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Sample records for cerebrospinal fluid stasis

  1. Abdominal cerebrospinal fluid pseudocysts.

    PubMed

    Erşahin, Y; Mutluer, S; Tekeli, G

    1996-12-01

    Abdominal cerebrospinal fluid pseudocyst in an infrequent complication of ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunts. We reviewed ten patients with abdominal pseudocyst. There were five girls and five boys, aged between 4 months and 14 years. The number of shunt procedures prior to the presentation varied between one and five. Only one patient had had a previous shunt infection. No patients had undergone prior abdominal surgery other than VP shunting. The time from the last shunting procedure to the development of abdominal pseudocyst ranged from 3 weeks to 5 years. Presenting symptoms and signs were mainly related to abdominal complaints in all patients. Three patients also had signs of shunt malfunction. The diagnosis was made by ultrasound in all patients. Shunt infection was determined in six patients. Repositioning if the peritoneal catheter seemed to have a higher rate of recurrence. The diagnosis of abdominal pseudocyst should be considered in VP-shunted patients presenting with abdominal complaints.

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a laboratory test to look for bacteria, fungi, and viruses in the fluid that moves in ... culture medium. Laboratory staff then observe if bacteria, fungi, or viruses grow in the dish. Growth means ...

  3. [Cerebrospinal fluid syndrome in neuroschistosomiasis].

    PubMed

    Livramento, J A; Machado, L R; da Silva, L C; Spina-França, A

    1985-12-01

    A study was made of 220 samples of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients who suffered from several diseases of the central nervous system. In all samples immunological reactions for syphilis, cysticercosis, toxoplasmosis, Chagas' disease and schistosomiasis were studied comparatively. Immunofluorescent reactions for schistosomiasis were made by indirect antiglobulin technic with two types of antigen: the worm and the liver granuloma of hamster infected by Schistosoma mansoni. Emphasis is given on data concerning to 16 cases in which these reactions were reagent. The importance of routine search in the CSF for schistosomiasis antibodies is discussed. The concept of a 'CSF neuroschistosomiasis syndrome' is discussed as the main aspect of diagnosis "in vivo" of the disease. It is supported by the demonstration of specific antibodies in the CSF. Hypercytosis of lymphomononuclear type associated to the presence of eosinophil cells, protein concentration increase and gamma globulins increase are other characteristics found in the CSF in this syndrome. PMID:3938654

  4. The maze of the cerebrospinal fluid discovery.

    PubMed

    Herbowski, Leszek

    2013-01-01

    The author analyzes a historical, long, and tortuous way to discover the cerebrospinal fluid. At least 35 physicians and anatomists described in the text have laid the fundamentals of recognition of this biological fluid's presence. On the basis of crucial anatomical, experimental, and clinical works there are four greatest physicians who should be considered as equal cerebrospinal fluid's discoverers: Egyptian Imhotep, Venetian Nicolo Massa, Italian Domenico Felice Cotugno, and French François Magendie.

  5. The Maze of the Cerebrospinal Fluid Discovery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The author analyzes a historical, long, and tortuous way to discover the cerebrospinal fluid. At least 35 physicians and anatomists described in the text have laid the fundamentals of recognition of this biological fluid's presence. On the basis of crucial anatomical, experimental, and clinical works there are four greatest physicians who should be considered as equal cerebrospinal fluid's discoverers: Egyptian Imhotep, Venetian Nicolo Massa, Italian Domenico Felice Cotugno, and French François Magendie. PMID:24396600

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid flow in adults.

    PubMed

    Bradley, William G; Haughton, Victor; Mardal, Kent-Andre

    2016-01-01

    This chapter uses magnetic resonance imaging phase-contrast cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow measurements to predict which clinical normal-pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) patients will respond to shunting as well as which patients with Chiari I are likely to develop symptoms of syringomyelia. Symptomatic NPH patients with CSF flow (measured as the aqueductal CSF stroke volume) which is shown to be hyperdynamic (defined as twice normal) are quite likely to respond to ventriculoperitoneal shunting. The hyperdynamic CSF flow results from normal systolic brain expansion compressing the enlarged ventricles. When atrophy occurs, there is less brain expansion, decreased aqueductal CSF flow, and less likelihood of responding to shunting. It appears that NPH is a "two-hit" disease, starting as benign external hydrocephalus in infancy, followed by deep white-matter ischemia in late adulthood, which causes increased resistance to CSF outflow through the extracellular space of the brain. Using computational flow dynamics (CFD), CSF flow can be modeled at the foramen magnum and in the upper cervical spine. As in the case of NPH, hyperdynamic CSF flow appears to cause the signs and symptoms in Chiari I and can provide an additional indication for surgical decompression. CFD can also predict CSF pressures over the cardiac cycle. It has been hypothesized that elevated pressure pulses may be a significant etiologic factor in some cases of syringomyelia. PMID:27432684

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid leaks following septoplasty.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Naren N; Mattox, Douglas E; Del Gaudio, John M

    2014-12-01

    We conducted a retrospective review to identify the characteristics of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak in patients who had undergone septoplasty and in selected patients who had experienced a spontaneous CSF leak. CSF leak is a known but infrequently reported complication of septoplasty; to the best of our knowledge, only 4 cases have been previously published in the literature. A review of our institution's database revealed 3 cases of postseptoplasty CSF leak. We reviewed all the available data to look for any commonalities among these 7 cases. In addition, we reviewed 6 cases of spontaneous CSF leak selected from our database for the same purpose. For all patients, we noted the side of the cribriform plate defect, its size and, for the postseptoplasty cases, the interval between the septoplasty and the leak repair. Overall, we found that leaks were much more common on the right side than on the left. The sizes of the leaks in the 2 postseptoplasty groups were comparable (mean: 14.0 × 6.4 mm). The interval between septoplasty and leak repair ranged from 2.5 to 20 years in our cases and from 3 days to 22 weeks in the previously published cases. All 3 of the postseptoplasty patients in our database presented with clear rhinorrhea. Two of the 3 patients had meningitis; 1 of these 2 also had pneumocephalus. Of the 6 cases of spontaneous CSF leaks, 4 occurred on the right and 2 on the left; the average size of the defect was 5.8 mm in the greatest dimension. The finding that cribriform plate defects after septoplasty were typically right-sided likely reflects the prevalence of left-sided surgical approaches. Also, the fact that the defects were larger in the postseptoplasty cases than in the spontaneous cases is likely attributable to the torque effect toward the thin skull base that occurs when the perpendicular plate is twisted during septoplasty.

  8. [Blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier in purulent cerebrospinal meningitis].

    PubMed

    Przyjałkowski, W; Lipowski, D; Kolasa, T; Issa, E; Olejnik, Z

    1996-01-01

    Our investigations concerned the blood-brain barrier (b.b.b.) in patients with acute bacterial purulent meningitis. For that purpose concentrations of proteins, which are synthesized beyond the central nervous system and in normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) exist only in slight amounts, were determined in CSF and in blood serum. Albumin was examined in the CSF of 59 patients and in the serum of 35 of them, transferrin of 40 and 32 patients, respectively. Etiological verification was obtained in 84.7% of patients. The control group consisted of 20 persons. Quantitative analytical tests were carried out by means of immunochemical, turbidimetric methods. High levels of albumin and transferrin in CSF and low in serum of patients with meningitis were observed. The obtained results, confirmed by statistical analysis, demonstrate that in the acute phase of purulent meningitis b.b.b is impaired, what leads to the transfer of the proteins from the blood serum into the cerebrospinal fluid and that transferrins a better indicator of the damage to blood-brain barrier than albumin. PMID:8657349

  9. Acrylamide exposure impairs blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xue; Yan, Licheng; Yao, Lin; Guan, Weijun; Zeng, Fanxu; Cao, Fuyuan; Zhang, Yanshu

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies show that chronic acrylamide exposure leads to central and peripheral neu-ropathy. However, the underlying mechanisms remained unclear. In this study, we examined the permeability of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier, and its ability to secrete transthyretin and transport leptin of rats exposed to acrylamide for 7, 14, 21 or 28 days. Transthyretin levels in cerebrospinal fluid began to decline on day 7 after acrylamide exposure. The sodium fluorescein level in cerebrospinal fluid was increased on day 14 after exposure. Evans blue concentration in cerebrospinal fluid was increased and the cerebrospinal fluid/serum leptin ratio was decreased on days 21 and 28 after exposure. In comparison, the cerebrospinal fluid/serum albumin ratio was increased on day 28 after exposure. Our findings show that acrylamide exposure damages the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier and impairs secretory and transport functions. These changes may underlie acrylamide-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:25206854

  10. [Cerebrospinal fluid diagnostics for neuroinfectious diseases].

    PubMed

    Spreer, A; Nau, R

    2015-02-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid analysis is of prime importance to establish an early diagnosis of central nervous system infections. Beside the basic diagnostics containing CSF white cell count, lactate concentration and protein analysis, the targeted search for agents of bacterial, viral or fungal CNS infectious diseases is essential. Decisive methods are bacterial and fungal staining techniques, microbiological culture methods, nucleic acid amplification and antigen detection methods or indirect identification of pathogens by serologic testings including the determination of pathogen-specific intrathecal immunoglobulin synthesis. Besides imparting basic principles of cerebrospinal fluid analysis, this article focuses on special aspects of detection of infectious agents. Well-directed questions and a close communication between clinician and laboratory allow optimal diagnostic analysis for successful confirmation of the diagnosis and for optimal treatment of the patient. PMID:25723775

  11. Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak at the clivus

    PubMed Central

    Składzien, Jacek; Betlej, Marek; Chrzan, Robert; Mika, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    We present a case report of a 60-year-old woman with a spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak at the clivus, obesity and no history of trauma. Follow-up imaging scans confirmed enlargement of the defect within the posterior clival framework to the size of 16 × 9 × 4 mm with a suspected meningocerebral hernia. The surgeons used the “two nostrils – four hands” endoscopic operating technique. The patient reported a history of cerebrospinal fluid leaks lasting for 3 years, with increasingly shorter leak-free periods and an increasing incidence of inflammatory complications. The patient recovered without complications, and she was discharged 14 days after the surgery. Good local outcome and improved patient condition were achieved postoperatively. PMID:26865899

  12. Reovirus type 2 isolated from cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Laura; Embree, Joanne; Hazelton, Paul; Wells, Barbara; Coombs, R T Kevin

    2004-04-01

    An 8-week-old female infant presented with a history of active varicella complicated by Escherichia coli sepsis, oral thrush, hypoalbuminemia, intermittent fevers, diarrhea and feeding intolerance. Rhesus monkey kidney cells inoculated with cerebrospinal fluid revealed reovirus-like particles by electron microscopy. Virus neutralization and RNA-gel electrophoresis studies identified the isolated pathogen as reovirus serotype 2. This report represents one of only a few to isolate reovirus from the central nervous system in humans.

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid tau proteins in status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Monti, Giulia; Tondelli, Manuela; Giovannini, Giada; Bedin, Roberta; Nichelli, Paolo F; Trenti, Tommaso; Meletti, Stefano; Chiari, Annalisa

    2015-08-01

    Tau protein is a phosphorylated microtubule-associated protein, principally localized at neuronal level in the central nervous system (CNS). Tau levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are considered to index both axonal and neuronal damage. To date, however, no study has specifically evaluated the CSF levels of tau proteins in patients with status epilepticus (SE). We evaluated these established biomarkers of neuronal damage in patients with SE who received a lumbar puncture during SE between 2007 and 2014. Status epilepticus cases due to acute structural brain damage, including CNS infection, were excluded. Clinical, biological, therapeutic, and follow-up data were collected. Group comparison between patients stratified according to SE response to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), disability, and epilepsy outcomes were performed. Twenty-eight patients were considered for the analyses (mean age 56 years): 14 patients had abnormally high CSF t-tau level, six patients had abnormally high CSF p-tau level, and only three patients had abnormally low Aβ1-42 level. Cerebrospinal fluid t-tau value was higher in patients who developed a refractory SE compared to patients with seizures controlled by AED. Cerebrospinal fluid t-tau values were positively correlated with SE duration and were higher in patients treated with propofol anesthesia compared to patients that had not received this treatment. Patients with higher CSF t-tau had higher risk of developing disability (OR = 32.5, p = 0.004) and chronic epilepsy (OR = 12; p = 0.016) in comparison with patients with lower CSF t-tau level. Our results suggest that CSF t-tau level might be proposed as a biomarker of SE severity and prognosis. Prospective studies are needed to evaluate the effects of propofol on tau pathology in this setting. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Status Epilepticus".

  14. Extracranial repair of cerebrospinal fluid otorhinorrhea

    SciTech Connect

    Persky, M.S.; Rothstein, S.G.; Breda, S.D.; Cohen, N.L.; Cooper, P.; Ransohoff, J. )

    1991-02-01

    Forty-eight patients with cerebrospinal fluid leaks comprise this retrospective study. There were 39 traumatic and 9 spontaneous leaks. Nine patients were initially managed with bed rest and spinal drainage, but 3 patients in this group ultimately required surgical intervention for repair of their persistent leaks. Thirty-nine patients had surgery as initial therapy, with 33 extracranial repairs, 2 intracranial repairs, and 4 combined approaches. The extracranial approach was used in 36 of 42 patients, with an initial success rate of 86%.

  15. Volumetric relief map for intracranial cerebrospinal fluid distribution analysis.

    PubMed

    Lebret, Alain; Kenmochi, Yukiko; Hodel, Jérôme; Rahmouni, Alain; Decq, Philippe; Petit, Éric

    2015-09-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid imaging plays a significant role in the clinical diagnosis of brain disorders, such as hydrocephalus and Alzheimer's disease. While three-dimensional images of cerebrospinal fluid are very detailed, the complex structures they contain can be time-consuming and laborious to interpret. This paper presents a simple technique that represents the intracranial cerebrospinal fluid distribution as a two-dimensional image in such a way that the total fluid volume is preserved. We call this a volumetric relief map, and show its effectiveness in a characterization and analysis of fluid distributions and networks in hydrocephalus patients and healthy adults.

  16. Hourly analysis of cerebrospinal fluid glucose shows large diurnal fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Verbeek, Marcel M; Leen, Wilhelmina G; Willemsen, Michèl A; Slats, Diane; Claassen, Jurgen A

    2016-05-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid analysis is important in the diagnostics of many neurological disorders. Since the influence of food intake on the cerebrospinal fluid glucose concentration and the cerebrospinal fluid/plasma glucose ratio is largely unknown, we studied fluctuations in these parameters in healthy adult volunteers during a period of 36 h. Our observations show large physiological fluctuations of cerebrospinal fluid glucose and the cerebrospinal fluid/plasma glucose ratio, and their relation to food intake. These findings provide novel insights into the physiology of cerebral processes dependent on glucose levels such as energy formation (e.g. glycolysis), enzymatic reactions (e.g. glycosylation), and non-enzymatic reactions (e.g. advanced endproduct glycation).

  17. A new look at cerebrospinal fluid circulation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    According to the traditional understanding of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) physiology, the majority of CSF is produced by the choroid plexus, circulates through the ventricles, the cisterns, and the subarachnoid space to be absorbed into the blood by the arachnoid villi. This review surveys key developments leading to the traditional concept. Challenging this concept are novel insights utilizing molecular and cellular biology as well as neuroimaging, which indicate that CSF physiology may be much more complex than previously believed. The CSF circulation comprises not only a directed flow of CSF, but in addition a pulsatile to and fro movement throughout the entire brain with local fluid exchange between blood, interstitial fluid, and CSF. Astrocytes, aquaporins, and other membrane transporters are key elements in brain water and CSF homeostasis. A continuous bidirectional fluid exchange at the blood brain barrier produces flow rates, which exceed the choroidal CSF production rate by far. The CSF circulation around blood vessels penetrating from the subarachnoid space into the Virchow Robin spaces provides both a drainage pathway for the clearance of waste molecules from the brain and a site for the interaction of the systemic immune system with that of the brain. Important physiological functions, for example the regeneration of the brain during sleep, may depend on CSF circulation. PMID:24817998

  18. Imhotep and the discovery of cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Blomstedt, Patric

    2014-01-01

    Herbowski (2013) suggested recently the Egyptian Imhotep from the 3rd dynasty in Egypt to be the discoverer of cerebrospinal fluid. There are, however, no sources within the first 2000 years after Imhotep suggesting him to be in any way connected with the field of medicine. Over the course of three millennia Imhotep evolves into the sage who besides architecture also masters the arts of medicine, magic, astronomy, and astrology, at the same time as him being transformed from man to demi-God, and finally to a God. The identification of Imhotep as a doctor has thus little to do with facts and it is unlikely that he had anything to do with the Edwin-Smith papyrus from a much later period where CSF is first mentioned.

  19. Characterization of individual mouse cerebrospinal fluid proteomes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeffrey S.; Angel, Thomas E.; Chavkin, Charles; Orton, Daniel J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-03-20

    Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) offers key insight into the status of the central nervous system. Characterization of murine CSF proteomes can provide a valuable resource for studying central nervous system injury and disease in animal models. However, the small volume of CSF in mice has thus far limited individual mouse proteome characterization. Through non-terminal CSF extractions in C57Bl/6 mice and high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of individual murine samples, we report the most comprehensive proteome characterization of individual murine CSF to date. Utilizing stringent protein inclusion criteria that required the identification of at least two unique peptides (1% false discovery rate at the peptide level) we identified a total of 566 unique proteins, including 128 proteins from three individual CSF samples that have been previously identified in brain tissue. Our methods and analysis provide a mechanism for individual murine CSF proteome analysis.

  20. Imhotep and the Discovery of Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Blomstedt, Patric

    2014-01-01

    Herbowski (2013) suggested recently the Egyptian Imhotep from the 3rd dynasty in Egypt to be the discoverer of cerebrospinal fluid. There are, however, no sources within the first 2000 years after Imhotep suggesting him to be in any way connected with the field of medicine. Over the course of three millennia Imhotep evolves into the sage who besides architecture also masters the arts of medicine, magic, astronomy, and astrology, at the same time as him being transformed from man to demi-God, and finally to a God. The identification of Imhotep as a doctor has thus little to do with facts and it is unlikely that he had anything to do with the Edwin-Smith papyrus from a much later period where CSF is first mentioned. PMID:24744920

  1. [Infection of cerebrospinal fluid shunt systems].

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Mejías, Manuel E; García-Cabrera, Emilio

    2008-04-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt infection is a cause of considerable morbidity and mortality. Shunt infection is produced mainly during surgery and by surgical wound infection. Staphylococcus spp. (> 50% methicillin-resistant) are the most common causative bacteria, although gram-negative bacilli (10%-25%) and Propionibacterium acnes are becoming increasingly implicated. Shunt malfunction syndrome and fever are the most frequent clinical manifestations, whereas signs of meningeal irritation are uncommon. Other clinical manifestations depend on the location of the distal catheter. CSF should be obtained by puncture of the shunt reservoir or the distal catheter and processed for biochemical analyses, cell count, Gram stain, and aerobic and anaerobic cultures (lengthy incubation). Because of biofilm formation and to avoid recurrences, the recommended treatment is intravenous antibiotics plus removal of all components of the infected shunt, followed by placement of an external drainage catheter and a new shunt. Prophylaxis is important and can include antimicrobial prophylaxis and/or antibiotic-impregnated catheters.

  2. Imhotep and the discovery of cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Blomstedt, Patric

    2014-01-01

    Herbowski (2013) suggested recently the Egyptian Imhotep from the 3rd dynasty in Egypt to be the discoverer of cerebrospinal fluid. There are, however, no sources within the first 2000 years after Imhotep suggesting him to be in any way connected with the field of medicine. Over the course of three millennia Imhotep evolves into the sage who besides architecture also masters the arts of medicine, magic, astronomy, and astrology, at the same time as him being transformed from man to demi-God, and finally to a God. The identification of Imhotep as a doctor has thus little to do with facts and it is unlikely that he had anything to do with the Edwin-Smith papyrus from a much later period where CSF is first mentioned. PMID:24744920

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid hypovolemia syndrome with benign course

    PubMed Central

    Ramesha, K. N.; Chandrashekaran, Kesavadas; Thomas, Sanjeev V.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The cerebrospinal fluid hypovolemia syndrome (CHS) is an under recognized cause of headache. This study was designed to highlight the clinico-radiological and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) picture of CHS and their long-term outcome from a tertiary referral center. Materials and Methods: The CHS was diagnosed on the basis of the criteria proposed by Chung et al. Cases with CSF rhinorrhoea or other CSF leak or head trauma were excluded from the study. Results: The study included eight consecutive cases of CHS diagnosed over the past 7 years from 2001. The mean age at diagnosis was 40.7 years (range, 34-56 years) and male-to-female ratio was 1:3. All patients presented with orthostatic headache of subacute onset and normal neurological examination. Magnetic resonance imaging studies of all patients showed hyperintensity of pachymeninges in T2W sequences, venous distension sign, and diffuse pachymeningeal gadolinium enhancement. The descent of the brainstem and subdural effusion were noted in two each (25%). CSF study (n = 5) showed low opening pressure in three (60%), and mild pleocytosis with elevated protein in two each (40%). The mean time to complete recovery with conservative treatment alone was 25.6 days. All radiological signs disappeared with clinical improvement in three patients where follow-up imaging was done. On mean follow-up period of 3.6 years, all were asymptomatic without any recurrence of CHS. Conclusion: CHS can resolve completely with conservative management and intervention with subdural blood patch or surgical repair would be required only if symptoms persist for more than 1 month. PMID:21264139

  4. Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage after Thoracic Decompression

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Pan-Pan; Liu, Xiao-Guang; Yu, Miao

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to review cerebrospinal fluid leakage (CSFL) after thoracic decompression and describe its regular and special features. Data Sources: Literature cited in this review was retrieved from PubMed and Medline and was primarily published during the last 10 years. “Cerebrospinal fluid”, “leakage”, “dural tears”, and “thoracic decompression” were the indexed terms. Relevant citations in the retrieved articles were also screened to include more data. Study Selection: All retrieved literature was scrutinized, and four categories were recorded: incidence and risk factors, complications, treatment modalities, and prognosis. Results: CSFL is much more frequent after thoracic decompression than after cervical and lumbar spinal surgeries. Its occurrence is related to many clinical factors, especially the presence of ossified ligaments and the adhesion of the dural sac. While its impact on the late neurological recovery is currently controversial, CSFL increases the risk of other perioperative complications, such as low intracranial pressure symptoms, infection, and vascular events. The combined use of primary repairs during the operation and conservative treatment postoperatively is generally effective for most CSFL cases, whereas lumbar drains and reoperations should be implemented as rescue options for refractory cases only. Conclusions: CSFL after thoracic decompression has not been specifically investigated, so the present study provides a systematic and comprehensive review of the issue. CSFL is a multi-factor-related complication, and pathological factors play a decisive role. The importance of CSFL is in its impact on the increased risk of other complications during the postoperative period. Methods to prevent these complications are in need. In addition, though the required treatment resources are not special for CSFL after thoracic decompression, most CSFL cases are conservatively curable, and surgeons should be

  5. Proteome analysis of chick embryonic cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Parada, Carolina; Gato, Angel; Aparicio, Mariano; Bueno, David

    2006-01-01

    During early stages of embryo development, the brain cavity is filled with embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (E-CSF), a complex fluid containing different protein fractions that contributes to the regulation of the survival, proliferation and neurogenesis of the neuroectodermal stem cells. Using 2-DE, protein sequencing and database searches, we identified and analyzed the proteome of the E-CSF from chick embryos (Gallus gallus). We identified 26 different gene products, including proteins related to the extracellular matrix, proteins associated with the regulation of osmotic pressure and metal transport, proteins related to cell survival, MAP kinase activators, proteins involved in the transport of retinol and vitamin D, antioxidant and antimicrobial proteins, intracellular proteins and some unknown proteins. Most of these gene products are involved in the regulation of developmental processes during embryogenesis in systems other than E-CSF. Interestingly, 14 of them are also present in adult human CSF proteome, and it has been reported that they are altered in the CSF of patients suffering neurodegenerative diseases and/or neurological disorders. Understanding these molecules and the mechanisms they control during embryonic neurogenesis is a key contribution to the general understanding of CNS development, and may also contribute to greater knowledge of these human diseases. PMID:16287170

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid composition modifications after neuroendoscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    Salvador, L; Valero, R; Carrero, E; Caral, L; Fernández, S; Marín, J L; Ferrer, E; Fábregas, N

    2007-02-01

    Normal saline solution is currently used as the ventricular irrigation fluid during neuroendoscopic procedures. The aim of this study is to determine the alterations in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) composition after neuroendoscopic interventions. Twenty nine patients who underwent a neuroendoscopic procedure under general anaesthesia were studied. Temperature inside the cerebral ventricle was measured and samples of CSF were taken to determinate oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures, pH, base excess, ionised calcium, standard bicarbonate, glucose, sodium, potassium, magnesium, total calcium, proteins, chlorine and osmolality before initiating the irrigation and after the neuronavigation. Patient demographics, neuronavigation time, total fluid volume used and temperature of the irrigation solution and complications that appeared in the first 24 hours were collected. Mean age of the patients was 42+/-18 years. The mean neuronavigation time was 21.5+/-15.4 minutes. The mean amount of saline solution used for irrigation was 919.6+/-994.7 mL. All the values studied in the CSF, except osmolality, showed significant variations. There was a significant correlation between the CSF variation of pH, oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures, base excess, standard bicarbonate, glucose and total calcium with respect to the total volume of irrigation solution, but not with respect to the neuronavigation time. A cut-off point of 500 mL of irrigation solution (sensitivity 0.7; specificity 0.87) was related with a CSF pH decrease greater than 0.2. The use of saline as irrigation solution during neuroendoscopic procedures produces important changes in CSF.

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid composition modifications after neuroendoscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    Salvador, L; Valero, R; Carrero, E; Caral, L; Fernández, S; Marín, J L; Ferrer, E; Fábregas, N

    2007-02-01

    Normal saline solution is currently used as the ventricular irrigation fluid during neuroendoscopic procedures. The aim of this study is to determine the alterations in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) composition after neuroendoscopic interventions. Twenty nine patients who underwent a neuroendoscopic procedure under general anaesthesia were studied. Temperature inside the cerebral ventricle was measured and samples of CSF were taken to determinate oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures, pH, base excess, ionised calcium, standard bicarbonate, glucose, sodium, potassium, magnesium, total calcium, proteins, chlorine and osmolality before initiating the irrigation and after the neuronavigation. Patient demographics, neuronavigation time, total fluid volume used and temperature of the irrigation solution and complications that appeared in the first 24 hours were collected. Mean age of the patients was 42+/-18 years. The mean neuronavigation time was 21.5+/-15.4 minutes. The mean amount of saline solution used for irrigation was 919.6+/-994.7 mL. All the values studied in the CSF, except osmolality, showed significant variations. There was a significant correlation between the CSF variation of pH, oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures, base excess, standard bicarbonate, glucose and total calcium with respect to the total volume of irrigation solution, but not with respect to the neuronavigation time. A cut-off point of 500 mL of irrigation solution (sensitivity 0.7; specificity 0.87) was related with a CSF pH decrease greater than 0.2. The use of saline as irrigation solution during neuroendoscopic procedures produces important changes in CSF. PMID:17546545

  8. Quantitative evaluation fo cerebrospinal fluid shunt flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chervu, S.; Chervu, L.R.; Vallabhajosyula, B.; Milstein, D.M.; Shapiro, K.M.; Shulman, K.; Blaufox, M.D.

    1984-01-01

    The authors describe a rigorous method for measuring the flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in shunt circuits implanted for the relief of obstructive hydrocephalus. Clearance of radioactivity for several calibrated flow rates was determined with a Harvard infusion pump by injecting the Rickham reservoir of a Rickham-Holter valve system with 100 ..mu..Ci of Tc-99m as pertechnetate. The elliptical and the cylindrical Holter valves used as adjunct valves with the Rickham reservoir yielded two different regression lines when the clearances were plotted against flow rats. The experimental regression lines were used to determine the in vivo flow rates from clearances calculated after injecting the Rickham reservoirs of the patients. The unique clearance characteristics of the individual shunt systems available requires that calibration curves be derived for an entire system identical to one implanted in the patient being evaluated, rather than just the injected chamber. Excellent correlation between flow rates and the clinical findings supports the reliability of this method of quantification of CSF shunt flow, and the results are fully accepted by neurosurgeons.

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis after unprovoked first seizure

    PubMed Central

    Zisimopoulou, Vaso; Mamali, Margarita; Katsavos, Serafeim; Siatouni, Anna; Tavernarakis, Antonios; Gatzonis, Stylianos

    2016-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to determine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) characteristics after an unprovoked first seizure (UFS). We reviewed the medical records of 71 patients with UFS who underwent lumbar puncture, and examined the CSF parameters. Each CSF parameter was evaluated separately for potential correlations with the other study variables. We observed an overall frequency of CSF abnormalities of 35.2%. CSF protein was the most common abnormal parameter (31%) and showed significant positive correlations with male gender (p=0.037) and older age (p=0.007). Only seven patients (9.9%) had an abnormal cell count (5–40 cells/μl). Higher CSF cell counts were found to predict a longer hospitalization period (p=0.005). No relationship with abnormal EEG findings could be established (p=0.169). This study is one of the few to evaluate postictal CSF parameters in a clinical setting, and to our knowledge the first to investigate these parameters specifically in the emergency department. The development of a rapid, easy-to-use test that does not require extensive laboratory equipment to differentiate UFS from other conditions could be of great value in everyday clinical practice. PMID:27358223

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolites and suicide.

    PubMed

    Jokinen, Jussi; Nordström, Anna-Lena; Nordström, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Prospective studies of the serotonergic system and suicide report that low 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and a history of attempted suicide predict suicide risk. Low CSF homovanillic acid (HVA) is reported to be associated with past and future lethality of suicide attempts but not with suicide. The interrelationships between monoamine metabolites, violent method, suicide intent and lethality of suicidal behaviour are complex. We hypothesized that CSF 5-HIAA and HVA levels are related to suicide intent, violence and lethality of suicidal behaviour. Fifteen male suicide attempters admitted to a psychiatric ward at the Karolinska University Hospital and eight healthy male volunteers were submitted to lumbar puncture and CSF 5-HIAA and HVA were assayed. Suicide intent with the Beck Suicide Intent Scale (SIS), lethality and violence of suicidal behaviour were assessed. All patients were followed up for causes of death. Six suicides and one fatal accident were identified with death certificates. Mean CSF 5-HIAA but not CSF HVA differed between suicides and survivors. Violent suicides had higher suicide intent and CSF 5-HIAA than non-violent suicides. In violent suicides, CSF 5-HIAA levels were negatively correlated with SIS. Greater suicide intent may be associated with greater aggressive intent and predicts a violent suicide method. PMID:19034712

  11. Case report. Isolation of Cladosporium cladosporioides from cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Kantarcioglu, A S; Yücel, A; de Hoog, G S

    2002-12-01

    Cladosporium cladosporioides was isolated from three subsequent cerebrospinal fluid specimens and from a brain biopsy specimen of a human patient. Susceptibility testing of the isolate was performed against seven antifungal agents.

  12. Endoscopic management of cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Parihar, Vijay; Janakiram, Narayanan; Pande, Sonjay; Bajaj, Jitin; Namdev, Hemant

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea occurs due to communication between the intracranial subarachnoid space and the sinonasal mucosa. It could be due to trauma, raised intracranial pressure (ICP), tumors, erosive diseases, and congenital skull defects. Some leaks could be spontaneous without any specific etiology. The potential leak sites include the cribriform plate, ethmoid, sphenoid, and frontal sinus. Glucose estimation, although non-specific, is the most popular and readily available method of diagnosis. Glucose concentration of > 30 mg/dl without any blood contamination strongly suggests presence and the absence of glucose rules out CSF in the fluid. Beta-2 transferrin test confirms the diagnosis. High-resolution computed tomography and magnetic resonance cisternography are complementary to each other and are the investigation of choice. Surgical intervention is indicated, when conservative management fails to prevent risk of meningitis. Endoscopic closure has revolutionized the management of CSF rhinorrhea due to its less morbidity and better closure rate. It is usually best suited for small defects in cribriform plate, sphenoid, and ethmoid sinus. Large defects can be repaired when sufficient experience is acquired. Most frontal sinus leaks, although difficult, can be successfully closed by modified Lothrop procedure. Factors associated with increased recurrences are middle age, obese female, raised ICP, diabetes mellitus, lateral sphenoid leaks, superior and lateral extension in frontal sinus, multiple leaks, and extensive skull base defects. Appropriate treatment for raised ICP, in addition to proper repair, should be done to prevent recurrence. Long follow-up is required before leveling successful repair as recurrences may occur very late. PMID:27366243

  13. Cerebrospinal Fluid Inflammatory Cytokines and Aggression in Personality Disordered Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Royce; Coussons-Read, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neurochemical studies have pointed to a modulatory role in human aggression for a variety of central neurotransmitters and neuromodulators such as cytokines. While animal studies of cytokines suggest an aggression-facilitating role for central cytokines, especially for interleukin-1β and other cytokines, no cerebrospinal fluid studies of cytokines have yet been reported in regard to human aggression. Methods: Basal lumbar cerebrospinal fluid samples were obtained from 38 physically healthy subjects with DSM-5 Personality Disorder and assayed for cerebrospinal fluid interleukin-6 (log IL-6) and cerebrospinal fluid soluble IL-1 Receptor II protein in the context of their relationship with measures of aggression. Results: Cerebrospinal fluid soluble interleukin-1 Receptor II (r=.35, r2 = .12, P= .03), but not log interleukin-6 (r = -.05, r2 = .00, P= .76), levels were positively correlated with a composite measure of aggression. Adding relevant covariates, including cerebrospinal fluid levels of serotonin and dopamine metabolites, to the statistical model doubled the strength of this relationship (partial r = .54, r2 = .29, P= .002). No relationship was seen with history of suicidal behavior or with any measure of impulsivity, negative affectivity, or of general dimensions of personality. Conclusion: These data suggest a positive relationship between at least one inflammatory cytokine in the central nervous system and aggression in human subjects. This finding adds to the complex picture of the central neurochemistry of impulsive aggression in human subjects. PMID:25650410

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid may mediate CNS ischemic injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanming F; Gwathmey, Judith K; Zhang, Guorong; Soriano, Sulpicio G; He, Shunli; Wang, Yanguang

    2005-01-01

    Background The central nervous system (CNS) is extremely vulnerable to ischemic injury. The details underlying this susceptibility are not completely understood. Since the CNS is surrounded by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that contains a low concentration of plasma protein, we examined the effect of changing the CSF in the evolution of CNS injury during ischemic insult. Methods Lumbar spinal cord ischemia was induced in rabbits by cross-clamping the descending abdominal aorta for 1 h, 2 h or 3 h followed by 7 d of reperfusion. Prior to ischemia, rabbits were subjected to the following procedures; 1) CSF depletion, 2) CSF replenishment at 0 mmHg intracranial pressure (ICP), and 3) replacement of CSF with 8% albumin- or 1% gelatin-modified artificial CSF, respectively. Motor function of the hind limbs and histopathological changes of the spinal cord were scored. Post-ischemic microcirculation of the spinal cord was visualized by fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) albumin. Results The severity of histopathological damage paralleled the neurological deficit scores. Paraplegia and associated histopathological changes were accompanied by a clear post-ischemic deficit in blood perfusion. Spinal cord ischemia for 1 h resulted in permanent paraplegia in the control group. Depletion of the CSF significantly prevented paraplegia. CSF replenishment with the ICP reduced to 0 mmHg, did not prevent paraplegia. Replacement of CSF with albumin- or gelatin-modified artificial CSF prevented paraplegia in rabbits even when the ICP was maintained at 10–15 mmHg. Conclusion We conclude that the presence of normal CSF may contribute to the vulnerability of the spinal cord to ischemic injury. Depletion of the CSF or replacement of the CSF with an albumin- or gelatin-modified artificial CSF can be neuroprotective. PMID:16174300

  15. [Diagnosis of spinal diseases by cerebrospinal fluid examination].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, R M

    1979-01-01

    In this work, changes in the cerebrospinal fluid in acute and chronic polyneuritis as well as in the Guillan-Barré-Strohl syndrome are discussed and and it is pointed out that a specific coordination of the inflammatory cerebrospinal fluid syndromes to certain pathogens or noxae cannot be made. For the differentiation of the Guillain-Barré-Strohl syndrome and existence of increased gamma-globulin bands with identical mobility in the serum is pointed out. In myelitic disease pictures, acute and chronic cerebrospinal fluid syndromes are distinguished also in the cerebrospinal fluid according to the clinical course; regular changes, however, cannot be derived. Syphilitic cerebrospinal-fluid syndromes can easily be differentiated by their immunoactive findings. In multiple sclerosis, we distinguish between typical and atypical changes in the cerebrospinal fluid. Above all, the oligoclonal bands, i. e. the discontinuous proceeding of the gamma-globulin zone and the existence of several bands in the agar gel electrophoresis, play an essential role. In 95 per cent of the cases, oligoclonal bands can be shown. There are no greater differences with respect to oligoclonal bands between intermittent and chronic-progressive courses. For the differential diagnosis of haemorrhagic syndromes, the cerebrospinal fluid cell picture can make a considerable contribution. Macrophages loaded with erythrocytes indicate that a haemorrhage occurred 12 to 18 hours before; macrophages loaded with haemosiderin indicate a haemorrhage that occurred 6 to 8 days before; and macrophages loaded with erythrocytes and haemosiderin indicate a seeping haemorrhage or an event that occurred several times. The Nonne-Froin syndrome indicates a massive protein increase often with a regular or only slightly increased number of cells. The importance of the Queckenstedt tests is pointed out. A particular role is played by meningitis carcinomatosa et sarcomatosa with the demonstration of a great number of

  16. The 1H NMR Profile of Healthy Dog Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Musteata, Mihai; Nicolescu, Alina; Solcan, Gheorghe; Deleanu, Calin

    2013-01-01

    The availability of data for reference values in cerebrospinal fluid for healthy humans is limited due to obvious practical and ethical issues. The variability of reported values for metabolites in human cerebrospinal fluid is quite large. Dogs present great similarities with humans, including in cases of central nervous system pathologies. The paper presents the first study on healthy dog cerebrospinal fluid metabolomic profile using 1H NMR spectroscopy. A number of 13 metabolites have been identified and quantified from cerebrospinal fluid collected from a group of 10 mix breed healthy dogs. The biological variability as resulting from the relative standard deviation of the physiological concentrations of the identified metabolites had a mean of 18.20% (range between 9.3% and 44.8%). The reported concentrations for metabolites may be used as normal reference values. The homogeneity of the obtained results and the low biologic variability show that the 1H NMR analysis of the dog’s cerebrospinal fluid is reliable in designing and interpreting clinical and therapeutic trials in dogs with central nervous system pathologies. PMID:24376499

  17. Alzheimer's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarker in cognitively normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Jon B; Zetterberg, Henrik; van Harten, Argonde C; Glodzik, Lidia; Martinez-Lage, Pablo; Bocchio-Chiavetto, Luisella; Rami, Lorena; Hansson, Oskar; Sperling, Reisa; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Osorio, Ricardo S; Vanderstichele, Hugo; Vandijck, Manu; Hampel, Harald; Teipl, Stefan; Moghekar, Abhay; Albert, Marilyn; Hu, William T; Monge Argilés, Jose A; Gorostidi, Ana; Teunissen, Charlotte E; De Deyn, Peter P; Hyman, Bradley T; Molinuevo, Jose L; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Linazasoro, Gurutz; de Leon, Mony J; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Scheltens, Philip; Blennow, Kaj; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q

    2015-09-01

    In a large multicentre sample of cognitively normal subjects, as a function of age, gender and APOE genotype, we studied the frequency of abnormal cerebrospinal fluid levels of Alzheimer's disease biomarkers including: total tau, phosphorylated tau and amyloid-β1-42. Fifteen cohorts from 12 different centres with either enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays or Luminex® measurements were selected for this study. Each centre sent nine new cerebrospinal fluid aliquots that were used to measure total tau, phosphorylated tau and amyloid-β1-42 in the Gothenburg laboratory. Seven centres showed a high correlation with the new Gothenburg measurements; therefore, 10 cohorts from these centres are included in the analyses here (1233 healthy control subjects, 40-84 years old). Amyloid-β amyloid status (negative or positive) and neurodegeneration status (negative or positive) was established based on the pathological cerebrospinal fluid Alzheimer's disease cut-off values for cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β1-42 and total tau, respectively. While gender did not affect these biomarker values, APOE genotype modified the age-associated changes in cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers such that APOE ε4 carriers showed stronger age-related changes in cerebrospinal fluid phosphorylated tau, total tau and amyloid-β1-42 values and APOE ε2 carriers showed the opposite effect. At 40 years of age, 76% of the subjects were classified as amyloid negative, neurodegeneration negative and their frequency decreased to 32% at 85 years. The amyloid-positive neurodegeneration-negative group remained stable. The amyloid-negative neurodegeneration-positive group frequency increased slowly from 1% at 44 years to 16% at 85 years, but its frequency was not affected by APOE genotype. The amyloid-positive neurodegeneration-positive frequency increased from 1% at 53 years to 28% at 85 years. Abnormally low cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β1-42 levels were already frequent in midlife and APOE genotype strongly

  18. Alzheimer's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarker in cognitively normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Jon B; Zetterberg, Henrik; van Harten, Argonde C; Glodzik, Lidia; Martinez-Lage, Pablo; Bocchio-Chiavetto, Luisella; Rami, Lorena; Hansson, Oskar; Sperling, Reisa; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Osorio, Ricardo S; Vanderstichele, Hugo; Vandijck, Manu; Hampel, Harald; Teipl, Stefan; Moghekar, Abhay; Albert, Marilyn; Hu, William T; Monge Argilés, Jose A; Gorostidi, Ana; Teunissen, Charlotte E; De Deyn, Peter P; Hyman, Bradley T; Molinuevo, Jose L; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Linazasoro, Gurutz; de Leon, Mony J; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Scheltens, Philip; Blennow, Kaj; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q

    2015-09-01

    In a large multicentre sample of cognitively normal subjects, as a function of age, gender and APOE genotype, we studied the frequency of abnormal cerebrospinal fluid levels of Alzheimer's disease biomarkers including: total tau, phosphorylated tau and amyloid-β1-42. Fifteen cohorts from 12 different centres with either enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays or Luminex® measurements were selected for this study. Each centre sent nine new cerebrospinal fluid aliquots that were used to measure total tau, phosphorylated tau and amyloid-β1-42 in the Gothenburg laboratory. Seven centres showed a high correlation with the new Gothenburg measurements; therefore, 10 cohorts from these centres are included in the analyses here (1233 healthy control subjects, 40-84 years old). Amyloid-β amyloid status (negative or positive) and neurodegeneration status (negative or positive) was established based on the pathological cerebrospinal fluid Alzheimer's disease cut-off values for cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β1-42 and total tau, respectively. While gender did not affect these biomarker values, APOE genotype modified the age-associated changes in cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers such that APOE ε4 carriers showed stronger age-related changes in cerebrospinal fluid phosphorylated tau, total tau and amyloid-β1-42 values and APOE ε2 carriers showed the opposite effect. At 40 years of age, 76% of the subjects were classified as amyloid negative, neurodegeneration negative and their frequency decreased to 32% at 85 years. The amyloid-positive neurodegeneration-negative group remained stable. The amyloid-negative neurodegeneration-positive group frequency increased slowly from 1% at 44 years to 16% at 85 years, but its frequency was not affected by APOE genotype. The amyloid-positive neurodegeneration-positive frequency increased from 1% at 53 years to 28% at 85 years. Abnormally low cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β1-42 levels were already frequent in midlife and APOE genotype strongly

  19. Fluids and Barriers of the CNS: a new journal encompassing Cerebrospinal Fluid Research

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This article celebrates the re-launch of Cerebrospinal Fluid Research in its new format as Fluids and Barriers of the CNS. Editors-in Chief, Hazel Jones and Tetsuya Terasaki, anticipate that this expanded journal will provide a unique and specialist platform for the publication of research in cerebrospinal fluid and all brain barriers and fluid systems in both health and disease. PMID:21349146

  20. Application of transport phenomena analysis technique to cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Lam, C H; Hansen, E A; Hall, W A; Hubel, A

    2013-12-01

    The study of hydrocephalus and the modeling of cerebrospinal fluid flow have proceeded in the past using mathematical analysis that was very capable of prediction phenomenonologically but not well in physiologic parameters. In this paper, the basis of fluid dynamics at the physiologic state is explained using first established equations of transport phenomenon. Then, microscopic and molecular level techniques of modeling are described using porous media theory and chemical kinetic theory and then applied to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics. Using techniques of transport analysis allows the field of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics to approach the level of sophistication of urine and blood transport. Concepts such as intracellular and intercellular pathways, compartmentalization, and tortuosity are associated with quantifiable parameters that are relevant to the anatomy and physiology of cerebrospinal fluid transport. The engineering field of transport phenomenon is rich and steeped in architectural, aeronautical, nautical, and more recently biological history. This paper summarizes and reviews the approaches that have been taken in the field of engineering and applies it to CSF flow. PMID:24091435

  1. Transnasal endoscopic treatment of cerebrospinal fluid leak: 17 years’ experience

    PubMed Central

    Presutti, L; Mattioli, F; Villari, D; Marchioni, D; Alicandri-Ciufelli, M

    2009-01-01

    Summary Aim of this report is to describe the long-term results of endoscopic endonasal repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak using a septal mucoperichondrial graft. A case series of 52 patients operated for cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea between 1990 and 2006 is presented. All patients underwent surgical treatment for endoscopic endonasal closure of a cerebrospinal fluid leak using a septal mucoperichondrial graft. No lumbar drain and fluorescein tests were used. The intra-operative localization of the fistula was aided by Valsalva’s manoeuvre by the anaesthetist. The success rate, after the first attempt, was 88.5% (46/52 patients); for the remaining 11.5% (6/52 patients), a second attempt was necessary which proved successful in 5 cases, raising the overall success rate to 98.1% (51/52 patients). Relapse occurred in only one case (1.9%), after the second attempt. In conclusion, a free mucoperichondrial graft offered good results for cerebrospinal fluid leak repair. In the Authors’ experience, a high success rate can be achieved without the use of intrathecal fluorescein and lumbar drain. PMID:20161876

  2. [Diagnostic significance of immunologic study of cerebrospinal fluid in neuroinfections].

    PubMed

    Dekonenko, E P; Umanskiĭ, K G; Andreeva, L S

    1985-01-01

    An increase in the antibody titre in the blood serum, previously considered sufficient for determining the etiology of neuroinfection can no longer be regarded as a satisfactory index in the light of the contemporary level of our knowledge. The literature and the authors' own data show the importance of a simultaneous examination of antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid and the blood serum in some neuroinfections. For example, the determination in the cerebrospinal fluid of antibodies to herpes simplex virus in herpetic encephalitis is considered sufficient (in the presence of the characteristic clinical picture) to make the diagnosis of this severe disease. The examination of antibodies to herpes simplex virus in the cerebrospinal fluid of 35 patients with a suspected herpetic encephalitis revealed their presence in 34% of those studied. The data obtained suggest that immunoassay of the cerebrospinal fluid and blood sera should be used on a broader scale in patients with acute and chronic neuroinfections. The method plays an the early diagnosis of these diseases and early administration of the appropriate treatment.

  3. Coccidioides immitis presenting as a hyphal form in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Zepeda, M. R.; Kobayashi, G. K.; Appleman, M. D.; Navarro, A.

    1998-01-01

    This article reports a case of Coccidioides immitis that presented as a hyphal form in a 38-year-old patient. The organism was observed growing exclusively as hyphae in the cerebrospinal fluid by microscopic examination. Coccidioides immitis was the only organism cultured. The identification of C immitis was confirmed by both standard culture methods and DNA probe studies. Images Figure PMID:9685779

  4. Management of Anterior Skull Base Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks.

    PubMed

    Le, Christopher; Strong, E Bradley; Luu, Quang

    2016-10-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak occurs from traumatic, iatrogenic, and idiopathic etiologies. Its timely diagnosis requires clinical, radiographic, and laboratory testing. Medical and surgical management can mitigate the risk of life-threatening infection and morbidity. This article outlines the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management or CSF leak of the anterior skull base. PMID:27648397

  5. More Than the Brain's Drain: Does Cerebrospinal Fluid Help the Brain Convey Messages?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, John

    1999-01-01

    Examines the role of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), a clear, colorless liquid that constantly bathes the brain and spinal cord. Scientists argue that cerebrospinal fluid carries important signals for sleep, appetite, and sex. Evaluates past and current research documenting the purpose of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain. (CCM)

  6. Cerebrospinal Fluid Cytokine Levels and Cognitive Impairment in Cerebral Malaria

    PubMed Central

    John, Chandy C.; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Opoka, Robert O.; Park, Gregory S.; Orchard, Paul J.; Jurek, Anne M.; Idro, Richard; Byarugaba, Justus; Boivin, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum levels of 12 cytokines or chemokines important in central nervous system (CNS) infections were measured in 76 Ugandan children with cerebral malaria (CM) and 8 control children. As compared with control children, children with cerebral malaria had higher cerebrospinal fluid levels of interleukin (IL)-6, CXCL-8/IL-8, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and IL-1 receptor antagonist. There was no correlation between cerebrospinal and serum cytokine levels for any cytokine except G-CSF. Elevated cerebrospinal fluid but not serum TNF-α levels on admission were associated with an increased risk of neurologic deficits 3 months later (odds ratio 1.55, 95% CI: 1.10, 2.18, P = 0.01) and correlated negatively with age-adjusted scores for attention (Spearman rho, -0.34, P = 0.04) and working memory (Spearman rho, -0.32, P = 0.06) 6 months later. In children with cerebral malaria, central nervous system TNF-α production is associated with subsequent neurologic and cognitive morbidity. PMID:18256412

  7. Distinct Lysosomal Network Protein Profiles in Parkinsonian Syndrome Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Boman, Andrea; Svensson, Samuel; Boxer, Adam; Rojas, Julio C.; Seeley, William W.; Karydas, Anna; Miller, Bruce; Kågedal, Katarina; Svenningsson, Per

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clinical diagnosis of parkinsonian syndromes like Parkinson’s disease (PD), corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is hampered by overlapping symptomatology and lack of diagnostic biomarkers, and definitive diagnosis is only possible post-mortem. Objective: Since impaired protein degradation plays an important role in many neurodegenerative disorders, we hypothesized that profiles of select lysosomal network proteins in cerebrospinal fluid could be differentially expressed in these parkinsonian syndromes. Methods: Cerebrospinal fluid samples were collected from PD patients (n = 18), clinically diagnosed 4-repeat tauopathy patients; corticobasal syndrome (CBS) (n = 3) and PSP (n = 8); and pathologically diagnosed PSP (n = 8) and CBD patients (n = 7). Each patient set was compared to its appropriate control group consisting of age and gender matched individuals. Select lysosomal network protein levels were detected via Western blotting. Factor analysis was used to test the diagnostic sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the select lysosomal network protein expression profiles. Results: PD, CBD and PSP were markedly different in their cerebrospinal fluid lysosomal network protein profiles. Lysosomal-associated membrane proteins 1 and 2 were significantly decreased in PD; early endosomal antigen 1 was decreased and lysozyme increased in PSP; and lysosomal-associated membrane proteins 1 and 2, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 and lysozyme were increased in CBD. A panel of lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2, lysozyme and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain discriminated between controls, PD and 4-repeat tauopathies. Conclusions: This study offers proof of concept that select lysosomal network proteins are differentially expressed in cerebrospinal fluid of Parkinson’s disease, corticobasal syndrome and progressive supranuclear palsy. Lysosomal network protein analysis

  8. Intraperitoneal cerebrospinal fluid pseudocyst. A rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunt.

    PubMed

    Birbilis, Th; Kontogianidis, K; Matis, G; Theodoropoulou, E; Efremidou, E; Argyropoulou, P

    2008-01-01

    The abdominal intraperitoneal cerebrospinal fluid pseudocyst is a rare but important complication in patients with ventriculoperitoneal shunts. We report a case of a 31-year-old female, in which a large abdominal pseudocyst was developed 1 year after insertion of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt for hydrocephalus. The abdominal CT scan and the ultrasonographical evaluation of the abdomen showed a well defined, cystic mass lesion with a volume of 50 cm3, in the recessus hepato-renal. The peritoneal tip of the shunt was located within the mass lesion. A distal externalization of the peritoneal catheter without excision of the pseudocyst was performed. Cerebrospinal fluid culture demonstrated a Staphylococcus epidermis infection and adequate antibiotic treatment was administrated. The previous symptoms improved 4 weeks later and a new catheter was placed intraperitoneally in a different quadrant. The postoperative course was uneventful. We suggest that chronic inflammation or subclinical peritonitis is a predisposing factor for this complication. PMID:18717287

  9. Actinomyces meyeri meningitis: the need for anaerobic cerebrospinal fluid cultures.

    PubMed

    Hagiya, Hideharu; Otsuka, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    We herein present a rare case of Actinomyces meyeri-induced meningitis that occurred in a patient of advanced age with poor oral hygiene. Although Gram staining of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) revealed Gram-positive rods and a blood culture was positive for the organism, a bacterial culture of the CSF was negative. Anaerobic cultures of CSF specimens are not routinely performed; however, anaerobes are sometimes involved in central nervous system infection. We therefore believe that anaerobic cultures should be considered in high-risk cases, such as those involving necrotizing bowel lesions or poor oral hygiene. A negative result on a CSF culture can result in misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment.

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in neurological diseases in children.

    PubMed

    Shahim, Pashtun; Månsson, Jan-Eric; Darin, Niklas; Zetterberg, Henrik; Mattsson, Niklas

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers is an integral part of neurology. Basic CSF biomarkers, such as CSF/serum albumin ratio and CSF cell counts, have been used to diagnose inflammatory and infectious CNS disorders in adults and children for decades. During recent years, however, numerous biomarkers for neuronal and astroglial injury, as well as disease-specific protein inclusions, have been developed for neurodegenerative disorders in adults. The overall aim of this paper is to give an updated overview of some of these biomarkers with special focus on their possible relevance to neurological disorders in children and adolescents.

  11. [Immunoglobulins in the cerebrospinal fluid and blood in acute neuroinfections].

    PubMed

    Dekonenko, E P; Poliakova, T G; Ivanova, L A; Umanskiĭ, K G; Demidova, S A

    1988-01-01

    The authors have examined 42 patients with viral encephalitides and other central nervous system lesions using a complex of clinical and viroimmunological methods of examination. The main emphasis has been laid on measuring immunoglobulins A, M, and G in the blood serum and cerebrospinal fluid. The results have shown marked changes in humoral immunity. The degree of these changes is directly correlated with severity of encephalitis. Investigation into humoral immunity in patients with neuroinfections and other nervous system diseases contributes to the development of differential diagnostic criteria and better understanding of the relationship between severity and outcome of diseases.

  12. Viral loads of cerebrospinal fluid in infants with enterovirus meningitis.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Hisashi; Ioi, Hiroaki; Ishii, Chiako; Hasegawa, Yuka; Amaha, Masahiro; Kashiwagi, Yasuyo; Takekuma, Kouji; Hoshika, Akinori; Watanabe, Yasuo

    2008-01-01

    For a better understanding of the role of the viral load, free radicals, and cytokines in viral meningitis, we surveyed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained from patients below 1 year of age who showed positive for enterovirus. In their first examinations interleukin (IL)-6 and free radicals increased whereas pleocytosis was rarely observed. IL-6 decreased within the short period. Viral loads and free radicals increased simultaneously. IL-6 and free radicals of CSF are helpful for diagnosis and treatment of viral meningitis at an early stage.

  13. Confocal Raman microscopy of pathologic cells in cerebrospinal fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonchukov, S. A.; Lonkina, T. V.; Minaeva, S. A.; Sundukov, A. V.; Migmanov, T. E.; Lademann, J.; Darvin, M. E.; Bagratashvili, V. N.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the spatial localization of leucocytes, bacteria, and erythrocytes in the crystal pattern of a dried droplet of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is established. Characteristic lines are detected and identified in the Raman spectrum of the CSF that point to the presence of pathologic cells therein and can be used in a timely way to diagnose meningitis, the spectroscopic sample preparation procedure being simple enough. A dry CSF sample retains its characteristic spectral features for no less than three days, which is important for its safe keeping and transportation, and also for the computer processing of its spectra.

  14. [Cerebrospinal fluid shunts for hydrocephalus and related disorders].

    PubMed

    Ito, Masaki; Houkin, Kiyohiro; Saito, Hisayasu; Shimbo, Daisuke; Motegi, Hiroaki; Kawabori, Masahito; Miyamoto, Michiyuki; Yamauchi, Tomohiro

    2012-10-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunts are commonly employed to treat patients with hydrocephalus. A large number of papers have been published focusing on complications and failures of CSF shunts. However, there appears to be a paucity of knowledge comprehensively covering both common complications and rare ones. In this systematic review, we surveyed articles about surgical complications of CSF shunts as comprehensively as possible. Quantitative analysis was performed to determine the frequency of well-known complications, mortality and revision rates of CSF shunts. Furthermore, rare complications of CSF shunts have also been reviewed.

  15. Site of origin of spinal cerebrospinal fluid pulse wave.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Urayama, K; Hoshino, Y

    1998-01-01

    : Since vascular pulsation in the cerebrospinal fluid causes the cerebrospinal fluid pulse wave (CSFPW), spinal CSFPW may serve as a monitor of spinal cord blood flow. However, there are two possible sources of spinal CSFPW: brain and spinal cord pulsation, and it is unclear for which region spinal CSFPW provides blood flow information. To resolve this question, we analyzed changes in CSFPW caused by occlusion of the large vessels in mongrel dogs. The thoracic and abdominal aorta (TA group, n = 13; AA, n = 6), bilateral internal carotid arteries (ICA, n = 7), and superior and inferior vena cava (SVC, n = 6; IVC, n = 8) were occluded. The CSFPW was measured at the second cervical and sixth lumbar spine level. To eliminate the influence of hemodynamic changes caused by the occlusion, CSFPWs were decomposed into component frequencies, harmonic waves (HWs), and analyzed using the system analysis method. After occlusion, cervical CSFPW was decreased in groups ICA (change in the first HW, 38%; P < 0.05 by Wilcoxon signed-ranks test), TA (40%; P < 0.05), and SVC (53%; P < 0.05), while lumbar CSFPW was decreased in groups TA (71%; P < 0.01), AA (78%; P < 0.05), and IVC (48%; P < 0.05). These results show that spinal CSFPW provides information on the blood flow of a relatively localized region, and could be used to monitor spinal cord blood flow.

  16. Evaluation of the Production and Absorption of Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    MIYAJIMA, Masakazu; ARAI, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    The traditional hypothesis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hydrodynamics presumes that CSF is primarily produced in the choroid plexus (CP), then flows from the ventricles into the subarachnoid spaces, and mainly reabsorbed in the arachnoid granulations. This hypothesis is necessary to reconsider in view of recent research and clinical observations. This literature review presents numerous evidence for a new hypothesis of CSF hydrodynamics—(1) A significantly strong relationship exists between the CSF and interstitial fluid (IF), (2) CSF and IF are mainly produced and absorbed in the parenchymal capillaries of the brain and spinal cord. A considerable amount of CSF and IF are also absorbed by the lymphatic system, and (3) CSF movement is not unidirectional flow. It is only local mixing and diffusion. PMID:26226980

  17. Cerebrospinal Fluid Mechanics and Its Coupling to Cerebrovascular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linninger, Andreas A.; Tangen, Kevin; Hsu, Chih-Yang; Frim, David

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is not stagnant but displays fascinating oscillatory flow patterns inside the ventricular system and reversing fluid exchange between the cranial vault and spinal compartment. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of pulsatile CSF motion. Observations contradicting classical views about its bulk production and clearance are highlighted. A clinical account of diseases of abnormal CSF flow dynamics, including hydrocephalus, syringomyelia, Chiari malformation type 1, and pseudotumor cerebri, is also given. We survey medical imaging modalities used to observe intracranial dynamics in vivo. Additionally, we assess the state of the art in predictive models of CSF dynamics. The discussion addresses open questions regarding CSF dynamics as they relate to the understanding and management of diseases.

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid pressure in conscious head-down tilted rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Severs, Walter B.; Morrow, Bret A.; Keil, Lanny C.

    1991-01-01

    The acute effects of a 1-h -45 deg head-down tilt on continouously recorded cerebrospinal fluid pressure (PCSF) of conscious rats are studied in order to investigate the shift of blood volume into the thoracic cavity in microgravity. PCSF, evaluated in 15-min time blocks over a 3-h experiment, increased slightly (less than 0.05) during the first 30 min of a control hour at 0 deg. There was a transient increase for about 5 min immediately after tilt (-45 deg) that may have been due to head movement after the position change. PCSF was statistically unchanged (above 0.05) during the second (-45 deg) hour and the third (0 deg) recovery hour. It is shown that the dynamics of intracranial pressure regulation can accommodate the acute cephalad fluid shift after tilting.

  19. Iatrogenic spinopelvic cerebro-spinal fluid fistula. Case report.

    PubMed

    Maleci, A; Bianco, F; Onnis, G; Di Lorenzo, N

    1995-12-01

    Perineurial cysts usually affect the lumbosacral spinal nerve roots, but sometimes they can erode the sacrum and reach the retroperitoneal space. In such cases misdiagnosis can lead to an improper treatment and cause serious complications. A presacral mass was diagnosed in a young woman during routine ultrasound investigation, and an exploratory laparotomy was performed. A large, fluid-containing cyst was found and marsupialized into the pelvis. After operation the patient experienced headache, vomiting and VI cranial nerve palsy whenever she stood up. By radiculography a iatrogenic spinopelvic cerebro-spinal fluid fistula was diagnosed, which required further surgery to be repaired. The presence of a giant perineurial cyst in the pelvis in unusual but must be considered in the differential diagnosis of presacral masses; the exceptionally rare case reported in this paper is exemplar of the harmful complications that an incautious procedure can determine.

  20. Optical analysis of suspended particles in the cerebrospinal fluid obtained by puncture from patients diagnosed with the disorders of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staroń, Waldemar; Herbowski, Leszek; Gurgul, Henryk

    2007-04-01

    The goal of the work was to determine the values of cumulative parameters of the cerebrospinal fluid. Values of the parameters characterise statistical cerebrospinal fluid obtained by puncture from the patients diagnosed due to suspicion of normotensive hydrocephalus. The cerebrospinal fluid taken by puncture for the routine examinations carried out at the patients suspected of normotensive hydrocephalus was analysed. In the paper there are presented results of examinations of several dozens of puncture samples of the cerebrospinal fluid coming from various patients. Each sample was examined under the microscope and photographed in 20 randomly chosen places. On the basis of analysis of the pictures showing the area of 100 x 100μm, the selected cumulative parameters such as count, numerical density, field area and field perimeter were determined for each sample. Then the average value of the parameters was determined as well.

  1. High Blood Pressure Effects on the Blood to Cerebrospinal Fluid Barrier and Cerebrospinal Fluid Protein Composition: A Two-Dimensional Electrophoresis Study in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    González-Marrero, Ibrahim; Castañeyra-Ruiz, Leandro; González-Toledo, Juan M.; Castañeyra-Ruiz, Agustín; de Paz-Carmona, Hector; Castro, Rafael; Hernandez-Fernaud, Juan R.; Castañeyra-Perdomo, Agustín; Carmona-Calero, Emilia M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to analyze the cerebrospinal fluid proteomic profile, trying to find possible biomarkers of the effects of hypertension of the blood to CSF barrier disruption in the brain and their participation in the cholesterol and β-amyloid metabolism and inflammatory processes. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a system linked to the brain and its composition can be altered not only by encephalic disorder, but also by systemic diseases such as arterial hypertension, which produces alterations in the choroid plexus and cerebrospinal fluid protein composition. 2D gel electrophoresis in cerebrospinal fluid extracted from the cistern magna before sacrifice of hypertensive and control rats was performed. The results showed different proteomic profiles between SHR and WKY, that α-1-antitrypsin, apolipoprotein A1, albumin, immunoglobulin G, vitamin D binding protein, haptoglobin and α-1-macroglobulin were found to be up-regulated in SHR, and apolipoprotein E, transthyretin, α-2-HS-glycoprotein, transferrin, α-1β-glycoprotein, kininogen and carbonic anhidrase II were down-regulated in SHR. The conclusion made here is that hypertension in SHR produces important variations in cerebrospinal fluid proteins that could be due to a choroid plexus dysfunction and this fact supports the close connection between hypertension and blood to cerebrospinal fluid barrier disruption. PMID:23401751

  2. Microchip capillary electrophoresis of nitrite and nitrate in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Masár, Marián; Bodor, Róbert; Troška, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Microchip capillary electrophoresis (MCE) is a relatively new analytical method requiring only small sample amounts, which is very favorable for the analysis of volume-limited biofluids. The practical use of MCE in bioanalysis is still restricted in terms of requirements for simplifying and/or concentrating sample pretreatment techniques. Here, we describe an MCE method for trace analysis of nitrite and nitrate, indicators of various neurological diseases, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The complex CSF samples were simplified by solid-phase microextraction prior to an online combination of isotachophoresis with capillary zone electrophoresis performed on a microchip with coupled channels and a high-volume sample injection channel (9.9 μL). The method is suitable for rapid (total analysis time lasted 20 min), reproducible (0.6-2.4 % RSD for migration time), and sensitive (3-9 nM limits of detection) determinations of nitrite and nitrate in 15-50 times diluted CSF samples. PMID:25673480

  3. A Subglandular Breast Cerebrospinal Fluid Pseudocyst Following Postsurgical Shunt Migration

    PubMed Central

    Mlynek, Karolina; Frautschi, Russell; Halasa, Brianna; Kwiecien, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage catheters have been associated with numerous complications in various anatomic locations, because of migration, infection, and obstruction. However, breast-related CSF shunt complications tend to occur infrequently or have seldom been reported in the empirical literature. Therefore, a case is presented detailing a breast pseudocyst caused by migration and subsequent coiling of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt in the right breast pocket. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first case that has been reported in the peer-reviewed literature of a pseudocyst resulting from a CSF drainage catheter coiling around the breast implant post pancreaticoduodenectomy. Moreover, this case highlights the importance of cross-disciplinary procedural awareness, particularly in regards to breast, ventriculoperitoneal shunt, and pancreatic procedures. PMID:26894004

  4. Congenital cerebrospinal fluid fistula through the inner ear and meningitis.

    PubMed

    Phelps, P D; Proops, D; Sellars, S; Evans, J; Michaels, L

    1993-06-01

    Congenital deformities of the labyrinth of the inner ear can be associated with a fistulous communication between the intracranial subarachnoid space and the middle ear cavity. We describe seven such cases, six confirmed by high resolution CT and one by postmortem histological section. The seven patients all presented with meningitis although a cerebrospinal fluid fistula was demonstrated at subsequent surgery or postmortem. The lesions were bilateral in three patients, unilateral in three and probably bilateral in the postmortem case although only one temporal bone was obtained. In every case there was a dilated sac instead of the normal two and a half turn cochlea on the affected side and this was confirmed at surgery. The demonstration of the basal cochlear turn is of paramount importance in any deaf child presenting with meningitis. A true Mondini deformity with a normal basal turn and some hearing is not at risk of developing a fistula. PMID:8345296

  5. Massive Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak of the Temporal Bone

    PubMed Central

    Manno, Alessandra; Pasqualitto, Emanuela; Ciofalo, Andrea; Angeletti, Diletta; Pasquariello, Benedetta

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage of the temporal bone region is defined as abnormal communications between the subarachnoidal space and the air-containing spaces of the temporal bone. CSF leak remains one of the most frequent complications after VS surgery. Radiotherapy is considered a predisposing factor for development of temporal bone CSF leak because it may impair dural repair mechanisms, thus causing inadequate dural sealing. The authors describe the case of a 47-year-old man with a massive effusion of CSF which extended from the posterior and lateral skull base to the first cervical vertebrae; this complication appeared after a partial enucleation of a vestibular schwannoma (VS) with subsequent radiation treatment and second operation with total VS resection. PMID:27597915

  6. Cerebrospinal Fluid Aquaporin-4 Antibody Levels in Neuromyelitis Optica Attacks

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Douglas Kazutoshi; Callegaro, Dagoberto; de Haidar Jorge, Frederico M; Nakashima, Ichiro; Nishiyama, Shuhei; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Simm, Renata Faria; Apostolos-Pereira, Samira Luisa; Misu, Tatsuro; Steinman, Lawrence; Aoki, Masashi; Fujihara, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    To elucidate immunopathogenetic roles of aquaporin-4 antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD), we analyzed aquaporin-4 antibody titers, cellular and inflammatory markers in the CSF collected from 11 aquaporin-4 antibody seropositive patients. The CSF aquaporin-4 antibody levels during attacks (but not in sera) closely correlated with pleocytosis, inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-6 that can regulate antibody-producing plasmablasts, and glial fibrillary acidic protein levels in the CSF. The amount of aquaporin-4 antibodies present in the central nervous system may have therapeutic implications, as it is associated with astrocyte injury and inflammatory responses during NMOSD attacks. Ann Neurol 2014;76:305–309 PMID:24977390

  7. Huntington's disease cerebrospinal fluid seeds aggregation of mutant huntingtin.

    PubMed

    Tan, Z; Dai, W; van Erp, T G M; Overman, J; Demuro, A; Digman, M A; Hatami, A; Albay, R; Sontag, E M; Potkin, K T; Ling, S; Macciardi, F; Bunney, W E; Long, J D; Paulsen, J S; Ringman, J M; Parker, I; Glabe, C; Thompson, L M; Chiu, W; Potkin, S G

    2015-11-01

    Huntington's disease (HD), a progressive neurodegenerative disease, is caused by an expanded CAG triplet repeat producing a mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT) with a polyglutamine-repeat expansion. Onset of symptoms in mutant huntingtin gene-carrying individuals remains unpredictable. We report that synthetic polyglutamine oligomers and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from BACHD transgenic rats and from human HD subjects can seed mutant huntingtin aggregation in a cell model and its cell lysate. Our studies demonstrate that seeding requires the mutant huntingtin template and may reflect an underlying prion-like protein propagation mechanism. Light and cryo-electron microscopy show that synthetic seeds nucleate and enhance mutant huntingtin aggregation. This seeding assay distinguishes HD subjects from healthy and non-HD dementia controls without overlap (blinded samples). Ultimately, this seeding property in HD patient CSF may form the basis of a molecular biomarker assay to monitor HD and evaluate therapies that target mHTT.

  8. Huntington's disease cerebrospinal fluid seeds aggregation of mutant huntingtin

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Z; Dai, W; van Erp, T G M; Overman, J; Demuro, A; Digman, M A; Hatami, A; Albay, R; Sontag, E M; Potkin, K T; Ling, S; Macciardi, F; Bunney, W E; Long, J D; Paulsen, J S; Ringman, J M; Parker, I; Glabe, C; Thompson, L M; Chiu, W; Potkin, S G

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD), a progressive neurodegenerative disease, is caused by an expanded CAG triplet repeat producing a mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT) with a polyglutamine-repeat expansion. Onset of symptoms in mutant huntingtin gene-carrying individuals remains unpredictable. We report that synthetic polyglutamine oligomers and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from BACHD transgenic rats and from human HD subjects can seed mutant huntingtin aggregation in a cell model and its cell lysate. Our studies demonstrate that seeding requires the mutant huntingtin template and may reflect an underlying prion-like protein propagation mechanism. Light and cryo-electron microscopy show that synthetic seeds nucleate and enhance mutant huntingtin aggregation. This seeding assay distinguishes HD subjects from healthy and non-HD dementia controls without overlap (blinded samples). Ultimately, this seeding property in HD patient CSF may form the basis of a molecular biomarker assay to monitor HD and evaluate therapies that target mHTT. PMID:26100538

  9. Ongoing HIV replication in cerebrospinal fluid under successful monotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bierhoff, Marieke; Boucher, Charles A B; Fibriani, Azzania; Ten Kate, Reinier W

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of an HIV-infected patient who was successfully treated with ritonavir/lopinavir (r/LPV) monotherapy for several years. He presented with neurological symptoms and high HIV RNA levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Sequencing of the HIV from the CSF revealed mutations in the protease gene reflecting resistance against most protease inhibitors, that is, lopinavir and ritonavir. His regimen was switched and after 2 months the HIV RNA viral load was again undetectable in both plasma as well as in CSF. Monotherapy with r/LPV may not be sufficient to fully suppress viral replication in the central nervous system in all individuals and may lead to compartimentalization and the selection of resistant mutations of HIV in the central nervous system. PMID:23344463

  10. Peptidome Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid by LC-MALDI MS

    PubMed Central

    Hölttä, Mikko; Zetterberg, Henrik; Mirgorodskaya, Ekaterina; Mattsson, Niklas; Blennow, Kaj; Gobom, Johan

    2012-01-01

    We report on the analysis of endogenous peptides in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by mass spectrometry. A method was developed for preparation of peptide extracts from CSF. Analysis of the extracts by offline LC-MALDI MS resulted in the detection of 3,000–4,000 peptide-like features. Out of these, 730 peptides were identified by MS/MS. The majority of these peptides have not been previously reported in CSF. The identified peptides were found to originate from 104 proteins, of which several have been reported to be involved in different disorders of the central nervous system. These results support the notion that CSF peptidomics may be viable complement to proteomics in the search of biomarkers of CNS disorders. PMID:22880031

  11. Microchip capillary electrophoresis of nitrite and nitrate in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Masár, Marián; Bodor, Róbert; Troška, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Microchip capillary electrophoresis (MCE) is a relatively new analytical method requiring only small sample amounts, which is very favorable for the analysis of volume-limited biofluids. The practical use of MCE in bioanalysis is still restricted in terms of requirements for simplifying and/or concentrating sample pretreatment techniques. Here, we describe an MCE method for trace analysis of nitrite and nitrate, indicators of various neurological diseases, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The complex CSF samples were simplified by solid-phase microextraction prior to an online combination of isotachophoresis with capillary zone electrophoresis performed on a microchip with coupled channels and a high-volume sample injection channel (9.9 μL). The method is suitable for rapid (total analysis time lasted 20 min), reproducible (0.6-2.4 % RSD for migration time), and sensitive (3-9 nM limits of detection) determinations of nitrite and nitrate in 15-50 times diluted CSF samples.

  12. Massive Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak of the Temporal Bone.

    PubMed

    Iannella, Giannicola; Manno, Alessandra; Pasqualitto, Emanuela; Ciofalo, Andrea; Angeletti, Diletta; Pasquariello, Benedetta; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage of the temporal bone region is defined as abnormal communications between the subarachnoidal space and the air-containing spaces of the temporal bone. CSF leak remains one of the most frequent complications after VS surgery. Radiotherapy is considered a predisposing factor for development of temporal bone CSF leak because it may impair dural repair mechanisms, thus causing inadequate dural sealing. The authors describe the case of a 47-year-old man with a massive effusion of CSF which extended from the posterior and lateral skull base to the first cervical vertebrae; this complication appeared after a partial enucleation of a vestibular schwannoma (VS) with subsequent radiation treatment and second operation with total VS resection. PMID:27597915

  13. Cerebrospinal Fluid Particles in Alzheimer Disease and Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yue; Keene, C Dirk; Peskind, Elaine R; Galasko, Douglas R; Hu, Shu-Ching; Cudaback, Eiron; Wilson, Angela M; Li, Ge; Yu, Chang-En; Montine, Kathleen S; Zhang, Jing; Baird, Geoffrey S; Hyman, Bradley T; Montine, Thomas J

    2015-07-01

    Human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contains diverse lipid particles, including lipoproteins that are distinct from their plasma counterparts and contain apolipoprotein (apo) E isoforms, apoJ, and apoAI, and extracellular vesicles, which can be detected by annexin V binding. The aim of this study was to develop a method to quantify CSF particles and evaluate their relationship to aging and neurodegenerative diseases. We used a flow cytometric assay to detect annexin V-, apoE-, apoAI-, apoJ-, and amyloid (A) β42-positive particles in CSF from 131 research volunteers who were neurologically normal or had mild cognitive impairment (MCI), Alzheimer disease (AD) dementia, or Parkinson disease. APOE ε4/ε4 participants had CSF apoE-positive particles that were more frequently larger but at an 88% lower level versus those in APOE ε3/ε3 or APOE ε3/ε4 patients; this finding was reproduced in conditioned medium from mouse primary glial cell cultures with targeted replacement of apoE. Cerebrospinal fluid apoE-positive and β-amyloid (Aβ42)-positive particle concentrations were persistently reduced one-third to one-half in middle and older age subjects; apoAI-positive particle concentration progressively increased approximately 2-fold with age. Both apoAI-positive and annexin V-positive CSF particle levels were reduced one-third to one-half in CSF of MCI and/or AD dementia patients versus age-matched controls. Our approach provides new methods to investigate CNS lipid biology in relation to neurodegeneration and perhaps develop new biomarkers for diagnosis or treatment monitoring.

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Sweetman, Brian; Linninger, Andreas A

    2011-01-01

    Cine-phase-contrast-MRI was used to measure the three-dimensional cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow field inside the central nervous system (CNS) of a healthy subject. Image reconstruction and grid generation tools were then used to develop a three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction model of the CSF flow inside the CNS. The CSF spaces were discretized using the finite-element method and the constitutive equations for fluid and solid motion solved in ADINA-FSI 8.6. Model predictions of CSF velocity magnitude and stroke volume were found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental data. CSF pressure gradients and amplitudes were computed in all regions of the CNS. The computed pressure gradients and amplitudes closely match values obtained clinically. The highest pressure amplitude of 77 Pa was predicted to occur in the lateral ventricles. The pressure gradient between the lateral ventricles and the lumbar region of the spinal canal did not exceed 132 Pa (~1 mmHg) at any time during the cardiac cycle. The pressure wave speed in the spinal canal was predicted and found to agree closely with values previously reported in the literature. Finally, the forward and backward motion of the CSF in the ventricles was visualized, revealing the complex mixing patterns in the CSF spaces. The mathematical model presented in this article is a prerequisite for developing a mechanistic understanding of the relationships among vasculature pulsations, CSF flow, and CSF pressure waves in the CNS.

  15. Embryonic blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier formation and function

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, David; Parvas, Maryam; Hermelo, Ismaïl; Garcia-Fernàndez, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    During embryonic development and adult life, brain cavities and ventricles are filled with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). CSF has attracted interest as an active signaling medium that regulates brain development, homeostasis and disease. CSF is a complex protein-rich fluid containing growth factors and signaling molecules that regulate multiple cell functions in the central nervous system (CNS). The composition and substance concentrations of CSF are tightly controlled. In recent years, it has been demonstrated that embryonic CSF (eCSF) has a key function as a fluid pathway for delivering diffusible signals to the developing brain, thus contributing to the proliferation, differentiation and survival of neural progenitor cells, and to the expansion and patterning of the brain. From fetal stages through to adult life, CSF is primarily produced by the choroid plexus. The development and functional activities of the choroid plexus and other blood–brain barrier (BBB) systems in adults and fetuses have been extensively analyzed. However, eCSF production and control of its homeostasis in embryos, from the closure of the anterior neuropore when the brain cavities become physiologically sealed, to the formation of the functional fetal choroid plexus, has not been studied in as much depth and remains open to debate. This review brings together the existing literature, some of which is based on experiments conducted by our research group, concerning the formation and function of a temporary embryonic blood–CSF barrier in the context of the crucial roles played by the molecules in eCSF. PMID:25389383

  16. Circulation of cerebrospinal fluid in the bullfrog, Rana catesbiana.

    PubMed

    Tornheim, P A; Foltz, F M

    1979-07-01

    In order to demonstrate features of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) path in the amphibian, 2--6 microliters of either Evans Blue-albumin (EBA) or ferrocyanide were injected into the ventricular system of anesthetized bullfrogs. The animals were sacrificed 1 to 135 minutes after injection by either quick freezing (EBA injections) or fixative perfusion (ferrocyanide injections). The contents of the cranial and vertebral cavities were then examined grossly and histologically for distribution of the tracers. In all animals, the tracers were seen throughout the ventricular cavity and in the subarachnoid space surrounding the caudal hindbrain. The site of communication between these two fluid spaces was the posterior tela of the hindbrain. Within this tela, "pores" were found between groups of pavement-like ependymal cells. In many animals, tracer was also observed in the vertebral subarachnoid and epidural spaces, adjacent to spinal nerve roots. In three EBA-injected animals, this tracer was also seen in the subcardinal lymph spaces. These findings suggest that the subarachnoid space in the bullfrog communicates functionally with the ventricular system by way of specialized "pores" in the posterior tela of the hindbrain. There is also indication of movement of fluid within the subarachnoid space which is predominately caudal in direction, with a primary absorptive path for CSF that consists of a perineural route to the lymphatic system. PMID:314246

  17. Idiopathic cerebrospinal fluid overproduction: case-based review of the pathophysiological mechanism implied in the cerebrospinal fluid production.

    PubMed

    Trevisi, Gianluca; Frassanito, Paolo; Di Rocco, Concezio

    2014-08-28

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) overproduction results from either CSF infection or choroid plexus hypertrophy or tumor, with only a single idiopathic case described so far. We report a unique case of a male infant with Crouzon syndrome who presented with intracranial hypertension, caused by up to 4-fold increase in CSF daily production. Conditions related to CSF overproduction, namely central nervous system infections and choroid plexus hypertrophy or tumor, were ruled out by repeated magnetic resonance imaging and CSF samples. Medical therapy failed to reduce CSF production and the patient underwent several shunting procedures, cranial expansion, and endoscopic coagulation of the choroid plexus. This article thoroughly reviews pertinent literature on CSF production mechanisms and possible therapeutic implications. PMID:25165051

  18. Early embryonic brain development in rats requires the trophic influence of cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Martin, C; Alonso, M I; Santiago, C; Moro, J A; De la Mano, A; Carretero, R; Gato, A

    2009-11-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid has shown itself to be an essential brain component during development. This is particularly evident at the earliest stages of development where a lot of research, performed mainly in chick embryos, supports the evidence that cerebrospinal fluid is involved in different mechanisms controlling brain growth and morphogenesis, by exerting a trophic effect on neuroepithelial precursor cells (NPC) involved in controlling the behaviour of these cells. Despite it being known that cerebrospinal fluid in mammals is directly involved in corticogenesis at fetal stages, the influence of cerebrospinal fluid on the activity of NPC at the earliest stages of brain development has not been demonstrated. Here, using "in vitro" organotypic cultures of rat embryo brain neuroepithelium in order to expose NPC to or deprive them of cerebrospinal fluid, we show that the neuroepithelium needs the trophic influence of cerebrospinal fluid to undergo normal rates of cell survival, replication and neurogenesis, suggesting that NPC are not self-sufficient to induce their normal activity. This data shows that cerebrospinal fluid is an essential component in chick and rat early brain development, suggesting that its influence could be constant in higher vertebrates. PMID:19540909

  19. Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteomics Reveals Potential Pathogenic Changes in the Brains of SIV-infected Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Pendyala, Gurudutt; Trauger, Sunia A.; Kalisiak, Ewa; Ellis, Ronald J.; Siuzdak, Gary; Fox, Howard S.

    2009-01-01

    The HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorder occurs in approximately one-third of infected individuals. It has persisted in the current era of anti-retroviral therapy, and its study is complicated by the lack of biomarkers for this condition. Since the cerebrospinal fluid is the most proximal biofluid to the site of pathology, we studied the cerebrospinal fluid in a nonhuman primate model for HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorder. Here we present a simple and efficient liquid chromatography coupled mass spectrometry based proteomics approach that utilizes small amounts of cerebrospinal fluid. First, we demonstrate the validity of the methodology using human cerebrospinal fluid. Next, using the simian immunodeficiency virus infected monkey model, we show its efficacy in identifying proteins such as alpha-1-antitrypsin, complement C3, hemopexin, IgM heavy chain and plasminogen, whose increased expression is linked to disease. Finally, we find that the increase in cerebrospinal fluid proteins is linked to increased expression of their genes in the brain parenchyma, revealing that the cerebrospinal fluid alterations identified reflect changes in the brain itself and not merely leakage of the blood-brain or blood- cerebrospinal fluid barriers. This study reveals new central nervous system alterations in lentivirus-induced neurological disease, and this technique can be applied to other systems in which limited amounts of biofluids can be obtained. PMID:19281240

  20. Highly potent soluble amyloid-β seeds in human Alzheimer brain but not cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Fritschi, Sarah K; Langer, Franziska; Kaeser, Stephan A; Maia, Luis F; Portelius, Erik; Pinotsi, Dorothea; Kaminski, Clemens F; Winkler, David T; Maetzler, Walter; Keyvani, Kathy; Spitzer, Philipp; Wiltfang, Jens; Kaminski Schierle, Gabriele S; Zetterberg, Henrik; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Jucker, Mathias

    2014-11-01

    The soluble fraction of brain samples from patients with Alzheimer's disease contains highly biologically active amyloid-β seeds. In this study, we sought to assess the potency of soluble amyloid-β seeds derived from the brain and cerebrospinal fluid. Soluble Alzheimer's disease brain extracts were serially diluted and then injected into the hippocampus of young, APP transgenic mice. Eight months later, seeded amyloid-β deposition was evident even when the hippocampus received subattomole amounts of brain-derived amyloid-β. In contrast, cerebrospinal fluid from patients with Alzheimer's disease, which contained more than 10-fold higher levels of amyloid-β peptide than the most concentrated soluble brain extracts, did not induce detectable seeding activity in vivo. Similarly, cerebrospinal fluid from aged APP-transgenic donor mice failed to induce cerebral amyloid-β deposition. In comparison to the soluble brain fraction, cerebrospinal fluid largely lacked N-terminally truncated amyloid-β species and exhibited smaller amyloid-β-positive particles, features that may contribute to the lack of in vivo seeding by cerebrospinal fluid. Interestingly, the same cerebrospinal fluid showed at least some seeding activity in an in vitro assay. The present results indicate that the biological seeding activity of soluble amyloid-β species is orders of magnitude greater in brain extracts than in the cerebrospinal fluid.

  1. Highly potent soluble amyloid-β seeds in human Alzheimer brain but not cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Fritschi, Sarah K; Langer, Franziska; Kaeser, Stephan A; Maia, Luis F; Portelius, Erik; Pinotsi, Dorothea; Kaminski, Clemens F; Winkler, David T; Maetzler, Walter; Keyvani, Kathy; Spitzer, Philipp; Wiltfang, Jens; Kaminski Schierle, Gabriele S; Zetterberg, Henrik; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Jucker, Mathias

    2014-11-01

    The soluble fraction of brain samples from patients with Alzheimer's disease contains highly biologically active amyloid-β seeds. In this study, we sought to assess the potency of soluble amyloid-β seeds derived from the brain and cerebrospinal fluid. Soluble Alzheimer's disease brain extracts were serially diluted and then injected into the hippocampus of young, APP transgenic mice. Eight months later, seeded amyloid-β deposition was evident even when the hippocampus received subattomole amounts of brain-derived amyloid-β. In contrast, cerebrospinal fluid from patients with Alzheimer's disease, which contained more than 10-fold higher levels of amyloid-β peptide than the most concentrated soluble brain extracts, did not induce detectable seeding activity in vivo. Similarly, cerebrospinal fluid from aged APP-transgenic donor mice failed to induce cerebral amyloid-β deposition. In comparison to the soluble brain fraction, cerebrospinal fluid largely lacked N-terminally truncated amyloid-β species and exhibited smaller amyloid-β-positive particles, features that may contribute to the lack of in vivo seeding by cerebrospinal fluid. Interestingly, the same cerebrospinal fluid showed at least some seeding activity in an in vitro assay. The present results indicate that the biological seeding activity of soluble amyloid-β species is orders of magnitude greater in brain extracts than in the cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:25212850

  2. Early embryonic brain development in rats requires the trophic influence of cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Martin, C; Alonso, M I; Santiago, C; Moro, J A; De la Mano, A; Carretero, R; Gato, A

    2009-11-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid has shown itself to be an essential brain component during development. This is particularly evident at the earliest stages of development where a lot of research, performed mainly in chick embryos, supports the evidence that cerebrospinal fluid is involved in different mechanisms controlling brain growth and morphogenesis, by exerting a trophic effect on neuroepithelial precursor cells (NPC) involved in controlling the behaviour of these cells. Despite it being known that cerebrospinal fluid in mammals is directly involved in corticogenesis at fetal stages, the influence of cerebrospinal fluid on the activity of NPC at the earliest stages of brain development has not been demonstrated. Here, using "in vitro" organotypic cultures of rat embryo brain neuroepithelium in order to expose NPC to or deprive them of cerebrospinal fluid, we show that the neuroepithelium needs the trophic influence of cerebrospinal fluid to undergo normal rates of cell survival, replication and neurogenesis, suggesting that NPC are not self-sufficient to induce their normal activity. This data shows that cerebrospinal fluid is an essential component in chick and rat early brain development, suggesting that its influence could be constant in higher vertebrates.

  3. Cysticercus Antigens in Cerebrospinal Fluid Samples from Patients with Neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Pardini, Alessandra Xavier; Vaz, Adelaide José; Machado, Luis Dos Ramos; Livramento, José Antônio

    2001-01-01

    Antigens were detected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from patients with neurocysticercosis (NC) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using polyclonal sera of rabbit anti-Taenia solium cysticerci (anti-Tso) and anti- Taenia crassiceps cysticerci vesicular fluid (anti-Tcra or anti-Tcra <30 kDa). A group of NC patients (n = 174) were studied (NC), including 40 patients in different phases of the disease. ELISAs carried out with the anti-Tso, anti-Tcra, and anti-Tcra <30 kDa showed sensitivities of 81.2, 90, and 95.8% and specificities of 82, 98, and 100%, respectively. The 14- and 18-kDa low-molecular-weight peptides were only detected in CSF samples from patients with NC by immunoblotting with anti-Tso and anti-Tcra sera. Because of the importance of the diagnosis and prognosis of cysticercosis, the detection of antigens may contribute as an additional marker to the study and clarification of the parasite-host relationship. PMID:11526181

  4. "Tasting" the cerebrospinal fluid: Another function of the choroid plexus?

    PubMed

    Tomás, J; Santos, C R A; Quintela, T; Gonçalves, I

    2016-04-21

    The choroid plexus (CP) located in brain ventricles, by forming the interface between the blood and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is in a privileged position to monitor the composition of these body fluids. Yet, the mechanisms involved in this surveillance system remain to be identified. The taste transduction pathway senses some types of molecules, thereby evaluating the chemical content of fluids, not only in the oral cavity but also in other tissues throughout the body, such as some cell types of the airways, the gastrointestinal tract, testis and skin. Therefore, we hypothesized that the taste transduction pathway could also be operating in the CP to assess the composition of the CSF. We found transcripts for some taste receptors (Tas1r1, Tas1r2, Tas1r3, Tas2r109 and Tas2r144) and for downstream signaling molecules (α-Gustducin, Plcβ2, ItpR3 and TrpM5) that encode this pathway, and confirmed the expression of the corresponding proteins in Wistar rat CP explants and in the CP epithelial cells (CPEC). The functionality of the T2R receptor expressed in CP cells was assessed by calcium imaging, of CPEC stimulated with the bitter compound D-Salicin, which elicited a rise in the intracellular Ca(2+). This effect was diminished in the presence of the bitter receptor blocker Probenecid. In summary, we described the expression of the taste-related components involved in the transduction signaling cascade in CP. Taken together, our results suggest that the taste transduction pathway in CPEC makes use of T2R receptors in the chemical surveillance of the CSF composition, in particular to sense bitter noxious compounds. PMID:26850994

  5. Endoscopic Management of Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea: The Charing Cross Experience

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Jagdeep Singh; Elmiyeh, Behrad; Saleh, Hesham A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe our experience of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea management. Design Retrospective. Setting Charing Cross Hospital, London, a tertiary referral center. Participants Fifty-four patients with CSF rhinorrhea managed from 2003 to 2011. Main outcome measures Surgical technique; Recurrence. Results Etiologically, 36 were spontaneous and 18 traumatic. Eight patients with spontaneous and two with traumatic leaks had previous failed repairs in other units. Success rates after first and second surgery were 93% and 100%, respectively. Mean follow-up was 21 months. Four patients, all of spontaneous etiology, had recurrences; three of these underwent successful second repair with three layered technique, and the fourth had complete cessation of the leak after gastric bypass surgery and subsequent weight reduction. Adaptation of anatomic three-layered repair since then averted any further failure in the following 7 years. Mean body mass index was 34.0 kg/m2 in spontaneous and 27.8 kg/m2 in traumatic cases (p < 0.05). Fifty percent of spontaneous leaks were from the cribriform plate, 22% sphenoid, 14% ethmoid, and 14% frontal sinus. In the traumatic CSF leak group: 33.3% were from the cribriform plate, 33.3% sphenoid, 22.2% ethmoid, and 11.1% frontal. Conclusion Endoscopic CSF fistula closure is a safe and effective operation. All sites of leak can be accessed endoscopically. We recommend the use of an anatomic three-layered closure in difficult cases. PMID:24436890

  6. Estimation of cerebrospinal fluid cortisol level in tuberculous meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Mahale, Rohan R.; Mehta, Anish; Uchil, Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in tuberculosis is around 5–10%. Of the various manifestations of CNS tuberculosis, meningitis is the most common (70–80%). Delay in diagnosis and treatment results in significant morbidity and mortality. Objective: To study the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cortisol levels in tubercular meningitis and compare the levels with controls. Methods: Cross-sectional, prospective, observational, hospital-based study done in 20 patients of tubercular meningitis, 20 patients of aseptic meningitis (AM) and 25 control subjects without any preexisting neurological disorders who have undergone lumbar puncture for spinal anesthesia. Results: Cortisol was detected in all 40 CSF samples of patients (100%). Mean CSF cortisol level was 8.82, 3.47 and 1.05 in tubercular meningitis, AM and controls, respectively. Mean CSF cortisol level in tubercular meningitis was significantly higher as compared to AM and controls (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Cortisol level estimation in CSF is one of the rapid, relatively inexpensive diagnostic markers in early identification of tubercular meningitis along with CSF findings of elevated proteins, hypoglycorrhachia and lymphocytic pleocytosis. This aids in earlier institution of appropriate treatment and thereby decreasing morbidity and mortality. This is the first study on the estimation of CSF cortisol level in tuberculous meningitis. PMID:26752900

  7. Utility of cerebrospinal fluid cortisol level in acute bacterial meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Anish; Mahale, Rohan R.; Sudhir, Uchil; Javali, Mahendra; Srinivasa, Rangasetty

    2015-01-01

    Background: Meningitis remains a serious clinical problem in developing as well as developed countries. Delay in diagnosis and treatment results in significant morbidity and mortality. The role and levels of intrathecal endogenous cortisol is not known. Objective: To study the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cortisol levels and to evaluate its role as a diagnostic and therapeutic marker in acute bacterial meningitis. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients with acute bacterial meningitis with no prior treatment were evaluated. Cortisol levels were compared with 20 patients with aseptic (viral) meningitis and 25 control subjects. Results: Mean CSF cortisol level was 13.85, 3.47, and 1.05 in bacterial meningitis, aseptic meningitis, and controls, respectively. Mean CSF cortisol level in bacterial meningitis was significantly higher as compared to controls (P < 0.001). There was significant difference in CSFcortisol levels in bacterial and aseptic meningitis (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Cortisol levels in CSF are highly elevated in patients with acute bacterial meningitis. This suggests that intrathecalcortisol may serve as a valuable, rapid, relatively inexpensive diagnostic marker in discriminatingbetween bacterial and aseptic meningitis. This helps in earlier institution of appropriate treatment and thereby decreasing morbidity and mortality. PMID:26019421

  8. The longitudinal cerebrospinal fluid metabolomic profile of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Elizabeth; Larkin, James R.; Claridge, Tim D. W.; Talbot, Kevin; Sibson, Nicola R.; Turner, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    Neurochemical biomarkers are urgently sought in ALS. Metabolomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy is a highly sensitive method capable of revealing nervous system cellular pathology. The 1H-NMR CSF metabolomic signature of ALS was sought in a longitudinal cohort. Six-monthly serial collection was performed in ALS patients across a range of clinical sub-types (n = 41) for up to two years, and in healthy controls at a single time-point (n = 14). A multivariate statistical approach, partial least squares discriminant analysis, was used to determine differences between the NMR spectra from patients and controls. Significantly predictive models were found using those patients with at least one year's interval between recruitment and the second sample. Glucose, lactate, citric acid and, unexpectedly, ethanol were the discriminating metabolites elevated in ALS. It is concluded that 1H-NMR captured the CSF metabolomic signature associated with derangements in cellular energy utilization connected with ALS, and was most prominent in comparisons using patients with longer disease duration. The specific metabolites identified support the concept of a hypercatabolic state, possibly involving mitochondrial dysfunction specifically. Endogenous ethanol in the CSF may be an unrecognized novel marker of neuronal tissue injury in ALS. PMID:26121274

  9. Visualization of the cerebrospinal fluid drainage into the Galen's vein.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, P H; Gotow, T; Ichimura, T; Nakatani, T; Takasu, N; Kodaka, R; Sumitani, S; Fukuda, T

    1985-04-01

    Arachnoid granulations are not always present in lower mammals and primate newborns. In order to visualize the route for the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to drain into the venous system, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was injected into the lateral ventricle or cisterna cerebellomedullaris of the mouse and rat. From 30 to 60 min after the commencing of a slow infusion for 15-30 min of 0.05-0.1 ml solution containing 10-20 mg HRP, the mouse, whose skull had been exposed, was dropped into cold acetone at dry ice temperature; other animals were fixed by perfusion with aldehyde solution. The frozen head was dissected in a cryostat kept at -18 degrees C to remove the skull, but leave the dura mater and the falx cerebri. The brain with meninges was cut into 30-45 microns sagittal sections in the cryostat, and processed for peroxidase reaction. The perfusion-fixed brains were used for scanning electron microscopy and for electron microscope observation of the tracer. The reaction product was found within fenestrated venous capillaries of the choroid plexus. The route for the HRP in the CSF to drain into the sinus rectus via the vena choroidea and vena cerebri magna was directly visualized in the mouse.

  10. Head movement, an important contributor to human cerebrospinal fluid circulation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qiang; Yu, Sheng-Bo; Zheng, Nan; Yuan, Xiao-Ying; Chi, Yan-Yan; Liu, Cong; Wang, Xue-Mei; Lin, Xiang-Tao; Sui, Hong-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The suboccipital muscles are connected to the upper cervical spinal dura mater via the myodural bridges (MDBs). Recently, it was suggested that they might work as a pump to provide power for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation. The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of the suboccipital muscles contractions on the CSF flow. Forty healthy adult volunteers were subjected to cine phase-contrast MR imaging. Each volunteer was scanned twice, once before and once after one-minute-head-rotation period. CSF flow waveform parameters at craniocervical junction were analyzed. The results showed that, after the head rotations, the maximum and average CSF flow rates during ventricular diastole were significantly increased, and the CSF stroke volumes during diastole and during entire cardiac cycle were significantly increased. This suggested that the CSF flow was significantly promoted by head movements. Among the muscles related with head movements, only three suboccipital muscles are connected to the upper cervical spinal dura mater via MDBs. It was believed that MDBs might transform powers of the muscles to CSF. The present results suggested that the head movements served as an important contributor to CSF dynamics and the MDBs might be involved in this mechanism. PMID:27538827

  11. Florbetapir positron emission tomography and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Hake, Ann; Trzepacz, Paula T.; Wang, Shufang; Yu, Peng; Case, Michael; Hochstetler, Helen; Witte, Michael M.; Degenhardt, Elisabeth K.; Dean, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Background We evaluated the relationship between florbetapir-F18 positron emission tomography (FBP PET) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers. Methods Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI)-GO/2 healthy control (HC), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia subjects with clinical measures and CSF collected ±90 days of FBP PET data were analyzed using correlation and logistic regression. Results In HC and MCI subjects, FBP PET anterior and posterior cingulate and composite standard uptake value ratios correlated with CSF amyloid beta (Aβ1-42) and tau/Aβ1-42 ratios. Using logistic regression, Aβ1-42, total tau (t-tau), phosphorylated tau181P (p-tau), and FBP PET composite each differentiated HC versus AD. Aβ1-42 and t-tau distinguished MCI versus AD, without additional contribution by FBP PET. Total tau and p-tau added discriminative power to FBP PET when classifying HC versus AD. Conclusion Based on cross-sectional diagnostic groups, both amyloid and tau measures distinguish healthy from demented subjects. Longitudinal analyses are needed. PMID:25916563

  12. Embryonic cerebrospinal fluid in brain development: neural progenitor control.

    PubMed

    Gato, Angel; Alonso, M Isabel; Martín, Cristina; Carnicero, Estela; Moro, José Antonio; De la Mano, Aníbal; Fernández, José M F; Lamus, Francisco; Desmond, Mary E

    2014-08-28

    Due to the effort of several research teams across the world, today we have a solid base of knowledge on the liquid contained in the brain cavities, its composition, and biological roles. Although the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is among the most relevant parts of the central nervous system from the physiological point of view, it seems that it is not a permanent and stable entity because its composition and biological properties evolve across life. So, we can talk about different CSFs during the vertebrate life span. In this review, we focus on the CSF in an interesting period, early in vertebrate development before the formation of the choroid plexus. This specific entity is called "embryonic CSF." Based on the structure of the compartment, CSF composition, origin and circulation, and its interaction with neuroepithelial precursor cells (the target cells) we can conclude that embryonic CSF is different from the CSF in later developmental stages and from the adult CSF. This article presents arguments that support the singularity of the embryonic CSF, mainly focusing on its influence on neural precursor behavior during development and in adult life. PMID:25165044

  13. Embryonic cerebrospinal fluid in brain development: neural progenitor control

    PubMed Central

    Gato, Angel; Alonso, M. Isabel; Martín, Cristina; Carnicero, Estela; Moro, José Antonio; De la Mano, Aníbal; Fernández, José M. F.; Lamus, Francisco; Desmond, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the effort of several research teams across the world, today we have a solid base of knowledge on the liquid contained in the brain cavities, its composition, and biological roles. Although the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is among the most relevant parts of the central nervous system from the physiological point of view, it seems that it is not a permanent and stable entity because its composition and biological properties evolve across life. So, we can talk about different CSFs during the vertebrate life span. In this review, we focus on the CSF in an interesting period, early in vertebrate development before the formation of the choroid plexus. This specific entity is called “embryonic CSF.” Based on the structure of the compartment, CSF composition, origin and circulation, and its interaction with neuroepithelial precursor cells (the target cells) we can conclude that embryonic CSF is different from the CSF in later developmental stages and from the adult CSF. This article presents arguments that support the singularity of the embryonic CSF, mainly focusing on its influence on neural precursor behavior during development and in adult life. PMID:25165044

  14. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid pharmacokinetics of flurbiprofen in children

    PubMed Central

    Kumpulainen, Elina; Välitalo, Pyry; Kokki, Merja; Lehtonen, Marko; Hooker, Andrew; Ranta, Veli-Pekka; Kokki, Hannu

    2010-01-01

    AIMS This study was designed to characterize paediatric pharmacokinetics and central nervous system exposure of flurbiprofen. METHODS The pharmacokinetics of flurbiprofen were studied in 64 healthy children aged 3 months to 13 years, undergoing surgery with spinal anaesthesia. Children were administered preoperatively a single dose of flurbiprofen intravenously as prodrug (n = 27) or by mouth as syrup (n = 37). A single cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sample (n = 60) was collected at the induction of anaesthesia, and plasma samples (n = 304) before, during and after the operation (up to 20 h after administration). A population pharmacokinetic model was built using the NONMEM software package. RESULTS Flurbiprofen concentrations in plasma were well described by a three compartment model. The apparent bioavailability of oral flurbiprofen syrup was 81%. The estimated clearance (CL) was 0.96 l h−1 70 kg−1. Age did not affect the clearance after weight had been included as a covariate. The estimated volume of distribution at steady state (Vss) was 8.1 l 70 kg−1. Flurbiprofen permeated into the CSF, reaching concentrations that were seven-fold higher compared with unbound plasma concentrations. CONCLUSIONS Flurbiprofen pharmacokinetics can be described using only weight as a covariate in children above 6 months, while more research is needed in neonates and in younger infants. PMID:20840447

  15. Proteomics Analysis of Perilymph and Cerebrospinal Fluid in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Leary Swan, Erin E.; Peppi, Marcello; Chen, Zhiqiang; Green, Karin M.; Evans, James E.; McKenna, Michael J.; Mescher, Mark J.; Kujawa, Sharon G.; Sewell, William F.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Proteins in perilymph may alter the delivery profile of implantable intracochlear drug delivery systems through biofouling. Knowledge of protein composition will help anticipate interactions with delivered agents. Study Design Analysis of mouse perilymph. Methods Protein composition of perilymph and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was analyzed using a capillary liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based iTRAQ quantitative proteomics approach. We searched against a mouse subset of the Uniprot FASTA protein database. We sampled perilymph from the apex of the mouse cochlea to minimize CSF contamination. Results More than 50 explicit protein isoforms were identified with very high confidence. iTRAQ reporter ions allowed determination of relative molar amounts of proteins between perilymph and CSF. Protein in perilymph was almost three times more concentrated than in CSF. More than one-third of the proteins in perilymph comprised protease inhibitors, with serpins being the predominant group. Apolipoproteins constituted 16%. Fifteen percent of the proteins were enzymes. Albumin was the most abundant single protein (14%). Proteins with relatively high perilymph/CSF ratios included broad-spectrum protease inhibitors and apolipoproteins. Discussion Some proteins found in perilymph, such as albumin and HMW kininogen, have been implicated in biofouling through adsorption to device materials. The relatively large quantities of apolipoprotein and albumin may serve as a reservoir for acidic and lipophillic drugs. Alpha-2-glycoprotein can bind basic drugs. Conclusions Perilymph is similar in protein composition to CSF, though amounts are 2.8 times higher. Protease inhibitors comprise the largest category of proteins. PMID:19358201

  16. Vitamin B6 in Plasma and Cerebrospinal Fluid of Children

    PubMed Central

    Albersen, Monique; Bosma, Marjolein; Jans, Judith J. M.; Hofstede, Floris C.; van Hasselt, Peter M.; de Sain-van der Velden, Monique G. M.; Visser, Gepke; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Over the past years, the essential role of vitamin B6 in brain development and functioning has been recognized and genetic metabolic disorders resulting in functional vitamin B6 deficiency have been identified. However, data on B6 vitamers in children are scarce. Materials and Methods B6 vitamer concentrations in simultaneously sampled plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 70 children with intellectual disability were determined by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. For ethical reasons, CSF samples could not be obtained from healthy children. The influence of sex, age, epilepsy and treatment with anti-epileptic drugs, were investigated. Results The B6 vitamer composition of plasma (pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) > pyridoxic acid > pyridoxal (PL)) differed from that of CSF (PL > PLP > pyridoxic acid > pyridoxamine). Strong correlations were found for B6 vitamers in and between plasma and CSF. Treatment with anti-epileptic drugs resulted in decreased concentrations of PL and PLP in CSF. Conclusion We provide concentrations of all B6 vitamers in plasma and CSF of children with intellectual disability (±epilepsy), which can be used in the investigation of known and novel disorders associated with vitamin B6 metabolism as well as in monitoring of the biochemical effects of treatment with vitamin B6. PMID:25760040

  17. The longitudinal cerebrospinal fluid metabolomic profile of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gray, Elizabeth; Larkin, James R; Claridge, Tim D W; Talbot, Kevin; Sibson, Nicola R; Turner, Martin R

    2015-01-01

    Neurochemical biomarkers are urgently sought in ALS. Metabolomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR) spectroscopy is a highly sensitive method capable of revealing nervous system cellular pathology. The (1)H-NMR CSF metabolomic signature of ALS was sought in a longitudinal cohort. Six-monthly serial collection was performed in ALS patients across a range of clinical sub-types (n = 41) for up to two years, and in healthy controls at a single time-point (n = 14). A multivariate statistical approach, partial least squares discriminant analysis, was used to determine differences between the NMR spectra from patients and controls. Significantly predictive models were found using those patients with at least one year's interval between recruitment and the second sample. Glucose, lactate, citric acid and, unexpectedly, ethanol were the discriminating metabolites elevated in ALS. It is concluded that (1)H-NMR captured the CSF metabolomic signature associated with derangements in cellular energy utilization connected with ALS, and was most prominent in comparisons using patients with longer disease duration. The specific metabolites identified support the concept of a hypercatabolic state, possibly involving mitochondrial dysfunction specifically. Endogenous ethanol in the CSF may be an unrecognized novel marker of neuronal tissue injury in ALS.

  18. A potential endophenotype for Alzheimer's disease: cerebrospinal fluid clusterin.

    PubMed

    Deming, Yuetiva; Xia, Jian; Cai, Yefei; Lord, Jenny; Holmans, Peter; Bertelsen, Sarah; Holtzman, David; Morris, John C; Bales, Kelly; Pickering, Eve H; Kauwe, John; Goate, Alison; Cruchaga, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have associated clusterin (CLU) variants with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the role of CLU on AD pathogenesis is not totally understood. We used cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma CLU levels as endophenotypes for genetic studies to understand the role of CLU in AD. CSF, but not plasma, CLU levels were significantly associated with AD status and CSF tau/amyloid-beta ratio, and highly correlated with CSF apolipoprotein E (APOE) levels. Several loci showed almost genome-wide significant associations including LINC00917 (p = 3.98 × 10(-7)) and interleukin 6 (IL6, p = 9.94 × 10(-6), in the entire data set and in the APOE ε4- individuals p = 7.40 × 10(-8)). Gene ontology analyses suggest that CSF CLU levels may be associated with wound healing and immune response which supports previous functional studies that demonstrated an association between CLU and IL6. CLU may play a role in AD by influencing immune system changes that have been observed in AD or by disrupting healing after neurodegeneration.

  19. Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome of Patients with Acute Lyme Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-10-05

    Acute Lyme disease results from transmission of and infection by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi following a tick bite. During acute infection, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of Lyme meningitis. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing for a deep view into the proteome for a cohort of patients with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation leading to the identification of proteins that reflect host responses, which are distinct for subjects with acute Lyme disease. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified changes in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. The measured changes in protein abundances reflect the impact of acute Lyme disease on the CNS as presented in CSF. We have identified 89 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease. A number of the differentially abundant proteins have been found to be localized to brain synapse and thus constitute important leads for better understanding of the neurological consequence of disseminated Lyme disease.

  20. Cerebrospinal fluid fistula as a consequence of war head injury.

    PubMed

    Melada, Ante; Marcikić, Marcel; Mrak, Goran; Stimac, Dinko; Sćap, Miroslav

    2002-08-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistula as a consequence of brain missile injury and following infectious complications has been recognized for years. Different methods of treatment have been advocated. Missiles used in war cause extensive destruction of the skull and brain as a result of their high kinetic energy. On its transfer through the skull, such high kinetic energy causes fractures called "discontinuous fractures," which are distant from the entry wound and not related to the fracture of the vault. The role of the timely diagnosis of CSF fistulas and their early repair in the management of these wounds is emphasized. Data on 312 patients with missile injuries of the brain inflicted during the war in Croatia were retrieved and analyzed, with special reference to the complications of CSF fistulas and infection. Forty-five patients developed CSF fistula, 15 (33%) of them at the wound site, 23 (51%) as CSF rhinorrhea, and seven (15%) as CSF otorrhea. Six patients developed infectious complications. The presented strategy and operative approach resulted in a low incidence of infectious complications in the study series.

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid neopterin and cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Mercedes; Ormazábal, Aida; Antón, Jordi; Aróstegui, Juan I; García-Cazorla, Angels

    2009-12-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome is a category of autoinflammatory disorders caused by mutations of the NLRP3 gene, with chronic infantile neurologic cutaneous and articular syndrome being the severest clinical phenotype. Various pterins have been reported as mediating immunologic functions in the central nervous system, but to date studies of pterin cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) values and cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome have been lacking. A 2-year-old child was affected with a severe atypical form of cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome, suspected based on the analysis of neopterin in CSF. He initially presented isolated neurologic manifestations mimicking a neuroregressive disorder. Blood and CSF analyses did not present any routine inflammatory markers, but CSF neopterin was elevated. Later, the patient developed arthritis and recurrent episodes of fever, and the cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome diagnosis was confirmed by genetic studies. Neopterin was the most altered indicator over the time. Child neurologists should be on the alert when unexplained neurologic signs appear, giving consideration to the possibility of inflammatory or immune-mediated diseases. The present case demonstrates the clinical utility of measurement of CSF neopterin levels in screening for these immune-mediated diseases, especially when neurologic symptoms are associated with normal results on routine CSF tests.

  2. A potential endophenotype for Alzheimer's disease: cerebrospinal fluid clusterin.

    PubMed

    Deming, Yuetiva; Xia, Jian; Cai, Yefei; Lord, Jenny; Holmans, Peter; Bertelsen, Sarah; Holtzman, David; Morris, John C; Bales, Kelly; Pickering, Eve H; Kauwe, John; Goate, Alison; Cruchaga, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have associated clusterin (CLU) variants with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the role of CLU on AD pathogenesis is not totally understood. We used cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma CLU levels as endophenotypes for genetic studies to understand the role of CLU in AD. CSF, but not plasma, CLU levels were significantly associated with AD status and CSF tau/amyloid-beta ratio, and highly correlated with CSF apolipoprotein E (APOE) levels. Several loci showed almost genome-wide significant associations including LINC00917 (p = 3.98 × 10(-7)) and interleukin 6 (IL6, p = 9.94 × 10(-6), in the entire data set and in the APOE ε4- individuals p = 7.40 × 10(-8)). Gene ontology analyses suggest that CSF CLU levels may be associated with wound healing and immune response which supports previous functional studies that demonstrated an association between CLU and IL6. CLU may play a role in AD by influencing immune system changes that have been observed in AD or by disrupting healing after neurodegeneration. PMID:26545630

  3. Establishing the Proteome of Normal Human Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Natelson, Benjamin H.; Angel, Thomas E.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Hixson, Kim K.; Lipton, Mary S.; Camp, David G.; Coyle, Patricia K.; Smith, Richard D.; Bergquist, Jonas

    2010-01-01

    Background Knowledge of the entire protein content, the proteome, of normal human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) would enable insights into neurologic and psychiatric disorders. Until now technologic hurdles and access to true normal samples hindered attaining this goal. Methods and Principal Findings We applied immunoaffinity separation and high sensitivity and resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to examine CSF from healthy normal individuals. 2630 proteins in CSF from normal subjects were identified, of which 56% were CSF-specific, not found in the much larger set of 3654 proteins we have identified in plasma. We also examined CSF from groups of subjects previously examined by others as surrogates for normals where neurologic symptoms warranted a lumbar puncture but where clinical laboratory were reported as normal. We found statistically significant differences between their CSF proteins and our non-neurological normals. We also examined CSF from 10 volunteer subjects who had lumbar punctures at least 4 weeks apart and found that there was little variability in CSF proteins in an individual as compared to subject to subject. Conclusions Our results represent the most comprehensive characterization of true normal CSF to date. This normal CSF proteome establishes a comparative standard and basis for investigations into a variety of diseases with neurological and psychiatric features. PMID:20552007

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid pressure in the pathogenesis of glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Jost B; Ritch, Robert; Panda-Jonas, Songhomitra

    2015-01-01

    The optic nerve head forms the interface between the intraocular compartment and the retrobulbar compartment. The former is characterized by what we term intraocular pressure (IOP) and the latter by orbital cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP). The trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference (TLCPD) is defined as the difference between the pressures in the two compartments. Any change in one of them can be associated with a disturbance of homeostasis of the optic nerve head, such as papilledema or glaucomatous optic neuropathy. In particular, glaucomatous optic neuropathy may be due to either an elevated IOP and/or an abnormally low orbital CSFP, or due to a change in the time-dependent relationship between the pulse-synchronous changes in IOP and orbital CSFP. Based on the triangular relationships between IOP, CSFP, and blood pressure, glaucoma may be described as an imbalance between these three pressure parameters, eventually leading to an increased TLCPD. Because the retinal and choroidal venous blood drains through the CSFP space, elevated CSFP may be associated with dilated retinal veins, increased incidence of retinal vein occlusions, higher prevalence and severity of diabetic retinopathy, and thicker choroid. PMID:26518071

  5. Increased Ventricular Cerebrospinal Fluid Lactate in Depressed Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Kailyn A. L.; Mao, Xiangling; Case, Julia A. C.; Kang, Guoxin; Shungu, Dikoma C.; Gabbay, Vilma

    2016-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial dysfunction has been increasingly examined as a potential pathogenic event in psychiatric disorders, although its role early in the course of major depressive disorder (MDD) is unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate mitochondrial dysfunction in medication-free adolescents with MDD through in vivo measurements of neurometabolites using high-spatial resolution multislice/multivoxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Methods Twenty-three adolescents with MDD and 29 healthy controls, ages 12–20, were scanned at 3T and concentrations of ventricular cerebrospinal fluid lactate, as well as N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), total creatine (tCr), and total choline (tCho) in the bilateral caudate, putamen, and thalamus were reported. Results Adolescents with MDD exhibited increased ventricular lactate compared to healthy controls [F(1, 41) = 6.98, p = .01]. However, there were no group differences in the other neurometabolites. Dimensional analyses in the depressed group showed no relation between any of the neurometabolites and symptomatology, including anhedonia and fatigue. Conclusions Increased ventricular lactate in depressed adolescents suggests mitochondrial dysfunction may be present early in the course of MDD; however it is still not known whether the presence of mitochondrial dysfunction is a trait vulnerability of individuals predisposed to psychopathology or a state feature of the disorder. Therefore, there is a need for larger multimodal studies to clarify these chemical findings in the context of network function. PMID:26802978

  6. Postoperative Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage Associated With Total En Bloc Spondylectomy.

    PubMed

    Yokogawa, Noriaki; Murakami, Hideki; Demura, Satoru; Kato, Satoshi; Yoshioka, Katsuhito; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Takayoshi; Igarashi, Takashi; Fang, Xiang; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage is a serious postoperative complication associated with total en bloc spondylectomy. The authors examined the risk factors for CSF leakage after this procedure. A total of 72 patients underwent total en bloc spondylectomy at the authors' institution between May 2010 and April 2013. Postoperative CSF leakage was observed in 17 of the 72 patients (23.6%). The results of univariate analysis suggested that age 54 years or older, preoperative surgical site irradiation, resection of 3 or more vertebral bodies, and dural injury were significant risk factors for postoperative CSF leakage after total en bloc spondylectomy. Multivariate analysis showed that preoperative surgical site irradiation was the only significant risk factor for postoperative CSF leakage (adjusted odds ratio, 5.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-26.45, P=.046). The authors also assessed the course of treatment for postoperative CSF leakage in each patient. Of 17 patients with postoperative CSF leakage, 13 recovered without further complications, but 4 required reoperation (2 for wound dehiscence, 1 for surgical site infection, and 1 for severe intracranial hypotension). All 4 patients who required reoperation had a history of surgical site irradiation. Thus, this study suggests that careful consideration should be given to postoperative CSF leakage in patients with a history of surgical site irradiation. These findings may contribute to the management of postoperative CSF leakage associated with total en bloc spondylectomy and supplement the information given to the patient in the process of obtaining informed consent.

  7. Metagenomic Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Perlejewski, Karol; Bukowska-Ośko, Iwona; Nakamura, Shota; Motooka, Daisuke; Stokowy, Tomasz; Płoski, Rafał; Rydzanicz, Małgorzata; Zakrzewska-Pniewska, Beata; Podlecka-Piętowska, Aleksandra; Nojszewska, Monika; Gogol, Anna; Caraballo Cortés, Kamila; Demkow, Urszula; Stępień, Adam; Laskus, Tomasz; Radkowski, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of central nervous system of unknown etiology. However, some infectious agents have been suggested to play a significant role in its pathogenesis. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) and metagenomics can be employed to characterize microbiome of MS patients and to identify potential causative pathogens. In this study, 12 patients with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating disorders (IIDD) of the central nervous system were studied: one patient had clinically isolated syndrome, one patient had recurrent optic neuritis, and ten patients had multiple sclerosis (MS). In addition, there was one patient with other non-inflammatory neurological disease. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was sampled from all patients. RNA was extracted from CSF and subjected to a single-primer isothermal amplification followed by NGS and comprehensive data analysis. Altogether 441,608,474 reads were obtained and mapped using blastn. In a CSF sample from the patient with clinically isolated syndrome, 11 varicella-zoster virus reads were found. Other than that similar bacterial, fungal, parasitic, and protozoan reads were identified in all samples, indicating a common presence of contamination in metagenomics. In conclusion, we identified varicella zoster virus sequences in one out of the 12 patients with IIDD, which suggests that this virus could be occasionally related to the MS pathogenesis. A widespread bacterial contamination seems inherent to NGS and complicates the interpretation of results. PMID:27311319

  8. Embryonic cerebrospinal fluid in brain development: neural progenitor control.

    PubMed

    Gato, Angel; Alonso, M Isabel; Martín, Cristina; Carnicero, Estela; Moro, José Antonio; De la Mano, Aníbal; Fernández, José M F; Lamus, Francisco; Desmond, Mary E

    2014-08-28

    Due to the effort of several research teams across the world, today we have a solid base of knowledge on the liquid contained in the brain cavities, its composition, and biological roles. Although the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is among the most relevant parts of the central nervous system from the physiological point of view, it seems that it is not a permanent and stable entity because its composition and biological properties evolve across life. So, we can talk about different CSFs during the vertebrate life span. In this review, we focus on the CSF in an interesting period, early in vertebrate development before the formation of the choroid plexus. This specific entity is called "embryonic CSF." Based on the structure of the compartment, CSF composition, origin and circulation, and its interaction with neuroepithelial precursor cells (the target cells) we can conclude that embryonic CSF is different from the CSF in later developmental stages and from the adult CSF. This article presents arguments that support the singularity of the embryonic CSF, mainly focusing on its influence on neural precursor behavior during development and in adult life.

  9. Simulating transitional hydrodynamics of the cerebrospinal fluid at extreme scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Kartik; Roller, Sabine; Mardal, Kent-Andre

    Chiari malformation type I is a disorder characterized by the herniation of cerebellar tonsils into the spinal canal through the foramen magnum resulting in obstruction to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) outflow. The flow of pulsating bidirectional CSF is of acutely complex nature due to the anatomy of the conduit containing it - the subarachnoid space. We report lattice Boltzmann method based direct numerical simulations on patient specific cases with spatial resolution of 24 μm amounting meshes of up to 2 billion cells conducted on 50000 cores of the Hazelhen supercomputer in Stuttgart. The goal is to characterize intricate dynamics of the CSF at resolutions that are of the order of Kolmogorov microscales. Results unfold velocity fluctuations up to ~ 10 KHz , turbulent kinetic energy ~ 2 times of the mean flow energy in Chiari patients whereas the flow remains laminar in a control subject. The fluctuations confine near the cranio-vertebral junction and are commensurate with the extremeness of pathology and the extent of herniation. The results advocate that the manifestation of pathological conditions like Chiari malformation may lead to transitional hydrodynamics of the CSF, and a prudent calibration of numerical approach is necessary to avoid overlook of such phenomena.

  10. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Spinocerebellar Ataxia: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Brouillette, Ashley M; Öz, Gülin; Gomez, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases, including the spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA), would benefit from the identification of reliable biomarkers that could serve as disease subtype-specific and stage-specific indicators for the development and monitoring of treatments. We analyzed the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) level of tau, α-synuclein, DJ-1, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), proteins previously associated with neurodegenerative processes, in patients with the autosomal dominant SCA1, SCA2, and SCA6, and the sporadic disease multiple system atrophy, cerebellar type (MSA-C), compared with age-matched controls. We estimated disease severity using the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA). Most proteins measured trended higher in disease versus control group yet did not reach statistical significance. We found the levels of tau in both SCA2 and MSA-C patients were significantly higher than control. We found that α-synuclein levels were lower with higher SARA scores in SCA1 and tau levels were higher with greater SARA in MSA-C, although this final correlation did not reach statistical significance after post hoc correction. Additional studies with larger sample sizes are needed to improve the power of these studies and validate the use of CSF biomarkers in SCA and MSA-C.

  11. Diagnosis of neurosyphilis by examination of the cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Luger, A; Schmidt, B L; Steyrer, K; Schonwald, E

    1981-01-01

    Thirty-six patients with reactive results in the cerebrospinal fluid to the Treponema pallidum haemagglutination assay (CSF-TPHA) were investigated by further serological tests for confirmation of active neurosyphilis. The results of the TPHA and fluorescent treponemal antibody tests were reactive in all CSF samples from patients with acute untreated neurosyphilis and from most patients with late latent syphilis but no signs of involvement of the central nervous system. The demonstration of 19S-IgM antibodies against Treponema pallidum in the CSF was a better indication of activity of the disease than the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory test. Ten of 11 patients with untreated acute neurosyphilis had reactive results in the solid-phase haemadsorption test for CSF-IgM (CSF-IgM-SPHA test). The TPHA index, which relates the CSF-TPHA titre to the albumin quotient and thus excludes errors from disturbed function of the blood-brain barrier, was above 100 in all but one of the patients with acute neurosyphilis but below 100 after treatment. Patients with late latent syphilis and without CNS signs had TPHA indices below 5. Thus a nonreactive CSF-TPHA test result excludes neurosyphilis but reactive CSF-IgM-SPHA results and TPHA indices above 100 strongly indicative active disease. PMID:7023601

  12. Report on a conference analyzing the role of cerebrospinal fluid prophylaxis for brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Glantz, Michael; Johanson, Conrad

    2008-01-01

    This is a report of a meeting sponsored by MundiPharma International to identify ways to exploit the cerebrospinal fluid system pharmacologically, for more effective management and prevention of primary and metastatic CNS tumors. PMID:18366751

  13. Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis C2, a Cerebrospinal Fluid Clinical Isolate from Central India

    PubMed Central

    Bhullar, Shradha S.; More, Ravi P.; Puranik, Sampada; Taori, Girdhar M.; Daginawala, Hatim F.

    2014-01-01

    We report the annotated genome sequence of a Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolate from the cerebrospinal fluid of a tuberculous meningitis patient admitted to the Central India Institute of Medical Sciences, Nagpur, India. PMID:25146143

  14. [Nitroblue tetrazolium reduction by the neutrophils of the cerebrospinal fluid and peripheral blood and by the monocytic-reticular cells of the cerebrospinal fluid in neuroinfections].

    PubMed

    Kucharska-Demczuk, K

    1980-01-01

    Using the method of Park et al. the author studied spontaneous and stimulated NBT reduction by neutrophil granulocytes in the cerebrospinal fluid and blood, and by monocytic-reticular cells in the cerebrospinal fluid of the patients with bacterial and viral meningitis and meningismus. The author performed 333 investigations in 74 patients. Significantly higher mean values of the index of spontaneous and stimulated NBT reduction by the granulocytes and cerebrospinal fluid were observed in cases of bacterial meningitis as compared with the granulocytes of the peripheral blood in healthy subjects. It was demonstrated that in patients with bacterial meningitis blood and fluid granulocytes showed a similar phagocytic acitivty independent of the humoral environment. In the patients with bacterial and viral meningitis the monocytic-reticular cells the cerebrospinal fluid showed a similar, sometimes high, phagocytic activity depending on the phase and severity of the disease. On the otherhand, in most cases of meningismus these cells failed to manifest any phagocytic and bactericidal activity. In only few isolated cells in the fluid weak NBT reduction was observed. The obtained results of investigations showed the usefulness of the NBT test not only for the differential diagnosis of the aetiology of neuroinfections but also for the assessment of immune processes taking place in the nervous system.

  15. Cytomegalovirus Antibody in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Schizophrenic Patients Detected by Enzyme Immunoassay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller Torrey, E.; Yolken, Robert H.; Winfrey, C. Jack

    1982-05-01

    By means of enzyme immunoassay techniques to detect the presence of antibody to cytomegalovirus, the cerebrospinal fluid of 178 patients with schizophrenia, 17 patients with bipolar disorders, and 11 other psychiatric patients was compared with that of 79 neurological patients and 41 normal control subjects. The cerebrospinal fluid of 20 of the schizophrenic patients and 3 of the patients with bipolar disorders showed significant increases in immunoglobulin M antibody to cytomegalovirus; no difference was found in patients on or off psychotropic medications.

  16. Cerebrospinal Fluid Secretory Ca2+-Dependent Phospholipase A2 Activity: A Biomarker of Blood-Cerebrospinal Fluid Barrier Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Chalbot, Sonia; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Fladby, Tormod; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2010-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier, the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCB) and other specialized brain barriers are increasingly recognized as a major obstacle to the treatment of most brain disorders. The impairment of these barriers has been implicated in neuropathology of several diseases, such as autism, ischemia, multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer disease. This dual function of the blood-neural barriers points out the importance and need for the development of techniques that can evaluate the nature and level of their integrity. Here we report the discovery of CSF secretory Ca2+-dependent phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) activity as a measure of BCB permeability. Lumbar CSF from BCB-impaired (n=26), multiple sclerosis (n=18) and healthy control (n=32) cases was analyzed using both a newly developed continuous fluorescence assay for CSF sPLA2 activity and CSF/Serum albumin ratio (QAlb), the most common and established method to evaluate BCB permeability. While both measurements showed no significant differences between multiple sclerosis and age-matched normal healthy cases, they were highly correlated. Though the CSF sPLA2 activity and QAlb had over 95 % agreement, the former was found to be more sensitive than the latter in measuring low levels of BCB impairment. PMID:20470866

  17. Progressive Differentiation and Instructive Capacities of Amniotic Fluid and Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteomes following Neural Tube Closure.

    PubMed

    Chau, Kevin F; Springel, Mark W; Broadbelt, Kevin G; Park, Hye-Yeon; Topal, Salih; Lun, Melody P; Mullan, Hillary; Maynard, Thomas; Steen, Hanno; LaMantia, Anthony S; Lehtinen, Maria K

    2015-12-21

    After neural tube closure, amniotic fluid (AF) captured inside the neural tube forms the nascent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Neuroepithelial stem cells contact CSF-filled ventricles, proliferate, and differentiate to form the mammalian brain, while neurogenic placodes, which generate cranial sensory neurons, remain in contact with the AF. Using in vivo ultrasound imaging, we quantified the expansion of the embryonic ventricular-CSF space from its inception. We developed tools to obtain pure AF and nascent CSF, before and after neural tube closure, and to define how the AF and CSF proteomes diverge during mouse development. Using embryonic neural explants, we demonstrate that age-matched fluids promote Sox2-positive neurogenic identity in developing forebrain and olfactory epithelia. Nascent CSF also stimulates SOX2-positive self-renewal of forebrain progenitor cells, some of which is attributable to LIFR signaling. Our Resource should facilitate the investigation of fluid-tissue interactions during this highly vulnerable stage of early brain development.

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid findings in adults with acute Lyme neuroborreliosis.

    PubMed

    Djukic, Marija; Schmidt-Samoa, Carsten; Lange, Peter; Spreer, Annette; Neubieser, Katja; Eiffert, Helmut; Nau, Roland; Schmidt, Holger

    2012-04-01

    Presence of BB-specific antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with evidence of their intrathecal production in conjunction with the white cell count in the CSF and typical clinical symptoms is the traditional diagnostic gold standard of Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB). Few data are available on the CSF lactate concentration in European adults with the diagnosis of acute LNB. The objective of the study was to investigate the CSF changes during acute LNB. Routine CSF parameters [leukocyte count, protein, lactate and albumin concentrations, CSF/serum quotients of albumin (Q(Alb)), IgG, IgA and IgM, and oligoclonal IgG bands] and the Borrelia burgdorferi (BB)-specific antibody index were retrospectively studied in relation to the clinical presentation in patients diagnosed with acute LNB. A total of 118 patients with LNB were categorized into the following groups according to their symptoms at presentation; group 1: polyradiculoneuritis (Bannwarth's syndrome), group 2: isolated facial palsy and group 3: predominantly meningitic course of the disease. In addition to the CSF of patients with acute LNB, CSF of 19 patients with viral meningitis (VM) and 3 with neurolues (NL) were analyzed. There were 97 patients classified with definite LNB, and 21 as probable LNB. Neck stiffness and fever were reported by 15.3% of patients. Most of these patients were younger than 50 years. Polyradiculoneuritis was frequently found in patients older than 50 years. Lymphopleocytosis was found in all patients. Only 5 patients had a CSF lactate ≥3.5 mmol/l, and the mean CSF lactate level was not elevated (2.1 ± 0.6 mmol/l). The patients with definite LNB had significantly higher lactate levels than patients with probable LNB. Elevated lactate levels were accompanied by fever and headache. In the Reiber nomograms, intrathecal immunoglobulin synthesis was found for IgM in 70.2% followed by IgG in 19.5%. Isoelectric focussing detected an intrathecal IgG synthesis in 83 patients (70

  19. Release Pattern of Liposomal Bupivacaine in Artificial Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Düzlü, Ayşe Ünal; Günaydın, Berrin; Şüküroğlu, Murat Kadir; Değim, İsmail Tuncer

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to compare the possible controlled release profile of multilamellar liposomal bupivacaine formulations with non-liposomal forms in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) under in vitro conditions. Methods Liposome formulations were prepared using a dry-film hydration method. Then, an artificial CSF-buffered solution was prepared. Bupivacaine base with liposomal bupivacaine base, bupivacaine HCl with liposomal bupivacaine HCl and bupivacaine HCl were added in a Franz diffusion cell. These solutions were kept in a hot water bath for 24 h. The samples were taken at 0.5, 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 h (1st series of experiment). Solutions of bupivacaine base with liposomal bupivacaine base and bupivacaine HCl with liposomal bupivacaine HCl were centrifuged to obtain liposomal bupivacaine base and liposomal bupivacaine HCl. Afterwards, liposomal bupivacaine base and liposomal bupivacaine HCl were added in a Franz diffusion cell. After keeping these solutions in a hot water bath for 24 h as well, the samples were taken at the same time intervals (2nd series of experiment). All samples (54 from the 1st experiment and 36 from the 2nd experiment) were analysed with high-performance liquid chromatography and ultra-performance liquid chromatography and their chromatograms were obtained. Results After obtaining calibration curves for bupivacaine base and HCl, release patterns of these formulations were plotted. A markedly controlled slow-release pattern was observed for multilamellar liposomal bupivacaine than for non-liposomal bupivacaine in artificial CSF. Conclusion Demonstration of controlled slow-release profile for mutilamellar liposomal bupivacaine in artificial CSF in vitro might support intrathecal use of liposomal bupivacaine in vivo in animal studies. PMID:27366547

  20. Cerebrospinal Fluid Levels of Monoamine Metabolites in the Epileptic Baboon

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, C. Ákos; Patel, Mayuri; Uteshev, Victor V.

    2016-01-01

    The baboon represents a natural model for genetic generalized epilepsy and sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). In this retrospective study, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) monoamine metabolites and scalp electroencephalography (EEG) were evaluated in 263 baboons of a pedigreed colony. CSF monoamine abnormalities have been linked to reduced seizure thresholds, behavioral abnormalities and SUDEP in various animal models of epilepsy. The levels of 3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenylglycol, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid and homovanillic acid in CSF samples drawn from the cisterna magna were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography. These levels were compared between baboons with seizures (SZ), craniofacial trauma (CFT) and asymptomatic, control (CTL) baboons, between baboons with abnormal and normal EEG studies. We hypothesized that the CSF levels of major monoaminergic metabolites (i.e., dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine) associate with the baboons’ electroclinical status and thus can be used as clinical biomarkers applicable to seizures/epilepsy. However, despite apparent differences in metabolite levels between the groups, usually lower in SZ and CFT baboons and in baboons with abnormal EEG studies, we did not find any statistically significant differences using a logistic regression analysis. Significant correlations between the metabolite levels, especially between 5-HIAA and HVA, were preserved in all electroclinical groups. While we were not able to demonstrate significant differences in monoamine metabolites in relation to seizures or EEG markers of epilepsy, we cannot exclude the monoaminergic system as a potential source of pathogenesis in epilepsy and SUDEP. A prospective study evaluating serial CSF monoamine levels in baboons with recently witnessed seizures, and evaluation of abnormal expression and function of monoaminergic receptors and transporters within epilepsy-related brain regions, may impact the electroclinical status. PMID:26924854

  1. [Diagnosis of cerebrospinal fluid leakages by gamma-cisternography].

    PubMed

    Oberson, R

    1976-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakages either secondary (traumatic) or spontaneous (non-traumatic) are first considered in their frequency and origin. The exact topography of the various meningeal and cranial lesions involved are difficult to assess particularly in the most important groups of persistant traumatic CSF rhinorrhea and recurrent meningitis. Among the various diagnostic approaches, direct observation is always necessary, but of limited value. Standard X-rays must be followed by multidirectionnal tomography (Polytome) and, whenever available, computed tomodensitography of the base of the skull. Brain pneumography provides a thorough setting fourth of the congenital or acquired cerebral lesions as well as the new cranio-meningeal conditions. Difficulties encountered with the techniques of subdurography and Pantopaque injection are underlined. Three radioisotope techniques are considered. 1) The earlier technique of cotton-pledgets only shows the external orifice. 2) The recent proposal of nuclide cranial subdurography is criticized for ignoring the leptomeningeal bag. 3) Radioisotope cisternography (RIC) or gamma-cisternography is described more precisely. It remains the most complete and appropriate method for observing the natural behaviour of the leakage. RIC with fistulography is performed through suboccipital injection of 99mTc-DTPA. RIC provides essential clues on the relative importance of associated dynamic disturbances of the third circulation and morphological changes of its anatomical bed (stenoses and widenings of the ependymal and leptomeningeal spaces). If present, the leakage may be directly shown on the RIC pictures. If rhinorrhea is abundant, there is no difficulty in assessing side and site of the fistula. If rhinorrhea is occult, dubious or intermittent, diagnosis is often difficult. There are also indirect signs of rhinorrhea: leptomeningeal dilatation near a frontal or ethmoidal fracture, contamination of the rhinopharynx, examination of

  2. Endostatin level in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Salza, Romain; Oudart, Jean-Baptiste; Ramont, Laurent; Maquart, François-Xavier; Bakchine, Serge; Thoannès, Henri; Ricard-Blum, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the level of endostatin, a fragment of collagen XVIII that accumulates in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), in the cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) of patients with neurodegenerative diseases. The concentrations of total protein, endostatin, amyloid-β1-42 peptide, tau, and hyperphosphorylated tau proteins were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in CSF of patients with AD (n = 57), behavioral frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD, n = 22), non AD and non FTD dementia (nAD/nFTD, n = 84), and 45 subjects without neurodegenerative diseases. The statistical significance of the results was assessed by Mann-Whitney and Kruskal and Wallis tests, and by ROC analysis. The concentration of endostatin in CSF was higher than the levels of the three markers of AD both in control subjects and in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. The endostatin/amyloid-β1-42 ratio was significantly increased in patients with AD (257%, p < 0.0001) and nAD/nFTD (140%, p < 0.0001) compared to controls. The endostatin/tau protein ratio was significantly decreased in patients with AD (-49%, p < 0.0001) but was increased in bvFTD patients (89%, p < 0.0001) compared to controls. In the same way, the endostatin/hyperphosphorylated tau protein ratio was decreased in patients with AD (-21%, p = 0.0002) but increased in patients with bvFTD (81%, p = 0.0026), compared to controls. The measurement of endostatin in CSF and the calculation of its ratio relative to well-established AD markers improve the diagnosis of bvFTD patients and the discrimination of patients with AD from those with bvFTD and nAD/nFTD. PMID:25408220

  3. Brain Gene Expression Signatures From Cerebrospinal Fluid Exosome RNA Profiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanello, S. B.; Stevens, B.; Calvillo, E.; Tang, R.; Gutierrez Flores, B.; Hu, L.; Skog, J.; Bershad, E.

    2016-01-01

    While the Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome observations have focused on ocular symptoms, spaceflight has been also associated with a number of other performance and neurologic signs, such as headaches, cognitive changes, vertigo, nausea, sleep/circadian disruption and mood alterations, which, albeit likely multifactorial, can also result from elevation of intracranial pressure (ICP). We therefore hypothesize that these various symptoms are caused by disturbances in the neurophysiology of the brain structures and are correlated with molecular markers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as indicators of neurophysiological changes. Exosomes are 30-200 nm microvesicles shed into all biofluids, including blood, urine, and CSF, carrying a highly rich source of intact protein and RNA cargo. Exosomes have been identified in human CSF, and their proteome and RNA pool is a potential new reservoir for biomarker discovery in neurological disorders. The purpose of this study is to investigate changes in brain gene expression via exosome analysis in patients suffering from ICP elevation of varied severity (idiopathic intracranial hypertension -IIH), a condition which shares some of the neuroophthalmological features of VIIP, as a first step toward obtaining evidence suggesting that cognitive function and ICP levels can be correlated with biomarkers in the CSF. Our preliminary work, reported last year, validated the exosomal technology applicable to CSF analysis and demonstrated that it was possible to obtain gene expression evidence of inflammation processes in traumatic brain injury patients. We are now recruiting patients with suspected IIH requiring lumbar puncture at Baylor College of Medicine. Both CSF (5 ml) and human plasma (10 ml) are being collected in order to compare the pattern of differentially expressed genes observed in CSF and in blood. Since blood is much more accessible than CSF, we would like to determine whether plasma biomarkers for

  4. Evaluation of Cerebrospinal Fluid Assay Variability in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    White, Matthew T; Shaw, Leslie M; Xie, Sharon X

    2016-01-01

    Studies of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease (AD) have indicated that much of the variability observed in the biomarkers may be due to measurement error. Biomarkers are often obtained with measurement error, which may make the diagnostic biomarker appear less effective than it truly is. In the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database, technical replicates of CSF biomarkers are available; the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center database contains longitudinal replicates of CSF biomarkers. We focus on the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) as the measure of diagnostic effectiveness for differentiating AD from normal cognition using CSF biomarkers and compare AUC estimates obtained by a more standard, naïve method (which uses a single observation per subject and ignores measurement error) to a maximum likelihood (ML) based method (which uses all replicates per subject and adjusts for measurement error). The choice of analysis method depends upon the noise to signal ratio (i.e., the magnitude of the measurement error variability relative to the true biomarker variability); moderate to high ratios may significantly bias the naïve AUC estimate, and the ML-based method would be preferred. The noise to signal ratios were low for the ADNI biomarkers but high for the tTau and pTau biomarkers in NACC. Correspondingly, the naïve and ML-based AUC estimates were nearly identical in the ADNI data but dissimilar for the tTau and pTau biomarkers in the NACC data. Therefore, using the naïve method is adequate for analysis of CSF biomarkers in the ADNI study, but the ML method is recommended for the NACC data.

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid ferritin in children with viral and bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, M; Mamishi, S; Mahmoudi, S; Pourakbari, B; Khotaei, G; Daneshjou, K; Hashemi, N

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fact that the prognosis of bacterial meningitis has been improved by the influence of antibiotics, this disease is still one of the significant causes of morbidity and mortality in children. Rapid differentiation between bacterial and aseptic meningitis, and the need for immediate antibiotic treatment in the former, is crucial in the prognosis of these patients. Ferritin is one of the most sensitive biochemical markers investigated in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for the early diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. The present study aims to evaluate the diagnostic capability of CSF ferritin in differentiating bacterial and viral meningitis in the paediatric setting. A cross-sectional study was carried out in the referral Children's Medical Center Hospital, Tehran, during 2008 and 2009. According to the inclusion criteria, CSF samples from 42 patients with suspected meningitis were obtained and divided into two meningitis groups, bacterial (n = 18) and viral (n = 24). Ferritin and other routine determinants (i.e., leucocytes, protein and glucose) were compared between the two groups. Ferritin concentration in the bacterial meningitis group was 106.39 +/- 86.96 ng/dL, which was considerably higher than in the viral meningitis group (10.17 +/- 14.09, P < 0.001). Mean CSF protein concentration and cell count were significantly higher in the bacterial meningitis group and showed a positive correlation with CSF ferritin. In conclusion, this study suggests that CSF ferritin concentration is an accurate test for the early differentiation of bacterial and aseptic meningitis; however, further investigation on a larger cohort of patients is required to confirm this finding.

  6. Longitudinal Measurements of Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Surova, Yulia; Öhrfelt, Annika; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hansson, Oskar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of tau, phosphorylated tau, β‐amyloid42, α‐synuclein, neurofilament light, and YKL‐40 change over time and if changes correlate with motor progression and/or cognitive decline in patients with PD and controls. Methods We included 63 patients with PD (nondemented) and 21 neurologically healthy controls from the prospective and longitudinal Swedish BioFINDER study, all of whom had clinical assessments and lumbar punctures at baseline and after 2 years. Results CSF tau levels correlated strongly with α‐synuclein. The levels of CSF α‐synuclein, tau, phosphorylated tau, neurofilament light, and YKL‐40, but not β‐amyloid42, increased in CSF over 2 years in PD. No changes were seen in the control group. Studying patients with a short disease duration ( ≤ 5 years) and patients with a long disease duration ( > 5 years) separately, α‐synuclein and tau only increased in the PD group with long disease duration. In the PD group, an increase in phosphorylated tau over 2 years correlated with faster motor progression and faster cognitive decline. An increase in YKL‐40 over 2 years correlated with faster cognitive decline. Conclusion CSF biomarkers reflecting Lewy body pathology and neurodegeneration (α‐synuclein), neuronal degeneration (tau, phosphorylated tau, and neurofilament light), and inflammation (YKL‐40) increase significantly over 2 years in PD. CSF levels of α‐synuclein and tau correlate and remain stable in the early symptomatic phase of PD but increase in the later phase. We hypothesize that CSF α‐synuclein levels might increase as a result of more intense neurodegeneration in PD with long disease duration. © 2016 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society PMID:26878815

  7. Cerebrospinal Fluid Particles in Alzheimer Disease and Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yue; Keene, C. Dirk; Peskind, Elaine R.; Galasko, Douglas R.; Hu, Shu-Ching; Cudaback, Eiron; Wilson, Angela M.; Li, Ge; Yu, Chang-En; Montine, Kathleen S.; Zhang, Jing; Baird, Geoffrey S.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Montine, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contains diverse lipid particles, including lipoproteins that are distinct from their plasma counterparts and contain apolipoprotein (apo) E isoforms, apoJ, and apoAI, and extracellular vesicles, which can be detected by annexin V binding. The aim of this study was to develop a method to quantify CSF particles and evaluate their relationship to aging and neurodegenerative diseases. We used a flow cytometric assay to detect annexin V-, apoE-, apoAI-, apoJ- and amyloid (A) β42-positive particles in CSF from 131 research volunteers who were neurologically normal or had mild cognitive impairment (MCI), Alzheimer disease (AD) dementia, or Parkinson disease. APOE ε4/ε4 participants had CSF apoE-positive particles that were more frequently larger but at an 88% lower level vs. those in APOE ε3/ε3 or APOE ε3/ε4 patients; this finding was reproduced in conditioned medium from mouse primary glial cell cultures with targeted replacement of apoE. CSF apoE-positive and β-amyloid (Aβ42)-positive particle concentrations were persistently reduced one-third to one-half in middle and older age subjects; apoAI-positive particle concentration progressively increased approximately 2-fold with age. Both apoAI-positive and annexin V-positive CSF particle levels were reduced one-third to one-half in CSF of MCI and/or AD dementia patients vs. age-matched controls. Our approach provides new methods to investigate CNS lipid biology in relation to neurodegeneration and perhaps develop new biomarkers for diagnosis or treatment monitoring. PMID:26083568

  8. Summary of cerebrospinal fluid routine parameters in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Jesse, Sarah; Brettschneider, Johannes; Süssmuth, Sigurd D; Landwehrmeyer, Bernhard G; von Arnim, Christine A F; Ludolph, Albert C; Tumani, Hayrettin; Otto, Markus

    2011-06-01

    In neurodegenerative diseases, cerebrospinal fluid analysis (CSF) is predominantly performed to exclude inflammatory diseases and to perform a risk assessment in dementive disorders by measurement of tau proteins and amyloid beta peptides. However, large scale data on basic findings of CSF routine parameters are generally lacking. The objective of the study was to define a normal reference spectrum of routine CSF parameters in neurodegenerative diseases. Routine CSF parameters (white cell count, lactate and albumin concentrations, CSF/serum quotients of albumin (Q (alb)), IgG, IgA, IgM, and oligoclonal IgG bands (OCB)) were retrospectively analyzed in an academic research setting. A total of 765 patients (Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD), vascular dementia (VD), frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), multisystem atrophy (MSA), motor neuron diseases (MND), spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA), Huntington's disease (HD)) and non-demented control groups including a group of patients with muscular disorders (MD). The main outcome measures included statistical analyses of routine CSF parameters. Mildly elevated Q (alb) were found in a small percentage of nearly all subgroups and in a higher proportion of patients with PSP, MSA, VD, PDD, and MND. With the exception of 1 MND patient, no intrathecal Ig synthesis was observed. Isolated OCBs in CSF were sometimes found in patients with neurodegenerative diseases without elevated cell counts; lactate levels were always normal. A slightly elevated Q (alb) was observed in a subgroup of patients with neurodegenerative diseases and does not exclude the diagnosis. Extensive elevation of routine parameters is not characteristic and should encourage a re-evaluation of the clinical diagnosis.

  9. Independent information from cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β and florbetapir imaging in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Niklas; Insel, Philip S; Donohue, Michael; Landau, Susan; Jagust, William J; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Weiner, Michael W

    2015-03-01

    Reduced cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 and increased retention of florbetapir positron emission tomography are biomarkers reflecting cortical amyloid load in Alzheimer's disease. However, these measurements do not always agree and may represent partly different aspects of the underlying Alzheimer's disease pathology. The goal of this study was therefore to test if cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β biomarkers are independently related to other Alzheimer's disease markers, and to examine individuals who are discordantly classified by these two biomarker modalities. Cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β were measured at baseline in 769 persons [161 healthy controls, 68 subjective memory complaints, 419 mild cognitive impairment and 121 Alzheimer's disease dementia, mean age 72 years (standard deviation 7 years), 47% females] and used to predict diagnosis, APOE ε4 carriage status, cerebral blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid total-tau and phosphorylated-tau levels (cross-sectionally); and hippocampal volume, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography results and Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale scores (longitudinally). Cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β were highly correlated, but adjusting one of these predictors for the other revealed that they both provided partially independent information when predicting diagnosis, APOE ε4, hippocampal volume, metabolism, cognition, total-tau and phosphorylated-tau (the 95% confidence intervals of the adjusted effects did not include zero). Cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β was more strongly related to APOE ε4 whereas positron emission tomography amyloid-β was more strongly related to tau levels (P < 0.05). Discordance (mainly isolated cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β positivity) differed by diagnostic group (P < 0.001) and was seen in 21% of cognitively healthy people but only 6% in dementia patients. The finding that

  10. Independent information from cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β and florbetapir imaging in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Niklas; Insel, Philip S; Donohue, Michael; Landau, Susan; Jagust, William J; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Weiner, Michael W

    2015-03-01

    Reduced cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 and increased retention of florbetapir positron emission tomography are biomarkers reflecting cortical amyloid load in Alzheimer's disease. However, these measurements do not always agree and may represent partly different aspects of the underlying Alzheimer's disease pathology. The goal of this study was therefore to test if cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β biomarkers are independently related to other Alzheimer's disease markers, and to examine individuals who are discordantly classified by these two biomarker modalities. Cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β were measured at baseline in 769 persons [161 healthy controls, 68 subjective memory complaints, 419 mild cognitive impairment and 121 Alzheimer's disease dementia, mean age 72 years (standard deviation 7 years), 47% females] and used to predict diagnosis, APOE ε4 carriage status, cerebral blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid total-tau and phosphorylated-tau levels (cross-sectionally); and hippocampal volume, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography results and Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale scores (longitudinally). Cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β were highly correlated, but adjusting one of these predictors for the other revealed that they both provided partially independent information when predicting diagnosis, APOE ε4, hippocampal volume, metabolism, cognition, total-tau and phosphorylated-tau (the 95% confidence intervals of the adjusted effects did not include zero). Cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β was more strongly related to APOE ε4 whereas positron emission tomography amyloid-β was more strongly related to tau levels (P < 0.05). Discordance (mainly isolated cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β positivity) differed by diagnostic group (P < 0.001) and was seen in 21% of cognitively healthy people but only 6% in dementia patients. The finding that

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid neurogranin: relation to cognition and neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Portelius, Erik; Zetterberg, Henrik; Skillbäck, Tobias; Törnqvist, Ulrika; Andreasson, Ulf; Trojanowski, John Q; Weiner, Michael W; Shaw, Leslie M; Mattsson, Niklas; Blennow, Kaj

    2015-11-01

    Synaptic dysfunction is linked to cognitive symptoms in Alzheimer's disease. Thus, measurement of synapse proteins in cerebrospinal fluid may be useful biomarkers to monitor synaptic degeneration. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of the postsynaptic protein neurogranin are increased in Alzheimer's disease, including in the predementia stage of the disease. Here, we tested the performance of cerebrospinal fluid neurogranin to predict cognitive decline and brain injury in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative study. An in-house immunoassay was used to analyse neurogranin in cerebrospinal fluid samples from a cohort of patients who at recruitment were diagnosed as having Alzheimer's disease with dementia (n = 95) or mild cognitive impairment (n = 173), as well as in cognitively normal subjects (n = 110). Patients with mild cognitive impairment were grouped into those that remained cognitively stable for at least 2 years (stable mild cognitive impairment) and those who progressed to Alzheimer's disease dementia during follow-up (progressive mild cognitive impairment). Correlations were tested between baseline cerebrospinal fluid neurogranin levels and baseline and longitudinal cognitive impairment, brain atrophy and glucose metabolism within each diagnostic group. Cerebrospinal fluid neurogranin was increased in patients with Alzheimer's disease dementia (P < 0.001), progressive mild cognitive impairment (P < 0.001) and stable mild cognitive impairment (P < 0.05) compared with controls, and in Alzheimer's disease dementia (P < 0.01) and progressive mild cognitive impairment (P < 0.05) compared with stable mild cognitive impairment. In the mild cognitive impairment group, high baseline cerebrospinal fluid neurogranin levels predicted cognitive decline as reflected by decreased Mini-Mental State Examination (P < 0.001) and increased Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (P < 0.001) scores at clinical follow-up. In addition, high baseline

  12. Independent information from cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β and florbetapir imaging in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Insel, Philip S.; Donohue, Michael; Landau, Susan; Jagust, William J.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Weiner, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Reduced cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 and increased retention of florbetapir positron emission tomography are biomarkers reflecting cortical amyloid load in Alzheimer's disease. However, these measurements do not always agree and may represent partly different aspects of the underlying Alzheimer's disease pathology. The goal of this study was therefore to test if cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β biomarkers are independently related to other Alzheimer's disease markers, and to examine individuals who are discordantly classified by these two biomarker modalities. Cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β were measured at baseline in 769 persons [161 healthy controls, 68 subjective memory complaints, 419 mild cognitive impairment and 121 Alzheimer's disease dementia, mean age 72 years (standard deviation 7 years), 47% females] and used to predict diagnosis, APOE ε4 carriage status, cerebral blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid total-tau and phosphorylated-tau levels (cross-sectionally); and hippocampal volume, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography results and Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale scores (longitudinally). Cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β were highly correlated, but adjusting one of these predictors for the other revealed that they both provided partially independent information when predicting diagnosis, APOE ε4, hippocampal volume, metabolism, cognition, total-tau and phosphorylated-tau (the 95% confidence intervals of the adjusted effects did not include zero). Cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β was more strongly related to APOE ε4 whereas positron emission tomography amyloid-β was more strongly related to tau levels (P < 0.05). Discordance (mainly isolated cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β positivity) differed by diagnostic group (P < 0.001) and was seen in 21% of cognitively healthy people but only 6% in dementia patients. The finding that

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities in patients with neoplastic meningitis. An evaluation using /sup 111/In-DTPA ventriculography

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, S.A.; Trump, D.L.; Chen, D.C.; Thompson, G.; Camargo, E.E.

    1982-11-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics were evaluated by /sup 111/In-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (/sup 111/In-DTPA) ventriculography in 27 patients with neoplastic meningitis. Nineteen patients (70 percent) had evidence of cerebrospinal fluid flow disturbances. These occurred as ventricular outlet obstructions, abnormalities of flow in the spinal canal, or flow distrubances over the cortical convexities. Tumor histology, physical examination, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, myelograms, and computerized axial tomographic scans were not sufficient to predict cerebrospinal fluid flow patterns. These data indicate that cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities are common in patients with neoplastic meningitis and that /sup 111/In-DTPA cerebrospinal fluid flow imaging is useful in characterizing these abnormalities. This technique provides insight into the distribution of intraventricularly administered chemotherapy and may provide explanations for treatment failure and drug-induced neurotoxicity in patients with neoplastic meningitis.

  14. Mannan-binding lectin in cerebrospinal fluid: a leptomeningeal protein

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mannan-binding lectin (MBL), a protein of the innate immune response is attracting increasing clinical interest, in particularly in relation to its deficiency. Due to its involvement in brain diseases, identifying the source of MBL in CSF is important. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) can provide data that discriminates between blood-, brain-, and leptomeninges-derived proteins. To detect the source of MBL in CSF we need to consider three variables: the molecular size-dependent concentration gradient between CSF and blood, the variation in transfer between blood and CSF, and the CSF MBL concentration correlation with the albumin CSF/serum quotient (QAlb), i.e., with CSF flow rate. Methods MBL was assayed in samples of CSF and serum with an ELISA, coated with anti MBL antibodies. Routine parameters such as albumin-, immunoglobulin- CSF/serum quotients, oligoclonal IgG and cell count were used to characterize the patient groups. Groups comprised firstly, control patients without organic brain disease with normal CSF and normal barrier function and secondly, patients without inflammatory diseases but with increased QAlb, i.e. with a blood CSF barrier dysfunction. Results MBL concentration in CSF was at least five-fold higher than expected for a molecular-size-dependent passage from blood. Secondly, in a QIgM/QAlb quotient diagram (Reibergram) 9/13 cases showed an intrathecal fraction in some cases over 80% of total CSF MBL concentration 3) The smaller inter-individual variation of MBL concentrations in CSF of the control group (CV = 66%) compared to the MBL concentrations in serum (CV = 146%) indicate an independent source of MBL in CSF. 4) The absolute MBL concentration in CSF increases with increasing QAlb. Among brain-derived proteins in CSF only the leptomeningeal proteins showed a (linear) increase with decreasing CSF flow rate, neuronal and glial proteins are invariant to changes of QAlb. Conclusions MBL in CSF is predominantly brain

  15. Cerebrospinal fluid passage of intravenous magnesium sulfate in neurosurgical patients.

    PubMed

    Fuchs-Buder, T; Tramèr, M R; Tassonyi, E

    1997-10-01

    Increasing evidence suggests a neuroprotective potential of magnesium sulfate (MgSO4). Only limited information about the passage of MgSO4 to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is available in neurosurgical patients. However, with regard to the clinical relevance of magnesium's neuroprotective properties, quantitative data about its CSF passage are needed. The present study aims to assess the amount and the time course of magnesium's CSF passage in neurosurgical patients. To this end, 20 patients undergoing general anesthesia for neurosurgery and needing CSF drainage were included. Patients received an i.v. bolus of 60 mg/kg MgSO4. The increase in plasma and CSF magnesium concentration were measured 30, 90, and 240 min after the end of the MgSO4 infusion. These values were compared with the baseline levels taken before the start of the MgSO4 infusion. Thus, each patient served as his or her own control. Values are expressed as means +/- SD. The plasma magnesium levels were measured as follows: baseline, 0.74 +/- 0.12 mM; at 30 min, 1.24 +/- 0.1 mM (p < 0.01); at 90 min, 0.95 +/- 0.15 mM (p < 0.01), and at 240 min, 0.82 +/- 0.14 mM (p < 0.05). The CSF magnesium levels were measured as follows: baseline, 0.95 +/- 0.11 mM; at 30 min, 1.00 +/- 0.15 mM (NS); at 90 min, 1.10 +/- 0.17 mM (p < 0.01); and at 240 min, 1.13 +/- 0.19 mM (p < 0.001). We concluded that a bolus of 60 mg/kg of MgSO4 leads at least after 90 min to a significant increase in the CSF magnesium concentration. Moreover, the increase in plasma and CSF magnesium concentration is not parallel. Thus, plasma magnesium concentration cannot be used to predict the changes in CSF concentrations.

  16. Proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, YAN; LIU, XIAO-HUI; WU, JIAN-JUN; REN, HUI-MING; WANG, JIAN; DING, ZHENG-TONG; JIANG, YU-PING

    2016-01-01

    The present study used comparative proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients in order to identify proteins that may act as diagnostic biomarkers and indicators of the pathogenesis of ALS. This analysis was performed using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) technology, coupled with 2-dimensional liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery software was utilized for bioinformatic analysis of the data. Following this, western blotting was performed in order to examine the expression of 3 candidate proteins in ALS patients compared with healthy individuals [as a normal control (NC) group] or patients with other neurological disease (OND); these proteins were insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-2), glutamate receptor 4 (GRIA4) and leucine-rich α-2-glycoprotein 1 (LRG1). Clinical data, including gender, age, disease duration and ALS functional rating scale (ALSFRS-R) score, were also collected in the ALS patients. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed between the clinical data and the results of western blot analysis. A total of 248 distinct proteins were identified in the ALS and NC groups, amongst which a significant difference could be identified in 35 proteins; of these, 21 proteins were downregulated and 14 were upregulated. These differentially-expressed proteins were thus revealed to be associated with ALS. The western blot analysis confirmed a proportion of the data attained in the iTRAQ analysis, revealing the differential protein expression of IGF-2 and GRIA4 between the ALS and NC groups. IGF-2 was significantly downregulated in ALS patients (P=0.017) and GRIA4 was significantly upregulated (P=0.016). These results were subsequently validated in the 35-patient ALS and OND groups (P=0.002), but no significant difference was identified in LRG1 expression between these groups. GRIA4 protein expression was higher

  17. Proteomic Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid in Canine Cervical Spondylomyelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Vaquero, Paula; da Costa, Ronaldo C.; Allen, Matthew J.; Moore, Sarah A.; Keirsey, Jeremy K.; Green, Kari B.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective study. Objective To identify proteins with differential expression in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 15 clinically normal (control) dogs and 15 dogs with cervical spondylomyelopathy (CSM). Summary of Background Data Canine CSM is a spontaneous, chronic, compressive cervical myelopathy similar to human cervical spondylotic myelopathy. There is a limited knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying these conditions. Differentially expressed CSF proteins may contribute with novel information about the disease pathogenesis in both dogs and humans. Methods Protein separation was performed with two-dimensional electrophoresis. A Student’s t-test was used to detect significant differences between groups (P < 0.05). Three comparisons were made: 1) control versus CSM-affected dogs, 2) control versus non-corticosteroid treated CSM-affected dogs, and 3) non-corticosteroid treated CSM-affected versus corticosteroid treated CSM-affected dogs. Protein spots exhibiting at least a statistically significant 1.25-fold change between groups were selected for subsequent identification with capillary-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Results A total of 96 spots had a significant average change of at least 1.25-fold in one of the three comparisons. Compared to the CSF of control dogs, CSM-affected dogs demonstrated increased CSF expression of eight proteins including vitamin D-binding protein, gelsolin, creatine kinase B-type, angiotensinogen, alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein, SPARC, calsyntenin-1, and complement C3, and decreased expression of pigment epithelium-derived factor, prostaglandin-H2 D-isomerase, apolipoprotein E, and clusterin. In the CSF of CSM-affected dogs, corticosteroid treatment increased the expression of haptoglobin, transthyretin isoform 2, cystatin C-like, apolipoprotein E, and clusterin, and decreased the expression of angiotensinogen, alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein, and gelsolin. Conclusions Many of the differentially expressed

  18. Mammalian embryonic cerebrospinal fluid proteome has greater apolipoprotein and enzyme pattern complexity than the avian proteome.

    PubMed

    Parada, Carolina; Gato, Angel; Bueno, David

    2005-01-01

    During early stages of embryo development, the brain cavity is filled with Embryonic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid, which has an essential role in the survival, proliferation and neurogenesis of the neuroectodermal stem cells. We identified and analyzed the proteome of Embryonic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid from rat embryos (Rattus norvegicus), which includes proteins involved in the regulation of Central Nervous System development. The comparison between mammalian and avian Embryonic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid proteomes reveals great similarity, but also greater complexity in some protein groups. The pattern of apolipoproteins and enzymes in CSF is more complex in the mammals than in birds. This difference may underlie the greater neural complexity and synaptic plasticity found in mammals. Fourteen Embryonic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid gene products were previously identified in adult human Cerebro-Spinal Fluid proteome, and interestingly they are altered in patients with neurodegenerative diseases and/or neurological disorders. Understanding these molecules and the mechanisms they control during embryonic neurogenesis may contribute to our understanding of Central Nervous System development and evolution, and these human diseases. PMID:16335996

  19. Radioimmunoassay of human growth hormone: technique and application to plasma, cerebrospinal fluid, and pituitary extracts

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Frances J.; Lloyd, H. M.; Thomas, M. J.

    1972-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay for human growth hormone using activated charcoal is described and its precision, accuracy, and sensitivity are defined. Results are presented for growth hormone measurements in plasma obtained during hypoglycaemia induced with insulin in patients of short stature and during glucose tolerance tests in patients with acromegaly. The method was used to measure growth hormone concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid and in extracts of pituitary tumours. No growth hormone was detected in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients without acromegaly. In patients with acromegaly, the concentration of growth hormone in cerebrospinal fluid was measurable and was considerably elevated in one patient with extrasellar extension of a pituitary tumour. Extracts of chromophobe pituitary tumours contained very small concentrations of growth hormone. In extracts of pituitary tumours removed from acromegalic patients, concentrations fell either below or within the normal range. PMID:5086220

  20. [Alpha-Synuclein in blood and cerebrospinal fluid of patients with alpha-synucleinopathy].

    PubMed

    Ono, Kenjiro; Yamada, Masahito

    2014-03-01

    Alpha-Synuclein protein(alphaS) aggregates from a monomer to assemblies such as oligomers, protofibrils, and mature fibrils. The early intermediate aggregate, that is, the oligomer, has been reported to be the most toxic species. We recently reported that melatonin inhibits alphaS aggregation, including protofibril and oligomer formations. While the alphaS concentration in cerebrospinal fluid was reported to significantly decrease in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies, there have been reports that the alphaS oligomer concentration was elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid of PD patients. Moreover, it was reported that the alphaS oligomer concentration was also elevated in the blood of PD patients. Further studies may establish alphaS in cerebrospinal fluid and blood as a biomarker of alpha-synucleinopathies, including PD.

  1. K, Cl, and H2O entry in endolymph, perilymph, and cerebrospinal fluid of the rat.

    PubMed

    Sterkers, O; Saumon, G; Tran Ba Huy, P; Amiel, C

    1982-08-01

    The kinetics of radioactive potassium, chloride, and water entry into endolymph, perilymph, and cerebrospinal fluid were studied after intravenous administration of tracers in anesthetized and nephrectomized rats. Samples of cochlear endolymph, perilymph of scala vestibuli, perilymph of scala tympani, and cisternal cerebrospinal fluid were obtained. The data showed: 1) a rapid turnover of water in endolymph, perilymph, and cerebrospinal fluid, since 3H2O equilibrated with plasma in a few minutes; 2) a slow entry of 42K and 36Cl in perilymph, since 36Cl equilibrated with plasma after 2 h and 42K did not at 6 h; 3) an extremely slow entry of 42K and 36Cl in endolymph, since no equilibrium with plasma was obtained within the 5 h of the experiments. The comparison of the compartmental analysis of our data with the results of other studies using perilymphatic perfusion of tracers indicated that perilymph rather than plasma may be considered as the precursor of endolymph.

  2. Changes in cerebrospinal fluid levels of malondialdehyde and glutathione reductase activity in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, V; Raffaele, R; Cosentino, E; Rizza, V

    1994-01-01

    The chemical composition of human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is considered to reflect brain metabolism. In this study we measured malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and the activity of enzymes involved in antioxidative processes, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase, in human cerebrospinal fluid of multiple-sclerosis (MS) patients and normal healthy volunteers. Our results indicated that the cerebrospinal fluid in MS showed significantly higher endogenous levels of MDA than the control, as well as a much greater resistance to in-vitro stimulation test. In addition, we found the activity of GSH reductase significantly increased, about twice the control values, whereas the activity of glutathione peroxidase was markedly decreased as compared to control values. Our findings suggest that in MS the activity of antioxidant enzymes is modified, and indicates the conceivable possibility of a pathogenic role of oxidative stress in the determinism of the disease. PMID:7607784

  3. A corny cause of cerebrospinal fluid ascites: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Jamal, Hira; Abrams, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To report a rare cause of cerebrospinal fluid ascites. Methods: A 37-year-old female with history of intracranial hypertension and a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt was referred to liver clinic for evaluation of newly developed ascites. Results: Initially, the cause of ascites was thought to be secondary to a liver etiology. However, this was excluded after a comprehensive evaluation including portal pressure measurements. We determined the ascites to be infected cerebrospinal fluid secondary to a rare commensal organism, Corynebacterium non-Jeikeium, which resolved after removing ventriculo-peritoneal shunt, appropriate antibiotics and conversion to a ventriculo-atrial shunt. Conclusion: Cerebrospinal fluid ascites is a rare complication of VP shunts and since 1976 only 8 cases of Corynebacterium non jk VP shunt infections have been reported in the literature but none associated with ascites. Also this report highlights the beneficial role of transjugular portal pressure measurements in the evaluation of ascites. PMID:27489721

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis detects cerebral amyloid-β accumulation earlier than positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Mattsson, Niklas

    2016-01-01

    See Rabinovici (doi:10.1093/brain/aww025) for a scientific commentary on this article. Cerebral accumulation of amyloid-β is thought to be the starting mechanism in Alzheimer’s disease. Amyloid-β can be detected by analysis of cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 or amyloid positron emission tomography, but it is unknown if any of the methods can identify an abnormal amyloid accumulation prior to the other. Our aim was to determine whether cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 change before amyloid PET during preclinical stages of Alzheimer’s disease. We included 437 non-demented subjects from the prospective, longitudinal Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) study. All underwent 18F-florbetapir positron emission tomography and cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 analysis at baseline and at least one additional positron emission tomography after a mean follow-up of 2.1 years (range 1.1–4.4 years). Group classifications were based on normal and abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography results at baseline. We found that cases with isolated abnormal cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β and normal positron emission tomography at baseline accumulated amyloid with a mean rate of 1.2%/year, which was similar to the rate in cases with both abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography (1.2%/year, P = 0.86). The mean accumulation rate of those with isolated abnormal cerebrospinal fluid was more than three times that of those with both normal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography (0.35%/year, P = 0.018). The group differences were similar when analysing yearly change in standardized uptake value ratio of florbetapir instead of percentage change. Those with both abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography deteriorated more in memory and hippocampal volume compared with the other groups (P < 0.001), indicating that they were closer to Alzheimer’s disease dementia. The results were replicated after

  5. 1H-NMR studies of cerebrospinal fluid: endogenous ethanol in patients with cervical myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Meshitsuka, S; Morio, Y; Nagashima, H; Teshima, R

    2001-10-01

    Endogenous ethanol was observed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the course of screening for cerebrospinal fluid of the patients with cervical myelopathy. Ethanol was detected in 10 out of 20 patients. It seems likely that the presence of endogenous ethanol is related to the severity of myelopathy. Also, the concentration of ethanol was correlated with that of lactate in the cerebrospinal fluid. This implies that ethanol may be formed as the end product of glycolysis or in an unknown pathway in the case of severely insulted myelonic tissues.

  6. Alzheimer’s disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarker in cognitively normal subjects

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Jon B.; Zetterberg, Henrik; van Harten, Argonde C.; Glodzik, Lidia; Martinez-Lage, Pablo; Bocchio-Chiavetto, Luisella; Rami, Lorena; Hansson, Oskar; Sperling, Reisa; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Osorio, Ricardo S.; Vanderstichele, Hugo; Vandijck, Manu; Hampel, Harald; Teipl, Stefan; Moghekar, Abhay; Albert, Marilyn; Hu, William T.; Monge Argilés, Jose A.; Gorostidi, Ana; Teunissen, Charlotte E.; De Deyn, Peter P.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Molinuevo, Jose L.; Frisoni, Giovanni B.; Linazasoro, Gurutz; de Leon, Mony J.; van der Flier, Wiesje M.; Scheltens, Philip; Blennow, Kaj; Shaw, Leslie M.

    2015-01-01

    In a large multicentre sample of cognitively normal subjects, as a function of age, gender and APOE genotype, we studied the frequency of abnormal cerebrospinal fluid levels of Alzheimer’s disease biomarkers including: total tau, phosphorylated tau and amyloid-β1-42. Fifteen cohorts from 12 different centres with either enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays or Luminex® measurements were selected for this study. Each centre sent nine new cerebrospinal fluid aliquots that were used to measure total tau, phosphorylated tau and amyloid-β1-42 in the Gothenburg laboratory. Seven centres showed a high correlation with the new Gothenburg measurements; therefore, 10 cohorts from these centres are included in the analyses here (1233 healthy control subjects, 40–84 years old). Amyloid-β amyloid status (negative or positive) and neurodegeneration status (negative or positive) was established based on the pathological cerebrospinal fluid Alzheimer’s disease cut-off values for cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β1-42 and total tau, respectively. While gender did not affect these biomarker values, APOE genotype modified the age-associated changes in cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers such that APOE ε4 carriers showed stronger age-related changes in cerebrospinal fluid phosphorylated tau, total tau and amyloid-β1-42 values and APOE ε2 carriers showed the opposite effect. At 40 years of age, 76% of the subjects were classified as amyloid negative, neurodegeneration negative and their frequency decreased to 32% at 85 years. The amyloid-positive neurodegeneration-negative group remained stable. The amyloid-negative neurodegeneration-positive group frequency increased slowly from 1% at 44 years to 16% at 85 years, but its frequency was not affected by APOE genotype. The amyloid-positive neurodegeneration-positive frequency increased from 1% at 53 years to 28% at 85 years. Abnormally low cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β1-42 levels were already frequent in midlife and APOE genotype

  7. [A Case of Spontaneous Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak Associated with Cervical Spondylosis].

    PubMed

    Arai, Atsushi; Miyamoto, Hirohito; Shiomi, Ryoji; Tatsumi, Shotaro; Kohmura, Eiji

    2016-09-01

    Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak and intracranial hypotension associated with cervical spondylosis have rarely been observed, and only a few cases are reported. A 69-year-old woman, previously treated for rectal and thyroid cancer, complained of a non-postural persistent headache. The patient regularly practiced aerobic exercise, but a month earlier she had started experiencing headache and neck pain while exercising. Computed tomography(CT)showed bilateral chronic subdural hematomas, and magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)revealed diffuse dural enhancement and tonsillar herniation. We drained the subdural hematomas and replaced the ventricular reservoir to safely access the cerebrospinal fluid space. After surgery, the persistent headache disappeared for several days, but a postural headache emerged. CT myelogram showed extradural accumulation of the contrast medium at the C2-5 level with cervical spondylosis. The patient was treated with conservative therapy of bed rest and intravenous fluid hydration for two weeks, and the headache improved. CT myelogram after treatment showed no extradural accumulation of the contrast medium. Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak associated with cervical spondylosis could be induced by the repeated minor mechanical stress caused by physical exercise. Therefore, the possibility that non-postural persistent headache may be caused by spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak should not be underestimated. PMID:27605479

  8. Lactate and glucose concentrations in brain interstitial fluid, cerebrospinal fluid, and serum during experimental pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Romero, L; Täuber, M G; Fournier, M A; Tureen, J H

    1992-09-01

    Metabolic abnormalities during bacterial meningitis include hypoglycorrhachia and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lactate accumulation. The mechanisms by which these alterations occur within the central nervous system (CNS) are still incompletely delineated. To determine the evolution of these changes and establish the locus of abnormal metabolism during meningitis, glucose and lactate concentrations in brain interstitial fluid, CSF, and serum were measured simultaneously and sequentially during experimental pneumococcal meningitis in rabbits. Interstitial fluid samples were obtained from the frontal cortex and hippocampus by using in situ brain microdialysis, and serum and CSF were directly sampled. There was an increase of CSF lactate concentration, accompanied by increased local production of lactate in the brain, and a decrease of CSF-to-serum glucose ratio that was paralleled by a decrease in cortical glucose concentration. Brain microdialysate lactate concentration was not affected by either systemic lactic acidosis or artificially elevated CSF lactate concentration. These data support the hypothesis that the brain is a locus for anaerobic glycolysis during meningitis, resulting in increased lactate production and perhaps contributing to decreased tissue glucose concentration.

  9. Extensive Recruitment of Plasma Blasts to the Cerebrospinal Fluid in Toscana Virus Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Schirmer, Lucas; Wölfel, Silke; Georgi, Enrico; Ploner, Markus; Bauer, Barbara; Hemmer, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    An unexpectedly extensive recruitment of B cells and plasma blasts to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in a patient with Toscana virus (TOSV) encephalitis is described. Acute infection by TOSV was demonstrated by serological methods and by detection of TOSV-specific nucleic acid in the CSF by real-time polymerase chain reaction and sequencing. PMID:26393235

  10. Seizures and retrograde amnesia with cerebrospinal fluid changes following H1N1 influenza vaccination.

    PubMed

    Mitrakrishnan, Shivanthan; Ranjanie, Gamage; Thirunavakarasu, Thivakaran; Manjula, Caldera; Nayananjani, Karunasena

    2011-08-26

    Vaccination against H1N1 influenza of healthcare workers of has been a standard measure to control the epidemic in many countries. Most side effects are minor and transient. Guillain Barre Syndrome and optic neuritis have been major concerns. We report a case of seizures with retrograde amnesia associated with cerebrospinal fluid changes following the H1N1 vaccine.

  11. A Novel Rapidly Growing Mycobacterium Species Causing an Abdominal Cerebrospinal Fluid Pseudocyst Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Cory K.; de Man, Tom J. B.; Toney, Nadege C.; Kamboj, Kamal; Balada-Llasat, Joan-Miquel; Wang, Shu-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are a rare cause of ventriculoperitoneal shunt infections. We describe the isolation and identification of a novel, rapidly growing, nonpigmented NTM from an abdominal cerebrospinal fluid pseudocyst. The patient presented with fevers, nausea, and abdominal pain and clinically improved after shunt removal. NTM identification was performed by amplicon and whole-genome sequencing.

  12. Therapeutic drug monitoring of cerebrospinal fluid vancomycin concentration during intraventricular administration.

    PubMed

    Popa, D; Loewenstein, L; Lam, S W; Neuner, E A; Ahrens, C L; Bhimraj, A

    2016-02-01

    Limited data are available on intraventricular vancomycin dosing for meningitis. This study explored clinical characteristics that correlated with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations. Over a nine-year period, 13 patients with 34 CSF vancomycin concentrations were evaluated. CSF output and time from dose correlated with CSF vancomycin concentration. No relationship was seen with regards to CSF protein, white blood cell count or glucose.

  13. Letter to the editor: Identification of Sarcocystis capracanis in cerebrospinal fluid from sheep with neurological disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A recent report (Formisano et al., 2013) identified clinical sacrocystosis in 2 adult sheep. The diagnosis relied primarily on characterization of DNA extracted from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and paraffin-embedded heart tissue. Parasites identified as merozoites were identified in CSF smears stained...

  14. Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Subarachnoid Haemorrhage and Vasospasm Enhances Endothelin Contraction in Rat Cerebral Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Assenzio, Barbara; Martin, Erica L.; Stankevicius, Edgaras; Civiletti, Federica; Fontanella, Marco; Boccaletti, Riccardo; Berardino, Maurizio; Mazzeo, AnnaTeresa; Ducati, Alessandro; Simonsen, Ulf; Mascia, Luciana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies have suggested that cerebrospinal fluid from patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) leads to pronounced vasoconstriction in isolated arteries. We hypothesized that only cerebrospinal fluid from SAH patients with vasospasm would produce an enhanced contractile response to endothelin-1 in rat cerebral arteries, involving both endothelin ETA and ETB receptors. Methods Intact rat basilar arteries were incubated for 24 hours with cerebrospinal fluid from 1) SAH patients with vasospasm, 2) SAH patients without vasospasm, and 3) control patients. Arterial segments with and without endothelium were mounted in myographs and concentration-response curves for endothelin-1 were constructed in the absence and presence of selective and combined ETA and ETB receptor antagonists. Endothelin concentrations in culture medium and receptor expression were measured. Results Compared to the other groups, the following was observed in arteries exposed to cerebrospinal fluid from patients with vasospasm: 1) larger contractions at lower endothelin concentrations (p<0.05); 2) the increased endothelin contraction was absent in arteries without endothelium; 3) higher levels of endothelin secretion in the culture medium (p<0.05); 4) there was expression of ETA receptors and new expression of ETB receptors was apparent; 5) reduction in the enhanced response to endothelin after ETB blockade in the low range and after ETA blockade in the high range of endothelin concentrations; 6) after combined ETA and ETB blockade a complete inhibition of endothelin contraction was observed. Conclusions Our experimental findings showed that in intact rat basilar arteries exposed to cerebrospinal fluid from patients with vasospasm endothelin contraction was enhanced in an endothelium-dependent manner and was blocked by combined ETA and ETB receptor antagonism. Therefore we suggest that combined blockade of both receptors may play a role in counteracting vasospasm in patients

  15. Circulating microRNAs in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with brain diseases.

    PubMed

    Machida, Akira; Ohkubo, Takuya; Yokota, Takanori

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding regulatory RNAs that regulate gene expression at the -posttranscriptional level. Although circulating miRNAs in human body fluids have recently been recognized as disease biomarkers, especially in the field of oncology, little is known about the miRNAs in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This chapter describes the feasibility of miRNAs in CSF as biomarkers for the diagnosis of brain diseases and the methods of miRNA isolation from CSF.

  16. Embryonic cerebrospinal fluid regulates neuroepithelial survival, proliferation, and neurogenesis in chick embryos.

    PubMed

    Gato, Angel; Moro, J A; Alonso, M I; Bueno, D; De La Mano, A; Martín, C

    2005-05-01

    Early in development, the behavior of neuroepithelial cells is controlled by several factors, which act in a developmentally regulated manner. Diffusible factors are secreted locally by the neuroepithelium itself, although other nearby structures may also be involved. Evidence suggests a physiological role for the cerebrospinal fluid in the development of the brain. Here, using organotypic cultures of chick embryo neuroepithelial explants from the mesencephalon, we show that the neuroepithelium in vitro is not able to self-induce cell survival, replication, and neurogenesis. We also show that the embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (E-CSF) promotes neuroepithelial stem cell survival and induces proliferation and neurogenesis in mesencephalic explants. These data strongly suggest that E-CSF is involved in the regulation of neuroepithelial cells behavior, supporting the hypothesis that this fluid plays a key role during the early development of the central nervous system. PMID:15803475

  17. Antibody and Viral Nucleic Acid Testing of Serum and Cerebrospinal Fluid for Diagnosis of Eastern Equine Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Brittain, David C.; Howard, John J.; Oliver, JoAnne

    2015-01-01

    Eastern equine encephalitis diagnostic serum antibody can appear 6 days after the onset of symptoms, and its numbers can increase 4-fold in 4 days, arguing for early and frequent serum testing. In populations where cerebrospinal fluid viral nucleic acid testing sensitivity and specificity remain undetermined, cerebrospinal antibody testing should also be performed. PMID:26063852

  18. The relationship between cerebrospinal fluid markers of Alzheimer pathology and positron emission tomography tau imaging.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Brian A; Friedrichsen, Karl; Brier, Matthew; Blazey, Tyler; Su, Yi; Christensen, Jon; Aldea, Patricia; McConathy, Jonathan; Holtzman, David M; Cairns, Nigel J; Morris, John C; Fagan, Anne M; Ances, Beau M; Benzinger, Tammie L S

    2016-08-01

    The two primary molecular pathologies in Alzheimer's disease are amyloid-β plaques and tau-immunoreactive neurofibrillary tangles. Investigations into these pathologies have been restricted to cerebrospinal fluid assays, and positron emission tomography tracers that can image amyloid-β plaques. Tau tracers have recently been introduced into the field, although the utility of the tracer and its relationship to other Alzheimer biomarkers are still unknown. Here we examined tau deposition in 41 cognitively normal and 11 cognitively impaired older adults using the radioactive tau ligand (18)F-AV-1451 (previously known as T807) who also underwent a lumbar puncture to assess cerebrospinal fluid levels of total tau (t-tau), phosphorylated tau181 (p-tau181) and amyloid-β42 Voxel-wise statistical analyses examined spatial patterns of tau deposition associated with cognitive impairment. We then related the amount of tau tracer uptake to levels of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers. All analyses controlled for age and gender and, when appropriate, the time between imaging and lumbar puncture assessments. Symptomatic individuals (Clinical Dementia Rating > 0) demonstrated markedly increased levels of tau tracer uptake. This elevation was most prominent in the temporal lobe and temporoparietal junction, but extended more broadly into parietal and frontal cortices. In the entire cohort, there were significant relationships among all cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers and tracer uptake, notably for tau-related cerebrospinal fluid markers. After controlling for levels of amyloid-β42, the correlations with tau uptake were r = 0.490 (P < 0.001) for t-tau and r = 0.492 (P < 0.001) for p-tau181 Within the cognitively normal cohort, levels of amyloid-β42, but not t-tau or p-tau181, were associated with elevated tracer binding that was confined primarily to the medial temporal lobe and adjacent neocortical regions. AV-1451 tau binding in the medial temporal, parietal, and frontal cortices

  19. A novel unbiased proteomic approach to detect the reactivity of cerebrospinal fluid in neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Menon, Krishnakumar N; Steer, David L; Short, Martin; Petratos, Steven; Smith, Ian; Bernard, Claude C A

    2011-06-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases, such as multiple sclerosis represent global health issues. Accordingly, there is an urgent need to understand the pathogenesis of this and other central nervous system disorders, so that more effective therapeutics can be developed. Cerebrospinal fluid is a potential source of important reporter molecules released from various cell types as a result of central nervous system pathology. Here, we report the development of an unbiased approach for the detection of reactive cerebrospinal fluid molecules and target brain proteins from patients with multiple sclerosis. To help identify molecules that may serve as clinical biomarkers for multiple sclerosis, we have biotinylated proteins present in the cerebrospinal fluid and tested their reactivity against brain homogenate as well as myelin and myelin-axolemmal complexes. Proteins were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, blotted onto membranes and probed separately with biotinylated unprocessed cerebrospinal fluid samples. Protein spots that reacted to two or more multiple sclerosis-cerebrospinal fluids were further analyzed by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight time-of-flight mass spectrometry. In addition to previously reported proteins found in multiple sclerosis cerebrospinal fluid, such as αβ crystallin, enolase, and 14-3-3-protein, we have identified several additional molecules involved in mitochondrial and energy metabolism, myelin gene expression and/or cytoskeletal organization. These include aspartate aminotransferase, cyclophilin-A, quaking protein, collapsin response mediator protein-2, ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1, and cofilin. To further validate these findings, the cellular expression pattern of collapsin response mediator protein-2 and ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 were investigated in human chronic-active MS lesions by immunohistochemistry. The observation that in multiple sclerosis lesions phosphorylated collapsin

  20. [Mononuclear phagocytes in the cerebrospinal fluid. Studies on the clinical significance and factors of activation].

    PubMed

    Weitbrecht, W U

    1984-09-27

    Examination of 1050 cerebrospinal fluid samples showed, that mononuclear phagocytes contribute only slightly to the explanation of affections of the CNS except they are containing specific particles e.g. iron. Further investigations on patients with concussion, herniation of the intervertebral disk and cerebral infarction turned out, that the relative proportion of mononuclear phagocytes and qualitative cytological changes correlate with the extent of the CNS lesion. Phagocytosis of India ink was studied dependent on milieu and different mediators. Phagocytosis correlates with alpha-1-glycoproteid and the relative part of mononuclear phagocytes in cerebrospinal fluid. It depends on pH, various ions and mediators (adrenalin, histamine, prostaglandines, cAMP, cGMP). DNA-contents of the nucleus was measured by cytophotometria. No signs of proliferation (tetraploidia) were found. The slightly increased contents of nuclear DNA of some phagocytes was interpreted as a metabolically active DNA.

  1. Increased selenoprotein P in choroid plexus and cerebrospinal fluid in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Rueli, Rachel H L H; Parubrub, Arlene C; Dewing, Andrea S T; Hashimoto, Ann C; Bellinger, Miyoko T; Weeber, Edwin J; Uyehara-Lock, Jane H; White, Lon R; Berry, Marla J; Bellinger, Frederick P

    2015-01-01

    Subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have elevated brain levels of the selenium transporter selenoprotein P (Sepp1). We investigated if this elevation results from increased release of Sepp1 from the choroid plexus (CP). Sepp1 is significantly increased in CP from AD brains in comparison to non-AD brains. Sepp1 localizes to the trans-Golgi network within CP epithelia, where it is processed for secretion. The cerebrospinal fluid from AD subjects also contains increased levels Sepp1 in comparison to non-AD subjects. These findings suggest that AD pathology induces increased levels of Sepp1 within CP epithelia for release into the cerebrospinal fluid to ultimately increase brain selenium.

  2. Increased Selenoprotein P in Choroid Plexus and Cerebrospinal Fluid in Alzheimer’s Disease Brain

    PubMed Central

    Rueli, Rachel H.L.H.; Parubrub, Arlene C.; Dewing, Andrea S.T.; Hashimoto, Ann C.; Bellinger, Miyoko T.; Weeber, Edwin J.; Uyehara-Lock, Jane H.; White, Lon R.; Berry, Marla J.; Bellinger, Frederick P.

    2015-01-01

    Subjects with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) have elevated brain levels of the selenium transporter selenoprotein P (Sepp1). We investigated if this elevation results from increased release of Sepp1 from the choroid plexus (CP). Sepp1 is significantly increased in CP from AD brains in comparison to non-AD brains. Sepp1 localizes to the trans-Golgi network within CP epithelia, where it is processed for secretion. The cerebrospinal fluid from AD subjects also contains increased levels Sepp1 in comparison to non-AD subjects. These findings suggest that AD pathology induces increased levels of Sepp1 within CP epithelia for release into the cerebrospinal fluid to ultimately increase brain selenium. PMID:25298198

  3. Cytokine network analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hornig, M; Gottschalk, G; Peterson, D L; Knox, K K; Schultz, A F; Eddy, M L; Che, X; Lipkin, W I

    2016-02-01

    Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome is an unexplained debilitating disorder that is frequently associated with cognitive and motor dysfunction. We analyzed cerebrospinal fluid from 32 cases, 40 subjects with multiple sclerosis and 19 normal subjects frequency-matched for age and sex using a 51-plex cytokine assay. Group-specific differences were found for the majority of analytes with an increase in cases of CCL11 (eotaxin), a chemokine involved in eosinophil recruitment. Network analysis revealed an inverse relationship between interleukin 1 receptor antagonist and colony-stimulating factor 1, colony-stimulating factor 2 and interleukin 17F, without effects on interleukin 1α or interleukin 1β, suggesting a disturbance in interleukin 1 signaling. Our results indicate a markedly disturbed immune signature in the cerebrospinal fluid of cases that is consistent with immune activation in the central nervous system, and a shift toward an allergic or T helper type-2 pattern associated with autoimmunity.

  4. Postmortem Cerebrospinal Fluid Pleocytosis: A Marker of Inflammation or Postmortem Artifact?

    PubMed Central

    Morris, James A.; Harrison, Linda M.; Telford, David R.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to reassess the significance of postmortem cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis. Published articles of CSF changes after death were reviewed, and reanalysis, in the light of modern views on the significance of bacterial postmortem isolates, was undertaken. There is theoretical and experimental evidence that the blood brain barrier to the movement of protein and cells is preserved in the first few hours after death. The number of mononuclear cells in the cerebrospinal fluid does rise in the first 24 hours after death, and this is most probably due to detachment of leptomeningeal lining cells. But the marked increase in lymphocyte counts seen in some cases of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and in other deaths in the paediatric age range could well be a marker of inflammation. PMID:22518189

  5. Aluminum and gallium arrest formation of cerebrospinal fluid by the mechanism of OH- depletion.

    PubMed

    Vogh, B P; Godman, D R; Maren, T H

    1985-06-01

    AlCl3 or GaCl3 was added to artificial cerebrospinal fluid and perfused through the cerebral ventricles of the rat. Depending on the metal and its concentration (1-10 mM) the pH of the perfusate ranged from 7.2 to 3.5. At 10 mM metal chloride, yielding pH 4.7 (Al) or 3.5 (Ga), formation of cerebrospinal fluid was suppressed 100%. The effect was reversed as soon as control cerebrospinal fluid (pH 7.35) was introduced. There was no effect at pH greater than 6 in the presence of metal ions nor was the effect mimicked by cerebrospinal fluid acidified with HCl or phosphate buffer to pH 4.7. HCl and phosphate at pH 4.7 had partial effects (25-30%). Inhibition of carbonic anhydrase is well known to have a partial effect (approximately 50%), the remainder of normal flow being dependent on the uncatalyzed formation of HCO3- and the corresponding movement of Na+. The complete cessation of flow after exposure to Al or Ga ions appears to occur when these ions are perfused at pH where they are partly hydrolyzed. Under these circumstances they form very powerful proton generating systems (as shown by titration data), which could lower [OH-] at the secretory border of choroid plexus cells. As a result, both the catalyzed and the uncatalyzed processes for formation of HCO3- from CO2 are abolished and secretion stops. This mechanism may also account for the antiperspirant action of Al salts. Using metal ion hydrolysis to probe other secretory systems will also be of interest.

  6. [Simultaneous diagnosis of pseudomeningocele, tethered cord syndrome and cerebrospinal fluid fistula: Report of a case].

    PubMed

    Quillo-Olvera, Javier; Zambrano-Velarde, Luis E; Velázquez-Santana, Héctor; Gutiérrez-Partida, Carlos F; Velázquez-García, Francisco; Alcántara-Gómez, Leopoldo A

    2016-01-01

    The clinical case is presented on a patient with an extensive sacral dysraphism, a history of myelomeningocele surgical repair in her childhood, as well as tethered cord syndrome. The patient was also diagnosed with pseudomeningocele and a cerebrospinal fluid cutaneous fístula. A surgical approach was used, with encouraging results being obtained in the clinical outcome of the patient. A review of the literature was performed to support the surgical decision in this case.

  7. Therapeutic drug monitoring of cerebrospinal fluid vancomycin concentration during intraventricular administration.

    PubMed

    Popa, D; Loewenstein, L; Lam, S W; Neuner, E A; Ahrens, C L; Bhimraj, A

    2016-02-01

    Limited data are available on intraventricular vancomycin dosing for meningitis. This study explored clinical characteristics that correlated with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations. Over a nine-year period, 13 patients with 34 CSF vancomycin concentrations were evaluated. CSF output and time from dose correlated with CSF vancomycin concentration. No relationship was seen with regards to CSF protein, white blood cell count or glucose. PMID:26654472

  8. Development of a theoretical framework for analyzing cerebrospinal fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Benjamin; Voorhees, Abram; Vedel, Søren; Wei, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Background To date hydrocephalus researchers acknowledge the need for rigorous but utilitarian fluid mechanics understanding and methodologies in studying normal and hydrocephalic intracranial dynamics. Pressure volume models and electric circuit analogs introduced pressure into volume conservation; but control volume analysis enforces independent conditions on pressure and volume. Previously, utilization of clinical measurements has been limited to understanding of the relative amplitude and timing of flow, volume and pressure waveforms; qualitative approaches without a clear framework for meaningful quantitative comparison. Methods Control volume analysis is presented to introduce the reader to the theoretical background of this foundational fluid mechanics technique for application to general control volumes. This approach is able to directly incorporate the diverse measurements obtained by clinicians to better elucidate intracranial dynamics and progression to disorder. Results Several examples of meaningful intracranial control volumes and the particular measurement sets needed for the analysis are discussed. Conclusion Control volume analysis provides a framework to guide the type and location of measurements and also a way to interpret the resulting data within a fundamental fluid physics analysis. PMID:19772652

  9. Differential proteomics analysis of mononuclear cells in cerebrospinal fluid of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Lifei; Wang, Dongtao; Wang, Lihong; Lan, Wenjie; Pan, Suyue

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is one common neurodegenerative disease featured with degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra. Multiple factors participate in the pathogenesis and progression of PD. In this study, we investigated the proteomics profiles of mononuclear cells in cerebrospinal fluids from both PD patients and normal people, in order to explore the correlation between disease factors and PD. Cerebrospinal fluid samples were collected from both PD and normal people and were separated for mononuclear cells in vitro. Proteins were then extracted and separated by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Proteins with differential expressions were identified by comparison to standard proteome expression profile map, followed by software and database analysis. In PD patients, there were 8 proteins with consistent expression profile and 16 proteins with differential expressions. Those differential proteins identified include cytoskeleton proteins (actin, myosin), signal transduction proteins (adenosine cyclase binding protein 1, calcium binding protein, talin) and anti-oxidation factor (thioredoxin peroxide reductase). PD patients had differential protein expressional profiles in the mononuclear cells of cerebrospinal fluids compared to normal people, suggesting the potential involvement of cytoskeleton and signal transduction proteins in apoptosis of neuronal apoptosis and PD pathogenesis. PMID:26823915

  10. Radioimmunoassay of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) in cerebrospinal fluid, plasma, and serum

    SciTech Connect

    Engbaek, F.; Voldby, B

    1982-04-01

    A direct radioimmunoassay is described for serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) in cerebrospinal fluid, platelet-poor plasma, and serum. Antisera in rabbits was raised against serotonin diazotized to a conjugate of bovine albumin and D,L-p-aminophenylalanine. Polyethylene glycol, alone or in combination with anti-rabbit immunoglobulins, is used to separate bound and unbound tritiated serotonin. The minimum concentration of serotonin detectable is 2 nmol/L in a 200-..mu..L sample. Within-day precision (CV) is 4.3% between-day precision 7.7%. Analytical recoveries of serotonin are 109% and 101% for cerebrospinal fluid and plasma, respectively. Tryptophan, 5-hydroxytryptophan, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and 5-hydroxytryptophol do not interfere with the assay. However, 5-methoxytryptamine and tryptamine cross react. Of samples of cerebrospinal fluid from patients with disc herniations (n=21) or low-pressure hydrocephalus (n=10), one-third had concentrations of 2-4 nmol/L and two-thirds were below the minimum detectable concentration. The observed range for the concentration of serotonin in plasma of 14 normal subjects was 5-14 nmol/L (mean +/- SD, 9 +/- 3 nmol/L). The observed ranges for serotonin in serum were: for 10 women 520-900 (mean +/- SD: 695 +/- 110) nmol/L and for 10 men 380-680 (520 +/- 94) nmol/L.

  11. Cytokine levels in cerebrospinal fluid and delayed ischemic deficits in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, K. Y.; Jeon, B. C.

    2001-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) induces an inflammatory reaction and may lead to ischemic brain damage. The pathogenesis of brain dysfunction and delayed ischemic symptoms remain difficult to understand despite extensive surveys of such reactions. Cytokine production in the central nervous system following SAH and its relation with clinical outcome have hardly been studied. This study was aimed to determine whether the levels of IL-1 beta, IL-6 and TNF-alpha in the initial cerebrospinal fluid would increase following aneurysmal SAH, and be related with development of delayed ischemic deficit and clinical outcome. Nineteen patients suffering from aneurysmal SAH and 12 control volunteers were the subjects in this study. Cerebrospinal fluid samples were obtained on admission and the levels of each cytokine were determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage showed elevated levels of IL-1 beta, and TNF-alpha on admission. The patients with poor neurological status showed high levels of IL-1 beta, and IL-6. The patients who developed delayed ischemic deficit had high level of IL-6. We suggest that elevated level of IL-6 in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with aneurysmal SAH on admission can predict the high risk of delayed ischemic deficit. PMID:11748361

  12. Application of Control Volume Analysis to Cerebrospinal Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Timothy; Cohen, Benjamin; Anor, Tomer; Madsen, Joseph

    2011-11-01

    Hydrocephalus is among the most common birth defects and may not be prevented nor cured. Afflicted individuals face serious issues, which at present are too complicated and not well enough understood to treat via systematic therapies. This talk outlines the framework and application of a control volume methodology to clinical Phase Contrast MRI data. Specifically, integral control volume analysis utilizes a fundamental, fluid dynamics methodology to quantify intracranial dynamics within a precise, direct, and physically meaningful framework. A chronically shunted, hydrocephalic patient in need of a revision procedure was used as an in vivo case study. Magnetic resonance velocity measurements within the patient's aqueduct were obtained in four biomedical state and were analyzed using the methods presented in this dissertation. Pressure force estimates were obtained, showing distinct differences in amplitude, phase, and waveform shape for different intracranial states within the same individual. Thoughts on the physiological and diagnostic research and development implications/opportunities will be presented.

  13. Development and functions of the choroid plexus–cerebrospinal fluid system

    PubMed Central

    Lun, Melody P.; Monuki, Edwin S.; Lehtinen, Maria K.

    2015-01-01

    The choroid plexus (ChP) is the principal source of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which has accepted roles as a fluid cushion and a sink for nervous system waste in vertebrates. Various animal models have provided insight into how the ChP–CSF system develops and matures. In addition, recent studies have uncovered new, active roles for this dynamic system in the regulation of neural stem cells, critical periods and the overall health of the nervous system. Together, these findings have brought about a paradigm shift in our understanding of brain development and health, and have stimulated new initiatives for the treatment of neurological disease. PMID:26174708

  14. [A case of subacute subarachnoid hemorrhage without xanthochromic cerebrospinal fluid--usefulness of emergent MRI].

    PubMed

    Ogami, Ryo; Ikawa, Fusao; Ohbayashi, Naohiko; Imada, Yasutaka; Hidaka, Toshikazu; Inagawa, Tetsuji

    2003-06-01

    We reported a case of subacute subarachnoid hemorrhage with watery clear cerebrospinal fluid. Emergent magnetic resonance image was useful not only for diagnosis by fluid attenuated inversion recovery image but also for evaluation of cerebral ischemia and vasospasm by magnetic resonance angiography, diffusion weighted image and perfusion weighted image. A 50-year-old man presented disturbance of consciousness and dysarthria. Neither computed tomographic scan nor cerebrospinal fluid study could diagnose subarachnoid hemorrhage clearly. However, emergent fluid attenuated inversion recovery image showed the show subarachnoid hemorrhage as high signal intensity. Diffusion weighted image showed multiple, round hypersignals both in the white and gray matter. In the area with diffusion hypersignal, the apparent diffusion coefficient value was 0.57 x 10(3) mm2/sec. Perfusion weighted image showed normal cerebral blood volume but prolonged mean transit time in the territory of the right middle cerebral artery. Magnetic resonance angiography revealed an aneurysm at the anterior communicating artery and severe vasospasm on the bilateral anterior cerebral artery, the right middle cerebral artery. Thus we are able to diagnose subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm. The hyperintensity of the diffusion weighted image and the fluid attenuated inversion recovery image was caused by cerebral ischemia from vasospasm. After conservative therapy during the period of vasospasm, successful surgical clipping was performed with full clinical recovery. PMID:12833876

  15. Meningeal haemorrhage secondary to cerebrospinal fluid drainage during thoracic endovascular aortic repair

    PubMed Central

    Mancio, Jennifer; Pires-Morais, Gustavo; Bettencourt, Nuno; Oliveira, Marco; Santos, Lino; Melica, Bruno; Rodrigues, Alberto; Braga, José Pedro; Ribeiro, Vasco Gama

    2014-01-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has shown lower mortality compared with open surgical repair (OSR). However, the risk of spinal cord ischaemia (SCI) remains similar than OSR. As a prophylactic measure to reduce the risk of SCI, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage has been widely used in OSR. In TEVAR, the utility of this adjunct is still controversial. We report a case of a 56-year-old man referred for TEVAR for a descending thoracic aneurysm that previously underwent an abdominal aneurysmectomy with aortobifemoral bypass graft. On the day before, a lumbar cerebrospinal drain was placed prophylactically. Forty-eight hours after the procedure, meningeal symptoms without neurological deficits developed. Clinical investigation revealed meningeal haemorrhage. Therapy with nimodipine was initiated with symptomatic relief. Evidence from randomized controlled trials supporting the role of CSF drainage in TEVAR is still lacking. We discuss the current recommendations, potential benefits and risks and cautions associated with CSF drainage in TEVAR. PMID:25988028

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid flow imaging by using phase-contrast MR technique.

    PubMed

    Battal, B; Kocaoglu, M; Bulakbasi, N; Husmen, G; Tuba Sanal, H; Tayfun, C

    2011-08-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces include ventricles and cerebral and spinal subarachnoid spaces. CSF motion is a combined effect of CSF production rate and superimposed cardiac pulsations. Knowledge of CSF dynamics has benefited considerably from the development of phase-contrast (PC) MRI. There are several disorders such as communicating and non-communicating hydrocephalus, Chiari malformation, syringomyelic cyst and arachnoid cyst that can change the CSF dynamics. The aims of this pictorial review are to outline the PC MRI technique, CSF physiology and cerebrospinal space anatomy, to describe a group of congenital and acquired disorders that can alter the CSF dynamics, and to assess the use of PC MRI in the assessment of various central nervous system abnormalities. PMID:21586507

  17. EDA-containing fibronectin levels in the cerebrospinal fluid of children with meningitis.

    PubMed

    Pupek, Małgorzata; Jasonek, Jolanta; Kątnik-Prastowska, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Fibronectin containing an alternatively spliced extra domain A (EDA-FN) participates in diverse biological cell functions, being also directly or indirectly engaged during an inflammatory response to brain injury and/or neuron regeneration. We analyzed FN and EDA-FN isoform levels by ELISA in 85 cerebrospinal fluid samples and 67 plasma samples obtained from children suffering from bacterial or viral meningitis and non-meningitis peripheral inflammation. We have found that the cerebrospinal level of EDA-FN was significantly lower in the bacterial meningitis group than in the viral- and non-meningitis groups. In the patients' plasma, EDA-FN was almost undetectable. The determination of fibronectin containing the EDA segment might be considered as an additional diagnostic marker of bacterial meningitis in children.

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid flow imaging by using phase-contrast MR technique

    PubMed Central

    Battal, B; Kocaoglu, M; Bulakbasi, N; Husmen, G; Tuba Sanal, H; Tayfun, C

    2011-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces include ventricles and cerebral and spinal subarachnoid spaces. CSF motion is a combined effect of CSF production rate and superimposed cardiac pulsations. Knowledge of CSF dynamics has benefited considerably from the development of phase-contrast (PC) MRI. There are several disorders such as communicating and non-communicating hydrocephalus, Chiari malformation, syringomyelic cyst and arachnoid cyst that can change the CSF dynamics. The aims of this pictorial review are to outline the PC MRI technique, CSF physiology and cerebrospinal space anatomy, to describe a group of congenital and acquired disorders that can alter the CSF dynamics, and to assess the use of PC MRI in the assessment of various central nervous system abnormalities. PMID:21586507

  19. Cerebrospinal Fluid Orexin A Levels and Autonomic Function in Kleine-Levin Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing Yu; Han, Fang; Dong, Song X.; Li, Jing; An, Pei; Zhang, Xiao Zhe; Chang, Yuan; Zhao, Long; Zhang, Xue Li; Liu, Ya Nan; Yan, Han; Li, Qing Hua; Hu, Yan; Lv, Chang Jun; Gao, Zhan Cheng; Strohl, Kingman P.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Kleine-Levin syndrome (KLS) is a rare disorder of relapsing sleepiness. The hypothesis was that the syndrome is related to a change in the vigilance peptide orexin A. Methods: From 2002 to 2013, 57 patients with relapsing hypersomnolence were clinically assessed in a referral academic center in Beijing, China, and 44 (28 males and 16 females; mean age 18.3 ± 8.9 y (mean ± standard deviation, range 9–57 y) were determined to have clinical and behavioral criteria consistent with KLS. Cerebrospinal fluid orexin A levels and diurnal blood pressure were measured in relapse versus remission in a subgroup of patients. Results: Presenting symptoms included relapsing or remitting excessive sleepiness–associated parallel complaints of cognitive changes (82%), eating disorders (84%); depression (45%); irritability (36%); hypersexuality (18%); and compulsions (11%). Episodes were 8.2 ± 3.3 days in duration. In relapse, diurnal values for blood pressure and heart rate were lower (P < 0.001). In a subgroup (n = 34), cerebrospinal fluid orexin A levels were ∼31% lower in a relapse versus remission (215.7 ± 81.5 versus 319.2 ± 95.92 pg/ml, P < 0.001); in three patients a pattern of lower levels during subsequent relapses was documented. Conclusions: There are lower orexin A levels in the symptomatic phase than in remission and a fall and rise in blood pressure and heart rate, suggesting a role for orexin dysregulation in KLS pathophysiology. Citation: Wang JY, Han F, Dong SX, Li J, An P, Zhang XZ, Chang Y, Zhao L, Zhang XL, Liu YN, Yan H, Li QH, Hu Y, Lv CJ, Gao ZC, Strohl KP. Cerebrospinal fluid orexin A levels and autonomic function in Kleine-Levin syndrome. SLEEP 2016;39(4):855–860. PMID:26943469

  20. Clearance from cerebrospinal fluid of intrathecally administered beta-endorphin in monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, V.C.; Burns, R.S.; Dubois, M.; Cohen, M.R.

    1984-05-01

    Five adult male monkeys (Macaca mulatta) weighing 7.1-9.9 kg were given synthetic human beta-endorphin (800 micrograms) and (/sup 14/C)methoxy-inulin (50 microCi) in 400 microliters of normal saline intrathecally. Serial samples of cerebrospinal fluid were drawn through a previously positioned indwelling spinal catheter and were assayed for concentrations of beta-endorphin (determined by radioimmunoassay) and inulin (determined by liquid scintillation counter). Spinal fluid concentrations of beta-endorphin and inulin peaked and declined in a parallel manner. The clearance ratio (calculated from the reciprocal of the ratio of the areas under the respective curves of elimination of the two species) remained remarkably similar from animal to animal, giving a mean value of 1.060 +/- 0.090 (SEM). This ratio, being near unity, suggests that beta-endorphin is eliminated from spinal fluid in a fashion similar to that of inulin, which is removed exclusively by bulk absorption.

  1. Three dimensional modeling of the cerebrospinal fluid dynamics and brain interactions in the aqueduct of sylvius.

    PubMed

    Fin, Loïc; Grebe, Reinhard

    2003-06-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method is presented to investigate the flow of cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) in the cerebral aqueduct. In addition to former approaches exhibiting a rigid geometry, we propose a model which includes a deformable membrane as the wall of this flow channel. An anatomical shape of the aqueduct was computed from magnetic resonance images (MRI) and the resulting meshing was immersed in a marker-and-cell (MAC) staggered grid for to take into account fluid-structure interactions. The time derivatives were digitized using the Crank-Nicolson scheme. The equation of continuity was modified by introducing an artificial compressibility and digitized by a finite difference scheme. Calculations were validated with the simulation of laminar flow in a rigid tube. Then, comparisons were made between simulations of a rigid aqueduct and a deformable one. We found that the deformability of the walls has a strong influence on the pressure drop for a given flow.

  2. Gorham-Stout syndrome affecting the temporal bone with cerebrospinal fluid leakage.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Noriko; Ogiwara, Hideki; Miyazaki, Osamu; Kitamuara, Masayuki; Nishina, Sachiko; Nakazawa, Atsuko; Maekawa, Takanobu; Morota, Nobuhito

    2013-09-01

    Gorham-Stout syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by progressive osteolysis that leads to the disappearance of bone. Lymphvascular proliferation causes the local destruction of bony tissue. Owing to the low incidence of this syndrome, little is known about its etiology or treatment. We present an 11-year-old girl with Gorham-Stout syndrome that involved right petrous apex in temporal bone and upper clivus, which cause intracranial pressure increase and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. The patient required surgical repair of CSF leakage by extradural middle fossa approach with temporal fascia flap. Combined treatment with interferon and propranolol prevented the progression of osteolysis.

  3. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of somatostatin and neuropeptide Y in multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Vecsei, L.; Csala, B.; Widerloev, E.E.; Ekman, R.; Czopf, J.; Palffy, G. )

    1990-09-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of somatostatin and neuropeptide Y were investigated by use of radioimmunoassay in patients suffering from chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. The somatostatin level was significantly decreased in the CSF of patients with multiple sclerosis compared to the control group. The magnitude of this change was more pronounced in patients with severe clinical symptoms of the illness. The CSF neuropeptide Y concentration did not differ from the control values. These findings suggest a selective involvement of somatostatin neurotransmission in multiple sclerosis.

  4. Chemical profiling of cerebrospinal fluid by multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Christina R; Yannell, Karen E; Mollenhauer, Brit; Espy, Ryan D; Cordeiro, Fernanda B; Ouyang, Z; Cooks, R G

    2016-09-21

    We report an accelerated biomarker discovery workflow and results of sample screening by mass spectrometry based on multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). This methodology shows promising initial results for the currently unsolved challenge of Parkinson's disease (PD) laboratory diagnosis by biomarker screening. Small molecules present in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at low parts per million levels are monitored using specific transitions connecting ion pairs. A set of such transitions constitutes a multidimensional chemical profile used to distinguish and characterize different CSF samples using multivariate statistical methods. PMID:27517482

  5. The use of cerebrospinal fluid and neuropathological studies in neuropsychiatry practice and research

    PubMed Central

    Kansal, Kalyani; Irwin, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis The gold standard for diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases (i.e. Alzheimer’s disease, Frontotemporal dementia, Parkinson’s disease, Dementia with Lewy bodies, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) is neuropathological examination at autopsy. As such, laboratory studies play a central role in ante mortem diagnosis of these conditions and their differentiation from the neuroinflammatory, infectious, toxic, and other non-degenerative etiologies (e.g. rapidly-progressive dementias) that are encountered in neuropsychiatric practice. This review summarizes the use of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) laboratory studies in the diagnostic evaluation of dementia syndromes and emerging CSF biomarkers specific for underlying neuropathology in neurodegenerative disease research. PMID:25998118

  6. Total glutamine synthetase levels in cerebrospinal fluid of Alzheimer's disease patients are unchanged.

    PubMed

    Timmer, Nienke M; Herbert, Megan K; Claassen, Jurgen A H R; Kuiperij, H Bea; Verbeek, Marcel M

    2015-03-01

    Decreased cerebral protein and activity levels of glutamine synthetase (GS) have been reported for Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Using a recently established method, we quantified total GS levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from AD patients and control subjects. Furthermore, we investigated if total GS levels in CSF could differentiate AD from frontotemperal dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies patients. As we found no significantly altered total GS levels in any of the patient groups compared with control subjects, we conclude that levels of total GS in CSF have no diagnostic value for AD, dementia with Lewy bodies, or frontotemperal dementia.

  7. High sensitivity and specificity of elevated cerebrospinal fluid kappa free light chains in suspected multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hassan-Smith, G; Durant, L; Tsentemeidou, A; Assi, L K; Faint, J M; Kalra, S; Douglas, M R; Curnow, S J

    2014-11-15

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis is routinely used in the diagnostic work-up of multiple sclerosis (MS), by detecting CSF-specific oligoclonal bands (OCB). More recently, several studies have reported CSF free light chains (FLC) as an alternative. We show that absolute CSF κFLC concentrations were highly sensitive - more than OCB testing - and specific for clinically isolated syndrome, relapsing remitting and primary progressive MS. Measurement of κFLC alone was sufficient. Our results suggest that CSF κFLC levels measured by nephelometry, if validated in a larger series, are a preferred test to OCB analysis in the diagnostic work-up of patients suspected of having MS.

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid protein changes in multiple sclerosis after dental amalgam removal.

    PubMed

    Huggins, H A; Levy, T E

    1998-08-01

    A relationship between multiple sclerosis (MS) and dental silver-mercury fillings has been suggested by some investigators, but never proven. This study documents objective biochemical changes following the removal of these fillings along with other dental materials, utilizing a new health care model of multidisciplinary planning and treatment. The dramatic changes in photolabeling of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteins following these dental interventions suggest CSF photolabeling may serve as an objective biomarker for monitoring MS. The clear-cut character of these changes should also encourage more research to better define this possible association between dental mercury and MS.

  9. Longitudinal assessment of tau and amyloid beta in cerebrospinal fluid of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Mattison, Hayley A; Liu, Changqin; Ginghina, Carmen; Auinger, Peggy; McDermott, Michael P; Stewart, Tessandra; Kang, Un Jung; Cain, Kevin C; Shi, Min

    2013-11-01

    Tau gene has been consistently associated with the risk of Parkinson disease in recent genome wide association studies. In addition, alterations of the levels of total tau, phosphorylated tau [181P], and amyloid beta 1-42 in cerebrospinal fluid have been reported in patients with sporadic Parkinson disease and asymptomatic carriers of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 mutations, in patterns that clearly differ from those typically described for patients with Alzheimer disease. To further determine the potential roles of these molecules in Parkinson disease pathogenesis and/or in tracking the disease progression, especially at early stages, the current study assessed all three proteins in 403 Parkinson disease patients enrolled in the DATATOP (Deprenyl and tocopherol antioxidative therapy of parkinsonism) placebo-controlled clinical trial, the largest cohort to date with cerebrospinal fluid samples collected longitudinally. These initially drug-naive patients at early disease stages were clinically evaluated, and cerebrospinal fluid was collected at baseline and then at endpoint, defined as the time at which symptomatic anti-Parkinson disease medications were determined to be required. General linear models were used to test for associations between baseline cerebrospinal fluid biomarker levels or their rates of change and changes in the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (total or part III motor score) over time. Robust associations among candidate markers are readily noted. Baseline levels of amyloid beta were weakly but negatively correlated with baseline Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale total scores. Baseline phosphorylated tau/total tau and phosphorylated tau/amyloid beta were significantly and negatively correlated with the rates of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale change. While medications (deprenyl and/or tocopherol) did not appear to alter biomarkers appreciably, a weak but significant positive correlation between the rate of change in total

  10. Chemical profiling of cerebrospinal fluid by multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Christina R; Yannell, Karen E; Mollenhauer, Brit; Espy, Ryan D; Cordeiro, Fernanda B; Ouyang, Z; Cooks, R G

    2016-09-21

    We report an accelerated biomarker discovery workflow and results of sample screening by mass spectrometry based on multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). This methodology shows promising initial results for the currently unsolved challenge of Parkinson's disease (PD) laboratory diagnosis by biomarker screening. Small molecules present in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at low parts per million levels are monitored using specific transitions connecting ion pairs. A set of such transitions constitutes a multidimensional chemical profile used to distinguish and characterize different CSF samples using multivariate statistical methods.

  11. State of the art of endoscopic frontal sinus cerebrospinal fluid leak repair.

    PubMed

    Patron, V; Roger, V; Moreau, S; Babin, E; Hitier, M

    2015-12-01

    Frontal sinus cerebrospinal fluid leaks are rare and their surgical management is difficult. Up until recently, they could only be treated by open surgery with an osteoplastic flap. With the development of endoscopic surgery, less invasive techniques such as an exclusive endoscopic approach can now be used, ensuring a simpler postoperative course. However, these techniques require a thorough knowledge of frontal sinus anatomy and endoscopic CSF leak repair. This knowledge is essential both to ensure closure of the CSF leak and to preserve frontal sinus patency. PMID:26363602

  12. Amino acid composition of cerebrospinal fluid in actue neuroinfections in children.

    PubMed

    Buryakova, A V; Sytinsky, I A

    1975-01-01

    A survey of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) amino acids, glutamine, and glutamic and gamma-aminobutyric (GABA) acids was made in 168 children, aged 1 to 14 years, with various neurological infections. The glutamic acid and glutamine concentrations in the CSF of children with severe forms of acute serous and bacterial meningitis were about three to four times as great as in controls. The indices returned almost to normal during recovery. GABA is absent in normal CSF, but appeared in the CSF of patients with bacterial meningitis. Its determination may be used as an additional test to differentiate between serous and bacterial meningitis.

  13. Cronobacter sakazakii DNA Detection in Cerebrospinal Fluid of a Patient with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Mimic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Piombo, Marianna; Chiarello, Daniela; Corbetto, Marzia; Di Pino, Giovanni; Dicuonzo, Giordano; Angeletti, Silvia; Riva, Elisabetta; De Florio, Lucia; Capone, Fioravante; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    A 45-year-old male noticed progressive weakness of the right lower limb with gait disturbance. Over the following months, motor deficits worsened, spreading to the right upper limb. Electromyography showed active denervation in the upper and lower limb muscles. A diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) was made. About 2 years after symptom onset, gradual improvement occurred. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis performed about 3 years after the beginning of symptoms identified Cronobacter sakazakii. Since no other possible causes were identified, we suggest that an almost completely reversible ALS-like syndrome had been triggered by Cronobacter infection in our immunocompetent patient. PMID:26955334

  14. [Cerebrospinal fluid pressure studies after the intravenous administration of the steroid narcotic, alphaxolone + alphadolone acetate (Althesin)].

    PubMed

    Ekhart, E; List, W F; Vadon, P; Oberbauer, R

    1979-09-30

    The effect of alphaxalon + alphadolon-acetate on cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP), mean arterial blood pressure (MPA), heart rate (BMP) and blood gases was investigated in 18 patients. Cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) was calculated from the difference MAP minus CSFP. Alphaxalon + alphadolon-acetate lowered the normal CSFP and normalized ketamin induced increase of CSFP. Premedication with alphaxalon + alphadolon-acetate delayed the ketamin induced increase of CSFP, which returned to norm after a second dose of alphaxalon + alphadolon-acetate. This effect was seen despite elevation of pCO2 in all patients breathing spontaneously.

  15. Delayed cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea four years after gamma knife surgery for juvenile angiofibroma.

    PubMed

    Min, Hyun Jin; Chung, Hyo Jin; Kim, Chang-Hoon

    2014-11-01

    Juvenile angiofibroma (JA) is a highly vascularized tumor that often recurs or regrows. Recently, gamma knife surgery (GKS) was attempted on unresectable or remnant JA. We experienced a JA case that developed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea 4 years after GKS. Two surgical excisions using midfacial degloving approach were performed before GKS. After radiosurgery, the tumor was controlled, and no early complications were observed. However, 4 years after, intractable CSF leakage developed as a late complication, and we thus performed 4 subsequent endoscopic surgical repairs. The CSF leakage is very rare but can occur as a late complication of GKS and should be treated aggressively.

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarker supported diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and rapid dementias: a longitudinal multicentre study over 10 years.

    PubMed

    Stoeck, Katharina; Sanchez-Juan, Pascual; Gawinecka, Joanna; Green, Alison; Ladogana, Anna; Pocchiari, Maurizio; Sanchez-Valle, Raquel; Mitrova, Eva; Sklaviadis, Theodor; Kulczycki, Jerzy; Slivarichova, Dana; Saiz, Albert; Calero, Miguel; Knight, Richard; Aguzzi, Adriano; Laplanche, Jean-Louis; Peoc'h, Katell; Schelzke, Gabi; Karch, Andre; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Zerr, Inga

    2012-10-01

    To date, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, particularly protein 14-3-3 testing, presents an important approach in the identification of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease cases. However, one special point of criticism of 14-3-3 testing is the specificity in the differential diagnosis of rapid dementia. The constant observation of increased cerebrospinal fluid referrals in the national surveillance centres over the last years raises the concern of declining specificity due to higher number of cerebrospinal fluid tests performed in various neurological conditions. Within the framework of a European Community supported longitudinal multicentre study ('cerebrospinal fluid markers') we analysed the spectrum of rapid progressive dementia diagnoses, their potential influence on 14-3-3 specificity as well as results of other dementia markers (tau, phosphorylated tau and amyloid-β(1-42)) and evaluated the specificity of 14-3-3 in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease diagnosis for the years 1998-2008. A total of 29 022 cerebrospinal fluid samples were analysed for 14-3-3 protein and other cerebrospinal fluid dementia markers in patients with rapid dementia and suspected Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in the participating centres. In 10 731 patients a definite diagnosis could be obtained. Protein 14-3-3 specificity was analysed for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with respect to increasing cerebrospinal fluid tests per year and spectrum of differential diagnosis. Ring trials were performed to ensure the comparability between centres during the reported time period. Protein 14-3-3 test specificity remained high and stable in the diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease during the observed time period across centres (total specificity 92%; when compared with patients with definite diagnoses only: specificity 90%). However, test specificity varied with respect to differential diagnosis. A high 14-3-3 specificity was obtained in differentiation to other neurodegenerative diseases (95-97%) and non

  17. A Rare Case of Spontaneous Pneumocephalus Associated with Nontraumatic Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak

    PubMed Central

    Tarar, Omer; Syed, Amer

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Spontaneous nontraumatic pneumocephalus (PNC) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks are both very uncommon conditions. We report a rare case of spontaneous pneumocephalus associated with CSF leak secondary to right sphenoid sinus bony defect without history of trauma. Case Description. 51-year-old Hispanic female with past medical history of hypertension and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri) presented to the emergency room complaining of headache and clear discharge from the right nostril. Physical examination was significant for right frontal sinus tenderness and clear discharge from right nostril. Computed Tomography (CT) scan of the brain showed moderate amount of extra-axial air within the right cerebral hemisphere indicative of pneumocephalus. CT scan of facial bones showed bony defect along the right sphenoid sinus with abnormal CSF collection. The patient was started on intravenous antibiotics for meningitis prophylaxis and subsequently underwent transsphenoidal repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak with abdominal fat graft. CSF rhinorrhea stopped completely after the surgery with near complete resolution of pneumocephalus before discharge. Conclusions. Early identification of pneumocephalus and surgical intervention can help decrease the morbidity and avoid possible complications. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension, although rare, can lead to CSF leak and pneumocepahlus. PMID:27217961

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid pharmacology: an improved pharmacology approach for chinese herbal medicine research.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan-Qing; Zhou, Ying-Wu; Qin, Xiu-de; Hua, Sheng-Yu; Zhang, Yu-Lian; Kang, Li-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Despite many successful applications of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) in the treatment and prevention of neurological diseases (ND), the fully scientific understanding of CHM's action mechanisms had been hampered for lack of appropriate methods to explore the combinatorial rules, the synergistic mechanisms, and the molecular basis of CHM. As an improved pharmacology approach, cerebrospinal fluid pharmacology (CSFP), based on the fact that cerebrospinal fluid plays an important role in the health maintenance of specific survival environment for neurons and glial cells, has been constructed and applied to CHM research for treating ND. In the present review, the concept and advantages of CSFP are briefly introduced. The approaches and key technologies of CSFP in CHM research are also collated and analyzed. Furthermore, the developing tendency of CSFP is summarized, and its framework in CHM research is also proposed. In summary, CSFP provides a new strategy not only to eliminate some barriers of CHM research for treating ND, but also to broaden the pharmacology research for bridging the gap between CHM and modern medicine. Moreover, the advancements in CSFP will bring about a conceptual move in active ingredients discovery of CHM and make a significant contribution to CHM modernization and globalization.

  19. Evidence of cellular immune activation in children with opsoclonus-myoclonus: cerebrospinal fluid neopterin.

    PubMed

    Pranzatelli, Michael R; Hyland, Keith; Tate, Elizabeth D; Arnold, Lauren A; Allison, Tyler J; Soori, Gamini S

    2004-12-01

    To evaluate cellular immune activation in opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome, we measured the inflammatory marker neopterin in the cerebrospinal fluid of 16 children with opsoclonus-myoclonus and neuroblastoma, 24 children with opsoclonus-myoclonus but no tumor, and 19 age-matched controls. The mean concentration in opsoclonus-myoclonus was 2.3-fold higher than in controls (P = .008). Neopterin was greatly elevated in four of the most neurologically severe cases, up to 8.3-fold above the highest control level. Thirteen of the 40 children with opsoclonus-myoclonus but no controls had a neopterin concentration >2 SD above the control mean (P = .005). In this high neopterin subgroup, neurologic severity was significantly greater and the duration of neurologic symptoms was less. In 16 children re-examined on immunotherapy, including adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) combination therapy, treatment was associated with a significant reduction in both neopterin and neurologic severity. Neopterin did not differ significantly between the tumor and non-tumor opsoclonus-myoclonus etiologies. No abnormalities of tetrahydrobiopterin were found. Although cerebrospinal fluid neopterin lacked the sensitivity to be a biomarker of disease activity in opsoclonus-myoclonus, elevated concentrations do support a role for T-cell activation and cell-mediated immunity in its pathophysiology.

  20. Embryonic cerebrospinal fluid collaborates with the isthmic organizer to regulate mesencephalic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Parada, Carolina; Martín, Cristina; Alonso, María I; Moro, José A; Bueno, David; Gato, Angel

    2005-11-01

    Early in development, the behavior of neuroepithelial cells is controlled by several factors acting in a developmentally regulated manner. Recently it has been shown that diffusible factors contained within embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) promote neuroepithelial cell survival, proliferation, and neurogenesis in mesencephalic explants lacking any known organizing center. In this paper, we show that mesencephalic and mesencephalic+isthmic organizer explants cultured only with basal medium do not express the typically expressed mesencephalic or isthmic organizer genes analyzed (otx2 and fgf8, respectively) and that mesencephalic explants cultured with embryonic CSF-supplemented medium do effect such expression, although they exhibit an altered pattern of gene expression, including ectopic shh expression domains. Other trophic sources that are able to maintain normal neuroepithelial cell behavior, i.e., fibroblast growth factor-2, fail to activate this ectopic shh expression. Conversely, the expression pattern of the analyzed genes in mesencephalic+isthmic organizer explants cultured with embryonic cerebrospinal fluid-supplemented medium mimics the pattern for control embryos developed in ovo. We demonstrate that embryonic CSF collaborates with the isthmic organizer in regulation of the expression pattern of some characteristic neuroectodermal genes during early stages of central nervous system (CNS) development, and we suggest that this collaboration is not restricted to the maintenance of neuroepithelial cell survival. Data reported in this paper corroborate the hypothesis that factors contained within embryonic CSF contribute to the patterning of the CNS during early embryonic development. PMID:16180222

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid prohormone processing and neuropeptides stimulating feed intake of dairy cows during early lactation.

    PubMed

    Kuhla, Björn; Laeger, Thomas; Husi, Holger; Mullen, William

    2015-02-01

    After parturition, feed intake of dairy cows increases within the first weeks of lactation, but the molecular mechanisms stimulating or delaying the slope of increase are poorly understood. Some of the molecules controlling feed intake are neuropeptides that are synthesized as propeptides and subsequently processed before they bind to specific receptors in feeding centers of the brain. Cerebrospinal fluid surrounds most of the feed intake regulatory centers and contains numerous neuropeptides. In the present study, we used a proteomic approach to analyze the neuropeptide concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid taken from dairy cows between day -18 and -10, and between day +10 and +20 relative to parturition. We found 13 proteins which were only present in samples taken before parturition, 13 proteins which were only present in samples taken after parturition, and 25 proteins which were commonly present, before and after parturition. Among them, differences in pro-neuropeptide Y, proenkephalin-A, neuroendocrine convertase-2, neurosecretory protein VGF, chromogranin-A, and secretogranin-1 and -3 concentrations relative to parturition highlight propeptides and prohormone processings involved in the control of feed intake and energy homeostasis. Scaffold analysis further emphasized an increased tone of endogenous opioids associated with the postparturient increase of feed intake.

  2. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid S100B concentrations in patients with neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Lima, J E; Walz, R; Tort, A; Souza, D; Portela, L; Bianchin, M M; Takayanagui, O M; Leite, J P

    2006-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of neurocysticercosis (NC) are varied and depend on the number and location of cysts, as well as on the host immune response. Symptoms usually occur in NC when cysticerci enter a degenerative course associated with an inflammatory response. The expression of brain damage markers may be expected to increase during this phase. S100B is a calcium-binding protein produced and released predominantly by astrocytes that has been used as a marker of reactive gliosis and astrocytic death in many pathological conditions. The aim of the present study was to investigate the levels of S100B in patients in different phases of NC evolution. Cerebrospinal fluid and serum S100B concentrations were measured in 25 patients with NC: 14 patients with degenerative cysts (D), 8 patients with viable cysts (V) and 3 patients with inactive cysts. All NC patients, except 1, had five or less cysts. In most of them, symptoms had been present for at least 1 month before sample collection. Samples from 8 normal controls (C) were also assayed. The albumin quotient was used to estimate the blood-brain barrier permeability. There were no significant differences in serum (P = 0.5) or cerebrospinal fluid (P = 0.91) S100B levels among the V, D, and C groups. These findings suggest that parenchymal changes associated with a relatively small number of degenerating cysts probably have a negligible impact on glial tissue.

  3. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for Kii Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/Parkinsonism-Dementia Complex.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Yui; Morimoto, Satoru; Yoneda, Misao; Kuzuhara, Shigeki; Kokubo, Yasumasa

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex is classified as one of the tauopathies. Methods. The total tau, phosphorylated tau, and amyloid β42 levels were assayed in cerebrospinal fluid from patients with Kii amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex (n = 12), Alzheimer's disease (n = 9), Parkinson's disease (n = 9), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (n = 11), and controls (n = 5) using specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods. Results. Total tau and phosphorylated tau did not increase and amyloid β42 was relatively reduced in Kii amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex. Relatively reduced amyloid β42 might discriminate Kii amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson's disease, and the ratios of phosphorylated-tau to amyloid β42 could discriminate Kii amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex from Alzheimer's disease. Conclusions. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis may be useful to differentiate amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex from Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease.

  4. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolic profiling of cerebrospinal fluid from epileptic dogs.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Tetsuya; Sumita, Maho; Horitani, Yusuke; Tamai, Reo; Tanaka, Katsuhiro; Komori, Masayuki; Takenaka, Shigeo

    2014-04-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder with seizures, but diagnostic approaches in veterinary clinics remain limited. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a body fluid used for diagnosis in veterinary medicine. In this study, we explored canine epilepsy diagnostic biomarkers using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolic profiling of CSF and multivariate data analysis. Profiles for subjects with idiopathic epilepsy differed significantly from those of healthy controls and subjects with symptomatic epilepsy. Among 60 identified metabolites, the levels of 20 differed significantly among the three groups. Glutamic acid was significantly increased in idiopathic epilepsy, and some metabolites including ascorbic acid were changed in both forms of epilepsy. These findings show that metabolic profiles of CSF differ between idiopathic and symptomatic epilepsy and that metabolites including glutamic acid and ascorbic acid in CSF may be useful for diagnosis of canine epilepsy.

  5. Liquor cotunnii: the history of cerebrospinal fluid in Domenico Cotugno's work.

    PubMed

    Di Ieva, Antonio; Yaşargil, M Gazi

    2008-08-01

    Domenico Cotugno was a famous physician who lived in Naples in the 18th century. At the age of only 25 years, he published an important book on the anatomy of the inner ear that contained some theories concerning the physiology of hearing, the later developments of which were associated with the name of Hermann von Helmholtz. Three years later, he wrote a book on the physiopathological causes of sciatic pain, in which, for the first time in medical history, he differentiated true sciatic pain from the pain attributable to secondary causes. Using a series of meticulous dissections and elegant experiments, he showed that not only brain ventricles but also the subarachnoid spaces of the cranium and spine were filled with circulating fluid, which is why cerebrospinal fluid is also known as "liquor cotunnii."

  6. Identification of Oropouche Orthobunyavirus in the cerebrospinal fluid of three patients in the Amazonas, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Michele de Souza; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu Moraes; Naveca, Felipe Gomes; Monte, Rossicleia Lins; Lessa, Natália; Pinto de Figueiredo, Regina Maria; Gimaque, João Bosco de Lima; Pivoto João, Guilherme; Ramasawmy, Rajendranath; Mourão, Maria Paula Gomes

    2012-04-01

    Oropouche fever is the second most frequent arboviral infection in Brazil, surpassed only by dengue. Oropouche virus (OROV) causes large and explosive outbreaks of acute febrile illness in cities and villages in the Amazon and Central-Plateau regions. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from 110 meningoencephalitis patients were analyzed. The RNA extracted from fluid was submitted to reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and sequencing to identify OROV. Three CSF samples showed the presence of OROV causing infection in the central nervous system (CNS). These patients are adults. Two of the patients had other diseases affecting CNS and immune systems: neurocysticercosis and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, respectively. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed that the OROV from the CSF of these patients belonged to genotype I. We show here that severe Oropouche disease is occurring during outbreaks of this virus in Brazil.

  7. How yawning switches the default-mode network to the attentional network by activating the cerebrospinal fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, Olivier

    2014-03-01

    Yawning is a behavior to which little research has been devoted. However, its purpose has not yet been demonstrated and remains controversial. In this article, we propose a new theory involving the brain network that is functional during the resting state, that is, the default mode network. When this network is active, yawning manifests a process of switching to the attentional system through its capacity to increase circulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), thereby increasing clearance of somnogenic factors (prostaglandin D(2), adenosine, and others) accumulating in the cerebrospinal fluid.

  8. Arterial pulsation-driven cerebrospinal fluid flow in the perivascular space: a computational model.

    PubMed

    Bilston, Lynne E; Fletcher, David F; Brodbelt, Andrew R; Stoodley, Marcus A

    2003-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether local arterial pulsations are sufficient to cause cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow along perivascular spaces (PVS) within the spinal cord. A theoretical model of the perivascular space surrounding a "typical" small artery was analysed using computational fluid dynamics. Systolic pulsations were modelled as travelling waves on the arterial wall. The effects of wave geometry and variable pressure conditions on fluid flow were investigated. Arterial pulsations induce fluid movement in the PVS in the direction of arterial wave travel. Perivascular flow continues even in the presence of adverse pressure gradients of a few kilopascals. Flow rates are greater with increasing pulse wave velocities and arterial deformation, as both an absolute amplitude and as a proportion of the PVS. The model suggests that arterial pulsations are sufficient to cause fluid flow in the perivascular space even against modest adverse pressure gradients. Local increases in flow in this perivascular pumping mechanism or reduction in outflow may be important in the etiology of syringomyelia.

  9. Age-Related 1H NMR Characterization of Cerebrospinal Fluid in Newborn and Young Healthy Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Barone, Francesca; Elmi, Alberto; Romagnoli, Noemi; Bacci, Maria Laura

    2016-01-01

    When it comes to neuroscience, pigs represent an important animal model due to their resemblance with humans’ brains for several patterns including anatomy and developmental stages. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a relatively easy-to-collect specimen that can provide important information about neurological health and function, proving its importance as both a diagnostic and biomedical monitoring tool. Consequently, it would be of high scientific interest and value to obtain more standard physiological information regarding its composition and dynamics for both swine pathology and the refinement of experimental protocols. Recently, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy has been applied in order to analyze the metabolomic profile of this biological fluid, and results showed the technique to be highly reproducible and reliable. The aim of the present study was to investigate in both qualitative and quantitative manner the composition of Cerebrospinal Fluid harvested form healthy newborn (5 days old-P5) and young (30-P30 and 50-P50 days old) piglets using 1H NMR Spectroscopy, and to analyze any possible difference in metabolites concentration between age groups, related to age and Blood-Brain-Barrier maturation. On each of the analyzed samples, 30 molecules could be observed above their limit of quantification, accounting for 95–98% of the total area of the spectra. The concentrations of adenine, tyrosine, leucine, valine, 3-hydroxyvalerate, 3-methyl-2-oxovalerate were found to decrease between P05 and P50, while the concentrations of glutamine, creatinine, methanol, trimethylamine and myo-inositol were found to increase. The P05-P30 comparison was also significant for glutamine, creatinine, adenine, tyrosine, leucine, valine, 3-hydroxyisovalerate, 3-methyl-2-oxovalerate, while for the P30-P50 comparison we found significant differences for glutamine, myo-inositol, leucine and trimethylamine. None of these molecules showed at P30 concentrations

  10. Age-Related 1H NMR Characterization of Cerebrospinal Fluid in Newborn and Young Healthy Piglets.

    PubMed

    Ventrella, Domenico; Laghi, Luca; Barone, Francesca; Elmi, Alberto; Romagnoli, Noemi; Bacci, Maria Laura

    2016-01-01

    When it comes to neuroscience, pigs represent an important animal model due to their resemblance with humans' brains for several patterns including anatomy and developmental stages. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a relatively easy-to-collect specimen that can provide important information about neurological health and function, proving its importance as both a diagnostic and biomedical monitoring tool. Consequently, it would be of high scientific interest and value to obtain more standard physiological information regarding its composition and dynamics for both swine pathology and the refinement of experimental protocols. Recently, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy has been applied in order to analyze the metabolomic profile of this biological fluid, and results showed the technique to be highly reproducible and reliable. The aim of the present study was to investigate in both qualitative and quantitative manner the composition of Cerebrospinal Fluid harvested form healthy newborn (5 days old-P5) and young (30-P30 and 50-P50 days old) piglets using 1H NMR Spectroscopy, and to analyze any possible difference in metabolites concentration between age groups, related to age and Blood-Brain-Barrier maturation. On each of the analyzed samples, 30 molecules could be observed above their limit of quantification, accounting for 95-98% of the total area of the spectra. The concentrations of adenine, tyrosine, leucine, valine, 3-hydroxyvalerate, 3-methyl-2-oxovalerate were found to decrease between P05 and P50, while the concentrations of glutamine, creatinine, methanol, trimethylamine and myo-inositol were found to increase. The P05-P30 comparison was also significant for glutamine, creatinine, adenine, tyrosine, leucine, valine, 3-hydroxyisovalerate, 3-methyl-2-oxovalerate, while for the P30-P50 comparison we found significant differences for glutamine, myo-inositol, leucine and trimethylamine. None of these molecules showed at P30 concentrations outside

  11. Spontaneous sphenoid sinus cerebrospinal fluid leak and meningoencephalocele – are they due to patent Sternberg's canal?

    PubMed Central

    Tomaszewska, Magdalena; Krzeski, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Sternberg's canal is a congenital bony defect in the lateral wall of the sphenoid sinus. If it persists to adulthood, it may become a source of spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak (CSF) and meningoencephalocele. The aim of the study was to describe the authors’ experience and review articles related to spontaneous sphenoid sinus CSF leaks and Sternberg's canal. We analysed patients managed surgicallly due to sphenoid sinus CSF leak and performed a PubMed database search. Two female patients with spontaneous CSF leak of sphenoid origin were found. Both patients underwent surgery with the endoscopic endonasal approach, and the defect was closed using the multi-layer technique. Twelve articles related to CSF leaks of sphenoid origin (due to Sternberg's canal) were found in the PubMed database. Lines of lesser resistance within sphenoid bone may underlie CSF leak pathology together with intracranial hypertension. The endoscopic transnasal approach to the sphenoid sinus is an excellent alternative to standard transcranial procedures. PMID:26240642

  12. Postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak after septoplasty: A potential complication of occult anterior skull base encephalocele

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Resha S.; Choudhry, Osamah J.; Liu, James K.

    2013-01-01

    Postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea after septoplasty is a known entity resulting from errors in surgical technique and improper handling of the perpendicular plate of the ethmoid bone. When these occur, urgent management is necessary to prevent deleterious sequelae such as meningitis, intracranial abscess, and pneumocephalus. Encephaloceles are rare occurrences characterized by herniation of intracranial contents through a skull base defect that can predispose patients to CSF rhinorrhea. In this report, we present a case of CSF rhinorrhea occurring 2 weeks after septoplasty likely from manipulation of an occult anterior skull base encephalocele. To our knowledge, no previous similar case has been reported in the literature. Otolaryngologists should be aware of the possibility of occult encephaloceles while performing septoplasties because minimal manipulation of these entities may potentially result in postoperative CSF leakage. PMID:23772326

  13. [Chromatographic analysis of low molecular weight fraction of cerebrospinal fluid in children with acute neuroinfections].

    PubMed

    Alekseeva, L A; Shatik, S V; Sorokina, M N; Karasev, V V

    2002-05-01

    Low molecular-weight (oligopeptide) fraction of the cerebrospinal fluid was analyzed by high-performance reversed phase liquid chromatography in 30 children with bacterial and viral neuroinfections. The incidence and height of chromathoraphic peaks in bacterial meningitis depended on the disease etiology, stage, and severity. Qualitative and quantitative composition of low molecular-weight fraction of the liquor varied in patients with viral neuroinfections, depending on the severity of the cerebral parenchyma involvement. Differences in chromatographic profiles in complicated and uneventful course of neuroinfections indicate a possible damaging, protective, or regulatory effect of the liquor peptides. These data focus the attention on the role of oligopeptides in the genesis of neuroinfectious process, significance of search for peptide markers, their further isolation, identification, and development of test systems available for clinical application. PMID:12085699

  14. Bone marrow elements in cerebrospinal fluid: Review of literature with a case study.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Anitha Ann; Goh, Felicia Tze Yee

    2013-01-01

    Presence of bone marrow elements in cerebrospinal fluid is rare. Journal publications on this topic are few and majority of them were written over a decade ago mostly as case reports in young children or the elderly. The increased cellularity and presence of myeloid precursors can be a pitfall and may be misdiagnosed as leukemia or lymphoma or central nervous system infection, when the specimen is actually not representative. With the intention to create awareness of potential pitfalls and avoid erroneous diagnoses, as well as adding on to the current photo archive of bone marrow elements in CSF, we present a recent case of bone marrow contaminants in the CSF of a 16-year-old girl. PMID:24228067

  15. Three-dimensional computational prediction of cerebrospinal fluid flow in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Sweetman, Brian; Xenos, Michalis; Zitella, Laura; Linninger, Andreas A

    2011-02-01

    A three-dimensional model of the human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces is presented. Patient-specific brain geometries were reconstructed from magnetic resonance images. The model was validated by comparing the predicted flow rates with Cine phase-contrast MRI measurements. The model predicts the complex CSF flow patterns and pressures in the ventricular system and subarachnoid space of a normal subject. The predicted maximum rostral to caudal CSF flow in the pontine cistern precedes the maximum rostral to caudal flow in the ventricles by about 10% of the cardiac cycle. This prediction is in excellent agreement with the subject-specific flow data. The computational results quantify normal intracranial dynamics and provide a basis for analyzing diseased intracranial dynamics.

  16. Metabolic clearance of insulin from the cerebrospinal fluid in the anesthetized rat

    SciTech Connect

    Manin, M.; Broer, Y.; Balage, M.; Rostene, W.; Grizard, J. )

    1990-01-01

    Infusion of 125I-(Tyr A14)-insulin at tracer doses into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) resulted in a slow rate of increase in the CSF-labeled insulin during the first 2 hours with a plateau thereafter. Labeled insulin was cleared from the CSF at a higher rate than 3H-inulin, a marker of CSF bulk flow. The labeled insulin was mainly distributed in all the ventricular and periventricular brain regions. Small amounts of degraded insulin appeared in the CSF. Coinfusion with an excess of unlabeled insulin impaired the clearance and degradation of labeled insulin. It also inhibited the labeling in medial hypothalamus, olfactory bulbs and brain stem. In contrast, coinfusion of ribonuclease B (used to test the specificity of uptake) was without any effect. It was concluded that there is an active insulin intake from CSF into brain specific compartments that is presumably essential for the effects of insulin on brain function.

  17. Immunological studies of cerebrospinal fluid from patients with CNS symptoms after human papillomavirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yukitoshi; Matsudaira, Takashi; Nakano, Hitoshi; Nasu, Hirosato; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Nakaoka, Kentaro; Takayama, Rumiko; Oota, Masayasu

    2016-09-15

    In 32 patients with prolonged central nervous system symptoms after human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination, we measured conventional and immunological markers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and compared with the levels in disease controls. Our studies revealed significantly decreased chloride and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) levels in CSF of patients with CNS symptoms after HPV vaccination compared to disease controls. IL-4, IL-13, and CD4(+) T cells increased significantly in patients, and IL-17 increased significantly from 12 to 24months after symptom onset. Chemokines (IL-8 and MCP-1) were also elevated, but CD8(+) T cells, PDGF-bb and IL-12 were reduced. Antibodies to GluN2B-NT2, GluN2B-CT and GluN1-NT increased significantly. These results suggest biological, mainly immunological, changes in the CSF of patients after HPV vaccination. PMID:27609278

  18. Effects of spatial variation of skull and cerebrospinal fluid layers on optical mapping of brain activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuping; Shibahara, Nanae; Kuramashi, Daishi; Okawa, Shinpei; Kakuta, Naoto; Okada, Eiji; Maki, Atsushi; Yamada, Yukio

    2010-07-01

    In order to investigate the effects of anatomical variation in human heads on the optical mapping of brain activity, we perform simulations of optical mapping by solving the photon diffusion equation for layered-models simulating human heads using the finite element method (FEM). Particularly, the effects of the spatial variations in the thicknesses of the skull and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) layers on mapping images are investigated. Mapping images of single active regions in the gray matter layer are affected by the spatial variations in the skull and CSF layer thicknesses, although the effects are smaller than those of the positions of the active region relative to the data points. The increase in the skull thickness decreases the sensitivity of the images to active regions, while the increase in the CSF layer thickness increases the sensitivity in general. The images of multiple active regions are also influenced by their positions relative to the data points and by their depths from the skin surface.

  19. Autoantibodies against glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in cerebrospinal fluids from Pug dogs with necrotizing meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Masahiro; Matsuki, Naoaki; Fujiwara, Kaori; Imajoh-Ohmi, Shinobu; Fukuda, Hiroyuki; Pham, Ngoc T; Tamahara, Satoshi; Ono, Kenichiro

    2007-03-01

    Cerebrospinal fluids (CSFs) from 9 Pug dogs with necrotizing meningoencephalitis (NME: Pug dog encephalitis) were examined to identify the antigens for anti-astrocyte autoantibodies. Each CSF exhibited a positive reaction to the cytoplasm of cultured canine astrocytes by an indirect fluorescent antibody test. In an immunoblotting analysis on normal canine brain proteins, eight of 9 CSFs showed a common band of 52 kDa, corresponding to glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and all of 9 CSFs reacted with purified bovine GFAP. From these results, GFAP is one of the common autoantigens in Pug dogs with NME. On the other hand, the reactivity of CSFs to chymotrypsin-digested bovine GFAP fragments were variable among dogs, indicating that the antibodies in the CSFs recognized different epitopes on GFAP.

  20. Elevated glial fibrillary acidic protein levels in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Feneberg, Emily; Steinacker, Petra; Lehnert, Stefan; Böhm, Bernhard; Mayer, Geert; Otto, Markus

    2013-07-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is an established indicator of astrogliosis. Therefore, variable cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of this protein might reflect disease-specific pathologic profiles. In patients with narcolepsy, a loss of hypocretin-1 (hcrt-1) neurons in the brain and low concentrations of hcrt-1 in CSF have been reported. We performed a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to investigate if GFAP also is altered in the CSF of these patients. Here we detected significantly higher CSF levels of GFAP in patients with low hcrt-1 levels, of which the majority had a diagnosis of narcolepsy and cataplexy (NC); however, this finding was not observed in patients with hcrt-1 levels that were within reference range. In conclusion, GFAP may be useful as an additional disease biomarker in patients with narcolepsy, and this hypothesis should be investigated in larger studies.

  1. Proteomic Analysis of Alzheimer’s Disease Cerebrospinal Fluid from Neuropathologically Diagnosed Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Maarouf, Chera L.; Andacht, Tracy M.; Kokjohn, Tyler A.; Castaño, Eduardo M.; Sue, Lucia I.; Beach, Thomas G.; Roher, Alex E.

    2010-01-01

    A crucial need exists for reliable Alzheimer’s disease (AD) diagnostic and prognostic tests. Given its intimate communication with the brain, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been surveyed intensively for reliable AD biomarkers. The heterogeneity of AD pathology and the unavoidable difficulties associated with the clinical diagnosis and differentiation of this dementia from other pathologies have confounded biomarker studies in antemortem CSF samples. Using postmortem ventricular CSF (V-CSF) pools, two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D DIGE) analyses revealed a set of proteins that showed significant differences between neuropathologically-diagnosed AD and elderly non-demented controls (NDC), as well as subjects with non-AD dementias. The 2D DIGE system identified a set of 21 different protein biomarkers. This panel of proteins probably reflects fundamental pathological changes that are divergent from both normal aging and non-AD dementias. PMID:19689240

  2. Resistance to outflow of cerebrospinal fluid after central infusions of angiotensin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, B. A.; Keil, L. C.; Severs, W. B.

    1992-01-01

    Infusions of artificial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) into the cerebroventricles of conscious rats can raise CSF pressure (CSFp). This response can be modified by some neuropeptides. One of these, angiotensin, facilitates the rise in CSFp. We measured CSFp in conscious rats with a computerized system and evaluated resistance to CSF outflow during infusion of artificial CSF, with or without angiotensin, from the decay kinetics of superimposed bolus injections. Angiotensin (10 ng/min) raised CSFp (P less than 0.05) compared with solvent, but the resistance to CSF outflow of the two groups was similar (P greater than 0.05). Because CSFp was increased by angiotensin without an increase in the outflow resistance, a change in some volume compartment is likely. Angiotensin may raise CSFp by increasing CSF synthesis; this possibility is supported, since the choroid plexuses contain an intrinsic isorenin-angiotensin system. Alternatively, angiotensin may dilate pial arteries, leading to an increased intracranial blood volume.

  3. Endoscopic repair of spontaneous cerebro-spinal fluid rhinorrhoea: a report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Gendeh, B S; Wormald, P J; Forer, M; Goh, B S; Misiran, K

    2002-12-01

    Three cases of spontaneous Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea were managed at the National University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur. Case 1 had bilateral leak secondary to empty sella syndrome and the rest two cases had unilateral leak. Four transnasal endoscopic approaches were performed on these three cases since March 1999. The role of intrathecal Sodium Fluorescein is highlighted in localising the CSF fistula. Case 3 required postoperative lumbar drain as an adjunct. No recurrent leak was noted on post operative follow up in Case 2 and 3 ranging from nine to thirty two months. A recurrent left leak at six months was noted in Case 1 which could likely be due to her sudden bout of cough attacks and patient refused further surgical intervention. PMID:12733180

  4. Ferritin levels in the cerebrospinal fluid predict Alzheimer's disease outcomes and are regulated by APOE.

    PubMed

    Ayton, Scott; Faux, Noel G; Bush, Ashley I

    2015-05-19

    Brain iron elevation is implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis, but the impact of iron on disease outcomes has not been previously explored in a longitudinal study. Ferritin is the major iron storage protein of the body; by using cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of ferritin as an index, we explored whether brain iron status impacts longitudinal outcomes in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) cohort. We show that baseline CSF ferritin levels were negatively associated with cognitive performance over 7 years in 91 cognitively normal, 144 mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 67 AD subjects, and predicted MCI conversion to AD. Ferritin was strongly associated with CSF apolipoprotein E levels and was elevated by the Alzheimer's risk allele, APOE-ɛ4. These findings reveal that elevated brain iron adversely impacts on AD progression, and introduce brain iron elevation as a possible mechanism for APOE-ɛ4 being the major genetic risk factor for AD.

  5. Consensus definitions and application guidelines for control groups in cerebrospinal fluid biomarker studies in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Teunissen, Charlotte; Menge, Til; Altintas, Ayse; Álvarez-Cermeño, José C; Bertolotto, Antonio; Berven, Frode S; Brundin, Lou; Comabella, Manuel; Degn, Matilde; Deisenhammer, Florian; Fazekas, Franz; Franciotta, Diego; Frederiksen, Jette L; Galimberti, Daniela; Gnanapavan, Sharmilee; Hegen, Harald; Hemmer, Bernhard; Hintzen, Rogier; Hughes, Steve; Iacobaeus, Ellen; Kroksveen, Ann C; Kuhle, Jens; Richert, John; Tumani, Hayrettin; Villar, Luisa M; Drulovic, Jelena; Dujmovic, Irena; Khalil, Michael; Bartos, Ales

    2013-11-01

    The choice of appropriate control group(s) is critical in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker research in multiple sclerosis (MS). There is a lack of definitions and nomenclature of different control groups and a rationalized application of different control groups. We here propose consensus definitions and nomenclature for the following groups: healthy controls (HCs), spinal anesthesia subjects (SASs), inflammatory neurological disease controls (INDCs), peripheral inflammatory neurological disease controls (PINDCs), non-inflammatory neurological controls (NINDCs), symptomatic controls (SCs). Furthermore, we discuss the application of these control groups in specific study designs, such as for diagnostic biomarker studies, prognostic biomarker studies and therapeutic response studies. Application of these uniform definitions will lead to better comparability of biomarker studies and optimal use of available resources. This will lead to improved quality of CSF biomarker research in MS and related disorders.

  6. Pneumococcal antigen detection in cerebrospinal fluid: a comparative study on counter immunoelectrophoresis, latex agglutination and coagglutination.

    PubMed

    Rai, G P; Zachariah, K; Sharma, R; Phadke, S; Belapurkar, K M

    2003-07-01

    The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and predictive values of counter immunoelectrophoresis (CIE), latex agglutination (LA) and coagglutination (CoAg) tests were compared for detection of pneumococcal antigen in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients suspected of meningitis. A total of 95 CSF samples comprising 15 culture proven, 47 clinically suspected but culture negative cases of meningitis and 33 controls were screened by above tests. Among three tests, LA was found to have high sensitivity and moderately high negative predictive value than CIE and CoAg tests. However, CIE had slightly better specificity than LA and CoAg tests. Accuracywise CIE and LA tests were comparable than CoAg test. CIE and LA tests had high positive predictive value than CoAg test.

  7. Detection of immunoglobulin M in cerebrospinal fluid from syphilis patients by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J B; Farshy, C E; Hunter, E F; Hambie, E A; Wobig, G H; Larsen, S A

    1986-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were evaluated in an immunoglobulin M enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (IgM ELISA) for syphilis with sonic extracts of Treponema pallidum coated on polystyrene plates. The ELISA procedure was reproducible, and T. pallidum antigens were stable., A total of 15 CSF samples from patients with neurosyphilis, 18 CSF samples from patients with syphilis, 12 CSF samples from patients treated for syphilis, and 494 CSF samples from patients with neurologic or other systemic diseases were tested. The IgM ELISA gave reactive results in all of six symptomatic and congenital neurosyphilitic patients and none of nine asymptomatic neurosyphilitic patients. Of 524 CSF samples from nonneurosyphilitic individuals, 513 were nonreactive, resulting in 98% test specificity. The IgM ELISA in CSF should prove to be useful for confirmation of symptomatic neurosyphilis. PMID:3533984

  8. Normal pressure hydrocephalus. Influences on cerebral hemodynamic and cerebrospinal fluid pressure--chemical autoregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.S.; Tachibana, H.; Hardenberg, J.P.; Dowell, R.E. Jr.; Kitagawa, Y.; Mortel, K.F.

    1984-02-01

    Blood flow in the cerebral gray matter was measured in normal pressure hydrocephalus and Alzheimer disease by 133Xe inhalation. Flow values in the frontal and temporal gray matter increased after lowering cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure by lumbar puncture in normal pressure hydrocephalus (p less than 0.05) and also after shunting. One case with cerebral complications did not improve clinically. In Alzheimer disease the reverse (decreases in flow in the gray matter) occurred after removal of CSF. Normal pressure hydrocephalus was associated with impaired cerebral vasomotor responsiveness during 100% oxygen and 5% carbon dioxide inhalation. This complication was restored toward normal after CSF removal and/or shunting. Cerebral blood flow measurements appear to be useful for confirming the diagnosis of normal pressure hydrocephalus and predicting the clinical benefit from shunting.

  9. Spontaneous sphenoid sinus cerebrospinal fluid leak and meningoencephalocele - are they due to patent Sternberg's canal?

    PubMed

    Tomaszewska, Magdalena; Brożek-Mądry, Eliza; Krzeski, Antoni

    2015-07-01

    Sternberg's canal is a congenital bony defect in the lateral wall of the sphenoid sinus. If it persists to adulthood, it may become a source of spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak (CSF) and meningoencephalocele. The aim of the study was to describe the authors' experience and review articles related to spontaneous sphenoid sinus CSF leaks and Sternberg's canal. We analysed patients managed surgicallly due to sphenoid sinus CSF leak and performed a PubMed database search. Two female patients with spontaneous CSF leak of sphenoid origin were found. Both patients underwent surgery with the endoscopic endonasal approach, and the defect was closed using the multi-layer technique. Twelve articles related to CSF leaks of sphenoid origin (due to Sternberg's canal) were found in the PubMed database. Lines of lesser resistance within sphenoid bone may underlie CSF leak pathology together with intracranial hypertension. The endoscopic transnasal approach to the sphenoid sinus is an excellent alternative to standard transcranial procedures. PMID:26240642

  10. Longitudinal study of cerebrospinal fluid amyloid proteins and apolipoprotein E in patients with probable Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Pirttilä, T; Koivisto, K; Mehta, P D; Reinikainen, K; Kim, K S; Kilkku, O; Heinonen, E; Soininen, H; Riekkinen, P; Wisniewski, H M

    1998-06-12

    Levels of soluble amyloid beta protein (sAbeta), amyloid beta precursor protein (APP) and apolipoprotein E (apoE) were examined in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained twice, at baseline and after 3-year follow-up, from 25 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD). Levels of sAbeta and apoE from patients with the apoE4 allele decreased with time, whereas the levels were similar in patients without apoE4 allele. Changes of sAbeta and apoE concentrations correlated significantly with those of mini-mental state examination (MMSE) scores. Levels of sAbeta did not change with time in patients with mild dementia, whereas they decreased significantly in patients with moderate dementia. ApoE concentrations decreased in both groups whereas APP levels were similar. We conclude that measurements of CSF sAbeta and apoE levels may be helpful in monitoring progression of the disease. PMID:9672379

  11. Knowledge-base for interpretation of cerebrospinal fluid data patterns. Essentials in neurology and psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Reiber, Hansotto

    2016-06-01

    The physiological and biophysical knowledge base for interpretations of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) data and reference ranges are essential for the clinical pathologist and neurochemist. With the popular description of the CSF flow dependent barrier function, the dynamics and concentration gradients of blood-derived, brain-derived and leptomeningeal proteins in CSF or the specificity-independent functions of B-lymphocytes in brain also the neurologist, psychiatrist, neurosurgeon as well as the neuropharmacologist may find essentials for diagnosis, research or development of therapies. This review may help to replace the outdated ideas like "leakage" models of the barriers, linear immunoglobulin Index Interpretations or CSF electrophoresis. Calculations, Interpretations and analytical pitfalls are described for albumin quotients, quantitation of immunoglobulin synthesis in Reibergrams, oligoclonal IgG, IgM analysis, the polyspecific ( MRZ- ) antibody reaction, the statistical treatment of CSF data and general quality assessment in the CSF laboratory. The diagnostic relevance is documented in an accompaning review. PMID:27332077

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid constituents of cat vary with susceptibility to motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucot, James B.; Crampton, George H.; Matson, Wayne R.; Gamache, Paul H.

    1989-01-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid drawn from the fourth ventricles of the brains of cats during and after the development of motion sickness was studied to determine what neurotransmitters may be involved in the development of the sickness. The analytical procedure, which uses HPLC coupled with n-electrode coulometric electrochemical detection to measure many compounds with picogram sensitivity, is described. Baseline levels of DOPAC, MHPGSO4, uric acid, DA, 5-HIAA, and HVA were lower on motion and control days in cats which became motion sick when compared with cats which did not. None of the total of 36 identified compounds identified in the samples varied as a function of either exposure to motion or provocation of emesis. It is concluded that susceptibility to motion sickness is a manifestation of individual differences related to fundamental neurochemical composition.

  13. [Chromatographic analysis of low molecular weight fraction of cerebrospinal fluid in children with acute neuroinfections].

    PubMed

    Alekseeva, L A; Shatik, S V; Sorokina, M N; Karasev, V V

    2002-05-01

    Low molecular-weight (oligopeptide) fraction of the cerebrospinal fluid was analyzed by high-performance reversed phase liquid chromatography in 30 children with bacterial and viral neuroinfections. The incidence and height of chromathoraphic peaks in bacterial meningitis depended on the disease etiology, stage, and severity. Qualitative and quantitative composition of low molecular-weight fraction of the liquor varied in patients with viral neuroinfections, depending on the severity of the cerebral parenchyma involvement. Differences in chromatographic profiles in complicated and uneventful course of neuroinfections indicate a possible damaging, protective, or regulatory effect of the liquor peptides. These data focus the attention on the role of oligopeptides in the genesis of neuroinfectious process, significance of search for peptide markers, their further isolation, identification, and development of test systems available for clinical application.

  14. Comparison of Three Nucleic Acid Amplification Assays of Cerebrospinal Fluid for Diagnosis of Cytomegalovirus Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Bestetti, Arabella; Pierotti, Chiara; Terreni, Mariarosa; Zappa, Alessandra; Vago, Luca; Lazzarin, Adriano; Cinque, Paola

    2001-01-01

    The diagnostic reliabilities of three cytomegalovirus (CMV) nucleic acid amplification assays of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were compared by using CSF samples from human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with a postmortem histopathological diagnosis of CMV encephalitis (n = 15) or other central nervous system conditions (n = 16). By using a nested PCR assay, the quantitative COBAS AMPLICOR CMV MONITOR PCR, and the NucliSens CMV pp67 nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assay, sensitivities were 93.3, 86.6, and 93.3%, respectively, and specificities were 93.7, 93.7, and 87.5%, respectively. The COBAS AMPLICOR assay revealed significantly higher CMV DNA levels in patients with diffuse ventriculoencephalitis than in patients with focal periventricular lesions. PMID:11230445

  15. Endoscopic Repair of Frontal Sinus Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks after Firearm Injuries: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Camilo; Solares, C. Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe two cases of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak repair after gunshot wound to the head. Design Retrospective review of two cases. Settings A large regional tertiary care facility. Participants Two patients with gunshot wounds to the skull base. Main Outcome Measures Preoperative and postoperative physical and radiologic findings. Results Patients in this series underwent endoscopic surgery, debridement, and repair of CSF leaks after gunshot wounds to the head. To date, the patients are without CSF leak. Conclusions Endoscopic closure of anterior skull base CSF leaks in patients with gunshot wounds can be safe and effective. Treatment should be decided by the severity of neurologic deterioration throughout the emergency period and the existence or absence of associated intracranial lesions. Timing for surgery should be decided with great care and with a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:26251818

  16. A new densovirus in cerebrospinal fluid from a case of anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Phan, Tung Gia; Messacar, Kevin; Dominguez, Samuel R; da Costa, Antonio Charlys; Deng, Xutao; Delwart, Eric

    2016-11-01

    We characterized the genome of a densovirus, tentatively called human CSF-associated densovirus 1 (HuCSFDV1), in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from a human case of encephalitis with antibodies against the N-methyl D-aspartate receptor. The presence of the viral genome in CSF was independently confirmed. This virus, which is proposed to be a member of a new species in the genus Iteradensovirus of the subfamily Densovirinae, showed the typical two ORFs encoding nonstructural and structural proteins with low-level identities of 22 and 16 % to the closest known densovirus relative. No other eukaryotic viral sequences were detected using deep sequencing. The replication and pathogenicity in humans of this virus, which belongs to a viral subfamily whose members are only known to replicate in invertebrates, remain to be demonstrated. Alternative explanations for the detection of densovirus DNA in CSF are discussed. PMID:27522586

  17. Hepatic cerebrospinal fluid pseudocyst: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, C T; Pai, C C; Tsai, T H; Chiang, Y H; Su, Y H

    2006-03-01

    An abdominal pseudocyst is a rare, but important complication in patients with a ventriculo-peritoneal (VP) shunt insertion. Several predisposing factors for this complication have been suggested, including infection, obstruction or dislodgement, but the pathophysiology is still unknown. However, the abdominal inflammatory process is accepted widely as a hypothesis for the formation of an abdominal pseudocyst. In this study, we report the case of a 21-year-old male that presented with a high-grade fever, poor appetite, shortness of breath and unconsciousness 1 week after receiving a VP shunt insertion for obstructive hydrocephalus. Ultrasonography and computed tomographic scans of the abdomen revealed a well-defined large hepatic cyst surrounding the peritoneal tube of the VP shunt. A hepatic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cyst was diagnosed and Staphylococcus epidermis was cultured via CSF. After externalization of the VP shunt and adequate antibiotic treatment, the hepatic cyst was resolved. There was no recurrence observed in the regular follow up. PMID:16679653

  18. Refractory Thoracolumbar Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak after Multiple Spinal Ependymoma Resections Treated with External Ventricular Drainage.

    PubMed

    Galgano, Michael A; Hazama, Ali; Deshaies, Eric M

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective Temporary external ventricular drainage for refractory thoracolumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak is not reported in the literature. We describe a recent case that utilized this technique. Methods Retrospective review of the patient's case notes was performed and the literature on this subject reviewed. Results The patient underwent multiple complex spinal surgeries for resection of innumerable metastatic ependymoma lesions. A case of significant refractory CSF leak developed and as a last resort a right frontal external ventricular drain was placed. The CSF leak ceased, and the patient was eventually discharged home without further complication. Conclusion External ventricular drainage can be a viable option for temporary proximal CSF diversion to treat refractory thoracolumbar CSF leaks. PMID:26835210

  19. How appropriate are cerebrospinal fluid polymerase chain reaction requests for suspected central nervous system infections?

    PubMed

    Mamoojee, Yaasir; Chadwick, David

    2011-12-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays have become the main diagnostic tests for central nervous system viral infections in recent years. Previous studies have suggested algorithms based on CSF leukocyte count and total protein levels to determine when CSF PCR assays are indicated. Based on these criteria, 1,469 CSF PCR tests requested over a two-year period were reviewed. A proportion of positive PCR results were found in children with normal CSF, unlike in adults where such occurrences were extremely rare. The results suggest that applying a strategy of screening CSF specimens using leukocyte count, glucose and protein, at least in adults, may have avoided more than half of CSF PCR requests with little detriment to patient care and considerable cost savings. Larger prospective studies are needed to determine whether algorithms using standard CSF parameters and clinical information can optimise the use of CSF PCR assays in clinical practice. PMID:22268308

  20. Zebrafish models of idiopathic scoliosis link cerebrospinal fluid flow defects to spine curvature.

    PubMed

    Grimes, D T; Boswell, C W; Morante, N F C; Henkelman, R M; Burdine, R D; Ciruna, B

    2016-06-10

    Idiopathic scoliosis (IS) affects 3% of children worldwide, yet the mechanisms underlying this spinal deformity remain unknown. Here we show that ptk7 mutant zebrafish, a faithful developmental model of IS, exhibit defects in ependymal cell cilia development and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow. Transgenic reintroduction of Ptk7 in motile ciliated lineages prevents scoliosis in ptk7 mutants, and mutation of multiple independent cilia motility genes yields IS phenotypes. We define a finite developmental window for motile cilia in zebrafish spine morphogenesis. Notably, restoration of cilia motility after the onset of scoliosis blocks spinal curve progression. Together, our results indicate a critical role for cilia-driven CSF flow in spine development, implicate irregularities in CSF flow as an underlying biological cause of IS, and suggest that noninvasive therapeutic intervention may prevent severe scoliosis.

  1. Jacalin-unbound fraction of Taenia saginata in immunodiagnosis of neurocysticercosis in human cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    da Silva Nunes, Daniela; da Silva Ribeiro, Vanessa; Manhani, Marianna Nascimento; Costa-Cruz, Julia Maria

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate jacalin-bound fraction (JBF) and jacalin-unbound fraction (JUF) of the total saline extract from Taenia saginata metacestodes for human neurocysticercosis (NC) immunodiagnosis in cerebrospinal fluid. Total extract, JBF, and JUF were separated by affinity chromatography using Sepharose(®)-jacalin and were tested in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blotting (WB) to detect immunoglobulin G. In ELISA test, JUF showed the higher diagnostic efficiency and specificity indexes, 92% and 100%, respectively. In WB, 5 immunodominant proteins (39-42, 47-52, 64-68, 70, and 75 kDa) were detected when using JUF. In conclusion, the results achieved demonstrate that JUF, obtained from T. saginata metacestodes, are an important source of specific peptides and are efficient in the diagnosis of NC.

  2. Spontaneous sphenoid sinus cerebrospinal fluid leak and meningoencephalocele - are they due to patent Sternberg's canal?

    PubMed

    Tomaszewska, Magdalena; Brożek-Mądry, Eliza; Krzeski, Antoni

    2015-07-01

    Sternberg's canal is a congenital bony defect in the lateral wall of the sphenoid sinus. If it persists to adulthood, it may become a source of spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak (CSF) and meningoencephalocele. The aim of the study was to describe the authors' experience and review articles related to spontaneous sphenoid sinus CSF leaks and Sternberg's canal. We analysed patients managed surgicallly due to sphenoid sinus CSF leak and performed a PubMed database search. Two female patients with spontaneous CSF leak of sphenoid origin were found. Both patients underwent surgery with the endoscopic endonasal approach, and the defect was closed using the multi-layer technique. Twelve articles related to CSF leaks of sphenoid origin (due to Sternberg's canal) were found in the PubMed database. Lines of lesser resistance within sphenoid bone may underlie CSF leak pathology together with intracranial hypertension. The endoscopic transnasal approach to the sphenoid sinus is an excellent alternative to standard transcranial procedures.

  3. Zebrafish models of idiopathic scoliosis link cerebrospinal fluid flow defects to spine curvature.

    PubMed

    Grimes, D T; Boswell, C W; Morante, N F C; Henkelman, R M; Burdine, R D; Ciruna, B

    2016-06-10

    Idiopathic scoliosis (IS) affects 3% of children worldwide, yet the mechanisms underlying this spinal deformity remain unknown. Here we show that ptk7 mutant zebrafish, a faithful developmental model of IS, exhibit defects in ependymal cell cilia development and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow. Transgenic reintroduction of Ptk7 in motile ciliated lineages prevents scoliosis in ptk7 mutants, and mutation of multiple independent cilia motility genes yields IS phenotypes. We define a finite developmental window for motile cilia in zebrafish spine morphogenesis. Notably, restoration of cilia motility after the onset of scoliosis blocks spinal curve progression. Together, our results indicate a critical role for cilia-driven CSF flow in spine development, implicate irregularities in CSF flow as an underlying biological cause of IS, and suggest that noninvasive therapeutic intervention may prevent severe scoliosis. PMID:27284198

  4. Quantification of Amino Acid Neurotransmitters in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with Neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, José Augusto; Bertolucci, Paulo Henrique Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Background : Neurocysticercosis is a parasitic disease that affects the central nervous system. Its main clinical manifestations are epileptic seizures. The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation between neurotransmitter concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the different evolutive forms of neurocysticercosis with or without seizures. Methods : Neurotransmitter concentrations (Aspartate, Glutamate, GABA, Glutamine, Glycine, Taurine) were determined in CSF samples from 42 patients with neurocysticercosis divided into patients with the active cystic form (n = 24, 12 with and 12 without seizures) and patients with calcified form (n = 18, 12 with and 6 without seizures), and a control group consisting of 59 healthy subjects. Results : Alterations in amino acid concentration were observed in all patients with neurocysticercosis. Conclusion : We conclude that disturbances in amino acid metabolism accompany the presentation of neurocysticercosis. Replacement of the terms inactive cyst by reactive inactive cyst and calcification by reactive calcification is suggested. PMID:26157521

  5. The Relief of Unilateral Painful Thoracic Radiculopathy without Headache from Remote Spontaneous Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak

    PubMed Central

    Son, Byung-chul; Ha, Sang-woo; Lee, Si-hoon; Choi, Jin-gyu

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) caused by spontaneous spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks produces orthostatic headaches. Although upper arm pain or paresthesia is reportedly associated with SIH from spontaneous spinal CSF leak in the presence of orthostatic headache, low thoracic radicular pain due to spontaneous spinal CSF leak unassociated with postural headache is extremely rare. We report a 67-year-old female who presented with chronic, positional radicular right T11 pain. Computed tomography myelography showed a spontaneous lumbar spinal CSF leak at L2-3 and repeated lumbar epidural blood patches significantly alleviated chronic, positional, and lower thoracic radiculopathic pain. The authors speculate that a chronic spontaneous spinal CSF leak not severe enough to cause typical orthostatic headache or epidural CSF collection may cause local symptoms such as irritation of a remote nerve root. There might be considerable variabilities in the clinical features of SIH which can present a diagnostic challenge. PMID:27445613

  6. Proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) with domoic acid toxicosis identifies proteins associated with neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Neely, Benjamin A; Soper, Jennifer L; Gulland, Frances M D; Bell, P Darwin; Kindy, Mark; Arthur, John M; Janech, Michael G

    2015-12-01

    Proteomic studies including marine mammals are rare, largely due to the lack of fully sequenced genomes. This has hampered the application of these techniques toward biomarker discovery efforts for monitoring of health and disease in these animals. We conducted a pilot label-free LC-MS/MS study to profile and compare the cerebrospinal fluid from California sea lions with domoic acid toxicosis (DAT) and without DAT. Across 11 samples, a total of 206 proteins were identified (FDR<0.1) using a composite mammalian database. Several peptide identifications were validated using stable isotope labeled peptides. Comparison of spectral counts revealed seven proteins that were elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid from sea lions with DAT: complement C3, complement factor B, dickkopf-3, malate dehydrogenase 1, neuron cell adhesion molecule 1, gelsolin, and neuronal cell adhesion molecule. Immunoblot analysis found reelin to be depressed in the cerebrospinal fluid from California sea lions with DAT. Mice administered domoic acid also had lower hippocampal reelin protein levels suggesting that domoic acid depresses reelin similar to kainic acid. In summary, proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in marine mammals is a useful tool to characterize the underlying molecular pathology of neurodegenerative disease. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002105 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002105).

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid HIV-1 compartmentalization in a patient with AIDS and acute varicella-zoster virus meningomyeloradiculitis.

    PubMed

    Falcone, E Liana; Adegbulugbe, Ademiposi A; Sheikh, Virginia; Imamichi, Hiromi; Dewar, Robin L; Hammoud, Dima A; Sereti, Irini; Lane, H Clifford

    2013-09-01

    We report a case of AIDS presenting as varicella-zoster virus (VZV) meningomyeloradiculitis associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) quasispecies compartmentalization within the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and a CSF viral load that was 1 log higher than in peripheral blood. Prolonged antiviral therapy for both VZV and HIV type 1 was associated with partial resolution.

  8. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with a monoclonal antibody for detecting group A meningococcal antigens in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Sugasawara, R J; Prato, C M; Sippel, J E

    1984-02-01

    Hybridomas were produced from spleen cells of BALB/c mice immunized with a membrane preparation from Neisseria meningitidis group A strain 4402 and S194/5.XXOBU.14 myeloma cells. The hybridomas were screened for secretion of antibodies suitable for an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) diagnostic for group A meningococcal meningitis. One hybridoma antibody, 3G7, was directed against the pilus protein. This antibody bound to all six lipopolysaccharide and protein group A meningococcal serotyping strains, as well as to meningococcal strains from serogroups C, W135, and Y, but not to a strain of Escherichia coli, Haemophilus influenzae type b, or to two or more strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Salmonella typhi. The ELISA used on antibody, antigen, antibody-conjugate sandwich. Rabbit anti-meningococcal serum was the coating antibody for the antibody sandwich, cerebrospinal fluids contained the bacterial antigens, and 3G7-alkaline phosphatase conjugate was the detecting antibody. The monoclonal antibody conjugate ELISA system was able to detect group A meningococcal antigens in 21 of 25 cerebrospinal fluid specimens that were positive in an immune rabbit serum conjugate ELISA; cerebrospinal fluid samples from patients with Haemophilus meningitis served as the controls. Counterimmunoelectrophoresis detected meningococcal antigens in 16 of the same 25 cerebrospinal fluid samples.

  9. Subpeak regional analysis of intracranial pressure waveform morphology based on cerebrospinal fluid hydrodynamics in the cerebral aqueduct and prepontine cistern.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Robert B; Baldwin, Kevin; Vespa, Paul; Bergsneider, Marvin; Hu, Xiao

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between intracranial pressure (ICP) pulse waveform morphology and selected hydrodynamic metrics of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) movement using a novel method for ICP pulse pressure regional analysis based on the Morphological Clustering and Analysis of Continuous Intracranial Pulse (MOCAIP) algorithm.

  10. Proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) with domoic acid toxicosis identifies proteins associated with neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Neely, Benjamin A; Soper, Jennifer L; Gulland, Frances M D; Bell, P Darwin; Kindy, Mark; Arthur, John M; Janech, Michael G

    2015-12-01

    Proteomic studies including marine mammals are rare, largely due to the lack of fully sequenced genomes. This has hampered the application of these techniques toward biomarker discovery efforts for monitoring of health and disease in these animals. We conducted a pilot label-free LC-MS/MS study to profile and compare the cerebrospinal fluid from California sea lions with domoic acid toxicosis (DAT) and without DAT. Across 11 samples, a total of 206 proteins were identified (FDR<0.1) using a composite mammalian database. Several peptide identifications were validated using stable isotope labeled peptides. Comparison of spectral counts revealed seven proteins that were elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid from sea lions with DAT: complement C3, complement factor B, dickkopf-3, malate dehydrogenase 1, neuron cell adhesion molecule 1, gelsolin, and neuronal cell adhesion molecule. Immunoblot analysis found reelin to be depressed in the cerebrospinal fluid from California sea lions with DAT. Mice administered domoic acid also had lower hippocampal reelin protein levels suggesting that domoic acid depresses reelin similar to kainic acid. In summary, proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in marine mammals is a useful tool to characterize the underlying molecular pathology of neurodegenerative disease. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002105 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002105). PMID:26364553

  11. A differentially expressed set of microRNAs in cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) can diagnose CNS malignancies.

    PubMed

    Drusco, Alessandra; Bottoni, Arianna; Laganà, Alessandro; Acunzo, Mario; Fassan, Matteo; Cascione, Luciano; Antenucci, Anna; Kumchala, Prasanthi; Vicentini, Caterina; Gardiman, Marina P; Alder, Hansjuerg; Carosi, Mariantonia A; Ammirati, Mario; Gherardi, Stefano; Luscrì, Marilena; Carapella, Carmine; Zanesi, Nicola; Croce, Carlo M

    2015-08-28

    Central Nervous System malignancies often require stereotactic biopsy or biopsy for differential diagnosis, and for tumor staging and grading. Furthermore, stereotactic biopsy can be non-diagnostic or underestimate grading. Hence, there is a compelling need of new diagnostic biomarkers to avoid such invasive procedures. Several biological markers have been proposed, but they can only identify specific prognostic subtype of Central Nervous System tumors, and none of them has found a standardized clinical application.The aim of the study was to identify a Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA signature that could differentiate among Central Nervous System malignancies.CSF total RNA of 34 neoplastic and of 14 non-diseased patients was processed by NanoString. Comparison among groups (Normal, Benign, Glioblastoma, Medulloblastoma, Metastasis and Lymphoma) lead to the identification of a microRNA profile that was further confirmed by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization.Hsa-miR-451, -711, 935, -223 and -125b were significantly differentially expressed among the above mentioned groups, allowing us to draw an hypothetical diagnostic chart for Central Nervous System malignancies.This is the first study to employ the NanoString technique for Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA profiling. In this article, we demonstrated that Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA profiling mirrors Central Nervous System physiologic or pathologic conditions. Although more cases need to be tested, we identified a diagnostic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA signature with good perspectives for future diagnostic clinical applications.

  12. Pharmacokinetics of fluconazole in cerebrospinal fluid and serum of rabbits: validation of an animal model used to measure drug concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Madu, A; Cioffe, C; Mian, U; Burroughs, M; Tuomanen, E; Mayers, M; Schwartz, E; Miller, M

    1994-01-01

    Complete concentration-time data describing the pharmacokinetics of fluconazole in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) following a single dose are not available for humans or animals. We studied the pharmacokinetics of fluconazole with an indwelling intracisternal needle as described by R.G. Dacey and M.A. Sande (Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 6:437-441, 1974). To determine whether the presence of an intracisternal needle alters pharmacokinetics in the CSF, we validated this model with uninfected rabbits by measuring pharmacokinetic constants following direct intracisternal and intravenous administration of fluconazole. Following direct injection, there was no alteration of elimination rates in the CSF with increasing sample number or time. Following intravenous administration, the penetration and kinetic constants were the same in individual animals from which multiple CSF samples were obtained as in a composite subject constructed by pooling virgin samples from different animals. The presence of the intracisternal needle did not alter CSF chemistry or leukocyte counts, and erythrocyte contamination was < 0.001%. While drug concentrations were measured by a microbiological assay, we also compared the sensitivity and reproducibility of a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay with those of the microbiological assay. Following a single intravenous dose, the maximum concentration of the drug in serum, the time to maximum concentration of the drug in serum, the terminal elimination half-life in the CSF, and the percent penetration by fluconazole were 6.12 micrograms/ml, 1 h, 9.0 h, and 84.3%, respectively. We conclude that the sampling of CSF via an indwelling needle does not alter fluconazole pharmacokinetics, cause inflammation, or alter chemical parameters; that the microbiological assay is at least equivalent in sensitivity and reproducibility to the HPLC assay; and that robust parameters describing the pharmacokinetics of fluconazole are possible with this

  13. Pharmacokinetics of fluconazole in cerebrospinal fluid and serum of rabbits: validation of an animal model used to measure drug concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Madu, A; Cioffe, C; Mian, U; Burroughs, M; Tuomanen, E; Mayers, M; Schwartz, E; Miller, M

    1994-09-01

    Complete concentration-time data describing the pharmacokinetics of fluconazole in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) following a single dose are not available for humans or animals. We studied the pharmacokinetics of fluconazole with an indwelling intracisternal needle as described by R.G. Dacey and M.A. Sande (Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 6:437-441, 1974). To determine whether the presence of an intracisternal needle alters pharmacokinetics in the CSF, we validated this model with uninfected rabbits by measuring pharmacokinetic constants following direct intracisternal and intravenous administration of fluconazole. Following direct injection, there was no alteration of elimination rates in the CSF with increasing sample number or time. Following intravenous administration, the penetration and kinetic constants were the same in individual animals from which multiple CSF samples were obtained as in a composite subject constructed by pooling virgin samples from different animals. The presence of the intracisternal needle did not alter CSF chemistry or leukocyte counts, and erythrocyte contamination was < 0.001%. While drug concentrations were measured by a microbiological assay, we also compared the sensitivity and reproducibility of a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay with those of the microbiological assay. Following a single intravenous dose, the maximum concentration of the drug in serum, the time to maximum concentration of the drug in serum, the terminal elimination half-life in the CSF, and the percent penetration by fluconazole were 6.12 micrograms/ml, 1 h, 9.0 h, and 84.3%, respectively. We conclude that the sampling of CSF via an indwelling needle does not alter fluconazole pharmacokinetics, cause inflammation, or alter chemical parameters; that the microbiological assay is at least equivalent in sensitivity and reproducibility to the HPLC assay; and that robust parameters describing the pharmacokinetics of fluconazole are possible with this

  14. Quantitative evaluation of changes in gait after extended cerebrospinal fluid drainage for normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Felix; Hickman, Thu-Trang; Tinl, Megan; Iracheta, Christine; Chen, Grace; Flynn, Patricia; Shuman, Matthew E; Johnson, Tatyana A; Rice, Rebecca R; Rice, Isaac M; Wiemann, Robert; Johnson, Mark D

    2016-06-01

    Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) is characterized by gait instability, urinary incontinence and cognitive dysfunction. These symptoms can be relieved by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage, but the time course and nature of the improvements are poorly characterized. Attempts to prospectively identify iNPH patients responsive to CSF drainage by evaluating presenting gait quality or via extended lumbar cerebrospinal fluid drainage (eLCD) trials are common, but the reliability of such approaches is unclear. Here we combine eLCD trials with computerized quantitative gait measurements to predict shunt responsiveness in patients undergoing evaluation for possible iNPH. In this prospective cohort study, 50 patients presenting with enlarged cerebral ventricles and gait, urinary, and/or cognitive difficulties were evaluated for iNPH using a computerized gait analysis system during a 3day trial of eLCD. Gait speed, stride length, cadence, and the Timed Up and Go test were quantified before and during eLCD. Qualitative assessments of incontinence and cognition were obtained throughout the eLCD trial. Patients who improved after eLCD underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement, and symptoms were reassessed serially over the next 3 to 15months. There was no significant difference in presenting gait characteristics between patients who improved after drainage and those who did not. Gait improvement was not observed until 2 or more days of continuous drainage in most cases. Symptoms improved after eLCD in 60% of patients, and all patients who improved after eLCD also improved after shunt placement. The degree of improvement after eLCD correlated closely with that observed after shunt placement.

  15. Pregnancy influences the plasma pharmacokinetics but not the cerebrospinal fluid pharmacokinetics of raltegravir: a preclinical investigation.

    PubMed

    Mahat, Mahamad Yunnus A; Thippeswamy, B S; Khan, Farhin R; Edunuri, Ramya; Nidhyanandan, Saranya; Chaudhary, Shilpee

    2014-12-18

    Alterations in antiretroviral pharmacokinetics during pregnancy must be understood for the drugs to be used safely and effectively. Present study is an attempt to understand the potential changes in raltegravir plasma and cerebrospinal fluid pharmacokinetics during pregnancy in late pregnant and non-pregnant rats. In vitro plasma protein binding, metabolic stability, intravenous blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and oral pharmacokinetic studies were performed. Raltegravir concentrations in different matrices were measured using LC-MS/MS. Raltegravir plasma protein binding remained similar in both groups, whereas, metabolic stability was significantly lower in pregnant rats than the non-pregnant rats liver microsomes. In oral pharmacokinetic study, peak plasma concentrations and systemic exposures were significantly lower (∼37%) and clearance was significantly higher (∼61%) in late pregnant rats compared to non-pregnant rats. However, unlike plasma pharmacokinetics, CSF pharmacokinetic profile of raltegravir was similar in both pregnant and non-pregnant rats. Following intravenous administration, raltegravir showed higher BBB permeability in pregnant rats compared to non-pregnant rats. But the mean CSF-to-plasma ratio was significantly higher in pregnant rats compared to non-pregnant rats suggesting higher brain penetration in pregnant rats. In conclusion, pregnancy significantly affected the plasma pharmacokinetics, whereas cerebrospinal fluid pharmacokinetics remained fairly similar in pregnant and non-pregnant rats. Although current plasma pharmacokinetic data is in contradiction to the reported human data, pregnancy-specific pharmacokinetic changes observed in the current study emphasize the need for close therapeutic monitoring while treating the pregnant population and also warrants the need for additional clinical data with larger group of patients.

  16. Enantioselective analysis of proteinogenic amino acids in cerebrospinal fluid by capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Prior, Amir; Sánchez-Hernández, Laura; Sastre-Toraño, Javier; Marina, Maria Luisa; de Jong, Gerhardus J; Somsen, Govert W

    2016-09-01

    d-Amino acids (AAs) are increasingly being recognized as essential molecules in biological systems. Enantioselective analysis of proteinogenic AAs in biological samples was accomplished by CE-MS employing β-CD as chiral selector and ESI via sheath-liquid (SL) interfacing. Prior to analysis, AAs were fully derivatized with FMOC, improving AA-enantiomer separation and ESI efficiency. In order to optimize the separation and MS detection of FMOC-AAs, the effects of type and concentration of CD in the BGE, the composition of the SL, and MS-interfacing parameters were evaluated. Using a BGE of 10 mM β-CD in 50 mM ammonium bicarbonate (pH 8) containing 15% v/v isopropanol, a SL of isopropanol-water-1 M ammonium bicarbonate (50:50:1, v/v/v) at a flow rate of 3 μL/min, and a nebulizer gas pressure of 2 psi, 15 proteinogenic AAs could be detected with enantioresolutions up to 3.5 and detection limits down to 0.9 μM (equivalent to less than 3 pg AA injected). The selectivity of the method was demonstrated by the analysis of spiked cerebrospinal fluid, allowing specific detection of d-AAs. Repeatability and linearity obtained for cerebrospinal fluid were similar to standard solutions, with peak area and migration-time RSDs (n = 5) below 16.2 and 1.6%, respectively, and a linear response (R(2) ≥ 0.977) in the 3-90 μM range. PMID:27465690

  17. Attenuated antiaggregation effects of magnetite nanoparticles in cerebrospinal fluid of people with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Gažová, Zuzana; Antošová, Andrea; Krištofiková, Zdena; Bartoš, Aleš; Ríčný, Jan; Cechová, Linda; Klaschka, Jan; Rípová, Daniela

    2010-11-01

    It is well known that oligomeric/aggregated amyloid β peptides are a key player in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and that different nanoparticles influence oligomerization/aggregation processes in experiments in vitro. Our previous results demonstrated antiaggregation effects of magnetite nanoparticles in the case of protein lysozyme, however, they have yet to be supported by biological samples containing peptides/proteins preaggregated in vivo. In the study, Thioflavin T based fluorescence was evaluated on cerebrospinal fluid samples from people with Alzheimer's disease/multiple sclerosis and corresponding age-related controls using magnetite nanoparticles incubated for 24 h. Our results are as follows: (i) fluorescence of samples without nanoparticles was significantly higher in both older groups (old controls and people with Alzheimer's disease) than in those of younger (young controls and people with multiple sclerosis), (ii) nanoparticles did not markedly influence a fluorescence intensity in young people but eliminated it in both old groups; nevertheless, the effects of nanoparticles were significantly lower in patients with Alzheimer's disease then in the age-matched controls, and finally (iii) significant positive correlation was observed between fluorescence of samples without nanoparticles and levels of phospho-tau. Our results support studies reporting enhanced aggregation of different peptides/proteins occurring during normal aging and demonstrate for the first time that peptides/proteins preaggregated in vivo during Alzheimer's disease are more resistant to the antiaggregation effects of magnetite nanoparticles than those of age-matched controls. A significant correlation with phospho-tau levels indicate that the in vitro test with magnetite nanoparticles and Thioflavin T dye on cerebrospinal fluid could be sensitive to changes mediated by early Alzheimer's disease stages.

  18. Cochlear and cerebrospinal fluid pressure: their inter-relationship and control mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Marchbanks, R J; Reid, A

    1990-06-01

    The patency of the cochlear aqueduct is a key factor in intra-cochlear hydromechanics. If patent, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) provides the reference pressure for the perilymph and also to a large extent the endolymph, since Reissner's membrane can only withstand a relatively small pressure differential. The aqueduct often becomes sealed as a natural process of ageing. In this instance the reference pressure is from a source, its position unknown, within the boundaries of the cochlea itself. Relatively large and rapid changes in the cerebrospinal fluid pressure may result from everyday events such as coughing (ca. 175 mm saline) and sneezing (ca. 250 mm saline). The resistive nature of the cochlear aqueduct and the mechanical compliance of the cochlear windows are probably important factors in limiting the amount of stress, and therefore possible damage, which may occur to the cochlea and cochlear windows for a given pressure change within the CSF system. A narrow aqueduct and compliant cochlear windows reduce the risk of structural damage. In practice, this should mean that the risk of structural damage will be increased by any process which reduces the compliance of one or both of the cochlear windows, for example, extremes of middle ear pressure perhaps brought about by Eustachian tube dysfunction or rapid barometric pressure changes. Techniques are now available which provide non-invasive indirect measures of perilymphatic pressure and CSF-perilymphatic pressure transfer. The tympanic membrane displacement measurement technique has been used to provide reliable measures of perilymphatic pressure and CSF-perilymphatic pressure transfer on an individual subject basis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2194603

  19. Pittsburgh compound B imaging and cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β in a multicentre European memory clinic study

    PubMed Central

    Leuzy, Antoine; Chiotis, Konstantinos; Hasselbalch, Steen G.; Rinne, Juha O.; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Otto, Markus; Lleó, Alberto; Castelo-Branco, Miguel; Santana, Isabel; Johansson, Jarkko; Anderl-Straub, Sarah; von Arnim, Christine A. F.; Beer, Ambros; Blesa, Rafael; Fortea, Juan; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa; Portelius, Erik; Pannee, Josef; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the agreement between data on cerebral amyloidosis, derived using Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography and (i) multi-laboratory INNOTEST enzyme linked immunosorbent assay derived cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of amyloid-β42; (ii) centrally measured cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 using a Meso Scale Discovery enzyme linked immunosorbent assay; and (iii) cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 centrally measured using an antibody-independent mass spectrometry-based reference method. Moreover, we examined the hypothesis that discordance between amyloid biomarker measurements may be due to interindividual differences in total amyloid-β production, by using the ratio of amyloid-β42 to amyloid-β40. Our study population consisted of 243 subjects from seven centres belonging to the Biomarkers for Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Disease Initiative, and included subjects with normal cognition and patients with mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer’s disease dementia, frontotemporal dementia, and vascular dementia. All had Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography data, cerebrospinal fluid INNOTEST amyloid-β42 values, and cerebrospinal fluid samples available for reanalysis. Cerebrospinal fluid samples were reanalysed (amyloid-β42 and amyloid-β40) using Meso Scale Discovery electrochemiluminescence enzyme linked immunosorbent assay technology, and a novel, antibody-independent, mass spectrometry reference method. Pittsburgh compound B standardized uptake value ratio results were scaled using the Centiloid method. Concordance between Meso Scale Discovery/mass spectrometry reference measurement procedure findings and Pittsburgh compound B was high in subjects with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease, while more variable results were observed for cognitively normal and non-Alzheimer’s disease groups. Agreement between Pittsburgh compound B classification and Meso Scale Discovery/mass spectrometry

  20. Pittsburgh compound B imaging and cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β in a multicentre European memory clinic study.

    PubMed

    Leuzy, Antoine; Chiotis, Konstantinos; Hasselbalch, Steen G; Rinne, Juha O; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Otto, Markus; Lleó, Alberto; Castelo-Branco, Miguel; Santana, Isabel; Johansson, Jarkko; Anderl-Straub, Sarah; von Arnim, Christine A F; Beer, Ambros; Blesa, Rafael; Fortea, Juan; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa; Portelius, Erik; Pannee, Josef; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Nordberg, Agneta

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the agreement between data on cerebral amyloidosis, derived using Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography and (i) multi-laboratory INNOTEST enzyme linked immunosorbent assay derived cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of amyloid-β42; (ii) centrally measured cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 using a Meso Scale Discovery enzyme linked immunosorbent assay; and (iii) cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 centrally measured using an antibody-independent mass spectrometry-based reference method. Moreover, we examined the hypothesis that discordance between amyloid biomarker measurements may be due to interindividual differences in total amyloid-β production, by using the ratio of amyloid-β42 to amyloid-β40 Our study population consisted of 243 subjects from seven centres belonging to the Biomarkers for Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Disease Initiative, and included subjects with normal cognition and patients with mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's disease dementia, frontotemporal dementia, and vascular dementia. All had Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography data, cerebrospinal fluid INNOTEST amyloid-β42 values, and cerebrospinal fluid samples available for reanalysis. Cerebrospinal fluid samples were reanalysed (amyloid-β42 and amyloid-β40) using Meso Scale Discovery electrochemiluminescence enzyme linked immunosorbent assay technology, and a novel, antibody-independent, mass spectrometry reference method. Pittsburgh compound B standardized uptake value ratio results were scaled using the Centiloid method. Concordance between Meso Scale Discovery/mass spectrometry reference measurement procedure findings and Pittsburgh compound B was high in subjects with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease, while more variable results were observed for cognitively normal and non-Alzheimer's disease groups. Agreement between Pittsburgh compound B classification and Meso Scale Discovery/mass spectrometry reference

  1. Blood-brain barrier and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier in normal and pathological conditions.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Masaki; Chiba, Yoichi; Murakami, Ryuta; Matsumoto, Koichi; Kawauchi, Machi; Fujihara, Ryuji

    2016-04-01

    Blood-borne substances can invade into the extracellular spaces of the brain via endothelial cells in sites without the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and can travel through the interstitial fluid (ISF) of the brain parenchyma adjacent to non-BBB sites. It has been shown that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drains directly into the blood via the arachnoid villi and also into lymph nodes via the subarachnoid spaces of the brain, while ISF drains into the cervical lymph nodes through perivascular drainage pathways. In addition, the glymphatic pathway of fluids, characterized by para-arterial pathways, aquaporin4-dependent passage through astroglial cytoplasm, interstitial spaces, and paravenous routes, has been established. Meningeal lymphatic vessels along the superior sagittal sinus were very recently discovered. It is known that, in mice, blood-borne substances can be transferred to areas with intact BBB function, such as the medial regions of the hippocampus, presumably through leaky vessels in non-BBB sites. In the present paper, we review the clearance mechanisms of interstitial substances, such as amyloid-β peptides, as well as summarize models of BBB deterioration in response to different types of insults, including acute ischemia followed by reperfusion, hypertension, and chronic hypoperfusion. Lastly, we discuss the relationship between perivascular clearance and brain disorders. PMID:26920424

  2. Human cerebrospinal fluid increases the excitability of pyramidal neurons in the in vitro brain slice

    PubMed Central

    Bjorefeldt, Andreas; Andreasson, Ulf; Daborg, Jonny; Riebe, Ilse; Wasling, Pontus; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hanse, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The composition of brain extracellular fluid is shaped by a continuous exchange of substances between the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid. The CSF is known to contain a wide range of endogenous neuromodulatory substances, but their collective influence on neuronal activity has been poorly investigated. We show here that replacing artificial CSF (aCSF), routinely used for perfusion of brain slices in vitro, with human CSF (hCSF) powerfully boosts spontaneous firing of CA1, CA3 and layer 5 pyramidal neurons in the rat brain slice. CA1 pyramidal neurons in hCSF display lowered firing thresholds, more depolarized resting membrane potentials and reduced input resistance, mimicking properties of pyramidal neurons recorded in vivo. The increased excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons was completely occluded by intracellular application of GTPγS, suggesting that endogenous neuromodulators in hCSF act on G-protein coupled receptors to enhance excitability. We found no increase in spontaneous inhibitory synaptic transmission by hCSF, indicating a differential effect on glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. Our findings highlight a previously unknown function of the CSF in promoting spontaneous excitatory activity, and may help to explain differences observed in the activity of pyramidal neurons recorded in vivo and in vitro. PMID:25556798

  3. Affinity proteomic profiling of plasma, cerebrospinal fluid, and brain tissue within multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Byström, Sanna; Ayoglu, Burcu; Häggmark, Anna; Mitsios, Nicholas; Hong, Mun-Gwan; Drobin, Kimi; Forsström, Björn; Fredolini, Claudia; Khademi, Mohsen; Amor, Sandra; Uhlén, Mathias; Olsson, Tomas; Mulder, Jan; Nilsson, Peter; Schwenk, Jochen M

    2014-11-01

    The brain is a vital organ and because it is well shielded from the outside environment, possibilities for noninvasive analysis are often limited. Instead, fluids taken from the spinal cord or circulatory system are preferred sources for the discovery of candidate markers within neurological diseases. In the context of multiple sclerosis (MS), we applied an affinity proteomic strategy and screened 22 plasma samples with 4595 antibodies (3450 genes) on bead arrays, then defined 375 antibodies (334 genes) for targeted analysis in a set of 172 samples and finally used 101 antibodies (43 genes) on 443 plasma as well as 573 cerebrospinal spinal fluid (CSF) samples. This revealed alteration of protein profiles in relation to MS subtypes for IRF8, IL7, METTL14, SLC30A7, and GAP43. Respective antibodies were subsequently used for immunofluorescence on human post-mortem brain tissue with MS pathology for expression and association analysis. There, antibodies for IRF8, IL7, and METTL14 stained neurons in proximity of lesions, which highlighted these candidate protein targets for further studies within MS and brain tissue. The affinity proteomic translation of profiles discovered by profiling human body fluids and tissue provides a powerful strategy to suggest additional candidates to studies of neurological disorders.

  4. Effects of irregular cerebrospinal fluid production rate in human brain ventricular system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadzri, Edi Azali; Shamsudin, Amir Hamzah; Osman, Kahar; Abdul Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq; Aziz, Azian Abd

    2012-06-01

    Hydrocephalus is an abnormal accumulation of fluid in the ventricles and cavities in the brain. It occurs when the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow or absorption is blocked or when excessive CSF is secreted. The excessive accumulation of CSF results in an abnormal widening of the ventricles. This widening creates potentially harmful pressure on the tissues of the brain. In this study, flow analysis of CSF was conducted on a three-dimensional model of the third ventricle and aqueduct of Sylvius, derived from MRI scans. CSF was modeled as Newtonian Fluid and its flow through the region of interest (ROI) was done using EFD. Lab software. Different steady flow rates through the Foramen of Monro, classified by normal and hydrocephalus cases, were modeled to investigate its effects. The results show that, for normal and hydrocephalus cases, the pressure drop of CSF flow across the third ventricle was observed to be linearly proportionally to the production rate increment. In conclusion, flow rates that cause pressure drop of 5 Pa was found to be the threshold for the initial sign of hydrocephalus.

  5. The concentration of erlotinib in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with brain metastasis from non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    DENG, YANMING; FENG, WEINENG; WU, JING; CHEN, ZECHENG; TANG, YICONG; ZHANG, HUA; LIANG, JIANMIAO; XIAN, HAIBING; ZHANG, SHUNDA

    2014-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that erlotinib is effective in treating patients with brain metastasis from non-small-cell lung cancer. However, the number of studies determining the erlotinib concentration in these patients is limited. The purpose of this study was to measure the concentration of erlotinib in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with brain metastasis from non-small-cell lung carcinoma. Six patients were treated with the standard recommended daily dose of erlotinib (150 mg) for 4 weeks. All the patients had previously received chemotherapy, but no brain radiotherapy. At the end of the treatment period, blood plasma and cerebrospinal fluid samples were collected and the erlotinib concentration was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). The average erlotinib concentration in the blood plasma and the cerebrospinal fluid was 717.7±459.7 and 23.7±13.4 ng/ml, respectively. The blood-brain barrier permeation rate of erlotinib was found to be 4.4±3.2%. In patients with partial response (PR), stable disease (SD) and progressive disease (PD), the average concentrations of erlotinib in the cerebrospinal fluid were 35.5±19.0, 19.1±8.7 and 16.4±5.9 ng/ml, respectively. In addition, the efficacy rate of erlotinib for metastatic brain lesions was 33.3%, increasing to 50% in patients with EGFR mutations. However, erlotinib appeared to be ineffective in cases with wild-type EGFR. In conclusion, a relatively high concentration of erlotinib was detected in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer. Thus, erlotinib may be considered as a treatment option for this patient population. PMID:24649318

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid ionic regulation, cerebral blood flow, and glucose use during chronic metabolic alkalosis

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeck, H.K.; Kuschinsky, W. )

    1989-10-01

    Chronic metabolic alkalosis was induced in rats by combining a low K+ diet with a 0.2 M NaHCO3 solution as drinking fluid for either 15 or 27 days. Local cerebral blood flow and local cerebral glucose utilization were measured in 31 different structures of the brain in conscious animals by means of the iodo-(14C)antipyrine and 2-(14C)deoxy-D-glucose method. The treatment induced moderate (15 days, base excess (BE) 16 mM) to severe (27 days, BE 25 mM) hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis and K+ depletion. During moderate metabolic alkalosis no change in cerebral glucose utilization and blood flow was detectable in most brain structures when compared with controls. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) K+ and H+ concentrations were significantly decreased. During severe hypochloremic alkalosis, cerebral blood flow was decreased by 19% and cerebral glucose utilization by 24% when compared with the control values. The decrease in cerebral blood flow during severe metabolic alkalosis is attributed mainly to the decreased cerebral metabolism and to a lesser extent to a further decrease of the CSF H+ concentration. CSF K+ concentration was not further decreased. The results show an unaltered cerebral blood flow and glucose utilization together with a decrease in CSF H+ and K+ concentrations at moderate metabolic alkalosis and a decrease in cerebral blood flow and glucose utilization together with a further decreased CSF H+ concentration at severe metabolic alkalosis.

  7. Methods for the Specific Detection and Quantitation of Amyloid-β Oligomers in Cerebrospinal Fluid.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Judith; Funke, Susanne Aileen

    2016-05-01

    Protein misfolding and aggregation are fundamental features of the majority of neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease, frontotemporal dementia, and prion diseases. Proteinaceous deposits in the brain of the patient, e.g., amyloid plaques consisting of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide and tangles composed of tau protein, are the hallmarks of AD. Soluble oligomers of Aβ and tau play a fundamental role in disease progression, and specific detection and quantification of the respective oligomeric proteins in cerebrospinal fluid may provide presymptomatically detectable biomarkers, paving the way for early diagnosis or even prognosis. Several studies on the development of techniques for the specific detection of Aβ oligomers were published, but some of the existing tools do not yet seem to be satisfactory, and the study results are contradicting. The detection of oligomers is challenging due to their polymorphous and unstable nature, their low concentration, and the presence of competing proteins and Aβ monomers in body fluids. Here, we present an overview of the current state of the development of methods for Aβ oligomer specific detection and quantitation. The methods are divided in the three subgroups: (i) enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), (ii) methods for single oligomer detection, and (iii) others, which are mainly biosensor based methods. PMID:27163804

  8. Comparison of gel-based methods for the detection of cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea.

    PubMed

    Lescuyer, Pierre; Auer, Lucas; Converset, Véronique; Hochstrasser, Denis F; Landis, Basile N; Burkhard, Pierre R

    2012-07-11

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea is a serious condition that may result in severe complications. Various laboratory tests, relying on the detection of CSF-specific proteins in nasal secretions, have been developed but diagnosis remains challenging. The aim of this study was to evaluate two new methods targeting either ß2-transferrin or beta-trace-protein. Rhinorrhea samples from patients suspected of CSF leakage (n=36) were analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) for CSF rhinorrhea diagnosis. Twelve patients with rhinorrhea strongly suggestive of a CSF leak also underwent a fluorescein test. The same cohort was retrospectively analyzed with a beta-trace protein immunoblot developed in-house (n=36) and a new commercial ß2-transferrin immunofixation assay (Sebia, Evry, France) (n=33). 2-DE was positive in 9 patients suffering from rhinorrhea following skull base fracture (n=3), post-surgery (n=4), or spontaneously (n=2). The 27 remaining cases were negative. These results were confirmed by the beta-trace protein immunoblot and ß2-transferrin immunofixation tests, except for one sample found negative with 2-DE but positive with the two other assays. Results from the three analytical methods were concordant with fluorescein tests. Beta-trace protein immunoblot and ß2-transferrin immunofixation assays are fast and reliable methods that allow detecting CSF leakage in nasal fluid with high sensitivity and specificity.

  9. Quantification of the cerebrospinal fluid from a new whole body MRI sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebret, Alain; Petit, Eric; Durning, Bruno; Hodel, Jérôme; Rahmouni, Alain; Decq, Philippe

    2012-03-01

    Our work aims to develop a biomechanical model of hydrocephalus both intended to perform clinical research and to assist the neurosurgeon in diagnosis decisions. Recently, we have defined a new MR imaging sequence based on SPACE (Sampling Perfection with Application optimized Contrast using different flip-angle Evolution). On these images, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) appears as a homogeneous hypersignal. Therefore such images are suitable for segmentation and for volume assessment of the CSF. In this paper we present a fully automatic 3D segmentation of such SPACE MRI sequences. We choose a topological approach considering that CSF can be modeled as a simply connected object (i.e. a filled sphere). First an initial object which must be strictly included in the CSF and homotopic to a filled sphere, is determined by using a moment-preserving thresholding. Then a priority function based on an Euclidean distance map is computed in order to control the thickening process that adds "simple points" to the initial thresholded object. A point is called simple if its addition or its suppression does not result in change of topology neither for the object, nor for the background. The method is validated by measuring fluid volume of brain phantoms and by comparing our volume assessments on clinical data to those derived from a segmentation controlled by expert physicians. Then we show that a distinction between pathological cases and healthy adult people can be achieved by a linear discriminant analysis on volumes of the ventricular and intracranial subarachnoid spaces.

  10. Homeostasis of cerebrospinal fluid has a role in early brain development.

    PubMed

    Castells, Anna; Parvas, Maryam; Bueno, David

    2012-11-14

    Embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (E-CSF) is a protein-containing fluid present in brain cavities that plays key roles in neuronal development and function. From the beginning of primary brain neurogenesis, E-CSF composition and homeostasis are precisely tuned by a transient blood-CSF barrier function, which controls protein transport and their relative concentration of within-brain cavities. One of the proteins found in E-CSF is ovalbumin, which is postulated to play a role in nutrition. Here, we address the question of whether neuroepithelial progenitor cells in developing chick embryos use ovalbumin as a highly specific nutritional source of amino acids or alternatively whether they use other amino acid sources, despite the fact that they cannot be transported from blood serum to brain cavities under physiological conditions. Although ovalbumin was not found to be a key protein required for neurogenesis and cell survival, our observations reinforce the crucial role of the embryonic blood-CSF barrier, as its precise regulation of protein transport and E-CSF homeostasis ensures the maximum efficiency of neural development.

  11. New understanding of the role of cerebrospinal fluid: offsetting of arterial and brain pulsation and self-dissipation of cerebrospinal fluid pulsatile flow energy.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyung Jay; Yoon, Soo Han; Kang, Jae-Kyu

    2011-06-01

    Many theories have been postulated to date regarding the mechanisms involved in the absorption of the intracranial arterial blood flow energy in the intracranial space, but it is as yet nor clearly defined. The blood flow energy that is transmitted from the heart formulates the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pulsatile flow, and is known to constitute the major energy of the CSF flow, while the bulk flow carries only small energy. The intracranial space that is enclosed in a solid cranium and is an isolate system as in the Monroe-Kellie doctrine, and the authors propose to re-analyze the Monroe-Kellie doctrine concept in terms of energy transfer and dissipation of the Windkessel effect. We propose that the large blood flow energy that initiates in the heart is transferred in order of precedence to the arteries, arterioles, brain parenchyma, and finally to CSF within the cranium, in which the energy is confined and unable to be transferred, so that the final transfer of energy to the CSF pulsatile flow is self-dissipated in terms of direction and chronology in CSF pulsatile flow. In order for the CSF pulsatile flow that is transferred from arterial blood flow energy to be dissipated in the intracranial space, this cannot be explained with bulk flow energy in any perspective, since the pulsatile flow kinetic energy is greater than the bulk flow kinetic energy by at least a 100-fold. The pulsatile flow energy within the closed intracranial space cannot be transferred and is confined, as postulated by the Monroe-Kellie doctrine, and therefore the authors propound that the pulsatile flow dissipates by itself. The dissipation of the CSF pulsatile flow kinetic energy will be in all directions in a diffuse and random manner, and is offset by the CSF flow energy vector due to the CSF mixing process. Such energy dissipation will lead to maintenance of low CSF flow energy, which will result in maintaining low intracranial pressure (ICP), and sufficient brain perfusion. It is our

  12. Soluble CD14 levels in the serum, synovial fluid, and cerebrospinal fluid of patients with various stages of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Lin, B; Noring, R; Steere, A C; Klempner, M S; Hu, L T

    2000-03-01

    Levels of circulating soluble CD14 (sCD14) in patients with various stages of Lyme disease (LD) were examined. Patients with early or untreated late LD had significantly higher levels of sCD14 than did healthy controls (P=.0001 and .0007, respectively); levels returned to normal within 3 months after antibiotic therapy. Patients with persistent posttreatment symptoms of LD had sCD14 levels equivalent to those of healthy controls. Differences in the serum sCD14 levels in patients with various stages of LD are likely to be directly correlated with differences in bacterial burden, suggesting that posttreatment symptoms may not require continued presence of the organism. sCD14 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with any stage of LD were no different from those of control subjects. Levels of synovial fluid sCD14 from patients with Borrelia burgdorferi in their joints were elevated, compared with levels in normal serum, and may play a role in the pathogenesis of arthritis.

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid total tau concentration predicts clinical phenotype in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Filipe Brogueira; Byrne, Lauren; McColgan, Peter; Robertson, Nicola; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Leavitt, Blair R; Zetterberg, Henrik; Wild, Edward J

    2016-10-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a hereditary neurodegenerative condition with no therapeutic intervention known to alter disease progression, but several trials are ongoing and biomarkers of disease progression are needed. Tau is an axonal protein, often altered in neurodegeneration, and recent studies pointed out its role on HD neuropathology. Our goal was to study whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau is a biomarker of disease progression in HD. After informed consent, healthy controls, pre-symptomatic and symptomatic gene expansion carriers were recruited from two HD clinics. All participants underwent assessment with the Unified HD Rating Scale '99 (UHDRS). CSF was obtained according to a standardized lumbar puncture protocol. CSF tau was quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Comparisons between two groups were tested using ancova. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated for disease progression. Significance level was defined as p < 0.05. Seventy-six participants were included in this cross-sectional multicenter international pilot study. Age-adjusted CSF tau was significantly elevated in gene expansion carriers compared with healthy controls (p = 0.002). UHDRS total functional capacity was significantly correlated with CSF tau (r = -0.29, p = 0.004) after adjustment for age, and UHDRS total motor score was significantly correlated with CSF tau after adjustment for age (r = 0.32, p = 0.002). Several UHDRS cognitive tasks were also significantly correlated with CST total tau after age-adjustment. This study confirms that CSF tau concentrations in HD gene mutation carriers are increased compared with healthy controls and reports for the first time that CSF tau concentration is associated with phenotypic variability in HD. These conclusions strengthen the case for CSF tau as a biomarker in HD. In the era of novel targeted approaches to Huntington's disease, reliable biomarkers are needed. We quantified Tau protein, a marker of

  14. The mediational effects of FDG hypometabolism on the association between cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers and neurocognitive function.

    PubMed

    Dowling, N Maritza; Johnson, Sterling C; Gleason, Carey E; Jagust, William J

    2015-01-15

    Positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of tau and amyloid beta42 suggest possible active underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD) including neurometabolic dysfunction and neurodegeneration leading to eventual cognitive decline. But the temporal relationship between CSF, imaging markers of neural function, and cognition has not been described. Using a statistical mediation model, we examined relationships between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analytes (hyperphosphorylated tau (p-Tau(181p)), β-amyloid peptides 1-42 (Aβ(1-42)), total tau (t-Tau), and their ratios); change in cognitive function; and change in [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake using positron emission tomography (PET). We hypothesized that a) abnormal CSF protein values at baseline, result in cognitive declines by decreasing neuronal glucose metabolism across time, and b) the role of altered glucose metabolism in the assumed causal chain varies by brain region and the nature of CSF protein alteration. Data from 412 individuals participating in Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging (ADNI) cohort studies were included in analyses. At baseline, individuals were cognitively normal (N = 82), or impaired: 241 with mild cognitive impairment, and 89 with Alzheimer's disease. A parallel-process latent growth curve model was used to test mediational effects of changes in regional FDG-PET uptake over time in relation to baseline CSF biomarkers and changes in cognition, measured with the 13-item Alzheimer Disease's Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog). Findings suggested a causal sequence of events; specifically, FDG hypometabolism acted as a mediator between antecedent CSF biomarker alterations and subsequent cognitive impairment. Higher baseline concentrations of t-Tau, and p-Tau(181p) were more predictive of decline in cerebral glucose metabolism than lower baseline concentrations of Aβ(1-42). FDG-PET changes appeared to mediate t-Tau or t-Tau/Aβ(1-42)-associated cognitive change across all brain

  15. The Mediational Effects of FDG Hypometabolism on the Association between Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers and Neurocognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, N. Maritza; Johnson, Sterling C.; Gleason, Carey E.; Jagust, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of tau and amyloid beta42 suggest possible active underlying Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) including neurometabolic dysfunction and neurodegeneration leading to eventual cognitive decline. But the temporal relationship between CSF, imaging markers of neural function, and cognition has not been described. Using a statistical mediation model, we examined relationships between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analytes (hyperphosphorylated tau (p-Tau181p), β-amyloid 1–42 (Aβ1–42), total tau (t-Tau), and their ratios); change in cognitive function; and change in [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake using positron emission tomography (PET). We hypothesized that a) abnormal CSF protein values at baseline, result in cognitive declines by decreasing neuronal glucose metabolism across time, and b) the role of altered glucose metabolism in the assumed causal chain varies by brain region and the nature of CSF protein alteration. Data from 412 individuals participating in Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging (ADNI) cohort studies were included in analyses. At baseline, individuals were cognitively normal (N = 82), or impaired: 241 with mild cognitive impairment, and 89 with Alzheimer’s disease. A parallel-process latent growth curve model was used to test mediational effects of changes in regional FDG-PET uptake over time in relation to baseline CSF biomarkers and changes in cognition, measured with the 13-item Alzheimer Disease’s Assessment Scale–cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog). Findings suggested a causal sequence of events; specifically, FDG hypometabolism acted as a mediator between antecedent CSF biomarker alterations and subsequent cognitive impairment. Higher baseline concentrations of t-Tau, and p-Tau181p were more predictive of decline in cerebral glucose metabolism than lower baseline concentrations of Aβ1–42. FDG-PET changes appeared to mediate t-Tau or t-Tau/Aβ1–42 -associated cognitive change across all brain

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid total tau concentration predicts clinical phenotype in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Filipe Brogueira; Byrne, Lauren; McColgan, Peter; Robertson, Nicola; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Leavitt, Blair R; Zetterberg, Henrik; Wild, Edward J

    2016-10-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a hereditary neurodegenerative condition with no therapeutic intervention known to alter disease progression, but several trials are ongoing and biomarkers of disease progression are needed. Tau is an axonal protein, often altered in neurodegeneration, and recent studies pointed out its role on HD neuropathology. Our goal was to study whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau is a biomarker of disease progression in HD. After informed consent, healthy controls, pre-symptomatic and symptomatic gene expansion carriers were recruited from two HD clinics. All participants underwent assessment with the Unified HD Rating Scale '99 (UHDRS). CSF was obtained according to a standardized lumbar puncture protocol. CSF tau was quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Comparisons between two groups were tested using ancova. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated for disease progression. Significance level was defined as p < 0.05. Seventy-six participants were included in this cross-sectional multicenter international pilot study. Age-adjusted CSF tau was significantly elevated in gene expansion carriers compared with healthy controls (p = 0.002). UHDRS total functional capacity was significantly correlated with CSF tau (r = -0.29, p = 0.004) after adjustment for age, and UHDRS total motor score was significantly correlated with CSF tau after adjustment for age (r = 0.32, p = 0.002). Several UHDRS cognitive tasks were also significantly correlated with CST total tau after age-adjustment. This study confirms that CSF tau concentrations in HD gene mutation carriers are increased compared with healthy controls and reports for the first time that CSF tau concentration is associated with phenotypic variability in HD. These conclusions strengthen the case for CSF tau as a biomarker in HD. In the era of novel targeted approaches to Huntington's disease, reliable biomarkers are needed. We quantified Tau protein, a marker of

  17. A meta-analysis of serum and cerebrospinal fluid autoantibodies in neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Ho, Roger C; Thiaghu, C; Ong, Huiyi; Lu, Yanxia; Ho, Cyrus S; Tam, Wilson W; Zhang, Melvyn W

    2016-02-01

    Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) is one of the most devastating presentations of SLE and comprises of psychiatric, central and peripheral neurological signs and symptoms. Previous studies suggest the possible associations between various autoantibodies (Abs) and NPSLE. The magnitudes of such association varied between studies. We performed a meta-analysis to pool data on serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels and positivity of Abs in blood and cerebrospinal fluid in patients with NPSLE and SLE. A systematic literature search was conducted to identify studies that fulfilled inclusion criteria. A random-effects model was used to calculate overall combined odd ratio (OR) and mean levels with its corresponding 95% confidence interval to evaluate the relationship between individual Abs and NPSLE patients relative to SLE patients. Forty-one studies met the inclusion criteria and were used in this analysis. There was a significantly greater proportion of NPSLE patients who demonstrated positivity for serum anti-cardiolipin (aCL) Abs (OR=1.63, p=0.016), lupus anticoagulants (LA) Abs (OR=1.91 p=0.01), anti-phospholipid (APL) Abs (OR=2.08, p=0.001), anti-ribosomal P Abs (OR=2.29, p<0.001), anti-neuronal Abs (OR=9.50, p<0.001) as compared to SLE patients. In NPSLE patients, there was a significant increased prevalence of positive titres for CSF anti-neuronal Abs (OR=36.84, p=0.001) as compared to SLE patients. Among the 19 neuropsychiatric syndromes, the positivity of these serum autoantibodies were found specifically significantly associated with the manifestations of mood disorder, psychosis, cerebrovascular disease, seizure disorders, acute confusional state, cognitive dysfunction, headache, movement disorder, demyelinating syndrome and polyneuropathy, with ORs ranging from 1.84 to 4.73. Meta-regression identified proportion of women as significant moderator for the heterogeneity of aCL (p=0.004) and anti-neuronal Abs (p=0.0007); mean age for the

  18. Three-dimensional cerebrospinal fluid flow within the human ventricular system.

    PubMed

    Howden, L; Giddings, D; Power, H; Aroussi, A; Vloeberghs, M; Garnett, M; Walker, D

    2008-04-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a Newtonian fluid and can, therefore, be modelled using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Previous modelling of the CSF has been limited to simplified geometric models. This work describes a geometrically accurate three dimensional (3D) computational model of the human ventricular system (HVS) constructed from magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the human brain. It is an accurate and full representation of the HVS and includes appropriately positioned CSF production and drainage locations. It was used to investigate the pulsatile motion of CSF within the human brain. During this investigation CSF flow rate was set at a constant 500 ml/day, to mimic real life secretion of CSF into the system, and a pulsing velocity profile was added to the inlets to incorporate the effect of cardiac pulsations on the choroid plexus and their subsequent influence on CSF motion in the HVS. Boundary conditions for the CSF exits from the ventricles (foramina of Magendie and Lushka) were found using a "nesting" approach, in which a simplified model of the entire central nervous system (CNS) was used to examine the effects of the CSF surrounding the ventricular system (VS). This model provided time varying pressure data for the exits from the VS nested within it. The fastest flow was found in the cerebral aqueduct, where a maximum velocity of 11.38 mm/s was observed over five cycles. The maximum Reynolds number recorded during the simulation was 15 with an average Reynolds number of the order of 0.39, indicating that CSF motion is creeping flow in most of the computational domain and consequently will follow the geometry of the model. CSF pressure also varies with geometry with a maximum pressure drop of 1.14 Pa occurring through the cerebral aqueduct. CSF flow velocity is substantially slower in the areas that are furthest away from the inlets; in some areas flow is nearly stagnant. PMID:18297492

  19. Research into the Physiology of Cerebrospinal Fluid Reaches a New Horizon: Intimate Exchange between Cerebrospinal Fluid and Interstitial Fluid May Contribute to Maintenance of Homeostasis in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    MATSUMAE, Mitsunori; SATO, Osamu; HIRAYAMA, Akihiro; HAYASHI, Naokazu; TAKIZAWA, Ken; ATSUMI, Hideki; SORIMACHI, Takatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) plays an essential role in maintaining the homeostasis of the central nervous system. The functions of CSF include: (1) buoyancy of the brain, spinal cord, and nerves; (2) volume adjustment in the cranial cavity; (3) nutrient transport; (4) protein or peptide transport; (5) brain volume regulation through osmoregulation; (6) buffering effect against external forces; (7) signal transduction; (8) drug transport; (9) immune system control; (10) elimination of metabolites and unnecessary substances; and finally (11) cooling of heat generated by neural activity. For CSF to fully mediate these functions, fluid-like movement in the ventricles and subarachnoid space is necessary. Furthermore, the relationship between the behaviors of CSF and interstitial fluid in the brain and spinal cord is important. In this review, we will present classical studies on CSF circulation from its discovery over 2,000 years ago, and will subsequently introduce functions that were recently discovered such as CSF production and absorption, water molecule movement in the interstitial space, exchange between interstitial fluid and CSF, and drainage of CSF and interstitial fluid into both the venous and the lymphatic systems. Finally, we will summarize future challenges in research. This review includes articles published up to February 2016. PMID:27245177

  20. Research into the Physiology of Cerebrospinal Fluid Reaches a New Horizon: Intimate Exchange between Cerebrospinal Fluid and Interstitial Fluid May Contribute to Maintenance of Homeostasis in the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Matsumae, Mitsunori; Sato, Osamu; Hirayama, Akihiro; Hayashi, Naokazu; Takizawa, Ken; Atsumi, Hideki; Sorimachi, Takatoshi

    2016-07-15

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) plays an essential role in maintaining the homeostasis of the central nervous system. The functions of CSF include: (1) buoyancy of the brain, spinal cord, and nerves; (2) volume adjustment in the cranial cavity; (3) nutrient transport; (4) protein or peptide transport; (5) brain volume regulation through osmoregulation; (6) buffering effect against external forces; (7) signal transduction; (8) drug transport; (9) immune system control; (10) elimination of metabolites and unnecessary substances; and finally (11) cooling of heat generated by neural activity. For CSF to fully mediate these functions, fluid-like movement in the ventricles and subarachnoid space is necessary. Furthermore, the relationship between the behaviors of CSF and interstitial fluid in the brain and spinal cord is important. In this review, we will present classical studies on CSF circulation from its discovery over 2,000 years ago, and will subsequently introduce functions that were recently discovered such as CSF production and absorption, water molecule movement in the interstitial space, exchange between interstitial fluid and CSF, and drainage of CSF and interstitial fluid into both the venous and the lymphatic systems. Finally, we will summarize future challenges in research. This review includes articles published up to February 2016. PMID:27245177

  1. Genome-wide copy number analysis of cerebrospinal fluid tumor cells and their corresponding archival primary tumors.

    PubMed

    Magbanua, Mark Jesus M; Roy, Ritu; Sosa, Eduardo V; Hauranieh, Louai; Kablanian, Andrea; Eisenbud, Lauren E; Ryazantsev, Artem; Au, Alfred; Scott, Janet H; Melisko, Michelle; Park, John W

    2014-12-01

    A debilitating complication of breast cancer is the metastatic spread of tumor cells to the leptomeninges or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Patients diagnosed with this aggressive clinical syndrome, known as leptomeningeal carcinomatosis, have very poor prognosis. Despite improvements in detecting cerebrospinal fluid tumor cells (CSFTCs), information regarding their molecular biology is extremely limited. In our recent work, we utilized a protocol previously used for circulating tumor cell isolation to purify tumor cells from the CSF. We then performed genomic characterization of CSFTCs as well as archival tumors from the same patient. Here, we describe the microarray data and quality controls associated with our study published in the Cancer Research journal in 2013 [1]. We also provide an R script containing code for quality control of microarray data and assessment of copy number calls. The microarray data has been deposited into Gene Expression Omnibus under accession # GSE46068.

  2. Increased sensitivity of bacterial detection in cerebrospinal fluid by fluorescent staining on low-fluorescence membrane filters.

    PubMed

    Durtschi, Jacob D; Erali, Maria; Bromley, L Kathryn; Herrmann, Mark G; Petti, Cathy A; Smith, Roger E; Voelkerding, Karl V

    2005-09-01

    A membrane-filter-based, fluorescent Gram stain method for bacterial detection in cerebrospinal fluid samples was developed and evaluated as a rapid, sensitive alternative to standard Gram stain protocols. A recently developed, modified version of the aluminium oxide membrane Anopore with low-fluorescence optical properties showed superior performance in this application. Other aspects of the fluorescent Gram stain system that were evaluated include membrane filter selection, strategies to reduce fluorescence fading and the effect of patient blood cells on bacterial detection in the fluorescently stained cerebrospinal fluid samples. The combination of the membrane filter's bacteria-concentrating ability and absolute retention along with high-contrast, fluorescent Gram discriminating dyes enabled rapid bacterial detection and Gram discrimination, with a 1-1.5 order of magnitude increase in the bacterial concentration limit of detection.

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid cytological and biochemical characteristics in the presence of CNS neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Sérgio M de; Nanakanishi, Edna; Conto, Arnaldo J de; Souza, Luciana P; Antonelli Filho, Dario; Roda, Carlos D

    2007-09-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) infiltration must be ruled out in patients with known neoplastic diseases and neurological symptoms. It was done a retrospective analysis of 1,948 CSF samples from patients with suspected malignant infiltration in the CNS, in order to evaluate the positivity rate of malignant cells in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples and correlate with cytochemical characteristics. Sixty-two percent of subjects had acute lymphocytic leukemia. Malignant cells were found in 24% of all CSF samples. Subjects with positive malignant cells had predominance of increased levels of CSF total protein (TP), glucose and total cytology (p<0.05). Mean total cell count in this group was 232 (SD 933) cells/mm(3), compared to 9 (SD 93) cells/mm(3) in the group without neoplasic cells (p=0.029). CSF TP specificity was 87% and negative predictive value (NPV) 96%. CSF total cell count specificity 86% and NPV 97%. Although sensitivity and positive predictive value were low. The presence of inflammatory cells and elevated TP found in patients with malignant cells in the CSF can aid in diagnosing CNS neoplasms.

  4. Interactions between Flow Oscillations and Biochemical Parameters in the Cerebrospinal Fluid.

    PubMed

    Puy, Vincent; Zmudka-Attier, Jadwiga; Capel, Cyrille; Bouzerar, Roger; Serot, Jean-Marie; Bourgeois, Anne-Marie; Ausseil, Jérome; Balédent, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The equilibrium between the ventricular and lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compartments may be disturbed (in terms of flow and biochemistry) in patients with chronic hydrocephalus (CH). Using flow magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and CSF assays, we sought to determine whether changes in CSF were associated with biochemical alterations. Nine elderly patients with CH underwent phase-contrast MRI. An index of CSF dynamics (Idyn) was defined as the product of the lumbar and ventricular CSF flows. During surgery, samples of CSF were collected from the lumbar and ventricular compartments and assayed for chloride, glucose and total protein. The lumbar/ventricular (L/V) ratio was calculated for each analyte. The ratio between measured and expected levels (Ibioch) was calculated for each analyte and compared with Idyn. Idyn varied from 0 to 100.10(3)μl(2).s(2). In contrast to the L/V ratios for chloride and glucose, the L/V ratio for total protein varied markedly from one patient to another (mean ± standard deviation (SD): 2.63 ± 1.24). The Ibioch for total protein was strongly correlated with the corresponding Idyn (Spearman's R: 0.98; p < 5 × 10(-5)).We observed correlated alterations in CSF flow and biochemical parameters in patients with CH. Our findings also highlight the value of dynamic flow analysis in the interpretation of data on CSF biochemistry. PMID:27445797

  5. Simultaneous Detection of Five Pathogens from Cerebrospinal Fluid Specimens Using Luminex Technology.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Linfu; Wu, Rui; Shi, Xiaodan; Feng, Dongyun; Feng, Guodong; Yang, Yining; Dai, Wen; Bian, Ting; Liu, Tingting; He, Ying; Shi, Ming; Zhao, Gang

    2016-02-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for the outcome of central nervous system (CNS) infections. In this study, we developed a multiplex PCR-Luminex assay for the simultaneous detection of five major pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, which frequently cause CNS infections. Through the hybridization reaction between multiplex PCR-amplified targets and oligonucleotide "anti-TAG" sequences, we found that the PCR-Luminex assay could detect as low as 10¹-10² copies of synthetic pathogen DNAs. Furthermore, 163 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens from patients with suspected CNS infections were used to evaluate the efficiency of this multiplex PCR-Luminex method. Compared with Ziehl-Neelsen stain, this assay showed a high diagnostic accuracy for tuberculosis meningitis (sensitivity, 90.7% and specificity, 99.1%). For cryptococcal meningitis, the sensitivity and specificity were 92% and 97.1%, respectively, compared with the May Grunwald Giemsa (MGG) stain. For herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 encephalitis, the sensitivities were 80.8% and 100%, and the specificities were 94.2% and 99%, respectively, compared with Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) assays. Taken together, this multiplex PCR-Luminex assay showed potential efficiency for the simultaneous detection of five pathogens and may be a promising supplement to conventional methods for diagnosing CNS infections. PMID:26861363

  6. Connective tissue spectrum abnormalities associated with spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Reinstein, Eyal; Pariani, Mitchel; Bannykh, Serguei; Rimoin, David L; Schievink, Wouter I

    2013-04-01

    We aimed to assess the frequency of connective tissue abnormalities among patients with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks in a prospective study using a large cohort of patients. We enrolled a consecutive group of 50 patients, referred for consultation because of CSF leak. All patients have been carefully examined for the presence of connective tissue abnormalities, and based on findings, patients underwent genetic testing. Ancillary diagnostic studies included echocardiography, eye exam, and histopathological examinations of skin and dura biopsies in selected patients. We identified nine patients with heritable connective tissue disorders, including Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and other unclassified forms. In seven patients, spontaneous CSF leak was the first noted manifestation of the genetic disorder. We conclude that spontaneous CSF leaks are associated with a spectrum of connective tissue abnormalities and may be the first noted clinical presentation of the genetic disorder. We propose that there is a clinical basis for considering spontaneous CSF leak as a clinical manifestation of heritable connective tissue disorders, and we suggest that patients with CSF leaks should be screened for connective tissue and vascular abnormalities.

  7. Addressing a folate imbalance in fetal cerebrospinal fluid can decrease the incidence of congenital hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Cains, Sarah; Shepherd, Andrew; Nabiuni, Mohammad; Owen-Lynch, Penelope Jane; Miyan, Jaleel

    2009-04-01

    Fetal-onset hydrocephalus (HC), which affects between 1:500 and 1:5000 live human births, results from unequal production and drainage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and is associated with abnormal development of the cerebral cortex leading to severe neurological deficits. We previously found that in the hydrocephalic Texas rat, the CSF of affected fetuses induced a cell cycle arrest in neural progenitor cells. Here, we show that alterations in folate metabolism in the CSF of the developing cerebrum are likely responsible for this effect. We identified 3 folate enzymes in the CSF and demonstrate that low levels of one of these, 10-formyltetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase, are associated with HC in the hydrocephalic Texas rat. Therefore, we tested whether supplementation with specific folate species would improve developmental outcome. After daily administration of a combination of tetrahydrofolic and 5-formyltetrahydrofolic acids to pregnant dams, there was a significant reduction in the incidence of HC and improved brain development. By contrast, supplementation with folic acid increased the incidence of congenital HC in this model. These results indicate the complexities of folate metabolism in the developing brain and suggest that folate imbalance leading to HC in the hydrocephalic Texas rat fetuses can be treated with maternal folate supplementation using specific folate metabolites and combinations thereof. PMID:19287311

  8. Routine cerebrospinal fluid analysis during 'de novo' ventriculoperitoneal shunt insertion: Single Institution Experience.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Ayman; Mandiwanza, Tafadzwa; Zakaria, Zaitun; Crimmins, Darach

    2016-08-01

    Background Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sampling is performed during ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunting procedure surgery for early detection of infection. We have performed a retrospective study to determine whether routine intraoperative CSF sampling at new VP shunt insertion has predicted shunt infection or changed subsequent surveillance or management. Method From January 2011 to December 2013, 99 patients underwent first time VP shunt insertion at our hospital. The data collected from Beaumont Hospital Information System and operating theatre logbook. The reviewed data were patient demographics, the clinical condition requiring VP shunt procedure, shunt type, date of VP shunt insertion, date of VP shunt infection or malfunction and laboratory data. Results A first time VP shunt insertion procedure was performed in 99 patients. During the VP shunt insertion procedure, 64 patients had CSF sampling for microbiological analysis. The CSF culture was negative in all samples. All patients were followed up for 12 months. During the follow-up period, a total of 15 patients underwent VP shunt revision. Three of the shunt revisions were secondary to infection. The three infected shunt cases had sterile CSF cultures at the time of insertion. Conclusion There appears to be no correlation between CSF sampling during first time VP shunt insertion and the later development VP shunt infection. This questions the need for routine CSF sampling at the time of insertion. This would be confirmed as a part of future randomised trials.

  9. Mechanism for measurement of flow rate of cerebrospinal fluid in hydrocephalus shunts.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Sathish; Kovar, Spencer; Qu, Peng; Inwald, David; Williams, Evan; Qu, Hongwei; Zakalik, Karol

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of the flow rate of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or existence of CSF flow inside the shunt tube after shunt implant have been reported as tedious process for both patients and doctors; this paper outlines a potential in vitro flow rate measurement method for CSF in the hydrocephalus shunt. The use of implantable titanium elements in the shunt has been proposed to allow for an accurate temperature measurement along the shunt for prediction of CSF flow rate. The CSF flow velocity can be deduced by decoupling the thermal transfer in the measured differential time at a pair of measurement spots of the titanium elements. Finite element analyses on the fluidic and thermal behaviors of the shunt system have been conducted. Preliminary bench-top measurements on a simulated system have been carried out. The measured flow rates, ranging from 0.5 mm/sec to 1.0 mm/sec, which is clinically practical, demonstrate good agreements with the simulation results.

  10. Osmolar relation between cerebrospinal fluid and serum in hyperosmolar hypernatraemic dehydration.

    PubMed

    Habel, A H; Simpson, H

    1976-09-01

    The relation between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum osmolality was studied in 16 patients with hyperosmolar hypernatraemic dehydration before treatment. After correcting shock and acidosis, 0-45% saline in 2-5 or 5% dextrose was infused in each patient over a 48- to 72-hour period. During rehydration, serum osmolality, electrolyte concentrations, urea nitrogen, and blood pH were measured sequentially. Five patients developed severe neurological abnormalities within 48 hours of addmission (convulsions 2, convulsions with hemiplegia 2, hemiplegia 1). Of these, 3 had residual defects on follow-up at least one year later. This group was indistinguishable from the 11 without significant neurological abnormality, both on clinical grounds before rehydration, and after analysis of admission and subsequent serum biochemical variables. A significant osmolar gap (greater than 4 mmol/kg H2O) between serum and CSF was found in 13 patients. Severe neurological disturbance only occurred when CSF osmolality exceeded that of serum by 7 or more mmol/kg H2O. Discriminant analysis of the paired osmolar data showed that D = -117+1-74 X(CSF osmolality) -1-41 X (serum osmolality), and that severe neurological abnormality was predicted when D was positive.

  11. Proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and clinically isolated syndrome

    PubMed Central

    PAVELEK, ZBYŠEK; VYŠATA, OLDŘICH; TAMBOR, VOJTĚCH; PIMKOVÁ, KRISTÝNA; VU, DAI LONG; KUČA, KAMIL; ŠŤOURAČ, PAVEL; VALIŠ, MARTIN

    2016-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) in the initial stages of the disease can significantly retard its progression. The aim of the present study was to identify changes in the cerebrospinal fluid proteome in patients with relapsing-remitting MS and clinically isolated MS syndrome who are at high risk of developing MS (case group) compared to healthy population (control) in order to identify potential new markers, which could ultimately aid in early diagnosis of MS. The protein concentrations of each of the 11 case and 15 control samples were determined using a bicinchoninic acid assay. Nanoscale liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry was used for protein identification. Proteomics data were processed using the Perseus software suite and R. The results were filtered using the Benjamini-Hochberg procedure for the false discovery rate (FDR) correction (FDR<0.05). The results showed that, 26 proteins were significantly dysregulated in case samples compared to the controls. Nine proteins were found to be significantly less abundant in case samples, while the abundance of 17 proteins was significantly increased in case samples compared to controls. Three of the proteins were previously linked to RR MS, including immunoglobulin (Ig) γ-1 chain C region, Ig heavy chain V–III region BRO and Ig κ chain C region. Three proteins that were uniquely expressed in patients with RR MS were identified and these proteins may serve as prognostic biomarkers for identifying patients with a high risk of developing RR MS. PMID:27347402

  12. Harnessing Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Clinical Trials for Treating Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases: Potential and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dana; Kim, Young-Sam; Shin, Dong Wun; Park, Chang-Shin

    2016-01-01

    No disease-modifying therapies (DMT) for neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) have been established, particularly for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). It is unclear why candidate drugs that successfully demonstrate therapeutic effects in animal models fail to show disease-modifying effects in clinical trials. To overcome this hurdle, patients with homogeneous pathologies should be detected as early as possible. The early detection of AD patients using sufficiently tested biomarkers could demonstrate the potential usefulness of combining biomarkers with clinical measures as a diagnostic tool. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for NDs are being incorporated in clinical trials designed with the aim of detecting patients earlier, evaluating target engagement, collecting homogeneous patients, facilitating prevention trials, and testing the potential of surrogate markers relative to clinical measures. In this review we summarize the latest information on CSF biomarkers in NDs, particularly AD and PD, and their use in clinical trials. The large number of issues related to CSF biomarker measurements and applications has resulted in relatively few clinical trials on CSF biomarkers being conducted. However, the available CSF biomarker data obtained in clinical trials support the advantages of incorporating CSF biomarkers in clinical trials, even though the data have mostly been obtained in AD trials. We describe the current issues with and ongoing efforts for the use of CSF biomarkers in clinical trials and the plans to harness CSF biomarkers for the development of DMT and clinical routines. This effort requires nationwide, global, and multidisciplinary efforts in academia, industry, and regulatory agencies to facilitate a new era.

  13. High cerebrospinal fluid levels of interleukin-10 attained by AAV in dogs.

    PubMed

    Pleticha, J; Malkmus, S A; Heilmann, L F; Veesart, S L; Rezek, R; Xu, Q; Yaksh, T L; Beutler, A S

    2015-02-01

    Intrathecal (IT) gene transfer using adeno-associated virus (AAV) may be clinically promising as a treatment for chronic pain if it can produce sufficiently high levels of a transgene product in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Although this strategy was developed in rodents, no studies investigating CSF levels of an analgesic or antiallodynic protein delivered by IT AAV have been performed in large animals. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is an antiallodynic cytokine for which target therapeutic levels have been established in rats. The present study tested IT AAV8 encoding either human IL-10 (hIL-10) or enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in a dog model of IT drug delivery. AAV8/hIL-10 at a dose of 3.5 × 10(12) genome copies induced high hIL-10 levels in the CSF, exceeding the target concentration previously found to be antiallodynic in rodents by >1000-fold. AAV8/EGFP targeted the primary sensory and motor neurons and the meninges. hIL-10, a xenogeneic protein in dogs, induced anti-hIL-10 antibodies detectable in the CSF and serum of dogs. The high hIL-10 levels demonstrate the efficacy of AAV for delivery of secreted transgenes into the IT space of large animals, suggesting a strong case for further development toward clinical testing.

  14. MR measurement of cerebrospinal fluid velocity wave speed in the spinal canal.

    PubMed

    Kalata, Wojciech; Martin, Bryn A; Oshinski, John N; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Royston, Thomas J; Loth, Francis

    2009-06-01

    Noninvasive measurement of the speed with which the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) velocity wave travels through the spinal canal is of interest as a potential indicator of CSF system pressure and compliance, both of which may play a role in the development of craniospinal diseases. However, measurement of CSF velocity wave speed (VWS) has eluded researchers primarily due to either a lack of access to CSF velocity measurements or poor temporal resolution. Here, we present a CSF VWS measurement methodology using a novel MR sequence that acquires unsteady velocity measurements during the cardiac cycle with a time interval < 10 ms. Axial CSF velocity measurements were obtained in the sagittal plane of the cervical spinal region on three subjects referred for an MRI scan without craniospinal disorders. CSF VWS was estimated by using the time shift identified by the maximum velocity and maximum temporal velocity gradient during the cardiac cycle. Based on the maximum velocity gradient, the mean VWS in the three cases was calculated to be 4.6 m/s (standard deviation 1.7 m/s, p < 0.005) during systolic acceleration. VWS computed using maximum velocity alone was not statistically significant for any of the three cases. The measurements of VWS are close in magnitude to previously published values. The methodology represents a new technique that can be used to measure VWS in the spinal canal noninvasively. Further research is required to both validate the measurements and determine clinical significance. PMID:19174343

  15. Anti-GAD65 Containing Cerebrospinal Fluid Does not Alter GABAergic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Hackert, Jana K.; Müller, Lorenz; Rohde, Marco; Bien, Christian G.; Köhling, Rüdiger; Kirschstein, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase of 65 kDa (GAD65) antibodies have been reported in a variety of neurological disorders such as stiff-person syndrome (SPS), sporadic ataxia and some cases of epilepsy. Since the target is believed to be the cytoplasmic enzyme GAD65, the key enzyme of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) synthesis, the pathophysiological role of these antibodies is poorly understood. Here, we stereotactically injected human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) containing GAD65-antibodies into the hippocampus of rats in vivo and then prepared hippocampal slices 1–2 days after post-operative recovery. We characterized both evoked and spontaneous GABAergic transmission in vitro using sharp microelectrode and patch-clamp recordings in CA1 neurons. Intracellular recordings with sharp microelectrodes from CA1 neurons showed that evoked GABAAR- or GABABR-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSP) remained unaltered in anti-GAD65 tissue. These results were confirmed with patch-clamp recordings showing no difference in evoked gabazine-sensitive inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs). In addition, spontaneous IPSCs also showed no difference between anti-GAD65 tissue and controls with respect to the mean frequency, the mean amplitude and the sIPSC distribution. In conclusion, stereotactic injection of GAD65-antibodies into the hippocampus leaves evoked and spontaneous GABAergic synaptic transmission intact. Hence, dysfunction of the inhibitory GABAergic system does not appear to be the major mechanism of epileptogenicity in this disease. PMID:27242441

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of neurovascular dysfunction in mild dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Melanie D; Sagare, Abhay P; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of age-related dementias. In addition to genetics, environment, and lifestyle, growing evidence supports vascular contributions to dementias including dementia because of AD. Alzheimer's disease affects multiple cell types within the neurovascular unit (NVU), including brain vascular cells (endothelial cells, pericytes, and vascular smooth muscle cells), glial cells (astrocytes and microglia), and neurons. Thus, identifying and integrating biomarkers of the NVU cell-specific responses and injury with established AD biomarkers, amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau, has a potential to contribute to better understanding of the disease process in dementias including AD. Here, we discuss the existing literature on cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of the NVU cell-specific responses during early stages of dementia and AD. We suggest that the clinical usefulness of established AD biomarkers, Aβ and tau, could be further improved by developing an algorithm that will incorporate biomarkers of the NVU cell-specific responses and injury. Such biomarker algorithm could aid in early detection and intervention as well as identify novel treatment targets to delay disease onset, slow progression, and/or prevent AD.

  17. Super-Resolution Microscopy of Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers as a Tool for Alzheimer's Disease Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, William I; Antonios, Gregory; Rabano, Alberto; Bayer, Thomas A; Schneider, Anja; Rizzoli, Silvio O

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is neuropathologically characterized by aggregates of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) and tau proteins. The consensus in the AD field is that Aβ and tau should serve as diagnostic biomarkers for AD. However, their aggregates have been difficult to investigate by conventional fluorescence microscopy, since their size is below the diffraction limit (∼200 nm). To solve this, we turned to a super-resolution imaging technique, stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy, which has a high enough precision to allow the discrimination of low- and high-molecular weight aggregates prepared in vitro. We used STED to analyze the structural organization of Aβ and tau in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 36 AD patients, 11 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 21 controls. We measured the numbers of aggregates in the CSF samples, and the aggregate sizes and intensities. These parameters enabled us to distinguish AD patients from controls with a specificity of ∼87% and a sensitivity of ∼79% . In addition, the aggregate parameters determined with STED microscopy correlated with the severity of cognitive impairment in AD patients. Finally, these parameters may be useful as predictive tools for MCI cases. The STED parameters of two MCI patients who developed AD during the course of the study, as well as of MCI patients whose Aβ ELISA values fall within the accepted range for AD, placed them close to the AD averages. We suggest that super-resolution imaging is a promising tool for AD diagnostics.

  18. HIV Migration Between Blood and Cerebrospinal Fluid or Semen Over Time

    PubMed Central

    Chaillon, Antoine; Gianella, Sara; Wertheim, Joel O.; Richman, Douglas D.; Mehta, Sanjay R.; Smith, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies reported associations between neuropathogenesis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) compartmentalization in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and between sexual transmission and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) compartmentalization in semen. It remains unclear, however, how compartmentalization dynamics change over time. To address this, we used statistical methods and Bayesian phylogenetic approaches to reconstruct temporal dynamics of HIV migration between blood and CSF and between blood and the male genital tract. We investigated 11 HIV-infected individuals with paired semen and blood samples and 4 individuals with paired CSF and blood samples. Aligned partial HIV env sequences were analyzed by (1) phylogenetic reconstruction, using a Bayesian Markov-chain Monte Carlo approach; (2) evaluation of viral compartmentalization, using tree-based and distance-based methods; and (3) analysis of migration events, using a discrete Bayesian asymmetric phylogeographic approach of diffusion with Markov jump counts estimation. Finally, we evaluated potential correlates of viral gene flow across anatomical compartments. We observed bidirectional replenishment of viral compartments and asynchronous peaks of viral migration from and to blood over time, suggesting that disruption of viral compartment is transient and directionally selected. These findings imply that viral subpopulations in anatomical sites are an active part of the whole viral population and that compartmental reservoirs could have implications in future eradication studies. PMID:24302756

  19. Evidence for Fungal Infection in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Brain Tissue from Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Ruth; Pisa, Diana; Marina, Ana Isabel; Morato, Esperanza; Rábano, Alberto; Rodal, Izaskun; Carrasco, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Among neurogenerative diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal illness characterized by a progressive motor neuron dysfunction in the motor cortex, brainstem and spinal cord. ALS is the most common form of motor neuron disease; yet, to date, the exact etiology of ALS remains unknown. In the present work, we have explored the possibility of fungal infection in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and in brain tissue from ALS patients. Fungal antigens, as well as DNA from several fungi, were detected in CSF from ALS patients. Additionally, examination of brain sections from the frontal cortex of ALS patients revealed the existence of immunopositive fungal antigens comprising punctate bodies in the cytoplasm of some neurons. Fungal DNA was also detected in brain tissue using PCR analysis, uncovering the presence of several fungal species. Finally, proteomic analyses of brain tissue demonstrated the occurrence of several fungal peptides. Collectively, our observations provide compelling evidence of fungal infection in the ALS patients analyzed, suggesting that this infection may play a part in the etiology of the disease or may constitute a risk factor for these patients. PMID:25892962

  20. Picornaviruses in cerebrospinal fluid of children with meningitis in Luanda, Angola.

    PubMed

    Pelkonen, Tuula; Roine, Irmeli; Anjos, Elizabete; Kaijalainen, Svetlana; Roivainen, Merja; Peltola, Heikki; Pitkäranta, Anne

    2012-07-01

    Human enteroviruses are the most common cause of viral meningitis. Viral-bacterial interaction may affect the clinical course and outcome of bacterial meningitis. In Africa, viruses might be responsible for 14-25% of all meningitis cases. However, only few studies from Africa have reported detection of viruses in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or mixed viral-bacterial infections of the central nervous system (CNS). The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of picornaviruses in the CSF of children suffering from meningitis in Luanda, Angola. The study included 142 consecutive children enrolled in a prospective study of bacterial meningitis in Luanda between 2005 and 2006, from whom a CSF sample was available. CSF samples were obtained at hospital admission, stored in a deep-freeze, and transported to Finland for testing by real-time PCR for picornaviruses. Enteroviruses were detected in 4 (3%) of 142 children with presumed bacterial meningitis. A 5-month-old girl with rhinovirus and Haemophilus influenzae meningitis recovered uneventfully. An 8-year-old girl with human enterovirus and pneumococcal meningitis developed no sequelae. A 2-month-old girl with human enterovirus and malaria recovered quickly. A 7-month-old girl with human enterovirus was treated for presumed tuberculous meningitis and survived with severe sequelae. Mixed infections of the CNS with picornaviruses and bacteria are rare. Detection of an enterovirus does not affect the clinical picture and outcome of bacterial meningitis.

  1. Direct Identification of Enteroviruses in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with Suspected Meningitis by Nested PCR Amplification.

    PubMed

    Krasota, Alexandr; Loginovskih, Natalia; Ivanova, Olga; Lipskaya, Galina

    2016-01-06

    Enteroviruses, the most common human viral pathogens worldwide, have been associated with serous meningitis, encephalitis, syndrome of acute flaccid paralysis, myocarditis and the onset of diabetes type 1. In the future, the rapid identification of the etiological agent would allow to adjust the therapy promptly and thereby improve the course of the disease and prognosis. We developed RT-nested PCR amplification of the genomic region coding viral structural protein VP1 for direct identification of enteroviruses in clinical specimens and compared it with the existing analogs. One-hundred-fifty-nine cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) from patients with suspected meningitis were studied. The amplification of VP1 genomic region using the new method was achieved for 86 (54.1%) patients compared with 75 (47.2%), 53 (33.3%) and 31 (19.5%) achieved with previously published methods. We identified 11 serotypes of the Enterovirus species B in 2012, including relatively rare echovirus 14 (E-14), E-15 and E-32, and eight serotypes of species B and 5 enteroviruses A71 (EV-A71) in 2013. The developed method can be useful for direct identification of enteroviruses in clinical material with the low virus loads such as CSF.

  2. Pathophysiology of increased cerebrospinal fluid pressure associated to brain arteriovenous malformations: The hydraulic hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Rossitti, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Background: Brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) produce circulatory and functional disturbances in adjacent as well as in remote areas of the brain, but their physiological effect on the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure is not well known. Methods: The hypothesis of an intrinsic disease mechanism leading to increased CSF pressure in all patients with brain AVM is outlined, based on a theory of hemodynamic control of intracranial pressure that asserts that CSF pressure is a fraction of the systemic arterial pressure as predicted by a two-resistor series circuit hydraulic model. The resistors are the arteriolar resistance (that is regulated by vasomotor tonus), and the venous resistance (which is mechanically passive as a Starling resistor). This theory is discussed and compared with the knowledge accumulated by now on intravasal pressures and CSF pressure measured in patients with brain AVM. Results: The theory provides a basis for understanding the occurrence of pseudotumor cerebri syndrome in patients with nonhemorrhagic brain AVMs, for the occurrence of local mass effect and brain edema bordering unruptured AVMs, and for the development of hydrocephalus in patients with unruptured AVMs. The theory also contributes to a better appreciation of the pathophysiology of dural arteriovenous fistulas, of vein of Galen aneurismal malformation, and of autoregulation-related disorders in AVM patients. Conclusions: The hydraulic hypothesis provides a comprehensive frame to understand brain AVM hemodynamics and its effect on the CSF dynamics. PMID:23607064

  3. Cerebral venous overdrainage: an under-recognized complication of cerebrospinal fluid diversion.

    PubMed

    Barami, Kaveh

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the altered physiology following cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diversion in the setting of adult hydrocephalus is important for optimizing patient care and avoiding complications. There is mounting evidence that the cerebral venous system plays a major role in intracranial pressure (ICP) dynamics especially when one takes into account the effects of postural changes, atmospheric pressure, and gravity on the craniospinal axis as a whole. An evolved mechanism acting at the cortical bridging veins, known as the "Starling resistor," prevents overdrainage of cranial venous blood with upright positioning. This protective mechanism can become nonfunctional after CSF diversion, which can result in posture-related cerebral venous overdrainage through the cranial venous outflow tracts, leading to pathological states. This review article summarizes the relevant anatomical and physiological bases of the relationship between the craniospinal venous and CSF compartments and surveys complications that may be explained by the cerebral venous overdrainage phenomenon. It is hoped that this article adds a new dimension to our therapeutic methods, stimulates further research into this field, and ultimately improves our care of these patients. PMID:27581321

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid Th1/Th2 cytokine profiles in children with enterovirus 71-associated meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Li, Huajun; Li, Shuxian; Zheng, Jianfeng; Cai, Chunyan; Ye, Bin; Yang, Jun; Chen, Zhimin

    2015-03-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection can cause severe neurological complications including meningoencephalitis (ME) in some patients with hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). However, to date no studies have reported changes in cytokine concentrations and their correlations with clinical variables in patients with ME following EV71 infection. In this study, responses of Th1/Th2 cytokine, including IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α and IFN-γ, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with EV71-related HFMD with ME and patients with febrile convulsions (FC) were analyzed using cytometric bead array technology. It was found that CSF IL-6 and IFN-γ concentrations were significantly higher in patients with EV71-related ME than in those with FC. Additionally, both CSF IL-6 and IFN-γ concentrations were correlated with CSF cytology, fever duration and duration of hospital stay. More interestingly, a positive correlation between CSF IL-6 and IFN-γ concentrations was observed. Finally, receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that when a cutoff value of 9.40 pg/mL was set for IL-6, the sensitivity and specificity were 84.5% and 85.5%, respectively, for discriminating EV71-related ME from FC. In conclusion, IL-6 and IFN-γ may be associated with EV71-induced neuropathology. PMID:25611005

  5. Low Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid-Beta Concentration Is Associated with Poorer Delayed Memory Recall in Women

    PubMed Central

    Haapalinna, Fanni; Paajanen, Teemu; Penttinen, Janne; Kokki, Hannu; Kokki, Merja; Koivisto, Anne M.; Hartikainen, Päivi; Solje, Eino; Hänninen, Tuomo; Remes, Anne Marja; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa

    2016-01-01

    Background Data on the association of memory performance with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are inconsistent. The Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease neuropsychological battery (CERAD-NB) is a commonly used validated cognitive tool; however, only few studies have examined its relationship with CSF biomarkers for AD. We studied the correlation of pathological changes in CSF biomarkers with various CERAD-NB subtests and total scores. Methods Out of 79 subjects (36 men, mean age 70.5 years), 63 had undergone an assessment of cognitive status with CERAD-NB and a CSF biomarker analysis due to a suspected memory disorder, and 16 were controls with no memory complaint. Results In women we found a significant correlation between CSF amyloid-beta (Aβ1-42) and several subtests measuring delayed recall. Word List Recall correlated with all markers: Aβ1-42 (r = 0.323, p = 0.035), tau (r = −0.304, p = 0.050) and hyperphosphorylated tau (r = −0.331, p = 0.046). No such correlations were found in men. Conclusions CSF biomarkers correlate with delayed memory scores in CERAD-NB in women, and women may have more actual AD pathology at the time of the investigations than men. PMID:27504119

  6. Demonstration that a new flow sensor can operate in the clinical range for cerebrospinal fluid flow

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Rahul; Lakshmanan, Shanmugamurthy; Apigo, David; Kanwal, Alokik; Liu, Sheng; Russell, Thomas; Madsen, Joseph R.; Thomas, Gordon A.; Farrow, Reginald C.

    2015-01-01

    A flow sensor has been fabricated and tested that is capable of measuring the slow flow characteristic of the cerebrospinal fluid in the range from less than 4 mL/h to above 100 mL/h. This sensor is suitable for long-term implantation because it uses a wireless external spectrometer to measure passive subcutaneous components. The sensors are pressure-sensitive capacitors, in the range of 5 pF with an air gap at atmospheric pressure. Each capacitor is in series with an inductor to provide a resonant frequency that varies with flow rate. At constant flow, the system is steady with drift <0.3 mL/h over a month. At variable flow rate, V̇, the resonant frequency, f0, which is in the 200–400 MHz range, follows a second order polynomial with respect to V̇. For this sensor system the uncertainty in measuring f0 is 30 kHz which corresponds to a sensitivity in measuring flow of ΔV̇= 0.6 mL/hr. Pressures up to 20 cm H2O relative to ambient pressure were also measured. An implantable twin capacitor system is proposed that can measure flow, which is fully compensated for all hydrostatic pressures. For twin capacitors, other sources of systematic variation within clinical range, such as temperature and ambient pressure, are smaller than our sensitivity and we delineate a calibration method that should maintain clinically useful accuracy over long times. PMID:26543321

  7. High cerebrospinal fluid levels of interleukin-10 attained by AAV in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Pleticha, Josef; Malkmus, Shelle A.; Heilmann, Lukas F.; Veesart, Samantha L.; Rezek, Rahaf; Xu, Qinghao; Yaksh, Tony L.; Beutler, Andreas S.

    2016-01-01

    Intrathecal (IT) gene transfer using adeno-associated virus (AAV) may be clinically promising as a treatment for chronic pain if it can produce sufficiently high levels of a transgene product in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). While this strategy was developed in rodents, no studies investigating CSF levels of an analgesic or anti-allodynic protein delivered by IT AAV have been performed in large animals. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is an anti-allodynic cytokine, for which target therapeutic levels have been established in rats. The present study tested IT AAV8 encoding either human IL-10 (hIL-10) or enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in a dog model of IT drug delivery. AAV8/hIL-10 at a dose of 3.5×1012 genome copies induced high hIL-10 levels in the CSF, exceeding the target concentration previously found to be anti-allodynic in rodents by >1000-fold. AAV8/EGFP targeted the primary sensory and motor neurons and the meninges. hIL-10, a xenogeneic protein in dogs, induced anti-hIL-10 antibodies detectable in the dogs’ CSF and serum. The high hIL-10 levels demonstrate the efficacy of AAV for delivery of secreted transgenes into the IT space of large animals suggesting a strong case for further development towards clinical testing. PMID:25354684

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid control of neurogenesis induced by retinoic acid during early brain development.

    PubMed

    Alonso, M I; Martín, C; Carnicero, E; Bueno, D; Gato, A

    2011-07-01

    Embryonic-cerebrospinal fluid (E-CSF) plays crucial roles in early brain development including the control of neurogenesis. Although FGF2 and lipoproteins present in the E-CSF have previously been shown to be involved in neurogenesis, the main factor triggering this process remains unknown. E-CSF contains all-trans-retinol and retinol-binding protein involved in the synthesis of retinoic acid (RA), a neurogenesis inducer. In early chick embryo brain, only the mesencephalic-rombencephalic isthmus (IsO) is able to synthesize RA. Here we show that in chick embryo brain development: (1) E-CSF helps to control RA synthesis in the IsO by means of the RBP and all-trans-retinol it contains; (2) E-CSF has retinoic acid activity, which suggests it may act as a diffusion pathway for RA; and (3) the influence of E-CSF on embryonic brain neurogenesis is to a large extent due to its involvement in RA synthesis. These data help to understand neurogenesis from neural progenitor cells. PMID:21594951

  9. [Assessment of a commonly available latex particle agglutination test in rapid, bacteriologic cerebrospinal fluid diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Grubbauer, H M; Dornbusch, H J; Zobel, G; Thiel, W

    1988-01-01

    36 cerebrospinal fluid specimens (CSF) from patients with bacterial meningitis were tested for the presence of bacterial antigens with the "Slidex Meningite Kit" (Bio Merieux). This kit has latex particles coated with antibodies against hemophilus influenzae type B (Hib) streptococcus pneumoniae (SP) and neisseria meningitidis (NM) group A and C. With the LAT we could detect the bacterial antigens in 84% of bacterial meningitis cases, 23 of the 27 of Hib meningitis (85.2%), all of the 6 cases of SP meningitis (100%) and two of the three NM meningitis cases. The test is handicapped by the fact, that there is no antiserum against NM sero-group B, the main cause of NM meningitis in Austria. There were no false positive results with the LAT. False negative results were obtained in 19.2% of Hib and in one case of NM. Even under sufficient antibiotic therapy and with negative culture we could detect 9 Hib- and 1 NM-cases during the first 12-48 hours of therapy with this method. The LAT-Kit is a useful addition to standard methods of CSF examinations in bacterial meningitis. With the LAT a rapid bacteriological diagnosis is possible within 15 minutes. The Kit is also able to identify bacterial antigens even with negative culture and after initiation of antibiotic treatment. PMID:3133628

  10. Simultaneous Determination of All Forms of Biopterin and Neopterin in Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In humans, genetic defects of the synthesis or regeneration of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), an essential cofactor in hydroxylation reactions, are associated with severe neurological disorders. The diagnosis of these conditions relies on the determination of BH4, dihydrobiopterin (BH2), and dihydroneopterin (NH2) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). As MS/MS is less sensitive than fluorescence detection (FD) for this purpose, the most widely used method since 1980 involves two HPLC runs including two differential off-line chemical oxidation procedures aiming to transform the reduced pterins into their fully oxidized fluorescent counterparts, biopterin (B) and neopterin (N). However, this tedious and time-consuming two-step indirect method underestimates BH4, BH2, and NH2 concentrations. Direct quantification of BH4 is essential for studying its metabolism and for monitoring the efficacy of BH4 supplementation in patients with genetic defects. Here we describe a single step method to simultaneously measure BH4, BH2, B, NH2, and N in CSF by HPLC coupled to FD after postcolumn coulometric oxidation. All target pterins were quantified in CSF with a small volume (100 μL), and a single filtration step for sample preparation and analysis. As compared to the most widely used method in more than 100 CSF samples, this new assay is the easiest route for accurately determining in a single run BH4, BH2, and NH2 in CSF in deficit situations as well as for monitoring the efficacy of the treatment. PMID:24650440

  11. Role of Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Clinical Trials for Alzheimer's Disease Modifying Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ryoo, Na-Young; Shin, Dong Wun; Trojanowski, John Q

    2014-01-01

    Until now, a disease-modifying therapy (DMT) that has an ability to slow or arrest Alzheimer's disease (AD) progression has not been developed, and all clinical trials involving AD patients enrolled by clinical assessment alone also have not been successful. Given the growing consensus that the DMT is likely to require treatment initiation well before full-blown dementia emerges, the early detection of AD will provide opportunities to successfully identify new drugs that slow the course of AD pathology. Recent advances in early detection of AD and prediction of progression of the disease using various biomarkers, including cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ1-42, total tau and p-tau181 levels, and imagining biomarkers, are now being actively integrated into the designs of AD clinical trials. In terms of therapeutic mechanisms, monitoring these markers may be helpful for go/no-go decision making as well as surrogate markers for disease severity or progression. Furthermore, CSF biomarkers can be used as a tool to enrich patients for clinical trials with prospect of increasing statistical power and reducing costs in drug development. However, the standardization of technical aspects of analysis of these biomarkers is an essential prerequisite to the clinical uses. To accomplish this, global efforts are underway to standardize CSF biomarker measurements and a quality control program supported by the Alzheimer's Association. The current review summarizes therapeutic targets of developing drugs in AD pathophysiology, and provides the most recent advances in the PMID:25598657

  12. Effect of endoscopic third ventriculostomy on cerebrospinal fluid pressure in the cerebral ventricles.

    PubMed

    Farnoush, Azadeh; Tan, Kristy; Juge, Lauriane; Bilston, Lynne E; Cheng, Shaokoon

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to show how endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) treatment may affect cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow dynamics in hydrocephalus, with and without aqueductal stenosis. Hydrocephalus is a neurological disorder which is characterized by enlarged brain ventricles. The periodic motion of CSF flow as a function of the cardiac cycle was prescribed as the inlet boundary condition at the foramen of Monro, and ETV was modeled as a 5mm diameter hole in the anterior wall of the third ventricle. The results show that ETV reduces the pressure in the ventricles by nine-fold in the model with aqueductal stenosis, and three-fold in the model without aqueductal stenosis. More importantly, ETV changes the temporal characteristics of the CSF pressure waveform in the model without aqueductal stenosis, such that there is higher pressure in the ventricle during diastole. This study suggests that changes in the temporal characteristics of the CSF pressure waveform in the ventricles may be the reason why ETV treatment is not effective for hydrocephalus without aqueductal stenosis.

  13. Flowing cerebrospinal fluid in normal and hydrocephalic states: Appearance on MR images

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, W.G.; Kortman, K.E.; Burgoyne, B.; Eng, D.

    1986-06-01

    The signal intensity of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the cerebral aqueduct and lateral ventricles on magnetic resonance (MR) images was evaluated in 16 healthy individuals and in 32 patients with various forms of hydrocephalus (20 with chronic normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH), seven with acute communicating hydrocephalus, and five with hydrocephalus ex vacuo (atrophy)). The low signal intensity frequently observed in the cerebral aqueduct is believed to reflect the pulsatile motion of CSF, which is related to the cardiac cycle. While this aqueductal flow void phenomenon can be observed in healthy individuals, it is most pronounced in patients with chronic, communicating NPH; is less evident in patients with acute, communicating hydrocephalus and is least evident in patients with atrophy. Ventricular compliance is known to be essentially normal in atrophy, mildly decreased in acute, communicating hydrocephalus; and severely decreased in NPH. The degree of aqueductal signal loss is believed to reflect the velocity of the pulsatile CSF motion, which in turn depends on the relative ventricular compliance and surface area.

  14. Interactions between Flow Oscillations and Biochemical Parameters in the Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Puy, Vincent; Zmudka-Attier, Jadwiga; Capel, Cyrille; Bouzerar, Roger; Serot, Jean-Marie; Bourgeois, Anne-Marie; Ausseil, Jérome; Balédent, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The equilibrium between the ventricular and lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compartments may be disturbed (in terms of flow and biochemistry) in patients with chronic hydrocephalus (CH). Using flow magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and CSF assays, we sought to determine whether changes in CSF were associated with biochemical alterations. Nine elderly patients with CH underwent phase-contrast MRI. An index of CSF dynamics (Idyn) was defined as the product of the lumbar and ventricular CSF flows. During surgery, samples of CSF were collected from the lumbar and ventricular compartments and assayed for chloride, glucose and total protein. The lumbar/ventricular (L/V) ratio was calculated for each analyte. The ratio between measured and expected levels (Ibioch) was calculated for each analyte and compared with Idyn. Idyn varied from 0 to 100.103μl2.s2. In contrast to the L/V ratios for chloride and glucose, the L/V ratio for total protein varied markedly from one patient to another (mean ± standard deviation (SD): 2.63 ± 1.24). The Ibioch for total protein was strongly correlated with the corresponding Idyn (Spearman’s R: 0.98; p < 5 × 10−5).We observed correlated alterations in CSF flow and biochemical parameters in patients with CH. Our findings also highlight the value of dynamic flow analysis in the interpretation of data on CSF biochemistry. PMID:27445797

  15. Sensitivity of a radioimmunoassay method for detection of certain viral antibodies in sera and cerebrospinal fluids.

    PubMed

    Forghani, B; Schmidt, N J; Lennette, E H

    1976-12-01

    An indirect solid-phase radioimmunoassay (RIA) was applied to titration of serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) antibodies against a variety of viruses including rubella, mumps, measles, herpes simplex, varicella-zoster, and vaccinia. The test used fixed, virus-infected cells as a source of antigen, and conditions for optimal production of viral antigen were determined for each virus-host cell system. In acute, uncomplicated viral infections, sera taken 2 to 5 days after onset generally had low homotypic RIA titers ranging from less than 1:100 to 1:500, whereas convalescent-phase titers ranged from 1:128,000 to 1:512,000. Rubella and measles antibody titers as high as 1:256,000 were demonstrated by RIA in CSF from patients with chronic panencephalitis, whereas homologous antibody titers of 1:4,000 were detected in CSF from acute mumps, herpes simplex, and varicella-zoster virus infections with central nervous system involvement. Some heterotypic antibody was demonstrable by RIA in CSF, but, with the exception of herpes simplex antibody in a mumps virus infection, titers were markedly lower than those to the infecting virus type. RIA generally demonstrated titers at least 1,000 times higher than those obtained by conventional assays such as complement fixation, hemagglutination inhibition, neutralization, and immunofluorescent staining.

  16. Single Operation to Repair Multifocal Cerebrospinal Fluid Fistulae Following Gunshot Wound: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    White-Dzuro, Gabrielle A.; Entezami, Pouya; Wanna, George; Russell, Paul; Chambless, Lola B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Traumatic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistulae can be a challenging neurosurgical disease, often requiring complicated surgical intervention. Case Presentation A 54-year-old man presented with a gunshot wound to the head with complex injury to the skull base and significant CSF leakage from multiple sites. A single surgery was performed using a combined Neurosurgery, Neurotology, and Rhinology team, which was successful in repairing the multiple skull base defects and preventing further CSF leak. Discussion Trauma to the skull base is a common inciting factor for the development of CSF fistulae. Endoscopic approaches are often preferred for repairing these defects, but craniotomy remains a viable option that may be required in more complex cases. A combined approach has not been described previously, but was successful for this severe multifocal defect. Conclusion A multidisciplinary approach allowed for a combined intervention that addressed both the anterior and middle fossae fistulae simultaneously. This limited the potential infectious complications of continued CSF leak and allowed for early rehabilitation. PMID:27330926

  17. Determination of dopamine in synthetic cerebrospinal fluid by SWV with a graphite-polyurethane composite electrode.

    PubMed

    de Toledo, R A; Santos, M C; Cavalheiro, E T G; Mazo, L H

    2005-03-01

    This work describes an electroanalytical investigation of dopamine using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and the graphite-polyurethane composite electrode (GPU). In CV studies, well-defined redox peaks characterize the oxidation process at the GPU electrode, which is indicative of electrocatalytic effects associated with active sites on the GPU electrode surface. A new analytical methodology was developed using the GPU electrode and square wave voltammetry (SWV) in BR buffer solution (0.1 mol L(-1); pH 7.4). Analytical curves were constructed under optimized conditions (f=60s(-1), DeltaE(a)=50 mV, DeltaE(I)=2 mV) and detection and quantification limits of 6.4x10(-8) mol L(-1) (12.1 microg L(-1)) and 5.2x10(-6) mol L(-1) (0.9 mg L(-1)), respectively, were achieved. The precision of the method was checked by performing ten successive measurements for a 9.9x10(-6) mol L(-1) dopamine solution. For intra-assay and inter-assay precisions, the relative standard deviations were 1.9 and 2.3%, respectively. In order to evaluate the developed methodology, the determination of dopamine was performed with good sensitivity and selectivity, without the interference of ascorbic acid in synthetic cerebrospinal fluid, which indicates that the new methodology enables reliable analysis of dopamine. PMID:15714300

  18. Human Cerebrospinal Fluid Promotes Neuronal Viability and Activity of Hippocampal Neuronal Circuits In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Alcazar, Marta; Culley, Georgia; Lyckenvik, Tim; Mobarrez, Kristoffer; Bjorefeldt, Andreas; Wasling, Pontus; Seth, Henrik; Asztely, Frederik; Harrer, Andrea; Iglseder, Bernhard; Aigner, Ludwig; Hanse, Eric; Illes, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    For decades it has been hypothesized that molecules within the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diffuse into the brain parenchyma and influence the function of neurons. However, the functional consequences of CSF on neuronal circuits are largely unexplored and unknown. A major reason for this is the absence of appropriate neuronal in vitro model systems, and it is uncertain if neurons cultured in pure CSF survive and preserve electrophysiological functionality in vitro. In this article, we present an approach to address how human CSF (hCSF) influences neuronal circuits in vitro. We validate our approach by comparing the morphology, viability, and electrophysiological function of single neurons and at the network level in rat organotypic slice and primary neuronal cultures cultivated either in hCSF or in defined standard culture media. Our results demonstrate that rodent hippocampal slices and primary neurons cultured in hCSF maintain neuronal morphology and preserve synaptic transmission. Importantly, we show that hCSF increases neuronal viability and the number of electrophysiologically active neurons in comparison to the culture media. In summary, our data indicate that hCSF represents a physiological environment for neurons in vitro and a superior culture condition compared to the defined standard media. Moreover, this experimental approach paves the way to assess the functional consequences of CSF on neuronal circuits as well as suggesting a novel strategy for central nervous system (CNS) disease modeling. PMID:26973467

  19. Natural killer cell subsets in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Martín, E; Picón, C; Costa-Frossard, L; Alenda, R; Sainz de la Maza, S; Roldán, E; Espiño, M; Villar, L M; Álvarez-Cermeño, J C

    2015-01-01

    Changes in blood natural killer (NK) cells, important players of the immune innate system, have been described in multiple sclerosis (MS). We studied percentages and total cell counts of different effector and regulatory NK cells in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of MS patients and other neurological diseases to gain clearer knowledge of the role of these cells in neuroinflammation. NK cell subsets were assessed by flow cytometry in CSF of 85 consecutive MS patients (33 with active disease and 52 with stable MS), 16 with other inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (IND) and 17 with non-inflammatory neurological diseases (NIND). MS patients showed a decrease in percentages of different CSF NK subpopulations compared to the NIND group. However, absolute cell counts showed a significant increase of all NK subsets in MS and IND patients, revealing that the decrease in percentages does not reflect a real reduction of these immune cells. Remarkably, MS patients showed a significant increase of regulatory/effector (CD56bright/CD56dim) NK ratio compared to IND and NIND groups. In addition, MS activity associated with an expansion of NK T cells. These data show that NK cell subsets do not increase uniformly in all inflammatory neurological disease and suggest strongly that regulatory CD56bright and NK T cells may arise in CSF of MS patients as an attempt to counteract the CNS immune activation characteristic of the disease. PMID:25565222

  20. Natural killer cell subsets in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Martín, E; Picón, C; Costa-Frossard, L; Alenda, R; Sainz de la Maza, S; Roldán, E; Espiño, M; Villar, L M; Álvarez-Cermeño, J C

    2015-05-01

    Changes in blood natural killer (NK) cells, important players of the immune innate system, have been described in multiple sclerosis (MS). We studied percentages and total cell counts of different effector and regulatory NK cells in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of MS patients and other neurological diseases to gain clearer knowledge of the role of these cells in neuroinflammation. NK cell subsets were assessed by flow cytometry in CSF of 85 consecutive MS patients (33 with active disease and 52 with stable MS), 16 with other inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (IND) and 17 with non-inflammatory neurological diseases (NIND). MS patients showed a decrease in percentages of different CSF NK subpopulations compared to the NIND group. However, absolute cell counts showed a significant increase of all NK subsets in MS and IND patients, revealing that the decrease in percentages does not reflect a real reduction of these immune cells. Remarkably, MS patients showed a significant increase of regulatory/effector (CD56(bright) /CD56(dim) ) NK ratio compared to IND and NIND groups. In addition, MS activity associated with an expansion of NK T cells. These data show that NK cell subsets do not increase uniformly in all inflammatory neurological disease and suggest strongly that regulatory CD56(bright) and NK T cells may arise in CSF of MS patients as an attempt to counteract the CNS immune activation characteristic of the disease. PMID:25565222

  1. Assessment of the Central Effects of Natural Uranium via Behavioural Performances and the Cerebrospinal Fluid Metabolome.

    PubMed

    Lestaevel, P; Grison, S; Favé, G; Elie, C; Dhieux, B; Martin, J C; Tack, K; Souidi, M

    2016-01-01

    Natural uranium (NU), a component of the earth's crust, is not only a heavy metal but also an alpha particle emitter, with chemical and radiological toxicity. Populations may therefore be chronically exposed to NU through drinking water and food. Since the central nervous system is known to be sensitive to pollutants during its development, we assessed the effects on the behaviour and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) metabolome of rats exposed for 9 months from birth to NU via lactation and drinking water (1.5, 10, or 40 mg·L(-1) for male rats and 40 mg·L(-1) for female rats). Medium-term memory decreased in comparison to controls in male rats exposed to 1.5, 10, or 40 mg·L(-1) NU. In male rats, spatial working memory and anxiety- and depressive-like behaviour were only altered by exposure to 40 mg·L(-1) NU and any significant effect was observed on locomotor activity. In female rats exposed to NU, only locomotor activity was significantly increased in comparison with controls. LC-MS metabolomics of CSF discriminated the fingerprints of the male and/or female NU-exposed and control groups. This study suggests that exposure to environmental doses of NU from development to adulthood can have an impact on rat brain function. PMID:27247806

  2. A zone immunoelectrophoresis assay method for quantification of apolipoprotein D in human cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Holmquist, L; Fredrikson, S; Vesterberg, O

    1996-10-15

    A zone immunoelectrophoresis assay (ZIA) has been developed for the quantification of apolipoprotein D (apo D) in human unconcentrated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The apo D concentrations of samples of the serum, plasma and CSF were directly proportional to the migration distances of the corresponding zones of immunoprecipitates developed during electrophoresis in glass capillaries filled with antibody-containing agarose gel. A linear standard curve, between about 1 and 12 mg of apo D/1 was obtained using a commercial serum preparation. Seronorm, as apo D standard. The coefficients of variation of the ZIA were below 8% (n = 5 x 6) and 10% (n = 8) for within-run and between-run reproducibility, respectively. Quantification experiments with disulfide-reducing agent, mixtures of CSF and urine as well as frozen and stored CSF samples indicated parallelism between the precipitate-forming immunologic reactions of apo D in different sample matrices when performed with ZIA. Application of this method to quantify apo D of CSF and plasma samples from 51 normal healthy men aged 16-72 years yielded means +/- SD of 5.3 +/- 1.5 mg/l and 128.4 +/- 22.7 mg/l, respectively. No correlation was found between the CSF and plasma apo D concentrations.

  3. Mechanism for measurement of flow rate of cerebrospinal fluid in hydrocephalus shunts.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Sathish; Kovar, Spencer; Qu, Peng; Inwald, David; Williams, Evan; Qu, Hongwei; Zakalik, Karol

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of the flow rate of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or existence of CSF flow inside the shunt tube after shunt implant have been reported as tedious process for both patients and doctors; this paper outlines a potential in vitro flow rate measurement method for CSF in the hydrocephalus shunt. The use of implantable titanium elements in the shunt has been proposed to allow for an accurate temperature measurement along the shunt for prediction of CSF flow rate. The CSF flow velocity can be deduced by decoupling the thermal transfer in the measured differential time at a pair of measurement spots of the titanium elements. Finite element analyses on the fluidic and thermal behaviors of the shunt system have been conducted. Preliminary bench-top measurements on a simulated system have been carried out. The measured flow rates, ranging from 0.5 mm/sec to 1.0 mm/sec, which is clinically practical, demonstrate good agreements with the simulation results. PMID:25570411

  4. Derivative spectrophotometric analysis of cerebrospinal fluid for the detection of a ruptured cerebral aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadri, P. R.; Majumder, A.; Morgan, C. J.; Pyne, G. J.; Zuccarello, M.; Jauch, E.; Wagner, K. R.; Clark, J. F.; Caffery, J., Jr.; Beyette, Fred R., Jr.

    2003-11-01

    A cerebral aneurysm is a weakened portion of an artery in the brain. When a cerebral aneurysm ruptures, a specific type of bleeding known as a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) occurs. No test exists currently to screen people for the presence of an aneurysm. The diagnosis of a SAH is made after an aneurysm ruptures, and the literature indicates that nearly one-third of patients with a SAH are initially misdiagnosed and subjected to the risks associated with aneurysm re-rupture. For those individuals with a suspected SAH, a computerized tomography (CT) scan of the brain usually demonstrates evidence of the bleeding. However, in a considerable portion of people, the CT scan is unable to detect the blood that has escaped from the blood vessel. For circumstances when a SAH is suspected despite a normal CT scan, physicians make the diagnosis of SAH by performing a spinal tap. A spinal tap uses a needle to sample the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collected from the patient"s back; CSF is tainted with blood after the aneurysm ruptures. To distinguish between a common headache and a SAH, a fast and an effective solution is required. We describe the development of an effective detection system integrating hardware and a powerful software interface solution. Briefly, CSF from the patient is aspirated and excited with an appropriate wavelength of light. The software employs spectrophotometric analysis of the output spectra and lays the foundation for the development of portable and user-friendly equipment for detection of a ruptured cerebral aneurysm.

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for differentiation of frontotemporal lobar degeneration from Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Irwin, David J; Trojanowski, John Q; Grossman, Murray

    2013-01-01

    Accurate ante mortem diagnosis in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is crucial to the development and implementation of etiology-based therapies. Several neurodegenerative disease-associated proteins, including the major protein constituents of inclusions in Alzheimer's disease (AD) associated with amyloid-beta (Aβ(1-42)) plaque and tau neurofibrillary tangle pathology, can be measured in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for diagnostic applications. Comparative studies using autopsy-confirmed samples suggest that CSF total-tau (t-tau) and Aβ(1-42) levels can accurately distinguish FTLD from AD, with a high t-tau to Aβ(1-42) ratio diagnostic of AD; however, there is also an urgent need for FTLD-specific biomarkers. These analytes will require validation in large autopsy-confirmed cohorts and face challenges of standardization of within- and between-laboratory sources of error. In addition, CSF biomarkers with prognostic utility and longitudinal study of CSF biomarker levels over the course of disease are also needed. Current goals in the field include identification of analytes that are easily and reliably measured and can be used alone or in a multi-modal approach to provide an accurate prediction of underlying neuropathology for use in clinical trials of disease modifying treatments in FTLD. To achieve these goals it will be of the utmost importance to view neurodegenerative disease, including FTLD, as a clinicopathological entity, rather than exclusively a clinical syndrome.

  6. Approach to Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Biomarker Discovery and Evaluation in HIV Infection

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Richard W.; Peterson, Julia; Fuchs, Dietmar; Angel, Thomas E.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hagberg, Lars; Spudich, Serena S.; Smith, Richard D.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Brown, Joseph N.; Gisslen, Magnus

    2013-12-13

    Central nervous system (CNS) infection is a nearly universal facet of systemic HIV infection that varies in character and neurological consequences. While clinical staging and neuropsychological test performance have been helpful in evaluating patients, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers present a valuable and objective approach to more accurate diagnosis, assessment of treatment effects and understanding of evolving pathobiology. We review some lessons from our recent experience with CSF biomarker studies. We have used two approaches to biomarker analysis: targeted, hypothesis-driven and non-targeted exploratory discovery methods. We illustrate the first with data from a cross-sectional study of defined subject groups across the spectrum of systemic and CNS disease progression and the second with a longitudinal study of the CSF proteome in subjects initiating antiretroviral treatment. Both approaches can be useful and, indeed, complementary. The first is helpful in assessing known or hypothesized biomarkers while the second can identify novel biomarkers and point to broad interactions in pathogenesis. Common to both is the need for well-defined samples and subjects that span a spectrum of biological activity and biomarker concentrations. Previouslydefined guide biomarkers of CNS infection, inflammation and neural injury are useful in categorizing samples for analysis and providing critical biological context for biomarker discovery studies. CSF biomarkers represent an underutilized but valuable approach to understanding the interactions of HIV and the CNS and to more objective diagnosis and assessment of disease activity. Both hypothesis-based and discovery methods can be useful in advancing the definition and use of these biomarkers.

  7. Direct Identification of Enteroviruses in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with Suspected Meningitis by Nested PCR Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Krasota, Alexandr; Loginovskih, Natalia; Ivanova, Olga; Lipskaya, Galina

    2016-01-01

    Enteroviruses, the most common human viral pathogens worldwide, have been associated with serous meningitis, encephalitis, syndrome of acute flaccid paralysis, myocarditis and the onset of diabetes type 1. In the future, the rapid identification of the etiological agent would allow to adjust the therapy promptly and thereby improve the course of the disease and prognosis. We developed RT-nested PCR amplification of the genomic region coding viral structural protein VP1 for direct identification of enteroviruses in clinical specimens and compared it with the existing analogs. One-hundred-fifty-nine cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) from patients with suspected meningitis were studied. The amplification of VP1 genomic region using the new method was achieved for 86 (54.1%) patients compared with 75 (47.2%), 53 (33.3%) and 31 (19.5%) achieved with previously published methods. We identified 11 serotypes of the Enterovirus species B in 2012, including relatively rare echovirus 14 (E-14), E-15 and E-32, and eight serotypes of species B and 5 enteroviruses A71 (EV-A71) in 2013. The developed method can be useful for direct identification of enteroviruses in clinical material with the low virus loads such as CSF. PMID:26751470

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid soluble L-selectin (sCD62L) in meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed Central

    Bührer, C; Herold, R; Stibenz, D; Henze, G; Obladen, M

    1996-01-01

    The leucocyte adhesion molecule L-selectin (CD62L) is rapidly cleaved off proteolytically after cell activation, generating soluble L-selectin (sCD62L) molecules. sCD62L concentrations were determined in 185 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples obtained from children aged 1 month to 17 years. In 36 CSF samples of children with meningoencephalitis, sCD62L was significantly higher (median 209 fmol/ml) than in samples of children with other febrile diseases (n = 67, median 50 fmol/ml) or non-febrile disorders (n = 82, median 44 fmol/ml). There was a positive correlation between CSF protein and CSF sCD62L (rS = 0.68), suggesting that a disturbed blood-brain barrier contributes to raised sCD62L concentrations in the CSF. However, the CSF sCD62L/protein ratio of children with meningoencephalitis was significantly higher than in children with other febrile diseases or non-febrile disorders, indicating that sCD62L concentrations in children with meningoencephalitis were higher than expected from plasma leakage alone. It is concluded that both an impaired blood-brain barrier and the generation of sCD62L by infiltrating leucocytes contribute to raised CSF sCD62L concentrations in children with meningoencephalitis. PMID:8669926

  9. Elevated nerve growth factor and neurotrophin-3 levels in cerebrospinal fluid of children with hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Hochhaus, Frederike; Koehne, Petra; Schäper, Christoph; Butenandt, Otfrid; Felderhoff-Mueser, Ursula; Ring-Mrozik, Elfride; Obladen, Michael; Bührer, Christoph

    2001-01-01

    Background Elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) resulting from impaired drainage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) causes hydrocephalus with damage to the central nervous system. Clinical symptoms of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) in infants may be difficult to diagnose, leading to delayed treatment by shunt placement. Until now, no biochemical marker of elevated ICP has been available for clinical diagnosis and monitoring. In experimental animal models, nerve growth factor (NGF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) have been shown to be produced by glial cells as an adaptive response to hypoxia. We investigated whether concentrations of NGF and NT-3 are increased in the CSF of children with hydrocephalus. Methods NGF was determined in CSF samples collected from 42 hydrocephalic children on 65 occasions (taps or shunt placement surgery). CSF samples obtained by lumbar puncture from 22 children with suspected, but unconfirmed bacterial infection served as controls. Analysis was performed using ELISA techniques. Results NGF concentrations in hydrocephalic children were over 50-fold increased compared to controls (median 225 vs 4 pg/mL, p < 0.0001). NT-3 was detectable (> 1 pg/mL) in 14/31 hydrocephalus samples at 2–51 pg/mL but in none of 11 control samples (p = 0.007). Conclusion NGF and NT-3 concentrations are increased in children with hydrocephalus. This may represent an adaptive response of the brain to elevated ICP. PMID:11580868

  10. Increased cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of soluble Fas (CD95/Apo-1) in hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Felderhoff-Mueser, U; Herold, R; Hochhaus, F; Koehne, P; Ring-Mrozik, E; Obladen, M; Buhrer, C

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—The ventricular enlargement observed in children with chronically raised intracranial pressure (ICP) causes a secondary loss of brain tissue. In animal studies of hydrocephalus, programmed cell death (apoptosis) has been found as a major mechanism of neuronal injury. One of the regulators of the apoptotic cell death programme is the receptor mediated Fas/Fas ligand interaction.
METHODS—The apoptosis regulating cytokines soluble Fas (sFas) and soluble Fas ligand (sFasL) were studied in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 31 hydrocephalic children undergoing shunt surgery for symptomatic hydrocephalus and 18controls.
RESULTS—High concentrations of sFas were observed in children with hydrocephalus (median 252 ng/ml); in controls sFas was below the detection limit (0.5 ng/ml). sFasL was undetectable in all but one sample.
CONCLUSION—High concentrations of sFas in the CSF of children with hydrocephalus suggest intrinsic sFas production, potentially antagonising pressure mediated Fas activation.

 PMID:11259245

  11. Cytoskeletal proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid as biomarker of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Madeddu, Roberto; Farace, Cristiano; Tolu, Paola; Solinas, Giuliana; Asara, Yolande; Sotgiu, Maria Alessandra; Delogu, Lucia Gemma; Prados, Jose Carlos; Sotgiu, Stefano; Montella, Andrea

    2013-02-01

    The axonal cytoskeleton is a finely organized system, essential for maintaining the integrity of the axon. Axonal degeneration is implicated in the pathogenesis of unremitting disability of multiple sclerosis (MS). Purpose of this study is to evaluate levels of cytoskeletal proteins such as neurofilament light protein (NFL), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and β-tubulin (β-Tub) isoforms II and III in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of MS patients and their correlation with MS clinical indices. CSF levels of cytoskeletal proteins were determined in 51 patients: 33 with MS and 18 with other neurological diseases (OND). NFL, GFAP and β-Tub II proteins were significantly higher (p < 0.0001) in MS than in OND group; no significant difference (p > 0.05) was found between MS and OND with regard to β-Tub III. Interestingly, levels of β-Tub III and NFL were higher in progressive than in remitting MS forms; on the contrary, higher levels of β-Tub II and GFAP were found in remitting MS forms. However, with the exception of β-Tub III, all proteins tend to decrease their CSF levels concomitantly with the increasing disability (EDSS) score. Overall, our results might indicate β-Tub II as a potential candidate for diagnostic and β-Tub III as a possible prognostic biomarker of MS. Therefore, further analyses are legitimated and desirable. PMID:22362332

  12. Contemporary Approach to the Diagnosis and Management of Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, Tiffany; Levy, Joshua; Fatakia, Adil; McCoul, Edward D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea, when left untreated, can lead to meningitis and other serious complications. Treatment traditionally has entailed an open craniotomy, although the paradigm has now evolved to encompass endoscopic procedures. Trauma, both accidental and iatrogenic, causes the majority of leaks, and trauma involving skull base and facial fractures is most likely to cause CSF rhinorrhea. Diagnosis is aided by biochemical assay and imaging studies. Methods: We reviewed the literature and summarized current practice regarding the diagnosis and management of CSF rhinorrhea. Results: Management of CSF leaks is dictated by the nature of the fistula, its location, and flow volume. Control of elevated intracranial pressure may require medical therapy or shunt procedures. Surgical reconstruction utilizes a graduated approach involving vascularized, nonvascularized, and adjunctive techniques to achieve closure of the CSF leak. Endoscopic techniques have an important role in select cases. Conclusion: An active surgical approach to closing CSF leaks may provide better long-term outcomes in some patients compared to more conservative management. PMID:27303222

  13. Systemic Pharmacokinetics and Cerebrospinal Fluid Uptake of Intravenous Ceftriaxone in Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanli; Cudkowicz, Merit E.; Shefner, Jeremy; Krivickas, Lisa; David, William S.; Vriesendorp, Francine; Pestronk, Alan; Caress, James B.; Katz, Jonathan; Simpson, Ericka; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Pascuzzi, Robert; Glass, Jonathan; Rezania, Kourosh; Harmatz, Jerold S.; Schoenfeld, David; Greenblatt, David J

    2015-01-01

    The cephalosporin antibiotic ceftriaxone was evaluated as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The pharmacokinetics (PK) of ceftriaxone in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were investigated in 66 participants in a previously reported clinical trial. Their mean age was 51 years, and 65 % were male. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups receiving intravenous infusions (mean duration: 25 minutes) every 12 hours of either: placebo and placebo; 2 grams ceftriaxone and placebo; or 2 grams ceftriaxone twice. Mean steady-state plasma PK variables were: volume of distribution, 14 liters (0.17 liters/kg); elimination half-life, 8 - 9 hours; total clearance, 17-21 mL/min (0.22 - 0.25 mL/min/kg). Values were not different between dosage groups. CSF PK analysis, determined through sparse CSF sampling, indicated apparent entry and elimination half-life values of 1.0 and 34 hours, respectively. With both dosage regimens, CSF concentrations were maintained above the target threshold of 1.0 μM (0.55 μg/mL) as determined from in vitro models. The plasma and CSF PK profile of ceftriaxone were used as a basis for planning the Phase 3 clinical trial of ceftriaxone in ALS. PMID:24771634

  14. Effects of cerebrospinal fluid proteins on brain atrophy rates in cognitively healthy older adults.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Niklas; Insel, Philip; Nosheny, Rachel; Trojanowski, John Q; Shaw, Leslie M; Jack, Clifford R; Tosun, Duygu; Weiner, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Biomarkers associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like brain atrophy in healthy individuals may identify mechanisms involved in early stage AD. Aside from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) β-amyloid42 (Aβ42) and tau, no studies have tested associations between CSF proteins and AD-like brain atrophy. We studied 90 healthy elders, who underwent lumbar puncture at baseline, and serial magnetic resonance imaging scans for up to 4 years. We tested statistical effects of baseline CSF proteins (N = 70 proteins related to Aβ42-metabolism, microglial activity, and synaptic/neuronal function) on atrophy rates in 7 AD-related regions. Besides the effects of Aβ42 and phosphorylated tau (P-tau) that were seen in several regions, novel CSF proteins were found to have effects in inferior and middle temporal cortex (including apolipoprotein CIII, apolipoprotein D, and apolipoprotein H). Several proteins (including S100β and matrix metalloproteinase-3) had effects that depended on the presence of brain Aβ pathology, as measured by CSF Aβ42. Other proteins (including P-tau and apolipoprotein D) had effects even after adjusting for CSF Aβ42. The statistical effects in this exploratory study were mild and not significant after correction for multiple comparisons, but some of the identified proteins may be associated with brain atrophy in healthy persons. Proteins interacting with CSF Aβ42 may be related to Aβ brain pathology, whereas proteins associated with atrophy even after adjusting for CSF Aβ42 may be related to Aβ-independent mechanisms.

  15. Sellar Reconstruction and Rates of Delayed Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak after Endoscopic Pituitary Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sanders-Taylor, Chris; Anaizi, Amjad; Kosty, Jennifer; Zimmer, Lee A.; Theodosopoulos, Phillip V.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Delayed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks are a complication in transsphenoidal surgery, potentially causing morbidity and longer hospital stays. Sella reconstruction can limit this complication, but is it necessary in all patients? Design Retrospective review. Setting Single-surgeon team (2005–2012) addresses this trend toward graded reconstruction. Participants A total of 264 consecutive patients with pituitary adenomas underwent endoscopic transsphenoidal resections. Sellar defects sizable to accommodate a fat graft were reconstructed. Main outcomes Delayed CSF leak and autograft harvesting. Results Overall, 235 (89%) had reconstruction with autograft (abdominal fat, septal bone/cartilage) and biological glue. Delayed CSF leak was 1.9%: 1.7%, and 3.4% for reconstructed and nonreconstructed sellar defects, respectively (p = 0.44). Complications included one reoperation for leak, two developed meningitis, and autograft harvesting resulted in abdominal hematoma in 0.9% and wound infection in 0.4%. Conclusion In our patients, delayed CSF leaks likely resulted from missed intraoperative CSF leaks or postoperative changes. Universal sellar reconstruction can preemptively treat missed leaks and provide a barrier for postoperative changes. When delayed CSF leaks occurred, sellar reconstruction often allowed for conservative treatment (i.e., lumbar drain) without repeat surgery. We found universal reconstruction provides a low risk of delayed CSF leak with minimal complications. PMID:26225317

  16. Natural killer cell subsets in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Martín, E; Picón, C; Costa-Frossard, L; Alenda, R; Sainz de la Maza, S; Roldán, E; Espiño, M; Villar, L M; Álvarez-Cermeño, J C

    2015-05-01

    Changes in blood natural killer (NK) cells, important players of the immune innate system, have been described in multiple sclerosis (MS). We studied percentages and total cell counts of different effector and regulatory NK cells in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of MS patients and other neurological diseases to gain clearer knowledge of the role of these cells in neuroinflammation. NK cell subsets were assessed by flow cytometry in CSF of 85 consecutive MS patients (33 with active disease and 52 with stable MS), 16 with other inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (IND) and 17 with non-inflammatory neurological diseases (NIND). MS patients showed a decrease in percentages of different CSF NK subpopulations compared to the NIND group. However, absolute cell counts showed a significant increase of all NK subsets in MS and IND patients, revealing that the decrease in percentages does not reflect a real reduction of these immune cells. Remarkably, MS patients showed a significant increase of regulatory/effector (CD56(bright) /CD56(dim) ) NK ratio compared to IND and NIND groups. In addition, MS activity associated with an expansion of NK T cells. These data show that NK cell subsets do not increase uniformly in all inflammatory neurological disease and suggest strongly that regulatory CD56(bright) and NK T cells may arise in CSF of MS patients as an attempt to counteract the CNS immune activation characteristic of the disease.

  17. Simultaneous Detection of Five Pathogens from Cerebrospinal Fluid Specimens Using Luminex Technology

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Linfu; Wu, Rui; Shi, Xiaodan; Feng, Dongyun; Feng, Guodong; Yang, Yining; Dai, Wen; Bian, Ting; Liu, Tingting; He, Ying; Shi, Ming; Zhao, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for the outcome of central nervous system (CNS) infections. In this study, we developed a multiplex PCR-Luminex assay for the simultaneous detection of five major pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, which frequently cause CNS infections. Through the hybridization reaction between multiplex PCR-amplified targets and oligonucleotide “anti-TAG” sequences, we found that the PCR-Luminex assay could detect as low as 101–102 copies of synthetic pathogen DNAs. Furthermore, 163 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens from patients with suspected CNS infections were used to evaluate the efficiency of this multiplex PCR-Luminex method. Compared with Ziehl-Neelsen stain, this assay showed a high diagnostic accuracy for tuberculosis meningitis (sensitivity, 90.7% and specificity, 99.1%). For cryptococcal meningitis, the sensitivity and specificity were 92% and 97.1%, respectively, compared with the May Grunwald Giemsa (MGG) stain. For herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 encephalitis, the sensitivities were 80.8% and 100%, and the specificities were 94.2% and 99%, respectively, compared with Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) assays. Taken together, this multiplex PCR-Luminex assay showed potential efficiency for the simultaneous detection of five pathogens and may be a promising supplement to conventional methods for diagnosing CNS infections. PMID:26861363

  18. Amyloid beta protein levels in cerebrospinal fluid are elevated in early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, T; Shoji, M; Harigaya, Y; Watanabe, M; Hosoda, K; Cheung, T T; Shaffer, L M; Golde, T E; Younkin, L H; Younkin, S G

    1994-12-01

    The 4-kd amyloid beta protein (A beta) deposited as amyloid in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is produced and released by normal proteolytic processing of the amyloid beta protein precursor (beta APP) and is readily detected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Here, we present the levels of A beta in CSF from a total of 95 subjects, including 38 patients with AD, 14 with early-onset AD and 24 with late-onset AD, 25 normal control subjects, and 32 patients with other neurological diseases. The level of A beta decreased with normal aging, and there was a significant elevation in the level of A beta in the CSF of early-onset AD patients (4.14 +/- 1.37 pmol/ml, p < 0.01). Neither Mini-Mental State nor Functional Assessment Staging were correlated with the amount of A beta in the CSF. The A beta/secreted form of beta APP ratio was elevated, but the level of alpha 1-antichymotrypsin in the CSF did not correlate with the level of CSF A beta in early-onset AD patients. Thus, the level of A beta in the CSF is elevated in early-onset AD patients and is suggested to be correlated with the pathology in the brain that characterizes AD. PMID:7998778

  19. Measurement of fluorescent probes concentration ratio in the cerebrospinal fluid for early detection of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbater, Osnat; Gannot, Israel

    2014-03-01

    The pathogenic process of Alzheimer's Disease (AD), characterized by amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain, begins years before the clinical diagnosis. Here, we suggest a novel method which may detect AD up to nine years earlier than current exams, minimally invasive, with minimal risk, pain and side effects. The method is based on previous reports which relate the concentrations of biomarkers in the Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) (Aβ and Tau proteins) to the future development of AD in mild cognitive impairment patients. Our method, which uses fluorescence measurements of the relative concentrations of the CSF biomarkers, replaces the lumbar puncture process required for CSF drawing. The process uses a miniature needle coupled trough an optical fiber to a laser source and a detector. The laser radiation excites fluorescent probes which were prior injected and bond to the CSF biomarkers. Using the ratio between the fluorescence intensities emitted from the two biomarkers, which is correlated to their concentration ratio, the patient's risk of developing AD is estimated. A theoretical model was developed and validated using Monte Carlo simulations, demonstrating the relation between fluorescence emission and biomarker concentration. The method was tested using multi-layered tissue phantoms simulating the epidural fat, the CSF in the sub-arachnoid space and the bone. These phantoms were prepared with different scattering and absorption coefficients, thicknesses and fluorescence concentrations in order to simulate variations in human anatomy and in the needle location. The theoretical and in-vitro results are compared and the method's accuracy is discussed.

  20. Nitric Oxide Metabolite Concentration in Cerebrospinal Fluid: Useful as a Prognostic Marker?

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Saurabh; Singh, Rakesh; Verma, Ashish; Bansal, Hemant

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Prospective study. Purpose To establish the significance of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) nitric oxide metabolite (NOx) concentration in acute spinal cord injury (SCI) patients to assess the neurological severity and prognosis. Overview of Literature Quantitative analysis of specific biomarkers in CSF will assess neurological severity more accurately and permit the formulation of a more precise management plan. Methods Forty SCI patients represented the cases and 20 lower limb injury patients were the controls. NOx concentration in CSF was measured at week 1, 2, and 4 by Griess method. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, T2-weighted) done in each case to measure cord edema and neurological severity was assessed using the Frankel classification. Results CSF NOx concentration peaked at week 2 and declined to normal by week 4. The concentration remained normal in controls. Mean NOx concentration was directly proportional to the severity of acute SCI as correlated with cord edema seen in MRI and neurological severity assessed. Conclusions CSF NOx concentration can be considered a specific quantitative biomarker in acute stage of SCI to predict the severity and prognosis of SCI patients. PMID:27790309

  1. Effect of Protein Binding on Unbound Atazanavir and Darunavir Cerebrospinal Fluid Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Delille, Cecile A.; Pruett, Sarah T.; Marconi, Vincent C.; Lennox, Jeffrey L.; Armstrong, Wendy S.; Arrendale, Richard F.; Sheth, Anandi N.; Easley, Kirk A.; Acosta, Edward P.; Vunnava, Aswani; Ofotokun, Ighovwerha

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) exhibit different protein binding affinities and achieve variable plasma and tissue concentrations. Degree of plasma protein binding may impact central nervous system penetration. This cross-sectional study assessed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) unbound PI concentrations, HIV-1 RNA, and neopterin levels in subjects receiving either ritonavir-boosted darunavir (DRV), 95% plasma protein bound, or atazanavir (ATV), 86% bound. Unbound PI trough concentrations were measured using rapid equilibrium dialysis and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Plasma and CSF HIV-1 RNA and neopterin were measured by Ampliprep/COBAS® Taqman® 2.0 assay (Roche) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ALPCO), respectively. CSF/plasma unbound drug concentration ratio was higher for ATV, 0.09 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.06–0.12] than DRV, 0.04 (95%CI 0.03–0.06). Unbound CSF concentrations were lower than protein adjusted wild-type inhibitory concentration-50 (IC50) in all ATV and 1 DRV-treated subjects (P < 0.001). CSF HIV-1 RNA was detected in 2/15 ATV and 4/15 DRV subjects (P = 0.65). CSF neopterin levels were low and similar between arms. ATV relative to DRV had higher CSF/plasma unbound drug ratio. Low CSF HIV-1 RNA and neopterin suggest that both regimens resulted in CSF virologic suppression and controlled inflammation. PMID:24691856

  2. Interference of Cerebrospinal Fluid Total Protein Measurement by Povidone-Iodine Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Gounden, Verena; Sacks, David B; Zhao, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Background A falsely high cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) total protein (TP) result measured by pyrogallol red (PGR) method was suspected to be caused by preparation of the collection site with povidone-iodine (PVP-iodine) solution. Methods CSF TP was evaluated for interference in samples with different final concentrations of PVP-iodine (up to 0.25% PVP and 0.025% iodine) or iodine alone (up to 0.025% iodine) using three methods: PGR, modified biuret and benzethonium chloride (BZTC). Interference exceeding ±20% of the baseline value is considered clinically significant according the criterion defined by College of American Pathologists. Results There was a positive interference with the PGR method and a negative inference for the BZTC method in CSF samples spiked with PVP-iodine. The PVP-iodine (up to 0.25% PVP and 0.025% iodine) did not cause a clinically significant interference with the modified biuret method. PVP alone without iodine caused a positive interference with the PGR method but did not interfere with the modified biuret or the BZTC method. When the samples were spiked with iodine alone, none of the three methods was affected (change < 20%) by iodine concentration up to 0.025%. Conclusions Contamination of CSF specimens with PVP-iodine can lead to interference with CSF TP measurements using PGR or BZTC methods. PMID:25446880

  3. Changes in Purines Concentration in the Cerebrospinal Fluid of Pregnant Women Experiencing Pain During Active Labor.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, André P; Böhmer, Ana E; Hansel, Gisele; Soares, Félix A; Oses, Jean P; Giordani, Alex T; Posso, Irimar P; Auler, José Otávio C; Mendes, Florentino F; Félix, Elaine A; Portela, Luís V; Souza, Diogo O

    2015-11-01

    Labor pain has been reported as a severe pain and can be considered as a model of acute visceral pain. It is well known that extracellular purines have an important role in pain signaling in the central nervous system. This study analyzes the relationship between extracellular purines and pain perception during active labor. A prospective observational study was performed. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of the purines and their metabolites were compared between women at term pregnancy with labor pain (n = 49) and without labor pain (Caesarian section; n = 47). Control groups (healthy men and women without chronic or acute pain-n = 40 and 32, respectively) were also investigated. The CSF levels of adenosine were significantly lower in the labor pain group (P = 0.026) and negatively correlated with pain intensity measured by a visual analogue scale (r = -0.48, P = 0.0005). Interestingly, CSF levels of uric acid were significantly higher in healthy men as compared to women. Additionally, pregnant women showed increased CSF levels of ADP, GDP, adenosine and guanosine and reduced CSF levels of AMP, GTP, and uric acid as compared to non-pregnant women (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that purines, in special the nucleoside adenosine, are associated with pregnancy and labor pain.

  4. Partial characterization of a novel endogenous opioid in human cerebrospinal fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.E.; Lipman, J.J.; Byrne, W.L.

    1987-12-07

    Human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contains many uncharacterized endogenous opioids, in addition to the known enkephalins, endorphins, and dynorphins. These opioids may be separated by gel filtration chromatography and identified by radioreceptor assay for opioid activity. One region of the chromatographic elution profile, designated Peak B has previously been shown to be related to the pain status of chronic pain patients. The authors now report that human Peak B isolated from the CSF of pain-free elective surgery patients is present at a typical concentration equivalent in activity to 1.4 pmol of morphine sulfate per ml of CSF measured by radioreceptor assay. At a dose of 0.06 and 0.12 pmol morphine sulfate equivalents of CSF (MSE), injected into the cerebroventricular system of the mouse, Peak B produced an antinociceptive effect, the intensity and duration of which was dose-dependent and which was antagonized by naloxone. The mouse vas deferens (MVD) preparation was inhibited by Peak B in a manner that was sensitive to antagonism by naloxone only at low (< 1.0 ..mu..M) but not at higher (>6.0 ..mu..M) concentrations of the antagonist. Peak B activity in the MVD assay was unaffected by treatment with trypsin or ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin. 32 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  5. Pre-analytical and analytical factors influencing Alzheimer's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarker variability.

    PubMed

    Fourier, Anthony; Portelius, Erik; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Quadrio, Isabelle; Perret-Liaudet, Armand

    2015-09-20

    A panel of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers including total Tau (t-Tau), phosphorylated Tau protein at residue 181 (p-Tau) and β-amyloid peptides (Aβ42 and Aβ40), is frequently used as an aid in Alzheimer's disease (AD) diagnosis for young patients with cognitive impairment, for predicting prodromal AD in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects, for AD discrimination in atypical clinical phenotypes and for inclusion/exclusion and stratification of patients in clinical trials. Due to variability in absolute levels between laboratories, there is no consensus on medical cut-off value for the CSF AD signature. Thus, for full implementation of this core AD biomarker panel in clinical routine, this issue has to be solved. Variability can be explained both by pre-analytical and analytical factors. For example, the plastic tubes used for CSF collection and storage, the lack of reference material and the variability of the analytical protocols were identified as important sources of variability. The aim of this review is to highlight these pre-analytical and analytical factors and describe efforts done to counteract them in order to establish cut-off values for core CSF AD biomarkers. This review will give the current state of recommendations. PMID:26141614

  6. Clinical Prognosis in Neonatal Bacterial Meningitis: The Role of Cerebrospinal Fluid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dongying; Ren, Fang; Luo, Zhongcheng; Zhang, Yongjun

    2015-01-01

    Neonates are at high risk of meningitis and of resulting neurologic complications. Early recognition of neonates at risk of poor prognosis would be helpful in providing timely management. From January 2008 to June 2014, we enrolled 232 term neonates with bacterial meningitis admitted to 3 neonatology departments in Shanghai, China. The clinical status on the day of discharge from these hospitals or at a postnatal age of 2.5 to 3 months was evaluated using the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). Patients were classified into two outcome groups: good (167 cases, 72.0%, GOS = 5) or poor (65 cases, 28.0%, GOS = 1–4). Neonates with good outcome had less frequent apnea, drowsiness, poor feeding, bulging fontanelle, irritability and more severe jaundice compared to neonates with poor outcome. The good outcome group also had less pneumonia than the poor outcome group. Besides, there were statistically significant differences in hemoglobin, mean platelet volume, platelet distribution width, C-reaction protein, procalcitonin, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) glucose and CSF protein. Multivariate logistic regression analyses suggested that poor feeding, pneumonia and CSF protein were the predictors of poor outcome. CSF protein content was significantly higher in patients with poor outcome. The best cut-offs for predicting poor outcome were 1,880 mg/L in CSF protein concentration (sensitivity 70.8%, specificity 86.2%). After 2 weeks of treatment, CSF protein remained higher in the poor outcome group. High CSF protein concentration may prognosticate poor outcome in neonates with bacterial meningitis. PMID:26509880

  7. Proteomic Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid in Pneumococcal Meningitis Reveals Potential Biomarkers Associated with Survival

    PubMed Central

    Goonetilleke, Upali R.; Scarborough, Matthew; Ward, Stephen A.; Gordon, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with pneumococcal meningitis often die or have severe neurological damage despite optimal antibiotic therapy. New or improved therapy is required. The delivery of new interventions will require an improved understanding of the disease pathogenesis. Our objective was to learn more about the pathophysiology of severe meningitis through the interpretation of differences in the proteomic profile of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with meningitis. Methods Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of CSF from normal subjects (controls, n = 10) and patients with pneumococcal meningitis (n = 20) was analyzed. Spot differences were compared and identified between controls, nonsurvivors (n = 9), and survivors (n = 11). Results Protein concentration in CSF of patients with meningitis was 4-fold higher than in CSF of control subjects (7.0 mg/mL vs 0.23 mg/mL; P < .01). A mean of 2466 discrete protein spots was present in CSF of patients with meningitis. Thirty-four protein spots were differentially expressed in CSF of nonsurvivors, compared with survivors. None of these protein spots were observed in CSF of control subjects. Conclusions Proteomic screening of CSF yields potential biomarkers capable of differentiating control subjects from nonsurvivors and survivors of meningitis. Proteins involved in the inflammatory process and central metabolism were represented in the differentially expressed protein repertoire. PMID:20608875

  8. Incidence of Pinhole Type Durotomy and Subsequent Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage Following Simple Laminectomy

    PubMed Central

    Bawany, Faizan Imran; Emaduddin, Muhammad; Hussain, Mehwish; Yousuful Islam, Mohammad; Khan, Muhammad Shahzeb

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Cross sectional study. Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and the associated risk factors of pinhole type of durotomy and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage following a simple laminectomy for spinal stenosis. Overview of Literature The incidence of spinal stenosis is expected to rise with increasing life expectancy. Moreover, lumbar spinal stenosis is the most common indication for spinal injury in the geriatric population. It is therefore important to identify and prevent the risks associated with laminectomy, the most widely used surgical procedure for spinal stenosis. The serious complication of incidental dural tear or durotomy and subsequent CSF leakage has not been studied in the region of Southeast Asia. Methods In this cross sectional study, we included 138 adult patients (age>18 years), who underwent a simple laminectomy for lumbar stenosis between 2011 and 2012. CSF leakage was the main outcome variable. Patients' wounds were examined for CSF leakage up to 1 week postoperatively. Results The incidence of pinhole type durotomy and subsequent CSF leakage in our region was 8.7%. Univariate analysis showed that hypertension, diabetes and smoking were significantly associated with durotomy and increased CSF leakage by 16.72, 44.25, and 33.71 times, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that only smoking and diabetes significantly increased the chances of leakage. Conclusions Glycemic control and cessation of smoking prior to a simple laminectomy procedure reduced the incidence of a dural tear. Larger clinical studies on this lethal complication are required. PMID:26240710

  9. Recruitment of dendritic cells to the cerebrospinal fluid in bacterial neuroinfections.

    PubMed

    Pashenkov, Mikhail; Teleshova, Natalia; Kouwenhoven, Mathilde; Smirnova, Tatiana; Jin, Ya Ping; Kostulas, Vasilios; Huang, Yu Min; Pinegin, Boris; Boiko, Alexey; Link, Hans

    2002-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) accumulate in the CNS during inflammation and may contribute to local immune responses. Two DC subsets present in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are probably recruited from myeloid (CD11c(+)CD123(dim)) and plasmacytoid (CD11c(-)CD123(high)) blood DC. In bacterial meningitis and especially in Lyme meningoencephalitis, numbers of myeloid and plasmacytoid DC in CSF were increased, compared to non-inflammatory neurological diseases, and correlated with chemotactic activity of CSF for immature monocyte-derived DC (moDC). Multiple DC chemoattractants, including macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1beta, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, MCP-3, RANTES and stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1alpha were elevated in CSF in these two neuroinfections. Chemotaxis of immature moDC induced by these CSFs could be partially inhibited by mAbs against CXCR4, the receptor for SDF-1alpha, and CD88, the receptor for C5a. SDF-1alpha present in CSF also chemoattracted mature moDC, which in vivo could correspond to a diminished migration of antigen-bearing DC from the CSF to secondary lymphoid organs. Regulation of DC trafficking to and from the CSF may represent a mechanism of controlling the CNS inflammation.

  10. [Ultrastructural location of enzymes in peripheral blood neutrophils and in cerebrospinal fluid neutrophils in neuroinfections].

    PubMed

    Skotarczak, B

    1993-01-01

    Using cytochemical methods the location and activity were determined of alkaline phosphatase, ATP-ase and succinate dehydrogenase as representative enzymes for the metabolic processes in neutrophils isolated from blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with meningococcal meningoencephalitis as compared with peripheral blood neutrophils in a control group. The study showed presence of phosphatase on the membranes of many intracellular structures. The activity of the enzymes was higher than in the control group in the membranes of neutrophils in blood and CSF. This is explained as an effect of action of the chemotactic factor on the cell membrane and activation of the cell to movements and phagocytosis. ATP-ase activity in peripheral blood neutrophils in controls was found in all membranous structures in the cell. However, in peripheral blood neutrophils and CSF neutrophils in the acute stage of the disease the active enzyme was noted, in the first place, in cell membranes and digesting vacuoles, which reflected probably the direction of metabolic processes for phagocytosis and destroying of bacteria. The activity of succinate dehydrogenase was found in mitochondrial membranes. Peripheral blood and CSF neutrophils showed a high activity of the enzyme. In the CSF cells in acute phase atypical sites of succinate dehydrogenase activity were noted, which was explained as a sign of cell destruction.

  11. Human Neurocysticercosis: Comparison of Different Diagnostic Tests Using Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Michelet, Lorraine; Fleury, Agnès; Sciutto, Edda; Kendjo, Eric; Fragoso, Gladis; Paris, Luc; Bouteille, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NC), caused by the larval stage of Taenia solium, is one of the most common parasitic diseases of the central nervous system. The diagnosis of NC is mostly based on costly brain neuroimaging (computed tomography and/or nuclear magnetic resonance), which is rarely accessible in most affected areas. The most sensitive and specific tools for NC diagnosis are imagery techniques. The identification of specific antibodies and antigens is currently used only to support NC diagnosis due to their limited specificity and sensitivity. This study was performed to compare immunodiagnostic assays (antibody detection by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA] and enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blotting [EITB] and HP10 antigen detection by ELISA) with the detection of parasite DNA by PCR amplification of a repetitive element of the parasite genome in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 121 radiologically and clinically characterized NC patients. Patients were divided into six groups according to the stage of the parasites and their localization. The CSF cellularity of each patient was also recorded. When all patients were considered, PCR exhibited the highest sensitivity (95.9%) and variable specificity (80% or 100%) depending on the controls used. The sensitivities of antibody detection by ELISA and EITB were not significantly different, and ELISA identified HP10 antigen mostly when vesicular cysticerci were located in the subarachnoideal basal cisterns. These results can help in the selection of different individual assays or combinations of assays to be used in NC diagnosis according to different requirements. PMID:21068283

  12. Metabolomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid indicates iron deficiency compromises cerebral energy metabolism in the infant monkey.

    PubMed

    Rao, Raghavendra; Ennis, Kathleen; Oz, Gulin; Lubach, Gabriele R; Georgieff, Michael K; Coe, Christopher L

    2013-03-01

    Iron deficiency anemia affects many pregnant women and young infants worldwide. The health impact is significant, given iron's known role in many body functions, including oxidative and lipid metabolism, protein synthesis and brain neurochemistry. The following research determined if (1)H NMR spectroscopy-based metabolomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) could detect the adverse influence of early life iron deficiency on the central nervous system. Using a controlled dietary model in 43 infant primates, distinct differences were found in spectra acquired at 600 MHz from the CSF of anemic monkeys. Three metabolite ratios, citrate/pyruvate, citrate/lactate and pyruvate/glutamine ratios, differed significantly in the iron deficient infant and then normalized following the consumption of dietary iron and improvement of clinical indices of anemia in the heme compartment. This distinctive metabolomic profile associated with anemia in the young infant indicates that CSF can be employed to track the neurological effects of iron deficiency and benefits of iron supplementation.

  13. Detection of Antibodies to Brucella Cytoplasmic Proteins in the Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with Neurobrucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Baldi, Pablo C.; Araj, George F.; Racaro, Graciela C.; Wallach, Jorge C.; Fossati, Carlos A.

    1999-01-01

    The diagnosis of human neurobrucellosis usually relies on the detection of antibodies to Brucella lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by agglutination tests or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Here we describe the detection of immunoglobulin G (IgG) to cytoplasmic proteins (CP) of Brucella spp. by ELISA and Western blotting in seven CSF samples from five patients with neurobrucellosis. While IgG to CP (titers of 200 to 12,800) and IgG to LPS (800 to 6,400) were found in the CSF of these patients, these antibodies were not detected in CSF samples from two patients who had systemic brucellosis without neurological involvement. The latter, however, had serum IgG and IgM to both LPS and CP. No reactivity to these antigens was found in CSF samples from 14 and 20 patients suffering from nonbrucellar meningitis and noninfectious diseases, respectively. These findings suggest that, in addition to its usefulness in the serological diagnosis of human systemic brucellosis, the ELISA with CP antigen can be used for the specific diagnosis of human neurobrucellosis. PMID:10473531

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid tau levels are a marker for molecular subtype in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Karch, André; Hermann, Peter; Ponto, Claudia; Schmitz, Matthias; Arora, Amandeep; Zafar, Saima; Llorens, Franc; Müller-Heine, Annika; Zerr, Inga

    2015-05-01

    The molecular subtype of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) is an important prognostic marker for patient survival. However, subtype determination is not possible during lifetime. Because the rate of disease progression is associated with the molecular subtype, this study aimed at investigating if total tau, a marker of neuronal death, allows premortem diagnosis of molecular subtype when codon 129 genotype is known. Two hundred ninety-six sCJD patients were tested for their cerebrospinal fluid total tau level at the time of diagnosis and were investigated for their sCJD subtype postmortem. There was a significant association between tau levels and the prion protein type in patients with codon 129 MM (p < 0.001), MV (p = 0.004), and VV (p = 0.001) genotype. Receiver operating characteristic analyses showed values of area under the curve of 0.76-0.80 for the different genotypes indicating a good diagnostic validity of the test. Total tau can be used as a diagnostic test for the assessment of prion protein type when codon 129 genotype is known. It provides valuable information for physicians and next of kin about the further course of disease.

  15. Massive Cerebrospinal Fluid Replacement Reduces Delayed Cerebral Vasospasm After Embolization of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Liming; Ma, Fei; Liu, Yun; Mu, Yanchun; Zou, Zhongmin

    2016-01-01

    Background Delayed cerebral vasospasm (DCVS) following aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a leading cause of poor prognosis and death in SAH patients. Effective management to reduce DCVS is needed. A prospective controlled trial was conducted to determine if massive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) replacement (CR) could reduce DCVS occurrence and improve the clinical outcome after aneurysmal SAH treated with endovascular coiling. Material/Methods Patients treated with endovascular coiling after aneurysmal SAH were randomly divided into a control group receiving regular therapy alone (C group, n=42) and a CSF replacement group receiving an additional massive CSF replacement with saline (CR group, n=45). CSF examination, head CT, DCVS occurrence, cerebral infarction incidence, Glasgow Outcome Scale prognostic score, and 1-month mortality were recorded. Results The occurrence of DCVS was 30.9% in the C group and 4.4% in the CR group (P<0.005). The cerebral infarction incidences in the C and CR groups were 19.0% and 2.2% (P<0.05), respectively, 1 month after the treatments. Mortality was not significantly different between the 2 groups during the follow-up period. Conclusions Massive CR after embolization surgery for aneurysmal SAH can significantly reduce DCVS occurrence and effectively improve the outcomes. PMID:27394187

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid B cells from Multiple Sclerosis patients are subject to normal germinal center selection

    PubMed Central

    Harp, Christopher; Lee, Jane; Lambracht-Washington, Doris; Cameron, Elizabeth; Olsen, Gregory; Frohman, Elliot; Racke, Michael; Monson, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Previous findings from our laboratory demonstrated that some clonally expanded cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) B cells from MS patients exhibit diminished mutation targeting patterns in comparison to typical B cells selected in the context of germinal centers (GCs). In order to determine whether the overall CSF B cell repertoires adhered to mutation patterns typical of GC-selected B cells, we analyzed the immunoglobulin repertoires from CSF B cells of 8 MS patients for mutation characteristics typical of GC-derived B cells. Mutation targeting was preserved. Thus, clonal expansion of some CSF B cells may occur independently of GC, but the CSF B cell pool is governed by typical GC selection. Interestingly, the heavy chain CDR3’s of CSF B cells from MS patients had a net acidic charge, similar to GC-derived B cells, but a tendency towards longer CDR3’s, consistent with autoreactive B cells. How these findings may support current hypotheses regarding the origin of CSF B cells is discussed. PMID:17169437

  17. Cerebrospinal fluid B cells from multiple sclerosis patients are subject to normal germinal center selection.

    PubMed

    Harp, Christopher; Lee, Jane; Lambracht-Washington, Doris; Cameron, Elizabeth; Olsen, Gregory; Frohman, Elliot; Racke, Michael; Monson, Nancy

    2007-02-01

    Previous findings from our laboratory demonstrated that some clonally expanded cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) B cells from MS patients exhibit diminished mutation targeting patterns in comparison to typical B cells selected in the context of germinal centers (GCs). In order to determine whether the overall CSF B cell repertoires adhered to mutation patterns typical of GC-selected B cells, we analyzed the immunoglobulin repertoires from CSF B cells of 8 MS patients for mutation characteristics typical of GC-derived B cells. Mutation targeting was preserved. Thus, clonal expansion of some CSF B cells may occur independently of GC, but the CSF B cell pool is governed by typical GC selection. Interestingly, the heavy chain CDR3's of CSF B cells from MS patients had a net acidic charge, similar to GC-derived B cells, but a tendency towards longer CDR3's, consistent with autoreactive B cells. How these findings may support current hypotheses regarding the origin of CSF B cells is discussed. PMID:17169437

  18. Acute phase proteins in serum and cerebrospinal fluid in the course of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Paradowski, M; Lobos, M; Kuydowicz, J; Krakowiak, M; Kubasiewicz-Ujma, B

    1995-08-01

    We carried out estimations of the following acute phase proteins: C-reactive protein (CRP), alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AAG), alpha-2-ceruloplasmin (CER), and alpha-2-haptoglobin (HPT) in serum and in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in patients with bacterial meningitis (BM, n = 30) and viral meningitis (VM, n = 30). We have shown that determinations of concentrations of AAG and CRP in serum and CER in CSF are useful in differentiation between BM and VM. The diagnostic power of these three tests (the areas under their ROC curves equal 0.942, 0.929, and 0.931, respectively) is bigger, though statistically not significantly, than that of traditional parameters of BM in CSF, i.e., total protein concentration and white blood cell count. Determination of AAG, CRP, and AAT in serum is a valuable monitoring marker in the course of BM treatment. Convenience of serum sampling constitutes an advantage over traditional BM parameters in CSF. PMID:8521602

  19. Clinical and cognitive implications of cerebrospinal fluid oligoclonal bands in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Anagnostouli, Maria; Christidi, Foteini; Zalonis, Ioannis; Nikolaou, Chryssoula; Lyrakos, Dimitrios; Triantafyllou, Nikolaos; Evdokimidis, Ioannis; Kilidireas, Constantinos

    2015-11-01

    The presence of cerebrospinal fluid oligoclonal bands (CSF-OCB) in Caucasian patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is supportive of diagnosis, though the relation with patients' clinical and specifically cognitive features has never been established or thoroughly examined. Thus, we investigated the clinical and for the first time the cognitive profile of MS patients in relation to CSF-OCB. We studied 108 patients with and without OCB and recorded demographic characteristics and detailed clinical data. A comprehensive neuropsychological battery covering different cognitive domains (attention/processing speed, memory, perception/constructions, reasoning, executive functions) was administered to MS patients and 142 demographically related healthy controls (HC). We did not find any significant differences between patients with and without OCB on demographic and clinical parameters (p > 0.05), including subtype and brain neuroimaging findings. Results revealed significantly higher cognitive scores in HC compared to both OCB subgroups, with more widespread cognitive changes in patients with OCB. Analysis between OCB subgroups showed significantly worse performance in patients with OCB on visual memory (Rey's complex figure test-recall; p = 0.006). Concluding, the presence of CSF-OCB in our MS patients tends to be related to more widespread cognitive changes, specifically worse visual memory. Future longitudinal studies in different populations are warranted to better clarify the clinical and cognitive characteristics related to CSF-OCB which could serve as early biomarker in disease monitoring. PMID:26130146

  20. Altered microRNA profiles in cerebrospinal fluid exosome in Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Gui, YaXing; Liu, Hai; Zhang, LiShan; Lv, Wen; Hu, XingYue

    2015-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of Parkinson's diseases (PD) is challenging, especially in the early stages of the disease. We developed a microRNA profiling strategy for exosomal miRNAs isolated from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in PD and AD. Sixteen exosomal miRNAs were up regulated and 11 miRNAs were under regulated significantly in PD CSF when compared with those in healthy controls (relative fold > 2, p < 0.05). MiR-1 and miR-19b-3p were validated and significantly reduced in independent samples. While miR-153, miR-409-3p, miR-10a-5p, and let-7g-3p were significantly over expressed in PD CSF exosome. Bioinformatic analysis by DIANA-mirPath demonstrated that Neurotrophin signaling, mTOR signaling, Ubiquitin mediated proteolysis, Dopaminergic synapse, and Glutamatergic synapse were the most prominent pathways enriched in quantiles with PD miRNA patterns. Messenger RNA (mRNA) transcripts [amyloid precursor protein, APP), α-synuclein (α-syn), Tau, neurofilament, light gene (NF-L), DJ-1/PARK7, Fractalkine and Neurosin] and long non-coding RNAs (RP11-462G22.1 and PCA3) were differentially expressed in CSF exosomes in PD and AD patients. These data demonstrated that CSF exosomal RNA molecules are reliable biomarkers with fair robustness in regard to specificity and sensitivity in differentiating PD from healthy and diseased (AD) controls. PMID:26497684

  1. Analysis of cells in cerebrospinal fluid from patients with neurocysticercosis by means of flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Bueno, E C; Vaz, A J; Oliveira, C A; Machado, L R; Livramento, J A; Mielli, S R; Ueda, M

    1999-06-15

    The events of the cellular immune response in neurocysticercosis (NC) are not fully understood. Studies of the CD3, CD3/CD4, CD3/CD8, CD45/CD19, and CD45/CD56 molecules and activation-related CD69 molecule in cells from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and peripheral blood (PB) of patients with NC may provide a better elucidation of the inflammatory and immunological events occurring in this disease. Seven patients with NC and 3 individuals with other disorders were evaluated by a three-color flow cytometric method. CD69 was detected in a higher percentage of cells in all CSF samples from patients, but not in PB or CSF from the control group. The percentage of CD3+ cells did not differ significantly in CSF and PB cells from patients and controls. The predominance of CD3+CD8+ cells was observed in CSF from one patient and in PB from 2 patients, who were in stage III of the disease (inflammatory process). The percentage of CD45+CD19+ cells was higher in CSF than in PB from patients who presented anti-cysticercus antibodies in CSF. The percentage of CD45+CD56+ cells in CSF was higher than in PB, but this rate was similar to reference values reported by other authors. Our data suggest that the cytometric method applied to a larger number of CSF samples may provide a better understanding of the cell-mediated immune response involved in NC.

  2. Total IgE detection in paired cerebrospinal fluid and serum samples from patients with neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Bueno, E C; Vaz, A J; Machado, L d; Livramento, J A

    2000-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NC), the presence of Taenia solium metacestodes in tissues, is the most frequent and severe parasitic infection of the central nervous system. We investigated the presence of total IgE by an automated chemiluminescence assay in 53 paired cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum samples from patients with NC (P) and in 40 CSF samples from individuals with other neurological disorders as the control group (C). Total IgE concentration ranged from 1.2 to 6.6 IU/ml (mean = 1.4 IU/ml, standard deviation-sd = 1.1 IU/ml) in 28.3% of CSF samples from the P group, a value significantly higher than for the C group ( pound1.0 IU/ml). The serum samples from the P group showed concentrations ranging from 1. 0 to 2330.0 IU/ml (mean = 224.1 IU/ml, sd = 452.1 IU/ml), which were higher than the normal value cited by the manufacturer (<100.0 IU/ml) in 32.1% of the samples. A significant difference was observed in CSF samples from the P and C groups (p = 0.005) and in serum samples from the P group compared to the normal value (p = 0. 005), with sera showing more frequent abnormal results.

  3. Gelatinase activity of matrix metalloproteinases in the cerebrospinal fluid of various patient populations.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, M A; Cartier, L; Collados, L; Kettlun, A M; Araya, F; Concha, C; Flores, L; Wolf, M E; Mosnaim, A D

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the enzymatic gelatinolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) present in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of samples obtained from 67 individuals, twenty-one nonneurological patients (considered controls) and 46 subjects with various neurological disorders e.g., vascular lesions, demyelination, inflammatory, degenerative and prion diseases. Biochemical characterization of MMPs, a family of neutral proteolytic enzymes involved in extracellular matrix modeling, included determination of substrate specificity and Ca+2 dependency, as well as the effects of protease inactivators, carboxylic and His (histidine) residue modifiers, and antibiotics. Whereas all CSF samples expressed MMP-2 (gelatinase A) activity, it corresponded in most cases (normal and pathological samples) to its latent form (proenzyme; pMMP-2). In general, inflammatory neurological diseases (especially meningitis and neurocisticercosis) were associated with the presence of a second enzyme, MMP-9 (or gelatinase B). Whereas MMP-9 was found in the CSF of every tropical spastic paraparesis patient studied, its presence in samples from individuals with vascular lesions was uncommon. Patients blood-brain barrier damage was ascertained by determining total CSF protein content using both, the conventional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis procedure under denaturing conditions and capillary zone electrophoresis.

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid T-regulatory cells recognize Borrelia burgdorferi NAPA in chronic Lyme borreliosis.

    PubMed

    Amedei, A; Codolo, G; Ozolins, D; Ballerini, C; Biagioli, T; Jaunalksne, I; Zilevica, A; D Elios, S; De Bernard, M; D' Elios, M M

    2013-01-01

    The NapA protein of B. burgdorferi is essential for the persistence of spirochetes in ticks. One of the most intriguing aspects of NapA is its potential to interfere with the host immune system. Here, we investigated the role of the acquired immune responses induced by NapA in the cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) of patients with chronic Lyme borreliosis. We evaluated the cytokine profile induced in microglia cells and CSF T cells following NapA stimulation. We report here that NapA induced a regulatory T (Treg) response in the CSF of patients with chronic Lyme borreliosis and it is able to expand this suppressive response by promoting the production of TGF-beta and IL-10 by microglia cells. Collectively, these data strongly support a central role of NapA in promoting both Treg response and immune suppression in the CSF of patients with chronic Lyme borreliosis and suggest that NapA and the Treg pathway may represent novel therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of the disease. PMID:24355226

  5. Zebrafish cerebrospinal fluid mediates cell survival through a retinoid signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jessica T.; Lehtinen, Maria K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) includes conserved factors whose function is largely unexplored. To assess the role of CSF during embryonic development, CSF was repeatedly drained from embryonic zebrafish brain ventricles soon after their inflation. Removal of CSF increased cell death in the diencephalon, indicating a survival function. Factors within the CSF are required for neuroepithelial cell survival as injected mouse CSF but not artificial CSF could prevent cell death after CSF depletion. Mass spectrometry analysis of the CSF identified retinol binding protein 4 (Rbp4), which transports retinol, the precursor to retinoic acid (RA). Consistent with a role for Rbp4 in cell survival, inhibition of Rbp4 or RA synthesis increased neuroepithelial cell death. Conversely, ventricle injection of exogenous human RBP4 plus retinol, or RA alone prevented cell death after CSF depletion. Zebrafish rbp4 is highly expressed in the yolk syncytial layer, suggesting Rbp4 protein and retinol/RA precursors can be transported into the CSF from the yolk. In accord with this suggestion, injection of human RBP4 protein into the yolk prevents neuroepithelial cell death in rbp4 loss‐of‐function embryos. Together, these data support the model that Rbp4 and RA precursors are present within the CSF and used for synthesis of RA, which promotes embryonic neuroepithelial survival. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 75–92, 2016 PMID:25980532

  6. Determination of metabolic organic acids in cerebrospinal fluid by microchip electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Danč, Ladislav; Bodor, Róbert; Troška, Peter; Horčičiak, Michal; Masár, Marián

    2014-08-01

    A new MCE method for the determination of oxalic, citric, glycolic, lactic, and 2- and 3-hydroxybutyric acids, indicators of some metabolic and neurological diseases, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was developed. MCE separations were performed on a PMMA microchip with coupled channels at lower pH (5.5) to prevent proteins interference. A double charged counter-ion, BIS-TRIS propane, was very effective in resolving the studied organic acids. The limits of detection (S/N = 3) ranging from 0.1 to 1.6 μM were obtained with the aid of contact conductivity detector implemented directly on the microchip. RSDs for migration time and peak area of organic acids in artificial and CSF samples were <0.8 and <9.7%, respectively. Recoveries of organic acids in untreated CSF samples on the microchip varied from 91 to 104%. Elimination of chloride interference, a major anionic constituent of CSF, has been reached by two approaches: (i) the use of coupled channels microchip in a column switching mode when approximately 97-99% of chloride was removed electrophoretically in the first separation channel and (ii) the implementation of micro-SPE with silver-form resin prior to the MCE analysis, which selectively removed chloride from undeproteinized CSF samples.

  7. Bioanalysis of acetylcarnitine in cerebrospinal fluid by HILIC-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Holder, Brian R; McNaney, Colleen A; Luchetti, David; Schaeffer, Eric; Drexler, Dieter M

    2015-09-01

    Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR) is a potential biomarker for the modulation of brain neurotransmitter activity, but is also present in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Recent studies have utilized hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS) based assays to detect and quantify ALCAR within biofluids such as urine, plasma and serum, using various sample pretreatment procedures. In order to address the need to quantify ALCAR in CSF on a high-throughput scale, a new and simple HILIC-MS/MS assay has been successfully developed and validated. For rapid analysis, CSF sample pretreatment was performed via 'dilute and shoot' directly onto an advanced HILIC column prior to MS/MS detection. This newly developed HILIC-MS/MS assay shows good recoveries of ALCAR without the need for chemical derivatization and multistep sample extraction procedures. The employment of this assay is suitable for the high-throughput bioanalysis and quantification of ALCAR within the CSF of various animal models and human clinical studies. PMID:25712252

  8. Assessment of the Central Effects of Natural Uranium via Behavioural Performances and the Cerebrospinal Fluid Metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Lestaevel, P.; Grison, S.; Favé, G.; Elie, C.; Dhieux, B.; Martin, J. C.; Tack, K.; Souidi, M.

    2016-01-01

    Natural uranium (NU), a component of the earth's crust, is not only a heavy metal but also an alpha particle emitter, with chemical and radiological toxicity. Populations may therefore be chronically exposed to NU through drinking water and food. Since the central nervous system is known to be sensitive to pollutants during its development, we assessed the effects on the behaviour and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) metabolome of rats exposed for 9 months from birth to NU via lactation and drinking water (1.5, 10, or 40 mg·L−1 for male rats and 40 mg·L−1 for female rats). Medium-term memory decreased in comparison to controls in male rats exposed to 1.5, 10, or 40 mg·L−1 NU. In male rats, spatial working memory and anxiety- and depressive-like behaviour were only altered by exposure to 40 mg·L−1 NU and any significant effect was observed on locomotor activity. In female rats exposed to NU, only locomotor activity was significantly increased in comparison with controls. LC-MS metabolomics of CSF discriminated the fingerprints of the male and/or female NU-exposed and control groups. This study suggests that exposure to environmental doses of NU from development to adulthood can have an impact on rat brain function. PMID:27247806

  9. Detection of IgM antibodies from cerebrospinal fluid and sera of dengue fever patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, W J; Hwang, K P; Fang, A H

    1991-12-01

    During the dengue epidemic from late 1987 to 1989, 6 specimens of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and sera for IgM detection were collected from 4 cases virologically confirmed dengue patients who had neural symptoms. Another 20 serum specimens, which had been diagnosed as dengue infection either virologically or serologically, were sent to the laboratory from Kaohsiung Medical College Hospital. All these specimens were also taken to detect the existence of IgM. The results showed that IgM could be detected from 14 out of 20 serum specimens. One of the positive specimens showed IgM can last up to 252 days after onset of illness. In addition, IgM was detected from both CSF and sera of all four dengue patients with neural symptoms. The IgM titer in CSF (less than or equal to 1:20) was always lower than that in serum (greater than or equal to 1:80). Two cases with sequentially collected specimens showed the fading of IgM titer in CSF. As a matter of fact, it became undetectable about a month after onset of illness, which is apparently different from the situation in serum.

  10. Direct Identification of Enteroviruses in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with Suspected Meningitis by Nested PCR Amplification.

    PubMed

    Krasota, Alexandr; Loginovskih, Natalia; Ivanova, Olga; Lipskaya, Galina

    2016-01-01

    Enteroviruses, the most common human viral pathogens worldwide, have been associated with serous meningitis, encephalitis, syndrome of acute flaccid paralysis, myocarditis and the onset of diabetes type 1. In the future, the rapid identification of the etiological agent would allow to adjust the therapy promptly and thereby improve the course of the disease and prognosis. We developed RT-nested PCR amplification of the genomic region coding viral structural protein VP1 for direct identification of enteroviruses in clinical specimens and compared it with the existing analogs. One-hundred-fifty-nine cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) from patients with suspected meningitis were studied. The amplification of VP1 genomic region using the new method was achieved for 86 (54.1%) patients compared with 75 (47.2%), 53 (33.3%) and 31 (19.5%) achieved with previously published methods. We identified 11 serotypes of the Enterovirus species B in 2012, including relatively rare echovirus 14 (E-14), E-15 and E-32, and eight serotypes of species B and 5 enteroviruses A71 (EV-A71) in 2013. The developed method can be useful for direct identification of enteroviruses in clinical material with the low virus loads such as CSF. PMID:26751470

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid norepinephrine and cognition in subjects across the adult age span.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lucy Y; Murphy, Richard R; Hanscom, Brett; Li, Ge; Millard, Steven P; Petrie, Eric C; Galasko, Douglas R; Sikkema, Carl; Raskind, Murray A; Wilkinson, Charles W; Peskind, Elaine R

    2013-10-01

    Adequate central nervous system noradrenergic activity enhances cognition, but excessive noradrenergic activity may have adverse effects on cognition. Previous studies have also demonstrated that noradrenergic activity is higher in older than younger adults. We aimed to determine relationships between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) norepinephrine (NE) concentration and cognitive performance by using data from a CSF bank that includes samples from 258 cognitively normal participants aged 21-100 years. After adjusting for age, gender, education, and ethnicity, higher CSF NE levels (units of 100 pg/mL) are associated with poorer performance on tests of attention, processing speed, and executive function (Trail Making A: regression coefficient 1.5, standard error [SE] 0.77, p = 0.046; Trail Making B: regression coefficient 5.0, SE 2.2, p = 0.024; Stroop Word-Color Interference task: regression coefficient 6.1, SE 2.0, p = 0.003). Findings are consistent with the earlier literature relating excess noradrenergic activity with cognitive impairment.

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid cytokine levels in type 1 narcolepsy patients very close to onset.

    PubMed

    Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Pizza, Fabio; Knudsen, Stine; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Jennum, Poul; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2015-10-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy is caused by a loss of hypocretin (orexin) signaling in the brain. Genetic data suggests the disorder is caused by an autoimmune attack on hypocretin producing neurons in hypothalamus. This hypothesis has however not yet been confirmed by consistent findings of autoreactive antibodies or T-cells in patient samples. One explanation for these negative results may be that the autoimmune process is no longer active when patients present to the clinic. With increasing awareness in recent years, more and more patients have been diagnosed closer and closer to disease onset. In this study, we tested whether an active immune process in the brain could be detected in these patients, as reflected by increased cytokine levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Using multiplex analysis, we measured the levels of 51 cytokines and chemokines in the CSF of 40 type 1 narcolepsy patients having varying disease duration. For comparison, we used samples from 9 healthy controls and 9 patients with other central hypersomnia. Cytokine levels did not differ significantly between controls and patients, even in 5 patients with disease onset less than a month prior to CSF sampling.

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid control of neurogenesis induced by retinoic acid during early brain development.

    PubMed

    Alonso, M I; Martín, C; Carnicero, E; Bueno, D; Gato, A

    2011-07-01

    Embryonic-cerebrospinal fluid (E-CSF) plays crucial roles in early brain development including the control of neurogenesis. Although FGF2 and lipoproteins present in the E-CSF have previously been shown to be involved in neurogenesis, the main factor triggering this process remains unknown. E-CSF contains all-trans-retinol and retinol-binding protein involved in the synthesis of retinoic acid (RA), a neurogenesis inducer. In early chick embryo brain, only the mesencephalic-rombencephalic isthmus (IsO) is able to synthesize RA. Here we show that in chick embryo brain development: (1) E-CSF helps to control RA synthesis in the IsO by means of the RBP and all-trans-retinol it contains; (2) E-CSF has retinoic acid activity, which suggests it may act as a diffusion pathway for RA; and (3) the influence of E-CSF on embryonic brain neurogenesis is to a large extent due to its involvement in RA synthesis. These data help to understand neurogenesis from neural progenitor cells.

  14. Pre-analytical and analytical factors influencing Alzheimer's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarker variability.

    PubMed

    Fourier, Anthony; Portelius, Erik; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Quadrio, Isabelle; Perret-Liaudet, Armand

    2015-09-20

    A panel of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers including total Tau (t-Tau), phosphorylated Tau protein at residue 181 (p-Tau) and β-amyloid peptides (Aβ42 and Aβ40), is frequently used as an aid in Alzheimer's disease (AD) diagnosis for young patients with cognitive impairment, for predicting prodromal AD in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects, for AD discrimination in atypical clinical phenotypes and for inclusion/exclusion and stratification of patients in clinical trials. Due to variability in absolute levels between laboratories, there is no consensus on medical cut-off value for the CSF AD signature. Thus, for full implementation of this core AD biomarker panel in clinical routine, this issue has to be solved. Variability can be explained both by pre-analytical and analytical factors. For example, the plastic tubes used for CSF collection and storage, the lack of reference material and the variability of the analytical protocols were identified as important sources of variability. The aim of this review is to highlight these pre-analytical and analytical factors and describe efforts done to counteract them in order to establish cut-off values for core CSF AD biomarkers. This review will give the current state of recommendations.

  15. Higher level of NT-proCNP in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with meningitis.

    PubMed

    Tomasiuk, Ryszard; Lipowski, Dariusz; Szlufik, Stanislaw; Peplinska, Krystyna; Mikaszewska-Sokolewicz, Malgorzata

    2016-02-12

    Aminoterminal pro-C type natriuretic peptide (NT-proCNP) as an active form of CNP, has been recently proven to be a potential marker of sepsis and to be linked to inflammatory diseases. So far, there are no studies describing the level of NT-proCNP in meningitis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of NT-proCNP in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in patients with meningitis and to compare it with the serum level of CRP and procalcitonin (PCT) in this group of patients. The results were compared to serum levels of CRP, PCT and CSF levels of cytosis, protein and lactate. NT-proCNP levels were statistically significant between the control group and the meningitis groups (p=0.02; R=0.3). We also noted a correlation between the level of NT-proCNP in the CSF of all of the study groups (controls and meningitis patients) and the CSF levels of cytosis (p<0.5; R=0.43), protein (p<0.05; R=0.39) and lactate (p<0.05; R=0.34), and also the serum level of CRP (p<0.05; R=0.30), but not serum PCT (p>0.05; R=0.11). These results suggest that NT-proCNP could be a potential marker of meningitis, but it cannot be used to distinguish between the types of meningitis.

  16. Role of cerebrospinal fluid-contacting nucleus in sodium sensing and sodium appetite.

    PubMed

    Xing, Dan; Wu, Yuehong; Li, Guangling; Song, Siyuan; Liu, Yuepeng; Liu, He; Wang, Xing; Fei, Yan; Zhang, Chao; Li, Ying; Zhang, Licai

    2015-08-01

    The brainstem plays an important role in controlling sodium and water homeostasis. It is a major regulatory site for autonomic and motor functions. Moreover, it integrates cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) signals with neuronal and hormonal signals. Evidence suggests that the CSF-contacting nucleus (CSF-CN) transmits and integrates CSF signals, but, the definitive role of CSF-CN in sodium homeostasis is poorly understood. In this study, we used c-Fos as a marker of neuronal activity and causing colocalization of Nax channel and 5-HT. This proved that CSF-CN played a role in sensing the increase of CSF sodium level. Then, we determined the role of the CSF-contacting nucleus in increasing the sodium appetite of rats. So, we performed targeted lesion of the CSF-contacting nucleus in the brainstem using the cholera toxin subunit B-saporin (CB-SAP), a cytotoxin coupled to cholera toxin subunit B. The lesion of the CSF-CN showed decreased and degenerative neurons, while sodium appetite have increased and Fos immunocytochemistry detected neuronal activity in the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBN), but not in the subfornical organ (SFO) and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (OVLT). These results indicate that the CSF-CN plays an important role in sensing CSF sodium level and satiating sodium appetite by influencing the LPBN but not SFO and OVLT. The Nax channel and 5-HT might be the molecular mechanisms through which contribute to sodium homeostasis.

  17. Sandwich Wound Closure Reduces the Risk of Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks in Posterior Fossa Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Heymanns, Verena; Oseni, Abidemi W.; Alyeldien, Ameer; Maslehaty, Homajoun; Parvin, Richard; Scholz, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Posterior fossa surgery is demanding and hides a significant number of obstacles starting from the approach to the wound closure. The risk of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage in posterior fossa surgery given in the literature is around 8%. The present study aims to introduce a sandwich closure of the dura in posterior fossa surgery, which reduces significantly the number of CSF leaks (3.8%) in the patients treated in our department. Three hundred and ten patients treated in our hospital in the years 2009-2013 for posterior fossa pathologies were retrospectively evaluated. The dura closure method was as following: lyophilized dura put under the dura and sealed with fibrin glue and sutures, dura adapting stitches, TachoSil® (Takeda Pharma A/S, Roskilde, Denmark), Gelfoam® (Pfizer Inc., New York, NY, USA) and polymethylmethacrylate (osteoclastic craniotomy). The incidence of postsurgical complications associated with the dural closure like CSF leakage, infections, bleeding is evaluated. Only 3.8% of patients developed CSF leakage and only 0.5% needed a second surgery for CSF leakage closure. Two percent had a cerebellar bleeding with no need for re-operation and 3% had a wound infection treated with antibiotics. The sandwich wound closure we are applying for posterior fossa surgery in our patients correlates with a significant reduction of CSF leaks compared to the literature. PMID:27478578

  18. Combined Approach for Tegmen Defects Repair in Patients with Cerebrospinal Fluid Otorrhea or Herniations: Our Experience

    PubMed Central

    Marchioni, Daniele; Bonali, Marco; Alicandri-Ciufelli, Matteo; Rubini, Alessia; Pavesi, Giacomo; Presutti, Livio

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To describe our departmental experience in the surgical repair of tegmen tympani defects using a combined transmastoid/minicraniotomic approach. Design Retrospective review of videos from surgery and patients' charts. Setting Tertiary university referral center. Participants Twenty-two patients who underwent surgical repair of tegmen defects associated with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage and/or meningocele/meningoencephalocele by a combined transmastoid/minicraniotomic approach. Main Outcome Measures A retrospective review of videos of surgery and charts of patients with tegmen tympani or tegmen antri defects and CSF leakage, temporal lobe encephalocele, and/or meningoencephalocele. Results All patients underwent the combined approach and had their defects closed, without significant intraoperative or postoperative complications. Conclusions Mastoidectomy with temporal minicraniotomy represents an effective approach in patients with tegmen tympani dehiscence; the advantages of this technique are the control of the floor of the middle cranial fossa and the possibility to reach bony defects located anteriorly without manipulation of the ossicular chain and temporal lobe. PMID:25093152

  19. The role of cerebrospinal fluid pressure in glaucoma pathophysiology: the dark side of the optic disc.

    PubMed

    Morgan, William H; Yu, Dao Yi; Balaratnasingam, Chandrakumar

    2008-08-01

    It is generally accepted that glaucoma occurs when intraocular pressure (IOP) is raised above atmospheric pressure beyond tolerable limits for the optic disc. However, the other, unseen side of the optic disc is not air but a set of pressure compartments dominated by the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within the subarachnoid space. This invisibility has made investigation difficult; however, in recent decades there has been increased interest in this corollary to IOP. We briefly review the anatomy of the optic nerve subarachnoid space and its pressure relationships to intracranial, retrolaminar, and orbital tissue pressures. The CSF pressure is equivalent to IOP in its influence on translaminar pressure gradient and optic disk surface movement. At low CSF pressure, its influence on retrolaminar tissue pressure is reduced tending to minimize an increase in translaminar pressure gradient. The available evidence suggests that orbital tissue pressure provides this moderating influence. CSF pressure affects axonal transport, which is known to be important in glaucoma etiology and retinal venous outflow and pressures. Recent attempts to develop noninvasive measurement of CSF pressure have increased our knowledge of retinal venous changes in glaucoma. Further work in this area is likely to greatly increase our understanding of glaucoma. PMID:18703953

  20. PBPK model of methotrexate in cerebrospinal fluid ventricles using a combined microdialysis and MRI acquisition.

    PubMed

    Brandhonneur, Nolwenn; Noury, Fanny; Bruyère, Arnaud; Saint-Jalmes, Hervé; Le Corre, Pascal

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the distribution of methotrexate (MTX) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lateral ventricles and in cisterna magna after 3rd intraventricular CSF administration in a rabbit model. MTX or gadolinium chelate (Gd-DOTA) was administered in the 3rd ventricle with a local microdialysis to study the pharmacokinetics at the site of administration and with a simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisition in the 3rd ventricle, the lateral ventricles and in the cisterna magna. A specific CSF Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was then extrapolated for MTX from Gd-DOTA data. The relative contribution of elimination and distribution processes to the overall disposition of MTX and Gd-DOTA in the 3rd ventricle was similar (i.e., around 60% for CLE and 40% for CLI) suggesting that Gd-DOTA was a suitable surrogate marker for MTX disposition in ventricular CSF. The PBPK predictions for MTX both in CSF of the 3rd ventricle and in plasma were in accordance with the in vivo results. The present study showed that the combination of local CSF microdialysis with MRI acquisition of the brain ventricles and a PBPK model could be a useful methodology to estimate the drug diffusion within CSF ventricles after direct brain CSF administration. Such a methodology would be of interest to clinicians for a rationale determination and optimization of drug dosing parameters in the treatment of leptomeningeal metastases. PMID:27142258

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid proteomics and protein biomarkers in frontotemporal lobar degeneration: Current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Oeckl, Patrick; Steinacker, Petra; Feneberg, Emily; Otto, Markus

    2015-07-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) comprises a spectrum of rare neurodegenerative diseases with an estimated prevalence of 15-22 cases per 100,000 persons including the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), progressive non-fluent aphasia (PNFA), semantic dementia (SD), FTD with motor neuron disease (FTD-MND), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and corticobasal syndrome (CBS). The pathogenesis of the diseases is still unclear and clinical diagnosis of FTLD is hampered by overlapping symptoms within the FTLD subtypes and with other neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Intracellular protein aggregates in the brain are a major hallmark of FTLD and implicate alterations in protein metabolism or function in the disease's pathogenesis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) which surrounds the brain can be used to study changes in neurodegenerative diseases and to identify disease-related mechanisms or neurochemical biomarkers for diagnosis. In the present review, we will give an overview of the current literature on proteomic studies in CSF of FTLD patients. Reports of targeted and unbiased proteomic approaches are included and the results are discussed in regard of their informative value about disease pathology and the suitability to be used as diagnostic biomarkers. Finally, we will give some future perspectives on CSF proteomics and a list of candidate biomarkers which might be interesting for validation in further studies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuroproteomics: Applications in neuroscience and neurology.

  2. Progranulin Levels in Plasma and Cerebrospinal Fluid in Granulin Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Meeter, Lieke H.H.; Patzke, Holger; Loewen, Gordon; Dopper, Elise G.P.; Pijnenburg, Yolande A.L.; van Minkelen, Rick; van Swieten, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pathogenic mutations in the granulin gene (GRN) are causative in 5-10% of patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD), mostly leading to reduced progranulin protein (PGRN) levels. Upcoming therapeutic trials focus on enhancing PGRN levels. Methods Fluctuations in plasma PGRN (n = 41) and its relationship with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, n = 32) and specific single nucleotide polymorphisms were investigated in pre- and symptomatic GRN mutation carriers and controls. Results Plasma PGRN levels were lower in carriers than in controls and showed a mean coefficient of variation of 5.3% in carriers over 1 week. Although plasma PGRN correlated with CSF PGRN in carriers (r = 0.54, p = 0.02), plasma only explained 29% of the variability in CSF PGRN. rs5848, rs646776 and rs1990622 genotypes only partly explained the variability of PGRN levels between subjects. Conclusions Plasma PGRN is relatively stable over 1 week and therefore seems suitable for treatment monitoring of PGRN-enhancing agents. Since plasma PGRN only moderately correlated with CSF PGRN, CSF sampling will additionally be needed in therapeutic trials.

  3. Chronic lumbar intrathecal catheterization for the collection of cerebrospinal fluid in the canine.

    PubMed

    West, Wanda; Ehrmann, Jon; Johnson, Wendy

    2014-08-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by an excessive production of extracellular amyloid plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. Studies have shown that concentrations of tau and amyloid protein (β-amyloid (Aβ)) are altered in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with AD. In an effort to support the investigation of specialized CSF biomarkers, a reliable and reproducible chronic system was developed to collect lumbar CSF from conscious dogs. Several nonsurgical and surgical procedures have been published for accessing lumbar CSF. We elected to use a lumbar catheter with a vascular access port to collect lumbar CSF. Although the surgical model is not novel, we evaluated various modifications to the procedure and maintenance to increase patency of chronic indwelling lumbar CSF catheters. Different types of catheters were evaluated, and for our purposes a 3.5 Fr open-ended polyurethane catheter was selected. With our final modified surgical procedure and catheter maintenance program, 67% remained patent for longer than 30 days for the first surgery and 86% remained patent for longer than 30 days if a repair or replacement surgery was performed. Based on the results of the proof of concept studies, our model proved to be useful for single and multiple dose pharmacokinetic studies in a search for effective Alzheimer's disease treatment. PMID:24694254

  4. Ethmoidal encephalocele associated with cerebrospinal fluid fistula: indications and results of mini-invasive transnasal approach.

    PubMed

    Fraioli, Mario Francesco; Umana, Giuseppe Emanuele; Fiorucci, Giulia; Fraioli, Chiara

    2014-03-01

    Anterior skull base defects with encephalocele in adults are quite rare and can be a cause of spontaneous rhinoliquorrhea; however, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistula can be not rarely misdiagnosed for several months or years. Five adult patients affected by ethmoidal encephalocele with CSF fistula were treated in our institute from 2006 through to 2011. Onset of clinical history was represented by rhinoliquorrhea, which was precociously recognized in only 1 patient; in the other 4, it was misdiagnosed for a period ranging from 11 months to 5 years. After clinical diagnosis of CSF fistula and after brain magnetic resonance imaging, ethmoidal encephalocele was evident in all patients; preoperative study was completed by spiral computed tomography scan, to clearly identify the skull base bone defect. All patients were operated on by transsphenoidal endonasal endoscope-assisted microsurgical approach through 1 nostril. The herniated brain was coagulated and removed, and reconstruction of cranial base was performed. Postoperative rhinoliquorrhea or other complications did not occur in any patient at short and late follow-up. All patients were discharged after a few days. Endonasal endoscope-assisted microsurgical approach was effective in exposing and repairing the ethmoidal bone defect; tridimensional vision and wide lateral and superior exposition of the operative field were possible in each patient, thanks to the use of microscope and angulated endoscope. PMID:24514886

  5. Diagnosis of acute leukemia in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF-acute leukemia).

    PubMed

    Crespo-Solis, Erick; López-Karpovitch, Xavier; Higuera, Jesús; Vega-Ramos, Beatriz

    2012-10-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid-acute leukemia (CSF-acute leukemia) is a frequent and serious complication in patients with acute leukemia. One of the major problems of this complication is the diagnosis process itself. CSF cytology is currently considered the gold standard for establishing the diagnosis, a technique which presents various processing limitations, seriously impacting the predictive values. In the last 11 years, studies of CSF flow cytometry analysis done in patients with acute leukemia have demonstrated superiority in comparison with CSF cytology. Although comparative studies between these two techniques have been reported since 2001, no new consensus or formal changes to the gold standard have been established for the CSF acute leukemia diagnosis. The evidence suggests that positive flow cytometry cases, considered as indeterminate cases, will behave like disease in the central nervous system (CNS). Nevertheless, we think there are some variables and considerations that must be first evaluated under research protocols before CNS relapse can be established with only one positive flow cytometry analysis in the setting of indeterminate CSF samples. This paper proposes a diagnostic algorithm and complementary strategies. PMID:22639108

  6. Chemokine biomarkers in central nervous system tissue and cerebrospinal fluid in the Theiler's virus model mirror those in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pachner, Andrew R; Li, Libin; Gilli, Francesca

    2015-12-01

    Chemokines have increasingly been implicated in inflammatory and infectious disease of the central nervous system, both as biomarkers and as molecules important in pathogenesis. Multiple sclerosis is a disabling disease of unknown etiology, and recently chemokines have been identified as being upregulated molecules in the disease. We were interested in how the chemokine expression patterns in the central nervous system of a viral model of multiple sclerosis, Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD), compared to that in humans with multiple sclerosis. Cerebrospinal fluid and spinal cord tissue were analyzed for expression of a range of cytokines and chemokines. Three chemokines, CXCL10, CXCL9, and CCL5 were strongly and specifically upregulated in both the cerebrospinal fluid and spinal cord in chronic disease, a pattern identical to that in multiple sclerosis. These data, the first study of cytokines in central nervous system tissue and cerebrospinal fluid in TMEV-IDD, support the hypothesis that multiple sclerosis is caused by chronic infection with an as-yet unidentified pathogen, possibly a picornavirus.

  7. Allogeneic cartilage used for skull base plasty in children with primary intranasal encephalomeningocele associated with cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea.

    PubMed

    Parízek, J; Mĕrićka, P; Nĕmecek, S; Nĕmecková, J; Zemánková, M; Sercl, M; Häringová, M

    1996-03-01

    Three children with primary intranasal encephalomeningocele associated with cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea were operated on at the Department of Neurosurgery, Hradec Králové. In two children, aged 4 and 9.5 years, freeze-dried allogeneic costal cartilage was glued into the skull base defect. This plugging was covered up with deep frozen allogeneic fascia lata. In the third child, an only 1-year-old boy, after transection of the neck of the encephalomeningocele freeze-dried allogeneic dura mater was glued on extradurally and deep-frozen allogeneic fascia lata applied intradurally. The cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea ceased immediately after surgery. Spontaneous atrophy of the intranasal portion of the encephalomeningocele was demonstrated respectively 11, 1, and 7 years postoperatively on computed tomography. To evaluate cartilage healing histologically, the extracted allogeneic cartilage used for orbital roof plasty after 4 months was examined. The extent of spotty regressions represented about 7% of the tissue volume. It is stressed that, once diagnosed, intranasal encephalomeningocele associated with cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea should be operated on for prevention of meningitis as soon as possible. PMID:8697455

  8. Effects of mild hypothermia therapy on the levels of glutathione in rabbit blood and cerebrospinal fluid after cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hui; Chen, Yueliang

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of mild hypothermia therapy on oxidative stress injury of rabbit brain tissue after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Materials and Methods: Rabbit models of cardiac arrest were established. After the restoration of spontaneous circulation, 50 rabbits were randomly divided into normothermia and hypothermia groups. The following five time points were selected: before CPR, immediately after CPR, 2 hr after CPR (hypothermia group reached the target temperature), 14 hr after CPR (hypothermia group before rewarming), and 24 hr after CPR (hypothermia group recovered to normal temperature). Glutathione (GSH) concentrations in both the blood and cerebrospinal fluid of the normothermia and hypothermia groups were measured. Results: At 2, 14, and 24 hr after CPR, the GSH concentrations in both the blood and cerebrospinal fluid were significantly higher in the hypothermia group than in the nomorthermia group. Conclusion: Mild hypothermia therapy may increase GSH concentrations in rabbit blood and cerebrospinal fluid after CPR as well as promote the recovery of cerebral function. PMID:25810895

  9. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid pharmacokinetics of 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine in rabbits and dogs.

    PubMed

    Chabot, G G; Rivard, G E; Momparler, R L

    1983-02-01

    5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dCyd) is an effective antileukemic agent. In view of the importance for an antileukemic agent to cross effectively the blood-brain-barrier, we studied the plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pharmacokinetics of this drug in rabbits and dogs. The 5-aza-dCyd concentrations in biological fluids were determined by bioassay and high-performance liquid chromatography. 5-Aza-dCyd was administered either as an i.v. bolus or as a continuous i.v. infusion following a loading dose. Blood and CSF samples were collected at various time intervals. After an i.v. bolus, the plasma disappearance of 5-aza-dCyd was biphasic with half-lives of 5 and 43 min in rabbits and of 5 and 75 min in dogs. The apparent volume of distribution at steady state was in the order of 800 ml/kg for both species. The total plasma clearance of the drug was 15 ml/min/kg in rabbits and 9 ml/min/kg in dogs. After a 180 min i.v. infusion, 5-aza-dCyd slow disappearance half-lives were of 39 min in rabbits and of 144 min in dogs. The 5-aza-dCyd concentrations attained in the CSF were 27 and 58% of the plateau plasma concentration in rabbits and dogs, respectively. The drug disparition from the CSF followed closely the plasma profile after an i.v. infusion with a somewhat longer half-life. These results showed that 5-aza-dCyd can cross the blood-CSF barrier effectively, producing cytotoxic concentrations in the CSF when given by i.v. infusion.

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid flow impedance is elevated in Type I Chiari malformation.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Nicholas; Martin, Bryn A; Rocque, Brandon; Madura, Casey; Wieben, Oliver; Iskandar, Bermans J; Dombrowski, Stephen; Luciano, Mark; Oshinski, John N; Loth, Francis

    2014-02-01

    Diagnosis of Type I Chiari malformation (CMI) is difficult because the most commonly used diagnostic criterion, cerebellar tonsillar herniation (CTH) greater than 3-5 mm past the foramen magnum, has been found to have little correlation with patient symptom severity. Thus, there is a need to identify new objective measurement(s) to help quantify CMI severity. This study investigated longitudinal impedance (LI) as a parameter to assess CMI in terms of impedance to cerebrospinal fluid motion near the craniovertebral junction. LI was assessed in CMI patients (N = 15) and age-matched healthy controls (N = 8) using computational fluid dynamics based on subject-specific magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements of the cervical spinal subarachnoid space. In addition, CTH was measured for each subject. Mean LI in the CMI group (551 ± 66 dyn/cm5) was significantly higher than in controls (220 ± 17 dyn/cm5, p < 0.001). Mean CTH in the CMI group was 9.0 ± 1.1 mm compared to -0.4 ± 0.5 mm in controls. Regression analysis of LI versus CTH found a weak relationship (R2 = 0.46, p < 0.001), demonstrating that CTH was not a good indicator of the impedance to CSF motion caused by cerebellar herniation. These results showed that CSF flow impedance was elevated in CMI patients and that LI provides different information than a standard CTH measurement. Further research is necessary to determine if LI can be useful in CMI patient diagnosis. PMID:24362680

  11. Utility of cerebrospinal fluid drug concentration as a surrogate for unbound brain concentration in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Nagaya, Yoko; Nozaki, Yoshitane; Kobayashi, Kazumasa; Takenaka, Osamu; Nakatani, Yosuke; Kusano, Kazutomi; Yoshimura, Tsutomu; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    In central nervous system drug discovery, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drug concentration (C(CSF)) has been widely used as a surrogate for unbound brain concentrations (C(u,brain)). However, previous rodent studies demonstrated that when drugs undergo active efflux by transporters, such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), at the blood-brain barrier, the C(CSF) overestimates the corresponding C(u,brain). To investigate the utility of C(CSF) as a surrogate for interstitial fluid (ISF) concentration (C(ISF)) in nonhuman primates, this study simultaneously determined the C(CSF) and C(ISF) of 12 compounds, including P-gp substrates, under steady-state conditions in cynomolgus monkeys using intracerebral microdialysis coupled with cisternal CSF sampling. Unbound plasma concentrations of non- or weak P-gp substrates were within 2.2-fold of the C(ISF) or C(CSF), whereas typical P-gp substrates (risperidone, verapamil, desloratadine, and quinidine) showed ISF-to-plasma unbound (K(p,uu,ISF)) and CSF-to-plasma unbound concentration ratios (K(p,uu,CSF)) that were appreciably lower than unity. Although the K(p,uu,CSF) of quinidine, verapamil, and desloratadine showed a trend of overestimating the K(p,uu,ISF), K(p,uu,CSF) showed a good agreement with K(p,uu,ISF) within 3-fold variations for all compounds examined. C(u,brain) of some basic compounds, as determined using brain homogenates, overestimated the C(ISF) and C(CSF). Therefore, C(CSF) could be used as a surrogate for C(ISF) in nonhuman primates.

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid flow impedance is elevated in Type I Chiari malformation.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Nicholas; Martin, Bryn A; Rocque, Brandon; Madura, Casey; Wieben, Oliver; Iskandar, Bermans J; Dombrowski, Stephen; Luciano, Mark; Oshinski, John N; Loth, Francis

    2014-02-01

    Diagnosis of Type I Chiari malformation (CMI) is difficult because the most commonly used diagnostic criterion, cerebellar tonsillar herniation (CTH) greater than 3-5 mm past the foramen magnum, has been found to have little correlation with patient symptom severity. Thus, there is a need to identify new objective measurement(s) to help quantify CMI severity. This study investigated longitudinal impedance (LI) as a parameter to assess CMI in terms of impedance to cerebrospinal fluid motion near the craniovertebral junction. LI was assessed in CMI patients (N = 15) and age-matched healthy controls (N = 8) using computational fluid dynamics based on subject-specific magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements of the cervical spinal subarachnoid space. In addition, CTH was measured for each subject. Mean LI in the CMI group (551 ± 66 dyn/cm5) was significantly higher than in controls (220 ± 17 dyn/cm5, p < 0.001). Mean CTH in the CMI group was 9.0 ± 1.1 mm compared to -0.4 ± 0.5 mm in controls. Regression analysis of LI versus CTH found a weak relationship (R2 = 0.46, p < 0.001), demonstrating that CTH was not a good indicator of the impedance to CSF motion caused by cerebellar herniation. These results showed that CSF flow impedance was elevated in CMI patients and that LI provides different information than a standard CTH measurement. Further research is necessary to determine if LI can be useful in CMI patient diagnosis.

  13. A computational model of cerebrospinal fluid production and reabsorption driven by Starling forces.

    PubMed

    Buishas, Joel; Gould, Ian G; Linninger, Andreas A

    2014-10-01

    Experimental evidence has cast doubt on the classical model of river-like cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow from the choroid plexus to the arachnoid granulations. We propose a novel model of water transport through the parenchyma from the microcirculation as driven by Starling forces. This model investigates the effect of osmotic pressure on water transport between the cerebral vasculature, the extracellular space (ECS), the perivascular space (PVS), and the CSF. A rigorous literature search was conducted focusing on experiments which alter the osmolarity of blood or ventricles and measure the rate of CSF production. Investigations into the effect of osmotic pressure on the volume of ventricles and the flux of ions in the blood, choroid plexus epithelium, and CSF are reviewed. Increasing the osmolarity of the serum via a bolus injection completely inhibits nascent fluid flow production in the ventricles. A continuous injection of a hyperosmolar solution into the ventricles can increase the volume of the ventricle by up to 125%. CSF production is altered by 0.231 μL per mOsm in the ventricle and by 0.835 μL per mOsm in the serum. Water flux from the ECS to the CSF is identified as a key feature of intracranial dynamics. A complete mathematical model with all equations and scenarios is fully described, as well as a guide to constructing a computational model of intracranial water balance dynamics. The model proposed in this article predicts the effects the osmolarity of ECS, blood, and CSF on water flux in the brain, establishing a link between osmotic imbalances and pathological conditions such as hydrocephalus and edema. PMID:25358881

  14. Alzheimer's Disease Cerebrospinal Fluid and Neuroimaging Biomarkers: Diagnostic Accuracy and Relationship to Drug Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Khan, Tapan K; Alkon, Daniel L

    2015-01-01

    Widely researched Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarkers include in vivo brain imaging with PET and MRI, imaging of amyloid plaques, and biochemical assays of Aβ 1 - 42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau (p-tau-181) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In this review, we critically evaluate these biomarkers and discuss their clinical utility for the differential diagnosis of AD. Current AD biomarker tests are either highly invasive (requiring CSF collection) or expensive and labor-intensive (neuroimaging), making them unsuitable for use in the primary care, clinical office-based setting, or to assess drug efficacy in clinical trials. In addition, CSF and neuroimaging biomarkers continue to face challenges in achieving required sensitivity and specificity and minimizing center-to-center variability (for CSF-Aβ 1 - 42 biomarkers CV = 26.5% ; http://www.alzforum.org/news/conference-coverage/paris-standardization-hurdle-spinal-fluid-imaging-markers). Although potentially useful for selecting patient populations for inclusion in AD clinical trials, the utility of CSF biomarkers and neuroimaging techniques as surrogate endpoints of drug efficacy needs to be validated. Recent trials of β- and γ-secretase inhibitors and Aβ immunization-based therapies in AD showed no significant cognitive improvements, despite changes in CSF and neuroimaging biomarkers. As we learn more about the dysfunctional cellular and molecular signaling processes that occur in AD, and how these processes are manifested in tissues outside of the brain, new peripheral biomarkers may also be validated as non-invasive tests to diagnose preclinical and clinical AD. PMID:26402622

  15. High-performance liquid chromatography of amino acids in urine and cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Lam, S; Azumaya, H; Karmen, A

    1984-10-19

    Two different methods for analyzing amino acids by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), both of which can separate D- and L- stereoisomers, have been used for studying the amino acid composition of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and urine. One method, by which Dns derivatives of amino acids are separated as mixed chelate complexes with Cu(II) and a single stereoisomer of a second amino acid, was used to analyze CSF. CSF contains ca. 10 mumole/l per amino acid, compared to 100 mumole/l in serum. The high sensitivity of fluorescence detection enabled complete analysis, starting with 50 microliter of fluid. The second method, which uses lower concentrations of both the copper and the second amino acid and detects amino acids by the change in absorbance of the copper complex, was used to measure the urine concentration of the lysine metabolite, pipecolic acid (piperidine-2-carboxylic acid), a secondary amino acid that is difficult to detect by the more usual detection methods. Our procedure involves passing urine through a cation-exchange column, collecting the fraction containing pipecolic acid, and chromatographing it on a reversed-phase HPLC column with a mobile phase containing L-aspartame and Cu(II). To assess the utility of the method, urine samples from a patient given loading doses of D- or L-isomers were analyzed. When either isomer was administered, both D- and L-isomers were detected, but in different proportions. Varying proportions and concentrations of both isomers were also detected in the urines of patients with hyperpipecolatemia from different metabolic abnormalities.

  16. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid measures of arginine vasopressin secretion in patients with bulimia nervosa and in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Demitrack, M A; Kalogeras, K T; Altemus, M; Pigott, T A; Listwak, S J; Gold, P W

    1992-06-01

    Bulimia nervosa is a psychiatric syndrome associated with intense hunger, deficient satiety mechanisms, an obsessional preoccupation with the adverse consequences of eating, ritualistic binge eating, and subsequent purging to forestall the effects of the binge. The morbidity of this illness reflects both the psychological suffering associated with a life organized around pathological eating behaviors, as well as medical complications such as fluid and electrolyte imbalances that occur largely as a result of purging and laxative abuse. We report here a study of the osmoregulation of plasma arginine vasopressin secretion and of vasopressin levels in the cerebrospinal fluid. This study was undertaken because vasopressin not only functions as the antidiuretic hormone, and thus as a principal modulator of fluid and electrolyte balance, but also because, in animals, centrally directed vasopressin delays the extinction of behaviors acquired during aversive conditioning. Thirteen normal-weight female patients with bulimia nervosa were studied after at least 1 month of nutritional stabilization and supervised abstinence from binge eating and purging. Plasma vasopressin, plasma sodium, and subjective thirst were measured serially before and during a 2-h infusion of 3% hypertonic saline (0.1 ml/kg min). In addition, cerebrospinal fluid was obtained by lumbar puncture upon admission and at 1 week before hypertonic saline infusion in 11 of these patients and in an additional 11 female patients who did not participate in the hypertonic infusion study. Fifteen healthy normal weight individuals (4 female, 11 male) served as controls for the hypertonic saline infusion and a separate group of 11 healthy normal weight female controls underwent puncture. Compared to controls, bulimic subjects showed a significant reduction in the plasma vasopressin response to hypertonic saline; in 12/13, plasma vasopressin correlated closely with plasma sodium, whereas in one patient vasopressin

  17. Lack of KIs virus DNA in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid in Italy.

    PubMed

    Macera, Lisa; Focosi, Daniele; Manzin, Aldo; Ceccherini Nelli, Luca; Pistello, Mauro; Maggi, Fabrizio

    2015-10-01

    Dear Sirs, Satoh et al. recently screened 516 Japanese blood donors with PCR using primers constructed from the consensus domain of the helicase of positive-stranded RNA viruses. They reported a novel enveloped virus with a circular double-stranded DNA genome (tentatively named KIs virus, KIs-V) (Satoh et al., 2011) occurring in 36 out of the 100 hepatitis E (HEV) antibody-positive donors with elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels (>60 IU/L). More recently, Biagini et al. failed to find KIs-V in plasma from 576 French blood donors with unknown HEV serostatus and unknown ALT values (Biagini et al., 2012). Based on an HEV seroprevalence of 3-52% in France, the authors suggested an uncommon frequency of KIs-V infection in healthy persons in France. To date, no information has been available on the prevalence of KIs-V DNA in Italy. In the present paper, we analyzed KIs-V in 242 plasma samples of blood donors, transplant recipients, and patients with chronic viral infections, and in 52 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples of patients with different neurological disorders. Informed consent was obtained from all patients and the study was performed in accordance with the ethical standards laid down in the 1964 Declaration of Helsinki and its amendments. Viral DNA extraction was carried out on 200 μl of plasma or 200 μl of CSF by using QIAamp DNA blood kit (Qiagen, Hilden, Germany) according to the manufacturer's instructions. Extracted nucleic acids were amplified for KIs-V DNA with the nested PCR protocol developed by Satoh et al. (2011) and used for screening Japanese blood donors. The first and second PCR rounds were designed on 458 and 304 nt-length fragments, respectively. To validate the amplification process, positive controls obtained from plasma dilutions of a synthetic template corresponding to the target sequence were run in each PCR. PCR sensitivity was less than 5 copies of target sequence. Fourteen liver and 16 kidney and/or pancreas transplant

  18. Lack of KIs virus DNA in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid in Italy.

    PubMed

    Macera, Lisa; Focosi, Daniele; Manzin, Aldo; Ceccherini Nelli, Luca; Pistello, Mauro; Maggi, Fabrizio

    2015-10-01

    Dear Sirs, Satoh et al. recently screened 516 Japanese blood donors with PCR using primers constructed from the consensus domain of the helicase of positive-stranded RNA viruses. They reported a novel enveloped virus with a circular double-stranded DNA genome (tentatively named KIs virus, KIs-V) (Satoh et al., 2011) occurring in 36 out of the 100 hepatitis E (HEV) antibody-positive donors with elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels (>60 IU/L). More recently, Biagini et al. failed to find KIs-V in plasma from 576 French blood donors with unknown HEV serostatus and unknown ALT values (Biagini et al., 2012). Based on an HEV seroprevalence of 3-52% in France, the authors suggested an uncommon frequency of KIs-V infection in healthy persons in France. To date, no information has been available on the prevalence of KIs-V DNA in Italy. In the present paper, we analyzed KIs-V in 242 plasma samples of blood donors, transplant recipients, and patients with chronic viral infections, and in 52 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples of patients with different neurological disorders. Informed consent was obtained from all patients and the study was performed in accordance with the ethical standards laid down in the 1964 Declaration of Helsinki and its amendments. Viral DNA extraction was carried out on 200 μl of plasma or 200 μl of CSF by using QIAamp DNA blood kit (Qiagen, Hilden, Germany) according to the manufacturer's instructions. Extracted nucleic acids were amplified for KIs-V DNA with the nested PCR protocol developed by Satoh et al. (2011) and used for screening Japanese blood donors. The first and second PCR rounds were designed on 458 and 304 nt-length fragments, respectively. To validate the amplification process, positive controls obtained from plasma dilutions of a synthetic template corresponding to the target sequence were run in each PCR. PCR sensitivity was less than 5 copies of target sequence. Fourteen liver and 16 kidney and/or pancreas transplant

  19. Multiplicity of cerebrospinal fluid functions: New challenges in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Johanson, Conrad E; Duncan, John A; Klinge, Petra M; Brinker, Thomas; Stopa, Edward G; Silverberg, Gerald D

    2008-01-01

    This review integrates eight aspects of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulatory dynamics: formation rate, pressure, flow, volume, turnover rate, composition, recycling and reabsorption. Novel ways to modulate CSF formation emanate from recent analyses of choroid plexus transcription factors (E2F5), ion transporters (NaHCO3 cotransport), transport enzymes (isoforms of carbonic anhydrase), aquaporin 1 regulation, and plasticity of receptors for fluid-regulating neuropeptides. A greater appreciation of CSF pressure (CSFP) is being generated by fresh insights on peptidergic regulatory servomechanisms, the role of dysfunctional ependyma and circumventricular organs in causing congenital hydrocephalus, and the clinical use of algorithms to delineate CSFP waveforms for diagnostic and prognostic utility. Increasing attention focuses on CSF flow: how it impacts cerebral metabolism and hemodynamics, neural stem cell progression in the subventricular zone, and catabolite/peptide clearance from the CNS. The pathophysiological significance of changes in CSF volume is assessed from the respective viewpoints of hemodynamics (choroid plexus blood flow and pulsatility), hydrodynamics (choroidal hypo- and hypersecretion) and neuroendocrine factors (i.e., coordinated regulation by atrial natriuretic peptide, arginine vasopressin and basic fibroblast growth factor). In aging, normal pressure hydrocephalus and Alzheimer's disease, the expanding CSF space reduces the CSF turnover rate, thus compromising the CSF sink action to clear harmful metabolites (e.g., amyloid) from the CNS. Dwindling CSF dynamics greatly harms the interstitial environment of neurons. Accordingly the altered CSF composition in neurodegenerative diseases and senescence, because of adverse effects on neural processes and cognition, needs more effective clinical management. CSF recycling between subarachnoid space, brain and ventricles promotes interstitial fluid (ISF) convection with both trophic and excretory

  20. Purely endoscopic pterional extradural approach: A novel technique for repair of cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Ajit Kumar; Goyal, Sumit

    2016-01-01

    Study Design: Retrospective descriptive study of an innovative surgical technique. Objective: To assess the feasibility and success of repair of transfrontal sinus cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea through pterional transcranial extradural approach using endoscope. Summary of Background Data: Repair of CSF rhinorrhea has seen advancement with the evolution of endoscopic transnasal techniques. However, leaks from defect in the posterior wall of frontal sinus still remain a challenge for the skull base surgeons and requires conventional craniotomy more often. We describe a novel technique to repair these leaks by purely endoscopic pterional extradural (PEPE) approach thereby avoiding complications associated with conventional craniotomy and endoscopic transnasal approaches. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five patients with traumatic CSF rhinorrhea from the posterior wall of frontal sinus underwent repair with the present technique. They were followed up for 6–18 months and were evaluated for feasibility of procedure, recurrence of leak, and occurrence of the fresh neurological deficit. Results: Thirty-five patients underwent CSF rhinorrhea repair using the above technique. The procedure was accomplished in all patients without any intraoperative complications. There was no requirement of blood transfusion in any case. All patients had a cessation of CSF leak in the postoperative period, and there was no recurrence. There was no evidence of frontal lobe retraction injury in any of these patients, and no fresh neurological deficit was observed. Conclusion: This PEPE approach to repair CSF leak through the posterior wall of the frontal sinus is a novel technique in which we can avoid disadvantages associated with both conventional craniotomy as well as transnasal endoscopic approaches. PMID:27114672

  1. Melatonin from cerebrospinal fluid but not from blood reaches sheep cerebral tissues under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Legros, C; Chesneau, D; Boutin, J A; Barc, C; Malpaux, B

    2014-03-01

    The pineal gland secretes melatonin (MLT) that circulates in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We provide data to support the hypothesis that, in sheep and possibly in humans, only the CSF MLT, and not the blood MLT, can provide most of MLT to the cerebral tissue in high concentrations, particularly in the periventricular area. The MLT content of sheep brain, our chosen animal model, was found in significant concentration gradients oriented from the ventricle (close to the CSF) to the cerebral tissue, with concentrations varying by a factor of 1-125. The highest concentrations were observed close to the ventricle wall, whereas the lowest concentrations were furthest from the ventricles (407.0 ± 71.5 pg/ml compared to 84.7 ± 5.2 pg/ml around the third ventricle). This concentration gradient was measured in brain tissue collected at mid-day and at the end of the night. Nocturnal concentrations were higher than daytime concentrations, reflecting the diurnal variation in the pineal gland. The concentration gradient was not detected when MLT was delivered to the brain via the bloodstream. The diffusion of MLT to cerebral tissues via CSF was supported by in vivo scintigraphy and autoradiography. 2-[(123)I]-MLT infused into the CSF quickly and efficiently diffused into the brain tissues, whereas [(123)I]-iodine (control) was mostly washed away by the CSF flow and [(123)I]-bovine serum albumin remained mostly in the CSF. Taken together, these data support a critical role of CSF in providing the brain with MLT.

  2. Cellular Composition of Cerebrospinal Fluid in HIV-1 Infected and Uninfected Subjects.

    PubMed

    Ho, Emily L; Ronquillo, Rollie; Altmeppen, Hermann; Spudich, Serena S; Price, Richard W; Sinclair, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    In order to characterize the cellular composition of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in a healthy state and in the setting of chronic pleocytosis associated with HIV-1 (HIV) infection, multi-parameter flow cytometry was used to identify and quantitate cellular phenotypes in CSF derived from HIV-uninfected healthy controls and HIV-infected subjects across a spectrum of disease and treatment. CD4+ T cells were the most frequent CSF population and the CD4:CD8 ratio was significantly increased in the CSF compared to blood (p = 0.0232), suggesting preferential trafficking of CD4+ over CD8+ T cells to this compartment. In contrast, in HIV-infection, CD8+ T cells were the major cellular component of the CSF and were markedly increased compared to HIV-uninfected subjects (p<0.001). As with peripheral blood, the CSF CD4:CD8 ratio was reversed in HIV-infected subjects compared to HIV-uninfected subjects. Monocytes, B cells and NK cells were rare in the CSF in both groups, although absolute counts of CSF NK cells and B cells were significantly increased in HIV-infected subjects (p<0.05). Our studies show that T cells are the major cellular component of the CSF in HIV-infected and uninfected subjects. The CSF pleocytosis characteristic of HIV infection involves all lymphocyte subsets we measured, except for CD4+ T cells, but is comprised primarily of CD8+ T cells. The reduced proportion of CD4+ T cells in the CSF may reflect both HIV-related peripheral loss and changes in trafficking patterns in response to HIV infection in the central nervous system.

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid neuropeptide Y in combat veterans with and without posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sah, Renu; Ekhator, Nosakhare N.; Jefferson-Wilson, Lena; Horn, Paul S.; Geracioti, Thomas D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Accruing evidence indicates that neuropeptide Y (NPY), a peptide neurotransmitter, is a resilience-to-stress factor in humans. We previously reported reduced cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) NPY concentrations in combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) subjects as compared with healthy, non-combat-exposed volunteers. Here we report CSF NPY in combat-exposed veterans with and without PTSD. We quantified NPY concentrations in morning CSF from 11 male subjects with PTSD from combat in Iraq and/or Afghanistan and from 14 combat-exposed subjects without PTSD. NPY-like immunoreactivity (NPY-LI) was measured by EIA. The relationship between CSF NPY and clinical symptoms, as measured by the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), was assessed, as was the relationship between combat exposure scale (CES) scores and CSF NPY. As compared with the combat-exposed comparison subjects without PTSD, individuals with PTSD had significantly lower concentrations of CSF NPY [mean CSF NPY was 258.6 ± 21.64 pg/mL in the combat trauma-no PTSD group but only 180.5 ± 12.62 pg/mL in PTSD patients (p = 0.008)]. After adjusting for CES and BDI scores the two groups were still significantly different with respect to NPY. Importantly, CSF NPY was negatively correlated with composite CAPS score and intrusive (re-experiencing) subscale scores, but did not significantly correlate with CES or BDI scores. Our current findings further suggest that NPY may regulate the manifestation of PTSD symptomatology, and extend previous observations of low CSF NPY concentrations in the disorder. Central nervous system NPY may be a clinically important pharmacotherapeutic target, and/or diagnostic measure, for PTSD. PMID:24485499

  4. Does Caffeine Consumption Modify Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid-β Levels in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease?

    PubMed

    Travassos, Maria; Santana, Isabel; Baldeiras, Inês; Tsolaki, Magda; Gkatzima, Olymbia; Sermin, Genc; Yener, Görsev G; Simonsen, Anja; Hasselbalch, Steen G; Kapaki, Elisabeth; Mara, Bourbouli; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Agostinho, Paula; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Mendes, Vera M; Manadas, Bruno; de Mendon, Alexandreça

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine may be protective against Alzheimer's disease (AD) by modulating amyloid-β (Aβ) metabolic pathways. The present work aimed to study a possible association of caffeine consumption with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, particularly Aβ. The study included 88 patients with AD or mild cognitive impairment. The consumption of caffeine and theobromine was evaluated using a validated food questionnaire. Quantification of caffeine and main active metabolites was performed with liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The levels of A(1-42), total tau, and phosphorylated tau in the CSF were determined using sandwich ELISA methods and other Aβ species, Aβ(X-38), Aβ(X-40), and Aβ(X-42), with the MSD Aβ Triplex assay. The concentration of caffeine was 0.79±1.15 μg/mL in the CSF and 1.20±1.88 μg/mL in the plasma. No correlation was found between caffeine consumption and Aβ42 in the CSF. However, a significant positive correlation was found between the concentrations of theobromine, both in the CSF and in the plasma, with Aβ42 in the CSF. Theobromine in the CSF was positively correlated with the levels of other xanthines in the CSF, but not in the plasma, suggesting that it may be formed by central metabolic pathways. In conclusion, caffeine consumption does not modify the levels of CSF biomarkers, and does not require to be controlled for when measuring CSF biomarkers in a clinical setting. Since theobromine is associated with a favorable Aβ profile in the CSF, the possibility that it might have a protective role in AD should be further investigated.

  5. BACE1 activity in cerebrospinal fluid and its relation to markers of AD pathology.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Sandra D; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Verheijen, Jan H; Mulder, Cees; Scheltens, Philip; Blankenstein, Marinus A; Hack, C Erik; Veerhuis, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have shown that reduced amyloid-beta 1-42 (Abeta(42)) and increased tau levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) reflect increased Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology in the brain. beta-site APP cleaving enzyme (BACE1) is thought to be the major beta-secretase involved in Abeta production in the brain, and therefore we investigated the relation between BACE1 activity and CSF markers Abeta(40), Abeta(42), total tau (t-tau), and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (p-tau) in CSF of control (n=12), mild cognitive impairment (n=18), and AD (n=17) subjects. Patients were classified according to their Abeta(42), t-tau, and p-tau CSF biomarker levels, with either an AD-like biomarker profile (two or three biomarkers abnormal: Abeta(42) < 495 pg/ml in combination with t-tau > 356 pg/ml, and/or p-tau > 54 pg/ml) or a normal biomarker profile (

  6. Specific absorbed fractions of energy from internal photon sources in brain tumor and cerebrospinal fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.F. )); Stubbs, J.B. )

    1995-03-01

    Transferrin, radiolabeled with In-111, can be coinjected into glioblastoma multiforme lesions, and subsequent scintigraphic imaging can demonstrate the biokinetics of the cytotoxic transferrin. The administration of [sup 111]In transferrin into a brain tumor results in distribution of radioactivity in the brain, brain tumor, and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Information about absorbed radiation doses to these regions, as well as other nearby tissues and organs, is important for evaluating radiation-related risks from this procedure. The radiation dose is usually estimated for a mathematical representation of the human body. We have included source/target regions for the eye, lens of the eye, spinal column, spinal CSF, cranial CSF, and a 100-g tumor within the brain of an adult male phantom developed by Cristy and Eckerman. The spinal column, spinal CSF, and the eyes have not been routinely included in photon transport simulations. Specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) as a function of photon energy were calculated using the ALGAMP computer code, which utilizes Monte Carlo techniques for simulating photon transport. The ALGAMP code was run three times, with the source activity distributed uniformly within the tumor, cranial CSF, and the spinal CSF volumes. These SAFs, which were generated for 12 discrete photon energies ranging from 0.01 to 4.0 MeV, were used with decay scheme data to calculate [ital S]-values needed for estimating absorbed doses. [ital S]-values for [sup 111]In are given for three source regions (brain tumor, cranial CSF, and spinal CSF) and all standard target regions/organs, the eye and lens, as well as to tissues within these source regions. [ital S]-values for the skeletal regions containing active marrow are estimated. These results are useful in evaluating the radiation doses from intracranial administration of [sup 111]In transferrin.

  7. Cerebrospinal Fluid JC Virus Antibody Index for Diagnosis of Natalizumab-Associated Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Warnke, Clemens; von Geldern, Gloria; Markwerth, Philipp; Dehmel, Thomas; Hoepner, Robert; Gold, Ralf; Pawlita, Michael; Kümpfel, Tania; Mäurer, Mathias; Stangel, Martin; Wegner, Florian; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Straeten, Vera; Limmroth, Volker; Weber, Thomas; Hermsen, Derik; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Wattjes, Mike P.; Anders, Svenningson; Major, Eugene; Olsson, Tomas; Kieseier, Bernd C.; Adams, Ortwin

    2014-01-01

    Objective Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), caused by JC virus (JCV), can occur in patients receiving natalizumab for multiple sclerosis (MS). JCV detection by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), or brain biopsy, is required for probable or definite diagnosis of PML. However, in some patients only low levels of JCV DNA (<100 copies/ml) are present in CSF, making the diagnosis challenging. Our objective was to assess the complementary value of a CSF JCV antibody index (AIJCV) in the diagnosis of natalizumab-associated PML. Methods AIJCV was assessed in 37 cases of natalizumab-associated PML and 89 MS-patients treated with natalizumab without PML. Sera and CSF were tested in a capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, using JCV-VP1 fused to glutathione S-transferase as antigen. Albumin levels and total immunoglobulin G concentration were determined by immunonephelometry, and the AIJCV was calculated as published. Results Twenty-six of 37 (70%) patients with natalizumab-associated PML exhibited an AIJCV > 1.5, whereas this was seen in none of the controls (p < 0.0001). At time of the first positive qPCR for JCV DNA, 11 of 20 (55%) patients with natalizumab-associated PML had an AIJCV > 1.5. JCV DNA levels of <100 copies/ml were seen in 14 (70%) of these 20 patients, of whom 8 (57%) demonstrated an AIJCV > 1.5. Interpretation Determination of the AIJCV could be an added tool in the diagnostic workup for PML and should be included in the case definition of natalizumab-associated PML. PMID:24729444

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid protein dynamic driver network: At the crossroads of brain tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhou; Liu, Rui; Zheng, Le; Hao, Shiying; Fu, Changlin; Li, Zhen; Deng, Xiaohong; Jang, Taichang; Merchant, Milton; Whitin, John C; Guo, Minyi; Cohen, Harvey J; Recht, Lawrence; Ling, Xuefeng B

    2015-07-15

    To get a better understanding of the ongoing in situ environmental changes preceding the brain tumorigenesis, we assessed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteome profile changes in a glioma rat model in which brain tumor invariably developed after a single in utero exposure to the neurocarcinogen ethylnitrosourea (ENU). Computationally, the CSF proteome profile dynamics during the tumorigenesis can be modeled as non-smooth or even abrupt state changes. Such brain tumor environment transition analysis, correlating the CSF composition changes with the development of early cellular hyperplasia, can reveal the pathogenesis process at network level during a time before the image detection of the tumors. In our controlled rat model study, matched ENU- and saline-exposed rats' CSF proteomics changes were quantified at approximately 30, 60, 90, 120, 150 days of age (P30, P60, P90, P120, P150). We applied our transition-based network entropy (TNE) method to compute the CSF proteome changes in the ENU rat model and test the hypothesis of the critical transition state prior to impending hyperplasia. Our analysis identified a dynamic driver network (DDN) of CSF proteins related with the emerging tumorigenesis progressing from the non-hyperplasia state. The DDN associated leading network CSF proteins can allow the early detection of such dynamics before the catastrophic shift to the clear clinical landmarks in gliomas. Future characterization of the critical transition state (P60) during the brain tumor progression may reveal the underlying pathophysiology to device novel therapeutics preventing tumor formation. More detailed method and information are accessible through our website at http://translationalmedicine.stanford.edu.

  9. Uptake and transport of lectins from the cerebrospinal fluid by cells of the immature mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Mares, V; Borges, L F; Sidman, R L

    1984-01-01

    40 mice (C57BL/6J) 2, 3, 6, and 10 d old were injected intraventricularly with 2% wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) or soybean agglutinin (SBA). The transport of lectins from the ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) into brain parenchyma was studied by an unlabelled antibody technique ( BORGES and SIDMAN 1982). The granule product of the immunohistochemical reaction was found in the cytoplasm of ventricular ependymal cells, the choroid plexus and meninges in all age groups studied. Penetration of lectins into brain parenchyma was higher in younger animals and at more immature-cell-surrounded parts of lateral and the IVth ventricle. The stain product was dispersed throughout the neuropil excepting cell nuclei. Higher concentration of lectins appeared in nerve cell cytoplasm of some regions of the brain of younger animals (P2 to P3); in 10 d old mice granules of stain appeared in the cytoplasm of PURKINJE cells and pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus. A fiber-like staining, apparent especially in large commissures adjacent to brain ventricles (corpus callosum, fornix hippocampi) in all age groups, suggests that lectins are transported within axons, even at the earliest postnatal ages. Unlike WGA, densely stained glial cells appeared in parenchyma of SBA injected animals, especially of the younger age group (P3 to P6). The results of this study confirm earlier findings that macromolecules within the ventricular CSF can penetrate into brain parenchyma but suggest that the penetration is higher in less mature animals and at the ventricle regions surrounded by less differentiated parenchyma.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Comparison of Antibodies with Amylase Activity from Cerebrospinal Fluid and Serum of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Doronin, Vasilii B.; Parkhomenko, Taisiya A.; Castellazzi, Massimiliano; Cesnik, Edward; Buneva, Valentina N.; Granieri, Enrico; Nevinsky, Georgy A.

    2016-01-01

    We have recently shown that IgGs from serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of MS patients are active in hydrolysis of DNA and myelin basic protein. According to literature data, anti-DNA and anti-MBP abzymes may promote important neuropathologic mechanisms in this chronic inflammatory disorder and in MS pathogenesis development. At the same time, the involvement of antibodies with amylase activity in the pathogenesis of any autoimmune disease has not yet been identified. Electrophoretically and immunologically homogeneous IgGs were obtained by a sequential affinity chromatography of the CSF proteins on protein G-Sepharose and FPLC gel filtration. We are able to present the first unpredictable evidence showing that IgGs from CSF possess amylase activity and efficiently hydrolyze maltoheptaose; their average specific Ab activity is ~30-fold higher than that of antibodies from sera of the same MS patients. Specific average RA (SAA) for IgGs from healthy volunteers was approximately ~1000 lower than that for MS patients. In addition, it was shown that a relative SAA of total proteins of CSF (including Abs) ~15-fold lower than that for purified IgGs, while the relative SAA of the total sera protein is higher than that of sera IgGs by a factor of 1033. This result speaks in favor of the fact that amylolytic activity of CSF proteins is mainly caused by the activity of amylase abzymes. One cannot exclude, that amylase abzymes of CSF can play a, as yet unknown, role in the pathogenesis of MS. Some possible reasons of these findings are discussed. PMID:27196086

  11. Receptor-mediated mechanism for the transport of prolactin from blood to cerebrospinal fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, R.J.; Slaby, F.J.; Posner, B.I.

    1987-05-01

    Prolactin (PRL) interacts with areas of the central nervous system which reside behind the blood-brain barrier. While vascular PRL does not cross this barrier, it is readily accessible to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from which it may gain access to the PRL-responsive areas of the brain. Studies were undertaken to characterize the mechanism responsible for the translocation of PRL from blood to CSF. Rats were given external jugular vein injections of (/sup 125/-I)iodo-PRL in the presence or absence of an excess of unlabeled ovine PRL (oPRL), human GH, bovine GH, or porcine insulin. CSF and choroid plexus were removed 60 min later. CSF samples were electrophoresed on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide slab gels and resultant autoradiographs were analyzed with quantitative microdensitometry. The data revealed that unlabeled lactogenic hormones, viz. oPRL and human GH, caused a statistically significant inhibition of (/sup 125/I)iodo-PRL transport from blood to CSF. In contrast, nonlactogenic hormones, viz bovine GH and insulin, had no effect on (/sup 125/I)iodo-PRL transport into the CSF. An identical pattern of competition was observed in the binding of hormone to the choroid plexus. Furthermore, vascular injections of (/sup 125/I)iodo-PRL administered with a range of concentrations of unlabeled oPRL revealed a dose-response inhibition in the transport of (/sup 125/I)iodo-PRL from blood to CSF. The study demonstrates that PRL enters the CSF by a specific, PRL receptor-mediated transport mechanism. The data is consistent with the hypothesis that the transport mechanism resides at the choroid plexus. The existence of this transport mechanism reflects the importance of the cerebroventricular system in PRL-brain interactions.

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid and plasma oxytocin concentrations are positively correlated and negatively predict anxiety in children.

    PubMed

    Carson, D S; Berquist, S W; Trujillo, T H; Garner, J P; Hannah, S L; Hyde, S A; Sumiyoshi, R D; Jackson, L P; Moss, J K; Strehlow, M C; Cheshier, S H; Partap, S; Hardan, A Y; Parker, K J

    2015-09-01

    The neuropeptide oxytocin (OXT) exerts anxiolytic and prosocial effects in the central nervous system of rodents. A number of recent studies have attempted to translate these findings by investigating the relationships between peripheral (e.g., blood, urinary and salivary) OXT concentrations and behavioral functioning in humans. Although peripheral samples are easy to obtain in humans, whether peripheral OXT measures are functionally related to central OXT activity remains unclear. To investigate a possible relationship, we quantified OXT concentrations in concomitantly collected cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood samples from child and adult patients undergoing clinically indicated lumbar punctures or other CSF-related procedures. Anxiety scores were obtained in a subset of child participants whose parents completed psychometric assessments. Findings from this study indicate that plasma OXT concentrations significantly and positively predict CSF OXT concentrations (r=0.56, P=0.0064, N=27). Moreover, both plasma (r=-0.92, P=0.0262, N=10) and CSF (r=-0.91, P=0.0335, N=10) OXT concentrations significantly and negatively predicted trait anxiety scores, consistent with the preclinical literature. Importantly, plasma OXT concentrations significantly and positively (r=0.96, P=0.0115, N=10) predicted CSF OXT concentrations in the subset of child participants who provided behavioral data. This study provides the first empirical support for the use of blood measures of OXT as a surrogate for central OXT activity, validated in the context of behavioral functioning. These preliminary findings also suggest that impaired OXT signaling may be a biomarker of anxiety in humans, and a potential target for therapeutic development in individuals with anxiety disorders.

  13. Treatment and microbiology of repeated cerebrospinal fluid shunt infections in children

    PubMed Central

    Tuan, Teresa J; Thorell, Emily A; Hamblett, Nicole Mayer; Kestle, John R. W.; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Simon, Tamara D

    2011-01-01

    Background A small group of children have second and even more cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt infections (SI). We sought to describe the treatment approaches used for, and the microbiology of, repeated shunt infections. Methods The study population included 31 children with second shunt infection (SI-2) among those undergoing initial CSF shunt placement and treatment for initial infection at Primary Children’s Medical Center. CSF shunt infection was defined as: 1) presence of bacteria in Gram stain and/or culture of CSF, wound, and/or pseudocyst; 2) visible hardware; or 3) abdominal pseudocyst; or (4) presence of bacteria in a blood culture in children with a ventriculoatrial shunt. Infection rates were generated using per-patient denominators, and the concordance of organisms across infections was summarized. Results Of the 31 children with SI-2, most were less than 6 months of age at initial shunt placement (81%), male (77%), and with ventriculoperitoneal shunts (71%). Eighteen developed SI-3 and 8 developed SI-4. Infection rates were 60% (95% confidence interval (CI): 42–75%, n=18/30) for SI-3 and 47% (95% CI: 26–69%, n=8/17) for SI-4. The median time to SI-3 was 477 days (range 5–828) and to SI-4 was 2137 days (range 9–2137). Gram-positive organisms predominated (93% of SI-2, 94% of SI-3). The majority of second shunt infections demonstrated Gram-stain concordance with both the initial (first) shunt infection (58%, 95% CI: 41–74%) and with the following (third) shunt infection (78%, 95% CI: 55–91%). Conclusions Children with second shunt infection experience high subsequent re-infection rates with a long time to re-infection. PMID:21852762

  14. Recurrent intracranial solitary fibrous tumor with cerebrospinal fluid dissemination. Case report.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Katsuyoshi; Hayashi, Yutaka; Fujisawa, Hironori; Hasegawa, Mitsuhiro; Yamashita, Junkoh

    2004-12-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a benign and rare neoplasm. To date, only 37 patients with intracranial SFTs have been reported. Although a number of the tumors were recurrent and some later underwent malignant transformation, none of these lesions progressed to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dissemination. In this paper the authors report a case of SFT in which the lesion recurred several times and ultimately was disseminated by the CSF. The patient was a 63-year-old woman with multiple intracranial and spinal tumors. Fifteen years before this presentation, at the age of 48 she had been hospitalized for resection of a falcotentorial tumor. During the ensuing 15 years she underwent multiple surgeries and sessions of radiation therapy for recurrent lesions. The exclusive location of her tumors in the subarachnoid space at the end of this 15-year period indicate CSF dissemination of the tumor. The tumor that was resected when the patient was 48 years old and the latest resected lesion were analyzed by performing immunohistological CD34, epithelial membrane antigen, vimentin, S100 protein, and reticulin staining, and determining the MIB-1 labeling index (LI). Most of the results were identical, and both tumors were diagnosed as SFT according to a staining pattern that showed a strong and diffuse positive reaction for CD34. Nevertheless, the authors noted that the MIB-1 LI increased from less than 1% in the original tumor to 13% in the latest tumor. The increased proliferation of MIB-1 indicates that the malignant transformation could have occurred during tumor recurrence with CSF dissemination.

  15. Analysis of cerebro-spinal fluid protein composition in early developmental stages in chick embryos.

    PubMed

    Gato, A; Martín, P; Alonso, M I; Martín, C; Pulgar, M A; Moro, J A

    2004-04-01

    Foetal cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) has a very high protein concentration when compared to adult CSF, and in many species five major protein fractions have been described. However, the protein concentration and composition in CSF during early developmental stages remains largely unknown. Our results show that in the earliest stages (18 to 30 H.H.) of chick development there is a progressive increase in CSF protein concentration until foetal values are attained. In addition, by performing electrophoretic separation and high-sensitivity silver staining, we were able to identify a total of 21 different protein fractions in the chick embryo CSF. In accordance with the developmental pattern of their concentration, these can be classified as follows: A: high-concentration fractions which corresponded with the ones described in foetal CSF by other authors; B: low-concentration fractions which remained stable throughout the period studied; C: low-concentration fractions which show changes during this period. The evolution and molecular weight of the latter group suggest the possibility of an important biological role. Our data demonstrate that all the CSF protein fractions are present in embryonic serum; this could mean that the specific transport mechanisms in neuroepithelial cells described in the foetal period evolve in very early stages of development. In conclusion, this paper offers an accurate study of the protein composition of chick embryonic CSF, which will help the understanding of the influences on neuroepithelial stem cells during development and, as a result, the appropriate conditions for the in vitro study of embryonic/foetal nervous tissue cells. PMID:15039986

  16. Approach to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker discovery and evaluation in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Price, Richard W; Peterson, Julia; Fuchs, Dietmar; Angel, Thomas E; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hagberg, Lars; Spudich, Serena; Smith, Richard D; Jacobs, Jon M; Brown, Joseph N; Gisslen, Magnus

    2013-12-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) infection is a nearly universal facet of systemic HIV infection that varies in character and neurological consequences. While clinical staging and neuropsychological test performance have been helpful in evaluating patients, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers present a valuable and objective approach to more accurate diagnosis, assessment of treatment effects and understanding of evolving pathobiology. We review some lessons from our recent experience with CSF biomarker studies. We have used two approaches to biomarker analysis: targeted, hypothesis-driven and non-targeted exploratory discovery methods. We illustrate the first with data from a cross-sectional study of defined subject groups across the spectrum of systemic and CNS disease progression and the second with a longitudinal study of the CSF proteome in subjects initiating antiretroviral treatment. Both approaches can be useful and, indeed, complementary. The first is helpful in assessing known or hypothesized biomarkers while the second can identify novel biomarkers and point to broad interactions in pathogenesis. Common to both is the need for well-defined samples and subjects that span a spectrum of biological activity and biomarker concentrations. Previously-defined guide biomarkers of CNS infection, inflammation and neural injury are useful in categorizing samples for analysis and providing critical biological context for biomarker discovery studies. CSF biomarkers represent an underutilized but valuable approach to understanding the interactions of HIV and the CNS and to more objective diagnosis and assessment of disease activity. Both hypothesis-based and discovery methods can be useful in advancing the definition and use of these biomarkers.

  17. Intracranial pressure pulse waveform correlates with aqueductal cerebrospinal fluid stroke volume.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Robert; Baldwin, Kevin; Fuller, Jennifer; Vespa, Paul; Hu, Xiao; Bergsneider, Marvin

    2012-11-01

    This study identifies a novel relationship between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) stroke volume through the cerebral aqueduct and the characteristic peaks of the intracranial pulse (ICP) waveform. ICP waveform analysis has become much more advanced in recent years; however, clinical practice remains restricted to mean ICP, mainly due to the lack of physiological understanding of the ICP waveform. Therefore, the present study set out to shed some light on the physiological meaning of ICP morphological metrics derived by the morphological clustering and analysis of continuous intracranial pulse (MOCAIP) algorithm by investigating their relationships with a well defined physiological variable, i.e., the stroke volume of CSF through the cerebral aqueduct. Seven patients received both overnight ICP monitoring along with a phase-contrast MRI (PC-MRI) of the cerebral aqueduct to quantify aqueductal stroke volume (ASV). Waveform morphological analysis of the ICP signal was performed by the MOCAIP algorithm. Following extraction of morphological metrics from the ICP signal, nine temporal ICP metrics and two amplitude-based metrics were compared with the ASV via Spearman's rank correlation. Of the nine temporal metrics correlated with the ASV, only the width of the P2 region (ICP-Wi2) reached significance. Furthermore, both ICP pulse pressure amplitude and mean ICP did not reach significance. In this study, we showed the width of the second peak (ICP-Wi2) of an ICP pulse wave is positively related to the volume of CSF movement through the cerebral aqueduct. This finding is an initial step in bridging the gap between ICP waveform morphology research and clinical practice.

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid markers including trefoil factor 3 are associated with neurodegeneration in amyloid-positive individuals.

    PubMed

    Paterson, R W; Bartlett, J W; Blennow, K; Fox, N C; Shaw, L M; Trojanowski, J Q; Zetterberg, H; Schott, J M

    2014-07-29

    We aimed to identify cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers associated with neurodegeneration in individuals with and without CSF evidence of Alzheimer pathology. We investigated 287 Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) subjects (age=74.9±6.9; 22/48/30% with Alzheimer's disease/mild cognitive impairment/controls) with CSF multiplex analyte data and serial volumetric MRI. We calculated brain and hippocampal atrophy rates, ventricular expansion and Mini Mental State Examination decline. We used false discovery rate corrected regression analyses to assess associations between CSF variables and atrophy rates in individuals with and without amyloid pathology, adjusting in stages for tau, baseline volume, p-tau, age, sex, ApoE4 status and diagnosis. Analytes showing statistically significant independent relationships were entered into reverse stepwise analyses. Adjusting for tau, baseline volume, p-tau, age, sex and ApoE4, 4/83 analytes were significantly independently associated with brain atrophy rate, 1/83 with ventricular expansion and 2/83 with hippocampal atrophy. The strongest CSF predictor for the three atrophy measures was low trefoil factor 3 (TFF3). High cystatin C (CysC) was associated with higher whole brain atrophy and hippocampal atrophy rates. Lower levels of vascular endothelial growth factor and chromogranin A (CrA) were associated with higher whole brain atrophy. In exploratory reverse stepwise analyses, lower TFF3 was associated with higher rates of whole brain, hippocampal atrophy and ventricular expansion. Lower levels of CrA were associated with higher whole brain atrophy rate. The relationship between low TFF3 and increased hippocampal atrophy rate remained after adjustment for diagnosis. We identified a series of CSF markers that are independently associated with rate of neurodegeneration in amyloid-positive individuals. TFF3, a substrate for NOTCH processing may be an important biomarker of neurodegeneration across the Alzheimer

  19. Performance of laser bonded glass/polyimide microjoints in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Mian, A; Newaz, G; Georgiev, D G; Rahman, N; Vendra, L; Auner, G; Witte, R; Herfurth, H

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, laser bonded microjoints between glass and polyimide is considered to examine their potential applicability in encapsulating neural implants. To facilitate bonding between polyimide and glass, a thin titanium film with a thickness of 2 microm was deposited on borosilicate glass plates by a physical vapor deposition (PVD) process. Titanium coated glass was then joined with polyimide by using a cw fiber laser emitting at a wavelength of 1.1 microm (1.0 W) to prepare several tensile samples. Some of the samples were exposed to artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) at 37 degrees C for two weeks to assess long-term integrity of the joints. Both the as-received and aCSF soaked samples were subjected to uniaxial tensile loads for bond strengths measurements. The bond strengths for the as-received and aCSF soaked samples were measured to be 7.31 and 5.33 N/mm, respectively. Although the long-term exposure of the microjoints to aCSF has resulted in 26% reduction of bond strength, the samples still retain considerably high strength as compared with the titanium-polyimide samples. The failed glass/polyimide samples were also analyzed using optical microscopy, and failure mechanisms are discussed. In addition, a two dimensional finite element analysis (FEA) was conducted to understand the stress distribution within the substrate materials while the samples are in tension. The FEA results match reasonably well with the experimental load-displacement curves for as-received samples. Detailed discussion on various stress contours is presented in the paper, and the failure mechanisms observed from the experiment are shown in good agreement with the FEA predicted ones. PMID:17334691

  20. Time-course of cerebrospinal fluid histamine in the wake-consolidated squirrel monkey.

    PubMed

    Zeitzer, Jamie M; Kodama, Tohru; Buckmaster, Christine L; Honda, Yoshiko; Lyons, David M; Nishino, Seiji; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2012-04-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) histamine is low in individuals with narcolepsy, a disease characterized by severe fragmentation of both sleep and wake. We have developed a primate model, the squirrel monkey, with which we can examine the role of the CNS in the wake-consolidation process, as these primates are day-active, have consolidated wake and sleep and have cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that is readily accessible. Using this model and three distinct protocols, we report herein on the role of CNS histamine in the wake consolidation process. CSF histamine has a robust daily rhythm, with a mean of 24.9 ± 3.29 pg mL(-1) , amplitude of 31.7 ± 6.46 pg mL(-1) and a peak at 17:49 ± 70.3 min (lights on 07:00-19:00 hours). These levels are not significantly affected by increases (up to 161 ± 40.4% of baseline) or decreases (up to 17.2 ± 2.50% of baseline) in locomotion. In direct contrast to the effects of sleep deprivation in non-wake-consolidating mammals, in whom CSF histamine increases, pharmacologically induced sleep (γ-hydroxybutyrate) and wake (modafinil) have no direct effects on CSF histamine concentrations. These data indicate that the time-course of histamine in CSF in the wake-consolidated squirrel monkey is robust against variation in activity and sleep and wake-promoting pharmacological compounds, and may indicate that histamine physiology plays a role in wake-consolidation such as is present in the squirrel monkey and humans.

  1. Effector T-cell trafficking between the leptomeninges and the cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Schläger, Christian; Körner, Henrike; Krueger, Martin; Vidoli, Stefano; Haberl, Michael; Mielke, Dorothee; Brylla, Elke; Issekutz, Thomas; Cabañas, Carlos; Nelson, Peter J; Ziemssen, Tjalf; Rohde, Veit; Bechmann, Ingo; Lodygin, Dmitri; Odoardi, Francesca; Flügel, Alexander

    2016-02-18

    In multiple sclerosis, brain-reactive T cells invade the central nervous system (CNS) and induce a self-destructive inflammatory process. T-cell infiltrates are not only found within the parenchyma and the meninges, but also in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that bathes the entire CNS tissue. How the T cells reach the CSF, their functionality, and whether they traffic between the CSF and other CNS compartments remains hypothetical. Here we show that effector T cells enter the CSF from the leptomeninges during Lewis rat experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model of multiple sclerosis. While moving through the three-dimensional leptomeningeal network of collagen fibres in a random Brownian walk, T cells were flushed from the surface by the flow of the CSF. The detached cells displayed significantly lower activation levels compared to T cells from the leptomeninges and CNS parenchyma. However, they did not represent a specialized non-pathogenic cellular sub-fraction, as their gene expression profile strongly resembled that of tissue-derived T cells and they fully retained their encephalitogenic potential. T-cell detachment from the leptomeninges was counteracted by integrins VLA-4 and LFA-1 binding to their respective ligands produced by resident macrophages. Chemokine signalling via CCR5/CXCR3 and antigenic stimulation of T cells in contact with the leptomeningeal macrophages enforced their adhesiveness. T cells floating in the CSF were able to reattach to the leptomeninges through steps reminiscent of vascular adhesion in CNS blood vessels, and invade the parenchyma. The molecular/cellular conditions for T-cell reattachment were the same as the requirements for detachment from the leptomeningeal milieu. Our data indicate that the leptomeninges represent a checkpoint at which activated T cells are licensed to enter the CNS parenchyma and non-activated T cells are preferentially released into the CSF, from where they can reach areas of antigen

  2. A technique for cannulating the Cisterna magna and sampling cerebrospinal fluid from socially housed birds.

    PubMed

    Moore, M S; Kuenzel, W J; Mench, J A

    1994-04-01

    The measurement of central levels of neurochemicals is an important approach to the understanding of the neurophysiological basis of behavior patterns in animals. Previous studies have utilized central sampling techniques developed for individually housed animals. The purpose of this study was to develop a cannulation technique and a method for sampling cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from socially housed birds to facilitate the study of the neurophysiological basis of social behaviors. The cannulation technique involved the surgical implantation of a 22-gauge concentric guide cannula into the cisterna magna of 16-wk-old, feed-restricted male broiler breeders (n = 6). Individual-specific coordinates and optimum angle and depth of implantation of the cannula were determined in order to place the cannula correctly in the designated site. Once implanted, the guide cannula proved to be unobtrusive and secure and did not attract aggressive pecking from other birds in the pen. Two methods of CSF sampling were then examined. The first method required the use of a push-pull perfusion pump to withdraw CSF at a rate of 1 to 2 microL/min. The second method (passive), which did not use a pump, involved simply removing a "dummy" cannula from the guide cannula to release the CSF, which was then collected with a glass Hamilton syringe. Samples ranging from 100 to 500 microL were collected using the passive method. The combination of the cannulation technique described and the passive sampling method proved to be the most simple, efficient, and reliable method for measuring central levels of neurochemicals in socially housed broiler breeder males.

  3. Chronic lead exposure alters transthyretin concentration in rat cerebrospinal fluid: the role of the choroid plexus.

    PubMed

    Zheng, W; Shen, H; Blaner, W S; Zhao, Q; Ren, X; Graziano, J H

    1996-08-01

    The choroid plexus, which is responsible for the maintenance of the biochemical milieu of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), avidly sequesters Pb. In order to test the hypothesis that chronic Pb exposure may impair choroid plexus function, male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to Pb in drinking water at doses of 0, 50, or 250 micrograms Pb/ml (as Pb acetate) for 30, 60, or 90 days. The function of the choroid plexus was assessed as reflected by CSF concentrations of transthyretin (TTR, a major CSF protein manufactured by brain choroid plexus) and CSF essential metal ions (Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, and Na+). TTR concentrations were determined by radioimmunoassay using a monospecific rabbit anti-rat TTR polyclonal antibody, and CSF metal ions analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Two-way ANOVA of CSF TTR concentrations revealed highly significant dose (p < 0.0001), time (p < 0.0223), and dose-by-time effects (p < 0.0379). Moreover, the percentage of reduction of CSF TTR was directly correlated with Pb concentrations in the choroid plexus (r = 0.703, p < 0.05). Pb exposure significantly increased CSF concentrations of Mg2+, but did not markedly altered CSF concentrations of Ca2+, K+, and Na+. Histopathologic examination under the light microscope did not show distinct alterations of plexus structure in Pb-treated rats. Since TTR is responsible for transport of thyroid hormones to the developing brain, we postulate that the depression of choroid plexus TTR production (and/or secretion) by Pb may impair brain development in young animals by depriving the CNS of thyroid hormones. PMID:8806863

  4. Identification of extracellular miRNA in human cerebrospinal fluid by next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Burgos, Kasandra Lovette; Javaherian, Ashkan; Bomprezzi, Roberto; Ghaffari, Layla; Rhodes, Susan; Courtright, Amanda; Tembe, Waibhav; Kim, Seungchan; Metpally, Raghu; Van Keuren-Jensen, Kendall

    2013-05-01

    There has been a growing interest in using next-generation sequencing (NGS) to profile extracellular small RNAs from the blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with neurological diseases, CNS tumors, or traumatic brain injury for biomarker discovery. Small sample volumes and samples with low RNA abundance create challenges for downstream small RNA sequencing assays. Plasma, serum, and CSF contain low amounts of total RNA, of which small RNAs make up a fraction. The purpose of this study was to maximize RNA isolation from RNA-limited samples and apply these methods to profile the miRNA in human CSF by small RNA deep sequencing. We systematically tested RNA isolation efficiency using ten commercially available kits and compared their performance on human plasma samples. We used RiboGreen to quantify total RNA yield and custom TaqMan assays to determine the efficiency of small RNA isolation for each of the kits. We significantly increased the recovery of small RNA by repeating the aqueous extraction during the phenol-chloroform purification in the top performing kits. We subsequently used the methods with the highest small RNA yield to purify RNA from CSF and serum samples from the same individual. We then prepared small RNA sequencing libraries using Illumina's TruSeq sample preparation kit and sequenced the samples on the HiSeq 2000. Not surprisingly, we found that the miRNA expression profile of CSF is substantially different from that of serum. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the small RNA fraction from CSF has been profiled using next-generation sequencing.

  5. BAFF is decreased in the cerebrospinal fluid of multiple sclerosis at clinical onset.

    PubMed

    Puthenparampil, M; Miante, S; Federle, L; Zanetta, C; Toffanin, E; Ruggero, S; Rinaldi, F; Gallo, P

    2016-08-15

    B-cells are thought to play a relevant role in multiple sclerosis (MS) pathology. BAFF (B cell activating factor of the TNF family) is a B-cell survival factor constitutively produced inside the CNS by astrocytes. We studied the intrathecal synthesis of BAFF in MS at clinical onset. Paired serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens from 40 clinically isolated syndromes (CIS) suggestive of MS or early relapse-onset MS (eRRMS) and from 18 healthy controls (HC) were analysed. Patients were classified based on the detection of oligoclonal IgG bands in the CSF (IgGOB+ and IgGOB-). BAFF was detected by highly sensitive ELISA and its ratio (CSF-BAFF/serum-BAFF, QBAFF) and Index (QBAFF/QAlb, BAFF-Index) were calculated. IgGOB+ presented lower CSF concentrations of BAFF compared to both HC and IgGOB- (p<0.05). BAFF Index was significantly lower in IgGOB+ compared to both HC and IgGOB- (p<0.01). A significant inverse correlation between QIgG and QBAFF (r: -0.4, p<0.05) and between BAFF index and IgGIF (r: -0.4, p<0.05) or IgG Index (r: -0.4, p=0.05) was found in IgGOB+. The decreased CSF levels of BAFF in IgGOB+ at clinical onset suggest the absorption of this factor by intrathecally recruited B cells since the early disease phases. PMID:27397077

  6. Chromosomal rearrangements and protein globularity changes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Xin Yue

    2016-01-01

    Background Meningitis is a major cause of mortality in tuberculosis (TB). It is not clear what factors promote central nervous system invasion and pathology but it has been reported that certain strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) might have genetic traits associated with neurotropism. Methods In this study, we generated whole genome sequences of eight clinical strains of Mtb that were isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients presenting with tuberculous meningitis (TBM) in Malaysia, and compared them to the genomes of H37Rv and other respiratory Mtb genomes either downloaded from public databases or extracted from local sputum isolates. We aimed to find genomic features that might be distinctly different between CSF-derived and respiratory Mtb. Results Genome-wide comparisons revealed rearrangements (translocations, inversions, insertions and deletions) and non-synonymous SNPs in our CSF-derived strains that were not observed in the respiratory Mtb genomes used for comparison. These rearranged segments were rich in genes for PE (proline-glutamate)/PPE (proline-proline-glutamate), transcriptional and membrane proteins. Similarly, most of the ns SNPs common in CSF strains were noted in genes encoding PE/PPE proteins. Protein globularity differences were observed among mycobacteria from CSF and respiratory sources and in proteins previously reported to be associated with TB meningitis. Transcription factors and other transcription regulators featured prominently in these proteins. Homologs of proteins associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis and Neisseria meningitidis virulence were identified in neuropathogenic as well as respiratory mycobacterial spp. examined in this study. Discussion The occurrence of in silico genetic differences in CSF-derived but not respiratory Mtb suggests their possible involvement in the pathogenesis of TBM. However, overall findings in this comparative analysis support the postulation that TB meningeal

  7. Overton's Rule Helps To Estimate the Penetration of Anti-Infectives into Patients' Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Djukic, Marija; Munz, Martin; Sörgel, Fritz; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Eiffert, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    In 1900, Ernst Overton found that the entry of anilin dyes through the cell membranes of living cells depended on the lipophilicity of the dyes. The brain is surrounded by barriers consisting of lipid layers that possess several inward and outward active transport systems. In the absence of meningeal inflammation, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) penetration of anti-infectives in humans estimated by the ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) in CSF (AUCCSF) to that in serum (AUCCSF/AUCS) correlated positively with the lipid-water partition coefficient at pH 7.0 (log D) (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient rS = 0.40; P = 0.01) and negatively with the molecular mass (MM) (rS = −0.33; P = 0.04). The ratio of AUCCSF to the AUC of the fraction in serum that was not bound (AUCCSF/AUCS,free) strongly correlated with log D (rS = 0.67; P < 0.0001). In the presence of meningeal inflammation, AUCCSF/AUCS also correlated positively with log D (rS = 0.46; P = 0.002) and negatively with the MM (rS = −0.37; P = 0.01). The correlation of AUCCSF/AUCS,free with log D (rS = 0.66; P < 0.0001) was as strong as in the absence of meningeal inflammation. Despite these clear correlations, Overton's rule was able to explain only part of the differences in CSF penetration of the individual compounds. The site of CSF withdrawal (lumbar versus ventricular CSF), age of the patients, underlying diseases, active transport, and alterations in the pharmacokinetics by comedications also appeared to strongly influence the CSF penetration of the drugs studied. PMID:22106225

  8. Overton's rule helps to estimate the penetration of anti-infectives into patients' cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Djukic, Marija; Munz, Martin; Sörgel, Fritz; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Eiffert, Helmut; Nau, Roland

    2012-02-01

    In 1900, Ernst Overton found that the entry of anilin dyes through the cell membranes of living cells depended on the lipophilicity of the dyes. The brain is surrounded by barriers consisting of lipid layers that possess several inward and outward active transport systems. In the absence of meningeal inflammation, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) penetration of anti-infectives in humans estimated by the ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) in CSF (AUC(CSF)) to that in serum (AUC(CSF)/AUC(S)) correlated positively with the lipid-water partition coefficient at pH 7.0 (log D) (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient r(S) = 0.40; P = 0.01) and negatively with the molecular mass (MM) (r(S) = -0.33; P = 0.04). The ratio of AUC(CSF) to the AUC of the fraction in serum that was not bound (AUC(CSF)/AUC(S,free)) strongly correlated with log D (r(S) = 0.67; P < 0.0001). In the presence of meningeal inflammation, AUC(CSF)/AUC(S) also correlated positively with log D (r(S) = 0.46; P = 0.002) and negatively with the MM (r(S) = -0.37; P = 0.01). The correlation of AUC(CSF)/AUC(S,free) with log D (r(S) = 0.66; P < 0.0001) was as strong as in the absence of meningeal inflammation. Despite these clear correlations, Overton's rule was able to explain only part of the differences in CSF penetration of the individual compounds. The site of CSF withdrawal (lumbar versus ventricular CSF), age of the patients, underlying diseases, active transport, and alterations in the pharmacokinetics by comedications also appeared to strongly influence the CSF penetration of the drugs studied. PMID:22106225

  9. Incorporating and Compensating Cerebrospinal Fluid in Surface-Based Forward Models of Magneto- and Electroencephalography

    PubMed Central

    Stenroos, Matti; Nummenmaa, Aapo

    2016-01-01

    MEG/EEG source imaging is usually done using a three-shell (3-S) or a simpler head model. Such models omit cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that strongly affects the volume currents. We present a four-compartment (4-C) boundary-element (BEM) model that incorporates the CSF and is computationally efficient and straightforward to build using freely available software. We propose a way for compensating the omission of CSF by decreasing the skull conductivity of the 3-S model, and study the robustness of the 4-C and 3-S models to errors in skull conductivity. We generated dense boundary meshes using MRI datasets and automated SimNIBS pipeline. Then, we built a dense 4-C reference model using Galerkin BEM, and 4-C and 3-S test models using coarser meshes and both Galerkin and collocation BEMs. We compared field topographies of cortical sources, applying various skull conductivities and fitting conductivities that minimized the relative error in 4-C and 3-S models. When the CSF was left out from the EEG model, our compensated, unbiased approach improved the accuracy of the 3-S model considerably compared to the conventional approach, where CSF is neglected without any compensation (mean relative error < 20% vs. > 40%). The error due to the omission of CSF was of the same order in MEG and compensated EEG. EEG has, however, large overall error due to uncertain skull conductivity. Our results show that a realistic 4-C MEG/EEG model can be implemented using standard tools and basic BEM, without excessive workload or computational burden. If the CSF is omitted, compensated skull conductivity should be used in EEG. PMID:27472278

  10. Decreased homovanilic acid in cerebrospinal fluid correlates with impaired neuropsychologic function in HIV-1-infected patients.

    PubMed

    di Rocco, A; Bottiglieri, T; Dorfman, D; Werner, P; Morrison, C; Simpson, D

    2000-01-01

    To determine whether dopamine metabolism is abnormal in HIV infected patients and whether dopamine metabolism abnormalities are related to specific neuropsychologic characteristics in HIV-infected patients, we measured cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of homovanilic acid (HVA), the primary dopamine metabolite, in 10 HIV-infected patients and compared it to HVA levels in CSF in a group of 13 healthy control subjects. HIV-infected patients were also assessed with a battery of neuropsychologic tests and HVA levels were then correlated with performance on specific neuropsychologic tests. The mean (+/-SD) HVA level in CSF was 100.9 +/- 29.3 nmol/L in the HIV-infected study group and 230.5 +/- 50.0 nmol/L in the non-HIV-infected control group (p < 0.0001). The decrease in concentrations of HVA in CSF correlated with impairment on performance on neuropsychologic testing (Spearman r = 0.67; p = 0.03). When the relationship between HVA levels and specific cognitive domains was evaluated, we observed trends for positive correlation between HVA levels and tests that measure motor speed (r = 0.59; p = 0.074) and those testing attention, concentration, and executive control (r = 0.54; p = 0.108). There was no relationship between performance on memory tests and CSF HVA levels (r = -0.0061; p = 0.987). These results further support the hypothesis that dopaminergic dysfunction plays an important role in the pathogenesis of AIDS dementia complex (ADC) and suggest that specific motor and cognitive abnormalities may be related to depressed dopaminergic activity. This may have important implications for the development of treatments or preventive strategies for ADC. PMID:11020122

  11. Concentration of soluble adhesion molecules in cerebrospinal fluid and serum of epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jing; Wang, Wei; Xi, Zhiqin; Dan, Chen; Wang, Liang; Xiao, Zheng; Wang, Xuefeng

    2014-12-01

    Mounting evidence supports the involvement of brain inflammation and the associated blood-brain barrier damage from which spontaneous and recurrent seizures originate. Detection of the soluble form of adhesion molecules (AM) has also been proven to predict outcomes in central nervous system (CNS) disorders. A recent study has shown that expression of AM in brain vessels was upregulated 24 h after kainic acid (KA) induced seizures. The aim of the present study was to investigate soluble AM levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum of epilepsy patients. Paired CSF and serum samples were analyzed by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to determine the concentrations of soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1). Increased serum concentrations of sICAM-1 were present in epileptic patients (41 localization-related of unknown etiology, 19 idiopathic generalized). Serum sICAM-1 level in drug-refractory epilepsy was elevated as compared to new diagnosis epilepsy and drug-responsive epilepsy. CSF sVCAM-1 and serum sVCAM-1 concentrations in the epilepsy group were higher as compared to the neurosis group. Moreover, CSF sVCAM-1 and serum sVCAM-1 concentrations in drug-refractory epilepsy were raised as compared to drug-responsive epilepsy and new diagnosis epilepsy. However, there were no significant differences in concentrations of CSF sICAM-1 between the epilepsy and neurosis groups. Our results suggest that sVCAM-1 and sICAM-1 could play an important role in the drug-refractory epilepsy. PMID:25001004

  12. Brain ventricular volume and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Brian R.; Cohen, Ronald A.; Gongvatana, Assawin; Okonkwo, Ozioma C.; Johanson, Conrad E.; Stopa, Edward G.; Donahue, John E.; Silverberg, Gerald D.

    2010-01-01

    The frequent co-occurrence of Alzheimer disease (AD) pathology in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus suggests a possible link between ventricular dilation and AD. If enlarging ventricles serve as a marker of faulty cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) clearance mechanisms, then a relationship may be demonstrable between increasing ventricular volume and decreasing levels of amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) in CSF in preclinical and early AD. CSF biomarker data (Aβ, tau, and phosphorylated tau) as well as direct measurements of whole brain and ventricular volumes were obtained from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative dataset. The ratio of ventricular volume to whole brain volume was derived as a secondary independent measure. Baseline data were used for the group analyses of 288 subjects classified as being either normal (n=87), having the syndrome of mild cognitive impairment (n=136), or mild AD (n=65). Linear regression models were derived for each biomarker as the dependent variable, using the MRI volume measures and age as independent variables. For controls, ventricular volume was negatively associated with CSF Aβ in APOE ε4 positive subjects. A different pattern was seen in AD subjects, in whom ventricular volume was negatively associated with tau, but not Aβ in ε4 positive subjects. Increased ventricular volume may be associated with decreased levels of CSF Aβ in preclinical AD. The basis for the apparent effect of APOE ε4 genotype on the relationship of ventricular volume to Aβ and tau levels is unknown, but could involve altered CSF-blood-brain barrier function during the course of disease. PMID:20182051

  13. The Streptococcus suis transcriptional landscape reveals adaptation mechanisms in pig blood and cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zongfu; Wu, Chunyan; Shao, Jing; Zhu, Zhenzhen; Wang, Weixue; Zhang, Wenwei; Tang, Min; Pei, Na; Fan, Hongjie; Li, Jiguang; Yao, Huochun; Gu, Hongwei; Xu, Xun; Lu, Chengping

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus suis (SS) is an important pathogen of pigs, and it is also recognized as a zoonotic agent for humans. SS infection may result in septicemia or meningitis in the host. However, little is known about genes that contribute to the virulence process and survival within host blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Small RNAs (sRNA) have emerged as key regulators of virulence in several bacteria, but they have not been investigated in SS. Here, using a differential RNA-sequencing approach and RNAs from SS strain P1/7 grown in rich medium, pig blood, or CSF, we present the SS genome-wide map of 793 transcriptional start sites and 370 operons. In addition to identifying 29 sRNAs, we show that five sRNA deletion mutants attenuate SS virulence in a zebrafish infection model. Homology searches revealed that 10 sRNAs were predicted to be present in other pathogenic Streptococcus species. Compared with wild-type strain P1/7, sRNAs rss03, rss05, and rss06 deletion mutants were significantly more sensitive to killing by pig blood. It is possible that rss06 contributes to SS virulence by indirectly activating expression of SSU0308, a virulence gene encoding a zinc-binding lipoprotein. In blood, genes involved in the synthesis of capsular polysaccharide (CPS) and subversion of host defenses were up-regulated. In contrast, in CSF, genes for CPS synthesis were down-regulated. Our study is the first analysis of SS sRNAs involved in virulence and has both improved our understanding of SS pathogenesis and increased the number of sRNAs known to play definitive roles in bacterial virulence. PMID:24759092

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid inflammatory markers in patients with multiple sclerosis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Matejčíková, Z; Mareš, J; Přikrylová Vranová, H; Klosová, J; Sládková, V; Doláková, J; Zapletalová, J; Kaňovský, P

    2015-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Autoimmune inflammation is common in the early stages of MS. This stage is followed by the neurodegenerative process. The result of these changes is axon and myelin breakdown. Although MS is according to McDonald's revised diagnostic criteria primarily a clinical diagnosis, paraclinical investigation methods are an important part in the diagnosis of MS. In common practice, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and spinal cord, examination of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and examination of visual evoked potentials are used. There are an increasing number of studies dealing with biomarkers in CSF and their role in the diagnosis and treatment of MS. We hypothesized that the levels of some markers could be changed in MS in comparison with controls. We studied five inflammatory markers [interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8, interleukin-10 (IL-10), beta-2-microglobulin, orosomucoid]. CSF and serum levels of inflammatory markers were assessed in 38 patients with newly diagnosed MS meeting McDonald's revised diagnostic criteria and in 28 subjects as a control group (CG). Levels of beta-2-microglobulin and interleukin-8 in CSF were found to be significantly higher in MS patients in comparison to CG (p < 0.001 resp. p = 0.007). No differences in other CSF markers (IL-6, IL-10 and orosomucoid) and serum levels of all markers between both groups were found. The levels of two studied inflammatory markers were found to be increased at the time of first clinical symptoms of MS. Research on the role of inflammatory and neurodegenerative markers in MS should continue. PMID:24894698

  15. Increased Concentrations of Interleukin-33 in the Serum and Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Jafarzadeh, Abdollah; Mahdavi, Roya; Jamali, Mitra; Hajghani, Hossain; Nemati, Maryam; Ebrahimi, Hossain-Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Interleukin (IL)-33 is a cytokine with both pro- and anti-inflammatory effects involved in the pathogenesis of some inflammatory diseases. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) IL-33 concentrations in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods Blood specimens were obtained from 140 patients with MS (46 males and 94 females) with various disease patterns and treatment plans and 140 healthy subjects (47 males and 93 females), who acted as a control group. CSF samples were collected from 20 MS group and 20 sex- and age-matched patients with other neurological diseases of nonautoimmune etiology. The serum and CSF concentrations of IL-33 were measured by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results The serum and CSF IL-33 levels were significantly higher in the MS group compared to the control group (p<0.001 and p<0.050, respectively). The serum IL-33 concentrations were also significantly higher in newly diagnosed (untreated) patients and patients treated with methylprednisolone or with interferon-β and methylprednisolone compared to the healthy patient group (p<0.007, p<0.002, and p<0.010, respectively). Moreover, the serum IL-33 concentrations in patients with relapsing-remitting (RRMS), primary progressive (PPMS), and secondary progressive (SPMS) forms of the disease were significantly higher than in the healthy control group (p<0.006, p<0.001, and p<0.020, respectively). Conclusions Our results showed increased concentrations of IL-33 in patients with MS including both untreated and treated MS patients and patients with the RRMS, SPMS, and PPMS forms. This suggests that IL-33 may be involved in the pathogenesis of all MS forms and treatment with methylprednisolone or both interferon-β plus methylprednisolone has no influence on IL-33 concentrations. PMID:26813806

  16. Sertraline Effects on Cerebrospinal Fluid Monoamines and Species-typical Socioemotional Behavior of Female Cynomolgus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Shively, Carol A.; Register, Thomas C.; Higley, J. Dee; Willard, Stephanie L.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Although widely prescribed, little is known about selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) effects on social behavior and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) monoamines in female primates. Objective To determine the effects of sertraline on agonistic and affiliative behavior. Methods 21 adult female cynomolgus monkeys were housed in small, stable social groups, trained to participate in oral dosing, and began a 5-week cumulative dose response study. Serial doses of 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mg/kg of sertraline were administered orally for one week each. Behavior was recorded daily during 10-minute observations before and 4 hours after dosing. On the 7th day of dosing, circulating sertraline/desmethylsertraline and CSF monoamines/metabolites were determined 4 hours after the last dose. Results At 20 mg/kg, circulating sertraline/desmethylsertraline was in the therapeutic range. CSF 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid decreased 33% (p<0.05). Overall aggression, submission, locomotion and time alone decreased, whereas affiliative behaviors (body contact, grooming) increased (all p’s<0.05). Effects of sertraline on aggression and submission were social status-dependent, reducing aggression in dominants and submission in subordinates. Conclusions A clinically relevant oral dose of sertraline resulted in CSF metabolite changes similar to those observed in patients, and altered the socioemotional behavior of female monkeys. Changes in CSF 5-HT and dopamine are novel observations that may be sex-specific. The robust effects of sertraline on aggression and affiliation may explain the efficacy of SSRIs on a range of human behavioral pathologies that share the characteristics of increased aggression and decreased sociality. PMID:24193371

  17. Cerebrospinal Fluid Hypocretin-1 (Orexin-A) Level Fluctuates with Season and Correlates with Day Length

    PubMed Central

    Boddum, Kim; Hansen, Mathias Hvidtfelt; Jennum, Poul Jørgen; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek

    2016-01-01

    The hypocretin/orexin neuropeptides (hcrt) are key players in the control of sleep and wakefulness evidenced by the fact that lack of hcrt leads to the sleep disorder Narcolepsy Type 1. Sleep disturbances are common in mood disorders, and hcrt has been suggested to be poorly regulated in depressed subjects. To study seasonal variation in hcrt levels, we obtained data on hcrt-1 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 227 human individuals evaluated for central hypersomnias at a Danish sleep center. The samples were taken over a 4 year timespan, and obtained in the morning hours, thus avoiding impact of the diurnal hcrt variation. Hcrt-1 concentration was determined in a standardized radioimmunoassay. Using biometric data and sleep parameters, a multivariate regression analysis was performed. We found that the average monthly CSF hcrt-1 levels varied significantly across the seasons following a sine wave with its peak in the summer (June—July). The amplitude was 19.9 pg hcrt/mL [12.8–26.9] corresponding to a 10.6% increase in midsummer compared to winter. Factors found to significantly predict the hcrt-1 values were day length, presence of snow, and proximity to the Christmas holiday season. The hcrt-1 values from January were much higher than predicted from the model, suggestive of additional factors influencing the CSF hcrt-1 levels such as social interaction. This study provides evidence that human CSF hcrt-1 levels vary with season, correlating with day length. This finding could have implications for the understanding of winter tiredness, fatigue, and seasonal affective disorder. This is the first time a seasonal variation of hcrt-1 levels has been shown, demonstrating that the hcrt system is, like other neurotransmitter systems, subjected to long term modulation. PMID:27008404

  18. BACE1 activity in cerebrospinal fluid and its relation to markers of AD pathology.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Sandra D; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Verheijen, Jan H; Mulder, Cees; Scheltens, Philip; Blankenstein, Marinus A; Hack, C Erik; Veerhuis, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have shown that reduced amyloid-beta 1-42 (Abeta(42)) and increased tau levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) reflect increased Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology in the brain. beta-site APP cleaving enzyme (BACE1) is thought to be the major beta-secretase involved in Abeta production in the brain, and therefore we investigated the relation between BACE1 activity and CSF markers Abeta(40), Abeta(42), total tau (t-tau), and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (p-tau) in CSF of control (n=12), mild cognitive impairment (n=18), and AD (n=17) subjects. Patients were classified according to their Abeta(42), t-tau, and p-tau CSF biomarker levels, with either an AD-like biomarker profile (two or three biomarkers abnormal: Abeta(42) < 495 pg/ml in combination with t-tau > 356 pg/ml, and/or p-tau > 54 pg/ml) or a normal biomarker profile (

  19. In Vitro Study of Cerebrospinal Fluid Dynamics in a Shaken Basal Cistern after Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kertzscher, Ulrich; Schneider, Torsten; Goubergrits, Leonid; Affeld, Klaus; Hänggi, Daniel; Spuler, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Background Cerebral arterial vasospasm leads to delayed cerebral ischemia and constitutes the major delayed complication following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Cerebral vasospasm can be reduced by increased blood clearance from the subarachnoid space. Clinical pilot studies allow the hypothesis that the clearance of subarachnoid blood is facilitated by means of head shaking. A major obstacle for meaningful clinical studies is the lack of data on appropriate parameters of head shaking. Our in vitro study aims to provide these essential parameters. Methodology/Principal Findings A model of the basal cerebral cistern was derived from human magnetic resonance imaging data. Subarachnoid hemorrhage was simulated by addition of dyed experimental blood to transparent experimental cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) filling the model of the basal cerebral cistern. Effects of various head positions and head motion settings (shaking angle amplitudes and shaking frequencies) on blood clearance were investigated using the quantitative dye washout method. Blood washout can be divided into two phases: Blood/CSF mixing and clearance. The major effect of shaking consists in better mixing of blood and CSF thereby increasing clearance rate. Without shaking, blood/CSF mixing and blood clearance in the basal cerebral cistern are hampered by differences in density and viscosity of blood and CSF. Blood clearance increases with decreased shaking frequency and with increased shaking angle amplitude. Head shaking facilitates clearance by varying the direction of gravitational force. Conclusions/Significance From this in vitro study can be inferred that patient or head shaking with large shaking angles at low frequency is a promising therapeutic strategy to increase blood clearance from the subarachnoid space. PMID:22870243

  20. Cerebrospinal-fluid orexin levels and daytime somnolence in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Liguori, C; Romigi, A; Mercuri, N B; Nuccetelli, M; Izzi, F; Albanese, M; Sancesario, G; Martorana, A; Sancesario, G M; Bernardini, S; Marciani, M G; Placidi, F

    2014-09-01

    Daytime somnolence and sleep-wake cycle disturbances are commonly encountered symptoms in Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD). Orexin-A (Hypocretin-1) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide regulating the sleep-wake rhythm. We investigated the cerebrospinal-fluid (CSF) orexin levels in a population of FTD patients and evaluated whether there is a relationship between daytime somnolence and CSF orexin concentrations. CSF orexin levels were measured in a sample of FTD patients (n = 11) compared to a population of non-demented controls (n = 13) similar for age and sex. Moreover, CSF orexin concentrations were correlated with daytime somnolence investigated by means of the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) in both FTD patients and controls. FTD patients showed CSF orexin concentrations (164.3 ± 66.45 vs 170.81 ± 42.73 pg/mL) and ESS scores (7.45 ± 4.36 vs 3.84 ± 1.82) not different from controls. However, three FTD patients showed pathological daytime sleepiness (ESS > 10) coupled with the lowest CSF orexin levels. In addition, we found a significant negative correlation between CSF orexin levels and ESS scores in the FTD population (R = -0.91; p < 0.0001), which was not evident in the control group (R = 0.16; p > 0.05). This is the first study investigating CSF orexin concentrations in FTD. We did not find differences in CSF orexin concentrations between FTD patients and controls. However, a significant negative correlation between daytime somnolence and CSF orexin levels was evident in FTD patients. Moreover, we have found that pathological daytime somnolence was evident in those FTD patients with the lowest CSF orexin levels. Based on these findings, we argued that lower orexin levels may be permissive for increased daytime somnolence in FTD.

  1. A Decade of Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for Alzheimer's Disease in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Somers, Charisse; Struyfs, Hanne; Goossens, Joery; Niemantsverdriet, Ellis; Luyckx, Jill; De Roeck, Naomi; De Roeck, Ellen; De Vil, Bart; Cras, Patrick; Martin, Jean-Jacques; De Deyn, Peter-Paul; Bjerke, Maria; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan

    2016-08-10

    During the past ten years, over 5,000 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were analyzed at the Reference Center for Biological Markers of Dementia (BIODEM), UAntwerp, for core Alzheimer's disease (AD) CSF biomarkers: amyloid-β peptide of 42 amino acids (Aβ1-42), total tau protein (T-tau), and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (P-tau181P). CSF biomarker analyses were performed using single-analyte ELISA kits. In-house validated cutoff values were applied: Aβ1-42 <638.5 pg/mL, T-tau >296.5 pg/mL, P-tau181P >56.5 pg/mL. A CSF biomarker profile was considered to be suggestive for AD if the CSF Aβ1-42 concentration was below the cutoff, in combination with T-tau and/or P-tau181P values above the cutoff (IWG2 criteria for AD). Biomarker analyses were requested for following clinical indications: 1) neurochemical confirmation of AD in case of clinical AD, 2) neurochemical confirmation of AD in case of doubt between AD and a non-AD dementia, 3) neurochemical diagnosis of prodromal AD in case of mild cognitive impairment, 4) neurochemical confirmation of AD in case of psychiatric symptoms (like depression, psychosis), or 5) other clinical indications. During these ten years, the number of yearly referred samples increased by 238% and clinical indications for referral showed a shift from neurochemical confirmation of AD in case of clinical AD to differential dementia diagnosis in case of doubt between AD and a non-AD dementia. Four percent of the patients also had a postmortem neuropathological examination. Together, these biomarker data were the basis for several research papers, and significantly contributed to the validation of these biomarkers in autopsy-confirmed subjects. PMID:27567807

  2. Cerebrospinal Fluid Hypocretin-1 (Orexin-A) Level Fluctuates with Season and Correlates with Day Length.

    PubMed

    Boddum, Kim; Hansen, Mathias Hvidtfelt; Jennum, Poul Jørgen; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek

    2016-01-01

    The hypocretin/orexin neuropeptides (hcrt) are key players in the control of sleep and wakefulness evidenced by the fact that lack of hcrt leads to the sleep disorder Narcolepsy Type 1. Sleep disturbances are common in mood disorders, and hcrt has been suggested to be poorly regulated in depressed subjects. To study seasonal variation in hcrt levels, we obtained data on hcrt-1 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 227 human individuals evaluated for central hypersomnias at a Danish sleep center. The samples were taken over a 4 year timespan, and obtained in the morning hours, thus avoiding impact of the diurnal hcrt variation. Hcrt-1 concentration was determined in a standardized radioimmunoassay. Using biometric data and sleep parameters, a multivariate regression analysis was performed. We found that the average monthly CSF hcrt-1 levels varied significantly across the seasons following a sine wave with its peak in the summer (June-July). The amplitude was 19.9 pg hcrt/mL [12.8-26.9] corresponding to a 10.6% increase in midsummer compared to winter. Factors found to significantly predict the hcrt-1 values were day length, presence of snow, and proximity to the Christmas holiday season. The hcrt-1 values from January were much higher than predicted from the model, suggestive of additional factors influencing the CSF hcrt-1 levels such as social interaction. This study provides evidence that human CSF hcrt-1 levels vary with season, correlating with day length. This finding could have implications for the understanding of winter tiredness, fatigue, and seasonal affective disorder. This is the first time a seasonal variation of hcrt-1 levels has been shown, demonstrating that the hcrt system is, like other neurotransmitter systems, subjected to long term modulation.

  3. Proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in Alzheimer's disease: wanted dead or alive.

    PubMed

    Oláh, Zita; Kálmán, János; Tóth, Melinda E; Zvara, Ágnes; Sántha, Miklós; Ivitz, Eszter; Janka, Zoltán; Pákáski, Magdolna

    2015-01-01

    Clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) relying on symptomatic features has a low specificity, emphasizing the importance of the pragmatic use of neurochemical biomarkers. The most advanced and reliable markers are amyloid-β (Aβ42), total tau (t-tau), and phosphorylated tau (p-tau) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with relatively high levels of sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy. Recent advances within the field of proteomics offer the potential to search for novel biomarkers in CSF by using modern methods, such as microarrays. The purpose of this study was to identify pathognostic proteins in CSF obtained from patients whose clinical AD diagnosis was confirmed by the "core" biomarkers. CSF samples were obtained from 25 AD patients and 25 control individuals. The levels of Aβ42, t-tau, and p-tau were measured by ELISA. In the microarray experiments, ultrasensitive slides representing of 653 antigens were used. Apolipoprotein E genotyping was also determined. A decrease of seven CSF proteins in AD were found, four of them (POLG, MGMT, parkin, and ApoD) have a protective function against neuronal death, while the remaining three proteins (PAR-4, granzyme B, Cdk5) trigger multiple pathways facilitating neuronal cell death. Since these proteins from CSF samples could not be identified by western blot, their decreased levels in AD patients were not verified. Our results provide new information of pathognostic importance of POLG and granzyme B in AD. Although the function of MGMT, parkin, ApoD, PAR-4, and Cdk5 was previously known in AD, the findings presented here provide novel evidence of the significance of CSF analysis in the mapping of the AD pathomechanism. PMID:25428253

  4. Facts and myths of cerebrospinal fluid pressure for the physiology of the eye.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Jost B; Wang, Ningli; Yang, Diya; Ritch, Robert; Panda-Jonas, Songhomitra

    2015-05-01

    The orbital cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP) represents the true counter-pressure against the intraocular pressure (IOP) across the lamina cribrosa and is, therefore, one of the two determinants of the trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference (TLPD). From this anatomic point of view, an elevated TLPD could be due to elevated IOP or abnormally low orbital CSFP. Both experimental and clinical studies have suggested that a low CSFP could be associated with glaucomatous optic neuropathy in normal-pressure glaucoma. These included monkey studies with an experimental long-term reduction in CSFP, and clinical retrospective and prospective studies on patients with normal-pressure glaucoma. Since the choroidal blood drains via the vortex veins through the superior ophthalmic vein into the intracranial cavernous sinus, anatomy suggests that the CSFP could influence choroidal thickness. A population-based study revealed that thicker subfoveal choroidal thickness was associated with higher CSFP. Since the central retinal vein passes through the orbital CSF space, anatomy suggests that the retinal venous pressure should be at least as high as the orbital CSFP. Other experimental, clinical or population-based studies suggested an association between higher CSFP and higher retinal venous pressure and wider retinal veins. Consequently, a higher estimated CSFP was associated with arterial hypertensive retinopathy (with respect to the dilated retinal vein diameter and higher arterial-to-venous diameter) and with the prevalence, severity and incidence of diabetic retinopathy. Physiologically, CSFP was related with higher IOP. The influence of the CSFP on the episcleral venous pressure and/or a regulation of both CSFP and IOP by a center in the dorsomedial/perifornical hypothalamus may be responsible for this. In summary, the CSFP may be an overlooked parameter in ocular physiology and pathology. Abnormal changes in the CSFP, in particular in relationship to the IOP, may have

  5. PCR for Detection of Herpes Simplex Virus in Cerebrospinal Fluid: Alternative Acceptance Criteria for Diagnostic Workup

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Roberto; de Egea, Viviana; Usubillaga, Rafael; Muñoz, Patricia; Bouza, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    The determination of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection using a PCR assay is one of the most commonly requested tests for analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), although only a very low proportion of results are positive. A previously reported study showed that selecting only those CSF samples with >5 leukocytes/mm3 or a protein level of >50 mg/dl was adequate for the diagnostic workup. The aim of the present study was to assess the reliability of alternative acceptance criteria based on elevated CSF white blood cell counts (>10 cells/mm3). We analyzed all requests for HSV PCR received between January 2008 and December 2011. CSF samples were accepted for analysis if they had >10 cells/mm3 or if the sample was from an immunocompromised patient or a child aged <2 years. In order to evaluate our selection criteria, we identified those CSF samples with a leukocyte count of 5 to 10 cells/mm3 or protein levels of >50 mg/dl in order to test them for HSV type 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) DNA. During the study period, 466 CSF samples were submitted to the microbiology laboratory for HSV PCR. Of these, 268 (57.5%) were rejected, and 198 (42.5%) were tested according to our routine criteria. Of the tested samples, 11 (5.5%) were positive for HSV DNA (7 for HSV-1 and 4 for HSV-2). Of the 268 rejected specimens, 74 met the criteria of >5 cells/mm3 and/or protein levels of >50 mg/dl. Of these, 70 (94.6%) were available for analysis. None of the samples yielded a positive HSV PCR result. Acceptance criteria based on CSF leukocyte counts, host immune status, and age can help to streamline the application of HSV PCR without reducing sensitivity. PMID:23804382

  6. Season of Sampling and Season of Birth Influence Serotonin Metabolite Levels in Human Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Luykx, Jurjen J.; Bakker, Steven C.; Lentjes, Eef; Boks, Marco P. M.; van Geloven, Nan; Eijkemans, Marinus J. C.; Janson, Esther; Strengman, Eric; de Lepper, Anne M.; Westenberg, Herman; Klopper, Kai E.; Hoorn, Hendrik J.; Gelissen, Harry P. M. M.; Jordan, Julian; Tolenaar, Noortje M.; van Dongen, Eric P. A.; Michel, Bregt; Abramovic, Lucija; Horvath, Steve; Kappen, Teus; Bruins, Peter; Keijzers, Peter; Borgdorff, Paul; Ophoff, Roel A.; Kahn, René S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Animal studies have revealed seasonal patterns in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) monoamine (MA) turnover. In humans, no study had systematically assessed seasonal patterns in CSF MA turnover in a large set of healthy adults. Methodology/Principal Findings Standardized amounts of CSF were prospectively collected from 223 healthy individuals undergoing spinal anesthesia for minor surgical procedures. The metabolites of serotonin (5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 5-HIAA), dopamine (homovanillic acid, HVA) and norepinephrine (3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol, MPHG) were measured using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Concentration measurements by sampling and birth dates were modeled using a non-linear quantile cosine function and locally weighted scatterplot smoothing (LOESS, span = 0.75). The cosine model showed a unimodal season of sampling 5-HIAA zenith in April and a nadir in October (p-value of the amplitude of the cosine = 0.00050), with predicted maximum (PCmax) and minimum (PCmin) concentrations of 173 and 108 nmol/L, respectively, implying a 60% increase from trough to peak. Season of birth showed a unimodal 5-HIAA zenith in May and a nadir in November (p = 0.00339; PCmax = 172 and PCmin = 126). The non-parametric LOESS showed a similar pattern to the cosine in both season of sampling and season of birth models, validating the cosine model. A final model including both sampling and birth months demonstrated that both sampling and birth seasons were independent predictors of 5-HIAA concentrations. Conclusion In subjects without mental illness, 5-HT turnover shows circannual variation by season of sampling as well as season of birth, with peaks in spring and troughs in fall. PMID:22312427

  7. Retroviral RNA identified in the cerebrospinal fluids and brains of individuals with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Håkan; Bachmann, Silke; Schröder, Johannes; McArthur, Justin; Torrey, E. Fuller; Yolken, Robert H.

    2001-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a serious brain disease of uncertain etiology. A role for retroviruses in the etiopathogenesis of some cases of schizophrenia has been postulated on the basis of clinical and epidemiological observations. We found sequences homologous to retroviral pol genes in the cell-free cerebrospinal fluids (CSFs) of 10 of 35 (29%) individuals with recent-onset schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Retroviral sequences also were identified in the CSFs of 1 of 20 individuals with chronic schizophrenia. However, retroviral sequences were not identified in any of the CSFs obtained from 22 individuals with noninflammatory neurological diseases or from 30 individuals without evidence of neurological or psychiatric diseases (χ2 = 19.25, P < 0.001). The nucleotide sequences identified in the CSFs of the individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were related to those of the human endogenous retroviral (HERV)-W family of endogenous retroviruses and to other retroviruses in the murine leukemia virus genus. Transcription of RNA homologous to members of the HERV-W family of retroviruses also was found to be up-regulated differentially in the frontal cortex regions of brains obtained postmortem from individuals with schizophrenia, as compared with corresponding tissue from individuals without psychiatric diseases. The transcriptional activation of certain retroviral elements within the central nervous system may be associated with the development of schizophrenia in at least some individuals. The further characterization of retroviral elements within the central nervous system of individuals with schizophrenia might lead to improved methods for the diagnosis and management of this disorder. PMID:11296294

  8. Bilateral meningoencephaloceles with cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea after facial advancement in the Crouzon syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Panuganti, Bharat A.; Leach, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea and encephaloceles are rare complications of craniofacial advancement procedures performed in patients with craniofacial dysostoses (CD) to address the ramifications of their midface hypoplasia including obstructed nasal airway, exorbitism, and impaired mastication. Surgical repair of this CSF rhinorrhea is complicated by occult elevations in intracranial pressure (ICP), potentially necessitating open, transcranial repair. We report the first case in otolaryngology literature of a patient with Crouzon syndrome with late CSF rhinorrhea and encephalocele formation after previous LeFort III facial advancement surgery. Objectives: Describe the case of a patient with Crouzon syndrome who presented with CSF rhinorrhea and encephaloceles as complications of Le Fort III facial advancement surgery. Review the literature pertaining to the incidence and management of post-operative CSF rhinorrhea and encephaloceles. Analyze issues related to repair of these complications, including occult elevations in ICP, the utility of perioperative CSF shunts, and the importance of considering alternative repair schemes to the traditional endonasal, endoscopic approach. Methods: Review of the literature describing CSF rhinorrhea and encephalocele formation following facial advancement in CD, focusing on management strategies. Results: CSF rhinorrhea and encephalocele formation are rare complications of craniofacial advancement procedures. Occult elevations in ICP complicate the prospect of permanent surgical repair, potentially necessitating transcranial repair and the use of CSF shunts. Though no consensus exists regarding the utility of perioperative CSF drains, strong associations exist between elevated ICP and failed surgical repair. Additionally, the anatomic changes in the frontal and ethmoid sinuses after facial advancement present a challenge to endoscopic repair. Conclusion: Otolaryngologists should be aware of the possibility of

  9. Effector T-cell trafficking between the leptomeninges and the cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Schläger, Christian; Körner, Henrike; Krueger, Martin; Vidoli, Stefano; Haberl, Michael; Mielke, Dorothee; Brylla, Elke; Issekutz, Thomas; Cabañas, Carlos; Nelson, Peter J; Ziemssen, Tjalf; Rohde, Veit; Bechmann, Ingo; Lodygin, Dmitri; Odoardi, Francesca; Flügel, Alexander

    2016-02-18

    In multiple sclerosis, brain-reactive T cells invade the central nervous system (CNS) and induce a self-destructive inflammatory process. T-cell infiltrates are not only found within the parenchyma and the meninges, but also in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that bathes the entire CNS tissue. How the T cells reach the CSF, their functionality, and whether they traffic between the CSF and other CNS compartments remains hypothetical. Here we show that effector T cells enter the CSF from the leptomeninges during Lewis rat experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model of multiple sclerosis. While moving through the three-dimensional leptomeningeal network of collagen fibres in a random Brownian walk, T cells were flushed from the surface by the flow of the CSF. The detached cells displayed significantly lower activation levels compared to T cells from the leptomeninges and CNS parenchyma. However, they did not represent a specialized non-pathogenic cellular sub-fraction, as their gene expression profile strongly resembled that of tissue-derived T cells and they fully retained their encephalitogenic potential. T-cell detachment from the leptomeninges was counteracted by integrins VLA-4 and LFA-1 binding to their respective ligands produced by resident macrophages. Chemokine signalling via CCR5/CXCR3 and antigenic stimulation of T cells in contact with the leptomeningeal macrophages enforced their adhesiveness. T cells floating in the CSF were able to reattach to the leptomeninges through steps reminiscent of vascular adhesion in CNS blood vessels, and invade the parenchyma. The molecular/cellular conditions for T-cell reattachment were the same as the requirements for detachment from the leptomeningeal milieu. Our data indicate that the leptomeninges represent a checkpoint at which activated T cells are licensed to enter the CNS parenchyma and non-activated T cells are preferentially released into the CSF, from where they can reach areas of antigen

  10. Chromosomal rearrangements and protein globularity changes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Xin Yue

    2016-01-01

    Background Meningitis is a major cause of mortality in tuberculosis (TB). It is not clear what factors promote central nervous system invasion and pathology but it has been reported that certain strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) might have genetic traits associated with neurotropism. Methods In this study, we generated whole genome sequences of eight clinical strains of Mtb that were isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients presenting with tuberculous meningitis (TBM) in Malaysia, and compared them to the genomes of H37Rv and other respiratory Mtb genomes either downloaded from public databases or extracted from local sputum isolates. We aimed to find genomic features that might be distinctly different between CSF-derived and respiratory Mtb. Results Genome-wide comparisons revealed rearrangements (translocations, inversions, insertions and deletions) and non-synonymous SNPs in our CSF-derived strains that were not observed in the respiratory Mtb genomes used for comparison. These rearranged segments were rich in genes for PE (proline-glutamate)/PPE (proline-proline-glutamate), transcriptional and membrane proteins. Similarly, most of the ns SNPs common in CSF strains were noted in genes encoding PE/PPE proteins. Protein globularity differences were observed among mycobacteria from CSF and respiratory sources and in proteins previously reported to be associated with TB meningitis. Transcription factors and other transcription regulators featured prominently in these proteins. Homologs of proteins associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis and Neisseria meningitidis virulence were identified in neuropathogenic as well as respiratory mycobacterial spp. examined in this study. Discussion The occurrence of in silico genetic differences in CSF-derived but not respiratory Mtb suggests their possible involvement in the pathogenesis of TBM. However, overall findings in this comparative analysis support the postulation that TB meningeal

  11. Novel modified method for injection into the cerebrospinal fluid via the cerebellomedullary cistern in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yili; Imai, Hideaki; Ito, Akihiro; Saito, Nobuhito

    2013-01-01

    A modified method of injection into the cerebellomedullary (CM) cistern of mice was developed based on fixation of the mouse with a special mask under inhalation anesthesia, and exposure of the sagittal suture of the cranium and midline of the nape to allow us to visualize injection point directly. The accuracy of the modified method was evaluated using the temporal and spatial intracranial distribution of dye by intracisternal injection of 6- microliter methylene blue aqueous solution. A high concentration of dye was found in the CM cistern, the ventral cisterns, and intracranial proximal portion of the main cranial nerves at 1 hour after injection. The color of the dye in the CM cistern and the ventral cisterns was lighter, and the dye had reached the intracranial distal portion of the main cranial nerves at 6 hours after injection. The dye was completely eliminated by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation at 24 hours after injection. No severe brain injury was found in any of the 20 mice. Intracisternal injection was successful in all 14 mice sacrificed 1 hour or 6 hours after injection according to the confirmation of dye distribution. The effects of central administration of endothelin-1 (ET1) were evaluated on cerebral blood supply, constriction of cerebral arteries, and change of respiration in mice. Three doses of ET1 were studied: 2 micrograms (0.8 nmol), 4 micrograms (1.6 nmol), and 6 micrograms (2.4 nmol). Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was monitored for 60 minutes following injection using a laser Doppler probe. Intracisternal ET1 injection induced dose-dependent reduction of CBF, constriction of cerebral arteries, and respiratory depression in mice. This modified method of injection into the CM cistern under direct visualization provides accurate and reproducible injection into the CSF, and can be used to investigate the effects of various chemical substances on the central nervous system in mice. PMID:23823990

  12. Insulin resistance is associated with higher cerebrospinal fluid tau levels in asymptomatic APOE ε4 carriers

    PubMed Central

    Starks, Erika J.; O'Grady, J. Patrick; Hoscheidt, Siobhan M.; Racine, Annie M.; Carlsson, Cindy M.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Okonkwo, Ozioma C.; Puglielli, Luigi; Asthana, Sanjay; Dowling, N. Maritza; Gleason, Carey E.; Anderson, Rozalyn M.; Davenport-Sis, Nancy J.; DeRungs, LeAnn M.; Sager, Mark A.; Johnson, Sterling C.; Bendlin, Barbara B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Insulin resistance (IR) is linked with the occurrence of pathological features observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD), including neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid plaques. However, the extent to which IR is associated with AD pathology in the cognitively asymptomatic stages of preclinical AD remains unclear. Objective To determine the extent to which IR is linked with amyloid and tau pathology in late-middle-age. Method Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples collected from 113 participants enrolled in the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention study (mean age = 60.6 years), were assayed for AD-related markers of interest: Aβ42, P-Tau181, and T-Tau. IR was determined using the Homeostatic Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR). Linear regression was used to test the effect of IR, and APOE ε4, on tau and amyloid pathology. We hypothesized that greater IR would be associated with higher CSF P-Tau181 and T-Tau, and lower CSF Aβ42. Results No significant main effects of HOMA-IR on P-Tau181, T-Tau, or Aβ42 were observed; however, significant interactions were observed between HOMA-IR and APOE ε4 on CSF markers related to tau. Among APOE ε4 carriers, higher HOMA-IR was associated with higher P-Tau181 and T-Tau. Among APOE ε4 non-carriers, HOMA-IR was negatively associated with P-Tau181 and T-Tau. We found no effects of IR on Aβ42 levels in CSF. Conclusion IR among asymptomatic APOE ε4 carriers was associated with higher P-Tau181 and T-Tau in late-middle age. The results suggest that IR may contribute to tau-related neurodegeneration in preclinical AD. The findings may have implications for developing prevention strategies aimed at modifying IR in mid-life. PMID:25812851

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid neuropeptide Y in combat veterans with and without posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Sah, Renu; Ekhator, Nosakhare N; Jefferson-Wilson, Lena; Horn, Paul S; Geracioti, Thomas D

    2014-02-01

    Accruing evidence indicates that neuropeptide Y (NPY), a peptide neurotransmitter, is a resilience-to-stress factor in humans. We previously reported reduced cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) NPY concentrations in combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) subjects as compared with healthy, non-combat-exposed volunteers. Here we report CSF NPY in combat-exposed veterans with and without PTSD. We quantified NPY concentrations in morning CSF from 11 male subjects with PTSD from combat in Iraq and/or Afghanistan and from 14 combat-exposed subjects without PTSD. NPY-like immunoreactivity (NPY-LI) was measured by EIA. The relationship between CSF NPY and clinical symptoms, as measured by the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), was assessed, as was the relationship between combat exposure scale (CES) scores and CSF NPY. As compared with the combat-exposed comparison subjects without PTSD, individuals with PTSD had significantly lower concentrations of CSF NPY [mean CSF NPY was 258. 6 ± 21.64 pg/mL in the combat trauma-no PTSD group but only 180.5 ± 12.62 pg/mL in PTSD patients (p=0.008)]. After adjusting for CES and BDI scores the two groups were still significantly different with respect to NPY. Importantly, CSF NPY was negatively correlated with composite CAPS score and intrusive (re-experiencing) subscale scores, but did not significantly correlate with CES or BDI scores. Our current findings further suggest that NPY may regulate the manifestation of PTSD symptomatology, and extend previous observations of low CSF NPY concentrations in the disorder. Central nervous system NPY may be a clinically important pharmacotherapeutic target, and/or diagnostic measure, for PTSD. PMID:24485499

  14. A Decade of Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for Alzheimer's Disease in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Somers, Charisse; Struyfs, Hanne; Goossens, Joery; Niemantsverdriet, Ellis; Luyckx, Jill; De Roeck, Naomi; De Roeck, Ellen; De Vil, Bart; Cras, Patrick; Martin, Jean-Jacques; De Deyn, Peter-Paul; Bjerke, Maria; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan

    2016-08-10

    During the past ten years, over 5,000 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were analyzed at the Reference Center for Biological Markers of Dementia (BIODEM), UAntwerp, for core Alzheimer's disease (AD) CSF biomarkers: amyloid-β peptide of 42 amino acids (Aβ1-42), total tau protein (T-tau), and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (P-tau181P). CSF biomarker analyses were performed using single-analyte ELISA kits. In-house validated cutoff values were applied: Aβ1-42 <638.5 pg/mL, T-tau >296.5 pg/mL, P-tau181P >56.5 pg/mL. A CSF biomarker profile was considered to be suggestive for AD if the CSF Aβ1-42 concentration was below the cutoff, in combination with T-tau and/or P-tau181P values above the cutoff (IWG2 criteria for AD). Biomarker analyses were requested for following clinical indications: 1) neurochemical confirmation of AD in case of clinical AD, 2) neurochemical confirmation of AD in case of doubt between AD and a non-AD dementia, 3) neurochemical diagnosis of prodromal AD in case of mild cognitive impairment, 4) neurochemical confirmation of AD in case of psychiatric symptoms (like depression, psychosis), or 5) other clinical indications. During these ten years, the number of yearly referred samples increased by 238% and clinical indications for referral showed a shift from neurochemical confirmation of AD in case of clinical AD to differential dementia diagnosis in case of doubt between AD and a non-AD dementia. Four percent of the patients also had a postmortem neuropathological examination. Together, these biomarker data were the basis for several research papers, and significantly contributed to the validation of these biomarkers in autopsy-confirmed subjects.

  15. Alterations of endocannabinoids in cerebrospinal fluid of dogs with epileptic seizure disorder

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic neurological disorders in dogs characterized by recurrent seizures. The endocannabinoid (EC) system plays a central role in suppressing pathologic neuronal excitability and in controlling the spread of activity in an epileptic network. Endocannabinoids are released on demand and their dysregulation has been described in several pathological conditions. Recurrent seizures may lead to an adverse reorganization of the EC system and impairment of its protective effect. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2AG) are altered in epileptic dogs. Concentrations of AEA and total AG (sum of 2AG and 1AG) were measured in 40 dogs with idiopathic epilepsy and in 16 unaffected, healthy control dogs using liquid chromatography combined with tandem mass spectrometry. Results AEA and total AG were measured at 4.94 (3.18 – 9.17) pM and 1.43 (0.90 – 1.92) nM in epileptic dogs and at 3.19 (2.04 – 4.28) pM and 1.76 (1.08 – 2.69) nM in the control group, respectively (median, 25 – 75% percentiles in brackets). The AEA difference between epileptic and healthy dogs was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Values correlated with seizure severity and duration of seizure activity. Dogs with cluster seizures and/or status epilepticus and with seizure activity for more than six months displayed the highest EC concentrations. Conclusion In conclusion, we present the first endocannabinoid measurements in canine CSF and confirm the hypothesis that the EC system is altered in canine idiopathic epilepsy. PMID:24370333

  16. Incorporating and Compensating Cerebrospinal Fluid in Surface-Based Forward Models of Magneto- and Electroencephalography.

    PubMed

    Stenroos, Matti; Nummenmaa, Aapo

    2016-01-01

    MEG/EEG source imaging is usually done using a three-shell (3-S) or a simpler head model. Such models omit cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that strongly affects the volume currents. We present a four-compartment (4-C) boundary-element (BEM) model that incorporates the CSF and is computationally efficient and straightforward to build using freely available software. We propose a way for compensating the omission of CSF by decreasing the skull conductivity of the 3-S model, and study the robustness of the 4-C and 3-S models to errors in skull conductivity. We generated dense boundary meshes using MRI datasets and automated SimNIBS pipeline. Then, we built a dense 4-C reference model using Galerkin BEM, and 4-C and 3-S test models using coarser meshes and both Galerkin and collocation BEMs. We compared field topographies of cortical sources, applying various skull conductivities and fitting conductivities that minimized the relative error in 4-C and 3-S models. When the CSF was left out from the EEG model, our compensated, unbiased approach improved the accuracy of the 3-S model considerably compared to the conventional approach, where CSF is neglected without any compensation (mean relative error < 20% vs. > 40%). The error due to the omission of CSF was of the same order in MEG and compensated EEG. EEG has, however, large overall error due to uncertain skull conductivity. Our results show that a realistic 4-C MEG/EEG model can be implemented using standard tools and basic BEM, without excessive workload or computational burden. If the CSF is omitted, compensated skull conductivity should be used in EEG. PMID:27472278

  17. Cerebrospinal Fluid Cortisol and Progesterone Profiles and Outcomes Prognostication after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Santarsieri, Martina; Niyonkuru, Christian; McCullough, Emily H.; Dobos, Julie A.; Dixon, C. Edward; Berga, Sarah L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Despite significant advances in the management of head trauma, there remains a lack of pharmacological treatment options for traumatic brain injury (TBI). While progesterone clinical trials have shown promise, corticosteroid trials have failed. The purpose of this study was to (1) characterize endogenous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) progesterone and cortisol levels after TBI, (2) determine relationships between CSF and serum profiles, and (3) assess the utility of these hormones as predictors of long-term outcomes. We evaluated 130 adults with severe TBI. Serum samples (n=538) and CSF samples (n=746) were collected for 6 days post-injury, analyzed for cortisol and progesterone, and compared with healthy controls (n=13). Hormone data were linked with clinical data, including Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores at 6 and 12 months. Group based trajectory (TRAJ) analysis was used to develop temporal hormone profiles delineating distinct subpopulations. Compared with controls, CSF cortisol levels were significantly and persistently elevated during the first week after TBI, and high CSF cortisol levels were associated with poor outcome. As a precursor to cortisol, progesterone mediated these effects. Serum and CSF levels for both cortisol and progesterone were strongly correlated after TBI relative to controls, possibly because of blood–brain barrier disruption. Also, differentially impaired hormone transport and metabolism mechanisms after TBI, potential de novo synthesis of steroids within the brain, and the complex interplay of cortisol and pro-inflammatory cytokines may explain these acute hormone profiles and, when taken together, may help shed light on why corticosteroid trials have previously failed and why progesterone treatment after TBI may be beneficial. PMID:24354775

  18. Effects of Lowering Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure on the Shape of the Peripapillary Retina in Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sibony, Patrick; Kupersmith, Mark J.; Honkanen, Robert; Rohlf, F. James; Torab-Parhiz, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To analyze the deformations of the peripapillary retinal pigment epithelium–basement membrane (ppRPE/BM) layer in response to procedures that lower intracranial pressure (ICP). Second, to demonstrate how shape changes may complement the mean retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness as a measure of intracranial hypertension (ICH) and papilledema. Methods. We used geometric morphometrics on spectral-domain optical coherence tomography images to analyze shape change of the ppRPE/BM layer after several interventions that lower cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure. We also evaluated the effects of pressure-lowering interventions on both the anterior–posterior displacement of ppRPE/BM and the mean RNFL thickness. Forty-one patients with ICH and papilledema were studied before and after lumbar puncture (20), CSF shunt (9), and medical treatment of idiopathic ICH (23). We also compared the shape of 30 normal subjects to 23 patients whose papilledema resolved after medical treatment. Results. The ppRPE/BM-layer in ICH and papilledema is characterized by an asymmetric anterior deformation that moves posteriorly and becomes more V-shaped after each pressure-lowering intervention. The differences were statistically significant for all three groups. These shape changes also occur in patients with ongoing ICH who have secondary optic atrophy (without papilledema). Posterior displacement at the margin of the ppRPE/BM layer correlated strongly with overall shape changes. Conclusions. The subsurface contour of the ppRPE/BM layer is a dynamic property that changes with CSF pressure-lowering interventions. It can supplement the RNFL thickness as an indirect gauge of ICP and is particularly helpful in patients with secondary optic atrophy. Direct measurements of displacement at the basement membrane opening may serve as a more convenient office-based surrogate for shape analysis. PMID:25406288

  19. Risk factors for postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak and meningitis after expanded endoscopic endonasal surgery.

    PubMed

    Ivan, Michael E; Iorgulescu, J Bryan; El-Sayed, Ivan; McDermott, Michael W; Parsa, Andrew T; Pletcher, Steven D; Jahangiri, Arman; Wagner, Jeffrey; Aghi, Manish K

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak is a serious complication of transsphenoidal surgery, which can lead to meningitis and often requires reparative surgery. We sought to identify preoperative risk factors for CSF leaks and meningitis. We reviewed 98 consecutive expanded endoscopic endonasal surgeries performed from 2008-2012 and analyzed preoperative comorbidities, intraoperative techniques, and postoperative care. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. The most common pathologies addressed included pituitary adenoma, Rathke cyst, chordoma, esthesioneuroblastoma, meningioma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma. There were 11 CSF leaks (11%) and 10 central nervous system (CNS) infections (10%). Univariate and multivariate analysis of preoperative risk factors showed that patients with non-ideal body mass index (BMI) were associated with higher rate of postoperative CSF leak and meningitis (both p<0.01). Also, patients with increasing age were associated with increased CSF leak (p = 0.03) and the length of time a lumbar drain was used postoperatively was associated with infection in a univariate analysis. In addition, three of three endoscopic transsphenoidal surgeries combined with open cranial surgery had a postoperative CSF leak and CNS infection rate which was a considerably higher rate than for transsphenoidal surgeries alone or surgeries staged with open cases (p<0.01 and p=0.04, respectively) In this series of expanded endoscopic transsphenoidal surgeries, preoperative BMI remains the most important preoperative predictor for CSF leak and infection. Other risk factors include age, intraoperative CSF leak, lumbar drain duration, and cranial combined cases. Risks associated with complex surgical resections when combining open and endoscopic approaches could be minimized by staging these procedures.

  20. Cerebrospinal Fluid Inflammatory Cytokines and Chemokines in Naturally Occurring Canine Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Amanda R.; Welsh, C. Jane; Young, Colin; Spoor, Erich; Kerwin, Sharon C.; Griffin, John F.; Levine, Gwendolyn J.; Cohen, Noah D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Canine intervertebral disk herniation (IVDH) is a common, naturally occurring form of spinal cord injury (SCI) that is increasingly being used in pre-clinical evaluation of therapies. Although IVDH bears critical similarities to human SCI with respect to lesion morphology, imaging features, and post-SCI treatment, limited data are available concerning secondary injury mechanisms. Here, we characterized cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytokines, and chemokines in dogs with acute, surgically treated, thoracolumbar IVDH (n=39) and healthy control dogs (n=21) to investigate early inflammatory events after SCI. A bioplex system was used to measure interleukin (IL)-2, -6, -7, -8, -10, -15, and -18, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interferon gamma (IFN-γ), keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC)-like protein, IFN-γ-inducible protein-10, monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), and tumor necrosis factor alpha. Cytokine and chemokine concentrations in the CSF of healthy and SCI dogs were compared and, in SCI dogs, were correlated to the duration of SCI, behavioral measures of injury severity at the time of sampling, and neurological outcome 42 days post-SCI as determined by a validated ordinal score. IL-8 concentration was significantly higher in SCI cases than healthy controls (p=0.0013) and was negatively correlated with the duration of SCI (p=0.042). CSF MCP-1 and KC-like protein were positively correlated with CSF microprotein concentration in dogs with SCI (p<0.0001 and p=0.004). CSF MCP-1 concentration was negatively associated with 42-day postinjury outcome (p<0.0001). Taken together, these data indicate that cytokines and chemokines present after SCI in humans and rodent models are associated with SCI pathogenesis in canine IVDH. PMID:24786364

  1. Stage-dependent agreement between cerebrospinal fluid proteins and FDG-PET findings in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Yakushev, Igor; Muller, Matthias J; Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Lang, Ulrike; Rossmann, Heidi; Hampel, Harald; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Fellgiebel, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    Cerebral hypometabolism and abnormal levels of amyloid beta (Aβ), total (t-tau) and phosphorylated tau (ptau) proteins in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are established biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We examined the agreement between these biomarkers in a single center study of patients with AD of severity extending over a wide range. Forty seven patients (MMSE 21.4 ± 3.6, range 13-28 points) with incipient and probable AD underwent positron emission tomography with [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) and lumbar puncture for CSF assays of Aβ1-42, p-tau181, and t-tau. All findings were classified as either positive or negative for AD. Statistical analyses were performed for the whole sample (n=47) and for the subgroups stratified as mild (MMSE > 20 points, n=30) and moderate (MMSE < 21 points, n=17) AD. In the whole patient sample, the agreement with the FDG-PET finding was 77% (chance-corrected kappa [κ]=0.34, p=0.016) for t-tau, 68% (κ=0.10, n.s.) for p-tau181, and 68% (κ=0.04, n.s.) for Aβ1-42. No significant agreement was found in the mild AD subgroup, while there was a strong agreement for t-tau (94%, κ=0.77, p=0.001) and p-tau181 (88%, κ=0.60, p=0.014) in the moderate AD group. A significant agreement between the FDG-PET and CSF tau findings in patients with AD supports the view that both are markers of neurodegeneration. CSF tau proteins and FDG-PET might substitute each other as supportive diagnostic tools in patients with suspected moderate-to-severe Alzheimer's dementia, while this is not the case in subjects at an earlier disease stage. PMID:22044023

  2. Fast circulation of cerebrospinal fluid: an alternative perspective on the protective role of high intracranial pressure in ocular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wostyn, Peter; De Groot, Veva; Van Dam, Debby; Audenaert, Kurt; Killer, Hanspeter Esriel; De Deyn, Peter Paul

    2016-05-01

    As ocular hypertension refers to a condition in which the intraocular pressure is consistently elevated but without development of glaucoma, study of it may provide important clues to factors that may play a protective role in glaucoma. β-amyloid, one of the key histopathological findings in Alzheimer's disease, has been reported to increase by chronic elevation of intraocular pressure in animals with experimentally induced ocular hypertension and to cause retinal ganglion cell death, pointing to similarities in molecular cell death mechanisms between glaucoma and Alzheimer's disease. On the other hand, recent studies have reported that intracranial pressure is higher in patients with ocular hypertension compared with controls, giving rise to the idea that elevated intracranial pressure may provide a protective effect for the optic nerve by decreasing the trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference. The speculation that the higher intracranial pressure reported in ocular hypertension patients may protect against glaucoma mainly through a lower trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference remains at least questionable. Here, we present an alternative viewpoint, according to which the protective effect of higher intracranial pressure could be due, at least in part, to a pressure-independent mechanism, namely faster cerebrospinal fluid production leading to increased cerebrospinal fluid turnover with enhanced removal of potentially neurotoxic waste products that accumulate in the optic nerve. This suggests a new hypothesis for glaucoma, which, just like Alzheimer's disease, may be considered then as an imbalance between production and clearance of neurotoxins, including β-amyloid. If confirmed, then strategies to improve cerebrospinal fluid flow are reasonable and could provide a new therapeutic approach for stopping the neurotoxic β-amyloid pathway in glaucoma.

  3. Quantitative targeted absolute proteomics of rat blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier transporters: comparison with a human specimen.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Yasuo; Zhang, Zhengyu; Tachikawa, Masanori; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine absolute protein expression levels of transporters in rat choroid plexus, that is, the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier, and to compare them with the levels in the human choroid plexus. Plasma membrane fractions were prepared from pooled, freshly isolated choroid plexuses of 30 male Wistar rats and from frozen choroid plexus of one male human donor. Protein expression levels of 54 rat and 121 human molecules were measured, using a quantitative targeted absolute proteomics technique. In rat, oatp1a5 showed the most abundant protein expression (30.3 fmol/μg protein), and its expression level was 3.1-, 4.5-, 5.5-, 8.4-, 9.0-, 9.9-, 22-, 91-, and 95-fold greater than those of glut1, oatp1c1, mrp1, mct1, oat3, pept2, mrp4, bcrp, and mdr1a, respectively. OATP1A2 (a possible homolog of rat oatp1a5), OATP1C1 and PEPT2 were not detected in human choroid plexus. MRP1, OAT3, and MRP4 showed 4.0-, 1.8-, and 1.7-fold smaller expression levels in human than rat, respectively. MATE1 was detected in human, but not rat, and its expression level (8.61 fmol/μg protein) was the highest among the xenobiotic transporters examined in human choroid plexus. These findings should be useful for understanding rat blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier function and its differences from that in human. This is the first study clarifying the absolute protein expression levels of many transporters in the plasma membrane fractions of rat and human choroid plexuses, that is, blood cerebrospinal fluid barrier, by means of quantitative targeted absolute proteomics (QTAP) technique. This study also identified the protein expressions of some transporters including MATE1 and ABCA8 in the choroid plexus for the first time.

  4. Fast circulation of cerebrospinal fluid: an alternative perspective on the protective role of high intracranial pressure in ocular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wostyn, Peter; De Groot, Veva; Van Dam, Debby; Audenaert, Kurt; Killer, Hanspeter Esriel; De Deyn, Peter Paul

    2016-05-01

    As ocular hypertension refers to a condition in which the intraocular pressure is consistently elevated but without development of glaucoma, study of it may provide important clues to factors that may play a protective role in glaucoma. β-amyloid, one of the key histopathological findings in Alzheimer's disease, has been reported to increase by chronic elevation of intraocular pressure in animals with experimentally induced ocular hypertension and to cause retinal ganglion cell death, pointing to similarities in molecular cell death mechanisms between glaucoma and Alzheimer's disease. On the other hand, recent studies have reported that intracranial pressure is higher in patients with ocular hypertension compared with controls, giving rise to the idea that elevated intracranial pressure may provide a protective effect for the optic nerve by decreasing the trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference. The speculation that the higher intracranial pressure reported in ocular hypertension patients may protect against glaucoma mainly through a lower trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference remains at least questionable. Here, we present an alternative viewpoint, according to which the protective effect of higher intracranial pressure could be due, at least in part, to a pressure-independent mechanism, namely faster cerebrospinal fluid production leading to increased cerebrospinal fluid turnover with enhanced removal of potentially neurotoxic waste products that accumulate in the optic nerve. This suggests a new hypothesis for glaucoma, which, just like Alzheimer's disease, may be considered then as an imbalance between production and clearance of neurotoxins, including β-amyloid. If confirmed, then strategies to improve cerebrospinal fluid flow are reasonable and could provide a new therapeutic approach for stopping the neurotoxic β-amyloid pathway in glaucoma. PMID:26691953

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neuronal biomarkers across the spectrum of HIV infection: hierarchy of injury and detection.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Julia; Gisslen, Magnus; Zetterberg, Henrik; Fuchs, Dietmar; Shacklett, Barbara L; Hagberg, Lars; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T; Spudich, Serena S; Price, Richard W

    2014-01-01

    The character of central nervous system (CNS) HIV infection and its effects on neuronal integrity vary with evolving systemic infection. Using a cross-sectional design and archived samples, we compared concentrations of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neuronal biomarkers in 143 samples from 8 HIV-infected subject groups representing a spectrum of untreated systemic HIV progression and viral suppression: primary infection; four groups of chronic HIV infection neuroasymptomatic (NA) subjects defined by blood CD4+ T cells of >350, 200-349, 50-199, and <50 cells/µL; HAD; treatment-induced viral suppression; and 'elite' controllers. Samples from 20 HIV-uninfected controls were also examined. The neuronal biomarkers included neurofilament light chain protein (NFL), total and phosphorylated tau (t-tau, p-tau), soluble amyloid precursor proteins alpha and beta (sAPPα, sAPPβ) and amyloid beta (Aβ) fragments 1-42, 1-40 and 1-38. Comparison of the biomarker changes showed a hierarchy of sensitivity in detection and suggested evolving mechanisms with progressive injury. NFL was the most sensitive neuronal biomarker. Its CSF concentration exceeded age-adjusted norms in all HAD patients, 75% of NA CD4<50, 40% of NA CD4 50-199, and 42% of primary infection, indicating common neuronal injury with untreated systemic HIV disease progression as well as transiently during early infection. By contrast, only 75% of HAD subjects had abnormal CSF t-tau levels, and there were no significant differences in t-tau levels among the remaining groups. sAPPα and β were also abnormal (decreased) in HAD, showed less marked change than NFL with CD4 decline in the absence of HAD, and were not decreased in PHI. The CSF Aβ peptides and p-tau concentrations did not differ among the groups, distinguishing the HIV CNS injury profile from Alzheimer's disease. These CSF biomarkers can serve as useful tools in selected research and clinical settings for patient classification, pathogenetic analysis

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid kynurenines in multiple sclerosis; relation to disease course and neurocognitive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Aeinehband, Shahin; Brenner, Philip; Ståhl, Sara; Bhat, Maria; Fidock, Mark D; Khademi, Mohsen; Olsson, Tomas; Engberg, Göran; Jokinen, Jussi; Erhardt, Sophie; Piehl, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system, with a high rate of neurocognitive symptoms for which the molecular background is still uncertain. There is accumulating evidence for dysregulation of the kynurenine pathway (KP) in different psychiatric and neurodegenerative conditions. We here report the first comprehensive analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) kynurenine metabolites in MS patients of different disease stages and in relation to neurocognitive symptoms. Levels of tryptophan (TRP), kynurenine (KYN), kynurenic acid (KYNA) and quinolinic acid (QUIN) were determined with liquid chromatography mass spectrometry in cell-free CSF. At the group level MS patients (cohort 1; n=71) did not differ in absolute levels of TRP, KYN, KYNA or QUIN as compared to non-inflammatory neurological disease controls (n=20). Stratification of patients into different disease courses revealed that both absolute QUIN levels and the QUIN/KYN ratio were increased in relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) patients in relapse. Interestingly, secondary progressive MS (SPMS) displayed a trend for lower TRP and KYNA, while primary progressive (PPMS) patients displayed increased levels of all metabolites, similar to a group of inflammatory neurological disease controls (n=13). In the second cohort (n=48), MS patients with active disease and short disease duration were prospectively evaluated for neuropsychiatric symptoms. In a supervised multivariate analysis using orthogonal projection to latent structures (OPLS-DA) depressed patients displayed higher KYNA/TRP and KYN/TRP ratios, mainly due to low TRP levels. Still, this model had low predictive value and could not completely separate the clinically depressed patients from the non-depressed MS patients. No correlation was evident for other neurocognitive measures. Taken together these results demonstrate that clinical disease activity and differences in disease courses are reflected

  7. A diagnostic scale for Alzheimer’s disease based on cerebrospinal fluid biomarker profiles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The relevance of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related disorders is clearly established. However, the question remains on how to use these data, which are often heterogeneous (not all biomarkers being pathologic). The objective of this study is to propose to physicians in memory clinics a biologic scale of probabilities that the patient with cognitive impairments has an Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathologic process. Methods For that purpose, we took advantage of the multicenter data of our Paris-North, Lille, and Montpellier (PLM) study, which has emerged through the initial sharing of information from these memory centers. Different models combining the CSF levels of amyloid-β 42, tau, and p-tau(181) were tested to generate categories of patients with very low (<10%), low (<25%), high (>75%), and very high predictive values (>90%) for positive AD. In total, 1,273 patients (646 AD and 627 non-AD) from six independent memory-clinic cohorts were included. Results A prediction model based on logistic regressions achieved a very good stratification of the population but had the disadvantages of needing mathematical optimization and being difficult to use in daily clinical practice. Remarkably, a simple and intuitive model based on the number (from zero to three) of three pathologic CSF biomarkers resulted in a very efficient predictive scale for AD in patients seen in memory clinics. The scale’s overall predictive value for AD for the different categories were as follows: class 0, 9.6% (95% confidence interval (CI), 6.0% to 13.2%); class 1, 24.7% (95% CI, 18.0% to 31.3%); class 2, 77.2% (95% CI, 67.8% to 86.5%); and class 3, 94.2% (95% CI, 90.7% to 97.7%). In addition, with this scale, significantly more patients were correctly classified than with the logistic regression. Its superiority in model performance was validated by the computation of the net reclassification index (NRI). The

  8. The effects of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) on testosterone transport into the cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, C J; Jones, R E; Plymate, S R

    1992-07-01

    The movement of testosterone (T) from blood across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is thought to reflect the combined effects of T's lipid solubility and the presence of circulating binding proteins for T such as albumin or sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). Since the adult rat lacks a circulating specific high affinity sex steroid binding protein, examination of the disappearance from serum and uptake into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of [3H]T before and after SHBG or albumin infusion should provide insight into the function of these two proteins with respect T transport. Three groups of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were cannulated at the femoral vein and cisterna magna. In a control group (n = 8), [3H]T was given as an intravenous bolus beginning at time zero; multiple serum and CSF collections were assayed for counts per min (cpm) during the subsequent 45 min. Data from these animals were then compared to those seen in animals that received either purified human SHBG (hSHBG) (n = 7) or human albumin (hALB) (n = 6) 10 min prior to the [3H]T infusion. High performance liquid chromatography was used to monitor the metabolic fate of the steroid infusate at the end of each study period. Infusion of hSHBG increased serum concentrations from undetectable to 93.8 nM/l (mean +/- SEM, n = 6). Administration of hALB significantly increased (25.0 +/- 1.2 g/l at baseline, 33.4 +/- 1.6 g/l post-infusion, mean +/- SEM, P less than 0.03, n = 5) the circulating albumin concentration. Comparison of data from each group of animals demonstrated that (1) following an i.v. injection of radiolabeled T, the initial decline in serum [3H]T was significantly reduced (P less than 0.03) in the presence of hSHBG, (2) hALB did not affect the movement of [3H]T out of serum, (3) the time to peak appearance of [3H]T in the CSF was significantly delayed (P less than 0.02) by the presence of circulating hSHBG, and (4) the net quantity of [3H]T found in the cSF under steady-state conditions was not

  9. The cerebrospinal fluid proteome in HIV infection: change associated with disease severity.

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Spudich, Serena S.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Fuchs, Dietmar; Liegler, Teri; Zetterberg, Henrik; Camp, David G.; Price, Richard W.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-03-20

    Central nervous system (CNS) infection is a constant feature of systemic HIV infection with a clinical spectrum that ranges from chronic asymptomatic infection to severe cognitive and motor dysfunction. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has played an important part in defining the character of this evolving infection and response to treatment. To further characterize CNS HIV infection and its effects, we applied advanced high-throughput proteomic methods to CSF to identify novel proteins and their changes with disease progression and treatment. After establishing an accurate mass and time (AMT) tag database containing 23,141 AMT tags for CSF peptides, we analyzed 91 CSF samples by LC-MS from 12 HIV-uninfected and 14 HIV-infected subjects studied in the context of initiation of antiretroviral and correlated abundances of identified proteins (a) within and between subjects, (b) with all other proteins across the entire sample set, and (c) with 'external' CSF biomarkers of infection (HIV RNA), immune activation (neopterin) and neural injury (neurofilament light chain protein, NFL). We identified a mean of 2,333 +/- 328 (SD) peptides covering 307 +/-16 proteins in the 91 CSF sample set. Protein abundances differed both between and within subjects sampled at different time points and readily separated those with and without HIV infection. Proteins also showed inter-correlations across the sample set that were associated with biologically relevant dynamic processes. One-hundred and fifty proteins showed correlations with the external biomarkers. For example, using a threshold of cross correlation coefficient (Pearson's) {le}0.3 and {ge}0.3 for potentially meaningful relationships, a total of 99 proteins correlated with CSF neopterin (43 negative and 56 positive correlations) and related principally to neuronal plasticity and survival and to innate immunity. Pathway analysis defined several networks connecting the identified proteins, including one with amyloid

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid and serum biomarkers of cerebral malaria mortality in Ghanaian children

    PubMed Central

    Armah, Henry B; Wilson, Nana O; Sarfo, Bismark Y; Powell, Michael D; Bond, Vincent C; Anderson, Winston; Adjei, Andrew A; Gyasi, Richard K; Tettey, Yao; Wiredu, Edwin K; Tongren, Jon Eric; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Stiles, Jonathan K

    2007-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum can cause a diffuse encephalopathy known as cerebral malaria (CM), a major contributor to malaria associated mortality. Despite treatment, mortality due to CM can be as high as 30% while 10% of survivors of the disease may experience short- and long-term neurological complications. The pathogenesis of CM and other forms of severe malaria is multi-factorial and appear to involve cytokine and chemokine homeostasis, inflammation and vascular injury/repair. Identification of prognostic markers that can predict CM severity will enable development of better intervention. Methods Postmortem serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were obtained within 2–4 hours of death in Ghanaian children dying of CM, severe malarial anemia (SMA), and non-malarial (NM) causes. Serum and CSF levels of 36 different biomarkers (IL-1β, IL-1ra, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-9, IL-10, IL-12 (p70), IL-13, IL-15, IL-17, Eotaxin, FGF basic protein, CRP, G-CSF, GM-CSF, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IP-10, MCP-1 (MCAF), MIP-1α, MIP-1β, RANTES, SDF-1α, CXCL11 (I-TAC), Fas-ligand [Fas-L], soluble Fas [sFas], sTNF-R1 (p55), sTNF-R2 (p75), MMP-9, TGF-β1, PDGF bb and VEGF) were measured and the results compared between the 3 groups. Results After Bonferroni adjustment for other biomarkers, IP-10 was the only serum biomarker independently associated with CM mortality when compared to SMA and NM deaths. Eight CSF biomarkers (IL-1ra, IL-8, IP-10, PDGFbb, MIP-1β, Fas-L, sTNF-R1, and sTNF-R2) were significantly elevated in CM mortality group when compared to SMA and NM deaths. Additionally, CSF IP-10/PDGFbb median ratio was statistically significantly higher in the CM group compared to SMA and NM groups. Conclusion The parasite-induced local cerebral dysregulation in the production of IP-10, 1L-8, MIP-1β, PDGFbb, IL-1ra, Fas-L, sTNF-R1, and sTNF-R2 may be involved in CM neuropathology, and their immunoassay may have potential utility in predicting mortality in CM

  11. Distribution in cerebrospinal fluid, blood, and lymph of epidurally injected morphine and inulin in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Durant, P.A.; Yaksh, T.L.

    1986-06-01

    We describe procedures for catheterizing the epidural space, the azygos vein, and the thoracic lymph duct of dogs without using fluoroscopy. The success rates of the procedures were 100, 80, and 50%, respectively (n = 10). To assess the validity of the model, /sup 3/H-morphine and unlabeled morphine (2 mg) were injected epidurally in ten dogs. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), azygos venous blood, arterial blood, and lymph were sampled before and 5, 20, 60, 120, 180, 240, 300 and 360 min after injection. During the first 20 min, morphine levels in the azygos vein were about three and ten times greater than arterial and lymphatic levels, respectively (n = 3; P less than 0.01). Morphine levels were significantly greater in the azygos vein (n = 8) and the femoral artery (n = 10) during the first 20 and 60 min than they were later, respectively (P less than 0.05). In the lymph (n = 5), the levels of morphine at 60 min were statistically greater (P less than 0.05) than levels at 4, 5, and 6 hr. At no time were the concurrent arterial and lymph levels different from each other. In the lumbar CSF, the morphine peak concentration was reached 5-60 min after epidural injection and ranged between 5 and 93 micrograms/ml. In the CSF, the levels of morphine were significantly greater during the first 20 min than later (n = 7; P less than 0.05). The washout of the lumbar CSF curve for morphine appeared to be fitted by a two-compartment open model. The t1/2-alpha and t1/2-beta values were 14.7 +/- 7.2 min and 106 +/- 45 min, respectively (mean +/- SD). Cumulative percentages of the epidural dose of morphine passed into the azygos system within the first 5, 20, 60, and 120 min after injection were calculated to be 4.0 +/- 2.1, 23.5 +/- 14.6, 49.2 +/- 34.2, and 55.9 +/- 35.3, respectively (mean +/- SD; n = 8).

  12. Drug-associated progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy: a clinical, radiological, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis of 326 cases.

    PubMed

    Maas, Roderick P P W M; Muller-Hansma, Annemarie H G; Esselink, Rianne A J; Murk, Jean-Luc; Warnke, Clemens; Killestein, Joep; Wattjes, Mike P

    2016-10-01

    The implementation of a variety of immunosuppressive therapies has made drug-associated progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) an increasingly prevalent clinical entity. The purpose of this study was to investigate its diagnostic characteristics and to determine whether differences herein exist between the multiple sclerosis (MS), neoplasm, post-transplantation, and autoimmune disease subgroups. Reports of possible, probable, and definite PML according to the current diagnostic criteria were obtained by a systematic search of PubMed and the Dutch pharmacovigilance database. Demographic, epidemiologic, clinical, radiological, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and histopathological features were extracted from each report and differences were compared between the disease categories. In the 326 identified reports, PML onset occurred on average 29.5 months after drug introduction, varying from 14.2 to 37.8 months in the neoplasm and MS subgroups, respectively. The most common overall symptoms were motor weakness (48.6 %), cognitive deficits (43.2 %), dysarthria (26.3 %), and ataxia (24.1 %). The former two also constituted the most prevalent manifestations in each subgroup. Lesions were more often localized supratentorially (87.7 %) than infratentorially (27.4 %), especially in the frontal (64.1 %) and parietal lobes (46.6 %), and revealed enhancement in 27.6 % of cases, particularly in the MS (42.9 %) subgroup. Positive JC virus results in the first CSF sample were obtained in 63.5 %, while conversion after one or more negative outcomes occurred in 13.7 % of cases. 52.2 % of patients died, ranging from 12.0 to 83.3 % in the MS and neoplasm subgroups, respectively. In conclusion, despite the heterogeneous nature of the underlying diseases, motor weakness and cognitive changes were the two most common manifestations of drug-associated PML in all subgroups. The frontal and parietal lobes invariably constituted the predilection sites of drug

  13. Selenium speciation in paired serum and cerebrospinal fluid samples of sheep.

    PubMed

    Humann-Ziehank, Esther; Ganter, Martin; Michalke, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to characterise selenium (Se) and Se species in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of sheep and its relation to the respective Se concentrations in serum. Paired samples from 10 adult sheep were used for the study. Five sheep were fed a diet with a marginal Se concentration of <0.05mg Se/kg diet dry weight (dw, Se(-)), and five animals were fed the same diet supplemented with sodium selenite revealing a concentration of 0.2mg Se/kg diet dw (Se(+)). The feeding strategy was conducted for two years; The results on metabolic effects were published previously. At the end of the feeding period, paired samples of serum and CSF were collected and analysed using ion exchange chromatography inductively coupled plasma-dynamic reaction cell-mass spectrometry (IEC-ICP-DRC-MS) technique for total Se concentration and concentrations of Se species. Albumin concentrations were analysed additionally. The feeding strategy caused significant differences (p<0.01) in serum Se concentrations with 33.1±5.11μg Se/l in the Se(-) group and 96.5±18.3μg Se/l in the Se(+) group, respectively. The corresponding total Se concentrations in CSF were 4.38±1.02μg Se/l and 6.13±1.64μg Se/l in the Se(-) and the Se(+) group, respectively, missing statistical significance (p=0.077). IEC-ICP-DRC-MS technique was able to differentiate the Se species selenoprotein P-bound Se (SePP), selenomethionine, glutathione peroxidase-bound Se (Se-GPx), selenocystine, thioredoxin reductase-bound Se, ovine serum albumin-bound Se (Se-OSA), SeIV and SeVI in ovine serum and CSF. Quantitatively, SePP is the main selenoprotein in ovine serum followed by Se-GPx. The CSF/blood ratio of albumin (QAlbumin) reflected a physiological function of the blood-CSF barrier in all sheep. QSe-species were higher than QAlbumin both feeding groups, supporting the hypothesis of local production of Se species in the brain. Significant positive regression lines for CSF vs. serum were found for albumin and Se-OSA only

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid HIV infection and pleocytosis: Relation to systemic infection and antiretroviral treatment

    PubMed Central

    Spudich, Serena S; Nilsson, Annelie C; Lollo, Nicole D; Liegler, Teri J; Petropoulos, Christos J; Deeks, Steven G; Paxinos, Ellen E; Price, Richard W

    2005-01-01

    Background Central nervous system (CNS) exposure to HIV is a universal facet of systemic infection. Because of its proximity to and shared barriers with the brain, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) provides a useful window into and model of human CNS HIV infection. Methods Prospective study of the relationships of CSF to plasma HIV RNA, and the effects of: 1) progression of systemic infection, 2) CSF white blood cell (WBC) count, 3) antiretroviral therapy (ART), and 4) neurological performance. One hundred HIV-infected subjects were cross-sectionally studied, and 28 were followed longitudinally after initiating or changing ART. Results In cross-sectional analysis, HIV RNA levels were lower in CSF than plasma (median difference 1.30 log10 copies/mL). CSF HIV viral loads (VLs) correlated strongly with plasma VLs and CSF WBC counts. Higher CSF WBC counts associated with smaller differences between plasma and CSF HIV VL. CSF VL did not correlate with blood CD4 count, but CD4 counts <50 cells/μL associated with a low prevalence of CSF pleocytosis and large differences between plasma and CSF VL. CSF HIV RNA correlated neither with the severity of the AIDS dementia complex (ADC) nor abnormal quantitative neurological performance, although these measures were associated with depression of CD4 counts. In subjects starting ART, those with lower CD4 counts had slower initial viral decay in CSF than in plasma. In all subjects, including five with persistent plasma viremia and four with new-onset ADC, CSF HIV eventually approached or reached the limit of viral detection and CSF pleocytosis resolved. Conclusion CSF HIV infection is common across the spectrum of infection and is directly related to CSF pleocytosis, though whether the latter is a response to or a contributing cause of CSF infection remains uncertain. Slowing in the rate of CSF response to ART compared to plasma as CD4 counts decline indicates a changing character of CSF infection with systemic immunological progression

  15. Effect of the drainage of cerebrospinal fluid in patients with aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Cong; Yu, Xiaobo; Chen, Jingyin; Gu, Chi; Wang, Lin; Chen, Gao; Dai, Yuying

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and objectives: Vasospasm-related injury such as delayed ischemic neurological defect (DIND) or cerebral infarction is an important prognostic factor for aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage can achieve a better outcome in aneurismal SAH patients after coiling or clipping remains the subject of debate. Here, we report a meta-analysis of the related available literature to assess the effect of continuous CSF drainage on clinical outcomes in patients with aneurismal SAH. Methods: Case-control studies regarding the association between aneurismal SAH and CSF drainage were systematically identified through online databases (PubMed, Web of Science, Elsevier Science Direct, and Springer Link). Inclusion and exclusion criteria were defined for the eligible studies. The fixed-effects model was performed when homogeneity was indicated. Alternatively, the random-effects model was utilized. Results: This meta-analysis included 11 studies. Continuous CSF drainage obviously improved patients’ long-term outcome (odds ratio [OR] of 2.86, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.37–5.98, P < 0.01). CSF drainage also reduced angiographic vasospasm (OR of 0.35, 95% CI, 0.23–0.51, P < 0.01), symptomatic vasospasm (OR of 0.32, 95% CI, 0.32–0.43, P < 0.01), and DIND (OR of 0.48, 95% CI, 0.25–0.91, P = 0.03), but there was no significant difference between the CSF drainage group and the no CSF drainage group on shunt-dependent hydrocephalus (SDHC) prevention (OR of 1.04, 95% CI, 0.52–2.07, P = 0.91). Further analysis on lumbar drainage (LD) and external ventricular drainage (EVD) indicated that LD had a better outcome (OR of 3.11, 95% CI, 1.18–8.23, P = 0.02), whereas no significant difference in vasospasm-related injury was detected between the groups (OR of 1.13, 95% CI, 0.54–2.37, P = 0.75). Conclusion: Continuous CSF drainage is an effective treatment for aneurismal SAH patients; lumbar drainage

  16. Cerebrospinal Fluid Peptides as Potential Parkinson Disease Biomarkers: A Staged Pipeline for Discovery and Validation*

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Min; Movius, James; Dator, Romel; Aro, Patrick; Zhao, Yanchun; Pan, Catherine; Lin, Xiangmin; Bammler, Theo K.; Stewart, Tessandra; Zabetian, Cyrus P.; Peskind, Elaine R.; Hu, Shu-Ching; Quinn, Joseph F.; Galasko, Douglas R.; Zhang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Finding robust biomarkers for Parkinson disease (PD) is currently hampered by inherent technical limitations associated with imaging or antibody-based protein assays. To circumvent the challenges, we adapted a staged pipeline, starting from our previous proteomic profiling followed by high-throughput targeted mass spectrometry (MS), to identify peptides in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for PD diagnosis and disease severity correlation. In this multicenter study consisting of training and validation sets, a total of 178 subjects were randomly selected from a retrospective cohort, matching age and sex between PD patients, healthy controls, and neurological controls with Alzheimer disease (AD). From ∼14,000 unique peptides displaying differences between PD and healthy control in proteomic investigations, 126 peptides were selected based on relevance and observability in CSF using bioinformatic analysis and MS screening, and then quantified by highly accurate and sensitive selected reaction monitoring (SRM) in the CSF of 30 PD patients versus 30 healthy controls (training set), followed by diagnostic (receiver operating characteristics) and disease severity correlation analyses. The most promising candidates were further tested in an independent cohort of 40 PD patients, 38 AD patients, and 40 healthy controls (validation set). A panel of five peptides (derived from SPP1, LRP1, CSF1R, EPHA4, and TIMP1) was identified to provide an area under curve (AUC) of 0.873 (sensitivity = 76.7%, specificity = 80.0%) for PD versus healthy controls in the training set. The performance was essentially confirmed in the validation set (AUC = 0.853, sensitivity = 82.5%, specificity = 82.5%). Additionally, this panel could also differentiate the PD and AD g