functions of CSF include: (1) buoyancy of the brain, spinal cord, and nerves; (2) volume adjustment in the cranial cavity; (3) nutrient transport; (4) protein or peptide transport; (5) brain volume regulation through osmoregulation; (6) buffering effect against external forces; (7) signal transduction; (8) drug transport; (9) immune system control; (10) elimination of metabolites and unnecessary substances; and finally (11) cooling of heat generated by neural activity. For CSF to fully mediate these functions, fluid-like movement in the ventricles and subarachnoid space is necessary. Furthermore, the relationship between the behaviors of CSF and interstitial fluid in the brain and spinal cord is important. In this review, we will present classical studies on CSF circulation from its discovery over 2,000 years ago, and will subsequently introduce functions that were recently discovered such as CSF production and absorption, water molecule movement in the interstitial space, exchange between interstitial fluid and CSF, and drainage of CSF and interstitial fluid into both the venous and the lymphatic systems. Finally, we will summarize future challenges in research. This review includes articles published up to February 2016. PMID:27245177

  20. Cerebrospinal fluid total protein cannot reliably distinguish true subarachnoid haemorrhage from other causes of raised cerebrospinal fluid net bilirubin and net oxyhaemoglobin absorbances.

    PubMed

    Birch, Katherine; Burrows, Gillian; Cruickshank, Anne; Egner, William; Holbrook, Ian; Lewis, Emma; McNeilly, Jane; Patel, Dina; Worthington, Viki

    2014-11-01

    In cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spectrophotometry, if the net bilirubin absorbance (NBA) and net oxyhaemoglobin absorbance (NOA) are both raised with a visible oxyhaemoglobin peak, the revised national guidelines for analysis of CSF bilirubin advise interpreting the results as 'Consistent with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH)' regardless of the CSF total protein concentration of the specimen. We wanted to study the range of CSF total protein concentrations found in confirmed SAH to establish if the CSF total protein value can give further guidance on the likelihood of SAH. Consecutive cases from five different hospital sites were included if the CSF NBA was greater than 0.007 AU and the NOA was greater than 0.02 AU with a visible oxyhaemoglobin peak. For the cases identified, the laboratory information management system and patient records were interrogated to identify the total protein concentration of the CSF specimen and whether SAH had ultimately been confirmed or excluded by other methods and supporting evidence. Results from 132 patients were included. The CSF total protein range in confirmed SAH was 0.23-3.08 g/L with a median concentration of 0.7 g/L (n = 51). In the SAH excluded group, the CSF total protein range was 0.43-29 g/L with a median concentration of 1.9 g/L (n = 81). Although confirmed SAH was not associated with the very highest concentrations of CSF total protein, a definite CSF protein cut-off concentration above which SAH could reliably be excluded cannot be recommended. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  1. Bicompartmental analysis of cerebrospinal fluid circulation. Theory and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Cabanes, J; Marti, J; Orozco, M; Beltran, A

    1983-08-01

    A new model for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation is proposed. Specific activity/time curves for CSF kinetics determined after intraventricular injection of a radiotracer were produced by fitting a biexponential function to data points and developing a two-compartmental model. Calculation of kinetic parameters of the model provides quantitative data about CSF dynamics. The study of each compartment separately and of the intercompartmental relationship is possible with this model. Sequential scan images and graphic plots of the variations of radioactivity in both compartments, derived from this model, add supplementary information in the evaluation of patients. Ventriculography was performed in 80 patients, who fell into four groups: those with normal CSF circulation, hydrocephalus, infantile hydrocephalus, and functioning ventricular shunts. Normal and hydrocephalic patients showed significant differences between the two groups in the means of some numerical parameters calculated from the new model. An increase of intraventricular radioactivity at 24 hours (p less than 10(-4)) and of the volume of Compartment 1 (p less than 0.01) with decreased volume of Compartment 2 (p less than 10(-4)) and total flow outside the system (p less than 10(-3)) were found in patients with hydrocephalus. The limiting values for normal patients were also estimated. Communicating and obstructive hydrocephalus could be differentiated by this method; however, no differences in mean values were found relating to the etiology or clinical course of the hydrocephalus. Normal-pressure hydrocephalus and cerebral atrophy produced significantly different mean values for the volume of Compartment 2 (p less than 0.01), flow out of the system (p less than 0.01), and intercompartmental flow (p less than 0.01).

  2. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarker for Alzheimer Disease Predicts Postoperative Cognitive Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Evered, Lisbeth; Silbert, Brendan; Scott, David A; Ames, David; Maruff, Paul; Blennow, Kaj

    2016-02-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) affects 16 to 21% of the elderly 3 months after anesthesia and surgery and is associated with adverse outcomes. The exact cause of POCD remains unknown. The authors hypothesized that elderly individuals with Alzheimer disease (AD) neuropathology, identified by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis, would have increased the risk for POCD. CSF samples were collected from 59 patients 60 yr or older who received combined spinal and general anesthesia for elective total hip replacement. Patients underwent neuropsychological testing preoperatively and at 7 days, 3 months, and 12 months postoperatively. POCD at 3 months and cognitive decline at 12 months were calculated by using the reliable change index. CSF amyloid β1-42 (Aβ1-42), total-tau, phosphorylated-tau, and neurofilament light were assayed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods. POCD was identified in 5 of 57 patients (8.8%) at 3 months. For Aβ1-42, 11 patients were below the cut-point for AD neuropathology of whom 3 were classified with POCD (27.3%; 95% CI, 6.0 to 61%), whereas of the 46 patients above the cut-point, 2 were classified with POCD (4.3%; 95% CI, 0.5 to 14.8%) (P = 0.01). There was no significant difference in the incidence of POCD in relation to the cut-points for any of the other analytes. Low CSF Aβ1-42 may be a significant predictor of POCD at 3 months. This indicates that patients with AD neuropathology even in the absence of clinically detectable AD symptoms may be susceptible to POCD.

  3. Floating dural sac sign is a sensitive magnetic resonance imaging finding of spinal cerebrospinal fluid leakage.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Takaaki; Hatazawa, Jun; Sato, Shinya; Kanoto, Masafumi; Fukao, Akira; Kayama, Takamasa

    2013-01-01

    We would like to propose floating dural sac sign, which is observed as a hyperintense band or rim around the spinal dural sac on axial T2-weighted images, as a sensitive sign to identify cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. One hundred patients with orthostatic headache were prospectively registered in 11 hospitals. These patients were examined by brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (n = 89), radioisotope cisternography (n = 89), MR myelography (n = 86), axial T2-weighted imaging of the spine (n = 70), and computed tomography myelography (n = 2). In this study, we separately evaluated the imaging findings of intracranial hypotension and spinal CSF leakage. Among 100 patients, 16 patients were diagnosed as having spinal CSF leaks. Of 70 patients examined with axial T2-weighted imaging, 14 patients were diagnosed with spinal CSF leaks, and floating dural sac sign was observed in 17 patients, 13 patients with spinal CSF leaks and 4 without CSF leaks (sensitivity 92.9%, specificity 92.9%). Of 86 patients examined by MR myelography, extradural fluid was observed in only 3 patients (sensitivity 21.4%, specificity 100%). The floating dural sac sign was a sensitive sign that can be used to identify CSF leakage. Spinal axial T2-weighted imaging might be a good screening method for spinal CSF leakage that can help to avoid the need for lumbar puncture.

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid neopterin in paediatric neurology: a marker of active central nervous system inflammation.

    PubMed

    Dale, Russell C; Brilot, Fabienne; Fagan, Elizabeth; Earl, John

    2009-04-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neopterin production is increased by interferon-gamma stimulation and appears to act as a marker of intrathecal immune activation. We aimed to test the usefulness of elevated CSF neopterin as a biological marker of central nervous system (CNS) inflammation. We retrospectively reviewed CSF neopterin in 158 children (89 males, 69 females, mean age 4y 1mo, SD 3y 11mo, range 1mo-15y). CSF neopterin levels in children with chronic static CNS disorders (n=105) were predominantly low, suggesting that inflammation is rare in these patients. We created an upper value of normal (chronic static group 95th centile 27.4 nmol/l). CSF neopterin was elevated in all 10 patients with acute encephalitis and in 10 of 12 patients with other acute inflammatory CNS disorders (demyelination, post-infectious ataxia, myelitis). CSF neopterin was also significantly elevated in patients with chronic progressive disorders of inflammatory origin. Interestingly, CSF neopterin was elevated in four of six patients with chronic static disorders who were tested during a febrile exacerbation of seizures or dystonia, suggesting that intrathecal immune activation may be important in this setting. Neopterin has a short half-life and was useful for monitoring inflammation activity in a patient with relapsing-remitting encephalitis. CSF neopterin is a useful marker of inflammation in a broad range of acute and chronic CNS disorders, and is a significantly more sensitive marker of inflammation than CSF pleocytosis.

  5. The cerebrospinal fluid HIV risk score for assessing central nervous system activity in persons with HIV.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Edward R; Crum, Rosa M; Treisman, Glenn J; Mehta, Shruti H; Marra, Christina M; Clifford, David B; Morgello, Susan; Simpson, David M; Gelman, Benjamin B; Ellis, Ronald J; Grant, Igor; Letendre, Scott L; McArthur, Justin C

    2014-08-01

    Detectable human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is associated with central nervous system (CNS) complications. We developed the CSF HIV risk score through prediction modeling to estimate the risk of detectable CSF HIV RNA (threshold >50 copies/mL) to help identify persons who might benefit most from CSF monitoring. We used baseline data from 1,053 participants receiving combination antiretroviral therapy who were enrolled in the 6-center, US-based CNS HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) prospective cohort in 2004-2007. Plasma HIV RNA, CNS penetration effectiveness, duration of combination antiretroviral therapy, medication adherence, race, and depression status were retained correlates of CSF HIV RNA, displaying good discrimination (C statistic = 0.90, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.87, 0.93) and calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow P = 0.85). The CSF HIV risk score ranges from 0 to 42 points, with a mean of 15.4 (standard deviation, 7.3) points. At risk scores greater than 25, the probability of detecting CSF HIV RNA was at least 42.9% (95% CI: 36.6, 49.6). For each 1-point increase, the odds of detecting CSF HIV RNA increased by 26% (odds ratio = 1.26, 95% CI: 1.21, 1.31; P < 0.01). The risk score correlates with detection of CSF HIV RNA. It represents an advance in HIV management and monitoring of CNS effects, providing a potentially useful tool for clinicians.

  6. The Cerebrospinal Fluid HIV Risk Score for Assessing Central Nervous System Activity in Persons With HIV

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Edward R.; Crum, Rosa M.; Treisman, Glenn J.; Mehta, Shruti H.; Marra, Christina M.; Clifford, David B.; Morgello, Susan; Simpson, David M.; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Grant, Igor; Letendre, Scott L.; McArthur, Justin C.

    2014-01-01

    Detectable human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is associated with central nervous system (CNS) complications. We developed the CSF HIV risk score through prediction modeling to estimate the risk of detectable CSF HIV RNA (threshold >50 copies/mL) to help identify persons who might benefit most from CSF monitoring. We used baseline data from 1,053 participants receiving combination antiretroviral therapy who were enrolled in the 6-center, US-based CNS HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) prospective cohort in 2004–2007. Plasma HIV RNA, CNS penetration effectiveness, duration of combination antiretroviral therapy, medication adherence, race, and depression status were retained correlates of CSF HIV RNA, displaying good discrimination (C statistic = 0.90, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.87, 0.93) and calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow P = 0.85). The CSF HIV risk score ranges from 0 to 42 points, with a mean of 15.4 (standard deviation, 7.3) points. At risk scores greater than 25, the probability of detecting CSF HIV RNA was at least 42.9% (95% CI: 36.6, 49.6). For each 1-point increase, the odds of detecting CSF HIV RNA increased by 26% (odds ratio = 1.26, 95% CI: 1.21, 1.31; P < 0.01). The risk score correlates with detection of CSF HIV RNA. It represents an advance in HIV management and monitoring of CNS effects, providing a potentially useful tool for clinicians. PMID:24966216

  7. Coefficient of energy balance, a new parameter for basic investigation of the cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Kelbich, Petr; Hejčl, Aleš; Krulichová, Iva Selke; Procházka, Jan; Hanuljaková, Eva; Peruthová, Jitka; Koudelková, Martina; Sameš, Martin; Krejsek, Jan

    2014-07-01

    The concentrations of glucose and lactate in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) provide important information about energy metabolism in the CSF compartment. To improve our understanding of this information we introduced a new parameter resulting from a formula for calculating the fictitious production of adenosine triphosphate, i.e., the coefficient of energy balance (KEB). We evaluated cytology, the concentrations of glucose and lactate and the KEB in the CSF of 948 patients, who were divided into five groups. For statistical analysis we used the Kruskal-Wallis test with post-hoc analysis using the Dunn method and multinomial regression analysis. We determined the specificities and sensitivities of the cytological pictures and the KEB. A KEB>28.0 corresponded to normal energy metabolism in the CSF. A KEB<28.0 corresponded to an increased level of anaerobic metabolism in the CSF during inflammation in the CNS. A KEB<10.0 corresponded to a high level of anaerobic metabolism in the CSF during severe inflammation with an oxidative burst of professional phagocytes in the CNS. The KEB parameter increased the specificities of cytological examinations of the CSF in all cases. The KEB represents an equation for calculating the fictitious average number of ATP molecules produced in the CSF compartment from one molecule of glucose, and we used it successfully as a new parameter for evaluating energy metabolism status in the CSF.

  8. Association between cerebrospinal fluid leak and meningitis after skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Gilad; Fliss, Dan M; Margalit, Nevo; Wasserzug, Oshri; Gil, Ziv

    2011-10-01

    Meningitis and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak are serious complications of skull base surgery, but whether postoperative CSF leak increases the risk of meningitis is unknown. To evaluate any association between meningitis and CSF leak after open or endoscopic skull base resection. A retrospective case series with chart review in a tertiary care university-affiliated medical center. A total of 156 patients underwent intradural tumor resection in our institution between 1994 and 2009, 135 (86%) via the subcranial approach and 21 (14%) through the expanded endonasal approach. All occurrences of meningitis, brain abscess, and CSF leak had been recorded and were available for analysis. Nine patients (5.7%) had postoperative meningitis, and 3 patients had postoperative CSF leak (1.9%). The risk of meningitis in patients without CSF leak was 4.5% (7/153) compared to 66% (2/3) in those with CSF leak. A statistical analysis revealed a significant association between CSF leak and meningitis, with a relative risk of 14.6 (95% confidence interval, 4.95-42; P = .008). Postoperative CSF leak significantly increases the risk of meningitis. Most cases of meningitis after skull base operation are probably associated with lumbar drainage infection or from an obscure leak.

  9. Pediatric status epilepticus: how common is cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis in the absence of infection?

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kara B; Michelson, Kenneth A; Lyons, Todd W; Nigrovic, Lise E; Landschaft, Assaf; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Kimia, Amir A

    2014-08-01

    To determine the rate of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis among children presenting with status epilepticus (SE) without proven central nervous system infection. We performed a retrospective cross-sectional study of all patients aged one month to 21 years of age who were evaluated in a single pediatric emergency department (ED) for SE between 1995 and 2012. We limited our study to those children who had a CSF culture obtained and excluded those children with proven viral or bacterial infection. We defined SE in a patient who had a single seizure or a cluster of seizures without regaining consciousness which lasted 30 min or longer. We defined CSF pleocytosis as a CSF white blood cells (WBC)>10 cells/mm(3) and a peripheral leukocytosis as WBC ≥ 15,000 cells/mm(3). We compared the rate of CSF pleocytosis between children with and without peripheral leukocytosis using the Fisher's exact test. We identified 289 ED visits for SE, of which 178 (62%) met study inclusion criteria. Seven children (4%, 95% confidence interval 1.7-8.2%) had CSF pleocytosis. More children with peripheral leukocytosis had CSF pleocytosis: (8.6% with peripheral leukocytosis vs. 0.9% without leukocytosis, p=0.01). CSF pleocytosis is relatively uncommon among children with prolonged seizures, even in the presence of peripheral leukocytosis. Therefore, all children with CSF pleocytosis after status epilepticus need comprehensive evaluation for central nervous system infection. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Higher Cerebrospinal Fluid pH may Contribute to the Development of Delayed Cerebral Ischemia after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hidenori; Shiba, Masato; Nakatsuka, Yoshinari; Nakano, Fumi; Nishikawa, Hirofumi

    2017-04-01

    Recent investigations have shown that many factors may cause delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). To find new potential contributors to DCI, this retrospective study compared gas data in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) between patients with and without DCI. The subjects were 61 consecutive patients with SAH classified as Fisher group III on admission computed tomography scans, whose aneurysms were obliterated by clipping or coiling within 24 h post-SAH. Thirty-three patients were treated with CSF drainage. CSF samples were chronologically obtained from CSF drains or lumbar taps. Patients with DCI were more frequently treated with CSF drainage, especially cisternal drainage, and were associated with significantly higher pH and lower partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) in the CSF compared with patients without DCI, although CSF concentrations of bicarbonate ion as well as arterial blood gas data were not different between the two groups. Total hemoglobin concentrations in the drained or tapped CSF were higher in patients with no DCI compared with patients with DCI at any sampling time, suggesting that CSF hemoglobin was not efficiently removed in patients with DCI. This study revealed higher CSF pH and lower CSF PCO2 as new potential contributors to the development of DCI, which might result from inappropriate CSF drainage that failed to remove clot and acid metabolites in it efficiently. Both of the disturbed CSF gas and inappropriate CSF drainage may cause constriction of the arteries and arterioles, leading to DCI.

  11. CSF total protein

    MedlinePlus

    CSF total protein is a test to determine the amount of protein in your spinal fluid, also called cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). ... The normal protein range varies from lab to lab, but is typically about 15 to 60 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) ...

  12. Reduced Cerebrospinal Fluid Concentration of Apolipoprotein A-I in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Per; Almqvist, Erik G; Bjerke, Maria; Wallin, Anders; Johansson, Jan-Ove; Andreasson, Ulf; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Svensson, Johan

    2017-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) has been extensively studied in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but little is known of apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Plasma lipids as well as ApoA-I and ApoE in plasma and CSF were determined and related to Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score, APOE genotype, and CSF AD biomarkers. Consecutive patients with AD (n = 29), stable mild cognitive impairment (n = 13), other dementias (n = 14), and healthy controls (n = 18) were included at a single center. AD patients had higher plasma triglycerides and lower CSF ApoA-I concentration than controls (both p < 0.05). CSF ApoE concentration was reduced in other dementias (p < 0.01). In AD as well as other dementias, the ratios between CSF and plasma concentrations of both ApoA-I and ApoE were lower than those in the controls. ApoA-I and ApoE in plasma and CSF were not influenced by APOEɛ4 allele distribution. In the total study population (n = 74), CSF ApoA-I correlated positively with MMSE score (r = 0.26, p < 0.05) and negatively with CSF P-tau (r = -0.25, p < 0.05). CSF ApoE correlated positively with CSF concentrations of T-tau and P-tau in the total study population and in AD patients. CSF ApoA-I was reduced in AD patients and associated with measures of cognitive function and AD disease status. The mechanisms underlying the decreased CSF:plasma ratios of ApoA-I and ApoE in AD and other dementias need to be explored in further studies.

  13. Variables that influence HIV-1 cerebrospinal fluid viral load in cryptococcal meningitis: a linear regression analysis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The central nervous system is considered a sanctuary site for HIV-1 replication. Variables associated with HIV cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) viral load in the context of opportunistic CNS infections are poorly understood. Our objective was to evaluate the relation between: (1) CSF HIV-1 viral load and CSF cytological and biochemical characteristics (leukocyte count, protein concentration, cryptococcal antigen titer); (2) CSF HIV-1 viral load and HIV-1 plasma viral load; and (3) CSF leukocyte count and the peripheral blood CD4+ T lymphocyte count. Methods Our approach was to use a prospective collection and analysis of pre-treatment, paired CSF and plasma samples from antiretroviral-naive HIV-positive patients with cryptococcal meningitis and assisted at the Francisco J Muñiz Hospital, Buenos Aires, Argentina (period: 2004 to 2006). We measured HIV CSF and plasma levels by polymerase chain reaction using the Cobas Amplicor HIV-1 Monitor Test version 1.5 (Roche). Data were processed with Statistix 7.0 software (linear regression analysis). Results Samples from 34 patients were analyzed. CSF leukocyte count showed statistically significant correlation with CSF HIV-1 viral load (r = 0.4, 95% CI = 0.13-0.63, p = 0.01). No correlation was found with the plasma viral load, CSF protein concentration and cryptococcal antigen titer. A positive correlation was found between peripheral blood CD4+ T lymphocyte count and the CSF leukocyte count (r = 0.44, 95% CI = 0.125-0.674, p = 0.0123). Conclusion Our study suggests that CSF leukocyte count influences CSF HIV-1 viral load in patients with meningitis caused by Cryptococcus neoformans.

  14. Proteomic Biomarker Identification in Cerebrospinal Fluid for Leptomeningeal Metastases with Neurological Complications.

    PubMed

    Galicia, Norma; Díez, Paula; Dégano, Rosa M; Guest, Paul C; Ibarrola, Nieves; Fuentes, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Leptomeningeal metastases (LM) from solid tumours, lymphoma and leukaemia are characterized by multifocal neurological deficits with a high mortality rate. Early diagnosis and initiation of treatment are essential to kerb neurological deterioration. However, this is not always possible as 25% of cerebrospinal fluid samples produce false-negative results at first cytological examination. The identification of biomarkers that allow stratification of individuals according to risk for developing LM would be a major benefit. Proteomic-based approaches are now in increasing use for this purpose, and these are reviewed in this chapter with a focus on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analyses. The construction of a CSF proteome disease database would also facilitate analysis of other neurological disorders.

  15. Drug transport in brain via the cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The human brain has no lymphatic system, but produces over a half-liter each day of cerebrospinal fluid. The cerebrospinal fluid is secreted at the choroid plexus and occupies the cavities of the four ventricles, as well as the cranial and spinal sub-arachnoid space. The cerebrospinal fluid moves over the surfaces of the brain and spinal cord and is rapidly absorbed into the general circulation. The choroid plexus forms the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier, and this barrier is functionally distinct from the brain microvascular endothelium, which forms the blood-brain barrier. Virtually all non-cellular substances in blood distribute into cerebrospinal fluid, and drug entry into cerebrospinal fluid is not an index of drug transport across the blood-brain barrier. Drug injected into the cerebrospinal fluid rapidly moves into the blood via bulk flow, but penetrates into brain tissue poorly owing to the limitations of diffusion. Drug transport into cerebrospinal fluid vs. brain interstitial fluid requires knowledge of the relative expression of transporters at the choroid plexus versus the brain microvascular endothelium. PMID:21349155

  16. The application of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in early diagnosis of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2013-05-01

    This article gives an updated account of the clinical application of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for Alzheimer disease (AD). The clinically most relevant biomarkers, total tau, phospho-tau and Aβ42 are discussed, and how they may be used, together with other diagnostic investigations, to make a predementia diagnosis of AD. Recent findings in sporadic and genetic preclinical AD are also discussed and, more specifically, what the biomarkers have taught us on the sequence of events in the pathogenic process underlying AD.

  17. Viral immunoblotting: a sensitive method for detecting viral-specific oliogoclonal bands in unconcentrated cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Moyle, S; Keir, G; Thompson, E J

    1984-06-01

    A new method for detecting viral antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid is described. The technique has many advantages over previously published methods in that it is highly sensitive eliminating the need to concentrate the CSF, takes 5 h to complete, avoids the use of radionucleides, and most importantly circumvents problems associated with prozone effects which occur in immunoprecipitation reaction since the viral antigen is immobilized on nitrocellulose membranes.

  18. Transforming growth factor-β1 in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with distinct neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Tomoyuki; Itoh, Junko; Koide, Takuya; Tomidokoro, Yasushi; Takei, Yosuke; Ishii, Kazuhiro; Tamaoka, Akira

    2017-01-01

    A chronic inflammatory condition may underlie neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). For example, both PD and AD patients show an increase in transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) levels in their cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). TGF-β1 is a cytokine that inhibits inflammation. In the present study, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we tested the hypothesis that the level of TGF-β1 in the CSF of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD), or multiple system atrophy-cerebellar subtype (MSA-C) would be elevated compared with that of normal controls. We found that TGF-β1 levels in the CSF were not significantly different between these patients and normal controls. Our data suggest that the level of TGF-β1 in the CSF is an unreliable biomarker of ALS, SCD, and MSA-C.

  19. Lassa fever encephalopathy: Lassa virus in cerebrospinal fluid but not in serum.

    PubMed

    Günther, S; Weisner, B; Roth, A; Grewing, T; Asper, M; Drosten, C; Emmerich, P; Petersen, J; Wilczek, M; Schmitz, H

    2001-08-01

    The pathogenesis of neurologic complications of Lassa fever is poorly understood. A Nigerian patient had fever, disorientation, seizures, and blood-brain barrier dysfunction, and Lassa virus was found in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) but not in serum. The concentration of Lassa virus RNA in CSF corresponded to 1 x 10(3) pfu/mL, as determined by a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. To characterize the Lassa virus in CSF, the 3.5-kb S RNA was sequenced. In the S RNA coding sequences, the CSF strain differed between 20% and 24.6% from all known prototype strains. These data suggest that Lassa virus or specific Lassa virus strains can persist in the central nervous system and thus contribute to neuropathogenesis. Lassa virus infection should be considered in West African patients or in travelers returning from this area who present only with fever and neurologic signs.

  20. Recommendations to standardize preanalytical confounding factors in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers: an update.

    PubMed

    del Campo, Marta; Mollenhauer, Brit; Bertolotto, Antonio; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Hampel, Harald; Simonsen, Anja Hviid; Kapaki, Elisabeth; Kruse, Niels; Le Bastard, Nathalie; Lehmann, Sylvain; Molinuevo, Jose L; Parnetti, Lucilla; Perret-Liaudet, Armand; Sáez-Valero, Javier; Saka, Esen; Urbani, Andrea; Vanmechelen, Eugeen; Verbeek, Marcel; Visser, Pieter Jelle; Teunissen, Charlotte

    2012-08-01

    Early diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's (AD) or Parkinson's disease (PD) is needed to slow down or halt the disease at the earliest stage. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers can be a good tool for early diagnosis. However, their use in clinical practice is challenging due to the high variability found between centers in the concentrations of both AD CSF biomarkers (Aβ42, total tau and phosphorylated tau) and PD CSF biomarker (α-synuclein). Such a variability has been partially attributed to different preanalytical procedures between laboratories, thus highlighting the need to establish standardized operating procedures. Here, we merge two previous consensus guidelines for preanalytical confounding factors in order to achieve one exhaustive guideline updated with new evidence for Aβ42, total tau and phosphorylated tau, and α-synuclein. The proposed standardized operating procedures are applicable not only to novel CSF biomarkers in AD and PD, but also to biomarkers for other neurodegenerative disorders.

  1. Blood stained cerebrospinal fluid responsible for false positive reactions of latex particle agglutination tests.

    PubMed Central

    Camargos, P A; Almeida, M S; Filho, G L; Batista, K W; Carvalho, A G; Pereira, C L

    1994-01-01

    The accuracy of the latex particle agglutination test (LPAT) was assessed in blood stained cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens from 166 paediatric patients, aged from three months to 13 years. A commercial LPAT kit was used to detect Haemophilus influenzae type b, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Neisseria meningitidis A, B, and C soluble antigens. Culture of CSF specimens was used as the standard and all laboratory procedures were performed blind. The mean CSF erythrocyte count was 66,406 cells/mm3 in the cases and 11,560 cells/mm3 in the controls. The sensitivity and the specificity of LPAT were 83.8 and 94.0%, respectively, suggesting that LPAT is a useful diagnostic tool even in blood stained CSF specimens. PMID:7876387

  2. HPLC-DAD determination of mepivacaine in cerebrospinal fluid from a fatal case.

    PubMed

    Nieddu, Maria; Boatto, Gianpiero; Serra, Domenico; Soro, Aldo; Lorenzoni, Salvatore; Lubinu, Francesco

    2007-09-01

    A fatal case involving mepivacaine-induced epidural anesthesia is described. The pathological findings were typical of cardiac shock from ischemic origin. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was obtained several hours after death and mepivacaine was identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Its concentration was determined by high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD). Extraction from CSF was performed by deproteinization with acetonitrile. The mepivacaine concentration in the sample was 264 microg/mL. Concentrations of mepivacaine in CSF following epidural anesthesia are not reported in literature to our knowledge. This is the first reported case of death in which the mepivacaine concentration in CSF has been determined.

  3. The Choroid Plexus and Cerebrospinal Fluid: Emerging Roles in Development, Disease, and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bjornsson, Christopher S.; Dymecki, Susan M.; Gilbertson, Richard J.; Holtzman, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Although universally recognized as the source of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), the choroid plexus (ChP) has been one of the most understudied tissues in neuroscience. The reasons for this are multiple and varied, including historical perceptions about passive and permissive roles for the ChP, experimental issues, and lack of clinical salience. However, recent work on the ChP and instructive signals in the CSF have sparked new hypotheses about how the ChP and CSF provide unexpected means for regulating nervous system structure and function in health and disease, as well as new ChP-based therapeutic approaches using pluripotent stem cell technology. This minisymposium combines new and established investigators to capture some of the newfound excitement surrounding the ChP-CSF system. PMID:24198345

  4. Use of acetazolamide to decrease cerebrospinal fluid production in chronically ventilated patients with ventriculopleural shunts

    PubMed Central

    Carrion, E; Hertzog, J; Medlock, M; Hauser, G; Dalton, H

    2001-01-01

    Acetazolamide (ACTZ), a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, has been shown to decrease cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) production in both in vivo and in vitro animal models. We report two children with hydrocephalus who experienced multiple shunt failures, and who had externalised ventriculostomy drains (EVD) prior to ventriculopleural shunt placement. The effects of increasing doses of ACTZ on CSF production and subsequent tolerance to ventriculopleural shunts were evaluated. The patients had a 48% and a 39% decrease in their EVD CSF output when compared to baseline with maximum ACTZ dose of 75 mg/kg/day and 50 mg/kg/day, respectively (p < 0.05). This is the first report of change in CSF volume in children after extended treatment with ACTZ. ACTZ treatment in mechanically ventilated paediatric patients with hydrocephalus may improve tolerance of ventriculopleural shunts and minimise respiratory compromise. Potassium and bicarbonate supplements are required to correct metabolic disturbances.

 PMID:11124792

  5. Acute phase proteins in serum and cerebrospinal fluid in the course of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Paradowski, M; Lobos, M; Kuydowicz, J; Krakowiak, M; Kubasiewicz-Ujma, B

    1995-08-01

    We carried out estimations of the following acute phase proteins: C-reactive protein (CRP), alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AAG), alpha-2-ceruloplasmin (CER), and alpha-2-haptoglobin (HPT) in serum and in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in patients with bacterial meningitis (BM, n = 30) and viral meningitis (VM, n = 30). We have shown that determinations of concentrations of AAG and CRP in serum and CER in CSF are useful in differentiation between BM and VM. The diagnostic power of these three tests (the areas under their ROC curves equal 0.942, 0.929, and 0.931, respectively) is bigger, though statistically not significantly, than that of traditional parameters of BM in CSF, i.e., total protein concentration and white blood cell count. Determination of AAG, CRP, and AAT in serum is a valuable monitoring marker in the course of BM treatment. Convenience of serum sampling constitutes an advantage over traditional BM parameters in CSF.

  6. Endoscopic Repair of Frontal Sinus Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks after Firearm Injuries: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Camilo; Solares, C. Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe two cases of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak repair after gunshot wound to the head. Design Retrospective review of two cases. Settings A large regional tertiary care facility. Participants Two patients with gunshot wounds to the skull base. Main Outcome Measures Preoperative and postoperative physical and radiologic findings. Results Patients in this series underwent endoscopic surgery, debridement, and repair of CSF leaks after gunshot wounds to the head. To date, the patients are without CSF leak. Conclusions Endoscopic closure of anterior skull base CSF leaks in patients with gunshot wounds can be safe and effective. Treatment should be decided by the severity of neurologic deterioration throughout the emergency period and the existence or absence of associated intracranial lesions. Timing for surgery should be decided with great care and with a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:26251818

  7. [Viridans streptococci isolated from cerebrospinal fluid. Clinical significance of 9 cases].

    PubMed

    Alba, D; Guerra, A; Peña, P; Molina, F

    1997-02-01

    Viridans streptococci (VS) are often isolated from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). However, the significance of such isolates is poorly understood. In the present study we carry out a retrospective analysis of 9 patients in whom VS were isolated from CSF during a 1-year period at La Paz Hospital. Two patients (22.2%) had meningitis diagnosed through clinical, laboratory and bacteriologic findings. Both patients had predisposition diseases (previous difficult spinal tap, ventriculo-peritoneal shunt). The other isolations were considered as contaminants. Three patients (33.3%) with no VS meningitis had other different serious disease (sepsis without bacteriologic confirmation). VS are isolated with relative frequency from CSF, although they cause meningitis in less than one-quarter of the cases (those who have a predisposition disease). In the other cases, VS are isolated as contaminants of CSF and other disease should be search as cause of patient symptoms.

  8. Development of hydrocephalus and classical hypothesis of cerebrospinal fluid hydrodynamics: facts and illusions.

    PubMed

    Orešković, D; Klarica, M

    2011-08-01

    According to the classical hypothesis of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hydrodynamics, CSF is produced inside the brain ventricles, than it circulates like a slow river toward the cortical subarachnoid space, and finally it is absorbed into the venous sinuses. Some pathological conditions, primarily hydrocephalus, have also been interpreted based on this hypothesis. The development of hydrocephalus is explained as an imbalance between CSF formation and absorption, where more CSF is formed than is absorbed, which results in an abnormal increase in the CSF volume inside the cranial CSF spaces. It is believed that the reason for the imbalance is the obstruction of the CSF pathways between the site of CSF formation and the site of its absorption, which diminishes or prevents CSF outflow from the cranium. In spite of the general acceptance of the classical hypothesis, there are a considerable number of experimental results that do not support such a hypothesis and the generally accepted pathophysiology of hydrocephalus. A recently proposed new working hypothesis suggests that osmotic and hydrostatic forces at the central nervous system microvessels are crucial for the regulation of interstial fluid and CSF volume which constitute a functional unit. Based on that hypothesis, the generally accepted mechanisms of hydrocephalus development are not plausible. Therefore, the recent understanding of the correlation between CSF physiology and the development of hydrocephalus has been thoroughly presented, analyzed and evaluated, and new insights into hydrocephalus etiopathology have been proposed, which are in accordance with the experimental data and the new working hypothesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Venlafaxine and O-desmethylvenlafaxine concentrations in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Paulzen, Michael; Groppe, Sarah; Tauber, Simone C; Veselinovic, Tanja; Hiemke, Christoph; Gründer, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    To investigate whether drug concentrations of venlafaxine and its metabolite O-desmethylvenlafaxine in plasma can be considered as a surrogate marker of concentrations in brain/cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). For therapeutic drug monitoring purposes, plasma and CSF concentrations of venlafaxine and O-desmethylvenlafaxine were measured between November 2011 and August 2013 in 16 depressive inpatients (ICD-10 diagnoses) who were treated with daily doses of venlafaxine extended release (dose range, 75-225 mg). Daily doses were correlated with plasma and CSF levels. The correlation between venlafaxine, O-desmethylvenlafaxine, and the active moiety (AM) in plasma and CSF was calculated. Venlafaxine in plasma (P = .005) and CSF (P = .023) correlated significantly with the daily dose, while O-desmethylvenlafaxine and the active moiety (AM = venlafaxine + O-desmethylvenlafaxine) did not. The correlation between venlafaxine, O-desmethylvenlafaxine, and the AM in plasma and CSF was highly significant (P < .001). The calculated CSF/plasma ratio was 0.74 for venlafaxine, 0.88 for O-desmethylvenlafaxine, and 0.84 for the AM. Venlafaxine and O-desmethylvenlafaxine were found to penetrate well into CSF in patients, which indicated good availability of the drug in the brain, although the findings on CSF concentrations do not allow calculation of concentrations at the target structure within the brain. CSF/plasma ratios for venlafaxine and its metabolite were high probably due to low plasma protein binding. The poor correlation of dose to concentrations in body fluids and the highly significant correlation of plasma to CSF concentrations indicate that plasma concentration is a much better marker of drug concentration in brain than the dose. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  10. Amino acid concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid: effects of aging, depression, and probenecid.

    PubMed

    Goodnick, P J; Evans, H E; Dunner, D L; Fieve, R R

    1980-08-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) amino acid concentrations were measured in six Bipolar I, eight Bipolar II, eight Unipolar, and four other and control patients. All but four were also studied after administration of probenecid. Fourteen amino acids showed significant correlations of concentrations with age of subjects. Significant diagnostic group differences were found for five amino acids; only that of tyrosine persisted after taking subject's age into account. Following probenecid administration, there were statistically significant changes in CSF concentration of several amino acids, but these changes were small and likely indicative of diurnal changes.

  11. The use of cerebrospinal fluid and neuropathological studies in neuropsychiatry practice and research

    PubMed Central

    Kansal, Kalyani; Irwin, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis The gold standard for diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases (i.e. Alzheimer’s disease, Frontotemporal dementia, Parkinson’s disease, Dementia with Lewy bodies, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) is neuropathological examination at autopsy. As such, laboratory studies play a central role in ante mortem diagnosis of these conditions and their differentiation from the neuroinflammatory, infectious, toxic, and other non-degenerative etiologies (e.g. rapidly-progressive dementias) that are encountered in neuropsychiatric practice. This review summarizes the use of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) laboratory studies in the diagnostic evaluation of dementia syndromes and emerging CSF biomarkers specific for underlying neuropathology in neurodegenerative disease research. PMID:25998118

  12. Digital subtraction cisternography: a new approach to fistula localisation in cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhoea.

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, J V; Ingram, C E; MacVicar, D; Sullivan, F M; Uttley, D

    1990-01-01

    Positive contrast cisternography with digital subtraction of fluoroscopy images before computed tomography (CT) was employed in the investigation of eight patients with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhoea. Fistulae were visualised by preliminary digital subtraction cisternography (DSC) in six patients and in five patients the sites of leakage were confirmed at surgery. Fluoroscopy facilitated interpretation of CT in all the positive studies and in two patients provided information which could not be deduced from CT cisternography (CTC) alone. The combined technique is recommended for the investigation of patients with recurrent and post operative CSF rhinorrhoea and when CTC alone fails to identify the site of leakage. Images PMID:2292701

  13. Mammalian embryonic cerebrospinal fluid proteome has greater apolipoprotein and enzyme pattern complexity than the avian proteome.

    PubMed

    Parada, Carolina; Gato, Angel; Bueno, David

    2005-01-01

    During early stages of embryo development, the brain cavity is filled with Embryonic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid, which has an essential role in the survival, proliferation and neurogenesis of the neuroectodermal stem cells. We identified and analyzed the proteome of Embryonic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid from rat embryos (Rattus norvegicus), which includes proteins involved in the regulation of Central Nervous System development. The comparison between mammalian and avian Embryonic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid proteomes reveals great similarity, but also greater complexity in some protein groups. The pattern of apolipoproteins and enzymes in CSF is more complex in the mammals than in birds. This difference may underlie the greater neural complexity and synaptic plasticity found in mammals. Fourteen Embryonic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid gene products were previously identified in adult human Cerebro-Spinal Fluid proteome, and interestingly they are altered in patients with neurodegenerative diseases and/or neurological disorders. Understanding these molecules and the mechanisms they control during embryonic neurogenesis may contribute to our understanding of Central Nervous System development and evolution, and these human diseases.

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid white cell count: discriminatory or otherwise for enteroviral meningitis in infants and young children?

    PubMed

    Tan, Natalie Woon Hui; Lee, Elis Yuexian; Khoo, Gloria Mei Chin; Tee, Nancy Wen Sim; Krishnamoorthy, Subramania; Choong, Chew Thye

    2016-04-01

    Non-polio enteroviruses (EV) are the most common viruses causing aseptic meningitis in children. We aim to evaluate the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) characteristics of neonates and children with EV meningitis with a view to determine whether it could be discriminatory or otherwise in making a positive diagnosis. We performed a 3-year (July 2008-July 2011) retrospective study of children ≤16 years, treated at a tertiary children's hospital, with positive CSF EV polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and negative blood and CSF bacterial cultures. A total of 206 children were studied. The median CSF white cell count was 79 cells/mm(3) (range 0-4608 cells/mm(3)). CSF pleocytosis was observed in 99/150 (66%) aged ≤90 days, 3/4 (75%) aged 90 days-1 year, and 49/52 (94%) children ≥3 years. There was a huge variability in CSF pleocytosis in infants ≤90 days, where 34% of them had no pleocytosis, while in 66%, a wide range of pleocytosis that might even suggest bacterial meningitis was noted. CSF red cells were low, and protein or sugar values were not discriminatory. CSF pleocytosis in relation to increasing age was found to be statistically significant (p < 0.001). Early lumbar puncture within 48 h of symptoms and absence of CSF pleocytosis was also statistically significant (p = 0.039). CSF pleocytosis in EV meningitis is commoner in older children. As there was a huge variability in CSF pleocytosis in infants ≤90 days particularly, CSF analysis including EV PCR could avoid unnecessary antibiotic therapy.

  15. Bilateral meningoencephaloceles with cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea after facial advancement in the Crouzon syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Panuganti, Bharat A.; Leach, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea and encephaloceles are rare complications of craniofacial advancement procedures performed in patients with craniofacial dysostoses (CD) to address the ramifications of their midface hypoplasia including obstructed nasal airway, exorbitism, and impaired mastication. Surgical repair of this CSF rhinorrhea is complicated by occult elevations in intracranial pressure (ICP), potentially necessitating open, transcranial repair. We report the first case in otolaryngology literature of a patient with Crouzon syndrome with late CSF rhinorrhea and encephalocele formation after previous LeFort III facial advancement surgery. Objectives: Describe the case of a patient with Crouzon syndrome who presented with CSF rhinorrhea and encephaloceles as complications of Le Fort III facial advancement surgery. Review the literature pertaining to the incidence and management of post-operative CSF rhinorrhea and encephaloceles. Analyze issues related to repair of these complications, including occult elevations in ICP, the utility of perioperative CSF shunts, and the importance of considering alternative repair schemes to the traditional endonasal, endoscopic approach. Methods: Review of the literature describing CSF rhinorrhea and encephalocele formation following facial advancement in CD, focusing on management strategies. Results: CSF rhinorrhea and encephalocele formation are rare complications of craniofacial advancement procedures. Occult elevations in ICP complicate the prospect of permanent surgical repair, potentially necessitating transcranial repair and the use of CSF shunts. Though no consensus exists regarding the utility of perioperative CSF drains, strong associations exist between elevated ICP and failed surgical repair. Additionally, the anatomic changes in the frontal and ethmoid sinuses after facial advancement present a challenge to endoscopic repair. Conclusion: Otolaryngologists should be aware of the possibility of

  16. Bilateral meningoencephaloceles with cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea after facial advancement in the Crouzon syndrome.

    PubMed

    Panuganti, Bharat A; Leach, Matthew; Antisdel, Jastin

    2015-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea and encephaloceles are rare complications of craniofacial advancement procedures performed in patients with craniofacial dysostoses (CD) to address the ramifications of their midface hypoplasia including obstructed nasal airway, exorbitism, and impaired mastication. Surgical repair of this CSF rhinorrhea is complicated by occult elevations in intracranial pressure (ICP), potentially necessitating open, transcranial repair. We report the first case in otolaryngology literature of a patient with Crouzon syndrome with late CSF rhinorrhea and encephalocele formation after previous LeFort III facial advancement surgery. Describe the case of a patient with Crouzon syndrome who presented with CSF rhinorrhea and encephaloceles as complications of Le Fort III facial advancement surgery. Review the literature pertaining to the incidence and management of post-operative CSF rhinorrhea and encephaloceles. Analyze issues related to repair of these complications, including occult elevations in ICP, the utility of perioperative CSF shunts, and the importance of considering alternative repair schemes to the traditional endonasal, endoscopic approach. Review of the literature describing CSF rhinorrhea and encephalocele formation following facial advancement in CD, focusing on management strategies. CSF rhinorrhea and encephalocele formation are rare complications of craniofacial advancement procedures. Occult elevations in ICP complicate the prospect of permanent surgical repair, potentially necessitating transcranial repair and the use of CSF shunts. Though no consensus exists regarding the utility of perioperative CSF drains, strong associations exist between elevated ICP and failed surgical repair. Additionally, the anatomic changes in the frontal and ethmoid sinuses after facial advancement present a challenge to endoscopic repair. Otolaryngologists should be aware of the possibility of occult elevations in ICP and sinonasal anatomic

  17. Quantification and regulation of the adipokines resistin and progranulin in human cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Berghoff, Martin; Hochberg, Alexandra; Schmid, Andreas; Schlegel, Jutta; Karrasch, Thomas; Kaps, Manfred; Schäffler, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Adipokines bearing the potential to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) are promising candidates for the endocrine regulation of central nervous processes and of a postulated fat-brain axis. Resistin and progranulin concentrations in paired serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples of patients undergoing neurological evaluation and spinal puncture were investigated. Samples of n = 270 consecutive patients with various neurological diseases were collected without prior selection. Adipokine serum and CSF concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and serum and CSF routine parameters by standard procedures. Anthropometric data, medication and patient history were available. Serum levels of resistin and progranulin were positively correlated among each other, with respective CSF levels, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and markers of systemic inflammation. CSF resistin concentrations were generally low. Progranulin CSF concentrations and CSF/serum progranulin ratio were significantly higher in patients with infectious diseases, with disturbed BBB function and with elevated CSF cell count and presence of oligoclonal bands. Both adipokines are able to cross the BBB depending on a differing patency that increases with increasing grade of barrier dysfunction. Whereas resistin represents a systemic marker of inflammation, CSF progranulin levels strongly depend on the underlying disease and dysfunction of blood-CSF barrier. Resistin and progranulin represent novel and putative regulators of the fat-brain axis by their ability to cross the BBB under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. The presented data provide insight into the characteristics of BBB function regarding progranulin and resistin and the basis for future establishment of normal values for CSF concentrations and CSF/serum ratios. © 2015 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  18. Importance and impact of preanalytical variables on Alzheimer disease biomarker concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Le Bastard, Nathalie; De Deyn, Peter Paul; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan

    2015-05-01

    Analyses of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers (β-amyloid protein, total tau protein, and hyperphosphorylated tau protein) are part of the diagnostic criteria of Alzheimer disease. Different preanalytical sample procedures contribute to variability of CSF biomarker concentrations, hampering between-laboratory comparisons. The aim of this study was to explore the influence of fractionated sampling, centrifugation, freezing temperature, freezing delay, and freeze-thaw cycles on CSF biomarker analyses. We studied fractionated sampling in sequential aliquots of lumbar CSF. Centrifuged and noncentrifuged samples from the same fraction were compared. CSF samples were subjected to different protocols (liquid nitrogen, -80 °C, and -20 °C; 24 h at 2-8 °C; and 24 and 48 h at room temperature). To study the influence of freeze-thaw cycles, samples were thawed up to 4 times and refrozen at -80 °C. CSF was collected in polypropylene tubes. We measured CSF biomarker concentrations with commercially available single-analyte Innotest assays. CSF biomarker concentrations from non-blood-contaminated samples are not influenced by centrifugation or fractionated sampling. Freezing temperature and delayed storage can affect biomarker concentrations; freezing of CSF samples at -80 °C as soon as possible after collection is recommended. Consecutive freezing and thawing of CSF samples up to 3 times had little effect. Temperature of freezing, delay until freezing, and freeze-thaw cycles significantly influence CSF biomarker concentrations, stressing the need for standard operating procedures for preanalytical sample handling. The differences observed in this study are, however, relatively small, and the impact on the clinical value of these CSF biomarkers needs to be determined. © 2015 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  19. Sodium Bicarbonate Facilitates Hemostasis in the Presence of Cerebrospinal Fluid Through Amplification of Platelet Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Kozuma, Yukinori; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Ishikawa, Eiichi; Yoshida, Fumiyo; Akutsu, Hiroyoshi; Matsuda, Masahide; Nakai, Kei; Tsuruta, Wataro; Takano, Shingo; Matsumura, Akira; Ninomiya, Haruhiko

    2016-02-01

    Appropriate hemostasis is essential for clear visualization of the neural structures and cleavage planes. It is also essential for avoiding heat-induced injury, minimizing blood loss, and reducing operative time. To determine the role of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in platelet-dependent hemostasis during neurosurgery. The amplification of aggregation, activation of integrin αIIbβ3, intrinsic and extrinsic coagulation pathways, and activation of signaling cascades in platelets were evaluated. For comparison, various concentrations of a commercially available artificial CSF solution (aCSF), an artificial CSF solution prepared by the authors, and normal saline (NS) were used. Differences between aCSF and NS in obtaining in vivo hemostasis were assessed by measuring the tail vein bleeding time in C57BL/6N mice. Platelet aggregation was directly amplified by the addition of aCSF through increased activation of integrin αIIbβ3, phosphatidylserine exposure, and P-selectin expression. However, the prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were not primarily related to coagulation activity with the addition of aCSF. Activation of Src kinase was related to platelet activation by aCSF. The elimination of sodium bicarbonate from aCSF and the addition of the selective inhibitor of the HCO3/Cl exchanger, 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid disodium salt, significantly inhibited platelet aggregation. The bleeding time in aCSF-treated mice was significantly shorter than that in NS-treated mice. Sodium bicarbonate facilitates hemostasis through the amplification of platelet aggregation function. The existence of CSF and irrigation with aCSF provide better conditions for physiological hemostasis and they have the potential of improving hemostasis by bipolar coagulation or with irrigation during neuroendoscopic procedures.

  20. Diagnostic value of circulating tumor cells in cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Mu; Chunhua, Ma; Yuan, Lv; Jinduo, Li; Bin, Wang; Liwei, Sun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess circulating tumor cells in cerebrospinal fluid as a diagnostic approach to identify meningeal metastasis in patients with non-small cell lung cancer by using tumor marker immunostaining–fluorescence in situ hybridization (TM-iFISH). Methods In 5 non-small cell lung cancer patients who were confirmed to have developed meningeal metastasis by cerebrospinal fluid cytology, 20 ml of cerebrospinal fluid was obtained through lumbar puncture, from which 7.5 ml was utilized for TM-iFISH to identify and quantitate circulating tumor cells, 10ml for cerebrospinal fluid cytology, and 2.5ml for detection of cerebrospinal fluid tumor markers. Results TM-iFISH examination identified 18 to 1,823 circulating tumor cells per 7.5ml cerebrospinal fluid. In contrast, cytology assessment revealed tumor cells in only 2 cases. The expression levels of cerebrospinal fluid tumor markers were all increased in all 5 patients when compared with their respective serum levels. Contrast-enhanced MRI scans demonstrated presence of meningeal metastasis in all 5 cases. Conclusion TM-iFISH may become a novel cerebrospinal fluid-based diagnostic strategy to identify circulating tumor cells and meningeal metastasis as compared to traditional diagnostic approaches, although its superior sensitivity and specificity needs to be confirmed through additional studies with a larger sample size.

  1. Changes with age in leucocyte counts, protein and IgG content of lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with inflammatory, ischemic, and hemorrhagic diseases or tumors of the central nervous system (CNS).

    PubMed

    Kleine, T O; Weber, L; Zöfel, P

    1988-01-01

    Parameters of blood-brain barrier (BBB) function and of humoral and cellular immune response were determined in lumbar CSF and blood serum samples from 717 patients and statistically compared to "healthy" controls (n = 190). Leucocyte counts (mainly mononuclear cells), total protein and IgG levels in CSF were significantly higher, and prealbumin fraction mostly lower in patients, besides other alterations of protein electrophoresis. Serum fractions (median) of protein electrophoresis were within the reference range. When parameters were correlated with age, a significant increase of total protein of 1.62 mg/dl and of IgG of 0.13 mg/dl per 10 years of age was found in lumbar CSF of controls. Elevated leucocyte counts did not correlate with age of patients, but they increased significantly with age, with respect to controls, to a higher extent in patients with polyneuritis, ischemia and injury; they decreased in patients with brain tumors and polyneuropathy. When compared to controls, elevated total protein levels significantly increased with age only with tumors and injury patients. In multiple sclerosis, IgG increased and beta-globulin fraction decreased significantly in CSF with age. The findings point to age-dependent alterations of BBB and immune response only in some patients groups which were different from those of controls.

  2. Volumetric relief map for intracranial cerebrospinal fluid distribution analysis.

    PubMed

    Lebret, Alain; Kenmochi, Yukiko; Hodel, Jérôme; Rahmouni, Alain; Decq, Philippe; Petit, Éric

    2015-09-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid imaging plays a significant role in the clinical diagnosis of brain disorders, such as hydrocephalus and Alzheimer's disease. While three-dimensional images of cerebrospinal fluid are very detailed, the complex structures they contain can be time-consuming and laborious to interpret. This paper presents a simple technique that represents the intracranial cerebrospinal fluid distribution as a two-dimensional image in such a way that the total fluid volume is preserved. We call this a volumetric relief map, and show its effectiveness in a characterization and analysis of fluid distributions and networks in hydrocephalus patients and healthy adults.

  3. Flow induced by ependymal cilia dominates near-wall cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in the lateral ventricles.

    PubMed

    Siyahhan, Bercan; Knobloch, Verena; de Zélicourt, Diane; Asgari, Mahdi; Schmid Daners, Marianne; Poulikakos, Dimos; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2014-05-06

    While there is growing experimental evidence that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow induced by the beating of ependymal cilia is an important factor for neuronal guidance, the respective contribution of vascular pulsation-driven macroscale oscillatory CSF flow remains unclear. This work uses computational fluid dynamics to elucidate the interplay between macroscale and cilia-induced CSF flows and their relative impact on near-wall dynamics. Physiological macroscale CSF dynamics are simulated in the ventricular space using subject-specific anatomy, wall motion and choroid plexus pulsations derived from magnetic resonance imaging. Near-wall flow is quantified in two subdomains selected from the right lateral ventricle, for which dynamic boundary conditions are extracted from the macroscale simulations. When cilia are neglected, CSF pulsation leads to periodic flow reversals along the ventricular surface, resulting in close to zero time-averaged force on the ventricle wall. The cilia promote more aligned wall shear stresses that are on average two orders of magnitude larger compared with those produced by macroscopic pulsatile flow. These findings indicate that CSF flow-mediated neuronal guidance is likely to be dominated by the action of the ependymal cilia in the lateral ventricles, whereas CSF dynamics in the centre regions of the ventricles is driven predominantly by wall motion and choroid plexus pulsation.

  4. Flow induced by ependymal cilia dominates near-wall cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in the lateral ventricles

    PubMed Central

    Siyahhan, Bercan; Knobloch, Verena; de Zélicourt, Diane; Asgari, Mahdi; Schmid Daners, Marianne; Poulikakos, Dimos; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2014-01-01

    While there is growing experimental evidence that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow induced by the beating of ependymal cilia is an important factor for neuronal guidance, the respective contribution of vascular pulsation-driven macroscale oscillatory CSF flow remains unclear. This work uses computational fluid dynamics to elucidate the interplay between macroscale and cilia-induced CSF flows and their relative impact on near-wall dynamics. Physiological macroscale CSF dynamics are simulated in the ventricular space using subject-specific anatomy, wall motion and choroid plexus pulsations derived from magnetic resonance imaging. Near-wall flow is quantified in two subdomains selected from the right lateral ventricle, for which dynamic boundary conditions are extracted from the macroscale simulations. When cilia are neglected, CSF pulsation leads to periodic flow reversals along the ventricular surface, resulting in close to zero time-averaged force on the ventricle wall. The cilia promote more aligned wall shear stresses that are on average two orders of magnitude larger compared with those produced by macroscopic pulsatile flow. These findings indicate that CSF flow-mediated neuronal guidance is likely to be dominated by the action of the ependymal cilia in the lateral ventricles, whereas CSF dynamics in the centre regions of the ventricles is driven predominantly by wall motion and choroid plexus pulsation. PMID:24621815

  5. Harnessing Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Clinical Trials for Treating Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases: Potential and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dana; Kim, Young Sam; Shin, Dong Wun; Park, Chang Shin; Kang, Ju Hee

    2016-10-01

    No disease-modifying therapies (DMT) for neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) have been established, particularly for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). It is unclear why candidate drugs that successfully demonstrate therapeutic effects in animal models fail to show disease-modifying effects in clinical trials. To overcome this hurdle, patients with homogeneous pathologies should be detected as early as possible. The early detection of AD patients using sufficiently tested biomarkers could demonstrate the potential usefulness of combining biomarkers with clinical measures as a diagnostic tool. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for NDs are being incorporated in clinical trials designed with the aim of detecting patients earlier, evaluating target engagement, collecting homogeneous patients, facilitating prevention trials, and testing the potential of surrogate markers relative to clinical measures. In this review we summarize the latest information on CSF biomarkers in NDs, particularly AD and PD, and their use in clinical trials. The large number of issues related to CSF biomarker measurements and applications has resulted in relatively few clinical trials on CSF biomarkers being conducted. However, the available CSF biomarker data obtained in clinical trials support the advantages of incorporating CSF biomarkers in clinical trials, even though the data have mostly been obtained in AD trials. We describe the current issues with and ongoing efforts for the use of CSF biomarkers in clinical trials and the plans to harness CSF biomarkers for the development of DMT and clinical routines. This effort requires nationwide, global, and multidisciplinary efforts in academia, industry, and regulatory agencies to facilitate a new era.

  6. PBPK model of methotrexate in cerebrospinal fluid ventricles using a combined microdialysis and MRI acquisition.

    PubMed

    Brandhonneur, Nolwenn; Noury, Fanny; Bruyère, Arnaud; Saint-Jalmes, Hervé; Le Corre, Pascal

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the distribution of methotrexate (MTX) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lateral ventricles and in cisterna magna after 3rd intraventricular CSF administration in a rabbit model. MTX or gadolinium chelate (Gd-DOTA) was administered in the 3rd ventricle with a local microdialysis to study the pharmacokinetics at the site of administration and with a simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisition in the 3rd ventricle, the lateral ventricles and in the cisterna magna. A specific CSF Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was then extrapolated for MTX from Gd-DOTA data. The relative contribution of elimination and distribution processes to the overall disposition of MTX and Gd-DOTA in the 3rd ventricle was similar (i.e., around 60% for CLE and 40% for CLI) suggesting that Gd-DOTA was a suitable surrogate marker for MTX disposition in ventricular CSF. The PBPK predictions for MTX both in CSF of the 3rd ventricle and in plasma were in accordance with the in vivo results. The present study showed that the combination of local CSF microdialysis with MRI acquisition of the brain ventricles and a PBPK model could be a useful methodology to estimate the drug diffusion within CSF ventricles after direct brain CSF administration. Such a methodology would be of interest to clinicians for a rationale determination and optimization of drug dosing parameters in the treatment of leptomeningeal metastases.

  7. Interactions between Flow Oscillations and Biochemical Parameters in the Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Puy, Vincent; Zmudka-Attier, Jadwiga; Capel, Cyrille; Bouzerar, Roger; Serot, Jean-Marie; Bourgeois, Anne-Marie; Ausseil, Jérome; Balédent, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The equilibrium between the ventricular and lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compartments may be disturbed (in terms of flow and biochemistry) in patients with chronic hydrocephalus (CH). Using flow magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and CSF assays, we sought to determine whether changes in CSF were associated with biochemical alterations. Nine elderly patients with CH underwent phase-contrast MRI. An index of CSF dynamics (Idyn) was defined as the product of the lumbar and ventricular CSF flows. During surgery, samples of CSF were collected from the lumbar and ventricular compartments and assayed for chloride, glucose and total protein. The lumbar/ventricular (L/V) ratio was calculated for each analyte. The ratio between measured and expected levels (Ibioch) was calculated for each analyte and compared with Idyn. Idyn varied from 0 to 100.103μl2.s2. In contrast to the L/V ratios for chloride and glucose, the L/V ratio for total protein varied markedly from one patient to another (mean ± standard deviation (SD): 2.63 ± 1.24). The Ibioch for total protein was strongly correlated with the corresponding Idyn (Spearman’s R: 0.98; p < 5 × 10−5).We observed correlated alterations in CSF flow and biochemical parameters in patients with CH. Our findings also highlight the value of dynamic flow analysis in the interpretation of data on CSF biochemistry. PMID:27445797

  8. Is lumbar drainage of postoperative cerebrospinal fluid fistula after spine surgery effective?

    PubMed

    Barbanti Bròdano, G; Serchi, E; Babbi, L; Terzi, S; Corghi, A; Gasbarrini, A; Bandiera, S; Griffoni, C; Colangeli, S; Ghermandi, R; Boriani, S

    2014-03-01

    This study is a retrospective consecutive case series analysis of 198 patients who underwent spine surgery between 2009 and 2010. The aim of this paper was to assess the efficacy and safeness of bed rest and lumbar drainage in treating postoperative CSF fistula. Postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistula is a well-known complication in spine surgery which lead to a significant change in length of hospitalization and possible postoperative complications. Management of CSF leaks has changed little over the past 20 years with no golden standard advocated from literature. Postoperative CSF fistulas were described in 16 of 198 patients (8%) who underwent spine surgery between 2009 and 2010. The choice of the therapeutic strategy was based on the clinical condition of the patients, taking into account the possibility to maintain the prone position continuously and the risk of morbidity due to prolonged bed rest. Six patients were treated conservatively (position prone for three weeks), ten patients were treated by positioning an external CSF lumbar drainage for ten days. The mean follow-up period was ten months. All patients healed their wound properly and no adverse events were recorded. Patients treated conservatively were cured in a mean period of 30 days, while patients treated with CSF drainage were cured in a mean period of 10 days. Lumbar drainage seems to be effective and safe both in preventing CSF fistula in cases of large dural tears and debilitated/irradiated patients and in treating CSF leaks.

  9. Neural differentiation of choroid plexus epithelial cells: role of human traumatic cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Elham; Sadeghi, Yousef; Aliaghaei, Abbas; Seddighi, Afsoun; Piryaei, Abbas; Broujeni, Mehdi Eskandarian; Shaerzadeh, Fatemeh; Amini, Abdollah; Pouriran, Ramin

    2017-01-01

    As the key producer of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), the choroid plexus (CP) provides a unique protective system in the central nervous system. CSF components are not invariable and they can change based on the pathological conditions of the central nervous system. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effects of non-traumatic and traumatic CSF on the differentiation of multipotent stem-like cells of CP into the neural and/or glial cells. CP epithelial cells were isolated from adult male rats and treated with human non-traumatic and traumatic CSF. Alterations in mRNA expression of Nestin and microtubule-associated protein (MAP2), as the specific markers of neurogenesis, and astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in cultured CP epithelial cells were evaluated using quantitative real-time PCR. The data revealed that treatment with CSF (non-traumatic and traumatic) led to increase in mRNA expression levels of MAP2 and GFAP. Moreover, the expression of Nestin decreased in CP epithelial cells treated with non-traumatic CSF, while treatment with traumatic CSF significantly increased its mRNA level compared to the cells cultured only in DMEM/F12 as control. It seems that CP epithelial cells contain multipotent stem-like cells which are inducible under pathological conditions including exposure to traumatic CSF because of its compositions. PMID:28250752

  10. Detection of free immunoglobulin light chains in cerebrospinal fluids of patients with central nervous system lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Schroers, Roland; Baraniskin, Alexander; Heute, Christoph; Kuhnhenn, Jan; Alekseyev, Andriy; Schmiegel, Wolff; Schlegel, Uwe; Pels, Hendrik-Johannes

    2010-09-01

    Diagnosis of central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma depends on histopathology of brain biopsies, because no reliable disease marker in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been identified yet. B-cell lymphomas such as CNS lymphomas are clonally restricted and express either kappa or lambda immunoglobulin light chains. The aim of this study was to find out a potential diagnostic value of free immunoglobulin light chains released into the CSF of CNS lymphoma patients. Kappa (kappa) and lambda (lambda) free immunoglobulin light chains (FLC) were measured in CSF and serum samples collected from 21 patients with primary and secondary CNS lymphomas and 14 control patients with different neurologic disorders. FLC concentrations and ratios were compared between patient groups and were further analyzed in correlation with clinical, cytopathological, and radiological findings. FLC concentrations for all patients were lower in CSF when compared to serum. In patients with CNS lymphoma, the FLC ratios in CSF were higher (range 392-0.3) compared to control patients (range 3.0-0.3). Irrespective of cytopathological proven lymphomatous meningitis, in 11/21 lymphoma CSF samples the FLC ratios were markedly above 3.0 indicating a clonally restricted B-cell population. Increased FLC ratios in CSF were found in those patients showing subependymal lymphoma contact as detected in magnetic resonance imaging. In summary, this is the first report demonstrating that a significant proportion of patients with CNS lymphomas display a markedly increased FLC ratio in the CSF.

  11. Transfer of liraglutide from blood to cerebrospinal fluid is minimal in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Christensen, M; Sparre-Ulrich, A H; Hartmann, B; Grevstad, U; Rosenkilde, M M; Holst, J J; Vilsbøll, T; Knop, F K

    2015-11-01

    Treatment with liraglutide leads to weight loss. We investigated whether blood-to-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) transfer of liraglutide occurs, and if so, whether it associates with clinical weight loss following liraglutide treatment in humans. We performed lumbar puncture and blood sampling in eight patients with type 2 diabetes (mean (range)): age 63 (54-79) years; actual body weight: 90 (75-118) kg treated with 1.8 mg liraglutide for 14 (5-22) months and with a treatment-induced weight loss of 8.4 (7-11) kg. We measured liraglutide in plasma and CSF with a radioimmunoassay specific for the N-terminus of the GLP-1 moiety of liraglutide. Mean plasma liraglutide was 31 (range: 21-63) nmol l(-1). The mean CSF-liraglutide concentration was 6.5 (range: 0.9-13.9) pmol l(-1). Ratio of CSF: plasma-liraglutide concentrations was 0.02 (range: 0.07-0.002)% and plasma liraglutide did not correlate with CSF-liraglutide levels (P=0.67). Body weight loss tended to correlate with plasma-liraglutide levels (P=0.06), but not with CSF-liraglutide levels (P=0.69). In conclusion, we measured very low concentrations of liraglutide in CSF, and the levels of CSF liraglutide did not correlate with the actual clinical weight loss in these patients. The amount of liraglutide in plasma tended to correlate with the clinical weight loss.

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid lactate: a differential biomarker for bacterial and viral meningitis in children.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Mudasir; Wani, Wasim Ahmad; Malik, Muzaffar Ahmad; Mir, Mohd Rafiq; Ashraf, Younis; Kawoosa, Khalid; Ali, Syed Wajid

    2017-08-30

    To assess the performance of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lactate as a biomarker to differentiate bacterial meningitis from viral meningitis in children, and to define an optimal CSF lactate concentration that can be called significant for the differentiation. Children with clinical findings compatible with meningitis were studied. CSF lactate and other conventional CSF parameters were recorded. At a cut-off value of 3mmol/L, CSF lactate had a sensitivity of 0.90, specificity of 1.0, positive predictive value of 1.0, and negative predictive value of 0.963, with an accuracy of 0.972. The positive and negative likelihood ratios were 23.6 and 0.1, respectively. When comparing between bacterial and viral meningitis, the area under the curve for CSF lactate was 0.979. The authors concluded that CSF lactate has high sensitivity and specificity in differentiating bacterial from viral meningitis. While at a cut-off value of 3mmol/L, CSF lactate has high diagnostic accuracy for bacterial meningitis, mean levels in viral meningitis remain essentially below 2mmol/L. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid Carbohydrate Antigen Series Biomarkers in Non-neoplastic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qiang; Tian, Chenglin; Huang, Xusheng; Pu, Chuanqiang

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate antigen series biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are important for the diagnosis of brain metastasis and meningeal carcinomatosis. Its relationship with CSF and serum in non-neoplastic diseases may be beneficial for earlier diagnosis and treatment. 161 pairs of CSF and serum samples were obtained and compared. The 97.5th percentile and maximum value of carbohydrate antigen series biomarkers were obtained. The 97.5th percentile and maximum value of CSF CA125, CA15-3 and CA19-9 concentration for overall participants was 4.31 u/ml and 4.59 u/ml, 2.01 and 3.65 u/ml, 2.71 u/ml and 3.00 u/ml, respectively. Gender had no significant effect on these three CSF biomarkers. The concentration of these three biomarkers in CSF were all lower than the paired serum concentration. The ratio of CA125, CA15-3 and CA19-9 level (CSF / serum) were from 0.018 to 0.69, 0.038 to 0.893, 0.017 to1, respectively. Evaluation of intrathecal tumor markers synthesis is a specific, sensitive, reliable, and reproducible diagnostic tool. The values determined in this study of CSF carbohydrate antigen series biomarkers are significantly lower than what is usually used in clinical practice. © 2015 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  14. Effects of blood contamination and the rostro-caudal gradient on the human cerebrospinal fluid proteome.

    PubMed

    Aasebø, Elise; Opsahl, Jill Anette; Bjørlykke, Yngvild; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Kroksveen, Ann Cathrine; Berven, Frode S

    2014-01-01

    Over the last years there has been an increased focus on the importance of knowing the effect of pre-analytical influence on the proteomes under study, particularly in the field of biomarker discovery. We present three proteomics studies examining the effect of blood contamination and the rostro-caudal gradient (RCG) on the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteome, in addition to plasma/CSF protein ratios. The studies showed that the central nervous system (CNS) derived proteins appeared to be unaffected by the RCG, while the plasma-derived proteins showed an increase in concentration towards the lumbar area. This implies that the concentration of the plasma-derived proteins in CSF will vary depending on the volume of CSF that is collected. In the CSF samples spiked with blood, 262 of 814 quantified proteins showed an abundance increase of more than 1.5 fold, while 403 proteins had a fold change of less than 1.2 and appeared to be unaffected by blood contamination. Proteins with a high plasma/CSF ratio appeared to give the largest effect on the CSF proteome upon blood contamination. The results give important background information on how factors like blood contamination, RCG and blood-CNS-barrier influences the CSF proteome. This information is particularly important in the field of biomarker discovery, but also for routine clinical measurements. The data from the blood contamination and RCG discovery studies have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000401.

  15. Comparison of Roche MONITOR and Organon Teknika NucliSens assays to quantify human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Spearman, P; Fiscus, S A; Smith, R M; Shepard, R; Johnson, B; Nicotera, J; Harris, V L; Clough, L A; McKinsey, J; Haas, D W

    2001-04-01

    We compared Roche MONITOR and Organon Teknika NucliSens assays for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Results of 282 assays were highly correlated (r = 0.826), with MONITOR values being 0.29 +/- 0.4 log(10) copies/ml (mean +/- standard deviation) values. Both assays can reliably quantify HIV-1 RNA in CSF.

  16. Adenosine deaminase in CSF and pleural fluid for diagnosis of tubercular meningitis and pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nepal, A K; Gyawali, N; Poudel, B; Mahato, R V; Lamsal, M; Gurung, R; Baral, N; Majhi, S

    2012-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most common infectious diseases in developing countries including Nepal. Delay in diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis results in poor prognosis of the disease. This study was conducted to estimate diagnostic cut off values of Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and pleural fluid and to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values ofADA in pleural fluid and CSF from patients with tuberculous and non-tuberculous disease. A total of 98 body fluid (CSF: 24, Pleural fluid: 74) specimens were received for the estimation of ADA. ADA activity was measured at 37 degrees C by spectrophotometric method of Guisti and Galanti, 1984 at 625nm wavelength. Among the patients enrolled for the study subjects for which CSF were received (n = 24) included 8 tuberculous meningitis (TBM), and 16 non-tubercular meningitis (NTM). Pleural fluid samples (n = 74) were received from 19 pulmonary TB with pleural effusion, 17 PTB without pleural effusion and 37 of non-tuberculous disease patients. CSF ADA activity were (11. 1 +/- 2.03 IU/L) and (5.3 +/- +1.89 IU/L) (p <00001) in TM and non-NTM groups and Pleural fluid ADA activity were (10 +/- 22.18 IU/L) and (23.79 +/- 11.62 IU/L) (p < 0.001) in PTB and non-TB groups respectively. ADA test in body fluids, which is simple, cost-effective and sensitive, specific for the tubercular disease is recommended to perform before forwarding the cumbersome and expensive procedures like culture and PCR for TB diagnosis.

  17. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarker Candidates for Parkinsonian Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Constantinescu, Radu; Mondello, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    The Parkinsonian disorders are a large group of neurodegenerative diseases including idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD) and atypical Parkinsonian disorders (APD), such as multiple system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, and dementia with Lewy bodies. The etiology of these disorders is not known although it is considered to be a combination of genetic and environmental factors. One of the greatest obstacles for developing efficacious disease-modifying treatment strategies is the lack of biomarkers. Reliable biomarkers are needed for early and accurate diagnosis, to measure disease progression, and response to therapy. In this review several of the most promising cerebrospinal biomarker candidates are discussed. Alpha-synuclein seems to be intimately involved in the pathogenesis of synucleinopathies and its levels can be measured in the cerebrospinal fluid and in plasma. In a similar way, tau protein accumulation seems to be involved in the pathogenesis of tauopathies. Urate, a potent antioxidant, seems to be associated to the risk of developing PD and with its progression. Neurofilament light chain levels are increased in APD compared with PD and healthy controls. The new “omics” techniques are potent tools offering new insights in the patho-etiology of these disorders. Some of the difficulties encountered in developing biomarkers are discussed together with future perspectives. PMID:23346074

  18. Hourly analysis of cerebrospinal fluid glucose shows large diurnal fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Verbeek, Marcel M; Leen, Wilhelmina G; Willemsen, Michèl A; Slats, Diane; Claassen, Jurgen A

    2016-05-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid analysis is important in the diagnostics of many neurological disorders. Since the influence of food intake on the cerebrospinal fluid glucose concentration and the cerebrospinal fluid/plasma glucose ratio is largely unknown, we studied fluctuations in these parameters in healthy adult volunteers during a period of 36 h. Our observations show large physiological fluctuations of cerebrospinal fluid glucose and the cerebrospinal fluid/plasma glucose ratio, and their relation to food intake. These findings provide novel insights into the physiology of cerebral processes dependent on glucose levels such as energy formation (e.g. glycolysis), enzymatic reactions (e.g. glycosylation), and non-enzymatic reactions (e.g. advanced endproduct glycation). © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Effects of irregular cerebrospinal fluid production rate in human brain ventricular system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadzri, Edi Azali; Shamsudin, Amir Hamzah; Osman, Kahar; Abdul Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq; Aziz, Azian Abd

    2012-06-01

    Hydrocephalus is an abnormal accumulation of fluid in the ventricles and cavities in the brain. It occurs when the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow or absorption is blocked or when excessive CSF is secreted. The excessive accumulation of CSF results in an abnormal widening of the ventricles. This widening creates potentially harmful pressure on the tissues of the brain. In this study, flow analysis of CSF was conducted on a three-dimensional model of the third ventricle and aqueduct of Sylvius, derived from MRI scans. CSF was modeled as Newtonian Fluid and its flow through the region of interest (ROI) was done using EFD. Lab software. Different steady flow rates through the Foramen of Monro, classified by normal and hydrocephalus cases, were modeled to investigate its effects. The results show that, for normal and hydrocephalus cases, the pressure drop of CSF flow across the third ventricle was observed to be linearly proportionally to the production rate increment. In conclusion, flow rates that cause pressure drop of 5 Pa was found to be the threshold for the initial sign of hydrocephalus.

  20. Identification of Oropouche Orthobunyavirus in the cerebrospinal fluid of three patients in the Amazonas, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Michele de Souza; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu Moraes; Naveca, Felipe Gomes; Monte, Rossicleia Lins; Lessa, Natália; Pinto de Figueiredo, Regina Maria; Gimaque, João Bosco de Lima; Pivoto João, Guilherme; Ramasawmy, Rajendranath; Mourão, Maria Paula Gomes

    2012-04-01

    Oropouche fever is the second most frequent arboviral infection in Brazil, surpassed only by dengue. Oropouche virus (OROV) causes large and explosive outbreaks of acute febrile illness in cities and villages in the Amazon and Central-Plateau regions. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from 110 meningoencephalitis patients were analyzed. The RNA extracted from fluid was submitted to reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and sequencing to identify OROV. Three CSF samples showed the presence of OROV causing infection in the central nervous system (CNS). These patients are adults. Two of the patients had other diseases affecting CNS and immune systems: neurocysticercosis and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, respectively. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed that the OROV from the CSF of these patients belonged to genotype I. We show here that severe Oropouche disease is occurring during outbreaks of this virus in Brazil.

  1. Point-of-care diagnosis and prognostication of cryptococcal meningitis with the cryptococcal antigen lateral flow assay on cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Kabanda, Taseera; Siedner, Mark J; Klausner, Jeffrey D; Muzoora, Conrad; Boulware, David R

    2014-01-01

    The cryptococcal antigen (CRAG) lateral flow assay (LFA) had 100% sensitivity and specificity on cerebrospinal fluid samples. Pretreatment LFA titers correlated with quantitative cultures (R(2) = 0.7) and predicted 2- and 10-week mortality. The CRAG LFA is an accurate diagnostic assay for CSF and should be considered for point-of-care diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis.

  2. Subpeak regional analysis of intracranial pressure waveform morphology based on cerebrospinal fluid hydrodynamics in the cerebral aqueduct and prepontine cistern.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Robert B; Baldwin, Kevin; Vespa, Paul; Bergsneider, Marvin; Hu, Xiao

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between intracranial pressure (ICP) pulse waveform morphology and selected hydrodynamic metrics of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) movement using a novel method for ICP pulse pressure regional analysis based on the Morphological Clustering and Analysis of Continuous Intracranial Pulse (MOCAIP) algorithm.

  3. Antiretroviral Treatment Effect on Immune Activation Reduces Cerebrospinal Fluid HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Elizabeth; Ronquillo, Rollie; Lollo, Nicole; Deeks, Steven G.; Hunt, Peter; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T.; Spudich, Serena; Price, Richard W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To define the effect of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on activation of T cells in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood, and interactions of this activation with CSF HIV-1 RNA concentrations. Design Cross-sectional analysis of 14 HIV-negative subjects and 123 neuroasymptomatic HIV-1–infected subjects divided into 3 groups: not on ART (termed “offs”), on ART with plasma HIV-1 RNA >500 copies/mL (“failures”), and on ART with plasma HIV-1 RNA ≤500 copies/mL (“successes”). T-cell activation was measured by coexpression of CD38 and human leukocyte antigen DR (HLA-DR). Other measurements included CSF neopterin and white blood cell (WBC) counts. Results CD8 T-cell activation in CSF and blood was highly correlated across all subjects and was highest in the offs, lower in the failures, and lower still in the successes. While CD8 activation was reduced in failures compared to offs across the range of plasma HIV-1, it maintained a coincident relation to CSF HIV-1 in both viremic groups. In addition to correlation with CSF HIV-1 concentrations, CD8 activation in blood and CSF correlated with CSF WBCs and CSF neopterin. Multivariate analysis confirmed the association of blood CD8 T-cell activation, along with plasma HIV-1 RNA and CSF neopterin, with CSF HIV-1 RNA levels. Conclusions The similarity of CD8 T-cell activation in blood and CSF suggests these cells move from blood to CSF with only minor changes in CD38/HLA-DR expression. Differences in the relation of CD8 activation to HIV-1 concentrations in the blood and CSF in the 2 viremic groups suggest that changes in immune activation not only modulate CSF HIV-1 replication but also contribute to CSF treatment effects. The magnitude of systemic HIV-1 infection and intrathecal macrophage activation are also important determinants of CSF HIV-1 RNA levels. PMID:18362693

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid and blood flow patterns in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Qvarlander, S; Ambarki, K; Wåhlin, A; Jacobsson, J; Birgander, R; Malm, J; Eklund, A

    2017-05-01

    Increased aqueduct cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow pulsatility and, recently, a reversed CSF flow in the aqueduct have been suggested as hallmarks of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (INPH). However, these findings have not been adequately confirmed. Our objective was to investigate the flow of blood and CSF in INPH, as compared to healthy elderly, in order to clarify which flow parameters are related to the INPH pathophysiology. Sixteen INPH patients (73 years) and 35 healthy subjects (72 years) underwent phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Measurements included aqueduct and cervical CSF flow, total arterial inflow (tCBF; i.e. carotid + vertebral arteries), and internal jugular vein flow. Flow pulsatility, net flow, and flow delays were compared (multiple linear regression, correcting for sex and age). Aqueduct stroke volume was higher in INPH than healthy (148±95 vs 90±50 mL, P<.05). Net aqueduct CSF flow was similar in magnitude and direction. The cervical CSF stroke volume was lower (P<.05). The internal carotid artery net flow was lower in INPH (P<.05), although tCBF was not. No differences were found in internal jugular vein flow or flow delays. The typical flow of blood and CSF in INPH was mainly characterized by increased CSF pulsatility in the aqueduct and reduced cervical CSF pulsatility. The direction of mean net aqueduct CSF flow was from the third to the fourth ventricle. Our findings may reflect the altered distribution of intracranial CSF volume in INPH, although the causality of these relationships is unclear. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Does Caffeine Consumption Modify Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid-β Levels in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease?

    PubMed

    Travassos, Maria; Santana, Isabel; Baldeiras, Inês; Tsolaki, Magda; Gkatzima, Olymbia; Sermin, Genc; Yener, Görsev G; Simonsen, Anja; Hasselbalch, Steen G; Kapaki, Elisabeth; Mara, Bourbouli; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Agostinho, Paula; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Mendes, Vera M; Manadas, Bruno; de Mendon, Alexandreça

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine may be protective against Alzheimer's disease (AD) by modulating amyloid-β (Aβ) metabolic pathways. The present work aimed to study a possible association of caffeine consumption with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, particularly Aβ. The study included 88 patients with AD or mild cognitive impairment. The consumption of caffeine and theobromine was evaluated using a validated food questionnaire. Quantification of caffeine and main active metabolites was performed with liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The levels of A(1-42), total tau, and phosphorylated tau in the CSF were determined using sandwich ELISA methods and other Aβ species, Aβ(X-38), Aβ(X-40), and Aβ(X-42), with the MSD Aβ Triplex assay. The concentration of caffeine was 0.79±1.15 μg/mL in the CSF and 1.20±1.88 μg/mL in the plasma. No correlation was found between caffeine consumption and Aβ42 in the CSF. However, a significant positive correlation was found between the concentrations of theobromine, both in the CSF and in the plasma, with Aβ42 in the CSF. Theobromine in the CSF was positively correlated with the levels of other xanthines in the CSF, but not in the plasma, suggesting that it may be formed by central metabolic pathways. In conclusion, caffeine consumption does not modify the levels of CSF biomarkers, and does not require to be controlled for when measuring CSF biomarkers in a clinical setting. Since theobromine is associated with a favorable Aβ profile in the CSF, the possibility that it might have a protective role in AD should be further investigated.

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid APOE levels: an endophenotype for genetic studies for Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Cruchaga, Carlos; Kauwe, John S.K.; Nowotny, Petra; Bales, Kelly; Pickering, Eve H.; Mayo, Kevin; Bertelsen, Sarah; Hinrichs, Anthony; Fagan, Anne M.; Holtzman, David M.; Morris, John C.; Goate, Alison M.

    2012-01-01

    The apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype is the major genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have access to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma APOE protein levels from 641 individuals and genome-wide genotyped data from 570 of these samples. The aim of this study was to test whether CSF or plasma APOE levels could be a useful endophenotype for AD and to identify genetic variants associated with APOE levels. We found that CSF (P = 8.15 × 10−4) but not plasma (P = 0.071) APOE protein levels are significantly associated with CSF Aβ42 levels. We used Mendelian randomization and genetic variants as instrumental variables to confirm that the association of CSF APOE with CSF Aβ42 levels and clinical dementia rating (CDR) is not because of a reverse causation or confounding effect. In addition the association of CSF APOE with Aβ42 levels was independent of the APOE ɛ4 genotype, suggesting that APOE levels in CSF may be a useful endophenotype for AD. We performed a genome-wide association study to identify genetic variants associated with CSF APOE levels: the APOE ɛ4 genotype was the strongest single-genetic factor associated with CSF APOE protein levels (P = 6.9 × 10−13). In aggregate, the Illumina chip single nucleotide polymorphisms explain 72% of the variability in CSF APOE protein levels, whereas the APOE ɛ4 genotype alone explains 8% of the variability. No other genetic variant reached the genome-wide significance threshold, but nine additional variants exhibited a P-value <10−6. Pathway mining analysis indicated that these nine additional loci are involved in lipid metabolism (P = 4.49 × 10−9). PMID:22821396

  7. Cellular Composition of Cerebrospinal Fluid in HIV-1 Infected and Uninfected Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Emily L.; Ronquillo, Rollie; Altmeppen, Hermann; Spudich, Serena S.; Price, Richard W.; Sinclair, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    In order to characterize the cellular composition of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in a healthy state and in the setting of chronic pleocytosis associated with HIV-1 (HIV) infection, multi-parameter flow cytometry was used to identify and quantitate cellular phenotypes in CSF derived from HIV-uninfected healthy controls and HIV-infected subjects across a spectrum of disease and treatment. CD4+ T cells were the most frequent CSF population and the CD4:CD8 ratio was significantly increased in the CSF compared to blood (p = 0.0232), suggesting preferential trafficking of CD4+ over CD8+ T cells to this compartment. In contrast, in HIV-infection, CD8+ T cells were the major cellular component of the CSF and were markedly increased compared to HIV-uninfected subjects (p<0.001). As with peripheral blood, the CSF CD4:CD8 ratio was reversed in HIV-infected subjects compared to HIV-uninfected subjects. Monocytes, B cells and NK cells were rare in the CSF in both groups, although absolute counts of CSF NK cells and B cells were significantly increased in HIV-infected subjects (p<0.05). Our studies show that T cells are the major cellular component of the CSF in HIV-infected and uninfected subjects. The CSF pleocytosis characteristic of HIV infection involves all lymphocyte subsets we measured, except for CD4+ T cells, but is comprised primarily of CD8+ T cells. The reduced proportion of CD4+ T cells in the CSF may reflect both HIV-related peripheral loss and changes in trafficking patterns in response to HIV infection in the central nervous system. PMID:23822975

  8. Cellular Composition of Cerebrospinal Fluid in HIV-1 Infected and Uninfected Subjects.

    PubMed

    Ho, Emily L; Ronquillo, Rollie; Altmeppen, Hermann; Spudich, Serena S; Price, Richard W; Sinclair, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    In order to characterize the cellular composition of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in a healthy state and in the setting of chronic pleocytosis associated with HIV-1 (HIV) infection, multi-parameter flow cytometry was used to identify and quantitate cellular phenotypes in CSF derived from HIV-uninfected healthy controls and HIV-infected subjects across a spectrum of disease and treatment. CD4+ T cells were the most frequent CSF population and the CD4:CD8 ratio was significantly increased in the CSF compared to blood (p = 0.0232), suggesting preferential trafficking of CD4+ over CD8+ T cells to this compartment. In contrast, in HIV-infection, CD8+ T cells were the major cellular component of the CSF and were markedly increased compared to HIV-uninfected subjects (p<0.001). As with peripheral blood, the CSF CD4:CD8 ratio was reversed in HIV-infected subjects compared to HIV-uninfected subjects. Monocytes, B cells and NK cells were rare in the CSF in both groups, although absolute counts of CSF NK cells and B cells were significantly increased in HIV-infected subjects (p<0.05). Our studies show that T cells are the major cellular component of the CSF in HIV-infected and uninfected subjects. The CSF pleocytosis characteristic of HIV infection involves all lymphocyte subsets we measured, except for CD4+ T cells, but is comprised primarily of CD8+ T cells. The reduced proportion of CD4+ T cells in the CSF may reflect both HIV-related peripheral loss and changes in trafficking patterns in response to HIV infection in the central nervous system.

  9. Isoelectric focusing in agarose gel for detection of oligoclonal bands in cerebrospinal and other biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Csako, Gyorgy

    2012-01-01

    Isoelectric focusing (IEF) coupled with immunodetection (immunofixation or immunoblotting) has become the leading technique for the detection and study of oligoclonal bands (OCBs) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and also is increasingly used in other body fluids such as the tear and serum. Limited commercial availability of precast agarose IEF gels for research and a need for customization prompted reporting a detailed general protocol for the preparation and casting of agarose IEF gel along with sample, control, and isoelectric point marker preparation and carrying out the focusing itself for CSF OCBs. However, the method is readily adaptable to the use of other body fluid specimens and, possibly, research specimens such as culture fluids as well.

  10. Albumin heterogeneity in low-abundance fluids. The case of urine and cerebro-spinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Maurizio; Santucci, Laura; Candiano, Giovanni; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2013-12-01

    Serum albumin is a micro-heterogeneous protein composed of at least 40 isoforms. Its heterogeneity is even more pronounced in biological fluids other than serum, the major being urine and cerebrospinal fluid. Modification 'in situ' and/or selectivity of biological barriers, such as in the kidney, determines the final composition of albumin and may help in definition of inflammatory states. This review focuses on various aspects of albumin heterogeneity in low 'abundance fluids' and highlights the potential source of information in diseases. The electrical charge of the protein in urine and CSF is modified but with an opposite change and depending on clinical conditions. In normal urine, the bulk of albumin is more anionic than in serum for the presence of ten times more fatty acids that introduce equivalent anionic charges and modify hydrophobicity of the protein. At the same time, urinary albumin is more glycosylated compared to the serum homolog. Finally, albumin fragments can be detected in urine in patients with proteinuria. For albumin in CSF, we lack information relative to normal conditions since ethical problems do not allow normal CSF to be studied. In multiple sclerosis, the albumin charge in CSF is more cationic than in serum, this change possibly involving structural anomalies or small molecules bindings. Massively fatty albumin could be toxic for tubular cells and be eliminated on this basis. Renal handling of glycosylated albumin can alter the normal equilibrium of filtration/reabsorption and trigger mechanisms leading to glomerulosclerosis and tubulo-interstitial fibrosis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Serum Albumin. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid hydrodynamic studies in children.

    PubMed Central

    Blomquist, H K; Sundin, S; Ekstedt, J

    1986-01-01

    CSF-hydrodynamic investigation using the constant pressure infusion method was used in children. The CSF resting pressure was recorded and the CSF formation rate was measured. The conductance of the CSF outflow pathways and the pressure in the sagittal sinus were calculated. The method was used in children with suspicion of disturbed CSF hydrodynamics due to various neurological and other conditions. The method is applicable in paediatric neurological diagnostics and provides information for further understanding of the mechanisms behind cranial hypertension. The following mean values are offered as reference values in clinical work and in further research in this field: CSF-resting pressure 1.3 kPa, sagittal sinus pressure 1.1 kPa, pressure difference across arachnoid villi 0.5 kPa, conductance of CSF outflow pathways 22.6 mm3 kPa-1s-1, CSF formation rate 6.8 m3s-1. PMID:3711916

  12. Sphingolipid Metabolism Correlates with Cerebrospinal Fluid Beta Amyloid Levels in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fonteh, Alfred N.; Ormseth, Cora; Chiang, Jiarong; Cipolla, Matthew; Arakaki, Xianghong; Harrington, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids are important in many brain functions but their role in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is not completely defined. A major limit is availability of fresh brain tissue with defined AD pathology. The discovery that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contains abundant nanoparticles that include synaptic vesicles and large dense core vesicles offer an accessible sample to study these organelles, while the supernatant fluid allows study of brain interstitial metabolism. Our objective was to characterize sphingolipids in nanoparticles representative of membrane vesicle metabolism, and in supernatant fluid representative of interstitial metabolism from study participants with varying levels of cognitive dysfunction. We recently described the recruitment, diagnosis, and CSF collection from cognitively normal or impaired study participants. Using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we report that cognitively normal participants had measureable levels of sphingomyelin, ceramide, and dihydroceramide species, but that their distribution differed between nanoparticles and supernatant fluid, and further differed in those with cognitive impairment. In CSF from AD compared with cognitively normal participants: a) total sphingomyelin levels were lower in nanoparticles and supernatant fluid; b) levels of ceramide species were lower in nanoparticles and higher in supernatant fluid; c) three sphingomyelin species were reduced in the nanoparticle fraction. Moreover, three sphingomyelin species in the nanoparticle fraction were lower in mild cognitive impairment compared with cognitively normal participants. The activity of acid, but not neutral sphingomyelinase was significantly reduced in the CSF from AD participants. The reduction in acid sphingomylinase in CSF from AD participants was independent of depression and psychotropic medications. Acid sphingomyelinase activity positively correlated with amyloid β42 concentration in CSF from cognitively normal but not impaired

  13. The nature of the decrease in blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier exchange during postnatal brain development in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Habgood, M D; Knott, G W; Dziegielewska, K M; Saunders, N R

    1993-01-01

    1. The blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) exchange of a wide range of passively transported lipid insoluble compounds (0.43-5.4 nm molecular radius) has been investigated in rats at different stages of postnatal development (2 days old to adult). A novel 'litter-based' model for investigating blood-CSF barrier exchange in immature animals is described. 2. At each age investigated there was a clear inverse correlation between molecular radius and blood-CSF barrier exchange, in addition to an overall decrease in blood-CSF barrier exchange with increasing age. 3. The decrease in blood-CSF barrier exchange with age was not consistent with a reduction in pore diameters, nor does it appear to be due to an increase in the CSF sink effect with age. It seems likely to be due to a relative decrease in the number of a population of large diameter pores. PMID:8254533

  14. Bacterial meningitis in the absence of cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hase, Ryota; Hosokawa, Naoto; Yaegashi, Makito; Muranaka, Kiyoharu

    2014-09-01

    Elevation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cell count is a key sign in the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. However, there have been reports of bacterial meningitis with no abnormalities in initial CSF testing. This type of presentation is extremely rare in adult patients. Here, a case involving an 83-year-old woman who was later diagnosed with bacterial meningitis caused by Neisseria meningitidis is described, in whom CSF at initial and second lumbar puncture did not show elevation of cell counts. Twenty-six non-neutropenic adult cases of bacterial meningitis in the absence of CSF pleocytosis were reviewed. The frequent causative organisms were Streptococcus pneumoniae and N meningitidis. Nineteen cases had bacteremia and seven died. The authors conclude that normal CSF at lumbar puncture at an early stage cannot rule out bacterial meningitis. Therefore, repeat CSF analysis should be considered, and antimicrobial therapy must be started immediately if there are any signs of sepsis or meningitis.

  15. Use of the translabyrinthine approach to repair congenital spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leakage in five Chinese patients with Mondini dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Yi, H J; Guo, H; Ch, W; Yang, S M; Liu, P N

    2013-12-01

    To introduce a more effective surgical technique for the repair of spontaneous incurable cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage (CSF otorrhea). The cases of five Chinese patients with Mondini dysplasia and CSF leakage were reviewed. All patients presented with rhinorrhea or otorrhea from childhood and recurrent meningitis attacks. CSF leakage was repaired surgically using the translabyrinthine approach. Facial paralysis occurred in the first two patients, but was cured 2 months later. The other three patients recovered well and had no facial paralysis or complication. CSF leakage did not recur in any patient after follow-up periods of 0.5-3 years. Mondini dysplasia with CSF leakage is rare. Adequate diagnosis and treatment are required to avoid life-threatening complications, such as meningitis. We recommend the translabyrinthine approach as an alternative surgical technique that reduces recurrence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Intracranial pressure, its components and cerebrospinal fluid pressure-volume compensation.

    PubMed

    Kasprowicz, M; Lalou, D A; Czosnyka, M; Garnett, M; Czosnyka, Z

    2016-09-01

    Clinical measurement of intracranial pressure (ICP) is often performed to aid diagnosis of hydrocephalus. This review discusses analysis of ICP and its components' for the investigation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics. The role of pulse, slow and respiratory waveforms of ICP in diagnosis, prognostication and management of hydrocephalus is presented. Two methods related to ICP measurement are listed: an overnight monitoring of ICP and a constant-rate infusion study. Due to the dynamic nature of ICP, a 'snapshot' manometric measurement of ICP is of limited use as it might lead to unreliable results. Therefore, monitoring of ICP over longer time combined with analysis of its waveforms provides more detailed information on the state of pressure-volume compensation. The infusion study implements ICP signal processing and CSF circulation model analysis in order to assess the cerebrospinal dynamics variables, such as CSF outflow resistance, compliance of CSF space, pressure amplitude, reference pressure, and CSF formation. These parameters act as an aid tool in diagnosis and prognostication of hydrocephalus and can be helpful in the assessment of a shunt malfunction. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarker Signature in Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Leslie M.; Vanderstichele, Hugo; Knapik-Czajka, Malgorzata; Clark, Christopher M.; Aisen, Paul S.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Blennow, Kaj; Soares, Holly; Simon, Adam; Lewczuk, Piotr; Dean, Robert; Siemers, Eric; Potter, William; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Develop a cerebrospinal fluid biomarker signature for mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) subjects. Methods Amyloid-β 1 to 42 peptide (Aβ1-42), total tau (t-tau), and tau phosphorylated at the threonine 181 were measured in (1) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples obtained during baseline evaluation of 100 mild AD, 196 mild cognitive impairment, and 114 elderly cognitively normal (NC) subjects in ADNI; and (2) independent 56 autopsy-confirmed AD cases and 52 age-matched elderly NCs using a multiplex immunoassay. Detection of an AD CSF profile for t-tau and Aβ1-42 in ADNI subjects was achieved using receiver operating characteristic cut points and logistic regression models derived from the autopsy-confirmed CSF data. Results CSF Aβ1-42 was the most sensitive biomarker for AD in the autopsy cohort of CSF samples: receiver operating characteristic area under the curve of 0.913 and sensitivity for AD detection of 96.4%. In the ADNI cohort, a logistic regression model for Aβ1-42, t-tau, and APOε4 allele count provided the best assessment delineation of mild AD. An AD-like baseline CSF profile for t-tau/Aβ1-42 was detected in 33 of 37 ADNI mild cognitive impairment subjects who converted to probable AD during the first year of the study. Interpretation The CSF biomarker signature of AD defined by Aβ1-42 and t-tau in the autopsy-confirmed AD cohort and confirmed in the cohort followed in ADNI for 12 months detects mild AD in a large, multisite, prospective clinical investigation, and this signature appears to predict conversion from mild cognitive impairment to AD. PMID:19296504

  18. Sellar Reconstruction and Rates of Delayed Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak after Endoscopic Pituitary Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sanders-Taylor, Chris; Anaizi, Amjad; Kosty, Jennifer; Zimmer, Lee A.; Theodosopoulos, Phillip V.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Delayed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks are a complication in transsphenoidal surgery, potentially causing morbidity and longer hospital stays. Sella reconstruction can limit this complication, but is it necessary in all patients? Design Retrospective review. Setting Single-surgeon team (2005–2012) addresses this trend toward graded reconstruction. Participants A total of 264 consecutive patients with pituitary adenomas underwent endoscopic transsphenoidal resections. Sellar defects sizable to accommodate a fat graft were reconstructed. Main outcomes Delayed CSF leak and autograft harvesting. Results Overall, 235 (89%) had reconstruction with autograft (abdominal fat, septal bone/cartilage) and biological glue. Delayed CSF leak was 1.9%: 1.7%, and 3.4% for reconstructed and nonreconstructed sellar defects, respectively (p = 0.44). Complications included one reoperation for leak, two developed meningitis, and autograft harvesting resulted in abdominal hematoma in 0.9% and wound infection in 0.4%. Conclusion In our patients, delayed CSF leaks likely resulted from missed intraoperative CSF leaks or postoperative changes. Universal sellar reconstruction can preemptively treat missed leaks and provide a barrier for postoperative changes. When delayed CSF leaks occurred, sellar reconstruction often allowed for conservative treatment (i.e., lumbar drain) without repeat surgery. We found universal reconstruction provides a low risk of delayed CSF leak with minimal complications. PMID:26225317

  19. MR measurement of cerebrospinal fluid velocity wave speed in the spinal canal.

    PubMed

    Kalata, Wojciech; Martin, Bryn A; Oshinski, John N; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Royston, Thomas J; Loth, Francis

    2009-06-01

    Noninvasive measurement of the speed with which the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) velocity wave travels through the spinal canal is of interest as a potential indicator of CSF system pressure and compliance, both of which may play a role in the development of craniospinal diseases. However, measurement of CSF velocity wave speed (VWS) has eluded researchers primarily due to either a lack of access to CSF velocity measurements or poor temporal resolution. Here, we present a CSF VWS measurement methodology using a novel MR sequence that acquires unsteady velocity measurements during the cardiac cycle with a time interval < 10 ms. Axial CSF velocity measurements were obtained in the sagittal plane of the cervical spinal region on three subjects referred for an MRI scan without craniospinal disorders. CSF VWS was estimated by using the time shift identified by the maximum velocity and maximum temporal velocity gradient during the cardiac cycle. Based on the maximum velocity gradient, the mean VWS in the three cases was calculated to be 4.6 m/s (standard deviation 1.7 m/s, p < 0.005) during systolic acceleration. VWS computed using maximum velocity alone was not statistically significant for any of the three cases. The measurements of VWS are close in magnitude to previously published values. The methodology represents a new technique that can be used to measure VWS in the spinal canal noninvasively. Further research is required to both validate the measurements and determine clinical significance.

  20. Prototype of an opto-capacitive probe for non-invasive sensing cerebrospinal fluid circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myllylä, Teemu; Vihriälä, Erkki; Pedone, Matteo; Korhonen, Vesa; Surazynski, Lukasz; Wróbel, Maciej; Zienkiewicz, Aleksandra; Hakala, Jaakko; Sorvoja, Hannu; Lauri, Janne; Fabritius, Tapio; Jedrzejewska-Szczerska, Małgorzata; Kiviniemi, Vesa; Meglinski, Igor

    2017-03-01

    In brain studies, the function of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) awakes growing interest, particularly related to studies of the glymphatic system in the brain, which is connected with the complex system of lymphatic vessels responsible for cleaning the tissues. The CSF is a clear, colourless liquid including water (H2O) approximately with a concentration of 99 %. In addition, it contains electrolytes, amino acids, glucose, and other small molecules found in plasma. The CSF acts as a cushion behind the skull, providing basic mechanical as well as immunological protection to the brain. Disturbances of the CSF circulation have been linked to several brain related medical disorders, such as dementia. Our goal is to develop an in vivo method for the non-invasive measurement of cerebral blood flow and CSF circulation by exploiting optical and capacitive sensing techniques simultaneously. We introduce a prototype of a wearable probe that is aimed to be used for long-term brain monitoring purposes, especially focusing on studies of the glymphatic system. In this method, changes in cerebral blood flow, particularly oxy- and deoxyhaemoglobin, are measured simultaneously and analysed with the response gathered by the capacitive sensor in order to distinct the dynamics of the CSF circulation behind the skull. Presented prototype probe is tested by measuring liquid flows inside phantoms mimicking the CSF circulation.

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics in multiple sclerosis patients through phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Lagana, Maria Marcella; Chaudhary, Anamika; Balagurunathan, Deepa; Utriainen, David; Kokeny, Paul; Feng, Wei; Cecconi, Pietro; Hubbard, David; Haacke, E Mark

    2014-01-01

    We studied cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow dynamics at the cervical level in association with internal jugular veins (IJV) flow for 92 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging was used to quantify flow of the CSF and major vessels (including the IJV and the carotid arteries) at the C2-C3 level in the neck. Contrast enhanced MR angiography and time-of-flight MR venography were used to subdivide MS patients into stenotic (ST) and non-stenotic (NST) populations. We evaluated: IJV flow normalized by arterial flow; CSF peaks; CSF outflow duration and its onset from systole. We tested if these variables were statistically different among different MS phenotypes and between ST and NST MS patients. The delay between the beginning of beginning of systole and the CSF outflow was higher in ST compared to NST MS. Less IJV flow was observed in ST vs NST MS. None of the measures was different between the different MS phenotypes. These results suggest that alterations of IJV morphology affect both IJV flow and CSF flow timing but not CSF flow amplitude.

  2. Elimination kinetics of domoic acid from the brain and cerebrospinal fluid of the pregnant rat.

    PubMed

    Maucher Fuquay, Jennifer; Muha, Noah; Wang, Zhihong; Ramsdell, John S

    2012-12-17

    Domoic acid (DA) causes neurological effects in multiple species upon exposure, including status epilepticus in pregnant sea lions and an epileptic disease state that commonly develops in juveniles. This study aims to define brain toxicokinetic parameters in the pregnant rat in the larger context of maternal-fetal toxin transfer. Specifically, Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to a low observable effect level of 1.0 mg DA/kg intravenously at gestational day 20, and plasma, brain, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were taken at discrete time points over 24 h. Domoic acid concentrations were determined by a tandem LC/MS method recently optimized for brain tissue and CSF. Data showed that 6.6% of plasma DA reached the brain, 5.3% reached the CSF, and DA levels were nearly identical in both brain and CSF for 12 h, remaining above the threshold to activate isolated hippocampal neurons for 2 h. The calculated terminal half-life of CSF was 4 h, consistent with the time for complete CSF regeneration, suggesting that CSF acts as a mechanism to clear DA from the brain.

  3. Quantitative analysis of cerebrospinal fluid brain derived neurotrophic factor in the patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mashayekhi, Farhad; Salehi, Zivar; Jamalzadeh, Hamid Reza

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common cause ofnontraumatic neurological disability in Europe and North America. Growth factor expression could participate in the repair process of the demyelinating disease. Among growth factors, brain derived neurotrophic factors (BDNF) has been demonstrated to play an important role in neuronal and axonal survival. In the central nervous system (CNS), neurons are the main source of BDNF. Another potential source are activated astrocytes, which are present in inflamed areas in the CNS as shown in MS. In this study, total protein concentration (TPC) and BDNF levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from the patients with MS (n = 48) and control subjects (n = 53) were measured using a Bio-Rad protein assay and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). No significant change in the CSF TPC of patients with MS was seen as compared to normal CSF. The presence of BDNF in the CSF samples was shown by Western blot. Using ELISA, it was shown that the level of BDNF in the MS CSF is higher than in normal CSF. It is concluded that BDNF is a constant component of human CSF. Moreover, it could be implicated in the pathophysiology of MS.

  4. Nasal absorption of (S)-UH-301 and its transport into the cerebrospinal fluid of rats.

    PubMed

    Dahlin, M; Björk, E

    2000-02-15

    Targeting the brain via nasal administration of drugs has been studied frequently over the last few years. In this study, the serotonin-1a receptor antagonist (S)-5-fluoro-8-hydroxy-2-(dipropyl-amino) tetralin ((S)-UH-301) hydrochloride was used as a model substance. The systemic absorption and transport of (S)-UH-301 into male Sprague-Dawley rat cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were investigated after nasal and intravenous administration. Blood and CSF samples were obtained at regular time intervals from the arteria carotis and by cisternal puncture, respectively, after administration to both nostrils (total 12 micromol/kg) or into the vena jugularis (6 micromol/kg). The concentrations of (S)-UH-301 in plasma and CSF were measured by HPLC with electrochemical detection. The maximum plasma concentration of intranasal (S)-UH-301 occurred in about 7 min and the absolute bioavailability seemed to be complete (F=1.2+/-0.4). Initially, no increased concentrations of (S)-UH-301 were seen in CSF after nasal compared to intravenous administration i.e. it appeared that no direct transport of (S)-UH-301 from the nasal cavity, along the olfactory neurons and into the CSF occurred. However, a prolonged duration of the concentration was seen after nasal administration of (S)-UH-301 and after about 20 min the CSF(na):CSF(iv) concentration ratio (corrected for different dosage) exceeded 1.

  5. Extracellular Mitochondria in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Neurological Recovery After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chou, Sherry H-Y; Lan, Jing; Esposito, Elga; Ning, MingMing; Balaj, Leonora; Ji, Xunming; Lo, Eng H; Hayakawa, Kazuhide

    2017-08-01

    Recent studies suggest that extracellular mitochondria may be involved in the pathophysiology of stroke. In this study, we assessed the functional relevance of endogenous extracellular mitochondria in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in rats and humans after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A standard rat model of SAH was used, where an intraluminal suture was used to perforate a cerebral artery, thus leading to blood extravasation into subarachnoid space. At 24 and 72 hours after SAH, neurological outcomes were measured, and the standard JC1 (5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethyl-benzimidazolylcarbocyanineiodide) assay was used to quantify mitochondrial membrane potentials in the CSF. To further support the rat model experiments, CSF samples were obtained from 41 patients with SAH and 27 control subjects. Mitochondrial membrane potentials were measured with the JC1 assay, and correlations with clinical outcomes were assessed at 3 months. In the standard rat model of SAH, extracellular mitochondria was detected in CSF at 24 and 72 hours after injury. JC1 assays demonstrated that mitochondrial membrane potentials in CSF were decreased after SAH compared with sham-operated controls. In human CSF samples, extracellular mitochondria were also detected, and JC1 levels were also reduced after SAH. Furthermore, higher mitochondrial membrane potentials in the CSF were correlated with good clinical recovery at 3 months after SAH onset. This proof-of-concept study suggests that extracellular mitochondria may provide a biomarker-like glimpse into brain integrity and recovery after injury. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Vanishing calcification associated with a spontaneous ventral spinal cerebrospinal fluid leak.

    PubMed

    Schievink, Wouter I; Ross, Lindsey; Prasad, Ravi S; Maya, M Marcel

    2016-12-01

    Some patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension have a ventral spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak and these CSF leaks may be associated with calcified disk herniations. Identifying these calcifications is helpful in directing treatment. We report here the unusual case of a patient with a ventral CSF leak in whom the associated calcification absorbed over a five-month period. A 42-year-old woman developed orthostatic headaches and bilateral abducens nerve palsies. Magnetic resonance imaging of her brain showed typical findings of spontaneous intracranial hypotension. Magnetic resonance imaging of her spine showed an extensive cervicothoracic CSF leak. Computed tomographic myelography showed calcification at the Th1-2 disk space. Three epidural blood patches were performed, but her symptoms persisted. Digital subtraction myelography performed five months later showed an upper thoracic ventral CSF, but the calcification was no longer present. A dural tear, found at surgery at the Th1-2 level, was repaired and the patient made an uneventful recovery. The resorption of calcifications at the level of a ventral spinal CSF leak could explain the absence of any calcifications in at least some patients with such leaks and demonstrates the usefulness of reviewing previous imaging in patients with ventral CSF leaks if the exact site of the leak remains unknown. © International Headache Society 2016.

  7. Clinical Prognosis in Neonatal Bacterial Meningitis: The Role of Cerebrospinal Fluid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dongying; Ren, Fang; Luo, Zhongcheng; Zhang, Yongjun

    2015-01-01

    Neonates are at high risk of meningitis and of resulting neurologic complications. Early recognition of neonates at risk of poor prognosis would be helpful in providing timely management. From January 2008 to June 2014, we enrolled 232 term neonates with bacterial meningitis admitted to 3 neonatology departments in Shanghai, China. The clinical status on the day of discharge from these hospitals or at a postnatal age of 2.5 to 3 months was evaluated using the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). Patients were classified into two outcome groups: good (167 cases, 72.0%, GOS = 5) or poor (65 cases, 28.0%, GOS = 1–4). Neonates with good outcome had less frequent apnea, drowsiness, poor feeding, bulging fontanelle, irritability and more severe jaundice compared to neonates with poor outcome. The good outcome group also had less pneumonia than the poor outcome group. Besides, there were statistically significant differences in hemoglobin, mean platelet volume, platelet distribution width, C-reaction protein, procalcitonin, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) glucose and CSF protein. Multivariate logistic regression analyses suggested that poor feeding, pneumonia and CSF protein were the predictors of poor outcome. CSF protein content was significantly higher in patients with poor outcome. The best cut-offs for predicting poor outcome were 1,880 mg/L in CSF protein concentration (sensitivity 70.8%, specificity 86.2%). After 2 weeks of treatment, CSF protein remained higher in the poor outcome group. High CSF protein concentration may prognosticate poor outcome in neonates with bacterial meningitis. PMID:26509880

  8. Alzheimer's Disease Cerebrospinal Fluid and Neuroimaging Biomarkers: Diagnostic Accuracy and Relationship to Drug Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Khan, Tapan K; Alkon, Daniel L

    2015-01-01

    Widely researched Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarkers include in vivo brain imaging with PET and MRI, imaging of amyloid plaques, and biochemical assays of Aβ 1 - 42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau (p-tau-181) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In this review, we critically evaluate these biomarkers and discuss their clinical utility for the differential diagnosis of AD. Current AD biomarker tests are either highly invasive (requiring CSF collection) or expensive and labor-intensive (neuroimaging), making them unsuitable for use in the primary care, clinical office-based setting, or to assess drug efficacy in clinical trials. In addition, CSF and neuroimaging biomarkers continue to face challenges in achieving required sensitivity and specificity and minimizing center-to-center variability (for CSF-Aβ 1 - 42 biomarkers CV = 26.5% ; http://www.alzforum.org/news/conference-coverage/paris-standardization-hurdle-spinal-fluid-imaging-markers). Although potentially useful for selecting patient populations for inclusion in AD clinical trials, the utility of CSF biomarkers and neuroimaging techniques as surrogate endpoints of drug efficacy needs to be validated. Recent trials of β- and γ-secretase inhibitors and Aβ immunization-based therapies in AD showed no significant cognitive improvements, despite changes in CSF and neuroimaging biomarkers. As we learn more about the dysfunctional cellular and molecular signaling processes that occur in AD, and how these processes are manifested in tissues outside of the brain, new peripheral biomarkers may also be validated as non-invasive tests to diagnose preclinical and clinical AD.

  9. The effect of APOE genotype on the delivery of DHA to cerebrospinal fluid in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Yassine, Hussein N; Rawat, Varun; Mack, Wendy J; Quinn, Joseph F; Yurko-Mauro, Karin; Bailey-Hall, Eileen; Aisen, Paul S; Chui, Helena C; Schneider, Lon S

    2016-06-30

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE) ɛ4 and low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) amyloid-β42 (Aβ42) levels are predictors for developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). The results of several studies indicate an interaction between docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) consumption and cognitive outcomes by APOE genotype. Our objective in the present study was to examine whether APOE ɛ4 genotype and low CSF Aβ42 levels were associated with reduced delivery of DHA to CSF in the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study-sponsored DHA clinical trial. Phospholipid DHA was assayed in the plasma of 384 participants and CSF of 70 participants at baseline. Forty-four of the 70 participants completed the 18-month follow-up visit after allocation to placebo (n = 15) or DHA (n = 29). Plasma and CSF DHA levels, CSF Aβ42, Tau, and phosphorylated Tau were measured at baseline and after the 18-month intervention. Participants were divided into tertiles based on baseline Aβ42 CSF levels. To assess DHA delivery across the blood-brain barrier, the ratio of CSF to plasma DHA levels was calculated. At baseline, there were no significant differences between CSF or plasma phospholipid DHA levels by CSF Aβ42 tertiles or ɛ4 status. After 18 months of DHA supplementation, participants at the lowest Aβ42 tertile had significantly lower CSF DHA levels (p = 0.01) and lower CSF-to-plasma DHA ratios (p = 0.05) compared to the other tertiles. Baseline CSF Aβ42 levels were significantly lower in ɛ4 carriers than in ɛ4 noncarriers (p = 0.01). Participants carrying the ɛ4 allele (n = 25) demonstrated a less pronounced increase in CSF DHA level compared with noncarriers (n = 4), with a possible interaction effect between treatment and APOE genotype (p = 0.07). APOE ɛ4 allele and lower CSF Aβ42 levels were associated with less transport of DHA to CSF. Brain amyloid pathology may limit the delivery of DHA to the brain in AD. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00440050 . Registered on 22 Feb

  10. Embryonic cerebrospinal fluid collaborates with the isthmic organizer to regulate mesencephalic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Parada, Carolina; Martín, Cristina; Alonso, María I; Moro, José A; Bueno, David; Gato, Angel

    2005-11-01

    Early in development, the behavior of neuroepithelial cells is controlled by several factors acting in a developmentally regulated manner. Recently it has been shown that diffusible factors contained within embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) promote neuroepithelial cell survival, proliferation, and neurogenesis in mesencephalic explants lacking any known organizing center. In this paper, we show that mesencephalic and mesencephalic+isthmic organizer explants cultured only with basal medium do not express the typically expressed mesencephalic or isthmic organizer genes analyzed (otx2 and fgf8, respectively) and that mesencephalic explants cultured with embryonic CSF-supplemented medium do effect such expression, although they exhibit an altered pattern of gene expression, including ectopic shh expression domains. Other trophic sources that are able to maintain normal neuroepithelial cell behavior, i.e., fibroblast growth factor-2, fail to activate this ectopic shh expression. Conversely, the expression pattern of the analyzed genes in mesencephalic+isthmic organizer explants cultured with embryonic cerebrospinal fluid-supplemented medium mimics the pattern for control embryos developed in ovo. We demonstrate that embryonic CSF collaborates with the isthmic organizer in regulation of the expression pattern of some characteristic neuroectodermal genes during early stages of central nervous system (CNS) development, and we suggest that this collaboration is not restricted to the maintenance of neuroepithelial cell survival. Data reported in this paper corroborate the hypothesis that factors contained within embryonic CSF contribute to the patterning of the CNS during early embryonic development.

  11. GWAS of cerebrospinal fluid tau levels identifies novel risk variants for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Cruchaga, Carlos; Kauwe, John S.K.; Harari, Oscar; Jin, Sheng Chih; Cai, Yefei; Karch, Celeste M.; Benitez, Bruno; Jeng, Amanda T.; Skorupa, Tara; Carrell, David; Bertelsen, Sarah; Bailey, Matthew; McKean, David; Shulman, Joshua M.; De Jager, Philip L.; Chibnik, Lori; Bennett, David A.; Arnold, Steve E.; Harold, Denise; Sims, Rebecca; Gerrish, Amy; Williams, Julie; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Mayeux, Richard; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Peskind, Elaine R.; Galasko, Douglas; Fagan, Anne M.; Holtzman, David M.; Morris, John C.; Goate, Alison M.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau, tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (ptau) and Aβ42 are established biomarkers for Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), and have been used as quantitative traits for genetic analyses. We performed the largest genome-wide association study for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau/ptau levels published to date (n=1,269), identifying three novel genome-wide significant loci for CSF tau and ptau: rs9877502 (P=4.89×10−9 for tau) located at 3q28 between GEMC1 and OSTN, rs514716 (P=1.07×10−8 and P=3.22×10−9 for tau and ptau respectively), located at 9p24.2 within GLIS3 and rs6922617 (P = 3.58×10−8 for CSF ptau) at 6p21.1 within the TREM gene cluster, a region recently reported to harbor rare variants that increase AD risk. In independent datasets rs9877502 showed a strong association with risk for AD, tangle pathology and global cognitive decline (P=2.67×10−4, 0.039, 4.86×10−5 respectively) illustrating how this endophenotype-based approach can be used to identify new AD risk loci. PMID:23562540

  12. GWAS of cerebrospinal fluid tau levels identifies risk variants for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cruchaga, Carlos; Kauwe, John S K; Harari, Oscar; Jin, Sheng Chih; Cai, Yefei; Karch, Celeste M; Benitez, Bruno A; Jeng, Amanda T; Skorupa, Tara; Carrell, David; Bertelsen, Sarah; Bailey, Matthew; McKean, David; Shulman, Joshua M; De Jager, Philip L; Chibnik, Lori; Bennett, David A; Arnold, Steve E; Harold, Denise; Sims, Rebecca; Gerrish, Amy; Williams, Julie; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Haines, Jonathan L; Mayeux, Richard; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Farrer, Lindsay A; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Peskind, Elaine R; Galasko, Douglas; Fagan, Anne M; Holtzman, David M; Morris, John C; Goate, Alison M

    2013-04-24

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau, tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (ptau), and Aβ₄₂ are established biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and have been used as quantitative traits for genetic analyses. We performed the largest genome-wide association study for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau/ptau levels published to date (n = 1,269), identifying three genome-wide significant loci for CSF tau and ptau: rs9877502 (p = 4.89 × 10⁻⁹ for tau) located at 3q28 between GEMC1 and OSTN, rs514716 (p = 1.07 × 10⁻⁸ and p = 3.22 × 10⁻⁹ for tau and ptau, respectively), located at 9p24.2 within GLIS3 and rs6922617 (p = 3.58 × 10⁻⁸ for CSF ptau) at 6p21.1 within the TREM gene cluster, a region recently reported to harbor rare variants that increase AD risk. In independent data sets, rs9877502 showed a strong association with risk for AD, tangle pathology, and global cognitive decline (p = 2.67 × 10⁻⁴, 0.039, 4.86 × 10⁻⁵, respectively) illustrating how this endophenotype-based approach can be used to identify new AD risk loci. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. CSF glucose test

    MedlinePlus

    Glucose test - CSF; Cerebrospinal fluid glucose test ... The glucose level in the CSF should be 50 to 80 mg/100 mL (or greater than 2/3 ... Abnormal results include higher and lower glucose levels. Abnormal ... or fungus) Inflammation of the central nervous system Tumor

  14. IMAGING DIAGNOSIS -ANTEMORTEM DETECTION OF OLIGODENDROGLIOMA "CEREBROSPINAL FLUID DROP METASTASES" IN A DOG BY SERIAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING.

    PubMed

    Vigeral, Mariana; Bentley, R Timothy; Rancilio, Nicholas J; Miller, Margaret A; Heng, Hock Gan

    2017-02-07

    An English Bulldog underwent radiation therapy of an intracranial, left lateral ventricle mass. Following resolution of the primary mass, an intraventricular fourth ventricle lesion developed. Subsequently, multiple lesions developed from the cervical central canal and leptomeninges. Serial magnetic resonance imaging documented the propagation of lesions along the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pathways, known as "CSF drop metastasis." Histopathology confirmed multifocal intraventricular and leptomeningeal oligodendroglioma. Oligodendroglioma should be included in the differential diagnosis for an intraventricular tumor exhibiting apparent CSF drop metastasis. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  15. Adrenocorticotropic hormone in serial cerebrospinal fluid in man - Subject to acute regulation by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical system?

    PubMed

    Kellner, Michael; Wortmann, Viola; Salzwedel, Cornelie; Kober, Daniel; Petzoldt, Martin; Urbanowicz, Tatiana; Pulic, Mersija; Boelmans, Kai; Yassouridis, Alexander; Wiedemann, Klaus

    2016-05-30

    Acute regulation of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical system has not been investigated in man. In a pilot study in healthy male volunteers we measured ACTH every twenty minutes in serial CSF for three hours after an intravenous placebo, hydrocortisone (100mg) or insulin (2mg/kg) injection. No acute inhibitory or stimulatory effects of these interventions were discovered. Our results corroborate previous findings in rhesus monkeys. The regulation of CSF ACTH and its potential relevance for behavioral alterations in health and disease (e.g. major depression or anorexia nervosa) in humans need further study.

  16. Nonuniform Moving Boundary Method for Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Intrathecal Cerebrospinal Flow Distribution in a Cynomolgus Monkey.

    PubMed

    Khani, Mohammadreza; Xing, Tao; Gibbs, Christina; Oshinski, John N; Stewart, Gregory R; Zeller, Jillynne R; Martin, Bryn A

    2017-08-01

    A detailed quantification and understanding of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics may improve detection and treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases and help optimize CSF system-based delivery of CNS therapeutics. This study presents a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model that utilizes a nonuniform moving boundary approach to accurately reproduce the nonuniform distribution of CSF flow along the spinal subarachnoid space (SAS) of a single cynomolgus monkey. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol was developed and applied to quantify subject-specific CSF space geometry and flow and define the CFD domain and boundary conditions. An algorithm was implemented to reproduce the axial distribution of unsteady CSF flow by nonuniform deformation of the dura surface. Results showed that maximum difference between the MRI measurements and CFD simulation of CSF flow rates was <3.6%. CSF flow along the entire spine was laminar with a peak Reynolds number of ∼150 and average Womersley number of ∼5.4. Maximum CSF flow rate was present at the C4-C5 vertebral level. Deformation of the dura ranged up to a maximum of 134 μm. Geometric analysis indicated that total spinal CSF space volume was ∼8.7 ml. Average hydraulic diameter, wetted perimeter, and SAS area were 2.9 mm, 37.3 mm and 27.24 mm2, respectively. CSF pulse wave velocity (PWV) along the spine was quantified to be 1.2 m/s.

  17. Homocysteine metabolism is associated with cerebrospinal fluid levels of soluble amyloid precursor protein and amyloid beta.

    PubMed

    Oikonomidi, Aikaterini; Lewczuk, Piotr; Kornhuber, Johannes; Smulders, Yvo; Linnebank, Michael; Semmler, Alexander; Popp, Julius

    2016-10-01

    Disturbed homocysteine metabolism may contribute to amyloidogenesis by modulating the amyloid precursor protein (APP) production and processing. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationships between cerebral amyloid production and both blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers of the homocysteine metabolism. We assessed CSF concentrations of soluble APPα, soluble APPβ, and amyloid β1-42 (Aβ1-42), as well as plasma levels of homocysteine (Hcys), total vitamin B12, and folate, and CSF concentrations of homocysteine (Hcys-CSF), 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MTHF), S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) in 59 subjects with normal cognition. Linear regression analyses were performed to assess associations between homocysteine metabolism parameters and amyloid production. The study was approved by the Ethical Committee of the University of Bonn. After controlling for age, gender, APOEe4 status, and albumin ratio (Qalb), higher Aβ1-42 CSF levels were associated with high Hcys and low vitamin B12 plasma levels as well as with high Hcys, high SAH, and low 5-MTHF CSF levels. Higher CSF concentrations of sAPPα and sAPPβ were associated with high SAH levels. The results suggest that disturbed homocysteine metabolism is related to increased CSF levels of sAPP forms and Aβ1-42, and may contribute to the accumulation of amyloid pathology in the brain. Disturbed homocysteine metabolism may contribute to amyloidogenesis by modulating the amyloid precursor protein (APP) production and processing. We found associations between CSF levels of soluble APP forms and Aβ1-42, and markers of the homocysteine metabolism in both plasma and CSF in adults with normal cognition. Disturbed homocysteine metabolism may represent a target for preventive and early disease-modifying interventions in Alzheimer's disease. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  18. Potential Pathways for CNS Drug Delivery Across the Blood-Cerebrospinal Fluid Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Strazielle, Nathalie; Ghersi-Egea, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    The blood-brain interfaces restrict the cerebral bioavailability of pharmacological compounds. Various drug delivery strategies have been developed to improve drug penetration into the brain. Most strategies target the microvascular endothelium forming the blood-brain barrier proper. Targeting the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier formed by the epithelium of the choroid plexuses in addition to the blood-brain barrier may offer added-value for the treatment of central nervous system diseases. For instance, targeting the CSF spaces, adjacent tissue, or the choroid plexuses themselves is of interest for the treatment of neuroinflammatory and infectious diseases, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, selected brain tumors, hydrocephalus or neurohumoral dysregulation. Selected CSF-borne materials seem to reach deep cerebral structures by mechanisms that need to be understood in the context of chronic CSF delivery. Drug delivery through both barriers can reduce CSF sink action towards parenchymal drugs. Finally, targeting the choroid plexus-CSF system can be especially relevant in the context of neonatal and pediatric diseases of the central nervous system. Transcytosis appears the most promising mechanism to target in order to improve drug delivery through brain barriers. The choroid plexus epithelium displays strong vesicular trafficking and secretory activities that deserve to be explored in the context of cerebral drug delivery. Folate transport and exosome release into the CSF, plasma protein transport, and various receptor-mediated endocytosis pathways may prove useful mechanisms to exploit for efficient drug delivery into the CSF. This calls for a clear evaluation of transcytosis mechanisms at the blood-CSF barrier, and a thorough evaluation of CSF drug delivery rates. PMID:27464721

  19. Pattern of recurrence and factors associated with cerebrospinal fluid dissemination of glioblastoma in Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Danny T. M.; Hsieh, Sonia Y. P.; Kam, Michael K. M.; Cheung, Tom C. Y.; Ng, Stephanie Chi P.; Poon, Wai S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pattern of recurrence of glioblastoma (GBM) seems to have undergone some shifts from distant metastasis as a rarity to a higher proportion, including disease disseminated via cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pathway. There is still no report on the pattern of recurrence for Chinese population. Here, we evaluated the pattern of recurrence of GBM in Chinese patients along with factors that could affect the distribution of recurrence. Methods: Medical records of GBM patients with definite recurrence were reviewed. Local recurrence was defined as tumor regrowth within the preoperative abnormal signals on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T2 sequence. New recurrence was a new lesion away from the preoperative T2 abnormalities. New recurrence in contact with CSF pathways was registered as new CSF dissemination. Progress-free survival (PFS) and survival after progress were compared using the Kaplan–Meier survival curves. Potential risk factors for new CSF dissemination were assessed using univariate models followed by multivariate analysis. Results: Thirty-six patients were proven to have recurrence; 22 local and 14 new recurrences. Among the 14 patients, 11 had new CSF dissemination. Median PFS for local, new parenchymal recurrence, and new CSF dissemination were 5.5 months, 9.9 months, and 12.1 months, whereas survival after progress were 6.1 months, 5.7 months, and 16.9 months, respectively. The ventricular entry during surgery and the completion of concomitant chemoradiotherapy were risk factors for new CSF dissemination. O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase methylation was associated with the development of CSF dissemination. Conclusion: The majority of recurrence remained local (22/36, 61%). However, CSF dissemination was up to 30% (11/36). PFS for patients with CSF dissemination was the longest, and paradoxically survival after progress was the shortest. Ventricular entry should be avoided. Whole craniospinal MRI surveillance should be included for these

  20. Reduced Levels of Nitric Oxide Metabolites in Cerebrospinal Fluid Are Associated with Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Njoku, Chinedu J.; Saville, William J. A.; Reed, Stephen M.; Oglesbee, Michael J.; Rajala-Schultz, Päivi J.; Stich, Roger W.

    2002-01-01

    Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) is a disease of horses that is primarily associated with infection with the apicomplexan Sarcocystis neurona. Infection with this parasite alone is not sufficient to induce the disease, and the mechanism of neuropathogenesis associated with EPM has not been reported. Nitric oxide (NO) functions as a neurotransmitter, a vasodilator, and an immune effector and is produced in response to several parasitic protozoa. The purpose of this work was to determine if the concentration of NO metabolites (NOx−) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is correlated with the development of EPM. CSF NOx− levels were measured before and after transport-stressed, acclimated, or dexamethasone-treated horses (n = 3 per group) were experimentally infected with S. neurona sporocysts. CSF NOx− levels were also compared between horses that were diagnosed with EPM after natural infection with S. neurona and horses that did not have clinical signs of disease or that showed no evidence of infection with the parasite (n = 105). Among the experimentally infected animals, the mean CSF NOx− levels of the transport-stressed group, which had the most severe clinical signs, was reduced after infection, while these values were found to increase after infection in the remaining groups that had less severe signs of EPM. Under natural conditions, horses with EPM (n = 65) had a lower mean CSF NOx− concentration than clinically normal horses with antibodies (Abs) against S. neurona (n = 15) in CSF, and horses that developed ataxia (n = 81) had a significantly lower mean CSF NOx− concentration than horses that did not have neurologic signs (n = 24). In conclusion, lower CSF NOx− levels were associated with clinical EPM, suggesting that measurement of CSF NOx− levels could improve the accuracy of diagnostic tests that are based upon detection of S. neurona-specific Abs in CSF alone and that reduced NO levels could be causatively related to the development

  1. Physician accountability in iatrogenic cerebrospinal fluid leak litigation.

    PubMed

    Kovalerchik, Olga; Mady, Leila J; Svider, Peter F; Mauro, Andrew C; Baredes, Soly; Liu, James K; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2013-09-01

    The potentially severe complications resulting from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak makes iatrogenic injury a medicolegal area of concern for otolaryngologists and neurosurgeons. The objectives of this analysis were to study legal outcomes as well as medical and nonmedical elements affecting malpractice litigation. Public court records available in the Westlaw legal database (Thomson Reuters, New York, NY) were searched for medical malpractice litigation related to iatrogenic CSF leak. Of the 18 jury verdicts and settlements included, outcomes and awards, patient demographic data, and other factors instrumental in determining legal responsibility were recorded for comparison. Ten (55.6%) cases were resolved in the defendant's favor, 2 (11.1%) resulted in damages awarded by a jury, and 6 (33.3%) were settled out of court before resolution of trial. Mean damages awarded were $1.1 million, while out of court settlements averaged $966,887. Malpractice stemming from patients who underwent endoscopic sinus surgery comprised 77.8% of cases analyzed. The most frequent alleged factors cited for litigation included having to undergo additional surgery (88.9%), developing meningitis (50.0%), and failing to recognize complications in a timely manner (44.4%). Perceived deficits in informed consent were alleged in one-third of cases. Although a slight majority of cases were resolved in the defendant's favor, payments made were considerable, averaging approximately $1 million. Strategies to decrease liability and allow patients to make more informed decisions should include clear communication with patients that explicitly states potential risks, such as meningitis, and possible need to undergo additional reparative surgery. © 2013 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  2. [Management of cerebrospinal fluid leaks according to size. Our experience].

    PubMed

    Alobid, Isam; Enseñat, Joaquim; Rioja, Elena; Enriquez, Karla; Viscovich, Liza; de Notaris, Matteo; Bernal-Sprekelsen, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    We present our experience in the reconstruction of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks according to their size and location. Fifty-four patients who underwent advanced skull base surgery (large defects) and 62 patients with CSF leaks of different origin (small and medium-sized defects) were included. Large defects were reconstructed with a nasoseptal pedicled flap positioned on fat and fascia lata and lumbar drainage was used. In small and medium-sized leaks of other origin, intrathecal fluorescein 5% was applied previously to identify the defect. Fascia lata in an underlay position was used for reconstruction, which was then covered with mucoperiosteum from the turbinate. Perioperative antibiotics were administered for 5-7 days. Nasal packing was removed after 24-48 hours. The most frequent aetiology for small and medium-sized defects was spontaneous (48.4%), followed by trauma (24.2%), iatrogenic (5%) and others. The success rate was of 91% after the first surgery and 98% in large skull base defects and small/medium-sized respectively. After rescue surgery, the rate of closure achieved was 100%. The follow-up was 15.6 ± 12.4 months for large defects and 75.3 ± 51.3 months for small/medium-sized defects without recurrence. Endoscopic surgery for closure of any type of skull base defect is the gold standard approach. Defect size does not play a significant role in the success rate. Fascia lata and mucoperiosteum allow a reconstruction of small/medium-sized defects. For larger skull base defects, a combination of fat, fascia lata and nasoseptal pedicled flaps provide a successful reconstruction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid markers reveal intrathecal inflammation in progressive multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Komori, Mika; Blake, Andrew; Greenwood, Mark; Lin, Yen Chih; Kosa, Peter; Ghazali, Danish; Winokur, Paige; Natrajan, Muktha; Wuest, Simone C; Romm, Elena; Panackal, Anil A; Williamson, Peter R; Wu, Tianxia; Bielekova, Bibiana

    2015-07-01

    The management of complex patients with neuroimmunological diseases is hindered by an inability to reliably measure intrathecal inflammation. Currently implemented laboratory tests developed >40 years ago either are not dynamic or fail to capture low levels of central nervous system (CNS) inflammation. Therefore, we aimed to identify and validate biomarkers of CNS inflammation in 2 blinded, prospectively acquired cohorts of untreated patients with neuroimmunological diseases and embedded controls, with the ultimate goal of developing clinically useful tools. Because biomarkers with maximum utility reflect immune phenotypes, we included an assessment of cell specificity in purified primary immune cells. Biomarkers were quantified by optimized electrochemiluminescent immunoassays. Among markers with cell-specific secretion, soluble CD27 is a validated biomarker of intrathecal T-cell activation, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.97. Comparing the quantities of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) immune cells and their respective cell-specific soluble biomarkers (released by CSF cells as well as their counterparts in CNS tissue) provided invaluable information about stationary CNS immune responses, previously attainable via brain biopsy only. Unexpectedly, progressive and relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) patients have comparable numbers of activated intrathecal T and B cells, which are preferentially embedded in CNS tissue in the former group. The cell-specific biomarkers of intrathecal inflammation may improve diagnosis and management of neuroimmunological diseases and provide pharmacodynamic markers for future therapeutic developments in patients with intrathecal inflammation that is not captured by imaging, such as in progressive MS. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  4. Normal pressure hydrocephalus. Influences on cerebral hemodynamic and cerebrospinal fluid pressure--chemical autoregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.S.; Tachibana, H.; Hardenberg, J.P.; Dowell, R.E. Jr.; Kitagawa, Y.; Mortel, K.F.

    1984-02-01

    Blood flow in the cerebral gray matter was measured in normal pressure hydrocephalus and Alzheimer disease by 133Xe inhalation. Flow values in the frontal and temporal gray matter increased after lowering cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure by lumbar puncture in normal pressure hydrocephalus (p less than 0.05) and also after shunting. One case with cerebral complications did not improve clinically. In Alzheimer disease the reverse (decreases in flow in the gray matter) occurred after removal of CSF. Normal pressure hydrocephalus was associated with impaired cerebral vasomotor responsiveness during 100% oxygen and 5% carbon dioxide inhalation. This complication was restored toward normal after CSF removal and/or shunting. Cerebral blood flow measurements appear to be useful for confirming the diagnosis of normal pressure hydrocephalus and predicting the clinical benefit from shunting.

  5. Normal pressure hydrocephalus. Influences on cerebral hemodynamic and cerebrospinal fluid pressure--chemical autoregulation.

    PubMed

    Meyer, J S; Tachibana, H; Hardenberg, J P; Dowell, R E; Kitagawa, Y; Mortel, K F

    1984-02-01

    Blood flow in the cerebral gray matter was measured in normal pressure hydrocephalus and Alzheimer disease by 133Xe inhalation. Flow values in the frontal and temporal gray matter increased after lowering cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure by lumbar puncture in normal pressure hydrocephalus (p less than 0.05) and also after shunting. One case with cerebral complications did not improve clinically. In Alzheimer disease the reverse (decreases in flow in the gray matter) occurred after removal of CSF. Normal pressure hydrocephalus was associated with impaired cerebral vasomotor responsiveness during 100% oxygen and 5% carbon dioxide inhalation. This complication was restored toward normal after CSF removal and/or shunting. Cerebral blood flow measurements appear to be useful for confirming the diagnosis of normal pressure hydrocephalus and predicting the clinical benefit from shunting.

  6. Zebrafish models of idiopathic scoliosis link cerebrospinal fluid flow defects to spine curvature.

    PubMed

    Grimes, D T; Boswell, C W; Morante, N F C; Henkelman, R M; Burdine, R D; Ciruna, B

    2016-06-10

    Idiopathic scoliosis (IS) affects 3% of children worldwide, yet the mechanisms underlying this spinal deformity remain unknown. Here we show that ptk7 mutant zebrafish, a faithful developmental model of IS, exhibit defects in ependymal cell cilia development and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow. Transgenic reintroduction of Ptk7 in motile ciliated lineages prevents scoliosis in ptk7 mutants, and mutation of multiple independent cilia motility genes yields IS phenotypes. We define a finite developmental window for motile cilia in zebrafish spine morphogenesis. Notably, restoration of cilia motility after the onset of scoliosis blocks spinal curve progression. Together, our results indicate a critical role for cilia-driven CSF flow in spine development, implicate irregularities in CSF flow as an underlying biological cause of IS, and suggest that noninvasive therapeutic intervention may prevent severe scoliosis.

  7. Diagnostic cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Parkinson's disease: a pathogenetically based approach.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Karin D; Teunissen, Charlotte E; Drukarch, Benjamin; Jimenez, Connie R; Groenewegen, Henk J; Berendse, Henk W; van de Berg, Wilma D J

    2010-09-01

    The inaccuracy of the early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) has been a major incentive for studies aimed at the identification of biomarkers. Brain-derived cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteins are potential biomarkers considering the major role that proteins play in PD pathogenesis. In this review, we discuss the current hypotheses about the pathogenesis of PD and identify the most promising candidate biomarkers among the CSF proteins studied so far. The list of potential markers includes proteins involved in various pathogenetic processes, such as oxidative stress and protein aggregation. This list will undoubtedly grow in the near future by application of CSF proteomics and subsequent validation of identified proteins. Probably a single biomarker will not suffice to reach high sensitivity and specificity, because PD is pathogenetically heterogeneous and shares etiological factors with other neurodegenerative diseases. Furthermore, identified candidate biomarkers will have to be thoroughly validated before they can be implemented as diagnostic aids.

  8. Level of sFas/APO 1 in serum and cerebrospinal fluid in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mahovic, Darija; Petravic, Damir; Petelin, Zeljka; Zurak, Niko; Horvat, Gordana; Hajnsek, Sanja

    2004-06-01

    The aim of the study was to measure sFas/APO 1 serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) during relapses, as an index of inhibition of apoptosis of activated lymphocytes in eight patients with clinically definite multiple sclerosis, and 12 healthy controls. The level of serum and CSF sFas/APO 1 was determined by commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. No significant differences were detected in the sFas/APO 1 serum level between patients and controls, but the levels in CSF was lower in the former. Our results suggest the possibility of Fas mediated apoptosis as a contributing factor in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis.

  9. Effects of spatial variation of skull and cerebrospinal fluid layers on optical mapping of brain activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuping; Shibahara, Nanae; Kuramashi, Daishi; Okawa, Shinpei; Kakuta, Naoto; Okada, Eiji; Maki, Atsushi; Yamada, Yukio

    2010-07-01

    In order to investigate the effects of anatomical variation in human heads on the optical mapping of brain activity, we perform simulations of optical mapping by solving the photon diffusion equation for layered-models simulating human heads using the finite element method (FEM). Particularly, the effects of the spatial variations in the thicknesses of the skull and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) layers on mapping images are investigated. Mapping images of single active regions in the gray matter layer are affected by the spatial variations in the skull and CSF layer thicknesses, although the effects are smaller than those of the positions of the active region relative to the data points. The increase in the skull thickness decreases the sensitivity of the images to active regions, while the increase in the CSF layer thickness increases the sensitivity in general. The images of multiple active regions are also influenced by their positions relative to the data points and by their depths from the skin surface.

  10. Detection and genotyping of enteroviruses in cerebrospinal fluid in patients in Victoria, Australia, 2007-2013.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Georgina; Chibo, Doris; Druce, Julian; Catton, Michael; Birch, Chris

    2014-09-01

    Genotyping by VP1 fragment polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and nucleic acid sequencing to detect enterovirus (EV) genotypes was performed directly on 729 EV PCR positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples collected between 2007 and 2012 from Victorian hospital inpatients. The overall genotype identification rate from CSF-positive material was 43%. The four most common genotypes identified were Echovirus 6 (24%), Echovirus 30 (17%), Echovirus 25 (10%), and Coxsackievirus A9 (10%), together comprising 61% of all EVs typed. The seasonal distribution of all EVs identified followed the recognized pattern of mainly summer epidemics. Three of the four predominant genotypes were present in each of the 6 years in which the study was conducted, with 20 other EV genotypes also detected, often in only a single year. Genotyping of EVs directly in CSF is faster, simpler and more sensitive than traditional virus neutralization assays performed on EV positive samples.

  11. Neurocysticercosis: validity of ELISA after storage of whole blood and cerebrospinal fluid on paper.

    PubMed

    Fleury, A; Bouteille, B; Garcia, E; Marquez, C; Preux, P M; Escobedo, F; Sotelo, J; Dumas, M

    2001-09-01

    Cysticercosis is an infestation of Cysticercus cellulosae. When it occurs in the brain, chronic neurological complications can ensue, most commonly seizures. Neurocysticercosis is usually diagnosed by neuroimaging, a technique not available in most endemic countries. Hence immunological tests are valuable for diagnosis and epidemiological surveys. We evaluated the suitability of paper for storing blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) until subsequent testing by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), by testing whole blood samples on filter paper from 305 patients and CSF samples from 117 patients stored on ordinary white typing paper and on filter paper. Optimal preservation of biological samples is achieved when whole blood is stored on filter paper, CSF on white paper, and when samples are frozen within 1 week after collection. Our results could improve diagnostic capabilities and facilitate epidemiological surveys in endemic countries where immunodiagnostic tests cannot be rapidly performed because of inadequate laboratory infrastructure.

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid-derived Semaphorin3B orients neuroepithelial cell divisions in the apicobasal axis.

    PubMed

    Arbeille, Elise; Reynaud, Florie; Sanyas, Isabelle; Bozon, Muriel; Kindbeiter, Karine; Causeret, Frédéric; Pierani, Alessandra; Falk, Julien; Moret, Frédéric; Castellani, Valérie

    2015-02-27

    The spatial orientation of cell divisions is fundamental for tissue architecture and homeostasis. Here we analysed neuroepithelial progenitors in the developing mouse spinal cord to determine whether extracellular signals orient the mitotic spindle. We report that Semaphorin3B (Sema3B) released from the floor plate and the nascent choroid plexus in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) controls progenitor division orientation. Delivery of exogenous Sema3B to neural progenitors after neural tube opening in living embryos promotes planar orientation of their division. Preventing progenitor access to cues present in the CSF by genetically engineered canal obstruction affects the proportion of planar and oblique divisions. Sema3B knockout phenocopies the loss of progenitor access to the CSF. Sema3B binds to the apical surface of mitotic progenitors and exerts its effect via Neuropilin receptors, GSK3 activation and subsequent inhibition of the microtubule stabilizer CRMP2. Thus, extrinsic control mediated by the Semaphorin signalling orients progenitor divisions in neurogenic zones.

  13. Three-dimensional computational prediction of cerebrospinal fluid flow in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Sweetman, Brian; Xenos, Michalis; Zitella, Laura; Linninger, Andreas A

    2011-02-01

    A three-dimensional model of the human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces is presented. Patient-specific brain geometries were reconstructed from magnetic resonance images. The model was validated by comparing the predicted flow rates with Cine phase-contrast MRI measurements. The model predicts the complex CSF flow patterns and pressures in the ventricular system and subarachnoid space of a normal subject. The predicted maximum rostral to caudal CSF flow in the pontine cistern precedes the maximum rostral to caudal flow in the ventricles by about 10% of the cardiac cycle. This prediction is in excellent agreement with the subject-specific flow data. The computational results quantify normal intracranial dynamics and provide a basis for analyzing diseased intracranial dynamics. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Three-dimensional computational prediction of cerebrospinal fluid flow in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Sweetman, Brian; Xenos, Michalis; Zitella, Laura; Linninger, Andreas A.

    2011-01-01

    A three-dimensional model of the human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces is presented. Patient-specific brain geometries were reconstructed from magnetic resonance images. The model was validated by comparing the predicted flow rates with Cine phase-contrast MRI measurements. The model predicts the complex CSF flow patterns and pressures in the ventricular system and subarachnoid space of a normal subject. The predicted maximum rostral to caudal CSF flow in the pontine cistern precedes the maximum rostral to caudal flow in the ventricles by about 10% of the cardiac cycle. This prediction is in excellent agreement with the subject-specific flow data. The computational results quantify normal intracranial dynamics and provide a basis for analyzing diseased intracranial dynamics. PMID:21215965

  15. Cerebrospinal fluid Coccidioides antigen testing in the diagnosis and management of central nervous system coccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    Bamberger, David M; Pepito, Brian S; Proia, Laurie A; Ostrosky-Zeichner, Luis; Ashraf, Madiha; Marty, Francisco; Scully, Eileen; Wheat, L Joseph

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this study was to report on the potential utility of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Coccidioides antigen testing in the diagnosis and management of Coccidioides meningitis. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of seven patients with Coccidioides meningitis who had Coccidioides antigen tests performed on CSF. In two severely immunocompromised patients, CSF Coccidioides antigen testing was helpful in the diagnosis when other testing modalities were negative. Coccidioides antigen testing was also useful in the management of patients who had progression of disease due to non-adherence, development of resistance, failure of therapy and the presence of vasculitis. Changing antigen levels helped identify disease complications in three patients that led to alterations in therapy or management. On the basis of our review of these seven patients with Coccidioides meningitis, we concluded that the Coccidioides antigen test contributed to the diagnosis and management of patients with Coccidioides meningitis. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Slc20a2 is critical for maintaining a physiologic inorganic phosphate level in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Nina; Autzen, Jacob Kwasi; Pedersen, Lene

    2016-04-01

    Mutations in the SLC20A2-gene encoding the inorganic phosphate (Pi) transporter PiT2 can explain approximately 40% of the familial cases of the rare neurodegenerative disorder primary familial brain calcification (Fahr's disease). The disease characteristic, cerebrovascular-associated calcifications, is also present in Slc20a2-knockout (KO) mice. Little is known about the specific role(s) of PiT2 in the brain. Recent in vitro studies, however, suggest a role in regulation of the [Pi] in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We here show that Slc20a2-KO mice indeed have a high CSF [Pi] in agreement with a role of PiT2 in Pi export from the CSF. The implications in relation to disease mechanism are discussed.

  17. A Window into the Heterogeneity of Human Cerebrospinal Fluid Aβ Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Ghidoni, Roberta; Paterlini, Anna; Albertini, Valentina; Stoppani, Elena; Binetti, Giuliano; Fuxe, Kjell; Benussi, Luisa; Agnati, Luigi F.

    2011-01-01

    The initiating event in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an imbalance in the production and clearance of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides leading to the formation of neurotoxic brain Aβ assemblies. Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF), which is a continuum of the brain, is an obvious source of markers reflecting central neuropathologic features of brain diseases. In this review, we provide an overview and update on our current understanding of the pathobiology of human CSF Aβ peptides. Specifically, we focused our attention on the heterogeneity of the CSF Aβ world discussing (1) basic research studies and what has been translated to clinical practice, (2) monomers and other soluble circulating Aβ assemblies, and (3) communication modes for Aβ peptides and their microenvironment targets. Finally, we suggest that Aβ peptides as well as other key signals in the central nervous system (CNS), mainly involved in learning and hence plasticity, may have a double-edged sword action on neuron survival and function. PMID:21876644

  18. [Cytology of the cerebrospinal fluid in dogs with brain tumors and spinal cord compression. Part 4].

    PubMed

    Grevel, V; Machus, B; Steeb, C

    1992-08-01

    The results of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytology of 9 dogs with brain tumors and 50 dogs with spinal cord compression are discussed. Of the 50 dogs with spinal cord compression, disc protrusion was diagnosed in 31, myelomalacia in 7, discospondylitis in 3 and spinal cord tumors in 9 dogs. In 4 of 9 dogs with brain tumors, tumor cells could be found by the sedimentation apparatus of Kölmel. Pleocytosis existed in 6 patients. In about 70% (29 of 41) of cases with disc protrusion, more than 200 cells could be evaluated in the CSF sediment, consisting mostly of transformed lymphocytes and activated monocytes. As the neurologic deficits increased, the amount of cells and especially cell complexes increased. This was especially evident in cases with myelomalacia of the spinal cord. Only in cases with discospondylitis or spinal cord neoplasia was the CSF cytology unchanged.

  19. Relation of cerebrospinal fluid/plasma HIV-RNA discordance with neurocognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Graciela; López-González, M; Monzón-Falconi, J F; Soto-Hernández, J L; Perales-Martínez, D; López-Vejar, C

    2015-01-01

    Neurological involvement is common in patients infected with HIV. The effectiveness of antiretroviral drugs in lowering the levels of HIV-RNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is limited by their inability to cross the blood-brain barrier. Discordance in CSF/plasma HIV-RNA levels may have a bearing on the progression of neurological disease in these patients. We report a woman with subacute neurocognitive impairment and abnormal findings on brain MRI, in whom there was a discordance between CSF/plasma HIV-RNA levels. The patient improved after a change in her highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimen. We also reviewed the available literature on the subject and found seven articles describing 27 patients.

  20. Oxygenation of the cerebrospinal fluid with artificial cerebrospinal fluid can ameliorate a spinal cord ischemic injury in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Keisuke; Adachi, Osamu; Kawatsu, Satoshi; Sakatsume, Ko; Kumagai, Kiichiro; Kawamoto, Shunsuke; Saiki, Yoshikatsu

    2016-11-01

    We evaluated the effect of cerebrospinal fluid oxygenation for the prevention of spinal cord ischemic injury after infrarenal aortic occlusion in a rabbit model. Twenty white Japanese rabbits were categorized into the following 4 groups (5 in each): group S (sham), balloon catheter insertion on to the aorta; group C (control), spinal cord ischemic injury by infrarenal abdominal aortic balloon occlusion for 15 minutes; group N (nonoxygenated), spinal cord ischemic injury with cerebrospinal fluid replacement by nonoxygenated artificial cerebrospinal fluid; and group O (oxygenated), spinal cord ischemic injury with cerebrospinal fluid replacement by nanobubble-oxygenated artificial cerebrospinal fluid. The changes in cerebrospinal fluid partial pressure of oxygen during the peri-ischemic period, modified Tarlov score, and histopathology of the spinal cord 48 hours after aortic maneuvers were evaluated. Cerebrospinal fluid partial pressure of oxygen significantly increased in group O compared with group N after cerebrospinal fluid replacement (254.5 ± 54.8 mm Hg vs 136.1 ± 43.5 mm Hg, P = .02). After 15 minutes of spinal cord ischemic injury, cerebrospinal fluid partial pressure of oxygen in group C decreased to 65.8 ± 18.6 mm Hg compared with baseline (148.8 ± 20.6 mm Hg, P < .01), whereas cerebrospinal fluid partial pressure of oxygen in group O was maintained at remarkably high levels after spinal cord ischemic injury (291.9 ± 51.8 mm Hg), which was associated with improved neurologic function, with 20% of spinal cord ischemic injury having a Tarlov score less than 5 compared with 100% of spinal cord ischemic injury in group C. Preservation of anterior horn neurons in groups N and O was confirmed by histopathologic analysis with significant reduction of degenerated neurons compared with group C. Cerebrospinal fluid oxygenation with artificial cerebrospinal fluid can exert a protective effect against spinal cord ischemic injury in rabbits

  1. Antioxidants for Alzheimer disease: a randomized clinical trial with cerebrospinal fluid biomarker measures.

    PubMed

    Galasko, Douglas R; Peskind, Elaine; Clark, Christopher M; Quinn, Joseph F; Ringman, John M; Jicha, Gregory A; Cotman, Carl; Cottrell, Barbara; Montine, Thomas J; Thomas, Ronald G; Aisen, Paul

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate whether antioxidant supplements presumed to target specific cellular compartments affected cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers. Double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Academic medical centers. Subjects with mild to moderate Alzheimer disease. Random assignment to treatment for 16 weeks with 800 IU/d of vitamin E (α-tocopherol) plus 500 mg/d of vitamin C plus 900 mg/d of α-lipoic acid (E/C/ALA); 400 mg of coenzyme Q 3 times/d; or placebo. Changes from baseline to 16 weeks in CSF biomarkers related to Alzheimer disease and oxidative stress, cognition (Mini-Mental State Examination), and function (Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study Activities of Daily Living Scale). Seventy-eight subjects were randomized; 66 provided serial CSF specimens adequate for biochemical analyses. Study drugs were well tolerated, but accelerated decline in Mini-Mental State Examination scores occurred in the E/C/ALA group, a potential safety concern. Changes in CSF Aβ42, tau, and P-tau(181) levels did not differ between the 3 groups. Cerebrospinal fluid F2-isoprostane levels, an oxidative stress biomarker, decreased on average by 19% from baseline to week 16 in the E/C/ALA group but were unchanged in the other groups. Antioxidants did not influence CSF biomarkers related to amyloid or tau pathology. Lowering of CSF F2-isoprostane levels in the E/C/ALA group suggests reduction of oxidative stress in the brain. However, this treatment raised the caution of faster cognitive decline, which would need careful assessment if longer-term clinical trials are conducted. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00117403.

  2. Gastrin and cholecystokinin in human cerebrospinal fluid. Immunochemical determination of concentrations and molecular heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Rehfeld, J F; Kruse-Larsen, C

    1978-10-20

    To determine whether gastrin and cholecystokinin (CCK), recently found in the central nervous sytem, were present in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), we studied human specimens by sensitive and specific radioimmunoassays for the two related polypeptide hormones. The concentration of gastrin in cerebrospinal fluid from 10 neurologically normal persons ranged from 1.5 to 8.0 pM (mean 3.4 pM), whereas the concentration of CCK ranged from 4 to 55 pM (mean 14 pM). The molecular heterogeneity of gastrin and CCK in CSF was determined by gel chromatography of concentrated fluid monitored by 3 gastrin radioimmunoassays specific for different sequences of gastrin17 and 3 CCK radioimmunoassays specific for different sequences of CCK33. Chromatography revealed that gastrin was present in molecular forms corresponding to gastrin34 ('big gastrin') and gastrin17. CCK was present in molecular forms corresponding to the COOH-terminal octapeptide amide of CCK33 and a fragment corresponding to sequence 25-29 of CCK33. Also, a peptide corresponding to COOH-terminal tetrapeptide amide common to both gastrin and CCK was found. The results indicate that true gastrin as well as CCK are present in CSF, and that both hormones display a molecular heterogeneity similar to that found in extracts of brain tissue.

  3. Cerebellar hemorrhage caused by cerebrospinal fluid leak after spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Farag, Ehab; Abdou, Amgad; Riad, Ihab; Borsellino, Sam R; Schubert, Armin

    2005-02-01

    Spine surgery is associated with a wide range of surgical and anesthetic complications. Excessive cerebrospinal fluid leak can be a cause of cerebellar hemorrhage postoperatively. We report a 43-yr-old patient who had lumbar spine reexploration surgery complicated by a cerebrospinal fluid leak which led to cerebellar hemorrhage manifested by postoperative mental status changes. Early detection and proper management resulted in full recovery.

  4. Glioblastoma multiforme with epithelial differentiation: a potential diagnostic pitfall in cerebrospinal fluid cytology.

    PubMed

    Gill, Simpal K; Padmanabhan, Vijayalakshmi; Hickey, William F; Marotti, Jonathan D

    2015-08-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytology provides valuable diagnostic and prognostic information for diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) and remains the gold standard for the detection of neoplastic meningitis. Metastatic involvement of the CSF by non-CNS neoplasms far surpasses that of primary brain tumors, although conventional glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) can occasionally be identified in the CSF. GBM with epithelial differentiation is an uncommon variant that may contain features such as adenoid structures, signet ring cells, or squamous metaplasia. Herein, we present a case of GBM with epithelial differentiation to highlight a potential diagnostic pitfall in CSF cytology. A 55-year-old man presented with neurological symptoms and a 6.4 cm left temporal lobe cystic mass. Primary resection revealed GBM with focal epithelial differentiation confirmed by cytokeratin, epithelial membrane antigen, and glial fibrillary acidic protein immunohistochemical studies. Four months following primary resection, the patient developed severe headache for which a lumbar puncture with CSF cytologic evaluation was performed. The cytospin preparation showed numerous malignant epithelioid cells with high nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio and prominent cytoplasmic vacuoles resembling metastatic carcinoma. However, the lesional cells were cytomorphologically identical to the epithelial component present in the patient's recently diagnosed GBM. This case illustrates the potential for GBM with epithelial differentiation to closely mimic metastatic carcinoma from a non-CNS site in CSF cytology, which expands the differential diagnosis and emphasizes the necessity of clinical correlation.

  5. Update on the core and developing cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Babić, Mirjana; Svob Štrac, Dubravka; Mück-Šeler, Dorotea; Pivac, Nela; Stanić, Gabrijela; Hof, Patrick R; Simić, Goran

    2014-08-28

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder, whose prevalence will dramatically rise by 2050. Despite numerous clinical trials investigating this disease, there is still no effective treatment. Many trials showed negative or inconclusive results, possibly because they recruited only patients with severe disease, who had not undergone disease-modifying therapies in preclinical stages of AD before severe degeneration occurred. Detection of AD in asymptomatic at risk individuals (and a few presymptomatic individuals who carry an autosomal dominant monogenic AD mutation) remains impractical in many of clinical situations and is possible only with reliable biomarkers. In addition to early diagnosis of AD, biomarkers should serve for monitoring disease progression and response to therapy. To date, the most promising biomarkers are cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and neuroimaging biomarkers. Core CSF biomarkers (amyloid β1-42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau) showed a high diagnostic accuracy but were still unreliable for preclinical detection of AD. Hence, there is an urgent need for detection and validation of novel CSF biomarkers that would enable early diagnosis of AD in asymptomatic individuals. This article reviews recent research advances on biomarkers for AD, focusing mainly on the CSF biomarkers. In addition to core CSF biomarkers, the potential usefulness of novel CSF biomarkers is discussed.

  6. Polymerase chain reaction in cerebrospinal fluid for the diagnosis of congenital toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Olariu, Tudor R; Remington, Jack S; Montoya, Jose G

    2014-06-01

    Congenital toxoplasmosis can result in visual impairment, hearing loss, serious neurologic sequelae and death in the infant. We studied the potential of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for diagnosis of congenital toxoplasmosis. For this purpose, we studied both congenitally infected (diagnosed clinically and serologically) and noninfected infants born to untreated mothers. The infants ranged in age from 0 to 180 days. CSF PCR was positive in 27 of the 58 (46.5%) congenitally infected infants and was negative in each of the 103 infants without congenital toxoplasmosis. The frequency of positive CSF PCR varied according to whether infants had major clinical signs of the disease; PCR was positive in 70.9%, 53.3% and 50.9% of those with hydrocephalus, cerebral calcifications and/or eye disease, respectively. Of 6 infants who were negative for both IgM and IgA antibodies, 3 had a positive PCR in their CSF as the confirmatory test for diagnosis of congenital toxoplasmosis. IgM and IgA antibodies and CSF PCR, when combined, yielded a higher sensitivity for diagnosis of congenital toxoplasmosis when compared with the performance of each test alone. Our findings reveal that in infants with clinical and serologic findings suggestive of congenital toxoplasmosis and born to untreated mothers, CSF PCR has the potential to increase the frequency of cases in which the diagnosis is confirmed.

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid penetration of cefpirome in patients with non-inflamed meninges.

    PubMed

    Nix, D E; Wilton, J H; Velasquez, N; Budny, J L; Lassman, H B; Mitchell, P; Divan, K; Schentag, J J

    1992-04-01

    Twenty patients (mean age 52 +/- 12 years, mean weight 75 +/- 15 kg) scheduled for elective myelogram or spinal anaesthesia were enrolled to determine the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) penetration of a new expanded spectrum cephalosporin antibiotic, cefpirome (HR-810). A single 2 g intravenous dose of cefpirome was administered as a bolus between 1 and 8 h before lumbar puncture. Blood samples were collected at 15 pre-determined times and a single CSF sample was obtained at the time of lumbar puncture. Serum and CSF cefpirome concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. The mean maximal serum concentration of cefpirome was 264 +/- 76 mg/L. A mean steady-state volume of distribution of 20 +/- 4 L, clearance of 7.4 +/- 1.3 L/h, and half-life of 2.5 +/- 0.5 h were determined. Mean CSF concentrations were 0.50 +/- 0.11 mg/L at 1-2 h post dose (n = 4), 0.57 +/- 0.13 mg/L at 2-4 h post dose (n = 4), 0.76 +/- 0.34 mg/L at 4-6 h post dose (n = 7), and 0.83 +/- 0.29 mg/L at 6-8.3 h post dose (n = 5). Blood:brain barrier permeability to cefpirome may not be a limiting factor as CSF concentrations were rapidly attained. Further studies are required to determine the mechanism of cefpirome transport between plasma and CSF.

  8. The Clinical Use of Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis: The Italian Selfie.

    PubMed

    Sancesario, Giulia M; Toniolo, Sofia; Chiasserini, Davide; Di Santo, Simona G; Zegeer, Josh; Bernardi, Gaetano; Musicco, Massimo; Caltagirone, Carlo; Parnetti, Lucilla; Bernardini, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Although the use of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) amyloid β1-42 (Aβ42), tau (T-tau), and phosphorylated tau (p-tau181) gives added diagnostic and prognostic values, the diffusion is still limited in clinical practice and only a restricted number of patients receive an integrated clinico-biological diagnosis. By a survey, we aimed to do a "selfie" of the use and diffusion of CSF biomarkers of dementia in Italy, the standardization of pre-analytical procedures, the harmonization of ranges, and the participation to Quality Control programs. An online questionnaire was sent to the members of SIBioC and SINdem-ITALPLANED and to main neurological clinics all over Italy. In Italy, 25 laboratories provide biomarkers analysis in addition to a network of 15 neighboring hospitals. In sum, 40 neurological centers require CSF analyses. 7/20 regions (35%) lack CSF laboratories. Standardization of pre-analytical procedures is present in 62.02% of the laboratories; only 56.00% of the laboratories participate in International Quality Control. There is no harmonization of cut-offs. In Italy, the use of CSF biomarkers is still limited in clinical practice. Standardization and harmonization of normal ranges are needed. To optimize and expand the use of CSF biomarkers, a cost-benefit analysis should be promoted by scientific societies and national health services.

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid control of neurogenesis induced by retinoic acid during early brain development.

    PubMed

    Alonso, M I; Martín, C; Carnicero, E; Bueno, D; Gato, A

    2011-07-01

    Embryonic-cerebrospinal fluid (E-CSF) plays crucial roles in early brain development including the control of neurogenesis. Although FGF2 and lipoproteins present in the E-CSF have previously been shown to be involved in neurogenesis, the main factor triggering this process remains unknown. E-CSF contains all-trans-retinol and retinol-binding protein involved in the synthesis of retinoic acid (RA), a neurogenesis inducer. In early chick embryo brain, only the mesencephalic-rombencephalic isthmus (IsO) is able to synthesize RA. Here we show that in chick embryo brain development: (1) E-CSF helps to control RA synthesis in the IsO by means of the RBP and all-trans-retinol it contains; (2) E-CSF has retinoic acid activity, which suggests it may act as a diffusion pathway for RA; and (3) the influence of E-CSF on embryonic brain neurogenesis is to a large extent due to its involvement in RA synthesis. These data help to understand neurogenesis from neural progenitor cells.

  10. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for the Diagnosis of Alzheimer Disease in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Won Seok; Kim, Hyeong Jun; Shin, Ho Sik; Kim, Saeromi; Im, Ji Young; Ahn, Sang Il; Min, Kyoung Dae; Yim, Soo Jae; Ye, Byoung Seok; Seo, Sang Won; Jeong, Jee Hyang; Park, Kyung Won; Choi, Seong Hye; Na, Duk L.

    2017-01-01

    Laboratory-specific reference values for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Alzheimer disease (AD) biomarkers are necessary. Our objective was to apply well-known CSF biomarkers and redetermine their diagnostic cutoff values for AD in South Korea. CSF samples from matched control subjects (n=71), patients with AD dementia (ADD, n=76), and other neurological disorders with cognitive decline (OND, n=47) were obtained from 6 Korean dementia clinics according to a standardized protocol. CSF biomarker concentrations were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. CSF biomarkers differed significantly between the ADD and control groups (P<0.001 for all), and between the ADD and OND groups (P<0.001 for all). The areas under the curve in differentiation of ADD from control subjects were 0.97 for Aβ42, 0.93 for total tau (tTau), 0.86 for pTau, and 0.99 for both tTau/Aβ42 and pTau/Aβ42 ratios. Our revised cutoff value for Aβ42 was higher than our previous one, whereas the values for the Tau proteins were similar. The tTau/Aβ42 ratio had the highest accuracy, 97%. Our findings highlight the usefulness of CSF AD biomarkers in South Korea, and the necessity of continually testing the reliability of cutoff values. PMID:28030437

  11. Contemporary Approach to the Diagnosis and Management of Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, Tiffany; Levy, Joshua; Fatakia, Adil; McCoul, Edward D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea, when left untreated, can lead to meningitis and other serious complications. Treatment traditionally has entailed an open craniotomy, although the paradigm has now evolved to encompass endoscopic procedures. Trauma, both accidental and iatrogenic, causes the majority of leaks, and trauma involving skull base and facial fractures is most likely to cause CSF rhinorrhea. Diagnosis is aided by biochemical assay and imaging studies. Methods: We reviewed the literature and summarized current practice regarding the diagnosis and management of CSF rhinorrhea. Results: Management of CSF leaks is dictated by the nature of the fistula, its location, and flow volume. Control of elevated intracranial pressure may require medical therapy or shunt procedures. Surgical reconstruction utilizes a graduated approach involving vascularized, nonvascularized, and adjunctive techniques to achieve closure of the CSF leak. Endoscopic techniques have an important role in select cases. Conclusion: An active surgical approach to closing CSF leaks may provide better long-term outcomes in some patients compared to more conservative management. PMID:27303222

  12. Omentum and reverse turnover latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap for the treatment of cerebrospinal fluid fistula.

    PubMed

    Söyüncü, Yetkin; Bigat, Zekiye; Söyüncü, İlkay; Özkan, Ömer

    2015-01-01

    Conventional procedures can usually prevent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakages, but they may not work for complicated cases. In this case presentation, we demonstrated the effectiveness of combined omental and latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flaps for management of difficult CSF fistula. A reverse turnover latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap and omental flap were transferred for reconstruction of the posterior wound and CSF leakage. The omental flap component was used for CSF absorption, and the latissimus dorsi muscle component was used for obliteration of the dead space, covering of the exposed bone, and tension-free closure of the wound. The wound healed dramatically, with no observed severe donor site morbidity. The patient has been followed for 30 months with no evidence of CSF leakage and no pseudomeningocele formation, which was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Although this is a case presentation, we can say that the combination of the omental and musculocutaneous flaps allow effective treatment and prevention of CSF fistulas in selected high-risk patients and provide durable coverage of complex spinal wounds.

  13. Update on the core and developing cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Babić, Mirjana; Švob Štrac, Dubravka; Mück-Šeler, Dorotea; Pivac, Nela; Stanić, Gabrijela; Hof, Patrick R.; Šimić, Goran

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder, whose prevalence will dramatically rise by 2050. Despite numerous clinical trials investigating this disease, there is still no effective treatment. Many trials showed negative or inconclusive results, possibly because they recruited only patients with severe disease, who had not undergone disease-modifying therapies in preclinical stages of AD before severe degeneration occurred. Detection of AD in asymptomatic at risk individuals (and a few presymptomatic individuals who carry an autosomal dominant monogenic AD mutation) remains impractical in many of clinical situations and is possible only with reliable biomarkers. In addition to early diagnosis of AD, biomarkers should serve for monitoring disease progression and response to therapy. To date, the most promising biomarkers are cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and neuroimaging biomarkers. Core CSF biomarkers (amyloid β1-42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau) showed a high diagnostic accuracy but were still unreliable for preclinical detection of AD. Hence, there is an urgent need for detection and validation of novel CSF biomarkers that would enable early diagnosis of AD in asymptomatic individuals. This article reviews recent research advances on biomarkers for AD, focusing mainly on the CSF biomarkers. In addition to core CSF biomarkers, the potential usefulness of novel CSF biomarkers is discussed. PMID:25165049

  14. Rapid sterilisation of cerebrospinal fluid in meningococcal meningitis: Implications for treatment duration.

    PubMed

    Crosswell, Julie M; Nicholson, W Ross; Lennon, Diana R

    2006-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the time and total cumulative dose of parenteral antibiotic, required to sterilize the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of children presenting with meningococcal meningitis (MM). The study was a retrospective audit of children aged 0-14 years who presented between January 1995 and December 1999 with MM. All cases had a delayed lumbar puncture (LP) at least 1 h after commencing antibiotic therapy and demonstrated at least one of the following: (i) a positive CSF culture of Neisseria meningitidis (n = 6); (ii) Gram negative diplococci on Gram stain (n = 16) or (iii) a positive CSF plasma clearance rate test for N. meningitidis (n = 26). Forty-eight children were identified with a mean age of 4.4 years. The cumulative dose of antibiotic prior to LP, ranged from 22 to 440 mg/kg body weight. All cases (n = 24) who received a cumulative dose of at least 150 mg/kg of antibiotic, prior to LP, had a sterile CSF. No CSF taken more than 5 h after commencing antibiotics grew N. meningitidis. Children in this study with MM had rapid sterilisation of the CSF in less than 6 h. This would support recent recommendations to reduce the duration of antibiotic therapy to 4 days. There is however, lack of long-term data on sequelae with 4 days of treatment.

  15. Connective tissue spectrum abnormalities associated with spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Reinstein, Eyal; Pariani, Mitchel; Bannykh, Serguei; Rimoin, David L; Schievink, Wouter I

    2013-04-01

    We aimed to assess the frequency of connective tissue abnormalities among patients with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks in a prospective study using a large cohort of patients. We enrolled a consecutive group of 50 patients, referred for consultation because of CSF leak. All patients have been carefully examined for the presence of connective tissue abnormalities, and based on findings, patients underwent genetic testing. Ancillary diagnostic studies included echocardiography, eye exam, and histopathological examinations of skin and dura biopsies in selected patients. We identified nine patients with heritable connective tissue disorders, including Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and other unclassified forms. In seven patients, spontaneous CSF leak was the first noted manifestation of the genetic disorder. We conclude that spontaneous CSF leaks are associated with a spectrum of connective tissue abnormalities and may be the first noted clinical presentation of the genetic disorder. We propose that there is a clinical basis for considering spontaneous CSF leak as a clinical manifestation of heritable connective tissue disorders, and we suggest that patients with CSF leaks should be screened for connective tissue and vascular abnormalities.

  16. Cerebrospinal Fluid Metabolomics After Natural Product Treatment in an Experimental Model of Cerebral Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Huan, Tao; Xian, Jia Wen; Leung, Wing Nang; Li, Liang; Chan, Chun Wai

    2016-11-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is an important biofluid for diagnosis of and research on neurological diseases. However, in-depth metabolomic profiling of CSF remains an analytical challenge due to the small volume of samples, particularly in small animal models. In this work, we report the application of a high-performance chemical isotope labeling (CIL) liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) workflow for CSF metabolomics in Gastrodia elata and Uncaria rhynchophylla water extract (GUW)-treated experimental cerebral ischemia model of rat. The GUW is a commonly used Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) for hypertension and brain disease. This study investigated the amine- and phenol-containing biomarkers in the CSF metabolome. After GUW treatment for 7 days, the neurological deficit score was significantly improved with infarct volume reduction, while the integrity of brain histological structure was preserved. Over 1957 metabolites were quantified in CSF by dansylation LC-MS. The analysis of this comprehensive list of metabolites suggests that metabolites associated with oxidative stress, inflammatory response, and excitotoxicity change during GUW-induced alleviation of ischemic injury. This work is significant in that (1) it shows CIL LC-MS can be used for in-depth profiling of the CSF metabolome in experimental ischemic stroke and (2) identifies several potential molecular targets (that might mediate the central nervous system) and associate with pharmacodynamic effects of some frequently used TCMs.

  17. Red blood cells in cerebrospinal fluid as possible inhibitory factor for enterovirus RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Sérgio Monteiro de; Raboni, Sônia Mara; Nogueira, Meri Bordignon; Vidal, Luine R Renaud

    2016-10-01

    The presence of hemoglobin in samples are considered an important inhibitory factor for polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The aim of this study was to examine the influence of red blood cells (RBC)s in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as an inhibitory factor to reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for enteroviruses (EV). Forty-four CSF samples from patients showing characteristics of viral meningitis were assessed for EV by RT-PCR. Viral RNA extracted with guanidine isothyocianate buffer and virus detection was performed by in-house nested PCR. Positivity for EV RT-PCR was higher in CSF samples without RBCs than in samples with RBCs: 13(26%) and 36(9.2%), p = 0.001. In the group with positive EV RT-PCR, the mean + SD CSF RBC was 37 ± 183 cell/mm3; the group with negative results had 580 + 2,890 cell/mm3 (p = 0.007). The acceptable upper limit for CSF RBCs that could not influence RT-PCR was 108 cells/mm3. CSF samples with negative results for EV RT-PCR have more erythrocytes.

  18. Sandwich Wound Closure Reduces the Risk of Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks in Posterior Fossa Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Heymanns, Verena; Oseni, Abidemi W.; Alyeldien, Ameer; Maslehaty, Homajoun; Parvin, Richard; Scholz, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Posterior fossa surgery is demanding and hides a significant number of obstacles starting from the approach to the wound closure. The risk of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage in posterior fossa surgery given in the literature is around 8%. The present study aims to introduce a sandwich closure of the dura in posterior fossa surgery, which reduces significantly the number of CSF leaks (3.8%) in the patients treated in our department. Three hundred and ten patients treated in our hospital in the years 2009-2013 for posterior fossa pathologies were retrospectively evaluated. The dura closure method was as following: lyophilized dura put under the dura and sealed with fibrin glue and sutures, dura adapting stitches, TachoSil® (Takeda Pharma A/S, Roskilde, Denmark), Gelfoam® (Pfizer Inc., New York, NY, USA) and polymethylmethacrylate (osteoclastic craniotomy). The incidence of postsurgical complications associated with the dural closure like CSF leakage, infections, bleeding is evaluated. Only 3.8% of patients developed CSF leakage and only 0.5% needed a second surgery for CSF leakage closure. Two percent had a cerebellar bleeding with no need for re-operation and 3% had a wound infection treated with antibiotics. The sandwich wound closure we are applying for posterior fossa surgery in our patients correlates with a significant reduction of CSF leaks compared to the literature. PMID:27478578

  19. Fibrinogen is not elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Elevated plasma fibrinogen levels are a well known finding in acute infectious diseases, acute stroke and myocardial infarction. However its role in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of acute and chronic central (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS) diseases is unclear. Findings We analyzed CSF and plasma fibrinogen levels together with routine parameters in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), acute inflammatory diseases of the CNS (bacterial and viral meningoencephalitis, BM and VM) and PNS (Guillain-Barré syndrome; GBS), as well as in non-inflammatory neurological controls (OND) in a total of 103 patients. Additionally, MS patients underwent cerebral MRI scans at time of lumbar puncture. CSF and plasma fibrinogen levels were significantly lower in patients with MS and OND patients as compared to patients with BM, VM and GBS. There was a close correlation between fibrinogen levels and albumin quotient (rho = 0.769, p < 0.001) which strongly suggests passive transfer of fibrinogen through the blood-CSF-barrier during acute inflammation. Hence, in MS, the prototype of chronic neuroinflammation, CSF fibrinogen levels were not elevated and could not be correlated to clinical and neuroradiological outcome parameters. Conclusions Although previous work has shown clear evidence of the involvement of fibrinogen in MS pathogenesis, this is not accompanied by increased fibrinogen in the CSF compartment. PMID:22029888

  20. Value of protein concentration in cerebrospinal fluid in paediatric patients with Guillain-Barre syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vidrio-Becerra, Martha Esther; Valle-Leal, Jaime; Loaiza-Sarabia, María Enriqueta; Alvarez-Bastidas, Lucia; Lachica-Valle, Jesus Ignacio; López-Morales, Cruz Mónica

    2017-09-01

    The albumin-cytologic dissociation in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) supports the diagnosis of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) but does not support the prognosis, so the aim of this study is to determine the usefulness of protein numbers in the CSF to predict progression in paediatric patients. A diagnostic test was performed in paediatric patients with GBS, analysing sociodemographic, clinical and protein variables in CSF as well as electromyography. The presence of dysautonomia was also documented. Data were analysed from 23 patients, predominantly males (87%), school age (43.5%) and history of digestive infection (73.9%). Using the ROC curve, an area under the curve of 0.966 with best CSF protein cut-off point of 87-92 proteins/mm was found for the presence of dysautonomias and to evaluate the poor response to treatment with 0.969 intravenous immunoglobulin with better cut-off point in 157 proteins/mm. The amount of proteins in the CSF can be used as a prognostic indicator and severity, such that proteins greater than 100 in CSF translate into a torpid evolution and with greater complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Dural Defect Repair in Translabyrinthine Acoustic Neuroma Surgery and Its Implications in Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak Occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Netto, Aloysio Augusto Tahan de Campos; Colafêmina, José Fernando; Centeno, Ricardo Silva

    2012-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak is a complication that may occur after translabyrinthine (translab) acoustic neuroma (AN) removal. The aim of this study is to verify the incidence of CSF leak using two techniques for dural defect closure in translab AN surgery and present a new technique for dural repair. A retrospective study was held, reviewing charts of 34 patients in a tertiary neurotologic referral center. Out of these 34 patients that underwent translab AN excision in a 1-year period, 18 had their dural defect repaired using only abdominal fat graft and 16 using synthetic dura substitute (SDS) plus abdominal fat tissue. One patient (5.5%) in the first group had CSF leak and 1 (6.2%) in the second group had CSF leak postoperatively. Our data suggest that there are no significant differences in CSF leak rates using both techniques, although studies in a larger series must be undertaken to conclude it. We believe that the development of some points in the new technique for dural repair can achieve better results and reduce the CSF leak incidence in the translabyrinthine acoustic neuroma surgery in the near future. PMID:24083124

  2. Delivery of ziconotide to cerebrospinal fluid via intranasal pathway for the treatment of chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Manda, Prashanth; Kushwaha, Avadhesh Singh; Kundu, Santanu; Shivakumar, H N; Jo, Seong Bong; Murthy, S Narasimha

    2016-02-28

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the plausibility of delivery of ziconotide to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) via intranasal administration. Ziconotide was administered either in the form of solution or Kolliphor P 407 gels (KP 407) intranasally in Sprague-Dawley rats. The effect of incorporation of chitosan in the formulation was also investigated. Time course of drug in the CSF was investigated by collecting CSF from cisterna magna. Pharmacokinetics of ziconotide in CSF following intrathecal and intravenous (i.v.) administration of ziconotide was investigated. Upon intrathecal administration the elimination rate constant of ziconotide in CSF was found to be 1.01±0.34h(-1). The Cmax and Tmax of ziconotide in CSF following intravenous administration were found to be 37.78±6.8ng/mL and ~2h respectively. The time required to attain maximum concentration (Tmax) in CSF was less upon intranasal administration (15min) compared to i.v. administration (120min). Presence of chitosan enhanced the overall bioavailability of ziconotide from intranasal solution and gel formulations. The elimination rate constant of ziconotide in CSF following intranasal and intravenous administration of ziconotide solution was found to be 0.54±0.08h(-1) and 0.42±0.10h(-1) respectively. Whereas, intranasal administration of ziconotide in the form of in situ forming gel lowered the elimination rate significantly. These results suggest that intranasal administration could be a potential noninvasive and patient compliant method of delivering ziconotide to CSF to treat chronic pain.

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid asparagine depletion during pegylated asparaginase therapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Louise T; Nersting, Jacob; Raja, Raheel A; Frandsen, Thomas L; Rosthøj, Steen; Schrøder, Henrik; Albertsen, Birgitte K

    2014-07-01

    L-asparaginase is an important drug in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) asparagine depletion is considered a marker of asparaginase effect in the central nervous system (CNS) and may play a role in CNS-directed anti-leukaemia therapy. The objective of this study was to describe CSF asparagine depletion during 30 weeks of pegylated asparaginase therapy, 1000 iu/m(2) i.m. every second week, and to correlate CSF asparagine concentration with serum L-asparaginase enzyme activity. Danish children (1-17 years) with ALL, treated according to the Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology ALL2008 protocol, standard and intermediate risk, were included. CSF samples were obtained throughout L-asparaginase treatment at every scheduled lumbar puncture. A total of 128 samples from 31 patients were available for analysis. Median CSF asparagine concentration decreased from a pre-treatment level of 5·3 μmol/l to median levels ≤1·5 μmol/l. However, only 4/31 patients (five samples) had CSF asparagine concentrations below the limit of detection (0·1 μmol/l). In 11 patients, 24 paired same day serum and CSF samples were obtained. A decrease in CSF asparagine corresponded to serum enzyme activities above 50 iu/l. Higher serum enzyme activities were not followed by more extensive depletion. In conclusion, pegylated asparaginase 1000 iu/m(2) i.m. every second week effectively reduced CSF asparagine levels.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole in serum and cerebrospinal fluid of adult patients with normal meninges.

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, M N; Levitz, R E; Quintiliani, R; Hickingbotham, J M; Nightingale, C H

    1984-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of trimethoprim (TMP) and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum after a single intravenous infusion of 5 mg of TMP and 25 mg of SMX per kg of body weight over approximately 120 min were studied i nine patients who had uninflamed meninges and were undergoing elective myelography. Peak concentrations of TMP and SMX in CSF were 1 microgram/ml and 13.8 micrograms/ml, respectively. The peak TMP concentration in CSF occurred significantly earlier than the peak SMX concentration (60 versus 480 min postinfusion). At 15 h, there was no detectable TMP in the CSF, and there was 4.7 micrograms of SMX per ml of CSF. In the postdistribution phase (in CSF), simultaneous CSF-to-serum concentration ratios ranged from 0.23 to 0.53 for TMP and from 0.20 to 0.36 for SMX. CSF penetration (measured by comparison of the area under the curve of the composite CSF and serum concentration-time curves) was 18% for TMP and 12% for SMX. A loading dose of TMP-SMX (bases on TMP) of 10 to 12 mg/kg and a maintenance dose of 6 mg/kg every 8 h or 8 mg/kg every 12 h (with a 2-h infusion) should yield steady-state peak concentrations of at least 5 micrograms of TMP per ml of serum and 160 micrograms of SMX per ml of serum. Further studies of TMP-SMX administered in these doses in the treatment of serious bacterial infection, including meningitis, are warranted. PMID:6335381

  5. Quantification of mutant huntingtin protein in cerebrospinal fluid from Huntington's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Wild, Edward J; Boggio, Roberto; Langbehn, Douglas; Robertson, Nicola; Haider, Salman; Miller, James R C; Zetterberg, Henrik; Leavitt, Blair R; Kuhn, Rainer; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Macdonald, Douglas; Weiss, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    Quantification of disease-associated proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been critical for the study and treatment of several neurodegenerative disorders; however, mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT), the cause of Huntington's disease (HD), is at very low levels in CSF and, to our knowledge, has never been measured previously. We developed an ultrasensitive single-molecule counting (SMC) mHTT immunoassay that was used to quantify mHTT levels in CSF samples from individuals bearing the HD mutation and from control individuals in 2 independent cohorts. This SMC mHTT immunoassay demonstrated high specificity for mHTT, high sensitivity with a femtomolar detection threshold, and a broad dynamic range. Analysis of the CSF samples showed that mHTT was undetectable in CSF from all controls but quantifiable in nearly all mutation carriers. The mHTT concentration in CSF was approximately 3-fold higher in patients with manifest HD than in premanifest mutation carriers. Moreover, mHTT levels increased as the disease progressed and were associated with 5-year onset probability. The mHTT concentration independently predicted cognitive and motor dysfunction. Furthermore, the level of mHTT was associated with the concentrations of tau and neurofilament light chain in the CSF, suggesting a neuronal origin for the detected mHTT. We have demonstrated that mHTT can be quantified in CSF from HD patients using the described SMC mHTT immunoassay. Moreover, the level of mHTT detected is associated with proximity to disease onset and diminished cognitive and motor function. The ability to quantify CSF mHTT will facilitate the study of HD, and mHTT quantification could potentially serve as a biomarker for the development and testing of experimental mHTT-lowering therapies for HD. Not applicable. CHDI Foundation Inc.; Medical Research Council (MRC) UK; National Institutes for Health Research (NIHR); Rosetrees Trust; Swedish Research Council; and Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation.

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid neuropeptide Y in combat veterans with and without posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Sah, Renu; Ekhator, Nosakhare N; Jefferson-Wilson, Lena; Horn, Paul S; Geracioti, Thomas D

    2014-02-01

    Accruing evidence indicates that neuropeptide Y (NPY), a peptide neurotransmitter, is a resilience-to-stress factor in humans. We previously reported reduced cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) NPY concentrations in combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) subjects as compared with healthy, non-combat-exposed volunteers. Here we report CSF NPY in combat-exposed veterans with and without PTSD. We quantified NPY concentrations in morning CSF from 11 male subjects with PTSD from combat in Iraq and/or Afghanistan and from 14 combat-exposed subjects without PTSD. NPY-like immunoreactivity (NPY-LI) was measured by EIA. The relationship between CSF NPY and clinical symptoms, as measured by the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), was assessed, as was the relationship between combat exposure scale (CES) scores and CSF NPY. As compared with the combat-exposed comparison subjects without PTSD, individuals with PTSD had significantly lower concentrations of CSF NPY [mean CSF NPY was 258. 6 ± 21.64 pg/mL in the combat trauma-no PTSD group but only 180.5 ± 12.62 pg/mL in PTSD patients (p=0.008)]. After adjusting for CES and BDI scores the two groups were still significantly different with respect to NPY. Importantly, CSF NPY was negatively correlated with composite CAPS score and intrusive (re-experiencing) subscale scores, but did not significantly correlate with CES or BDI scores. Our current findings further suggest that NPY may regulate the manifestation of PTSD symptomatology, and extend previous observations of low CSF NPY concentrations in the disorder. Central nervous system NPY may be a clinically important pharmacotherapeutic target, and/or diagnostic measure, for PTSD. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Impact of frequent cerebrospinal fluid sampling on Aβ levels: systematic approach to elucidate influencing factors.

    PubMed

    Van Broeck, Bianca; Timmers, Maarten; Ramael, Steven; Bogert, Jennifer; Shaw, Leslie M; Mercken, Marc; Slemmon, John; Van Nueten, Luc; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Streffer, Johannes Rolf

    2016-05-19

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides are predictive biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease and are proposed as pharmacodynamic markers for amyloid-lowering therapies. However, frequent sampling results in fluctuating CSF Aβ levels that have a tendency to increase compared with baseline. The impact of sampling frequency, volume, catheterization procedure, and ibuprofen pretreatment on CSF Aβ levels using continuous sampling over 36 h was assessed. In this open-label biomarker study, healthy participants (n = 18; either sex, age 55-85 years) were randomized into one of three cohorts (n = 6/cohort; high-frequency sampling). In all cohorts except cohort 2 (sampling started 6 h post catheterization), sampling through lumbar catheterization started immediately post catheterization. Cohort 3 received ibuprofen (800 mg) before catheterization. Following interim data review, an additional cohort 4 (n = 6) with an optimized sampling scheme (low-frequency and lower volume) was included. CSF Aβ(1-37), Aβ(1-38), Aβ(1-40), and Aβ(1-42) levels were analyzed. Increases and fluctuations in mean CSF Aβ levels occurred in cohorts 1-3 at times of high-frequency sampling. Some outliers were observed (cohorts 2 and 3) with an extreme pronunciation of this effect. Cohort 4 demonstrated minimal fluctuation of CSF Aβ both on a group and an individual level. Intersubject variability in CSF Aβ profiles over time was observed in all cohorts. CSF Aβ level fluctuation upon catheterization primarily depends on the sampling frequency and volume, but not on the catheterization procedure or inflammatory reaction. An optimized low-frequency sampling protocol minimizes or eliminates fluctuation of CSF Aβ levels, which will improve the capability of accurately measuring the pharmacodynamic read-out for amyloid-lowering therapies. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01436188 . Registered 15 September 2011.

  8. Time-related change evaluation of the cerebrospinal fluid using postmortem CT.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Kohei; Hyodoh, Hideki; Matoba, Kotaro; Mizuo, Keisuke; Okazaki, Shunichiro; Watanabe, Satoshi

    2016-09-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) CT density at the lateral ventricle to compare the postmortem intervals in cadavers. The number of cadavers enrolled in this study was 189 (male 120, female 69). According to the estimated postmortem time, the cadavers were divided into 13 groups (postmortem day 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 7, 10, 14, 21, 30), and were also re-grouped into 3 groups according to the postmortem time-width: group A (postmortem day 0.5-2.5), group B (day 3-7), and group C (day 10-30). Comparisons between the CSF density and estimated postmortem time were also analyzed. The CSF density was around 20HU up to day 2.5, and it increased gradually after day 3. Day 3 and 4 presented higher CSF density than day 1 and 1.5 (p<0.05). Day 7 presented higher CSF density than day 3 (p<0.05). According to the postmortem time-width, the CSF density increased with postmortem time (p<0.05). The simple linear regression equations presented negative correlation between CSF density and estimated postmortem time, and R(2) was 0.119. The CSF density increased, but not linearly, according to the postmortem time, and the 3rd postmortem day was the earliest time allowing the difference to be detected. The CSF density needs further evaluation to enable estimation of the postmortem time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Chronic lead exposure alters transthyretin concentration in rat cerebrospinal fluid: the role of the choroid plexus.

    PubMed

    Zheng, W; Shen, H; Blaner, W S; Zhao, Q; Ren, X; Graziano, J H

    1996-08-01

    The choroid plexus, which is responsible for the maintenance of the biochemical milieu of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), avidly sequesters Pb. In order to test the hypothesis that chronic Pb exposure may impair choroid plexus function, male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to Pb in drinking water at doses of 0, 50, or 250 micrograms Pb/ml (as Pb acetate) for 30, 60, or 90 days. The function of the choroid plexus was assessed as reflected by CSF concentrations of transthyretin (TTR, a major CSF protein manufactured by brain choroid plexus) and CSF essential metal ions (Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, and Na+). TTR concentrations were determined by radioimmunoassay using a monospecific rabbit anti-rat TTR polyclonal antibody, and CSF metal ions analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Two-way ANOVA of CSF TTR concentrations revealed highly significant dose (p < 0.0001), time (p < 0.0223), and dose-by-time effects (p < 0.0379). Moreover, the percentage of reduction of CSF TTR was directly correlated with Pb concentrations in the choroid plexus (r = 0.703, p < 0.05). Pb exposure significantly increased CSF concentrations of Mg2+, but did not markedly altered CSF concentrations of Ca2+, K+, and Na+. Histopathologic examination under the light microscope did not show distinct alterations of plexus structure in Pb-treated rats. Since TTR is responsible for transport of thyroid hormones to the developing brain, we postulate that the depression of choroid plexus TTR production (and/or secretion) by Pb may impair brain development in young animals by depriving the CNS of thyroid hormones.

  10. Cerebrospinal Fluid and Parenchymal Brain Development and Growth in the Healthy Fetus.

    PubMed

    Andescavage, Nickie N; DuPlessis, Adre; McCarter, Robert; Vezina, Gilbert; Robertson, Richard; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to apply quantitative magnetic resonance imaging to characterize absolute cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) development, as well as its relative development to fetal brain parenchyma in the healthy human fetus. We created three-dimensional high-resolution reconstructions of the developing brain for healthy fetuses between 18 and 40 weeks' gestation, segmented the parenchymal and CSF spaces, and calculated the volumes for the lateral, third, and fourth ventricles; extra-axial CSF space; and the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brainstem. From these data, we constructed normograms of the resulting volumes according to gestational age and described the relative development of CSF to fetal brain parenchyma. Each CSF space demonstrated major increases in volumetric growth during the second half of gestation: third ventricle (23-fold), extra-axial CSF (11-fold), fourth ventricle (8-fold), and lateral ventricle (2-fold). Total CSF volume was related to total brain volume (p < 0.01), as was lateral ventricle to cerebral volume (p < 0.01); however, the fourth ventricle was not related to cerebellar or brainstem volume (p = 0.18-0.19). Abnormalities of the CSF spaces are the most common anomalies of neurologic development detected on fetal screening using neurosonography. Normative values of absolute CSF volume, as well as relative growth in comparison to intracranial parenchyma, provide valuable insight into normal fetal neurodevelopment. These data may provide important biomarkers of early deviations from normal growth, better distinguish between benign variants and early disease, and serve as reference standards for postnatal growth and development in the premature infant. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. How yawning switches the default-mode network to the attentional network by activating the cerebrospinal fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, Olivier

    2014-03-01

    Yawning is a behavior to which little research has been devoted. However, its purpose has not yet been demonstrated and remains controversial. In this article, we propose a new theory involving the brain network that is functional during the resting state, that is, the default mode network. When this network is active, yawning manifests a process of switching to the attentional system through its capacity to increase circulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), thereby increasing clearance of somnogenic factors (prostaglandin D(2), adenosine, and others) accumulating in the cerebrospinal fluid. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Dinosaur Tail Sign: A Useful Spinal MRI Finding Indicative of Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Keita; Kanoto, Masafumi; Nakagawa, Motoo; Shimohira, Masashi; Tokumaru, Aya M; Kameyama, Masashi; Shimoji, Keigo; Morimoto, Satoru; Matsukawa, Noriyuki; Nishio, Minoru; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the imaging characteristics and diagnostic utility of the "Dinosaur tail sign" in the diagnosis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. The authors propose the "Dinosaur tail sign," defined as a combination of the dorsal epidural hyperintensities, fat tissue, spinal cord, and cauda equine on lumbosacral sagittal fat-suppressed T2-weighted image (FST2WI), as a sensitive indicator for diagnosing CSF leakage. Imaging characteristics of the "Dinosaur tail sign" was evaluated in seven spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) and 23 iatrogenic CSF leakage (ICSFL) patients. Additionally, the diagnostic index was compared between the "Dinosaur tail sign" and other previously reported useful magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance myelography (MRM) findings. In contrast to other imaging findings including the epidural expansion, floating dural sac sign, and distension of the spinal epidural veins on MRI, and paraspinal fluid collections (PFC) on MRM, the "Dinosaur tail sign" was found equally in both SIH and ICSFL patients (6 SIH and 19 ICSFL; 83% of all patients with CSF leakage). The "Dinosaur tail sign" showed sufficient diagnostic utility (sensitivity 83%, specificity 94%, accuracy 89%) that was comparable to that of PFC. The "Dinosaur tail sign" is a useful imaging finding suggestive of CSF leakage. Evaluation of subtle interspinous arched hyperintensities on spinal MRI is mandatory for the diagnosis of SIH and ICSFL. © 2017 American Headache Society.

  13. Reference measurement procedures for Alzheimer's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers: definitions and approaches with focus on amyloid β42.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Niklas; Zegers, Ingrid; Andreasson, Ulf; Bjerke, Maria; Blankenstein, Marinus A; Bowser, Robert; Carrillo, Maria C; Gobom, Johan; Heath, Theresa; Jenkins, Rand; Jeromin, Andreas; Kaplow, June; Kidd, Daniel; Laterza, Omar F; Lockhart, Andrew; Lunn, Michael P; Martone, Robert L; Mills, Kevin; Pannee, Josef; Ratcliffe, Marianne; Shaw, Leslie M; Simon, Adam J; Soares, Holly; Teunissen, Charlotte E; Verbeek, Marcel M; Umek, Robert M; Vanderstichele, Hugo; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Portelius, Erik

    2012-08-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease (AD) are increasingly used in clinical settings, research and drug trials. However, their broad-scale use on different technology platforms is hampered by the lack of standardization at the level of sample handling, determination of concentrations of analytes and the absence of well-defined performance criteria for in vitro diagnostic or companion diagnostic assays, which influences the apparent concentration of the analytes measured and the subsequent interpretation of the data. There is a need for harmonization of CSF AD biomarker assays that can reliably, across centers, quantitate CSF biomarkers with high analytical precision, selectivity and stability over long time periods. In this position paper, we discuss reference procedures for the measurement of CSF AD biomarkers, especially amyloid β42 and tau. We describe possible technical approaches, focusing on a selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry assay as a candidate reference method for quantification of CSF amyloid β42.

  14. C-terminal fragments of the amyloid precursor protein in cerebrospinal fluid as potential biomarkers for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    García-Ayllón, María-Salud; Lopez-Font, Inmaculada; Boix, Claudia P; Fortea, Juan; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Lleó, Alberto; Molinuevo, José-Luis; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Sáez-Valero, Javier

    2017-05-30

    This study assesses whether C-terminal fragments (CTF) of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) are present in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and their potential as biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Immunoprecipitation and simultaneous assay by Western blotting using multiplex fluorescence imaging with specific antibodies against particular domains served to characterize CTFs of APP in human CSF. We demonstrate that APP-CTFs are detectable in human CSF, being the most abundant a 25-kDa fragment, probably resulting from proteolytic processing by η-secretase. The level of the 25-kDa APP-CTF was evaluated in three independent CSF sample sets of patients and controls. The CSF level of this 25-kDa CTF is higher in subjects with autosomal dominant AD linked to PSEN1 mutations, in demented Down syndrome individuals and in sporadic AD subjects compared to age-matched controls. Our data suggest that APP-CTF could be a potential diagnostic biomarker for AD.

  15. An example of genetically distinct HIV type 1 variants in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma during suppressive therapy.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Viktor; Gisslen, Magnus; Hagberg, Lars; Peterson, Julia; Shao, Wei; Spudich, Serena; Price, Richard W; Palmer, Sarah

    2014-05-15

    We sequenced the genome of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) recovered from 70 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens and 29 plasma samples and corresponding samples obtained before treatment initiation from 17 subjects receiving suppressive therapy. More CSF sequences than plasma sequences were hypermutants. We determined CSF sequences and plasma sequences in specimens obtained from 2 subjects after treatment initiation. In one subject, we found genetically distinct CSF and plasma sequences, indicating that they came from HIV-1 from 2 different compartments, one potentially the central nervous system, during suppressive therapy. In addition, there was little evidence of viral evolution in the CSF during therapy, suggesting that continuous virus replication is not the major cause of viral persistence in the central nervous system.

  16. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 is present in the cerebrospinal fluid of a majority of infected individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Chiodi, F; Keys, B; Albert, J; Hagberg, L; Lundeberg, J; Uhlén, M; Fenyö, E M; Norkrans, G

    1992-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens from 63 patients with different severities of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection, including asymptomatic virus carriers, were examined for the presence of HIV-1 by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and virus isolation. Polyadenylated RNA, presumably associated with virus particles, was extracted and reverse transcribed, and the pol region was amplified in a nested PCR. Virus could be detected in 90% of the CSF specimens examined by PCR, and data on isolation of virus from CSF were in agreement with these figures. In fact, when several CSF specimens from the same individual were studied, HIV-1 could be isolated from 80% of the patients. The presence of the viral RNA in CSF was independent of the clinical stage of infection and of neurological symptoms. These results show that the spread of HIV-1 to the brain represents an early event during infection and occurs in the majority of asymptomatic individuals. PMID:1629333

  17. Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Detection of Angiostrongylus cantonensis DNA in Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Eosinophilic Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Xayavong, Maniphet; da Silva, Ana Cristina Aramburu; Park, Sarah Y; Whelen, A Christian; Calimlim, Precilia S; Sciulli, Rebecca H; Honda, Stacey A A; Higa, Karen; Kitsutani, Paul; Chea, Nora; Heng, Seng; Johnson, Stuart; Graeff-Teixeira, Carlos; Fox, LeAnne M; da Silva, Alexandre J

    2016-01-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is the most common infectious cause of eosinophilic meningitis. Timely diagnosis of these infections is difficult, partly because reliable laboratory diagnostic methods are unavailable. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the detection of A. cantonensis DNA in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens. A total of 49 CSF specimens from 33 patients with eosinophilic meningitis were included: A. cantonensis DNA was detected in 32 CSF specimens, from 22 patients. Four patients had intermittently positive and negative real-time PCR results on subsequent samples, indicating that the level of A. cantonensis DNA present in CSF may fluctuate during the course of the illness. Immunodiagnosis and/or supplemental PCR testing supported the real-time PCR findings for 30 patients. On the basis of these observations, this real-time PCR assay can be useful to detect A. cantonensis in the CSF from patients with eosinophilic meningitis.

  18. Changes in serum and cerebrospinal fluid cytokines in response to non-neurological surgery: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Surgery launches an inflammatory reaction in the body, as seen through increased peripheral levels of cytokines and cortisol. However, less is known about perioperative inflammatory changes in the central nervous system (CNS). Our aim was to compare inflammatory markers in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) before and after surgery and evaluate their association with measures of blood–brain barrier (BBB) integrity. Methods Thirty-five patients undergoing knee arthroplastic surgery with spinal anesthesia had CSF and serum samples drawn before, after and on the morning following surgery. Cytokines and albumin in serum and CSF and cortisol in CSF were assessed at all three points. Results Cytokines and cortisol were significantly increased in serum and CSF after surgery (Ps <0.01) and CSF increases were greater than in serum. Ten individuals had an increased cytokine response and significantly higher CSF/serum albumin ratios (Ps <0.01), five of whom had albumin ratios in the pathological range (>11.8). Serum and CSF levels of cytokines were unrelated, but there were strong correlations between CSF IL-2, IL-10 and IL-13, and albumin ratios (Ps <0.05) following surgery. Conclusion Cytokine increases in the CNS were substantially greater than in serum, indicating that the CNS inflammatory system is activated during peripheral surgery and may be regulated separately from that in the peripheral body. CSF cytokine increase may indicate sensitivity to trauma and is linked to BBB macromolecular permeability. PMID:23095517

  19. Alzheimer's disease: Elevated pigment epithelium-derived factor in the cerebrospinal fluid is mostly of systemic origin.

    PubMed

    Lang, Veronika; Zille, Marietta; Infante-Duarte, Carmen; Jarius, Sven; Jahn, Holger; Paul, Friedemann; Ruprecht, Klemens; Pina, Ana Luisa

    2017-04-15

    Pigment-epithelium derived factor (PEDF) is a neurotrophic factor with neuroprotective, anti-tumorigenic, and anti-angiogenic effects. Elevated levels of PEDF have previously been proposed as a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker for Alzheimer's disease. However, the origin of PEDF in CSF, i.e. whether it is derived from the brain or from the systemic circulation, and the specificity of this finding hitherto remained unclear. Here, we analyzed levels of PEDF in paired CSF and serum samples by ELISA in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD, n=12), frontotemporal dementia (FTD, n=6), vascular dementia (n=4), bacterial meningitis (n=8), multiple sclerosis (n=32), pseudotumor cerebri (n=36), and diverse non-inflammatory neurological diseases (n=19). We established CSF/serum quotient diagrams to determine the fraction of intrathecally synthesized PEDF in CSF. We found that PEDF is significantly increased in CSF of patients with AD, FTD, and bacterial meningitis. Remarkably, PEDF concentrations were also significantly elevated in serum of patients with AD. CSF/serum quotient diagrams demonstrated that elevated PEDF concentrations in CSF of patients with AD are mostly due to elevated PEDF concentrations in serum. These findings underscore the importance of relating concentrations of proteins in CSF to their respective concentrations in serum to avoid erroneous interpretations of increased protein concentrations in lumbar CSF.

  20. Cerebrospinal fluid findings after epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Chatzikonstantinou, Anastasios; Ebert, Anne D; Hennerici, Michael G

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to evaluate ictally-induced CSF parameter changes after seizures in adult patients without acute inflammatory diseases or infectious diseases associated with the central nervous system. In total, 151 patients were included in the study. All patients were admitted to our department of neurology following acute seizures and received an extensive work-up including EEG, cerebral imaging, and CSF examinations. CSF protein elevation was found in most patients (92; 60.9%) and was significantly associated with older age, male sex, and generalized seizures. Abnormal CSF-to-serum glucose ratio was found in only nine patients (5.9%) and did not show any significant associations. CSF lactate was elevated in 34 patients (22.5%) and showed a significant association with focal seizures with impaired consciousness, status epilepticus, the presence of EEG abnormalities in general and epileptiform potentials in particular, as well as epileptogenic lesions on cerebral imaging. Our results indicate that non-inflammatory CSF elevation of protein and lactate after epileptic seizures is relatively common, in contrast to changes in CSF-to-serum glucose ratio, and further suggest that these changes are caused by ictal activity and are related to seizure type and intensity. We found no indication that these changes may have further-reaching pathological implications besides their postictal character.

  1. Effect of Cerebrospinal Fluid Modelling on Spherically Convergent Shear Waves during Blunt Head Trauma.

    PubMed

    Madhukar, Amit; Chen, Ying; Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    2017-03-14

    The MRI-based computational model, previously validated by tagged MRI and HARP imaging analysis technique on in vivo human brain deformation, is employed to study transient wave dynamics during blunt head trauma. Three different constitutive models are used for the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF): incompressible solid elastic, viscoelastic and fluid-like elastic using an equation of state model. Three impact cases are simulated which indicate that the blunt impacts give rise not only to a fast pressure wave but also to a slow, and potentially much more damaging, shear (distortional) wave that converges spherically towards the brain center. The wave amplification due to spherical geometry is balanced by damping due to tissues' viscoelasticity and the heterogeneous brain structure, suggesting a stochastic competition of these two opposite effects. It is observed that this convergent shear wave is dependent on the constitutive property of the CSF whereas the peak pressure is not as significantly affected.

  2. New understanding of the role of cerebrospinal fluid: offsetting of arterial and brain pulsation and self-dissipation of cerebrospinal fluid pulsatile flow energy.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyung Jay; Yoon, Soo Han; Kang, Jae-Kyu

    2011-06-01

    Many theories have been postulated to date regarding the mechanisms involved in the absorption of the intracranial arterial blood flow energy in the intracranial space, but it is as yet nor clearly defined. The blood flow energy that is transmitted from the heart formulates the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pulsatile flow, and is known to constitute the major energy of the CSF flow, while the bulk flow carries only small energy. The intracranial space that is enclosed in a solid cranium and is an isolate system as in the Monroe-Kellie doctrine, and the authors propose to re-analyze the Monroe-Kellie doctrine concept in terms of energy transfer and dissipation of the Windkessel effect. We propose that the large blood flow energy that initiates in the heart is transferred in order of precedence to the arteries, arterioles, brain parenchyma, and finally to CSF within the cranium, in which the energy is confined and unable to be transferred, so that the final transfer of energy to the CSF pulsatile flow is self-dissipated in terms of direction and chronology in CSF pulsatile flow. In order for the CSF pulsatile flow that is transferred from arterial blood flow energy to be dissipated in the intracranial space, this cannot be explained with bulk flow energy in any perspective, since the pulsatile flow kinetic energy is greater than the bulk flow kinetic energy by at least a 100-fold. The pulsatile flow energy within the closed intracranial space cannot be transferred and is confined, as postulated by the Monroe-Kellie doctrine, and therefore the authors propound that the pulsatile flow dissipates by itself. The dissipation of the CSF pulsatile flow kinetic energy will be in all directions in a diffuse and random manner, and is offset by the CSF flow energy vector due to the CSF mixing process. Such energy dissipation will lead to maintenance of low CSF flow energy, which will result in maintaining low intracranial pressure (ICP), and sufficient brain perfusion. It is our

  3. Evidence for Elevated Cerebrospinal Fluid ERK1/2 Levels in Alzheimer Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Spitzer, Philipp; Schieb, Heinke; Kamrowski-Kruck, Heike; Otto, Markus; Chiasserini, Davide; Parnetti, Lucilla; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa; Schuchhardt, Johannes; Wiltfang, Jens; Klafki, Hans-Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from 33 patients with Alzheimer dementia (AD), 21 patients with mild cognitive impairment who converted to AD during followup (MCI-AD), 25 patients with stable mild cognitive impairment (MCI-stable), and 16 nondemented subjects (ND) were analyzed with a chemiluminescence immunoassay to assess the levels of the mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK1/2 (extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2). The results were evaluated in relation to total Tau (tTau), phosphorylated Tau (pTau), and beta-amyloid 42 peptide (Aβ42). CSF-ERK1/2 was significantly increased in the AD group as compared to stable MCI patients and the ND group. Western blot analysis of a pooled cerebrospinal fluid sample revealed that both isoforms, ERK1 and ERK2, and low amounts of doubly phosphorylated ERK2 were detectable. As a predictive diagnostic AD biomarker, CSF-ERK1/2 was inferior to tTau, pTau, and Aβ42. PMID:22145083

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of thiamine in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Jiménez, F J; Molina, J A; Hernánz, A; Fernández-Vivancos, E; de Bustos, F; Barcenilla, B; Gómez-Escalonilla, C; Zurdo, M; Berbel, A; Villanueva, C

    1999-08-13

    Thiamine is an essential cofactor for several important enzymes involved in brain oxidative metabolism, such as the alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC), pyruvate-dehydrogenase complex, and transketolase. The activity of KGDHC is decreased in the substantia nigra or patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We measured cerebrospinal (CSF) levels of thiamine-diphosphate, thiamine-monophosphate, free thiamine, and total thiamine, using ion-pair reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography, in 24 PD patients and 40 matched controls. The mean CSF levels of thiamine-derivatives did not differ significantly from those of controls, with the exception of lower CSF free thiamine levels in the PD-patient group. PD patients under levodopa therapy had significantly higher CSF thiaminediphosphate and total thiamine than those not treated with this drug. CSF thiamine levels were not correlated with age, age at onset, duration of the disease, scores of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale of the Hoehn and Yahr staging in the PD group. These results suggest that low CSF free thiamine levels could be related with the risk for PD.

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid total tau concentration predicts clinical phenotype in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Filipe Brogueira; Byrne, Lauren; McColgan, Peter; Robertson, Nicola; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Leavitt, Blair R; Zetterberg, Henrik; Wild, Edward J

    2016-10-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a hereditary neurodegenerative condition with no therapeutic intervention known to alter disease progression, but several trials are ongoing and biomarkers of disease progression are needed. Tau is an axonal protein, often altered in neurodegeneration, and recent studies pointed out its role on HD neuropathology. Our goal was to study whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau is a biomarker of disease progression in HD. After informed consent, healthy controls, pre-symptomatic and symptomatic gene expansion carriers were recruited from two HD clinics. All participants underwent assessment with the Unified HD Rating Scale '99 (UHDRS). CSF was obtained according to a standardized lumbar puncture protocol. CSF tau was quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Comparisons between two groups were tested using ancova. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated for disease progression. Significance level was defined as p < 0.05. Seventy-six participants were included in this cross-sectional multicenter international pilot study. Age-adjusted CSF tau was significantly elevated in gene expansion carriers compared with healthy controls (p = 0.002). UHDRS total functional capacity was significantly correlated with CSF tau (r = -0.29, p = 0.004) after adjustment for age, and UHDRS total motor score was significantly correlated with CSF tau after adjustment for age (r = 0.32, p = 0.002). Several UHDRS cognitive tasks were also significantly correlated with CST total tau after age-adjustment. This study confirms that CSF tau concentrations in HD gene mutation carriers are increased compared with healthy controls and reports for the first time that CSF tau concentration is associated with phenotypic variability in HD. These conclusions strengthen the case for CSF tau as a biomarker in HD. In the era of novel targeted approaches to Huntington's disease, reliable biomarkers are needed. We quantified Tau protein, a marker of

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid hypersecretion in pediatric hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Karimy, Jason K; Duran, Daniel; Hu, Jamie K; Gavankar, Charuta; Gaillard, Jonathan R; Bayri, Yasar; Rice, Hunter; DiLuna, Michael L; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Marc Simard, J; Kahle, Kristopher T

    2016-11-01

    Hydrocephalus, despite its heterogeneous causes, is ultimately a disease of disordered CSF homeostasis that results in pathological expansion of the cerebral ventricles. Our current understanding of the pathophysiology of hydrocephalus is inadequate but evolving. Over this past century, the majority of hydrocephalus cases has been explained by functional or anatomical obstructions to bulk CSF flow. More recently, hydrodynamic models of hydrocephalus have emphasized the role of abnormal intracranial pulsations in disease pathogenesis. Here, the authors review the molecular mechanisms of CSF secretion by the choroid plexus epithelium, the most efficient and actively secreting epithelium in the human body, and provide experimental and clinical evidence for the role of increased CSF production in hydrocephalus. Although the choroid plexus epithelium might have only an indirect influence on the pathogenesis of many types of pediatric hydrocephalus, the ability to modify CSF secretion with drugs newer than acetazolamide or furosemide would be an invaluable component of future therapies to alleviate permanent shunt dependence. Investigation into the human genetics of developmental hydrocephalus and choroid plexus hyperplasia, and the molecular physiology of the ion channels and transporters responsible for CSF secretion, might yield novel targets that could be exploited for pharmacotherapeutic intervention.

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid soluble TREM2 is higher in Alzheimer disease and associated with mutation status.

    PubMed

    Piccio, Laura; Deming, Yuetiva; Del-Águila, Jorge L; Ghezzi, Laura; Holtzman, David M; Fagan, Anne M; Fenoglio, Chiara; Galimberti, Daniela; Borroni, Barbara; Cruchaga, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    Low frequency coding variants in TREM2 are associated with increased Alzheimer disease (AD) risk, while loss of functions mutations in the gene lead to an autosomal recessive early-onset dementia, named Nasu-Hakola disease (NHD). TREM2 can be detected as a soluble protein in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma, and its CSF levels are elevated in inflammatory CNS diseases. We measured soluble TREM2 (sTREM2) in the CSF of a large AD case-control dataset (n = 180) and 40 TREM2 risk variant carriers to determine whether CSF sTREM2 levels are associated with AD status or mutation status. We also performed genetic studies to identify genetic variants associated with CSF sTREM2 levels. CSF, but not plasma, sTREM2 was highly correlated with CSF total tau and phosphorylated-tau levels (r = 0.35, P < 1×10(-4); r = 0.40, P < 1×10(-4), respectively), but not with CSF Aβ42. AD cases presented higher CSF sTREM2 levels than controls (P = 0.01). Carriers of NHD-associated TREM2 variants presented significantly lower CSF sTREM2 levels, supporting the hypothesis that these mutations lead to reduced protein production/function (R136Q, D87N, Q33X or T66M; P = 1×10(-3)). In contrast, CSF sTREM2 levels were significantly higher in R47H carriers compared to non-carriers (P = 6×10(-3)), suggesting that this variant does not impact protein expression and increases AD risk through a different pathogenic mechanism than NHD variants. In GWAS analyses for CSF sTREM2 levels the most significant signal was located on the MS4A gene locus (P = 5.45 × 10(-07)) corresponding to one of the SNPs reported to be associated with AD risk in this locus. Furthermore, SNPs involved in pathways related to virus cellular entry and vesicular trafficking were overrepresented, suggesting that CSF sTREM2 levels could be an informative phenotype for AD.

  8. Ventricle wall movements and cerebrospinal fluid flow in hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Penn, Richard D; Basati, Sukhraaj; Sweetman, Brian; Guo, Xiaodong; Linninger, Andreas

    2011-07-01

    The dynamics of fluid flow in normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) are poorly understood. Normally, CSF flows out of the brain through the ventricles. However, ventricular enlargement during NPH may be caused by CSF backflow into the brain through the ventricles. A previous study showed this reversal of flow; in the present study, the authors provide additional clinical data obtained in patients with NPH and supplement these data with computer simulations to better understand the CSF flow and ventricular wall displacement and emphasize its clinical implications. Three NPH patients and 1 patient with aqueductal stenosis underwent cine phase-contrast MR imaging (cine MR imaging) for measurement of CSF flow and ventricle wall movement during the cardiac cycle. These data were compared to data previously obtained in 8 healthy volunteers. The CSF flow measurements were obtained at the outlet of the aqueduct of Sylvius. Calculation of the ventricular wall movement was determined from the complete set of cine MR images obtained axially at the middle of the lateral ventricle. The data were obtained before and after CSF removal with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt with an adjustable valve. To supplement the clinical data, a computational model was used to predict the transmural pressure and flow. In healthy volunteers, net CSF aqueductal flow was 1.2 ml/minute in the craniocaudal direction. In patients with NPH, the net CSF flow was in the opposite direction--the caudocranial direction--before shunt placement. After shunting, the magnitude of the abnormal fluid flow decreased or reversed, with the flow resembling the normal flow patterns observed in healthy volunteers. The authors' MR imaging-based measurements of the CSF flow direction and lateral ventricle volume size change and the results of computer modeling of fluid dynamics lead them to conclude that the directional pattern and magnitude of CSF flow in patients with NPH may be an indication of the disease state. This has

  9. Expression of TRPM8 in the distal cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons in the brain mesencephalon of rats

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jing; Yang, Xinwei; Zhang, Licai; Zeng, Yin-ming

    2009-01-01

    Background It has been shown that distal cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons (dCSF-CNs) exist near the ventral midline of the midbrain aqueduct and also in the grey matter of the inferior third ventricle and the fourth ventricle floor in the superior segment of the pons. The dCSF-CNs communicate between the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the brain parenchyma and may participate in the transduction and regulation of pain signals. The cold sensation receptor channel, TRPM8 is involved in analgesia for neuropathic pain, but whether the TRPM8 receptor exists on dCSF-CNs remains unknown. However, there is preliminary evidence that TRPM8 is expressed in dCSF-CNs and may participate in the transmission and regulation of sensory information between brain parenchyma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in rats. Methods Retrograde tracing of the cholera toxin subunit B labeled with horseradish peroxidase (CB-HRP) injected into the lateral ventricle was used to identify dCSF-CNs. A double-labeled immunofluorescent technique and laser scanning confocal microscopy were used to identify the expression of TRPM8 in dCSF-CNs. Software Image-Pro Plus was used to count the number of neurons in three sections where CB-HRP positive neurons were located in the mesencephalon of six rats. Results The cell bodies of CB-HRP-positive dCSF-CNs were found in the brain parenchyma near the midline of the ventral Aq, also in the grey of the 3V, and the 4V floor in the superior segment of the pons. In the mesencephalon their processes extended into the CSF. TRPM8 labeled neurons were also found in the same area as were CB-HRP/TRPM8 double-labeled neurons. CB-HRP/TRPM8 double-labeled neurons were found in 42.9 ± 2.3% of neurons labeled by TRPM8, and all CB-HRP-labeled neurons were also labeled with TPRM8. Conclusion This study has demonstrated that the cold sensation receptor channel, TRPM8, is localised within the dCSF-CNs of the mesencephalon. TRPM8 acts as receptor of dCSF-CNs for sensation

  10. Insulin and glucagon in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid in suicide attempters and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Bendix, Marie; Uvnäs-Moberg, Kerstin; Petersson, Maria; Kaldo, Viktor; Åsberg, Marie; Jokinen, Jussi

    2017-03-23

    Mental disorders and related behaviors such as suicidality and violence have been associated to dysregulation of e g carbohydrate metabolism. We hypothesized that patients after suicide attempt, compared to healthy controls, would have higher insulin and lower glucagon levels in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid and that these changes would be associated to violent behavior. Twenty-eight medication-free patients (10 women, 18 men), hospitalized after suicide attempt, and 19 healthy controls (7 women, 12 men) were recruited with the aim to study risk factors for suicidal behavior. Psychological/psychiatric assessment was performed with SCID I and II or the SCID interview for healthy volunteers respectively, the Karolinska Interpersonal Violence Scale (KIVS) for assessment of lifetime violence expression behavior, the Montgomery-Åsberg-Depression-Scale (MADRS) and the Comprehensive Psychological Rating Scale (CPRS) for symptomatic assessment of depression and appetite. Fasting levels of insulin and glucagon were measured in plasma (P) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Suicide attempters had higher insulin- and lower glucagon-levels in plasma- and CSF compared to controls. Except for P-glucagon these associations remained significant after adjusting for age and/or BMI. Patients reported significantly more expressed interpersonal violence compared to healthy volunteers. Expressed violence was significantly positively correlated with P- and CSF-insulin and showed a significant negative correlation with P-glucagon in study participants. These findings confirm and extend prior reports that higher insulin and lower glucagon levels in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid are associated with suicidal behavior pointing towards a potential autonomic dysregulation in the control of insulin and glucagon secretion in suicidal patients.

  11. Factors in cerebrospinal fluid from goats that affect sleep and activity in rats*

    PubMed Central

    Fencl, V.; Koski, G.; Pappenheimer, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    1. Intraventricular infusion in the rat of 0·1 ml. cerebrospinal fluid (c.s.f.) from sleep-deprived goats increases the duration of sleep (measured by e.e.g.) and decreases locomotor activity (measured photo-electrically) for at least 6 hr subsequent to the infusion. Subarachnoid infusions are ineffective. 2. C.s.f. from control and sleep-deprived goats was fractionated by ultrafiltration through molecular sieves. The sleep-promoting Factor S is found in the low molecular weight fraction (mol. wt. < 500) of c.s.f. from sleep-deprived but not from control goats. 3. The concentration of Factor S in c.s.f. increases progressively during the first 48 hr of sleep deprivation. 4. The sleep promoting effects of Factor S cannot be duplicated by serotonin, 4-OH-butyrate, butyrolactone, GABA (γ-amino butyric acid), glutamic acid or 3′,5′-cyclic AMP when these substances are added to control fluids in concentrations up to 10 times greater than those found in normal c.s.f. 5. Intraventricular or subarchnoid infusion in the rat of 0·1 ml. proteinfree c.s.f. containing molecules in the mol. wt. range of 500-10,000 at 10-30 × normal concentration causes hyperactivity which persists for several days and nights following the infusion. The excitatory material, probably a peptide, is present in c.s.f. from both control and sleep-deprived goats. 6. The properties of Factor S suggest that it may play a role in the normal regulation of sleep and wakefulness. PMID:4327693

  12. Cerebrospinal and Interstitial Fluid Transport via the Glymphatic Pathway Modeled by Optimal Mass Transport

    PubMed Central

    Ratner, Vadim; Gao, Yi; Lee, Hedok; Elkin, Rena; Nedergaard, Maiken; Benveniste, Helene; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2017-01-01

    The glymphatic pathway is a system which facilitates continuous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid (ISF) exchange and plays a key role in removing waste products from the rodent brain. Dysfunction of the glymphatic pathway may be implicated in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. Intriguingly, the glymphatic system is most active during deep wave sleep general anesthesia. By using paramagnetic tracers administered into CSF of rodents, we previously showed the utility of MRI in characterizing a macroscopic whole brain view of glymphatic transport but we have yet to define and visualize the specific flow patterns. Here we have applied an alternative mathematical analysis approach to a dynamic time series of MRI images acquired every 4 min over ∼3 hrs in anesthetized rats, following administration of a small molecular weight paramagnetic tracer into the CSF reservoir of the cisterna magna. We use Optimal Mass Transport (OMT) to model the glymphatic flow vector field, and then analyze the flow to find the network of CSF-ISF flow channels. We use 3D visualization computational tools to visualize the OMT defined network of CSF-ISF flow channels in relation to anatomical and vascular key landmarks from the live rodent brain. The resulting OMT model of the glymphatic transport network agrees largely with the current understanding of the glymphatic transport patterns defined by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI revealing key CSF transport pathways along the ventral surface of the brain with a trajectory towards the pineal gland, cerebellum, hypothalamus and olfactory bulb. In addition, the OMT analysis also revealed some interesting previously unnoticed behaviors regarding CSF transport involving parenchymal streamlines moving from ventral reservoirs towards the surface of the brain, olfactory bulb and large central veins. PMID:28323163

  13. A computational model of cerebrospinal fluid production and reabsorption driven by Starling forces

    PubMed Central

    Buishas, Joel; Gould, Ian G.; Linninger, Andreas A.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental evidence has cast doubt on the classical model of river-like cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow from the choroid plexus to the arachnoid granulations. We propose a novel model of water transport through the parenchyma from the microcirculation as driven by Starling forces. This model investigates the effect of osmotic pressure on water transport between the cerebral vasculature, the extracellular space (ECS), the perivascular space (PVS), and the CSF. A rigorous literature search was conducted focusing on experiments which alter the osmolarity of blood or ventricles and measure the rate of CSF production. Investigations into the effect of osmotic pressure on the volume of ventricles and the flux of ions in the blood, choroid plexus epithelium, and CSF are reviewed. Increasing the osmolarity of the serum via a bolus injection completely inhibits nascent fluid flow production in the ventricles. A continuous injection of a hyperosmolar solution into the ventricles can increase the volume of the ventricle by up to 125%. CSF production is altered by 0.231 µL per mOsm in the ventricle and by 0.835 µL per mOsm in the serum. Water flux from the ECS to the CSF is identified as a key feature of intracranial dynamics. A complete mathematical model with all equations and scenarios is fully described, as well as a guide to constructing a computational model of intracranial water balance dynamics. The model proposed in this article predicts the effects the osmolarity of ECS, blood, and CSF on water flux in the brain, establishing a link between osmotic imbalances and pathological conditions such as hydrocephalus and edema. PMID:25358881

  14. Cerebrospinal and interstitial fluid transport via the glymphatic pathway modeled by optimal mass transport.

    PubMed

    Ratner, Vadim; Gao, Yi; Lee, Hedok; Elkin, Rena; Nedergaard, Maiken; Benveniste, Helene; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2017-03-18

    The glymphatic pathway is a system which facilitates continuous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid (ISF) exchange and plays a key role in removing waste products from the rodent brain. Dysfunction of the glymphatic pathway may be implicated in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. Intriguingly, the glymphatic system is most active during deep wave sleep general anesthesia. By using paramagnetic tracers administered into CSF of rodents, we previously showed the utility of MRI in characterizing a macroscopic whole brain view of glymphatic transport but we have yet to define and visualize the specific flow patterns. Here we have applied an alternative mathematical analysis approach to a dynamic time series of MRI images acquired every 4min over ∼3h in anesthetized rats, following administration of a small molecular weight paramagnetic tracer into the CSF reservoir of the cisterna magna. We use Optimal Mass Transport (OMT) to model the glymphatic flow vector field, and then analyze the flow to find the network of CSF-ISF flow channels. We use 3D visualization computational tools to visualize the OMT defined network of CSF-ISF flow channels in relation to anatomical and vascular key landmarks from the live rodent brain. The resulting OMT model of the glymphatic transport network agrees largely with the current understanding of the glymphatic transport patterns defined by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI revealing key CSF transport pathways along the ventral surface of the brain with a trajectory towards the pineal gland, cerebellum, hypothalamus and olfactory bulb. In addition, the OMT analysis also revealed some interesting previously unnoticed behaviors regarding CSF transport involving parenchymal streamlines moving from ventral reservoirs towards the surface of the brain, olfactory bulb and large central veins.

  15. Harnessing Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Clinical Trials for Treating Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases: Potential and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dana; Kim, Young-Sam; Shin, Dong Wun; Park, Chang-Shin

    2016-01-01

    No disease-modifying therapies (DMT) for neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) have been established, particularly for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). It is unclear why candidate drugs that successfully demonstrate therapeutic effects in animal models fail to show disease-modifying effects in clinical trials. To overcome this hurdle, patients with homogeneous pathologies should be detected as early as possible. The early detection of AD patients using sufficiently tested biomarkers could demonstrate the potential usefulness of combining biomarkers with clinical measures as a diagnostic tool. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for NDs are being incorporated in clinical trials designed with the aim of detecting patients earlier, evaluating target engagement, collecting homogeneous patients, facilitating prevention trials, and testing the potential of surrogate markers relative to clinical measures. In this review we summarize the latest information on CSF biomarkers in NDs, particularly AD and PD, and their use in clinical trials. The large number of issues related to CSF biomarker measurements and applications has resulted in relatively few clinical trials on CSF biomarkers being conducted. However, the available CSF biomarker data obtained in clinical trials support the advantages of incorporating CSF biomarkers in clinical trials, even though the data have mostly been obtained in AD trials. We describe the current issues with and ongoing efforts for the use of CSF biomarkers in clinical trials and the plans to harness CSF biomarkers for the development of DMT and clinical routines. This effort requires nationwide, global, and multidisciplinary efforts in academia, industry, and regulatory agencies to facilitate a new era. PMID:27819412

  16. Insights into the human brain proteome: Disclosing the biological meaning of protein networks in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Paulo; Ferreira, Rita; Manadas, Bruno; Moreira, Paula I; Vitorino, Rui

    2017-04-10

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is an excellent source of biological information regarding the nervous system, once it is in close contact and accurately reflects alterations in this system. Several studies have analyzed differential protein profiles of CSF samples between healthy and diseased human subjects. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms and how CSF proteins relate to diseases are still poorly known. By applying bioinformatics tools, we attempted to provide new insights on the biological and functional meaning of proteomics data envisioning the identification of putative disease biomarkers. Bioinformatics analysis of data retrieved from 99 mass spectrometry (MS)-based studies on CSF profiling highlighted 1985 differentially expressed proteins across 49 diseases. A large percentage of the modulated proteins originate from exosome vesicles, and the majority are involved in either neuronal cell growth, development, maturation, migration, or neurotransmitter-mediated cellular communication. Nevertheless, some diseases present a unique CSF proteome profile, which were critically analyzed in the present study. For instance, 48 proteins were found exclusively upregulated in the CSF of patients with Alzheimer's disease and are mainly involved in steroid esterification and protein activation cascade processes. A higher number of exclusively upregulated proteins were found in the CSF of patients with multiple sclerosis (76 proteins) and with bacterial meningitis (70 proteins). Whereas in multiple sclerosis, these proteins are mostly involved in the regulation of RNA metabolism and apoptosis, in bacterial meningitis the exclusively upregulated proteins participate in inflammation and antibacterial humoral response, reflecting disease pathogenesis. The exploration of the contribution of exclusively upregulated proteins to disease pathogenesis will certainly help to envision potential biomarkers in the CSF for the clinical management of nervous system diseases.

  17. Modified Graded Repair of Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks in Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Hyun; Choi, Jai Ho; Kim, Young-Il; Kim, Sung Won

    2015-01-01

    Objective Complete sellar floor reconstruction is critical to avoid postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage during transsphenoidal surgery. Recently, the pedicled nasoseptal flap has undergone many modifications and eventually proved to be valuable and efficient. However, using these nasoseptal flaps in all patients who undergo transsphenoidal surgery, including those who had none or only minor CSF leakage, appears to be overly invasive and time-consuming. Methods Patients undergoing endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal tumor surgery within a 5 year-period were reviewed. Since 2009, we classified the intraoperative CSF leakage into grades from 0 to 3. Sellar floor reconstruction was tailored to each leak grade. We did not use any tissue grafts such as abdominal fat and did not include any procedures of CSF diversions such as lumbar drainage. Results Among 200 cases in 188 patients (147 pituitary adenoma and 41 other pathologies), intraoperative CSF leakage was observed in 27.4% of 197 cases : 14.7% Grade 1, 4.6% Grade 2a, 3.0% Grade 2b, and 5.1% Grade 3. Postoperative CSF leakage was observed in none of the cases. Septal bone buttress was used for Grade 1 to 3 leakages instead of any other foreign materials. Pedicled nasoseptal flap was used for Grades 2b and 3 leakages. Unused septal bones and nasoseptal flaps were repositioned. Conclusion Modified classification of intraoperative CSF leaks and tailored repair technique in a multilayered fashion using an en-bloc harvested septal bone and vascularized nasoseptal flaps is an effective and reliable method for the prevention of postoperative CSF leaks. PMID:26279811

  18. Risk factors for postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak and meningitis after expanded endoscopic endonasal surgery.

    PubMed

    Ivan, Michael E; Iorgulescu, J Bryan; El-Sayed, Ivan; McDermott, Michael W; Parsa, Andrew T; Pletcher, Steven D; Jahangiri, Arman; Wagner, Jeffrey; Aghi, Manish K

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak is a serious complication of transsphenoidal surgery, which can lead to meningitis and often requires reparative surgery. We sought to identify preoperative risk factors for CSF leaks and meningitis. We reviewed 98 consecutive expanded endoscopic endonasal surgeries performed from 2008-2012 and analyzed preoperative comorbidities, intraoperative techniques, and postoperative care. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. The most common pathologies addressed included pituitary adenoma, Rathke cyst, chordoma, esthesioneuroblastoma, meningioma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma. There were 11 CSF leaks (11%) and 10 central nervous system (CNS) infections (10%). Univariate and multivariate analysis of preoperative risk factors showed that patients with non-ideal body mass index (BMI) were associated with higher rate of postoperative CSF leak and meningitis (both p<0.01). Also, patients with increasing age were associated with increased CSF leak (p = 0.03) and the length of time a lumbar drain was used postoperatively was associated with infection in a univariate analysis. In addition, three of three endoscopic transsphenoidal surgeries combined with open cranial surgery had a postoperative CSF leak and CNS infection rate which was a considerably higher rate than for transsphenoidal surgeries alone or surgeries staged with open cases (p<0.01 and p=0.04, respectively) In this series of expanded endoscopic transsphenoidal surgeries, preoperative BMI remains the most important preoperative predictor for CSF leak and infection. Other risk factors include age, intraoperative CSF leak, lumbar drain duration, and cranial combined cases. Risks associated with complex surgical resections when combining open and endoscopic approaches could be minimized by staging these procedures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Analysis of cerebro-spinal fluid protein composition in early developmental stages in chick embryos.

    PubMed

    Gato, A; Martín, P; Alonso, M I; Martín, C; Pulgar, M A; Moro, J A

    2004-04-01

    Foetal cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) has a very high protein concentration when compared to adult CSF, and in many species five major protein fractions have been described. However, the protein concentration and composition in CSF during early developmental stages remains largely unknown. Our results show that in the earliest stages (18 to 30 H.H.) of chick development there is a progressive increase in CSF protein concentration until foetal values are attained. In addition, by performing electrophoretic separation and high-sensitivity silver staining, we were able to identify a total of 21 different protein fractions in the chick embryo CSF. In accordance with the developmental pattern of their concentration, these can be classified as follows: A: high-concentration fractions which corresponded with the ones described in foetal CSF by other authors; B: low-concentration fractions which remained stable throughout the period studied; C: low-concentration fractions which show changes during this period. The evolution and molecular weight of the latter group suggest the possibility of an important biological role. Our data demonstrate that all the CSF protein fractions are present in embryonic serum; this could mean that the specific transport mechanisms in neuroepithelial cells described in the foetal period evolve in very early stages of development. In conclusion, this paper offers an accurate study of the protein composition of chick embryonic CSF, which will help the understanding of the influences on neuroepithelial stem cells during development and, as a result, the appropriate conditions for the in vitro study of embryonic/foetal nervous tissue cells.

  20. The late and dual origin of cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons in the mouse spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Petracca, Yanina L.; Sartoretti, Maria Micaela; Di Bella, Daniela J.; Marin-Burgin, Antonia; Carcagno, Abel L.; Schinder, Alejandro F.; Lanuza, Guillermo M.

    2016-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms that control the production of specialized neuronal types. However, how the timing of differentiation contributes to neuronal diversity in the developing spinal cord is still a pending question. In this study, we show that cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons (CSF-cNs), an anatomically discrete cell type of the ependymal area, originate from surprisingly late neurogenic events in the ventral spinal cord. CSF-cNs are identified by the expression of the transcription factors Gata2 and Gata3, and the ionic channels Pkd2l1 and Pkd1l2. Contrasting with Gata2/3+ V2b interneurons, differentiation of CSF-cNs is independent of Foxn4 and takes place during advanced developmental stages previously assumed to be exclusively gliogenic. CSF-cNs are produced from two distinct dorsoventral regions of the mouse spinal cord. Most CSF-cNs derive from progenitors circumscribed to the late-p2 and the oligodendrogenic (pOL) domains, whereas a second subset of CSF-cNs arises from cells bordering the floor plate. The development of these two subgroups of CSF-cNs is differentially controlled by Pax6, they adopt separate locations around the postnatal central canal and they display electrophysiological differences. Our results highlight that spatiotemporal mechanisms are instrumental in creating neural cell diversity in the ventral spinal cord to produce distinct classes of interneurons, motoneurons, CSF-cNs, glial cells and ependymal cells. PMID:26839365

  1. Impaired lymphatic cerebrospinal fluid absorption in a rat model of kaolin-induced communicating hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Nagra, G; Li, J; McAllister, J P; Miller, J; Wagshul, M; Johnston, M

    2008-05-01

    It has been assumed that the pathogenesis of hydrocephalus includes a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) absorption deficit. Because a significant portion of CSF absorption occurs into extracranial lymphatics located in the olfactory turbinates, the purpose of this study was to determine whether CSF transport was compromised at this location in a kaolin-induced communicating (extraventricular) hydrocephalus model in rats. Under 1-3% halothane anesthesia, kaolin (n = 10) or saline (n = 9) was introduced into the basal cisterns of Sprague-Dawley rats, and the development of hydrocephalus was assessed 1 wk later using MRI. After injection of human serum albumin ((125)I-HSA) into a lateral ventricle, the tracer enrichment in the olfactory turbinates 30 min postinjection provided an estimate of CSF transport through the cribriform plate into nasal lymphatics. Lateral ventricular volumes in the kaolin group (0.073 +/- 0.014 ml) were significantly greater than those in the saline-injected animals (0.016 +/- 0.001 ml; P = 0.0014). The CSF tracer enrichment in the olfactory turbinates (expressed as percent injected/g tissue) in the kaolin rats averaged 0.99 +/- 0.39 and was significantly lower than that measured in the saline controls (5.86 +/- 0.32; P < 0.00001). The largest degree of ventriculomegaly was associated with the lowest levels of lymphatic CSF uptake with lateral ventricular expansion occurring only when almost all of the lymphatic CSF transport capacity had been compromised. We conclude that lymphatic CSF absorption is impaired in a kaolin-communicating hydrocephalus model and that the degree of this impediment may contribute to the severity of the induced disease.

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid Presenilin-1 increases at asymptomatic stage in genetically determined Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sogorb-Esteve, Aitana; García-Ayllón, María-Salud; Fortea, Juan; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Lleó, Alberto; Molinuevo, José-Luis; Sáez-Valero, Javier

    2016-09-29

    Presenilin-1 (PS1), the active component of the intramembrane γ-secretase complex, can be detected as soluble heteromeric aggregates in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The aim of this study was to examine the different soluble PS1 complexes in the lumbar CSF (CSF-PS1) of individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD), particularly in both symptomatic and asymptomatic genetically determined AD, in order to evaluate their potential as early biomarkers. Western blotting, differential centrifugation and co-immunoprecipitation served to determine and characterize CSF-PS1 complexes. We also monitored the assembly of soluble PS1 into complexes in a cell model, and the participation of Aβ in the dynamics and robustness of the stable PS1 complexes. There was an age-dependent increase in CSF-PS1 levels in cognitively normal controls, the different complexes represented in similar proportions. The total levels of CSF-PS1, and in particular the proportion of the stable 100-150 kDa complexes, increased in subjects with autosomal dominant AD that carried PSEN1 mutations (eight symptomatic and six asymptomatic ADAD) and in Down syndrome individuals (ten demented and ten non-demented DS), compared with age-matched controls (n = 23), even prior to the appearance of symptoms of dementia. The proportion of stable CSF-PS1 complexes also increased in sporadic AD (n = 13) and mild-cognitive impaired subjects (n = 12), relative to age-matched controls (n = 17). Co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated the association of Aβ oligomers with soluble PS1 complexes, particularly the stable complexes. Our data suggest that CSF-PS1 complexes may be useful as an early biomarker for AD, reflecting the pathology at asymptomatic state.

  3. Differences in cerebrospinal fluid inflammatory cell reaction of patients with leptomeningeal involvement by lymphoma and carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Illán, Julia; Simo, Marta; Serrano, Cristina; Castañón, Susana; Gonzalo, Raquel; Martínez-García, María; Pardo, Javier; Gómez, Lidia; Navarro, Miguel; Altozano, Javier Pérez; Alvarez, Ruth; Bruna, Jordi; Subirá, Dolores

    2014-12-01

    Dissemination of neoplastic cells into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and leptomeninges is a devastating complication in patients with epithelial cell neoplasia (leptomeningeal carcinomatosis [LC]) and lymphomas (lymphomatous meningitis [LyM]). Information about the surrounding inflammatory cell populations is scarce. In this study, flow cytometry immunophenotyping was used to describe the distribution of the main leukocyte populations in the CSF of 83 patients diagnosed with neoplastic meningitis (LC, n = 65; LyM, n = 18). These data were compared with those obtained in the CSF from 55 patients diagnosed with the same groups of neoplasia without meningeal involvement (solid tumors, n = 36; high-grade lymphoma, n = 19). Median (interquartile) rates of lymphocytes, monocytes, and polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells were 59.7% (range, 35-76.6%), 24% (range, 16-53%), and 1.5% (range, 0-7.6%) in LC, respectively, and 98.5% (range, 70.8-100%), 1.5% (range, 0-29.3%), and 0% in LyM, respectively (P < 0.001). No difference was observed between patients with breast adenocarcinoma (n = 30) and lung adenocarcinoma (n = 21), nor with different rates of malignant CSF involvement. Patients with lymphoma (with or without LyM) had a similar CSF leukocyte distribution, but cancer patients with LC and without LC had a distinctive PMN cell rate (P = 0.002). These data show that CSF samples from patients with LC have a greater number of inflammatory cells and a different leukocyte distribution than seen in the CSF from patients with LyM. Description of PMN cells is a distinctive parameter of patients with LC, compared with the CSF from patients with LyM and patients with cancer but without LC.

  4. Cerebrospinal Fluid Aβ42 Levels and APP Processing Pathway Genes in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bekris, L.M.; Tsuang, D.W.; Peskind, E.R.; Yu, C.E.; Montine, T.J.; Zhang, J.; Zabetian, C.P.; Leverenz, J.B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Of recent interest is the finding that certain CSF biomarkers traditionally linked to Alzheimer’s disease (AD), specifically amyloid beta protein (Aβ), are abnormal in PD CSF. The aim of this exploratory investigation was to determine if genetic variation within the amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing pathway genes, correlate with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ42 levels in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Method PD (n=86) and control (n=161) DNA were genotyped for 19 regulatory region tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within nine genes (APP, ADAM10, BACE1, BACE2, PSEN1, PSEN2, PEN2, NCSTN and APH1B) involved in the cleavage of APP. SNP genotypes were tested for their association with CSF biomarkers and PD risk while adjusting for age, gender, and APOE ε4 status. Results Significant correlation with CSF Aβ42 levels in PD was observed for two SNPs, (APP rs466448 and APH1B rs2068143). Conversely, significant correlation with CSF Aβ42 levels in controls was observed for three SNPs (APP rs214484 and rs2040273 and PSEN1 rs362344). Conclusion The results of this exploratory investigation suggest that an APP SNP and an APH1B SNP are marginally associated with PD CSF Aβ42 levels in APOE ε4 non-carriers. Further hypotheses generated include that decreased CSF Aβ42 levels are in part driven by genetic variation in APP processing genes. Additional investigation into the relationship between these findings and clinical characteristics of PD, including cognitive impairment, compared to other neurodegenerative diseases, such as AD, are warranted. PMID:25808939

  5. Blood and Cerebrospinal Fluid α-Tocopherol and Selenium Concentrations in Neonatal Foals with Neuroaxonal Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Finno, C J; Estell, K E; Katzman, S; Winfield, L; Rendahl, A; Textor, J; Bannasch, D L; Puschner, B

    2015-01-01

    Equine neuroaxonal dystrophy/equine degenerative myeloencephalopathy (NAD/EDM) is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting genetically predisposed foals maintained on α-tocopherol (α-TP)-deficient diet. Intramuscular α-TP and selenium (Se) administration at 4 days of age would have no significant effect on serum or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) α-TP in healthy foals. Serum and CSF α-TP, but not Se, would be significantly decreased in NAD/EDM-affected foals during first year of life. Fourteen Quarter horse foals; 10 healthy foals supplemented with 0.02 mL/kg injectable α-TP and Se (n = 5) or saline (n = 5) at 4 days of age and 4 unsupplemented NAD/EDM-affected foals. Complete neurologic examinations were performed, blood and CSF were collected before (4 days of age) and after supplementation at 10, 30, 60, 120, 180, 240, and 360 days of age. Additional blood collections occurred at 90, 150, 210, and 300 days. At 540 days, NAD/EDM-affected foals and 1 unsupplemented healthy foal were euthanized and necropsies performed. Significant decreases in blood, CSF α-TP and Se found in the first year of life in all foals, with most significant changes in serum α-TP from 4-150 days. Dam α-TP and Se significantly influenced blood concentrations in foals. Injection of α-TP and Se did not significantly increase CSF Se, blood or CSF α-TP in healthy foals. NAD/EDM-affected foals had significantly lower CSF α-TP through 120 days. Injection of α-TP and Se at 4 days of age does not significantly increase blood or CSF α-TP. Despite all 14 foals remaining deficient in α-TP, only the 4 genetically predisposed foals developed NAD/EDM. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  6. Ante mortem cerebrospinal fluid tau levels correlate with postmortem tau pathology in frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Irwin, David J; Lleó, Alberto; Xie, Sharon X; McMillan, Corey T; Wolk, David A; Lee, Edward B; Van Deerlin, Viviana M; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Grossman, Murray

    2017-08-01

    To test the hypotheses that (1) antemortem cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau levels correlate with postmortem tau pathology in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and (2) tauopathy patients have higher phosphorylated-tau levels compared to transactivation response element DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) proteinopathy patients while accounting for Alzheimer's disease (AD) copathology. Patients had autopsy-confirmed FTLD with tauopathy (n = 31), TDP-43 proteinopathy (n = 49), or AD (n = 26) with antemortem CSF. CSF tau levels were compared between groups and correlated with digital histology measurement of postmortem tau pathology averaged from three cerebral regions (angular gyrus, mid-frontal cortex, and anterior cingulate gyrus). Multivariate linear regression tested the association of ante mortem CSF tau levels with postmortem tau pathology adjusting for demographics. Multivariate regression found an independent association of ante mortem CSF phosphorylated tau levels with postmortem cerebral tau pathology in FTLD (Beta = 1.3; 95% confidence interval = 0.2-2.4; p < 0.02). After excluding patients with coincident AD-associated tau pathology accompanying sporadic FTLD, we found lower CSF phosphorylated tau levels in the TDP-43 group (median = 7.4pg/ml; interquartile range [IQR] = 6.0, 12.3; n = 26) compared to the tauopathy group (median = 12.5pg/ml; IQR = 10.7, 15.0; n = 23; Z = 2.6; p < 0.01). CSF phosphorylated-tau levels are positively associated with cerebral tau burden in FTLD. In vivo detection of AD copathology in sporadic FTLD patients may help stratify clinical cohorts with pure neuropathology in which low CSF phosphorylated-tau levels may have diagnostic utility to distinguish TDP-43 proteinopathy from tauopathy. Autopsy-confirmed samples are critical for FTLD biomarker development and validation. Ann Neurol 2017;82:247-258. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  7. Specific absorbed fractions of energy from internal photon sources in brain tumor and cerebrospinal fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.F. )); Stubbs, J.B. )

    1995-03-01

    Transferrin, radiolabeled with In-111, can be coinjected into glioblastoma multiforme lesions, and subsequent scintigraphic imaging can demonstrate the biokinetics of the cytotoxic transferrin. The administration of [sup 111]In transferrin into a brain tumor results in distribution of radioactivity in the brain, brain tumor, and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Information about absorbed radiation doses to these regions, as well as other nearby tissues and organs, is important for evaluating radiation-related risks from this procedure. The radiation dose is usually estimated for a mathematical representation of the human body. We have included source/target regions for the eye, lens of the eye, spinal column, spinal CSF, cranial CSF, and a 100-g tumor within the brain of an adult male phantom developed by Cristy and Eckerman. The spinal column, spinal CSF, and the eyes have not been routinely included in photon transport simulations. Specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) as a function of photon energy were calculated using the ALGAMP computer code, which utilizes Monte Carlo techniques for simulating photon transport. The ALGAMP code was run three times, with the source activity distributed uniformly within the tumor, cranial CSF, and the spinal CSF volumes. These SAFs, which were generated for 12 discrete photon energies ranging from 0.01 to 4.0 MeV, were used with decay scheme data to calculate [ital S]-values needed for estimating absorbed doses. [ital S]-values for [sup 111]In are given for three source regions (brain tumor, cranial CSF, and spinal CSF) and all standard target regions/organs, the eye and lens, as well as to tissues within these source regions. [ital S]-values for the skeletal regions containing active marrow are estimated. These results are useful in evaluating the radiation doses from intracranial administration of [sup 111]In transferrin.

  8. Cellular immune surveillance of central nervous system bypasses blood-brain barrier and blood-cerebrospinal-fluid barrier: revealed with the New Marburg cerebrospinal-fluid model in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Kleine, Tilmann O

    2015-03-01

    In healthy human brain/spinal cord, blood capillaries and venules are locked differently with junctions and basement membrane (blood-brain barrier, blood-venule barrier). In choroid plexus, epithelial tight junctions and basement membrane lock blood-cerebrospinal-fluid (CSF) barrier. Lymphocytic cell data, quantified with multicolour flow-cytometry or immuno-cytochemical methods in sample pairs of lumbar CSF, ventrictricular CSF and peripheral venous blood, are taken from references; similarly, data of thoracic duct chyle and blood sample pairs. Through three circumventricular organs (median eminence, organum vasculosum lamina terminalis, area postrema), 15-30 μl blood are pressed by blood pressure through fenestrated capillaries, matrix/basement membrane spaces and ependyma cell lacks into ventricular/suboccipital CSF to generate CD3(+) , CD4(+) , CD8(+) , CD3(+) HLA-DR(+) , CD16(+) 56(+) 3(-) NK, CD19(+) 3(-) B subsets; some B, few NK cells adhere in circumventricular organs. Into lumbar CSF, 10-15 μl thoracic chyle with five lymphocyte subsets (without CD3(+) HLA-DR(+) cells) reflux, when CSF drains out with to-and-fro movements of chyle/CSF along nerve roots. Lymphocytes in lumbar CSF represent a mixture of blood and lymph lymphocytic cells with similar HLA-DR(+) CD3(+) cell counts in ventricular and lumbar CSF, higher CD3(+) , CD4(+) , CD8(+) subsets in lumbar CSF, and few NK and B cells due to absorption in circumventricular organs. The Marburg CSF Model reflects origin and turnover of lymphatic cells in CSF realistically; the model differs from ligand-multistep processes of activated lymphocytes through blood-brain-, blood-venule-, and blood-CSF-barriers; because transfer of inactivated native lymphocytes through the barriers is not found with healthy humans, although described so in literature.

  9. Sarcoid meningitis with fulminant delirium and markedly abnormal cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Noble, James M; Anderson, Christopher Todd; Etienne, Mill; Williams, Olajide; Adams, David J

    2007-01-01

    To describe a patient with an acute fulminant delirium and eventual spinal fluid block secondary to sarcoid meningitis. Case report. Hospital and Neurology Clinic. A previously healthy, 24-year-old man. Antimicrobials, corticosteroids, lumbar puncture, myelography, and lymph node biopsy. Cerebrospinal fluid, clinical status. The patient improved after treatment with corticosteroids. Sarcoid meningitis may present with delirium and spinal block.

  10. Interferon-gamma and cortisol levels in cerebrospinal fluid and its relationship to the etiology of aseptic meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Holub, M; Beran, O; Lacinová, Z; Cinek, O; Chalupa, P

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the concentrations of Th1/Th2 cytokines and cortisol in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with aseptic meningoencephalitis (AM). The study enrolled 37 patients with AM and 11 control subjects. CSF concentrations of IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha were analyzed using cytokine bead array and flow cytometry; CSF cortisol concentrations were measured by a RIA method. Cortisol was detected in 37 CSF samples (100%) from patients with AM, and it was significantly elevated in comparison to control subjects. IFN-gamma was detected in 32 CSF samples (86.5%) and IL-10 was detectable in 9 CSF samples (24.3%). The CSF cortisol levels correlated negatively with the duration of AM. The intrathecal concentration of IFN-gamma correlated positively with CSF numbers of leukocytes and lymphocytes, and negatively with the duration of AM. The etiology of AM influenced the CSF cortisol concentration, which was significantly higher in patients with tick-borne encephalitis when compared to persons with AM of unknown origin and control subjects. The results indicate that the prevailing intrathecal immune reaction during AM is shifted to a Th1-like response, whereas anti-inflammatory response in the brain is executed by the effect of cortisol.

  11. Added Prognostic Value of Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Predicting Decline in Memory Clinic Patients in a Prospective Cohort.

    PubMed

    Handels, Ron L H; Joore, Manuela A; Vos, Stephanie J B; Aalten, Pauline; Ramakers, Inez H G B; Rikkert, Marcel Olde; Scheltens, Philip; Jansen, Willemijn J; Visser, Pieter-Jelle; van Berckel, Bart M N; van Domburg, Peter; Smid, Machiel; Hoff, Erik; Hoogmoed, Jan; Bouwman, Femke; Claassen, Jurgen; Leentjens, Albert F G; Wolfs, Claire A G; Severens, Johan L; Verhey, Frans R J

    2016-03-31

    Limited information is available on short-term prognosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in addition to routine diagnostic workup. This study aims to investigate the added prognostic value of AD CSF biomarkers. In a prospective cohort study, clinical experts predicted cognitive and functional symptoms in 114 memory clinic patients by assessing comprehensive routine diagnostic test information (patient history, and physical, neurological, psychiatric, neuropsychological, and MRI examinations), without and with CSF biomarkers. The reference standard was the 'observed clinically relevant decline' using baseline and 1- and 2-year follow-up information. Decline over a 2-year period was observed in 51% of all participants (3% in SMC, 48% in MCI, 90% in mild dementia). In the total sample, the accuracy of predicted decline did not differ significantly between routine assessment without (79% correctly predicted) and with (74% correctly predicted) CSF biomarkers. Subgroup analyses revealed 25 (83%) correct predictions in SMC, 30 (68%) in MCI, and 35 (88%) in dementia without the use of CSF; and 21 (70%), 27 (61%), and 36 (90%), respectively, with the use of CSF in addition to the routine assessment. AD CSF biomarkers did not increase accuracy of 2-year prognosis of cognitive and functional decline when added to routine diagnostic workup. This suggests that the standard diagnostic workup without CSF biomarkers allows fairly accurate predictions for the short-term course of symptoms. Routine AD biomarkers in CSF have limited prognostic value over 2 years in persons with a suspected cognitive disorder.

  12. New techniques and technology to repair cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea.

    PubMed

    Paludetti, G; Sergi, B; Rigante, M; Campioni, P; Galli, J

    2004-06-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea occurs as a result of abnormal communication between the subarachnoid space and the pneumatized portion of the skull base, the paranasal sinuses and the middle ear. Conservative measures may be sufficient in the management of cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea, but, in some cases, surgical treatment may be required. Transnasal endoscopic techniques are constantly being used in preference to the intra- and extracranial approaches. Recently, image guidance systems have been adopted in neurosurgery, skull base and paranasal sinus surgery. The present report refers to 4 cases of nasal cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea leak successfully treated with a transnasal endoscopic approach using various techniques and materials to close the bone defect, in 2 of which, the navigation system (Stealth Station Treon ENT Image Guidance System with Landmark X, Software, Medtronic, XOMED, Jacksonville, FL, USA) was also used. In all cases, correct localization and repair of the leak was achieved and no major complications occurred. Following a review of the literature, the Authors conclude that, at present, transnasal endoscopic repair of cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea is the surgical treatment of choice when the techniques and materials are correctly used. Furthermore, preliminary findings indicate that it is possible to make routine use of the navigation systems and that this technology may be usefully employed, above all, in the management of cerebrospinal fluid leaks.

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid oligoclonal bands in childhood opsoclonus-myoclonus.

    PubMed

    Pranzatelli, Michael R; Slev, Patricia R; Tate, Elizabeth D; Travelstead, Anna L; Colliver, Jerry A; Joseph, Suja Anne

    2011-07-01

    Oligoclonal bands in cerebrospinal fluid reflect local B-cell responses associated with various neuroinflammatory disorders. In opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome, cerebrospinal fluid B-cell expansion was demonstrated, but no studies of oligoclonal bands are available. In a prospective case-control study of 132 children (103 with opsoclonus-myoclonus, 29 neurologic control subjects), cerebrospinal fluid oligoclonal bands, measured by isoelectric focusing with immunofixation, were observed in 35% with opsoclonus-myoclonus and none of the control subjects, with the highest frequency in severe cases (56%). In oligoclonal band-positive patients, the mean band number was 5 ± 3 S.D. (range, 2-10) and the total severity score was significantly higher than in band-negative patients, whereas the frequency of CD19(+) B cells, opsoclonus-myoclonus duration, neuroblastoma detection, and relapse history did not differ. The cerebrospinal fluid immunoglobulin G synthesis rate, immunoglobulin index, and Q albumin were normal. In 17 untreated children receiving adrenocorticotropic hormone, intravenous immunoglobulins, and rituximab, the number of oligoclonal band-positive decreased by 75%, and the mean band count fell by 80%. Oligoclonal band detection adds useful information to neuroimmunologic "staging" in opsoclonus-myoclonus. However, flow cytometry provides a more sensitive measure of B-cell infiltration. Cerebrospinal fluid oligoclonal bands warrant monitoring in long-term follow-up studies of disease-modifying drugs for opsoclonus-myoclonus.

  14. The 1H NMR Profile of Healthy Dog Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Musteata, Mihai; Nicolescu, Alina; Solcan, Gheorghe; Deleanu, Calin

    2013-01-01

    The availability of data for reference values in cerebrospinal fluid for healthy humans is limited due to obvious practical and ethical issues. The variability of reported values for metabolites in human cerebrospinal fluid is quite large. Dogs present great similarities with humans, including in cases of central nervous system pathologies. The paper presents the first study on healthy dog cerebrospinal fluid metabolomic profile using 1H NMR spectroscopy. A number of 13 metabolites have been identified and quantified from cerebrospinal fluid collected from a group of 10 mix breed healthy dogs. The biological variability as resulting from the relative standard deviation of the physiological concentrations of the identified metabolites had a mean of 18.20% (range between 9.3% and 44.8%). The reported concentrations for metabolites may be used as normal reference values. The homogeneity of the obtained results and the low biologic variability show that the 1H NMR analysis of the dog’s cerebrospinal fluid is reliable in designing and interpreting clinical and therapeutic trials in dogs with central nervous system pathologies. PMID:24376499

  15. Cerebral microbleeds topography and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Shams, Sara; Granberg, Tobias; Martola, Juha; Charidimou, Andreas; Li, Xiaozhen; Shams, Mana; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Cavallin, Lena; Aspelin, Peter; Wiberg-Kristoffersen, Maria; Wahlund, Lars-Olof

    2017-03-01

    Cerebral microbleeds, a marker of small vessel disease, are thought to be of importance in cognitive impairment. We aimed to study topographical distribution of cerebral microbleeds, and their involvement in disease pathophysiology, reflected by cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers; 1039 patients undergoing memory investigation underwent lumbar puncture and a brain magnetic resonance imaging scan. Cerebrospinal fluid samples were analyzed for amyloid β(Aβ)42, total tau(T-tau), tau phosphorylated at threonine 18(P-tau) and cerebrospinal fluid/serum albumin ratios. Magnetic resonance imaging sequences were evaluated for small vessel disease markers, including cerebral microbleeds, white matter hyperintensities and lacunes. Low Aβ42 levels were associated with lobar cerebral microbleeds in the whole cohort and Alzheimer's disease ( P < 0.001). High cerebrospinal fluid/serum albumin ratios were seen with increased number of cerebral microbleeds in the brainstem ( P < 0.001). There were tendencies for increased Aβ42 levels and decreased Tau levels with deep and infratentorial cerebral microbleeds ( P < 0.05). Lobar cerebral microbleeds were associated with white matter hyperintensities and lacunes ( P < 0.001). Probable cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related cerebral microbleeds were associated with low Aβ42 levels and lacunes, whereas probable cerebral amyloid angiopathy-unrelated cerebral microbleeds were associated with white matter hyperintensities ( P < 0.001). Our findings show that cerebral microbleed distribution is associated with different patterns of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers, supporting different pathogenesis of deep/infratentorial and lobar cerebral microbleeds.

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid profiles with increasing number of cerebral microbleeds in a continuum of cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Shams, Sara; Granberg, Tobias; Martola, Juha; Li, Xiaozhen; Shams, Mana; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Cavallin, Lena; Aspelin, Peter; Kristoffersen-Wiberg, Maria; Wahlund, Lars-Olof

    2016-03-01

    Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) are hypothesised to have an important yet unknown role in the dementia disease pathology. In this study we analysed increasing number of CMBs and their independent associations with routine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers in a continuum of cognitive impairment. A total of 1039 patients undergoing dementia investigation were analysed and underwent lumbar puncture, and an MRI scan. CSF samples were analysed for amyloid β (Aβ) 42, total tau (T-tau), tau phosphorylated at threonine 18 (P-tau) and CSF/serum albumin ratios. Increasing number of CMBs were independently associated with low Aβ42 levels, in the whole cohort, Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment (p < 0.05). CSF/serum albumin ratios were high with multiple CMBs (p < 0.001), reflecting accompanying blood-brain barrier dysfunction. T-tau and P-tau levels were lower in Alzheimer's patients with multiple CMBs when compared to zero CMBs, but did not change in the rest of the cohort. White matter hyperintensities were associated with low Aβ42 in the whole cohort and Alzheimer's disease (p < 0.05). Aβ42 is the routine CSF-biomarker mainly associated with CMBs in cognitive impairment, and there is an accumulative effect with increasing number of CMBs.

  17. Changes in Purines Concentration in the Cerebrospinal Fluid of Pregnant Women Experiencing Pain During Active Labor.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, André P; Böhmer, Ana E; Hansel, Gisele; Soares, Félix A; Oses, Jean P; Giordani, Alex T; Posso, Irimar P; Auler, José Otávio C; Mendes, Florentino F; Félix, Elaine A; Portela, Luís V; Souza, Diogo O

    2015-11-01

    Labor pain has been reported as a severe pain and can be considered as a model of acute visceral pain. It is well known that extracellular purines have an important role in pain signaling in the central nervous system. This study analyzes the relationship between extracellular purines and pain perception during active labor. A prospective observational study was performed. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of the purines and their metabolites were compared between women at term pregnancy with labor pain (n = 49) and without labor pain (Caesarian section; n = 47). Control groups (healthy men and women without chronic or acute pain-n = 40 and 32, respectively) were also investigated. The CSF levels of adenosine were significantly lower in the labor pain group (P = 0.026) and negatively correlated with pain intensity measured by a visual analogue scale (r = -0.48, P = 0.0005). Interestingly, CSF levels of uric acid were significantly higher in healthy men as compared to women. Additionally, pregnant women showed increased CSF levels of ADP, GDP, adenosine and guanosine and reduced CSF levels of AMP, GTP, and uric acid as compared to non-pregnant women (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that purines, in special the nucleoside adenosine, are associated with pregnancy and labor pain.

  18. Effect of continuous cisternal cerebrospinal fluid drainage for patients with thin subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Otawara, Yasunari; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Kubo, Yoshitaka; Sasoh, Masayuki; Ogawa, Akira

    2007-01-01

    External cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage is an effective method to remove massive subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), but carries the risk of meningitis and shunt-dependent hydrocephalus. This study investigated whether postoperative cisternal CSF drainage affects the incidence of cerebral vasospasm and clinical outcome in patients with thin SAH. Seventy-eight patients with thin SAH, 22 men and 56 women aged from 17 to 73 years (mean 51.2 years), underwent surgical repair for ruptured anterior circulation aneurysm. Patients were divided into groups with (38 patients) and without (40 patients) postoperative cisternal CSF drainage, and the incidences of angiographical and symptomatic vasospasm, shunt-dependent hydrocephalus, meningitis, and the clinical outcome were compared. The incidences of angiographical vasospasm (31.6% vs 50.0%), symptomatic vasospasm (7.9% vs 12.5%), shunt-dependent hydrocephalus (5.3% vs 0%), and meningitis (2.6% vs 0%) did not differ between patients with and without cisternal CSF drainage. All patients in both groups resulted in good recovery. Postoperative cisternal CSF drainage does not affect the incidence of cerebral vasospasm or the clinical outcome in patients with thin SAH. PMID:17969369

  19. Altered microRNA profiles in cerebrospinal fluid exosome in Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Gui, YaXing; Liu, Hai; Zhang, LiShan; Lv, Wen; Hu, XingYue

    2015-11-10

    The differential diagnosis of Parkinson's diseases (PD) is challenging, especially in the early stages of the disease. We developed a microRNA profiling strategy for exosomal miRNAs isolated from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in PD and AD. Sixteen exosomal miRNAs were up regulated and 11 miRNAs were under regulated significantly in PD CSF when compared with those in healthy controls (relative fold > 2, p < 0.05). MiR-1 and miR-19b-3p were validated and significantly reduced in independent samples. While miR-153, miR-409-3p, miR-10a-5p, and let-7g-3p were significantly over expressed in PD CSF exosome. Bioinformatic analysis by DIANA-mirPath demonstrated that Neurotrophin signaling, mTOR signaling, Ubiquitin mediated proteolysis, Dopaminergic synapse, and Glutamatergic synapse were the most prominent pathways enriched in quantiles with PD miRNA patterns. Messenger RNA (mRNA) transcripts [amyloid precursor protein (APP), α-synuclein (α-syn), Tau, neurofilament light gene (NF-L), DJ-1/PARK7, Fractalkine and Neurosin] and long non-coding RNAs (RP11-462G22.1 and PCA3) were differentially expressed in CSF exosomes in PD and AD patients. These data demonstrated that CSF exosomal RNA molecules are reliable biomarkers with fair robustness in regard to specificity and sensitivity in differentiating PD from healthy and diseased (AD) controls.

  20. Regulation of human cerebrospinal fluid malate dehydrogenase 1 in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Matthias; Llorens, Franc; Pracht, Alexander; Thom, Tobias; Correia, Ângela; Zafar, Saima; Ferrer, Isidre; Zerr, Inga

    2016-01-01

    The identification of reliable diagnostic biomarkers in differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases is an ongoing topic. A previous two-dimensional proteomic study on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) revealed an elevated level of an enzyme, mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase 1 (MDH1), in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) patients. Here, we could demonstrate the expression of MDH1 in neurons as well as in the neuropil. Its levels are lower in sCJD brains than in control brains. An examination of CSF-MDH1 in sCJD patients by ELISA revealed a significant elevation of CSF-MDH1 levels in sCJD patients (independently from the PRNP codon 129 MV genotype or the prion protein scrapie (PrPSc) type) in comparison to controls. In combination with total tau (tau), CSF-MDH1 detection exhibited a high diagnostic accuracy for sCJD diagnosis with a sensitivity of 97.5% and a specificity of 95.6%. A correlation study of MDH1 level in CSF with other neurodegenerative marker proteins revealed a significant positive correlation between MDH1 concentration with tau, 14-3-3 and neuron specific enolase level. In conclusion, our study indicated the potential of MDH1 in combination with tau as an additional biomarker in sCJD improving diagnostic accuracy of tau markedly. PMID:27852982

  1. Altered microRNA profiles in cerebrospinal fluid exosome in Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Gui, YaXing; Liu, Hai; Zhang, LiShan; Lv, Wen; Hu, XingYue

    2015-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of Parkinson's diseases (PD) is challenging, especially in the early stages of the disease. We developed a microRNA profiling strategy for exosomal miRNAs isolated from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in PD and AD. Sixteen exosomal miRNAs were up regulated and 11 miRNAs were under regulated significantly in PD CSF when compared with those in healthy controls (relative fold > 2, p < 0.05). MiR-1 and miR-19b-3p were validated and significantly reduced in independent samples. While miR-153, miR-409-3p, miR-10a-5p, and let-7g-3p were significantly over expressed in PD CSF exosome. Bioinformatic analysis by DIANA-mirPath demonstrated that Neurotrophin signaling, mTOR signaling, Ubiquitin mediated proteolysis, Dopaminergic synapse, and Glutamatergic synapse were the most prominent pathways enriched in quantiles with PD miRNA patterns. Messenger RNA (mRNA) transcripts [amyloid precursor protein, APP), α-synuclein (α-syn), Tau, neurofilament, light gene (NF-L), DJ-1/PARK7, Fractalkine and Neurosin] and long non-coding RNAs (RP11-462G22.1 and PCA3) were differentially expressed in CSF exosomes in PD and AD patients. These data demonstrated that CSF exosomal RNA molecules are reliable biomarkers with fair robustness in regard to specificity and sensitivity in differentiating PD from healthy and diseased (AD) controls. PMID:26497684

  2. Pneumocephalus leading to the diagnosis of cerebrospinal fluid leak and esophageal perforation after cervical spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, C Rory; Boone, Christine E; Pendleton, James; Elder, Benjamin D; Wei, Zhikui; Hsu, Wesley; Sciubba, Daniel M; Witham, Timothy F

    2016-04-01

    Pneumocephalus is a collection of air within in the intracranial cavity, most commonly seen following traumatic injury or cranial surgeries. Esophageal injury and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak are rare complications that may occur following anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). We present a novel case of pneumocephalus arising from unrestricted leakage of CSF via coincident esophageal injury and durotomy in a patient who underwent an ACDF after trauma. A 21-year-old man presented to an outside hospital with C5/C6 subluxation, complete spinal cord injury, and quadriplegia from a motor vehicle accident. He underwent an ACDF, during which a CSF leak was observed. He was then transferred to our institution for rehabilitation and tracheostomy placement 1 week after the ACDF surgery. Following the tracheostomy, the patient developed intractable fevers and nonspecific symptoms. A CT scan demonstrated frontal pneumocephalus without mass effect. Air was found in the retropharyngeal space. There were no accumulations of CSF in the neck. Extravasation of contrast around instrumentation at C5/C6 on a cine esophagogram demonstrated an esophageal perforation at that level. Pneumocephalus may form when large volumes of CSF escape from the intracranial space and air is drawn into the space by the negative pressure. In this unusual case, the esophageal perforation promoted the formation of the pneumocephalus. Treatment included closure of both defects, disrupting the suspected communication between the intracranial space and the esophagus. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Effect of inhaled nitric oxide on cerebrospinal fluid and blood nitrite concentrations in newborn lambs

    PubMed Central

    Conahey, George R.; Power, Gordon G.; Hopper, Andrew O.; Terry, Michael H.; Kirby, Laura S.; Blood, Arlin B.

    2009-01-01

    Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) has many extrapulmonary effects. As the half-life of NO in blood is orders of magnitude less than the circulation time from lungs to the brain, the mediator of systemic effects of iNO is unknown. We hypothesized that concentrations of nitrite, a circulating byproduct of NO with demonstrated NO bioactivity, would increase in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) during iNO therapy. iNO (80ppm) was given to six newborn lambs and results compared to six control lambs. Blood and CSF nitrite concentrations increased two-fold in response to iNO. cGMP increased in blood but not CSF suggesting brain guanylate cyclase activity was not increased. When sodium nitrite was infused intravenously blood and CSF nitrite levels increased within 10 min and reached similar levels of 14.6±1.5 µM after 40 min. The reactivity of nitrite in hemoglobin-free brain homogenates was investigated, with the findings that nitrite did not disappear nor did measurable amounts of s-nitroso, n-nitroso, or iron-nitrosyl-species appear. We conclude that although nitrite diffuses freely between blood and CSF, due to its lack of reactivity in the brain, nitrite’s putative role as the mediator of the systemic effects of iNO is limited to intravascular reactions. PMID:18535482

  4. Determination of metabolic organic acids in cerebrospinal fluid by microchip electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Danč, Ladislav; Bodor, Róbert; Troška, Peter; Horčičiak, Michal; Masár, Marián

    2014-08-01

    A new MCE method for the determination of oxalic, citric, glycolic, lactic, and 2- and 3-hydroxybutyric acids, indicators of some metabolic and neurological diseases, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was developed. MCE separations were performed on a PMMA microchip with coupled channels at lower pH (5.5) to prevent proteins interference. A double charged counter-ion, BIS-TRIS propane, was very effective in resolving the studied organic acids. The limits of detection (S/N = 3) ranging from 0.1 to 1.6 μM were obtained with the aid of contact conductivity detector implemented directly on the microchip. RSDs for migration time and peak area of organic acids in artificial and CSF samples were <0.8 and <9.7%, respectively. Recoveries of organic acids in untreated CSF samples on the microchip varied from 91 to 104%. Elimination of chloride interference, a major anionic constituent of CSF, has been reached by two approaches: (i) the use of coupled channels microchip in a column switching mode when approximately 97-99% of chloride was removed electrophoretically in the first separation channel and (ii) the implementation of micro-SPE with silver-form resin prior to the MCE analysis, which selectively removed chloride from undeproteinized CSF samples.

  5. Tau protein concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Jiménez, F J; Zurdo, J M; Hernanz, A; Medina-Acebrón, S; de Bustos, F; Barcenilla, B; Sayed, Y; Ayuso-Peralta, L

    2002-12-01

    FUNDAMENTALS AND OBJECTIVE: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the prototype of demyelinating disease, but recently, it has been shown that the existence of axonal lesions contribute to irreversible central nervous system damage in this disease. Tau proteins are considered to be important for maintaining the stability of axonal microtubules involved in the mediation of fast axonal transport of synaptic constituents. There have been reports of increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau concentrations in patients with MS, and it has been suggested that this could be a marker of axonal damage. The objective of the present study was to elucidate whether CSF tau levels could be a marker of MS activity. We measured tau concentrations in the CSF of 20 patients with MS (nine in the first, seven in the second, one in the fourth exacerbation, and three patients with chronic progressive course) and 32 age- and sex-matched controls, using a specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. The CSF tau concentrations of patients with MS did not differ from those of controls, and they were not correlated with age at onset and duration of the disease. CSF tau concentrations are not a marker of MS activity. Copyright Blackwell Munksgaard 2002

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid Th1/Th2 cytokine profiles in children with enterovirus 71-associated meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Li, Huajun; Li, Shuxian; Zheng, Jianfeng; Cai, Chunyan; Ye, Bin; Yang, Jun; Chen, Zhimin

    2015-03-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection can cause severe neurological complications including meningoencephalitis (ME) in some patients with hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). However, to date no studies have reported changes in cytokine concentrations and their correlations with clinical variables in patients with ME following EV71 infection. In this study, responses of Th1/Th2 cytokine, including IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α and IFN-γ, in cerebrospinal fluid (